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Washington County news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028312/00783
 Material Information
Title: Washington County news
Uniform Title: Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Chipley Fla
Publication Date: 10-31-2012
Frequency: semiweekly[<1994>]
weekly[ former <1931>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates: 30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 23, 1924.
General Note: L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID: UF00028312:00783
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JOE TAYLOR for Superintendent of Schools Excellence is not an act. It is a habit. Vote November 6th Elect 50 Wednesday, OCTOBER 31 2012 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com Volume 89, Number 57 INDEX Arrests .................................. A8 Opinion ................................. A4 Sports ................................. A11 Extra ..................................... B1 Faith ..................................... B4 Obituaries ............................. B5 Classi eds ............................. B6 IN BRIEF NEWS Washington County Community yard sale planned BONIFAY Holmes County Health Department will be sponsoring Baby Bash from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3. Baby Bash is a community yard sale at the First Baptist Church Annex. This yard sale is for baby and childrens Chipley celebrates 130th anniversary, see more on A6 INSIDE By S. BRADY CALHOUN 747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Florida voters can ensure lower taxes for themselves and tax exemptions for certain groups through a series of constitutional amendments on the ballot this November. But, opponents of the measure caution the cost of these tax cuts might come out of local and state government services. Many of the tax amendments on the ballot have little to no opposition because they give tax breaks to veterans, their spouses and the elderly. However, the language in Amendment 4 is alarming many people in local government who rely on property taxes to fund everything from law enforcement to libraries. The amendment would be a boon for people who own nonhomesteaded property and would allow the Legislature to eliminate the recapture rule. The rule, which came out of the Save Our Homes amendment, means when property values go down, taxes on the property can go up so that government still recaptures the same amount of revenue. It was passed at a time when no one ever thought property values in the state would go down. State Sen. Don Gaetz, a Niceville Republican and the sponsor of Amendment 4, said he is passionate about repealing the recapture rule. I believe that if your taxable value goes up, your taxes ought to go up, he said. If your taxable value goes down, I think your taxes ought to go down, not up. However, other parts of the amendment could hit local governments hard, according Voters to weigh tax relief Amendments offer exemptions See VOTERS A2 From Staff Reports TALLAHASSEE No probable cause was found to believe that Holmes County Commissioner Philip Music misused his position to receive a construction contract, according to a news release from the Florida Commission on Ethics. Meeting in Tallahassee on Oct.19 in closed session, the Florida Commission on Ethics took action on 41 complaints, including the complaint lodged against Music, Chair Susan Maurer said on Oct. 24. The Commission also found no probable cause to believe that Music violated the ethics laws by doing business with the county. An allegation that he had a contractual relationship with his construction company while it was doing business with the County was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. In other actions, the Commission found probable cause to believe that U.S. Congressman David Rivera, former member of the Florida House of Representatives, may have violated Florida ethics laws in 11 instances while serving in the Florida House of Representatives. Probable cause was found to believe that he received income from Southwest Florida Enterprises, Inc. while he was a member of the Florida House, when he knew, or with the exercise of reasonable care should have known it was given to in uence his vote or of cial action. Panel clears Holmes County commissioner See PANEL A3 TRUNK OR TREAT By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Two Chipley residents were arrested on charges of insurance fraud on Oct. 17 in connection with a Dec. 28, 2011, residential re. Ruben Alonzo Laurel, 42, and Lorrie Ann Laurel, 47, both of Chipley were arrested on charges of insurance fraud (more than $20,000 and less than $100,000) by the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce on behalf of the state, according to an af davit from the Department of Financial Services, Division of Insurance Fraud. The Laurels own Chipley Physical Therapy, as well as physical therapy businesses in Bonifay, Marianna and Graceville. The residence at 4139 Crystal Lake Drive in Chipley was gutted by re on Dec. 28 and was not the primary residence of the Laurels, but was used as a part-time residence at the lake, according to the af davit. According to the afdavit, expert analysis determined that 15 items claimed to have been lost in the re were not present in the house at the time of the re. The 15 items had a combined value of $64,759.10. Investigators say other items value had been in ated to exaggerate the insurance claim. Insurance fraud (more than $20,000 and less than $100,000) is a second-degree felony. Couple owns physical therapy businesses State charges duo with insurance fraud RUBEN LAUREL LORRIE LAUREL See FRAUD A2 EARLY VOTING Early voting continues this week at the Supervisor of Elections ofce located at 1221 South Blvd, Suite 900 in Chipley. Voting is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily until Saturday, Nov. 3. Visit chipleypaper.com on Nov. 7 to see the latest in election results. Today may be Halloween, but Saturday all the little goblins and ghosts in Chipley turned out for Trunk Or Treat, sponsored by the Merchants of Historic Chipley and held at the football eld. Churches, businesses and civic groups turned out to distribute candy to hundreds of children. For more photos, see Page 1B. PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER See IN BRIEF A3

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 to the amendments opponents. Along with eliminating the recapture rule, passage of the amendment, which requires a 60 percent majority approval, would place an annual 5 percent tax cap on non-homesteaded property. Ed Smith, county manager for Bay County, said if the amendment passes it will take between $700,000 and $900,000 out of county coffers the rst year. He described it as a bill that favors out-of-state homebuyers over locals. I think its going to create another whole new set of inequalities down the road, Smith said. Its not comprehensive or fair. Floridas League of Cities and the Florida Association of Counties are both against the amendment. Amendment 4 is likely to lead to tax hikes for fulltime Floridians in order to pay for tax breaks for snowbirds, Manny Morono, president of the Florida League of Cities and mayor of the city of Sweetwater, said in a news release. Opponents also warn that the amendment shifts the tax burden away from out-of-state buyers and back to locals. But, according to Gaetz, what actually happened is that the burden was shifted unfairly years ago to people who own little rental properties and small businesses. Two-thirds of the people who pay non-homesteaded taxes live in Northwest Florida. That includes Gaetz himself, he said, adding that he pays $30,000 a year in property taxes for property he owns in Bay County. This isnt some rich guy from Birmingham; this is, you know, your next door neighbor who owns a little rental house or a small business, Gaetz said. He added that local governments who lived well off property taxes when times were good also must be prepared to live with what comes when times are bad. Government should be lashed to the realities of the economy, Gaetz said. If you live be the sword, you should die by the sword. Floridas real estate professionals, most notably Florida Realtors, support the change. The additional homestead exemption will help boost Floridas struggling housing market by giving quali ed buyers a reason to get into the market. This will help lower the inventory of abandoned foreclosures that are dragging current homeowners prices down in neighborhoods across Florida, a ier on their website states. Amendment 4 will bring more predictability to small businesses in Florida and allow them to reinvest in local economies by creating jobs, lowering prices and raising pay for their workers. Government of cials such as Smith say the actual number of jobs created is tiny compared to the cost to local governments. Im not sure its going to accomplish anything, Smith said. 2012 TAX TOLL OPEN FOR COLLECTION NOVEMBER 1st In accordance with Florida Statutes notice is hereby given that the Property Appraiser has delivered the 2012 Tax Toll to the Tax Collector for collection of ad valorem taxes for the Washington County Board of County Commissioners, the Washington County School Board, Northwest Florida Water Management District, the City of Chipley and the City of Vernon. FLORIDA LAW PROVIDES THE FOLLOWING DISCOUNT FOR EARLY PAYMENT OF TAXES: 4% if paid in November 3% if paid in December 2% if paid in January 1% if paid in February Net Amount in March Delinquent April 1 County Government Building, 1331 South Boulevard, Suite 101, Chipley, Florida, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 a.m.4:00 p.m. or for your convenience you may use our Drop Box located at the front of the building. Taxes are assessed to the owner of record as of December 31, 2011. If you have purchased property this year, your statement will go to the former owner. Duplicate statements are available at the Tax If you own property and did not receive a tax bill or for questions Helen McEntyre, Tax Collector Washington County, Florida Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon Smart Lenses SM Precinct 1 (Caryville) Caryville Town Hall 4436 Old Spanish Trail Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 2 (Five Points) Five Points Community Center 3892 Desalva Rd. Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 3 (Hinson Crossroads) Hinson Crossroads Fire Station 5487 Douglas Ferry Rd. Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 4 (Agricultural Center) Washington County Agricultural Center 1424 Jackson Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 5 (Vernon City Hall) Vernon City Hall Old VHS Cafeteria 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive Vernon, FL 32462 Precinct 6 (New Hope) Gilleys Place 3351 Mallory Rd. Vernon, FL 32462 Precinct 7 (Orange Hill) Orange Hill Fire Station 1927 Orange Hill Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 8 (Armory) US National Guard Armory 749 7th Street Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 9 (Wausau) 1607 Second Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 10 (Courts of Praise Church) Courts of Praise Church 1720 Clayton Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 11 (Ebro) Ebro City Hall 629 Dog Track Rd. Ebro, FL 32437 Precinct 12 (Greenhead) New Vision Methodist Church 2661 Blocker Church Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 15 (Sunny Hills) Sunny Hills Community Center/Library 4083 Challenger Blvd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 17 (Shepherds Gate Church) Shepherds Gate Church 1915 Ferguson Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 18 (Recycling Center) Washington County Recycling Center 3115 Hwy 77 Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 19 (Buckhorn Creek) Country Oaks Baptist Church 574 Buckhorn Blvd. Chipley, FL 32428 VOTERS from page A1 FRAUD from page A1 These allegations are not true, said Ruben Laurel on Friday. This has nothing to do with our practice, and we have hired an attorney to take care of it. Among the 15 items claimed lost were a Brunswick Bridgeport pool table, 250 CDs, 250 DVDS and 200 VHS tapes, 60 X-Box video games and 85 Wii video games, SCUBA tanks and regulators, 350 Barbie dolls, Pampered Chef kitchen utensils, 53 bottles of wine, champagne and liquor and two six-foot surf boards. State Fire Marshal Matt Streichert investigated the re scene on the night of the blaze and determined the re originated in the kitchen area, causing extensive damage to the house. Jerry Troy Bradley, Lorrie Laurels brother, told the re marshal that he had been cooking on the stove prior to leaving the house and possibly left cooking grease on the stovetop, forgetting to turn off the burner, according to the af davit. He returned a short time later to nd the re department attempting to extinguish the re. The Laurels were insured by Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. of Atlanta, and the re took place one day prior to the policy cancellation date, according to the af davit. They led an insurance claim and provided a detailed listing of contents lost, with a loss valued at $435,905. Of that amount, $107,580.89 was for items purchased within one year of the insurance claim. The insurer alleges items claimed as damaged or lost in the re were not present at the time of the re and/or have been in ated, according to the af davit. The Laurels were examined under oath, and upon review of the examination, Detective David Lindsay of the Division of Insurance Fraud learned the couple had claimed an extensive list of items lost or damaged in the house re to include items not discovered in an investigation of the re scene by Fire Investigator J. Michael Hawkins of Fire Analysis & Investigative Resources, according to the af davit. Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. had hired Hawkins, who told the detective that 15 items on the claim were not present at the time of the re, according to his investigation. The combined value of those items alone is $64,759.10. Bradley F. Smith of Paul Davis Restoration in Panama City was hired to perform a detailed inventory of the debris in February, and he failed to locate items listed in the insurance claim at the re scene. Denise Zdenahlik, senior investigator with Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co., told Lindsay that the claim has not been settled and alleges that the Laurels insurance claim was in ated. She cited the example of an Atmosphere Air Puri er purchased from Amway that was lost in the re. The Laurels listed the price of the air puri er as $1,150.25, while receipts from Amway show the actual price was $698.75. The air puri er was purchased on Dec. 21, eight days prior to the re loss, according to the af davit. VOTING LOCATIONS The Laurels were insured by Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. of Atlanta, and the re took place one day prior to the policy cancellation date, according to the af davit. They led an insurance claim and provided a detailed listing of contents lost, with a loss valued at $435,905. Of that amount, $107,580.89 was for items purchased within one year of the insurance claim.

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Be Safe this Halloween! Sheri Tim Brown Holmes County Sheri Department Horton's Chipley Heating & Cooling 1213 Main Stree 850-638-1309 Have a safe and fun Halloween! Nichols Auto 1146 Jackson Avenue Chipley 638-8584 JOHNSONS PHARMACY www.walmart.com 850-638-2243 1612 Main Street, Chipley, Florida L AYA W AY NO W A V A IL A BLE ON Thank You For Choosing Your Chipley Walmart From The Associates At Store #2114 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Ben Saunders, DMD (850) 526S PIT (7748) BRO C K AUTO BODY 638-8768 HORIZON HEALTH CARE www.medicineshoppe.com BONIFAY, FL 507 West Hwy. 90 850-547-1877 CHIPLEY, FL 1357 Brickyard Road 850-638-0424 Have Fun and Be Safe!! Colonial Restaurant (850) 638-4708 Be safe and have fun this Halloween While kids are out trick-or-treating, parents may be home or at work hoping their kids are safe and sound. Because Halloween is so popular among kids, its hard for parents to forbid trick-or-treating. But parents should instruct kids on the following tips to ensure this Halloween is as safe as it is fun. Strangers homes are off limits Make sure kids know they should never enter the home of a stranger, no matter how friendly or welcoming that stranger may seem. Theres no going it alone. Kids should not be permitted to go out alone. When trick-or-treat ing, kids should always be accompanied not only by their friends, but there must be at least one adult chaperone present at all times. Stay close to home. Kids should stay in their own neighborhood and only visit homes of neighbors they know. Tips for Halloween Safety Choose safe costumes. Kids should wear costumes made of light colored costume. No toy guns. Toy guns are just asking for trouble, as many of todays replicas are easily confused with the real thing. Night falls quickly late October, improve their visibility and make them more visible to passing motorists. Be wary of masks. Many masks restrict a childs vision, so look for one that provides low on visibility, make children agree to remove their mask when crossing the street. Probable cause also was found to believe that his contract with SFEI through Millennium Marketing, Inc. would create a frequently recurring con ict between his private interests and his public duties as a Florida House member or would impede the full and faithful discharge of his public duties. The Commission also found probable cause to believe that Rivera misused his public position by using campaign funds for non-campaign related expenditures. An allegation that he misused his position to request or accept State reimbursement for travel expenses paid with campaign funds or state of ce expense accounts, and an allegation that he failed to report, as a gift, forgiveness of a part of a debt he owed Millennium. Probable cause was found to believe that Robert Skidmore III, Charlotte County Commissioner, misused his position to ask for special treatment in obtaining a liquor license for a third party, and by asking County employees to look for and selectively enforce code violations against his former wifes new family. The Commission also found probable cause to believe that Skidmore requested a County employee continue a hearing for the bene t of himself or another person. However, the Commission found no probable cause to believe that he misused his position to request that staff waive the code violations of a constituent. Finding that the public interest would not be served by further proceedings due to the totality of the circumstances and because he sought the advice of counsel, the Commission voted to dismiss allegations that Walton County Commissioner Larry Jones employment with waste management, which had a contract with Walton County, created a prohibited con ict or that his votes on measures affecting the company created a prohibited voting con ict. The Commission also found no probable cause to believe that he solicited or accepted employment with Waste Management in return for his of cial action, accepted the employment when he knew or should have known it was offered to in uence his of cial action, or used inside information gained by reason of his public position to secure a bene t for his employer. An allegation that he misused his position to bene t Waste Management was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. Probable cause was also found to believe that Rivera violated Article II, Section 8, of the Florida Constitution with regard to six allegations surrounding his nancial disclosure: that he failed to report or did not properly report income, stocks and bonds, or secondary income sources on his 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 CE Form 6s; and that he failed to le a CE Form 6F within 60 days of leaving ofce in the Florida House. However, the Commission issued a nding of no probable cause regarding an allegation that Mr. Rivera had a voting con ict when he voted on HB 1047 which bene ted SFEI, as the alleged violations fell outside the veyear statute of limitations. The Commission found no probable cause to believe that Paul Mac Work, DeFuniak Springs City Council member, entered into a real estate listing agreement given to in uence him, or misused his position to direct the efforts of the DeFuniak Springs Code Enforcement Board. An allegation that he had a real estate listing agreement with a homeowner while the homeowner was subject to the regulation of the City was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. The Commission dismissed the following complaints for lack of legal suf ciency: Warren J. Yeager Jr., Gulf County Commissioner; Kevin Kipp, Executive Director of the University of South Florida College of Nursing Research Center; Tanya Murphy, Director of the Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry at the University of South Florida; Rana Erbrick, Cape Coral City Councilmember; two complaints against Alice Frierson, Deputy Mayor of Arcadia; two complaints against Robert Heine, Arcadia City Council member; two complaints against Robert Allen, Arcadia City Council member; Eleanor Sobel, member of the Florida Senate; Bob Gualtieri, Pinellas County Sheriff; Cheryl Byers, Director of Research Integrity and Compliance at the University of South Florida; James Robinson, Pinellas County School District General Counsel; Peggy OShea, Pinellas County School Board Member; Robin Wikle, Pinellas County School Board Member; Terry Krassner, Pinellas County School Board Member; Carol Cook, Pinellas County School Board Member; Janet Clark, Pinellas County School Board Member; two complaints against Keith Fitzgerald, former member of the Florida House; Myron Rosner, North Miami Beach Mayor; Paul Eichner, Chief Legal Counsel for the Broward County Health Department; Anthony Vomero, Acting Environmental Administrator of the Broward County Health Department; Thelbert David Morgan, Escambia County Sheriff; Lawrence Bustle, Manatee County Commissioner and former Palmetto Mayor; Roy Johnson, Holly Hill Mayor; Nancy Bostock, Pinellas County Commissioner; Kenneth Welch, Pinellas County Commissioner; Neil Brick eld, Pinellas County Commissioner; Karen Seel; Pinellas County Commissioner; and, William P. Cervone, State Attorney for the 8th Judicial Circuit. In an advisory opinion, the Commission determined that a prohibited con ict of interest would not be created were the law rm of a candidate for the Broward County Commission to continue to serve as special counsel to a municipality located within the County, should the candidate be elected and take of ce. Although the municipality and County have an ongoing dispute over the expansion of an airport and its impact on the municipality and its citizens, the Commission found no prohibited continuing or frequently recurring con ict or impediment to duty would be created, because the airport expansion is a unique situation and neither the candidate nor his law rm have had any involvement in the citys dispute with the county. PANEL from page A1 items only. If you would like to sell your unwanted baby/ childrens and maternity clothing or other items at this event you can pick up a registration form at Holmes County Health Dept. to reserve your table by Oct. 26 or call 547-8684 ext. 19. You may keep all proceeds you make at this event. The charge to participate is one pack of diapers. You may drop them off at the health department or bring them the day of the event. Information will be available to the community regarding Kid care, Family Planning, Medicaid, Chronic Disease, Healthy Start and other childrens services. There will be face painting, fun for the kids, free haircuts and more. Reunion of Cousins ESTO The decadents of Henry J. and Sara Mixon Adams will have a Reunion of Cousins, all Adams, Lamb, Mixon, Pippin and Shiver cousins are invited to attend, at 10 a.m. today at John Clark Park in Esto. Bring old pictures to share. Paper products will be provided. Bring a covered dish and your musical instrument and enjoy a day lled with fun, food and fellowship. For more information, call Linda Shiver Miller at 334-684-8750 or Ruth Lamb at 263-0161. IN BRIEF from page A1

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Opinion A4 | Washington County News POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. For topics, your writer is capitalizing on the 75th anniversary celebration of the Panama City News-Herald, currently in progress for the entire year of 2012. This is the third article re ecting on our experiences for the 17-year period of February 1952 until December 1969, the time Hester and I were in Panama City. This was in conjunction with my job at Sears, Roebuck and Company for six years, then with the Florida Probation and Parole Commission for eleven additional years. Hester and I were married on Oct. 4, 1952 in Cottonwood, Ala. We spent our honeymoon in our newly purchased twobedroom frame home at 1118 Fairland Avenue. This was one of two new homes built on property left vacant when the brick homes, known as Lisenby Project, were built in the early 1940s. Our house was built by Frank Dama and Eugene Lokey, who had a construction rm at that time. It was nanced by a new nancial institution, Security Federal Savings and Loan Association, managed by Mr. Casper Harris, with Mrs. Florence Gay and Mrs. Jean Thomas Smith as tellers and assistants. Ours was one of their rst loans. The Prattler had been employed with Sears for six months and had been assigned the job as receiving manager. The job seemed to be a dead end for the recent graduate from the University of Florida with a degree in sales and sales Management. Each manager, from Mr. Richard (Dick) Murphy, Mr. Charles S. Sanders and Mr. Bob Hudson, assured me that I was in an unof cial management training program and was being groomed for a promotion when the time came. After more than six years and after meeting some ne fellow employees who became lifelong friends, your writer applied for a job with the Florida Probation and Parole Commission and was hired. For the next 11 years, I had an of ce in the Bay County Courthouse and the opportunity to meet elected of cials who I knew were in of ce but had never had the opportunity to meet. The three circuit judges, comprising the 14th Judicial Circuit at that time, were the Honorable E. Clay Lewis, Jr., Honorable W. L. Fitzpatrick and Honorable E. C. Welch, whose service was primarily in Jackson County. In a few years, Honorable Joseph W. Bailey, county judge of Bay County, was appointed to the Circuit Court Bench upon the retirement of Judge Welch and Honorable Robert L. McCrary, Jr., county judge of Jackson County was elevated to the Circuit Court Bench upon the death of Judge Lewis. My entire service was with the above judges and mostly with Judges Fitzpartick, Bailey and McCrary. Mr. J. Frank Adams, of Blountstown, was the elected State Attorney and served all six counties with no assistants. I well recall when attorney, William E. (Bill) Harris, was appointed as a part time assistant state attorney, working mostly the cases in Bay County. Later, William C. (Bill) Mongoven, a Chipley lawyer, was added as an assistant state attorney, working the Northern counties of the circuit. Defense lawyers in those days were primarily W. Fred Turner, Leo C. Jones and J. C. Bodiford. The Bay County Sheriff was the colorful and wellloved M. J. (Doc) Daf n, whose career extended for many years with much history and stories, written and carried down through the years with one appearing in the Heritage of Bay County Book (2005), authored by his kinsman, Rev. J. R. Daf n. In Bay County, Bruce Collins was the elected Clerk of Court and served many years before losing the post to youthful aspirant, Harold Bazzel. Harold held the job until retirement. The story of Bruce and Harold, was written for the second edition of the Heritage of Bay County( 2011), by the Prattler, as was a narrative on the life of Circuit Judge Joseph W. Bailey. Gerald Conrad was serving as Tax Assessor, A. G. Appleberg was the long time Tax Collector, J. J. (Josh) Mashburn was continuing his long service as Supervisor of Elections and Tommy Smith was winding down his long tenure as Superintendent of Schools. The landmark United States Supreme Court decision in a case originating in Bay County Circuit Court, Gideon vs. Wainwright was handed down in 1963. The ruling stated that every defendant charged with a felony offense was entitled to legal counsel and if he could not afford a lawyer, the court was to appoint one for him. Soon, the decision was amended to included all misdemeanor offenses. This court case resulted in the creation of the Public Defender system in all states. Our public defender was Blountstown attorney, Virgil Q. Mayo, who held the position until retirement. Our four sons were born while we lived in Panama City. The Prattler was one of the original members of the church body which constituted St. Andrew Primitive Baptist Church, 2100 Michigan Avenue, midst the wild palmettos, scrub oak, sand pines and snakes prevalent on the site. That congregation has survived until this present day and is presently under the pastor ship of Elder J. C. Stanaland. Your writer resigned the parole job in late 1969 and moved to Chipley for the many new experiences which have come his way. Upon being elected county judge in Washington County Judge in 1976, the opportunity to serve in Bay County presented itself on many occasions On each assignment, I was always welcomed and treated royally by the court of cials known earlier. I am still on the invitation list to the judges Christmas Party and other functions of the court, including investitures and retirement ceremonies. Sadly, it has been my responsibility to attend too many funerals of those judges, and other key employees, who have departed this life. Hester and I still receive invitations to the Sears Retirees Christmas Event and have able to keep in touch with many of them down through the years. We have also lost many of those friends in death also. See you all next week. When I met DeAnna Oldham at the chamber breakfast at Hardees last month, I knew I had to interview her for my Happy Corner. She impressed me immediately with her enthusiasm about her work and especially about Bonifay. Some people move to a small place like ours and nd lots to complain about. She nds lots to brag about. Though her mother hails from nearby Geneva, Ala., she married a career Air Force man and raised her family in California until DeAnna and her brother were in high school when they moved from there to Milton. DeAnna married right out of high school while attending the Milton campus of The University of Florida. After two children, she was divorced, and as a single parent, she worked in food service and continued her education until she received her degree in business administration from UF. Shawnees restaurant in Pensacola promoted her to manager, but she loved working with people so she took a job as Church Administrator for Central Chapel associated with Churches of God. Her concern for women who came to the church needing help led her to start a ministry called Women in Transition where she helped them to nd agencies to help them with expenses; to nd jobs; to nd places to live; to nd clothes to wear for jobs; how to interview for jobs, and ETC. The church continues that ministry still. When her husband, Joshua Oldham, the son of Eugene and Julia of Bonifay, was transferred here for a job with the state three years ago, she made this their home and went to work as manager for Hardees of Bonifay. She has treated that establishment, not as a job with a hamburger chain, but as if it were her own private restaurant. She knows her clientele. The mens group who eat breakfast there every morning are her personal friends. The ladies group who meet there on Fridays for lunch are known by name. The sisters who meet there weekly get special attention. The teens that congregate there on Friday nights are greeted by Mrs. Oldham. They know they are welcome there, but if they need correction, she supplies that. Relay For Life has special meaning for DeAnna, and she has agreed to be the event chair for Bonifays Relay in April of 2013. Her dad is now undergoing treatment for a recurrence of Hodgkin Lymphoma after an 11year period of remission. About 12 years ago as she was holding her sons hand as they walked for the relay in Pensacola, her dad was battling his rst round of chemo from the disease. The son saw the luminaria being placed and he said, We dont want Granddaddys name on one of these. DeAnna realized that both her grandfathers had died with cancer, and she vowed that it was not going to rob her children of a grandfather if she could prevent it. Since that time she has been involved with Relay and welcomes the opportunity to lead her newly adopted homes event. Her goal is to answer any questions the public has, to teach us the mission of the American Cancer Society, and to raise awareness for the need to continue research to nd a cure for this killer which is second only to heart attacks in the U.S Bonifay Relays theme is Roping For A Cure and the sponsorship goal is $2000, $1600 of which has already been pledged. Julia Bullington is the survivor chairman and she intends to nd at least 50 survivors to attend the event where they will be honored guests DeAnna says, Bonifay is now my home. If I had known such a community existed while I was rearing my children, I would have come here sooner. Her children are Hannah Johnston who is a prevet student at University of West Florida, and her son Daniel Johnston is also at UWF hoping to pursue a degree in sports medicine or some related eld. We welcome DeAnna and Joshua to Bonifay and look forward to future associations with this lady who is so willing to give of herself and her resources to make our community a better place. I urge you, along with her, to get your team together and begin planning for April 19, 2013. Relay is a lot of fun and is a major source of funds to ght cancer. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Perry and Hester Lucas Wells as a youthful couple, as we appear in a photograph made on the grounds of St. Andrew Primitive Baptist Church. Keep God in mind when voting The upcoming election will be the most important election of our lifetime. The elected president will be able to place one or more judges on the Supreme Court. These judges are for their lifetime. The decisions handed down by them will affect our children and their children event o the fourth generation. These judges usually votes their decision as the President who appoints them. I speak not as a Democrat or Republican; I speak as a man of God. Today in many schools, the word God has been stricken, or the phrase God Bless America forbidden. We fought, gave our blood and are still ghting under a ag that in many places, even our homes, we are forbidden to display. The Devil with a capital D can go into our schools and sponsor a dance, put a preacher cant go in and hold a church service. In Jeremiah 1:5, God said, Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee: and before thow came forth out of the womb I sancti es thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations. Therefore, God knew us before we are formed, for we are formed in the mind of God, and are humans at the moment of conception. Therefore the morning after pill, is the killing of an unborn human being. Our present government says it is a womens right to choose, even at taxpayers expense. But God says its murder. In Genesis 19:1-24, God destroyed two cities, Sodom and Gomorrah, because of the sin of homosexuality. Our present government says homosexuality should be honored, and homosexual marriages should be the law of the land. God spoke to me and said, America is down to its knees and this is our last chance. I will not attempt to tell you how to vote. But I will ask you two questions: 1. Are you for morality, or against morality? 2. Are you for God or against God? Your vote will determine. I am a voice in the Wilderness Crying for the Salvation of our Nation. Bishop L.C. Frederick Vernon Readers say thank you How do you say Thank You to three or four hundred people at one time? You sure cant call each one. You cant nd addresses for each one and drop them a note. Even if you could you would surely leave someone out. Well, this is my most pleasurable, humble and grateful task at hand! So here goes a feeble attempt. First and foremost, to God be the glory and I do so thank God in the quiet place in my heart and on the rooftop of my house! I am so unworthy and yet so grateful to be able to do so. Make no mistake please; I speak Thanks to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. To Yaweh God. Jehovah God, Father God, the God that the Christian Holy Bible speaks of. Prattler re ects on his Panama City years PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Hardees manager has found her home in Bonifay Wednesday, October 31, 2012 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR See LETTERS A5

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Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Second, I would like to say Thanks to the Holmes County 911 dispatch and the rescue squad. Great job guys! Thank you and may God bless you in a special way for all you do is my prayer! Not once but twice this service has aided in saving my husbands life and of this I am certain. We are so very grateful! Third, wow what a great church family we have! We attend First Baptist Church of Bonifay, but our church family is the whole family of God. We had Baptist, Methodist, Assembly of God, Church of Christ and other Christian people praying, visiting, sending cards, gift baskets, phone calls, and so on. It gave me chills to see Gods people come together and just love one another, forgetting those differences that separate us in certain ways. The differences just didnt matter and I loved it. You will know that they are my disciples by the way that they love on another, Jesus said. Fourth, although most will never see or read this I would like to say thank you to all of the doctors, medical staff, cleaning crew laundry workers and cafeteria personnel for all they did. There is so very much care, effort and empathy that was put in out near death experience! We are so humbled by what we have been through! Last but not least, I would like to say Thank You to my husband of 38 years who narrowly escaped death, thank you for too many things to mention. Anyone who knows him at all has heard him say that I (his wife) am the luckiest woman in all of Holmes County and probably all of Northwest Florida. As I sit here in the hospital by your side Sid and I go back over in my mind the past hours of events, as I look down and see all of those tubes everywhere, as I hear the soft sound of a snore and watch your chest rise and fall, as I see the most concerned and worried look on the doctors, faces turn to smiles, I just have to agree Sid, I felt like the luckiest woman in not only all of Holmes County but possibly in the whole wide world! It hit me hard and straight that I nee to say Thank You now while I still can and not just sit back and wish one day that I had. Once again, Thank you all for everything. I am so grateful! Suzanne Johnson / Sid Johnson Bonifay Clean,clear, natural sound Your Hearing Aids communicate with each other automatically adjusting themselves. Ear-to-Ear Synchronization: Settings are automatically transferred to the other aid. Beltone Promise Hearing Aid System $1200 off Comes In All Models* Based on 2 Hearing aids. NEW J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU Textured Plush Carpet 79 99 Super Thick 13 Loose Lay Vinyl 49 FHA Quality Vinyl SF SF SF Engineered Value Grade 3 Oak Plank $ 2 29 SF AREA RUG SALE! Over 200 In Stock carpettilemarianna.com 1721 South Waukesha Street, Bonifay, FL (850) 547-2060 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 and Panama City News Herald The November ballot is chockablock with proposed amendments to the Florida Constitution, even more so than usual. Its worth noting that none of the amendments were sponsored by citizens groups. All originated in the Legislature, and several re ect partisan political agendas. This is a summary of where we stand on each issue. AMENDMENT 1 states the government cant require citizens to buy health insurance. This is Floridas attempt to thumb its nose at the individual mandate portion of Obamacare that was upheld by the Supreme Court. We oppose that mandate, but this amendment, if passed, would carry no legal weight as federal law trumps state law. The Florida Constitution should not be cluttered with symbolic political statements. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENTS 2, 9 and 11 expand property tax exemptions for certain groups disabled veterans who move, spouses of veterans or rst responders killed in the line of duty, low-income seniors who have lived in their homes a long time. The state constitution already is full of such carve-outs, and we have opposed most of them because they make a Swiss cheese of the tax code. We would prefer to see comprehensive tax relief for everyone, not just sympathetic groups. We recommend a NO vote on all three. AMENDMENT 3 would change the way Florida calculates its revenue limit. Currently it is capped according to the increase in personal income. Under this amendment, it would be based on the rate of in ation and population growth. This would help prevent the state from going on a spending spree during ush economic times, which is what happened prior to the 2006 downturn that led to so many painful budget cuts. Revenues collected in excess of the cap would be placed in a reserve fund for emergencies. Also, the Legislature could temporarily suspend the cap during emergencies. AMENDMENT 3 would impose spending discipline on Tallahassee while giving lawmakers exibility to loosen the purse strings when it is truly needed. We recommend a YES vote. AMENDMENT 4 would give the Legislature the power to repeal the recapture rule, which allows the taxable value of a homeowners property to rise even when the propertys market value is falling. We have supported repeal of the recapture rule for years on the grounds that it undermines the protections afforded by the Save Our Homes amendment. However, this amendment also includes other changes to homestead exemptions that would complicate the system and risk shifting the tax burden to residents. We recommend a NO vote and urge the Legislature to come back with a clean, recapture-only amendment in 2014. AMENDMENT 5 would give the Legislature more authority over state courts, including con rmation power over judicial nominations. This is a partisan power grab in response to some court rulings that have not gone the Republicans way. It would politicize the judiciary and threaten its independence. The current setup works ne. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 6 would change the states right-to-privacy law by prohibiting public funding of abortion. However, that is already federal and state law. Therefore, this measure seems redundant. In addition, supporters argue the amendment is needed to allow the Legislature to pass a law requiring minors to get parental consent for an abortion. But the text of the amendment says nothing about that. If proponents want to pursue that goal, they should do so explicitly in a separate amendment. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 8 would allow taxpayer funding, both directly and indirectly, of religious institutions. This opens the door to state-funded education vouchers that could be used at parochial schools. That is something we have supported, so long as the aid goes directly to parents and allows them to choose where it will be spent public, private or parochial. That is consistent with U.S. Supreme Court rulings. For example, in a 2002 case that upheld a Cleveland school voucher system, the court developed a private choice test for such programs: They must have a valid secular purpose. Aid must go to the parents and not to the schools. A broad class of bene ciaries must be covered. The programs must be neutral with respect to religion. There must be adequate nonreligous options. However, this measure also would open the door to government choosing which religious organizations to fund directly (under current law, state agencies can use taxpayer dollars to fund social or health care services provided by nonpro t organizations af liated with religious groups). That is problematic. Those funds will come with government strings attached, which could undermine the religious mission of the organization. It could exacerbate religious differences among the public if the state funds groups that some citizens disagree with. If the state denies funding based on these objections, that will spark lawsuits. Legislators should craft a narrower amendment tailored speci cally to vouchers. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 10 would double the tax exemption on tangible personal property used in businesses (machinery, of ce furniture, computers, etc.). This is an existing tax, not the creation of a new one. Increasing the exemption will lower the cost of doing business, which could bene t the state economy. We recommend a YES vote. AMENDMENT 12 would change the way student representatives to the Board of Governors is chosen. This is a minor procedural matter that is unnecessary and unbecoming of the state constitution. We recommend a NO vote. Opinion LETTERS from page A4 Our guide to proposed amendments EDITORIAL

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Local A6 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Local Washington County News | A7 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 FILE PHOTOS From right, the railroad was central to the founding of Chipley, so it was tting that a model railroad show was held in the Chipley Train Depot in the 1980s. An aerial view of Harrell Square in 1980 shows Northwest Florida Community Hospital, top left, surrounded by open elds. Walmart has been serving Chipley since August 30, 1994 A tradition of excellence and community service since 1893, continuing The Chipley Banner www.chipleypaper.com (850) 638-0212 We have been in operation since 1995. Washington County Christian School Train up a child Proverbs 22:6 Jason Haddock Administrator 1405 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-9227 Email: wccs@bellsouth.net www.washingtoncountychristian.com WASHINGTON-HOLMES TECHNICAL CENTER WHTC Celebrates 45 Years of Excellence in Education Washington-H olmes Technical Center has been a major part of educating our citizens since 1967. WHTC has grown from its original nine vocational programs to 26 career and technical education programs. Program oerings sometimes change to keep pace with the new demands of industry. While maintaining traditional trade programs, the Technical Center is shifting its focus toward information and medical technologies. All of Washington-Holmes Technical Centers programs train students to earn industry certications or state licenses that are necessary to compete in the 21st century workforce. C FURNITURE & GI F TS B C HAVERSB ROCK Serving customers since 1926. gulfpower.com Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power We Treat You Like Family better than Northwest Florida Community Hospital Proudly Serving Our Community Since 1951 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-1610 www.nfch.org By CATHRINE LAMB 638-0212 | @WCNHCT clamb@chipleypaper.com The town of Chipley was originally called Orange, before being renamed Chipley in 1882. The town was named after railroad man, businessman and Florida Sen. William D. Chipley, also known as Mr. Railroad of West Florida throughout Northwest Florida. A statue was erected in Pensacolas Plaza Ferdinand after his death on Dec. 1, 1897, with an inscription that read, Soldier Statesman Public Benefactor. On the battle eld he was without reproach. In the councils of state he was wise and sagacious, and in his public and private benefactions he was ever alert and tireless. The history of his life is the history of the upbuilding of West Florida, and every material advancement for two decades bears the imprint of his genius and his labor. Not long after Chipley became incorporated in 1882, the courts held that charter invalid. Chipley was re-chartered in 1900. Chipley never got to see the town develop and prosper into what it has become today. The town was only about 15 years old when he died. For more than 75 years, there were two towns that bore his name. One of those being the Chipley we all know and love today. The other was Chipley, Ga., which is now the resort town of Pine Mountain, Ga. A train track completed in 1882 put Chipley on the map. The side track allowed for trains to pull off of the main track and re ll their steam engines at what became known as Tank Pond, where the agriculture center and City Hall are now located. The rst train station and rst post of ce in Chipley were in old boxcars. The railroad connecting Pensacola and Chattahoochee was completed in 1883. The rst two businesses that opened in Chipley were a wine shop and a whiskey distillery, in 1881. The businesses were owned by B.W. Berry. The whiskey distillery was in the area that is now known as Falling Waters State Park. Berrys businesses lasted until 1899, when the Washington County electors voted to prohibit the manufacture or sale of alcoholic beverages. The McGreachy General Store was one of the rst general stores in the area. The store sold things such as apparel, shoes, hats, yard goods, sewing machines, custom-made suits and groceries. The McGreachy General Store also had a soda fountain, making the store the rst in Chipley to serve CocaCola when it rst came onto the market. The McGreachy family also owned the rst bottling works in Chipley. On May 14, 1898, a re destroyed most of the business district in Chipley. The re reportedly started a few minutes after noon, in a building at the rear of the White and Williams Store in the middle of the business district. By the time a line of people passing buckets back and forth put out the re, 35 businesses and residences were in ashes. Almost everything on the south side of the railroad was gone. The cause of the re was a mystery to the residents of Chipley. There was also a re in 1967 that gutted the thenpolice station and the Crystal Ice Company. The ice company was erected in 1914, to house the Chipley Power and Lights Power Company. It wasnt until 1970, and several res later, that the Chipley Volunteer Fire Department was established. The rst re department consisted of 12 members and three vehicles. Those vehicles were a 1939 Chevrolet, a 1940 and a 1960 Ford. There are several places of worship in Chipley. Three of the oldest are First United Methodist Church, First Baptist Church and First Presbyterian Church. The rst written record of the First United Methodist Church is from 1887. The church stands on the corner of Fifth Street and U.S. 90. First Baptist Church of Chipley also was established in 1887 with 19 members. The church met for its rst service in a tworoom school house where the Washington County Court House now stands. The congregation moved to a two-story building on the corner of Cypress Avenue and Fifth Street in 1899. First Baptist Church of Chipley made the move to its present location on South Boulevard on Dec. 2, 1979. First Presbyterian Church held its rst services in Methodist and Baptist churches in Chipley when it was formed Oct. 18, 1846. The church moved its services to a church on Watts Avenue in May 1904. In 1938, First Presbyterian made its nal move in 1938 to its current location on Fifth Street in Chipley. The Washington County School District was established with the Berry Hill School No. 14 in 1847. The Berry Hill School was located where First United Methodist Church and the Washington County Court House are now located. The Berry Hill School was discontinued in 1879 for lack of attendance and became the Limestone Church. In 1883, the Limestone Church became the Jordan School House, and a year later in 1884, the Jordan School House was changed to the Chipley School. The Washington County School District, in 1887, ordered that the school be open to the public. Three years later, in 1890, Washington County was ordered to establish the Chipley High School District, to encompass the town of Chipley. In 1902, the school was located on the present-day campus of the Washington County School Board of ces. The school consisted of two stories with four classrooms, an auditorium and a bell tower. The 12th grade was not added until to Chipley High School until 1916. The Historic Chipley High School was erected in 1930 and now houses of ce and the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Chipley High School is now on Brickyard Road and has been in operation since 2001. The rst and only colored school in Chipley was constructed in 1913. The school was named after its rst principal, T.J. Roulhac. When the school opened in 1913, it was called the Chipley Colored School, and it only went through the seventh grade. Colored students who wanted to progress beyond the seventh grade had to go to Tallahassee. It wasnt until 1968 that the school became non-segregated and was renamed Chipley Junior High School. The school eventually was renamed Roulhac Middle School, now on Brickyard Road next to the Chipley High School campus, where it has been in operation since 2000. The old Roulhac Middle School buildings now house the T.J. Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center. Chipley has grown from being a lling station for steam engine trains to being a prosperous and lively town. Chipley encompasses 4.1 square miles, halfway in between the state capital of Tallahassee and the states westernmost city of Pensacola in beautiful Northwest Florida. Information in this story was compiled from articles published in the Washington County News May 15, 1982, edition. By PERRY E. WELLS Special to the News The City of Chipley is generally accepted as beginning in the year 1882, the year P&A Railroad was completed through this area after the mammoth project took three or more years to complete. Orange changed to Chipley after the development in an area south of the new town began to shift northward to be near the railroad. In 1982, many towns along the rail route from Tallahassee to Pensacola engaged in a yearlong time of jubilation of cially called the Railroad Centennial Celebration. Townspeople enjoyed boasting that Chipley led the way and took top honors of staging a full-year celebration, hosting numerous rousing performances of musicians and other entertainers, before the main celebration on May 22-23. These happenings put the spotlight on Chipleys big plans for the culmination weekend, which were labeled by the Washington County News following the event as a Super Success! Chipleys Railroad Centennial Celebration was led by relatively newcomers to the area, the husband-and-wife team of Dick and Polly Kneiss. The logo for the entire event was made into a giant button with the words, Chipley Centennial 100 Years of Rollin. Sales for the souvenir promotional item were brisk, and some of them still can be found in thrift stores here and in nearby towns. The full story of this historic extravaganza, along with writings on other festivals of the area, were printed the Heritage of Washington County book, issued in 2006. It sold more than 1,400 copies and remained out of print until two months ago when 200 additional copies were received. Contact me if you missed getting one earlier. Thirty years later, this newspaper is printing a special edition of the midweek paper, paying tribute to the towns history and looking at developments that have come our way since the all-out horn blowing of 1982. A Wal-Mart Supercenter has been added to the town. Numerous fast food outlets, including Waf e House, KFC, Burger King, Wendys, Arbys, and Sonic have joined existing Hardees and McDonalds in providing food for tourists, early and late workers and townspeople generally. Other specialty foods with Mexican and Chinese menus are available in addition to the traditional restaurants, Baileys, Continental, Skins and Bubbas. K.C. Pizza has joined Pizza Hut in providing pizza and pasta. West Point Home, manufactures of ne linens and other fabrics, became established in Chipley within the past 30 years, providing employment for hundreds of workers in the immediate area. Despite a troubled worldwide market for their goods, the local plant has survived with the persistence and perseverance of top-level and local company executives. Since 1982, Chipley native Tommy Ray McDonald Sr. returned to his hometown after a successful and interesting career in the U.S. Air Force, bringing his wife, Vivian, a young son, Tommy Ray Jr., and daughter, Kim, with him. Almost overnight, he ascended to positions of leadership, becoming the executive director of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and the mayor of Chipley. He still was holding both jobs at his untimely sickness and death April 29, 2005. The area lost other leaders in the passing of Farrell Nelson, Lloyd White, Ross Deal, E.W. (Judge) Carswell, Phillip Rountree, Marvin Engram, J.E. (Red) Davis and many others since the rst celebration. Chipley has a total new slate of leaders in City Hall from that of 1982. Linda Cain is the veteran mayor. The City Council consists of Karen Rustin, Kevin Russell, Lee Dell Kennedy and Ellis Reed. Kevin Crews is police chief, Floyd Aycock serves as re chief and Dan Miner holds the city managers post. A complete changeover also applies to the countys constitutional of cers. Colby Peel is county judge. Bobby Haddock is the current sheriff. Linda Cook holds the clerk of court position, while Gil Carter is property appraiser and Carol Finch Grif n is the elected supervisor of elections. Helen Guettler McEntyre, tax collector, and Dr. Sandra Cook, superintendent of schools, will leave these posts at the end of their present terms. Even though there has been a recognized downturn in the national economy during the past four years, new businesses and many other changes are coming into the area almost monthly. Gabriel Heater, the national news radio columnist during the World War II years, began his Mutual Radio Network nightly broadcast with this opening: Theres Good News Tonight! He ended his newscast with, Time Marches On. Hopefully Heaters prophetic opening and closing of a radio career which ended March 30, 1972, gives hope for all who joyfully celebrate life to its fullest in hometown Chipley, Fla. 1882 2012 From left are the historic Chipley Train Depot as it appeared in 1886 and Miss Chipley Helen Benson, who was featured on the front of the Washington County News on Oct. 12, 1939, as she was heading to Dothan, Ala., to compete in the second annual National Peanut Festival pageant. Railroad Avenue, as seen shortly after turn of the 20th century. The Washington County News of ce is now in this building. CHIPLEY CELEBRATES ITS BEGINNINGS: 1882-2012 1882 train station a humble beginning City still growing despite poor economy PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Community leaders Paul Peacock, from left, Tommy McDonald, Perry Wells and Raymond Norris during a Kiwanis Club presentation in the mid-90s. At right, a historic Chipley quilt is displayed by Sherri Biddle and Tommy McDonald Sr., celebrating the towns Centennial in 1982.

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Local A8 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Saturday, November 3rd, 2012 7:00am Registration for Redsh Run ( Front Steps of Gibson Inn) 8:00am Start of Redsh Run 10:00am Gates Open ($5.00 admission Charge & kids Under 12 Free) 10:00am Parade Starts (Hwy 98) 1:00-5:00pm Blue Crab Races (at the Top of Each Hour) (kids under 12) 1:00pm Oyster Shucking Contest 1:15pm Oyster Eating Contest 2:30pm 7:00pm Musical Entertainment 8:00pm Headline Entertainment ( Lee Brice ) 11:00pm Park Closes www.FloridaSeafoodFestival.com Friday, November 2nd, 2012 10:00am Park Opens (No Admission Charge) 4:00pm Blessing of the Fleet 4:00pm Arrival of King Retsyo Smokey Parrish and Queen Christina Collins 5:00-11:00pm Musical Entertainment 11:00pm Park Closes NOTICE OF ELECTION AND QUALIFYING FOR THE TOWN OF WAUSAU, FLORIDA GENERAL ELECTION On Tuesday, December 11, 2012 a general election will be held in the Town of Wausau at the Wausau Town Hall, 1607 Second Avenue, Wausau, Florida. Qualifying for the election will begin on Monday November 12, 2012 through November 15, 2012 during the hours of MondayWednesday 8:00 AM-4:00 PM; Thursday 8:00 AM-Noon at the Wausau Town Hall. The Qualifying fee is $25.00 plus a 1% election assessment fee for a total of $43.54. The seats up for election are Post 1, currently held by Roger D. Hagan, Council Post 4, currently held by Gail Culbreth and Post 5, currently held by B.J. Phillips. Anyone wishing to vote in the upcoming election who is not registered to vote may do so with the Washington County Supervisor of Elections on or before November 12, 2012, Registration books will close at this time. As published in the Washington County News on October 20, 24 & 31, 2012 Margaret Riley, Town Clerk FOR COUNTY COMMISSION ER DISTRICT 1 PRITCHARD PRITCHARD PRITCHARD Political advertisement paid for and approved by R oss Pritchard, Democrat for County Commissioner, District 1 A county commissioner should possess a host of qualities in order to be effective. I am a Floridalicensed building contractor and small business owner. Additionally, I have 25 years of work experience in emergency services. My experience and training have rendered me knowledgeable in areas such as positive business planning and Florida building codes and regulations. I also have expertise in disaster management, knowledge of the handling of hazardous materials (HAZMAT) as well as an extensive knowledge regarding all areas of FEMA. These credentials combined with communication skills, energy and drive make me the candidate that will work best for Washington County. I want the best for our county, and I have the skills and passion for serving the people of Washington County. I will make a difference. Lets work together to ensure that our residents can afford of this county and its values. Ross Pritchard NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2012, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. Oct. 15-22 Daven Bowden, 31, Chipley, petit theft, resist of cer without violence two counts, violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property, violation of state probation on false imprisonment Aldric Brown, 44, Vernon, sell of marijuana Robert Bullard, 40, Pensacola, driving while license suspended or revoked Sadarrius Bush, 20, Chipley, simple assault Brenda Chambers, 38, Clermont, possession of controlled substance without a prescription Glenn Chestnutt, 42, Las Vegas, Nev., Sarasota County warrant for child support Sebastian Dilsaver, 20, Chipley, operate motor vehicle without valid drivers license, possession marijuana less than 20 grams Robert Douds, 61, Bonifay, deliver meth, traf c in opium, sell of opium Alycia Flowers, 21, Bonifay, sell of marijuana, deliver or distribute meth Ernesto Gonzalez, 18, Chipley, operate motor vehicle without valid driver license Margaret Gunn, 36, Chipley, child support Jeremiah Hill, 22, Chipley, violation of state probation on criminal mischief Cody Knowles, 30, Bonifay, sell of marijuana, sell of meth Lorrie Laurel, 47, Chipley, insurance fraud more than 20 thousand but less than 100 thousand Ruben Laurel, 42, Chipley, insurance fraud more than 20 thousand but less than 100 thousand Tamala Payne, 46, Caryville, sell of marijuana four counts, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Miracle Williams, 20, Panama City, violation of state probation on resist of cer without violence, battery on law enforcement of cer, conspire to disrupt education process, felony battery John Works, 40, Caryville, sell of marijuana two counts Paul Wright, 52, Chipley, battery By RANDAL YAKEY 522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland has outraised challenger Al Lawson by more than $1.1 million in his campaign to regain his House District 2 seat. The numbers were posted earlier this month by the Center for Responsive Politics, which runs the website OpenSecrets.org. According to the group, Southerland, R-Panama City, was able to raise $1,602,108 through Oct. 17. Lawson, D-Tallahassee, raised $509,690. Southerlands campaign has spent $1,105,168 versus Lawsons $435,615. In 2010, Southerland spent nearly $1.3 million to capture the seat from Rep. Allen Boyd, who spent more than $3.8 million. On its OpenSecrets website, the Center for Responsive Politics has analyized individual contributors to the campaigns and listed the organizations and companies where the contributors or their spouses work. Southerlands main local contributors work for organizations that are fairly well known in the community. At the top of the list for Southerland is Gulf Coast Dermatology, $14,201, according to the latest numbers by OpenSecrets. Second is Eastern Shipbuilding, $12,500; and third is Bill Cramer Chevrolet at $10,500. The $10,000 organizations are Every Republican is Crucial PAC, Freedom Project, National Beer Wholesalers Association and the OSI Restaurant Partners. Others include GAC Contractors, $7,000, and L-3 Communications, $6,000. The Southerland campaign said the donations to the campaign were a sign the constituency was behind the congressman. The people of the district are rewarding Steve for going to Washington and keeping his promises, said Matt McCullough, communications director for Southerland. McCullough said the Lawson campaign was backed by special interest groups. Lawsons campaign said they are not worried about the spending gap. We are going to ght right through it, said Mara Sloan, spokeswoman for the Lawson campaign. Sloan also swung back at the Southerland camp, saying no one is getting more backing from Washington than Mr. Southerland. Its no surprise that the Southerland campaign is outspending the Lawson campaign, considering that theyve had two years to raise money from Washington special interest groups and big-time Washington donors, Sloan said. The Al Lawson campaign is fortunate to have the support of so many local North Floridians. Many of our top donors are actually commercial shermen right here in the second district. They have come together to support Al Lawson because they know that he will continue to stand up for them, unlike Congressman Southerland, who has not supported them during his time in Congress. Lawsons contributors work for organizations that include the American Association for Justice, $5,250, and a number of $5,000 contributions, including some from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Workers, BRIDGE PAC, Democrats Win Seats, Florida Benevolent Association, International Associations of Fireghters and the Plumbers and Pipe tters Union. Florida State University employees contributed $1,250 and Blue Cross/ Blue Shield employees put up $1,000 in support of Lawson. Special to the News CHIPLEY Take Stock In Children, a 120-credit-hour college tuition scholarship program announces it has selected eight new recipients in grades eight and nine who will be recognized by name at the annual presentation dinner on Nov. 13. Since its inception in Washington County in 2005, the local TSIC program has graduated 47 students from high school and 39 (including the 2012 high school graduates) are currently enrolled in a two-year or four-year college program or a certi cation program at technical centers. Three students are either in the one-year deferral or military deferral. For school year 2012-13, there are 29 students in grades 9-12 working toward high school graduation and receipt of the scholarship. The number of scholarship contracts to be awarded varies from year-to-year based upon the donations from Washington County businesses and individuals, as well as money in the state matching account. Since starting in 2005, the local TSIC has raised about $400,000, which excludes the state-level match, and the total value of scholarships is estimated at $775,000. The program has averaged about 10 high school graduates between Vernon and Chipley high schools each year that receive the 120-credit-hour tuition scholarship. To obtain the TSIC scholarship, a student must be in grades seven to 11, sign a contract to meet certain standards during the remaining school years until high school graduation and have family support; the parents/guardians also sign a contract to support their student. Family incomes must be below a certain level based upon the number of children in the family at the time the quali cation for TSIC is established. TSIC allocates more scholarships to grades seven to nine so the students will have more years in the program prior to high school graduation. Applications are taken each September shortly after the school year starts and are available from middle and high school guidance counselors. There is an urgent need for additional student mentors who work directly with the students and for additional student advocates who are the liaison between Take Stock and the local schools and guidance counselors. Other volunteer opportunities are available to serve on the Leadership Council that guides the total program or in fund raising. The Washington County Take Stock In Children program is locally run and locally funded and there is always work for willing hands. The TSIC program is operated by the Washington County Scholarship Foundation Inc., which holds federal and state income tax exemption with charitable organization registration. For more information about the program, to volunteer or to make a donation, contact David Solger, program coordinator, at 638-1276 or visit www.takestockinchildren.org. Arrest REPORT Take Stock In Children selects 8 new recipients Southerland tops Lawson

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Local Washington County News | A9 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 The WestPoint Home Factory Outlet is back in Chipley! Different location but same great product and great prices! WestPoint Home Factory Outlet 1055 Flower Ave, Chipley, FL 32428 Located behind our Chipley factory in the Industrial Park. The address is 1055 Fowler Drive. Turn off of Orange Hill Hwy on Commerce Ave, turn right on Fowler Drive, Outlet on left. (850) 638-9421 New Store Hours: Thursday and Friday 9 AM to 5 PM Saturday 9AM to 3 PM WestPoint Home WestPoint Home Great selection of Famous name Comforters, Sheets, Towels, Pillows, Blankets, Throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices. By RANDAL YAKEY 522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY From arguments over authorization of the RESTORE Act to accusations of slashing funding for Medicare and Medicaid, the race for the Florida Congressional District 2 seat has gone though a number of transformations. At one point during the campaign, a Democratic pollster had incumbent Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, and his Democratic challenger, Al Lawson, running neck-andneck, each garnering about 43 percent of the vote. And the two men have been throwing barbs at each other since early this summer. Lawson has charged Southerland doesnt pay his taxes on time, while Southerland has charged Lawson will gut Medicare and Medicaid. Earlier this month, the Southerland campaign dubbed Lawson Absentee Al after Lawson chose not to attend candidate forums in Marianna and Vernon, and, according to Southerlands campaign, pulled out of a scheduled television debate in Panama City. Lawson did join in the televised League of Women Voters forum Wednesday in Panama City, and when he showed up, Lawson threw some jabs at Southerland. I am the candidate in this race with the proven experience to stand up for the issues that are most important to North Florida, said Lawson, a former state senator whose district wedged into a small part of eastern Bay County. From protecting guaranteed bene ts like Medicare and Social Security, to making college affordable, to helping small businesses create jobs to boost our economy and strengthen the middle class, I will wake up every day ready to ght for our community and our values. Both candidates have said they can work across party lines to get more done if elected to Congress. A big issue for both candidates has been easing gridlock in Washington. Lawson, who was prevented from running for re-election to the state Senate because of term limits, said that back in 2010 he supported former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist over Democrat Kendrick Meek for U.S. Senate. Lawson also touted working with former Gov. Jeb Bush. I have a record of working across party lines, Lawson said. Lawson also charged that Southerland worked in lock step with Republicans on nearly every issue. He said Southerland voted along Republican Party lines 93 percent of the time. Southerland also touted working across party lines. In a recent radio interview with WFSU, Southerland talked about working with Democrats in Congress. Floyd Patrick Miller, who was wedged in between Lawson and Southerland in a recent forum, is a write-in candidate. I am here with the New Deal of the 21st Century to bring new development of minerals, oil, natural gas and infrastructure to the United States that will bring jobs all across this great country, Miller writes on his website. Miller doesnt give any speci cs as how he plans to implement his plan. Southerland, Lawson battle heats up for District 2 STEVE SOUTHERLAND II Party af liation: Republican Current occupation: Small business owner and member of Congress Experience: As a third generation small business owner with family roots in the region that predate statehood, Im proud to ght for the land I love. Long before joining Congress, I took an active role in strengthening our community, including experience chairing the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida and the Bay County Chamber of Commerce, while also serving on the boards of the Covenant Hospice Foundation, the Economic Development Alliance and the Bay Defense Alliance. Platform: Both parties share blame in giving rise to a federal government that no longer re ects its people. Thats why I havent hesitated to stand up to both parties to defend our North and Northwest Florida values. Im focused on empowering families and job creators to improve conditions for economic growth, and that begins with eliminating the crushing burden of Washington regulations, spending and debt. Im proud of the progress weve made, but much work remains. Why do you deserve to be reelected? Ive kept my word to my constituents. I said Id ght to save Medicare, and I voted to restore $716 billion in Medicare funding cut by ObamaCare. I said Id reduce spending, and I voted to cut our House of ce budgets by 11percent while implementing historic levels in federal spending cuts. I said Id rebuild the connection between the people and their representative, and Ive hosted 44 free town hall discussions in two years. Campaign website: www. southerlandforcongress.com AL LAWSON Party af liation: Democrat Current occupation: President, Lawson & Associates Experience: Member, Florida House of Representatives 19822000; member, Florida Senate 2000-2010; Senate Democratic Leader 20082010, dean of the Florida Legislature 2010. Platform: As hardworking families continue to struggle in this economy, Congress is gridlocked, and Congressman Steve Southerland is part of the problem. I am not alone in expressing frustration with Congress. Washington is paralyzed by partisanship, and nothing is getting done. Its not a problem with Democrats, and its not a problem with Republicans. Its a problem with Congress. During my time in the Florida Legislature, I had a record of getting things done. Why do you deserve to be elected? Ive worked with my own party when it was right for my district, and Ive worked across party lines when it was right for my district. My philosophy has always been that Im here to represent the people, not to engage in partisan politics. This is a viewpoint too often absent from the halls of Congress. When elected to the Congress, the people of North Florida will nally have a congressman who will put their interests rst. Campaign website: www. lawson4congress.com FLOYD PATRICK MILLER Party af liation: Write-in Current occupation: Hospitality industry Experience: Held Florida real estate sales associate license since 1994. I have been a working manager for most of the past 20 years, bringing a unique view of needs of the working class and the needs and costs of employers. I am a property owner and have the same concerns as millions of middle-class homeowners trying to make mortgage payments, homeowners insurance, property taxes and monthly upkeep of a home. Platform: I am a working man for the working class. Education is the most important investment our country can make. I am for fully funding education. I will ght for Social Security, Medicare and veterans needs. I will ght for womens rights from equal pay to freedom to determine their own health needs. I am for raising the minimum wage to a living wage set by in ation; it would be $15.50 an hour. Why do you deserve to be elected/re-elected? I will work to bring con dence back to our government by keeping big money in check by working for We The People. Will work to end the war on drugs and tax it. Will work for better pay for our teachers, military, police, all civil employees. Will ght to keep the oil, natural gas and minerals on federal land and in federal water for We The People to pay off debt of the nation and fund future needs. Campaign website: oydpatrickmiller.com

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Local A10 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 From the Associates of Store 2114 Way to Go Athletes Alex ONeal Chipley H.S. Football Linebacker 11th Grade Fallon Braxton Holmes County H.S. Volleyball 12th Grade Athletes Congratulations to these top athletes! Jacob Martinez (red) Bozeman H.S. Football QB & DB 12th Grade Chance Jowers Graceville H.S. Football Guard 10th Grade Austin Brown Vernon H.S. Football Wide Receiver 10th Grade Athletes for Poplar Springs H.S. and Ponce de Leon H.S. will begin in November. Hanna Mollet Bethlehem H.S. Volleyball Hitter 12th Grade Fallon Braxton Hanna Mollet Jacob Martinez (red) Alex ONeal Austin Brown Austin Brown Chance Jowers Chance Jowers CHIPLEY HIGH SCHOOL BAND PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER The Chipley High School Marching Band performed its last home game half time show Friday, complete with a special appearance by a freight train that rolled through town during the bands performance. This years show, which features songs from The Sound of Music, earned the band Superior marks during their performance at the 27th annual Daleville Invitational Band Classic in Alabama.

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COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today! NOV. 3 SC O REB O ARD Enter by Noon on Friday TI E BR E AK E R Miami I ndianapolis Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______ Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County TimesA dvertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www.bonifaynow.com Name ____________________________________________ Address __________________________________________ City ________________________________ Zip _________ Daytime Phone ____________________________________ Email ____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-Subscriber R ules 1. College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2. Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3. Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4. A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5. Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6. Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7. All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8. Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9. The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10. Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11. Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. 1. Syracuse Cincinnati 2. TCU West Virginia 3. Texas A&M Mississippi State 4. Arizona State Oregon State 5. Missouri Florida 6. Oregon Southern California 7. Colorado State Wyoming 8. Alabama LSU 9. New Mexico State Auburn 10. SMU UCF CHEC K HE R E FO R E A CH WEE K S W I NNE R October 27 Winner Scott Waltrip Chipley Missed 3, TB Yardage By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Kobe McCrary and the Chipley Tigers outran the Freeport Bulldogs 39-13 Friday night at Philip Rountree Stadium. It was a nondistrict game between two of the more successful Class 1A programs in recent years. Chipley improved to 5-4, with Freeport falling to 3-6. Freeport senior quarterback Owen Cole connected with junior Morgan Hardee in the end zone with 8:21 to play in the rst quarter and senior Nick Russells kick gave the Bulldogs a 7-0 lead. It was short-lived as Chipley running back McCrary scored three rst-half touchdowns and the Tigers were in command. Less than 30 seconds after Freeports touchdown, McCrary answered with a 52-yard scoring run. Fletcher Dillmores kick tied the game. With 3:02 left in the rst quarter, the Tigers took the lead on McCrarys 17-yard run that capped a 55-yard, six-play drive. With 5:48 remaining in the half, Chipley again found the end zone with McCrary busting over the middle from 3 yards to make it 20-7. The Tigers rst-half response wasnt completed as with 2:07 left in the second quarter junior quarterback Jordan Finch connected with junior wide receiver Dallas Oliver in the end zone. Chipley led 26-7 at intermission. The Tigers scored on their rst possession of the second half when sophomore wide receiver Carlon Smiths TD capped a 46yard, four-play drive. Dillmores kick gave the Tigers a 33-7 lead. Freeport responded with an 80-yard, seven-play drive, helped by a Tiger personal foul. The march ended with senior wide receiver Zach Fordem nabbing Coles pass in the end zone. The Tigers nished the scoring as the third quarter expired when sophomore running back Wyatt Brock ran up the middle from 2 yards to cap a 57-yard, nine-play effort. Chipley heads to Bonifay next week to face Holmes County in a key District 3-1A game. McCrary sparks Chipley to non-district triumph PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER The Chipley Tigers manhandled the Freeport Bulldogs 39-13 Friday in non-conference play at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley. The Tigers travel to Bonifay this week to face the Blue Devils. SP O RTS www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, October 31, 2012 A Page 11 Section Crestview overwhelms Mosley By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY If Friday night was a referendum on postseason motivation versus pride, motivation won out handily at Tommy Oliver Stadium. Crestview, still striving to become a factor in District 2-6A, downed Mosley 39-7 to remain relevant in the playoff discussion at 2-2, 4-5 overall. Mosley, already eliminated, slid to 0-4, 3-5. More to the point, the game showcased a team with a number of players who soon will be suiting up on Saturdays against an overmatched opponent. Micah Reed, a verbal commitment to UCF, rushed for 108 yards and the rst two touchdowns of the game to spark the Bulldogs. Junior defensive end Denzel Ware, who already has announced his intention to attend Florida State, sacked Mosley quarterback Zach Rhodes for a 16-yard loss early in the game. That negated a fumble recovery by Zach Warnick on a muffed punt by Crestview that set up the Dolphins on the Bulldogs 21. The series ended in a punt, and Mosley eventually trailed 17-0 at halftime. Reed scored on runs of 9 and 40 yards, the latter coming only 18 seconds before halftime and appearing to take the steam out of the Dolphins. Crestviews defense already had punished a depleted Mosley offense. Of 15 rst-half running plays by the Dolphins, only three resulted in positive yardage. Mosley momentarily clawed back into contention midway through the third quarter to trail 17-7. Louie Abbotts interception and 30-yard return set up the Dolphins on the Crestview 31, and they took 10 plays to reach the end zone. Rhodes engineered a pair of fourthdown conversions, nding wide receiver Nat Dixon for 6 yards and sneaking for 2 yards behind Caleb Houghton. Rhodes found Dixon on a fade route in the corner of the end zone from 8 yards with 5:37 left in the quarter and Christian Marshs extra point narrowed the gap to 10 points. Until the ensuing kickoff. Jaylynn Robinson bobbled Marshs pooch kick at his 20 and dribbled the ball momentarily around his feet. When he gained possession he easily broke contain down the visiting sideline and picked up a pair of vicious blocks to go 80 yards. It sparked a trio of long scoring plays as the Bulldogs turned a triumph into a rout. Robinson streaked 69 yards on a sweep to the right on Crestviews opening possession of the fourth quarter. Emmanuel Reed duplicated the yardage and the result with 5:19 remaining. Crestview enjoyed an advantage of beef and muscle on both side of the football and it showed on the stat sheet. The Bulldogs piled up 361 yards to 171 for the Dolphins. From Staff Reports BLOUNTSTOWN Javakiel Brigham led a balanced scoring attack with two rushing touchdowns and Hunter Jordan completed his two passes for scores to lead Blountstown to a 51-0 rout of Franklin County on Friday. Jordan tossed scoring strikes to Josh Taylor and Tripp Taylor to give the Tigers an early 21-0 lead. Brigham rushed for 45 yards and scored twice in the rst half to propel the Tigers to a 44-0 lead. Fabian Solomon added 41 yards and the games nal score in the fourth quarter. Alex Mayorga led Blountstown with 75 yards rushing and he added a secondquarter touchdown. Bobby Andrews also scored on the ground and the Tigers racked up 237 yards rushing. Blountstown dominated on defense, holding Franklin County to minus-63 total yards. Ladarius Rhodes was the lone Franklin County rusher with positive yardage, as he nished with 9 yards and the Seahawks longest gain of 7. Blountstown (5-3, 2-1 District 4-1A) hosts West Gadsden next week in its nal district game. Franklin County (2-6, 1-3) is off. Blountstown dominates Franklin County, 51-0 HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Mosleys Peyton Kirkley (65) and Ben Morrisey (58) combine to bring down Crestviews Micah Reed after a short gain Friday night at Tommy Oliver Stadium. Mosley momentarily clawed back into contention midway through the third quarter to trail 17-7. Louie Abbotts interception and 30-yard return set up the Dolphins on the Crestview 31, and they took 10 plays to reach the end zone. See CRESTVIEW A12

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Red, White & Blue Celebration Music Concert Saturday, 3 November 2012 11:00 AM 4:00 PM All American Music Show featuring Church Cake Sale COUNTRY, ROCK & ROLL, BEACH MUSIC, GOSPEL, 50s & 60s, BLUES & ELVIS HITS Bring Your Picnic Basket, Lawn Chairs, Umbrellas, Pop-up Canopies and Cooler, but Please No Alcoholic Beverages or Pets. This is a Family Event! Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Pettis, NPA, for Sheri Prizes Fun Games FREE JW Adams the star of Echoes of Elvis and Terry King at the Farmers Market and Gazebo Downtown Chipley, Florida Come Join the Party Kids Fun and Face Painting DAMAGE PREVENTION CALL BEFORE YOU DIG The Sunshine One-Call of Florida advises that many damages to buried utility lines can be avoided when everyone participates in a four-step process that begins with a call before you dig. Follow these four steps designed to help you avoid hitting buried utility lines during any project that involves digging. Step 1: Call before you dig Florida law says homeowners must call 811 or (800)432-4770 two full business days before digging in any easement, right-of-way, or permitted use area. Contractors are required to call in every job that involves digging or disturbing the earths surface. After you call, a locate ticket will be generated and buried utility lines will be located and marked with color-coded them. Hitting a buried utility could result in anything from no cable tv service to serious injury or loss of life when electrical or gas lines are involved. Visit www. callsunshine.com for more information. Step 2: Wait the required time. After you call, utility companies have two full business days to locate and mark the approximate location of buried utility lines. Refrain from digging until all utilities on your locate ticket have responded or the allowed color-coded locate marks have been placed, whether the site is clear of a particular utility or if the locate has been delayed by calling (800)852-8057 and entering your locate ticket number. This can also be done at www.callsunshine.com. Step 3: Protect the locate marks. Keep the locate marks visible until the project is complete. When marks are destroyed or removed, the excavator must stop any digging and place another call for locate marks. Locate marks are valid for 20 days. Removal of valid locate marks is a misdemeanor. Step 4: Dig safely. Use extreme caution when digging within 24 inches on either side of the marks to avoid hitting the buried utility lines. If you are using machinery to dig, someone other than the person operating the machine must supervise the activity, watching carefully to avoid damaging the buried utility. Failure to call Sunshine State One-Call of Florida $250 and the job site being shut down. If damage occurs, please notify. Emergency Contacts: Chester Campbell, Public Works (850) 638-6346 Fire Department (850) 638-6301 Sheriffs Department (850) 638-6111 FAIR HOUSING Washington County has enacted a Fair Housing Ordinance making it illegal to discriminate on the basis of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, age or handicap: In the sale or rental or terms or conditions for rental housing. In advertising the sale or rental of housing. In the provision of real estate brokerage service. In the tactics of blockbusting. Washington County will receive, investigate, and seek to conciliate complaints of housing discrimination. Fair and impartial hearings are assured and both administrative and appellant relief opportunities are provided. For further information, contact Washington County at 850-638-6200 or contact the following: 1-800-342-8170 State Hotline 1-800-424-8590 Federal Hotline I Caught You Another Big One! Come and Get It At The Best Seafood Market In Town FRIDAYS PREP SCORES Admiral Farragut 47, Northside Christian 13 Alonso 17, Tampa Catholic 14 Anclote 21, Wesley Chapel 14 Auburndale 39, Fort Meade 0 Bartow 24, Sebring 7 Bayshore 21, DeSoto County 20 Belleview 42, Santa Fe 7 Bishop Moore 27, Lake Nona 26 Bishop Snyder 35, Branford 0 Bishop Verot 37, North Fort Myers 7 Blountstown 51, Franklin County 0 Boca Ciega 33, Tarpon Springs 20 Bozeman School 49, Wewahitchka 12 Calvary Christian 48, Bradenton Christian 28 Cambridge Christian 7, Seffner Christian 6 Cape Coral 48, Lehigh 42 Carrollwood Day 28, Indian Rocks 22 Chamberlain 19, Gaither 17 Chipley 39, Freeport 13 Citrus 63, Lake Weir 41 Clay 26, Paxon 6 Clearwater Central Catholic 23, Lemon Bay 0 Columbia 21, Orange Park 0 Community School of Naples 35, St. Stephens Episcopal 14 Cottondale 36, Sneads 21 Countryside 23, Pinellas Park 7 Crestview 39, Mosley 7 Dixie County 34, Chie and 7 Dunbar 44, Avon Park 0 Dunedin 17, Middleton 7 Dunnellon 40, Crystal River 29 Durant 28, East Bay 3 Eagles View 53, St. Francis 13 East Gadsden 27, Florida 8 East Lee County 55, Cypress Lake 16 Estero 48, Mariner 35 Eustis 51, Tavares 0 Evangelical Christian 30, St. Petersburg Catholic 27 First Baptist 46, Out-of-Door Academy 42 Fort Myers 30, Ida S. Baker 27 Frostproof 24, Tenoroc 8 Gainesville 14, Madison County 9 George Steinbrenner 48, Wiregrass Ranch 10 Godby 64, Tate 28 Golden Gate 28, Gulf Coast 10 Graceville 28, Jay 14 Gulf Breeze 35, Choctawhatchee 12 Hamilton County 42, The Villages 14 Harmony 15, Gateway 13 Harvest Community Scvool 68, Seacoast Christian 0 Hawthorne 35, Bronson 0 Hernando 14, Nature Coast Tech 7 Hillsborough 43, King 7 Hudson 30, Gulf 0 Island Coast 31, Riverdale 14 Jefferson 39, Leto 6 Jesuit 21, Gibbs 13 John Paul II Catholic 41, Rocky Bayou Christian 35 Kissimmee Osceola 43, Liberty 6 Lafayette 42, P.K. Yonge 14 Lake Brantley 21, Lake Mary 17 Lake Gibson 15, Kathleen 13 Lake Howell 21, Winter Springs 14 Lake Mary Prep 26, Agape Christian 24 Lake Placid 16, LaBelle 14 Lake Region 34, Haines City 29 Lakeland Christian 45, Shorecrest Prep 3 Land OLakes 31, Brooksville Central 14 Landmark Christian 46, International Community 26 Largo 38, Lakewood Ranch 0 Leesburg 34, South Lake 27 Leesburg The First Academy 36, Windermere Prep 30 Lely 47, Palmetto Ridge 0 Liberty County 48, South Walton 0 Maclay 62, Munroe Day 0 Manatee 62, Palmetto 0 Milton 28, Pace 20 Mount Dora 29, Bradford 18 Navarre 44, Ft. Walton Beach 28 Nease 37, Matanzas 14 Newsome 42, Riverview 6 North Florida Christian 48, Walton 24 Northview 40, Vernon 0 Oak Hall 35, St. Johns Country Day 0 Oakleaf 39, Middleburg 13 Ocala Trinity Catholic 32, Booker 0 Ocala Vanguard 48, Lecanto 0 Orlando The First Academy 56, Berkeley Prep 0 Oviedo 16, Oak Ridge 14 Oviedo Masters Academy 40, Peniel Baptist 8 Pasco 45, Ridgewood 0 Pensacola 50, Pensacola Washington 7 Pine Forest 21, Escambia 3 Plant City 22, Brandon 20 Plant 20, Armwood 19, OT Ponte Vedra 20, Creekside 0 Providence 27, West Nassau County 22 Rickards 48, Fort White 17 Ridge Community 36, George Jenkins 6 Ridgeview 58, Leon 21 Robinson 19, Lakewood 8 Sanford Seminole 28, Hagerty 19 Sarasota Riverview 28, Sarasota 24 Seminole Osceola 55, Dixie Hollins 26 Seven Rivers Christian 42, Central Florida Christian 35 Sickles 31, Strawberry Crest 17 South Fort Myers 28, Charlotte 27 South Sumter 42, Keystone Heights 0 Southeast 44, Hardee 10 Spoto 13, Lennard 3 Springstead 35, Mitchell 0 St. Cloud 49, Celebration 0 St. John Neumann 47, Southwest Florida Christian 6 St. Petersburg Canterbury 21, Keswick Christian 0 St. Petersburg Northeast 35, Seminole 0 St. Petersburg 10, Clearwater 7 Sunlake 35, River Ridge 9 Tampa Bay Tech 37, Tampa Freedom 0 Taylor County 28, Suwannee 20 Temple Christian 34, Cedar Creek Christian 22 Trenton 49, Hilliard 6 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 42, Yulee 22 Trinity Prep 27, Santa Fe Catholic 0 Umatilla 62, Montverde Academy 0 Union County 33, Williston 12 Venice 45, Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 29 Vero Beach Masters Academy 61, Bishop McLaughlin 7 Victory Christian 28, Foundation Academy 20 Wakulla 56, Deltona Trinity Christian 0 Warner Christian 12, St. John Lutheran 0 Weeki Wachee 29, Interlachen 22 West Florida 52, Arnold 21 West Orange 21, Ocoee 0 West Port 42, Chiles 33 Wharton 38, Blake 7 Winter Haven 27, Lake Wales 14 Zephyrhills 35, Fivay 28 By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner Bmilner@pcnh.com SAND HILLS You can forgive Bozeman for looking ahead to next week. Bucks coach Loren Tillman only hopes they saved a few points. Bozeman overcame an early hiccup to race past visiting Wewahitchka 49-12 on Friday. It was Bozemans nal tuner for the District 3-1A nale at South Walton next week when the Bucks will try to wrap up their second playoff berth in school history. We wanted to come out, play enough to be sharp and not get anyone hurt, said Tillman, whose parents are Wewa natives. Thats what we had to do to go into next Friday and give ourselves a chance to compete. Wewa (2-7), which lost for the fth time in six games, struck rst on the games opening possession. Rashard Rainie carried 66 yards on the games rst play and Jalyn Addison scored from 3 to give the upset-minded Gators a 6-0 lead. Thoughts of pulling off a shocker faded quickly, as James Jernigan raced 20 yards for a tying score four plays later. Jernigan added touchdown receptions of 34 and 16 yards from Jacob Martinez and Jovani Bell scored twice to stake the Bucks to a 42-6 halftime lead. Martinez also rushed for a rst-half score to help Bozeman (6-2) score 42 unanswered points. The running clock in the second half put a merciful end to the night for the overmatched Gators. Wewa has a lot of youth and they just need to keep playing, Tillman said. I see a bright future for them. Rainie led Wewa with 109 yards rushing on 18 carries. Addison added a second score at the end of the third quarter. The Gators were held to 199 yards for the game after amassing 77 on their rst drive. Bell exploded for a game-high 138 yards on the ground on only ve totes. Martinez added 66 yards rushing and was 4 of 5 for 93 through the air. Jernigan chipped in 83 total yards. Bozeman can assure itself no worse than a tiebreaker with a win over South Walton. The Bucks will clinch second place and a regional spot with a win and a Holmes County victory over Chipley. We win and see how the other game goes, Tillman said. If we lose then all bets are off. Wewa is idle next week. Wewahitchka 6 0 6 0 12 Bozeman 21 21 0 7 49 First quarter WHS Addison 3 run (pass failed) 9:10, 6-0 WHS BOZ Jernigan 20 run (kick failed) 7:22, 6-6 BOZ Bell 51 run (Burns run) 4:57, 14-6 BOZ BOZ Jernigan 34 pass from Martinez (Burns kick) 3:33, 21-6 Second quarter BOZ Jernigan 16 pass from Martinez (Burns kick) 9:43, 28-6 BOZ Bell 1 run (Benjamin kick) 3:59, 35-6 BOZ Martinez 2 run (Burns kick) :55, 42-6 Third quarter WHS Addison 23 run (pass failed) :00, 42-12 Fourth quarter BOZ Thompson 5 run (Burns kick) 8:02, 49-12 Bozeman crushes Wewa Mosleys back eld, already missing leading rusher Ryan Rogers and forced to juggle the roster, was further limited in the second half. In the space of two minutes, Rhodes was knocked from the game when Ware broke through for a clean hit during an incompletion, halfback Andrew Hardrick had to leave the game and Warnick, moved from defense to supplement the halfback position was sidelined. All but Warnick returned by the fourth quarter. However, Rhodes and Dixon supplied most of the offensive output by teaming on eight completions for 103 yards. Rhodes was 11-24 overall with one interception, and that on his nal pass of the game. Mosley completes its district schedule at rst-place Navarre next week. Crestview could stake a claim to a shootout berth or a playoff spot outright by winning its district nale against visiting Niceville. CRESTVIEW from page A11 HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Fullback Christian Childree (40) finds running room as Tyler Henderson makes the stop for Crestview and the Bulldogs Brandon Davis (9) moves in. Sports A12 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section JOHN PETTIS for Washington County S HERIFF HONESTY INTEGR I TY PROFESS I ONAL I SM Its not about making promises, its about producing results. Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Pettis, No Party Aliation for Sheri INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Car Wash CHIPEY The City of Chipley Public Works Department will be having a car wash on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Citys Parking lot on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 90 to bene t needy families for their annual Christmas Fund. The car wash starts at 8 a.m. Ladies Ministry Yard Sale BONIFAY During the annual 9-mile Yard Sale on Nov. 3, the Hickory Hill Baptist Church Ladies Ministry will be selling hundreds of items in downtown Westville. The yard sale will include childrens and adult clothes, shoes, household items and much more. Prices will be the lowest ever. The sale begins at 7 a.m. on Highway 179-A about two blocks north of the Westville City Hall. Proceeds from the sale will be used for ministry work in the community as the Ladies Ministry spread the blessings of Jesus to all. Everyone is invited to check out the sale, and are welcome to church services at Hickory Hill Baptist Church. Information on church programs can be obtained by calling the church of ce at 956-4116. VES Annual Fall Festival VERNON Vernon Elementary School will be holding their annual Fall Festival from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1. Tickets may be purchased today in advance from 7:30 to 8 a.m. or 2:15 to 3 p.m. Tickets are 5 for $1. For more ticket information call 535-2486. Food for sale will include hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, pickles, polish sausage, chili, boiled peanuts, beverages. There will also be a Sweet Shoppe. Games at the festival will be a cake walk, glow-in-the-dark, pick up ducks, can toss, treasure box, mystery box, sh pond, plinko, ring toss and many more. There will also be spirit shirt sales, face painting, in atable toys, and a bouncy house. Entertainment will be provided and there will also be an auction. For more information call 535-2486. Wednesday, OCTOBER 31 2012 T R U n K O R T R e A T Hundreds of children and parents turned out Saturday for Chipleys Trunk Or Treat, sponsored by the Merchants of Historic Chipley. Churches, businesses and civic groups were on hand to distribute treats to hundreds of little goblins and ghouls. Wausau also held the city Halloween festivities on Saturday, including a haunted house at the Volunteer Fire Department. Tonight is Halloween, so more children are likely to be out and about throughout the county. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Annual CHRISTMAS GREETINGS S ECTI O N This fun holiday section features letters to Santa from local elementary school children. Publishes Wednesday, Nov. 21 Deadline: Wednesday, Nov. 14 at noon To advertise call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Just in time for Black Friday! Home for the Holiday S H OPP ING GU I D E Featurin g holiday specials, gifts or oers Only $65 Publishes Wed., Nov. 21 Deadline: Wed., Nov. 14 at noon SPECIAL OFFER Run in both the Shopping Guide and Greetings section and SAVE 10% on your Greetings ad Special to Extra VERNON Vernon Middle School will receive Nook tablets for grades six through eight. The tablets will help all students with class work and homework. The tablets will help students gain a better un derstanding of their work and get them to try some thing new, as well as alle viate the weight students carry in their backpacks. The students can choose whether or not to receive a tablet. Students will be giv en the option to pay $20.91 ahead of time or pay noth ing and be responsible for the tablet, but if damage occurs then the student will pay the whole price of the Nook tablet. If students do not get a tablet, they will have a textbook. These Nook tab lets have a lot memory and are specially used for stor ing books. The tablets are enabled with the Internet, games and other features, but students will be respon sible for anything stored, lost or used on them, like graphics or videos. Each tablet will come with a soft case. The Nooks will also help the teachers who dont have classroom textbook copies and textbook cop ies for each student to take home for the year. Special to Extra MARIANNA The Chipola College Student Support Services program recently has been busy touring universities, giving its students a chance to research future education opportunities. SSS is a TRIO program funded by the U.S. Department of Education to assist rst generation and/or low-in come students and/or students with disabilities to succeed academically in college. The Chipola SSS program is funded to serve 140 students. Chipola SSS advisers Kristie Mos ley, Christen Bennett and their group of students visited Florida State University on Oct. 13 for a tour and a football game, a true Nole experi ence. On Oct. 19, the group headed to Auburn University for a tour of the campus. Next semester, SSS will visit the University of Florida and Troy University. High school or Chipola students interested in the SSS program should contact Kristie Mosley or Christen Bennett or call 718-2417. For more information, visit the Chipola SSS website at chipola.edu/ SSS/index.htm. Stephine Lurtz and Jessie Ramsey announce the upcoming their upcoming wedding in Bethlehem. Stephine is the daughter of LaDelle Lurtz and the late Daniel Lurtz of Bonifay. Jessie is the son of Felix and Sharon Ramsey of Marianna. The wedding will take place, Saturday, Nov. 3, at Bethlehem Methodist Church with a fun-lled reception at the couples home in Bethlehem to follow. Todd and Fawn Katherine (Turner) Hess of Fort Riley, Kan., announce the birth of their daughter. Lauren Katherine was born Oct. 8 and weighed 8 pounds 5 ounces and was 20.5 inches long at Geary Community Hospital, Junction City, Kan. Grandparents are the late Paul Turner, Ocala, Cheri and Ron Shafer, and Augustine and Deb and Dennis Hess Ill. Army Pvt. Nathen C. Hendrickson has graduated from the Basic Field Artillery Cannon Crewmember Advanced Individual Training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. The course is designed to train service members to maintain, prepare and load ammunition for ring; operate and perform operator maintenance on prime movers, self-propelled Howitzers and ammunition vehicles; store, maintain and distribute ammunition to using units as a member of battery or battalion ammunition section; perform crew maintenance and participate in organizational maintenance of weapons and related equipment; and establish and maintain radio and wire communications. Hendrickson is the son of Donna Burch of Sea Lion Lane, Ponce de Leon. He is a 2010 graduate of Freeport High School. Dr. Vickie Stephens has been selected the Chipola College Faculty/Administrator/ Other Professional Award of the month for November. Stephens has served as dean of School of Health Sciences since 2009. Here, Dr. Stephens is congratulated by Dr. Jason Hurst, vice president of Baccalaureate and Occupational Education.SP E C IA L T O EXT RA Vernon Middle School to get tablets Cakes and Pies for a Cure The Krafty Katz Relay For Life team is holding a Cakes and Pies for a Cure Thanksgiving sale. Pecan, pumpkin, cherry and apple pies are $15. The coconut cake, chocolate cake, peanut butter cake, key lime cake and the cream cheese pound cake are $25. The red velvet cake is $35. Payment is due when order is placed. All prots from the cakes and pies will go to Washington County Relay For Life. The deadline for orders is Nov. 16. Anyone ordering will be able to pick up his or her cakes or pies from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 21 at C&C Bookkeeping located at 809 Main St. in Chipley. The team will deliver to local business in Bonifay and Chipley. For more information or to place an order, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 6381483, Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121 or Cecilia Spears at 658-4038.Washington County Relay For LifeWASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County will be holding their 2013 Relay For Life Event, from 6 p.m. on April 12 to 11 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. The theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. LUR TZ AND RAMSEY TO WED Hesses welcome baby girl SP E C IA L T O EXT RA The Chipola College Student Support Services (SSS) program has been busy recently touring universities, giving its students a chance to research future education opportunities. Here, the group is pictured at the FSU fountain.Chipola SSS students tour universities Relay for Life EVENTS Hendrickson graduates training To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY THE CAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Endowment for Tomorrows Jobs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0,0 00 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL STEPHENS RECEIVES AWARD BIR TH

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Halloween is today, and many pet owners have already purchased their animals costume. Although these outts can be fun and festive, the wrong outt can be harmful to your animal. Although costumes are a fun way to interact with your pet, Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor and director of general surgery services at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, stressed the importance of monitoring your pet in the clothing. Cute little costumes are fun to put on your animals while trick-or-treating, but when you are not watching your animals, make sure to take them off, Stickney said. He also explained that this also goes for sweaters, jackets or any other pet clothing. While it may seem like pets need clothes to stay warm, they can do more harm than good if the animal is not monitored. More than likely your animal does not need to keep clothing on to stay warm, even in the winter, Stickney said. If you have a house pet that only goes outside for 15-20 minutes to go to the bathroom, they will be more than ne without the clothing. Another thing Stickney recommended avoiding in pet costumes are dangly pieces of fabric, bells, or other small objects that the animal can chew off and swallow. These things can cause the pet to choke and possibly cause blockages in their intestinal track. Ribbons and bows are especially dangerous for cats, Stickney added. These are things cats love to play with and chew on, but if they swallow them it causes what is called a linear foreign body. This requires emergency surgery to remove or it can saw a hole in the intestines. Stickney also warned of a pet being allergic to the clothing material or the laundry detergent used to wash the costume. If an animal is allergic to a costume or clothing, Stickney said it might develop an itchy, red rash. The best thing to do is to take the outt off of the pet and retire it, Stickney said. There is no reason to cause your pet pain and discomfort. Finally, Stickney stressed that it is important to make sure the outts t correctly. Anything that can wrap around the pets neck, paws, or legs can cause them to panic or injure themselves. This is especially common in small or young dogs as many costumes may not t them correctly because of their size, Stickney said. The best way to select pet costumes or clothing is to buy them at a pet store where you can take your pet with you and try the outt on them. That way you will know for sure that it not only ts correctly but that it also looks as adorable as you hoped. About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http:// tamunews.tamu.edu/. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu Special to Extra FORT WALTON BEACH To facilitate ongoing dialogue and further develop re lationships with military partners, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll met with the newly restructured Air Force Materiel Command, Com mander Brig. Gen. Arnold Bunch, Jr. and the 96th Test Wing Commander at Eglin Air Force Base, Brigadier General David Harris to get a status update on the recent consolidation com pletion required by BRAC 2005 of the Air Force Mate riel Command. Bunch reassured Carroll that he was committed to getting the desired mission at Eglin to increase efcien cy and effectiveness to stand up the mission and support all personnel. He also stated that, no jobs or pay were lost at Eglin due to the consolida tion. The consolidation will realize $109 million/year cost avoidance to the Air Force. Carroll raised concerns about the looming national security threat of cyber ter rorism and asked General Bunchs help to grow more mission opportunities for the 96th Test Wing to be the leader in the Air Force for research and development of counter cyber security measures. Carroll said, there is a great opportunity for Flor ida to utilize the talent and extraordinary asset at the Wing to consolidate a cross section of departments and agencies to enhance and conduct proper systems test and development to combat the next greatest threat to our nation. Bunch was pleased with his visit to Florida and ap plauded Carrolls efforts to advance the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative. He stated that, other states see what Florida is doing and they want to implement the same measures to enhance their bases. VES Annual Fall Festival VERNON Vernon Elementary School will be holding their annual Fall Festival from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1. Tickets may be purchased today in advance from 7:30 to 8 a.m. or 2:15 to 3 p.m. Tickets are 5 for $1. For more ticket information call 535-2486. Food for sale will include hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, pickles, polish sausage, chili, boiled peanuts, beverages. There will also be a Sweet Shoppe. Games at the festival will be a cake walk, glow-in-thedark, pick up ducks, can toss, treasure box, mystery box, sh pond, plinko, ring toss and many more. There will also be spirit shirt sales, face painting, inatable toys, and a bouncy house. Entertainment will be provided and there will also be an auction. For more information call 535-2486. Chipley Public Works Car Wash CHIPEY The City of Chipley Public Works Department will be having a car wash on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Citys Parking lot on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 90 to benet needy families for their annual Christmas Fund. The car wash starts at 8 a.m. Carnley-Holland Family Reunion GRACEVILLE The Carnley-Holland Family Reunion will be held at 11 a.m. the rst Saturday in November, this day falls on Saturday, Nov. 3. The reunion will be held at the Graceville Civic Center. Bring your lunch and come join us. Reunions are a good time for food, seeing family, and counting new additions. They are also a time for pausing to remember those who have gone before. Several that were with us last year are not with us now. Reunions are also a time for being thankful for our heritage. And this family is rich in its heritage based on our values that are founded in God. The Carnley Reunion rst began in the 1800s and still continues strong today. The reunion used to be held at the old home site of Joe and Roxie Best Carnley but has since been moved to the Graceville Civic Center. As R.J. Carnley has always said, If you know of a Carnley, you are invited. If you never heard of a Carnley, we want you to come. If you are a Carnley, you are expected to be here. Snakes in The Grass CHIPLEY Falling Waters State Park and Scott Sweeney will present Snakes in the Grass at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3. The program will be held at Falling Waters State Park. For more information call 638-6131. Campbellton School Reunion The Campbellton High School Reunion for all who were ever associated with the school; whether student, faculty, employee of any type will be held at the First Baptist Church of Campbellton, on Saturday, Nov. 3. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. The program will begin promptly at 10 a.m. Bring a covered dish for lunch in the Fellowship Hall at noon. There will be no speaker this year. There will also be door prizes. A collection will be taken to defray the expenses. Come early and mingle. Noises Off MARIANNA The Chipola Fall Theater Production will present Noises Off at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1, to Saturday, Nov. 3, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. Tickets are general admission $7 for adults and $5 for children 18 and under. For more information email sirmonc@chipola. edu. Sunday Afternoon with The Arts MARIANNA Chipola Center for the Arts will be holding and art exhibit and reception on Nov. 416. The Annual Exhibit Reception will be held from 1 5 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. For more information call 557-0655. Veterans Day powwow CHIPLEY The North Bay Clan of Lower Creek Muscogee Tribe Village will be holding a Veterans Day Powwow on Nov. 9-11. This is a free event. For more information email howell. marilyn@yahoo.com. Holmes County High School 1977 BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Class of 1977 will be having a 35th reunion in conjunction with the HCHS Homecoming on Nov. 9 and 10. Those wishing to participate should contact the class President, Ossie Darwin McMahan at 598-1313. Veterans Appreciation BONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Mounted Posse and the Holmes County Sheriffs will be holding a Veterans Appreciation Parade at 10 a.m. in Nov. 10. The parade will begin on Highway 79 in front of the Piggly Wiggly and will then travel South on Veterans Boulevard. There will be no entry fee. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. ATVs, Go Carts and motorcycles in organized/recognized groups only. Applications may be picked up at the Holmes County Sheriff Ofce or downloaded from www.holmescosheriff.org. Lunch will be provided by the City of Bonifay following the parade at veterans Park. For more information call Joe Hardy at 547-9298. HCHS Reunion The Holmes County High School Reunion will be held at 11 a.m., on Nov. 13, at the Dog Wood Lakes Country Club. For more information call Kathryn Treadwell at 547-3526. Holiday Heritage Festival GRACEVILLE The Baptist College of Florida will be holding a Holiday Heritage Festival on Nov. 16. For more information call 263-3261. Chipley Womans Club Fall Yard Sale CHIPLEY The Chipley Womans Club will be holding a very big yard sale on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 and 17, at their Clubhouse, at 607 Fifth Street, in Chipley. The sale will start at 8 a.m. Rain or shine. At this sale, the Club is selling holiday and home decorations, toys, indoor and outdoor furniture, fall and winter clothing for all ages, etc. Proceeds will help fund Scholarships given by the Club to high school and college students going to Chipola College. If anyone in the community has items that you would like to donate to this sale, the club will pick up from your home or business. Or you can bring them to the Clubhouse on Thursday before the sale. Call 260-5896 if you have questions or items to donate. PET T ALK Dangers of pet Halloween costumesS PECIAL TO EX TRA Brig. Gen. Arnold W. Bunch, left, met with Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll and Brig. Gen. David A. Harris to discuss the Air Force presence in Fort Walton Beach. Air Force updates Lt. Gov. Carroll Community EVENTS Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Some traditional Mohawks are treating the naming of the nations rst Native American saint with skepticism and fear that the Roman Catholic Church is using it to shore up its image and marginalize traditional spiritual practices. They see the story of Kateri Tekakwitha as yet another reminder of colonial atrocities and religious oppression. I was a recipient of these historical profanities and want to ensure this does not happen again, said Doug George-Kanentiio, a Mohawk writer who left Catholicism to follow traditional longhouse spiritual practices. The daughter of a Mohawk chief and a Catholic Algonquin woman, Kateri was born in 1656 about 40 miles northwest of Albany and in the heart of the Iroquois Confederacy to which the Mohawks belong. She was orphaned at age 4 when smallpox wiped out her family and much of her village and left her blinded and dis gured. A Catholic convert at 20, she settled in Kahnawake, a Mohawk settlement south of Montreal where Jesuits had a mission and where she and other women performed morti cation rituals such as selfogging as part of their faith. At her death at age 24, Kateris smallpox scars reportedly vanished, and later she was reported to appear before several people. She is buried at a shrine on Kahnawake. Speaking in English and French at her canonization last Sunday, Pope Benedict XVI noted how unusual it was in Kateris culture for her to choose to devote herself to her Catholic faith. Shes seen very much as a bridge between native culture and Christianity, said the Rev. Jim Martin, a Jesuit priest. He said the Jesuit missionaries took great pains to learn the native languages and tried their best to present the Christian faith using words, phrases and ideas from the native cultures. Traditional Mohawks recognize the reverence their Catholic relatives and friends have for Kateri, said Chaz Kader, a Mohawk journalist who was raised Catholic but follows ancient longhouse traditions now. But many remain troubled by how the church portrays her life. The story of Kateri told in various church writings describes her as maintaining her faith despite torment by her people, suffering ostracism and persecution at the hands of her own tribe and eventually eeing to Canada. I disagree with the characterizations of the other Mohawks in the Jesuit accounts of Kateri, Kader said. The contrast of good Mohawks and bad Mohawks still is affecting our people. Traditional Mohawks have struggled to keep their spiritual traditions and ancient language alive despite pressure from non-Indians to adopt European religion, culture and language. These traditionalists have established Mohawk language-immersion schools and follow a clanbased government separate from the elected tribal government recognized by the U.S., Canada and New York state. To outsiders, they are associated with an image of bad Mohawks who smuggle goods across the border and refuse to collect state taxes on cigarette sales, Kader said, and the good Mohawks are the ones who went to Rome to celebrate Kateri, he said. Its dif cult to gauge just how widespread the feelings are given the factionalism that pervades the nation and the circumspection they favor when dealing with the media. But many Mohawks interviewed downplayed any controversy and joined Catholics who see Kateri as a uniting gure and hope her elevation to sainthood will help heal old wounds. Its so nice to see God showing all the avors of the world, said Gene Caldwell, a Native American member of the Menominee reservation in Neopit, Wis., who attended Kateris canonization with his wife, Linda. The Native Americans are enthralled to have Kateri attain sainthood, he said. Russell Roundpoint, director of the Mohawk history and cultural center at Akwesasne, said her sainthood is not a contentious issue by any stretch of the imagination. The Mohawk people are very proud of the fact that she has attained such a high level, he said. Sister Jennifer Votraw is director of communications for the diocese where the Mohawk reservation is located. Though the diocese doesnt provide direct pastoral care to the Mohawks, Votraw belongs to the order the Sisters of St. Joseph, nuns who regularly aid the priests who minister to the tribe. She said years of interactions between the church and the tribe demonstrate a mutual respect. Still, she knows there are traditional Mohawks who will never be swayed in their view of the church and might resent Kateris canonization as a ploy to improve the churchs image among Native Americans. They believe very rmly in their religion, which is Mohawk, she said. You just have to respect that. Orenda Boucher, a Mohawk humanities professor at Kiana Institution, a Native American college near Montreal, said there are mixed feelings and no easy answer to the question of what Kateri represents to Mohawks or the world. A lot of my friends who are traditionalists see Kateri as tied into the story of colonization that has deeply affected Kahnawake, and to the atrocities of the church, she said. Boucher said to understand the complexities of Kateris life, its important for people to look beyond the biographies written by clergymen who focus on what they consider her Christian virtues. George-Kanentiio said traditional Iroquois worry that Kateris sainthood could be used as way to encourage Native Americans to eschew their ancestral values for Catholic dogma. It should never obscure the best elements of our aboriginal spirituality, nor should Kateris personal behaviors, given their extremities, be endorsed as a model for women anywhere, he said, referring to her self-mutilation with whips, thorns and hot coals. Women in particular need not kneel in supplication to any man or any god but to rise to dance and sing in true joy, he said. We can never accept any institution which actively suppresses women or quali es their potential. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. On Growing UP What does it mean to grow up and become an adult? This is certainly not an easy question to answer, although we usually know it when adulthood is lacking and someone is acting childishly. There is a lot of growing up required of us nowadays and thus adulthood is being delayed by an extended period of adolescence. This leaves us with lots of twentyand thirty-year-old individuals who are living at home and taking on very few if any of the responsibilities to be responsible for ones actions and ones life and to stop expecting other people to take care of you. It also entails taking responsibility for where one is in life and refus ing to blame our parents, teachers, or others for our lack of success. At some point, we all have to grow up and realize that our life is OURS and no one elses, and however much others may have contributed to it, only we can shape our own lives. Whether this is always true is debatable; parents and teachers do have an impact on children and the adults they will become. But, it is best for each of us to take responsibility for our own lives and start acting and believing as if we are the masters of our own fates. Perhaps that is what it really means to be grown up: to strive to mold and fashion our own lives and to live by our own standards and ideals. And, to do it with the faith of one who takes complete responsibility for every aspect of his or her existence. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 1 Corinthians 13: 11 Special to Extra Mount Zion to hold spaghetti dinner BONIFAY Mount Zion Independent Baptist Church will have a spaghetti dinner from 5-7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Plates, $5, will consist of spaghetti, green beans, roll, cake and tea. There will also be a silent cake auction from 5-6:15 p.m. All political candidates are welcome and will be given a chance to speak. This is a fundraiser for the church building fund. For more information, call 547-5302. Caryville Baptist Church to host bluegrass event CARYVILLE The Caryville Baptist Church will host a Bluegrass Picking and Sing at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Come enjoy many pickers with a food break for pot lick dishes. For more information, call Blondell Freeman at 548-5504. Prayer Quilt Ministry fundraiser BONIFAY The Blessed Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay will have a fundraiser for their Prayer Quilt Ministry by hosting an indoor/ outdoor yard and baked goods sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 2-3. Evergreen Baptist plans fundraiser WESTVILLE Evergreen Baptist Church will have a fundraiser for missions on Saturday, Nov. 3, at Evergreen Baptist Church on Highway 179A in Westville. We will have delicious pancakes starting at 6 a.m. for $3. For lunch we will have barbecue pork plates for $6 or barbecue sandwiches for $3. Please stop by and help us with our mission project. Experience the Judgment The public is invited to Experience the Judgment. This 30-minute evangelistic walkthrough drama will be presented by Southwide Baptist Church from 6-9 p.m. through Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Walton County Fairgrounds. The rst Judgment group enters at 6 p.m., with a new group following every 20 minutes. Admission is free. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information on group reservations, please call 892-3835. New Prospect Baptist Church Fall Festival CHIPLEY New Prospect Baptist Church will have its annual Fall Festival at 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3. There will be chili, hot dogs, boiled peanuts, a cakewalk, bingo, jumping house and hay rides. Come have a good time of food, fellowship and fun. For more information, call Lynn at 703-9635 or Kermit at 638-3638. Christian Haven Church Jam Session Christian Haven Church will have its monthly Jam Session on Saturday, Nov. 3. Refreshments will be served at 6 p.m. with singing shortly after. For more information, call 638-0836 or 773-2602 Kingsmen Quartet coming to Wausau WAUSAU The Kingsmen Quartet will perform at the Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Church on Sunday, Nov. 4. Homecoming Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. with guest speaker the Rev. Joe Phillips from Granbury, Texas. Lunch will be served at noon followed by the Kingsmen concert at 1:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. G220 Mens Conference BONIFAY On, Nov 16-17 in Holmes County, numerous churches have come together to host the G220 Mens Conference in partnership with some of the men from Sherwood Baptist Church in Albany, Ga., which includes several of the actors from the movie Courageous. The conference will be at the Bethlehem High School, just north of Bonifay. The cost is $40, which includes three jam-up meals (seafood dinner on Friday), conference materials and a T-shirt. We will begin at 6 p.m. Friday and finish at 3 p.m. Saturday. There is a great promo piece on the website that will give more insight as well. Above all things, be praying and thinking about whom to bring with you. Our goal is to see men in Christ grow and men without Christ saved. If you know of a mens group from out of town needing a place to stay, we have some room in fellowship halls of numerous churches where there are showers. For more information, call Pastor Kent Lampp at 209-1723, Assistant Pastor Tony Ladley at 381-5890 or Pastor Ryan Begue at 238-6853. Faith BRIEFS AP Members of the faithful attend a mass celebrating the life of Kateri Tekakwitha on the Kahnawake reserve near Montreal on Oct. 21. Pope Benedict XVI canonized seven people, Kateri Tekakwitha, Maria del Carmen, Pedro Calungsod, Jacques Berthieu, Giovanni Battista Piamarta, Mother Marianne Cope, and Anna Shaeffer. 1st Native American saint stirs pride, skepticism Page 4 Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Selma Fay Kirkland, 73, of Hartford, Ala., died Oct. 24, 2012. Funeral services were held Oct. 27 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at New Effort Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Selma F. Kirkland George Edward McConnell, 55, of Bonifay died Oct. 20. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. George E. McConnell Mrs. Karey Jo Brownell, age 65, of Westville passed away Oct. 23 at her home. She was born July 30, 1947, in Westville to the late Maurice and Annie Bell Hood Windham. Mrs. Brownell is survived by her husband, Daniel Jerry Brownell of Westville; two sons, Roger Windham of Bonifay and Tim Windham of Westville; one daughter, Beverly Bowers and husband, Rodney, of Westville; one stepdaughter, Kristie Mitchell of Bonifay; one granddaughter, Railyn Bowers; two stepgranddaughters, Cheyenne Mitchell and Summer Pippin; one sister, Clara Hawthorne of Westville; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 26, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. David Davis and the Rev. Buford Williams of ciating. Interment was in the Westville Community Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Thursday at Peel Funeral Home. Karey J. Brownell Mrs. Mary Louise Thomas Mims of Highway 163, Westville, went home to be with the Lord Thursday, Oct. 25, with her loving and supportive family at her side. She was 77. Mrs. Mims was born June 12, 1935, in Geneva County, Ala., to the late John Henry and Mary Etta Jackson Thomas. She enjoyed shing, canning and freezing vegetables. When anyone needed vegetables, fresh or frozen, they would always call Louise. She was a very giving person and would do anything she could for you. She loved her family dearly. Everyone was always welcome at her home, and she will be greatly missed by her family and many friends. For many years, she was a member of Poplar Head United Methodist Church. In addition to her parents, her husband, Earl Mims, two sisters, Lucille Mims and Debra Thomas, as well as three brothers, John H. Jr., James and Joe Thomas, preceded her in death. Survivors include six children, Mary Jo Craft, Westville, Billy Wayne Mims (Caroline), Westville, Carolyn Holloway (Danny), Geneva, John W. Mims (Teresa), Westville, Kathy Harker (Robert), Westville, and Barbara Marsh (Joey), Bonifay; eight grandchildren, Eric Craft (Shirl), Jonathan Mims (Kathy), Amy Hambric (Thomas), Shannon Harris (Michael), Andrea Mims, Austin Harker (Kendall), Ashley Harker and Ryan Mims; four greatgrandchildren, Kathlyn Lucille and Jenna Mims and Wyatt and Wayden Harris; four sisters, Pat Childs (Waymon) and Margie Harrison, all of Geneva, Margaret Hamilton (Russ), Avon, S.D., and Martha Sue Locklear, Westville; one brother, Billy Thomas (Ethel), Samson, and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, at Poplar Head United Methodist Church with the Rev. Chuck Grantham and the Rev. Jim Mashburn of ciating. Mrs. Mims was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Friday, Oct. 26, from 6-8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com Mary L. Mims R.L. Winfred Lawrence, 89, of Chipley passed away Thursday, Oct. 25, at Flowers Hospital. He was born April 9, 1923, in Chipley to the late Brunson Lee Lawrence and Maundy Lee (Peavy) Lawrence. Mr. Lawrence worked in furniture repair and was of the Baptist faith. He was predeceased by his wife, Ethel Lou Lawrence; one daughter, Margaret Lane, and one sister Francis Goodyear. Mr. Lawrence is survived by four daughters, Genell Whiton and husband, Jerry, of Chipley, Mary Barlow of St. Petersburg, Pat Posner and husband, Richard, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Judy Claxton and husband, Joe, of Lake Wales; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grand children. Family will receive friends Thursday, Nov. 1, from 6-8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m., Friday, Nov. 2, at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Michael Orr of ciating. Interment will follow at Piney Grove Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. R.L. Winfred Lawrence Sherron Lucas Sampson, age 59, passed away Oct. 25 at her home in Westville. She was born June 27, 1953, in Opp, Ala., to the late Doyle E. Lucas and Willie Mae Lucas. We love and miss you, Momma, Orde. Sherron was preceded in death by her mother, Willie Mae Holland; father, Doyle E. Lucas; and a brother, Marvin Lucas. She is survived by one daughter and son-in-law, Amanda and Oliver Goddin of Westville; two sons and one daughter-in-law, Matthew and Casey Lunt of Cordele, Ga. and Bobby Sampson of Westville; one brother, Chris Lucas of Tennessee; one sister, Joyce Klinefelter of Pennsylvania; six grandchildren, Michael Goddin, Nicholas Lunt, Logan Lunt, Victoria Currington, Madison Lunt, and Marissa Sheldon. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Sherron L. Sampson William Dawson McDaniel Jr. (Bill), 62, of Punta Gorda passed away Oct. 15 at his home. Born June 26, 1950, in Phenix City, Ala., McDaniel grew up in Bonifay and graduated from Holmes County High School in 1968. After graduating, he moved with his family to Lake Placid and worked with Consolidated Tomoka Land Company until 1970, when he joined the U.S. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (Seabees). During active duty service to his country, McDaniel was deployed to South Vietnam and Puerto Rico. He then served in the Reserves until his discharge in 1976. His career in law enforcement began in 1972. First, he spent ve years with the Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce and then eight years with the Collier County Sheriffs Of ce, where he was awarded a Medal of Honor for Bravery and inducted into the Policemans Hall of Fame in North Port in 1984. The following year he accepted a position in the Fort Myers Field Of ce of the Division of State Fire Marshal Bureau of Fire and Arson Investigations. He worked there until his retirement as a Senior Fire Investigator in 2002. McDaniel was preceded in death by his father, William D. McDaniel Sr. of Lake Placid. He is survived by his mother, Edna Tant McDaniel of Lake Placid; his brother, Bobby E. McDaniel (Anita) of Venus; two sisters, Judy M. Steverson (Paul) of Tallahassee and Patricia A. Elkins (Earl) of Lilburn, Ga.; two nephews, Jonathan P. Steverson (Bevin) of Tallahassee and Christopher W. Elkins of Lilburn, Ga.; two nieces, Susan S. Hawkins (Nathanael) of Panama City and Valerie E. Elkins of Lilburn, Ga.; and two great-nephews, Dawson L. and Holton R. Steverson of Tallahassee. A memorial service was scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, at First Assembly of God in Lake Placid. Private graveside services will be held later. The family requests that anyone who wishes to make a memorial contribution consider donating to the Wounded Warrior Project or the American Diabetes Association. William Dawson McDaniel Jr. WILLIAM DAWSON MCDANIEL JR. Obituaries Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOK About the book: The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality, coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. $ 29 .95 SHIP S MID NOVEMBER R eg. $ 39.95 BUY NOW! EX T E N DED DE A D LIN E BY PUBLISHING COMPANY D U E TO POPULAR DE MAN D OR DE R NO W & SA VE $10! ACTUAL C OVER & T I TL E Included in the book: Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MA I L I N FORM OR ORDER O NL I N E AT : P ANA M AC I T Y.PI CT ORI AL BOOK. C OM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order: ______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______ Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/ book T O TAL A MO UNT E NCL O S ED :_______________ Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ P A YME NT ME T HOD C HE C K / MO N EYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VI SA A ME X M AST ER CA RD DI SC OVER Honoring Our e men and women whove served in our armed services and protected our precious freedoms are more than a name, rank and serial number. Actual size of 1 block ad Honor the Veterans in Your Family in our special Tribute feature published in the Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser on Wednesday, Nov. 7 Each Tribute includes color photo, name and rank, branch of service, duty status, awards or special distinctions and your tribute message. 4 sizes 1 block $22 3 blocks $48 2 blocks $36 4 blocks $62 PFC John Smith U.S. Army July 2008-present We thank you for yo ur dedication to our country and freedoms. Love, Mom, Dad & Sis Tribute copy, photo and payment MUST be received by Noon on Thursday, Nov. 1 Mail or drop by our oces at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425 Make checks payable to the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser 638-0212 547-9414 HOLMES COUNTY Special to Extra Grand Ridge woman arrested on assault charge GRAND RIDGE Jackson County sheriffs deputies recently arrested a Grand Ridge woman on charges of aggravated assault, according to a sheriffs report. Deputies responded to a home on in Grand Ridge on Oct. 24 in reference to a disturbance. Deputies say Carol Lynn Frazier, 59, had pointed a .22 caliber ri e at her father, Daniel Frazier, in a threatening manner. Carol Lynn Frazier was arrested on charges of aggravated assault. Frazier was taken to the Jackson County Correctional Facility to await rst appearance. JCSO: Car stolen from Microtel parking lot MARIANNA An 18-year-old Marianna woman has been arrested on charges of grand theft auto by the Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce. On Oct. 4, a 1999 Chevrolet Cavalier owned by Ollie Williams was stolen from the parking lot of the Microtel on Whitetail Drive. On the morning of Oct. 5, Williams and two witnesses observed a black female driving the car on Highway 71. After further investigation, the female was identi ed as Breyuanna Hall, 18, of Marianna. It was discovered Hall had been arrested on unrelated charges that same afternoon. On Oct. 25, Hall was charged with grand theft of a motor vehicle. She remains in Jackson County Correction Facility to await rst appearance. Facebook scam reported The Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce received a report of a scam utilizing Facebook. Through this scam, the victim is asked to like former senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum. After accepting, the user receives a Facebook messages from someone claiming to work for Santorum. These messages will state the availability of government grants and ask for personal information. It then will state the different amounts of grants and the amount of fees you need to pay up front. These fees are to be paid via Western Union. The grant money supposedly would be sent to the victim via UPS. This is a scam. Do not respond to these messages. Traf c stop leads to arrest MARIANNA A Laurel Hill man was arrested on an outstanding warrant after a routine traf c stop. At 8:46 p.m. Oct. 24, a Jackson County sheriffs deputy observed a Ford F-250 traveling north on Highway 71 with no headlights. The deputy conducted a traf c stop as the vehicle pulled into the Pilot parking lot. During the traf c stop, it was discovered the driver, William Ansley of Laurel Hill, had an active warrant from Seminole County, Ga., for fraud and insuf cient funds. Ansley was arrested and transported to the Jackson County Correctional Facility to be held for Seminole County. Jackson County CRIME REPORT HCHS to honor veterans Special to Extra BONIFAY It is that time of the year that we, the JROTC Program, on behalf of the Holmes County High School, would like to recognize veterans for their service in the Armed Forces. We will be holding a ceremony starting at 8:45 a.m. Nov. 12 in the gym at the Holmes County High School. We would also like for the veterans to join us afterward for a few refreshments in the conference room after the ceremony. We look forward to seeing you. WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER FIND US ON FACEBOOK @WCN_HCT FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 BETTIE'S COUNTRY REALTYBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. NORTH AVE., BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 850-547-35104 BR 2.5 BA ON 4 ACRES-$95,000 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 40 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$275,000 2 BR 2 BA FISH CAMP-$59,900 \ 4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900 2 BR FISH CAMP-$39,900 2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500 3 BR 2 BA FIXER UPPER ON 3 AC -$39,900 41+ ACRES W/ 3 MH'S & 4 PONDS-$129,900 2 BR INTOWN-$39,000 9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900 --NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000 2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000 3 BR 2 BA DWMH ON 3+ ACRES-$82,000 42+ACRES-$124,900 15 ACRES-$28,500 3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD-$149,900 3 BR BRICK IN TOWN-$82,000 2 BR LAKE FRONT FISH CAMP-$55,000www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT The Washington County School Board is accepting proposals for “ Legal Services School Board Attorney”. Specifications may be picked up at the Washington County School Board Office, 652 Third Street, Chipley, Florida 32428, any time Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. until 4:00p.m or specification may be viewed on the District website at http://washingtoncountyflschools.us/ Proposals are to be sealed and marked for “ Legal Services School Board Attorney’, RFP # 12-06, and delivered or mailed to Lucy Carmichael, Chief Financial Officer, School Board of Washington County, 652 Third Street, Chipley, FL 32428, no later than November 7, 2012 at 2:00p.m. (CST). Proposals will be opened at this time and formally presented for Board action at the Reorganizational Meeting of the Board on November 20, 2012 at 3:00p.m.(CST) The Washington County School Board reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all proposals. As published in the Washington County News Oct 20, 24, 27, 31, 2012 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 5:99CV163 -SPM ROBERT M. FENDER, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE RENDERED IN THE ABOVE-STYLED CASE ON NOVEMBER 2, 1999, BY THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, IN FAVOR OF THE PLAINTIFF, THE UNDERSIGNED, APPOINTED IN SAID DECREE, WILL ON THE 6th DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012, AT 12:00 NOON, IN FRONT OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE DOOR IN THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, OFFER FOR SALE AND SELL AT PUBLIC OUTCRY TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA: Beginning at the intersection of the North line of Section 9, Township 2 North, Range 15 West and the West right of way line of State Road S-277, thence South along said West right of way line 119.5 feet, thence West parallel to the North line of said Section 9, 529.68 feet, thence North 119.5 feet to the North line of said section 9, thence East 528.52 feet along said North line of Section to the Point of Beginning. Said property being in the NW ? of Section 9, Township 2 North, Range 15 West, of Washington County, Florida. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONCERNING THE ABOVE PROPERTY CONTACT ASSISTANT U. S. ATTORNEY PAUL ALAN SPROWLS AT (850) 942-8430. ALL SALES ARE SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION OF THE COURT. METHOD OF PAYMENT IS BY POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR CERTIFIED CHECK MADE PAYABLE TO THE U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE. TEN PERCENT OF HIGH/ACCEPTABLE BID IN CERTIFIED CHECK OR CASHIER’S CHECK WILL BE ACCEPTED WITH THE BALANCE DUE WITHIN 48 HOURS. NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED. EDWARD M. SPOONER United States Marshal Northern District of Florida BY:Glenn Millier U.S. Marshals Service DATE:10/03/2012 As published in the Washington County News Oct 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Chipley Fl will hold a sale on these units for nonpayment of unit in accordance with the FL Statutes Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until 11/8/12 to pay in full, NO CHECKS accepted. 1. Gery McIntyre Chipley, FL 2. Laura Jones Chipley, FL 3. Donna Pratt Chipley,.FL 4. Unknown As published in the Washington County News Oct 24, 31 2012 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* Christian Dating & Friendship service Thousand of succ essful relationships & marriages since 1989! Free package for singles over 40, call 1-800-814-3359. Full Blooded Yorkies8 weeks and ready 2 females 3 males tails docked & wormed Beautiful parents small silkies light in color $400 850-415-6256 Come view my Antiques & Collectable. Lets Make A Deal! Call Mary Louise at 535-4861 3Br/2Ba w/ attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12 10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. AUCTIONDATE: November 17th, 20128:00AM LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, Florida 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank repos, city and county surplus, Jackson County School Board, Scott Rentals, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m REAL ESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN: (55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. FOR SALECHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 Leather Living Room Set. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Big Yard Sale Multi-Families Nov. 3 at Mini Storage unit Esto, Fl. Hwy 79 & 2. Some New items great for Christmas. 8 a.m. til 2 p.m. Gospel singing. Big Yard Sale Nov. 1, 2, 3. 1086 Main St. Noma Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturday’s 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. Chipley 1430 N Hwy 81 Westville Nov. 3, 7:00-untilYard SaleFurniture, little boys clothing, ladies clothing, and misc. Chipley 1765 Gainer Road One mile east of Hwy 77 north off of Clayton Rd on Gainer Nov 3 8:00 am Huge multi family, furniture, children clothes, designer clothes, bedding and lots of misc. Text FL29999 to 56654 Clothes-10 to XXL, very good condition. Misc. Very low prices. Nov. 2nd & 3rd. 2685 Marian Dr., Dogwood Lakes, Bonifay. ESTATE SALE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! Thur, Fri, Sat. Nov 1, 2, 3. 742 Sunday Rd Chipley. HUGE HUGE YARD SALE Nov 1,2,3. 8am-unitl. 1010 6th Ave Graceville. Everything from furniture toys, glass ware, clothes & women clothes. Money made to go to Ghana Missions trip for West gate Church of Christ. Multi-family yard sale November 3rd. Cane grinding, new cane syrup. 8 a.m. until—. 1888 Hwy 2, Bonifay 1/2 mile west of New Hope Baptist Church. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday November 2nd & 3rd 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Large Yardsale 2 blocks west of elementary school on 177A, Bonifay. Nov 3rd. 8:30a.m.-until. MEGA YARD SALE Sat Nov 3 7am Until. 1583 Hudson Rd Westville. Please NO Early Birds! Tools of all kind, lots of Christmas, clothes, lights, Way too much to name. Moving Sale 779 Gilbert Dr Chipley. Sat Nov 3. 8am to 1pm. Furniture, appliances, ladies clothes sizes 12-16 womans cloths size 24-30, books, garding, home decor, wedding linens, baskets, tools, purses, swings & much more. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 3. 7a.m.-until-. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 8am-3pm.Clothes, furniture, household items, Christmas, etc. 3321 Spring Vally LN Bonifay Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 7am-4pm. 977 Pioneer Rd 5 1/2 miles east of Wausau. Cane Mill, chipper, wine press, barber chair, tools, cake baking items, base of Hoosier Cabinet, lots of household items. YARD SALE MAPHIS TREE FARM Large 2 family yard sale Friday & Saturday Nove 2 & 3. 7am -5pm. Rain or Shine. Lots of items, new & used to choose from, including baby items. Even things fro them men. 1534 Orange Hill Rd. 3 miles south of Chipley. 850-638-8243 Yard Sale Sat 11/3. Like new washer & dryer, whicker furniture, new electronic keyboard still in box, lots of household items. 2661 North Hwy 81. PDL. Just north of PDL high school Yard Sale Saturday Nov 3 Margie Peels 1488 S. Blvd Chipley.Clothes, dishes, furniture, toys, wedding stuff, baby items, pictures and lots of good stuff. Gross and Son Farms You Pick Peas! 231 N. to Alford FL Left on 276 to County line. Follow the signs 850-849-9330 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 CERAMIC SHOP OPENING IN BONIFAY Come check out our items, such as Christmas Trees & seasonal items. Many more available. Call for info 850-547-5244 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 The business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. REACH OVER 3M READERS! Jenny @ (321)283-5276. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Commercial Bldg For Rent downtown Ideal for office, salon, computer repair, or your choice. Call Progressive Realty. 850-638-8220 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 WANTED: Commercial property for lease with adjacent parking lot, can be shared with joining business; Convent Store Ideal. Call 850-428-1973. 1 BD UpStairs Apt for rent. Kitchen, living room & walk in closet. Refrigerator, stove, and new carpet, new shower, new floor tile. $450/mth.including water sewer & garbarge. 850-547-5244 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Charming 1 Bedroom home on pond For Rent near Bonifay. Large yard, deck, storage building, Recently renovated $650. per month. Call 802-496-7746 For Rent 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Duplex. Chipley, $575./mth. Background check & references required. 638-7128 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. (2) MH 2BR/1BA near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $385/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/2BA MH, $400/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 2 BR/1 BA Mobile Home located at 225 Hwy 77 N Chipley, clean, w/d, stove, refrig., d/w, a/c. Small patio. Non smoking environment, no pets. $550.00/ mth. $400.00 deposit. Application, backgroud, & credit check. Avaialbe now. (850) 638-1272 & ask for Chuck 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 +20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3 Br 2 Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 FOR SALE 2005 Yamaha Motorcycle. 15,000 miles Excellent condition, windshield, locking hand bags, floorboards, after market seats. $4500.00. Call 850-638-8540 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matt’s Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Liens -NO Problem. Don’t Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 31, 2012 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By CAROLINE M.L. POTTERMonster Contributing Writer As soon as the calendar turns over to September, retailers will know how much help they will need to handle the holidays. The National Retail Federation predicts retailers will add 585,000 to 625,000 seasonal workers in 2012, which is comparable to the 607,500 seasonal employees hired last year. Recent consumer confidence readings have been relatively weak and unemployment remains stubbornly high,Ž John Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, said in a statement. The mixed picture is likely to compel retail employers to proceed cautiously when it comes to hiring extra workers for the holiday season. Look for many to start at last years levels and hire additional workers only if strong sales early in the season warrant it.Ž If you want to get a distinct advantage over other would-be seasonal workers, plan your job search carefully using these tips.Know where to lookThe best opportunities for seasonal job seekers will be at the large discounters, like Target and Wal-Mart, which will be heavily favored by cost-conscious consumers this holiday season,Ž Challenger said. But be prepared to look past retail sales jobs for other opportunities. The big-box stores need extra workers on the floor, but they also need extra workers in their shipping facilities and overnight stocking positions,Ž he said. Opportunities also exist outside of retail, in areas like catering and with shipping companies such as UPS and FedEx.ŽStart earlyEmployers already know how many people they will need, so start searching today. Even if a job does not begin for another month, its best to lock in an opportunity sooner rather than later.Dress the partWhen youre looking for any kind of job, show up dressed in business-casual attire, at the very least. Even if the seasonal work for which youre applying is outdoors (think Christmas trees), wear neat slacks, polished shoes and a collared shirt.Be prepared If you are stopping into an establishment to shop for seasonal work, be prepared to fill out an application and participate in an impromptu interview. Bring your own pen, necessary documentation to prove you can work in the U.S. legally, a resume if you have one and all contact information for your professional references. Be sure you block off enough time to meet with a few supervisors should the opportunity arise.Know what you wantIf you are applying for seasonal work, know precisely what you offer to a potential employee „ and what you want in return. Determine what hourly rate is acceptable to you, what hours and days you are available, if you have the wherewithal for a particular position (some might involve lifting heavy boxes or standing for the greater part of your shift), and if the location is viable in terms of fuel costs and transportation options. (Will you always have access to a reliable car or a convenient bus line?) You do not want to make a commitment only to leave an employer in the lurch during the hectic holidays.Be flexibleThe best way to make sure you stand out from other seasonal talent is to present yourself as flexible „ but only if you really are. A hiring manager revealed that demanding a specific schedule from prospective employers is a sure way to jettison your chances at landing a job. Instead, advised Challenger, Temporary workers must be prepared to be flexible, whether it is hours or type of work. Either can vary as the holiday season progresses.ŽBoost your chance of landing a seasonal job A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com Administrative Secretary position available at Surplus & Salvage of Chipley. Please come by to apply. 1600 Hwy 90. Delivery Driver Wanted Part-Time. Must pass background screening. Call 850-638-4719 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 O-Op -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com OTR Drivers Wanted. Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/ tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www.otterytransportation.c om Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US—No forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www.mamotransportation.com Water Well Driller helper CDLrequired. (850)263-8064 Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/ mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transportation EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veteran Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 Volume 50 Number 33 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2012 me me me e e e 5 0 Nu mb er 3 3 me50Number33 W E DNE S D A Y O C T O B B E R 3 1 2 2 2 0 1 2 WEDNE S DAY O C T O BER312012 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Y o u r Your H O M E T O W N HOMETOWN S h o p p i n g G u i d e Shopping Guide F o r W a s h i n g t o n & For Washington & H o l m e s C o u n t i e s Holmes CountiesFREETAKE ONE B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 8am-3pm.Clothes, furniture, household items, Christmas, etc. 3321 Spring Vally LN Bonifay YARD SALE MAPHIS TREE FARM Large 2 family yard sale Friday & Saturday Nove 2 & 3. 7am -5pm. Rain or Shine. Lots of items, new & used to choose from, including baby items. Even things fro them men. 1534 Orange Hill Rd. 3 miles south of Chipley. 850-638-8243 Yard Sale Sat 11/3. Like new washer & dryer, whicker furniture, new electronic keyboard still in box, lots of household items. 2661 North Hwy 81. PDL. Just north of PDL high school Yard Sale Saturday Nov 3 Margie Peels 1488 S. Blvd Chipley.Clothes, dishes, furniture, toys, wedding stuff, baby items, pictures and lots of good stuff. Gross and Son Farms You Pick Peas! 231 N. to Alford FL Left on 276 to County line. Follow the signs 850-849-9330 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 ESTATE SALE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! Thur, Fri, Sat. Nov 1, 2, 3. 742 Sunday Rd Chipley. Large Yardsale 2 blocks west of elementary school on 177A, Bonifay. Nov 3rd. 8:30a.m.-until. MEGA YARD SALE Sat Nov 3 7am Until. 1583 Hudson Rd Westville. Please NO Early Birds! Tools of all kind, lots of Christmas, clothes, lights, Way too much to name. Moving Sale 779 Gilbert Dr Chipley. Sat Nov 3. 8am to 1pm. Furniture, appliances, ladies clothes sizes 12-16 womans cloths size 24-30, books, garding, home decor, wedding linens, baskets, tools, purses, swings & much more. Multi-family yard sale November 3rd. Cane grinding, new cane syrup. 8 a.m. until—. 1888 Hwy 2, Bonifay 1/2 mile west of New Hope Baptist Church. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 3. 7a.m.-until-. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 7am-4pm. 977 Pioneer Rd 5 1/2 miles east of Wausau. Cane Mill, chipper, wine press, barber chair, tools, cake baking items, base of Hoosier Cabinet, lots of household items. Chipley 1430 N Hwy 81 Westville Nov. 3, 7:00-untilYard SaleFurniture, little boys clothing, ladies clothing, and misc. Chipley 1765 Gainer Road One mile east of Hwy 77 north off of Clayton Rd on Gainer Nov 3 8:00 am Huge multi family, furniture, children clothes, designer clothes, bedding and lots of misc. Text FL29999 to 56654 Clothes-10 to XXL, very good condition. Misc. Very low prices. Nov. 2nd & 3rd. 2685 Marian Dr., Dogwood Lakes, Bonifay. HUGE HUGE YARD SALE Nov 1,2,3. 8am-unitl. 1010 6th Ave Graceville. Everything from furniture toys, glass ware, clothes & women clothes. Money made to go to Ghana Missions trip for West gate Church of Christ. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday November 2nd & 3rd 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. REAL ESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN: (55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. FOR SALECHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 Leather Living Room Set. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Big Yard Sale Multi-Families Nov. 3 at Mini Storage unit Esto, Fl. Hwy 79 & 2. Some New items great for Christmas. 8 a.m. til 2 p.m. Gospel singing. Big Yard Sale Nov. 1, 2, 3. 1086 Main St. Noma Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturday’s 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. Come view my Antiques & Collectable. Lets Make A Deal! Call Mary Louise at 535-4861 3Br/2Ba w/ attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12 10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. AUCTIONDATE: November 17th, 20128:00AM LOCATION: 5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, Florida 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank repos, city and county surplus, Jackson County School Board, Scott Rentals, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* Christian Dating & Friendship service Thousand of succ essful relationships & marriages since 1989! Free package for singles over 40, call 1-800-814-3359. Full Blooded Yorkies8 weeks and ready 2 females 3 males tails docked & wormed Beautiful parents small silkies light in color $400 850-415-6256

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, October 31, 2012 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 FOR SALE 2005 Yamaha Motorcycle. 15,000 miles Excellent condition, windshield, locking hand bags, floorboards, after market seats. $4500.00. Call 850-638-8540 BETTIES COUNTRY REALTYBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. NORTH AVE., BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 850-547-35104 BR 2.5 BA ON 4 ACRES-$95,000 € 43 ACRES-$77,500 € 42+ACRES-$85,000 € 40 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$275,000 € 2 BR 2 BA FISH CAMP-$59,900 \€ 4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900 € 2 BR FISH CAMP-$39,900 € 2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500 € 3 BR 2 BA FIXER UPPER ON 3 AC -$39,900 € 41+ ACRES W/ 3 MHS & 4 PONDS-$129,900 € 2 BR INTOWN-$39,000 € 9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900 € --NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000 € 2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000 € 3 BR 2 BA DWMH ON 3+ ACRES-$82,000 € 42+ACRES-$124,900 € 15 ACRES-$28,500 € 3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900 € 43 ACRES-$77,500 € 42+ACRES-$85,000 € 10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD-$149,900 € 3 BR BRICK IN TOWN-$82,000 € 2 BR LAKE FRONT FISH CAMP-$55,000www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com +20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3 Br 2 Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 For Rent 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Duplex. Chipley, $575./mth. Background check & references required. 638-7128 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. (2) MH 2BR/1BA near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $385/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/2BA MH, $400/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 2 BR/1 BA Mobile Home located at 225 Hwy 77 N Chipley, clean, w/d, stove, refrig., d/w, a/c. Small patio. Non smoking environment, no pets. $550.00/ mth. $400.00 deposit. Application, backgroud, & credit check. Avaialbe now. (850) 638-1272 & ask for Chuck 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 WANTED: Commercial property for lease with adjacent parking lot, can be shared with joining business; Convent Store Ideal. Call 850-428-1973. 1 BD UpStairs Apt for rent. Kitchen, living room & walk in closet. Refrigerator, stove, and new carpet, new shower, new floor tile. $450/mth.including water sewer & garbarge. 850-547-5244 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Charming 1 Bedroom home on pond For Rent near Bonifay. Large yard, deck, storage building, Recently renovated $650. per month. Call 802-496-7746 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veteran Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Commercial Bldg For Rent downtown Ideal for office, salon, computer repair, or your choice. Call Progressive Realty. 850-638-8220 O-Op -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US—No forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www.mamotransportation.com Water Well Driller helper CDLrequired. (850)263-8064 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/ mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transportation EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Administrative Secretary position available at Surplus & Salvage of Chipley. Please come by to apply. 1600 Hwy 90. Delivery Driver Wanted Part-Time. Must pass background screening. Call 850-638-4719 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 OTR Drivers Wanted. Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/ tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www.otterytransportation.c om Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CERAMIC SHOP OPENING IN BONIFAY Come check out our items, such as Christmas Trees & seasonal items. Many more available. Call for info 850-547-5244 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 The business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. REACH OVER 3M READERS! Jenny @ (321)283-5276. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matt’s Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Liens -NO Problem. Don’t Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



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JOE TAYLORforSuperintendent of Schools Excellence is not an act. It is a habit.Vote November 6thElect 50 Wednesday, OCTOBER 31 2012 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com Volume 89, Number 57INDEXArrests ..................................A8 Opinion .................................A4 Sports .................................A11 Extra .....................................B1 Faith .....................................B4 Obituaries .............................B5 Classi eds .............................B6 IN BRIEF NEWSWashington CountyCommunity yard sale plannedBONIFAY Holmes County Health Department will be sponsoring Baby Bash from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3. Baby Bash is a community yard sale at the First Baptist Church Annex. This yard sale is for baby and childrens Chipley celebrates 130th anniversary, see more on A6INSIDE By S. BRADY CALHOUN747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Florida voters can ensure lower taxes for themselves and tax exemptions for certain groups through a series of constitutional amendments on the ballot this November. But, opponents of the measure caution the cost of these tax cuts might come out of local and state government services. Many of the tax amendments on the ballot have little to no opposition because they give tax breaks to veterans, their spouses and the elderly. However, the language in Amendment 4 is alarming many people in local government who rely on property taxes to fund everything from law enforcement to libraries. The amendment would be a boon for people who own nonhomesteaded property and would allow the Legislature to eliminate the recapture rule. The rule, which came out of the Save Our Homes amendment, means when property values go down, taxes on the property can go up so that government still recaptures the same amount of revenue. It was passed at a time when no one ever thought property values in the state would go down. State Sen. Don Gaetz, a Niceville Republican and the sponsor of Amendment 4, said he is passionate about repealing the recapture rule. I believe that if your taxable value goes up, your taxes ought to go up, he said. If your taxable value goes down, I think your taxes ought to go down, not up. However, other parts of the amendment could hit local governments hard, according Voters to weigh tax reliefAmendments offer exemptions See VOTERS A2 From Staff ReportsTALLAHASSEE No probable cause was found to believe that Holmes County Commissioner Philip Music misused his position to receive a construction contract, according to a news release from the Florida Commission on Ethics. Meeting in Tallahassee on Oct.19 in closed session, the Florida Commission on Ethics took action on 41 complaints, including the complaint lodged against Music, Chair Susan Maurer said on Oct. 24. The Commission also found no probable cause to believe that Music violated the ethics laws by doing business with the county. An allegation that he had a contractual relationship with his construction company while it was doing business with the County was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. In other actions, the Commission found probable cause to believe that U.S. Congressman David Rivera, former member of the Florida House of Representatives, may have violated Florida ethics laws in 11 instances while serving in the Florida House of Representatives. Probable cause was found to believe that he received income from Southwest Florida Enterprises, Inc. while he was a member of the Florida House, when he knew, or with the exercise of reasonable care should have known it was given to in uence his vote or of cial action. Panel clears Holmes County commissionerSee PANEL A3 TRUNKORTREATBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Two Chipley residents were arrested on charges of insurance fraud on Oct. 17 in connection with a Dec. 28, 2011, residential re. Ruben Alonzo Laurel, 42, and Lorrie Ann Laurel, 47, both of Chipley were arrested on charges of insurance fraud (more than $20,000 and less than $100,000) by the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce on behalf of the state, according to an af davit from the Department of Financial Services, Division of Insurance Fraud. The Laurels own Chipley Physical Therapy, as well as physical therapy businesses in Bonifay, Marianna and Graceville. The residence at 4139 Crystal Lake Drive in Chipley was gutted by re on Dec. 28 and was not the primary residence of the Laurels, but was used as a part-time residence at the lake, according to the af davit. According to the afdavit, expert analysis determined that 15 items claimed to have been lost in the re were not present in the house at the time of the re. The 15 items had a combined value of $64,759.10. Investigators say other items value had been in ated to exaggerate the insurance claim. Insurance fraud (more than $20,000 and less than $100,000) is a second-degree felony.Couple owns physical therapy businessesState charges duo with insurance fraud RUBEN LAUREL LORRIE LAURELSee FRAUD A2EARLY VOTING Early voting continues this week at the Supervisor of Elections ofce located at 1221 South Blvd, Suite 900 in Chipley. Voting is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily until Saturday, Nov. 3. Visit chipleypaper.com on Nov. 7 to see the latest in election results. Today may be Halloween, but Saturday all the little goblins and ghosts in Chipley turned out for Trunk Or Treat, sponsored by the Merchants of Historic Chipley and held at the football eld. Churches, businesses and civic groups turned out to distribute candy to hundreds of children. For more photos, see Page 1B.PHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLER See IN BRIEF A3

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 to the amendments opponents. Along with eliminating the recapture rule, passage of the amendment, which requires a 60 percent majority approval, would place an annual 5 percent tax cap on non-homesteaded property. Ed Smith, county manager for Bay County, said if the amendment passes it will take between $700,000 and $900,000 out of county coffers the rst year. He described it as a bill that favors out-of-state homebuyers over locals. I think its going to create another whole new set of inequalities down the road, Smith said. Its not comprehensive or fair. Floridas League of Cities and the Florida Association of Counties are both against the amendment. Amendment 4 is likely to lead to tax hikes for fulltime Floridians in order to pay for tax breaks for snowbirds, Manny Morono, president of the Florida League of Cities and mayor of the city of Sweetwater, said in a news release. Opponents also warn that the amendment shifts the tax burden away from out-of-state buyers and back to locals. But, according to Gaetz, what actually happened is that the burden was shifted unfairly years ago to people who own little rental properties and small businesses. Two-thirds of the people who pay non-homesteaded taxes live in Northwest Florida. That includes Gaetz himself, he said, adding that he pays $30,000 a year in property taxes for property he owns in Bay County. This isnt some rich guy from Birmingham; this is, you know, your next door neighbor who owns a little rental house or a small business, Gaetz said. He added that local governments who lived well off property taxes when times were good also must be prepared to live with what comes when times are bad. Government should be lashed to the realities of the economy, Gaetz said. If you live be the sword, you should die by the sword. Floridas real estate professionals, most notably Florida Realtors, support the change. The additional homestead exemption will help boost Floridas struggling housing market by giving quali ed buyers a reason to get into the market. This will help lower the inventory of abandoned foreclosures that are dragging current homeowners prices down in neighborhoods across Florida, a ier on their website states. Amendment 4 will bring more predictability to small businesses in Florida and allow them to reinvest in local economies by creating jobs, lowering prices and raising pay for their workers. Government of cials such as Smith say the actual number of jobs created is tiny compared to the cost to local governments. Im not sure its going to accomplish anything, Smith said. 2012 TAX TOLL OPEN FOR COLLECTION NOVEMBER 1st In accordance with Florida Statutes notice is hereby given that the Property Appraiser has delivered the 2012 Tax Toll to the Tax Collector for collection of ad valorem taxes for the Washington County Board of County Commissioners, the Washington County School Board, Northwest Florida Water Management District, the City of Chipley and the City of Vernon.FLORIDA LAW PROVIDES THE FOLLOWING DISCOUNT FOR EARLY PAYMENT OF TAXES:4% if paid in November 3% if paid in December 2% if paid in January 1% if paid in February Net Amount in March Delinquent April 1 County Government Building, 1331 South Boulevard, Suite 101, Chipley, Florida, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 a.m.4:00 p.m. or for your convenience you may use our Drop Box located at the front of the building. Taxes are assessed to the owner of record as of December 31, 2011. If you have purchased property this year, your statement will go to the former owner. Duplicate statements are available at the Tax If you own property and did not receive a tax bill or for questions Helen McEntyre, Tax Collector Washington County, Florida Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeonSmart LensesSM Precinct 1 (Caryville) Caryville Town Hall 4436 Old Spanish Trail Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 2 (Five Points) Five Points Community Center 3892 Desalva Rd. Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 3 (Hinson Crossroads) Hinson Crossroads Fire Station 5487 Douglas Ferry Rd. Caryville, FL 32427 Precinct 4 (Agricultural Center) Washington County Agricultural Center 1424 Jackson Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 5 (Vernon City Hall) Vernon City Hall Old VHS Cafeteria 2808 Yellow Jacket Drive Vernon, FL 32462 Precinct 6 (New Hope) Gilleys Place 3351 Mallory Rd. Vernon, FL 32462 Precinct 7 (Orange Hill) Orange Hill Fire Station 1927 Orange Hill Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 8 (Armory) US National Guard Armory 749 7th Street Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 9 (Wausau) 1607 Second Ave. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 10 (Courts of Praise Church) Courts of Praise Church 1720 Clayton Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 11 (Ebro) Ebro City Hall 629 Dog Track Rd. Ebro, FL 32437 Precinct 12 (Greenhead) New Vision Methodist Church 2661 Blocker Church Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 15 (Sunny Hills) Sunny Hills Community Center/Library 4083 Challenger Blvd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 17 (Shepherds Gate Church) Shepherds Gate Church 1915 Ferguson Rd. Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 18 (Recycling Center) Washington County Recycling Center 3115 Hwy 77 Chipley, FL 32428 Precinct 19 (Buckhorn Creek) Country Oaks Baptist Church 574 Buckhorn Blvd. Chipley, FL 32428 VOTERS from page A1 FRAUD from page A1These allegations are not true, said Ruben Laurel on Friday. This has nothing to do with our practice, and we have hired an attorney to take care of it. Among the 15 items claimed lost were a Brunswick Bridgeport pool table, 250 CDs, 250 DVDS and 200 VHS tapes, 60 X-Box video games and 85 Wii video games, SCUBA tanks and regulators, 350 Barbie dolls, Pampered Chef kitchen utensils, 53 bottles of wine, champagne and liquor and two six-foot surf boards. State Fire Marshal Matt Streichert investigated the re scene on the night of the blaze and determined the re originated in the kitchen area, causing extensive damage to the house. Jerry Troy Bradley, Lorrie Laurels brother, told the re marshal that he had been cooking on the stove prior to leaving the house and possibly left cooking grease on the stovetop, forgetting to turn off the burner, according to the af davit. He returned a short time later to nd the re department attempting to extinguish the re. The Laurels were insured by Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. of Atlanta, and the re took place one day prior to the policy cancellation date, according to the af davit. They led an insurance claim and provided a detailed listing of contents lost, with a loss valued at $435,905. Of that amount, $107,580.89 was for items purchased within one year of the insurance claim. The insurer alleges items claimed as damaged or lost in the re were not present at the time of the re and/or have been in ated, according to the af davit. The Laurels were examined under oath, and upon review of the examination, Detective David Lindsay of the Division of Insurance Fraud learned the couple had claimed an extensive list of items lost or damaged in the house re to include items not discovered in an investigation of the re scene by Fire Investigator J. Michael Hawkins of Fire Analysis & Investigative Resources, according to the af davit. Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. had hired Hawkins, who told the detective that 15 items on the claim were not present at the time of the re, according to his investigation. The combined value of those items alone is $64,759.10. Bradley F. Smith of Paul Davis Restoration in Panama City was hired to perform a detailed inventory of the debris in February, and he failed to locate items listed in the insurance claim at the re scene. Denise Zdenahlik, senior investigator with Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co., told Lindsay that the claim has not been settled and alleges that the Laurels insurance claim was in ated. She cited the example of an Atmosphere Air Puri er purchased from Amway that was lost in the re. The Laurels listed the price of the air puri er as $1,150.25, while receipts from Amway show the actual price was $698.75. The air puri er was purchased on Dec. 21, eight days prior to the re loss, according to the af davit. VOTING LOCATIONS The Laurels were insured by Cotton States Mutual Insurance Co. of Atlanta, and the re took place one day prior to the policy cancellation date, according to the af davit. They led an insurance claim and provided a detailed listing of contents lost, with a loss valued at $435,905. Of that amount, $107,580.89 was for items purchased within one year of the insurance claim.

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LocalWashington County News | A3Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Be Safe this Halloween!Sheri Tim Brown Holmes County Sheri Department Horton's Chipley Heating & Cooling 1213 Main Stree 850-638-1309Have a safe and fun Halloween! Nichols Auto1146 Jackson Avenue Chipley638-8584 JOHNSONS PHARMACY www.walmart.com850-638-22431612 Main Street, Chipley, FloridaLAYAWAYNOWAVAILABLEON Thank You For Choosing Your Chipley Walmart From The Associates At Store #2114 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRYBen Saunders, DMD (850) 526-SPIT (7748) BROCK AUTO BODY 638-8768 HORIZON HEALTH CAREwww.medicineshoppe.com BONIFAY, FL 507 West Hwy. 90 850-547-1877 CHIPLEY, FL 1357 Brickyard Road 850-638-0424 Have Fun and Be Safe!!Colonial Restaurant (850) 638-4708 Be safe and have fun this Halloween While kids are out trick-or-treating, parents may be home or at work hoping their kids are safe and sound. Because Halloween is so popular among kids, its hard for parents to forbid trick-or-treating. But parents should instruct kids on the following tips to ensure this Halloween is as safe as it is fun. Strangers homes are off limits. Make sure kids know they should never enter the home of a stranger, no matter how friendly or welcoming that stranger may seem. Theres no going it alone. Kids should not be permitted to go out alone. When trick-or-treating, kids should always be accompanied not only by their friends, but there must be at least one adult chaperone present at all times. Stay close to home. Kids should stay in their own neighborhood and only visit homes of neighbors they know. Tips for Halloween Safety Choose safe costumes. Kids should wear costumes made of light colored costume. No toy guns. Toy guns are just asking for trouble, as many of todays replicas are easily confused with the real thing. Night falls quickly late October, improve their visibility and make them more visible to passing motorists. Be wary of masks. Many masks restrict a childs vision, so look for one that provides low on visibility, make children agree to remove their mask when crossing the street. Probable cause also was found to believe that his contract with SFEI through Millennium Marketing, Inc. would create a frequently recurring con ict between his private interests and his public duties as a Florida House member or would impede the full and faithful discharge of his public duties. The Commission also found probable cause to believe that Rivera misused his public position by using campaign funds for non-campaign related expenditures. An allegation that he misused his position to request or accept State reimbursement for travel expenses paid with campaign funds or state of ce expense accounts, and an allegation that he failed to report, as a gift, forgiveness of a part of a debt he owed Millennium. Probable cause was found to believe that Robert Skidmore III, Charlotte County Commissioner, misused his position to ask for special treatment in obtaining a liquor license for a third party, and by asking County employees to look for and selectively enforce code violations against his former wifes new family. The Commission also found probable cause to believe that Skidmore requested a County employee continue a hearing for the bene t of himself or another person. However, the Commission found no probable cause to believe that he misused his position to request that staff waive the code violations of a constituent. Finding that the public interest would not be served by further proceedings due to the totality of the circumstances and because he sought the advice of counsel, the Commission voted to dismiss allegations that Walton County Commissioner Larry Jones employment with waste management, which had a contract with Walton County, created a prohibited con ict or that his votes on measures affecting the company created a prohibited voting con ict. The Commission also found no probable cause to believe that he solicited or accepted employment with Waste Management in return for his of cial action, accepted the employment when he knew or should have known it was offered to in uence his of cial action, or used inside information gained by reason of his public position to secure a bene t for his employer. An allegation that he misused his position to bene t Waste Management was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. Probable cause was also found to believe that Rivera violated Article II, Section 8, of the Florida Constitution with regard to six allegations surrounding his nancial disclosure: that he failed to report or did not properly report income, stocks and bonds, or secondary income sources on his 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 CE Form 6s; and that he failed to le a CE Form 6F within 60 days of leaving ofce in the Florida House. However, the Commission issued a nding of no probable cause regarding an allegation that Mr. Rivera had a voting con ict when he voted on HB 1047 which bene ted SFEI, as the alleged violations fell outside the veyear statute of limitations. The Commission found no probable cause to believe that Paul Mac Work, DeFuniak Springs City Council member, entered into a real estate listing agreement given to in uence him, or misused his position to direct the efforts of the DeFuniak Springs Code Enforcement Board. An allegation that he had a real estate listing agreement with a homeowner while the homeowner was subject to the regulation of the City was also dismissed with a nding of no probable cause. The Commission dismissed the following complaints for lack of legal suf ciency: Warren J. Yeager Jr., Gulf County Commissioner; Kevin Kipp, Executive Director of the University of South Florida College of Nursing Research Center; Tanya Murphy, Director of the Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry at the University of South Florida; Rana Erbrick, Cape Coral City Councilmember; two complaints against Alice Frierson, Deputy Mayor of Arcadia; two complaints against Robert Heine, Arcadia City Council member; two complaints against Robert Allen, Arcadia City Council member; Eleanor Sobel, member of the Florida Senate; Bob Gualtieri, Pinellas County Sheriff; Cheryl Byers, Director of Research Integrity and Compliance at the University of South Florida; James Robinson, Pinellas County School District General Counsel; Peggy OShea, Pinellas County School Board Member; Robin Wikle, Pinellas County School Board Member; Terry Krassner, Pinellas County School Board Member; Carol Cook, Pinellas County School Board Member; Janet Clark, Pinellas County School Board Member; two complaints against Keith Fitzgerald, former member of the Florida House; Myron Rosner, North Miami Beach Mayor; Paul Eichner, Chief Legal Counsel for the Broward County Health Department; Anthony Vomero, Acting Environmental Administrator of the Broward County Health Department; Thelbert David Morgan, Escambia County Sheriff; Lawrence Bustle, Manatee County Commissioner and former Palmetto Mayor; Roy Johnson, Holly Hill Mayor; Nancy Bostock, Pinellas County Commissioner; Kenneth Welch, Pinellas County Commissioner; Neil Brick eld, Pinellas County Commissioner; Karen Seel; Pinellas County Commissioner; and, William P. Cervone, State Attorney for the 8th Judicial Circuit. In an advisory opinion, the Commission determined that a prohibited con ict of interest would not be created were the law rm of a candidate for the Broward County Commission to continue to serve as special counsel to a municipality located within the County, should the candidate be elected and take of ce. Although the municipality and County have an ongoing dispute over the expansion of an airport and its impact on the municipality and its citizens, the Commission found no prohibited continuing or frequently recurring con ict or impediment to duty would be created, because the airport expansion is a unique situation and neither the candidate nor his law rm have had any involvement in the citys dispute with the county. PANEL from page A1items only. If you would like to sell your unwanted baby/ childrens and maternity clothing or other items at this event you can pick up a registration form at Holmes County Health Dept. to reserve your table by Oct. 26 or call 547-8684 ext. 19. You may keep all proceeds you make at this event. The charge to participate is one pack of diapers. You may drop them off at the health department or bring them the day of the event. Information will be available to the community regarding Kid care, Family Planning, Medicaid, Chronic Disease, Healthy Start and other childrens services. There will be face painting, fun for the kids, free haircuts and more.Reunion of CousinsESTO The decadents of Henry J. and Sara Mixon Adams will have a Reunion of Cousins, all Adams, Lamb, Mixon, Pippin and Shiver cousins are invited to attend, at 10 a.m. today at John Clark Park in Esto. Bring old pictures to share. Paper products will be provided. Bring a covered dish and your musical instrument and enjoy a day lled with fun, food and fellowship. For more information, call Linda Shiver Miller at 334-684-8750 or Ruth Lamb at 263-0161. IN BRIEF from page A1

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OpinionA4 | Washington County News POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USPS 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. For topics, your writer is capitalizing on the 75th anniversary celebration of the Panama City News-Herald, currently in progress for the entire year of 2012. This is the third article re ecting on our experiences for the 17-year period of February 1952 until December 1969, the time Hester and I were in Panama City. This was in conjunction with my job at Sears, Roebuck and Company for six years, then with the Florida Probation and Parole Commission for eleven additional years. Hester and I were married on Oct. 4, 1952 in Cottonwood, Ala. We spent our honeymoon in our newly purchased twobedroom frame home at 1118 Fairland Avenue. This was one of two new homes built on property left vacant when the brick homes, known as Lisenby Project, were built in the early 1940s. Our house was built by Frank Dama and Eugene Lokey, who had a construction rm at that time. It was nanced by a new nancial institution, Security Federal Savings and Loan Association, managed by Mr. Casper Harris, with Mrs. Florence Gay and Mrs. Jean Thomas Smith as tellers and assistants. Ours was one of their rst loans. The Prattler had been employed with Sears for six months and had been assigned the job as receiving manager. The job seemed to be a dead end for the recent graduate from the University of Florida with a degree in sales and sales Management. Each manager, from Mr. Richard (Dick) Murphy, Mr. Charles S. Sanders and Mr. Bob Hudson, assured me that I was in an unof cial management training program and was being groomed for a promotion when the time came. After more than six years and after meeting some ne fellow employees who became lifelong friends, your writer applied for a job with the Florida Probation and Parole Commission and was hired. For the next 11 years, I had an of ce in the Bay County Courthouse and the opportunity to meet elected of cials who I knew were in of ce but had never had the opportunity to meet. The three circuit judges, comprising the 14th Judicial Circuit at that time, were the Honorable E. Clay Lewis, Jr., Honorable W. L. Fitzpatrick and Honorable E. C. Welch, whose service was primarily in Jackson County. In a few years, Honorable Joseph W. Bailey, county judge of Bay County, was appointed to the Circuit Court Bench upon the retirement of Judge Welch and Honorable Robert L. McCrary, Jr., county judge of Jackson County was elevated to the Circuit Court Bench upon the death of Judge Lewis. My entire service was with the above judges and mostly with Judges Fitzpartick, Bailey and McCrary. Mr. J. Frank Adams, of Blountstown, was the elected State Attorney and served all six counties with no assistants. I well recall when attorney, William E. (Bill) Harris, was appointed as a part time assistant state attorney, working mostly the cases in Bay County. Later, William C. (Bill) Mongoven, a Chipley lawyer, was added as an assistant state attorney, working the Northern counties of the circuit. Defense lawyers in those days were primarily W. Fred Turner, Leo C. Jones and J. C. Bodiford. The Bay County Sheriff was the colorful and wellloved M. J. (Doc) Daf n, whose career extended for many years with much history and stories, written and carried down through the years with one appearing in the Heritage of Bay County Book (2005), authored by his kinsman, Rev. J. R. Daf n. In Bay County, Bruce Collins was the elected Clerk of Court and served many years before losing the post to youthful aspirant, Harold Bazzel. Harold held the job until retirement. The story of Bruce and Harold, was written for the second edition of the Heritage of Bay County( 2011), by the Prattler, as was a narrative on the life of Circuit Judge Joseph W. Bailey. Gerald Conrad was serving as Tax Assessor, A. G. Appleberg was the long time Tax Collector, J. J. (Josh) Mashburn was continuing his long service as Supervisor of Elections and Tommy Smith was winding down his long tenure as Superintendent of Schools. The landmark United States Supreme Court decision in a case originating in Bay County Circuit Court, Gideon vs. Wainwright was handed down in 1963. The ruling stated that every defendant charged with a felony offense was entitled to legal counsel and if he could not afford a lawyer, the court was to appoint one for him. Soon, the decision was amended to included all misdemeanor offenses. This court case resulted in the creation of the Public Defender system in all states. Our public defender was Blountstown attorney, Virgil Q. Mayo, who held the position until retirement. Our four sons were born while we lived in Panama City. The Prattler was one of the original members of the church body which constituted St. Andrew Primitive Baptist Church, 2100 Michigan Avenue, midst the wild palmettos, scrub oak, sand pines and snakes prevalent on the site. That congregation has survived until this present day and is presently under the pastor ship of Elder J. C. Stanaland. Your writer resigned the parole job in late 1969 and moved to Chipley for the many new experiences which have come his way. Upon being elected county judge in Washington County Judge in 1976, the opportunity to serve in Bay County presented itself on many occasions On each assignment, I was always welcomed and treated royally by the court of cials known earlier. I am still on the invitation list to the judges Christmas Party and other functions of the court, including investitures and retirement ceremonies. Sadly, it has been my responsibility to attend too many funerals of those judges, and other key employees, who have departed this life. Hester and I still receive invitations to the Sears Retirees Christmas Event and have able to keep in touch with many of them down through the years. We have also lost many of those friends in death also. See you all next week. When I met DeAnna Oldham at the chamber breakfast at Hardees last month, I knew I had to interview her for my Happy Corner. She impressed me immediately with her enthusiasm about her work and especially about Bonifay. Some people move to a small place like ours and nd lots to complain about. She nds lots to brag about. Though her mother hails from nearby Geneva, Ala., she married a career Air Force man and raised her family in California until DeAnna and her brother were in high school when they moved from there to Milton. DeAnna married right out of high school while attending the Milton campus of The University of Florida. After two children, she was divorced, and as a single parent, she worked in food service and continued her education until she received her degree in business administration from UF. Shawnees restaurant in Pensacola promoted her to manager, but she loved working with people so she took a job as Church Administrator for Central Chapel associated with Churches of God. Her concern for women who came to the church needing help led her to start a ministry called Women in Transition where she helped them to nd agencies to help them with expenses; to nd jobs; to nd places to live; to nd clothes to wear for jobs; how to interview for jobs, and ETC. The church continues that ministry still. When her husband, Joshua Oldham, the son of Eugene and Julia of Bonifay, was transferred here for a job with the state three years ago, she made this their home and went to work as manager for Hardees of Bonifay. She has treated that establishment, not as a job with a hamburger chain, but as if it were her own private restaurant. She knows her clientele. The mens group who eat breakfast there every morning are her personal friends. The ladies group who meet there on Fridays for lunch are known by name. The sisters who meet there weekly get special attention. The teens that congregate there on Friday nights are greeted by Mrs. Oldham. They know they are welcome there, but if they need correction, she supplies that. Relay For Life has special meaning for DeAnna, and she has agreed to be the event chair for Bonifays Relay in April of 2013. Her dad is now undergoing treatment for a recurrence of Hodgkin Lymphoma after an 11year period of remission. About 12 years ago as she was holding her sons hand as they walked for the relay in Pensacola, her dad was battling his rst round of chemo from the disease. The son saw the luminaria being placed and he said, We dont want Granddaddys name on one of these. DeAnna realized that both her grandfathers had died with cancer, and she vowed that it was not going to rob her children of a grandfather if she could prevent it. Since that time she has been involved with Relay and welcomes the opportunity to lead her newly adopted homes event. Her goal is to answer any questions the public has, to teach us the mission of the American Cancer Society, and to raise awareness for the need to continue research to nd a cure for this killer which is second only to heart attacks in the U.S Bonifay Relays theme is Roping For A Cure and the sponsorship goal is $2000, $1600 of which has already been pledged. Julia Bullington is the survivor chairman and she intends to nd at least 50 survivors to attend the event where they will be honored guests DeAnna says, Bonifay is now my home. If I had known such a community existed while I was rearing my children, I would have come here sooner. Her children are Hannah Johnston who is a prevet student at University of West Florida, and her son Daniel Johnston is also at UWF hoping to pursue a degree in sports medicine or some related eld. We welcome DeAnna and Joshua to Bonifay and look forward to future associations with this lady who is so willing to give of herself and her resources to make our community a better place. I urge you, along with her, to get your team together and begin planning for April 19, 2013. Relay is a lot of fun and is a major source of funds to ght cancer. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPerry and Hester Lucas Wells as a youthful couple, as we appear in a photograph made on the grounds of St. Andrew Primitive Baptist Church.Keep God in mind when votingThe upcoming election will be the most important election of our lifetime. The elected president will be able to place one or more judges on the Supreme Court. These judges are for their lifetime. The decisions handed down by them will affect our children and their children event o the fourth generation. These judges usually votes their decision as the President who appoints them. I speak not as a Democrat or Republican; I speak as a man of God. Today in many schools, the word God has been stricken, or the phrase God Bless America forbidden. We fought, gave our blood and are still ghting under a ag that in many places, even our homes, we are forbidden to display. The Devil with a capital D can go into our schools and sponsor a dance, put a preacher cant go in and hold a church service. In Jeremiah 1:5, God said, Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee: and before thow came forth out of the womb I sancti es thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations. Therefore, God knew us before we are formed, for we are formed in the mind of God, and are humans at the moment of conception. Therefore the morning after pill, is the killing of an unborn human being. Our present government says it is a womens right to choose, even at taxpayers expense. But God says its murder. In Genesis 19:1-24, God destroyed two cities, Sodom and Gomorrah, because of the sin of homosexuality. Our present government says homosexuality should be honored, and homosexual marriages should be the law of the land. God spoke to me and said, America is down to its knees and this is our last chance. I will not attempt to tell you how to vote. But I will ask you two questions: 1. Are you for morality, or against morality? 2. Are you for God or against God? Your vote will determine. I am a voice in the Wilderness Crying for the Salvation of our Nation.Bishop L.C. FrederickVernon Readers say thank youHow do you say Thank You to three or four hundred people at one time? You sure cant call each one. You cant nd addresses for each one and drop them a note. Even if you could you would surely leave someone out. Well, this is my most pleasurable, humble and grateful task at hand! So here goes a feeble attempt. First and foremost, to God be the glory and I do so thank God in the quiet place in my heart and on the rooftop of my house! I am so unworthy and yet so grateful to be able to do so. Make no mistake please; I speak Thanks to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. To Yaweh God. Jehovah God, Father God, the God that the Christian Holy Bible speaks of. Prattler re ects on his Panama City yearsPERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison Hardees manager has found her home in BonifayWednesday, October 31, 2012 LETTERS TO THE EDITORSee LETTERS A5

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Washington County News | A5Wednesday, October 31, 2012Second, I would like to say Thanks to the Holmes County 911 dispatch and the rescue squad. Great job guys! Thank you and may God bless you in a special way for all you do is my prayer! Not once but twice this service has aided in saving my husbands life and of this I am certain. We are so very grateful! Third, wow what a great church family we have! We attend First Baptist Church of Bonifay, but our church family is the whole family of God. We had Baptist, Methodist, Assembly of God, Church of Christ and other Christian people praying, visiting, sending cards, gift baskets, phone calls, and so on. It gave me chills to see Gods people come together and just love one another, forgetting those differences that separate us in certain ways. The differences just didnt matter and I loved it. You will know that they are my disciples by the way that they love on another, Jesus said. Fourth, although most will never see or read this I would like to say thank you to all of the doctors, medical staff, cleaning crew laundry workers and cafeteria personnel for all they did. There is so very much care, effort and empathy that was put in out near death experience! We are so humbled by what we have been through! Last but not least, I would like to say Thank You to my husband of 38 years who narrowly escaped death, thank you for too many things to mention. Anyone who knows him at all has heard him say that I (his wife) am the luckiest woman in all of Holmes County and probably all of Northwest Florida. As I sit here in the hospital by your side Sid and I go back over in my mind the past hours of events, as I look down and see all of those tubes everywhere, as I hear the soft sound of a snore and watch your chest rise and fall, as I see the most concerned and worried look on the doctors, faces turn to smiles, I just have to agree Sid, I felt like the luckiest woman in not only all of Holmes County but possibly in the whole wide world! It hit me hard and straight that I nee to say Thank You now while I still can and not just sit back and wish one day that I had. Once again, Thank you all for everything. I am so grateful!Suzanne Johnson / Sid JohnsonBonifay Clean,clear, natural soundYour Hearing Aids communicate with each other automatically adjusting themselves. Ear-to-Ear Synchronization: Settings are automatically transferred to the other aid.Beltone Promise Hearing Aid System$1200 offComes In All Models* Based on 2 Hearing aids. NEW J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597 Springcreek Road, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU Textured PlushCarpet7999Super Thick 13 Loose LayVinyl49FHA QualityVinylSF SF SFEngineered Value Grade3 Oak Plank$229SFAREA RUG SALE!Over 200 In Stockcarpettilemarianna.com 1721 South Waukesha Street, Bonifay, FL (850) 547-2060 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 Expires 11/15/12 and Panama City News HeraldThe November ballot is chockablock with proposed amendments to the Florida Constitution, even more so than usual. Its worth noting that none of the amendments were sponsored by citizens groups. All originated in the Legislature, and several re ect partisan political agendas. This is a summary of where we stand on each issue. AMENDMENT 1 states the government cant require citizens to buy health insurance. This is Floridas attempt to thumb its nose at the individual mandate portion of Obamacare that was upheld by the Supreme Court. We oppose that mandate, but this amendment, if passed, would carry no legal weight as federal law trumps state law. The Florida Constitution should not be cluttered with symbolic political statements. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENTS 2, 9 and 11 expand property tax exemptions for certain groups disabled veterans who move, spouses of veterans or rst responders killed in the line of duty, low-income seniors who have lived in their homes a long time. The state constitution already is full of such carve-outs, and we have opposed most of them because they make a Swiss cheese of the tax code. We would prefer to see comprehensive tax relief for everyone, not just sympathetic groups. We recommend a NO vote on all three. AMENDMENT 3 would change the way Florida calculates its revenue limit. Currently it is capped according to the increase in personal income. Under this amendment, it would be based on the rate of in ation and population growth. This would help prevent the state from going on a spending spree during ush economic times, which is what happened prior to the 2006 downturn that led to so many painful budget cuts. Revenues collected in excess of the cap would be placed in a reserve fund for emergencies. Also, the Legislature could temporarily suspend the cap during emergencies. AMENDMENT 3 would impose spending discipline on Tallahassee while giving lawmakers exibility to loosen the purse strings when it is truly needed. We recommend a YES vote. AMENDMENT 4 would give the Legislature the power to repeal the recapture rule, which allows the taxable value of a homeowners property to rise even when the propertys market value is falling. We have supported repeal of the recapture rule for years on the grounds that it undermines the protections afforded by the Save Our Homes amendment. However, this amendment also includes other changes to homestead exemptions that would complicate the system and risk shifting the tax burden to residents. We recommend a NO vote and urge the Legislature to come back with a clean, recapture-only amendment in 2014. AMENDMENT 5 would give the Legislature more authority over state courts, including con rmation power over judicial nominations. This is a partisan power grab in response to some court rulings that have not gone the Republicans way. It would politicize the judiciary and threaten its independence. The current setup works ne. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 6 would change the states right-to-privacy law by prohibiting public funding of abortion. However, that is already federal and state law. Therefore, this measure seems redundant. In addition, supporters argue the amendment is needed to allow the Legislature to pass a law requiring minors to get parental consent for an abortion. But the text of the amendment says nothing about that. If proponents want to pursue that goal, they should do so explicitly in a separate amendment. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 8 would allow taxpayer funding, both directly and indirectly, of religious institutions. This opens the door to state-funded education vouchers that could be used at parochial schools. That is something we have supported, so long as the aid goes directly to parents and allows them to choose where it will be spent public, private or parochial. That is consistent with U.S. Supreme Court rulings. For example, in a 2002 case that upheld a Cleveland school voucher system, the court developed a private choice test for such programs: They must have a valid secular purpose. Aid must go to the parents and not to the schools. A broad class of bene ciaries must be covered. The programs must be neutral with respect to religion. There must be adequate nonreligous options. However, this measure also would open the door to government choosing which religious organizations to fund directly (under current law, state agencies can use taxpayer dollars to fund social or health care services provided by nonpro t organizations af liated with religious groups). That is problematic. Those funds will come with government strings attached, which could undermine the religious mission of the organization. It could exacerbate religious differences among the public if the state funds groups that some citizens disagree with. If the state denies funding based on these objections, that will spark lawsuits. Legislators should craft a narrower amendment tailored speci cally to vouchers. We recommend a NO vote. AMENDMENT 10 would double the tax exemption on tangible personal property used in businesses (machinery, of ce furniture, computers, etc.). This is an existing tax, not the creation of a new one. Increasing the exemption will lower the cost of doing business, which could bene t the state economy. We recommend a YES vote. AMENDMENT 12 would change the way student representatives to the Board of Governors is chosen. This is a minor procedural matter that is unnecessary and unbecoming of the state constitution. We recommend a NO vote. Opinion LETTERS from page A4Our guide to proposed amendments EDITORIAL

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LocalA6 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 LocalWashington County News | A7Wednesday, October 31, 2012 FILE PHOTOS From right, the railroad was central to the founding of Chipley, so it was tting that a model railroad show was held in the Chipley Train Depot in the 1980s. An aerial view of Harrell Square in 1980 shows Northwest Florida Community Hospital, top left, surrounded by open elds. Walmart has been serving Chipley since August 30, 1994 A tradition of excellence and community service since 1893, continuing The Chipley Banner www.chipleypaper.com (850) 638-0212 We have been in operation since 1995.Washington County Christian SchoolTrain up a child Proverbs 22:6Jason Haddock, Administrator1405 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-9227 Email: wccs@bellsouth.net www.washingtoncountychristian.com WASHINGTON-HOLMES TECHNICAL CENTER WHTC Celebrates 45 Years of Excellence in EducationWashington-Holmes Technical Center has been a major part of educating our citizens since 1967. WHTC has grown from its original nine vocational programs to 26 career and technical education programs. Program oerings sometimes change to keep pace with the new demands of industry. While maintaining traditional trade programs, the Technical Center is shifting its focus toward information and medical technologies. All of Washington-Holmes Technical Centers programs train students to earn industry certications or state licenses that are necessary to compete in the 21st century workforce. CFURNITURE & GIFTSBCHAVERS-BROCK Serving customers since 1926.gulfpower.com Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power Chipley, the birthplace of Gulf Power We Treat You Like Familybetter than Northwest Florida Community HospitalProudly Serving Our Community Since 19511360 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-1610 www.nfch.org By CATHRINE LAMB638-0212 | @WCNHCT clamb@chipleypaper.com The town of Chipley was originally called Orange, before being renamed Chipley in 1882. The town was named after railroad man, businessman and Florida Sen. William D. Chipley, also known as Mr. Railroad of West Florida throughout Northwest Florida. A statue was erected in Pensacolas Plaza Ferdinand after his death on Dec. 1, 1897, with an inscription that read, Soldier Statesman Public Benefactor. On the battle eld he was without reproach. In the councils of state he was wise and sagacious, and in his public and private benefactions he was ever alert and tireless. The history of his life is the history of the upbuilding of West Florida, and every material advancement for two decades bears the imprint of his genius and his labor. Not long after Chipley became incorporated in 1882, the courts held that charter invalid. Chipley was re-chartered in 1900. Chipley never got to see the town develop and prosper into what it has become today. The town was only about 15 years old when he died. For more than 75 years, there were two towns that bore his name. One of those being the Chipley we all know and love today. The other was Chipley, Ga., which is now the resort town of Pine Mountain, Ga. A train track completed in 1882 put Chipley on the map. The side track allowed for trains to pull off of the main track and re ll their steam engines at what became known as Tank Pond, where the agriculture center and City Hall are now located. The rst train station and rst post of ce in Chipley were in old boxcars. The railroad connecting Pensacola and Chattahoochee was completed in 1883. The rst two businesses that opened in Chipley were a wine shop and a whiskey distillery, in 1881. The businesses were owned by B.W. Berry. The whiskey distillery was in the area that is now known as Falling Waters State Park. Berrys businesses lasted until 1899, when the Washington County electors voted to prohibit the manufacture or sale of alcoholic beverages. The McGreachy General Store was one of the rst general stores in the area. The store sold things such as apparel, shoes, hats, yard goods, sewing machines, custom-made suits and groceries. The McGreachy General Store also had a soda fountain, making the store the rst in Chipley to serve CocaCola when it rst came onto the market. The McGreachy family also owned the rst bottling works in Chipley. On May 14, 1898, a re destroyed most of the business district in Chipley. The re reportedly started a few minutes after noon, in a building at the rear of the White and Williams Store in the middle of the business district. By the time a line of people passing buckets back and forth put out the re, 35 businesses and residences were in ashes. Almost everything on the south side of the railroad was gone. The cause of the re was a mystery to the residents of Chipley. There was also a re in 1967 that gutted the thenpolice station and the Crystal Ice Company. The ice company was erected in 1914, to house the Chipley Power and Lights Power Company. It wasnt until 1970, and several res later, that the Chipley Volunteer Fire Department was established. The rst re department consisted of 12 members and three vehicles. Those vehicles were a 1939 Chevrolet, a 1940 and a 1960 Ford. There are several places of worship in Chipley. Three of the oldest are First United Methodist Church, First Baptist Church and First Presbyterian Church. The rst written record of the First United Methodist Church is from 1887. The church stands on the corner of Fifth Street and U.S. 90. First Baptist Church of Chipley also was established in 1887 with 19 members. The church met for its rst service in a tworoom school house where the Washington County Court House now stands. The congregation moved to a two-story building on the corner of Cypress Avenue and Fifth Street in 1899. First Baptist Church of Chipley made the move to its present location on South Boulevard on Dec. 2, 1979. First Presbyterian Church held its rst services in Methodist and Baptist churches in Chipley when it was formed Oct. 18, 1846. The church moved its services to a church on Watts Avenue in May 1904. In 1938, First Presbyterian made its nal move in 1938 to its current location on Fifth Street in Chipley. The Washington County School District was established with the Berry Hill School No. 14 in 1847. The Berry Hill School was located where First United Methodist Church and the Washington County Court House are now located. The Berry Hill School was discontinued in 1879 for lack of attendance and became the Limestone Church. In 1883, the Limestone Church became the Jordan School House, and a year later in 1884, the Jordan School House was changed to the Chipley School. The Washington County School District, in 1887, ordered that the school be open to the public. Three years later, in 1890, Washington County was ordered to establish the Chipley High School District, to encompass the town of Chipley. In 1902, the school was located on the present-day campus of the Washington County School Board of ces. The school consisted of two stories with four classrooms, an auditorium and a bell tower. The 12th grade was not added until to Chipley High School until 1916. The Historic Chipley High School was erected in 1930 and now houses of ce and the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Chipley High School is now on Brickyard Road and has been in operation since 2001. The rst and only colored school in Chipley was constructed in 1913. The school was named after its rst principal, T.J. Roulhac. When the school opened in 1913, it was called the Chipley Colored School, and it only went through the seventh grade. Colored students who wanted to progress beyond the seventh grade had to go to Tallahassee. It wasnt until 1968 that the school became non-segregated and was renamed Chipley Junior High School. The school eventually was renamed Roulhac Middle School, now on Brickyard Road next to the Chipley High School campus, where it has been in operation since 2000. The old Roulhac Middle School buildings now house the T.J. Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center. Chipley has grown from being a lling station for steam engine trains to being a prosperous and lively town. Chipley encompasses 4.1 square miles, halfway in between the state capital of Tallahassee and the states westernmost city of Pensacola in beautiful Northwest Florida. Information in this story was compiled from articles published in the Washington County News May 15, 1982, edition.By PERRY E. WELLSSpecial to the News The City of Chipley is generally accepted as beginning in the year 1882, the year P&A Railroad was completed through this area after the mammoth project took three or more years to complete. Orange changed to Chipley after the development in an area south of the new town began to shift northward to be near the railroad. In 1982, many towns along the rail route from Tallahassee to Pensacola engaged in a yearlong time of jubilation of cially called the Railroad Centennial Celebration. Townspeople enjoyed boasting that Chipley led the way and took top honors of staging a full-year celebration, hosting numerous rousing performances of musicians and other entertainers, before the main celebration on May 22-23. These happenings put the spotlight on Chipleys big plans for the culmination weekend, which were labeled by the Washington County News following the event as a Super Success! Chipleys Railroad Centennial Celebration was led by relatively newcomers to the area, the husband-and-wife team of Dick and Polly Kneiss. The logo for the entire event was made into a giant button with the words, Chipley Centennial 100 Years of Rollin. Sales for the souvenir promotional item were brisk, and some of them still can be found in thrift stores here and in nearby towns. The full story of this historic extravaganza, along with writings on other festivals of the area, were printed the Heritage of Washington County book, issued in 2006. It sold more than 1,400 copies and remained out of print until two months ago when 200 additional copies were received. Contact me if you missed getting one earlier. Thirty years later, this newspaper is printing a special edition of the midweek paper, paying tribute to the towns history and looking at developments that have come our way since the all-out horn blowing of 1982. A Wal-Mart Supercenter has been added to the town. Numerous fast food outlets, including Waf e House, KFC, Burger King, Wendys, Arbys, and Sonic have joined existing Hardees and McDonalds in providing food for tourists, early and late workers and townspeople generally. Other specialty foods with Mexican and Chinese menus are available in addition to the traditional restaurants, Baileys, Continental, Skins and Bubbas. K.C. Pizza has joined Pizza Hut in providing pizza and pasta. West Point Home, manufactures of ne linens and other fabrics, became established in Chipley within the past 30 years, providing employment for hundreds of workers in the immediate area. Despite a troubled worldwide market for their goods, the local plant has survived with the persistence and perseverance of top-level and local company executives. Since 1982, Chipley native Tommy Ray McDonald Sr. returned to his hometown after a successful and interesting career in the U.S. Air Force, bringing his wife, Vivian, a young son, Tommy Ray Jr., and daughter, Kim, with him. Almost overnight, he ascended to positions of leadership, becoming the executive director of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and the mayor of Chipley. He still was holding both jobs at his untimely sickness and death April 29, 2005. The area lost other leaders in the passing of Farrell Nelson, Lloyd White, Ross Deal, E.W. (Judge) Carswell, Phillip Rountree, Marvin Engram, J.E. (Red) Davis and many others since the rst celebration. Chipley has a total new slate of leaders in City Hall from that of 1982. Linda Cain is the veteran mayor. The City Council consists of Karen Rustin, Kevin Russell, Lee Dell Kennedy and Ellis Reed. Kevin Crews is police chief, Floyd Aycock serves as re chief and Dan Miner holds the city managers post. A complete changeover also applies to the countys constitutional of cers. Colby Peel is county judge. Bobby Haddock is the current sheriff. Linda Cook holds the clerk of court position, while Gil Carter is property appraiser and Carol Finch Grif n is the elected supervisor of elections. Helen Guettler McEntyre, tax collector, and Dr. Sandra Cook, superintendent of schools, will leave these posts at the end of their present terms. Even though there has been a recognized downturn in the national economy during the past four years, new businesses and many other changes are coming into the area almost monthly. Gabriel Heater, the national news radio columnist during the World War II years, began his Mutual Radio Network nightly broadcast with this opening: Theres Good News Tonight! He ended his newscast with, Time Marches On. Hopefully Heaters prophetic opening and closing of a radio career which ended March 30, 1972, gives hope for all who joyfully celebrate life to its fullest in hometown Chipley, Fla. 1882 2012From left are the historic Chipley Train Depot as it appeared in 1886 and Miss Chipley Helen Benson, who was featured on the front of the Washington County News on Oct. 12, 1939, as she was heading to Dothan, Ala., to compete in the second annual National Peanut Festival pageant. Railroad Avenue, as seen shortly after turn of the 20th century. The Washington County News of ce is now in this building. CHIPLEY CELEBRATES ITS BEGINNINGS: 1882-20121882 train station a humble beginning City still growing despite poor economy PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommunity leaders Paul Peacock, from left, Tommy McDonald, Perry Wells and Raymond Norris during a Kiwanis Club presentation in the mid-90s. At right, a historic Chipley quilt is displayed by Sherri Biddle and Tommy McDonald Sr., celebrating the towns Centennial in 1982.

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LocalA8 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Saturday, November 3rd, 20127:00am Registration for Redsh Run ( Front Steps of Gibson Inn) 8:00am Start of Redsh Run 10:00am Gates Open ($5.00 admission Charge & kids Under 12 Free)10:00am Parade Starts (Hwy 98) 1:00-5:00pm Blue Crab Races (at the Top of Each Hour) (kids under 12) 1:00pm Oyster Shucking Contest 1:15pm Oyster Eating Contest 2:30pm 7:00pm Musical Entertainment8:00pm Headline Entertainment ( Lee Brice ) 11:00pm Park Closeswww.FloridaSeafoodFestival.comFriday, November 2nd, 201210:00amPark Opens (No Admission Charge) 4:00pm Blessing of the Fleet 4:00pm Arrival of King Retsyo Smokey Parrish and Queen Christina Collins 5:00-11:00pm Musical Entertainment 11:00pm Park Closes NOTICE OF ELECTION AND QUALIFYING FOR THE TOWN OF WAUSAU, FLORIDA GENERAL ELECTIONOn Tuesday, December 11, 2012 a general election will be held in the Town of Wausauat the Wausau Town Hall, 1607 Second Avenue, Wausau, Florida. Qualifying for the election will begin on Monday November 12, 2012 through November 15, 2012 duringthe hours of MondayWednesday 8:00 AM-4:00 PM; Thursday 8:00 AM-Noon at the Wausau Town Hall. The Qualifying fee is $25.00 plus a 1% election assessment fee for a total of $43.54. The seats up for election are Post 1, currently held by Roger D. Hagan, Council Post 4, currently held by Gail Culbreth and Post 5, currently held by B.J. Phillips. Anyone wishing to vote in the upcoming election who is not registered to vote may do so with the Washington County Supervisor of Elections on or before November 12, 2012, Registration books will close at this time. As published in the Washington County News on October 20, 24 & 31, 2012 Margaret Riley, Town Clerk FORCOUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 PRITCHARD PRITCHARD PRITCHARD Political advertisement paid for and approved by Ross Pritchard, Democrat for County Commissioner, District 1 A county commissioner should possess a host of qualities in order to be effective. I am a Floridalicensed building contractor and small business owner. Additionally, I have 25 years of work experience in emergency services. My experience and training have rendered me knowledgeable in areas such as positive business planning and Florida building codes and regulations. I also have expertise in disaster management, knowledge of the handling of hazardous materials (HAZMAT) as well as an extensive knowledge regarding all areas of FEMA. These credentials combined with communication skills, energy and drive make me the candidate that will work best for Washington County. I want the best for our county, and I have the skills and passion for serving the people of Washington County. I will make a difference. Lets work together to ensure that our residents can afford of this county and its values. Ross Pritchard NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2012, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. Oct. 15-22Daven Bowden, 31, Chipley, petit theft, resist of cer without violence two counts, violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property, violation of state probation on false imprisonment Aldric Brown, 44, Vernon, sell of marijuana Robert Bullard, 40, Pensacola, driving while license suspended or revoked Sadarrius Bush, 20, Chipley, simple assault Brenda Chambers, 38, Clermont, possession of controlled substance without a prescription Glenn Chestnutt, 42, Las Vegas, Nev., Sarasota County warrant for child support Sebastian Dilsaver, 20, Chipley, operate motor vehicle without valid drivers license, possession marijuana less than 20 grams Robert Douds, 61, Bonifay, deliver meth, traf c in opium, sell of opium Alycia Flowers, 21, Bonifay, sell of marijuana, deliver or distribute meth Ernesto Gonzalez, 18, Chipley, operate motor vehicle without valid driver license Margaret Gunn, 36, Chipley, child support Jeremiah Hill, 22, Chipley, violation of state probation on criminal mischief Cody Knowles, 30, Bonifay, sell of marijuana, sell of meth Lorrie Laurel, 47, Chipley, insurance fraud more than 20 thousand but less than 100 thousand Ruben Laurel, 42, Chipley, insurance fraud more than 20 thousand but less than 100 thousand Tamala Payne, 46, Caryville, sell of marijuana four counts, possession of controlled substance without a prescription, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Miracle Williams, 20, Panama City, violation of state probation on resist of cer without violence, battery on law enforcement of cer, conspire to disrupt education process, felony battery John Works, 40, Caryville, sell of marijuana two counts Paul Wright, 52, Chipley, batteryBy RANDAL YAKEY522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland has outraised challenger Al Lawson by more than $1.1 million in his campaign to regain his House District 2 seat. The numbers were posted earlier this month by the Center for Responsive Politics, which runs the website OpenSecrets.org. According to the group, Southerland, R-Panama City, was able to raise $1,602,108 through Oct. 17. Lawson, D-Tallahassee, raised $509,690. Southerlands campaign has spent $1,105,168 versus Lawsons $435,615. In 2010, Southerland spent nearly $1.3 million to capture the seat from Rep. Allen Boyd, who spent more than $3.8 million. On its OpenSecrets website, the Center for Responsive Politics has analyized individual contributors to the campaigns and listed the organizations and companies where the contributors or their spouses work. Southerlands main local contributors work for organizations that are fairly well known in the community. At the top of the list for Southerland is Gulf Coast Dermatology, $14,201, according to the latest numbers by OpenSecrets. Second is Eastern Shipbuilding, $12,500; and third is Bill Cramer Chevrolet at $10,500. The $10,000 organizations are Every Republican is Crucial PAC, Freedom Project, National Beer Wholesalers Association and the OSI Restaurant Partners. Others include GAC Contractors, $7,000, and L-3 Communications, $6,000. The Southerland campaign said the donations to the campaign were a sign the constituency was behind the congressman. The people of the district are rewarding Steve for going to Washington and keeping his promises, said Matt McCullough, communications director for Southerland. McCullough said the Lawson campaign was backed by special interest groups. Lawsons campaign said they are not worried about the spending gap. We are going to ght right through it, said Mara Sloan, spokeswoman for the Lawson campaign. Sloan also swung back at the Southerland camp, saying no one is getting more backing from Washington than Mr. Southerland. Its no surprise that the Southerland campaign is outspending the Lawson campaign, considering that theyve had two years to raise money from Washington special interest groups and big-time Washington donors, Sloan said. The Al Lawson campaign is fortunate to have the support of so many local North Floridians. Many of our top donors are actually commercial shermen right here in the second district. They have come together to support Al Lawson because they know that he will continue to stand up for them, unlike Congressman Southerland, who has not supported them during his time in Congress. Lawsons contributors work for organizations that include the American Association for Justice, $5,250, and a number of $5,000 contributions, including some from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Workers, BRIDGE PAC, Democrats Win Seats, Florida Benevolent Association, International Associations of Fireghters and the Plumbers and Pipe tters Union. Florida State University employees contributed $1,250 and Blue Cross/ Blue Shield employees put up $1,000 in support of Lawson.Special to the NewsCHIPLEY Take Stock In Children, a 120-credit-hour college tuition scholarship program announces it has selected eight new recipients in grades eight and nine who will be recognized by name at the annual presentation dinner on Nov. 13. Since its inception in Washington County in 2005, the local TSIC program has graduated 47 students from high school and 39 (including the 2012 high school graduates) are currently enrolled in a two-year or four-year college program or a certi cation program at technical centers. Three students are either in the one-year deferral or military deferral. For school year 2012-13, there are 29 students in grades 9-12 working toward high school graduation and receipt of the scholarship. The number of scholarship contracts to be awarded varies from year-to-year based upon the donations from Washington County businesses and individuals, as well as money in the state matching account. Since starting in 2005, the local TSIC has raised about $400,000, which excludes the state-level match, and the total value of scholarships is estimated at $775,000. The program has averaged about 10 high school graduates between Vernon and Chipley high schools each year that receive the 120-credit-hour tuition scholarship. To obtain the TSIC scholarship, a student must be in grades seven to 11, sign a contract to meet certain standards during the remaining school years until high school graduation and have family support; the parents/guardians also sign a contract to support their student. Family incomes must be below a certain level based upon the number of children in the family at the time the quali cation for TSIC is established. TSIC allocates more scholarships to grades seven to nine so the students will have more years in the program prior to high school graduation. Applications are taken each September shortly after the school year starts and are available from middle and high school guidance counselors. There is an urgent need for additional student mentors who work directly with the students and for additional student advocates who are the liaison between Take Stock and the local schools and guidance counselors. Other volunteer opportunities are available to serve on the Leadership Council that guides the total program or in fund raising. The Washington County Take Stock In Children program is locally run and locally funded and there is always work for willing hands. The TSIC program is operated by the Washington County Scholarship Foundation Inc., which holds federal and state income tax exemption with charitable organization registration. For more information about the program, to volunteer or to make a donation, contact David Solger, program coordinator, at 638-1276 or visit www.takestockinchildren.org. Arrest REPORTTake Stock In Children selects 8 new recipientsSoutherland tops Lawson

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LocalWashington County News | A9Wednesday, October 31, 2012 The WestPoint Home Factory Outlet is back in Chipley! Different location but same great product and great prices!WestPoint Home Factory Outlet1055 Flower Ave, Chipley, FL 32428Located behind our Chipley factory in the Industrial Park. The address is 1055 Fowler Drive. Turn off of Orange Hill Hwy on Commerce Ave, turn right on Fowler Drive, Outlet on left.(850) 638-9421New Store Hours: Thursday and Friday 9 AM to 5 PM Saturday 9AM to 3 PM WestPoint Home WestPoint Home Great selection of Famous name Comforters, Sheets, Towels, Pillows, Blankets, Throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices. By RANDAL YAKEY522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY From arguments over authorization of the RESTORE Act to accusations of slashing funding for Medicare and Medicaid, the race for the Florida Congressional District 2 seat has gone though a number of transformations. At one point during the campaign, a Democratic pollster had incumbent Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, and his Democratic challenger, Al Lawson, running neck-andneck, each garnering about 43 percent of the vote. And the two men have been throwing barbs at each other since early this summer. Lawson has charged Southerland doesnt pay his taxes on time, while Southerland has charged Lawson will gut Medicare and Medicaid. Earlier this month, the Southerland campaign dubbed Lawson Absentee Al after Lawson chose not to attend candidate forums in Marianna and Vernon, and, according to Southerlands campaign, pulled out of a scheduled television debate in Panama City. Lawson did join in the televised League of Women Voters forum Wednesday in Panama City, and when he showed up, Lawson threw some jabs at Southerland. I am the candidate in this race with the proven experience to stand up for the issues that are most important to North Florida, said Lawson, a former state senator whose district wedged into a small part of eastern Bay County. From protecting guaranteed bene ts like Medicare and Social Security, to making college affordable, to helping small businesses create jobs to boost our economy and strengthen the middle class, I will wake up every day ready to ght for our community and our values. Both candidates have said they can work across party lines to get more done if elected to Congress. A big issue for both candidates has been easing gridlock in Washington. Lawson, who was prevented from running for re-election to the state Senate because of term limits, said that back in 2010 he supported former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist over Democrat Kendrick Meek for U.S. Senate. Lawson also touted working with former Gov. Jeb Bush. I have a record of working across party lines, Lawson said. Lawson also charged that Southerland worked in lock step with Republicans on nearly every issue. He said Southerland voted along Republican Party lines 93 percent of the time. Southerland also touted working across party lines. In a recent radio interview with WFSU, Southerland talked about working with Democrats in Congress. Floyd Patrick Miller, who was wedged in between Lawson and Southerland in a recent forum, is a write-in candidate. I am here with the New Deal of the 21st Century to bring new development of minerals, oil, natural gas and infrastructure to the United States that will bring jobs all across this great country, Miller writes on his website. Miller doesnt give any speci cs as how he plans to implement his plan.Southerland, Lawson battle heats up for District 2 STEVE SOUTHERLAND IIParty af liation: Republican Current occupation: Small business owner and member of Congress Experience: As a third generation small business owner with family roots in the region that predate statehood, Im proud to ght for the land I love. Long before joining Congress, I took an active role in strengthening our community, including experience chairing the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida and the Bay County Chamber of Commerce, while also serving on the boards of the Covenant Hospice Foundation, the Economic Development Alliance and the Bay Defense Alliance. Platform: Both parties share blame in giving rise to a federal government that no longer re ects its people. Thats why I havent hesitated to stand up to both parties to defend our North and Northwest Florida values. Im focused on empowering families and job creators to improve conditions for economic growth, and that begins with eliminating the crushing burden of Washington regulations, spending and debt. Im proud of the progress weve made, but much work remains. Why do you deserve to be reelected? Ive kept my word to my constituents. I said Id ght to save Medicare, and I voted to restore $716 billion in Medicare funding cut by ObamaCare. I said Id reduce spending, and I voted to cut our House of ce budgets by 11percent while implementing historic levels in federal spending cuts. I said Id rebuild the connection between the people and their representative, and Ive hosted 44 free town hall discussions in two years. Campaign website: www. southerlandforcongress.com AL LAWSONParty af liation: Democrat Current occupation: President, Lawson & Associates Experience: Member, Florida House of Representatives 19822000; member, Florida Senate 2000-2010; Senate Democratic Leader 20082010, dean of the Florida Legislature 2010. Platform: As hardworking families continue to struggle in this economy, Congress is gridlocked, and Congressman Steve Southerland is part of the problem. I am not alone in expressing frustration with Congress. Washington is paralyzed by partisanship, and nothing is getting done. Its not a problem with Democrats, and its not a problem with Republicans. Its a problem with Congress. During my time in the Florida Legislature, I had a record of getting things done. Why do you deserve to be elected? Ive worked with my own party when it was right for my district, and Ive worked across party lines when it was right for my district. My philosophy has always been that Im here to represent the people, not to engage in partisan politics. This is a viewpoint too often absent from the halls of Congress. When elected to the Congress, the people of North Florida will nally have a congressman who will put their interests rst. Campaign website: www. lawson4congress.comFLOYD PATRICK MILLERParty af liation: Write-in Current occupation: Hospitality industry Experience: Held Florida real estate sales associate license since 1994. I have been a working manager for most of the past 20 years, bringing a unique view of needs of the working class and the needs and costs of employers. I am a property owner and have the same concerns as millions of middle-class homeowners trying to make mortgage payments, homeowners insurance, property taxes and monthly upkeep of a home. Platform: I am a working man for the working class. Education is the most important investment our country can make. I am for fully funding education. I will ght for Social Security, Medicare and veterans needs. I will ght for womens rights from equal pay to freedom to determine their own health needs. I am for raising the minimum wage to a living wage set by in ation; it would be $15.50 an hour. Why do you deserve to be elected/re-elected? I will work to bring con dence back to our government by keeping big money in check by working for We The People. Will work to end the war on drugs and tax it. Will work for better pay for our teachers, military, police, all civil employees. Will ght to keep the oil, natural gas and minerals on federal land and in federal water for We The People to pay off debt of the nation and fund future needs. Campaign website: oydpatrickmiller.com

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LocalA10 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012 From the Associates of Store 2114 Way to Go AthletesAlex ONealChipley H.S. Football Linebacker 11th GradeFallon BraxtonHolmes County H.S. Volleyball 12th Grade AthletesCongratulations to these top athletes!Jacob Martinez (red)Bozeman H.S. Football QB & DB 12th GradeChance JowersGraceville H.S. Football Guard 10th Grade Austin BrownVernon H.S. Football Wide Receiver 10th GradeAthletes for Poplar Springs H.S. and Ponce de Leon H.S. will begin in November.Hanna MolletBethlehem H.S. Volleyball Hitter 12th Grade Fallon Braxton Hanna Mollet Jacob Martinez (red) Alex ONeal Austin Brown Austin Brown Chance Jowers Chance Jowers CHIPLEY HIGH SCHOOL BANDPHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLERThe Chipley High School Marching Band performed its last home game half time show Friday, complete with a special appearance by a freight train that rolled through town during the bands performance. This years show, which features songs from The Sound of Music, earned the band Superior marks during their performance at the 27th annual Daleville Invitational Band Classic in Alabama.

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COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today!NOV. 3 SCOREBOARD Enter by Noon on Friday TIE BREAKERMiami Indianapolis Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County Times-Advertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www.bonifaynow.comName____________________________________________ Address__________________________________________ City________________________________Zip_________ Daytime Phone____________________________________ Email____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-SubscriberRules1.College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2.Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3.Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4.A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5.Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6.Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7.All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8.Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9.The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10.Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11.Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. 1. SyracuseCincinnati 2.TCUWest Virginia 3.Texas A&MMississippi State 4.Arizona StateOregon State 5.MissouriFlorida 6.OregonSouthern California 7.Colorado StateWyoming 8.AlabamaLSU 9.New Mexico StateAuburn 10.SMUUCF CHECK HEREFOR EACH WEEKS WINNEROctober 27 WinnerScott Waltrip, Chipley Missed 3, TB Yardage By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY Kobe McCrary and the Chipley Tigers outran the Freeport Bulldogs 39-13 Friday night at Philip Rountree Stadium. It was a nondistrict game between two of the more successful Class 1A programs in recent years. Chipley improved to 5-4, with Freeport falling to 3-6. Freeport senior quarterback Owen Cole connected with junior Morgan Hardee in the end zone with 8:21 to play in the rst quarter and senior Nick Russells kick gave the Bulldogs a 7-0 lead. It was short-lived as Chipley running back McCrary scored three rst-half touchdowns and the Tigers were in command. Less than 30 seconds after Freeports touchdown, McCrary answered with a 52-yard scoring run. Fletcher Dillmores kick tied the game. With 3:02 left in the rst quarter, the Tigers took the lead on McCrarys 17-yard run that capped a 55-yard, six-play drive. With 5:48 remaining in the half, Chipley again found the end zone with McCrary busting over the middle from 3 yards to make it 20-7. The Tigers rst-half response wasnt completed as with 2:07 left in the second quarter junior quarterback Jordan Finch connected with junior wide receiver Dallas Oliver in the end zone. Chipley led 26-7 at intermission. The Tigers scored on their rst possession of the second half when sophomore wide receiver Carlon Smiths TD capped a 46yard, four-play drive. Dillmores kick gave the Tigers a 33-7 lead. Freeport responded with an 80-yard, seven-play drive, helped by a Tiger personal foul. The march ended with senior wide receiver Zach Fordem nabbing Coles pass in the end zone. The Tigers nished the scoring as the third quarter expired when sophomore running back Wyatt Brock ran up the middle from 2 yards to cap a 57-yard, nine-play effort. Chipley heads to Bonifay next week to face Holmes County in a key District 3-1A game.McCrary sparks Chipley to non-district triumphPHOTO BY RANDAL SEYLERThe Chipley Tigers manhandled the Freeport Bulldogs 39-13 Friday in non-conference play at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley. The Tigers travel to Bonifay this week to face the Blue Devils. SP O RTS www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, October 31, 2012 APage 11Section Crestview overwhelms MosleyBy PAT McCANN747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY If Friday night was a referendum on postseason motivation versus pride, motivation won out handily at Tommy Oliver Stadium. Crestview, still striving to become a factor in District 2-6A, downed Mosley 39-7 to remain relevant in the playoff discussion at 2-2, 4-5 overall. Mosley, already eliminated, slid to 0-4, 3-5. More to the point, the game showcased a team with a number of players who soon will be suiting up on Saturdays against an overmatched opponent. Micah Reed, a verbal commitment to UCF, rushed for 108 yards and the rst two touchdowns of the game to spark the Bulldogs. Junior defensive end Denzel Ware, who already has announced his intention to attend Florida State, sacked Mosley quarterback Zach Rhodes for a 16-yard loss early in the game. That negated a fumble recovery by Zach Warnick on a muffed punt by Crestview that set up the Dolphins on the Bulldogs 21. The series ended in a punt, and Mosley eventually trailed 17-0 at halftime. Reed scored on runs of 9 and 40 yards, the latter coming only 18 seconds before halftime and appearing to take the steam out of the Dolphins. Crestviews defense already had punished a depleted Mosley offense. Of 15 rst-half running plays by the Dolphins, only three resulted in positive yardage. Mosley momentarily clawed back into contention midway through the third quarter to trail 17-7. Louie Abbotts interception and 30-yard return set up the Dolphins on the Crestview 31, and they took 10 plays to reach the end zone. Rhodes engineered a pair of fourthdown conversions, nding wide receiver Nat Dixon for 6 yards and sneaking for 2 yards behind Caleb Houghton. Rhodes found Dixon on a fade route in the corner of the end zone from 8 yards with 5:37 left in the quarter and Christian Marshs extra point narrowed the gap to 10 points. Until the ensuing kickoff. Jaylynn Robinson bobbled Marshs pooch kick at his 20 and dribbled the ball momentarily around his feet. When he gained possession he easily broke contain down the visiting sideline and picked up a pair of vicious blocks to go 80 yards. It sparked a trio of long scoring plays as the Bulldogs turned a triumph into a rout. Robinson streaked 69 yards on a sweep to the right on Crestviews opening possession of the fourth quarter. Emmanuel Reed duplicated the yardage and the result with 5:19 remaining. Crestview enjoyed an advantage of beef and muscle on both side of the football and it showed on the stat sheet. The Bulldogs piled up 361 yards to 171 for the Dolphins.From Staff ReportsBLOUNTSTOWN Javakiel Brigham led a balanced scoring attack with two rushing touchdowns and Hunter Jordan completed his two passes for scores to lead Blountstown to a 51-0 rout of Franklin County on Friday. Jordan tossed scoring strikes to Josh Taylor and Tripp Taylor to give the Tigers an early 21-0 lead. Brigham rushed for 45 yards and scored twice in the rst half to propel the Tigers to a 44-0 lead. Fabian Solomon added 41 yards and the games nal score in the fourth quarter. Alex Mayorga led Blountstown with 75 yards rushing and he added a secondquarter touchdown. Bobby Andrews also scored on the ground and the Tigers racked up 237 yards rushing. Blountstown dominated on defense, holding Franklin County to minus-63 total yards. Ladarius Rhodes was the lone Franklin County rusher with positive yardage, as he nished with 9 yards and the Seahawks longest gain of 7. Blountstown (5-3, 2-1 District 4-1A) hosts West Gadsden next week in its nal district game. Franklin County (2-6, 1-3) is off.Blountstown dominates Franklin County, 51-0 HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldMosleys Peyton Kirkley (65) and Ben Morrisey (58) combine to bring down Crestviews Micah Reed after a short gain Friday night at Tommy Oliver Stadium. Mosley momentarily clawed back into contention midway through the third quarter to trail 17-7. Louie Abbotts interception and 30-yard return set up the Dolphins on the Crestview 31, and they took 10 plays to reach the end zone. See CRESTVIEW A12

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Red, White & Blue CelebrationMusic ConcertSaturday, 3 November 201211:00 AM 4:00 PMAll American Music Showfeaturing Church Cake Sale COUNTRY, ROCK & ROLL, BEACH MUSIC, GOSPEL, 50s & 60s, BLUES & ELVIS HITSBring Your Picnic Basket, Lawn Chairs, Umbrellas, Pop-up Canopies and Cooler, but Please No Alcoholic Beverages or Pets. This is a Family Event! Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Pettis, NPA, for SheriPrizes Fun Games FREE JWAdamsthe star ofEchoes of ElvisandTerry Kingat theFarmers Market and GazeboDowntown Chipley, FloridaCome Join the Party Kids Fun and Face Painting DAMAGE PREVENTIONCALL BEFORE YOU DIGThe Sunshine One-Call of Florida advises that many damages to buried utility lines can be avoided when everyone participates in a four-step process that begins with a call before you dig. Follow these four steps designed to help you avoid hitting buried utility lines during any project that involves digging. Step 1: Call before you dig Florida law says homeowners must call 811 or (800)432-4770 two full business days before digging in any easement, right-of-way, or permitted use area. Contractors are required to call in every job that involves digging or disturbing the earths surface. After you call, a locate ticket will be generated and buried utility lines will be located and marked with color-coded them. Hitting a buried utility could result in anything from no cable tv service to serious injury or loss of life when electrical or gas lines are involved. Visit www. callsunshine.com for more information. Step 2: Wait the required time. After you call, utility companies have two full business days to locate and mark the approximate location of buried utility lines. Refrain from digging until all utilities on your locate ticket have responded or the allowed color-coded locate marks have been placed, whether the site is clear of a particular utility or if the locate has been delayed by calling (800)852-8057 and entering your locate ticket number. This can also be done at www.callsunshine.com. Step 3: Protect the locate marks. Keep the locate marks visible until the project is complete. When marks are destroyed or removed, the excavator must stop any digging and place another call for locate marks. Locate marks are valid for 20 days. Removal of valid locate marks is a misdemeanor. Step 4: Dig safely. Use extreme caution when digging within 24 inches on either side of the marks to avoid hitting the buried utility lines. If you are using machinery to dig, someone other than the person operating the machine must supervise the activity, watching carefully to avoid damaging the buried utility. Failure to call Sunshine State One-Call of Florida $250 and the job site being shut down. If damage occurs, please notify. Emergency Contacts: Chester Campbell, Public Works (850) 638-6346 Fire Department (850) 638-6301 Sheriffs Department (850) 638-6111 FAIR HOUSINGWashington County has enacted a Fair Housing Ordinance making it illegal to discriminate on the basis of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, age or handicap: In the sale or rental or terms or conditions for rental housing. In advertising the sale or rental of housing. In the provision of real estate brokerage service. In the tactics of blockbusting.Washington County will receive, investigate, and seek to conciliate complaints of housing discrimination. Fair and impartial hearings are assured and both administrative and appellant relief opportunities are provided. For further information, contact Washington County at 850-638-6200 or contact the following: 1-800-342-8170 State Hotline 1-800-424-8590 Federal Hotline I Caught You Another Big One! Come and Get It At The Best Seafood Market In Town FRIDAYS PREP SCORESAdmiral Farragut 47, Northside Christian 13 Alonso 17, Tampa Catholic 14 Anclote 21, Wesley Chapel 14 Auburndale 39, Fort Meade 0 Bartow 24, Sebring 7 Bayshore 21, DeSoto County 20 Belleview 42, Santa Fe 7 Bishop Moore 27, Lake Nona 26 Bishop Snyder 35, Branford 0 Bishop Verot 37, North Fort Myers 7 Blountstown 51, Franklin County 0 Boca Ciega 33, Tarpon Springs 20 Bozeman School 49, Wewahitchka 12 Calvary Christian 48, Bradenton Christian 28 Cambridge Christian 7, Seffner Christian 6 Cape Coral 48, Lehigh 42 Carrollwood Day 28, Indian Rocks 22 Chamberlain 19, Gaither 17 Chipley 39, Freeport 13 Citrus 63, Lake Weir 41 Clay 26, Paxon 6 Clearwater Central Catholic 23, Lemon Bay 0 Columbia 21, Orange Park 0 Community School of Naples 35, St. Stephens Episcopal 14 Cottondale 36, Sneads 21 Countryside 23, Pinellas Park 7 Crestview 39, Mosley 7 Dixie County 34, Chie and 7 Dunbar 44, Avon Park 0 Dunedin 17, Middleton 7 Dunnellon 40, Crystal River 29 Durant 28, East Bay 3 Eagles View 53, St. Francis 13 East Gadsden 27, Florida 8 East Lee County 55, Cypress Lake 16 Estero 48, Mariner 35 Eustis 51, Tavares 0 Evangelical Christian 30, St. Petersburg Catholic 27 First Baptist 46, Out-of-Door Academy 42 Fort Myers 30, Ida S. Baker 27 Frostproof 24, Tenoroc 8 Gainesville 14, Madison County 9 George Steinbrenner 48, Wiregrass Ranch 10 Godby 64, Tate 28 Golden Gate 28, Gulf Coast 10 Graceville 28, Jay 14 Gulf Breeze 35, Choctawhatchee 12 Hamilton County 42, The Villages 14 Harmony 15, Gateway 13 Harvest Community Scvool 68, Seacoast Christian 0 Hawthorne 35, Bronson 0 Hernando 14, Nature Coast Tech 7 Hillsborough 43, King 7 Hudson 30, Gulf 0 Island Coast 31, Riverdale 14 Jefferson 39, Leto 6 Jesuit 21, Gibbs 13 John Paul II Catholic 41, Rocky Bayou Christian 35 Kissimmee Osceola 43, Liberty 6 Lafayette 42, P.K. Yonge 14 Lake Brantley 21, Lake Mary 17 Lake Gibson 15, Kathleen 13 Lake Howell 21, Winter Springs 14 Lake Mary Prep 26, Agape Christian 24 Lake Placid 16, LaBelle 14 Lake Region 34, Haines City 29 Lakeland Christian 45, Shorecrest Prep 3 Land OLakes 31, Brooksville Central 14 Landmark Christian 46, International Community 26 Largo 38, Lakewood Ranch 0 Leesburg 34, South Lake 27 Leesburg The First Academy 36, Windermere Prep 30 Lely 47, Palmetto Ridge 0 Liberty County 48, South Walton 0 Maclay 62, Munroe Day 0 Manatee 62, Palmetto 0 Milton 28, Pace 20 Mount Dora 29, Bradford 18 Navarre 44, Ft. Walton Beach 28 Nease 37, Matanzas 14 Newsome 42, Riverview 6 North Florida Christian 48, Walton 24 Northview 40, Vernon 0 Oak Hall 35, St. Johns Country Day 0 Oakleaf 39, Middleburg 13 Ocala Trinity Catholic 32, Booker 0 Ocala Vanguard 48, Lecanto 0 Orlando The First Academy 56, Berkeley Prep 0 Oviedo 16, Oak Ridge 14 Oviedo Masters Academy 40, Peniel Baptist 8 Pasco 45, Ridgewood 0 Pensacola 50, Pensacola Washington 7 Pine Forest 21, Escambia 3 Plant City 22, Brandon 20 Plant 20, Armwood 19, OT Ponte Vedra 20, Creekside 0 Providence 27, West Nassau County 22 Rickards 48, Fort White 17 Ridge Community 36, George Jenkins 6 Ridgeview 58, Leon 21 Robinson 19, Lakewood 8 Sanford Seminole 28, Hagerty 19 Sarasota Riverview 28, Sarasota 24 Seminole Osceola 55, Dixie Hollins 26 Seven Rivers Christian 42, Central Florida Christian 35 Sickles 31, Strawberry Crest 17 South Fort Myers 28, Charlotte 27 South Sumter 42, Keystone Heights 0 Southeast 44, Hardee 10 Spoto 13, Lennard 3 Springstead 35, Mitchell 0 St. Cloud 49, Celebration 0 St. John Neumann 47, Southwest Florida Christian 6 St. Petersburg Canterbury 21, Keswick Christian 0 St. Petersburg Northeast 35, Seminole 0 St. Petersburg 10, Clearwater 7 Sunlake 35, River Ridge 9 Tampa Bay Tech 37, Tampa Freedom 0 Taylor County 28, Suwannee 20 Temple Christian 34, Cedar Creek Christian 22 Trenton 49, Hilliard 6 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 42, Yulee 22 Trinity Prep 27, Santa Fe Catholic 0 Umatilla 62, Montverde Academy 0 Union County 33, Williston 12 Venice 45, Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 29 Vero Beach Masters Academy 61, Bishop McLaughlin 7 Victory Christian 28, Foundation Academy 20 Wakulla 56, Deltona Trinity Christian 0 Warner Christian 12, St. John Lutheran 0 Weeki Wachee 29, Interlachen 22 West Florida 52, Arnold 21 West Orange 21, Ocoee 0 West Port 42, Chiles 33 Wharton 38, Blake 7 Winter Haven 27, Lake Wales 14 Zephyrhills 35, Fivay 28 By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner Bmilner@pcnh.com SAND HILLS You can forgive Bozeman for looking ahead to next week. Bucks coach Loren Tillman only hopes they saved a few points. Bozeman overcame an early hiccup to race past visiting Wewahitchka 49-12 on Friday. It was Bozemans nal tuner for the District 3-1A nale at South Walton next week when the Bucks will try to wrap up their second playoff berth in school history. We wanted to come out, play enough to be sharp and not get anyone hurt, said Tillman, whose parents are Wewa natives. Thats what we had to do to go into next Friday and give ourselves a chance to compete. Wewa (2-7), which lost for the fth time in six games, struck rst on the games opening possession. Rashard Rainie carried 66 yards on the games rst play and Jalyn Addison scored from 3 to give the upset-minded Gators a 6-0 lead. Thoughts of pulling off a shocker faded quickly, as James Jernigan raced 20 yards for a tying score four plays later. Jernigan added touchdown receptions of 34 and 16 yards from Jacob Martinez and Jovani Bell scored twice to stake the Bucks to a 42-6 halftime lead. Martinez also rushed for a rst-half score to help Bozeman (6-2) score 42 unanswered points. The running clock in the second half put a merciful end to the night for the overmatched Gators. Wewa has a lot of youth and they just need to keep playing, Tillman said. I see a bright future for them. Rainie led Wewa with 109 yards rushing on 18 carries. Addison added a second score at the end of the third quarter. The Gators were held to 199 yards for the game after amassing 77 on their rst drive. Bell exploded for a game-high 138 yards on the ground on only ve totes. Martinez added 66 yards rushing and was 4 of 5 for 93 through the air. Jernigan chipped in 83 total yards. Bozeman can assure itself no worse than a tiebreaker with a win over South Walton. The Bucks will clinch second place and a regional spot with a win and a Holmes County victory over Chipley. We win and see how the other game goes, Tillman said. If we lose then all bets are off. Wewa is idle next week. Wewahitchka 6 0 6 0 12 Bozeman 21 21 0 7 49 First quarter WHS Addison 3 run (pass failed) 9:10, 6-0 WHS BOZ Jernigan 20 run (kick failed) 7:22, 6-6 BOZ Bell 51 run (Burns run) 4:57, 14-6 BOZ BOZ Jernigan 34 pass from Martinez (Burns kick) 3:33, 21-6 Second quarter BOZ Jernigan 16 pass from Martinez (Burns kick) 9:43, 28-6 BOZ Bell 1 run (Benjamin kick) 3:59, 35-6 BOZ Martinez 2 run (Burns kick) :55, 42-6 Third quarter WHS Addison 23 run (pass failed) :00, 42-12 Fourth quarter BOZ Thompson 5 run (Burns kick) 8:02, 49-12Bozeman crushes WewaMosleys back eld, already missing leading rusher Ryan Rogers and forced to juggle the roster, was further limited in the second half. In the space of two minutes, Rhodes was knocked from the game when Ware broke through for a clean hit during an incompletion, halfback Andrew Hardrick had to leave the game and Warnick, moved from defense to supplement the halfback position was sidelined. All but Warnick returned by the fourth quarter. However, Rhodes and Dixon supplied most of the offensive output by teaming on eight completions for 103 yards. Rhodes was 11-24 overall with one interception, and that on his nal pass of the game. Mosley completes its district schedule at rst-place Navarre next week. Crestview could stake a claim to a shootout berth or a playoff spot outright by winning its district nale against visiting Niceville. CRESTVIEW from page A11 HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldFullback Christian Childree (40) finds running room as Tyler Henderson makes the stop for Crestview and the Bulldogs Brandon Davis (9) moves in. SportsA12 | Washington County News Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section JOHN PETTIS forWashington CountySHERIFFHONESTY INTEGRITY PROFESSIONALISM Its not about making promises, its about producing results.Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Pettis, No Party Aliation for Sheri INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6Car WashCHIPEY The City of Chipley Public Works Department will be having a car wash on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Citys Parking lot on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 90 to bene t needy families for their annual Christmas Fund. The car wash starts at 8 a.m.Ladies Ministry Yard SaleBONIFAY During the annual 9-mile Yard Sale on Nov. 3, the Hickory Hill Baptist Church Ladies Ministry will be selling hundreds of items in downtown Westville. The yard sale will include childrens and adult clothes, shoes, household items and much more. Prices will be the lowest ever. The sale begins at 7 a.m. on Highway 179-A about two blocks north of the Westville City Hall. Proceeds from the sale will be used for ministry work in the community as the Ladies Ministry spread the blessings of Jesus to all. Everyone is invited to check out the sale, and are welcome to church services at Hickory Hill Baptist Church. Information on church programs can be obtained by calling the church of ce at 956-4116.VES Annual Fall FestivalVERNON Vernon Elementary School will be holding their annual Fall Festival from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1. Tickets may be purchased today in advance from 7:30 to 8 a.m. or 2:15 to 3 p.m. Tickets are 5 for $1. For more ticket information call 535-2486. Food for sale will include hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, pickles, polish sausage, chili, boiled peanuts, beverages. There will also be a Sweet Shoppe. Games at the festival will be a cake walk, glow-in-the-dark, pick up ducks, can toss, treasure box, mystery box, sh pond, plinko, ring toss and many more. There will also be spirit shirt sales, face painting, in atable toys, and a bouncy house. Entertainment will be provided and there will also be an auction. For more information call 535-2486.Wednesday, OCTOBER 31 2012 T R U n K O R T R e A T Hundreds of children and parents turned out Saturday for Chipleys Trunk Or Treat, sponsored by the Merchants of Historic Chipley. Churches, businesses and civic groups were on hand to distribute treats to hundreds of little goblins and ghouls. Wausau also held the city Halloween festivities on Saturday, including a haunted house at the Volunteer Fire Department. Tonight is Halloween, so more children are likely to be out and about throughout the county.PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Annual CHRISTMAS GREETINGSSECTIONThis fun holiday section features letters to Santa from local elementary school children.Publishes Wednesday, Nov. 21 Deadline: Wednesday, Nov. 14 at noon To advertise call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Just in time for Black Friday!Home for the HolidaySHOPPING GUIDEFeaturing holiday specials, gifts or oers Only$65 Publishes Wed., Nov. 21 Deadline: Wed., Nov. 14 at noonSPECIAL OFFERRun in both the Shopping Guide and Greetings section and SAVE 10% onyour Greetings ad Special to ExtraVERNON Vernon Middle School will receive Nook tablets for grades six through eight. The tablets will help all students with class work and homework. The tablets will help students gain a better understanding of their work and get them to try something new, as well as alleviate the weight students carry in their backpacks. The students can choose whether or not to receive a tablet. Students will be given the option to pay $20.91 ahead of time or pay nothing and be responsible for the tablet, but if damage occurs then the student will pay the whole price of the Nook tablet. If students do not get a tablet, they will have a textbook. These Nook tablets have a lot memory and are specially used for storing books. The tablets are enabled with the Internet, games and other features, but students will be responsible for anything stored, lost or used on them, like graphics or videos. Each tablet will come with a soft case. The Nooks will also help the teachers who dont have classroom textbook copies and textbook copies for each student to take home for the year. Special to ExtraMARIANNAThe Chipola College Student Support Services program recently has been busy touring universities, giving its students a chance to research future education opportunities. SSS is a TRIO program funded by the U.S. Department of Education to assist rst generation and/or low-income students and/or students with disabilities to succeed academically in college. The Chipola SSS program is funded to serve 140 students. Chipola SSS advisers Kristie Mosley, Christen Bennett and their group of students visited Florida State University on Oct. 13 for a tour and a football game, a true Nole experience. On Oct. 19, the group headed to Auburn University for a tour of the campus. Next semester, SSS will visit the University of Florida and Troy University. High school or Chipola students interested in the SSS program should contact Kristie Mosley or Christen Bennett or call 718-2417. For more information, visit the Chipola SSS website at chipola.edu/ SSS/index.htm. Stephine Lurtz and Jessie Ramsey announce the upcoming their upcoming wedding in Bethlehem. Stephine is the daughter of LaDelle Lurtz and the late Daniel Lurtz of Bonifay. Jessie is the son of Felix and Sharon Ramsey of Marianna. The wedding will take place, Saturday, Nov. 3, at Bethlehem Methodist Church with a fun-lled reception at the couples home in Bethlehem to follow. Todd and Fawn Katherine (Turner) Hess of Fort Riley, Kan., announce the birth of their daughter. Lauren Katherine was born Oct. 8 and weighed 8 pounds 5 ounces and was 20.5 inches long at Geary Community Hospital, Junction City, Kan. Grandparents are the late Paul Turner, Ocala, Cheri and Ron Shafer, and Augustine and Deb and Dennis Hess Ill. Army Pvt. Nathen C. Hendrickson has graduated from the Basic Field Artillery Cannon Crewmember Advanced Individual Training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. The course is designed to train service members to maintain, prepare and load ammunition for ring; operate and perform operator maintenance on prime movers, self-propelled Howitzers and ammunition vehicles; store, maintain and distribute ammunition to using units as a member of battery or battalion ammunition section; perform crew maintenance and participate in organizational maintenance of weapons and related equipment; and establish and maintain radio and wire communications. Hendrickson is the son of Donna Burch of Sea Lion Lane, Ponce de Leon. He is a 2010 graduate of Freeport High School.Dr. Vickie Stephens has been selected the Chipola College Faculty/Administrator/ Other Professional Award of the month for November. Stephens has served as dean of School of Health Sciences since 2009. Here, Dr. Stephens is congratulated by Dr. Jason Hurst, vice president of Baccalaureate and Occupational Education.SPe E Cia IA L To O EXTra RAVernon Middle School to get tablets CCakes and PPies for a C CureThe Krafty Katz Relay For Life team is holding a Cakes and Pies for a Cure Thanksgiving sale. Pecan, pumpkin, cherry and apple pies are $15. The coconut cake, chocolate cake, peanut butter cake, key lime cake and the cream cheese pound cake are $25. The red velvet cake is $35. Payment is due when order is placed. All prots from the cakes and pies will go to Washington County Relay For Life. The deadline for orders is Nov. 16. Anyone ordering will be able to pick up his or her cakes or pies from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 21 at C&C Bookkeeping located at 809 Main St. in Chipley. The team will deliver to local business in Bonifay and Chipley. For more information or to place an order, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 6381483, Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121 or Cecilia Spears at 658-4038.Washington CCounty Relay For LLifeWASHINGTTON CCOUNTTY Washington County will be holding their 2013 Relay For Life Event, from 6 p.m. on April 12 to 11 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. The theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. LurLUR TZ anAND RamseyAMSEY ToO weWEDHesses welcome baby girl SPe E Cia IA L To O EXTra RAThe Chipola College Student Support Services (SSS) program has been busy recently touring universities, giving its students a chance to research future education opportunities. Here, the group is pictured at the FSU fountain.CChipola SSS students tour universities Relay for Life evenEVEN TsSHendrickson graduates training To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITYTHECAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITYEndowment for Tomorrows Jobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL STeEPhensHENS reRECeivesEIVES awarAWARD BirIR ThH

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Halloween is today, and many pet owners have already purchased their animals costume. Although these outts can be fun and festive, the wrong outt can be harmful to your animal. Although costumes are a fun way to interact with your pet, Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor and director of general surgery services at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, stressed the importance of monitoring your pet in the clothing.  Cute little costumes are fun to put on your animals while trick-or-treating, but when you are not watching your animals, make sure to take them off, Stickney said.  He also explained that this also goes for sweaters, jackets or any other pet clothing. While it may seem like pets need clothes to stay warm, they can do more harm than good if the animal is not monitored.  More than likely your animal does not need to keep clothing on to stay warm, even in the winter, Stickney said. If you have a house pet that only goes outside for 15-20 minutes to go to the bathroom, they will be more than ne without the clothing.  A nother thing Stickney recommended avoiding in pet costumes are dangly pieces of fabric, bells, or other small objects that the animal can chew off and swallow. These things can cause the pet to choke and possibly cause blockages in their intestinal track.  Ribbons and bows are especially dangerous for cats, Stickney added. These are things cats love to play with and chew on, but if they swallow them it causes what is called a linear foreign body. This requires emergency surgery to remove or it can saw a hole in the intestines.  S tickney also warned of a pet being allergic to the clothing material or the laundry detergent used to wash the costume. If an animal is allergic to a costume or clothing, Stickney said it might develop an itchy, red rash.  The best thing to do is to take the outt off of the pet and retire it, Stickney said. There is no reason to cause your pet pain and discomfort.  F inally, Stickney stressed that it is important to make sure the outts t correctly. Anything that can wrap around the pets neck, paws, or legs can cause them to panic or injure themselves.  This is especially common in small or young dogs as many costumes may not t them correctly because of their size, Stickney said. The best way to select pet costumes or clothing is to buy them at a pet store where you can take your pet with you and try the outt on them. That way you will know for sure that it not only ts correctly but that it also looks as adorable as you hoped.  About Pet TalkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the W eb at  http:// tamunews.tamu.edu/. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to  editor@cvm.tamu.edu Special to ExtraFORT WALTON BEACH To facilitate ongoing dialogue and further develop relationships with military partners, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll met with the newly restructured Air Force Materiel Command, Commander Brig. Gen. Arnold Bunch, Jr. and the 96th Test Wing Commander at Eglin Air Force Base, Brigadier General David Harris to get a status update on the recent consolidation completion required by BRAC 2005 of the Air Force Materiel Command.  Bunch reassured Carroll that he was committed to getting the desired mission at Eglin to increase efciency and effectiveness to stand up the mission and support a ll personnel.  He also stated that, no jobs or pay were lost at Eglin due to the consolidat ion.  The consolidation will realize $109 million/year cost avoidance to the Air Force. Carroll raised concerns about the looming national security threat of cyber terrorism and asked General Bunchs help to grow more mission opportunities for the 96th Test Wing to be the leader in the Air Force for research and development of counter cyber security measures. Carroll said, there is a great opportunity for Florida to utilize the talent and extraordinary asset at the Wing to consolidate a cross section of departments and agencies to enhance and conduct proper systems test and development to combat the next greatest threat to our nation. Bunch was pleased with his visit to Florida and applauded Carrolls efforts to advance the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative. He stated that, other states see what Florida is doing and they want to implement the same measures to enhance their bases.VES Annual Fall FestivalVERNON Vernon Elementary School will be holding their annual Fall Festival from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1. Tickets may be purchased today in advance from 7:30 to 8 a.m. or 2:15 to 3 p.m. Tickets are 5 for $1. For more ticket information call 535-2486. Food for sale will include hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, pickles, polish sausage, chili, boiled peanuts, beverages. There will also be a Sweet Shoppe. Games at the festival will be a cake walk, glow-in-thedark, pick up ducks, can toss, treasure box, mystery box, sh pond, plinko, ring toss and many more. There will also be spirit shirt sales, face painting, inatable toys, and a bouncy house. Entertainment will be provided and there will also be an auction. For more information call 535-2486.Chipley Public Works Car WashCHIPEY The City of Chipley Public Works Department will be having a car wash on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Citys Parking lot on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 90 to benet needy families for their annual Christmas Fund. The car wash starts at 8 a.m.Carnley-Holland Family ReunionGRACEVILLE The Carnley-Holland Family Reunion will be held at 11 a.m. the rst Saturday in November, this day falls on Saturday, Nov. 3. The reunion will be held at the Graceville Civic Center. Bring your lunch and come join us. Reunions are a good time for food, seeing family, and counting new additions. They are also a time for pausing to remember those who have gone before. Several that were with us last year are not with us now. Reunions are also a time for being thankful for our heritage. And this family is rich in its heritage based on our values that are founded in God. The Carnley Reunion rst began in the 1800s and still continues strong today. The reunion used to be held at the old home site of Joe and Roxie Best Carnley but has since been moved to the Graceville Civic Center. As R.J. Carnley has always said, If you know of a Carnley, you are invited. If you never heard of a Carnley, we want you to come. If you are a Carnley, you are expected to be here.Snakes in The GrassCHIPLEY Falling Waters State Park and Scott Sweeney will present Snakes in the Grass at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3. The program will be held at Falling Waters State Park. For more information call 638-6131.Campbellton School ReunionThe Campbellton High School Reunion for all who were ever associated with the school; whether student, faculty, employee of any type will be held at the First Baptist Church of Campbellton, on Saturday, Nov. 3. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. The program will begin promptly at 10 a.m. Bring a covered dish for lunch in the Fellowship Hall at noon. There will be no speaker this year. There will also be door prizes. A collection will be taken to defray the expenses. Come early and mingle.Noises OffMARIANNA The Chipola Fall Theater Production will present Noises Off at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1, to Saturday, Nov. 3, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. Tickets are general admission $7 for adults and $5 for children 18 and under. For more information email sirmonc@chipola. edu. Sunday Afternoon with The ArtsMARIANNA Chipola Center for the Arts will be holding and art exhibit and reception on Nov. 416. The Annual Exhibit Reception will be held from 1 5 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. For more information call 557-0655.Veterans Day powwowCHIPLEY The North Bay Clan of Lower Creek Muscogee Tribe Village will be holding a Veterans Day Powwow on Nov. 9-11. This is a free event. For more information email howell. marilyn@yahoo.com. Holmes County High School 1977BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Class of 1977 will be having a 35th reunion in conjunction with the HCHS Homecoming on Nov. 9 and 10. Those wishing to participate should contact the class President, Ossie Darwin McMahan at 598-1313.Veterans AppreciationBONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Mounted Posse and the Holmes County Sheriffs will be holding a Veterans Appreciation Parade at 10 a.m. in Nov. 10. The parade will begin on Highway 79 in front of the Piggly Wiggly and will then travel South on Veterans Boulevard. There will be no entry fee. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. ATVs, Go Carts and motorcycles in organized/recognized groups only. Applications may be picked up at the Holmes County Sheriff Ofce or downloaded from www.holmescosheriff.org. Lunch will be provided by the City of Bonifay following the parade at veterans Park. For more information call Joe Hardy at 547-9298.HCHS ReunionThe Holmes County High School Reunion will be held at 11 a.m., on Nov. 13, at the Dog Wood Lakes Country Club. For more information call Kathryn Treadwell at 547-3526.Holiday Heritage FestivalGRACEVILLE The Baptist College of Florida will be holding a Holiday Heritage Festival on Nov. 16. For more information call 263-3261.Chipley Womans Club Fall Yard SaleCHIPLEY The Chipley Womans Club will be holding a very big yard sale on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 and 17, at their Clubhouse, at 607 Fifth Street, in Chipley. The sale will start at 8 a.m. Rain or shine. At this sale, the Club is selling holiday and home decorations, toys, indoor and outdoor furniture, fall and winter clothing for all ages, etc. Proceeds will help fund Scholarships given by the Club to high school and college students going to Chipola College. If anyone in the community has items that you would like to donate to this sale, the club will pick up from your home or business. Or you can bring them to the Clubhouse on Thursday before the sale. Call 260-5896 if you have questions or items to donate. PetET Tal ALKDangers of pet Halloween costumesSpecial PECIAL toTO EXtra TRABrig. Gen. Arnold W. Bunch, left, met with Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll and Brig. Gen. David A. Harris to discuss the Air Force presence in Fort Walton Beach.Air Force updates Lt. Gov. Carroll Community EventsVENTS Crossword PUZZleLESOLUUTION ON PAGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Some traditional Mohawks are treating the naming of the nations rst Native American saint with skepticism and fear that the Roman Catholic Church is using it to shore up its image and marginalize traditional spiritual practices. They see the story of Kateri Tekakwitha as yet another reminder of colonial atrocities and religious oppression. I was a recipient of these historical profanities and want to ensure this does not happen again, said Doug George-Kanentiio, a Mohawk writer who left Catholicism to follow traditional longhouse spiritual practices. The daughter of a Mohawk chief and a Catholic Algonquin woman, Kateri was born in 1656 about 40 miles northwest of Albany and in the heart of the Iroquois Confederacy to which the Mohawks belong. She was orphaned at age 4 when smallpox wiped out her family and much of her village and left her blinded and dis gured. A Catholic convert at 20, she settled in Kahnawake, a Mohawk settlement south of Montreal where Jesuits had a mission and where she and other women performed morti cation rituals such as selfogging as part of their faith. At her death at age 24, Kateris smallpox scars reportedly vanished, and later she was reported to appear before several people. She is buried at a shrine on Kahnawake. Speaking in English and French at her canonization last Sunday, Pope Benedict XVI noted how unusual it was in Kateris culture for her to choose to devote herself to her Catholic faith. Shes seen very much as a bridge between native culture and Christianity, said the Rev. Jim Martin, a Jesuit priest. He said the Jesuit missionaries took great pains to learn the native languages and tried their best to present the Christian faith using words, phrases and ideas from the native cultures. Traditional Mohawks recognize the reverence their Catholic relatives and friends have for Kateri, said Chaz Kader, a Mohawk journalist who was raised Catholic but follows ancient longhouse traditions now. But many remain troubled by how the church portrays her life. The story of Kateri told in various church writings describes her as maintaining her faith despite torment by her people, suffering ostracism and persecution at the hands of her own tribe and eventually eeing to Canada. I disagree with the characterizations of the other Mohawks in the Jesuit accounts of Kateri, Kader said. The contrast of good Mohawks and bad Mohawks still is affecting our people. Traditional Mohawks have struggled to keep their spiritual traditions and ancient language alive despite pressure from non-Indians to adopt European religion, culture and language. These traditionalists have established Mohawk language-immersion schools and follow a clanbased government separate from the elected tribal government recognized by the U.S., Canada and New York state. To outsiders, they are associated with an image of bad Mohawks who smuggle goods across the border and refuse to collect state taxes on cigarette sales, Kader said, and the good Mohawks are the ones who went to Rome to celebrate Kateri, he said. Its dif cult to gauge just how widespread the feelings are given the factionalism that pervades the nation and the circumspection they favor when dealing with the media. But many Mohawks interviewed downplayed any controversy and joined Catholics who see Kateri as a uniting gure and hope her elevation to sainthood will help heal old wounds. Its so nice to see God showing all the avors of the world, said Gene Caldwell, a Native American member of the Menominee reservation in Neopit, Wis., who attended Kateris canonization with his wife, Linda. The Native Americans are enthralled to have Kateri attain sainthood, he said. Russell Roundpoint, director of the Mohawk history and cultural center at Akwesasne, said her sainthood is not a contentious issue by any stretch of the imagination. The Mohawk people are very proud of the fact that she has attained such a high level, he said. Sister Jennifer Votraw is director of communications for the diocese where the Mohawk reservation is located. Though the diocese doesnt provide direct pastoral care to the Mohawks, Votraw belongs to the order the Sisters of St. Joseph, nuns who regularly aid the priests who minister to the tribe. She said years of interactions between the church and the tribe demonstrate a mutual respect. Still, she knows there are traditional Mohawks who will never be swayed in their view of the church and might resent Kateris canonization as a ploy to improve the churchs image among Native Americans. They believe very rmly in their religion, which is Mohawk, she said. You just have to respect that. Orenda Boucher, a Mohawk humanities professor at Kiana Institution, a Native American college near Montreal, said there are mixed feelings and no easy answer to the question of what Kateri represents to Mohawks or the world. A lot of my friends who are traditionalists see Kateri as tied into the story of colonization that has deeply affected Kahnawake, and to the atrocities of the church, she said. Boucher said to understand the complexities of Kateris life, its important for people to look beyond the biographies written by clergymen who focus on what they consider her Christian virtues. George-Kanentiio said traditional Iroquois worry that Kateris sainthood could be used as way to encourage Native Americans to eschew their ancestral values for Catholic dogma. It should never obscure the best elements of our aboriginal spirituality, nor should Kateris personal behaviors, given their extremities, be endorsed as a model for women anywhere, he said, referring to her self-mutilation with whips, thorns and hot coals. Women in particular need not kneel in supplication to any man or any god but to rise to dance and sing in true joy, he said. We can never accept any institution which actively suppresses women or quali es their potential. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.On Growing UPWhat does it mean to grow up and become an adult? This is certainly not an easy question to answer, although we usually know it when adulthood is lacking and someone is acting childishly. There is a lot of growing up required of us nowadays and thus adulthood is being delayed by an extended period of adolescence. This leaves us with lots of twentyand thirty-year-old individuals who are living at home and taking on very few if any of the responsibilities to be responsible for ones actions and ones life and to stop expecting other people to take care of you. It also entails taking responsibility for where one is in life and refusing to blame our parents, teachers, or others for our lack of success. At some point, we all have to grow up and realize that our life is OURS and no one elses, and however much others may have contributed to it, only we can shape our own lives. Whether this is always true is debatable; parents and teachers do have an impact on children and the adults they will become. But, it is best for each of us to take responsibility for our own lives and start acting and believing as if we are the masters of our own fates. Perhaps that is what it really means to be grown up: to strive to mold and fashion our own lives and to live by our own standards and ideals. And, to do it with the faith of one who takes complete responsibility for every aspect of his or her existence.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofWhen I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 1 Corinthians 13: 11 Special to ExtraMount Zion to hold spaghetti dinnerBONIFAY Mount Zion Independent Baptist Church will have a spaghetti dinner from 5-7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Plates, $5, will consist of spaghetti, green beans, roll, cake and tea. There will also be a silent cake auction from 5-6:15 p.m. All political candidates are welcome and will be given a chance to speak. This is a fundraiser for the church building fund. For more information, call 547-5302. Caryville Baptist Church to host bluegrass eventCARYVILLE The Caryville Baptist Church will host a Bluegrass Picking and Sing at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Come enjoy many pickers with a food break for pot lick dishes. For more information, call Blondell Freeman at 548-5504.Prayer Quilt Ministry fundraiserBONIFAY The Blessed Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay will have a fundraiser for their Prayer Quilt Ministry by hosting an indoor/ outdoor yard and baked goods sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 2-3.Evergreen Baptist plans fundraiserWESTVILLE Evergreen Baptist Church will have a fundraiser for missions on Saturday, Nov. 3, at Evergreen Baptist Church on Highway 179A in Westville. We will have delicious pancakes starting at 6 a.m. for $3. For lunch we will have barbecue pork plates for $6 or barbecue sandwiches for $3. Please stop by and help us with our mission project.Experience the JudgmentThe public is invited to Experience the Judgment. This 30-minute evangelistic walkthrough drama will be presented by Southwide Baptist Church from 6-9 p.m. through Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Walton County Fairgrounds. The rst Judgment group enters at 6 p.m., with a new group following every 20 minutes. Admission is free. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information on group reservations, please call 892-3835.New Prospect Baptist Church Fall FestivalCHIPLEY New Prospect Baptist Church will have its annual Fall Festival at 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3. There will be chili, hot dogs, boiled peanuts, a cakewalk, bingo, jumping house and hay rides. Come have a good time of food, fellowship and fun. For more information, call Lynn at 703-9635 or Kermit at 638-3638.Christian Haven Church Jam SessionChristian Haven Church will have its monthly Jam Session on Saturday, Nov. 3. Refreshments will be served at 6 p.m. with singing shortly after. For more information, call 638-0836 or 773-2602Kingsmen Quartet coming to Wausau WAUSAU The Kingsmen Quartet will perform at the Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Church on Sunday, Nov. 4. Homecoming Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. with guest speaker the Rev. Joe Phillips from Granbury, Texas. Lunch will be served at noon followed by the Kingsmen concert at 1:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. G220 Mens ConferenceBONIFAY On, Nov 16-17 in Holmes County, numerous churches have come together to host the G220 Mens Conference in partnership with some of the men from Sherwood Baptist Church in Albany, Ga., which includes several of the actors from the movie Courageous. The conference will be at the Bethlehem High School, just north of Bonifay. The cost is $40, which includes three jam-up meals (seafood dinner on Friday), conference materials and a T-shirt. We will begin at 6 p.m. Friday and finish at 3 p.m. Saturday. There is a great promo piece on the website that will give more insight as well. Above all things, be praying and thinking about whom to bring with you. Our goal is to see men in Christ grow and men without Christ saved. If you know of a mens group from out of town needing a place to stay, we have some room in fellowship halls of numerous churches where there are showers. For more information, call Pastor Kent Lampp at 209-1723, Assistant Pastor Tony Ladley at 381-5890 or Pastor Ryan Begue at 238-6853. Faith BRIEFSAPMembers of the faithful attend a mass celebrating the life of Kateri Tekakwitha on the Kahnawake reserve near Montreal on Oct. 21. Pope Benedict XVI canonized seven people, Kateri Tekakwitha, Maria del Carmen, Pedro Calungsod, Jacques Berthieu, Giovanni Battista Piamarta, Mother Marianne Cope, and Anna Shaeffer. 1st Native American saint stirs pride, skepticismPage 4 Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Selma Fay Kirkland, 73, of Hartford, Ala., died Oct. 24, 2012. Funeral services were held Oct. 27 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at New Effort Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Selma F. KirklandGeorge Edward McConnell, 55, of Bonifay died Oct. 20. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.George E. McConnellMrs. Karey Jo Brownell, age 65, of Westville passed away Oct. 23 at her home. She was born July 30, 1947, in Westville to the late Maurice and Annie Bell Hood Windham. Mrs. Brownell is survived by her husband, Daniel Jerry Brownell of Westville; two sons, Roger Windham of Bonifay and Tim Windham of Westville; one daughter, Beverly Bowers and husband, Rodney, of Westville; one stepdaughter, Kristie Mitchell of Bonifay; one granddaughter, Railyn Bowers; two stepgranddaughters, Cheyenne Mitchell and Summer Pippin; one sister, Clara Hawthorne of Westville; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 26, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. David Davis and the Rev. Buford Williams of ciating. Interment was in the Westville Community Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Thursday at Peel Funeral Home.Karey J. BrownellMrs. Mary Louise Thomas Mims of Highway 163, Westville, went home to be with the Lord Thursday, Oct. 25, with her loving and supportive family at her side. She was 77. Mrs. Mims was born June 12, 1935, in Geneva County, Ala., to the late John Henry and Mary Etta Jackson Thomas. She enjoyed shing, canning and freezing vegetables. When anyone needed vegetables, fresh or frozen, they would always call Louise. She was a very giving person and would do anything she could for you. She loved her family dearly. Everyone was always welcome at her home, and she will be greatly missed by her family and many friends. For many years, she was a member of Poplar Head United Methodist Church. In addition to her parents, her husband, Earl Mims, two sisters, Lucille Mims and Debra Thomas, as well as three brothers, John H. Jr., James and Joe Thomas, preceded her in death. Survivors include six children, Mary Jo Craft, Westville, Billy Wayne Mims (Caroline), Westville, Carolyn Holloway (Danny), Geneva, John W. Mims (Teresa), Westville, Kathy Harker (Robert), Westville, and Barbara Marsh (Joey), Bonifay; eight grandchildren, Eric Craft (Shirl), Jonathan Mims (Kathy), Amy Hambric (Thomas), Shannon Harris (Michael), Andrea Mims, Austin Harker (Kendall), Ashley Harker and Ryan Mims; four greatgrandchildren, Kathlyn Lucille and Jenna Mims and Wyatt and Wayden Harris; four sisters, Pat Childs (Waymon) and Margie Harrison, all of Geneva, Margaret Hamilton (Russ), Avon, S.D., and Martha Sue Locklear, Westville; one brother, Billy Thomas (Ethel), Samson, and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, at Poplar Head United Methodist Church with the Rev. Chuck Grantham and the Rev. Jim Mashburn of ciating. Mrs. Mims was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Friday, Oct. 26, from 6-8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.comMary L. MimsR.L. Winfred Lawrence, 89, of Chipley passed away Thursday, Oct. 25, at Flowers Hospital. He was born April 9, 1923, in Chipley to the late Brunson Lee Lawrence and Maundy Lee (Peavy) Lawrence. Mr. Lawrence worked in furniture repair and was of the Baptist faith. He was predeceased by his wife, Ethel Lou Lawrence; one daughter, Margaret Lane, and one sister Francis Goodyear. Mr. Lawrence is survived by four daughters, Genell Whiton and husband, Jerry, of Chipley, Mary Barlow of St. Petersburg, Pat Posner and husband, Richard, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Judy Claxton and husband, Joe, of Lake Wales; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grand children. Family will receive friends Thursday, Nov. 1, from 6-8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m., Friday, Nov. 2, at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Michael Orr of ciating. Interment will follow at Piney Grove Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.R.L. Winfred LawrenceSherron Lucas Sampson, age 59, passed away Oct. 25 at her home in Westville. She was born June 27, 1953, in Opp, Ala., to the late Doyle E. Lucas and Willie Mae Lucas. We love and miss you, Momma, Orde. Sherron was preceded in death by her mother, Willie Mae Holland; father, Doyle E. Lucas; and a brother, Marvin Lucas. She is survived by one daughter and son-in-law, Amanda and Oliver Goddin of Westville; two sons and one daughter-in-law, Matthew and Casey Lunt of Cordele, Ga. and Bobby Sampson of Westville; one brother, Chris Lucas of Tennessee; one sister, Joyce Klinefelter of Pennsylvania; six grandchildren, Michael Goddin, Nicholas Lunt, Logan Lunt, Victoria Currington, Madison Lunt, and Marissa Sheldon. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Sherron L. SampsonWilliam Dawson McDaniel Jr. (Bill), 62, of Punta Gorda passed away Oct. 15 at his home. Born June 26, 1950, in Phenix City, Ala., McDaniel grew up in Bonifay and graduated from Holmes County High School in 1968. After graduating, he moved with his family to Lake Placid and worked with Consolidated Tomoka Land Company until 1970, when he joined the U.S. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion (Seabees). During active duty service to his country, McDaniel was deployed to South Vietnam and Puerto Rico. He then served in the Reserves until his discharge in 1976. His career in law enforcement began in 1972. First, he spent ve years with the Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce and then eight years with the Collier County Sheriffs Of ce, where he was awarded a Medal of Honor for Bravery and inducted into the Policemans Hall of Fame in North Port in 1984. The following year he accepted a position in the Fort Myers Field Of ce of the Division of State Fire Marshal Bureau of Fire and Arson Investigations. He worked there until his retirement as a Senior Fire Investigator in 2002. McDaniel was preceded in death by his father, William D. McDaniel Sr. of Lake Placid. He is survived by his mother, Edna Tant McDaniel of Lake Placid; his brother, Bobby E. McDaniel (Anita) of Venus; two sisters, Judy M. Steverson (Paul) of Tallahassee and Patricia A. Elkins (Earl) of Lilburn, Ga.; two nephews, Jonathan P. Steverson (Bevin) of Tallahassee and Christopher W. Elkins of Lilburn, Ga.; two nieces, Susan S. Hawkins (Nathanael) of Panama City and Valerie E. Elkins of Lilburn, Ga.; and two great-nephews, Dawson L. and Holton R. Steverson of Tallahassee. A memorial service was scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, at First Assembly of God in Lake Placid. Private graveside services will be held later. The family requests that anyone who wishes to make a memorial contribution consider donating to the Wounded Warrior Project or the American Diabetes Association.William Dawson McDaniel Jr. WILLIAM DAWSON MCDANIEL JR. Obituaries Library hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8-9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOKAbout the book:The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality,coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November.$29.95SHIPS MID NOVEMBER Reg. $39.95 BUY NOW! EXTENDED DEADLINE BY PUBLISHINGCOMPANYDUE TOPOPULAR DEMANDORDERNOW & SAVE $10!ACTUAL COVER & TITLEIncluded in the book:Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order:______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/bookTOTAL AMOUNTENCLOSED:_______________Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ PAYMENTMETHODCHECK/MONEYORDERPayable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER Honoring Oure men and women whove served in our armed services and protected our precious freedoms are more than a name, rank and serial number. Actual size of 1 block ad Honor the Veterans in Your Family in our special Tribute feature published in the Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser on Wednesday, Nov. 7. Each Tribute includes color photo, name and rank, branch of service, duty status, awards or special distinctions and your tribute message. 4 sizes 1 block$223 blocks$48 2 blocks$364 blocks$62 PFC John SmithU.S. Army July 2008-presentWe thank you for your dedication to our country and freedoms.Love, Mom, Dad & Sis Tribute copy, photo and payment MUST be received by Noon on Thursday, Nov. 1Mail or drop by our oces at 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425 Make checks payable to the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser638-0212 547-9414 HOLMES COUNTY Special to ExtraGrand Ridge woman arrested on assault chargeGRAND RIDGE Jackson County sheriffs deputies recently arrested a Grand Ridge woman on charges of aggravated assault, according to a sheriffs report. Deputies responded to a home on in Grand Ridge on Oct. 24 in reference to a disturbance. Deputies say Carol Lynn Frazier, 59, had pointed a .22 caliber ri e at her father, Daniel Frazier, in a threatening manner. Carol Lynn Frazier was arrested on charges of aggravated assault. Frazier was taken to the Jackson County Correctional Facility to await rst appearance. JCSO: Car stolen from Microtel parking lotMARIANNA An 18-year-old Marianna woman has been arrested on charges of grand theft auto by the Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce. On Oct. 4, a 1999 Chevrolet Cavalier owned by Ollie Williams was stolen from the parking lot of the Microtel on Whitetail Drive. On the morning of Oct. 5, Williams and two witnesses observed a black female driving the car on Highway 71. After further investigation, the female was identi ed as Breyuanna Hall, 18, of Marianna. It was discovered Hall had been arrested on unrelated charges that same afternoon. On Oct. 25, Hall was charged with grand theft of a motor vehicle. She remains in Jackson County Correction Facility to await rst appearance.Facebook scam reportedThe Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce received a report of a scam utilizing Facebook. Through this scam, the victim is asked to like former senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum. After accepting, the user receives a Facebook messages from someone claiming to work for Santorum. These messages will state the availability of government grants and ask for personal information. It then will state the different amounts of grants and the amount of fees you need to pay up front. These fees are to be paid via Western Union. The grant money supposedly would be sent to the victim via UPS. This is a scam. Do not respond to these messages.Traf c stop leads to arrestMARIANNA A Laurel Hill man was arrested on an outstanding warrant after a routine traf c stop. At 8:46 p.m. Oct. 24, a Jackson County sheriffs deputy observed a Ford F-250 traveling north on Highway 71 with no headlights. The deputy conducted a traf c stop as the vehicle pulled into the Pilot parking lot. During the traf c stop, it was discovered the driver, William Ansley of Laurel Hill, had an active warrant from Seminole County, Ga., for fraud and insuf cient funds. Ansley was arrested and transported to the Jackson County Correctional Facility to be held for Seminole County. Jackson County CRIME REPORT HCHS to honor veteransSpecial to ExtraBONIFAY It is that time of the year that we, the JROTC Program, on behalf of the Holmes County High School, would like to recognize veterans for their service in the Armed Forces. We will be holding a ceremony starting at 8:45 a.m. Nov. 12 in the gym at the Holmes County High School. We would also like for the veterans to join us afterward for a few refreshments in the conference room after the ceremony. We look forward to seeing you. WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISERFIND US ON FACEBOOK @WCN_HCTFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 BETTIES COUNTRY REALTYBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. NORTH AVE., BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 850-547-35104 BR 2.5 BA ON 4 ACRES-$95,000 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 40 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$275,000 2 BR 2 BA FISH CAMP-$59,900 \ 4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900 2 BR FISH CAMP-$39,900 2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500 3 BR 2 BA FIXER UPPER ON 3 AC -$39,900 41+ ACRES W/ 3 MHS & 4 PONDS-$129,900 2 BR INTOWN-$39,000 9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900 --NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000 2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000 3 BR 2 BA DWMH ON 3+ ACRES-$82,000 42+ACRES-$124,900 15 ACRES-$28,500 3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD-$149,900 3 BR BRICK IN TOWN-$82,000 2 BR LAKE FRONT FISH CAMP-$55,000www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT The Washington County School Board is accepting proposals for Legal Services School Board Attorney. Specifications may be picked up at the Washington County School Board Office, 652 Third Street, Chipley, Florida 32428, any time Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. until 4:00p.m or specification may be viewed on the District website at http://washingtoncountyflschools.us/ Proposals are to be sealed and marked for Legal Services School Board Attorney, RFP # 12-06, and delivered or mailed to Lucy Carmichael, Chief Financial Officer, School Board of Washington County, 652 Third Street, Chipley, FL 32428, no later than November 7, 2012 at 2:00p.m. (CST). Proposals will be opened at this time and formally presented for Board action at the Reorganizational Meeting of the Board on November 20, 2012 at 3:00p.m.(CST) The Washington County School Board reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all proposals. As published in the Washington County News Oct 20, 24, 27, 31, 2012 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 5:99CV163 -SPM ROBERT M. FENDER, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE RENDERED IN THE ABOVE-STYLED CASE ON NOVEMBER 2, 1999, BY THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, IN FAVOR OF THE PLAINTIFF, THE UNDERSIGNED, APPOINTED IN SAID DECREE, WILL ON THE 6th DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012, AT 12:00 NOON, IN FRONT OF THE WASHINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE DOOR IN THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, OFFER FOR SALE AND SELL AT PUBLIC OUTCRY TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA: Beginning at the intersection of the North line of Section 9, Township 2 North, Range 15 West and the West right of way line of State Road S-277, thence South along said West right of way line 119.5 feet, thence West parallel to the North line of said Section 9, 529.68 feet, thence North 119.5 feet to the North line of said section 9, thence East 528.52 feet along said North line of Section to the Point of Beginning. Said property being in the NW ? of Section 9, Township 2 North, Range 15 West, of Washington County, Florida. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONCERNING THE ABOVE PROPERTY CONTACT ASSISTANT U. S. ATTORNEY PAUL ALAN SPROWLS AT (850) 942-8430. ALL SALES ARE SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION OF THE COURT. METHOD OF PAYMENT IS BY POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR CERTIFIED CHECK MADE PAYABLE TO THE U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE. TEN PERCENT OF HIGH/ACCEPTABLE BID IN CERTIFIED CHECK OR CASHIERS CHECK WILL BE ACCEPTED WITH THE BALANCE DUE WITHIN 48 HOURS. NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED. EDWARD M. SPOONER United States Marshal Northern District of Florida BY:Glenn Millier U.S. Marshals Service DATE:10/03/2012 As published in the Washington County News Oct 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Chipley Fl will hold a sale on these units for nonpayment of unit in accordance with the FL Statutes Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until 11/8/12 to pay in full, NO CHECKS accepted. 1. Gery McIntyre Chipley, FL 2. Laura Jones Chipley, FL 3. Donna Pratt Chipley,.FL 4. Unknown As published in the Washington County News Oct 24, 31 2012 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* Christian Dating & Friendship service. Thousand of succ essful relationships & marriages since 1989! Free package for singles over 40, call 1-800-814-3359. Full Blooded Yorkies8 weeks and ready 2 females 3 males tails docked & wormed Beautiful parents small silkies light in color $400 850-415-6256 Come view my Antiques & Collectable. Lets Make A Deal! Call Mary Louise at 535-4861 3Br/2Ba w/ attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12 10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. AUCTIONDATE:November 17th, 20128:00AM LOCATION:5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, Florida 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank repos, city and county surplus, Jackson County School Board, Scott Rentals, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m REAL ESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN: (55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. FOR SALECHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 Leather Living Room Set. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Big Yard Sale Multi-Families Nov. 3 at Mini Storage unit Esto, Fl. Hwy 79 & 2. Some New items great for Christmas. 8 a.m. til 2 p.m. Gospel singing. Big Yard Sale Nov. 1, 2, 3. 1086 Main St. Noma Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturdays 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. Chipley 1430 N Hwy 81 Westville Nov. 3, 7:00-untilYard SaleFurniture, little boys clothing, ladies clothing, and misc. Chipley 1765 Gainer Road One mile east of Hwy 77 north off of Clayton Rd on Gainer Nov 3 8:00 am Huge multi family, furniture, children clothes, designer clothes, bedding and lots of misc. Text FL29999 to 56654 Clothes-10 to XXL, very good condition. Misc. Very low prices. Nov. 2nd & 3rd. 2685 Marian Dr., Dogwood Lakes, Bonifay. ESTATE SALE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! Thur, Fri, Sat. Nov 1, 2, 3. 742 Sunday Rd Chipley. HUGE HUGE YARD SALE. Nov 1,2,3. 8am-unitl. 1010 6th Ave Graceville. Everything from furniture toys, glass ware, clothes & women clothes. Money made to go to Ghana Missions trip for West gate Church of Christ. Multi-family yard sale November 3rd. Cane grinding, new cane syrup. 8 a.m. until. 1888 Hwy 2, Bonifay 1/2 mile west of New Hope Baptist Church. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday November 2nd & 3rd 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Large Yardsale 2 blocks west of elementary school on 177A, Bonifay. Nov 3rd. 8:30a.m.-until. MEGA YARD SALE Sat Nov 3 7am Until. 1583 Hudson Rd Westville. Please NO Early Birds! Tools of all kind, lots of Christmas, clothes, lights, Way too much to name. Moving Sale 779 Gilbert Dr Chipley. Sat Nov 3. 8am to 1pm. Furniture, appliances, ladies clothes sizes 12-16 womans cloths size 24-30, books, garding, home decor, wedding linens, baskets, tools, purses, swings & much more. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 3. 7a.m.-until-. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 8am-3pm.Clothes, furniture, household items, Christmas, etc. 3321 Spring Vally LN Bonifay Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 7am-4pm. 977 Pioneer Rd 5 1/2 miles east of Wausau. Cane Mill, chipper, wine press, barber chair, tools, cake baking items, base of Hoosier Cabinet, lots of household items. YARD SALE MAPHIS TREE FARM Large 2 family yard sale Friday & Saturday Nove 2 & 3. 7am -5pm. Rain or Shine. Lots of items, new & used to choose from, including baby items. Even things fro them men. 1534 Orange Hill Rd. 3 miles south of Chipley. 850-638-8243 Yard Sale Sat 11/3. Like new washer & dryer, whicker furniture, new electronic keyboard still in box, lots of household items. 2661 North Hwy 81. PDL. Just north of PDL high school Yard Sale Saturday Nov 3 Margie Peels 1488 S. Blvd Chipley.Clothes, dishes, furniture, toys, wedding stuff, baby items, pictures and lots of good stuff. Gross and Son Farms You Pick Peas! 231 N. to Alford FL Left on 276 to County line. Follow the signs 850-849-9330 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 CERAMIC SHOP OPENING IN BONIFAY Come check out our items, such as Christmas Trees & seasonal items. Many more available. Call for info 850-547-5244 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 The business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. REACH OVER 3M READERS! Jenny @ (321)283-5276. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Commercial Bldg For Rent downtown Ideal for office, salon, computer repair, or your choice. Call Progressive Realty. 850-638-8220 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 WANTED: Commercial property for lease with adjacent parking lot, can be shared with joining business; Convent Store Ideal. Call 850-428-1973. 1 BD UpStairs Apt for rent. Kitchen, living room & walk in closet. Refrigerator, stove, and new carpet, new shower, new floor tile. $450/mth.including water sewer & garbarge. 850-547-5244 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment. 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Charming 1 Bedroom home on pond For Rent near Bonifay. Large yard, deck, storage building, Recently renovated $650. per month. Call 802-496-7746 For Rent 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Duplex. Chipley, $575./mth. Background check & references required. 638-7128 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. (2) MH 2BR/1BA near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $385/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/2BA MH, $400/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 2 BR/1 BA Mobile Home located at 225 Hwy 77 N Chipley, clean, w/d, stove, refrig., d/w, a/c. Small patio. Non smoking environment, no pets. $550.00/ mth. $400.00 deposit. Application, backgroud, & credit check. Avaialbe now. (850) 638-1272 & ask for Chuck 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 +20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3 Br 2 Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 FOR SALE 2005 Yamaha Motorcycle. 15,000 miles Excellent condition, windshield, locking hand bags, floorboards, after market seats. $4500.00. Call 850-638-8540 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Liens -NO Problem. Dont Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 31, 2012 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By CAROLINE M.L. POTTERMonster Contributing Writer As soon as the calendar turns over to September, retailers will know how much help they will need to handle the holidays. The National Retail Federation predicts retailers will add 585,000 to 625,000 seasonal workers in 2012, which is comparable to the 607,500 seasonal employees hired last year. Recent consumer confidence readings have been relatively weak and unemployment remains stubbornly high, John Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, said in a statement. The mixed picture is likely to compel retail employers to proceed cautiously when it comes to hiring extra workers for the holiday season. Look for many to start at last years levels and hire additional workers only if strong sales early in the season warrant it. If you want to get a distinct advantage over other would-be seasonal workers, plan your job search carefully using these tips.Know where to lookThe best opportunities for seasonal job seekers will be at the large discounters, like Target and Wal-Mart, which will be heavily favored by cost-conscious consumers this holiday season, Challenger said. But be prepared to look past retail sales jobs for other opportunities. The big-box stores need extra workers on the floor, but they also need extra workers in their shipping facilities and overnight stocking positions, he said. Opportunities also exist outside of retail, in areas like catering and with shipping companies such as UPS and FedEx.Start earlyEmployers already know how many people they will need, so start searching today. Even if a job does not begin for another month, its best to lock in an opportunity sooner rather than later.Dress the partWhen youre looking for any kind of job, show up dressed in business-casual attire, at the very least. Even if the seasonal work for which youre applying is outdoors (think Christmas trees), wear neat slacks, polished shoes and a collared shirt.Be prepared If you are stopping into an establishment to shop for seasonal work, be prepared to fill out an application and participate in an impromptu interview. Bring your own pen, necessary documentation to prove you can work in the U.S. legally, a resume if you have one and all contact information for your professional references. Be sure you block off enough time to meet with a few supervisors should the opportunity arise.Know what you wantIf you are applying for seasonal work, know precisely what you offer to a potential employee and what you want in return. Determine what hourly rate is acceptable to you, what hours and days you are available, if you have the wherewithal for a particular position (some might involve lifting heavy boxes or standing for the greater part of your shift), and if the location is viable in terms of fuel costs and transportation options. (Will you always have access to a reliable car or a convenient bus line?) You do not want to make a commitment only to leave an employer in the lurch during the hectic holidays.Be flexibleThe best way to make sure you stand out from other seasonal talent is to present yourself as flexible but only if you really are. A hiring manager revealed that demanding a specific schedule from prospective employers is a sure way to jettison your chances at landing a job. Instead, advised Challenger, Temporary workers must be prepared to be flexible, whether it is hours or type of work. Either can vary as the holiday season progresses.Boost your chance of landing a seasonal job A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com Administrative Secretary position available at Surplus & Salvage of Chipley. Please come by to apply. 1600 Hwy 90. Delivery Driver Wanted. Part-Time. Must pass background screening. Call 850-638-4719 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 O-Op -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com OTR Drivers Wanted. Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/ tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www.otterytransportation.c om Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout USNo forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www.mamotransportation.com Water Well Driller helper CDLrequired. (850)263-8064 Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/ mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transportation EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veteran Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 The Weekly Advertiser | 1 Volume 50 Number 33 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2012 me me me e e e 5 0 Nu mb er 3 3 me50Number33 W E DNES D A Y O C T O B B E R 3 1 2 2 2 0 1 2 WEDNE S DAY O C T O BER312012 Vo lu m Volum Vo lu m Vo lu m Your Your HOMETOWN HOMETOWN Shopping Guide Shopping Guide For Washington & For Washington & Holmes Counties Holmes CountiesFREETAKE ONE B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 8am-3pm.Clothes, furniture, household items, Christmas, etc. 3321 Spring Vally LN Bonifay YARD SALE MAPHIS TREE FARM Large 2 family yard sale Friday & Saturday Nove 2 & 3. 7am -5pm. Rain or Shine. Lots of items, new & used to choose from, including baby items. Even things fro them men. 1534 Orange Hill Rd. 3 miles south of Chipley. 850-638-8243 Yard Sale Sat 11/3. Like new washer & dryer, whicker furniture, new electronic keyboard still in box, lots of household items. 2661 North Hwy 81. PDL. Just north of PDL high school Yard Sale Saturday Nov 3 Margie Peels 1488 S. Blvd Chipley.Clothes, dishes, furniture, toys, wedding stuff, baby items, pictures and lots of good stuff. Gross and Son Farms You Pick Peas! 231 N. to Alford FL Left on 276 to County line. Follow the signs 850-849-9330 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 ESTATE SALE! EVERYTHING MUST GO! Thur, Fri, Sat. Nov 1, 2, 3. 742 Sunday Rd Chipley. Large Yardsale 2 blocks west of elementary school on 177A, Bonifay. Nov 3rd. 8:30a.m.-until. MEGA YARD SALE Sat Nov 3 7am Until. 1583 Hudson Rd Westville. Please NO Early Birds! Tools of all kind, lots of Christmas, clothes, lights, Way too much to name. Moving Sale 779 Gilbert Dr Chipley. Sat Nov 3. 8am to 1pm. Furniture, appliances, ladies clothes sizes 12-16 womans cloths size 24-30, books, garding, home decor, wedding linens, baskets, tools, purses, swings & much more. Multi-family yard sale November 3rd. Cane grinding, new cane syrup. 8 a.m. until. 1888 Hwy 2, Bonifay 1/2 mile west of New Hope Baptist Church. Semiannual, 9 mile community yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 3. 7a.m.-until-. 5 miles south of New Hope, Hwy 2, & 8 miles north of Westville on Hwy 179A. Yard Sale Fri & Sat Nov 2 & 3. 7am-4pm. 977 Pioneer Rd 5 1/2 miles east of Wausau. Cane Mill, chipper, wine press, barber chair, tools, cake baking items, base of Hoosier Cabinet, lots of household items. Chipley 1430 N Hwy 81 Westville Nov. 3, 7:00-untilYard SaleFurniture, little boys clothing, ladies clothing, and misc. Chipley 1765 Gainer Road One mile east of Hwy 77 north off of Clayton Rd on Gainer Nov 3 8:00 am Huge multi family, furniture, children clothes, designer clothes, bedding and lots of misc. Text FL29999 to 56654 Clothes-10 to XXL, very good condition. Misc. Very low prices. Nov. 2nd & 3rd. 2685 Marian Dr., Dogwood Lakes, Bonifay. HUGE HUGE YARD SALE. Nov 1,2,3. 8am-unitl. 1010 6th Ave Graceville. Everything from furniture toys, glass ware, clothes & women clothes. Money made to go to Ghana Missions trip for West gate Church of Christ. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday November 2nd & 3rd 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. REAL ESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN: (55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. FOR SALECHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 Leather Living Room Set. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Big Yard Sale Multi-Families Nov. 3 at Mini Storage unit Esto, Fl. Hwy 79 & 2. Some New items great for Christmas. 8 a.m. til 2 p.m. Gospel singing. Big Yard Sale Nov. 1, 2, 3. 1086 Main St. Noma Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturdays 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. Come view my Antiques & Collectable. Lets Make A Deal! Call Mary Louise at 535-4861 3Br/2Ba w/ attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12 10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. AUCTIONDATE:November 17th, 20128:00AM LOCATION:5529 Hwy 231 North Campbellton, Florida 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank repos, city and county surplus, Jackson County School Board, Scott Rentals, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* Christian Dating & Friendship service. Thousand of succ essful relationships & marriages since 1989! Free package for singles over 40, call 1-800-814-3359. Full Blooded Yorkies8 weeks and ready 2 females 3 males tails docked & wormed Beautiful parents small silkies light in color $400 850-415-6256

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2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, October 31, 2012 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 FOR SALE 2005 Yamaha Motorcycle. 15,000 miles Excellent condition, windshield, locking hand bags, floorboards, after market seats. $4500.00. Call 850-638-8540 BETTIES COUNTRY REALTYBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER 205 E. NORTH AVE., BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 850-547-35104 BR 2.5 BA ON 4 ACRES-$95,000 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 40 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$275,000 2 BR 2 BA FISH CAMP-$59,900 \ 4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900 2 BR FISH CAMP-$39,900 2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500 3 BR 2 BA FIXER UPPER ON 3 AC -$39,900 41+ ACRES W/ 3 MHS & 4 PONDS-$129,900 2 BR INTOWN-$39,000 9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900 --NICE 3 BR 2 BA ON 1 AC-$102,000 2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONT-$159,000 3 BR 2 BA DWMH ON 3+ ACRES-$82,000 42+ACRES-$124,900 15 ACRES-$28,500 3 BR 2 BA BRICK ON GOLF COURSE-$129,900 43 ACRES-$77,500 42+ACRES-$85,000 10 AC 4 BR 2 BA HOME PAVED ROAD-$149,900 3 BR BRICK IN TOWN-$82,000 2 BR LAKE FRONT FISH CAMP-$55,000www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com +20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3 Br 2 Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 For Rent 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Duplex. Chipley, $575./mth. Background check & references required. 638-7128 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. (2) MH 2BR/1BA near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $385/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/2BA MH, $400/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 2 BR/1 BA Mobile Home located at 225 Hwy 77 N Chipley, clean, w/d, stove, refrig., d/w, a/c. Small patio. Non smoking environment, no pets. $550.00/ mth. $400.00 deposit. Application, backgroud, & credit check. Avaialbe now. (850) 638-1272 & ask for Chuck 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 WANTED: Commercial property for lease with adjacent parking lot, can be shared with joining business; Convent Store Ideal. Call 850-428-1973. 1 BD UpStairs Apt for rent. Kitchen, living room & walk in closet. Refrigerator, stove, and new carpet, new shower, new floor tile. $450/mth.including water sewer & garbarge. 850-547-5244 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment. 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Charming 1 Bedroom home on pond For Rent near Bonifay. Large yard, deck, storage building, Recently renovated $650. per month. Call 802-496-7746 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veteran Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Commercial Bldg For Rent downtown Ideal for office, salon, computer repair, or your choice. Call Progressive Realty. 850-638-8220 O-Op -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout USNo forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www.mamotransportation.com Water Well Driller helper CDLrequired. (850)263-8064 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/ mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transportation EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Administrative Secretary position available at Surplus & Salvage of Chipley. Please come by to apply. 1600 Hwy 90. Delivery Driver Wanted. Part-Time. Must pass background screening. Call 850-638-4719 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 OTR Drivers Wanted. Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDL w/ tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www.otterytransportation.c om Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CERAMIC SHOP OPENING IN BONIFAY Come check out our items, such as Christmas Trees & seasonal items. Many more available. Call for info 850-547-5244 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 The business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. REACH OVER 3M READERS! Jenny @ (321)283-5276. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Liens -NO Problem. Dont Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414