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Washington County news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028312/00676
 Material Information
Title: Washington County news
Uniform Title: Washington County news (Chipley, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Chipley Fla
Publication Date: 09-14-2011
Frequency: semiweekly[<1994>]
weekly[ former <1931>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Chipley (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Chipley
Coordinates: 30.779167 x -85.539167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 23, 1924.
General Note: L.E. Sellers, editor.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 8, no. 1 (May 28, 1931).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000384704
oclc - 07260886
notis - ACC5987
lccn - sn 81000810
issn - 0279-795X
System ID: UF00028312:00676
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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visit CHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com No Strings Attached New and Used Auto Loans As low as 2.99% APR* for up to 60 months No Direct Deposit Required No Payment Draft Required No Payroll Deduction Required *Based on credit rating. Bonifay 1720 S Waukesha Street (850) 547-2260 Chipley 1044 Hwy. 90 East (850) 638-8376 Special to The News Mackenzie Lane, a 2008 CHS graduate, completed the 2011 Drum Corps International Sum mer Tour with The Cadets from Allentown, Pa., and comes home a world champion. Wrapping up a 17,000-mile summer cross-country tour of the United States, the 2011 Cadets show Between Angels and Demons captured a clean sweep of the DCI World Championships in Indianapolis, winning the top spot on quarternals, seminals and nals night. For the 10th time in the organi zations 77-year history, the Cadets can again call themselves world champions. The corps proved that Between Angels and Demons lies a corps with unparalleled talent and dedication, earning a score of 98.35 of 100 and the 2011 World Championship title on Aug. 13 at the Drum Corps Internation al Finals. Word of the win came to the Washington County News in the form of a release from the Ca dets ofce in Allentown. Between Angels and Demons is a performance based on the epic struggle of good and evil put on the eld to musical selections by Frank Ticheli and Hans Zimmer. The white-uniformed Angels do battle with the maroon-uniformed Demons for a 13-minute thrill ride that eventually ends with good triumphing over evil. The Cadets, a program of Youth Education in The Arts, are one of the oldest and most honored con tinuously operating drum and bugle corps in the world, with per forming members from all over the country and world. Lane is a senior attending The Baptist College of Florida, major ing in music education. In a state ment issued by the Cadets, he said he would like to thank his friends, family and all who helped this pos sibility become a reality. Staff report BONIFAY Tea Party Patriots will host History of the Constitution and Its Relevance Today: Your Rights/ School Prayer at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at Simbos Family Restaurant in Bonifay. They will welcome guest speaker KrisAnn Hall, who is a constitutional attorney, author and nationally known veteran. Admission is free, and everyone is welcome to attend. INDEX Arrests .................................. A2 Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ................................... A9 Extra ..................................... B1 Faith ..................................... B4 Obituaries ............................. B5 Classieds ............................. B7 INSIDE Area football coverage A9 Perrys Prattle A4 Arrests A2 Volunteer Fireghter Weekend A5 FLATHEADS TAKING OVER OUTDOORS | A8 Wednesday, S EP T E M BE R 14 2011 Volume 88, Number 43 Staff report The Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors welcomed Richard Alan Williams as their new board member at his rst meeting. Williams is one of two members representing the area on the 10-member board, joining long time member and past board chair Glo ria Keenan of Bristol. Williams is the executive director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Develop ment Board, a private sector-driven policy and over sight organization designed to assist employers and employ ees in Calhoun, Holmes, Jack son, Liberty and Washington counties. As workforce direc tor, he has spent the last nine years working closely with lo cal governmental, economic development organizations and private-sector entities to help improve the business cli mate, and thus employment opportunities, of the region. Im excited to add Rich ards expertise and resources to our team to help Chipola Healthy Start move in a posi tive direction as we contin ue to serve our ve-county area, said Chipola Healthy Start Board Chair Chephus Granberry. He brings a lot of board experience and connections that will be a valuable asset. In addition to Chipola Healthy Start, Williams is a board member of several other organizations including Floridas Great Northwest, Opportunity Florida, Early Learning Coali tion of Northwest Florida and the Chipola River Soil and Water Conservation District. He also served on the Florida Department of Juvenile Jus tices Blueprint Commission and served as an ex-ofcio member of the State of Flor idas WAGES (Work and Gain Economic Sufciency) Board, which was responsible for the initial implementation of Floridas successful welfare reform effort. FIND IT ONLINE Info and videos of Between Angels and Demons and Drum Corps International, Marching Musics Major League, can be found at: www.youtube.com/ watch?v13ovDobvUcs www.youtube.com/ watch?voQZMFrv8aiU www.yea.org/site/ PageNavigator/aboutcadets www.dci.org/about/ CHS grad a Drum Corps champ RICHARD ALAN WILLIAMS CHEAPER THAN NA TIONAL AVERAGE ST EVE L INE R | The News The only explanation for why area gas is more than 50 cents less expensive than Chicagos national high of $4.06 per gallon for regular, unleaded gasoline is the price of our suppliers, according to local petroleum retailers. T ea Party Patriots to meet Thursday Williams named to Chipola Healthy Start Board Dozens of local citizens joined at Chipley City Hall on Sunday to set out ags remembering those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and the sacrice of those who have served in the intervening years. CE C ILIA S PEA R S | The News See WILLIAMS A3

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE O RD I NAN CE N O 11-002 AN O RD I NAN CE AD O P TI NG A BU DG ET F O R T H E F I S C A L Y E AR 2011-2012 F O R T H E TO WN O F WA U SA U F LO R I DA AND APPR O PR I A TI NG T H E F U NDS F O R APPR O PR I A TIO N F O R SA I D F I S C A L Y E AR was Town of Wausau 2011-2012 Proposed Budget Summary All Departments Town of Wausau 2011-2012 Proposed Budget Summary All Departments INCOME General Funds .......................... 103950 Water/Garbage Funds ............... 146600 Street Funds .............................. 10400 Recreation ................................... 4400 Fire Department ......................... 50200 Energy Grant ........................... 250000 VFD Funds ................................. 34550 Total Projected Income ...... 600100 EXPENSES General Funds .......................... 103950 Water/Garbage Funds ............... 146600 Street Funds .............................. 10400 Recreation ................................... 4400 Fire Department ......................... 50200 Energy Grant ........................... 250000 VFD Funds ................................. 34550 Total Projected Expenses ... 600100 The Town of Wausau is an equal opportunity employer and handicapped assessable jurisdiction. Anyone needing assistance to attend this meeting please contact the Town Clerk at 850-638-1781 48 hours prior to the meeting. As published in the Washington County News September 14 and 21, 2011 Special to The News An Angels Haves will host an evening of entertainment to showcase the talent of children ages 5 18 from the surrounding counties and communities, on Nov. 5. If your child or a child you know would like to participate in this event in the categories of dance, drama, music, modeling or art, please call Darrell at (850) 768-1855 to register the childs act. There will be two scheduled rehearsals prior to the event. It is very important that you register your childs act before Sept. 16 to allow proper planning and arrangements. Kids talent showcase Nov. 5 Special to The News Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Washington County Section 8 Rental Assistance Program is currently taking applications on Wednesdays for the waiting list. Applications are taken by interview appointments only. Eligibility for assistance is based on income, being a legal citizen of the United States or having an eligible immigrant status, criminal history and other criteria. For more information contact Aubrey Morris at 638-4520 ext 25. Section 8 rental assistance offered By Cathrine Lamb Editorial Assistant clamb@chipleypaper.com WESTVILLE According to the Florida Highway Pa trol, on Sept. 3, at 8:45 a.m., on County Road 163, a 2006 Nissan Pickup driven by Charlie Lee Miller, Jr., 39, of Westville, collided with a culvert on the west shoul der of County Road 163 near Mims Road. The front of the pickup collided with the cul vert on the south side of the Laura Ingalls Wilder His torical Site driveway. As the pickup crossed the drive way, it became airborne and struck a tree north of the drive. Miller landed north of the tree, and the pickup rolled on to its right side, facing east when it came to a nal rest. Those who wit nessed the accident pulled Miller from the truck before it ignited. The investigation indicated that Miller was having a heart attack at the scene, which possibly contributed to the accident. Miller was wearing a sea belt at the time of the crash. There were no passengers in the truck Miller was later trans ported to Southeast Ala bama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala., and was pro nounced dead at 10:36 p.m., according to law enforce ment reports. Westville man dies in crash LIVESTOCK REPORTS At Florida Livestock Auctions receipts totaled $6,218 compared to $9,077 last week and $6,061 last year. According to the Florida-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared to one week ago, slaughter cows were $13 lower, bull sold unevenly steady, feeder steers were $1-2 higher, heifers sold $1-3 higher, replacement cows were $1-2 lower. Feeder Steers: 300-400 lbs $121-170 400-500 lbs $110-136 500-600 lbs. $111-124 Feeder heifers: 300-400lbs. $107-137.50 400-500lbs. $104-123 500-600lbs. $100-116 Slaughter Cows: 90 percent Lean 750 1200lbs. $51-60 85 percent Boner 1200 1500lbs. $58-66 Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1 2 1500 2100lbs. $72-85 Special to The NewsCHIPLEY There is a group of people in Chipley who are trying to help our youth and need help. Teen Court is designed to give our youth a second chance in life. Any student that has been arrested with a first time misdemeanor may be sent to Teen Court with an opportunity to have adjudication withheld, so that they are able to go on to college, state or federal jobs or apply for the military. Our cases are held in the court annex and our program has a director who overseas everything, the attorneys, Bailiff, and clerk are all students. The judge is an attorney from the area. The students are put on trial and given a sentence, any where from community service, serving on the jury for another defendant, house arrest, and many more. They can also be drug tested. If they have caused injury or damage to someone or something they have restitution also. The reason Im writing this is because we have limited money to run the program. We need your help. If anyone can donate anything to the program it will be greatly appreciated. If you have any questions, please feel free to call the office, and Teen Court staff would be more than happy to speak to you. Call 415-5021 and ask for Shirley. Teen Court set in Washington County Aug. 28 Sept. 4 Philip Adkins III 23, Chipley, Battery, Criminal mischief Tanya Bievenour 38, Alford, Possession of controlled substance without prescription, Possession of paraphernalia Michael Dempsey 47, Chipley, Violation of probation on burglary Jalyn Everett 28, Chipley, Driving while license suspended or revoked Elizabeth Granger Vernon, 22, Driving under the influence, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription Matthew Hogue 24, Chipley, Fraud X2, Violation of probation on possession of controlled substance without a prescription and fraud William Hunter 30, Marianna, Violation of probation on sell of cocaine Jamie Johnson 53, Caryville, Battery domestic violence, Walton County warrant for violation of probation on trespassing Bert Jones Jr. 52, Chipley, Battery Thomas Kelly 56, Ponce de Leon, Holmes county warrant on larceny Phong Le 22, Biloxi MS, Possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, Smuggle Barbiturate into state, Possession of paraphernalia Linda Marble 25, Chipley, Violation of probation on battery Joseph McComas 24, Chipley, Driving under the influence, Possession of marijuana, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription Bobbi Noss 41, Cottondale, Violation of controlled release on possession of paraphernalia, Possession controlled substance without a prescription Dequarious Peterson 18, Caryville, Resist officer without violence Douglas Porter 59, Wausau, Violation of state probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Carson Salinger 43, Chipley, Making false report to law enforcement officer Timothy Shiver 31, Graceville, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription, 2 counts Sandra Smith 52, Vernon, Battery Travis Spear s, 21, Wausau, Jackson County warrant for battery Anthony Taylor 32, Dothan Ala., Violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property Danielle Vaughan 19, Graceville, Holmes County warrant for violation of probation on operating a motor vehicle without a license Louie Weathers 32, Panama City, Driving while license suspended or revoked Washington County ARRESTS Go to chipleypaper.com for more local news By Felicia Kitzmiller Florida Freedom Newspapers P ANAMA CITY The 463 rst responders and ight crew personnel who died on Sept. 11, 2001 trying to manage the devastation brought to American soil by terrorists are frequently remembered as part of the collective tale of American courage displayed that day. But they were more than that. They were husbands, wives, sons, daughters, mothers and fathers and on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011, each one was remembered as an individual as their names were read during Bay Countys 10-year remembrance ceremony at Panama City Marina. More than a dozen rst responders and military personnel took turns reciting the list of names, each group concluding with the traditional ringing of a bell. Fire service, law enforcement, military, emergency medical service and civilian ight crew representatives shared their memories and reections of that tragic day with an audience of hundreds who came to honor the fallen. Most of the attendees were from the elds most deeply impacted by that day. Near the end of his time at the lectern, EMS director Corky Young asked everyone who served as a rst responder on Sept. 10, 2001 to raise their hands. Dozens appeared in the air. I salute you for coming to work on Sept. 12, he said. And all of those who joined after, I salute you for entering a career path knowing what could happen. Julius Halas, director of the Division of the State Fire Marshal, was a re chief in Sarasota County on Sept. 11, 2001. While rst responders in the county were already on heightened alert because of then-President George W. Bushs visit to a local school, they were thrown into chaos when, prior to the president, they learned the country was under attack. Suddenly their town had come into immediate danger simply by hosting the president. I tell you that story because you never know when the next terror incident is going to take place, he said. The fallen heroes are and should be remembered and honored, he said. But thousands of people put their lives on the line to protect their neighbors simply by going to work and they are equally deserving of our thoughts and respect, Halas said. In the wake of the terrorist attack, an unprecedented level of patriotism ooded the country, Maj. Tom McCarthy of Panama City Police Department said. The American ag appeared everywhere; in front of houses, businesses and even car windows. The message of unity was strong and appropriate, he said. The men and women who died trying to rescue people from the days events were, like you, undoubtedly patriots, he said. McCarthy said he still ies the Stars and Stripes outside his home every day, but he has noticed the prevalence of the ag beginning to dwindle. He challenged each attendee to renew the vigorous and visual passion they had for their country on that day and sustain it through the trials of every day life. Lets work together toward making Panama City synonymous with Flag City and being the city that will never forget, he said. First responders are remembered

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Local Washington County News | A3 Wednesday, September 14, 2011 SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Has Your Insurance Company Changed Again? Auto Home Life 1361 Jackson Ave. Chipley 638-1756 washington@ffbic.com Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay. Local Agents. Local Offices. Local Service. Best Value. Farm Bureau was ruled an A+ Superior Agency by AM Best ratings. What grade did your company get? 1108 N. Waukesha St. Bonifay 547-4227 holmes@ffbic.com G Williams grew up just in Jackson County but attend ed kindergarten through 12th grade at Altha School in Calhoun County. After he received a Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University, he and his wife, Denise, settled in the area, where they have raised their two sons, Daniel, 20, and Joshua, 17. He served as a volunteer private sector member of the Chipola Regional Work force Development Board while employed as the own er/operator of a manufac turing company before he became executive director for that board in 2002. He is also a member, rst class, of the University of Florida Wedgeworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources. When asked what drives him, Williams replied, Ive got a passion for the peo ple of this area, and I want to help. I want to not only teach people to sh, but how to get the shing pole. He sees his role on the Chipola Healthy Start Board as, just another avenue to try to help. I want to make sure we (at Chipola Healthy Start) are using a long-term view and leveraging our resourc es to get the most back for the people of this area. Chipola Healthy Start is 501(c)3 nonprot corpora tion serving Calhoun, Hol mes, Liberty, Jackson and Washington Counties. Their mission is to decrease in fant mortality and improve health outcomes for women of childbearing age and children under age 3. For information on services, call your local Healthy Start at 643-2415 for Calhoun and Liberty counties, 547-8684 for Holmes County and 5262412 for Jackson and Wash ington Counties, or call tollfree at 866-591-2852. WILLIAMS from page A1 By Chris Olwell Florida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY Steven Mark Lang apologized to the families of the two men killed during a botched home invasion of his design, but he insisted he was the innocent vic tim of vindictive police and prosecutors. Judge James Fensom sentenced Lang to spend the rest of his life in prison for his role as the alleged mastermind in the May 2010 home invasion rob bery that left two men dead. Lang received four consecutive life sentences. Though Michael Norman actu ally shot Devin Butler and Patrick Duffy inside his Southport home, it was Lang who put the two men up to the crime, according to pros ecutors, and it was Lang who was charged and convicted of murder. Randy Butler said his son left behind six brothers and sisters. Lisa Sowell, Butlers mother, called the sen tence a hollow victory. She said her son was in telligent and good-heart ed but made some bad decisions. She said Lang wasnt the only one being sentenced. Ive been sentenced to a lifetime without my son, she told Fensom. Ill never have grandchildren, and Ill never hear, I love you, mom again. Brittany Duffy said she wanted the maximum sentence for Lang, though it wouldnt bring Patrick back, and Duffys mother de scribed a bright and talented man with a solid future until he began to struggle with drug addiction. Lang was convicted based in part on testimony by two more alleged co-conspirators, Alecia Alford and Justin Polston, who pleaded guilty to charges of ac cessory to armed burglary after the fact and second-degree mur der and were sentenced to ve years and 20 years, respectively. In court Monday, Lang was de ant, calling his conviction an in justice and promising to spend the rest of his life exposing the deplorable actions of investi gators and the unconscionable actions of prosecutors. But he said he was sincerely sorry to the families of Butler and Duffy, and he apologized to his mother and Norman and Nelson, whom he called the true victims of this tragedy. Outside the courtroom after the hearing, prosecutor Larry Basford assured members of Duffys and Butlers families the case had been prosecuted ethically. Lang, Polston, Butler, Duffy and Alford planned to rob Nor man and his roommate, Daniel Nelson, of money and drugs. Norman and Nelson are charged with several counts each of drug trafcking and possession of child pornography after various amounts and types of drugs were discovered buried in their back yard, according to investigators. Authorities said they also found pornographic video footage of Lang and Norman. By Felicia Kitzmiller Florida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY The U.S. Coast Guard sought public input Mon day on an update to the Sector Mobile Area Contingency Plan that guides responses to marine pollution emergencies. In the wake of the Deepwa ter Horizon oil spill, Capt. Don Rose, commander of the USCGs Sector Mobile, said Coast Guard ofcials convened a panel to dis sect the Coast Guard response to the crisis and create a lessons learned document. The 35 sector commanders have been instruct ed to incorporate that informa tion into their Area Contingency Plans (ACP) after seeking public comment. Area Contingency Plans are blueprints for how incident com manders are to handle an emer gency pollution event. They con tain names and contact informa tion on important players along with geographical information for the coastline, including sensi tive areas and boat launches and access points. It also contains general rules on proceeding with containment and cleanup. This is not a step-by-step guide for what to do in every oil spill, Rose said. The Coast Guard went through a similar process in 2008 and re ceived very little public participa tion. Their experience so far this year at previous meetings in Ala bama, Mississippi and Escambia County has yielded a far different result. The meeting Monday after noon in the Bay County Govern ment Center had few attendees, but they had a lot to say, and the meeting lasted more than two hours. Most folks didnt really care about the Area Contingency Plan until a little incident we had last summer involving Deepwater Horizon sinking and exploding, Rose said. Most of the participants were emergency management ofcials from surrounding counties, in cluding Gulf, Franklin and Oka loosa, but concerned citizens from Walton and other counties attend ed, as well. Much of the conversation cen tered on the need for the ACP to contain plans on an efcient way to distribute accurate information to local leaders and residents in the 15 coastal counties comprising Sector Mobile. Many participants, even those charged with managing response to the emergency, com plained that different agencies of ten seemed out of touch with one another and issued contradictory information. Questions often were met with a bureaucratic puzzle and in a few cases demands for a formal, written Freedom of Infor mation Act request. There also were concerns about language that grants sector commanders a standing clearance to use dispersants in managing oil slicks, but fails to clarify when, where and what kind of disper sants can be used. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill also highlighted the need to have procedures in place to lay boom around important areas. There were protocols for laying boom, but they were removed sev eral years ago, Rose said. A new worst-case scenario section also will be in the new plans, which re quires commanders to identify the worst possible event that could happen in their sector and stipu late what the result could be. STEVEN MARK LANG Coast Guard preparing emergency plan Home invasion mastermind gets 4 life sentences

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Opinion A4 | Washington County News POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 USP S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2011, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Steve Liner, Managing Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Brad Goodyear, Composition SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com MANAGING EDITOR Steve Liner: sliner@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULA TION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on F acebook or tweet us @ W C N H C T HA VE SOMETHING TO SA Y? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions may be addressed to Managing Editor Steve Liner by calling 638-0212 or via email at sliner@chipleypaper.com. In the eld of Bluegrass music, one of the industrys magazines, Bluegrass Unlimited, September 2011 issue, has dedicated the entire year to a William Smith (Bill) Monroe Centennial Celebration. Sirius Radios Bluegrass Junction Channel, is billing 2011 as the Year of Bill Monroe. Throughout each broadcast day, a cross section of recordings from Bluegrass Bands, both past and present, are featured on that Satellite XM station. The prattlers keen interest in bluegrass, bluegrass gospel and the old time traditional music, simply cannot let the recognition of Bill Monroes uncommon musical life, go unnoticed. He was born September 13, 1911 near Rosine, Kentucky and died September 9, 1996, just two days short of his 85th birthday. He is buried near his birth place with the towering impressive tombstone bearing a bronze picture plaque, with the name Monroe beautifully engraved in the mammoth marker. The grave site, enclosed with coping and native rock, bears in bold lettering William Bill Monroe, with the birth and death dates prominently inscribed. The top of the vault contains much of the history of this man who achieved greatness writing songs from his heart and playing music he grew up with, an art he dearly loved. Bills father, Buck, was a farmer, cattleman, sawmill operator, coal miner and hued cross ties from the farms virgin timber. He was a buck dancer and Bill remembers how well he did the Kentucky Backstep!. Malissa, Bills mother, played ddle and accordion and reported that playing music relieved the every day pains of chronic leg swelling which constantly plagued her life. Bill was the baby of the family, with brothers Birch and Charlie and sister, Bertha, being his senior. He reportedly had poor vision as a youngster, which caused him to feel left out of a lot activities with children his own age. He was said to be a lonesome lad and painfully shy to the point of hiding in the barn when visitors came to the farm. What rescued him was the musical talent Bill inherited from his mothers side of the family. She sang old time ballads around the house in addition to adding the harmonica to the instruments she played. Then there was her brother, Pendleton Vandiver, the Uncle Pen who Monroe was to write an important song some years later. He was an old time ddle player, who would bring his ddle each time he came to visit the family for a few days at the time. After supper, Bill would get him to ddle until his father would call bed time. Bluegrass lovers recall the lyrics to this old song which remained a Bill Monroe standard throughout his career: Late in the evenin about sundown, High in a hill above the town, Uncle Pen played the ddle, Oh, how it would ring! You can hear it talk, you can hear it sing! Bills mother died when he was eight and the father died when he was fteen. He then batched it with his uncle Pen. When the uncle died in 1930, Bill, along with brothers, Birch and Charlie went to Chicago and found employment in an oil renery. The brothers played music in northern Indiana radio stations in their spare time. After Birch returned to Kentucky, Charlie and Bill teamed up as the Monroe Brothers and were able to do some recordings. When the two went separate ways, Charlie Monroe and the Kentucky Pardners became the name of his group with the second band taking the name of Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys. It is reported that Bill Monroe trained and employed one hundred and seventyve blue grass boys in his extensive history of playing music, recording and playing for public appearances. He made it to the Grand Ol Opry in Nashville in 1939 taking a band consisting of string bass, guitar, ddle and his mandolin. Record sales and personal concerts sky rocketed upon his becoming an Opry star. Bill Monroe has been labeled The Father of Bluegrass and such greats as Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs, Mac Wiseman, Chubby Wise and Del McCoury had their start with this man. Wayne Lewis holds the record as serving the longest tenure as lead singer with Bill and Kenny Baker, who just died July 8, 2011 at age 85, began working with Bill Monroe as the ddler in July 1957 and worked off and on until October 12, 1984. He reportedly recorded 237 sides with Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys between 1968 and 1984. Highlight honors in the Bill Monroe career include induction into the County Music Hall of Fame in 1970, Nashville Songwriters Association in 1971, appeared on the stage of Ford Theater in Washington, D.C. in 1979 in a televised concert for President Jimmy Carter, a 1988 honor when Blue Moon of Kentucky was designated the ofce state song by the Kentucky General Assembly and his induction into the International Bluegrass Hall of Fame in 1991. The current issue of Bluegrass Unlimited has ve feature tribute articles by various writers on this outstanding performer. One writing list twentyeight Columbia Records sides recorded in 1946-47 and further gave a combined total of one hundred and eleven songs, by titles, which the man wrote, recorded or played at festival events during his illustrious musical career. Your writer has to admit that he did not recall all of them. My musical friends in Washington County, Jerry Tyre and Rex Sowell, and Lizzie R. Lewis in Holmes County could possible score one hundred percent in remembering the songs. Miss Lizzie was president of this areas Bill Monroe Fan Club for many years and furnished much information for this writing. See you all next week. The front page of September 2011 Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine with one of Bill Monroes last pictures. 2011 is Year of Bill Monroe When I was young, I learned that a deals a deal. Your word is your bond. Even, fair is fair. Later, when I entered public service, I am proud to say, these principals had the force of politics behind them. In fact, these tenets kept quite a few stupid ideas from ever seeing the light of day. But now, the State of Floridas leadership has decided the states word is not its bond, weve learned. Apparently, fairness can be suspended just because either we dont want to spend the money we thought wed invest or we dont like the outcome. A generation ago, Florida decided as a matter of public policy that being the Sunshine State meant, at least in part, that there should be public investment in solar energy generation. Eventually, a program was developed (and funded) to encourage home and business owners to invest in solar generation. Power utilities were to invest in smart meters that would allow solarproduced electricity to be sold by indi-viduals and businesses. Not only that, but the State promised to reimburse homeowners and businesses for their installation of solar panels. Was it a good idea? Probably not. Was it a costeffective way to generate solar power? Denitely not. Should it have been done? Lets just say I wouldnt have done it. But done it was. Agreements were signed. Twenty-two million dollars or so was allocated. Well, guess what? Now that solar panels are being installed and bills are being presented, the State of Florida has decided this is not at all cool, and they have decided not to pay. My point is that its too late for that. The State promised to pay causing businesses and homeowners to invest hard-to-come-by resources. These investors are right to cry foul! The State of Florida is all of us. Our word is our bond, and fair is fair. Should we have promised to pay? No way. Did we promise to pay? Yes, indeed. Do we owe the debt? No question. Rick Scott and the Legislature should pay up and learn the valuable lesson: be careful how you promise to spend my money! A deals a deal? Nope! Y our trusted news source online at xtras onlin e Online EXCLUSIVE Washington county budget High school football coverage Crime Crime never takes a break. Neither do we. Scroll to the bottom of any story online to leave a comment. SPORTS Also ONLINE PERRYS PRA TTLE Perry Wells Wednesday, September 14, 2011 STEVE LINER Managing Editor

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Local Washington County News | A5 Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Special to the News Washington County IFAS Extension is conducting new Master Gardener Volunteer Training this fall. To help you decide, ask yourself the following questions: Do I want to learn more about plants, growing things and gardening? Am I eager to participate in a practical and intensive training program? Do I look forward to sharing my knowledge with people in my community? Do I have enough time to attend the training and to complete my volunteer commitment? As the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County, I would like to extend to the public an invitation to join us and become part of the Washington County Master Gardeners. This year there is room for approximately 20 people to participate in the new Master Gardener training program, scheduled to begin on Sept. 20. The program will take place Every Tuesday, through Dec. 13, with the exception of Thanksgiving week. Classes will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., with one hour lunch/social break, in the east wing of the Washington County Ag. Center. A brief history and description of the Florida Master Gardener Program will follow. In 1972, an innovative extension agent in the State of Washington reasoned that well-trained volunteers could enhance his education program by providing basic horticulture information to homeowners, develop projects to enhance the community and assist him in conducting interactive educational classes and workshops. The Extension agent selected, trained, and certied volunteers as Master Gardeners. They soon succeeded in meeting his desired objectives in fact they exceeded his expectations. This led to the genesis of the Master Gardener volunteer program. Since that time, the Master Gardener program has grown and is now active in 45 states. Floridas began in 1979. The program has been a tremendous success and is now active in over half of Floridas counties. The Florida Master Gardener Program is sponsored by the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) of which the Cooperative Extension Service is a part. Just what is the Cooperative Extension Service? The motto and goal of the Cooperative Extension Service is Helping People Help Themselves. Thus, you can see how well the volunteer Master Gardener concept ts into the ultimate objectives and goals of the Extension Service. In order to be considered for this years program, you will need to do several things: 1.Complete the application form, which is available at the Washington County Extension Ofce. 2.Send a check made out to Washington County Agriculture Improvement Fund (memo Horticulture) for $125. This fee covers the materials you will use during training, including books and the graduation dinner. Materials will be ordered after the rst class. Although checks are due when applying, they will be refunded after the rst class should you need to withdraw. After the rst class, materials will be ordered, so there are no refunds. 3. Return all forms and your check by September 20, 2011 in person or by mail To request these forms, please email, call or come by the Washington County Extension Ofce at 1424 Jackson Ave., Chipley. If you have any questions, please contact County Extension Agent Matthew J. Orwat at 6386180 or mjorwat@u.edu. Master Gardener training planned AP Left to right, former President George W. Bush, former rst lady Laura Bush, former President Bill Clinton, Dr. Jill Biden and Vice President Joe Biden review the Wall of Names during the dedication of Phase 1 of the permanent Flight 93 National Memorial near the crash site in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 10. The Wall of Names features the names of those passengers and crew aboard Flight 93 who died when the plane crashed on 9/11. Funeral marks the remembrance of Flight 93 Volunteer Fireghters expected in Niceville Special to The News More than 240 volunteer firefighters have registered early to attend the Sixth Annual North West Florida Volunteer Firefighter Weekend Sept. 1418, at the Northwest Florida State College in Niceville. The pre-registered firefighters come from all parts of Florida south to Collier and Broward counties and across the panhandle. Early registrations have also been received from the neighboring states of Alabama and Georgia. The weekend will provide participants an opportunity to become involved in one or more of the 25 certified training classes being offered on emergency response, fire suppression and education. Live fire demonstrations and practical exercises each day will also provide an enriching educational experience for attendees and excellent photo/ reporting opportunities for members of the media. Schedule of Events Thursday Basic firefighter skill check offs during the day. Friday Hands on vehicle extrication demonstrations beginning at 6 p.m. Attacks on vehicle fires to follow. Saturday The day will be filled with search and rescue and fire attacks at the burn building Around 4:15 p.m., a demonstration of a new fire protection substance that can be applied to a home or other buildings in the event of wildfire. Vehicle extrication demonstrations will continue throughout the day. On campus, later in the evening, will be the annual banquet. Sunday Participants of the water safety class will be taking a leap of faith into the pool of the Quality Inn in full gear and air packs. Vehicle extrications will continue throughout the day, as well as various live fire demonstrations. The weekend, a cooperative effort between the NW Florida Volunteer Firefighter Weekend Council and the Region 1 Type 3 All Hazards Incident Management Team from the Florida Forest Service, promises several learning opportunities, handson training and unique experiences. More information, including registration is available from Todd W. Schroeder of the Florida Forest Service at 414-1138 or Mike Cox of the State Fire Marshals Office at (813) 918-2303. SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) The remains of those killed aboard Flight 93 in rural Pennsylvania were buried Monday in a pri vate ceremony for family members of the 40 pas sengers and crew, who were joined by those who responded to the scene on Sept. 11, 2001. Nearly 500 family members, along with po lice, fire and emergency workers took part in the private interment at the Flight 93 National Memorial. The park was closed to the public to give them privacy. A rabbi, a Buddhist sensei, a Catholic priest and a Lutheran minister officiated as the remains, kept in three caskets in a crypt for nearly 10 years, were placed to rest af ter being looked after by Somerset County Coro ner Wallace Miller. Carole OHare, whose mother Hilda Marcin was traveling to California to live with her daugh ter, said the ceremony brought some peace. Theres definitely peace of mind. I was al ways concerned about what would happen with the unidentified re mains, OHare said. And now my feeling is theyre at peace and where they are meant to be. After the religious leaders spoke, the Som erset County Honor Guard played taps, and the American flags on each of the three dark brown caskets were fold ed and given to those in attendance. Family members and mourners placed flow ers on the caskets. The ceremony took place at whats called the Sacred Ground site in the field at the national park. Jerry Bingham, the fa ther of victim Mark Bing ham, said the service was done just right. He thanked Miller for taking care of the uniden tified remains and for all his work with the family members. Hes just a fantastic man. Were just glad that Wally Miller was here. He took care of us fami lies and took us under his wing. Were very fortu nate, Bingham said.

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Local A6 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 NEW YORK (AP) The plot of land known for a decade as the pile, the pit and ground zero opened to the public Monday for the rst time since that terrible morning in 2001, transformed into a memorial consisting of two serene reecting pools ringed by the chiseled-inbronze names of the nearly 3,000 souls lost. The 9/11 memorial plaza opened its gates at 10 a.m. under tight, airport-style security. Visitors walked among hundreds of white oak trees on the eight-acre site and gazed at the water on the exact spots where the World Trade Centers twin towers stood. They also ran their ngers over the names of the 2,977 people killed in the terrorist attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, as well as the six who died in the bombing of the trade center in 1993. Its so surreal. When we walked in, those images were popping in my head from 10 years ago, said Laura Pajar, a pharmaceutical-industry researcher from Las Vegas. But when I saw the memorial, all of that went away. This is so peaceful, and you kind of forget about what happened and you look toward the future. Jim Drzewiecki, a volunteer reghter from Lancaster, N.Y., said he was shaking as he walked up to the memorial entrance and stood next to the pools. It makes it clear how devastating to see the number of people who lost their lives at this location, he said. He added: Im actually still shaking. It could have been me on that ight. On any one of the ights. ... Theres not much that separates us. Eileen Cristina, of Lititz, Pa., who a decade ago volunteered her services as a massage therapist to the landll workers who handled the trade center debris, was moved to tears. For me, the water element is very important, because water is so cleansing. Water can cleanse the energy of the area, she said. Visitors sat on benches and clustered for photos in front of the trees. Some wept, some embraced. Others made penciland-paper rubbings of the victims names. Sun gleamed off the bronze parapets on which the names were inscribed. The memorial plaza opened to the families of the victims for the rst time on Sunday. Jelena Watkins, whose brother died at the trade center, came from London for Sundays 10th anniversary of the attacks. At the memorial, she and her husband held up their two children so that they could see their uncles name. Luka, 5, ran his hands through the water that pools under the names. I love it. It was a huge relief to see that its actually beautiful, Watkins said. Its the right feel. Its just so right. Its so spacious. Although thousands of construction workers have come and gone from the site over the years, Monday marked the rst time that ordinary Americans without a badge, a press pass or a hard hat were able to walk the grounds where the victims were once entombed in a mountain of smoking rubble. About 7,000 people were issued tickets for opening day. Some 400,000 have reserved tickets for the coming months, memorial president Joe Daniels said. For the vast majority of the world, the images that they remember from this site are very difcult. Its the recovery period, its seeing those images of the towers falling. So when they come on now and see this place thats been transformed into a place of beauty, its exciting, Daniels said. Admission is free, but access is tightly controlled. Visitors need to obtain passes in advance, allowing them to enter at a specied time. No more than about 1,500 at a time will be allowed in. Visitors must empty their pockets, walk through a metal detector and send their handbags and backpacks through an Xray machine. The museum portion of the memorial complex is still under construction. The museum pavilion, a tilting structure that evokes the sections of the trade center facade that remained standing after the towers fell, is scheduled to open on the 11th anniversary of the attacks. Eventually visitors to the underground portion will be able to gaze at such sights as the giant slurry wall, built to keep the Hudson River from ooding the trade centers foundations, and the survivors staircase that allowed so many people to ee to safety. The cost of the memorial and museum has been put at about $700 million, with an annual operating budget of $50 million to $60 million. The nonprot organization that runs the project has raised about $400 million in private donations and is seeking federal funds so that the memorial and museum can be free of charge. The centerpiece of the memorial is the two giant, square pits and reecting pools that sit in the footprints of the two towers. The waterfalls cascading down the four walls of each fountain are the largest such fountains in North America. The letters in the names have been entirely cut out of the bronze, with only emptiness beneath them. Skyscrapers are now pushing upward all around the plaza, and the roar of construction will be a constant at the site for some time. One World Trade Center, the spire once called the Freedom Tower, is now 1,000 feet high and well on its way to becoming the tallest building in the U.S. at 1,776 feet higher even than the twin towers. The steel skeleton of the new 4 World Trade Center is 47 stories high and counting. The memorial foundation has arranged for a separate entrance for relatives of the victims and plans to set aside certain days or hours where the plaza will be open only to reghters, police ofcers and other emergency workers. 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Local Washington County News | A7 Wednesday, September 14, 2011 By Mitch Stacy Associated Press CLEARWATER, Fla. (AP) The little injured dolphin they called Winter couldnt have come along at a better time for the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, a rustic sea life rescue center occupying the citys old sewage treatment plant. The nonprot public aquarium was about ready to go belly-up at the end of 2005, when the baby bottlenose dolphin was brought there after getting her tail tightly entangled in a crab-trap line. She lived, but her tail uke withered away, forcing the young animal to learn how to swim with just a stump and then adapt to a revolutionary prosthetic. Winters inspirational story of perseverance made her a global media star, quadrupled attendance at the aquarium and spawned a lucrative line of toys, books and other merchandise. Now Winter is a movie star. The charismatic animal plays herself in Dolphin Tale, a family-friendly 3-D movie starring Harry Connick Jr., Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson, opening Sept. 23. The production is based on Winters unlikely story of surviving the loss of her tail, then thriving and inspiring human visitors including war veterans who have lost limbs and are adapting to their own prosthetics. The story got some ctional tweaks a troubled boy (Nathan Gamble) who bonds with Winter was created as a central character who nds the gravely injured animal but the movie sticks close to the real events surrounding the loss of Winters tail and her recovery at the aquarium. And in another twist on art imitating life, in the movie Winters presence helps save the modest marine rescue center from nancial ruin. A big chunk of the lm was shot at the facility last fall. Largely what you see with her rescue, her rehabilitation, the (prosthetic) tail being made, the fact it was lmed here and Winter stars as herself, its pretty much real life, aquarium CEO David Yates says. Connick, who plays a veterinarian and director of the marine rescue hospital, says he didnt nd out the script was based on a true story until after he had read it. I thought it was somebodys creative imagination at work, he says. I was just blown away. I couldnt get over it, really, not only because of her survival and consequently thriving, but the advancements they made in human prosthetics because of it. I was just blown away that the whole thing was true. Winter wasnt expected to survive when brought to the aquarium in December 2005 and was left with a rounded stump after losing her tail. A team of more than 150 volunteers and veterinarians spent more than four months nursing her back to health around the clock. When she arrived here we didnt think she would make it through the night, says trainer Abby Stone. She was stressed, she was not physically doing well, she had been through a major ordeal. Most animals in that situation would not have made it. Winter learned how to swim without her tail amazing her handlers with a unique combination of moves that resemble an alligators undulating swimming style and a sharks side-to-side tail swipes. She uses her ippers, normally employed for steering and braking, to get moving. The prosthetic tail made of rubberized plastic and carbon ber is a wonder of modern science, with the developers, Hanger Orthopedic Groups Dan Strzempka and Kevin Carroll, having to design the intricate tail uke as well as gure out a way to keep the whole thing on her body. The solution was a sleeve created from a sticky gel composite that slips down onto her stump and creates suction when the prosthetic appendage is applied. Since Hanger got involved, Strzempka has taken new amputees to see Winter at the aquarium. Interaction with her has been especially effective in coaxing children to wear their new prosthetics, which can feel strange and uncomfortable at rst. Its amazing to see the impact she has on people, Strzempka said. When we rst got into this, we thought we could help this dolphin. Shes helped us 20 times more than we could ever help her. Winter wears the new tail only a half hour at a time, three or four times during the day, as her handlers continue to get her used to it and give her spine a break from the strain of the side-to-side swimming. She is trained to follow commands and patiently allows the prosthetic to be put on and taken off in front of adoring crowds. Director Charles Martin Smith says Winter was so social and animated that capturing her engaging behaviors on lm was relatively easy. She enjoys human contact, which he says opened up a lot of possibilities for lming people in the water with her. I spent those rst three days just walking around and learning about her, Smith says. She likes to carry toys around on her (nose), so I wrote that into the movie. She has a blue mattress that she likes to jump up on and oat around on like a little kid, so I put that in the movie. She has this signature sound that she makes that they call a tweety bird like a little high-pitched bird trill so I wrote that into the movie. Winter captivated everyone, including Freeman. The veteran actor plays the specialist who takes on the challenge of designing the new appendage for the tailless animal. Freeman had never even been near a dolphin before. Playing the doctor who was going to create the prosthesis for her, I had a lot of hands-on time with her, Freeman said. I remember one day early on when I felt we needed to get to know each other a little bit, so I coaxed her up to get some sh and keep her nearby where I could pet her and talk to her a little bit. The aquarium got a signicant expansion thanks to the movie, after Smith decided he needed a nicer pool to lm some of the water scenes. The other concrete tanks were left over from the aquariums previous life treating the citys sewage. Yates says a second aquarium building is opening in downtown Clearwater that will display the movie props. It was like a dream come true getting her story out there, because she has such an amazing story, says Stone, the trainer. It was like the best thing that could ever happen to this facility. 2037908 Re-Design Your Life! Washington-Holmes Technical Center is now accepting students for its Printing and Graphic Communications course. 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Barton, center, of Williamson, N.Y., and Kelsie Castagne, of Carmel, N.Y., in Clearwater, Fla. The nonprot public aquarium was about ready to go belly-up at the end of 2005 when Winter, the bottlenose dolphin was brought there after getting her tail tightly entangled in a crab-trap line. Winter plays herself in Dolphin Tale, a family-friendly 3-D movie starring Harry Connick Jr., Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson, opening Sept. 23.

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OUTD OO RS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Suddenly shing has improved from one side of the county to the other. In Walton County, many redsh are being caught in Hogtown Bayou. If you have never been to Hogtown it is and old cracker settlement just north of Santa Rosa just west of U.S. 331 north. When you approach the bayou and before you cross the bridge you will turn left and there is a boat ramp. Also situated there is a pretty park with tables to picnic and bathroom facilities. Usually the bayou is full of menhaden but lately a guide I know said that white shrimp are mixed in with them. He said nd the white shrimp and you will nd the speckled trout and redsh. He said to watch for the birds diving and this time of the year they might be after shrimp. A sherman in the pass reportedly caught more than 30 ounder last week before the weather became rough. According to my calendar, September is a little early for ounder to be heading to the Gulf; October usually is the month to look for these sh. I was talking with guide Capt. Greg Burnet on the guide boat Osprey and he said a couple of his clients had a ball catching skipjacks in the Gulf before the storm last week. Most of the time shermen will turn up their noses at skipjacks. Capt. Greg said as they were returning from a redsh trip and he saw what he thought were bonito striking on the surface. He told one of his clients to pitch a topwater lure to the frenzy and before he could get a turn on the reel his line was peeling off at a furious rate. Not knowing what this sherman had he told the other client to do the same with another rod also equipped with a topwater lure. This immediately drew another strike and another line-burning run. Neither sh jumped, they just see-sawed back and forth until Capt. Greg saw the rst sh hooked and he could not believe his eyes. When they got both sh in the boat they weighed in two skipjacks at 9 and 10 pounds, respectively. Could you imagine catching these sh on a y rod? Hooked on Outdoors Special to the News Herald Anglers from across the area enjoyed a plentiful snapper season this summer. Photos like this will be published in The News Herald and online by sending them to news@ chipleypaper.com SUBMIT YOUR HUNTING AND FI S HING PHOTO S TO NEW S @CHIPLEYPAPER.COM SCOTT LINDSEY Outdoor Writer By STAN KIRKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission For years sheries biologists in several states watched the eastward expansion of athead catsh popula tions from their native waters of the Midwest. Now that the species has found its way to most of the rivers of the Florida panhandle, they are here at a price. Thats the view of Dan Dobbins, a sheries biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission (FWC). Dobbins retires at the end of the month but hes spent much of his 35year career studying the effects of atheads on native sh species in the Ochlockonee River and other rivers west to the Alabama line. The rst thing you have to under stand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available, he said. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dobbins said several native spe cies are heavily impacted by at heads, including bullheads, which comprises several species of small catsh, white catsh and redbreast sunsh, commonly called river bream by anglers. Although atheads will certainly eat channel catsh, which are highly prized as a food sh, he said channel catsh numbers dont seem to be im pacted as much as the other species. From 2002-05 Dobbins said fresh water sheries staff tried to reduce the number of atheads in a 7 -mile section of the Yellow River below Interstate 10 using electroshocking boats. We went multiple times a year and removed every athead we saw. We did well the rst couple of years, re moving 20-30 sh, but then it jumped to 240 sh, he said. We realized that we couldnt keep up. Reproduction outside the area we worked was such that there was a constant supply of sh. Similarly on the Choctawhatchee River, Dobbins said staff has done baseline sampling work over the years looking at what species are present and their abundance. He said in 2002 they found only a few atheads in the upper river near the Alabama line, which were collect ed and removed. By 2004 they were picking up at heads all the way down to Highway 20. In their most recent surveys com pleted this year, he said bullheads and white catsh have virtually disap peared from the upper river while the athead population has exploded. Flatheads are now the predomi nant catsh species in the river, he said. Like them or not, Dobbins said at heads are here to stay. He said several civic organizations in towns along the Apalachicola Riv er now hold annual athead catsh tournaments. The tournaments draw anglers and their money from north Florida, south Alabama and Georgia mostly. While native catsh are typically caught on earthworms or stink baits, thats not the case with atheads. Serious athead anglers use stout tackle and small bluegills or shell cracker for bait and they sh the deeper holes after sundown. As a non-native sh, Dobbins said the standing advice for anglers is to keep any atheads they catch and never move or release any unwanted sh. P HOTO BY FWC Fisheries biologist Andy Strickland shocked this athead in the Apalachicola River. Flatheads taking over The rst thing you have to understand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dan Dobbins FWC biologist Even with deer hunting season still about six weeks away, local hunters are now receiving their bounties from taxidermist shops. This deer was harvested in February and was ready for display in August. Have pictures of your mount ed deer? Email them to us at news@chipleypaper.com Page A8 Wednesday, September 14, 2011

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SP O RT S www.chipleypaper.com Section TALLAHASSEE (AP) Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher is counting on a bad experience leading to a good one for his fth-ranked Seminoles. Florida State (2-0) is hosting top-ranked Oklahoma on Satur day night with the memory of last seasons embarrassing 47-17 loss to the Sooners still fresh. Fisher says the biggest im provement that his team has made since last years meeting with the Sooners is maturity along with the knowledge of what it takes to beat a team such as Oklahoma. Its the rst real test of the sea son for the Seminoles, who have outscored two inferior opponents by a combined 96-10. The same can be said for Okla homa (1-0) which opened its sea son with a 47-14 win over Tulsa on Sept. 3. The Sooners had an open date last weekend. ST. PETERSBURG (AP) James Shields and the Tam pa Bay Rays got the sweep they needed to charge back into the playoff race. Shields came within two outs of his 12th complete game this season, B.J. Up ton hit his rst grand slam and the Rays routed the fad ing Boston Red Sox 9-1 on Sunday. Tampa Bay moved within 3 games of the AL wild card leaders, sweeping the threegame series to go a seasonhigh 17 games over .500 at 81-64. The Rays have won 21 games in a row when scoring ve runs or more. We needed to win these, manager Joe Maddon said. Theres no other way to look at it. Under the circumstanc es, youve got to do what we did or its pretty much almost impossible to recover. Our guys believe we can do this. Its truly not impossible. Tampa Bay was 10 games behind the New York Yankees in the wild-card standings on Aug. 7. Boston has lost ve con secutive games, its longest skid since opening the sea son 0-6, and nine of 11 over all. The teams play each other four more times, in a four-game series beginning Thursday night at Fenway Park. Were kind of in a ght right now, we know that, Red Sox manager Terry Franco na said about his teams re cent play. Its not real pretty. Well come out and ght, and hopefully play better. I al ways feel like were going to play well and when we dont, were going to x it. I still feel that way. Shields (15-10), who has won four consecutive starts en route to his career-best 15th win, allowed seven hits over 8 1-3 innings. Coming off a 5-1 complete-game victory over Texas last Monday, the right-hander was replaced by Dane De La Rosa after issuing a one-out walk in the ninth on his 121st pitch. Were back in the hunt, Shields said. They know that were right behind them. The Rays went up 8-1 on Uptons 20th homer in the fth off Matt Albers. Upton nished with four hits and walked once. He and his brother Justin of the Ari zona Diamondbacks became the rst set of siblings in major league history to both have 20 homers and 20 stolen bases in the same season. Couldnt ask for a better day, B.J. Upton said. Jon Lester (15-7) gave up four runs and eight hits over four innings for the Red Sox. Boston starting pitchers have gone ve innings or less in nine of the last 11 games. Boston is off Monday, while Tampa Bay will begin an 11-game road trip at Balti more. Rays right-hander Jeff Niemann (9-7) will go against left-hander Zach Britton (9-9). I dont think there will be a letdown, Niemann said. I think everyone knows what our goal is here. Take care of business. ... We have to win. The Red Sox did get some encouraging news: Francona said Josh Beckett, out with a sprained right ankle, is scheduled to throw off a bull pen mound Monday. After loading the bases with no outs in the rst, Tam pa Bay took a 2-0 lead on Ben Zobrists two-run single off Lester. Sean Rodriguez made it 3-0 later in the inning with a sacrice y. Lester had allowed one earned run or less in his pre vious ve starts, going 4-0 during that stretch. The lefthander threw 43 pitches in the rst and 111 overall. Rodriguez put the Rays up 4-1 with an RBI double in the third. Marco Scutaro got the Red Sox within 3-1 on a third-in ning homer. It stopped a per sonal stretch of 161 at-bats without a home run, dating to July 15 against Tampa Bay. Shields worked out of a bases-loaded, one-out jam lat er in the third when David Or tiz ied out and Josh Reddick was retired on a foul pop. The Red Sox had two on and one out in the second, but Jason Varitek hit a doubleplay grounder. Bostons Jacoby Ellsbury, who turned 28 on Sunday, ex tended his hitting streak to 16 games with a fth-inning single. Score are from Sept. 9 games across the state: Admiral Farragut 51, Shorecrest Prep 0 Alonso 26, Durant 5 American 35, Hialeah-Miami Lakes 34, OT Andrew Jackson 38, Englewood 0 Arnold 40, Amite County, Miss. 6 Astronaut 57, Episcopal 36 Atlantic Coast 50, Paxon 0 Atlantic Community 35, Boca Raton Community 32 Baker County 31, Trinity Christian-Jack sonville 28 Baker School 40, Rocky Bayou Christian 0 Baldwin 49, Stanton College Prep 29 Barron Collier 27, Southern Pines Pinecrest, N.C. 15 Bartow 21, Auburndale 14 Bartram Trail 55, Ponte Vedra 26 Bay 7, Liberty County 0 Bayshore 34, Port Charlotte 0 Berkeley Prep 38, Victory Christian 12 Bishop Kenny 28, Fletcher 14 Bishop Snyder 20, St. Joseph Academy 17 Bishop Verot 20, Cardinal Mooney 6 Bloomingdale 40, Strawberry Crest 6 Bozeman School 21, Port St. Joe 0 Bradenton Christian 55, Northside Christian 6 Bradford 50, Hawthorne 14 Bronson 52, Seven Rivers Christian 34 Cape Coral 50, Ida S. Baker 37 Cardinal Gibbons 47, Coral Glades 7 Cedar Creek Christian 42, Ocala Chris tian Academy 36 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 34, Ransom Everglades 0 Charlotte 37, Riverdale 14 Chipley 16, Blountstown 7 Christs Church 42, Seacoast Christian 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 31, Mi ami Belen Jesuit Prep 21 Clay 34, Ridgeview 27 Clearwater Central Catholic 20, Lake land Christian 6 Colonial 25, Deltona 14 Cooper City 47, West Broward 0 Coral Shores 41, Northwest Christian 6 Countryside 27, East Lake 21 Creekside 28, Mandarin 22 Crestview 32, Escambia 0 Cypress Lake 15, Lely 7 Deltona Trinity Christian 14, St. Ed wards 7 DeSoto County 34, Okeechobee 21 Dixie Hollins 47, Seminole 29 Doral Academy Charter 27, Mater Academy 21 Dr. Phillips 35, Olympia 7 Dunbar 26, Lehigh 22 East Gadsden 41, Crescent City 6 East Lee County 21, South Fort Myers 20 East Ridge 20, South Sumter 12 Ed White 68, Forrest 21 Edgewater 20, Winter Park 9 Evangelical Christian 37, LaBelle 0 Evans 40, Cypress Creek 0 Everglades 35, South Broward 12 FAMU Developmental Research 26, Walton 0 Fernandina Beach 21, Keystone Heights 15 First Baptist 55, St. Stephens Episcopal 21 Fivay 21, Springstead 14 Fleming Island 29, Nature Coast Tech 7 Florida 30, Chiles 6 Fort Myers 41, Golden Gate 9 Fort Pierce Central 17, Palm Bay 14, OT Fort White 21, Newberry 7 Franklin County 22, Graceville 14 Freeport 39, South Walton 13 Frostproof 20, Sebring 12 Ft. Walton Beach 33, Tate 0 Gainesville 28, Columbia 6 Gaither 48, Leto 3 Gateway 29, Lake Minneola High School 28 George Steinbrenner 20, East Bay 14 Gibbs 27, Lennard 0 Godby 26, Choctawhatchee 9 Hallandale 21, Oakland Park Northeast 14 Hardee 43, Avon Park 7 Hilliard 44, Harvest Community Scvool 38 Holmes County 41, Jay 12 Immokalee 39, Naples 28 Indian Rocks 42, Calvary Christian 3 Island Coast 61, Estero 0 Jefferson 22, Newsome 21 Jensen Beach 18, Eau Gallie 14 Jesuit 25, Middleton 6 Jupiter Christian 46, Pope John Paul II 13 Kathleen 9, George Jenkins 0 Keswick Christian 30, Carrollwood Day 27 Key West 40, North Miami Beach 28 Kings Academy 20, Clewiston 0 Kissimmee Osceola 42, Bishop Moore 21 Lafayette 55, Bell 20 Lake Brantley 31, Apopka 25 Lake Howell 16, Lyman 0 Lake Mary 38, Winter Springs 10 Lake Region 28, Fort Meade 27 Lake Wales Vanguard 40, All Saints 0 Lake Wales 19, Lake Gibson 16 Lake Weir 28, Belleview 7 Lakeland 49, Tenoroc 6 Lakewood 28, Blake 0 Largo 26, Pinellas Park 0 Leesburg 23, Eustis 7 Lemon Bay 56, Gateway Charter 0 Lowndes, Ga. 39, Leon 22 Madison County 42, Jefferson County 7 Mainland 28, Jones 12 Manatee 48, Sarasota Riverview 6 Matanzas 50, Florida Air Academy 13 McArthur 41, Monarch 24 Miami Central 29, Miami Washington 26 Miami Jackson 43, Braddock 8 Miami Palmetto 20, Coral Gables 19 Miami Southridge 28, Homestead 20 Middleburg 21, Nease 17 Miramar 31, Blanche Ely 9 Mitchell 26, Gulf 9 Moore Haven 21, Lake Placid 13 Mount Dora 47, Tavares 0 Mount Dora Bible 42, Leesburg The First Academy 0 Niceville 14, Pace 13 North Florida Christian 49, Agape Christian 8 North Fort Myers 21, Mariner 20 North Port 7, Braden River 6 Northview 27, Marianna 14 Nova 46, Pompano Beach 14 Oak Hall 42, Aucilla Christian 12 Oak Ridge 12, Lake Highland 6 Ocala Forest 10, Dunnellon 3 Ocala Trinity Catholic 48, Eastside 0 Ocala Vanguard 8, North Marion 2 Orlando Freedom 35, West Orange 7 Orlando The First Academy 55, John Carroll Catholic 0 Out-of-Door Academy 28, Community School of Naples 12 Oviedo 24, Sanford Seminole 2 P.K. Yonge 27, Chieand 12 Palm Harbor University 35, St. Peters burg 26 Palmetto 35, Sarasota 14 Palmetto Ridge 33, Gulf Coast 27 Park Vista Community 14, Seminole Ridge 13 Pasco 39, Land OLakes 6 Pembroke Pines 28, Piper 27, OT Pensacola Catholic 41, Gulf Breeze 35, 3OT Pensacola 29, Navarre 22 Pine Ridge 24, Port Orange Atlantic 0 Plant City 29, Tampa Freedom 7 Plant 36, Hillsborough 6 Plantation American Heritage 28, Bolles School 17 Poinciana 47, Celebration 0 Raines 34, R.E. Lee 14 Ribault 21, Terry Parker 0 Ridge Community 24, Mulberry 6 River Ridge 34, Ridgewood 0 Robinson 34, Dunedin 14 Rockledge 14, St. Cloud 7 Rutherford 7, Milton 6 Sandalwood 42, Wolfson 3 Santa Fe 40, Dixie County 13 Santa Fe Catholic 27, Bishop McLaugh lin 7 Santaluces 21, Palm Beach Lakes 7 Seffner Christian 56, Life Academy 14 Sickles 38, Wharton 21 Sneads 46, Cottondale 12 South Lake 27, Hernando 13 Southeast 33, Lakewood Ranch 13 Spanish River 20, Wellington 16 St. Augustine 27, Menendez 10 St. John Lutheran 40, Taylor 7 St. Petersburg Canterbury 43, Cam bridge Christian 42 St. Petersburg Northeast 14, Anclote 6 St. Thomas Aquinas 34, Cypress Bay 0 Sugar Land Fort Bend, Texas 58, Cen tral Florida Christian 8 Suncoast 11, Olympic Heights 8 Sunlake 36, Wiregrass Ranch 0 Suwannee 51, Hamilton County 26 Tampa Bay Tech 35, King 28 Tampa Catholic 39, Zephyrhills 13 Tarpon Springs 56, Clearwater 8 The Villages 34, Lecanto 22 Timber Creek 31, Boone 27 Treasure Coast 41, Fort Pierce West wood 12 Trenton 62, Branford 0 Umatilla 46, Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 25 Union County 37, Interlachen 14 Valdosta, Ga. 10, Lincoln 7 Valwood, Ga. 42, Munroe Day 6 Venice 63, Booker 6 Vernon 51, Wewahitchka 26 Vero Beach 42, Martin County 14 Viera 26, Cocoa Beach 0 Wakulla 30, Taylor County 21 Warner Christian 59, Father Lopez Catholic 7 Wekiva 26, East River 22 Wesley Chapel 26, St. Petersburg Catholic 14 West Florida 12, Pensacola Washing ton 7 West Nassau County 35, Eagles View 20 West Port 44, Citrus 20 Westminster Academy 20, Coral Springs Christian 7 Wildwood 52, Brooksville Central 0 Williston 42, Crystal River 21 Winter Haven 17, Haines City 10 By Cathrine Lamb Editorial Assistant clamb@chipleypaper.com Going into the fourth week of high school football all local teams have won their openers. Vernon and Bonifay one their openers on August 26, Chipley won their opener September 2. The Blue Devils of Holmes County High School brought home a win from Jay last Friday night, Sep tember 9, with a score of 41-12. The Blue Devils with undefeated record of 3-0 will take on Baker at home this Friday night, September 16, at Memorial Field at 7 p.m. The Tigers of Chipley High School gave Blount stown a run for their money on Friday nigh Septem ber 2, pulling out a Chipley Tiger win with a score of 16-7. The Tigers with a undefeated record of 2-0 will take on Northview at home this Friday night, Septem ber 16, at Memorial Field at 7 p.m. The Yellow Jackets of Vernon High School brought back a win from Wewa last Friday night, September 2, with a score of 51-26. This win gives Vernon at 2-1 re cord as they take on Bozeman this Friday night, Sep tember 16, at the Vernon High School Football Field, at 7 p.m. Check back next week for more local high school football. Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Page 9 Prep FOOTBALL Rays sweep Red Sox with 9-1 win FSU, Oklahoma have big rematch game S PE CI AL T O T HE N E W S The Holmes County Blue Devils are shown in their opening victory against Blountstown last week. Below, crush on as Holmes High Blue Devils overcome Jay. Bottom, NADA! Jay gets nowhere against host of defending Blue Devils. Devils, Tigers, Jackets prevail A

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Local A10 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 By Tom McLaughlin Florida Freedom Newspapers SHALIMAR In the end, the cold hard truth that teenager Chris Pitcock had been murdered outweighed all the passion and argu ment presented on Johna than Louvieres behalf at a Monday sentencing hearing. Louviere, 17, who in Feb ruary pleaded no contest to second-degree murder as an accessory to the March 2010 killing of Pitcock, was sentenced to 183.7 months, or just over 15 years, in prison. The sentence is a mini mum guideline sentence and was the one recom mended by Assistant State Attorney Angela Mason, who, with Louvieres even tual cooperation, success fully prosecuted three teens for the killing of Pitcock. Tyree Washington and Kyle Walling have both been sentenced to life in prison without parole for their roles in the Pitcock murder. Preston Chavers, who will be sentenced next month, must also, under the law, be sentenced to life without parole. Bruce Miller, Louvieres attorney, told Circuit Court Judge William Stone that his clients age and degree of participation in the crime were among several fac tors that required the judge to depart from sentencing guidelines and reduce the recommended sentence. This should not be a difcult procedure. Justice demands there be a down ward departure, he said. Pitcock was killed af ter he agreed to meet Washington, his friend and schoolmate, to sell him some marijuana. Washington and Chav ers met Pitcock with a plan, hatched that afternoon at the food court in Santa Rosa Mall, to rob him at gunpoint. Pitcock died of a bullet wound to the side. Chav ers was alleged to be the gunman. Louviere was not at the mall or at the scene of the shooting. He arrived at Washingtons backyard shortly before Washington and Chavers left to commit the robbery. Washington borrowed Louvieres gloves and used his cellphone to call Pit cock to nalize details of their meeting. Miller called on Louvi eres mother, Cathy Hoff man, to testify that her son, 16 at the time of the murder, was less mature than others his age and a follower. Miller also pointed out that Louviere joined the three teens convicted in the Pitcock killing after they had already planned and begun executing their scheme to rob Pitcock of marijuana. This freight train had left the station at the mall, Miller said. And it wasnt going to stop whether or not Johnathan showed up. Miller criticized the evi dence the State Attorneys Ofce used to link Louviere to the crime: The borrowed gloves and cellphone. He argued that his client did not know why the gloves or cellphone were being bor rowed and that there were plenty of plausible explana tions for Louviere lending them to Washington. But, he said, because the charge Louviere origi nally faced, felony murder, carries a state guideline of life without parole as the sentence, the price for a guilty verdict was too high to risk going to trial. Mason, who presented the victims father, David Pitcock, and a family friend as witnesses, argued that Louviere had become a participant in the crime when he lent Washington his property. The problem for this defendant was that he agreed to get on the train, she said. Stone said in announcing the sentence that he had to take into account the seri ousness of the crime com mitted in deciding whether or not to depart from state guidelines. Im just not able to say I nd a departure is appro priate, he said. I believe I should take into consider ation the seriousness of the crime. David Pitcock, who cried openly as he addressed Louviere from the witness stand, told him that he hopes he spends his time in prison reecting on the pain he had inicted upon the Pitcock family. I dont know how to take this, four of his friends, four of his friends, took his life for nothing, Pitcock said. What you did was terrible. You need to stop and think what you did. 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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B P A GE 1 Section Wednesday, SE PT EMBER 14 2011 Fashion world marks Sept. 11; show goes on TOP: The EDUN Spring 2012 collection is modeled Sunday, Sept. 11, during Fashion Week in New York. ABOVE RIGHT : Charlotte Ronson Spring 2012 collection modeled during Fashion Week in New York. LEFT Charlotte Ronson shows the Charlotte Ronson Spring 2012 collection modeled during Fashion Week in New York. in a range of whites, from silvery to bright. A diamond print was featured on slouch trousers paired with a matching halter. The print was carried over to several other looks, including a silk scarfdress with matching jersey leggings. Organic white mesh for a jumpsuit had shorts laser cut in a uttery petal shape. That detailing, along with the round metal trim, were all over the runway in short dresses, loose shorts, halter tops and trousers. The company, founded in 2005, produces some of its clothes in Africa. With the help of artisan nuns in Kenya known as the crochet sisters, the line includes their black, hand-knotted skirt and tted dress trimmed in leather. Hewson said in an interview before the show that Eduns latest collection is kind of innocent but tough as she tries to bring an ethical and steady, sustainable manufacturing industry to Africa. CHA R LOTT E R ONSON Ronson gave her youthful customer a bit of a history lesson. She drew references from the Victorian era, including a tan suede jacket with an asymmetrical front and high neck; the 1920s, dropped-waist dresses; and the restless grunge decade of the 90s thats where the denim t in. There is a minimalist pulled back feeling to the collection, a dreamy airy lightness, punched up with vivid hues of molten lava, faded chambray, crisp whites and electric neons, said Ronson in her notes. Denim is treated in a new way, we color block, patchwork, bleach bandanna motifs on chambray and use an array of denim hues to create a water-colored plaid print. She hit some of the seasons main themes and successfully tweaked them for her trend-conscious fan. She had the oral halter-neck, button-down top blending tangerine, yellow and black on white, and the cropped crocheted top paired with a maxi skirt. N E W YO R K (AP) The fashion world stood still when the World Trade Center towers came down in the middle of New York Fashion Week a decade ago, but the shows went on at the anniversary with moments of reection and remembrance. On a day like this, were all American, U2s Bono said Sunday after the spring preview for Edun, the African-inspired brand he founded with his wife, Ali Hewson. In an intimate hall at the New York Public Librarys agship, guests at Victoria Beckhams show twice stopped in their tracks on the way to their seats for moments of silence one for each tower as scheduled by the designer. All Fashion Week events are proceeding as planned through Thursday, in contrast to the jarring halt of the September previews after the terrorist attacks, said Stephanie Winston Wolkoff, Lincoln Centers fashion director. On the front row at Lela Rose, she described the conicting mood on the tragedys anniversary: Today is a day that is very exciting, but there is also a certain calmness, you know? Everyone can sort of just look at each other today and know exactly what each other is thinking. The Lela Rose runway stayed dark as John Lennons Imagine played before the show, with the crowd joining in. Oscar de la Renta said he watched the anniversary unfold on TV in the morning before heading to the Lincoln Center tents. I was in tears. But I say this country is about the rebirth, all over again. Its like the phoenix bird reborn from its ashes. Linda Fargo, senior vice president of fashion at Bergdorf Goodman, wore a patriotic blue blouse and red trousers on the Beckham front row. I didnt expect to be so emotional today, but I am. Designer Tracy Reese had been scheduled for her rst New York Fashion Week show on Sept. 11, 2001, and is proud to mark the anniversary at the tents on the same date this year. At the end of the day, New York is unlike any other city in the world. Everyone worked together to pick ourselves back up. Several designers said theyve made donations to various organizations in memory of the dead, including Derek Lam to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and Donna Karan to Action America, an initiative to turn Sept. 11 into a day of positive action and volunteerism. We remember that day 10 years ago that changed our city forever, Karan said in her show notes. We remember the courage, the inspiration, the compassion. How we came together, reafrming our strength to the world. There truly is no place anywhere like our beloved city, New York. Our inspiration. After eight days of spring previews in New York, shows move to London, then Milan and Paris. V I CTO RI A BE CKHA M Her crisp, clean and sophisticated collection showed off her skills as a dressmaker. Beckham added several outerwear pieces to the repertoire including hooded satin jackets but she mostly stepped back from the looser silhouette that she experimented with last season. Even the dresses with pleated skirts were built with tight bodices. Beckham has made her hallmark out of well-cut geometric clothes, and its OK for her to stick with it. Its the style that suits her best, anyway, as she showed off her post-baby gure in a zip-back shift while she took it all in from the front row. In recent seasons, Beckham narrated from a perch next to the runway in an intimate townhouse venue. On Sunday, however, she was quiet in the librarys long, narrow Astor Hall. DV F Diane von Furstenbergs spring collection, dubbed Beginnings, seemed more about renewal. The looks were fresh and breezy, but not overly frilly or frivolous. The light appears and changes everything, she said in notes for guests that included Oscar de la Renta and Valentino. Von Furstenberg was faced with a challenge from the start. As president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, she helps set the international calendar of style previews. New Yorks spring shows are always the second week of September, therefore always crossing Sept. 11. This year, on the milestone 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks, it fell on the day of von Furstenbergs usual time slot. She couldnt really change it, nor did she want to, she said in an interview earlier this week, but she had to acknowledge it, too. She found the appropriate balance by handing out American ags to the front row as she took her bow hand in hand with creative director Yvan Mispelaere. D ERE K LA M Lam is dumping a new daytime wardrobe of elegant, unfussy pieces in his ladys lap. His California dreamin muse could start with brunch in skinny navy trousers with an exaggerated white cuff and silk crepe shirt under a sweater. If it were a lunch date, she could step it up with a kaleidoscope-print shirt, sweater and black, bone and yellow patchwork snake skirt. Cruising the afternoon away in the convertible, shed soak up the sunshine in his yellow and caramel leather jacket, long and lean white crocheted T-shirt and matching skirt. And, when it turns a little chilly, theres the bold coral-colored, pebble-leather trench coat. E DUN The label founded by U2s Bono and wife Ali Hewson presented a mix of breezy, delicate orals and edgy laser-cut silks studded with rocker metal grommets. Bright color lit up the runway in a dark, cavernous warehouse, including some hand dying in indigo using a technique from Mali on a ared jacket made of recycled hemp. There were reds from a deep clay to a light salmon in African-inspired prints, tangerine in a parachute romper and solids From the Heart B4 Community calendar and events B5, B6 Editors Life B4 Rafe winner! B3 INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classieds ............................ B7

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Special to Extra This is the text of President Barack Obamas speech at the Kennedy Center commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, as delivered: The Bible tells us, Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. Ten years ago, America confronted one of our darkest nights. Mighty towers crumbled. Black smoke billowed up from the Pentagon. Airplane wreckage smoldered on a Pennsylvania eld. Friends and neighbors, sisters and brothers, mothers and fathers, sons and daughters they were taken from us with heartbreaking swiftness and cruelty. On September 12, 2001, we awoke to a world in which evil was closer at hand, and uncertainty clouded our future. In the decade since, much has changed for Americans. Weve known war and recession, passionate debates and political divides. We can never get back the lives that were lost on that day, or the Americans who made the ultimate sacrice in the wars that followed. And yet today, it is worth remembering what has not changed. Our character as a nation has not changed. Our faith in God and each other that has not changed. Our belief in America, born of a timeless ideal that men and women should govern themselves; that all people are created equal, and deserve the same freedom to determine their own destiny that belief, through tests and trials, has only been strengthened. These past 10 years have shown that America does not give in to fear. The rescue workers who rushed to the scene; the reghters who charged up the stairs; the passengers who stormed the cockpit these patriots dened the very nature of courage. Over the years we have also seen a more quiet form of heroism in the ladder company that lost so many men and still suits up and saves lives every day; the businesses that have rebuilt from nothing; the burn victim who has bounced back; the families that press on. Last spring, I received a letter from a woman named Suzanne Swaine. She had lost her husband and brother in the Twin Towers, and said that she had been robbed of so many would-be proud moments where a father watches their child graduate, or tend goal in a lacrosse game, or succeed academically. But her daughters are in college, the other doing well in high school. It has been 10 years of raising these girls on my own, Suzanne wrote. I could not be prouder of their strength and resilience. That spirit typies our American family. And the hopeful future for those girls is the ultimate rebuke to the hateful killers who took the life of their father. These past ten years have shown Americas resolve to defend its citizens, and our way of life. Diplomats serve in far-off posts, and intelligence professionals work tirelessly without recognition. Two million Americans have gone to war since 9/11. They have demonstrated that those who do us harm cannot hide from the reach of justice, anywhere in the world. America has been defended not by conscripts, but by citizens who choose to serve young people who signed up straight out of high school; guardsmen and reservists; workers and businesspeople; immigrants and fourth-generation soldiers. They are men and women who left behind lives of comfort for two, three, four or ve tours of duty. Too many will never come home. Those that do carry dark memories from distant places, and the legacy of fallen friends. The sacrices of these men and women, and of our military families, remind us that the wages of war are great; that while service to our nation is full of glory, war itself is never glorious. Our troops have been to lands unknown to many Americans a decade ago to Kandahar and Kabul, to Mosul and Basra. But our strength is not measured in our ability to stay in these places; it comes from our commitment to leave those lands to free people and sovereign states, and our desire to move from a decade of war to a future of peace. These 10 years have shown that we hold fast to our freedoms. Yes, we are more vigilant against those who threaten us, and there are inconveniences that come with our common defense. Debates about war and peace, about security and civil liberties have often been erce these last 10 years. But it is precisely the rigor of these debates, and our ability to resolve them in a way that honors our values and our democracy, that is a measure of our strength. Meanwhile, our open markets still provide innovators with the chance to create, our citizens are still free to speak their minds, and our souls are still enriched in churches and temples, our synagogues and mosques. These past 10 years underscore the bonds between all Americans. We have not succumbed to suspicion and we have not succumbed to mistrust. After 9/11, to his great credit, President Bush made clear what we reafrm today: The United States will never wage war against Islam or any religion. Immigrants come here from all parts of the globe. In the biggest cities and the smallest towns, in schools and workplaces, you still see people of every conceivable race, religion and ethnicity all of them pledging allegiance to the ag, all of them reaching for the same American dream e pluribus unum, out of many, we are one. These past 10 years tell a story of our resilience. The Pentagon is repaired, lled with patriots working in common purpose. Shanksville is the scene of friendships forged between residents of that town, and families who lost loved ones there. New York remains the most vibrant of capitals of arts and industry, fashion and commerce. Where the World Trade Center once stood, the sun glistens off a new tower that reaches toward the sky. Our people still work in skyscrapers. Our stadiums are lled with fans, and our parks full of children playing ball. Our airports hum with travel, and our buses and subways take millions where they need to go. Families sit down to Sunday dinner, and students prepare for school. This land pulses with the optimism of those who set out for distant shores, and the courage of those who died for human freedom. Decades from now, Americans will visit the memorials to those who were lost on 9/11. They will run their ngers over the places where the names of those we loved are carved into marble and stone, and they may wonder at the lives they led. Standing before the white headstones in Arlington, and in peaceful cemeteries and small-town squares in every corner of our country, they will pay respects to those lost in Afghanistan and Iraq. They will see the names of the fallen on bridges and statues, at gardens and schools. And they will know that nothing can break the will of a truly United States of America. They will remember that we have overcome slavery and Civil War; weve overcome bread lines and fascism; recession and riots; Communism and, yes, terrorism. They will be reminded that we are not perfect, but our democracy is durable, and that democracy reecting, as it does, the imperfections of man also gives us the opportunity to perfect our union. That is what we honor on days of national commemoration those aspects of the American experience that are enduring, and the determination to move forward as one people. Y B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Owens, Graham engagement announced BONIFAY Mr. and Mrs. Howard Owens of Bonifay, announce the engagement of their daughter, Dr. Sherie Owens of Bonifay, to Mr. Kris Graham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Graham of Melbourne. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. Bonnie Carnley and the late Mr. Festus Carnley of Bonifay, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Owens of Bonifay. Sherie is a graduate of Graceville High School. She attended the University of Florida on an academic and athletic scholarship where she received her Bachelors in Animal Biology. She continued her studies at UF and earned her Doctorate degree in Veterinary Medicine. She is an associate veterinarian at Panhandle Veterinary Services in Chipley. The future bride-groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Otha Tucker of Melbourne and Mrs. Annie Graham and the late Mr. Don Graham of Ocala. Kris is a graduate of Eau Gallie High School in Melbourne. He attended the University of Florida and received his bachelors degree in Economics and Business. Kris is currently employed as Operations Manager with SuperValue Logistics and has been for the past three years. Kris and Sherie are planning to tie the knot at 5 p.m. on Saturday, October 1, at Little Rock Assembly of God in Bonifay. A reception will follow at the Ag Center in Bonifay. Bruner birth announced CHIPLEY Larry and Leanne Bruner are proud to announce the birth of their son, Lucas Lloyd Bruner. He was born May 20, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. He weighed 7 pounds, 2 ounces and was 20 inches long. Lucas was welcomed home by his big brother Landon Lee Bruner. Lucas is the grandson of Lloyd and Jean Bruner of Vernon and Bill and Carol Phillips of Chipley. He is also the great-grandson of Arvie Yongue of Chipley. Johnson, Dunn nuptials told Mr. Tony Johnson & Ms. Terrie Chestnut Johnson are pleased to announce the engagement & forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Chasity Anna to Chad Nicholas Dunn, son of Jerry Dunn of Westville and Denice Sims Dunn of Bonifay. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Virginia Holland of Graceville and Kenneth Chestnut of the Poplar Springs Community and Gerald and Eleanor Johnson of Graceville. Chasity is a 2007 graduate of Chipley High School and will complete the Cosmetology program at Chipola College in January 2008. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Rudolph and Norma Sims of Bonifay and the late Herman and Maudie Dunn of Westville. Chad is a 2007 graduate of Holmes County High School. He is currently employed at the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Greenhead. The wedding is planned for September 24, 2011, at 5 p.m. at the Chautauqua Building on Lake Defuniak in DeFuniak Springs. All family and friends are invited to attend. The couple will reside in Bonifay. Howell birth announced GENEVA, Ala. Cory and Jessica Howell of Geneva announce the birth of their daughter, Rayna Brielle. She was born June 28, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan and weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce and was 20.5 inches long. Raynas maternal grandparents are Earl and Wanda Stafford of Bethlehem and Jim and Ellen Pollock of Ponce de Leon. Her great grandparents are Charles and Ella Baine of Westville, the late Cortez Stafford of Westville, Violet Wileman and the late Delton Wileman of Esto. Paternal grandparents are Aaron and Jean Summereld of DeFuniak Springs. Her great grandparents are the late Alter V. and Corene Cain of Leonia. RAYNA BRIELLE HOWELL SHERIE OWENS, KRIS GRAHAM LUCAS LLOYD BRUNER CHASITY ANNA JOHNSON, CHAD NICHOLAS DUNN Births Joy cometh in the morning Engagements & WEDDINGS See MORNING B4

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Extra To draw attention to senior nutritional issues and related problems, the local Home Instead Se nior Care office is encour aging area families to dig into their recipe box, find a favorite dish, then pre pare and share a meal with their favorite senior and enter that favorite recipe into a recipe con test that ends on Sept. 15. For seniors nutritional information and mealtime tips with seniors, visit www.caregiverstress. com. To enter the Craving Companionship Recipe Contest, visit www.meal sandcompanionship.com and click on the link that takes you to the Facebook page for entering the con test online. For more information, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care Of fice at 850-522-1919. Strong bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles are vital to healthy move ment and a healthy life style in animals. Now, when these func tions go awry in a pet due to unhealthy habits or un fortunate circumstances, a pets quality of life can still be sustained due to the modern day proce dures of orthopedics in veterinary medicine. Dr. Sharon Kerwin, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veteri nary Medicine & Biomedi cal Sciences (CVM) and a specialist in orthopedics and neurosurgery, says that orthopedics is the treatment or prevention of conditions affecting the bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles. Kerwin notes that or thopedic procedures in animals are much more advanced than most peo ple are aware of. We perform many of the same types of proce dures that are available for treatment of similar problems in humans, with the goal of getting the in jured animal back to nor mal activities as quickly and comfortably as pos sible, Kerwin explains. Advances in anesthesia, implant technology, pain control, and physical reha bilitation have made this a great time to access top quality care for animals with injury or disease of the bones and joints. Kerwin says that two of the most common prob lems she sees in dogs and cats are cranial cruciate ligament disease (similar to an ACL tear in humans) and hip dysplasia. Twenty years ago, af fected patients of these problems would have re sulted in cases of crippling osteoarthritis. Fortunately, with to days modern convenienc es and knowledgeable specialists, these patients may enjoy full recoveries. The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) at the CVM is trained and equipped to cover ortho pedic problems in many different species. On the large animal side, there is an active sports medicine, lame ness, and trauma service that provides arthroscopy (minimally invasive sur gery using an arthroscope to treat damage in the interior of the joint) and fracture repair for horses and other large animal species, Kerwin explains. Our exotic and zoo animal service often sees birds, pocket pets, and exotic an imals with bone and joint problems, many of which can be treated successful ly. While dogs traditionally have been more common patients than cats, we are beginning to discover that orthopedic disease, par ticularly osteoarthritis, is emerging as a major health problem for cats over 10 years of age. Orthopedic diseases have not yet been con firmed to be related to just hereditary or environmen tal conditions. A lot of research has been targeted toward the inherited basis of the more common orthopedic diseases. Kerwin suggests that orthopedic problems can spur from both aspects. There is definitely a hereditary basis for hip dysplasia, with multiple genes involved. Ker win says. Environment plays a big role as well, with diet and exercise as key factors involved in the development of signs of problems in affected animals. Certain types of problems are more likely to occur in certain breeds of dogs and cats. For ex ample, the Scottish Fold breed of cat is predis posed to the development of osteoarthritis. Preventative measures are always important for owners to keep in mind, and there are many pre ventative measures that may help alleviate future orthopedic diseases. Kerwin suggests that the best thing you can do to prevent many diseases is to keep your pet healthy and in-shape. This will not only help to ease orthopedic dis eases, but it will help in all aspects of your pets livelihood. Kerwin explains that research in dogs indi cates that dogs kept in an appropriate body condi tion will live two years lon ger than their overweight counterparts, which is a very long time in dog years. In addition, their risk for osteoarthritis is much lower. Kerwin also points out the necessary environ mental precautions that an owner can take on a day-to-day basis, such as allowing your trained dog to ride in the back of the truck may result in a tragic accident or even death. Always keep your pet on a leash in an unfamiliar environment to keep them out of harms way. If you have a house cat, ensure that all of the furni ture is secured to the wall and will not fall in case your cat likes to explore. Kerwin is enthusiastic about where veterinary orthopedics has come, but she also understands what is possible in the future and that there are a couple of challenges to face. Although this is a great time for veterinary ortho pedics, we have a lot of work left to do, Kerwin says. Educating pet own ers regarding prevention of orthopedic disease is very important and an ongoing challenge. In ad dition, orthopedic treat ments can be very expen sive, and we would like to explore ways to provide the best care possible in the most cost-effective way to reach the largest num ber of pets. Further work is needed, particularly in cats, regarding causes of orthopedic diseases and preventive strategies. For dogs, better outcome as sessments are needed to help decide which treat ments are best, just as in people. The VMTH at the CVM is always eager to help educate pet owners and work with pets affected by orthopedic diseases. For more informa tion on veterinary or thopedics, please visit www.vetmed.tamu.edu/ services/orthopedics. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedi cal Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http://tamunews.tamu. edu. Partners For Pets will be hosting a Spaghetti Din ner to benet the shelter on Sept. 16 from 4-8 p.m. The dinner will be held at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club House. The golf course is the old Marianna Oaks Golf Course at 3071 Hwy. 90 near the old Circle D. Art Penello of Marianna will once again be lending his culinary skills and do ing the cooking for the shel ter. We will also be hosting a Thirty-One Gifts party at the dinner. Thirty-One Gifts is a faith-based or ganization celebrating the Proverbs 31 woman. This party is being given by Ash ley Slay. She will donate all of her commissions back to Partners For Pets. We will have a musi cian playing music at the dinner. Door prizes will be handed out. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for chil dren under 12. The shelter is going through hard times be cause of the bad economy so come on out, enjoy the food and music, and help support the shelter. Recipe contest set by group Modern-day orthopedics for animals Partners for Pets sets dinnerSPECIAL TO E XTRA Saturday, Sept. 3, Partners For Pets, a non-prot, no-kill animal shelter at 4011 Maintenance Drive, Marianna, presented Suzanne Speed of Albany, Ga., with a quilt she had won in their rafe. Speed had adopted one of our favorite shelter dogs, Jake, in March. Jake was a very shy dog and had been at the shelter for more than two years. Speed had driven to Marianna to adopt another dog, but when she heard Jakes story, she decided to take a chance on him. Jake had heartworms, but due to Speeds care and costly treatment, Jake is on his way to living a long and happy life. The shelter will be rafing off a saddle and television at the end of this month. Tickets remain available. RAFFLE WINNER GETS QUILT AND COMPANION

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Are there worries or concerns in our life that are making us tense? If so, we should release them into Gods are and let Him handle them. Imagine that our cares are like helium balloons which we are struggling to hold onto. Just let go of them and let them rise up to heaven and go out of sight. Trust God to take care of them. Now of course, there may be some things which we have to do ourselves in dont need to worry about such things. Just do it and be done with it. Also, we should realize that God may not handle the worry or con cern in the way that we thought He would. Again, we dont need to worry about this. We have to learn to let go of our cares and concerns and literally release them into Gods hands. Most of place, i.e., they are things we really cant control change the things in our life that we can change, and give the rest of them to God. He can handle them. Anxiety in the heart of man causes depression, but a good word makes it glad. New K.J.V. Proverbs 12:25 Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688 Stephen B. Register, CPA 1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 Place your ad here for only $8.00 per week First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser 1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414 This Message Courtesy Of BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Watch and pray that you may not enter into temp tation; the spirit indeed weak R.S.V. Matthew 26:41 Place your ad here for only $8.00 per week Let Go and Let God ??????? Ways to follow Gods will Recently, I was in the hospital and then enforced bed rest. I used a part of that time to explore living out Gods will for my life. Being a nerd by inclination, I wanted to know how to know what that will was. So Scriptures in hand, I began to explore that topic. And though I am sure any of our local faith leaders or even Sunday school teachers could do a better job, here is what I came up with. First rule: God is unchangeable. His will for us is unchanging in the long term love Him, accept His Son. It only seems to change for two reasons: It is a living, daily will, and we often do not do what we should, leading us to have to work our way back to the starting point. Second rule: Love God. We are to be passionately in love with the God of our creation and salvation. Any thought we have about service or following His will needs to be carefully measured against an unbending love of God and His commandments. Among those commandments, of course, are the 10 given Moses at Sinai. But there is also those highlighted by Jesus: Love your neighbor as yourself and love the Lord God with all your mind and strength. Third rule: Seek His will. How can you possibly know what to do without considering the options? Its not so much that nding Gods will is difcult (though it can be, particularly if you approach nding Gods will the wrong way) as it is that God wants us to determine His call on our lives from a perspective of worshipful obedience. To do that, we have to actively look rather than take an attitude of, OK, Lord, what do you want me to do now? You seek Him out by consulting His Word prayerfully. That brings me to the fourth rule: Pray about it. You cannot get an answer without an earnest questioning. And you cannot earnestly question without prayer. So you need to purify yourself spiritually and talk to the Creator. Will He answer? He has promised He will. And I believe He will answer you. In fact, I pray He will show you His will and help you accept the task(s) He has for you. Have a great week. And please do me the favor of letting me know if this has helped you in your walk with Him. I love hearing about His victories (and ours through Him). Four Calvary on Gospel Music Dinner Cruise PANAMA CITY The gospel quartet, Four Calvary, will be singing on the Lady Andersons Gospel Music Dinner Cruise on Thursday September 15. Boarding begins at 6:30 p.m. and the cruise begins at 7 p.m. The Lady Anderson is located on Grand Lagoon at Thomas Drive on Panama City Beach. Come out and enjoy the all you can eat seafood buffet and gospel music. For reservations call 1-800-3600510. Four Calvary will be singing songs from their new CD. Everyone is invited to attend. Festival of the Americas CHIPLEY Saint Joseph The Worker Catholic Church is cordially inviting the community to participate in an evening of fun for the whole family. We are celebrating our Hispanic heritage month with the Festival of the Americas on Saturday, September 17, starting at 5 p.m. There will be food from different Latin American countries and we will have Latin American music to listen to and dance. There will be fun activities for everybody. Come and enjoy. Bring your family and friends and enjoy our festivity. New Orange Baptist Church Gospel Jam CHIPLEY New Orange Baptist Church will hold its monthly Gospel Jam on Saturday, September 17, at 6 p.m. The church is located 6 miles south of Chipley off Orange Hill Road, mile East on Alford Road. For more information call 6381330 or 638-1166. Refreshments will follow the sing. Broken Strings at Otter Creek Methodist Church PONCE DE LEON Broken Strings will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church, Saturday September 17, at 7 p.m., the church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Everyone is invited. Harris Chapel Gospel Sing CARYVILLE Harris Chapel will be having a gospel sing, fellowship, and worship in the Lords presence. Local talent will do the singing. This is a free event. A love offering will be taken to benet the youth of the church to help build the church of tomorrow. The sing will be held on September 17, at 5 p.m. The church is located 8 miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. Gully Springs Baptist Homecoming Gully Springs Baptist Church celebrates 94 years of serving our Lord and ministering to out community during their Homecoming celebrations on Sunday. September 18, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The Homecoming celebration will feature music from the Gully Springs Choir and others, with a visionary message from Dr. Jessie Reader. Please join with us as we celebrate the Lord leading those who planted Gully Springs Baptist Church here 94 years ago, as we praise Him for all the ways He is blessing us today, and as we look forward to being all that He would have us to be as He leads us forward for the future. Everyone is invited to come and be a part of our celebration service, which will be followed by dinner. For more information please call 850-547-3920. The church is at 2845 Highway 90 West, just 3 miles West of Bonifay. New Bethany Assembly Of God Pastor Appreciation Day VERNON New Bethany Assembly of God, located at Hinsons Crossroads, in Vernon, will be having pastor appreciation day, on Sept. 18. Bro. Vic Kolmetz will be the morning speaker. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall at 12:30. Come and be blessed. For more information call Bro. Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Northside Baptist Church Homecoming Services PONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon will be holding their Homecoming services on Sunday, September 18. Service will begin at 10 a.m. Singing will be done by Voices of Northside, with preaching being done by Larry Cummings. Dinner will immediately follow the worship service. For more information call Carol Busby at 836-4470, Lavelle Brooks at 836-4881 or Frances Cooey at 956-2822. Annette Herndon At Popular Springs Baptist Church GRACEVILLE Annette Herndon of North Georgia, recording and publishing artist with Grapevine Records and Grape Arbor Publishers will be the featured guest at Popular Springs Baptist Church, located at 1098 Lovewood Road in Graceville, on September 20, at 6 p.m. She has appeared on Daystar, TBN, Dove Broadcasting and others. Diamond award nominee for female vocalist, Annette is a gifted singer and motivational speaker who has a hart for God and a passion for prayer and is eager to share her ministries. St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church 24 th Annual St. Marys Day On behalf of Pastor White and the members of St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church, we invite you and your congregation to our 24 th Annual St. Marys Day on Sunday, September 25, at 11 a.m. for morning Worship Service. The Rev. Sylvester Robinson, Pastor of St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church from Quincy, will be our guest speaker for this great day. Hurricane-ready: coming to Florida As a young man, I never understood why people came to Florida for their vacations. I had spent most of my life either in the city of Chicago or in the mountains of North Georgia. Things have changed since those days, for now I have lived here in the Panhandle for almost fourteen years and it seems like home. I now know that it is a popular vacation spot because of the beautiful beaches, amusement parks, and the weather is hot and beautiful most of the year. But I also have learned some other things about Florida. Have you heard the old saying youve got a better chance of getting struck by lightning than. . .. Well in Florida you do have a better chance of getting struck by lightning than anywhere else in the world. And not only does Florida see more lightning than anywhere else in the world, after youve lived here any length of time you soon learn to be prepared for the weather to change throughout the day. It can be sunny when you go in a building, and raining when you come out ten minutes later, or visa versa. And when its hurricane season you begin to count the days until its over, this is true. There is even a sign in Tallahassee on the highway that keeps track of the days until hurricane season is over, like the one in Atlanta that counts the days until Christmas. As Im writing, hurricanes Irene and Lee have spared us, and others are following close behind. We count our blessings as one passes over us with very little damage and check on one another and send help to those who were less fortunate. All the while, realizing we tried to be prepared for the worst never knowing exactly what danger we may experience. We are then thankful after its all over and wonder if we were as prepared as we should have been. The beautiful thing about hurricanes is that they are somewhat predictable with all this new weather technology we have today. Often we are given up to a week of warning before they visit. Tornados, earthquakes, oods and res are not that polite. The sad and ugly part of a hurricane is that so many people fail to heed the warning, thinking they have a better plan and then the tragedy becomes fatal. One of the interesting things about hurricane preparation is, as Judy has to remind me often, as I complain about the money we are spending to be prepared, most of it is for things that we use everyday anyway. So there is really no great loss if the hurricane changes its course and decides not to pay us a visit. But you know there are always those who do not prepare for the one that is coming, because the one before missed us or it wasnt as bad as we thought it would be. Since Christ arose from the grave and ascended into the heavens, followers of Christ have been sharing the message of the love that God has for all people and that He sent His son, Jesus Christ to die for their sins on the cruel Roman cross. This message of love also comes with a warning that Christ will return for His Bride, the Church. Once we have left the Bible teaches that this world and those left will experience the wrath of God. The sad part of this warning is that so many have heard it many times and no longer take it serious. Others have come to the conclusion that they can handle it, because it probably will not be as bad as they say anyway. Something they dont take into consideration is that after He takes His church out, those who normally do most of the volunteer recovery work will not be here nor will the Lords grace be present as it was before. If the truth is known, we have probably not delivered a true understanding of how bad this world will be when God releases His wrath upon it. From one friend to another, please heed the warning; receive Christ today as your Lord and Savior, while there is time. Whether He returns today, next week, next year, or ten years from now, when you experience the peace that comes with being ready, you will wonder why you waited so long. For the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night (2 Peter 3:10 NKJV). But if we are prepared we are looking forward to a new heaven and new earth that the Lord is preparing where there will be no sin, separation, disappointment or death (2 Peter 3:11-13). Romans 10:9-13 promises that God is waiting to hear your prayer of repentance, which will prepare you for that day. Please prepare today by repenting of your sins and giving your life to Him. Once you do, please share with a church and be baptized and begin to grow in your new life with others who will help you and whom you can also minister to. (Please be advised that my articles are purposely meant to be challenging and at times, controversial. They should no way reect negatively on the paper in which you read it) Tim Hall is senior pastor of Gully Springs Baptist Church, three miles west of the light at State Road 79. He can be reached at timhall_2000@ yahoo.com, timothyjhall.org or c/o Gully Springs Baptist Church, P.O. Box 745, 2824 Highway 90 West, Bonifay, FL 32425. STEVE LINER Living the Editors Life FROM THE HEART Tim Hall Faith BRIEFS Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Page 4 More than monuments, that will be the legacy of 9/11 a legacy of reghters who walked into re and soldiers who signed up to serve; of workers who raised new towers, of citizens who faced down fear, most of all of children who realized the dreams of their parents. It will be said of us that we kept that faith; that we took a painful blow, and we emerged stronger than before. Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. With a just God as our guide, let us honor those who have been lost, let us rededicate ourselves to the ideals that dene our nation, and let us look to the future with hearts full of hope. May God bless the memory of those we lost, and may God bless the United States of America. MORNING from page B2

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Extra Mr. Perry Dady Stanley, Jr., of Westville, (Royals Cross Roads Community) passed away Friday, September 2, at Flowers Hospital after a short illness. He was 80. Perry was born January 4, 1931 in Holmes County, to the late Perry Dady, Sr. and Ola Royals Stanley. He served his country in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, served as a member of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Mason for over 48 years and retired from the Florida Department of Corrections/ Caryville Work Camp. In addition to serving his country, the State of Florida, the Royals Cross Road Community, and being a loving son, brother, husband, father and friend, his most honored duty was serving his Lord Jesus Christ at Leonia Baptist Church. Through his faith, he touched the lives of so many people, he never met a stranger, always had a smile on his face and always had time to visit with everyone he met. A brother, Bonnard Stanley, and two sisters, Vina Lou Grifn and Laura Henderson, preceded him in death. Perry leaves behind his wife of 56 years, Pauline McCormick Stanley; one son and daughter-inlaw, Charlie D. Chuck and Linda Stanley, all of Westville (Royals Cross Roads Community); one sister, Ola Jean Lesuers of Pensacola; a large extended family and group of life long friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Monday, September 5, in the Leonia Baptist Church with the Rev. Rod Jones and the Rev. Stacey Stafford ofciating. Mr. Stanley lay in state at the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed at the Hurricane Creek Baptist Church cemetery with full Masonic Rites and Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Sunday, September 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com Perry D. Stanley, Jr. Charlie Lee Miller, Jr. of Myrtle Road, Westville, passed away Saturday, September 3, from injuries sustained in an auto accident. He was 39. Charlie was born November 4, 1971, in Geneva County, Ala. He was a 1989 graduate of Geneva High School. In 1995, following his Moms career, he graduated from Wallace College School of Nursing and was employed with Wiregrass Medical Center as a Registered Nurse. He touched many lives in many different ways. Charlie enjoyed hunting and was an avid War Eagle Auburn fan. He was of the Church of God faith. Charlie was a very loving and devoted son, brother and uncle. He dearly loved his family and they in turn, also loved him. He will be greatly missed. Survivors include his parents, Charlie and Mable King Miller, Westville; three sisters, Beverly Howell and LaRita Creech (Michael), all of Samson, Shelia Fortner (Eddie), Enterprise; nieces and nephews, Amanda Moore (Keith), Shea and Marti Howell, Lee Holland (Stacie), Jamey, Halie and Logan Fortner, Garrett Seago and Landon Creech; great nephew and nieces, Kaydin and Karleigh Moore and Kynlee Holland; other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Wednesday, September 7, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Eddie Eaton and the Rev. Stacey Stafford ofciating. Burial followed in the Mt. Olive Assembly of God cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Tuesday, September 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. The family would like to say a special thank you to Mary Jane Barton, Ricky McKinney, the Mims family and anyone else they may not know about who assisted in helping to remove Charlie from the vehicle. Your act of unselsh kindness will never be forgotten. May God Bless ALL of YOU. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com Charlie Lee Miller, Jr. Mr. Josh Junior Pat Davis, 79, of Caryville, passed away August 28, at his home. He was born April 20, 1932 in Caryville. He is preceded in death by his father, Curtis A. Brock; his mother, Cora Lee Martin Davis; three brothers, Aubrey Davis, Heston Davis, Howard Davis, and one sister, Ruby Parish. Mr. Davis is survived by his wife of 61 years, Myrtle Louise Harrell Davis of Caryville; two sons, Franklin Davis of Caryville, and Patrick Davis and wife Vicki of Caryville; one daughter, Jean Murray of Caryville; one brother, Hertis Davis and wife, Linda of Caryville; three grandchildren, Jeana and Keith Prescott, Shane and Lisa Davis, Will Spence, and six greatgrandchildren, Tiffanie, Josh, Victory, Veda, Vera, Billy. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, August 31, at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church with Elder Bobby Willis ofciating. Interment will follow in the Bethel Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Josh J. Davis Christina Skeeter Maines Flowers, 44, of Caryville, passed away September 3, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. She was born July 7, 1967 in Winter Haven, to the late Gordon Everett Maines, Sr., and Opal LaWanda Wilson Maines. She is survived by her anc, James Gay of Caryville; a sister, Cynthia Fussell and husband, Dan, of Bonay; four brothers, Gordon Eugene Maines of Sherman, TX, Gordon Everett Maines, Jr. and wife, Jamie, of Caryville; Charles Nathan Maines and wife, Luan, of Ebro; William Anthony Bush and wife, Tiffany, of Bonifay; several nieces and nephews. Graveside services were held at 4 p.m., Monday, September 5, at New Bethany Assembly of God Church Cemetery with the Rev. Victor Fisher ofciating. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directed. Christina M. Flowers Mrs. Armi Maria Niemi, 85, of Bonifay, passed away August 28, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. She was born November 3, 1925 in Iso Kyro, Finland to the late Isaac and Lempi Nylund Karhu. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Niemi is preceded in death by her husband, Elmer Niemi, and two sisters, Anne Golden and Alice Miller. Mrs. Niemi is survived by four sons, Allen Niemi and wife, Mary. of Baytown, TX; David Niemi of Houston, TX; Jim Niemi and wife, Linda, of Cleveland, TX; Henry Niemi and wife, Teresa, of Bonifay; ve grandchildren, Marcia Niemi VenHaus, Melissa Niemi, Josh Niemi, Jicole Niemi Wells, Mollie Niemi; two great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, August 31, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Shelly Chandler ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church Music Fund, 311 North Waukesha Street, Bonifay, or Holmes County Public Library, 303 North Harvey Etheridge Street, Bonifay. Armi M. Niemi Fred William Evans, 64, of Plant City, passed away Tuesday, September 6. Mr. Fred was born in Sebring, on February 12, 1947, to the late Jart Ellis and Era Mae Hicks Evans. He worked as a contractor and was of the Christian faith. Mr. Fred was a family man, enjoying time with his family and passing the time shing. Preceded in death by three sons, Kurt, Tracy, and Stacy; two brothers John Edd Evans, James Evans. He is survived by three sons, David Evans, Wade Evans, of Graceville, Ronald Evans, Dayton, TN; two daughters Betty Harris, Sale Creek, TN, Deanna Evans, Graceville; three brothers, Wesley Evans, Bill Evans, Graceville, Jack Evans, Lakeland; three sisters, Shirley Goodman, Lakeland, Freda Ward, Dayton, TN, Bobbie Wamble, Dothan, AL; 13 grandchildren; two great grandchildren, and several nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m.(CDT), Friday, September 9, at the Graceville Community Church with the Rev. Dale Worley and the Rev. Charlie Chavers ofciating. Burial followed in Beulah Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Thursday, Sept. 9, from 6 to 8 p.m. Fred W. Evans Elmer G. Lauen, 96, Lt. Col. retired, U. S. Air Force of Marianna died Tuesday, September 6, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan. A native of Port Arthur, TX., Mr. Lauen had resided in Marianna for the past 41 years and was a member of Eastside Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Nancy Coats Lauen. Survivors include his wife of 69 years, Mary Ceravolo Lauen of Marianna; one son, the Rev. David Lauen and wife, Christine of Bonifay; two daughters, M. Gail Schinman and husband, Gary Schinman, and Barbara G. Lauen, Lt. Col. (RET.) all of Marianna; one brother, James Eugene Lauen of Marianna; ve grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, September 9, at Eastside Baptist Church with the Rev. David Lauen, the Rev. John Rollyson and Dr. Steve Canada ofciating. Interment followed at Pinecrest Memorial Gardens. James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel will direct. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, September 8, at Eastside Baptist, 4785 Highway 90, Marianna. In lieu of owers contributions may be made to The Gideons, P O Box 293, Marianna, Fl 32447. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.james andsikesfuneralhome.com Anthony G. Herrington Mr. Anthony Grant Herrington, 55, of Westville, passed away September 6, at his home. He was born April 17, 1956, in Milton, to the late Steven Loren Herrington, Sr. and Nola Mae Grant Herrington. Mr. Herrington is survived by four sisters, Menthia Faulk and husband, Charles, of Pace; Nola Ennger and husband, Wilton, of Pensacola; Wilda Limerick and husband, Joe, of Pace; Sally Lathan and husband, Sonny, of Holt; one brother, Loren Herrington of Westville; several nieces and nephews. Services were held at 11 a.m., Saturday, September 10, at Hickory Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Chris Nelson ofciating. Interment followed in the Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Elmer G. Lauen Mrs. Etta Virginia Aldridge-Reddick, 67, of Grand Ridge, passed away September 6, at her daughters home in Dothan, Ala. She was born February 3, 1944 in Bonifay, to the late John Henry and Susie Virginia Bush Clark. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by her husband, James Aldridge, and four brothers, Otis Clark, John Henry Clark, Daniel Webster Clark and Dee Clark. She is survived by two daughters, Julie McLaughlin and husband, Michael, of Dothan, Ala.; and Jerrilyn Aldridge of Grand Ridge; four grandchildren, Alex, Maggie, Kayla, Sean; sister, Ella Pate of Bonifay; a sister-in-law, Myrtle Ruth Willis of GA; several nieces and nephews; special friends, Ola Lott and Daisy Barrentine; the Lovedale Baptist Church Family; Theodore Reginal Reddick. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, September 8, at Lovedale Baptist Church with the Rev. Steve Canada ofciating. Interment will follow in the Lovedale Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay, directing. Etta V. Aldridge-Reddick On Monday, September 5, Lewis Farrell Boyett, one of the greatest men to walk this earth went to be with our beloved mother Inez Day Boyett. He was an honest peaceful man that would help anyone. He will be truly missed. He left two daughters, Michelle Boyett and Mary Whitehead; two sons, Daniel Boyett and Anthony Boyett; his faithful granddaughter Janie Helton & son-inlaw Michael Helton; two brothers Eugene Philips & Lovis Boyett; one sister Pat Nelson; 21 grand children and 29 great-great-grandchildren. Rest in peace, dear father, until we meet again. Memorialization was by cremation. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of local arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Lewis F. Boyett Obituaries Craving Companionship Recipe Contest To draw attention to senior nutritional issues and related problems, the local Home Instead Senior Care ofce is encouraging area families to dig into their recipe box, nd a favorite dish, then prepare and share a meal with their favorite senior and enter that favorite recipe into a recipe contest that ends on September 15. For seniors nutritional information and mealtime tips with seniors, visit www.caregiverstress.com. To enter the Craving Companionship Recipe Contest, visit www. mealsandcompanionship.com and click on the link that takes you to the Facebook page for entering the contest online. For more information, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care Ofce at (850) 522-1919. Benet Car Show WALTON COUNTY Friends and family of Stephen Whisenhunt, Jr., will host a benet car show at the Walton County Fairgrounds, Saturday, September 17. Gates open at 11 a.m. The auction will begin at 12 p.m. The event will include Shine & Show car show featuring cars, trucks, antiques and motorcycles. There will also be an auction of various goods and services donated by local and nationally known companies and attractions such as re trucks, rafes and a delicious BBQ dinner. Car show participants need to arrive no later than 10:30 a.m., to register for the event. Trophies will be awarded for rst, second, and third place in each division, pus Best of Show, Viewers choice, and Milli, Sadie and Masons Pick. All proceeds will benet Susan May, Stephens mother, and his three children, Milli, Sadie, and Mason Whisenhunt. Volunteers and sponsors are encouraged to contact Stephanie Manning at 401-4465 Chipley High School Band pizza fundraiser CHIPLEY The Chipley High School Band is kicking off their rst fundraiser of the year. Band members are currently selling Little Caesars pizza kits and cookie dough. There is a wide selection that should cover just about any taste. The selection varies and includes different types of pizza, such as deep dish and personal size to mini calzones, wings, breadsticks and pretzels. You can even stock up on breakfast items with breakfast mini calzones and cinnamon French toast sticks. For those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the selection also includes pie kits and cookie dough. The pizzas are a great buy and extremely tasty. The ingredients are all packaged separately and allow pizza acionados to control exactly what goes on their pizza creation. The pizzas are a Community BRIEFS See BRIEFS B6

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra LIBRARY HOURS Wausau Library: Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1 p.m. 6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: 10a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay): Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley): Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed. Sunday: Closed Vernon Library: Monday: Closed Tuesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library: Monday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 5 p.m. Coupon clipping at the Washington County Library 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group each Monday. Meetings are held at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets every second Tuesday of the month. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blesses Trinity Catholic Church, on Hwy 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are the fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. 10:30-11 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets the thirs Thursday of every month at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets the rst Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blesses Trinity Catholic Church, on Hwy 177A FRIDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. every third Friday, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation, call 638-6216 or 638-6217 6 p.m. Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation is holding a get together for 50 + senior singles, widowed, or divorced on the last Friday of every month at Winn Dixie in Marianna from 6-8p.m. Come join the fun for games, prizes, snacks and you can also do some shopping. For more information call 526-4561. 6 p.m.: The Winn Dixie in Marianna is hosting a get together for Seniors (single, divorced, or widowed) on the last Friday of every month from 6-8 p.m. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Community CALENDAR BRIEFS from page B5 quick and easy crowd pleaser as well, so stock up for all those Saturday football parties. Band members will be selling the pizzas until September 13. The delivery date is Friday, September 23. Please order from your favorite band member or give us a call at 638-6100, Ext. 525 or you can email us at chipleyband@gmail.com for more information. You may also order online at the band website: www.chipleyband.com. The sales will help the CHS band raise money for the many expenses incurred throughout the year. Western S tar R odeo Pageant VE R N O N The Western Star Rodeo Pageant will be held on, Saturday, September 24, at the Vernon Community Center (old Vernon High School). The age groups are boys infant thru 9 years old and girls infant thru 20 years old. Registration will be, Saturday, September 3 and September 10, at the Dance Center on Highway 90 in Bonifay, from 12 to 3:30 p.m. For more information call Bernyce or Wanda at 547-3474 or (850) 768-1150 Constitution Day Luncheon M ARIA NN A Thursday, September 8 in the deadline for Constitution Day luncheon reservations. The DAR/C.A.R./ SAR Constitution Day luncheon will be held on Saturday, September 17 at 11 a.m. at St. Lukes Episcopal Church in Marianna. Kenneth Brooten Jr. Esq. will speak on The U.S. Constitution Under Attack. Dutch treat: Adults $10, Children 12 and under $5. Reservations are required. C.A.R./JAC members in colonial attire free. The church is located at 4362 Highway 90 in Marianna. For more information contact Mary Robbins at Snoopyxii60@ hotmail.com or call (850) 209-4066 A dvance A uto Parts in B onifay, JD R F Car S how BO N I F AY Advance Auto Parts in Bonifay will be holding a free Car Show on, September 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the store to support Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Donations will be accepted on site or in the store. Drop you name in the hat to win some door prizes from our supporters. Refreshments will be provided by Ripiccis Italian Ice, courtesy of Melea and Todd Flanery. The event is sponsored and supported by: Vernon Drugs, Dees Restaurant, Hometown Automotive, Gils Auto Medic, Sims Insurance Agency, The Holiday Restaurant, Donut Land, Around The Corner Grill, M&J Automotive, Los Rancheros Mexican Restaurant, WFECA and Walmart. Picnic I n The Park P O NCE DE LE O N The Ponce de Leon Park will be holding a Picnic In The Park on, September 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is a no Charge picnic there will Hamburgers, Hot Dogs Games and Swimming all for free. The Picnic is being sponsored by, Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E. Coalition, Sheriffs Department, and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Partners For Pets S paghetti Dinner M ARIA NN A Partners For Pets will be hosting a Spaghetti Dinner to benet the shelter on September 16 from 4:00pm to 8:00pm. The dinner will be held at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club House. The golf course is the old Marianna Oaks Golf Course at 3071 Hwy. 90 near the old Circle D. Art Penello of Marianna will once again be lending his culinary skills and doing the cooking for the shelter. We will also be hosting a ThirtyOne Gifts party at the dinner. Thirty-One Gifts is a faithbased organization Celebrating the Proverbs 31 woman. This party is being given by Ashley Slay. She will donate all of her commissions back to Partners For Pets. We will have a Musician playing music at the dinner. Door prizes will be handed out. Tickets are $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children under 12. The shelter is going thru hard times because of the bad economy so come on out, enjoy the food and music, and help support the shelter. R odeo Pageant BO N I F AY The Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Pageant will be held on Saturday, September 17,2011 @ HCHS auditorium. The entry fee is $45.00 per contestant. This pageant is sponsored by the HCHS band booster. You may register at HCHS on the following dates: Tuesday, September 6th 5-7 pm Saturday September 10th 10am-12pm Late registration will be on Tuesday September 13th 5-7pm. at HCHS there will be $10.00 fee added. You can also drop off any registration form off at BES, BMS, or HCHS. If you have any questions you may contact Candi Meeks at 850-547-9000. The pageant is open for any boy ages 4-9, girl ages 4-20. No residency requirement. A ngels H aven R egistration for Evening of Entertainment BO N I F AY An Angels Haven will host an evening of entertainment to showcase the talent of children ages 5 18 from the surrounding counties and communities, on November 5. If your child or a child you know would like to participate in this event in the categories of Dance, Drama, Music, modeling or Art, please call Darrell at (850) 768-1855 to register the childs act. There will be two scheduled rehearsals prior to the event. It is very important that you register your childs act before September 16 to allow proper planning and arrangements. H unter S afety I nternetCompletion Course BO N I F AY The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-Completion course in Holmes County. The Course will be at the First Baptist Church, 211 N. Waukesha Street in Bonifay. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on September 16 and 8 a.m. to noon on September 17. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report from does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satises hunter safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety course at MyFWC.com/huntersafety or by calling the FWC regional ofce in Panama City at (850) 265--3676 S herry Cobb R etirement R eception VE R N O N The community is invited to a retirement reception in honor of Mrs. Sherry Cobb, longtime Vernon City Clerk. The reception will be held on Sunday, September 18, from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Vernon Community Center. This event is being hosted by the City of Vernon and the Vernon Historical Society. Florida S heriffs Y outh R anch Golf Tournament SU NN Y HI LL S This year, the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch is celebrating 54 years of operation and the Washington County Sheriffs Ofce and Bay County Sheriffs Ofce will again team up to sponsor the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament, which will take place September 24, at the beautiful Sunny Hills Golf and Country Club in Washington County. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Youth Ranch takes children from troubled homes and difcult situations and gives them a safe, nurturing home and an education. It gives young men and women new hope, new dreams, and a new start to help them grow into productive citizens in our community. Our ofce staff believes strongly in this organization and each and every one of us are proud to be part of ensuring the Youth Ranch will continue to help the children of Florida in the years to come. For more information on this event and sponsorship opportunities please contact Andrea Gainey, 850-638-6115. Everett Family R eunion B ET H LE H EM The Everett Family Reunion will be held Sunday, September 25, at the Bethlehem Methodist Church Fellowship Hall starting at 11 a.m. The church is located off Highway 177 North of Bonifay, on Bethlehem Church Road. All friends and relatives are invited. Bring your favorite food and family pictures or other memories to share. Plates, utensils and ice will be furnished. For more information contact Carl Everett at 547-5855 or J. Peters at 547-3756 R M S O pen H ouse C HI PLE Y Roulhac Middle School Title 1 Annual Parent Involvement and School Advisory Meeting and Open House will be held for fth grade on September 15 at 6 p.m., and Sixth to eight grade on September 26 at 6 p.m. Parents and guardians are invited to RMS for a parents involvement meeting and open house. The meeting will be used to share information about the school, and the families will then be released to travel through the school day following the students daily schedules. During the classroom visits, families will meet teachers in their classrooms where information will be given about each class to orient families to academic expectation for the year V HS Class of 1981 VE R N O N Vernon High School Class of 1981 will celebrate their 30th reunion. On October 7, class members will have a oat in the Homecoming Parade and attend the football games and on October 8, meet for supper at a restaurant in Panama City. If you have any contact with a class member, let them know about the reunion plans. For more information contact Denise Brock at dbrock@ centurylink.net or Judy Basarab at judybasarab@hughes.net. Worthington family reunion HI N SO N C ROSSROA D S The Worthington Family Reunion will be held on October 8, at the Hinson Crossroads Fire Department. Lunch will be served around noon. B ull R un 5K, 1 mile Fun R un BO N I F AY Get your running shoes on for the Bull Run 5K and 1 mile Fun Run in conjunction with the Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo. The run will be on Saturday, October 8, at Middlebrooks Park in Bonifay. The race starts at 8 a.m. with onsite registration will be from 7 to 7:45 a.m. Pre-register with entry forms at the following places: Holmes County High School, Bonifay Elementary School, or the Bonifay Athletic Club. The course is paved and mostly at road. Entry fee is $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. A T-shirt is guaranteed if registered by September 23. Awards for overall male/ female, master, grand masters, senior grand masters and one deep in standard 5-year age group and rst three walkers. Fun Run award for rst 3 kids 12 and under. All proceeds from the run will benet the Holmes County High School Track and Field Team, which formed last year. Restrooms are available at Middlebrooks Park. For more information, call 956-2720 or 527-5051. 2011 Fall Field Day Q UI NC Y The University of Florida/IFAS/North Florida Research and Education Center, will host its 2011 Fall Field Day on Tuesday, October 11, beginning at 4 p.m. eastern time. This year tours will include but not limited to Deciduous Fruit and cold-hardy Citrus, Perennial Peanuts as an EcoFriendly Turf and Forage, Tomato Varieties for Florida and the Southeastern U.S., Wood energy through Pyrolysis. There will be a choice of two tours with dinner following. The eld day will be held at the NFRECQuincy, located off Pat Thomas Parkway at 155 Research Road. Registration begins at 4 p.m. This event is free to the public however pre-registration is required by Thursday, October 6. To register please visit http:// falleldday2011.eventbrite.com. Lassos and H airbows C HI PLE Y Its time to clean out the toy chest and kids closets! With Christmas around the corner, would you like an opportunity to earn some cash? The Chipley Junior Womens Club (CJWC) will hold the fall Lassos and Hairbows sale on Saturday, October 16. There will be a special pre-sale for volunteers and consignors on Friday night, October 14. Do you have you consignor number yet or do you need a new one? Please call (850) 867-3901 and start tagging. To volunteer or register visit www.chipleyjuniors. com to download information or visit and like our facebook page Chipley Junior Womans Club Lassos and Hairbows sale. The CJWC was organized in 1991 with the purpose being to provide local young women an opportunity to foster a moral, intellectual, and social culture, and to encourage movements for the betterment of society. We also encourage the value of education and public spirit in the community.

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B7| Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS UP TO $300 Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted SCRAP METAL HAULINGPaying $250 & Up B u y i n g A l l T y p e s Buying All Types O f S c r a p M e t a l s Of Scrap Metals a n d J u n k C a r s and Junk Cars a n d T r u c k s and Trucks. 850-547-0224 Family Operated Fully Insured Free Estimates Tree Removal Small Tract Harvesting Chipper Pruning & Trimming Aerial Truck Bobcat WorkBus: 850.415.1217 Cell: 850.573.1270Jason Morris, Owner Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Washington County, Florida Case No.: 67-11-CA-79 Centennial Bank as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Samuel Fitzsimons, IV, Catherine F. Shores, Wilshire Holding Group, Inc., a Florida corporation, 1200 Properties, Inc., a Florida corporation and any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Washington County, Florida, described as: The NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 14 West, situate, lying and being in Washington County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, in Chipley Florida, at 11: 00 A.M. Central Time On September 19, 2011. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus funds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 31st day of August, 2011. CLERK OF COURT by: Kay McDaniel Deputy Clerk. As published in the Washington County News September 7, 14, 2011. CITY OF CHIPLEY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO CITY CODE ORDINANCE NO. 908 The Chipley City Council will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING regarding adoption of the following ordinance on Monday, September 26, 2011, at 5:15 p.m., at the City Hall Council Chambers, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, VACATING A PORTION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY ALSO KNOWN AS 2nd STREET; PROVIDING FOR CESSATION OF OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE RESPONSIBILITIES; PROVIDING FOR REVERSION OF VACATED REAL PROPERTY TO THE ADJOINING PROPERTY OWNER; PROVIDING FOR CORRECTION TO PUBLIC RECORDS OF THE CITY; PROVIDING FOR FILING OF THE ORDINANCE WITH WASHINGTON COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Adoption of this ordinance will vacate a portion of right-of-way also known as 2nd Street. All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to provide written and/or verbal comments on the matter under consideration. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of disability or physical impairments should contact the City at (850) 638-6350, 48 hours prior to the hearing. For further information pertaining to the proposed ordinance, contact Dan Miner, City Administrator. As published in the Washington County News September 14, 2011 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. DIRECTV Summer Special! 1 Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO/Starz/Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 8/15! 1-866-419-5666 LOSTJackrussell Male white with brown spots 10 years old neutered Reward $300 850-258-0309 Text FL75516 to 56654 1 Male& 1 female 18 week old, vet checked English Bulldogs for adoption at a nominal fee to a good home. Please contact: denniscole007@gmail.com if interested or for more information Coastal Bermuda Hay6’x5’ Rolls. Fertalized. $35 Per Roll Leave Msg. 850-859-2598 or 850-849-1269 Text FL75861 to 56654 Small horse, Bay filly approx. 58”. Rides. $200.00 after 5:30. (850)547-4068 AUCTION Annual Fall Harvest Sale Saturday Sept 17, 2011-8:00 A.M. 5529 Hwy 231 N Campbell, Fla. Selling (2) Local farm dispersal. (2) Estates, bank Repos, sheriff dept, city & county surplus plus consignment. Mason Auction & Sales LLC# 642 office 263-0473 Chad 258-7652 Gerald 849-0792 www.masonauction.com AUCTION Michelle & HC’s Auctions, 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday, 6PM. Miscellaneous auction 3rd Saturday Big Truckload Auction Multi-Sellers, selection varies, cash, debit/credit cards 5% buyers premium. Building has Air Conditioning. Sellers welcome. Michelle Roof Fl AU 3014 AB 2224 850-547-9140 850-326-1606 850-415-0183 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn Yard Sale Fri & Sat Sept 16th & 17th @ 2483 Comet Ln (off Sand Path Rd), Bonifay Fl. (850)547-5628. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 LAST WEEK U-Pick Grapes Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley, u pick $5.00 gallon, we pick $8.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 2 Items For Sale (1) 10ft heavy duty root rake $1750 & (1) low boy trailer.$ 2500 850-535-0711 850-258-6018 EAGLE TRADING POST Vernon, Hwy 79 by Dollar Store Open Saturday and Sunday, 1pm-6pm. If you need it, I probably have it! Antiques, furniture, etc. (850)774-4688, (850)872-0350. Going Out of Business Sale mo’s Trading Post/ produce, Vernon. Inventory, refrigeration, scales, fixtures,and much more. Call Moses 850-388-6535 Troy Built 38” Riding Mower ; 3 Door Dog Box-fits big truck; new summit climber; (5)-26” Bikes-new; (850)547-9975, (352)516-1509. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CHILD CARE Opening for a loving person to work with young children. Call 547-1444 Wanted: We are accepting applications for entry level positions working with youth. If you are highly motivated and would like to help troubled youth, we are the place for you. Vacation & holiday pay, insurance and retirement package included. Applicants must be able to pass background screening and drug screening. Apply in person or call Jennie Rushing @ (850)548-5524. IndustrialManpoweris currently taking applications for PRODUCTION WORKERS AND FORKLIFT OPERATORS in Chipley, FL. Must be available Monday-Saturday. First, Second & Third Shifts Available. Candidates must have GED or High School Education and will also be required to pass a drug test and background check. For more information, call Manpower today at 334-794-7564. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Frac Sand Haulers with complete Bulk Pneumatic Rigs only. Relocate to Texas for tons of work! Fuel/Quick pay available. (800)491-9022 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Driver Up to $2500 Sign on Bonus. Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST EXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com DriverGREAT MILES! Great Pay! $1000 Sign-on for Experienced CO’s & $1500 Incentives for O/O’s. Driver Academy Refresher Course available. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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B8| Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* 2005 Toyota Tundra 4X4. 4 door, white, 66.600 miles. Very clean. $ 17,500 Call 850-638-8526. PUBLIC A UCTION 150+ Spec and Dealer Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available Saturday, September 10, 10am Philadelphia, MS www.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 GA LAND SALE -17 Tracts to choose from. Creeks, pond sites, wooded, clear cut, etc. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. 2BR MH for rent with utility building, window air. 535-2657. For Sale 2 bedroom house on 3 1/2 acresoutside of Chipley City limits. Call 209-2763 & leave message! 3 Bedroom home for rent in Bonifay. Call (850)768-0217. 1282 Holley Ave 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Convenient location in Chipley. $675/mo + $650 sec.depo (850)271-9973 For Rent 2 BD/ 1BA home in the countryChipley area. Call 209-9593 & leave Message! For Rent. 4BR/1BA CH/A south of Chipley. .$750 Rent. $750 deposit. 638-7601. 2 & 3 BR $590 -$675 Greenhead Washer & Dryer Incl Some pets welcome248-0048 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath MH total electric, clean, 4101-A Douglas Ferry Rd, West of 79. No Pets. Background check required. $395. (850)547-4606. 3 Bdrm 1 1/2 Bath MH In Westville, Hwy 90. $325/mo. $200/depo References. (850)548-5541. 2BR/2BA Chipley, w/large addition on 2 acres, fenced. 2 storage buildings. Smoke free environment, no pets. $550 amonth plus deposit. Water & Sewage included. 850-258-2086. 2BD/1 1/2 BA MH CHA, well & septic. Verylarge yard, country living. 2 miles from Vernon. $350/mth. 535-9886 2BR/2BA, 3BR/2BA MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean.$500/mth $200/dep.850-638-1462& 2BD 2BA Mobile Home CH/A, hardwood floors. $200 dep $500/mth. No pets. 638-1462 3BR/2 BA MH 3/4 mile from Bonifay Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3 BR/ 2 BA Doublewide in Bonifay. Sorry No Pets Please call 850-373-8938 For rent: 2 and 3 Bdrm Mobile Homes. Deposit required. No pets. Water & sewage included. Bonifay. (850)547-5007 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Lot For Sale 1 Acre lot w/ well & septic tank. 1116 Chance Rd Chipley $22,500. 850-535-0711 or 850-258-6018 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 For Rent: Nice townhouse apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Townhouse Apt For Rent 2BD/ 1 1/2 BA 638-1918 BEAUTY/ HEALTHCARE Studio L Tanning & Spa is currently taking applications for qualified team members who are self motivated, friendly,& fun. We are accepting applications for the following positions: Massage Therapist (FL Lic) Full Specialist or cosmetologist (FL Lic), Tanning Associate ( will Train) & Esthetician( FL Lic) We have part time & full time positions available. Please pick up applications @ 1414 Main ST Suite 4 .Chipley For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 SOD & SEED on the farm, delivered or installed. Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda. West Florida Turf (850) 415-0385; 638-4860. Established 1980 $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Care-Giver with 24 years experience. IWill take care of your loved one at home or in a facility, Contact Sharon (850)535-0051, 850-849-2755 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com

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1| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS UP TO $300 Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted SCRAP METAL HAULINGPaying $250 & Up B u y i n g A l l T y p e s Buying All Types O f S c r a p M e t a l s Of Scrap Metals a n d J u n k C a r s and Junk Cars a n d T r u c k s and Trucks. 850-547-0224 Family Operated Fully Insured Free Estimates Tree Removal Small Tract Harvesting Chipper Pruning & Trimming Aerial Truck Bobcat WorkBus: 850.415.1217 Cell: 850.573.1270Jason Morris, Owner Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Volume 48 Number 26 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 2011 FLORIDA FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC. Y o u r Your H O M E T O W N HOMETOWN S h o p p i n g G u i d e Shopping Guide F o r W a s h i n g t o n & For Washington & H o l m e s C o u n t i e s Holmes Counties FREETAKE ONEGOD BLESS AM ERICA 1 Male& 1 female 18 week old, vet checked English Bulldogs for adoption at a nominal fee to a good home. Please contact: denniscole007@gmail.com if interested or for more information Coastal Bermuda Hay6’x5’ Rolls. Fertalized. $35 Per Roll Leave Msg. 850-859-2598 or 850-849-1269 Text FL75861 to 56654 Small horse, Bay filly approx. 58”. Rides. $200.00 after 5:30. (850)547-4068 AUCTION Annual Fall Harvest Sale Saturday Sept 17, 2011-8:00 A.M. 5529 Hwy 231 N Campbell, Fla. Selling (2) Local farm dispersal. (2) Estates, bank Repos, sheriff dept, city & county surplus plus consignment. Mason Auction & Sales LLC# 642 office 263-0473 Chad 258-7652 Gerald 849-0792 www.masonauction.com AUCTION Michelle & HC’s Auctions, 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday, 6PM. Miscellaneous auction 3rd Saturday Big Truckload Auction Multi-Sellers, selection varies, cash, debit/credit cards 5% buyers premium. Building has Air Conditioning. Sellers welcome. Michelle Roof Fl AU 3014 AB 2224 850-547-9140 850-326-1606 850-415-0183 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn Yard Sale Fri & Sat Sept 16th & 17th @ 2483 Comet Ln (off Sand Path Rd), Bonifay Fl. (850)547-5628. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. DIRECTV Summer Special! 1 Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO/Starz/Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 8/15! 1-866-419-5666 LOSTJackrussell Male white with brown spots 10 years old neutered Reward $300 850-258-0309 Text FL75516 to 56654 TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classified ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? Contact us today and start turning the stuff you don't want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS BEAUTY/ HEALTHCARE Studio L Tanning & Spa is currently taking applications for qualified team members who are self motivated, friendly,& fun. We are accepting applications for the following positions: Massage Therapist (FL Lic) Full Specialist or cosmetologist (FL Lic), Tanning Associate ( will Train) & Esthetician( FL Lic) We have part time & full time positions available. Please pick up applications @ 1414 Main ST Suite 4 .Chipley For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 SOD & SEED on the farm, delivered or installed. Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda. West Florida Turf (850) 415-0385; 638-4860. Established 1980 $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Care-Giver with 24 years experience. IWill take care of your loved one at home or in a facility, Contact Sharon (850)535-0051, 850-849-2755 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

PAGE 20

2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, September 14, 2011 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT 2005 Toyota Tundra 4X4. 4 door, white, 66.600 miles. Very clean. $ 17,500 Call 850-638-8526. PUBLIC A UCTION 150+ Spec and Dealer Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available Saturday, September 10, 10am Philadelphia, MS www.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2BR/2BA, 3BR/2BA MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean.$500/mth $200/dep.850-638-1462& 2BD 2BA Mobile Home CH/A, hardwood floors. $200 dep $500/mth. No pets. 638-1462 2BR MH for rent with utility building, window air. 535-2657. 3BR/2 BA MH 3/4 mile from Bonifay Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3 BR/ 2 BA Doublewide in Bonifay. Sorry No Pets Please call 850-373-8938 For rent: 2 and 3 Bdrm Mobile Homes. Deposit required. No pets. Water & sewage included. Bonifay. (850)547-5007 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Lot For Sale 1 Acre lot w/ well & septic tank. 1116 Chance Rd Chipley $22,500. 850-535-0711 or 850-258-6018 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com For Sale 2 bedroom house on 3 1/2 acresoutside of Chipley City limits. Call 209-2763 & leave message! GA LAND SALE -17 Tracts to choose from. Creeks, pond sites, wooded, clear cut, etc. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 For Rent: Nice townhouse apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425.00 Two Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Townhouse Apt For Rent 2BD/ 1 1/2 BA 638-1918 3 Bedroom home for rent in Bonifay. Call (850)768-0217. 1282 Holley Ave 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Convenient location in Chipley. $675/mo + $650 sec.depo (850)271-9973 For Rent 2 BD/ 1BA home in the countryChipley area. Call 209-9593 & leave Message! For Rent. 4BR/1BA CH/A south of Chipley. .$750 Rent. $750 deposit. 638-7601. 2 & 3 BR $590 -$675 Greenhead Washer & Dryer Incl Some pets welcome248-0048 2 Bdrm/1 Bath MH total electric, clean, 4101-A Douglas Ferry Rd, West of 79. No Pets. Background check required. $395. (850)547-4606. 3 Bdrm 1 1/2 Bath MH In Westville, Hwy 90. $325/mo. $200/depo References. (850)548-5541. 2BR/2BA Chipley, w/large addition on 2 acres, fenced. 2 storage buildings. Smoke free environment, no pets. $550 amonth plus deposit. Water & Sewage included. 850-258-2086. 2BD/1 1/2 BA MH CHA, well & septic. Verylarge yard, country living. 2 miles from Vernon. $350/mth. 535-9886 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 LAST WEEK U-Pick Grapes Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley, u pick $5.00 gallon, we pick $8.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 2 Items For Sale (1) 10ft heavy duty root rake $1750 & (1) low boy trailer.$ 2500 850-535-0711 850-258-6018 EAGLE TRADING POST Vernon, Hwy 79 by Dollar Store Open Saturday and Sunday, 1pm-6pm. If you need it, I probably have it! Antiques, furniture, etc. (850)774-4688, (850)872-0350. Going Out of Business Sale mo’s Trading Post/ produce, Vernon. Inventory, refrigeration, scales, fixtures,and much more. Call Moses 850-388-6535 Troy Built 38” Riding Mower ; 3 Door Dog Box-fits big truck; new summit climber; (5)-26” Bikes-new; (850)547-9975, (352)516-1509. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CHILD CARE Opening for a loving person to work with young children. Call 547-1444 IndustrialManpoweris currently taking applications for PRODUCTION WORKERS AND FORKLIFT OPERATORS in Chipley, FL. Must be available Monday-Saturday. First, Second & Third Shifts Available. Candidates must have GED or High School Education and will also be required to pass a drug test and background check. For more information, call Manpower today at 334-794-7564. Wanted: We are accepting applications for entry level positions working with youth. If you are highly motivated and would like to help troubled youth, we are the place for you. Vacation & holiday pay, insurance and retirement package included. Applicants must be able to pass background screening and drug screening. Apply in person or call Jennie Rushing @ (850)548-5524. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Frac Sand Haulers with complete Bulk Pneumatic Rigs only. Relocate to Texas for tons of work! Fuel/Quick pay available. (800)491-9022 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Driver Up to $2500 Sign on Bonus. Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST EXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com DriverGREAT MILES! Great Pay! $1000 Sign-on for Experienced CO’s & $1500 Incentives for O/O’s. Driver Academy Refresher Course available. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*



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50 Phone: 850-638-0212 Web site: chipleypaper.com Fax: 850-638-4601 For the latest breaking news, visitCHIPLEYPAPER.COM www.chipleypaper.com No Strings AttachedNew and Used Auto LoansAs low as 2.99%APR*for up to 60 monthsNo Direct Deposit Required No Payment Draft Required No Payroll Deduction Required*Based on credit rating. Bonifay 1720 S Waukesha Street (850) 547-2260 Chipley 1044 Hwy. 90 East (850) 638-8376 Special to The News Mackenzie Lane, a 2008 CHS graduate, completed the 2011 Drum Corps International Sum mer Tour with The Cadets from Allentown, Pa., and comes home a world champion. Wrapping up a 17,000-mile summer cross-country tour of the United States, the 2011 Cadets show Between Angels and Demons captured a clean sweep of the DCI World Championships in Indianapolis, winning the top spot on quarternals, seminals and nals night. For the 10th time in the organi zations 77-year history, the Cadets can again call themselves world champions. The corps proved that Between Angels and Demons lies a corps with unparalleled talent and dedication, earning a score of 98.35 of 100 and the 2011 World Championship title on Aug. 13 at the Drum Corps Internation al Finals. Word of the win came to the Washington County News in the form of a release from the Ca dets ofce in Allentown. Between Angels and Demons is a performance based on the epic struggle of good and evil put on the eld to musical selections by Frank Ticheli and Hans Zimmer. The white-uniformed Angels do battle with the maroon-uniformed Demons for a 13-minute thrill ride that eventually ends with good triumphing over evil. The Cadets, a program of Youth Education in The Arts, are one of the oldest and most honored con tinuously operating drum and bugle corps in the world, with per forming members from all over the country and world. Lane is a senior attending The Baptist College of Florida, major ing in music education. In a state ment issued by the Cadets, he said he would like to thank his friends, family and all who helped this possibility become a reality. Staff reportBONIFAY Tea Party Patriots will host History of the Constitution and Its Relevance Today: Your Rights/ School Prayer at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at Simbos Family Restaurant in Bonifay. They will welcome guest speaker KrisAnn Hall, who is a constitutional attorney, author and nationally known veteran. Admission is free, and everyone is welcome to attend.INDEXArrests . .................................. A2 Opinion . ................................. A4 Outdoors . ............................... A8 Sports . ................................... A9 Extra . ..................................... B1 Faith . ..................................... B4 Obituaries . ............................. B5 Classieds . ............................. B7 INSIDEArea football coverage A9 Perrys Prattle A4 Arrests A2 Volunteer Fireghter Weekend A5 FLATHEADS TAKING OVER OUTDOORS | A8Wednesday, Sep EP Te E Mbe BE R 14 2011Volume 88, Number 43 Staff reportThe Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors welcomed Richard Alan Williams as their new board member at his rst meeting. Williams is one of two members representing the area on the 10-member board, joining long time member and past board chair Glo ria Keenan of Bristol. Williams is the executive director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board, a private sector-driven policy and over sight organization designed to assist employers and employ ees in Calhoun, Holmes, Jack son, Liberty and Washington counties. As workforce direc tor, he has spent the last nine years working closely with lo cal governmental, economic development organizations and private-sector entities to help improve the business cli mate, and thus employment opportunities, of the region. Im excited to add Richards expertise and resources to our team to help Chipola Healthy Start move in a positive direction as we continue to serve our ve-county area, said Chipola Healthy Start Board Chair Chephus Granberry. He brings a lot of board experience and connections that will be a valuable asset. In addition to Chipola Healthy Start, Williams is a board member of several other organizations including Floridas Great Northwest, Opportunity Florida, Early Learning Coali tion of Northwest Florida and the Chipola River Soil and Water Conservation District. He also served on the Florida Department of Juvenile Justices Blueprint Commission and served as an ex-ofcio member of the State of Flor idas WAGES (Work and Gain Economic Sufciency) Board, which was responsible for the initial implementation of Floridas successful welfare reform effort. FIND ITT ONLINE Info and videos of Between Angels and Demons and Drum Corps International, Marching Musics Major League, can be found at: www.youtube.com/ watch?v13ovDobvUcs www.youtube.com/ watch?voQZMFrv8aiU www.yea.org/site/ PageNavigator/aboutcadets www.dci.org/about/CHS grad a Drum Corps champ RiRICHaARdD AlanLAN WilliaILLIAMsS CCHeapeEAPER THanAN naNA TionalIONAL aveAVERaAGeE STeve EVE Line INE R | The NewsThe only explanation for why area gas is more than 50 cents less expensive than Chicagos national high of $4.06 per gallon for regular, unleaded gasoline is the price of our suppliers, according to local petroleum retailers. TT ea Party Patriots to meet TThursday Williams named to Chipola Healthy Start BoardDozens of local citizens joined at Chipley City Hall on Sunday to set out ags remembering those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and the sacrice of those who have served in the intervening years. CeCE Cilia ILIA Spea PEA Rs S | The NewsSee WILLIAMMS A3

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 11-002 ANORDINANCE ADOPTING A BUDGET FORTHE FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 FORTHETOWNOF WAUSAU, FLORIDA AND APPROPRIATINGTHE FUNDS FOR APPROPRIATION FOR SAID FISCAL YEAR was Town of Wausau 2011-2012 Proposed Budget Summary All DepartmentsTown of Wausau 2011-2012 Proposed Budget Summary All Departments INCOME General Funds..........................103950 Water/Garbage Funds...............146600 Street Funds..............................10400 Recreation...................................4400 Fire Department.........................50200 Energy Grant...........................250000 VFD Funds.................................34550 Total Projected Income......600100 EXPENSES General Funds..........................103950 Water/Garbage Funds...............146600 Street Funds..............................10400 Recreation...................................4400 Fire Department.........................50200 Energy Grant...........................250000 VFD Funds.................................34550 Total Projected Expenses...600100 The Town of Wausau is an equal opportunity employer and handicapped assessable jurisdiction. Anyone needing assistance to attend this meeting please contact the Town Clerk at 850-638-1781 48 hours prior to the meeting.As published in the Washington County News September 14 and 21, 2011 Special to The NewsAn Angels Haves will host an evening of entertainment to showcase the talent of children ages 5 18 from the surrounding counties and communities, on Nov. 5. If your child or a child you know would like to participate in this event in the categories of dance, drama, music, modeling or art, please call Darrell at (850) 768-1855 to register the childs act. There will be two scheduled rehearsals prior to the event. It is very important that you register your childs act before Sept. 16 to allow proper planning and arrangements.Kids talent showcase Nov. 5Special to The NewsTri-County Community Council, Inc., Washington County Section 8 Rental Assistance Program is currently taking applications on Wednesdays for the waiting list. Applications are taken by interview appointments only. Eligibility for assistance is based on income, being a legal citizen of the United States or having an eligible immigrant status, criminal history and other criteria. For more information contact Aubrey Morris at 638-4520 ext 25.Section 8 rental assistance offeredBy Cathrine LambEditorial Assistant clamb@chipleypaper.com WESTVILLE According to the Florida Highway Patrol, on Sept. 3, at 8:45 a.m., on County Road 163, a 2006 Nissan Pickup driven by Charlie Lee Miller, Jr., 39, of Westville, collided with a culvert on the west shoulder of County Road 163 near Mims Road. The front of the pickup collided with the culvert on the south side of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Historical Site driveway. As the pickup crossed the driveway, it became airborne and struck a tree north of the drive. Miller landed north of the tree, and the pickup rolled on to its right side, facing east when it came to a nal rest. Those who witnessed the accident pulled Miller from the truck before it ignited. The investigation indicated that Miller was having a heart attack at the scene, which possibly contributed to the accident. Miller was wearing a sea belt at the time of the crash. There were no passengers in the truck Miller was later transported to Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala., and was pronounced dead at 10:36 p.m., according to law enforcement reports.Westville man dies in crash LivestIVESTOCkK ReEPOrtsRTSAt Florida Livestock Auctions receipts totaled $6,218 compared to $9,077 last week and $6,061 last year. According to the Florida-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared to one week ago, slaughter cows were $13 lower, bull sold unevenly steady, feeder steers were $1-2 higher, heifers sold $1-3 higher, replacement cows were $1-2 lower. Feeder Steers: 300-400 lbs $121-170 400-500 lbs $110-136 500-600 lbs. $111-124 Feeder heifers: 300-400lbs. $107-137.50 400-500lbs. $104-123 500-600lbs. $100-116 Slaughter Cows: 90 percent Lean 750 1200lbs. $51-60 85 percent Boner 1200 1500lbs. $58-66 Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1 2 1500 2100lbs. $72-85 Special to The NewsCCHIPPLEY There is a group of people in Chipley who are trying to help our youth and need help. Teen Court is designed to give our youth a second chance in life. Any student that has been arrested with a first time misdemeanor may be sent to Teen Court with an opportunity to have adjudication withheld, so that they are able to go on to college, state or federal jobs or apply for the military. Our cases are held in the court annex and our program has a director who overseas everything, the attorneys, Bailiff, and clerk are all students. The judge is an attorney from the area. The students are put on trial and given a sentence, any where from community service, serving on the jury for another defendant, house arrest, and many more. They can also be drug tested. If they have caused injury or damage to someone or something they have restitution also. The reason Im writing this is because we have limited money to run the program. We need your help. If anyone can donate anything to the program it will be greatly appreciated. If you have any questions, please feel free to call the office, and Teen Court staff would be more than happy to speak to you. Call 415-5021 and ask for Shirley.Teen Court set in Washington CountyAug. 28 Sept. 4Philip Adkins III 23, Chipley, Battery, Criminal mischief Tanya Bievenour 38, Alford, Possession of controlled substance without prescription, Possession of paraphernalia Michael Dempsey 47, Chipley, Violation of probation on burglary Jalyn Everett 28, Chipley, Driving while license suspended or revoked Elizabeth Granger Vernon, 22, Driving under the influence, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription Matthew Hogue 24, Chipley, Fraud X2, Violation of probation on possession of controlled substance without a prescription and fraud William Hunter 30, Marianna, Violation of probation on sell of cocaine Jamie Johnson 53, Caryville, Battery domestic violence, Walton County warrant for violation of probation on trespassing Bert Jones Jr. 52, Chipley, Battery Thomas Kelly 56, Ponce de Leon, Holmes county warrant on larceny Phong Le 22, Biloxi MS, Possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, Smuggle Barbiturate into state, Possession of paraphernalia Linda Marble 25, Chipley, Violation of probation on battery Joseph McComas 24, Chipley, Driving under the influence, Possession of marijuana, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription Bobbi Noss 41, Cottondale, Violation of controlled release on possession of paraphernalia, Possession controlled substance without a prescription Dequarious Peterson 18, Caryville, Resist officer without violence Douglas Porter 59, Wausau, Violation of state probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Carson Salinger 43, Chipley, Making false report to law enforcement officer Timothy Shiver 31, Graceville, Possession of controlled substance without a prescription, 2 counts Sandra Smith 52, Vernon, Battery Travis Spear s, 21, Wausau, Jackson County warrant for battery Anthony Taylor 32, Dothan Ala., Violation of state probation on dealing in stolen property Danielle Vaughan 19, Graceville, Holmes County warrant for violation of probation on operating a motor vehicle without a license Louie Weathers 32, Panama City, Driving while license suspended or revoked Washington County arrests ARRESTS Go to chipleypaper.com for more local newsBy Felicia KitzmillerFlorida Freedom NewspapersP P ANAMA CCITY The 463 rst responders and ight crew personnel who died on Sept. 11, 2001 trying to manage the devastation brought to American soil by terrorists are frequently remembered as part of the collective tale of American courage displayed that day. But they were more than that. They were husbands, wives, sons, daughters, mothers and fathers and on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011, each one was remembered as an individual as their names were read during Bay Countys 10-year remembrance ceremony at Panama City Marina. More than a dozen rst responders and military personnel took turns reciting the list of names, each group concluding with the traditional ringing of a bell. Fire service, law enforcement, military, emergency medical service and civilian ight crew representatives shared their memories and reections of that tragic day with an audience of hundreds who came to honor the fallen. Most of the attendees were from the elds most deeply impacted by that day. Near the end of his time at the lectern, EMS director Corky Young asked everyone who served as a rst responder on Sept. 10, 2001 to raise their hands. Dozens appeared in the air. I salute you for coming to work on Sept. 12, he said. And all of those who joined after, I salute you for entering a career path knowing what could happen. Julius Halas, director of the Division of the State Fire Marshal, was a re chief in Sarasota County on Sept. 11, 2001. While rst responders in the county were already on heightened alert because of then-President George W. Bushs visit to a local school, they were thrown into chaos when, prior to the president, they learned the country was under attack. Suddenly their town had come into immediate danger simply by hosting the president. I tell you that story because you never know when the next terror incident is going to take place, he said. The fallen heroes are and should be remembered and honored, he said. But thousands of people put their lives on the line to protect their neighbors simply by going to work and they are equally deserving of our thoughts and respect, Halas said. In the wake of the terrorist attack, an unprecedented level of patriotism ooded the country, Maj. Tom McCarthy of Panama City Police Department said. The American ag appeared everywhere; in front of houses, businesses and even car windows. The message of unity was strong and appropriate, he said. The men and women who died trying to rescue people from the days events were, like you, undoubtedly patriots, he said. McCarthy said he still ies the Stars and Stripes outside his home every day, but he has noticed the prevalence of the ag beginning to dwindle. He challenged each attendee to renew the vigorous and visual passion they had for their country on that day and sustain it through the trials of every day life. Lets work together toward making Panama City synonymous with Flag City and being the city that will never forget, he said.First responders are remembered

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LocalWashington County News | A3Wednesday, September 14, 2011 SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Has Your Insurance Company Changed Again?Auto Home Life1361 Jackson Ave.Chipley 638-1756washington@ffbic.comTrust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.Local Agents. Local Offices. Local Service. Best Value.Farm Bureau was ruled an A+ Superior Agency by AM Best ratings. What grade did your company get?1108 N. Waukesha St.Bonifay 547-4227holmes@ffbic.comG Williams grew up just in Jackson County but attend ed kindergarten through 12th grade at Altha School in Calhoun County. After he received a Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University, he and his wife, Denise, settled in the area, where they have raised their two sons, Daniel, 20, and Joshua, 17. He served as a volunteer private sector member of the Chipola Regional Work force Development Board while employed as the own er/operator of a manufac turing company before he became executive director for that board in 2002. He is also a member, rst class, of the University of Florida Wedgeworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources. When asked what drives him, Williams replied, Ive got a passion for the peo ple of this area, and I want to help. I want to not only teach people to sh, but how to get the shing pole. He sees his role on the Chipola Healthy Start Board as, just another avenue to try to help. I want to make sure we (at Chipola Healthy Start) are using a long-term view and leveraging our resourc es to get the most back for the people of this area. Chipola Healthy Start is 501(c)3 nonprot corpora tion serving Calhoun, Hol mes, Liberty, Jackson and Washington Counties. Their mission is to decrease in fant mortality and improve health outcomes for women of childbearing age and children under age 3. For information on services, call your local Healthy Start at 643-2415 for Calhoun and Liberty counties, 547-8684 for Holmes County and 5262412 for Jackson and Wash ington Counties, or call tollfree at 866-591-2852. WILLIAMS from page A1By Chris OlwellFlorida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY Steven Mark Lang apologized to the families of the two men killed during a botched home invasion of his design, but he insisted he was the innocent vic tim of vindictive police and prosecutors. Judge James Fensom sentenced Lang to spend the rest of his life in prison for his role as the alleged mastermind in the May 2010 home invasion rob bery that left two men dead. Lang received four consecutive life sentences. Though Michael Norman actu ally shot Devin Butler and Patrick Duffy inside his Southport home, it was Lang who put the two men up to the crime, according to pros ecutors, and it was Lang who was charged and convicted of murder. Randy Butler said his son left behind six brothers and sisters. Lisa Sowell, Butlers mother, called the sen tence a hollow victory. She said her son was in telligent and good-heart ed but made some bad decisions. She said Lang wasnt the only one being sentenced. Ive been sentenced to a lifetime without my son, she told Fensom. Ill never have grandchildren, and Ill never hear, I love you, mom again. Brittany Duffy said she wanted the maximum sentence for Lang, though it wouldnt bring Patrick back, and Duffys mother de scribed a bright and talented man with a solid future until he began to struggle with drug addiction. Lang was convicted based in part on testimony by two more alleged co-conspirators, Alecia Alford and Justin Polston, who pleaded guilty to charges of ac cessory to armed burglary after the fact and second-degree mur der and were sentenced to ve years and 20 years, respectively. In court Monday, Lang was de ant, calling his conviction an in justice and promising to spend the rest of his life exposing the deplorable actions of investi gators and the unconscionable actions of prosecutors. But he said he was sincerely sorry to the families of Butler and Duffy, and he apologized to his mother and Norman and Nelson, whom he called the true victims of this tragedy. Outside the courtroom after the hearing, prosecutor Larry Basford assured members of Duffys and Butlers families the case had been prosecuted ethically. Lang, Polston, Butler, Duffy and Alford planned to rob Nor man and his roommate, Daniel Nelson, of money and drugs. Norman and Nelson are charged with several counts each of drug trafcking and possession of child pornography after various amounts and types of drugs were discovered buried in their back yard, according to investigators. Authorities said they also found pornographic video footage of Lang and Norman.By Felicia KitzmillerFlorida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY The U.S. Coast Guard sought public input Mon day on an update to the Sector Mobile Area Contingency Plan that guides responses to marine pollution emergencies. In the wake of the Deepwa ter Horizon oil spill, Capt. Don Rose, commander of the USCGs Sector Mobile, said Coast Guard ofcials convened a panel to dis sect the Coast Guard response to the crisis and create a lessons learned document. The 35 sector commanders have been instructed to incorporate that informa tion into their Area Contingency Plans (ACP) after seeking public comment. Area Contingency Plans are blueprints for how incident commanders are to handle an emer gency pollution event. They con tain names and contact information on important players along with geographical information for the coastline, including sensi tive areas and boat launches and access points. It also contains general rules on proceeding with containment and cleanup. This is not a step-by-step guide for what to do in every oil spill, Rose said. The Coast Guard went through a similar process in 2008 and re ceived very little public participation. Their experience so far this year at previous meetings in Ala bama, Mississippi and Escambia County has yielded a far different result. The meeting Monday after noon in the Bay County Government Center had few attendees, but they had a lot to say, and the meeting lasted more than two hours. Most folks didnt really care about the Area Contingency Plan until a little incident we had last summer involving Deepwater Horizon sinking and exploding, Rose said. Most of the participants were emergency management ofcials from surrounding counties, including Gulf, Franklin and Okaloosa, but concerned citizens from Walton and other counties attend ed, as well. Much of the conversation cen tered on the need for the ACP to contain plans on an efcient way to distribute accurate information to local leaders and residents in the 15 coastal counties comprising Sector Mobile. Many participants, even those charged with managing response to the emergency, complained that different agencies of ten seemed out of touch with one another and issued contradictory information. Questions often were met with a bureaucratic puzzle and in a few cases demands for a formal, written Freedom of Infor mation Act request. There also were concerns about language that grants sector commanders a standing clearance to use dispersants in managing oil slicks, but fails to clarify when, where and what kind of disper sants can be used. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill also highlighted the need to have procedures in place to lay boom around important areas. There were protocols for laying boom, but they were removed sev eral years ago, Rose said. A new worst-case scenario section also will be in the new plans, which requires commanders to identify the worst possible event that could happen in their sector and stipu late what the result could be. StTEVEnN MaARK LanANG Coast Guard preparing emergency planHome invasion mastermind gets 4 life sentences

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OpinionA4 | Washington County News POSTMASTER: S S end address change to: Washington County News P .O O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 US SPS S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $18.98; 26 weeks: $27.30; 52 weeks: $46.20OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks: $23.14; 26 weeks: $34.65; 52 weeks: $57.75 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copyright 2011, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COp PYriRIGHtT NOticTICE: The entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Steve Liner, Managing E Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Brad Goodyear, Composition SupervisorHHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com Ma ANaAGING EDITOR Steve Liner: sliner@chipleypaper.comN N EWS, SpPORTS OR OpPINION news@chipleypaper.com CLa ASSIFIED & cCIRcCULaA TION Nikki Cullifer: ncullifer@chipleypaper.com 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING 850-638-0212 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on F F acebook or tweet us @W W CN N _H H CT T HaHA VE SOMETHING TO SaA Y?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the W ashington County News or HHolmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions may be addressed to Managing E Editor Steve Liner by calling 638-0212 or via email at sliner@chipleypaper.com. In the eld of Bluegrass music, one of the industrys magazines, Bluegrass Unlimited, September 2011 issue, has dedicated the entire year to a William Smith (Bill) Monroe Centennial Celebration. Sirius Radios Bluegrass Junction Channel, is billing 2011 as the Year of Bill Monroe. Throughout each broadcast day, a cross section of recordings from Bluegrass Bands, both past and present, are featured on that Satellite XM station. The prattlers keen interest in bluegrass, bluegrass gospel and the old time traditional music, simply cannot let the recognition of Bill Monroes uncommon musical life, go unnoticed. He was born September 13, 1911 near Rosine, Kentucky and died September 9, 1996, just two days short of his 85th birthday. He is buried near his birth place with the towering impressive tombstone bearing a bronze picture plaque, with the name Monroe beautifully engraved in the mammoth marker. The grave site, enclosed with coping and native rock, bears in bold lettering William Bill Monroe, with the birth and death dates prominently inscribed. The top of the vault contains much of the history of this man who achieved greatness writing songs from his heart and playing music he grew up with, an art he dearly loved. Bills father, Buck, was a farmer, cattleman, sawmill operator, coal miner and hued cross ties from the farms virgin timber. He was a buck dancer and Bill remembers how well he did the Kentucky Backstep!. Malissa, Bills mother, played ddle and accordion and reported that playing music relieved the every day pains of chronic leg swelling which constantly plagued her life. Bill was the baby of the family, with brothers Birch and Charlie and sister, Bertha, being his senior. He reportedly had poor vision as a youngster, which caused him to feel left out of a lot activities with children his own age. He was said to be a lonesome lad and painfully shy to the point of hiding in the barn when visitors came to the farm. What rescued him was the musical talent Bill inherited from his mothers side of the family. She sang old time ballads around the house in addition to adding the harmonica to the instruments she played. Then there was her brother, Pendleton Vandiver, the Uncle Pen who Monroe was to write an important song some years later. He was an old time ddle player, who would bring his ddle each time he came to visit the family for a few days at the time. After supper, Bill would get him to ddle until his father would call bed time. Bluegrass lovers recall the lyrics to this old song which remained a Bill Monroe standard throughout his career: Late in the evenin about sundown, High in a hill above the town, Uncle Pen played the ddle, Oh, how it would ring! You can hear it talk, you can hear it sing! Bills mother died when he was eight and the father died when he was fteen. He then batched it with his uncle Pen. When the uncle died in 1930, Bill, along with brothers, Birch and Charlie went to Chicago and found employment in an oil renery. The brothers played music in northern Indiana radio stations in their spare time. After Birch returned to Kentucky, Charlie and Bill teamed up as the Monroe Brothers and were able to do some recordings. When the two went separate ways, Charlie Monroe and the Kentucky Pardners became the name of his group with the second band taking the name of Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys. It is reported that Bill Monroe trained and employed one hundred and seventyve blue grass boys in his extensive history of playing music, recording and playing for public appearances. He made it to the Grand Ol Opry in Nashville in 1939 taking a band consisting of string bass, guitar, ddle and his mandolin. Record sales and personal concerts sky rocketed upon his becoming an Opry star. Bill Monroe has been labeled The Father of Bluegrass and such greats as Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs, Mac Wiseman, Chubby Wise and Del McCoury had their start with this man. Wayne Lewis holds the record as serving the longest tenure as lead singer with Bill and Kenny Baker, who just died July 8, 2011 at age 85, began working with Bill Monroe as the ddler in July 1957 and worked off and on until October 12, 1984. He reportedly recorded 237 sides with Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys between 1968 and 1984. Highlight honors in the Bill Monroe career include induction into the County Music Hall of Fame in 1970, Nashville Songwriters Association in 1971, appeared on the stage of Ford Theater in Washington, D.C. in 1979 in a televised concert for President Jimmy Carter, a 1988 honor when Blue Moon of Kentucky was designated the ofce state song by the Kentucky General Assembly and his induction into the International Bluegrass Hall of Fame in 1991. The current issue of Bluegrass Unlimited has ve feature tribute articles by various writers on this outstanding performer. One writing list twentyeight Columbia Records sides recorded in 1946-47 and further gave a combined total of one hundred and eleven songs, by titles, which the man wrote, recorded or played at festival events during his illustrious musical career. Your writer has to admit that he did not recall all of them. My musical friends in Washington County, Jerry Tyre and Rex Sowell, and Lizzie R. Lewis in Holmes County could possible score one hundred percent in remembering the songs. Miss Lizzie was president of this areas Bill Monroe Fan Club for many years and furnished much information for this writing. See you all next week.The front page of September 2011 Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine with one of Bill Monroes last pictures.2011 is Year of Bill MonroeWhen I was young, I learned that a deals a deal. Your word is your bond. Even, fair is fair. Later, when I entered public service, I am proud to say, these principals had the force of politics behind them. In fact, these tenets kept quite a few stupid ideas from ever seeing the light of day. But now, the State of Floridas leadership has decided the states word is not its bond, weve learned. Apparently, fairness can be suspended just because either we dont want to spend the money we thought wed invest or we dont like the outcome. A generation ago, Florida decided as a matter of public policy that being the Sunshine State meant, at least in part, that there should be public investment in solar energy generation. Eventually, a program was developed (and funded) to encourage home and business owners to invest in solar generation. Power utilities were to invest in smart meters that would allow solarproduced electricity to be sold by indi-viduals and businesses. Not only that, but the State promised to reimburse homeowners and businesses for their installation of solar panels. Was it a good idea? Probably not. Was it a costeffective way to generate solar power? Denitely not. Should it have been done? Lets just say I wouldnt have done it. But done it was. Agreements were signed. Twenty-two million dollars or so was allocated. Well, guess what? Now that solar panels are being installed and bills are being presented, the State of Florida has decided this is not at all cool, and they have decided not to pay. My point is that its too late for that. The State promised to pay causing businesses and homeowners to invest hard-to-come-by resources. These investors are right to cry foul! The State of Florida is all of us. Our word is our bond, and fair is fair. Should we have promised to pay? No way. Did we promise to pay? Yes, indeed. Do we owe the debt? No question. Rick Scott and the Legislature should pay up and learn the valuable lesson: be careful how you promise to spend my money!A deals a deal? Nope! YY our trusted news source online at .xtrasonline Online EXc CLUSIVEWashington county budget HHigh school football coverage CrimeCrime never takes a break. Neither do we. Scroll to the bottom of any story online to leave a comment. SSPORTSORTS Also ONLINEPERRYS p PRaA TTLEPerry Wells Wednesday, September 14, 2011 SSTEVE LLINERManaging Editor

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LocalWashington County News | A5Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Special to the NewsWashington County IFAS Extension is conducting new Master Gardener Volunteer Training this fall. To help you decide, ask yourself the following questions: Do I want to learn more about plants, growing things and gardening? Am I eager to participate in a practical and intensive training program? Do I look forward to sharing my knowledge with people in my community? Do I have enough time to attend the training and to complete my volunteer commitment? As the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County, I would like to extend to the public an invitation to join us and become part of the Washington County Master Gardeners. This year there is room for approximately 20 people to participate in the new Master Gardener training program, scheduled to begin on Sept. 20. The program will take place Every Tuesday, through Dec. 13, with the exception of Thanksgiving week. Classes will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., with one hour lunch/social break, in the east wing of the Washington County Ag. Center. A brief history and description of the Florida Master Gardener Program will follow. In 1972, an innovative extension agent in the State of Washington reasoned that well-trained volunteers could enhance his education program by providing basic horticulture information to homeowners, develop projects to enhance the community and assist him in conducting interactive educational classes and workshops. The Extension agent selected, trained, and certied volunteers as Master Gardeners. They soon succeeded in meeting his desired objectives in fact they exceeded his expectations. This led to the genesis of the Master Gardener volunteer program. Since that time, the Master Gardener program has grown and is now active in 45 states. Floridas began in 1979. The program has been a tremendous success and is now active in over half of Floridas counties. The Florida Master Gardener Program is sponsored by the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) of which the Cooperative Extension Service is a part. Just what is the Cooperative Extension Service? The motto and goal of the Cooperative Extension Service is Helping People Help Themselves. Thus, you can see how well the volunteer Master Gardener concept ts into the ultimate objectives and goals of the Extension Service. In order to be considered for this years program, you will need to do several things: 1.Complete the application form, which is available at the Washington County Extension Ofce. 2.Send a check made out to Washington County Agriculture Improvement Fund (memo Horticulture) for $125. This fee covers the materials you will use during training, including books and the graduation dinner. Materials will be ordered after the rst class. Although checks are due when applying, they will be refunded after the rst class should you need to withdraw. After the rst class, materials will be ordered, so there are no refunds. 3. Return all forms and your check by September 20, 2011 in person or by mail To request these forms, please email, call or come by the Washington County Extension Ofce at 1424 Jackson Ave., Chipley. If you have any questions, please contact County Extension Agent Matthew J. Orwat at 6386180 or mjorwat@u.edu. Master Gardener training planned APLeft to right, former President George W. Bush, former rst lady Laura Bush, former President Bill Clinton, Dr. Jill Biden and Vice President Joe Biden review the Wall of Names during the dedication of Phase 1 of the permanent Flight 93 National Memorial near the crash site in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 10. The Wall of Names features the names of those passengers and crew aboard Flight 93 who died when the plane crashed on 9/11. Funeral marks the remembrance of Flight 93 Volunteer Fireghters expected in NicevilleSpecial to The NewsMore than 240 volunteer firefighters have registered early to attend the Sixth Annual North West Florida Volunteer Firefighter Weekend Sept. 1418, at the Northwest Florida State College in Niceville. The pre-registered firefighters come from all parts of Florida south to Collier and Broward counties and across the panhandle. Early registrations have also been received from the neighboring states of Alabama and Georgia. The weekend will provide participants an opportunity to become involved in one or more of the 25 certified training classes being offered on emergency response, fire suppression and education. Live fire demonstrations and practical exercises each day will also provide an enriching educational experience for attendees and excellent photo/ reporting opportunities for members of the media. Schedule of EventsThursday Basic firefighter skill check offs during the day. Friday Hands on vehicle extrication demonstrations beginning at 6 p.m. Attacks on vehicle fires to follow. Saturday The day will be filled with search and rescue and fire attacks at the burn building Around 4:15 p.m., a demonstration of a new fire protection substance that can be applied to a home or other buildings in the event of wildfire. Vehicle extrication demonstrations will continue throughout the day. On campus, later in the evening, will be the annual banquet. Sunday Participants of the water safety class will be taking a leap of faith into the pool of the Quality Inn in full gear and air packs. Vehicle extrications will continue throughout the day, as well as various live fire demonstrations. The weekend, a cooperative effort between the NW Florida Volunteer Firefighter Weekend Council and the Region 1 Type 3 All Hazards Incident Management Team from the Florida Forest Service, promises several learning opportunities, handson training and unique experiences. More information, including registration is available from Todd W. Schroeder of the Florida Forest Service at 414-1138 or Mike Cox of the State Fire Marshals Office at (813) 918-2303. SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) The remains of those killed aboard Flight 93 in rural Pennsylvania were buried Monday in a private ceremony for family members of the 40 passengers and crew, who were joined by those who responded to the scene on Sept. 11, 2001. Nearly 500 family members, along with police, fire and emergency workers took part in the private interment at the Flight 93 National Memorial. The park was closed to the public to give them privacy. A rabbi, a Buddhist sensei, a Catholic priest and a Lutheran minister officiated as the remains, kept in three caskets in a crypt for nearly 10 years, were placed to rest after being looked after by Somerset County Coroner Wallace Miller. Carole OHare, whose mother Hilda Marcin was traveling to California to live with her daughter, said the ceremony brought some peace. Theres definitely peace of mind. I was always concerned about what would happen with the unidentified remains, OHare said. And now my feeling is theyre at peace and where they are meant to be. After the religious leaders spoke, the Somerset County Honor Guard played taps, and the American flags on each of the three dark brown caskets were folded and given to those in attendance. Family members and mourners placed flowers on the caskets. The ceremony took place at whats called the Sacred Ground site in the field at the national park. Jerry Bingham, the father of victim Mark Bingham, said the service was done just right. He thanked Miller for taking care of the unidentified remains and for all his work with the family members. Hes just a fantastic man. Were just glad that Wally Miller was here. He took care of us families and took us under his wing. Were very fortunate, Bingham said.

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LocalA6 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011NEW YORK (AP) The plot of land known for a decade as the pile, the pit and ground zero opened to the public Monday for the rst time since that terrible morning in 2001, transformed into a memorial consisting of two serene reecting pools ringed by the chiseled-inbronze names of the nearly 3,000 souls lost. The 9/11 memorial plaza opened its gates at 10 a.m. under tight, airport-style security. Visitors walked among hundreds of white oak trees on the eight-acre site and gazed at the water on the exact spots where the World Trade Centers twin towers stood. They also ran their ngers over the names of the 2,977 people killed in the terrorist attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, as well as the six who died in the bombing of the trade center in 1993. Its so surreal. When we walked in, those images were popping in my head from 10 years ago, said Laura Pajar, a pharmaceutical-industry researcher from Las Vegas. But when I saw the memorial, all of that went away. This is so peaceful, and you kind of forget about what happened and you look toward the future. Jim Drzewiecki, a volunteer reghter from Lancaster, N.Y., said he was shaking as he walked up to the memorial entrance and stood next to the pools. It makes it clear how devastating to see the number of people who lost their lives at this location, he said. He added: Im actually still shaking. It could have been me on that ight. On any one of the ights. ... Theres not much that separates us. Eileen Cristina, of Lititz, Pa., who a decade ago volunteered her services as a massage therapist to the landll workers who handled the trade center debris, was moved to tears. For me, the water element is very important, because water is so cleansing. Water can cleanse the energy of the area, she said. Visitors sat on benches and clustered for photos in front of the trees. Some wept, some embraced. Others made penciland-paper rubbings of the victims names. Sun gleamed off the bronze parapets on which the names were inscribed. The memorial plaza opened to the families of the victims for the rst time on Sunday. Jelena Watkins, whose brother died at the trade center, came from London for Sundays 10th anniversary of the attacks. At the memorial, she and her husband held up their two children so that they could see their uncles name. Luka, 5, ran his hands through the water that pools under the names. I love it. It was a huge relief to see that its actually beautiful, Watkins said. Its the right feel. Its just so right. Its so spacious. Although thousands of construction workers have come and gone from the site over the years, Monday marked the rst time that ordinary Americans without a badge, a press pass or a hard hat were able to walk the grounds where the victims were once entombed in a mountain of smoking rubble. About 7,000 people were issued tickets for opening day. Some 400,000 have reserved tickets for the coming months, memorial president Joe Daniels said. For the vast majority of the world, the images that they remember from this site are very difcult. Its the recovery period, its seeing those images of the towers falling. So when they come on now and see this place thats been transformed into a place of beauty, its exciting, Daniels said. Admission is free, but access is tightly controlled. Visitors need to obtain passes in advance, allowing them to enter at a specied time. No more than about 1,500 at a time will be allowed in. Visitors must empty their pockets, walk through a metal detector and send their handbags and backpacks through an Xray machine. The museum portion of the memorial complex is still under construction. The museum pavilion, a tilting structure that evokes the sections of the trade center facade that remained standing after the towers fell, is scheduled to open on the 11th anniversary of the attacks. Eventually visitors to the underground portion will be able to gaze at such sights as the giant slurry wall, built to keep the Hudson River from ooding the trade centers foundations, and the survivors staircase that allowed so many people to ee to safety. The cost of the memorial and museum has been put at about $700 million, with an annual operating budget of $50 million to $60 million. The nonprot organization that runs the project has raised about $400 million in private donations and is seeking federal funds so that the memorial and museum can be free of charge. The centerpiece of the memorial is the two giant, square pits and reecting pools that sit in the footprints of the two towers. The waterfalls cascading down the four walls of each fountain are the largest such fountains in North America. The letters in the names have been entirely cut out of the bronze, with only emptiness beneath them. Skyscrapers are now pushing upward all around the plaza, and the roar of construction will be a constant at the site for some time. One World Trade Center, the spire once called the Freedom Tower, is now 1,000 feet high and well on its way to becoming the tallest building in the U.S. at 1,776 feet higher even than the twin towers. The steel skeleton of the new 4 World Trade Center is 47 stories high and counting. The memorial foundation has arranged for a separate entrance for relatives of the victims and plans to set aside certain days or hours where the plaza will be open only to reghters, police ofcers and other emergency workers. You Have The Power To Change Your Life!Washington-Holmes Technical Centeris now accepting students for its Electrical Program.For more information call 850-638-1180, ext. 317757 Hoyt Street Chipley, FLwww.whtc.us this saturday in and featuring Princess Parties Call Today For Rates850-547-12772901 Miller Lane, Bonifay, Florida J.D. 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Plush..............$2055012 x 20Multi Color Comm.................$16990BOUND RUGS2x4...........$5.00 2x8.........$15.50 3x5.........$12.50 4x6.........$19.90 5x7.........$35.50 6x9.........$48.50 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL (850) 547-9289 Rapid Recovery Program for In-Patient or Out-Patient RehabCome Take A Virtual Tourwww.bonifayrehab.comnPhysical, Occupational & Speech Therapy with vital stem available daily nOutpatient Rehabilitation nStroke Recovery nCardiac Recovery nRespite Care nRestorative Care ServicesnInfusion Therapy Services nAdvanced Wound Care Services with Specialized Physician on Staff to Oversee Wound Care TherapynTerminal CarenRespiratory Therapy ServicesnPharmaceutical ServicesnDietary ServicesnPatient & Family Educational ServicesnPastoral Care ServicesnSocial Services B ONIFAY NURSING & REHAB CENTER 9/11 memorial plaza in NYC opens to publicAPVisitors make etchings of the names of victims inscribed on the wall surrounding one of the pools at the 9/11 memorial plaza in the World Trade Center site in New York on Monday, Sept. 12, the rst day the memorial was open to the public.

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LocalWashington County News | A7Wednesday, September 14, 2011By Mitch StacyAssociated Press CLEARWATER, Fla. (AP) The little injured dolphin they called Winter couldnt have come along at a better time for the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, a rustic sea life rescue center occupying the citys old sewage treatment plant. The nonprot public aquarium was about ready to go belly-up at the end of 2005, when the baby bottlenose dolphin was brought there after getting her tail tightly entangled in a crab-trap line. She lived, but her tail uke withered away, forcing the young animal to learn how to swim with just a stump and then adapt to a revolutionary prosthetic. Winters inspirational story of perseverance made her a global media star, quadrupled attendance at the aquarium and spawned a lucrative line of toys, books and other merchandise. Now Winter is a movie star. The charismatic animal plays herself in Dolphin Tale, a family-friendly 3-D movie starring Harry Connick Jr., Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson, opening Sept. 23. The production is based on Winters unlikely story of surviving the loss of her tail, then thriving and inspiring human visitors including war veterans who have lost limbs and are adapting to their own prosthetics. The story got some ctional tweaks a troubled boy (Nathan Gamble) who bonds with Winter was created as a central character who nds the gravely injured animal but the movie sticks close to the real events surrounding the loss of Winters tail and her recovery at the aquarium. And in another twist on art imitating life, in the movie Winters presence helps save the modest marine rescue center from nancial ruin. A big chunk of the lm was shot at the facility last fall. Largely what you see with her rescue, her rehabilitation, the (prosthetic) tail being made, the fact it was lmed here and Winter stars as herself, its pretty much real life, aquarium CEO David Yates says. Connick, who plays a veterinarian and director of the marine rescue hospital, says he didnt nd out the script was based on a true story until after he had read it. I thought it was somebodys creative imagination at work, he says. I was just blown away. I couldnt get over it, really, not only because of her survival and consequently thriving, but the advancements they made in human prosthetics because of it. I was just blown away that the whole thing was true. Winter wasnt expected to survive when brought to the aquarium in December 2005 and was left with a rounded stump after losing her tail. A team of more than 150 volunteers and veterinarians spent more than four months nursing her back to health around the clock. When she arrived here we didnt think she would make it through the night, says trainer Abby Stone. She was stressed, she was not physically doing well, she had been through a major ordeal. Most animals in that situation would not have made it. Winter learned how to swim without her tail amazing her handlers with a unique combination of moves that resemble an alligators undulating swimming style and a sharks side-to-side tail swipes. She uses her ippers, normally employed for steering and braking, to get moving. The prosthetic tail made of rubberized plastic and carbon ber is a wonder of modern science, with the developers, Hanger Orthopedic Groups Dan Strzempka and Kevin Carroll, having to design the intricate tail uke as well as gure out a way to keep the whole thing on her body. The solution was a sleeve created from a sticky gel composite that slips down onto her stump and creates suction when the prosthetic appendage is applied. Since Hanger got involved, Strzempka has taken new amputees to see Winter at the aquarium. Interaction with her has been especially effective in coaxing children to wear their new prosthetics, which can feel strange and uncomfortable at rst. Its amazing to see the impact she has on people, Strzempka said. When we rst got into this, we thought we could help this dolphin. Shes helped us 20 times more than we could ever help her. Winter wears the new tail only a half hour at a time, three or four times during the day, as her handlers continue to get her used to it and give her spine a break from the strain of the side-to-side swimming. She is trained to follow commands and patiently allows the prosthetic to be put on and taken off in front of adoring crowds. Director Charles Martin Smith says Winter was so social and animated that capturing her engaging behaviors on lm was relatively easy. She enjoys human contact, which he says opened up a lot of possibilities for lming people in the water with her. I spent those rst three days just walking around and learning about her, Smith says. She likes to carry toys around on her (nose), so I wrote that into the movie. She has a blue mattress that she likes to jump up on and oat around on like a little kid, so I put that in the movie. She has this signature sound that she makes that they call a tweety bird like a little high-pitched bird trill so I wrote that into the movie. Winter captivated everyone, including Freeman. The veteran actor plays the specialist who takes on the challenge of designing the new appendage for the tailless animal. Freeman had never even been near a dolphin before. Playing the doctor who was going to create the prosthesis for her, I had a lot of hands-on time with her, Freeman said. I remember one day early on when I felt we needed to get to know each other a little bit, so I coaxed her up to get some sh and keep her nearby where I could pet her and talk to her a little bit. The aquarium got a signicant expansion thanks to the movie, after Smith decided he needed a nicer pool to lm some of the water scenes. The other concrete tanks were left over from the aquariums previous life treating the citys sewage. Yates says a second aquarium building is opening in downtown Clearwater that will display the movie props. It was like a dream come true getting her story out there, because she has such an amazing story, says Stone, the trainer. 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Chipley, FL Art imitates life in Dolphin Tale APClearwater Marine Aquarium senior marine mammal trainer Abby Stone, left, shows Winter the dolphin to J.C. Barton, center, of Williamson, N.Y., and Kelsie Castagne, of Carmel, N.Y., in Clearwater, Fla. The nonprot public aquarium was about ready to go belly-up at the end of 2005 when Winter, the bottlenose dolphin was brought there after getting her tail tightly entangled in a crab-trap line. Winter plays herself in Dolphin Tale, a family-friendly 3-D movie starring Harry Connick Jr., Morgan Freeman, Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson, opening Sept. 23.

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OUTDoo OO RS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Suddenly shing has improved from one side of the county to the other. In Walton County, many redsh are being caught in Hogtown Bayou. If you have never been to Hogtown it is and old cracker settlement just north of Santa Rosa just west of U.S. 331 north. When you approach the bayou and before you cross the bridge you will turn left and there is a boat ramp. Also situated there is a pretty park with tables to picnic and bathroom facilities. Usually the bayou is full of menhaden but lately a guide I know said that white shrimp are mixed in with them. He said nd the white shrimp and you will nd the speckled trout and redsh. He said to watch for the birds diving and this time of the year they might be after shrimp. A sherman in the pass reportedly caught more than 30 ounder last week before the weather became rough. According to my calendar, September is a little early for ounder to be heading to the Gulf; October usually is the month to look for these sh. I was talking with guide Capt. Greg Burnet on the guide boat Osprey and he said a couple of his clients had a ball catching skipjacks in the Gulf before the storm last week. Most of the time shermen will turn up their noses at skipjacks. Capt. Greg said as they were returning from a redsh trip and he saw what he thought were bonito striking on the surface. He told one of his clients to pitch a topwater lure to the frenzy and before he could get a turn on the reel his line was peeling off at a furious rate. Not knowing what this sherman had he told the other client to do the same with another rod also equipped with a topwater lure. This immediately drew another strike and another line-burning run. Neither sh jumped, they just see-sawed back and forth until Capt. Greg saw the rst sh hooked and he could not believe his eyes. When they got both sh in the boat they weighed in two skipjacks at 9 and 10 pounds, respectively. Could you imagine catching these sh on a y rod?Hooked on OutdoorsSpecial to the News HeraldAnglers from across the area enjoyed a plentiful snapper season this summer. Photos like this will be published in The News Herald and online by sending them to news@ chipleypaper.com SUBMIT YOUR HUNTING AND FIs S HING PHOTOs S TO NEWs S @CHIPLEYPAPER.COM SCOTT LLINDsSEY Outdoor WriterBy STAN KIRkKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission For years sheries biologists in several states watched the eastward expansion of athead catsh popula tions from their native waters of the Midwest. Now that the species has found its way to most of the rivers of the Florida panhandle, they are here at a price. Thats the view of Dan Dobbins, a sheries biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission (FWC). Dobbins retires at the end of the month but hes spent much of his 35year career studying the effects of atheads on native sh species in the Ochlockonee River and other rivers west to the Alabama line. The rst thing you have to under stand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available, he said. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dobbins said several native spe cies are heavily impacted by at heads, including bullheads, which comprises several species of small catsh, white catsh and redbreast sunsh, commonly called river bream by anglers. Although atheads will certainly eat channel catsh, which are highly prized as a food sh, he said channel catsh numbers dont seem to be im pacted as much as the other species. From 2002-05 Dobbins said fresh water sheries staff tried to reduce the number of atheads in a 7 -mile section of the Yellow River below Interstate 10 using electroshocking boats. We went multiple times a year and removed every athead we saw. We did well the rst couple of years, re moving 20-30 sh, but then it jumped to 240 sh, he said. We realized that we couldnt keep up. Reproduction outside the area we worked was such that there was a constant supply of sh. Similarly on the Choctawhatchee River, Dobbins said staff has done baseline sampling work over the years looking at what species are present and their abundance. He said in 2002 they found only a few atheads in the upper river near the Alabama line, which were collect ed and removed. By 2004 they were picking up at heads all the way down to Highway 20. In their most recent surveys com pleted this year, he said bullheads and white catsh have virtually disap peared from the upper river while the athead population has exploded. Flatheads are now the predomi nant catsh species in the river, he said. Like them or not, Dobbins said at heads are here to stay. He said several civic organizations in towns along the Apalachicola Riv er now hold annual athead catsh tournaments. The tournaments draw anglers and their money from north Florida, south Alabama and Georgia mostly. While native catsh are typically caught on earthworms or stink baits, thats not the case with atheads. Serious athead anglers use stout tackle and small bluegills or shell cracker for bait and they sh the deeper holes after sundown. As a non-native sh, Dobbins said the standing advice for anglers is to keep any atheads they catch and never move or release any unwanted sh. PP HOTO BY FWCFWC Fisheries biologist Andy Strickland shocked this athead in the Apalachicola River.Flatheads taking overThe rst thing you have to understand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. DDan DDobbins FWC biologist Even with deer hunting season still about six weeks away, local hunters are now receiving their bounties from taxidermist shops. This deer was harvested in February and was ready for display in August. Have pictures of your mount ed deer? Email them to us at news@chipleypaper.comPage A8 Wednesday, September 14, 2011

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SP O RTs S www.chipleypaper.comSectionTALLAHASSEE (AP) Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher is counting on a bad experience leading to a good one for his fth-ranked Seminoles. Florida State (2-0) is hosting top-ranked Oklahoma on Satur day night with the memory of last seasons embarrassing 47-17 loss to the Sooners still fresh. Fisher says the biggest im provement that his team has made since last years meeting with the Sooners is maturity along with the knowledge of what it takes to beat a team such as Oklahoma. Its the rst real test of the sea son for the Seminoles, who have outscored two inferior opponents by a combined 96-10. The same can be said for Okla homa (1-0) which opened its sea son with a 47-14 win over Tulsa on Sept. 3. The Sooners had an open date last weekend. ST. PETERSBURG (AP) James Shields and the Tam pa Bay Rays got the sweep they needed to charge back into the playoff race. Shields came within two outs of his 12th complete game this season, B.J. Up ton hit his rst grand slam and the Rays routed the fad ing Boston Red Sox 9-1 on Sunday. Tampa Bay moved within 3 games of the AL wild card leaders, sweeping the threegame series to go a seasonhigh 17 games over .500 at 81-64. The Rays have won 21 games in a row when scoring ve runs or more. We needed to win these, manager Joe Maddon said. Theres no other way to look at it. Under the circumstanc es, youve got to do what we did or its pretty much almost impossible to recover. Our guys believe we can do this. Its truly not impossible. Tampa Bay was 10 games behind the New York Yankees in the wild-card standings on Aug. 7. Boston has lost ve con secutive games, its longest skid since opening the sea son 0-6, and nine of 11 over all. The teams play each other four more times, in a four-game series beginning Thursday night at Fenway Park. Were kind of in a ght right now, we know that, Red Sox manager Terry Franco na said about his teams re cent play. Its not real pretty. Well come out and ght, and hopefully play better. I al ways feel like were going to play well and when we dont, were going to x it. I still feel that way. Shields (15-10), who has won four consecutive starts en route to his career-best 15th win, allowed seven hits over 8 1-3 innings. Coming off a 5-1 complete-game victory over Texas last Monday, the right-hander was replaced by Dane De La Rosa after issuing a one-out walk in the ninth on his 121st pitch. Were back in the hunt, Shields said. They know that were right behind them. The Rays went up 8-1 on Uptons 20th homer in the fth off Matt Albers. Upton nished with four hits and walked once. He and his brother Justin of the Ari zona Diamondbacks became the rst set of siblings in major league history to both have 20 homers and 20 stolen bases in the same season. Couldnt ask for a better day, B.J. Upton said. Jon Lester (15-7) gave up four runs and eight hits over four innings for the Red Sox. Boston starting pitchers have gone ve innings or less in nine of the last 11 games. Boston is off Monday, while Tampa Bay will begin an 11-game road trip at Balti more. Rays right-hander Jeff Niemann (9-7) will go against left-hander Zach Britton (9-9). I dont think there will be a letdown, Niemann said. I think everyone knows what our goal is here. Take care of business. ... We have to win. The Red Sox did get some encouraging news: Francona said Josh Beckett, out with a sprained right ankle, is scheduled to throw off a bull pen mound Monday. After loading the bases with no outs in the rst, Tam pa Bay took a 2-0 lead on Ben Zobrists two-run single off Lester. Sean Rodriguez made it 3-0 later in the inning with a sacrice y. Lester had allowed one earned run or less in his pre vious ve starts, going 4-0 during that stretch. The lefthander threw 43 pitches in the rst and 111 overall. Rodriguez put the Rays up 4-1 with an RBI double in the third. Marco Scutaro got the Red Sox within 3-1 on a third-in ning homer. It stopped a per sonal stretch of 161 at-bats without a home run, dating to July 15 against Tampa Bay. Shields worked out of a bases-loaded, one-out jam lat er in the third when David Or tiz ied out and Josh Reddick was retired on a foul pop. The Red Sox had two on and one out in the second, but Jason Varitek hit a doubleplay grounder. Bostons Jacoby Ellsbury, who turned 28 on Sunday, ex tended his hitting streak to 16 games with a fth-inning single.Score are from Sept. 9 games across the state: Admiral Farragut 51, Shorecrest Prep 0 Alonso 26, Durant 5 American 35, Hialeah-Miami Lakes 34, OT Andrew Jackson 38, Englewood 0 Arnold 40, Amite County, Miss. 6 Astronaut 57, Episcopal 36 Atlantic Coast 50, Paxon 0 Atlantic Community 35, Boca Raton Community 32 Baker County 31, Trinity Christian-Jack sonville 28 Baker School 40, Rocky Bayou Christian 0 Baldwin 49, Stanton College Prep 29 Barron Collier 27, Southern Pines Pinecrest, N.C. 15 Bartow 21, Auburndale 14 Bartram Trail 55, Ponte Vedra 26 Bay 7, Liberty County 0 Bayshore 34, Port Charlotte 0 Berkeley Prep 38, Victory Christian 12 Bishop Kenny 28, Fletcher 14 Bishop Snyder 20, St. Joseph Academy 17 Bishop Verot 20, Cardinal Mooney 6 Bloomingdale 40, Strawberry Crest 6 Bozeman School 21, Port St. Joe 0 Bradenton Christian 55, Northside Christian 6 Bradford 50, Hawthorne 14 Bronson 52, Seven Rivers Christian 34 Cape Coral 50, Ida S. Baker 37 Cardinal Gibbons 47, Coral Glades 7 Cedar Creek Christian 42, Ocala Chris tian Academy 36 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 34, Ransom Everglades 0 Charlotte 37, Riverdale 14 Chipley 16, Blountstown 7 Christs Church 42, Seacoast Christian 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 31, Mi ami Belen Jesuit Prep 21 Clay 34, Ridgeview 27 Clearwater Central Catholic 20, Lake land Christian 6 Colonial 25, Deltona 14 Cooper City 47, West Broward 0 Coral Shores 41, Northwest Christian 6 Countryside 27, East Lake 21 Creekside 28, Mandarin 22 Crestview 32, Escambia 0 Cypress Lake 15, Lely 7 Deltona Trinity Christian 14, St. Ed wards 7 DeSoto County 34, Okeechobee 21 Dixie Hollins 47, Seminole 29 Doral Academy Charter 27, Mater Academy 21 Dr. Phillips 35, Olympia 7 Dunbar 26, Lehigh 22 East Gadsden 41, Crescent City 6 East Lee County 21, South Fort Myers 20 East Ridge 20, South Sumter 12 Ed White 68, Forrest 21 Edgewater 20, Winter Park 9 Evangelical Christian 37, LaBelle 0 Evans 40, Cypress Creek 0 Everglades 35, South Broward 12 FAMU Developmental Research 26, Walton 0 Fernandina Beach 21, Keystone Heights 15 First Baptist 55, St. Stephens Episcopal 21 Fivay 21, Springstead 14 Fleming Island 29, Nature Coast Tech 7 Florida 30, Chiles 6 Fort Myers 41, Golden Gate 9 Fort Pierce Central 17, Palm Bay 14, OT Fort White 21, Newberry 7 Franklin County 22, Graceville 14 Freeport 39, South Walton 13 Frostproof 20, Sebring 12 Ft. Walton Beach 33, Tate 0 Gainesville 28, Columbia 6 Gaither 48, Leto 3 Gateway 29, Lake Minneola High School 28 George Steinbrenner 20, East Bay 14 Gibbs 27, Lennard 0 Godby 26, Choctawhatchee 9 Hallandale 21, Oakland Park Northeast 14 Hardee 43, Avon Park 7 Hilliard 44, Harvest Community Scvool 38 Holmes County 41, Jay 12 Immokalee 39, Naples 28 Indian Rocks 42, Calvary Christian 3 Island Coast 61, Estero 0 Jefferson 22, Newsome 21 Jensen Beach 18, Eau Gallie 14 Jesuit 25, Middleton 6 Jupiter Christian 46, Pope John Paul II 13 Kathleen 9, George Jenkins 0 Keswick Christian 30, Carrollwood Day 27 Key West 40, North Miami Beach 28 Kings Academy 20, Clewiston 0 Kissimmee Osceola 42, Bishop Moore 21 Lafayette 55, Bell 20 Lake Brantley 31, Apopka 25 Lake Howell 16, Lyman 0 Lake Mary 38, Winter Springs 10 Lake Region 28, Fort Meade 27 Lake Wales Vanguard 40, All Saints 0 Lake Wales 19, Lake Gibson 16 Lake Weir 28, Belleview 7 Lakeland 49, Tenoroc 6 Lakewood 28, Blake 0 Largo 26, Pinellas Park 0 Leesburg 23, Eustis 7 Lemon Bay 56, Gateway Charter 0 Lowndes, Ga. 39, Leon 22 Madison County 42, Jefferson County 7 Mainland 28, Jones 12 Manatee 48, Sarasota Riverview 6 Matanzas 50, Florida Air Academy 13 McArthur 41, Monarch 24 Miami Central 29, Miami Washington 26 Miami Jackson 43, Braddock 8 Miami Palmetto 20, Coral Gables 19 Miami Southridge 28, Homestead 20 Middleburg 21, Nease 17 Miramar 31, Blanche Ely 9 Mitchell 26, Gulf 9 Moore Haven 21, Lake Placid 13 Mount Dora 47, Tavares 0 Mount Dora Bible 42, Leesburg The First Academy 0 Niceville 14, Pace 13 North Florida Christian 49, Agape Christian 8 North Fort Myers 21, Mariner 20 North Port 7, Braden River 6 Northview 27, Marianna 14 Nova 46, Pompano Beach 14 Oak Hall 42, Aucilla Christian 12 Oak Ridge 12, Lake Highland 6 Ocala Forest 10, Dunnellon 3 Ocala Trinity Catholic 48, Eastside 0 Ocala Vanguard 8, North Marion 2 Orlando Freedom 35, West Orange 7 Orlando The First Academy 55, John Carroll Catholic 0 Out-of-Door Academy 28, Community School of Naples 12 Oviedo 24, Sanford Seminole 2 P.K. Yonge 27, Chieand 12 Palm Harbor University 35, St. Petersburg 26 Palmetto 35, Sarasota 14 Palmetto Ridge 33, Gulf Coast 27 Park Vista Community 14, Seminole Ridge 13 Pasco 39, Land OLakes 6 Pembroke Pines 28, Piper 27, OT Pensacola Catholic 41, Gulf Breeze 35, 3OT Pensacola 29, Navarre 22 Pine Ridge 24, Port Orange Atlantic 0 Plant City 29, Tampa Freedom 7 Plant 36, Hillsborough 6 Plantation American Heritage 28, Bolles School 17 Poinciana 47, Celebration 0 Raines 34, R.E. Lee 14 Ribault 21, Terry Parker 0 Ridge Community 24, Mulberry 6 River Ridge 34, Ridgewood 0 Robinson 34, Dunedin 14 Rockledge 14, St. Cloud 7 Rutherford 7, Milton 6 Sandalwood 42, Wolfson 3 Santa Fe 40, Dixie County 13 Santa Fe Catholic 27, Bishop McLaugh lin 7 Santaluces 21, Palm Beach Lakes 7 Seffner Christian 56, Life Academy 14 Sickles 38, Wharton 21 Sneads 46, Cottondale 12 South Lake 27, Hernando 13 Southeast 33, Lakewood Ranch 13 Spanish River 20, Wellington 16 St. Augustine 27, Menendez 10 St. John Lutheran 40, Taylor 7 St. Petersburg Canterbury 43, Cam bridge Christian 42 St. Petersburg Northeast 14, Anclote 6 St. Thomas Aquinas 34, Cypress Bay 0 Sugar Land Fort Bend, Texas 58, Cen tral Florida Christian 8 Suncoast 11, Olympic Heights 8 Sunlake 36, Wiregrass Ranch 0 Suwannee 51, Hamilton County 26 Tampa Bay Tech 35, King 28 Tampa Catholic 39, Zephyrhills 13 Tarpon Springs 56, Clearwater 8 The Villages 34, Lecanto 22 Timber Creek 31, Boone 27 Treasure Coast 41, Fort Pierce West wood 12 Trenton 62, Branford 0 Umatilla 46, Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 25 Union County 37, Interlachen 14 Valdosta, Ga. 10, Lincoln 7 Valwood, Ga. 42, Munroe Day 6 Venice 63, Booker 6 Vernon 51, Wewahitchka 26 Vero Beach 42, Martin County 14 Viera 26, Cocoa Beach 0 Wakulla 30, Taylor County 21 Warner Christian 59, Father Lopez Catholic 7 Wekiva 26, East River 22 Wesley Chapel 26, St. Petersburg Catholic 14 West Florida 12, Pensacola Washington 7 West Nassau County 35, Eagles View 20 West Port 44, Citrus 20 Westminster Academy 20, Coral Springs Christian 7 Wildwood 52, Brooksville Central 0 Williston 42, Crystal River 21 Winter Haven 17, Haines City 10By Cathrine LambEditorial Assistant clamb@chipleypaper.com Going into the fourth week of high school football all local teams have won their openers. Vernon and Bonifay one their openers on August 26, Chipley won their opener September 2. The Blue Devils of Holmes County High School brought home a win from Jay last Friday night, Sep tember 9, with a score of 41-12. The Blue Devils with undefeated record of 3-0 will take on Baker at home this Friday night, September 16, at Memorial Field at 7 p.m. The Tigers of Chipley High School gave Blountstown a run for their money on Friday nigh Septem ber 2, pulling out a Chipley Tiger win with a score of 16-7. The Tigers with a undefeated record of 2-0 will take on Northview at home this Friday night, Septem ber 16, at Memorial Field at 7 p.m. The Yellow Jackets of Vernon High School brought back a win from Wewa last Friday night, September 2, with a score of 51-26. This win gives Vernon at 2-1 re cord as they take on Bozeman this Friday night, Sep tember 16, at the Vernon High School Football Field, at 7 p.m. Check back next week for more local high school football. Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Page 9 Prep FOOtballTBALL Rays sweep Red Sox with 9-1 winFSU, Oklahoma have big rematch game Spe PE CIal AL tT O The HE Ne E Ws S The Holmes County Blue Devils are shown in their opening victory against Blountstown last week. Below, crush on as Holmes High Blue Devils overcome Jay. Bottom, NADA! Jay gets nowhere against host of defending Blue Devils.Devils, Tigers, Jackets prevail A

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LocalA10 | Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011By Tom McLaughlinFlorida Freedom Newspapers SHALIMAR In the end, the cold hard truth that teenager Chris Pitcock had been murdered outweighed all the passion and argument presented on Johnathan Louvieres behalf at a Monday sentencing hearing. Louviere, 17, who in February pleaded no contest to second-degree murder as an accessory to the March 2010 killing of Pitcock, was sentenced to 183.7 months, or just over 15 years, in prison. The sentence is a minimum guideline sentence and was the one recommended by Assistant State Attorney Angela Mason, who, with Louvieres eventual cooperation, successfully prosecuted three teens for the killing of Pitcock. Tyree Washington and Kyle Walling have both been sentenced to life in prison without parole for their roles in the Pitcock murder. Preston Chavers, who will be sentenced next month, must also, under the law, be sentenced to life without parole. Bruce Miller, Louvieres attorney, told Circuit Court Judge William Stone that his clients age and degree of participation in the crime were among several factors that required the judge to depart from sentencing guidelines and reduce the recommended sentence. This should not be a difcult procedure. Justice demands there be a downward departure, he said. Pitcock was killed after he agreed to meet Washington, his friend and schoolmate, to sell him some marijuana. Washington and Chavers met Pitcock with a plan, hatched that afternoon at the food court in Santa Rosa Mall, to rob him at gunpoint. Pitcock died of a bullet wound to the side. Chavers was alleged to be the gunman. Louviere was not at the mall or at the scene of the shooting. He arrived at Washingtons backyard shortly before Washington and Chavers left to commit the robbery. Washington borrowed Louvieres gloves and used his cellphone to call Pitcock to nalize details of their meeting. Miller called on Louvieres mother, Cathy Hoffman, to testify that her son, 16 at the time of the murder, was less mature than others his age and a follower. Miller also pointed out that Louviere joined the three teens convicted in the Pitcock killing after they had already planned and begun executing their scheme to rob Pitcock of marijuana. This freight train had left the station at the mall, Miller said. And it wasnt going to stop whether or not Johnathan showed up. Miller criticized the evidence the State Attorneys Ofce used to link Louviere to the crime: The borrowed gloves and cellphone. He argued that his client did not know why the gloves or cellphone were being borrowed and that there were plenty of plausible explanations for Louviere lending them to Washington. But, he said, because the charge Louviere originally faced, felony murder, carries a state guideline of life without parole as the sentence, the price for a guilty verdict was too high to risk going to trial. Mason, who presented the victims father, David Pitcock, and a family friend as witnesses, argued that Louviere had become a participant in the crime when he lent Washington his property. The problem for this defendant was that he agreed to get on the train, she said. Stone said in announcing the sentence that he had to take into account the seriousness of the crime committed in deciding whether or not to depart from state guidelines. Im just not able to say I nd a departure is appropriate, he said. I believe I should take into consideration the seriousness of the crime. David Pitcock, who cried openly as he addressed Louviere from the witness stand, told him that he hopes he spends his time in prison reecting on the pain he had inicted upon the Pitcock family. I dont know how to take this, four of his friends, four of his friends, took his life for nothing, Pitcock said. What you did was terrible. You need to stop and think what you did. 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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B Pa A GE 1 SectionWednesday, SEpt PT EMBER 14 2011 Fashion world marks Sept. 11; show goes onTOP: The EDUN Spring 2012 collection is modeled Sunday, Sept. 11, during Fashion Week in New York. ABBOVEE RRIGhtHT : Charlotte Ronson Spring 2012 collection modeled during Fashion Week in New York. LEFtT Charlotte Ronson shows the Charlotte Ronson Spring 2012 collection modeled during Fashion Week in New York.in a range of whites, from silvery to bright. A diamond print was featured on slouch trousers paired with a matching halter. The print was carried over to several other looks, including a silk scarfdress with matching jersey leggings. Organic white mesh for a jumpsuit had shorts laser cut in a uttery petal shape. That detailing, along with the round metal trim, were all over the runway in short dresses, loose shorts, halter tops and trousers. The company, founded in 2005, produces some of its clothes in Africa. With the help of artisan nuns in Kenya known as the crochet sisters, the line includes their black, hand-knotted skirt and tted dress trimmed in leather. Hewson said in an interview before the show that Eduns latest collection is kind of innocent but tough as she tries to bring an ethical and steady, sustainable manufacturing industry to Africa. CHAR R LOTTE E R R ONSON Ronson gave her youthful customer a bit of a history lesson. She drew references from the Victorian era, including a tan suede jacket with an asymmetrical front and high neck; the 1920s, dropped-waist dresses; and the restless grunge decade of the 90s thats where the denim t in. There is a minimalist pulled back feeling to the collection, a dreamy airy lightness, punched up with vivid hues of molten lava, faded chambray, crisp whites and electric neons, said Ronson in her notes. Denim is treated in a new way, we color block, patchwork, bleach bandanna motifs on chambray and use an array of denim hues to create a water-colored plaid print. She hit some of the seasons main themes and successfully tweaked them for her trend-conscious fan. She had the oral halter-neck, button-down top blending tangerine, yellow and black on white, and the cropped crocheted top paired with a maxi skirt. NE E W YOR R K (AP) The fashion world stood still when the World Trade Center towers came down in the middle of New York Fashion Week a decade ago, but the shows went on at the anniversary with moments of reection and remembrance. On a day like this, were all American, U2s Bono said Sunday after the spring preview for Edun, the African-inspired brand he founded with his wife, Ali Hewson. In an intimate hall at the New York Public Librarys agship, guests at Victoria Beckhams show twice stopped in their tracks on the way to their seats for moments of silence one for each tower as scheduled by the designer. All Fashion Week events are proceeding as planned through Thursday, in contrast to the jarring halt of the September previews after the terrorist attacks, said Stephanie Winston Wolkoff, Lincoln Centers fashion director. On the front row at Lela Rose, she described the conicting mood on the tragedys anniversary: Today is a day that is very exciting, but there is also a certain calmness, you know? Everyone can sort of just look at each other today and know exactly what each other is thinking. The Lela Rose runway stayed dark as John Lennons Imagine played before the show, with the crowd joining in. Oscar de la Renta said he watched the anniversary unfold on TV in the morning before heading to the Lincoln Center tents. I was in tears. But I say this country is about the rebirth, all over again. Its like the phoenix bird reborn from its ashes. Linda Fargo, senior vice president of fashion at Bergdorf Goodman, wore a patriotic blue blouse and red trousers on the Beckham front row. I didnt expect to be so emotional today, but I am. Designer Tracy Reese had been scheduled for her rst New York Fashion Week show on Sept. 11, 2001, and is proud to mark the anniversary at the tents on the same date this year. At the end of the day, New York is unlike any other city in the world. Everyone worked together to pick ourselves back up. Several designers said theyve made donations to various organizations in memory of the dead, including Derek Lam to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, and Donna Karan to Action America, an initiative to turn Sept. 11 into a day of positive action and volunteerism. We remember that day 10 years ago that changed our city forever, Karan said in her show notes. We remember the courage, the inspiration, the compassion. How we came together, reafrming our strength to the world. There truly is no place anywhere like our beloved city, New York. Our inspiration. After eight days of spring previews in New York, shows move to London, then Milan and Paris. VI I CTORI RI A BE BE CKHAM M Her crisp, clean and sophisticated collection showed off her skills as a dressmaker. Beckham added several outerwear pieces to the repertoire including hooded satin jackets but she mostly stepped back from the looser silhouette that she experimented with last season. Even the dresses with pleated skirts were built with tight bodices. Beckham has made her hallmark out of well-cut geometric clothes, and its OK for her to stick with it. Its the style that suits her best, anyway, as she showed off her post-baby gure in a zip-back shift while she took it all in from the front row. In recent seasons, Beckham narrated from a perch next to the runway in an intimate townhouse venue. On Sunday, however, she was quiet in the librarys long, narrow Astor Hall. DVF F Diane von Furstenbergs spring collection, dubbed Beginnings, seemed more about renewal. The looks were fresh and breezy, but not overly frilly or frivolous. The light appears and changes everything, she said in notes for guests that included Oscar de la Renta and Valentino. Von Furstenberg was faced with a challenge from the start. As president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, she helps set the international calendar of style previews. New Yorks spring shows are always the second week of September, therefore always crossing Sept. 11. This year, on the milestone 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks, it fell on the day of von Furstenbergs usual time slot. She couldnt really change it, nor did she want to, she said in an interview earlier this week, but she had to acknowledge it, too. She found the appropriate balance by handing out American ags to the front row as she took her bow hand in hand with creative director Yvan Mispelaere. DERE ERE K LAM M Lam is dumping a new daytime wardrobe of elegant, unfussy pieces in his ladys lap. His California dreamin muse could start with brunch in skinny navy trousers with an exaggerated white cuff and silk crepe shirt under a sweater. If it were a lunch date, she could step it up with a kaleidoscope-print shirt, sweater and black, bone and yellow patchwork snake skirt. Cruising the afternoon away in the convertible, shed soak up the sunshine in his yellow and caramel leather jacket, long and lean white crocheted T-shirt and matching skirt. And, when it turns a little chilly, theres the bold coral-colored, pebble-leather trench coat. EE DUN The label founded by U2s Bono and wife Ali Hewson presented a mix of breezy, delicate orals and edgy laser-cut silks studded with rocker metal grommets. Bright color lit up the runway in a dark, cavernous warehouse, including some hand dying in indigo using a technique from Mali on a ared jacket made of recycled hemp. There were reds from a deep clay to a light salmon in African-inspired prints, tangerine in a parachute romper and solids From the Heart BB4 Community calendar and events BB5, BB6 Editors Life BB4 Rafe winner! BB3 INDEXSociety ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classieds ............................ B7

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Special to ExtraThis is the text of President Barack Obamas speech at the Kennedy Center commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, as delivered: The Bible tells us, Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. Ten years ago, America confronted one of our darkest nights. Mighty towers crumbled. Black smoke billowed up from the Pentagon. Airplane wreckage smoldered on a Pennsylvania eld. Friends and neighbors, sisters and brothers, mothers and fathers, sons and daughters they were taken from us with heartbreaking swiftness and cruelty. On September 12, 2001, we awoke to a world in which evil was closer at hand, and uncertainty clouded our future. In the decade since, much has changed for Americans. Weve known war and recession, passionate debates and political divides. We can never get back the lives that were lost on that day, or the Americans who made the ultimate sacrice in the wars that followed. And yet today, it is worth remembering what has not changed. Our character as a nation has not changed. Our faith in God and each other that has not changed. Our belief in America, born of a timeless ideal that men and women should govern themselves; that all people are created equal, and deserve the same freedom to determine their own destiny that belief, through tests and trials, has only been strengthened. These past 10 years have shown that America does not give in to fear. The rescue workers who rushed to the scene; the reghters who charged up the stairs; the passengers who stormed the cockpit these patriots dened the very nature of courage. Over the years we have also seen a more quiet form of heroism in the ladder company that lost so many men and still suits up and saves lives every day; the businesses that have rebuilt from nothing; the burn victim who has bounced back; the families that press on. Last spring, I received a letter from a woman named Suzanne Swaine. She had lost her husband and brother in the Twin Towers, and said that she had been robbed of so many would-be proud moments where a father watches their child graduate, or tend goal in a lacrosse game, or succeed academically. But her daughters are in college, the other doing well in high school. It has been 10 years of raising these girls on my own, Suzanne wrote. I could not be prouder of their strength and resilience. That spirit typies our American family. And the hopeful future for those girls is the ultimate rebuke to the hateful killers who took the life of their father. These past ten years have shown Americas resolve to defend its citizens, and our way of life. Diplomats serve in far-off posts, and intelligence professionals work tirelessly without recognition. Two million Americans have gone to war since 9/11. They have demonstrated that those who do us harm cannot hide from the reach of justice, anywhere in the world. America has been defended not by conscripts, but by citizens who choose to serve young people who signed up straight out of high school; guardsmen and reservists; workers and businesspeople; immigrants and fourth-generation soldiers. They are men and women who left behind lives of comfort for two, three, four or ve tours of duty. Too many will never come home. Those that do carry dark memories from distant places, and the legacy of fallen friends. The sacrices of these men and women, and of our military families, remind us that the wages of war are great; that while service to our nation is full of glory, war itself is never glorious. Our troops have been to lands unknown to many Americans a decade ago to Kandahar and Kabul, to Mosul and Basra. But our strength is not measured in our ability to stay in these places; it comes from our commitment to leave those lands to free people and sovereign states, and our desire to move from a decade of war to a future of peace. These 10 years have shown that we hold fast to our freedoms. Yes, we are more vigilant against those who threaten us, and there are inconveniences that come with our common defense. Debates about war and peace, about security and civil liberties have often been erce these last 10 years. But it is precisely the rigor of these debates, and our ability to resolve them in a way that honors our values and our democracy, that is a measure of our strength. Meanwhile, our open markets still provide innovators with the chance to create, our citizens are still free to speak their minds, and our souls are still enriched in churches and temples, our synagogues and mosques. These past 10 years underscore the bonds between all Americans. We have not succumbed to suspicion and we have not succumbed to mistrust. After 9/11, to his great credit, President Bush made clear what we reafrm today: The United States will never wage war against Islam or any religion. Immigrants come here from all parts of the globe. In the biggest cities and the smallest towns, in schools and workplaces, you still see people of every conceivable race, religion and ethnicity all of them pledging allegiance to the ag, all of them reaching for the same American dream e pluribus unum, out of many, we are one. These past 10 years tell a story of our resilience. The Pentagon is repaired, lled with patriots working in common purpose. Shanksville is the scene of friendships forged between residents of that town, and families who lost loved ones there. New York remains the most vibrant of capitals of arts and industry, fashion and commerce. Where the World Trade Center once stood, the sun glistens off a new tower that reaches toward the sky. Our people still work in skyscrapers. Our stadiums are lled with fans, and our parks full of children playing ball. Our airports hum with travel, and our buses and subways take millions where they need to go. Families sit down to Sunday dinner, and students prepare for school. This land pulses with the optimism of those who set out for distant shores, and the courage of those who died for human freedom. Decades from now, Americans will visit the memorials to those who were lost on 9/11. They will run their ngers over the places where the names of those we loved are carved into marble and stone, and they may wonder at the lives they led. Standing before the white headstones in Arlington, and in peaceful cemeteries and small-town squares in every corner of our country, they will pay respects to those lost in Afghanistan and Iraq. They will see the names of the fallen on bridges and statues, at gardens and schools. And they will know that nothing can break the will of a truly United States of America. They will remember that we have overcome slavery and Civil War; weve overcome bread lines and fascism; recession and riots; Communism and, yes, terrorism. They will be reminded that we are not perfect, but our democracy is durable, and that democracy reecting, as it does, the imperfections of man also gives us the opportunity to perfect our union. That is what we honor on days of national commemoration those aspects of the American experience that are enduring, and the determination to move forward as one people. Y B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Owens, Graham engagement announcedBONIFAY Mr. and Mrs. Howard Owens of Bonifay, announce the engagement of their daughter, Dr. Sherie Owens of Bonifay, to Mr. Kris Graham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Graham of Melbourne. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. Bonnie Carnley and the late Mr. Festus Carnley of Bonifay, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Owens of Bonifay. Sherie is a graduate of Graceville High School. She attended the University of Florida on an academic and athletic scholarship where she received her Bachelors in Animal Biology. She continued her studies at UF and earned her Doctorate degree in Veterinary Medicine. She is an associate veterinarian at Panhandle Veterinary Services in Chipley. The future bride-groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Otha Tucker of Melbourne and Mrs. Annie Graham and the late Mr. Don Graham of Ocala. Kris is a graduate of Eau Gallie High School in Melbourne. He attended the University of Florida and received his bachelors degree in Economics and Business. Kris is currently employed as Operations Manager with SuperValue Logistics and has been for the past three years. Kris and Sherie are planning to tie the knot at 5 p.m. on Saturday, October 1, at Little Rock Assembly of God in Bonifay. A reception will follow at the Ag Center in Bonifay. Bruner birth announcedCHIPLEY Larry and Leanne Bruner are proud to announce the birth of their son, Lucas Lloyd Bruner. He was born May 20, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. He weighed 7 pounds, 2 ounces and was 20 inches long. Lucas was welcomed home by his big brother Landon Lee Bruner. Lucas is the grandson of Lloyd and Jean Bruner of Vernon and Bill and Carol Phillips of Chipley. He is also the great-grandson of Arvie Yongue of Chipley.Johnson, Dunn nuptials toldMr. Tony Johnson & Ms. Terrie Chestnut Johnson are pleased to announce the engagement & forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Chasity Anna to Chad Nicholas Dunn, son of Jerry Dunn of Westville and Denice Sims Dunn of Bonifay. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Virginia Holland of Graceville and Kenneth Chestnut of the Poplar Springs Community and Gerald and Eleanor Johnson of Graceville. Chasity is a 2007 graduate of Chipley High School and will complete the Cosmetology program at Chipola College in January 2008. The prospective groom is the grandson of the late Rudolph and Norma Sims of Bonifay and the late Herman and Maudie Dunn of Westville. Chad is a 2007 graduate of Holmes County High School. He is currently employed at the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Greenhead. The wedding is planned for September 24, 2011, at 5 p.m. at the Chautauqua Building on Lake Defuniak in DeFuniak Springs. All family and friends are invited to attend. The couple will reside in Bonifay. Howell birth announcedGENEVA, Ala. Cory and Jessica Howell of Geneva announce the birth of their daughter, Rayna Brielle. She was born June 28, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan and weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce and was 20.5 inches long. Raynas maternal grandparents are Earl and Wanda Stafford of Bethlehem and Jim and Ellen Pollock of Ponce de Leon. Her great grandparents are Charles and Ella Baine of Westville, the late Cortez Stafford of Westville, Violet Wileman and the late Delton Wileman of Esto. Paternal grandparents are Aaron and Jean Summereld of DeFuniak Springs. Her great grandparents are the late Alter V. and Corene Cain of Leonia. RaynaAYNA BrielleRIELLE HoOWellELL SherieHERIE OWensENS, KrisRIS GrahaRAHAM LUcasCAS LloydLOYD BrRUnerNER ChasiHASITyY AnnaNNA JohnsonOHNSON, ChadHAD NicholasICHOLAS DUnnNN BirthsJoy cometh in the morning Engagements & WeddingsWEDDINGS See MorningMORNING B4

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 ExtraTo draw attention to senior nutritional issues and related problems, the local Home Instead Senior Care office is encouraging area families to dig into their recipe box, find a favorite dish, then prepare and share a meal with their favorite senior and enter that favorite recipe into a recipe contest that ends on Sept. 15. For seniors nutritional information and mealtime tips with seniors, visit www.caregiverstress. com. To enter the Craving Companionship Recipe Contest, visit www.mealsandcompanionship.com and click on the link that takes you to the Facebook page for entering the contest online. For more information, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care Office at 850-522-1919. Strong bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles are vital to healthy movement and a healthy lifestyle in animals. Now, when these functions go awry in a pet due to unhealthy habits or unfortunate circumstances, a pets quality of life can still be sustained due to the modern day procedures of orthopedics in veterinary medicine. Dr. Sharon Kerwin, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and a specialist in orthopedics and neurosurgery, says that orthopedics is the treatment or prevention of conditions affecting the bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles. Kerwin notes that orthopedic procedures in animals are much more advanced than most people are aware of. We perform many of the same types of procedures that are available for treatment of similar problems in humans, with the goal of getting the injured animal back to normal activities as quickly and comfortably as possible, Kerwin explains. Advances in anesthesia, implant technology, pain control, and physical rehabilitation have made this a great time to access top quality care for animals with injury or disease of the bones and joints. Kerwin says that two of the most common problems she sees in dogs and cats are cranial cruciate ligament disease (similar to an ACL tear in humans) and hip dysplasia. Twenty years ago, affected patients of these problems would have resulted in cases of crippling osteoarthritis. Fortunately, with todays modern conveniences and knowledgeable specialists, these patients may enjoy full recoveries. The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) at the CVM is trained and equipped to cover orthopedic problems in many different species. On the large animal side, there is an active sports medicine, lameness, and trauma service that provides arthroscopy (minimally invasive surgery using an arthroscope to treat damage in the interior of the joint) and fracture repair for horses and other large animal species, Kerwin explains. Our exotic and zoo animal service often sees birds, pocket pets, and exotic animals with bone and joint problems, many of which can be treated successfully. While dogs traditionally have been more common patients than cats, we are beginning to discover that orthopedic disease, particularly osteoarthritis, is emerging as a major health problem for cats over 10 years of age. Orthopedic diseases have not yet been confirmed to be related to just hereditary or environmental conditions. A lot of research has been targeted toward the inherited basis of the more common orthopedic diseases. Kerwin suggests that orthopedic problems can spur from both aspects. There is definitely a hereditary basis for hip dysplasia, with multiple genes involved. Kerwin says. Environment plays a big role as well, with diet and exercise as key factors involved in the development of signs of problems in affected animals. Certain types of problems are more likely to occur in certain breeds of dogs and cats. For example, the Scottish Fold breed of cat is predisposed to the development of osteoarthritis. Preventative measures are always important for owners to keep in mind, and there are many preventative measures that may help alleviate future orthopedic diseases. Kerwin suggests that the best thing you can do to prevent many diseases is to keep your pet healthy and in-shape. This will not only help to ease orthopedic diseases, but it will help in all aspects of your pets livelihood. Kerwin explains that research in dogs indicates that dogs kept in an appropriate body condition will live two years longer than their overweight counterparts, which is a very long time in dog years. In addition, their risk for osteoarthritis is much lower. Kerwin also points out the necessary environmental precautions that an owner can take on a day-to-day basis, such as allowing your trained dog to ride in the back of the truck may result in a tragic accident or even death. Always keep your pet on a leash in an unfamiliar environment to keep them out of harms way. If you have a house cat, ensure that all of the furniture is secured to the wall and will not fall in case your cat likes to explore. Kerwin is enthusiastic about where veterinary orthopedics has come, but she also understands what is possible in the future and that there are a couple of challenges to face. Although this is a great time for veterinary orthopedics, we have a lot of work left to do, Kerwin says. Educating pet owners regarding prevention of orthopedic disease is very important and an ongoing challenge. In addition, orthopedic treatments can be very expensive, and we would like to explore ways to provide the best care possible in the most cost-effective way to reach the largest number of pets. Further work is needed, particularly in cats, regarding causes of orthopedic diseases and preventive strategies. For dogs, better outcome assessments are needed to help decide which treatments are best, just as in people. The VMTH at the CVM is always eager to help educate pet owners and work with pets affected by orthopedic diseases. For more information on veterinary orthopedics, please visit www.vetmed.tamu.edu/ services/orthopedics. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http://tamunews.tamu. edu. Partners For Pets will be hosting a Spaghetti Dinner to benet the shelter on Sept. 16 from 4-8 p.m. The dinner will be held at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club House. The golf course is the old Marianna Oaks Golf Course at 3071 Hwy. 90 near the old Circle D. Art Penello of Marianna will once again be lending his culinary skills and doing the cooking for the shelter. We will also be hosting a Thirty-One Gifts party at the dinner. Thirty-One Gifts is a faith-based organization celebrating the Proverbs 31 woman. This party is being given by Ashley Slay. She will donate all of her commissions back to Partners For Pets. We will have a musician playing music at the dinner. Door prizes will be handed out. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children under 12. The shelter is going through hard times because of the bad economy so come on out, enjoy the food and music, and help support the shelter.Recipe contest set by groupModern-day orthopedics for animals Partners for Pets sets dinnerSPECIAL TO EE XTRASaturday, Sept. 3, Partners For Pets, a non-prot, no-kill animal shelter at 4011 Maintenance Drive, Marianna, presented Suzanne Speed of Albany, Ga., with a quilt she had won in their rafe. Speed had adopted one of our favorite shelter dogs, Jake, in March. Jake was a very shy dog and had been at the shelter for more than two years. Speed had driven to Marianna to adopt another dog, but when she heard Jakes story, she decided to take a chance on him. Jake had heartworms, but due to Speeds care and costly treatment, Jake is on his way to living a long and happy life. The shelter will be rafing off a saddle and television at the end of this month. Tickets remain available. RAFFLE WINNER GETsS QUILT AND COMPANION

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Are there worries or concerns in our life that are making us tense? If so, we should release them into Gods are and let Him handle them. Imagine that our cares are like helium balloons which we are struggling to hold onto. Just let go of them and let them rise up to heaven and go out of sight. Trust God to take care of them. Now of course, there may be some things which we have to do ourselves in dont need to worry about such things. Just do it and be done with it. Also, we should realize that God may not handle the worry or concern in the way that we thought He would. Again, we dont need to worry about this. We have to learn to let go of our cares and concerns and literally release them into Gods hands. Most of place, i.e., they are things we really cant control change the things in our life that we can change, and give the rest of them to God. He can handle them. Anxiety in the heart of man causes depression, but a good word makes it glad. New K.J.V. Proverbs 12:25 Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688Stephen B. Register, CPA1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 Place your ad here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida(850) 638-1830Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414This Message Courtesy OfBROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010Watch and pray that you may not enter into temptation; the spirit indeed weak. R.S.V. Matthew 26:41Place your ad here for only $8.00 per week.Let Go and Let God??????? Ways to follow Gods will Recently, I was in the hospital and then enforced bed rest. I used a part of that time to explore living out Gods will for my life. Being a nerd by inclination, I wanted to know how to know what that will was. So Scriptures in hand, I began to explore that topic. And though I am sure any of our local faith leaders or even Sunday school teachers could do a better job, here is what I came up with. First rule: God is unchangeable. His will for us is unchanging in the long term love Him, accept His Son. It only seems to change for two reasons: It is a living, daily will, and we often do not do what we should, leading us to have to work our way back to the starting point. Second rule: Love God. We are to be passionately in love with the God of our creation and salvation. Any thought we have about service or following His will needs to be carefully measured against an unbending love of God and His commandments. Among those commandments, of course, are the 10 given Moses at Sinai. But there is also those highlighted by Jesus: Love your neighbor as yourself and love the Lord God with all your mind and strength. Third rule: Seek His will. How can you possibly know what to do without considering the options? Its not so much that nding Gods will is difcult (though it can be, particularly if you approach nding Gods will the wrong way) as it is that God wants us to determine His call on our lives from a perspective of worshipful obedience. To do that, we have to actively look rather than take an attitude of, OK, Lord, what do you want me to do now? You seek Him out by consulting His Word prayerfully. That brings me to the fourth rule: Pray about it. You cannot get an answer without an earnest questioning. And you cannot earnestly question without prayer. So you need to purify yourself spiritually and talk to the Creator. Will He answer? He has promised He will. And I believe He will answer you. In fact, I pray He will show you His will and help you accept the task(s) He has for you. Have a great week. And please do me the favor of letting me know if this has helped you in your walk with Him. I love hearing about His victories (and ours through Him). Four Calvary on Gospel Music Dinner Cruise PANAMA CITY The gospel quartet, Four Calvary, will be singing on the Lady Andersons Gospel Music Dinner Cruise on Thursday September 15. Boarding begins at 6:30 p.m. and the cruise begins at 7 p.m. The Lady Anderson is located on Grand Lagoon at Thomas Drive on Panama City Beach. Come out and enjoy the all you can eat seafood buffet and gospel music. For reservations call 1-800-3600510. Four Calvary will be singing songs from their new CD. Everyone is invited to attend. Festival of the Americas CHIPLEY Saint Joseph The Worker Catholic Church is cordially inviting the community to participate in an evening of fun for the whole family. We are celebrating our Hispanic heritage month with the Festival of the Americas on Saturday, September 17, starting at 5 p.m. There will be food from different Latin American countries and we will have Latin American music to listen to and dance. There will be fun activities for everybody. Come and enjoy. Bring your family and friends and enjoy our festivity. New Orange Baptist Church Gospel Jam CHIPLEY New Orange Baptist Church will hold its monthly Gospel Jam on Saturday, September 17, at 6 p.m. The church is located 6 miles south of Chipley off Orange Hill Road, mile East on Alford Road. For more information call 6381330 or 638-1166. Refreshments will follow the sing. Broken Strings at Otter Creek Methodist Church PONCE DE LEON Broken Strings will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church, Saturday September 17, at 7 p.m., the church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Everyone is invited. Harris Chapel Gospel Sing CARYVILLE Harris Chapel will be having a gospel sing, fellowship, and worship in the Lords presence. Local talent will do the singing. This is a free event. A love offering will be taken to benet the youth of the church to help build the church of tomorrow. The sing will be held on September 17, at 5 p.m. The church is located 8 miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. Gully Springs Baptist Homecoming Gully Springs Baptist Church celebrates 94 years of serving our Lord and ministering to out community during their Homecoming celebrations on Sunday. September 18, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The Homecoming celebration will feature music from the Gully Springs Choir and others, with a visionary message from Dr. Jessie Reader. Please join with us as we celebrate the Lord leading those who planted Gully Springs Baptist Church here 94 years ago, as we praise Him for all the ways He is blessing us today, and as we look forward to being all that He would have us to be as He leads us forward for the future. Everyone is invited to come and be a part of our celebration service, which will be followed by dinner. For more information please call 850-547-3920. The church is at 2845 Highway 90 West, just 3 miles West of Bonifay. New Bethany Assembly Of God Pastor Appreciation Day VERNON New Bethany Assembly of God, located at Hinsons Crossroads, in Vernon, will be having pastor appreciation day, on Sept. 18. Bro. Vic Kolmetz will be the morning speaker. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall at 12:30. Come and be blessed. For more information call Bro. Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Northside Baptist Church Homecoming Services PONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon will be holding their Homecoming services on Sunday, September 18. Service will begin at 10 a.m. Singing will be done by Voices of Northside, with preaching being done by Larry Cummings. Dinner will immediately follow the worship service. For more information call Carol Busby at 836-4470, Lavelle Brooks at 836-4881 or Frances Cooey at 956-2822. Annette Herndon At Popular Springs Baptist Church GRACEVILLE Annette Herndon of North Georgia, recording and publishing artist with Grapevine Records and Grape Arbor Publishers will be the featured guest at Popular Springs Baptist Church, located at 1098 Lovewood Road in Graceville, on September 20, at 6 p.m. She has appeared on Daystar, TBN, Dove Broadcasting and others. Diamond award nominee for female vocalist, Annette is a gifted singer and motivational speaker who has a hart for God and a passion for prayer and is eager to share her ministries. St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church 24 th Annual St. Marys Day On behalf of Pastor White and the members of St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church, we invite you and your congregation to our 24 th Annual St. Marys Day on Sunday, September 25, at 11 a.m. for morning Worship Service. The Rev. Sylvester Robinson, Pastor of St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church from Quincy, will be our guest speaker for this great day. Hurricane-ready: coming to FloridaAs a young man, I never understood why people came to Florida for their vacations. I had spent most of my life either in the city of Chicago or in the mountains of North Georgia. Things have changed since those days, for now I have lived here in the Panhandle for almost fourteen years and it seems like home. I now know that it is a popular vacation spot because of the beautiful beaches, amusement parks, and the weather is hot and beautiful most of the year. But I also have learned some other things about Florida. Have you heard the old saying youve got a better chance of getting struck by lightning than. . .. Well in Florida you do have a better chance of getting struck by lightning than anywhere else in the world. And not only does Florida see more lightning than anywhere else in the world, after youve lived here any length of time you soon learn to be prepared for the weather to change throughout the day. It can be sunny when you go in a building, and raining when you come out ten minutes later, or visa versa. And when its hurricane season you begin to count the days until its over, this is true. There is even a sign in Tallahassee on the highway that keeps track of the days until hurricane season is over, like the one in Atlanta that counts the days until Christmas. As Im writing, hurricanes Irene and Lee have spared us, and others are following close behind. We count our blessings as one passes over us with very little damage and check on one another and send help to those who were less fortunate. All the while, realizing we tried to be prepared for the worst never knowing exactly what danger we may experience. We are then thankful after its all over and wonder if we were as prepared as we should have been. The beautiful thing about hurricanes is that they are somewhat predictable with all this new weather technology we have today. Often we are given up to a week of warning before they visit. Tornados, earthquakes, oods and res are not that polite. The sad and ugly part of a hurricane is that so many people fail to heed the warning, thinking they have a better plan and then the tragedy becomes fatal. One of the interesting things about hurricane preparation is, as Judy has to remind me often, as I complain about the money we are spending to be prepared, most of it is for things that we use everyday anyway. So there is really no great loss if the hurricane changes its course and decides not to pay us a visit. But you know there are always those who do not prepare for the one that is coming, because the one before missed us or it wasnt as bad as we thought it would be. Since Christ arose from the grave and ascended into the heavens, followers of Christ have been sharing the message of the love that God has for all people and that He sent His son, Jesus Christ to die for their sins on the cruel Roman cross. This message of love also comes with a warning that Christ will return for His Bride, the Church. Once we have left the Bible teaches that this world and those left will experience the wrath of God. The sad part of this warning is that so many have heard it many times and no longer take it serious. Others have come to the conclusion that they can handle it, because it probably will not be as bad as they say anyway. Something they dont take into consideration is that after He takes His church out, those who normally do most of the volunteer recovery work will not be here nor will the Lords grace be present as it was before. If the truth is known, we have probably not delivered a true understanding of how bad this world will be when God releases His wrath upon it. From one friend to another, please heed the warning; receive Christ today as your Lord and Savior, while there is time. Whether He returns today, next week, next year, or ten years from now, when you experience the peace that comes with being ready, you will wonder why you waited so long. For the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night (2 Peter 3:10 NKJV). But if we are prepared we are looking forward to a new heaven and new earth that the Lord is preparing where there will be no sin, separation, disappointment or death (2 Peter 3:11-13). Romans 10:9-13 promises that God is waiting to hear your prayer of repentance, which will prepare you for that day. Please prepare today by repenting of your sins and giving your life to Him. Once you do, please share with a church and be baptized and begin to grow in your new life with others who will help you and whom you can also minister to. (Please be advised that my articles are purposely meant to be challenging and at times, controversial. They should no way reect negatively on the paper in which you read it) Tim Hall is senior pastor of Gully Springs Baptist Church, three miles west of the light at State Road 79. He can be reached at timhall_2000@ yahoo.com, timothyjhall.org or c/o Gully Springs Baptist Church, P.O. Box 745, 2824 Highway 90 West, Bonifay, FL 32425. SteveTEVE LinerINER Living the Editors Life FromROM theTHE heartHEART Tim Hall Faith briefsBRIEFS Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Page 4More than monuments, that will be the legacy of 9/11 a legacy of reghters who walked into re and soldiers who signed up to serve; of workers who raised new towers, of citizens who faced down fear, most of all of children who realized the dreams of their parents. It will be said of us that we kept that faith; that we took a painful blow, and we emerged stronger than before. Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. With a just God as our guide, let us honor those who have been lost, let us rededicate ourselves to the ideals that dene our nation, and let us look to the future with hearts full of hope. May God bless the memory of those we lost, and may God bless the United States of America. MORNING from page B2

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 ExtraMr. Perry Dady Stanley, Jr., of Westville, (Royals Cross Roads Community) passed away Friday, September 2, at Flowers Hospital after a short illness. He was 80. Perry was born January 4, 1931 in Holmes County, to the late Perry Dady, Sr. and Ola Royals Stanley. He served his country in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, served as a member of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Mason for over 48 years and retired from the Florida Department of Corrections/ Caryville Work Camp. In addition to serving his country, the State of Florida, the Royals Cross Road Community, and being a loving son, brother, husband, father and friend, his most honored duty was serving his Lord Jesus Christ at Leonia Baptist Church. Through his faith, he touched the lives of so many people, he never met a stranger, always had a smile on his face and always had time to visit with everyone he met. A brother, Bonnard Stanley, and two sisters, Vina Lou Grifn and Laura Henderson, preceded him in death. Perry leaves behind his wife of 56 years, Pauline McCormick Stanley; one son and daughter-inlaw, Charlie D. Chuck and Linda Stanley, all of Westville (Royals Cross Roads Community); one sister, Ola Jean Lesuers of Pensacola; a large extended family and group of life long friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Monday, September 5, in the Leonia Baptist Church with the Rev. Rod Jones and the Rev. Stacey Stafford ofciating. Mr. Stanley lay in state at the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed at the Hurricane Creek Baptist Church cemetery with full Masonic Rites and Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Sunday, September 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.comPerry D. Stanley, Jr.Charlie Lee Miller, Jr. of Myrtle Road, Westville, passed away Saturday, September 3, from injuries sustained in an auto accident. He was 39. Charlie was born November 4, 1971, in Geneva County, Ala. He was a 1989 graduate of Geneva High School. In 1995, following his Moms career, he graduated from Wallace College School of Nursing and was employed with Wiregrass Medical Center as a Registered Nurse. He touched many lives in many different ways. Charlie enjoyed hunting and was an avid War Eagle Auburn fan. He was of the Church of God faith. Charlie was a very loving and devoted son, brother and uncle. He dearly loved his family and they in turn, also loved him. He will be greatly missed. Survivors include his parents, Charlie and Mable King Miller, Westville; three sisters, Beverly Howell and LaRita Creech (Michael), all of Samson, Shelia Fortner (Eddie), Enterprise; nieces and nephews, Amanda Moore (Keith), Shea and Marti Howell, Lee Holland (Stacie), Jamey, Halie and Logan Fortner, Garrett Seago and Landon Creech; great nephew and nieces, Kaydin and Karleigh Moore and Kynlee Holland; other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Wednesday, September 7, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Eddie Eaton and the Rev. Stacey Stafford ofciating. Burial followed in the Mt. Olive Assembly of God cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Tuesday, September 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. The family would like to say a special thank you to Mary Jane Barton, Ricky McKinney, the Mims family and anyone else they may not know about who assisted in helping to remove Charlie from the vehicle. Your act of unselsh kindness will never be forgotten. May God Bless ALL of YOU. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.comCharlie Lee Miller, Jr.Mr. Josh Junior Pat Davis, 79, of Caryville, passed away August 28, at his home. He was born April 20, 1932 in Caryville. He is preceded in death by his father, Curtis A. Brock; his mother, Cora Lee Martin Davis; three brothers, Aubrey Davis, Heston Davis, Howard Davis, and one sister, Ruby Parish. Mr. Davis is survived by his wife of 61 years, Myrtle Louise Harrell Davis of Caryville; two sons, Franklin Davis of Caryville, and Patrick Davis and wife Vicki of Caryville; one daughter, Jean Murray of Caryville; one brother, Hertis Davis and wife, Linda of Caryville; three grandchildren, Jeana and Keith Prescott, Shane and Lisa Davis, Will Spence, and six greatgrandchildren, Tiffanie, Josh, Victory, Veda, Vera, Billy. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, August 31, at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church with Elder Bobby Willis ofciating. Interment will follow in the Bethel Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.Josh J. DavisChristina Skeeter Maines Flowers, 44, of Caryville, passed away September 3, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. She was born July 7, 1967 in Winter Haven, to the late Gordon Everett Maines, Sr., and Opal LaWanda Wilson Maines. She is survived by her anc, James Gay of Caryville; a sister, Cynthia Fussell and husband, Dan, of Bonay; four brothers, Gordon Eugene Maines of Sherman, TX, Gordon Everett Maines, Jr. and wife, Jamie, of Caryville; Charles Nathan Maines and wife, Luan, of Ebro; William Anthony Bush and wife, Tiffany, of Bonifay; several nieces and nephews. Graveside services were held at 4 p.m., Monday, September 5, at New Bethany Assembly of God Church Cemetery with the Rev. Victor Fisher ofciating. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directed.Christina M. FlowersMrs. Armi Maria Niemi, 85, of Bonifay, passed away August 28, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. She was born November 3, 1925 in Iso Kyro, Finland to the late Isaac and Lempi Nylund Karhu. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Niemi is preceded in death by her husband, Elmer Niemi, and two sisters, Anne Golden and Alice Miller. Mrs. Niemi is survived by four sons, Allen Niemi and wife, Mary. of Baytown, TX; David Niemi of Houston, TX; Jim Niemi and wife, Linda, of Cleveland, TX; Henry Niemi and wife, Teresa, of Bonifay; ve grandchildren, Marcia Niemi VenHaus, Melissa Niemi, Josh Niemi, Jicole Niemi Wells, Mollie Niemi; two great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, August 31, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Shelly Chandler ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church Music Fund, 311 North Waukesha Street, Bonifay, or Holmes County Public Library, 303 North Harvey Etheridge Street, Bonifay.Armi M. NiemiFred William Evans, 64, of Plant City, passed away Tuesday, September 6. Mr. Fred was born in Sebring, on February 12, 1947, to the late Jart Ellis and Era Mae Hicks Evans. He worked as a contractor and was of the Christian faith. Mr. Fred was a family man, enjoying time with his family and passing the time shing. Preceded in death by three sons, Kurt, Tracy, and Stacy; two brothers John Edd Evans, James Evans. He is survived by three sons, David Evans, Wade Evans, of Graceville, Ronald Evans, Dayton, TN; two daughters Betty Harris, Sale Creek, TN, Deanna Evans, Graceville; three brothers, Wesley Evans, Bill Evans, Graceville, Jack Evans, Lakeland; three sisters, Shirley Goodman, Lakeland, Freda Ward, Dayton, TN, Bobbie Wamble, Dothan, AL; 13 grandchildren; two great grandchildren, and several nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m.(CDT), Friday, September 9, at the Graceville Community Church with the Rev. Dale Worley and the Rev. Charlie Chavers ofciating. Burial followed in Beulah Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Thursday, Sept. 9, from 6 to 8 p.m.Fred W. EvansElmer G. Lauen, 96, Lt. Col. retired, U. S. Air Force of Marianna died Tuesday, September 6, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan. A native of Port Arthur, TX., Mr. Lauen had resided in Marianna for the past 41 years and was a member of Eastside Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Nancy Coats Lauen. Survivors include his wife of 69 years, Mary Ceravolo Lauen of Marianna; one son, the Rev. David Lauen and wife, Christine of Bonifay; two daughters, M. Gail Schinman and husband, Gary Schinman, and Barbara G. Lauen, Lt. Col. (RET.) all of Marianna; one brother, James Eugene Lauen of Marianna; ve grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, September 9, at Eastside Baptist Church with the Rev. David Lauen, the Rev. John Rollyson and Dr. Steve Canada ofciating. Interment followed at Pinecrest Memorial Gardens. James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel will direct. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, September 8, at Eastside Baptist, 4785 Highway 90, Marianna. In lieu of owers contributions may be made to The Gideons, P O Box 293, Marianna, Fl 32447. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.james andsikesfuneralhome.com Anthony G. Herrington Mr. Anthony Grant Herrington, 55, of Westville, passed away September 6, at his home. He was born April 17, 1956, in Milton, to the late Steven Loren Herrington, Sr. and Nola Mae Grant Herrington. Mr. Herrington is survived by four sisters, Menthia Faulk and husband, Charles, of Pace; Nola Ennger and husband, Wilton, of Pensacola; Wilda Limerick and husband, Joe, of Pace; Sally Lathan and husband, Sonny, of Holt; one brother, Loren Herrington of Westville; several nieces and nephews. Services were held at 11 a.m., Saturday, September 10, at Hickory Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Chris Nelson ofciating. Interment followed in the Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Elmer G. LauenMrs. Etta Virginia Aldridge-Reddick, 67, of Grand Ridge, passed away September 6, at her daughters home in Dothan, Ala. She was born February 3, 1944 in Bonifay, to the late John Henry and Susie Virginia Bush Clark. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by her husband, James Aldridge, and four brothers, Otis Clark, John Henry Clark, Daniel Webster Clark and Dee Clark. She is survived by two daughters, Julie McLaughlin and husband, Michael, of Dothan, Ala.; and Jerrilyn Aldridge of Grand Ridge; four grandchildren, Alex, Maggie, Kayla, Sean; sister, Ella Pate of Bonifay; a sister-in-law, Myrtle Ruth Willis of GA; several nieces and nephews; special friends, Ola Lott and Daisy Barrentine; the Lovedale Baptist Church Family; Theodore Reginal Reddick. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, September 8, at Lovedale Baptist Church with the Rev. Steve Canada ofciating. Interment will follow in the Lovedale Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay, directing.Etta V. Aldridge-ReddickOn Monday, September 5, Lewis Farrell Boyett, one of the greatest men to walk this earth went to be with our beloved mother Inez Day Boyett. He was an honest peaceful man that would help anyone. He will be truly missed. He left two daughters, Michelle Boyett and Mary Whitehead; two sons, Daniel Boyett and Anthony Boyett; his faithful granddaughter Janie Helton & son-inlaw Michael Helton; two brothers Eugene Philips & Lovis Boyett; one sister Pat Nelson; 21 grand children and 29 great-great-grandchildren. Rest in peace, dear father, until we meet again. Memorialization was by cremation. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of local arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.Lewis F. Boyett ObituariesCraving Companionship Recipe ContestTo draw attention to senior nutritional issues and related problems, the local Home Instead Senior Care ofce is encouraging area families to dig into their recipe box, nd a favorite dish, then prepare and share a meal with their favorite senior and enter that favorite recipe into a recipe contest that ends on September 15. For seniors nutritional information and mealtime tips with seniors, visit www.caregiverstress.com. To enter the Craving Companionship Recipe Contest, visit www. mealsandcompanionship.com and click on the link that takes you to the Facebook page for entering the contest online. For more information, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care Ofce at (850) 522-1919.Benet Car ShowWALTON COUNTY Friends and family of Stephen Whisenhunt, Jr., will host a benet car show at the Walton County Fairgrounds, Saturday, September 17. Gates open at 11 a.m. The auction will begin at 12 p.m. The event will include Shine & Show car show featuring cars, trucks, antiques and motorcycles. There will also be an auction of various goods and services donated by local and nationally known companies and attractions such as re trucks, rafes and a delicious BBQ dinner. Car show participants need to arrive no later than 10:30 a.m., to register for the event. Trophies will be awarded for rst, second, and third place in each division, pus Best of Show, Viewers choice, and Milli, Sadie and Masons Pick. All proceeds will benet Susan May, Stephens mother, and his three children, Milli, Sadie, and Mason Whisenhunt. Volunteers and sponsors are encouraged to contact Stephanie Manning at 401-4465Chipley High School Band pizza fundraiserCHIPLEY The Chipley High School Band is kicking off their rst fundraiser of the year. Band members are currently selling Little Caesars pizza kits and cookie dough. There is a wide selection that should cover just about any taste. The selection varies and includes different types of pizza, such as deep dish and personal size to mini calzones, wings, breadsticks and pretzels. You can even stock up on breakfast items with breakfast mini calzones and cinnamon French toast sticks. For those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the selection also includes pie kits and cookie dough. The pizzas are a great buy and extremely tasty. The ingredients are all packaged separately and allow pizza acionados to control exactly what goes on their pizza creation. The pizzas are a Community briefsBRIEFS See BRIEFS B6

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraLIBRARY HOURSWausau Library: Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1 p.m. 6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: 10a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay): Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley): Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed. Sunday: Closed Vernon Library: Monday: Closed Tuesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library: Monday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MOONDAYAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 5 p.m. Coupon clipping at the Washington County Library 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group each Monday. Meetings are held at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUUESSDAYAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets every second Tuesday of the month. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blesses Trinity Catholic Church, on Hwy 177A WEDNESSDAYAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSHURSDAYAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are the fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. 10:30-11 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets the thirs Thursday of every month at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets the rst Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blesses Trinity Catholic Church, on Hwy 177A FRIRIDAYAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. every third Friday, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation, call 638-6216 or 638-6217 6 p.m. Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation is holding a get together for 50 + senior singles, widowed, or divorced on the last Friday of every month at Winn Dixie in Marianna from 6-8p.m. Come join the fun for games, prizes, snacks and you can also do some shopping. For more information call 526-4561. 6 p.m.: The Winn Dixie in Marianna is hosting a get together for Seniors (single, divorced, or widowed) on the last Friday of every month from 6-8 p.m. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUSUNDAYAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Community CAlendLENDAR BRIEFS from page B5quick and easy crowd pleaser as well, so stock up for all those Saturday football parties. Band members will be selling the pizzas until September 13. The delivery date is Friday, September 23. Please order from your favorite band member or give us a call at 638-6100, Ext. 525 or you can email us at chipleyband@gmail.com for more information. You may also order online at the band website: www.chipleyband.com. The sales will help the CHS band raise money for the many expenses incurred throughout the year. Western S S tar R R odeo Pageant VER R NO O N The Western Star Rodeo Pageant will be held on, Saturday, September 24, at the Vernon Community Center (old Vernon High School). The age groups are boys infant thru 9 years old and girls infant thru 20 years old. Registration will be, Saturday, September 3 and September 10, at the Dance Center on Highway 90 in Bonifay, from 12 to 3:30 p.m. For more information call Bernyce or Wanda at 547-3474 or (850) 768-1150Constitution Day Luncheon MARIA ARIA NNA A Thursday, September 8 in the deadline for Constitution Day luncheon reservations. The DAR/C.A.R./ SAR Constitution Day luncheon will be held on Saturday, September 17 at 11 a.m. at St. Lukes Episcopal Church in Marianna. Kenneth Brooten Jr. Esq. will speak on The U.S. Constitution Under Attack. Dutch treat: Adults $10, Children 12 and under $5. Reservations are required. C.A.R./JAC members in colonial attire free. The church is located at 4362 Highway 90 in Marianna. For more information contact Mary Robbins at Snoopyxii60@ hotmail.com or call (850) 209-4066 AA dvance A A uto Parts in BB onifay, JDR R F Car S S how BOBO NI I FAY AY Advance Auto Parts in Bonifay will be holding a free Car Show on, September 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the store to support Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Donations will be accepted on site or in the store. Drop you name in the hat to win some door prizes from our supporters. Refreshments will be provided by Ripiccis Italian Ice, courtesy of Melea and Todd Flanery. The event is sponsored and supported by: Vernon Drugs, Dees Restaurant, Hometown Automotive, Gils Auto Medic, Sims Insurance Agency, The Holiday Restaurant, Donut Land, Around The Corner Grill, M&J Automotive, Los Rancheros Mexican Restaurant, WFECA and Walmart. Picnic I I n The Park PO O NCE DE LEO O N The Ponce de Leon Park will be holding a Picnic In The Park on, September 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is a no Charge picnic there will Hamburgers, Hot Dogs Games and Swimming all for free. The Picnic is being sponsored by, Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E. Coalition, Sheriffs Department, and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.Partners For Pets SS paghetti Dinner MARIA ARIA NNA A Partners For Pets will be hosting a Spaghetti Dinner to benet the shelter on September 16 from 4:00pm to 8:00pm. The dinner will be held at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club House. The golf course is the old Marianna Oaks Golf Course at 3071 Hwy. 90 near the old Circle D. Art Penello of Marianna will once again be lending his culinary skills and doing the cooking for the shelter. We will also be hosting a ThirtyOne Gifts party at the dinner. Thirty-One Gifts is a faithbased organization Celebrating the Proverbs 31 woman. This party is being given by Ashley Slay. She will donate all of her commissions back to Partners For Pets. We will have a Musician playing music at the dinner. Door prizes will be handed out. Tickets are $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children under 12. The shelter is going thru hard times because of the bad economy so come on out, enjoy the food and music, and help support the shelter. RR odeo Pageant BOBO NI I FAY AY The Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Pageant will be held on Saturday, September 17,2011 @ HCHS auditorium. The entry fee is $45.00 per contestant. This pageant is sponsored by the HCHS band booster. You may register at HCHS on the following dates: Tuesday, September 6th 5-7 pm Saturday September 10th 10am-12pm Late registration will be on Tuesday September 13th 5-7pm. at HCHS there will be $10.00 fee added. You can also drop off any registration form off at BES, BMS, or HCHS. If you have any questions you may contact Candi Meeks at 850-547-9000. The pageant is open for any boy ages 4-9, girl ages 4-20. No residency requirement. AA ngels H H aven RR egistration for Evening of Entertainment BOBO NI I FAY AY An Angels Haven will host an evening of entertainment to showcase the talent of children ages 5 18 from the surrounding counties and communities, on November 5. If your child or a child you know would like to participate in this event in the categories of Dance, Drama, Music, modeling or Art, please call Darrell at (850) 768-1855 to register the childs act. There will be two scheduled rehearsals prior to the event. It is very important that you register your childs act before September 16 to allow proper planning and arrangements. HH unter S S afety I I nternetCompletion Course BOBO NI I FAY AY The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-Completion course in Holmes County. The Course will be at the First Baptist Church, 211 N. Waukesha Street in Bonifay. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on September 16 and 8 a.m. to noon on September 17. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report from does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satises hunter safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety course at MyFWC.com/huntersafety or by calling the FWC regional ofce in Panama City at (850) 265--3676 SS herry Cobb R R etirement RR eception VER R NO O N The community is invited to a retirement reception in honor of Mrs. Sherry Cobb, longtime Vernon City Clerk. The reception will be held on Sunday, September 18, from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Vernon Community Center. This event is being hosted by the City of Vernon and the Vernon Historical Society. Florida S S heriffs Y Y outh RR anch Golf Tournament SUSU NNY Y HI HI LLS S This year, the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch is celebrating 54 years of operation and the Washington County Sheriffs Ofce and Bay County Sheriffs Ofce will again team up to sponsor the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament, which will take place September 24, at the beautiful Sunny Hills Golf and Country Club in Washington County. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Youth Ranch takes children from troubled homes and difcult situations and gives them a safe, nurturing home and an education. It gives young men and women new hope, new dreams, and a new start to help them grow into productive citizens in our community. Our ofce staff believes strongly in this organization and each and every one of us are proud to be part of ensuring the Youth Ranch will continue to help the children of Florida in the years to come. For more information on this event and sponsorship opportunities please contact Andrea Gainey, 850-638-6115. Everett Family R R eunion BB ETH H LEH H EM The Everett Family Reunion will be held Sunday, September 25, at the Bethlehem Methodist Church Fellowship Hall starting at 11 a.m. The church is located off Highway 177 North of Bonifay, on Bethlehem Church Road. All friends and relatives are invited. Bring your favorite food and family pictures or other memories to share. Plates, utensils and ice will be furnished. For more information contact Carl Everett at 547-5855 or J. Peters at 547-3756 RR MS S O O pen H H ouse CHI HI PLEY Y Roulhac Middle School Title 1 Annual Parent Involvement and School Advisory Meeting and Open House will be held for fth grade on September 15 at 6 p.m., and Sixth to eight grade on September 26 at 6 p.m. Parents and guardians are invited to RMS for a parents involvement meeting and open house. The meeting will be used to share information about the school, and the families will then be released to travel through the school day following the students daily schedules. During the classroom visits, families will meet teachers in their classrooms where information will be given about each class to orient families to academic expectation for the year VHS HS Class of 1981 VER R NO O N Vernon High School Class of 1981 will celebrate their 30th reunion. On October 7, class members will have a oat in the Homecoming Parade and attend the football games and on October 8, meet for supper at a restaurant in Panama City. If you have any contact with a class member, let them know about the reunion plans. For more information contact Denise Brock at dbrock@ centurylink.net or Judy Basarab at judybasarab@hughes.net.Worthington family reunion HIHI NSO SO N CROSSROA ROSSROA DS S The Worthington Family Reunion will be held on October 8, at the Hinson Crossroads Fire Department. Lunch will be served around noon. BB ull R R un 5K, 1 mile Fun R R un BOBO NI I FAY AY Get your running shoes on for the Bull Run 5K and 1 mile Fun Run in conjunction with the Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo. The run will be on Saturday, October 8, at Middlebrooks Park in Bonifay. The race starts at 8 a.m. with onsite registration will be from 7 to 7:45 a.m. Pre-register with entry forms at the following places: Holmes County High School, Bonifay Elementary School, or the Bonifay Athletic Club. The course is paved and mostly at road. Entry fee is $20 for the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run. A T-shirt is guaranteed if registered by September 23. Awards for overall male/ female, master, grand masters, senior grand masters and one deep in standard 5-year age group and rst three walkers. Fun Run award for rst 3 kids 12 and under. All proceeds from the run will benet the Holmes County High School Track and Field Team, which formed last year. Restrooms are available at Middlebrooks Park. For more information, call 956-2720 or 527-5051.2011 Fall Field Day QUI UI NCY Y The University of Florida/IFAS/North Florida Research and Education Center, will host its 2011 Fall Field Day on Tuesday, October 11, beginning at 4 p.m. eastern time. This year tours will include but not limited to Deciduous Fruit and cold-hardy Citrus, Perennial Peanuts as an EcoFriendly Turf and Forage, Tomato Varieties for Florida and the Southeastern U.S., Wood energy through Pyrolysis. There will be a choice of two tours with dinner following. The eld day will be held at the NFRECQuincy, located off Pat Thomas Parkway at 155 Research Road. Registration begins at 4 p.m. This event is free to the public however pre-registration is required by Thursday, October 6. To register please visit http:// falleldday2011.eventbrite.com. Lassos and H H airbows CHI HI PLEY Y Its time to clean out the toy chest and kids closets! With Christmas around the corner, would you like an opportunity to earn some cash? The Chipley Junior Womens Club (CJWC) will hold the fall Lassos and Hairbows sale on Saturday, October 16. There will be a special pre-sale for volunteers and consignors on Friday night, October 14. Do you have you consignor number yet or do you need a new one? Please call (850) 867-3901 and start tagging. To volunteer or register visit www.chipleyjuniors. com to download information or visit and like our facebook page Chipley Junior Womans Club Lassos and Hairbows sale. The CJWC was organized in 1991 with the purpose being to provide local young women an opportunity to foster a moral, intellectual, and social culture, and to encourage movements for the betterment of society. We also encourage the value of education and public spirit in the community.

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B7| Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS UP TO $300Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted SCRAP METAL HAULINGPaying $250 & Up Buying All Types Buying All Types Of Scrap Metals Of Scrap Metals and Junk Cars and Junk Cars and Trucks. and Trucks.850-547-0224Family Operated Fully Insured Free Estimates Tree Removal Small Tract Harvesting Chipper Pruning & Trimming Aerial Truck Bobcat WorkBus: 850.415.1217 Cell: 850.573.1270Jason Morris, Owner Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Washington County, Florida Case No.: 67-11-CA-79 Centennial Bank as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Samuel Fitzsimons, IV, Catherine F. Shores, Wilshire Holding Group, Inc., a Florida corporation, 1200 Properties, Inc., a Florida corporation and any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Washington County, Florida, described as: The NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 14 West, situate, lying and being in Washington County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Washington County Courthouse, in Chipley Florida, at 11: 00 A.M. Central Time On September 19, 2011. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus funds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 31st day of August, 2011. CLERK OF COURT by: Kay McDaniel Deputy Clerk. As published in the Washington County News September 7, 14, 2011. CITY OF CHIPLEY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO CITY CODE ORDINANCE NO. 908 The Chipley City Council will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING regarding adoption of the following ordinance on Monday, September 26, 2011, at 5:15 p.m., at the City Hall Council Chambers, 1442 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, Florida. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CHIPLEY, FLORIDA, VACATING A PORTION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY ALSO KNOWN AS 2nd STREET; PROVIDING FOR CESSATION OF OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE RESPONSIBILITIES; PROVIDING FOR REVERSION OF VACATED REAL PROPERTY TO THE ADJOINING PROPERTY OWNER; PROVIDING FOR CORRECTION TO PUBLIC RECORDS OF THE CITY; PROVIDING FOR FILING OF THE ORDINANCE WITH WASHINGTON COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Adoption of this ordinance will vacate a portion of right-of-way also known as 2nd Street. All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to provide written and/or verbal comments on the matter under consideration. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hearing because of disability or physical impairments should contact the City at (850) 638-6350, 48 hours prior to the hearing. For further information pertaining to the proposed ordinance, contact Dan Miner, City Administrator. As published in the Washington County News September 14, 2011 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. DIRECTV Summer Special! 1 Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO/Starz/Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 8/15! 1-866-419-5666 LOSTJackrussell Male white with brown spots 10 years old neutered Reward $300 850-258-0309 Text FL75516 to 56654 1 Male& 1 female 18 week old, vet checked English Bulldogs for adoption at a nominal fee to a good home. Please contact: denniscole007@gmail.com if interested or for more information Coastal Bermuda Hay6x5 Rolls. Fertalized. $35 Per Roll Leave Msg. 850-859-2598 or 850-849-1269 Text FL75861 to 56654 Small horse, Bay filly approx. 58. Rides. $200.00 after 5:30. (850)547-4068 AUCTION Annual Fall Harvest Sale Saturday Sept 17, 2011-8:00 A.M. 5529 Hwy 231 N Campbell, Fla. Selling (2) Local farm dispersal. (2) Estates, bank Repos, sheriff dept, city & county surplus plus consignment. Mason Auction & Sales LLC# 642 office 263-0473 Chad 258-7652 Gerald 849-0792 www.masonauction.com AUCTION Michelle & HCs Auctions, 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday, 6PM. Miscellaneous auction 3rd Saturday Big Truckload Auction Multi-Sellers, selection varies, cash, debit/credit cards 5% buyers premium. Building has Air Conditioning. Sellers welcome. Michelle Roof Fl AU 3014 AB 2224 850-547-9140 850-326-1606 850-415-0183 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn Yard Sale Fri & Sat Sept 16th & 17th @ 2483 Comet Ln (off Sand Path Rd), Bonifay Fl. (850)547-5628. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 LAST WEEK U-Pick Grapes Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley, u pick $5.00 gallon, we pick $8.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 2 Items For Sale (1) 10ft heavy duty root rake $1750 & (1) low boy trailer.$ 2500 850-535-0711 850-258-6018 EAGLE TRADING POST, Vernon, Hwy 79 by Dollar Store Open Saturday and Sunday, 1pm-6pm. If you need it, I probably have it! Antiques, furniture, etc. (850)774-4688, (850)872-0350. Going Out of Business Sale. mos Trading Post/ produce, Vernon. Inventory, refrigeration, scales, fixtures,and much more. Call Moses 850-388-6535 Troy Built 38 Riding Mower; 3 Door Dog Box-fits big truck; new summit climber; (5)-26 Bikes-new; (850)547-9975, (352)516-1509. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CHILD CARE Opening for a loving person to work with young children. Call 547-1444 Wanted: We are accepting applications for entry level positions working with youth. If you are highly motivated and would like to help troubled youth, we are the place for you. Vacation & holiday pay, insurance and retirement package included. Applicants must be able to pass background screening and drug screening. Apply in person or call Jennie Rushing @ (850)548-5524. IndustrialManpoweris currently taking applications for PRODUCTION WORKERS AND FORKLIFT OPERATORS in Chipley, FL. Must be available Monday-Saturday. First, Second & Third Shifts Available. Candidates must have GED or High School Education and will also be required to pass a drug test and background check. For more information, call Manpower today at 334-794-7564. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Frac Sand Haulers with complete Bulk Pneumatic Rigs only. Relocate to Texas for tons of work! Fuel/Quick pay available. (800)491-9022 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Driver Up to $2500 Sign on Bonus. Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST EXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com DriverGREAT MILES! Great Pay! $1000 Sign-on for Experienced COs & $1500 Incentives for O/Os. Driver Academy Refresher Course available. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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B8| Washington County News Wednesday, September 14, 2011 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* 2005 Toyota Tundra 4X4. 4 door, white, 66.600 miles. Very clean. $ 17,500 Call 850-638-8526. PUBLIC AUCTION 150+ Spec and Dealer Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available Saturday, September 10, 10am Philadelphia, MS www.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 GA LAND SALE -17 Tracts to choose from. Creeks, pond sites, wooded, clear cut, etc. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. 2BR MH for rent with utility building, window air. 535-2657. For Sale 2 bedroom house on 3 1/2 acresoutside of Chipley City limits. Call 209-2763 & leave message! 3 Bedroom home for rent in Bonifay. Call (850)768-0217. 1282 Holley Ave 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Convenient location in Chipley. $675/mo + $650 sec.depo (850)271-9973 For Rent 2 BD/ 1BA home in the countryChipley area. Call 209-9593 & leave Message! For Rent. 4BR/1BA CH/A south of Chipley. .$750 Rent. $750 deposit. 638-7601. 2 & 3 BR $590 -$675 Greenhead Washer & Dryer Incl Some pets welcome248-0048 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath MH total electric, clean, 4101-A Douglas Ferry Rd, West of 79. No Pets. Background check required. $395. (850)547-4606. 3 Bdrm 1 1/2 Bath MH In Westville, Hwy 90. $325/mo. $200/depo References. (850)548-5541. 2BR/2BA Chipley, w/large addition on 2 acres, fenced. 2 storage buildings. Smoke free environment, no pets. $550 amonth plus deposit. Water & Sewage included. 850-258-2086. 2BD/1 1/2 BA MH CHA, well & septic. Verylarge yard, country living. 2 miles from Vernon. $350/mth. 535-9886 2BR/2BA, 3BR/2BA MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean.$500/mth $200/dep.850-638-1462& 2BD 2BA Mobile Home CH/A, hardwood floors. $200 dep $500/mth. No pets. 638-1462 3BR/2 BA MH 3/4 mile from Bonifay Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3 BR/ 2 BA Doublewide in Bonifay. Sorry No Pets Please call 850-373-8938 For rent: 2 and 3 Bdrm Mobile Homes. Deposit required. No pets. Water & sewage included. Bonifay. (850)547-5007 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Lot For Sale 1 Acre lot w/ well & septic tank. 1116 Chance Rd Chipley $22,500. 850-535-0711 or 850-258-6018 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 For Rent: Nice townhouse apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Townhouse Apt For Rent 2BD/ 1 1/2 BA 638-1918 BEAUTY/ HEALTHCARE Studio L Tanning & Spa is currently taking applications for qualified team members who are self motivated, friendly,& fun. We are accepting applications for the following positions: Massage Therapist (FL Lic) Full Specialist or cosmetologist (FL Lic), Tanning Associate ( will Train) & Esthetician( FL Lic) We have part time & full time positions available. Please pick up applications @ 1414 Main ST Suite 4 .Chipley For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 SOD & SEED on the farm, delivered or installed. Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda. West Florida Turf (850) 415-0385; 638-4860. Established 1980 $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Care-Giver with 24 years experience. IWill take care of your loved one at home or in a facility, Contact Sharon (850)535-0051, 850-849-2755 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com

PAGE 19

1| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, September 14, 2011 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS UP TO $300Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted SCRAP METAL HAULINGPaying $250 & Up Buying All Types Buying All Types Of Scrap Metals Of Scrap Metals and Junk Cars and Junk Cars and Trucks. and Trucks.850-547-0224Family Operated Fully Insured Free Estimates Tree Removal Small Tract Harvesting Chipper Pruning & Trimming Aerial Truck Bobcat WorkBus: 850.415.1217 Cell: 850.573.1270Jason Morris, Owner Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Volume 48 Number 26 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 2011 FLORIDA FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC. Your Your HOMETOWN HOMETOWN Shopping Guide Shopping Guide For Washington & For Washington & Holmes Counties Holmes Counties FREETAKE ONEGOD BLESS AM ERICA 1 Male& 1 female 18 week old, vet checked English Bulldogs for adoption at a nominal fee to a good home. Please contact: denniscole007@gmail.com if interested or for more information Coastal Bermuda Hay6x5 Rolls. Fertalized. $35 Per Roll Leave Msg. 850-859-2598 or 850-849-1269 Text FL75861 to 56654 Small horse, Bay filly approx. 58. Rides. $200.00 after 5:30. (850)547-4068 AUCTION Annual Fall Harvest Sale Saturday Sept 17, 2011-8:00 A.M. 5529 Hwy 231 N Campbell, Fla. Selling (2) Local farm dispersal. (2) Estates, bank Repos, sheriff dept, city & county surplus plus consignment. Mason Auction & Sales LLC# 642 office 263-0473 Chad 258-7652 Gerald 849-0792 www.masonauction.com AUCTION Michelle & HCs Auctions, 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday, 6PM. Miscellaneous auction 3rd Saturday Big Truckload Auction Multi-Sellers, selection varies, cash, debit/credit cards 5% buyers premium. Building has Air Conditioning. Sellers welcome. Michelle Roof Fl AU 3014 AB 2224 850-547-9140 850-326-1606 850-415-0183 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn Yard Sale Fri & Sat Sept 16th & 17th @ 2483 Comet Ln (off Sand Path Rd), Bonifay Fl. (850)547-5628. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. DIRECTV Summer Special! 1 Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO/Starz/Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free-Choice Ultimate/Premier-Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 8/15! 1-866-419-5666 LOSTJackrussell Male white with brown spots 10 years old neutered Reward $300 850-258-0309 Text FL75516 to 56654 TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classified ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? Contact us today and start turning the stuff you dont want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS BEAUTY/ HEALTHCARE Studio L Tanning & Spa is currently taking applications for qualified team members who are self motivated, friendly,& fun. We are accepting applications for the following positions: Massage Therapist (FL Lic) Full Specialist or cosmetologist (FL Lic), Tanning Associate ( will Train) & Esthetician( FL Lic) We have part time & full time positions available. Please pick up applications @ 1414 Main ST Suite 4 .Chipley For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 SOD & SEED on the farm, delivered or installed. Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda. West Florida Turf (850) 415-0385; 638-4860. Established 1980 $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Care-Giver with 24 years experience. IWill take care of your loved one at home or in a facility, Contact Sharon (850)535-0051, 850-849-2755 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

PAGE 20

2| The Weekly Advertiser Wednesday, September 14, 2011 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT 2005 Toyota Tundra 4X4. 4 door, white, 66.600 miles. Very clean. $ 17,500 Call 850-638-8526. PUBLIC AUCTION 150+ Spec and Dealer Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available Saturday, September 10, 10am Philadelphia, MS www.hendersonauction.com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2BR/2BA, 3BR/2BA MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean.$500/mth $200/dep.850-638-1462& 2BD 2BA Mobile Home CH/A, hardwood floors. $200 dep $500/mth. No pets. 638-1462 2BR MH for rent with utility building, window air. 535-2657. 3BR/2 BA MH 3/4 mile from Bonifay Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3 BR/ 2 BA Doublewide in Bonifay. Sorry No Pets Please call 850-373-8938 For rent: 2 and 3 Bdrm Mobile Homes. Deposit required. No pets. Water & sewage included. Bonifay. (850)547-5007 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. Lot For Sale 1 Acre lot w/ well & septic tank. 1116 Chance Rd Chipley $22,500. 850-535-0711 or 850-258-6018 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com For Sale 2 bedroom house on 3 1/2 acresoutside of Chipley City limits. Call 209-2763 & leave message! GA LAND SALE -17 Tracts to choose from. Creeks, pond sites, wooded, clear cut, etc. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. SAWMILLS from only $3997-MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 For Rent: Nice townhouse apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. SpaciousOne Bedroom $425.00 Two Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Townhouse Apt For Rent 2BD/ 1 1/2 BA 638-1918 3 Bedroom home for rent in Bonifay. Call (850)768-0217. 1282 Holley Ave 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Convenient location in Chipley. $675/mo + $650 sec.depo (850)271-9973 For Rent 2 BD/ 1BA home in the countryChipley area. Call 209-9593 & leave Message! For Rent. 4BR/1BA CH/A south of Chipley. .$750 Rent. $750 deposit. 638-7601. 2 & 3 BR $590 -$675 Greenhead Washer & Dryer Incl Some pets welcome248-0048 2 Bdrm/1 Bath MH total electric, clean, 4101-A Douglas Ferry Rd, West of 79. No Pets. Background check required. $395. (850)547-4606. 3 Bdrm 1 1/2 Bath MH In Westville, Hwy 90. $325/mo. $200/depo References. (850)548-5541. 2BR/2BA Chipley, w/large addition on 2 acres, fenced. 2 storage buildings. Smoke free environment, no pets. $550 amonth plus deposit. Water & Sewage included. 850-258-2086. 2BD/1 1/2 BA MH CHA, well & septic. Verylarge yard, country living. 2 miles from Vernon. $350/mth. 535-9886 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 LAST WEEK U-Pick Grapes Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley, u pick $5.00 gallon, we pick $8.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 2 Items For Sale (1) 10ft heavy duty root rake $1750 & (1) low boy trailer.$ 2500 850-535-0711 850-258-6018 EAGLE TRADING POST, Vernon, Hwy 79 by Dollar Store Open Saturday and Sunday, 1pm-6pm. If you need it, I probably have it! Antiques, furniture, etc. (850)774-4688, (850)872-0350. Going Out of Business Sale. mos Trading Post/ produce, Vernon. Inventory, refrigeration, scales, fixtures,and much more. Call Moses 850-388-6535 Troy Built 38 Riding Mower; 3 Door Dog Box-fits big truck; new summit climber; (5)-26 Bikes-new; (850)547-9975, (352)516-1509. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CHILD CARE Opening for a loving person to work with young children. Call 547-1444 IndustrialManpoweris currently taking applications for PRODUCTION WORKERS AND FORKLIFT OPERATORS in Chipley, FL. Must be available Monday-Saturday. First, Second & Third Shifts Available. Candidates must have GED or High School Education and will also be required to pass a drug test and background check. For more information, call Manpower today at 334-794-7564. Wanted: We are accepting applications for entry level positions working with youth. If you are highly motivated and would like to help troubled youth, we are the place for you. Vacation & holiday pay, insurance and retirement package included. Applicants must be able to pass background screening and drug screening. Apply in person or call Jennie Rushing @ (850)548-5524. $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Frac Sand Haulers with complete Bulk Pneumatic Rigs only. Relocate to Texas for tons of work! Fuel/Quick pay available. (800)491-9022 A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Driver Up to $2500 Sign on Bonus. Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST EXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com DriverGREAT MILES! Great Pay! $1000 Sign-on for Experienced COs & $1500 Incentives for O/Os. Driver Academy Refresher Course available. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99*


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