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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main: Business
 Section A: Main: Winter Garden
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Ocoee
 Section A: Main: Windermere
 Section A: Main: Dr. Phillips
 Section A: Main: Social
 Section A: Main: Entertainment
 Section B: Elections
 Section B: Winter Garden Elect...
 Section B: Ocoee Elections
 Section B: Windermere Election...
 Section B: Oakland Elections
 Section B: Windermere Elections...
 Section C
 Section C: Sports
 Section C: Golf
 Section C: Schools
 Section D: Classifieds














The West Orange times
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028310/00061
 Material Information
Title: The West Orange times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Winter Garden Times, Inc.
Place of Publication: Winter Garden Fla
Creation Date: March 2, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Garden (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Garden
Coordinates: 28.560278 x -81.584167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Descrpition based on: Vol. 54, no. 12 (Apr. 7, 1988).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000974605
oclc - 33887682
notis - AEV0236
lccn - sn 95047487
System ID: UF00028310:00061

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: Business
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: Winter Garden
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
    Section A: Main: Ocoee
        page A 10
        page A 11
    Section A: Main: Windermere
        page A 12
    Section A: Main: Dr. Phillips
        page A 13
    Section A: Main: Social
        page A 14
    Section A: Main: Entertainment
        page A 15
        page A 16
    Section B: Elections
        page B 1
    Section B: Winter Garden Elections
        page B 2
    Section B: Ocoee Elections
        page B 3
    Section B: Windermere Elections
        page B 4
    Section B: Oakland Elections
        page B 5
    Section B: Windermere Elections continued
        page B 6
    Section C
        page C 1
    Section C: Sports
        page C 2
        page C 3
    Section C: Golf
        page C 4
    Section C: Schools
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: Classifieds
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
Full Text







ti1m~lW6I1


.. .West Orange


Times


Crawford Tire
Relay team plans
2 events Saturday
The Crawford Tire Relay For
Life team will hold two events
this Saturday, March 4, at the Elks
Club on Ninth Street in Winter
Garden. All proceeds will go to the
American Cancer Society.
A rummage sale will take place
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To donate
items ahead of time, call 407-656-
5125 and leave a message.
A barbecue and horseshoe
tournament will start at noon.
Chicken and ribs and combo din-
ners will be for sale. This is being
sponsored for the sixth year by
Apple Air Conditioning, which
is supplying everything and doing
all the cooking.

Community yard sale
this Sat. at OHS
The Varsity Club at Olympia
High School will sponsor a com-
munity yard sale this Saturday,
March 4, from 7-11 a.m. in the
parking lot.
The club is renting booth space
at the sale for $10. Individuals in-
terested in joining the sale should
e-mail Colleen Windt at mit-
tonc @ocps.net.

Tibet-Butler Preserve
hosting Backyard
Habitat Fest March 4
The Tibet-Butler Nature Pre-
serve is sponsoring a Backyard
Habitat Fest this Saturday, March
4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The community is invited to
join this free program, explore
the preserve, learn how to create
a backyard habitat, participate in
environmental programs and take
guided hikes. There will be a va-
riety of exhibits. live animals to
see, craft active aies, a face-paint-,
ing booth, door prizes, snacks and
music for dancing.
The nature preserve is operat-
ed by Orange County Parks and
Recreation and is located at 8777
County Road 535 (Winter Gar-
den-Vineland) in Orlando. For
details, call 407-876-6696 or go
to www.orangecountyparks.net.

Library to host
program on stress
on Saturday, March 4
Dr. Kirti Kalidas from the Cen-
ter for Natural and Integrative
Medicines will discuss how
adrenal hormones, declining thy-
roid and sex hormones affect
weight and stress at the South-
west Library this Saturday, March
4, at 2 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call the library at 407-835-
7323

Business After Hours
is March 9
The West Orange Chamber of
Commerce \\ill hold its March
Business After Hours at Steak
and Ale. 7320 W. Colonial Drive,
on Thursday March 9, from 5:30-
7p.m.

WO Jr. Service
League to host
Roaring '20s dinner-
dance this Saturday
The West Orange Junior Ser-
vice League -, ill host its annual
fund-raiser this Saturday. March
4. at Windermere Country Club
from 7 p.m. to midnight. This
year, the dinner, dance and auc-
tion will have a Roaring '20s
theme, and guests are asked to
dress in social attire or 1920s cos-
tumes Entertainment \\ill feature
a jazz band, and buckets are $100
each.
For details or reservations, call
Elisa Davis at 407-909-1234 or
Lori Tyson at 407-509-444-0.

Christian Service
Center needs
donations .
The West Orange Christian
Sen ice Center is asking the com-
munity to please donate the fol-
lowing items that are needed:
Kool-Aid juice boxes, Capri Sun
juice bo.xes. popcorn, spaghetti
and spaghetti sauce, potato chips.
diapers. bab. wipes, sunscreen.
tissue paper, tempera paints. copy
paper, toilet paper, colored mark-
ets, scissors and'tewsprint paper.
The center is located at 300 W.
Franklin St. in Ocoee. For more
information, call 407-656-6678.


Winter Garden denies

anti-rail resolution


Photo by Amy Quesinberry
Dr. Sonia Warner, principal of Tildenville Elementary School, holds the elevations for the school's new cam-
pus. Students and staff have relocated to the former West Orange Ninth-Grade Center for the 2005-06
school year while the new facility is being built on the 100-year-old TES property in Winter Garden.


New facility, maybe new name

for Tildenville Elementary


After 100 years in
education, TES hopes to
change misperceptions
about the school by
changing the name to
Tilden Oaks Elementary.

By Amy Quesinberry

The school has been nestled in a
small community among brick roads
and towering trees for decades, some-
times struggling for an identity but al-
ways providing consistent education
for its students, a majority of them
Hispanic.
Tildenville Elementary School -
located on Tildenville School Road
between Winter Garden and Oakland
- was the first designated dual-lan-
guage magnet elementary school in
Orange County, has won the Golden
School and 5-Star School awards from
the state's Department of Education
and has received a $1 million DOE
Title 3 Dual Language grant, in addi-
tion to monies from the Golden Rule
and Ella B. Sadler Trust.
Yet many parents in the TES atten-
dance zone send their children else-
where.


Karen Lougheed is out to change
the misperceptions she said people
have about this 100-year-old com-
munity school even if it means
changing the name.
Lougheed, who currently serves on
the School Advisory Council, has been
a Tildenville parent and volunteer for
12 years. Thi is her last, though, be-
cause her youngest child is in fifth
grade.
In a recent presentation to The West
Orange Tmiiit. Lougheed said only
nine percent of the children living in
the school zone attend Tildefiville,
which is known, she added, as a mi-
grant school.
When Whispering Oak Elementary
was built to relieve overcrowding at
Tildenville and Lake Whitney ele-
mentaries, this further shifted TES's
demographics.
In addition, the state gave the school
a C grade last year (missing its previ-
ous-year grade of B by three points),
which only aggravates the school's
negative reputation, she said.
A new facility is being built, and
with it comes the opportunity to "re-
brand" the school to the community.
For the 2005-06 school year, stu-
dents are attending classes at the West
Orange High Ninth-Grade Center


Ocoee to host Safety Spring Fling


- The community is
invited to this family
event focusing on child
safety later this month.

By Mary Anne Swickerath
Nancy Parker in her second-to-last
meeting as an Ocoee City Commis-
sioner last week encouraged the com-
munity to attend the Safety Spring
Fling on Saturday, March 25, from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. on'the shores of Starke
Lake. This safety event, geared toward
families,. is being sponsored by the
Ocoee Child Protection Recommen-
dation Committee, the city of Ocoee
and the Ocoee police and fire depart-
ments.
Presentations and information will be
available on Intemet safety, swimming
pool safety. fire safety and bicycle safe-
ty, and child car seats will be inspect-
ed by appointment.
This is an event for the entire fam-
ily," said Parker. "There will be games
and activities that focus on safety."
Special guests will be McGruff the
Crime Dog, the OFD puppets and Tug-
ger, the Jeep Who Wanted To Fly.
Parker also took the opportunity at
this meeting to comment on her nine
years (four full terms) as District 4
commissioner.
"As I leave this office, I leave with
no regrets," she said. "I've really en-
joy ed my years of ser ice and working
with the citizens. I take full responsi-
bility, gladly, for the decisions I've
made and for the participation in city
government.
She listed examples of the progress
made in the cirt during her tenure, in-
cluding the purchase and development
of the Coke Property, the new Thomas


Ison Veteran and Senior Center, the
new fire stations, the improvements to
Maguire Road, the city's part, in the
West Orange Health Alliance and the
establishment of the city's first Com-
munity Redevelopment Agency for
the West Colonial Drive/Maguire Road
area.
She praised city staff and City Man-
ager Rob Frank.
"Thanks," she said. "It's been a good
nine years. It's been a pleasure to serve
you."
In other business, the elected offi7
cials:
passed two resolutions giving the
city the option of putting stormwater
utility fees and solid waste fees on the
County Tax Roll as a non-ad valorem
uniform method of collection. The city
has asked staff to bring back a sliding
scale of stormwater utility fee rates
that would assess fees based on square
footage. ,For example, the larger the
home the larger the fee. But this slid-
ing scale of fees was not brought to
the commission last week but is sched-
uled to be discussed in an upcoming
meeting.
heard a presentation by Fire Chief
Richard Firstnerwho officiated at the
departmental promotions of Kenneth
Strickland to lieutenant and Brian Shiv-
er and Christopher Atlaski to engineer.
honored the 2005 Ocoee Police
Officer of the Year, Sgt. Steve Mc-
Cosker, and the 2005 OPD Volunteer
of the Year, Harrison Grogan, a Police
Explorer. These awards were voted on
. by the Citizens' Advisory Council for
the department.
recognized the volunteer work of
the entire Ocoee Police Explorer
Group, a group whose team at a recent
Explorer Camp placed third in the state

(See Ocoee, 3A)


while the replacement school is being
built in its place. The new facility will
open this fall for the 2006-07 school.
year with a capacity of 830.
A school was first built on that site,
which fronts Brick Road, in 1906.
Classes started a few months behind
schedule, the
students were
by fields. Thi
had two store,
attractive bell tower on top..
A larger brick-building was later
constructed on the same site to serve
Winter Garden and Oakland, and in
1918, that facility, called Oakland-
Winter Garden School, was expand-
ed.
The name was changed to
Tildenville Elementary in the late
1920s in honor of the Tilden family.
A new facility was constructed in
1964. Two more buildings were added
in 1999, and these were incorporated
into the new plan.
"This school has so much history, so
much heart," Lougheed said.
One thing the principal would like
to see on the new building is a repli-
ca of the original bell tower.
According to Dr. Sonia Warner,

(See Tildenville, 3A)


Commissioner Rod
Reynolds cited a
non-existent study in
criticizing commuter rail.

By Michael Laval

Winter Garden will not be making
a stand anytime soon on commuter
rail.
,Citizens in attendance responded
with loud applause last Thursday at
Tanner Hall when the City Commis-
sion voted 3-2 against passing a res-
olution that would have stated Win-
ter Garden's opposition to the pro-
posed mass transit project.
While the majority of the commis-
sion opted to wait until more infor-
mation is available, commissioners
Carol Nichols and Rod Reynolds
pushed for the city to take an imme-
diate stand against the commuter rail
proposal, citing cost figures from a
study that has since proven to-be non-
existent.
"You're talking about a rail that
will cost Winter Garden citizens dear-
ly," said Nichols.
Reynolds told the commission that
commuter rail would cost each Win-
ter Garden resident more than
$15,000. He cited as proof a study
conducted by Dr. Randall Holcombe,
a Florida State University professor
and a member of Gov. Jeb Bush's
Council of Economic Advisors.
The West Orange Times contacted


the-envelope calculation that I did
based on incomplete information,"
Holcombe said. "It was part of an e-
mail exchange I had with Doug Guet-
'zloe. I did not do a study on the cost
of that project [commuter rail], and I
do not have an estimate of what the
cost would be to Winter Garden res-
idents."
Holcombe added that he supports
Guetzloe's efforts to oppose com-
muter rail and said he believes rail
transit is usually not cost-effective.
Reynolds first motioned for the res-
olution at the commission's Dec. 22
meeting and again at the Feb. 9 meet-
ing after the elected officials heard
presentations for and against com-
muter rail. The commission waited
until last Thursday to vote after lis-
tening to guest speakers from Orange
County government and MqtroPlan


Orlando.
If passed later this year by the Or-
ange County Board of County Com-
missioners, the 61-mile commuter rail
would be built to stretch from De-
Land, through the metro Orlando area,
to Kissimmee. The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation estimates the
project will cost $473.5 million.
Jim Harrison, Orange County di-
rector of growth management, told
the commission last Thursday it was
too early for Winter Garden to make
a decision.
"We are not asking for a resolution
of support or no support," he said.
"There is not enough information [on
the project] yet."
Harrison and MetroPlan Orlando
representative Bob O'Malley both
said it would take another 6-12
months before enough information
on commuter rail would be available
to make an informed decision.
"Until we hear the whole matter,
I'Im not going to vote against it,"
Commissioner Mildred Dixon agreed.
Nichols sought to discredit the no-
tion that Winter Garden could stand
to lose state and county funding if it
opposed commuter rail, but City Man-
ager Michael Bollhoefer said a back-
lash against Winter Garden was a def-
inite possibility that could cost the
city millions of dollars.
"Let's take a step back before we
risk losing funds," Bollhoefer said.
"The bottom line is, there's no need
to take a stance now. It [the commuter
_raill could die its own death anyway.
ng to make a political
]Hliih mmuter rail before the
.-- available, Bollhoefer
added, could cost Winter Garden $9
million in TRIPS funds, as well as
money for improvements to State
Road 545 and East Plant Street.
Commissioner Theo Graham sup-
ported Bollhoefer.
"I was going to say similar to what
Mike said," Graham told the com-
mission. "We need more time. They
[state and county agencies] can pull it
or take it [funding] away."
In other business, the elected offi-
cials:
voted 3-2, with Nichols and
Reynolds casting the dissenting votes,
to appoint Harold Bouler, Bradley
Lomneck and Joseph Skubas to the
city Code Enforcement and Nuisance
Abatement Board.
approved the first reading of a

(See Winter Garden, 3A)


Lakeview teacher is OCPS

Teacher of the Year


David Warren, a seventh-grade
math teacher at Lakeview Middle
School, has been named Orange
County Public Schools Teacher of
the Year. The announcement was
made at the annual Teacher of the
Year ceremony, which celebrates
the contributions of classroom
teachers who demonstrate a supe-
rior capacity to inspire a love of
learning in students of all back-
grounds and abilities.
When he talked to The West Or-
ange Times on Tuesday, Warren
said: "The Teacher of the Year
Award is a great honor and inspi-
ration. Through the county's cele-
bration of teachers, I am inspired
to continue teaching my students a
lifelong love of learning. I wish to
show them how 'work that's fun
gets done.'"
Warren has been teaching for
three years. His colleagues praise
him for his creative spirit, sense of
humor and willingness to work
hard. Through the use of songs,


poetry or dance, Warren has helped
his students learn how to do an al-
gebraic equation. He creates in stu-
dents the desire to explore and dis-
cover the wonderful and marvelous
secrets of math.
He described his philosophy of
teaching this way: "There are many
different and successful philoso-
phies that support effective learn-
ing; however, when it comes down
to what is most important, the best
philosophy is to simply teach from
the heart. Master teachers love
what they do and fill their class-
rooms with humor, warmth and
meaning. This is my teaching phi-
losophy; this is why I am passion-
ate about teaching."
Principal Debra Lucas said: "Ev-
ery student is a success in Dave's
classroom. He challenges them to
reach their highest potential, and
he instills within them a sense of
confidence and pride."
Warren is now in the running for
Florida Teacher of the Year.


DAVID WARREN
School districts from across the
state submit nominees, and the
winner will be announced in Au-
gust.


Two-day-a-week lawn watering rule becomes effective March 1


The St. Johns River Water Man-
agement District's lawn and landscape
irrigation rule limiting irrigation to no
more than two days a week, before 10
a.m. or after 4 p.m., became effective
March 1. The rule applies throughout
the District's 18-county area.
Lawn and landscape irrigation can
account for more than 50 percent of
total water use at residential and com-


mercial locations. Efficient irrigation
can save thousands of gallons of wa-
ter weekly for businesses and home-
owners.
"Most people don't realize how
much water is used for lawn and land-
scape irrigation," said Alfred Canepa,
assistant director of the SJWMD's de-
partment of resource management.
"Nor do they realize that they may be


over-watering their lawns. The rule
helps ensure the efficient use of wa-
ter for irrigation and allows use of an
adequate amount of water to maintain
healthy lawns," said Canepa.
The rule applies to lawn and land-
scape irrigation not regulated by a dis-
trict-issued consumptive-use permit.

(See Water, 3A)


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2A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


Obituaries


DANNY L. AMBURGEY, 54; Ocoee,
died Feb. 20. He was born in Detroit in
1951. He was a tire technician. Sur-
vivors: wife, Darline; sons, Dunstan,
Ocoee, David, Orlando; brother,
Michael, Groveland; grandchildren,
Brandon M. Townson, Paige C. Town-
son, Austan L., all of Ocoee, Dakota K.,
Deborah J., Daniell N., all of Orlando.
Loomis Family Funeral Home, Apop-
ka.
CHARLOTTE A. WATERMAN
BAGLEY, 82, Orlando, died Feb. 22.
She was a Certified Genealogical Re-
searcher, a member of Daughters of
the American Revolution and a mem-
ber of the, Ocoee Ward of the LDS
Church. She was preceded in death
by her husband, James. Survivors:
son, James Jr.; daughter, Sandra
Bagley Ogden. Baldwin-Fairchild Fu-
neral Home, Winter Garden Chapel;
Florida National Cemetery.
STANLEY LYTLE BENEDICT SR.,
78, formerly of Health Center of Win-
dermere, died Feb. 20. He was born in
1927 in Ravenhurst, Staten Island,
N.Y. He had lived in Central Florida
since 1983 and was employed as an
attorney accounts manager with the
former Harcouit Brace Jovanovich
Publishing Co. He attended Calvary
Baptist Church, Winter Garden, and
was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He
was predeceased by a granddaugh-
ter, Ashley Joy. Survivors: wife, An-
toinette "Nan" Tortora Benedict; sons,
Stan Jr. (and Marcia), Glen'Alpine,
N.C., Richard (and Susan), Clarks
Summit, Pa., Dwight, Orlando, Mark
(and Janet), Yonkers, N.Y., Doug (and
Karen), Winter Garden; daughter, An-
toinette J. (and Mark) McCreary, East
Stroudsburg, Pa.; brothers, Charles
* (and Vivian), Chalfont, Pa., Willard
(and Donna), Summerfield; 15 grand-
children; 3 great-grandchildren; many
nieces and nephews. Collison Carey
Hand Funeral Home, Winter Garden
Chapel; Mount Hope Cemetery in
Hastings on Hudson, N.Y.
LORETTA SANDERS BROOKLYN,
89, Gotha, died Friday, Feb. 24. She
was born in 1916 in Winter Garden.
She was an active member of Beulah
Baptist Church. Survivors: husband of
66 years, Edgar; daughters, Vicki
Summers, Jan Thurmond; son-in-law,
Wayne Thurmond; grandchildren, Bret
Summers, Scott (and Andrea) Sum-
mers, Ashley (and Doug) Bagley,
Dana Thurmond; 9 great-grandsons,
Steam, Rhet, Reid,_ Jared, Blake,
Grant, Shane, Brandon, Colton.
Woodlawn Memorial Park, Gotha.
MARY GALLAGHER, 96, Winter Gar-
den, died Feb. 20. Brewer & Sons Fu-
neral Homes & Cremation Services,
Clermont Chapel.
RICHARD E. HANDLE, 52, Ocoee,
died Feb. 21. Survivors: girlfriend of
:16 years, Patricia Burney, Ocoee; son,
Gary, Jamestown, Tenn.; stepsons,
Shawn and Matthew Nettles, both of
Ocoee; daughter, Heather,
Jamestown, brothers, Robert, Texas,
Mike, Ocoee; sister, Patricia Spoon,
Georgetown; 8 grandchildren. Wood-
'lawn Memorial Park and Funeral
Home.
AGNES M. HULTSTROM, 93, Winter
,Garden, died Feb. 21. She was born
'in 1912 in Calgary Alberta, Canada,
"but her childhood was spent in Nor-


Theater for Everyone
Summer Institute
This summer, the United Cerebral
Palsy of Central Florida, the Uni-
iversity of Central Florida-Shake-
:speare Festival and the UCF Excep-
tional Education program will be
,partnering to present an inclusive
drama institute.
Professional Shakespeare actors
':and directors will lead this unique
performance ensemble for middle
,school and high school teens with
and without disabilities. The two-
.week acting camp will culminate in
;the performance of a Shakespearean
;play.
The goals of the program include
providing drama instruction, inspir-
iing a passion for theater, providing
natural opportunities for interactions
and friendships, creating opportuni-
ties for teens without disabilities to
learn about the many abilities and
'talents of individuals with disabili-
ties and fostering self-esteem and
;confidence through accomplishment.
The institute \ ill run from July 17
'through July 27 from 9 a.m. to noon
-at the UCF-Shakespeare Festival,
:812 E. Rollins St. The cost is $150,
,and scholarships are available.
For more information, contact
- 'Carol Clark at 407-852-3306 or
Scclarki'ucpcdc.org or isit the Web
,site at www.ucpcdc.org.

;Republicans to meet
: The Southwest Orange County Re-
Spublicans meet the fourth Monday of
,the month at 7:30 p.m. at J.J. Whis-
'pers, 4732 Kirkman Road, Orlando.
:For more information, call 407-903-
S5031 or' send an e-mail to
'jbgop@cfl.rr.com. The group regis-
ters voters and encourages voters to
'help elect candidates.


way. Her family settled in Mas-
sachusetts after coming through Ellis
Island in 1922. After a career with her
husband at Factory Mutual Insurance,
they retired to Orlando in 1978. They
were active members of Tabernacle
Baptist Church for nearly 30 years.
She was preceded in death by her
husband of 59 years, Harold. Sur-
vivors: sons, Kenneth (and Phyllis),
Hampden, Mass., Gordon (and Car-
la), Andover, Mass., Neal (and Judith),
Woodstock, Ga.; sister, Jean (and
Walter) MacLure, Orlando; 6 grand-
children; 12 great-grandchildren. In-
. terment at Ocoee Cemetery.
TERESA JULIAN, 84, Windermere,
died Feb. 22. Dobbs Funeral Home,
Orlando.
HAZEL LUCILLE "GIGI" McEWEN,
93, died Feb. 22. She was born in
Springdale, Ky., in 1912 and moved
to the College Park area of Orlando in
1947 with her husband and family. She
was a devoted member of the College
Park Baptist Church for more than 59
years, where she served as a Sunday
School teacher for 45 years. She was
a member of.the Orlando Garden Club
Orange Blossom Circle and the Or-
ange County Extension' Service
Friendship Circle. She was preceded
in death by her husband, Charles. Sur-
vivors: daughters, Marilyn Mackemer
and Charlene Twyford, both of Orlan-
do; 3 grandchildren, Debra Booth (and
Carl), Ocoee, Douglas Mackemer (and
Caprice), Maitland, Teresa Twyford,
Orlando; 4 great-grandchildren, James
Scott Freeman, Orlando, Megan Nick-
elsen, Ocoee, Marissa and Annalise
Mackemer, both of Maitland; great-
great-grandson, Justin Freeman, West
Palm Beach. The family requests do-
nations be made to the College Park
Baptist Church, Children's Ministry,
1914 Edgewater Drive, Orlando, FL
32804. Carey Hand Cox-Parker Fu-
neral Home.
SUKDEO RAMJAS, 59, Windermere,
died Feb. 18. He was born in 1946 in
Plantation Albion, Guyana. Survivors:
wife, Annesuyah; children, Suchita
Mohabir, Shavita Lewis, Haresh;
brothers, Bjoh, Jainarine, Moolchand;
6 grandchildren. Woodlawn Memori-
al Park & Funeral Home, Gotha.
MARGIE G. REED, 66, Ocoee, died
Feb. 15. Born in 1939, she moved to
Central Florida from Georgia in 1950.
She was a member of Taft Baptist
Church. Survivors: husband, Norman;
sister, Anne Riggins, St. Mary's, Ga.;
nephews, Ricky Crews, David,
Michael, Bruce Riggins, Danny;
nieces, Ann Marie Crews, Debbie
Crews, Loretta Riggins. Dobbs Fu-
neral Home, Orlando Chapel; Ocoee
Cemetery.
"GRANNY" ANNIE L. RICHARD-
SON, 84, St. Petersburg, died Feb.
23. Born in 1921, she moved to Cen-
tral Florida from Alabama in 1964. She
was a member of the Church of God
of Prophecy, Survivors: daughters,
Ruth Howell, St. Petersburg, Shirley
Bell, Winter Garden, Linda Chapman,
Clermont; sons, Billy, Winter Garden,
Vernice, Bushnell, Frank, Bonifay,
Jackie, Ocoee; 20 grandchildren; 13
great-grandchildren; 2 great-great-
grandchildren. Dobbs Funeral Home,
Orlando Chapel; Winter Garden
Cemetery.
VIRGINIA LEE RYE, 82, Ocoee, died


Windermere Union is site for wee
Windermere Union Church, Unit-
ed Church of Christ, invites area res-
idents to participate in weekly Weight
Watchers meetings. Visitors and mem-
bers can attend meetings at 8:30 a.m.
on Saturday for weigh-ins and then
stay for discussion sessions that last ap-

Alzheimer's caregiver
support groups "
The Greater Orlando Alzheimer's
Association sponsors two caregiver
support groups in Winter Garden.
They take place at Golden Pond Com-
munities,'404 Lakeview Road (407-
654-7217) and Beverly Healthcare,
15204 W. Colonial Drive (407-877-
2394).

Register children for
Head Start program
The Orange County Head Start pro-
gram is enrolling preschoolers ages
3-5. Parents can register at 407-656-
5329.


Feb. 25. A Community Funeral Home
& Sunset Cremations, Downtown
Chapel, Orlando.
FLORENCE L. SASSER, 81, Winter
Garden, died Feb. 19. Survivors: 2
sons; 4 daughters; 4 sisters; 13 grand-
children; 22 great-grandchildren. Col-
lison Carey Hand Funeral Home.
STEPHANIE ANN STRATFORD, 62,
Winter Garden, died Feb. 25. Wood-
lawn Funeral Home, Gotha.
JACK TAYLOR, 78, Sanford, died
Feb. 19. He was a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Florida, where he was a
member of the Phi Kappa Alpha fra-
ternity. He was co-owner of American
Produce Exchange (APEX). Survivors:
wife of 56 years, Bobbie Anne; daugh-
ters, Debbie Thomson (John), Deland,
Pamela Housholder (Wayne), Dog Is-
land; sons, Charles 0. (Lou Ann),
Geneva, Danny, Winter Park; sisters,
Virgina Douglas, Tavares, Barbara
Joiner, Winter Garden; 8 grandchil-
dren; 5 great-grandchildren. The fam-
ily requests donations be made to the
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of
Central Florida Chapter, 3319 Maguire
Blvd., Orlando, FL 32803.
EDNA M. TWOMBLY, 89, Alton, N.H.,
died Feb. 11. She was a frequent vis-
itor to her sister, Isabel T. Fowler of
Winter Garden. She was born to Arthur
and Capitola (Leake) Twombly in 1916
and was a lifelong resident of Alton.
She was a graduate of Keene Teach-
ers College and received her master's
degree from Plymouth State College.
She retired in 1971 after teaching
school for 32 years. She was a mem-
ber of county, state and national teach-
ers' organizations and was a member
of the Order of Eastern Star. She was
preceded in death by her parents and
older sister, Marguerite Chamberlain.
Survivors: sister, Isabel Fowler, Win-
ter Garden; nieces, Isabel McDougal,
Scottsdale, Ariz., Jane F. Bekemey-
er, Winter Garden, Kristin Bekemeyer
and Terri B. Fredericksen, both of
Rapid City, S.D.; grandnephews, Bill
and Gregory Kneeland, Jason Harris,
Hal and Steve Bekemeyer. A memo-
rial service will be held in the spring.
HUGH N. VAUGHAN, 63, Winter Gar-
den,'died Feb. 24. He was, born in
1942 in Detroit. He worked and at-
tended high school in Daytona Beach
before moving with his family to Madi-
son, Ind., where he lived for 16 years,
prior to moving to Winter Garden two
years ago with his wife. In Indiana, he
and his wife ran a private care home
for the elderly. He was preceded in
death by his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
George Vaughan of Daytona Beach,
and his grandson, Jonathan Robbins
of Madison. Survivors: wife of 45
years, Cloe, Winter Garden; brother,
George, Ormond Beach; 4 daughters,
Thelma, Phoenix, Irene Windham,
Ladsen, S.C., Loretta Medina, Point
Comfort, Texas, Patricia Bean, Madi-
son; 5 grandchildren, Joseph and
Monica Rayden, Edinberg, Texas,
Ryan, Katie and Elizabeth Windham,
Ladsen; dear friend, Elizabeth Kunkel.
A memorial service is set for Wednes-
day, March 1, at 11 a.m. at Church of
God of Prophecy, 159 Taylor St.,
Ocoee. The family requests donations
be made to Church of God of Prophe-
cy Youth Drama and Ensemble
"XLR8," 159 Taylor St., Ocoee, FL
34761.


ekly Weight Watchers meetings
proximately 30-45 minutes. Every
week there is a new topic on nutrition,
activity, healthy habits and successes
to celebrate. Individuals do not have
to join to attend. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-651-6000 or go to
weight.watchers.com.



Masonic Lodge.
schedules meetings
Winter Garden Masonic
Lodge 165 F&AM holds its
stated communications on the
first and third Thursday of the
month at 7:30 p.m. The lodge is
at 230 W. Bay St. On the third
Thursday, brothers and their
families can come to a covered-
dish dinner and program at 6
p.m. For more information, call
Steve Teal, worshipful rnaster,
at 407-654-2181 or the lodge
at 407-877-2550.


SCOLLI1ON


W'a des1, FUNERAL
est 1890


1148 E. Plant St.
Winter Garden, FL 34787
407-877-6700
Fax 407-877-7403


HOMES
D gu)


529 N. Ocoee-Apopka Rd.
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-656-3443
Fax 407-877-9097


Traffic crash
in Ocoee
On Feb. 27, at approximately
3:42 p.m., the Ocoee Police De-
partment responded to the inter-
section of Clarcona-Ocoee Road to
investigate a 2-vehicle head-on
crash.
Investigation at the scene re-
vealed that 52-year-old Robert
Cheney was driving his 1989
Dodge pickup westbound on Clar-
cona-Ocoee Road nearing the in-
tersection of Clarke Road. Ac-
cording to police, as Cheney ap-
proached the intersection and en-
tered the turn lane for Clarke Road,
he observed a 1999 Mazda pickup,
driven by 19-year-old Shawn Fort-
ner, passing another vehicle in a
no-passing zone and entering the
turn lane occupied by Cheney.
Cheney's vehicle was struck
head-on by Fortner's truck. Cheney
was transported by air to Orlando
Regional Medical Center where he
is listed in stable condition. Fort-
ner was transported by ambulance
to Health Central and refused med-
ical assistance, said police.


Add shade to the yard
with 'Trees Friday'
. The Orange County IFAS Cooper-
ative Extension recently announced
its "Trees Friday" event. Free three-gal-
lon live oak, magnolia and crepe myr-
tle trees will be given to Orange Coun-
ty residents on Friday, April 14, from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Trees are limited to two per house-
hold and will be given out on a first-
come, first served basis. Residents
need to show proof of Orange Coun-
ty residency and attend a brief educa-
tional session on how to plant and care
for the new trees.
For more information, call 407-836-
7573.


Streetscape
tree giveaway
is March 18
Anyone interested in "adopting" up
to two three-gallon native trees can
go by Barnett Park from 9 a.m..to noon
on March 18. The Streetscape tree
give-away is making trees available
to county residents who will attend a
10-15 minute training session on how
to correctly plant a tree and take care
of it.
Trees available include live oak,
sand live oak, Southern magnolia, red
maple and bald cypress. No registra-
tion or fee is required to participate.
Proof of Orange Country residency is
necessary.
For information, call Streetscape at
407-836-9571.


Six years have passed, not a day
goes by that a phrase, your smile,
love and caring gentleness crosses
our mind. You are with us always.
We love and miss you so much!
Sleep with the angel our beloved.
With love,
Bob and Sharon McKenzie
and Family


ATTENTI

AUTO ACCIDENT VI

Are you suffering

from injuries?

\ I can help!


DR. JO J. REEVES,
CHIROPRACTOR
407-656-0390
1080 S. DILLARD ST. WINTER GARDEN, FL
Most insurance accepted Lic. # MA12692


The Ocoee Police Traffic Homi-
cide Unit is investigating the crash
and charges are pending results of
blood analysis.

Neighborhood Watch
seminar on March 23
All subdivisions and homeown-
ers associations in the West Orange
County area are invited to attend a
Neighborhood Watch seminar on
Thursday, March 23, from 7-9 p.m.
in the fellowship hall at St. Luke's
United Methodist Church, 4851 S.
Apopka-Vineland Road, Orlando.
The program will be presented
by the Orange County Sheriff's Of-
fice and will be of interest to ev-
eryone in the subdivision.
The church is located at 4851 S.
Apopka-Vineland Road, Orlando,
just east of Windermere.
Area residents can also sign up for.
a free security survey with OCSO
Deputy Nick Cominos on their res-
idential or commercial property by
call 407-667-6205. Cominos is a
homeland protection specialist and
is certified by the state to do these
surveys which take about one hour.


Chronic illness
support group meets
on the 4th Monday
Area residents are invited to a free
support group for people with chron-
ic illnesses, including liver diseases
and hepatitis C, at St. Luke's United
Methodist Church. The group meets the
fourth Monday of each month from
7-9 p.m. For more information, call
the church office at 407-876-4991 or
Katie at 407-351-5582. The church is
located at 4851 S. Apopka-Vineland
Road, Orlando.

West Orange Chamber
seeking walkers for SW
Relay for Life April 7-8
The West Orange Chamber of Com-
merce will participate in the South-
west Relay for Life at Dr. Phillips
High School from 5:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, April 7, through noon on Satur-
day, April 8. The Chamber is looking
for volunteers to join its Relay team and
sign up to walk the stadium track for
one-hour periods through the night.
Each walker also commits to raising
$100 for the Relay. To sign up, call
team leader Alice Williams or the
Chamber office at 407-656-1304.


Sunshine Singers
seeking new voices,
meets at St. Luke's
Area residents who enjoy
singing are invited to "get on
top of the world" and join the
Sunshine Singers.
The group entertains at nurs-
ing homes, senior residences
and service clubs in and
around Orlando.
Members do not have to
know how to read music. The
group does three-part singing,
soprano, second soprano and
alto.
Interested individuals
should attend a practice any
Monday at 9:30 a.m. at St.
Luke's United Methodist
Church, 4951 S. Apopka-
Vineland Road, Orlando.
The group is pot affiliated
with any denomination and
usually sings secular music.
For more information, call
Mary Ellen Boice at 407-299-
5244 or just come to a re-
hearsal.


SApple Air Conditioning
WKcr> & Heating, Inc.
"We can take a slice out of your energy costs"
Commercial/Residential Service
Offering: 24 hour Emergency Service;
FREE Estimates On Replacement Equipment;
Flexible Maintenance Programs.
Over 35 years of Experience.
Licensed, Insured & Bonded. State License #CMC056836
Financing Available. www.appleac.com
'- Office 407-654-3777 Fax 407-654-4828 V









Announce their New Metro West Location
Saturday Appointments Available!


2869 Wilshire Drive, Suite #201, Orlando

Aflab Qadir, M.D., F.A.P.A.
Sofia Qadir, M.D. Rubina Inayat, M.D.
Please call (407) 578-6200 or

(407) 246-6620 for an appointment or more info.


Local police and fire reports


SPECIALIZING IN TREATING
A UTO ACCIDENT INJURIES
Licensed Massage Therapist
GENTLE CHIROPRACTIC HAS BEEN EFFECTIVE TREATING:
Back Pain Headaches Shoulder Pain Neck Pain
* Arthritis Painful Joints Stiffness Numbness Arm/Leg
Pain Bursitis Hip Pain Cold Hands/Feet


I,


,%N


OFD weekly report
The Ocoee Fire Department re-
sponded to 66 calls for assistance
during the period of Feb. 16-22:
Fire-3
EMS-39
Vehicle accidents-2
Hazardous materials-2
Public service-17
False alarms-3
City calls-55
County calls-9
Winter Garden-0
Windermere calls-2.

Winter Garden
fire report
The Winter Garden Fire Depart-
ment responded to 73 calls for as-
sistance during the period of Feb.
19-25:
Fires-5
Emergency medical calls-43
Auto accidents-10
Automatic fire alarms-4
Public assist-1
Hazardous conditions-2
Miscellaneous-8.








Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 3A


The original school on the Tildenville Elementary site in Winter Garden was built in 1906 and called the Oak-
land-Winter Garden School.

*


By 1918, a new school had been built in close proximity to the old building (in background). Eventually, the
name was changed to Tildenville to reflect the area and honor the Tilden family.


Tildenville

plans for the new campus originally
called for a bell tower; however, it
was removed from plans, she said, be-,
cause of funding. She is now hoping
a Tildenville supporter from the-com-
munity would be willing to make a
donation so the school can keep its
ties to its origins.
There are plenty of people who are
dedicated to Tildenville. The school has
18 community partners, and each
'week, 65 Florida Turnpike employ-
ees volunteer at the school. This huge,
TES supporter has also brought in
$79,000 through fund-raisers that has
been incorporated into school pro-
grams.
There are also 150 students attend-



Ocoee
out of more than 50 posts. The team
also won three first-place awards in
competitions.
proclaimed. April 30 as Day of
Remembrance in order to be mindful
of the horrors of the Nazi Holocaust.
approved upgrades to the Thomas
Ison Senior and Veteran Service Cen-
ter in the amount of $83,830. The city
will be reimbursed through grants
from the U.S. Department of Hous-
ing and urban Det elopment. The up-
grades %\ill include a concrete hand-
icap ramp and hand rails, a Dumpster
enclosure, back-flow prevention de-
vices and testing and additional park-
ing lot lighting.
voted to allow line-item budget
''funding for the city's advisory boards.


Water
Typically this includes individual
homes; businesses, government and
commercial locations.
The rule applies regardless if the
water comes from a private well, a
private or public utility. or a surface
water body.
Water users choose their ow n irri-,
gation da s unless their local gov-'
ernment adopts an ordinance speci-
fying the irrigation days. Also in-
cluded in the rule is a prove ision re-'
quiring that rain sensors be installed.
maintained and operated on automatic
lawin irrigation systems installed after
Nlay 1991. Rain sensors are devices
.that override the system when ade-

W.G. e-mail newsletter
To receive a free monthly informa-
tional e-newsletter from the Winter
Garden Recreation Department, resi-
dents can register their e-mail ad-
dresses at the 'city's Web site at
www.cwgdn.com. Call the rec office
at 407-656-4155 for details.

Sign up for Head Stairt
Meals are a\ ailable at no charge to
children enrolled in the Head Start
program in Orange County. Locally,.
the program is at Ma.xey Elementary
School. 1100 E. Maple St., Winter
Garden. For information, call 407-
836-6590. '


ing the dual-language magnet program
that live outside the regular school
zone. This innovative bilingual pro-
gram for both native English and na-
tive Spanish speakers has served as a
model for other Orange County Pub-
lic Schools.
But, Lougheed.said, it all goes back
to the Tildenville name and the "stig-
ma" that was attached decades ago.
Dr. Warner is all for a new name to
complement the new building. But she
and he SAC are pushing to keep
"Tilden" in the name because of its
history with the area and the family.
Several descendants of the Tilden fam-
ily have signed a petition giving their
OK for a change to Tilden Oaks Ele-




Line items of $2,000 are set up for
the Citizens Advisory Council for the
Fire Department, the Citizen Advi-
sory Council for the Police Depart-.
ment, the Human Relations Diversi-
ty Board and the Parks and Recre-
ation Advisory Board. Line items of
$1,000 are set up for the Code En-,
forcement Board, the Education Com-
missiofi, the Planning and Zoning
Commission, the General Employ-
ees' Retirement Trust Fund Board of
Trustees and the Firefighters' Re-
tirement Trust Fund Board of'
Trustees.
.annexed and rezoned 15.8 acres for
an affordable housing subdivision
known as Lakewood Estates located
west of the intersection of Wurst Road




quate rainfall has occurred.
Exceptions to the rule include:
irrigation using a micro-irrigation
(drip) system,
irrigation of new landscape is al-
lowed at an\ lime of day on any day
for the initial 30 da)s following in-
stallation of the new landscape and
everY other day for the next 30 days
for a total of one 60-day period,
*, watering in of chemicals, includ-
ing insecticides, pesticides, fertiliz-
ers. fungicides and herbicides,
operation of irrigation systems for
maintenance and repair purposes, not
to exceed 10 minutes per hour per
zone.

Visit downtown
W.G. museums.
Downtown Winter Garden has sev-
eral museums honoring the city's his-
tory. The Winter Garden Heritage
Museum is at 1 N. Main St. There is
no admission. For information or to
schedule a tour for large groups, call
407-656-5544. The Winter Garden
History Center is downtown on West
Plant Street. For information, call
407-656-3244. The Central Florida
Railroad Museum is at 101 S. Boyd
St.
For more information, call 407-
656-0559.


(Continued from front page)

mentary.
Warner wants to know what the
community thinks of the name change,
and she welcomes comments via'e-
mail at wamers@ocps.net.
"We just want to know if there's
going to be a huge outcry," she said,
adding that she's enthusiastic about
"the new name and a new century at
Tildenville."
The principal stressed that the
school will not pursue a different name
until it's been presented to the pub-
lic. She did, however, say that the Or-
ange County School Board has an-
nounced its support for the change.
"Tildenville is a really good
school," Lougheed said.


(Continued from front page)

and Lakewood Avenue. The proper-
ty was rezoned from Orange County
Citrus Rural to a planned-unit-devel-
opment designation.
approved the residential devel-
opment plat for Crestwood Heights,
which is located within the planned-
unit development of Ocoee Commons
on the northeast comer of West Colo-
nial Drive and Blackwood Avenue.
The plat includes 14.44 acres of a 97-
unit multi-family townhouse devel-
opment.
donated $1,000 to support' the
Winter Garden Elks Charity Ball..
donated $250 to help sponsor the'
Woman's Club of Ocoee's annual
Birthday Luncheon to be held this
Saturday, March 4.


(Continued from front page)

irrigation using a'hand-held hose
equipped with an automatic shut-off.
nozzle,
discharge of water from a water-
to-air air-conditioning unit or other
water-dependent cooling system,
irrigation using water from a re-
claimed water system and
irrigation using recycled water
from \ et detention treatment ponds;
pro% ided the ponds are not augment-
ed from any ground or off-site sur-
face water, or public supply sources.
For information on the irrigation
rule, visit the district's Web site at
www.sjrwmd.com and click on Irri-
gation Rule/Conservation.

Tanner Hall available
Tanner Hall on Lake Apopka is
available for rental for events on week-
ends and weekdays. For details, call
the Winter Garden Recreation De-
partment at 407-656-4155. The Tanner
is at 29 W. Garden Ave.

Alzheimer's caregiver
support groups
The Greater Orlando Alzheimer's
Association sponsors two caregiver
support groups in Winter Garden. They
take place at Golden Pond Communi-
ties, 404 Lakeview Road (407-654-
7217) and Beverly Healthcare, 15204
W. Colonial Drive (407-877-2394).


Photographers Who
Millenia Fine Art Gallery is pre-
senting an exhibition of three pho-
tographers whose work centers around
the world of rock artists through
March 31. .
Not only has their work, over the
course of decades, helped to make
rock bands and singers into stars, but
their work had made the photogra-
phers into celebrities as well. Curi-
ously, all three photographers were
born in England. They are Gered
Mankowitz, Graham Nash and Terry
O'Neill.
Mankowitz was born in London in
1946, the son of author and playwright
Wolf Mankowitz. After an education
at several progressive schools, he left
at age 15 and completed his own ed-
ucation. In 1962, he started working
for portraitist Jeff Vickers, who pro-
vided him the opportunity to take por-
traits of personalities. Mankowitz pho-
tographed the singing duo Chad and
Jeremy; one of his photos was used
as the cover of the duo's first album.
This led him to photograph other
artists who were his own age and felt
comfortable with him. After opening


Winter Garden
(Continued from front page)

proposed ordinance to amend the de-.
velopment order for the Winter Gar-
den Village at Fowler Groves. The
commission voted 4-1 with Nichols
voting "no."
Changes to the order include agree-
ments by the Sembler Co. with the
city of Winter Garden and the Flori-
da Department of Transportation re-
garding Daniels Road and West Colo-,
nial Drive, respectively.
A second reading and public hear-
ing is set for the March 9 commission
meeting.
passed an ordinance amending the
city's Large Scale Comprehensive
Plan to include a six-lane Daniels
Road passing through the Fowler
property. The City Commission vot-
ed 4-1 in favor of the ordinance with
Nichols casting the dissenting vote.
approved the site plan for a
96,000-square-foot commercial pro-
ject located at the southeast comer of
the Florida Turnpike and Winter Gar-
den-Vineland Road. The commission
voted 4-1 with Reynolds voting "no"
against the project.
approved the site plan for Phase I
of Foundation Academy's school
campus'to be located at the southeast
comer of Avalon and Tilden roads.


Support theater
renovation process
The Winter Garden Heritage Foun-
dation is restoring the old (1935)
movie theater at 160 W.-Plant St. A
capital campaign has been established,
and donations are being accepted.
Donor cards are available at the Win-
ter Garden History Center, 32 W. Plant
St.
For more information, call 407-656-
3244.


Central Florida Native

GREAT BENEFITS
IN EQUITY SHARING
Equity sharing can be an arrangement
in which all of the players win. Equity shar-
ing contracts are drawn up with the spe-
cific terms agreed-upon by the co-owners.
The non-resident co-owner will often make
the down payment, while the resident co-
owner pays themortgage payments, in-
surance, property taxes, and repairs.
SThe biggest benefit for the non-resident
co-owner is the tax loss deduction (most-
ly from depreciation) against ordinary in-
come such as salary, dividends, and inter-
est. Other advantages include part owner-
ship in a property with almost no month-
ly expenses and a management-free in-
vestment. The biggest risk for the non-res-
ident owner is that the resident may not
make the monthly payments, resulting in dif-
ficulties clearing title and removing the
resident.
The benefits of the resident owner in-
clude part ownership in a home that will
probably appreciate in market value, in-
volves little or no cash investment upfront,
and tax deductions for part of the mort-
gage interest and property taxes. The res-
ident owner has few risks, with the excep-
tion of extraordinary expenses, such as a
new roof.
If you would like to talk further about
buying or selling real estate, please con-
tact Libby Tomyn at Century 21 Profes-
sional Group. Call me on my personal mes-
sage line, (407) 570-0318.



Do u n't forge t isqiuimyvwebsiterq
atw woiandoibbycom


Rock exhibit continues at Millenia Gallery


his first studio in London in 1963, he
started photographing Marianne Faith-
ful and the Rolling Stones. The Stones
asked him to accompany them to
America on their record-breaking
1965 tour. Evermore sought after, he
has worked with Jimi Hendrix, Free,
Traffic, The Yardbirds, Slade, Elton
John, Kate Bush, Eurythmics, ABC,
Duran Duran and many others.
Nash is a contemporary Renais-
sance man. One of the most enduring
musical figures to have emerged from
the 1960s, he was a key figure in both
the British Invasion and the '70s
singer-songwriter era that followed.
As a harmony singer, first with The
Hollies and later with Crosby, Stills,
Nash and Young, his voice is among
the most familiar in two distinct
schools of rock music. He still records
and tours with CSNY. As a visual
artist, he is a lifelong photographer
exhibiting in galleries and museums
around the world. Nash Editions is
his own arts press. Nash's latest book
of photographs is titled Eye to Eye.
The Millenia exhibit will include
personal and evocative photos of Ca-


role King, Stephen Stills, Johnny
Cash, Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan,
among others.
O'Neill was born in London's East
End and became a professional jazz
musician at the age of 14. After doing
military service, he began his photo-
graphic career on the Daily Sketch
(1960-63), after which he went free-
lance for Vogue, Paris Match and
Rolling Stone.
During the 1960s and '70s, he be-
came one of the world's most pub-
lished photographers.
His books include Legends (1985)
and Celebrity (2003).
Another previously unseen photo
is of his former companion, Martha
Stewart. The domestic style guru is
photographed riding a motorcycle.
And, of course, the exhibition will in-
clude photos of the Beatles taken in the
1960s.
The gallery is located at 4190 Mil-
lenia Blvd., Orlando, and is open
Tuesday through Sunday.
For more information, call 407-226-
8701 or go to www.Millenia-
gallery.com.


Winter Garden citizens to elect
CAB representative


An election for a community
representative and alternate (as a
team) for the Winter Garden area
for the Orange County Depart-
ment of Health and Family Ser-
vices Comrmunity Action Board
will be held March 21, which is
an extension of the original date.
This Community Action Board
(CAB) is advisory to the Board of
County Commissioners and over-
sees the Community Action Pro-
gram as a volunteer board com-
posed of 24 citizens selected from
*three sectors: public government,
private business and industry and
community representatives.
The elected team is to serve a
three-year CAB District 7 term
'representing targeted area con-
stituents in Winter Garden,.Ocoee,
Oakland and Tildenville, with lo-
cal polling sites to be announced
later.
The Community Action Pro-
gram provides services, programs,
aid and assistance for targeted area


low-income and disadvantaged
citizens through community gov-'
ernmental services, in cooperation
and partnership with governmen-
tal, private and community re-
sources in Orange and Osceola
counties.
Interested community candi-
dates who are citizens who have
resided in the targeted area for six
months or more and are 18 years
or older can contact the Maxey
Community Center at 407-654-
5161 for more information or
questions on eligibility.
Applicants must register as a
team unit but must each fill out a
separate application, which is
available at the Maxey Commu-
nity Center, 830 Klondike St.,
Winter Garden. Applicant teams
must return the completed appli-
cations together as one set by 5
p.m. on March 6. Upon notifica-
tion of approved eligibility, teams
may start campaigning through
Election Day.


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AMSOWH

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City of Winter Garden
Notice of General Municipal Election

The City of Winter Garden will hold an election on
Tuesday, March 14, 2006. All municipal polling locations will
be open for the Mayor/Commissioner District 5 as follows:
Tanner Hall, 29 W. Garden Avenue
Senior Center (old library site), 1 E. Cypress St.
Stoneybrook West Golf Club, 15501 Towne Commons Blvd.
Commission District 1 polling location willbe
Tanner Hall, 29 W. Garden Avenue

Polls will open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 p.m.






We are a Debt Relief Agency. We help people file
for Bankruptcy Relief under the Bankruptcy Code.


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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely
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4A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


Opinion


In our opinion

Editorials


Winter Garden didn't get 'railroaded'
We commend the Winter Garden Commis- to influence the commission.


sion for voting down Commissioner Reynolds'
resolution denouncing commuter rail. The vote
was not for or against commuter rail, but against
a resolution that the city had no reason to ap-
prove. The resolution was politically motivat-
ed by Reynolds's "political consultant," who
is also the one responsible for feeding the com-
missioner incorrect figures that he was using


Mayor Quesinberry and commissioners Gra-
ham and Dixon didn't fall for the showboat-
ing of the freshmen commissioners and right-
ly gave it three thumbs down. They deserve
kudos for deflecting the pressure and being
smart enough to understand that approving the
resolution would be a no-win situation for the


Not sure which mayoral candidate to support;
one Windermere resident had a sign for both
mayoral candidates: incumbent Gary Bruhn
and former Mayor Carl Patterson. After being


Editor:
I would like to thank the city of Winter Garden
Recreation Department for the outstanding job done
with the middle school dances. Mary, Sabrina, Iris
and the other great staff that has made the dances a
safe and fun environment truly deserve a pat on the


informed by the town manager that only one
sign is permitted, the resident has succumbed
to rotating the signs. Maybe he should display
them "on his fence."


back.
Our community needs to support the Rec Depart-
ment as it continues to offer exciting events such as
the middle school dances.
.. Gina Jamerson-Vigeant


.Reader says thank you to Rep. Brummer for his efforts


With Bike Week officially kicking off in Day-
tdna Beach this week the Florida Safety Council
is warning both drivers and riders to use extra pre-
caution on the roads. Bike Week typically brings
between 300,000 and 500,000 participants into the
area. While these numbers affect the local econo-
my greatly, they have a disastrous effect on the
number of injuries and fatalities on our roadways.
"All too often we hear about injuries and fatali-
ties involving motorcycles during Bike
Week that could be prevented with
just a little extra precaution," said
Glenn Victor, spokesperson for the WR
Florida Safety Council. "Increased ',
public awareness is half the bat-
tle in reducing these numbers." ,,Il
The Florida Safety Council of-
fers area motorists the follow- ,e
ing tips to raise, their
awareness of motorcy-
clists.
Respect mo-
torcyclists as
motorists. A
motorcycle is a
vehicle with all
the rights and ,
privileges of
any other vehi-
cle on the road-
way.
Look out for
motorcyclists. At in-
tersections watch for motorcyclists making left
turns and on the highway watch for them making
lane changes.
Don't follow a motorcycle too closely. Allow
enough room for the motorcyclist to take evasive
action.
Anticipate a motorcyclist's. maneuver. Predict
evasive actions. Obstructions that you may not per-
ceive as a threat to you in a car may be deadly for


a motorcyclist.
The Florida Safety Council also offers these mo-
torcycle safety tips in order to prevent crashes:
Make yourself visible. Choose protective gear
that increases your visibility, such as bright or light
colors.
Ride where you can be seen. Use land posi-
tioning to your advantage. This allows you to be seen
and provides extra space for emergency braking
situations or avoidance maneuvers.
Wear a helmet and eye protection.
Although Florida has no law re-
quiring helmet use,
fatalities and most
Syr, i serious injuries to
motorcyclists are
caused by head
injuries. Eye
protection is
S also important
when riding a
motorcycle be-
cause wind
o stand particles in
the air can dan-.
gerously affect vi-
sion.
SNever weave be-
tween lanes. Clearly sig-
nal your intentions and make lane
changes gradually avoiding mo-
torists' blind spots.
Complete a motorcycle safety foundation rid- ,
er course. The defensive driving techniques learned
in this course are undoubtedly effective inii pre-
venting fatal accidents. Since the course began, not
a single person who completed the course in Flori-
da has died as a result of a fatal motorcycle acci-
dents.
(The Florida Safety Council is located at 427 N.
Primrose Drive, Orlando, and is the largest ,
provider of motorcycle training in the state.)


Editor,


According to Rep. Brummer's letter in last week's
Times, the state Department of Health's rampage is at
least temporarily halted, pending a thorough scientific study
of nitrogen infusion into the Wekiva River. Most of
your readers who would have been affected may not re-,
alize how important this is. You were each in danger of
being required to spend up to $15,000 on a new onsite
sewage treatment system td replace your old septic tank.


Reader says thanks 1
Editor,

Thank you for standing up for our community against
this Guetzloe fellow. He's no good for our community.
He's made fun of Winter Garden, and he and his people


55 years ago
The Ocoee City Council voted to send Mayor Bud
Owens and City Clerk W.H. Wurst to the school for
municipal finance officers to be held in Gainesville.
The new Winter Garden Elementary School will be
erected on 10 acres on the southeast comer of the L.W.
Tilden estate at Dillard and Tilden streets. School Board
Member Hugh Lassiter said that all three buildings -
the new one, the old Winter Garden Elementary and
Tildenville School-- would be used. "We are growing,"
he said, "and I don't see how we can abandon class-
rooms anywhere."

40 years ago
"Words from Windermere" by Alice Marshall: It
seems the Windermere Garden has something inter-
esting going on all the time. This week's activity'was
a tour of the Mulford B. Foster estate to see the many
unusual and exotic plants, then on to lunch at Apop-
ka's newest restaurant.
The first to quality by selling more than 25 sub-
scriptions in the Winter Garden Times Bike-O-Rama
Contest is Johnny Harreil, a 4th-grader at Dillard Street
Elementary. He hasn't made up his'mind whether he
wants the cash or a new bike, but he's still out selling
subscriptions.

35 years ago
Foy Maloy of Winter Garden was New York Life In-
surance Company's leading agent in Florida during
January.
Hilton Teal of Winter Garden has joined Al Ewing Ford
as a sales representative handling both cars and trucks.
The championship regatta on Starke Lake in Ocoee
is dra%\ ing more than 200 entries from all over the Unit-
ed States and Europe.

15 years ago
A cartoon on the Opinion Page featured Robin Leach
of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" with a woman


Maybe-you still are,,if we are not vigilant and active.
A big round of thanks to Rep. Brummer for being the
rare politician who realized that his good intentions had
been twisted and set about to correct it. He is tireless in
his efforts to protect the citizens from the bureaucracy.
You don't see this very often. We should all remember
this at election time
Henry Morgan
Ocoee


for 'doing what's right'
have got to go!
Thank you for doing what's right.


Sam Miller
Winter Garden


who had purchased an' entire roll of stamps.
Joan Zeigler of Windermere wAs one of nine em-
ployees of Orange County schools to be given the "Bet-
ter Than Ever" award during the month of January. The
award is given for "outstanding service to the school sys-
tem." Mrs. Zeigler has been with the Orange County Mi-
grant Program since it began about 20 years ago. "I
love my work so much, I don't want to retire," she said.


30 years ago.
Among the many Central Floridians who have joined
the new University-Community Chorus at Florida
Technological University are these local songsters
from the Winter Garden area. From left (seated) Di-
nah Tompkins and Debra Coffman; (standing) Jim-
my Taylor, Chuck Mears, Bill McRoy, Ken Marsden
and Clifton Glenn.:The choir, under the direction of
William Jarvis, who teaches at West Orange High
School, will perform two major works this spring: -
Howard Hanson's 'Song of Democracy' and Brahm's
'Requiem' to cap the group's inaugural season.


Nati;






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onal Training Center at South Lake Hospital


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ENTRY: $15 ($10 for NTC Members) Kid Sprint: FREE!
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stop by the NTC for an entry form, 1109 Citrus Tower Blvd.


Special Thanks to our Sponsors:

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and supplies needed to initiate a youth fitness project at each school level initially, engaging youth and measuring
progress, with expansion planned in future years.


EDITORIALPUBLISHER................Andrew Bailey
EDITORIAL.......................... ..................... EDITOR......Mary Anne Swickerath .V E Af 4
ADVERTISING ..... ...............................(407) 656-2121 1. LO r 4f
SFAX,,..................., ........................ ....................... ..............................,(407) 656-6075 STAFF W RITERS
'.wotmes@aolcom Kathy Aber, Gall Dressel,
SE-MAIL............... ..,,,........wotlmes@aolcomMichael Laval, Amy Quesinberry
The West Orange Times (USPS 687-120) Is published weekly for $21.50 per year ($35.00 outside of Or- h
ange County) by The Winter Garden Times, Inc., 720 S. Dillard St., Winter Garden Florida 34787. Pe- ADVERTISING W) V^
riodical postage paid at Winter Garden Florida. POSTMASTER send address changes to THE WEST OR- Jackie Browder, Carol Morgan, Karen Shipp O
a w e e k I y ne wspap e r ANGE TIMES, 720. S. Dillard St., Winter Garden, Florida 34787. Opinions in The West Orange Times are
those of the Individual writer and are not necessarily those of The West Orange Times, its publisher
720 S. Dillard St. or editors. Mailed letters must be typed and Include the author's signature and phone number. Let- AD DESIGN ................Andres Tam
Winter Garden Florida 34787 ters to the editor are subjectto editing for space and grammar and become property of the news- PAGE DESIGN......Laine Richardson
paper.


Florida Safety County offers tips on Bike Week
safety for motorists


On the lighter side of the election


Reader opinions

Letters to the editor


Reader extols Winter Garden Rec


From our archives

Old Times


NC.
Memersip
CSpeia
Naio al riigCne

members ipitaio


o,,0,1%SOUTH LAICF, HOSP
R, Partnership with Orfaido R(itional Heal Lh A


South Lake
Anesthesia Services






Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 5A



Business


Cox joins Florida
Bank of Commerce
West Orange County resident
Wayne Cox recently joined Florida
Bank of Commerce as its senior vice
president for the Orlando market.
A 14-year veteran of Florida's fi-
nancial services industry, Cox pre-
viously served as regional manager
for RBC Centura Bank. Cox also
spent four years at SouthTrust Bank
as a commercial relationship man-
ager and business development of-
ficer.
"Wayne and I worked together at
SouthTrust a number of years ago,
and I know he will be an asset to our
team and help build our banking pres-
ence in Orlando," said Craig Pole-
jes, president of Florida Bank of
Commerce.
As an active member of the com-
munity, Cox currently sits on the
board of directors of the Florida Hos-
pital College of Health Science,
serves as president of the West Or-
lando Rotary Club and as an assis-
tant coach for the MetroWest Little
League.


Sight and Sole Walk to benefit visual impairment
Lighthouse Central Florida will versal City Walk. sal Studios and Islands of Adventure.
host its 20th Annual Sight and Sole The walk will begin at 7:30 a.m. Participants can register in advance
Walk to benefit adults and children and will conclude with an awards cer- at lighthousecentralflorida.org or by
with visual impairment Saturday at emony at 8:45 a.m., where top calling 407-898-2483. To receive a
Universal Orlando's Islands of Ad- fundraisers will be recognized with T-shirt and two-park pass, each walk-
venture. Registration begins at 6:45 prizes. Teams and individual walk- er or team member must raise a min-
a.m. with a complimentary breakfast ers are invited to enjoy a free one- imum of $75. The two-park pass will
served at 7 a.m. at the entrance to Uni- day, two-park admission for Univer- be valid only on March 4.


Richter earns
Jamie Zweifel, broker and owner of
Century 21 Professional Group, an-
nounced last week that broker associate
Sue Richter recently earned the Centu-
ry 21 System's Centurion Producer
award.
The award honors Century 21 Sys-
tem sales associates who earn between
$185,000 and $379,000 in sales pro-
duction or 60 closings within a calen-
dar year. Richter will be presented with
a Centurion award statue and lapel pin,
in addition to being recognized at the
Century 21 International Convention in
Las Vegas.
"Sue is a leader and innovator in de-
livering powerful home buying and sell-
ing choices to her clients because she
knows the community she serves," said
Zweifel. "Sue is a valued and trusted


WAYNE COX


Centurion Producer award
real estate resource for the southwest
community and a major contributor to the
overall success of the Century 21 Pro-
fessional Group."
Richter has 17 years of experience in
the real estate industry and has been with
the Century 21 System for seven years.
She successfully sold real estate in New
Jersey for 10 years prior to moving to
Florida.
This marks the second consecutive
year that Richter has won the Centurion
award, as well as receiving the Quality '
Service Award for the past four years.
"Achieving Centurion Producer sta-
tus is a great milestone in my profes-
sional career and, with a continued effort
and focus on my clients, I hope to con-
tinue on this path of success," said
Richter. SUE RICHTER


DEBRA WESLEY
Regions Financial Corp.
names new VP
Regions Financial Corp. recently
announced the promotion of Debra
Wesley to the position of vice presi-
dent, Dr. Phillips branch manager.
Wesley is the former branch man-
ager for Regions Bank in Oviedo and
is a veteran banker with 18 years of
banking experience. She previously
spent eight years with AmSouth Bank
in Orlando.


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6A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006



Winter Garden


A fun day for residents
West Orange Civitan President Cindy Baker helps one of the residents of Colonial Lakes Healthcare Cen-
ter in a game of bingo. Civitan members brought Valentine cookies and punch and played bingo for quar-
ters with the residents to celebrate the day.


Plant sale to
benefit youth camp
The students at West Orange Bap-
tist Church are holding a huge plant
sale March 2-4. All proceeds will go
toward the youth camp trip in June.
The church is at 200 S. Tubb St.,
Oakland.


Sharing their experiences
The youth group at Church of the Messiah in Winter Garden recently shared testimonies from their trip to
Youthquake in North Carolina. Pictured during the talk are, I-r, youth directors Heather and Jarrod Hanks,
Kate Griffin, Corey Chancelor, Meredith Matthews, Stephanie Griffith, Mattie Hungate and Casey Cook.


Weight-loss specialist joins Herb Shoppe
Christine Allen has joined the staff and is certified as a personal trainer and
at Downtown Herb Shoppe and Day Beyond Success master coach.
Spa as a weight-loss specialist. Allen For more information, call 407-
has worked in the health and wellness 656-9119. The business is at 33 S.
field since 1992. She has a Bachelor Main St., Winter Garden. Allen is
of Science degree in exercise science available for private consultations.


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Students express thoughts about flag
The Winter Garden Elks Lodge 2165 recently held its annual Americanism essay contest at Whispering Oak
Elementary School, and 5th-graders were asked to write an essay on 'What I Feel When I Look Up at the
American Flag' in 250 words or less. Students were judged on content, originality and neatness, those
placing were Brandon Rowley and Ashley Virden, 1st place; Carleigh Sales and Katelyn Erickson, 2nd
place; Kerry Callery and Haleigh Mott, 3rd place; and Anthony Morales, Sarah Hussain and Maggie Bak-
er, honorable mention. The winners received an American flag and framed certificate, and the top players
also received $50, $25 or $15. The top 3 will now compete at the district level. With the winners are Elks
Alice Armstrong and Stan Srrmith, contest chairpersons.


Taking a break on a bridge
Several members from Boy Scout Troop 210 of Winter Garden recently backpacked 11.4 miles through the
Tosohatchee Preserve. Thirty-six Scouters from throughout Central Florida continue training for their 12-
day expedition through the rugged Philmont Scout Ranch in northeast New Mexico this summer. Pausing
during their hike are, I-r, Jamer Heasley, Bryan Hare, Brendon Knapp, Alex Slimak, Robert Eisinger and
Marco Sulsenti. Next up for these hearty trekkers is a 20-mile day hike March 19.





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Foreign missionary
to speak at
W.O. Baptist
The public is invited to hear the
Rev. Dr. Gene Dubberly, missionary
to Uruguay, speak this Sunday, March
5, at the morning worship service at
West Orange Baptist Church in Oak-
land. Dubberly and his wife have min-
istered in South America for the past
42 years, appointed by the Foreign
Mission Board of the Southern Bap-
tist Convention.
Dubberly graduated from Stetson
University, DeLand, and the south-
western Baptist Theological Seminary
in Fort Worth, Texas. He was previ-
ously pastor of the First Baptist
Church of Jensen Beach.
He will be accompanied by his sis-
ter, Dixie Atkinson, formerly of Win-
ter Garden, who will sing prior to the
message.
The church is at 200 S. Tubb St. For
more information, call 407-656-9749.

Rent Tanner Hall
Tanner Hall on Lake Apopka is
available for rental for events on
weekends and weekdays. For more
information, call the Winter Garden
Recreation Department at 407-656-
4155. The Tanner is at 29 W. Garden
Ave.


Breastfeeding information and support
Melissa Hessert, pictured with her 4-month-old son, Devon Thomas, is
leading a new La Leche League group in Winter Garden. La Leche
League International is a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to
providing breastfeeding help to mothers and babies. Hessert leads
monthly meetings and takes phone calls at home. Call 407-656-7878
for more information or assistance.


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W-A-7 --






Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 7A


Blood-screening program raises $5,500
The Winter Garden Rotary Club thanks all who helped with the Rotary and Health Central's blood-screen-
ing program last month. There were 277 participants, and $5,500 was raised. David Sylvester (back), who
is with Health Central Park, is surrounded by some of the volunteers who helped with the successful event.
The money raised will be spread to various organizations the Rotary helps to support, such as the School
Nurse Program, Edgewood Children's Ranch, the Christian Service Center, Russell Home for Atypical Chil-
dren and the Oakland Nature Preserve.


Classes at Winter
Garden Rec
The Winter Garden Recreation De-
partment offers activities for children
and adults. For more information, call
the rec office at 407-656-4155. Pre-
registration is required for most
events.
The Winter Garden Recreation De-
partment has scheduled activities for
adults 50 and older. For more infor-
mation, call the rec at 407-656-4155.
Pilates Learn techniques in
stretching and healthy exercise to in-
crease flexibility, cardiovascular
strength and spine alignment. Each
class is $7 and takes place Thursdays
< from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Little Hall, 31
" W. Garden Ave.
Tennis lessons Beginner and in-
termediate classes are for adults and
youth ages 5 and older at the Chapin
Station courts on Tuesday evenings
: and Saturday mornings. Classes run
six weeks and cost $30 (5-7 years old),
: $54 (ages 8-14) and $84 (15 to adult).
S Yoga Join yoga instructor
Sheila Scott at the Old Fire Station
f Rec Center. Classes are Mondays and
Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. Cost is
$10 per class for city residents, $11
,: for others. A discounted six-class rate
and private instruction are available.
Bird-watching Go bird-Watch-
ing at Lake Apopka. Bird checklists,
plus binoculars and a field guide, are
also available to borrow free of charge.

AARP to meet
All seniors in the area are invited
to the next meeting of AARP Chapter
3697. It is March 6 at 1 p.m. in the
Hyde Park clubhouse on West Colo-
nial Drive in Winter Garden.
SAt the Februar meeting. Bozena
Premec. a health educator for the
SJ.S.A. Medical Group. spoke on the
importance of % vegetables and fruits in
the daih diet.
lN Members x ith initials fromJ-Q are
1 asked to bring refreshments for the
SMarch meeting. All are reminded to
bring used postage stamps, eyeglass-
es and hearing aids to be given to the
Lions Club and aluminum can tabs'
for the Ronald McDonald House.
Aso. canned and boxed foods willbe
collected for the West Orange Chris-
tian Ser\ ice Center in Ocoee.
For more. information, call Presi-
dent Esther Braswell at 407-905-0802.

VFW news
., Sandy Germany, national president
of the Ladies Auxiliary to the Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars, will be in Flori-
da this week. An aisle of flags will be
held in her honor in Ocala, followed
by two days of touring in the area and
a dinner on the third da\y.
Her theme this year is "From Sea
to Shining Sea. Freedom is not Free,'
and is has inspired many auxiliary:
members to fulfill projects for Amer-:
ican sern ice men and women.

Health screening
Walgreen sin Winter Garden will
host a free diabetes screening:March
6-7 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m..and
2:30-5 p.m. The drug store is at 13720
W. Colonial Drive. For more details,
call 407-656-1144.


Meeting at Dillard Elementary
School 310 N. Dillard St. Winter
,, .! arden :.
F', F .more information, call '
4, ,07- 77-8665 or visit
:. vwgracechurchorlando.corn


Rotary Club grows
The Winter Garden Rotary Club has a new member. Gary Atwill (far right),
a business intermediary with High Street Business Broker, was spon-
sored by John Terrell Jr. (center). With them is Don Duncan, mem-
bership chairperson.


Rec offers Active 50 programs


The Winter Garden Recreation
Department has programs for its
Active 50 and Over Group. For
more information on these pro-
grams, call the rec office at 407-
656-4155. All take place at the Old
Fire Station Recreation Cenler, 127
S. Boyd St., Winter Garden. Sign up'
in person at the rec office, 1 Sur-
prise Drive.
Irish for a day Wear green
March 16 and see a matinee show
at the Youkey Theater in Lakeland.
In concert: Ireland's comedian Hal
Roach, tenor Ciaran Sheehan and
pianist Eily O'Patterson. Cost is
$33 for city residents, $35 for oth-,
ers and includes transportation and
show admission. Lunch is on your
own.
Armchair Traveler Travel-
ers meet from 10 a.m. to noon on the
third Friday of each month. This
month's tour is of Germany and
will be conducted by local residents
through a video show and person-
al stories. The cost is $2, and light
refreshments will be served.

Duplicate bridge
N-S: 1. G. and M. Czarnecki 2. J.
Mitchell-R. Seidner 3. S. and I.
Horovitz 4/5 tied. Y. Peabody-M.
Voorhees, T. and L. Saulino; E-W: 1.
D. and J. Schweiger 2. G. and J. Wolt-
man 3. R. and B. Blair 4. N. Fortin-K.J.
Montaz 5. C. and N. Pavey.


Breakfast Event Club Join
the club for a steady diet of friend-
ship and healthy eating and discuss
current .events and topics of the day.
It meets on the third Tuesday of
each month from 9-11 a.m. Cost is
$2 and includes bagels, muffins,
fruit, orange juice, coffee and tea.
Knife collecting A local guest
speaker will share his fascination
with knife collecting and discuss
pocketknives Monday, March 20,
from 10-11:30 a.m. There is no
charge. -
AARP Driver Safety Program
- This two-day course (four hours
each day) is April 20-21 from 9'
a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $10 and
is open to anyone of any age. Par-
ticipants should bring a pencil and
pen; class materials will be pro-
vided.
Page Turners Literary Book
Club --- The group meets monthly
on the second MondaN from 2-5
p.m. There is no charge, and light
refreshments are served during the
round-robin discussion.

Rotary says thanks
The Winter Garden Rotary Club
thanks community members who pur-
chased orchids through the group's
West Orange Relay For Life fund-
raiser. A total of $364 was raised for
the American Cancer Society.


Steak Night!Pst 4305


1ST FRIDAY
of every month
6:00 pm to 8:30 pin
Steak, Baked Poteao & Salad
$12.00 per person
S ine in or take out! y

VFW Post 4305
1170 E. Plant St. Winter Garden
407-656-3078


Join Us For:
* Meaningful Contemporary Worship
* Relevant Biblical Teaching
* Interactive and caring Children's Classes
* A desire to serve and care for our
Community


Crawford Tire
Relay team plans
two events Saturday
The Crawford Tire Relay For Life
team will hold two events this Satur-
day, March 4. Both will be held at the
Elks Club on Ninth Street in Winter
Garden. All proceeds will go to the
American Cancer Society.
A rummage sale will take place
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To donate items
ahead of time, call 407-656-5125 and
leave a message.
A barbecue and horseshoe tourna-
ment will start at noon. Chicken and
ribs and combo dinners will be for
sale. This is being sponsored for the
sixth year by Apple Air Condition-
ing, which is supplying everything
and doing all the cooking.

Gardening seminars
at Pounds Motors
Pounds Motor Co. in downtown
Winter Garden is offering a lineup of
free classes on Saturdays at 10 a.m.
Each seminar will provide a different
aspect of do-it-yourself gardening.
The schedule is as follows: March
4, household pest control; and March
11, taking care of trees.
For more information, call 407-656-
1352.

City schedules free
landscaping seminar
The Winter Garden Utilities De-
partment is hosting a free landscap-
ing seminar just in time for spring. It
will be presented by Florida Yards
and Neighborhoods.
The seminar is Saturday, March 11,
from 9 a.m. to noon at Little Hall on
Lake Apopka. Call 407-654-2732 to,
reserve a seat.

Rotary offers chance
to win a grill and
help Relay team
The Winter Garden Rotary Club is
selling raffle tickets to help the Amer-
ican Cancer Society through the club's
West Orange Relay For Life team.
Walter Toole of Ace Hardware has
donated a $499 grill to be raffled off
at the Relay (at 10 p.m. March 31).
Tickets are $5 and can be purchased
from members or at various locations,
such as the Winter Garden Heritage
Foundation, First Commercial Bank,
West Orange Chamber of Commerce,
Hillcrest Insurance or Twin Land Ti-
tle.
For more details, call Bob
Buchanan at 407-716-1212.

Low-income seniors
can get assistance
with their utility bill
The city of Winter Garden is offer-
ing utility,bill assistance to qualify-
ing low-income seniors.. The Senior
Citizens' Utility Assistance Program
application and renewal process runs
through May 1.
Residents must meet several qual-
ifications. In addition, their annual in-
come in 2006 from all sources must not
exceed $1,034.09 per month for sin-
gle residents and $1,445.70 a month
for married seniors.
Residents can obtain an application
from the lobby of City Hall, 251 W.
Plant St., Winter Garden.
After qualifying, residents' city util-
ity bill will be reduced up to $35 each
month beginning in May. For more
information, call the assistant city
clerk at 407-656-4111, Ext. 2297.


Roper YMCA
registering for
soccer, T-ball
The Roper YMCA in Winter Garden
continues registrations for soccer and
baseball (T-ball and coach-pitch). The
sign-up period ends March 5. The cost
is $75 for Y members, $140 for others.
For more information, call 407-656-
6430. The Y is at 100 Windermere
Road.

FUMC sets spring
rummage sale
The United Methodist Women at
the First United Methodist Church of
Winter Garden are holding its spring
rummage sale this Saturday, March 4,
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Fellow-
ship Hall. Anyone with items to drop
off may do so Wednesday, March 1,
from 6-8 p.m.; Thursday from 9 a.m.
to 8 p.m.; and Friday from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m.
The church is at 125 N. Lakeview
Ave.

Memorial Gospel
Choir performing in
spring concert at
St. Paul M.B.C.
St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church
in Oakland is hosting its annual spring
concert featuring the Florida Memorial
Gospel Choir from Miami. The concert
is Saturday, March 11, at 7 p.m. and
will also feature other entertainment.
Florida Memorial College alumni
and members of the community who
enjoy gospel music are invited to attend.
The church is at 413 W. Oakland
Ave. For more information, call the
church at 407-877-6616.

Rec organizing
softball leagues
Registration continues for the Win-
ter Garden Recreation Department's
2006 spring men's, men's church and
co-ed leagues.
The league runs for 10 weeks. All
teams are awarded trophies at the end
of the season. The registration fee for
each team is $340 and includes six
new Worth softballs.
The season begins the week of
March 13. The deadline to register is
Friday, March 10. For more informa-
tion, call the rec office at 407-656-
4155.


DAILY
LUNCH SPECIALS
Dine In/Take Out


Programs at the
Winter Garden library
For information on programs offered
at the S.C. Battaglia Memorial Winter
Garden Library, call 407-656-4582. The
new library is at 805 E. Plant St. in Win-
ter Garden.
April 5, from 6-8 p.m., the library will
hold a reception for patrons and the par-
ents and students of Lakeview Middle
School who have displayed winning pro-
jects in the library relating to the histo-
ry and heritage of Winter Garden.
The library offers more than 90 com-
puter classes per month, ranging from
computer basics to advance classes, such
as Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
Wednesday program for children:
Tiny Tales is presented at 10:15 a.m. to
infants from birth to 18 months. Toddler
Time is at 10:45 a.m. for children 18-36
months. Storybook Fun for those ages
3-5 is at 11:15 a.m.

Blood drive at
C&W Trucking
C&W Trucking Inc. is hosting a
blood drive Saturday, March 18, from
9 a.m. to noon. First-time donors must
bring a photo ID.
The general public is welcome and
encouraged to give blood. C&W is at
703 Hennis Road, Winter Garden.

OCPS meeting to offer
info on relief school
for Lakeview Middle
Orange County Public Schools is
hosting a community meeting to in-
troduce the status of the new school de-
sign and construction for the Lake-
view Middle relief school.
The meeting, hosted by School
Board members Karen Ardaman of
District 4 and Jim Martin of District
1, is set for Tuesday, March 21, at
6:30 p.m. in the Lakeview auditori-
um. The school is at 1200 W. Bay St.,
Winter Garden.
The purpose of the meeting is to
share information and update residents
on the construction of a new middle
school in southwest Winter Garden
north of Lake Hartley and near the
newest extension of the State Road
429 Daniel Webster Beltway.
Anyone with questions regarding
this meeting can contact Dennis Foltz
of OCPS at 407-317-3974 or
foltzd@ocps.net.


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8A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


Messiah group returns from Gulf Coast trip


After traveling more than 1,100 miles to and
from Mississippi, the work crew from Church
of the Messiah in Winter Garden arrived home
weary but looking forward to returning as soon
as they can. It's an overwhelming job still fac-
ing the people in the small area of the Gulf Coast
where the group volunteered.
One member of the group, Marc Bujnicki,
j. as startled by the vast devastation still exist-
ing more than five months after Hurricane Ka-
trina hit.
"Some damaged homes have not been
touched," he said. "There are big and little hous-
es and businesses just sitting there. People are
awaiting money to make the changes needed."
Camp Coast Care was set up right after Kat-
rina in what was left of the gymnasium of Coast


Episcopal School. Three of its walls had been
blown out, and 85 percent of the roof was gone.
But under the direction of the Rev. Joe Robin-
son and a permanent staff of seven plus 3,000
volunteers this camp is working diligently
to help residents left in Long Beach, Miss., get
their lives back in order.
Someone. said the camp is a combination of
church camp and the television series M*A*S*H.
There is a medical clinic, where one of the
volunteers from Winter Garden, Ada Athill,
worked part of the week. The clinic is now in a
building, but initially the medical staff worked
in a tent. There is another tent where donated
clothing is sorted and distributed. There is a
tool shed, where tools of all kinds are stored
when not in use.


The local work crew directed traffic, did yard
work and helped muck out houses, which in-
volving ripping out drywall. Athill also worked
part of the time on a mucking project.
It took the group just a few days to build a
39-foot handicap ramp and deck for the new
medical facility. Members also served meals to
the 100-plus volunteers and cleaned up after-
ward.
Tom Johnston, one of the crew, expressed
amazement at how cooperative the Messiah
group, with the help of Alabama resident Ken
Snow, worked so rapidly and well together.
"It was like they had worked together for
years," Johnston said.
The crew felt it brought hope to the people,
who constantly expressed their gratitude.


Bob Somers, Steve LaFave, Tom Johnston, Marc Bujnicki and Tom
Rutherford (from left) stand on the completed medical clinic handicap
ramp and deck.


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 9A


Health Central gets physical with Oakland PD


With the aid of a specially designed program from Health
Central, 15 Oakland police officers are gunning for the
bad guys high cholesterol, poor nutrition and lack of ex-
ercise in their plan to stay fit.
The officers volunteered to participate in a new health
and wellness program created by the hospital's wellness
director, Lee Anne Denney, and personal trainer Chris-
tine Allen. Based on the officers' responses to confiden-
tial questionnaires, Denney and Allen rolled fitness train-
ing, nutrition information and suggestions for living a
healthy lifestyle into a 12-week program.
Oakland Police Chief Tim Driscoll was keen on bring-
ing a wellness program to the department.
"1 know how important it is to refresh and motivate of-
ficers who are required to be in good physical condition,"
he said. "Offering medical testing, fitness training and nu-
tritional education assists an officer by better understanding
their body and how it may have changed during their ca-
reer, whether they are new to law enforcement or sea-
soned veterans."


The program, which started last month, first put the of-
ficers through their paces by measuring each officer's
weight, height, body fat, blood pressure and heart rate.
Cholesterol, blood sugar, flexibility and cardiovascular
tests rounded out the pre-screening. Based on their indi-
vidual results, each officer received customized exercise
plans to increase their fitness quotients.
Education and fitness seminars are part of the four-
month program, and officers will be re-evaluated in May
to measure their progress.
Chief Driscoll feels that a wellness program is integral
in maintaining emotional health as well.
"I truly believe that a fit and healthy employee is a hap-
py employee, and a happy employee is a productive em-
ployee. And, typically, employees who are seen as happy
and productive are those who tend to provide a service
with care and a smile.
For more'information on the wellness programs avail-
able at Health Central, go to www.healthcentral.org or
call 407-296-1398.


Oakland Police Chief Tim Driscoll prepares for a glucose test
administered by Lee Anne Denney, wellness director at Health
Central.


r I, [
a e I.


5 HOMES BEING ARCHITECTURALLY SALVAGED!
7 DAYS: FRIDAY TO FRIDAY/ MAR 3" TO MAR 10"T 9:30AM 6:00PM
ALL ITEMS must be removed by March 25, 2006, "ALMYRA" a 1922 Arts & Crafts 2 Story Home,
late 1800's 2 story Bead & Board Home, 1925 Sears Roebuck.Honie, 1940's 1950's Homes,
some 1960's & 1970's Refurbishings. 1870"s Antiques to 1920's 1980's Attire & Decor.
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Christine Allen, personal trainer for the
Health Central Wellness Department, watch-
es while Oakland Police Chief Tim Driscoll
gets a leg up on his fitness regimen.


I
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'^f^






10A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006



Ocoee

I I New church premieres in West Oaks AMC theater


SL.A. Acting Workshop grads
,,, Excited to be recent graduates of the L.A. Acting Workshop's Voice-Over Technique, Level I class, students
,:smile for the camera as they show off their new success. Pictured are: Ginny Kopf (instructor), Richard
SKump, Cathy Bieda, Joey Suska, Janet Raskin and Gary van Clief.


Seniors to visit Strawberry Festival


, On Saturday, March 11, the West
Orange Seniors will take the bus to
,the Strawberry Festival in Plant
City. The cost is $15. Those plan-
ning to attend need to call Helen
I: Esposito at 407-656-6826. She is
' he trip coordinator.
Set for Thursday, March 16, is a
Penny Social at the noon luncheon
meeting im the Ocoee Community
Center. Members will bring items
to sell, such as books, dishes, ce-
-ramics and household items no
clothes or shoes.
Last Thursday, members met for
lunch at the Asian Bistro Buffet in


The West Orange Christian Ser-
vice Center Thrift Shop, 300 W.
Franklin St. in Ocoee, is now open
on Saturday mornings between 9
a.m. and noon for local shoppers.
Donations to the thrift shop are
only accepted on Tuesdays and
Thursday between 9 a.m. and 6


* ABEKA Curriculum
P Tumbling
*Arts& Crafts
* Safe Playground
* Chapel
* Recorded Video
Monitoring


Winter Garden, and the crafters
then worked on St. Patrick's Day
cloverleaf pins for the March 16
luncheon.
Celebrating a birthday was Car-
ol Morris.
Seniors will also be attending the
Thundering Spirit Pow-Wow in
Mount Dora March 3, 4 and 5, a
Native American gathering. Oth-
ers will attend the Woman's Club
of Ocoee's 82nd Birthday Luncheon
on March 4.
For more information, call
Frances Watts, club president, at
407-656-5622.


Items left outside the building
without being accepted by a staff
member must be disposed of due
to frequent and random scaveng-
ing.
For more information, call 407-
656-6678.


WEST ORLANDO
BAPTIST CHURCH
Child Discovery Center
INFANTS THROUGH K-4
Easy access to 429
and Turnpike
Located at 429
& Plant St.

Dance Classes
Music
ACSI Certified-
Brand New Facilities
Safe & Clean
Environment


Fashion and
Jewelry Show
to benefit
Relay for Life
t9elk's of Ocoee and jew-
elers with Premier Designs
have teamed up to provide a
day of fashion and fun for all
ages. The Crawford Tire Re-
lay for Life Team Fashion
and Jewelry Show will be
held Sunday, March 12, from
2-4 p.m. in Health Central's
Gleason Room. The cost is a
$5 donation at the door, and
Vanessa Echols of Channel
9 will be the guest speaker.
Models will display the
versatility of high-fashion
Premier Designs with cloth-
ing provided by Belk's. Jew-
elry will be available for pur-
chase. Raffle prizes will be
awarded, and refreshments
will be served.
Guest speaker will be
Vanessa Echols, and allpro-
ceeds will benefit the Amer-
ican Cancer Society's Relay
for Life.
To buy tickets, call 407-
656-5125 and leave message
if no one is home. For more
information, call Donna Sol-
do at 352-242-5336 or Melis-
sa Albrecht at 352-267-3757.


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Choosing a 20-foot movie screen
and comfy chairs with cup-holders
over the traditional pew and pulpit, Fu-
sion Church will launch church ser-
vices in the West Oaks AMC movie
theater on Easter Sunday, April 16, at
10 a.m.
Holding a church service in a
movie theater may seem odd, but Fu-
sion Church is actually the latest in a
nationwide trend of progressive
churches that meet in cinemas in an
effort to be more accessible in the
community.
"Everyone goes to movie theaters,"
says Nathan Camp, Fushion's lead
pastor. "It's a comfortable, non-
threatening environment for people
who are curious about church but
would never set foot in a traditional
steeple-topped building. Instead of
bringing the people to the church,
we're bringing the church to the peo-

Ocoee Christian Church
names new staff member
Oco'ee Christian Church has a new
director of Children's Ministries,
Scott Fensterer, who has presented
Bible studies for almost 10 years.
His background includes a suc-
cessful career in art and sculpture,
which he incorporates into his teach-
ing curriculum in unique and creative
ways, using up-to-date technology,
such as audio, video, games, work-
shops, puppetry and music.
"Our new rooms will envelop the
children and invite them into our
world," said Fensterer. "Our Studio
Room, designed for grades K-5, will
be modeled after a fun and fantasti-
cal working studio complete with can
lights and plenty of nonsensical
props.
"It will likely be.a total work-in-
. progress for years to come since I
feel each child should be able to add.
his or her distinctiveness to the room
in subtle ways."
Ocoee Christian Church, located
on South Bluford Avenue, has al-
ready started offering Children's Sun-
day School classes for all ages from
9:30 a.m. and Children's Church dur-
ing the regular morning worship from
10:45 until noon.
For more information, call 407-
656-2010 or visit www.ocoeechristian.
com.

Blood Drive in Ocoee
The city of Ocoee is sponsoring a
blood drive on Friday, March 10, from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the old fire station
on Bluford Avenue in front of City
Hall.
Darden Restaurants is giving away
$10 in gift certificates to every donor.
Other coupons will also be available
to donors.


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ple."
Camp says that several area loca-
tions were considered but that the
AMC theater offered the best atmo-
sphere for the kind of church he en-
visioned.
Fusion's service will feature music
that reflects today's music with a
mixing of rock and hip hop.
"I never understood why so often
stepping into a church feels like you
are stepping into a time warp back to
the '70s," said Camp.
"I think you can praise God with
hip hop, turn tables and guitars as
much as with pipe organs. The point
is not the music, but the message it re-
lays."
Next in the service is a relevant
message that merges God with life,
said Camp: "The point is to make Je-
sus understandable to today's gener-
ation."

OGTV rebroadcasts
Ocoee political forum
The political forum held at Ocoee
City Hall last week is being re-
broadcast on OGTV-Channel on
March 2 at 7 p.m., March 3, 4, 5
and 6 at 1 p.m. and 8 p.m., March
9 at 7 p.m. and March 10, 11, 12
and 13 at 1 p.m. and 8 p.m.
All eight candidates for the
Ocoee City Commission partici-
pated in the forum, which was
sponsored by the Woman's Club
of Ocoee.

Senior Health Day
at Ocoee McRae's
The next Senior Health Day will be
held Tuesday, March 7, in the com-
munity room at McRae' s in the West
Oaks Mall in Ocoee from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. There will be bingo at 11 a.m.
and 1 p.m., as well as door prizes, in-
formative seminars, blood pressure
checks and vendors presenting their
services.
Lunch will be provided from 11:45
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and the first 100
people who present this press release
or their Senior Day postcard will re-
ceive a prize.
The free event for seniors is spon-
sored by McRae's and Colonial Lakes
Health Care.

Christian Service Center
to hold Spring Break
Vacation Club
The KidsFOCUS Program at the
West Orange Christian Service Cen-
ter announces its Spring Break Vaca-
tion Club. All-day adventures are
planned for Friday, March 10, through
Friday,. March 17, for children of
working parents.
The West Orange Christian Service
Center is located 300 W. Franklin St.
in Ocoee.
Call 407-656-6678 for availability
and prices and ask for Arthur.


He preaches from an Apple laptop
and uses lots of stories and videos in
his messages.
Keeping with the setting, dress will
be casual and comfortable, with jeans
the norm.
The church will begin with a four-
part series called "Espresso Yourself:
How to live a caffeinated Christian-
ity," a topic of interest to many 20- and
30-somethings who view Jesus as su-
pernatural but are still searching for
a faith that reflects that, said Camp,
who was formerly the young adult
pastor for five years at Victory World
Church in Atlanta.
Camp left Atlanta with his wife,
three children and more than 20 peo-
ple to start Fusion Church.
The West Oaks AMC is located at
9415 W. Colonial Drive in Ocoee.
For more information, log on to
www.fusionchurch.org.

Adult softball registration
The Ocoee Parks and Recreation
Department is holding registration for
men's C and D softball leagues from
now to March 10. The registration fee
is $350, and this includes the $40 ASA
fee.
Space will be limited to six teams per
league, and games will start March
20.
For more information, call Mark
Johnson at 407-905-3100, Ext. 5002.
Adult basketball
registration
The Ocoee Parks and Recreation
Department is taking registrations for
its adult basketball league. Deadline for
registration is March 1. The registra-
tion fee is $350, and limited space is
available.
The league will start March 16.
For more information, call Mark
Johnson at 407-905-3100, Ext. 5002.


Christian Service
Center needs volunteers
The West Orange Christian Service
Center, 300 W. Franklin St. in Ocoee,
needs volunteers for its KidsFOCUS
Program to help youngsters with read-
ing, math and spelling for an hour and
one half per week.
"All it takes is a willing spirit to be-
come a child's mentor," said Peg Mac-
Donald, director of the West Orange
center. For details, call 407-656-6678.

Teen dances for Ocoee
students
The Ocoee Parks and Recreation
Department sponsors teen dances only
for Ocoee Middle School students on
the first and third Friday of every
month from 8-11 p.m. at the Jim
Beech Recreation Center, 1820 A.D.
Mims Road. The cost is $3, and the
student must have a school I.D.
For more information, call Lori
Horn at 407-905-3182.


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 11A


Ocoee teen raising funds for
American Lung Association


By Mary Anne Swickerath

Sixteen-year-old Taylor Elliott of
Ocoee is an active community service
volunteer for the American Legion Post
63 and the VFW Ladies Auxiliary in
Winter Garden and the American Lung
Association of Central Florida.
"Some college scholarship applica-
tions require community service," said
the Circle Christian School 10"-grad-
er. "Although my hours are well ful-
filled, the American Legion, VFW
Ladies Auxiliary and the American
Lung Association continue to be a big
part of my life."
Last year, she and her family and
friends organized Team Elliott that
raised $3,206 for the ALA Orlando
Asthma Walk. This year the team's
goal is to surpass that mark.
Team Elliot will hold a garage sale
at the American Legion Hall on Plant
Street in downtown Winter Garden on
Saturday, April 8. Tiger's Eye Studio,
also on Plant Street, is a collection point
for garage sale donations.
"Everyone I know either has or
knows someone who has breathing is-
sues," said Taylor. "I was diagnosed
as a young toddler with asthma, and I
continue to manage this condition ev-
eryday. A good friend of mine has em-
physema. Another friend has severe
allergies that affect her breathing."
She said that other teens might vol-
unteer for the Lung Association if they
know about her involvement.
Alan Bounville of the American
Lung Association said: "High school
students who need community service
involvement for scholarship applica-
tions are invited to participate with ed-
ucation programs and fund-raising."
The association and Taylor are part-
nering with all teens who wish to vol-
unteer.
"My involvement has become so


TAYLOR ELLIOTT
meaningful that I see myself connect-
ed to the American Lung Association
for life," said Taylor. "I'm proud to be
involved. It feels good to help. Hope-
fully, my generation will make a dif-
ference in helping everyone 'breathe
easier.' "
Her asthma has not kept Taylor from
being a competitive ice dancer, with
her brother, Zachary, a team that won
a bronze medal at junior Nationals re-
cently.
, Besides her work with the Lung As-
sociation, she also volunteers as a pa-
triotic singer for local events and vet-
erans' groups, a role she has enjoyed
since she was 8 years old.
She has won awards for her volun-
teer efforts, as well as her photogra-'
phy, and is an excellent student.
Despite all of her activities, she has
agreed to be a team captain for the up-
coming ALA's Orlando Asthma Walk
on Sept. 16.
For more information on volunteer
opportunities with the American Lung
Association, call 407-425-5864.


Golf tournament to raise funds

for American Cancer Society


The Crawford Tire Relay for Life
Team is hosting its sixth annual golf
tournament at the'Forest Lake Club
in Ocoee on Friday, March 24, and
more than 100 golfers are expected to
take part. The cost is $70 per person,
and this fee includes lunch. There will
be awards for the first-, second- and
third-place teams, as well as. door
prizes.

Line dancing in Ocoee
* Line dance classes are held each
Wednesday and Friday morning from 9-
10:30. Evening classes are held every,
Thursday except on the second Thurs-
day. Classes on Thursday are as fol-
lows: beginners from 6-7:30 p.m. and in- -
termediate to advanced classes from
7:30-9 p.m. Donations are accepted.
This is a fun way to exercise and work
outat the same time. Please wear leather
sole shoes or something comfortable.
These lessons are held in the Ocoee
Community Center behind the old fire
station and the Withers-Maguire House.
For more information, call Glenda Mar-
shall at 407-294-9048.

Join the Ocoee
Historical Commission
Interested members of the commu-
nity are invited to attend the meetings
of the Ocoee Historical Comirission
on the second Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m. at the Ocoee Woman's Club
on Lakewood Avenue.

Woman's Club available
The Woman's Club of Ocoee Club-
house is available for weddings, show-
ers, birthday parties and club meet-
ings. TQ inquire about availability and
rental rates, call 407-656-7115.






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Hole sponsorships are available at
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All proceeds from this tournament
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To register, call Toby Best at 321-
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Committee holding Stranger Safety Poster Contest


By Victoria Laney

Crayons and paper can help
protect children from danger
when they use them to illustrate
basic safety rules for Ocoee's
Stranger Safety Poster Contest.
The contest is open to kinder-
garten through fifth grade, and
prizes will be awarded for each
grade level.
"The goal is to teach children
to understand and be aware of
'stranger danger,' said Martha
Lopez Anderson, chairman of
Ocoee's Child Protection Rec-
ommendation Committee, which
is hosting the contest.
"They can learn how to stay
safe with people they don't know
and people they kind of know."
The posters must be original
drawings and may not have pho-


American Legion meets at
The Ocoee American Legion Post
109 is now located at the Vignetti
Recreation Center at 1906 Adair St.
in Ocoee while the post is under-
going construction. The Vignetti.
Rec Center will continue as the
meeting place until the end of the
year. The meetings are held on the
second Friday of each month at 7

Birthday Luncheon
this Saturday
One of the most popular social events
of the year is the Woman Club of
Ocoee's annual Birthday Luncheon at
the clubhouse at 4 N. Lakewood Av-
enue. The event will be held Saturday,
March 4; and tickets, at $15 each, are
now available by calling 407-656-7115.

Christian Service Center
needs donations
The West Orange Christian Service
Center is asking the community to
please donate the following items that
are needed: Kool-Aid juice boxes,
Capri Sun juice boxes, popcorn,
spaghetti and spaghetti sauce, potato
chips, diapers, baby wipes, sunscreen,
tissue paper, tempera paints, copy pa-
per, toilet paper, colored markers, scis-
sors and newsprint paper.
The center is located at 300 W.
Franklin St. in Ocoee. For more in-
formation, call 407-656-6678.


tographs, stickers or other objects
attached. Each poster will be
judged on creativity, colorfulness,
compliance with the rules and
how well a clear safety message is
conveyed. As part of the contest,
children will be taught four basic
safety rules.
"This poster contest will help
our children to be safer," said Lisa
Arnold, Ocoee Elementary art
teacher. "Students remember in-
formation much better when they
express it through their art. They
discuss their drawings with oth-
er students and the teacher, and it
is an opportunity to reinforce im-
portant safety rules. Also, we are
able to see how well they under-
stand what is taught."
A first-, second- and third-place
winner will be selected from each
grade level, and the school with


Vignetti Recreation Center
p.m.
Anyone who has a son, daughter,
mother, father, brother or sister, hus-
band or wife serving in the military
qualifies for a Blue Star Banner.
Those whose zip code is 34761 can
call Post 109 to receive a banner.
For more information, call Adju-
tant Ed Bowers at 407-877-6057.

Pop Warner league
needs coaches
The Ocoee Bulldogs Pop Warner
Football League is seeking cheer and
football coaches for the 2006 season.
The league is looking for experienced
coaches interested in sharing time and
knowledge with kids.
The league would also like to hear
from anyone interested in being a part
of its general board for the 2006 season.
For details, call Sheri Adkinson at
407-702-4222 or Lisa Schifftner at
407-654-7514 or visit the league's Web
site at www.ocoeebulldogs.org.

Square dance lessons
offered Thursdays
Square dancing with the Garden
Patch Squares is offered each Thurs-
day at the Vignetti Recreation Center
from 6-9 p.m. Tht center is located at
1910 Adair St. in Ocoee.
For details, call Barbara McBride
at 407-889-8558 or 407-256-7354.


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Our Office Policy. :The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right
to refuse to pay; cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment or ny other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 horse of re-
sponding to the advertisement for Ihe free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, ex-
aminalion or treatment.


the most participants will win a
prize. All contestants will receive
a certificate of participation. The
prizes will be awarded at Ocoee's
First Spring Safety Fling on
March 25 at the Ocoee Commu-
nity Center on Starke Lake.
"Every student at Citrus Ele-
mentary will be entering the con-
test, and we hope to have the same
level of participation from other
schools," said Lopez Anderson.
Flyers have been distributed to
home-schooled students and lo-
cal elementary schools. Students
do have to be residents of Ocoee
to enter the contest, and posters
must be received at Ocoee City
Hall on or before the entry dead-
line of Friday, March 3.
For complete contest rules,
click on the Ocoee city Web site
at www.ci.ocoee.us.


Evening classes
offered at Ocoee High
Beginning March 20, three evening
classes will be offered at Ocoee High
School through Westside Tech. In-
struction will be available in conver-
sational Spanish, Microsoft Office
computer applications and art (acrylic
and watercolor).
For more information or to sign up,
call 407-905-3000, Ext. 4105, Monday
through Friday from 3:30-7 p.m.

Veterans reps
Thursday in Ocoee
The American Legion Post 109 of
Ocoee will have a representative in
Ocoee City Hall each Thursday to pro-
vide claim initiation assistance for Or-
ange County residents who may be
entitled to receive veteran-related fed-
eral and state entitlements. For more
information, call 407-905-3100.


Barbecue and Horseshoe
Tournament March 4
The Crawford Tire Relay for Life
Team of Ocoee is holding a barbecue
and horseshoe tournament this Satur-
day, March 4, at the Elks Club at Ninth
and Plant streets in Winter Garden.
Starting at noon chicken and ribs;and
combo dinners will be served. This
barbecue is being sponsored for the
sixth year by Apple Air Condition-
ing. The owners supply everything for
the barbecue and take care of all the
cooking for this event.
"We appreciate their support foi our
team," said Sherry Wise.
All proceeds will go to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.

Rummage sale
to benefit American
Cancer Society
The Crawford Tire Relay Team:will
hold a rummage sale at the Elks Club
on Ninth Street in Winter Garden'this
Saturday, March 4, from 8 a.m. until
2 p.m. If you have any items to;do-
nate, call 407"656-5125 and leave a
message.
All proceeds will go to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society..

Pinewood Derby Challenge
planned for March
The Jim Beech Rec Center will be
the scene of the 2006 Pinewood Der-
by Challenge presented by Boy Scout
Troop 198 on Saturday, March 25.
Registration and check-in will be held
at 9 a.m., and the first race is sched-
uled for 10 a.m.
There is a,$5 entrance fee per car
for each division, and concessions will
be open.
The divisions for competition are
Cub Scouts, Boys Scouts, adult lead-
ers, siblings and open.
The first-place winners in each di-
vision will receive $25 and a trophy.
Trophies will also be awarded to the
second- and third-place winners.
For more information or to be a lane
sponsor, call 407-4$9-2979.


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12A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006



Windermere


Local firm supports People to People ambassador Parsons' dancers present a 'Royal' tribute i. a


MetroWest resident Tilden Snow-
don of Legacy Financial Advisors is
an advocate for education and op-
portunities to further education. He
has offered financial support to Gotha
Middle School student Clayton Vren-
Jak, who intends to further his edu-
cation with high school and college
credits as a People to People ambas-


sador.
Vrenjak has been accepted into the
People to People Student Ambassador
Class of 2006, an international and
domestic education, cultural exchange
and humanitarianism program. This
opportunity is offered through the of-
fice of Mary Jean Eisenhower through
a special nomination process.


-i


MetroWest resident Tilden Snowdon of Legacy Financial Advisors has
offered financial support to Gotha Middle School student Clayton Vren-
jak to participate in the People to People student ambassador program.


Garden Club plans tea
for March meeting
The Windermere Garden Club will
hold its next regular monthly meeting
on Thursday, March 9, beginning with
business meeting 9:30 a.m. in Town
,Hall. After the meeting, members will
'carpool to the home of Sheryle
,McAfee for the Iris in Bloom Garden
Club Tea and a talk by Jim Thomas of
Biosphere Inc. Thomas will discuss
bioscaping and aquascaping and show
its results in the landscape and shore-
line improvements at McAfee's yard.
Fmo more information on the club
or the meeting, call Sherry Smith at
407-909-1309. New members are wel-
p;ome at any time.

Olympia High baseball,
softball boosters present
Cowboy Ball March 4
The community is invited to attend
the Cowboy Ball presented by the
Ol\ mpia High School baseball and
softball boosters on Saturday, March
4,. from 6-10 p.m. at Camp Down.
Tickets for the adults-only party are
$35 per person in advance or $50 at the
'd6or. The dinner, dance and auction
will feature a barbecue dinner with
beer and wine included. Proceeds will
benefit the OHS baseball and softball
Construction project. For more infor-
mation or tickets, call Cheryl Miller at
407-492-1323 or Mary Click at 407-
t491-8712. Camp Down is located on
NMain Street in Windermere.


Community yard sale
this Sat. at OHS
The Varsity Club at Olympia High
School will sponsor a community yard
sale this Saturday, March 4, from 7-11
a.m. in the parking lot.
The club is renting booth space at the
sale for $10. Individuals interested in
joining the sale should e-mail Colleen
Windt at mittonc@ocps.net.


Rent booth space for.
Windermere Rotary
Festival Among Lakes
The Windermere Rotary Club has
started planning its annual communi-
ty event, Festival Among the Lakes.
The two-day event will take place
April 1-2 at Camp Down on Main
Street in Windermere. This year, Ro-
tary International is celebrating its
100th anniversary.
The festival will include a wake-
board competition, extensive boat
show, concessions, games, entertain-
ment and a charity art show sponsored
by Cutting Edge Communications.
Local vendors, crafters and artists
can reserve booth space by calling
Paula Abney at 407-877-6110, Ext.
222. The exhibit space is 10 feet by
10 feet, and tents are welcome.
Cash prized for Best of Show ex-
hibits will be awarded for first, sec-
ond and third places. The prizes are
$300, $200 and $100, respectively.
Booth space is limited.


Register for Windermere's
Run Among the Lakes April
-.Windermere's Parks and Recreation All participants will enjoy co
.Conmmittee in collaboration \ ith Track mentary breakfast sandwiches pr
-,Shack %t ill host its fifth annual 5K Run ed by Bistro Gourmet at McDon
.Among the Lakes on Saturday. April 8. along with fruit, orange drink an
Ingginning at Town Hall. tled water.
- -The course for the 3.1 -mile run/w alk To download a registration for
d.iIi meander along the tow n's unpa% ed, to www.trackshack.com/events.
.hkrd-packed sand streets under the oak Shack is located at 1104 N. Mills
canopyy and along the lakefront. in Orlando. For details, call 407
-.The race is an unscored fun run for 1313. Registration forms are avail
:-unners and %\ alkers of all ages. The top the town office.
10 male and female finishers will re-
qceive awards. No other times will be
recorded but participants will be able to i i
get their times from an overhead clock, 1- 1 N 1'
': at the fish line.
The adult race begins at 8 a.m. fol-
lo\\ed bs a children's race at 9:15 a.m.
"-The awards ceremony is scheduled for
9:30 a.m.
The kids run is free to all children,
S\ ho must register the day of the event.
.They \ ill receive finishing ribbons The
first 100 children to register will receive
complimentaryn T-shirts.
The entr. fee is $10 for youth younger
than 17 and adults 65 \years and older
and $17 for other adults through April 1.
*The enrN fee from April 2 through April
7 is $20. There is an additional $1 fee for
;pa ment by credit card The fee on race
day is $25 by cash or check only.
Runners can pick up race packets,
which include race numbers, T-shirts
and information at Track Shack. April 5- B
.7. from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and at Town L
'Hall on race daN beginning at 6-30 a.m. -*
The presenting sponsors are Bogin,
Mlunns & Nlunns and Health Central I
hospital. Other sponsors include Main
; Street Realtors, Keene's Pointe, Suzi
Karr Realty, Pinnacle Financial, Ani- o.".. ,,or ,., *iln,. ..l.d... ia
imal Clinic of Windermere. The West
'Orange Times. As You Like It and Col- 407 656-8838
or Wheel paints. -,,... ,- ...
This year's T-shirt will feature an orig-
inal design by Windermere artist Kitty
,Osbum. ..,",I-L l


,mpli-
rovid-
ald's,
d bot-

m, go
Track
s Ave.
-893-
able at


By Gail Parker


The Nutcracker presented by Eliz-
abeth Parsons Community Dance
Theatre at Olympia High School re-
cently was a tribute to the legacy of
Orlando dance pioneers Edith and
Bill Royal.
The Royals once had the largest
dance school in Central Florida.
They also produced the first, and for
many years, the only Nutcracker in
the community.
Veteran Henry Hemandez, former
principal dancer of Southern Ballet
Theatre now known as Orlando Bal-
let, choreographed Elizabeth Par-
sons' endeavor. This version of The
Nutcracker offered an enchanted
evening filled with glamorous cos-
tumes and amazing scenery, consis-
tent with the 1830s.
Act one began with the usual ar-
rival of party guests entering through
a beautifully decorated front door
where the Silverhaus' maid greeted
them.
The door opened to a grand parlor
with a towering, lighted Christmas
tree where the guests mingled and
performed traditional party dances
with the children.
Robert Meyers, who anchored the
ballet, provided a rich and lively per-
formance as Herr Dresselmeyer. He
was the epitome of intrigue as he
performed his magical acts with his
stylish cape, captivating the audi-
ence.
The Columbine and dancing
Harlequin performed beautifully, es-
pecially Jacque Westbrook with her
graceful and strong stage presence
as the Vivandiere.
Brittany Dobbs as Clara, appeared
looking for her Nutcracker and car-
rying a single light. She emerged
onto a dark stage, except for the
twinkling of the Christmas tree.
At the stroke of midnight under
the direction of Dresselmeyer, the
tree and the Nutcracker magically
grew. Thus, Clara's mystical dream


began.
After the Nutcracker and his sol- '
diers fought the Rat Queen and her
rodents, the Nutcracker transformed
into a prince with graceful precision
portrayed by guest artist Patrick
VanBuren. Now in the blue hue of the
Snow Kingdom, he slid Clara across
the stage in a glittering sleigh. The
Snow Queen, portrayed by West-
brook, danced fairylike in a shim-
mering ice blue tutu and then, the
Snow Queen and Dresselmeyer
whisked the young couple away.
Act two opened with the Dance
of the Angels as they swirled on the
stage, looking like winged celestials
in flowing white gowns. They were
followed by guest artist Lilyan Vigo
Ellis, principal dancer of the Car-
olina Ballet. She performed a sweet
and exquisite variation of the Sugar
Plum Fairy. As Clara and the prince
watched from their thrones, they
were treated to various dances from
the Land of the Sweets.
Spanish Chocolate was followed
by Chinese Tea Dancers, utilizing
colorful umbrellas and ribbons to
create a swirling palette of colors.
Arabian Coffee was a sultry, sensu-
ous dance, which preceded the Rus-
sian dance. It featured difficult ath-
letic choreography, performed grace-
fully by Rachel DiBiasio and Van-
Buren. Me're Gigone featured Bar- "
bara Riggins, founder and former
artistic director of Southern Ballet.
Her cameo appearance was well re-
ceived and rewarded with rich ap-
plause.
This and the following dances,
such as The Waltz of the Flowers
with a butterfly and dragonfly, were
performed by some of the younger
dancers.,
The Sugar Plum Fairy, Vigo El-
lis, and her Cavalier, Attila Bongar,
another guest artist and principal of
the Carolina Ballet, danced the grand
Pas De Deux. They created a magi-
cal pair, graceful and deliberate with
spectacular lifts, stunning pirouettes


Elizabeth Parsons Community Dance Theatre performed 'The Nutcrack-
er' at Olympia High School in December. ,


The annual holiday favorite was a tribute to Edith and Bill Royal, Orlando
dance pioneers, who for many years produced the only 'Nutcracker'
performance in Central Florida.


and amazing leaps. Bongar seemed
to fly across the stage.
From start to finish, what im-
pressed me the most about Hernan-
dez's choreography was his atten-
tion to detail and his sense of music
- so keen that, it seemed


Rotarians learn about Canine Companions
Kelly Hargadon (center) of Canine Companions spoke to the Windermere Rotary Club during its meeting
Feb. 21. Hargadon told club members that after intensive training her golden retriever, Regan, was brought'
into service to assist with patient therapy in a hospital environment. The Canine Companions program
brings emotional benefits to patients and enhances their visual and memory aptitudes. Hargadon and Re-
gan are pictured with Julia Strimple, incoming Rotary president, and Craig Lee, current club, president.


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Tchaikovsky's music was written
just for this performance. Together
with the talented cast and the won-
derful contributions of the guest
artists, this was a Nutcracker that
defined the holidays with its suc-
cess.

Tickets on sale for
Garden Club's
annual Crazy Card
Party March 30
The Windermere Garden Club is
planning its annual Crazy Card Party
for Thursday, March 30. Doors will
open at Windermere Town Hall at
10:15 a.m. Lunch will be served at
11:15 a.m., and the crazy card games
will begin at 12:15 p.m. In addition,
festivities include a silent auction,
door prizes sand raffles.
The card party is open to the public
by prepaid reservation only. Tickets are
$15 per person and can be reserved
by calling Mary Brett at 407-877-2030
or e-mailing her at
marybrett@cfl.rr.com. Order tickets
early because seating is limited and
last year the event was sold out.
This is the club's only event to raise
funds for many community service
projects, such as scholarships at the
University of Florida for horticulture
students, grants for needy children to
attend summer camp and expenses to
send high school students to environ-
mental workshops. Throughout the
year, the club also provides floral ar-
rangements to the Windermere Post
Office, the library, local Hospice pa-
tients and area nursing homes and
cares for a butterfly garden in Town
Square. Annually, the club members
decorate the town Christmas tree and
sponsor Arbor Day activities. It is also
supporting the Nehrling Society. Win-
dermere Garden Club meets regular-
ly on the second Thursday of each
month at Windermere Town Hall.


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 13A


Dr. Phillips


Dr. Phillips YMCA, Fresh Market

to host Taste of the Vineyards


The second annual Taste of the
Vineyards wine-tasting event to ben-
efit the Dr. Phillips YMCA Family
Center Scholarship Fund will be held
Wednesday, March 15, from 7-9 p.m.
at The Fresh Market, 5000 Dr. Phillips
Blvd. Tickets are $30 in advance and
can be purchased at the Dr. P. Phillips
YMCA or by calling 407-595-3645.
Each year, the Dr. P. Phillips
YMCA Family Center begins the task
of raising funds to help subsidize
memberships and program fees for
youth and families who otherwise
could not participate in many of the
activities the YMCA provides. Pro-
grams such as swimming lessons, day
camp, youth sports, teen activities,


summer programs or enjoying the ben-
efits of being a member.
"Our goal this year is $100,000,"
said Dar Kelly, 2006 scholarship chair
for the Dr. Phillips YMCA Family
Center.
This popular event which only dis-
tributes 400 tickets was a sellout last
year and promises to repeat its per-
formance. Fine wines, heavy hors
d'oeuvres and a silent auction high-
light the evening.
"The Fresh Market donates this
event to us and all of the proceeds ben-
efit the Y's scholarship fund. They
are a very generous community part-
ner and friend of the YMCA Family
Center," said Kelly.


The Mary, Queen of the Universe Shrine Choir and Orchestra will perform Handel's immortal oratorio,
,* r ,3 Messiah, on 2 consecutive Thursdays, March 23 and 30, at 7:30 p.m. The community is invited to at-
tend. Tickets are $10 for adults; children under 12 are free.

Shrine Choir and Orchestra plans 2 concerts

to present Handel's 'Messiah' in its entirety
The Music Department of Mary, Prophecy and Fulfillment of the Na- poser was deeply moved during the
Queen of the Universe Shrine will tivity," along with a special perfor- composition of the "Messiah." At one


Bay Meadows student Haley Aniello set a personal goal to raise $1,000
for Jump Rope for Heart and jump rope 1,000 times.


Local student raises $1,000

for Jump Rope for Heart


When the staff at Bay Meadows El-
ementary School asked the students
to help raise funds for heart disease
through the American Heart Associ-
ation' s Jump Rope for Heart program,
one student in particular took the chal-
lenge to heart.
Fifth-grade student Haley Aniello
created a personal goal for herself of
raising $1,000 and jumping rope 1,000
times. In addition to being educated
about heart health, fitness, nutrition
and the value of community service,
Jump Rope For Heart provides the
students with an opportunity to win
exciting prizes. Aniello was deter-
mined to raise $1,000 in order to win
a bicycle through the program. But
her plan was not for selfish reasons. She
wanted to give the bike to charity.
"When Haley shared her plan with
me, I was really impressed," said Ha-
ley's mom, Pamela Aniello. "She
asked me to help her build a Web site
to get all of our family and friends in-
volved. She wrote letters asking for
support and tracked her progress on-
line everyday."
Aniello exceeded her goal by rais-
ing $1,300 and jumping a total of
1,000 times, which were personally
counted by her mom. According to
the latest research, physical inactivi-


ty is linked to obesity, a major risk
factor for cardiovascular disease.
That's why Bay Meadows Elemen-
tary Coach Jennie McNelis and others
at the school decided to have students
raise funds for heart disease and stroke
research.
"Our goal in participating in Jump
Rope For Heart was to inform all of the
students about the dangers of heart
disease and what they can do to pre-
vent it," said McNelis. "Haley Aniel-
lo's determination and selflessness is
an inspiration to the staff and her fel-
low classmates."
The American Heart Association
recommends:
children age 2 and older should
get at least 30 minutes of moderate
intensity physical activity every day
and at least 30 minutes of vigorous
physical activity three to four days a
week.
children should eat a variety of
fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy
products, fish, poultry and lean meat.
after age 2, children should limit
foods high in saturated fat (less than
10 percent of overall calories), choles-
terol (less than 300 mg. daily) and
transfats.
For more information on Jump
Rope For Heart, call-407-843-1330.


continue its 2005-06 Shrine Concert
Series with a presentation of George
Frederic Handel's "Messiah." The im-
mortal oratorio will be presented in
its entirety over two consecutive
Thursday nights, March 23 and 30, at
7:30 p.m. The program will feature
soloists with an expanded Shrine
Choir and Orchestra, under the direc-
tion of Dr. William Picher. There is
ample free parking.
On March 23, the performance will
feature Part I of the oratorio, "The


mance of Handel's Suite for Trumpet
and Strings with Picher as both trum-
pet soloist and conductor.
The performance on March 30 will
contain Part II, "The Passion and the
Resurrection," and Part III, "The Res-
urrection of All Mankind to the Glo-
ry of God."
The premiere performance of "Mes-
siah" took place on April 23, 1742 in
Dublin and was composed in only 23
days by Handel, who was known for
his rapid and inspired work. The com-


Buzzcatz in concert this Fri. at Millenia Mall


The Mall at Millenia will feature
The Buzzcatz in its ongoing First Fri-
days concert series on March 3.
These free music events run from
5-8 p.m. on the first Friday of each
month outside the mall's main en-
trance.
The Buzzcatz' sound is a classic
mix of soul, blues, jazz and rock 'n'
roll. Lead singer Ricky Silvia takes
the audience on a musical journey
from Sinatra and Louis Armstrong to
The Stones and The Commodores,
while keeping the dance floor packed
all evening long. The "Nine Lives"
tour has seen The Buzzcatz playing


to sold out venues across the country,
including a performance for the Pres-
ident of the United States.
Concertgoers can purchase food
from mall restaurants, including John-
ny Rockets, California Pizza Kitchen
and Panera Bread. The concerts are
sponsored by FM radio station WLOQ
103.1, Lake Nona Golf and Country
Club and Fountain Acura, and they
feature modeling by Lisa Maile Im-
age Modeling and Acting to highlight
fashions from the center's leading re-
tailers.
For more information, call 407-363-
3555.


Learn public-speaking skills at Toastmasters weekly meetings


Vista Toastmasters Club 7250 is
meeting weekly at the Southwest Li-
brary, 7255 Della Drive, off Dr.
Phillips Boulevard. Meetings take
place each Thursday from 6:45-8 p.m.
Guests and perspective members are
welcome at any time, and everyone is
encouraged to arrive early at 6:30 p.m.
to network and socialize.
New members are welcome, and
there is no charge. For details, go to

Southwest Book Club
The Southwest Book Club meets on
the third Tuesday of each month at 7
p.m. at the Southwest Library in the
meeting room, and community residents
are invited to join the group at any meet-
ing.


http://www.tut.com/vista.htm.
The purpose of the club' is to help
members become better speakers and
leaders while enjoying the process.
Toastmasters International is the
world's largest educational organiza-
tion devoted to communication and
leadership development.
For more information on the orga-
nization or specific meeting locations,
call Joan at 407-654-3396.

meets on 3rd Tuesday
The group will discuss In Praise of
Slowness by Carl Honore on March 21.
For information on upcoming meet-
ings, call Sand.\ MaC l e. librarian at the
South est Libraiy, at 407-835-7323 or
e-nmail mas er.sandy@ocls.info.


point, after having written the famous
"Hallelujah" chorus, Handel's eyes
filled with tears and he exclaimed, "I
did think I did see all heaven before me,
and the great God himself."
The Shrine is located at 8300
Vineland Road, Orlando, near Lake
Buena Vista. Tickets are available at
the Shrine Gift Shop and are $10 for
adults; children under 12 are free. For
directions, call the Music Department
at 407-239-6600, Ext. 38, or e-mail
shrinemusic@netpass.com.



LBV Baptist plans
Wed. evening study
for young adults
Lake Buena Vista Baptist
Church has started a new Bible
study, Get Your Acts Togeth-
er, that runs through April 19.
The class is a verse-by-verse,
story-by-story look at the Book
of Acts. The program begins
at 9 p.m. each week.
College students, singles and
young adults are invited to this
late-night, contemporary wor-
ship service with music by An-
gelo Ballestero. The church is
located at 11551 County Road
535 near the Grand Cypress
Golf Course, north of Walt
Disney World.
For more information, call
407-876-2234 or go to
www.thevista.-org.


Femmes de Coeur
present donation to
Landwirth's charity,
Dignity U Wear
Femmes de Coeur recently present-
ed a check for $102,000 to Dignity U
Wear, a charity founded by Dr. Phillips
area resident Henri Landwirth. The cer-
emony took place at the Orlando Mar-
riott Downtown.
The donation is a result of the an-
nual Femmes de Coeur Soiree de
Coeur event held in November. This
year, the event broke previous fund-
raising totals with the help of Friends
de Coeur, a group of Central Florida
professionals who banded together to
re-imagine, market and manage the
event.
'Through the assistance of the vol-
unteers Friends de Coeur, who went
far beyond expectations, the ladies of
Femmes de Coeur, as well as our cor-
porate sponsors, Stein Mart and Poi-
tobello Yacht Club at Downtown Dis-
ney, we are able to make a very real
and very direct impact on Central Fl6ri-
da's needy," said Landwirth, founder
of Dignity U Wear and Give Kids the
World.
"I know what it means not to have
clothes, to be stripped of dignity and to
give up all hope," said Landwirtfi.
"When I see children suffering indig-
nities, I know we have to help."
Four Central Florida charities will
receive clothing purchased with the
proceeds from the event. They are Beta
Center, Children's Home Society, Boys
and Girls Clubs of Central Florida and
Hurricane Katrina Relief efforts.
Femmes de Coeur is a charity fund-
raising organization whose continuing
mission since 1999 has been to pro-
vide financial support for Central Flori-
da charities.
Dignity U Wear is a national non-
profit organization that partners with
clothing manufacturers and retailers to
provide new clothing to non-profit
agencies serving those in need atnrio
cost to the recipients.

Tibet-Butler Preserve
hosting Backyard Habitat
Fest March 4
The Tibet-Butler Nature Preserve is
sponsoring a Backyard Habitat Festdn
Saturday, March 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The community is invited to join this
free program, explore the preserve, lear
how to create a backyard habitat, par-
ticipate in environmental programs and
take guided hikes. There will be a vari-
ety of exhibits, live animals to see, craft
activities, a face-painting booth, door
prizes, snacks and music to dance to.
The nature preserve is operated by
Orange County Parks and Recreation
and is located at 8777 County Road 535
(Winter Garden-Vineland) in Orlando.
For details, call 407-876-6696 or go to
www.orangecountyparks.net.


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14A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006



Social


WOJSL to host Roaring '20s dinner-dance


The West Orange Junior Service
League will host its annual fundrais-
er on Saturday, March 4, at Winder-
imere Country Club from 7 p.m. to
midnight. This year, the dinner, dance
and auction will have a Roaring '20s
theme, and guests are asked to dress
in social attire or 1920s costumes. En-
tertainment will feature a jazz band,
and tickets are $100 each.
. The league recently announced the
nominees for this year's Best Guy and
Best Doll titles. Kurt Ardaman, Steve
Delisle, Fish Morgan, Ron Sikes and
Rick Smith have been nominated for
Best Guy, and Kathie Glass, Pam
Gould, Suzi Karr, Barbara Roper and
Tracy Seebach are nominated for Best
Doll. These community representa-
tives were selected for their ongoing
.commitment to West Orange Coun-
ty.
In a friendly competition, each
nominee earns points for donations
of auction items, sponsorships, ticket
sales and contributions, and the win-

Library to host
program on stress
on Saturday, March 4
, Dr. Kirti Kalidas from the Center
for Natural and Integrative Medicines
will discuss how adrenal hormones,
declining thyroid and sex hormones
affect weight and stress at the South-
west Library on Saturday, March 4,
at 2 p.m. For more information, call
the library at 407-835-7323.

Movie night March 16 at
Windermere Library
The Windermere Library will spon-
sor a family movie night on Thurs-
day, March 16, at 6 p.m. The com-
munity is invited to attend and see the
featured family movie. The library
will host family movie night on the
third Thursday of the month.
For details, call 407-876-7540.

Brain injury recovery
group meets 1st Thurs.
GiveBack Inc. is a non-profit self-
help organization dedicated to edu-
cating, encouraging and inspiring sur-
vivors of head injuries to commit to us-
ing compensation strategies to regain
.control of their lives and build new
futures. The group will continue meet-
ing on the first and second Thursday
Lof each month at 6:30 p.m. at St.
Luke's United Methodist Church.
, All head injury survivors are invit-
ed to attend and bring friends and fam-
ily members. Refreshments are served.
The church is located at 4851 S.
Apopka-Vineland Road, Orlando, near
the comer of Conroy-Windermere'and
Apopka-Vineland roads.
For more information, go to
,ww.http://health.groups.yahoo.com/g
rbup/giveback/ and follow the direc-
'tions to join the group. Interested in-
,dividuals can also visit the Web site at
)yww.givebackorlando.com.

.Service of prayer and
healing at Camp Ithiel
.New Covenant Church of the
,Brethren has scheduled its monthly
service of prayer and healing for Sun-
day. March 5. at 7 p.m.Persons of all
faith traditions are invited to partici-
iate in the service that combines tra-
ditional liturgy with a time for testi-
monies and prayer requests'.
Prayers are offered for'the healing
'of body, mind, spirit and relationships.
"'he service will take place in the
chapel at Camp Ithiel, 2037 Hempel
,\e. in Gotha.
'For more information, call Pastor
iephen Horrell at -107-375-1617.


ning pair is announced at the dance.
Proceeds from the event will en-
able the WOJSL to continue its com-
mitments to organizations it has sup-
ported through the years, such as Rop-
er YMCA, Magnolia School, West
Orange Daily Bread, Health Central,
School Nurse, college scholarships
for local high school seniors, the
American Cancer Society's Relay for
Life event, Health Central Park and
the Heritage Museum's Garden The-
atre in Winter Garden.
The league is currently looking for
corporate sponsors and silent auction
items. Sponsorship levels range from
$500 to $2,500.
The WOJSL was founded in 1936
by 25 women in West Orange Coun-
ty as a community service organiza-
tion.
For more information or reserva-
tions, call Elisa Davis at 407-909-
1234 or Lori Tyson at 407-509-4440
or go to the league's Web site at
www.wojsl.com.

Windermere Union plans
baptism event
Windermere Union Church, 436
Oakdale St., will host a special baptism
ceremony on Sunday, March 12, in
the continuation of its year of Home-
coming and Housewarming Celebra-
tions. The congregation is inviting all
those baptized at the church, as well
as others who want to renew their bap-
tismal covenant, to join either the 9
a.m. traditional or 11 a.m. contempo-
rary praise service that day.
This is one of the last Sundays that
the congregation will be worshipping
in its current location since construc-
tion is currently underway for its new
facility on Parkridge-Gotha Road. The
church was founded 90 years ago.
For more information or to be bap-
tized March 12, call Pastor Barton
Buchanan at 407-876-2112. If you
know individuals who were baptized
at the church, contact Debbie at
Snow4ds@aol.com or 407-234-6616.


Lakeview High
Class of 1956
The Lakeview High School Class
of 1956 is holding its reunion April
22 and is still looking for three mem-
bers: R.L. Sweat, Frankie Powell and
Adrian Flippen. For more informa-
tion, call Janice Charles at 407-656-
1724 or Joyce Oliver at 407-295-5094.

LHS Class of '52
makes plans for
spring mountain trip
The Class of 1952 at Lakeview
High School is planning its annual
spring break at the Dillard House in
Dillard, Ga. The trip is April 23-25.
The class is inviting all Lakeview
High graduates to join in the spring
break adventure. For details, contact
Larry Grimes at 407-656-2223 or la-
. grimes@earthlink.net.

Rent Tanner Hall
Tanner Hall. on Lake Apopka is
available for rental for events on week-
ends and weekdays. For more infor-
mation, call the Winter Garden Recre-
ation Department at 407-656-4155.
The Tanner is at 29 W. Garden Ave.

American Legion
honoring deceased
The American Legion Post 63 in
Winter Garden honors deceased vet-
erans of the U.S. Armed Forces each
month. The veteran must have received
an honorable discharge or have died
\ while in service. For details, contact
James Fleming at flemi43@aol.com.


Join Beulah Baptist, Sobiks in fight against cancer March 9
The community is invited to join the Beulah Baptist Church Relay for
Life team and Sobiks Subs on Thursday. March 9, between 4 and 8 p.m.
Come and enjoy a sub and thank the folks at Sobiks (12307 W. Colo-
nial Drive, Peoples Plaza West, Winter Garden) for their support in the
fight against cancer.
A portion of sales will be donated to the American Cancer Society.


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Maxey Community Center Library begins Friday Reading Club


The Maxey Community Center Li-
brary is fully stocked and renovated and
will begin a Friday Reading Club on
March 3. All children in third through
12th grade are invited to participate.
Each week, a volunteer from the
* West Orange community will read a
story to club members and discuss his
or her profession and how reading has
influenced his or her life. The club


will also feature activities to enhance
the reading experience.
Students can sign up to participate
in the Maxey Community Center lob-
by area or just come on any Friday.
There is no charge to participate.
Monique Bollhoefer is looking for
community volunteers to read to club
members. To volunteer, call her at
407-421-8848.


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55th wedding anniversary
Ralph and Dorothy Blevins celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary
on a cruise to the Caribbean in December. They were married Oct. 14,
1950, at Saltville, Va. They are both now retired. They have 5 children:
Dan and Harvey, both of Orlando; and Patti Hagen, Gary and David,
all of Winter Garden. The Blevinses have 12 grandchildren and 10
great-grandchildren.

Parsons dancers invited to join in reunion performance


Elizabeth Parsons School of Dance
in Windermere is celebrating its 25'"
anniversary this year. The school is
inviting all of its former students to
participate in the annual program in
June by joining others on stage for

HCP needs helpers
Health Central Park in Winter Garden
needs volunteers to help push
wheelchairs during field trips and to help
residents with out-trip activities. To help,
call Susan Young at 407-296-1628.
Also, someone is needed to teach res-
idents how to operate computers and
how to use e-mail programs. There is an
ongoing need for help with HCP's ani-
mal population, including birds and rab-
bits, as well.

Knitting club
The West Orange Knitters Guild meets
Monday from 6-9 p.m. at the First Unit-
ed Methodist Church of Winter Garden,
125 N. Lakeview Ave. All knitters and
crocheters are welcome to the free class,
held in the old parsonage building near
the playground. For more details, call
Pam Stewart at 407-427-0480.

Awana Club
Boys and girls ages 3 through sixth
grade can participate in Awana on
Sunday from 5:30-7 p.m. at Beulah
Baptist Church, 671 Beulah Road,
Winter Garden.
For more information or to sign up,
call the church office at 407-656-
3342.


the finale.
The program is scheduled for June
4 at 2 p.m. at the Bob Carr Perform-
ing Arts Center in Orlando.
For more information, call the
dance studio at 407-876-4604.

Walk for Autism
set for April 29 '
The local Walk for Autism commit-
tee held its first kick-off luncheon at the
Buena Vista Palace recently. Nearly
100 attendees showedup to rally for the
inaugural Walk for Autism on April 29.
The National Alliance for Autism Re-
search and Autism Speaks invite ev-
eryone in the community to join the
walk on April 29 at Blue Jacket Park. The
money raised will go toward increas-
ing autism research and awareness.
For more information, visit
autismwalk.org/orlando and form a
team.


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 15A




Entertainment


Central Florida Home, Garden Show
is March 24-26 at Convention Center


Area homeowners can find millions
of decorating ideas, building and re-
modeling solutions and landscaping
tips when the all-new expanded Cen-
tral Florida Home & Garden Show re-
turns March 24-26 to the Orange
County Convention Center's new
complex off Universal Boulevard.
Highlights include Lisa LaPorta and
Clive Pearse, co-hosts of HGTV's De-
signed to Sell, who will share interi-
or design ideas, home-improvement
tips and real estate insider secrets.
They will also answer questions, meet
with guests and sign autographs.
Steven Katkowski, kitchen and bath
remodeling guru, will share his top
tips to avoid common pitfalls, work
with contractors and ensure a suc-
cessful renovation.
Orlando residents Anne-Marie
Hodges and Pam Brandon, the PTA
Divas, will entertain guests with their
unique brand of humor and innova-
tive recipes.
Guests can view gardens spanning
more than 6,000 square feet designed


by six local landscaping companies.
Orchids and tropical plants will be on
display and for sale by members of
the Orchid Society.
The "House that Food Build" will
be located on the show floor. It is a
transparent Plexiglas house built by
Morrison Homes, waiting to be filled
with food. Guests who bring non-per-
ishable food items for the Coalition
for the Homeless of Central Florida
will receive $2 off admission. Guests
can also bid on celebrity painted pots,
a silent auction of plant holders paint-
ed by professional athletes, entertain-
ers, media personalities and govern-
ment leaders.
Kids play space will feature a real
fire truck, face-painting and other ac-
tivities.
Tickets are available at the door ($9
for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12 and
free for children under 6). On-site
parking is $6.
For more information or to buy tick-
ets, visit www.orlandohomeshow.com
or call 800-645-7798.


Festival presents 'The Jungle Book'


Nineteenth-century India comes
alive as the Orlando-UCF Shakespeare
Festival presents Rudyard Kipling's
The Jungle Book March 4 through
-April 1. This classic tale will be per-
formed in the Margeson Theater of
the Lowndes Shakespeare Center. Per-
formances are Saturdays at 2 and 4:30
p.m. and Sundays at 4:30 p.m.
With adaptation by April-Dawn
Gladu, music by Daniel Levy and
choreography by Geeta Raaj, this sto-
ry of friendship, family and the law
of the jungle immerses itself in Indi-
an culture by using traditional Indian
costume, music and dance. Every ef-
fort was used to ensure that each ele-
ment found a melding of Indian and


American tradition that would res-
onate its message to the audience.
Tickets are $9 for children and $13
for adults and are available at the
Shakespeare Center Box Office at 812
E. Rollins St., by calling 407-447-
1700 and online at www.shake-
spearefest.org.
As an added treat, the first 50 chil-
dren through the door for each week-
end performance will receive a free
cookie, courtesy of Cookies by De-
sign. Everyone is encouraged to reg-
ister to win a special swing set, cour-
tesy of Creative Playthings.
The production is part of the Dard-
en Foundation for Young Audiences
Series.


Leu Gardens celebrates 45 years
Harry P. Leu Gardens is celebrating 45 years with many special
events, some of which are free. Membership begins at $30. Admission
is free on Monday mornings from 9 a.m. to noon.
The gardens are located at 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando. For infor-
mation, call 407-246-2620 or visit the Web site at www.leugardens.org.


Photo by Heinz Kluetmeier
'Stars on Ice'
'Stars on Ice' will be at the TD Waterhouse Centre March 3 with its 20th anniversary show entitled 'A Show.. .about
the Show.' Tickets start at $25 and are available at the box office, all Ticketmaster locations and starsonice.com.
Pictured are 2002 Olympic Pair Champions Jamie Sal6 and David Pelletier of Canada.


Special exhibits at
Orlando Museum of
Art this month
Feel a part of the cultural rev-
olution by visiting "The Art of
the Motorcycle" exhibit at the
Orlando Mugeum of Art. Based
on the landmark exhibit that
opened at the Guggenheim Mu-
seum in New York in 1998 to
record crowds, this exhibit ex-
plores the motorcycle as both
cultural icon and design achieve-
ment. It offers a thought-pro-
voking challenge to conventional
assumptions about art and pop-
ular culture in the modem age.
Showcasing 80 historic and
contemporary motorcycles in an
installation encompassing 14,000
square feet, the exhibit shows
how the motorcycle emerged as
an icon of our time and explores
themes of danger, romance, re-
bellion and beauty.
Don't miss the collection of
Marlene Rozen Davis, the March
Florida Artist of the Month. Her
work, entitled "Tiers," is sym-
bolic expressions of color and
form created by painting images
of Jewish history and artifacts.
Her work was selected for dis-
play this.month to coincide with
Jewish Arts Week. Visitors can
meet the artist on Sunday, March
19, from 1-3 p.m.
"American Art: Portraits and
Landscapes" is on exhibit March
3 through April 30. These paint-
ings reflect the many forces that
have shaped American art from
the Colonial period to the early
20th century. Among the artists
represented in this exhibit are
Benjamin West, Thomas Moran,
Rembrandt Peale, Georgia 0'-
Keeffe and Carl Wuermer.


On the first weekend in March, the
Mennello Museum of American Art
will host the Orlando Folk Festival -
two days (March 4-5) of music, prim-
itive art and fine craft, food, face
painting and children's art activities.
The event is held on the museum
grounds on Princeton Avenue on the
shores of Lake Formosa.
More than 25 self-taught and fine
craft artists will be featured. Media
will include paintings, sculpture, ce-
ramics, clothing and jewelry. Twen-


ty musical groups will perform
throughout the day on the main stage,
and a daylong jam session will be
held under the Mayor, a 300-year-
old oak tree. Musicians are encour-
aged to bring their instrument and
participate in the jam.
Hands-on art activity for children
will feature a self-portrait collage
throughout the day.
The festival is sponsored in part
by Sam Ash Music Stores and the
city of Orlando.


Universal Studios offers Kids Free ticket
Universal Orlando Resort launched olds free admission to Universal's
a new ticket offer recently that allows theme parks when the parent buys a
one kid up to and including 9-year- two-day, multi-park pass online.


4-SpinLt





Why search high when


you can go low?


Coin, Money Show
is March 3-5
The Central Florida Coin Club (a
not-for-profit corporation) will hold
its 83" consecutive semi-annual Coin
and Money Show at the Central Flori-
da Fairgrounds March 3-5.
Admission is free, and attendees
will receive a free coin. Hourly door
prizes will-be awarded, and more than
100 dealers will be on hand to offer
coins and currency for sale, as well as
buy items. A national grading service,
ANACS, will be available for grad-
ing opinions and encapsulation.
Show hours are noon to 6 p.m. on
Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday
and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.

Highwaymen exhibit
at History Center
"Florida's Highwaymen: Legendary
Landscapes" recently opened at the
Orange County Regional History Cen-
ter. Carlton Fields, P.A., is the pre-
senting sponsor.
More than 65 never-before-seen
original oil-on-canvas paintings from
the personal collection of Geoff Cook
are on view through April 16. The ex-
hibit highlights an important part of
Florida's 20th century cultural histo-
ry and unfolds the secrets of persever-
ance in the face of societal limitations
during the '50s and '60s.
The exhibit tells the story behind the
artwork of the group of young African-
Americans who managed to create eco-
nomic opportunities despite the op-
pression of the South.
The History Center is open from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday and
from noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Gen-
eral admission is $7 with a reduced
rate for students and seniors and chil-
dren.
For information, call 407-836-8500
or visit www.thehistorycenter.org.

Pig on the Pond BBQ
Competition, Festival
is March 10-11
The eighth annual Pig on the Pond
Sanctioned BBQ Competition and Fes-
tival is offering a challenge. Local peo-
ple, are encouraged to participate in the
Great Chili Challenge on Friday,
March 10. Let your best chefs represent
your business or organization or com-
pete as an individual.
The festival will be held at the Wa-
terfront Park in Clermont March 10-
11 and will feature live music by Rob
Nichols and others, a Midway carni-
val, kids' area, crafters, a rock climb-
ing wall and more. Call David Batman
352-636-8716 for information, a chili
application or chili sampling tickets.

St. Patrick's Day
celebration at
Raglan Road
Raglan Road Irish Pub and Restau-
rant at Downtown Disney will host an
Irish celebration of St. Patrick's Day
on March 17. The house band, Tuskar
Rock, will perform traditional and
contemporary Irish music. Champi-
on Irish dancer and native Dubliner
Danielle Fitzpatrick will dance, as
well as the Irish dance troupe, Celtic
Pulse. The troupe is led by Myra Wa-
ters, a former dancer with Michael
Flatley's "Lord of the Dance."
Pleasure Island will also celebrate
St. Patrick's Day March 16-18 fromn7
p.m. to 2 a.m. The island will turn
"green" with music, videos by Irish
artists, leprechaun characters and stilt
walkers. Pleasure Island club admis-
sion is not required for this event. .


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Mennello Museum of Art to host Orlando Folk Festival in March


U


* (







16A The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


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TIMES
a weekly newspaper


Winter Garden, Florida Thursday, March 2, 2006


Municipal elections set for March 14


I
BALLOT CARD I

7 -

SPECIAL ELECTION |=1
CITY OF OCOEE, FL I
MARCH 14, 2006
ELECTION ESPECIAL
CIUDAD DE OCOEE, FL
EL 14 DE MARZO DEL 2006


-I


1
I







J^


BALLOT CARD I

8 -

GENERAL ELECTIONnl
CITY OF OCOEE, FL In
MARCH 14, 2006
ELECTION GENERAL
CIUDAD DE OCOEE, FL .
EL 14DE MARZO DEL 2006


1=
n=


BALLOT CARD


GENERAL ELECTION
CITY OF OCOEE, FL
MARCH 14, 2006
ELECTION GENERAL
CIUDAD DE OCOEE, FL
EL 14 DE MARZO DEL 20(


9I





06
=1
-


To vote, complete the
arrow pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencil. If
you make a mistake, don't
hesitate to ask for a new ballot, If
you erase or make other marks,
your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete la
flecha que
apunta asu selection. Use tinta
negra o lapiz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
Spapeleta, Si borra 6 hace
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contarA.
CITY COMMISSIONER,
DISTRICT 1
COMISARIO DE LA CIUDAD,
DISTRITO 1
(Vote for One Vote por Uno)


John Grogan


Gary Hood


I


I








. -g !..




I
I




I


To vote, complete the
arrow 'p-ad pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencil. If
you make a mistake, don't
hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If
you erase or make other marks,
Your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete la
flecha mb-a que
apunta a su seleccion. Use tinta
Snegra o l6piz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
I papeleta. Si borra o hace.
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contar6.

CITY COMMISSIONER,
DISTRICT 2
COMISARIO DE LA CIUDAD,
| DISTRITO 2
S (Vote for One -Vote por Uno)


' Scott Anderson

Darrell Lowery


To vote, complete the
arrow ^i-a pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencil. If
you make a mistake, don't
hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If
you erase or make other marks,
your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete Ia
flecha que
apunta a su seleccion. Use tinta
negra o ISpiz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
papeleta. Si borra o hace
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contara.
CITY COMMISSIONER,
DISTRICT 4
COMISARIO DE LA CIUDAD,
DISTRITO 4
(Vote for One Vote por Uno)


Joel F. Keller

Shelly Simon


Janet Shira


Jim Slls
I -. .... I


BALLOT CARD


GENERAL ELECTION
TOWN OF WINDERMERE,
MARCH 14, 2006
ELECTION GENERAL
CIUDAD DE WINDERMERE
EL 14 DE MARZO DEL 20


20


FL

, FL
)06


BALLOT CARD I

6 -

GENERAL ELECTION
TOWN OF OAKLAND, FL mm 1!
MARCH 14, 2006 i
ELECTION GENERAL
CIUDAD DE OAKLAND, FL ^^^
EL 14 DE MARZO DEL 2006


BALLOT CARD I

21 m

GENERAL ELECTION
CITY OF WINTER GARDEN, FL NOE"I
MARCH 14, 2006 I
ELECTION GENERAL ,lgil
CIUDAD DE WINTER GARDEN, FL
EL 14 DE MARZO DEL 2006
I


To vote, complete the
arrow m pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencil. If
you make a mistake, don't
estate to ask for a hew ballot. If
you eraseor make other marks,
your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete la
flecha m que
apunta a su selection.. Use tinta
negra o lapiz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
papeleta. Si borra o hace
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contar&.
MAYOR,
'ALCALDE
(Vote for One Vote por Uno)

Gary Bruhn


Carl D. Patterson, Jr.,

COUNCIL MEMBER
MIEMBRO DE CONCEJO
(Vote for no more than Three)
(Vote por no mas de Tres)
Michael J. Hogan

Ronald Martin

Jennifer Roper


To vote, complete the
arrow ( m*m- pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencie If
you make a mistake, don't
estate to ask for a new ballot. If
you erase or make other marks,
your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete la
flecha (mu-,. que
apunta a su selection. Use tinta
negra o lapiz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
papeleta. Si borra o hace
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contara.
COMMISSION, SEAT #1
COMISION, ESCANO #1
(Vote for One Vote por Uno)

Sam Carr


To vote, complete the
arrow pointing to
your choice. Use ink or pencil. If
you make a mistake, don't
hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If
you erase or make other marks,
your vote may not count.

Para votar, complete la
flecha que
apunta a su selection. Use tinta
negra o IApiz. Si compete un
error, por favor pida una nueva
papeleta. Si borra o hace
cualquier otra marca su voto
no contara.
MAYOR/COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
ALCALDE/COMISARIO
DISTRITO 5
(Vote for One Vote por Uno)

Edward R. Bowman

Jack Quesinberry

Rod Reynolds


1

4m we I


Ramona (Mona) Phipps


Colin Sharman

COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1
COMISARIO DISTRITO 1
(Vote for One Vote por LIno)

Bob Buchanan

Kent Horsley/


Robert Sprick


Matthew E Sullivan


H. Gerald Jowers


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2B The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006




Winter Garden elections


By Michael Laval

Seven candidates will be on Winter Garden's ballot in the
March 14 municipal election. All registered voters in Winter
Garden will be able to cast ballots for the office of mayor,
while only registered voters of District I will choose their
next representative on the City Commission.
The West Orange Times asked each candidate several ques-
tions, and their responses follow:

Mayor
Four candidates are campaigning to serve as Winter Gar-
den's mayor for the next two years. Two of the candidates cur-
rently sit on the commission. Voters will chose between Ed-
ward Bowman, incumbent Mayor Jack Quesinberry, District
1 Commissioner Rod Reynolds and Colin Sharman.

Why do you wish to serve as mayor of Winter Garden?
Bowman: I wish to serve as mayor because I believe that
I can better represent all the people of the city of Winter Gar-
den better than our present mayor.
Quesinberry: I have had dozens upon dozens of citizens
ask me to run for mayor, and I feel obligated to do so to en- \
sure that we continue on our path of being the best small city ED BOWMAN
in Florida.
It is important that we manage our growth properly. I be-
lieve I have demonstrated the knowledge, experience and leadership to ensure we
make wise decisions for the citizens of Winter Garden.
I want to continue building upon all the great accomplishments we have had
over the past years, for example, the West Orange Trail, the redevelopment of
downtown and the expansion of our parks system. I want to make sure as we move
forward that we continue to manage our growth and not let growth manage us,
and continue our redevelopment of Highway 50, East Plant Street and East Win-
ter Garden.
We are well on our way to becoming the cultural capitol of West Orange Coun-
ty, and I want to work with the commission, city staff and citizens to ensure we ac-
complish this goal.
Reynolds: It is time for a change in Winter Garden. The politics of the past has
prevented many of our citizens from participating in the political process. We have
made some good progress since the past election and, with my election as mayor,
I would like to see more open government at City Hall.
Since my appointment by Gov. Bush to the council, 1 have had the opportunity
to listen to the people of the city concerning major problems with improper drainage,
run-away growth and concerns about the new mall.
Sharman: I want to be a steward for the people of Winter Garden. I'm looking
out for their tax dollars and utilizing new ideas and innovations to build roads and
rebuild infrastructure. I will also be a voice of the people and fight for what is im-
portant for all of Winter Garden.

Why do you feel you are the best candidate for the position?
Bowman: I believe that I am the best candidate for the position because I have
no connection to the special-interest group that has been using the commission
and the people of Winter Garden to further their own interest.
Quesinberry: I am familiar with issues the city is facing and am confident I have
the leadership skills to lead the city in the right direction. I have the knowledge and
experience needed to ensure that Winter Garden continues to be one of the best cities
in the state of Florida. I have always had the interest of the city and citizens and
will continue to do so.
We are at a crucial time for this city, as we transition from a small town of
15,000 people to a present population of more than 25,000 residents. We need to
grow wisely to provide the infrastructure, parks and other amenities that meet the
needs of Winter Garden.
We should make the right decisions to accomplish our goal and continue to be
,an award-winning city. I know I am the right person, as mayor, to continue lead-
ing Winter Garden in this endeavor.
Reynolds: Serving as mayor of Winter Garden is more than just a ribbon-cut-
S-ting position. The mayor should set the direction for the city and lead by example.
The attitude of city government over the past 12 years has been one of exclusion,
not inclusion.
As mayor, I will seek consensus on the big issues by listening to all viewpoints.,
We need strong, honest leadership committed to changing the perception among
our citizens that City Hall is a closed shop.
I also hear frequently that the city is a business. With my college degree in busi-
ness management and my experience operating a'small business in Winter Garden
'since 1986, I offer a strong background in business as a mayor.
Sharman: In my profession, I work with and manage accounts for school boards,
utility companies, water management districts, engineers, business owners, asset
'managers and contractors.
I work for Siemens, an international corporation with many operating compa-
nies. We specialize in working with cities, schools and governmental facilities,
providing guaranteed savings on infrastructure upgrades with new technologies that
save on operating costs.
We finance these improvements and pay for them with the guaranteed savings
on operating costs. This saves taxpayer dollars.
I also bring a variety of experience, such as having a mechanical contractor's li-
.cense to teaching part-time for Orange County Schools in a joint apprenticeship
training program. I will utilize this to give Winter Garden the very best.

What do you feel are the most important issues facing Winter Garden and why?
Bowman: The most important issues facing Winter Garden are: doing away
with the special-interest group in this city, affordable housing for the elderly, ad-
equate recreational facilities with proper supervision for our children, adequate
and practical mass transportation for our citizens. The reason being that no one has
-dealt with these issues in more years than I can remember.
Quesinberry: Currently, one of our most important issues is the East Plant
Street corridor. This area is in our Community Redevelopment Agency and also
part of the east side of Winter Garden, which needs many improvements. This is
.our gateway from the Western Beltway to Winter Garden's downtown area. The
',,commercial area would provide more jobs and customers for downtown Winter
Garden.
Reynolds: Opening up the government is the most important issue facing our
S'city. Being born and raised in Winter Garden, I've seen our city government open
the doors to uncontrolled growth that has created a host of problems that we must
*now deal with. .
Traffic congestion and a lack of planning have created a nightmare for many cit-
izens on a daily basis. The attempt to close Trailer City by a misguided, heavy-handL
ed city manager 'and possibly open it up for development is an example.
Winter Garden residents should control their own destiny, not a small group of
Power brokers and non-residents who wish to use our city as a profit center for a
-few.
Sharman: Growth and small business viability. We are experiencing tremen-
dous growth, and this will impact our roads and school systems. We need to be a
leader in growth management and set a precedent for other cities to follow.
SWe need to get roads and schools built while we are growing, not after. Addi-
tionally, this potential growth will cause competition for many of our small busi-
nesses. We need to carefully manage our growing city so that small businesses, in-
cluding our downtown area, are not impacted. Seeing the continued success of
small business will be a priority of mine.

How do you feel City Manager Michael Bollhoefer is performing at his job?
Bowman: I feel Michael Bollhoefer has not been in office but one year. The may-
or has had his hands tied because he no longer has a majority on the city council.
SI am reserving my opinion until we see what will happen when and if Jack Quesin-
Sberry remains in office and gains a majority rule on the council.
Quesinberry: I have complete confidence in our city manager, Michael Boll-
hoefer. He is well informed on all issues concerning the city and works to keep the
Selected officials up to date.
-Reynolds: I supported Mr. Bollhoefer's appointment but I've been disappoint-
Sed that he has chosen to become involved in politics rather than stick to city man-


agemeht. We,all saw what happened in Ocoee when the city manager became po-
litically involved, and we cannot let that happen in Winter Garden.
Mr. Bollhoefer needs to refrain from political involvement in city politics and
simply do his job fairly and he could be, an asset to the city. We all agree that we
do not need another "my way or the highway" attitude in that sensitive position.
Sharman: I don't think Mike has been given an opportunity to show us what
he can do as city manager. He is still cleaning up many items from the former city
manager. I feel that Mike has presented a good plan to keep downtown vital. How


'.4


BOB BUCHANAN


KENT HORSLEY


he executes will be de-
termined in the upcom-
ing months. 3 ,

What volunteer work
or community service
have you done in Win-
ter Garden?
Bowman: I was very
active in the fight to .
save the Trailer City
mobile home park when
the commission tried to
do away with our park. .,
Quesinberry: As
mayor of Winter Gar-
den for the past 14 .
years, I have served on
many major committees I
throughout the city.
I am active in the
First United Methodist
Church of Winter Gar-
den and the Winter Gar-
den Masonic Lodge.
Reynolds: Through JACK QUESINBERRY ROD R
my relationship with the
church in which I served
for several years as the Deacon of Benevolence, as well as individually, I have
served the community of Winter Garden and other communities with housing as-
sistance, feeding the homeless, utility assistance, hurricane relief and economic as-
sistance to widows and orphans.,
Sharman: I have coached Winter Garden Little League. I have also volunteered
20 hours a year for the last three years at my son's elementary school. Most recently,
I helped improve the East Winter Garden Maxey Center.

Personal information:
Bowman: Bowman is retired after having worked many years in construction
and other occupations. He and his wife of 27 years, Clara, have had nine children.
Bowman has lived in Winter Garden for 27 years.
Quesinberry: Quesinberry is a retired state-certified building contractor of
more than 46 years. He and his wife, Gloria, have lived in Winter Garden for 36
years and have five children, 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Quesinberry currently- serves on the Metro Plan Advisory Board, resolutions
committee for the Florida League of Cities, policy-making board for the Ameri-
can Public Gas Association and Orange County Tourist Development Council and
as president of the Lake Apopka Natural Gas Board.
He is the former president of the Tri-County League of Cities and still serves on
the league's board of directors. He is a member of the Winter Garden Masonic
Lodge and the Orlando Scottish Rite and York Rite.
Reynolds: Reynolds has been the owner of Daily Graphics since 1986. He and
his wife of 27 years, Cynthia, have four children. Reynolds was born in Winter
Garden in 1957. He is a member of the West Orange Chamber of Commerce,
Sharman: Sharman is an account manager for Siemens Building Technolo-
gies. He and his wife, Cynthia, have two children. Sharman is a Central Florida na-
tive who has lived in Winter Garden for eight years.
Sharman currently serves on the Winter Garden Planning and Zoning Board
and the legislative committee of the Building Owners and Managers Association.
He is a member of the National Association of Industrial and Office Parks and the
United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters.

District 1
Residents of Winter Garden's District 1 will choose between candidates Bob
Buchanan, Kent Horsley and Gerald Jowers.

Why do you wish to serve as District 1 commissioner?
Buchanan: My family has resided in Orange County for five generations. Be-
ing born and raised here, I have seen many changes in our local landscape. I have
witnessed growth that was properly managed and some that was poorly managed.
I made Winter Garden my home 20 years ago and have worked for many years
to see that its growth would prosper the entire West Orange community. I have de-
cided to run for the City Commission because I want to assist the city in its vision
for the future.
Horsley: I am not satisfied with the way things have been and continue to be in
the management of our city. I am prepared to make a difference in Winter Garden,
and being commissioner of District 1 will provide me the opportunity to positive-
ly affect change.
Jowers: Serving as District 1 commissioner is a civic responsibility by which
a person can express his opinion and make a difference. At this time in Winter
Garden's development, I feel District 1 needs a commissioner who has the inter-
est of the entire district, not just the special-interest groups who have candidates
representing them.
I am not aligned with any special-interest.group and will not be. I am the only
candidate who is not sponsored by special-interest groups. I will not promote the
interest of any group over that of all the citizens, and I will only vote positively for'
items on agendas that benefit all the citizens of Winter Garden.

Why do you feel you are the best candidate for the position?
Buchanan: I believe that my record of service on multiple committees and in-
volvement in several organizations over many years proves that I am concerned
with my constituents' needs and desires. This coupled with my years of manage-
rial experience makes me the best candidate for the District 1 commission seat.
Horsley: I have no ties to special-interest groups, live within the district, have
a proven history of appearing before the City Commission seeking to protect the
property values and rights of city homeowners and have a passion for making a dif-
ference.
Jowers: I am a businessman with 29 years of business experience in Winter
Garden. I understand running large, multiple businesses and the budgets they de-
mand.
I also am a former three-term commissioner and comprehend the issues of the
city. I realize the necessity for a strong commission comprised of independent
thinkers who will do what is necessary'to make Winter Garden a strong and viable
city.

What do you feel are the most important issues facing Winter Garden?
Buchanan: Winter Garden is expanding rapidly. I feel that growth needs to be
managed properly by looking at the long-term implications and manage cost ef-
fectively. It is critical to explore means in which growth pays for itself.
Along those lines, we have enjoyed much-needed beautification in the down-
town area. I want to make sure that it continues by encouraging living space, im-
proving the East Plant Street corridor and planning sufficient parking. This will help
to attract new business to our community.


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,
G E*' -D.. 'J O--
GERALD POWERS


COLIN SHARMAN


EYNOLDS


We must diligently work on incentives to encourage the much-needed redevel-
opment of Highway 50. This corridor has fallen far below the needs of all of Win-
ter Garden's citizens.
We should ensure the growth and development of our parks and recreational
facilities. We must keep up with the needs of our citizens and ensure our commu-
nity is one that offers a multitude of activities that assist in the health and well-be-
ing of the entire community.
We must work to improve relations with Orange County and state government
agencies. We don't want to be left out of much-needed and deserving support that
is our due. This would include seeking funding for the above-mentioned projects,
as well as monitoring closely the plans for new schools to complement projected
development.
Horsley: The top priority is implementing a permanent solution to Trailer City
that will assure residents that their home and life here is safe. Second, a resolution
of storm drain and flooding issues that continue to plague existing properties as the
result of new housing developments that have not been properly managed by the
city.
Third, bring about a modified merit pay program for all city employees that will
provide salary increases based upon results, not subjective judgment. Fourth, to en-
courage, oversee and monitor the creation of a new City Charter that will bring Win-
ter Garden out of the 19th century and introduce it to the 21st century.
Jowers: The most important issues facing Winter Garden are fast growth and
being able to accommodate this growth with the services it demands. With an es-
calation of housing and business within the city limits, there will be large demands
made on all the city's services, including police, fire, sewer, water and stormwa-
ter.
Much of this growth should be accommodated by impact fees and another por-
tion by development agreements. Growth without such fees and proper supervi-
sion thereof would cause a severe drain on the city's revenues, causing increased
taxes that should be at the roll-back rate or less.

How do you feel City Manager Michael Bollhoefer is performing at his job?
Buchanan: Mike Bollhoefer stepped into a position filled with discord and has
done an excellent job of staying on task and handling the issues and demands pre-
sented to him. He is professional in his performance and demeanor. I have found
that he comes before the city well-versed and well-prepared.
Horsley: I have enjoyed a great working relationship with Michael since he
first assumed the role of city manager.
I have found him to be personable, attentive and quick responding to citizen
concerns and critical issues. I anticipate a continued pleasant and satisfying work-
ing relationship with Michael.
Jowers: The city manager has been at his new job for approximately five months.
It is impossible to evaluate accurately his job performance in only a five-month pe-
riod. He is barely getting his feet wet, so to speak, and has been wrapping up the
former city manager's contracts and agreements.
The next six months to one year will begin to show what kind of job the city man-
ager is doing. The agreements he is working on now will not come to fruition for
the better part of six to nine months.
Furthermore, he needs to be given time to show the citizens what he can do.

What volunteer work or community service have you done in Winter Garden?
Buchanan: My volunteer service to Winter Garden includes serving on the ini-
tial Main Street Winter Garden Redevelopment Committee, the Occupational Li-
cense Review Board, the Code Enforcement Board and the committee for the
city's July 4th fireworks display.
I am a current member of the Planning and Zoning Board, as well as a current
member and past president of Winter Garden Rotary Club. I am a member of the
Winter Garden Heritage Foundation, the Oakland Nature Preserve and the West
Orange Chamber of Commerce.
Horsley: I have served two terms as president of the Tuscany Homeowners As-
sociation, been committee chair of the Public Policy Committee of the Winter
Garden Homeowners Alliance and served in several programs related to compas-
sionate service to the poor and less fortunate.
Jowers: I have been involved with my community since I left teaching in 1977.
I have been active in the Winter Garden Little League, West Orange Wildcats
Pop Warner football, West Orange Girls Club, Resurrection Catholic Church and
Winter Garden Lions Club, I have served on the Winter Garden City Commission
(three terms), Planning and Zoning Board, city Police and Fire Pension Board,
West Orange Memorial Hospital Taxing District Board of Trustees and West Or-
ange Chamber of Commerce.
I am also a past president of the Downtown Winter Garden Merchants Associ-
ation.
Personal information:
Buchanan: Buchanan has lived in Winter Garden for more than 20 years. He
has owned and operated Bob's Handyman Service for the past five years.
Buchanan's previous occupations included working as a Walt Disney maintenance
supervisor and later as a purchasing manager for Amber Electric. He has grown
sons and is currently engaged to Winter Garden resident Laureen Josselyn.
Horsley: Horsley has been a Winter Garden resident for five years. He and his
wife, Donna, have four children. Horsley is president-elect of the Central Florida
Chapter of Professional Construction Estimators Association.
Jowers: Jowers was born in Winter Garden and has lived here for 58 years. He
is married to Sandra Jowers, with whom he has three children. Jowers is president
of G.J. Batteries, Jowers Batteries and U.S. Lead.







Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 3B




Ocoee elections


By Mary Anne Swickerath

Eight candidates are running for
three slots on the Ocoee City Com-
mission in the municipal election on
March 14. Districts 1, 2 and 4 will be
on the ballot, and only voters living
in those districts will be eligible to
vote.
All eight candidates vying for three-
year terms on the commission attended
the recent political forum at City Hall,
sponsored by the Woman's Club of
Ocoee.
The West Orange Times asked each
candidate several questions, and his
or her responses follow:

District 1
John Grogan and Gary Hood are
competing to fill the final year of Dan-
ny Howell's term as District 1 com-
missioner. Hood was appointed by the
commission to serve as Howell's re-
placement until the election after How-
ell's resignation.

Why do you want to serve on the
City Commission?
Grogan: As a resident, volunteer
and a member of many city boards, I
want to take the next step in support-
ing my community. I have a vested
interest in this city where I raise my
family and own my home.
The work that a city commission
does directly impacts those who live
and work in Ocoee.
As a commissioner, I will strive to
ensure that Ocoee maintains its small-
town qualities while the unstoppable
growth and development provide a
tax base from which to provide Ocoee
residents the best possible services
available.
Hood: I have lived in Ocoee for 44
years and have seen us grow from dirt
roads to major highway interchanges.
As a commissioner, I have worked
with other commissioners and city
staff to work on the challenges that
come with growth.
This election comes at a critical time,
just as we are making progress on
problems in my district. I want to fin-
ish the improvements I have started
and continue the progress we have
made together. It doesn't make sense
to change coaches in the middle of a
winning season.

What do you feel are the most im-
portant issues facing Ocoee and
why?
Grogan: I see three major issues
facing Ocoee. A. Growth: With
growth comes more traffic, more peo-
ple, more water usage, more sewer us-
age and crowded schools and shops.
This has and will continue to cause an
intense strain on our infrastructure. In
other words, we will need intense
growth management with a focus on
ininimizing the bulk of these costs to
citizens.
B. Affordable housing: We are all
aware of the sharp increase in the cost
of buying a home. Many of us have
profited from increased property val-
ue. However; we need to implement
a comprehensive plan to produce and
ensure affordable housing so that av-
erage people can own a home in this
city.
C. Public safety: Having adequate
space, modem equipment, the latest
training and proper staffing for public
safety is important. We must provide
for the safety of our citizens, as well as
for those who protect them. Lagging
behind in these critical areas will cause
a work overload to those city em-
ployees charged with our safety, and
this may subsequently endanger the
public. We need to do our best to pre-
-vent this.
Hood: Even before I became a com-
missioner, I listened to citizens as a
coach in youth sports and as a volun-
teer on several community advisory
boards. Ocoee residents are telling me
that their No. 1 issue is growth. As we
grow, we need to be certain that we
have enough police, firefighters and
city staff to serve the new neighbors.
Our streets in District 1 are crowd-
ed, and they need resurfacing and
drainage improvements. Our parks in
District 1 need major repairs, and I
have been working with city staff to ac-
complish those. Our schools are over-
crowded. Too often, portable class-
rooms are placed on athletic fields so
they can't be used for sports. '
I look forward to attending upcom-
ing work sessions with the Orange
County School Board to address these
concerns.

What changes would you like to see
in Ocoee's government?
Grogan: I believe the city com-
missioners and the mayor are doing a
very good job. I am not running be-
cause I'm "against" anyone.'I would
like to see the city use more volun-
teers to augment (and not to replace)
paid employees in an attempt to pro-
vide the best possible services,at the
lowest possible cost.
An example could be Police Ex-
plorers, like my son Harrison, assist-
ing with traffic control at parades.
These volunteers free up police offi-


cers for more important functions than
closing a road.
I would also like to see more use of
city parks and resources to bring res-
idents together and more citizen in-
volvement in the functioning of pity


SCOTT ANDERSON


government.
Hood: I do riot see any need for ma-
jor changes in the way the city is man-
aged. Rob Frank and his staff have
been responsive when I have discussed
the concerns of District 1. There have
been open work sessions between the
city staff and citizens. Those have been
very helpful, and I look forward to
more in the future.
I want to be certain there is quality
leadership in our city departments.
Our directors should encourage em-
ployees to use tuition reimbursement
and other educational opportunities to
improve their skills. As a commis-
sioner, we reviewed employee rules
and regulations and wage recom-
mendations. We want to have good
morale among our current employees
and attract qualified applicants in the
future.

What are your goals if elected?
Grogan: A. I am a volunteer with
the Ocoee Neighborhood Restorative
Justice Program, a court-diversion pro-
gram for first-time juvenile offenders,
where I have served since it began in
Ocoee in 2001. Over the years, I've
seen it evolve into a very successful
partnership between the city of Ocoee
and the Ninth Judicial Circuit Court.
I have seen many young adults put
on the right track because of this pro-
gram. We have a 91 percent comple-
tion rate, and only 5 percent of those
who successfully complete this pro-
gram have been arrested for new
crimes. These are basically good kids
who made a mistake.
Having seen first-hand the positive
impacts of such programs, I would
like to see more efforts made to ad-
dress juvenile crime and its impacts,
possibly to include a city teen court
program.
B. I would like to see the fire and
police departments have the opportu-
nities to receive the best and most up-
to-date training, equipment and
staffing. I would like our parks to be
the envy of Central Florida, more pro-
grams and entertainment for our se-
niors. For example, perhaps we could
open city parks, like the Starke Lake
gazebo, to bands and other entertain-
ment that currently perform in parking
lots.
C. Lastly and most importantly, I
will pledge to be available to the citi-
zens of my district and to have an open
line of communication where they can
share with me their issues, concerns
and ideas. "
Hood: There is so much I want to
do for Ocoee that I cannot discuss it all
in this limited space. Here are four
main goals: first, parks are a priority.
I want to see us reserve more land for
new parks and take better care of our
existing parks. In District 1, we need
better playground equipment and new
fencing and security. The new Veter-
ans Center on Adair Street is a great
new facility where there could be in-
tergenerational recreation programs.
for families.
Second, we need to maintain our
neighborhoods. We want to improve
drainage and street surfaces in our dis-
trict, including more frequent street
sweeping. When we do a good job of
maintaining city property, we earn the
right to ask citizens to do a good job
of maintaining their own private prop-
erty. Working with Code Enforce-
ment, we can make that happen. For
the first time this year, we had Christ-
mas decorations installedin our district
Next year, there will be more, and they
will be lighted. I will fight atbudget
time to be sure our district gets its fair
share of future projects and is not over-
looked.
Third, I want more schools, ele-
mentary and middle. We have a site for
a middle school off Ingram Road that
should be constructed in the next cou-
ple of years, but we need more ele-
mentary schools. Spring Lake Ele-
mentary needs to be refurbished, or
have a new school built on property east
of the current structure.
Fourth, I want our fire department
to have ALS certification and our po-
lice to have the best equipment.

Personal information:
Grogan: Grogan is employed at
Walt Disney World MGM Studios as
a welder/mechanic and holds more
than 40 job-related certifications. He
and his wife, Michelle, have three chil-
dren and first moved to Ocoee in 1998.
They returned in 2001 to purchase
their home on Sabrina Drive.
He is a former member of the Ocoee
Education Commission, attended the


LL-, *" .



JOHN GROGAN
Citizen Police Academy and is a cur-
rent member of the Citizen Advisory
Council to the Ocoee Police Depart-
ment. He volunteered for child-fin-
gerprinting events, fund-raisers for
Holiday Toys for Tots in Need,
Ocoee's National Night Out and
Ocoee Founders' Day. He currently
serves on the Parks and Recreation
Committee.
He is a member of the Law En-
forcement Emerald Society of Cen-
tral Florida and has participated in
events to raise money for fallen offi-
cers and the society's college schol-
arship program.
He is also a member of the Untied
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join-
ers Local 1820.
Hood: Hood has worked at K In-
ternational for 14 years where he is a
project/service manager helping cus-
tomers receive the best animated char-
acters and props.
He and his wife, Tish, are parents
of two sons, and he has twin daughters
and a son from a previous marriage.
He has lived in Ocoee 44 years and
has served on the Recreation Adviso-
ry Board, Community Merit Awards
Board and the Commission Redis-
tricting Committee.
He was City of Ocoee Volunteer of
the Year for 2004, is past president of
the Amber Ridge Homeowners As-
sociation and has served the Ocoee
Little League as president, member
of the board of directors and coach.
He was assistant administrator for Dis-
trict 14 of Little League Incorporated
and a member of the 1999 World
Champions Big League Division.
He is on the board of directors and
a coach .for the Ocoee Youth Soccer
League and an Ocoee Pop Warner
coach, as well as head junior varsity
baseball coach at Ocoee High School.

District 2
Voters in District 2 have four can-
didates to choose from on March 14.
Incumbent Scott Anderson is being
challenged by Darrell Lowery, Janet
Shira and Jim Sills.

Why do you want to serve on the
City Commission?
Anderson: I have worked with
many wonderful people during my 10'
years of experience as Ocoee District
2 commissioner. We have made much
progress as a community, but we still
face many challenges caused by
change and growth. In times of change,
my long experience serving Ocoee is
especially valuable. I want to contin-
ue important initiatives we are work-
ing on to create more recreational fa-
cilities and better school sites, improve
roads and business districts and help
police and firefighters keep us safe.
Lowery: I believe that it is now the
time in my life to give back to the com-
munity that has given much to me and
my family. I am amazed at commu-
nities such as Celebration and Har-
mony that want so much to "create" the
hometown feeling and sense of com-
munity that is at the heart of life in
Ocoee.
I believe we can overcome the chal-
lenges of recent unprecedented
growth, changing demographics and
the ever-increasing complexities of
life. In fact, I believe that these chal-
lenges, properly managed, can become
Ocoee's greatest assets. I want to work
on bringing the ideals of family, neigh-
borhoods and community pride to its
fullest fruition.
I want to make the city's slogan,
"The Center of Good Living," more
than just words. I want to make them
a reality for all of Ocoee's citizens,
not just some of them, but all of them.
I believe that building a sense of
community in the truest sense is the
greatest asset for all of Ocoee's resi-
dents and the greatest gift we can be-
queath our children. As an Ocoee city
commissioner, I would work diligently
to make that my legacy.
Shira: Ocoee has been my home
since I moved to Florida in 1987. I
want to serve on the City Commis-
sion to help Ocoee achieve its poten-
tial. There are many good things about
Ocoee; but I think there is a lot of room
for improvement. I really want to help
the city accomplish some important
projects. The knowledge Ihave gained
about Ocoee's government after 17
years of employment there, together
with my passion and ability to get
things done, are all important quali-
ties I would bring to the job.
Fundamentally speaking, I believe
it is my duty to serve the city I call


GARY HOOD


JANET SHIRA
home. I have always been drawn to
public service. I spent 17 years of my
career serving the citizens of Ocoee. I
feel strongly that my work benefited
the community, and I feel just, as
strongly that I could make a signifi-
cant difference as an elected official.
Not everyone feels qualified or is
in a position to take on public office,
but I think those of us who can should
feel some obligation to make that con-
tribution. If I am elected, I also want
to use my time in office to encourage
others to serve. I feel strongly that
elected office should be a temporary
calling; and, therefore, I would work
to foster an environment of encour-
agement for people who want to give
of their time.
Sills: I have been serving the com-
munity on various boards since the
1980s. I have gained useful insight to
the needs of the community through
this service. I am ready and willing to
serve the citizens in a new capacity as
City Commissioner District 2.

What do you feel are the most im-
portant issues facing Ocoee and
why?
Anderson: Ocoee has made
tremendous progress during the past 10
years. We must stay the course on im-
provements which are already under-
way and not let them be interrupted
by changes in leadership. We already
have a plan in place to preserve land
for ball fields, green space and parks.
We already have sites for new
schools, and we are talking to Orange
County about expediting construction.
We have been redeveloping the area
around State Road 50. If you drive by,
you can see new construction on roads
and buildings. We are also upgrading,
repairing and resurfacing roads in the
older sections of our city.
We are installing devices, which
safely slow traffic in our neighbor-
hoods. Our police department won
awards this year for outstanding com-
munity policing. We have new busi-
nesses and shopping centers in various
stages of development.
Where we are already making
progress, we must lengthen our stride
and do even more in three main areas.
First, all of us need to support our po-
lice through Neighborhood Watch pro-
grams.
Second, we are improving the qual-
ity of our large lakes and need to do
more for smaller lakes and neighbor-
hood retention ponds. We have a tree
ordinance, but some invasive trees and
plants remain, which are harmful to
lakes. We can remove and replace
those with native trees and plants,
which will improve our lakes' quali-
ty.
Third, Founders' Day features well-
known singes and talented artists, but
we can do more to support a variety of
cultural arts. The auditorium at Ocoee
High is a wonderful resource for per-
forming arts. Until the Tom Ison Se-
nior Veteran Center and Starke Lake
amphitheater are completed, we have
the Beech Center, Community Center,
gazebo and other venues available.
Lowery: 1. Loss of trust. I believe
that many of our citizens have lost
faith in our elected officials, and I can
understand why. Too often, it appears
that our elected officials are not work-
ing for the good of the community at
large but more out of self-interest or
ego. I believe that needs to be cor-
rected and that our elected officials
should adhere to the highest ethical
standards and that their actions, words
and deeds should be above reproach.
2. Respecting and equipping our
first responders. Our police officers
and firefighters are heroes ... .What we
can do is treat them with the respect that


DARRELL LOWERY


JOEL KELLER


JIM SILLS SHELLY SIMON


they deserve, assure that they are com-
pensated to the fullest extent possible
'and provide them with the tools and
equipment necessary to allow them to
do their important jobs with the latest
in technology to the best of their abil-
ity.
3. Growth. I support a system of
managed growth that protects natural
resources and guides land-use plan-
ning and design decisions by consid-
ering the community's physical and
social needs.... I believe in a strong
collaboration between planners and
elected officials and in integrating ac-
tive public participation and a con-
sensus-building approach into the plan-
ning process.
4. Education... .To this day, I view
education as the great equalizer and
the best way of achieving your life's
dreams, whether those dreams require
a college education or technical/vo-
cational training. I believe in encour-
aging school volunteerism as an im-
portant tool in providing that support.
I also believe in active collaboration
with our elected officials on the School
Board and with educational leaders
and educators at the local level to en-
sure the success of all our children.
5. Services. The quality of life of all
of Ocoee's residents is greatly im-
pacted by the quality of services pro-
vided, from such amenities as those
available through parks and recreation
to the daily necessities of garbage and
sanitation, mosquito control, public
works (streets and traffic), utilities,
waste water management, code en-
forcement efforts and animal con-
trol....If they are not managed well,
we all suffer the consequences, such
as increased rates or the recent deba-
cle with our garbage.collection.
Outsourced without proper study
and preparation just a few years ago,
the negotiated contract with the ser-
vice provider failed the needs of our res-
idents, resulting in the need to now
bring back garbage collection under
the city's control.
Shira: I think the most important
issue facing Ocoee is the lack of a pro-
active plan to chart our future. We
need a very specific plan with goals
and objectives to outline what we want
for our community. Lots of things need
to be addressed as part of the plan,
among them: recreation, culture, shop-
ping, entertainment, schools, public
safety, housing and redevelopment.
Without this, Ocoee is letting the
developers shape our future. The plan
needs to be developed by Ocoee res-
idents. The elected officials and city
staff should help guide the process and
make sure the plan is followed, but
they should not be the people creat-
ing the vision.
Although all my issues are related
to the need for a plan, I do have some
other specific things I think warrant
attention. I want to see Ocoee spend
more time on redevelopment We need
to enhance Ocoee's uniqueness. I
would recommend a better balance
between the attention we pay to new
growth and the attention we pay to the
people and places that already exist in
Ocoee.
Economic development is another
critical component of"'smart growth."
The establishment of the proposed
Community Redevelopment Area
(CRA) along the State Road 50 corri-
dor will provide one mechanism for
economic development. The creation
of office complexes together with re-
tail, entertainment and civic uses could
offer our residents more employment
and social opportunities. But to achieve
something like this takes a plan that
will ensure enough resources are ded-
icated to that ideal.
We need to do more thah just react


to the next developer who walks
through the door with his or her plan.
We need to convince developers to
join in our plan. It is done succesful-
ly in places all over Florida and the
nation. Let's break the mold and work
hard to make Ocoee the special place
it could be.
I think it is also vitally important to
our quality of life for Ocoee to con-
tinue to expand its park system, in-
cluding more extensive multi-purpose
trails.
Sills: Rapid growth, tax-based in-
frastructure, transportation and recre-
ational and environmental needs are
some of the important issues facing
Ocoee. The growth we are currently
experiencing is not adequately pro-
viding the tax base to keep up with the
needs within our community.

What changes would you like to see
in Ocoee's city government?
Anderson: We are undergoing
rapid change as we add an assistant
city manager and new department
heads. We need to be sure we remain
an effective team and that we don't
forget the past as we work on the fu-
ture. In times of change, my experi-
ence on the commission is especially
valuable.
I We have a city manager who co-
operates with the commission. This
cooperation is helping us to take action
to solve problems rather than merely
debate them. We are working on im-
provement sin physical facilities for
our government, including a new po-
lice station.
We are developing compensation
packages that will retain the best tal-
ent and develop new skills, like ALS
certification for our firefighters. We
are making good use of grant money
to fund drainage improvements that
will help improve the quality of Starke
Lake and other areas of the city. We
need to be aggressive in seeking out the
best sources of grants and matching
funds, and I have the experience to
make it happen.
Lowery: The changes I would like
to see in Ocoee's city government in-
clude: that we should care for all of
our citizens, but especially our most
vulnerable, our children and our se-
niors; that government should serve
the people and provide a climate where
families can flourish; in holding peo-
ple accountable for their actions, in
hard work and in always giving 100
percent, in teamwork and strength in
diversity, in collaboration that a terri-
toriality and a silo approach is counter-
productive' and that we should tackle
all issues in a collaborative spirit.
Shira: The biggest change I would
like to see is the establishment of a
plan for the city. This process Would
start off with a vision that the residents
develop and then from there a specif-
ic plan with goals, budgets, schedules
and responsibilities clearly defined.
The other big change I would like to
see is a much more balanced system
between,the attention we pay to new
growth and the attention we pay to the
people and things that already exist.
Growth is an inevitable part of life in
Central Florida these days, but the de-
velopers should not dictate our agen-
da.
Sills: We need to get back to abid-
ing by the city's charter. Allowing the
city manager to oversee the day-to-
day operations of the city without be-
ing hindered by the commission. I am
a firm believer that the commission
sets policy and makes budgetary de-
cisions, but it is up to the city manag-
er to put those policies and decisions
into action. It is the responsibility of the

(See Ocoee elections, 5B)








4B The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006




Windermere elections


By Kathy Aber

Windermere voters will go to the
polls Tuesday, March 14, to elect a
mayor and three Town Council mem-
bers from a ballot list of seven candi-
dates.
Incumbent Mayor Gary Bruhn, 108
Forest St., is seeking his second term
and is being challenged by Winder-
mere's town planner, Carl Patterson
Jr., 219 W. Third Ave., who also served
as mayor from 1982-85.
Incumbent Town Council members
Ron Martin, 1012 Main St., and Matt
Sullivan, 1003 Oakdale St., are seek-
ing their second terms on the council.
Council Member Bob Sprick, 606
Magnolia St., has been serving on the
council since December, when he was
appointed to fill the vacancy created
by Fred Pryor's death. He and candi-
dates Mike Hogan, 2 First Court, and
Jennifer Roper, 425 Magnolia St., are
seeking election for the first time.
Currently, the council has six mem-
bers, including the mayor, who votes
only to break a tie. All positions are
unpaid.
The West Orange Times asked all of
the candidates to answer several ques-
tions on town issues. The following
are their responses.

What town issues or concerns
.prompted you to run for Town
Council? What specific skills would
you add to the council? Have you
held elected office before?
Bruhn: Like many candidates, I was
prompted to run because there were a
number of issues that I felt needed to
be addressed.
Two years ago, there was no way to
address your elected officials without
asking to be put on the agenda almost
a week ahead of time. Today, anyone
can address the Town Council during
the Citizens Forum at the start of every
meeting.
I also felt that Windermere needed to
take a more active role in working with
our neighboring communities and Or-
ange County regarding the decisions
that affect us. In the last two years, we
have become active, equal partners in
.the political process. This is' accom-
plished by a mayor who stays active
and engaged with other elected offi-
cials and committees.
Another issue was the fact that- our
-police officers used to perform duties
of crossing guards. This prevented our
..professional law enforcement officers
from doing their job during peak school,
traffic hours. It also put our children
- at risk when the officers were called
to an emergency. Windermere Princi-
-pal Dr. Chisena requested approval for
school crossing guards. I agreed with
our principal's request, and we now/
' have crossing guards protecting our
children.
After two years of serving as the
mayor, I have gained a tremendous
amount of experience. When I was
elected, no one could have predicted
the challenges that Windermere would
.face and the evolution that our town
would experience. Three hurricanes
became a lesson for all of Central Flori-
da, as well as Windermere: We have
learned a great deal from this unfortu-
nate experience and now have a disas-
ter recovery plan in place.
To be an elected official requires an
individual who can represent the
"town's views and stay focused, whether
speaking to the news media, other
elected officials or our residents. I have
gained this experience. Windermere
- was unfairly targeted by certain mem-
bers of the media as we tried to pro-
tect our residents from cut-through traf-
fic, which had turned our residential
streets into busy thoroughfares. I also
worked hand-in-hand with our county
officials in the aftermath of our hurri-
canes to establish no-wake zones on
',the Butler Chain for the protection of
our residents.
We need a mayor who will work
with all levels of government, whether
it is neighboring r; municipalities, Or-
ange County, the state level or our con-
gressmen and senators. I have taken a
very proactive role in making sure that
Windermere's voice is heard. I have
traveled to Washington to meet with
our lobbyists and elected officials in
trying to secure federal grant money. I

have been an active participant and
member of the Orange County Coun-
,cil of Mayors, the Board of Directors
of the Tri-County League of Cities and
the West Orange Chamber of Com-
merce Board of Directors to ensure that
our voice is heard.
I am the incumbent mayor for the
past two years.
Hogan: The first issue that I became
involved with is stormwater runoff.
The street I live on (First Court) is
sloped downhill to the north and is
made of hard-packed shell and clay.
During heavy rains a great volume of
water runs past my house and ends up
in my neighbor's yard at the end of the
street. I have had conversations with
my neighbors, the town manager and


the mayor regarding plans to control
the runoff. I have attended a meeting
- sponsored by the town to educate the
residents on the results of a completed
engineering study and what specific
control measures in the form of cul-


verts, drains and retention area are
planned. The goal is to settle and filter
the stormwater runoff before it enters
the lakes. Additionally, there is need
to eliminate low-standing water that is
a breeding ground for insects.
Last year at the parade and dedica-
tion of our new downtown, it dawned
on me how fortunate I was to live in
such a beautiful and unique town. I
deeply appreciated all the hard work
that it took by so many dedicated peo-
ple to make the new downtown a real-
ity. I heard the mayor speak of the vi-
sion that had brought our town to this
point and how we still had the respon-
sibility to see to the needs of the fu-
ture. I decided that it was time for me
to contribute to that future and serve
the town that has been my home for
more than 18 years.
I have a background in construction,
so I will be able to understand and par-
ticipate in the process of upgrading our
roads, drainage and other building pro-
jects. As an entrepreneur and business
owner for more than 12 years, I bring
an understanding of what it means to
operate an organization in the black.
As a former Coast Guard search-and-
rescue coordinator and emergency
medical technician, I am very inter-
ested in ensuring that our town is pre-
pared for any natural or manmade dis-
aster. As a prosthetist, it is critical that
I develop a close relationship with my
patients to facilitate a successful pros-
thetic outcome. I bring to the table
strong people skills: the ability to lis-
ten carefully,'the ability to ask ques-
tions to elicit pertinent information and
the ability to communicate and edu-
cate.
No, I have not held elected office
before.
Martin: I was asked by several peo-
. ple to run for council based on the fact
that I try to listen to the people of Win-
dermere and strive to represent the best
interests of the majority of the people
to the best of my ability.
The skills that I bring are service and
no agenda other than serving the peo-
ple of Windermere. I have business,
planning, communication and com-
puter skills. I have served a two-year
term on the council as liaison to the
police department, as well as liaison
to the Parks and Recreation and Elders
committees.
Patterson: Over the past few years
I have seen the town losing the part-
nership that made the town a friendly,
cooperative family one where we
had a partnership among citizens, busi-
nesses, churches and civic organiza-
tions, elected town officials and town
employees. I see the need to bring us
back together and allow us to grow and
mature together as individuals and as
a community. I can do that with the
help of everyone to renew and preserve
the sense of our community.
I saw the need to run again and serve
as your mayor and give you a person
who will conduct Town Council meet-
ings without the free-for-all at the coun-
cil meetings that serve the interest of a
few extreme individuals.
For many years, since I was mayor
in 1982-85, I have seen many effec-
tive mayors administer town business.
As mayor, they effectively conducted
business through the elected Town
Council, selected by the residents.
I bring you an individual who was
your mayor for four years. One who
over 13 years as planner and histori-
an, prepared the town Comprehensive
Plan and Code of Ordinance, prepared
grants to the state for renovation of
your Town Hall, prepared applications
for National Register status of three of
our historic buildings and wrote a new
and comprehensive history of the town
which each resident will be receiving.
We have not had a mayor who could
continue the work created by Bill Os-
borne, Fred Pryor, Jim Willard and oth-
ers, who not only came up with a vision
for the future but created new streets and
roundabouts which were desired by the
residents after more than 15 public in-
put sessions. Rather, I have seen amnay-
or who by his talk and Web site at-
tempts to take credit for the improve-
ments in town.
Your mayor at the December meet-
ing showed that he was uninformed of
the town charter and rules by asking
the council to ignore the charter by not
appointing Fred Pryor's replacement
until the March election and stating
"there is nothing of consequence com-
ing before the council in the next 90
days." Do you want a mayor who af-
ter two years had to be corrected by
the town attorney? That is why I chose
to rui for a third term as your mayor.
Nothing new and productive has oc-
curred during Gary Bruhn's term oth-
er.than an expensive lawsuit directed at
residents by the special-interest group
that recruited and campaigned for his
election. The need to quash the law-
suits is why I felt the need to run again.
We haven't had a mayor who could
bring back Windermere's image as a
pleasant place to live where you can
enjoy with your neighbors the won-


derful little town called Windermere
by the lakes.'
I was elected twice as mayor and as
president of the Orlando Area Board
of Realtors by that group.
Roper: Although this is my first time


MIKE HOGAN


to run for public office, I am qualified
to serve the residents because I have
attended town council, county com-
mission and county zoning meetings
regularly for the past five years. I am
not only aware of the issues in Win-
dermere, but I am also very informed
on what is happening in the surround-
ing area. I have considered running for
office for a number of years but want-
ed to be more informed on the issues,
which are water quality in our lakes,
the downtown development, park fa-
cilities and traffic. I wanted to take the
time to get a vision for what the resi-
dents want. I want to make sure that, as
we continue to have the explosion of de-
velopment in and around town, Win-
dermere will remain the safe, quaint
and unique place that it always has
been.
Sprick: There were no issues or con-
cerns that prompted me to run for Town
Council. Rather, I had a long-running
interest in joining the Town Council
and representing the town of Winder-
mere. With my two daughters finishing
high school and going to college, I fi-
nally felt I had the time to devote to
being a councilman. In addition to my
legal background, I believe I will bring
substantial mediation skills and peo-
ple skills to the position. The town of
Windermere has many intelligent and
energetic citizens, and it is often a chal-
lenge to find a common ground. I feel
I can carefully evaluate problems and
find mutually acceptable solutions. I
also have a strong environmental back-
ground in terms of both education and
work experience, which lends itself to
lake-quality reservations.
I have not held elected office before.
.Sullivan: As an existing Town
Council member, Ihave observed the
inner workings of the political frame-
work of our town and I am concerned
that the majority of the voting public is
not being fairly represented. We have
recently experienced the largest tax in-
crease in the history of the'town. Costs
to operate this town will continue to
increase. If creative solutions to bal-
ance the budget, without raising tax-
es, are not found, then the only alter-
native will be to reduce services to the
town residents. Without the proper
leadership the town will continue to
see rising taxes and, most likely, re-
duced services, neither of which I be-
lieve the town residents want or de-
serve. It is our duty as elected officials
to represent the concerns of all our cit-
izens and not just serve a select few.
Due to the vision and perseverance of
certain Town Council members, we
successfully completed the downtown
renovation project to resounding ap-
plause. New projects on the horizon,
increased demands on town services
and increasing costs of operation will
require council members that exem-
plify a strong sense of leadership and
have creative problem-solving skills
and a trust of the people to guide this
town through the times ahead.
The Town Council operates as a
quasi board of directors to the town
and, thus, as council members, our du-
ties are to set policies and develop a
strategic vision as to the future course
df this town. The charter calls for the
day-to-day operations of the town to
be handled by the town manager. We
cannot, as a board, micro-manage the
operations of the town. As a business
owner, I understand the need to em-
power your people and give them a
sense of ownership of their duties. In
order to be successful, we must dele-
gate and empower our people, set a vi-
sion and a course of action, and mon-
itor, guide and help them achieve their
goals and objectives. If we are suc-
cessful, the town will grow and thrive.
I bring the ability to lead people and
provide strategic thinking and prob--
lem solving that the board of direc-
tors/Town Council of Windermere
needs and deserves.
I ari currently a member of the Win-
dermere Town Council.

What are your goals, if elected?
Bruhn: The recently completed con-
struction was only the first phase of a
three-phase project to improve pedes-
trian and traffic safety and, ultimate-
ly, the quality of life in Windermere. We
need to move forward as quickly as
possible on the second phase to im-
proye the traffic flow at Park Avenue
and Maguire Road at the Windermere
Elementary School intersection. We


RON MARTIN


t1


JENNIFER ROPER


know that this area is a bottleneck at
school times, and we have money ear-
marked for this. Unfortunately, the
costs continue to escalate andwe must
act quickly in acquiring the rights-of-
way and begin construction. The third
phase is to complete an integrated sys-
tem of sidewalks and crosswalks. We
also need to complete this as soon as
possible because of the ever-increas-
ing costs.
Secondly, we have an obligation to
remediate those areas that are prone to
flooding when we experience heavy
rainfall. These areas affect our resi-
dents' safety and property, and we need
to move forward to solve this problem.
We also need to stay focused in
maintaining lake quality. We have
identified more than 20 areas where
runoff affects our lakes. The Butler
Chain is one of the reasons that we live
here, and we have everything to gain
and lose by the, quality of our lakes.
We need to fix the problems because
Windermere has always led the way
in preserving lake quality, witnessed
by our low phosphorous fertilizer or-
dinance and berm and swale inspec-
tion program.
Martin: My goals are to continue
to listen to the voice of the people and
serve in an honest and forthright man-
ner. I think each member of the Town
Council and town staff should be ac-
countable for their actions.
Hogan: During this campaign, I will
be walking every neighborhood and
street talking to the-residents and lis-
tening to issues that concern them the
most. I will be their representative in the
council and serve my constituents as
their advocate. On a personal level, I be-
lieve that serving as a member of the
council will make me a better citizen.
Specific goals:
I Want to ensure that the work be-
gun to resolve the drainage and
stormwater runoff problems in town
is done as expeditiously as possible.
Town Project Manager-- our town
manager has become overwhelmed by
the growing demands on her time and
the complexity of the various issues
she has to deal with. I support the pro-
posal for a town project manager. This
would be a person with a civil engi-
neering background who can effec-
tively deal with the detailed zoning and
permitting issues, the writing and man-
aging of grants for infrastructure im-
provements and dealing with the ever-
more complex regulations the town,
must comply with.
I support the integration of existing
sidewalk and bicycle segments in town
into one unified system.
I support the construction of a
roundabout at the Windermere Ele-
mentary School to facilitate traffic flow
and pedestrian safety.
After our experience with the hur-
ricanes of 2004 and'watching the poor
response in the aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina, I want to ensure that our town
is as prepared as possible for future
storms. This includes a comprehensive
disaster plan that is integrated with the
country, state and federal agencies. We
should have redundant communication
capabilities that will keep us in con-
tact even after a devastating storm.
,There should be a well-trained network
of neighborhood volunteers who can
assist in the initial damage assessment
and provide immediate assistance to
residents, particularly the elderly and
disabled.
Patterson: 1. To insist on a proper
and sound budget and undo the tax hike
adopted during Gary Bruhn's council.
2. To obtain central water and sew-


71h


BOB SPRICK


er system for all residents of the town.
3. To bring leadership to council
meetings using my experience as may-
or and public servant over the past 45
years by encouraging that the council
rules be followed at all times.
4. To lead the Town Council in im-
plementing the remaining traffic man-
agement plans as set forth in Vision
2020.
5. To improve relations as mayor
with the police department.
6. To fully support the town man-
ager, our chief executive officer, and en-
courage her backing by the Town
Council, so as to assist her in effective
deliverance of important town services.
7. To encourage attendance at bud-
get hearings, committee meetings and
council meetings.
8. To encourage participation in
committee activities.
9. To guide the Town Council as it
discusses the problems the town and
residents face and to help the council
as they work toward peaceful solutions
of the problems.
10. To encourage the council to
schedule an annual community forum
to provide the council with the input
of the residents as to how they see the
problems within the town and how the
residents see solutions.
11. To encourage the council to con-
tinue the forum but place it as the last
item on the agenda so as to permit the
citizens to comment on the current
meeting rather than waiting until the
next month to express their views.
12. To make the Town Council
meetings visible to all residents through
Web casts or local television to expose
any special interests who attempts to
dominate the council or their meetings.
Roper: If I am elected, I will support
the sidewalk system plan. I will push
for more park facilities for our resi-
dents. I will make sure that our lakefront
properties are maintained and acces-
sible for recreation. And I will enforce
strict design standards. I will not sup-
port any development that would not be
sustained by our town.
Sprick: One goal is to see if we can
timely resolve the outstanding lake
lawsuits, either through litigation or
mutual agreement. The town current-
ly has a Motion For Summary Judg-
ment pending in court. A second goal
is to improve communication between
the Town Council and the administra-
tion and between the Town Council
and the citizens. A third goal is to ad-
dress pressing construction issues, in-
cluding the roundabout at Park and
Maguire and residential construction
issues.
Sullivan: Our greatest assets to the
town are the lakes. We must continue
to persevere and complete the stonnwa-
ter projects. We have made tremen-
dous progress in submitting for and,
based on preliminary information, ob-
taining state and federal grants for the
stormwater projects. As a continued
effort of lake preservation, we need to
address the use of septic tanks. This is
imperative for the long-term health of
the lakes.
Work with the manager and coun-
cil to find ways to balance the budget
without raising taxes.
Work with the manager and coun-
cil to look at our Code of Ordinances
and update them as needed to issues
of today.
To see that the sidewalk master
plan as defined by the Long-Range
Planning Committee is implemented.
Work with the manager and coun-
cil to explore all possible sources of
new revenue for the town in an effort


MATT SULLIVAN


to set a long-term solution to our bud-
get constraints.
Work with the manager and coun-
cil to ensure that the charter review is
completed and the updated charter is
brought before the town for a vote.

What are the most significant chal-
lenges facing the Town council in the
next two years?
Bruhn: 1. Growth If you live in
Central Florida, you know that there,
is no other issue that challenges us
more than growth. And Windermere
is a recipient of the growth around it.
Growth is inevitable. But we need
Smart growth. It should be no surprise
to anyone who lives in our town that on
our border lies Horizon West. This is
an area that will encompass 30 to 40
times our population. How will they
drive to work? Where will they shop?
These are issues that we need to stay en-
gaged in and ensure that Orange Coun-
ty provides the services and infras-
tructure that does not destroy our qual-
ity of life. Windermere taxpayers spent
$2.5 million to provide traffic relief.
We need to guarantee that this money
was not spent in vain and that residents
decide how, when and where we will
grow. ,
2, Maintaining or reducing the bud-,
get Despite the illusion that Win-
dermere is a wealthy community and
taxes don't matter, more than 10 per-
cent of our population is comprised of
seniors. That means they live on a fixed
income and, in the case of Winder-
mere, they are land rich and cash poor.
I often say that if you sell your home
in Windermere, you cannot afford to
move back, as your property taxes will
triple or quadruple. We need to hold
the line on taxes and explore opportu-
nities to provide cost savings to roll
back taxes.
3. The Charter Review The Town
Charter, which is our constitution, has
been outdated for many years and as
a result, a Charter Review Commis-
sion was established almost a year ago.
Their recommendations will come be-
fore our council in 2006, and voters
will have an opportunity to reshape the
political structure of Windermere in
the next year. Voters will be asked if
they want to provide the same political
makeup of most of our other commu-
nities where the mayor has a vote and
reduce the Town Council by one mem-
ber. Most individuals do not realize
that although they expect the Winder-
mere mayor to represent them, lead
them and provide direction, in today's
current political structure, the mayor
cannot vote or even make a motion.
Voters will need to decide if they wish
to retain this structure, in addition to
other important issues. Your Town
Council will decide what is provided to
voters for their consideration, so it is
very important that you understand
where the elected officials and those
seeking office stand on these issues.,
Hogan: 1. Upgrading the profes-
sionalism and capabilities of our town
staff to be able to effectively meet the
complex demands of a growing town
in the 21st century.
2. As I have become more involved
with the personalities who are active
in the life of our town, I have become
aware of tensions and conflicts that are
damaging to the well-being and har-
mony of our community. I will work to
make sure that the council serves the in-
terests of all of our residents and not
just a particular faction.
3. To formulate a comprehensive

(See Windermere elections, 6B)


Wi,







Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 5B




Oakland election


By Amy Quesinberry

Two seats are up on the Oakland Town Commission, but only one will ap-
pear on the March 14 ballot. Bill Sullivan had no opposition to the District 4
seat relinquished by Commissioner Bill Dudzinski, who moved out-of-state
to be closer to family.
District 1 incumbent Ramona "Mona" Phipps and the, candidate trying to
unseat her, William S. "Sam" Carr Jr., were opponents two years ago when
both ran for the seat vacated by Kathy Stark in her bid for mayor.
Voters will go to a new location for this election. Instead of the traditional
polling place (Oakland Presbyterian Church), residents will cast their ballots
at the new meeting hall, 221 N. Arrington St.
The West Orange Times gave the candidates a questionnaire, and below are
their responses.

Why do you want to serve on the commission?
Carr: I desire to serve on the commission to provide a voice for the Oakland
town residents, particularly concerning future growth, the town's budget and
supporting development that will enhance and add to the quality of living for
our community. I wouJd desire to maintain the atmosphere and sense of com-
munity I feel today and I would like to feel 20 years from now and that I want
,my children to experience.
Phipps: I.would like to retain my seat on the Town Commission to see
through continuing projects and objectives. My involvement in Oakland began
when I moved to town. I hope to continue working with the commission and
staff to create a master plan for Oakland, which includes new legislative ini-
tiatives, coupled with community goals. I bring a passion for preserving the past
while embracing our future. I believe we all bring something unique to this
process. As a collective, we are able to work together toward a consensus that
allows for comprehensive and critical thinking. These qualities are very important
to the decision-making and achieving process.

What do you feel are the most important issues facing Oakland and why?
Carr: My family decided to move to Oakland in 2001 because we saw a
very small community that was almost exclusively residential in nature and
which had the flavor of old Florida. With the limited amount of infrastructure,
I realized that the possibility of multi-family development townhomes and
small-lot subdivisions were most likely not to occur here and that the amount
of commercial development that would occur someday would be along the
Highway 50 corridor.
The residents of Oakland that I have had the opportunity to speak with have
the same opinion, and, therefore, many of us feel that higher-density residen-
tial development is not what we envisioned in Oakland's future.
Controlled growth, quality development and a high-quality family lifestyle
are on my agenda. With these comes low impact to the town's infrastructure,
including traffic, environmental concerns, utilities and personnel.
Existing residential development within the named six subdivisions within
the town limits of Oakland present a limited impact on traffic, school capaci-
ty and utility needs because they are a low-density product. If the town of Oak-
land wants to maintain a low-density residential community, then wastewater
facilities should only be available along the Highway 50 corridor for com-
mercial uses, which was my same position two years ago.
Two proposed single-family residential developments, which are a higher-
intensity use than anything else that we have seen in Oakland, are dependent
on a central wastewater collection system provided by the city of Winter Gar-
den. The town of Oakland will experience more traffic, increase the demand
on our potable water infrastructure to accommodate an additional 250-plus
single-family lots, as planned, and increase the school-age population by more'
than 100 students.
Phipps: Because of the-size and location of Oakland, we continue to face im-
pacts on our borders that often leave us out of the decision-making process. We
have initiated staff to pursue our interests in Plaza Collina, State Road 50,
Wekiva and water-management issues.
However, there is one important issue facing all of Central Florida that we
must face head on and take a proactive approach to seek avenues to address change.
This issue is the lack of affordable housing. The latest real estate "bubble" has
again widened the gap and made it impossible for many citizens and families
to own a home of their own. One of the unique characteristics of Oakland has
been generations of families that have stayed in Oakland to raise their children
close to the love and support of family. Today's home prices have put that
choice at risk. In many cases, it is impossible for young people to buy and old-
er people to retire in our town.
It is critical that we look at development options that allow home ownership
to be a reality, not just a dream. Diversity in housing, grant programs and part-
nerships with organizations like HUD and Habitat For Humanity will contin-
ue to play an important role. (There is a trend toward building smaller homes
that are affordable, not only to buy but also to furnish and maintain. This issue
has long-reaching effects that could have a major impact on local economy
over the next several years.)


What are your thoughts on Plaza Collina and its impact on the town?
Growth along Highway 50 within the town limits? The management and
state grades at Oakland Avenue Charter School?
Carr: Commercial development along Highway 50 within the town limits
is inevitable. A wastewater force main from the city of Winter Garden Utili-
ties is slowly progressing along the south side of Highway 50 and will soon be
at our western town limits doorstep. I believe the town is fortunate in that we
have a limited amount of potential commercial development along Highway
50, which should eliminate the large retail developments that you see occur-
ring in eastern Lake County.
As we all know, commercial development along U.S. 50 in east Lake Coun-
ty has exploded over the past years, and with that commercial explosion comes
Plaza Collina, an outdoor mall of huge proportions that will forever impact the
general flavor and character of east Lake County. I would forecast that traffic
will be much worse than it is today along U.S. 50, old Highway 50 and the
surrounding local roadway network, including the western portion of the town
of Oakland. We must insist on appropriate roadway improvements committed
to by the developer along Oakland Avenue, including the intersection at U.S.
50, Jones Road and old Highway 50. $200,000 will not go too far in solving
the pending traffic issues, including design, right-of-way acquisition and con-
struction costs. A round-about may be the answer, however, all intersection
improvements should be paid for by the developer.
I look forward to continued success with Oakland's charter school, and I be-
lieve it promotes a strong sense of community awareness. The unfavorable
grade that was achieved last term was unfortunate and should improve this
year. The change in management should help the situation.
Phipps: Overwhelming is the word that comes to mind in reference to Plaza
Collina. For two years, I have been attending meetings regarding this project.
I have been amazed on more than one occasion as plans passed through approval
levels without adequately addressing issues of regional impact as local issues
and concerns seem not to weigh in during the regional impact process. Oakland
will continue to work to address acceptable solutions for traffic impacts. Per-
haps the only positive thing that came from this process was the partnership be-
tween Orange County, Lake County, Clermont and Oakland to continue to
work together. This development awakened the issue of growth and its im-
pacts upon neighboring jurisdictions. Major issues that concern me beyond
traffic are the protection of the West Orange Trail, the safety of the South Lake

Trail connection and the protection of the Scenic Byway.
Plaza Collina's impact For more than five years I have worked with the
Friends of Lake Apopka and the Scenic Byway Committee to enhance and
protect this area as part of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail system and as a state-
designated Scenic Byway (which now continues through Oakland and into
Winter Garden). The negative impacts of Plaza Collina with no protective mea-
sures puts into place for the trail and/or byway was a hard blow. However, we
will continue to address these issues as the project proceeds through the de-
velopment process.
Growth on Highway 50 Oakland staff has come up with a saying that "all
roads meet in Oakland." With the proposed widening of Highway 50 and the
Turnpike-widening project, the fear is Oakland will become a major intersec-
tion. The center part of the hourglass that funnels the growth of Orange Coun-
ty and Lake County right now there is no other east-west option. At this
time we are working with both the Department of Transportation and the Turn-
pike Authority to ensure that Oakland's best interests are kept in the forefront.
New development on Highway 50-will need to look at the ongoing issue of
traffic impacts. Oakland's traffic is being monitored, and the traffic studies
along with the Master Plan will be helpful tools for the future. I do not believe
we will ever generate as much local traffic in Oakland in comparison to the amount
that comes through Oakland. Addressing additional issues, I worked on the
Gateway Corridor Ordinance, which describes commercial development stan-
dards along Highway 50, and all key corridors within the town. I strongly sup-
port the new amendment to this ordinance, which adds another layer of con-
trol for future commercial development. In an attempt to maintain our identi-
ty and small-town character prudent planning is essential. We must be ready
with a definite plan once sewer lines are in place along the Highway 50 corri-
dor.
Oakland Avenue Charter School As a previous educator, I could go on
for days about my view of FCAT and its use as a measuring tool. I do not be-
lieve the "grade" by any means defines the Oakland Avenue Charter School.
The teachers, staff and parents who are determined to rise above the challenge
without folding to the pressure of "teaching to the FCAT" more accurately de-
fine the school. This dedication and determination is also a priority with the town
and the School Advisory Board. It was a major accomplishment when we built
a neighborhood school for the children of Oakland. I believe we will continue
to strive for local educational success. You can't measure the Oakland charter
school or any school in Florida with a broken ruler; it is inconsistent.

What are your goals if elected?
Carr: My primary mission, if elected, would be to maintain and enhance
the quality of living. This could be accomplished by careful review and con-


SAM CARR MONA PHIPPS

sideration of the budget, controlling future development, reanalyzing utility
rates and providing education on water usage.
Phipps: My goals as commissioner for Oakland would be to set up a series
of commission workshops to expand our future land-use map to create a mas-
ter plan and establish a capital budget; continue working to have the library at
the charter school become a part of the Orange County Library System; sup-
port the completion of the Environmental Education Center at the Oakland
Nature Preserve; work with the curriculum specialist at the charter school to
set up hands-on science classes for all grades at the Oakland Nature Preserve;
complete the restoration of the Historic African American Cemetery and make
enhancements to the Oakland Tildenville Cemetery; work with all jurisdic-
tions for the protection of the Green Mountain Scenic Byway; work with all ju-
risdictions and the St. Johns River Water Management District for the completion
of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail; continue working with neighboring commu-
nities to minimize regional impacts; and create a master water plan addressing
Wekiva, waste water and SJRWMD.

Carr's personal information
Carr is vice president/director of engineering at Consul-Tech Development
Services in Orlando and has been with the company for nearly nine years. He
and his wife, Beth Ann, have been married for more than 14 years and have lived
'in Oakland for more than four. The Carrs have three children.
He is a licensed professional engineer in both Florida and Georgia and a li-
censed general contractor. He received his bachelor's degree in civil engi-
neering from Georgia Tech and completed technical training in the School of
Pipeline Technology from the University of Texas in Austin. 'He also attend-
ed the University of Southern Mississippi while pursuing an MBA but did not
have time to complete the program.
Carr has served for seven years on the Orange County Environmental Pro-
tection Commission, four of those as chairman. While there, he was the des-
ignate to serve on the Well Drillers Advisory Board of Orange County. He
also served on the Orange County Republican Party Executive Committee for
almost four years. Currently, he is chairman of Oakland's Board of Zoning
Adjustments and Appeals. He serves as vice chairman of the Utilities Sub-
committee of Governmental Affairs Oversite Committee, HBA. He is the pres-
ident of the John's Landing Homeowners Association, serving as vice presi-
dent from May 2004 to October 2005. This group gave him its endorsement last
'week.

Phipps' personal information
Phipps has lived in Central Florida for 23 years and in Oakland for 10. She
has worked for Biosphere Consulting for seven years as office manager and as-
sistant to owner Jim Thomas. She is widowed with one son.
She has a Bachelor of Science degree in social science and journalism from
the University of Central Florida.
Phipps is a past board member of the Oakland Nature Preserve and still
serves as an advisory board member and educational guide. She is also a mem-
ber of the town's Cemetery Restoration Committee and Long-Range Planning
Committee, Oakland Avenue Charter School Task Force and Green Mountain
Scenic Byway Committee. She is president of Friends of Lake Apopka and,
through that, is on the Lake Apopka Loop Trail Task Force. She spearheaded
the town's Tree City USA designation, is a certified Wildlife Habitat steward
with the Florida Wildlife Foundation, is a corporate member of the West Or-
ange Chamber of Commerce, serves on the Human Services Council, has been
a Hospice volunteer for 10 years and was co-chair of the Orange Audubon Ed-
ucation Committee. She belongs to Leadership UCF and the Growth Man-
agement Symposium as well..


Ocoee elections
commission to make sure actions are
followed through by working with
the city manager.

What are your goals if elected?
Anderson: I will continue to be a
servant of the people who elected me
to office. I will continue to attend
homeowners association meetings
and listen to their needs and wishes.
I will continue to support grass roots
efforts to improve our neighborhoods
.and help them get grants and other
support through the city.
We have been wise stewards of the
Coca-Cola Property and, as a result,
we have a high school named after
the city, future middle and elementary
schools and 30 acres of recreation
land.
We built three fire stations, and we
are working on a new police station.
We are upgrading Old Winter Gar-
den Road to four lanes and revitaliz-
ing State Road 50. We are in the mid-
dle of many important initiatives, and
my goal is to see them completed on
time and on budget.'
Low*ry: To work diligently to
make Ocoee's slogan, "The Center
of Good Living," a reality for all of
our residents.
Shira: My primary goal will be to
represent the people of District 2 by
listening to their ideas for Ocoee and
any concerns they have with our city.
Beyond that, one of my immediate
goals will be to work with the other
members of the commission, the
city's advisory board members and
all Ocoee residents to establish a well-
defined vision for Ocoee with spe-
cific goals to ensure we stay on track.
My goal would be to coordinate this
process with the FY 2006-2007 bud-
get.
A related goal, but more "specific
in nature, would be to champion both
downtown redevelopment as well as
redevelopment in the proposed CRA
along State Road 50;1 would like to
see detailed plans created for each
area which can then be incorporated
into the overall city plan.
I think all these plans are impor-
tant so that to the extent possible,


S
Ocoee residents are dictating what
the Ocoee of the future will look like.
Developers come and go. We need
to make sure While they are here they
are contributing positively to our vi-
sion.
Sills: My goals if elected will be
to work with the city manager, staff
and developers to bring quality busi-
nesses, dining establishments, im-
proved transportation and parks and
recreational facilities to our city. Aft-
other goal is to put plans in place to
preserve our lakes within our city.

Personal information:
Anderson: A 10-year member of
the Ocoee City Commission, Ander-
son has lived in Ocoee for 26 years,
and he and his wife, Linda, have one
son.
He serves as mayor pro tem on the
commission and is an ex-officio
member of the Recreation Advisory
Board. He has volunteered as an Out
Reach director for the First Baptist
Church of Ocoee and is a member of
the Ocoee Lions Club and Ocoee His-
torical Commission. He also was a
board member of the West 'Orange
Health Alliance.
A graduate of Central Michigan
University who owns his own mark-
ing company in Ocoee, Anderson has'
held world and national records and
titles in power boating and water ski
and was named to the American Pow-
er Boat Association Hall of Fame.
He describes himself as an expe-
rienced aviator who, as a commer-
cial pilot, racked up more than 12,000
hours of flight time.
Lowery: A self-employed sub-
contractor/project manager special-
izing in home renovations and
restoration, Lowery retired after 27
years with Walt Disney World Engi-
neering Services. He and his, wife,
Betty, have four grown children and
five grandchildren.
He has lived in Ocoee since 1989
and been involved as a volunteer with
the Ocoee Golf Association, which
he served as vice president, and as a
coach for more than 10 years with
Pop Warner Football and Ocoee Lit-


(Continued from 3B)
tle League.
Shira: Shira is a professionally cer-
tified municipal planner in private
practice. She and her husband, Jim,
own and operate a planning and en-
gineering firm in Clermont, and their
clients are mostly local governments.
She also worked for the city of
Ocoee for 17 years as a planner, di-
rector of community relations and as-
sistant to the city manager.in charge
of special projects.
A 19-year resident of Ocoee, she
was honored as the Member of the
Month by the West Orange Cham-
ber of Commnerce for her efforts on be-
half of economic development and
as the 2003-04 Mentor of the Year
for the Orange County Public Schools
West Learning Community. On
March 31, 2005, Mayor Scott Van-
dergrift issued a proclamation mak-
ing that day "Janet Shira Day" in
Ocoee.
Sills: Sills has owned D.J.'s Auto
Sales of Ocoee Inc. in the same lo-
cation in downtown Ocoee for the
past 30. He and his wife, Cathy, have
two daughters and two grandchildren.
A resident of Ocoee since 1985,
Sills is currently president of the
'Ocoee Lions Club, of which he has
been a member of for 23 years. He
has also been a member of the Elks
Lodge of Winter Garden for 17 year,
and he belongs to the West Orange
Chamber of Commerce.
For the city of Ocoee, Sills, who
was honored as the Volunteer of the
Year in 2002, has volunteered as
chairman of the Equity Study Com-
mission, the Code Enforcement
Board, the Citizens Advisory Board
for the Ocoee Police Department and
the Community Merit Board (current
chairman).
He is also a member of the Planning
and Zoning Commission and has
been a monetary sponsor of the Big
Orange Games since they began.

District 4
Two political newcomers are in
competition for the District 4 seat be-
ing vacated by Nancy Parker. They are
Joel Keller and Shelly Simon.


Why do you want to serve on the
City Commission?
Keller: Because I have a heart to
serve the community. I have been an
active member with my homeown-
ers association, the schools and the
town. With an open seat in District
4 in Ocoee, I believe I have the time
and talent that would be beneficial
to move the city along during this pe-
riod of growth.
Simon,: I love this community and
have lived here for 17 years. I've
lived in my district for 14 of those
years. I want to ensure our commu-
nity is the best that it can be and help
make the right decisions for citizens
who live here. The way to do that is
to get involved, ask the right ques-
tions and ensure the right answers are
being given to the City Commission
and the citizens. I truly believe that I
can do a great job, and I'm very ex-
cited to get started.

What do you feel are the most im-
portant issues facing Ocoee and
why?
Keller: The top issue is controlled
growth. We need to make sure that
we have the infrastructure to be able
to support the growth we are going
through. Roads, water and sewer are
very important needs to keep up with
the city growth. Along with that is
the police and fire department that
need to be able to keep up with per-
sonnel, equipment and training.
Another issue is ballfields. As the
community grows, there is less land
for expansion of our already over-
worked ballfields. We need to be
looking at developer-donated land
along with buying land before it gets
any more costly.
The mall is another issue, but this
has to be handled more delicately
since we are dealing with private
property. We need to get mall man-
agement and our police force talking,
along with the commissioners. We.
need new constructive ideas to stop
the drain of stores.
Simon: Development is a huge is-
sue. It sounds like a standard answer
given by other candidates, but it is a
big issue in our community. It can be
beneficial or detrimental to our com-


munity welfare contingent on how it
is allowed in our community. In my
view, the priority for development is
the compatibility of the projects with
the existing community, and I will
view every project before the com-
mission with the existing communi-
ty as my compass.
The other biggest issue is our ser-
vices, ensuring that we maintain the
services we have and looking for
ways to enhance these services that
will best serve our community.

What changes would you like to see
in Ocoee's city government?
Keller: Speed up the time to get
commercial land development (like
restaurants) through approval. How-
ever, at the same time, we do not want
to compromise Ocoee's growth strat-
egy just for the sake of that growth.
There has to be a melding so that
things can be done timely but hold
to what we really want to see our city
look like.
Simon: Consistency is a change
I'd like to see in Ocoee's city gov-
ernment. I believe that change,
growth and innovation are great when
it's progressive. Unfortunately, some
of the changes Ocoee has experienced
over the last few years have not been
progressive. There has been the start-
up of services only to shut them down
or eliminating services and jobs only
to bring them back in the city.
I'd like to see the city plan a course
for operations consistent with a city
of our size that meets the needs of
our residents and then work within
this plan. The constant changes each
time there is a management or poli-
cy change that doesn't work out is
simply too expensive.

What are your goals if elected?
Keller: Continued controlled
growth. Improved facilities for the
police department along with getting
our officer numbers, up to the sur-
rounding comparable cities. Have our
fire department go to Advanced Life
Support unit instead of only Basic
Life Support. Ballfields and parks for
our children. Continue the good
working rapport with the Ocoee High
School and [Ocoee] Middle School.


Hopefully, work with the mall to im-
prove safety concerns on the week-
ends especially.
Simon: My goals are very simple
in theory but ambitious to implement.
I want to ensure that the policies and
services that are set and provided by
the city are carried out equitably and
expeditiously. Decisions that are
made will be done based on needed
research of each project or subject
and citizen input.
Working with the commission will'
be a focus so that we can be produc-
tive and move forward with the city
business.

Personal information:
Keller: Keller, who is employed
by Hughes Supply in Orlando, has
been on the Sawmill Homeowners
Association for 14 of its 15 years,
taking off one year due to commit-
ments at.work. He has served as pres-
ident of the Ocoee Middle School
Advisory Council and the Ocoee
Middle PTA between 1998-2004.
He also served as vice president of
the West Orange High PTSA and was
a member of the WOHS/Apopka
High Relief Committee that helped
decide the zoning for the new Ocoee
High.
In addition, he served on the EAR
Committee in 1998, which reviewed
Ocoee's 20-year plan. In 2000, he
began serving on the Citizen Advi-
sory Council for the Ocoee Police
Department and is currently its chair-
man. In 2002, he was appointed to
the Planning and Zoning Board.
Simon: Simon, a 17-year resident
of Ocoee, and her husband, Bill, a re-
tired Ocoee police officer, live in the
Watershed subdivision.
She said some of the experiences
she's had in'the city have involved
local fund-raisers, American Cancer
Society events, Reading Mentoring
Program through Ocoee Elementary
and holiday events for the commu-
nity sponsored by the city.
A former employee for the city of .
Ocoee, Simon is currently the code en-
forcement manager for the city of
Winter Garden.






*6B The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


Windermere elections


plan for the future of our town that
will meet the needs of a growing com-
munity while preserving the historical
character of Windermere.
Martin: Issues to be dealt with in
order of precedence are:
management of stormwater
runoff,
traffic management at the ele-
mentary school,
pedestrian safety with improved
and additional crosswalks and side-
walks,
settlement of the lawsuit,
sewer systems for low-lying ar-
,,eas that impact the water quality of
:,the lakes,
management of business growth,
no new business that depends on ex-
emrnal support for survival and brings
j additional traffic problems,
stewardship of the tax dollars
through cost-saving activities,
continued management of the tree
,canopy,
satellite phone system for the po-
lice department,
parks maintenance,
underground utilities down the
-thoroughfares,
and water, sewage and under-
ground utilities for the town.
Roper: I believe the three most sig-
nificant challenges facing the town
council in the next two years will be
;resident satisfaction, traffic and de-
-velopment.
Patterson: Challenges The
council and the residents must work
together to accomplish goals within
the next few years. The result will be
a pleasant and friendly town that does
not have to worry about outside in-
fluences.
Sewer, water and stormwater
drainage. We now have eight to 10
septic systems in a block where we
had only one or two earlier. The lakes
are being endangered, and the safety
of the drinking water is critical.


Obtain clean, safe drinking water
from a central system. Install a central
sewer system and eliminate septic
tanks.
The council must be encouraged to
establish an environmentally respon-
sible public policy to maintain the
town's greatest asset, the Butler Chain
of Lakes. Protect the Butler Chain by
completing stormwater drainage con-
trol at all outfalls into the lakes. Keep
fertilizer out of the lakes.
The council must be reminded of
their responsibility to complete the
sidewalk improvements and the pr6p-
er maintenance of our
streets. The council and residents
must push forward from the Vision
2020 and set new goals for 2030, 2040"
and 2050. What should the town do in
the future?
Return the atmosphere within the
-town to that of a small friendly vil-
lage with close neighborly contacts.
one happy family.
Town Council meetings since Gary
Bruhn was elected have not run quick-
ly and smoothly. While in the past,
because the council adopted Roberts
Rules of Order in 1989, meetings
moved along without the vitriolic out-
bursts permitted by Mr. Bruhn. Meet-
ings need to run smoothly and not be
extended late into the night.
Sprick: The three most pressing
challenges facing the Town Council
are the lake lawsuits, construction is-
sues and communication issues with
the citizens.
Sulllivan: 1. Budget. Finding a way
to increase revenue while holding ex-
penses in line. Our main source of
revenue is ad valorem taxes. We have
benefited from increased property val-
ues from a red-hot real estate market
and thereby increased revenues; how-,
ever, we were still short more than
$400,000 in balancing the budget last
year, which resulted in an increase .in
taxes to the residents. Without look-


(Continued from 4B)
ing for new sources of revenue, we
will be faced with either increased
taxes or reduced services, neither of
which I believe is the answer. As a
council, we must look at all opportu-
nities as they present themselves and
explore other ways for new revenue
sources while controlling expenses.
2. Stormwater/water quality. We
have a responsibility to our citizens
and their children to establish a re-
sponsible stormwater policy that will
ensure water quality for generations to
come. That includes the construction
and maintenance of the stormwater
projects as established and prioritized
by our consultants, PEC. Additional-
ly, we must explore a responsible pol-
icy relating to septic tanks and the po-
tential for sewer in our town. This will
be a huge undertaking. However, we
have proven to ourselves and the town
residents that we can undertake a vi-
sioning process and see through a
multi-million-dollar construction pro-
ject that each and every citizen can
enjoy and use.
3. Visioning. We have an opportu-
nity in front of us to set a course of
action and a vision of what we want
for this town and how it will be
achieved. We will be unable to do this
if the council does not start focusing
on this most important goal. The
council and mayor must make this a
priority and let the day-to-day opera-
tions of the town continue with the
town manager as established by the
charter. The council must focus on
why it was elected: "council shall en-
act local legislation, adopt budgets,
determine policies and appoint such
town officials..."
Personal information:
Bruhn is a systems design and in-
tegration manager for Lockheed Mar-
tin, where he has been employed for
25 years. He is also a certified Six
Sigma productivity expert for Lock-


heed. He has been married to his wife,
Kay, for 24 years and has lived in
Windennere for 18 years. He has one
son.
He attended University of Wis-
consin at Whitewater. In addition to
memberships listed elsewhere, he is a
member of the Municipal Advisory
Committee to MetroPlan and chair-
man of the Orange County Council
of Mayors Committee to the Orange
County-City of Orlando Consolida-
tion Services Study Commission.
Hogan became a certified pros-
thetist/orthotist in 1993 and for the
past 12 years has operated his own
business, Mobile Limb and Brace Inc.,
which provides comprehensive in-
home prosthetic and orthotic services
to homebound elderly and disabled
patients. His company operates in
Central and North Florida and south-
ern Georgia.
He served in the U.S. Coast Guard
from 1972-76. From 1976-78, he was
an emergency medical technician at
West Orange Hospital in Winter Gar-
den. He and his wife, Barbara, have
been married for 25 years and have
one son.
He was a college student and an In-
fantry Patrol Leader in the Florida
National Guard from 1978-82. He
graduated from the University of Cen-
tral Florida and served in the U.S.
Army from 1982-86. His family
moved to Windermere in 1987, and
he was employed as a construction
superintendent for residential home
construction and remodeling.
His civic involvement includes
serving as assistant Scoutmaster for
Windermere Troop 225 and as a
Deputy Black Belt Tae Kwon Do and
instructor at K.C. Chung Tae Kwon Do
in the Plantation Groves Shopping
Center. He was a member of the Win-
dermere Rotary Club for one year.
Martin currently works as a pri-
vate consultant for IBM at Gulfstream
Aerospace in Savannah, Ga., helping
to implement product definition sys-


tem using 3-D design. He expects to
complete this work by June. He also
has his own company, Ron Martin
Consulting, and he does product data
management for engineering and
manufacturing product structures. Pre-
viously, he worked for Martin Mari-
etta, now Lockheed Martin, for more
than 38 years. Prior to his current as-
signment, he worked for IBM for sev-
en years. He has been married to his
wife, Violet, for 26 years, and they
have lived in Windermere since 1981.
They have seven children, 13 grand-
children and four great-grandchildren.
Martin graduated from Rollins Col-
lege with a bachelor's degree in busi-
ness and economics and from Regis
University, Denver, Colo., with an
MBA.
Patterson is a retired lieutenant
colonel in the United States Army and
is serving as a consultant to the town
as its planner and voluntary histori-
an. He has been married to his wife,
Jane, for almost 60 years. They have
two grown children and have lived in
Windermere since 1978. Patterson
has two years of college.
He is chairman of Windermere's
Historic Preservation Committee and
was chairman of the Planning and
Zoning Committee. He has prepared
five grant requests to the state for ren-
ovation of the Town Hall and sub-
mitted an application to have Town
Hall, the Cal Palmer Memorial Build-
ing and the 1890s schoolhouse added
to the National Register of Historic
Places.
He has been a member of the Win-
dermere Rotary Club since 1971 and
is a Paul Harris fellow. He was the
real estate manager of Gale Realty in
Windermere from 1970-73 when he
founded Windermere Realty, which
later was sold to Judy Black in 1989
and is now known as Main Street Re-
altors. He is currently a broker there.
He was president of the Orlando
Area Board of Realtors. He was chair-
man of the Florida Bar-Florida As-


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sociation of Realtors Joint Committee
and has served on numerous com-
mittees for several local boards of Re-
altors and the Florida Bar. He was the
Scoutmaster of Troop 223 in Win-
dermere for three years and served as
mayor from 1982-85.
Roper works as a producer for Or-
ange County Television. She has two
children, and her family has been in
the West Orange area for five gener-
ations. She was raised in Windermere
and has lived at her present residence
for three years. Roper attended Win-
dermere Elementary, Lakeview Ju-
nior High and. West Orange High
schools. She attended Florida South-
ern College, where she studied com-
munication and later earned a degree
from the Art Institute of Atlanta.
She is a member of the Audubon
Society, Butler Chain Concerned Cit-
izens and the PTA. She has been a
Cub Scout leader and was a member
of the Celebration Committee that or-
ganized the dedication ceremony and
parade for the new Main Street project.
She has been a member of the Parks
and Recreation Committee.
Sprick is an attorney and has lived
in Windermere for 18 years. He is sin-
gle and has two daughters. He holds
a bachelor's and master's degree in
environmental science from Rutgers
University and a juris doctor degree
from the University of Florida. He
has served on the town Traffic Com-
mittee and was the chairman of the
Maintenance of Traffic Committee
for the Main Street improvement pro-
ject and chairman of the Main Street
Celebration Committee.
Sullivan is the managing director
and principal at Colliers Arnold, "a
commercial real estate firm in Orlan-
do. He has been married to his wife,
Stacey, for 10 years, and they have
two sons. He has lived in Windermere
for 32 years.


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TmE West


a weekly newspaper



Rivals meet for first time on diamond


Ocoee High hosted the first-ever meeting on the baseball field with ri- West Orange's Nolan Fontana (No. 8) rounds first base after hitting a
val West Orange last week. The Warriors came out on top 4-0. Ocoee pop fly into the outfield as first-base Coach Adam Miller (No. 3) looks
players look on from the dugout as a teammate prepares for the pitch. on.


Warrior players congratulate Scott Horvath after crossing the plate last
week in West Orange's 4-0 victory at Ocoee High.


4-. I


I. ~
...L ~


1.


~'1. A


West Orange players gather around Coach Jesse Marlo for some works of encouragement during last week's WOHS vs. Ocoee
game.


An Ocoee Knight base runner dives into first base as West Orange's Craig Dodge catch-
es an attempted pick-off throw.








2C The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


Sports


Ocoee softball wins three in a row


Shimai take 2nd at Gator Showcase
The IUS Shimai Ul 18 girls soccer team gave up only one goal over four games to claim second place in the
Gator Showcase tournament held Feb. 17-20 in Gainesville. The Shimai outscored their opponents 10-1
and currently hold the state's No. 7 ranking. Gathered on the field in Gainesville are teammates (l-r): front
row, Marie Sapper, Nicole Fagg, Taylor Adams, Kayla Gans, Rose Gaset, Martha Taboas, Carolina Esco-
bar; back row, Kim Newsome, Jenna Nelms, Kelly Wiedenbeck, Kayla Parrish, Mandy Maag, Ashley Pere-
zluha, Kathy Drury, Carol Myers, Debora Ziccardi and Coach Jeff Parrish. Not pictured: Coach Sam Keith,
Coach Jennie Powell, Manager Denise Nelms, Erin Duncan and Daniela Gavivia.


The Lady Knight varsity fastpitch
softball team went 3-for-3 last week,
defeating University, Dr. Phillips and
Colonial. Jenn Noiseau pitched for the
victory over University. Dominique
Smith and Kristen Crowe played out-
standing defense. Crowe, Megan
Squartino, Devin Crabb and Brittany
Spencer each had 2 hits against the
Cpugars.
Ocoee rallied for 8 runs in the top of
the seventh inning to break a 3-3 tie and
,crush Dr. Phillips 11-3 last week. Jenn
Henry started the offensive attack by
knocking in the go ahead RBI. Crowe
provided the fireworks by hitting a
grand slam. Noiseau picked up the
victory with Heather Durrance pitch-
ing the final two innings in relief.
The Lady Knights improved their
record to 6-3 by beating Colonial 10-
5 last Friday.
The Ocoee junior varsity fastpitch
softball team lost 13-9 to University
last week. Miranda Isbell made her
pitching debut for Ocoee in the third
inning.


The J.V. Lady Knights also dropped
a game to Dr. Phillips 12-10 last week.
Julia Daily made her debut on the
mound for Ocoee and picked up 5
strikeouts. Isbell, Daily and Danielle
Saravo each connected for doubles.
The Ocoee High varsity baseball
team fell 4-0 to rival West Orange last
week, despite a strong pitching per-
formance by Ralph Barden over five
innings. Rashid Mitchell led the Ocoee
offense with a single and a walk.
The Knights also lost last Saturday
5-4 to University. Mike Arsenault
pitched a complete game for Ocoee.
Corey Bemstine hit the team's first-
ever home run. Bobby Garver went
2-for-2 at the plate to raise his batting
average to .667.
The Knight junior varsity base-
ball team fell 9-7 to Lyman last week.
Cory Roach and Terrance Coakley
each went 2-for-4 and scored 2 runs
apiece. C.J. DePalma racked up 9
strikeouts in five innings on the mound
for Ocoee.
The Ocoee varsity boys lacrosse


team lost in overtime 9-8 to Edgewa-
ter last week. Knight goalie Billy
Vereb racked up 22 saves. Wes Ven-
turino led Ocoee with 3 goals, while
Chris Santos added 2 goals and an as-
sist and Blaine Cockcroft scored 2
goals. Brett Reynolds knocked in a
goal and Tyler Chestney helped out
with 2 assists.
The Knight varsity boys tennis
team lost to rival West Orange 6-1 last
week with Andy Pace picking up
Ocoee's lone match victory. The boys
team also lost 7-0 to Apopka last
week.
The Lady Knight varsity girls ten-
nis team fell 5-2 to West Orange. Jose-
lyn Yeager and Erica Spivey teamed
up to win a doubles match for Ocoee.
The Lady Knights fell 6-1 to Apopka
with Brittany Hopkins and Yeager
winning their doubles match.
The Ocoee varsity boys and girls
water polo teams both lost to Boone
last week. Jordan Rawski scored for the
boys team, while Brittney Nuckoles
picked up a goal for the Lady Knights.


The IUS Patriots girls soccer team recently captured third place in the Weston Invitational tournament. The
Patriot roster consists of players Abbey Brown, Jessenia Barragan, Cindy Buchner, Mari Cirilo, Lauren
Green, Maria Hernandez, Selena Jaimes, Alyssa Kaminski, Brianna Lemerise, Kalle Miller, Rasha Roberts
and Brooke Wigmore. The team is coached by Pat Incantalupo and Cheryl Pilkington.


IUS Patriots place third in soccer tourney
The West Orange IUS Patriots Cirilo scored three minutes later to came to an end with a 3-0 loss to
U111 girls soccer team took third secure the victory, the Miramar Strikers. A combination
place at the Weston Invitational soc- The Patriots went on to defeat the of good defense and excellent goal- '
cer tournament held Feb. 18-20. Plantation Eagles Gold 3-1 in the keeping prevented the Patriots from ..
F -_' .- 0 ---+.. .. ....- 0 -41 _- -. .. -A r-. / .,.- 1


I th meir nirst game, the patriots
'staged a 3-2 come-from-behind vic-
,tory over the West Pines United.
Prianna Lemerise scored on a head-
er off a comer kick to.tie the score
with seven minutes remaining. Mari


next game. Cirilo accounted for two
goals, while Selena Jaime.s added
another goal off a penalty kick.
Marla Hernandez dished out one as-
sist.
West Orange's winning streak


mounting a rally.
The Patriots play Saturday and
Sunday in Ocala in the Region B
Cub Challenge round of the Flori-
da Youth Soccer Association play-
offs.


Ocoee Little League opens new season
A colorful parade and opening day ceremonies (top) kicked off the 44th Ocoee Little League season last
Saturday. (Above left) Harry Shelton (shown with his son at left) served as the parade's grand marshal and
threw out the first pitch to catcher Tommy Denmark. (Above right) Ocoee Little League board member Gary
Hood presents the Chuck Bramlett Award for outstanding sportsmanship to Cory Bernstine.


A Taste of


"Super Tuscans".


from Italy


Due to.the recent overwhelming success of our pri\ ate Single Mall Scorch tasting,
we have eagerly decided to thank everyone involved by offering another elite tasting
in the same relaxed format. Consequently. on Saturday. March 4th 2006. the Italians
are coming to Clermont. More specifically, the Italian "Super Tuscans" are coming.

Majestic Wines & Liquor located at, 2560 Hwvy 50. Suite 101 in Clermont is offering
you the chance to join us for a privat.-Wine tasting of exceptional quality when we
explore the boldness and nuance
of the unconventional red wines of italy's Tuscany region.

Our resident advanced sommelier. PauldMowrer, will be hosting the tasting w\ which
will include 5 phenomenal wines cufiminating with
Bibi Graetz's "Crazy Head" 2001 Testamatta
The tasting will begin promptly at 6:OOPNI and last until 8:00PMl. The cost is 522.00
per person in advance of the event. Everyone in attendance will be required to pro-
duce legal picture I.D. proof of age and identification.

We are only accepting 10 reservanons for the evening's, festivities so you may wish
to act fast and call us to reserve your seating. Unfortunately, there will be no walk-in
seating for the tasting on the night of the event.

To reserve your seating, have your credit card ready and call 1352 -536-1402:

If you are unable to make a reservation in time for this event, please remember that
we host weekly tasting every Friday evening from 6:00PM to 8:00PM at the ex-,
tremeIl reasonable cost of FREE. Call us for more information.






WI \VNES & LIQUID OR


2560 Hwy. 50 (NW corner of Hancock Rd.) Clermont, FL 34711 352-536-1402


Knights field J.V. baseball team
Ocoee High School has fielded its inaugural junior varsity baseball team. The 2006 J.V. Knights roster con-
sists of (1-r): front row, Mitchell Storey, Cory Roach, John Blair, Ryan Wilder, Nityan Rampersaed, Austin
Flowers, Brad Hermesman, C.J. Depalma, Terrance Coakley, Richie Dilyerd; back row, Head J.V. Coach
Gary Hood, Sean Blackketter, Anthony Ducksworth, Kenneth Lewkow, Jarec Solomon, Derek Mastin, Sean
Tidmus, Devah Hersey, Brett Butler and Assistant Coach Marc Marchant.


IUS Vipers make tourney finals
The Inter United U16 Vipers boys soccer team advanced to the finals of a 24-team tournament held recently
in Jacksonville. The Vipers are coached by Dr. Phillips resident Phil Smart. The team consists of several play-
ers who attend West Orange area high schools. Gathered on the field are (l-r): Jeremy Sanchez, Scotty
Funston (Dr. Phillips), Jerry Hatsady (Olympia), Russell Harbin, Eddie Funston (Dr. Phillips), Kevin Edman,
Dusan Gnjatovic, Ryan Mulligan, Conor Smart, Justin Hohm, Devon Yelenosky, Trent Taylor, Jeff Goldstein
(Olympia) and Michael Guerriero (Dr.'Phillips). Not pictured: Tyler Hough (Ocoee) and Pedro Afonso.







Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 3C


Warrior weightlifters look to repeat strong season


The West Orange High varsity
boys weightlifting team was set to
open its season Wednesday at Apop-
ka. The Warrior roster includes Im-
ran Goolmohamed, Johnathan
Hooten, Jamison Carlson, Cornelius
Taylor, Malcolm Thompson,
Phanouvong Phogneunh and Kevin
Dacosta. West Orange has its sights
set on improving on last year's sec-
ond-place Metro Conference finish.
The Warrior varsity baseball
team put up big numbers last week.
West Orange opened with a 4-0 vic-
tory over rival Ocoee. Pitcher Paul
Kuehn picked up the win and record-
ed 4 strikeouts, while Scott Horvath
and Giovanni Blanco added 2 hits


apiece.
West Orange hosted Evans last
week and blasted the Trojans 23-0.
The Warriors led 10-0 by the sec-
ond inning. Horvath and Nolan
Fontana each had 2 hits and a stolen
base. Both Eric Weiser and Kuehn hit
their first home runs of the season.
The West Orange junior varsity
baseball team lost last week to both
University and Winter Park.
The West Orange varsity boys
tennis team, led by the play of broth-
ers Gabriel and Daniel Mattos, blew
past rival Ocoee 6-1 last week.
The Warriors continued their dom-
inance with a 7-0 victory over Edge-
water. Gabriel Mattos, Daniel Mat-


DP tennis teams take on rival Olympia


Gotha girls volleyball
The Gotha Middld School girls volleyball team has opened its season with a 4-2 record. Gathered on the
court are (1-r): Bree Brasch, Kayla Shoener, Michelle Labbie, Karoline Gaviao, Krista Petkov and Lyndsay


The Orange County Parks and
Recreation Department has begun ac-
cepting applications for Phase V of
its Field of Dreams grant program.
Sample applications have been avail-
able to youth sports organizations
since last Friday. Official applications
will be distributed at mandatory work-
shops set for March 1 and March 8.
Orange County Mayor Richard


Knights prepare for first
Ocoee High will host its first-ever
boys volleyball game March 7 vs..Bish-
op Moore. The Knights will field both
varsity and junior varsity teams.
"This team has the potential to ac-
complish great things," said Coach A.L.
Dean. "There are some real go-getters
who are expected to perform above and
beyond the call of duty."
Although the Knights have no re-
turning players to rely upon, Dean said
Ocoee will build its program on the tal-
ents of young players like Theodore
Luke, Willis McPhee and Charlie


DP boys look to maintain
The Dr. Phillips High varsity boys
volleyball team will open its season
March 7 at home vs. Poinciana. With
five returning starters from last year's
22-4,district championship squad, the
Panthers are poised for a run at the
state title.
DP Coach April Ball said the Pan-
thers will be led by junior Tanner


Rec organizing
softball leagues
Registration continues for the Win-
ter Garden Recreation Department's
2006 spring men's, men's church and
co-ed leagues.
The league runs for 10 weeks. All
teams are awarded trophies at the end
of the season. The registration fee for
each team is $340 and includes six new
Worth softballs.
The season begins the week of
March 13. The deadline to register is Fri-
day, March 10.
For more information, call the rec
office at 407-656-4155.


Adult softball registration
The Ocoee Parks and Recreation
Department is holding registration for
men's C and D softball leagues from
now to March 10. The registration fee
is $350, and this includes the $40, ASA
fee.
Space will be limited to six teams per
league, and games will start March
20.
For more information, call Mark
Johnson at 407-905-3100, Ext. 5002.


Crotty and the Board of County Com-
missioners approved $520,000 in grant
monies that will be awarded only to
volunteer youth sports organizations.
Qualified groups are eligible to re-
ceive up to $90,000 to make field im-
provements, such as better turf and
improved lighting and irrigation.
For more information, call 407-836-
6235.


boys volleyball season
Vasquez. Dean described them as pow-
erful hitters and setters with great po-
tential.
"The goal of this team is not just win-
ning," Dean said. "We expect to win
some and lose some, but we want to be
looked at as a school that can work to-
gether as a true team. It is our desire to
show pristine sportsmanship no matter'
what the game outcome may be."
The Knights expect tough competi-
tion this season from rivals Olympia
(March 27), West Orange (March 28,
April 17) and Dr. Phillips (April 11).


dominance in volleyball
Wright, sophomore Victor Callado,
junior Marcos Waissman and senior
Danny Baker.
"\e'te \eti excited about a very
strong returning group, but we need
newcomers to improve and make an
impact," said Ball. "We hope to be
prepared to compete strongly in the
state tournament."


Olympia High
baseball, softball boost-
ers present Cowboy Ball
March 4
The community is invited to attend
the Cowboy Ball presented by the
Olympia High School baseball and
softball) boosters on Saturday, March
4, from 6-10 p.m. at Camp Down.
Tickets for the adults-only party are
$35 per person in advance or $50 at the
door. The dinner, dance.and auction
will feature a barbecue dinner with
beer and wine included. Proceeds will
benefit the OHS baseball and softball
construction project.
For more information or tickets, call
Cheryl Miller at 407-492-1323 or
Mary Click at 407-491-8712.
Camp Down is located on Main
Street in Windermere.


Adult basketball
registration ,
The Ocoee Parks and Recreation De-
partment is taking registrations for its
adult basketball league. Deadline for
registration is March 1. The registration
fee is $350, and limited space is avail-
able..The league will start March 16.
For more information, call Mark
Johnson at 407-905-3100, Ext. 5002.


Charlton.


Field of Dreams grant applications available


The Dr. Phillips varsity boys ten-
nis team opened play last week by
beating Edgewater 5-1. Junior Eddie
Svenda breezed through the top line
with an 8-1 victory, while Kyle East-
man (8-3) and Scott Schumacher (8-
0) cruised to easy victories. Mike
Haddock pulled out a tough 9-7 win.
Svenda and Eastman teamed up to
win-in doubles play.
The Panthers followed up with a 4-
3 victory over Brooksville Central.
Svenda, Eastman and Schumacher
picked up wins in singles competi-
tion, while Svenda and Eastman took
their doubles match 8-1. DP finished
the week with a 4-2 record.
The Lady Panther varsity girls ten-
nis team beat Edgewater 6-1 last
week. Nikki Chappell and Galina
Losch won easily in the top two sin-
gles matches, while Alena Savostiko-
va (8-4), Malee Bringardner (8-5) and
Alison Heaney (8-3) swept singles
matches for DP. Jacqueline Sunga
and Heaney won their No. 2 doubles
match 8-1.
DP fell to 3-2 on the season last
week following a 4-3 loss to rival
Olympia.
The Dr. Phillips junior varsity
girls tennis team rolled through all
five lines against Olympia last week
in a match that was postponed due to
time constraints. Meaghan Reardon
(6-4), Rachel Conway (6-1), Lauren
Smith (6-2), Hilary Good (6-2) and
Alyssa Licata (6-0) completed the
sweep for the J.V. Lady Panthers.
The team blew past Freedom 6-0
earlier last week. Conway, Reardon,
Smith, Good and Mary Cossey Tali-


aferro rolled through singles compe-
tition.
The DP varsity girls water polo
team got off to a roaring start with
victories over Boone, West Orange
and Timber Creek.
Jessica Enns scored her second goal
of the night in the final seconds to
give the Lady Panthers a 4-3 win over
Boone. Madeleine Flores and
Micheala McGinty added one goal
apiece. Goalie Chanda Farrar stopped
10 Boone shots.
Dr. Phillips picked up a 9-7 win
against West Orange with 5 goals
scored by Flores. Stephanie Brandt
scored twice, while McGinty and
Enns rounded out the scoring. Farrar
picked up 15 saves.
Flores scored a career-high 7 goals
last week against Timber Creek to
give DP a 15-11 win. Caitlin Massey
and McGinty both recorded hat tricks,
while Brandt and Tiffany Baumer
added one goal apiece.
The Panther varsity boys water
polo team fell to Boone 11-2 last
week. Julien Auge accounted for DP's
scoring. Dr. Phillips also fell to West
Orange 17-11 last week. Matt Griel,
David Syrett and Andy Gordon
scored 3 goals apiece, while Auge
and Quiciano Albuquerque each
scored once.
Dr. Phillips bounced back with a
23-7 hammering of Timber Creek.
Griel and Syrett scored 6 goals each.
Gordon scored 4 goals, whlie Auge
and Francisco Pinto both scored a pair
of goals. Chad Brandt, Juan Valen-
cia and Erik LeBlanc rounded out the
scoring for DP.


Olympia water polo teams off to fast start,


Register for 3rd annual
Adventure Kids Team
challenge run and adult
adventure race
Area children are invited to register
for the 3rd annual Adventure Kids
Team Adventure Race on Saturday,
March 4, beginning at 8 a.m. Runners
can check in at In The Wake at Fifth
Avenue and Main Street in Winder-
mere from 5-7 p.m. on Friday, March
3 or beginning at 7 a.m. on Saturday,
March 4, in the park on the corner of
Fifth Avenue and Oakdale Street.
An adult race is scheduled at 3 p.m.,
also on Saturday, Mardi4. There will
be an early check in on Friday, March
3, from 5-7 p.m. at As You Like It.
For more information or to regis-
ter, go to www.adventurekids.org,
www.active.com or www.adveniture-
sportsmanagement.com.


OARS regatta set
for Sat., March 11,
at Turkey Lake Park
The Orlando Area Rowing Society
(OARS) will host the OARS Invita-
tional Regatta at Bill Fredrick Park at
Turkey Lake Park on Saturday, March
11. There will be approximately 30
high school crew teams from all over
the state and the Southeast, including
Georgia and Tennessee, competing.
Races % ill begin at 8 a.m. and con-
tinue until 5 p.m. This regatta is the
largest rowing event planned for the
spring season.
The park is located at 3140 Hi-
awassee Road in Orlando. There is no
charge for the regatta; however, there
is a park entry fee of $4 per carload.
Concessions will be available for
breakfast and lunch, as well as snacks
throughout the day. Attendees are en-
couraged to bring lawn chairs and sun-
screen to enjoy a day of competitive
rowing. The park offers excellent
spectator viewing of all events from the
shore of Turkey Lake.,
For park directions, call 407-299-
5594. For more information on
OARS, go to www.oars-online.com.
OARS is a nonprofit corporation
created to promote the sport of rowing
at all levels of interest. The crew is
comprised of high school students,
both men and women, grades nine to
12. Student athletes represent Dr.
Phillips, Olympia, West. Orange,
Ocoee and a variety of private high
schools in the area.

Roper YMCA
registering for
soccer, T-ball
The Roper YMCA in Winter Garden
continues registrations for soccer and
baseball (T-ball and coach-pitch). The
sign-up period ends March 5. The cost
is $75 for Y members, $140 for others.
For more information, call 407-656-
6430. The Y is at 100 Windermere
Road.


Lady Titans. Goalie Katie Fitzgib-
bon has stopped 74 percent of
shots against her.
The Olympia varsity boys
lacrosse team crushed Seminole
High 15-1 Feb. 18. Steven Shuba
led the Titans with 5 goals and 6
assists, while Will Anoka added
a goal and 3 assists. Teammates
Shaun Sing, Michael Thomas,
John Smith, Joey Magner and
Bobby Barton accounted for the
rest of Olympia's goals.
Freshman Jimmy Arnold pro-
vided great defensive play in his
first varsity game. Fellow fresh-
man Peter Butler also dominated
in face-offs.


tos, Jose Puente, Jorge Puente and
Bryan Simard swept their singles
and doubles matches.
The Lady Warrior varsity girls
tennis team, led by Lauren Beck,
also beat rival Ocoee last week. West
Orange fell days later with a 4-3 loss
to Edgewater. Beck and Natalia
Lopez both won their singles match-
es.
The West Orange varsity boys
and girls water polo teams com-
peted against Cypress Creek and
Timber Creek last week. Against
Cypress Creek, the boys fell 13-10,
while the Lady Warriors lost 12-9.
Both teams bounced back, though, to
beat Timber Creek.


IUS ranks among top
soccer clubs
The West Orange-based Inter Unit-
ed Soccer Club recently earned a No.
2 ranking among the state's more than
135 soccer clubs that field competi-
tive girls teams. Clubs are ranked ac"
cording to how successful their team
perform at tournaments and state com-
petitions.
For more information, log onto in-
terunitedsoccer.com.



Your

Money
Ldd By Dennis R.
Gillard, CPA

DOES THIS APRIL 3
DEADLINE APPLY
TO YOU?
If you reached age 70 last year, April 3,2006,
could be an important deadline. That's the last
day you can take your 2005 required minimum
distribution (RMD) from your traditional IRAs.
If you miss that deadline, the penalty could be
a 50% excise tax on the amount you should
have withdrawn.
Here's how the rules work. Once you reach
age 70, you must start taking annual distribu-
tions from your traditional IRAs. Normally
these distributions must occur by December
31 of each year. But a special rule lets you de-
fer the first distribution until April 1 of the
year after you reach age 70. That deadline is
April 3 this year because April 1 falls on a Sat-
urday. So if you turned 70 last year, April 3 is
the deadline for your 2005 distribution. Be
aware that you'll still need to take your 2006
RMD before the end of this year.
Generally, the amount of the RMD for any
year is based on your age. You take the balance
in all your traditional IRAs as of the last day
of the previous year, and divide by a factor
representing your life expectancy. The IRS has
published a standard life expectancy table to use
in the calculation. Special rules might apply
if your spouse is more than ten years younger
than you are.
Because all or part of your o, rnt.urir, .r, m
be taxable, it is important to include RMDs in
your tax planning. Ideally you should start
planning for RMDs several years before you
reach age 70.
The RMD rules don't apply to Roth IRAs.
,Unless you're still working, this deadline also
applies to other retirement accounts. Again,
special rules apply if you.work for a company
in which you are a 5% or more owner.


GILLARD FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS. LLC

407-877-6887
114 Pennsylvania Ave..Winter Garden


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West Orange Residents...You asked for it! Here it is!


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Taking Care of your Trees


Both the Titan varsity boys and
girls water polo teams have
opened their seasons with a 2-0
start. Olympia took on Osceola
last week with the boys winning
12-7 and the Lady Titans picking
up a 13-4 victory. Olympia
brought home its first.Metro Con-
ference wins of the season when
the boys crushed Timber Creek
13-0 and the girls team won 12-
2.
Chip Hawthorne led the boys
team in scoring with 9 goals, while
David Mayhew stopped 80 per-
cent of shots on goal by opposing
players. Tabatha Charron record-
ed 13 goals in two games for the


NoIJ I
133


I,


0 I A I 'I IN I I v IF A. IT 0 fI Ai







4C The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006




Golf


------- -----------------------------*-


4C~


Great Cuts

407-654-1868
11159 W. Colonial Dr. Ocoee


Golf tournament to raise funds
for American Cancer Society


The Crawford Tire Relay for Life
Team is hosting its sixth annual golf
tournament at the Forest Lake Club
in Ocoee on Friday, March 24, and
more than 100 golfers are expected to
take part. The cost is $70 per person,
and this fee includes lunch. There will
be awards for the first-, second- and
third-place teams, as well as door
prizes.


The golf begins at 1 p.m. with a
four-man-scramble/shot-gun start.
Hole sponsorships are available at
$100 each.
All proceeds from this tournament
will benefit the American Cancer So-
ciety.
To register, call Toby Best at 321-
689-2306 or Melissa Albrecht at 352-
267-3757.


Olympia football to host golf fund-raiser


The Olympia High School Football
Booster Club will host a golf tourna-
ment fund-raiser to benefit the Titan
football team.
The event, set for April 29 at Cele-
bration Golf Club, will raise funds to
pay for the team's weight room equip-
ment, uniforms, travel expenses and
more. A field of 144 golfers is ex-
pected to participate in what organiz-
ers hope will become an annual event.
"It takes $1,000 per player per year
to meet these needs," said Elaine An-
derson, tournament chairwoman and
Titan Booster. "Without local com-


munity support, we will be unable to
provide the necessary elements to put
our Titan football team on a compet-
itive playing field."
A raffle held at the event will fea-
ture gift certificates to restaurants,
spas and hotels, jewelry, art and tick-
ets to Orlando Magic games, theater
performances and theme parks.
Donations, including cash, prizes,
promotional products and sponsor-
ships will be greatly appreciated, An-
derson said.
For more information, contact An-
derson at 407-701-2804.


Area golfers are invited to join a
charity golf tournament Saturday,
March 25, at Stoneybrook West Golf
Club to benefit the American Stroke
Association and American Cancer So-
ciety. The entry fee is $100 per person
and includes greens fee, range balls,
breakfast, lunch, two drink tickets and
a raffle ticket. For $25, players can
purchase a super ticket that includes
two extra drink tickets and two raffle
tickets. Tournament events also in-
clude a silent auction, putting contest


and prizes for closest-to-the-pin and
longest drive.
The entry deadline is March 18.
Proceeds of the tournament will sup-
port local runner Gina Guzzello who
is training to run in the Kona Marathon
to benefit the American Stroke Asso-
ciation and the Adirondack Marathon
to support the American Cancer So-
ciety.
For more information and to regis-
ter, call Gina at 407-758-0325 or
Roger Masterson at 407-877-8533.


Golf tournament to support Big Orange Games


The city of Ocoee is sponsoring
the Big Orange Golf Tournament to
support the Big Orange Games for
physically challenged youth on Sun-
day, March 12, at Green Valley
Country Club.
Area golfers are invited to sign up
for the four-person, best-ball scram-
ble event. The entry fee is $50 per
player and includes lunch. Check-in


and lunch are scheduled from 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The tournament
will kick off with a shotgun start at
12:45 p.m. There will be four hole-in-
one prizes, anid hole sponsorships are
$50.
For more information, call Jim
Beech at 407-656-2669 or Debbie
Gallo at 407-905-3100, Ext. 9-5005.
The registration deadline is March 1.


Executive Women's Golf plans
Tee-Off Dinner March 13
Area women golfers are invited to the Tee-Off Dinner for the Or-
lando Chapter of the Executive Women's Golf Association from 6-9
p.m. Monday, March 13, at Maison & Jardin restaurant.
The registration deadline is March 6, and the restaurant is located
at 430 S. Wymore Road, Altamonte Springs. The cost is $35 per per-
son for the three-course dinner, if paid by the deadline, and $40 afterward.
Seating is limited.
Debbie Austin, a former LPGA touring professional, is the guest speak-
er. She was Golf Magazine's 1977 LPGA Player of the Year, the win-
ner of five LPGA events in 1977 and 1978 Women's Australian Open
Champion.
New, occasional and avid golfers all find EWGA programs geared
to their interests and demanding schedules. Golfers of all skill levels
are encouraged to attend the Tee-Off event and learn more about the
benefits of membership. The event will also include networking op-
portunities, door prizes, a silent auction and more.
Dorothy Cipolla of Winter Garden is the event coordinator. For
more information or a reservation, call 407-902-9142 or e-mail her at
rcipolla@surfwg.net. For more information on the organization, go to
www.ewga-orlando.com.



Tavistock communities, Lake Nona and Isleworth,
honored by 'Travel + Leisure Golf' magazine


There's a new wrinkle in the friend-
ly cross-town rivalry between Lake
Nona and Isleworth. With the 2006
Tavistock Cup now just one month
away, Isleworth and Lake Nona have
both been named in the top 20 of
America's top 100 golf communities.
The inaugural list of the nation's
most desirable residential golf prop-
erties was recently published by Trav-
el + Leisure Golf. The two commu-
nities within 25 minutes of each oth-
er in Orlando are both owned by Tavi-
stock Group and they were ranked
third and fifth, respectively. No oth-
er developers have two properties in
the top 20.
The ranking considered criteria
such as course design, maintenance
and easy access for members. But su-
perb golf isn't enough to make this
list. The highest ranked communities
offered amenities, including superi-
or housing, unique, flawless facili-
ties, breathtaking sunset views and
intangibles, such as resident's feel-
ing a sense of security, identity and
community.
Travel + Leisure Golf cites Isle-
worth as offering unique extras like
'family Thanksgiving turkeys cooked
by a master chef, 'tween dances for
kids, the $25 million Sotheby's sculp-
ture exhibit adorning the recently re-
vamped golf course, as well as the


7,000-square-foot men's lounge with
golf simulator, putting green, gam-
ing tables and basketball court.
"We have never built our commu-
nities for rankings, but we are grati-
fied to have T+L publicly confirm
what we think our residents have felt
all along about these country clubs
- they are very special, private, se-
cure communities that truly are their
homes," said Doug McMahon, a man-
aging partner of the Tavistock Group.
The T+LIranking sets the stage for
the 2006 Tavistock Cup. This annu-
al turf war matches members and res-
idents of Isleworth against members
and residents of Lake Nona. The fact
that the members have names like
O'Meara, Els, Woods, Garcia,
Goosen, Appleby, Sorenstam, Hoch,
Janzen and others make this the most
unique intraclub championship in the
world, a two-day showdown consid-
ered the World Golf and Country
Club Championship. What other in-
traclub championship is sanctioned
by the PGA and televised live world-
wide?
The 2006 Tavistock Cup will be
held March 27-28 at Isleworth. Team
rosters will be announced March 15.


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 5C



Schools


F .unsday, Madess


'1



- U W - -~


Foundation Academy honors its Students of the Month for having such a joyful spirit. Pictured are (1-r):
(front row) Dani Lord, Erica Haynes, Brandon Murphy and Kiely Chambers; (2nd row) Reilly Lord, Alexan-
der Levin, Morgin Bennett, Benjamin Griffiths, Megan Miller and Callen Pappas; and (3rd row) Gabby Oban-
do, Derick Murphy, Courtney McCoy and Sarah Fabry.

MonterdeAcdm


Mrs. Warren's kindergarten class at Lake Whitney Elementary celebrated the wedding of Miss Q and Mr.
U on Valentine's Day. The children enjoyed being the guests at the reception by eating real wedding cake
and drinking Quik chocolate milk.

Chan f ak s .Midl


Montverde Academy's Lower School celebrated Valentine's Day by participating in the American Heart
Association's Jump Rope for Heart. All enjoyed a healthy snack after completing different obstacle cours-
es, as well as traditional jumping rope. All the students from PK3 to 5h grade participated in this annual event.
The high school girls and boys basketball teams were on hand to help. They raised money for a good cause
and learned how to keep their hearts healthy with diet and exercise.


'3' j\


Students in Shannon Levain's science classes at Chain of Lakes Middle School participated in a mini-lab
called Down the Tubes. They explored electrical currents using water and observed the flow of current us-
ing funnels with different thickness. Thickness is 1 of the 2 factors that affect the flow of an electric current,
along with length. Pictured are Willie Desir (left) and Sybaston Brown.


Westside offers
evening massage
therapy classes
Westside Tech on Story Road in
Winter Garden is now offering a new
evening class in massage therapy
Monday through Thursday from 5-9.
For registration information, call
407-905-2000, Ext. 2018.

$10,000 college
scholarship available
West Orange VFW Post'4305
Ladies Auxiliary is seeking ninth-
through 12th-graders for the Young
American Creative Patriotic Art Pro-
gram. To enter, students must create
a positive patriotic depiction on can-
vas or paper. The submission must be
no smaller than 8x10 and no larger
than 16x24.
The deadline to enter is March 29.
For entry details, call 407-656-5586.

Christian Service Center
to hold Spring Break
Vacation Club
The KidsFOCUS Program at the
SWest Orange Christian Service Cen-
ter announces its Spring Break Vaca-
tion Club. All-day adventures are
planned for Friday, March 10, through
Friday, March 17, for children of
working parents.
The West Orange Christian Service
Center is located 300 W. Franklin St.
in Oc6ee. Call 407-656-6678 for avail-
ability and prices and ask for Arthur.

LMS Guardian Angels
need supplies, clothes
The Guardian Angel Program at
Lakeview Middle School is in need
of basic school supplies and some
clothing to help needy students. For
more information, call 407-877-5010.
Register children for
Head Start program
The Orange County Head Start pro-
gram is enrolling preschoolers ages
3-5. Parents can register at 407-654-
5161.


Ocoe--Midd-


Ocoee Middle FFA students recently competed in the state horse-judg-
ing competition at the Tampa State Fair. Students from all over the
state competed. The competition consisted of judging 4 halter classes,
identifying parts of a horse, tack items and components of feed. Ocoee
students placed 3rd in the state contest and will receive an award
plaque at the FFA State Convention. The members of the team include
Justin Watters, Elizabeth Frank, Kayla Switzer and Roxanne Blake.




Tri Alliance
Preparatory School

Nurturing Lifelong Success
Private Middle and High School
for children with mood disorders.
Please call 407-521-1189
for enrollment information.

Visit us on the web at r
www.triallianceprep.com


IBM


- *~j'.<*i.~


Students in Katrina Summerville's 5th-grade class at Maxey Elementary are participating in the gardening
program sponsored by the University of Florida Health and Nutrition Program.

Personal Attention, Caring Faculty... The Crenshaw School
If your child is feeling lost in the system, at the Crenshaw School
.we work to raise self-esteem!


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www.crenshawschool.com 407-876-9122


y


* .,s..
* ..' r *~..


Lake Whitney


, -, ,


tal I


& a,--







6C The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


I We~-st rageHih.


Palm Lake Elementary 3rd-graders recently went on their annual Medieval Times field trip. They got to ex-
perience life as it was in the Middle Ages. Pictured are students from Mrs. Costello's class enjoying their
feast: Grant Johnson, Cortey Feacher, Lorenzo Martinex, Clayton Moyer, Arantza Barros, Jamie Cole and
Loretta Martinez, chaperone.

S ri La


The West Orange High Shakespeare Competition was held recently with 12 participants presenting a mem-
orized monologue from a Shakespearean play. The purpose of the event is to develop students' understanding
of the Bard and his universality and to help them communicate that understanding. Torey Scarbrough, son
of Tony and Tanya Scarbrough, was the winner and will advance to the next level of, which is held at the
University Club of Winter Park on Feb. 27. The winner there will advance to competition in New York City.
The event is sponsored by the English Speaking Union, an international organization with headquarters in
London. Second place went to Rob Mobley, third place went to Kate Gordon, and honorable mention went
to Whitney Abell. The Orlando-UCF Shakespeare Festival awarded prizes of theater tickets valued at $210
to the top 3 winners. Judges for the event were Tommie Witthohn, Meghan McGee and Lynette Phillips.
The WOHS Shakespeare Competition coordinator is Joyce Rose. Pictured are (l-r): (front) Amber Wilker-
son, Max Hillard, Scarbrough, Jennifer McAllister; and (back) Mark Glass, Andrea Whitman, Shawn Hebbel-
er, Rose, Gordon, Sarah Van Alstine, Geneva Detommaso, Mobley and Abell.


tt~


-CV.
~ ~ .~


Throughout the year, Mrs. Benages' bilingual kindergarten class at Spring Lake Elementary learns about
the many different customs in the United States. Her students are pictured with the vests they created.
They learned all about the customs of the first Thanksgiving.

to~ s


Ms. Suess's 5th-grade enrichment class at MetrbWest Elementary recently researched and designed a
postage stamp for Black Historians and National Woman's Month. They worked from a rubric that includ-
ed a biography, a picture of the person, a list of achievements, how they impacted the world, a recom-
mendation of why they would be nominated for a stamp and the actual design of the stamp. The class pre-
sented the report and then had visits with their guidance counselor, Ms. Gash; the front-office staff; Ms. Samuel-
son; Ms. Peterson; and Principal Smith. The students learned how to search Web sites and write a bibli-
ography. Picture with the class are Ms. Suess and Mrs. Smith.


% FOUNDATION


ACADEMY

HIGH SCHOOL. MIDDLE SCHOOL.
FOUNDED 1958 ELEMENTARY AND PRESCHOOL
A .Ministry of The First Baptist Chlurch of Winter Garden
Low Student to Teacher Ratio ACSI Accredited Certified Teachers College Prep.* Foreign Languages
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Independent Learning Center Technology Lab FHSAA Sports Instrumental and Vocal Music
Educational Trips IWashinglon D.C.. Europe. etc.)

Enrolling for 200612007 Tours Available

K-3 thru Grade 12


The 2006 WOHS Air Force Junior ROTC Ball was held recently. The highlight of the evening was the crown-
ing of the court. Princes and princesses were Fabian Reyes and Ashley Alexander, 9th grade; Kevin Kirkley
and Kelsey Tompkins, 10th grade; and Kevin Van Wie and Ninoshka Gonzalez, 11th grade. King and queen
were seniors Imran God/lmohammed and Heather Caamano.


Signing the West Orange High community safe-driving pledge are Gary Bruhn, Windermere mayor; Loufs
Fazio Jr., Florida Auto Auction; Teresa Jacobs, Orange County commissioner; and Stina D'Uva, West OP-
"nne fChamhbr.


AFJROTC Ball
The West Orange High Air Force Ju-
nior ROTC held its annual ball recent-
ly at Tanner Hall in Winter Garden. The
evening included dinner and dancing
for the 128 cadets and their guests.
The ball was formally opened with
a receiving line, which was headed by
Col. Harvey Shelton and his wife, Mil-
lie. The guests of honor for the evening
were Dr. Dan Buckman, principal, and
his wife, Sue Ellen. Cadets Opal Lehrer
and Ninoshka Gonzalez sang the na-
tional anthem to complete the open-
ing ceremonies.
A multi-media slide show of unit ac-
tivities throughout the year was pre-
sented by Cadet Wilson Dang prior to
dinner.


The highlight of the evening was the
crowning of the 2006 Ball Court.
Princes and princesses were Fabian
Reyes and Ashley Alexander, 9th
grade; Kevin Kirkley and Kelsey Tomp-
kins, 10th grade; and Kevin Van Wie
and Ninoshka Gonzalez, 11th grade.
King and queen were seniors Imran
Goolmohammed and Heather Caa-
mano.
Each winning couple was honored
with a saber arch and a royal sash,
along with tiaras for the girls and a
crown for the king. All winners were
selected by their fellow cadets.
The theme for the ball was "Across
the Stars." The entire evening was
made possible by the cadets' Kitty
Hawk Air Society, a voluntary service


organization. Cadets held a fund-rais-
er last fall to help fund the cost of the
event. The annual ball provides an opt-
portunity for the cadets to plan a ma-
jor social event and to get a flavor of one
of the military's time-honored social
customs.
Cheerleading try-outs
There will be a meeting on March 9
at 5:30 p.m. at West Orange High to go
over cheerleading try-out information.
Anyone interested in cheering for
the 2006-07 school year should attend
the meeting. Information will be given
on the try-out dates, the physical exam
and the skills needed.
For more information, call 407-905-
2400, Ext. 2556.


8:15am 11:30am
8:15am 3:00pm


125 East Plant Street
Winter Garden, FL 34787

407-656-3677


K3 (Only) 8:15am 11:30am
2 Day Program (M. F)
Foundation Academy -,
0 Plant St.

Hwy. 50 Dilard St.Ocoee


St. Paul's Missionary Baptist Church
413 W. Oakland Ave. Oakland, FL
407-877-6616


Annual
Spring
Gospel
Concert
MARCH 11TH 7:30 PM
Featuring the Florida Memorial
University Gospel Choir of Miami &
Elder John Mosley from West Palm Beach.


Visit us on
the Web!


SWWW. .

wotimes.
corn


K3 & K4
(5 days)


Visit our website at http://www.foundationacademy.net
Founcialicr Ac.a-,.3 m wi n a-3rTii : riu dri .:. arn, rar ce ,:,'r, r.aicir, .:.r "lhnic .rii. Ir, 'ail nrqhu. I .pr.ilege- p,rograi, a'd ci.,I,-$ g, neral,
.ac cc orrjc ,j cr m ace .3 ilab I -? -,:* _-rludeniL 31 Ir, c. m-,,:, %W. i a lln,'- p,-,l .Jl rcrln-,Ilr l *.:Dian If, a :, r h:, r3 .r ._ : irhlr h Ir, a irJI, l .:. 1 .:..jr
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Palm Lake


al IYU, %-,I tall Imul.







Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 7C


Ocoee Hig


Ocoee High School and Principal Mike Armbruster congratulate the February Seniors of the Month. The stu-
Sdents all received a $50 check from the Winter Garden Elks Lodge and qualified for the 2 $1,000 scholar-
'ships the lodge gives at the end of the year. Pictured are (1-r): Laura Vittum, Elks Scholarship chairperson;
students Dustin Cook, Angie Garcia and Jillian Rokowski; Trallis Williams, lodge member; and Armbruster.
.(lot pictured is Azurdee Ramasar.


Parent Night
Ocoee High will hold an Eighth-
TGrade Parent Night at 7s on April 4.
The event is for parents of students


currently in eighth grade who plan questions.
on attending OHS in the fall. Valu- Parents are encouraged to bring
able information will be given, and their children and walk through the
the staff will be on hand to answer campus.


To make the atmo- "4 .
sphere in the Oak- '
land Avenue Charter J
School library a little / '_
,more fun and light- ,
hearted, it was de- '
cided 1 wall should
be covered'in a fan-
ciful mural. Art teach-
er Patrick O'Keefe, /
'nephew of.renowned -. ___ _
'artist Georgia O'- ,
Keefe, volunteered
for the job. He came 7
up With the design .. ,
and then painted it. "
Aside from murals, -, '
he enjoys oil painting -
and plans to sell can-
vases. .,,
iw -" "


The middle school students at Family Christian enjoyed the opportunity to see artifacts fr6m King Tut's
'Tomb when they traveled to the Museum -of Art in Fort Lauderdale:. The exhibit contained hundreds of
pieces excavated from the famous king's tomb, as well as many other tombs located in the Valley of the
Kings in Egypt.

Windermre Pre


Jump Rope for Heart
Windermere Prep students recently jumped rope, made
basketball jump shots and jumped for-joy when they added
up all the contributions they had collected for the American
Heart Association.
Students in PreK-3 through second grade participated
in the AHA's annual Jump Rope for Heart, and those in
third through sixth grade tacked Hoops for Heart with record
results.


Third-graders Kaiz Premji and Daniel Levin shoot
hoops at Windermere Prep during Hoops for Heart.


A preliminary count showed a total of $13,980 collected
by WPS students to help fight America's No. 1 and No. 3
killers heart disease and stroke.
This beat last year's total of $12,855, which won 2005
county honors and ranked WPS as the leading school in
the state that participated in a combined Jump Rope/Hoops
for Heart program. WPS also ranked 35th in the top 100
schools nationally in this combined category.
This is the fifth year WPS has participated in the two
programs.
'The whole idea is to get the kids moving and jumping,"
said Athletic Director Tom Raymond, who coordinates the
event.
He was assisted this year by physical education teach-
ers Ken Ratcliffe and Carrie Miller.
Students collect donations from family and friends who
sponsor their jumping endeavors. Since the younger stu-
dents .have difficulty jumping rope, they are offered an al-
ternative where they have to jump over moving ropes and
Hula Hoops, as well as maneuver over speed ladder.
Some of the older girls opt to jump rope instead of shoot-
ing hoops.
The physical education department sponsored a class-
room door-decorating contest. The decorated doors edu-
cated others on being heart healthy. Julie Tresca's first-grade
class won the Jump Rope for Heart door contest, and
Cathy Novokowsky's fourth-grade class took Hoops for
Heart door honors.


As I See It...
A Comment &,Study of the Scriptures Remembering George Gano


Southwest Church
Meeting @ Roper YMCA
'100 Windermere Rd. Windermere .


Pastor Jeff Pritchard
(407) 656-2351 Email:
slbchurch@yahoo.com


den, FL 407-656-3949 VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH
dy Rusell And Christian Academy
1601 A.D. Mims Rd. Ocoee FL.
Rev. Bradley T. Phillips,
Pastor/Administrator
BAPTIST (' 407) 656-3097


BANANA BAY BAPTIST
1333 E. Crown Point Rd.
S407-656-8558

BEULAH BAPTIST CHURCH
671 Beulah Road, Winter Garden
(407) 656-3342
Pastor G. Sieve Rice.
Www.beulahfl.com ,

;CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
,631 S. Dillard St. Winter Garden,
*FL.
*Jay Knolls, Pastor/President
,(407) 656-3001
Awana/Patch (Summer program)
Calvary Christian School
K-3-12tn

'FIRST BAPTIST OF MONTVERDE
.17409 87th St.
Montverde FL 34756
(407)1 469-4569
Pastor Jonathan G. Winningham
fbcmoniverde@peoplepc.com
..Sunday Worship 9:00 am:
Moniverde Academy Service
Celebration and
Praise Services:
9:45 am and 11:00 am
'Small Groups and
Sunday School:
.9:45 am and 11:00 am
Wednesday 6:30 pm:
Prayer and Education

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Jwo service locations:
800 N. Pine Hills Rd.
407-293-4571
English-Wed. Mid-Week Worship
,6:30pm. Spanish Sun.
11am & Wed. 6:30pm.
-iaitian Sun. 11am, 7pm, &
Wed. 6:30pm
Deaf Ministry Filipino Ministry
Awana's 3 yr-8th gr.
8800 W. Colonial Dr. Ocoee
(at Good Homes) Sunday
Worship 9:30am or 11am
Also Deaf, Spanish, Haitian,
;Filipino, and Vietnamese
communities.
,For details, 407-293-4571 or
'www.fbccf.net

-OAK LEVEL BAPTIST CHURCH
110564 2nd. Avenue, Ocoee
'14071 656-1523
,Dr. Walter M. Fowler, Pastor

ISTARKE LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH
611 West. Ave., Ocoee
1r


WEST ORANGE BAPTIST
Tubb St., Oakland, FL.,
"Where Jesus Reigns Supreme"
(407) 656-9749
www.westorangebaptist.org

WEST ORLANDO BAPTIST
CHURCH
& CHILD DISCOVERY CENTER
429 & Plant St.
Winter Garden, FL.
407-905-9508


CATHOLIC

RESURRECTION CATHOLIC
CHURCH
1211 S. Vineland Rd.
Winter Garden. 407-656-3113


,CHRISTIAN,

NEW HORIZONS CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
616 S. Dillard St, Winter Garden.
407-654-5050
Worship 10:30 am.
Philip Walter, Minister
.NewHorizonsChristianChurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST
1450 S. Daniels Rd. Winter
Garden, FL 34787 407-656-2770
Minister -Mark Smith.
9:00 am Sunday School.
10 am Worship. 6:30 pm
Evening Worship.



CHRISTIAN &
MISSIONARY ALLIANCE

SOUTHWEST CHURCH
Roper YMCA. 100 Windermere
Rd. Bible Hr. 9:15am. Worship
Serv. 10:3oam.
Tom Welch, Pastor. 407-903-
1384


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
OF CLERMONT
Clermont, Fifth and Minneola
streets-
Sunday service is ai 10:30 a.m.
Details: (352) 217-2899


RCH


e.


CHURCH OF GOD

GARDEN CATHEDRAL CHURCH
OF GOD
1001 W. Plant St. Winter Garden*
407-656-1,855. ,
Sunday School 9:30
Worship 10:30, 6pm.' ,
Wed. Svc. 7:30pm, Youth,
Men's & Women's Ministries.
www.GardenCathedralCOG.org

OCOEE CHURCH OF GOD
1105 N. Lakewood
Pastor Steve Davis
(407) 656-8011


COMMUNITY

OASIS COMMUNITY CHU
Meeting at:
West Orange Charter Schi
Oakland Ave, Oakland, FL.
11:00 am Worship Servici
Website:
WWW.OASIS-CC.ORG
407-905-4931

HARVEST CHURCH
Gathers Sundays at 10:05
Lake Whitney Elementary
1351 Windermere Rd.
Come as you are. 407-383
www.harvestl.org


CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH
On the corner of Main St. and
Tilden. (407) 656-3218
Sunday services at 8AM, 9:30AM
11AM & 7:00PM with Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30. Child
Care &Youth Ministry.

EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF THE
ASCENSION
4950 S. Apopka-Vineland Rd. Or-
lando, FL 32819. 1 block south of
Conroy-Windermere Rd. on right.
407-876-3480
Sunday Services 8:30am and
10.30am. Sunday School 9:30am
for all ages vith childcare.
www.ascension-orlando.org


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

CHRIST COMMUNITY CHURCH
5425 South Apopka-Vineland Rd.
9:45 AM, Sunday School,
11:00 AM. Worship Service.
, www.christcommunitychurch.cc
407-909-9495


Have you ever thought what your funeral will be
like? Many times when a friend or loved one is taken
tragically, or out of due time, we take a more introspec-
tive look at our own lives and the legacy we leave be-
hind. I have thought of my own wake and funeral and
what I would hope it would be like. I hope there would
be many who would mourn my passing. I desire to
leave a legacy of being loving and.caring; passing
these traits onto my children, grandchildren, and ,o:.h-
ers I love.
You know, friends, our life here on Earth, compared
to eternity, isn't very long. In the book of James, the
author compares it this way: "for sour life is just a '.a-
per I tthirl. of it like steam coming off a boiling pot
of water. You don't see it for very long. Even though.
our life is short, the decisions we make while here 'de-
termine our eternal destiny. Someday we will each
have.to stand before the Father and answer a ques-
tion... did we accept or reject His gift of eternal life?


SJEWISHf

CONGREGATION SINAI,
CLERMONT
635 West SR. 50, Ste. B'
For services info. call
352-243-5353 or
www.congregationsinai-cler-
' mont.org '


He gtes e J all the free \% dJ to accept or reject that of-
fer by exercising our faith in Jesus' atoning work on
the cross.
Romans 10:9-10 say it simply; "If you confess with
your mouth that Jesus is Lord, and believe in your
heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be
saved. For it is with the heart you believe and are justi-
tied and %ith ,oui rmoui ', confe,.ion for t s ath ori i.,
made Being a Chnisuan isn't difficult Jeu. acuaall,
said you havelo 1:aj tihe nruinng mentaiir of child.
God's call to you and me eJ :.aN is to aru nt HLn with
everything and believe He will share His life and love
with us, so we may share it with others.
Lea% e a legacy of hearing God's love with all those
you ki all:k h through this norld and n,.un ill experi-
ence a full. rich life and know you are doing precisely
n hat He callS us all to do ,
From the believers at First Baptist Winter Garden
ADV.


ST. LUKE'S UNITED METHODIST
4851 S. Apopka-Vineland Rd.,
Dr. William S. Barnes,
Senior Pastor
Assoc. Pastor Rev. Beth M.'
Farabee
Dr. David Stephens'
407-876-4991 '
Worship Services 8, 9:30 and
11:00am. Contemporary Worship
5:30pm.


LUTHERAN


PEOPLE OF FAITH CHURCH
am at 220 Windermere Rd,
School Winter Garden
8:30am & 10.45am
3-3022- 407-877-3937
Pastor Rev. Johan Bergh
www.PeopleOfFaitn'ORG

ZION NEW LIFE LUTHERAN
Paul Fausi, Pastor /.
Worship Service
a amR. &i'n.N 30m


Sunday School Bible Study 9:15
Corner of Hempel & Gotha Rd,
Gotha



METHODIST

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
125 North Lakeview Avenue
407-656-1135
Rev. Russell Belcher
8:00 Brief Traditional, 9:00
Contemporary, 10:00
Sunday School, 11:00 Tradition
al, 5:00pm TNT Youth Group,
7:00pm Contemporary & Gospi


NON-DENOMINATIONAL


THE CROSSINGS,
A COMMUNITY CHURCH -
Corner of McKinnon Rd. and
Lake Butler Blvd, 1 mile west of
Windermere
Elementary School. 10:30 am
Worship Service. 407-656-6044

PASSION INTL.CHRISTIAN CTR
271 W. Plant St. Winter Garden
5 Sunday Service 11:00idm
Free Dinner after Service
Rev. Jerome & Cynthia Thomp-
son. Pastors. 407-232-4776

UNITY CHURCH OF
CHRISTIANITY
4801 Clarcona Ocoee Rd. Orlan-
do, FL 32810 Ph. 407-295-9181
Worship Service 9:15 & 11am
Rev. Bob Marshall
info@unityccorlando.org


I-

el.


lNewell'St. '
Pont First United
0iGe < Methodist Church a
A. Plant St. 5

Colonial Dr. IN


UUUOCOEE OUAK UMC
201 S. Clarke Road, Ocoee. FL.
9:00am Traditional 10:00am SS
11:00am Conlemporary. Monday
night services at 7:00pm. Pastor
Ernie Post 407-293-0700


Sunday School for all ages at
,9:45am.'
Nursery provided during worship
Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr.,.Pastor
Call about our preschool &
summer camps

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF'
THE LAKES, USA
Conroy-Windermere Rd. @
Lincoln Ave.
Sunday School 9:00AM, Worship
10:30 407-291-2886
Worship on Wed.:7:00 7:30 PM
"Come hear the Gospel"
Rev. Ferdinand Brils
www pcol.org


PENTECOSTAL

GRACE WORSHIP CENTER
1132 E. Plant St. Winter Ga
(407) 656-3727
Pastor Rick Faircloth


UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST

WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH
United Church of Christ
436 Oakdale SI. Windermere, FL
34,786 (Corner of 5th Ave. &
Main St) Phone,407-876-2112
www.windermereunion.org


NAZARENEi

FAITH FAMILY COMMUNITY
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
245 Beulah,Winter Garden;
Rev. Rick Page. .877-7735,.


PRESBYTERIAN


OAKLAND PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
218 E. Oakland Ave. Oakland, FL
407-656-4452
www.oaklandpres.org
Near exit 272 off the FL Turnpike,
Worship at 8:45 am and 11 am


Sunday Family Bible Hour 9:15am
Sunday. Wors-ip Sern ice 10:30am
Tom Welch, Pastor
407-903-1384


SW. Hwy 50.
at Dillard


|McDonald s




The Crossings
A Community Church .
10:30 am Worship Service 407-656-6044
Hwy5O Ocoee




S L *akeButerBlvd. PR
SWindermere
1 "


arden.


CLERMONT ORLANDO WINTER GARDEN


Smnes, Girvin.
Blakeslee & Campbell
Certified Public Accountants,RP. A. PO Box 771047
800 S. Dillard St
Winter Garden-34777-1047
407-656-6611

$1ta:i#.Li:I: t fn'I&YI B
AUTO ELECTRIC CO.
533 W. Plant St
Winter Garden
656-3307
COMPLETE
.* AUTO REPAIR

ST. ANDREWS CATHOUC CHURCH
Singles Dance
(last Saturday of Every Month)
8pm to 11 pm $5.OO
Hastings St., Near Kirkman Rd
off West Colonial


JAMiSOm BANK
Kevin Clark
14705 W. Colonial Dr.
Winter Garden
407-656-3633


ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
9'.q S Vineland Rd.


V ..Pato G
;Winter Gar
'Pastor Gra


Family Christian


AAAnrU A lDA lSERA#


I






8C The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


I C ilden f te-M ssih-


I Oly pia. igh


As students at Lakeview Middle prepare for the FCAT, all is not strug-
gle and stress. Their very own F-CA T makes his rounds to classes and
provides a warm fuzzy while modeling studying techniques. The stu-
dents watch the scrolling news each day to see whom the F-CAT is
visiting. With students and teachers working hard since the beginning
of the year to prepare, the students no longer fear the FCA T but will em-
brace it with their best effort.


Immunizations for 7th grade
If a child'is out of compliance with
state health regulations, the student
will not be able to attend the seventh
grade in the fall until the immuniza-
tions are up to date.
The Orange County Health Depart-
ment will be giving immunizations at the


school on Wednesday, March 22, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For a child to participate, parents
must complete and sign a white card
and return it to guidance by March 6.
For more information, call 407-877-
5010 and ask for Mary Skipper at Ext.
284 or Becky Bradley at Ext. 387.


Children of the Messiah Preschool had its annual 'Donuts for Dad' re- The 200506 A-County Jazz Concert was hed t Olympia Hih r
cently. The students' fathers were invited into the classroom to share centlhe20y.05-06 All-Coratulations go to the 4 students who wereselected by au-
some special time with their children, along with doughnuts, milk ando the 4 students who were selected by au-
coffee. Pictured are Rick Heath and his children, Holly and Hunter. edition to perform in the High School Jazz Ensemble: John Meyer, 12th
grade, lead alto sax; Curtis Viselli, 11th grade, ban sax; lan Kivler, 11th
grade, trumpet; and Case O'Donnell, 10th grade, trumpet. The Jazz En-
semble was conducted by guest clinician Don Zentz, chairman of Fine
and Performing Arts Department at the Bolles School in Jacksonville.
Pictured are (1-r): Kivler, Meyer, Viselli and O'Donnell.


I iny ide


I Whiperi- Oak


Whispering Oak Elementary was awarded a Mega Party for its fall fund-
raising efforts. Each grade level got to experience an inflatable slide,
bounce house, sticky wall and obstacle course. Grace Gustino (pic-
tured) was 1 of 5 students with the highest dollars raised during, the
-fall campaign. She received 30 seconds in the money booth in recog-
nition of her efforts.


Citrus Elementary is thankful the Elks Lodge is helping to keep the stu-
dents safe. It is the law that children riding bicycles must wear helmets.
The Elks Lodge recently supplied helmets to the students who didn't have
them. Pictured is Marge Johnstone, Owner of Ocoee Goodyear Tires,
fitting Darius Irvin with his new helmet.


The students in Mrs. Heistand's class at Windy Ridge School learned
about heroes of the past, such as Martin Luther King Jr., Jackie Robin-
son, Thomas Edison, Rosa Parker and more. They also interviewed
heroes in their community and invited them to 'Here's Looking Up to You'
Day. Many heroes, such as doctors, soldiers, parents and firefighters,
came to talk to the class. Each person was presented with a certificate
expressing the students'gratitude for all they db to help make a difference.
Pictured are (1-r): Randy Jones, Casey Clark and Alex Gonzalez.


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10
Announcements

GIGANTIC 3-DAY auc-
tion. March, 8, 9, 10;2006.
Montgomery, AL. Single,
tandem & tri-axle .dumps
(68 of which are 2005-06
year), truck tractors, low-
boys, crawler loaders &-
tractors, excavators, motor
,i graders & scrapers, back-
hoes, rubber tired loaders,
forklifts, paving, skidders,
Sfeller.bunchers, log load-
ers, farm tractors. J.M.
Wood Auction Co., Inc.
334/264-3265. Bryant
Wood AL. Lic. # 1137.
; fcan2

GLAD TIDINGS IS cur-
rently accepting registra-
t tion for Ist-7th grade Sum-
mer Day Camp. Early bird
registration fee is $35,
weekly rate is $70. Call
407/656-4140 to reserve
your child's space. 3/30gtps

HUNT ELK, RED Stag,
Whit6tail, Buffalo, Wild
Boar. Our season: now
: 3/31/06. Guaranteed li-
cense, $5, trophy in two
days. No game/no pay pol-'
icy. Days 314/209-9800;
evenings 314/293-0610.
fcan2

LAND AUCTION .200
props must be sold. Low
do'n E-Z financing. Free
catalog. 800/937-1603..
% wxx\v landauction com.
fcan2

ONE CALL STANDS
BETWEEN YOUR busi-
ness and millions of po-
tential customers Place
your ad for just $450 (25
words) $10 each addition-
al word.and your ad.will be
. placed in 150 papers. Call
The West Orange Times at
407/656-2121 and ask
Jackie about placing an ad
thru Flodda Classified Ad-
vertising Network. tfn
020
Travel
:Opportunities

CRUISE-7 NIGHTS, East-
ern Caribbean. Brand ne?\
ship sailing r/t from Ft
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NMarch 2007. From $499
i port taxe included) % ith
free bus. SOO741-177o
SvN.allaboardtravel.com
i ARC Exempo. fcan2

030
Personals

CHILDLESS MARRIED
COUPLE In oui 31's has
loving home for your baby.
FIT mom/devoted dad. 2
sneet dogs. Expenses paid.
Am\/Dae. 810/227-0373.
Access Code 00 fcan2

WE BUY MORTGAGES.
Are you collecting pay-
ments on a mortgage? Why
anit \ears for pa ments1
Call 800/282-125l. fcan:2

035
Schools and
Instruction

EARN DEGREE ON-
LINE from home. Medi-
cal. Business. Paralegal.
computers, criminal jus-
rice, job placement assis-
tance Computer &: fian-
cial aid if quahfty. 866/858-
212 \v\ u.onlinetide\ a-
terlech.com. fcan2

ENROLLING TWO.
THREE and four year old
children for Glad Tidings
Pre-School. Hands on ac-
'L ities. designed for all
learning styles. Call
407/656-4140 for more in-
formation. tfngrps

040
Business
Opportunities
A CASH COW' 90
VENDING MACHINE
TUNTS/YOUI OK LOCA-
TIONS. ENTIRE BUSI-
NESS-$10,970. HURRY'
800/836-3464 #BO2428.
3/2sag

ALL CASH CANDY
j route. Do you earn
$S00/dav? 30 machines.
free candy. All for $9,995
888'629-9968.
SB02000033 Call us. We
sill not be undersold.
fcan2

BRAND NAME.
Soda/candy route. Earn big
$. $0 do\ n financing.
800/367-6709 x 3177
(24/7) BO # 2510. fcan2


SOLID COMPANY-
GROWTH-Staying Pow-
er-Serious Income Poten-
tial. Call for info CD.
407/325-6174. 3/23jg

#1
CORPORATE/SPORTS
apparel franchise. Full
training and support. No
exp. needed. Financing
avail. Call 800/727-6720.,
www.EmbroidMe.com.
fcan2

070
Lost and Found

FOUND: MEDIUM SIZE,
solid white long haired
male dog w/blue collar.
Plant St. Ocoee/Winter
Garden area. 407/399-
2330. 3/9ka





100
General Office

BOOKKEEPER., LOCAL
A/C contractor looking for
FT Bookkeeper to handle
payables,. job costing,
billing & collections. Ex-
perience with Word, Excel
and Quickbooks. Comp.
salary, benefits and flexi-,
ble schedule. Call Action
Air 407/521-0400. 3/2aa

CUSTOMER SERVICE'
REPRESENTATIVES.
Winter Garden. FT, previ-
ous call center/customer
service experience req'd.
Exc. computer skills, de-
tail & deadline onented
Team player. Fax\ or email
resume 407/654-8451 or
patricial@djbimports.com.
ffndjb

RECEPTIONIST/SALES
SECRETARY for down-
Stown. Winter Garden real
estate company. Fax re-
sume to 407/654-4920.
3/2ewr

105
Domestic

DO YOU ENJOY clean-
ing? Clean homes with our
company M-F. Each ap-
plicant needs a car English
required. Start $9 25/hour
Weekly pay. Drug free
workplace Call 4107/877-
"73S after 9 a m for an in-
ter iew. 3/2cc

110
Crafts/Skills/Trade

AUTO TECH. EURO-
PEAN vehicle repairs. Ex-
perience a plus. ASE cert-
fication. Job includes ben-
efits. Call 407/497-9134.
tfnhl

CARPENTERS &
HELPERS. Steady work in
W Orange area. Trans-
portation available. Call
407/579-9277. 3/2fk

DISPATCHER. DAYS
ORLANDO area. Exp
preferred. P/T 407/656-
2624. tfnes _

DRIVERS-AULTO
TRANSPORT Co. Top
Earnings! Excellent Home-
Time! We Train! Paid Ben-
efits! CDL-A. 2 yrs.. exp
good MVR. Larry:
877/453-7964. 3/2aa

DRIVERS NEEDED.
CDL required Apply in
person: Johnson's Wrecker
Sern ice, 500 Wilmer Ave.
Orlando. No phone calls
tfnlwv

DRIVER-NOW HIRING
qualified drivers for cen-
tral Fl. Local & national
OTR positions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat, no
pumps. great benefits,
competitive pay & neu
equipment. Need 2 \rs
exp. Call BInum Transport
for .our oppotunirv today.
800/741-7950. fcan2

ELECTRICAL TECHNI-
CLAN NEEDED. Electri-
cal exp. a must for motor
operator, troubleshooting '
& installanon. Must have
clean driving record &
transportation. Full ttme
w/overtime Apopka area.
Call 407/884-5955. 3/9ds

EXP CLASS A diners. In
state food service delRier.
Sun/Fn nights. Li'tnng re-
quired. Food service or
beverage exp. a plus.. $500
signing bonus. Accuracy
bonus. 401k, pd. holidays &
vacations. Call Nicole @C'
KellP Foods. Winter Gar-
den. 407/654-0500. rfnki"

F/T POOL SERVICE
Tech needed. Will tram.


GENERAL:
C10 AnriOutlCE.EMErIETS
020 TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES
030 PERSONALS
040 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
050 HEALTH/DIET & BEAUTY
070 LOST & FOUND
090 MISCELLANEOUS
EMPLOYMENT:
100 GENERAL OFFICE.
105 DOMESTIC,
110 CRAFT/SKILLS/TRADE
120 LABOR
130 MEDICAL
132 'LEGAL
135 PROFESSIONAL
136 RELIGIOUS .
140 RESTAURANT/HOTEL/MOTE
150 RETAIL
155 HEALTH & BEAUTY
160 MISCELLANEOUS! .
165 PART-TIME
170 EMPLOYMENT WANTED


MERCHANDISE:
200 ITEMS FOR SALE
220 COLLECTIBLES
240 GARAGE/YARD SALE
280 ITEMS WANTED
PETS:
300 ANIMALS FOR SALE
340 FREE TO GOOD HOME
380 PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES'
VEHICLES:
400 AUTOS FOR SALE
401 TRADES
405 ACCESSORIES
410 AUTO PARTS
420 AUTO SERVICES & REPAIR
430 TRUCKS &VANS
L 440. RVS &TRAVELTRAILERS
450 MOTORCYCLES
455 EQUIPMENT
460. BOATS ,
470 BOAT PARTS
480. VEHICLES WANTED


SERVICE:
500 MEDICAL & HEALTH
505 DETECTIVE
510 FLORAL & HOME
PHOTOGRAPHY
515 MUSIC & PHOTOGRAPHY
520 ACCOUNTING
/BOOKKEEPING
525 INSURANCE
530 CHILDCARE
540 CLEANING
550 MOVING & HAULING
560 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
570 LAWN & TREE
575 TOWING
580 REPAIRS
585 MISCELLANEOUS
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT:
600 HOMES
610 CONDO & TOWNHOUSE
620 APARTMENT & DUPLEXES
625 ROOMS/EFFICIENCY
630 ROOMMATES


640 WAREHOUSE
650 COMMERCIAL
655 INCOME PROPERTY
670 VACATION
690 MOBILE HOME
695 WANTED
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE:
700 HOMES
710 CONDO & TOWNHOUSES
720 COMMERCIAL
730 WATERFRONT
740 LOTS & ACREAGE
750 OUT-OF-STATE
760 MOBILE HOMES
770 REAL ESTATE WANTED
800 SCHOOL & INSTRUCTION
810 REAL ESTATE WANTED
820 MISCELLANEOUS


FOe LSIFEmD CAL 0765-221o AX 407656-075*eEADINE:TUESAY 1AM


Top pay. Please call
407/654-2131. 3/9as

FIELD TECHNICIANS.'
Electric nieter change-out
field technicians are need-
ed to work in the Apop-
ka/Eustis area Starting
salary $13.50-$15.00. Must
have a valid Florida driv-
er's license, and pass apre-
employment drug test and
criminal background
check. Call 407/831-6669
or submit your resume to
UMS @asplundh.com.
UMS-EOE. 3/2ums

F/T & P/T STUFFERS
needed at our location near
Winter Garden. Fax
407/654-8451. tfndjb

GOLF COURSE WORK-
ER. FT/PT work. Apply in
person: 2501 McKinnon,
Windermere. Golf privi-
leges available. Hrs. 5am-
1pm. 407/876-1814. tfn-
wcc

HEAVY TOW-TRUCK
operator. Experience req'd.
Class A CDL required. Ap-
ply in person. 500 Wilmer
Ave. tfnjw ,

INSTALLERS, SERVICE
TECHNICIANS, and
Laminators wanted. Grow-.
ing Clermont area Kitchen
and Bath Cabinet Compa-
ni is currently seeking im-
mediate hire for the fol-
lowing positions. Installers.
Sert ice Technicians. and
Larmnators for production
shop Applicant needs to
be self-motvated and ex-
perienced in their trade.
Company offers good
salary, medical benefits.
401k and bonus. Please
send resume to- Fax
352,394-7944 or E-mail
Georgia@'niargaret oo-d-
craft com. 3/9m"wi

LEAD OPERATOR. WE
will rain ,ou on our laser
engra ing machine. Must
be reliable. & hase good
attenuon to detail. You v.ill
be responsible for super-
vising up to 4 employees
in production operations I
\r. supervisor.\ exp pre-
ferred. F/T benefits.
Please fax work historN to
Mr. Wehmeier 407/654-
8451 tfndjb

OVERHEAD DOOR IN-
STALLERS needed. Com-
mercial construction &
welding experience a plus.
Must have clean driving
record and transportation.
Overtime available Apop-
ka area. Call 407/884-
5955. 3/9fds

Pool Service Route. no ex-
perience necessary. will
train. MANY GREAT
BENEFITS. Must be 21
and hate good driving
record Call 407/294-9921.
8 to 4. NMon.-Fri. After
hours, lease message.
3/9pcc

POSITION AVAILABLE
IN Chnsuan-oswned bust-
nessicomputer literate/man-
ual skills. Know ledge of I1-
lusnator/Photoshop. 30-40
hrs. flexible Must hate
transportation. Occasional
moderate lifting. Call for
interview 407/656-7986.
3/2tsf

PRODLiCTION WORK-
ERS NEEDED, For 1st &
2nd shifts in V G area.
F/T sv/benefits. Fax
4(7/654-845 I. tfndjb

SPECIAL ORIENTA-
TION PAY for experi-
enced drivers! Home
sseekends. Great pay &
benefits. Paid training for
school grads. Cypress
Truck Lines, Inc. \ w'%.icy-


presstruck.com. 888/808-
5846. fcan2

130
Medical

LPN. FULL/PART/PRN
time. Experience preferred.
Apply at: 650 E. Minneha-
ha Ave., Clermont, FL.
34711.352/241,9088 (fax)
3/2opal

NEW PATIENT COOR-
DINATOR. F/T, 36 hrs/p
wk. Ortho/dental exp. pre-
ferred. Personable, enthu-
siastic team player needed
for this position. Exc. ben-
efit package avail. Fax re-
sume to 407/909-3004.
3/23dro

RECEPTIONIST-PODI-
ATRY OFFICE. Ocode. 29,
hrs/wk. Comp. skills.
407/578-9922. tfndl

STERILIZATION TECH:
Looking for a hard-work-
ing team player wanting to
learn the dental field. Ex-
perience would be a plus,
but will train the right per-
son. Excellent salary and
benefits Fa\ resume to,
407-909-3004. tfndro

135
Professional

ALL-FLORIDA MORT-
GAGE Center is noro hu-
ing licensed mortgage bro-
.kers and experienced loan
officers for the Clermont
office. Great commission
splits. 401k, and health
benefits. Please fax resume
to 352/404-0020 or call
Richard at 352/241-6060
3/9afmc

ARE YOU CURRENTLY
getung paid %. hat \ou are
worth Grow ing Allstate
Insurance office needs
help! Exp. preferred, w ill
train right person. Life Spe-
cialist also needed. Call
407/654 -6068. fax
407/654-6698 or e-mail.
ksling 1988@cfl rr.com.
3/2aic

PRESCHOOL TEACH-
ERS. DUE to increased en-
rollment. Oakland Presby-
terian Preschool in Oak-
land, FL. is accepting ap-
plications foi teacher posi-
tions for the *2006-07
school year. Excellent
working conditions and
good pay in a quality envi-
ronment. Please fax resume
to 407/656-8201 I or call Di-
rector Debby Aldridge at
407/656-4452 or 321/438-
1465 for further informna-
ton. 3/9opc

REAL ESTATE BRO-
KER/trainer needed for
fastest growing ajea. West
Orange Count'. Minimum
2 'rs. exp. in real estate.
Full benefits package For
further details call Ike at
407/654-1242 or e-mail re-
sume to
ike@allending biz 3/2all

140
Restaurant,
Hotel/Motel

COOKIES BY DESIGN
now hiding full & part-


time. Bakers, decorator, &
drivers to work Dr. Phillips
area. Call 407/903-0230.:
tfbcbd .

DELI COOK. GOOD
hours, good pay, Experi-
ence preferred. Cashier,
good pay, some exp. pre-
ferred. 4 days p/wk Food
service at the auto auction.
Call 407/947-6327 for appt
tfnafs

PHIL RITSON'S. 19TH
hole @ Orange County Na-
tional hiring for FT line
cook, dishwasher, and
servers. Please come by or
call 407/905-221.1.
3/2orngc

SONNY'S REAL PIT Bar-
B-Q is now hiring
SERVERS at 1500 East
Highway 50, Clermont,
FL. If interested, please ap-
ply between 2-4 pm, Mon-
day through Thursday (no
phone calls please). 3/9srpb

155
Health & Beauty

HAIRDRESSERS FOR.
NURSING home/assisted.
living facilities in. Ocoee
area. 407/290-8015 leave
msg. 3/9bu

NAIL TECH. F/T. New sa-
lon @ Stoneybrook West.
Call 41:07/489-1723. 3/9us

160
General
Employment











Athletic Coordinator P/T
Bldg. Inspector I & II
Bldg. Maintenance
Supervisor
Distribution Tech
GIS Coordinator
Police Dispatcher
Police Officer
Public Service Worker
Recreation Aide P/T
Additional -penings andr
applications are ast liable
online at u c%' gdn corn
01 apply in person at

City Hall 251
W. Plant St.. Winter
Garden, FL 34787
Tr-e L.I .l 5 l, I GanJrli, ui
q U ,I "*i|": n, ,,l, pf ii|',.I. 1






Plus Commissions,
Bonuses, and Spiffs.
Flexible Hours.
Great Work Ens iron-
ment Expenrience
NecessarY,.
Call Nes\ Business
Serve ice at
407-877-8865


:, AGENTS

New, Experienced Or
100% Commission Options
Build Your Business And Reputation
With A Company That Wants You To
Stay for Your Career

407-877-8853


ADVERTISING COM-
PANY NEEDS sales reps;
&/or Sales Managers for
restaurant placed display
ads Lip to 50% commis-
sion, car & cell phone al-
lowance. Telemarketing
appoints 'provided.
800/752-4309. fcan2

RELIABLE BABYSIT-.
TER WITH reliable trans-
portation. Call 321/388-
5681. 3/91d

SALES PERSON NEED-
ED. Will train. Make up to,
$10k p/yr. Immediate
openings w/established
roofing company' 954/444-
S53S.I/ 2cr _

SENIOR CITIZEN FOR
delivery for dry cleaners.
Must speak flueflt English
or bi-lirigual. 407/877-
.7027. 3/2aoc

165
Part-Time

COMPUTER SKILLS'
NECESSARY, P/T possi-
bly F/T. $7 p/hr. Approx.
20-30 hrs. p/wk. 407/877-,
5657.3/2jr

DOG GROOMER P/T,2-1
3 days p/wk. For mobile
- service in Southwest Or-
lando area. Call 407/340-
7636. 3/16spmdg

LIFEGUARD. CITY OF
OCOEE $8 45/hr Sea-
sonal/part time app. 35
hrs/s eek March 20. 2006
thru September 30. 2006.
Must be at least 16 years
old, lifeguard and
CPR'First Aid certifica-
tions preferred. Apply at
150 N Lakeshore Di..
Ocoee, FL 34761 Open
until filled EOE'DFWVP.
3,2coo

NURSERY ATTEN-
DANT. To provide child
care for children 0-5 \rs
in a controlled. Christian
en ironment of lose and
acceptance during church
services at Salem Luther-
an Church. Hours are Sun-
da\ mornings from 7 45
am-12 15 pm. Christmas
and Easter wl tl involve e\-
uia services. NMust be at
least 18 years old. CPR
know ledge is desirable,
and needs to clear back-
giound checks. $10 per
hour. Contact Eric Schu-
bert at 407/962-0846.
3/23sl

SWIM INSTRUCTOR.
BIG Fish in little pond
One-man business ex-
panding slow I%1 and offer-
ing seasonal posiuon from
May-Aug. for teaching pst
swim lessons to ages 3 to
12. Lessons and \ after safe-
ty taught wkd> mornings
and early afternoons ipos-
sible evenings) in various
pools in SouthWest Orlan-
do as well as in pn\ ate res-
idences Must ha\e reliable
trans. and be killing to ob-
tain a national certification
for swim
instrucion/CPR/FA. Must
be imaginati% e. energetic.
punctual. responsible, self-
motivated. analytical and
planning to attend school


OR REMAIN IN OR-
LANDO until Oct. 2007.
Good communication.
skills a must Call407/251-
9869. 3/30pk





200
Items for Sale

AIR CONDITIONER, GE,
115 volt, 10,500 btu, used
only 2 mos. $100..
407/654-0934. 3/2wh

BUILDING SALE! "Go
Direct/Save!" 20x26 now
$5100; 25x30 $6800;
.30x40( $10,600; 40x60,
$16.600 Exiensite range,
of sizes and models Fioni
end optional. Pioneer.
800/668:5422. fcan2

CORRUGATED STEEL
ROOFING for Barns, Boat
Docks, Shops, etc. Also
Culvert Pipe: 15"x20,'
18"x20'. Surplus Steel &
Supply, Inc. Apopka. Call
for pricing. 407/293-5788.
tfnss.

CUSTOM MADE WIN-
DOW valances, Kingston
style, neutral color. (1) 15"
x 25", (1) 45" x 25". Will
take best offer. Roll-top
pine desk. $250. All in exc;
cond 407/905-90,S5. 3/9pa

METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ buy direct from,
manufacturer. 20 colors in
stock w% ith all accessories.
Qwuck turn around. Deliv-
ery available. Toll free
8S,/393-0335. fcan2

ORLANDO TANGELOS
AT Mlaigroff Grote
Across Rt. 50 from West
Orange Lumber Co., Oak-
land You pick or I pick.
407/656-5768. trnmg

REDUCED!!' RUG IN-
DIA KASHAN Oriental.
12 xlS'. Nes. never used
Hand made. Netw Zealand
%iool. Ivory w,'blue & pink
pastel flouter pattern.
$1900. MIST SELL-
MAKE ANY REASON-
ABLE OFFER 407/654-
7718 tfnid

SNAPPER 28" RIDING
mower.:' Runs great. $400
firm 407/656-8239 3/2%%b

240
Garage/Yard Sale

BIG SALE. PRIMA Vista
subdv. Clothes for all
(great condition), Gator
fans memorabilia, baby
stuff & etc. Fn.& Sat.620
Banderas Ate. 3/2tt

GARAGE SALE Fn /Sat.
322 Apopka St., WG.
Leather sofas & much
more. 3/2mt ,

GAR AGE SALE. Sat. &
Sunday. 8am-3pm. 712
Surprise Dr., W.G. 3/2ts

HUGE ESTATE SALE.
At Fowler Groses Almyra
Farm" 7 Days from Friday
to Friday. March 3rd to
10th. 9.30 am. to6:00p.m.


S Join Our friendly
Professional Team!
U N ETA
Li .RestEstateAgents &.Mortgage Brbikers
Fat expanding Real Estate Office,
Real Estate & Mprtgage Network
W ,West Orange 'Area. Full training Provided.
Please call 407-654-1242 or.
'Email resume to: ike@al lending.biz


16 room-3 story "Colonial
Dutch" home Arts & Crafts
built in 1922. Four other
homes included. Architec-
tural items: All to be sal-
vaged before demolition.
Everything from fixtures
to flooring to be sold.
Whatever you buy, you re-
move, at your risk. All
items must be removed by
March 14, 2006! Bring
your trailers & tools. Ev-
erything GOES! Fruit trees
& shrubbery for sale. 175
acre farm established cir-
ca 1875. President Chester
A. Arthur signed land
grant, Winter Garden,
Florida. Available items
are Antiques from 1870's
to 1960'-1970's collectibles
and architectural items and
features for sale. Civil War
era sewing table with
curved bottom drawer, En-
glish cotton two drawer
needle case/sewing box,
1850's O.G. mirror, bas-
kets, trunks, cedar chest,
iron bird door stop, B & H
bookend, saddle bag, early
brown automobile riding
jacket, late 1800's black
mourning cape, skirt &
bonnet, fancy late 1800's
lacey blouses, dated, crazy
quilts, (10) 1870's-1920's
New Hampshire quilts,
"drunkard's path" and "hole
in the barn", Victorian wall
hanging, piano runner with
flowers, beaded collar,
*black jet beads, black bus-
tle skirt, lots of trinkets and
late 1800's glassware, Ma-
hogany radio and phono-
graph, small Mahogany 2
drawer cabinet with 2 mesh
doors on bottom. 1950's
hats, leather tooled purse
with bust of horse, late
1800's picture frames,
books' pictures, lamps,
telephone table, televisionr-,
1860's rocker, Aladdin
Classic magnifier viewer-
with large screen, luggage,
kitchen items, doilies,
bisque German Indian doll..
Architectural items and
featirures foi sale L-shaped
stairway and banister,
v. ood flooring, crown
molding, raised paneled
.doors, 3 piece front door,
and side lights with divid-
ed panes. Six sets of French
doors, various sizes of pan-
eled doors approximately
40- all different sizes. Pair
of oval mirror-back prism
sconces, pair of round,
dome-shaped ceilingi
prism fixtures. Italian tile.
1920's porcelain tubs,
1920's HAJOCA toilets
(made in Pennsylvania),
*pair of swinging pantry
doors, balcony, green Arts
& Crafts fireplace tiles,
Original horseshoe shaped,
bead board back butlers,
' pantry with wood & glass
panes, wooden floors, old
personal items, custom
made kitchen cabinet, cus-
tom made vanity w ith teal
Formica top, mirrors, cus-
tom made office desk &
cabinets "L" shaped. An-,
tique brick arched entry.
and wall Bullshed one car
garage u/door Rembrandt
collection of 50 Steiling
coins in 5 dras'er case
Chnstmas decorations.
household items, tons of
other items. From Hwy. 50
in Winter Garden go South
on Hwy. 535 2.3 miles turn
left. From Hwy. 429, exit
Hwy. 535, go North 1/4
nmile, on right. Watch for
yellow direction signs.
Shirle's Antiques handling
,sale. Into. 407/383-3619.
Visa, MasterCard, Ameri-
can Express, Cash accept-
ed! NO EARLY BIRDS!!
3/2ta

HUGE GARAGE SALE
& Bake Sale. Arrowhead


Home lst I
Lending -...
Home First lending &
Novak Realty of Central Florida, LLC
13335 West Colonial Drive
Winter Garden, FL 34787
Ph: 407-656-8889
Fax: 407-209-3506

NOW HIRING

Loan Originators Wanted

* You can starr before you get your license, as
we are a licensed correspondent mortgage lender
with employee exemption for Loan Originators.
* We provide excellent ongoing training.
* We offer a productive environment and an in-house
real estate company.
* Excellent Orlando, Central Florida Market, office
located in Winter Garden.
Hiring enthusiastic, cheerful individuals
Real Estate Sales positions also available


Estates in South Clermont
(off CR 455) Sat., March
4th. 8am. Tons of items
have been donated!! All
proceeds to benefit the
Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society. 3/2kb

MARCH 4TH SATUR-
DAY. Rummage sale at the
Elks Club on Ninth St.,
W.G. from 8am-2pm. All
proceeds benefit American
Cancer Society. Dona-
tions? Call 407/656-5125
Iv. msg. 3/2fa

MULTI FAMILY
GARAGE sale. Sat. 8am-
2pm. 985 Glenmeadow
Dr., W.G. Lots of chil-
dren's clothes. 3/2jl

MULTI-FAMILY YARD
sale. Sat., 8-2. Lots of ev-
erything and new Jet 3 hov-
eround motorized chair,
$1,000, obo. Across For-
est Lake Golf Course in
Ocoee. Corner of 5th & -
Angola. 3/21m

ORANGE TREE 'MO-
BILE Home Park. Park-
wide yard sale. Sat., March
4. 8am-4pm.. Raindate
March 11, 8 to 4. 3/2pc

SLEEPY HARBOUR, 413
E. Lakeshore Dr., Ocoee.
Friday, 3/3 from 8am till
2. 3/2te

SPRING RUMMAGE
SALE to be held Sat:,
March 4th from 7am to
1pm. Sponsored by UMW
of 1st United Methodist
Church of W.G. Sale will
be in the Fellowship Hall,
125 N. Lakeview Dr. Do-
nations may be dropped off
Wed., March 1 thru Friday,
March 3. 3/2aqc

VARIOUS HOUSE-
HOLD AND decorative
items. Wicker dresser &
.headboard, clothing, bed-
ding, etc Sat., March 4,
7:30 am. 331 W.2nd A'e.,
Windermere. 3/2ts

617 BANDERAS AVE.,
Ocoee. (PriimaVicsta sub-
dv.) Sat., March 4, 8-2pm.
Clothes. shoes, videos,
household items, lawn
equipment, beanie babies,
electronics, stuffed ani-
mals, misc. items. 3/2pc




50+ Families
March 3rd thru 5th
Fri & Sat 9-2 Sun 11-2
ButlerBay
Recreation Center
11465 Park Ave.
Windermere
Clothing.bab) equipment.
to)s. maternirt & loLs more!
F.... irni'ili.-.r mall
407-247-8804


280
Items Wanted

DONATIONS NEEDED!!
Helping Kids Thrift & Gift
needs your donauons. We
% dl gladly accept your do-
nations of used furniture,
collectibles, household
items, books and gently
worn clothing. We provide
financial assistance to The
Children's Wish Founda-
tion and The Center for
Grne ing Children. We'd
be happy to pick up your
donation. To schedule a
pick-up, please call
407/648-8393. Your dona-
tions help a child, rfn

WANTED TO BUY: Pa-
per money and old coins,


SWest







Section D
Thursday, March 2, 2006

Email:
advertising@ wotiines.com








2D The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


.single coins, notes, accu-
mulations, entire collec-
ctions. Littleton Coin Com-
:pany since 1945. Call
* 800/581-2646, e-mail coin-
'buy@littletoncoin.com.
!Mention code B8K520.
fcan2
WE BUY GOLD, dia-
:monds and any broken
-'jewelry & watches.
"407/296-6999. tfnsj


POWERS
BATTERIES
Now
Purchasing
SCRAP
BATTERIES,
500 EACH
510 E. HWY 50
WINTER GARDEN
656-6588

380
Pet Services &
Supplies
11 STALL BARN with
large paddocks and pas- .
ture. Bathroom, laundry
and round pen. Starting @
$200, 6th month free.
407/293-7441. 3/16pt




430
Trucks & Vans
2002 DODGE DURAN-
GO SLT, V-8, auto, all ac-
cessories. $16,000.
* 407/469-4429. 3/23pc
450
Motorcycles
2000 HONDA SHADOW
,SABRE 1100 V-twin,
black. Custom Mustang
seat and hard cases. Only
3,950 miles. Exc. cond.
'Garage kept. $5500, obo.
'407/654-7718. tfndd
460
Boat
"04. 14' TRACKER JON
obdat. 5hp o.b /55 lb. Min-


nakota. Depth finder, bilge,
lights. New gal. trlr. Full
deck w/carpet, gas tank.
$3,000. 407/722-2591
Chris. 3/16cc
Services
528
Legal
ARRESTED? ALL
CRIMINAL defense.
Felonies, misdemeanors,
state or federal charges, pa-
role, probation, DUI, traf-
fic tickets, bond reduction.
Private attorneys statewide,
24 hrs. A-A-A Attorney
Referral Svc. 800/733-
5342. fcan2
DIVORCE. $275-$350.
Covers children, etc. Only
one signature req'd. Ex-
cludes govt. fees. Call
weekdays 800/462-2000,
ext. 600. (8am-7pm). Alta
Divorce, LLC. Established
1977. fcan2
540
Cleaning
PRESSURE WASHING.
Licensed & Insured. In
business since 1986. Free
estimates!
Commercial/Residential.
407/491-1555. 3/2cw
560
Home
Improvement


S.E. Dollen, Inc.
Winter Garden longest es-
tablished electrical con-
tractor serving
Central FL since 1983.
All Service Techs are
LICENSED
Journeymen and Master
Electricians.
For professional results
and competitive rates call
407-656-5818
EC 13001719


CROWN MOULDING,
TILE, bathroom repair,
laminate flooring, more.
Owned/operated by local
firefighter. 407/489-0116,
352/242-9265. 3/9fcs
HOME PLANS. Put your


ideas to paper. Complete
set of working floor plans
& elevations in 1-3 weeks.
Call Jerry Koncz at
407/656-8883. 3/2jk
REPAIR, REMODEL,
RENOVATIONS & in-
stallation services. Call
Handyroo's. Licensed/In-
sured. 407/340-1719.
3/2nr


WELL DRILL
PUMPS
Smith Brothers
Marshall Farms Rd.
OCOEE
656-5883 or
656-4394
Licensed -'Bonded
Water or no Pay
Servicing all of Central Florida


580
Repairs
COMPUTER REPAIR IN
your home. Pick up and
drop off service. Upgrade,
trouble shoot. Jason Kour-
takis 407/579-0699. 3/16jk





600
Homes for Rent
BRAND NEW 3/2/2, 1900
sq. ft., living, dining, large
faro/study. $1475 p/mo.
Lease opt. is avail. Oak-
land subdv. 407/920-2593.
3/2vp
OCOEE., ON STARKE
Lake. Private dock back-
yard, 3/2, all appliances. 12
mo; lease. $1400 p/mo.
Ref. 407/579-9824. 3/2rc
OCOEE. 3/2, SPLIT plan
home w/pool. Prestigious
community. $1700/month-
ly. .12 mo. lease. Avail.
now! 407/579-9824. Jay-
ci. 3/2rc
610
Condo &
Townhouses


CITRUS OAK CQNDO.
Gotha. 1938 sq. ft. Mag-
nificent water view. Gated
community near West
Oaks Mall. Pool, 2/2/2, w/d
incl. $1400 p/mo. Ref. Im-
mediate occupancy.
407/924-8645. 3/9phi
WINTER GARDEN
TOWNHOME for rent. 3
br., 2 ba. $875 + sec.
407/654-4124. 3/2cc
620
Apts. & Duplexes
FURN. ONE BDRM. apt.
Cent. h/a, one adult, no
smokers or pets. Clean!
$700 mo.; $700 security;
$25 wk for utilities (sew-
er, water, cable & elec.)
Avail. March 22., 407/656-
4029. 3/2rjmc
1/1 APT. NEWLY refur-
bished. W.G. No pets.
$550 p/mo. Within walk-
ing distance to shopping &
restaurants in historic
'downtown. 407/376-8763.
tfnmec
625
Rooms/Efficiency
EFFICIENCY APTS FOR
rent. By week. 407/656-
8124. tfnrs
1/1 APT. NEWLY refur-
bished. W.G. No pets.
$550 p/mo. Within walk-
ing distance to shopping &
restaurants in historic
downtown. 407/376-8763.
tfnmec
650
Commercial
COMMERCIAL OFFICE
SPACE. 1500 sq. ft.
w/competitive rates. Lo-
cated at 1735 B. East Hwy.
50, Ste. C. Clermont, FL.
34711. Call Gita Vyas for
more details: 407/447-
4270. 3/9fpg
OFFICE WAREHOUSE
& fenced in area for lease.
Downtown Ocoee. Ap-
prox. 7400 sq. ft total. Call
Charline 407/251-6789.
tfncf
PROFESSIONAL OF-
FICE SPACE for rent. N.


Dillard St. 407/656-2812.
tfnmab
31 S. Main St. 2nd floor of-
fice spaces avail. Starting
@ $350 a month. 407/656-
6420. tfncp





700
Homes for Sale
FOREST BROOKE. 4
bdrm., 3 ba. 2480 sq. ft.
Formal living & dining,
great room, 3 car garage.
Private lot. Built 2005.
Coldwell Banker, Erin
Tompkins. 321/231-2262.
erin.tompkins@flori-
damoves.com. 3/2et
FSBO. COME SEE this
lovely 2 bdrm. home in
friendly Ocoee! 1 yr..old,
c/a, carpet, vinyl fir., ceil-
ing fans, sat. dish. Brand
new fridge, flt.-top stove,
Kenmore w/d. X-large
yard w/endless possibili-
ties. Enjoy sitting on the
scrn. porch. Low taxes. Off
Lady Ave. Reasonable of-
fers considered. Flex. clos-
ing date. $177k. Call be-
fore 12/after 7. 407/287-
9429. 3/2jg
GLENVIEW ESTATES.
WINTER Garden. 3 br., 2
ba, 2128 sq. ft. living area.
Beautiful comer lot w/ma-
jestic oaks, azaleas, fruit
trees. 407/877-7269 or
407/467-8520. Must see
this one before you decide!
3/2rs
MAGNIFICENT VIEW
OF Lake Apopka. This
home is located in histori-
cal Winter Garden. 3 br/ 2
ba, large office. Pool, spa.
Double lot. Asking
$399 000. 407/963-0826.
3/9sm
MUST SEE. Ready to
move. 4/3,2,400 sf. Ocoee.
Best price in town. Im-
maculate. 1 year warranty.
Premium lot. Excellent lo-
cation. $363,900. More
info on:
geocities.comlyournext_
home. 407/443-0403,
407/484-3186. 3/16pt


OCOEE. BEAUTIFUL,
MOVE-IN ready 3/2 with
bonus room. 1525 sq. ft.
Screened porch, laminate
wood floor, .ceramic tile,
and carpet. $255,900. Vis-
it www.geocities.com/mar-
cell55 ities.com/marcell55> or
call 407/296-5235. 3/2db
OCOEE. FSBO. 907 Alas-
ka Dr. 3/2, $220,999, obo.
407/877-8053. 3/2rr
REDUCED! LAKE-
FRONT IN Sleepy Har-
bour on Starke Lake. 3/2
with private boat dock.
Lots of upgrades and large
lot. Open House Sat.,
March 4th, 10am-2pm. Of-
fered by Jamison Proper-
ties, Inc., Realtors. Call
Nanette Barton direct at
407/592-0409. 3/2nb
WINTER GARDEN/
OAKLAND. 3 bed., 2
bath, 1/2 acre homesite.
Quiet community, best
kept secret in West Orange,
$299k. 407/656-9320.
3/2er
710
Condo &
Townhouses
CONDO FOR SALE.
Windtree Gardens. 2 bed/2
bath. $129,000. 407/656-
3336. 3/2cm
740
Lots and Acreage
REAL ESTATE FOR sale.
5 acres, city water & sew-
er available. Clermont area
near Hancock Rd. Reduced
$375,000. Austin Teal Cor-
poration, Broker 407/448-
0572. 3/9atc
750
Homes Out of
Area
ADULT COMMUNITIES
AND other properties for
sale. Ocala/Marion county
team real estate of Ocala,
Inc. Realtor. Multiple list-
ing service. 888/391-6658.
fcan2
ASHEVILLE NC AREA
homesites. Own a private
mountain retreat. Gated


riverfront community.
Stunning mountain views.
1 to 8 acres from the $60s.
Four-season climate. Call
866/292-5762. Bear River
Lodge. fcan2
BEAUTIFUL NORTH
CAROLINA. Winter sea-
son is here. Must see the
beautiful peaceful moun-
tains of western NC moun-
tains. Homes, cabins,
acreage & investments.
Cherokee Mountain Real-
ty, GMAC Real Estate,
Murphy. www.chero-
keemountainrealty.com.
Call for free brochure
800/841-5868. fcan2
EASTERN TENNESSEE
MOUNTAIN homesites.
Gated lakeside community.
1 to 5 acre wooded and
- lake view -sites from the
$40's. Planned amenities.
Minutes from Chat-
tanooga. Call today
866/292-5769. Gates of the
River. fcan2
LAKEFRONT AND
LAKEVIEW properties
nestled in the hills of Ten-
nessee on the shores of
pristine Norris Lake. Call
Lakeside Realty at
423/626-5820 or visit
www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com. fcan2
LARGE MTN. LAND
bargains. High elevation.
Adjoins pristine state forest.
20+ AC to 350 AC.
Sweeping mtn. views,
streams.
www.liveinwv.com. fcan2
LOOKING TO OWN
land? Invest in rural
acreage throughout Amer-
ica; coastal, mountain, wa-
terfront properties. 20 to
200 acres. Free, monthly
special land reports.
www.land-wanted.com/sw.
fcan2
MONTANA MOUN-
TAIN PARADISE. Great
mountain views! 2.29 acres
just $59,990. Ride out your
back door to millions of
acres of national forest.
Close to Canyon, Ferry
Lake, minutes to Helena.
Soils tested, utilities, ready
to build. Call owner.
866/365-6103. fcan2


MOUNTAINS OF
NORTH Ga. The very best
of riverfront, lakefront,
acreage tracts, building
parcels from 1 to 195 acres
direct from owners.
706/276-7773. fcan2
MURPHY, NORTH
CAROLINA. Aah cool
summers, mild winters. Af-
fordable homes & moun-
tain cabins. Call for free
brochure. 877/837-2288.
Exit Realty Mountain
View Properties. www.ex-
itmurphy.com. fcan2
NC MOUNTAINS 10.51
acres on mountain top in
gated community, view,
trees, waterfall & large
public lake nearby, paved
private access, $119,500.
Owner 866/789-8535
www.NC77.com. fcan2
NORTH CAROLINA
GATED lakefront com-
munity. 1.5 acres plus, 90
miles of shoreline. Never
before offered with 20%
pre-development dis-
counts, 90% financing.
Call 800/709-5253. fcan2
OPEN HOUSE. THOR-
OUGHBRED horse farm
estate liquidation! Sat.,
March 11th, 9am-3pm, 67
acres. $689,000. Historic
stone home, huge barns, in-
door riding arena, acres &
acres of quality fenced pas-
ture w/more avail. Awe-
some views, gorgeous set-
ting on quiet country lane'
near state forest & more
riding opportunities. Less
than 3 1/2 hrs. to NY City.
Call 877/909-5263. Now
or go to http://horse-
farm.upstatenyland.com for
photos & directions. Bro-
kers welcome. fcan2
ST. PETERSBURG CON-
DOS. Resident owned,
55+, no rentals or pets,
many activities/amenities.
1 bdrm. from $65,900; 2
bdrm. from $89,900. Cal
Elaine King, Panache Re-
alty, 727/525-9018,
727/321-5028. fcan2
WATERFRONT LAND
SALE! Direct waterfront
parcels from only $9,900.
2 acres dockable with log


cabin pkg. from $89,900.
4.5 acres dockable water-
front only $99,900. all
properties are new to the
market. Call toll free t
866/770-5263, ext. 8.
fcan2
WATERFRONT! 2
ACRES +/- $159,900.
Gorgeous acreage, great
views, pristine shoreline &
deep boatable water. Near
Bath, NC. Enjoy access to
ICW, Sound, Atlantic.
Paved road, underground
utilities, well water, septic
approved. Exc. financing.
By appointment only. Call
now 800/732-6601 x 1497.
fcan2
WESTERN NEW MEXI-
CO. 20 acres starting at
$39,900. Scenic region,
views, trees, rolling hills,
wildlife. Family retreat,
hunting property or year
round home. Power, 100%
financing. NALC 866/365-
2825. fcan2
760
Mobile Homes
SINGLE & DOU-
BLEWIDE. Owner will fi-
nance. 407/654-8155.
tfndh
1999 CHARIOT 34 x 40
park model trailer. One
bedroom, furnished with
heat/air, storage building,
washer & dryer. Large lot.
Great condition. $25,000.
479/459-7159. 3/9fs
810
Real Estate
Wanted
LOOKING TO SELL your
home? Call Larry Abreu at
321/332-5117. Weichert
Realtors/Hallmark Proper-
ties. 3/91a


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA


11 1- .- I a- -I
ELm


WEST ORANGE


ROOFING
a BOB SWINDLE,


MASTE


KEYS MADE LOCKS REPAIRED
EMERGENCY OPENINGS


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Residential* Commercial TFN
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Mobile 407-761-0793 Shop 407-656-8240
130 CHARLOTTE ST WINTER GARDEN, FL 34787


c. #RC0033054
onded & Insured

Residential
r Commercial


FREE ESTIMATES.

407-656-8920


Shingle Build-Up One Ply
5 Year Workmanship Warranty on New Roofs
1 Year Warranty on Repairs


Ph: 407-877-0709 0 '
Fax: 407-877-3486'

Winter Garden Grassing, Inc.
M/WBE ENTERPRISE since 1980
Commercial Seeding and Sodding
Residential Pick Up and Delivery
Hay Seed Bahia St. Augustine Bermuda
/ -St. Augustine by the piece- ,
532 N. Bluford Ave, Ocoee, FL 34761
www.wintergardengrassing.com TFN

TFN


SCREENS








m -Carol



T IVI Morgan
C ..il WAdvertising
Cm........ R" Representative


407-656-2121
720 N. Dillard St, Winter Garden, FL 34787


"We're proud of our service,
and You will be too!"


We are a Full Service Roofing Contractor
with over 20 years of Experience in the
Central FLorida area.


Specializing in Shingle,

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Call us today for your FREE estimate


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State Licensed and Insured TFN
License #RC29027165


TFN
AVERY'S FREE
Home Improvement Estimates
Specializing in Remodeling
Pressure Washing & Painting Residential
& Commercial Tile & Carpentry Door &
Window Installation .
DrywallTexturing James. Cardwell
^ 407-656-8579
J Cell 407-929-7263


Bill Straugh
Broker Associate
Cell 407-716-3010

Windsor Realty Group, Inc.
410 N. Dillard St. Ste. 103
Winter Garden. FL 34787 ,
407-877-FIND (3463) \ M


1, [-


352-394-429
REPAIRS & INSTALLATION
SNEW CONSTRUCTION ,
A DRAIN CLEANING



)oce BTrown Horticulture SpeciAlrt/Arborist



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S 10 rs. Dissne Horttcmlturc

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Serving West Orange Since '82 -.
Phone (407) 656-6812
FAX (407) 656-6830 '

Quality service at
MIVassey s a reasonable price
Paint & Body Shop
Michael D.Massey
wnMichael D.Massey 249 Capital Court
TFN Owner Ocoee, FL 34761



CRAWFORD TIRE

SERVICE, INC.
110 Taylor St. Ocoee (407) 656-4575

MORE THAN JUST

TIRE VALUES
Bridgetone Michelin Cordovan Lee Tires







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ur









Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 3D


PROBATE DIVISION
File No,: 48-2006-CIP-000256-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALICE K. LECHLEITNER
a/k/a ALICE ELEANOR LECH-
LEITNER,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALICE K. LECHLEITNER
a/k/a ALICE ELEANOR LECH-
LEITNER, deceased, whose date of
death was December 27.2005, and
whose Social Security Number is
235-22-7714, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court Probate Division, 425
N. Orange Avenue, Room 340, Or-
lando, FL. 32801. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WIL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is February 23, 2006.
Personal Representatives:
/s/ Peggy L. Starcher
PEGGY L. STARCHER
203 Spring Street
Spencer, WV. 25276
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ Stephen D. Dunegan
STEPHEN D. DUNEGAN
Florida Bar No.: 326933
DEAN, MEAD, EGERTON,
BLOODWORTH, CAPOUANO


& BOZARTH, P.A.
P.O. Box 2346
Orlhndo, Florida 32802-2346
Telephone: 407/841-1200
Fax: 407/423-1831
2/23, 3/2/06



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
File No.: 48-2005-CP-002399-O
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VIOLA HENDERSON
RISHER WILBERT,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
VIOLA HENDERSON,
RISHER WILBERT, Deceased,
whose date of death was December
13, 2004, Case Number 48-2005-
CP-002399-O, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Orlando, FL.32801. The
names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representatives and the Per-
sonal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons who have claims or
demands against Decedent's estate,
including unmatured, or unliqui-
dated claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is February 23,-2006.
/s/ Barbara Risher Smith
BARBARA RISHER SMITH
Personal Representative
8040 Landgrove Court
Orlando, Florida 32819

/s/ F. Douglas McKnight
F. DOUGLAS McKNIGHT, ES-
QUIRE
Florida Bar No.: 095012
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive


126 East Jefferson Street6
Post Office Box 3695
Orlando, Florida 32802-3695
Telephone: 407/843-3252
2/23, 3/2/06



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FILE NO.: 48-2006-CP-000350-
0
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY ROBERTA JENNINGS,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
MARY ROBERTA JENNINGS,
deceased, whose date of death was
December 26, 2005, File Number
48-2006-CP-000350-0, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 N. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando, FL. 32801.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER TIE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other credit's of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE* DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH. IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is February 23, 2006.
Personal Representative
/s/ Robert E. Jennings
Robert E. Jennings
5344 Lake Lawson Road
Virginia Beach, VA. 23455
Attorney for Personal Representa-


tive:
/s/ Richard A. Wagner
Richard A. Wagner
Florida Bar No. 139672
304 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32801
Telephone: 407/423-340 I1
2/23, 3/2/06




NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Sly's Towing & Recovery gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell vehicles pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes that on 3/14/06 10:00 a.m.
at 119 5th St., Winter Garden, Fl.
34787-3613. Sly's Towing & Re-
covery reserves the right to accept
or reject any and/or all bids.
88 PLY., VAN,
SP4FH543XKX564927
94 CADI, 4DR.,
IG6KD52B8RU231388
95 NISSAN, 4DR.,
IN4AB41DXSC747880
97 CHEV, 2DR.,
1G1JF12T8V7260010
99. FORD, VAN,
2FMZA5140XBB30545
00 FORD, 4DR.,
1FAFP3434YW301252
02 PONT., 4DR.,
IG2NW52E22M720720


ORANGE COUNTY NO-
TICE OF PUBIC HEARING
PUBLIC HEARINGS SCHED-
ULE FOR THE CONSOLIDA-
TION OF SERVICES STUDY
COMMISSION
Pursuant to Article IX, Section 901
B. of the Orange County Charter,
the Orange County/City of Orlan-
do Consolidation of Services Study
Commission shall hold no less than
four public hearings before sub-
mitting its report to County and the
City. As such, the Consolidation
of Services Study Commission has
established the following sched-
utile of public hearings to receive
input from the general public on
the proposals and recommenda-
tions that will be presented to the
two governments.
In accordance with the Sunshine
Law of Florida, all Consolidation
of Services Study Commission
meetings are open to the public.
All members of the public are en-
couraged to attend these four pub-
lic hearings which will begin
promptly at 7 p.m.
For more information please visit
our website at http://www.or-
angecountyfl.net/cms/CSSC/de-
fault.htm or call the office for'the
Consolidation of Services Study
Commission at 407/836-5236.
February 20,2006: City of Orlan-
do Council Chambers
Second Floor, 400 S. Orange Av-
enue


Orlando, Florida 32801
March 7,2006: Dr. James R. Smith
Neighborhood Center
1723 Bruton Boulevard
Orlando, Florida 32805
March 20, 2006: Orange County
Commission Chambers
First Floor, 201 S. Rosalind Av-
enue
Orlando, FL. 32801
March 29, 2006: Union Park
Neighborhood Center for Families
12050 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32826
If you require special accommo-
dations under the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990, please
call 407/836-5631 no later than
two business days prior to the hear-
ing for assistance. Para mas infor-
macion en Expanol, por favor
Ilame al 407/836-3111.
Martha 0. Haynie County
Comptroller
As Clerk of'the Board of County
Commissioners
Orange County, Florida
3/2, 3/16/06



NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicles will be sold
at Public Auction for cash to satisfy
lien pursuant to F.S. 713.78 on
3/24/06 at 0800.
94 NISS. 4N2DNI 1W2RD854048
94CHRY., 1C3EU4537RF163523
HUGHES TOWING & RECOV-
ERY
103 S. ORANGE BLOSSOM
TRAIL
ORLANDO, FL. 32805
407/425-9999


NOTICE OF SALE.
The following vehicles will be sold
at Public Auction for cash to satisfy
lien pursuant to F.S. 713.78 on
3/31/06 at 0800.
00 FORD,
IFDEE14N8KHA30690
94 JEEP, lJ4FT67S3RL108677
HUGHES TOWING & RECOV-
ERY
103 -S. ORANGE BLOSSOM
TRAIL
ORLANDO, FL. 32805
407/425-9999


Notice of Sale
Pursuant to Fl. St. 713.585, Auto
Lien & Recovery Experts, Inc.
w/Power of Attorney, will sell the
following vehicles to the highest
bidder to satisfy lien. All auctions
held with reserve, as is where is,
Cash or Certified funds. Inspect 1
week prior at lienor facility. Inter-
ested parties call 954/893-0052.
Sale date 03/23/06 @ 10:00 am.


Auction will occur where each ve-
hicle is located under License
AB0100538. Be advised that own-
er or lienholder has a right to a
hearing prior to the scheduled date
of sale by filing with the Clerk of
Courts. Owner/Lienholder may re-
cover vehicle without instituting
judicial proceedings by posting
bond as per FL. Stat. 559.917; 25%
buyer premium additional. Net
proceeds in excess of lien amount
will be deposited with the Clerk of
Court.
#ORGC387 lien amt $2867.50
1994 DODGE, 4D vin #
I B3HD46F2RF316926 reg: DAR-
LYNN M BUSKEY of 2005 OAK
ST., ST. CLOUD cus: WILLY
TROUTMAN of 5714 LJUNE
STREET, ORLANDO l.h. NONE
lienor: TECH 1 AUTOMOTIVE,
918 S. ORANGE BLOSSOM
TRL., APOPKA phone: 407/888-
5004.
#ORGC388 lien amt. $2836.62
1988 MERCEDES-BENZ, 4D
vin# WDBDA28D4JF437871 reg:
PIERRE REGIONAL JOSEPH of
5906 ANTILLE DR., ORLANDO
cus: JOHN DOE lh. NONE
lienor: AFFORDABLE MER-
CEDES-BENZ &, 2010 W.
WASHINGTON ST., ORLANDO
phone: 407/843-0300.
#ORGC389 lien amt. $2623.62
1982 MERCEDES-BENZ, 4D.
vin# BAB23A8CB357674 reg:
MATILDA FRANKLIN HART
of 4140 LENOX BLVD., OR-
LANDO cus: JARVRS HART of
4140 LENOX BLVD., ORLAN-
DO l.h. NONE lienor:AFFORD-
ABLE MERCEDES-BENZ &,
2010 W. WASHINGTON ST.,
ORLANDO phone: 407/843-0300.
#ORGC406 lien ami. $2012.95
1995 YAMAHA, MC vin#
JYA3ALEOXSA039675 reg:
DALE E. MATTHEWS of 944
SYLVIA DR., DELTONA cus:
DALE E. MATTHEWS of 944
SYLVIA DR., DELTONA 1.h.
NONE lienor: TRANSCARE
TRANSMISSION, 4400 W.
COLONIAL DR., ORLANDO
phone: 407/295-3155.
#ORGC413 lien amt. $4662.73
1998 DODGE, TK. vin#
3B7KF26D4WM231695 reg:
MARC WOOD DEJESUS of
2835 PINE MEADOW DRIVE,
MARIETTA cus: MARK DEJE-
SUS of 1501 WINTER GAR-
DEN BLVD., WINTER PARK
l.h. GEORGIA TELCO CREDIT
UNION of P.O. BOX 105205,
ATLANTA lienor: DIESEL SPE-
CIALISTS, INC., 850 SUNSHINE
LANE, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS
phone: 407/788-0775.
#ORGC415 lien amt. $3415.00
1996 MAZDA, 4D vin#
JM1BB1410T0360627 reg:
USAA EDI-SEI of P.O. BOX
33490, SAN ANTONIO cus:
FRANCISCO THEW of 7217
TORTOISE COURT, ORLANDO
l.h. NONE lienor: THEN AUTO
BODY AND PAINT, 1231 W,
ROBINSON STREET, ORLAN-
DO phone: 407/540-0396.
AUTO LIEN & RECOVERY EX-
PERTS, INC.
P.O. BOX 813578
HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33081-0000
954/893-0052


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR THE NINTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FOR
ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 48-2005-CP-
002861-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO M. WESTMORELAND,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Formal Administration)
The formal 'administration of the
estate of LEO M. WESTMORE-
LAND, deceased, whose date of
death was September 8, 2005, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
425 N. Orange Avenue, Room
340, Orlando, Florida 32801; File
Number 48-2005-CP-002861-0.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and


6I


rl
2

D
2.


D_


y, n


J6


other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this Notice has
been served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE TIME
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED. I
Notwithstanding the time period
set forth above, any claim filed two
(2) years jor more after the dece-
dent's date of death is barred.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is March 2, 2006.

/s/ Charles C. Westmoreland
Charles C. Westmoreland
Personal Representative
311 14th Street
St. Augustine, Florida 32084
/s/ Ondean B. Balch
Ondean B. Balch
Personal Representative
9004 Reyes Court
Orlando, Florida 32836


/s/ Lynn Walker Wright
Lynn Walker Wright, Esq.
LYNN WALKER WRIGHT, P.A.
2715 Rew Circle, Suite 102
Ocoee, Florida 34761
Florida Bar No.: 0509442
3/2, 3/9/06


NOTICE UNDER FICTI-
TIOUS NAME STATUTE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned pursuant to the "Ficti-
tious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will reg-
ister with the Division of Corpo-
rations of the Department of State,
Tallahassee, Florida, upon receipt
of proof of the publication of this
notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
SMOOTH LINES
under which it is engaged in busi-
ness at: 1976 Blackwood Ave.,
Gotha, FL. 34734.
That the corporation interested in
said business enterprise is as fol-
lows: TRA ENTERPRISES, INC.
By: /s/ Todd Arnold
TODD ARNOLD, PRESIDENT
Dated at Orlando, Orange Coun-
ty, Florida, February 20, 2006.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
ON 3/13/06 @ 8:30 AM 'AT
RALPH JOHNSON 24 HOUR
WRECKER SERVICE, 11409 W.
COLONIAL DR., OCOEE,


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4D The West Orange Timnes Thursday, March 2, 2006


FLORIDA. THE FOLLOWING
VEHICLES WILL BE SOLD
FOR CASH. SOME OF THE VE-
HICLES POSTED MAY HAVE
ALREADY BEEN RELEASED
AND NOT ELIGIBLE FOR SAL-
VAGE SALE.
99 DODGE, 4D. VIN #
I- B3EJ46X8XN676807
i RALPH JOHNSON'S WRECK-
ER SERVICE RESERVES THE
** RIGHT TO ACCEPT OR RE-
'. JECT ANY AND ALL BIDS.
r1 RALPH JOHNSON'S WRECK-
ER SERVICE RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO BID. BIDDING BE-
GINS AT THE AMOUNT
OWED. ALL VEHICLES SOLD
AS IS. NO WARRANTY IS AND
NO GUARANTEE OF TITLES.
CALL 407/656-5617.


r, PUBLIC NOTICE
To satisfy owners lien for rent due
in accordance with -Florida
1 Statutes, "The Self Storage Facil-
ity Act" (Sections 83.801-83.809),
contents of the leased storage units
(individuals identified below) in-
S eluding all personal property con-
sisting of miscellaneous household
items, furniture, clothing, boxes
and other items will be sold at Pub-
lie Auction to the highest bidder
(or otherwise disposed of) at the
i following locations and time.
[ All units are sold "as-is", and must
% be paid for in CASH immediately
following the auction. All units ad-
vertised may not be available at
.' the time of auction in the event of
"' settlement between owner and ob-
I ligated party.
SAFE-T-STORAGE I
300 E. DIVISION
r- MINNEOLA, FL. 34755
Date: March 17, 2006
Time: 8:00 a.m.
Tenant; Unit
No. .
Christopher Shubert. B32
Christopher Shubert B42
Kathy Johnson B132
Christopher Shubert B134
Custom Dockside Canvas C15
Charles Dunnigan C109
Brian Tanner E28
Matthew Stevens 1902
Matthew Stevens 1904
' SAFE-T-STORAGE II
S1970 S.'HIGHWAY 27
,4 CLERMONT, FL. 34711
Date: March 17, 2006
* Time: 8:45 a.m.
," Tenant Unit
SNo.-
," WesFlanagan 119
Q Paul Gonzales 145
r.:' Brandon Schaffner 310
F., Joey Ingram 371
Wes Flanagan 534
Wes Flanagan 574
e Wes Flanagan 632
'James Boyd 640
, 3/2, 3/9/06
14.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
', Auction for the following vehicles
, will be held on March 17,2006, at
8:00 a.m. at 1510 N. Forsyth Road,
0' Orlando, FL. 32807 for the tow-
ing and storage pursuant to F.S. #
713.78. Terms are cash.
I y.l k,.-. sEF'HI -,

"MD Towing reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and all bids.


i: NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE


pv.
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C.


,.si ...'r;'s.s,.iFS


INn,, HCLE"-`35.5I.,i75454


MD Towing reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and all bids.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
- Auction for the following vehicles
will be held on March 19,2006, at
0' t' .i q !1 ".11 N Fufsm,l R w.ij
' 'n r, nd .I...ri,' '.u u i, a ,F.S. #
; er ,
4'4~, uLINCOLN TOrwNC'S6R
"t lr' a ILrL BP,''.F tC'| .|l-".',-.
t, l IO N D .- 'I~O R ',
'\1N a ihMCt: ..-2kR l:'irK

p, F
As LAID-OFF
A'. th wortld'S B u.s tt t
Schneider Natioral's B,.
S s6r'ri hiring,.
S Epenrience re,arded b
SComp.3ny paid COL Ira
$34,500 S57,500 [IdLp-
TS.ms can earn more i
S Immediate DtenlerI for
gn-c'n lnu5 rmay 5. :.
Apply Online @ sc
r Or call 1-600-44-PRIDE (1
SCHA
ft m *- -


1991 TOYOTA CAMRY
VIN # 4T1SV21E2MU427318
1993 MAZDA 626
VIN # I YVGE22B4P5130638
1996 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
VIN # 2P4FP2538TR847746
MD Towing reserves the right to
accept or reject any and all bids.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 48-2006-CP-000458-
0
Division: I
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALTAGRACIA ASENCIO,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of


ALTAGRACIA ASENCIO, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
January 9, 2006 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, File
Number 48-2006-CP-000458-O,
the address of which is 425 N. Or-
ange Avenue, Room 340, Orlan-
do, FL. 32801. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons, wholiave claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, and who
have been served a copy of this no-
lice must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-


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NOTICE! If you have a HOME MORTGAGE
with SunTrust, Bank of America, Wells Fargo or
Wachovia Mtg Cos. Market Research Co. is seeking
customers to participate in an independent study of customer
service levels in the aforementioned Mtg Cos. telephone call
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tingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
All other creditor of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's es-
tate must 1ile their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATIONOF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is March 2, 2006.
Personal Representative
RAFAEL CAMPUSANO
13 Blanchard Street
Apartment 2
East Lynn, Massachusetts 01904


Attorney for Personal Representa-
live:
DAVID W. VELIZ
Florida Bar No.: 846368
425 West Colonial Drive
Suite 103
Orlando, Florida 32804
Telephone: 407/849-7072
3/2, 3/9/06


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Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 5D


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lot. Grab a pool lounger and come it pools, pla) ground and tennis
and enjoy! $245.000. court. A must see @ $247,500.


Windsor Realty Group, Inc. 410 N. Dillard St. Winter Garden, FL 34787 .


30yr Fixed '6.675%
75yr Fixed '6.375%
5yr ARM '5.75%
3yr ARM '5.625%
30yr. 2nd Mrg. 'S. 75%
Al rates are sublt to approval based on cpdit& Income
e: fWtictons may apply, call for details
RATES ARE OIiNG UP
CALL NOW TO RECIEVE


77


4


'i," [


I


- '-I !':; '
;^r


.. ;t







6D The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


IT'S A SMALL PRICE TO PAY!!!
DON'T WAIT TO SEE THIS 3 BDRM., 2 BATH BEAU-
TY... LIVING ROOM, DINING AREA, SPLIT BED-
ROOM PLAN, SCREENED PATIO, PRIVACY FENCED
YARD, STORAGE SHED AND LANDSCAPED YARD!
LAMINATED WOOD FLOORING AND SO MUCH
MORE !!! ASKING ONLY $184,900.


THIS HOUSE
3 BDRM., 2 BATH WITH I
KITCHEN, SPLIT BEDROOM P
ING, CERAMIC TILE, HUGE MV
KITCHEN APPLIANCES AND
CATED ON CUL DE SAC WI
WEST ORANGERA AIL...CON\
429,408 & TURNPIKE... GRE
$279,900.


LAN, LAMINATED WOOD FLOOR- POOL/SPA HOME!4 BDRM., 2 BA., FORMAL LIVING & DINING, FAMI-
/IASTER BEDROOM CLOSET, ALL LY ROOM WITH BRICK WOOD BURNING FIREPLACE, SCREENED LANAI,
TH LARGE LOT, WALK TO THE SPARKLING POOL/SPA, LANDSCAPED YARD, PRIVACY FENCED, SPLIT
VENIENTLY LOCAT ED CLOSE To BEDROOM PLAN, INSIDE LAUNDRY, ALL KITCHEN APPLIANCES STAY,
EAT CONDITION ..ASKING ONLY CERAMIC TILE EVERYWHERE EXCEPT BEDROOMS, WALK TO THE WEST
ORANGE TRAIL... GREAT LOCATION...ASKING ONLY $309,900.





YOUR STYLE!!!
INTA PRETTIER PICTURETHAN
APED BEAUTY, SITUATED ON
IDED BY MATURE TREES, NO ULTRA TASTEFUL!!!
US LIVING ROOM WITH WOOD NEVER BEEN LIVED IN IS THIS BEAUTY... 2 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH, WITH
-IN ULTRA MODERN KITCHEN, INSIDE LAUNDRY, PANTRY, PLANT SHELVES, CERAMIC TILE, SE-
PLUS BARN(ALUMINUM SID- CURITY AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM, 1 CAR GARAGE WITH OPENER,
THIS ISA MUST SEE... ASKING PAVER DRIVEWAY, WALK TO DOWNTOWN WINTER GARDEN...ASK-
ING ONLY $209,900.00


..'.- THE OWNER HAS LOVED THIS HOME -
ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE!!! BUT MUST SILL IT!!!
SAY GOOD-BYE TO THAT SMALL HOUSE...LARGE CUSTOM BUILT 11 ACRES, WITH APPROX, 5 ACRES DRY, THIS IS A PEAK OF PERFECTION!!!
HOMEHASALARGELIVINGROOM,DINING ROOM,ULTRAMODERN GREAT BUY, THIS HOME HAS BEEN COMPLETELY RE- CLERMONT, GATED COMMUNITY, 3 BDRM., 2 BA., DECORA-
KITCHEN WITH ALL THE COUNTER SPACE & CABINETS DE- MODELED, 4 BDRMS. 3 BA., LIVING/GREAT ROOM, TORTOUCHES, IMMACULATE CONDITION!!!THIS ISA BEAUTY
SIRED...BREAKFAST NOOK OVER LOOKING THE SPARKLING POOL DINING ROOM, LARGE BREAKFAST NOOK, INSIDE WITH FORMAL LIVING ROOM & DINING, FAMILY ROOM, BREAK-
& SCREENED LANAI. SPACIOUS FAMILY ROOM, 4 BEDROOMS, 3 LAUNDRY, SCREENED PATIO, FENCED, SO CONVE- FAST NOOK, KITCHEN WITH ALL APPLIANCES STAYiNG,-ALL
BATHS, BONUS RM OVER CAR GARAGE, IN GATED COMMUNITY, NIENTLY LOCATED...JUST OFF OF 455. ASKING ONLY WINDOW COVERINGS STAYING, COVERED PATIO AND LOCA-
PRIME LOCATION!I PRICED TO SELLASKING ONLY$569,900.00 $524,900.00 TION IS GREAT!!! ASKING ONLY $344,900





SUCH A DEAL!!! .YOUR FAMILY DESERVES THE BEST!!! TOTALLY MODERNI!
H YOU'LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME.WHEN YOU SEE THIS WELL-CARED
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOUSE ON THIS LOVELY LOT GATED COMMUNITY.. WHATABEAU... THISISA MUSTSEE...2STO- FOR, BRIGHT, SPACIOUS BDRM., 2 BA., POOL HOME. LOCATEDIN
LOCATED DOWNTOWN WINTER GARDEN, LOT MEA- RY,4 BDRM. 2.5 BA. WITH MASTER BEDROOM DOWNSTAIRS, YOU WILL A QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD WITH NO HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION &
SURES 75x142x75X142 ZONEDRESIDENTIAL!!!THIS LOVE ENTERTAINING FAMILYAND FRIENDS IN THIS HOME...FORMAL LIV- OERNEIGHBORHS I NHGEOY E
ING & DINING, LARGE FAMILY ROOM WITH WOOD BURNING FIRE- NO REAR NEIGHBORS! STRIKING ENTRY FOYER, OPEN LIVING ROOM
IS A GREAT INVESTMENT, DRIVE BY. AND TAKE A PLACE...BREAKFASTNOOK, KITCHEN FEATURES GRANITE COUNTER TOPS, & DINING, FAMILY ROOM FEATURES A BRICK FIREPLACE, SLIDING
LOOK ON SOUTH MAIN, GIVE ME A CALL!!! ASKING SPARKLING SCREENED POOL AND PATIO OVERLOOKING POND WITH GLASS DOORS LEADING TO SCREENED LANAI AND OPEN PATIO &
FOUNTAIN...RELAX AND ENJOY!!! OVER 2900 SQ.FT. OF LIVING... ASK- POOL! THjS HOME WAS COMPLETELY REMODELED! ASKING ONLY
ONLY $159,OOQ. ING ONLY $466,900.00 $295,900.


-.11 MM MO


1929 SQUARE FEET OF LIVING AREA!
SBM W/t alma -. ..^f^aB


Shaat- BUYING A NEW HOME?
SELLING YOUR HOME?
MultiMillion Dollar ioducer PLEASE CALL ME!

Bro w e. .03. patsharr@aol.com 407-948-1326


RaIzor
REAl yINC
i~i a~y


www.raizorrealty.com

CALL 407-876-1576
CELL 401-468-3234



What's

My Hom

Worh'

Fin ou tdayv sit


SOUTHERN PINES- Brand new gated
,COMPLETED" community- 2&3 bdrm.
units to choose from $1150-$1350, wa-
leriseu age ncld. Graniecouniers in kitchen
& baths, .some unms a h single car garages
GREAT AMENITIES' Pool. spa. indoor
baskeiballiracqueibal. fitness center. Home
Theatre and MORE' 407-425-4561
Marti Purd3. Property Manager
Don Asher & Assoc.
Ph 407-425-4561 Fax-407-843-5169
www.DonAsher.com
OmA SSE&R INR
REALTOR


WINTER GARDEN
Brand new.
Large 3br/2.5ba.
Immediate occupancy.
$1,400/mo.
eOenO Reg
C7 ,. Cal l '
'Bill Sereno, BROKER
(407) 654-8222


CATCH A FALLING
PRICE TAG!
Was: $579,500.00
Then: $529,500.00
Then: $499,500.00
NOW $379,500.00
forthis 3,600 sq. ft.
Office/Home. Call today!
-. L.A. Grimnes Agency, Realtors
407-656-2223


WE GUY

* Honest
* Reliable
* Fast Closing
* As Is Condition .
SHOMEVESTORS
l RED TAIL DEVELOPMENT
NLi~ .i>. .iinl^, i .-,t-iifii.


Stop Paying Commission Fees
__ *A*


To Sell Your Home Toda
Don't Give Thousands Of Your Hard Earned Dollars Aw<
CALL US TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE APPRAISAL!
RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS
W COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
PROPERTY INVESTMENTS
NOW HIRING LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENTS

$5OK SALARY

COMPANY CAR

alSs BONUSES


ay MAIN STREET USA 4

MORTGAGE SERVICES
FULL REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE SERVICES
SPECIAL FINANCING FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS
100% INVESTOR FINANCING
REFINANCING OUR SPECIALITY
REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE LEARNING CENTERS
SPECIAL OFFER
REAL ESTATE SCHOOL $199
'MORTGAGE SCHOOL $99


NO FEE REALTY IS A FULL SERVICE REAL ESTATE FIRM WITH LOCATIONS IN
RLANDO, KISSIMMEE AND OUR NEWEST FACILITY IN DOWNTOWN CLERMIONT.
WE WORK CLOSELY WITH INVESTORS -- FIRST TIME BUYERS... NO PROBLEM !


DOWNTOWN CLERMONT


(352)-241


-6661


DEERFIELD PLACE
Brand new! Elegant, 5 beds, 4 baths,
3439 sq ft on a comer lot with canal in
back, lots & lots of extras. Must See!
Only $529,000.
Janet Spikes 407-905-5608
Brenda DeArmond Realty, LLC

Buying a Home?
New OR Resale 50%
Commission Rebate*1-.


"Based on 3% conimssion

Home ,1E0f Reatty.co
407.496.4900
i J.- L' ) e Commission As Low As 3%;
Norb Wekr. Reail Estnue c Mott,.i Broler ll- 'i'







WINTER
GARDEN
Office space
1,150 sq. ft.
Available
April 1st.
$1,00o/Mo

ge ono Re
Call
Bill Sereno BROKER
(407) 654-8222


lt. I 3 Bedrooms %'%ith 2 5 Baths. Upstair-s
2 bedioonm-s a full bath anid a loft.
NMla.ter Bedroom do,) nstairs
All appliances included: Refrigerator,
Range, Dishwasher, Washer and Dryer. Must see to believe.
One year home warranty included. Call today to arrange a
viewing before it's gone!


H. Raizor
REALTOR
P.O. Box 812
Windermere, FL 34786


David






Thursday, March 2, 2006 The West Orange Times 7D


RGRAC 0 us LI
*PAS II w
Grreatel' Pines 912Db1 Garage. TP. 1 m- Pi 'Jc'Z et &ra baw
1-1-1 A 19r; Q nr 7AA) Imasofsut~5ie & b In K US 2~


MAINk5TREETr
RE A L T 0 R S
RESORT INVESTMENT OP!!
Brand new 4/3 tiled roof home with
S screened pool in Solana Resort,
just 11 min. from Disney! Gated! Club-
house! Good vacation rental oppor-
tunity! Call for details! $365,000.
Karen Jorgensen,Realtor, CRS,
Main Street REALTORS, Windermere.
(407) 808-3118

OAK MEADOWS SUBDIVISION!
District Executive 3/2 home w/1831
sf.ft. & large fenced backyard! Built
in 1986.New roof, new carpeting,new
French doors, more!! Olympia HS Dis-
trict!! $277,000. Hurry!
Karen Jorgensen, Realtor,CRS.
Main Street REALTORS, Windermere,
(407) 808-3118.

DOWNTOWN GATED CONDO!!
One Thousand Oaks 3/2 condo on 2nd
'U&3rd floors! 1316 sq.ft. Wood-burn-
ing fireplace! Three balconies! All ap-
pliances stay! Comm. pool,tennis
courts. $175,000. HOA fees:$544 mo.
-Karen Jorgensen, Realtor, CRS.
Main Street REALTORS, Windermere,
(407) 808-311
A ,-- AVALON-PARK IN SE ORLANDO!
Brand new 3/2 one-story home-with sepa-
.. rae office! Family room has electric fire-
s. place! Lots of tile! Over 2300 sq.ft.! All
kitchen appliances stay!2-car rear-entry
garage. Corner lotwith conservation lot on
rtwo sides! Comm. pool. Schools are only a
le* blocks away.Seller motivated! Reduced
___._. o $365,000.
Karen Jorgensen, Realtor, CRS,
Main Street REALTORS, Windermere,
(407) 808-3118

W SW ORLANDO/LAKE ROSE POINTE
S 3/2 block home w/ new roof, new tile
S floors, new SS appl.1592 sq.ft. Partially
fenced backyard. Watch sunset on
community dock over Lake Rose!
Seller motivated! $320,000.
Karen Jorgensen, Realtor,CRS,
Main Street REALTORS, Windermere,
(407) 808-3118

For more information on my listings and any
other MLS listings, feel free to contact me!!
KAREN JORGENSEN, REALTOR, GRI, CNHS, CRS
MAIN STREET REALTORS 401 MAIN ST, SUITE B
WINDERMERE, FL 34786 Cell: (407) 808-3118
Homes4U@cfl.rr.com
Thinking about selling your home? List with me and I'll advertise your home
extensively and give your Buyers the.gift of a free 1-Year Home Warranty!


NEW DEADLINE FOR
CLASSIFIED ADS





For more info call

407-656-2121








eWKI ie I


NEW DEADLINE FOR
REAL ESTATE ADS





For more info call

407-656-2121


~

JoAnne
Quarles-Sikes



us real estate
s.





2_ A. OL'TE, STE102X .
WINTER N, 34787
Fery- Commerce

TELEPHONE 407/654-8811 FAX 407/654-4885

LOWEST PRICE IN SUBDIVISION!


JUST REDUCED /
PRICED TO SELL!
All upgraded appliances
included! Refrigerator, Built-in "
Microwave, Range, Dishwasher,
Washer and Dryer. One year home
warranty included! 3 bedrooms with
2.5 baths. Screened in back porch across entire back side of home!
BEAUTIFUL WINTER GARDEN HOME BUILT IN 2001
Call today to arrange a viewing of this home before it's gone!


David H. Raizor
REALTOR


P.O. Box 812
Windermere, FL 34786


R AiO www.raizorrealty.com

Ei y INc CALL 407-876-1576


CELL 407-468-3234


This is the watch Stephen Hollingsherad, Jr. was
,--,, i, h-,i. he encountered a drunk driver.
Time of death 6:55pm.

Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.

/ ,.id


'N


Career Opportunities
Available!
407-509-7995
| www.avalarcareer.com
Br""".", Featurg


CaU Dor... L.ao
352-636-0362



CoD Stodo Mhno
407-810-1103



Coil Mrie .V.id..
407-617-81562


295 E SR 50 SUITE 2
CLERMONT, FL 34711
352-242-3939
www.avalarinclermont.com
ed Listings


Beautiful 2 Br/2bath end unit townhome.
Custom Tile in Wet Areas and Silestone
Countertops, Great location across from
pool and recreation building.
Doreen Landi 352-636-0362

Winter Park Jewel with beautiful view and only a
5 min. stroll to prestigious Park Ave. Enjoy Park
Ave's upscale shopping and dining.
Stacie Mims 407-810-1103

Well Maintained; Move in Condition; backs up to
Conservation Area; Great Neighborhood; schools
close by; Centrally located
Marie Valdes 407- 617- 8562


Now accepting New Listings in Orange and
Lake County.
Callfor a free market analysis.







Village Grove in Winter Garden, FL
New construction Townhomes. 3 and 2 bedroom units, some
with a garage. To be completed Summer 2006. Selling NOW!
Hurry, won't last. Prices starting at 171 K and 260K.

Call Barbara Killian at 407-718-1584
Vance Realty Group









TIMES,


NOW ON LINE! wotimes.com






I+e'?ih5 Child-eh

with all disabilit-ies sine 1. 7 ;5



United Cerebral Palsy of Central Florida cares for children with
all disabilities and developmental delays from birth to age 21.
We address the child's cognitive social,, emotional, self-help .
and physical needs. We offer many services, including:



Pre-school Charter School -FREE tuition for :
eligible children
Home & community early intervention
Developmental "Parent and Child" playgroups :<
Physical, speech and occupational therapy
evaluations and treatment a
Support groups, training & counseling for the
entire family


p


a
U S Department of Transportation


UCP
630 S. Dillard St.
Winter Garden
407-905-0531


LwCP
CHILD
DEVELOPMENT
CENTERS


AVALAR







8D The West Orange Times Thursday, March 2, 2006


11!SiRanerlr


Signature


GM AC


Real Estate

www.srgmac.com


Service You Deserve. People You Trust.,
)


[E '--- -






SUMMERPORT ELEGANCE 4 BD, 3 BA pool home w/designer de-
cor currently a model. Upgrades galore, custom pool & access to
Lake Spear. Office will be converted back to a 3-car garage.
$605,000
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4650170
or call 407-354-1060


BEAUTIFUL 20 ACRES Lake County property zoned AG, high & dry.
Waiting for you! Bring horses & build a dream home. 2 BD, 2 BA man-
ufactfred home on site. Access to pristine ski lake.
$445,000
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4640440,
or call 407-352-0520


LAKEFRONT BEAUTY Custom built w/pool, spa, Jacuzzi. Upper &
lower balcony, 5,823 sq. ft., 2 bonus rooms & many custom fea-
tures. Convenient to everything & excellent schools.
$849,990
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4644222
or call 407-352-0520


NOBODY SLEPT HERE This new 4 BD, 3 BA, 3 Car home new w/dra-
matic flair features bonus room w/surround sound, large cabinets &
granite counter tops in kitchen. Fully Loaded.
$449,900
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4648575
or call 407-352-0520


NEW HOME IN SUMMERPORT 4 BD, 3 BA Park Square home
w/pond view in beautiful Summerport. Many upgrades including
tile, cabinets, faucets, and Corian countertops w/built-in sink.
$437,700
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=-o4647238
or call 407-354-1060


E N 1 1N E ERE D
.HOMES


There's a new neighbor in town...
all your real estate needs under one roof!


SHE'S A BEAUTY! New wood flooring & tile in all living areas, car- IMMACULATE AND SPACIOUS! 3 BD, 2.5 BA home w/screened pool
pet in BR only! Wood fence & no rear neighbors. Eat-in kitchen,. and patio. Enjoy home cooking in a very large kitchen w/walk-in pantry
formal living & dining rooms plus family room. & breakfast bar. Jacuzzi tub in master bedroom.
$399,900 $385,000
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls-o4653496. Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4657713
or call 407-352-0520 or call 407-992-5030


Hlomel


Lending'


* Residential Loans


. 1


* Commercial Loans
* Refinancing with
Money Back
* 100% Financing
* First-Time Buyers
Programs
* Investing Loans
* Interest Only Programs
* No Income Verification.
Programs
* And More


*..We can help


If you're having difficulty qualifying
for a home loan because of credit chal-
lenges, we can help. Our loan specialist
\\ill find the right product for you, even
if you have bankruptcy issues or little
or no money for a down payment.
Call today for details!


For more information please call

C4O7-656-8889i

www.mortgages4people.com
email: info@ mortgages4people.com


REALTY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


...HELPING ONE FA MILY ATA TIME

* Complete Real Estate Services Serving Buyers and Sellers
Investors Welcome Stress Free Process

Finding the right real estate agent can be the difference between
a happy. stress-free home buying or selling experience.
If you're thinking of selling or buying or just want to know the value
of your property in today's market, just give us a call and answer a few
questions, all done conveniently over the phone. There's no obligation.
Call for your FREE over-the-phone market analysis today!





13335 W. Colonial Drive Winter Garden, FL 34787
www.realestate4people.com Email: info@realestate4people.com

Conveniently located in the K-Mart Plaza. behind Taco Bell


ACTIVE'RETIREMENT LlN IN'G e,-ui'ul huT,., ,r Su.,T,,,,[ reens.
Hard ood floors nu ': .-r":,-,:J por.:h ,. i .:. ];ii, ,u,, -' BD,
2 BA with den. C,,.-.,-. l..ah Fl:...r..j a ,i,:
t31 ,,0lX
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=g4599728
or call 352-243-7929


M UST SEE!! :,ui,.tjl J. I ', i.. li-:: .. d n I .-,ul.di e .a. : &
has a huge backyard w/privacy fence & screened back patio. Spacious
& full of special features. .
$299,990
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4649301
or call 407-352-0520


VILLA WITH PRIVACY 5 BD, 3 BA, pool home backs to preserve &
is a corner lot. Fully furnished and close to Champions Gate & 1-4.
Good investment area zoned for short term rental.
$310,000-
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4651787
or call 407-352-0520









KING'S RIDGE DE.ONSHIRE imnT.,.:.ul .. .Ac. F.b
"unr,, ], juli d i.:,-,Ilng _r-,:1.:.' <.1 1, h _,,uir,: diir ,',,_ h.: ui Trans-
~-.rbl,l g.:. -l n...i. r hp ,rr. '. 3.: : jdull .:.|T..T.IJI- ,
$249,900
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4658055
or call 407-992-5030


DO \NITON ORLANDO L.,A,, -i C, -:r.-, i D I I?- 1 i SOLID HOME 4 BD, 2 BA traditional in well established neighbor-
i ..: .:,-.r,.:, ]p.:..:.l ... .:. ,iul i ,:lin.- B.-rb.i ,:a-i. ., ,.'n hood. Totally new upgrades & on a corner lot. Easy access to 1-4,
porch. Across from Delaney-Park, secured entrance. John Young Parkway & Florida Mall.
$225,000 $159,900
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4658093 Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4653798
or call 407-992-5030 or call 407-352-0520


BEST IN GREENGROVE ESTATES Beautiful lot with nice elevation
& oak trees. Over 4 total acres with 1.3 buildable.
$1 59,900
'Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=g4599352
or call 352-243-7929'


QUAINT NEST 2 BD, 1 BA nicely upgraded near John Young Pkwy,
neighborhood park & bus line. Newly tiled, carpeted & painted.
Ready to move-in.
$152,900
Visit www.srgmac.com/mls=o4654274
call 407-352-0520


Clron CooasBeach D. Pilis* K=s -Lae ar


Broker Participation Welcomed. Prices, plans and specifications
- ]ui-ic ..-i 11i. .e -without prior notice. I CGC1501492