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Washington County news ( June 22, 2013 )

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Washington County news
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Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
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Chipley Fla
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Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
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L.E. Sellers, editor.
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Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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notis - ACC5987
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UF00028312:00849

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Material Information

Title:
Washington County news
Uniform Title:
Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Chipley Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates:
30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began May 23, 1924.
General Note:
L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID:
UF00028312:00849

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C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T chipleypaper .c om 50¢ Wednesday, JULY 24 2013 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com Volume 90, Number 29 INDEX Arrests .................................. A5 Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ................................... A7 Extra ..................................... B1 Faith ..................................... B4 Obituaries ............................. B3 Classi eds ............................. B6 IN BRIEF N EWS Washington County Possum Pageant WAUSAU — The 44th annual Possum Festival kicks off Saturday, July 27, with the annual Wausau Miss Possum Festival Pageant at the Possum Palace. Gates open at 5 p.m. Entry for the pageant is 18 and under. Gate admission is $3 for adults, 12 and under free. Bring a chair. Planning commission to meet Aug. 6 CHIPLEY — The Washington County Planning Commission will have a public hearing and meeting at 5 p.m. Aug. 6 in the County Government Annex Meeting Room, 1331 South Blvd. The commission will accommodate handicapped and disabled persons who wish to attend. Call 415-5093 at least 48 hours before the meeting date to make arrangements. First Presbyterian Art Day Camp CHIPLEY — Chipley First Presbyterian Church will have its annual Art Day Camp Bible School 9:3011:30 a.m. Aug. 5-9. This year’s theme is, “Faith, Hope and Charity!” Attendance will be limited to 20 students, ages 10-13. Registration must be completed before Aug. 1 by contacting the church at 658 5th St. Chipley. Attendees will be accepted on a rstcome, rst-served basis. By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — The Washington County Tourist Development Council approved the new method of providing advertising, not cash, to local events during their workshop and meeting Monday at the Chamber Building in Chipley. The decision was not unanimous, with Mary Richmond voting against the change. “I don’t have enough information,” she said. Three council members, Richmond, Elizabeth Henderson and Mark Hess, joined the meeting via conference call so the TDC would have a quorum. From now on, when events such as the Panhandle Watermelon Festival apply for TDC assistance with promotion, they will be awarded that assistance in pre-purchased bulk advertising, Administrative Assistant Heather Lopez said. “This will save the council money,” Member Ted Everett said. The switch from cash to advertising will also make the process simpler and more transparent, Everett said. “The event representatives will have radio and print advertising to choose from, and the TDC will be there to give them advice as to which station or media is more appropriate for their event.” Richmond questioned the amount of money the TDC planned on spending for advertising. “I don’t think we should spend $80,000 on advertising,” she said. Everett said $80,000 would represent the entire annual budget of the TDC. “We’re talking about spending $10,000 a year on bulk advertising,” Everett said. This doesn’t mean the TDC will stop funding events, Everett said. The grant program only provided funds to be used for advertising and promotion, and that is still the mission of the TDC. “This will also allow us to See GRANTS A2 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON — Mayor Michelle Cook told the Vernon City Council that the postponed Fourth of July event is going to be on Aug. 31. The city council had its July meeting at City Hall on Monday. “We won’t have a parade this year, and the event will begin at 5 p.m.,” Cook said. “We still will have entertainment by Gilley’s, and the fireworks will start at 9 p.m.” The event was postponed due to the flooding that occurred in Vernon on July 4 when the area received over 20 inches of rain in the matter of a couple of days. Several buildings and homes were damaged in Vernon — the cost of the damage to the community has been estimated at $2.1 million. Cook said she has continued to work to collect information for the city’s effort to collect FEMA assistance, but asked if someone else on the council could help her since she is also busy planning the Aug. 31 event. Councilman Tray Hawkins volunteered to help. “If you can just bring me what you have so far I can take that on,” he said. The Washington County Tourist Development Council approved an additional $100 for the city of Vernon during its meeting Vernon reworks set for Aug. 31 See FIREWORKS A2 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — Washington County Chamber of Commerce is teaming with Northwest Florida Community Hospital again this year to bring the “We Can!” program to the annual Back To School Fair. The annual Back To School Fair, which is planned for Tuesday, Aug. 13. “We’re always looking for volunteers to help with the Back To School Fair,” said Ted Everett, chamber executive director. The fair also needs school supplies to distribute to children. Last year 3,000 people attended the Back To School Fair, and not only school supplies were distributed. “There were three tractor-trailers of food, eggs and vegetables, that were handed out,” Everett said. “And it was all gone really quickly. We have some needy families in our county, and this event is a great thing.” Students also received free haircuts and even bicycle helmets at last year’s event. Future grants to be paid with advertising, not cash ‘FOOTLOOSE’ RANDAL SEYLER | The News Blake Collins, left, and Malinda Locke, second from left, play Ren and Ariel, the star-crossed teenagers who ght to bring dancing to the rural Bomont in the Spanish Trail Playhouse production of “Footloose: The Musical.” The production was staged this weekend. For more photos, see Page B1 and visit chipleypaper.com. Back to School Fair set for Aug. 13 See SCHOOL A2 See our ‘Back To School’ special section inserted today! RANDAL SEYLER | The News Vernon Garden Club member Rhonda Dickenson discusses changing venues for the monthly club meeting at the Vernon City Council meeting Monday.

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 24, 2013 The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Clean,clear natur al sound Y our Hearing Aids communicate with each other automatically adjusting themselves. Ear -to-Ear Synchronization: Settings are automatically transferred to the other aid. Beltone Pr omise™ Hearing Aid System $1000 off Applies to 2 Hearing Aids at Pr emier Level. $800 off Adv antage Level. MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850)387-4931 W ednesdays & F ridays Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience WE’RE IN Y OUR NEIGHBORHOOD! CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850)387-4931 Monday F riday The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 7 -31 -1 3 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 !# 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon GRANTS from page A1 promote the county in general when there isn’t a speci c event taking place,” Lopez said. “Which is one of the things the TDC has been wanting to do more of.” Tim Lanham visited the TDC during its workshop and informed the council that there will be a state Bee Keeping Conference held in Chipley from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. “We expect there will be 200 to 250 people coming to Chipley for the event,” Lanham said. He added that Lopez has been working with him in arranging hotel accommodations for visitors. The event is sponsored in part by the Chipola, the Tupelo and the Central Panhandle Bee Keepers Associations, Lanham said. “The county extension of ce is also heavily involved, and we hope to get our FFA, 4-H and JROTC kids involved in the events as well,” Lanham said. In other business, the council approved a $100 grant request from the city of Vernon for the Firecracker Day event, which had to be rescheduled until Aug. 31 due to ooding on the Fourth of July. The TDC members also heard a report from Lopez on attendance at the Panhandle Watermelon Festival, which was held June 28-29. “The attendance at Friday’s concert event was estimated at 3,500,” Lopez said, “which is tremendous considering the weather.” Numerous people booked hotel rooms and stayed for Saturday’s events, and the Washington County Agricultural Center auditorium was packed for the Watermelon Auction and the concert by the Grammy Award-winning bluegrass group Dailey & Vincent. “People were standing along the walls because there were no more seats,” Lopez said. The Watermelon Festival’s Facebook page also received a record number of visits, getting up to 20,000 hits a day during the week leading up to the event. The Festival’s web page received 439,000 hits in the three months prior to the event, and the county web site’s visits also increased in June due to the Festival, posting 1,518 visits with 1,300 of those clicking through to the Watermelon Festival page. “The rebranding, and the shift in focus they have done with the Watermelon Festival has done wonders for the event,” Lopez said. Monday afternoon to help the city promote the rescheduled event. City Clerk Dian Hendrix asked the council for clari cation on the matter of a nal attorney’s bill from former city attorney Kerry Adkison. “I received this email, and I was not sure if the city wanted an itemized bill for just this one item or for all of them,” Hendrix said. Adkison was under the impression the city wanted an itemized bill for just one of the listed charges, she said. “I would like to see an itemized list for the whole bill,” Councilwoman Gwen March said. “That is what we discussed,” Hawkins added. March asked that Hendrix seek an itemized bill so the council could discuss it at the next council workshop. Vernon Garden Club member Tom Holman asked the council if the garden club could begin holding its monthly meetings in the City Hall instead of in the old high school. Hendrix said the room the garden club had been using in the old high school sustained water damage in the July 4 weekend ooding. “We’re going to get that room cleaned out,” she said. Club member Rhonda Dickenson asked if the club couldn’t just meet in Room No. 3 instead. “That other room is wet and smells moldy, I don’t think we should be meeting in there.” Holman said the garden club is up to 30 members, and the group will begin meeting again in September. The council agreed the club could use the alternative room for their monthly meetings. “I have a request,” Hawkins asked Holman and Dickenson. “In Wausau, the garden club gives out a ‘Yard of the Month’ award. Do you think we could start doing something like that in Vernon?” Holman agreed that the club could begin that program, presenting the winners with a certi cate at the monthly city council meetings and perhaps providing a sign for the lawn. Hawkins said the city had tried the punitive method of getting people to take care of they lawns, to little avail. “Maybe if we try the carrot we’ll get more participation.” FIREWORKS from page A1 “You also might remember, Washington County was recently ranked as 65th of 67 counties in child obesity,” said Everett. “This is a problem, and we have to understand that it affects us as business owners.” Obese children are likely to have developed diabetes by the time they are 30, which means health care expenses. “Not only does the health insurance costs rise, but it also affects productivity and absenteeism in the workplace,” Everett said. The “We Can!” program (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) is a national movement designed to give parents, caregivers, and entire communities a way to help children 8 to 13 years old stay at a healthy weight, according to the website nhlbi.nih. gov. Research shows that parents and caregivers are the primary in uence on this age group. The “We Can!” education program provides parents and caregivers with tools, fun activities, and more to help them encourage healthy eating, increased physical activity, and reduced time sitting in front of the TV or computer in their entire family, Everett said. “This year we will be at the Back To School Fair, and we are also working with the schools to get information into the classrooms and to the kids,” Everett said. We Can! also offers organizations, community groups, and health professionals a centralized resource to promote a healthy weight in youth through community outreach, partnership development, and media activities that can be adapted to meet the needs of diverse populations, according to the website. Science-based educational programs, support materials, training opportunities, and other resources are available to support programming for youth, parents, and families in the community. Chamber member and insurance agent Kathy Rudd said that she had encountered children as young as 12 who were uninsurable due to their health risks. “We have to get busy trying to get our kids educated and get them to where they need to be, size-wise,” Everett said. SCHOOL from page A1 RANDAL SEYLER | The News Tourist Development Council Administrative Assistant Heather Lopez, center, explains the plan to switch from providing cash to providing advertising for local events during Monday’s TDC meeting in Chipley, while Council members Joel Pate, left, and Ted Everett, right, listen to the discussion. RANDAL SEYLER | The News Ted Everett, executive director of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, discusses the “We Can!” program on Thursday. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, July 24, 2013 @ w { h ˆ e | 3 p w { k c [ @ w { h ˆ e | 3 p w { k c [ @ w { h ˆ e | 3 p w { k c [ 0 w r r  u k ‹ 7 w | x k [ p 0 w r r  u k ‹ 7 w | x k [ p 0 w r r  u k ‹ 7 w | x k [ p S u r g ic a l I n s ti tu t e O ur t ea m of de dic at ed su r ge on s an d hig hly tr ain ed su r ge r y sta me mb ers wi ll pr o vid e y ou c om pa ssi on at e c ar e thr ou gh ou t y ou r su r ge r y sta y P lea se c all for an ap p oin tm en t an d let ou r su r gic al t ea m pr o vid e the sp eci ali z ed c ar e y ou an d y ou r f am ily de ser v e H. J am es W al l M D Bo ar d Ce r ti ed Ot o lar yng o log y Ea r no se and thr oat il lne sse s, v er tig o sur g er y r hin op las t y al ler g y tes tin g and tr eat me nt f or v er tig o He ar ing tes ts f or c hil dr en and a du lts. F or app oin t me nt c al l: 850 -41 5-8 185 G ab rie l B er r y M D Bo ar d Ce r ti ed Ge ne r al Su rg e r y F ul l g ene r al sur g er y to inc lud e bu t no t lim ite d to: He r nia app end ect o my abd o mi nal sur g er y gal l bla dd er bio psy ma ste cto my and lum pec xto my as w el l as end osc op y and col o nso cop y F or app oin t me nt c al l: 850 -41 5-8 180 H ec t or M ej ia M D of T alla has see O r tho p edi c Cli nic Bo ar d Eli g ib le O r tho p edi c Sur g e r y P r a ctic ing or tho ped ic sur g er y wit h spe cia liz ati o n in spo r ts me dic ine sur g er y sho uld er and kn ee ar thr osc op y A CL tea r r ota tor cu tea r lab r al tea r and me nis c al tea r F or app oin t me nt c al l: 850 -41 5-8 30 3 A da m P ea de n, DP M Bo ar d Eli g ib le F o ot and A nkl e Sur g e r y Di abe tic w oun d c ar e ank le and f oot tr aum a, FD A app r o v ed toe nai l fun gus las er F or app oint ment, c al l: 850-638-(FO O T ) 3668 V anessa KingJohnson, MD Bo ar d Ce r tied Obst et r ics and G yneco log y G y necologic al exams, oce pr ocedur es, out patient/inpatient minor and major surg er ies, ur inar y inco ntinence e valuatio n and tr eatment. F or app oint ment c al l: 850-415-8320 J Daniell R ack le y MD of Southeast e r n Ur o log y Cent e r Bo ar d Ce r tied Ur o log y Disor ders of the kidne y s, bla dder pr ostate A dult and pediatr ic ur olog y F or app oint ment c al l: 1-800-689-6678 Aa r on S ho r es M D Bo ar d Ce r ti ed P ain Ma nag em ent D r S ho r es is tr ain ed in tr a dit io nal and int er v ent io nal pai n ma nag em ent to r elie v e pai n tha t c an lim it no r ma l dai l y fun ctio n and a ctiv it y er e is ho pe D r S ho r es and his qu ali ed sta c an hel p y ou g et y our lif e ba c k. T r eat me nt inc lud es dis or der s of the spi n, inc lud ing pin c hed ner v es, lo w ba c k and nec k pai n, per ip her al neu r op ath y D r S ho r es’ o ce is loc ate d in S uit e 3 of the He alth & W el lne ss Ce nte r wh ic h is lo c ate d o n the no r th end of the ho spi tal c am pu s. F or app oin t me nt c al l: 850 -63 8-0 505 v}™™}“ ™€q W e T r eat Y ou L ike F ami ly 1 3 6 0 BRICK Y ARD R OA D C HIPLE Y F L 32428 850 638 1610 W W W N F C H.O R G P a in M a n a g e m e n t I n s ti tu t e

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HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.chipleypaper.com A Page 4 Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 mkabaci@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212 The death of former neighbor Ann Medley brought a rush of memories from former days. I cant remember now whether Guy and Ann Medley built their home across State Road 79 from us before we built because we were living here in the house in which my husband was raised for several years. But they, the Tom and Betty Segers family, and we built about the same time and were the only ones living in this neighborhood for a few years. We were all stay-at-home moms then as our children were small. So most of my memories are episodes with our children, usually involving some disaster. The rst thing I recalled was wearing Anns too-big sandals to the hospital when our son was struck by a motor bike as he was getting off the school bus. Hearing the commotion from the highway, I had raced down the driveway in my bare feet. Ann had already called the ambulance. At that time we had no emergency services. The funeral home ambulances transported injured and ill people. Sims Funeral Home ambulance answered the call, and I rode to the hospital with Hiram while Ann came over and got Cindy and Glen, who were taking a nap. (I guess Mike and Gina were napping, too.) After Hiram was stabilized, Franklin Forehand drove the ambulance to Pensacola, and Ann took charge of my other two until my parents could get here. I returned her sandals when I ran home to pack a few clothes to take to Pensacola. Another crisis episode with our children was one morning when Ann and I were talking on the telephone. I heard this terrible scream, and Ann threw down the phone. I quickly hung up and ran across the highway to see what the crisis was. Ann was mixing a cake while we were talking, and Ginas long blond locks got caught in the mixer blades. By the time I got there, she was untangled and everything was OK. I am not sure about the cake batter. We didnt have a telephone the evening I discovered that Glen had drunk rust remover (hydro ouric acid). I ran to Anns to call the doctor. After I told Dr. Henry he had already vomited, he assured me that Glen would be OK. He dryly added, Well, he ought never to rust. Another time when I rushed over to the Medleys was when our daughter Cindy hit Gina as she was trying to swing a golf club. Cindy was the most upset of anybody, and I dont believe she has ever picked up a golf club since. Though the Medley children were a few years younger than ours, Gina loved to come over and play with Cindys Barbie dolls. At Anns visitation, Gina also remembered Glen putting on puppet shows and charging them a nickel to see them. Glen and Mike were frequent playmates. For years after we built the house we now live in, we had a big pile of dirt on the side of our front yard, so the children including Hiram and his friends played war a lot. But once I discovered Glen and Mike pretending they were revenuers. I had an old copper wash pot that had belonged to Jacks Grandma Meeker. The two boys were using Glens scout hatchet to chop holes in the copper pot. They were busting up a moonshine still. I remember when Hiram was studying compound interest in maybe the seventh grade. He was adamant that what I was showing him couldnt be right. I threatened to call Guy, the banker, to con rm the interest is indeed added back to the principle each month before he would believe that I knew what I was talking about. As our children grew and we went separate ways, we didnt see the Medleys much. In 1969, I started to teach college, and the year I started teaching, 1972, the Medleys moved to Abbeville. Ann started a career herself working in the Henry County Hospital, eventually becoming the administrator there and at the Henry County Nursing Home. As they had been in Bonifay, the family was active in the Methodist Church in Abbeville, where Ann was very much involved with the music ministry. She continued that after they moved to Dothan, Ala., as well. Ann was also a long-time member of the Troy University Community Band. In addition, Ann was cofounder of Women of The Wiregrass, an organization that furnishes scholarships to single mothers at Wallace College. Golf was a passion of Anns, and she became very involved in that after the move to Dothan, becoming a member of the Dothan Country Club and Ladies Golf Association, serving a term as president of that group. That group of ladies occupied a place of honor at her funeral service in Dothan First Methodist Church on Wednesday. Our condolences go out to Guy, Mike, Gina, Don and Barbara Lee and the rest of the family. Anns zest for life and her happy spirit sustained her through her courageous battle with cancer. May her Lord sustain you all through the dif cult days ahead. Allow the Prattler to brie y rely on his writers crutch, Setting It Straight, and acknowledge an error in last weeks column. Karla is the daughter of Bill and Sybil Webb. Jessica is the daughter of Karla, and the granddaughter of Bill and Sybil. The July 10 article did not do full justice to Dr. Robert Snare in his never failing effort to bring bidders into the process when the big watermelons are being sold in the annual auction by auctioneer David Corbin. These are not errors, per se, but maybe a little more elaboration is needed into the doctors accomplishments in obtaining more buyers. This is especially true in the tribute and in memory category of bids. The doctor brought a total of nine bids, not six, as previously reported. The Jimmy Trawick bid was submitted in memory of his in-laws, Jodie and Bera Yates Owens. Mike Arnold, of Henry Arnold Ford in Graceville, should have had his bid announced in honor to his father, Henry Arnold, The Old Plowboy who founded the business. Dr. Snares business, Snare Waterworks of Bonifay, was the one made in respect to Julian J. Fussell, World War II tanker and later a farmer, who passed away in June of this year. He also joined Ronnie Cook, owner of Padgett Drugs in Bonifay, and Richard Morris of Graceville in paying tribute to the four brave Americans who lost their lives in Benghazi earlier this year. Richard, a long-time supporter of the watermelon auction, always includes his military veterans from the Vietnam War unit in which he served and the group that continues to hold annual reunions. The weekend after the watermelon festival had slowed its pace to the point of allowing me to attend the Varnum reunion by special request of Lanita (Nita) Nicholson Varnum. She is the widow of Kennith Varnum and a native of Nettleton, Miss. Her story of meeting and later marrying Kennith is one of the most heart-warming stories written in the Heritage of Washington County book in the writers humble opinion. This romance grew from an unusual experience during World War II, and readers will nd the full story on page 352 of the book. The John Bethel Varnum family is considered the patriarch of that family in Washington County. He brought his family to the area in October 1885 and the family continued to multiply greatly as outlined in the heritage book, page 351. That story was written and submitted by grandson, Stanley Varnum, who lived to see the book come to full fruition but died soon after its printing. Readers will nd that the Varnum family settled in the Greenhead area of the county where Nita continues to live. Previous writings will show that this family was prominently involved in High Hills Primitive Baptist Church during its existence in the earlier history of the county. It was dissolved as a church congregation in 1926, but the adjoining Blue Pond Cemetery containing numerous burials of the Varnum family, still exists and maintained by Dale Taylor, and others, in the historic area of the county located in Moodys Pasture. When Nita Varnum invited me to the July 6 reunion, she told me that it would be the 26th year of the get-together and that this one promised to bring additional family members, especially from the Clewiston area, where many migrated to seeking employment many years ago. She stated that this element of the family had not seen the heritage book and felt it would be much in demand as she requested that books be brought to the event. The Prattler immediately recalled the two members of the Varnum family, J.R. and Wilburn, who made Clewiston their home immediately after completing Vernon High School only a short time after my departure from the school upon graduation. I was aware that the brothers have passed away. Her prediction proved correct as many offspring of the two, plus other family members that I had never met, came to the family gathering and immediately were attracted to the history and heritage recorded on their family, resulting in the sale of ve additional copies of the ever popular heritage book. Readers will recall that the sponsors of the book had hoped that June would wind up sales of the 200 additional copies received on August 13 of last year. Our efforts in May, June and July have reduced the remaining books to 19 which are still available. You still have time to obtain your copy by contacting me at 638-1016 or email at perry1000@abellsouth.net. The price is $64.20 when picked up from me, or $72 when mailed. The watermelon festival, plus my own Brock reunion and many other family gatherings, seem to have taken my time this summer, as it traditionally has done each summer for many years. I am not complaining. I look forward to all of the activity in which I am fortunate to participate and hope health and strength will allow me to stay involved in many more. See you all next week. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Eliza Ham Varnum and John Bethel Varnum are considered the patriarch family of the Varnums in Washington County. Varnum family prominent in county since 1885 HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells Former neighbors death brings back memories We built about the same time and were the only ones living in this neighborhood for a few years. We were all stay-at-home moms then as our children were small. Wednesday, July 24, 2013

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, July 24, 2013 a nd 5 0 17 2 4 7 JULY 8 JULY 16 Lacey Adkison, 20, Vernon, recommit on possession of paraphernalia, purchase cocaine Jessie Barnes, 40, Bonifay, resist ofcer with violence two counts, assault of law enforcement ofcer Cheryl Colbert, 54, Bonifay, possession of meth with intent, possession of paraphernalia, possession of controlled substance without prescription, possession of listed chemical Gina Culp, 42, Chipley, sell of opium David Dodson, 26, Springeld, violation of state probation on possession of a controlled substance without a prescription Dennis Supree, 39, Chipley, battery Dustin Durrance, 33, Cottondale, Holmes County warrant for child support Michael Haines, 25, Chipley, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, ee and elude, driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia Wayne Hardy, 55, Caryville, criminal mischief Freddie Lawrence, 56, Chipley, petit theft, disorderly conduct, criminal mischief Antonia Livingsotn, 24, Chipley, battery Vina Mamoran, 39, Sunny Hills, battery Jerry McDade, 62, Vernon, violation of injunction of protection Shaun Reed, 45, Chipley, specic felony commit act could cause death two counts Gregory Rolling, 42, Graceville, trafc opium Douglas Sanders, 35, Crestview, carrying a concealed weapon, possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Mark Sisson, 41, Cottondale, harass witness, victim or informant, trespassing, recommit sell of meth Walter Street, 47, Caryville, driving under the inuence Richard Turner, 32, Chipley, warrantless arrest for Bay County violation of stateprobation on forgery, fraud, larceny Joseph Watts III, 33, Panama City, sex assault Robert West, 50, Chipley, violation of count probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Darren Williams Sr., 44, Chipley, Osceola County warrant for child support Arrest REPOR T Bodies of 2 missing swimmers found By SCOTT CARROLL 522-5180 | @scottyknoxville SCarroll@pcnh.com P ANAMA CI TY BEACH The bodies of two men who disappeared while swimming off the coast were found Sunday, Panama City Beach police reported. Tony Underwood Jr., of Rex, Ga., drowned Saturday in the water near the Chateau Motel at 12525 Front Beach. He went missing about 6 p.m. after losing grip of a otation device and getting caught in an undertow, ac cording to PCB police. Rescue crews searched the area but did not nd him. His body was recovered beach side at County Pier about 11:15 p.m. The other swimmer, 26-year-old Korvotney Barber, of Manchester, Ga., went missing in the water behind Pineapple Willies on Front Beach about 7 p.m. Saturday. According to a police broadcast, Barber was knocked underwater by a wave after swimming past a sandbar. Shortly before 4 p.m. Sunday, Barbers body was found by a passerby between Boardwalk Beach and Resort Condominiums and Top of the Gulf condos, PCB police said. Barber was a basketball player at Auburn University from 2005 to 2009. In a public statement released Sun day, Auburn athletic director Jay Ja cobs said Barbers death was tragic and untimely. The Bay County Sheriffs Ofce had posted double red ags on the beaches in Bay County on Satur day, indicating swimming conditions are highly hazardous and have an increased likelihood of strong cur rents and high surf. Also, beaches are closed to swimmers during the post ing of double red ags. Double red ags were posted again Sunday. Holmes Countys best kept secret By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y San Sebas tian Winery, the newest Holmes County Chamber commerce member, has been referred to by Cham ber Coordinator Julia Bul lington as Holmes Countys best kept secret, with their largest vineyard of 450 acres being located in Holmes County. Thats 450 acres of tax es paid to Holmes County, said Bullington. Nestled in the northern part of Holm es County near the Walton County line is some of the most beautiful land in Holm es County and thats where the vineyard is located. Charles Cox President of Seavin Inc. and son of the Founder and Chair of Seavin, Inc. said that it winemaking was in his blood, going as far back as his grandfather and at the age of thirteen was intro duced to the local vineyards by his father, who started by planting ve acres of vineyards near his home. Cox moved to St. Au gustine in 1996 to open San Sebastian Winery where hed become president of Seavin, Inc., Cox, operat ing out of St. Augustine and overseeing San Sebastian Winery, Lakeridge Winery and vineyards. I like to stay active in the community, serving as a member for the St. Au gustine Chamber of Com merce, Attractions Associ ation, St. Augustine Light house Board of Trustees and as a member and as the Chair Elect for the Visi tors and Convention Bu reau, said Cox. Im also a member of the Florida Grape Growers Association, Orlandos Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Clermont Areas Chamber of Com merce. We strive to con tinue to be structured as a private corporation with Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards in Clermont, San Sebastian Winery and Prosperity Vineyards in Prosperity.PH OTOS B Y SEA V IN I NC On over 450 acres in Holmes County, Muscodine grapes are grown and harvested for several wineries throughout Florida, which includes San Sebastian winery in St. Augustine, owned and operated by Seavin Inc. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y Missy Sword Lee, Family intervention program aupervisor with Habilitative Services of Northwest Florida, visited the Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs July 16 meeting to speak about The WashingtonHolmes Domestic Violence Task Force. The mission of the Washington-Holmes Do mestic Violence Task Force is to provide safety for the victims of domestic vio lence and sexual violence through training, counsel ing and guidance while at tempting to preserve the family as a whole, said Lee. The goal of the Wash ington-Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force is to reduce domestic and sex ual violence in our commu nities. It is our objective to provide a shelter that will offer safety and security to those looking to end the violence in their lives by removing themselves from the situation. Lee explained that she used to work for the De partment of Children and Families. I am ashamed to admit that I used to be one of those people who would frown at a woman who didnt want to leave a violent relationship and say things like why would you stay? and its your fault, said Lee. The truth of the matter is it isnt as simple as all that. These women have no where to go, especially in our area. The closest shelter is in Panama City, said Lee, and that makes the decision to leave harder. We need your help, said Lee. Weve got the get the word out and were working hard to do just that. We held a softball tournament recently that raised over $2,000, weve got a walk/vigil planed for Holmes County in Octo ber for Domestic Violence Awareness and in memory of those who suffered at the hands of Domestic Violence. Lee also said that Octo ber was Domestic Violence Awareness and requested that the Bonifay Kiwanis Club consider dedicating one of the rodeo nights to Domestic Violence Awareness. The color for Domes tic Violence Awareness is purple, so it can be a purple night, said Lee. Weve also got these shirts that have been very poplar. It takes a community to stop the violence. Also present to speak on behalf of the WashingtonHolmes Domestic Violence Task Force was Tammy Slay. This has been our home for over 25 years now, said Slay. That would not have been possible if someone didnt help me 27 years ago to get out of an abusive relationship. She said she was work ing at a bank at the time. Id come into work with fresh bruises and black eyes, said Slay. No one should ever be so scared that theyre willing to get beat up occasionally than to face the dangers of leaving. Last year 25.9 percent of murders in Florida were the results of domestic dis putes, she said. We had one murdered due to domestic violence right here in Holmes Coun ty just last year, said Slay. Some may say that was just one, but if that was your relative, your mother, sister, aunt or grandmoth er, then thats one death too many. She said she and her husband had witnessed an act of violence the parking lot of Wal-Mart last week. This woman was get ting beat up in the parking lot and while her boyfriend was circling her with his vehicle a couple stepped in and helped her, she said. Come to nd out she just got out of the hospital the week before to get stitches on the inside of her mouth. Shes safe now but if it had not been for that couple theres no telling what might have happened to her. She said that 3,341 domestic violence survi vors requesting shelter was turned down due to overcrowding. We need a shelter here, because if even one gets turned away its one too many, said Slay. My kids make a difference in this community and I am very proud of them because they came from a difcult situa tion but they overcome. I tried seven times to leave before I received help; now as a community we can make a difference. She explained that they are looking for someone who is willing to donate property to them. If theres a building you just cant get rid of, were a 301c3 non-prot organi zation and that donation can be used as tax deduc tion, said Slay. We need to spread the word so we can make a difference together and we cant do this alone. For more information contact Lee at 596-3288, or email WashingtonHolmes DVtaskforce@yahoo.co m Guests speak out against domestic violenceC ECI L IA S P EAR S | Times-Advertiser Missy Sword Lee, Family Intervention Program Supervisor with Habilitative Services of Northwest Florida visited the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to speak about The Washington-Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force. Program Coordinator Roger Brooks introduced their guest speaker, Missy Lee, and Bonifay Kiwanis Club President Carlton Treadwell wore his rodeo outt to encourage others to do the same in efforts of reminding everyone that rodeo is coming up real quick.

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HALIFAX FILE PHOTO The Sea Screamer boat makes its way past the St. Andrews Marina and Harbour Village in Panama City. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration charged operators of the tour boat with two counts of illegal dolphin feeding. NOAA also charged AAA Jet Ski Rentals and Tours and Blue Dolphin Tours. OUTDOORS Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Page A6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Three Bay County tour boat companies are facing nes for unlawfully feeding wild dolphins in violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, but at least one of the companies says the charges are false. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration charged operators of the tour boat Sea Screamer with two counts of illegal dolphin feeding in July 2011 and August 2012, resulting in a $10,000 ne. We are disputing these claims, said Capt. Andy Redmond, the owner of the Sea Screamer. We do not feed dolphins aboard the Sea Screamer. Redmond said each tour begins with a verbal admonition to passengers that it is illegal to feed or harass dolphins and that the sea creatures are fully capable of nding all the food they need. He added that charges stem from one incident in 2011 and another in 2012 and that though undercover agents from NOAA had been aboard his boat several times in the past few years, they have not seen humans feeding dolphins from the vessel. All we do is observe dolphins, he said. We do not feed dolphins. Also charged were AAA Jet Ski Rentals and Tours and Blue Dolphin Tours, with each company facing a $5,000 ne for illegal feedings in August of last year. Contacted by phone Sunday, a man with AAA Jet Ski Rentals said the business would not comment on its ne. The owner of Blue Dolphin Tours was unavailable for comment Sunday. We work very closely with the (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission), and these cases were a result of a planned working group, said Jeff Dadonski, the acting deputy special agent in charge at NOAAs of ce of law enforcement. All of the cases were witnessed by law enforcement or other components. Under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, it is illegal to feed, touch or pursue wild dolphins, and Bay County is a known hotspot for illegal dolphin interaction. The incidents happened a year or two ago, but of cials said it is not unusual to take that long to conclude an investigation and le federal charges. NOAA Fisheries bottlenose dolphin conservation coordinator Stacy Horstman said the areas large commercial and recreational boating eet coupled with a growing tourism industry presents a unique challenge when it comes to preventing dolphin interaction. Panama City is the one scienti cally documented place where we know dolphins have been fed so people can get in the water and interact with them, Horstman said. The uniqueness about Panama City is the amount of vessels in a small area; youll have upwards of 25 boats encircling two dolphins and trying to interact with those dolphins. In an attempt to counteract the negative effects of dolphin interaction, NOAA has led outreach programs in Bay County for more than two decades. Horstman said outreach focuses primarily on educating the public through brochures, posted signs, workshops, billboards and on-air public service announcements. This season, the agency also has begun utilizing banner plane yovers as a means to communicate the message. Despite two decades of effort, Horstman said the huge in ux of commercial businesses and tourism in a small geographic area has smothered any progress. There was a time when we were seeing improvements, but unfortunately in the last few years, its just as bad as its ever been, Horstman said. We really need everybodys help to keep the people and the dolphins safe. Local tour businesses Osprey Charters and St. Andrew Bay Ferry say they have made an effort to adhere to the initiatives set forth in NOAAs Dolphin SMART partnership, even though the program has not yet been implemented in the area. You can safely and responsibly view dolphin from a vessel, Horstman said. We know it can happen, but there are a lot of commercial and recreational boaters in the area, and its going to take everybody to really help us solve this problem. By SCOTT CARROLL 522-5180 | @scottyknoxville scarroll@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Hundreds of people attended the Bay Point Boating and Outdoor Expo at Bay Point Marina on Saturday, dodging midday rain showers to see live music, watercrafts ranging from jet skis to yachts, and reality television stars. All proceeds from the expo will go toward the Gulf Coast Childrens Advocacy Center, which supports victims of child abuse. Expo ofcials said theyll know how much was collected by the end of the month. We nd it fun, enjoyable and exciting to help out the less fortunate, thats for sure, said Bay Point Marina director Daniel Fussell. About 50 watercrafts from Great Southern Yachts and Legendary Marine, among others, were on display at the expo, drawing many members of the local boating community. Anybody that does anything with boats is out here, Fussell said. The expo included an appearance by John Godwin and Justin Martin, cast members of the reality TV show Duck Dynasty. Bay Point sold $50 tickets for a VIP meet-and-greet with the pair. The expo also attracted dozens of small business owners, who said the expo provided exposure and networking opportunities. Among them was Tracey Sharp, owner of Girls Night Out salsa. Sharp rst offered the salsa to friends as a holiday gift. After selling 1,900 jars of her homemade sauce at the Junior League of Panama Citys Holly Fair in 2009, she decided to expand. Sharps four salsa avors and two seasoning packs are now sold at several local grocery stores. Im just a little local girl trying to make a dollar, she said Saturday at the expo. A lot of people dont get the chance to taste it when they see it in the store, so (the expo) gives them the chance to taste every single avor and see which level of heat they like. Doing these shows does a lot for me. It gives everyone the chance to try it, and I get to listen to peoples responses, so it keeps me going. While people sampled Sharps salsa on Saturday, James Diesel of James Diesel Repair and Performance discussed all-terrain tires and gas mileage with expo attendees nearby. The expo, he said, was a chance to pitch his auto service and performance center, which he started in 2010 after stints at several local auto dealerships. But Diesel, who noted he is an advocate of keeping our money local, also had the community on his mind. We get to contribute to the charity by being in the expo, he said. That was the biggest thing for us, that we get to give back to the community. Diesels business began in a barn, he said, but has grown into an operation housed in an 8,000-squarefoot facility. Networking at expos and other local events, he said, can be crucial for start-ups. The community has helped me a lot, and (the expo) is good for these local businesses to get some exposure, Diesel said. Kristy Bondarchuk shared his sentiment, adding she has attended two Panama City Friday Fests since starting her boutique, Khloes Closet, three months ago. The shop sells dresses, jewelry and fashion accessories. Im just starting out, and Im just trying to get things going, she said. (The expo) just kind of promotes my product and lets people become more aware of who I am and what I have. Meeting will focus on CWD prevention Special to Halifax The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will have a public meeting Aug. 8 in Gainesville to discuss possible options for minimizing the risk of chronic wasting disease coming into Florida. The meeting will be 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Paramount Plaza Hotel, 2900 S.W. 13th St., Ballroom A/B, and is open to the public. CWD is not known to affect people but is a contagious neurological disease affecting deer, elk and moose. The disease is always fatal, and there is no known cure or vaccine. So far, the disease has been discovered in 22 states, two Canadian provinces and South Korea. The meeting will begin with a presentation by commission staff on the signi cance of CWD and will include a discussion on possible solutions for minimizing the risk of the disease being brought into the state. For more information, contact Curtis Brown at Curtis.Brown@MyFWC.com or 617-9490. For more information on CWD, go to www.CWD-info.org. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this workshop/ meeting is asked to advise the agency at least ve days before the workshop/meeting by callingthe ADA coordinator at 488-6411. If you are hearingor speech-impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 800-955-8771 (TDD) or 800-955-8770 (voice). Regulations needed for scallop size Scalloping season is in, and they are being dragged out of the bays like there is no tomorrow. The problem is they are too small to keep. You go out in the hot sun and get into the water several times, climbing in and out of a boat and getting sunburned in the process, and then head back to the house and try to clean these small scallops and guess what? It has been my experience that scallop cleaning is a heck of a job when the scallops are large enough to keep, but just try and clean these little peanuts that are about as large as the tip of your thumb and you really have a task. You might be surprised at what happens to most of these smaller scallops. I know there are some people who will stick to the job and clean every one they catch, but they are the exception. Most of these peanutsize scallops are thrown into the trash after several attempts are made to clean them. A natural resource that could still be alive and growing every day to a respectable size is wasted. The scalloping experience includes getting the family out on the water whether you catch scallops or not. The idea is to catch scallops, of course, but whether catching a bag full or a boat load it is still a family affair and pleasure is derived no matter how many you catch. Do you realize scallops are one of the most popular marine creatures that the public can catch where the size is not regulated? Just go to the Keys and try and catch lobsters without a measuring stick and see what happens. The oysters we eat every day have to be at least 3 inches or longer in order to keep one. Try and keep a snapper under 16 inches and see how your fortune works out if you meet the wrong person at the dock. What Im trying to say is that scallops should be regulated size-wise. Winston Chester devised a piece of cardboard with a hole cut in it in the shape of a scallop to gauge the size big enough to keep. If you catch a scallop that falls through the hole you throw it back. This measuring device would be easy enough to build out of plastic and worn around the wrist. When you were through scalloping you could measure them in the boat and throw back the ones that are too small. Remember, if it falls through you know what to do. Throw it back. Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net 3 Panama City Beach companies ned for illegal dolphin feeding Expo a boon to businesses, child advocacy center Panama City is the one scienti cally documented place where we know dolphins have been fed so people can get in the water and interact with them. The uniqueness about Panama City is the amount of vessels in a small area; youll have upwards of 25 boats encircling two dolphins and trying to interact with those dolphins. Stacy Horstman NOAA Fisheries bottlenose dolphin conservation coordinator

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com A Section By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com It is nearly impossible to dilute the travel ball baseball experience into one blanket statement. While certainly there are many organizations that offer boys an opportunity to play at high level as well as a chance for more games and travel to tournaments in the region, not all have the same goals. And the motivation compelling adults to create travel teams for young ages, 8U and up by each calendar year, seems to wane as kids age and leave the game. Therefore there are fewer travel teams in the age 12U, 13U brackets, and heading into high school those summer programs often take precedence. What is certain, however, is that travel ball isnt going away anytime soon, and that the number of travel teams has increased dramatically in Bay County. Where they may have been ve travel teams a decade ago, there might now be 35, although those numbers strictly are unof cial. Many of the players have left the local rec leagues because the latter no longer allow travel teams to remain intact and compete against teams chosen through a player draft. Travel teams basically are a collection of all-stars, or what their organizers perceive to be some of the top local talent at that age level. That doesnt mean the rec leagues strictly offer a watered-down product. All of them still have skilled players, and some travel ball kids continue to play rec ball during the spring months, so its not as if only travel kids know how to pitch, hit and eld. As example, local rec leagues sent a number of teams to the recent Dizzy Dean state tournament in Tallahassee and the Hiland Park 10U placed third. But there is a perception by travel ball proponents, and its probably valid, that the added experience they provide helps produce better quality players into the future. TOURNAMENT TIME We all like rec ball, but for us its a time issue, Lynn Haven Dolphins 9U coach Brian Thomas said. Were practicing two or three nights a week. How much baseball can you play? from March through May. The summer months are when travel ball truly takes over, but Josh Parker of the Beach Bashers organization said their travel players start practicing in January, often play in their rst tournament in mid-February and continue with tournaments through mid-July. Parker said the Bashers have been growing by the year and currently have six teams ages 8U through 13U with about 65-70 players involved. He said some younger players compete in rec ball to get extra reps, but we dont require that. Parker said coaches of the various age-group teams meet prior to the season and produce a tournament schedule, which averages about 10 tournaments per team. I think in this day and age if you dont do some type of competitive (travel) baseball youre behind when you get to high school, Parker said. Its not like it used to be. Thats my thought on it. While some organizations have a more proli c tournament schedule involving extensive travel, Parker said that the Bashers usually play in closer tournaments held in Dothan, Gulf Breeze and Pensacola, and one luxury limiting expenses is their home venue Frank Brown Park offers a number of major tournaments during June and July. Parents are asked to help with the costs of uniforms and tournament entry fees. Parker said that on average parents pay $500 for their kid to participate, but then also have to delve deeper into their finances if they want to travel and watch him play. Weve been able to do fundraisers in addition, Parker said. If we didnt do that wed have to ask for parents to pay more. Some tournament costs are pay as you go. Considering the added expense for parents, compared to say one $50-75 rec league registration fee, a number of parents in Bay County obviously believe the added expense is worth it for their boy. Parker doesnt think travel ball has reached a ceiling here. As far as a number of players I dont think so, he said. Every year theres a new crop of 8year-olds coming up; parents unhappy with one (organization) looking for another. It seems theres teams popping up on every block. Thomas said the 9U Dolphins play about 12 tournaments in the spring and four more in the summer. They travel as far as Lake City, but also play closer to home in Dothan, Marianna and Panama City Beach. He said he prefers tournaments in Dothan because competing teams come from all directions of the Southeast. Thomas said that prior to the travel season he visits websites of various tournaments trying to determine which ones would be best for the Dolphins, and which tournaments are going to make. That helps determine an operating budget when gauging fees and travel costs. Once or twice a year we have a big fundraiser, we sell ribs and chicken, anywhere from 300-400 ribs in a day, Thomas explained. Still, he estimated an expense of $4,000 to $5,000 for the parents of players, which often can depend on the caliber of the team. When they played in the Dizzy Dean World Series, for example, it cost us all about $1,000 apiece because the event takes the better part of a week to complete. Thomas has heard of some much larger organizations in other Southeastern states that charge as much as $500 for their boy simply to try out with no guarantee he will make the team. If 400 try out, that can provide an instant operating budget. The Dolphins, he said, lose a player or two every year to attrition. Heres the difference, we want everybody to be from here, Thomas said. We know of one team that had kids from Alabama, Georgia and Florida, from all over. We want to make these kids better, then when they get to high school it makes everybody better. David Chapman is president of the R.L. Turner Little League rec ball organization, but also is involved with 11U and 13U travel teams his boys play for. Based on eight tournaments, he said the cost to parents is about $500. We try to stay within a 150-mile radius, from Pensacola to Enterprise, Chapman said. The whole goal is to play baseball. It just depends on how much you want to put into it. ANOTHER LEVEL Geoffrey Lancaster has progressed through the age levels of travel ball in Bay County and is representative of the experience for some of our best boys. The son of Chris and Chrissy Lancaster of Lynn Haven, Geoffrey is a rising freshman at Mosley High School and participates in the Dolphins summer program, but also caught the eye of larger travel ball organizations through his performance in tournaments against their teams in previous summers. As a result, he currently is a member of a 13U team based in Albany, Ga., and another in Edison, Ga. He played against both teams for years both teams came to us wanting to pick him up, said Geoffreys mother, Chrissy. Each time he tried out and made the team. The Lancasters, in addition to the normal travel expenses to watch Geoffrey play, also have had to drive to Georgia and spend weekends away from home when he practiced. Chrissy estimated that Geoffrey had played in 12 tournaments prior to her being interviewed for this story. She said she was leaving the next day to y to Fort Lauderdale, where her husband was scheduled to pick her up that Saturday and drive to Fort Myers where Geoffrey was playing in a major tournament. She expected to return home sometime on Wednesday, and be back to work on Thursday. Vacation time from work, she said, often revolves around her sons tournament schedule. We pay for uniforms, membership we gured out than on average we spend about $8-9,000 per year not only for their son to compete, but for them to travel and watch him play, Chrissy said. It can be stressful sometimes, she said. We have two other children (ages 15 and 17) and its a very ne line of balancing (Geoffreys) goals. He started at 9 years old in travel ball and I ask him every year if hes committed and he answers, yes maam. Chrissy said that the ultimate goal is for Geoffrey to attend college by garnering a baseball scholarship. One of the teams hes on has a coach who played in the majors and he said at least nine of the 11 kids on the team should have no problem getting Division-I scholarships, Chrissy said. Geoffrey also has a keen interest in playing football in high school. He loves both sports, Chrissy said. If he wants to keep doing both of them we want him to. Part IV describes the softball travel ball experience. e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community s U niv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMMUNIT Y S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL LEAGUES OF THEIR OWN: PART III Baseball travel teams on the rise Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Page 7

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Local A8 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 24, 2013 In loving memory of Etta M. White Hudson By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY On a beautiful sunny day, after a long week of bleak weather, friends, family and city of cials gathered at Eastside Park to rename it Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park. The city park was named inmemory of Etta M. White Hudson during a rededication ceremony held on July 16. Thank you all for coming to celebrate the life of Mrs. Etta Hudson, said Mayor Lawrence Cloud. Mrs. Hudson accomplished many things in her life; she was a dedicated wife, mother, friend and nurse. He said she had earned her masters degree in nursing and lovingly served the community in this area for many years. Most of all Mrs. Etta was totally committed in her faith as a Christian and a woman of strong, moral character. It is my honor and privilege to dedicate this park in memory of Mrs. Etta Hudson. Cloud concluded the ceremony by reading a city resolution, dedicating the new name to the park. The great and supreme ruler of the universe has in his in nite wisdom removed from among us, Etta M. White Hudson, read Cloud. Etta M. White Hudson consistently dedicated her time and energy on behalf of the health and welfare of the citizens of Bonifay and surrounding areas. The City wishes to recognize Etta M. White Hudson for her many years of service to the public and the citizens of Bonifay and the City will acknowledge its appreciation to Etta M. White Hudson by changing the name of Eastside Park to Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park. Hudson passed away on Feb. 9 of this year at her home surrounded by her family. She was born on Nov. 5, 1947 in Bonifay to Jestine White and Robert Horne. She attended Bayview School in Bonifay in 1965, continued her education with the Washington-Holmes Technical Center and earned her Licensed Practical Nurse license in 1976. She earned her Registered Nurse degree from Pensacola College in 1987, her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in Nursing from Florida State University in 2002 and her Masters Degree in Nursing from Pheonix University in 2005. She was a nurse for 36 years, starting her career with Dr. John Grace at Doctors Memorial Hospital before transferring to the Holmes County Correctional Facility, then to Jackson County Correctional Institute as a Registered Nurse Supervisor, then promoted to the of ce of Registered Nurse Consultant at the Regional Of ce and then achieved the position of Assistant Director of Nursing in the Central Of ce of the Department of Corrections for the State of Florida. One of her happiest memories of her life was meeting and marrying the Rev. Robert E. Hudson in 1977 and to this union a son was born and reared in love along with, Poe, Judy, Barbara, Joseph and Zoey, according to her obituary. She was survived by her husband of 36 years, the Rev. Robert E. Hudson; three sons, Poiterist White, Raymond Hudson of Bonifay and Joseph Sanders of Pensacola; three daughters, Judy Love, Barbara Sanders and Zoey Hudson of Bonifay; stepdaughter, Elaine Smith of Pensacola; god-daughters, Shenika Richardson (Stephen) of Raleigh, N.C. and Annie Staten of Bonifay; four brothers, Charles White (Nina) of Middletown, Conn.; half-brother, John Horne of Fort Myers; sisters, Icey Horne of Lake Wales, Freda Clark Middletown, Conn.; halfsister, Ether Bell of Fort Myers; a host of in-laws; 16 grandchildren, 24 great grandchildren; one godson, Tavarus Moore and a host of devoted friends and coworkers. C ar p et & C er amic O utlet Y OUR HOMET O WN L O W P RICE! 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W e need t o list y our home pr oper t y and v ac an t land M ik e A lvis Br ok er O ce: 850-547-9400 Cell: 850-258-2214 School District considering 1.5 mill property tax By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County School District met July 16 and approved of advertising for a public hearing at 5:15 p.m. on July 29 to discuss a possible 1.5 mill property tax in addition to the to the schools proposed tax of 6.043 mills. The tax is estimated to generate $670,751 to go toward building the new Bonifay Middle and Elementary Schools, reimburse maintenance, renovation and repairs, roof repairs and replacement, paving, purchase of seven school buses, purchasing school furniture and equipment district wide and lease purchase of Data Processing Equipment. Superintendent Eddie Dixon gave a preview of the presentation he would be presenting before the visiting representatives from the Florida Department of Education about building the new Bonifay Middle and Elementary Schools. In 1985 Ponce de Leon High was built for $5,299,402; in 1988 Holmes County High was built for $12,042,055; in 1997 Bethlehem School was built for $15,527,022; and in 2003 Poplar Springs School was built for $13,322,713 for a total of $46,191,192, said Dixon. What they all have in common is that these schools would not have existed without the Special Facilities Program. He explained that the value of one mill in Holmes County is equivalent to $412,000 and the value of Walton County is $11,200,000. With our one mill we could purchase three buses, but with their one mill they could purchase 82 buses, said Dixon. But thats also why we qualify for a special grant. Dixon also explained that the new schools would be a bene t to both the school and the community. There would be a modern spacious facility that accommodates todays numbers, designed for todays students, he said. It would be safer from outside threats, a consolidation cost savings to facilities, maintenance, personnel, resources and energy. There would be simpli ed and safer bus traf c, better control of the students, simpli ed parent traf c ow, convenient for parents and closer to and on the same side of the railroad tracks as the hospital, police, Emergency Management Services and the Fire Department. For the community he said it would be bene cial because of it doubling as a special needs shelter located on the South end of the county which will balance out the needs as Poplar Springs serves as a shelter in the northern portion of the county. Not to mention a new water tower for Southwest Bonifay, upgraded streets and new sidewalks, said Dixon. Board Chairman Rusty Williams also thanked everyone for their work towards getting the new schools built. I want to thank the board members and staff and all those involved in process of developing and building these new schools, said Williams. Thank you for all of your hard work and dedication towards building our students a brighter future in Holmes County. Board member Debbie Kolmetz said that she had attended the Rural Summit on Safety in Quincy. We had some speakers come in from Sandy Hook and I found it to be very informative, said Kolmetz. Eastside Park gets new name CECILIA SPEARS | The News Eastside Park was renamed Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park in honor of the dearly departed Etta M. White Hudson during a rededication ceremony held on July 16. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Wednesday, JULY 24 2013 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who was the rst Beatle to have a #1 single following the groups breakup? John, Paul, George, Ringo 2) What dog breed was named for an area along the coast of Croatia? Chihuahua, Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Dalmatian 3) Of these who once worked as a pineapple chunker in a Hawaiian cannery? Bette Midler, Demi Moore, Michelle Pfeiffer, Uma Thurman 4) What make was the Cunningham family car in TVs Happy Days? Hudson, DeSoto, Ford, Chevy 5) Which bill is the second most-used denomination of U.S. currency? $5, $10, $20, $100 6) At what age was Rudolph Valentino at time of death? 31, 46, 67, 94 7) What song was Michael Jackson performing when he introduced the moonwalk? Billie Jean, Beat It, Thriller, Bad 8) A sesquipedalian speaker ordinarily uses what sort of words? Kindergarten, Racist, Long, Religious 9) The rst Corvette was made in 1953 with its color being? Black, Red, Blue, White 10) In 1922 which city had the rst of cial police car, the Bandit-Chaser? Denver, NYC, Detroit, Chicago 11) Of these who was named after a department store? Halle Berry, Meg Ryan, Jodie Foster, Lucy Lawless 12) Bronze John was an old disease name for? Meningitis, tuberculosis, syphilis, yellow fever 13) In the early 1900s about what percentage of American homes had bathtubs? 5%, 20%, 33%, 40% 14) If someone is aphonic, what is lost? Keys, Soul, Voice, Mind ANSWERS 1) George. 2) Dalmatian. 3) Bette Midler. 4) DeSoto. 5) $20. 6) 31. 7) Billie Jean. 8) Long. 9) White. 10) Denver. 11) Halle Berry. 12) Yellow Fever. 13) 20%. 14) Voice. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER The Spanish Trail Playhouse presented Footloose: The Musical this past weekend before a packed house. The 1998 play was based on the 1984 lm of the same name. Blake Collins and Malinda Locke play Ren and Ariel, the star-crossed teenagers who ght to bring dancing to the rural Bomont. The lm was loosely based on events which happened in Elmore City, Okla., where the 1980 graduating class got permission to hold a dance in a town where dancing had been banned for 100 years. The music featured in the production was by Tom Snow with lyrics by Dean Pitchford, and included additional numbers by Eric Carmen, Sammy Hagar, Kenny Loggins and Jim Steinman. For more photos, visit chipleypaper.com FOOTLOOSE: THE MUSICAL Director: Kevin Russell Music Direction: Rachel Webb Choreography: Deanna Kay Bailey and Meredith Moreau Cast: Blake Collins as Ren McCormack Malinda Locke as Ariel Moore Phyllis Sloan as Ethel McCormack Rob Nixon as Shaw Moore Terrie Garrett as Vi Moore John David Brown as Willard Hewitt Andrew Sadler as Chuck Cranston Jacquie Funderburk as Lulu Warnicker Emory Wells as Wes Warnicker Raymond Bixby as Coach Dunbar Diane Webb as Eleanor Dunbar Sierra Hill as Rusty Ashleigh Stowe as Urleen Julie Wells as Wendy Jo TJ Herndon as Jeter Matthew Shook as Bickle Blake Bush as Garvin Atrayu Adkins as Lyle Taylor Young as Travis Carrie Bennett as Principal Harriett Clark Kevin Russell as Cowboy Bob Deanna Bailey as Betty Blast Townspeople and Dance Ensemble: Bri Beechum Kate Burke Amber Casey Elizabeth Christmas Courtney Corbin Heidi Edwards Zedra Hawkins Costin Hewitt Taylor Shaw Stage Manager: Chelsea Herndon Technical Director: Jimmy Miller Everybody cut footloose!

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra W e T rade for Anything That Don’ t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) 33/; 2<99 3 3 /;; 33:32 F r ee Admission f or c hildr en ag es 5 and y oung er and milit ar y per sonnel wit h v alid I.D. ; 7 6' +! ( & $ %83 83 9< 9 ;/0037/32 3
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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Summer is a rough season for our furry friends As summer progresses and temperatures come close to triple digits, many of us make it a habit to protect ourselves from the sweltering heat. Unfortunately for our pets these scorching summer months are not only uncomfortable, but they are also a time when the risk of heat stroke is at its highest. A heat stroke occurs when the bodys ability to rid itself of heat is exceeded by the heat that it is generating, said James Barr, Assistant Professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). This results in an increase in body temperature to the point where damage to the internal organs occurs. Heat stroke is a very dangerous condition, especially in pets. If it is severe, the pet will almost certainly die if it does not receive proper medical care immediately. Oftentimes, the pet will be brought to the hospital too late and will die despite our best efforts, said Barr. Although the initial signs of heat stroke are simply anxiety, excessive panting, and inability to settle down after exercise, these symptoms can quickly and severely progress into lethargy, muscle weakness, seizures, and even death. If you believe your pet is at risk for heat stroke, there are several steps you should take immediately to guarantee the pets longevity. The rst thing you should do is take the pets temperature, said Barr. If their body temperature is above 104 degrees, they are in danger of organ damage. Submersing the pet in cool, but not cold, water is very helpful in lowering their temperature to a more normal level. Since time is a crucial factor when dealing with a heat stroke, spraying a pet down with a garden hose or immersing them in a nearby body of water are preferred methods of cooling the pet down. After you have started this cooling process, the pet should be seen by a veterinarian immediately so that it can receive prompt medical attention to prevent any further damage. The most important way to keep your pets temperature at a normal range throughout the sizzling summer months is to avoid exercising with them during the hottest parts of the day. It is also vital to provide plenty of drinking water and to take frequent breaks from playing outside to allow your pet to cool off and rehydrate. Often a long run in the early afternoon is the precursor to a heat stroke episode, said Barr. It is also very important to not leave your pets in the car while it is not running as it can reach dangerous temperatures very quickly. If, after prolonged outdoor exposure, you notice that your pet does not calm down, looks lethargic, or if you are at all worried that they may be suffering from a heat stroke, you should immediately contact your local veterinarian or emergency services. The most dangerous thing is the failure to seek veterinary attention, as time is of the essence, said Barr. A BO U T PE T T A LK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.ed u PET T ALK Julaine Padgett, 72, of Chipley, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, July 14, 2013, sur rounded by her loving family, after a long ght with cancer. Julaine was born Sept. 29, 1940, to the late Tom and Minnie Dee (Brock) John son in Greenhead. She was a graduate of Vernon High School, class of 1958. Ju laine was a faithful member of Shiloh Baptist Church and she loved to sing in the choir and play the hand bells. She owned a beauty salon for many years then worked at the Washington Holmes Vocational School. Her greatest joy was caring for her family, her husband, children and grandchildren. She was a kind hearted, compassionate, loving per son, always thinking of the needs of others. Julaine is survived by her loving husband, Bobby R. Padgett; three sons, Steve Padgett and wife Cindy, Mike Padgett and Ty Padgett and wife Windy all of Chipley; her precious grandchildren, Adam Padgett of West Hollywood, Calif., Jay, Aus tin, and Juliann Padgett, all of Chi pley; two sisters, Joann Parish and husband Howell of Skipperville, Ala. and Charlotte J. Hightower of Panama City; one sister-in-law, LaVania Herrington and husband Roland of Dothan, Ala., and numerous nieces and nephews. Family received friends for visitation on Wednes day, July 17, 2013, from 9 to 11 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, Chipley with the Services starting at 11 a.m., with the Rev. Tim Patton ofciating. Interment fol lowed in the Shiloh Baptist Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Flowers will be accepted, donations can be made to Covenant Hospice 4215 Kel son Avenue Suite E, Mari anna, FL 32446 or to Shiloh Baptist Church. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Julaine Padgett JULAINE P ADGETT Elisea Brown, 76, passed away July 12, 2013, at her residence. She was born June 14, 1937, in San Ildefonso, Bulocan, Philippine Islands to Pedro and Ana Calderon. Elisea married Orville Brown on Aug. 5, 1945. Shortly after being married she moved to the United States in November 1945. In 1973, Elisea moved to Florida from Michigan. She is survived by her four children, Jon Brown of McKinney, Texas, Jane Taylor of Ponce De Leon, Olive Ellithorpe of Sand Lake, Mich., and Michael Brown of Navarre; three nephews, Steven Kramer of Twining, Mich., Terry Kramer, and Russell Kramer of Almont, N.D.; 10 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 16, 2013 beginning at 3 p.m. in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83, North DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, with the Rev. Father Richard Dawson as celebrant. Visitation was held one hour prior to the service. Committal services followed at a later date at Cedar Valley Cemetery in Twining, Mich. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the directions of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.Elisea Brown Mrs. Frances Gainey Thomas, 69, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013. She was born March 11, 1944, in DeFuniak Springs, Fla., to Millard and Wilma Gandy Gainey. Mrs. Thomas was a lifelong resident of Walton County. She was Baptist by faith and a member of the Southwide Baptist Church. She owned and operated Fran Thomas Enterprises, INC for over 10 years. She was the Grants Coordinator for the City of DeFuniak Springs, and served as the Director of the Council on Aging. She enjoyed shing, hunting, working crossword puzzles, traveling and especially spending time with her family. Mrs. Thomas was preceded in death by her parents, Millard and Wilma Gandy Gainey. Mrs. Thomas is survived by her loving husband of 45 years, Clayton M. Thomas of DeFuniak Springs; one son, Craig Thomas and wife Debbie of DeFuniak Springs; one daughter, Amy E. Ripley and husband Scott of Niceville; one brother, Raymond Gainey of DeFuniak Springs; two sisters, Agnes Smith and husband Roger of Tallahassee and Marie Hinson and husband Charles of DeFuniak Springs; six grandchildren, Krista Wilbon and husband Freddie, Joseph Drew Touchton, Stephanie Ripley, Kaelin Ripley, Courtney Currid and husband Jordy and Jordan Thomas; three great grandchildren, Elijah, Elena and Olivia and by numerous beloved nieces and nephews. Visitation services were held from 10 to 11 a.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel; 230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel; 230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435 with Dr. Bobby Tucker ofciating. Pallbearers will be Jordy Currid, Chuck Hinson, Scott Ripley, Drew Touchton, David Thomas, Robert Thomas, Todd Gainey, Matthew Gainey, Gage Smith, Derek Randolph and Scott Thomas. Burial followed at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Frances G. Thomas FRANCES G. THOMAS Hadley Ella Dalayna Morris, infant daughter of Lucas and Jessica Morris, of Chipley, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola. Survivors include her parents, Lucas and Jes sica (Birge) Morris of Chipley; twin brothers, Easton and Weston Morris; maternal grandparents, Timothy and Mattie Birge of Vernon; paternal grand parents, James and Susie Morris of Chipley; mater nal great grandmother, Verla Mae Hall of Vernon; paternal great grandpar ents, Jim and Jane Rudd of Chipley; aunt and uncle, Crystal and Lee Duke; aunt and uncle, Jamie and Andy White and aunt, Jenna Birge. Funeral services were held Friday, July 19, 2013, at 1 p.m., in the Chapel of Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Leon Jen kins, the Rev. Wayne Bran non and the Rev. Keith Mashburn ofciating. Interment followed in New Bethany Church Cemetery in Hinson Cross Roads. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Hadley E. Morris Charles D. Baur, 66, passed away Wednesday, July 17, 2013. A native of Quincy, Charles had lived in Chipley for the past 11 years, He was a computer programmer in Tallahassee and Chattahoochee at Florida State Hospital. He was a member of Courts of Praise Church, actively serving on the Praise and Worship Team. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edwin and Douglas Baur. He is survived by his wife, Cecelia Baur of Chipley; sons, Larry (Cindy) Pooser of Tallahassee and Daniel (Crystal) McNeill of Chipley; daughters, Julia (Jason) Bennett and Kaylor (Ryan) Collins all of Chipley; brother, Pete Baur of Okeechobee; nephew, Tommy (Tonya) Baur and his children, Kaley, Braden, Brian, and Sophia Baur; grandchildren, Rocky and Shirley Roberts, Chase Walker, Haylee and Lance Rivenbark, Braylee, Tristan, and Laramie Pooser, Eli and Nehemiah McNeill, Lexi and Blane Brasher, Hayden Bennett, and Austin, Luke, and Ryley Collins and four great grandchildren. A celebration of his life was held Saturday, July 20, 2013, at 10 a.m., at Courts of Praise Church 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley, FL 32428 with a private family inurnment at a later date at Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy. Memorial contributions may be made to Emerald Coast Hospice, 1330 South Blvd., Chipley, FL 32328. Independent Funeral Home (850-8751529) of Quincy is handling arrangements.Charles D. Baur Obituaries OBITUARIES continued on B5

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Register CP A 1 552 Bric k yard R oad Chipley FL P anhandle Lumber & Supply F or ALL Y our Building Needs 405 W Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547-9354 507 W Hwy 90, Bonifay 1 357 Bric k yard Rd., Chipley Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment V isit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 Home F olks serving Home F olks W e gi v e commercial rates to area churches Gas 1055 F o wler A v e ., C hiple y B ehind our Chipley f ac t or y H ours: T hur and F ri. 9 A M 5 PM S a t 9 A M 3 PM 638-9421 WE S T P OIN T HOME F ACTOR Y OUTLET 879 U se r y R o ad C h i p le y F lo r id a 32428 850-638-4654 Washington County Re habilit at ion & Nursing Cente r Page 4 Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Last week I was tootling along without a care in the world. Actually, I did have several cares but I was ignoring them as much as possible. My basic philosophy is this, the more you ignore something the less you have to deal with it. This, however, does not apply to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Experience has taught me one lesson concerning women, especially wives. They will not stand to be ignored, particularly by their husbands. I have learned the less attention I pay to my wife the more I pay in other areas of life, if you know what I mean. So, ignoring the cares I had last week, I was caught off guard when I received a letter from my credit card company. This was no friendly, how are you, kind of a letter. Nor was it a cheery birthday greeting. I cannot tell you how many times I have reminded them of my birthday but to date they have not picked up on my hint. The ominous letter I did receive informed me that along with millions of other customers my identity had been stolen. The letter went on to assure me I had nothing to worry about and they had the situation well in hand. That is easy for them to say. They know who they are but what about me? When I got the letter I ran to my bathroom and looking into my mirror -nothing! My identity was indeed gone. I assure you I will worry until I get to the bottom of this. I will not rest until I know exactly who I am and my identity is fully restored. Of course, there is one problem here. What if when I do recover my identity I dont like myself? Can I exchange it or get my money back? For some reason the personal information of millions of people had been lost or stolen from the security of my credit card company, which begs the question, how secured is my personal information? While I am in the begging mood, another question comes to mind. If someone has stolen my identity, who in the world am I? And, how do I reclaim my identity? As a young person whenever my mother was upset with me about something I had done or did not do, she would always look at me and ask, Who do you think you are? If anybody in the world should know who I am it would be my mother. And if she he was wrestling with the same question I was wrestling with, how in the world could I ever come to grips with my personal identity? It is hard enough discovering who you are without somebody casting dispersions upon that very thing. Perhaps my mother and I could work together in solving this problem. After all, two heads are better than one, unless one does not know who he is. I have spent years trying to nd myself. Once I thought I found myself but it turned out to be an old pair of socks I lost three years prior. My problem is compounded by this one thing, I did not really know who I was before my identity was stolen. I had my suspicions, of course. However, somewhere in the back of my mind, I really could not come to grips with who I really was in this world. In the course of time, (actually it was a four-course lunch) I have come to several conclusions. First, I am a man. What kind of a man, is anyones guess this point. The truth is that at the root of everything I am, I am a man. Second, I am a husband. This, of course, is the most baf ing of my identity. What it means to be a husband differs from wife to wife. Fortunately, for me, I have only one wife, but even her idea of a husband changes from one moment to the next. I am never sure what she expects of me as a husband. Once I thought I had it all gured out but someone, I am not mentioning any names, changed the rules. Third, I am a father. As a father, my role consists of bankrolling the childhood adventures of my children; nancing their higher education career, hoping they get married before my money runs out. To this day, I am not sure if I made it or not. Fourth, I am a grandfather. This is the most well de ned role I have. The great thing about being a grandfather is, nobody expects much from us. Our role is covertly to help our grandchildren make the lives of their parents as tempestuous as possible. Revenge is sweet when laced with jellybeans. Sugar highs are a grandfathers best retaliation. The most important thing about my identity quest is, I am a Christian. This undergirds everything else I may or may not be. My Christianity is the foundation upon which everything else is built. I take comfort in the Bible; These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God. (1 John 5:13 KJV). When my identity is rooted in believing in Jesus Christ, everything else in my life falls into place. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.co m New Home Baptist Church VBS GRACEVILLE New Home Baptist Church will be holding Vacation Bible School from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on July 24 to July 26. On July 27 there will be a day of activities and food. VBS is open to all ages. The church is located in Jackson County just off of Piano Road. For more information call 326-4712. Bonnett Pond Church The Bonnett Pond Community Church membership will be honoring Pastor Teddy Joe Bias and Sister Pauline Bias during the 11 a.m., service and lunch to follow on Sunday, July 28. After 14 years of service at our church the Bias family will soon be moving from our community to answer the call of serving God in another area. Please join us in honoring Brother and Sister Bias on this day. Fun in the Son at Union Hill BONIFAY Fun in the Son days will be observed on Saturday, July 27, and Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include lunch. Youth and children age 4 and up are invited, along with parents, for water slide, puppets, music and drama, Bible study and crafts. Union Hill Baptist Church is located at 2759 Union Hill Church Road in Bonifay. The church is on County Road 177 and is one mile south of the Millers Crossroad and Route 2 intersection. To pre-register: Please call 334-8863513 or email: ascollins@centurytel.net. For more information, call Liz Kidd at 263-3612. Youth Caravan is Coming to Bonifay FUMC BONIFAY Youth Caravan will be at Bonifay First United Methodist Church July 29-31. Services will begin nightly at 6 p.m. Youth Caravan is a team of Christian young adults on a summer mission geared towards youth ministry. They are students from the Auburn University Wesley Foundation. Their goal is to spread Gods light in new and exciting ways through song, educational programs, games, and fellowship. Come join the fun. For more information, contact Ben Goolsby or Dan Godwin at 547-3785. Faith EVENTS The age-long query: Who am I? DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Crossword SOLUTION Mary Paulk Mary Paulk, 62, of Bonifay, died Monday, July 15, 2013. Memorialization was by Cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Jimmy L. Smith Jimmy Lamax Smith, 69, of Bonifay, died July 16, 2013. Memorialization was by Cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Charity Amanda Wilkes, 40, of Plano, Texas, passed away July 15, 2013, at her parent’s home in Bonifay. She was born March 11, 1973, in Dothan, Ala. Mrs. Wilkes was preceded in death by her maternal grandfather, George W. Brown; paternal grandparents, Coy Lee and Flora Mae Polston; maternal grandparents-inlaw, Buford and Mary Hazel Culbreth and paternal grandparents-in-law, Elson and Hazel Wilkes. Mrs. Wilkes is survived by her husband, Scott Wilkes of Plano, Texas; two sons, Tavis Wilkes and Kavan Wilkes both of Plano, Texas; one daughter, Annaliese Wilkes of Plano, Texas; parents, Larry and Dianne Polston of Bonifay; maternal grandmother, Daphin and Ray Holsombach of Bonifay; father-in-law and mother-in-law, Danny and Karen Wilkes of Cottondale and best friend, Sandra Martinez of Plano, Texas. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Thursday, July 18, 2013, at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Juno Douglas and the Rev. Tommy Moore of ciating. Interment followed in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday at Carmel Assembly of God Church. Charity A. Wilkes Mr. Willie O’Neal. 77, passed away Monday, July 15, 2013. He was born Sept. 30, 1935, in DeFuniak Springs, to Troy and Mary Hall. Mr. O’Neal was a resident of Walton County. He was Baptist by faith and a member of the Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church. He worked as a Lineman with AT&T before retiring. He enjoyed playing cards, traveling, and spending time with his family. Mr. O’Neal was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, Eunice Mae Hall and two sons, Sammy Green, and Frank “Willie” Larkins. Mr. O’Neal is survived by his special companion of 33 years, Dora Adkins of DeFuniak Springs; three sons, Lawrence “Tyler” Dowing of Milton, Willie Mikey O’Neal of Tampa and David O’Neal of Miami; two daughters, Shontria O’Neal of DeFuniak Springs and CiCi O’Neal of Miami; one brother, Michael Hall of Bonifay; nephews, James Cotton and wife Mary of DeFuniak Springs, Carlos Cotton of Panama City, Cornelius Cotton of DeFuniak Springs and Pam Peters and husband Raymond of Panama City, and a host of nieces, nephews and grandchildren. Visitation services was held from 1 to 2 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013. at Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church; 416 Railroad Ave, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held 2 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church; 416 Railroad Ave, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 with Pastor A.M. Johnson of ciating. Burial followed at Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.clary-glenn. com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Willie O’Neal WILLIE O’NEAL Robert Lamar (PeeWee) Gay, 76, of Greenwood, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at Noland Hospital in Dothan. He was born Feb. 16, 1937, in Chipley, to the late H.M Gay and Eunice ( Jenkins) Gay. Mr. Robert worked in the soil lab for the Department of Transportation in Chipley. He was predeceased by his parents and one son, Joey Gay. Mr. Robert was survived by one son, Ronnie Gay of Greenwood; three grandchildren, Nicholas Gay and wife Danielle, Ethan Isaiah Gay, Summer Nicole Daniels and husband James and one great grandchild, Dellany Daniels. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Tim Hall of ciating. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel. Interment followed at Piney Grove Baptist Church Cemetery of Cottondale. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Robert L. Gay Grace Theresa Usery, 87, of Orlando, passed away Wednesday, July 17, 2013, at home. She was born Aug. 4, 1925, in Gar eld, N.J., to the late Daniel Veltri and Mildred (Stalfa) Veltri. Mrs. Grace made drill bits for the New York Twist. She is survived by three daughters, Marlene Usery MacRae of New Jersey, Gwen Brandes of Orlando, and Patty Grantham and husband Donnie of Chipley; two brothers, Tony Veltri and Timothy Veltri of New Jersey; six grandchildren and ve great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with Don Milton and Jared Grantham of ciating. Interment followed in Glenwood Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to service. Family and friends may sign the online registry at www.brownfh.net. Grace T. Usery GRACE T. USERY Obituaries WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. – 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. – Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Men’s Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January – September. Community CALENDAR Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 7-3284 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NO.:2013CA001 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. BILLY J. ADAMS, JR. and KATHERINE F. ADAMS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the under signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgement of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 18, 2013, at 11:00 am Central Time at Washington County Courthouse, at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Northwest of NW of Section 25, Township 1 North, Range 15 West, thence S0043’09”W along the West right-of-way line of a 60 foot road, 972.96 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue S0043’09”W along said right-of-way 319.32 feet; thence departing said right-of-way line on a bearing of N8906’33”W 662.57 feet: thence N0042’27”E 319.35 feet; thence S8906’24”E 662.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said land lying and being in the NW of the NW of Section 25, Township 1 North, Range 15 West, and being a part of Crystal Lake Tract, Seminole Plantation, Washington County, Florida. This Notice dated this 8 day of July, 2013 Clerk of Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News on July 17, 2013 and July 24, 2013. 7-3285 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-327CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ADKISON and NANCY ADKISON, husband and wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 18, 2013, at 111:00 am Central Time at Washington County Courthouse, at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: NE of SE of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 14 West, Washington County, Florida. This Notice dated this 3 day of July, 2013. As published in the Washington County News of July 17, 2013 and July 24, 2013. 7-3279 Notice of Public Hearing to Revise School Board Policies/Procedures, Student Code of Student Conduct and Pupil Progression Plan Washington County School District 652 Third Street – Chipley, FL 32428 Monday, August 12, 2013 at 5:00 pm Notice is hereby given that on Monday, August 12, 2013 at 5:00 pm., the Washington County School Board will consider adopting/revising School Board Policies/Procedures, Code of Student Conduct and the Pupil Progression Plan. The purpose and specific legal authority under which School Board Policies/Procedures are authorized, and a summary of the estimate of economic impact of the proposed policies/procedures on all affected persons, are given. Purpose To revise School Board Policies/Procedures based on policy and legislative changes. Proposed Revisions to School Board Policies/Procedures 3.50+P ublic Information and Inspection of Records 5.14 Homeless Students 5.32 Zero Tolerance for School Related Crimes 6.62+ AIDS, Bloodborne Pathogens and Environmental Hazards 6.90 Personnel Files 8.14Inspections 9.80+ School Concurrency Code of Student Conduct (includes Student Attendance Policy) Pupil Progression Plan Legal Authority The Washington County School Board is authorized under Chapter 1001.43 of the Florida K-20 Education Code to develop/revise policy and procedures. Economic Impact The cost of promulgating these revisions will be approximately $.50 per document. Cost or benefit to those affected: None Impact on open market: None Individuals wishing to obtain a copy of the proposed new/revised Policies/Procedures may contact the Superintendent’s Office at 652 Third Street, Chipley, Florida As published in the Washignton County News July 10, 24, 31, 2013. 7-3287 Meeting Notice Tri-County Airport Authority will hold a special called authority meeting on July 25, 2013 at 6:00 pm local time. The meeting will be held in the Tri-County Airport Terminal building. As published in the Washington County News July 24, 2013. ADOPTION: Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. j Christine & Greg j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Choosing Adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Let’s help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Great Dane Puppies Available now! Please call 850-520-4751 Text FL59227 to 56654 PREMIUM METAL Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply. com Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 24, 2013 5017391 B USINESS G UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only $10.00 per week8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 TROLLING MOTOR REPAIRAordable service! Fast Repair! Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only $18.00 per week!8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 5017238 5017226 31805 Blue Star Hwy. Midway, FL 32343www.midwaymachineryandauction.com Surplus trucks, vehicles & equipmentBy order of Walton Co, FL BOCC (With additional items from area county governments)Friday, July 26, 2013: 9:00 A.M. Central Time DeFuniak Springs, FL: Walton County Fair Yard GOVERNMENT AUCTION ITEMS INCLUDE: *2006 Cat 950G & 928G loaders *(2)Cat 12H graders *Cat 12G grader *Cat 420E backhoe (non op) *Cat 416D backhoe *Cat 307B excavator *JCB 1400B Backhoe *Terex compactor *(4)1998-2004 bucket trucks *23.5 & 14.5 ton crane trucks *2004-2006 Chevy Utilities*Numerous 1995-2008 pickups *Numerous cars/SUVs *Mowers, 4 wheeler (late model) and misc. oce furnitureTERMS: *All items sell AS IS *5% Buyer Premium *Cash, Cashier Checks, Credit and Debit cards, Checks with bank letterPREVIEW: 9AM-4PM Thursday, July 25**Live internet bidding with proxibid** MIDWAY MACHINERY & AUCTION New Home Builders & Contractors: Call the Carpenters Son for kitchen & bath cabinets, furniture design & woodworking. Specializing in custom cabinets, desk, conference tables, entertainment centers, all types of church furniture. Builders of quality for 33 years. Simply the best/best price. Contact owner/operator, The Carpenters Son, Ken Nowell (850)326-8232. Garage Sale. July 27, 7a.m. Until, Maternity Clothes, Adult and Children’s Clothes, Toy, and Odds and Ends. 1382 South Blvd. Indoor outdoor final moving sale Scrubs, craft items and much more. 703 N. Hamlin St Bonifay. 7a.m.-2p.m Sat., July 27. TREASURE SALE! Live Oak Assembly of God Women’s Ministry at Live Oak Assembly of God Church, Hwy 177Aon left going towards Dogwood Lakes Friday, July 26 from 7:00 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday, July 27 from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. BreakfastFriday morning the ladies will be selling delicious homemade breakfast foods including biscuits and cinnamon rolls. Come and enjoy! The yard sale includes, furniture, appliances, bicycles, clothes, books and much, much more! SEE YOU THERE! 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. 2010 Craftsman riding mower, 17.5 hp, B-S, 42 in, auto, like new, $850 Call 850-628-5436 Scrape Metal, FREE!! 624-1679 MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director – Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioner’s office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING. Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED PC/ Internet needed! 1-888-2125888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Efficient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans. com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Benefits and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855IRT-TANK www.indian rivertransport.com A SODA/ SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Includes all utilities. $425/month. (850)326-4548. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 For Rent: House 2BR/2BACHAnewly remodeled, stove, refrigerator, NO Pets, rental references, $550 month, yards included, $500 Deposit, 601 2nd St. 850-326-2920. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 Br/2Ba 16x70 MH near Dogwood Lakes on private lot. Not in a park. $485/mo plus deposit. (850)547-4232. 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. 3BR/2BA Brick Home with large shop on 21/2 acres in Chipley area $195,000. 850-726-0396 For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works!

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser July 24, 2013 Supplies List I Tips for Parents I Tax-Free Shopping

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2 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Washington County 2013-2014 School Calendar Aug. 19, 2013 . ....................... FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 2, 2013 . ....................... Labor Day – No school Sept. 11, 2013 . ..................... Recognition of “Patriot Day” at Schools Sept. 17, 2013 . ..................... Recognition of “Constitution Day” at Schools Sept. 17, 2013 . ..................... Early Release – 1:00pm Sept. 23-27, 2013 . ................ Recognition of “Celebrate Freedom Week” at Schools Oct. 21, 2013 . ....................... Fall Day – No school Oct.29, 2013 . ........................ Early Release – 1:00pm Nov. 11, 2013 . ...................... Recognition of Veterans at Chipley and Vernon Schools Nov. 25-29, 2013 . .................. Thanksgiving Holidays – No school Dec. 20, 2013 . ...................... Early Release – 1:00pm Dec. 23, 2013 – Jan. 7, 2014 . Christmas Break Jan. 6, 2014 . ......................... Teacher Planning Day – No school Jan. 7, 2014 . ......................... Professional Development Day – No school Jan. 8, 2014 . ......................... CLASSES RESUME FOR STUDENTS Jan.20, 2014 . ........................ Martin Luther King’s Birthday – No school Feb. 4, 2014 . ......................... Early Release – 1:00pm Feb.17, 2014 . ........................ President’s Day – No school Mar. 11, 2014 . ...................... Early Release – 1:00pm March 24-28, 2014 . .............. Spring Break (Students & All Personnel Out) April 18, 2014 . ...................... Spring Day – No school May 26, 2014 ....................... Memorial Day – No school June 4, 2014 . ........................ Last Day of School (Students Released – 1:00pm) Graduations May 13, 2014 . ........................... WHTC May 29, 2014 . .......................... Chipley High School May 30, 2014 . .......................... Vernon High School June 3, 2014 . ........................... WISE Holmes County 2013-2014 School Calendar Aug. 19, 2013 . ............................... FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 2, 2013 . ................................ Labor Day – No school Oct. 4, 2013 . .................................. Students & All Personnel Out Oct. 18, 2013 . ................................ End of 1st grading period Oct. 28-Nov 1, 2013 . ..................... Fall Break – No school Nov. 4, 2013 . ................................ Classes Resume Nov. 25-29, 2013 . .......................... Thanksgiving Break – No school Dec. 20, 2013 . ............................... Early Release Day Dec. 23, 2013-Jan, 3, 2014 . ........... Christmas Break Jan. 6, 2014 . .................................. Classes Resume Jan. 17, 2014 . ................................ Early Release Day, End of 1st semester Jan. 20, 2014 . ................................ Martin Luther King’s Birthday – No school Febr. 14, 2014 . .............................. Early Release Day Feb. 17, 2014 . ................................ President’s Day – No school Mar. 21, 2014 . .............................. Early Release Day, End of 3rd Mar. 24-28, 2014 . .......................... Spring Break Students and All Personnel Out Mar. 31, 2014 . ............................... Classes Resume May 26, 2014 . ............................... Memorial Day – No school June 6, 2014 . ................................. Last Day of School – Early Release Day Graduations May 30, 2014 . .................................... Holmes County High School June 2, 2014 . ..................................... Ponce de Leon High School June 3, 2014 . ..................................... Bethlehem High School June 5, 2014 . .................................... Poplar Springs High School Report Cards November 6, 2013 January 27, 2014 April 4, 2014 Report Cards October 24, 2013 January 14, 2014 April 8, 2014 June 17, 2014 School Lunch Prices Prices for breakfast are $0.90 (full) and $0.30 (reduced). Prices for lunch are $2.00 (full) and $0.40 (re duced). Extra milk costs $0.30. All second meals for students cost $2.00 (whether full, reduced, or free). School board policy states that a student can only charge up to $14.50 for meals. is equals one week of both breakfast & lunch. Washington County Dental Clinic The Washington County Dental Clinic is located at 1334 South Blvd. in Chipley. The Clinic is open from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon day through Thursday. The clinic close for 30 minutes at Noon for lunch. They only serve children on Medicaid up to age 21. The clinic provides services includ ing exams, cleanings, sealants, restorations extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal ther apy and Nitrous Oxide. To make an appoint ment with the clinic call 547-8572. Holmes County Dental Clinic The Holmes County Dental Clinic is located at 1177 East Highway 90 in Bonifay. The Clinic is open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Thursday. They only serve children on Medicaid ages three to 19.. The clinic provides services including ex ams, cleanings, sealants, restorations extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal therapy and Ni trous Oxide. To make an appointment with the clinic call 547-8572. TIPS FOR P P AREN tT S

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 3 E
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4 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlL IE sS LIstsSTS Bethlehem School K II ND EE RGARTEE N 4 boxes of 8 large crayons 1 PP air of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 rest mat (plastic on both sides) 3 boxes of tissue 2 bottles of liquid soap 1 box of Ziplock bags** 1 pack of #2 pencils 2 boxes of baby wipes 1 large eraser 2 coloring books 1 backpack 10 glue sticks 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs F II RST GRADEE 1 box of 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO G EE L) 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 box of baby wipe 1 container of disinfecting wipes 1 large eraser 1 coloring book 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs S EE COND GRADEE 1 box 24 pack crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO G EE L) 1 box of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 pack of wide ruled note book paper 1 pack of disinfecting wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 1 glue stick 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 highlighter 2 blue dry-erase markers TH II RD GRADEE 1 pack of 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO G EE L) 2 pocket folders 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 2 pack of wide ruled note book paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 1 composition notebook 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs 1 pack of multi colored construction paper 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) F oO U rthRTH GradRADE 1 pack 24 count crayons 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO G EE L) 4 pocket folders 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 pack of wide ruled paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 zipper pocket 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 blue dry-erase marker 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) F II FTH GRADEE 1 pack 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 pocket folder 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils*** 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 6 packs of wide ruled paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 zipper pocket 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 highlighter 2 blue dry-erase markers 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) 1 1-inch three ring view binder No large Notebooks No Rolling backpacks PP lastic folders ** Girls bring gallon size: Boys bring quart size; 2nd Grade only bring gallon size. *** PP ack of 24 PP lain #2 yel low pencils Pre-K students : No sup plies are required, how ever donations of liquid hand soap, tissues, hand sanitizer, and baby wipes would be appreciated. Bonifay Elementary PrPR E K 2 boxes of baby wipes 2 bottles of liquid hand soap 2 boxes of tissues 2 boxes of snacks (fruit snacks, gold fish, graham crackers, etc.) 1 bag of M & M’s or Skittles 2 bottles of table cleaner (409 or Lysol, please no bleach) 2 glue sticks 1 box of pencils 4 boxes of 8 count Crayola Crayons 1 box of Crayola Colored PP encils 1 pair of Fiskers round tip scissors 1 regular size back pack (please no small backpacks) 1 set of extra clothes 1 blanket (please no sleep ing bags or large blankets or pillows) KI ndND E rgartRGARTE nN 1 pre-packaged supply kit from BEE S ($28) 1 regular sized backpack (no wheels and no small) 1 kindergarten resting mat (no thicker than 1 inch) 1 change of clothes 1 box of tissue 1 box of wipes 1 bottle of soap 1 bottle of sanitizer 1 large bag of M&M’s or Skittles 1 set of ear phones or ear buds Girls bring 1 box Gallon Zip-Lock bags Boys bring 1 box Quart ZipLock bags Girls bring 1 box Froot Loops Boys 1 box Apple Jacks **please write your child’s name in the backpack, on the resting mat and in each item of clothing Kindergarten wish list items: paper plates, brown and white lunch bags, cups, gummy bears, Smart ies, Dum Dums lollipops and gold fish. FI rstRST grad GRADE 1 large backpack (no roll ing backpacks) 2 jumbo pink erasers 1 pack pencil top erasers 1 pack #2 pencils (24 or more) 4 boxes Crayola Crayons (not more than 24 count) 1 box Crayola markers 1 box Crayola colored pencils 2 dry erase markers 1 pair of Fiskers scissors 2 three pronged folders (1 green and 1 red) See BONIFAY page 5

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 5 S S $5 to open B ir thday K eith K ash N o M inimum B alance R equir ement N o M onthly S er vice Charge eS tatements A v ailable O nline B anking M arianna E ast 4701 Hwy 90 (850) 526-7144 Chiple y 1012 M ain S t. (850) 638-7892 Bonifay 300 N. W aukesha S t. (850) 526-4411 G r een S tr eet 2914 G r een S t. (850) 526-4411 C oming S oon 4215 Lafay ette S t. M arianna, FL S t uden t Sa v er s: i s i s a n in t er es t b e a r in g acco un t. $2 c h a r g e p er w i t h dra wa l o v er 3 p er m o n t h. T ra n sf er s t o a n o t h er acco un t o r 3r d p a r t ies b y p r e-a u t h o r ize d a u t o m a t ic, t e lep h o n e t ra n sf er limi t e d t o 6 p er m o n t h. C ur r en t A nn u a l P er cen t a g e Y ie ld (APY ) i s 0.05% f o r b a l a n ces o v er $5 a n d i s e e c t i v e a s o f 04/25/13. e in t er es t ra t e a n d APY a r e s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t ice A cco un t w i l l e a r n n o in t er es t a n y d a y t h e b a l a n ce fa l l s b e lo w $5. F e es m a y r e d uce e a r nin gs. A p a r en t o r gu a r di a n m u s t b e a sig n er t h e acco un t w i t h t h e min o r w w w sb .c o m 1 wide ruled composition book (70 pages) 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 bottle of Elmer’s glue 2 glue sticks 1 set ear buds 1 large box of antibacterial wet wipes 1 bottle of antibacterial liquid soap 1 bottle hand sanitizer 2 boxes facial tissues $8 for class T-shirt Girls bring 1 box quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 bog gallon Zip-lock bags **Please label with child’s name and bring all supplies to 1st Grade Orientation S eE C o O ND g G RADeE 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 pack #2 plain yellow pencils (no mechanical) (12 count) 1 pair of children’s Fiskars scissors 2 large pink erasers 1 glue stick 1 bottle of Elmer’s school (4 ounces) 1 box crayons (no more than 32 count) 1 large box of baby wipes 1 large box of facial tissue 1 small plastic school box 1 bottle of liquir hand soap 1 bottle of hand sanitizer NN O RR ULE RR S Third grade 1 pack of highlighters 2 packs #2 pencils 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 pack CC rayons, markers and/or colored pencils 1 bottle glue and/or pack of glue sticks 1 pair of scissors 1 pack of pencil cap erasers and/or pack of pink erasers 1 pencil bag 1 pack of red pens 1 bottle of Germ-X 1 pack of baby wipes 5 three pronged folders (1 blue, 1 red, 1 green, 1 purple and 1 yellow) 1 pack of expo markers 2 boxes of tissue Girls bring 1 box quart ZipLock bags Boys bring 1 box Gallon Zip-Lock bags F ouOU R t T H g G RADeE 1 backpack 1 zippered pencil bag 1 pack yellow wooden #2 pencils 1 pack colored pencils 1 pack paper 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 protractor 1 highlighter 1 pack red pens 1 bottle of glue 1 pair of scissors 1 pack of baby wipes 1 box of Kleenex 1 writing journal 1 pack black expo markers (black only) 1 pack pencil top erasers or large pink eraser 4 three pronged folders (laminated or plastic if possible) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds to keep in the classroom $3 for class music recorder kit Girls bring 1 bottle of liquid hand soap Boys bring 1 bottle of Germ-X Girls bring 1 box quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 box gallon Zip-lock bags Ponce De Leon KIND eE R g G AR te TE N Each student will need to bring $35 (cash only) to Open H H ouse for school supplies. This supply money is used to purchase B ACACK TO SCHCH OOL SupplUPPL I esES LIstsSTS your child’s school supplies for the entire school year including the crayons, col ored pencils, scissors, pen cils, erasers, glue, folders, journals, notebook paper, wet wipes, tissues, hand sanitizer, storage bags and dry erase markers. PLEA A SE DD O N N OT BUY AN AN Y OF T H H ESE I I TEMS AND AND SEND ND TO SCH CH OOL BECA CA USE WE P R R EFER R SPECI CI F IC IC KIND IND S O NN LY. This supply money also includes a class T-Shirt. Each student will need to purchase their own headphones or ear buds to use in the computer lab. Please bring these to Open HH ouse as well. Kindergar ten students will begin on Thursday, A A ugust 23. Open HH ouse will be announced at a later date. Students will be screened academi cally sometime during the month of July. We will call you to schedule an ap pointment for your child. FIR stST GRADeE Each student will need to bring $35 (cash only) to Open H H ouse for school supplies. This supply money is used to purchase your child’s school supplies for the entire school year including the crayons, col ored pencils, scissors, pen cils, erasers, glue, folders, red checking pens, jour nals, notebook paper, wet wipes, Kleenex, Germ X, Zip-loc bags and dry erase markers. PLEA A SE D D O N N OT SE NDND ANAN Y OF THH ESE II TEMS TO SCH CH OOL BECA CA USE WE P R R EFER R SPECI CI F IC IC KIND IND S O N N LY. This supply money will also include a class T-shirt. Each student will need to purchase their own headphones or ear buds. NN O RR OLLE RR B ACACK P AC AC KS A A T A A LL. First grade BONIFAY frm page 4 See PDL page 6

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6 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 OBAR’S INSURANCE AGENCY AN INDEPENDENT INSURANCE AGENCY ARTHUR P. W. OBAR, JR. hdK{ ,KD{&ZD{KDDZ/> {tKZ,KD^{KE^{>/&{,>d, P O BOX 594 850-263-4483 PHONE >/&&^dZd rr&y 'Zs/>>U&> KZz/E^›>>^Khd,XEd DPWEePM D=7I ZD ;7W= CHIPLE Y FL 1357 Brick y ar d R oad 850-638-0424 BONIF A Y FL 507 W est H w y 90 850-547-1877 www .medicineshoppe.com BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlL IE sS LIstsSTS will have Open House from 9 to 11 a.m., Friday, August 16. School begins Monday, August 19. SE coCOND GRa A DE 2 packs of wide ruled note book paper 2 packs of U U SA green cedar pencils or 2 packs of Ticon deroga pencils 1 spiral bound composition book 2 packs of 24 Crayola Crayons 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack of glue sticks 1 pack of dry erase markers 1 zipper pencil bag (no boxes) 1 pocket folder 1 box of tissues 1 container of zip lock bags (girls –Gallon size; Boys – Quart size) 1 container of baby wipes 1 backpack (no rolling ones) DD ue to the limited space in the desks, please do not by 3 ring notebooks or pencil boxes. PP EE requires lace up or Velcro tennis shoes. T hH IRD g G R a A DE $25 (this will cover all class room school sup plies and most classroom activities**) 1 backpack (no roller back packs please) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds (any kind) Classroom supply money may be paid during PP reSchool, Open House, but must be paid no later than the first day of school. **This money will also be used for many classroom activities including par ties. II f your child does not pay the $25, they will be responsible for all of their classroom school supplies and may not be able to participate in some class room activities. F oO UR th TH g G R a A DE $25 (this will cover all class room school sup plies and most classroom activities**) 1 backpack (no roller back packs please) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds (any kind) Classroom supply money may be paid during PP reSchool, Open House, but must be paid no later than the first day of school. **This money will also be used for many classroom activities including par ties. II f your child does not pay the $25, they will be responsible for all of their classroom school supplies and may not be able to participate in some class room activities. FI fthFTH g G R a A DE 1 three ring binder inch with pockets (preferably white) 1 wireless notebook (com position book) 2 three prong folders with pockets 3 packs wide ruled note book paper 2 highlighters 2 packs of 12 pencils 1 inch and centimeter ruler (not bendable) Crayons or colored pencils 1 hand held pencil sharpener (N N OT battery operated) 1 pack of cap erasers 1 pack of colored pens for correcting (red, purple, green ect) 1 pencil pouch or pencil box 1 clip board 1 box of Kleenex Tissues 2 EE xpo markers 1 pack of copy paper 1 pair of ear buds or headphones Girls bring 1 box quart bags Boys bring 1 box gallon bags For P P E E lace up or Velcro tennis shoes with closed back required Poplar Springs KINDER ga GA R t T EN 1 backpack (their size – no rollers) 1 mat for rest time 1 towel for rest time 1 set of extra clothes (in case of an accident) 1 box of tissue 1 pair of Fisker scissors (small, round tip) 6 large glue sticks 4 boxes of crayons (8 count only) 6 sharpened pencils (the size your child uses) 2 block style erasers 1 small box for crayons and pencils Label your child’s things that come to school. Chil dren should ware safe, comfortable shoes and clothes. Ones they can handle on their own. Flipflops are a very bad choice. The dress code states that your child must be covered from next to knees, front and back. II f your child can not tie their shoes please send them in something they can handle. FIR stST g G R a A DE 1 pair of scissors 1 bottle of glue 1 glue stick 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of pencil erasers 1 pack of dry erase markers 1 pack of highlighters 1 school box 1 one subject notebook 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 container of disinfecting wipes 1 backpack Girls bring 1 bottle of anti bacterial soap Boys bring 1 bottle of hand sanitizer Girls bring 1 box of quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 box gallon Ziplock bags SE coCOND g G R a A DE 1 pair of scissors 1 bottle of glue 1 pencil box 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 container of antibacterial wipes 2 packs of pencil erasers 2 packs of 16 count Crayola crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of highlighters 1 one subject composition book 1 backpack 1 pack dry erase markers (any size) Boys bring Gallon Ziplock bags PDL from page 5 See POPLAR page 7

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 7 BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlL IE sS LIstsSTS 1 pack of highlighters 1 box of antibacterial wipes (no baby wipes) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) Kate M. Smith KINDERGaA R t T EN 1 pencil box (not Harris/ PP eel, Cox) 1 pair Fiskar Scissors 1 box Kleenex tissues 1 box colored pencils 1 box Ziplock (G G allonBoys…… Quart/GG irls) 2 packages dry erase mark ers 1 backpack (to fit 8 x 10 papers)no wheels 2 pencils 1 8 count basic color mark ers 2 8 count basic color cray ons 2 bottles E E lmer’s G G lue (not gel) 1 towel (only D D eese, D D avis, Mosley) 2 containers Antibacterial Wipes 2 highlighters 1 GG erm-X 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) 1 complete change of clothing to be left at school FIR stST G G R a A DE 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) 1 pair Fiskar Scissors 2 boxes 16 count Crayola Crayons 2 bottles EE lmer’s GG lue (4oz) 2 large pink erasers 5 X 8 pencil box 1 large box of tissues 2 boxes (12 count) yellow school pencils 2 pump bottles of hand soap 1 box Ziplock Bags (boys/ gallon, girls/quart) 1 container Clorox Wipes Black DD ry EE rase Markers (boys-large size/girls-small size) SE coCOND G G R a A DE Wide ruled loose leaf paper 3 spiral wide ruled note books 2 packages of #2 pencils 1 pack Fiskar Scissors 2 red checking pens 2 plastic folders (Bunge RR oyal Blue) 2 packs of crayons 1 pink pearl eraser 1 box Kleenex 1 zipper pouch 1 glue stick 1 bottle EE lmer’s glue 1 pack Clorox Wipes 1 box Ziplock bags (BoysGG allon/ GG irls-quart) DD ry EE rase Markers (skinny) Mr. Clean Magic EE rasers (Ms. Tuel) T hH IRD G G R a A DE You may purchase supplies or send $20 to school with your child and teacher will purchase all supplies. 2 boxes Kleenex 2 containers Clorox Wipes 2 boxes PP apermate PP encils 2 boxes (24 count) Crayola crayons 2 pkg loose leaf paper wide ruled 2 boxes pencil top erasers 1 pack DD ry EE rase Markers 1 PP lastic PP encil Box 2 glue sticks 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) F oO UR th TH G G R a A DE 24 wood pencils 2 rectangular pink erasers (not pencil top) 1 pack loose leaf paper 5 Marble composition books (not spiral) 1 pack DD ry EE rase Markers 1 pack red stick pens 1 package 3 inch square post it notes 1 package index cards 1 package Crayola Markers 2 highlighters 1 bottle EE lmer’s GG lue 1 package glue sticks 3 boxes facial tissue 3 containers Clorox Wipes 1 bottle hand sanitizer MR sS Walt ALTER sS ClassLASS 1 one inch three ring bind er (with pockets) and clear cover 5 plastic pocket folders (with prongs and pockets) 2 packages #2 pencils 3 packages pencil top eras ers 2 -24 count packages Cray ola crayons 1 package 24 count col ored pencils 2 Clorox Wipes 2 boxes of tissue 1 hand held pencil sharp ener 2 spiral notebooks Vernon PP REK 1 backpack 1 box of tissues 1 container of GG erm-X KINDERGaA R t T EN 4 expo dry erase markers 2 boxes of jumbo Crayola crayons 8 pack 2 boxes of regular Crayola crayons 24 pack 2 bottles of E E lmer’s School GG lue 4 ounces (NN O GEGE L) 12 E E lmer’s G G lue Sticks (small) 1 pack plain #2 yellow pen cils 8 count 4 jumbo pencils with erasers 2 jumbo pink erasers 1 set of Crayola watercolors paint 1 marble bound composi tion notebook 9 ” X 7 ” 100 pages 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 plastic crayon box 5 X 8 X 3 9 cigar box size 1 three ring binder ” or inch 1 pack of plastic clear sheet protectors at least 20 1 box of Clorox wipes 1 box of tissues or baby wipes GG irls bring 1 box of ZIP IP LOC gallon size bags Boys bring 1 box of ZIP IP LOC quart size bags FIR stST GRa A DE 1 pack of 4 glue sticks 1 box quart size ZIPIP LOC bags 1 small bottle of white liq uid glue 2 boxes of tissues 1 small bottle of GG erm-X 1 container of Clorox wipes 2 packs of 24 #2 pencils 1 pack of pink erasers 3 pocket folders without prongs 4 packs of 24 crayons 1 zippered pencil bag POPLAR from page 6 GG irls bring sandwich size Ziplock bags T hH IRD GRa A DE 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 box of disinfecting wipes (for cleaning) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) 1 pair of scissors 1 glue stick 1 pencil box 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of 16 count Crayola Crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of red pens 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 backpack 1 composition book (100 sheet with black and white cover and name plate on the front) (no spiral notebooks) F oO UR th TH GRa A DE 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 spiral notebook (70 pages) 1 three ring binder (at least 2 inches) 1 set of index tabs for bind er (5 or 8 tab) 1 box of tissues 1 box quart bags 1 pack of highlighters 1 box of antibacterial wipes (no baby wipes) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) FI fthFTH GRa A DE 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 spiral notebook (70 pages) 1 three ring binder (at least 2 inches) 1 set of index tabs for bind er (5 or 8 tab) 1 box of tissues 1 box quart bags See VERNON page 8

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8 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 1 composition book 1 yellow highlighter 1 pack of multi colored dry erase markers 1 pack magic eraser SECOND GRADE 1 box of #2 pencils 1 magic eraser 2 packs loose leaf paper wide ruled 2 spiral notebooks wide ruled 1 bottle of GG erm-X 1 pack of red pens 1 pack of large block erasers 2 packs index cards 2 packs small black dry erase markers low odor 1 container of CC lorox wipes 1 box of tissues 1 box of 24 county crayons 1 pack of glue sticks THIRD GRADE 3 packs of wide ruled note book paper 1 box 24 count crayons 4 spiral bound single sub ject notebooks 1 box gallon Ziploc bags 36 #2 pencils 1 container of CC lorox wipes 2 large pink erasers BACACK TO O SCHOOCHOO L SUPPlL IE sS LIstsSTS 2 boxes quart size Ziploc bags 1 box of 8 colored pencils 4 boxes of tissues FOUR t T H GRADE 100 cap erasers 4 packs of 24 #2 pencils 2 packs of wide ruled note book paper 1 box quart size Ziploc bags 2 large rolls of paper towels 1 box G G allon size Ziploc bags 2 boxes of tissue 2 red or green ball point pens 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 1 bookbag 1 large or 2 small contain ers of disinfectant wipes 2 bottles of hand soap 6 paper pocket folders 1 pack of skinny expo markers PP lease do not send with any VE E S student hand held sharpeners, binders, or pencil boxes unless they are requested. Brands such as C C rayola, Ticonderoga, and PP apermate will per form better for your child. II f you have any questions please call the office at 535-2486. Florida sales tax holiday to be held Aug. 24 Legislation has been passed to create a threeday sales tax holiday that will begin at 12:01 a.m., Friday, Aug. 2, and end at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. During this period, no Florida sales tax or local option tax will be collected on sales of clothing, footwear, and certain accessories selling for $75 or less per item, on certain school supplies selling for $15 or less per item, and on computers and certain related accessories sell ing for $750 or less per item when purchased for noncommercial home or personal use. “Clothing” means any article of wearing apparel, including all footwear (except skis, swim ns, roller blades, and skates), intended to be worn on or about the human body. How ever, “clothing” does not include watches, watch bands, jewelry, umbrel las, handkerchiefs, or sporting equipment. Clothing Exempt from Florida Sales Tax CC lothing and accessories must be $50 or less. I I tems eligible include: C C lothing must be under $100 for: AA erobic CC loth ing, AA lter CC lothing*, AA prons, AA thletic Supporters, Baby CC lothes, Backpacks, Bandanas, Barrettes, Baseball CC leats, Bathing Suits, Bathing caps, Bathing CC over ups, Belts, Belt Buckles, Bibs, Blouses, Bobby PP ins, Book Bags, Boots (except ski boots), Bow Ties, Bowl ing Shoes (P P urchased), Bras, Braces (worn to correct or alleviate a physical incapacity or II njury)*, CC aps, CC hoir CC loth ing*, CC leated Shoes, CC lerical Vestments*, CC lothing Shields, CC oats, CC oin PP urses, CC ostumes, CC overalls, D D iaper Bags, D D iapers (adult and baby, cloth or dis posable), DD iaper II nserts (adult and baby), D D resses, E E mployee UU niforms, Fanny P P acks, Fishing Vests (no otation), Fitness CC lothing, Formal C C lothing (purchased), G G loves (general use), D D ress G G loves, G G arden GG loves, Leather G G loves, Work GG loves, GG raduation CC aps and GG owns, GG ym Suits, GG ym UU ni forms, H H air Bands, H H air Bows, HH air C C lips, H H air N N ets, H H and Bags, H H ats, H H osiery, H H unting Vests II nsoles, Jackets, Jeans, Lab C C osts, Leg Warmers, Leotards, Lingerie, Martial A A rts AA ttire, NN eckwear, NN ightgowns, OO vershoes, P P ajamas, P P ants, PP anythose, P P onchos, P P ony Tail HH olders, P P urses, R R ain C C oats, RR ain H H ats, R R eceiving Blankets, RR eligious C C lothing *, R R obes, RR ubber Shoes, Safety CC loth ing, Safety Shoes, Scarves, Scout UU niforms, Shawls, Shirts, Shoes, Shoe II nserts, Shoulder PP ads, Shorts, Ski Suits (snow), Skirts, Slacks, Sleepwear, Slip pers, Slips, Socks, Sports UU niforms, Spiked Shoes, Suits, Support HH osiery, Suspend ers, Sweat Bands, Sweat Suits, Sweat ers, Swim Suits, Swim Trunks, Ties, Tights, Tux edos (pur chased), U U ndergarments, UU niforms, Vests, Vintage CC loth ing, Wallets, Work C C lothes and Wraps School Supplies Exempt from Florida Sales Tax Limit per item is $10 on these school supplies: Binders, CC alculators, CC ellophane Tape, CC olored PP encils, CC ompasses, CC omposition Books, CC om puter D D isks (blank CD CD ’s only), CC onstruction P P aper, C C rayons, EE rasers, Folders, GG lue (stick and liquid), H H ighlighters, Legal PP ads, Lunch Boxes, Mark ers, NN otebook Filler PP aper, NN otebooks, P P aste, P P encils, PP ens, P P oster Board, P P oster PP aper, P P rotractors, R R ulers and Scissors. Computer and Related Accessories Exempt from Florida State Sales Tax Limit per item is $750 on these items: AA ntivi rus Soft ware, Blank CDCD ’s, CC ar AA dap tors for Laptop, CC entral PP rocess ing UU nit ( CPU CPU ), CC om pact DD isc DD rives, CC om puter Batter ies, CC omputer CC ables, DD ata base Software, DD ata Storage DD evices, DD esktop CC omputer, DD iskettes, DD ocking Stations (designed for computers), EE ar Buds, EE ducational Software, EE lectronic Book RR eaders, Financial Software, Flash DD rives, HH ard DD rives, HH ead PP hones, II nk CC artridges (for computers), Jump DD rives, Keyboards (for computers), Lap Top CC omputer, Memory CC ards, Mice, Microphone (built in computers), Mo dems, Monitors (except ones that include a TV tuner), Motherboards, NN oncom mercial UU se CC omputer, PP ersonal DD igital AA ssistant DD evices (except cell phones), PP ersonal UU se CC omputer, PP ort RR eplicators, PP ortable HH ard DD rives, PP rinter CC artridges, PP rinters, RR am (random access memory), RR outers, Scanners, Speakers, Storage DD rives, Tablet, Thumb DD rives, Zip DD rives, Web CC ameras and Word PP rocessing Software. Taxable II tems – AA thletic GG loves, AA thletic PP ads, Base ball GG loves, Baseball HH elmets, Batteries**, Batting GG loves, Belts for Weightlifting, Bike HH elmets, Bicycle GG loves, Books*, Boutonnieres, Bowl ing Shoes (rented), Briefcases, Buttons, CC ases for EE lectronic DD evices, CDCD ’s (prerecorded), CC ell PP hones, CC heckbook covers (separate from wallets), CC hest PP rotectors, CC loth, CC lothing RR epair II tems, CC lothing Tapes, CC omputer Bags, CC omputers designed for recreation (games and toys), CC omputer paper, CC opy Machines, CC opier II nk/Toner, CC orrection tape, CC orrec tion uid, CC orrection PP ens, CC orsages, CC osmetic Bags, CC ostumes (rented), CC rib Blan kets, DD igital CC ameras, DD igital Media RR eceivers, DD iving Suits, DD ry DD iving Suits, DD uel Bags, DD ust Masks, EE lbow PP ads, Fabrics, Fax Machines, Fins, Fishing Boots (waders), Football HH elmets, Football PP ads, Football Shoulder PP ads, Formal CC lothing (rented), Furniture, GG ames, GG ame CC onsoles, GG ame CC ontrollers, GG aming Software, GG ame Sys tems, GG arment Bags, GG oggles (except prescription)*, GG olf GG loves, HH andkerchiefs, HH ard HH ats, HH ockey GG loves, HH ockey HH elmets, HH ockey PP ads, HH ockey Shoulder PP ads, II ce Skates, II n-Line Skates, II ron-on PP atches, Jewelry, Key CC ases, Key CC hains, Knee PP ads, Lace, Life Jackets, Life Vests, Lug gage, Knitting Yarn, Makeup Bags, Masking Tape, MPP 3 AA ccessories, MPP 3 PP layers, RR ented CC omputers, RR ented CC omputer AA ccessories, Motorcycle HH elmets, PP aint Masks, PP atterns, PP rinter PP aper, PP rojectors, PP rotective Masks (athletic), RR epair of Wear ing AA pparel, RR oller Blades, RR oller Skates, RR ubber GG loves, Shaving Kits, Shin GG uards, Shin PP ads, Ski Boots (snow), Ski Vests (water), Skin DD iving Suits, Smart PP hones, Soccer PP ads, Sports HH elmets, Sports Shoulder PP ads, Staplers, Staples, Surge PP rotectors, Sunglasses (except prescrip tion)*, Surgical GG loves, Swim ming Masks, Tables CC ases, Tablet CC overs, Tennis GG loves, Thread, TV’s (including digital media receivers), UU mbrellas, UU niforms (RR ented), Video GG ame CC onsoles, Watches, Watch Bands, Water Ski Vests, Weightlifting belts, Wet DD iv ing Suits, Wigs and Zippers. *These items are always exempt as religious, prescrip tion, prosthetic or orthopedic items. ** Batteries used in prosthetic and orthopedic appliances are always tax exempt. t VERNON from page 7

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 9 Technical Center trains for employment Washington-Holmes Technical Center provides 34 unique opportunities for employment. If you want to get the skills you need for some of the most rewarding and in-demand careers avail able today, the Technical Center can help make it happen. e programs are specially designed for people who want high wage jobs in our work force region. e Tech nical Center maintains and develops programs and courses according to industry needs, identify ing the skills needed for today’s job market by working closely with local employers and industry professionals. By the year 2014, 65 percent of the jobs will require an education past high school, but most of that training can be com pleted in less than two years. “ere are so many people in our region facing unemployment and underemployment that the Technical Center is focusing on training programs that will allow students to complete their training in one year,” says Martha Compton, Director of the Technical Center. Students can choose from ve health-related programs including Practical Nursing, Patient Care Technician, Pharma cy Technician, EMT, and Medical Coding and Bill ing. e WHTC Health Programs are renowned for high completion rates and licensing rates above 90 percent. e construction industry is nally on the rise again, and the Technical Center oers six programs in that area: Carpentry, Cabinetmak ing, Drafting, Electrician, Heavy Equipment Op erator and Welding. e Public Safety Academy provides training in Law Enforcement, Fireght ing and Corrections; all programs lead to state cer tication in their respec tive elds. For those who love automotive work and diesel engines, choices include Auto Collision Repair and Renishing, Auto Mechanics, Heavy Equipment Mechanics and Heavy Duty Truck and Bus Mechanics. ese programs provide the opportunities for ASE certications. Service-related jobs continue to have a big demand and the Techni cal Center’s Cosmetology See WHTC page 11

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10 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Holmes County Superintendent welcomes students By: Eddie Dixon Holmes County Superintendent Welcome to the 2013-14 school year. Holmes County Schools have been busy all sum mer preparing to provide students opportunities to excel academically, athleti cally, and artistically. Our teachers, support sta, school administrators and district administrators are excited and eager to help students in every aspect of their academic career. We are committed to improve the future of all children in Holmes County. Holmes County Schools work hard to incorporate and focus all of its resources to help each student achieve their highest potential. We will continue to support our teachers by providing professional development to enhance instruction in the classroom. We are continuously implement ing the newest strategies in the classroom to sup port improved instruction and achievement. Data analysis will be used to review student learning gains and to drive instruc tion to support student success. Holmes County also provides a variety of instructional models to help all students attain success. Holmes County Schools celebrate and Eddie Dixon encourage parents to be actively involved in their child’s education. Our goal is to improve the lives of students by foster ing good relationships between students, parents, and educators. Working together we can make a dierence in the lives of Holmes County children. Every educator in Hol mes County believes that the decisions they make every day aect a child’s life forever. I look forward to the new school year because it’s always a great day in Holmes County Schools. Welcome from Washington County Superintendent By: Joe Taylor Washington County Superintendent I would like to wel come all of our students back for a very successful school year. Please note that a few changes to school start and ending times have been made. e order of dismissal has been changed from last year. e order of dismissal is: Middle Schools, High Schools, Elementary Schools in the afternoon. Please be aware that this will change the trac ow and patterns of the buses. Please join me in welcoming new adminis trators to the Washington County School District. Chipley High School has a new principal, Mr. Charles Williams, and a new assistant princi pal, Ms. Nancy Holley. Roulhac Middle School has a new principal, Mr. Kyle Newsome, Mr. Troy People remains as assistant principal. Kate M. Smith Elementary has no changes, Ms. Lesa Burdeshaw, principal and Ms. Bonnie Lind sey, assistant principal. Vernon High School, Mr. Brian Riviere remains as principal and is joined by Ms. Lora Barnes, the new assistant principal. Ver non Middle School, Ms. Kim Register, remains as principal and is joined by Dr. Charles Peterson as the new assistant princi pal. Vernon Elementary School, Mr. Steve Grin is the new principal, Latina English remains as assistant principal. Eective August 9, 2013, the school District will have a new web site www.wcsdschools. com. All of our schools have links on this site. I would like to draw special attention to the Parent Portal. is resource is invaluable in monitoring student’s progress and the abil ity to contact student’s teachers. Joe Taylor FASHION FRENZY B OO UT II QU EE COME SEE US FOR YOUR BACK TO SCHOOL SHOPPING! NEW BACKPACKS, TABLET and LAPTOP CASES! New arrivals of clothing coming in every week. "8)XZr#POJGBZ 547-2000 No Sales Tax %BZTt"VH Mention this ad and receive 10% o your purchase. CALL OR STOPY BY FOR A FREE QUOTE 1364 N. RAILROAD AVE. CHIPLEY, FL 32428 we print MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 11 Tips for quick weeknight meals Cold dinners, including salads, are an option for time-strapped families who still want to enjoy meals together on weeknights. Enjoying a meal together on a weeknight is a goal for many fami lies. But adults often nd themselves pressed for time on weeknights, and that time crunch can make it dicult to enjoy a homecooked meal. But time is not the only thing getting in the way of family meals. Be it after school activities, long commutes or late hours at the oce, many things can make it dif cult for a family to sit down and enjoy a meal together. e National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse notes that family dinners are one of the most eec tive ways for parents to engage in the lives of their children. Studies have also shown that families who eat together tend to eat healthier, as parents can more eectively monitor their kids’ diets, includ ing whether or not their youngsters are getting enough fruits and vegeta bles, when they are dining together. While it may not be feasible for parents and kids to scale back their busy schedules, there are steps parents can take to make weeknight meal preparation quicker. By shortening the time it takes to make meals on weeknights, families might be able to sit down to dinner together more often. Plan ahead. e most eective way to make more time for family meals is to plan ahead. Planning meals on the y encourages everyone to fend for themselves, mak ing it dicult for families to enjoy nutritious meals they can eat together. Plan for the coming week’s meals on the week end, when you can survey your pantry and make a trip to the grocery store if need be. Planning ahead also allows you to prepare certain parts of a meal in advance, which will save you time on busy week nights. Make cold meals. Dinner does not have be served hot, and cold meals often take less time to prepare. Consider serv ing salad or sandwiches on those nights when you are especially pressed for time. When serving sand wiches, serve them on whole grain bread to add some nutritional value to the meal. Turn breakfast into dinner. ere are no laws regarding what qualies as dinner and what does not, so families without much time on their hands on a weeknight can turn break fast into dinner. Eggs are both quick and easy to prepare, and they can be served alongside toast and grapefruit. When making omelets for dinner, add some spinach or another vegetable to make the meal more nutritious. Lean on seafood more often. Seafood can be healthy and delicious, but that’s not the only reason it’s an ally to timestrapped families. Seafood should not take much time to cook, as even those dishes that take more time than simpler dishes like sauteed shrimp will still take less than 30 minutes to complete. at’s signicantly less time than meals in which beef, pork or poultry is the main entree. Leftovers aren’t just for lunch. Leftovers are often relegated to lunch, but extras from a meal cooked over the weekend can be used as a quick go-to meal on a hectic weeknight. If the family enjoyed the meal the rst time around, there’s no reason they won’t enjoy it again. When eating leftovers for dinner, make sure the leftovers are fresh, but try to avoid serving leftovers the night after they were initially cooked. Enjoy meals as a family is a great way for families to eat healthy and stay engaged in one another’s lives. And even families with hectic schedules can employ a few tricks to make dining together more convenient. Program and Commer cial Foods/Culinary Arts are fast tracks into those careers. For those who enjoy the excitement of entertainment, the new Digital Audio Production Program leads to careers as technicians in broad cast and sound engineer ing. Finally, with informa tion technology careers booming, the Administra tive Oce Professional, Network Support and Administration, Applied Information Technology and Cybersecurity are sure paths to high-wages. Applied Information Technology and Cyber security are the Tech Center’s newest programs. Careers in web design and development, IT problem-diagnostics and resolution top the charts. Recently, Cybersecu rity has become one of the nation’s most serious challenges. Cybersecurity is the branch of com puter science that studies cyber threats in order to develop tools and strate gies that help provide for a stable, safe and resilient cyberspace. “Cyberspace touches nearly every part of our daily lives. It’s the broadband networks beneath us and the wire less signals around us, the local networks in our schools and hospitals and businesses, and the mas sive grids that power our nation. It’s the classied military and intelligence networks that keep us safe, and the World Wide Web that has made us more interconnected than at any time in human his tory. We must secure our cyberspace to ensure that we can continue to grow the nation’s economy and protect our way of life.” (e White House Cybersecurity website). Cybersecurity technicians review cyber communica tions so they can develop and implement processes for maintaining conden tiality, integrity, avail ability, and security in cyberspace. All of the IT pro grams at the Technical Center lead to industry recognized credentials by Microsoft and CompTia. Actually, all programs at the Technical Center lead to industry recognized certications. ese are important to employers because they ensure that the individual is qualied, up-to-date on the latest equipment and proce dures, and can perform specic skills eectively. Last year, WashingtonHolmes Technical Center students successfully obtain more industry cer tications than any other educational institution in the Florida Panhandle. For more informa tion on your next step to career success, call the Technical Center Student Services at 638-1180 ext 317 or toll-free 1-855345-WHTC. WHTC from page 9

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12 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Fr o m S cho ol Supplies and T r endy B ack P acks To S t ylish A ppar el A nd A ll T he L a t est E lec tr onics G et A ll T he B ack T o -S cho ol E ssen tials a t 1612 M ain S tr eet C hiple y F lorida 850-638-2243 S t or e 2114 T ax F r ee Da y s A ug 2-4

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 B USINESS G UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only $10.00 per week8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 TROLLING MOTOR REPAIRAordable service! Fast Repair! Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only $18.00 per week!8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 5017238 5017933 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.ŽHessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 5017931 5017930 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.ŽHessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. Ow n r M u t ll Nicely wooded lot in prime recreational area. Crystal clear mountain lake, ski area and brand new golf course. All within 1 mile of property.Oy $ 79,900! Adjoiigosodfo$ 249,900Bank will finance! Cao:877-888-7581ex62Brokerage services provided by: GLS Realty, LLC € Office: 301-387-8100 € Robert Orr, BIC 5017934 5017923 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEAL To place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser *Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKS FOR $ 19.99* 7LUHGRI 6HDUFKLQJ )RU%X\HUV" 3ODFLQJDFODVVLHGDGLVDQ HDV\DQGDIIRUGDEOHZD\WRPDNH\RXUZDUHV WKHIRFXVRIDWWHQWLRQDPRQJSRWHQWLDOEX\ HUV:KDWDUH\RXZDLWLQJIRU"&RQWDFWXV WRGD\DQGVWDUWWXUQLQJWKHVWXII\RXGRQW ZDQWLQWRVRPHWKLQJ\RXGRZDQW &$6+ *(77+,1*6029,1* :,7+7+(&/$66,),('6 7/" "1 /9 7-nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9/-‡6,/-,nxx{‡™{£{ ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. j Christine & Greg j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Choosing Adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Let’s help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Great Dane PuppiesAvailable now! Please call 850-520-4751 Text FL59227 to 56654 PREMIUM METAL Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply. com New Home Builders & Contractors: Call the Carpenters Son for kitchen & bath cabinets, furniture design & woodworking. Specializing in custom cabinets, desk, conference tables, entertainment centers, all types of church furniture. Builders of quality for 33 years. Simply the best/best price. Contact owner/operator, The Carpenters Son, Ken Nowell (850)326-8232. Garage Sale. July 27, 7a.m. Until, Maternity Clothes, Adult and Children’s Clothes, Toy, and Odds and Ends. 1382 South Blvd. Indoor outdoor final moving sale Scrubs, craft items and much more. 703 N. Hamlin St Bonifay. 7a.m.-2p.m Sat., July 27. TREASURE SALE! Live Oak Assembly of God Women’s Ministry at Live Oak Assembly of God Church, Hwy 177Aon left going towards Dogwood Lakes Friday, July 26 from 7:00 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday, July 27 from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. BreakfastFriday morning the ladies will be selling delicious homemade breakfast foods including biscuits and cinnamon rolls. Come and enjoy! The yard sale includes, furniture, appliances, bicycles, clothes, books and much, much more! SEE YOU THERE! 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. 2010 Craftsman riding mower, 17.5 hp, B-S, 42 in, auto, like new, $850 Call 850-628-5436 Scrape Metal, FREE!! 624-1679 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 &/$66,),('$' '($'/,1(6 i>`ˆivœV>ˆwi`>` ˆœ`>>£" œœvœ …i7i`i`>>i>` /…'`>>£" œœvœ…i ->'`>7iiŽi``ˆˆœ Volume 51 Number 12 WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 2013 Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes Counties FREE T AKE ONE

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2 | The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, July 24, 2013 5017391 MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director – Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioner’s office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING. Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED PC/ Internet needed! 1-888-2125888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Efficient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans. com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Benefits and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855IRT-TANK www.indian rivertransport.com A SODA/ SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Includes all utilities. $425/month. (850)326-4548. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 For Rent: House 2BR/2BACHAnewly remodeled, stove, refrigerator, NO Pets, rental references, $550 month, yards included, $500 Deposit, 601 2nd St. 850-326-2920. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 Br/2Ba 16x70 MH near Dogwood Lakes on private lot. Not in a park. $485/mo plus deposit. (850)547-4232. 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. 3BR/2BA Brick Home with large shop on 21/2 acres in Chipley area $195,000. 850-726-0396 For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. &DOORQHRIRXU §DGYLVRUV¨DQGSXWWKH &ODVVLILHGVWR :25.)25<28 7/" "1 /9 7nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9 /-‡6,/-, nxx{‡™{£{ Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



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Connectwithus24/7Getbreakingnews,videos,expandedstories,photo galleries,opinionsandmore...@WCN_HCT chipleypaper.com 50 Wednesday, JULY 24 2013 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com Volume 90, Number 29INDEXArrests ..................................A5 Opinion .................................A4 Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports ...................................A7 Extra .....................................B1 Faith .....................................B4 Obituaries .............................B3 Classi eds .............................B6 IN BRIEF NEWSWashington CountyPossum PageantWAUSAU The 44th annual Possum Festival kicks off Saturday, July 27, with the annual Wausau Miss Possum Festival Pageant at the Possum Palace. Gates open at 5 p.m. Entry for the pageant is 18 and under. Gate admission is $3 for adults, 12 and under free. Bring a chair. Planning commission to meet Aug. 6CHIPLEY The Washington County Planning Commission will have a public hearing and meeting at 5 p.m. Aug. 6 in the County Government Annex Meeting Room, 1331 South Blvd. The commission will accommodate handicapped and disabled persons who wish to attend. Call 415-5093 at least 48 hours before the meeting date to make arrangements.First Presbyterian Art Day CampCHIPLEY Chipley First Presbyterian Church will have its annual Art Day Camp Bible School 9:3011:30 a.m. Aug. 5-9. This years theme is, Faith, Hope and Charity! Attendance will be limited to 20 students, ages 10-13. Registration must be completed before Aug. 1 by contacting the church at 658 5th St. Chipley. Attendees will be accepted on a rstcome, rst-served basis. By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Washington County Tourist Development Council approved the new method of providing advertising, not cash, to local events during their workshop and meeting Monday at the Chamber Building in Chipley. The decision was not unanimous, with Mary Richmond voting against the change. I dont have enough information, she said. Three council members, Richmond, Elizabeth Henderson and Mark Hess, joined the meeting via conference call so the TDC would have a quorum. From now on, when events such as the Panhandle Watermelon Festival apply for TDC assistance with promotion, they will be awarded that assistance in pre-purchased bulk advertising, Administrative Assistant Heather Lopez said. This will save the council money, Member Ted Everett said. The switch from cash to advertising will also make the process simpler and more transparent, Everett said. The event representatives will have radio and print advertising to choose from, and the TDC will be there to give them advice as to which station or media is more appropriate for their event. Richmond questioned the amount of money the TDC planned on spending for advertising. I dont think we should spend $80,000 on advertising, she said. Everett said $80,000 would represent the entire annual budget of the TDC. Were talking about spending $10,000 a year on bulk advertising, Everett said. This doesnt mean the TDC will stop funding events, Everett said. The grant program only provided funds to be used for advertising and promotion, and that is still the mission of the TDC. This will also allow us to See GRANTS A2By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON Mayor Michelle Cook told the Vernon City Council that the postponed Fourth of July event is going to be on Aug. 31. The city council had its July meeting at City Hall on Monday. We wont have a parade this year, and the event will begin at 5 p.m., Cook said. We still will have entertainment by Gilleys, and the fireworks will start at 9 p.m. The event was postponed due to the flooding that occurred in Vernon on July 4 when the area received over 20 inches of rain in the matter of a couple of days. Several buildings and homes were damaged in Vernon the cost of the damage to the community has been estimated at $2.1 million. Cook said she has continued to work to collect information for the citys effort to collect FEMA assistance, but asked if someone else on the council could help her since she is also busy planning the Aug. 31 event. Councilman Tray Hawkins volunteered to help. If you can just bring me what you have so far I can take that on, he said. The Washington County Tourist Development Council approved an additional $100 for the city of Vernon during its meeting Vernon reworks set for Aug. 31See FIREWORKS A2By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Washington County Chamber of Commerce is teaming with Northwest Florida Community Hospital again this year to bring the We Can! program to the annual Back To School Fair. The annual Back To School Fair, which is planned for Tuesday, Aug. 13. Were always looking for volunteers to help with the Back To School Fair, said Ted Everett, chamber executive director. The fair also needs school supplies to distribute to children. Last year 3,000 people attended the Back To School Fair, and not only school supplies were distributed. There were three tractor-trailers of food, eggs and vegetables, that were handed out, Everett said. And it was all gone really quickly. We have some needy families in our county, and this event is a great thing. Students also received free haircuts and even bicycle helmets at last years event. Future grants to be paid with advertising, not cash FOOTLOOSERANDAL SEYLER | The NewsBlake Collins, left, and Malinda Locke, second from left, play Ren and Ariel, the star-crossed teenagers who ght to bring dancing to the rural Bomont in the Spanish Trail Playhouse production of Footloose: The Musical. The production was staged this weekend. For more photos, see Page B1 and visit chipleypaper.com.Back to School Fair set for Aug. 13See SCHOOL A2 See our Back To School special section inserted today! RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsVernon Garden Club member Rhonda Dickenson discusses changing venues for the monthly club meeting at the Vernon City Council meeting Monday.

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. Clean,clear,naturalsoundYourHearingAidscommunicatewitheachother automaticallyadjustingthemselves. Ear-to-EarSynchronization: Settingsareautomaticallytransferredtotheotheraid.BeltonePromise HearingAidSystem$1000offAppliesto2HearingAidsatPremierLevel.$800offAdvantageLevel. MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)387-4931Wednesdays&FridaysAllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years ExperienceBillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience WEREINYOURNEIGHBORHOOD!CHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)387-4931Monday-Friday Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:7-31-13 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson, M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon GRANTS from page A1promote the county in general when there isnt a speci c event taking place, Lopez said. Which is one of the things the TDC has been wanting to do more of. Tim Lanham visited the TDC during its workshop and informed the council that there will be a state Bee Keeping Conference held in Chipley from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. We expect there will be 200 to 250 people coming to Chipley for the event, Lanham said. He added that Lopez has been working with him in arranging hotel accommodations for visitors. The event is sponsored in part by the Chipola, the Tupelo and the Central Panhandle Bee Keepers Associations, Lanham said. The county extension of ce is also heavily involved, and we hope to get our FFA, 4-H and JROTC kids involved in the events as well, Lanham said. In other business, the council approved a $100 grant request from the city of Vernon for the Firecracker Day event, which had to be rescheduled until Aug. 31 due to ooding on the Fourth of July. The TDC members also heard a report from Lopez on attendance at the Panhandle Watermelon Festival, which was held June 28-29. The attendance at Fridays concert event was estimated at 3,500, Lopez said, which is tremendous considering the weather. Numerous people booked hotel rooms and stayed for Saturdays events, and the Washington County Agricultural Center auditorium was packed for the Watermelon Auction and the concert by the Grammy Award-winning bluegrass group Dailey & Vincent. People were standing along the walls because there were no more seats, Lopez said. The Watermelon Festivals Facebook page also received a record number of visits, getting up to 20,000 hits a day during the week leading up to the event. The Festivals web page received 439,000 hits in the three months prior to the event, and the county web sites visits also increased in June due to the Festival, posting 1,518 visits with 1,300 of those clicking through to the Watermelon Festival page. The rebranding, and the shift in focus they have done with the Watermelon Festival has done wonders for the event, Lopez said. Monday afternoon to help the city promote the rescheduled event. City Clerk Dian Hendrix asked the council for clari cation on the matter of a nal attorneys bill from former city attorney Kerry Adkison. I received this email, and I was not sure if the city wanted an itemized bill for just this one item or for all of them, Hendrix said. Adkison was under the impression the city wanted an itemized bill for just one of the listed charges, she said. I would like to see an itemized list for the whole bill, Councilwoman Gwen March said. That is what we discussed, Hawkins added. March asked that Hendrix seek an itemized bill so the council could discuss it at the next council workshop. Vernon Garden Club member Tom Holman asked the council if the garden club could begin holding its monthly meetings in the City Hall instead of in the old high school. Hendrix said the room the garden club had been using in the old high school sustained water damage in the July 4 weekend ooding. Were going to get that room cleaned out, she said. Club member Rhonda Dickenson asked if the club couldnt just meet in Room No. 3 instead. That other room is wet and smells moldy, I dont think we should be meeting in there. Holman said the garden club is up to 30 members, and the group will begin meeting again in September. The council agreed the club could use the alternative room for their monthly meetings. I have a request, Hawkins asked Holman and Dickenson. In Wausau, the garden club gives out a Yard of the Month award. Do you think we could start doing something like that in Vernon? Holman agreed that the club could begin that program, presenting the winners with a certi cate at the monthly city council meetings and perhaps providing a sign for the lawn. Hawkins said the city had tried the punitive method of getting people to take care of they lawns, to little avail. Maybe if we try the carrot well get more participation. FIREWORKS from page A1You also might remember, Washington County was recently ranked as 65th of 67 counties in child obesity, said Everett. This is a problem, and we have to understand that it affects us as business owners. Obese children are likely to have developed diabetes by the time they are 30, which means health care expenses. Not only does the health insurance costs rise, but it also affects productivity and absenteeism in the workplace, Everett said. The We Can! program (Ways to Enhance Childrens Activity and Nutrition) is a national movement designed to give parents, caregivers, and entire communities a way to help children 8 to 13 years old stay at a healthy weight, according to the website nhlbi.nih. gov. Research shows that parents and caregivers are the primary in uence on this age group. The We Can! education program provides parents and caregivers with tools, fun activities, and more to help them encourage healthy eating, increased physical activity, and reduced time sitting in front of the TV or computer in their entire family, Everett said. This year we will be at the Back To School Fair, and we are also working with the schools to get information into the classrooms and to the kids, Everett said. We Can! also offers organizations, community groups, and health professionals a centralized resource to promote a healthy weight in youth through community outreach, partnership development, and media activities that can be adapted to meet the needs of diverse populations, according to the website. Science-based educational programs, support materials, training opportunities, and other resources are available to support programming for youth, parents, and families in the community. Chamber member and insurance agent Kathy Rudd said that she had encountered children as young as 12 who were uninsurable due to their health risks. We have to get busy trying to get our kids educated and get them to where they need to be, size-wise, Everett said. SCHOOL from page A1 RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsTourist Development Council Administrative Assistant Heather Lopez, center, explains the plan to switch from providing cash to providing advertising for local events during Mondays TDC meeting in Chipley, while Council members Joel Pate, left, and Ted Everett, right, listen to the discussion. RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsTed Everett, executive director of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, discusses the We Can! program on Thursday. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.chipleypaper.com APage 4Section POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION 850-638-0212 mkabaci@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212The death of former neighbor Ann Medley brought a rush of memories from former days. I cant remember now whether Guy and Ann Medley built their home across State Road 79 from us before we built because we were living here in the house in which my husband was raised for several years. But they, the Tom and Betty Segers family, and we built about the same time and were the only ones living in this neighborhood for a few years. We were all stay-at-home moms then as our children were small. So most of my memories are episodes with our children, usually involving some disaster. The rst thing I recalled was wearing Anns too-big sandals to the hospital when our son was struck by a motor bike as he was getting off the school bus. Hearing the commotion from the highway, I had raced down the driveway in my bare feet. Ann had already called the ambulance. At that time we had no emergency services. The funeral home ambulances transported injured and ill people. Sims Funeral Home ambulance answered the call, and I rode to the hospital with Hiram while Ann came over and got Cindy and Glen, who were taking a nap. (I guess Mike and Gina were napping, too.) After Hiram was stabilized, Franklin Forehand drove the ambulance to Pensacola, and Ann took charge of my other two until my parents could get here. I returned her sandals when I ran home to pack a few clothes to take to Pensacola. Another crisis episode with our children was one morning when Ann and I were talking on the telephone. I heard this terrible scream, and Ann threw down the phone. I quickly hung up and ran across the highway to see what the crisis was. Ann was mixing a cake while we were talking, and Ginas long blond locks got caught in the mixer blades. By the time I got there, she was untangled and everything was OK. I am not sure about the cake batter. We didnt have a telephone the evening I discovered that Glen had drunk rust remover (hydro ouric acid). I ran to Anns to call the doctor. After I told Dr. Henry he had already vomited, he assured me that Glen would be OK. He dryly added, Well, he ought never to rust. Another time when I rushed over to the Medleys was when our daughter Cindy hit Gina as she was trying to swing a golf club. Cindy was the most upset of anybody, and I dont believe she has ever picked up a golf club since. Though the Medley children were a few years younger than ours, Gina loved to come over and play with Cindys Barbie dolls. At Anns visitation, Gina also remembered Glen putting on puppet shows and charging them a nickel to see them. Glen and Mike were frequent playmates. For years after we built the house we now live in, we had a big pile of dirt on the side of our front yard, so the children including Hiram and his friends played war a lot. But once I discovered Glen and Mike pretending they were revenuers. I had an old copper wash pot that had belonged to Jacks Grandma Meeker. The two boys were using Glens scout hatchet to chop holes in the copper pot. They were busting up a moonshine still. I remember when Hiram was studying compound interest in maybe the seventh grade. He was adamant that what I was showing him couldnt be right. I threatened to call Guy, the banker, to con rm the interest is indeed added back to the principle each month before he would believe that I knew what I was talking about. As our children grew and we went separate ways, we didnt see the Medleys much. In 1969, I started to teach college, and the year I started teaching, 1972, the Medleys moved to Abbeville. Ann started a career herself working in the Henry County Hospital, eventually becoming the administrator there and at the Henry County Nursing Home. As they had been in Bonifay, the family was active in the Methodist Church in Abbeville, where Ann was very much involved with the music ministry. She continued that after they moved to Dothan, Ala., as well. Ann was also a long-time member of the Troy University Community Band. In addition, Ann was cofounder of Women of The Wiregrass, an organization that furnishes scholarships to single mothers at Wallace College. Golf was a passion of Anns, and she became very involved in that after the move to Dothan, becoming a member of the Dothan Country Club and Ladies Golf Association, serving a term as president of that group. That group of ladies occupied a place of honor at her funeral service in Dothan First Methodist Church on Wednesday. Our condolences go out to Guy, Mike, Gina, Don and Barbara Lee and the rest of the family. Anns zest for life and her happy spirit sustained her through her courageous battle with cancer. May her Lord sustain you all through the dif cult days ahead. Allow the Prattler to brie y rely on his writers crutch, Setting It Straight, and acknowledge an error in last weeks column. Karla is the daughter of Bill and Sybil Webb. Jessica is the daughter of Karla, and the granddaughter of Bill and Sybil. The July 10 article did not do full justice to Dr. Robert Snare in his never failing effort to bring bidders into the process when the big watermelons are being sold in the annual auction by auctioneer David Corbin. These are not errors, per se, but maybe a little more elaboration is needed into the doctors accomplishments in obtaining more buyers. This is especially true in the tribute and in memory category of bids. The doctor brought a total of nine bids, not six, as previously reported. The Jimmy Trawick bid was submitted in memory of his in-laws, Jodie and Bera Yates Owens. Mike Arnold, of Henry Arnold Ford in Graceville, should have had his bid announced in honor to his father, Henry Arnold, The Old Plowboy who founded the business. Dr. Snares business, Snare Waterworks of Bonifay, was the one made in respect to Julian J. Fussell, World War II tanker and later a farmer, who passed away in June of this year. He also joined Ronnie Cook, owner of Padgett Drugs in Bonifay, and Richard Morris of Graceville in paying tribute to the four brave Americans who lost their lives in Benghazi earlier this year. Richard, a long-time supporter of the watermelon auction, always includes his military veterans from the Vietnam War unit in which he served and the group that continues to hold annual reunions. The weekend after the watermelon festival had slowed its pace to the point of allowing me to attend the Varnum reunion by special request of Lanita (Nita) Nicholson Varnum. She is the widow of Kennith Varnum and a native of Nettleton, Miss. Her story of meeting and later marrying Kennith is one of the most heart-warming stories written in the Heritage of Washington County book in the writers humble opinion. This romance grew from an unusual experience during World War II, and readers will nd the full story on page 352 of the book. The John Bethel Varnum family is considered the patriarch of that family in Washington County. He brought his family to the area in October 1885 and the family continued to multiply greatly as outlined in the heritage book, page 351. That story was written and submitted by grandson, Stanley Varnum, who lived to see the book come to full fruition but died soon after its printing. Readers will nd that the Varnum family settled in the Greenhead area of the county where Nita continues to live. Previous writings will show that this family was prominently involved in High Hills Primitive Baptist Church during its existence in the earlier history of the county. It was dissolved as a church congregation in 1926, but the adjoining Blue Pond Cemetery containing numerous burials of the Varnum family, still exists and maintained by Dale Taylor, and others, in the historic area of the county located in Moodys Pasture. When Nita Varnum invited me to the July 6 reunion, she told me that it would be the 26th year of the get-together and that this one promised to bring additional family members, especially from the Clewiston area, where many migrated to seeking employment many years ago. She stated that this element of the family had not seen the heritage book and felt it would be much in demand as she requested that books be brought to the event. The Prattler immediately recalled the two members of the Varnum family, J.R. and Wilburn, who made Clewiston their home immediately after completing Vernon High School only a short time after my departure from the school upon graduation. I was aware that the brothers have passed away. Her prediction proved correct as many offspring of the two, plus other family members that I had never met, came to the family gathering and immediately were attracted to the history and heritage recorded on their family, resulting in the sale of ve additional copies of the ever popular heritage book. Readers will recall that the sponsors of the book had hoped that June would wind up sales of the 200 additional copies received on August 13 of last year. Our efforts in May, June and July have reduced the remaining books to 19 which are still available. You still have time to obtain your copy by contacting me at 638-1016 or email at perry1000@abellsouth.net. The price is $64.20 when picked up from me, or $72 when mailed. The watermelon festival, plus my own Brock reunion and many other family gatherings, seem to have taken my time this summer, as it traditionally has done each summer for many years. I am not complaining. I look forward to all of the activity in which I am fortunate to participate and hope health and strength will allow me to stay involved in many more. See you all next week. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEliza Ham Varnum and John Bethel Varnum are considered the patriarch family of the Varnums in Washington County.Varnum family prominent in county since 1885HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells Former neighbors death brings back memoriesWe built about the same time and were the only ones living in this neighborhood for a few years. We were all stay-at-home moms then as our children were small. Wednesday, July 24, 2013

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LocalWashington County News | A5Wednesday, July 24, 2013 and5017247 JULY 8 JULY 16Lacey Adkison, 20, Vernon, recommit on possession of paraphernalia, purchase cocaine Jessie Barnes, 40, Bonifay, resist ofcer with violence two counts, assault of law enforcement ofcer Cheryl Colbert, 54, Bonifay, possession of meth with intent, possession of paraphernalia, possession of controlled substance without prescription, possession of listed chemical Gina Culp, 42, Chipley, sell of opium David Dodson, 26, Springeld, violation of state probation on possession of a controlled substance without a prescription Dennis Supree, 39, Chipley, battery Dustin Durrance, 33, Cottondale, Holmes County warrant for child support Michael Haines, 25, Chipley, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, ee and elude, driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia Wayne Hardy, 55, Caryville, criminal mischief Freddie Lawrence, 56, Chipley, petit theft, disorderly conduct, criminal mischief Antonia Livingsotn, 24, Chipley, battery Vina Mamoran, 39, Sunny Hills, battery Jerry McDade, 62, Vernon, violation of injunction of protection Shaun Reed, 45, Chipley, specic felony commit act could cause death two counts Gregory Rolling, 42, Graceville, trafc opium Douglas Sanders, 35, Crestview, carrying a concealed weapon, possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Mark Sisson, 41, Cottondale, harass witness, victim or informant, trespassing, recommit sell of meth Walter Street, 47, Caryville, driving under the inuence Richard Turner, 32, Chipley, warrantless arrest for Bay County violation of stateprobation on forgery, fraud, larceny Joseph Watts III, 33, Panama City, sex assault Robert West, 50, Chipley, violation of count probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Darren Williams Sr., 44, Chipley, Osceola County warrant for child support Arrest REPOrR T Bodies of 2 missing swimmers foundBy SCOTT CARROLL522-5180 | @scottyknoxville SCarroll@pcnh.comP P A NAMA CITY TY BEACH The bodies of two men who disappeared while swimming off the coast were found Sunday, Panama City Beach police reported. Tony Underwood Jr., of Rex, Ga., drowned Saturday in the water near the Chateau Motel at 12525 Front Beach. He went missing about 6 p.m. after losing grip of a otation device and getting caught in an undertow, according to PCB police. Rescue crews searched the area but did not nd him. His body was recovered beachside at County Pier about 11:15 p.m. The other swimmer, 26-year-old Korvotney Barber, of Manchester, Ga., went missing in the water behind Pineapple Willies on Front Beach about 7 p.m. Saturday. According to a police broadcast, Barber was knocked underwater by a wave after swimming past a sandbar. Shortly before 4 p.m. Sunday, Barbers body was found by a passerby between Boardwalk Beach and Resort Condominiums and Top of the Gulf condos, PCB police said. Barber was a basketball player at Auburn University from 2005 to 2009. In a public statement released Sunday, Auburn athletic director Jay Jacobs said Barbers death was tragic and untimely. The Bay County Sheriffs Ofce had posted double red ags on the beaches in Bay County on Saturday, indicating swimming conditions are highly hazardous and have an increased likelihood of strong currents and high surf. Also, beaches are closed to swimmers during the posting of double red ags. Double red ags were posted again Sunday. Holmes Countys best kept secretBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BO ONIFAY Y San Sebastian Winery, the newest Holmes County Chamber commerce member, has been referred to by Chamber Coordinator Julia Bullington as Holmes Countys best kept secret, with their largest vineyard of 450 acres being located in Holmes County. Thats 450 acres of taxes paid to Holmes County, said Bullington. Nestled in the northern part of Holmes County near the Walton County line is some of the most beautiful land in Holmes County and thats where the vineyard is located. Charles Cox President of Seavin Inc. and son of the Founder and Chair of Seavin, Inc. said that it winemaking was in his blood, going as far back as his grandfather and at the age of thirteen was introduced to the local vineyards by his father, who started by planting ve acres of vineyards near his home. Cox moved to St. Augustine in 1996 to open San Sebastian Winery where hed become president of Seavin, Inc., Cox, operating out of St. Augustine and overseeing San Sebastian Winery, Lakeridge Winery and vineyards. I like to stay active in the community, serving as a member for the St. Augustine Chamber of Commerce, Attractions Association, St. Augustine Lighthouse Board of Trustees and as a member and as the Chair Elect for the Visitors and Convention Bureau, said Cox. Im also a member of the Florida Grape Growers Association, Orlandos Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Clermont Areas Chamber of Commerce. We strive to continue to be structured as a private corporation with Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards in Clermont, San Sebastian Winery and Prosperity Vineyards in Prosperity.PhPH OTOS b B Y Sea SEA Vin IN Inc NC .On over 450 acres in Holmes County, Muscodine grapes are grown and harvested for several wineries throughout Florida, which includes San Sebastian winery in St. Augustine, owned and operated by Seavin Inc. By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BO ONIFAY Y Missy Sword Lee, Family intervention program aupervisor with Habilitative Services of Northwest Florida, visited the Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs July 16 meeting to speak about The WashingtonHolmes Domestic Violence Task Force. The mission of the Washington-Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force is to provide safety for the victims of domestic violence and sexual violence through training, counseling and guidance while attempting to preserve the family as a whole, said Lee. The goal of the Washington-Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force is to reduce domestic and sexual violence in our communities. It is our objective to provide a shelter that will offer safety and security to those looking to end the violence in their lives by removing themselves from the situation. Lee explained that she used to work for the Department of Children and Families. I am ashamed to admit that I used to be one of those people who would frown at a woman who didnt want to leave a violent relationship and say things like why would you stay? and its your fault, said Lee. The truth of the matter is it isnt as simple as all that. These women have no where to go, especially in our area. The closest shelter is in Panama City, said Lee, and that makes the decision to leave harder. We need your help, said Lee. Weve got the get the word out and were working hard to do just that. We held a softball tournament recently that raised over $2,000, weve got a walk/vigil planed for Holmes County in October for Domestic Violence Awareness and in memory of those who suffered at the hands of Domestic Violence. Lee also said that October was Domestic Violence Awareness and requested that the Bonifay Kiwanis Club consider dedicating one of the rodeo nights to Domestic Violence Awareness. The color for Domestic Violence Awareness is purple, so it can be a purple night, said Lee. Weve also got these shirts that have been very poplar. It takes a community to stop the violence. Also present to speak on behalf of the WashingtonHolmes Domestic Violence Task Force was Tammy Slay. This has been our home for over 25 years now, said Slay. That would not have been possible if someone didnt help me 27 years ago to get out of an abusive relationship. She said she was working at a bank at the time. Id come into work with fresh bruises and black eyes, said Slay. No one should ever be so scared that theyre willing to get beat up occasionally than to face the dangers of leaving. Last year 25.9 percent of murders in Florida were the results of domestic disputes, she said. We had one murdered due to domestic violence right here in Holmes County just last year, said Slay. Some may say that was just one, but if that was your relative, your mother, sister, aunt or grandmother, then thats one death too many. She said she and her husband had witnessed an act of violence the parking lot of Wal-Mart last week. This woman was getting beat up in the parking lot and while her boyfriend was circling her with his vehicle a couple stepped in and helped her, she said. Come to nd out she just got out of the hospital the week before to get stitches on the inside of her mouth. Shes safe now but if it had not been for that couple theres no telling what might have happened to her. She said that 3,341 domestic violence survivors requesting shelter was turned down due to overcrowding. We need a shelter here, because if even one gets turned away its one too many, said Slay. My kids make a difference in this community and I am very proud of them because they came from a difcult situation but they overcome. I tried seven times to leave before I received help; now as a community we can make a difference. She explained that they are looking for someone who is willing to donate property to them. If theres a building you just cant get rid of, were a 301c3 non-prot organization and that donation can be used as tax deduction, said Slay. We need to spread the word so we can make a difference together and we cant do this alone. For more information contact Lee at 596-3288, or email WashingtonHolmesDVtaskforce@yahoo.com. Guests speak out against domestic violenceCeci ECI Lia IA SS Pear EAR S | Times-AdvertiserMissy Sword Lee, Family Intervention Program Supervisor with Habilitative Services of Northwest Florida visited the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to speak about The Washington-Holmes Domestic Violence Task Force. Program Coordinator Roger Brooks introduced their guest speaker, Missy Lee, and Bonifay Kiwanis Club President Carlton Treadwell wore his rodeo outt to encourage others to do the same in efforts of reminding everyone that rodeo is coming up real quick.

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HALIFAX FILE PHOTOThe Sea Screamer boat makes its way past the St. Andrews Marina and Harbour Village in Panama City. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration charged operators of the tour boat with two counts of illegal dolphin feeding. NOAA also charged AAA Jet Ski Rentals and Tours and Blue Dolphin Tours. OUTDOORS Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Page A6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASectionBy VALERIE GARMAN747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Three Bay County tour boat companies are facing nes for unlawfully feeding wild dolphins in violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, but at least one of the companies says the charges are false. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration charged operators of the tour boat Sea Screamer with two counts of illegal dolphin feeding in July 2011 and August 2012, resulting in a $10,000 ne. We are disputing these claims, said Capt. Andy Redmond, the owner of the Sea Screamer. We do not feed dolphins aboard the Sea Screamer. Redmond said each tour begins with a verbal admonition to passengers that it is illegal to feed or harass dolphins and that the sea creatures are fully capable of nding all the food they need. He added that charges stem from one incident in 2011 and another in 2012 and that though undercover agents from NOAA had been aboard his boat several times in the past few years, they have not seen humans feeding dolphins from the vessel. All we do is observe dolphins, he said. We do not feed dolphins. Also charged were AAA Jet Ski Rentals and Tours and Blue Dolphin Tours, with each company facing a $5,000 ne for illegal feedings in August of last year. Contacted by phone Sunday, a man with AAA Jet Ski Rentals said the business would not comment on its ne. The owner of Blue Dolphin Tours was unavailable for comment Sunday. We work very closely with the (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission), and these cases were a result of a planned working group, said Jeff Dadonski, the acting deputy special agent in charge at NOAAs of ce of law enforcement. All of the cases were witnessed by law enforcement or other components. Under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, it is illegal to feed, touch or pursue wild dolphins, and Bay County is a known hotspot for illegal dolphin interaction. The incidents happened a year or two ago, but of cials said it is not unusual to take that long to conclude an investigation and le federal charges. NOAA Fisheries bottlenose dolphin conservation coordinator Stacy Horstman said the areas large commercial and recreational boating eet coupled with a growing tourism industry presents a unique challenge when it comes to preventing dolphin interaction. Panama City is the one scienti cally documented place where we know dolphins have been fed so people can get in the water and interact with them, Horstman said. The uniqueness about Panama City is the amount of vessels in a small area; youll have upwards of 25 boats encircling two dolphins and trying to interact with those dolphins. In an attempt to counteract the negative effects of dolphin interaction, NOAA has led outreach programs in Bay County for more than two decades. Horstman said outreach focuses primarily on educating the public through brochures, posted signs, workshops, billboards and on-air public service announcements. This season, the agency also has begun utilizing banner plane yovers as a means to communicate the message. Despite two decades of effort, Horstman said the huge in ux of commercial businesses and tourism in a small geographic area has smothered any progress. There was a time when we were seeing improvements, but unfortunately in the last few years, its just as bad as its ever been, Horstman said. We really need everybodys help to keep the people and the dolphins safe. Local tour businesses Osprey Charters and St. Andrew Bay Ferry say they have made an effort to adhere to the initiatives set forth in NOAAs Dolphin SMART partnership, even though the program has not yet been implemented in the area. You can safely and responsibly view dolphin from a vessel, Horstman said. We know it can happen, but there are a lot of commercial and recreational boaters in the area, and its going to take everybody to really help us solve this problem. By SCOTT CARROLL522-5180 | @scottyknoxville scarroll@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Hundreds of people attended the Bay Point Boating and Outdoor Expo at Bay Point Marina on Saturday, dodging midday rain showers to see live music, watercrafts ranging from jet skis to yachts, and reality television stars. All proceeds from the expo will go toward the Gulf Coast Childrens Advocacy Center, which supports victims of child abuse. Expo ofcials said theyll know how much was collected by the end of the month. We nd it fun, enjoyable and exciting to help out the less fortunate, thats for sure, said Bay Point Marina director Daniel Fussell. About 50 watercrafts from Great Southern Yachts and Legendary Marine, among others, were on display at the expo, drawing many members of the local boating community. Anybody that does anything with boats is out here, Fussell said. The expo included an appearance by John Godwin and Justin Martin, cast members of the reality TV show Duck Dynasty. Bay Point sold $50 tickets for a VIP meet-and-greet with the pair. The expo also attracted dozens of small business owners, who said the expo provided exposure and networking opportunities. Among them was Tracey Sharp, owner of Girls Night Out salsa. Sharp rst offered the salsa to friends as a holiday gift. After selling 1,900 jars of her homemade sauce at the Junior League of Panama Citys Holly Fair in 2009, she decided to expand. Sharps four salsa avors and two seasoning packs are now sold at several local grocery stores. Im just a little local girl trying to make a dollar, she said Saturday at the expo. A lot of people dont get the chance to taste it when they see it in the store, so (the expo) gives them the chance to taste every single avor and see which level of heat they like. Doing these shows does a lot for me. It gives everyone the chance to try it, and I get to listen to peoples responses, so it keeps me going. While people sampled Sharps salsa on Saturday, James Diesel of James Diesel Repair and Performance discussed all-terrain tires and gas mileage with expo attendees nearby. The expo, he said, was a chance to pitch his auto service and performance center, which he started in 2010 after stints at several local auto dealerships. But Diesel, who noted he is an advocate of keeping our money local, also had the community on his mind. We get to contribute to the charity by being in the expo, he said. That was the biggest thing for us, that we get to give back to the community. Diesels business began in a barn, he said, but has grown into an operation housed in an 8,000-squarefoot facility. Networking at expos and other local events, he said, can be crucial for start-ups. The community has helped me a lot, and (the expo) is good for these local businesses to get some exposure, Diesel said. Kristy Bondarchuk shared his sentiment, adding she has attended two Panama City Friday Fests since starting her boutique, Khloes Closet, three months ago. The shop sells dresses, jewelry and fashion accessories. Im just starting out, and Im just trying to get things going, she said. (The expo) just kind of promotes my product and lets people become more aware of who I am and what I have. Meeting will focus on CWD preventionSpecial to HalifaxThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will have a public meeting Aug. 8 in Gainesville to discuss possible options for minimizing the risk of chronic wasting disease coming into Florida. The meeting will be 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Paramount Plaza Hotel, 2900 S.W. 13th St., Ballroom A/B, and is open to the public. CWD is not known to affect people but is a contagious neurological disease affecting deer, elk and moose. The disease is always fatal, and there is no known cure or vaccine. So far, the disease has been discovered in 22 states, two Canadian provinces and South Korea. The meeting will begin with a presentation by commission staff on the signi cance of CWD and will include a discussion on possible solutions for minimizing the risk of the disease being brought into the state. For more information, contact Curtis Brown at Curtis.Brown@MyFWC.com or 617-9490. For more information on CWD, go to www.CWD-info.org. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this workshop/ meeting is asked to advise the agency at least ve days before the workshop/meeting by callingthe ADA coordinator at 488-6411. If you are hearingor speech-impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 800-955-8771 (TDD) or 800-955-8770 (voice). Regulations needed for scallop sizeScalloping season is in, and they are being dragged out of the bays like there is no tomorrow. The problem is they are too small to keep. You go out in the hot sun and get into the water several times, climbing in and out of a boat and getting sunburned in the process, and then head back to the house and try to clean these small scallops and guess what? It has been my experience that scallop cleaning is a heck of a job when the scallops are large enough to keep, but just try and clean these little peanuts that are about as large as the tip of your thumb and you really have a task. You might be surprised at what happens to most of these smaller scallops. I know there are some people who will stick to the job and clean every one they catch, but they are the exception. Most of these peanutsize scallops are thrown into the trash after several attempts are made to clean them. A natural resource that could still be alive and growing every day to a respectable size is wasted. The scalloping experience includes getting the family out on the water whether you catch scallops or not. The idea is to catch scallops, of course, but whether catching a bag full or a boat load it is still a family affair and pleasure is derived no matter how many you catch. Do you realize scallops are one of the most popular marine creatures that the public can catch where the size is not regulated? Just go to the Keys and try and catch lobsters without a measuring stick and see what happens. The oysters we eat every day have to be at least 3 inches or longer in order to keep one. Try and keep a snapper under 16 inches and see how your fortune works out if you meet the wrong person at the dock. What Im trying to say is that scallops should be regulated size-wise. Winston Chester devised a piece of cardboard with a hole cut in it in the shape of a scallop to gauge the size big enough to keep. If you catch a scallop that falls through the hole you throw it back. This measuring device would be easy enough to build out of plastic and worn around the wrist. When you were through scalloping you could measure them in the boat and throw back the ones that are too small. Remember, if it falls through you know what to do. Throw it back. Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.net 3 Panama City Beach companies ned for illegal dolphin feedingExpo a boon to businesses, child advocacy center Panama City is the one scienti cally documented place where we know dolphins have been fed so people can get in the water and interact with them. The uniqueness about Panama City is the amount of vessels in a small area; youll have upwards of 25 boats encircling two dolphins and trying to interact with those dolphins.Stacy Horstman NOAA Fisheries bottlenose dolphin conservation coordinator

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com ASectionBy PAT McCANN747-5068 | @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com It is nearly impossible to dilute the travel ball baseball experience into one blanket statement. While certainly there are many organizations that offer boys an opportunity to play at high level as well as a chance for more games and travel to tournaments in the region, not all have the same goals. And the motivation compelling adults to create travel teams for young ages, 8U and up by each calendar year, seems to wane as kids age and leave the game. Therefore there are fewer travel teams in the age 12U, 13U brackets, and heading into high school those summer programs often take precedence. What is certain, however, is that travel ball isnt going away anytime soon, and that the number of travel teams has increased dramatically in Bay County. Where they may have been ve travel teams a decade ago, there might now be 35, although those numbers strictly are unof cial. Many of the players have left the local rec leagues because the latter no longer allow travel teams to remain intact and compete against teams chosen through a player draft. Travel teams basically are a collection of all-stars, or what their organizers perceive to be some of the top local talent at that age level. That doesnt mean the rec leagues strictly offer a watered-down product. All of them still have skilled players, and some travel ball kids continue to play rec ball during the spring months, so its not as if only travel kids know how to pitch, hit and eld. As example, local rec leagues sent a number of teams to the recent Dizzy Dean state tournament in Tallahassee and the Hiland Park 10U placed third. But there is a perception by travel ball proponents, and its probably valid, that the added experience they provide helps produce better quality players into the future.TOURNAMENT TIMEWe all like rec ball, but for us its a time issue, Lynn Haven Dolphins 9U coach Brian Thomas said. Were practicing two or three nights a week. How much baseball can you play? from March through May. The summer months are when travel ball truly takes over, but Josh Parker of the Beach Bashers organization said their travel players start practicing in January, often play in their rst tournament in mid-February and continue with tournaments through mid-July. Parker said the Bashers have been growing by the year and currently have six teams ages 8U through 13U with about 65-70 players involved. He said some younger players compete in rec ball to get extra reps, but we dont require that. Parker said coaches of the various age-group teams meet prior to the season and produce a tournament schedule, which averages about 10 tournaments per team. I think in this day and age if you dont do some type of competitive (travel) baseball youre behind when you get to high school, Parker said. Its not like it used to be. Thats my thought on it. While some organizations have a more proli c tournament schedule involving extensive travel, Parker said that the Bashers usually play in closer tournaments held in Dothan, Gulf Breeze and Pensacola, and one luxury limiting expenses is their home venue Frank Brown Park offers a number of major tournaments during June and July. Parents are asked to help with the costs of uniforms and tournament entry fees. Parker said that on average parents pay $500 for their kid to participate, but then also have to delve deeper into their finances if they want to travel and watch him play. Weve been able to do fundraisers in addition, Parker said. If we didnt do that wed have to ask for parents to pay more. Some tournament costs are pay as you go. Considering the added expense for parents, compared to say one $50-75 rec league registration fee, a number of parents in Bay County obviously believe the added expense is worth it for their boy. Parker doesnt think travel ball has reached a ceiling here. As far as a number of players I dont think so, he said. Every year theres a new crop of 8year-olds coming up; parents unhappy with one (organization) looking for another. It seems theres teams popping up on every block. Thomas said the 9U Dolphins play about 12 tournaments in the spring and four more in the summer. They travel as far as Lake City, but also play closer to home in Dothan, Marianna and Panama City Beach. He said he prefers tournaments in Dothan because competing teams come from all directions of the Southeast. Thomas said that prior to the travel season he visits websites of various tournaments trying to determine which ones would be best for the Dolphins, and which tournaments are going to make. That helps determine an operating budget when gauging fees and travel costs. Once or twice a year we have a big fundraiser, we sell ribs and chicken, anywhere from 300-400 ribs in a day, Thomas explained. Still, he estimated an expense of $4,000 to $5,000 for the parents of players, which often can depend on the caliber of the team. When they played in the Dizzy Dean World Series, for example, it cost us all about $1,000 apiece because the event takes the better part of a week to complete. Thomas has heard of some much larger organizations in other Southeastern states that charge as much as $500 for their boy simply to try out with no guarantee he will make the team. If 400 try out, that can provide an instant operating budget. The Dolphins, he said, lose a player or two every year to attrition. Heres the difference, we want everybody to be from here, Thomas said. We know of one team that had kids from Alabama, Georgia and Florida, from all over. We want to make these kids better, then when they get to high school it makes everybody better. David Chapman is president of the R.L. Turner Little League rec ball organization, but also is involved with 11U and 13U travel teams his boys play for. Based on eight tournaments, he said the cost to parents is about $500. We try to stay within a 150-mile radius, from Pensacola to Enterprise, Chapman said. The whole goal is to play baseball. It just depends on how much you want to put into it.ANOTHER LEVELGeoffrey Lancaster has progressed through the age levels of travel ball in Bay County and is representative of the experience for some of our best boys. The son of Chris and Chrissy Lancaster of Lynn Haven, Geoffrey is a rising freshman at Mosley High School and participates in the Dolphins summer program, but also caught the eye of larger travel ball organizations through his performance in tournaments against their teams in previous summers. As a result, he currently is a member of a 13U team based in Albany, Ga., and another in Edison, Ga. He played against both teams for years both teams came to us wanting to pick him up, said Geoffreys mother, Chrissy. Each time he tried out and made the team. The Lancasters, in addition to the normal travel expenses to watch Geoffrey play, also have had to drive to Georgia and spend weekends away from home when he practiced. Chrissy estimated that Geoffrey had played in 12 tournaments prior to her being interviewed for this story. She said she was leaving the next day to y to Fort Lauderdale, where her husband was scheduled to pick her up that Saturday and drive to Fort Myers where Geoffrey was playing in a major tournament. She expected to return home sometime on Wednesday, and be back to work on Thursday. Vacation time from work, she said, often revolves around her sons tournament schedule. We pay for uniforms, membership we gured out than on average we spend about $8-9,000 per year not only for their son to compete, but for them to travel and watch him play, Chrissy said. It can be stressful sometimes, she said. We have two other children (ages 15 and 17) and its a very ne line of balancing (Geoffreys) goals. He started at 9 years old in travel ball and I ask him every year if hes committed and he answers, yes maam. Chrissy said that the ultimate goal is for Geoffrey to attend college by garnering a baseball scholarship. One of the teams hes on has a coach who played in the majors and he said at least nine of the 11 kids on the team should have no problem getting Division-I scholarships, Chrissy said. Geoffrey also has a keen interest in playing football in high school. He loves both sports, Chrissy said. If he wants to keep doing both of them we want him to. Part IV describes the softball travel ball experience. enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL LEAGUES OF THEIR OWN: PART IIIBaseball travel teams on the rise Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISERWednesday, July 24, 2013 Page 7

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LocalA8 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 24, 2013In loving memory of Etta M. White HudsonBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY On a beautiful sunny day, after a long week of bleak weather, friends, family and city of cials gathered at Eastside Park to rename it Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park. The city park was named inmemory of Etta M. White Hudson during a rededication ceremony held on July 16. Thank you all for coming to celebrate the life of Mrs. Etta Hudson, said Mayor Lawrence Cloud. Mrs. Hudson accomplished many things in her life; she was a dedicated wife, mother, friend and nurse. He said she had earned her masters degree in nursing and lovingly served the community in this area for many years. Most of all Mrs. Etta was totally committed in her faith as a Christian and a woman of strong, moral character. It is my honor and privilege to dedicate this park in memory of Mrs. Etta Hudson. Cloud concluded the ceremony by reading a city resolution, dedicating the new name to the park. The great and supreme ruler of the universe has in his in nite wisdom removed from among us, Etta M. White Hudson, read Cloud. Etta M. White Hudson consistently dedicated her time and energy on behalf of the health and welfare of the citizens of Bonifay and surrounding areas. The City wishes to recognize Etta M. White Hudson for her many years of service to the public and the citizens of Bonifay and the City will acknowledge its appreciation to Etta M. White Hudson by changing the name of Eastside Park to Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park. Hudson passed away on Feb. 9 of this year at her home surrounded by her family. She was born on Nov. 5, 1947 in Bonifay to Jestine White and Robert Horne. She attended Bayview School in Bonifay in 1965, continued her education with the Washington-Holmes Technical Center and earned her Licensed Practical Nurse license in 1976. She earned her Registered Nurse degree from Pensacola College in 1987, her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in Nursing from Florida State University in 2002 and her Masters Degree in Nursing from Pheonix University in 2005. She was a nurse for 36 years, starting her career with Dr. John Grace at Doctors Memorial Hospital before transferring to the Holmes County Correctional Facility, then to Jackson County Correctional Institute as a Registered Nurse Supervisor, then promoted to the of ce of Registered Nurse Consultant at the Regional Of ce and then achieved the position of Assistant Director of Nursing in the Central Of ce of the Department of Corrections for the State of Florida. One of her happiest memories of her life was meeting and marrying the Rev. Robert E. Hudson in 1977 and to this union a son was born and reared in love along with, Poe, Judy, Barbara, Joseph and Zoey, according to her obituary. She was survived by her husband of 36 years, the Rev. Robert E. Hudson; three sons, Poiterist White, Raymond Hudson of Bonifay and Joseph Sanders of Pensacola; three daughters, Judy Love, Barbara Sanders and Zoey Hudson of Bonifay; stepdaughter, Elaine Smith of Pensacola; god-daughters, Shenika Richardson (Stephen) of Raleigh, N.C. and Annie Staten of Bonifay; four brothers, Charles White (Nina) of Middletown, Conn.; half-brother, John Horne of Fort Myers; sisters, Icey Horne of Lake Wales, Freda Clark Middletown, Conn.; halfsister, Ether Bell of Fort Myers; a host of in-laws; 16 grandchildren, 24 great grandchildren; one godson, Tavarus Moore and a host of devoted friends and coworkers. Carpet&CeramicOutletYOURHOMETOWNLOWPRICE! 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MikeAlvis,Broker Oce:850-547-9400Cell:850-258-2214 School District considering 1.5 mill property taxBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County School District met July 16 and approved of advertising for a public hearing at 5:15 p.m. on July 29 to discuss a possible 1.5 mill property tax in addition to the to the schools proposed tax of 6.043 mills. The tax is estimated to generate $670,751 to go toward building the new Bonifay Middle and Elementary Schools, reimburse maintenance, renovation and repairs, roof repairs and replacement, paving, purchase of seven school buses, purchasing school furniture and equipment district wide and lease purchase of Data Processing Equipment. Superintendent Eddie Dixon gave a preview of the presentation he would be presenting before the visiting representatives from the Florida Department of Education about building the new Bonifay Middle and Elementary Schools. In 1985 Ponce de Leon High was built for $5,299,402; in 1988 Holmes County High was built for $12,042,055; in 1997 Bethlehem School was built for $15,527,022; and in 2003 Poplar Springs School was built for $13,322,713 for a total of $46,191,192, said Dixon. What they all have in common is that these schools would not have existed without the Special Facilities Program. He explained that the value of one mill in Holmes County is equivalent to $412,000 and the value of Walton County is $11,200,000. With our one mill we could purchase three buses, but with their one mill they could purchase 82 buses, said Dixon. But thats also why we qualify for a special grant. Dixon also explained that the new schools would be a bene t to both the school and the community. There would be a modern spacious facility that accommodates todays numbers, designed for todays students, he said. It would be safer from outside threats, a consolidation cost savings to facilities, maintenance, personnel, resources and energy. There would be simpli ed and safer bus traf c, better control of the students, simpli ed parent traf c ow, convenient for parents and closer to and on the same side of the railroad tracks as the hospital, police, Emergency Management Services and the Fire Department. For the community he said it would be bene cial because of it doubling as a special needs shelter located on the South end of the county which will balance out the needs as Poplar Springs serves as a shelter in the northern portion of the county. Not to mention a new water tower for Southwest Bonifay, upgraded streets and new sidewalks, said Dixon. Board Chairman Rusty Williams also thanked everyone for their work towards getting the new schools built. I want to thank the board members and staff and all those involved in process of developing and building these new schools, said Williams. Thank you for all of your hard work and dedication towards building our students a brighter future in Holmes County. Board member Debbie Kolmetz said that she had attended the Rural Summit on Safety in Quincy. We had some speakers come in from Sandy Hook and I found it to be very informative, said Kolmetz. Eastside Park gets new nameCECILIA SPEARS | The NewsEastside Park was renamed Etta M. White Hudson Memorial Park in honor of the dearly departed Etta M. White Hudson during a rededication ceremony held on July 16. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Wednesday, JULY 24 2013Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who was the rst Beatle to have a #1 single following the groups breakup? John, Paul, George, Ringo 2) What dog breed was named for an area along the coast of Croatia? Chihuahua, Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Dalmatian 3) Of these who once worked as a pineapple chunker in a Hawaiian cannery? Bette Midler, Demi Moore, Michelle Pfeiffer, Uma Thurman 4) What make was the Cunningham family car in TVs Happy Days? Hudson, DeSoto, Ford, Chevy 5) Which bill is the second most-used denomination of U.S. currency? $5, $10, $20, $100 6) At what age was Rudolph Valentino at time of death? 31, 46, 67, 94 7) What song was Michael Jackson performing when he introduced the moonwalk? Billie Jean, Beat It, Thriller, Bad 8) A sesquipedalian speaker ordinarily uses what sort of words? Kindergarten, Racist, Long, Religious 9) The rst Corvette was made in 1953 with its color being? Black, Red, Blue, White 10) In 1922 which city had the rst of cial police car, the Bandit-Chaser? Denver, NYC, Detroit, Chicago 11) Of these who was named after a department store? Halle Berry, Meg Ryan, Jodie Foster, Lucy Lawless 12) Bronze John was an old disease name for? Meningitis, tuberculosis, syphilis, yellow fever 13) In the early 1900s about what percentage of American homes had bathtubs? 5%, 20%, 33%, 40% 14) If someone is aphonic, what is lost? Keys, Soul, Voice, Mind ANSWERS 1) George. 2) Dalmatian. 3) Bette Midler. 4) DeSoto. 5) $20. 6) 31. 7) Billie Jean. 8) Long. 9) White. 10) Denver. 11) Halle Berry. 12) Yellow Fever. 13) 20%. 14) Voice. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLERThe Spanish Trail Playhouse presented Footloose: The Musical this past weekend before a packed house. The 1998 play was based on the 1984 lm of the same name. Blake Collins and Malinda Locke play Ren and Ariel, the star-crossed teenagers who ght to bring dancing to the rural Bomont. The lm was loosely based on events which happened in Elmore City, Okla., where the 1980 graduating class got permission to hold a dance in a town where dancing had been banned for 100 years. The music featured in the production was by Tom Snow with lyrics by Dean Pitchford, and included additional numbers by Eric Carmen, Sammy Hagar, Kenny Loggins and Jim Steinman. For more photos, visit chipleypaper.com FOOTLOOSE: THE MUSICALDirector: Kevin Russell Music Direction: Rachel Webb Choreography: Deanna Kay Bailey and Meredith Moreau Cast: Blake Collins as Ren McCormack Malinda Locke as Ariel Moore Phyllis Sloan as Ethel McCormack Rob Nixon as Shaw Moore Terrie Garrett as Vi Moore John David Brown as Willard Hewitt Andrew Sadler as Chuck Cranston Jacquie Funderburk as Lulu Warnicker Emory Wells as Wes Warnicker Raymond Bixby as Coach Dunbar Diane Webb as Eleanor Dunbar Sierra Hill as Rusty Ashleigh Stowe as Urleen Julie Wells as Wendy Jo TJ Herndon as Jeter Matthew Shook as Bickle Blake Bush as Garvin Atrayu Adkins as Lyle Taylor Young as Travis Carrie Bennett as Principal Harriett Clark Kevin Russell as Cowboy Bob Deanna Bailey as Betty Blast Townspeople and Dance Ensemble: Bri Beechum Kate Burke Amber Casey Elizabeth Christmas Courtney Corbin Heidi Edwards Zedra Hawkins Costin Hewitt Taylor Shaw Stage Manager: Chelsea Herndon Technical Director: Jimmy MillerEverybody cut footloose!

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) FreeAdmissionforchildrenages5andyoungerandmilitarypersonnelwithvalidI.D. Viewthecurrentscheduleonline: presents LIVEMUSIC Clark elected chairman of Chipola College boardMARIANNA The Chipola College District Board of Trustees recently elected Gary Clark of Chipley to serve as chair of the board for the 2013-14 year. Clark is vice president of West Florida Electric Cooperative. Danny Ryals, a realtor from Calhoun County, was elected vice-chairman. Clark assumed the chair from Jan Page, CEO of Community South Credit Union in Chipley, who served as chairman during the previous two years. Nine trustees appointed by Gov. Rick Scott represent Chipolas ve-county district on the board. Other trustees include Tommy Lassmann of Marianna, a commercial banker with Cadence Bank; Nolan Baker of Ponce de Leon, an engineer with CDG Engineers & Associates; Hannah Causseaux of Bristol, former director of appointments in the Executive Ofce of the Governor; John Padgett of Marianna, a retired Jackson County commissioner; Gina Stuart of Marianna, a Realtor; and Dr. Leisa Bailey, a physician in Holmes County. Maggards welcome baby boyJared and Renee Maggard announce the birth of their son, Malaki Jacoby. He was born at 11:43 p.m. July 2 at Ash Memorial Hospital in Jefferson, N.C. He weighed 7 pounds, 1.7 ounces and was 20 inches long. Grandparents are Laury and Chuck Maggard of Bonifay and Ginny and Robert Roland of Jefferson, N.C. Davis named to Presidents ListSpecial to ExtraGRACEVILLE Katie Lynn Davis has been named to the Presidents List at the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the spring 2013 semester. The Presidents List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 4.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Davis is a junior at BCF pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Christian counseling. She is active in the AAC, the wind ensemble and the Jazz Band. Davis is the daughter of Randall Davis and Joani Rogers of Chipley. She is a 2010 graduate of Chipley High School. The honor student is a member of Oakie Ridge Baptist Church in Chipley.Special to ExtraTake the heat out of your home and make your meals on the grill. Grill entrees, side dishes and desserts as a healthy alternative to frying. Join us for Meals on the Grill in 30 Minutes from 6-8 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Holmes County Ag Center Farmers Market Complex, 1169 E. U.S. 90, Bonifay. The program includes grilling tips, meat selection and menu ideas. Registration is $10 per person and includes sample foods, materials and a recipe booklet. Preregistration is required by July 25. Call the University of Florida/ IFAS Holmes County Extension Office, 5471108, or the Washington County Extension Office, 638-6265. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact the extension office (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least five working days before the class. Freeman, Doolittle to wedBrian and Melanie Freeman of Ponce de Leon are pleased to announce the upcoming wedding of their daughter, Brianna Michelle, to Marcus Wayne Doolittle. Marcus is the son of Bruce Sr. and Theresa Doolittle of Culpeper, Va. Brianna is the granddaughter of Billy and Gail Bearden of Ponce de Leon and Margaret Murphy and the late Earl Freeman of Alford. Brianna is a 2012 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School. She graduated from Northwest Florida State College with her Associate of Art degree in May 2013 and will be entering the radiography program at Northwest Florida State College in August. Marcus is the grandson of Carl Gakeler of North Carolina, Christine Gakeler of New Jersey and James and Edna Mae Doolittle of Burlington, N.J. Marcus is a 2012 graduate of Orange County High School in Locust Grove, Va. He is employed with Magee Industries in Freeport. The wedding will take place Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013, at 4 p.m. at the Chautauqua Building in DeFuniak Springs. Reception will follow. No local invitations are being sent, but all friends and family are cordially invited to attend. Welcome, baby girlFarrah Sheree Forehand was born May 6, 2013. She was 7 pounds, 3 ounces, 19 inches. She is the daughter of Dale B. Mann and Josh W. Forehand of Bonifay. She is the granddaughter of Angie Miller and Lawrence Brown, Pat A. Vaughan and Wayne Forehand. She also has two brothers, Holden and Ethen. Congratulations Births Wedding Campus KUDOSMake meals on the grill in 30 minutes

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Crossword PUZZLESOLULUTION ON PAGEE B5Summer is a rough season for our furry friendsAs summer progresses and temperatures come close to triple digits, many of us make it a habit to protect ourselves from the sweltering heat. Unfortunately for our pets these scorching summer months are not only uncomfortable, but they are also a time when the risk of heat stroke is at its highest. A heat stroke occurs when the bodys ability to rid itself of heat is exceeded by the heat that it is generating, said James Barr, Assistant Professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). This results in an increase in body temperature to the point where damage to the internal organs occurs. Heat stroke is a very dangerous condition, especially in pets. If it is severe, the pet will almost certainly die if it does not receive proper medical care immediately. Oftentimes, the pet will be brought to the hospital too late and will die despite our best efforts, said Barr. Although the initial signs of heat stroke are simply anxiety, excessive panting, and inability to settle down after exercise, these symptoms can quickly and severely progress into lethargy, muscle weakness, seizures, and even death. If you believe your pet is at risk for heat stroke, there are several steps you should take immediately to guarantee the pets longevity. The rst thing you should do is take the pets temperature, said Barr. If their body temperature is above 104 degrees, they are in danger of organ damage. Submersing the pet in cool, but not cold, water is very helpful in lowering their temperature to a more normal level. Since time is a crucial factor when dealing with a heat stroke, spraying a pet down with a garden hose or immersing them in a nearby body of water are preferred methods of cooling the pet down. After you have started this cooling process, the pet should be seen by a veterinarian immediately so that it can receive prompt medical attention to prevent any further damage. The most important way to keep your pets temperature at a normal range throughout the sizzling summer months is to avoid exercising with them during the hottest parts of the day. It is also vital to provide plenty of drinking water and to take frequent breaks from playing outside to allow your pet to cool off and rehydrate. Often a long run in the early afternoon is the precursor to a heat stroke episode, said Barr. It is also very important to not leave your pets in the car while it is not running as it can reach dangerous temperatures very quickly. If, after prolonged outdoor exposure, you notice that your pet does not calm down, looks lethargic, or if you are at all worried that they may be suffering from a heat stroke, you should immediately contact your local veterinarian or emergency services. The most dangerous thing is the failure to seek veterinary attention, as time is of the essence, said Barr.  Abo BO Ut T PEt T Ta A LKPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics m ay be directed to  editor@cvm.tamu.edu. PEtT Ta ALK Julaine Padgett, 72, of Chipley, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, July 14, 2013, surrounded by her loving family, after a long ght with cancer. Julaine was born Sept. 29, 1940, to the late Tom and Minnie Dee (Brock) Johnson in Greenhead. She was a graduate of Vernon High School, class of 1958. Julaine was a faithful member of Shiloh Baptist Church and she loved to sing in the choir and play the hand bells. She owned a beauty salon for many years then worked at the Washington Holmes Vocational School. Her greatest joy was caring for her family, her husband, children and grandchildren. She was a kind hearted, compassionate, loving person, always thinking of the needs of others. Julaine is survived by her loving husband, Bobby R. Padgett; three sons, Steve Padgett and wife Cindy, Mike Padgett and Ty Padgett and wife Windy all of Chipley; her precious grandchildren, Adam Padgett of West Hollywood, Calif., Jay, Austin, and Juliann Padgett, all of Chipley; two sisters, Joann Parish and husband Howell of Skipperville, Ala. and Charlotte J. Hightower of Panama City; one sister-in-law, LaVania Herrington and husband Roland of Dothan, Ala., and numerous nieces and nephews. Family received friends for visitation on Wednesday, July 17, 2013, from 9 to 11 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, Chipley with the Services starting at 11 a.m., with the Rev. Tim Patton ofciating. Interment followed in the Shiloh Baptist Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Flowers will be accepted, donations can be made to Covenant Hospice 4215 Kelson Avenue Suite E, Marianna, FL 32446 or to Shiloh Baptist Church. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Julaine Padgett JULainAINE Pa ADgGEttTTElisea Brown, 76, passed away July 12, 2013, at her residence. She was born June 14, 1937, in San Ildefonso, Bulocan, Philippine Islands to Pedro and Ana Calderon. Elisea married Orville Brown on Aug. 5, 1945. Shortly after being married she moved to the United States in November 1945. In 1973, Elisea moved to Florida from Michigan. She is survived by her four children, Jon Brown of McKinney, Texas, Jane Taylor of Ponce De Leon, Olive Ellithorpe of Sand Lake, Mich., and Michael Brown of Navarre; three nephews, Steven Kramer of Twining, Mich., Terry Kramer, and Russell Kramer of Almont, N.D.; 10 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 16, 2013 beginning at 3 p.m. in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83, North DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, with the Rev. Father Richard Dawson as celebrant. Visitation was held one hour prior to the service. Committal services followed at a later date at Cedar Valley Cemetery in Twining, Mich. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the directions of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.EElisea BrownMrs. Frances Gainey Thomas, 69, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013. She was born March 11, 1944, in DeFuniak Springs, Fla., to Millard and Wilma Gandy Gainey. Mrs. Thomas was a lifelong resident of Walton County. She was Baptist by faith and a member of the Southwide Baptist Church. She owned and operated Fran Thomas Enterprises, INC for over 10 years. She was the Grants Coordinator for the City of DeFuniak Springs, and served as the Director of the Council on Aging. She enjoyed shing, hunting, working crossword puzzles, traveling and especially spending time with her family. Mrs. Thomas was preceded in death by her parents, Millard and Wilma Gandy Gainey. Mrs. Thomas is survived by her loving husband of 45 years, Clayton M. Thomas of DeFuniak Springs; one son, Craig Thomas and wife Debbie of DeFuniak Springs; one daughter, Amy E. Ripley and husband Scott of Niceville; one brother, Raymond Gainey of DeFuniak Springs; two sisters, Agnes Smith and husband Roger of Tallahassee and Marie Hinson and husband Charles of DeFuniak Springs; six grandchildren, Krista Wilbon and husband Freddie, Joseph Drew Touchton, Stephanie Ripley, Kaelin Ripley, Courtney Currid and husband Jordy and Jordan Thomas; three great grandchildren, Elijah, Elena and Olivia and by numerous beloved nieces and nephews. Visitation services were held from 10 to 11 a.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel; 230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel; 230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435 with Dr. Bobby Tucker ofciating. Pallbearers will be Jordy Currid, Chuck Hinson, Scott Ripley, Drew Touchton, David Thomas, Robert Thomas, Todd Gainey, Matthew Gainey, Gage Smith, Derek Randolph and Scott Thomas. Burial followed at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Frances G. Thomas FRanANCEsS G. THoOMasASHadley Ella Dalayna Morris, infant daughter of Lucas and Jessica Morris, of Chipley, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola. Survivors include her parents, Lucas and Jessica (Birge) Morris of Chipley; twin brothers, Easton and Weston Morris; maternal grandparents, Timothy and Mattie Birge of Vernon; paternal grandparents, James and Susie Morris of Chipley; maternal great grandmother, Verla Mae Hall of Vernon; paternal great grandparents, Jim and Jane Rudd of Chipley; aunt and uncle, Crystal and Lee Duke; aunt and uncle, Jamie and Andy White and aunt, Jenna Birge. Funeral services were held Friday, July 19, 2013, at 1 p.m., in the Chapel of Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Leon Jenkins, the Rev. Wayne Brannon and the Rev. Keith Mashburn ofciating. Interment followed in New Bethany Church Cemetery in Hinson Cross Roads. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. HHadley EE. MMorrisCharles D. Baur, 66, passed away Wednesday, July 17, 2013. A native of Quincy, Charles had lived in Chipley for the past 11 years, He was a computer programmer in Tallahassee and Chattahoochee at Florida State Hospital. He was a member of Courts of Praise Church, actively serving on the Praise and Worship Team. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edwin and Douglas Baur. He is survived by his wife, Cecelia Baur of Chipley; sons, Larry (Cindy) Pooser of Tallahassee and Daniel (Crystal) McNeill of Chipley; daughters, Julia (Jason) Bennett and Kaylor (Ryan) Collins all of Chipley; brother, Pete Baur of Okeechobee; nephew, Tommy (Tonya) Baur and his children, Kaley, Braden, Brian, and Sophia Baur; grandchildren, Rocky and Shirley Roberts, Chase Walker, Haylee and Lance Rivenbark, Braylee, Tristan, and Laramie Pooser, Eli and Nehemiah McNeill, Lexi and Blane Brasher, Hayden Bennett, and Austin, Luke, and Ryley Collins and four great grandchildren. A celebration of his life was held Saturday, July 20, 2013, at 10 a.m., at Courts of Praise Church 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley, FL 32428 with a private family inurnment at a later date at Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy. Memorial contributions may be made to Emerald Coast Hospice, 1330 South Blvd., Chipley, FL 32328. Independent Funeral Home (850-8751529) of Quincy is handling arrangements.CCharles DD. Baur Obituaries ObitBITUaARiIEsS continued on B5

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Actually, I did have several cares but I was ignoring them as much as possible. My basic philosophy is this, the more you ignore something the less you have to deal with it. This, however, does not apply to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Experience has taught me one lesson concerning women, especially wives. They will not stand to be ignored, particularly by their husbands. I have learned the less attention I pay to my wife the more I pay in other areas of life, if you know what I mean. So, ignoring the cares I had last week, I was caught off guard when I received a letter from my credit card company. This was no friendly, how are you, kind of a letter. Nor was it a cheery birthday greeting. I cannot tell you how many times I have reminded them of my birthday but to date they have not picked up on my hint. The ominous letter I did receive informed me that along with millions of other customers my identity had been stolen. The letter went on to assure me I had nothing to worry about and they had the situation well in hand. That is easy for them to say. They know who they are but what about me? When I got the letter I ran to my bathroom and looking into my mirror -nothing! My identity was indeed gone. I assure you I will worry until I get to the bottom of this. I will not rest until I know exactly who I am and my identity is fully restored. Of course, there is one problem here. What if when I do recover my identity I dont like myself? Can I exchange it or get my money back? For some reason the personal information of millions of people had been lost or stolen from the security of my credit card company, which begs the question, how secured is my personal information? While I am in the begging mood, another question comes to mind. If someone has stolen my identity, who in the world am I? And, how do I reclaim my identity? As a young person whenever my mother was upset with me about something I had done or did not do, she would always look at me and ask, Who do you think you are? If anybody in the world should know who I am it would be my mother. And if she he was wrestling with the same question I was wrestling with, how in the world could I ever come to grips with my personal identity? It is hard enough discovering who you are without somebody casting dispersions upon that very thing. Perhaps my mother and I could work together in solving this problem. After all, two heads are better than one, unless one does not know who he is. I have spent years trying to nd myself. Once I thought I found myself but it turned out to be an old pair of socks I lost three years prior. My problem is compounded by this one thing, I did not really know who I was before my identity was stolen. I had my suspicions, of course. However, somewhere in the back of my mind, I really could not come to grips with who I really was in this world. In the course of time, (actually it was a four-course lunch) I have come to several conclusions. First, I am a man. What kind of a man, is anyones guess this point. The truth is that at the root of everything I am, I am a man. Second, I am a husband. This, of course, is the most baf ing of my identity. What it means to be a husband differs from wife to wife. Fortunately, for me, I have only one wife, but even her idea of a husband changes from one moment to the next. I am never sure what she expects of me as a husband. Once I thought I had it all gured out but someone, I am not mentioning any names, changed the rules. Third, I am a father. As a father, my role consists of bankrolling the childhood adventures of my children; nancing their higher education career, hoping they get married before my money runs out. To this day, I am not sure if I made it or not. Fourth, I am a grandfather. This is the most well de ned role I have. The great thing about being a grandfather is, nobody expects much from us. Our role is covertly to help our grandchildren make the lives of their parents as tempestuous as possible. Revenge is sweet when laced with jellybeans. Sugar highs are a grandfathers best retaliation. The most important thing about my identity quest is, I am a Christian. This undergirds everything else I may or may not be. My Christianity is the foundation upon which everything else is built. I take comfort in the Bible; These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God. (1 John 5:13 KJV). When my identity is rooted in believing in Jesus Christ, everything else in my life falls into place. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com.New Home Baptist Church VBSGRACEVILLE New Home Baptist Church will be holding Vacation Bible School from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on July 24 to July 26. On July 27 there will be a day of activities and food. VBS is open to all ages. The church is located in Jackson County just off of Piano Road. For more information call 326-4712.Bonnett Pond ChurchThe Bonnett Pond Community Church membership will be honoring Pastor Teddy Joe Bias and Sister Pauline Bias during the 11 a.m., service and lunch to follow on Sunday, July 28. After 14 years of service at our church the Bias family will soon be moving from our community to answer the call of serving God in another area. Please join us in honoring Brother and Sister Bias on this day.Fun in the Son at Union HillBONIFAY Fun in the Son days will be observed on Saturday, July 27, and Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include lunch. Youth and children age 4 and up are invited, along with parents, for water slide, puppets, music and drama, Bible study and crafts. Union Hill Baptist Church is located at 2759 Union Hill Church Road in Bonifay. The church is on County Road 177 and is one mile south of the Millers Crossroad and Route 2 intersection. To pre-register: Please call 334-8863513 or email: ascollins@centurytel.net. For more information, call Liz Kidd at 263-3612.Youth Caravan is Coming to Bonifay FUMCBONIFAY Youth Caravan will be at Bonifay First United Methodist Church July 29-31. Services will begin nightly at 6 p.m. Youth Caravan is a team of Christian young adults on a summer mission geared towards youth ministry. They are students from the Auburn University Wesley Foundation. Their goal is to spread Gods light in new and exciting ways through song, educational programs, games, and fellowship. Come join the fun. For more information, contact Ben Goolsby or Dan Godwin at 547-3785. Faith EVENTSThe age-long query: Who am I? DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Crossword SOLUTIONMary PaulkMary Paulk, 62, of Bonifay, died Monday, July 15, 2013. Memorialization was by Cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Jimmy L. SmithJimmy Lamax Smith, 69, of Bonifay, died July 16, 2013. Memorialization was by Cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Charity Amanda Wilkes, 40, of Plano, Texas, passed away July 15, 2013, at her parents home in Bonifay. She was born March 11, 1973, in Dothan, Ala. Mrs. Wilkes was preceded in death by her maternal grandfather, George W. Brown; paternal grandparents, Coy Lee and Flora Mae Polston; maternal grandparents-inlaw, Buford and Mary Hazel Culbreth and paternal grandparents-in-law, Elson and Hazel Wilkes. Mrs. Wilkes is survived by her husband, Scott Wilkes of Plano, Texas; two sons, Tavis Wilkes and Kavan Wilkes both of Plano, Texas; one daughter, Annaliese Wilkes of Plano, Texas; parents, Larry and Dianne Polston of Bonifay; maternal grandmother, Daphin and Ray Holsombach of Bonifay; father-in-law and mother-in-law, Danny and Karen Wilkes of Cottondale and best friend, Sandra Martinez of Plano, Texas. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Thursday, July 18, 2013, at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Juno Douglas and the Rev. Tommy Moore of ciating. Interment followed in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday at Carmel Assembly of God Church.Charity A. WilkesMr. Willie ONeal. 77, passed away Monday, July 15, 2013. He was born Sept. 30, 1935, in DeFuniak Springs, to Troy and Mary Hall. Mr. ONeal was a resident of Walton County. He was Baptist by faith and a member of the Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church. He worked as a Lineman with AT&T before retiring. He enjoyed playing cards, traveling, and spending time with his family. Mr. ONeal was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, Eunice Mae Hall and two sons, Sammy Green, and Frank Willie Larkins. Mr. ONeal is survived by his special companion of 33 years, Dora Adkins of DeFuniak Springs; three sons, Lawrence Tyler Dowing of Milton, Willie Mikey ONeal of Tampa and David ONeal of Miami; two daughters, Shontria ONeal of DeFuniak Springs and CiCi ONeal of Miami; one brother, Michael Hall of Bonifay; nephews, James Cotton and wife Mary of DeFuniak Springs, Carlos Cotton of Panama City, Cornelius Cotton of DeFuniak Springs and Pam Peters and husband Raymond of Panama City, and a host of nieces, nephews and grandchildren. Visitation services was held from 1 to 2 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013. at Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church; 416 Railroad Ave, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held 2 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church; 416 Railroad Ave, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 with Pastor A.M. Johnson of ciating. Burial followed at Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.clary-glenn. com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Willie ONeal WILLIE ONEALRobert Lamar (PeeWee) Gay, 76, of Greenwood, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at Noland Hospital in Dothan. He was born Feb. 16, 1937, in Chipley, to the late H.M Gay and Eunice ( Jenkins) Gay. Mr. Robert worked in the soil lab for the Department of Transportation in Chipley. He was predeceased by his parents and one son, Joey Gay. Mr. Robert was survived by one son, Ronnie Gay of Greenwood; three grandchildren, Nicholas Gay and wife Danielle, Ethan Isaiah Gay, Summer Nicole Daniels and husband James and one great grandchild, Dellany Daniels. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Tim Hall of ciating. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, July 19, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel. Interment followed at Piney Grove Baptist Church Cemetery of Cottondale. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.Robert L. GayGrace Theresa Usery, 87, of Orlando, passed away Wednesday, July 17, 2013, at home. She was born Aug. 4, 1925, in Gar eld, N.J., to the late Daniel Veltri and Mildred (Stalfa) Veltri. Mrs. Grace made drill bits for the New York Twist. She is survived by three daughters, Marlene Usery MacRae of New Jersey, Gwen Brandes of Orlando, and Patty Grantham and husband Donnie of Chipley; two brothers, Tony Veltri and Timothy Veltri of New Jersey; six grandchildren and ve great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Saturday, July 20, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with Don Milton and Jared Grantham of ciating. Interment followed in Glenwood Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to service. Family and friends may sign the online registry at www.brownfh.net. Grace T. Usery GRACE T. USERY ObituariesWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. Community CALENDAR Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 7-3284 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NO.:2013CA001 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. BILLY J. ADAMS, JR. and KATHERINE F. ADAMS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the under signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgement of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 18, 2013, at 11:00 am Central Time at Washington County Courthouse, at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Northwest of NW of Section 25, Township 1 North, Range 15 West, thence S004309W along the West right-of-way line of a 60 foot road, 972.96 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue S004309W along said right-of-way 319.32 feet; thence departing said right-of-way line on a bearing o f N890633W 662.57 feet: t hence N004227E 319.35 feet; t hence S890624E 662.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said land lying and being in the NW of the NW of Section 25, Township 1 North, Range 15 West, and being a part of Crystal Lake Tract, Seminole Plantation, Washington County, Florida. This Notice dated this 8 day of July, 2013 Clerk of Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News on July 17, 2013 and July 24, 2013. 7-3285 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-327CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. KEITH ADKISON and NANCY ADKISON, husband and wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 18, 2013, at 111:00 am Central Time at Washington County Courthouse, at 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Washington County, Florida, to-wit: NE of SE of Section 16, Township 3 North, Range 14 West, Washington County, Florida. This Notice dated this 3 day of July, 2013. As published in the Washington County News of July 17, 2013 and July 24, 2013. 7-3279 Notice of Public Hearing to Revise School Board Policies/Procedures, Student Code of Student Conduct and Pupil Progression Plan Washington County School District 652 Third Street Chipley, FL 32428 Monday, August 12, 2013 at 5:00 pm Notice is hereby given that on Monday, August 12, 2013 at 5:00 pm., the Washington County School Board will c onsider adopting/revising School B oard Policies/Procedures, Code of Student Conduct and the Pupil Progression Plan. The purpose and specific legal authority under which School Board Policies/Procedures are authorized, and a summary of the estimate of economic impact of the proposed policies/procedures on all affected persons, are given. Purpose To revise School Board Policies/Procedures based on policy and legislative changes. Proposed Revisions to School B oard Policies/Procedures 3.50+Public Information and Inspection of Records 5.14 Homeless Students 5.32 Zero Tolerance for School Related Crimes 6.62+AIDS, Bloodborne Pathogens and Environmental Hazards 6.90 P ersonnel Files 8.14Inspections 9.80+School Concurrency Code of Student Conduct (includes Student Attendance Policy) Pupil Progression Plan Legal Authority The Washington County School Board is authorized under Chapter 1001.43 of the Florida K-20 Education Code to develop/revise policy and procedures. Economic Impact The cost of promulgating these revisions will be approximately $.50 per document. Cost or benefit to those affected: None Impact on open market: None Individuals wishing to obtain a copy of the proposed new/revised Policies/Procedures may contact the Superintendents Office at 652 Third Street, Chipley, Florida As published in the Washignton County News July 10, 24, 31, 2013. 7-3287 Meeting Notice Tri-County Airport Authority will hold a special called authority meeting on July 25, 2013 at 6:00 pm local time. The meeting will be held in the Tri-County Airport Terminal building. As published in the Washington County News July 24, 2013. ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. Christine & Greg 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Choosing Adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Great Dane PuppiesAvailable now! Please call 850-520-4751 Text FL59227 to 56654 PREMIUM METAL Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply. comCall To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 24, 2013 5017391 B USINESS G UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414TROLLING MOTOR REPAIRAordable service! Fast Repair! Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 5017238 501722631805 Blue Star Hwy. Midway, FL 32343www.midwaymachineryandauction.com Surplus trucks, vehicles & equipmentBy order of Walton Co, FL BOCC (With additional items from area county governments)Friday, July 26, 2013: 9:00 A.M. Central Time DeFuniak Springs, FL: Walton County Fair Yard GOVERNMENT AUCTION ITEMS INCLUDE: *2006 Cat 950G & 928G loaders *(2)Cat 12H graders *Cat 12G grader *Cat 420E backhoe (non op) *Cat 416D backhoe *Cat 307B excavator *JCB 1400B Backhoe *Terex compactor *(4)1998-2004 bucket trucks *23.5 & 14.5 ton crane trucks *2004-2006 Chevy Utilities*Numerous 1995-2008 pickups *Numerous cars/SUVs *Mowers, 4 wheeler (late model) and misc. oce furnitureTERMS: *All items sell AS IS *5% Buyer Premium *Cash, Cashier Checks, Credit and Debit cards, Checks with bank letterPREVIEW: 9AM-4PM Thursday, July 25**Live internet bidding with proxibid** MIDWAY MACHINERY & AUCTION New Home Builders & Contractors: Call the Carpenters Son for kitchen & bath cabinets, furniture design & woodworking. Specializing in custom cabinets, desk, conference tables, entertainment centers, all types of church furniture. Builders of quality for 33 years. Simply the best/best price. Contact owner/operator, The Carpenters Son, Ken Nowell (850)326-8232. Garage Sale. July 27, 7a.m. Until, Maternity Clothes, Adult and Childrens Clothes, Toy, and Odds and Ends. 1382 South Blvd. Indoor outdoor final moving sale Scrubs, craft items and much more. 703 N. Hamlin St Bonifay. 7a.m.-2p.m Sat., July 27. TREASURE SALE! Live Oak Assembly of God Womens Ministry at Live Oak Assembly of God Church, Hwy 177Aon left going towards Dogwood Lakes Friday, July 26 from 7:00 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday, July 27 from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. BreakfastFriday morning the ladies will be selling delicious homemade breakfast foods including biscuits and cinnamon rolls. Come and enjoy! The yard sale includes, furniture, appliances, bicycles, clothes, books and much, much more! SEE YOU THERE! 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. 2010 Craftsman riding mower, 17.5 hp, B-S, 42 in, auto, like new, $850 Call 850-628-5436 Scrape Metal,FREE!!624-1679 MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioners office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING.Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED PC/ Internet needed! 1-888-2125888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Efficient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans. com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Benefits and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855IRT-TANK www.indian rivertransport.com A SODA/ SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex. 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Includes all utilities. $425/month. (850)326-4548. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA, AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 For Rent: House 2BR/2BACHAnewly remodeled, stove, refrigerator, NO Pets, rental references, $550 month, yards included, $500 Deposit, 601 2nd St. 850-326-2920. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 Br/2Ba 16x70 MH near Dogwood Lakes on private lot. Not in a park. $485/mo plus deposit. (850)547-4232. 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. 3BR/2BA Brick Home with large shop on 21/2 acres in Chipley area $195,000. 850-726-0396 For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works!

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser July 24, 2013Supplies List I Tips for Parents I Tax-Free Shopping

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2 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Washington County 2013-2014 School CalendarAug. 19, 2013 . ....................... FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 2, 2013 . ....................... Labor Day No school Sept. 11, 2013 . ..................... Recognition of Patriot Day at Schools Sept. 17, 2013 . ..................... Recognition of Constitution Day at Schools Sept. 17, 2013 . ..................... Early Release 1:00pm Sept. 23-27, 2013 . ................ Recognition of Celebrate Freedom Week at Schools Oct. 21, 2013 . ....................... Fall Day No school Oct.29, 2013 . ........................ Early Release 1:00pm Nov. 11, 2013 . ...................... Recognition of Veterans at Chipley and Vernon Schools Nov. 25-29, 2013 . .................. Thanksgiving Holidays No school Dec. 20, 2013 . ...................... Early Release 1:00pm Dec. 23, 2013 Jan. 7, 2014 . Christmas Break Jan. 6, 2014 . ......................... Teacher Planning Day No school Jan. 7, 2014 . ......................... Professional Development Day No school Jan. 8, 2014 . ......................... CLASSES RESUME FOR STUDENTS Jan.20, 2014 . ........................ Martin Luther Kings Birthday No school Feb. 4, 2014 . ......................... Early Release 1:00pm Feb.17, 2014 . ........................ Presidents Day No school Mar. 11, 2014 . ...................... Early Release 1:00pm March 24-28, 2014 . .............. Spring Break (Students & All Personnel Out) April 18, 2014 . ...................... Spring Day No school May 26, 2014 ....................... Memorial Day No school June 4, 2014 . ........................ Last Day of School (Students Released 1:00pm)en Graduations May 13, 2014 . ........................... WHTC May 29, 2014 . .......................... Chipley High School May 30, 2014 . .......................... Vernon High School June 3, 2014 . ........................... WISE Holmes County 2013-2014 School CalendarAug. 19, 2013 . ............................... FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR STUDENTS Sept. 2, 2013 . ................................ Labor Day No school Oct. 4, 2013 . .................................. Students & All Personnel Out Oct. 18, 2013 . ................................ End of 1st grading period Oct. 28-Nov 1, 2013 . ..................... Fall Break No school Nov. 4, 2013 . ................................ Classes Resume Nov. 25-29, 2013 . .......................... Thanksgiving Break No school Dec. 20, 2013 . ............................... Early Release Day Dec. 23, 2013-Jan, 3, 2014 . ........... Christmas Break Jan. 6, 2014 . .................................. Classes Resume Jan. 17, 2014 . ................................ Early Release Day, End of 1st semester Jan. 20, 2014 . ................................ Martin Luther Kings Birthday No school Febr. 14, 2014 . .............................. Early Release Day Feb. 17, 2014 . ................................ Presidents Day No school Mar. 21, 2014 . .............................. Early Release Day, End of 3rd Mar. 24-28, 2014 . .......................... Spring Break Students and All Personnel Out Mar. 31, 2014 . ............................... Classes Resume May 26, 2014 . ............................... Memorial Day No school June 6, 2014 . ................................. Last Day of School Early Release Day Graduationsen May 30, 2014 . .................................... Holmes County High School June 2, 2014 . ..................................... Ponce de Leon High School June 3, 2014 . ..................................... Bethlehem High School June 5, 2014 . .................................... Poplar Springs High School Report Cards November 6, 2013 January 27, 2014 April 4, 2014 Report Cards October 24, 2013 January 14, 2014 April 8, 2014 June 17, 2014School Lunch Prices Prices for breakfast are $0.90 (full) and $0.30 (reduced). Prices for lunch are $2.00 (full) and $0.40 (reduced). Extra milk costs $0.30. All second meals for students cost $2.00 (whether full, reduced, or free). School board policy states that a student can only charge up to $14.50 for meals. is equals one week of both breakfast & lunch. Washington County Dental Clinic The Washington County Dental Clinic is located at 1334 South Blvd. in Chipley. The Clinic is open from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. The clinic close for 30 minutes at Noon for lunch. They only serve children on Medicaid up to age 21. The clinic provides services including exams, cleanings, sealants, restorations extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal therapy and Nitrous Oxide. To make an appointment with the clinic call 547-8572. Holmes County Dental Clinic The Holmes County Dental Clinic is located at 1177 East Highway 90 in Bonifay. The Clinic is open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Thursday. They only serve children on Medicaid ages three to 19.. The clinic provides services including exams, cleanings, sealants, restorations extractions, pulpotomy therapy, root canal therapy and Nitrous Oxide. To make an appointment with the clinic call 547-8572. TIPS FOR P P ARENtT S

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 3 FREE ADMISSIONforschool-age childrenand familiesWashingtonCountyHealthDept. IMMUNIZ AT I ONCLIN ICForschoolagechildren Tuesday Aug.13,2013 9am-Noon FreeHaircuts Food BackpackDoorPrizes VariousSchool Entertainment 1360 BRICK Y ARDR OA D CHIPLE Y, FL8506381610WWW.NFCH. ORG Enrolling your child in schoolIn order to enter kindergarten a child must be (5) ve on or before September 1. In order to enter the rst grade a child must be six (6) on or before September 1. Enrolling for the rst time in school is easy. Proof of the childs age, a medical examination, contact information in case of emergency, and an address are necessary to enroll a student. You will also have to provide documents showing the childs immunizations are up to date. Check with the childs school for any additional requirements. By law, children up to TIPS FOR P P ARENtT S 16 years of age must come to school or the parents may be prosecuted. e child cannot succeed in school if they do not attend regularly. To enroll a child in school you will need the following: e childs certied birth certicate e childs immunization records If transferring, the childs record from previous school or if the child was home schooled the childs portfolio and achievement testsPhysicals and immunizations for Holmes County studentsIf your school-aged child will be attending Pre-K or Kindergarten in Holmes County they must have a current Florida physical (must be completed no more than one year prior to entry) and current Florida immunizations to enroll and attend Holmes County schools. e Holmes County Health Department will be doing school physicals and immunizations by appointment only; physicals can be billed to insurance, otherwise the cost is $35.00 per student. Immunizations are free to all students. You may use your private provider, or you may call Holmes County Health Department for an appointment. Appointment space and times are limited; please call as soon as possible. You may call for an appointment at 547-8000 Ext. 1.Riding a bike to school wear a helmet an adult of the road or trail in a single le tion as trac road tracksRiding the busAt the bus stop Be responsible for your behavior while going to and waiting at the bus stop Stand off the roadway while waiting for the bus property Dont push, shove or engage in horse play An adult should supervise children at the bus stop Be at the bus stop at least five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive proved locations approved locations During loading and unloading Stay away from the 12 foot danger zone around the bus except when the driver tells you to get on and off of the bus. Ask the driver for help if you drop something under the bus Be sure the driver can see you at all times Be sure that clothing and backpacks have no loose strings or straps that can get caught in the handrails or door During the ride Always listen to the driver Dont distract the driver unless there is an emergency Stay in your seat and keep the aisles clear Dont eat, drink, or chew gum on the bus Keep all body parts in side the bus.

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4 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlLIEsS LIstsSTS Bethlehem School KIINDEERGARTEEN 4 boxes of 8 large crayons 1 PP air of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 rest mat (plastic on both sides) 3 boxes of tissue 2 bottles of liquid soap 1 box of Ziplock bags** 1 pack of #2 pencils 2 boxes of baby wipes 1 large eraser 2 coloring books 1 backpack 10 glue sticks 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs FIIRST GRADEE 1 box of 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO GEEL) 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 box of baby wipe 1 container of disinfecting wipes 1 large eraser 1 coloring book 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs SEECOND GRADEE 1 box 24 pack crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO GEEL) 1 box of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 pack of wide ruled note book paper 1 pack of disinfecting wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 1 glue stick 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 highlighter 2 blue dry-erase markers THIIRD GRADEE 1 pack of 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO GEEL) 2 pocket folders 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 2 pack of wide ruled note book paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 1 composition notebook 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 2 folders with pockets and prongs 1 pack of multi colored construction paper 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) FoOUrthRTH GradRADE 1 pack 24 count crayons 1 pack of colored pencils 1 school box (plastic) 1 bottle of white glue (NO GEEL) 4 pocket folders 2 boxes of tissue 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 pack of wide ruled paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 zipper pocket 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 blue dry-erase marker 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) FIIFTH GRADEE 1 pack 24 count crayons 1 pair of scissors (Fiskars) 1 pack of colored pencils 1 pocket folder 2 boxes of tissues 1 bottle of liquid soap 1 pack of #2 pencils*** 1 box of plastic Ziploc bags** 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 6 packs of wide ruled paper 1 box of baby wipes 1 pack of red pens 1 large eraser 1 roll of paper towels 1 backpack 2 glue sticks 1 zipper pocket 2 bottles of hand sanitizer 1 highlighter 2 blue dry-erase markers 1 pack of copier paper (8 X 11) 1 1-inch three ring view binder No large Notebooks No Rolling backpacks PP lastic folders ** Girls bring gallon size: Boys bring quart size; 2nd Grade only bring gallon size. *** PP ack of 24 PP lain #2 yel low pencils Pre-K students: No sup plies are required, how ever donations of liquid hand soap, tissues, hand sanitizer, and baby wipes would be appreciated.Bonifay Elementary PrPR E K 2 boxes of baby wipes 2 bottles of liquid hand soap 2 boxes of tissues 2 boxes of snacks (fruit snacks, gold fish, graham crackers, etc.) 1 bag of M & Ms or Skittles 2 bottles of table cleaner (409 or Lysol, please no bleach) 2 glue sticks 1 box of pencils 4 boxes of 8 count Crayola Crayons 1 box of Crayola Colored PP encils 1 pair of Fiskers round tip scissors 1 regular size back pack (please no small backpacks) 1 set of extra clothes 1 blanket (please no sleep ing bags or large blankets or pillows) KIndNDErgartRGARTEnN 1 pre-packaged supply kit from BEES ($28) 1 regular sized backpack (no wheels and no small) 1 kindergarten resting mat (no thicker than 1 inch) 1 change of clothes 1 box of tissue 1 box of wipes 1 bottle of soap 1 bottle of sanitizer 1 large bag of M&Ms or Skittles 1 set of ear phones or ear buds Girls bring 1 box Gallon Zip-Lock bags Boys bring 1 box Quart ZipLock bags Girls bring 1 box Froot Loops Boys 1 box Apple Jacks **please write your childs name in the backpack, on the resting mat and in each item of clothing Kindergarten wish list items: paper plates, brown and white lunch bags, cups, gummy bears, Smart ies, Dum Dums lollipops and gold fish. FIrstRST grad GRADE 1 large backpack (no rolling backpacks) 2 jumbo pink erasers 1 pack pencil top erasers 1 pack #2 pencils (24 or more) 4 boxes Crayola Crayons (not more than 24 count) 1 box Crayola markers 1 box Crayola colored pencils 2 dry erase markers 1 pair of Fiskers scissors 2 three pronged folders (1 green and 1 red) See BONIFAY page 5

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 5 SS$5toopen BirthdayKeithKash NoMinimumBalanceRequirement NoMonthlyServiceCharge eStatementsAvailable OnlineBanking MariannaEast 4701Hwy90 (850)526-7144 Chipley 1012MainSt. (850)638-7892 Bonifay 300N.WaukeshaSt. (850)526-4411 GreenStreet 2914GreenSt. (850)526-4411 ComingSoon 4215LafayetteSt. Marianna,FL *St uden t Sa v ers: isisan in t eres tbear in g account.$2 chargep er with drawa lov er 3p er mont h. T ra n sfer s toanoth eraccoun tor 3r dpart ies bypr e-a uthor ize d,automat ic, te lep honet ra n sferlimi tedto6p er mont h. C ur r en tA nn ualP ercen tageY ield(APY )is 0.05% forbalan ces ov er$5 andis e ectiveasof 04/25/13. e in t eres t ra teand APY aresubjecttochangewithoutnot ice .A ccoun twillearnno in t eres tanydaythebalan ce fa llsbe lo w $5. Fe es mayred uce ear nings. Apar en tor gu ar di anmustbea sig n er the accoun twiththe min or.www .sb.c om 1 wide ruled composition book (70 pages) 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 bottle of Elmers glue 2 glue sticks 1 set ear buds 1 large box of antibacterial wet wipes 1 bottle of antibacterial liquid soap 1 bottle hand sanitizer 2 boxes facial tissues $8 for class T-shirt Girls bring 1 box quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 bog gallon Zip-lock bags **Please label with childs name and bring all supplies to 1st Grade Orientation SeECo OND g GRADeE 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 pack #2 plain yellow pencils (no mechanical) (12 count) 1 pair of childrens Fiskars scissors 2 large pink erasers 1 glue stick 1 bottle of Elmers school (4 ounces) 1 box crayons (no more than 32 count) 1 large box of baby wipes 1 large box of facial tissue 1 small plastic school box 1 bottle of liquir hand soap 1 bottle of hand sanitizer NNO RRULERRS Third grade 1 pack of highlighters 2 packs #2 pencils 1 pack wide ruled note book paper 1 pack CC rayons, markers and/or colored pencils 1 bottle glue and/or pack of glue sticks 1 pair of scissors 1 pack of pencil cap erasers and/or pack of pink erasers 1 pencil bag 1 pack of red pens 1 bottle of Germ-X 1 pack of baby wipes 5 three pronged folders (1 blue, 1 red, 1 green, 1 purple and 1 yellow) 1 pack of expo markers 2 boxes of tissue Girls bring 1 box quart ZipLock bags Boys bring 1 box Gallon Zip-Lock bags FouOURt TH g GRADeE 1 backpack 1 zippered pencil bag 1 pack yellow wooden #2 pencils 1 pack colored pencils 1 pack paper 1 ruler (with centimeter and inch marks) 1 protractor 1 highlighter 1 pack red pens 1 bottle of glue 1 pair of scissors 1 pack of baby wipes 1 box of Kleenex 1 writing journal 1 pack black expo markers (black only) 1 pack pencil top erasers or large pink eraser 4 three pronged folders (laminated or plastic if possible) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds to keep in the classroom $3 for class music recorder kit Girls bring 1 bottle of liquid hand soap Boys bring 1 bottle of Germ-X Girls bring 1 box quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 box gallon Zip-lock bagsPonce De Leon KINDeERg GARte TEN Each student will need to bring $35 (cash only) to Open H H ouse for school supplies. This supply money is used to purchase BACACK TO SCHCHOOL SupplUPPLIesES LIstsSTS your childs school supplies for the entire school year including the crayons, colored pencils, scissors, pencils, erasers, glue, folders, journals, notebook paper, wet wipes, tissues, hand sanitizer, storage bags and dry erase markers. PLEA A SE DD O N N OT BUY AN AN Y OF TH H ESE I I TEMS AND AND SEND ND TO SCH CH OOL BECA CA USE WE PR R EFER R SPECI CI FIC IC KIND IND S ONNLY. This supply money also includes a class T-Shirt. Each student will need to purchase their own headphones or ear buds to use in the computer lab. Please bring these to Open HHouse as well. Kindergar ten students will begin on Thursday, A A ugust 23. Open HHouse will be announced at a later date. Students will be screened academically sometime during the month of July. We will call you to schedule an ap pointment for your child. FIRstST GRADeE Each student will need to bring $35 (cash only) to Open H H ouse for school supplies. This supply money is used to purchase your childs school supplies for the entire school year including the crayons, colored pencils, scissors, pencils, erasers, glue, folders, red checking pens, jour nals, notebook paper, wet wipes, Kleenex, Germ X, Zip-loc bags and dry erase markers. PLEA A SE D D O N N OT SENDND ANAN Y OF THHESE IITEMS TO SCH CH OOL BECA CA USE WE PR R EFER R SPECI CI FIC IC KIND IND S ON N LY. This supply money will also include a class T-shirt. Each student will need to purchase their own headphones or ear buds. NNO RR OLLERR BACACK PAC AC KS A A T A A LL. First grade BONIFAY frm page 4 See PDL page 6

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6 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 OBARS INSURANCE AGENCYAN INDEPENDENT INSURANCE AGENCYARTHUR P. W. OBAR, JR. P O BOX 594 850-263-4483 PHONE CHIPLEY,FL 1357BrickyardRoad 850-638-0424 BONIFAY,FL 507WestHwy.90 850-547-1877www.medicineshoppe.com BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlLIEsS LIstsSTS will have Open House from 9 to 11 a.m., Friday, August 16. School begins Monday, August 19. SEcoCOND GRa ADE 2 packs of wide ruled note book paper 2 packs of U U SA green cedar pencils or 2 packs of Ticonderoga pencils 1 spiral bound composition book 2 packs of 24 Crayola Crayons 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 pack of glue sticks 1 pack of dry erase markers 1 zipper pencil bag (no boxes) 1 pocket folder 1 box of tissues 1 container of zip lock bags (girls Gallon size; Boys Quart size) 1 container of baby wipes 1 backpack (no rolling ones) DD ue to the limited space in the desks, please do not by 3 ring notebooks or pencil boxes. PP .EE requires lace up or Velcro tennis shoes. ThHIRD g GRa ADE $25 (this will cover all class room school sup plies and most classroom activities**) 1 backpack (no roller back packs please) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds (any kind) Classroom supply money may be paid during PP reSchool, Open House, but must be paid no later than the first day of school. **This money will also be used for many classroom activities including par ties. II f your child does not pay the $25, they will be responsible for all of their classroom school supplies and may not be able to participate in some classroom activities. FoOURth TH g GRa ADE $25 (this will cover all class room school sup plies and most classroom activities**) 1 backpack (no roller back packs please) 1 pair of headphones or ear buds (any kind) Classroom supply money may be paid during PP reSchool, Open House, but must be paid no later than the first day of school. **This money will also be used for many classroom activities including par ties. II f your child does not pay the $25, they will be responsible for all of their classroom school supplies and may not be able to participate in some classroom activities. FIfthFTH g GRa ADE 1 three ring binder inch with pockets (preferably white) 1 wireless notebook (composition book) 2 three prong folders with pockets 3 packs wide ruled note book paper 2 highlighters 2 packs of 12 pencils 1 inch and centimeter ruler (not bendable) Crayons or colored pencils 1 hand held pencil sharpener (N N OT battery operated) 1 pack of cap erasers 1 pack of colored pens for correcting (red, purple, green ect) 1 pencil pouch or pencil box 1 clip board 1 box of Kleenex Tissues 2 EExpo markers 1 pack of copy paper 1 pair of ear buds or headphones Girls bring 1 box quart bags Boys bring 1 box gallon bags For P P .E E lace up or Velcro tennis shoes with closed back requiredPoplar Springs KINDERga GARt TEN 1 backpack (their size no rollers) 1 mat for rest time 1 towel for rest time 1 set of extra clothes (in case of an accident) 1 box of tissue 1 pair of Fisker scissors (small, round tip) 6 large glue sticks 4 boxes of crayons (8 count only) 6 sharpened pencils (the size your child uses) 2 block style erasers 1 small box for crayons and pencils Label your childs things that come to school. Children should ware safe, comfortable shoes and clothes. Ones they can handle on their own. Flipflops are a very bad choice. The dress code states that your child must be covered from next to knees, front and back. II f your child can not tie their shoes please send them in something they can handle. FIRstST g GRa ADE 1 pair of scissors 1 bottle of glue 1 glue stick 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of pencil erasers 1 pack of dry erase markers 1 pack of highlighters 1 school box 1 one subject notebook 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 container of disinfecting wipes 1 backpack Girls bring 1 bottle of antibacterial soap Boys bring 1 bottle of hand sanitizer Girls bring 1 box of quart Ziplock bags Boys bring 1 box gallon Ziplock bags SEcoCOND g GRa ADE 1 pair of scissors 1 bottle of glue 1 pencil box 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 container of antibacterial wipes 2 packs of pencil erasers 2 packs of 16 count Crayola crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of highlighters 1 one subject composition book 1 backpack 1 pack dry erase markers (any size) Boys bring Gallon Ziplock bagsPDL from page 5 See POPLAR page 7

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 7 BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPlLIEsS LIstsSTS 1 pack of highlighters 1 box of antibacterial wipes (no baby wipes) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap)Kate M. Smith KINDERGaARt TEN 1 pencil box (not Harris/ PP eel, Cox) 1 pair Fiskar Scissors 1 box Kleenex tissues 1 box colored pencils 1 box Ziplock (G G allonBoys Quart/GGirls) 2 packages dry erase mark ers 1 backpack (to fit 8 x 10 papers)no wheels 2 pencils 1 8 count basic color mark ers 2 8 count basic color cray ons 2 bottles E E lmers G G lue (not gel) 1 towel (only D D eese, D D avis, Mosley) 2 containers Antibacterial Wipes 2 highlighters 1 GG erm-X 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) 1 complete change of clothing to be left at school FIRstST G GRa ADE 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) 1 pair Fiskar Scissors 2 boxes 16 count Crayola Crayons 2 bottles EElmers GGlue (4oz) 2 large pink erasers 5 X 8 pencil box 1 large box of tissues 2 boxes (12 count) yellow school pencils 2 pump bottles of hand soap 1 box Ziplock Bags (boys/ gallon, girls/quart) 1 container Clorox Wipes Black DDry EErase Markers (boys-large size/girls-small size) SEcoCOND G GRa ADE Wide ruled loose leaf paper 3 spiral wide ruled note books 2 packages of #2 pencils 1 pack Fiskar Scissors 2 red checking pens 2 plastic folders (Bunge RR oyal Blue) 2 packs of crayons 1 pink pearl eraser 1 box Kleenex 1 zipper pouch 1 glue stick 1 bottle EElmers glue 1 pack Clorox Wipes 1 box Ziplock bags (BoysGG allon/GGirls-quart) DDry EErase Markers (skinny) Mr. Clean Magic EErasers (Ms. Tuel) ThHIRD G GRa ADE You may purchase supplies or send $20 to school with your child and teacher will purchase all supplies. 2 boxes Kleenex 2 containers Clorox Wipes 2 boxes PP apermate PP encils 2 boxes (24 count) Crayola crayons 2 pkg loose leaf paper wide ruled 2 boxes pencil top erasers 1 pack DDry EErase Markers 1 PP lastic PP encil Box 2 glue sticks 2 black and white Mead notebooks (stitched with heavy cardboard covers) FoOURth TH G GRa ADE 24 wood pencils 2 rectangular pink erasers (not pencil top) 1 pack loose leaf paper 5 Marble composition books (not spiral) 1 pack DDry EErase Markers 1 pack red stick pens 1 package 3 inch square post it notes 1 package index cards 1 package Crayola Markers 2 highlighters 1 bottle EElmers GGlue 1 package glue sticks 3 boxes facial tissue 3 containers Clorox Wipes 1 bottle hand sanitizer MRsS Walt ALTERsS ClassLASS 1 one inch three ring binder (with pockets) and clear cover 5 plastic pocket folders (with prongs and pockets) 2 packages #2 pencils 3 packages pencil top erasers 2 -24 count packages Cray ola crayons 1 package 24 count colored pencils 2 Clorox Wipes 2 boxes of tissue 1 hand held pencil sharp ener 2 spiral notebooksVernon PPREK 1 backpack 1 box of tissues 1 container of GG erm-X KINDERGaARt TEN 4 expo dry erase markers 2 boxes of jumbo Crayola crayons 8 pack 2 boxes of regular Crayola crayons 24 pack 2 bottles of E E lmers School GGlue 4 ounces (NNO GEGEL) 12 E E lmers G G lue Sticks (small) 1 pack plain #2 yellow pencils 8 count 4 jumbo pencils with erasers 2 jumbo pink erasers 1 set of Crayola watercolors paint 1 marble bound composition notebook 9 X 7 100 pages 1 pair of Fiskars scissors 1 plastic crayon box 5 X 8 X 3 9 cigar box size 1 three ring binder or inch 1 pack of plastic clear sheet protectors at least 20 1 box of Clorox wipes 1 box of tissues or baby wipes GG irls bring 1 box of ZIP IP LOC gallon size bags Boys bring 1 box of ZIP IP LOC quart size bags FIRstST GRa ADE 1 pack of 4 glue sticks 1 box quart size ZIPIPLOC bags 1 small bottle of white liquid glue 2 boxes of tissues 1 small bottle of GG erm-X 1 container of Clorox wipes 2 packs of 24 #2 pencils 1 pack of pink erasers 3 pocket folders without prongs 4 packs of 24 crayons 1 zippered pencil bagPOPLAR from page 6 GG irls bring sandwich size Ziplock bags ThHIRD GRa ADE 2 boxes of Kleenex 1 box of disinfecting wipes (for cleaning) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) 1 pair of scissors 1 glue stick 1 pencil box 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of 16 count Crayola Crayons 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of red pens 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 backpack 1 composition book (100 sheet with black and white cover and name plate on the front) (no spiral notebooks) FoOURth TH GRa ADE 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 spiral notebook (70 pages) 1 three ring binder (at least 2 inches) 1 set of index tabs for binder (5 or 8 tab) 1 box of tissues 1 box quart bags 1 pack of highlighters 1 box of antibacterial wipes (no baby wipes) 1 bottle of hand sanitizer (no soap) FIfthFTH GRa ADE 2 packs of #2 pencils 1 pack of cap erasers 2 packs of loose leaf wide ruled paper 1 spiral notebook (70 pages) 1 three ring binder (at least 2 inches) 1 set of index tabs for binder (5 or 8 tab) 1 box of tissues 1 box quart bags See VERNON page 8

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8 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 20131 composition book 1 yellow highlighter 1 pack of multi colored dry erase markers 1 pack magic eraser SECOND GRADE 1 box of #2 pencils 1 magic eraser 2 packs loose leaf paper wide ruled 2 spiral notebooks wide ruled 1 bottle of GG erm-X 1 pack of red pens 1 pack of large block erasers 2 packs index cards 2 packs small black dry erase markers low odor 1 container of CClorox wipes 1 box of tissues 1 box of 24 county crayons 1 pack of glue sticks THIRD GRADE 3 packs of wide ruled note book paper 1 box 24 count crayons 4 spiral bound single sub ject notebooks 1 box gallon Ziploc bags 36 #2 pencils 1 container of CClorox wipes 2 large pink erasers BACACK TO O SCHOOCHOOL SUPPlLIEsS LIstsSTS 2 boxes quart size Ziploc bags 1 box of 8 colored pencils 4 boxes of tissues FOURt TH GRADE 100 cap erasers 4 packs of 24 #2 pencils 2 packs of wide ruled note book paper 1 box quart size Ziploc bags 2 large rolls of paper towels 1 box G G allon size Ziploc bags 2 boxes of tissue 2 red or green ball point pens 1 bottle of hand sanitizer 1 bookbag 1 large or 2 small containers of disinfectant wipes 2 bottles of hand soap 6 paper pocket folders 1 pack of skinny expo markers PP lease do not send with any VE E S student hand held sharpeners, binders, or pencil boxes unless they are requested. Brands such as C C rayola, Ticonderoga, and PP apermate will per form better for your child. IIf you have any questions please call the office at 535-2486. Florida sales tax holiday to be held Aug. 24Legislation has been passed to create a threeday sales tax holiday that will begin at 12:01 a.m., Friday, Aug. 2, and end at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. During this period, no Florida sales tax or local option tax will be collected on sales of clothing, footwear, and certain accessories selling for $75 or less per item, on certain school supplies selling for $15 or less per item, and on computers and certain related accessories selling for $750 or less per item when purchased for noncommercial home or personal use. Clothing means any article of wearing apparel, including all footwear (except skis, swim ns, roller blades, and skates), intended to be worn on or about the human body. However, clothing does not include watches, watch bands, jewelry, umbrellas, handkerchiefs, or sporting equipment.Clothing Exempt from Florida Sales Taxen CClothing and accessories must be $50 or less. I I tems eligible include: C C lothing must be under $100 for: AA erobic CCloth ing, AA lter CClothing*, AA prons, AA thletic Supporters, Baby CClothes, Backpacks, Bandanas, Barrettes, Baseball CCleats, Bathing Suits, Bathing caps, Bathing CC over ups, Belts, Belt Buckles, Bibs, Blouses, Bobby PP ins, Book Bags, Boots (except ski boots), Bow Ties, Bowling Shoes (P P urchased), Bras, Braces (worn to correct or alleviate a physical incapacity or II njury)*, CC aps, CChoir CCloth ing*, CCleated Shoes, CClerical Vestments*, CClothing Shields, CC oats, CC oin PP urses, CC ostumes, CC overalls, D Diaper Bags, D Diapers (adult and baby, cloth or disposable), DDiaper II nserts (adult and baby), D D resses, E E mployee UU niforms, Fanny P P acks, Fishing Vests (no otation), Fitness CC lothing, Formal C C lothing (purchased), G G loves (general use), D D ress G G loves, G G arden GG loves, Leather G G loves, Work GGloves, GGraduation CC aps and GG owns, GGym Suits, GGym UUni forms, H H air Bands, H H air Bows, HH air C C lips, H H air N N ets, H H and Bags, H H ats, H H osiery, H H unting Vests II nsoles, Jackets, Jeans, Lab C C osts, Leg Warmers, Leotards, Lingerie, Martial A A rts AA ttire, NNeckwear, NN ightgowns, OO vershoes, P P ajamas, P P ants, PP anythose, P P onchos, P P ony Tail HH olders, P P urses, R R ain C C oats, RR ain H H ats, R R eceiving Blankets, RR eligious C C lothing *, R R obes, RRubber Shoes, Safety CCloth ing, Safety Shoes, Scarves, Scout UUniforms, Shawls, Shirts, Shoes, Shoe II nserts, Shoulder PP ads, Shorts, Ski Suits (snow), Skirts, Slacks, Sleepwear, Slip pers, Slips, Socks, Sports UU niforms, Spiked Shoes, Suits, Support HH osiery, Suspenders, Sweat Bands, Sweat Suits, Sweat ers, Swim Suits, Swim Trunks, Ties, Tights, Tux edos (pur chased), U U ndergarments, UUniforms, Vests, Vintage CCloth ing, Wallets, Work C C lothes and Wraps School Supplies Exempt from Florida Sales Tax Limit per item is $10 on these school supplies: Binders, CC alculators, CC ellophane Tape, CC olored PP encils, CC ompasses, CC omposition Books, CC om puter D D isks (blank CD CD s only), CC onstruction P P aper, C C rayons, EErasers, Folders, GGlue (stick and liquid), H Highlighters, Legal PP ads, Lunch Boxes, Mark ers, NNotebook Filler PP aper, NN otebooks, P P aste, P P encils, PP ens, P P oster Board, P P oster PP aper, P P rotractors, R R ulers and Scissors. Computer and Related Accessories Exempt from Florida State Sales Tax Limit per item is $750 on these items: AA ntivi rus Soft ware, Blank CDCD s, CC ar AA dap tors for Laptop, CC entral PP rocess ing UUnit (CPU CPU), CC om pact DDisc DDrives, CC om puter Batter ies, CC omputer CC ables, DData base Software, DData Storage DD evices, DD esktop CC omputer, DDiskettes, DD ocking Stations (designed for computers), EEar Buds, EE ducational Software, EElectronic Book RR eaders, Financial Software, Flash DDrives, HHard DDrives, HHead PP hones, II nk CC artridges (for computers), Jump DDrives, Keyboards (for computers), Lap Top CC omputer, Memory CC ards, Mice, Microphone (built in computers), Mo dems, Monitors (except ones that include a TV tuner), Motherboards, NNoncom mercial UU se CC omputer, PP ersonal DDigital AA ssistant DD evices (except cell phones), PP ersonal UU se CC omputer, PP ort RR eplicators, PP ortable HHard DDrives, PP rinter CC artridges, PP rinters, RR am (random access memory), RR outers, Scanners, Speakers, Storage DDrives, Tablet, Thumb DDrives, Zip DDrives, Web CC ameras and Word PP rocessing Software. Taxable II tems AA thletic GGloves, AA thletic PP ads, Base ball GGloves, Baseball HHelmets, Batteries**, Batting GGloves, Belts for Weightlifting, Bike HHelmets, Bicycle GGloves, Books*, Boutonnieres, Bowling Shoes (rented), Briefcases, Buttons, CC ases for EElectronic DD evices, CDCD s (prerecorded), CC ell PP hones, CCheckbook covers (separate from wallets), CChest PP rotectors, CCloth, CClothing RR epair II tems, CClothing Tapes, CC omputer Bags, CC omputers designed for recreation (games and toys), CC omputer paper, CC opy Machines, CC opier II nk/Toner, CC orrection tape, CC orrec tion uid, CC orrection PP ens, CC orsages, CC osmetic Bags, CC ostumes (rented), CC rib Blan kets, DDigital CC ameras, DDigital Media RR eceivers, DDiving Suits, DDry DDiving Suits, DD uel Bags, DD ust Masks, EElbow PP ads, Fabrics, Fax Machines, Fins, Fishing Boots (waders), Football HHelmets, Football PP ads, Football Shoulder PP ads, Formal CClothing (rented), Furniture, GG ames, GG ame CC onsoles, GG ame CC ontrollers, GG aming Software, GG ame Sys tems, GG arment Bags, GG oggles (except prescription)*, GG olf GGloves, HHandkerchiefs, HHard HHats, HHockey GGloves, HHockey HHelmets, HHockey PP ads, HHockey Shoulder PP ads, IIce Skates, II n-Line Skates, II ron-on PP atches, Jewelry, Key CC ases, Key CChains, Knee PP ads, Lace, Life Jackets, Life Vests, Luggage, Knitting Yarn, Makeup Bags, Masking Tape, MPP3 AA ccessories, MPP3 PP layers, RR ented CC omputers, RR ented CC omputer AA ccessories, Motorcycle HHelmets, PP aint Masks, PP atterns, PP rinter PP aper, PP rojectors, PP rotective Masks (athletic), RR epair of Wear ing AA pparel, RR oller Blades, RR oller Skates, RRubber GGloves, Shaving Kits, Shin GGuards, Shin PP ads, Ski Boots (snow), Ski Vests (water), Skin DDiving Suits, Smart PP hones, Soccer PP ads, Sports HHelmets, Sports Shoulder PP ads, Staplers, Staples, Surge PP rotectors, Sunglasses (except prescrip tion)*, Surgical GGloves, Swim ming Masks, Tables CC ases, Tablet CC overs, Tennis GGloves, Thread, TVs (including digital media receivers), UUmbrellas, UUniforms (RR ented), Video GG ame CC onsoles, Watches, Watch Bands, Water Ski Vests, Weightlifting belts, Wet DDiv ing Suits, Wigs and Zippers. *These items are always exempt as religious, prescrip tion, prosthetic or orthopedic items. ** Batteries used in prosthetic and orthopedic appliances are always tax exempt. VERNON from page 7

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 9 Technical Center trains for employment Washington-Holmes Technical Center provides 34 unique opportunities for employment. If you want to get the skills you need for some of the most rewarding and in-demand careers available today, the Technical Center can help make it happen. e programs are specially designed for people who want high wage jobs in our workforce region. e Technical Center maintains and develops programs and courses according to industry needs, identifying the skills needed for todays job market by working closely with local employers and industry professionals. By the year 2014, 65 percent of the jobs will require an education past high school, but most of that training can be completed in less than two years. ere are so many people in our region facing unemployment and underemployment that the Technical Center is focusing on training programs that will allow students to complete their training in one year, says Martha Compton, Director of the Technical Center. Students can choose from ve health-related programs including Practical Nursing, Patient Care Technician, Pharmacy Technician, EMT, and Medical Coding and Billing. e WHTC Health Programs are renowned for high completion rates and licensing rates above 90 percent. e construction industry is nally on the rise again, and the Technical Center oers six programs in that area: Carpentry, Cabinetmaking, Drafting, Electrician, Heavy Equipment Operator and Welding. e Public Safety Academy provides training in Law Enforcement, Fireghting and Corrections; all programs lead to state certication in their respective elds. For those who love automotive work and diesel engines, choices include Auto Collision Repair and Renishing, Auto Mechanics, Heavy Equipment Mechanics and Heavy Duty Truck and Bus Mechanics. ese programs provide the opportunities for ASE certications. Service-related jobs continue to have a big demand and the Technical Centers Cosmetology See WHTC page 11

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10 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Holmes County Superintendent welcomes students By: Eddie Dixon Holmes County Superintendent Welcome to the 2013-14 school year. Holmes County Schools have been busy all summer preparing to provide students opportunities to excel academically, athleti cally, and artistically. Our teachers, support sta, school administrators and district administrators are excited and eager to help students in every aspect of their academic career. We are committed to improve the future of all children in Holmes County. Holmes County Schools work hard to incorporate and focus all of its resources to help each student achieve their highest potential. We will continue to support our teachers by providing professional development to enhance instruction in the classroom. We are continuously implementing the newest strategies in the classroom to support improved instruction and achievement. Data analysis will be used to review student learning gains and to drive instruction to support student success. Holmes County also provides a variety of instructional models to help all students attain success. Holmes County Schools celebrate and Eddie Dixon encourage parents to be actively involved in their childs education. Our goal is to improve the lives of students by fostering good relationships between students, parents, and educators. Working together we can make a dierence in the lives of Holmes County children. Every educator in Holmes County believes that the decisions they make every day aect a childs life forever. I look forward to the new school year because its always a great day in Holmes County Schools. Welcome from Washington County Superintendent By: Joe Taylor Washington County Superintendent I would like to welcome all of our students back for a very successful school year. Please note that a few changes to school start and ending times have been made. e order of dismissal has been changed from last year. e order of dismissal is: Middle Schools, High Schools, Elementary Schools in the afternoon. Please be aware that this will change the trac ow and patterns of the buses. Please join me in welcoming new administrators to the Washington County School District. Chipley High School has a new principal, Mr. Charles Williams, and a new assistant principal, Ms. Nancy Holley. Roulhac Middle School has a new principal, Mr. Kyle Newsome, Mr. Troy People remains as assistant principal. Kate M. Smith Elementary has no changes, Ms. Lesa Burdeshaw, principal and Ms. Bonnie Lindsey, assistant principal. Vernon High School, Mr. Brian Riviere remains as principal and is joined by Ms. Lora Barnes, the new assistant principal. Vernon Middle School, Ms. Kim Register, remains as principal and is joined by Dr. Charles Peterson as the new assistant principal. Vernon Elementary School, Mr. Steve Grin is the new principal, Latina English remains as assistant principal. Eective August 9, 2013, the school District will have a new website www.wcsdschools. com. All of our schools have links on this site. I would like to draw special attention to the Parent Portal. is resource is invaluable in monitoring students progress and the ability to contact students teachers. Joe Taylor FASHION FRENZY BOOUTIIQUEE COME SEE US FOR YOUR BACK TO SCHOOL SHOPPING!NEW BACKPACKS, TABLET and LAPTOP CASES!New arrivals of clothing coming in every week.547-2000No Sales Tax Mention this ad and receive 10% o your purchase. CALL OR STOPY BY FOR A FREE QUOTE 1364 N. RAILROAD AVE. CHIPLEY, FL 32428 we print MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS

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July 24, 2013, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Back To School 11Tips for quick weeknight meals Cold dinners, including salads, are an option for time-strapped families who still want to enjoy meals together on weeknights.Enjoying a meal together on a weeknight is a goal for many families. But adults often nd themselves pressed for time on weeknights, and that time crunch can make it dicult to enjoy a homecooked meal. But time is not the only thing getting in the way of family meals. Be it after school activities, long commutes or late hours at the oce, many things can make it difcult for a family to sit down and enjoy a meal together. e National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse notes that family dinners are one of the most eective ways for parents to engage in the lives of their children. Studies have also shown that families who eat together tend to eat healthier, as parents can more eectively monitor their kids diets, including whether or not their youngsters are getting enough fruits and vegetables, when they are dining together. While it may not be feasible for parents and kids to scale back their busy schedules, there are steps parents can take to make weeknight meal preparation quicker. By shortening the time it takes to make meals on weeknights, families might be able to sit down to dinner together more often. Plan ahead. e most eective way to make more time for family meals is to plan ahead. Planning meals on the y encourages everyone to fend for themselves, making it dicult for families to enjoy nutritious meals they can eat together. Plan for the coming weeks meals on the weekend, when you can survey your pantry and make a trip to the grocery store if need be. Planning ahead also allows you to prepare certain parts of a meal in advance, which will save you time on busy weeknights. Make cold meals. Dinner does not have be served hot, and cold meals often take less time to prepare. Consider serving salad or sandwiches on those nights when you are especially pressed for time. When serving sandwiches, serve them on whole grain bread to add some nutritional value to the meal. Turn breakfast into dinner. ere are no laws regarding what qualies as dinner and what does not, so families without much time on their hands on a weeknight can turn breakfast into dinner. Eggs are both quick and easy to prepare, and they can be served alongside toast and grapefruit. When making omelets for dinner, add some spinach or another vegetable to make the meal more nutritious. Lean on seafood more often. Seafood can be healthy and delicious, but thats not the only reason its an ally to timestrapped families. Seafood should not take much time to cook, as even those dishes that take more time than simpler dishes like sauteed shrimp will still take less than 30 minutes to complete. ats signicantly less time than meals in which beef, pork or poultry is the main entree. Leftovers arent just for lunch. Leftovers are often relegated to lunch, but extras from a meal cooked over the weekend can be used as a quick go-to meal on a hectic weeknight. If the family enjoyed the meal the rst time around, theres no reason they wont enjoy it again. When eating leftovers for dinner, make sure the leftovers are fresh, but try to avoid serving leftovers the night after they were initially cooked. Enjoy meals as a family is a great way for families to eat healthy and stay engaged in one anothers lives. And even families with hectic schedules can employ a few tricks to make dining together more convenient. Program and Commercial Foods/Culinary Arts are fast tracks into those careers. For those who enjoy the excitement of entertainment, the new Digital Audio Production Program leads to careers as technicians in broadcast and sound engineering. Finally, with information technology careers booming, the Administrative Oce Professional, Network Support and Administration, Applied Information Technology and Cybersecurity are sure paths to high-wages. Applied Information Technology and Cybersecurity are the Tech Centers newest programs. Careers in web design and development, IT problem-diagnostics and resolution top the charts. Recently, Cybersecurity has become one of the nations most serious challenges. Cybersecurity is the branch of computer science that studies cyber threats in order to develop tools and strategies that help provide for a stable, safe and resilient cyberspace. Cyberspace touches nearly every part of our daily lives. Its the broadband networks beneath us and the wireless signals around us, the local networks in our schools and hospitals and businesses, and the massive grids that power our nation. Its the classied military and intelligence networks that keep us safe, and the World Wide Web that has made us more interconnected than at any time in human history. We must secure our cyberspace to ensure that we can continue to grow the nations economy and protect our way of life. (e White House Cybersecurity website). Cybersecurity technicians review cyber communications so they can develop and implement processes for maintaining condentiality, integrity, availability, and security in cyberspace. All of the IT programs at the Technical Center lead to industry recognized credentials by Microsoft and CompTia. Actually, all programs at the Technical Center lead to industry recognized certications. ese are important to employers because they ensure that the individual is qualied, up-to-date on the latest equipment and procedures, and can perform specic skills eectively. Last year, WashingtonHolmes Technical Center students successfully obtain more industry certications than any other educational institution in the Florida Panhandle. For more information on your next step to career success, call the Technical Center Student Services at 638-1180 ext 317 or toll-free 1-855345-WHTC.WHTC from page 9

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12 Back To School, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, July 24, 2013 Fr om SchoolSupplies and Trendy BackPacks To StylishApparel AndAllTheLatest ElectronicsGetAllTheBack-To-SchoolEssentialsat 1612MainStreet, Chipley,Florida 850-638-2243Store2114 TaxFreeDays Aug.2-4

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 B USINESS G UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414TROLLING MOTOR REPAIRAordable service! Fast Repair! Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 5017238 5017933 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.Hessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 5017931 5017930 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.Hessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. Ow nr Mut ll Nicely wooded lot in prime recreational area. Crystal clear mountain lake, ski area and brand new golf course. All within 1 mile of property.Oy$79,900!Adjoiigosodfo$249,900Bank will finance!Caob:877-888-7581ex62Brokerage services provided by: GLS Realty, LLC Office: 301-387-8100 Robert Orr, BIC 5017934 5017923 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. Christine & Greg 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Choosing Adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Great Dane PuppiesAvailable now! Please call 850-520-4751 Text FL59227 to 56654 PREMIUM METAL Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply. com New Home Builders & Contractors: Call the Carpenters Son for kitchen & bath cabinets, furniture design & woodworking. Specializing in custom cabinets, desk, conference tables, entertainment centers, all types of church furniture. Builders of quality for 33 years. Simply the best/best price. Contact owner/operator, The Carpenters Son, Ken Nowell (850)326-8232. Garage Sale. July 27, 7a.m. Until, Maternity Clothes, Adult and Childrens Clothes, Toy, and Odds and Ends. 1382 South Blvd. Indoor outdoor final moving sale Scrubs, craft items and much more. 703 N. Hamlin St Bonifay. 7a.m.-2p.m Sat., July 27. TREASURE SALE! Live Oak Assembly of God Womens Ministry at Live Oak Assembly of God Church, Hwy 177Aon left going towards Dogwood Lakes Friday, July 26 from 7:00 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday, July 27 from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. BreakfastFriday morning the ladies will be selling delicious homemade breakfast foods including biscuits and cinnamon rolls. Come and enjoy! The yard sale includes, furniture, appliances, bicycles, clothes, books and much, much more! SEE YOU THERE! 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. 2010 Craftsman riding mower, 17.5 hp, B-S, 42 in, auto, like new, $850 Call 850-628-5436 Scrape Metal,FREE!!624-1679 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Volume 51 Number 12 WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 2013 Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes Counties FREE T AKE ONE

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, July 24, 2013 5017391 MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioners office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING. Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED PC/ Internet needed! 1-888-2125888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Efficient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans. com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Benefits and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855IRT-TANK www.indian rivertransport.com A SODA/ SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex. 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Includes all utilities. $425/month. (850)326-4548. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA, AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 For Rent: House 2BR/2BACHAnewly remodeled, stove, refrigerator, NO Pets, rental references, $550 month, yards included, $500 Deposit, 601 2nd St. 850-326-2920. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 Br/2Ba 16x70 MH near Dogwood Lakes on private lot. Not in a park. $485/mo plus deposit. (850)547-4232. 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. 3BR/2BA Brick Home with large shop on 21/2 acres in Chipley area $195,000. 850-726-0396 For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414