Washington County news

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Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
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Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00918

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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T chipleypaper .c om www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, APRIL 2 2014 Volume 90, Number 101 Orange and Blue Golf Classic VERNON Vernon Middle School will hold the Orange and Blue Golf Classic to bene t girls and boys athletic programs this Saturday, April 5, at the Sunny Hills Golf Club. There is a donation of $65 per person or $260 per four-man/ woman team. The fee includes green fees, cart rental, breakfast, lunch and prizes. Tournament format is a Captains Choice Scramble. There will be at 8 a.m., shotgun start. Individual registrations are welcomed; you will be assigned to a team. Hole Sponsorships are $50 per sign. For questions and registration, please contact Laurie Simmons at 2584332 or VMS at 535-2808. Motorcycle Club to host sh fry CHIPLEY The Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club will host a fish fry fundraiser dinner at 11 a.m. in Shivers Park Saturday, April 12. Proceeds will benefit the clubs charitable activities. Plates are $6.50 and include a fish sandwich, chips and drink. INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ......................... B7-8 NEWS Washington County CHIPLEY What do you get when you combine kids and creativity? Come and nd out at ArtKidDoo this Saturday, April 5, at Shivers Park in Chipley. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, along with businesses and organizations in the community are sponsoring ArtKidDoo A Celebration of Children and the Arts. Families can bring their children to Shivers Park and spend time experiencing the creative process in a variety of mediums including drawing and painting, collage, music, dance, storytelling and drama, said Lynne Eldridge, executive director of the ELCNWF. Research shows that it is important for all children, beginning when they are very young, to have the opportunity to express themselves both through play and the arts. ArtKidDoo time A celebration of arts to take place at Shivers Park CHIPLEY The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce says there has been a spike in reports of a fraud scheme in which scammers pose as law enforcement of cers in an attempt to get money. The caller may say the victim needs to pay a fee to remove a warrant, pay for an expired drivers license or pay to bail someone out. However, the caller always identi es himself as a law enforcement of cer and requests wiring of money or credit card information. Law enforcement agencies never contact citizens by phone, email, or regular mail and instructs them to pay fees or nes by wiring money, using prepaid money cards, using a money telegram or using similar methods Sheriff Haddock said. This scam I take very personally because theyre taking advantage of the trust between law enforcement and the citizens. Sheriff Haddock offers the following tips to avoid becoming a victim: Never give your personal identi cation information over the phone or computer. You may make an WCSO: Watch out for scam See SCAM A2 See ARTS A2 CHIPLEY The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public information meeting concerning proposed improvements on two segments of State Road (S.R.) 77 from north of County Road (C.R.) 279 to south of Ben Road in Washington County. The meeting will be held Tuesday, April 8 from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. CDT at the Shepherds Gate Church, Fellowship Hall, 1915 Ferguson Road, Chipley. The intent of these two projects is to widen eight miles of S.R. 77 extending from C.R. 279 to Ben Road from two to four lanes, improve drainage, and construct various safety upgrades along the corridor. Both projects are funded for right-of-way acquisition; however, construction is not currently funded within the departments Five Year Work Program. Maps, drawings, and other information will be on display. There will be no formal presentation. Representatives from FDOT will be available to explain proposed improvements and answer questions. Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. FDOT to hold hearing on road proposals Special to the News Jackson County based attorney Shalene Grover has announced her candidacy for the Circuit Court judge seat for the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, which includes Jackson, Calhoun, Washington, Holmes, Gulf and Bay counties. The three other candidates reside in Bay County. Grover, a 15-year law veteran, is experienced in criminal law, family law, real estate law, labor law and other types of civil litigation. She has served as County Attorney for the Liberty County Board of County Commissioners for the past 13 years. I am a country girl from a small town near the Smoky Mountains, said Grover. For several generations, my paternal grandfathers family farmed and labored in a sawmill. Farming and raising livestock was the way of life of my maternal grandfathers family. Both of my parents are descendants of hardworking people who expected everyone to do their part. If I am elected, I will apply the values my parents taught me as a child. I will work hard and be fair. I will also strive to make the system ef cient and user friendly. My decisions will be based on the law and on common sense. Grover and her husband have two sons, ages ten and ve and live in Calhoun County. Grover announces candidacy for Circuit Court judge & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring WASHINGTON COUNTY N E W S HOLMES C OUNTY TIMESADVERTISER W EDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 HOME & FARM, INSIDE Children of all ages can express themselves through various art disciplines at the ArtKidDoo event this Saturday. Photos special the News SHALENE GROVER

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014 So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com So w ell and K ubota 40 Y ears of T rusted P erf or mance W e T rade for Anything That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) ArtKidDoo will give them that opportunity. The Washington County Arts Council will be announcing the 2014 ArtKidDoo Art Contest winners at 11 a.m. ArtKidDoo begins at 10 a.m. and will wrap up around 1 p.m. Many different types of creative activities will be available for children of all ages. Many activities are scheduled through the day and food will be available for purchase. In addition, the ELCNWF will be issuing Certicates of Eligibility (COE) for the Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) program to eligible families. Everyone is encouraged to come and spend time discovering the arts with their children, said Eldridge. For more information about ArtKidDoo, or the activities scheduled for the event, call 638-6343 ext.2425. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida is a non-prot organization that exists to grow healthy children, parents and foster the relationship between them. It administers Child Care Resource and Referral, School Readiness, and VoluntaryPrekindergarten programs in a sevencounty service area. For more information, visit http://www.elcnwf. org. exception if you initiated the call or contact and you are certain that you are talking to a trustworthy employee of a trustworthy business Never wire money to anyone claiming to be a po lice ofcer to get out of an arrest. Never wire money to get more money back (sweep stakes or lottery), or help someone get out of a bad situ ation such as an arrest, or a broken down vehicle. Espe cially if the person requesting the money is not known to you personally, or the person called and claimed to be a dis tant relative, etc. If you would like to report a fraud, scam or identity theft, contact the fraud line at 6388477. If you would like a Fraud Specialist to speak to your organization or community group, please call 638-6111. ARTS from page A1 SCAM from page A1 WCSO ISSUES FIRST TEEN DRIVERS CHALLENGE HERE Photos by Carol Kent | The News Members of Washington Countys inaugural Teen Driving Challenge were: Paisley Bruner, Ashlee Cates, Patrick Dohrenwend, Isaac Guettler, Daniel Lane, Jay Padgett, Taylor Perryman, Jonathan Rice, Logan Smith and Brooklynn Stephens. Instructors were Deputy Daryl White, Investigator Justin Jenkins and School Resource Ofcer Brian Paridon. Above, White and Jenkins gave students an evening of classroom instruction before taking them on the driving course. Right, Paridon walks alongside Padgett as he attempts to maneuver around cones on a scooter while wearing Fatal Vision goggles, which simulate varying degrees of intoxication.

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F r ee Clean & Check (Any make or model) B e n e ts o f hearing aids v a r y b y t y pe a nd deg r ee of he a ring loss noise en v ironmen t a c cura c y of hearing e va lu a tion and prop e r t B el t one He a rin g C a r e Cente r s a re independently own e d and opera t ed Par t icipati o n m a y v a r y 201 4 Belton e Cleaning Al r eady own hearing aids? F (Any make or model) free Sc r eening F r ee hearing sc r eening & video ear scan Offer Good April 2 25, 2014 Offer Good April 2 25, 2014 Offer good April 2 25, 2014 b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850) 260-0436 W ednesdays & F ridays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday F riday WASHINGTON (AP) As a roller-coaster sign-up sea son winds down, President Barack Obamas health care law has indeed managed to change the country. Americans are unlikely to go back to a time when peo ple with medical problems could be denied coverage. But Obamas overhaul needs major work of its own if it is to go down in history as a legacy achievement like Medicare or Social Security. Major elements of the Affordable Care Act face an uncertain future: As a 6-month-long signup season comes to an end Monday the administrations next big challenge is to make 2015 open enrollment more manageable for consumers unaccustomed to dealing with insurance jargon. There also is concern premiums will rise next year. The new insurance markets created by the law are anything but cus tomer friendly. After the HealthCare.gov website nally got xed, more than 6 million people have man aged to sign up, allowing the exchanges to stay aoat economically. But many con sumers have bought policies with restricted access to toptier hospitals and the latest medications. The website is seeing heavy trafc this weekend, and consumers may encounter a wait or lastminute glitches. Almost half the states still are opposed to or unde cided about the laws expan sion of Medicaid, the gov ernments health insurance program for the poor. As a result, millions of low-income people who otherwise would have been covered remain uninsured. This years pitch has been about the carrots in the law: subsidies and guar anteed coverage. But the sticks are just over the horizon: collecting penalties from individuals who remain uninsured and enforcing re quirements that mediumto large-sized employers pro vide affordable coverage. Many basic facts about the ultimate effects of the health insurance program remain unclear. Its not known how many of those who have gotten coverage were previously uninsured the ultimate test of the law. Independent measure ments by Gallup do show fewer uninsured Americans, but such progress hasnt won hearts and minds. The public remains deeply divid ed, with opponents of the law outnumbering supporters. At a recent insurance industry conference, a top administration ofcial ac knowledged the huge job still ahead. The No. 1 thing that probably weve all learned from 2014 is that this is hard work, said Gary Cohen, out going director of the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, the agency created to carry out the health care law. Its not a one-year project; its a multiyear project ... were asking a lot, frankly, of con sumers, he added. This is new for them. Among those consumers is Dan Luke of St. Paul, Minn., the owner of a small video production company who had been uninsured since he was turned down for coverage last year be cause of a pre-existing con dition. The condition? Luke was born with one eye due to a birth defect, and he uses a glass eye. For 63 years Ive had one eye, said Luke. They had to dig deep to nd that. Hes happy with the coverage he and his wife have bought; theyre saving $300 a month on premiums compared with the last time they had insurance. But he said he had to endure weeks of website run-arounds. There is a lot of bureau cracy involved, said Luke. Its sort of like taxes, lled with loopholes and pitfalls. They should make it easier for people to get insur ance and pay for insurance, rather than have to prove so many things and jump through so many hoops. Those comments echo sentiments broadly reected in national opinion polls. Most Americans want law makers to x the problems with the health care law, rath er than scrapping it. A new AP-Gfk poll nds that only 13 percent expect the law will be completely repealed. Sev enty-two percent say it will be implemented with changes, whether major or minor. Republicans have again made repeal of Obamacare their ofcial battle cry this election season. But even if the GOP wins control of the Senate and Congress were to repeal the law next year, the president would veto it. Opponents would then need a difcult two-thirds major ity in both chambers to over ride Obamas veto. Its going to depend on the next couple of elec tions whether we stick with the current ACA models, said Brookings Institution health policy expert Mark McClellan, who oversaw the rollout of the last major fed eral coverage expansion, the Medicare prescription drug benet. We are still a long way from a stable market and from completing implemen tation, he said. But were not going back to people with pre-existing conditions hav ing no good options. The administration will have to get to work quickly on a plan for next year. It is still struggling with such basics as providing consumers with clear information about the process and their options. Until now, those sign ing up have skewed toward an older crowd. That could lead to higher premiums next year, making the pro gram a more difcult sell for younger people. Some Democratic law makers who voted for the law are frustrated. Instead of just circling the wagons against all the political arrows that are shot against this plan, we need a little more accountability, and we need to ensure the next enrollment period is not handled as poorly as the last one, said Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas. DeAnn Friedholm, health reform team leader for Consumers Union, said her group still supports Obamas overhaul, but with concerns. The jury is out in terms of its long-term success, she said. We still think its better than the old way, which left a lot of people out because they were sick. Health law legacy eludes Obama as changes sink in We are still a long way from a stable market and from completing implementation. (But) were not going back to people with pre-existing conditions having no good options. Mark McClellan Brookings Institution health policy expert TALLAHASSEE (AP) The fed eral government has dropped the ball for the last 30 or 40 years in its marijuana policy and Florida is ready to pick it up, Sen. Jeff Clemens said Mon day, expressing condence that this Novembers ballot initia tive to legalize medicinal pot will pass. This 50 and 60s era reefer madness attitude caused us to turn away from a plant as form of medicine and move to these synthetic drugs that are often a lot worse for our bodies, said Clemens, D-Lake Worth. He was part of a bipartisan trio of law makers speaking at the Double tree Hotel ballroom on the fu ture of medical marijuana in the state. In a panel discussion Mon day, Clemens joined Democratic Rep. Katie Edwards and Repub lican Rep. Matt Gaetz to pledge a push for passage of so-called Charlottes Web, a non-intoxicat ing oil extracted from the mari juana plant. Gaetz in particular has been pushing a bill (HB 843) that would approve the oil extract, in tear-jerker hear ings that have been marked by testimony from parents of children with intractable epi lepsy and have heard of suc cessful treatment via the oil in Colorado, where it is legal. Several bills concerning mar ijuana are moving in and around the statehouse, from a bill that would legalize all use of pot to the very specic measure Gaetz and Edwards are carrying. The panel agreed that pas sage of a limited-use measure, aimed at treating children af icted by epilepsy, would help because it could establish a framework for what all agreed was the inevitable passage of a ballot proposal to alter the state constitution and legalize marijuana for medicinal use. A research operation of can nabis investors, ArcView, puts the legal cannabis market val ue at $1.53 million in 2013, and projects a 68 percent increase for this year. I suspect we are on a cautious walk forward, and this is the rst step, Gaetz said. State lawmakers extol virtues of medical pot

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OPINION www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, April 2, 2014 A Page 4 Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com Oh, if life were as simple as those crazy commercials. Some truly ridiculous commercials bombard our television airwaves. And why am I only now having this revelation? Perhaps youve known for years that if commercials were generally worth watching, advertisers wouldnt have to pay to be on the air, and we wouldnt avoid them by hitting the remote to switch between The Voice and re-runs of The Fresh Prince. One ad in particular leaves me arguing with the television as if I were watching a Jerry Springer episode, believing my words will magically permeate the screen and help those idiotic guests see the error of their ways. Youve seen it. An attractive woman glides into her living room, twirls around in a pretty dress and asks her husband, What do you think? Apparently overcome by the beauty of his bride, the man reacts as any man would: he suggests a vacation (right...), explaining the credit card reward points theyve earned will pay for everything. We cant, says the wife. The husband, overwhelmed by his wifes loveliness, insists. Oh yes, we can. Then he explains all the wonderful things they can do as a couple with all those points. The scene is complete with visuals of the couple laughing and having all sorts of fun on several outings. The husband is about to be surprised. No, we cant, she says again, with a sly smile, deftly smoothing the sides of her dress. Then, it dawns on him. His well-dressed wife has just spent all their reward points on that one dress. Thats when this little tale strays well away from any reality Ive ever known. The husband just smiles, and the commercial is over. Over, that is except for the speed-talking part of gratuitous disclaimers from the announcer. Who are they kidding? Where is the raging discussion that should logically ensue? I can accept the Snuggle bear caressing his furry little cheek with my linens and complimenting me on how soft they are. Its not even too far-fetched that a bumblebee who sounds suspiciously like Antonio Banderas is concerned about my allergy medication. But a husband having no problem that his wife spent what appears to be their hard-earned points on a dress apparently worth at least the cost of two plane tickets, a boat rental and a night of dancing? Oh, please! Does that company really expect us to buy that in this economy? Wouldnt it make more sense to say, Honey, I paid our health insurance premium with our points or Gas is four dollars a gallon again, so I used our points to ll up both cars? My outrage ebbs when I realize this couple obviously doesnt live in a small Northwest Florida community (well, that and the fact they arent real.) Most ladies here would be more considerate of their spouse, and while we might like nice dresses, most of us prefer our clothes machine washable and commercials more believable. After all, Snuggles the cuddly bear wont magically appear to compliment your laundry if the tags say dry clean only. CAROL KENT Editor Real lifes not all snuggles like on TV HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@ chipleypaper.com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Quit chasing what you want most The sun was thinking about making its daily appearance, its slight presence hesitantly announcing itself in the east like a puppy with a paw on a couch trying to decide whether to take the next step: you know its coming but its taking its time. A friend and I were getting out of our vehicle about 45 miles north of Panama City, it was about 5:40 a.m. and I wondered if the slightly cooler than normal temperatures and stifferthan-ideal wind would interfere with the rst attempt to lure a gobbler this year. We need this wind to die down, he said. We had everything else we needed decoys, shotguns, camo, netting, mosquito spray, water everything, really, except a doped-up gobbler that would ensure success. We just need Mother Nature to throw us a bone. And she did, for as we walked to the spot I had mentally pondered for a week, the wind disappeared like a child at bath time. We settled in and waited for that most glorious of sounds for a true turkey hunter: the rst gobble of the morning which would, for me, also be the rst gobble of the season. You dont get a gobble every time out, but gobbles rarely translate into taking home a bird. This isnt deer hunting, sitting in a stand on a food plot ush with their favorite foods. You cant hunt turkeys over bait, number one, and hearing a turkey gobble is a long cry from seeing a deer. On my hunting lease we dont allow turkeys to be taken by ri e, it is shotgun only and that means a range of about 45-50 yards. It also means you have to call the gobbler in. And early in the seasons, the hens are pretty cooperative and tend to head toward that rst gobble and offer to work in concert with the gobbler to produce the next generation of turkeys, if you get my drift. So there sits the gobbler in his tree some people dont realize turkeys roost in trees overnight gobbling away and his harem gathers and its a buyers market. We, meanwhile, are a couple of hundred yards away letting out some yelps and hen noises trying to get that gobbler to come on over to us and our decoys. It brought to mind Spring Break and the analogy that our task that morning would be about like standing 100 yards from a stage with Luke Bryan performing and us busting out in song in hopes that some of those ladies would abandon him and head our way. But we know it can be done and my friend went to work on the calling while I took pictures and imagined a giant gobbler behind every sway of a bush in the breeze. We heard that golden sound, in fact we heard at least three and maybe four gobblers talking. And one was moving closer. But, as often happens, the morning fell silent and we had a choice to make: Was it time to get on the move and track those gobblers down or sit tight and see if they showed up? Silence doesnt always mean the gobbler is henned up, or busy with a hen, it sometimes means hes honing in on you. Its early in the season and we were antsy, so we took off. We worked around the fringes of woods, we traipsed through pine straw-covered forest oor between planted pines and we tromped through heavy brush near creeks, trying to nd that gobbler. And we just couldnt pin him down. So we decided to head back to our original spot and work our way in from there, where the going would be easier. As we approached the spot, you can probably guess what we saw: turkeys. They were ying. Away from us. From the very spot our gear still sat. The gobbler that had gone silent had been moving toward us and some hens had shown up and if wed just sat still wed probably have taken him home. And it was a beautiful day that reminded me of two things. Theres a reason they call it hunting, not killing. And sometimes you never catch the things you chase the hardest, but if youll hold still and let them determine their own path, they might come to you on their own. MIKE CAZALAS Between the Cracks Throughout the 11-year history of Perrys Prattle, the writer has had requests to write on a particular subject. Along the way, efforts were made to write on some of the suggested topics, and I hope that I did them justice. A few weeks ago, Rhonda Dalton Dickinson called me to request an article on Clark Rogers and wife, Myrtle Finch Rogers. Her conversation was, Perry, you know that Mr. Clark Rogers is approaching 99 years old and is still living in his Vernon home, assisted by a caregiver, who comes in daily to help with his needs. She continued, Mrs. Myrtle Finch Rogers, the wife, is a resident of the third oor of the Washington County Community Hospital, who administers to her needs, along with a host of other older citizens, both male and female. Rhonda further told me she makes sure Mr. Rogers gets a copy of each weekly edition of the Washington County News in order for him to be sure and read Perrys Prattle. Assurance was given to Rhonda that writing on this beloved couple would be a joy and I really didnt think that three weeks would elapse before pursuing the requested topic. I came to know Wausaus big Rogers family from second-hand information given to me with my long association by the only sister in the family, Marvel Rogers Carter Taylor. This lady came to work at Panama Citys newest retail store in early 1952 when she was hired by Sears, Roebuck and Company in the receiving room. She, along with other ladies, were responsible for receiving, checking, pricing and moving to the sales oor the mammoth loads of merchandise received in the store daily. Some of the other employees included Faye Peacock, Audrey Rushing, Thelma Fountain and Billie Jean Knowles. When I was assigned as Receiving Manager, we also had Jimmy Smith and Oscar Ceasar working in that department. Marvel and Faye worked until retirement at Sears and are still active in the Sears Retirees Club, where Hester and I have been included in their Christmas Party each year. During our Sears experience, the Receiving Room Crew, although busy with daily deliveries of merchandise, still had time for Marvels conversation about her large family and singing by Faye Peacock. I came to know each brother and something special about him. Brother Clark Rogers, born Dec. 24, 1915, was the third in the series of boys. He married Myrtle Finch Rogers, July 24, 1937. The rst born in the Rogers household was Allen Rogers, born May 1, 1911, who married Minnie Owens Lloyd. Second in the order of birth was Arthur Rogers, born Nov. 25, 1913, and married Lucille Taylor. Following Clarks arrival was Lewis Rogers, born Nov. 23, 1918, who married Wilma Haddock. Lewis was the preacher in the family and carried that title throughout life. Leo Rogers arrived next, on Jan. 20, 1920. He married Evie Dee Pippin on May 12, 1940. Then came Marvel on Dec. 14, 1922, who married Paul Carter on Dec. 17, 1939, and Alex Taylor on Dec. 31, 1972, after the death of Paul Carter in 1958. Howard Rogers was born on Jan. 24, 1924, and was the last of the siblings to celebrate a 90th birthday on Jan. 24, 2014. He married Paulette Grif n on March 6, 1946. They reside in Port St. Joe. Your writer well remembers when tragedy came to the family with the accidental death of the father, Buster Rogers, on Oct. 12, 1965, at the age of 76. He and his shing partner, Joseph Walsingham, had experienced vehicle problems and were walking along State Road 77, when struck and killed by an approaching car. The mother, Mollie, died Aug. 12, 1986 at age 92. All of the Rogers offspring were born and reared on a farm east of Wausau. Schooling for the family included hard labor and Wausau schools. All experienced extremely hard work while growing up. Clarks rst paying job was when he and brother, Arthur, cut pulpwood for Tom Bar eld. The product was hauled to the B. C. Railroad siding at Wausau on a Model T Ford. Later, he worked for the B. C. Railroad, Coggin and Deermont and Faulk-Coleman Construction Company. During World War II, Clark was employed at Wainwright Shipyard in Panama City. In 1945, Clark was hired as a school bus driver for Washington County, driving a bus from the Deadening, Porter Pond, Wages Pond, Wausau and on to Vernon. His route was a total of 108 miles round trip. In the late 1950s, Mr. Rogers was hired as Bus Mechanic at Vernon, where he continued until retirement. Myrtle Rogers began employment at the school lunch room in Chipley and later transferred to Vernon when her husbands job took him there. Both Clark and Myrtle stayed active in community affairs in Vernon as they had done while living in Wausau. Clark found time to be active in the Vernon Booster Club and was a charter member of the Vernon Volunteer Fire Department. He served six years on the Vernon City Council and six years on the Washington County Hospital Board of Trustees. Upon retirement of both Mr. and Mrs. Rogers in 1986, a reception and dinner was held in their honor. Kelly Brock, Superintendent of Schools, Farrell Nelson, School Board Member and Arol Hudson, former Supervisor of Transportation, spoke highly of this couples long years of service to the school system of Washington County. In retirement, the Rogers still call Vernon their home. Clark Rogers is still able to maintain himself in the home as he approaches his 99th birthday. His two care givers include Barbara Tuten, who is married to the grandson of a Vernon pioneer, Mr. Joe Tuten. Congratulations to Clark and Myrtle Rogers for a long life lled with contributions to whatever the endeavor at hand called for. See you all next week. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Clark and Myrtle Rogers as they appeared in the 2006 Heritage of Washington County Book. Rogerses have impacted the community PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, April 2, 2014 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Guest speakers at last weeks Bonifay Kiwanis Club meeting on March 26 were Jeep Sullivan, founder of Jeep Sullivans Outdoor Adventures Inc. and Carter Hess, son of State Attorney Glen Hess and wounded veteran. I attribute most of what I do to my father who is a big hearted man and honored for his service in the military, Sullivan said. He kind of started this new ministry for our wounded warriors and Carter was our rst warrior. Sullivan explained that Outdoor Adventures provides hunting, shing, wildlife education, boat tours, frog and sh gig, bow sh and hunting alligator, wild hog, duck, whitetail, turkey, elk, moose, caribou, bear and more to wounded veterans as well as families and individuals. Veterans are own to the nearest airport where Sullivan picks them up and the adventure begins. It is amazing and an honor to have these men in my boat, deer stand or duck blind, Sullivan said. This gives these guys a chance to really relax and smile and its become something better than I could ever imagine. Its been a blessing. He said his heart is touched by the men and women who sacri ced of themselves, guratively and literally, and he wanted to give something back. Soon, he started a 501c3 organization to do just that. Carter Hess served two tours with the 82nd Airborne before he lost his leg to an IED, improvised explosive device, in June of 2012. In November of last year, my dad said if I wanted to go turkey hunting, Jeep Sullivan was just the guy to see, Hess said. Normally, if you want to go hunting, I imagine you want a guy with a name like Jeep. So, we went turkey hunting with a colonel from the Air Force. He told about their rst day hunting, which no turkeys showed up and on the second day the colonel and Hess were sitting, waiting on a turkey. While we were sitting I decided to take off my prosthetic leg and the colonel watched with wide eyes, Hess said. I told him if I had to shoot the turkey with a gun or bow and arrow or if I have to beat him down with this leg, one way or another a turkey was going to die. Needless to say that really broke the ice. He said after a while a turkey came out, turned a corner and was out of sight. Figuring that for the only turkey to come out that day they were surprised to see a second turkey and this time the colonel didnt hesitate to shoot the turkey. The aim must not have been so good because instead of hitting the ground the turkey ran around in ve-yard circles with the colonel not far behind him, Hess said. If I ever remember anything it would be the image of the colonel chasing that turkey around in circles. I tell you now, its not about the hunt, its about the memories made, its about a connections and its thanks to Jeep we have that opportunity. Sullivan said as a 501(c)(3) organization, donations are accepted. If you have the money and you want to make a difference we sure could use it, Sullivan said. Ive seen the faces of the new guys just wanting to connect and I just want to continue connecting and be there for them to show that civilians care enough about our veterans to do something for them. For more information, visit www.JeepSullivan. com or call 326-1771. A l l c i t i z e n s an d i n t e r e s t e d p a r t i e s a r e e nc o ur a ge d t o a t t e nd t h e pu bl ic h e a r i n g A n y i nq u i r i e s r e ga r d i n g t h e pu bl ic h e a r i n g o r an y pe r s o n r e q u i r i n g s pe c i a l a c c omm o d a t i on s d ue t o d i s a bi l i t y o r p h y sic a l i m p a i r m e n t i ncl u d i n g sp e e c h o r h e a r in g im p a i r m e nt s s h o ul d c o nt a c t t h e c i t y a d m i n i s t ra t o r s o f ce a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 3 8 6 3 5 0 a t l e a s t t h r e e ( 3 ) b us i n e s s d a y s pr i o r t o t h e h e a r i n g Da v i d P e t t i s Jr P l a n ni n g & Z o ni n g O f c e r N O T I C E O F P U B L I C H E A R I N G T h e P l an n i n g C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e C i t y o f C h i p l e y F l o r i d a w i l l c o n d u c t a P u bl ic He a r i n g i n t h e C i t y Ha l l C o u nci l C h am be r s a t 1 4 4 2 J a c k s o n A v e n u e on T h u r s d a y A p r i l 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t 2 : 3 0 p. m T h e p u r po s e o f t h e h e a r i n g i s t o r e v i e w an d c o n s i d e r t h e f o l l o w i n g r e q u e s t: 1 R eq u e s t f o r D e v e l o p men t O r d er : Ja zm in e P r o p e r t i e s L L C i s re qu e s t in g a d e v el o pm e n t or d e r t o c o n st r uc t a 2 0 0 0 s q f t c omm e r ci a l bu i ld i n g t o r e p l a ce a 2 5 7 0 s q f t c o m m e r c i a l b u i l d i n g t h a t w a s de m ol is h e d Loc a t i o n: 1 2 38 M ai n St r e e t P e t i t i on e r: Ja zm in e P r o p e r t i e s L L C T h e s u b j e c t pr o pe r t y i s m o r e sp e ci c a l ly d e si g n a t e d i n t h e m a p re e c t e d h e re in NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 4-1 5-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 Chiple y FL 32428 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon Ocala Star-Banner The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline inched up 2 cents in the past week. Typical spring factors like re nery maintenance, increasing demand and the switch to summerblend fuel remain part of the story. The most expensive prices in the Southeast are found in Florida, where the average price on Monday was $3.63, 8 cents higher than the national average and 7 cents higher than last week. Florida motorists are seeing the highest gas prices since July, said Mark Jenkins, spokesman, AAA The Auto Club Group. While Florida prices could continue inching up, they are still well below last years peak of $3.88 and not expected to reach $4 a gallon. Gas prices in Florida are increasing more than other states because of supply issues and strong demand. Unlike other states, the majority of Floridas gasoline is delivered by ship instead of pipeline. According to the Energy Information Administration, imports have dramatically declined during recent years, due to re nery closures in the Caribbean and limited shipments from re neries in the Gulf of Mexico that would otherwise be able to offset the shortage. Now, anytime gasoline demand spikes, retailers must engage in a bidding war with the New York Harbor for shipments from the Atlantic basin to prevent a shortage. The EIA also states that gasoline consumption in Florida typically peaks in March, when seasonal population is high and Spring Break travelers and baseball fans arrive. This pattern differs from other states, where gasoline consumption typically peaks in July and August and is lowest during the winter months. In Gainesville, the average price per gallon on Monday was $3.63, up 3 cents from last week, according to the website GasBuddy. com In Ocala, the average was $3.63, up from $3.57 last week. The lowest price in Florida was $3.28 in St. Augustine, and the highest was $5.99 in Lake Buena Vista, according to GasBuddy.com Congress patches Medicare cut again Floridas average gas price highest in the Southeast WASHINGTON (AP) With just hours to spare, Congress stepped Monday to nalize legislation to prevent doctors who treat Medicare patients from being hit with a 24 percent cut in their payments from the government. The Senates 64-35 vote sends a measure to delay the cuts for a year to President Barack Obama, who is expected to quickly sign it. The House passed the measure last week. The $21 billion measure would stave off a 24 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to doctors for a year and extend dozens of other expiring health care provisions such as higher payment rates for rural hospitals. The legislation is paid for by cuts to health care providers, but fully half of the cuts wont kick in for 10 years. Its the 17th temporary patch to a broken payment formula that dates to 1997 and comes after lawmakers failed to reach a deal on nancing a permanent x. The measure passed the House on Thursday, but only after top leaders in both parties engineered a voice vote when it became clear they were having dif culty mustering the two-thirds vote required to advance it under expedited procedures. Several top Democrats opposed the bill, saying it would take momentum away from the drive to permanently solve the payment formula problem. ANDREW WARDLOW | The News Herald Gov. Rick Scott, left, joined local leaders and veterans at the National Guard Armory in Panama City to sign a bill Monday creating a $22.2 million law designed to create educational and professional opportunities for returning military members. Scott sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the states main health care agency asking for hospital inspections. Governor wants inspection of federal hospitals TALLLAHASSEE (AP) Gov. Rick Scott wants state authorities to inspect federal hospitals that serve veterans. Scott sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the states main health care agency asking for the inspections. The governor joins other elected officials pressing for answers about care at hospitals in the Veterans Affairs Sunshine Healthcare Network. The Tampa Tribune reported last week that five cancer patients died and nine others suffered injury because of delays in diagnosis or treatment through the network that includes Florida, South Georgia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Federal officials have refused to say in which hospitals the deaths occurred. The office of U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., last week said the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs would report the information to Congress in the next two months. Scott to sign tougher sex predator measures TALLAHASSEE (AP) Gov. Rick Scott is signing into law a series of measures that would require sexual predators to be locked up longer. Scott was scheduled to sign four bills Tuesday at the Capitol. The measures the governor will sign will also require that more sexual predators be committed for psychiatric review once they nish their criminal sentences. The wide-ranging legislative package attempts to close loopholes in the Jimmy Ryce Act, which allows for the psychiatric review, or civil commitment, of sexually violent offenders even after they nish their prison sentences. Lawmakers in both chambers have said the inspiration for strengthening the laws came from the death of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle last June and a newspaper investigation on sexual predators who were released only to commit more crimes. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ Help for local wounded warriors CECILIA SPEARS | The News Focus was on local Jeep Sullivan and Carter Hess during the March 26 Bonifay Kiwanis Club meeting as they spoke of local efforts to help wounded veterans with outdoor activities.

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Local A6 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014 T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.f su.edu. FL ORIDA ST A TE UNIVERSI T Y P ANAMA CIT Y THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMM UNIT Y S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL Gulf Power line personnel recognized on National Lineman Appreciation Day Special to the News Monday, March 31, was National Lineman Appreciation Day. Gulf Power Company is joined utility companies across the nation in recognizing the efforts of the men and women who work in all sorts of weather at all times of the day and night to keep Northwest Floridas electricity owing. Whether its going on storm duty, restoring a customers power or just turning on someones power for the rst time, the work Gulf Power crews do every day is to keep our customers at the center of everything we do, said Jeff Rogers, Gulf Power corporate communications manager. These men and women are truly heroes and this day is to honor them. Gulf Power has about 175 employees who work on the companys transmission and distribution lines. Although the state Legislature has made Aug. 26 Lineworker Appreciation Day in Florida, a resolution in the U.S. House of Representatives set aside March 31 as National Lineman Appreciation Day. Part of Gulf Powers mission is to help other companies when natural disasters knock power out to thousands of customers. In December, Gulf Power sent crews to Texas to assist in the Dallas area following an ice storm. Gulf Power line personnel didnt have to travel far in late January when an unusual ice storm in the Pensacola area disrupted power for two days. Then in February, Gulf Power crews spent a week in Georgia, assisting Georgia Power restore power following an ice storm there. Our line workers are committed to getting customers power back on, whether here in Northwest Florida or across the country, Rogers said. Thats what they do and were proud they are being recognized for their efforts. The company has about 175 employees who work on its transmission and distribution linesSPECIAL TO THE NEW S A Gulf Power employee works on power lines recently. Measure targets mug shot websites TALLAHASSEE (AP) The Florida Legislature is pushing through a bill that targets websites that charge individuals a fee to remove their police mug shots, a practice that some have criticized as a legal form of extortion. The bill targets companies that obtain booking photos from law enforcement agencies and then put them online, along with the persons name and the charges they face. They then charge arrestees hundreds to thousands of dollars to remove them or face continued embarrassment. Some websites refuse to remove the photos even if the charges are dropped later or if the person is acquitted. Under the proposed law, an individual could obtain a court order for removal. The website would be subject to a $1,000-a-day ne if it doesnt comply within 14 days. Florida is trailing several states in addressing the practice by such websites as mugshots. com States across the U.S. are moving on this, so were hoping to catch up, said Sen. Darren Soto, DKissimmee, the author of a measure that would require mug shot sites to remove booking photos at no charge. State and local governments would be exempt from the law. Soto said he worked with the Florida Sheriffs Association in drafting the bill. In January, the Pinellas County Sheriffs Ofce took its booking photos ofine. Theyre still an open record, but to get them you have to go through the ling of a request, said Cecilia Barreda, a department spokeswoman. Mug shot companies, as well as media outlets, use Floridas strong open records laws to obtain content for their sites. Some commercial sites have begun to include instructions on how to get a mug shot removed, charging by the arrest. At mugshots.com one arrest costs $399 with the removal fee increasing to $1,799 for ve arrests. Removing booking photos for free would sap at least half of the operating revenue for mugshots.com said Marc G. Epstein, a Florida lawyer who represents the company. We dont solicit business, and we want to get to a point where all the revenue we get is from advertising rather than ads and removal, Epstein said. But removing for free at this point? When legislators work for free, then well work for free. Wyoming, Georgia and Utah have passed laws similar to the one proposed by Soto. All measures outlaw the fee-for-removal practice. At least 12 states have mug shot-related bills pending. When Georgias law took effect last year, mugshots. com stopped pulling mug shots altogether, for fee or for free, Epstein said. That did not get a happy response from people who had just had a bad day and wanted to throw money at it to make it go away, he said. Legislation introduced last year by Rep. Carl Zimmerman would have required publishers to remove a mug shot when charges are dropped or a not-guilty verdict is reached. The bill died in committee. Zimmerman, DDunedin, also has a mug shot bill this session, although he is going to sign on as a co-sponsor to the House version of Sotos bill being carried by Rep. Carlos Trujillo, R-Doral. I think were actually going to get this one passed, Zimmerman said. He said the only reservation he has with the Soto bill is that it only addresses booking photos posting going forward, leaving existing photos alone. The idea is that next year we can take that on. Its one thing to remove the nancial incentive, but in the future, Id like to address these sites that are already out there, Zimmerman said. Efforts to deal with the mug shot industry in Florida have been opposed by media outlets, including the First Amendment Foundation, who are hesitant to back a measure that restricts records access. The new legislation clears that opposition as it goes after the removal prot motive. Mug shots are public records, and we cant restrict access to them, said Barbara Petersen, the foundations president. This is the idea, to get the people who charge for removal.

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com A Section By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Nick Flairs business cards could read hitter, plain and simple. The Gulf Coast sophomore rarely sees a pitch he cant connect with and he racked up three more hits on Monday, including a three-run home run, in a 95 win over Northwest Florida State at Bill Frazier Field. His homer capped a seven-run third inning to give starter Brendan Leach a cushion on a day when the right-hander didnt have his usual dominant mix on the mound. Flair drove in half of GCs eight runs through the rst three innings. He added a single in the sixth and nished the day with a .426 batting average, seven points higher than when he woke up on Monday. His three hits and an identical number from Dalton Kelley kept GC in a rst-place tie with Chipola in the Panhandle Conference at 6-2 after a fth straight win. Leach has been great all year. This was his rst rough game all year, said Flair of the GC starter, who had six strikeouts and three walks while giving up eight hits in 4 1/3 innings of a no-decision. If he struggles, we struggle. On offense we took it upon ourselves to make things happen. Flairs homer off losing pitcher Brandon Nagem turned a 1-1 tie into a three-run GC lead. Max Bartlett and Dondrayas Harris (Rutherford) had RBIs from the bottom of the lineup and Kelley singled them in when the Commodores batted through the lineup in the third. GC (29-8) held on behind Kelley, who entered for Leach in the fth and tossed 3 1/3 innings of scoreless relief for the win. Kelley yielded a walk and gave up RBIs singles to Danny Blanco and Ryan Fucci to pull NWF State (22-11, 4-4) within 8-5. Blanco also had a solo homer in the fourth and he and Fucci nished with two hits apiece. Each of the ve runs were charged to Leach, who gave up six earned runs in his previous 47 1/3 innings. Kelley (1-0) had ve strikeouts and one walk and Brandon Pergantis and Ryan Koziol combined to hold NWF State scoreless over the nal four innings. Brian Lamboys triple in the fth capped the scoring. It was his rst of the season. Flair has four triples in one of ve categories he leads the team. Flair of Belle Chase, La., said GC has given him a chance to ourish after two seasons at Mississippi State where he redshirted his rst season and had only seven at-bats as a freshman. I didnt get to play the last two years and (GC) coach (Mike) Kandler gave me a shot, Flair said. Im a hitter by nature. Its what I do. For the most part, getting to play every day has helped me. You cant sit the bench and do much. Flair has done most of the heavy lifting at the plate, but he noted he wasnt the only top bat in the lineup. He singled out Trevor Davis, who is near .400 and was 1 for 4 on Tuesday. He also said this seasons success has been a total effort. As a team we have a good offense, but we also have solid pitchers and can play defense, Flair said. When we make a bad play they (pitchers) pick us up. Flair and GC wrap up the three-game series against NWF State in Niceville at 5 p.m. on Wednesday. NWF STATE 010 130 000 5 12 0 GULF COAST 107 010 00X 9 12 1 Nagem (L), McKinney (3), Rodriguez (7) and Halsted; Leach, Kelley (5, W, 1-0), Pergantis (8), Koziol (9) and Durham. 2B: GC 2 (Koziol. Kelley). HR: NWF State (Blanco), GC (Flair). E: GC (Flair). LOB: NWF State 11, GC 8. GC 9, NWF STATE 5: COMMODORES KEEP SHARE OF CONFERENCE LEAD Flair for the dramatic PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald TOP: Gulf Coasts Nick Flair, right, is congratulated after his three-run home run in the third inning of Gulf Coasts 9-5 win over Northwest Florida State on Monday. BOTTOM: Brian Lamboy forces out NWF States Jack Crittenberger and later had an RBI triple. Gulf Coasts Nick Flair drove in half of the Commodores eight runs through the first three innings. He added a single in the sixth and finished the day with a .426 batting average, seven points higher than when he woke up on Monday. Special to Times-Advertiser The Vernon High School Yellow Jackets weightlifting team hosted the rst State Quali er at the VHS weight room Monday, March 24. This meet determined the lifters who would represent the Vernon subsection at the nal State Quali er on April 8th at Arnold High School. Participating teams were Vernon, Chipley, Graceville, Marianna and Bozeman. Lifters must have nished in the top three at this meet to be eligible to move on towards a State quali cation. VHS had 16 lifters compete and 14 will advance to the nal sectional competition. Those lifters include Justyn Oge, winner in the 129 class, Ryan Malloy, winner in the 139 class, Zack Weisner, second in the 139 class, Brandon Malloy, winner in the 169 class, JT Padgett, winner in the 183 class, Traice Adams, second in the 183 class, Stoney Long, winner in the 199 class, Jonshae Works, second in the 199 class, Darrion Peterson, winner in the 219 class, Darrius Peterson, second in the 219 class, Marlon Stephens, winner in the 238 class, and Malik Sheppard, third in the unlimited class. Joining these lifters from this subsection will be one lifter from Chipley, 5 lifters from Marianna, 2 from Graceville, and 3 from Bozeman. The nal State quali er on April 8 will be the last step for these young men to qualify for the State Finals on April 24 in Kissimmee. VHS hosts State Quali er WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Like us on ATTENTION COACHES, PARENTS, FANS AND SUPPORTERS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY SPORTS We want to promote our student athletes and sports programs offered by ALL schools in the Washington County School District! Our goal is to cover as many local sporting events in person as possible, but you can help ensure our hard working athletes are recognized by submitting info such as schedules, upcoming events, scores and photos. Submissions may be made by emailing ckent@chipley paper.com. Please include your name and a daytime phone number. Thank you for helping support our local athletes! Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Page 7

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Local A8 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014 By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The State Attorneys Ofce will prose cute a Calhoun County Jail guard for the misdemeanor battery of an inmate, of cials announced Monday. Deputy Christopher Doyal is charged with one count of battery against inmate Ventura Brown. In vestigators said evidence shows Doyal used exces sive force without lawful justication during an al tercation in Browns cell on Feb. 24. The State Attorneys Ofce also has video and audio evidence of the inci dent but would not release those les Monday. In the report, Investigator Jim my Nolan said the video clearly shows Doyal swing ing at Inmate Brown, but witnesses did not report seeing Doyal actually hit Brown. In Browns account of the incident, Doyal began punching him the face with keys he had in his right hand, chipping his front tooth, before he was taken to a local hospital. Inmates in neighbor ing cells recounted hear ing Brown pounding on his cell door and yelling before Doyal appeared to investigate the disturbance. Brown told investi gators that a day ear lier he slipped on a wet oor and hit his head. He was yelling for his prescribed medication because his head was hurting. And he was using profanity toward Doyal, investigators reported. During the altercation, Brown was on the phone with his wife. He put the phone down, stepped back from the door and put his hands behind his back when Doyal arrived, he said. Browns wife could not make out what happened from there, she told investi gators, but Brown said the door ew open and Doyal took a swing at him, which he sidestepped. At that time, Doyal pushed Brown against the wall then onto his bunk and began chok ing him before Doyal even tually punched him in the face with the keys, he said. A trustee inmate, Chris topher Phillips, said he and other inmates were eating when Doyal came around asking who was beating on the door. When Doyal went into the cell, they heard hol lering and ran into the hall to see. He watched Doyal detain Brown to his bunk but did not see either man throw a punch, he said. Phillips said, before sep arating the two, he heard Doyal say: What have I done to you, what have I done to you, a couple times, Nolan reported. Brown was taken to a local hospital for treat ment to his injuries and is detained in the Jackson County Jail. W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles $ 19 95 W e p r o ud l y a n n o u n c e t h a t K r i s t e n "L i l V ic k" Ri ve rs, da u g h t e r o f Ro be r t a n d J a c q ue l i n e V ic k, h a s be e n a c c e p t e d t o t h e Ok la h o m a S t a t e U n i ve rs i t y C e n t e r f o r V et e r i n a r y H e a l t h S c ie n c es f o r t h e c la s s o f 2018 D VM p r og r a m. S h e i s a 2002 g rad u a t e o f P o n ce de L e o n hig h s c h o o l a n d r e cei v e d a B .S. deg r e e f r o m t h e U ni v er si t y o f S o u t h Flo r id a in B io M e dic a l S cien ces w i t h a min o r in P h ysics. T he R oman t ic N o ve l of t he Y e ar by F o s te r S ande rs a t ama z on b o ok s com or a lmo s t to des t in com W e Steam for F ree! *Not All items can be steamed. Jail guard charged with battery of inmate TALLAHASSEE (AP) Floridas economy is show ing signs of continued re covery, but a new analysis prepared by state econo mists also points to some problems. State economists on Monday released a 29-page snapshot looking at everything from wag es to housing prices and unemployment. The good news: Florida was ranked 13th in 2013 in personal income growth and had a rate that ex ceeded the national aver age. Growth rates also are returning to more typical levels and consumer con dence is improving, as is building permit activity. But the effects of the Great Recession will linger for a few more years. Econ omists estimate normalcy will not occur until 2016. Gov. Rick Scott consistently has touted the drop in the states unem ployment rate as a sign his push for tax cuts and re duction in regulations has aided the state. The states unemployment rate is 6.2 percent, which is below the national average. But the state report notes the drop in Floridas unemployment rate has been helped by people drop ping out of the labor force, or people who have not be gun seeking work. Report says states economy recovering but problems remain Gov. Rick Scott consistently has touted the drop in the states un employment rate as a sign his push for tax cuts and reduction in regulations has aided the state. The states unemployment rate is 6.2 percent, which is below the national average. Chipley resident Abigail Anderson wins essay contest Special to the NewsEvery year, the Veterans of For eign Wars Post 10555 sponsors Holy Nativ ity Episcopal School in the VFW Patriots Pen Essay Contest. This years theme was What Patriotism Means to Me. Holy Nativity consistently has students place at the Post Level of judging. This year, all three Post Level winners came from the Holy Nativity Episcopal School. Third place went to Jack Briggs. Second place went to Ann Ma rie Shores. First place went to Abigail Anderson, a Chipley resident. Having won rst place at the post level, Abigail, daughter of Lorna and Todd E. Anderson D.V.M.. proceeded to the District Level Competition. In Florida, there are 199 posts and 18 districts. Abigail won rst place for District 17, which includes all middle schools in Bay, Gulf and Jackson counties. She was honored at a luncheon and read her essay for the District 17 Ofcers and guest U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, who asked for a copy to place on his ofcial web site and took a photo for his ofce. The VFW Ladies Auxiliary from District 17 also honored teacher, Angela Sullivan with a Youth Es say Award Citation for her con stant support of the Patriots Pen contest and her consistent record of high quality writing from her winning students. Abigail then proceeded to the State Level, competing against 17 other students. She was accom panied by her parents, grandpar ents, siblings and her language arts teacher, Angela Sullivan. Abigails essay was chosen as one of the top three from 4,517 submitted essays and was awarded $950, a medal, a plaque, and an expense paid trip for her and her family to stay onsite at Disney. Abigail Anderson is shown here with her parents at the Awards Banquet in Orlando.

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, APRIL 2 2014 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Hilary Duff gained fame as the title character in which TV series? Jericho, Lizzie McGuire, Degrassi High, Judging Amy 2) What does the British English word tripper mean in American English? Tourist, Jogger, Daydreamer, Oven 3) Which Bonanza actor served in the military during the Korean War? Greene, Roberts, Landon, Blocker 4) Whos been the only president that previously was a CIA director? LBJ, Harry Truman, JFK, George H.W. Bush 5) In backgammon, how many pieces or checkers does each player receive at the start? 7, 12, 15, 16 6) Of these, which is not a landlocked country? Austria, Ethiopia, Finland, Switzerland 7) A winged woman holding an atom best describes which awards trophy? Oscar, Pulitzer, Emmy, Tony 8) What is the #1 gassiest dog breed? German Shepherd, Beagle, Boxer, Dalmatian 9) Mats Sundin is best known for what sport? Tennis, Golf, Hockey, Skiing 10) What variety of food is a morel? Lobster, Mushroom, Pear, Onion 11) Who made his lm debut in 1955s Revenge of the Creature? Gene Hackman, Jack Nicholson, Burt Reynolds, Clint Eastwood 12) Which of these is a famous Welsh national park and mountain range? Lake District, Brecon Beacons, Peak District, Exmore 13) Of these celebrities who is the youngest? Spike Lee, Billy Crystal, Chuck Norris, Tom Arnold 14) In horse racing how many miles long is a furlong? 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 ANSWERS 1) Lizzie McGuire. 2) Tourist. 3) Blocker. 4) George H.W. Bush. 5) 15. 6) Finland. 7) Emmy. 8) German Shepherd. 9) Hockey. 10) Mushroom. 11) Clint Eastwood. 12) Brecon Beacons. 13) Tom Arnold. 14) 1/8. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The Chipley Police Department, Washington County Sheriffs Of ce, Chipley Probation and Parole and the members of both Northwest Florida Reception Centers main unit and annexs K-9 and Rapid Response teams joined more than 300 Florida law enforcement in the state-wide torch run to bene t the athletes of Special Olympics Florida Monday, March 31. Each year, of cers carry the torch on a 1500-mile relay through 67 counties in Florida before the Special Olympics Florida State Summer Games. This intrastate torch relay began in Escambia County March 24 and was picked up Monday by participants here in front of the Washington County Courthouse. The route ended at Peoples South Bank for a total of about 2.5 miles. The statewide event will culminate May 16 in Lake Buena Vista during Opening Ceremonies as of cers from around the state bring the Flame of Hope into the stadium at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. The coordinator for Washington Countys leg of the torchs journey was Of cer Jessica Hawkins, Administrative Disciplinary Investigator for NWFRC. Every year, the state of Florida is broken up into Regions by the Special Olympics of Florida. Each region consists of approximately ve counties and is assigned one Regional Liaison, Hawkins said. I was chosen this year to be our Regional Liaison. To be quite honest, it was a bit intimidating at rst glance, but everyone jumped on board and was in there for the long haul, all more than willing to help. It was a fabulous experience from the planning of the event, to the run. We live in an amazing community, she added. That was proven to me through this experience, yet again. When you ask for help around here, you better be ready to receive it. It was great to be a part of such a united local law enforcement team and to see them unify for the bene t of such a wonderful cause. On hand to help with the event were Greg Hutching and his criminal justice class at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center and Tisha Marsceill of Peoples South Bank, who helped provide drinks and snacks for participants. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More than 30 members of local law enforcement began their day by running in support of Floridas Special Olympics Monday, March 31. A ame of hope Local law enforcement of cers carry torch to bene t Special Olympics LEFT: The Chipley Police Department was represented in part by Of cer Curtis French, Of cer Jerrad Williams and Lieutenant Scott Thompson. RIGHT: Local event coordinator Of cer Jessica Hawkins was presented with owers at the end of the run by her daughter, Kinslee. The Washington County leg of the torch run began Monday in front of the courthouse and ended at Peoples South Bank.

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra ORLANDO (AP) Florida is a politically divided state. The Republicans have won the last four gubernatorial elections, but the Democrats have carried the state in the last two presidential elections. One U.S. senator is a Repub lican, while the other is a Demo crat. The Democrats hold a slight edge in voter registration. But that narrow divide be comes a chasm in Floridas congressional delegation and in the Legislature. Sixteen of Floridas 26 U.S. representa tives are Republicans, with one vacancy that will almost as suredly be lled by a Repub lican. Republicans also hold a 26-14 advantage in the Florida Senate and a 76-44 margin in the state House. Some Democrats argue that the discrepancies are caused by gerrymandering the Re publican-controlled Legislature drawing districts to give the GOP an unfair advantage, which would be illegal under Florida law. But two political science pro fessors say the discrepancies arent so simple or nefarious they have used the Sunshine State to popularize their argu ment that large concentrations of Democrats living in cities have given Republicans a redistricting advantage not just in Florida but nationwide. Jowei Chen of the University of Michigan and Jonathan Rod den of Stanford University say no amount of reforms to elimi nate gerrymandering is going to change an inherent bias based on where people live. Human geography plays a far greater role in generat ing electoral bias in the United States than commonly thought, they wrote in an inuential 2013 paper. Reformers in Florida have tried to stamp out gerrymander ing. They successfully convinced voters in 2010 to approve two amendments to the Florida Con stitution that would reduce the opportunities for lawmakers to make legislative and congressio nal districts that benet one party over the other. The amendments require districts to be compact and contiguous whenever pos sible and to follow existing city and county boundaries. They also prohibit attempts to diminish the chances for minorities to elect a candidate of their choosing. Chen and Rodden argue that Democrats tend to live in densely-populated cities while Republicans are more evenly scattered throughout suburban and rural areas. They also argue that Democratic precincts tend to be next to other highly-Demo cratic precincts, more so than Republican precincts, which tend to be located in politically mixed neighborhoods. As a result, Democrats tend to be tightly packed into fewer dis tricts than Republicans. Repub lican-dominated districts tend to be more diverse than Democratic precincts since pro-Republican rural areas often include Demo crats in small cities to reach the population threshold needed to create a district. In Florida, this translates into highly Democratic districts along Floridas southeastern coast in and around Fort Lauderdale, Mi ami and West Palm Beach. Mean while, Democratic precincts in interior cities like Ocala, and col lege towns like Gainesville and Tallahassee, are swallowed up by more rural, Republican districts, essentially drowning out Demo cratic votes. When compact, contiguous districts are imposed on this ge ography without regard to parti sanship, the result will be a skew in the distribution of partisanship across districts such that with 50 percent of the votes, Democrats can expect fewer than 50 percent of the seats, Chen and Rodden wrote. Despite having new redistrict ing standards in place, reformers felt the congressional plan ille gally favored Republicans and in cumbents and diminished the op portunities for minorities to elect representatives of their choice. The reformers, led by the League of Women Voters of Florida, have sued the Florida House, hoping to invalidate the current congressional and state Senate plans and prevent the current districts from being used in any future elections. The law suit is pending, and the Florida Supreme Court ruled in Decem ber that legislators can be forced to testify in the lawsuit, setting aside a long-standing privilege that legislators usually enjoy. Deirdre MacNab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, said the new amend ments are giving voters more choices. With regard to the House seats, Floridians have already seen a signicant increase in the numbers of competitive dis tricts, she said. Geography inuences redistricting in Florida Guinea Pigs are friendly and playful animals, and they can make for a wonderful addition to your family. However, there are always things to consider before welcoming any new pet into your home, and guinea pigs are no different. In honor of March being Adopt-a-Rescued-Guinea PigMonth, here is some information on these uffy friends to help you decide if they are the right pet for you. As with any pet, it is important that you have enough time to incorporate pet ownership into your everyday schedule. The responsibility of caring for a guinea pig should not be taken any less seriously than that of a dog, cat, or any other pet. Guinea pigs need to be properly groomed and have their cages thoroughly cleaned on a regular basis, and they require daily interaction outside of their cage. All of these responsibilities are necessities and essential for a guinea pigs well-being. Guinea pigs are generally friendly and curious animals and can make great pets, said Dr. Caitlin Burrell, a zoological medicine intern at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. It is important, however, that parents teach their children how to handle guinea pigs correctly, how to clean their cage and change their food, and how to tell if they are feeling ill. If you are bringing a guinea pig into your home as a family pet, make sure that your children are ready to take on the responsibility. Figuring pet ownership into a busy after school and weekend schedule can often be difcult for children to juggle. Adult supervision may also be required for younger children. Once you have decided you are ready to become a guinea pig parent, your next task will be choosing a breed that best suits your family. There are four types of guinea pigs commonly seen as pets: the Shorthair or English, the Abyssinian, the Silky, and the Peruvian, said Burrell. They can be found at pet stores but many shelters have small mammals, such as guinea pigs, that would love to be adopted! Most animal shelters now accept small animals that are in need of loving homes, and you could save a well deserving guinea pigs life while nding the perfect addition to your family. Guinea pigs can be housed in a variety of cages. Wire cages can be used but it is important to provide an area of solid ooring to prevent foot lesions, said Burrell. Cages can be lled with bedding materials like shredded paper or aspen shavings, but cedar and pine shavings should be avoided. Bedding material also needs to be changed regularly so that toxic substances dont accumulate. Another factor to consider when creating housing for your new pet is the location of the cage. Make sure it is safe from any other pets in your home that may view them as prey, and put somewhere that social interaction and out-of-cage play time may be supervised if you have small children. They should also be kept in a temperature and humidity controlled area and should have places within the cage that they can hide, said Burrell. As for food and diet, guinea pigs are herbivores that require a proper balance of fresh pellets, hay and fresh vegetables on a daily basis. They need lots of high quality hay to promote dental health, keep their gastrointestinal tract functioning normally, and to maintain a healthy weight. They can also be offered small amounts of guinea pig pellets and fresh veggies, but the main part of their diet should be hay, said Burrell. Additionally, guinea pigs need Vitamin C in their diet because they cannot synthesize it themselves. There are diets that have been supplemented with Vitamin C, but this can degrade rapidly as the food sits on the shelf. Burrell suggests that certain vegetables, such as dark leafy greens, peppers, or parsley can be a good source of Vitamin C as well. Rescuing a pet guinea pig from your local animal shelter could bring tremendous amounts of joy and life into your home. With the proper care and adequate attention, these small pets can earn a large spot in your heart. Boston celebrates 13th birthday Alexander Boston will celebrate his 13th Birthday on April 4, 2014. He is the son of Miss Sabrina Boston and Mr. Rory Moore. Alexander is the grandson of Martha Boston of Chipley and Annie Moore of Bonifay. What to consider when adopting a guinea pig PET TALK $ 39.00 10l bs L eg Q u a r t er s 5l bs G r o un d B e ef 5l bs S m o k e d H a m S t e a ks 2p k H o t D ogs $ 59.00 20l bs L eg Q u a r t er s 5l bs R i b lets 5l bs P o l lo c k 5l bs G r o un d B e ef 2p k H o t D ogs $ 89.00 15l bs G r o un d B e ef 20l bs L eg Q u a r t er 10l bs P o r k C h o ps 5l bs R i b lets 2p k H o t D ogs Half & Whole Beef A v ailable SPECIAL T -BONE STEAK $5.19/lb. US D A In s p e c t e d H A C C P F a c ili t y C a t t l e H ogsS h e e p P r oce s s e d 2 9 6 5 R M W a r d R d ( 1 8 1 C ) | W e s t v i l l e F l 3 2 4 6 4 P ho ne : (8 50 ) 54 8 1 20 1 B u t c h e r s : R o n n i e T h a r p & M i k e B r o w n C u s t o m P a c k a g in g A v ai l a bl e P l e a s e c a l l 2 4 4 8 h r s fo r p a c k a g e s W e s t v i l l e M e a t s

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 and sor enes s aches Special to Extra Fifteen teams of students from across ve counties competed against each other using student de signed and built robots in the seventh annual robotics contest sponsored by CareerSource Chipola and Opportu nity Florida. The contest challenged the students to create robots that could race down an obstacle course in the fastest time as well as create log books designed to document the design and build of their robots. Team Titanium from Altha High School set a course record in the nals to defeat Team Aint Care, also from Altha, by eight seconds. Gear heads from Marianna High School came in third, and Insane in the Membrane from Holmes County High School came in fourth. Bethlehems Team Wildcat won the Log Book portion of the contest, with Vernons Team Kloutz placing second and Insane in the Membrane taking third. Team Kolutz also took home the prize for Most Unique Design and the Sportsmanship award. The contest was started by Ca reerSource Chipola to give area ed ucators an extra tool to use as they help youth learn how to think criti cally, problem solve and work as a team. Richard Williams, executive direc tor of CareerSource Chipola, said the contest is a fun way for students to expand their classroom knowledge. Each year we are amazed by the creative designs the students devel op and the way they bring those de signs to life, Williams said. These students are getting hands on expe rience in science, technology, engi neering and math in a way that al lows them to do more than just read about it in a book. Anyone that thinks the youth of today dont have the tools to excel in the future needs to come to this contest next year and watch these students because they are amazing, he said. Byron Ward, Chair of Opportunity Florida, said he was impressed by the level of technical skill on display. These students have obtained the fundamental elements that it will take to be successful in whatever life brings their way. Simply put, they are winners, Ward said. CareerSource Chipola provides oversight and implementation of workforce development programs in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington County. The board also works with local educational institutions, economic development organizations and local employers to promote our goal of having a highly skilled and competitive workforce. Special to Extra The Spanish Trail Playhouse in Chipley presents an Evening of Bluegrass at 7 p.m. this Saturday April, featur ing the band, Deepsouth Bluegrass. Deepsouth Bluegrass is an upcoming bluegrass band based in the Panama City-area. They specialize in traditional bluegrass and bluegrass Gospel mu sic. The band members include Jeff Scutcheld, Richard Chambers, Greg Youngblood and Garrett Youngblood. Jeff Scutcheld is the rhythm guitar player and the serves as MC for the band. He has traveled and performed with the late Bluegrass Hall of Fame inductee Jimmy Williams. Since then, he has stayed around Panama City play ing with both Greg and Richard at times with his notoriously solid rhythm on his hand built guitar, put together by himself. Richard Chambers plays the banjo and per forms vocals. His inu ences comes from a wide range of sources, which makes his own sound unique form any other banjo player. He is also an accomplished singer and songwriter. Greg Youngblood plays the upright bass and per forms vocals. He hold the tempo in place like no oth er and is quite apt at per forming antics on stage, and you can also hear him sing vocal parts as well. Garrett Youngblood is an award winning ddle player and also performs vocals. Only 19 years old, he shares many of the so los with Richard with his smooth style and sings with the group as well. Advanced tickets will be on sale at the Washing ton County Public Library or at the Spanish Trail Playhouse box ofce the day of the show. Tickets are $10, and seating is general admission. For additional informa tion, call 326-3685. WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January to September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATURDAY 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale 1st Saturday of the month until 2 p.m. 1560 Lonnie Rd Free Medical Clinic in Graceville Opens 10am third and fth Saturday of the month. Call 263-6912 or 272-0101 for information. The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SUNDAY 11 a.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. Deepsouth Bluegrass to take the stage this weekend SP E C IA L T O EX TRA Bethlehems Team Wildcat won the Log Book portion of the contest. Local teams place in robotics competition COMMUNITY CALENDAR Vernons Team Kolutz also took home the prize for Most Unique Design and the Sportsmanship award. Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON P AGE B5

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US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 Page 4 Wednesday, April 2, 2014 CHRISTIAN HAVEN GOSPEL JAM CHIPLEY The Christian Haven Church Gospel Jam will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 5. Refreshments will be provided. Come and enjoy an evening of music and fellowship. For more information, call 773-2602. UNION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH HOMECOMING BETHLEHEM The Union Hill Baptist Church will celebrate its 110th Homecoming on Sunday, April 6. FOUR CALVARY, a local Southern Gospel quartet, will be in concert at 10 a.m. and then again during the 11 a.m. worship service. A fellowship meal will be immediately after the morning worship service. The 11 a.m., Homecoming speaker will be the Rev. Robb Goodman, who has been the Senior Pastor of the Summerville Baptist Church in Phoenix City, Ala., since 2005. HOLY WEEK BONIFAY The following is Bonifay First United Methodist Churchs Holy Week and Easter schedule: Noon April 9: Music recital and lunch with Roy Hoobler. 6 p.m. April 17: Holy Communion Service 6 p.m. April 18: The Last Seven Words of Christ, an Adult Choir Music Program 10:45 a.m. April 20: Easter Morning worship service UNION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH EASTER SERVICES BETHELHEM Union Hill Baptist Church will have a special Easter service Sunday, April 20. Bible Study will be at 10 a.m. During the 11 a.m. worship service, the choir will present JESUS MESSIAH, an Easter cantata, directed by Music Director Lisbeth Kidd. Union Hill Baptist Church is in the Bethlehem community on State Road 177, 1 mile south of Millers Cross Road. RUNNING FOR SOULS 5K RUN/WALK CHIPLEY Grace Assembly at Chipley will have a Running For Souls 5K Color Run/Walk on May 3. Registration and check in will be 7-7:45 a.m. at the Washington Holmes Vocational Center. The run/walk will begin at 8 a.m. Registration is $45 before April 5 and $50 after. 5K participants will receive a T-shirt and a goody bag if registered by April 5. There is no T-shirt guaranteed if you register late. For more information, visit www. gaceagchipley.org. THE MASTERS MONDAYS POPLAR SPRINGS Bethel Baptist Church will host The Masters Mondays, A Walk With The Master In The Word, at 7 p.m. Mondays in April. The rst speaker will be the Rev. Ray Jones, pastor of Ridgecrest Baptist Church, Dothan, Ala., on April 7. Special to Extra The Alabama-West Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church is excited to join other conferences within the United Methodist Church connection and announce the 2014 Imagine No Malaria campaign to save lives. Imagine No Malaria is an effort of The United Methodist Church to eliminate malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. The AWF conference has a goal of saving 100,000 lives, or raising more than $1 million. It only takes $10 to save one life through Imagine No Malaria. Malaria is spread by mosquitoes, and $10 will buy one insecticide-treated bed net. The United Methodists world-wide partners include the United Nations Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund. Through the efforts of the church and other organizations, deaths from malaria in Africa have been cut in half since 2010. But still, one child in Africa dies from malaria every 45 seconds. In America, we have been able to eliminate deaths from malaria. Now is the time to join together to eliminate deaths from malaria in Africa. The Outreach Team of Bonifay United Methodist Church has set a goal saving 500 lives. In dollars, this means raising $5,000 between now and June 1, but the Outreach Team prefers to think in terms of lives saved rather than money raised. If you would like to join with others in ghting this deadly disease, please send a check to Bonifay United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 477, Bonifay, FL 32425. Mark the check as being for the Malaria Campaign. Simply giving up eating out one time could save one live. In what better way can we be the hands and feet of Christ? The California condor, North Americas largest bird, is almost extinct. No longer does this majestic bird grace the skies. A few remain in captivity, and naturalists are seeking to breed them in order to reintroduce to the wild. Something else has disappeared, and few seem to notice the passing. I refer to old-fashioned saints. They were common in a former generation. Many people thought them a bit peculiar, but they were spiritual pillars of the Lords work in their day. They were the God-intoxicated souls, to use the language of that generation. They walked with God and had such rapport with Him they needed nothing exterior for support. With the passing of these saints, other things have disappeared. An obvious thing, at least for the person who reads Christian biographies, is the absence of spiritual power in the church today. Saints of a bygone generation evidenced power in their daily lives and carried an aura of Gods presence wherever they went. They unleashed spiritual energy through prayer. Gods ear seemed bent in their direction. Contemporary church leaders have exchanged this power for slick strategy, modern technology and polished promotion. Todays emphasis is on hatching programs instead of breeding saints. Few activities depend heavily on the Holy Spirit these days. We have become so sophisticated that He is not necessary in our ministries. Instead, the emphasis is on education, strategy and marketing. The saints of a former generation relied on the Holy Spirit. This was their most distinctive characteristic. A sure sign of the neglect of the Holy Spirit among todays Christians is in contemporary evangelism methods. When any one method is slavishly duplicated, you can be certain God is not in it. The Spirit-led saint of the past initiated things; he never imitated. In one of his books, E.M. Bounds makes this comment: The Church is looking for better methods; God is looking for better men: men whom the Holy Ghost can use men of prayer, men mighty in prayer. If we learn anything from the public ministry of our Lord, it is that He was not a slave to strategy but relied on the ministry of the Holy Spirit in everything. Our Lord never relied solely on methods to do the work of the ministry. Our crowds are bigger and the offerings larger. However, the spiritual in uence of our generation is almost nothing compared with the in uence saints of the past had in their generation. It is about time that a few concerned Christians became interested in making saints to reintroduce them into the church. Faith BRIEFS Church ghts to eliminate malaria by 2015 On making saints, not technology DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Special to Extra PDL fundraiser WESTVILLE Ponce de Leon High Schools FCCLA Chapter will have a fundraiser from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 5 at the Pine Log Community Volunteer Fire and Rescue. There will be a yard sale and hamburger and hot dog plates for $5. The FCCLA is raising money for travel expenses to their national convention in San Antonio. Kindergarten registration WASHINGTON COUNTY Kate M. Smith and Vernon elementary schools will begin kindergarten registration April 8 for the 2014-2015 school year. Stop by the school ofce to pick up a registration packet. All requirements for registration will be attached to the packet. All forms and proper documentation must complete for child to be registered. Children must be 5 years of age on or before Sept. 1, 2014. Friday Fish Fries during Lent BONIFAY The Knights of Columbus, Child of Prague Council 10513, will have a sh fry from 4-7 p.m. Friday during Lent (through April 11) at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church. Plates are $10 and include all the sh you can eat, as well as sides, sweet tea and a dessert. Carryouts are available. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A. Retherford Reunion The annual Retherford Reunion will be April 5 at Curry Boat Landing and Baseball Field. All family and friends are invited to celebrate with fun, fellowship and a covered dish lunch. For more information, call Sharon Johnson at 956-2772. Orange and Blue Golf Classic VERNON Vernon Middle School will have the Orange and Blue Golf Classic to benet girls and boys athletic programs on Saturday, April 5, at the Sunny Hills Golf Club. A fee of $65 per person or $260 per four-man/woman team includes green fees, cart rental, breakfast, lunch and prizes. Tournament format is a Captains Choice Scramble. There will be an 8 a.m., shotgun start. Individual registrations are welcome; you will be assigned to a team. Hole sponsorships are $50 per sign. For questions and registration, call Laurie Simmons at 258-4332 or VMS at 535-2808. Breakfast Cooked to Order DEFUNIAK SPRINGS Breakfast Cooked to Order will be available April 5 and May 3 in the Parish Hall at St. Agathas Episcopal Church, 150 Circle Drive. Menu selections include pancakes, eggs, grits or home fries, sausage or bacon, sausage gravy on toast or biscuit, juice, milk and coffee. Breakfast will be offered from 7-11 a.m., along with service with a smile. Healthy choice selections will also be offered. Cost for the breakfast is $5.50 for adults and $3.50 for children under 10. Take-outs are available. Proceeds benet the church, which has a Hospitality and Food Ministry as a part of its outreach efforts. Byrd benet WESTVILLE Westville City Hall will serve sh, smoked pork and chicken plates with two sides starting at 10 a.m. April 5. Plates will cost $6, and all proceeds will go to Zan Braxton Byrd to help pay medical expenses. HCHS luncheon CHIPLEY Holmes County High School will have a luncheon at 11 a.m. April 8 a Baileys Surf and Turf. For more information, call 547-3526. Jazz Concert and Spaghetti Dinner BONIFAY The Blue Pride Band Jazz Concert and Spaghetti Dinner will be at 6 p.m. April 11 at Holmes County High School. Tickets are $6 in advance, $8 at the door. For more information, call Connie at 209-0531. Groce reunion LYNN HAVEN The Groce Family Reunion will be April 12 at Leslie Porter Park in Lynn Haven. All friends and relatives have a special invitation to attend. Lunch will be served at noon. For more information, call Drama at 773-3456. Benet dinner BONIFAY Campground Cemetery will have a benet dinner at 11 a.m. April 12. There will be sh and chicken plates with all the trimmings for $6. There will also be a cake auction. All candidates are welcome. Ribs for Relay CHIPLEY Community South Credit Union will have Rib Sale on April 17. One rack will cost $20. Ribs can be picked up from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Community South Credit Union in Chipley. Delivery is available. To order, email rebecca.harris@ communitysouth.net. BMS selling Vidalia onions BONIFAY Bonifay Middle School is selling Vidalia onions through April 11. Each 10-pound bag costs $10 and must be paid for on or before April 11. A portion of the money raised will go directly to each grade level for the purchasing of new equipment/supplies and to help with some of the costs of student eld trips. To make a purchase, see a Bonifay Middle School student or call JaLisa Brannon at 547-2678. CHS students to perform Grease CHIPLEY Chipley High School music theater students will perform their spring musical, Grease, at 7 p.m. April 10-April 12. For more information, call 638-6100. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Crossword SOLUTION Aurelio Torres, 76, passed from this life Friday, March 28, 2014, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. He was born in Bronx, N.Y., on April 29, 1937, to Thomas and DeJesus (Clementine) Torres. Mr. Aurelio worked as a carpenter and had lived in Chipley since 1996, coming from Bronx. He was also a member of the Carpenters Union Local 157. Mr. Torres is survived by his wife, Patricia Torres of New York City; one son, Michael Anthony Torres and wife, Andrea, of Andover, N.J.; two brothers, Thomas and Raymond; three sisters, Delia, Lucy and Gladys; one niece, Evelyn Modesti and husband, Angelo; and three grandchildren Janine, Amanda and Michael. A memorial service will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 3, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home Chapel. The family will receive friends from 6 to 7:30 p.m., before the service. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Aurelio Torres World War II and Korean War veteran and Geneva County, Ala., cattle rancher Wilson Ashley Stembridge of Samson, Ala., passed away Monday, March 17, 2014, at his residence. He was 88. Mr. Stembridge was born in Wicksburg, Ala., on Sept. 2, 1925, to the late James George and Johnnie Wilson Stembridge. In high school, he was an all-star basketball player in Chipley. In his early 20s, Mr. Stembridge owned and operated a produce trucking company, running seven trucks in Miami. He was later drafted in the United States Military, proudly serving in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army. He was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He was a successful cattle rancher in Geneva County, Ala., for more than 30 years. He was also preceded in death by his siblings, Charles Lindy Stembridge, Travis Wayne Stembridge, George Hilton Stembridge and Willadene Stembridge Odom, who was his only sister, and his twin brothers, Comer Stembridge and Homer Stembridge. He is survived by two brothers, Melvin Rudolph Stembridge and John Madison Stembridge, both of Miami. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 20, 2014, at Pilgrim Home Baptist Church in Wicksburg with the Rev. Buddy Hood and the Rev. Hilton Wilson ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery under the direction of Bottoms Garden Chapel Funeral Home of Hartford, Ala. Wilson A. Stembridge WILSON A. STEMBRIDGE Mother Katherine Andrews, 75, of Ebro passed away at her home on March 20. She was a seamstress and of the Holiness faith. Survivors include her husband, Bishop John Andrews, Jr. of Ebro; seven children, Assoc. Pastor Bernice Andrews, Carrie Andrews, John Elvis Andrews (Beatrice), all of Ebro, Curtis Andrews, Pastor Earnest Andrews (Victoria), Minister Sarah Harris (James) and Sherry Brown (Donnie), all of Vernon; two sisters, Johnell Andrews of Ebro and Bertha Tinsley of Marianna; and a large number of grandchildren, great-grands, other relatives and friends. Funeral services were at 11 a.m., CST Saturday, March 29, at the True Holiness Church of Ebro, with Pastor Louis D. Brown, Min. Wade Brown, Min. Eli Andrews and Jr. Bishop John O. Brown, ofciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Gardens of Vernon. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to services at 11 a.m., with the Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Mother K. Andrews MOTHER K. ANDREWS Donnie Russell, age 74, of Chipley passed away Monday night, March 24, 2014, at Bay Medical Center surrounded by his loving family. Donnie was born March 26, 1939, in Washington County to the late Leon and Verna (Palmer) Russell. He was a lifelong resident of the Washington County area and a member of the First Baptist Church of Chipley. Donnie is survived by his wife, Jimmie Lou Russell of Chipley; four daughters, Lynn Paine and husband, Thomas, of Baton Rouge, La., Connie Redmon and husband, Jeff, of Chipley, Carla Elliot and husband, Rob, of Chattahoochee and Leah Pettis and husband, Randy, of Chipley; eight grandchildren, Robert and Lee Paine, Jessica (Redmon) Zimmer and Mindy Redmon, Rhyne and Jae Elliot, Cortney (Pettis) Corbin and Meghan Pettis; ve great-grandchildren; one half-brother, J.D. Cockrell of Mississippi; and a very special cousin, Evelyn Tiller of Chipley. Family received friends for visitation from 1 to 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Chipley, with memorial services beginning at 2 p.m., with the Rev. Mike Orr ofciating. Flowers will be accepted, but the family requests donations be made to the First Baptist Church of Chipley Building Fund, P.O. Box 643, Chipley, FL 32428. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Donnie Russell Madie Rabion Smith, 79, of Sneads, died Sunday, March 23, 2014, at Jackson Hospital. Mrs. Smith was a native and lifelong resident of Jackson County, where she was a homemaker and member of Emmanuel Holiness Church. She enjoyed her children and grandchildren and loved them deeply. Mrs. Smith was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas (Toby) Smith. She is survived by two daughters, Juanita Pippin and husband, David, of Sneads and Rita Rolph and husband, Murray, of Ekalaka, Mt.; one brother, Jerry Rabion and wife, Alice; one sister, Ross Parmer and husband, James, all of Sneads; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014, at Emmanuel Holiness Church with the Rev. Eva Howell ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, 2014, at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com. Madie Rabion Smith Larry J. Pitts, 67, of Bonifay died Monday, March 17, 2014. Funeral services were held at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Sellers Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Larry J. Pitts GUIDELINES AND DEADLINES Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser reserve the right to edit for Associated Press style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 9:30 a.m. Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. There is a $25 charge for obituaries. Obituaries may be emailed to funerals@chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 E. Virginia Ave. in Bonifay. Obituaries Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra March 24-31 Allen Bates, Alford, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia Leonard Bates, Russellville, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent George Beachum Jr., Chipley, driving while license suspended or revoked, recommit on possession of weapon by convicted felon, resist ofcer, driving while license suspended or revoked Stephen Bray, Chipley, battery Jonathon Brett, Chipley, Columbia County warrant for violation of county probation on criminal mischief James Byers, Little Rock, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent William Cambley III, Fountain, violation of state probation on possession of meth David Carr, Chipley, fraud, illegal use of credit card Brittany Cooks, Montgomery, Ala., operate motor vehicle without license, Escambia County warrant for theft Randy Holley, Panama City, battery, assault Jordan Holman, Russellville, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent Frances Jeffries, Homeless, Okaloosa County warrant for operate motor vehicle without a license, reckless driving Fredricus Johnson, Opelika, carrying a concealed weapon, resist ofcer, possession of marijuana with intent, possession of barbiturate, possession of paraphernalia Bert Jones, Jr., Chipley, assault with a weapon, possession of weapon by convicted felon Vernita Joslin, Chipley, battery on disabled person Alethea Lester, Dothan, Ala., violation of state probation on felony driving under the inuence Marion Marshall, Chipley, resist ofcer without violence, violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property Melissa McCormick, Fountain, Bay County warrant for failure to appear on theft Joseph Peter, Fountain, Bay County warrant for dealing in stolen property Dean Rollison, Fort Walton Beach, violation of county probation on possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of county probation on driving under the inuence Jamie Sattereld, Chipley, battery Frances Sheridan, Chipley battery Anthony Smith, Jr., Chipley, sell of marijuana two counts Daniel Tindol, Chipley, battery April Zimmerman, Southport, introduction of contraband, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of county probation on petit theft Florida bill could raise speed limit to 75 mph in state TALLAHASSEE (AP) Sev enty-nine. In the rain. With no headlights on. With those words, Flor ida Highway Patrol Troop er John Schultz sped onto Interstate 10 and ipped on his red, white and blue ashing lights and pulled over a black Nissan Max ima. He told the driver she was getting a ticket for ex ceeding the 70 mph speed limit. She said, I had the cruise control set at 79. Yeah, its working, Schul tz said as he wrote the ticket. She said I just as sumed I could go 10 over. So if we change the limit to 75, shed be going 85. Highway safety advo cates say if the Florida Legislature passes a bill that would allow the state to raise the speed limit to 75 mph there could be more crashes, injuries and deaths. The bills support ers say people already are driving that fast and the speed limit should reect reality and would actu ally be safer. If you articially force lower speed limits on roads that can accommo date faster speed limits, what youre going to have is a greater disparity be tween the fastest drivers and the slowest drivers and thats actually a much more unsafe environment than having everybody go ing faster together, Sen. Jeff Clemens said. The bill (SB 392) Clem ens, D-Lake Worth, spon sored along with Republi can Sen. Jeff Brandes of St. Petersburg sailed through committees with little op position and is ready to be considered by the full Senate. A House bill (HB 761) sponsored by Repub lican Rep. Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres also has received little opposition and has one more com mittee stop before being ready for a House vote. The measures would allow the Department of Transportation to raise the speed limit on inter state and limited access highways from 70 to 75 mph, from 65 to 70 mph on rural, four-lane divided highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. It does not automatically raise the speed limits. If you look back to when we rescinded the national speed limit (of 55 mph) in the mid-90s until now, its been 20 years of history and I think in only one year have fatalities actually increased. So the predictions of doom and gloom that we had in the mid-90s just didnt come true, Clemens said. But a National High way Trafc Safety Admin istration report showed trafc fatalities on rural interstates increased by 10 percent in 1996, the year after the national speed limit was lifted and states were allowed to set their own standards. And the fear of high way safety advocates is that another increase in Florida will result in more deaths because people will drive faster and be that much more at risk of losing control. The higher speeds also create more violent collisions, they say. Its clear that inju ries and fatalities go up whenever someone raises the speed limit, John Ul czycki, a vice president of the National Safety Council, said in a press release opposing the bills. Raising speed limits will increase the likelihood of a crash, and the govern ment would in effect be telling people its safe to drive faster. Schultz, who patrols an area near Tallahassee, estimates most drivers on Interstate 10 are driving between 75 and 80 mph, and he thinks that will in crease with a higher limit. Driving in the rain, he clocked a string of traf c going in the opposite direction. Seventy-eight, he said after the rst radar reading. Theres 79 on the truck. That motorcycle right there is 82. Where Im going with this is its raining out, and no one re duces their speed. And a higher speed lim it will make the situation more dangerous, he said. He also pointed out that the speed limit now is es sentially 75 mph because the state only allows for warnings and not nes for the rst ve miles per hour above the speed limit. Theyre going to take it to the next extreme and go up even higher, Schul tz said. We want to keep people safe. FDOT announces intermittent lane closures for I-10 ChipleyMotorists on Interstate 10 will encounter intermittent closures of the outside travel lanes through Saturday, April 6. The closures will occur at various locations along I10 between mile marker 175, just east of State Road 12, in Gadsden County and mile marker 45, County Road 189/Holt, in Okaloosa County. During the closures construction crews will be performing geotechnical investigations for the installation of overhead message signs. Drivers should be alert for the presence of construction workers, vehicles and equipment. All planned construction activities are weather dependent and might be rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. For more information, follow the Florida Department of Transportation District Three on Twitter @myfdot_nw. Friends of the Library to meet April 3 The Friends of the Library will meet at noon tomorrow, April 3, in the East conference room of the Agricultural Center. The guest speaker will be Cathy Everitt, a speech therapist from Panama City. She wanted to be an author from the time her third grade teacher complimented her writing, and nally her dream came true last September. She believes her most important mission in life is to encourage others and pray for them, and hopes this rst book Heart Whisperer will be an inspiration to many people. What chicken soup did for your soul, Heart Whisperer will do for your heart and more. Everyone is encouraged to attend and bring a friend. Special to Extra WEWAHITCHKA Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative will hold its 66th annual members meeting Satur day, April 5, at its headquar ter ofce, located at 722 W. Highway 22 in Wewahi tchka. The purpose of the meeting is to communicate information about the Co operative, including the nancial reports and overall business status, as well as serve as a social event for the entire membership. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. with each regis tered member receiving a $10 credit on his or her electric bill. Members will be given the opportunity to win prizes throughout the day, including the grand prizes, which are 10 $100 credits to an electric bill. There will also be plenty of refreshments provided by GCEC and booths offering valuable information for the duration of the meeting. Beginning at 9:15 a.m., entertainment will be pro vided by The Gann Family. There will also be a bounce house and a petting zoo for the children. The business portion of the annual meet ing will begin at 11 a.m. I invite all of our mem bers to come and take part in our annual meeting, not only to be present for the business portion of the meeting, but also to enjoy food, prizes and entertain ment, Gulf Coast Electric CEO/General Manager Mi chael White said. Gulf Coast Electric Co operative is part of the Touchstone Energy na tional alliance of local, con sumer-owned electric co operatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. GCEC serves about 20,500 meters in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewa hitchka, Ebro, White City, Lynn Haven, Fountain and Southport. Washington County ARRESTS Community BRIEFS Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative to hold annual members meeting Saturday CHIPLEY FFA P AR TICIP ATES IN AG ON THE HILL SP ECIAL TO EX T R A Chipley FFA Parliamentary Procedure team had an amazing opportunity to participate in Ag on the Hill in Tallahassee. This is a day when FFA chapters from across the state converge on the capitol to meet with legislators and discuss matters important to agriculture education and the FFA program. The students got to hear from Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam, meet with representatives of the House and explore House chambers. Pictured above, students had the opportunity to speak with Rep. Marti Coley, Rep. Tom Goodson, Rep. Jimmy Patronis and Grace Potter Lovett (Former Chipley FFA member) from Commissioner Putnams ofce. Holmes County Chamber of Commerce helped welcome the newest business to the area, The Medical Gallery, with a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony held in front of the business on March 25. The Medical Gallery specializes in medical equipment and supplies, such as diabetic shoes, circulation and support stockings and socks, electric beds and chairs, scooters, shower chairs, CPAP supplies, vitamins and much more. The Medical Gallery is at 217 N. Waukesha St. in Bonifay. For more information, call 547-1767.C ECILIA SP EA R S | Extra MEDICAL GALLERY OPENS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 4-3433 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 2012-CA-000364 HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1, PLAINTIFF, vs. Carolyn Patricia Farrington and Daniel Lee Farrington, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012-CA-000364 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1, is Plaintiff and Carolyn Patricia Farrington and Daniel Lee Farrington are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, FL, 32428, at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, ( 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on the 7 day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 1, Township 1 North, Range 14 West, and Run East 1111.29 Feet; thence North 1253.75 feet to the point of beginning; thence North 225.0 feet; Thence S 75 Degrees 55 Minutes 18 Seconds E 208.0 feet; thence run South 300.00 feet more or less to the waters edge of Chain Lake; thence run Northwesterly along said waters edge 205.58 feet more or less to a point South of the point of beginning; thence run North 75 feet more or less to the point of beginning; being Lot 26 on unrecorded plat of Chain Lake Subdivision; being in Washington County, Florida. Street Address: 3302 Lodge Dr, Chipley, FL 32428 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Chipley, Washington County, Florida, this 18 day of March, 2014. Harrold Bazzel Clerk of said Circuit Court By:K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone, & Pincus, P.L. 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3427 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-417 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. UTE LANG, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: Ute Lang, Werderstr. 4, 8615G Augseutg, Germany, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 6, Block 776, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 11, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 120 through 128, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiff’s attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-958771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. LINDA HAYES COOK Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3437 IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-CA-126 TIMOTHY B. GIETZ and MICHAEL J. SIMON, Plaintiffs, vs. MARY KATHLEEN COSTLEY and BENJAMIN C. DiZOGLIO, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Amdned Order Granting Supplementary Relief for Plaintiffs dated March 21, 2014, and entered in Civil Action No. 12-CA-126 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiffs, TIMOTHY B. GIETZ and MICHAEL J. SIMON, and the Defendants, MARY KATHLEEN COSTLEY and BENJAMIN C. DiZOGLIO, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time) on the 23rd day of April, 2014, at the Washington County Government Offices Building, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida, the following described real property located in Bay County, Florida, as set forth in said Order Granting Supplementary Relief for Plaintiffs: 0.307 acres, more or less, at 8139 Random Road, being tax parcel number 32595-000-000; and .045 acres, more or less, at 98 Gulf Blvd., being tax parcel number 33864-010-000; Bay County, Florida The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21 day of March, 2014. HON. HAROLD BAZZEL Clerk of the Court Washington County, Florida By: K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk April 2 and April 9, 2014 4-3439 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 67-2012-CA-000333 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. VIRGINIA CARLISLE, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered May 8, 2013 in Civil Case No. 67-2012-CA-000333 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, wherein 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC is Plaintiff and VIRGINIA CARLISLE A/K/A VIRGINIA JOHNSON FORAN A/K/A VIRGINIA FORAN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOUGLAS CARLISLE A/K/A RICHARD DOUGLAS CARLISLE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION #1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION #2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue Building 100, Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 23 day of April, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: A parcel of land situate, lying and being in the W of SE of Section 5, Township 4 North, Range 13 West, described as follows: Commence on the West boundary of said Section 5, at a point 1323.12 feet North of the Southwest corner thereof, and run thence South 8908`30” East, 2895.54 feet, to a point; thence run North 7949`30” East, 432.81 feet, to a point; thence run South 026`30” East, 50.73 feet, to Point of Beginning; thence run S 016`21” E 180.01 feet, thence run N 7946`24” E 69.00 feet, thence run N 0528`42” E 61.25 feet, thence run N 0409`37” W 37.51 feet, thence run N 0240`41” W 81.68 feet, thence run S 7949`30” W 69.16 feet to Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19 day of March, 2014. Deputy Clerk CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel April 2 and April 9, 2014 4-3438 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 12000260CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. ANTONIO B. DAVIS, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 29, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 12000260CA, in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ANTONIO B. DAVIS, et al., are the Defendants, Washington County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Washington County, Florida, described as: COMMENENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S0012`02”E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 2, 820.00 FEET: THENCE S8939`11”E, 240 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S8939`11”E 200 FEET; THENCE S0012`02E, 100 FEET; THENCE N8939`11”W, 200 FEET TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF A 40 FOOT ROAD; THENCE N0012`02”W ALONG SAID EAST R/W LINE 100.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2007 DESTINY INDUSTRIES DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME MODEL: D483-216-96T, SERIAL NUMBER: DISH02637GA A&B. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 201 West Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL 32428 at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of April, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: January 28, 2014. By: K. McDaniel Washington County Clerk of Court CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3446 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No:67-2012-CA-000148-C AXX-XX LPP MORTGAGE LTD. Plaintiff, Division: Civil Division vs. CHERRY E. HALL A/K/A CHERRY HALL, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in WASHINGTON County, Florida, described as: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 180.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 100.00 FEET; THENCE WEST 180.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS EXISTING ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. Property address: 823 8th Street Chipley, FL 32428 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, HIGHWAY 90, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, beginning at 11:00 o’clock, A.M. Central Standard Time on May 7, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 19 day of March, 2014. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. April 2 and 9, 2014 4-3430 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-2009-CA-000164 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, VS. ANTHONYH. STOCKSTILL; ERICA L. STOCKSTILL; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on March 13, 2014 in Civil Case No. 67-2009-CA-000164, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ANTHONYH. STOCKSTILL; ERICA L. STOCKSTILL; DUNFORD HAVEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. ; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Linda Hayes Cook will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the FRONTof the Courthouse at 11:00 a.m. on the 7 day of May, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT5, BLOCK B, DUNFORD’S HAVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 184, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 14 day of March, 2014. Harold Bazzel Washington County, Florida, Clerk of Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Telephone: (561) 392-6391 Facsimile: (561) 392-6965 IMPORTANT IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COSTTO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTCOURT ADMINISTRATION, P.O. BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447; PHONE:850-718-0026; EMAIL: ADAREQUEST@JUD14.FLC OURTS.ORG, ATLEAST7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELYUPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS: IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED CALL711. March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3449 Whereabouts Notice for James Lassiter, father of the minor child, Alana Elizabeth Sheppard Anyone knowing the whereabouts of James Lassiter, father of Alana Elizabeth Sheppard, female born on August 5, 2010, in the LSU Earl K. Long Medical Center, City of Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish Louisiana or having any knowledge of his location is asked to contact Attorney Bernard J. Francis, Sr., at 1411 McKinley Street, Donaldsonville, Louisiana 70346 or call 225-473-8535. April 2,5, 2014 4-3444 HOUSING/REHAB SPECIALIST POSITION QUALIFICATIONS Washington County Grants Department is seeking a qualified individual who has his own transportation, vehicle insurance, camera, and has a personal computer and basic computer skills. Must be a Licensed Certified Florida Contractor, with at least 5 years experience in Roofing, Building, Electrical and Plumbing fields. Have previous experience in performing inspections, collecting data, preparing bid sheet’s, prepare a sketch of each dwelling with all measurements, including width, length, doors, windows, etc. Hold a General Liability Insurance Policy, provide proof of Workers Comp Insurance or W.C. Exemption. BID QUOTES FOR SELF-EMPLOYED CONTRACTOR: Washington County Grants Department is accepting bids to perform an initial inspection, prepare work write-up bid packets, conduct contractor walk-thru, perform baseline bids, conduct bid openings with County staff, conduct 1 interim inspection and 1 final inspection for a set fee of _____________ per each qualified housing unit. If additional trips to housing units are required, an additional fee of ______________ per trip. ACCEPTING BIDS STARTING 9 AM FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014 TO 4 PM TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014. BIDS WILL BE OPENED 9 AM WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014. April 2, 2014. 4-3429 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-413 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PARADISE GARDEN CHURCH, INC., a Dissolved Florida corporation, et al, Defendants. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: The Estate and Unknown Heirs of Jimmie Helton, Deceased, a/k/a Reverend James Helton, 2913 W. Xanthus Street, Tampa, Florida 34614 Mary Helton, 2913 W. Xanthus Street, Tampa, Florida 34614, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 2, Block 554, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 9, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 103 through 107, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiff’s attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. LINDA HAYES COOK Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3428 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-422 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. KWOK HUNG LIU, Defendant. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: Kwok Hung Liu, Flat #10, 7 FL. NGAR ON, House Kamon Court MA On, Shan NT, Hong Kong Kwok Hung Liu, Flat G 4/F, Block 3, Melody Garden Tuen NT, Hong Kong, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 7, Block 438, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 7, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 77 through 86, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiff’s attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-958771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. Harold Bazzel Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3435 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the Tallahassee Office until 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, April 30, 2014, for Proposal ID T3490. A Certification of Qualification is not required for this project on SR 10 (US 90) in Washington County. Work consists of constructing concrete sidewalk, concrete removal, excavation, embankment, concrete driveway construction and curb and gutter construction. Budget Estimate $99,380.00. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www.dot.state.fl.us/c c-admin/Lettings/Letting_Proje ct_Info.shtm or by calling (850) 414-4000. April 2, 9, 2014. 4-3434 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AN FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 13000148CA ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC Plaintiff(s), vs. PATRICK LGIBSON, et. al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in an for WASHINGTON County, Florida, where in ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC. is the Plaintiff and PATRICK GIBSON A/K/APATRICK EUGEN GIBSON; MICHELLE ANNE GIBSON AND JANETR LEWELLEN are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, FL32428, at 11:00 a.m. on the 4 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth is said Order of Final Judgment, to wit:Commencing at the southeast corner of s 1/2 of se 1/4 of ne 1/4, section 14, township 2 north, range 15 west, for point of beginning, thence north 417.50 feet, thence west 417.50 feet, thence south 417.50 feet, thence east 417.50 feet, containing 4 acres, more or less. Less and except the following: a portion of the proposed 60 feet wide right of way for holmes valley road lying in the s.e. 1/4 of the n.e. 1/4 of section 14, township 2 north, range 15 west, washington county, florida. Being more particularly described as follows: commence at the presumed s.e. Corner of the s.e. 1/4 of the n.e. 1/4 of said section 14. Thence north 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds east for a distance of 15.57 feet along the east line of said section 14 to a point on a curve representing the southern boundary line of the proposed 60 feet wide right of way for holmes valley road. Said point being the point of beginning. Thence along the southern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road through a curve to the right having a radius of 430.00 feet and an arc length of 116.04 feet, being subtended by a chord of south 84 degrees 37 minutes 10 seconds west for a distance of 115.69 feet. Thence north 87 degrees 38 minutes 58 seconds west for a distance of 302.34 feet along the southern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road. Thence north 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds east for a distance of 60.03 feet to the northern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road. Thence south 87 degrees 38 minutes 58 seconds east for a distance of 304.35 feet along the northern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road to a curve to the left, thence along the north-

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedHVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS For Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 Washington County Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road € Cottondale5019480 Security/Protective Services The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for(2) INMATE SUPERVISOR positions in the Parks and Recreation Department .The primary function of an Inmate Supervisor position will be to supervise the Department of Corrections and /or Washington County Jail inmates in the performance of maintenance activities such as cutting brush, limbs, trees and other vegetation grown at roadsides; utilizing power equipment such as “boom” mowers tractors, and chain saws; cleaning trash and debris, and/or moves trees or other obstructive objects from County right of way and hauling debris for deposit at specified locations. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent; Must possess a Florida Class E drivers license; Must pass a background check through the Department of Corrections; Must attend and satisfactorily complete Department of Corrections class for inmate supervisors; Carpentry skills preferred. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on April 2, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34284214 ern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road through a curve to the left having a radius of 370.00 feet and an arc length of 114.38 feet, being subtended by a chord of north 83 degrees 29 minutes 41 seconds east for a distance of 113.92 feet to the east line of said section 14. Thence south 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds west for a distance of 62.01 feet along the east line of said section 14 to the point of beginning. Including a 1984 cima mobile home serial #gbics09782 and commoly known as: 3274 HOLMES VALLEYRD, VERNON, FL32462. IF YOU ARE APESON CLAIING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAININ AFTER THE DALE, YOU MUSTFILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS ATER THE SALE. IF OU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, OU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. SATED at WASHINGTON County, Florida, this 27 day of February, 2014 Harold Bazzel WASHINGTON County, Florida BY: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk April 2 and April 9, 2014 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Annual Spring Farm and Construction Auction April 26, 2014 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC —FL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON www.masonauction.com Website ONLINE ONLY AUCTION -Buses, Tractor & Equipment & More for Sale! Ends April 3rd @ 7PM. Gulf Bay Auctions: 251-600-9595 or Visit GulfBayAuctions. com, AU3301 Big Yard Sale Friday and Saturday, April 4 and 5 behind the Bonifay Armory, Rain or Shine. Clothes, shoes, knickknacks, toys, dishes, lamps, Etc. To much to list! Something for everyone! Come Check it out! Yall come! LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big flea market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, April 4th and 5th, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Ala. Near Courthouse. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, April 5 7a.m.-until. tools, furniture, kitchen appliances, books, jewelry, glasswares clothes all sizes, and lots of Misc. items. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale April 4 and 5, 9 AM until. Two families, Tools, Household, Misc... Lots of Stuff. 1583 Hudson Rd. Westville/Prosperity. Yard Sale, April 4 and 5. Three families, 10 AM until. Lots of Misc Items! 1629 Hudson Road Westville/Prosperity Yard Sale. April 5th. FL. Springs RV Park in Bonifay. 8am-until. Sites available for $20.00. 850-774-3719. For Sale. Misc Farm Equipment. 638-7586. Store, office or art gallery $250 MO with full bath sink and stove. Downtown Bonifay visible for business. 850-547-5244. TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classied ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? C ontact us today and start turning the stuff you dont want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairGroundskeeperThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for Grounds Keeper. Minimum Qualifications must have completed W.C.I. inmate supervisor training course and have a valid W.C.I. card, or be eligible for card; general knowledge of lawn care; basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment; ability to project a courteous and polite attitude to public, supervisors and subordinates; and able to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34284933 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Sign On Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34284633 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipart ners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/tanker endorsement, Prefer 2 yrs experience, Mileage & Drop Pay, Vacation, Health, Dental & 401k. For information call 800-569-6816 or go to our website www.ottery transportation.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 REGIONAL DRIVERS! Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608. Students Check Out The New Pay Increase! Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Nice 2/BR Apartment, family oriented complex, Rental assistance, and HUD in Vernon. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $375-480/mo Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 2BR cabin 1BA, no pets. $400 month, 1st, and last month. Deposit required. 229-400-5645. 8 miles South Bonifay 3BR/2BA House for rent/sale in Chipley. CHA, large lot, fruit trees. No HUD. 850-481-5352, 850-326-3319. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 House For Rent Vernon, 3BR/1BA, Large fenced backyard, Quite, $600/MO, $600/DEP, Reference required. 850-625-6997 Small 2BR/1BA out in country near Gap Lake. $400/month plus security. Sorry No Pets 850-258-3815 or 850-773-1352 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1.5BAin Wausau $400.00/mth + security deposit. No pets. 850-113-1352 or 850-258-3815. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. For Sale 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. Price reduced. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. Handyman Special Frame House in Westville on 1.25 acres. 850-333-0157 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext91 Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to finish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76 Up to 9 acres from $14,900. Mountain cabin only $89,900. Access to lake and trout stream. Views of the Atlanta skyline. 45 minutes from Northern Atlanta. Priced below developer cost! Call 888-260-0905 Ext. 17. 98 Coachman Leprechaun REV 30’, Great Condition-low mileage 40,000 miles, sleeps 8, V10 Triton gas engine, Exterior, private queen size bedroom, full size separate shower, central heat/air, central stereo we/ disc player, 2 /, double stainless steel sinks, 3 burner stove/oven, large refrigerator/freezer, canopy, beautiful oak cabinets throughout, original decor like new. Priced well below book value at $17,500 OBOE. 1 year warranty on engine and drive train. Also offering 2007 Harley-Davidson XL50 sportster, 50th Anniversey, 200cc engine. Commercial size gill/fryer, 60X42, dull back 1800 BTU burners, with stainless steel fry vat, and commercial size fry basket. Call 850-557-9712 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. AL#1481;GAL#2034;FL-AB#1488;NC#6397;TNAL#3945€10%BuyersP remium 255Properties in 100 Offerings Detailed Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com Bid at the Auction or Online Bank Owned & Other Secured Parties AuctionAlabama€Florida€Georgia N.Carolina€TennesseeWednesday, April 23 & Thursday,April24 11:00am Both Days SaleSite: HolidayInn-AtlantaPerimeter/Dunwoody 4386ChambleeDunwoodyRd,Atlanta,GAPROPERTIESINCLUDE: Residential€Commercial Industrial€Agricultural 1123835

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WASHINGTON COUNTY NE W S HOLMES C OUNTY TIMESADVERTISER W EDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014

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2 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 5018891 Challenges facing farmers today and tomorrow Though farming was once big business in the United States, by 2012 less than 1 percent of Americans were profes sional farmers. Many challenges face todays farmers, many of which are largely unknown to the general public. Many people have an outdated view of a farm as a small, family-owned and operated parcel of land where livestock is raised in open pens and crops are hand-harvested when ripe. The reality is that modern-day farms have had to overhaul op erations to meet demand and remain competitively priced while adapting to the ever-changing ways all parts of life. Each of these factors present obstacles for todays farmers. Technology Rural farming com munities are expected to make an effort to integrate modern technol ogy into an industry that has been around for centuries. But such a transition in rural areas, where communications systems may not be as up-to-date as those in urban areas, is not always so easy. According to the Manitoba Rural Adaptation Coun cil, a shift from a resource-based to an informationbased economy, compounded by the rapid introduc tion and expansion of new technology in the workplace, has altered farm operation and the skills in demand. Older workers who have been schooled in one way of agriculture may on labor supply and the vitality of farming as a career. Younger adults who are knowledgeable in technology may no longer seek out agricul tural careers. Decrease in farming as an occupation The United States En vironmental Protection Agency says that only about 960,000 Americans claim farming as their principal occupation. As the average age of farm ers continues to rise, as the Bureau of Labor Sta tistics notes that roughly 40 percent of the farmers in this country are 55 years old or older. This has led to concerns about the long-term health of family farms throughout the United States. Environmental concerns Many farmers have come under scrutiny for how farming impacts the environment. A growing emphasis on sustainabil ity and conservation has led many people to pro test certain farming prac tices. Protesters claim that certain practices, such as raising livestock, can pollute water, while the use of fertilizers and chemical pesticides is bad for the environ ment. Many farmers, however, have altered their methods to be more environmentally friendly and selfsustainable in the process. Climate change is another environ mental issue farm ers must deal with. Strong storms and severe droughts have made farming even more chal lenging. Financial fall-out The ongoing re cession of the last half-decade has also affected farm ers. In November of 2012, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated that the unemployment rate within the agricul and hunting industries was at 13.6 percent, far higher than the national unemployment rate. As a result, many farm fami lies have found them selves stuck between a rock and a hard place, as rising costs for equipment and technology are being coupled with decreasing ployment. Further complicating matters is competition from corporations and international food pro ducers who have made farmers rely on loans and lines of credit to survive, but thanks to changes in saw banks become less willing to extend lines of credit, some farmers are facing bankruptcy. T ree Removal & Pruning T ractor W ork

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 3 The Best of Both WorldsLocal Agents, Local Oces, Local Service, Best Value.The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life.Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Membership doesnt cost, it pays! 1361 JACKSON A VE., C HIPLEY 6381756washington@bic.com1108 N WAUKESHA S T., BONIFAY 5474227holmes@bic.com G rai n f e d be e f w h e n a v ai l ab l e ( No h or mo n e s or st e r o i ds ) W e O f f e rUS D A In s pe c t e d W e o f f e r c u s t o m bu t c he r i ng : W e a l s o d o w i l d g a m e pr o c e s si n g P ho ne : ( 8 5 0 ) 5 4 8 1 2 0 1 2 9 6 5 R M W a r d R d ( 1 8 1 C ) W e s t v i l l e F l 3 24 6 4 WestvilleMeats The impacts of last years heavy rainfall and the still-varying tem peratures has caused a planting delay for many of Holmes and Washing ton county farmers and gardening enthusiasts, but local extension staff say theyre hopeful the impact on agribusinesses wont last long. Its too early to tell much about the ultimate effects of the rainfall and cold, said Matthre Or wat, Washington County Horticulture Extension Agent. We did lose some cit rus trees, and sometimes, freeze damage wont show up in citrus for two years. You might see some die out later in the year because they were stressed out by weather last year. Orwat says one advantage to the incli mate cold experienced by the area is a potential decrease in certain pests and a higher blueberry yield. The cold weather possibly helped push back some of the pests that were invading us last year, he said. Kudzu bugs are a big problem here, especially for any kind of bean plant, but we should see less of them this season. The blueberry harvest should be pretty good, Despite delays, agriculture outlook is strong too, because those plants like that cold zap; it makes them produce heavier. Orwat says the wet weather poses more problems, however, such as root rot. Dogwoods are being harmed right now; I see a lot of dogwood blight out there, and everything is late. For example, azaleas are usually in full bloom by now, but theyre pretty late as a result of the weather. Still, Orwat says the frost danger has passed and encourages planting, even though its late. Now is a good time to plant your summer vegetables, such as squash and watermelon, he said. Shep Eubanks, Hol mes County Extension Director and Agriculture Agent, agrees. Were running be hind on getting ready to put crops in the ground because of the rain, said Eubanks. But now is a good time to plant those summer vegetables, even though theyre behind. Eubanks said heavy rainfall has kept many local farmers out of the time, and cold weather snaps have affected even greehouse crops, such as transplants. Meanwhile, Eubanks says many here are still making decision on how to move forward as the implementing of shape. Farmers are trying to going do; what ratio of crops to plant with the new farm bill and what options to take. Farmers must choose between one subsidy program based on dimin ishing sales, or another based on declining crop prices. The farmers pro gram selection, which wont be effective until next year, is due this month. Eubanks also reports local cattlemen have a good forecast, We just need some warmer weather, but the cattle market is strong, he said. Agriculture at a glance Agriculture is not only an important industry for Wash ington and Holmes counties, but for the state of Florida as a whole. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and wear on a daily basis, but too few people appreciate this contribution to our economy and our way of life. matic increase from the average of 25 people per farmer which was the case in the 1960s. account for 1,587 jobs, $59 million dollars in revenue and contributes 12.6 percent to the gross regional product. vide 1,950 jobs, $58 million in revenue and contributes 17.3 percent to the gross regional product. By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com

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4 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 As one of the largest agriculture banks in the nation R egions has the strength to suppor t you in nancing and growing your operation Thats good to know But whats better is that we ser ve your needs locally Whether you need help with lending and equipment leasing, treasur y management, production credit or crop insurance, our team has the experience and focus that you want. Interested in what we can do for you? L ets talk. W e think youll see its time to make the switch to R egions. Rhonda Sapp|V ice P resident|Community Bank er 2889 Green St.|Marianna, FL 32446 Phone: 850.849.3476|rhonda.sapp@regions.comS w i t ch t o R e g i o n s f o r b a nk i n g s o l u t i o n s t h a t w i l l hel p y ou g r o w .Lending|Insurance|Treasury Managementv i s i t a R e g i o n s b r a n c h o r r e g i o n s c o m / a g b a n k i n g 2 0 1 3 R e g i o n s A l l l o a n s s u b j e c t t o c r e d i t a p p r o v a l L e a s i n g s o l u t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h R e g i o n s E q u i p m e n t F i n a n c e C o r p o r a t i o n a n d D e L a g e L a n d e n F i n a n c i a l S e r v i c e s I n c I n s u r a n c e p r o d u c t s a r e s o l d t h r o u g h R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e I n c a n d R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s I n c a f l i a t e s o f R e g i o n s B a n k a n d a r e n o t F D I C i n s u r e d n o t d e p o s i t s n o t g u a r a n t e e d b y R e g i o n s B a n k o r i t s a f l i a t e s n o t i n s u r e d b y a n y g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y a n d m a y g o d o w n i n v a l u e T h e p u r c h a s e o f i n s u r a n c e t h r o u g h R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e I n c o r R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s I n c i s c o m p l e t e l y o p t i o n a l W h e t h e r o r n o t y o u p u r c h a s e i n s u r a n c e t h r o u g h R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e I n c o r R e g i o n s I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s I n c w i l l n o t a f f e c t a n y a p p l i c a t i o n f o r c r e d i t o r t h e t e r m s o f a n y e x i s t i n g c r e d i t a g r e e m e n t Rose Demonstration Garden helps identify prime varieties for local area By MATTHEW OR WAT Horticulture Agent, Washington County, UF IFAS Extension Not many residents know about the Rose Demonstration Gar den at the Washington County Agricul tural Center. Heres a chance to learn a bit more about it. In this garden, there are eight rose bushes that survive well under a no spray program, other than dormant sulfur sprays once a year. These rose cultivars are resistant to the most com mon ailment of roses in the south, Black spot. They also require minimal ir rigation and fertilizer inputs. Blackspot spores are spread from the canes or leaves of the previous seasons growth by rain or overhead irrigation. To minimize inoculum (black spot spores) re move all leaves from the previous season and any dead leaves at the base of the plant. After the annual pruning in mid to late February, it is a good idea to spray roses with sulfur or copper based fungicidal soap. This helps kill spores that have been lying dormant throughout the winter. Be careful not to spray these products when temperatures rise above 80 F. Doing so could burn the plants, although these products will dam age tender young growth as well at temperatures below 80 F. Several other cultural methods that will prevent spread of this disease among the rose garden include avoiding over head irrigation, planting in well ventilated areas and proper plant spacing. These techniques attempt to make the garden envi ronment inhospitable for blackspot proliferation. While dormant sprays and cultural methods often allow rose garden ers to get ahead of the disease, the best defense for the home garden is to plant resistant cultivars. There are several old and new resistant cultivars on the market. Some new resistant cultivars of note include Home Run and Knockout. Also, sev eral older cultivars have demonstrated excellent resistance, such as Mrs. B.R. Cant and Spice. Matthew Orwat has been working with several older rose cultivars at the UF / IFAS Washington County Extension dem onstration garden that have shown resistance during the last three years. While this dem onstration garden is not roses that have dem onstrated some merit include Belindas Dream, Monsieur Tillier, Mme. Antoine Mari, Ro sette Del izy and Souvenier de la Malmaison. Current plans for expansion of the Wash ington County Dem onstration Garden and the Master Gardener program include the addition of a vegetable demonstration garden and camellia collection, to be located at the front entrance of the Washing ton County Agricultural Center.

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 5 ALL TYPES OF INSURANCENeed Farm or Ranch Insurance?Proudly representing Great American Insurance Group.CALL TOD A Y FOR A QUOTE!(850) 638-18051396 Jackson Avenue Chipley, FL 32428 Serving You Is Our Most Important Product T w o home impr o v ements mor e attic insulation and ener gyecient windo ws can mak e a big di er ence in y our ener gy usage I nsulation with an R-38 value (about 12-15 inches) and ener gyecient windo ws impr o v e y our home s ener gy per f or mance and ther mal comf or t. L et us per f or m a home ener gy audit and nd wa ys t o use ener gy wisely T ogether w e po w er y our lif e W e use ener gy wisely F or mor e ener gy ecienc y tips visit w w w .w estor ida.c oop Increase storage possibilities What homeowner has not lamented that they have many more belongings than they have storage space? In some homes, particularly in older homes, closet space and other areas to store items may be lacking. But savvy hom eowners can manent and temporary so lutions to their home storage problems. One of the easiest ways to create storage space is to simply remove some belongings from the residence. Go through closets around the house and pick through the attic and/or garage to see if there are any items that can be dis carded or donated. The next step is to maximize the space of your exist ing closets. Many closets are equipped with just a shelf and a clothing rack, greatly limiting the storage potential. Invest ing in a closet organiza tion system is one way to transform a poorly utilized space. These sys tems can be purchased, often inexpensively, from a home improve ment center. Compiled of modular racks and shelv ing, the positioning can be customized depending on the size of the closet. Oftentimes, the addition of shelving or another rack for hanging clothes can solve some stor age issues. These closet systems also are ideal for renters because they can be installed with minimal damage and be removed when a lease expires. Homeowners may have to think vertically to solve storage solu tions. Wall space may be abundant in a home where closets are not. Therefore, shelving and cabinets can be places to keep items neatly off the can be installed next to a washing machine to keep laundry supplies organized. In childrens rooms, build bookcases the height of the room so children can store frequently used reading material and toys on the lower levels, and adults can put collectibles and mementos near the top. Hang hooks to hold hats and robes. Whenever possible, look to store items on the walls where they will keep clutter off Storage can even be created in the bathroom, where the space over the toilet can be used to hang a cabinet to store hand towels and other toiletries if the space under the sink has already been claimed. Many apart ment dwellers recognize the advantage of having items that serve double-duty in their living spaces. For example, a convertible sofa can be used for sit ting and then turn into a bed for overnight guests. Ottomans that have a storage compartment can house anything from throw blankets to maga house the television but also have a pull-out shelf that can hold a laptop computer. In the kitchen, move food items out of cabin etry and into a pantry you create elsewhere in the house, such as a laundry room or garage. This frees up more room for pots and pans. Cabi nets that have pull-out shelving help maxi mize tight recesses of cabinets and keep things organized and in sight. For those with limited cabinets, pots and pans can be hung from a pot rack suspended in the kitchen.

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6 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 Deer-proong a garden Creating a beautiful and bountiful garden is a popular pastime for people all across the country. It is important to keep in mind that aesthetically appealing plants may be appetizing to area wildlife, includ ing deer. Those who do not want their gardens to turn into all-you-can-eat buffets for deer, rabbits and other wild animals can take a more proac tive approach to garden ing. Deer are opportunists who will no doubt see your garden as a salad bar ripe with all of their favorite foods. As hous ing developments con tinue to encroach on the natural habitats of deer and other animals, these animals are becoming more visible. Deer may not be able to forage for food effectively in their smaller, natural sur roundings, or they may become accustomed to the easy pickings they yards. Either way, you may encounter a deer in or around your area. Keeping deer at bay involves some work and maintenance on the part of a homeowner. There are safe and humane methods to repelling deer, or at least block ing access to the plants worth protecting. Here are the main ways to deer-proof a garden. Fence It Fences are one way to deter deer from enter ing a yard and dining on your garden. Keep in mind that deer can jump fences that are quite tall, but they have to be especially motivated to jump an eight-foot-tall fence. Still, they tend to be weary about scaling a fence when they cannot see what is on the other side. Therefore, if you are fencing out deer, choose a fence that cam and completely encloses the area to be protected. If you do not want the fence to be solid, con sider putting stakes or thorny plants within the garden so that the deer will hesitate to jump into the garden. Scare Them Deer are naturally skittish around people, but over time they can become quite compla cent around human beings. Once a deer decides that something will not present a threat, the deer can adapt to its presence. Motion-activated devices may not work, nor the presence of pets. Predator urine is typi cally an effective way at keeping deer at bay. Bottled coyote urine can be quite effective, although human urine may work as well. Reapplying the prod uct weekly around the plants is a good idea. Repel the Deer There are many organic or chemicallybased products on the market that deer may or smell. Hot pepper, sulfur and eggs or even the use of soapy water have been successful in certain in stances. The use of blood meal or even human hair around the garden may repel the deer and keep them on a different foraging path. However, remember that any deer that is very hungry may ignore unpleasant tastes or smells for a quick bite. Change Plants If other food sources are available, there are some species of plants and trees that deer will avoid. Filling your garden with these plants can help you maintain a beautiful, al beit untasty, environment for deer. When planting annuals, select among: In terms of perennials, plant these items once, and deer could stay away: Plant these herbs along more protection:

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 7 C & C Construction of Northwest Florida LLCServicing Northwest Florida and Lower Alabama We do new construction, replacement, and repairs for Call today for your free quote. 850-547-1001FL: CCC1327331 AL: S-44779 What to expect with a tree removal Trees serve many purposes for a land scape, providing shade and habitats for birds and other animals and serving as natural blinds between two homes. Trees are often beautiful elements of a natural landscape, add ing aesthetic appeal to a property or even an entire community. But there are times when a tree must be removed, an action that, in many instances, requires the services of a profes sional tree service. A tree with roots invading the foundation of a home or infringing on a patio or walkway can become a safety hazard. Other trees may cast shade where a pool is planned or cause disagreements between neighbors when the tree straddles a property line. These are instances when tree removal will be necessary, and a repu table service can advise as to the best methods for ridding the property of the troublesome tree. Homeowners will need to do a bit of planning and research to remove trees safely and secure ly. It is best to contact a variety of different tree removal services and compare their offerings and prices. The cost of a tree removal will vary depending on various factors, includ ing the height of the tree, its width, the number of branches it has, its location on a property and the proximity of that location to potential hazards like power lines. Tree removal may range from a few hundred dol lars to several thousand. When a tree is be ing removed, most of the branches will be removed to make the tree more manageable. Trees are rarely chopped at the base and allowed to fall. Sections of the tree will be cut, roped off and slowly lowered. A climber will scale the tree or use a cherry picker machine to reach the top of the tree to facilitate the process. The pieces of the tree will be loaded into a wood-chipper for grinding before they are hauled away. Larger, heavier portions of the stumps may need to be moved later on with ma chinery. Hauling trees off the prop erty may cost extra, so it is important that homeown ers read their contract thoroughly before sign ing on the dotted line. Additional costs may be factored into the bill. These can include stump-and-root grinding. Trees will be cut down to the stump. To prevent eyesores or tripping haz ards, some homeowners opt to have the stumps ground down into sawdust. This will not re move all of the roots but will take care of most of the above-ground portion of the remaining stump. It is usually up to the homeowner to discard the sawdust or use it as a mulching material. Expect the ground around the former tree to be soft, and there may be a depression depend ing on how much stump grinding took place. Some people prefer to wait a season for the ground to recover before planting something new. It may take a while for grass to sprout where a tree was once located, and there may be bare spots when grass starts to grow in. Tree removal can be an expensive venture but is necessary for differ ent reasons. Be sure that tree-removal services are fully insured before signing a contract. HENR Y ARNOLD FORD CO., INCMIKE ARNOLDSales

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8 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 Farm Families of the Year Holmes County Jeremy Rolling Family Rolling Farms Westville Peanuts, cotton, oats, watermelons, and hay Conservation Farm Family Sherrouse Family Forest Stewardship Award Paramore Family Washington County Dennis Gainer Family Gainer Blueberry Farm Chipley Blueberries Tree Farmer of the Year Ty Peel Cattleman of the Year George Owens Conservationist of the Year Dr. Ron Harrell and Dr. Les Nichols Distinguished Service to Agriculture Diann Webb

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 AUCTION45NORTH FLORIDA &COASTAL ALABAMAPROPERTIESWednesday, April 16, 11:00 A.M. CDTSale Site: Holiday Inn Pensacola,7813 N. Davis Highway, Pensacola, FL 32514Thursday, April 17, 11:00 A.M. CDTSale Site: The Palms Conference Center, 9201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach, FL 32407Properties Include:Waterfront Luxury Homes & Condos Prime Waterfront Lots & Land Of“ceBuildings,RecreationalFacility HighTraf“cCommercialLots&LandBroker Compensation Available10% Buyers Premium FL-AB #1488 AL #1481 Bid at the Auction or OnlineDetailed Information800.479.1763 johndixon.com Final & Complete Liquidation of Bank Holding Properties 5019251 5019238 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-13902 5019246 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedHVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS For Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 Washington County Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road € Cottondale5019480 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 5019248 Security/Protective Services The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for(2) INMATE SUPERVISOR positions in the Parks and Recreation Department .The primary function of an Inmate Supervisor position will be to supervise the Department of Corrections and /or Washington County Jail inmates in the performance of maintenance activities such as cutting brush, limbs, trees and other vegetation grown at roadsides; utilizing power equipment such as “boom” mowers tractors, and chain saws; cleaning trash and debris, and/or moves trees or other obstructive objects from County right of way and hauling debris for deposit at specified locations. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent; Must possess a Florida Class E drivers license; Must pass a background check through the Department of Corrections; Must attend and satisfactorily complete Department of Corrections class for inmate supervisors; Carpentry skills preferred. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on April 2, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34284214 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Annual Spring Farm and Construction Auction April 26, 2014 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC —FL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON www.masonauction.com Website ONLINE ONLY AUCTION -Buses, Tractor & Equipment & More for Sale! Ends April 3rd @ 7PM. Gulf Bay Auctions: 251-600-9595 or Visit GulfBayAuctions. com, AU3301 Big Yard Sale Friday and Saturday, April 4 and 5 behind the Bonifay Armory, Rain or Shine. Clothes, shoes, knickknacks, toys, dishes, lamps, Etc. To much to list! Something for everyone! Come Check it out! Yall come! LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big flea market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, April 4th and 5th, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Ala. Near Courthouse. Yard Sale April 4 and 5, 9 AM until. Two families, Tools, Household, Misc... Lots of Stuff. 1583 Hudson Rd. Westville/Prosperity. Yard Sale, April 4 and 5. Three families, 10 AM until. Lots of Misc Items! 1629 Hudson Road Westville/Prosperity Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, April 5 7a.m.-until. tools, furniture, kitchen appliances, books, jewelry, glasswares clothes all sizes, and lots of Misc. items. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale. April 5th. FL. Springs RV Park in Bonifay. 8am-until. Sites available for $20.00. 850-774-3719. For Sale. Misc Farm Equipment. 638-7586. Store, office or art gallery $250 MO with full bath sink and stove. Downtown Bonifay visible for business. 850-547-5244. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairGroundskeeperThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for Grounds Keeper. Minimum Qualifications must have completed W.C.I. inmate supervisor training course and have a valid W.C.I. card, or be eligible for card; general knowledge of lawn care; basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment; ability to project a courteous and polite attitude to public, supervisors and subordinates; and able to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34284933 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Sign On Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34284633 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipart ners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/tanker endorsement, Prefer 2 yrs experience, Mileage & Drop Pay, Vacation, Health, Dental & 401k. For information call 800-569-6816 or go to our website www.ottery transportation.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 REGIONAL DRIVERS! Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608. Students Check Out The New Pay Increase! Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Nice 2/BR Apartment, family oriented complex, Rental assistance, and HUD in Vernon. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $375-480/mo Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 2BR cabin 1BA, no pets. $400 month, 1st, and last month. Deposit required. 229-400-5645. 8 miles South Bonifay 3BR/2BA House for rent/sale in Chipley. CHA, large lot, fruit trees. No HUD. 850-481-5352, 850-326-3319. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 House For Rent Vernon, 3BR/1BA, Large fenced backyard, Quite, $600/MO, $600/DEP, Reference required. 850-625-6997 Small 2BR/1BA out in country near Gap Lake. $400/month plus security. Sorry No Pets 850-258-3815 or 850-773-1352 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1.5BAin Wausau $400.00/mth + security deposit. No pets. 850-113-1352 or 850-258-3815. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Handyman Special Frame House in Westville on 1.25 acres. 850-333-0157 For Sale 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. Price reduced. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext91 Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to finish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76 Up to 9 acres from $14,900. Mountain cabin only $89,900. Access to lake and trout stream. Views of the Atlanta skyline. 45 minutes from Northern Atlanta. Priced below developer cost! Call 888-260-0905 Ext. 17. 98 Coachman Leprechaun REV 30’, Great Condition-low mileage 40,000 miles, sleeps 8, V10 Triton gas engine, Exterior, private queen size bedroom, full size separate shower, central heat/air, central stereo we/ disc player, 2 /, double stainless steel sinks, 3 burner stove/oven, large refrigerator/freezer, canopy, beautiful oak cabinets throughout, original decor like new. Priced well below book value at $17,500 OBOE. 1 year warranty on engine and drive train. Also offering 2007 Harley-Davidson XL50 sportster, 50th Anniversey, 200cc engine. Commercial size gill/fryer, 60X42, dull back 1800 BTU burners, with stainless steel fry vat, and commercial size fry basket. Call 850-557-9712 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Volume 51 Number 47 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes Counties FREE TAKE ONE5019543

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, April 2, 2014



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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Website: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM IN BRIEF Connectwithus24/7Getbreakingnews,videos,expandedstories,photo galleries,opinionsandmore...@WCN_HCT chipleypaper.com www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, APRIL 2 2014Volume 90, Number 101Orange and Blue Golf ClassicVERNON Vernon Middle School will hold the Orange and Blue Golf Classic to bene t girls and boys athletic programs this Saturday, April 5, at the Sunny Hills Golf Club. There is a donation of $65 per person or $260 per four-man/ woman team. The fee includes green fees, cart rental, breakfast, lunch and prizes. Tournament format is a Captains Choice Scramble. There will be at 8 a.m., shotgun start. Individual registrations are welcomed; you will be assigned to a team. Hole Sponsorships are $50 per sign. For questions and registration, please contact Laurie Simmons at 2584332 or VMS at 535-2808.Motorcycle Club to host sh fryCHIPLEY The Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club will host a fish fry fundraiser dinner at 11 a.m. in Shivers Park Saturday, April 12. Proceeds will benefit the clubs charitable activities. Plates are $6.50 and include a fish sandwich, chips and drink.INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds .........................B7-8 NEWSWashington County CHIPLEY What do you get when you combine kids and creativity? Come and nd out at ArtKidDoo this Saturday, April 5, at Shivers Park in Chipley. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, along with businesses and organizations in the community are sponsoring ArtKidDoo A Celebration of Children and the Arts. Families can bring their children to Shivers Park and spend time experiencing the creative process in a variety of mediums including drawing and painting, collage, music, dance, storytelling and drama, said Lynne Eldridge, executive director of the ELCNWF. Research shows that it is important for all children, beginning when they are very young, to have the opportunity to express themselves both through play and the arts. ArtKidDoo timeA celebration of arts to take place at Shivers ParkCHIPLEY The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce says there has been a spike in reports of a fraud scheme in which scammers pose as law enforcement of cers in an attempt to get money. The caller may say the victim needs to pay a fee to remove a warrant, pay for an expired drivers license or pay to bail someone out. However, the caller always identi es himself as a law enforcement of cer and requests wiring of money or credit card information. Law enforcement agencies never contact citizens by phone, email, or regular mail and instructs them to pay fees or nes by wiring money, using prepaid money cards, using a money telegram or using similar methods Sheriff Haddock said. This scam I take very personally because theyre taking advantage of the trust between law enforcement and the citizens. Sheriff Haddock offers the following tips to avoid becoming a victim: Never give your personal identi cation information over the phone or computer. You may make an WCSO: Watch out for scamSee SCAM A2 See ARTS A2CHIPLEY The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public information meeting concerning proposed improvements on two segments of State Road (S.R.) 77 from north of County Road (C.R.) 279 to south of Ben Road in Washington County. The meeting will be held Tuesday, April 8 from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. CDT at the Shepherds Gate Church, Fellowship Hall, 1915 Ferguson Road, Chipley. The intent of these two projects is to widen eight miles of S.R. 77 extending from C.R. 279 to Ben Road from two to four lanes, improve drainage, and construct various safety upgrades along the corridor. Both projects are funded for right-of-way acquisition; however, construction is not currently funded within the departments Five Year Work Program. Maps, drawings, and other information will be on display. There will be no formal presentation. Representatives from FDOT will be available to explain proposed improvements and answer questions. Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status.FDOT to hold hearing on road proposals Special to the NewsJackson County based attorney Shalene Grover has announced her candidacy for the Circuit Court judge seat for the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, which includes Jackson, Calhoun, Washington, Holmes, Gulf and Bay counties. The three other candidates reside in Bay County. Grover, a 15-year law veteran, is experienced in criminal law, family law, real estate law, labor law and other types of civil litigation. She has served as County Attorney for the Liberty County Board of County Commissioners for the past 13 years. I am a country girl from a small town near the Smoky Mountains, said Grover. For several generations, my paternal grandfathers family farmed and labored in a sawmill. Farming and raising livestock was the way of life of my maternal grandfathers family. Both of my parents are descendants of hardworking people who expected everyone to do their part. If I am elected, I will apply the values my parents taught me as a child. I will work hard and be fair. I will also strive to make the system ef cient and user friendly. My decisions will be based on the law and on common sense. Grover and her husband have two sons, ages ten and ve and live in Calhoun County. Grover announces candidacy for Circuit Court judge & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Farm Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY TIMESADVERTISER WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 HOME & FARM, INSIDEChildren of all ages can express themselves through various art disciplines at the ArtKidDoo event this Saturday.Photos special the News SHALENE GROVER

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.com SowellandKubota 40YearsofTrustedPerformance WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) ArtKidDoo will give them that opportunity. The Washington County Arts Council will be announcing the 2014 ArtKidDoo Art Contest winners at 11 a.m. ArtKidDoo begins at 10 a.m. and will wrap up around 1 p.m. Many different types of creative activities will be available for children of all ages. Many activities are scheduled through the day and food will be available for purchase. In addition, the ELCNWF will be issuing Certicates of Eligibility (COE) for the Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) program to eligible families. Everyone is encouraged to come and spend time discovering the arts with their children, said Eldridge. For more information about ArtKidDoo, or the activities scheduled for the event, call 638-6343 ext.2425. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida is a non-prot organization that exists to grow healthy children, parents and foster the relationship between them. It administers Child Care Resource and Referral, School Readiness, and VoluntaryPrekindergarten programs in a sevencounty service area. For more information, visit http://www.elcnwf. org. exception if you initiated the call or contact and you are certain that you are talking to a trustworthy employee of a trustworthy business Never wire money to anyone claiming to be a police ofcer to get out of an arrest. Never wire money to get more money back (sweepstakes or lottery), or help someone get out of a bad situation such as an arrest, or a broken down vehicle. Especially if the person requesting the money is not known to you personally, or the person called and claimed to be a distant relative, etc. If you would like to report a fraud, scam or identity theft, contact the fraud line at 6388477. If you would like a Fraud Specialist to speak to your organization or community group, please call 638-6111. ARTS from page A1 SCAM from page A1 WCSO IssSSUEsS FIRsST TTEEN DRIVERsS CHALLENGE HEREPhotos by Carol Kent | The NewsMembers of Washington Countys inaugural Teen Driving Challenge were: Paisley Bruner, Ashlee Cates, Patrick Dohrenwend, Isaac Guettler, Daniel Lane, Jay Padgett, Taylor Perryman, Jonathan Rice, Logan Smith and Brooklynn Stephens. Instructors were Deputy Daryl White, Investigator Justin Jenkins and School Resource Ofcer Brian Paridon. Above, White and Jenkins gave students an evening of classroom instruction before taking them on the driving course. Right, Paridon walks alongside Padgett as he attempts to maneuver around cones on a scooter while wearing Fatal Vision goggles, which simulate varying degrees of intoxication.

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LocalWashington County News | A3Wednesday, April 2, 2014 > SixMonthIntroductoryAPRaslowas1.99%, andaslowas4.25%thereafter* > Noclosingcostsonlinesupto$250,000** > Possibletaxbenets^ > Fast,easyapprovalupto100%LTV > Interest-onlypaymentoptionavailableApplyforaHomeEquityLineofCreditjustlikealoan,andonceyoure approvedyoucanaccessthiscashuptoyourfullavailablecreditlimit wheneveryouneedit.Stopbytodayorapply*onlineat www.ccbg.com.*SubjecttoCreditApproval.Theintroductoryratewillbeineffectfortherstsix(6)months afteryouraccountisopened.Uponexpirationoftheintroductoryrate,allbalanceswillaccrueinterestatthevariable standardAnnualPercentageRate,whichcanrangefromPrime+1%toPrime+4.5%usingtheJPMorganChasePrime (JPMCP)rate(currentlyanAPRof3.25%)nottoexceed18%atanytime.Informationaccurateasof03/10/2014.Subject tochangewithoutnotice.Afterthepromotionalperiod,thevariablestandardAPRwillbebasedonyourlineamount, combinedloantovalueratio,andcreditrating.Thisofferisavailabletonewequitylineclients,andtoexistingequity lineclientswithanincreaseintheirexistingcreditlineofatleast$15,000,andissubjecttochangewithoutnotice. Hazardinsurancerequiredandoodinsurance,ifapplicable.Exclusionsandlimitationsapply.**Noclosingcostswill beassessedonlinesupto$250,000,subjecttothefollowingconditions:(1)BorrowermusthaveaCapitalCityBank depositaccount;and(2)ifapplicable,Borrowerwillpayforthesecondandanysubsequentvaluationsoftheproperty. Borrowerwillparticipateinclosingcostsforlinesexceeding$250,000.Minimumlineof$15,000required.Ifyouclose yourCreditLineandwereleaseourlienwithinthree(3)yearsfromthedateofclosing,youwilloweaprepayment penaltyof2%ofthelineamount,nottoexceed$1,500.Owner-occupiedpropertyonlyandCCBmustbeinavalid rstorsecondlienposition.RefertoHELOCapplicationoraskyourbankerforcompletedetails.Thisoffermaybe withdrawnatanytime.^Consultyourtaxadvisoraboutpossibletaxbenets. 1242JacksonAve.|638.0510 www.ccbg.com/sale atBeltone!SpringtimeHearingAidCLEAN & CHECK NALEC Anymakeormodel! GetaFREEhearingscreening atthesametime Trythe wirelessstreaming everyonestalkingaboutKEEPYOURHEARINGAIDS PERFORMINGATTHEIRBEST.PLUS CALLTODAY Timesarelimited free CleaningAlreadyownhearingaids? FreeClean&Check (Anymakeormodel) Benetsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.BeltoneHearing CareCentersareindependentlyownedandoperated.Participationmayvary.2014Beltone Cleaning Al r eady own hearing aids? F (Any make or model) free ScreeningFreehearingscreening &videoearscan OfferGoodApril2-25,2014 OfferGoodApril2-25,2014OffergoodApril2-25,2014 b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 BillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience AllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)260-0436Wednesdays&FridaysCHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)260-0436Monday-Friday WASHINGTON (AP) As a roller-coaster sign-up season winds down, President Barack Obamas health care law has indeed managed to change the country. Americans are unlikely to go back to a time when people with medical problems could be denied coverage. But Obamas overhaul needs major work of its own if it is to go down in history as a legacy achievement like Medicare or Social Security. Major elements of the Affordable Care Act face an uncertain future: As a 6-month-long signup season comes to an end Monday the administrations next big challenge is to make 2015 open enrollment more manageable for consumers unaccustomed to dealing with insurance jargon. There also is concern premiums will rise next year. The new insurance markets created by the law are anything but customer friendly. After the HealthCare.gov website nally got xed, more than 6 million people have managed to sign up, allowing the exchanges to stay aoat economically. But many consumers have bought policies with restricted access to toptier hospitals and the latest medications. The website is seeing heavy trafc this weekend, and consumers may encounter a wait or lastminute glitches. Almost half the states still are opposed to or undecided about the laws expansion of Medicaid, the governments health insurance program for the poor. As a result, millions of low-income people who otherwise would have been covered remain uninsured. This years pitch has been about the carrots in the law: subsidies and guaranteed coverage. But the sticks are just over the horizon: collecting penalties from individuals who remain uninsured and enforcing requirements that mediumto large-sized employers provide affordable coverage. Many basic facts about the ultimate effects of the health insurance program remain unclear. Its not known how many of those who have gotten coverage were previously uninsured the ultimate test of the law. Independent measurements by Gallup do show fewer uninsured Americans, but such progress hasnt won hearts and minds. The public remains deeply divided, with opponents of the law outnumbering supporters. At a recent insurance industry conference, a top administration ofcial acknowledged the huge job still ahead. The No. 1 thing that probably weve all learned from 2014 is that this is hard work, said Gary Cohen, outgoing director of the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, the agency created to carry out the health care law. Its not a one-year project; its a multiyear project ... were asking a lot, frankly, of consumers, he added. This is new for them. Among those consumers is Dan Luke of St. Paul, Minn., the owner of a small video production company who had been uninsured since he was turned down for coverage last year because of a pre-existing condition. The condition? Luke was born with one eye due to a birth defect, and he uses a glass eye. For 63 years Ive had one eye, said Luke. They had to dig deep to nd that. Hes happy with the coverage he and his wife have bought; theyre saving $300 a month on premiums compared with the last time they had insurance. But he said he had to endure weeks of website run-arounds. There is a lot of bureaucracy involved, said Luke. Its sort of like taxes, lled with loopholes and pitfalls. They should make it easier for people to get insurance and pay for insurance, rather than have to prove so many things and jump through so many hoops.Those comments echo sentiments broadly reected in national opinion polls. Most Americans want lawmakers to x the problems with the health care law, rather than scrapping it. A new AP-Gfk poll nds that only 13 percent expect the law will be completely repealed. Seventy-two percent say it will be implemented with changes, whether major or minor.Republicans have again made repeal of Obamacare their ofcial battle cry this election season. But even if the GOP wins control of the Senate and Congress were to repeal the law next year, the president would veto it. Opponents would then need a difcult two-thirds majority in both chambers to override Obamas veto. Its going to depend on the next couple of elections whether we stick with the current ACA models, said Brookings Institution health policy expert Mark McClellan, who oversaw the rollout of the last major federal coverage expansion, the Medicare prescription drug benet. We are still a long way from a stable market and from completing implementation, he said. But were not going back to people with pre-existing conditions having no good options. The administration will have to get to work quickly on a plan for next year. It is still struggling with such basics as providing consumers with clear information about the process and their options. Until now, those signing up have skewed toward an older crowd. That could lead to higher premiums next year, making the program a more difcult sell for younger people. Some Democratic lawmakers who voted for the law are frustrated. Instead of just circling the wagons against all the political arrows that are shot against this plan, we need a little more accountability, and we need to ensure the next enrollment period is not handled as poorly as the last one, said Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas. DeAnn Friedholm, health reform team leader for Consumers Union, said her group still supports Obamas overhaul, but with concerns. The jury is out in terms of its long-term success, she said. We still think its better than the old way, which left a lot of people out because they were sick. Health law legacy eludes Obama as changes sink in We are still a long way from a stable market and from completing implementation. (But) were not going back to people with pre-existing conditions having no good options.Mark McClellan Brookings Institution health policy expert TALLAHASSEE (AP) The federal government has dropped the ball for the last 30 or 40 years in its marijuana policy and Florida is ready to pick it up, Sen. Jeff Clemens said Monday, expressing condence that this Novembers ballot initiative to legalize medicinal pot will pass. This 50 and 60s era reefer madness attitude caused us to turn away from a plant as form of medicine and move to these synthetic drugs that are often a lot worse for our bodies, said Clemens, D-Lake Worth. He was part of a bipartisan trio of lawmakers speaking at the Doubletree Hotel ballroom on the future of medical marijuana in the state. In a panel discussion Monday, Clemens joined Democratic Rep. Katie Edwards and Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz to pledge a push for passage of so-called Charlottes Web, a non-intoxicating oil extracted from the marijuana plant. Gaetz in particular has been pushing a bill (HB 843) that would approve the oil extract, in tear-jerker hearings that have been marked by testimony from parents of children with intractable epilepsy and have heard of successful treatment via the oil in Colorado, where it is legal. Several bills concerning marijuana are moving in and around the statehouse, from a bill that would legalize all use of pot to the very specic measure Gaetz and Edwards are carrying. The panel agreed that passage of a limited-use measure, aimed at treating children aficted by epilepsy, would help because it could establish a framework for what all agreed was the inevitable passage of a ballot proposal to alter the state constitution and legalize marijuana for medicinal use. A research operation of cannabis investors, ArcView, puts the legal cannabis market value at $1.53 million in 2013, and projects a 68 percent increase for this year. I suspect we are on a cautious walk forward, and this is the rst step, Gaetz said.State lawmakers extol virtues of medical pot

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OPINION www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, April 2, 2014 APage 4Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.comOh, if life were as simple as those crazy commercials. Some truly ridiculous commercials bombard our television airwaves. And why am I only now having this revelation? Perhaps youve known for years that if commercials were generally worth watching, advertisers wouldnt have to pay to be on the air, and we wouldnt avoid them by hitting the remote to switch between The Voice and re-runs of The Fresh Prince. One ad in particular leaves me arguing with the television as if I were watching a Jerry Springer episode, believing my words will magically permeate the screen and help those idiotic guests see the error of their ways. Youve seen it. An attractive woman glides into her living room, twirls around in a pretty dress and asks her husband, What do you think? Apparently overcome by the beauty of his bride, the man reacts as any man would: he suggests a vacation (right...), explaining the credit card reward points theyve earned will pay for everything. We cant, says the wife. The husband, overwhelmed by his wifes loveliness, insists. Oh yes, we can. Then he explains all the wonderful things they can do as a couple with all those points. The scene is complete with visuals of the couple laughing and having all sorts of fun on several outings. The husband is about to be surprised. No, we cant, she says again, with a sly smile, deftly smoothing the sides of her dress. Then, it dawns on him. His well-dressed wife has just spent all their reward points on that one dress. Thats when this little tale strays well away from any reality Ive ever known. The husband just smiles, and the commercial is over. Over, that is except for the speed-talking part of gratuitous disclaimers from the announcer. Who are they kidding? Where is the raging discussion that should logically ensue? I can accept the Snuggle bear caressing his furry little cheek with my linens and complimenting me on how soft they are. Its not even too far-fetched that a bumblebee who sounds suspiciously like Antonio Banderas is concerned about my allergy medication. But a husband having no problem that his wife spent what appears to be their hard-earned points on a dress apparently worth at least the cost of two plane tickets, a boat rental and a night of dancing? Oh, please! Does that company really expect us to buy that in this economy? Wouldnt it make more sense to say, Honey, I paid our health insurance premium with our points or Gas is four dollars a gallon again, so I used our points to ll up both cars? My outrage ebbs when I realize this couple obviously doesnt live in a small Northwest Florida community (well, that and the fact they arent real.) Most ladies here would be more considerate of their spouse, and while we might like nice dresses, most of us prefer our clothes machine washable and commercials more believable. After all, Snuggles the cuddly bear wont magically appear to compliment your laundry if the tags say dry clean only. CAROL KENTEditorReal lifes not all snuggles like on TV HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@ chipleypaper.com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Quit chasing what you want mostThe sun was thinking about making its daily appearance, its slight presence hesitantly announcing itself in the east like a puppy with a paw on a couch trying to decide whether to take the next step: you know its coming but its taking its time. A friend and I were getting out of our vehicle about 45 miles north of Panama City, it was about 5:40 a.m. and I wondered if the slightly cooler than normal temperatures and stifferthan-ideal wind would interfere with the rst attempt to lure a gobbler this year. We need this wind to die down, he said. We had everything else we needed decoys, shotguns, camo, netting, mosquito spray, water everything, really, except a doped-up gobbler that would ensure success. We just need Mother Nature to throw us a bone. And she did, for as we walked to the spot I had mentally pondered for a week, the wind disappeared like a child at bath time. We settled in and waited for that most glorious of sounds for a true turkey hunter: the rst gobble of the morning which would, for me, also be the rst gobble of the season. You dont get a gobble every time out, but gobbles rarely translate into taking home a bird. This isnt deer hunting, sitting in a stand on a food plot ush with their favorite foods. You cant hunt turkeys over bait, number one, and hearing a turkey gobble is a long cry from seeing a deer. On my hunting lease we dont allow turkeys to be taken by ri e, it is shotgun only and that means a range of about 45-50 yards. It also means you have to call the gobbler in. And early in the seasons, the hens are pretty cooperative and tend to head toward that rst gobble and offer to work in concert with the gobbler to produce the next generation of turkeys, if you get my drift. So there sits the gobbler in his tree some people dont realize turkeys roost in trees overnight gobbling away and his harem gathers and its a buyers market. We, meanwhile, are a couple of hundred yards away letting out some yelps and hen noises trying to get that gobbler to come on over to us and our decoys. It brought to mind Spring Break and the analogy that our task that morning would be about like standing 100 yards from a stage with Luke Bryan performing and us busting out in song in hopes that some of those ladies would abandon him and head our way. But we know it can be done and my friend went to work on the calling while I took pictures and imagined a giant gobbler behind every sway of a bush in the breeze. We heard that golden sound, in fact we heard at least three and maybe four gobblers talking. And one was moving closer. But, as often happens, the morning fell silent and we had a choice to make: Was it time to get on the move and track those gobblers down or sit tight and see if they showed up? Silence doesnt always mean the gobbler is henned up, or busy with a hen, it sometimes means hes honing in on you. Its early in the season and we were antsy, so we took off. We worked around the fringes of woods, we traipsed through pine straw-covered forest oor between planted pines and we tromped through heavy brush near creeks, trying to nd that gobbler. And we just couldnt pin him down. So we decided to head back to our original spot and work our way in from there, where the going would be easier. As we approached the spot, you can probably guess what we saw: turkeys. They were ying. Away from us. From the very spot our gear still sat. The gobbler that had gone silent had been moving toward us and some hens had shown up and if wed just sat still wed probably have taken him home. And it was a beautiful day that reminded me of two things. Theres a reason they call it hunting, not killing. And sometimes you never catch the things you chase the hardest, but if youll hold still and let them determine their own path, they might come to you on their own. MIKE CAZALASBetween the Cracks Throughout the 11-year history of Perrys Prattle, the writer has had requests to write on a particular subject. Along the way, efforts were made to write on some of the suggested topics, and I hope that I did them justice. A few weeks ago, Rhonda Dalton Dickinson called me to request an article on Clark Rogers and wife, Myrtle Finch Rogers. Her conversation was, Perry, you know that Mr. Clark Rogers is approaching 99 years old and is still living in his Vernon home, assisted by a caregiver, who comes in daily to help with his needs. She continued, Mrs. Myrtle Finch Rogers, the wife, is a resident of the third oor of the Washington County Community Hospital, who administers to her needs, along with a host of other older citizens, both male and female. Rhonda further told me she makes sure Mr. Rogers gets a copy of each weekly edition of the Washington County News in order for him to be sure and read Perrys Prattle. Assurance was given to Rhonda that writing on this beloved couple would be a joy and I really didnt think that three weeks would elapse before pursuing the requested topic. I came to know Wausaus big Rogers family from second-hand information given to me with my long association by the only sister in the family, Marvel Rogers Carter Taylor. This lady came to work at Panama Citys newest retail store in early 1952 when she was hired by Sears, Roebuck and Company in the receiving room. She, along with other ladies, were responsible for receiving, checking, pricing and moving to the sales oor the mammoth loads of merchandise received in the store daily. Some of the other employees included Faye Peacock, Audrey Rushing, Thelma Fountain and Billie Jean Knowles. When I was assigned as Receiving Manager, we also had Jimmy Smith and Oscar Ceasar working in that department. Marvel and Faye worked until retirement at Sears and are still active in the Sears Retirees Club, where Hester and I have been included in their Christmas Party each year. During our Sears experience, the Receiving Room Crew, although busy with daily deliveries of merchandise, still had time for Marvels conversation about her large family and singing by Faye Peacock. I came to know each brother and something special about him. Brother Clark Rogers, born Dec. 24, 1915, was the third in the series of boys. He married Myrtle Finch Rogers, July 24, 1937. The rst born in the Rogers household was Allen Rogers, born May 1, 1911, who married Minnie Owens Lloyd. Second in the order of birth was Arthur Rogers, born Nov. 25, 1913, and married Lucille Taylor. Following Clarks arrival was Lewis Rogers, born Nov. 23, 1918, who married Wilma Haddock. Lewis was the preacher in the family and carried that title throughout life. Leo Rogers arrived next, on Jan. 20, 1920. He married Evie Dee Pippin on May 12, 1940. Then came Marvel on Dec. 14, 1922, who married Paul Carter on Dec. 17, 1939, and Alex Taylor on Dec. 31, 1972, after the death of Paul Carter in 1958. Howard Rogers was born on Jan. 24, 1924, and was the last of the siblings to celebrate a 90th birthday on Jan. 24, 2014. He married Paulette Grif n on March 6, 1946. They reside in Port St. Joe. Your writer well remembers when tragedy came to the family with the accidental death of the father, Buster Rogers, on Oct. 12, 1965, at the age of 76. He and his shing partner, Joseph Walsingham, had experienced vehicle problems and were walking along State Road 77, when struck and killed by an approaching car. The mother, Mollie, died Aug. 12, 1986 at age 92. All of the Rogers offspring were born and reared on a farm east of Wausau. Schooling for the family included hard labor and Wausau schools. All experienced extremely hard work while growing up. Clarks rst paying job was when he and brother, Arthur, cut pulpwood for Tom Bar eld. The product was hauled to the B. C. Railroad siding at Wausau on a Model T Ford. Later, he worked for the B. C. Railroad, Coggin and Deermont and Faulk-Coleman Construction Company. During World War II, Clark was employed at Wainwright Shipyard in Panama City. In 1945, Clark was hired as a school bus driver for Washington County, driving a bus from the Deadening, Porter Pond, Wages Pond, Wausau and on to Vernon. His route was a total of 108 miles round trip. In the late 1950s, Mr. Rogers was hired as Bus Mechanic at Vernon, where he continued until retirement. Myrtle Rogers began employment at the school lunch room in Chipley and later transferred to Vernon when her husbands job took him there. Both Clark and Myrtle stayed active in community affairs in Vernon as they had done while living in Wausau. Clark found time to be active in the Vernon Booster Club and was a charter member of the Vernon Volunteer Fire Department. He served six years on the Vernon City Council and six years on the Washington County Hospital Board of Trustees. Upon retirement of both Mr. and Mrs. Rogers in 1986, a reception and dinner was held in their honor. Kelly Brock, Superintendent of Schools, Farrell Nelson, School Board Member and Arol Hudson, former Supervisor of Transportation, spoke highly of this couples long years of service to the school system of Washington County. In retirement, the Rogers still call Vernon their home. Clark Rogers is still able to maintain himself in the home as he approaches his 99th birthday. His two care givers include Barbara Tuten, who is married to the grandson of a Vernon pioneer, Mr. Joe Tuten. Congratulations to Clark and Myrtle Rogers for a long life lled with contributions to whatever the endeavor at hand called for. See you all next week.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClark and Myrtle Rogers as they appeared in the 2006 Heritage of Washington County Book. Rogerses have impacted the communityPERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells

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LocalWashington County News | A5Wednesday, April 2, 2014By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Guest speakers at last weeks Bonifay Kiwanis Club meeting on March 26 were Jeep Sullivan, founder of Jeep Sullivans Outdoor Adventures Inc. and Carter Hess, son of State Attorney Glen Hess and wounded veteran. I attribute most of what I do to my father who is a big hearted man and honored for his service in the military, Sullivan said. He kind of started this new ministry for our wounded warriors and Carter was our rst warrior. Sullivan explained that Outdoor Adventures provides hunting, shing, wildlife education, boat tours, frog and sh gig, bow sh and hunting alligator, wild hog, duck, whitetail, turkey, elk, moose, caribou, bear and more to wounded veterans as well as families and individuals. Veterans are own to the nearest airport where Sullivan picks them up and the adventure begins. It is amazing and an honor to have these men in my boat, deer stand or duck blind, Sullivan said. This gives these guys a chance to really relax and smile and its become something better than I could ever imagine. Its been a blessing. He said his heart is touched by the men and women who sacri ced of themselves, guratively and literally, and he wanted to give something back. Soon, he started a 501c3 organization to do just that. Carter Hess served two tours with the 82nd Airborne before he lost his leg to an IED, improvised explosive device, in June of 2012. In November of last year, my dad said if I wanted to go turkey hunting, Jeep Sullivan was just the guy to see, Hess said. Normally, if you want to go hunting, I imagine you want a guy with a name like Jeep. So, we went turkey hunting with a colonel from the Air Force. He told about their rst day hunting, which no turkeys showed up and on the second day the colonel and Hess were sitting, waiting on a turkey. While we were sitting I decided to take off my prosthetic leg and the colonel watched with wide eyes, Hess said. I told him if I had to shoot the turkey with a gun or bow and arrow or if I have to beat him down with this leg, one way or another a turkey was going to die. Needless to say that really broke the ice. He said after a while a turkey came out, turned a corner and was out of sight. Figuring that for the only turkey to come out that day they were surprised to see a second turkey and this time the colonel didnt hesitate to shoot the turkey. The aim must not have been so good because instead of hitting the ground the turkey ran around in ve-yard circles with the colonel not far behind him, Hess said. If I ever remember anything it would be the image of the colonel chasing that turkey around in circles. I tell you now, its not about the hunt, its about the memories made, its about a connections and its thanks to Jeep we have that opportunity. Sullivan said as a 501(c)(3) organization, donations are accepted. If you have the money and you want to make a difference we sure could use it, Sullivan said. Ive seen the faces of the new guys just wanting to connect and I just want to continue connecting and be there for them to show that civilians care enough about our veterans to do something for them. For more information, visit www.JeepSullivan. com or call 326-1771. Allcitizensandinterestedpartiesare encouragedtoattendthepublichearing. Anyinquiriesregardingthepublic hearingoranypersonrequiringspecial accommodationsduetodisabilityor physicalimpairment,includingspeech orhearingimpairments,shouldcontact thecityadministratorsofceat(850) 638-6350atleastthree(3)business dayspriortothehearing. DavidPettis,Jr. Planning&ZoningOfcer NOTICEOFPUBLICHEARINGThePlanningCommissionoftheCity ofChipley,Florida,willconducta PublicHearingintheCityHallCouncil Chambers,at1442JacksonAvenue, on Thursday,April17,2014at2:30 p.m .Thepurposeofthehearingis toreviewandconsiderthefollowing request: 1. RequestforDevelopmentOrder: JazmineProperties,LLC.isrequesting adevelopmentordertoconstructa 2,000sq.ft.commercialbuildingto replacea2,570sq.ft.commercial buildingthatwasdemolished. Location: 1238MainStreet Petitioner: JazmineProperties,LLC. Thesubjectpropertyismore specicallydesignatedinthemap reectedherein NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:4-15-14 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 ChipleyFL32428850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon Ocala Star-Banner The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline inched up 2 cents in the past week. Typical spring factors like re nery maintenance, increasing demand and the switch to summerblend fuel remain part of the story. The most expensive prices in the Southeast are found in Florida, where the average price on Monday was $3.63, 8 cents higher than the national average and 7 cents higher than last week. Florida motorists are seeing the highest gas prices since July, said Mark Jenkins, spokesman, AAA The Auto Club Group. While Florida prices could continue inching up, they are still well below last years peak of $3.88 and not expected to reach $4 a gallon. Gas prices in Florida are increasing more than other states because of supply issues and strong demand. Unlike other states, the majority of Floridas gasoline is delivered by ship instead of pipeline. According to the Energy Information Administration, imports have dramatically declined during recent years, due to re nery closures in the Caribbean and limited shipments from re neries in the Gulf of Mexico that would otherwise be able to offset the shortage. Now, anytime gasoline demand spikes, retailers must engage in a bidding war with the New York Harbor for shipments from the Atlantic basin to prevent a shortage. The EIA also states that gasoline consumption in Florida typically peaks in March, when seasonal population is high and Spring Break travelers and baseball fans arrive. This pattern differs from other states, where gasoline consumption typically peaks in July and August and is lowest during the winter months. In Gainesville, the average price per gallon on Monday was $3.63, up 3 cents from last week, according to the website GasBuddy. com In Ocala, the average was $3.63, up from $3.57 last week. The lowest price in Florida was $3.28 in St. Augustine, and the highest was $5.99 in Lake Buena Vista, according to GasBuddy.com Congress patches Medicare cut againFloridas average gas price highest in the SoutheastWASHINGTON (AP) With just hours to spare, Congress stepped Monday to nalize legislation to prevent doctors who treat Medicare patients from being hit with a 24 percent cut in their payments from the government. The Senates 64-35 vote sends a measure to delay the cuts for a year to President Barack Obama, who is expected to quickly sign it. The House passed the measure last week. The $21 billion measure would stave off a 24 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to doctors for a year and extend dozens of other expiring health care provisions such as higher payment rates for rural hospitals. The legislation is paid for by cuts to health care providers, but fully half of the cuts wont kick in for 10 years. Its the 17th temporary patch to a broken payment formula that dates to 1997 and comes after lawmakers failed to reach a deal on nancing a permanent x. The measure passed the House on Thursday, but only after top leaders in both parties engineered a voice vote when it became clear they were having dif culty mustering the two-thirds vote required to advance it under expedited procedures. Several top Democrats opposed the bill, saying it would take momentum away from the drive to permanently solve the payment formula problem. ANDREW WARDLOW | The News HeraldGov. Rick Scott, left, joined local leaders and veterans at the National Guard Armory in Panama City to sign a bill Monday creating a $22.2 million law designed to create educational and professional opportunities for returning military members. Scott sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the states main health care agency asking for hospital inspections.Governor wants inspection of federal hospitalsTALLLAHASSEE (AP) Gov. Rick Scott wants state authorities to inspect federal hospitals that serve veterans. Scott sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the states main health care agency asking for the inspections. The governor joins other elected officials pressing for answers about care at hospitals in the Veterans Affairs Sunshine Healthcare Network. The Tampa Tribune reported last week that five cancer patients died and nine others suffered injury because of delays in diagnosis or treatment through the network that includes Florida, South Georgia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Federal officials have refused to say in which hospitals the deaths occurred. The office of U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., last week said the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs would report the information to Congress in the next two months. Scott to sign tougher sex predator measuresTALLAHASSEE (AP) Gov. Rick Scott is signing into law a series of measures that would require sexual predators to be locked up longer. Scott was scheduled to sign four bills Tuesday at the Capitol. The measures the governor will sign will also require that more sexual predators be committed for psychiatric review once they nish their criminal sentences. The wide-ranging legislative package attempts to close loopholes in the Jimmy Ryce Act, which allows for the psychiatric review, or civil commitment, of sexually violent offenders even after they nish their prison sentences. Lawmakers in both chambers have said the inspiration for strengthening the laws came from the death of 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle last June and a newspaper investigation on sexual predators who were released only to commit more crimes. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ Help for local wounded warriors CECILIA SPEARS | The NewsFocus was on local Jeep Sullivan and Carter Hess during the March 26 Bonifay Kiwanis Club meeting as they spoke of local efforts to help wounded veterans with outdoor activities.

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LocalA6 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Gulf Power line personnel recognized on National Lineman Appreciation DaySpecial to the NewsMonday, March 31, was National Lineman Appreciation Day. Gulf Power Company is joined utility companies across the nation in recognizing the efforts of the men and women who work in all sorts of weather at all times of the day and night to keep Northwest Floridas electricity owing. Whether its going on storm duty, restoring a customers power or just turning on someones power for the rst time, the work Gulf Power crews do every day is to keep our customers at the center of everything we do, said Jeff Rogers, Gulf Power corporate communications manager. These men and women are truly heroes and this day is to honor them. Gulf Power has about 175 employees who work on the companys transmission and distribution lines. Although the state Legislature has made Aug. 26 Lineworker Appreciation Day in Florida, a resolution in the U.S. House of Representatives set aside March 31 as National Lineman Appreciation Day. Part of Gulf Powers mission is to help other companies when natural disasters knock power out to thousands of customers. In December, Gulf Power sent crews to Texas to assist in the Dallas area following an ice storm. Gulf Power line personnel didnt have to travel far in late January when an unusual ice storm in the Pensacola area disrupted power for two days. Then in February, Gulf Power crews spent a week in Georgia, assisting Georgia Power restore power following an ice storm there. Our line workers are committed to getting customers power back on, whether here in Northwest Florida or across the country, Rogers said. Thats what they do and were proud they are being recognized for their efforts.The company has about 175 employees who work on its transmission and distribution linesSPECIAL TO THE NEWs SA Gulf Power employee works on power lines recently.Measure targets mug shot websites TALLAHATALLAHASSEEEE (AP) The Florida Legislature is pushing through a bill that targets websites that charge individuals a fee to remove their police mug shots, a practice that some have criticized as a legal form of extortion. The bill targets companies that obtain booking photos from law enforcement agencies and then put them online, along with the persons name and the charges they face. They then charge arrestees hundreds to thousands of dollars to remove them or face continued embarrassment. Some websites refuse to remove the photos even if the charges are dropped later or if the person is acquitted. Under the proposed law, an individual could obtain a court order for removal. The website would be subject to a $1,000-a-day ne if it doesnt comply within 14 days. Florida is trailing several states in addressing the practice by such websites as mugshots. com. States across the U.S. are moving on this, so were hoping to catch up, said Sen. Darren Soto, DKissimmee, the author of a measure that would require mug shot sites to remove booking photos at no charge. State and local governments would be exempt from the law. Soto said he worked with the Florida Sheriffs Association in drafting the bill. In January, the Pinellas County Sheriffs Ofce took its booking photos ofine. Theyre still an open record, but to get them you have to go through the ling of a request, said Cecilia Barreda, a department spokeswoman. Mug shot companies, as well as media outlets, use Floridas strong open records laws to obtain content for their sites. Some commercial sites have begun to include instructions on how to get a mug shot removed, charging by the arrest. At mugshots.com, one arrest costs $399 with the removal fee increasing to $1,799 for ve arrests. Removing booking photos for free would sap at least half of the operating revenue for mugshots.com, said Marc G. Epstein, a Florida lawyer who represents the company. We dont solicit business, and we want to get to a point where all the revenue we get is from advertising rather than ads and removal, Epstein said. But removing for free at this point? When legislators work for free, then well work for free. Wyoming, Georgia and Utah have passed laws similar to the one proposed by Soto. All measures outlaw the fee-for-removal practice. At least 12 states have mug shot-related bills pending. When Georgias law took effect last year, mugshots. com stopped pulling mug shots altogether, for fee or for free, Epstein said. That did not get a happy response from people who had just had a bad day and wanted to throw money at it to make it go away, he said. Legislation introduced last year by Rep. Carl Zimmerman would have required publishers to remove a mug shot when charges are dropped or a not-guilty verdict is reached. The bill died in committee. Zimmerman, DDunedin, also has a mug shot bill this session, although he is going to sign on as a co-sponsor to the House version of Sotos bill being carried by Rep. Carlos Trujillo, R-Doral. I think were actually going to get this one passed, Zimmerman said. He said the only reservation he has with the Soto bill is that it only addresses booking photos posting going forward, leaving existing photos alone. The idea is that next year we can take that on. Its one thing to remove the nancial incentive, but in the future, Id like to address these sites that are already out there, Zimmerman said. Efforts to deal with the mug shot industry in Florida have been opposed by media outlets, including the First Amendment Foundation, who are hesitant to back a measure that restricts records access. The new legislation clears that opposition as it goes after the removal prot motive. Mug shots are public records, and we cant restrict access to them, said Barbara Petersen, the foundations president. This is the idea, to get the people who charge for removal.

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com ASection By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Nick Flairs business cards could read hitter, plain and simple. The Gulf Coast sophomore rarely sees a pitch he cant connect with and he racked up three more hits on Monday, including a three-run home run, in a 95 win over Northwest Florida State at Bill Frazier Field. His homer capped a seven-run third inning to give starter Brendan Leach a cushion on a day when the right-hander didnt have his usual dominant mix on the mound. Flair drove in half of GCs eight runs through the rst three innings. He added a single in the sixth and nished the day with a .426 batting average, seven points higher than when he woke up on Monday. His three hits and an identical number from Dalton Kelley kept GC in a rst-place tie with Chipola in the Panhandle Conference at 6-2 after a fth straight win. Leach has been great all year. This was his rst rough game all year, said Flair of the GC starter, who had six strikeouts and three walks while giving up eight hits in 4 1/3 innings of a no-decision. If he struggles, we struggle. On offense we took it upon ourselves to make things happen. Flairs homer off losing pitcher Brandon Nagem turned a 1-1 tie into a three-run GC lead. Max Bartlett and Dondrayas Harris (Rutherford) had RBIs from the bottom of the lineup and Kelley singled them in when the Commodores batted through the lineup in the third. GC (29-8) held on behind Kelley, who entered for Leach in the fth and tossed 3 1/3 innings of scoreless relief for the win. Kelley yielded a walk and gave up RBIs singles to Danny Blanco and Ryan Fucci to pull NWF State (22-11, 4-4) within 8-5. Blanco also had a solo homer in the fourth and he and Fucci nished with two hits apiece. Each of the ve runs were charged to Leach, who gave up six earned runs in his previous 47 1/3 innings. Kelley (1-0) had ve strikeouts and one walk and Brandon Pergantis and Ryan Koziol combined to hold NWF State scoreless over the nal four innings. Brian Lamboys triple in the fth capped the scoring. It was his rst of the season. Flair has four triples in one of ve categories he leads the team. Flair of Belle Chase, La., said GC has given him a chance to ourish after two seasons at Mississippi State where he redshirted his rst season and had only seven at-bats as a freshman. I didnt get to play the last two years and (GC) coach (Mike) Kandler gave me a shot, Flair said. Im a hitter by nature. Its what I do. For the most part, getting to play every day has helped me. You cant sit the bench and do much. Flair has done most of the heavy lifting at the plate, but he noted he wasnt the only top bat in the lineup. He singled out Trevor Davis, who is near .400 and was 1 for 4 on Tuesday. He also said this seasons success has been a total effort. As a team we have a good offense, but we also have solid pitchers and can play defense, Flair said. When we make a bad play they (pitchers) pick us up. Flair and GC wrap up the three-game series against NWF State in Niceville at 5 p.m. on Wednesday.NWF STATE 010 130 000 5 12 0 GULF COAST 107 010 00X 9 12 1Nagem (L), McKinney (3), Rodriguez (7) and Halsted; Leach, Kelley (5, W, 1-0), Pergantis (8), Koziol (9) and Durham. 2B: GC 2 (Koziol. Kelley). HR: NWF State (Blanco), GC (Flair). E: GC (Flair). LOB: NWF State 11, GC 8. GC 9, NWF STATE 5: COMMODORES KEEP SHARE OF CONFERENCE LEADFlair for the dramatic PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldTOP: Gulf Coasts Nick Flair, right, is congratulated after his three-run home run in the third inning of Gulf Coasts 9-5 win over Northwest Florida State on Monday. BOTTOM: Brian Lamboy forces out NWF States Jack Crittenberger and later had an RBI triple. Gulf Coasts Nick Flair drove in half of the Commodores eight runs through the first three innings. He added a single in the sixth and finished the day with a .426 batting average, seven points higher than when he woke up on Monday. Special to Times-AdvertiserThe Vernon High School Yellow Jackets weightlifting team hosted the rst State Quali er at the VHS weight room Monday, March 24. This meet determined the lifters who would represent the Vernon subsection at the nal State Quali er on April 8th at Arnold High School. Participating teams were Vernon, Chipley, Graceville, Marianna and Bozeman. Lifters must have nished in the top three at this meet to be eligible to move on towards a State quali cation. VHS had 16 lifters compete and 14 will advance to the nal sectional competition. Those lifters include Justyn Oge, winner in the 129 class, Ryan Malloy, winner in the 139 class, Zack Weisner, second in the 139 class, Brandon Malloy, winner in the 169 class, JT Padgett, winner in the 183 class, Traice Adams, second in the 183 class, Stoney Long, winner in the 199 class, Jonshae Works, second in the 199 class, Darrion Peterson, winner in the 219 class, Darrius Peterson, second in the 219 class, Marlon Stephens, winner in the 238 class, and Malik Sheppard, third in the unlimited class. Joining these lifters from this subsection will be one lifter from Chipley, 5 lifters from Marianna, 2 from Graceville, and 3 from Bozeman. The nal State quali er on April 8 will be the last step for these young men to qualify for the State Finals on April 24 in Kissimmee.VHS hosts State Quali er WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Like us on ATTENTION COACHES, PARENTS, FANS AND SUPPORTERS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY SPORTSWe want to promote our student athletes and sports programs offered by ALL schools in the Washington County School District! Our goal is to cover as many local sporting events in person as possible, but you can help ensure our hard working athletes are recognized by submitting info such as schedules, upcoming events, scores and photos. Submissions may be made by emailing ckent@chipley paper.com. Please include your name and a daytime phone number. Thank you for helping support our local athletes!Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Page 7

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LocalA8 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 2, 2014By ZACK McDONALD747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The State Attorneys Ofce will prosecute a Calhoun County Jail guard for the misdemeanor battery of an inmate, ofcials announced Monday. Deputy Christopher Doyal is charged with one count of battery against inmate Ventura Brown. Investigators said evidence shows Doyal used excessive force without lawful justication during an altercation in Browns cell on Feb. 24. The State Attorneys Ofce also has video and audio evidence of the incident but would not release those les Monday. In the report, Investigator Jimmy Nolan said the video clearly shows Doyal swinging at Inmate Brown, but witnesses did not report seeing Doyal actually hit Brown. In Browns account of the incident, Doyal began punching him the face with keys he had in his right hand, chipping his front tooth, before he was taken to a local hospital. Inmates in neighboring cells recounted hearing Brown pounding on his cell door and yelling before Doyal appeared to investigate the disturbance. Brown told investigators that a day earlier he slipped on a wet oor and hit his head. He was yelling for his prescribed medication because his head was hurting. And he was using profanity toward Doyal, investigators reported. During the altercation, Brown was on the phone with his wife. He put the phone down, stepped back from the door and put his hands behind his back when Doyal arrived, he said. Browns wife could not make out what happened from there, she told investigators, but Brown said the door ew open and Doyal took a swing at him, which he sidestepped. At that time, Doyal pushed Brown against the wall then onto his bunk and began choking him before Doyal eventually punched him in the face with the keys, he said. A trustee inmate, Christopher Phillips, said he and other inmates were eating when Doyal came around asking who was beating on the door. When Doyal went into the cell, they heard hollering and ran into the hall to see. He watched Doyal detain Brown to his bunk but did not see either man throw a punch, he said. Phillips said, before separating the two, he heard Doyal say: What have I done to you, what have I done to you, a couple times, Nolan reported. Brown was taken to a local hospital for treatment to his injuries and is detained in the Jackson County Jail. Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles $1995 WeproudlyannouncethatKristen"Lil Vick"Rivers,daughterofRobertand JacquelineVick,hasbeenacceptedtothe OklahomaStateUniversityCenterfor VeterinaryHealthSciencesfortheclassof 2018DVMprogram.Sheisa2002 graduateof PoncedeLeon highschooland receivedaB.S. degreefromthe Universityof SouthFloridain BioMedical Scienceswitha minorinPhysics. TheRomanticNoveloftheYear byFosterSanders atamazonbooks.comor almosttodestin.com WeSteam forFree! *NotAllitems canbesteamed. Jail guard charged with battery of inmate TALLAHASSEE (AP) Floridas economy is showing signs of continued recovery, but a new analysis prepared by state economists also points to some problems. State economists on Monday released a 29-page snapshot looking at everything from wages to housing prices and unemployment. The good news: Florida was ranked 13th in 2013 in personal income growth and had a rate that exceeded the national average. Growth rates also are returning to more typical levels and consumer condence is improving, as is building permit activity. But the effects of the Great Recession will linger for a few more years. Economists estimate normalcy will not occur until 2016. Gov. Rick Scott consistently has touted the drop in the states unemployment rate as a sign his push for tax cuts and reduction in regulations has aided the state. The states unemployment rate is 6.2 percent, which is below the national average. But the state report notes the drop in Floridas unemployment rate has been helped by people dropping out of the labor force, or people who have not begun seeking work.Report says states economy recovering but problems remain Gov. Rick Scott consistently has touted the drop in the states unemployment rate as a sign his push for tax cuts and reduction in regulations has aided the state. The states unemployment rate is 6.2 percent, which is below the national average. Chipley resident Abigail Anderson wins essay contestSpecial to the NewsEvery year, the Veterans of  Fore ign  Wars Post 10555 sponsors Holy Nativ i ty Episcopal School in the  VFW  Patriots Pen Essay  Contest. This years theme was What Patriotism Means to Me. Holy Nativity consistently has students place at the Post Level of judging. T his year,  all three Post Level winners came from the Holy Nativity Episcopal School. Third place went to Jack Briggs. Second place went to Ann Marie Shores. First place went to Abigail Anderson, a Chipley resident. Having won rst place at the post level, Abigail, daughter of Lorna and Todd E. Anderson D.V.M.. proceeded to the District Level Competition. In Florida, there are 199 posts a nd 18 districts. Abigail won  rst place for District 17, which includes all middle schools in Bay, Gulf and Jackson counties. She was honored at a luncheon and read her essay for the District 17 Ofcers and g uest  U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, who asked for a copy to place on his ofcial website and took a photo for his ofce. The VFW Ladies Auxiliary from District 17 also honored teacher, A ngela Sullivan with a  Youth Es s ay Award Citation  for her con stant support of the Patriots Pen contest and her consistent record of high quality writing from her winning students. Abigail then proceeded to the State Level, competing against 1 7 other students.  She was accom panied by her parents, grandparents, siblings and her language arts teacher, Angela Sullivan. Abigails essay was chosen as o ne of the  top three from 4,517 submitted essays and was awarded $950, a medal, a plaque, and an expense paid trip for her and her family to stay onsite at Disney. Abigail Anderson is shown here with her parents at the Awards Banquet in Orlando.

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-AdvertiserWednesday, APRIL 2 2014 BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Hilary Duff gained fame as the title character in which TV series? Jericho, Lizzie McGuire, Degrassi High, Judging Amy 2) What does the British English word tripper mean in American English? Tourist, Jogger, Daydreamer, Oven 3) Which Bonanza actor served in the military during the Korean War? Greene, Roberts, Landon, Blocker 4) Whos been the only president that previously was a CIA director? LBJ, Harry Truman, JFK, George H.W. Bush 5) In backgammon, how many pieces or checkers does each player receive at the start? 7, 12, 15, 16 6) Of these, which is not a landlocked country? Austria, Ethiopia, Finland, Switzerland 7) A winged woman holding an atom best describes which awards trophy? Oscar, Pulitzer, Emmy, Tony 8) What is the #1 gassiest dog breed? German Shepherd, Beagle, Boxer, Dalmatian 9) Mats Sundin is best known for what sport? Tennis, Golf, Hockey, Skiing 10) What variety of food is a morel? Lobster, Mushroom, Pear, Onion 11) Who made his lm debut in 1955s Revenge of the Creature? Gene Hackman, Jack Nicholson, Burt Reynolds, Clint Eastwood 12) Which of these is a famous Welsh national park and mountain range? Lake District, Brecon Beacons, Peak District, Exmore 13) Of these celebrities who is the youngest? Spike Lee, Billy Crystal, Chuck Norris, Tom Arnold 14) In horse racing how many miles long is a furlong? 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 ANSWERS 1) Lizzie McGuire. 2) Tourist. 3) Blocker. 4) George H.W. Bush. 5) 15. 6) Finland. 7) Emmy. 8) German Shepherd. 9) Hockey. 10) Mushroom. 11) Clint Eastwood. 12) Brecon Beacons. 13) Tom Arnold. 14) 1/8. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By CAROL KENT638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The Chipley Police Department, Washington County Sheriffs Of ce, Chipley Probation and Parole and the members of both Northwest Florida Reception Centers main unit and annexs K-9 and Rapid Response teams joined more than 300 Florida law enforcement in the state-wide torch run to bene t the athletes of Special Olympics Florida Monday, March 31. Each year, of cers carry the torch on a 1500-mile relay through 67 counties in Florida before the Special Olympics Florida State Summer Games. This intrastate torch relay began in Escambia County March 24 and was picked up Monday by participants here in front of the Washington County Courthouse. The route ended at Peoples South Bank for a total of about 2.5 miles. The statewide event will culminate May 16 in Lake Buena Vista during Opening Ceremonies as of cers from around the state bring the Flame of Hope into the stadium at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. The coordinator for Washington Countys leg of the torchs journey was Of cer Jessica Hawkins, Administrative Disciplinary Investigator for NWFRC. Every year, the state of Florida is broken up into Regions by the Special Olympics of Florida. Each region consists of approximately ve counties and is assigned one Regional Liaison, Hawkins said. I was chosen this year to be our Regional Liaison. To be quite honest, it was a bit intimidating at rst glance, but everyone jumped on board and was in there for the long haul, all more than willing to help. It was a fabulous experience from the planning of the event, to the run. We live in an amazing community, she added. That was proven to me through this experience, yet again. When you ask for help around here, you better be ready to receive it. It was great to be a part of such a united local law enforcement team and to see them unify for the bene t of such a wonderful cause. On hand to help with the event were Greg Hutching and his criminal justice class at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center and Tisha Marsceill of Peoples South Bank, who helped provide drinks and snacks for participants. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMore than 30 members of local law enforcement began their day by running in support of Floridas Special Olympics Monday, March 31.A ame of hopeLocal law enforcement of cers carry torch to bene t Special OlympicsLEFT: The Chipley Police Department was represented in part by Of cer Curtis French, Of cer Jerrad Williams and Lieutenant Scott Thompson. RIGHT: Local event coordinator Of cer Jessica Hawkins was presented with owers at the end of the run by her daughter, Kinslee. The Washington County leg of the torch run began Monday in front of the courthouse and ended at Peoples South Bank.

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra ORLANDO (AP) Florida is a politically divided state. The Republicans have won the last four gubernatorial elections, but the Democrats have carried the state in the last two presidential elections. One U.S. senator is a Republican, while the other is a Democrat. The Democrats hold a slight edge in voter registration. But that narrow divide becomes a chasm in Floridas congressional delegation and in the Legislature. Sixteen of Floridas 26 U.S. representatives are Republicans, with one vacancy that will almost assuredly be lled by a Republican. Republicans also hold a 26-14 advantage in the Florida Senate and a 76-44 margin in the state House. Some Democrats argue that the discrepancies are caused by gerrymandering the Republican-controlled Legislature drawing districts to give the GOP an unfair advantage, which would be illegal under Florida law. But two political science professors say the discrepancies arent so simple or nefarious they have used the Sunshine State to popularize their argument that large concentrations of Democrats living in cities have given Republicans a redistricting advantage not just in Florida but nationwide. Jowei Chen of the University of Michigan and Jonathan Rodden of Stanford University say no amount of reforms to eliminate gerrymandering is going to change an inherent bias based on where people live. Human geography plays a far greater role in generating electoral bias in the United States than commonly thought, they wrote in an inuential 2013 paper. Reformers in Florida have tried to stamp out gerrymandering. They successfully convinced voters in 2010 to approve two amendments to the Florida Constitution that would reduce the opportunities for lawmakers to make legislative and congressional districts that benet one party over the other. The amendments require districts to be compact and contiguous whenever possible and to follow existing city and county boundaries. They also prohibit attempts to diminish the chances for minorities to elect a candidate of their choosing. Chen and Rodden argue that Democrats tend to live in densely-populated cities while Republicans are more evenly scattered throughout suburban and rural areas. They also argue that Democratic precincts tend to be next to other highly-Democratic precincts, more so than Republican precincts, which tend to be located in politically mixed neighborhoods. As a result, Democrats tend to be tightly packed into fewer districts than Republicans. Republican-dominated districts tend to be more diverse than Democratic precincts since pro-Republican rural areas often include Democrats in small cities to reach the population threshold needed to create a district. In Florida, this translates into highly Democratic districts along Floridas southeastern coast in and around Fort Lauderdale, Miami and West Palm Beach. Meanwhile, Democratic precincts in interior cities like Ocala, and college towns like Gainesville and Tallahassee, are swallowed up by more rural, Republican districts, essentially drowning out Democratic votes. When compact, contiguous districts are imposed on this geography without regard to partisanship, the result will be a skew in the distribution of partisanship across districts such that with 50 percent of the votes, Democrats can expect fewer than 50 percent of the seats, Chen and Rodden wrote. Despite having new redistricting standards in place, reformers felt the congressional plan illegally favored Republicans and incumbents and diminished the opportunities for minorities to elect representatives of their choice. The reformers, led by the League of Women Voters of Florida, have sued the Florida House, hoping to invalidate the current congressional and state Senate plans and prevent the current districts from being used in any future elections. The lawsuit is pending, and the Florida Supreme Court ruled in December that legislators can be forced to testify in the lawsuit, setting aside a long-standing privilege that legislators usually enjoy. Deirdre MacNab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, said the new amendments are giving voters more choices. With regard to the House seats, Floridians have already seen a signicant increase in the numbers of competitive districts, she said. Geography inuences redistricting in Florida Guinea Pigs are friendly and playful animals, and they can make for a wonderful addition to your family. However, there are always things to consider before welcoming any new pet into your home, and guinea pigs are no different. In honor of March being Adopt-a-Rescued-Guinea PigMonth, here is some information on these uffy friends to help you decide if they are the right pet for you. As with any pet, it is important that you have enough time to incorporate pet ownership into your everyday schedule. The responsibility of caring for a guinea pig should not be taken any less seriously than that of a dog, cat, or any other pet. Guinea pigs need to be properly groomed and have their cages thoroughly cleaned on a regular basis, and they require daily interaction outside of their cage. All of these responsibilities are necessities and essential for a guinea pigs well-being. Guinea pigs are generally friendly and curious animals and can make great pets, said Dr. Caitlin Burrell, a zoological medicine intern at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. It is important, however, that parents teach their children how to handle guinea pigs correctly, how to clean their cage and change their food, and how to tell if they are feeling ill. If you are bringing a guinea pig into your home as a family pet, make sure that your children are ready to take on the responsibility. Figuring pet ownership into a busy after school and weekend schedule can often be difcult for children to juggle. Adult supervision may also be required for younger children. Once you have decided you are ready to become a guinea pig parent, your next task will be choosing a breed that best suits your family. There are four types of guinea pigs commonly seen as pets: the Shorthair or English, the Abyssinian, the Silky, and the Peruvian, said Burrell. They can be found at pet stores but many shelters have small mammals, such as guinea pigs, that would love to be adopted! Most animal shelters now accept small animals that are in need of loving homes, and you could save a well deserving guinea pigs life while nding the perfect addition to your family. Guinea pigs can be housed in a variety of cages. Wire cages can be used but it is important to provide an area of solid ooring to prevent foot lesions, said Burrell. Cages can be lled with bedding materials like shredded paper or aspen shavings, but cedar and pine shavings should be avoided. Bedding material also needs to be changed regularly so that toxic substances dont accumulate. Another factor to consider when creating housing for your new pet is the location of the cage. Make sure it is safe from any other pets in your home that may view them as prey, and put somewhere that social interaction and out-of-cage play time may be supervised if you have small children. They should also be kept in a temperature and humidity controlled area and should have places within the cage that they can hide, said Burrell. As for food and diet, guinea pigs are herbivores that require a proper balance of fresh pellets, hay and fresh vegetables on a daily basis. They need lots of high quality hay to promote dental health, keep their gastrointestinal tract functioning normally, and to maintain a healthy weight. They can also be offered small amounts of guinea pig pellets and fresh veggies, but the main part of their diet should be hay, said Burrell. Additionally, guinea pigs need Vitamin C in their diet because they cannot synthesize it themselves. There are diets that have been supplemented with Vitamin C, but this can degrade rapidly as the food sits on the shelf. Burrell suggests that certain vegetables, such as dark leafy greens, peppers, or parsley can be a good source of Vitamin C as well. Rescuing a pet guinea pig from your local animal shelter could bring tremendous amounts of joy and life into your home. With the proper care and adequate attention, these small pets can earn a large spot in your heart.Boston celebrates 13th birthdayAlexander Boston will celebrate his 13th Birthday on April 4, 2014. He is the son of Miss Sabrina Boston and Mr. Rory Moore. Alexander is the grandson of Martha Boston of Chipley and Annie Moore of Bonifay. What to consider when adopting a guinea pig PET TalTALK $39.0010lbsLegQuarters 5lbsGroundBeef 5lbsSmokedHamSteaks 2pkHotDogs$59.0020lbsLegQuarters 5lbsRiblets 5lbsPollock 5lbsGroundBeef 2pkHotDogs$89.0015lbsGroundBeef 20lbsLegQuarter 10lbsPorkChops 5lbsRiblets 2pkHotDogsHalf&Whole BeefAvailable SPECIAL T-BONESTEAK $5.19/lb.USDAInspectedHACCPFacilityCattle-Hogs-SheepProcessed 2965RMWardRd.(181-C)|Westville,Fl32464 Phone:(850)548-1201Butchers:RonnieTharp&MikeBrown CustomPackagingAvailable Pleasecall24-48hrsforpackages.WestvilleMeats

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 and soreness aches Special to ExtraFifteen teams of students from across ve counties competed against each other using student designed and built robots in the seventh annual robotics contest sponsored by CareerSource Chipola and Opportunity Florida. The contest challenged the students to create robots that could race down an obstacle course in the fastest time as well as create log books designed to document the design and build of their robots. Team Titanium from Altha High School set a course record in the nals to defeat Team Aint Care, also from Altha, by eight seconds. Gearheads from Marianna High School came in third, and Insane in the Membrane from Holmes County High School came in fourth. Bethlehems Team Wildcat won the Log Book portion of the contest, with Vernons Team Kloutz placing second and Insane in the Membrane taking third. Team Kolutz also took home the prize for Most Unique Design and the Sportsmanship award. The contest was started by CareerSource Chipola to give area educators an extra tool to use as they help youth learn how to think critically, problem solve and work as a team. Richard Williams, executive director of CareerSource Chipola, said the contest is a fun way for students to expand their classroom knowledge. Each year we are amazed by the creative designs the students develop and the way they bring those designs to life, Williams said. These students are getting hands on experience in science, technology, engineering and math in a way that allows them to do more than just read about it in a book. Anyone that thinks the youth of today dont have the tools to excel in the future needs to come to this contest next year and watch these students because they are amazing, he said. Byron Ward, Chair of Opportunity Florida, said he was impressed by the level of technical skill on display. These students have obtained the fundamental elements that it will take to be successful in whatever life brings their way. Simply put, they are winners, Ward said. CareerSource Chipola provides oversight and implementation of workforce development programs in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington County. The board also works with local educational institutions, economic development organizations and local employers to promote our goal of having a highly skilled and competitive workforce.Special to ExtraThe Spanish Trail Playhouse in Chipley presents an Evening of Bluegrass at 7 p.m. this Saturday April, featuring the band, Deepsouth Bluegrass. Deepsouth Bluegrass is an upcoming bluegrass band based in the Panama City-area. They specialize in traditional bluegrass and bluegrass Gospel music. The band members include Jeff Scutcheld, Richard Chambers, Greg Youngblood and Garrett Youngblood. Jeff Scutcheld is the rhythm guitar player and the serves as MC for the band. He has traveled and performed with the late Bluegrass Hall of Fame inductee Jimmy Williams. Since then, he has stayed around Panama City playing with both Greg and Richard at times with his notoriously solid rhythm on his hand built guitar, put together by himself. Richard Chambers plays the banjo and performs vocals. His inuences comes from a wide range of sources, which makes his own sound unique form any other banjo player. He is also an accomplished singer and songwriter. Greg Youngblood plays the upright bass and performs vocals. He hold the tempo in place like no other and is quite apt at performing antics on stage, and you can also hear him sing vocal parts as well. Garrett Youngblood is an award winning ddle player and also performs vocals. Only 19 years old, he shares many of the solos with Richard with his smooth style and sings with the group as well. Advanced tickets will be on sale at the Washington County Public Library or at the Spanish Trail Playhouse box ofce the day of the show. Tickets are $10, and seating is general admission. For additional information, call 326-3685.WEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January to September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAY8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale 1st Saturday of the month until 2 p.m. 1560 Lonnie Rd Free Medical Clinic in Graceville Opens 10am third and fth Saturday of the month. Call 263-6912 or 272-0101 for information. The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road.SUNDAY11 a.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Worship Service 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville.Deepsouth Bluegrass to take the stage this weekend SPe E Cia IA L tT O EXtra TRABethlehems Team Wildcat won the Log Book portion of the contest.Local teams place in robotics competition CCOMMunityUNITY CaCALendarENDAR Vernons Team Kolutz also took home the prize for Most Unique Design and the Sportsmanship award. Crossword PuPUZZLeESOLOLUTIOON OON PP AGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com FirstBapistChurchComeasyouare FChurchp ist irst Ba Come as you are FChurchp ist irst Ba Come as you are StephenB.Register,CPA 1552BrickyardRoad Chipley,FL (850)638-8376 Consumer& Commercial Power Equipment Visitourwebsiteat www.lanesoutdoor.com 901Hwy277,Chipley850.638.4364 MARIANNATOYOTA Itsnotwhatwedobuthowwedoit!982OrangeHillRoad,Chipley638-9505 507W.Hwy90,Bonifay1357BrickyardRd.,Chipley 1055FowlerAve.,ChipleyBehindourChipleyfactory.Hours:Wed.Thurs.andFri.9AM-5PM Sat.9AM-3PM638-9421 879UseryRoad,Chipley,Florida32428850-638-4654 Washington Rehabilitation& NursingCenter HAVEYOURUNITSERVICEDTO SAVE ONYOURELECTRICBILL(850)263-28231075N.HWY.79BONIFAY,FL P&P 4242LafayetteSt.MariannaFL,32446 850-482-4043 Open:M-F8am-6pm,Sat8am-6pm www.chipolaford.comChipolaFord 1254ChurchAve.ChipleyFL32438 850-638-1751 Servingyousince1953FriendlyHometownService 1882JacksonAve.ChipleyFL 850-638-7445 www.aandbautosales.net ShopWithTheRestThemComeToThe A&BAUTOSALES BROWN FUNERALHOME1068MainSt.,Chipley,FL32428Phone:638-4010DonaldBrown-LFD,Owner1126398 MooreCo PorterPaintSales Bait&Tackle 2206Highway177A,Bonifay 850-547-9511 LikeusonFacebook@ MooreCoofBonifay,Florida(850)547-2163219N.WaukeshaSt. Bonifay,FLJohnsonsPharmacy OBERT FUNERALHOME PROGRESSIVEREALTY"SeeusforallyourRealtyneeds"850-638-82201046MainSt.|Chipley Obar'sInsuranceAgencyAnIndependentInsuranceAgency Auto,Home,Farm,CommercialAndBonds MobileHomes,Life,HealthArthurP.W.ObarJr. AGENT POBox594 5390CLIFFST. Graceville,FL32440-0594 Obar_ins@bellsouth.net (850)263-4483Voice (850)263-4484Fax HomeFolksservingHomeFolks PERSONALTOUCH CARCARE"WETAKEPRIDEIN CARINGFORYOURCAR"106W.Evans,Bonifay547-3330 1396JacksonAve (850)638-1805 FloridaMicrolm&OfceSupplyInc. 6594S.US231, Dothan,AL36301(334)677-3318 800-886-3318 Page 4 Wednesday, April 2, 2014CHRISTIAN HAVEN GOSPEL JAMCHIPLEY The Christian Haven Church Gospel Jam will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 5. Refreshments will be provided. Come and enjoy an evening of music and fellowship. For more information, call 773-2602.UNION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH HOMECOMINGBETHLEHEM The Union Hill Baptist Church will celebrate its 110th Homecoming on Sunday, April 6. FOUR CALVARY, a local Southern Gospel quartet, will be in concert at 10 a.m. and then again during the 11 a.m. worship service. A fellowship meal will be immediately after the morning worship service. The 11 a.m., Homecoming speaker will be the Rev. Robb Goodman, who has been the Senior Pastor of the Summerville Baptist Church in Phoenix City, Ala., since 2005. HOLY WEEK BONIFAY The following is Bonifay First United Methodist Churchs Holy Week and Easter schedule: Noon April 9: Music recital and lunch with Roy Hoobler. 6 p.m. April 17: Holy Communion Service 6 p.m. April 18: The Last Seven Words of Christ, an Adult Choir Music Program 10:45 a.m. April 20: Easter Morning worship serviceUNION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH EASTER SERVICESBETHELHEM Union Hill Baptist Church will have a special Easter service Sunday, April 20. Bible Study will be at 10 a.m. During the 11 a.m. worship service, the choir will present JESUS MESSIAH, an Easter cantata, directed by Music Director Lisbeth Kidd. Union Hill Baptist Church is in the Bethlehem community on State Road 177, 1 mile south of Millers Cross Road.RUNNING FOR SOULS 5K RUN/WALKCHIPLEY Grace Assembly at Chipley will have a Running For Souls 5K Color Run/Walk on May 3. Registration and check in will be 7-7:45 a.m. at the Washington Holmes Vocational Center. The run/walk will begin at 8 a.m. Registration is $45 before April 5 and $50 after. 5K participants will receive a T-shirt and a goody bag if registered by April 5. There is no T-shirt guaranteed if you register late. For more information, visit www. gaceagchipley.org.THE MASTERS MONDAYS POPLAR SPRINGS Bethel Baptist Church will host The Masters Mondays, A Walk With The Master In The Word, at 7 p.m. Mondays in April. The rst speaker will be the Rev. Ray Jones, pastor of Ridgecrest Baptist Church, Dothan, Ala., on April 7.Special to ExtraThe Alabama-West Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church is excited to join other conferences within the United Methodist Church connection and announce the 2014 Imagine No Malaria campaign to save lives. Imagine No Malaria is an effort of The United Methodist Church to eliminate malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. The AWF conference has a goal of saving 100,000 lives, or raising more than $1 million. It only takes $10 to save one life through Imagine No Malaria. Malaria is spread by mosquitoes, and $10 will buy one insecticide-treated bed net. The United Methodists world-wide partners include the United Nations Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund. Through the efforts of the church and other organizations, deaths from malaria in Africa have been cut in half since 2010. But still, one child in Africa dies from malaria every 45 seconds. In America, we have been able to eliminate deaths from malaria. Now is the time to join together to eliminate deaths from malaria in Africa. The Outreach Team of Bonifay United Methodist Church has set a goal saving 500 lives. In dollars, this means raising $5,000 between now and June 1, but the Outreach Team prefers to think in terms of lives saved rather than money raised. If you would like to join with others in ghting this deadly disease, please send a check to Bonifay United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 477, Bonifay, FL 32425. Mark the check as being for the Malaria Campaign. Simply giving up eating out one time could save one live. In what better way can we be the hands and feet of Christ? The California condor, North Americas largest bird, is almost extinct. No longer does this majestic bird grace the skies. A few remain in captivity, and naturalists are seeking to breed them in order to reintroduce to the wild. Something else has disappeared, and few seem to notice the passing. I refer to old-fashioned saints. They were common in a former generation. Many people thought them a bit peculiar, but they were spiritual pillars of the Lords work in their day. They were the God-intoxicated souls, to use the language of that generation. They walked with God and had such rapport with Him they needed nothing exterior for support. With the passing of these saints, other things have disappeared. An obvious thing, at least for the person who reads Christian biographies, is the absence of spiritual power in the church today. Saints of a bygone generation evidenced power in their daily lives and carried an aura of Gods presence wherever they went. They unleashed spiritual energy through prayer. Gods ear seemed bent in their direction. Contemporary church leaders have exchanged this power for slick strategy, modern technology and polished promotion. Todays emphasis is on hatching programs instead of breeding saints. Few activities depend heavily on the Holy Spirit these days. We have become so sophisticated that He is not necessary in our ministries. Instead, the emphasis is on education, strategy and marketing. The saints of a former generation relied on the Holy Spirit. This was their most distinctive characteristic. A sure sign of the neglect of the Holy Spirit among todays Christians is in contemporary evangelism methods. When any one method is slavishly duplicated, you can be certain God is not in it. The Spirit-led saint of the past initiated things; he never imitated. In one of his books, E.M. Bounds makes this comment: The Church is looking for better methods; God is looking for better men: men whom the Holy Ghost can use men of prayer, men mighty in prayer. If we learn anything from the public ministry of our Lord, it is that He was not a slave to strategy but relied on the ministry of the Holy Spirit in everything. Our Lord never relied solely on methods to do the work of the ministry. Our crowds are bigger and the offerings larger. However, the spiritual in uence of our generation is almost nothing compared with the in uence saints of the past had in their generation. It is about time that a few concerned Christians became interested in making saints to reintroduce them into the church. Faith BRIEFS Church ghts to eliminate malaria by 2015On making saints, not technology DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Special to ExtraPDL fundraiserWESTVILLE Ponce de Leon High Schools FCCLA Chapter will have a fundraiser from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 5 at the Pine Log Community Volunteer Fire and Rescue. There will be a yard sale and hamburger and hot dog plates for $5. The FCCLA is raising money for travel expenses to their national convention in San Antonio. Kindergarten registrationWASHINGTON COUNTY Kate M. Smith and Vernon elementary schools will begin kindergarten registration April 8 for the 2014-2015 school year. Stop by the school ofce to pick up a registration packet. All requirements for registration will be attached to the packet. All forms and proper documentation must complete for child to be registered. Children must be 5 years of age on or before Sept. 1, 2014. Friday Fish Fries during LentBONIFAY The Knights of Columbus, Child of Prague Council 10513, will have a sh fry from 4-7 p.m. Friday during Lent (through April 11) at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church. Plates are $10 and include all the sh you can eat, as well as sides, sweet tea and a dessert. Carryouts are available. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A. Retherford ReunionThe annual Retherford Reunion will be April 5 at Curry Boat Landing and Baseball Field. All family and friends are invited to celebrate with fun, fellowship and a covered dish lunch. For more information, call Sharon Johnson at 956-2772. Orange and Blue Golf ClassicVERNON Vernon Middle School will have the Orange and Blue Golf Classic to benet girls and boys athletic programs on Saturday, April 5, at the Sunny Hills Golf Club. A fee of $65 per person or $260 per four-man/woman team includes green fees, cart rental, breakfast, lunch and prizes. Tournament format is a Captains Choice Scramble. There will be an 8 a.m., shotgun start. Individual registrations are welcome; you will be assigned to a team. Hole sponsorships are $50 per sign. For questions and registration, call Laurie Simmons at 258-4332 or VMS at 535-2808. Breakfast Cooked to OrderDEFUNIAK SPRINGS Breakfast Cooked to Order will be available April 5 and May 3 in the Parish Hall at St. Agathas Episcopal Church, 150 Circle Drive. Menu selections include pancakes, eggs, grits or home fries, sausage or bacon, sausage gravy on toast or biscuit, juice, milk and coffee. Breakfast will be offered from 7-11 a.m., along with service with a smile. Healthy choice selections will also be offered. Cost for the breakfast is $5.50 for adults and $3.50 for children under 10. Take-outs are available. Proceeds benet the church, which has a Hospitality and Food Ministry as a part of its outreach efforts. Byrd benetWESTVILLE Westville City Hall will serve sh, smoked pork and chicken plates with two sides starting at 10 a.m. April 5. Plates will cost $6, and all proceeds will go to Zan Braxton Byrd to help pay medical expenses.HCHS luncheonCHIPLEY Holmes County High School will have a luncheon at 11 a.m. April 8 a Baileys Surf and Turf. For more information, call 547-3526. Jazz Concert and Spaghetti DinnerBONIFAY The Blue Pride Band Jazz Concert and Spaghetti Dinner will be at 6 p.m. April 11 at Holmes County High School. Tickets are $6 in advance, $8 at the door. For more information, call Connie at 209-0531. Groce reunionLYNN HAVEN The Groce Family Reunion will be April 12 at Leslie Porter Park in Lynn Haven. All friends and relatives have a special invitation to attend. Lunch will be served at noon. For more information, call Drama at 773-3456.Benet dinnerBONIFAY Campground Cemetery will have a benet dinner at 11 a.m. April 12. There will be sh and chicken plates with all the trimmings for $6. There will also be a cake auction. All candidates are welcome. Ribs for RelayCHIPLEY Community South Credit Union will have Rib Sale on April 17. One rack will cost $20. Ribs can be picked up from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Community South Credit Union in Chipley. Delivery is available. To order, email rebecca.harris@ communitysouth.net. BMS selling Vidalia onionsBONIFAY Bonifay Middle School is selling Vidalia onions through April 11. Each 10-pound bag costs $10 and must be paid for on or before April 11. A portion of the money raised will go directly to each grade level for the purchasing of new equipment/supplies and to help with some of the costs of student eld trips. To make a purchase, see a Bonifay Middle School student or call JaLisa Brannon at 547-2678. CHS students to perform GreaseCHIPLEY Chipley High School music theater students will perform their spring musical, Grease, at 7 p.m. April 10-April 12. For more information, call 638-6100. UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Crossword SOLUTIONAurelio Torres, 76, passed from this life Friday, March 28, 2014, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. He was born in Bronx, N.Y., on April 29, 1937, to Thomas and DeJesus (Clementine) Torres. Mr. Aurelio worked as a carpenter and had lived in Chipley since 1996, coming from Bronx. He was also a member of the Carpenters Union Local 157. Mr. Torres is survived by his wife, Patricia Torres of New York City; one son, Michael Anthony Torres and wife, Andrea, of Andover, N.J.; two brothers, Thomas and Raymond; three sisters, Delia, Lucy and Gladys; one niece, Evelyn Modesti and husband, Angelo; and three grandchildren Janine, Amanda and Michael. A memorial service will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 3, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home Chapel. The family will receive friends from 6 to 7:30 p.m., before the service. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.Aurelio TorresWorld War II and Korean War veteran and Geneva County, Ala., cattle rancher Wilson Ashley Stembridge of Samson, Ala., passed away Monday, March 17, 2014, at his residence. He was 88. Mr. Stembridge was born in Wicksburg, Ala., on Sept. 2, 1925, to the late James George and Johnnie Wilson Stembridge. In high school, he was an all-star basketball player in Chipley. In his early 20s, Mr. Stembridge owned and operated a produce trucking company, running seven trucks in Miami. He was later drafted in the United States Military, proudly serving in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army. He was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He was a successful cattle rancher in Geneva County, Ala., for more than 30 years. He was also preceded in death by his siblings, Charles Lindy Stembridge, Travis Wayne Stembridge, George Hilton Stembridge and Willadene Stembridge Odom, who was his only sister, and his twin brothers, Comer Stembridge and Homer Stembridge. He is survived by two brothers, Melvin Rudolph Stembridge and John Madison Stembridge, both of Miami. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 20, 2014, at Pilgrim Home Baptist Church in Wicksburg with the Rev. Buddy Hood and the Rev. Hilton Wilson ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery under the direction of Bottoms Garden Chapel Funeral Home of Hartford, Ala.Wilson A. Stembridge WilsonILSON A. StembridgeTEMBRIDGEMother Katherine Andrews, 75, of Ebro passed away at her home on March 20. She was a seamstress and of the Holiness faith. Survivors include her husband, Bishop John Andrews, Jr. of Ebro; seven children, Assoc. Pastor Bernice Andrews, Carrie Andrews, John Elvis Andrews (Beatrice), all of Ebro, Curtis Andrews, Pastor Earnest Andrews (Victoria), Minister Sarah Harris (James) and Sherry Brown (Donnie), all of Vernon; two sisters, Johnell Andrews of Ebro and Bertha Tinsley of Marianna; and a large number of grandchildren, great-grands, other relatives and friends. Funeral services were at 11 a.m., CST Saturday, March 29, at the True Holiness Church of Ebro, with Pastor Louis D. Brown, Min. Wade Brown, Min. Eli Andrews and Jr. Bishop John O. Brown, ofciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Gardens of Vernon. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to services at 11 a.m., with the Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Mother K. Andrews MotherOTHER K. AndrewsNDREWSDonnie Russell, age 74, of Chipley passed away Monday night, March 24, 2014, at Bay Medical Center surrounded by his loving family. Donnie was born March 26, 1939, in Washington County to the late Leon and Verna (Palmer) Russell. He was a lifelong resident of the Washington County area and a member of the First Baptist Church of Chipley. Donnie is survived by his wife, Jimmie Lou Russell of Chipley; four daughters, Lynn Paine and husband, Thomas, of Baton Rouge, La., Connie Redmon and husband, Jeff, of Chipley, Carla Elliot and husband, Rob, of Chattahoochee and Leah Pettis and husband, Randy, of Chipley; eight grandchildren, Robert and Lee Paine, Jessica (Redmon) Zimmer and Mindy Redmon, Rhyne and Jae Elliot, Cortney (Pettis) Corbin and Meghan Pettis; ve great-grandchildren; one half-brother, J.D. Cockrell of Mississippi; and a very special cousin, Evelyn Tiller of Chipley. Family received friends for visitation from 1 to 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Chipley, with memorial services beginning at 2 p.m., with the Rev. Mike Orr ofciating. Flowers will be accepted, but the family requests donations be made to the First Baptist Church of Chipley Building Fund, P.O. Box 643, Chipley, FL 32428. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.Donnie RussellMadie Rabion Smith, 79, of Sneads, died Sunday, March 23, 2014, at Jackson Hospital. Mrs. Smith was a native and lifelong resident of Jackson County, where she was a homemaker and member of Emmanuel Holiness Church. She enjoyed her children and grandchildren and loved them deeply. Mrs. Smith was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas (Toby) Smith. She is survived by two daughters, Juanita Pippin and husband, David, of Sneads and Rita Rolph and husband, Murray, of Ekalaka, Mt.; one brother, Jerry Rabion and wife, Alice; one sister, Ross Parmer and husband, James, all of Sneads; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014, at Emmanuel Holiness Church with the Rev. Eva Howell ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, 2014, at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com.Madie Rabion SmithLarry J. Pitts, 67, of Bonifay died Monday, March 17, 2014. Funeral services were held at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Sellers Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Larry J. Pitts GuidelinesUIDELINES andAND deadlinesDEADLINESObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser reserve the right to edit for Associated Press style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 9:30 a.m. Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. There is a $25 charge for obituaries. Obituaries may be emailed to funerals@chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 E. Virginia Ave. in Bonifay. Obituaries Community EventsVENTS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraMarch 24-31Allen Bates, Alford, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia Leonard Bates, Russellville, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent George Beachum Jr., Chipley, driving while license suspended or revoked, recommit on possession of weapon by convicted felon, resist ofcer, driving while license suspended or revoked Stephen Bray, Chipley, battery Jonathon Brett, Chipley, Columbia County warrant for violation of county probation on criminal mischief James Byers, Little Rock, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent William Cambley III, Fountain, violation of state probation on possession of meth David Carr, Chipley, fraud, illegal use of credit card Brittany Cooks, Montgomery, Ala., operate motor vehicle without license, Escambia County warrant for theft Randy Holley, Panama City, battery, assault Jordan Holman, Russellville, Ark., possession of marijuana with intent Frances Jeffries, Homeless, Okaloosa County warrant for operate motor vehicle without a license, reckless driving Fredricus Johnson, Opelika, carrying a concealed weapon, resist ofcer, possession of marijuana with intent, possession of barbiturate, possession of paraphernalia Bert Jones, Jr., Chipley, assault with a weapon, possession of weapon by convicted felon Vernita Joslin, Chipley, battery on disabled person Alethea Lester, Dothan, Ala., violation of state probation on felony driving under the inuence Marion Marshall, Chipley, resist ofcer without violence, violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property Melissa McCormick, Fountain, Bay County warrant for failure to appear on theft Joseph Peter, Fountain, Bay County warrant for dealing in stolen property Dean Rollison, Fort Walton Beach, violation of county probation on possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of county probation on driving under the inuence Jamie Sattereld, Chipley, battery Frances Sheridan, Chipley battery Anthony Smith, Jr., Chipley, sell of marijuana two counts Daniel Tindol, Chipley, battery April Zimmerman, Southport, introduction of contraband, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of county probation on petit theftFlorida bill could raise speed limit to 75 mph in stateTALLAHASSEE (AP) Seventy-nine. In the rain. With no headlights on. With those words, Florida Highway Patrol Trooper John Schultz sped onto Interstate 10 and ipped on his red, white and blue ashing lights and pulled over a black Nissan Maxima. He told the driver she was getting a ticket for exceeding the 70 mph speed limit. She said, I had the cruise control set at 79. Yeah, its working, Schultz said as he wrote the ticket. She said I just assumed I could go 10 over. So if we change the limit to 75, shed be going 85. Highway safety advocates say if the Florida Legislature passes a bill that would allow the state to raise the speed limit to 75 mph there could be more crashes, injuries and deaths. The bills supporters say people already are driving that fast and the speed limit should reect reality and would actually be safer. If you articially force lower speed limits on roads that can accommodate faster speed limits, what youre going to have is a greater disparity between the fastest drivers and the slowest drivers and thats actually a much more unsafe environment than having everybody going faster together, Sen. Jeff Clemens said. The bill (SB 392) Clemens, D-Lake Worth, sponsored along with Republican Sen. Jeff Brandes of St. Petersburg sailed through committees with little opposition and is ready to be considered by the full Senate. A House bill (HB 761) sponsored by Republican Rep. Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres also has received little opposition and has one more committee stop before being ready for a House vote. The measures would allow the Department of Transportation to raise the speed limit on interstate and limited access highways from 70 to 75 mph, from 65 to 70 mph on rural, four-lane divided highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. It does not automatically raise the speed limits. If you look back to when we rescinded the national speed limit (of 55 mph) in the mid-90s until now, its been 20 years of history and I think in only one year have fatalities actually increased. So the predictions of doom and gloom that we had in the mid-90s just didnt come true, Clemens said. But a National Highway Trafc Safety Administration report showed trafc fatalities on rural interstates increased by 10 percent in 1996, the year after the national speed limit was lifted and states were allowed to set their own standards. And the fear of highway safety advocates is that another increase in Florida will result in more deaths because people will drive faster and be that much more at risk of losing control. The higher speeds also create more violent collisions, they say. Its clear that injuries and fatalities go up whenever someone raises the speed limit, John Ulczycki, a vice president of the National Safety Council, said in a press release opposing the bills. Raising speed limits will increase the likelihood of a crash, and the government would in effect be telling people its safe to drive faster. Schultz, who patrols an area near Tallahassee, estimates most drivers on Interstate 10 are driving between 75 and 80 mph, and he thinks that will increase with a higher limit. Driving in the rain, he clocked a string of trafc going in the opposite direction. Seventy-eight, he said after the rst radar reading. Theres 79 on the truck. That motorcycle right there is 82. Where Im going with this is its raining out, and no one reduces their speed. And a higher speed limit will make the situation more dangerous, he said. He also pointed out that the speed limit now is essentially 75 mph because the state only allows for warnings and not nes for the rst ve miles per hour above the speed limit. Theyre going to take it to the next extreme and go up even higher, Schultz said. We want to keep people safe.FDOT announces intermittent lane closures for I-10ChipleyMotorists on Interstate 10 will encounter intermittent closures of the outside travel lanes through Saturday, April 6. The closures will occur at various locations along I10 between mile marker 175, just east of State Road 12, in Gadsden County and mile marker 45, County Road 189/Holt, in Okaloosa County. During the closures construction crews will be performing geotechnical investigations for the installation of overhead message signs. Drivers should be alert for the presence of construction workers, vehicles and equipment. All planned construction activities are weather dependent and might be rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. For more information, follow the Florida Department of Transportation District Three on Twitter @myfdot_nw. Friends of the Library to meet April 3The Friends of the Library will meet at noon tomorrow, April 3, in the East conference room of the Agricultural Center. The guest speaker will be Cathy Everitt, a speech therapist from Panama City. She wanted to be an author from the time her third grade teacher complimented her writing, and nally her dream came true last September. She believes her most important mission in life is to encourage others and pray for them, and hopes this rst book Heart Whisperer will be an inspiration to many people. What chicken soup did for your soul, Heart Whisperer will do for your heart and more. Everyone is encouraged to attend and bring a friend. Special to ExtraWEWAHITCHKA Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative will hold its 66th annual members meeting Saturday, April 5, at its headquarter ofce, located at 722 W. Highway 22 in Wewahitchka. The purpose of the meeting is to communicate information about the Cooperative, including the nancial reports and overall business status, as well as serve as a social event for the entire membership. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. with each registered member receiving a $10 credit on his or her electric bill. Members will be given the opportunity to win prizes throughout the day, including the grand prizes, which are 10 $100 credits to an electric bill. There will also be plenty of refreshments provided by GCEC and booths offering valuable information for the duration of the meeting. Beginning at 9:15 a.m., entertainment will be provided by The Gann Family. There will also be a bounce house and a petting zoo for the children. The business portion of the annual meeting will begin at 11 a.m. I invite all of our members to come and take part in our annual meeting, not only to be present for the business portion of the meeting, but also to enjoy food, prizes and entertainment, Gulf Coast Electric CEO/General Manager Michael White said. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. GCEC serves about 20,500 meters in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, White City, Lynn Haven, Fountain and Southport. Washington County aARRestsESTS Community BRiefsIEFSGulf Coast Electric Cooperative to hold annual members meeting Saturday ChiHIPleLEY FFA Pa ARtici TICIPates ATES iIN AG oON theTHE HillILL SPecial ECIAL toTO EXt T Ra AChipley FFA Parliamentary Procedure team had an amazing opportunity to participate in Ag on the Hill in Tallahassee. This is a day when FFA chapters from across the state converge on the capitol to meet with legislators and discuss matters important to agriculture education and the FFA program. The students got to hear from Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam, meet with representatives of the House and explore House chambers. Pictured above, students had the opportunity to speak with Rep. Marti Coley, Rep. Tom Goodson, Rep. Jimmy Patronis and Grace Potter Lovett (Former Chipley FFA member) from Commissioner Putnams ofce. Holmes County Chamber of Commerce helped welcome the newest business to the area, The Medical Gallery, with a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony held in front of the business on March 25. The Medical Gallery specializes in medical equipment and supplies, such as diabetic shoes, circulation and support stockings and socks, electric beds and chairs, scooters, shower chairs, CPAP supplies, vitamins and much more. The Medical Gallery is at 217 N. Waukesha St. in Bonifay. For more information, call 547-1767.Cecilia ECILIA SPea EA Rs S | Extra MedicalEDICAL GalleGALLERY o OPeENsS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 4-3433 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 2012-CA-000364 HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1, PLAINTIFF, vs. Carolyn Patricia Farrington and Daniel Lee Farrington, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012-CA-000364 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1, is Plaintiff and Carolyn Patricia Farrington and Daniel Lee Farrington are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, FL, 32428, at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, ( 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on the 7 day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 1, Township 1 North, Range 14 West, and Run East 1111.29 Feet; thence North 1253.75 feet to the point of beginning; thence North 225.0 feet; Thence S 75 Degrees 55 Minutes 18 Seconds E 208.0 feet; thence run South 300.00 feet more or less to the waters edge of Chain Lake; thence run Northwesterly along said waters edge 205.58 feet more or less to a point South of the point of beginning; thence run North 75 feet more or less to the point of beginning; being Lot 26 on unrecorded plat of Chain Lake Subdivision; being in Washington County, Florida. Street Address: 3302 Lodge Dr, Chipley, FL 32428 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Chipley, Washington County, Florida, this 18 day of March, 2014. Harrold Bazzel Clerk of said Circuit Court By:K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone, & Pincus, P.L. 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3427 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-417 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. UTE LANG, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: Ute Lang, Werderstr. 4, 8615G Augseutg, Germany, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 6, Block 776, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 11, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 120 through 128, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiffs attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-958771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. LINDA HAYES COOK Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3437 IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-CA-126 TIMOTHY B. GIETZ and MICHAEL J. SIMON, Plaintiffs, vs. MARY KATHLEEN COSTLEY and BENJAMIN C. DiZOGLIO, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Amdned Order Granting Supplementary Relief for Plaintiffs dated March 21, 2014, and entered in Civil Action No. 12-CA-126 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiffs, TIMOTHY B. GIETZ and MICHAEL J. SIMON, and the Defendants, MARY KATHLEEN COSTLEY and BENJAMIN C. DiZOGLIO, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time) on the 23rd day of April, 2014, at the Washington County Government Offices Building, 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, Florida, the following described real property located in Bay County, Florida, as set forth in said Order Granting Supplementary Relief for Plaintiffs: 0.307 acres, more or less, at 8139 Random Road, being tax parcel number 32595-000-000; and .045 acres, more or less, at 98 Gulf Blvd., being tax parcel number 33864-010-000; Bay County, Florida The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21 day of March, 2014. HON. HAROLD BAZZEL Clerk of the Court Washington County, Florida By: K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk April 2 and April 9, 2014 4-3439 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 67-2012-CA-000333 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. VIRGINIA CARLISLE, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered May 8, 2013 in Civil Case No. 67-2012-CA-000333 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Chipley, Florida, wherein 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC is Plaintiff and VIRGINIA CARLISLE A/K/A VIRGINIA JOHNSON FORAN A/K/A VIRGINIA FORAN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOUGLAS CARLISLE A/K/A RICHARD DOUGLAS CARLISLE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION #1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION #2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, 1293 Jackson Avenue Building 100, Chipley, FL. 32428 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 23 day of April, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: A parcel of land situate, lying and being in the W of SE of Section 5, Township 4 North, Range 13 West, described as follows: Commence on the West boundary of said Section 5, at a point 1323.12 feet North of the Southwest corner thereof, and run thence South 89`30 East, 2895.54 feet, to a point; thence run North 79`30 East, 432.81 feet, to a point; thence run South 0`30 East, 50.73 feet, to Point of Beginning; thence run S 0`21 E 180.01 feet, thence run N 79`24 E 69.00 feet, thence run N 05`42 E 61.25 feet, thence run N 04`37 W 37.51 feet, thence run N 02`41 W 81.68 feet, thence run S 79`30 W 69.16 feet to Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19 day of March, 2014. Deputy Clerk CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: K. McDaniel April 2 and April 9, 2014 4-3438 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 12000260CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. ANTONIO B. DAVIS, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 29, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 12000260CA, in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ANTONIO B. DAVIS, et al., are the Defendants, Washington County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Washington County, Florida, described as: COMMENENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S00`02E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 2, 820.00 FEET: THENCE S89`11E, 240 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S89`11E 200 FEET; THENCE S00`02E, 100 FEET; THENCE N89`11W, 200 FEET TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF A 40 FOOT ROAD; THENCE N00`02W ALONG SAID EAST R/W LINE 100.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2007 DESTINY INDUSTRIES DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME MODEL: D483-216-96T, SERIAL NUMBER: DISH02637GA A&B. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 201 West Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL 32428 at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of April, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: January 28, 2014. By: K. McDaniel Washington County Clerk of Court CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3446 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No:67-2012-CA-000148-C AXX-XX LPP MORTGAGE LTD. Plaintiff, Division: Civil Division vs. CHERRY E. HALL A/K/A CHERRY HALL, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in WASHINGTON County, Florida, described as: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 180.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 100.00 FEET; THENCE WEST 180.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS EXISTING ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. Property address: 823 8th Street Chipley, FL 32428 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, HIGHWAY 90, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, beginning at 11:00 oclock, A.M. Central Standard Time on May 7, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 19 day of March, 2014. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. April 2 and 9, 2014 4-3430 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-2009-CA-000164 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, VS. ANTHONYH. STOCKSTILL; ERICA L. STOCKSTILL; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on March 13, 2014 in Civil Case No. 67-2009-CA-000164, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for WASHINGTON County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff, and ANTHONYH. STOCKSTILL; ERICA L. STOCKSTILL; DUNFORD HAVEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. ; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Linda Hayes Cook will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the FRONTof the Courthouse at 11:00 a.m. on the 7 day of May, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT5, BLOCK B, DUNFORDS HAVEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 184, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 14 day of March, 2014. Harold Bazzel Washington County, Florida, Clerk of Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Telephone: (561) 392-6391 Facsimile: (561) 392-6965 IMPORTANT IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COSTTO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTCOURT ADMINISTRATION, P.O. BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447; PHONE:850-718-0026; EMAIL: ADAREQUEST@JUD14.FLC OURTS.ORG, ATLEAST7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELYUPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS: IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED CALL711. March 26 and April 2, 2014 4-3449 Whereabouts Notice for James Lassiter, father of the minor child, Alana Elizabeth Sheppard Anyone knowing the whereabouts of James Lassiter, father of Alana Elizabeth Sheppard, female born on August 5, 2010, in the LSU Earl K. Long Medical Center, City of Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish Louisiana or having any knowledge of his location is asked to contact Attorney Bernard J. Francis, Sr., at 1411 McKinley Street, Donaldsonville, Louisiana 70346 or call 225-473-8535. April 2,5, 2014 4-3444 HOUSING/REHAB SPECIALIST POSITION QUALIFICATIONS Washington County Grants Department is seeking a qualified individual who has his own transportation, vehicle insurance, camera, and has a personal computer and basic computer skills. Must be a Licensed Certified Florida Contractor, with at least 5 years experience in Roofing, Building, Electrical and Plumbing fields. Have previous experience in performing inspections, collecting data, preparing bid sheets, prepare a sketch of each dwelling with all measurements, including width, length, doors, windows, etc. Hold a General Liability Insurance Policy, provide proof of Workers Comp Insurance or W.C. Exemption. BID QUOTES FOR SELF-EMPLOYED CONTRACTOR: Washington County Grants Department is accepting bids to perform an initial inspection, prepare work write-up bid packets, conduct contractor walk-thru, perform baseline bids, conduct bid openings with County staff, conduct 1 interim inspection and 1 final inspection for a set fee of _____________ per each qualified housing unit. If additional trips to housing units are required, an additional fee of ______________ per trip. ACCEPTING BIDS STARTING 9 AM FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014 TO 4 PM TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014. BIDS WILL BE OPENED 9 AM WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014. April 2, 2014. 4-3429 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-413 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PARADISE GARDEN CHURCH, INC., a Dissolved Florida corporation, et al, Defendants. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: The Estate and Unknown Heirs of Jimmie Helton, Deceased, a/k/a Reverend James Helton, 2913 W. Xanthus Street, Tampa, Florida 34614 Mary Helton, 2913 W. Xanthus Street, Tampa, Florida 34614, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 2, Block 554, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 9, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 103 through 107, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiffs attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. LINDA HAYES COOK Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3428 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 67-10-CA-422 THE DELTONA CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. KWOK HUNG LIU, Defendant. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, TO: Kwok Hung Liu, Flat #10, 7 FL. NGAR ON, House Kamon Court MA On, Shan NT, Hong Kong Kwok Hung Liu, Flat G 4/F, Block 3, Melody Garden Tuen NT, Hong Kong, and the unknown husband or wife, as the case may be, of any or either of the natural persons who are parties defendant to this cause, if alive, and if dead, then to all unknown persons claiming interest by, through or against any or either of said named Defendants as heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, successors, legal representatives, assignees, trustees, lienors, creditors or otherwise claimants; and all unknown parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the following property situate in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 7, Block 438, of SUNNY HILLS, Unit 7, a subdivision according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 77 through 86, of the Public Records of Washington County, Florida. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the quiet title action on the Plaintiffs attorney, CHARLES E. BERK, ESQUIRE, whose address is Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, on or before the 10th day of May, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint filed herein. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice to Charles E. Berk, Esquire, Post Office Box 5056, Ocala, Florida 34478, (352) 629-1155, not later than seven days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-958771 or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6 day of March, 2014. Harold Bazzel Clerk of the Circuit Court Washington County, Florida By K. McDaniel As Deputy Clerk Charles E. Berk, Esquire Florida Bar No. 141171 Post Office Box 5056 Ocala, Florida 34478 Attorney for Plaintiff (352) 629-1155 cceberk@aol.com March 26, April 2, 9, and 16, 2014 4-3435 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the Tallahassee Office until 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, April 30, 2014, for Proposal ID T3490. A Certification of Qualification is not required for this project on SR 10 (US 90) in Washington County. Work consists of constructing concrete sidewalk, concrete removal, excavation, embankment, concrete driveway construction and curb and gutter construction. Budget Estimate $99,380.00. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www.dot.state.fl.us/c c-admin/Lettings/Letting_Proje ct_Info.shtm or by calling (850) 414-4000. April 2, 9, 2014. 4-3434 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AN FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 13000148CA ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC Plaintiff(s), vs. PATRICK LGIBSON, et. al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in an for WASHINGTON County, Florida, where in ROSE ACCEPTANCE, INC. is the Plaintiff and PATRICK GIBSON A/K/APATRICK EUGEN GIBSON; MICHELLE ANNE GIBSON AND JANETR LEWELLEN are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse, 1331 South Blvd., Chipley, FL32428, at 11:00 a.m. on the 4 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth is said Order of Final Judgment, to wit:Commencing at the southeast corner of s 1/2 of se 1/4 of ne 1/4, section 14, township 2 north, range 15 west, for point of beginning, thence north 417.50 feet, thence west 417.50 feet, thence south 417.50 feet, thence east 417.50 feet, containing 4 acres, more or less. Less and except the following: a portion of the proposed 60 feet wide right of way for holmes valley road lying in the s.e. 1/4 of the n.e. 1/4 of section 14, township 2 north, range 15 west, washington county, florida. Being more particularly described as follows: commence at the presumed s.e. Corner of the s.e. 1/4 of the n.e. 1/4 of said section 14. Thence north 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds east for a distance of 15.57 feet along the east line of said section 14 to a point on a curve representing the southern boundary line of the proposed 60 feet wide right of way for holmes valley road. Said point being the point of beginning. Thence along the southern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road through a curve to the right having a radius of 430.00 feet and an arc length of 116.04 feet, being subtended by a chord of south 84 degrees 37 minutes 10 seconds west for a distance of 115.69 feet. Thence north 87 degrees 38 minutes 58 seconds west for a distance of 302.34 feet along the southern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road. Thence north 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds east for a distance of 60.03 feet to the northern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road. Thence south 87 degrees 38 minutes 58 seconds east for a distance of 304.35 feet along the northern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road to a curve to the left, thence along the north-

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedHVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS For Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 Washington County Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road Cottondale5019480 Security/Protective Services The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for(2) INMATE SUPERVISOR positions in the Parks and Recreation Department .The primary function of an Inmate Supervisor position will be to supervise the Department of Corrections and /or Washington County Jail inmates in the performance of maintenance activities such as cutting brush, limbs, trees and other vegetation grown at roadsides; utilizing power equipment such as boom mowers tractors, and chain saws; cleaning trash and debris, and/or moves trees or other obstructive objects from County right of way and hauling debris for deposit at specified locations. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent; Must possess a Florida Class E drivers license; Must pass a background check through the Department of Corrections; Must attend and satisfactorily complete Department of Corrections class for inmate supervisors; Carpentry skills preferred. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office by 4:00 PM on April 2, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veterans Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34284214 ern boundary line of the proposed right of way for holmes valley road through a curve to the left having a radius of 370.00 feet and an arc length of 114.38 feet, being subtended by a chord of north 83 degrees 29 minutes 41 seconds east for a distance of 113.92 feet to the east line of said section 14. Thence south 00 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds west for a distance of 62.01 feet along the east line of said section 14 to the point of beginning. Including a 1984 cima mobile home serial #gbics09782 and commoly known as: 3274 HOLMES VALLEYRD, VERNON, FL32462. IF YOU ARE APESON CLAIING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAININ AFTER THE DALE, YOU MUSTFILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS ATER THE SALE. IF OU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, OU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. SATED at WASHINGTON County, Florida, this 27 day of February, 2014 Harold Bazzel WASHINGTON County, Florida BY: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk April 2 and April 9, 2014 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Annual Spring Farm and Construction Auction April 26, 2014 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC FL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON www.masonauction.com Website ONLINE ONLY AUCTION -Buses, Tractor & Equipment & More for Sale! Ends April 3rd @ 7PM. Gulf Bay Auctions: 251-600-9595 or Visit GulfBayAuctions. com, AU3301 Big Yard Sale Friday and Saturday, April 4 and 5 behind the Bonifay Armory, Rain or Shine. Clothes, shoes, knickknacks, toys, dishes, lamps, Etc. To much to list! Something for everyone! Come Check it out! Yall come! LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big flea market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, April 4th and 5th, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Ala. Near Courthouse. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, April 5 7a.m.-until. tools, furniture, kitchen appliances, books, jewelry, glasswares clothes all sizes, and lots of Misc. items. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale, April 4 and 5, 9 AM until. Two families, Tools, Household, Misc... Lots of Stuff. 1583 Hudson Rd. Westville/Prosperity. Yard Sale, April 4 and 5. Three families, 10 AM until. Lots of Misc Items! 1629 Hudson Road Westville/Prosperity Yard Sale. April 5th. FL. Springs RV Park in Bonifay. 8am-until. Sites available for $20.00. 850-774-3719. For Sale. Misc Farm Equipment. 638-7586. Store, office or art gallery $250 MO with full bath sink and stove. Downtown Bonifay visible for business. 850-547-5244. TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classied ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? C ontact us today and start turning the stuff you dont want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairGroundskeeperThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for Grounds Keeper. Minimum Qualifications must have completed W.C.I. inmate supervisor training course and have a valid W.C.I. card, or be eligible for card; general knowledge of lawn care; basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment; ability to project a courteous and polite attitude to public, supervisors and subordinates; and able to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34284933 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Sign On Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34284633 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipart ners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/tanker endorsement, Prefer 2 yrs experience, Mileage & Drop Pay, Vacation, Health, Dental & 401k. For information call 800-569-6816 or go to our website www.ottery transportation.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 REGIONAL DRIVERS! Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608. Students Check Out The New Pay Increase! Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Nice 2/BR Apartment, family oriented complex, Rental assistance, and HUD in Vernon. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $375-480/mo Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 2BR cabin 1BA, no pets. $400 month, 1st, and last month. Deposit required. 229-400-5645. 8 miles South Bonifay 3BR/2BA House for rent/sale in Chipley. CHA, large lot, fruit trees. No HUD. 850-481-5352, 850-326-3319. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 House For Rent Vernon, 3BR/1BA, Large fenced backyard, Quite, $600/MO, $600/DEP, Reference required. 850-625-6997 Small 2BR/1BA out in country near Gap Lake. $400/month plus security. Sorry No Pets 850-258-3815 or 850-773-1352 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1.5BAin Wausau. $400.00/mth + security deposit. No pets. 850-113-1352 or 850-258-3815. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. For Sale 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. Price reduced. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. Handyman Special Frame House in Westville on 1.25 acres. 850-333-0157 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext91 Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to finish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76 Up to 9 acres from $14,900. Mountain cabin only $89,900. Access to lake and trout stream. Views of the Atlanta skyline. 45 minutes from Northern Atlanta. Priced below developer cost! Call 888-260-0905 Ext. 17. 98 Coachman Leprechaun REV 30, Great Condition-low mileage 40,000 miles, sleeps 8, V10 Triton gas engine, Exterior, private queen size bedroom, full size separate shower, central heat/air, central stereo we/ disc player, 2 /, double stainless steel sinks, 3 burner stove/oven, large refrigerator/freezer, canopy, beautiful oak cabinets throughout, original decor like new. Priced well below book value at $17,500 OBOE. 1 year warranty on engine and drive train. Also offering 2007 Harley-Davidson XL50 sportster, 50th Anniversey, 200cc engine. Commercial size gill/fryer, 60X42, dull back 1800 BTU burners, with stainless steel fry vat, and commercial size fry basket. Call 850-557-9712 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. AL#1481;GAL#2034;FL-AB#1488;NC#6397;TNAL#394510%BuyersP remium255Properties in 100 Offerings Detailed Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com Bid at the Auction or Online Bank Owned & Other Secured Parties AuctionAlabamaFloridaGeorgia N.CarolinaTennesseeWednesday, April 23 & Thursday,April24 11:00am Both DaysSaleSite: HolidayInn-AtlantaPerimeter/Dunwoody 4386ChambleeDunwoodyRd,Atlanta,GAPROPERTIESINCLUDE:ResidentialCommercial IndustrialAgricultural 1123835

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WASHINGTON COUNTY N NEw W S HOLMES c C OUNTY TIMESADVERTISER wW EDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014

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2 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 5018891 Challenges facing farmers today and tomorrow Though farming was once big business in the United States, by 2012 less than 1 percent of Americans were profes sional farmers. Many challenges face todays farmers, many of which are largely unknown to the general public. Many people have an outdated view of a farm as a small, family-owned and operated parcel of land where livestock is raised in open pens and crops are hand-harvested when ripe. The reality is that modern-day farms have had to overhaul op erations to meet demand and remain competitively priced while adapting to the ever-changing ways all parts of life. Each of these factors present obstacles for todays farmers. Technology Rural farming com munities are expected to make an effort to integrate modern technol ogy into an industry that has been around for centuries. But such a transition in rural areas, where communications systems may not be as up-to-date as those in urban areas, is not always so easy. According to the Manitoba Rural Adaptation Coun cil, a shift from a resource-based to an informationbased economy, compounded by the rapid introduc tion and expansion of new technology in the workplace, has altered farm operation and the skills in demand. Older workers who have been schooled in one way of agriculture may on labor supply and the vitality of farming as a career. Younger adults who are knowledgeable in technology may no longer seek out agricul tural careers. Decrease in farming as an occupation The United States En vironmental Protection Agency says that only about 960,000 Americans claim farming as their principal occupation. As the average age of farm ers continues to rise, as the Bureau of Labor Sta tistics notes that roughly 40 percent of the farmers in this country are 55 years old or older. This has led to concerns about the long-term health of family farms throughout the United States. Environmental concerns Many farmers have come under scrutiny for how farming impacts the environment. A growing emphasis on sustainabil ity and conservation has led many people to pro test certain farming prac tices. Protesters claim that certain practices, such as raising livestock, can pollute water, while the use of fertilizers and chemical pesticides is bad for the environ ment. Many farmers, however, have altered their methods to be more environmentally friendly and selfsustainable in the process. Climate change is another environ mental issue farm ers must deal with. Strong storms and severe droughts have made farming even more chal lenging. Financial fall-out The ongoing re cession of the last half-decade has also affected farm ers. In November of 2012, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated that the unemployment rate within the agricul and hunting industries was at 13.6 percent, far higher than the national unemployment rate. As a result, many farm fami lies have found them selves stuck between a rock and a hard place, as rising costs for equipment and technology are being coupled with decreasing ployment. Further complicating matters is competition from corporations and international food pro ducers who have made farmers rely on loans and lines of credit to survive, but thanks to changes in saw banks become less willing to extend lines of credit, some farmers are facing bankruptcy. TreeRemoval&Pruning TractorWork

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 3 The Best of Both WorldsLocal Agents, Local Oces, Local Service, Best Value.The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life.Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Membership doesnt cost, it pays! 1361 JACKSON AVE., CHIPLEY 6381756washington@bic.com1108 N. WAUKESHA ST., BONIFAY 5474227holmes@bic.com G rai nfed be efwhenav ai l ab le ( No h ormo nes orst eroi ds ) WeOfferUS DA In spectedWeoffercustom bu tc he ri ng : Wealsodowildgame pr oces si ng P hone :(850)548-1201 2965RMWardRd.(181-C) Westville,Fl32464 WestvilleMeats The impacts of last years heavy rainfall and the still-varying tem peratures has caused a planting delay for many of Holmes and Washing ton county farmers and gardening enthusiasts, but local extension staff say theyre hopeful the impact on agribusinesses wont last long. Its too early to tell much about the ultimate effects of the rainfall and cold, said Matthre Or wat, Washington County Horticulture Extension Agent. We did lose some cit rus trees, and sometimes, freeze damage wont show up in citrus for two years. You might see some die out later in the year because they were stressed out by weather last year. Orwat says one advantage to the incli mate cold experienced by the area is a potential decrease in certain pests and a higher blueberry yield. The cold weather possibly helped push back some of the pests that were invading us last year, he said. Kudzu bugs are a big problem here, especially for any kind of bean plant, but we should see less of them this season. The blueberry harvest should be pretty good, Despite delays, agriculture outlook is strongtoo, because those plants like that cold zap; it makes them produce heavier. Orwat says the wet weather poses more problems, however, such as root rot. Dogwoods are being harmed right now; I see a lot of dogwood blight out there, and everything is late. For example, azaleas are usually in full bloom by now, but theyre pretty late as a result of the weather. Still, Orwat says the frost danger has passed and encourages planting, even though its late. Now is a good time to plant your summer vegetables, such as squash and watermelon, he said. Shep Eubanks, Holmes County Extension Director and Agriculture Agent, agrees. Were running be hind on getting ready to put crops in the ground because of the rain, said Eubanks. But now is a good time to plant those summer vegetables, even though theyre behind. Eubanks said heavy rainfall has kept many local farmers out of the time, and cold weather snaps have affected even greehouse crops, such as transplants. Meanwhile, Eubanks says many here are still making decision on how to move forward as the implementing of shape. Farmers are trying to going do; what ratio of crops to plant with the new farm bill and what options to take. Farmers must choose between one subsidy program based on dimin ishing sales, or another based on declining crop prices. The farmers program selection, which wont be effective until next year, is due this month. Eubanks also reports local cattlemen have a good forecast, We just need some warmer weather, but the cattle market is strong, he said. Agriculture at a glanceAgriculture is not only an important industry for Washington and Holmes counties, but for the state of Florida as a whole. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and wear on a daily basis, but too few people appreciate this contribution to our economy and our way of life. matic increase from the average of 25 people per farmer which was the case in the 1960s. account for 1,587 jobs, $59 million dollars in revenue and contributes 12.6 percent to the gross regional product. vide 1,950 jobs, $58 million in revenue and contributes 17.3 percent to the gross regional product.By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com

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4 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 Asoneofthelargestagriculturebanksinthenation,Regionshasthestrengthtosupport youinnancingandgrowingyouroperation.Thatsgoodtoknow.Butwhatsbetteristhat weserveyourneedslocally.Whetheryouneedhelpwithlendingandequipmentleasing, treasurymanagement,productioncreditorcropinsurance,ourteamhastheexperience andfocusthatyouwant.Interestedinwhatwecandoforyou?Letstalk.Wethinkyoull seeitstimetomaketheswitchtoRegions. RhondaSapp|V ice P resident|CommunityBanker 2889GreenSt.|Marianna,FL32446 Phone:850.849.3476|rhonda.sapp@regions.comSwitchtoRegionsforbankingsolutionsthatwillhelpyougrow.Lending|Insurance|TreasuryManagementvisitaRegionsbranchorregions.com/agbanking 2013Regions.Allloanssubjecttocreditapproval.LeasingsolutionsareprovidedthroughRegionsEquipmentFinanceCorporationandDeLageLandenFinancial Services,Inc.InsuranceproductsaresoldthroughRegionsInsurance,Inc.,andRegionsInsuranceServices,Inc.,afliatesofRegionsBank,andarenotFDIC-insured, notdeposits,notguaranteedbyRegionsBankoritsafliates,notinsuredbyanygovernmentagency,andmaygodowninvalue.ThepurchaseofinsurancethroughRegionsInsurance,Inc., orRegionsInsuranceServices,Inc.,iscompletelyoptional.WhetherornotyoupurchaseinsurancethroughRegionsInsurance,Inc.,orRegionsInsuranceServices,Inc.,willnotaffectany applicationforcreditorthetermsofanyexistingcreditagreement. Rose Demonstration Garden helps identify prime varieties for local areaBy MATTHEW OrR WAT Horticulture Agent, Washington County, UF IFAS Extension Not many residents know about the Rose Demonstration Gar den at the Washington County Agricultural Center. Heres a chance to learn a bit more about it. In this garden, there are eight rose bushes that survive well under a no spray program, other than dormant sulfur sprays once a year. These rose cultivars are resistant to the most com mon ailment of roses in the south, Black spot. They also require minimal ir rigation and fertilizer inputs. Blackspot spores are spread from the canes or leaves of the previous seasons growth by rain or overhead irrigation. To minimize inoculum (black spot spores) re move all leaves from the previous season and any dead leaves at the base of the plant. After the annual pruning in mid to late February, it is a good idea to spray roses with sulfur or copper based fungicidal soap. This helps kill spores that have been lying dormant throughout the winter. Be careful not to spray these products when temperatures rise above 80 F. Doing so could burn the plants, although these products will dam age tender young growth as well at temperatures below 80 F. Several other cultural methods that will prevent spread of this disease among the rose garden include avoiding over head irrigation, planting in well ventilated areas and proper plant spacing. These techniques attempt to make the garden envi ronment inhospitable for blackspot proliferation. While dormant sprays and cultural methods often allow rose garden ers to get ahead of the disease, the best defense for the home garden is to plant resistant cultivars. There are several old and new resistant cultivars on the market. Some new resistant cultivars of note include Home Run and Knockout. Also, several older cultivars have demonstrated excellent resistance, such as Mrs. B.R. Cant and Spice. Matthew Orwat has been working with several older rose cultivars at the UF / IFAS Washington County Extension dem onstration garden that have shown resistance during the last three years. While this dem onstration garden is not roses that have dem onstrated some merit include Belindas Dream, Monsieur Tillier, Mme. Antoine Mari, Rosette Del izy and Souvenier de la Malmaison. Current plans for expansion of the Wash ington County Dem onstration Garden and the Master Gardener program include the addition of a vegetable demonstration garden and camellia collection, to be located at the front entrance of the Washing ton County Agricultural Center.

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 5 ALL TYPES OF INSURANCENeed Farm or Ranch Insurance?Proudly representing Great American Insurance Group.CALL TOD AY FOR A QUOTE!(850) 638-18051396 Jackson Avenue Chipley, FL 32428 Serving You Is Our Most Important Product Twohomeimprovementsmoreatticinsulationandenergyecientwindowscanmakeabigdierenceinyourenergy usage.InsulationwithanR-38value(about12-15inches) andenergy-ecientwindowsimproveyourhomesenergy performanceandthermal comfort.Letusperform ahomeenergyauditand ndwaystouseenergy wisely.Togetherwepower yourlife. We useenergywisely Formoreenergyeciencytips, visitwww.westorida.coop Increase storage possibilities What homeowner has not lamented that they have many more belongings than they have storage space? In some homes, particularly in older homes, closet space and other areas to store items may be lacking. But savvy homeowners can manent and temporary so lutions to their home storage problems. One of the easiest ways to create storage space is to simply remove some belongings from the residence. Go through closets around the house and pick through the attic and/or garage to see if there are any items that can be dis carded or donated. The next step is to maximize the space of your exist ing closets. Many closets are equipped with just a shelf and a clothing rack, greatly limiting the storage potential. Invest ing in a closet organiza tion system is one way to transform a poorly utilized space. These sys tems can be purchased, often inexpensively, from a home improve ment center. Compiled of modular racks and shelv ing, the positioning can be customized depending on the size of the closet. Oftentimes, the addition of shelving or another rack for hanging clothes can solve some stor age issues. These closet systems also are ideal for renters because they can be installed with minimal damage and be removed when a lease expires. Homeowners may have to think vertically to solve storage solu tions. Wall space may be abundant in a home where closets are not. Therefore, shelving and cabinets can be places to keep items neatly off the can be installed next to a washing machine to keep laundry supplies organized. In childrens rooms, build bookcases the height of the room so children can store frequently used reading material and toys on the lower levels, and adults can put collectibles and mementos near the top. Hang hooks to hold hats and robes. Whenever possible, look to store items on the walls where they will keep clutter off Storage can even be created in the bathroom, where the space over the toilet can be used to hang a cabinet to store hand towels and other toiletries if the space under the sink has already been claimed. Many apart ment dwellers recognize the advantage of having items that serve double-duty in their living spaces. For example, a convertible sofa can be used for sit ting and then turn into a bed for overnight guests. Ottomans that have a storage compartment can house anything from throw blankets to maga house the television but also have a pull-out shelf that can hold a laptop computer. In the kitchen, move food items out of cabin etry and into a pantry you create elsewhere in the house, such as a laundry room or garage. This frees up more room for pots and pans. Cabi nets that have pull-out shelving help maxi mize tight recesses of cabinets and keep things organized and in sight. For those with limited cabinets, pots and pans can be hung from a pot rack suspended in the kitchen.

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6 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 Deer-proong a garden Creating a beautiful and bountiful garden is a popular pastime for people all across the country. It is important to keep in mind that aesthetically appealing plants may be appetizing to area wildlife, includ ing deer. Those who do not want their gardens to turn into all-you-can-eat buffets for deer, rabbits and other wild animals can take a more proac tive approach to garden ing. Deer are opportunists who will no doubt see your garden as a salad bar ripe with all of their favorite foods. As hous ing developments con tinue to encroach on the natural habitats of deer and other animals, these animals are becoming more visible. Deer may not be able to forage for food effectively in their smaller, natural sur roundings, or they may become accustomed to the easy pickings they yards. Either way, you may encounter a deer in or around your area. Keeping deer at bay involves some work and maintenance on the part of a homeowner. There are safe and humane methods to repelling deer, or at least block ing access to the plants worth protecting. Here are the main ways to deer-proof a garden. Fence It Fences are one way to deter deer from enter ing a yard and dining on your garden. Keep in mind that deer can jump fences that are quite tall, but they have to be especially motivated to jump an eight-foot-tall fence. Still, they tend to be weary about scaling a fence when they cannot see what is on the other side. Therefore, if you are fencing out deer, choose a fence that cam and completely encloses the area to be protected. If you do not want the fence to be solid, con sider putting stakes or thorny plants within the garden so that the deer will hesitate to jump into the garden. Scare Them Deer are naturally skittish around people, but over time they can become quite compla cent around human beings. Once a deer decides that something will not present a threat, the deer can adapt to its presence. Motion-activated devices may not work, nor the presence of pets. Predator urine is typi cally an effective way at keeping deer at bay. Bottled coyote urine can be quite effective, although human urine may work as well. Reapplying the prod uct weekly around the plants is a good idea. Repel the Deer There are many organic or chemicallybased products on the market that deer may or smell. Hot pepper, sulfur and eggs or even the use of soapy water have been successful in certain in stances. The use of blood meal or even human hair around the garden may repel the deer and keep them on a different foraging path. However, remember that any deer that is very hungry may ignore unpleasant tastes or smells for a quick bite. Change Plants If other food sources are available, there are some species of plants and trees that deer will avoid. Filling your garden with these plants can help you maintain a beautiful, al beit untasty, environment for deer. When planting annuals, select among: In terms of perennials, plant these items once, and deer could stay away: Plant these herbs along more protection:

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 7 C & C Construction of Northwest Florida LLCServicing Northwest Florida and Lower Alabama We do new construction, replacement, and repairs for Call today for your free quote. 850-547-1001FL: CCC1327331 AL: S-44779 What to expect with a tree removal Trees serve many purposes for a landscape, providing shade and habitats for birds and other animals and serving as natural blinds between two homes. Trees are often beautiful elements of a natural landscape, add ing aesthetic appeal to a property or even an entire community. But there are times when a tree must be removed, an action that, in many instances, requires the services of a professional tree service. A tree with roots invading the foundation of a home or infringing on a patio or walkway can become a safety hazard. Other trees may cast shade where a pool is planned or cause disagreements between neighbors when the tree straddles a property line. These are instances when tree removal will be necessary, and a repu table service can advise as to the best methods for ridding the property of the troublesome tree. Homeowners will need to do a bit of planning and research to remove trees safely and secure ly. It is best to contact a variety of different tree removal services and compare their offerings and prices. The cost of a tree removal will vary depending on various factors, includ ing the height of the tree, its width, the number of branches it has, its location on a property and the proximity of that location to potential hazards like power lines. Tree removal may range from a few hundred dol lars to several thousand. When a tree is be ing removed, most of the branches will be removed to make the tree more manageable. Trees are rarely chopped at the base and allowed to fall. Sections of the tree will be cut, roped off and slowly lowered. A climber will scale the tree or use a cherry picker machine to reach the top of the tree to facilitate the process. The pieces of the tree will be loaded into a wood-chipper for grinding before they are hauled away. Larger, heavier portions of the stumps may need to be moved later on with ma chinery. Hauling trees off the property may cost extra, so it is important that homeowners read their contract thoroughly before sign ing on the dotted line. Additional costs may be factored into the bill. These can include stump-and-root grinding. Trees will be cut down to the stump. To prevent eyesores or tripping haz ards, some homeowners opt to have the stumps ground down into sawdust. This will not re move all of the roots but will take care of most of the above-ground portion of the remaining stump. It is usually up to the homeowner to discard the sawdust or use it as a mulching material. Expect the ground around the former tree to be soft, and there may be a depression depend ing on how much stump grinding took place. Some people prefer to wait a season for the ground to recover before planting something new. It may take a while for grass to sprout where a tree was once located, and there may be bare spots when grass starts to grow in. Tree removal can be an expensive venture but is necessary for differ ent reasons. Be sure that tree-removal services are fully insured before signing a contract. HENRYARNOLD FORDCO.,INCMIKEARNOLDSales

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8 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 2, 2014 Farm Families of the Year Holmes County Jeremy Rolling Family Rolling Farms WestvillePeanuts, cotton, oats, watermelons, and hayConservation Farm Familyen Sherrouse FamilyForest Stewardship AwardParamore FamilyWashington County Dennis Gainer Family Gainer Blueberry Farm ChipleyBlueberriesTree Farmer of the Yearen Ty PeelCattleman of the Yearen George OwensConservationist of the Yearen Dr. Ron Harrell and Dr. Les NicholsDistinguished Service to Agricultureen Diann Webb

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 AUCTION45NORTH FLORIDA &COASTAL ALABAMAPROPERTIESWednesday, April 16, 11:00 A.M. CDTSale Site: Holiday Inn Pensacola,7813 N. Davis Highway, Pensacola, FL 32514Thursday, April 17, 11:00 A.M. CDTSale Site: The Palms Conference Center, 9201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach, FL 32407Properties Include:Waterfront Luxury Homes & Condos Prime Waterfront Lots & Land OfceBuildings,RecreationalFacility HighTrafcCommercialLots&LandBroker Compensation Available10% Buyers Premium FL-AB #1488 AL #1481 Bid at the Auction or OnlineDetailed Information800.479.1763 johndixon.com Final & Complete Liquidation of Bank Holding Properties 5019251 5019238 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER?Dr.KevinHornsby,MD,willmailtherst37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollarbookADoctorsGuidetoErecle Dysfuncon.Hessosurethisbookwillchangeyourlifehewillevenpay thepostageandhandling.Ifthepopularpillsdon'tworkforyou,regardless ofyourageormedicalhistory,youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoread thisbooknow!CallTollFree 800-777-1922 24-hrs.andleaveyourname andaddress(only). 5019240 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-13902 5019246 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedHVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS For Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 Washington County Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road Cottondale5019480 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 5019248 Security/Protective Services The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for(2) INMATE SUPERVISOR positions in the Parks and Recreation Department .The primary function of an Inmate Supervisor position will be to supervise the Department of Corrections and /or Washington County Jail inmates in the performance of maintenance activities such as cutting brush, limbs, trees and other vegetation grown at roadsides; utilizing power equipment such as boom mowers tractors, and chain saws; cleaning trash and debris, and/or moves trees or other obstructive objects from County right of way and hauling debris for deposit at specified locations. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent; Must possess a Florida Class E drivers license; Must pass a background check through the Department of Corrections; Must attend and satisfactorily complete Department of Corrections class for inmate supervisors; Carpentry skills preferred. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office by 4:00 PM on April 2, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veterans Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34284214 The Romantic Novel of the Year! almostdestin.com. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Annual Spring Farm and Construction Auction April 26, 2014 at 8:00 AM, Highway 231 North, Campbellton, FL 32426. (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Departments, City and County, Plus Consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC FL # 642 850-263-0473 OFFICE 850-258-7652 CHAD MASON 850-849-0792 GERALD MASON www.masonauction.com Website ONLINE ONLY AUCTION -Buses, Tractor & Equipment & More for Sale! Ends April 3rd @ 7PM. Gulf Bay Auctions: 251-600-9595 or Visit GulfBayAuctions. com, AU3301 Big Yard Sale Friday and Saturday, April 4 and 5 behind the Bonifay Armory, Rain or Shine. Clothes, shoes, knickknacks, toys, dishes, lamps, Etc. To much to list! Something for everyone! Come Check it out! Yall come! LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big flea market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, April 4th and 5th, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Ala. Near Courthouse. Yard Sale April 4 and 5, 9 AM until. Two families, Tools, Household, Misc... Lots of Stuff. 1583 Hudson Rd. Westville/Prosperity. Yard Sale, April 4 and 5. Three families, 10 AM until. Lots of Misc Items! 1629 Hudson Road Westville/Prosperity Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, April 5 7a.m.-until. tools, furniture, kitchen appliances, books, jewelry, glasswares clothes all sizes, and lots of Misc. items. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale. April 5th. FL. Springs RV Park in Bonifay. 8am-until. Sites available for $20.00. 850-774-3719. For Sale. Misc Farm Equipment. 638-7586. Store, office or art gallery $250 MO with full bath sink and stove. Downtown Bonifay visible for business. 850-547-5244. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairGroundskeeperThe City of Chipley is accepting applications for Grounds Keeper. Minimum Qualifications must have completed W.C.I. inmate supervisor training course and have a valid W.C.I. card, or be eligible for card; general knowledge of lawn care; basic knowledge of the functions of lawn equipment; ability to project a courteous and polite attitude to public, supervisors and subordinates; and able to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34284933 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded ImmediatelyDump Trailer Experience. $1000 Sign On Bonus Walton/Bay/ Washington Counties Panama City Area *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdido trucking.com 1653 Maple Avenue Panama City, Florida 32405 850-784-7940 Web ID#: 34284633 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipart ners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/tanker endorsement, Prefer 2 yrs experience, Mileage & Drop Pay, Vacation, Health, Dental & 401k. For information call 800-569-6816 or go to our website www.ottery transportation.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 REGIONAL DRIVERS! Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608. Students Check Out The New Pay Increase! Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Nice 2/BR Apartment, family oriented complex, Rental assistance, and HUD in Vernon. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $375-480/mo Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 2BR cabin 1BA, no pets. $400 month, 1st, and last month. Deposit required. 229-400-5645. 8 miles South Bonifay 3BR/2BA House for rent/sale in Chipley. CHA, large lot, fruit trees. No HUD. 850-481-5352, 850-326-3319. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 House For Rent Vernon, 3BR/1BA, Large fenced backyard, Quite, $600/MO, $600/DEP, Reference required. 850-625-6997 Small 2BR/1BA out in country near Gap Lake. $400/month plus security. Sorry No Pets 850-258-3815 or 850-773-1352 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1.5BAin Wausau. $400.00/mth + security deposit. No pets. 850-113-1352 or 850-258-3815. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Handyman Special Frame House in Westville on 1.25 acres. 850-333-0157 For Sale 3BR/2BA, CHA, Large lot, brick, fruit trees, optional large workshop, in Chipley. Price reduced. 850-481-5352 or 850-326-3319. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext91 Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to finish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76 Up to 9 acres from $14,900. Mountain cabin only $89,900. Access to lake and trout stream. Views of the Atlanta skyline. 45 minutes from Northern Atlanta. Priced below developer cost! Call 888-260-0905 Ext. 17. 98 Coachman Leprechaun REV 30, Great Condition-low mileage 40,000 miles, sleeps 8, V10 Triton gas engine, Exterior, private queen size bedroom, full size separate shower, central heat/air, central stereo we/ disc player, 2 /, double stainless steel sinks, 3 burner stove/oven, large refrigerator/freezer, canopy, beautiful oak cabinets throughout, original decor like new. Priced well below book value at $17,500 OBOE. 1 year warranty on engine and drive train. Also offering 2007 Harley-Davidson XL50 sportster, 50th Anniversey, 200cc engine. Commercial size gill/fryer, 60X42, dull back 1800 BTU burners, with stainless steel fry vat, and commercial size fry basket. Call 850-557-9712 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Volume 51 Number 47 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes Counties FREE TAKE ONE5019543

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, April 2, 2014