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UF00028312 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028312/00790
 Material Information
Title: Washington County news
Uniform Title: Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Chipley Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates: 30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 23, 1924.
General Note: L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID: UF00028312:00824
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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWS Washington County 2012 R egions Bank. Simple and reliable has always been a good way to go R hond a S a pp | 85 0 8 4 9 34 7 6 | r h o n d a s a p p @ regions.com Wednesday, APRIL 17 2013 Volume 90, Number 1 Arts Council holds Scholarship Competition The Washington County Arts Council announces its annual $500 Scholarship Competition. Graduating High School seniors in Washington County who wish to pursue a college degree in the Arts music, drama, literature, dance or the visual arts are eligible to compete by submitting a double spaced typewritten essay of 2,500 words or less on the subject of Why the Arts? In these dif cult economic times, your essay should convey to the reader why you feel supporting the Arts is important. Deadline for submission is May 13 and entries should be mailed to Washington County Arts Council, P.O. Box 973, Chipley, FL 32428; or e-mailed to tonya@ pippinappraisal.com. Autism Awareness and Bene t Walk CHIPLEY There will be an Autism Awareness and Bene t Walk from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday at Shivers Park in Chipley. There will be food, games, raf es and much more. Come out a show the children and their families Water bill de cit down to about $9,000 Wausau residents catching up on utility payments By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.co m WAUSAU The city has collected all but about $9,000 of the water bills that were delinquent in Wausau, the Town Council learned Thursday night. We have about 26 people who are at the end of the 90-day range, and 18 of them have been in to make a payment, City Clerk Margaret Riley said. A few of them are still trying to get caught up, and we have a few that we are going to have to cut off their water. Riley said the delinquent amount was down from a high of about $22,000 last year, which caught the attention of the council when it was brought to light following an audit of the towns nances. We have had some people who have habitually behind, and theyve been that way for 17 years, Riley said, and I dont expect them to change. However, the town has been more adamant about having the water bills paid or shutting off the service. How long are we going to give them to try? Council Member Marlene Blount asked. Everybody has been in making some payment, Riley said, adding that two accounts she didnt expect to hear from had come in to make payments, and one troublesome P hoto by RANDAL SEYLER | The News Bill and Barbara Dorman of Wausau were given Yard of the Month honors by the Wausau Garden Club President Roxanne Bush, left, on Thursday at the April Town Council meeting, held at Wausau City Hall. Legends & Lore Festival returns this weekend Special to the News CHIPLEY The past will come to life Friday and Saturday at Falling Waters State Park. This year will mark the 10th year the Friends of Falling Waters, with the help of many great demonstrators, crafters and volunteers, have been able to give young and old a like a glimpse of a more carefree time. The Legends & Lore Festival festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days, and will have a wide variety of unique and seldomseen sites as well as arts and crafts, live music and food. The annual event will feature Civil War re-enactors, Vernon FFA Alumni membership drive started Special to the News VERNON Recently, a group of parents, business leaders, local farmers and interested citizens met at the Vernon High School Ag classroom in order to organize and establish the VHS FFA (Future Farmers of America) Association. The purpose of the organization is to play a major role in supporting agricultural education. The National FFA Alumni Mission Statement, to secure the promise of FFA and agricultural education by creating an environment where people and communities can develop their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success, was adopted by the organization. The newly elected ofcers are: Hiram Tison, president; Pam Cates, vice president; Gwen Brock, secretary; Warren Walsingham, treasurer. Anyone having a concern for the future of agriculture education can become a member. You do not have to had been a member of FFA previously to join. The annual membership dues are $10. The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on May 6 in the Ag classroom (Building 600, Room 612) at Vernon High School. For more information, please contact Hiram Tison, 547-4670; Pam Cates, 535-4224; Gwen Brock, 2606924; Jimmy Gainey, 8490098; George or Maxine Weber, 535-2613. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS This years Legends & Lore Festival is being held in memory of Raymond Smoker, seen at last years festival. Smoker was an active participant at past festivals. Event marks 10th anniversary at Falling Waters State Park P hoto by CATHRINE LAMB | The News Hundreds braved a chilly Friday evening and early Saturday morning to walk in the Relay For Life of Washington County this weekend at Pals Park in Chipley. For the full story and more photos, see Page B1 INDEX Arrests .................................. A3 Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ................................... A7 Extra ..................................... B1 Faith ..................................... B4 Obituaries ............................. B5 Classi eds .......................... B7-8 See LEGENDS A2 See DEFICIT A2 Celebrating life Home & Farm | INSIDE See BRIEFS A2

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 17, 2013 a blacksmith, candlemakers, basket weavers, live alligators, wood crafters, storytelling and much more. You sometimes dont know where you are going until you get there. The Legends & Lore Festival started out as a Satur day night program in the fall of the year and now we are cele brating the 10th annual Legends & Lore Festival, Park Service Specialist Scott Sweeney said. The event now takes place the third Friday and Saturday in April and has grown into one of the most signicant cultural and historical events in the Florida panhandle, he said. All proceeds and donation will be used by the Friends of Falling Waters support the many programs in the park and community outreach programs. We now live in a world of instant gratication, but not so many years ago, you would have bartered for the necessities of life like food, shelter and a good bar of soap, Sweeney said. This spring festival at Fall ing Waters State Park recre ates that time where neighbors helped neighbors and instead of running to the store for ev ery little thing. We knew how to make things with our own two hands and x stuff that broke, Sweeney said. In todays world most everything has that little Made in China sticker and is quick to hit the bottom of the trash can at the rst sign of fail ing. One of the unique things about this event is that all of the crafts, artwork and unusual items are made locally and that little sticker earlier mentioned is not allowed in the park. This event also gives children the opportunity to experience many of the crafts and skills their grandparents relied on for day-to-day living, Sweeney said. The main focus for Friday is set aside for the fourth grad ers from Holmes, Jackson, Bay and Washington County to edu cate our area youngsters about these various crafts and skills to take them back in time to expe rience life from over 100 years ago, but the general public is always welcome. On Saturday, the energy lev el gets bumped up a notch with live music throughout the day, Civil War re-enactors, living his tory demonstrations, animal ex hibits, local artists and crafters, great food and more, Sweeney said. Falling Waters State Park is a place lled with natural won ders and a rich cultural history. The park was established in 1962 to preserve what is con sidered one of Floridas most unique geological features but the park is so much more. During the ensuing ve de cades, Falling Waters State Park added many amenities and to this day continues to improve. The parks improvements can be attributed to the dedi cated staff that continues to strive to make this state park one of the best, Sweeney said. However, in recent years the local community has become more involved with assisting in preserving and protecting one of the Floridas Panhandle hid den treasure. This years event is in memo ry of Raymond Smoker. He was a big part of the success of the Legends & Lore Festival. This years event is dedi cated to his memory for all of his hard work and effort in the countless events he played a part in, Sweeney said. His love for the simple things in life has inspired us all. We will miss him seeing you here with us. Smoker was one of the festi vals most avid supporters. He was lost to us this year while working with horses and helping others. He is a great loss to our event and the community as a whole, Sweeney said. LEGENDS from page A1 account had been paid in full. We denitely need to keep going for ward with this, Councilman Dallas Cart er said. Riley said there was $8,264 still out standing from prior to Jan. 1, 2013, and there is $1,217 outstanding in past due water bills for 2013. Its coming down, so we are moving in the right direction, Mayor B.J. Phil lips said. The council also approved hiring At torney Jeff Goodman of Chipley to serve as the town attorney. Goodman was present for the meeting, and the council members wasted no time in putting him to work. The rst question they had for Good man was whether or not the town could barter services for a surplus pickup truck. Phillips said the town was consid ering trading the truck in exchange for animal control services. It costs us $39 per dog we haul to the shelter, and so far this year weve spent $429 on animal control, Phillips said. The town had received an offer of trad ing the truck for one years free animal hauling. Goodman suggested the town council put the surplus truck up for bid rst, to determine what value the vehicle might have. You can dispose of the property in any way you see t, the law allows you quite a bit of latitude in this area, Good man said. However, I would recommend putting the truck up for bid. The bids can be rejected, or they could sell the truck to the highest bidder. I doubt we would get $500 for it, Phil lips said, and he noted that the city had already spent nearly that much on ani mal disposal this year and it is only April. If you do barter for services, I would set an amount, not a length of time, for the val ue, like $1,000, Goodman recommended. The council had a similar question for the attorney about an unused generator the town was wanting to sell at auction. Dont get me started on generators, Goodman joked, referring to the Wash ington County Board of County Commis sioners recent purchase of a generator. The purchase resulted in turmoil at the March BOCC meeting when Commis sioner Lynn Gothard accused the board of breaking the law and violating policy when it purchased the $22,000 generator without taking bids and by purchasing it from an person who had done contract work with the county in the past. We tried to get the county to purchase it, but they werent interested, Riley said with a smile. DEFICIT from page A1 File Photo by CATHRINE LAMB | The News The Legends & Lore Festival at Falling Waters State Park will feature educational displays and give children the opportunity to experience the crafts and skills of their grandparents day. affected by Autism that they live in an amazing community. All donations will be gratefully appreciated. To help, donate, sponsor or for more information contact Kristina Hodges at 459-1367. Trinity Baptist to host simulcast MARIANNA Trinity Baptist Church in Marianna will host a simulcast of Priscilla Shirer Live from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on April 27. Doors will open at 8 a.m. and cost is $15, which includes a listener guide, box lunch and child care. Please indicate if you will need child care at the time of purchase. For information call 209-3296 or 482-3705 or visit www. trinitymarianna.com. 1947 and Reunion set CHIPLEY The 1947 class will celebrate their 66th and the 1948 class will celebrate their 65th reunion on Saturday at Baileys Surf and Turf in Chipley. They will meet at Baileys at 12 p.m. Come early, at least 11 a.m. if you want to visit and reminisce. Bring a friend or relative if you want to. For more information call 547-1409. Poker Run planned GRITNEY Gritney Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on their 3rd Annual Poker Run Event on Saturday. We will start off with a Pancake Breakfast, which we will start serving at 7 a.m. Registration for the run will began at 10 a.m. For more information please call Mrs. Jessica at 547-2200. BRIEFS from page A1

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, April 17, 2013 April 1 April 8 Sonia Ackre, 43, DeFuniak Springs, violation of county probation on driving while license suspended or revokes James Banks, 58, Homeless, 58, petit theft Felisha Blaine, 35, Chipley, traf c in opium, possession of controlled substance without a prescription Julie Bledsoe, 43, Chipley, sell of cocaine Reggie Brown, 24, Vernon, sell of marijuana Wade Brown, 60, Chipley, failure to appear on petit theft Samuel Carroll, 19, Chipley, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of state probation on possession of controlled substance without prescription, producing marijuana, possession of paraphernalia Tori Clarke, 20, Vernon, violation of state probation on battery, trespassing, intro of contraband, criminal mischief, possession of controlled substance Jessica Curry, 27, Westville, Holmes County warrant for violation of state probation on possession of controlled substance without a prescription Antonio Dawson, 26, Chipley, battery Michael Furney, 61, Chipley, Walton County warrant for contempt of court Tory Gayman, 32, Graceville, violation of county probation on worthless checks, Holmes County warrant fro aggravated battery Jose Guzman, 50, Orlando, Orange County warrant for child support Rachel Johnson, 28, Florence, Ala., violation of state probation on tampering with evidence, Georgia warrant for violation of state probation on resist of cer, possession of controlled substance Brandon Jones, 18, Chipley, violation of state probation on petit theft, burglary Charles Looney, 34, Bonifay, kidnap adult, aggravated assault, intimidate witness, violation of state probation on criminal mischief Ronald Palumbo, 60, Graceville, burglary, grand theft Shedrick Patton, 36, Chipley, sell cocaine, traf c in controlled substance Thomas Peterson Jr., 43, Vernon, sell of marijuana two counts Michael Pettis, 32, Wausau, violation of state probation on possession of marijuana with intent, possession of meth Kristopher Presley, 23, Middleburg, refuse to submit to driving under the in uence test, driving while license suspended or revoked, driving under the in uence Ahzric Proctor, 21, Vacherie, La., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Wesley Register, 31, Chipley, contributing to the delinquency of a minor Deborah Sharek, 60, Chipley, violation of state probation on possession of cocaine Brandon Taylor, 30, Santa Rosa Beach, kidnap adult, battery Ashley Thornton, 24, Ebro, sell of marijuana four counts, sell opium three counts, traf c in opium, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Kathryn Walthall, 34, Bonifay, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of paraphernalia Sonia Womack, 57, Chipley, violation of county probation on resist of cer without violence WASHINGTON COUNTY WASHINGTON COUNTY WASHINGTON COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Brock Auto Body Chipley Physical Therapy Obert Funeral Home Rogers Insurance GOLD SILVER BRONZE Chipley Tire & Service Kindel Awards Community South Credit Union Lanes Outdoor Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating 18 18 18 18 18 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other ser vice, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted fee or reduced fee ser vice, examination or treatment. "WE WELCOME NE W P A TIE N TS, C ALL T ODA Y FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with T odd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The e xam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY : U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 4-30-13 FREE EYE E X AM CODE : W C 00 S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances www .mulliseye.com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chipley Office 16 91 Ma in St ., St e. 1 W e are located directly across the parking lot from the W almart in Chipley T odd Robinson, M.D. Boar d C ertified E ye Physician and C ataract S urgeon Washington County ARRESTS Environmental consultants compete for Holmes County job By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Two environmental consultants went toe-to-toe during the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners meeting on Tuesday, April 9 one rm ghting for the spot of environmental consultant overseeing the clean-up of the local land ll, and the other rm ghting to remain. Belinda Pollock with CDG Engineers, the countys current environmental consultant group, was present to give an update on the land ll site. Pollock explained that even though the site contamination is low, it is still contaminated with petroleum and after the last site screening evaluation it ranked one point higher then what is allowed for site clean up. We double checked to see if we could have it rescored, but weve found even if we did it wouldnt yield better results, said Pollock. For now the site is at a standstill. Shortly afterward, Michael Tadlock, marketing director for Wes Environmental, LLC, stepped up to ask for the boards consideration to make Wes Environmental the countys new environmental consultant. We are a small company that brings big results, said Tadlock. Weve got three geologists that combined bring 60 years of experience, we treat the property as we would our very own and we a local company. We hire in Holmes County, we shop in Holmes County, we live in Holmes County, Tadlock said. We also rmly believe we can get the site rescored and continue progress so you can have a swift and complete closure to this project. Tadlock said that their geologists have found a chemical in the soil that could boost their rating by a point if allowed to rescore. It would be of no cost to transfer the project to us, said Tadlock. It would be a cost-free and seamless transition. Pollock stood up and said that she assured the board that the site may be able to be rescored, but she knew it wouldnt be ranked any higher. Tadlock insisted that if the board would appoint his rm as the countys consultant, then they could get that score higher. Put your money where your mouth is, Commissioner Kenneth Williams told Tadlock. If you can rescore it higher then the position is yours. Tadlock agreed with the boards decision that if Wes Environmental could return with a rescored site evaluation, then they would be the new contracted environmental consultants for the county a position which is state funded and county appointed. The board also approved to award Melvin Engineering with the design of Sandpath Road Phase II, which is a sidewalk project. Chairman Monty Merchant said there is an issue with the spotlights for the courthouses ag pole constantly being out at night. We need to put a light on it or take it down, said Merchant. The board agreed to see if the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce could see about taking it down every night and putting it up every morning. Commissioner Bill Parish was unanimously chosen to by the other board members to be the auctioneer at the auction of surplus county items to be held at 9 a.m. on Friday, April 12. Thats only because everyone one else wants money to do it, said Merchant.

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On the heels of celebrating 10 years of publication, the Prattler feels a fulledged commercial coming on for the Prattle and for the Heritage of Washington County book. Many activities came to Chipley this past weekend Relay for Life, Flea Across Florida with yard sales and ea market vendors on every corner, and the concert at Spanish Play House on Saturday night, featuring Big River Bluegrass, which concluded the events. Hester and I participated in all of the above, plus attended other events during the week. Included was Ms. Lotta Davis 101st Birthday Reception held at First Presbyterian Church on April 7 and the Oral Interpretation presentation by Carol Saunders and her Chipola College Students at the Chipley Kiwanis Club noon meeting held at Pattillos on Tuesday April 9. We also treated ourselves to dinner at Baileys Restaurant on Thursday night. The 10th year celebration continues as accolades come forth for Perrys Prattle. Wade Webb told me that Ms. Lottas event that he is a regular in reading my articles and inquired as to my source of research. He seemed surprised with the answer that most of my material comes from memories and experiences of the past. Catherine Jeffries Braxton, a Cottondale business person, who we have known since Chuck Wagon days in Chipley, apologized to Hester for interrupting our dinner at Baileys. She was highly complimentary of the historic materials found in each weeks Prattle. She mentioned her maiden name of Jeffries, explaining that James Arthur Jefferies married Marie White of the Poplar Head community and Annie Jeffries married Dempsey J. Brock and all the large family of children all were given names beginning with the letter C. She did not mention owning the Heritage Book and I need to let her know all of the above in included in that publication. On Friday of the ea market event, Hester and I worked the West U.S. Highway 90 corridor as long as our energy held out. We encountered vendors, Steve and Jan Mason, set up on the grounds of St. Matthews Episcopal Church. They were accompanied by eight-yearold granddaughter, Ella, visiting from Atlanta. The Masons reported excellent sales and were almost sold out a noon time and were folding empty tables preparing to call it a day. Also at that location, we met up with kinfolk, Dana Brock and wife, Janet, with a display of nursery plants and home made specialty arts and crafts items of bird houses made from gourds, beautifully decorated and pleasing to the eye. They were joined by Penny Brock, wife of Donald Brock, who displayed her own gorgeous paintings of various scenes and subjects. Dana is the grandson and Penny if the granddaughter-inlaw of Same Brock and Comilla Hall Brock, whose story was written by daughter, Trudell Brock Washington, and printed in noted Heritage Book. These family members missed buying a book before the sell outs on previous printings and both jumped at the opportunity to purchase one each which the Prattler just happened to have in his vehicle. Promises were also received from both that they would attend the June 15 Brock Reunion to be held at the Agriculture Center in Bonifay. Out second day of dropping in on more yard sales, took us to the Book Sale at the Washington County Library. We encountered Judy Corbus parents as we did the previous day. Mr. Corbus commented on his enjoyment of reading my writings. Both parents have been coming to Chipley for 25 years or more and joined in working at Watermelon Festivals just as if they were on the payroll. For the past two years, they have made Chipley their homes and can be seen actively working at the June watermelon event. Also in the library, we encountered Susan Jones Cook, the daughter of the late Vern Jones and Merle Jones. After giving a glowing report on Perrys Prattle, she told me she still remembers my compliment on her uncle, Paul Jones, who was in the eighth grade at Vernon when I arrived there. I well remember telling her that Paul, who looked like a grown man to me, gave me protection from the older boys who attempted to thump the ears of an over grown, but youthful, Perry Wells, who had just arrived at the big school from the small Brackin School. After a time-out at noon on Saturday, your writer attended the sh fry for the Senior Men of the county held at Daniels Lake. James Earl Guy heads this informal gathering and has been especially attentive to this Senior Person. He con rmed that he and wife, Naomi, will be at the 1944 Vernon High School Reunion to be held Saturday, April 20. At the sh fry I had a conversation with Ronnie Brock of the Sand Hill Brocks whose wife is Wanda Brock. He is a nephew of my 1944 classmate, Emma Lou Chesser Tew, who plans to attend the reunion, accompanied by daughters, Sharon and Nancy. I also had a promise from Ronnie that he will attend the reunion for our clan of Brocks in June. Topping off a week lled with wonderful experiences was when Ken Ruth visited Hester and me in out home. Ken and wife, Betty, were our caretakers at the Northwest Florida Music Park and Campground for many years. He carried on his craft of building clocks, many of them especially crafted for bluegrass performers who made appearances at the bluegrass festivals. Ken numbers among the list of those who have read Perrys Prattle since its beginning and made his purchase of the Heritage of Washington County book immediately upon its rst printing. The remaining books have dwindled from the 200 received in August to 37 now in the hands of the Prattler. Call me at 6381016 for your copy. They are $64.20 when picked up in Chipley or $70 when mailed. My email address if perry1000@bellsouth. ne t See you all next week. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, April 17, 2013 A Page 4 Section Dear Editor, It was recently reported in the HCTA that an ambulance worth what? $200,000? was out of commission due to the wheel balancing machine being broken and there was no funding to x it. My rst thought was why not use the spare? Next was that the only wheel balancing machine available? No, Eastern Diesel who works on big trucks has one available 24/7. Knowing that most businesses and most likely governments have proceeds for processing small items without much fuss, why not get it done? Whats a wheel balance $20 to $30 at most? To potentially put the lives of the citizens of Holmes County at risk for this reason is beyond absurd. Its at out irresponsible. Whoever dropped the ball on this should be red. If Holmes County still had a county administrator this would not have happened. One is certainly needed. Im glad they nally quit hauling free dirt and rock to a few select. That was brought up Maybe 10 years ago and I got no where, even going through Tallahassee. Now I hope they can afford a wheel balancing machine. Dick Basht Bonifay Recently I watched an episode of HGTV s Flea Market Flips. One of the requirements for the teams involved is to repurpose one item that they nd at the ea market. On this particular episode, an old fashioned threeburner oil stove was chosen to repurpose. It was all metal built on 4 legs, similar to ones I can recall from childhood which might have been used in apartment. It had no oven. I can remember a cousin, a newly wed who lived near us, having one like that. Kerosene was purchased in a one gallon or 5 gallon can often from the rolling store which carried a tank on the back end of the vehicle. On the TV show they sanded the rust off, painted the metal and laid a piece of heavy glass over the burners to make a side table to be used as a bar. I Dont recall (or I stopped watching) if somebody bought it. But it started me thinking about how cooking has changed in my lifetime. When Jack and I married and moved into an apartment in Gainesville, we had a 4-burner kerosene stove with an oven. Id never cooked on anything but my Mamas Home Comfort wood burning stove. It was state of the art and I remember when a travelling salesman sold it to our family. It was much larger than the other 4burner wood range which she had used. That stove turned out too many to count bakers full of corn pone and homemade biscuit not to mention the bushels of sweet potatoes it baked. I learned to bake cakes on the wood stove using white lard rendered at home for the shortening. My Grandma Wells had a beautiful green enamel wood burning range, the fanciest one I recall. It had a reservoir to hold hot water as did the Home Comfort my Mama had. Grandmas also had a warming closet above the range to keep dinner hot till the workers got home from the eld. For many years, I have used the base of Grandmas green enamel stove base as a coffee table base. Uncle Josh Wells salvaged it for me. The rst thing I tried to bake in the kerosene oven was a disaster. I had made a beautiful cherry pie with a lattice crust and it had baked to perfection. We were going to Cedar Key with Sam and Lucille Polston and eat when we returned. So I pulled the rack out to take my pie out and the rack tipped, dumping my pie on the oven door. Lucille quickly grabbed a turner and ipped it back into the pan, somewhat scrambled, but edible. When we moved to Bonifay in 1951 and had an apartment in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Terrel Creel, we cooked on an antique electric stove that must have been a prototype. It stood up on four legs. Four burners were at one end and the oven was at the other. It was the rst of the waist high ovens that became popular as built-ins and remain so today. The one at the Creel house was exciting to use as it would shoot sparks and dance about upon occasion. More than anything else, microwave ovens have revolutionized the way we cook, not that I actually cook a lot of things in the thing. Yet I nd I can hardly prepare a meal without using the microwave in some way. I recall the rst I heard of microwave cooking, Mrs. Sally Childers was our extension home economist, and we had some one come to the fair building on Highway 90 and talk about a way of cooking without heat. I dont recall the word microwave being used, but we were amazed at the speed with which things would heat up. My brother Jim and his wife Lavoughan were the rst in our family to get one. He proudly demonstrated how it would boil a cup of water in 2 minutes. I have gone from using a wood stove to a kerosene stove to an antique electric stove to a full size electric range to a built in oven and counter top stove and back to a 36-inch drop in range. I have never had a gas range except in an ef ciency apartment while on vacation. Neither have I owned a glass smooth topped range. I was afraid it might not heat my huge jelly-making pot fast enough. I still enjoy cooking, but as my energy level wanes and my memory span shortens I am thinking more and more of not having a cooking stove at all. Letter to the EDITOR My how cook stoves have changed over the years HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells The clock designed and built by Ken Ruth. It was displayed at WBGC Radio Station during the years Perry Wells did Bluegrass Express on the Chipley station. Prattler enjoys many weekend activities

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Textured Plush Carpet 79 SF Loose Lay Vinyl 69 SF FHA Quality Vinyl 49 SF Super Thick Loose Lay Vinyl 99 SF 12 x 9 Tan Frieze ...................................... $ 95 50 12 x 12 Dark Green Plush ........................ $ 139 90 12 x 13 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 109 90 12 x 13 Dark Blue Plush ........................... $ 155 50 12 x 14 Heavy Tan Frieze ......................... $ 165 50 12 x 14 Medium Brown Frieze ................. $ 149 90 12 x 15 Chocolate Frieze ......................... $ 179 90 12 x 15 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 155 50 12 x 16 Medium Blue Frieze .................... $ 189 90 12 x 19 Heavy Velvet Plush Tan .............. $ 225 50 12 x 19 2 Green Comm. Plush .................... $ 205 50 12 x 20 Multi Color Comm. ...................... $ 169 90 carpettilemarianna.com and PET OF THE WEEK Left: Teddy is an 8 to 10 week old male shepherd cross, about 12 to 15 pounds. He is totally adorable, a very sweet, loving, kissing little cuddle bear! Teddy has so much love to give, you will have many years of joy and companionship to share with him if you can give him the forever home hes searching for! Right: Leyla is a 2 to 3 year old female lab cross, about 40 to 45 pounds. She is good on a leash, very gentle and lovable, with stunning green eyes. She has recently weaned a litter of pups and now shes ready to stop playing momma and nd a home where she can be someones baby. Are you looking for a new baby? Leyla would love to be your baby and best friend all in one package! For more information contact Animal Control of West Florida in Chipley at 638-2082. Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. until noon. Special to the News TALLAHASSEE In recognition of April 8-12 as Wild re Awareness Week in the State of Florida, the Florida Division of Emergency Management encourages all Floridians to take the opportunity to update wild re emergency plans and learn how best to protect themselves and their property from the danger of wild res. Wild res can occur year round in Florida, said Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Bryan W. Koon. Have a current emergency plan and be proactive in your efforts to keep your home and family safe during a re emergency by taking necessary precautions. Florida experiences more than 4,600 wild res, burning nearly 110,000 acres of land in a typical year. This year, Florida has faced over 1,000 wild res on 20,430 acres. The three leading causes of wild res are arson, uncontrolled yard debris or trash res, and lightning. The National Fire Protection Associations Firewise program encourages homeowners to use prevention measures to decrease re threats around their homes, including planting reresistant vegetation, trimming trees to a height of 15 feet near structures, clearing brush up to 30 feet around your home, and keeping roofs and gutters clear of debris, such as leaves and pine needles. Along with Firewise prevention measures, of cials urge residents to follow these guidelines set by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service (FFS): 1. Check with local city or county of cials to see if there are any burn restrictions in the area. 2. Keep res contained to an 8-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel. Fires must be at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. 3. Obtain a burning authorization from the Florida Forest Service for piles larger than 8 feet in diameter. Call your local Florida Forest Service eld of ce. 4. Check the weather and dont burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. 5. Never leave a re unattended, and make sure it is completely out before leaving. 6. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case the small re starts to escape containment. 7. Report suspicious activity to the Arson Alert Hotline at 1-800-342-5869. Kids can learn how to protect their familys home and stay safe from a wild re with the Firewise Simulator at kidsgetaplan. com. To learn more about severe weather in Florida, and to Get A Plan!, visit www.FloridaDisaster. org, and follow FDEM on Twitter at @FLSERT, on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/FloridaSERT and www.Facebook. com/KidsGetAPlan. Special to the News GAINESVILLE Although April 22 is designated generally as Earth Day, it is observed by farm families every day. Floridas farmers and ranchers take care of our bountiful natural resources. Their livelihoods depend upon the good health of the land and water around them. Across the state farmers, ranchers and nursery plant growers have implemented state-of-the art irrigation systems. These systems have dramatically reduced water use on farm properties. According to eld evaluations by Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services personnel, conservation measures employed by farm families save almost 11 billion gallons of freshwater each year. The savings occur in all regions. For example, of cials at north Floridas Suwannee River Water Management District report that, in this substantially rural area, farmers and ranchers are saving more than one billion gallons annually. Innovation by farm owners has also improved water quality. This improvement is a longterm commitment, despite the nancial challenges agricultural operations face. Intensive testing of nutrient use by soils and plants has allowed farmers to apply only the minimum amount of fertilizer plants need to grow. Dairy producers have adopted containment structures that recycle water and animal waste for corn and other forage crops on the farm, preventing releases of nutrients into surrounding environments. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection has determined that citrus growers in south-central Florida reduced nitrogen levels in groundwater by nearly 33 percent in three years with their advanced management efforts. The South Florida Water Management District has reported that farmers in the Everglades Agricultural Area slashed phosphorous levels by 71 percent in water owing from their properties during the 2012 reporting year. Farm operators support Floridas natural resources in other ways. They maintain greenspace and wildlife habitat. And they control invasive, nonnative species introduced through our seaports and air terminals. Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick praised farm families for their excellent management of natural resources. Our farmers and ranchers make our quality of life possible, Hoblick said. They do this every day while they grow the food, ber and renewable fuels we all need. I am proud of them and their many successes. Earth Day is every day on the farm Wild re Awareness

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section The Alabama state record for striped bass has been broken by 15 pounds. James R. Bramlett of Dora, Ala., fishing near a warmwater outlet of the Gorgas Steam Plant near Parish, northwest of Birmingham, caught a 70-pound striped bass Feb. 28 eclipsing the record of 55 pounds that has stood for 54 years. The fish already has been approved as the new Alabama state record and if approved by the International Game Fish Association it will become the new world record for land-locked striped bass. The old IGFA record for land-locked stripers is a 67-pound, 8-ounce fish caught in 1992 in Los Banos, Calif. The FWC is holding meetings concerning tarpon and bonefish. At present it is illegal to take bonefish except during tournaments and then they can be kept alive in livewells only until they can be weighed. A new ruling would put a stop to this practice and the fish must not be possessed for any reason. Concerning tarpon, the current rule states you can kill one if you possess a $50 kill tag. If new rules are put in place, the only way you could possess and kill a tarpon is with a kill tag, and the fisherman must be trying to break an existing world record. Neither tarpon nor bonefish are edible. Bonefish are bony and almost impossible to eat. Four Florida counties opened April 1 to gag grouper recreational harvest: Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor. They are open to recreational harvest. This regional season will remain open until June 30 with the first day of closure being July 1. If you plan to fish this special season remember you must leave from one of those counties and return to one of them. You cannot leave say, from Bay County and fish the waters off these counties and return to Bay County. Do not leave from one of these four counties and return to some other county other than one of the four mentioned. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net Special to The News Herald Anglers and divers have 19 new reefs to visit thanks to the efforts of the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association (MBARA), Mexico Beach, and support from numerous organizations and members. On Saturday, 62 reef modules worth more than $91,000, found new resting places off the shores of Mexico Beach. Mexico Beach received a $60,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Fund and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The rest came from donations, membership, fund raising and three shing tournaments the annual MBARA King sh Tournament, the Mexico Beach Marina Offshore Classic and the 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding. Reef modules of varying design, each weighing more than 5,000 pounds, were placed in 19 locations, with one to eight structures submerged at each site. The reef modules, all made with steel reinforced concrete and limestone rock, include pyramids, rectangular grouper modules, layer-cake shaped ecosystems and a new hybrid reef that consists of a grouper module topped by a small ecosystem. This is the rst time the hybrid reefs have been deployed in Florida, and MBARA research divers are anxious to nd out what type of marine life will be attracted to them. According to MBARA research diver Carol Cox, Different structures attract different sh. Amberjack and red snappers are attracted to taller structures such as the pyramids, the grouper units act as low limestone ledges that are preferred by groupers, and ecosystems are a magnet for black sea bass. We nd that placing different types of structures together has a dynamic effect, greatly increasing diversity on the reef. We hope the hybrid reef with its height, ledge and crevices will attract the greatest diversity we have seen on any single arti cial reef. During this deployment, MBARA added reefs to six existing sites that have become dif cult to nd over the years. MBARA president, Bob Cox, said, It is important to maintain these reefs in honor of the people they were named after. Older reefs often were made with lighter or smaller materials that could be moved by powerful storms or covered by sand. The deployment was overseen by Bill Horn of the FWC along with MBARA volunteers Bob and Carol Cox, Ron Childs, Jimmy Nicholson, and Captain Charlene Burke. MBARA volunteers were involved in every step of the arti cial reef deployment--applying for permits, writing grants, and raising matching funds to earn points when competing for grants. According to Horn, Excellent planning by MBARA and excellent execution by Walter Marine made the project a great success. To get coordinates for the new reefs, visit MBARAs website at www.mbara. org. MBARA deploys new reefs P hotos by CAROL AND BOB COX | Special to The News Herald A pyramid-shaped Florida Limestone Artificial Reef is deployed. Bob Cox, left, MBARA president, and Bill Horn, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission marine biologist are seen at the reef site. FWC to meet this week near Tallahassee Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will meet Wednesday and Thursday to discuss an array of issues, ranging from marine sheries and upland wildlife management and harvest issues to boating safety, staff reports and enhancing the publics ability to help control the invasive lion sh. Sessions start both days at 8:30 a.m. at the Florida Public Safety Institute, 85 Academy Drive, Havana, FL 32333 ( www. oridapsi.com ). The Institute is west of Midway on U.S. 90. The meeting is open to the public, and all interested individuals may speak within guidelines established by the Commission. Marine issues dominate the rst day, after a representative of the Wildlife Foundation of Florida presents the annual Louise Ireland Humphrey Employee of the Year Award to FWC Assistant Executive Director Greg Holder. When the Commission takes up marine sheries issues Wednesday, it will start with a nal public hearing on the Gulf of Mexico recreational red snapper season. The proposed season would be open June 1 through July 14. The commissioners will discuss a draft rule that proposes format standardization and reorganization for several marine sheries rules in Florida Administrative Code 68B, as well as the creation of a new General chapter that will include a series of de nitions and general regulations that would be applied to all saltwater shing. In a draft rule hearing, the commissioners will discuss a proposal to eliminate the requirement for a recreational shing license when targeting lion sh with certain gear and to have no recreational or commercial harvest limit. Additionally, the Commission will consider a proposal to make tarpon and bone sh catch-andrelease-only species, and review and discuss gear use for tarpon in Boca Grande Pass. At the request of the Collier County Board of Commissioners, the commission also will discuss in a draft rule hearing the repeal of two Special Acts of Local Application that prohibit spearing or gigging with arti cial light and spearing in state waters off the county shoreline. The commission will end the marine sheries section with a staff update on South Atlantic Fishery Management Council actions and discussions. On Thursday, Commissioners will welcome a representative of the Shikar-Safari Club International to present the Of cer of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Surrounded by friends, family, teachers and teammates Holmes County High School senior Mikayla Moore signed a two-year basketball scholarship with the Northwest Florida State Raiders on April 3 in the Holmes County High Schools library. What makes this team so special was some of the qualities that Im looking for in all my student athletes, said Head Coach of the NWFS Raiders Patrick Harrington. We went out on a bus trip and it was a lot of time spent together, 10 days in fact before we came back. We didnt have one sulky attitude, not one sourpuss, no problems and no bad times and they conducted themselves in a manner that was so positive that I was more proud of what they did off the court then they did on the court and they did pretty darn good on the court. Harrington said a lot of them have moved on to higher ranked schools. These are kids who quali ed academically and just generally overlooked and then when they came and played in our program and they got the attention they deserved and I really feel that Northwest Florida State is a stepping stone for you to go and follow your dreams as a student athlete, said Harrington. Last summer Mikayla came to my camp, my little league camp, and I was thinking that I would like to see someone come through our program on full scholarship and I know shes a very good student, shes very passionate about the game and shes had tremendous success here. What I would like to see her do is have a great experience with us at Northwest Florida State and be able to transition to where she wants to go, if its after one year or if its after two years. Holmes County High School Head Coach Devon Miles said that he was very proud of the progress shes made, having coached her since the seventh grade. Ive seen a trend of players coming back in town after six months of college and I dont want to see you back in town after only six months, said Miles. You better work hard and you better make every single one here proud. I appreciate everything you did in middle school and in high school. Everyone heres going to miss you. Mikayla said she is going to major in Elementary Education. HCHS student signs on with NWFS Raiders SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, April 17, 2013 A Page 7 Section PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS Sitting with her mother and father, Sherry and Mike Moore, and Head Coach of the NWFS Raiders Patrick Harrington, Holmes County High School senior Mikayla Moore signed a two-year basketball scholarship with the Northwest Florida State Raiders. From Staff Reports CHIPLEY Chipley High School and Tiger 100 sponsored a scholarship ceremony Monday, April 8, for the Lady Tigers pitcher and third baseman Mallory Dean. The signing was held at Chipley High School in the cafeteria. Dean is a Senior at CHS and is signing a softball scholarship with the Pensacola State College Pirates. On hand for the signing were, from left, her father Jerry Dean, PSC assistant coach Becky Horn, Mallory, and her mother, Kala Dean. I think Mallory is going to t right in, said coach Horn. She said the PSC softball team would begin practicing after Labor Day. PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER Mallory Dean is anked by her parents, Jerry and Kala Dean, and Pensacola State College assistant coach Becky Horn as she signs a letter of intent. Dean signs with Pirates SIGN UP CEREMONY The News Herald BONIFAY Chris Walker looked like he was right at home in a recent pair of national all-star basketball games. Competing against the nations top recruits in the McDonalds All-American Game on April 3 and the Jordan Brand Classic this past Saturday, Walker validated his status as one of the countrys premier prospects. Walker, a high school senior who led Holmes County to a Class 1A state championship this year, is headed to the University of Florida on a basketball scholarship next season. Walker is a 6-foot10 forward whose explosiveness was on display in the Powerade JamFest two days prior to the McDonalds game at the Ratner Center in Chicago. On his rst attempt, Walker lobbed the ball toward the basket from beyond the 3-point line, caught the ball off a bounce with both hands and threw down a lefthanded windmill jam. He hammered down a tomahawk dunk on his second effort following another lob from the three-point line, garnering a perfect score of 60 from the judges. He added another windmill jam off a 360-degree midair rotation on his third attempt before capping his night with a dunk in which he threw the ball between his legs off the backboard before throwing down the dunk with both hands. Walker was crowned champion over a whoswho of prospects, including Jabari Parker (Duke), Andrew Wiggins (undecided) and Aaron Gordon (Arizona). ESPN currently ranks those three players Nos. 1, 2 and 4 in the country, respectively, and Walker is 14th. Walker played 12 minutes in the McDonalds All-American Game, which was held at the United Center in Chicago and televised nationally on ESPN. He compiled six points on 2 of 6 shooting for the East in a 110-99 defeat, and his six rebounds was one shy of the team high. Walker was one of the most ef cient players on the oor in the Jordan Brand Classic, which was contested at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., and aired on ESPN2. He scored 14 points on 7 of 13 shooting from the oor, and he also shared the team lead in rebounds with seven in 15 minutes. He also added a blocked shot. Walker headlined the Class 1A All-State Basketball Team released Monday. Somewhat startling, however, was that of 15 players named to the rst three teams, more than half represented area schools. Region nalists Malone and Cottondale each had two players selected by the Florida Association of Basketball Coaches (FABC) & SourceHoops.com. Walker was joined by junior Chai Baker of Malone. Bakers brother, Ty, was chosen to the second team along with senior Marquis White of Graceville and senior Jerodd Blount of Cottondale. The third team included senior D.J. Roulhac of Cottondale, senior Raheem Wright of Wewahitchka and freshman Trent Forrest of Chipley. No honorable mention list was included. First team Chris Walker, 6-10 sr., Holmes County Brandon Shingles, 6-1 sr., West Gadsden Ed Porter, 6-6 so., Hawthorne Chai Baker, 6-2 jr., Malone Shaimea Maeweather, 5-10 sr., Lake Butler Union County Second team Leamon Wilson, 6-0 sr., Hawthorne Neino Robinson, 6-0 sr, Bratt Northview Ty Baker, 6-6 sr,, Malone Marquis White, 6-0 sr., Graceville Jerodd Blount, 6-2 sr., Cottondale Third team D.J. Roulhac, 6-0 sr., Cottondale Raheem Wright, 6-3 sr., Wewahitchka Trent Forrest, 6-3 fr., Chipley Zack Wright, 6-6 so., Milton Central Lane Munz, 6-3 jr., Villages Walker considered one of countrys top prospects From Staff Reports CHIPLEY The Chipley Tigers faced off against the Holmes County Blue Devils in a the Class 1A Rural District 2 Softball District Tournament Monday night in Chipley, clinching a win with a score of 5-1. The teams faced off with a stalemate that lasted on into the 4th inning and thats when things really started heating up. Chipley Tigers Braylee Pooser, and Kacie Crews had consecutive runs to home base with Sarah Gilbert quickly following suite. Holmes County Blue Devil Shelby Clark, retaliated with a run to home plate, however this would be the Blue Devils rst and only score as the Chipley Tigers wrapped up the 7th inning with a run to home plate from Gilbert, and Sara Kay Compton, to wrap up the game with a score of 5-1. Our seniors really stepped up and played like they meant it, said Chipley Tigers Head Coach Kami Fannin. Im really excited and hope we can hit and we can play like we did last night. Weve just got to take it one game at a time. The Tigers were to face Northview Tuesday night in second round action. The district championship game will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday at Chipley High School. Tigers beat Blue Devils 5-1 in district tournament Above: An unidenti ed Lady Blue Devil at bat against the Lady Tigers during Mondays Class 1A Rural District 2 Softball District Tournament in Chipley. The Holmes County girls fell 5-1 to the Chipley squad. Right: Chipley Lady Tiger Sarah Gilbert pitches during their district tournament opener against Holmes County High on Monday in Chipley.

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Local A8 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 17, 2013 F R I D A Y A P R I L 1 9 12 noon until 10 p.m. S A T U R D A Y A P R I L 2 0 9 a.m. until Face Painting, Balloon Animals, Magic Show, Trent The Train Man, Bounce House, Slide, Wrecking Ball, Zip Line, Mechanical Bull, Rock Wall and Much More! Kids Activities Sponsored by For more information visit A contemporary a cappella group Saturday, 6:00 p.m. Sponsored by Marianna Toyota Saturday 8 pm Fine Arts Contest, Arts and Crafts, Entertainment, Food And Activities For The Young and Young At Heart! Join us for the 5K/10K Walk/Run Saturday, 8 am Registration 6:40 to 7:40 am Sign Up For The D ON T MISS T HE 3 RD A NNUAL J ACKSON C OUNTY S HERIFF S O FFICE A NTIQUE & C LASSIC C AR S HOW AND A NTIQUE T RACTOR S ECTION ON S ATURDAY The fresh catch of the day is waiting for you best seafood market! F ISH CALLOPS HRIMP B AGGED YSTERS NOW RAB EGS 2093024 By S. BRADY CALHOUN 747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Katie Wright was always going to be a missionary, her mother and father, Teresa and Jimmy Wright said Thursday. When asked how they knew, Teresa gave Jimmy a knowing look and laughed. Instinct, she said. She was always caring about others. She was always helping others. On Thursday, Katie Wright, 25, a local nurse who graduated from FSU and Haney, was in DraganestiOlt, Romania, working with a local church and teaching English to a woman and her 4-year-old daughter. She has been working with churches to help orphans, to start other churches, to minister to women and children trapped in human traf cking and to preach the Gospel of Jesus. She said she has done everything from medicine to construction so far during the trip. Her journey is sponsored by The World Race, an organization that sends out groups to 11 countries in 11 months to serve the least of these while amongst real and raw community. Her adventure began in January and will end in November. I wanted to see what God is up to around the world and how I could be a part of it, she wrote in a text message. I want to hold the orphan and the poor and the unloved of society and tell them about Jesus and that someone does love them. She has already worked in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Her group will be in South Africa, Thailand and Malaysia later this year. These arent sightseeing tours. Wrights group works in villages away from where tourists ever venture and in some places with the highest crime rates in the world. Teresa Wright said a part of her wished Katie could help people by being a nurse at a local hospital instead of in a dangerous situation far from home. It is exciting, but it is scary. I have to rely on God protecting her, Teresa Wright said. She added that her daughter has been part of several miracles, including healing for a burned child and help for a child having breathing dif culties. However, even while she is working away from home, Katie Wright and her family are raising money to fund the second half of the trip. She needs to raise $4,000 by July 1. Those interested in nding out more about her experiences can follow her blog at katiewright.theworldrace.org. Donations can be made at the website. Nurse helps orphans around the world Of all the joys spring offers us, one of the most troublesome things about this time of year is the increase of insects on our furry friends. Of all these creepy pests, adult eas cause the most problems for our pets. In order to become adults, eas need warm weather, between 70 and 80 degrees, and around 70 to 80 percent relative humidity. Those ideal conditions are usually what we are experience during this time of the year, which is why we generally see more eas coming out in the spring, said Dr. Alison Diesel, lecturer in dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). While many people think eas are relatively harmless, except for making our pets itch, eas can cause numerous other health problems in our pets. For example, some animals may react to an allergen found in eas saliva, causing the animal to have an allergic reaction. This causes the animal to itch and ultimately scratch, which can lead to a secondary skin infection. If there is a massive amount of eas, anemia could even become a potential problem, especially with small animals that do not have large amounts of blood. Fleas also carry diseases like tapeworms and Bartonella (which causes cat scratch disease) that can infect both pets and humans. While there is no way to completely prevent eas from reaching our pets, a key factor to controlling eas is breaking their life cycle either by killing the adults and/or at least one of the juvenile stages. The ea life cycle has four phases: The adult eas lay eggs; the eggs hatch into larvae; the larvae turns into pupae, which, eventually, turn into adults, Diesel said. Targeting several phases of the ea lifecycle is best, particularly when dealing with an infestation. The easiest stage to target is the adult ea since they live on the pet. The other stages, such as eggs, larvae and pupae, are present in the environment. With regards to speci c therapy for eas and secondary problems, your pets veterinarian is a valuable resource for the best options and possible medications. Your pets veterinarian can help recommend the most appropriate product to help prevent eas based on other factors (other skin conditions, food allergies, etc.) as well as discuss the appropriate way to administer the product, Diesel said. I suggest using a ea prevention that lasts the entire month and is still effective if the pet gets wet. Using ea prevention products once every 30 days provides the best protection for your pet from ea bites and can even prevent a ea infestation from being established in your pets environment. It is important to minimize an animals exposure to eas by avoiding infested areas and pets. There are some things which can be done to minimize exposure to eas: avoid known infested areas, do not allow your pet to come into contact with wild animals or burrows, and protect areas of the house where wild animals may enter to minimize wild animals from establishing residency in the rst place, Diesel said. If eas become a problem inside the house, try vacuuming once a week. If the ea presence grows larger, there are various in-house treatments and exterminators to aid in ea removal. Focus on places where the pets spends most of their time inside the house because that will contain the most concentrated area of eas, Diesel said. Also, dont forget under beds and furniture, behind curtains, and along hallways connecting rooms when treating the house for eas. It may be best to contact a professional exterminator when there is a large ea burden present. In addition to treating animals and the inside of the home, it may also be essential to treat the outside environment around your home. This can be done by treating areas of the surrounding property that have an unusually high populace of eas. This includes shaded areas, under trees and bushes, in dog houses, under porches and decks. As with indoor control, when the burden is high, a professional exterminator may be the most help, Diesel said. The best approach to managing eas is to practice prevention continuously throughout the year by treating all pets with proper medication as well as treating the inside and outside of the home if there is a suspected infestation. It is much easier to prevent eas than to treat eas, Diesel said. About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. PET TALK Dealing with eas and our pets PET TALK PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WRIGHT FAMILY Katie Wright during her mission trip.

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CHIPLEY Despite deep chills that lasted throughout the evening hours, the Relay For Life of Washington County drew in crowds by the hundreds to this years main event, which was held from 6 p.m. Friday until noon on Saturday. A variety of entertainment and events kept the festivities rolling. This year added some new events, such as Miss Relay Pageant and a car show along with the classics such as the Survivors Banquet, Survivor Lap and vendors of all shapes, sizes and varieties raising funds for this years Relay For Life of Washington County. All evening and into the wee hours of the morning, relay teams competed for spirit points with various games and activities, such as the classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests as well as a variety of funlled laps such as the pajama lap, super hero lap, zany hat lap and much more that stretched from the setting of the sun on past sunrise. I want to thank all those who have shown us so much tremendous support, said Event Chairperson Jimmy Schweinsburg. We didnt quite make our goal of $60,000, but were close and were not done yet. We still have until August to meet our goal so were going to continue with our fundraising efforts. Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, April 17, 2013 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who often uttered, Well, heres another nice mess youve gotten us into? Oliver Hardy, Barney Rubble, Jackie Gleason, Moe Howard 2) What brand of parking meters is found in over 50 countries on 6 continents? Edison, Franklin, Duncan, Williams 3) In 2001 what was named the of cial state toy of Pennsylvania? Silly Putty, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys, Slinky 4) Of these which did not reach the 100th episode milestone? Gilligans Island, West Wing, Dawsons Creek, Seinfeld 5) Which U.S. state produces the most wool? Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Texas 6) Worldwide about how many people are killed by tigers each year? 5, 50, 500, 5000 7) What Coronation Ball is generally accepted as the rst major rock and roll concert? Jumper, Elroy, Moondog, Space 8) Todays day is about how much longer than one during the time of dinosaurs? 15 minutes, 1 hour, 90 minutes, 2 hours 9) How is carmaker Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino better known? Lamborghini, Peugeot, Renault, Fiat 10) Though they had a short run, where were DeLorean cars manufactured? Detroit, Italy, Ireland, France 11) What is the most populated city on the continent of Africa? Tripoli, Casablanca, Johannesburg, Cairo 12) How was famed Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne killed? Plane crash, Lightning, Shot, Poisoned 13) Where in Missouri do both Ford and Harley-Davidson have assembly plants? Kansas City, Fulton, St. Louis, Lamar 14) During WWII what Japanese project used balloon bombs to hit the U.S. mainland? Hati, Keze, Totu, Fugo ANSWERS: 1) Oliver Hardy. 2) Duncan. 3) Slinky. 4) Gilligans Island. 5) Texas. 6) 50. 7) Moondog. 8) 1 hour. 9) Fiat. 10) Ireland. 11) Cairo. 12) Plane crash. 13) Kansas City. 14) Fugo. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests as well as a variety of classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests Relay For Life of Washington County draws in crowds Photos by CATHRINE LAMB and CECILIA SPEARS

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Special to Extra Mr. and Mrs. Scott Hildon Barton of Perry announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Hayden Carole, to Ryan Langdon Hagberg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ron Hagberg of Perry. Maternal grandparents of the brideelect are Mr. and Mrs. Bill Smith of Thomasville, Ga., and the paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Hildon Barton of Bonifay. The prospective grooms maternal grandparents are Mrs. Barbara Sue Butts of St. Petersburg and the late Faison Butts. His paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Hagberg also of St. Petersburg. The wedding and event will be at 5 p.m. May 18 at the First Baptist Church of Perry.SPECIAL TO E XTRA Bonifay Elementary Schools Relay For Life team raised $300 on Saturday, April 6 for Relay For Life of Bonifay. Special to ExtraC H IPLE Y The Chipley Kiwanis Club heard a presentation by Chipola College students during its weekly meeting on April 9. Member Joe Johnson introduced Carol Saunders of Chipola College. Saunders explained the program was about oral interpretation as presented by a group of her students. Oral interpretation combines speech, drama and literature. The students try to orally convey the meaning and emotions of the material presented. The source materials included poetry, non-ction, humor, impersonations and inspirational writings. Source authors included Fanny Flag, Presidents Reagan, Clinton and Obama, Louis Grizzard and Mother Teresa. The students presented an interesting crosssection of Chipola College. Macy Miles is majoring in political science and is a member of the Chipola Womens Basketball Team. Karissa Chiles is on the Chipola Womens softball team. Anna Bailey is majoring in early education, while Julie Wells is a theater major. The students drew numerous laughs from the Kiwanians, who stayed past the normal adjournment time because the students were so entertaining. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chairperson at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to Extra Oneal and Trudell Miller are pleased to announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Lori Lynn Miller, to Carl Gillman. Carl is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gillman and the late Mrs. Julie Russ Dogget. The wedding will be at 4 p.m. on May 11 at the Chautauqua Building, 96 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Reception will immediately follow. Special to Extra Air Force Airman Andrew J. Rainey graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Rainey is the son of Teresa and John Rainey of Bonifay and is a 2012 graduate of Bethlehem High School in Bonifay. Special to ExtraB O N I F A Y West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC) is accepting nominations for new community recognition program called The Power of One. Nominees will be accepted from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties during each quarter of the year. One winner will be selected from each county and receive recognition for their volunteer services as well as a $250 donation, which will be made in their honor to a charitable organization of their choice. A nomination form is available online at www.westorida.coop. Nominations will also be accepted in each of the cooperatives ofces. Nominees cannot be WFEC employees, family members or serve on the board of trustees at the cooperative. A complete list of requirements is available online or in each of the cooperatives district ofces. For more information about the Power of One contact Terry Mullen or Candace Croft at 263-3231. Engagements Rainey graduates basic training Chipola College students entertain Kiwanis Club West Florida Electric accepting nominationsSPECIAL TO E XTRA Chipola College students performed for the Bonifay Kiwanis Club on April 9. BONIF A Y ELEMENTAR Y RELA Y FOR LIFE Barton and Hagberg to wed Miller and Gillman to wed

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Colon cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10 cancer deaths can be pre v ented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose pre v ention and get screened. If y ou re 50 or older ask y our d octor which colon cancer screening test is right f or y ou. Colon Cancer Screening Sa v es Liv es coloncancerFL.org FOR 12 MOS A F TER INST ANT SA VINGS E NTER T AIN M ENT P A CKA GE N ew A ppr ov ed C ustomer s O nly 24-Mo A gr eement R equir ed DIRECT ST AR TV 866-314-3769 and sor enes s aches Special to Extra CHIPLEY On April 6, Chipley High School JROTC competed in the State Drill Competition at George Jenkins High School in Lakeland. The competing teams included Female Color Guard, Male Color Guard, Female Unarmed Squad, Male Unarmed Squad, Male-Mix Unarmed Platoon, Male Dual Exhibition, Female Dual Exhibition and Female Individual Exhibition. Although it was tough competing against many other schools that were much larger than Chipley the cadets refused to give up. The experience was very exciting and showed that their hard work, practice, and dedication paid off. The Chipley JROTC program was proud to compete in such a challenging event and add it to their list of successes. The cadets who were not competing were observing each of the teams and cheered them on while taking pictures. It was inspirational and exciting to watch other cadets do what they do best. The Chipley JROTC program continues to put their time, dedication and hard work into everything they do. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY While visiting the Bonifay Kiwanis Club during their April 10 meet ing, Madison Simmons, representing the Holmes County High School Key Club, invited everyone to join them for A Satur day Afternoon Movie to help raise food for the local food pantry. They will be showing Disneys Wreck It Ralph at 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 27 at the Holmes County High School Auditori um and admission is 1 to 2 cans of food per person and concession will be available with $1 soda, $1 assorted candy, $1 small popcorn and $2 large popcorn. This is open to everyone in the com munity in efforts to increase the food sup ply at our local pantry, said Simmons. Plus its good, clean entertainment for families to enjoy together. Kiwanis continued with a business meeting discussing why they raised their dues to $125 a quarter and preparations for Octobers rodeo. Special to Extra The Chipley JROTC program has just received the results from the State Drill Meet on April 6. The Female Color Guard placed in the Final Four at fourth place. The cadets that participated in this event were C/MAJ Sabrina Goodman, C/ LTC Myiesha Boston, C/MAJ Regan Walls, C/2LT Justice Watford, and alternate C/ SSG Kristyn Gutierrez. The Female Color Guard did a fantastic job, and we are very proud of their accomplishment. Congratulations for being one of the only two teams in North Florida to bring home a trophy. W.I.N.G.S program registration begins Special to Extra BONIFAY Registra tion has begun for the W.I.N.G.S. Summer Program. Registration will be from 3 to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 18, at Bethlehem High School, Bonifay Elementary School, Bonifay Middle School, Ponce de Leon Elementary School and Poplar Spring School. The summer program will begin June 12 and end on July 3. The pro gram will operate every weekday from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Each program site will offer a daily nu tritious breakfast and lunch in the school caf eteria. Limited bus trans portation will be provided daily to and from school. Please contact the site coordinator for bus route information. The theme for sum mer is Making Sense of Bugs and Slugs. STEM educational activities through project based learning will relate to us ing our ve senses to un derstand bugs and slugs. The curriculum in cludes science, math, reading, physical and health education, and ex citing enrichment activi ties. Remedial education programs and activities are also available. Re turning this year is Camp of Champs, which will provide character educa tion combined with bas ketball and life skills. Registration packets will be available at each school on April 18. W.I.N.G.S. is a Florida Department of Education 21st Century Community Learning Center afterschool grant adminis tered through the Holmes County School Board. For more information contact at Bethlehem High School Leesa Lee at 547-3621, at Bonifay El ementary School Phillip Byrd at 547-3631, at Boni fay Middle School Kyle Newsom at 547-26-78, at Ponce de Leon Elemen tary School Pam Price at 836-4296 and at Poplar Springs School Faye Cor bitt at 263-6260. P HO T O BY C ECILIA S PEA R S Holmes County High School Key Club member Madison Simmons came before the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to inform them of their latest efforts to increase food at the local pantry with A Saturday Afternoon Movie of Wreck It Ralph. Ponce de Leon archery team in state tourney Special to Extra PONCE DE LEON Ponce de Leon High School is involved in the National Archery in the Schools project and competes each year in the Florida Archery in the School statewide tournament. This is a tournament where students at partici pating schools compete at their local school through the supervision of a cer tied archery instructor and submit their scored to the state headquarters for verication. This year, Jesse Arm strong, a freshman at Ponce de Leon High School is the statewide high scorer in the high school division. Jesse had a score of 295 which eclipsed the previ ous state record score of 282 in this tournament. A perfect score is 300. Only last year did a com petitor at the national level for this program score 300. Jesse along with Cody Al len, a senior at Ponce de Leon High School, now qualies for the National Tournament which will be held on location in Louis ville, Ky., on May 10 and 11 of this year. For his ef forts Jesse received a new bow from Matthews Ar chery and a trophy as the state winner. Jesse is the son of Charles and Pam Armstrong. In addition to Jesse win ning his age division Ponce de Leon High School had 20 plus students that compet ed with eight placing in the top 30 in the boys and girls divisions respectively. Cody Allen took fourth (Quali es for Nationals), Trace Brannon placed 12th, Crete Zorn placed 23rd and Bra son English was 30th in the boys division. The girls were Dakota Pryor placed 24th, Ashley Harper placed 25th and Delilah Bass placed 28 in the girls division. Overall in the high school division Ponce de Leon placed sixth as a team. All of this was made pos sible by the hard work and dedication of their teacher Mr. Janice Andrews. Ms. Andrews had the opportu nity to become a certied archery instructor through the National Archery in the Schools project where, through the sponsorship of Matthews Archery, Inc., training and equipment was provided for start up programs at schools will ing to invest in the time and people to make this program happen. Chipley Tigers go to State Chipley color guard makes Final Four HCHS Key Club to host A Saturday Afternoon Movie

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Chipley (850) 6381815 1 1 03446 Home F olks serving Home F olks W e gi v e commercial rates to area churches Gas 1055 F o wler A v e ., C hiple y B ehind our Chipley f ac t or y H ours: T hur and F ri. 9 A M 5 PM S a t 9 A M 3 PM 638-9421 WE S T P OIN T HOME F ACTOR Y OUTLET 1111 6 1 9 F l or i d a M i cr o l m & Of ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 1111 6 2 5 879 U se r y R o ad C h i p le y F lo r id a 32428 850-638-4654 Washington County Re habilit at ion & Nursing Cente r 1111 6 2 0 Page 4 Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Calvary Hill Revival VERNON Pastor Tim Bush and the congregation of Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church invite everyone to attend revival services at 7 p.m. today. The guest speaker will be Brother Dewain Phillips. The church is across from Vernon Elementary School on County Road 277. Oakie Ridge youth revival CHIPLEY Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be holding a youth revival at 6 p.m. on April 18 20. The message will be brought by Brother Tim Brigham. Music will be by the First Baptist Church Praise Team. The church is at 2971 Gilberts Mill Road in Chipley. For more information or directions call 535-2007. Otter Creek to present The Conrads PONCE DE LEON The Conrads, from Cowarts, Ala., will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church at 7 p.m. on April 20. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. FPU provides hope to families in Chipley CHIPLEY Financial Peace University will be at Grace Assembly at Chipley at 4:30 p.m. on April 21. More than 1.5 million families have changed their nancial future through Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University (FPU). Updated in summer 2012, the nine-week course provides families and individuals with practical tools to gain control of their nances and set themselves up for long-term nancial success. The course meets once a week where a different lesson is taught by Dave on DVD followed by a small-group discussion. Lessons include budgeting, relationships and money, getting out of debt, saving for emergencies and investing. Call Robbie Collins at 638-1791 for information or to register. Poplar Head homecoming services Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church will have homecoming services at 10:30 a.m. on April 28. The Rev. Troy Lee Walsingham will be the guest speaker for the service. Special music will be presented by One Heart of Bonifay. The group is comprised of Kim Drummond, lead vocalist, Anita Hathaway, alto, Dan Drummond Tenor and Justin Woods, instrumentalist. Lunch will be served in the church fellowship hall following the morning worship service. After lunch, special music will be presented by One Heart. The church is on Poplar Head Road in Washington County. New Bethany homecoming VERNON New Bethany Assembly of God Church will be holding homecoming services on May 5. Brother Donald Morris will be bringing the message. Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall. For more information call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Did you ever have a day when everything went so well that you could not believe you were awake? I have dreams of times when everything goes perfect. Then, I awake to the reality of the world around me. I guess everybody dreams of at least one perfect day. Last week my dream came true... or almost. For no apparent reason I awoke from sleep feeling quite happy. I had no explanation for this giggly feeling of mine. I do not normally rouse myself from sleep with a chipper attitude. Just ask my wife. On second thought, dont. I just was in such a good mood that I broke out into song, which my wife threatened to end my life if I did not stop it immediately. I did not try to psychoanalyze myself and think that perhaps this was the beginning of senility or something. I just accepted it as a great day to be alive. One of my basic philosophies of life is, dont look a gift horse in the mouth; after all, he might have bad breath. This particular day nothing could bring me back to earth. I was all but literally dancing on the clouds and I cannot dance. But it was a good day to be alive and know it. Very nonchalantly, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage addressed me in a rather semi-informal manner. Would you run to the store and get me something? Being in such a high spirit, I sang my af rmative answer to her in spite of her glaring in my direction. I did not care. I would have jumped over the moon if she had asked at the time. Lucky for me, she did not ask. I was in such a good mood that I thought a shopping trip would be okay. Let it be known that when it comes to shopping, shopping and me go together like peanut butter and lobster tail. It was such a wonderful day and I felt so terri c I agreed to go shopping for my wife. Not that I needed a new wife, the one I have is ne, thank you. When I entered the store, I had a nagging feeling that something was wrong. Being in such a great mood that I was in, I shook it off and rebuked it rmly. In record time, I found the item my wife needed. Dancing and singing up the aisle, I went immediately to the checkout counter. When I got there, I found nobody there. On the counter was a bell and next to the bell, a sign that read, Ring bell for cashier. Being in such a great mood, I rang the bell to the tune of the song I was singing at the time. After all, happy is as happy shares, and I had my share of happiness at the time. Then I heard it. All right, growling from the back of the store, I heard ya. Ill be there when I get there. If I would have stopped there, it might not have gotten out of hand. Being in the goosy-kind of mood I was in, I had to take it one step further. I stared at the bell until I could stare no more and then I broke out into song accompanied by the cashiers bell. I wish you could have been there, it was spectacular. I heard you the rst time, the voice exploded from the back of the store. Ill get there when I get there and not a second sooner. I smiled to myself and reminded myself that nobody was going to spoil my mood of happiness today. Then I saw her stomping up the aisle towards the cashier counter where I was waiting. If looks could kill, and I am not so sure they cant, I would have died on the spot. I do not think steam was coming out her ears, but I am not absolutely sure about that. I know there was re in her eyes, which were focused in my direction like a laser beam. When she got to the counter she growled, Are you the one ringing the bell? With my nger on the bell, and nobody else in the store, it was hard to answer in the negative. In fact, it was hard for me to say anything while she was looking at me the way she was looking at me. She stared for a moment, at least it was something close to a stare that burrowed itself deep into my soul and that goosy-kind of feeling evaporated. Its customers like you, she snarled, that makes my day terrible. She then looked at the one item I had laying on the counter for her to ring up. She looked at it, and then looked up at me and then looked back at the item on the counter. Hissing like I have never heard hissing before, Is this what youre making all that racket about? Did you ever have a day when you felt like crawling into a groundhog hole and hiding until next February? On my way home from the store I thought about what David said in Psalm 23. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me... I can endure anything and anybody as long as God is with me. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com. Grouchy is as grouchy growls DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor Faith EVENTS

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Mrs. Annie Mae Rone, 91, of Bonifay, Fla., passed away April 7, 2013, at her home. She was born Oct. 20, 1921, in Uriah, Ala. to the late Lafayette and Barbara Hollinger Williams. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Rone was preceded in death by her husband, Raymond K. Rone; a son, Robert Rone and daughter, Elizabeth Rone. Mrs. Rone is survived by six sons, John Quinn and Betty of Bonifay, Charles Rone and Erolyn of Tampa, Bill Rone and Rita of Gulf Breeze, Tommy Rone and Janet of Bonifay, David Rone and Cindy of Destin, and Joe Rone and Lee of Bonifay; 13 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall, the Rev. Hamp Christmas and the Rev. Carl Hadley ofciating. Interment Rev. Carl Hadley ofciating. Interment followed in the Gully Springs Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family will received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home. Annie M. RoneOBITU AR IES C O NTINUE O N P A GE B 6 Hulon Paul Mitchell, 80, of Little Rock, Ark., formerly of Panama City, passed away Friday, April 5, 2013. Hulon was a 1951 graduate of Bay High and a US Army veteran of the Korean War. He retired after 36 years service with St. Joe and International Paper Company. Hulon was a 32nd degree Mason, a Shriner, and a member of VFW Post 1936 in Alexandria, La. He was preceded in death by his parents, Harmon C. Mitchell and Vesta Jewell Mitchell (Roach), and sisters, Eula Champagne and Mary Martin. Survivors include his daughters, Michelle Powers (Chuck) and Paula Gean (Kyle), all of Little Rock, Ark.; two granddaughters, Mary Kate Powers and Victoria Gean; his sisters, Bonnie Mitchell, Virginia Abernathy (Larry), Doris Becker (Ralph), Jeanette Riley (Charles), and Janice Stukey (Marvin) and numerous nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life service was held at 3 p.m., Monday, April 8, 2013, at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Mr. Marvin Stukey ofciating. In lieu of owers, contributions in Mr. Mitchells name may be made to either the Arkansas Hospice, 14 Parkstone Circle, North Little Rock, AR 72116, or to the Alzheimers Association, 204 Executive Ct., Little Rock, AR 72116. Kent-Forest Lawn, 2403 Harrison Avenue, 763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com.Hulon P Mitchell Sergeant First Class (Retired U. S. Army) Donald R. McElwain, 80 of Noma, passed away Monday, April 8, 2013 at his residence following a brief illness. Mr. Donald was born in Stockton, Calif., on Dec. 3, 1930, to the late Harold and Ila Tibbett McElwain. During his Military career, he was involved in two major conicts, the Korean and the Vietnam War. Mr. Donald received several Commendations, Citations, Campaign Ribbons, Decorations, Badges and Medals, including two Purple Hearts in Japan and Germany. After retiring, he then worked as a manager with Kmart for a number of years. Mr. Donald was a member of Blessed Trinity Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus and Noma Town Council. Proceeded in death by his beloved wife, Judy Booten McElwain and son Gary McElwain. Survived by one son, Donald Donnie McElwain, Graceville; four daughters, Debi Pendl (Vince), Summereld, N.C., Dawn McElwain Crutcheld, Noma, Kim Miller, Noma, and Jessica Walters (D.J.), Graceville; two brothers, Butch McElwain, and Scotty McElwain, Calif.; seven grandchildren, Zoie, Jolie, Carly, Christopher, Eric, Kathy and David; two great grandsons Liam and Logan and a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral Mass was held at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 13, 2013, at the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church with Father Richard Dawson ofciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with full Military Honors by the U.S. Army, James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Friday, 5-8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford.com.Donald R. McElwain Mrs. Mary Maxine Padgett, 91, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, April 9, 2013. She was born Oct. 14, 1921, in Darlington, to William and Florence Jones Royals. Mrs. Padgett was a life long resident of Holmes and Walton County. She was Baptist by faith and a charter member of Northside Baptist Church. She graduated from Troy State University receiving her Bachelors degree. She worked as an Elementary School Teacher for many years before retiring. Mrs. Padgett is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Edgar Drew Padgett; two brothers, Earl Royals and Byron Royals and one sister, Kate McDonald. Mrs. Padgett is survived by her sister, Willene Crews of Ft. Walton Beach; nephews, Rick Crews and wife Kathy, David Crews, Gary Crews and wife Karen, Bill McDonald, Bob McDonald and Max Padgett and wife Ann; nieces, Debbie Richards and husband Mike and Candace Royals, and by numerous great nieces and nephews. A time of visitation was held from 3 to 4 p.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Northside Baptist Church, 2835 North Highway 81, Ponce De Leon, Florida 32455. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Northside Baptist Church with Reverends Larry Sweat, Sr and Kenneth Harrison ofciating. Those asked to serve as pallbearers were Richard Crews, Gary Crews, Bob McDonald, Bill McDonald, Mike Richards and Max Padgett. Floral arrangements are being accepted or donations may be made to Northside Baptist Church at 2835 North HWY 81, Ponce De Leon, Florida 32455. Burial followed in the New Ponce De Leon Cemetery. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.clary-glenn. com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Mary M. Padgett MAR Y M. PADGETT Mr. Ray Nelson Jackson, 50, of Vernon passed away April 2, 2013, at his residence. He was a native of Vernon, of the Holiness faith, a former employee of the Forestry Service and a Correctional Ofcer. Survivors include a son, PO3C Christopher Rashad Jackson (Alyssa) of Virginia Beach, Va.; parents, Min. John C and Missionary Kathleen Jackson, of Vernon; brother, John C. Jackson Jr., of Vernon; grandmother, Miss. Katherine Bell of Vernon and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m., Sunday, April 6, 2013, at McQueens Temple Holiness Church Vernon, with Bishop John O. Brown Pastor, ofciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Garden Cemetery, in Vernon with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to service the Copper Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Ray N. Jackson Mrs. Dianna Gray Barrett, 57 of Chipley, wife of the late Rev. Walter Barrett, passed away April 4, 2013, in Colquitt, Ga. She was a native of Jackson County, a graduate of Cottondale High School, and was a member of Saint Matthews Baptist Church of Cottondale. She served for 18 years as First Lady at Shiloh Baptist Church of Graceville and 11 years as First Lady at New Galilee Baptist Church in Marianna. Survivors include the children, Teon Knox (Sherrita), the Rev. Walter Barrett III (Alicia, Keonia Barrett, Audrey Grifn (Jerone) and Walter Barrett II; brothers, Sam Gray (Agnes), Audrey Gray Jr., Authur Gray (Millouise) and Larry Gray; sisters, Bernice Gray, Doretha Gray, Lee Gray and Dorthy Gray; 19 grandchildren and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 13 at Jerusalem Baptist Church in Chipley, with the Rev. David Green, the Rev. Walter Barrett III, and the Rev. Price Wilson, pastor Ofciating. Interment will followed in the Northside Cemetery in Chipley with Copper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to services. The family received friends from 5-6 p.m. Friday in the Copper Funeral Home Chapel.Dianna G. Barrett James Brice Jackson, 49, of Chipley, passed away Friday April 5, 2013, in Caryville, the result of a boating accident. Brice was born Jan. 12, 1964, in Chipley to Virgil and Annette (Sasser) Jackson. He had worked many years at Leigh High Furniture as well a surveyor, and with Trawick Construction. Brice is preceded in death by his father, Virgil Jackson; grandparents, Pete Sasser, and Waco and Nellie Jackson. Survivors include his mother, Annette Jackson; one daughter, Jo Anna; his maternal grandmother, Mary Sasser Barber; several aunts and uncles, and his two loving dogs, Rattler and Shortie. Memorialization was by cremation and memorial services were private. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family can sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. James B. Jackson Clinton Adam Lee, 85, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Thursday, April 11, 2013, at his residence. He was born May 11, 1927, in Ponce de Leon. In his spare time he enjoyed shing and spending time with his family. He is preceded in death by his parents, Isaiah and Sislie Lee; one son, Roger Lee; one daughter-inlaw, Kathy Lee and three brothers, Leslie and Miles Lee and Clifford Prescott. Clinton is survived by his loving wife, Mary M. Lee; three children, Jr. and wife Kay Lee of Ponce de Leon, Gwen and husband Hayward Wilson also of Ponce de Leon, and Mary Jane Felch and husband John of Blakely, Ga.; four step-children, Rusty Bourkard and wife Gina of Vernon, Eddie Bourkard of New Hope, Amy Sue Davis of Bonifay, and Sandy Sherman and husband Earl of Mobile, Ala.; 21 grandchildren; 23 greatgrandchildren, and two great greatgrandchildren. A time of visitation was held Sunday, April 14, 2013, at Davis-Watkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, from 6-8 p.m. Funeral services were held Monday, April 15, 2013, at Red Bay Presbyterian Church beginning at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Royce Montgomery ofciating. Committal services followed at Red Bay Cemetery. Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.Clinton A. Lee CLINTON A. LEE Mrs. Dolores Sapp Taylor, 76, of Bonifay, passed away April 13, 2013, at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center. She was born May 20, 1936, in Bonifay. She was preceded in death by her husband, R.C. Taylor; her father, Benjamin Sapp, and a grandson, R.C. Taylor. Mrs. Sapp is survived by her mother, Bessie Miller Sapp of Bonifay; a son, Mike Taylor and wife Sara of Bonifay; two sisters, Pat Alford and husband John of Bonifay, Margaret Medley and husband Ray of Bonifay; three grandchildren, Robert Taylor II and wife Traci, Benjamin Taylor and Aaron Taylor, and one great-grandson, Zachary Taylor. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, April 16, 2013, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Eber Overly ofciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service from 10 to 11 a.m., at Peel Funeral Home.Dolores S. T aylor Michael John Baxley, 59, of Chipley, passed away Thursday, April 11, 2013, at his home surrounded by his loving family. Mike was born April 25, 1953, in Clearwater, to the late James and Margaret (Church) Baxley. Mike was a veteran that served in the Army and Army Reserves as a mechanic for 22 years. His knowledge of vehicles led him to a career as a log and long haul truck driver. His love of vehicles extended into a passion for car racing, both as a driver and a mechanic. Mikes loves also included working in the yard and playing with his dog Hope. Mike was preceded in death by his daughter, Cari Briard, 37, of Akin, S.C. Mike is survived by his wife Linda Baxley of Chipley; daughter Daniellie Browning and her husband Mark of Crestview; two sisters, Vicky Baxley and Cathy Sasser of Chipley; one brother, Clayton and his wife Judy Ann of Chipley, and many beloved grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and extended family. A special thank you to Covenant Hospice and in particular Toby, Angela, and Nicole for their loving care and support. We would also like to thank God for blessing us with Pastor Michael Orr of First Baptist Church and Brother Ronnie Wright. Family received friends for visitation Tuesday, April 16, 2013, from 1-2 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, April 16, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Ronnie Wright and the Rev. Mike Orr ofciating. Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery in Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net Michael J. Baxley WA S H INGT O N C O UNTY NE W S / HOLM ES C O UNTY ADV E R TISE R FIND US ON FACEBOOK Obituaries Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Robert Wayne Roberts, 86, a resident of Ponce de Leon, passed away Friday, April 5, 2013, at the Joyce White Adult Care Home in Bonifay. As a young man, he served his country faithfully in the United States Navy. He and his wife Gertrude had been happily married 57 years when she passed away. Robert was a loved and faithful member of Grace Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon and was fondly known around the community as, California Wayne or Pops. Sitting in the local Subway sipping coffee and talking was a daily occurrence he truly enjoyed. Thank you to Joyce White and her family for the love and care they gave Robert during his last years. Memorial services will be held at a later date at Grace Baptist Church. Arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home and Crematory. Robert W. Roberts ROBER T W. ROBER TS Mary Watford, 83, of Little Rock, passed away Wednesday, March 27, 2013. She was born in Holmes County, to the late William and Lula Mae Tindell. Mary was a great wife, mother, grandmother and friend. She attended St. James United Methodist Church in Little Rock. She is survived by her son, Ed Watford (Patty) of Little Rock; two grandchildren, Eric Watford and Shannon (Noah) Singer of Park City, Utah; two sisters, Essie Morgan and Shirley Hartman of Florida and one brother, Hugh Tindell of Florida. The family would like to thank the great staff at Brookside Health and Rehab for their love and care. There will be a graveside service to be held at Galilee United Methodist Church at a later date. Friends and family may sign the online guest book at www. rollerfuneralhomes. com/chenal. Mary Watford Elsie Cumi Vaughan of Geneva passed away Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at her residence. She was 66 years old. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charlie and Emma Smith Vaughan; two brothers, Johnny Vaughan and James Lee Vaughan and one sister, Charline Haw thorne. She is survived by her son, Matt (Tonya) McCall; one brother, Posie Vaughan; three sisters, Ruth Forsythe, Rachel Heath, and Eudene Hughes and several niec es, nephews and extended family members and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, April 12, 2013, at New Hope Bap tist Church with Bro. Clay Hatcher ofciating. Burial followed in Mt. Ida Congre gational Church Cemetery under the direction of Bot toms Garden Chapel Fu neral Home of Geneva. The family received friends one hour prior to the services at the church.Elsie C. Vaughan Helen Louise Bozarth, 80, of Chipley went to be with the Lord on April 13, 2013, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. She was born on Jan. 29, 1933, in Trenton, Mo., to Jesse and Marguerite Avery Meek. She was a homemaker and lived in Chipley for 10 years since coming from Panama City Beach. She was preceded in death by her parents, Jesse and Marguerite Avery Meek. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Homer D. Bozarth; two sons, Don Bozarth and wife Brenda of Graceville, and Jim Bozarth of Chipley; two brothers, Cecil Meek of Cambrey, Mo., and Marvin Meek of Jacksonville; sister, Ann Losey of Milan, Mo., and two grandchildren, Dylan Bozarth of Troy, Ala., and Jared Bozarth of Myrtle Beach, S.C. Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at Obert Funeral Home in Chipley with the Rev. Ernie Gray ofciating. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements.Helen L. Bozarth Mrs. Brenda Gail Jones, 68, of Westville, died April 13, 2013. A memorial service was held April 16, 2013, at Izagora United Methodist Church. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Brenda G. Jones Obituaries P H OTOS BY RANDA L S EY L E R The Merchants of Historic Downtown Chipley hosted the second annual Flea Market Days on Friday and Saturday in conjunction with the Flea Across Florida event being hosted by communities along a 272-mile-long stretch of I-10 extending from Lake City to Pensacola. Yard sales were set up all along Highway 90 with several being found in Chipley, but no booths were set up this year along Railroad Avenue on Saturday. On Friday, there were only two booths out on Railroad Avenue, one being a vendor and the other belonging to the musical act, Diamonds, which performed both Friday and Saturday and kept downtown shoppers entertained. In Bonifay, only one yard sale was spotted, and it was located on the corner of Highway 90 and Highway 79. Flea Market Days

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7 Celebrate National Library Week CHIPLEY National Library Week is this week, and the theme is Communities Matter. To show their appreciation, the Washington County Library staff will have daily drawings all week for individuals to win fun library prizes. Check out any library material to receive a free ticket. You must be a library patron to enter. Remember to show you appreciation of your library by thanking county commissioners, the Friends of Washington County Public Library and other government leaders for their funding support. See librarians outside their natural habitats CHIPLEY The Friends of Falling Waters State Park presents the 10th annual Legends and Lore Festival on Friday and Saturday. There will be living history demonstrators, animal exhibits, Civil War battle re-enactments, local artisans, crafts and great food. You can also stop at the Washington County Public Librarys table and chat with your library staff. Have you always had a question you wanted to know about the staff or library? Now is your opportunity to ask and learn more about the services that the library provides. Autism Awareness and Benet Walk CHIPLEY There will be an Autism Awareness and Benet Walk from 5-7 p.m. on Friday at Shivers Park in Chipley. There will be food, games, rafes and more. All donations will be gratefully appreciated. To help, donate, sponsor or for more information, contact Kristina Hodges at 459-1367. Poker Run planned GRITNEY Gritney Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on their third annual Poker Run Event on Saturday. The day will start with a pancake breakfast, which we will start serving at 7 a.m. Registration for the run will begin at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Mrs. Jessica at 547-2200. 1947 and 1948 Reunion CHIPLEY The 1947 class will celebrate its 66th reunion and the 1948 class will celebrate its 65th reunion at noon Saturday at Baileys Surf and Turf in Chipley. Come early to visit and reminisce. Bring a friend or relative if you want to. For more information, call 547-1409. Groce Reunion PANAMA CITY The annual Groce Reunion will be held at noon on Saturday at Under the Oaks Park on Tyndall Parkway. All friends and relatives are more than welcome. For more information or directions, call 773-3456. Community EVENTS Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed V ernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. : Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 4-5268 Public Auction The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Nichols Auto Repair and Towing @ 1146 Jackson Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 @ 8:00AM on the following dates: 98 Chev 2G1WL52M7W9279453 8 a.m. April 30th. 98 GMC 8 a.m. May 7, 1GKCS13W42511483 As published in the Washington County News April 17, 2013. 4-5267 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until April 27, 2013 to pay in full. No checks are accepted. 1. Kimberly Knight, Chipley, Fl. 2. Megan Brown, Chipley, Fl. 3. Anita Ingersoll, Wausau, Fl. 4. Gery McIntyre, Chipley, Fl. 5. Unknown. As published in the Washington County News April 10, 17, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 67-12-CA-000298 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. RONNIE J. GOMILLION; BRENDA R. GOMILLION; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through, and under any of the avobe-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, will on the 22 day of May 2013, at 11:00am at the On the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse in Chipley, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following -described property situate in Washington County, Florida: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 27, Township 4 North, Range 13 West, Washington County, Florida; thence South 890945 East along the South line of said Section 27, 1028.06 feet;thence North 003335East, 325.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 003335 East, 335.00 feet; thence South 890945 East, 300.00 feet to the East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of said Section 27; thence South003335 West along said East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 27, 335.00 feet;thence North 890945 West, 50.00 feet through a central angel of 1200001, an arc distance of 104.72 feet ( chord bearing= North 890945 West chord distance= 86.60 feet) to end curve, thence North 890945 west, 106.82 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 18 day of March, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: K McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 4-5269 NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned below to enforce lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues (Section 83.801.83.809). The undersigned will sell at public sale or private sale by competitive bidding or by other disposal deemed appropriate by Orange Hill Road Self Storage on Thursday, May 2, 2013, starting at 8:00 am on the premises where said Property has been stored and which is located at Orange Hill Road Self Storage, 897 Orange Hill Road, 32428, City of Chipley, County of Washington, State of Florida, the following: # 12-Miranda Rogers, household items. Please contact Gary Cobia @ 850-263-2817 to redeem your unit prior to disposal. As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF TOMMY O. COTTER FILE NO. : 13-CP-22 DIVISION: PROBATE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of TOMMY O. COTTER, deceased, whose date of death was on February 12, 2013, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-1018, is pending in the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, file number 13-CP-22. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: James J. Goodman, Jr. Jeff Goodman P.A. 935 Main Street Chipley, FL 32428 850-638-9722 Florida Bar No. 0071877 Personal Representative: DAWN FROST HADDOCK 2935 Pioneer Road Vernon, Florida 32462As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 11-00029 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-5, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, vs. CARL W. MELANCHUK, ET AL, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20, 2013, and entered in Case No. 11-00029 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-5, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-5, is the Plaintff and Carl w. Melanchuk, Donna Marcele Baguzis, Washington County, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, Washington County, Florida at on the 22 day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 33, BLOCK A, GILBERT ACRES SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 54, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING A PART OF THE WAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 4, A/K/A 1243 APPLE AVE., CHIPLEY, FL 32428-2018 Any person claiming an interest in teh surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Washington County, Florida this 20 day of March, 2013. Clerk of Circuit Court Washington County By: K McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News April 10, 17, 2013 DIRECTV Official TV Deal -Americas top satellite provider! DIRECTV Plans starting at $29.99/mo for 12 months after instant rebate. Get the best in entertainment. 1-800253-0519 A CHILDLESS married couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Lets help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 ONLINE ONLY Real Estate Auction-Oceanfront Lot in Holden Beach & 17+/-Acre Water Front Tract in Hertford, NC. Direct ICW Access, Selling Regardless of Price in Excess or $399,000 on the Day of the Auction, 4/29 at 8am to 5/9 at 3pm, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Check our cars and trucks in todays classified section! Extra | Classieds

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, April 17, 2013 5016150 Bettie's Country Realty BETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510LARGE 3 BR 2 BA BRICK REDUCED-$89,900---43 ACRES-$77,500--4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000--2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000---15 ACRES-$28,500--3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900---NICE 3 BR 1 BA BRICK-$87,500---10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD REDUCED$134,900---EXECUTIVE 4 BR 2.5 BA BRICK ON 19+ AC-$350,000 12 AC MINI RANCH W/2 BR 2 BA BRICK HOME-$164,900---2 BR INTOWN-$69,900---5 AC 2 BR BRICK-$79,900---31+ AC OLD HOUSE PAVED ROAD-$65,900---42+ ACRES OWNER FINANCING-$89,900 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com Northwest Florida Community Hospital Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provider in the panhandle is seeking quali ed candidates for the following positions:€ Kitchen Supervisor Management experience, Healthcare experience preferred € Purchasing Manager FT € RN FT, ER, Nights € CNA PRN, SNU, Weekends € General Maintenance FTApplications available online at: www.NFCH.org and/or application to: Email dblount@nfch.org (850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622Smoke and Drug Free Campus AUCTION LARGE FARM AND CONSTRUCTION DATE: Saturday April 20 8:00 A.M. LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, FL 32426 (2) Local Farm Dispersals (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city & county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m Barber Shop for Sale 850-228-2173 Want to buy Chevy 3500 parts truck 88-98 or frame. (850)956-2220. Affordable Lawn Care Low overhead=low prices. (850)263-3813, (850)849-1175. Books-n-Beans and More Featuring used books of all kinds: Mystery, romance, horror, childrens, nonfiction, self help. Plus knick-knacks, furniture and more. Open Mon-Fri 9a.m.-3p.m. Come in and browse. We have something for everyone. Across from Sims Funeral Home in Bonifay. High School Graduate needs work Day laborer, yard work, heavy lifting, etc. (850)768-1611, (850)547-5953. Ask for Aaron. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located in Graceville, Florida is seeking qualified persons for the following positions: RN’s to work on an as needed basis, primarily evenings, nights and weekends; must have a current Florida Nursing License. Premium pay offered for these positions. If you are seeking to supplement your income and meet the above requirements, Campbellton-Graceville Hospital is the place for you. Apply or inquire to Campbellton-Graceville Hospital www .c ghospit al.com or call (850)263-4431 ext. 2012. Resume may be faxed to (850)263-3312, Attn: Personnel Director or email to JAustin@p anhandle.rr .com. Drug Free workplaxe, EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 General Need a temporary position? Become a University of South Florida Evaluation Data Collector in Holmes County. Data collection requires working in Holmes County high schools, attending a paid training in Tampa, FL (all expenses paid by USF), and survey administration. Training will be April 29 – May 2. Please contact Ashley Singleton at asingle3@health.usf.ed u or 813-974-6698 for information. General Now accepting applications for servers. Apply in person at French’s Restaurant and Oyster Bar located on Hwy. 90 Caryville, Fl. 850-548-5800. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Hiring immediately We are looking for a multitask individual to work for our internet shipping company. The applicant must be highly proficient with computer, typing & writing skills, very detail oriented and motivated. This position is in the Vernon area. Work hours are 9-5 Monday-Friday. Position starts at $9.00 per hour with pay increases based on performance. Applicant must have a good car and be dependable. References will be checked. If interested call (850)535-2133 and speak to Russ. Install/Repair A/C DUCT and/or EQUIPMENT INSTALLERS 5 yrs. Min. Experience (850) 638-3611 Logistics/TransportDISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has openings for a District Manager position. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The perfect candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until April 19, 2013. Web ID#34246700Text FL46700 to 56654 OTR Drivers Wanted IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Don’t Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngstown in Bay County The News Herald needs carriers for early AM hours Must have: Be 18 yrs or older Areliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance Avalid driver’s license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cp arker@chipley p aper .com Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngs town in Bay County The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work form 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must Have: .Be 18 yrs or older .A reliable vehicle .Proof of Auto Insurance .A valid driver’s license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cparker@ chipleypaper.com Maintenance The City of Vernon, Fl will accept applications for the position of Facility Maintenance / Custodial worker. Various janitorial duties, plus routine maintenance to City owned properties and minor repairs. Starting Salary $8.50/hr. part-time 20 hours a week, flexible hours may be required at times to accommodate activities, I.e. evenings or weekends. Apply at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Vernon Fl; Monday thru Friday 7:00 am to 5:00 pm, application deadline is Monday, Aprill 22nd at 4:30 p.m.. Pre-employment drug testing is required. The City of Vernon is a Drug-free workplace, equal opportunity employer. Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Program Assistant for the Community Services Office in DeFuniak Springs. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist qualifying low-income families with Services Programs. QUALIFICATIONS: High School diploma (GED); 1 yr experience serving low-income or elderly. Must have Current driver’s license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For additional information and qualifications call Lea Ann, Personnel Tech or visit www .tricountycommunity council.com Applications must be submitted to any Tri-County Community Council office by April 22, 2013; 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR CAREER! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888203-3179 WWW. CENTURAONLINE. COM PROTECT YOUR IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free “Gold Guide” AMERICAN BULLION, (800) 527-5679 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 1-800443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Barber Shop for sale (850) 228-2173. Visi Opportunity MeetingCome Join us at the Holmes County High School Gymnasium at Sat. 4/20/13 @ 5:00pm for a meeting to discuss a Great Ground Floor Business opportunity for those Entrepreneurial people .YOU need to get in NOW. Timing is EVERYTHING! Vsi can offer you and your family a Life-Changing Opportunity designed to completely transform your life. A generous income with a bonus structure that will enable you to provide for your family and achieve unsurpassed wealth in the future. Sponsored by Poe White and Margie Metz. Please call for additional Information 904-955-5817 or check us out at www.visiworldwide.comText FL48397 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintance & water provided. 850-547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now offering studio apts. $350/mo. 2 Bdrm $500/month. Includes city utilities. (850)557-7732. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 -$450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Taking Applications. 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex. Background check and employment verification required. 850638-7128 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Townhouse Apt. Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath House Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 2BD/1BA House 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Call 850-271-9973. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. Two, 2BR/1BA MH and one 3BR/1BA MH. All on Corbin Rd. Storage buildings, decks, all electric. On nice big lots. I furnish water, garbage, do lawn in summer, spray once a month and change AC filters. For more info call Lou at 638-1911 or 326-0044. Sorry, no pets. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home 2BR clean, great condition, furnished, CH/A, carport, paved road, nice area. No pets & NOT in park. $525/mth 850-638-7009. Secluded 5Br/2Ba MH on 2 acres, close to Holmes Creek. High & dry. $600/mo, 1st & last month. HUD approved. Call (850)326-3687. Trailer for rent Bethlehem. (850)547-3293 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. 3BR/2BA Housein Chipley Owner finance Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700/month. Call 850-547-3746. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70’s or you purchase as is for lower 50’s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Classifieds work!

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Spring Home & Farm

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2 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Seven inexpensive ways to update a home now Oftentimes, buy ing a home opens up a bottomless pit of op portunities for projects and improvements. While some homeown ers engage in dierent repairs and x-ups out of necessity, many others like to freshen-up their spaces out of personal preference instead of need. But even the most well-intentioned projects can be waylaid if budgets are tight. e following are seven projects that wont break the bank. 1. Move around furni ture. You may be able to change the look of a room without spend ing any money. Find a focal point in the room and angle the furniture toward it. Try changing the placement of chairs and sofas. Simply mov ing a curio cabinet from one corner to another may also make a dier ence. 2. Add lighting. Lighting at dif ferent levels in the room can create a vibrant impact. Many homeown ers mistakenly put in a couple of table lamps and think that will be adequate. However, properly illuminat ing a room means varying the light ing to create dierent moods at dierent times. 3. Add new pillows or drapes. Changing a few aspects of a room can give it an entirely new look. If you want to add a splash of color but dont know what to do, think about incorporat ing some new throw pillows or change the curtains. 4. Change knobs or small accents. Switch out cabinet knobs for something updated and modern. Take inventory of wall outlets and light switches and think about selecting new ones that coordinate with your home decor. 5 Use plants. Empty corners or spots youre not certain how to ll may benet from a plant. Plants are inexpensive ways to add instant color and visual appeal to a room. Plus, having live plants can help improve indoor air by ltering out contaminants. A home with plants also feels more cozy. 6. Hang new wall art. Finding new prints to hang could instantly change a rooms ambi ence. And you neednt spend a lot of money on professional photogra phy, either. Grab your camera and take a few close-up shots of owers or take in a landscape scenery. Many of todays home printers can pro duce professional-quality prints in minutes. 7. Try a new coat of Kelli Ellis is an interior designer for all sea sons. But when spring rolls around each year, she is truly in her element. An award-winning celebrity interior design er, textile designer and design psychology ex pert, Elliss work is everywhere, from television, the Web to print media. Known for her love of owers and oral design, Ellis also serves as a spokesperson for the Society of American Florists. According to Ellis, one of the best and easiest ways to add seasonal color and refresh a living space is with fresh owers displayed in a variety of containers. A lot of people are afraid of color in their decor, so a less scary way of introducing color is with owers and vases, Ellis notes. Fresh owers can go with any type of decor and generally last as long as your mood, so there are endless opportunities to experiment without making a long-term commitment. Decorating with owers begins with choos ing a container that is in sync with the season and the style of your home, counsels Ellis. ere are so many container options for every type of decor, Ellis says. If your home leans toward country, think about using old decanters, tins or even wooden boxes. For con temporary homes, glass vases with clean lines work best. And for traditional homes, go with urns or ornate vases. Next comes color. While Ellis leans toward monochromatic arrangements of white owers stargazers, lilies, roses and orchids are among her personal favorites. When choosing owers for a particular spot or room, Ellis advises looking at complemen tary colors those that are on the opposite side of the color wheel. For example, if the walls are a warm shade of yellow or gold, a container lled with blue owers, such as hydrangeas, delphiniums or sapphire orchids, makes a bold statement. I think the greatest thing in the world is to bring your own vase or container to the orist and ask for something special that works with it, she reveals. Not every orist has a vase that suits your taste or will work in a particular spot, so I take in my containers and say, I want something blue. en Im both surprised with the result and certain that it will work with the decor. Celebrity designer celebrates the sights and scents of spring See UPDATE page 6 Carpet Masters Carpet, T ile and Upholster y Cleaning Exper ts 906 Joseph Drive, Chipley (850) 638-6789

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 3 The Best of Both WorldsLocal Agents, Local Oces, Local Service, Best Value.The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life.Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Membership doesnt cost, it pays! 1361 JACKSON A VE., C HIPLEY 6381756washington@bic.com1108 N WAUKESHA S T., BONIFAY 5474227holmes@bic.com WESTPOINTHOMEFACTORY OUTLETSALE SALE SALEGreat selection of famous name comforters, sheets, towels, pillows, blankets, throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices.1055 Fowler Ave., Chipley Behind our Chipley factory in the Industrial Park. O of Orange Hill Hwy. on Commerce Ave.Hours: Thur. and Fri. 9 AM 5 PM Sat. 9 AM 3 PM(850) 638-9421Huge Selection ofVELLUX BLANKETSOnly $5.99 thru April Twin Size SHEETS starting at $2.99Twin C O MFO R T ERS starting at $5.99GREAT SELECTION OF TOWELS AT OUTLET PRICES! Pairs of P ILLOWCASES starting at just 99 Hydroponics becoming popular with local farmers By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com is month is plant ing time for vegetable crops such as sweet corn, southern peas, tomatoes and squash, said Exten sion Agent Matthew J. Orwat. Field corn planting season started several weeks ago and is continuing. Ranchers are testing their elds for fertility requirements and preparing for the spring growing season. Orwat, an Extension Agent I in Horticulture for Washington Countys University of Floridas IFAS Extension, added that wheat crops should also be coming to a head pretty soon. Orwat said that the latest agricultural phe nomenon to expect in this area is hydroponics. Hydroponics have become very popular lately and strawberries have become very popu lar this year in this eld, said Orwat. is demand might grow if there isnt a strong supply for straw berries in Panama City, he said. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants in water instead of soil and using sh defecation as fertilizer. Orwat also said that their services have in creased eorts to provide education throughout the surrounding areas about various aspects of planting any where from home gardens to farmers crops. Classes include learning how to maxi mize your dehydrator with an introduction to dehydrating and vacuum sealing, 4-H summer programs that allow children to learn rsthand science that mixes healthy lifestyles in through snacks and recreation, pressure can ning courses, beekeeping in the Panhandle and much more. Information about upcoming classes can be found at the websites, washington.ifas.u.edu and holmes.ifas.u.edu. Dr. John Beasley, UGA Extension Agron omist, made a Peanut Production Update presentation at this years Panhandle Row Crop Short Course in Mari anna, which highlights the important factors for peanut production this year. Today I was talking about peanut produc tion, which will focus on several dierent topics, said Beasley. Lets talk about rotation. Coming out of 2012 production year in which we had tremendous yields across the Southeast but we also increased acreage from the 2011 year and, with that combined, we ended up with a tre mendous over supply of peanuts, not only for the Southeast, but for the U.S. in total. He said as peanut growers were moving into the 2013 calen dar there was a lot of concern about this over supply and it causing depressed prices. ey were having to look at growers having to grow peanuts for $355 a ton that was the price they were going to see, but one thing has Lettuce grown using hydrophonics farming See HYDROPONICS page 4

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4 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 HYDROPONICS from page 3 changed over the past several weeks the Chinese have come in unexpectedly and pur chased a lot of peanuts and this is whittling away some of that over supply, said Beasley. is isnt going to get rid of all of it, but it certainly helps. We have seen some contracts come out and thats go ing to help too if we can get peanut prices at $450 a ton but we still need to manage our acreage in 2013. He said it would be preferable if they could reduce the amount of acreage. Weve got to get it lower, said Beasley. I cant tell you exactly what that acreage should be. I know in Georgia were thinking we should be back down to 5,000 acres; we were over 730 last year. I know Florida was over 200,000 in 2012 and the year before they were at 150,000 to 155,000, so somewhere down close to where we were in 2011, particularly where we are with the yield potential. e two crops that are the most promising are corn and soybeans, according to Beasley. If youve been paying attention, the market has been strong on those two for a while now, he said. Corn prices are about $6-plus, soybean prices have been at $1 a bushelplus. You can book those and pencil in a pretty good amount of prot. If a farmer decided to go this route, he said that they strongly consider their rotation. e one point I em phasize to growers is the fact that if you include soybean in your rotation in 2013, think about the negative impact that its going to have on peanuts in following years, said Beasley. If you plan your 2014, 2015 and beyond cropping sequence dont forget that soybean is a legume like peanut and will harbor lot of the same disease organisms and is best to incorpo rate cotton or corn for a couple of years prior to going back into peanut. Another emphasis for this year was to plant earlier. Im encouraging planters to consider planting earlier, he said. Weve conducted research the last three years looking at planting from April 20 into June 1 for seven consecutive weeks. Weve seen high yields with these dates and seen that with a planting date range of around April 25 on into the May 10 to May 15 dates, and yields declin ing after that. Beasley said that this is a contradiction to previous instructions. I know we came in for years telling you that you can plant later because of spotted wilt virus and we were seeing higher yields in May 10 and growing resistance to spotted wilt virus, we have exibility in plant ing; we can plant earlier, he said. Research has shown that. In fact were being shown that yield declines as we plant later, with cold weather shutting down maturity on those peanuts planted at the end of May and part of June, so con sider planting earlier but watch your soil tempera ture. He explained that it is best to wait until that average four inch temperature is above 65 degrees, preferably closer to 70 degrees. Make sure you dont plant before an ap proaching cold front, said Beasley. Yields decline in soil tempera tures that were declining, so we want to move our planting window to three weeks earlier and to get our crops planted at least by May 20. www.kubota.com ZG127S $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months $0 Down & 0% A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months* Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.Expect Affordability Expect Exceptional Performance Expect Signature Styling & Comfort Expect Full 4-Year/300-Hour Warranty** Panhandle Tractor, Inc.5003 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 526-2257 Farm Families of the Year WASHINGTON COUNTY Jarrod Adkison Family HOLMES COUNTY Ken Barton Family www.kubota.com ZG127S $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months $0 Down & 0% A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months* Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.Expect Affordability Expect Exceptional Performance Expect Signature Styling & Comfort Expect Full 4-Year/300-Hour Warranty** Panhandle Tractor, Inc.5003 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 526-2257 Panhandle Tractor, Inc. MAIN STREET MARKET & FeedCome see our large selection of feed!WE ACCEPT EBT, VISA & DEBIT Red Fox Fertilizer We have a great selection of Bonnie Plants! TOMATOES PINE STRAW COASTAL SQUARE All blends available

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 5 ALL TYPES OF INSURANCENeed Farm or Ranch Insurance?Proudly representing Great American Insurance Group.CALL TOD A Y FOR A QUOTE!(850) 638-18051396 Jackson Avenue Chipley, FL 32428 Serving You Is Our Most Important Product Gardening is a reward ing hobby with thousands of devotees. Backyard gardens provide beauty and aesthetic appeal to a landscape, and they can be a source of homegrown food and a natural habitat for outdoor wildlife. A selfsustaining garden can be an ecient addition to any home, but gardens require upkeep and a certain measure of dedication. A selfsucient garden is a garden that sustains it self through proper planning and execu tion. Such gardens can almost take care of themselves so long as the soil is healthy soil, the seeds are reused and organic material is produced. Self-sustaining gardens also represent a lifestyle where individuals are responsible for producing their own foods -thus sustaining themselves with out the need to shop for produce elsewhere. When planting your own selfsustaining garden, consider the following tips. Start with soil. Healthy soil is essential to a thriving garden. e soil must have the right Plant a self-sustaining garden pH, correct texture and composition, and be full of nutrients. Very often the native soil in yards is not adequate to keep a garden thriving. In such instances, the soil needs to be im proved. Adding compost -which can be produced in the yard as well -to the soil will enrich the soil with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Maintain proper soil consistency. Soil that is the right consistency, meaning the optimum balance of sand, clay and actual soil, is another necessity for a self-sustaining garden. e ideal ratio should be 40 percent sand, 40 percent silt and 20 percent clay. Having the right balance of soil can secure root formation and promote proper drainage. Test the pH. Certain plants need a specic pH in order to grow. A neutral pH range is typically ideal for growing vegetables. A pH tester can be purchased from a gardening center. Amend the soil accordingly to get the soil back to its correct level. Know the grow ing season. Vegetables should be planted during the season in which they will thrive. Peas, beets and cabbage, for example, are coldtemperature vegetables, while cucum bers, squash and melons thrive in warm climates. Plant accordingly so that the vegetables will have the best chances for success. Purchase quality seeds. Use fresh seeds, particu larly ones that have been harvested from your own garden the year before, to have the best chances for germination. Or buy seeds from a reputable source, like a garden center or an online retailer who specializes in vegetable seeds. Start seedlings indoors. You may want to work with seedlings indoors so that you can monitor growth and care for them more easily. en transplant the seedlings outside when they are stable enough for the elements.

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6 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Few things are better than having a functional and beautiful outdoor space to entertain guests. Having a great outdoor space enables a person to host parties or intimate gatherings all year long. ere are many things homeowners can do to ensure their entertain ing space is safe and functional. Here are a few key tips for readying your yard for entertain ing possibilities. Expand on these basics to cus tomize an area for your unique needs. Check the area for any needed repairs. Look over the deck or patio to take note of any aws that may present Prepare a deck or patio for entertaining Consider a replace or re pit. For centuries man (and woman) has gathered around re for socialization and a means to warming up. Having a backyard replace, pit or chiminea is a conver sation-starter, a decora tive focal point, and a functional tool to extend the number of seasons in which outdoor entertain ing can take place. Place the re wisely and with concern for safety. Invest in quality out door furniture. Todays yards are extensions of a homes interior. Guests no longer want to sit on uncomfortable metal or plastic furniture. ere are many dierent out door sofas and chairs that are as stylish as they are comfortable. ese pieces can be matched to the decor inside your home for a cohesive look. Accessorize. Consider the creature comforts of indoors and mimic that outdoors. Dont shy away from hanging artwork on an exterior wall or using urns or pottery to deco rate the space. Weatherresistant materials ensure everything from clocks to televisions can be used outdoors. paint. After youve exhausted other avenues, choosing a new paint color may be the new look you desire. Painting is one of the least expen sive yet most dramatic methods of changing a homes interior. With dozens of hues to choose from, and new apps that enable you to take snap shots of things in nature or in your life and match them up to a paint color, you will have scores of opportunities to explore fresh new colors for your home. When you get inspired to make improvements to the home but fear how much it may take out of your wallet, consider in expensive tricks that can induce a big wow factor. UPDATE from page 2 safety hazards. Are there any loose railings? Are all screws and nails ush so they do not cause tripping? Are there any cracks in concrete or loose patio blocks? Be sure to remedy all of the repairs needed to ensure guests will be safe. If you are unsure of any struc tural decits, consult with a contractor. Hire a reputable con tractor. If you are just laying the groundwork for a new patio or deck, it is important to get the necessary permits and then hire a person who has been properly vetted. Check qualications and licensing before hiring a contractor and ask to view a portfolio of his or her previous work. Word-of-mouth recom mendations from trusted friends and family mem bers are good, and you can also double-check qualications by contact ing the Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been lodged or use a service such as Angies List to read reviews of his or her work. ink about closing in a portion of a deck or patio. e use of a canopy, netting or even greenery to protect an entertaining space can help minimize weatherrelated damage to out door furniture. Netting will keep a good number of biting insects at bay when the weather is warm and humid. Plan well-dened areas. Establish a sitting nook where guests can gather and talk. Have a bar or serving area where refreshments are made and served. Make sure there is a shaded area for when the sun is too uncomfortable to make sitting outside enjoyable. Similarly, have a sunny area where people can soak up a few rays or dry o after a dip in the spa or pool.

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 7 Alabama Lic # 98126 FL lic # CAC1814302 1075 N Hwy 79, Bonifay, FL Panhandle Lumber & Supply 405 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay, FLwww.panhandlesalvage.com850-547-9354 Free Pool Water Testing!!!Pool Chemicals & Pool Salt IN STOCK!! Garden Tools on Sale! 405 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay, FL Red Mulch, Cypress Mulch, and Top Soil Privacy Fence Panel $24.95 Landscape Timbers $3.19 Deck Kits & Pole Barn Kits C & C Construction of Northwest Florida LLCServicing Northwest Florida and Lower Alabama We do new construction, replacement, and repairs for Call today for your free quote. 850-547-1001FL: CCC1327331 AL: S-44779 Feel like cheating? Forget what the inside of your home looks like for just a bit and focus on your homes exterior. e exterior of your home makes a lasting and daily impression on your friends and family, along with your neighbors, says Mark Clement, professional contractor and host of MyFixItU pLife home improve ment radio show. While the weather is good, my advice is to get outside and x up problem areas, work on the landscaping and invest in products that make your homes exterior not only look great, but work great. Clement recommends assessing your needs and then diving in on projects. On the exterior of the home there are three big, critical areas I recom mend people evaluate every year -the roof, the windows and the entry door. Clement oers these recommendations for keeping your home exterior in top shape: Roong Tips 1. Check your roof yearly to determine the condition of your roof. Look for problem areas, such as missing or broken shingles, along with roong tiles that may be apping in the wind. ese are all indications that a new roof may be in your future. 2. Dont forget to check the sides of your roof. e southern expo sure weathers signicant ly faster than the other sides of the roof, so make sure to care 3. If youre in the market for a new roof, Keep your home exterior in top shape investigate polymer roof ing tiles as a good option. ese impact-resistant slate and shake tiles are man-made in a wide va riety of colors. Some tiles, like those from DaVinci Roofscapes that Clem ent chose for his home, have a 50-year limited warranty and are ideal for all types of weather conditions, including hurricanes and hail. Entry Door Tips 1. If you can see light around your main entry door from the inside, the door is hard to close or lock, or the door itself is warped, its time to consider a new door. 2. Even if you cant see light, air may be mov ing through gaps in the weather stripping at a surprising rate. If you can feel air moving or a sig nicant cold spot, thats a signal your existing door could benet from better sealing. 3. Determine what role you would like an entry door to play on your homes exterior. Do you want it to be a focal point with a splash of color? Is it important that you have decorative glass in the door system? Search the web for Door Designer and My Saved Door online tools to help visualize how a new door will look on your home. 4. ink about the weather conditions your homes door faces along with your energy bills. If either run to the extreme, consider replacing your entryway with a highperformance berglass door (which has four times more insulation than wood doors). Window Tips 1. Evaluate the func tionality and decorative appeal of your current windows. If you have condensation between glass panes, the windows are hard to open or close, your energy bills are soar ing or if there are drafts coming in around the window units, then its time to seriously consider replacement windows. 2. Vinyl framed win dows are the category of windows with the highest growth rate in the coun try. Why? ese frames are extremely energyecient and some of the best have fusion-welded corners and multi-cham bered construction. 3. Investigate your window options and stick with a national manufacturer that can stand behind a long-term warranty. 4. Remember that a thermally-ecient window is sealed tight est when its locked. So, to keep your energy bills lowers, dont just close your windows, make sure to lock them. Trim Tips 1. If you have the opportunity to replace your entry door or windows, make sure to nish o the job with stylish window and door trim. Lightweight and easy to install, weatherresistant synthetic mouldings, shutters and entryway surrounds from Fypon(R) are a denite do-it-yourself project for any homeowner. 2. Take an eagles eye look at your home. Most houses have louvers placed high above the attic or garage space to allow ventilation in those areas. And, most houses have wooden louvers that can rot with time. Replacing louvers with insect-resistant and rotresistant synthetic louvers can improve the homes appearance and function ality. 3. Wrap it up. Clem ent recommends that if you have unsightly porch posts you can eas ily transform them into showpiece parts of your home by using Column Wrap Kits. e decorative synthetic pieces can be installed in less than 15 minutes around existing structural posts and col umns to give an upgraded look to any home. Contractor Mark Clement installs polymer DaVinci Slate tiles.

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8 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Fix-it. Clean it. Paint it. Plant it.is in the airYou'll nd everything you need to spruce up your home and garden for Spring at WALMART!We'll be glad to help plan your "honey-do's" and weekend projects check out our variety of plants and garden supplies!Great selection, prices and service! It's what you expect from your local Walmart.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 3023408 Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If you’re 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 Volume 51 Number 5 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 me me me me e e e e e e 5 1 1 Nu mb er5 me51Number5 W W W DNESDAYAPRIL1 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 201 3 3 WEDNE S DAYAPRIL17 2013 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes Counties FREE TAKE ONE5016153 TrainforhandsonAviaonCareer. FAAapprovedprogram. Financialaidifqualied-Housingavailable. CALLAviaonInstuteofMaintenance866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING 3023405 Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and FinancialAidifqualied.SCHEVauthorized.MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 3023404 3023403 PACKAGESSTARTINGATONLY$29.99FOR 12 MOS. AFTER INSTANT SAVINGS ENTERTAINMENT PACKAGE/MONTH AUTHORIZED DEALER 1-800-293-1402New Approved Customers Only. 24-Mo Agreement Required.DIRECT*STAR TV Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255 or www.eddoctor.com.Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.ŽHessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 3023402 DIRECTV Official TV Deal -America’s top satellite provider! DIRECTV Plans starting at $29.99/mo for 12 months after instant rebate. Get the best in entertainment. 1-800253-0519 A CHILDLESS married couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Let’s help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 ONLINE ONLY Real Estate Auction-Oceanfront Lot in Holden Beach & 17+/-Acre Water Front Tract in Hertford, NC. Direct ICW Access, Selling Regardless of Price in Excess or $399,000 on the Day of the Auction, 4/29 at 8am to 5/9 at 3pm, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m AUCTION LARGE FARM AND CONSTRUCTION DATE: Saturday April 20 8:00 A.M. LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, FL 32426 (2) Local Farm Dispersals (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city & county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m Barber Shop for Sale 850-228-2173 Want to buy Chevy 3500 parts truck 88-98 or frame. (850)956-2220. Affordable Lawn Care Low overhead=low prices. (850)263-3813, (850)849-1175. Books-n-Beans and More Featuring used books of all kinds: Mystery, romance, horror, childrens, nonfiction, self help. Plus knick-knacks, furniture and more. Open Mon-Fri 9a.m.-3p.m. Come in and browse. We have something for everyone. Across from Sims Funeral Home in Bonifay. High School Graduate needs work Day laborer, yard work, heavy lifting, etc. (850)768-1611, (850)547-5953. Ask for Aaron. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located in Graceville, Florida is seeking qualified persons for the following positions: RN’s to work on an as needed basis, primarily evenings, nights and weekends; must have a current Florida Nursing License. Premium pay offered for these positions. If you are seeking to supplement your income and meet the above requirements, Campbellton-Graceville Hospital is the place for you. Apply or inquire to Campbellton-Graceville Hospital www .c ghospit al.com or call (850)263-4431 ext. 2012. Resume may be faxed to (850)263-3312, Attn: Personnel Director or email to JAustin@p anhandle.rr .com. Drug Free workplaxe, EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 General Need a temporary position? Become a University of South Florida Evaluation Data Collector in Holmes County. Data collection requires working in Holmes County high schools, attending a paid training in Tampa, FL (all expenses paid by USF), and survey administration. Training will be April 29 – May 2. Please contact Ashley Singleton at asingle3@health.usf.ed u or 813-974-6698 for information. General Now accepting applications for servers. Apply in person at French’s Restaurant and Oyster Bar located on Hwy. 90 Caryville, Fl. 850-548-5800. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Hiring immediately We are looking for a multitask individual to work for our internet shipping company. The applicant must be highly proficient with computer, typing & writing skills, very detail oriented and motivated. This position is in the Vernon area. Work hours are 9-5 Monday-Friday. Position starts at $9.00 per hour with pay increases based on performance. Applicant must have a good car and be dependable. References will be checked. If interested call (850)535-2133 and speak to Russ. Install/Repair A/C DUCT and/or EQUIPMENT INSTALLERS 5 yrs. Min. Experience (850) 638-3611 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngstown in Bay County The News Herald needs carriers for early AM hours Must have: Be 18 yrs or older Areliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance Avalid driver’s license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cp arker@chipley p aper .com Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngs town in Bay County The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work form 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must Have: .Be 18 yrs or older .A reliable vehicle .Proof of Auto Insurance .A valid driver’s license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cparker@ chipleypaper.com Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section! The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Bettie's Country Realty BETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510LARGE 3 BR 2 BA BRICK REDUCED-$89,900---43 ACRES-$77,500--4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000--2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000---15 ACRES-$28,500--3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900---NICE 3 BR 1 BA BRICK-$87,500---10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD REDUCED$134,900---EXECUTIVE 4 BR 2.5 BA BRICK ON 19+ AC-$350,000 12 AC MINI RANCH W/2 BR 2 BA BRICK HOME-$164,900---2 BR INTOWN-$69,900---5 AC 2 BR BRICK-$79,900---31+ AC OLD HOUSE PAVED ROAD-$65,900---42+ ACRES OWNER FINANCING-$89,900 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com 5016150 3023407 Go Painlessly withTHERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-13902 3023406 Logistics/TransportDISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has openings for a District Manager position. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The perfect candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until April 19, 2013. Web ID#34246700Text FL46700 to 56654 OTR Drivers Wanted IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Don’t Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Maintenance The City of Vernon, Fl will accept applications for the position of Facility Maintenance / Custodial worker. Various janitorial duties, plus routine maintenance to City owned properties and minor repairs. Starting Salary $8.50/hr. part-time 20 hours a week, flexible hours may be required at times to accommodate activities, I.e. evenings or weekends. Apply at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Vernon Fl; Monday thru Friday 7:00 am to 5:00 pm, application deadline is Monday, Aprill 22nd at 4:30 p.m.. Pre-employment drug testing is required. The City of Vernon is a Drug-free workplace, equal opportunity employer. Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Program Assistant for the Community Services Office in DeFuniak Springs. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist qualifying low-income families with Services Programs. QUALIFICATIONS: High School diploma (GED); 1 yr experience serving low-income or elderly. Must have Current driver’s license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For additional information and qualifications call Lea Ann, Personnel Tech or visit www .tricountycommunity council.com Applications must be submitted to any Tri-County Community Council office by April 22, 2013; 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR CAREER! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888203-3179 WWW. CENTURAONLINE. COM PROTECT YOUR IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free “Gold Guide” AMERICAN BULLION, (800) 527-5679 Barber Shop for sale (850) 228-2173. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 1-800443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Visi Opportunity MeetingCome Join us at the Holmes County High School Gymnasium at Sat. 4/20/13 @ 5:00pm for a meeting to discuss a Great Ground Floor Business opportunity for those Entrepreneurial people .YOU need to get in NOW. Timing is EVERYTHING! Vsi can offer you and your family a Life-Changing Opportunity designed to completely transform your life. A generous income with a bonus structure that will enable you to provide for your family and achieve unsurpassed wealth in the future. Sponsored by Poe White and Margie Metz. Please call for additional Information 904-955-5817 or check us out at www.visiworldwide.comText FL48397 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintance & water provided. 850-547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now offering studio apts. $350/mo. 2 Bdrm $500/month. Includes city utilities. (850)557-7732. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 -$450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Taking Applications. 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex. Background check and employment verification required. 850638-7128 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Townhouse Apt. Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath House Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 2BD/1BA House 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Call 850-271-9973. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Trailer for rent Bethlehem. (850)547-3293 For Rent. Two, 2BR/1BA MH and one 3BR/1BA MH. All on Corbin Rd. Storage buildings, decks, all electric. On nice big lots. I furnish water, garbage, do lawn in summer, spray once a month and change AC filters. For more info call Lou at 638-1911 or 326-0044. Sorry, no pets. Mobile Home 2BR clean, great condition, furnished, CH/A, carport, paved road, nice area. No pets & NOT in park. $525/mth 850-638-7009. Secluded 5Br/2Ba MH on 2 acres, close to Holmes Creek. High & dry. $600/mo, 1st & last month. HUD approved. Call (850)326-3687. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. 3BR/2BA Housein Chipley Owner finance Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700/month. Call 850-547-3746. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70’s or you purchase as is for lower 50’s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Classifieds work! Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255 or www.eddoctor.com.Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.ŽHessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 3023401



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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWSWashington County 2012RegionsBank. Simpleandreliablehas alwaysbeenagoodwaytogo. RhondaSapp|850.849.3476|rhonda.sapp@regions.com Wednesday, APRIL 17 2013Volume 90, Number 1Arts Council holds Scholarship CompetitionThe Washington County Arts Council announces its annual $500 Scholarship Competition. Graduating High School seniors in Washington County who wish to pursue a college degree in the Arts music, drama, literature, dance or the visual arts are eligible to compete by submitting a double spaced typewritten essay of 2,500 words or less on the subject of Why the Arts? In these dif cult economic times, your essay should convey to the reader why you feel supporting the Arts is important. Deadline for submission is May 13 and entries should be mailed to Washington County Arts Council, P.O. Box 973, Chipley, FL 32428; or e-mailed to tonya@ pippinappraisal.com.Autism Awareness and Bene t WalkCHIPLEY There will be an Autism Awareness and Bene t Walk from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday at Shivers Park in Chipley. There will be food, games, raf es and much more. Come out a show the children and their families Water bill de cit down to about $9,000Wausau residents catching up on utility paymentsBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com WAUSAU The city has collected all but about $9,000 of the water bills that were delinquent in Wausau, the Town Council learned Thursday night. We have about 26 people who are at the end of the 90-day range, and 18 of them have been in to make a payment, City Clerk Margaret Riley said. A few of them are still trying to get caught up, and we have a few that we are going to have to cut off their water. Riley said the delinquent amount was down from a high of about $22,000 last year, which caught the attention of the council when it was brought to light following an audit of the towns nances. We have had some people who have habitually behind, and theyve been that way for 17 years, Riley said, and I dont expect them to change. However, the town has been more adamant about having the water bills paid or shutting off the service. How long are we going to give them to try? Council Member Marlene Blount asked. Everybody has been in making some payment, Riley said, adding that two accounts she didnt expect to hear from had come in to make payments, and one troublesome Photo by RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsBill and Barbara Dorman of Wausau were given Yard of the Month honors by the Wausau Garden Club President Roxanne Bush, left, on Thursday at the April Town Council meeting, held at Wausau City Hall. Legends & Lore Festival returns this weekendSpecial to the NewsCHIPLEY The past will come to life Friday and Saturday at Falling Waters State Park. This year will mark the 10th year the Friends of Falling Waters, with the help of many great demonstrators, crafters and volunteers, have been able to give young and old a like a glimpse of a more carefree time. The Legends & Lore Festival festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days, and will have a wide variety of unique and seldomseen sites as well as arts and crafts, live music and food. The annual event will feature Civil War re-enactors, Vernon FFA Alumni membership drive startedSpecial to the NewsVERNON Recently, a group of parents, business leaders, local farmers and interested citizens met at the Vernon High School Ag classroom in order to organize and establish the VHS FFA (Future Farmers of America) Association. The purpose of the organization is to play a major role in supporting agricultural education. The National FFA Alumni Mission Statement, to secure the promise of FFA and agricultural education by creating an environment where people and communities can develop their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success, was adopted by the organization. The newly elected ofcers are: Hiram Tison, president; Pam Cates, vice president; Gwen Brock, secretary; Warren Walsingham, treasurer. Anyone having a concern for the future of agriculture education can become a member. You do not have to had been a member of FFA previously to join. The annual membership dues are $10. The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on May 6 in the Ag classroom (Building 600, Room 612) at Vernon High School. For more information, please contact Hiram Tison, 547-4670; Pam Cates, 535-4224; Gwen Brock, 2606924; Jimmy Gainey, 8490098; George or Maxine Weber, 535-2613. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThis years Legends & Lore Festival is being held in memory of Raymond Smoker, seen at last years festival. Smoker was an active participant at past festivals. Event marks 10th anniversary at Falling Waters State Park Photo by CATHRINE LAMB | The News Hundreds braved a chilly Friday evening and early Saturday morning to walk in the Relay For Life of Washington County this weekend at Pals Park in Chipley. For the full story and more photos, see Page B1. INDEXArrests ..................................A3 Opinion .................................A4 Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports ...................................A7 Extra .....................................B1 Faith .....................................B4 Obituaries .............................B5 Classi eds ..........................B7-8See LEGENDS A2 See DEFICIT A2 Celebrating lifeHome & Farm | INSIDESee BRIEFS A2

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 17, 2013 a blacksmith, candlemakers, basket weavers, live alligators, wood crafters, storytelling and much more. You sometimes dont know where you are going until you get there. The Legends & Lore Festival started out as a Saturday night program in the fall of the year and now we are celebrating the 10th annual Legends & Lore Festival, Park Service Specialist Scott Sweeney said. The event now takes place the third Friday and Saturday in April and has grown into one of the most signicant cultural and historical events in the Florida panhandle, he said. All proceeds and donation will be used by the Friends of Falling Waters support the many programs in the park and community outreach programs. We now live in a world of instant gratication, but not so many years ago, you would have bartered for the necessities of life like food, shelter and a good bar of soap, Sweeney said. This spring festival at Falling Waters State Park recreates that time where neighbors helped neighbors and instead of running to the store for every little thing. We knew how to make things with our own two hands and x stuff that broke, Sweeney said. In todays world most everything has that little Made in China sticker and is quick to hit the bottom of the trash can at the rst sign of failing. One of the unique things about this event is that all of the crafts, artwork and unusual items are made locally and that little sticker earlier mentioned is not allowed in the park. This event also gives children the opportunity to experience many of the crafts and skills their grandparents relied on for day-to-day living, Sweeney said. The main focus for Friday is set aside for the fourth graders from Holmes, Jackson, Bay and Washington County to educate our area youngsters about these various crafts and skills to take them back in time to experience life from over 100 years ago, but the general public is always welcome. On Saturday, the energy level gets bumped up a notch with live music throughout the day, Civil War re-enactors, living history demonstrations, animal exhibits, local artists and crafters, great food and more, Sweeney said. Falling Waters State Park is a place lled with natural wonders and a rich cultural history. The park was established in 1962 to preserve what is considered one of Floridas most unique geological features but the park is so much more. During the ensuing ve decades, Falling Waters State Park added many amenities and to this day continues to improve. The parks improvements can be attributed to the dedicated staff that continues to strive to make this state park one of the best, Sweeney said. However, in recent years the local community has become more involved with assisting in preserving and protecting one of the Floridas Panhandle hidden treasure. This years event is in memory of Raymond Smoker. He was a big part of the success of the Legends & Lore Festival. This years event is dedicated to his memory for all of his hard work and effort in the countless events he played a part in, Sweeney said. His love for the simple things in life has inspired us all. We will miss him seeing you here with us. Smoker was one of the festivals most avid supporters. He was lost to us this year while working with horses and helping others. He is a great loss to our event and the community as a whole, Sweeney said. LEGENDS from page A1account had been paid in full. We denitely need to keep going forward with this, Councilman Dallas Carter said. Riley said there was $8,264 still outstanding from prior to Jan. 1, 2013, and there is $1,217 outstanding in past due water bills for 2013. Its coming down, so we are moving in the right direction, Mayor B.J. Phillips said. The council also approved hiring Attorney Jeff Goodman of Chipley to serve as the town attorney. Goodman was present for the meeting, and the council members wasted no time in putting him to work. The rst question they had for Goodman was whether or not the town could barter services for a surplus pickup truck. Phillips said the town was considering trading the truck in exchange for animal control services. It costs us $39 per dog we haul to the shelter, and so far this year weve spent $429 on animal control, Phillips said. The town had received an offer of trading the truck for one years free animal hauling. Goodman suggested the town council put the surplus truck up for bid rst, to determine what value the vehicle might have. You can dispose of the property in any way you see t, the law allows you quite a bit of latitude in this area, Goodman said. However, I would recommend putting the truck up for bid. The bids can be rejected, or they could sell the truck to the highest bidder. I doubt we would get $500 for it, Phillips said, and he noted that the city had already spent nearly that much on animal disposal this year and it is only April. If you do barter for services, I would set an amount, not a length of time, for the value, like $1,000, Goodman recommended. The council had a similar question for the attorney about an unused generator the town was wanting to sell at auction. Dont get me started on generators, Goodman joked, referring to the Washington County Board of County Commissioners recent purchase of a generator. The purchase resulted in turmoil at the March BOCC meeting when Commissioner Lynn Gothard accused the board of breaking the law and violating policy when it purchased the $22,000 generator without taking bids and by purchasing it from an person who had done contract work with the county in the past. We tried to get the county to purchase it, but they werent interested, Riley said with a smile. DEFICIT from page A1 File Photo by CATHRINE LAMB | The NewsThe Legends & Lore Festival at Falling Waters State Park will feature educational displays and give children the opportunity to experience the crafts and skills of their grandparents day. affected by Autism that they live in an amazing community. All donations will be gratefully appreciated. To help, donate, sponsor or for more information contact Kristina Hodges at 459-1367.Trinity Baptist to host simulcastMARIANNA Trinity Baptist Church in Marianna will host a simulcast of Priscilla Shirer Live from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on April 27. Doors will open at 8 a.m. and cost is $15, which includes a listener guide, box lunch and child care. Please indicate if you will need child care at the time of purchase. For information call 209-3296 or 482-3705 or visit www. trinitymarianna.com.1947 and Reunion setCHIPLEY The 1947 class will celebrate their 66th and the 1948 class will celebrate their 65th reunion on Saturday at Baileys Surf and Turf in Chipley. They will meet at Baileys at 12 p.m. Come early, at least 11 a.m. if you want to visit and reminisce. Bring a friend or relative if you want to. For more information call 547-1409.Poker Run plannedGRITNEY Gritney Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on their 3rd Annual Poker Run Event on Saturday. We will start off with a Pancake Breakfast, which we will start serving at 7 a.m. Registration for the run will began at 10 a.m. For more information please call Mrs. Jessica at 547-2200. BRIEFS from page A1

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LocalWashington County News | A3Wednesday, April 17, 2013 April 1 April 8Sonia Ackre, 43, DeFuniak Springs, violation of county probation on driving while license suspended or revokes James Banks, 58, Homeless, 58, petit theft Felisha Blaine, 35, Chipley, traf c in opium, possession of controlled substance without a prescription Julie Bledsoe, 43, Chipley, sell of cocaine Reggie Brown, 24, Vernon, sell of marijuana Wade Brown, 60, Chipley, failure to appear on petit theft Samuel Carroll, 19, Chipley, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of state probation on possession of controlled substance without prescription, producing marijuana, possession of paraphernalia Tori Clarke, 20, Vernon, violation of state probation on battery, trespassing, intro of contraband, criminal mischief, possession of controlled substance Jessica Curry, 27, Westville, Holmes County warrant for violation of state probation on possession of controlled substance without a prescription Antonio Dawson, 26, Chipley, battery Michael Furney, 61, Chipley, Walton County warrant for contempt of court Tory Gayman, 32, Graceville, violation of county probation on worthless checks, Holmes County warrant fro aggravated battery Jose Guzman, 50, Orlando, Orange County warrant for child support Rachel Johnson, 28, Florence, Ala., violation of state probation on tampering with evidence, Georgia warrant for violation of state probation on resist of cer, possession of controlled substance Brandon Jones, 18, Chipley, violation of state probation on petit theft, burglary Charles Looney, 34, Bonifay, kidnap adult, aggravated assault, intimidate witness, violation of state probation on criminal mischief Ronald Palumbo, 60, Graceville, burglary, grand theft Shedrick Patton, 36, Chipley, sell cocaine, traf c in controlled substance Thomas Peterson Jr., 43, Vernon, sell of marijuana two counts Michael Pettis, 32, Wausau, violation of state probation on possession of marijuana with intent, possession of meth Kristopher Presley, 23, Middleburg, refuse to submit to driving under the in uence test, driving while license suspended or revoked, driving under the in uence Ahzric Proctor, 21, Vacherie, La., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Wesley Register, 31, Chipley, contributing to the delinquency of a minor Deborah Sharek, 60, Chipley, violation of state probation on possession of cocaine Brandon Taylor, 30, Santa Rosa Beach, kidnap adult, battery Ashley Thornton, 24, Ebro, sell of marijuana four counts, sell opium three counts, traf c in opium, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Kathryn Walthall, 34, Bonifay, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of paraphernalia Sonia Womack, 57, Chipley, violation of county probation on resist of cer without violence WASHINGTON COUNTY WASHINGTON COUNTY WASHINGTON COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Brock Auto Body Chipley Physical Therapy Obert Funeral Home Rogers Insurance GOLD SILVER BRONZEChipley Tire & Service Kindel Awards Community South Credit Union Lanes Outdoor Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating Celebrating 18 18 18 18 18 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 1995-2013 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay,cancelpaymentorbereimbursed bypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofandwithin72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree, discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:4-30-13 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson, M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysician andCataractSurgeon Washington County ARRESTS Environmental consultants compete for Holmes County jobBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Two environmental consultants went toe-to-toe during the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners meeting on Tuesday, April 9 one rm ghting for the spot of environmental consultant overseeing the clean-up of the local land ll, and the other rm ghting to remain. Belinda Pollock with CDG Engineers, the countys current environmental consultant group, was present to give an update on the land ll site. Pollock explained that even though the site contamination is low, it is still contaminated with petroleum and after the last site screening evaluation it ranked one point higher then what is allowed for site clean up. We double checked to see if we could have it rescored, but weve found even if we did it wouldnt yield better results, said Pollock. For now the site is at a standstill. Shortly afterward, Michael Tadlock, marketing director for Wes Environmental, LLC, stepped up to ask for the boards consideration to make Wes Environmental the countys new environmental consultant. We are a small company that brings big results, said Tadlock. Weve got three geologists that combined bring 60 years of experience, we treat the property as we would our very own and we a local company. We hire in Holmes County, we shop in Holmes County, we live in Holmes County, Tadlock said. We also rmly believe we can get the site rescored and continue progress so you can have a swift and complete closure to this project. Tadlock said that their geologists have found a chemical in the soil that could boost their rating by a point if allowed to rescore. It would be of no cost to transfer the project to us, said Tadlock. It would be a cost-free and seamless transition. Pollock stood up and said that she assured the board that the site may be able to be rescored, but she knew it wouldnt be ranked any higher. Tadlock insisted that if the board would appoint his rm as the countys consultant, then they could get that score higher. Put your money where your mouth is, Commissioner Kenneth Williams told Tadlock. If you can rescore it higher then the position is yours. Tadlock agreed with the boards decision that if Wes Environmental could return with a rescored site evaluation, then they would be the new contracted environmental consultants for the county a position which is state funded and county appointed. The board also approved to award Melvin Engineering with the design of Sandpath Road Phase II, which is a sidewalk project. Chairman Monty Merchant said there is an issue with the spotlights for the courthouses ag pole constantly being out at night. We need to put a light on it or take it down, said Merchant. The board agreed to see if the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce could see about taking it down every night and putting it up every morning. Commissioner Bill Parish was unanimously chosen to by the other board members to be the auctioneer at the auction of surplus county items to be held at 9 a.m. on Friday, April 12. Thats only because everyone one else wants money to do it, said Merchant.

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On the heels of celebrating 10 years of publication, the Prattler feels a fulledged commercial coming on for the Prattle and for the Heritage of Washington County book. Many activities came to Chipley this past weekend Relay for Life, Flea Across Florida with yard sales and ea market vendors on every corner, and the concert at Spanish Play House on Saturday night, featuring Big River Bluegrass, which concluded the events. Hester and I participated in all of the above, plus attended other events during the week. Included was Ms. Lotta Davis 101st Birthday Reception held at First Presbyterian Church on April 7 and the Oral Interpretation presentation by Carol Saunders and her Chipola College Students at the Chipley Kiwanis Club noon meeting held at Pattillos on Tuesday April 9. We also treated ourselves to dinner at Baileys Restaurant on Thursday night. The 10th year celebration continues as accolades come forth for Perrys Prattle. Wade Webb told me that Ms. Lottas event that he is a regular in reading my articles and inquired as to my source of research. He seemed surprised with the answer that most of my material comes from memories and experiences of the past. Catherine Jeffries Braxton, a Cottondale business person, who we have known since Chuck Wagon days in Chipley, apologized to Hester for interrupting our dinner at Baileys. She was highly complimentary of the historic materials found in each weeks Prattle. She mentioned her maiden name of Jeffries, explaining that James Arthur Jefferies married Marie White of the Poplar Head community and Annie Jeffries married Dempsey J. Brock and all the large family of children all were given names beginning with the letter C. She did not mention owning the Heritage Book and I need to let her know all of the above in included in that publication. On Friday of the ea market event, Hester and I worked the West U.S. Highway 90 corridor as long as our energy held out. We encountered vendors, Steve and Jan Mason, set up on the grounds of St. Matthews Episcopal Church. They were accompanied by eight-yearold granddaughter, Ella, visiting from Atlanta. The Masons reported excellent sales and were almost sold out a noon time and were folding empty tables preparing to call it a day. Also at that location, we met up with kinfolk, Dana Brock and wife, Janet, with a display of nursery plants and home made specialty arts and crafts items of bird houses made from gourds, beautifully decorated and pleasing to the eye. They were joined by Penny Brock, wife of Donald Brock, who displayed her own gorgeous paintings of various scenes and subjects. Dana is the grandson and Penny if the granddaughter-inlaw of Same Brock and Comilla Hall Brock, whose story was written by daughter, Trudell Brock Washington, and printed in noted Heritage Book. These family members missed buying a book before the sell outs on previous printings and both jumped at the opportunity to purchase one each which the Prattler just happened to have in his vehicle. Promises were also received from both that they would attend the June 15 Brock Reunion to be held at the Agriculture Center in Bonifay. Out second day of dropping in on more yard sales, took us to the Book Sale at the Washington County Library. We encountered Judy Corbus parents as we did the previous day. Mr. Corbus commented on his enjoyment of reading my writings. Both parents have been coming to Chipley for 25 years or more and joined in working at Watermelon Festivals just as if they were on the payroll. For the past two years, they have made Chipley their homes and can be seen actively working at the June watermelon event. Also in the library, we encountered Susan Jones Cook, the daughter of the late Vern Jones and Merle Jones. After giving a glowing report on Perrys Prattle, she told me she still remembers my compliment on her uncle, Paul Jones, who was in the eighth grade at Vernon when I arrived there. I well remember telling her that Paul, who looked like a grown man to me, gave me protection from the older boys who attempted to thump the ears of an over grown, but youthful, Perry Wells, who had just arrived at the big school from the small Brackin School. After a time-out at noon on Saturday, your writer attended the sh fry for the Senior Men of the county held at Daniels Lake. James Earl Guy heads this informal gathering and has been especially attentive to this Senior Person. He con rmed that he and wife, Naomi, will be at the 1944 Vernon High School Reunion to be held Saturday, April 20. At the sh fry I had a conversation with Ronnie Brock of the Sand Hill Brocks whose wife is Wanda Brock. He is a nephew of my 1944 classmate, Emma Lou Chesser Tew, who plans to attend the reunion, accompanied by daughters, Sharon and Nancy. I also had a promise from Ronnie that he will attend the reunion for our clan of Brocks in June. Topping off a week lled with wonderful experiences was when Ken Ruth visited Hester and me in out home. Ken and wife, Betty, were our caretakers at the Northwest Florida Music Park and Campground for many years. He carried on his craft of building clocks, many of them especially crafted for bluegrass performers who made appearances at the bluegrass festivals. Ken numbers among the list of those who have read Perrys Prattle since its beginning and made his purchase of the Heritage of Washington County book immediately upon its rst printing. The remaining books have dwindled from the 200 received in August to 37 now in the hands of the Prattler. Call me at 6381016 for your copy. They are $64.20 when picked up in Chipley or $70 when mailed. My email address if perry1000@bellsouth. net. See you all next week. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, April 17, 2013 APage 4SectionDear Editor, It was recently reported in the HCTA that an ambulance worth what? $200,000? was out of commission due to the wheel balancing machine being broken and there was no funding to x it. My rst thought was why not use the spare? Next was that the only wheel balancing machine available? No, Eastern Diesel who works on big trucks has one available 24/7. Knowing that most businesses and most likely governments have proceeds for processing small items without much fuss, why not get it done? Whats a wheel balance $20 to $30 at most? To potentially put the lives of the citizens of Holmes County at risk for this reason is beyond absurd. Its at out irresponsible. Whoever dropped the ball on this should be red. If Holmes County still had a county administrator this would not have happened. One is certainly needed. Im glad they nally quit hauling free dirt and rock to a few select. That was brought up Maybe 10 years ago and I got no where, even going through Tallahassee. Now I hope they can afford a wheel balancing machine.Dick BashtBonifay Recently I watched an episode of HGTV s Flea Market Flips. One of the requirements for the teams involved is to repurpose one item that they nd at the ea market. On this particular episode, an old fashioned threeburner oil stove was chosen to repurpose. It was all metal built on 4 legs, similar to ones I can recall from childhood which might have been used in apartment. It had no oven. I can remember a cousin, a newly wed who lived near us, having one like that. Kerosene was purchased in a one gallon or 5 gallon can often from the rolling store which carried a tank on the back end of the vehicle. On the TV show they sanded the rust off, painted the metal and laid a piece of heavy glass over the burners to make a side table to be used as a bar. I Dont recall (or I stopped watching) if somebody bought it. But it started me thinking about how cooking has changed in my lifetime. When Jack and I married and moved into an apartment in Gainesville, we had a 4-burner kerosene stove with an oven. Id never cooked on anything but my Mamas Home Comfort wood burning stove. It was state of the art and I remember when a travelling salesman sold it to our family. It was much larger than the other 4burner wood range which she had used. That stove turned out too many to count bakers full of corn pone and homemade biscuit not to mention the bushels of sweet potatoes it baked. I learned to bake cakes on the wood stove using white lard rendered at home for the shortening. My Grandma Wells had a beautiful green enamel wood burning range, the fanciest one I recall. It had a reservoir to hold hot water as did the Home Comfort my Mama had. Grandmas also had a warming closet above the range to keep dinner hot till the workers got home from the eld. For many years, I have used the base of Grandmas green enamel stove base as a coffee table base. Uncle Josh Wells salvaged it for me. The rst thing I tried to bake in the kerosene oven was a disaster. I had made a beautiful cherry pie with a lattice crust and it had baked to perfection. We were going to Cedar Key with Sam and Lucille Polston and eat when we returned. So I pulled the rack out to take my pie out and the rack tipped, dumping my pie on the oven door. Lucille quickly grabbed a turner and ipped it back into the pan, somewhat scrambled, but edible. When we moved to Bonifay in 1951 and had an apartment in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Terrel Creel, we cooked on an antique electric stove that must have been a prototype. It stood up on four legs. Four burners were at one end and the oven was at the other. It was the rst of the waist high ovens that became popular as built-ins and remain so today. The one at the Creel house was exciting to use as it would shoot sparks and dance about upon occasion. More than anything else, microwave ovens have revolutionized the way we cook, not that I actually cook a lot of things in the thing. Yet I nd I can hardly prepare a meal without using the microwave in some way. I recall the rst I heard of microwave cooking, Mrs. Sally Childers was our extension home economist, and we had some one come to the fair building on Highway 90 and talk about a way of cooking without heat. I dont recall the word microwave being used, but we were amazed at the speed with which things would heat up. My brother Jim and his wife Lavoughan were the rst in our family to get one. He proudly demonstrated how it would boil a cup of water in 2 minutes. I have gone from using a wood stove to a kerosene stove to an antique electric stove to a full size electric range to a built in oven and counter top stove and back to a 36-inch drop in range. I have never had a gas range except in an ef ciency apartment while on vacation. Neither have I owned a glass smooth topped range. I was afraid it might not heat my huge jelly-making pot fast enough. I still enjoy cooking, but as my energy level wanes and my memory span shortens I am thinking more and more of not having a cooking stove at all. Letter to the EDITOR My how cook stoves have changed over the years HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells The clock designed and built by Ken Ruth. It was displayed at WBGC Radio Station during the years Perry Wells did Bluegrass Express on the Chipley station. Prattler enjoys many weekend activities

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OWENS CARPET & CERAMIC OUTLETLocated Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters!Textured Plush Carpet 79 SF Loose Lay Vinyl 69 SF FHA Quality Vinyl 49 SF Super Thick Loose Lay Vinyl 99 SF12 x 9Tan Frieze......................................$955012 x 12Dark Green Plush........................$1399012 x 13Light Tan Plush............................$1099012 x 13Dark Blue Plush...........................$1555012 x 14Heavy Tan Frieze.........................$1655012 x 14Medium Brown Frieze.................$1499012 x 15Chocolate Frieze.........................$1799012 x 15Light Tan Plush............................$1555012 x 16Medium Blue Frieze....................$1899012 x 19Heavy Velvet Plush Tan..............$2255012 x 192Green Comm. Plush....................$2055012 x 20Multi Color Comm.......................$16990carpettilemarianna.com and PET OF THE WEEK Left: Teddy is an 8 to 10 week old male shepherd cross, about 12 to 15 pounds. He is totally adorable, a very sweet, loving, kissing little cuddle bear! Teddy has so much love to give, you will have many years of joy and companionship to share with him if you can give him the forever home hes searching for! Right: Leyla is a 2 to 3 year old female lab cross, about 40 to 45 pounds. She is good on a leash, very gentle and lovable, with stunning green eyes. She has recently weaned a litter of pups and now shes ready to stop playing momma and nd a home where she can be someones baby. Are you looking for a new baby? Leyla would love to be your baby and best friend all in one package! For more information contact Animal Control of West Florida in Chipley at 638-2082. Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. until noon.Special to the NewsTALLAHASSEE In recognition of April 8-12 as Wild re Awareness Week in the State of Florida, the Florida Division of Emergency Management encourages all Floridians to take the opportunity to update wild re emergency plans and learn how best to protect themselves and their property from the danger of wild res. Wild res can occur year round in Florida, said Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Bryan W. Koon. Have a current emergency plan and be proactive in your efforts to keep your home and family safe during a re emergency by taking necessary precautions. Florida experiences more than 4,600 wild res, burning nearly 110,000 acres of land in a typical year. This year, Florida has faced over 1,000 wild res on 20,430 acres. The three leading causes of wild res are arson, uncontrolled yard debris or trash res, and lightning. The National Fire Protection Associations Firewise program encourages homeowners to use prevention measures to decrease re threats around their homes, including planting reresistant vegetation, trimming trees to a height of 15 feet near structures, clearing brush up to 30 feet around your home, and keeping roofs and gutters clear of debris, such as leaves and pine needles. Along with Firewise prevention measures, of cials urge residents to follow these guidelines set by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service (FFS): 1. Check with local city or county of cials to see if there are any burn restrictions in the area. 2. Keep res contained to an 8-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel. Fires must be at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. 3. Obtain a burning authorization from the Florida Forest Service for piles larger than 8 feet in diameter. Call your local Florida Forest Service eld of ce. 4. Check the weather and dont burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. 5. Never leave a re unattended, and make sure it is completely out before leaving. 6. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case the small re starts to escape containment. 7. Report suspicious activity to the Arson Alert Hotline at 1-800-342-5869. Kids can learn how to protect their familys home and stay safe from a wild re with the Firewise Simulator at kidsgetaplan. com. To learn more about severe weather in Florida, and to Get A Plan!, visit www.FloridaDisaster. org, and follow FDEM on Twitter at @FLSERT, on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/FloridaSERT and www.Facebook. com/KidsGetAPlan.Special to the NewsGAINESVILLE Although April 22 is designated generally as Earth Day, it is observed by farm families every day. Floridas farmers and ranchers take care of our bountiful natural resources. Their livelihoods depend upon the good health of the land and water around them. Across the state farmers, ranchers and nursery plant growers have implemented state-of-the art irrigation systems. These systems have dramatically reduced water use on farm properties. According to eld evaluations by Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services personnel, conservation measures employed by farm families save almost 11 billion gallons of freshwater each year. The savings occur in all regions. For example, of cials at north Floridas Suwannee River Water Management District report that, in this substantially rural area, farmers and ranchers are saving more than one billion gallons annually. Innovation by farm owners has also improved water quality. This improvement is a longterm commitment, despite the nancial challenges agricultural operations face. Intensive testing of nutrient use by soils and plants has allowed farmers to apply only the minimum amount of fertilizer plants need to grow. Dairy producers have adopted containment structures that recycle water and animal waste for corn and other forage crops on the farm, preventing releases of nutrients into surrounding environments. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection has determined that citrus growers in south-central Florida reduced nitrogen levels in groundwater by nearly 33 percent in three years with their advanced management efforts. The South Florida Water Management District has reported that farmers in the Everglades Agricultural Area slashed phosphorous levels by 71 percent in water owing from their properties during the 2012 reporting year. Farm operators support Floridas natural resources in other ways. They maintain greenspace and wildlife habitat. And they control invasive, nonnative species introduced through our seaports and air terminals. Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick praised farm families for their excellent management of natural resources. Our farmers and ranchers make our quality of life possible, Hoblick said. They do this every day while they grow the food, ber and renewable fuels we all need. I am proud of them and their many successes.Earth Day is every day on the farmWild re Awareness

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection The Alabama state record for striped bass has been broken by 15 pounds. James R. Bramlett of Dora, Ala., fishing near a warmwater outlet of the Gorgas Steam Plant near Parish, northwest of Birmingham, caught a 70-pound striped bass Feb. 28 eclipsing the record of 55 pounds that has stood for 54 years. The fish already has been approved as the new Alabama state record and if approved by the International Game Fish Association it will become the new world record for land-locked striped bass. The old IGFA record for land-locked stripers is a 67-pound, 8-ounce fish caught in 1992 in Los Banos, Calif. The FWC is holding meetings concerning tarpon and bonefish. At present it is illegal to take bonefish except during tournaments and then they can be kept alive in livewells only until they can be weighed. A new ruling would put a stop to this practice and the fish must not be possessed for any reason. Concerning tarpon, the current rule states you can kill one if you possess a $50 kill tag. If new rules are put in place, the only way you could possess and kill a tarpon is with a kill tag, and the fisherman must be trying to break an existing world record. Neither tarpon nor bonefish are edible. Bonefish are bony and almost impossible to eat. Four Florida counties opened April 1 to gag grouper recreational harvest: Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor. They are open to recreational harvest. This regional season will remain open until June 30 with the first day of closure being July 1. If you plan to fish this special season remember you must leave from one of those counties and return to one of them. You cannot leave say, from Bay County and fish the waters off these counties and return to Bay County. Do not leave from one of these four counties and return to some other county other than one of the four mentioned.Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.netSpecial to The News HeraldAnglers and divers have 19 new reefs to visit thanks to the efforts of the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association (MBARA), Mexico Beach, and support from numerous organizations and members. On Saturday, 62 reef modules worth more than $91,000, found new resting places off the shores of Mexico Beach. Mexico Beach received a $60,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Fund and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The rest came from donations, membership, fund raising and three shing tournaments the annual MBARA King sh Tournament, the Mexico Beach Marina Offshore Classic and the 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding. Reef modules of varying design, each weighing more than 5,000 pounds, were placed in 19 locations, with one to eight structures submerged at each site. The reef modules, all made with steel reinforced concrete and limestone rock, include pyramids, rectangular grouper modules, layer-cake shaped ecosystems and a new hybrid reef that consists of a grouper module topped by a small ecosystem. This is the rst time the hybrid reefs have been deployed in Florida, and MBARA research divers are anxious to nd out what type of marine life will be attracted to them. According to MBARA research diver Carol Cox, Different structures attract different sh. Amberjack and red snappers are attracted to taller structures such as the pyramids, the grouper units act as low limestone ledges that are preferred by groupers, and ecosystems are a magnet for black sea bass. We nd that placing different types of structures together has a dynamic effect, greatly increasing diversity on the reef. We hope the hybrid reef with its height, ledge and crevices will attract the greatest diversity we have seen on any single arti cial reef. During this deployment, MBARA added reefs to six existing sites that have become dif cult to nd over the years. MBARA president, Bob Cox, said, It is important to maintain these reefs in honor of the people they were named after. Older reefs often were made with lighter or smaller materials that could be moved by powerful storms or covered by sand. The deployment was overseen by Bill Horn of the FWC along with MBARA volunteers Bob and Carol Cox, Ron Childs, Jimmy Nicholson, and Captain Charlene Burke. MBARA volunteers were involved in every step of the arti cial reef deployment--applying for permits, writing grants, and raising matching funds to earn points when competing for grants. According to Horn, Excellent planning by MBARA and excellent execution by Walter Marine made the project a great success. To get coordinates for the new reefs, visit MBARAs website at www.mbara. org.MBARA deploys new reefs Photos by CAROL AND BOB COX | Special to The News Herald A pyramid-shaped Florida Limestone Artificial Reef is deployed. Bob Cox, left, MBARA president, and Bill Horn, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission marine biologist are seen at the reef site.FWC to meet this week near TallahasseeFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will meet Wednesday and Thursday to discuss an array of issues, ranging from marine sheries and upland wildlife management and harvest issues to boating safety, staff reports and enhancing the publics ability to help control the invasive lion sh. Sessions start both days at 8:30 a.m. at the Florida Public Safety Institute, 85 Academy Drive, Havana, FL 32333 ( www. oridapsi.com ). The Institute is west of Midway on U.S. 90. The meeting is open to the public, and all interested individuals may speak within guidelines established by the Commission. Marine issues dominate the rst day, after a representative of the Wildlife Foundation of Florida presents the annual Louise Ireland Humphrey Employee of the Year Award to FWC Assistant Executive Director Greg Holder. When the Commission takes up marine sheries issues Wednesday, it will start with a nal public hearing on the Gulf of Mexico recreational red snapper season. The proposed season would be open June 1 through July 14. The commissioners will discuss a draft rule that proposes format standardization and reorganization for several marine sheries rules in Florida Administrative Code 68B, as well as the creation of a new General chapter that will include a series of de nitions and general regulations that would be applied to all saltwater shing. In a draft rule hearing, the commissioners will discuss a proposal to eliminate the requirement for a recreational shing license when targeting lion sh with certain gear and to have no recreational or commercial harvest limit. Additionally, the Commission will consider a proposal to make tarpon and bone sh catch-andrelease-only species, and review and discuss gear use for tarpon in Boca Grande Pass. At the request of the Collier County Board of Commissioners, the commission also will discuss in a draft rule hearing the repeal of two Special Acts of Local Application that prohibit spearing or gigging with arti cial light and spearing in state waters off the county shoreline. The commission will end the marine sheries section with a staff update on South Atlantic Fishery Management Council actions and discussions. On Thursday, Commissioners will welcome a representative of the Shikar-Safari Club International to present the Of cer of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Surrounded by friends, family, teachers and teammates Holmes County High School senior Mikayla Moore signed a two-year basketball scholarship with the Northwest Florida State Raiders on April 3 in the Holmes County High Schools library. What makes this team so special was some of the qualities that Im looking for in all my student athletes, said Head Coach of the NWFS Raiders Patrick Harrington. We went out on a bus trip and it was a lot of time spent together, 10 days in fact before we came back. We didnt have one sulky attitude, not one sourpuss, no problems and no bad times and they conducted themselves in a manner that was so positive that I was more proud of what they did off the court then they did on the court and they did pretty darn good on the court. Harrington said a lot of them have moved on to higher ranked schools. These are kids who quali ed academically and just generally overlooked and then when they came and played in our program and they got the attention they deserved and I really feel that Northwest Florida State is a stepping stone for you to go and follow your dreams as a student athlete, said Harrington. Last summer Mikayla came to my camp, my little league camp, and I was thinking that I would like to see someone come through our program on full scholarship and I know shes a very good student, shes very passionate about the game and shes had tremendous success here. What I would like to see her do is have a great experience with us at Northwest Florida State and be able to transition to where she wants to go, if its after one year or if its after two years. Holmes County High School Head Coach Devon Miles said that he was very proud of the progress shes made, having coached her since the seventh grade. Ive seen a trend of players coming back in town after six months of college and I dont want to see you back in town after only six months, said Miles. You better work hard and you better make every single one here proud. I appreciate everything you did in middle school and in high school. Everyone heres going to miss you. Mikayla said she is going to major in Elementary Education.HCHS student signs on with NWFS Raiders SPORTS www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, April 17, 2013 APage 7Section PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS Sitting with her mother and father, Sherry and Mike Moore, and Head Coach of the NWFS Raiders Patrick Harrington, Holmes County High School senior Mikayla Moore signed a two-year basketball scholarship with the Northwest Florida State Raiders.From Staff ReportsCHIPLEY Chipley High School and Tiger 100 sponsored a scholarship ceremony Monday, April 8, for the Lady Tigers pitcher and third baseman Mallory Dean. The signing was held at Chipley High School in the cafeteria. Dean is a Senior at CHS and is signing a softball scholarship with the Pensacola State College Pirates. On hand for the signing were, from left, her father Jerry Dean, PSC assistant coach Becky Horn, Mallory, and her mother, Kala Dean. I think Mallory is going to t right in, said coach Horn. She said the PSC softball team would begin practicing after Labor Day. PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLERMallory Dean is anked by her parents, Jerry and Kala Dean, and Pensacola State College assistant coach Becky Horn as she signs a letter of intent.Dean signs with Pirates SIGN UP CEREMONYThe News HeraldBONIFAY Chris Walker looked like he was right at home in a recent pair of national all-star basketball games. Competing against the nations top recruits in the McDonalds All-American Game on April 3 and the Jordan Brand Classic this past Saturday, Walker validated his status as one of the countrys premier prospects. Walker, a high school senior who led Holmes County to a Class 1A state championship this year, is headed to the University of Florida on a basketball scholarship next season. Walker is a 6-foot10 forward whose explosiveness was on display in the Powerade JamFest two days prior to the McDonalds game at the Ratner Center in Chicago. On his rst attempt, Walker lobbed the ball toward the basket from beyond the 3-point line, caught the ball off a bounce with both hands and threw down a lefthanded windmill jam. He hammered down a tomahawk dunk on his second effort following another lob from the three-point line, garnering a perfect score of 60 from the judges. He added another windmill jam off a 360-degree midair rotation on his third attempt before capping his night with a dunk in which he threw the ball between his legs off the backboard before throwing down the dunk with both hands. Walker was crowned champion over a whoswho of prospects, including Jabari Parker (Duke), Andrew Wiggins (undecided) and Aaron Gordon (Arizona). ESPN currently ranks those three players Nos. 1, 2 and 4 in the country, respectively, and Walker is 14th. Walker played 12 minutes in the McDonalds All-American Game, which was held at the United Center in Chicago and televised nationally on ESPN. He compiled six points on 2 of 6 shooting for the East in a 110-99 defeat, and his six rebounds was one shy of the team high. Walker was one of the most ef cient players on the oor in the Jordan Brand Classic, which was contested at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., and aired on ESPN2. He scored 14 points on 7 of 13 shooting from the oor, and he also shared the team lead in rebounds with seven in 15 minutes. He also added a blocked shot. Walker headlined the Class 1A All-State Basketball Team released Monday. Somewhat startling, however, was that of 15 players named to the rst three teams, more than half represented area schools. Region nalists Malone and Cottondale each had two players selected by the Florida Association of Basketball Coaches (FABC) & SourceHoops.com. Walker was joined by junior Chai Baker of Malone. Bakers brother, Ty, was chosen to the second team along with senior Marquis White of Graceville and senior Jerodd Blount of Cottondale. The third team included senior D.J. Roulhac of Cottondale, senior Raheem Wright of Wewahitchka and freshman Trent Forrest of Chipley. No honorable mention list was included. First team Chris Walker, 6-10 sr., Holmes County Brandon Shingles, 6-1 sr., West Gadsden Ed Porter, 6-6 so., Hawthorne Chai Baker, 6-2 jr., Malone Shaimea Maeweather, 5-10 sr., Lake Butler Union County Second team Leamon Wilson, 6-0 sr., Hawthorne Neino Robinson, 6-0 sr, Bratt Northview Ty Baker, 6-6 sr,, Malone Marquis White, 6-0 sr., Graceville Jerodd Blount, 6-2 sr., Cottondale Third team D.J. Roulhac, 6-0 sr., Cottondale Raheem Wright, 6-3 sr., Wewahitchka Trent Forrest, 6-3 fr., Chipley Zack Wright, 6-6 so., Milton Central Lane Munz, 6-3 jr., Villages Walker considered one of countrys top prospects From Staff ReportsCHIPLEY The Chipley Tigers faced off against the Holmes County Blue Devils in a the Class 1A Rural District 2 Softball District Tournament Monday night in Chipley, clinching a win with a score of 5-1. The teams faced off with a stalemate that lasted on into the 4th inning and thats when things really started heating up. Chipley Tigers Braylee Pooser, and Kacie Crews had consecutive runs to home base with Sarah Gilbert quickly following suite. Holmes County Blue Devil Shelby Clark, retaliated with a run to home plate, however this would be the Blue Devils rst and only score as the Chipley Tigers wrapped up the 7th inning with a run to home plate from Gilbert, and Sara Kay Compton, to wrap up the game with a score of 5-1. Our seniors really stepped up and played like they meant it, said Chipley Tigers Head Coach Kami Fannin. Im really excited and hope we can hit and we can play like we did last night. Weve just got to take it one game at a time. The Tigers were to face Northview Tuesday night in second round action. The district championship game will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday at Chipley High School.Tigers beat Blue Devils 5-1 in district tournament Above: An unidenti ed Lady Blue Devil at bat against the Lady Tigers during Mondays Class 1A Rural District 2 Softball District Tournament in Chipley. The Holmes County girls fell 5-1 to the Chipley squad. Right: Chipley Lady Tiger Sarah Gilbert pitches during their district tournament opener against Holmes County High on Monday in Chipley.

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LocalA8 | Washington County News Wednesday, April 17, 2013 F R I D A Y A P R I L 1 9 12 noon until 10 p.m.S A T U R D A Y A P R I L 2 0 9 a.m. until Face Painting, Balloon Animals, Magic Show, Trent The Train Man, Bounce House, Slide, Wrecking Ball, Zip Line, Mechanical Bull, Rock Wall and Much More!Kids Activities Sponsored by For more information visit A contemporary a cappella group Saturday, 6:00 p.m. Sponsored by Marianna Toyota Saturday 8 pm Fine Arts Contest, Arts and Crafts, Entertainment, Food And Activities For The Young and Young At Heart! Join us for the5K/10K Walk/RunSaturday, 8 am Registration6:40 to 7:40 am Sign Up For The DONTMISSTHE3RDANNUALJACKSONCOUNTYSHERIFFSOFFICEANTIQUE& CLASSICCARSHOWANDANTIQUETRACTORSECTIONONSATURDAY. The fresh catch of the day is waiting for you best seafood market!FISHCALLOPSHRIMP BAGGEDYSTERSNOWRABEGS 2093024 By S. BRADY CALHOUN747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Katie Wright was always going to be a missionary, her mother and father, Teresa and Jimmy Wright said Thursday. When asked how they knew, Teresa gave Jimmy a knowing look and laughed. Instinct, she said. She was always caring about others. She was always helping others. On Thursday, Katie Wright, 25, a local nurse who graduated from FSU and Haney, was in DraganestiOlt, Romania, working with a local church and teaching English to a woman and her 4-year-old daughter. She has been working with churches to help orphans, to start other churches, to minister to women and children trapped in human traf cking and to preach the Gospel of Jesus. She said she has done everything from medicine to construction so far during the trip. Her journey is sponsored by The World Race, an organization that sends out groups to 11 countries in 11 months to serve the least of these while amongst real and raw community. Her adventure began in January and will end in November. I wanted to see what God is up to around the world and how I could be a part of it, she wrote in a text message. I want to hold the orphan and the poor and the unloved of society and tell them about Jesus and that someone does love them. She has already worked in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Her group will be in South Africa, Thailand and Malaysia later this year. These arent sightseeing tours. Wrights group works in villages away from where tourists ever venture and in some places with the highest crime rates in the world. Teresa Wright said a part of her wished Katie could help people by being a nurse at a local hospital instead of in a dangerous situation far from home. It is exciting, but it is scary. I have to rely on God protecting her, Teresa Wright said. She added that her daughter has been part of several miracles, including healing for a burned child and help for a child having breathing dif culties. However, even while she is working away from home, Katie Wright and her family are raising money to fund the second half of the trip. She needs to raise $4,000 by July 1. Those interested in nding out more about her experiences can follow her blog at katiewright.theworldrace.org. Donations can be made at the website. Nurse helps orphans around the worldOf all the joys spring offers us, one of the most troublesome things about this time of year is the increase of insects on our furry friends. Of all these creepy pests, adult eas cause the most problems for our pets. In order to become adults, eas need warm weather, between 70 and 80 degrees, and around 70 to 80 percent relative humidity. Those ideal conditions are usually what we are experience during this time of the year, which is why we generally see more eas coming out in the spring, said Dr. Alison Diesel, lecturer in dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). While many people think eas are relatively harmless, except for making our pets itch, eas can cause numerous other health problems in our pets. For example, some animals may react to an allergen found in eas saliva, causing the animal to have an allergic reaction. This causes the animal to itch and ultimately scratch, which can lead to a secondary skin infection. If there is a massive amount of eas, anemia could even become a potential problem, especially with small animals that do not have large amounts of blood. Fleas also carry diseases like tapeworms and Bartonella (which causes cat scratch disease) that can infect both pets and humans. While there is no way to completely prevent eas from reaching our pets, a key factor to controlling eas is breaking their life cycle either by killing the adults and/or at least one of the juvenile stages. The ea life cycle has four phases: The adult eas lay eggs; the eggs hatch into larvae; the larvae turns into pupae, which, eventually, turn into adults, Diesel said. Targeting several phases of the ea lifecycle is best, particularly when dealing with an infestation. The easiest stage to target is the adult ea since they live on the pet. The other stages, such as eggs, larvae and pupae, are present in the environment. With regards to speci c therapy for eas and secondary problems, your pets veterinarian is a valuable resource for the best options and possible medications. Your pets veterinarian can help recommend the most appropriate product to help prevent eas based on other factors (other skin conditions, food allergies, etc.) as well as discuss the appropriate way to administer the product, Diesel said. I suggest using a ea prevention that lasts the entire month and is still effective if the pet gets wet. Using ea prevention products once every 30 days provides the best protection for your pet from ea bites and can even prevent a ea infestation from being established in your pets environment. It is important to minimize an animals exposure to eas by avoiding infested areas and pets. There are some things which can be done to minimize exposure to eas: avoid known infested areas, do not allow your pet to come into contact with wild animals or burrows, and protect areas of the house where wild animals may enter to minimize wild animals from establishing residency in the rst place, Diesel said. If eas become a problem inside the house, try vacuuming once a week. If the ea presence grows larger, there are various in-house treatments and exterminators to aid in ea removal. Focus on places where the pets spends most of their time inside the house because that will contain the most concentrated area of eas, Diesel said. Also, dont forget under beds and furniture, behind curtains, and along hallways connecting rooms when treating the house for eas. It may be best to contact a professional exterminator when there is a large ea burden present. In addition to treating animals and the inside of the home, it may also be essential to treat the outside environment around your home. This can be done by treating areas of the surrounding property that have an unusually high populace of eas. This includes shaded areas, under trees and bushes, in dog houses, under porches and decks. As with indoor control, when the burden is high, a professional exterminator may be the most help, Diesel said. The best approach to managing eas is to practice prevention continuously throughout the year by treating all pets with proper medication as well as treating the inside and outside of the home if there is a suspected infestation. It is much easier to prevent eas than to treat eas, Diesel said.About Pet TalkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. PET TALKDealing with eas and our pets PET TALK PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WRIGHT FAMILY Katie Wright during her mission trip.

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CHIPLEY Despite deep chills that lasted throughout the evening hours, the Relay For Life of Washington County drew in crowds by the hundreds to this years main event, which was held from 6 p.m. Friday until noon on Saturday. A variety of entertainment and events kept the festivities rolling. This year added some new events, such as Miss Relay Pageant and a car show along with the classics such as the Survivors Banquet, Survivor Lap and vendors of all shapes, sizes and varieties raising funds for this years Relay For Life of Washington County. All evening and into the wee hours of the morning, relay teams competed for spirit points with various games and activities, such as the classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests as well as a variety of funlled laps such as the pajama lap, super hero lap, zany hat lap and much more that stretched from the setting of the sun on past sunrise. I want to thank all those who have shown us so much tremendous support, said Event Chairperson Jimmy Schweinsburg. We didnt quite make our goal of $60,000, but were close and were not done yet. We still have until August to meet our goal so were going to continue with our fundraising efforts. Washington County News Holmes County Times-AdvertiserWednesday, April 17, 2013 BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County Times-Advertiser. 1) Who often uttered, Well, heres another nice mess youve gotten us into? Oliver Hardy, Barney Rubble, Jackie Gleason, Moe Howard 2) What brand of parking meters is found in over 50 countries on 6 continents? Edison, Franklin, Duncan, Williams 3) In 2001 what was named the of cial state toy of Pennsylvania? Silly Putty, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys, Slinky 4) Of these which did not reach the 100th episode milestone? Gilligans Island, West Wing, Dawsons Creek, Seinfeld 5) Which U.S. state produces the most wool? Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Texas 6) Worldwide about how many people are killed by tigers each year? 5, 50, 500, 5000 7) What Coronation Ball is generally accepted as the rst major rock and roll concert? Jumper, Elroy, Moondog, Space 8) Todays day is about how much longer than one during the time of dinosaurs? 15 minutes, 1 hour, 90 minutes, 2 hours 9) How is carmaker Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino better known? Lamborghini, Peugeot, Renault, Fiat 10) Though they had a short run, where were DeLorean cars manufactured? Detroit, Italy, Ireland, France 11) What is the most populated city on the continent of Africa? Tripoli, Casablanca, Johannesburg, Cairo 12) How was famed Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne killed? Plane crash, Lightning, Shot, Poisoned 13) Where in Missouri do both Ford and Harley-Davidson have assembly plants? Kansas City, Fulton, St. Louis, Lamar 14) During WWII what Japanese project used balloon bombs to hit the U.S. mainland? Hati, Keze, Totu, Fugo ANSWERS: 1) Oliver Hardy. 2) Duncan. 3) Slinky. 4) Gilligans Island. 5) Texas. 6) 50. 7) Moondog. 8) 1 hour. 9) Fiat. 10) Ireland. 11) Cairo. 12) Plane crash. 13) Kansas City. 14) Fugo. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests as well as a variety of classic Chubby Bunny, frozen t-shirt contests, box-car races for Road to Recovery, dance contests Relay For Life of Washington County draws in crowdsPhotos by CATHRINE LAMB and CECILIA SPEARS

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Special to ExtraMr. and Mrs. Scott Hildon Barton of Perry announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Hayden Carole, to Ryan Langdon Hagberg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ron Hagberg of Perry. Maternal grandparents of the brideelect are Mr. and Mrs. Bill Smith of Thomasville, Ga., and the paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Hildon Barton of Bonifay. The prospective grooms maternal grandparents are Mrs. Barbara Sue Butts of St. Petersburg and the late Faison Butts. His paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Hagberg also of St. Petersburg. The wedding and event will be at 5 p.m. May 18 at the First Baptist Church of Perry.SPECIAL TO EE XTRABonifay Elementary Schools Relay For Life team raised $300 on Saturday, April 6 for Relay For Life of Bonifay.Special to ExtraCC HIPLE IPLE Y The Chipley Kiwanis Club heard a presentation by Chipola College students during its weekly meeting on April 9. Member Joe Johnson introduced Carol Saunders of Chipola College. Saunders explained the program was about oral interpretation as presented by a group of her students. Oral interpretation combines speech, drama and literature. The students try to orally convey the meaning and emotions of the material presented. The source materials included poetry, non-ction, humor, impersonations and inspirational writings. Source authors included Fanny Flag, Presidents Reagan, Clinton and Obama, Louis Grizzard and Mother Teresa. The students presented an interesting crosssection of Chipola College. Macy Miles is majoring in political science and is a member of the Chipola Womens Basketball Team. Karissa Chiles is on the Chipola Womens softball team. Anna Bailey is majoring in early education, while Julie Wells is a theater major. The students drew numerous laughs from the Kiwanians, who stayed past the normal adjournment time because the students were so entertaining. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chairperson at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to ExtraOneal and Trudell Miller are pleased to announce the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Lori Lynn Miller, to Carl Gillman. Carl is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gillman and the late Mrs. Julie Russ Dogget. The wedding will be at 4 p.m. on May 11 at the Chautauqua Building, 96 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Reception will immediately follow.Special to ExtraAir Force Airman Andrew J. Rainey graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Rainey is the son of Teresa and John Rainey of Bonifay and is a 2012 graduate of Bethlehem High School in Bonifay.Special to ExtraBO O NI I FA A Y West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC) is accepting nominations for new community recognition program called The Power of One. Nominees will be accepted from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties during each quarter of the year. One winner will be selected from each county and receive recognition for their volunteer services as well as a $250 donation, which will be made in their honor to a charitable organization of their choice. A nomination form is available online at www.westorida.coop. Nominations will also be accepted in each of the cooperatives ofces. Nominees cannot be WFEC employees, family members or serve on the board of trustees at the cooperative. A complete list of requirements is available online or in each of the cooperatives district ofces. For more information about the Power of One contact Terry Mullen or Candace Croft at 263-3231. EngagementsRainey graduates basic trainingChipola College students entertain Kiwanis ClubWest Florida Electric accepting nominationsSPECIAL TO EE XTRAChipola College students performed for the Bonifay Kiwanis Club on April 9. bBOnNIfF Ay Y ELEMEnNTARy Y RELAy Y fFOR LIfFE Barton and Hagberg to wedMiller and Gillman to wed

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Coloncanceristhe2ndleadingcauseofcancer deathsinFlorida.7outof10cancerdeathscanbepreventedthrough screeningandlifestylechanges. Coloncancerstartswithoutsymptomssochoose preventionandgetscreened.Ifyoure50orolder,askyourdoctorwhichcolon cancerscreeningtestisrightforyou. ColonCancerScreening SavesLivescoloncancerFL.org FOR12MOS.AFTERINSTANTSAVINGS ENTERTAINMENTPACKAGE NewApprovedCustomersOnly.24-MoAgreementRequired.DIRECT*STAR TV 866-314-3769 and sor enes s aches Special to ExtraCHIPLEY On April 6, Chipley High School JROTC competed in the State Drill Competition at George Jenkins High School in Lakeland. The competing teams included Female Color Guard, Male Color Guard, Female Unarmed Squad, Male Unarmed Squad, Male-Mix Unarmed Platoon, Male Dual Exhibition, Female Dual Exhibition and Female Individual Exhibition. Although it was tough competing against many other schools that were much larger than Chipley the cadets refused to give up. The experience was very exciting and showed that their hard work, practice, and dedication paid off. The Chipley JROTC program was proud to compete in such a challenging event and add it to their list of successes. The cadets who were not competing were observing each of the teams and cheered them on while taking pictures. It was inspirational and exciting to watch other cadets do what they do best. The Chipley JROTC program continues to put their time, dedication and hard work into everything they do. By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY While visiting the Bonifay Kiwanis Club during their April 10 meeting, Madison Simmons, representing the Holmes County High School Key Club, invited everyone to join them for A Saturday Afternoon Movie to help raise food for the local food pantry. They will be showing Disneys Wreck It Ralph at 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 27 at the Holmes County High School Auditorium and admission is 1 to 2 cans of food per person and concession will be available with $1 soda, $1 assorted candy, $1 small popcorn and $2 large popcorn. This is open to everyone in the community in efforts to increase the food supply at our local pantry, said Simmons. Plus its good, clean entertainment for families to enjoy together. Kiwanis continued with a business meeting discussing why they raised their dues to $125 a quarter and preparations for Octobers rodeo.Special to ExtraThe Chipley JROTC program has just received the results from the State Drill Meet on April 6. The Female Color Guard placed in the Final Four at fourth place. The cadets that participated in this event were C/MAJ Sabrina Goodman, C/ LTC Myiesha Boston, C/MAJ Regan Walls, C/2LT Justice Watford, and alternate C/ SSG Kristyn Gutierrez. The Female Color Guard did a fantastic job, and we are very proud of their accomplishment. Congratulations for being one of the only two teams in North Florida to bring home a trophy.W.I.N.G.S program registration beginsSpecial to ExtraBONIFAY Registration has begun for the W.I.N.G.S. Summer Program. Registration will be from 3 to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 18, at Bethlehem High School, Bonifay Elementary School, Bonifay Middle School, Ponce de Leon Elementary School and Poplar Spring School. The summer program will begin June 12 and end on July 3. The program will operate every weekday from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Each program site will offer a daily nutritious breakfast and lunch in the school cafeteria. Limited bus transportation will be provided daily to and from school. Please contact the site coordinator for bus route information. The theme for summer is Making Sense of Bugs and Slugs. STEM educational activities through project based learning will relate to using our ve senses to understand bugs and slugs. The curriculum includes science, math, reading, physical and health education, and exciting enrichment activities. Remedial education programs and activities are also available. Returning this year is Camp of Champs, which will provide character education combined with basketball and life skills. Registration packets will be available at each school on April 18. W.I.N.G.S. is a Florida Department of Education 21st Century Community Learning Center afterschool grant administered through the Holmes County School Board. For more information contact at Bethlehem High School Leesa Lee at 547-3621, at Bonifay Elementary School Phillip Byrd at 547-3631, at Bonifay Middle School Kyle Newsom at 547-26-78, at Ponce de Leon Elementary School Pam Price at 836-4296 and at Poplar Springs School Faye Corbitt at 263-6260. Pho HO To O byBY Cecilia ECILIA Spea PEA Rs SHolmes County High School Key Club member Madison Simmons came before the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to inform them of their latest efforts to increase food at the local pantry with A Saturday Afternoon Movie of Wreck It Ralph. Ponce de Leon archery team in state tourneySpecial to ExtraPONCE DE LEON Ponce de Leon High School is involved in the National Archery in the Schools project and competes each year in the Florida Archery in the School statewide tournament. This is a tournament where students at participating schools compete at their local school through the supervision of a certied archery instructor and submit their scored to the state headquarters for verication. This year, Jesse Armstrong, a freshman at Ponce de Leon High School is the statewide high scorer in the high school division. Jesse had a score of 295 which eclipsed the previous state record score of 282 in this tournament. A perfect score is 300. Only last year did a competitor at the national level for this program score 300. Jesse along with Cody Allen, a senior at Ponce de Leon High School, now qualies for the National Tournament which will be held on location in Louisville, Ky., on May 10 and 11 of this year. For his efforts Jesse received a new bow from Matthews Archery and a trophy as the state winner. Jesse is the son of Charles and Pam Armstrong. In addition to Jesse winning his age division Ponce de Leon High School had 20 plus students that competed with eight placing in the top 30 in the boys and girls divisions respectively. Cody Allen took fourth (Qualies for Nationals), Trace Brannon placed 12th, Crete Zorn placed 23rd and Brason English was 30th in the boys division. The girls were Dakota Pryor placed 24th, Ashley Harper placed 25th and Delilah Bass placed 28 in the girls division. Overall in the high school division Ponce de Leon placed sixth as a team. All of this was made possible by the hard work and dedication of their teacher Mr. Janice Andrews. Ms. Andrews had the opportunity to become a certied archery instructor through the National Archery in the Schools project where, through the sponsorship of Matthews Archery, Inc., training and equipment was provided for start up programs at schools willing to invest in the time and people to make this program happen. Chipley Tigers go to State Chipley color guard makes Final Four HCHS Key Club to host A Saturday Afternoon Movie

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The guest speaker will be Brother Dewain Phillips. The church is across from Vernon Elementary School on County Road 277.Oakie Ridge youth revivalCHIPLEY Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be holding a youth revival at 6 p.m. on April 18 20. The message will be brought by Brother Tim Brigham. Music will be by the First Baptist Church Praise Team. The church is at 2971 Gilberts Mill Road in Chipley. For more information or directions call 535-2007.Otter Creek to present The ConradsPONCE DE LEON The Conrads, from Cowarts, Ala., will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church at 7 p.m. on April 20. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81.FPU provides hope to families in Chipley CHIPLEY Financial Peace University will be at Grace Assembly at Chipley at 4:30 p.m. on April 21. More than 1.5 million families have changed their nancial future through Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University (FPU). Updated in summer 2012, the nine-week course provides families and individuals with practical tools to gain control of their nances and set themselves up for long-term nancial success. The course meets once a week where a different lesson is taught by Dave on DVD followed by a small-group discussion. Lessons include budgeting, relationships and money, getting out of debt, saving for emergencies and investing. Call Robbie Collins at 638-1791 for information or to register. Poplar Head homecoming servicesPoplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church will have homecoming services at 10:30 a.m. on April 28. The Rev. Troy Lee Walsingham will be the guest speaker for the service. Special music will be presented by One Heart of Bonifay. The group is comprised of Kim Drummond, lead vocalist, Anita Hathaway, alto, Dan Drummond Tenor and Justin Woods, instrumentalist. Lunch will be served in the church fellowship hall following the morning worship service. After lunch, special music will be presented by One Heart. The church is on Poplar Head Road in Washington County.New Bethany homecomingVERNON New Bethany Assembly of God Church will be holding homecoming services on May 5. Brother Donald Morris will be bringing the message. Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall. For more information call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Did you ever have a day when everything went so well that you could not believe you were awake? I have dreams of times when everything goes perfect. Then, I awake to the reality of the world around me. I guess everybody dreams of at least one perfect day. Last week my dream came true... or almost. For no apparent reason I awoke from sleep feeling quite happy. I had no explanation for this giggly feeling of mine. I do not normally rouse myself from sleep with a chipper attitude. Just ask my wife. On second thought, dont. I just was in such a good mood that I broke out into song, which my wife threatened to end my life if I did not stop it immediately. I did not try to psychoanalyze myself and think that perhaps this was the beginning of senility or something. I just accepted it as a great day to be alive. One of my basic philosophies of life is, dont look a gift horse in the mouth; after all, he might have bad breath. This particular day nothing could bring me back to earth. I was all but literally dancing on the clouds and I cannot dance. But it was a good day to be alive and know it. Very nonchalantly, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage addressed me in a rather semi-informal manner. Would you run to the store and get me something? Being in such a high spirit, I sang my af rmative answer to her in spite of her glaring in my direction. I did not care. I would have jumped over the moon if she had asked at the time. Lucky for me, she did not ask. I was in such a good mood that I thought a shopping trip would be okay. Let it be known that when it comes to shopping, shopping and me go together like peanut butter and lobster tail. It was such a wonderful day and I felt so terri c I agreed to go shopping for my wife. Not that I needed a new wife, the one I have is ne, thank you. When I entered the store, I had a nagging feeling that something was wrong. Being in such a great mood that I was in, I shook it off and rebuked it rmly. In record time, I found the item my wife needed. Dancing and singing up the aisle, I went immediately to the checkout counter. When I got there, I found nobody there. On the counter was a bell and next to the bell, a sign that read, Ring bell for cashier. Being in such a great mood, I rang the bell to the tune of the song I was singing at the time. After all, happy is as happy shares, and I had my share of happiness at the time. Then I heard it. All right, growling from the back of the store, I heard ya. Ill be there when I get there. If I would have stopped there, it might not have gotten out of hand. Being in the goosy-kind of mood I was in, I had to take it one step further. I stared at the bell until I could stare no more and then I broke out into song accompanied by the cashiers bell. I wish you could have been there, it was spectacular. I heard you the rst time, the voice exploded from the back of the store. Ill get there when I get there and not a second sooner. I smiled to myself and reminded myself that nobody was going to spoil my mood of happiness today. Then I saw her stomping up the aisle towards the cashier counter where I was waiting. If looks could kill, and I am not so sure they cant, I would have died on the spot. I do not think steam was coming out her ears, but I am not absolutely sure about that. I know there was re in her eyes, which were focused in my direction like a laser beam. When she got to the counter she growled, Are you the one ringing the bell? With my nger on the bell, and nobody else in the store, it was hard to answer in the negative. In fact, it was hard for me to say anything while she was looking at me the way she was looking at me. She stared for a moment, at least it was something close to a stare that burrowed itself deep into my soul and that goosy-kind of feeling evaporated. Its customers like you, she snarled, that makes my day terrible. She then looked at the one item I had laying on the counter for her to ring up. She looked at it, and then looked up at me and then looked back at the item on the counter. Hissing like I have never heard hissing before, Is this what youre making all that racket about? Did you ever have a day when you felt like crawling into a groundhog hole and hiding until next February? On my way home from the store I thought about what David said in Psalm 23. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me... I can endure anything and anybody as long as God is with me. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com.Grouchy is as grouchy growls DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor Faith EVENTS

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Mrs. Annie Mae Rone, 91, of Bonifay, Fla., passed away April 7, 2013, at her home.  She was born Oct. 20, 1921, in Uriah, Ala. to the late Lafayette and Barbara Hollinger W illiams.  In addition to her parents, Mrs. Rone was preceded in death by her husband, Raymond K. Rone; a son, Robert Rone and daughter, Elizabeth Rone. Mrs. Rone is survived by six sons, John Quinn and Betty of Bonifay, Charles Rone and Erolyn of Tampa, Bill Rone and Rita of Gulf Breeze, Tommy Rone and Janet of Bonifay, David Rone and Cindy of Destin, and Joe Rone and Lee of Bonifay; 13 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall, the Rev. Hamp Christmas and the Rev. Carl Hadley ofciating.  Interment Rev. Carl Hadley ofciating.  Interment followed in the Gully Springs Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.  Family will received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home.Annie M. RoneOBITUar AR IES Co O NTINUE oO N Pa A GE BB 6Hulon Paul Mitchell, 80, of Little Rock, Ark., formerly of Panama City, passed away Friday, April 5, 2013. Hulon was a 1951 graduate of Bay High and a US Army veteran of the K orean War. He  retired after 36 years service with St. Joe and International Paper Company. Hulon was a 32nd degree Mason, a Shriner, and a member of VFW Post 1936 in Alexandria, La. He was preceded  in death by his parents, Harmon C. Mitchell and Vesta Jewell Mitchell (Roach), and sisters, Eula Champagne and Mary Martin. Survivors include his daughters, Michelle Powers (Chuck) and Paula Gean (Kyle), all of Little Rock, Ark.; two granddaughters, Mary Kate Powers and Victoria Gean; his sisters, Bonnie Mitchell, Virginia Abernathy (Larry), Doris Becker (Ralph), Jeanette Riley (Charles), and Janice Stukey (Marvin) and numerous nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life service was held at 3 p.m., Monday, April 8, 2013, at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Mr. Marvin Stukey ofciating. In lieu of owers, contributions in Mr. Mitchells name may be made to either the Arkansas Hospice, 14 Parkstone Circle, North Little Rock, AR 72116, or to the Alzheimers Association, 204 Executive Ct., Little Rock, AR 72116. Kent-Forest Lawn, 2403 Harrison Avenue, 763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com.Hulon PP MitchellSergeant First Class (Retired U. S. Army) Donald R. McElwain, 80 of Noma, passed away Monday, April 8, 2013 at his residence following a brief illness. Mr. Donald was born in Stockton, Calif., on Dec. 3, 1930, to the late Harold and Ila Tibbett McElwain. During his Military career, he was involved in two major conicts, the Korean and the Vietnam War. Mr. Donald received several Commendations, Citations, Campaign Ribbons, Decorations, Badges and Medals, including two Purple Hearts in Japan and Germany. After retiring, he then worked as a manager with Kmart for a number of years. Mr. Donald was a member of Blessed Trinity Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus and Noma Town Council. Proceeded in death by his beloved wife, Judy Booten McElwain and son Gary McElwain. Survived by one son, Donald Donnie McElwain, Graceville; four daughters, Debi Pendl (Vince), Summereld, N.C., Dawn McElwain Crutcheld, Noma, Kim Miller, Noma, and Jessica Walters (D.J.), Graceville; two brothers, Butch McElwain, and Scotty McElwain, Calif.; seven grandchildren, Zoie, Jolie, Carly, Christopher, Eric, Kathy and David; two great grandsons Liam and Logan and a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral Mass was held at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 13, 2013, at the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church with Father Richard Dawson ofciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with full Military Honors by the U.S. Army, James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Friday, 5-8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford.com.Donald R. McEElwainMrs. Mary Maxine Padgett, 91, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, April 9, 2 013.  She was born Oct. 14, 1921, in Darlington, to William and Florence Jones R oyals. Mrs. Padgett  was a life long resident of Holmes and Walton County. She was Baptist by faith and a charter member of Northside Baptist Church. She graduated from Troy State University receiving her Bachelors degree. She worked as an Elementary School Teacher for many y ears before retiring.      Mrs. Padgett is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Edgar Drew Padgett; two brothers, Earl Royals and Byron Royals and one sister, Kate McDonald. M rs. Padgett  is survived by her sister, Willene Crews of Ft. Walton Beach; nephews, Rick Crews and wife Kathy, David Crews, Gary Crews and wife Karen, Bill McDonald, Bob McDonald and Max Padgett and wife Ann; nieces, Debbie Richards and husband Mike and Candace Royals, and by numerous great nieces and nephews. A time of visitation was held from 3 to 4 p.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Northside Baptist Church, 2835 North Highway 81, Ponce De Leon, Florida 32455. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m., Thursday, April 11, 2013, at Northside Baptist Church with Reverends Larry Sweat, Sr and Kenneth Harrison ofciating. Those asked to serve as pallbearers were Richard Crews, Gary Crews, Bob McDonald, Bill McDonald, Mike Richards and Max Padgett. Floral arrangements are being accepted or donations may be made to Northside Baptist Church at 2835 North HWY 81, Ponce De Leon, Florida 32455. Burial followed in the New Ponce De Leon Cemetery. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.clary-glenn. com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Mary M. PPadgett MarAR Y M. Pad PADGETTMr. Ray Nelson Jackson, 50, of Vernon passed away April 2, 2013, at his residence. He was a native of Vernon, of the Holiness faith, a former employee of the Forestry Service and a Correctional Ofcer. Survivors include a son, PO3C Christopher Rashad Jackson (Alyssa) of Virginia Beach, Va.; parents, Min. John C and Missionary Kathleen Jackson, of Vernon; brother, John C. Jackson Jr., of Vernon; grandmother, Miss. Katherine Bell of Vernon and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m., Sunday, April 6, 2013, at McQueens Temple Holiness Church Vernon, with Bishop John O. Brown Pastor, ofciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Garden Cemetery, in Vernon with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to service the Copper Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Ray NN. JacksonMrs. Dianna Gray Barrett, 57 of Chipley, wife of the late Rev. Walter Barrett, passed away April 4, 2013, in Colquitt, Ga. She was a native of Jackson County, a graduate of Cottondale High School, and was a member of Saint Matthews Baptist Church of Cottondale. She served for 18 years as First Lady at Shiloh Baptist Church of Graceville and 11 years as First Lady at New Galilee Baptist Church in Marianna. Survivors include the children, Teon Knox (Sherrita), the Rev. Walter Barrett III (Alicia, Keonia Barrett, Audrey Grifn (Jerone) and Walter Barrett II; brothers, Sam Gray (Agnes), Audrey Gray Jr., Authur Gray (Millouise) and Larry Gray; sisters, Bernice Gray, Doretha Gray, Lee Gray and Dorthy Gray; 19 grandchildren and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 13 at Jerusalem Baptist Church in Chipley, with the Rev. David Green, the Rev. Walter Barrett III, and the Rev. Price Wilson, pastor Ofciating. Interment will followed in the Northside Cemetery in Chipley with Copper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains were in repose at the church one hour prior to services. The family received friends from 5-6 p.m. Friday in the Copper Funeral Home Chapel.Dianna GG. BBarrettJames Brice Jackson, 49, of Chipley, passed away Friday April 5, 2013, in Caryville, the result of a boating accident. Brice was born Jan. 12, 1964, in Chipley to Virgil and Annette (Sasser) Jackson. He had worked many years at Leigh High Furniture as well a surveyor, and with Trawick Construction. Brice is preceded in death by his father, Virgil Jackson; grandparents, Pete Sasser, and Waco and Nellie Jackson. Survivors include his mother, Annette Jackson; one daughter, Jo Anna; his maternal grandmother, Mary Sasser Barber; several aunts and uncles, and his two loving dogs, Rattler and Shortie. Memorialization was by cremation and memorial services were private. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family can sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. James BB. JacksonClinton Adam Lee, 85, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Thursday, April 11, 2013, at his residence.  He was born May 11, 1927, in P once de Leon.  In his spare time he enjoyed shing and spending time with his family. He is preceded in death by his parents, Isaiah and Sislie Lee; one son, Roger Lee; one daughter-inlaw, Kathy Lee and three brothers, Leslie and Miles Lee and Clifford Prescott. Clinton is survived by his loving wife, Mary M. Lee; three children, Jr. and wife Kay Lee of Ponce de Leon, Gwen and husband Hayward Wilson also of Ponce de Leon, and Mary Jane Felch and husband John of Blakely, Ga.; four step-children, Rusty Bourkard and wife Gina of Vernon, Eddie Bourkard of New Hope, Amy Sue Davis of Bonifay, and Sandy Sherman and husband Earl of Mobile, Ala.; 21 grandchildren; 23 greatgrandchildren, and two great greatgrandchildren.   A time of visitation was held Sunday, April 14, 2013, at Davis-Watkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, from 6-8 p.m.  Funeral services were held Monday, April 15, 2013, at Red Bay Presbyterian Church beginning at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Royce Montgomer y ofciating.  Committal services followed at Red Bay Cemeter y.  Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.CClinton A. Lee ClCLINToON A. LEEMrs. Dolores Sapp Taylor, 76, of Bonifay, passed away April 13, 2013, at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center. She was born May 20, 1936, in Bonifay. She was preceded in death by her husband, R.C. Taylor; her father, Benjamin Sapp, and a grandson, R.C. Taylor. Mrs. Sapp is survived by her mother, Bessie Miller Sapp of Bonifay; a son, Mike Taylor and wife Sara of Bonifay; two sisters, Pat Alford and husband John of Bonifay, Margaret Medley and husband Ray of Bonifay; three grandchildren, Robert Taylor II and wife Traci, Benjamin Taylor and Aaron Taylor, and one great-grandson, Zachary Taylor. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, April 16, 2013, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Eber Overly ofciating.  Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel F uneral Home directing.  Family received friends one hour prior to service from 10 to 11 a.m., at Peel Funeral Home.Dolores SS. TT aylorMichael John Baxley, 59, of Chipley, passed away Thursday, April 11, 2013, at his home surrounded by his loving family .  Mike was born April 25, 1953, in Clearwater, to the late James and Margaret (Church) Baxley   Mike was a veteran that served in the Army and Army Reserves as a mechanic for 22 years.   His knowledge of vehicles led him to a career as a log and long haul truck driver   His love of vehicles extended into a passion for car racing, both as a driver and a mechanic.   Mikes loves also included working in the yard and playing with his dog Hope.  Mike was preceded in death by his daughter, Cari Briard, 37, of Akin, S.C.  Mike is survived by his wife Linda Baxley of Chipley; daughter Daniellie Browning and her husband Mark of Crestview; two sisters, Vicky Baxley and Cathy Sasser of Chipley; one   brother, Clayton and his wife Judy Ann of Chipley, and many beloved grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and extended family   A special thank you to Covenant Hospice and in particular Toby, Angela, and Nicole for their loving care and support. We would also like to thank God for blessing us with Pastor Michael Orr of First Baptist Church and Brother Ronnie W right.  Family received friends for visitation Tuesday, April 16, 2013, from 1-2 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel.  Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, April 16, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Ronnie Wright and the Rev Mike Orr ofciating.  Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery in Chipley, with Brown F uneral Home directing.  Friends and family may sign the online register at www .brownfh.net    Michael J. BBaxley WAS S HINGT INGT ON N C C OUNTY UNTY NE NE WS S / HOLMES ES C C OUNTY UNTY ADVE E RTISE TISE RFIND US ON FACEBOOK OObituaries CCrossword SSOLUTIUTIONN

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraRobert Wayne Roberts, 86, a resident of Ponce de Leon, passed away Friday, April 5, 2013, at the Joyce White Adult Care Home in Bonifay .  As a young man, he served his country faithfully i n the United States Navy.   He and his wife Gertrude had been happily married 57 years when she passed a way.  Robert was a loved and faithful member of Grace Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon and was fondly known around the community as, California Wayne o r Pops.  Sitting in the local Subway sipping coffee and talking was a daily occurrence he truly enjoyed. Thank you to Joyce White and her family for the love and care they gave Robert during his last years. Memorial services will be held at a later date at Grace Baptist Church. Arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home and Crematory.Robert W. Roberts ROBErR T W. ROBErR TSMary Watford, 83, of Little Rock, passed away Wednesday, March 27, 2013. She was born in Holmes County, to the late William and Lula Mae Tindell. Mary was a great wife, mother, grandmother and friend. She attended St. James United Methodist Church in Little Rock. She is survived by her son, Ed Watford (Patty) of Little Rock; two grandchildren, Eric Watford and Shannon (Noah) Singer of Park City, Utah; two sisters, Essie Morgan and Shirley Hartman of Florida and one brother, Hugh Tindell of Florida. The family would like to thank the great staff at Brookside Health and Rehab for their love and care. There will be a graveside service to be held at Galilee United Methodist Church at a later date. Friends and family may sign the online guest book at www. rollerfuneralhomes. com/chenal. Mary WatfordElsie Cumi Vaughan of Geneva passed away Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at her residence. She was 66 years old. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charlie and Emma Smith Vaughan; two brothers, Johnny Vaughan and James Lee Vaughan and one sister, Charline Hawthorne. She is survived by her son, Matt (Tonya) McCall; one brother, Posie Vaughan; three sisters, Ruth Forsythe, Rachel Heath, and Eudene Hughes and several nieces, nephews and extended family members and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, April 12, 2013, at New Hope Baptist Church with Bro. Clay Hatcher ofciating. Burial followed in Mt. Ida Congregational Church Cemetery under the direction of Bottoms Garden Chapel Funeral Home of Geneva. The family received friends one hour prior to the services at the church.EElsie C. VaughanHelen Louise Bozarth, 80, of Chipley went to be with the Lord on April 13, 2013, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. She was born on Jan. 29, 1933, in Trenton, Mo., to Jesse and Marguerite Avery Meek. She was a homemaker and lived in Chipley for 10 years since coming from Panama City Beach. She was preceded in death by her parents, Jesse and Marguerite Avery Meek. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Homer D. Bozarth; two sons, Don Bozarth and wife Brenda of Graceville, and Jim Bozarth of Chipley; two brothers, Cecil Meek of Cambrey, Mo., and Marvin Meek of Jacksonville; sister, Ann Losey of Milan, Mo., and two grandchildren, Dylan Bozarth of Troy, Ala., and Jared Bozarth of Myrtle Beach, S.C. Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at Obert Funeral Home in Chipley with the Rev. Ernie Gray ofciating. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements.Helen L. BBozarthMrs. Brenda Gail Jones, 68, of Westville, died April 13, 2013.  A memorial service was held April 16, 2013, at Izagora United Methodist Church.  Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.BBrenda G. Jones Obituaries Ph H OTOS BY RANDAl L SS EYl L Er RThe Merchants of Historic Downtown Chipley hosted the second annual Flea Market Days on Friday and Saturday in conjunction with the Flea Across Florida event being hosted by communities along a 272-mile-long stretch of I-10 extending from Lake City to Pensacola. Yard sales were set up all along Highway 90 with several being found in Chipley, but no booths were set up this year along Railroad Avenue on Saturday. On Friday, there were only two booths out on Railroad Avenue, one being a vendor and the other belonging to the musical act, Diamonds, which performed both Friday and Saturday and kept downtown shoppers entertained. In Bonifay, only one yard sale was spotted, and it was located on the corner of Highway 90 and Highway 79. Flea Market Days

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7Celebrate National Library WeekCHIPLEY National Library Week is this week, and the theme is Communities Matter. To show their appreciation, the Washington County Library staff will have daily drawings all week for individuals to win fun library prizes. Check out any library material to receive a free ticket. You must be a library patron to enter. Remember to show you appreciation of your library by thanking county commissioners, the Friends of Washington County Public Library and other government leaders for their funding support.See librarians outside their natural habitatsCHIPLEY The Friends of Falling Waters State Park presents the 10th annual Legends and Lore Festival on Friday and Saturday. There will be living history demonstrators, animal exhibits, Civil War battle re-enactments, local artisans, crafts and great food. You can also stop at the Washington County Public Librarys table and chat with your library staff. Have you always had a question you wanted to know about the staff or library? Now is your opportunity to ask and learn more about the services that the library provides.Autism Awareness and Benet WalkCHIPLEY There will be an Autism Awareness and Benet Walk from 5-7 p.m. on Friday at Shivers Park in Chipley. There will be food, games, rafes and more. All donations will be gratefully appreciated. To help, donate, sponsor or for more information, contact Kristina Hodges at 459-1367.Poker Run plannedGRITNEY Gritney Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on their third annual Poker Run Event on Saturday. The day will start with a pancake breakfast, which we will start serving at 7 a.m. Registration for the run will begin at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Mrs. Jessica at 547-2200.1947 and 1948 ReunionCHIPLEY The 1947 class will celebrate its 66th reunion and the 1948 class will celebrate its 65th reunion at noon Saturday at Baileys Surf and Turf in Chipley. Come early to visit and reminisce. Bring a friend or relative if you want to. For more information, call 547-1409.Groce ReunionPANAMA CITY The annual Groce Reunion will be held at noon on Saturday at Under the Oaks Park on Tyndall Parkway. All friends and relatives are more than welcome. For more information or directions, call 773-3456. Community eEVentsENTSLibrary hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedV V e rnon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. : Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. communityCOMMUNITY calendarCALENDAR Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 4-5268 Public Auction The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Nichols Auto Repair and Towing @ 1146 Jackson Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 @ 8:00AM on the following dates: 98 Chev 2G1WL52M7W9279453 8 a.m. April 30th. 98 GMC 8 a.m. May 7, 1GKCS13W42511483 As published in the Washington County News April 17, 2013. 4-5267 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute A ct 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until April 27, 2013 to pay in full. No checks are accepted. 1. Kimberly Knight, Chipley, Fl. 2. Megan Brown, Chipley, Fl. 3. Anita Ingersoll, Wausau, Fl. 4. Gery McIntyre, Chipley, Fl. 5. Unknown. As published in the Washington County News April 10, 17, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE N O: 67-12-CA-000298 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. RONNIE J GOMILLION; BRENDA R. GOMILLION; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through, and under any of the avobe-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Washington County, Florida, will on the 22 day of May 2013, at 11:00am at the On the front steps of the Washington County Courthouse in Chipley, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the f ollowing -described property situate in Washington County, Florida: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 27, Township 4 North, Range 13 West, Washington County, Florida; thence South 890945 East along the South line of said Section 27, 1028.06 feet;thence North 003335East, 325.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 003335 East, 335.00 feet; thence South 890945 East, 300.00 feet to the East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of said Section 27; thence South003335 West along said East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 27, 335.00 feet;thence North 890945 West, 50.00 feet through a central angel of 1200001, an arc distance of 104.72 feet ( chord bearing= North 890945 West chord distance= 86.60 feet) to end curve, thence North 890945 west, 106.82 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 18 day of March, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: K McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 4-5269 NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned below to enforce lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues ( Section 83.801.83.809). The undersigned will sell at public sale or private sale by competitive bidding or by other disposal deemed appropriate by Orange Hill Road Self Storage on Thursday, May 2, 2013, starting at 8:00 am on the premises where said Property has been stored and which is located at Orange Hill Road Self Storage, 897 Orange Hill Road, 32428, City of Chipley, County of Washington, State of Florida, the following: # 12-Miranda Rogers, household items. Please contact Gary Cobia @ 850-263-2817 to redeem your unit prior to disposal. As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF TOMMY O. COTTER FILE NO. : 13-CP-22 DIVISION: PROBATE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of TOMMY O. COTTER, deceased, whose date of death was on February 12, 2013, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-1018, is pending in the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida, file number 13-CP-22. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: James J. Goodman, Jr. Jeff Goodman P.A. 935 Main Street Chipley, FL 32428 850-638-9722 Florida Bar No. 0071877 Personal Representative: DAWN FROST HADDOCK 2935 Pioneer Road Vernon, Florida 32462As published in the Washington County News April 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 11-00029 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-5, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, vs. CARL W. MELANCHUK, ET AL, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20, 2013, and entered in Case No. 11-00029 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Washington County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-5, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-5, is the Plaintff and Carl w. Melanchuk, Donna Marcele Baguzis, Washington County, a re defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, Washington County, Florida at on the 22 day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 33, BLOCK A, GILBERT ACRES SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 54, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING A PART OF THE WAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 4, A/K/A 1243 APPLE AVE., CHIPLEY, F L 32428-2018 Any person claiming an interest in teh surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Washington County, Florida this 20 day of March, 2013. Clerk of Circuit Court Washington County By: K McDaniel Deputy Clerk As published in the Washington County News April 10, 17, 2013 DIRECTV Official TV Deal -Americas top satellite provider! DIRECTV Plans starting at $29.99/mo for 12 months after instant rebate. Get the best in entertainment. 1-800253-0519 A CHILDLESS married couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Lets help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 ONLINE ONLY Real Estate Auction-Oceanfront Lot in Holden Beach & 17+/-Acre Water Front Tract in Hertford, NC. Direct ICW Access, Selling Regardless of Price in Excess or $399,000 on the Day of the Auction, 4/29 at 8am to 5/9 at 3pm, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Check our cars and trucks in todays classified section! Extra | Classieds

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, April 17, 2013 5016150 Bettie's Country RealtyBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510LARGE 3 BR 2 BA BRICK REDUCED-$89,900---43 ACRES-$77,500--4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000--2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000---15 ACRES-$28,500--3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900---NICE 3 BR 1 BA BRICK-$87,500---10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD REDUCED$134,900---EXECUTIVE 4 BR 2.5 BA BRICK ON 19+ AC-$350,000 12 AC MINI RANCH W/2 BR 2 BA BRICK HOME-$164,900---2 BR INTOWN-$69,900---5 AC 2 BR BRICK-$79,900---31+ AC OLD HOUSE PAVED ROAD-$65,900---42+ ACRES OWNER FINANCING-$89,900 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com Northwest Florida Community Hospital Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provider in the panhandle is seeking quali ed candidates for the following positions: Kitchen Supervisor Management experience, Healthcare experience preferred Purchasing Manager, FT RN, FT, ER, Nights CNA, PRN, SNU, Weekends General Maintenance, FTApplications available online at: www.NFCH.org and/or application to: Email dblount@nfch.org (850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622Smoke and Drug Free Campus AUCTION LARGE FARM AND CONSTRUCTION DATE: Saturday April 20 8:00 A.M. LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, FL 32426 (2) Local Farm Dispersals (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city & county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m Barber Shop for Sale 850-228-2173 Want to buy Chevy 3500 parts truck 88-98 or frame. (850)956-2220. Affordable Lawn Care. Low overhead=low prices. (850)263-3813, (850)849-1175. Books-n-Beans and More. Featuring used books of all kinds: Mystery, romance, horror, childrens, nonfiction, self help. Plus knick-knacks, furniture and more. Open Mon-Fri 9a.m.-3p.m. Come in and browse. We have something for everyone. Across from Sims Funeral Home in Bonifay. High School Graduate needs work. Day laborer, yard work, heavy lifting, etc. (850)768-1611, (850)547-5953. Ask for Aaron. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located in Graceville, Florida is seeking qualified persons for the following positions: RNs to work on an as needed basis, primarily evenings, nights and weekends; must have a current Florida Nursing License. Premium pay offered for these positions. If you are seeking to supplement your income and meet the above requirements, Campbellton-Graceville Hospital is the place for you. Apply or inquire to Campbellton-Graceville Hospital www .c ghospit al.com or call (850)263-4431 ext. 2012. Resume may be faxed to (850)263-3312, Attn: Personnel Director or email to JAustin@p anhandle.rr .com. Drug Free workplaxe, EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 General Need a temporary position? Become a University of South Florida Evaluation Data Collector in Holmes County. Data collection requires working in Holmes County high schools, attending a paid training in Tampa, FL (all expenses paid by USF), and survey administration. Training will be April 29 May 2. Please contact Ashley Singleton at asingle3@health.usf.ed u or 813-974-6698 for information. General Now accepting applications for servers. Apply in person at Frenchs Restaurant and Oyster Bar located on Hwy. 90 Caryville, Fl. 850-548-5800. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Hiring immediately. We are looking for a multitask individual to work for our internet shipping company. The applicant must be highly proficient with computer, typing & writing skills, very detail oriented and motivated. This position is in the Vernon area. Work hours are 9-5 Monday-Friday. Position starts at $9.00 per hour with pay increases based on performance. Applicant must have a good car and be dependable. References will be checked. If interested call (850)535-2133 and speak to Russ. Install/Repair A/C DUCT and/or EQUIPMENT INSTALLERS 5 yrs. Min. Experience (850) 638-3611 Logistics/TransportDISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has openings for a District Manager position. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The perfect candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until April 19, 2013. Web ID#34246700Text FL46700 to 56654 OTR Drivers Wanted IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngstown in Bay County The News Herald needs carriers for early AM hours Must have: Be 18 yrs or older Areliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance Avalid drivers license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cp arker@chipley p aper .com Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngs town in Bay County The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work form 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must Have: .Be 18 yrs or older .A reliable vehicle .Proof of Auto Insurance .A valid drivers license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cparker@ chipleypaper.com Maintenance The City of Vernon, Fl will accept applications for the position of Facility Maintenance / Custodial worker. Various janitorial duties, plus routine maintenance to City owned properties and minor repairs. Starting Salary $8.50/hr. part-time 20 hours a week, flexible hours may be required at times to accommodate activities, I.e. evenings or weekends. Apply at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Vernon Fl; Monday thru Friday 7:00 am to 5:00 pm, application deadline is Monday, Aprill 22nd at 4:30 p.m.. Pre-employment drug testing is required. The City of Vernon is a Drug-free workplace, equal opportunity employer. Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Program Assistant for the Community Services Office in DeFuniak Springs. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist qualifying low-income families with Services Programs. QUALIFICATIONS: High School diploma (GED); 1 yr experience serving low-income or elderly. Must have Current drivers license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For additional information and qualifications call Lea Ann, Personnel Tech or visit www .tricountycommunity council.com Applications must be submitted to any Tri-County Community Council office by April 22, 2013; 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR CAREER! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888203-3179 WWW. CENTURAONLINE. COM PROTECT YOUR IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free Gold Guide AMERICAN BULLION, (800) 527-5679 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 1-800443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Barber Shop for sale (850) 228-2173. Visi Opportunity MeetingCome Join us at the Holmes County High School Gymnasium at Sat. 4/20/13 @ 5:00pm for a meeting to discuss a Great Ground Floor Business opportunity for those Entrepreneurial people .YOU need to get in NOW. Timing is EVERYTHING! Vsi can offer you and your family a Life-Changing Opportunity designed to completely transform your life. A generous income with a bonus structure that will enable you to provide for your family and achieve unsurpassed wealth in the future. Sponsored by Poe White and Margie Metz. Please call for additional Information 904-955-5817 or check us out at www.visiworldwide.comText FL48397 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintance & water provided. 850-547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now offering studio apts. $350/mo. 2 Bdrm $500/month. Includes city utilities. (850)557-7732. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 -$450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Taking Applications. 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex. Background check and employment verification required. 850638-7128 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Townhouse Apt. Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath House Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 2BD/1BA House. 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Call 850-271-9973. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. Two, 2BR/1BA MH and one 3BR/1BA MH. All on Corbin Rd. Storage buildings, decks, all electric. On nice big lots. I furnish water, garbage, do lawn in summer, spray once a month and change AC filters. For more info call Lou at 638-1911 or 326-0044. Sorry, no pets. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home 2BR clean, great condition, furnished, CH/A, carport, paved road, nice area. No pets & NOT in park. $525/mth 850-638-7009. Secluded 5Br/2Ba MH on 2 acres, close to Holmes Creek. High & dry. $600/mo, 1st & last month. HUD approved. Call (850)326-3687. Trailer for rent. Bethlehem. (850)547-3293 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. 3BR/2BA Housein Chipley Owner finance Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700/month. Call 850-547-3746. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70s or you purchase as is for lower 50s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Classifieds work!

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2 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Seven inexpensive ways to update a home now Oftentimes, buying a home opens up a bottomless pit of opportunities for projects and improvements. While some homeowners engage in dierent repairs and x-ups out of necessity, many others like to freshen-up their spaces out of personal preference instead of need. But even the most well-intentioned projects can be waylaid if budgets are tight. e following are seven projects that wont break the bank. 1. Move around furniture. You may be able to change the look of a room without spending any money. Find a focal point in the room and angle the furniture toward it. Try changing the placement of chairs and sofas. Simply moving a curio cabinet from one corner to another may also make a dierence. 2. Add lighting. Lighting at different levels in the room can create a vibrant impact. Many homeowners mistakenly put in a couple of table lamps and think that will be adequate. However, properly illuminating a room means varying the lighting to create dierent moods at dierent times. 3. Add new pillows or drapes. Changing a few aspects of a room can give it an entirely new look. If you want to add a splash of color but dont know what to do, think about incorporating some new throw pillows or change the curtains. 4. Change knobs or small accents. Switch out cabinet knobs for something updated and modern. Take inventory of wall outlets and light switches and think about selecting new ones that coordinate with your home decor. 5. Use plants. Empty corners or spots youre not certain how to ll may benet from a plant. Plants are inexpensive ways to add instant color and visual appeal to a room. Plus, having live plants can help improve indoor air by ltering out contaminants. A home with plants also feels more cozy. 6. Hang new wall art. Finding new prints to hang could instantly change a rooms ambience. And you neednt spend a lot of money on professional photography, either. Grab your camera and take a few close-up shots of owers or take in a landscape scenery. Many of todays home printers can produce professional-quality prints in minutes. 7. Try a new coat of Kelli Ellis is an interior designer for all sea sons. But when spring rolls around each year, she is truly in her element. An award-winning celebrity interior designer, textile designer and design psychology expert, Elliss work is everywhere, from television, the Web to print media. Known for her love of owers and oral design, Ellis also serves as a spokesperson for the Society of American Florists. According to Ellis, one of the best and easiest ways to add seasonal color and refresh a living space is with fresh owers displayed in a variety of containers. A lot of people are afraid of color in their decor, so a less scary way of introducing color is with owers and vases, Ellis notes. Fresh owers can go with any type of decor and generally last as long as your mood, so there are endless opportunities to experiment without making a long-term commitment. Decorating with owers begins with choosing a container that is in sync with the season and the style of your home, counsels Ellis. ere are so many container options for every type of decor, Ellis says. If your home leans toward country, think about using old decanters, tins or even wooden boxes. For contemporary homes, glass vases with clean lines work best. And for traditional homes, go with urns or ornate vases. Next comes color. While Ellis leans toward monochromatic arrangements of white owers stargazers, lilies, roses and orchids are among her personal favorites. When choosing owers for a particular spot or room, Ellis advises looking at complementary colors those that are on the opposite side of the color wheel. For example, if the walls are a warm shade of yellow or gold, a container lled with blue owers, such as hydrangeas, delphiniums or sapphire orchids, makes a bold statement. I think the greatest thing in the world is to bring your own vase or container to the orist and ask for something special that works with it, she reveals. Not every orist has a vase that suits your taste or will work in a particular spot, so I take in my containers and say, I want something blue. en Im both surprised with the result and certain that it will work with the decor.Celebrity designer celebrates the sights and scents of springSee UPDATE page 6 Carpet Masters Carpet,Tile andUpholstery CleaningExperts 906 Joseph Drive, Chipley (850) 638-6789

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 3 The Best of Both WorldsLocal Agents, Local Oces, Local Service, Best Value.The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life.Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Membership doesnt cost, it pays! 1361 JACKSON AVE., CHIPLEY 6381756washington@bic.com1108 N. WAUKESHA ST., BONIFAY 5474227holmes@bic.com WESTPOINTHOMEFACTORY OUTLETSALE SALE SALEGreat selection of famous name comforters, sheets, towels, pillows, blankets, throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices.1055 Fowler Ave., Chipley Behind our Chipley factory in the Industrial Park. O of Orange Hill Hwy. on Commerce Ave.Hours: Thur. and Fri. 9 AM 5 PM Sat. 9 AM 3 PM(850) 638-9421Huge Selection ofVELLUX BLANKETSOnly $5.99 thru April Twin Size SHEETS starting at $2.99Twin CO MFORT ERS starting at $5.99GREAT SELECTION OF TOWELS AT OUTLET PRICES! Pairs of P ILLOWCASES starting at just 99 Hydroponics becoming popular with local farmersBy CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCTcspears@chipleypaper.comis month is planting time for vegetable crops such as sweet corn, southern peas, tomatoes and squash, said Extension Agent Matthew J. Orwat. Field corn planting season started several weeks ago and is continuing. Ranchers are testing their elds for fertility requirements and preparing for the spring growing season. Orwat, an Extension Agent I in Horticulture for Washington Countys University of Floridas IFAS Extension, added that wheat crops should also be coming to a head pretty soon. Orwat said that the latest agricultural phenomenon to expect in this area is hydroponics. Hydroponics have become very popular lately and strawberries have become very popular this year in this eld, said Orwat. is demand might grow if there isnt a strong supply for strawberries in Panama City, he said. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants in water instead of soil and using sh defecation as fertilizer. Orwat also said that their services have increased eorts to provide education throughout the surrounding areas about various aspects of planting any where from home gardens to farmers crops. Classes include learning how to maximize your dehydrator with an introduction to dehydrating and vacuum sealing, 4-H summer programs that allow children to learn rsthand science that mixes healthy lifestyles in through snacks and recreation, pressure canning courses, beekeeping in the Panhandle and much more. Information about upcoming classes can be found at the websites, washington.ifas.u.edu and holmes.ifas.u.edu. Dr. John Beasley, UGA Extension Agronomist, made a Peanut Production Update presentation at this years Panhandle Row Crop Short Course in Marianna, which highlights the important factors for peanut production this year. Today I was talking about peanut production, which will focus on several dierent topics, said Beasley. Lets talk about rotation. Coming out of 2012 production year in which we had tremendous yields across the Southeast but we also increased acreage from the 2011 year and, with that combined, we ended up with a tremendous over supply of peanuts, not only for the Southeast, but for the U.S. in total. He said as peanut growers were moving into the 2013 calendar there was a lot of concern about this over supply and it causing depressed prices. ey were having to look at growers having to grow peanuts for $355 a ton that was the price they were going to see, but one thing has Lettuce grown using hydrophonics farming See HYDROPONICS page 4

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4 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013HYDROPONICS from page 3changed over the past several weeks the Chinese have come in unexpectedly and purchased a lot of peanuts and this is whittling away some of that over supply, said Beasley. is isnt going to get rid of all of it, but it certainly helps. We have seen some contracts come out and thats going to help too if we can get peanut prices at $450 a ton but we still need to manage our acreage in 2013. He said it would be preferable if they could reduce the amount of acreage. Weve got to get it lower, said Beasley. I cant tell you exactly what that acreage should be. I know in Georgia were thinking we should be back down to 5,000 acres; we were over 730 last year. I know Florida was over 200,000 in 2012 and the year before they were at 150,000 to 155,000, so somewhere down close to where we were in 2011, particularly where we are with the yield potential. e two crops that are the most promising are corn and soybeans, according to Beasley. If youve been paying attention, the market has been strong on those two for a while now, he said. Corn prices are about $6-plus, soybean prices have been at $1 a bushelplus. You can book those and pencil in a pretty good amount of prot. If a farmer decided to go this route, he said that they strongly consider their rotation. e one point I emphasize to growers is the fact that if you include soybean in your rotation in 2013, think about the negative impact that its going to have on peanuts in following years, said Beasley. If you plan your 2014, 2015 and beyond cropping sequence dont forget that soybean is a legume like peanut and will harbor lot of the same disease organisms and is best to incorporate cotton or corn for a couple of years prior to going back into peanut. Another emphasis for this year was to plant earlier. Im encouraging planters to consider planting earlier, he said. Weve conducted research the last three years looking at planting from April 20 into June 1 for seven consecutive weeks. Weve seen high yields with these dates and seen that with a planting date range of around April 25 on into the May 10 to May 15 dates, and yields declining after that. Beasley said that this is a contradiction to previous instructions. I know we came in for years telling you that you can plant later because of spotted wilt virus and we were seeing higher yields in May 10 and growing resistance to spotted wilt virus, we have exibility in planting; we can plant earlier, he said. Research has shown that. In fact were being shown that yield declines as we plant later, with cold weather shutting down maturity on those peanuts planted at the end of May and part of June, so consider planting earlier but watch your soil temperature. He explained that it is best to wait until that average four inch temperature is above 65 degrees, preferably closer to 70 degrees. Make sure you dont plant before an approaching cold front, said Beasley. Yields decline in soil temperatures that were declining, so we want to move our planting window to three weeks earlier and to get our crops planted at least by May 20. www.kubota.com ZG127S $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months $0 Down & 0% A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months* Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.Expect Affordability Expect Exceptional Performance Expect Signature Styling & Comfort Expect Full 4-Year/300-Hour Warranty** Panhandle Tractor, Inc.5003 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 526-2257 Farm Families of the Year WASHINGTON COUNTYJarrod Adkison FamilyHOLMES COUNTYKen Barton Family www.kubota.com ZG127S $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months Financing for 36 Months $0 Down & 0% A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months* Command lawns. Capture attention. Bring home the new Kubota Kommander today Great Expectations start here. Offer ends May 31, 2013.Expect Affordability Expect Exceptional Performance Expect Signature Styling & Comfort Expect Full 4-Year/300-Hour Warranty** Panhandle Tractor, Inc.5003 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 526-2257 Panhandle Tractor, Inc. MAIN STREET MARKET & FeedCome see our large selection of feed!WE ACCEPT EBT, VISA & DEBIT Red Fox Fertilizer We have a great selection of Bonnie Plants! TOMATOES PINE STRAW COASTAL SQUARE All blends available

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 5 ALL TYPES OF INSURANCENeed Farm or Ranch Insurance?Proudly representing Great American Insurance Group.CALL TOD AY FOR A QUOTE!(850) 638-18051396 Jackson Avenue Chipley, FL 32428 Serving You Is Our Most Important Product Gardening is a reward ing hobby with thousands of devotees. Backyard gardens provide beauty and aesthetic appeal to a landscape, and they can be a source of homegrown food and a natural habitat for outdoor wildlife. A selfsustaining garden can be an ecient addition to any home, but gardens require upkeep and a certain measure of dedication. A selfsucient garden is a garden that sustains itself through proper planning and execution. Such gardens can almost take care of themselves so long as the soil is healthy soil, the seeds are reused and organic material is produced. Self-sustaining gardens also represent a lifestyle where individuals are responsible for producing their own foods -thus sustaining themselves without the need to shop for produce elsewhere. When planting your own selfsustaining garden, consider the following tips. Start with soil. Healthy soil is essential to a thriving garden. e soil must have the right Plant a self-sustaining gardenpH, correct texture and composition, and be full of nutrients. Very often the native soil in yards is not adequate to keep a garden thriving. In such instances, the soil needs to be improved. Adding compost -which can be produced in the yard as well -to the soil will enrich the soil with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Maintain proper soil consistency. Soil that is the right consistency, meaning the optimum balance of sand, clay and actual soil, is another necessity for a self-sustaining garden. e ideal ratio should be 40 percent sand, 40 percent silt and 20 percent clay. Having the right balance of soil can secure root formation and promote proper drainage. Test the pH. Certain plants need a specic pH in order to grow. A neutral pH range is typically ideal for growing vegetables. A pH tester can be purchased from a gardening center. Amend the soil accordingly to get the soil back to its correct level. Know the growing season. Vegetables should be planted during the season in which they will thrive. Peas, beets and cabbage, for example, are coldtemperature vegetables, while cucumbers, squash and melons thrive in warm climates. Plant accordingly so that the vegetables will have the best chances for success. Purchase quality seeds. Use fresh seeds, particu larly ones that have been harvested from your own garden the year before, to have the best chances for germination. Or buy seeds from a reputable source, like a garden center or an online retailer who specializes in vegetable seeds. Start seedlings indoors. You may want to work with seedlings indoors so that you can monitor growth and care for them more easily. en transplant the seedlings outside when they are stable enough for the elements.

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6 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Few things are better than having a functional and beautiful outdoor space to entertain guests. Having a great outdoor space enables a person to host parties or intimate gatherings all year long. ere are many things homeowners can do to ensure their entertaining space is safe and functional. Here are a few key tips for readying your yard for entertaining possibilities. Expand on these basics to customize an area for your unique needs. Check the area for any needed repairs. Look over the deck or patio to take note of any aws that may present Prepare a deck or patio for entertainingConsider a replace or re pit. For centuries man (and woman) has gathered around re for socialization and a means to warming up. Having a backyard replace, pit or chiminea is a conversation-starter, a decorative focal point, and a functional tool to extend the number of seasons in which outdoor entertaining can take place. Place the re wisely and with concern for safety. Invest in quality outdoor furniture. Todays yards are extensions of a homes interior. Guests no longer want to sit on uncomfortable metal or plastic furniture. ere are many dierent outdoor sofas and chairs that are as stylish as they are comfortable. ese pieces can be matched to the decor inside your home for a cohesive look. Accessorize. Consider the creature comforts of indoors and mimic that outdoors. Dont shy away from hanging artwork on an exterior wall or using urns or pottery to decorate the space. Weatherresistant materials ensure everything from clocks to televisions can be used outdoors. paint. After youve exhausted other avenues, choosing a new paint color may be the new look you desire. Painting is one of the least expensive yet most dramatic methods of changing a homes interior. With dozens of hues to choose from, and new apps that enable you to take snapshots of things in nature or in your life and match them up to a paint color, you will have scores of opportunities to explore fresh new colors for your home. When you get inspired to make improvements to the home but fear how much it may take out of your wallet, consider inexpensive tricks that can induce a big wow factor. UPDATE from page 2safety hazards. Are there any loose railings? Are all screws and nails ush so they do not cause tripping? Are there any cracks in concrete or loose patio blocks? Be sure to remedy all of the repairs needed to ensure guests will be safe. If you are unsure of any structural decits, consult with a contractor. Hire a reputable contractor. If you are just laying the groundwork for a new patio or deck, it is important to get the necessary permits and then hire a person who has been properly vetted. Check qualications and licensing before hiring a contractor and ask to view a portfolio of his or her previous work. Word-of-mouth recommendations from trusted friends and family members are good, and you can also double-check qualications by contacting the Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been lodged or use a service such as Angies List to read reviews of his or her work. ink about closing in a portion of a deck or patio. e use of a canopy, netting or even greenery to protect an entertaining space can help minimize weatherrelated damage to outdoor furniture. Netting will keep a good number of biting insects at bay when the weather is warm and humid. Plan well-dened areas. Establish a sitting nook where guests can gather and talk. Have a bar or serving area where refreshments are made and served. Make sure there is a shaded area for when the sun is too uncomfortable to make sitting outside enjoyable. Similarly, have a sunny area where people can soak up a few rays or dry o after a dip in the spa or pool.

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Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 7 Alabama Lic # 98126 FL lic # CAC1814302 1075 N Hwy 79, Bonifay, FL Panhandle Lumber & Supply 405 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay, FLwww.panhandlesalvage.com850-547-9354 Free Pool Water Testing!!!Pool Chemicals & Pool Salt IN STOCK!! Garden Tools on Sale! 405 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay, FL Red Mulch, Cypress Mulch, and Top Soil Privacy Fence Panel $24.95 Landscape Timbers $3.19 Deck Kits & Pole Barn Kits C & C Construction of Northwest Florida LLCServicing Northwest Florida and Lower Alabama We do new construction, replacement, and repairs for Call today for your free quote. 850-547-1001FL: CCC1327331 AL: S-44779 Feel like cheating? Forget what the inside of your home looks like for just a bit and focus on your homes exterior. e exterior of your home makes a lasting and daily impression on your friends and family, along with your neighbors, says Mark Clement, professional contractor and host of MyFixItUpLife home improvement radio show. While the weather is good, my advice is to get outside and x up problem areas, work on the landscaping and invest in products that make your homes exterior not only look great, but work great. Clement recommends assessing your needs and then diving in on projects. On the exterior of the home there are three big, critical areas I recommend people evaluate every year -the roof, the windows and the entry door. Clement oers these recommendations for keeping your home exterior in top shape: Roong Tips 1. Check your roof yearly to determine the condition of your roof. Look for problem areas, such as missing or broken shingles, along with roong tiles that may be apping in the wind. ese are all indications that a new roof may be in your future. 2. Dont forget to check the sides of your roof. e southern exposure weathers signicantly faster than the other sides of the roof, so make sure to care 3. If youre in the market for a new roof, Keep your home exterior in top shapeinvestigate polymer roofing tiles as a good option. ese impact-resistant slate and shake tiles are man-made in a wide variety of colors. Some tiles, like those from DaVinci Roofscapes that Clement chose for his home, have a 50-year limited warranty and are ideal for all types of weather conditions, including hurricanes and hail. Entry Door Tips 1. If you can see light around your main entry door from the inside, the door is hard to close or lock, or the door itself is warped, its time to consider a new door. 2. Even if you cant see light, air may be moving through gaps in the weather stripping at a surprising rate. If you can feel air moving or a signicant cold spot, thats a signal your existing door could benet from better sealing. 3. Determine what role you would like an entry door to play on your homes exterior. Do you want it to be a focal point with a splash of color? Is it important that you have decorative glass in the door system? Search the web for Door Designer and My Saved Door online tools to help visualize how a new door will look on your home. 4. ink about the weather conditions your homes door faces along with your energy bills. If either run to the extreme, consider replacing your entryway with a highperformance berglass door (which has four times more insulation than wood doors). Window Tips 1. Evaluate the functionality and decorative appeal of your current windows. If you have condensation between glass panes, the windows are hard to open or close, your energy bills are soaring or if there are drafts coming in around the window units, then its time to seriously consider replacement windows. 2. Vinyl framed windows are the category of windows with the highest growth rate in the country. Why? ese frames are extremely energyecient and some of the best have fusion-welded corners and multi-chambered construction. 3. Investigate your window options and stick with a national manufacturer that can stand behind a long-term warranty. 4. Remember that a thermally-ecient window is sealed tightest when its locked. So, to keep your energy bills lowers, dont just close your windows, make sure to lock them. Trim Tips 1. If you have the opportunity to replace your entry door or windows, make sure to nish o the job with stylish window and door trim. Lightweight and easy to install, weatherresistant synthetic mouldings, shutters and entryway surrounds from Fypon(R) are a denite do-it-yourself project for any homeowner. 2. Take an eagles eye look at your home. Most houses have louvers placed high above the attic or garage space to allow ventilation in those areas. And, most houses have wooden louvers that can rot with time. Replacing louvers with insect-resistant and rotresistant synthetic louvers can improve the homes appearance and functionality. 3. Wrap it up. Clement recommends that if you have unsightly porch posts you can easily transform them into showpiece parts of your home by using Column Wrap Kits. e decorative synthetic pieces can be installed in less than 15 minutes around existing structural posts and columns to give an upgraded look to any home. Contractor Mark Clement installs polymer DaVinci Slate tiles.

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8 Spring Home and Farm, Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser, April 4, 2013 Fix-it. Clean it. Paint it. Plant it.is in the airYou'll nd everything you need to spruce up your home and garden for Spring at WALMART!We'll be glad to help plan your "honey-do's" and weekend projects check out our variety of plants and garden supplies!Great selection, prices and service! It's what you expect from your local Walmart.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 3023408 Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 Volume 51 Number 5 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 me me me me e e e e e e 5 1 1 Nu mb er5 me51Number5 W W W DNESDAYAPRIL1 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 201 3 3 WEDNE S DAYAPRIL17 2013 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Your HOMETOWN Shopping Guide For Washington & Holmes CountiesFREETAKE ONE5016153 TrainforhandsonAviaonCareer. FAAapprovedprogram. Financialaidifqualied-Housingavailable. CALLAviaonInstuteofMaintenance866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING 3023405 Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and FinancialAidifqualied.SCHEVauthorized.MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 3023404 3023403 PACKAGESSTARTINGATONLY$29.99FOR 12 MOS. AFTER INSTANT SAVINGS ENTERTAINMENT PACKAGE/MONTH AUTHORIZED DEALER 1-800-293-1402New Approved Customers Only. 24-Mo Agreement Required.DIRECT*STAR TV Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255 or www.eddoctor.com.Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.Hessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 3023402 DIRECTV Official TV Deal -Americas top satellite provider! DIRECTV Plans starting at $29.99/mo for 12 months after instant rebate. Get the best in entertainment. 1-800253-0519 A CHILDLESS married couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Lets help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 ONLINE ONLY Real Estate Auction-Oceanfront Lot in Holden Beach & 17+/-Acre Water Front Tract in Hertford, NC. Direct ICW Access, Selling Regardless of Price in Excess or $399,000 on the Day of the Auction, 4/29 at 8am to 5/9 at 3pm, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m AUCTION LARGE FARM AND CONSTRUCTION DATE: Saturday April 20 8:00 A.M. LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, FL 32426 (2) Local Farm Dispersals (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city & county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m Barber Shop for Sale 850-228-2173 Want to buy Chevy 3500 parts truck 88-98 or frame. (850)956-2220. Affordable Lawn Care. Low overhead=low prices. (850)263-3813, (850)849-1175. Books-n-Beans and More. Featuring used books of all kinds: Mystery, romance, horror, childrens, nonfiction, self help. Plus knick-knacks, furniture and more. Open Mon-Fri 9a.m.-3p.m. Come in and browse. We have something for everyone. Across from Sims Funeral Home in Bonifay. High School Graduate needs work. Day laborer, yard work, heavy lifting, etc. (850)768-1611, (850)547-5953. Ask for Aaron. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located in Graceville, Florida is seeking qualified persons for the following positions: RNs to work on an as needed basis, primarily evenings, nights and weekends; must have a current Florida Nursing License. Premium pay offered for these positions. If you are seeking to supplement your income and meet the above requirements, Campbellton-Graceville Hospital is the place for you. Apply or inquire to Campbellton-Graceville Hospital www .c ghospit al.com or call (850)263-4431 ext. 2012. Resume may be faxed to (850)263-3312, Attn: Personnel Director or email to JAustin@p anhandle.rr .com. Drug Free workplaxe, EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 General Need a temporary position? Become a University of South Florida Evaluation Data Collector in Holmes County. Data collection requires working in Holmes County high schools, attending a paid training in Tampa, FL (all expenses paid by USF), and survey administration. Training will be April 29 May 2. Please contact Ashley Singleton at asingle3@health.usf.ed u or 813-974-6698 for information. General Now accepting applications for servers. Apply in person at Frenchs Restaurant and Oyster Bar located on Hwy. 90 Caryville, Fl. 850-548-5800. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Hiring immediately. We are looking for a multitask individual to work for our internet shipping company. The applicant must be highly proficient with computer, typing & writing skills, very detail oriented and motivated. This position is in the Vernon area. Work hours are 9-5 Monday-Friday. Position starts at $9.00 per hour with pay increases based on performance. Applicant must have a good car and be dependable. References will be checked. If interested call (850)535-2133 and speak to Russ. Install/Repair A/C DUCT and/or EQUIPMENT INSTALLERS 5 yrs. Min. Experience (850) 638-3611 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngstown in Bay County The News Herald needs carriers for early AM hours Must have: Be 18 yrs or older Areliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance Avalid drivers license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cp arker@chipley p aper .com Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Carriers needed in Washington, Jackson, & Calhoun Co or Fountain/ Youngs town in Bay County The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work form 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must Have: .Be 18 yrs or older .A reliable vehicle .Proof of Auto Insurance .A valid drivers license If interested, Contact Colin Parker at 850-625-7466 or cparker@ chipleypaper.com Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Check our cars and trucks in todays classified section! The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Bettie's Country RealtyBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510LARGE 3 BR 2 BA BRICK REDUCED-$89,900---43 ACRES-$77,500--4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000--2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000---15 ACRES-$28,500--3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900---NICE 3 BR 1 BA BRICK-$87,500---10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD REDUCED$134,900---EXECUTIVE 4 BR 2.5 BA BRICK ON 19+ AC-$350,000 12 AC MINI RANCH W/2 BR 2 BA BRICK HOME-$164,900---2 BR INTOWN-$69,900---5 AC 2 BR BRICK-$79,900---31+ AC OLD HOUSE PAVED ROAD-$65,900---42+ ACRES OWNER FINANCING-$89,900 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com 5016150 3023407 Go Painlessly withTHERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-13902 3023406 Logistics/TransportDISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has openings for a District Manager position. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The perfect candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until April 19, 2013. Web ID#34246700Text FL46700 to 56654 OTR Drivers Wanted IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Maintenance The City of Vernon, Fl will accept applications for the position of Facility Maintenance / Custodial worker. Various janitorial duties, plus routine maintenance to City owned properties and minor repairs. Starting Salary $8.50/hr. part-time 20 hours a week, flexible hours may be required at times to accommodate activities, I.e. evenings or weekends. Apply at City Hall, 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Vernon Fl; Monday thru Friday 7:00 am to 5:00 pm, application deadline is Monday, Aprill 22nd at 4:30 p.m.. Pre-employment drug testing is required. The City of Vernon is a Drug-free workplace, equal opportunity employer. Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Program Assistant for the Community Services Office in DeFuniak Springs. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist qualifying low-income families with Services Programs. QUALIFICATIONS: High School diploma (GED); 1 yr experience serving low-income or elderly. Must have Current drivers license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For additional information and qualifications call Lea Ann, Personnel Tech or visit www .tricountycommunity council.com Applications must be submitted to any Tri-County Community Council office by April 22, 2013; 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR CAREER! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888203-3179 WWW. CENTURAONLINE. COM PROTECT YOUR IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free Gold Guide AMERICAN BULLION, (800) 527-5679 Barber Shop for sale (850) 228-2173. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 1-800443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Visi Opportunity MeetingCome Join us at the Holmes County High School Gymnasium at Sat. 4/20/13 @ 5:00pm for a meeting to discuss a Great Ground Floor Business opportunity for those Entrepreneurial people .YOU need to get in NOW. Timing is EVERYTHING! Vsi can offer you and your family a Life-Changing Opportunity designed to completely transform your life. A generous income with a bonus structure that will enable you to provide for your family and achieve unsurpassed wealth in the future. Sponsored by Poe White and Margie Metz. Please call for additional Information 904-955-5817 or check us out at www.visiworldwide.comText FL48397 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintance & water provided. 850-547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now offering studio apts. $350/mo. 2 Bdrm $500/month. Includes city utilities. (850)557-7732. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 -$450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Taking Applications. 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex. Background check and employment verification required. 850638-7128 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Townhouse Apt. Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath House Chipley area. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 2BD/1BA House. 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Call 850-271-9973. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Trailer for rent. Bethlehem. (850)547-3293 For Rent. Two, 2BR/1BA MH and one 3BR/1BA MH. All on Corbin Rd. Storage buildings, decks, all electric. On nice big lots. I furnish water, garbage, do lawn in summer, spray once a month and change AC filters. For more info call Lou at 638-1911 or 326-0044. Sorry, no pets. Mobile Home 2BR clean, great condition, furnished, CH/A, carport, paved road, nice area. No pets & NOT in park. $525/mth 850-638-7009. Secluded 5Br/2Ba MH on 2 acres, close to Holmes Creek. High & dry. $600/mo, 1st & last month. HUD approved. Call (850)326-3687. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. 3BR/2BA Housein Chipley Owner finance Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700/month. Call 850-547-3746. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70s or you purchase as is for lower 50s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Classifieds work! Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Classifiedcan!If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the drugcompaniesdontwantyoutoknow!CallTollFree (800)960-4255 or www.eddoctor.com.Dr.KevinHornsby,MDwillmailthe first37menthatrespondtothisad afreecopyofhisnewthirtydollar bookADoctorsGuidetoErectile Dysfunction.Hessosurethisbook willchangeyourlifehewilleven paythepostageandhandling.If thepopularpillsdontworkforyou, regardlessofyourageormedical history(includingdiabetesand prostatecancer)youoweittoyourselfandyourladytoreadthisbook. 3023401