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Title: Washington County news
Uniform Title: Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Chipley Fla
Publication Date: 03-27-2013
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates: 30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 23, 1924.
General Note: L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID: UF00028312:00818
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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWS Washington County Connect with us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT tiser chipleypaper.com Wednesday, MARCH 27 2013 Chamber banquet set for April 4 CHIPLEY The Washington County Chamber of Commerce annual Membership Banquet will be held at 6 p.m. April 4 at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. Big River Bluegrass Band will provide the entertainment and the theme of the event is Denim & Diamonds. The event begins with a punch reception sponsored by the Washington Rehabilitation & Nursing Center at 6 p.m. and the dinner, provided by the Northwest Florida Community Hospital, willl begin at 7 p.m. Sponsorships are available for $250 and include 4 tickets and recognition as a sponsor of the event in the program. Single tickets may be purchased for $25 each. For more information, call the Chamber at 638-4157. CSX announces road work CHIPLEY CSX has noti ed at the Washington County News that the railroad will be working on several intersections in Chipley in April. On April 8-9, the roads Odom, New Prospect and Advant will be closed for two days for roadwork on the crossroads. The work moves to 5th Street, 7th Street, Main Street, 2nd Street, Dalton, Grif n and Glass roads on April 10-11. DEA arrests four on drug charges By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.co m CHIPLEY The Drug Enforcement Administration arrested four men in connection with drug charges on Sunday, March 17, after 7.9 pounds of methamphetamines were discovered at Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley. Arrested were Raymundo Reyes-Barragan, 43, of Chipley, on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Hector Hernandez, 46, of Atlanta, Ga., on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Ruben Heredia-Barron, 42, of Atlanta on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; and Alejandro Barron-Soto, 30, of Troy, Ala., on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida criminal complaint is dated March 18 and signed by Special Agent John C. Manna, and a probable cause af davit outlined the incidents leading up to the arrests. According to the af davit written by Special Agent Manna, the men were arrested in connection with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute in excess of 500 grams of a mixture or substance containing methamphetamine. In April 2012, the DEA initiated an investigation into a drug traf cking organization based in Northern Florida that moved or transported cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine from Texas and Atlanta, Georgia, to Northern Florida, the af davit states. A DEA informant, identi ed as Cooperating Source in the af davit, and who has provided information to the agency for over 25 years, began a series of telephone calls and text messages with Reyes-Barragan on March 6, according to the af davit, during which the informant negotiated with Reyes-Barragan for the purchase of pound quantities of methamphetamine. According to Manna, the informants assistance to the DEA has resulted in the arrest of dozens of drug traf ckers and the seizure of hundreds of kilograms of drugs. I have worked with the CS for over 20 years and have never found information the CS provided to be untruthful. On Wednesday, March 6, the informant reported to PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER | The News Drug Enforcement Administration agents, along with Florida Highway Patrol, Washington County Sheriffs Of ce and Chipley Police Department, arrested four men on Sunday, March 17, at Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley on charges of having almost 8 pounds of methamphetamine in their possession for distribution. See DEA A2 INDEX Opinion ................................. A4 Sports ................................... A9 Extra ..................................... B1 Obituaries ............................. B5 Classi eds .......................... B7-8 TDC looks to end grant program By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.co m CHIPLEY The Tourism Development Council might be getting out of the grant awarding business. Members discussed funding options during the TDC workshop on Monday, and decided to hold a workshop in May or June to further discuss options for promoting Washington County events outside of outright fund disbursements. When I rst came on this board, the TDC was seen as a big old fat cow, said Council Chairman Joel Pate. Council funds have dwindled over the years, and Council Member Scott Sweeney said he didnt think giving out grants was the best use of the TDCs limited resources. The TDC traditionally has given grants of up to $2,000 to community events with the stipulation that the funds be used for advertising. Over the past two years, the TDC had been cutting down the amounts the various events. I think the TDC should be in charge of promotion for events in the county, Sweeney said. We could buy big blocks of advertising on radio stations, such as Beach 95.1, and promote the various events. Sweeney also noted that updating the TDC website, another project the council has been working on, can be instrumental in promoting events in the county. We have discussed this in the past, Council Member Ted Everett said. I agree, we can buy a lot of advertising with the same funds by the block. Everett said the council should hold a workshop to discuss whether or not to continue the grant program before the next years budget Holmes, Washington Counties look forward to exciting year INSIDE | C1 Volume 89, Number 99 See TDC A2 New council members sworn in By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON The Vernon City Council learned the Garden Club will be receiving a $100,000 highway beauti cation grant and welcomed two new council members on Monday. Pam Cates shared a letter she had received from the Florida Highway Beauti cation Council notifying her that the Vernon Garden Club had received a $100,000 grant for a beauti cation project along Highway 79. You may remember, I came before the council a few months ago asking for permission to apply for this project, Cates said. I was thrilled to nd out that our project was accepted. The Vernon Garden Club was one of 30 applicants for the grant, Cates said. The project will include irrigation and landscaping work from Creek Road south to Pompei Street, Cates said. The beauti cation project is meant to go along with the planned widening of Highway 79, and Cates said she hopes the new highway plans include a median. The grant requires the plans for the project be complete and required agreements executed within one year. The council also welcomed two new members as Shawn Sanders and Tray Hawkins were sworn in to their of ces on Monday. VERNON GARDEN CLUB RECEIVES $100,000 GRANT PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS City Council Members Tray Hawkins, from left, Shawn Sanders and Tina Sloan are sworn into of ce by City Clerk Dian Hendrix on Monday at Vernon City Hall. Michelle Cook takes the oath of of ce as she is sworn into the of ce of Mayor by City Clerk Dian Hendrix on Monday, while Cooks father, Al Keown, holds the Bible. See GRANT A7 See BRIEFS A7

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013 is due in August. The rst draft of the budget is due in May, Administrative Assis tant Heather Lopez said. I think we also need to talk to the grant recipients, and hear their thoughts, Everett said. Its impor tant that we be responsible and balanced in our deci sions. At the end of the day, its all about getting heads in beds. If we dont have people spending money in the county, then were going to lose. Council Member Mary Richmond said she did not think the TDC should give grants to any one-day events, since an overnight stay is not generally re quired for attendance. However, Everett said that events that are cur rently budgeted for the remainder of this scal year should still be considered for grants. After the grant discus sion in the workshop, the TDC had two grant re quests to consider in their March meeting, which immediately followed the workshop. Vernon City Coun cil was requesting $1,000 for the Vernon 4th of July Extravaganza and the city of Wausau was seeking $2,000 for the 3rd annual Wausau Possum Classic 3D Archery tournament. The TDC members split 2-2 on supporting the grant request from Vernon, with Richmond and Sweeney voting against the request and members Everett and Dana Phillips voting for the request. Council Member Gwen March, who also serves on the Vernon City Council, ab stained from voting. Pate, as chairman, broke the tie by voting in favor of the request, which had also been allocated in the TDC budget. The Wausau event, how ever, was a new event and was not allocated in this years budget, and it was not approved by the TDC mem bers. The archery event was to be held at Everetts Hard Labor Creek, so he abstained from voting, and Phillips, March and Rich mond voted against funding the Wausau grant request, while Sweeney voted for it. I said it before, but I just cant support one-day events, Richmond said. Were too low on funds. Manna that Reyes-Barra gan and the informant had talked on the telephone, and during that conversation Reyes-Barragan said that he had a source of suppy for methamphetamine in Atlanta who could provide the drug for $22,000 per kilogram. On Saturday, March 16, the informant told Manna that at about 2 p.m. ReyesBarragan sent the infor mant a text message stating that Los Gallos were on the way, according to the afdavit. I know from my experi ence conducting narcotics investigations that drug trafckers use coded lan guage when referring to drugs while speaking to one another on the telephone, Manna states in the afda vit. I also know from con ducting this investigation that Reyes-Barragan has used the word Gallo when referring to one kilogram of methamphetamine. On Saturday, March 16, at 10:30 p.m. the informant contacted Manna and said that he had just completed a series of phone calls with Reyes-Barragan. Accord ing to the afdavit, ReyesBarragan agreed to meet with the informants asso ciate at Cancuns Restau rant in Chipley on Sunday, March 17, at 9 a.m. in or der for the informants as sociate to bring money to purchase three kilograms of methamphetamine from Reyes-Barragan. The informant also told Manna that Reyes-Barra gan said that the gallos were close. On Sunday, March 17, law enforcement established surveillance at Cancuns Restaurant, where ofcers saw a white Chevrolet Ta hoe arrive at about 8:30 a.m., according to the afdavit. The Tahoe departed after several minutes. At about 8:35 a.m., Manna spoke with the informant, who told Manna that he had just spoken to Reyes-Bar ragan by telephone and that Reyes-Barragan said that he was inside the restaurant and his friends were coming to the restaurant. At about 9:07 a.m., three vehicles arrived at the res taurant. One vehicle parked to the rear of the restaurant, while a second vehicle, a red Mazda, entered the parking lot and parked on the side of the restaurant in the north side of the parking lot. A third vehicle, a silver Volk swagen, entered directly behind the red Mazda and parked on the north side of the restaurant next to the red Mazda, according to the afdavit. The driver of the Mazda, later identied as BarronSoto, and the passenger, later identied as HerediaBarron, climbed out of the vehicle. The driver of the sil ver Volkswagen, later iden tied as Hernandez, also exited his vehicle. The three men walked to the rear of the restaurant, according to the afdavit. After several minutes, Hernandez returned to the silver Volkswagen and drove the car to the rear of the restaurant. When the Volk swagen stopped behind the restaurant, the turn signals and rear lights of the Volk swagen began to illuminate and ash. At 9:17 a.m., the infor mant told Manna that he had just spoken with ReyesBarragan and the gallos had arrived. Then at 9:24 a.m., Barron-Soto and Here dia-Barron left the parking lot, driving north on Main Street in the Mazda. A Flor ida Highway Patrol cruiser followed the Mazda. Hernandez saw the High way Patrol cruiser and hur ried toward the Volkswagen, according to the afdavit. He and a woman identied as Regia Abreu got into the Volkswagen and drove south on Main Street. Troopers from the High way Patrol conducted a trafc stop on the Volkswa gen just south of the res taurant. During the stop, ofcers used a narcotics K-9 drug dog to search around the car. The dog alerted to the Volkswagen for the odor of narcotics, according to the afdavit. Meanwhile, a Highway Patrol trooper stopped the red Mazda on Highway 90 in Chipley. At the time of the stop, Barron-Soto, who was driving the Mazda, tried to run away from the car but was apprehended. The Mazda was returned to Cancuns Restaurant where ofcers deployed a narcotics K-9 drug dog, who alerted to the odor of narcotics, according to the afdavit. At about the same time as the trafc stops, law en forcement ofcers went to the restaurant, where Man na and other ofcers went to the rear of the building. Reyes-Barragan walked out of the rear of the restaurant, and was asked by ofcers if there was anyone inside the restaurant. Reyes-Barragan said there was not anyone in the building, but Manna heard noises and voices inside the restaurant, so ofcers entered the restaurant for a security sweep, locating several workers, according to the afdavit. Reyes-Barragan then provided verbal and written consent for law enforcement to search the restaurant. During the search, of cers discovered six Tupper ware containers, individu ally wrapped in cellophane, inside a black trash bag in the storage shed to the rear of the restaurant, according to the afdavit. I looked at the Tupper ware containers and saw that each container held a substance resembling meth amphetamine and that each container was wrapped in cellophane, Manna wrote in the afdavit. The substance tested positive for metham phetamine. I weighed the six plastic containers and the total weigh was approxi mately 3.6 kilograms. One kilogram equals 2.2 pounds 3.6 kilograms equals 7.9 pounds. During the search of the Volkswagen, law enforce ment discovered a con cealed trap to the side of the left rear passenger seat. The concealed trap, which was electronically activated, was empty. Law enforcement then arrested Reyes-Barragan, Hernandez, Abreu, BarronSoto and Heredia-Barron. Abreu was later released after post-arrest interviews, according to the afdavit. During a search of cell phones belonging to ReyesBarraga and Barron-Soto, references to gallos were found in text messages, which Manna said he be lieved were references to the drugs. According to the afda vit, during a post-Miranda interview of Heredia-Bar ron at the DEA ofce in Panama City, Heredia-Bar ron told Manna that he and Barron-Soto met up with Hernandez at a Taco Bell in Troy, Ala., and Hernan dez followed them down to Cancuns Restaurant. During a post-Miranda interview of Hernandez at the Panama City DEA of ce, Hernandez told Manna that an unidentied subject in Atlanta let Hernandez use the silver Volkswagen so that Hernandez and Abreu could travel to Panama City and then to Miami. The sub ject in Atlanta asked Her nandez to pick something up for him and gave Her nandez a telephone number for Hernandez to call so that Hernandez could contact this unknown person and then follow that person to Panama City. Hernandez used that telephone number to link up with the red Mazda at the Taco Bell in Troy, accord ing to the affdavit, which he then followed to Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley. Hernandez said he parked next to the red Maz da at the restaurant and then walked to the rear of the restaurant. Barron-Soto told Hernandez to move the Volkswagen to the rear of the building, then Hernan dez said he went to the re stroom and, upon returning, Heredia-Barron was walk ing away from the area near the left rear passenger seat of the Volkswagen. DEA from page A1 TDC from page A1

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Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 We Treat You Like Family better than YOUR COMMUNIT Y PARTNER FOR QUALIT Y HEALT H C ARE Dr. David Taing Family/Sports Medicine (850) 415-8303 Dr. Samuel Ward Family Medicine (850) 638-3400 Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Community Hospital Community Hospital Community Hospital 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, Florida 850-638-1610 www.nfch.org Northwest Florida Community Hospital recognizes our dedicated physicians for their commitment to providing our community with quality health care. Dr. Wade Melvin Family Medicine (850) 638-0552 Dr. Gabriel Berry General Surgery (850) 415-8180 Dr. Annette Porter Family/Emergency Medicine (850) 638-4383 Dr. James Wall Ear, Nose and Throat (850) 415-8185 Dr. Artur Vardanyan Wound Specialist (850) 415-8300 Dr. Mohammed Yunus Internal Medicine (850) 638-2088 Dr. Muhammad Amin Family Medicine (850) 547-3679 Dr. James Clemmons Family Medicine (850) 638-0678 Dr. Jason Hatcher Family Medicine (850) 638-4555 Dr. Aaron Shores Pain Management (850) 638-0505 Dr. Adam Peaden Podiatry (850) 638-FOOT (3668) Dr. Nayan Bhatt Cardiology (850) 415-8111 Dr. Dinesh Bhatt Cardiology (850) 415-8111 Dr. Narendra Gowda Emergency Medicine Dr. Joda Lynn Emergency Medicine Dr. Nathanial Hawkins Emergency Medicine Dr. Hector Mejia Orthopedic Surgery (850) 415-8303 Dr. Vanessa King-Johnson Obstetrics and Gynecology (850) 415-8320 Dr. Daniell Rackley Urology 1-800-689-6678 Dr. Jesus Ramirez Internal Medicine (850) 638-9398 Dr. Paul Hart Emergency Medicine Dr. Patrick Conrad Emergency Medicine Dr. Martin Roberts Hospitalist

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(EDITORS NOTE: This column originally ran on March 21, 2012.) On rare occasions, my long-time friend from high school calls me and we talk for about an hour. Since she lives in Lakeland, Florida, where she mostly grew up, she always wants an update on which ones of the Vernon High School class of 1949 have died, who has Alzheimers, and who besides the two of us are still as sharp as ever. Lenora Coxwell came to Washington County as an elementary school child when her mother Blen Coxwell married George Bryant after the death of my dads aunt, Emma Wells Bryant. While Lenora was living with them near Millers Ferry she attended school at Hinsons Cross Roads. Later, not adjusting well to life in rural Washington County, she returned to live with her much older sister whom she called Aunt Ila in Lakeland. If that sounds strange, calling her sister her aunt, you should hear the rest of the story. Blen was from Sopchoppy, Fla., and was rst married to a Revell. Her children from that marriage were Percy and Clarice. When Mr. Revell died, Blen married a much older man named Coxwell, Lenoras father. He had a daughter Ila who was older than his new wife. Im not sure I can name all the older Bryant children belonging to Uncle George and Aunt Emma, but there were about 10 of them and several were living at home when he married Lenoras mother. Then, George Wester, Ansel, and Betty Jean were born to Blen. My rst recollection of knowing the Bryant cousins was one summer when I was about 9 or 10 years old. A twomule wagon load of the Bryants, mostly teenagers, came up to our home near the Holmes County line for a visit. Even though Id never seen any of them before, they invited me to go home with them for a visit. I gathered my belongings and climbed aboard for the 10 mile trip over dirt roads for about a weeks stay. Daddy would pick me up on his way home from peddling in Panama City and the Beaches at New Hope Hill late on Friday afternoon. I had several experiences that week. I attended Prayer Meeting for the rst time. I learned to swim in a little sandy bottomed pond in front of their house where the grown girls took the weekly washing to do at the lake. And I took my rst ride in a mule drawn wagon across Holmes Creek by way of the Millers Ferry. I didnt meet Lenora as she was spending the summer with Ila until the beginning of our Junior year at Vernon High School when she chose to come and live with her mother and family. That was the only year that she was here, but we formed a bond from shared experiences. By this time, my cousin Arkie Wells had married Lenoras brother Percy. Lenora and I were elected as cheerleaders; we were both in the Jr. Class Play, and since neither of us had transportation and lived miles from school and from each other, we often spent the night with whichever one had a ride home after the ball game. My Uncle Alex Wells, Arkies dad, drove the bus and sometimes transported the team, so hed take us home. Sometimes one of the basketball players could borrow the family car and give us a ride. But one of our most vivid memories was riding Mr. Perkins bus, we thought, home. That night we would go to Lenoras house since she lived about three miles from Mr. Perkins and we were sure hed drive on that far, but when we got to his driveway, to our dismay, he pulled in and stopped. This is as far as I am going, he said. It was a moonless night, but fortunately, two of the basketball players Jimmy Porter and Hollis Dean Galloway lived on that same road. We all piled out and began the trek down the wet sand road, with no light except a few stars. Hollis Dean had a beautiful singing voice and he kept the buggers away singing, Im A Comin A Courtin Cora Bell and other renditions. We reached Jimmys house rst and he got off the train there. Then, a little farther was the Galloway home. Lenora and I were worried about the next dark mile wed have to go alone. But gallant Hollis Dean in spite of having been at school all day, and playing a hard fought basketball game, walked us two not so giggly girls on down to the Bryant home. I think one reason Lenoras and my bond was so strong is that I was the only one among her friends who could decipher her family tree. She has six half siblings from three marriages, and one large set of step-siblings. When both the parents died, I dont know how they ever settled the estate. Lenora celebrated her 81st birthday on April 1. I dont know if that has anything to do with it or not, but she may be the one who caused the signs on Vernon bridge to read No Jumping From The Bridge. For some reason, the conversation came up as Hester and I were having breakfast a few mornings ago as how we were able to claim a few dollars in earnings from the limited opportunities which presented themselves during our tender years. She remembers, as I do, that at any given time each of the children in the household had his or her own pile of junk iron. We knew that periodically the junk man would come by and purchase the scrap metal at his price. Whatever he offered was the nal gure. We knew a second purchaser would not be coming along, thus allowing for any bargaining as to price. So all the siblings in our household took the amount presented, notwithstanding the disappointment in not receiving more. Hester recalls that the same scenario was carried out in the Lucas family take what the man gives, guard it cautiously and spend it carefully. Replacing farm plow points and a few other metal items relative to keeping the farm implements in good order, allowed for some throwaway objects which had a little weight to it and added to the collection of junk iron. We were fortunate to have a log railroad track running on the southern edge of our land and farm. The upkeep of the track by the section hands produced a few metal pieces of scrap iron, which we were always scavenging for by walking the tracks, usually while driving the cows from their grazing grounds or making many walks to and from Gum Creek either for a quick swim or an occasional shing trip. My friend, the late Doug Jones, who was with me all the way through Vernon High School, as well as in the University of Florida, was well familiar with the assimilation of every pound of scrap metal he could nd. His home was near the old abandoned BC Railroad in Greenhead, which provided an excellent source for the much sought after scrap. Doug reported nding a piece of heavy steel rail, which he managed to get to his home. He was sure he would get a dollar bill when the junk man came by. The man came before Doug got home from school and he learned his mother had let the prized item go for 50 cents. My friend positioned himself by the roadway awaiting the return of the scrap collector. He bantered the gentlemen for an additional half dollar for his special piece of metal, but nally comprised when the gentlemen offered him twentyve cents more. In Holmes County, Hester reports the main source of money making in her young years was picking cotton. She came from a long line of people who really knew how to grow quality cotton, thus allowing for a person to be able to pick 100 pounds a day with any effort at all. At the usual penny per pound, she could come out of the cotton eld with the much coveted $1. My wife and I both remember that picking blackberries (we called them brier berries) for townspeople could bring in 50 cents for a gallon, a piece of money that could easily purchase a shirt for a boy or a blouse for a girl if they shopped carefully. Blueberries grown in our community by Jack and Bunch Hewett were open for picking and children of young ages could weather the heat, mosquitoes and the threat of snakes and pick up a few nickels and dimes. Hester recalls when Highway 79, north of Bonifay, was under construction by the C. C. Moore Construction Company. She, along with James Blackburn and his sister, Opal, all young children, agreed to go into the sugar cane eld and bring Mr. Moore three stalks of cane for chewing. They were all thrilled with the ve-cent piece that he gave to each of them. My brother, Jim, and I have re ected many times of the very rst serious money that either of us was able to make. Our great uncle on mamas side of the family, Bud Cook, had recently died at the young age of 41. He was in the prime of life and in his hey day of enjoying a long and promising career in the turpentine business. (His complete and interesting story is in the Heritage of Washington County book, now available by calling me at 638-1016) With the Bud Cook death, the Parrish family expanded their naval stores operation into the area formerly leased and managed by uncle Bud. One operation in the turpentine business is called hoeing boxes. This is simply hoeing completely around each pine tree, which had been tapped for turpentine. The idea is to keep wild forest res from burning the product in the cups or on the face of the tree. Our dad saw the opportunity for his sons to get this job. Mr. Parrish hired us at the rate of ve cents per tree, or a second face added another nickel. We kept our own count. He drove to our property after we had nished, did his examination and paid us in cash. We did not have to be told to protect our money nor that we should use it wisely, e.g., buying school clothes or pay for school lunches when that program came into Vernon School. Rolling stores taught us to trade a few eggs to the operator, Mr. Jake Young, in exchange for a few pieces of much wanted candy. The Watkins man, Mr. Monroe Williams, a traveling entrepreneur, sold a product that could be made into delicious malted milk. We probably swapped a live chicken for this delicacy. Our meager methods of making a few dollars possibly taught us the true value of money. We knew to accept a lesser paying job instead of waiting for the top one to come along. The Prattler has written extensively of his experience and that of his brother, Jim, in working at menial jobs on the beach as youngster at a salary that now seems like slave wages. The experiences outlined here give a good review of our lives and the values learned that has guided us through a life, especially appreciating the value a few hard earned dollars. Dear Editor, As a citizen of Holmes County and as a parent of a senior enrolled in our public school system, I would like to take this opportunity and disclose very real biases and prejudices that exist within our school system. My daughter has been a Florida Virtual School student for the last seven years. She has been extremely successful. In addition to high school, she has earned 48 college credits through dual enrollment all while maintaining a Grade Point Average greater than 4.0. In January, my daughter enrolled at our local high school to obtain her high school diploma; Florida Virtual School does not issue diplomas but only provides classes in which to earn credits needed for graduation. Her transcripts were sent to the school January 14 and we were not noti ed of any discrepancies or problems with her credits. Two months passed and through a phone call I made to the school, I learn she is lacking 1/2 credit. This would not have been an issue if we had gotten this information in a timely manner. As my husband and I met with the superintendent and it became quite clear what type of discrimination existed. My daughters records were set aside to collect dust because we had chosen Florida Virtual School rather than the usual route of public school. Instead of using this meeting to discuss the issue at hand, my daughters credits, it became a therapy session for Mr. Dixon. He aired his frustrations about Florida Virtual School, the FTE money he didnt receive because my daughter didnt actually sit in a desk at a Holmes County school and also criticized the Florida Virtual School staffs teaching capabilities and the rigor of the curriculum. Im quite certain my daughters ACT and FCAT scores and current GPA rebuff that claim. The 2002 Florida School Code, adopted by legislature, provides parents and students with educational choice. It even goes a step further in stating parents will be made aware of Florida Virtual School as a valid educational choice, students will be provided unlimited access to courses and Florida Virtual School will be a component of the delivery of public education. I nd it astounding that we, in Holmes County, have a superintendent and administrative staff at some schools that havent gotten on board with Florida Virtual School. Personal opinion about Florida Virtual School means absolutely nothing. It is the law you dont have to like it. You do have to deal with it. RESPECTFULLY, AMBER STROMENGER HOLMES COUNTY Junk man brought extra money to families PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells A scene from Holmes County in years gone by, depicting pine trees being harvested for turpentine and typical of those cleaned around by the Prattler and his brother. Letter to the EDITOR POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT OPINION www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013 A Page 4 Section HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212.

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Refinance with Community South between March 1 and May 15, 2013 and get 2% off your current auto loan rate (as low as 2.49% APR)!* Special to the News CHIPLEY Several mem bers of Chipley Garden Club attended Gulf Beach Garden Clubs Flowers by the Sea Standard Flower Show at Panama City Beach on Sun day, March 24. The divisions featured horticulture container grown, cut foliage and blooms, shrubs and trees and design. The design di vision featured designs such as underwater, duo (twosided), exhibition table set ting and tiny petite. Chipley Garden Club member/FFGC District II Director Jane Brewer topped the Table Art istry Award with her beauti ful laguna blue and sunshine yellow Picnic by the Sea entry. Jane is also a member of Gulf Beach Garden Club. In years past, Chipley Garden Club made a mark in Northwest Florida with their ower and oral design shows. Today club members enjoyed viewing entries and learning a little about how a ower show is presented. You never know, there may be a ower/horticulture show again in Chipley. The next regular monthly meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 3, at Oakie Ridge Baptist Church at 2971 Gilberts Mill Road. If you would like more in formation about Chipley Gar den Club, would to attend a meeting or are curious about ower shows, contact Karen Roland at 638-9968. Meetings are open to the public, and new members are welcomed at any time. P H OTOS SPECI A L TO T HE N E WS Left: Glenda Wilson and Edwina Showers critique a duo-design. Right: Jane Brewer with her winning design at Gulf Beach Garden Clubs Flowers by the Sea Standard Flower Show at Panama City Beach. Garden club members attend ower show By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com B O NIF A Y Are expensive elec tric bills draining your wallet? Gulf Powers Commercial and In dustrial Marketing Specialist Tra cy Andrews asked during Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs March 20 meeting. Im here to show you a variety of free services provided to help you evaluate your home and conserve energy, which in turn saves you money. The rst step usually is to do an energy consumption assessment, or as they call it a home energy audit, Andrews said. Weve got several free pro grams and services for you to take advantage of, Andrews said. Weve got the Home Energy Check-up, EarthCents Home, Low Cost to No Cost Recommen dations and EarthCents Rebates. The rst I will review is the Home Energy Check-up. She explained this was a way of them evaluating ways of saving money by reducing energy con sumption within the house. An energy audit can be per formed by someone coming out to your house, she said. Or if youd prefer not to have strang ers at your house, there are mailin sheets that can be mailed to Gulf Power and then Gulf Power will provide a written report of recommendations based on the information provided by the cus tomer, or you can go to our web site for a home energy check-up online. She said there is also a free New Home Audit, which allows Gulf Power to review new home plans to make sure it meets the mini mum energy efciency standard established by the Department of Energy, conduct the Florida En ergy Code Calculation required to obtain a building permit and per form load calculation used by your HVAC dealer to determine the ap propriate size HVAC system for your new home. Some ways of saving money through energy conservation is a high-efciency HVAC system, in creased ceiling and wall insulation, high-efciency windows, high-ef ciency water heating, at least three Energy Star appliances, high-ef ciency lighting and a more airtight home to name a few, Andrews said. There are several simple steps to help save energy. First, set the thermostat at 78 degrees in the summer and 68 degrees in the winter. You can ex pect a 9 percent increase in energy use for every degree you set your thermostat lower in the summer and higher in the winter. Also, con sider enrolling in Energy Select. Secondly, set your water heat er to 120 degrees to save energy. Check your heater system to make sure the lter is clean. Do you know that keeping an extra refrig erator in the garage can cost you an extra $150 per year? Thirdly, air getting into your house can make your heating and cooling system run longer to keep you warm. Check around windows and doors to make sure you have good seals, make sure you have enough attic insulation and inspect your ductwork for leaks. Lastly, todays homes use much more energy then just ve years ago. Phone chargers, com puters, game consoles, DVRs and atscreen televisions, often in many rooms, add dramatically to your energy usage. Remind your family to turn off the television and other electronics when not in use. There are also rebates to help you save money on updating your home to be more energy efcient, said Andrews. Theres our free Energy Check-up and rebates for Check Me Plus! heating and cool ing, water heating, windows, ceil ing insulation, roong, pool pumps, Energy Select, appliances and ap pliance recycling. A few examples of the rebates provided are $75 on an energy ef cient clothes washer; $75 on an energy efcient window air condi tioning unit; $50 on an energy ef cient refrigerator; and $25 on an energy efcient freezer. We also have a recycling pro gram that will provide you with $35 for old appliances, she said. Thats us paying you to pick up and haul off your old appliances. Also, if you convert to gas heat ing thats free, we just give you a voucher to go to Lowes and pick it up. For more information, call An drews at 415-4211 or visit www. gulfpower.com. C ECILI A SPE A R S | The News Gulf Powers Tracy Andrews speaks to the Bonifay Kiwanis on March 20. Gulf Power rep reveals money-saving tips

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Local A6 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Now Accepting New Patients The Health Clinic Dr. Sohail Khan Dr. Amer Malik Teresa Seay, ARNP 850-638-1230 1351 South Boulevard Chipley, FL NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS The deadline for paying 2012 property taxes without a delinquent fee is April 1, 2013. All mail payments postmarked April 1, 2013 will be accepted without a penalty. Taxes paid after April 1, 2013 will have an additional 3% penalty. Taxes paid after April 25, 2013 will have a 3% penalty and newspaper advertising costs. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. (850) 638-6275 or (850) 638-6276 Ken Naker Washington County Tax Collector Celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ! Easter Sunday Service 8:15 a.m. Grace Lutheran Church 3309 Highway 90 East Bonifay, FL 32425 (850) 547-9898 First United Methodist Church of Chipley Holy Week Services Monday-Friday at 12:00 noon Good Friday Stations of the Cross March 29 at 6:30 p.m. Visual reenactment of the days leading up to Jesus crucixion perfomed by our group on the stage in our new John Wesley Building. Sunday, March 31 at 9:00 and 11:00 am Celebration of the Risen Lord. Message by Rev. Jerry May. All are invited to bring a friend and come rejoice with us. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Easter Schedule Sunday March 24 at 10:30 AM Easter Cantata Friday, March 29 at 6:30 PM Tenebrae Service Sunday, March 31 at 10:30 AM Easter Service No Evening Services on Easter Sunday Easter Morning Celebration Worship Service 8:30am, 9:45am, 11:00am Sunday School 9:45am, 11:00 am 1300 South Blvd. Michael J. Orr, Pastor Services March 28 Service of Tenebrae 6:30 pm March 29 Good Friday 12:00 pm March 31 Easter Service 10:45 AM First United Methodist Church 202 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay 547-3785 First Baptist Church Bonifay Passion Play 2013 Friday 7 p.m. Saturday 5 & 7:30 p.m. Easter Sunday 7 p.m. Free early seating tickets available 850-547-2420 or robin@fbcbonifay.com LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD C HURCH Breakfast will follow in the fellowship hall. Everyone Featuring T HE T IPTO N F AMILY Celebrating the Resurrection! Grace Assembly@Chipley 567 Main Street Games, Food Inatables and prizes Bring your family and friends! TALLAHASSEE Governor Rick Scott has been recognized by the Consul General of the Israeli consulate and multiple chapters of the Jewish Federation for his Florida Families First Budget, which directs Enterprise Florida to invest $100,000 to create an international economic development of ce in Tel Aviv, Israel. Governor Scott said, Israel is a strong friend of Florida and an innovator in science, technology, engineering, and math. Thats why my Florida Families First Budget invests $100,000 to enhance trade relations with Israel. With this targeted investment, well increase Floridas role as a hub for global commerce, so we can better grow jobs and opportunities for Florida families. Since 2010, Floridas trade with Israel has totaled nearly $800 million. Chaim Shacham, Consul General of the State of Israel said, We are con dent that a funded Enterprise Florida of ce in Israel will provide a new level of exposure to Israels economy for Florida companies, and vice versa. We look forward to working together with the new EFI of ce to further the mutual economic interests of both states. This is truly a win-win situation. Pepi Dunay, Vice President for Community Relations of the Jewish Federation of Broward County said, The Community Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of Broward County would like to thank Governor Scott for his support in funding an Enterprise Florida of ce in Tel Aviv. The establishment of this of ce would strengthen the bilateral economic relationship between Israel and the State of Florida, and bring business and jobs to Florida. Carol Brick-Turin, Director of Miamis Jewish Community Relations Council said, The establishment of an Enterprise Florida of ce in Tel Aviv would facilitate the continued strengthening of our bilateral relationship through cooperative economic activity and job creation. Having had the pleasure of joining Governor Scott at the kick-off dinner for his trade mission to Israel in December 2011, it is particularly ful lling to see this effort coming closer to fruition. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Washington County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony for Honest Gold Guy of Chipley on Thursday, March 21. The business is owned by Darryl Van Kirk and is located at 2922 Highway 77, south of Chipley. The Honest Gold Guy of Chipley buys gold, silver, and unwanted, broken or old gold, silver and platinum jewelry. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturdays by appointment. HONEST GOLD GUY OPENS Gov. Scott recognized for establishing business of ce in Israel

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Local Washington County News | A7 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 J.D. OWENS CARPET, IN C Carpet & Ceramic Outlet J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 carpettilemarianna.com CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS Weve got it at the price you want! JUST IN 1st QUALITY CARPETING, FACTORY OVERSTOCKS! Originally $1.89/SF NOW 99 SF Originally $2.50/SF NOW $ 1 25 SF NEW SHIPMENT OF AREA RUGS 2x4 ......... $ 5 00 2x6 ....... $ 12 50 2x8 ....... $ 15 50 3x5 ....... $ 12 50 4x6 ....... $ 19 90 5x8 ....... $ 35 60 6x9 ....... $ 49 90 Loose Lay Fiber Back Vinyl 13 Wide 79 /SF Heavy Fiber Back Closeouts Reg. $2.50 NOW 99 /SF WE NOW SELL CONCRETE PAVERS Beautiful and Durable For Pools, Deck, Patio & Driveways 6x6, 6x12, 8x8, 12x12 Hexagon, Cobbles, Bishops Hat and Interlocking in a variety of colors Starting at $2.95 / SF The Place to Shop, if Money Matters! ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. COSMETI C GENERAL & FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Sasha Minor NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS ADULTS & CHILDREN 5 YEARS & UP (850) 638-4708 www.DownHomeDentalCenter.com Dr. Sasha Minor Dr. Sasha Minor We now oer Botox and Dermal Fillers We are providers for Cigna PPO, Delta Dental PPO and United Concordia. As a courtesy, we le most insurances. March 11-18 Gregory Arbona, 32, Cottondale, violation of injunction for protection Tamara Beasley, 25, Chipley, dealing in stolen property two counts, petit theft, larceny Jessica Blackburn, 20, Pensacola, driving under the in uence Marcus Brewer, 28, Bonifay, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, driving while license suspended or revoked, destroying evidence Kyree Burns, 21, Chipley, violation of state probation on sell of cocaine William Cambley Jr., Fountain, violation of state probation on possession of meth Laramie Cline, 19, Ozark, Ala., driving while license suspended or revoked Alexis Curry, 28, Chipley, driving while license suspended or revoked, leaving the scene of an accident with property damage Brenda Davis, 35, Marianna, possession of paraphernalia, driving while license suspended or revoked Juan Galvis, 18, Atlanta Ga., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana with intent Scott Hall, 38, DeFuniak Springs, violation of game and sh laws Debbie Harper, 49, Tallahassee, driving under the in uence Mary Hartzog, 48, Chipley, burglary of unoccupied dwelling unarmed John Holley, 29, Caryville, deliver meth Benedict Ihesiabe, 20, Newman Ga., possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Francisco Maillo, 20, Newman Ga., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana with intent Samuel Martin Jr., 39, Chipley, aggravated battery offender knew/should have known victim is pregnant Emily McCarthy, 22, Caryville, petit theft, warrantless arrest on violation of state probation for felony battery Arthur Mott Jr., 32, Chipley, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia, producing marijuana Justin Myers, 22, Atlanta Ga., possession of marijuana with intent, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of paraphernalia, carrying a concealed weapon Gabriel Nelson, 32, Fort Walton Beach, possession of paraphernalia, distributing marijuana Daniel Parrish Jr., 34, Caryville, battery, recommitted on sell of marijuana Misty Russell, 32, Bonifay, violation of county probation on petit theft Perry Shackleford, 41, Chipley, child support two counts Roberta Smith, 36, Chipley, Lee County warrant for child support Randall Wynn, 21, Graceville, petit theft, Jackson County warrantless arrest for violation of state probation Arrest REPORT Special to The News TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced Friday the appointments of Richard Albertson, Rabbi Sholom Ciment, Dr. Jerry T. Haag, and Patricia Pat Smith and the reappointments of Thomas L. Lukasik and Leonel E. Mesa to the Florida Faith-Based and Community-Based Advisory Council. Albertson, 51, of Tallahassee, is the president and CEO of Live the Life Ministries. He succeeds Joel C. Hunter and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Ciment, 43, of Boynton Beach, is the president of the Congregation Chabad-Lubavitch of Greater Boynton Inc. He succeeds Shneior Z. Oreichman and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Haag, 47, of Lakeland City, is the president of Florida Baptist Childrens Homes. He succeeds Julia W. Boyd and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Smith, 52, of Tallahassee, is the community engagement manager for the Department of Children and Families. She succeeds Linda King and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Lukasik, 59, of Boynton Beach, is the executive director of 4kids of South Florida Inc. He is reappointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Mesa, 47, of Miami Lakes, is the CEO of the New Day Center. He is reappointed to a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Governor appoints 6 to advisory council Special to the News TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced on Thursday the appointments of C. Wayne Ansley, Patrick Byrne, Brad Drake, and Michael Flynt to the Northwest Florida State College District Board of Trustees. Ansley, 65, of Baker, is a retired Assistant Superintendent with the Okaloosa County School Board. He served in the Okaloosa County School system from 1969-2007. Ansley received his associate degree from Okaloosa-Walton Junior College, which is now Northwest Florida State College. He received his bachelors and masters degrees from the University of West Florida. He succeeds Sandra Sims and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2015. Byrne, 57, of Niceville, is president of Valparaiso Realty Company. Previously, he has served on the Okaloosa-Walton Community College Board of Trustees from 19851990, and the Florida State Board of Community Colleges from 19911999. Byrne currently serves on the Florida College System Foundation Board of Directors. He attended Birmingham Southern College, Florida State University, Okaloosa Walton Community College and the University of West Florida. He succeeds Dale Rice and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. Drake, 38, of DeFuniak Springs, is owner of Southern Marketing Co. Drake previously served in the Florida House of Representatives from 2008-2012. Drake attended Northwest Florida State College and received his bachelors degree from the University of Florida. He succeeds Henry Wilkerson and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. Flynt, 67, of Miramar Beach, is an independent contractor. He served in the United States Air Force from 1968-1993. From 1996-2002, he served as the City Administrator of the City of Valparaiso. He received his bachelors degree from the University of Florida. Flynt received masters degrees from Central Michigan University and from the University of West Florida. He succeeds Esteena Wells and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. The appointments are subject to con rmation by the Florida Senate. Scott appoints 4 to Board of Trustees Council President Tina Sloan was also re-elected in the March 12 city election, as was Mayor Michelle Cook, who was unchallenged. Sloan was re-elected to the city council by 52 votes, coming in rst in the citywide election results and securing a two-year term on the council. Shawn Sanders earned 46 votes, which also got him a two-year term as councilman. John W. Tray Hawkins III came in third with 42 votes, which means hell serve a one-year term. Hawkins previously served on the Vernon council. In other business, the council also re-appointed Sloan as president and member Joey Brock as vice-president. The council approved the use of the community center on May 4 for the Miss Vernon Pageant and approved the use of the community center on May 30 for Project Graduation. The council also set the date of the Miss Firecracker Pageant, which will be held on June 29. GRANT from page A1 On April 15-16, Private Road 764.6 and 764.2 and Ray Lane will be closed for work, according to the schedule. County Road 759.6, Magnolia, Hubbard, Oklahoma, Moody and Arnett streets will be closed April 17-18. April 22-23 nds the railroad working on Boswell Road, RD Carter Parkway and County Road 754.2. ArtKidDoo set for April 6 CHIPLEY ArtKidDoo will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 6 at Shivers Park in Chipley. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, along with business and other organizations in the community, are sponsoring ArtKidDoo A Celebration of Children and the Arts. ArtKidDoo is a free event. Families are encouraged to come and spend time discovering the arts with their children. For more information about ArtKidDoo call 638-6343 and ask for the Early Learning Coalition. BRIEFS from page A1

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Page 8 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Hooked on Outdoors When it gets too hot to sh, the Gulf is shut down to snapper and ling and pompano have moved on, usually I stop saltwater shing. I love to mackerel sh and eat mackerel, but now it seems the bigger mackerel are loaded with mercury so Im going to have to rethink eating them. I was looking online at a product poachers use to catch and sell cat sh in the local rivers. The device Im talking about is called a snuff can. The reason it is called that is because it resembles a tin that snuff comes in. Im very familiar with this product because the Dog Doctor goes through a can every shing trip and spits most of it in or on my boat. The device Im referring to can be bought online and costs $45 and is quite illegal to use. It has two leads that connect to a 12-volt battery and a lead runs to some chains that go to the bottom. Hook it up and voila, instant cat sh. Im not telling you this to get you arrested and lose your boat. Im mentioning it because I know some boys who do use it and what they are catching is something I would like to catch legally this summer when the river gets low. Im too nervous to use a snuff can, but I think I could use a reel and rod and do quite well. Over on the Apalachicola River they have tournaments to catch giant cat sh called atheads. Thanks to these snuff-can shermen, we now know there is a thriving community of athead cat sh in the Choctawhatchee River. Flatheads are best caught on live bait with bream being the best according to the shermen who seek them. Heres where the rub comes in. By the time I can catch enough bream to use for bait its usually dark. I suppose thats all right, because they say atheads bite best at dark, but I just dont want to spend 24 hours on the river. So Ive come up with a bait I can sh in daylight. I gure I could use live choffers. I know choffers are a saltwater sh, but they will live in freshwater long enough to attract a athead. This shing and hunting stuff requires a lot of planning and Im already planning four months ahead. If you buy one of those snuff cans call me from the jail and tell me how they work. I will tell you this; if I ever have a hankering to try out one of these snuff cans Ill use it in the Dog Doctors boat. That way all Ill lose is money. Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net By Diane Hirth Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission A disease which has killed more than 5 million bats in the eastern United States recently was documented in north Georgia for the rst time, increasing the level of threat to Florida bats. People who explore or do research in caves are being asked by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to take precautions to prevent the disease, which has devastated bat colonies in other states, from moving into Florida. The disease that is deadly to bats, known as white-nose syndrome (WNS), has not been detected in Florida. But WNS can spread by spores found on the clothing and equipment of people moving between caves, as well as by bat-to-bat contact, according to FWC biologists. No human illnesses have been attributed to WNS. Nevertheless, biologists warn the public not to handle sick, injured or dead bats. Also, no one should enter Florida caves with equipment or clothing that has been used in caves in WNS-infected states. If equipment or clothing has been used outside Florida, it should be decontaminated following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocols described at WhitenoseSyndrome.org where you click on WNS Info, then select Decon. Landowners with caves on their property can help by requiring that anyone entering their caves use only Florida-speci c gear or decontaminated equipment. Florida has 13 native bat species that play a major role in reducing agricultural pests and controlling mosquitoes, which can carry human disease. The value of insect suppression by bats to U.S. agriculture has been estimated at between $4 billion and $50 billion a year. In 2006, bats with an unknown fungus on their noses and wings were rst found in a New York cave. Researchers identi ed the fungus as Geomyces destructans, which thrives in cold caves with temperatures below 65 degrees Fahrenheit. FWC biologists do not know whether Floridas warm temperatures and short winters will protect the states bats from white-nose syndrome. But they are certain that limiting the bats exposure to the white fungus is an important method of prevention. The tricolored bat, gray bat and a bat called southeastern myotis all roost in Florida caves, said Melissa Tucker, FWC wildlife biologist. These caves are also important summertime maternity roosts for southeastern myotis and some gray bats. Since its discovery, WNS has been identi ed in 22 states and ve Canadian provinces and found in all states adjacent to Florida. The name comes from the white fungus found covering the muzzles and wings of hibernating bats. WNS appears to have the most severe impact on bats during their long winter hibernation period, although research is ongoing to nd out exactly how hibernation and WNS are related. In Florida, bats typically spend very little time hibernating but we have discovered several Florida caves cold enough during the winter months to support growth of the fungus, Tucker said. Bats affected by WNS do not always display the typical white fungus appearance. Instead, they might appear emaciated or severely dehydrated. Other signs of WNS include bats ying outside or near cave openings during the day, and dead or dying bats on the ground, usually in the winter. People can report dead bats or bats behaving unusually by going to MyFWC.com/WildlifeHabitats and selecting Health & Disease. Florida bat populations face other risks in addition to WNS, Tucker said. Loss of habitat has limited bat roosting and foraging sites. Bats also are particularly vulnerable during their maternity season, when they are giving birth and rearing young. To protect bats during maternity season, do not disturb their colonies from April 15 through Aug. 15. Cavers should avoid known bat caves during this period, and if they unexpectedly encounter bats, they should leave that area of a cave. For additional WNS information, go to www.whitenosesyndrome.org Cavers asked to help prevent spread of bat disease By Richard Hance Special to The News Herald The most popular color on our boats is white, but there are dozens of shades of white. Gelcoat manufacturers offer a small packaged kit that includes a basic white along with a variety of tint colors, red, green and yellow. Adding tint adjusts the shades and tones of the white. Adding tint is a very delicate process. Adding small, pinhead red tint will warm up the white. There also are gelcoat kits, already mixed to match, available through the boat dealer or Spectrum Colors (800-754-5516) or Mini-Craft (800-282-8244). When adding the provided catalyst, MEK, be careful to follow the directions on the package. When the stress crack has developed and appears to be getting larger, use a small drill bit and carefully drill a mark/ hole into the top layer, gelcoat only. Do not penetrate the berglass. This will help keep the crack from growing. With a sharp object, such as an old-time church key, can/bottle opener or the edge of a screwdriver, deepen and widen the stress crack. This will allow gelcoat to bond the two edges. If you have many stress cracks, prepare them all for ll. Apply masking tape along the edges of the cracks. Find a small, 1-2 inch wide rigid plastic, like a credit card, clean each crack thoroughly with acetone, ngernail polish remover or alcohol. Catalyze your gelcoat and spread, pushing gelcoat into crack and over ll, allowing us to later sand into a smooth repair. Drying times vary depending on heat and humidity; be patient. Once the gelcoat has thoroughly hardened, use 120grit sandpaper, wrapped around a small block (1 by 3 inches) and begin sanding until the masking tape will peel away from the crack. At this point change sanding paper to 400-grit wet/ dry, using a spray bottle with water to moisten the repair area and gently sand until perfectly smooth. Use your ngertips as well as your eyes to get it right. Change sandpaper again to a 1,000or 1,200-grit paper, wet sand to remove tiny scratches left by the 400-grit. Using rubbing compound, or aqua buff 1,000, aggressively buff the area or hand polish/buff until luster is consistent with surrounding area. Tips for gelcoat repairs on minor stress cracks FWC

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013 A Page 9 Section Special to the News Salina, Kan. The Chipola Lady Indians nished in the Elite Eight of the NJCAA Womens Basketball National Tournament in Salina, KS, March 21. The Lady Indians (27-7) won two of three games in the tournament before falling to number two seed Central Arizona (32-1), 8467, on Thursday, March 21. Kristine Brance led Chipola with 23 points including four three-pointers. Jasmine Crawford had 12 points. Lashonda Littleton had 10 points and 4 rebounds. Treyvonna Brooks led Chipola in rebounding with 5. Chipola scored a 66-57 win over Southern Idaho on March 20. Jasmine Crawford led Chipola with 18 points off the bench, making 11-of-12 free throws for the game. Free throws turned out to be the difference in the game. Chipola shot an amazing 26-of-29 free throws as a team. Rayven Brooks added 16 points, seven rebounds, four assists, and three steals. Jade Givens nished with 11 points and 13 rebounds. The Lady Indians opened the tournament March 18 with a 78-62 win over Southwest Illinois. Rayven Brooks led the Lady Indians in nearly every category with 29 points including 6 of 9 three pointers, 11 rebounds, 5 assists and 4 steals. Brance and Littleton each scored 13. Littleton also grabbed 8 rebounds. Treyvonna Brooks scored 11 and pulled down 8 rebounds. Crawford also added 8 points. Chipolas Cinderella post-season run began with a 72-52 upset win over Northwest Florida in the FCSAA Florida/Region VIII Tournament. The Lady Indians went on to nish second in the state tournament, losing 61-53 to state champion Gulf Coast in the title game. Their showing earned the Lady Indians a rst ever at-large bid to play in the NJCAA National Tournament. Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough dubbed the Lady Indians, The Magni cent Seven, as only seven players on the injury-plagued squad played in state and national tournaments. The Lady Indians nished the regular season third in the Panhandle Conference under rst year head coach Greg Franklin. Gulf Coast and Northwest were conference co-champions. Franklin came to Chipola after serving ve seasons as an assistant coach in the Mississippi State University womens basketball program where he was instrumental in helping Mississippi State claim back-to-back year wins in the NCAA Tournament, including the programs rst Sweet 16 appearance. Before Mississippi State, Franklin served at Southeastern Illinois College in Harrisburg, Illinois, as athletic director, head womens coach and assistant mens coach. Chipola and Northwest both were bene ciaries of the NJCAAs change to an expanded 24 team bracket which now includes four at-large teams, four zone quali ers and 16 district champions. Northwest also made it to the Elite Eight before losing to Hutchinson on March 21. Special to the News Chad Prough of Chipley won the Walmart Bass Fishing League Bulldog Tournament on Lake Seminole, March 16. Prough caught ve bass weighing in at a total of 22 pounds and 8 ounces to take the $4,163 prize. More than 200 professionals and co-anglers competed in the tournament that was held in Bainbridge, Ga. Special to the News CHIPLEY The Chipley High JROTC ri e team traveled to Liberty County on March 22 to compete in Area 11 competition of 2013. The cadets that went and competed were: Ri e team commander, C/1LT Brittney Sanders, C/MAJ Regan Walls, C/MAJ Sean McDonald, and C/1LT Jonathan Gilbert to all the cadets that went and competed. Highest Single shooter with 256 was C/ MAJ Regan Walls. Chipley placed rst in the Area 11 shoulderto-shoulder match, as well as second in the Area 11 Postal match. Congratulations to Chipley High JROTC for qualifying for state. Chipola Women nish in elite eight at national tournament Chipley High School JROTC ri e team members Brittney Sanders, Regan Walls, Sean McDonald, and Jonathan Gilbert competed on March 22. CHS res up to go to state PROUGH WINS TOURNAMENT From the Associates of Store 2114 Way to Go Athletes Dallas Oliver Chipley H.S. Baseball 11th Grade Congratulations to these top athletes! Hannah Redding Bozeman H.S. Soccer/Softball 12th Grade Graceville H.S. No information available Holly Parson Ponce de Leon H.S. Basketball/Softball 12th Grade Bethlehem H.S. No information available Morgan Helms Holmes County H.S. Volleyball 10th Grade Ashlyn Golden Poplar Springs H.S. softball 9th Grade Hunter Dobbs Vernon H.S. Baseball Catcher 12th Grade Members of the Chipola College Womens Basketball team are, from left: (top) Jasmine Crawford, Treyvonna Brooks, Rayven Brooks, Jade Givens, (bottom) Rahni Bell, Kristine Brance, LaShonda Littleton and head coach Greg Franklin.

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Local A10 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners gathered together for a special session on March 20 to discuss action for roads impacted during the recent ooding speci cally, District 3s roads. Ive had several calls about roads that werent up to standards even before the ooding, said Commissioner David Whitaker. Now weve got clay dumped out on roads and residents with vehicles stuck in mud up to their doors. Ive seen the photos and I think its a leadership issue. Whitaker explained that both his foreman and grader operator were well educated and certi ed for their positions but both lack experience and requested assistance from his fellow districts until both could receive further training from well-experienced employees in their eld. My grader operator is willing to get any additional training needed to do his job to the best of his abilities and thats the kind of man I want to invest in, said Whitaker. Its a lot easier to maintain a properly xed road. The people cant wait for years for these guys to get the experience they need before they can get their roads taken care of. Based on further discussion between Board members, County Attorney Jeff Goodman suggested eight to 12 weeks with Commissioner Bill Parishs foreman overseeing whats required to bring District 3s roads back to standards with additional assistance from other districts when available. When there is a problem anywhere in this county it is not just a problem for that district it is a problem for the county, said Parish. I dont mind stepping in and seeing about whats needed to be done. Commissioner Kenneth Williams also volunteered to help when he was able. Weve got some more rains coming this weekend and Ive got to nish up with my district, said Williams. But as soon as Im able Ill send you whatever you need. Parish also agreed to ride along with his foreman and Whitakers road grader to give advice on how to correct and repair District 3s roads. Goodman reminded them that the commissioners werent allowed to talk to each other outside of a public meeting, however their road foremen and road grater operators could communicate with one another after the Board approved of an action. The Board approved of Goodmans recommendation to allow Parishs foreman to oversee road repairs for District 3 and District 5 for eight to 12 weeks and to make the workers aware that he is in charge for that time period. Anything longer then 12 weeks and well have to revisit the matter, said Goodman. Whitaker said he had another issue with his crew. I have concerns because three out of my ve workers are related to each other, said Whitaker. Theres a guy working with his father-in-law and his brother-in-law. I inherited a problem and Im looking to moving some people around. Theyre under union contract and one of your solutions is for lateral moves to other districts, said Goodman. At the same time the Board has to work together on which employees they want to take on and which ones theyre willing to give up. Its not our employees fault that we put them in that position. The Board agreed to give this matter further consideration before coming up with a possible solution. Commissioner Bobby Sasnett requested the procedure for new hires. First, there has to be an opening, said Goodman. Then we consider employees within the county before we advertise to bring someone in from outside sources. The Board reviewed and approved of a letter to be sent to all department heads on the process of presenting issues and requests before the Board. 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CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 850 638-9350 Monday Friday Spanish Trail Playhouse presents presents Saturday, April 13, 2013 7 pm $10 General Admission Advance tickets on sale at the Washington County Library (850) 638-1314 or at the box oce day of show. Spanish Trail Playhouse THE MUSICAL THE MUSICAL THE MUSICAL Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Can You Sing, Dance, Act? OPEN AUDITIONS May 20 & 21, 20 13...6pm nightly Audition packets available at the Washington County Public Library or online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.com in Concert Commissioners hold special session to aid ood impacted roads PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS | The News Holmes County Board of County Commissioners met March 20 in a special session.

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com In Memory Of Emerald Coast Hospice remembers patients By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Tears of remembrance were shed, and candles were lit by the many loved ones as Emerald Coast Hospice hosted their annual memorial service on Saturday, March 23, at the First United Methodist Church to honor the patients that passed away in 2012 in Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes and Washington counties. Emerald Coast Hospice conducts the service to give families the opportunity to pay tribute to loved ones and reunite with hospice staff for encouragement and support. We gather here to remember loved ones weve lost, Emerald Coast Hospice Branch Director Julie Pettis said. Weve come together in remembrance and to say their names because everyone in this room has this bond of grief. The staff does such a wonderful job in making everyone feel like family. One of the guest speakers was Chipley Mayor Linda Cain, who shared her experience with those attending. I think this is a great thing that Emerald Coast Hospice does, Cain said. Ive been on the city council for 26 years and mayor for 10. We all have something in common in this room; we all have lost loved ones. Cain spoke about her son, who died suddenly. She told of how she received a call one evening telling her that her son was in a hospital in Jacksonville, and he wouldnt survive the night. We had no idea that he was going to leave us so soon, she said. We had just spoken with him shortly before, and he said he wasnt feeling well and that he was going to bed. How were we to know that would be the last wed ever hear from him? She said they went to his side as quickly as possible, and they were able to see him before he passed away, though she said he didnt know who they were. Out of no where appeared two ladies from Hospice, Cain said. They were so quick and such a God-send. They stayed with us, and unless youve needed Hospice you dont know how much theyre needed. Im so glad that Emerald Coast Hospice is a part of Chipley. Emerald Coast Hospice is a not-for-pro t organization, serving patients in the Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes, and Washington counties. For more information, contact the Chipley of ce at 638-8787. Wednesday, MARCH 27 2013 PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS Emerald Coast Hospice held a memorial service on Saturday at the First United Methodist Church in Chipley for family members of patients who passed away in 2012. In memory of Dianne Sorey. In memory of Francis Daniel Bud Thompkins. In memory of J. Clegg Ivey. In memory of Joyce Braxton. In memory of Vicky White. In memory of Etta Bradley. In memory of Ida Peral Thomas. In memory of Jim Everett. In memory of Phyllis Hall. In memory of John Cook. In memory of Dorthy Seals. In memory of Glen Watson. In memory of James Furr. In memory of Kathleen Segers. In memory of Virgie Keen. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County Times-Advertiser. 1) Around one-third of all asthma cases in the U.S. are related to an allergy to what? Cigarette smoke, Perfume, Cats, Sulfa drugs 2) What John Wayne movie co-star was the 1st woman to run a U.S. airline? Maureen OHara, Vera Miles, Patricia Neal, Kim Darby 3) Sandra Bullock, Chevy Chase, and Bruce Willis are all former what? Pizza deliverers, Bartenders, Cigar smokers, Accountants 4) To whom did Helen Keller dedicate her autobiography? Alexander Graham Bell, Gandhi, Teddy Roosevelt, Jesus 5) Around the kitchen about half of us reuse what after the rst use? Paper towel, Aluminum foil, Zip lock bags, Wax paper 6) What was the name of the rst daily comic strip published in the U.S.? Mr. Mutt, Scruples, Katzenjammer Kids, Hobo 7) As paid in gold dust how much did Levi Strauss get for his rst pair of jeans in 1850? $6, $32, $65, $290 8) The U.S. Marines rst recruiting station was in a what? Church, Station wagon, Bar, Grocery store 9) On Wall Street whats a quarter-point change in a stocks price? Quirk, Quire, Quirt, Quack 10) Valentine was one of Shakespeares Two Gentlemen of Verona; who was the other? Leonato, Macduff, Tybalt, Proteus 11) What was Lindberghs average m.p.h. speed on his historic nonstop Atlantic ight in 1927? 45, 74, 89, 108 12) A premature infant is ve times more likely to be what? Blind, Mentally challenged, Left-handed, Blue-eyed 13) In an average lifetime a woman will consume how many pounds of lipstick? 6, 8, 10, 12 14) What does a labeorphilist ordinarily collect? Parking tickets, Cigar bands, Beer bottles, Car tags ANSWERS 1) Cats. 2) Maureen OHara. 3) Bartenders. 4) Alexander Graham Bell. 5) Aluminum foil. 6) Mr. Mutt. 7) $6. 8) Bar. 9) Quack. 10) Proteus. 11) 108. 12) Left-handed. 13) 6. 14) Beer bottles.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Grand Ridge Spring Festival and Easter Egg Hunt March 30th 8:00 am 2:00 pm At John Thomas Porter Park beside Grand Ridge School The Town of Grand Ridge is gearing up for its Spring Festival and Easter Egg Hunt!!! It features an Easter Egg Hunt at 10:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. with 3 dierent age divisions having a total of 12 golden eggs worth $25.00 each and a coloring contest with prizes. Admission to this event is free, but there are small fees for the childrens activities. There will be no charge for the egg hunt or for the color ing contest. There will be something for everyone including arts, crafts, food vendors, childrens games and activities, and live bunny photos from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. There are a variety of activities for children and adults. Ven dors will be selling T-shirts, homemade jellies, candles, handmade crafts, jewelry, carnival foods, corn dogs, chicken on a stick, shrimp on a stick, corn, sausage dogs, and snoballs. Games and activities for the children will include train rides, helicopter rides, Race Mania, slides, a bouncy house, and more. We are inviting vendors to participate. Vendor spaces are $25 each with proceeds going to Sneads High School Project Graduation 2013. Any vendors that wish to participate are encouraged to contact Crystal Avriett at 850-573-6750 or at crystalavriett@gmail.com. Funded in part by the Jackson County Tourist Development Council, East Jackson County Economic Development Council, and Town of Grand Ridge Sellers celebrates 7th birthday Ashton Gage Sellers of Bonifay celebrated his 7th birthday on March 24. Gage is the son of Ashley Skinner of Caryville, and father William Sellers of Bonifay. His grandparents are Patti Manwarring of Caryville and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sellers of Bonifay. He is the great grandson of Dot Mixson of Enterprise Ala., and the late Mack and Jeanell Turner of Ozark Ala. Bethlehem FFA Wins Land Judging Contest On March 7, Bethlehem FFA traveled to Bonifay, to compete in the District Land Judging competition. Land Judging can be a complicated contest you go out to four holes and score them in a class. The way three of the holes are scored is by Surface Texture, Organic Matter, Permeability, Slope, Drainage, and Erosion. One of the holes Home site gets scored by Surface texture, Depth, Permeability, Slop, Drainage, ShrinkSwell, and Erosion. The Bethlehem FFA took two teams both competing in the Senior Division. The rst team consisted of Josie Dampier, Macey Thomas, Gene Myers, and Jonathan Kirkland. The second team consisted of David Boatwright, James Graham, and Blake Majors. Team one brought back rst place, and team two brought back second place. Along with that, Josie Dampier brought back High Individual. Being that team one placed placed this qualies them for State in Bronson, later in March. The Bonifay Book Club met at the home of Edna McDonald on Tuesday afternoon, March 12. Present at the meeting were Brenda Alford, Joyce Brannon, Cynthia Brooks, Medea Callahan, Wanda Howell, June Jones, Edna McDonald, Nancy Riley, DiAnn Shores, Dianne Smith, and Hazel Tison. The meeting was called to order by President Medea Callahan. The minutes were approved as read by Secretary Brenda Alford. Wanda Howell reviewed the book The Forgotten by David Baldacci. The setting for the novel is Paradise, Florida, a ctional seemingly picture perfect tourist community, on the Emerald Coast of Florida in the neighborhood of Fort Walton Beach. Army Special Agent John Puller, a combat veteran, who is assigned some of the Armys most dif cult criminal cases, comes to Paradise in response to a letter that his Aunt has written asking for his help. She writes that things and people are just not as they seem in Paradise, and she needs him. Puller ends up in Paradise investigating the death of his Aunt whom the local authorities have ruled as accidental. Pullers investigation leads him on a bloody, dangerous and deadly journey with many unexpected twists and turns. Many secrets exist in Paradise. Delicious refreshments were served by Ms. McDonald at the conclusion of the meeting. Bonifay Book Club meets World Heritage Student Exchange Program, a highly respected, nonpro t, public-bene t organization, is seeking local host families for high school boys and girls from Scandinavia, France, Germany, Italy, Thailand, China, South Korea, and the former Soviet Republics. Students are already awaiting word on their host families for the 201314 academic school year (or semester). Host families provide room, board, and guidance for a teenager living thousands of miles from home. Couples, single parents, and families with or without children in the home are all encouraged to apply. The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before the 2013-14 school year begins and each World Heritage student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please call local Area Representative Amy Strout at 281-2092 or 1-800888-9040 (toll free). Please also visit our website at www.whHosts.com Hosts sought for exchange students Miss. Washington County Relay WASHINGTON COUNTY Come be apart of the Miss. Washington County Relay Beauty Pageant. The pageant will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday night April 12, for ages 11 to 18 and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, April 13 for ages birth to 10 years old. Entry fee is $50. You can pick up you entry forms at C & C Bookkeeping, Washington County News or by contacting Naomi Carter at ncrelayforlife@gmail.com. You can also sign up at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 2 in the lobby. 2013 Race For a Cure car show WASHINGTON COUNTY On behalf of the Washington County Relay for Life, we would like to invite you to bring your favorite Hot Rod and show it off in out rst ever Race For a Cure Car Show. The show will be held at 9 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. Trophies will be awarded on the Relay stage at approximately 12 p.m. trophies will be awarded to the fans favorite car, rst, second and third place and a Grand Champion trophy will be awarded to the Car or Club who turns in the most donations from your entry. There is no charge to enter your car. The club that enters the most card will receive a plaque from the American Cancer Society in recognition of your clubs contribution to a world with more birthdays. There is no year, make, or model limit to this show. There will be food, drinks, and entertainment available to all who enter or attend. Call Jimmy to register at 786-4477440 or jim@bigjimssmokinbutts.com Relay looking for cancer survivors to be honored WASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay for Life is looking for survivors to honor at this years Relay for Life 2013 event. If you are a cancer survivor your name, address and shirt size to the following locations for Relay updates, reservation at the Survivors Banquet and free survivor t-shirt: to the Washington County News (ask for Cathrine), or call Connie Wheeler at 260-4073 Or you can mail it to the Washington County News, C/O Cathrine Lamb, 1364 North Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fl., 32428 you may also send the email to clamb@chipleypaper.com. Relay EVENTS

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Chipola brain bowl wins sixth straight state championship Special to Extra MARIANNA For the sixth straight year, Chipola College has won the State Brain Bowl Tournament, defeating Valencia 915-50 in the nals of the Florida College System Activities Association Tournament on March 17. Chipolas six consecutive championships breaks the old record of ve straight set by Broward College. Broward still has the most state titles with seven. Chipola also set a record for the largest margin of victory in a nal round with the 915-50 win over Valencia. The Chipola team answered 29 of the 36 questions in the nals. Chipola MVP Paul Kelson was the David Elhert High Point Winner in the tournament with 1,120 total points and an average of 131 points per game. Kelson also was named to the AllTournament team for the second straight year. Chipola head Coach Stan Young, says, Paul Kelson is the best community college player in the country and maybe the best at any level. Other Chipola Blue team members are: Katelyn Miller, William Singleton and Becca Delgado. Miller nished seventh in individual scoring in the tournament. The Chipola White Team nished eighth in the State Tournament and was led Wesley Chevillot who nished eighth in individual scoring. Other Chipola White members are: Bobby Gause, Jamie McCoy and Faith Tice. Chipola will next play in the Intercollegiate Championship Tournament (ICT) in Chicago, April 12-13, as one of only six community colleges invited to the tournament. Chipola won its third straight NAQT (National Academic Quiz Tournament) Community College Championship Tournament in St. Louis on March 2. Based on that performance, Chipola received the number ve seed in the ICT, behind only Harvard, Yale, Stanford, and Brown. Chipola math professor Stan Young is head coach of the Brain Bowl team with volunteer assistant Dr. Robert Dunkle. About Chipolas run of six straight, Young says, You can nd intelligent people everywhere. Were in this small community college with just over 2,000 students and were competing with Ivy League schools. It just goes to show you that intelligence can come from anywhere. If you take that and put in a lot of hard work and prepare yourself, it just kind of shows you what you can do, Young said. SPEC IA L TO E XT RA Members of the winning Brain Bowl team are, from left: Becca Delgado, Katelyn Miller, Tournament MVP Paul Kelson and William Singleton. Annika is a 1 year old female chocolate lab cross, about 30 lbs. She seems to have had a home at one time where she was taught to walk politely on a leash, sit, shake and perhaps other things we have yet to discover. She appears very healthy and well groomed. She is a very sweet, loving and beautiful girl. You just cant go wrong with this little darling, she will gladly become a much loved part of your family in no time! PETS OF THE WEEK Russ is a 1 to 2 year old male shepherd cross, about 40 to 45 pounds. He is a very friendly boy, alert, curious and lots of fun to play with. Russ is an adorable young man who would love to be your faithful friend and companion, dont you have some room in your heart and home to give this sweetie the life he deserves? For more information contact Animal Control of West Florida, 686 Highway 90, Chipley, or call 638-2082. Our hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. until noon. Pet Talk: Mange and Your Dog We love for our pets to play outdoors with their friends, but owners should be cautious about the dangers that lurk there. Youve probably heard the term mangy mutt referring to a poor dog with a ratty, patchy coat. Thats actually how dogs with sarcoptic mange really look. Mange is a condition caused by an infestation of a specic type of mite that is too tiny to be seen with the naked eye. In this country, primarily dogs get sarcoptic mange, or scabies, said Dr. Alison Diesel, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. It can be transmitted and carried by other wild canids including coyotes and foxes. Sarcoptes mites are very contagious and can be spread by your pet coming into contact with an infected source. Sarcoptes mites are spread by direct contact with an infected animal or from an infected environment (e.g. coyote den or fox burrow, even dog parks or grooming facilities), said Diesel. It is important that all incontact animals be treated for mites if one dog in the household is diagnosed with scabies. The most common sign associated with sarcoptic mange is severe itchiness. Dogs may also develop a rash, lose their hair, and have crusting lesions on various body regions, said Diesel. The most common areas include the ear margins, hocks, and elbows; however signs may become generalized very quickly. Veterinarians often use therapy or the pets history and clinical signs to diagnose mange. Sarcoptes mites can be very difcult to nd as they live very supercially on the skin and are typically only present in very small numbers, said Diesel. Skin scrapings may help to identify the mites, however often we do not nd the mites on our patients. A positive pinnal-pedal response (where the veterinarian folds the ear ap on itself, rubs the two surfaces together, and watches for the hind limb to exhibit the classic Thumper or scratching response) can be supportive of the suspected diagnosis. Your dogs veterinarian will recommend the most appropriate therapy given your animals specic needs and preferences. Typically therapy lasts between 6-8 weeks. Thankfully, Sarcoptes mites are pretty wimpy, said Diesel. Several topical, oral, and injectable treatments are available for treating them. Certain breeds (e.g. Collies, Shetland sheepdogs, Border collies) need to be specially considered as some of the therapeutic options can be toxic and cause severe side effects including seizures. Unfortunately, sarcoptic mange can also be spread from dogs to their owners. If a pet owner is concerned they may have contracted scabies from their pet, particularly if their veterinarian diagnoses scabies, they should contact their primary care physician for recommendations and let them know their dog is being treated for scabies, said Diesel. The best prevention from mange is to keep dogs away from known infested environments including coyote dens and fox burrows. If the owner knows their dog has scabies, they should also keep their pet away from other dogs (including staying away from dog parks, doggie day care and groomers) until the infestation is fully resolved, said Diesel.About P et T alk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk PET TALK Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON P AGE B6

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Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certied Eye Physician & Surgeon Mullis Eye Institute 1691 Main Street, Suite #1 Located across from Walmart 850-638-7220 Eye Care for Seniors First Bap ist Church Come as you are 1300 South Blvd Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-1830 First Bap ist Church Come as you are First Bap ist Church Come as you are Owners: Jerry & Brenda Tice 1218 Main St. 638-4097 Celebrating 31 years JERRY WATKINS I NSURANCE A GENCY A UTO HOME LIFE LET US QUOTE YOU 1304 Jackson A ve., C hipley, FL (850) 638-2222 Hortons Chipley Heating & Cooling Sales, Service & Installation 1213 Main St., Chipley (850) 638-1309 (850) 263-0052 (850) 547-9078 (850) 638-8376 (850) 638-1805 BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main St., Chipley, FL 32428 Phone: 638-4010 Donald Brown LFD, Manager Stephen B. Register, CPA 1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 Local Agents, Local Service, Best Value. The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life. The Best of Both Worlds 1361 Jackson Ave., Chipley 638-1756 washington@ffbic.com 1108 N. Waukesha St., Bonifay 547-4227 holmes@ffbic.com Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay. Membership doesnt cost, it pays! Panhandle Lumber & Supply For ALL Your Building Needs 405 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547-9354 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547-1877 1357 Brickyard Rd., Chipley (850) 638-0424 Consumer & Commercial Power Equipment Visit our website at www.lanesoutdoor.com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 1621 Main St. Chipley OPEN 24 H O URS C HIPLEY H ARDWARE & MOBILE HO M E SUPPLIES 1163 Jackson Ave. Chipley (850) 638-1815 Home Folks serving Home Folks We give commercial rates to area churches 415 S. Waukesha St., Bonifay, Fla. 850-547-3696 Tri-County Gas 1055 Fowler Ave., Chipley Behind our Chipley factory. Hours: Thur. and Fri. 9 AM 5 PM Sat. 9 AM 3 PM 638-9421 WEST P OINT Florida Microlm & Ofce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 879 Usery Road, Chipley, Florida 32428 850-638-4654 Washington County Rehabilitation & Nursing Center Weekly Bible Trivia With how many plagues did God punish Egypt? (answer found in this weeks scripture reading) I am what many people refer to as a purist. Many do not understand or know what a purist is so let me explain. No, a purist is not a Puritan, although I have nothing against Puritans and lean heavily in their direction. After all, I think it is better to be radical in the right direction than radical in the wrong direction as many people are today. I think the Puritans are getting a bad rap today. A purist, however, is someone who likes things just the way they are. No additives. No upgrades. No unnecessary changes. If my light bulb goes out, I want to change. That is the limit for change except maybe some of it that jingles in my pocket. Have you ever noticed that once you are comfortable with a computer program and really like it, someone will upgrade it until it is a completely different program with no relationship to the one you love? I hate that. When you got something that works, do not try to x it. That is one of the basic rules of life. It is a rule I have been trying to explain to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage for years. I keep telling her I am not broken and therefore I do not need xing. It has become the mission of her life to upgrade me. Can you imagine that? I love me the way I are. Some people are more like soup than anything else. Anything and everything goes into the pot. Not me. I like to savor something in its own environment. So, I am a purist in many regards, which can best be seen from my point of view in holidays. I like holidays but I do not like all of the upgrading and embellishments attached to every holiday you can think of except perhaps April 1. We know who celebrates that holiday. I would like to enjoy a holiday sometime without all of the extras. At Christmas time I want to celebrate the purpose of Christmas, I have no idea what a Santa Claus with reindeer, and Frosty the Snowman have to do with Christmas. This is rather confusing to me. What are we celebrating at Christmas? If you follow the commercials, you have no idea what holiday is being celebrated. For Easter, I would like to strip away all of the trappings, all of the hype and just celebrate it for what it is. What do the Easter bunny and the Easter egg have to do with Easter? I would be open to having a holiday for the Easter bunny, another holiday for the Easter egg and if you want to get technical, a holiday for Santa Claus, one for Rudolph the red nose reindeer and a separate one for Frosty the Snowman. When you put it all together, it just is rather confusing to me. I know who is in charge of these holidays. A holiday is not to celebrate but rather a holiday is to make money. Some people, and I will not mention any names, has never seen a holiday they did not want to make a buck. Maybe every holiday should be called Buck Day, where we celebrate and honor the almighty dollar. One more holiday I would suggest is one with no commercials and no selling whatsoever. A holiday where you would be ned dearly if you bought anything. A holiday from buying would suit me just ne. I know my critics will say that unless somebody buys something nobody makes anything. I have no problem with that. Wouldnt it be nice to have a holiday where that kind of thing was not front and center? The value of the Easter bunny is how much money it can make for the person sponsoring the holiday. I have seen a very interesting thing and I just cannot quite explain it. Just before the Easter holiday and leading up to it, all the Easter candy is at a premium price. Then, after Easter, this same Easter candy is at a hefty discount in the stores. What has changed? Could it be that the older something gets the less it is worth? Of course, I am beginning to feel that way myself, as I get older. (Thanks, Uncle Sam.) As a purist, I would like to celebrate a holiday for once without all of the rigmarole and shenanigans. A holiday where nobody will pester me. A holiday where I can shut out the world and enjoy the comforts of home and family. If I have not offended anybody up to now, let me take this a step further. It would be nice to have a holiday when all media would shut down. No television. No radio. No telephone or cell phone. No Internet. I know I am a radical, but I think it would be nice some time just to close out the world and remember the things that have value. Even Jesus understood this in his time. And he said unto them, Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place, and rest a while: for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat (Mark 6:31 KJV). Therefore, I would like all of these things to hop along let me enjoy the things that really have value to me before I simply come apart. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com. Will the Easter bunny just hop away ... Please! Easter Mass Schedule CHIPLEY St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church in Chipley and St. Anne Catholic Church in Marianna will host Holy Week services. Holy Thursday, March 28, services will be held at St. Anne, Marianna at 7 p.m. On Good Friday, March 29, Veneration of the Cross at St. Joseph at 3 p.m. and Easter Vigil held at St. Joseph at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 30. Sunday Mass at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph in Chipley. Chipley Ministerial Association Annual Holy Week CHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley will again host the Chipley Ministerial Associations Annual Holy Week Services from March 25 to 29. The services will begin each day at 12 p.m., in the Sanctuary and will conclude with a soup and sandwich lunch in the John Wesley Building. As is the tradition, each service will consist of special music and a short devotional given by a different pastor each day. The speakers for this year are on Monday March 25, the Rev. Kermit Soileau, Pastor of New Prospect Baptist Church. Tuesdays speaker will be the Rev. Ward Clarke of St. Matthews Episcopal Church and on Wednesday, the Rev. Mike Orr of the First Baptist Church will give the devotion. The Rev. Clint Ellis, Pastor of Holmes Creek Baptist Church will speak on Thursday and Good Fridays message will be given by the Rev. Vince Spencer, of New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Church. After each days service a soup and sandwich luncheon will be served in the John Wesley Building. The service and luncheon will be timed so that you can attend both the service and luncheon and still return to work by 1 p.m. There is no charge for participating in the service or the luncheon although an Agape Plate will be placed at each end of the Alter to allow those who wish to contribute to the Ministerial Associations Benevolent Fund that provides lodging for distressed Faith BRIEFS See FAITH B6 Page 4 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at or Mr. Eddie Lee Mosley Jr., 45 of the St. Joseph Community, Chipley, passed away March 7, on Highway 90 on his way to work near Marianna. He was a Native of Fort Polk, La, and has resided in Washington County most of his life, he was a 1986 graduate of Chipley High School. He has been employed with the Marianna Automotive Service since 2006 and was a member of the Saint Joseph A.M.E. Church. Survivors include his parents, Eddie Sr. and Lucille Mosley; two sons, Eddie III and Elijah Mosley all of Chipley; brother, Erick Mosley, Tallahassee; sister, Erika Mosley, Tallahassee and many other relatives and friends. Funeral Services were conducted at 11 a.m., Saturday, March 16, 2013 at Saint Joseph A.M.E. Church on Monroe Shef eld Road in Chipley, with the Rev. Alice Clark, the Rev. Franklin Southland, the Rev. Larry Brown and the Rev. Sinclair Forbes of ciating. Interment followed in the Saint Joseph Cemetery with The Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, directing. The remains were in repose at the church onehour prior to the service. Visitation was held at the Cooper Funeral Home from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday. Eddie L. Mosley Jr. Jesse Andrew Dennis, Jr. age 73 of Vernon, passed away Sunday March 17, 2013 in the Covenant Hospice Unit of Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Mr. Dennis was born July 31, 1939 in Miami, to the late Jesse Andrew, Sr. and Mattie (Houck) Dennis. He had been a resident of Vernon since 1974, coming from Hialeah. Mr. Dennis was a self employed contractor and a member of the Unity Baptist Church in Vernon. He loved his Lord, his family and shing. His grandchildren were the light of his life. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by two brothers, John Dennis and Bobby Dennis, as well as two great grandsons, Trenton and Brenton Hagan. Survivors include his loving wife of 54 years, Mary Dennis of Vernon; one son, Charles Dennis of Vernon; one daughter, Terri Strickland and husband Glen of Ebro; two brothers, Jerry Dennis of Lynn, Ala. and Raymond Dennis of Lady Lake; two sisters, Lilly Kellar of Okeechobee and Ruth Ambrose of South Carolina; four grandchildren, Theresa Hagan, Brittany Cook, Andrew Dennis and Aaron Dennis and four great grandchildren, Trinity and Riley Hagan and Ayden and Leighton Cook. The family received friends Tuesday, March 19, 2013 from 6 to 8 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel. Funeral services were held Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 3 p.m., at Unity Baptist Church with the Rev. Lindsey Martin and Alan English of ciating. Interment followed in the Unity Baptist Church Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Jesse A. Dennis Jr. Kenneth Robert Foster, 70, of Bonifay, died March 16, 2013. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Kenneth R. Foster Mr. Grady Jerl Chitty, age 64, of Bonifay, passed away March 20, 2013 at Covenant Hospice Inpatient and Palliative Care Center of Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Mr. Chitty was born Jan. 30, 1949 in Bonifay. He is preceded in death by his father, Fate Chitty. Mr. Chitty is survived by his wife, Belinda Chitty of Bonifay; his mother, Clara Chitty of Bonifay; a son, Darren Chitty and wife Michelle of Bonifay; a daughter, Toni Williams and husband Dale of Bonifay; a brother, Gene Chitty and wife Susan of Bonifay; grandchildren, Dylan Chitty, Tiffany and Daniel Birge, Tabitha, Sabian, David, and Bryan; a great-grandson, Timber Birge; mother-in-law, Betty Hutchinson of Bonifay and numerous relatives. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 23, 2013 at First Baptist Church with the Rev. Shelly Chandler, the Rev. Jeep Sullivan, the Rev. David Lauen and the Rev. Chris Nelson of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Friday at First Baptist Church. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be given to: The Gideons International, P.O. Box 845, Bonifay, FL 32425. Grady J. Chitty Mr. Okley Strickland, 60 of Bonifay, died on Wednesday, March 20, 2013, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan. Born Thursday, Oct. 16, 1952 in Bonifay, he was the son of the late John Strickland and the late Pearlie Mills Strickland. He was the husband of Cynthia Strickland Strickland. He was a member of Shady Grove Baptist Church. Surviving are daughters, Tiffany Strickland of Bonifay, and Jessica Strickland of Bonifay; brothers, Clearance Carroll of Panama City, and Oneal Strickland of Panama City; sisters, Mary Ann Berry of Bonifay, Kathleen Keith of Palatka, Ola Grif n of Noma, Owene Leer of Glendale, Teen Steverson of Bonifay and Murley Wood of Bonifay. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, March 23, 2013 at Shady Grove Baptist Church, Bonifay, with the Rev. Eber Overly and the Rev. Johnie Bradshaw of ciating. Interment followed in Shady Grove Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 22, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Okley Strickland Mrs. Sybil Ellen Sellers, 76 of Westville, died on Monday, March 18, 2013, at Wiregrass Rehabilitation Center & Nursing Home in Geneva, Ala. Born Friday, May 22, 1936 in Geneva County, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Bascom Stafford and the late Flossie Carroll Stafford. She was preceded in death by one daughter, Earnestine Carnley and ve brothers, Carroll, Leamon, Ben, Ray and Rex Stafford. Surviving are sons, Hershel Carnley of Bonifay, Bobby Carnley of Panama City, Timothy Sellers of Hartford, Ala., and Tommy Sellers of Black, Ala.; daughters, Geraldine Chambliss of Marianna, Rachel Pickron of Westville and Sonya Gibson of Bonifay; brothers, George Stafford of Dothan, Ala., and Mitchell Stafford of Birmingham, Ala.; 17 grand children and 27 great grand children. A Funeral service was held at 1 p.m., on Thursday, March 21, 2013 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Clois Joiner and the Rev. Mitchell Johnson of ciating. Interment followed in Bonifay Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Wednesday, March 20, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Sybil E. Sellers Alice B. Crutch eld, age 80, passed from this life Thursday morning, March 21, 2013 at her home in Chipley. She was born Nov. 13, 1932 to the late Tom and Mary (Walters) Johns in Wausau. Mrs. Alice is a lifelong resident of the Chipley area and she was a member of the Grace Assembly of God Church of Chipley. She is preceded in death by her husband, Carlos Crutch eld. Survivors include one son, Drexel Owens and wife Stefanie of Panama City Beach; two daughters, Vicki Howard and husband Lowell of Picayune, Miss., and Linda Morris and husband Sonny of Eufaula, Ala.; one brother, Theo Johns of Ocala; three sisters, Elena Dunn and Verdell Carter of Chipley, and Helen Clavier of Niceville; six grandchildren, Mark Odom, Kristen McClure, Jeanine Kolmetz, Heather Wells, Ashley Rester, Brittany Bryant and 11 great grandchildren. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, March 22, 2013 for visitation at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Saturday at 10 a.m., March 23, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Dallas Pettis and the Rev. Jim Creel of ciating. Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery, Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Alice B. Crutch eld Bennie Earl (Pete) Davis, age 87 of Graceville, passed away Friday, March 22, 2013 in the CampbelltonGraceville Hospital in Graceville. Mr. Davis was born Dec. 16, 1925 in Graceville to the late Charlie and Bennie (Narramore) Davis. He was a retired mail carrier and farmer. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Hanna Mae (Leavins) Davis. Survivors include ve sons, Sonny Davis and his wife Teresa of Graceville, Randy Davis and girlfriend Linda Brown of Cottondale, Michael Davis and wife Lisa of Graceville, Keith Davis and wife Cory of Graceville and Roger Davis and anc Paige Lamb of Graceville; one sister in law, Gracie Davis of Marianna; 15 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Monday, March 25, 2013, at 11 a.m., in the Poplar Springs Baptist Church, with the Rev. John Howell and Kenneth Adkison of ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to services at the church. Interment followed in Poplar Springs Baptist Church Cemetery. The family suggests in lieu of owers, contributions be made to the Poplar Springs Baptist Church, 1098 Lovewood Road, Graceville, Florida 32440. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Bennie E. Davis Mrs. Elaine Lamarr Holmes, 70, of Westville, died on Thursday, March 21, 2013, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Ala. Born Friday, May 8, 1942, in Westville, she was the daughter of the late Talmer Cullifer. She was also preceded by her husband, Ralph Holmes. Surviving is her mother, Vivian Clemmons Motley; sons, Phillip Holmes of Westville, Greg Holmes and wife Lydia of Ponce de Leon, and Paul Holmes and wife Lori of Ponce de Leon; daughters, Sheila Clark and husband Carlos of Geneva, Ala., and Lisa Denning and husband Walter of Ponce De Leon; brother, Ellis Cullifer and wife Marie of Geneva, Ala.; sister, Dorothy Gibson of Westville; eight grandchildren; four great-grand children; and many other relatives and friends. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Monday, March 25, 2013 at Hickory Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Stacey Stafford and the Rev. Stephen Hendrick of ciating. Interment followed in Hickory Hill Cemetery, Westville, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m., on Monday, March 25, 2013, at Hickory Hill Baptist Church, Westville. Elaine L. Holmes Gregory Kenneth Clumfoot, 56, of Bonifay, died March 21, 2013. A memorial service will be held, March 27, 2013 at Otter Creek Church in Ponce De Leon with memorialization by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Gregory K. Clumfoot James Harold Jim Grissett passed away March 22, 2013, in Macclenny, after a long battle with diabetes. Jim was born Nov. 8, 1933, in Chipley and was a graduate of Chipley High School. He was the son of Charlie Grissett and Jessie Horne Grissett. After serving in the U.S. Army, he retired from Anchor Class Corporation in Jacksonville. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Odessa Warner Grissett; brother, Larry Grissett and wife Pat of Chipley; nieces, Shawn Reichenbach (Ben) of Middleburg, and Deborah Grim (Jesse) of Macclenny; nephew, Matthew Grissett of Jacksonville and numerous other nieces and nephews. James H. Grissett Obituaries @WCN_HCT FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. : Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. ZG127S www.kubota.com Plus $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 36 Months Mow like the pros with Kubotas newest zero-turn mower. Expect Commercial-Grade Transmission Expect Professional Quality Mower Deck Expect 4-Year/300-Hour Factory Warranty** Expect Kubotas Most Affordable Zero-turn Mower Ever and travelers. The First United Methodist Church is next to the Washington County Courthouse at the top of the hill on Highway 90, 1285 Jackson Ave. Come and worship with us each day, the entire community is invited to attend these services. For additional information you can call the church of ce at 638-0010. FUMC Youth Present Stations of the Cross CHIPLEY The Youth Fellowship of Chipley First United Methodist Church will present the Stations of the Cross at 6:30 p.m., on Friday evening March 29. The Stations of the Cross is a visual reenactment of the days leading up to Jesus cruci xion. This performance will be given on the stage of our new John Wesley Building. Chipley United Methodist Church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue, next to the Washington County Courthouse at the top of the hill on Highway 90. The entire community is invited to attend this service. Come and worship with us, you might just nd that missing link in your life. For additional information on this service you may contact, Luke Scho eld, Youth Minister at 638-0010. Northside Baptist Easter Pageant PONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church will beholding an Easter Pageant at 7 p.m., March 30. Sunrise Service VERNON The Churches of Hinson Crossroads and surrounding area invite everyone to join them at 7 a.m., Easter Morning March 31, for Easter Sunrise Service. It will be at the Hinson Crossroad Fires Department Pavilion. Refreshments will follow the service. Oak Grove Baptist Homecoming PONCE DE LEON Oak Grove Baptist Church would like to cordially invite everyone to Homecoming and Easter services on March 31. Sunday School will begin at 10 a.m. with morning Worship at 11 a.m. Brother Gerald Brazile will bring the message. Lunch will be spread at noon. Launch Conference GRACEVILLE Come and experience the expansion of Gods power at Impact Church Launch Conference. This grand event will be held at the Graceville Civic Center at 6 p.m. on March 29th and at 7 p.m., on March 30. Our guest speakers will be Apostle Mark Pickett of Impact Church & Apostle Mark T. Jones, Sr. of Center for Manifestation (Tampa). For more information visit us at www.impactchurch .or g or call the Church Of ce at 372-2883. Gap Pond Cemetery Clean Up The Gap Pond Cemetery Committee will be holding a cemetery clean up day from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. on April 3. Tent Revival of America BONIFAY The Florida Springs RV Resort and Campground will be hosting Todd Allen Herendeens Tent Revival of America on April 6. The church and Veterans organization yard sale will begin at 4 p.m., with a gospel and patriotic music program at 7 p.m. food and soft drinks will be available. The yard sale and tent program are free to everyone. For more information or to reserve camping spots call 258-3110. FAITH from page B4 Community CALENDAR Washington County Libraries to be closed WASHINGTON COUNTY All Washington County Public Library branches will be closed on Good Friday March 29. All branches will reopen for regular hours on April 1. The Early Learning Coalition hosts VPK Registration CHIPLEY The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida will be holding Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) registration for families in Holmes and Washington counties at their of ce from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Friday, April 5. The coalition of ce is located at 680 2nd Street, Chipley, in the Old Chipley High School building. To be eligible for VPK, children must turn four on or before Sept. 1, and they must live in Florida. When enrolling for VPK, parents will need to bring proof of childs age and proof of Florida residency. Typical examples for each are: for proof of age a Birth Certi cate, Passport or Military ID For proof of residency Drivers License, Utility Bill (must show street address), Residential rental agreement, FL Vehicle Registration Card, or pay stub. The VPK program is a great way to help prepare children to be successful in school and in life, said Lynne Eldridge, Executive Director for the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida. Parents have many different quality programs to choose from when looking to enroll their child in VPK. To nd out more information about VPK or to nd an enrollment in your area call 1-866-269-3022 or visit www. elcnwf.org Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611REOPENED Blanchette & Associates Inc.CONCRETE MASONRY HEAVY GAUGE METALDESIGN & BUILD CONSULTANTS LAND DEVELOPMENTJoe Blanchette850 532-2178gjblanchette@gmail.comCGC#1510933 Professional Engineer#74634SAFE ROOMS Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only$18.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 D&GPainting & Remodeling(850) 547-3805All types of Roo ng, Painting and Remodeling Call Gene (850) 849-0736 or Dwayne (850) 849-7982License #RC0067336 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672010CA000113XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. FRANK A. YADACK, JR.; JO YADACK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure datedFeb 8, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672010CA000113XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and FRANK A. YADACK, JR.; JO YADACK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of _April 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: ONE TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SECTION CORNER WHICH IS COMMON TO SECTIONS 26, 27, 34 AND 35, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST WHICH IS MARKED BY AN OLD IRON AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1898.14 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 748.76 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE 46 MINUTES EAST, 753.68 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 278 (100’ RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST, 761.44 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 278; THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 46 MINUTES WEST, 596.10 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT AND BEING IN THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 27 TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013. LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 CITY OF CHIPLEY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO CITY CODE The Chipley City Council will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING regarding adoption of the following ordinance on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, at 6:00 p.m., at the City Hall Council Chambers, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 924 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 20, ENTITLED “ZONING”, AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Adoption of this ordinance will amend the Historical Commercial Land Use District to use the upstairs in the downtown buildings for residential purposes. All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to provide written and/or verbal comments on the matter under consideration. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of disability or physical impairments should contact the City at (850) 638-6350, 48 hours prior to the hearing. For further information pertaining to the proposed ordinance, contact Dan Miner, City Administrator. As published in the Washington County News March 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672011CA000491XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B. VAN WILPE; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated Feb 8_, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672011CA000491XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is Plaintiff and JAMES B. VAN WILPE; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of April,2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 86, CHIPLEY HEIGHTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CHIPLEY IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 86, CHIPLEY HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013 LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672012CA000260XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANTONIO B. DAVIS; WENDY A. DAVIS; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated FEB 8_, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672012CA000260XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and ANTONIO B. DAVIS; WENDY A. DAVIS; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of April ,2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S0012’02”E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 2, 820.00 FEET: THENCE S8939’11”E, 240 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S8939’11”E 200 FEET; THENCE S0012’02”E, 100 FEET; THENCE; N8939’11”W, 200 FEET TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF A 40 FOOT ROAD; THENCE N0012’02”W ALONG SAID EAST R/W LINE 100.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2007 DESTINY INDUSTRIES DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON, VIN NUMBERS DlSH02637GAA AND DlSH02637GAB, TITLE NUMBERS 99713672 AND 99713723. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013 LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF EVANS CRAIG ALLEN, JR. File No.: 13-11-CP NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Evans Craig Allen, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was January 23, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1293 Jackson Ave, Suite 100, Chipley, Florida 32428. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 20, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Julie Ann Sombathy Attorney for Rosalind Raley Allen Florida Bar Number 0009740 Isler & Sombathy, P.A. P.O. Box 430 434 Magnolia Avenue(Zip: 32401) Panama City, Florida 32402-0430 Telephone:(850) 769-5532 Fax:(850) 785-5852 E-Mail: Julie.Sombathy.Court@g mail.com Secondary E-Mail: JASAssistant1@gmail.co m Personal Representative: Rosalind Raley Allen 144 Summer Breeze Road Panama City Beach, Florida 32413 As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 Notice to Professional Consultants Seventh Street Sidewalks FPID No. 425739-2-38-01 City of Chipley, Florida The City of Chipley, Florida anticipates seeking professional consultant services for the design of sidewalk along the west side of Seventh Street from CR 273 (South Boulevard) to U.S. 90 located in Chipley, Florida. The project length is approximately .511 miles. Consideration will be given to only those firms that are qualified pursuant to law and that have been prequalified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) in accordance with Rule Chapter 14-75, Florida Administrative Code to perform the indicated type(s) of work. Work Types: 3.1-Minor Highway Design Response Deadline: April 19, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. local time Selection Date: April 26, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. local time City Council ApprovalMay 7, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. local time CONSULTANT ELIGIBILITY: It is a basic tenet of the City’s contracting program that contracts are procured in a fair, open, and competitive manner. By submitting a Letter of Response, the Consultant certifies that they are in compliance with FDOT Directive No. 375-030-006. This directive is available on FDOT’s Web Site. In addition to the restrictions identified in Directive No. 375-030-006, please be advised of the following prohibition: A consultant firm or its affiliate who was the Designer or Engineer of Record is precluded from bidding on the same project as the construction contractor, or as a member of the construction contractor’s team (subcontractor). FEDERAL DEBARMENT: By submitting a Letter of Response, the consultant certifies that no principal (which includes officers, directors, or executives) is presently suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible or voluntarily excluded from participation on this transaction by any Federal Department or Agency. SELECTION PROCEDURE: This project is covered by the selection process detailed in the Rule Chapter 14-75, Florida Administrative Code. Selection will be made directly from Letters of Response for this project. After ranking of the consultants, the contract fee will be negotiated in accordance with Section 287.055, Florida Statutes. Note: The final selection meeting date and time is provided in this advertisement. Any other meetings will be noticed on the City of Chipley Web Site. All public meetings will be held in the Council Chambers located in the Chipley City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428. Changes to meeting dates and times will be updated on the City of Chipley Web Site. In order to ensure a fair, competitive, and open process, once a project is advertised for Letters of Response or Letters of Qualification, all communications between interested firms and the City must be directed to Mr. Dan Miner, City Administrator, 850-638-6350. RESPONSE PROCEDURE: Qualified consultants are encouraged to submit a Letter of Response, for each project in which they are interested, to the City Clerk, at 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida by the response deadline. Selection will be made directly from Letters of Responsewhich are limited to five pages for this project. Letters of Response should at a minimum, include the following information: a. Project Name/FDOT Financial Management Number b. Consultant’s name and address c. Proposed responsible office for consultant d. Contact person, phone number and Internet Email Address e. Statement regarding prequalification of consultant or proposed subconsultants in advertised type of work f. Proposed key personnel and their proposed roles (do not include resumes) g.Subconsultant(s) that may be used for the project h. Indication as to whether the prime firm and/or subconsultants are disadvantaged business enterprises (DBE) i. Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion j. Certification Regarding Lobbying k. Truth in Negotiation Certification l. DBE Participation Statement m. Bid Opportunity List ADVERTISEMENT DATES: March 23, 2013, March 27, 2013, RESPONSE DEADLINE: April 19, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. local time FINAL SELECTION: April 26, 2013 – 2:00 p.m. local time -City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL: May 7, 2013 6:00 p.m. local time City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL Note: Any changes to these dates will be posted on the C ity of Chipley Web Site at www .cityofchipley .com As published in the W ashington County News March 23, 27, 2013 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 A Childless Married Couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Let’s help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 Abalauction.comWakulla County, Crawfordville, Fl 3br 2ba split plan. Online bidding now through April 3, (850)510-2501 ab2387 broker For Sale Leather Sectional Sofa burgundy in color.$150.00. Small tear in the pillow in left corner. Call 850-535-9125between 9am-8pm LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used Org. $3,000, sacrifice $975.—CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes—$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. Flea Across Florida 272 mile yard sale April 12-14. Three days through Caryville, Florida. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works! Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 This position includes developing, presenting and closing sales for new and existing customers. Advertising solutions which include print and digital are related to business customer needs that span all categories of small to medium local businesses. Presentations are made via in-person sales calls.We are seeking strong sales minded individuals who are able to manage multiple tasks, prospect for new business & offer excellent customer service.Certi cation: Valid driver’s license Find out why our team loves their job. Is it the exciting environment, the revenue rewards, the great bene ts, or all of the above? The Halifax Media Group is adding talented and motivated multi-media sales professionals to our advertising team.Please submit resume & cover letter to:lgrimes@pcnh.com or contact Lorraine Grimes at 850.747.5002 for more informationHalifax Media Group encourages applications from those with diverse backgrounds. Halifax Media Group is a DRUG-FREE environment. Accounting/FinanceManager of Accounting and FinanceGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of Manager of Accounting and Finance at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, March 29, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34245217 Text FL45217 to 56654 Clerical Full time position, 8-5, M-F in Chipley, Contact One Stop Career Center for more info 850-638-6089 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Golf Cart Mechanic Minimum 3 years experience. Growing company located in Defuniak Springs. Long-term opportunity. Fax resume (850)622-2004. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Help Wanted: Cleaning/cooking position available at Bonifay and Vernon facility working with Limited Mental Health residents. Pay starts at $8.75 an hour with a pay raise in six months. Duties entail daily cleaning, assisting with ADL’s, medication, etc. Must be able to pass background screening and have reliable transportation. Call (850)547-3708 or 535-1160 for more info. Preschool needs loving, dependable person to teach, play and love our 2 year olds. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US—No forced dispatch: (800) 501-3783 www.mamo transportation.com Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Community Services Specialist for the Chipley Outreach office. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist low income families in need of assistance with Services Programs and coordinate with other social service agencies. QUALIFICATIONS : Two year degree and one year work experience serving the low-income or elderly; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have Current driver’s license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech @ 547-3689 or visit www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com. Applications are available at any Tri-County Community Council office and must be submitted by Apr 01 @ 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING! Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain.edu No computer Experience Needed! Job placement Assistance HS Diploma/GED a Must Start Immediately! 1-888-872-4677 Driver Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Don’t Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-(888) 926-7884 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline. com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 1800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BAUpdated House. in country. East of McDonalds. Stove, DW, fridge, water, septic & yard care include. App Required. $600/month plus $600 deposit. 850-638-4228. Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 For Rent 2BR/1BA Sunny Hills area. Very nice, good area. $ 575/ mth. Deposit & references required. 850-258-3874 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. on pond! $500 month, New floors. 856-793-8429 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 ALSO FOR RENT 3BR/1BA, AC Bonifay, FL. $550.00 rent/ $550.00 Deposit. No pets. 638-7601 House for rent, lease or sell 3 Bedroom. 714 Nebraska Ave., Bonifay, Fl. (850)428-6512, (850)956-2073. Houses For Sale/ Owner Financing. 3bd houses & apartments for rent. Furnished affiency apartments for rent. Call Martha 850-547-2531 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley on Orange Hill Rd. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Bonifay Area: Assortment of Mobile Homes & RV’s. Also RV spaces for rent. Quiet location. 5 minutes from shopping. (850)849-3911. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $300/mth 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month.. Ponce de Leon area (850)226-4656. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home For Rent in Bonifay and Chipley. Water, sewer included. Rental references required. Call 638-2999 Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70’s or you purchase as is for lower 50’s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Acreage 1511 Hwy 177, P.O. Box 1181 Bonifay. (850)547-2646 Saturday 7-8 a.m. BANKREPOSSESSION SMITH LAKE, ALABAMA. Prime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120k per lot, over $3million on 34 lots, makes possible a $200k + homesite for 25 cents on the dollar. Level to water, no stairs. Build at water’s edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appointment. Once in a lifetime opportunity. Call (877)448-6816. By owner 19 wooded acres 3 miles north of Bonifay with 660’ frontage on Hwy 79. $3,500 per acre. Restricted to housing. Call Richard-(850) 547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2006 FEMA Trailer. 33ft w/ slide out. All electric. $5000.00 OBO. 548-4715 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473. Land HomesExpress.com For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500. For more information call 638-4492 C-175 Aircarft Low airframe Hrs, IFR equiped. In annual, ready to go. Will sell or trade for motorhome, equal value, $25,000; 850-849-6842.

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HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS 2013 2013 2013 Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com Both Holmes and Washington Counties are ready for an exciting year of growth in 2013. Washington County is looking forward to several exciting developments, includ ing a new Kate M. Smith Elementary School and a new Dollar General store, while the long-term Rhythm Project seems to have stalled out. In Holmes County, community lead ers are working on a strategic plan for economic development and are seeking a director for the Holmes County Develop ment Commission. Holmes County This year the Holmes County Develop ment Commission devised, with the lead ership of Strategic Planning Consultant Dr. David L. Goetsch, a Strategic Plan for Holmes County. Workshops to facilitate the effort were led by Dr. Goetsch. Attending the work and county management, board members, school board members, local business leaders and members of the public. The mission statement devised for the county reads: The mission of the Holmes County Development Commission is to focus them on retaining and creating jobs, improving the local economy, and en hancing the quality of life throughout the community. Dr. Goetsch assisted the work groups opment would be desired for the county, what the county has to offer, and values the county wishes to sustain during the development. Holmes County is also currently in search of a new Executive Director for the Holmes County Development Commis sion. These things take time, said Ju lia Bullington with the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce. You dont want just anyone in that position. If the person does what theyre suppose to it could change the history of Holmes County. Another positive aspect coming to Holmes County is the expanding of State Road 79 from a two-lane to a four-lane, said Bullington. open up so many possibilities for Hol mes County to grow, she said. Holmes County is at an advantage because theres low land here available for purchase and to expand on. This may even lead to trans fer stations in the area. Holmes County, along with Washington County, will also continue to participate in the RiverWay South Apalachicola Choc tawhatchee project, a multi-county consor tium which seeks to bring tourism into the rural counties of Florida. The project is a public/private partner ship that encourages sustainable economic development through the preservation and promotion of the natural, cultural and his torical resources of the Apalachicola and Choctawhatchee River basins. Holmes Creek provides one of the most and mollusks in the Choctawhatchee River basin, according to the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website. springs do indeed feed into Holmes Creek, including Burn-out Spring, Cypress Spring and Becton Spring. Washington County Washington County voters approval of slot machines in January 2012 probably wont make any difference for Ebro Grey hound Park this year, as far as adding slot machines to the facility goes. County residents voted by a nearly 15 percent margin to have 2,000 slot ma chines installed at Ebro Greyhound Park, but an opinion issued by Attorney General Pam Bondi resulted in a standstill. In 2012, Bondi ruled that pari-mutuel facilities in Florida outside of MiamiDade and Broward counties were not permitted to have slot machines. However, Brevard and Gadsden counties voted to have slots at their local pari-mutuel facili ties. Mark Hess, co-owner of Ebro Grey hound Park, said he believed it should be a matter of what the voters want. Its our desire to make sure Washing ton County voters voices have been heard and they deserve their voices to be heard in Tallahassee, Hess said. R-Niceville, said this January the Gam ing Committee he created will focus on information gathering, not drafting com prehensive legislation this session. Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, will use studying how it impacts communities economically and socially. He also wants the public to weigh in at hearings around the state. down should come in 2014, likely the same year the Legislature will renegotiate the Seminole Compact, which governs gambling on Seminole territory. Likewise, the long-coming Rhythm Project seems to have come to a stand still. County Senior Planner Mike until the economy improves. Rhythm is an age-restricted community planned for Washington County for residents 55 and older with 3,200 dwelling units and prom and retail for the communitys immediate needs. The 1,883 acre parcel purchased in 2006 for about $3,700 an acre and cur rently on the tax rolls at $1,000 an acre is located in the southeastern corner of the county where Jackson, Bay and Washing ton counties join along County Line Road. One project that is moving forward is the new 12,480-square-foot Dollar General store planned for Chipley, to be located on Highway 90. The new store, once complete, will tale the place of the Dollar General store currently located in downtown Chipley. The new store will be a bigger Dol lar General store and will feature more groceries and have up to 50 coolers, said Tom Hodges, who was representing Dollar General at the meeting. The city council has approved the projects development order so construction can proceed. The City Council is also seeking a con sultant to work with the city to seek grants to upgrade the citys water system, as well as extend water service south of Interstate 10. Extending water service south of the interstate will allow more development along the interstate. The Washington County School Board also approved a site for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School, which will al low Superintendent Joe Taylor to pursue funding for the new school. This is a long-term project, but we have to get the process started, Taylor said in January. Currently there are two Special Facilities projects in line ahead of Washington County School District which have been approved by the state for funding a $49 million and a $36 mil lion project. If we can get approved, and if no other schools are out there planning a project, we could be number three in line, Taylor said. Taylor said the elementary school is projected to cost about $20 million. Holmes, Washington Counties look forward to exciting year

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Special to Horizons In a world of big-bank bailouts, First Federal Bank of Florida stands out as one of the few strong, stable and community-based banks headquartered in Florida. Founded in 1962 in a small town in North Florida, First Federals hometown values have remained consistent. Being local matters and most all of the banks employees are from the communities in which they work. They all strongly believe in supporting these communities. Countless volunteer hours are logged and thousands of dollars are donated by employees and the bank to support and grow these communities. First Federal also takes pride in being able to provide local decisions so their customers can take care of nancial matters quickly. First Federal of cers take time to know their customer and provide them with customized options for their nancial needs. First Federal offers a wide range of products and services to help their consumer and commercial customers save time, make money and access their banking need conveniently. For more information about First Federals checking and savings accounts, mobile banking and mobile eDeposit or other great products visit your nearest location. C M S. () BANKING ning INVESTMENT with us is an in you Brf N. Wnt S. () b-b M b G S. () -bb For over 50 years First Federal has been committed to building vibrant communities through our support of education, sports, the arts and improving the quality of life for all. www.sb.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013 C2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Horizons Special to Horizons Gulf Power Co.s beginnings go back 88 years. It was Feb. 10, 1925, through the purchase of the Pensacola Electric Co. by Southeastern Power and Light Co., that Gulf Power eventually would be formed. Southeastern was a holding company that operated electric, gas and street railway systems in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi. Later that year, on Oct. 29, Gulf Power Co. was organized as a Southeastern subsidiary. In 1926, Gulf Power Co. became an actual operating public utility as it acquired the Chipley Light and Power Co. Later that year, the Pensacola Electric Co., which had been rescued from receivership by the holding company, was merged into Gulf Power. From its beginnings until 1940, Gulf Power continued to acquire electric systems, including those in Bonifay, Vernon, Graceville, Caryville, Millville, St. Andrew and Panama City among others. Early generation of electricity came from at least 20 scattered, isolated and individually operating units. These generators had been designed to supply power for ice plants, lumber yards and electric transit systems and were not known for their reliability. Despite the depressed economic condition of Northwest Florida, a move toward modernization was virtually forced upon Gulf Power. The hurricane of Sept. 6, 1926, with 120-mph winds, ripped out almost 4,000 rotting power poles. To make matters worse, the storm surge of 9 feet above normal put out the res in the old downtown Pensacola generating plant. More than 600 workers from sister companies restored service with a more modern system in a mere 65 days. By years end, an 110,000-volt transmission line had been erected from the Alabama/ Florida line on the north, into Pensacola. The old Allis-Chalmers steam turbine-generator was placed on standby, ending the era of local power generation. Gulf Power relied on imported energy for the next 39 years, even as customer numbers rose from the 7,366 inherited in 1926, to more than 40,000 in the mid1940s. Finally, in 1945, after years of delay brought about by war shortages, the rst unit at the Crist Steam Plant in Pensacola went online. The 22-megawatt unit enabled the company to take its rst giant step toward generating self-suf ciency. During the next 30 years, demand continues to grow as large companies began to locate in Northwest Florida. Plant Crist added a third generating unit, while another plant was built in Sneads, called Plant Scholz. In 1965, Plant Smith came online near Panama City to handle the growing demand there. In the 1970s, Plant Crist added a seventh unit. Gulf Power launched Good Cents Home Program, which now is a nationally renowned project called Earth Cents Select. To handle local customers, ofces were built in places such as Graceville, Bonifay and Chipley during the 1980s, allowing customers a place to come pay their bill and request services. Hurricanes have always been a part of living on Northwest Florida, but Hurricane Ivan in 2004 will be remembered as the one that affected Gulf Power the most. More than 300,000 customers lost power. Thousands of out-ofstate workers arrived to assist and it took just 13 days to restore power to those who could receive electricity a testament to all the hard work of Gulf Power employees and other utilities. Gulf Power continues to look for ways to improve the environment and come up with alternative means of fuels. A scrubber system to reduce emissions was installed on Plant Crist in 2010. The company built a Land ll Gas-to-Energy Facility at the Perdido Land ll in Escambia County. Taking the methane gas from the land ll and converting it to energy, Gulf Power produces enough electricity to power 900 homes. From its early beginnings, Gulf Power has grown to serve more than 430,000 customers across the Florida Panhandle. As during the early years, the company prides itself on rates that are below the national average. Headquartered in Pensacola, Gulf Power continues to grow and is an active participant in the economic development arena, as well as community involvement endeavors. First Federal a strong, stable, community-based bank Gulf Power has long history of lighting region SPECIAL TO HORIZONS As during the early years, Gulf Power prides itself on rates that are below the national average.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Horizons Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C3 Holmes schools look forward to great year By EDDIE DIXON Superintendent of Schools Welcome to the Holmes County School District. The 2013-14 school year will provide students exciting opportunities to excel academically, athletically and artisti cally. Holmes County has shown excep tional performance in each of its schools. Our teachers, support staff, school administrators and dis trict administrators strive to support our students so they can excel in every aspect of their academic career. Holmes County Schools work hard to incorporate and focus all of its re sources to help each stu dent achieve their high est potential. Our schools have worked diligently to incorporate new state and federal requirements. Teachers have embraced the new teacher evaluation system and common core curriculum to improve their capacity to instruct all students and improvement their achieve ment levels. Holmes County School District will con tinue to support teachers by providing pro fessional development to enhance instruc tion in the classroom. We are vigorously implementing Common Core Standards in the classroom to support improved instruc tion and achievement. Data analysis will be used to review student learning gains and to drive instruction to support student success. Holmes County also provides a variety of instructional models to help all students attain success. Holmes County Schools celebrate and encourage parents to be actively involved in their childs education. Our goal is to improve the lives of students by fostering good relationships between students, par ents, and educators. Working together we can make a difference in the lives of Hol mes County children. I look forward to next year because, its always a great day in Holmes County Schools. EDDIE DIXON Greyhound racing resumes May 24 Special to Horizons Ebro Greyhound Park is about to be gin its 59th season when racing resumes May 24. The origin of the greyhound is deeply rooted in ancient history. Murals and paintings of the dogs strikingly similar to todays greyhound existed more than 4,000 years ago. From the beginning, the greyhound was held in high regard as ev idenced by pictures etched on the walls of tombs of ancient Egyptians. Pharaohs rated them rst among animals, both pets and humans. The ancient Egyptians so admired the physical attributes and speed of the greyhound that it was the only dog per mitted to share their tents and ride atop their camels. In early Arabian culture, the birth of a greyhound ranked second in importance only to the birth of a son. In Persia, Rome and Greece, the grey hound enjoyed similar stature and is the only canine mentioned in the Holy Scrip ture (Proverbs 30:29-31). It is documented that the greyhound arrived in England more than 3,500 years ago. Queen Elizabeth I initiated the rst formal rules of greyhound coursing around the 16th century, introducing the Sport of Queens. In the late 1800s, the greyhound was imported to American and coursing events soon followed. Greyhound racing, as we know it today, began about 1912 when Owen Patrick Smith invented the mechanical lure, making racing around a circular track possible. The rst circular track opened in 1919 in Emeryville, Ca lif., in the San Francisco Bay area, pav ing the way for the development of the greyhound racing industry in America. Pari-mutuel wagering was legalized in 1931 when Florida passed legislation allowing for both greyhound and horse racing. The newly established Racing Commission immediately granted op eration permits for greyhound tracks, in cluding Palm Beach Kennel Club, which opened in 1932. History has proven that the grey hound is an animal born to run. Origi nally a hunting dog because of its speed, a greyhound will chase anything that moves. To run is the fulllment of the greyhounds basic interest. They run for their own benet and for the benet and enjoyment of others. Greyhounds by nature are gentle and always have had a strong relationship with humans. The breeding and train ing of greyhounds is an extension of the human/animal relationship established thousands of years ago. Since 1955, Ebro has brought fun for the whole family with exciting Grey hound Racing. Running from May to September and racing rain or shine, Greyhound Racing at Ebro is Your Best Bet! First opened in 1955, Ebro Greyhound Park, on State Road 79 just north of State 20, is Wash ington Countys only gaming facility and one of its largest private employers. The pari-mutuel track is locally owned and operated. Ebro Greyhound Park features greyhound racing and card games. For more than 56 years, Ebro Grey hound Park has played a major role in building our economy, employing county residents and sharing its success with our community. With a work force of 200 or more and total local spending of $5 million annually, the owners and op erators consider it a privilege to provide jobs here and do business locally. Since opening, Ebro Greyhound Park has em ployed several thousand Washington County residents. There are few places in North Florida that offer it all, and your entertainment dollar goes further at Ebro than any where else in the area. Then theres Ebros famous Poker Room, where casual players have be come legends over the years winning huge amounts of money simply by mak ing the decision to play. Huge jackpots worth thousands of dollars are on offer all the time, and someone has to win them. Why cant it be you? Ebro Greyhound Park & Poker Room Poker Room is open seven Days a week. The poker room rarely sleeps and is open from 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Sunday to Thurs day, and it is open 24 hours each Friday and Saturday. Take part in the No-Limit Holdem tournaments every day includ ing the Midnight Madness events on Sat urdays. Then theres the grand daddy of all tournaments, the Emerald Coast Championship during the second half of the year, where you get to watch and rub shoulders with some of the biggest names in the sport. Friendly staff that is eager to serve you and make sure you have everything you need while duel ing with others makes for an experience youll never forget.

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Special to Horizons Is there someone in your community who goes above and beyond the call of duty to volunteer? Someone who truly makes a difference? West Florida Electric Cooperative will begin accepting nominations for a new community recognition program called The Power of One beginning this month. Nominees will be accepted from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties during each quarter of the year. Every four months, one winner will be chosen from each county by a selection committee. These winners will receive recognition for their volunteer service as well as a $250 donation which will be made in their honor to the charitable organization of their choice (must be a 501-C3 organization). WFEC will accept nominations in any district ofce. Ask a member services representative for a nomination form, complete it and place it into the nomination box in that of ce. Nomination forms also will be accepted at www. west orida.coop. Nominees must be members of West Florida Electric Cooperative in good standing, to be determined by the selection committee. Nominees should be considered good citizens and be directly or indirectly involved in activities that bene t the community or persons within the community by utilizing their time, efforts or other resources. Individuals may be nominated more than once, but can only be selected to receive the award once within a three-year period. Nominations that are not selected may be carried over to the following quarter(s) for consideration. Those making nominations might or might not be recognized for doing so. Nominations will be kept anonymous upon request. Multiple nominations will be accepted. At least one reference other than the nominator will be required to validate the nomination. Nominees may not be West Florida Electric employees, board members or immediate family. Nominees must be 21 or older. The award selection committee will be made up of representatives, chosen by the cooperative, from each district of the service area. A minimum of four representatives will serve on this committee. Representatives from each county are preferred, but not required. After the selection committee has reviewed all nominations and veri ed that requirements are met, quali ed nominees will be considered and decided upon based on the following: Time and resources utilized or donated by the nominee The value of the time and resources utilized or donated How the community was impacted by the nominees efforts The number of people in the community that were impacted through their efforts The overall good or goodwill that was accomplished through their efforts The overall sacri ce and/or commitment made For more information about the Power of One awards, visit www.westorida.coop or ask a member services representative on your next trip into the of ce. Wednesday, March 27, 2013 C4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Horizons Special to Horizons Agriculture is not only an important industry for Washington and Holmes counties, but for the state of Florida as a whole. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and wear on a daily basis, but too few people appreciate this contribution to our economy and our way of life. Each American farmer feeds more than 144 people, a dramatic increase from the average of 25 people per farmer that was the case in the 1960s. In Washington County, agriculture and related industries account for 1,587 jobs and $59 million in revenue and contribute 12.6 percent to the gross regional product. In Holmes County, agriculture and related industries provide 1,950 jobs and $58 million in revenue and contribute 17.3 percent to the gross regional product. Floridas farmers produce 280 commodities, employ more than half a million people, generate more than $103 billion in annual economic impact and provide tax surpluses. According to the state Department of Agriculture, Florida is the nations top producer of citrus, sugar cane, winter vegetables, ornamental plants and sod, and agriculture consistently ranks second only to tourism in supporting the Florida economy, Floridas farmers also are caretakers of the states richly diverse environment. Farmers have been leaders in the use of reclaimed water and developing best management practices to improve water quality, minimize impacts and care for the land while producing an abundance of safe, affordable food and other products that make our lives more enjoyable. The Agriculture Institute of Florida is an organization of communications professionals, individual farms and producers from a diverse blend of agricultural associations, commodity producers and ag-interested businesses working together to promote the value of Florida agriculture and raise media and consumer awareness of the bene ts it provides. Florida agricultural overview Floridas 47,500 commercial farms, utilizing 9.25 million acres, continue to produce a wide variety of safe and dependable food products. From the citrus groves and the nurseries in central and southern Florida, to the vegetables in various regions around the State, to the cattle and calves throughout the State, these farms provide Florida with a large and stable economic base. In 2011 Florida ranked: First in the U.S. in the value of production of oranges and grapefruit. First in value of production of fresh market snap beans, cucumbers for fresh market, bell peppers, squash, sweet corn, fresh-market tomatoes and watermelons. Second in value of production of cucumbers for pickles, strawberries, tangerines and sugarcane for sugar and seed. Fourth in value of production of honey. In 2011, in terms of total value of production, Florida accounted for: 65 percent of the total U.S. value for grapefruit ($181 million) 67 percent of the total U.S. value for oranges ($1.3 billion) 43 percent of the total U.S. value for sugarcane for sugar and seed ($493 million) 36 percent of the total U.S. value for bell peppers ($248 million) 44 percent of the total U.S. value for fresh market tomatoes ($565 million) 43 percent of the total U.S. value for snap beans ($131 million) 33 percent of the total U.S. value for squash ($95 million) 23 percent of the total U.S. value for sweet corn ($174 million) 28 percent of the total U.S. value for cucumbers for fresh market ($52 million) 21 percent of the total U.S. value for watermelons ($112 million) 21 percent of the total U.S. value for tangerines ($65 million) Florida citrus growers in 2010-2011 produced 140.3 million boxes of oranges (96 percent of which were used for orange juice) and 19.8 million boxes of grapefruit (58 percent of which were used for grapefruit juice). Fruit sales exceeded $1.9 billion. Florida growers harvested vegetables for fresh market from 185,000 acres in 2011. The value of vegetable crops exceeded $1.5 billion. Florida ranks second to California in the total value of fresh market vegetable production. Livestock and products in 2010 produced cash receipts of $1.3 billion. Poultry farms generated $306 million in sales, with $151 million coming from broilers and $151 million coming from eggs. On Jan. 1, 2012, there were 1.71 million head of cattle on farms and ranches in Florida, including 940,000 head of beef cows and 120,000 head of milk cows. Florida ranked 13th in the number of chickens on farms in 2011. Floridas poultry farmers maintained an average of 9.6 million layers in 2011 (producing 2.7 billion eggs) and produced 61.8 million broilers. The total cash receipts for nursery and greenhouse products in Florida were just over $1.7 billion in 2010. The Economic Research Service, USDA, reported receipts from Florida agricultural products in 2010 amounted to $7.81 billion. This is an increase of $6.40 million from 2009. Cash receipts from all crops were $6.46 billion, an increase of $3.97 million from 2009. All crops accounted for 82.7 percent of total cash receipts. As in previous years, the leading crop commodities were oranges (16.0 percent of all cash receipts), greenhouse and nursery (22.4 percent), tomatoes (8.1 percent), and sugarcane (7.0 percent). The leading livestock commodities were cattle and calves (6.4 percent of all cash receipts), dairy products (5.6 percent), and poultry and eggs (3.9 percent). Farms and land in farms Florida had 47,500 commercial farms in 2011, using a total of 9,250,000 acres. There were 5,500 farms with sales exceeding $100,000. The average farm size was 195 acres. Florida ranks 19th among all states in number of farms and tied at 30th in land in farms. 2010-2011 season citrus highlights U.S. AND FLORIDA PRODUCTION Florida provides 63 percent of citrus crops. Citrus utilized production for the 2010-11 season in the United States totaled 11.7 million tons, up 7 percent from the 2009-10 season. Florida accounted for 63 percent of the total United States citrus production with 7.4 million tons of citrus in the 2010-2011 season, California totaled 33 percent, and Texas and Arizona produced the remaining 4 percent. Floridas total 2010-2011 citrus utilization of 165.9 million boxes increased 4 percent from the previous season. The other three states also had increases in citrus production California, 11 percent; Texas, 14 percent; and Arizona, 15 percent. Floridas all orange production increased 5 percent to 140.3 million boxes. Navel production was 2.65 million boxes, up 15 percent from last season. Grapefruit utilization in Florida, at 19.8 million boxes, was down 3 percent from the 20092010 seasons utilization. All tangerine production at 4.65 million boxes was up 4 percent from the previous seasons 4.45 million boxes. Utilization of tangelos was up 28 percent at 1.15 million boxes. TREE INVENTORY Results of the annual commercial citrus inventory show total citrus acreage is 541,328, down more than 2 percent from the last survey. Compared to the previous inventory, the net decrease of 12,709 acres is less with a lower gross loss (21,769) and fewer new plantings (9,060). Of the 30 counties included in the survey, 23 recorded decreases in acreage, 5 showed increases, and 2 are unchanged. Martin County, down 4,567 acres, has suffered the greatest loss for three straight years and has been declining since 1994. DeSoto County has recorded gains in the last 4 surveys and this years gain of 739 is the most of any county. Polk remains the leader in acreage with 82,577. Orange acreage declined for the seventh consecutive survey to 473,086, the lowest since the record low of 466,252 tallied in the 1986 inventory. Grapefruit acreage fell to a new low of 48,990, representing only 55 percent of the pre-hurricanes gure while specialty acreage continued to decline to a record low of 19,252. Total citrus trees are down over 2 percent from 72,164,800 in 2010 to 70,640,700 in 2011. Polk is the new leader with nearly 9.9 million trees, followed closely by Hendry with 9.7 million, DeSoto with 8.4 million, and Highlands with 8.0 million trees. Of the total, oranges comprise over 88 percent; grapefruit, almost 8 percent; and the remainder, including specialty and other citrus, at 4 percent. Since 2010, bearing trees decreased nearly 3 percent to 65,908,700 while non-bearing trees increased by almost 5 percent to 4,732,000. Information from the Florida Department of Agriculture 2012 report Florida Agriculture By The Numbers. Nominate someone who shows Power of One Florida farmers are agricultural leaders

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Chipley Walmart store 2114 has been newly remodeled, re-stocked and re-energized all to make your shopping experience more convenient and easy. Chipley Walmart store 2114 has been newly remodeled, Walmart makes shopping fun! New self-check-outs get you in and out quicker. Shelving is better organized to make nding what you need easier. New technology helps us better serve you. We still have great selection and low prices! Check-us out! Youre in vited to our remodeling grand opening April 5! Over 60 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Horizons Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C5 Special to Horizons CHIPLEY For almost 19 years, Walmart Supercenter in Chipley has been providing a complete shopping experience to Washington County residents. On April 5, the store will hold its grand re-opening, celebrating its newly remodeled interior, including new self-checkout lanes. People were afraid some people would lose their jobs, but that is not happening. In fact, were hiring, Store Manager Joy Davis said. Along with a new look, the store also is receiving new technology and a complete system upgrade, Davis said. There has been a great response from the public to the remodeling, she added. The 146,397-square-foot store opened in 1994, and the world-famous discount retailer offers groceries, pharmacy, vision center, tire and lube express, garden center, money center and jewelry. At the Chipley Walmart, a number of associates have been working with the store since it opened in 1994, Davis said. We have 12 associates who were there when the store rst opened, Davis said. Theyre great people. The Garden Center also held its spring opening on March 15, with employees celebrating the reopening. The Walmart Garden Center has everything you need for your outdoor projects, Davis said. Special to Horizons Trawick Construction Co. is an established communications construction rm with an unparalleled reputation for high quality outside plant construction at competitive prices. The rm was established in 1946 to provide outside plant construction services to the communications industry and has been in continuous operation ever since. The rm continues to focus upon the communications industry and has extensive experience with all of the latest technologies, including ber optics as well as a comprehensive background in outside plant construction techniques, including directional boring. Trawick offers buried construction utilizing cable plows (30 to 240 hp), Trenching machines, backhoes and excavators. Trawick also offers aerial services, and with 50 years of cable placement, Trawick has had the opportunity to acquire skills in a variety of placement methods, including horizontal and directional boring, bridge attachments and sub aqueous crossings. The rm has a history of successfully adapting to changes in the volatile communications industry. This has taken us from aerial open wire, aerial copper cable, to buried copper cable, to buried ber-optic and buried coaxial cable. Our clients include an impressive list of demanding organizations in the communications industry, public utilities, government and CATV companies. SPECIAL TO HORIZONS Trawick Construction presented the United Way of Northwest Florida with $6,965 from funds raised during its fourth annual Bring Your Old Buddy Golf Tournament at Sunny Hills Golf Course in July. Attending were, from left, Trawick associates Jack Commander, Tim Hammack, Dennis Richards, Darryl Spence and Phillip Metcalf; and Wayland Fulford, Darrin Wall and Nicole Bare eld representing the Washington County United Way Campaign Committee. Trawick: A reputation for quality, competitive prices Walmart remodeling nears completion

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create jobs foster networking Contact us to learn how the Chamber drives economic growth. 638-4157 washcomall.com Were the CHAMBER that DOES ... help expand business T HERAPY W ORLD OF N OR T H W ES T F LORIDA Healing for a better life 850-638-1331 Email: therapyworldchipley@gmail.com www.therapyworldchipley. com Owner Cindy Johnson-Brown brings a world of healing through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients in Washington, Holmes, Jackson, and Bay counties, as well as Dothan, Ala. Johnson-Brown is a speech language pathologist who is Vital Stim certied, a Dementia Certied Practitioner and Hanen It Takes Two To Talk certied. She treats birth through geriatrics with a wide variety of child and adult language disorders through Language Services Johnson-Brown is an Early Steps Provider. She accepts Medicaid, private pay and other insurances. Email: therapyworldchipley@gmail.com Child and Adult disorders treated include: Aphasia, Apraxia of Speech, Auditory Processing Disorder, Autism, Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate, Cognitive-Communication Disorders, Dementia, Dysarthria, Dysphagia (Swallowing and Feeding Disorders), Pragmatic Language Disorders, Preschool Language Disorders, Severe Disabilities, Selective Mutism, Speech Sound Development and Disorders in Children and Adults, Stuttering, Traumatic Brain Injury, Voice Disorders, & Stroke Rehabilitation COMMERCIAL PROPERTY INVESTMENTS www.commercialpropertyinvestments.us Bay County Association of Realtors Chipola Area Board of Realtors Gary Hartman Broker Associate 850.773.3338 Fax 850.773.3332 Email: ghartman36@bellsouth.net Knowledge..., the pollen so ideas blossom. The Holmes County Chamber of Commerce invites you to become a member today. We support, encourage and dedicate ourselves to the growth and development of the business community in Holmes County and are proud to say Theres No Place Like Holmes! www.holmescountyonline.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013 C6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Horizons Therapy World brings healing Special to Horizons Therapy World of Northwest Floridas motto is Healing for a better life. The clinic, located in Chipley and owned by Cindy Johnson-Brown, brings a world of healing to patients through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients in Washington, Holmes, Jackson and Bay counties as well as Dothan, Ala. Disorders treated at the clinic include aphasia, apraxia of speech, auditory processing disorder, autism, cleft lip and cleft palate, cognitive-communication disorders, dementia, dysarthria, dysphagia, pragmatic language disorders, preschool language disorders, severe disabilities, selective mutism, speech sound development and disorders in children and adults, stuttering, traumatic brain injury, voice disorders and stroke rehabilitation. Johnson-Brown is a speech language pathologist who is Vital Stim certied, a Dementia Certi ed Practitioner and Hanen It Takes Two To Talk certi ed. She treats a wide range of age groups, birth through geriatrics, with a wide variety of child and adult language disorders through individual therapy sessions, group therapy sessions, consultative services, in-hone and community/school based speechlanguage services. Johnson-Brown is an Early Steps Provider. She accepts Medicaid, private pay and other insurances. For more information, call Therapy World of Northwest Florida at 638-1331, email therapyworldchipley@gmail.com or visit www.therapyworldchipley.com. By TED EVERETT Executive Director Washington County Chamber of Commerce The Washington County Chamber of Commerces No. 1 resource is its members. With that said, our goal is to help our business community in any way possible. If you have questions on permitting, licensing, or need to nd resources for your business, call us. If we do not have the answer, we can usually nd it. There are some speci c areas the Chamber is focusing on in 2013, including: The Chamber is in the process of revamping the Economic Development Council. One priority will be to give more assistance to our local businesses and see if there is an opportunity to help them grow and expand their current operations. The Chamber capitalizes on our legislative relationships at all levels state, federal and local to assist local businesses with issues affecting their business growth. Weve also sent legislative delegations to the state as well as hosted forums for local businesses to share concerns with their governmental representatives. The Chamber spends a good deal of time to bring relevant seminars and courses to our business and consumer community. Last summer the Chamber partnered with the Washington County Emergency Operations Center, local utilities and others to host the Disaster Preparedness Expo. We also hosted a Business Credit Seminar in conjunction with eight area banks. This seminar discussed the core components of a credit score and offered many tips for improving a credit score. We plan on doing so again this year. We will also sponsored a Principals of Management seminar with Bay Solutions, and cohosted a Small Business Assistance Seminar that helped businesses nd nancial resources and learn how to create a business plan. The Chamber continues to partner with Northwest Florida Community Hospital, the Health Department and other local businesses to combat childhood obesity in Washington County through the We Can program. If you have a particular need which may be addressed in a seminar or workshop, or other efforts, please let us know. The mission of the Chamber is to develop a strong and balanced economy while improving quality of life for all citizens. We invite our business and community to join us Washington County may bene t. For more information about the Chamber of Commerce, call 638-4157 or visit www.washcomall. com. Special to Horizons TALLAHASSEE Building on the success of information technology-focused Career and Professional Education Academies across the state, Workforce Florida Inc. and The Whetstone Group announced recently the implementation of Phase II of the Middle School CAPE Information Technology Career Academy Technical Assistance Project. Phase I of the project resulted in middle school teachers and students from 15 Florida school districts earning more than 150 industry certi cations in Microsoft and Adobe in the rst semester of the 2012-13 school year. Phase II of the project will enable 10 more Florida middle school districts to participate in a competitive selection process to receive more than $30,000 in technical assistance products and services to establish new CAPE IT academies. These academies are anticipated to generate Science Technology Engineering & Math (STEM) training and digital literacy opportunities for middle school students, preparing them for more advanced certi cations in high school and college. Over the past ve years, we have watched CAPE Academies connect Florida students to market-relevant training and certi cations that create career opportunities, said Workforce Florida President/CEO Chris Hart IV. I am proud that Workforce Floridas support will enable this initiative to continue to open new doors for middle school students as they progress toward joining the IT workforce, Hart said. CAPE Academies were established by the 2007 CAPE Act sponsored by now Senate President Don Gaetz (R-Destin). They provide rigorous and relevant career-focused courses that articulate to postsecondary-level coursework and lead to industry certi cations. The goal of growing and expanding our CAPE Academies is to give Florida students a career advantage in key industries through a collaboration of educators, business leaders and workforce development professionals, Gaetz said. Today, I applaud students enrolled in Floridas middle school IT CAPE Academies for seizing that opportunity to build their future careers. This initiative ties education to the realities of todays economy, exemplifying the drive of our students as well as the lengths our teachers are willing to go to help them succeed. Under the 2007 CAPE Act, each school district must have at least one high school CAPE Academy, established in partnership with business and workforce development leaders in the community. In 2011, the CAPE Act was expanded to require plans for at least one CAPE Academy at the middle school level in each district. Information Workforce Florida has funded both phases of the Middle School IT Career Academies Technical Assistance Project. The initiative is being implemented by The Whetstone Group, a youth-talent-development leader, using the LEAD Through Workforce Innovations Career Pathways/Academy model. Due in large part to the commitment and partnership of leaders from Floridas IT industry including CCI Learning and Certiport and education community as well as the Florida Chamber of Commerce and state agencies including the Department of Education and the Department of Economic Opportunity, the project focuses on providing valuable technical assistance rather than traditional grant funding. In addition to the technical assistance which supports compliance with CAPE Act standards and reinforces the connection between CAPE academies and career-themed education, and the regional economic drivers the project offers students certi cation in two of the worlds leading digital literacy vendors applications Microsoft and Adobe. We are honored to continue our efforts with Workforce Florida in providing Floridas youth with the opportunity to obtain marketable skill sets that will give them a competitive advantage in their pursuit of college and/or career goals, said Melissa Bumpers, President of The Whetstone Group. For more information, visit the project website designed by Web V students at Niceville High School in Niceville, Florida, at www.middleschool careeracademytap.com. SPECIAL TO HORIZONS The Chipley clinic owned by Cindy Johnson-Brown, brings healing to patients through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients. IT career academies to expand The goal of growing and expanding our CAPE Academies is to give Florida students a career advantage ... Senate President Don Gaetz Washington Chamber: Members No. 1 resource

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Promoting Holmes County Job Creation W ILL S UBDIVIDE Holmes County Development Commission 106 E. Byrd Ave. Bonifay, Florida 850-547-4682 Panhandle Family Insurance Youre in good hands. Ask about our Drive Wise Discount Program and other discounts. Formerly Vickery Insurance 1069 Main Street Chipley, FL 850-638-7855 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Horizons Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C7 Special to Horizons There is a spirit of renewal that has been ushered in during the past year at WHTC. Facilities have been modernized, new programs have been added, existing programs have been restructured, and equipment has been updated. The campus is buzzing with new technologies to ensure Washington-Holmes Technical Center offers the best workforce training in the Florida Panhandle. WHTC regularly meets with the Chipola Regional Workforce Board and local business partners to proactively identify the size and quality of the workforce necessary to support and expand industries that create high-skill and high-wage jobs. WHTC has opened three new information technology programs after partnering with the University of West Florida and Chipola College for a $3.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. The grant provides training, support services, industry certi cations and job placement assistance to unemployed or underemployed prospects in IT and health elds. The federal grant funds originated from fees paid by employers to bring foreign workers into the United States under the H-1B program. This project, known as Florida HireED, will change lives in our region. Participants will earn industry certi cations that represent portable skills recognized by employers national-wide. Graduates will have greater opportunities to earn a good living by lling high-skill, highwage jobs, which will help decrease industry reliance on workers from other countries. WHTCs new IT programs include Applied Information Technology, Cybersecurity and Network Administration. The Applied Information Technology Program offers a broad foundation of knowledge and skills to prepare students for employment in information technology careers. The program includes instruction in computer hardware, software applications, web applications, web page design and advanced web tools. Graduates will be prepared to earn the CompTia A+ Certi cation and the CIW (Certi ed Internet Web Professional) Site Development Associate Certi cation. The Cybersecurity Program prepares students for employment in cybersecurity related careers. These jobs usually protect computers, networks, and devices from cybercrimes, which occur when a perpetrator hacks or breaks in to illegally obtain sensitive information or disseminate destructive computer programs. Such crimes may threaten a nations security and nancial health. This program will prepare students for the CIW Network Technology Associate Certi cation and the CompTia Security+ Certi cation. Network Support Services has been a part of WHTCs program offerings for over 15 years. The excellent instruction provided by instructor, Bert Fravezzi, is evident by his students 94 percent pass rate on the industry certi cation exams. Computer networking is the connecting of computers and computer equipment to other computers by means of cables or airwaves, routers and access points for the purpose of sharing data and resources. The Network Systems Administration program is the advanced networking program that includes Server Infrastructure, Servicer Active Directory and Network/Server Security. Students will have opportunities to test for CompTia A+ certi cations, CompTia Network+ and CompTia Security+ certi cations. A huge bene t to the WHTC IT programs is the recent agreement signed with Pearson VUE to become an authorized computer-based testing site. This allows candidates pursuing their GEDs and key industry certi cation from leading IT programs such as Cisco, CompTia, Oracle and HP to test on the WHTC Campus instead of traveling 50-100 miles. Were very excited about our new partnership with Pearson VUE, said Martha Compton, WHTC director. The Pearson VUE Testing System is the most powerful available and gives us unparalleled control and exibility we can easily manage same-day testing and bring industry testing to our students on-campus and the panhandle. On a lighter note, entertainment technologies also have been added to WHTCs programs. Digital Audio Production was opened in January, 2013. This training program will prepare students for jobs as recording studio technicians, lm sound engineers, sound design artists, theater sound designers, multimedia developers or game audio designers. Audio producer, digital audio editor and production manager are other career options available. Many audio technicians record commercials for the advertising industry. An exciting acquisition came with the program: WHTCs own radio station. After months of waiting, Digital Audio Instructor Kirk Thompson announced to the faculty and staff that WHTC was approved by FCC to move forward with 91.1 FM. We will proceed by working with PAEC and other resources to get the station set up and running. Soon, youll be hearing WHTC on your radios, iPhones, and at local events, reported Martha Compton. With this new endeavor comes much responsibility, however, we are up for the task. I am so excited to see where this will lead WHTC and our community. Helping our people enter, remain and advance in the workforce while strengthening our communitys economic development priorities continues to be a top priority, Compton said. It requires us to be willing to change with the workforce and new technologies, which can sometimes be dif cult. But (as Will Rogers said) Even if youre on the right track, youll get run over if you just sit there. Holmes devises strategic plan for economic development Special to Horizons This year the Holmes County Development Commission devised, with the leadership of Strategic Planning Consultant Dr. David L. Goetsch, a Strategic Plan for Economic Development speci cally for Holmes County. Goetsch led workshops to facilitate the effort. Attending the workshops were local elected of cials, city and county management, board members, school board members, local business owners, clergy, nonpro t organizational leaders and members of the public. The mission statement devised for the county reads: The mission of the Holmes County Development Commission is to mobilize the human, physical, natural, and nancial resources of the County and focus them on retaining and creating jobs, improving the local economy, and enhancing the quality of life throughout the community. Goetsch assisted the work groups with recognizing what economic development would be desired for the county, what the county has to offer, and values the county wishes to sustain during the development. Ten strategies were then formed for implementation. The Holmes County Development Commission chose three of those goals with the hope of implementing the strategies within the next one to two years: Continually enhance the quality of the labor force, and provide speakers from businesses for high school classes. Also to sponsor, in conjunction with local businesses, corporate training seminars for improving skills and attitudes of existing employees. Institute a comprehensive marketing program aimed at attracting new business and engage in piggy-back marketing with larger regional economic development. Encourage local entrepreneurship for local business start-ups and work with Small Business Development Center of UWF to offer its Steps to Starting a New Business seminars on-site in Holmes County. The Development Commission has asked that the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce partner with them in the implementation of the Strategic Plan. Strategic Plan implementation discussions have taken place with board member Tim Wells as chairman. Wells has identi ed as his rst goal a need to gain community interest and involvement. Look for kick-off receptions and regular reports from the Development Commission on how you can become involved. Special to Horizons The Washington County Chamber of Commerce celebrated the opening of Panhandle Family Insurance on March 16. Panhandle Family Insurance is an Allstate Insurance of ce at 1069 Main St., in Chipley. It is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The insurance of ce was formerly owned by James Vickery for many years, but upon his retirement, Manuel Garcia purchased the business Feb. 1. Garcias open house featured food and music, and the community welcomed the new owners to the community. The Allstate agency offers multiple discounts, including the Drive Wise discount program. For more information, call Manuel Garcia at 638-7855 (of ce) or 596-2709 (cell). Panhandle Family Insurance opens in Chipley SPECIAL TO HORIZONS Applied Information Technology and Cybersecurity Instructor Sherri Skipper helps a student. WHTC modernizes, restructures

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 C8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra THANK YOU From U nited Way of N orthwest Florida Thank you for heeding our call to GIVE ADVOCATE and VOLUNTEER and for demonstrating what it really means to LIVE UNITED Together, we will continue to build a future where individuals and families achieve their human potential through quality education, nancial stability and healthy lives. Thank you! Funds Raised in 2012 WASHINGTON COUNTY HOLMES COUNTY $53,736 $6,831 2012 Funds Distribution Committee Melissa Bruner Holmes County Chair Regions Bank Wayland Fulford Washington County Chair Capital City Bank Nicole Bareeld Washington County News/ Holmes County Times-Advertiser Brenda Blitch Doctors Memorial Hospital Julia Bullington Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Melanie Davis Regions Bank Missy Finch National Healthcare Corp. Fran Haithcoat Wells Fargo Bank Philip Metcalf Trawick Construction Darrin Wall Gulf Power Leadership giving requires great leaders with an understanding of community needs. Listed here are the top Workplace Campaigns for 2012 in Holmes and Washington Counties. AT&T ARC of Washington/Holmes Counties Capital City Bank City of Chipley Doctors Memorial Hospital Green Circle Bio Energy Gulf Power Holmes County Times-Advertiser Kids World of Chipley Lewis Bear Northwest Florida Community Hospital PAEC Regions Bank Small World Day Care Center Subway Trawick Construction Tri-County Community Council Walmart Washington County Schools Washington County Council on Aging Washington County News WestPoint Home United Way of Northwest Florida is excited to share the 2012 Community Campaign for Holmes and Washington Counties. After all, these results belong to the communities we serve. The strength of United Way lies in connecting people and institutions across our region to improve the very foundation of our community. Working together as volunteers, contributors, non-prot partners, corporate partners, government, faith groups, the list goes on and helps us change lives and build stronger communities. We are very fortunate to have a broad range of partners, individuals and organizations who have willingly joined with us to advance our work in EDUCATION INCOME and HEALTH throughout Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. We are especially proud of our partner agencies and the incredible services they deliver each and every day. Grant Funds Distributed in 2012 H OLMES & W ASHINGTON C OUNTIES American Red Cross .......................................... $1,850 AMI Kids West FL ................................................. $450 ARC of Washington/Holmes ............................ $9,819 Bay Area Food Bank .......................................... $1,500 Chipola Healthy Start ........................................ $1,750 Covenant Hospice ............................................. $2,200 Early Learning Coalition ................................... $1,600 Gulf Coast Childrens Advocacy Ctr ............... $2,000 Habilitative Services of NFL ............................ $1,000 Life Management Center ................................. $1,675 Tri-County Community Council ..................... $2,724 Washington Cty Council on Aging ................ $5,000 Note: In add ition to the grant funds distributed an addi tional $22,397 of designated funds were distributed to agencies serving Holmes and Washington Counties.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 Volume 50 Number 54 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 2013 me me me me e e e e e e 5 0 0 Nu mb er54 me50Number54 W W E D N E SD AY M A R C H 2 2 7 2 0 0 0 1 1 3 WEDNE S DAYMAR C H272013 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Y o u r Your H O M E T O W N HOMETOWN S h o p p i n g G u i d e Shopping Guide F o r W a s h i n g t o n & For Washington & H o l m e s C o u n t i e s Holmes CountiesFREETAKE ONE B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611REOPENED Blanchette & Associates Inc.CONCRETE MASONRY HEAVY GAUGE METALDESIGN & BUILD CONSULTANTS LAND DEVELOPMENTJoe Blanchette850 532-2178gjblanchette@gmail.comCGC#1510933 Professional Engineer#74634SAFE ROOMS Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only$18.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 D&GPainting & Remodeling(850) 547-3805All types of Roo ng, Painting and Remodeling Call Gene (850) 849-0736 or Dwayne (850) 849-7982License #RC0067336 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 A Childless Married Couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Let’s help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 Abalauction.comWakulla County, Crawfordville, Fl 3br 2ba split plan. Online bidding now through April 3, (850)510-2501 ab2387 broker For Sale Leather Sectional Sofa burgundy in color.$150.00. Small tear in the pillow in left corner. Call 850-535-9125between 9am-8pm LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used Org. $3,000, sacrifice $975.—CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes—$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. Flea Across Florida 272 mile yard sale April 12-14. Three days through Caryville, Florida. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Accounting/FinanceManager of Accounting and FinanceGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of Manager of Accounting and Finance at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, March 29, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34245217 Text FL45217 to 56654 Clerical Full time position, 8-5, M-F in Chipley, Contact One Stop Career Center for more info 850-638-6089 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Golf Cart Mechanic Minimum 3 years experience. Growing company located in Defuniak Springs. Long-term opportunity. Fax resume (850)622-2004. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Help Wanted: Cleaning/cooking position available at Bonifay and Vernon facility working with Limited Mental Health residents. Pay starts at $8.75 an hour with a pay raise in six months. Duties entail daily cleaning, assisting with ADL’s, medication, etc. Must be able to pass background screening and have reliable transportation. Call (850)547-3708 or 535-1160 for more info. Preschool needs loving, dependable person to teach, play and love our 2 year olds. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US—No forced dispatch: (800) 501-3783 www.mamo transportation.com Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Community Services Specialist for the Chipley Outreach office. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist low income families in need of assistance with Services Programs and coordinate with other social service agencies. QUALIFICATIONS : Two year degree and one year work experience serving the low-income or elderly; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have Current driver’s license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech @ 547-3689 or visit www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com. Applications are available at any Tri-County Community Council office and must be submitted by Apr 01 @ 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING! Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain.edu No computer Experience Needed! Job placement Assistance HS Diploma/GED a Must Start Immediately! 1-888-872-4677 Driver Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Don’t Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-(888) 926-7884 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline. com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 1800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BAUpdated House. in country. East of McDonalds. Stove, DW, fridge, water, septic & yard care include. App Required. $600/month plus $600 deposit. 850-638-4228. Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 For Rent 2BR/1BA Sunny Hills area. Very nice, good area. $ 575/ mth. Deposit & references required. 850-258-3874 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. on pond! $500 month, New floors. 856-793-8429 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 ALSO FOR RENT 3BR/1BA, AC Bonifay, FL. $550.00 rent/ $550.00 Deposit. No pets. 638-7601 House for rent, lease or sell 3 Bedroom. 714 Nebraska Ave., Bonifay, Fl. (850)428-6512, (850)956-2073. Houses For Sale/ Owner Financing. 3bd houses & apartments for rent. Furnished affiency apartments for rent. Call Martha 850-547-2531 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley on Orange Hill Rd. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Bonifay Area: Assortment of Mobile Homes & RV’s. Also RV spaces for rent. Quiet location. 5 minutes from shopping. (850)849-3911. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $300/mth 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month.. Ponce de Leon area (850)226-4656. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home For Rent in Bonifay and Chipley. Water, sewer included. Rental references required. Call 638-2999 Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70’s or you purchase as is for lower 50’s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Acreage 1511 Hwy 177, P.O. Box 1181 Bonifay. (850)547-2646 Saturday 7-8 a.m. BANKREPOSSESSION SMITH LAKE, ALABAMA. Prime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120k per lot, over $3million on 34 lots, makes possible a $200k + homesite for 25 cents on the dollar. Level to water, no stairs. Build at water’s edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appointment. Once in a lifetime opportunity. Call (877)448-6816. By owner 19 wooded acres 3 miles north of Bonifay with 660’ frontage on Hwy 79. $3,500 per acre. Restricted to housing. Call Richard-(850) 547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2006 FEMA Trailer. 33ft w/ slide out. All electric. $5000.00 OBO. 548-4715 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473. Land HomesExpress.com For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500. For more information call 638-4492 C-175 Aircarft Low airframe Hrs, IFR equiped. In annual, ready to go. Will sell or trade for motorhome, equal value, $25,000; 850-849-6842. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works!

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*



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50Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com IN BRIEF NEWSWashington County Connect with us 24/7Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT tiserchipleypaper.com Wednesday, MARCH 27 2013Chamber banquet set for April 4CHIPLEY The Washington County Chamber of Commerce annual Membership Banquet will be held at 6 p.m. April 4 at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. Big River Bluegrass Band will provide the entertainment and the theme of the event is Denim & Diamonds. The event begins with a punch reception sponsored by the Washington Rehabilitation & Nursing Center at 6 p.m. and the dinner, provided by the Northwest Florida Community Hospital, willl begin at 7 p.m. Sponsorships are available for $250 and include 4 tickets and recognition as a sponsor of the event in the program. Single tickets may be purchased for $25 each. For more information, call the Chamber at 638-4157.CSX announces road workCHIPLEY CSX has noti ed at the Washington County News that the railroad will be working on several intersections in Chipley in April. On April 8-9, the roads Odom, New Prospect and Advant will be closed for two days for roadwork on the crossroads. The work moves to 5th Street, 7th Street, Main Street, 2nd Street, Dalton, Grif n and Glass roads on April 10-11.DEA arrests four on drug chargesBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Drug Enforcement Administration arrested four men in connection with drug charges on Sunday, March 17, after 7.9 pounds of methamphetamines were discovered at Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley. Arrested were Raymundo Reyes-Barragan, 43, of Chipley, on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Hector Hernandez, 46, of Atlanta, Ga., on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Ruben Heredia-Barron, 42, of Atlanta on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; and Alejandro Barron-Soto, 30, of Troy, Ala., on charges of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida criminal complaint is dated March 18 and signed by Special Agent John C. Manna, and a probable cause af davit outlined the incidents leading up to the arrests. According to the af davit written by Special Agent Manna, the men were arrested in connection with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute in excess of 500 grams of a mixture or substance containing methamphetamine. In April 2012, the DEA initiated an investigation into a drug traf cking organization based in Northern Florida that moved or transported cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine from Texas and Atlanta, Georgia, to Northern Florida, the af davit states. A DEA informant, identi ed as Cooperating Source in the af davit, and who has provided information to the agency for over 25 years, began a series of telephone calls and text messages with Reyes-Barragan on March 6, according to the af davit, during which the informant negotiated with Reyes-Barragan for the purchase of pound quantities of methamphetamine. According to Manna, the informants assistance to the DEA has resulted in the arrest of dozens of drug traf ckers and the seizure of hundreds of kilograms of drugs. I have worked with the CS for over 20 years and have never found information the CS provided to be untruthful. On Wednesday, March 6, the informant reported to PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsDrug Enforcement Administration agents, along with Florida Highway Patrol, Washington County Sheriffs Of ce and Chipley Police Department, arrested four men on Sunday, March 17, at Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley on charges of having almost 8 pounds of methamphetamine in their possession for distribution. See DEA A2 INDEXOpinion .................................A4 Sports ...................................A9 Extra .....................................B1 Obituaries .............................B5 Classi eds ..........................B7-8TDC looks to end grant programBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Tourism Development Council might be getting out of the grant awarding business. Members discussed funding options during the TDC workshop on Monday, and decided to hold a workshop in May or June to further discuss options for promoting Washington County events outside of outright fund disbursements. When I rst came on this board, the TDC was seen as a big old fat cow, said Council Chairman Joel Pate. Council funds have dwindled over the years, and Council Member Scott Sweeney said he didnt think giving out grants was the best use of the TDCs limited resources. The TDC traditionally has given grants of up to $2,000 to community events with the stipulation that the funds be used for advertising. Over the past two years, the TDC had been cutting down the amounts the various events. I think the TDC should be in charge of promotion for events in the county, Sweeney said. We could buy big blocks of advertising on radio stations, such as Beach 95.1, and promote the various events. Sweeney also noted that updating the TDC website, another project the council has been working on, can be instrumental in promoting events in the county. We have discussed this in the past, Council Member Ted Everett said. I agree, we can buy a lot of advertising with the same funds by the block. Everett said the council should hold a workshop to discuss whether or not to continue the grant program before the next years budget Holmes, Washington Counties look forward to exciting year INSIDE | C1Volume 89, Number 99 See TDC A2New council members sworn inBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON The Vernon City Council learned the Garden Club will be receiving a $100,000 highway beauti cation grant and welcomed two new council members on Monday. Pam Cates shared a letter she had received from the Florida Highway Beauti cation Council notifying her that the Vernon Garden Club had received a $100,000 grant for a beauti cation project along Highway 79. You may remember, I came before the council a few months ago asking for permission to apply for this project, Cates said. I was thrilled to nd out that our project was accepted. The Vernon Garden Club was one of 30 applicants for the grant, Cates said. The project will include irrigation and landscaping work from Creek Road south to Pompei Street, Cates said. The beauti cation project is meant to go along with the planned widening of Highway 79, and Cates said she hopes the new highway plans include a median. The grant requires the plans for the project be complete and required agreements executed within one year. The council also welcomed two new members as Shawn Sanders and Tray Hawkins were sworn in to their of ces on Monday. VERNON GARDEN CLUB RECEIVES $100,000 GRANT PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCity Council Members Tray Hawkins, from left, Shawn Sanders and Tina Sloan are sworn into of ce by City Clerk Dian Hendrix on Monday at Vernon City Hall. Michelle Cook takes the oath of of ce as she is sworn into the of ce of Mayor by City Clerk Dian Hendrix on Monday, while Cooks father, Al Keown, holds the Bible. See GRANT A7 See BRIEFS A7

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013is due in August. The rst draft of the budget is due in May, Administrative Assistant Heather Lopez said. I think we also need to talk to the grant recipients, and hear their thoughts, Everett said. Its important that we be responsible and balanced in our decisions. At the end of the day, its all about getting heads in beds. If we dont have people spending money in the county, then were going to lose. Council Member Mary Richmond said she did not think the TDC should give grants to any one-day events, since an overnight stay is not generally required for attendance. However, Everett said that events that are currently budgeted for the remainder of this scal year should still be considered for grants. After the grant discussion in the workshop, the TDC had two grant requests to consider in their March meeting, which immediately followed the workshop. Vernon City Council was requesting $1,000 for the Vernon 4th of July Extravaganza and the city of Wausau was seeking $2,000 for the 3rd annual Wausau Possum Classic 3D Archery tournament. The TDC members split 2-2 on supporting the grant request from Vernon, with Richmond and Sweeney voting against the request and members Everett and Dana Phillips voting for the request. Council Member Gwen March, who also serves on the Vernon City Council, abstained from voting. Pate, as chairman, broke the tie by voting in favor of the request, which had also been allocated in the TDC budget. The Wausau event, however, was a new event and was not allocated in this years budget, and it was not approved by the TDC members. The archery event was to be held at Everetts Hard Labor Creek, so he abstained from voting, and Phillips, March and Richmond voted against funding the Wausau grant request, while Sweeney voted for it. I said it before, but I just cant support one-day events, Richmond said. Were too low on funds. Manna that Reyes-Barragan and the informant had talked on the telephone, and during that conversation Reyes-Barragan said that he had a source of suppy for methamphetamine in Atlanta who could provide the drug for $22,000 per kilogram. On Saturday, March 16, the informant told Manna that at about 2 p.m. ReyesBarragan sent the informant a text message stating that Los Gallos were on the way, according to the afdavit. I know from my experience conducting narcotics investigations that drug trafckers use coded language when referring to drugs while speaking to one another on the telephone, Manna states in the afdavit. I also know from conducting this investigation that Reyes-Barragan has used the word Gallo when referring to one kilogram of methamphetamine. On Saturday, March 16, at 10:30 p.m. the informant contacted Manna and said that he had just completed a series of phone calls with Reyes-Barragan. According to the afdavit, ReyesBarragan agreed to meet with the informants associate at Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley on Sunday, March 17, at 9 a.m. in order for the informants associate to bring money to purchase three kilograms of methamphetamine from Reyes-Barragan. The informant also told Manna that Reyes-Barragan said that the gallos were close. On Sunday, March 17, law enforcement established surveillance at Cancuns Restaurant, where ofcers saw a white Chevrolet Tahoe arrive at about 8:30 a.m., according to the afdavit. The Tahoe departed after several minutes. At about 8:35 a.m., Manna spoke with the informant, who told Manna that he had just spoken to Reyes-Barragan by telephone and that Reyes-Barragan said that he was inside the restaurant and his friends were coming to the restaurant. At about 9:07 a.m., three vehicles arrived at the restaurant. One vehicle parked to the rear of the restaurant, while a second vehicle, a red Mazda, entered the parking lot and parked on the side of the restaurant in the north side of the parking lot. A third vehicle, a silver Volkswagen, entered directly behind the red Mazda and parked on the north side of the restaurant next to the red Mazda, according to the afdavit. The driver of the Mazda, later identied as BarronSoto, and the passenger, later identied as HerediaBarron, climbed out of the vehicle. The driver of the silver Volkswagen, later identied as Hernandez, also exited his vehicle. The three men walked to the rear of the restaurant, according to the afdavit. After several minutes, Hernandez returned to the silver Volkswagen and drove the car to the rear of the restaurant. When the Volkswagen stopped behind the restaurant, the turn signals and rear lights of the Volkswagen began to illuminate and ash. At 9:17 a.m., the informant told Manna that he had just spoken with ReyesBarragan and the gallos had arrived. Then at 9:24 a.m., Barron-Soto and Heredia-Barron left the parking lot, driving north on Main Street in the Mazda. A Florida Highway Patrol cruiser followed the Mazda. Hernandez saw the Highway Patrol cruiser and hurried toward the Volkswagen, according to the afdavit. He and a woman identied as Regia Abreu got into the Volkswagen and drove south on Main Street. Troopers from the Highway Patrol conducted a trafc stop on the Volkswagen just south of the restaurant. During the stop, ofcers used a narcotics K-9 drug dog to search around the car. The dog alerted to the Volkswagen for the odor of narcotics, according to the afdavit. Meanwhile, a Highway Patrol trooper stopped the red Mazda on Highway 90 in Chipley. At the time of the stop, Barron-Soto, who was driving the Mazda, tried to run away from the car but was apprehended. The Mazda was returned to Cancuns Restaurant where ofcers deployed a narcotics K-9 drug dog, who alerted to the odor of narcotics, according to the afdavit. At about the same time as the trafc stops, law enforcement ofcers went to the restaurant, where Manna and other ofcers went to the rear of the building. Reyes-Barragan walked out of the rear of the restaurant, and was asked by ofcers if there was anyone inside the restaurant. Reyes-Barragan said there was not anyone in the building, but Manna heard noises and voices inside the restaurant, so ofcers entered the restaurant for a security sweep, locating several workers, according to the afdavit. Reyes-Barragan then provided verbal and written consent for law enforcement to search the restaurant. During the search, ofcers discovered six Tupperware containers, individually wrapped in cellophane, inside a black trash bag in the storage shed to the rear of the restaurant, according to the afdavit. I looked at the Tupperware containers and saw that each container held a substance resembling methamphetamine and that each container was wrapped in cellophane, Manna wrote in the afdavit. The substance tested positive for methamphetamine. I weighed the six plastic containers and the total weigh was approximately 3.6 kilograms. One kilogram equals 2.2 pounds 3.6 kilograms equals 7.9 pounds. During the search of the Volkswagen, law enforcement discovered a concealed trap to the side of the left rear passenger seat. The concealed trap, which was electronically activated, was empty. Law enforcement then arrested Reyes-Barragan, Hernandez, Abreu, BarronSoto and Heredia-Barron. Abreu was later released after post-arrest interviews, according to the afdavit. During a search of cell phones belonging to ReyesBarraga and Barron-Soto, references to gallos were found in text messages, which Manna said he believed were references to the drugs. According to the afdavit, during a post-Miranda interview of Heredia-Barron at the DEA ofce in Panama City, Heredia-Barron told Manna that he and Barron-Soto met up with Hernandez at a Taco Bell in Troy, Ala., and Hernandez followed them down to Cancuns Restaurant. During a post-Miranda interview of Hernandez at the Panama City DEA ofce, Hernandez told Manna that an unidentied subject in Atlanta let Hernandez use the silver Volkswagen so that Hernandez and Abreu could travel to Panama City and then to Miami. The subject in Atlanta asked Hernandez to pick something up for him and gave Hernandez a telephone number for Hernandez to call so that Hernandez could contact this unknown person and then follow that person to Panama City. Hernandez used that telephone number to link up with the red Mazda at the Taco Bell in Troy, according to the affdavit, which he then followed to Cancuns Restaurant in Chipley. Hernandez said he parked next to the red Mazda at the restaurant and then walked to the rear of the restaurant. Barron-Soto told Hernandez to move the Volkswagen to the rear of the building, then Hernandez said he went to the restroom and, upon returning, Heredia-Barron was walking away from the area near the left rear passenger seat of the Volkswagen. DEA from page A1 TDC from page A1

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Washington County News | A3Wednesday, March 27, 2013 We Treat You Like Familybetter than YOUR COMMUNITY PARTNER FOR QUALITY HEALTHCARE Dr. David Taing Family/Sports Medicine (850) 415-8303 Dr. Samuel Ward Family Medicine (850) 638-3400 Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Northwest Florida Community Hospital Community Hospital Community Hospital 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, Florida850-638-1610www.nfch.orgNorthwest Florida Community Hospital recognizes our dedicated physicians for their commitment to providing our community with quality health care. Dr. Wade Melvin Family Medicine (850) 638-0552 Dr. Gabriel Berry General Surgery (850) 415-8180 Dr. Annette Porter Family/Emergency Medicine (850) 638-4383 Dr. James Wall Ear, Nose and Throat (850) 415-8185 Dr. Artur VardanyanWound Specialist (850) 415-8300 Dr. Mohammed YunusInternal Medicine (850) 638-2088Dr. Muhammad AminFamily Medicine (850) 547-3679 Dr. James Clemmons Family Medicine (850) 638-0678 Dr. Jason Hatcher Family Medicine (850) 638-4555 Dr. Aaron Shores Pain Management (850) 638-0505 Dr. Adam Peaden Podiatry (850) 638-FOOT (3668) Dr. Nayan Bhatt Cardiology (850) 415-8111 Dr. Dinesh Bhatt Cardiology (850) 415-8111 Dr. Narendra GowdaEmergency Medicine Dr. Joda Lynn Emergency MedicineDr. Nathanial HawkinsEmergency Medicine Dr. Hector Mejia Orthopedic Surgery (850) 415-8303Dr. Vanessa King-JohnsonObstetrics and Gynecology (850) 415-8320 Dr. Daniell Rackley Urology 1-800-689-6678 Dr. Jesus Ramirez Internal Medicine (850) 638-9398Dr. Paul HartEmergency Medicine Dr. Patrick ConradEmergency Medicine Dr. Martin RobertsHospitalist

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(EDITORS NOTE: This column originally ran on March 21, 2012.) On rare occasions, my long-time friend from high school calls me and we talk for about an hour. Since she lives in Lakeland, Florida, where she mostly grew up, she always wants an update on which ones of the Vernon High School class of 1949 have died, who has Alzheimers, and who besides the two of us are still as sharp as ever. Lenora Coxwell came to Washington County as an elementary school child when her mother Blen Coxwell married George Bryant after the death of my dads aunt, Emma Wells Bryant. While Lenora was living with them near Millers Ferry she attended school at Hinsons Cross Roads. Later, not adjusting well to life in rural Washington County, she returned to live with her much older sister whom she called Aunt Ila in Lakeland. If that sounds strange, calling her sister her aunt, you should hear the rest of the story. Blen was from Sopchoppy, Fla., and was rst married to a Revell. Her children from that marriage were Percy and Clarice. When Mr. Revell died, Blen married a much older man named Coxwell, Lenoras father. He had a daughter Ila who was older than his new wife. Im not sure I can name all the older Bryant children belonging to Uncle George and Aunt Emma, but there were about 10 of them and several were living at home when he married Lenoras mother. Then, George Wester, Ansel, and Betty Jean were born to Blen. My rst recollection of knowing the Bryant cousins was one summer when I was about 9 or 10 years old. A twomule wagon load of the Bryants, mostly teenagers, came up to our home near the Holmes County line for a visit. Even though Id never seen any of them before, they invited me to go home with them for a visit. I gathered my belongings and climbed aboard for the 10 mile trip over dirt roads for about a weeks stay. Daddy would pick me up on his way home from peddling in Panama City and the Beaches at New Hope Hill late on Friday afternoon. I had several experiences that week. I attended Prayer Meeting for the rst time. I learned to swim in a little sandy bottomed pond in front of their house where the grown girls took the weekly washing to do at the lake. And I took my rst ride in a mule drawn wagon across Holmes Creek by way of the Millers Ferry. I didnt meet Lenora as she was spending the summer with Ila until the beginning of our Junior year at Vernon High School when she chose to come and live with her mother and family. That was the only year that she was here, but we formed a bond from shared experiences. By this time, my cousin Arkie Wells had married Lenoras brother Percy. Lenora and I were elected as cheerleaders; we were both in the Jr. Class Play, and since neither of us had transportation and lived miles from school and from each other, we often spent the night with whichever one had a ride home after the ball game. My Uncle Alex Wells, Arkies dad, drove the bus and sometimes transported the team, so hed take us home. Sometimes one of the basketball players could borrow the family car and give us a ride. But one of our most vivid memories was riding Mr. Perkins bus, we thought, home. That night we would go to Lenoras house since she lived about three miles from Mr. Perkins and we were sure hed drive on that far, but when we got to his driveway, to our dismay, he pulled in and stopped. This is as far as I am going, he said. It was a moonless night, but fortunately, two of the basketball players Jimmy Porter and Hollis Dean Galloway lived on that same road. We all piled out and began the trek down the wet sand road, with no light except a few stars. Hollis Dean had a beautiful singing voice and he kept the buggers away singing, Im A Comin A Courtin Cora Bell and other renditions. We reached Jimmys house rst and he got off the train there. Then, a little farther was the Galloway home. Lenora and I were worried about the next dark mile wed have to go alone. But gallant Hollis Dean in spite of having been at school all day, and playing a hard fought basketball game, walked us two not so giggly girls on down to the Bryant home. I think one reason Lenoras and my bond was so strong is that I was the only one among her friends who could decipher her family tree. She has six half siblings from three marriages, and one large set of step-siblings. When both the parents died, I dont know how they ever settled the estate. Lenora celebrated her 81st birthday on April 1. I dont know if that has anything to do with it or not, but she may be the one who caused the signs on Vernon bridge to read No Jumping From The Bridge. For some reason, the conversation came up as Hester and I were having breakfast a few mornings ago as how we were able to claim a few dollars in earnings from the limited opportunities which presented themselves during our tender years. She remembers, as I do, that at any given time each of the children in the household had his or her own pile of junk iron. We knew that periodically the junk man would come by and purchase the scrap metal at his price. Whatever he offered was the nal gure. We knew a second purchaser would not be coming along, thus allowing for any bargaining as to price. So all the siblings in our household took the amount presented, notwithstanding the disappointment in not receiving more. Hester recalls that the same scenario was carried out in the Lucas family take what the man gives, guard it cautiously and spend it carefully. Replacing farm plow points and a few other metal items relative to keeping the farm implements in good order, allowed for some throwaway objects which had a little weight to it and added to the collection of junk iron. We were fortunate to have a log railroad track running on the southern edge of our land and farm. The upkeep of the track by the section hands produced a few metal pieces of scrap iron, which we were always scavenging for by walking the tracks, usually while driving the cows from their grazing grounds or making many walks to and from Gum Creek either for a quick swim or an occasional shing trip. My friend, the late Doug Jones, who was with me all the way through Vernon High School, as well as in the University of Florida, was well familiar with the assimilation of every pound of scrap metal he could nd. His home was near the old abandoned BC Railroad in Greenhead, which provided an excellent source for the much sought after scrap. Doug reported nding a piece of heavy steel rail, which he managed to get to his home. He was sure he would get a dollar bill when the junk man came by. The man came before Doug got home from school and he learned his mother had let the prized item go for 50 cents. My friend positioned himself by the roadway awaiting the return of the scrap collector. He bantered the gentlemen for an additional half dollar for his special piece of metal, but nally comprised when the gentlemen offered him twentyve cents more. In Holmes County, Hester reports the main source of money making in her young years was picking cotton. She came from a long line of people who really knew how to grow quality cotton, thus allowing for a person to be able to pick 100 pounds a day with any effort at all. At the usual penny per pound, she could come out of the cotton eld with the much coveted $1. My wife and I both remember that picking blackberries (we called them brier berries) for townspeople could bring in 50 cents for a gallon, a piece of money that could easily purchase a shirt for a boy or a blouse for a girl if they shopped carefully. Blueberries grown in our community by Jack and Bunch Hewett were open for picking and children of young ages could weather the heat, mosquitoes and the threat of snakes and pick up a few nickels and dimes. Hester recalls when Highway 79, north of Bonifay, was under construction by the C. C. Moore Construction Company. She, along with James Blackburn and his sister, Opal, all young children, agreed to go into the sugar cane eld and bring Mr. Moore three stalks of cane for chewing. They were all thrilled with the ve-cent piece that he gave to each of them. My brother, Jim, and I have re ected many times of the very rst serious money that either of us was able to make. Our great uncle on mamas side of the family, Bud Cook, had recently died at the young age of 41. He was in the prime of life and in his hey day of enjoying a long and promising career in the turpentine business. (His complete and interesting story is in the Heritage of Washington County book, now available by calling me at 638-1016) With the Bud Cook death, the Parrish family expanded their naval stores operation into the area formerly leased and managed by uncle Bud. One operation in the turpentine business is called hoeing boxes. This is simply hoeing completely around each pine tree, which had been tapped for turpentine. The idea is to keep wild forest res from burning the product in the cups or on the face of the tree. Our dad saw the opportunity for his sons to get this job. Mr. Parrish hired us at the rate of ve cents per tree, or a second face added another nickel. We kept our own count. He drove to our property after we had nished, did his examination and paid us in cash. We did not have to be told to protect our money nor that we should use it wisely, e.g., buying school clothes or pay for school lunches when that program came into Vernon School. Rolling stores taught us to trade a few eggs to the operator, Mr. Jake Young, in exchange for a few pieces of much wanted candy. The Watkins man, Mr. Monroe Williams, a traveling entrepreneur, sold a product that could be made into delicious malted milk. We probably swapped a live chicken for this delicacy. Our meager methods of making a few dollars possibly taught us the true value of money. We knew to accept a lesser paying job instead of waiting for the top one to come along. The Prattler has written extensively of his experience and that of his brother, Jim, in working at menial jobs on the beach as youngster at a salary that now seems like slave wages. The experiences outlined here give a good review of our lives and the values learned that has guided us through a life, especially appreciating the value a few hard earned dollars.Dear Editor,As a citizen of Holmes County and as a parent of a senior enrolled in our public school system, I would like to take this opportunity and disclose very real biases and prejudices that exist within our school system. My daughter has been a Florida Virtual School student for the last seven years. She has been extremely successful. In addition to high school, she has earned 48 college credits through dual enrollment all while maintaining a Grade Point Average greater than 4.0. In January, my daughter enrolled at our local high school to obtain her high school diploma; Florida Virtual School does not issue diplomas but only provides classes in which to earn credits needed for graduation. Her transcripts were sent to the school January 14 and we were not noti ed of any discrepancies or problems with her credits. Two months passed and through a phone call I made to the school, I learn she is lacking 1/2 credit. This would not have been an issue if we had gotten this information in a timely manner. As my husband and I met with the superintendent and it became quite clear what type of discrimination existed. My daughters records were set aside to collect dust because we had chosen Florida Virtual School rather than the usual route of public school. Instead of using this meeting to discuss the issue at hand, my daughters credits, it became a therapy session for Mr. Dixon. He aired his frustrations about Florida Virtual School, the FTE money he didnt receive because my daughter didnt actually sit in a desk at a Holmes County school and also criticized the Florida Virtual School staffs teaching capabilities and the rigor of the curriculum. Im quite certain my daughters ACT and FCAT scores and current GPA rebuff that claim. The 2002 Florida School Code, adopted by legislature, provides parents and students with educational choice. It even goes a step further in stating parents will be made aware of Florida Virtual School as a valid educational choice, students will be provided unlimited access to courses and Florida Virtual School will be a component of the delivery of public education. I nd it astounding that we, in Holmes County, have a superintendent and administrative staff at some schools that havent gotten on board with Florida Virtual School. Personal opinion about Florida Virtual School means absolutely nothing. It is the law you dont have to like it. You do have to deal with it. RESPECTFULLY, AMBER STROMENGER HOLMES COUNTY Junk man brought extra money to families PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells A scene from Holmes County in years gone by, depicting pine trees being harvested for turpentine and typical of those cleaned around by the Prattler and his brother. Letter to the EDITOR POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT OPINION www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, March 27, 2013 APage 4SectionHAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212.

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LocalWashington County News | A5Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Refinance with Community South between March 1 and May 15, 2013 and get 2% off your current auto loan rate (as low as 2.49% APR)!* Special to the NewsCHIPLEY Several members of Chipley Garden Club attended Gulf Beach Garden Clubs Flowers by the Sea Standard Flower Show at Panama City Beach on Sunday, March 24. The divisions featured horticulture container grown, cut foliage and blooms, shrubs and trees and design. The design division featured designs such as underwater, duo (twosided), exhibition table setting and tiny petite. Chipley Garden Club member/FFGC District II Director Jane Brewer topped the Table Artistry Award with her beautiful laguna blue and sunshine yellow Picnic by the Sea entry. Jane is also a member of Gulf Beach Garden Club. In years past, Chipley Garden Club made a mark in Northwest Florida with their ower and oral design shows. Today club members enjoyed viewing entries and learning a little about how a ower show is presented. You never know, there may be a ower/horticulture show again in Chipley. The next regular monthly meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 3, at Oakie Ridge Baptist Church at 2971 Gilberts Mill Road. If you would like more information about Chipley Garden Club, would to attend a meeting or are curious about ower shows, contact Karen Roland at 638-9968. Meetings are open to the public, and new members are welcomed at any time. Ph H OTOS SpeciSPECI Al L TO The HE Ne E WSLeft: Glenda Wilson and Edwina Showers critique a duo-design. Right: Jane Brewer with her winning design at Gulf Beach Garden Clubs Flowers by the Sea Standard Flower Show at Panama City Beach.Garden club members attend ower show By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BO O N IFA A Y Are expensive electric bills draining your wallet? Gulf Powers Commercial and Industrial Marketing Specialist Tracy Andrews asked during Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs March 20 meeting. Im here to show you a variety of free services provided to help you evaluate your home and conserve energy, which in turn saves you money. The rst step usually is to do an energy consumption assessment, or as they call it a home energy audit, Andrews said. Weve got several free programs and services for you to take advantage of, Andrews said. Weve got the Home Energy Check-up, EarthCents Home, Low Cost to No Cost Recommendations and EarthCents Rebates. The rst I will review is the Home Energy Check-up. She explained this was a way of them evaluating ways of saving money by reducing energy consumption within the house. An energy audit can be performed by someone coming out to your house, she said. Or if youd prefer not to have strangers at your house, there are mailin sheets that can be mailed to Gulf Power and then Gulf Power will provide a written report of recommendations based on the information provided by the customer, or you can go to our website for a home energy check-up online. She said there is also a free New Home Audit, which allows Gulf Power to review new home plans to make sure it meets the minimum energy efciency standard established by the Department of Energy, conduct the Florida Energy Code Calculation required to obtain a building permit and perform load calculation used by your HVAC dealer to determine the appropriate size HVAC system for your new home. Some ways of saving money through energy conservation is a high-efciency HVAC system, increased ceiling and wall insulation, high-efciency windows, high-efciency water heating, at least three Energy Star appliances, high-efciency lighting and a more airtight home to name a few, Andrews said. There are several simple steps to help save energy. First, set the thermostat at 78 degrees in the summer and 68 degrees in the winter. You can expect a 9 percent increase in energy use for every degree you set your thermostat lower in the summer and higher in the winter. Also, consider enrolling in Energy Select. Secondly, set your water heater to 120 degrees to save energy. Check your heater system to make sure the lter is clean. Do you know that keeping an extra refrigerator in the garage can cost you an extra $150 per year? Thirdly, air getting into your house can make your heating and cooling system run longer to keep you warm. Check around windows and doors to make sure you have good seals, make sure you have enough attic insulation and inspect your ductwork for leaks. Lastly, todays homes use much more energy then just ve years ago. Phone chargers, computers, game consoles, DVRs and atscreen televisions, often in many rooms, add dramatically to your energy usage. Remind your family to turn off the television and other electronics when not in use. There are also rebates to help you save money on updating your home to be more energy efcient, said Andrews. Theres our free Energy Check-up and rebates for Check Me Plus! heating and cooling, water heating, windows, ceiling insulation, roong, pool pumps, Energy Select, appliances and appliance recycling. A few examples of the rebates provided are $75 on an energy efcient clothes washer; $75 on an energy efcient window air conditioning unit; $50 on an energy efcient refrigerator; and $25 on an energy efcient freezer. We also have a recycling program that will provide you with $35 for old appliances, she said. Thats us paying you to pick up and haul off your old appliances. Also, if you convert to gas heating thats free, we just give you a voucher to go to Lowes and pick it up. For more information, call Andrews at 415-4211 or visit www. gulfpower.com. Cecili ECILI A SpeSPE Ar R S | The NewsGulf Powers Tracy Andrews speaks to the Bonifay Kiwanis on March 20.Gulf Power rep reveals money-saving tips

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LocalA6 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Now Accepting New PatientsThe Health ClinicDr. Sohail Khan Dr. Amer Malik Teresa Seay, ARNP850-638-12301351 South Boulevard Chipley, FL NOTICE TO TAXPAYERSThe deadline for paying 2012 property taxes without a delinquent fee is April 1, 2013. All mail payments postmarked April 1, 2013 will be accepted without a penalty. Taxes paid after April 1, 2013 will have an additional 3% penalty. Taxes paid after April 25, 2013 will have a 3% penalty and newspaper advertising costs. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. (850) 638-6275 or (850) 638-6276 Ken Naker Washington County Tax Collector Celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ!Easter Sunday Service 8:15 a.m.Grace Lutheran Church3309 Highway 90 East Bonifay, FL 32425 (850) 547-9898 First United Methodist Church of ChipleyHoly Week Services Monday-Friday at 12:00 noon Good Friday Stations of the Cross, March 29 at 6:30 p.m. Visual reenactment of the days leading up to Jesus crucixion perfomed by our group on the stage in our new John Wesley Building. Sunday, March 31 at 9:00 and 11:00 amCelebration of the Risen Lord.Message by Rev. Jerry May. All are invited to bring a friend and come rejoice with us. Holmes Creek Baptist ChurchEaster ScheduleSunday March 24 at 10:30 AM Easter Cantata Friday, March 29 at 6:30 PM Tenebrae Service Sunday, March 31 at 10:30 AM Easter Service No Evening Services on Easter Sunday Easter Morning CelebrationWorship Service 8:30am, 9:45am, 11:00am Sunday School 9:45am, 11:00 am 1300 South Blvd. Michael J. Orr, Pastor ServicesMarch 28 Service of Tenebrae 6:30 pm March 29 Good Friday 12:00 pm March 31 Easter Service 10:45 AMFirst United Methodist Church202 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay 547-3785 First Baptist Church Bonifay Passion Play 2013Friday 7 p.m. Saturday 5 & 7:30 p.m. Easter Sunday 7 p.m.Free early seating tickets available 850-547-2420 or robin@fbcbonifay.com LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Breakfast will follow in the fellowship hall.Everyone Featuring THE TIPTON FAMILY Celebrating the Resurrection! Grace Assembly@Chipley567 Main Street Games, Food Inatables and prizes Bring your family and friends! TALLAHASSEE Governor Rick Scott has been recognized by the Consul General of the Israeli consulate and multiple chapters of the Jewish Federation for his Florida Families First Budget, which directs Enterprise Florida to invest $100,000 to create an international economic development of ce in Tel Aviv, Israel. Governor Scott said, Israel is a strong friend of Florida and an innovator in science, technology, engineering, and math. Thats why my Florida Families First Budget invests $100,000 to enhance trade relations with Israel. With this targeted investment, well increase Floridas role as a hub for global commerce, so we can better grow jobs and opportunities for Florida families. Since 2010, Floridas trade with Israel has totaled nearly $800 million. Chaim Shacham, Consul General of the State of Israel said, We are con dent that a funded Enterprise Florida of ce in Israel will provide a new level of exposure to Israels economy for Florida companies, and vice versa. We look forward to working together with the new EFI of ce to further the mutual economic interests of both states. This is truly a win-win situation. Pepi Dunay, Vice President for Community Relations of the Jewish Federation of Broward County said, The Community Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of Broward County would like to thank Governor Scott for his support in funding an Enterprise Florida of ce in Tel Aviv. The establishment of this of ce would strengthen the bilateral economic relationship between Israel and the State of Florida, and bring business and jobs to Florida. Carol Brick-Turin, Director of Miamis Jewish Community Relations Council said, The establishment of an Enterprise Florida of ce in Tel Aviv would facilitate the continued strengthening of our bilateral relationship through cooperative economic activity and job creation. Having had the pleasure of joining Governor Scott at the kick-off dinner for his trade mission to Israel in December 2011, it is particularly ful lling to see this effort coming closer to fruition. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCEThe Washington County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony for Honest Gold Guy of Chipley on Thursday, March 21. The business is owned by Darryl Van Kirk and is located at 2922 Highway 77, south of Chipley. The Honest Gold Guy of Chipley buys gold, silver, and unwanted, broken or old gold, silver and platinum jewelry. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturdays by appointment. HONEST GOLD GUY OPENS Gov. Scott recognized for establishing business of ce in Israel

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LocalWashington County News | A7Wednesday, March 27, 2013 J.D. OWENS CARPET, INC.Carpet & Ceramic Outlet J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597 Springcreek Road, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619carpettilemarianna.comCARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGSWeve got it at the price you want! JUST IN 1st QUALITY CARPETING, FACTORY OVERSTOCKS!Originally $1.89/SF NOW 99 SF Originally $2.50/SF NOW $125 SFNEW SHIPMENT OF AREA RUGS2x4.........$5002x6.......$12502x8.......$15503x5.......$12504x6.......$19905x8.......$35606x9.......$4990Loose Lay Fiber Back Vinyl 13 Wide 79/SF Heavy Fiber Back Closeouts Reg. $2.50 NOW 99/SF WE NOW SELL CONCRETE PAVERSBeautiful and Durable For Pools, Deck, Patio & Driveways 6x6, 6x12, 8x8, 12x12 Hexagon, Cobbles, Bishops Hat and Interlocking in a variety of colorsStarting at $2.95/SF The Place to Shop, if Money Matters! ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product*Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. COSMETIC, GENERAL & FAMILY DENTISTRYDr. Sasha Minor NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS ADULTS & CHILDREN 5 YEARS & UP(850) 638-4708www.DownHomeDentalCenter.com Dr. Sasha Minor Dr. Sasha Minor We now oer Botox and Dermal Fillers We are providers for Cigna PPO, Delta Dental PPO and United Concordia. As a courtesy, we le most insurances. March 11-18Gregory Arbona, 32, Cottondale, violation of injunction for protection Tamara Beasley, 25, Chipley, dealing in stolen property two counts, petit theft, larceny Jessica Blackburn, 20, Pensacola, driving under the in uence Marcus Brewer, 28, Bonifay, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, driving while license suspended or revoked, destroying evidence Kyree Burns, 21, Chipley, violation of state probation on sell of cocaine William Cambley Jr., Fountain, violation of state probation on possession of meth Laramie Cline, 19, Ozark, Ala., driving while license suspended or revoked Alexis Curry, 28, Chipley, driving while license suspended or revoked, leaving the scene of an accident with property damage Brenda Davis, 35, Marianna, possession of paraphernalia, driving while license suspended or revoked Juan Galvis, 18, Atlanta Ga., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana with intent Scott Hall, 38, DeFuniak Springs, violation of game and sh laws Debbie Harper, 49, Tallahassee, driving under the in uence Mary Hartzog, 48, Chipley, burglary of unoccupied dwelling unarmed John Holley, 29, Caryville, deliver meth Benedict Ihesiabe, 20, Newman Ga., possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Francisco Maillo, 20, Newman Ga., possession of paraphernalia, possession of marijuana with intent Samuel Martin Jr., 39, Chipley, aggravated battery offender knew/should have known victim is pregnant Emily McCarthy, 22, Caryville, petit theft, warrantless arrest on violation of state probation for felony battery Arthur Mott Jr., 32, Chipley, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of paraphernalia, producing marijuana Justin Myers, 22, Atlanta Ga., possession of marijuana with intent, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of paraphernalia, carrying a concealed weapon Gabriel Nelson, 32, Fort Walton Beach, possession of paraphernalia, distributing marijuana Daniel Parrish Jr., 34, Caryville, battery, recommitted on sell of marijuana Misty Russell, 32, Bonifay, violation of county probation on petit theft Perry Shackleford, 41, Chipley, child support two counts Roberta Smith, 36, Chipley, Lee County warrant for child support Randall Wynn, 21, Graceville, petit theft, Jackson County warrantless arrest for violation of state probation Arrest REPORT Special to The NewsTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced Friday the appointments of Richard Albertson, Rabbi Sholom Ciment, Dr. Jerry T. Haag, and Patricia Pat Smith and the reappointments of Thomas L. Lukasik and Leonel E. Mesa to the Florida Faith-Based and Community-Based Advisory Council. Albertson, 51, of Tallahassee, is the president and CEO of Live the Life Ministries. He succeeds Joel C. Hunter and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Ciment, 43, of Boynton Beach, is the president of the Congregation Chabad-Lubavitch of Greater Boynton Inc. He succeeds Shneior Z. Oreichman and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Haag, 47, of Lakeland City, is the president of Florida Baptist Childrens Homes. He succeeds Julia W. Boyd and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Smith, 52, of Tallahassee, is the community engagement manager for the Department of Children and Families. She succeeds Linda King and is appointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Lukasik, 59, of Boynton Beach, is the executive director of 4kids of South Florida Inc. He is reappointed for a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Mesa, 47, of Miami Lakes, is the CEO of the New Day Center. He is reappointed to a term beginning March 22, 2013, and ending July 18, 2016. Governor appoints 6 to advisory councilSpecial to the NewsTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced on Thursday the appointments of C. Wayne Ansley, Patrick Byrne, Brad Drake, and Michael Flynt to the Northwest Florida State College District Board of Trustees. Ansley, 65, of Baker, is a retired Assistant Superintendent with the Okaloosa County School Board. He served in the Okaloosa County School system from 1969-2007. Ansley received his associate degree from Okaloosa-Walton Junior College, which is now Northwest Florida State College. He received his bachelors and masters degrees from the University of West Florida. He succeeds Sandra Sims and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2015. Byrne, 57, of Niceville, is president of Valparaiso Realty Company. Previously, he has served on the Okaloosa-Walton Community College Board of Trustees from 19851990, and the Florida State Board of Community Colleges from 19911999. Byrne currently serves on the Florida College System Foundation Board of Directors. He attended Birmingham Southern College, Florida State University, Okaloosa Walton Community College and the University of West Florida. He succeeds Dale Rice and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. Drake, 38, of DeFuniak Springs, is owner of Southern Marketing Co. Drake previously served in the Florida House of Representatives from 2008-2012. Drake attended Northwest Florida State College and received his bachelors degree from the University of Florida. He succeeds Henry Wilkerson and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. Flynt, 67, of Miramar Beach, is an independent contractor. He served in the United States Air Force from 1968-1993. From 1996-2002, he served as the City Administrator of the City of Valparaiso. He received his bachelors degree from the University of Florida. Flynt received masters degrees from Central Michigan University and from the University of West Florida. He succeeds Esteena Wells and is appointed for a term beginning March 21, 2013, and ending May 31, 2014. The appointments are subject to con rmation by the Florida Senate. Scott appoints 4 to Board of Trustees Council President Tina Sloan was also re-elected in the March 12 city election, as was Mayor Michelle Cook, who was unchallenged. Sloan was re-elected to the city council by 52 votes, coming in rst in the citywide election results and securing a two-year term on the council. Shawn Sanders earned 46 votes, which also got him a two-year term as councilman. John W. Tray Hawkins III came in third with 42 votes, which means hell serve a one-year term. Hawkins previously served on the Vernon council. In other business, the council also re-appointed Sloan as president and member Joey Brock as vice-president. The council approved the use of the community center on May 4 for the Miss Vernon Pageant and approved the use of the community center on May 30 for Project Graduation. The council also set the date of the Miss Firecracker Pageant, which will be held on June 29. GRANT from page A1 On April 15-16, Private Road 764.6 and 764.2 and Ray Lane will be closed for work, according to the schedule. County Road 759.6, Magnolia, Hubbard, Oklahoma, Moody and Arnett streets will be closed April 17-18. April 22-23 nds the railroad working on Boswell Road, RD Carter Parkway and County Road 754.2.ArtKidDoo set for April 6CHIPLEY ArtKidDoo will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 6 at Shivers Park in Chipley. The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, along with business and other organizations in the community, are sponsoring ArtKidDoo A Celebration of Children and the Arts. ArtKidDoo is a free event. Families are encouraged to come and spend time discovering the arts with their children. For more information about ArtKidDoo call 638-6343 and ask for the Early Learning Coalition. BRIEFS from page A1

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Page 8www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Hooked on OutdoorsWhen it gets too hot to sh, the Gulf is shut down to snapper and ling and pompano have moved on, usually I stop saltwater shing. I love to mackerel sh and eat mackerel, but now it seems the bigger mackerel are loaded with mercury so Im going to have to rethink eating them. I was looking online at a product poachers use to catch and sell cat sh in the local rivers. The device Im talking about is called a snuff can. The reason it is called that is because it resembles a tin that snuff comes in. Im very familiar with this product because the Dog Doctor goes through a can every shing trip and spits most of it in or on my boat. The device Im referring to can be bought online and costs $45 and is quite illegal to use. It has two leads that connect to a 12-volt battery and a lead runs to some chains that go to the bottom. Hook it up and voila, instant cat sh. Im not telling you this to get you arrested and lose your boat. Im mentioning it because I know some boys who do use it and what they are catching is something I would like to catch legally this summer when the river gets low. Im too nervous to use a snuff can, but I think I could use a reel and rod and do quite well. Over on the Apalachicola River they have tournaments to catch giant cat sh called atheads. Thanks to these snuff-can shermen, we now know there is a thriving community of athead cat sh in the Choctawhatchee River. Flatheads are best caught on live bait with bream being the best according to the shermen who seek them. Heres where the rub comes in. By the time I can catch enough bream to use for bait its usually dark. I suppose thats all right, because they say atheads bite best at dark, but I just dont want to spend 24 hours on the river. So Ive come up with a bait I can sh in daylight. I gure I could use live choffers. I know choffers are a saltwater sh, but they will live in freshwater long enough to attract a athead. This shing and hunting stuff requires a lot of planning and Im already planning four months ahead. If you buy one of those snuff cans call me from the jail and tell me how they work. I will tell you this; if I ever have a hankering to try out one of these snuff cans Ill use it in the Dog Doctors boat. That way all Ill lose is money. Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.netBy Diane HirthFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission A disease which has killed more than 5 million bats in the eastern United States recently was documented in north Georgia for the rst time, increasing the level of threat to Florida bats. People who explore or do research in caves are being asked by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to take precautions to prevent the disease, which has devastated bat colonies in other states, from moving into Florida. The disease that is deadly to bats, known as white-nose syndrome (WNS), has not been detected in Florida. But WNS can spread by spores found on the clothing and equipment of people moving between caves, as well as by bat-to-bat contact, according to FWC biologists. No human illnesses have been attributed to WNS. Nevertheless, biologists warn the public not to handle sick, injured or dead bats. Also, no one should enter Florida caves with equipment or clothing that has been used in caves in WNS-infected states. If equipment or clothing has been used outside Florida, it should be decontaminated following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocols described at WhitenoseSyndrome.org where you click on WNS Info, then select Decon. Landowners with caves on their property can help by requiring that anyone entering their caves use only Florida-speci c gear or decontaminated equipment. Florida has 13 native bat species that play a major role in reducing agricultural pests and controlling mosquitoes, which can carry human disease. The value of insect suppression by bats to U.S. agriculture has been estimated at between $4 billion and $50 billion a year. In 2006, bats with an unknown fungus on their noses and wings were rst found in a New York cave. Researchers identi ed the fungus as Geomyces destructans, which thrives in cold caves with temperatures below 65 degrees Fahrenheit. FWC biologists do not know whether Floridas warm temperatures and short winters will protect the states bats from white-nose syndrome. But they are certain that limiting the bats exposure to the white fungus is an important method of prevention. The tricolored bat, gray bat and a bat called southeastern myotis all roost in Florida caves, said Melissa Tucker, FWC wildlife biologist. These caves are also important summertime maternity roosts for southeastern myotis and some gray bats. Since its discovery, WNS has been identi ed in 22 states and ve Canadian provinces and found in all states adjacent to Florida. The name comes from the white fungus found covering the muzzles and wings of hibernating bats. WNS appears to have the most severe impact on bats during their long winter hibernation period, although research is ongoing to nd out exactly how hibernation and WNS are related. In Florida, bats typically spend very little time hibernating but we have discovered several Florida caves cold enough during the winter months to support growth of the fungus, Tucker said. Bats affected by WNS do not always display the typical white fungus appearance. Instead, they might appear emaciated or severely dehydrated. Other signs of WNS include bats ying outside or near cave openings during the day, and dead or dying bats on the ground, usually in the winter. People can report dead bats or bats behaving unusually by going to MyFWC.com/WildlifeHabitats and selecting Health & Disease. Florida bat populations face other risks in addition to WNS, Tucker said. Loss of habitat has limited bat roosting and foraging sites. Bats also are particularly vulnerable during their maternity season, when they are giving birth and rearing young. To protect bats during maternity season, do not disturb their colonies from April 15 through Aug. 15. Cavers should avoid known bat caves during this period, and if they unexpectedly encounter bats, they should leave that area of a cave. For additional WNS information, go to www.whitenosesyndrome.org .Cavers asked to help prevent spread of bat diseaseBy Richard HanceSpecial to The News Herald The most popular color on our boats is white, but there are dozens of shades of white. Gelcoat manufacturers offer a small packaged kit that includes a basic white along with a variety of tint colors, red, green and yellow. Adding tint adjusts the shades and tones of the white. Adding tint is a very delicate process. Adding small, pinhead red tint will warm up the white. There also are gelcoat kits, already mixed to match, available through the boat dealer or Spectrum Colors (800-754-5516) or Mini-Craft (800-282-8244). When adding the provided catalyst, MEK, be careful to follow the directions on the package. When the stress crack has developed and appears to be getting larger, use a small drill bit and carefully drill a mark/ hole into the top layer, gelcoat only. Do not penetrate the berglass. This will help keep the crack from growing. With a sharp object, such as an old-time church key, can/bottle opener or the edge of a screwdriver, deepen and widen the stress crack. This will allow gelcoat to bond the two edges. If you have many stress cracks, prepare them all for ll. Apply masking tape along the edges of the cracks. Find a small, 1-2 inch wide rigid plastic, like a credit card, clean each crack thoroughly with acetone, ngernail polish remover or alcohol. Catalyze your gelcoat and spread, pushing gelcoat into crack and over ll, allowing us to later sand into a smooth repair. Drying times vary depending on heat and humidity; be patient. Once the gelcoat has thoroughly hardened, use 120grit sandpaper, wrapped around a small block (1 by 3 inches) and begin sanding until the masking tape will peel away from the crack. At this point change sanding paper to 400-grit wet/ dry, using a spray bottle with water to moisten the repair area and gently sand until perfectly smooth. Use your ngertips as well as your eyes to get it right. Change sandpaper again to a 1,000or 1,200-grit paper, wet sand to remove tiny scratches left by the 400-grit. Using rubbing compound, or aqua buff 1,000, aggressively buff the area or hand polish/buff until luster is consistent with surrounding area. Tips for gelcoat repairs on minor stress cracks FWC

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SPORTS www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, March 27, 2013 APage 9SectionSpecial to the News Salina, Kan. The Chipola Lady Indians nished in the Elite Eight of the NJCAA Womens Basketball National Tournament in Salina, KS, March 21. The Lady Indians (27-7) won two of three games in the tournament before falling to number two seed Central Arizona (32-1), 8467, on Thursday, March 21. Kristine Brance led Chipola with 23 points including four three-pointers. Jasmine Crawford had 12 points. Lashonda Littleton had 10 points and 4 rebounds. Treyvonna Brooks led Chipola in rebounding with 5. Chipola scored a 66-57 win over Southern Idaho on March 20. Jasmine Crawford led Chipola with 18 points off the bench, making 11-of-12 free throws for the game. Free throws turned out to be the difference in the game. Chipola shot an amazing 26-of-29 free throws as a team. Rayven Brooks added 16 points, seven rebounds, four assists, and three steals. Jade Givens nished with 11 points and 13 rebounds. The Lady Indians opened the tournament March 18 with a 78-62 win over Southwest Illinois. Rayven Brooks led the Lady Indians in nearly every category with 29 points including 6 of 9 three pointers, 11 rebounds, 5 assists and 4 steals. Brance and Littleton each scored 13. Littleton also grabbed 8 rebounds. Treyvonna Brooks scored 11 and pulled down 8 rebounds. Crawford also added 8 points. Chipolas Cinderella post-season run began with a 72-52 upset win over Northwest Florida in the FCSAA Florida/Region VIII Tournament. The Lady Indians went on to nish second in the state tournament, losing 61-53 to state champion Gulf Coast in the title game. Their showing earned the Lady Indians a rst ever at-large bid to play in the NJCAA National Tournament. Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough dubbed the Lady Indians, The Magni cent Seven, as only seven players on the injury-plagued squad played in state and national tournaments. The Lady Indians nished the regular season third in the Panhandle Conference under rst year head coach Greg Franklin. Gulf Coast and Northwest were conference co-champions. Franklin came to Chipola after serving ve seasons as an assistant coach in the Mississippi State University womens basketball program where he was instrumental in helping Mississippi State claim back-to-back year wins in the NCAA Tournament, including the programs rst Sweet 16 appearance. Before Mississippi State, Franklin served at Southeastern Illinois College in Harrisburg, Illinois, as athletic director, head womens coach and assistant mens coach. Chipola and Northwest both were bene ciaries of the NJCAAs change to an expanded 24 team bracket which now includes four at-large teams, four zone quali ers and 16 district champions. Northwest also made it to the Elite Eight before losing to Hutchinson on March 21. Special to the NewsChad Prough of Chipley won the Walmart Bass Fishing League Bulldog Tournament on Lake Seminole, March 16. Prough caught ve bass weighing in at a total of 22 pounds and 8 ounces to take the $4,163 prize. More than 200 professionals and co-anglers competed in the tournament that was held in Bainbridge, Ga.Special to the NewsCHIPLEY The Chipley High JROTC ri e team traveled to Liberty County on March 22 to compete in Area 11 competition of 2013. The cadets that went and competed were: Ri e team commander, C/1LT Brittney Sanders, C/MAJ Regan Walls, C/MAJ Sean McDonald, and C/1LT Jonathan Gilbert to all the cadets that went and competed. Highest Single shooter with 256 was C/ MAJ Regan Walls. Chipley placed rst in the Area 11 shoulderto-shoulder match, as well as second in the Area 11 Postal match. Congratulations to Chipley High JROTC for qualifying for state.Chipola Women nish in elite eight at national tournament Chipley High School JROTC ri e team members Brittney Sanders, Regan Walls, Sean McDonald, and Jonathan Gilbert competed on March 22.CHS res up to go to state PROUGH WINS TOURNAMENT From the Associates of Store 2114 Way to Go AthletesDallas Oliver Chipley H.S. Baseball 11th Grade Congratulations to these top athletes!Hannah ReddingBozeman H.S. Soccer/Softball 12th Grade Graceville H.S. No information availableHolly ParsonPonce de Leon H.S. Basketball/Softball 12th Grade Bethlehem H.S. No information availableMorgan HelmsHolmes County H.S. Volleyball 10th GradeAshlyn GoldenPoplar Springs H.S. softball 9th Grade Hunter DobbsVernon H.S. Baseball Catcher 12th Grade Members of the Chipola College Womens Basketball team are, from left: (top) Jasmine Crawford, Treyvonna Brooks, Rayven Brooks, Jade Givens, (bottom) Rahni Bell, Kristine Brance, LaShonda Littleton and head coach Greg Franklin.

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LocalA10 | Washington County News Wednesday, March 27, 2013By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners gathered together for a special session on March 20 to discuss action for roads impacted during the recent ooding speci cally, District 3s roads. Ive had several calls about roads that werent up to standards even before the ooding, said Commissioner David Whitaker. Now weve got clay dumped out on roads and residents with vehicles stuck in mud up to their doors. Ive seen the photos and I think its a leadership issue. Whitaker explained that both his foreman and grader operator were well educated and certi ed for their positions but both lack experience and requested assistance from his fellow districts until both could receive further training from well-experienced employees in their eld. My grader operator is willing to get any additional training needed to do his job to the best of his abilities and thats the kind of man I want to invest in, said Whitaker. Its a lot easier to maintain a properly xed road. The people cant wait for years for these guys to get the experience they need before they can get their roads taken care of. Based on further discussion between Board members, County Attorney Jeff Goodman suggested eight to 12 weeks with Commissioner Bill Parishs foreman overseeing whats required to bring District 3s roads back to standards with additional assistance from other districts when available. When there is a problem anywhere in this county it is not just a problem for that district it is a problem for the county, said Parish. I dont mind stepping in and seeing about whats needed to be done. Commissioner Kenneth Williams also volunteered to help when he was able. Weve got some more rains coming this weekend and Ive got to nish up with my district, said Williams. But as soon as Im able Ill send you whatever you need. Parish also agreed to ride along with his foreman and Whitakers road grader to give advice on how to correct and repair District 3s roads. Goodman reminded them that the commissioners werent allowed to talk to each other outside of a public meeting, however their road foremen and road grater operators could communicate with one another after the Board approved of an action. The Board approved of Goodmans recommendation to allow Parishs foreman to oversee road repairs for District 3 and District 5 for eight to 12 weeks and to make the workers aware that he is in charge for that time period. Anything longer then 12 weeks and well have to revisit the matter, said Goodman. Whitaker said he had another issue with his crew. I have concerns because three out of my ve workers are related to each other, said Whitaker. Theres a guy working with his father-in-law and his brother-in-law. I inherited a problem and Im looking to moving some people around. Theyre under union contract and one of your solutions is for lateral moves to other districts, said Goodman. At the same time the Board has to work together on which employees they want to take on and which ones theyre willing to give up. Its not our employees fault that we put them in that position. The Board agreed to give this matter further consideration before coming up with a possible solution. Commissioner Bobby Sasnett requested the procedure for new hires. First, there has to be an opening, said Goodman. Then we consider employees within the county before we advertise to bring someone in from outside sources. The Board reviewed and approved of a letter to be sent to all department heads on the process of presenting issues and requests before the Board. 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Allen BarnesHAS: BC-HIS 23 Years ExperienceBill FletcherHAS: BC-HIS 24 Years Experience WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD!CHIPLEY1611 MAIN STREET #4850 638-9350Monday Friday Spanish Trail Playhousepresents presents Saturday, April 13, 2013 7 pm$10 General AdmissionAdvance tickets on sale at the Washington County Library (850) 638-1314 or at the box oce day of show.Spanish Trail Playhouse THE MUSICAL THE MUSICAL THE MUSICAL Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Footloose Can You Sing, Dance, Act? OPEN AUDITIONSMay 20 & 21, 2013...6pm nightlyAudition packets available at the Washington County Public Library or online at www.spanishtrailplayhouse.comin Concert Commissioners hold special session to aid ood impacted roadsPHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS | The NewsHolmes County Board of County Commissioners met March 20 in a special session.

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com In Memory OfEmerald Coast Hospice remembers patientsBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Tears of remembrance were shed, and candles were lit by the many loved ones as Emerald Coast Hospice hosted their annual memorial service on Saturday, March 23, at the First United Methodist Church to honor the patients that passed away in 2012 in Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes and Washington counties. Emerald Coast Hospice conducts the service to give families the opportunity to pay tribute to loved ones and reunite with hospice staff for encouragement and support. We gather here to remember loved ones weve lost, Emerald Coast Hospice Branch Director Julie Pettis said. Weve come together in remembrance and to say their names because everyone in this room has this bond of grief. The staff does such a wonderful job in making everyone feel like family. One of the guest speakers was Chipley Mayor Linda Cain, who shared her experience with those attending. I think this is a great thing that Emerald Coast Hospice does, Cain said. Ive been on the city council for 26 years and mayor for 10. We all have something in common in this room; we all have lost loved ones. Cain spoke about her son, who died suddenly. She told of how she received a call one evening telling her that her son was in a hospital in Jacksonville, and he wouldnt survive the night. We had no idea that he was going to leave us so soon, she said. We had just spoken with him shortly before, and he said he wasnt feeling well and that he was going to bed. How were we to know that would be the last wed ever hear from him? She said they went to his side as quickly as possible, and they were able to see him before he passed away, though she said he didnt know who they were. Out of no where appeared two ladies from Hospice, Cain said. They were so quick and such a God-send. They stayed with us, and unless youve needed Hospice you dont know how much theyre needed. Im so glad that Emerald Coast Hospice is a part of Chipley. Emerald Coast Hospice is a not-for-pro t organization, serving patients in the Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes, and Washington counties. For more information, contact the Chipley of ce at 638-8787.Wednesday, MARCH 27 2013PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARSEmerald Coast Hospice held a memorial service on Saturday at the First United Methodist Church in Chipley for family members of patients who passed away in 2012. In memory of Dianne Sorey. In memory of Francis Daniel Bud Thompkins. In memory of J. Clegg Ivey. In memory of Joyce Braxton. In memory of Vicky White. In memory of Etta Bradley. In memory of Ida Peral Thomas. In memory of Jim Everett. In memory of Phyllis Hall. In memory of John Cook. In memory of Dorthy Seals. In memory of Glen Watson. In memory of James Furr. In memory of Kathleen Segers. In memory of Virgie Keen.Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County Times-Advertiser. 1) Around one-third of all asthma cases in the U.S. are related to an allergy to what? Cigarette smoke, Perfume, Cats, Sulfa drugs 2) What John Wayne movie co-star was the 1st woman to run a U.S. airline? Maureen OHara, Vera Miles, Patricia Neal, Kim Darby 3) Sandra Bullock, Chevy Chase, and Bruce Willis are all former what? Pizza deliverers, Bartenders, Cigar smokers, Accountants 4) To whom did Helen Keller dedicate her autobiography? Alexander Graham Bell, Gandhi, Teddy Roosevelt, Jesus 5) Around the kitchen about half of us reuse what after the rst use? Paper towel, Aluminum foil, Zip lock bags, Wax paper 6) What was the name of the rst daily comic strip published in the U.S.? Mr. Mutt, Scruples, Katzenjammer Kids, Hobo 7) As paid in gold dust how much did Levi Strauss get for his rst pair of jeans in 1850? $6, $32, $65, $290 8) The U.S. Marines rst recruiting station was in a what? Church, Station wagon, Bar, Grocery store 9) On Wall Street whats a quarter-point change in a stocks price? Quirk, Quire, Quirt, Quack 10) Valentine was one of Shakespeares Two Gentlemen of Verona; who was the other? Leonato, Macduff, Tybalt, Proteus 11) What was Lindberghs average m.p.h. speed on his historic nonstop Atlantic ight in 1927? 45, 74, 89, 108 12) A premature infant is ve times more likely to be what? Blind, Mentally challenged, Left-handed, Blue-eyed 13) In an average lifetime a woman will consume how many pounds of lipstick? 6, 8, 10, 12 14) What does a labeorphilist ordinarily collect? Parking tickets, Cigar bands, Beer bottles, Car tags ANSWERS 1) Cats. 2) Maureen OHara. 3) Bartenders. 4) Alexander Graham Bell. 5) Aluminum foil. 6) Mr. Mutt. 7) $6. 8) Bar. 9) Quack. 10) Proteus. 11) 108. 12) Left-handed. 13) 6. 14) Beer bottles.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Grand Ridge Spring Festival and Easter Egg HuntMarch 30th 8:00 am 2:00 pm At John Thomas Porter Park beside Grand Ridge SchoolThe Town of Grand Ridge is gearing up for its Spring Festival and Easter Egg Hunt!!! It features an Easter Egg Hunt at 10:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. with 3 dierent age divisions having a total of 12 golden eggs worth $25.00 each and a coloring contest with prizes. Admission to this event is free, but there are small fees for the childrens activities. There will be no charge for the egg hunt or for the coloring contest. There will be something for everyone including arts, crafts, food vendors, childrens games and activities, and live bunny photos from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. There are a variety of activities for children and adults. Vendors will be selling T-shirts, homemade jellies, candles, handmade crafts, jewelry, carnival foods, corndogs, chicken on a stick, shrimp on a stick, corn, sausage dogs, and snoballs. Games and activities for the children will include train rides, helicopter rides, Race Mania, slides, a bouncy house, and more. We are inviting vendors to participate. Vendor spaces are $25 each with proceeds going to Sneads High School Project Graduation 2013. Any vendors that wish to participate are encouraged to contact Crystal Avriett at 850-573-6750 or at crystalavriett@gmail.com. Funded in part by the Jackson County Tourist Development Council, East Jackson County Economic Development Council, and Town of Grand Ridge Sellers celebrates 7th birthdayAshton Gage Sellers of Bonifay celebrated his 7th birthday on March 24. Gage is the son of Ashley Skinner of Caryville, and father William Sellers of Bonifay. His grandparents are Patti Manwarring of Caryville and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sellers of Bonifay. He is the great grandson of Dot Mixson of Enterprise Ala., and the late Mack and Jeanell Turner of Ozark Ala. Bethlehem FFA Wins Land Judging ContestOn March 7, Bethlehem FFA traveled to Bonifay, to compete in the District Land Judging competition. Land Judging can be a complicated contest you go out to four holes and score them in a class. The way three of the holes are scored is by Surface Texture, Organic Matter, Permeability, Slope, Drainage, and Erosion. One of the holes Home site gets scored by Surface texture, Depth, Permeability, Slop, Drainage, ShrinkSwell, and Erosion. The Bethlehem FFA took two teams both competing in the Senior Division. The rst team consisted of Josie Dampier, Macey Thomas, Gene Myers, and Jonathan Kirkland. The second team consisted of David Boatwright, James Graham, and Blake Majors. Team one brought back rst place, and team two brought back second place. Along with that, Josie Dampier brought back High Individual. Being that team one placed placed this qualies them for State in Bronson, later in March. The Bonifay Book Club met at the home of Edna McDonald on Tuesday afternoon, March 12. Present at the meeting were Brenda Alford, Joyce Brannon, Cynthia Brooks, Medea Callahan, Wanda Howell, June Jones, Edna McDonald, Nancy Riley, DiAnn Shores, Dianne Smith, and Hazel Tison. The meeting was called to order by President Medea Callahan. The minutes were approved as read by Secretary Brenda Alford. Wanda Howell reviewed the book The Forgotten by David Baldacci. The setting for the novel is Paradise, Florida, a ctional seemingly picture perfect tourist community, on the Emerald Coast of Florida in the neighborhood of Fort Walton Beach. Army Special Agent John Puller, a combat veteran, who is assigned some of the Armys most dif cult criminal cases, comes to Paradise in response to a letter that his Aunt has written asking for his help. She writes that things and people are just not as they seem in Paradise, and she needs him. Puller ends up in Paradise investigating the death of his Aunt whom the local authorities have ruled as accidental. Pullers investigation leads him on a bloody, dangerous and deadly journey with many unexpected twists and turns. Many secrets exist in Paradise. Delicious refreshments were served by Ms. McDonald at the conclusion of the meeting. Bonifay Book Club meetsWorld Heritage Student Exchange Program, a highly respected, nonpro t, public-bene t organization, is seeking local host families for high school boys and girls from Scandinavia, France, Germany, Italy, Thailand, China, South Korea, and the former Soviet Republics. Students are already awaiting word on their host families for the 201314 academic school year (or semester). Host families provide room, board, and guidance for a teenager living thousands of miles from home. Couples, single parents, and families with or without children in the home are all encouraged to apply. The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before the 2013-14 school year begins and each World Heritage student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please call local Area Representative Amy Strout at 281-2092 or 1-800888-9040 (toll free). Please also visit our website at www.whHosts.com Hosts sought for exchange studentsMiss. Washington County RelayWASHINGTON COUNTY Come be apart of the Miss. Washington County Relay Beauty Pageant. The pageant will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday night April 12, for ages 11 to 18 and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, April 13 for ages birth to 10 years old. Entry fee is $50. You can pick up you entry forms at C & C Bookkeeping, Washington County News or by contacting Naomi Carter at ncrelayforlife@gmail.com. You can also sign up at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 2 in the lobby.2013 Race For a Cure car showWASHINGTON COUNTY On behalf of the Washington County Relay for Life, we would like to invite you to bring your favorite Hot Rod and show it off in out rst ever Race For a Cure Car Show. The show will be held at 9 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. Trophies will be awarded on the Relay stage at approximately 12 p.m. trophies will be awarded to the fans favorite car, rst, second and third place and a Grand Champion trophy will be awarded to the Car or Club who turns in the most donations from your entry. There is no charge to enter your car. The club that enters the most card will receive a plaque from the American Cancer Society in recognition of your clubs contribution to a world with more birthdays. There is no year, make, or model limit to this show. There will be food, drinks, and entertainment available to all who enter or attend. Call Jimmy to register at 786-4477440 or jim@bigjimssmokinbutts.comRelay looking for cancer survivors to be honoredWASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay for Life is looking for survivors to honor at this years Relay for Life 2013 event. If you are a cancer survivor your name, address and shirt size to the following locations for Relay updates, reservation at the Survivors Banquet and free survivor t-shirt: to the Washington County News (ask for Cathrine), or call Connie Wheeler at 260-4073 Or you can mail it to the Washington County News, C/O Cathrine Lamb, 1364 North Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fl., 32428 you may also send the email to clamb@chipleypaper.com. Relay EVENTS

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Chipola brain bowl wins sixth straight state championshipSpecial to ExtraMARIANNA For the sixth straight year, Chipola College has won the State Brain Bowl Tournament, defeating Valencia 915-50 in the nals of the Florida College System Activities Association Tournament on March 17. Chipolas six consecutive championships breaks the old record of ve straight set by Broward College. Broward still has the most state titles with seven. Chipola also set a record for the largest margin of victory in a nal round with the 915-50 win over Valencia. The Chipola team answered 29 of the 36 questions in the nals. Chipola MVP Paul Kelson was the David Elhert High Point Winner in the tournament with 1,120 total points and an average of 131 points per game. Kelson also was named to the AllTournament team for the second straight year. Chipola head Coach Stan Young, says, Paul Kelson is the best community college player in the country and maybe the best at any level. Other Chipola Blue team members are: Katelyn Miller, William Singleton and Becca Delgado. Miller nished seventh in individual scoring in the tournament. The Chipola White Team nished eighth in the State Tournament and was led Wesley Chevillot who nished eighth in individual scoring. Other Chipola White members are: Bobby Gause, Jamie McCoy and Faith Tice. Chipola will next play in the Intercollegiate Championship Tournament (ICT) in Chicago, April 12-13, as one of only six community colleges invited to the tournament. Chipola won its third straight NAQT (National Academic Quiz Tournament) Community College Championship Tournament in St. Louis on March 2. Based on that performance, Chipola received the number ve seed in the ICT, behind only Harvard, Yale, Stanford, and Brown. Chipola math professor Stan Young is head coach of the Brain Bowl team with volunteer assistant Dr. Robert Dunkle. About Chipolas run of six straight, Young says, You can nd intelligent people everywhere. Were in this small community college with just over 2,000 students and were competing with Ivy League schools. It just goes to show you that intelligence can come from anywhere. If you take that and put in a lot of hard work and prepare yourself, it just kind of shows you what you can do, Young said. SPECia IA L TO EE XTra RAMembers of the winning Brain Bowl team are, from left: Becca Delgado, Katelyn Miller, Tournament MVP Paul Kelson and William Singleton. Annika is a 1 year old female chocolate lab cross, about 30 lbs. She seems to have had a home at one time where she was taught to walk politely on a leash, sit, shake and perhaps other things we have yet to discover. She appears very healthy and well groomed. She is a very sweet, loving and beautiful girl. You just cant go wrong with this little darling, she will gladly become a much loved part of your family in no time! PETPETS OOF TTHEE WEEK Russ is a 1 to 2 year old male shepherd cross, about 40 to 45 pounds. He is a very friendly boy, alert, curious and lots of fun to play with. Russ is an adorable young man who would love to be your faithful friend and companion, dont you have some room in your heart and home to give this sweetie the life he deserves? For more information contact Animal Control of West Florida, 686 Highway 90, Chipley, or call 638-2082. Our hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. until noon. Pet Talk: Mange and Your DogWe love for our pets to play outdoors with their friends, but owners should be cautious about the dangers that lurk there. Youve probably heard the term mangy mutt referring to a poor dog with a ratty, patchy coat. Thats actually how dogs with sarcoptic mange really look. Mange is a condition caused by an infestation of a specic type of mite that is too tiny to be seen with the naked eye. In this country, primarily dogs get sarcoptic mange, or scabies, said Dr. Alison Diesel, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. It can be transmitted and carried by other wild canids including coyotes and foxes. Sarcoptes mites are very contagious and can be spread by your pet coming into contact with an infected source. Sarcoptes mites are spread by direct contact with an infected animal or from an infected environment (e.g. coyote den or fox burrow, even dog parks or grooming facilities), said Diesel. It is important that all incontact animals be treated for mites if one dog in the household is diagnosed with scabies. The most common sign associated with sarcoptic mange is severe itchiness. Dogs may also develop a rash, lose their hair, and have crusting lesions on various body regions, said Diesel. The most common areas include the ear margins, hocks, and elbows; however signs may become generalized very quickly. Veterinarians often use therapy or the pets history and clinical signs to diagnose mange. Sarcoptes mites can be very difcult to nd as they live very supercially on the skin and are typically only present in very small numbers, said Diesel. Skin scrapings may help to identify the mites, however often we do not nd the mites on our patients. A positive pinnal-pedal response (where the veterinarian folds the ear ap on itself, rubs the two surfaces together, and watches for the hind limb to exhibit the classic Thumper or scratching response) can be supportive of the suspected diagnosis. Your dogs veterinarian will recommend the most appropriate therapy given your animals specic needs and preferences. Typically therapy lasts between 6-8 weeks. Thankfully, Sarcoptes mites are pretty wimpy, said Diesel. Several topical, oral, and injectable treatments are available for treating them. Certain breeds (e.g. Collies, Shetland sheepdogs, Border collies) need to be specially considered as some of the therapeutic options can be toxic and cause severe side effects including seizures. Unfortunately, sarcoptic mange can also be spread from dogs to their owners. If a pet owner is concerned they may have contracted scabies from their pet, particularly if their veterinarian diagnoses scabies, they should contact their primary care physician for recommendations and let them know their dog is being treated for scabies, said Diesel. The best prevention from mange is to keep dogs away from known infested environments including coyote dens and fox burrows. If the owner knows their dog has scabies, they should also keep their pet away from other dogs (including staying away from dog parks, doggie day care and groomers) until the infestation is fully resolved, said Diesel.About P P et T T alkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. PPET TaTALK Crossword PPUZZLESOLUTOLUTIOON OON PP AGEE B6

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Register, CPA1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL638-4251 Local Agents, Local Service, Best Value.The Florida Farm Bureau Federations mission is to increase the net income of farmers and ranchers, and to improve the quality of rural life. The Best of Both Worlds1361 Jackson Ave., Chipley 638-1756 washington@ffbic.com 1108 N. Waukesha St., Bonifay 547-4227 holmes@ffbic.comTrust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Membership doesnt cost, it pays! Panhandle Lumber & SupplyForALL Your Building Needs 405 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay(850) 547-9354 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay(850) 547-18771357 Brickyard Rd., Chipley(850) 638-0424 Consumer & Commercial Power EquipmentVisit our website at www.lanesoutdoor.com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley850.638.4364 1621 Main St. ChipleyOPEN 24 HOURS CHIPLEYHARDWARE& MOBILE HOME SUPPLIES 1163 Jackson Ave. Chipley(850) 638-1815 Home Folks serving Home FolksWe give commercial rates to area churches415 S. 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If my light bulb goes out, I want to change. That is the limit for change except maybe some of it that jingles in my pocket. Have you ever noticed that once you are comfortable with a computer program and really like it, someone will upgrade it until it is a completely different program with no relationship to the one you love? I hate that. When you got something that works, do not try to x it. That is one of the basic rules of life. It is a rule I have been trying to explain to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage for years. I keep telling her I am not broken and therefore I do not need xing. It has become the mission of her life to upgrade me. Can you imagine that? I love me the way I are. Some people are more like soup than anything else. Anything and everything goes into the pot. Not me. I like to savor something in its own environment. So, I am a purist in many regards, which can best be seen from my point of view in holidays. I like holidays but I do not like all of the upgrading and embellishments attached to every holiday you can think of except perhaps April 1. We know who celebrates that holiday. I would like to enjoy a holiday sometime without all of the extras. At Christmas time I want to celebrate the purpose of Christmas, I have no idea what a Santa Claus with reindeer, and Frosty the Snowman have to do with Christmas. This is rather confusing to me. What are we celebrating at Christmas? If you follow the commercials, you have no idea what holiday is being celebrated. For Easter, I would like to strip away all of the trappings, all of the hype and just celebrate it for what it is. What do the Easter bunny and the Easter egg have to do with Easter? I would be open to having a holiday for the Easter bunny, another holiday for the Easter egg and if you want to get technical, a holiday for Santa Claus, one for Rudolph the red nose reindeer and a separate one for Frosty the Snowman. When you put it all together, it just is rather confusing to me. I know who is in charge of these holidays. A holiday is not to celebrate but rather a holiday is to make money. Some people, and I will not mention any names, has never seen a holiday they did not want to make a buck. Maybe every holiday should be called Buck Day, where we celebrate and honor the almighty dollar. One more holiday I would suggest is one with no commercials and no selling whatsoever. A holiday where you would be ned dearly if you bought anything. A holiday from buying would suit me just ne. I know my critics will say that unless somebody buys something nobody makes anything. I have no problem with that. Wouldnt it be nice to have a holiday where that kind of thing was not front and center? The value of the Easter bunny is how much money it can make for the person sponsoring the holiday. I have seen a very interesting thing and I just cannot quite explain it. Just before the Easter holiday and leading up to it, all the Easter candy is at a premium price. Then, after Easter, this same Easter candy is at a hefty discount in the stores. What has changed? Could it be that the older something gets the less it is worth? Of course, I am beginning to feel that way myself, as I get older. (Thanks, Uncle Sam.) As a purist, I would like to celebrate a holiday for once without all of the rigmarole and shenanigans. A holiday where nobody will pester me. A holiday where I can shut out the world and enjoy the comforts of home and family. If I have not offended anybody up to now, let me take this a step further. It would be nice to have a holiday when all media would shut down. No television. No radio. No telephone or cell phone. No Internet. I know I am a radical, but I think it would be nice some time just to close out the world and remember the things that have value. Even Jesus understood this in his time. And he said unto them, Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place, and rest a while: for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat (Mark 6:31 KJV). Therefore, I would like all of these things to hop along let me enjoy the things that really have value to me before I simply come apart. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com.Will the Easter bunny just hop away ... Please!Easter Mass ScheduleCHIPLEY St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church in Chipley and St. Anne Catholic Church in Marianna will host Holy Week services. Holy Thursday, March 28, services will be held at St. Anne, Marianna at 7 p.m. On Good Friday, March 29, Veneration of the Cross at St. Joseph at 3 p.m. and Easter Vigil held at St. Joseph at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 30. Sunday Mass at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph in Chipley.Chipley Ministerial Association Annual Holy WeekCHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley will again host the Chipley Ministerial Associations Annual Holy Week Services from March 25 to 29. The services will begin each day at 12 p.m., in the Sanctuary and will conclude with a soup and sandwich lunch in the John Wesley Building. As is the tradition, each service will consist of special music and a short devotional given by a different pastor each day. The speakers for this year are on Monday March 25, the Rev. Kermit Soileau, Pastor of New Prospect Baptist Church. Tuesdays speaker will be the Rev. Ward Clarke of St. Matthews Episcopal Church and on Wednesday, the Rev. Mike Orr of the First Baptist Church will give the devotion. The Rev. Clint Ellis, Pastor of Holmes Creek Baptist Church will speak on Thursday and Good Fridays message will be given by the Rev. Vince Spencer, of New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Church. After each days service a soup and sandwich luncheon will be served in the John Wesley Building. The service and luncheon will be timed so that you can attend both the service and luncheon and still return to work by 1 p.m. There is no charge for participating in the service or the luncheon although an Agape Plate will be placed at each end of the Alter to allow those who wish to contribute to the Ministerial Associations Benevolent Fund that provides lodging for distressed Faith BRIEFS See FAITH B6Page 4 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at or Mr. Eddie Lee Mosley Jr., 45 of the St. Joseph Community, Chipley, passed away March 7, on Highway 90 on his way to work near Marianna. He was a Native of Fort Polk, La, and has resided in Washington County most of his life, he was a 1986 graduate of Chipley High School. He has been employed with the Marianna Automotive Service since 2006 and was a member of the Saint Joseph A.M.E. Church. Survivors include his parents, Eddie Sr. and Lucille Mosley; two sons, Eddie III and Elijah Mosley all of Chipley; brother, Erick Mosley, Tallahassee; sister, Erika Mosley, Tallahassee and many other relatives and friends. Funeral Services were conducted at 11 a.m., Saturday, March 16, 2013 at Saint Joseph A.M.E. Church on Monroe Shef eld Road in Chipley, with the Rev. Alice Clark, the Rev. Franklin Southland, the Rev. Larry Brown and the Rev. Sinclair Forbes of ciating. Interment followed in the Saint Joseph Cemetery with The Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, directing. The remains were in repose at the church onehour prior to the service. Visitation was held at the Cooper Funeral Home from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday.Eddie L. Mosley Jr. Jesse Andrew Dennis, Jr. age 73 of Vernon, passed away Sunday March 17, 2013 in the Covenant Hospice Unit of Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Mr. Dennis was born July 31, 1939 in Miami, to the late Jesse Andrew, Sr. and Mattie (Houck) Dennis. He had been a resident of Vernon since 1974, coming from Hialeah. Mr. Dennis was a self employed contractor and a member of the Unity Baptist Church in Vernon. He loved his Lord, his family and shing. His grandchildren were the light of his life. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by two brothers, John Dennis and Bobby Dennis, as well as two great grandsons, Trenton and Brenton Hagan. Survivors include his loving wife of 54 years, Mary Dennis of Vernon; one son, Charles Dennis of Vernon; one daughter, Terri Strickland and husband Glen of Ebro; two brothers, Jerry Dennis of Lynn, Ala. and Raymond Dennis of Lady Lake; two sisters, Lilly Kellar of Okeechobee and Ruth Ambrose of South Carolina; four grandchildren, Theresa Hagan, Brittany Cook, Andrew Dennis and Aaron Dennis and four great grandchildren, Trinity and Riley Hagan and Ayden and Leighton Cook. The family received friends Tuesday, March 19, 2013 from 6 to 8 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel. Funeral services were held Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 3 p.m., at Unity Baptist Church with the Rev. Lindsey Martin and Alan English of ciating. Interment followed in the Unity Baptist Church Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Jesse A. Dennis Jr.Kenneth Robert Foster, 70, of Bonifay, died March 16, 2013. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Kenneth R. FosterMr. Grady Jerl Chitty, age 64, of Bonifay, passed away March 20, 2013 at Covenant Hospice Inpatient and Palliative Care Center of Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Mr. Chitty was born Jan. 30, 1949 in Bonifay. He is preceded in death by his father, Fate Chitty. Mr. Chitty is survived by his wife, Belinda Chitty of Bonifay; his mother, Clara Chitty of Bonifay; a son, Darren Chitty and wife Michelle of Bonifay; a daughter, Toni Williams and husband Dale of Bonifay; a brother, Gene Chitty and wife Susan of Bonifay; grandchildren, Dylan Chitty, Tiffany and Daniel Birge, Tabitha, Sabian, David, and Bryan; a great-grandson, Timber Birge; mother-in-law, Betty Hutchinson of Bonifay and numerous relatives. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 23, 2013 at First Baptist Church with the Rev. Shelly Chandler, the Rev. Jeep Sullivan, the Rev. David Lauen and the Rev. Chris Nelson of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Friday at First Baptist Church. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be given to: The Gideons International, P.O. Box 845, Bonifay, FL 32425.Grady J. ChittyMr. Okley Strickland, 60 of Bonifay, died on Wednesday, March 20, 2013, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan. Born Thursday, Oct. 16, 1952 in Bonifay, he was the son of the late John Strickland and the late Pearlie Mills Strickland. He was the husband of Cynthia Strickland Strickland. He was a member of Shady Grove Baptist Church. Surviving are daughters, Tiffany Strickland of Bonifay, and Jessica Strickland of Bonifay; brothers, Clearance Carroll of Panama City, and Oneal Strickland of Panama City; sisters, Mary Ann Berry of Bonifay, Kathleen Keith of Palatka, Ola Grif n of Noma, Owene Leer of Glendale, Teen Steverson of Bonifay and Murley Wood of Bonifay. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, March 23, 2013 at Shady Grove Baptist Church, Bonifay, with the Rev. Eber Overly and the Rev. Johnie Bradshaw of ciating. Interment followed in Shady Grove Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 22, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Okley StricklandMrs. Sybil Ellen Sellers, 76 of Westville, died on Monday, March 18, 2013, at Wiregrass Rehabilitation Center & Nursing Home in Geneva, Ala. Born Friday, May 22, 1936 in Geneva County, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Bascom Stafford and the late Flossie Carroll Stafford. She was preceded in death by one daughter, Earnestine Carnley and ve brothers, Carroll, Leamon, Ben, Ray and Rex Stafford. Surviving are sons, Hershel Carnley of Bonifay, Bobby Carnley of Panama City, Timothy Sellers of Hartford, Ala., and Tommy Sellers of Black, Ala.; daughters, Geraldine Chambliss of Marianna, Rachel Pickron of Westville and Sonya Gibson of Bonifay; brothers, George Stafford of Dothan, Ala., and Mitchell Stafford of Birmingham, Ala.; 17 grand children and 27 great grand children. A Funeral service was held at 1 p.m., on Thursday, March 21, 2013 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Clois Joiner and the Rev. Mitchell Johnson of ciating. Interment followed in Bonifay Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Wednesday, March 20, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Sybil E. SellersAlice B. Crutch eld, age 80, passed from this life Thursday morning, March 21, 2013 at her home in Chipley. She was born Nov. 13, 1932 to the late Tom and Mary (Walters) Johns in Wausau. Mrs. Alice is a lifelong resident of the Chipley area and she was a member of the Grace Assembly of God Church of Chipley. She is preceded in death by her husband, Carlos Crutch eld. Survivors include one son, Drexel Owens and wife Stefanie of Panama City Beach; two daughters, Vicki Howard and husband Lowell of Picayune, Miss., and Linda Morris and husband Sonny of Eufaula, Ala.; one brother, Theo Johns of Ocala; three sisters, Elena Dunn and Verdell Carter of Chipley, and Helen Clavier of Niceville; six grandchildren, Mark Odom, Kristen McClure, Jeanine Kolmetz, Heather Wells, Ashley Rester, Brittany Bryant and 11 great grandchildren. Family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, March 22, 2013 for visitation at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Saturday at 10 a.m., March 23, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Dallas Pettis and the Rev. Jim Creel of ciating. Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery, Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.Alice B. Crutch eldBennie Earl (Pete) Davis, age 87 of Graceville, passed away Friday, March 22, 2013 in the CampbelltonGraceville Hospital in Graceville. Mr. Davis was born Dec. 16, 1925 in Graceville to the late Charlie and Bennie (Narramore) Davis. He was a retired mail carrier and farmer. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Hanna Mae (Leavins) Davis. Survivors include ve sons, Sonny Davis and his wife Teresa of Graceville, Randy Davis and girlfriend Linda Brown of Cottondale, Michael Davis and wife Lisa of Graceville, Keith Davis and wife Cory of Graceville and Roger Davis and anc Paige Lamb of Graceville; one sister in law, Gracie Davis of Marianna; 15 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Monday, March 25, 2013, at 11 a.m., in the Poplar Springs Baptist Church, with the Rev. John Howell and Kenneth Adkison of ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to services at the church. Interment followed in Poplar Springs Baptist Church Cemetery. The family suggests in lieu of owers, contributions be made to the Poplar Springs Baptist Church, 1098 Lovewood Road, Graceville, Florida 32440. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Bennie E. DavisMrs. Elaine Lamarr Holmes, 70, of Westville, died on Thursday, March 21, 2013, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Ala. Born Friday, May 8, 1942, in Westville, she was the daughter of the late Talmer Cullifer. She was also preceded by her husband, Ralph Holmes. Surviving is her mother, Vivian Clemmons Motley; sons, Phillip Holmes of Westville, Greg Holmes and wife Lydia of Ponce de Leon, and Paul Holmes and wife Lori of Ponce de Leon; daughters, Sheila Clark and husband Carlos of Geneva, Ala., and Lisa Denning and husband Walter of Ponce De Leon; brother, Ellis Cullifer and wife Marie of Geneva, Ala.; sister, Dorothy Gibson of Westville; eight grandchildren; four great-grand children; and many other relatives and friends. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Monday, March 25, 2013 at Hickory Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Stacey Stafford and the Rev. Stephen Hendrick of ciating. Interment followed in Hickory Hill Cemetery, Westville, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m., on Monday, March 25, 2013, at Hickory Hill Baptist Church, Westville.Elaine L. HolmesGregory Kenneth Clumfoot, 56, of Bonifay, died March 21, 2013. A memorial service will be held, March 27, 2013 at Otter Creek Church in Ponce De Leon with memorialization by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Gregory K. ClumfootJames Harold Jim Grissett passed away March 22, 2013, in Macclenny, after a long battle with diabetes. Jim was born Nov. 8, 1933, in Chipley and was a graduate of Chipley High School. He was the son of Charlie Grissett and Jessie Horne Grissett. After serving in the U.S. Army, he retired from Anchor Class Corporation in Jacksonville. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Odessa Warner Grissett; brother, Larry Grissett and wife Pat of Chipley; nieces, Shawn Reichenbach (Ben) of Middleburg, and Deborah Grim (Jesse) of Macclenny; nephew, Matthew Grissett of Jacksonville and numerous other nieces and nephews.James H. Grissett Obituaries @WCN_HCTFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. : Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. ZG127Swww.kubota.com Plus$0Down&0%A.P.R.Financing for 36 Months*Mow like the pros with Kubotas newest zero-turn mower.Expect Commercial-Grade Transmission Expect Professional Quality Mower Deck Expect 4-Year/300-Hour Factory Warranty** Expect Kubotas Most Affordable Zero-turn Mower Ever and travelers. The First United Methodist Church is next to the Washington County Courthouse at the top of the hill on Highway 90, 1285 Jackson Ave. Come and worship with us each day, the entire community is invited to attend these services. For additional information you can call the church of ce at 638-0010. FUMC Youth Present Stations of the CrossCHIPLEY The Youth Fellowship of Chipley First United Methodist Church will present the Stations of the Cross at 6:30 p.m., on Friday evening March 29. The Stations of the Cross is a visual reenactment of the days leading up to Jesus cruci xion. This performance will be given on the stage of our new John Wesley Building. Chipley United Methodist Church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue, next to the Washington County Courthouse at the top of the hill on Highway 90. The entire community is invited to attend this service. Come and worship with us, you might just nd that missing link in your life. For additional information on this service you may contact, Luke Scho eld, Youth Minister at 638-0010. Northside Baptist Easter PageantPONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church will beholding an Easter Pageant at 7 p.m., March 30. Sunrise ServiceVERNON The Churches of Hinson Crossroads and surrounding area invite everyone to join them at 7 a.m., Easter Morning March 31, for Easter Sunrise Service. It will be at the Hinson Crossroad Fires Department Pavilion. Refreshments will follow the service.Oak Grove Baptist HomecomingPONCE DE LEON Oak Grove Baptist Church would like to cordially invite everyone to Homecoming and Easter services on March 31. Sunday School will begin at 10 a.m. with morning Worship at 11 a.m. Brother Gerald Brazile will bring the message. Lunch will be spread at noon.Launch ConferenceGRACEVILLE Come and experience the expansion of Gods power at Impact Church Launch Conference. This grand event will be held at the Graceville Civic Center at 6 p.m. on March 29th and at 7 p.m., on March 30. Our guest speakers will be Apostle Mark Pickett of Impact Church & Apostle Mark T. Jones, Sr. of Center for Manifestation (Tampa). For more information visit us at www.impactchurch .org or call the Church Of ce at 372-2883. Gap Pond Cemetery Clean UpThe Gap Pond Cemetery Committee will be holding a cemetery clean up day from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. on April 3.Tent Revival of AmericaBONIFAY The Florida Springs RV Resort and Campground will be hosting Todd Allen Herendeens Tent Revival of America on April 6. The church and Veterans organization yard sale will begin at 4 p.m., with a gospel and patriotic music program at 7 p.m. food and soft drinks will be available. The yard sale and tent program are free to everyone. For more information or to reserve camping spots call 258-3110. FAITH from page B4 Community CALENDARWashington County Libraries to be closedWASHINGTON COUNTY All Washington County Public Library branches will be closed on Good Friday March 29. All branches will reopen for regular hours on April 1.The Early Learning Coalition hosts VPK RegistrationCHIPLEY The Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida will be holding Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) registration for families in Holmes and Washington counties at their of ce from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Friday, April 5. The coalition of ce is located at 680 2nd Street, Chipley, in the Old Chipley High School building. To be eligible for VPK, children must turn four on or before Sept. 1, and they must live in Florida. When enrolling for VPK, parents will need to bring proof of childs age and proof of Florida residency. Typical examples for each are: for proof of age a Birth Certi cate, Passport or Military ID For proof of residency Drivers License, Utility Bill (must show street address), Residential rental agreement, FL Vehicle Registration Card, or pay stub. The VPK program is a great way to help prepare children to be successful in school and in life, said Lynne Eldridge, Executive Director for the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida. Parents have many different quality programs to choose from when looking to enroll their child in VPK. To nd out more information about VPK or to nd an enrollment in your area call 1-866-269-3022 or visit www. elcnwf.org Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611REOPENED Blanchette & Associates Inc.CONCRETE MASONRY HEAVY GAUGE METALDESIGN & BUILD CONSULTANTS LAND DEVELOPMENTJoe Blanchette850 532-2178gjblanchette@gmail.comCGC#1510933 Professional Engineer#74634SAFE ROOMS Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only$18.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 D&GPainting & Remodeling(850) 547-3805All types of Roo ng, Painting and Remodeling Call Gene (850) 849-0736 or Dwayne (850) 849-7982License #RC0067336 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672010CA000113XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. FRANK A. YADACK, JR.; JO YADACK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure datedFeb 8, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672010CA000113XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and FRANK A. YADACK, JR.; JO YADACK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of _April 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: ONE TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SECTION CORNER WHICH IS COMMON TO SECTIONS 26, 27, 34 AND 35, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST WHICH IS MARKED BY AN OLD IRON AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1898.14 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 748.76 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE 46 MINUTES EAST, 753.68 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 278 (100 RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST, 761.44 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 278; THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 46 MINUTES WEST, 596.10 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT AND BEING IN THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 27 TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013. LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 CITY OF CHIPLEY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO CITY CODE The Chipley City Council will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING regarding adoption of the following ordinance on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, at 6:00 p.m., at the City Hall Council Chambers, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 924 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 20, ENTITLED ZONING, AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Adoption of this ordinance will amend the Historical Commercial Land Use District to use the upstairs in the downtown buildings for residential purposes. All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to provide written and/or verbal comments on the matter under consideration. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of disability or physical impairments should contact the City at (850) 638-6350, 48 hours prior to the hearing. For further information pertaining to the proposed ordinance, contact Dan Miner, City Administrator. As published in the Washington County News March 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672011CA000491XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B. VAN WILPE; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated Feb 8_, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672011CA000491XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is Plaintiff and JAMES B. VAN WILPE; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of April,2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 86, CHIPLEY HEIGHTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CHIPLEY IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 86, CHIPLEY HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013 LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 672012CA000260XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANTONIO B. DAVIS; WENDY A. DAVIS; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated FEB 8_, 2013, and entered in Case No. 672012CA000260XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Washington County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and ANTONIO B. DAVIS; WENDY A. DAVIS; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the steps of the Washington County Courthouse Building, 1293 West Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of April ,2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S00E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 2, 820.00 FEET: THENCE S89E, 240 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S89E 200 FEET; THENCE S00E, 100 FEET; THENCE; N89W, 200 FEET TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF A 40 FOOT ROAD; THENCE N00W ALONG SAID EAST R/W LINE 100.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2007 DESTINY INDUSTRIES DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON, VIN NUMBERS DlSH02637GAA AND DlSH02637GAB, TITLE NUMBERS 99713672 AND 99713723. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Chipley, Florida, on Feb 8, 2013 LINDA HAYES COOK As Clerk, Circuit Court By: K McDaniel As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF EVANS CRAIG ALLEN, JR. File No.: 13-11-CP NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Evans Craig Allen, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was January 23, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1293 Jackson Ave, Suite 100, Chipley, Florida 32428. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 20, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Julie Ann Sombathy Attorney for Rosalind Raley Allen Florida Bar Number 0009740 Isler & Sombathy, P.A. P.O. Box 430 434 Magnolia Avenue(Zip: 32401) Panama City, Florida 32402-0430 Telephone:(850) 769-5532 Fax:(850) 785-5852 E-Mail: Julie.Sombathy.Court@g mail.com Secondary E-Mail: JASAssistant1@gmail.co m Personal Representative: Rosalind Raley Allen 144 Summer Breeze Road Panama City Beach, Florida 32413 As published in the Washington County News March 20, 27, 2013 Notice to Professional Consultants Seventh Street Sidewalks FPID No. 425739-2-38-01 City of Chipley, Florida The City of Chipley, Florida anticipates seeking professional consultant services for the design of sidewalk along the west side of Seventh Street from CR 273 (South Boulevard) to U.S. 90 located in Chipley, Florida. The project length is approximately .511 miles. Consideration will be given to only those firms that are qualified pursuant to law and that have been prequalified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) in accordance with Rule Chapter 14-75, Florida Administrative Code to perform the indicated type(s) of work. Work Types: 3.1-Minor Highway Design Response Deadline: April 19, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. local time Selection Date: April 26, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. local time City Council ApprovalMay 7, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. local time CONSULTANT ELIGIBILITY: It is a basic tenet of the Citys contracting program that contracts are procured in a fair, open, and competitive manner. By submitting a Letter of Response, the Consultant certifies that they are in compliance with FDOT Directive No. 375-030-006. This directive is available on FDOTs Web Site. In addition to the restrictions identified in Directive No. 375-030-006, please be advised of the following prohibition: A consultant firm or its affiliate who was the Designer or Engineer of Record is precluded from bidding on the same project as the construction contractor, or as a member of the construction contractors team (subcontractor). FEDERAL DEBARMENT: By submitting a Letter of Response, the consultant certifies that no principal (which includes officers, directors, or executives) is presently suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible or voluntarily excluded from participation on this transaction by any Federal Department or Agency. SELECTION PROCEDURE: This project is covered by the selection process detailed in the Rule Chapter 14-75, Florida Administrative Code. Selection will be made directly from Letters of Response for this project. After ranking of the consultants, the contract fee will be negotiated in accordance with Section 287.055, Florida Statutes. Note: The final selection meeting date and time is provided in this advertisement. Any other meetings will be noticed on the City of Chipley Web Site. All public meetings will be held in the Council Chambers located in the Chipley City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida 32428. Changes to meeting dates and times will be updated on the City of Chipley Web Site. In order to ensure a fair, competitive, and open process, once a project is advertised for Letters of Response or Letters of Qualification, all communications between interested firms and the City must be directed to Mr. Dan Miner, City Administrator, 850-638-6350. RESPONSE PROCEDURE: Qualified consultants are encouraged to submit a Letter of Response, for each project in which they are interested, to the City Clerk, at 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida by the response deadline. Selection will be made directly from Letters of Responsewhich are limited to five pages for this project. Letters of Response should at a minimum, include the following information: a. Project Name/FDOT Financial Management Number b. Consultants name and address c. Proposed responsible office for consultant d. Contact person, phone number and Internet Email Address e. Statement regarding prequalification of consultant or proposed subconsultants in advertised type of work f. Proposed key personnel and their proposed roles (do not include resumes) g.Subconsultant(s) that may be used for the project h. Indication as to whether the prime firm and/or subconsultants are disadvantaged business enterprises (DBE) i. Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion j. Certification Regarding Lobbying k. Truth in Negotiation Certification l. DBE Participation Statement m. Bid Opportunity List ADVERTISEMENT DATES: March 23, 2013, March 27, 2013, RESPONSE DEADLINE: April 19, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. local time FINAL SELECTION: April 26, 2013 2:00 p.m. local time -City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL: May 7, 2013 6:00 p.m. local time City Hall, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL Note: Any changes to these dates will be posted on the C ity of Chipley Web Site at www .cityofchipley .com As published in the W ashington County News March 23, 27, 2013 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 A Childless Married Couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Lets help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 Abalauction.comWakulla County, Crawfordville, Fl 3br 2ba split plan. Online bidding now through April 3, (850)510-2501 ab2387 broker For Sale Leather Sectional Sofa burgundy in color.$150.00. Small tear in the pillow in left corner. Call 850-535-9125between 9am-8pm LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used Org. $3,000, sacrifice $975.CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. Flea Across Florida. 272 mile yard sale April 12-14. Three days through Caryville, Florida. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works! Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 This position includes developing, presenting and closing sales for new and existing customers. Advertising solutions which include print and digital are related to business customer needs that span all categories of small to medium local businesses. Presentations are made via in-person sales calls.We are seeking strong sales minded individuals who are able to manage multiple tasks, prospect for new business & offer excellent customer service.Certi cation: Valid drivers licenseFind out why our team loves their job. Is it the exciting environment, the revenue rewards, the great bene ts, or all of the above? The Halifax Media Group is adding talented and motivated multi-media sales professionals to our advertising team.Please submit resume & cover letter to:lgrimes@pcnh.com or contact Lorraine Grimes at 850.747.5002 for more informationHalifax Media Group encourages applications from those with diverse backgrounds. Halifax Media Group is a DRUG-FREE environment. Accounting/FinanceManager of Accounting and FinanceGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of Manager of Accounting and Finance at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, March 29, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34245217 Text FL45217 to 56654 Clerical Full time position, 8-5, M-F in Chipley, Contact One Stop Career Center for more info 850-638-6089 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Golf Cart Mechanic Minimum 3 years experience. Growing company located in Defuniak Springs. Long-term opportunity. Fax resume (850)622-2004. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Help Wanted: Cleaning/cooking position available at Bonifay and Vernon facility working with Limited Mental Health residents. Pay starts at $8.75 an hour with a pay raise in six months. Duties entail daily cleaning, assisting with ADLs, medication, etc. Must be able to pass background screening and have reliable transportation. Call (850)547-3708 or 535-1160 for more info. Preschool needs loving, dependable person to teach, play and love our 2 year olds. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout USNo forced dispatch: (800) 501-3783 www.mamo transportation.com Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Community Services Specialist for the Chipley Outreach office. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist low income families in need of assistance with Services Programs and coordinate with other social service agencies. QUALIFICATIONS : Two year degree and one year work experience serving the low-income or elderly; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have Current drivers license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech @ 547-3689 or visit www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com. Applications are available at any Tri-County Community Council office and must be submitted by Apr 01 @ 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING! Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain.edu No computer Experience Needed! Job placement Assistance HS Diploma/GED a Must Start Immediately! 1-888-872-4677 Driver Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-(888) 926-7884 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline. com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 1800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BAUpdated House. in country. East of McDonalds. Stove, DW, fridge, water, septic & yard care include. App Required. $600/month plus $600 deposit. 850-638-4228. Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 For Rent 2BR/1BA Sunny Hills area. Very nice, good area. $ 575/ mth. Deposit & references required. 850-258-3874 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. on pond! $500 month, New floors. 856-793-8429 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 ALSO FOR RENT 3BR/1BA, AC Bonifay, FL. $550.00 rent/ $550.00 Deposit. No pets. 638-7601 House for rent, lease or sell. 3 Bedroom. 714 Nebraska Ave., Bonifay, Fl. (850)428-6512, (850)956-2073. Houses For Sale/ Owner Financing. 3bd houses & apartments for rent. Furnished affiency apartments for rent. Call Martha 850-547-2531 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley on Orange Hill Rd. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Bonifay Area: Assortment of Mobile Homes & RVs. Also RV spaces for rent. Quiet location. 5 minutes from shopping. (850)849-3911. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $300/mth 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month.. Ponce de Leon area (850)226-4656. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home For Rent in Bonifay and Chipley. Water, sewer included. Rental references required. Call 638-2999 Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70s or you purchase as is for lower 50s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Acreage 1511 Hwy 177, P.O. Box 1181 Bonifay. (850)547-2646 Saturday 7-8 a.m. BANKREPOSSESSION SMITH LAKE, ALABAMA. Prime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120k per lot, over $3million on 34 lots, makes possible a $200k + homesite for 25 cents on the dollar. Level to water, no stairs. Build at waters edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appointment. Once in a lifetime opportunity. Call (877)448-6816. By owner 19 wooded acres 3 miles north of Bonifay with 660 frontage on Hwy 79. $3,500 per acre. Restricted to housing. Call Richard-(850) 547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2006 FEMA Trailer. 33ft w/ slide out. All electric. $5000.00 OBO. 548-4715 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473. Land HomesExpress.com For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500. For more information call 638-4492 C-175 Aircarft, Low airframe Hrs, IFR equiped. In annual, ready to go. Will sell or trade for motorhome, equal value, $25,000; 850-849-6842.

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HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS HORIZONS 2013 2013 2013 Washington County News / Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com Both Holmes and Washington Counties are ready for an exciting year of growth in 2013. Washington County is looking forward to several exciting developments, including a new Kate M. Smith Elementary School and a new Dollar General store, while the long-term Rhythm Project seems to have stalled out. In Holmes County, community leaders are working on a strategic plan for economic development and are seeking a director for the Holmes County Development Commission. Holmes County This year the Holmes County Development Commission devised, with the leadership of Strategic Planning Consultant Dr. David L. Goetsch, a Strategic Plan for Holmes County. Workshops to facilitate the effort were led by Dr. Goetsch. Attending the workand county management, board members, school board members, local business leaders and members of the public. The mission statement devised for the county reads: The mission of the Holmes County Development Commission is to focus them on retaining and creating jobs, improving the local economy, and enhancing the quality of life throughout the community. Dr. Goetsch assisted the work groups opment would be desired for the county, what the county has to offer, and values the county wishes to sustain during the development. Holmes County is also currently in search of a new Executive Director for the Holmes County Development Commission. These things take time, said Julia Bullington with the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce. You dont want just anyone in that position. If the person does what theyre suppose to it could change the history of Holmes County. Another positive aspect coming to Holmes County is the expanding of State Road 79 from a two-lane to a four-lane, said Bullington. open up so many possibilities for Holmes County to grow, she said. Holmes County is at an advantage because theres low land here available for purchase and to expand on. This may even lead to transfer stations in the area. Holmes County, along with Washington County, will also continue to participate in the RiverWay South Apalachicola Choctawhatchee project, a multi-county consortium which seeks to bring tourism into the rural counties of Florida. The project is a public/private partnership that encourages sustainable economic development through the preservation and promotion of the natural, cultural and historical resources of the Apalachicola and Choctawhatchee River basins. Holmes Creek provides one of the most and mollusks in the Choctawhatchee River basin, according to the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website. springs do indeed feed into Holmes Creek, including Burn-out Spring, Cypress Spring and Becton Spring. Washington County Washington County voters approval of slot machines in January 2012 probably wont make any difference for Ebro Greyhound Park this year, as far as adding slot machines to the facility goes. County residents voted by a nearly 15 percent margin to have 2,000 slot machines installed at Ebro Greyhound Park, but an opinion issued by Attorney General Pam Bondi resulted in a standstill. In 2012, Bondi ruled that pari-mutuel facilities in Florida outside of MiamiDade and Broward counties were not permitted to have slot machines. However, Brevard and Gadsden counties voted to have slots at their local pari-mutuel facilities. Mark Hess, co-owner of Ebro Greyhound Park, said he believed it should be a matter of what the voters want. Its our desire to make sure Washington County voters voices have been heard and they deserve their voices to be heard in Tallahassee, Hess said. R-Niceville, said this January the Gaming Committee he created will focus on information gathering, not drafting comprehensive legislation this session. Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, will use studying how it impacts communities economically and socially. He also wants the public to weigh in at hearings around the state. down should come in 2014, likely the same year the Legislature will renegotiate the Seminole Compact, which governs gambling on Seminole territory. Likewise, the long-coming Rhythm Project seems to have come to a stand still. County Senior Planner Mike until the economy improves. Rhythm is an age-restricted community planned for Washington County for residents 55 and older with 3,200 dwelling units and promand retail for the communitys immediate needs. The 1,883 acre parcel purchased in 2006 for about $3,700 an acre and currently on the tax rolls at $1,000 an acre is located in the southeastern corner of the county where Jackson, Bay and Washington counties join along County Line Road. One project that is moving forward is the new 12,480-square-foot Dollar General store planned for Chipley, to be located on Highway 90. The new store, once complete, will tale the place of the Dollar General store currently located in downtown Chipley. The new store will be a bigger Dollar General store and will feature more groceries and have up to 50 coolers, said Tom Hodges, who was representing Dollar General at the meeting. The city council has approved the projects development order so construction can proceed. The City Council is also seeking a consultant to work with the city to seek grants to upgrade the citys water system, as well as extend water service south of Interstate 10. Extending water service south of the interstate will allow more development along the interstate. The Washington County School Board also approved a site for the new Kate M. Smith Elementary School, which will allow Superintendent Joe Taylor to pursue funding for the new school. This is a long-term project, but we have to get the process started, Taylor said in January. Currently there are two Special Facilities projects in line ahead of Washington County School District which have been approved by the state for funding a $49 million and a $36 million project. If we can get approved, and if no other schools are out there planning a project, we could be number three in line, Taylor said. Taylor said the elementary school is projected to cost about $20 million.Holmes, Washington Counties look forward to exciting year

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Special to HorizonsIn a world of big-bank bailouts, First Federal Bank of Florida stands out as one of the few strong, stable and community-based banks headquartered in Florida. Founded in 1962 in a small town in North Florida, First Federals hometown values have remained consistent. Being local matters and most all of the banks employees are from the communities in which they work. They all strongly believe in supporting these communities. Countless volunteer hours are logged and thousands of dollars are donated by employees and the bank to support and grow these communities. First Federal also takes pride in being able to provide local decisions so their customers can take care of nancial matters quickly. First Federal of cers take time to know their customer and provide them with customized options for their nancial needs. First Federal offers a wide range of products and services to help their consumer and commercial customers save time, make money and access their banking need conveniently. For more information about First Federals checking and savings accounts, mobile banking and mobile eDeposit or other great products visit your nearest location. C M S. () BANKINGningINVESTMENT with us is an in youBrf N. Wnt S. () b-b M b G S. () -bb For over 50 years First Federal has been committed to building vibrant communities through our support of education, sports, the arts and improving the quality of life for all. www.sb.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013C2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News HorizonsSpecial to HorizonsGulf Power Co.s beginnings go back 88 years. It was Feb. 10, 1925, through the purchase of the Pensacola Electric Co. by Southeastern Power and Light Co., that Gulf Power eventually would be formed. Southeastern was a holding company that operated electric, gas and street railway systems in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi. Later that year, on Oct. 29, Gulf Power Co. was organized as a Southeastern subsidiary. In 1926, Gulf Power Co. became an actual operating public utility as it acquired the Chipley Light and Power Co. Later that year, the Pensacola Electric Co., which had been rescued from receivership by the holding company, was merged into Gulf Power. From its beginnings until 1940, Gulf Power continued to acquire electric systems, including those in Bonifay, Vernon, Graceville, Caryville, Millville, St. Andrew and Panama City among others. Early generation of electricity came from at least 20 scattered, isolated and individually operating units. These generators had been designed to supply power for ice plants, lumber yards and electric transit systems and were not known for their reliability. Despite the depressed economic condition of Northwest Florida, a move toward modernization was virtually forced upon Gulf Power. The hurricane of Sept. 6, 1926, with 120-mph winds, ripped out almost 4,000 rotting power poles. To make matters worse, the storm surge of 9 feet above normal put out the res in the old downtown Pensacola generating plant. More than 600 workers from sister companies restored service with a more modern system in a mere 65 days. By years end, an 110,000-volt transmission line had been erected from the Alabama/ Florida line on the north, into Pensacola. The old Allis-Chalmers steam turbine-generator was placed on standby, ending the era of local power generation. Gulf Power relied on imported energy for the next 39 years, even as customer numbers rose from the 7,366 inherited in 1926, to more than 40,000 in the mid1940s. Finally, in 1945, after years of delay brought about by war shortages, the rst unit at the Crist Steam Plant in Pensacola went online. The 22-megawatt unit enabled the company to take its rst giant step toward generating self-suf ciency. During the next 30 years, demand continues to grow as large companies began to locate in Northwest Florida. Plant Crist added a third generating unit, while another plant was built in Sneads, called Plant Scholz. In 1965, Plant Smith came online near Panama City to handle the growing demand there. In the 1970s, Plant Crist added a seventh unit. Gulf Power launched Good Cents Home Program, which now is a nationally renowned project called Earth Cents Select. To handle local customers, ofces were built in places such as Graceville, Bonifay and Chipley during the 1980s, allowing customers a place to come pay their bill and request services. Hurricanes have always been a part of living on Northwest Florida, but Hurricane Ivan in 2004 will be remembered as the one that affected Gulf Power the most. More than 300,000 customers lost power. Thousands of out-ofstate workers arrived to assist and it took just 13 days to restore power to those who could receive electricity a testament to all the hard work of Gulf Power employees and other utilities. Gulf Power continues to look for ways to improve the environment and come up with alternative means of fuels. A scrubber system to reduce emissions was installed on Plant Crist in 2010. The company built a Land ll Gas-to-Energy Facility at the Perdido Land ll in Escambia County. Taking the methane gas from the land ll and converting it to energy, Gulf Power produces enough electricity to power 900 homes. From its early beginnings, Gulf Power has grown to serve more than 430,000 customers across the Florida Panhandle. As during the early years, the company prides itself on rates that are below the national average. Headquartered in Pensacola, Gulf Power continues to grow and is an active participant in the economic development arena, as well as community involvement endeavors. First Federal a strong, stable, community-based bank Gulf Power has long history of lighting regionSPECIAL TO HORIZONSAs during the early years, Gulf Power prides itself on rates that are below the national average.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 HorizonsWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C3Holmes schools look forward to great yearBy EDDIE DIXON Superintendent of Schools Welcome to the Holmes County School District. The 2013-14 school year will provide students exciting opportunities to excel academically, athletically and artistically. Holmes County has shown exceptional performance in each of its schools. Our teachers, support staff, school a dministrators and dis trict administrators strive to support our students so they can excel in every aspect of their academic career. Holmes County Schools work hard to incorporate and focus all of its resources to help each student achieve their highest potential. Our schools have worked diligently to incorporate new state and federal requirements. Teachers have embraced the new teacher evaluation system and common core curriculum to improve their capacity to instruct all students and improvement their achievement levels. Holmes County School District will continue to support teachers by providing professional development to enhance instruction in the classroom. We are vigorously implementing Common Core Standards in the classroom to support improved instruction and achievement. Data analysis will be used to review student learning gains and to drive instruction to support student success. Holmes County also provides a variety of instructional models to help all students attain success. Holmes County Schools celebrate and encourage parents to be actively involved in their childs education. Our goal is to improve the lives of students by fostering good relationships between students, parents, and educators. Working together we can make a difference in the lives of Holmes County children. I look forward to next year because, its always a great day in Holmes County Schools. EDDIE DIXON Greyhound racing resumes May 24Special to HorizonsEbro Greyhound Park is about to begin its 59th season when racing resumes May 24. The origin of the greyhound is deeply rooted in ancient history. Murals and paintings of the dogs strikingly similar to todays greyhound existed more than 4,000 years ago. From the beginning, the greyhound was held in high regard as evidenced by pictures etched on the walls of tombs of ancient Egyptians. Pharaohs rated them rst among animals, both pets and humans. The ancient Egyptians so admired the physical attributes and speed of the greyhound that it was the only dog permitted to share their tents and ride atop their camels. In early Arabian culture, the birth of a greyhound ranked second in importance only to the birth of a son. In Persia, Rome and Greece, the greyhound enjoyed similar stature and is the only canine mentioned in the Holy Scripture (Proverbs 30:29-31). It is documented that the greyhound arrived in England more than 3,500 years ago. Queen Elizabeth I initiated the rst formal rules of greyhound coursing around the 16th century, introducing the Sport of Queens. In the late 1800s, the greyhound was imported to American and coursing events soon followed. Greyhound racing, as we know it today, began about 1912 when Owen Patrick Smith invented the mechanical lure, making racing around a circular track possible. The rst circular track opened in 1919 in Emeryville, Calif., in the San Francisco Bay area, paving the way for the development of the greyhound racing industry in America. Pari-mutuel wagering was legalized in 1931 when Florida passed legislation allowing for both greyhound and horse racing. The newly established Racing Commission immediately granted operation permits for greyhound tracks, including Palm Beach Kennel Club, which opened in 1932. History has proven that the greyhound is an animal born to run. Originally a hunting dog because of its speed, a greyhound will chase anything that moves. To run is the fulllment of the greyhounds basic interest. They run for their own benet and for the benet and enjoyment of others. Greyhounds by nature are gentle and always have had a strong relationship with humans. The breeding and training of greyhounds is an extension of the human/animal relationship established thousands of years ago. Since 1955, Ebro has brought fun for the whole family with exciting Greyhound Racing. Running from May to September and racing rain or shine, Greyhound Racing at Ebro is Your Best Bet! First opened in 1955, Ebro Greyhound Park, on State Road 79 just north of State 20, is Washington Countys only gaming facility and one of its largest private employers. The pari-mutuel track is locally owned and operated. Ebro Greyhound Park features greyhound racing and card games. For more than 56 years, Ebro Greyhound Park has played a major role in building our economy, employing county residents and sharing its success with our community. With a work force of 200 or more and total local spending of $5 million annually, the owners and operators consider it a privilege to provide jobs here and do business locally. Since opening, Ebro Greyhound Park has employed several thousand Washington County residents. There are few places in North Florida that offer it all, and your entertainment dollar goes further at Ebro than anywhere else in the area. Then theres Ebros famous Poker Room, where casual players have become legends over the years winning huge amounts of money simply by making the decision to play. Huge jackpots worth thousands of dollars are on offer all the time, and someone has to win them. Why cant it be you? Ebro Greyhound Park & Poker Room Poker Room is open seven Days a week. The poker room rarely sleeps and is open from 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Sunday to Thursday, and it is open 24 hours each Friday and Saturday. Take part in the No-Limit Holdem tournaments every day including the Midnight Madness events on Saturdays. Then theres the grand daddy of all tournaments, the Emerald Coast Championship during the second half of the year, where you get to watch and rub shoulders with some of the biggest names in the sport. Friendly staff that is eager to serve you and make sure you have everything you need while dueling with others makes for an experience youll never forget.

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Special to HorizonsIs there someone in your community who goes above and beyond the call of duty to volunteer? Someone who truly makes a difference? West Florida Electric Cooperative will begin accepting nominations for a new community recognition program called The Power of One beginning this month. Nominees will be accepted from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties during each quarter of the year. Every four months, one winner will be chosen from each county by a selection committee. These winners will receive recognition for their volunteer service as well as a $250 donation which will be made in their honor to the charitable organization of their choice (must be a 501-C3 organization). WFEC will accept nominations in any district ofce. Ask a member services representative for a nomination form, complete it and place it into the nomination box in that of ce. Nomination forms also will be accepted at www. west orida.coop. Nominees must be members of West Florida Electric Cooperative in good standing, to be determined by the selection committee. Nominees should be considered good citizens and be directly or indirectly involved in activities that bene t the community or persons within the community by utilizing their time, efforts or other resources. Individuals may be nominated more than once, but can only be selected to receive the award once within a three-year period. Nominations that are not selected may be carried over to the following quarter(s) for consideration. Those making nominations might or might not be recognized for doing so. Nominations will be kept anonymous upon request. Multiple nominations will be accepted. At least one reference other than the nominator will be required to validate the nomination. Nominees may not be West Florida Electric employees, board members or immediate family. Nominees must be 21 or older. The award selection committee will be made up of representatives, chosen by the cooperative, from each district of the service area. A minimum of four representatives will serve on this committee. Representatives from each county are preferred, but not required. After the selection committee has reviewed all nominations and veri ed that requirements are met, quali ed nominees will be considered and decided upon based on the following: Time and resources utilized or donated by the nominee The value of the time and resources utilized or donated How the community was impacted by the nominees efforts The number of people in the community that were impacted through their efforts The overall good or goodwill that was accomplished through their efforts The overall sacri ce and/or commitment made For more information about the Power of One awards, visit www.westorida.coop or ask a member services representative on your next trip into the of ce. Wednesday, March 27, 2013C4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News HorizonsSpecial to HorizonsAgriculture is not only an important industry for Washington and Holmes counties, but for the state of Florida as a whole. Agriculture provides almost everything we eat, use and wear on a daily basis, but too few people appreciate this contribution to our economy and our way of life. Each American farmer feeds more than 144 people, a dramatic increase from the average of 25 people per farmer that was the case in the 1960s. In Washington County, agriculture and related industries account for 1,587 jobs and $59 million in revenue and contribute 12.6 percent to the gross regional product. In Holmes County, agriculture and related industries provide 1,950 jobs and $58 million in revenue and contribute 17.3 percent to the gross regional product. Floridas farmers produce 280 commodities, employ more than half a million people, generate more than $103 billion in annual economic impact and provide tax surpluses. According to the state Department of Agriculture, Florida is the nations top producer of citrus, sugar cane, winter vegetables, ornamental plants and sod, and agriculture consistently ranks second only to tourism in supporting the Florida economy, Floridas farmers also are caretakers of the states richly diverse environment. Farmers have been leaders in the use of reclaimed water and developing best management practices to improve water quality, minimize impacts and care for the land while producing an abundance of safe, affordable food and other products that make our lives more enjoyable. The Agriculture Institute of Florida is an organization of communications professionals, individual farms and producers from a diverse blend of agricultural associations, commodity producers and ag-interested businesses working together to promote the value of Florida agriculture and raise media and consumer awareness of the bene ts it provides.Florida agricultural overviewFloridas 47,500 commercial farms, utilizing 9.25 million acres, continue to produce a wide variety of safe and dependable food products. From the citrus groves and the nurseries in central and southern Florida, to the vegetables in various regions around the State, to the cattle and calves throughout the State, these farms provide Florida with a large and stable economic base. In 2011 Florida ranked: First in the U.S. in the value of production of oranges and grapefruit. First in value of production of fresh market snap beans, cucumbers for fresh market, bell peppers, squash, sweet corn, fresh-market tomatoes and watermelons. Second in value of production of cucumbers for pickles, strawberries, tangerines and sugarcane for sugar and seed. Fourth in value of production of honey. In 2011, in terms of total value of production, Florida accounted for: 65 percent of the total U.S. value for grapefruit ($181 million) 67 percent of the total U.S. value for oranges ($1.3 billion) 43 percent of the total U.S. value for sugarcane for sugar and seed ($493 million) 36 percent of the total U.S. value for bell peppers ($248 million) 44 percent of the total U.S. value for fresh market tomatoes ($565 million) 43 percent of the total U.S. value for snap beans ($131 million) 33 percent of the total U.S. value for squash ($95 million) 23 percent of the total U.S. value for sweet corn ($174 million) 28 percent of the total U.S. value for cucumbers for fresh market ($52 million) 21 percent of the total U.S. value for watermelons ($112 million) 21 percent of the total U.S. value for tangerines ($65 million) Florida citrus growers in 2010-2011 produced 140.3 million boxes of oranges (96 percent of which were used for orange juice) and 19.8 million boxes of grapefruit (58 percent of which were used for grapefruit juice). Fruit sales exceeded $1.9 billion. Florida growers harvested vegetables for fresh market from 185,000 acres in 2011. The value of vegetable crops exceeded $1.5 billion. Florida ranks second to California in the total value of fresh market vegetable production. Livestock and products in 2010 produced cash receipts of $1.3 billion. Poultry farms generated $306 million in sales, with $151 million coming from broilers and $151 million coming from eggs. On Jan. 1, 2012, there were 1.71 million head of cattle on farms and ranches in Florida, including 940,000 head of beef cows and 120,000 head of milk cows. Florida ranked 13th in the number of chickens on farms in 2011. Floridas poultry farmers maintained an average of 9.6 million layers in 2011 (producing 2.7 billion eggs) and produced 61.8 million broilers. The total cash receipts for nursery and greenhouse products in Florida were just over $1.7 billion in 2010. The Economic Research Service, USDA, reported receipts from Florida agricultural products in 2010 amounted to $7.81 billion. This is an increase of $6.40 million from 2009. Cash receipts from all crops were $6.46 billion, an increase of $3.97 million from 2009. All crops accounted for 82.7 percent of total cash receipts. As in previous years, the leading crop commodities were oranges (16.0 percent of all cash receipts), greenhouse and nursery (22.4 percent), tomatoes (8.1 percent), and sugarcane (7.0 percent). The leading livestock commodities were cattle and calves (6.4 percent of all cash receipts), dairy products (5.6 percent), and poultry and eggs (3.9 percent).Farms and land in farmsFlorida had 47,500 commercial farms in 2011, using a total of 9,250,000 acres. There were 5,500 farms with sales exceeding $100,000. The average farm size was 195 acres. Florida ranks 19th among all states in number of farms and tied at 30th in land in farms.2010-2011 season citrus highlightsU.S. AND FLORIDA PRODUCTION Florida provides 63 percent of citrus crops. Citrus utilized production for the 2010-11 season in the United States totaled 11.7 million tons, up 7 percent from the 2009-10 season. Florida accounted for 63 percent of the total United States citrus production with 7.4 million tons of citrus in the 2010-2011 season, California totaled 33 percent, and Texas and Arizona produced the remaining 4 percent. Floridas total 2010-2011 citrus utilization of 165.9 million boxes increased 4 percent from the previous season. The other three states also had increases in citrus production California, 11 percent; Texas, 14 percent; and Arizona, 15 percent. Floridas all orange production increased 5 percent to 140.3 million boxes. Navel production was 2.65 million boxes, up 15 percent from last season. Grapefruit utilization in Florida, at 19.8 million boxes, was down 3 percent from the 20092010 seasons utilization. All tangerine production at 4.65 million boxes was up 4 percent from the previous seasons 4.45 million boxes. Utilization of tangelos was up 28 percent at 1.15 million boxes. TREE INVENTORY Results of the annual commercial citrus inventory show total citrus acreage is 541,328, down more than 2 percent from the last survey. Compared to the previous inventory, the net decrease of 12,709 acres is less with a lower gross loss (21,769) and fewer new plantings (9,060). Of the 30 counties included in the survey, 23 recorded decreases in acreage, 5 showed increases, and 2 are unchanged. Martin County, down 4,567 acres, has suffered the greatest loss for three straight years and has been declining since 1994. DeSoto County has recorded gains in the last 4 surveys and this years gain of 739 is the most of any county. Polk remains the leader in acreage with 82,577. Orange acreage declined for the seventh consecutive survey to 473,086, the lowest since the record low of 466,252 tallied in the 1986 inventory. Grapefruit acreage fell to a new low of 48,990, representing only 55 percent of the pre-hurricanes gure while specialty acreage continued to decline to a record low of 19,252. Total citrus trees are down over 2 percent from 72,164,800 in 2010 to 70,640,700 in 2011. Polk is the new leader with nearly 9.9 million trees, followed closely by Hendry with 9.7 million, DeSoto with 8.4 million, and Highlands with 8.0 million trees. Of the total, oranges comprise over 88 percent; grapefruit, almost 8 percent; and the remainder, including specialty and other citrus, at 4 percent. Since 2010, bearing trees decreased nearly 3 percent to 65,908,700 while non-bearing trees increased by almost 5 percent to 4,732,000. Information from the Florida Department of Agriculture 2012 report Florida Agriculture By The Numbers. Nominate someone who shows Power of One Florida farmers are agricultural leaders

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Chipley Walmart store 2114 has been newly remodeled, re-stocked and re-energized all to make your shopping experience more convenient and easy. Chipley Walmart store 2114 has been newly remodeled, Walmart makes shopping fun!New self-check-outs get you in and out quicker. Shelving is better organized to make nding what you need easier. New technology helps us better serve you.We still have great selection and low prices! Check-us out!Youre invited to our remodeling grand opening April 5! Over60 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 HorizonsWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C5Special to HorizonsCHIPLEY For almost 19 years, Walmart Supercenter in Chipley has been providing a complete shopping experience to Washington County residents. On April 5, the store will hold its grand re-opening, celebrating its newly remodeled interior, including new self-checkout lanes. People were afraid some people would lose their jobs, but that is not happening. In fact, were hiring, Store Manager Joy Davis said. Along with a new look, the store also is receiving new technology and a complete system upgrade, Davis said. There has been a great response from the public to the remodeling, she added. The 146,397-square-foot store opened in 1994, and the world-famous discount retailer offers groceries, pharmacy, vision center, tire and lube express, garden center, money center and jewelry. At the Chipley Walmart, a number of associates have been working with the store since it opened in 1994, Davis said. We have 12 associates who were there when the store rst opened, Davis said. Theyre great people. The Garden Center also held its spring opening on March 15, with employees celebrating the reopening. The Walmart Garden Center has everything you need for your outdoor projects, Davis said.Special to HorizonsTrawick Construction Co. is an established communications construction rm with an unparalleled reputation for high quality outside plant construction at competitive prices. The rm was established in 1946 to provide outside plant construction services to the communications industry and has been in continuous operation ever since. The rm continues to focus upon the communications industry and has extensive experience with all of the latest technologies, including ber optics as well as a comprehensive background in outside plant construction techniques, including directional boring. Trawick offers buried construction utilizing cable plows (30 to 240 hp), Trenching machines, backhoes and excavators. Trawick also offers aerial services, and with 50 years of cable placement, Trawick has had the opportunity to acquire skills in a variety of placement methods, including horizontal and directional boring, bridge attachments and sub aqueous crossings. The rm has a history of successfully adapting to changes in the volatile communications industry. This has taken us from aerial open wire, aerial copper cable, to buried copper cable, to buried ber-optic and buried coaxial cable. Our clients include an impressive list of demanding organizations in the communications industry, public utilities, government and CATV companies. SPECIAL TO HORIZONSTrawick Construction presented the United Way of Northwest Florida with $6,965 from funds raised during its fourth annual Bring Your Old Buddy Golf Tournament at Sunny Hills Golf Course in July. Attending were, from left, Trawick associates Jack Commander, Tim Hammack, Dennis Richards, Darryl Spence and Phillip Metcalf; and Wayland Fulford, Darrin Wall and Nicole Bare eld representing the Washington County United Way Campaign Committee.Trawick: A reputation for quality, competitive prices Walmart remodeling nears completion

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create jobs foster networkingContact us to learn how the Chamber drives economic growth.638-4157washcomall.com Were theCHAMBERthatDOES... help expand business THERAPYWORLD OF NORTHWESTFLORIDAHealing for a better life 850-638-1331Email: therapyworldchipley@gmail.comwww.therapyworldchipley. comOwner Cindy Johnson-Brown brings a world of healing through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients in Washington, Holmes, Jackson, and Bay counties, as well as Dothan, Ala. Johnson-Brown is a speech language pathologist who is Vital Stim certied, a Dementia Certied Practitioner and Hanen It Takes Two To Talk certied. She treats birth through geriatrics with a wide variety of child and adult language disorders through Language Services Johnson-Brown is an Early Steps Provider. She accepts Medicaid, private pay and other insurances. Email: therapyworldchipley@gmail.com Child and Adult disorders treated include: Aphasia, Apraxia of Speech, Auditory Processing Disorder, Autism, Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate, Cognitive-Communication Disorders, Dementia, Dysarthria, Dysphagia (Swallowing and Feeding Disorders), Pragmatic Language Disorders, Preschool Language Disorders, Severe Disabilities, Selective Mutism, Speech Sound Development and Disorders in Children and Adults, Stuttering, Traumatic Brain Injury, Voice Disorders, & Stroke Rehabilitation COMMERCIAL PROPERTY INVESTMENTSwww.commercialpropertyinvestments.usBay County Association of Realtors Chipola Area Board of RealtorsGary HartmanBroker Associate850.773.3338Fax 850.773.3332Email: ghartman36@bellsouth.net Knowledge..., the pollen so ideas blossom. The Holmes County Chamber of Commerceinvites you to become a member today. We support, encourage and dedicate ourselves to the growth and development of the business community in Holmes County and are proud to say Theres No Place Like Holmes! www.holmescountyonline.com Wednesday, March 27, 2013C6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News HorizonsTherapy World brings healingSpecial to HorizonsTherapy World of Northwest Floridas motto is Healing for a better life. The clinic, located in Chipley and owned by Cindy Johnson-Brown, brings a world of healing to patients through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients in Washington, Holmes, Jackson and Bay counties as well as Dothan, Ala. Disorders treated at the clinic include aphasia, apraxia of speech, auditory processing disorder, autism, cleft lip and cleft palate, cognitive-communication disorders, dementia, dysarthria, dysphagia, pragmatic language disorders, preschool language disorders, severe disabilities, selective mutism, speech sound development and disorders in children and adults, stuttering, traumatic brain injury, voice disorders and stroke rehabilitation. Johnson-Brown is a speech language pathologist who is Vital Stim certied, a Dementia Certi ed Practitioner and Hanen It Takes Two To Talk certi ed. She treats a wide range of age groups, birth through geriatrics, with a wide variety of child and adult language disorders through individual therapy sessions, group therapy sessions, consultative services, in-hone and community/school based speechlanguage services. Johnson-Brown is an Early Steps Provider. She accepts Medicaid, private pay and other insurances. For more information, call Therapy World of Northwest Florida at 638-1331, email therapyworldchipley@gmail.com or visit www.therapyworldchipley.com.By TED EVERETTExecutive Director Washington County Chamber of Commerce The Washington County Chamber of Commerces No. 1 resource is its members. With that said, our goal is to help our business community in any way possible. If you have questions on permitting, licensing, or need to nd resources for your business, call us. If we do not have the answer, we can usually nd it. There are some speci c areas the Chamber is focusing on in 2013, including: The Chamber is in the process of revamping the Economic Development Council. One priority will be to give more assistance to our local businesses and see if there is an opportunity to help them grow and expand their current operations. The Chamber capitalizes on our legislative relationships at all levels state, federal and local to assist local businesses with issues affecting their business growth. Weve also sent legislative delegations to the state as well as hosted forums for local businesses to share concerns with their governmental representatives. The Chamber spends a good deal of time to bring relevant seminars and courses to our business and consumer community. Last summer the Chamber partnered with the Washington County Emergency Operations Center, local utilities and others to host the Disaster Preparedness Expo. We also hosted a Business Credit Seminar in conjunction with eight area banks. This seminar discussed the core components of a credit score and offered many tips for improving a credit score. We plan on doing so again this year. We will also sponsored a Principals of Management seminar with Bay Solutions, and cohosted a Small Business Assistance Seminar that helped businesses nd nancial resources and learn how to create a business plan. The Chamber continues to partner with Northwest Florida Community Hospital, the Health Department and other local businesses to combat childhood obesity in Washington County through the We Can program. If you have a particular need which may be addressed in a seminar or workshop, or other efforts, please let us know. The mission of the Chamber is to develop a strong and balanced economy while improving quality of life for all citizens. We invite our business and community to join us Washington County may bene t. For more information about the Chamber of Commerce, call 638-4157 or visit www.washcomall. com.Special to HorizonsTALLAHASSEE Building on the success of information technology-focused Career and Professional Education Academies across the state, Workforce Florida Inc. and The Whetstone Group announced recently the implementation of Phase II of the Middle School CAPE Information Technology Career Academy Technical Assistance Project. Phase I of the project resulted in middle school teachers and students from 15 Florida school districts earning more than 150 industry certi cations in Microsoft and Adobe in the rst semester of the 2012-13 school year. Phase II of the project will enable 10 more Florida middle school districts to participate in a competitive selection process to receive more than $30,000 in technical assistance products and services to establish new CAPE IT academies. These academies are anticipated to generate Science Technology Engineering & Math (STEM) training and digital literacy opportunities for middle school students, preparing them for more advanced certi cations in high school and college. Over the past ve years, we have watched CAPE Academies connect Florida students to market-relevant training and certi cations that create career opportunities, said Workforce Florida President/CEO Chris Hart IV. I am proud that Workforce Floridas support will enable this initiative to continue to open new doors for middle school students as they progress toward joining the IT workforce, Hart said. CAPE Academies were established by the 2007 CAPE Act sponsored by now Senate President Don Gaetz (R-Destin). They provide rigorous and relevant career-focused courses that articulate to postsecondary-level coursework and lead to industry certi cations. The goal of growing and expanding our CAPE Academies is to give Florida students a career advantage in key industries through a collaboration of educators, business leaders and workforce development professionals, Gaetz said. Today, I applaud students enrolled in Floridas middle school IT CAPE Academies for seizing that opportunity to build their future careers. This initiative ties education to the realities of todays economy, exemplifying the drive of our students as well as the lengths our teachers are willing to go to help them succeed. Under the 2007 CAPE Act, each school district must have at least one high school CAPE Academy, established in partnership with business and workforce development leaders in the community. In 2011, the CAPE Act was expanded to require plans for at least one CAPE Academy at the middle school level in each district. Information Workforce Florida has funded both phases of the Middle School IT Career Academies Technical Assistance Project. The initiative is being implemented by The Whetstone Group, a youth-talent-development leader, using the LEAD Through Workforce Innovations Career Pathways/Academy model. Due in large part to the commitment and partnership of leaders from Floridas IT industry including CCI Learning and Certiport and education community as well as the Florida Chamber of Commerce and state agencies including the Department of Education and the Department of Economic Opportunity, the project focuses on providing valuable technical assistance rather than traditional grant funding. In addition to the technical assistance which supports compliance with CAPE Act standards and reinforces the connection between CAPE academies and career-themed education, and the regional economic drivers the project offers students certi cation in two of the worlds leading digital literacy vendors applications Microsoft and Adobe. We are honored to continue our efforts with Workforce Florida in providing Floridas youth with the opportunity to obtain marketable skill sets that will give them a competitive advantage in their pursuit of college and/or career goals, said Melissa Bumpers, President of The Whetstone Group. For more information, visit the project website designed by Web V students at Niceville High School in Niceville, Florida, at www.middleschool careeracademytap.com. SPECIAL TO HORIZONSThe Chipley clinic owned by Cindy Johnson-Brown, brings healing to patients through speech, occupational and physical therapy to clients.IT career academies to expandThe goal of growing and expanding our CAPE Academies is to give Florida students a career advantage ...Senate President Don GaetzWashington Chamber: Members No. 1 resource

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Promoting Holmes County Job Creation WILL SUBDIVIDE!Holmes County Development Commission106 E. Byrd Ave. Bonifay, Florida850-547-4682 Panhandle Family InsuranceYoure in good hands. Ask about our Drive Wise Discount Program and other discounts. Formerly Vickery Insurance1069 Main Street Chipley, FL 850-638-7855 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 HorizonsWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | C7Special to HorizonsThere is a spirit of renewal that has been ushered in during the past year at WHTC. Facilities have been modernized, new programs have been added, existing programs have been restructured, and equipment has been updated. The campus is buzzing with new technologies to ensure Washington-Holmes Technical Center offers the best workforce training in the Florida Panhandle. WHTC regularly meets with the Chipola Regional Workforce Board and local business partners to proactively identify the size and quality of the workforce necessary to support and expand industries that create high-skill and high-wage jobs. WHTC has opened three new information technology programs after partnering with the University of West Florida and Chipola College for a $3.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. The grant provides training, support services, industry certi cations and job placement assistance to unemployed or underemployed prospects in IT and health elds. The federal grant funds originated from fees paid by employers to bring foreign workers into the United States under the H-1B program. This project, known as Florida HireED, will change lives in our region. Participants will earn industry certi cations that represent portable skills recognized by employers national-wide. Graduates will have greater opportunities to earn a good living by lling high-skill, highwage jobs, which will help decrease industry reliance on workers from other countries. WHTCs new IT programs include Applied Information Technology, Cybersecurity and Network Administration. The Applied Information Technology Program offers a broad foundation of knowledge and skills to prepare students for employment in information technology careers. The program includes instruction in computer hardware, software applications, web applications, web page design and advanced web tools. Graduates will be prepared to earn the CompTia A+ Certi cation and the CIW (Certi ed Internet Web Professional) Site Development Associate Certi cation. The Cybersecurity Program prepares students for employment in cybersecurity related careers. These jobs usually protect computers, networks, and devices from cybercrimes, which occur when a perpetrator hacks or breaks in to illegally obtain sensitive information or disseminate destructive computer programs. Such crimes may threaten a nations security and nancial health. This program will prepare students for the CIW Network Technology Associate Certi cation and the CompTia Security+ Certi cation. Network Support Services has been a part of WHTCs program offerings for over 15 years. The excellent instruction provided by instructor, Bert Fravezzi, is evident by his students 94 percent pass rate on the industry certi cation exams. Computer networking is the connecting of computers and computer equipment to other computers by means of cables or airwaves, routers and access points for the purpose of sharing data and resources. The Network Systems Administration program is the advanced networking program that includes Server Infrastructure, Servicer Active Directory and Network/Server Security. Students will have opportunities to test for CompTia A+ certi cations, CompTia Network+ and CompTia Security+ certi cations. A huge bene t to the WHTC IT programs is the recent agreement signed with Pearson VUE to become an authorized computer-based testing site. This allows candidates pursuing their GEDs and key industry certi cation from leading IT programs such as Cisco, CompTia, Oracle and HP to test on the WHTC Campus instead of traveling 50-100 miles. Were very excited about our new partnership with Pearson VUE, said Martha Compton, WHTC director. The Pearson VUE Testing System is the most powerful available and gives us unparalleled control and exibility we can easily manage same-day testing and bring industry testing to our students on-campus and the panhandle. On a lighter note, entertainment technologies also have been added to WHTCs programs. Digital Audio Production was opened in January, 2013. This training program will prepare students for jobs as recording studio technicians, lm sound engineers, sound design artists, theater sound designers, multimedia developers or game audio designers. Audio producer, digital audio editor and production manager are other career options available. Many audio technicians record commercials for the advertising industry. An exciting acquisition came with the program: WHTCs own radio station. After months of waiting, Digital Audio Instructor Kirk Thompson announced to the faculty and staff that WHTC was approved by FCC to move forward with 91.1 FM. We will proceed by working with PAEC and other resources to get the station set up and running. Soon, youll be hearing WHTC on your radios, iPhones, and at local events, reported Martha Compton. With this new endeavor comes much responsibility, however, we are up for the task. I am so excited to see where this will lead WHTC and our community. Helping our people enter, remain and advance in the workforce while strengthening our communitys economic development priorities continues to be a top priority, Compton said. It requires us to be willing to change with the workforce and new technologies, which can sometimes be dif cult. But (as Will Rogers said) Even if youre on the right track, youll get run over if you just sit there. Holmes devises strategic plan for economic developmentSpecial to HorizonsThis year the Holmes County Development Commission devised, with the leadership of Strategic Planning Consultant Dr. David L. Goetsch, a Strategic Plan for Economic Development speci cally for Holmes County. Goetsch led workshops to facilitate the effort. Attending the workshops were local elected of cials, city and county management, board members, school board members, local business owners, clergy, nonpro t organizational leaders and members of the public. The mission statement devised for the county reads: The mission of the Holmes County Development Commission is to mobilize the human, physical, natural, and nancial resources of the County and focus them on retaining and creating jobs, improving the local economy, and enhancing the quality of life throughout the community. Goetsch assisted the work groups with recognizing what economic development would be desired for the county, what the county has to offer, and values the county wishes to sustain during the development. Ten strategies were then formed for implementation. The Holmes County Development Commission chose three of those goals with the hope of implementing the strategies within the next one to two years: Continually enhance the quality of the labor force, and provide speakers from businesses for high school classes. Also to sponsor, in conjunction with local businesses, corporate training seminars for improving skills and attitudes of existing employees. Institute a comprehensive marketing program aimed at attracting new business and engage in piggy-back marketing with larger regional economic development. Encourage local entrepreneurship for local business start-ups and work with Small Business Development Center of UWF to offer its Steps to Starting a New Business seminars on-site in Holmes County. The Development Commission has asked that the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce partner with them in the implementation of the Strategic Plan. Strategic Plan implementation discussions have taken place with board member Tim Wells as chairman. Wells has identi ed as his rst goal a need to gain community interest and involvement. Look for kick-off receptions and regular reports from the Development Commission on how you can become involved.Special to HorizonsThe Washington County Chamber of Commerce celebrated the opening of Panhandle Family Insurance on March 16. Panhandle Family Insurance is an Allstate Insurance of ce at 1069 Main St., in Chipley. It is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The insurance of ce was formerly owned by James Vickery for many years, but upon his retirement, Manuel Garcia purchased the business Feb. 1. Garcias open house featured food and music, and the community welcomed the new owners to the community. The Allstate agency offers multiple discounts, including the Drive Wise discount program. For more information, call Manuel Garcia at 638-7855 (of ce) or 596-2709 (cell). Panhandle Family Insurance opens in Chipley SPECIAL TO HORIZONSApplied Information Technology and Cybersecurity Instructor Sherri Skipper helps a student.WHTC modernizes, restructures

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 C8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra THANK YOUFromUnited Way of Northwest FloridaThank you for heeding our call to GIVE, ADVOCATE and VOLUNTEER and for demonstrating what it really means to LIVE UNITED. Together, we will continue to build a future where individuals and families achieve their human potential through quality education, nancial stability and healthy lives. Thank you! Funds Raised in 2012WASHINGTON COUNTYHOLMES COUNTY $53,736 $6,831 2012 Funds Distribution CommitteeMelissa Bruner Holmes County Chair Regions Bank Wayland Fulford Washington County Chair Capital City Bank Nicole Bareeld Washington County News/ Holmes County Times-Advertiser Brenda Blitch Doctors Memorial Hospital Julia Bullington Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Melanie Davis Regions Bank Missy Finch National Healthcare Corp. Fran Haithcoat Wells Fargo Bank Philip Metcalf Trawick Construction Darrin Wall Gulf Power Leadership giving requires great leaders with an understanding of community needs. Listed here are the top Workplace Campaigns for 2012 in Holmes and Washington Counties.AT&T ARC of Washington/Holmes Counties Capital City Bank City of Chipley Doctors Memorial Hospital Green Circle Bio Energy Gulf Power Holmes County Times-Advertiser Kids World of Chipley Lewis Bear Northwest Florida Community Hospital PAEC Regions Bank Small World Day Care Center Subway Trawick Construction Tri-County Community Council Walmart Washington County Schools Washington County Council on Aging Washington County News WestPoint HomeUnited Way of Northwest Florida is excited to share the 2012 Community Campaign for Holmes and Washington Counties. After all, these results belong to the communities we serve. The strength of United Way lies in connecting people and institutions across our region to improve the very foundation of our community. Working together as volunteers, contributors, non-prot partners, corporate partners, government, faith groups, the list goes on and helps us change lives and build stronger communities. We are very fortunate to have a broad range of partners, individuals and organizations who have willingly joined with us to advance our work in EDUCATION, INCOME and HEALTH throughout Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. We are especially proud of our partner agencies and the incredible services they deliver each and every day. Grant Funds Distributed in 2012HOLMES & WASHINGTON COUNTIESAmerican Red Cross..........................................$1,850 AMI Kids West FL.................................................$450 ARC of Washington/Holmes............................$9,819 Bay Area Food Bank..........................................$1,500 Chipola Healthy Start........................................$1,750 Covenant Hospice............................................. $2,200 Early Learning Coalition...................................$1,600 Gulf Coast Childrens Advocacy Ctr ...............$2,000 Habilitative Services of NFL ............................$1,000 Life Management Center .................................$1,675 Tri-County Community Council .....................$2,724 Washington Cty Council on Aging ................$5,000Note: In addition to the grant funds distributed an additional$22,397 of designated funds were distributed to agencies serving Holmes and Washington Counties.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 Volume 50 Number 54 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 2013 me me me me e e e e e e 5 0 0 Nu mb er54 me50Number54 W W E D N E SD AY M A R C H 2 2 7 2 0 0 0 1 1 3 WEDNE S DAYMAR C H272013 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Your Your HOMETOWN HOMETOWN Shopping Guide Shopping Guide For Washington & For Washington & Holmes Counties Holmes CountiesFREETAKE ONE B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611REOPENED Blanchette & Associates Inc.CONCRETE MASONRY HEAVY GAUGE METALDESIGN & BUILD CONSULTANTS LAND DEVELOPMENTJoe Blanchette850 532-2178gjblanchette@gmail.comCGC#1510933 Professional Engineer#74634SAFE ROOMS Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your business or service here for only$18.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 D&GPainting & Remodeling(850) 547-3805All types of Roo ng, Painting and Remodeling Call Gene (850) 849-0736 or Dwayne (850) 849-7982License #RC0067336 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 A Childless Married Couple seeks to adopt. Financial security. Homestudy approved! Lets help each other. Expenses paid. Carolyn & Ken. Call Sklar Law Firm 1-800218-6311. Bar# 0150789 Abalauction.comWakulla County, Crawfordville, Fl 3br 2ba split plan. Online bidding now through April 3, (850)510-2501 ab2387 broker For Sale Leather Sectional Sofa burgundy in color.$150.00. Small tear in the pillow in left corner. Call 850-535-9125between 9am-8pm LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used Org. $3,000, sacrifice $975.CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. Flea Across Florida. 272 mile yard sale April 12-14. Three days through Caryville, Florida. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Accounting/FinanceManager of Accounting and FinanceGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of Manager of Accounting and Finance at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, March 29, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34245217 Text FL45217 to 56654 Clerical Full time position, 8-5, M-F in Chipley, Contact One Stop Career Center for more info 850-638-6089 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Golf Cart Mechanic Minimum 3 years experience. Growing company located in Defuniak Springs. Long-term opportunity. Fax resume (850)622-2004. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Help Wanted: Cleaning/cooking position available at Bonifay and Vernon facility working with Limited Mental Health residents. Pay starts at $8.75 an hour with a pay raise in six months. Duties entail daily cleaning, assisting with ADLs, medication, etc. Must be able to pass background screening and have reliable transportation. Call (850)547-3708 or 535-1160 for more info. Preschool needs loving, dependable person to teach, play and love our 2 year olds. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout USNo forced dispatch: (800) 501-3783 www.mamo transportation.com Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for a Community Services Specialist for the Chipley Outreach office. PRIMARY DUTIES: Assist low income families in need of assistance with Services Programs and coordinate with other social service agencies. QUALIFICATIONS : Two year degree and one year work experience serving the low-income or elderly; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have Current drivers license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with background screening. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech @ 547-3689 or visit www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com. Applications are available at any Tri-County Community Council office and must be submitted by Apr 01 @ 4:00 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to a pre-employment drug test. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING! Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain.edu No computer Experience Needed! Job placement Assistance HS Diploma/GED a Must Start Immediately! 1-888-872-4677 Driver Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE IN A RUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST A JOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY 16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-(888) 926-7884 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline. com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 1800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BAUpdated House. in country. East of McDonalds. Stove, DW, fridge, water, septic & yard care include. App Required. $600/month plus $600 deposit. 850-638-4228. Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 For Rent 2BR/1BA Sunny Hills area. Very nice, good area. $ 575/ mth. Deposit & references required. 850-258-3874 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. on pond! $500 month, New floors. 856-793-8429 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 ALSO FOR RENT 3BR/1BA, AC Bonifay, FL. $550.00 rent/ $550.00 Deposit. No pets. 638-7601 House for rent, lease or sell. 3 Bedroom. 714 Nebraska Ave., Bonifay, Fl. (850)428-6512, (850)956-2073. Houses For Sale/ Owner Financing. 3bd houses & apartments for rent. Furnished affiency apartments for rent. Call Martha 850-547-2531 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley on Orange Hill Rd. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Bonifay Area: Assortment of Mobile Homes & RVs. Also RV spaces for rent. Quiet location. 5 minutes from shopping. (850)849-3911. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $300/mth 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month.. Ponce de Leon area (850)226-4656. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Mobile Home For Rent in Bonifay and Chipley. Water, sewer included. Rental references required. Call 638-2999 Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. 3 Homes for Sale in Chipley. Good rental income. Large lots. Recently remodeled. Motivated seller. 850-481-5352 or 850-849-7676. POTENTIAL GREAT FLIP PROPERTY!4 BD/2BA plus 800 sqf shop CH/A on 1 acre in country, 3 miles from Chipley. Present owner upgrades will sell in lower 70s or you purchase as is for lower 50s. Call Ron @ 850-638-6414 20 acres rural woodlands on Steverson Road, north of Bonifay. Some owner financing available. Call (850)547-3129, cell# (850)415-2998. Acreage 1511 Hwy 177, P.O. Box 1181 Bonifay. (850)547-2646 Saturday 7-8 a.m. BANKREPOSSESSION SMITH LAKE, ALABAMA. Prime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120k per lot, over $3million on 34 lots, makes possible a $200k + homesite for 25 cents on the dollar. Level to water, no stairs. Build at waters edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appointment. Once in a lifetime opportunity. Call (877)448-6816. By owner 19 wooded acres 3 miles north of Bonifay with 660 frontage on Hwy 79. $3,500 per acre. Restricted to housing. Call Richard-(850) 547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 2006 FEMA Trailer. 33ft w/ slide out. All electric. $5000.00 OBO. 548-4715 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473. Land HomesExpress.com For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500. For more information call 638-4492 C-175 Aircarft, Low airframe Hrs, IFR equiped. In annual, ready to go. Will sell or trade for motorhome, equal value, $25,000; 850-849-6842. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Spot Advertising works!

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, March 27, 2013 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*