<%BANNER%>

UF00028309 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00393
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Publication Date: 12-13-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00403

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923www.levyjournalonline.com VOL. 89, NO. 23 50 CENTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 NFL Give WHS $10,000 Crybaby in a Santa Suit History in the Pictures Track the Winning Sea Turtle The Pony & The Milk CowsPearl Harbor – a New RenditionSee page 12BSee page 5ASee page 6ASee page 10BSee page 3A S See Levy Life 1B With assistance from great sta members of Levy Countys Department of Public Safety, Director David Knowles and IAFF Local 4069 sponsored the “ rst Annual Christmas Dinner and Employee of the Year Recognition on December 7, 2012 at the Black Prong Equestrian Center in Bronson. is is the Departments way to honor the employees who serve the public 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. is was the employees night, a relaxing evening with a steak dinner provided by the Director and Local IAFF 4069. Levy County Department of Public Safety announced their employees of the year. Elysia Foran and David Florance were voted employee(s) of the year by their peers. Elysia and David both exemplify the dedication and passion serving the residents and visitors of Levy County. e second award of the night went to Jimmy Jones; Jimmys patch design was selected as the winner for the new patch for the Department of Public Safety. Director Knowles asked employees of the Department to design a new patch that represents the direction of the department. Mr. Jones chose this design after completing research from Greek mythology. I chose the symbol of the Phoenix because I believe it more than “ ts the current changes we are seeing with our department.Ž said Jones. Levy County EMS is the old Phoenix that is dying, only to be reborn again as the new and young Department of Public Safety. A Department that will no doubt live as long as its old self and will undoubtedly renew itself again. We will always be current. Our vibrant colors and beautiful song will forever be displayed in the community. I also feel that it will be a symbol of hope to the community. When citizens su er a loss, our presence and the story of the Phoenix we carry with us will bear witness that from the ashes of their personal tragedies something new will rise to carry on. For this reason I chose the motto on the bottom outer ring and the Phoenixs prominent and central location; From the Ashes, Rise Anew.Ž We would like to thank the following organizations that made this event a great success: IAFF Local 4069 Black Prong Equestrian Center Perkins State Bank — submitted.LCSO Looking for More Information on Homicide in BronsonLevy County Sheri s O ce reported that on Saturday December 8, deputies responded to a 911 call to a residence on NE 48 Lane. A family member told the arriving deputies that George Hamilton Pierce, 51, was deceased inside the residence. After con“ rming that the deceased was in fact George Hamilton Pierce, the case has been classi“ ed as a homicide. is is the second homicide in 2012 in Levy County. At this time the cause of death is not being released. Anyone with any information is asked to call Detective Jimmy Anderson or you can remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477. — submitted by Major. Evan Sullivan, LCSO Levy County Department of Public Safety’s First Annual Christmas Dinner and Employee of the Year RecognitionLevy County Public Employees celebrating Christmas Dinner and Employee Recognition. Jimmy Jones (on the left) designed the new patch for the new Public Safety Department as Director David Knowles smiles approval. Elysia Foran and David Florance show o their awards with Director David Knowles in the middle. Bronson Names All State Football Local & Pastor Curtis Stacy as Recreation DirectorAt the December 3 meeting of the Bronson Town Council with all in attendance, Bronson High School graduate and all state football player Curtis Stacy was voted in as the new Parks and Recreation Director. e Town of Bronson has been working on developing a comprehensive sports program for the youth of the area moving on from the Bronson Youth League to the new Parks and Recreation Department. e majority of the council preferred keeping the position close to home. Councilman Berlon Weeks did bring up the advantage of a person from out of Bronson who would not have any irons in the “ reŽ in the area nor have to deal with calling in a favor from a friend. Weeks and Councilman Jason Kennedy expressed the right nowŽ quali“ cations and experience of Michael Whelan for the job. Also in the running for the position were Rodney omas and Deitrich Stewart. e vote was tied and Clerk Kelli Brettel passed it on to Mayor Franklin Schuler to break that tie. e choice went to Curtis Stacy. Stacy was all state in football, basketball and track. He was recruited by Coach Mike Shannahan, currently the Washington Redskins coach, out of high school at Bronson and earned a scholarship to play defensive back at the University of Florida playing under Charlie Pell and Galen Hall. Later he signed on with the Seattle Seahawks as a free agent moving on from there to the Canadian Football League. Stacy coached football and basketball at Williston High School after spending over 20 years with the Alachua County Sheri s O ce in corrections. He has also served as the football coach for Bronson High School and the 2012 defensive back coach for the Chie” and Indians. Stacy is currently the Pastor and originator of Elohim Praise, Worship and Deliverance Ministry in Chie” and. Bronson Town Attorney, Steven Warm, gave a summary of the resolution up to this point noting that Stacy will be part-time up to 32 hours per week at $12 per hour and serve under Councilwoman Beatrice Roberts who heads up the Parks and Recreation project. ere will be a 10-day orientation from whenever the job commences during which Stacy would become familiar with town personnel, functions and various programs. Councilman Aaron Edmondson brought up a previous discussion for a 6-month probation period for evaluation. e decision was made to evaluate each contender for the position and select the person with a tally of the cumulative points. With Mayor Schuler casting the deciding vote from the tie, Curtis Stacy was that person. Motion was made to accept Stacey in accordance with the resolution being drawn up. e resolution creates the position, states that the director serves at the discretion of the council and reports to the council once per month. All were in agreement. e council also voted to purchase 500 string bags to award to sports participants with Bronson Parks & Recreation on the bags. ese bags make great carry-alls for the children or volunteers. e bags could then be printed up with di erent types of sports or awards depending on the occasion. Because the programs overall goal is to be available and useful to the youth of the area in many ways, the annual Christmas in the Park event to be held on Dec. 21 at 6:30 p.m. was discussed. Clerk Brettel requested pizza and popcorn this year as she and others have wrapped up so many hot dogsŽ they would like to do something else. Councilman Jason Kennedy suggested that the Tri County DAV be contacted since they have all the equipment and know how to really do the cookout right. Kennedy said, I would rather be giving a donation to the DAVŽ and a decision to contact Fred Heinrich was made to see if this could be done. Santa is also expected to be at the event to listen to all the childrens wishes. Clerk Brettel discussed the new garbage rates for the Town of Bronson. e new totersŽ garbage collectors are in the process of being given out to customers. Clerk Brettel gave the new recommended rates as: in city … residential $14.50/mo. with one collector and two pickups per week; Commercial 1 with one collector and two pickups per week, $19.00; and Commercial 2 with two collectors and two pickups per week as $29.00/mo.; for out of the city … residential $18.13/mo., C1 $23.75/mo., and C2 $36.25/mo. Bronson Town Council News continued on page 2ABronson Parks & Recreation Needs a CoachIf you would like to be considered for a position as Coach for the Spring Baseball, Softball and T-Ball season for the Bronson Parks & Recreation Department give a call to: Curtis Stacy at (352) 486-2354.

PAGE 2

The Levy County Journal2ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Johnson, Michelle L Inglis FTA DWLSR KNOWINGLY $5,000 BOND Maxwell, Roderick Ocala WRIT OF BODILY ATTACHMENT $1,000 PURGE Shiver, Raymond Williston VOP GRAND THEFT NO BOND Gauger, Keith A Gainesville VOP GRAND THEFT, TRAFFIC IN STOLEN PROPERTYJail Media Report for 12/03/2012 to 12/10/2012 BAILEY, NICHOLAS LEE 23, OF BRONSON, FL: PROB VIOLATION. BARTKUS, DAWN MARIE 45, OF BRONSON, FL: OUT-OF-COUNTY WARRANT X 2. BELL, LATORIA SHANESE 27, OF CROSS CITY, FL: OUT-OF-COUNTY WARRANT. BINGAMAN, JUSTIN WAYNE 25, OF CHIEFLAND, FL: BATTERY TOUCH OR STRIKE; MISUSE 911 OR E911 SYSTEM. BISCHOFF, RONALD ROBERT 40, OF VINE GROVE, KY: PROB VIOLATION X 2. CARVER JR, TONY ARTHUR 39, OF HOMASSASSA, FL: DRIVE WHILE LIC SUSP 1ST OFF; OUT-OF-COUNTY-WARRANT X 3. COX, DAVID PAUL 33, OF CHIEFLAND, FL: HOLD FOR COURT. DARDEN, TERRY 50, OF BRONSON, FL: VIOL INJUNCTION PROTECTION DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. EDWARDS, JAMES DARRELL 40, OF INGLIS, FL: PROB VIOLATION. ESIEL, ELIZABETH ANN 21, OF INGLIS: OUTOF-COUNTY WARRANT. FLANDERS, JONATHON HOSE A, 46, OF CHIEFLAND, FL: BRAWLING FIGHTING CORRUPT PUBLIC MORAL DECENCY; OBSTRUCT WO VIOLENCE; BATTERY ON OFFICER FIREFIGHTER EMT ETC. FLOWERS, DIXIE LENORA 42, OF OLD TOWN, FL: RETAIL THEFT 300 MORE DOLS 2ND SUBSQ OFF; CNTRL SUB WO PRESCRIPTION.Levy County Sheri s O ce Arrest Report Levy County’s Most WantedHALL, HELEN 25, OF INGLIS, FL: FAILURE TO APPEAR. HAWTHORNE, RICHARD NATHAN 37, OF INGLIS, FL: BATTERY TOUCH OR STRIKE; TAMPERING IN FELONY 3RD DEGREE PROCEEDING. HILLARD, JEFFREY LYNN 43, HOMELESS: OUT-OF-COUNTYWARRANT. JAMES, ROBERT EARL 34, OF WILLISTON, FL: DRIVE WHILE LIC SUSP 2ND OFF. JONES, CARL HARRISON 53, OF BRONSON, FL: BATTERY TOUCH OR STRIKE. KEENE, JANE RUSBY 61, FANNING SPRINGS/ TRENTON, FL: MUNICIPAL ORDINANCE VIOL. LEWIS, LEE CLARENCE 25, OF WILLISTON, FL: W DEADLY WEAPON WITHOUT INTENT TO KILL X 3. MCKENZIE, WINSTON LEE 47, OF GAINESVILLE, FL: HOLD FOR OTHER AGENCY. MOORE, HOWARD THOMAS 18, OF CHIEFLAND, FL. LEWD LASCV BEHAVIOR MOLEST VIC LESS 12YOA OFFENDER 18 YOA OR OLDER X 4. PAYNE, TODD DAVID 43, OF BRONSON, FL: PROB VIOLATION. POINTER, LYLE LEROY 78, OF WILLISTON, FL: OUT-OF-COUNTY WARRANT. RATLEY, DANIEL THOMAS 33, OF BELL, FL: HOLD FOR OTHER AGENCY. SCHULER, SHANE ANTHONY 26, OF OLD TOWN, FL: DISORDER INTOX PUBLIC PLACE CAUSE DISTURBANCE; WITH VIOLENCE; OBSTRUCT WO VIOLENCE; DRUG EQUIPPOSSESS AND OR USE. SPROTT, SHAWN MICHAEL 29, OF JACKSONVILLE, FL: RE-ADMIT FROM COURT. STACY, STEVEN DEMAR 29, OF WILLISTON, FL: AGG BATTERY PERSON USES A DEADLY WEAPON; BATTERY TOUCH OR STRIKE. WESLEY, DERRICK JEROME 22, OF WILLISTON, FL: W DEADLY WEAPON WITHOUT INTENT TO KILL X 3. WILLIAMS, JAMES RUDOLPH III 30, OF WILLISTON, FL: W DEADLY WEAPON WITHOUT INTENT TO KILL X 3. Wilds, Dawn K Homosassa VOP DWLSR $15,000 BOND Service Jacks Land Have a safe and Happy Holiday!From the Levy County Journal Sta Our o ces will be closed December 24, 25 and 26 December 31, January 1 and 2Next up was Katherine Manuel, of Bronson Middle/ High School, who requested that Main Street be renamed as Martin Luther King Jr. Main Street. She suggested putting Martin Luther King on top of Main Street so addresses would not have to be changed. Manuel stated that motivation was missing due to the lack of celebrations for MLK. She also thanked the council for backing up Black History day. Manuel said,  e kids need something; right now they just have a homecoming ” oat. We need something every year to celebrate all the good that MLK did for everyone.Ž Councilman Edmondson made the motion to incorporate Martin Luther King on top of the Main Street name. e council also decided to name February 16, 2013 as Black History day with a celebration from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and a plea for more volunteers to help on that day. Councilman Berlon Weeks speaking about criteria for infrastructure said he is just waiting for the grants being applied for by Clerk Brettel. Brettel said she has applied for two grants from the Suwannee River Water Management District … one for $66,000 for the watershed management plan and the other for $22,500 to put in place a plan to encourage water conservation projects around the area. Councilman Kennedy spoke at length on the Bronson Industrial Committees plans to re-route tra c from the Court Street area which gets GPS tra c and pave a thruway for commercial tra c to be able to come into Bronson the back way without traveling on a dirt road. e council gave a lot of feedback on this plan to make Bronson more attractive to industry which will bring more jobs into the area. Councilman Kennedy also brought up the fact that Bronson Fire Chief Je DiMaggio was highly quali“ ed and had proven himself serving three years now. Kennedy mentioned a budgeted amount that was going to another department to do “ re reports and that DiMaggio was now doing them and he would like to give DiMaggio the extra $200 per month. He also requested that this be retroactive to October 1 of this year. is was approved unanimously.Bronson Town Council News continued from page 1ADixie CountyOn December 12 Ms. Minnie Melba Delaney, 86, of Old Town, was walking south across SR 55A in Dixie County while leading a horse she owned with 10-year-old Emma Maria Mercado of Old Town riding on the horse. It was just after 6 p.m. and getting dark. A 2002 Windstar van driven by John Mash was traveling eastbound at the same time on CR 55A. Mash did not see the horse with Mercado on it or Delaney walking beside it. ey were right in his lane of travel and the van struck them. Ms. Delaney was pronounced deceased on the scene by Dixie County EMS. e minor child, Mercado, was airlifted to Shands-UF Hospital in critical condition but succumbed to her injuries and was pronounced deceased at 12:07 a.m. on December 5, 2012.Alachua CountyA green Harley Davidson motorcycle ridden by Robert Eugene Sheppard, 64, of Archer, was traveling south on CR 241 approaching the intersection of SW 83 Ave. at about 6:35 p.m. on December 5. A construction zone with men working there was just north of SW 83 Ave. taking up the southbound lane. ere were signs half a mile and a quarter mile north of the construction zone warning the southbound tra c. A ” ag person, Earnest Lawrence Hall, 43, of Gainesville, wearing a re” ective vest and holding a re” ective stop sign was placed just north of the construction zone to direct tra c. Sheppard failed to see the ” ag person or the construction zone and struck Hall on his right side. Hall was transported to Shands Hospital with minor injuries. Sheppard was charged with Careless Driving. He was not wearing a helmet.Marion CountyA 2003 Chevrolet Impala driven by Linda Mitchell, 63, of Dunnellon, was traveling southbound on December 11 at 7:05 a.m. on CR 484 in the fog. Mitchell attempted to pass a southbound witness vehicle by moving into the northbound lane and into the path of a 2008 Hyundai Elantra driven by John Gri n. Mitchell struck Gri ns Hyundai head on. Both drivers were trapped in their vehicles and had to be extracted by Marion County Fire Rescue. Both drivers were seriously injured; however, Mitchell may have su ered a medical condition as a result of the crash and has been listed as critical at this time. Mitchell did have a seatbelt on. Charges are pending.St. Johns CountyA person unknown intentionally drove a 1004 Chevrolet Monte Carlo into the St. Johns River by placing a concrete block on the gas pedal. e Chevy traveled in a westerly direction on the north grass shoulder of SR 16 at the east end of the Shands Bridge. e vehicle then traveled over concrete pieces of the river breakfront and in to the water, submerging it up to the roof.From the Desk of the Williston Police DepartmentA female prisoner escaped from a DC work van December 11 on her return trip to the womens prison in Lowell. Prisoner Katherine Handy jumped from the van and tried to elude her Corrections O cer who continued to follow her in the van while calling 911 for help. e Corrections O cer kept the escapee in sight and called in the description and direction of travel throughout the chase. Code Enforcement O cer Wayne Carson and Police O cer Bryan Landis approached the escaped prisoner and took her into custody without further incident in the 100 block of North Main Street. e escapee was free for eight minutes. — submitted by Clay Connolly, WPD From the Florida Highway Patrol

PAGE 3

The Levy County Journal 3ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 FEMA is launching a new way to submit a request to change your propertys ” ood zone designation … with the Online Letter of Map Change (LOMC). If you believe your property has been inadvertently included in a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA), you may now request a change over the web, instead of by mail. e SFHA is the area that has a 1-percent or greater chance of ” ooding in any given year; this area is also referred to by some as the 1-percentannual-chance ” oodplain, base ” oodplain, or the 100-year ” oodplain. Applicants can use this new website instead of the MT-1 or MT-EZ paper forms. All home or property owners, their designated representatives, or professional surveyors and engineers, can use this online tool to conveniently submit required documents, property information, and payment information all in one place. e new Online LOMC o ers many advantages over paper forms: € Applicants may save information online and “ nish applying at their convenience € Clear and intuitive interface makes applying user-friendly € Eliminates time associated with the paper-based submission € Frequent applicants can manage multiple LOMC requests online € More e cient communications with LOMC processing sta € Applicants can check their application status in real-time Visit www.fema.gov/online-lomc to learn more!FEMA Launching Online Ability to Request a Change in Property Flood Zone Designation e Suwannee River Water Management District (District) is using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology to map ground elevations. Our goal is to map the entire District using to LiDAR to enhance our ability to identify ” ood prone areas, plan land management activities and develop water storage and recharge projects" said Erich Marzolf, Water Resource Division Director for the District. LiDAR is an optical remote sensing technology that measures the ground elevation using an airplane. A rapid collection of light points (more than 150,000 per second) are aimed at the ground surface, which, in turn, re” ects the light back to an emitter. A digital elevation model is created of the ground surface from the data that greatly improves ground level elevation accuracy from old elevation data of 10 feet and 5 feet to 2 or less feet elevation data using LiDAR. About 70% or 5,510 square miles of the District have been mapped using LiDAR technology. e Districts partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) will add 373 square miles of LIDAR mapping in 2013. Once this work is completed as planned, 78% of the District will have been mapped, leaving 1,695 square miles for future years' e orts. LiDAR measures the time that it takes a laser pulse to strike an object and return to the aircraft. It then records the laser angle and determines the distance using the travel time. From this information, the data is constructed where the re” ecting object is located and then converted into three dimensions. ese ” ights can only occur during the winter when leaves are less dense thus allowing the laser pulses to re” ect o the ground. e District has also previously partnered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Florida Department of Emergency Management, St. Johns River Water Management District, South West Florida Water Management District, Northwest Florida Water Management District and Alachua County to save its taxpayers money and to provide the best available mapping data for its communities.SRWMD Maps Regions Land Elevation with LiDAR, Light Detection Technology The Greater Chie and Area Chamber Of CommerceIs sending a Special ank Youto all the sponsors, donators and volunteers that made our 2012 Christmas Festival, 5K Run, Miss ChristmasŽ Pageant and Parade a wonderful experience and great success All Seasons Heating & Air Conditioning HardisonInk.com Badcock Home Furniture & More Gator Works Computing Bar-B-Que BillsHeirs-Baxley Funeral Home Beef OBradysHospice of the Nature Coast Bejeweled Custom Jewelers, IncJ & L Construction Burger KingJim King Realty Capital City BankLevy County Journal Chie” and Billiards & Sports Bar Levy County Citizen on Patrol Chie” and Chrysler-Dodge-JeepLife South Community Blood bank Chie” and Citizen/ Citrus PublishingMitchs Gold & Diamonds D & D Dance StudioNew Beginnings Entertainment Dakotah Winery & Vineyard Perkins State Bank Dekes Steak House Progress Energy Diana Childs PhotosSanta & Mrs. Claus Disabled American VeteransSpanns Heating & Air Conditioning Drummond Community Bank Star Computer II Edward Jones InvestmentsSubway of Chie” and Eva CeramicsSuwannee Valley Veterinary Clinic Furr-Ever-Furtography e Print Shop of Chie” and Gator Works ComputingTri-County Chiropractic Chie” and Walgreens Tri-County Uniforms ank You to all of our volunteers, entertainers, local organizations, pageant entries, 5K run participants, and our vendors. Your participation is what made this years Christmas & Winter Festival such a great success. Tales from a Florida CowmanBill OHara lives in Chie” and and is a cowboy storyteller par excellence. Bill has been cowboying for over 50 years and has some real stories to tell and they are all true! His grandparents came down to Florida from Georgia when there was nothing left after the War between the States (Civil War). ey loaded up the ox cart with all their belongings and settled in Sanford. And never left. Bill was born between just outside of Sanford and his father worked for what was then, Florida Power and Light. ey had 3 acres of land where Bill had a horse and a milk cow. Bills granddaddy worked other peoples farms and it looks like that bug bit Bill too. His granddaddy never had a drivers license or a car, just a horse for riding or hitching to a wagon. Bill says he remembers learning all about cowboying from his granddaddy, and about tobacco. His granddaddy chewed and spit and Bill said he was always wet after spending a day working and learning. Bill was cowboying at 5 years old and has not stopped since. e “ rst ranch he worked on his own was in Bifalo, Florida in 1960. At 20 years of age he married Ms. Jean and according to Bill, she can crack a whip with the rest of em. Bills oldest daughter said they had a rough life but a great upbringing with lots of Cowboys and Indians games, love and hard work. Bill now manages a hunting camp on CR 345 about three miles from Carter Store north of Chie” and and it suits him just “ ne. Ms. Jean is still working a job. Folks like these are why there is still a great generation. And Bill is going to share his stories with our readers. ese stories will make you laugh, remember and even learn a cracker lesson or two. We hope you enjoy them like we did.The Pony and the Milk CowsI was working at the Curt Farless dairy just outside of Orlando and the man who owned the dairy had a bunch of horses in the woods. I asked him if I could ride one down in the pasture to get the milk cows. ese cows were trouble to get to the barn and I was having to walk down to the gates and back. I picked out a pretty little buckskin “ lly and broke her. She wasnt hard to break and soon I was ridin instead of walkin after those cows. One day after I hadnt been riding her long, I was headed back to the milking barn and the horse was doing real good so I decided to roll me a PA (Prince Albert) cigarette. I laid the bridle reins across my lap and rolled my cigarette, no trouble. But when I struck, that sonof-gun jumped out from under me. I went o her backwards over her rump, landing on my head. It didnt hurt anything but my pride because Id been telling the guys in the barn about the bad horses I rode and the bad cows Id popped outa the brush … then I get sanded by a pony trailin behind a bunch of dairy cows. Moral of the story: e Cowboys in the dirt!! You can contact Bill for a CD at 352/493-2766 or write him at: 8151 NW 77 Place, Chie” and, 32626. Bronsons Christmas in the Park Dec. 21Come and tell Santa what you want at this years Christmas in the Park on Fri. Dec. 21 at 6:30 p.m. Join the celebration with a movie, free food and fun.

PAGE 4

The Levy County Journal4ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Taxing the Poor Thomas SowellCreators SyndicateWith all the talk about taxing the rich, we hear very little talk about taxing the poor. Yet the marginal tax rate on someone living in poverty can sometimes be higher than the marginal tax rate on millionaires. While it is true that nearly half the households in the country pay no income tax at all, the apparently simple word taxŽ has many complications that can be a challenge for even professional economists to untangle. If you de“ ne a tax as only those things that the government chooses to call a tax, you get a radically di erent picture from what you get when you say, If it looks like a tax, acts like a tax and takes away your resources like a tax, then its a tax.Ž One of the biggest, and one of the oldest, taxes in this latter sense is in” ation. Governments have stolen their peoples resources this way, not just for centuries, but for thousands of years. Hyperin” ation can take virtually your entire lifes savings, without the government having to bother raising the o cial tax rate at all. e Weimar Republic in Germany in the 1920s had thousands of printing presses turning out vast amounts of money, which the government could then spend to pay for whatever it wanted to pay for. Of course, prices skyrocketed with vastly more money in circulation. Many peoples life savings would not buy a loaf of bread. For all practical purposes, they had been robbed, big time. A rising demagogue coined the phrase starving billionaires,Ž because even a billion Deutschmarks was not enough to feed your family. at demagogue was Adolf Hitler, and the publics loss of faith in their irresponsible government may well have contributed toward his Nazi movements growth. Most in” ation does not reach that level, but the government can quietly steal a lot of your wealth with much lower rates of in” ation. For example a $100 bill at the end of the 20th century would buy less than a $20 bill would buy in 1960. If you put $1,000 in your piggy bank in 1960 and took it out to spend in 2000, you would discover that your money had, over time, lost 80 percent of its value. Despite all the political rhetoric today about how nobodys taxes will be raised, except for the rich,Ž in” ation transfers a percentage of everybodys wealth to a government that expands the money supply. Moreover, in” ation takes the same percentage from the poorest person in the country as it does from the richest. ats not all. Income taxes only transfer money from your current income to the government, but it does not touch whatever money you may have saved over the years. With in” ation, the government takes the same cut out of both. It is bad enough when the poorest have to turn over the same share of their assets to the government as the richest do, but it is grotesque when the government puts a bigger bite on the poorest. is can happen because the rich can more easily convert their assets from money into things like real estate, gold or other assets whose value rises with in” ation. But a welfare mother is unlikely to be able to buy real estate or gold. She can put a few dollars aside in a jar somewhere. But wherever she may hide it, in” ation can steal value from it without having to lay a hand on it. No wonder the Federal Reserve uses fancy words like quantitative easing,Ž instead of saying in plain English that they are essentially just printing more money. e biggest and most deadly taxŽ rate on the poor comes from a loss of various welfare state bene“ ts-food stamps, housing subsidies and the like-if their income goes up. Someone who is trying to climb out of poverty by working their way up can easily reach a point where a $10,000 increase in pay can cost them $15,000 in lost bene“ ts that they no longer qualify for. at amounts to a marginal tax rate of 150 percent-far more than millionaires pay. Some government policies help some people at the expense of other people. But some policies can hurt welfare recipients, the taxpayers and others, all at the same time, even though in di erent ways. Why? Because we are too easily impressed by lofty political rhetoric and too little interested in the reality behind the words. omas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His Web site is www.tsowell.com. To “ nd out more about omas Sowell and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page at www.creators.com. COPYRIGHT 2012 CREATORS.COM OPINIONSince the Spanish-American War, the United States has had a poor record of preparing against future threats. We cut vital development needed to meet future foes, losing lives and treasure until we wake up from our self-in” icted slumber. We used to call it short-sightedness. Today we call it Sequestration.Ž e biggest bullies on the planet stating their aim to harm America are Iran, North Korea, and trans-national, radical Muslim extremists. While those in the rogue states are launching their tirades, they are also launching real missiles. Trans-national radicals become ready allies in this newest way to threaten America with limited resources. ese ballistic bullies should be the focus of our limited funds. When Nazi Germany embarked on a new militarism in 1934, few could grasp the threat from a country defeated 15 years prior. Germany quietly developed its airpower with hidden pilots and technicians. Most of Europe ignored the threat when a vibrant, dangerous air capability arose. Only Britain had sense to commit a reluctant sliver of funds to nascent radar technology and superior “ ghter aircraft design. Even prophets like Winston Churchill could not fathom costal radar stations and Spit“ res becoming the defense of the entire free world when Britain stood alone in the summer of 1940. In 2009, President Obama declared that Iran possessed technology capable of reaching Europe.Ž If our intelligence experts are correct, Irans ballistic missiles could follow by 2015. If the President felt this threat was real enough to declare, then policy makers have a moral imperative to correctly identify and back the technologies to meet it. In the next few years, the missile threat will only grow. Iran and North Korea are pressing a capacity to deliver a nuclear weapon to the U.S. mainland. Intelligence indicates their cooperation in this e ort. Reports emerged in September that these two countries are now sharing scientists and nuclear and missile technology. If both countries acquire the capacity to reach the U.S. with missiles, we must have the technology needed to defend against a coordinated missile attack. Fortunately, a recent live-“ re missile defense test demonstrated our ability to defend against these threats. e system test -called FTI-01 -took place on October 26 and marked the most complex missile defense ” ight test in history. e test peppered our missile defense capability by throwing “ ve ballistic and cruise missile attacks at it simultaneously. e test employed the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD), the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD), the Patriot Weapon System, the Army Navy/Transportable Radar Surveillance radar (AN/TPY-2 Radar), and the Command, Control, Battle Management and Communications (C2BMC). ese might seem like high-tech duplications, but each plays a vital role in keeping the United States safe from a coordinated attack from abroad. Sadly, many are on the chopping block. Cutting these programs ignores current threats, historical precedent -and American safety. Just look at the AN/TPY-2 Radar -the most advanced mobile radar system in the world. is technology provides extraordinarily precise tracking of ballistic missiles. It can even make nuanced determinations -distinguishing between an actual warhead and a decoy. Policy hacks have put a halt to the Missile Defense Agencys purchase of seven more of them. One of the seven cut may survive in the restructured FY 2014 budget. Completing it will bring Americas total stock of AN/TPY-2 radars to twelve -a good start, but still far fewer than our military commanders have deemed necessary. Congress should safeguard enough funding for the survival of this capability. is is not defense industry hyperbole. Consider that Iran has not hesitated to develop threatening technologies. Iran recently paraded a new system designed to combat American “ ghter jets, drones, helicopters and, of course, cruise missiles. Earlier this month, it is likely that they conducted a test against one of our drones. Iranian-backed Hamas is launching deadly attacks against innocents in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, forcing retaliation strikes against suspected missile sites in Gaza. e future threat is clear. Ten years from now, we can only hope we can re” ect how policy makers took the risk, curbed the urge of wasteful entitlement spending, and carved out a sliver for the missile defense programs that saved thousands of American lives. LTC Steve Russell, US Army, (Ret.), was a major “ gure in the capture of Saddam Hussein and is the author of We Got Him!Ž A Memoir of the Hunt and Capture of Saddam Hussein (Simon & Schuster, 2011). He is an infantry veteran of Kosovo, Kuwait, Afghanistan and Iraq. He is also a military analyst for Concerned Veterans for America and served as the Chairman of the Veterans A airs Committee in the Oklahoma Senate. Michelle MalkinCreators SyndicateMessage for wealth-bashing millionaire actor Ed Asner: Man up and take responsibility for lying to Americas schoolchildren. Confronted by a producer for Fox News Channels  e Sean Hannity ShowŽ this week, the left-wing celebrity claimed he couldnt remember a thing (he) saidŽ on a vile propaganda video produced and published by the California Federation of Teachers. Asner narrated the unforgettable eight-minute anti-capitalist screed geared toward children. ink Occupy Wall Street meets Sesame Street.  ings go downhill in a happy and prosperous land after the rich decide they dont want to pay taxes anymore,Ž Asner warbles in a folksy grandpa voice. After education reform journalist Kyle Olson of EAGNews.org blew the whistle on the “ lms vulgar cartoon depiction of a richŽ man urinating on the poor,Ž the teachers union whitewashed the animated images from the video. While the Occupy-cheerleading teachers have to concoct such fantasy scenes, informed Americans remember that it was the Occupiers themselves who openly defecated in the streets. Whats even more grossly comical is the sight of pampered Asner shilling for the progressiveŽ war on prosperity while ignoring Big Labors own self-serving evasion of their fair shareŽ in taxes. e California Federation of Teachers, an AFL-CIO a liate that rakes in an estimated $22 million in coerced dues, enjoys nonpro“ t, tax-exempt 501(c)(5) status. So does CFTs larger counterpart, the California Teachers Association, which collects a whopping $300 million in annual dues. While they burn through mountains of dues lobbying for everyone else to pay higher taxes, these Democratic partisan heavies pay nothing in either federal or state income taxes. Zero, zip, nada. In theory, the unions are entitled to this special status because their primaryŽ purpose is to secure better working conditions, wages and similar bene“ tsŽ for their members. In practice, of course, the unions are Democratic Party front groups that shovel hundreds of millions of dollars to liberal causes and candidates -against the will of their rank-and-“ le members and often without their knowledge. Mark Levins ever-vigilant Landmark Legal Foundation has pressured the Internal Revenue Service for more than a decade to force national teachers unions to “ le proper federal reporting and IRS statements regarding their hidden political expenditures. ( e overwhelmingly Democratic donations are not tax-exempt.) As a result of Landmarks investigative work, the Wisconsin Education Association admitted in 2006 that it had failed to pay more than $171,000 in federal taxes on Democratic political expenditures. Given the immense di culty that dissenting teachers across the country have had in challenging the abuse of their dues for political purposes, its clear this is the tip of Big Labors tax-evasion iceberg. In addition, the national parent organizations of the CFT and CTA also bene“ t from widespread property tax exemptions on their ownership of lavish real estate used for union brass vacations and retreats. Fox Business Network reporter Elizabeth MacDonalds investigation of IRS records earlier this year shed light on several tax-sheltered, union-owned luxury hotels, golf courses and country clubs -including the swankyŽ AFL-CIO-owned Westin Diplomat resort in Florida and the UAWs $33 million lakeside resort and golf club in Onaway, Mich. What the documents dont show,Ž FBN noted, is whether union members like teachers, “ remen and cops get invited to these junkets -or even approve of or know about the use of their dues to outright buy and run resorts, or spend on junkets, among other things.Ž en theres the Obamacare Cadillac tax exemption for unions. Delivered behind closed doors and out of sight of C-SPAN cameras, the Obama White House cut a lucrative sweetheart deal with AFL-CIO, Service Employees International Union and other labor groups to shield them from the federal health care mandates steep 40 percent excise tax on high-cost health care plans. e 90 percent of Americans who dont belong to unions and participate in these plans must pay their fair shareŽ beginning in 2013. But Big Labors cozy Cadillac tax escape clause is e ective until 2018. Even after that deadline, union dental and vision plans will remain exempt. e cost? $60 billion in foregone tax revenue. Who are the greedy, sel“ sh, “ lthy-rich tax evaders pissing on the poor and politically unconnected now? Michelle Malkin is the author of Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks and CroniesŽ (Regnery 2010). Her e-mail address is malkinblog@gmail.com. COPYRIGHT 2012 CREATORS.COM LEVY PUBLISHING, LLCThe Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by Levy Publishing, LLC 440 S. Court St., Bronson, FL. 32621. Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL. (USPS 310-780).POSTMASTER:Send address changes to:Levy County Journal P.O. Box 159 Bronson, FL 32621-0159CONTACT INFORMATION:Linda Cooper General Manager Kathy Hilliard Editor Michel Bell Of ce Manager Christina Cozart – Ad Design/ Graphics/Layout advertising@levyjournal.com classi eds@levyjournal.com legals@levyjournal.comBronson: (352) 486-2312 Fax: (352) 486-5042 Chie and: (352) 490-4462 Fax: 352) 490-4490Reproduction of the contents of this publication in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher’s liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the space occupied by the error. Deadline for all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday. Classi ed deadline is noon Friday. Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Letter to the EditorBallistic Bullies and Balanced BudgetsHey, Fat Cat Unions: Pay Your “Fair Share”

PAGE 5

The Levy County Journal 5ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Complete and clip this coupon and send it with a check, money order, or credit card information to PO Box 2990, Chie” and, FL 32644 Yearly subscription prices are as follows: $25/ year for subscribers in Levy County $30/year for subscribers in Florida; $35/year for subscribers outside FloridaName: _____________________________________________ Daytime Phone________________________________________ Address:____________________________________________ City:_________________________State__ __ Zip ___________ VISA MASTERCARD Card Number:______________________Expiration Date: ________ Security Code (3-digit number on back): _____ Your Locally-Owned Paper of Record since 1923JournalLevy County Last Week’s CrosswordLast Week’s Word Search Word SearchAlly Begin Blown Bought Break Chores Courts Cowboys Cubs Dads Departments Drop Ease Equated Erase Eyes Fans Fried Gain Germ Glory Glow Gone Grew Grin Hour Idea Into Ironed Lame Learn Near Neighborhood Nice Pace Pass Pebbles Port Rate Removed Sang Seize Shift Snack Sweater Text us Tide Tied Urge Wash Worry not Windows lovers, Windows 8 is not as scary to use as you think! All new operating systems will have their own sets of glitches to be discovered and reported to its creator for “ xing. at being said, we generally recommend that people wait a while before trying out any new operating systems. However, if you happen to be one of those people who rushed out and bought Windows 8 when it was released, have no fear. We have a few tips and tricks that will make it feel more like the original Windows you know and love while still taking full advantage of all the new features. e main visual di erence between Windows 7 and Windows 8 is the Start menu. In Windows 7 the Start Menu is located on the bottom left hand corner of the taskbar on the desktop. In the new Windows 8 the Start menu is a separate metroŽ style page all its own with a user menu called StartŽ. Once on the desktop we feel lost without a standard start menu to “ nd our system tools, programs, and games. For those who want to return to having the older style of Start menu, Windows 8 has no option to do that built in by default, but the new Windows App Store does. If youd like to install one in Windows 8, open your Metro interface and click on the App StoreŽ located in the new Metro Start Menu. Next, place your mouse in the bottom right corner of your screen to populate your new Options bar (this is a feature built into the new Metro menu). When it comes up you will see options for SearchŽ, ShareŽ, StartŽ, DevicesŽ, and SettingsŽ. Click on Search and your search menu will populate giving you the option of typing in exactly what you are looking for. is is where you want to type Start Menu for Windows 8Ž and select the option to search for this in the StoreŽ application. You will now see the results page where you will “ nd di erent styles of Start Menus to choose from. One of the “ rst two options you should see are Pokki Start Menu for Windows 8Ž that provides a fresh new way of utilizing your Start menu. It has all the standard items from your normal Start menu and has incorporated the applications from the Metro Start menu as well. is e ectively makes your Start menu a one stop place to do it all. e second option is Classic Start 8Ž that provides you with an exact copy of the Windows 7 style start menu. is application brings back the familiar Start menu button and look from the previous versions, making Windows 8 feel a little more like home again. Both of these particular applications require you to click the link provided to go to the publishers website to download the application. Once you have the Start menu of your choosing, you can get back to doing almost everything you need to o of your desktop again. You can sit back, relax, and take your time getting to know the new operating system and all its features and “ nd ways to make it more familiar as needed. Look forward to more tips on getting Windows 8 set up the way you want over the next few weeks. If you have any further questions on how to get started, please feel free to give us a call. We will be more than happy to set up an in-shop appointment with one of our established technicians to sit with you and assist with setting up your new Windows 8 operating system. computer tips Windows 8 Tips & Tricks gator works computing 352-493-1006Ask About Our GWC Pro Care Total Technology Solutions! www.gatorworks.com4 WEST PARK AVENUE, CHIEFLAND, FL 32626 History in the Pictures ese pictures will bring back memories for some. For others they will add to your history lessons. Enjoy. (1) Chuck Norris and Bruce Lee (2) Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong (3) Martin Luther King Jr. And Marlon Brando (4) Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Warren G. Harding, and Harvey Firestone, 1921 (5) Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash (6) Paul Newman and Clint Eastwood1 2 3 4 5 6

PAGE 6

The Levy County Journal6ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Editors Note: On Friday of last week the 71st remembrance of the infamous attack on Pearl Harbor passed us by. Since that attack on America, research through Freedom of Information Act requests and journalistic skills shows that there might be more to the story than most of us are aware of. Below is writer James Perlo s “ ndings which have a strange parallel to the present and past worldwide confrontations. We present it to you for your reading and personal decision on its implications now. e art of thinking out of the boxŽ is acquired by taking facts as you “ nd them and properly weighing those facts by the moral parameters at your disposal. ose moral parameters may be di erent culturally and educationally for di erent groups which explains why the same facts present themselves with di erent outcomes. People may inherit a boxŽ from upbringing and education but through age and wisdom and choices, thinking out of that box brings them closer to a deeper understanding of our world as it really is. Kathy Hilliard, EditorWritten by James Perloff On Sunday, December 7, 1941, Japan launched a sneak attack on the U.S. Paci“ c Fleet at Pearl Harbor, shattering the peace of a beautiful Hawaiian morning and leaving much of the ” eet broken and burning. e destruction and death that the Japanese military visited upon Pearl Harbor that day „ 18 naval vessels (including eight battleships) sunk or heavily damaged, 188 planes destroyed, over 2,000 servicemen killed „ were exacerbated by the fact that American commanders in Hawaii were caught by surprise. But that was not the case in Washington. Comprehensive research has not only shown Washington knew in advance of the attack, but deliberately withheld its foreknowledge from our commanders in Hawaii in the hope that the "surprise" attack would catapult the U.S. into World War II. Oliver Lyttleton, British Minister of Production, stated in 1944: "Japan was provoked into attacking America at Pearl Harbor. It is a travesty of history to say that America was forced into the war." Although FDR desired to directly involve the United States in the Second World War, his intentions sharply contradicted his public pronouncements. A pre-war Gallup poll showed 88 percent of Americans opposed U.S. involvement in the European war. Citizens realized that U.S. participation in World War I had not made a better world, and in a 1940 (election-year) speech, Roosevelt typically stated: "I have said this before, but I shall say it again and again and again: Your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars." But privately, the president planned the opposite. Roosevelt dispatched his closest advisor, Harry Hopkins, to meet British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in January 1941. Hopkins told Churchill: e President is determined that we [the United States and England] shall win the war together. Make no mistake about it. He has sent me here to tell you that at all costs and by all means he will carry you through, no matter what happens to him „ there is nothing he will not do so far as he has human power." William Stevenson noted in A Man Called Intrepid that AmericanBritish military sta talks began that same month under "utmost secrecy," which, he clari“ ed, "meant preventing disclosure to the American public." Even Robert Sherwood, the president's friendly biographer, said: "If the isolationists had known the full extent of the secret alliance between the United States and Britain, their demands for impeachment would have rumbled like thunder throughout the land."Background to BetrayalRoosevelt's intentions were nearly exposed in 1940 when Tyler Kent, a code clerk at the U.S. embassy in London, discovered secret dispatches between Roosevelt and Churchill. ese revealed that FDR „ despite contrary campaign promises „ was determined to engage America in the war. Kent smuggled some of the documents out of the embassy, hoping to alert the American public „ but was caught. With U.S. government approval, he was tried in a secret British court and con“ ned to a British prison until the war's end. During World War II's early days, the president o ered numerous provocations to Germany: freezing its assets; shipping 50 destroyers to Britain; and depth-charging U-boats. e Germans did not retaliate, however. ey knew America's entry into World War I had shifted the balance of power against them, and they shunned a repeat of that scenario. FDR therefore switched his focus to Japan. Japan had signed a mutual defense pact with Germany and Italy (the Tripartite Treaty). Roosevelt knew that if Japan went to war with the United States, Germany and Italy would be compelled to declare war on America „ thus entangling us in the European con” ict by the back door. As Harold Ickes, secretary of the Interior, said in October 1941: "For a long time I have believed that our best entrance into the war would be by way of Japan." Much new light has been shed on Pearl Harbor through the recent work of Robert B. Stinnett, a World War II Navy veteran. Stinnett has obtained numerous relevant documents through the Freedom of Information Act. In Day of Deceit: e Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor (2000), the book so brusquely dismissed by director Bruckheimer, Stinnett reveals that Roosevelt's plan to provoke Japan began with a memorandum from Lieutenant Commander Arthur H. McCollum, head of the Far East desk of the O ce of Naval Intelligence. e memorandum advocated eight actions predicted to lead Japan into attacking the United States. McCollum wrote: "If by these means Japan could be led to commit an overt act of war, so much the better." FDR enacted all eight of McCollum's provocative steps „ and more. While no one can excuse Japan's belligerence in those days, it is also true that our government provoked that country in various ways „ freezing her assets in America; closing the Panama Canal to her shipping; progressively halting vital exports to Japan until we “ nally joined Britain in an all-out embargo; sending a hostile note to the Japanese ambassador implying military threats if Tokyo did not alter its Paci“ c policies; and on November 26th „ just 11 days before the Japanese attack „ delivering an ultimatum that demanded, as prerequisites to resumed trade, that Japan withdraw all troops from China and Indochina, and in e ect abrogate her Tripartite Treaty with Germany and Italy. After meeting with President Roosevelt on October 16, 1941, Secretary of War Henry Stimson wrote in his diary: "We face the delicate question of the diplomatic fencing to be done so as to be sure Japan is put into the wrong and makes the “ rst bad move „ overt move." On November 25th, the day before the ultimatum was sent to Japan's ambassadors, Stimson wrote in his diary: e question was how we should maneuver them [the Japanese] into the position of “ ring the “ rst shot...." e bait o ered Japan was our Paci“ c Fleet. In 1940, Admiral J.O. Richardson, the ” eet's commander, ” ew to Washington to protest FDR's decision to permanently base the ” eet in Hawaii instead of its normal berthing on the U.S. West Coast. e admiral had sound reasons: Pearl Harbor was vulnerable to attack, being approachable from any direction; it could not be e ectively rigged with nets and ba es to defend against torpedo planes; and in Hawaii it would be hard to supply and train crews for his undermanned vessels. Pearl Harbor also lacked adequate fuel supplies and dry docks, and keeping men far from their families would create morale problems. e argument became heated. Said Richardson: "I came away with the impression that, despite his spoken word, the President was fully determined to put the United States into the war if Great Britain could hold out until he was reelected." Richardson was quickly relieved of command. Replacing him was Admiral Husband E. Kimmel. Kimmel also informed Roosevelt of Pearl Harbor's de“ ciencies, but accepted placement there, trusting that Washington would notify him of any intelligence pointing to attack. is proved to be misplaced trust. As Washington watched Japan preparing to assault Pearl Harbor, Admiral Kimmel, as well as his Army counterpart in Hawaii, General Walter C. Short, were completely sealed o from the information pipeline.Prior KnowledgeOne of the most important elements in America's foreknowledge of Japan's intentions was our government's success in cracking Japan's secret diplomatic code known as "Purple." Tokyo used it to communicate to its embassies and consulates, including those in Washington and Hawaii. e code was so complex that it was enciphered and deciphered by machine. A talented group of American cryptoanalysts broke the code in 1940 and devised a facsimile of the Japanese machine. ese, utilized by the intelligence sections of both the War and Navy departments, swiftly revealed Japan's diplomatic messages. e deciphered texts were nicknamed "Magic." Copies of Magic were always promptly delivered in locked pouches to President Roosevelt, and the secretaries of State, War, and Navy. ey also went to Army Chief of Sta General George Marshall and to the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Harold Stark. However, although three Purple decoding machines were allotted to Britain, none were sent to Pearl Harbor. Intercepts of ciphered messages radioed between Tokyo and its Honolulu consulate had to be forwarded to Washington for decrypting. us Kimmel and Short, the Hawaiian commanders, were at the mercy of Washington for feedback. A request for their own decoding machine was rebu ed on the grounds that diplomatic tra c was of insu cient interest to soldiers. How untrue that was! On October 9, 1941, the War Department decoded a Tokyo-to-Honolulu dispatch instructing the Consul General to divide Pearl Harbor into “ ve speci“ ed areas and to report the exact locations of American ships therein. ere is nothing unusual about spies watching ship movements „ but reporting precise whereabouts of ships in dock has only one implication. Charles Willoughby, Douglas MacArthur's chief of intelligence later wrote that the "reports were on a grid system of the inner harbor with coordinate locations of American men of war ... coordinate grid is the classical method for pinpoint target designation; our battleships had suddenly become targets." is information was never sent to Kimmel or Short. Additional intercepts were decoded by Washington, all within one day of their original transmission: € November 5th: Tokyo noti“ ed its Washington ambassadors that November 25th was the deadline for an agreement with the U.S. € November 11th: ey were warned, e situation is nearing a climax, and the time is getting short." € November 16th: e deadline was pushed up to November 29th. e deadline absolutely cannot be changed," the dispatch said. "After that, things are automatically going to happen." € November 29th (the U.S. ultimatum had now been received): e ambassadors were told a rupture in negotiations was "inevitable," but that Japan's leaders "do not wish you to give the impression that negotiations are broken o ." € November 30th: Tokyo ordered its Berlin embassy to inform the Germans that "the breaking out of war may come quicker than anyone dreams." € December 1st: e deadline was again moved ahead. "[T]o prevent the United States from becoming unduly suspicious, we have been advising the press and others that ... the negotiations are continuing." € December 1st-2nd: e Japanese embassies in non-Axis nations around the world were directed to dispose of their secret documents and all but one copy of their codes. ( is was for a reason easy to fathom „ when war breaks out, the diplomatic o ces of a hostile state lose their immunity and are normally overtaken. One copy of code was retained so that “ nal instructions could be received, after which the last code copy would be destroyed.) An additional warning came via the so-called "winds" message. A November 18th intercept indicated that, if a break in U.S. relations were forthcoming, Tokyo would issue a special radio warning. is would not be in the Purple code, as it was intended to reach consulates and lesser agencies of Japan not equipped with the code or one of its machines. e message, to be repeated three times during a weather report, was "Higashi no kaze ame," meaning "East wind, rain." "East wind" signi“ ed the United States; "rain" signi“ ed diplomatic split „ in e ect, war. is prospective message was deemed so signi“ cant that U.S. radio monitors were constantly watching for it, and the Navy Department typed it up on special reminder cards. On December 4th, "Higashi no kaze ame" was indeed broadcast and picked up by Washington intelligence. On three di erent occasions since 1894, Japan had made surprise attacks coinciding with breaks in diplomatic relations. is history was not lost on President Roosevelt. Secretary Stimson, describing FDR's White House conference of November 25th, noted: e President said the Japanese were notorious for making an attack without warning and stated that we might be attacked, say next Monday, for example." Nor was it lost on Washington's senior military o cers, all of them War College graduates. As Robert Stinnett has revealed, Washington was not only deciphering Japanese diplomatic messages, but naval dispatches as well. President Roosevelt had access to these intercepts via his routing o cer, Lieutenant Commander McCollum, who had authored the original eight-point plan of provocation to Japan. So much secrecy has surrounded these naval dispatches that their existence was not revealed during any of the ten Pearl Harbor investigations, even the mini-probe Congress conducted in 1995. Most of Stinnett's requests for documents concerning Pearl Harbor have been denied as still classi“ ed, even under the Freedom of Information Act. It was long presumed that as the Japanese ” eet approached Pearl Harbor, it maintained complete radio silence. is is untrue. e ” eet barely observed discretion, let alone silence. Naval intelligence intercepted and translated numerous dispatches, some clearly revealing that Pearl Harbor had been targeted. e most signi“ cant was the following, sent by Admiral Yamamoto to the Japanese First Air Fleet on November 26, 1941: e task force, keeping its movement strictly secret and maintaining close guard against submarines and aircraft, shall advance into Hawaiian waters, and upon the very opening of hostilities shall attack the main force of the United States ” eet and deal it a mortal blow. e “ rst air raid is planned for the dawn of x-day. Exact date to be given by later order. So much o cial secrecy continues to surround the translations of the intercepted Japanese naval dispatches that it is not known if the foregoing message was sent to McCollum or seen by FDR. It is not even known who originally translated the intercept. One thing, however, is certain: e message's signi“ cance could not have been lost on the translator. 1941 also witnessed the following: On January 27th, our ambassador to Japan, Joseph Grew, sent a message to Washington stating: e Peruvian Minister has informed a member of my sta that he has heard from many sources, including a Japanese source, that in the event of trouble breaking out between the United States and Japan, the Japanese intended to make a surprise attack against Pearl Harbor with all their strength...." On November 3rd, still relying on informants, Grew noti“ ed Secretary of State Cordell Hull: "War with the United States may come with dramatic and dangerous suddenness." He sent an even stronger warning on November 17th. Congressman Martin Dies would write: Early in 1941 the Dies Committee came into possession of a strategic map which gave clear proof of the intentions of the Japanese to make an assault on Pearl Harbor. e strategic map was prepared by the Japanese Imperial Military Pearl Harbor: Hawaii Was Surprised; FDR Was Not

PAGE 7

The Levy County Journal 7ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Intelligence Department. As soon as I received the document I telephoned Secretary of State Cordell Hull and told him what I had. Secretary Hull directed me not to let anyone know about the map and stated that he would call me as soon as he talked to President Roosevelt. In about an hour he telephoned to say that he had talked to Roosevelt and they agreed that it would be very serious if any information concerning this map reached the news services.... I told him it was a grave responsibility to withhold such vital information from the public. e Secretary assured me that he and Roosevelt considered it essential to national defense. Dusko Popov was a Yugoslav who worked as a double agent for both Germany and Britain. His true allegiance was to the Allies. In the summer of 1941, the Nazis ordered Popov to Hawaii to make a detailed study of Pearl Harbor and its nearby air“ elds. e agent deduced that the mission betokened a surprise attack by the Japanese. In August, he fully reported this to the FBI in New York. J. Edgar Hoover later bitterly recalled that he had provided warnings to FDR about Pearl Harbor, but that Roosevelt told him not to pass the information any further and to just leave it in his (the president's) hands. Kilsoo Haan, of the Sino-Korean People's League, received de“ nite word from the Korean underground that the Japanese were planning to assault Hawaii "before Christmas." In November, after getting nowhere with the State Department, Haan convinced Iowa Senator Guy Gillette of his claim's merit. Gillette briefed the president, who laconically thanked him and said it would be looked into. In Java, in early December, the Dutch Army decoded a dispatch from Tokyo to its Bangkok embassy, forecasting attacks on four sites including Hawaii. e Dutch passed the information to Brigadier General Elliot orpe, the U.S. military observer. orpe sent Washington a total of four warnings. e last went to General Marshall's intelligence chief. orpe was ordered to send no further messages concerning the matter. e Dutch also had their Washington military attach, Colonel Weijerman, personally warn General Marshall. Captain Johann Ranneft, the Dutch naval attach in Washington, who was awarded the Legion of Merit for his services to America, recorded revealing details in his diary. On December 2nd, he visited the O ce of Naval Intelligence (ONI). Ranneft inquired about the Paci“ c. An American o cer, pointing to a wall map, said, is is the Japanese Task Force proceeding East." It was a spot midway between Japan and Hawaii. On December 6th, Ranneft returned and asked where the Japanese carriers were. He was shown a position on the map about 300-400 miles northwest of Pearl Harbor. Ranneft wrote: "I ask what is the meaning of these carriers at this location; whereupon I receive the answer that it is probably in connection with Japanese reports of eventual American action.... I myself do not think about it because I believe that everyone in Honolulu is 100 percent on the alert, just like everyone here at O.N.I." On November 29th, Secretary of State Cordell Hull secretly met with freelance newspaper writer Joseph Leib. Leib had formerly held several posts in the Roosevelt administration. Hull knew him and felt he was one newsman he could trust. e secretary of state handed him copies of some of the Tokyo intercepts concerning Pearl Harbor. He said the Japanese were planning to strike the base and that FDR planned to let it happen. Hull made Leib pledge to keep his name out of it, but hoped he could blow the story sky-high in the newspapers. Leib ran to the o ce of his friend Lyle Wilson, the Washington bureau chief of United Press. While keeping his pledge to Hull, he told Wilson the details and showed him the intercepts. Wilson replied that the story was ludicrous and refused to run it. rough connections, Leib managed to get a hurried version onto UP's foreign cable, but only one newspaper carried any part of it. After Pearl Harbor, Lyle Wilson called Leib to his o ce. He handed him a copy of FDR's just-released "day of infamy" speech. e two men wept. Leib recounted his story in the recent History Channel documentary, "Sacri“ ce at Pearl Harbor." e foregoing represents just a sampling of evidence that Washington knew in advance of the Pearl Harbor attack. For additional evidences, see Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian John Toland, and Day of Deceit: e Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor by Robert Stinnett.* So certain was the data that, at a private press brie“ ng in November 1941, General George Marshall con“ dently predicted that a Japanese-American war would break out during the "“ rst ten days of December." However, none of this information was passed to our commanders in Hawaii, Kimmel and Short, with the exception of Ambassador Grew's January warning, a copy of which reached Kimmel on February 1st. To allay any concerns, Lieutenant Commander McCollum „ who originated the plan to incite Japan to war „ wrote Kimmel: "Naval Intelligence places no credence in these rumors. Furthermore, based on known data regarding the present disposition and deployment of Japanese naval and army forces, no move against Pearl Harbor appears imminent or planned for in the foreseeable future."Sitting DucksTo ensure a successful Japanese attack „ one that would enrage America into joining the war „ it was vital to keep Kimmel and Short out of the intelligence loop. However, Washington did far more than this to facilitate the Japanese assault. On November 25th, approximately one hour after the Japanese attack force left port for Hawaii, the U.S. Navy issued an order forbidding U.S. and Allied shipping to travel via the North Paci“ c. All transpaci“ c shipping was rerouted through the South Paci“ c. is order was even applied to Russian ships docked on the American west coast. e purpose is easy to fathom. If any commercial ship accidentally stumbled on the Japanese task force, it might alert Pearl Harbor. As Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner, the Navy's War Plans o cer in 1941, frankly stated: "We were prepared to divert tra c when we believed war was imminent. We sent the tra c down via the Torres Strait, so that the track of the Japanese task force would be clear of any tra c." e Hawaiian commanders have traditionally been censured for failing to detect the approaching Japanese carriers. What goes unsaid is that Washington denied them the means to do so. An army marching overland toward a target is easily spotted. But Hawaii is in the middle of the ocean. Its approaches are limitless and uninhabited. During the week before December 7th, naval aircraft searched more than two million square miles of the Paci“ c „ but never saw the Japanese force. is is because Kimmel and Short had only enough planes to survey one-third of the 360-degree arc around them, and intelligence had advised (incorrectly) that they should concentrate on the Southwest. Radar, too, was insu cient. ere were not enough trained surveillance pilots. Many of the reconnaissance craft were old and su ered from a lack of spare parts. e commanders' repeated requests to Washington for additional patrol planes were turned down. Rear Admiral Edward T. Layton, who served at Pearl Harbor, summed it up in his book And I Was ere: ere was never any hint in any intelligence received by the local command of any Japanese threat to Hawaii. Our air defenses were stripped on orders from the army chief himself. Of the twelve B-17s on the island, only six could be kept in the air by cannibalizing the others for spare parts." e Navy has traditionally followed the rule that, when international relations are critical, the ” eet puts to sea. at is exactly what Admiral Kimmel did. Aware that U.S.-Japanese relations were deteriorating, he sent 46 warships safely into the North Paci“ c in late November 1941 „ without notifying Washington. He even ordered the ” eet to conduct a mock air raid on Pearl Harbor, clairvoyantly selecting the same launch site Admiral Yamamoto chose two weeks later. When the White House learned of Kimmel's move it countermanded his orders and ordered all ships returned to dock, using the dubious excuse that Kimmel's action might provoke the Japanese. Washington knew that if the two ” eets met at sea, and engaged each other, there might be questions about who “ red the “ rst shot. Kimmel did not give up, however. With the exercise canceled, his carrier chief, Vice Admiral William "Bull" Halsey, issued plans for a 25-ship task force to guard against an "enemy air and submarine attack" on Pearl Harbor. e plan never went into e ect. On November 26th, Admiral Stark, Washington's Chief of Naval Operations, ordered Halsey to use his carriers to transport “ ghter planes to Wake and Midway islands „ further depleting Pearl Harbor's air defenses. It was clear, of course, that once disaster struck Pearl Harbor, there would be demands for accountability. Washington seemed to artfully take this into account by sending an ambiguous "war warning" to Kimmel, and a similar one to Short, on November 27th. is has been used for years by Washington apologists to allege that the commanders should have been ready for the Japanese. Indeed, the message began conspicuously: is dispatch is to be considered a war warning." But it went on to state: e number and equipment of Japanese troops and the organizations of naval task forces indicates an amphibious expedition against the Philippines, ai or Kra Peninsula, or possibly Borneo." None of these areas were closer than 5,000 miles to Hawaii! No threat to Pearl Harbor was hinted at. It ended with the words: "Continental districts, Guam, Samoa take measures against sabotage." e message further stated that "measures should be carried out so as not repeat not to alarm civil population." Both commanders reported the actions taken to Washington. Short followed through with sabotage precautions, bunching his planes together (which hinders saboteurs but makes ideal targets for bombers), and Kimmel stepped up air surveillance and sub searches. If their response to the "war warning" was insu cient, Washington said nothing. e next day, a follow-up message from Marshall's adjutant general to Short warned only: "Initiate forthwith all additional measures necessary to provide for protection of your establishments, property, and equipment against sabotage, protection of your personnel against subversive propaganda and protection of all activities against espionage." us things stood as Japan prepared to strike. Using the Purple code, Tokyo sent a formal statement to its Washington ambassadors. It was to be conveyed to the American Secretary of State on Sunday, December 7th. e statement terminated relations and was tantamount to a declaration of war. On December 6th, in Washington, the War and Navy departments had already decrypted the “ rst 13 parts of this 14-part message. Although the “ nal passage o cially severing ties had not yet come through, the “ ery wording made its meaning obvious. Later that day, when Lieutenant Lester Schulz delivered to President Roosevelt his copy of the intercept, Schulz heard FDR say to his advisor, Harry Hopkins, is means war." During subsequent Pearl Harbor investigations, both General Marshall, Army Chief of Sta and Admiral Stark, Chief of Naval Operations, denied any recollection of where they had been on the evening of December 6th „ despite Marshall's reputation for a photographic memory. But James G. Stahlman, a close friend of Navy Secretary Frank Knox, said Knox told him FDR convened a highlevel meeting at the White House that evening. Knox, Marshall, Stark, and War Secretary Stimson attended. Indeed, with the nation on war's threshold, such a conference only made sense. at same evening, the Navy Department received a request from Stimson for a list of the whereabouts of all ships in the Paci“ c. On the morning of December 7th, the “ nal portion of Japan's lengthy message to the U.S. government was decoded. Tokyo added two special directives to its ambassadors. e “ rst directive, which the message called "very important," was to deliver the statement at 1 p.m. e second directive ordered that the last copy of code, and the machine that went with it, be destroyed. e gravity of this was immediately recognized in the Navy Department: Japan had a long history of synchronizing attacks with breaks in relations; Sunday was an abnormal day to deliver diplomatic messages „ but the best for trying to catch U.S. armed forces at low vigilance; and 1 p.m. in Washington was shortly after dawn in Hawaii! Admiral Stark arrived at his o ce at 9:25 a.m. He was shown the message and the important delivery time. One junior o cer pointed out the possibility of an attack on Hawaii; another urged that Kimmel be noti“ ed. But Stark refused; he did nothing all morning. Years later, he told the press that his conscience was clear concerning Pearl Harbor because all his actions had been dictated by a "higher authority." As Chief of Naval Operations, Stark had only one higher authority: Roosevelt. In the War Department, where the 14-part statement had also been decoded, Colonel Rufus Bratton, head of the Army's Far Eastern section, discerned the message's signi“ cance. But the chief of intelligence told him nothing could be done until Marshall arrived. Bratton tried reaching Marshall at home, but was repeatedly told the general was out horseback riding. e horseback ride turned out to be a long one. When Bratton “ nally reached Marshall by phone and told him of the emergency, Marshall said he would come to the War Department. Marshall took 75 minutes to make the 10-minute drive. He didn't come to his o ce until 11:25 a.m. „ an extremely late hour with the nation on the brink of war. He perused the Japanese message and was shown the delivery time. Every o cer in Marshall's o ce agreed these indicated an attack in the Paci“ c at about 1 p.m. EST. e general “ nally agreed that Hawaii should be alerted, but time was running out. Marshall had only to pick up his desk phone to reach Pearl Harbor on the transpaci“ c line. Doing so would not have averted the attack, but at least our men would have been at their battle stations. Instead, the general wrote a dispatch. After it was encoded it went to the Washington o ce of Western Union. From there it was relayed to San Francisco. From San Francisco it was transmitted via RCA commercial radio to Honolulu. General Short received it six hours after the attack. Two hours later it reached Kimmel. One can imagine their exasperation on reading it. Despite all the evidence accrued through Magic and other sources during the previous months, Marshall had never warned Hawaii. To historians „ ignorant of that classi“ ed evidence „ it would appear the general had tried to save Pearl Harbor, "but alas, too late." Similarly, FDR sent a last-minute plea for peace to Emperor Hirohito. Although written a week earlier, he did not send it until the evening of December 6th. It was to be delivered by Ambassador Grew, who would be unable to receive an audience with the emperor before December 8th. us the message could not conceivably have forestalled the attack „ but posterity would think that FDR, too, had made "a valiant, last e ort." e Roberts Commission, assigned to investigate the Japanese attack, consisted of personal cronies of Roosevelt and Marshall. e Commission fully absolved Washington and declared that America was caught o guard due to "dereliction of duty" by Kimmel and Short. e wrath of America for these two was exceeded only by its wrath for Tokyo. To this day, many believe it was negligence by the Hawaii commanders that made the Pearl Harbor disaster possible. ough a major exposer of the Pearl Harbor conspiracy, Robert Stinnett is sympathetic regarding FDR's motives. He writes in his book: "As a veteran of the Paci“ c War, I felt a sense of outrage as I uncovered secrets that had been hidden from Americans for more than “ fty years. But I understood the agonizing dilemma faced by President Roosevelt. He was forced to “ nd circuitous means to persuade an isolationist America to join in a “ ght for freedom." In our view, a government that is allowed to operate in such fashion is a government that has embarked on a dangerous, slippery slope toward dictatorship. Nonetheless, Stinnett's position on FDR's motives makes his expos of FDR's actions all the more compelling. Reprinted with permission by eNewAmerican.com. personalizedgiftsstarting at $999+s/h Order now and take 20% off Personal Creations products. Visit PersonalCreations.com /Cheeror call 1.888.714.8053.Create lasting memories with personalized holiday gifts *Take 20% off minimum product purchase of $19.00. Discounts: (i) apply to the regular price of the products, (ii) will appear upon checkout and cannot be combined with other offers or fees or taxes. Prices valid while supplies last. Offer expires 12/25/2012. save 20%*Expert personalization & fast shipping! Winter Wonderland StockingsOffer expires December 25, 2012.

PAGE 8

The Levy County Journal8ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 The choice is yours.At Capital City Bank, we have a 115-year history of exceptional client service and provide convenient banking tools like free checking, instant issue ATM cards, competitive loan rates, bank-to-bank transfers and mobile banking*. Dont settle. Make the switch to a better community bank today. www.ccbg.com Settle or Switch? *Client purchases checks. Account subject to fees if overdrawn. All loans subject to credit approval. ATM card may be used with in 24 hours after issuance for ATM or other pin-based transactions only. Bank-to-bank transfers require online banking service, and outbound and inbound transfer fees apply. Fees charged by the mobile service provider for accessing mobile banking are the responsibility of the user. Ask a banker for details. Earn up to$25for cashing in your unused checks and old debit cards. REGULAR MEETING LEVY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NOVEMBER 6, 2012 e Regular Meeting of the Board of Levy County Commissioners was held on November 6, 2012 at 9:00 AM in the Levy County Board of County Commissioners meeting room, with the following Commissioners present: Chairman Danny Stevens Comm. Chad Johnson Comm. Marsha Drew Comm. Ryan Bell Comm. Mike Joyner Also present were: County Attorney Anne Bast Brown County Coordinator Fred Moody Comm. Stevens called the Meeting to order at 9:05 A.M. Osborn Barker gave the invocation, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. EXPENDITURES Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the following expenditures presented for payment. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. CHECK NUMBER 109530-109703 FUND AMOUNT GENERAL REVENUE 1,261,936.83 ROAD 176,599.00 SHIP 19,431.00 COURT TECH/CRIM PREV 10,517.11 TRANSPORTATION 10,341.86 911 14,000.00 COURT FACILITIES 23 .00 PROGRESS ENERGY 1,729.46 EMS 47,222.34 FIRE 50,910.56 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT 4,560.63 UTILITIES 5,200.27 ADD COURT COSTS 3,031.37 DEBT SERVICE 9,000.00 LANDFILL 70,498 .61 TOTAL $1,685,002.04 PRESENTATION TO COMM. DREW Comm. Stevens made a presentation to Comm. Drew in appreciation for her service as a Commissioner. LEVY COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Linda Fugate Request to allow the Tax Collector to retain $125,000 of Operating Expenses. Mrs. Fugate requested the Board allow the o ce of the Tax Collector to retain $125,000 of Operating Expenses until a distribution is received in order to have funds in which to operate. Tax bills are being mailed out today, and funds are expected to be available by the end of the month. e Tax Collectors o ce should be able to reimburse this money back to the Board by the end of the year. Comm. Bell made a motion to allow the Levy County Tax Collector to retain $125,000 of Operating Expense as requested. Second was made by Comm. Johnson and the MOTION CARRIES. LEVY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Je Edison Presenting an update to the Board of County Commissioners regarding Levy County School Boards pursuit of special facility funding for a new school in Williston and plans as to what to do with the current Williston High School and Middle School Facilities. Mr. Edison spoke to the Board, advising them of the Levy County School Boards intent to pursue funding assistance from the State for new Middle and High School facilities in Williston. e existing buildings will be available if the county has a use for them. LEVY COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Patty Galyean, Executive Assistance Request approval/signature on the Certi“ cate of Acceptance for the 2012 Application of the Levy County Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force 21 Grant, through Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Justice Assistance Grant Program, $48,644.00. Sheri Johnny Smith requested on behalf of Mrs. Galyean Board approval/signature on the Certi“ cate of Acceptance for the 2012 Application of the Levy County Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force 21 Grant in the amount of $48,644. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve and have the Chairman sign the Certi“ cate of Acceptance as presented. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. LEVY COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Major Michael She eld, Director of Corrections Review pending Agreement with Simplex Grinnell regarding inmate visitation system. Major She eld reviewed with the Board the pending Agreement with Simplex Grinnell regarding the Inmate Visitation System. Atty. Brown stated there are two items to approve, the Licensing Agreement and the Addendum addressing Article 3, Additional Services. PUBLIC COMMENTS Barbara Locke thanked the Board for their help with the opening of a Dental Clinic at the Levy County Health Department. e Clinic will serve children up to the age of 21 and is expected to open to the public in about three weeks. ere will be a Grand Opening on ursday, November 15th and Mrs. Locke invited all the Commissioners to attend. COUNTY COORDINATOR Fred Moody A. Request approval of the Funding Agreement for the Provision of Mental Health and Addiction Services; Meridian Behavioral Healthcare, Inc. Mr. Moody requested Board approval of the Funding Agreement for the Provision of Mental Health and Addiction Services; Meridian Behavioral Healthcare in the amount of $50,000 for “ scal year 2012-2013. Comm. Bell made a motion to approve the Funding Agreement for Meridian Behavioral Healthcare as presented. Second was made by Comm. Drew and the MOTION CARRIES. B. Request approval of the Master Consulting Services Agreement. is is an agreement between Levy County and Passero Associates, LLC, as a result of the RFP for the George T. Lewis Airport (Cedar Key). Mr. Moody requested Board approval of the Master Consulting Services Agreement with Passero Associates, LLC regarding the George T. Lewis Airport in Cedar Key. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the Master Consulting Services Agreement with Passero Associates, LLC as requested. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. C. Request Board direction for suggested dates for Chairman and Vice-Chairman appointments. Mr. Moody requested Board direction for dates to appoint Chairman and Vice-Chairman. After discussion among the Commissioners, Comm. Joyner made a motion to appoint Chairman and Vice-chairman at the last meeting in December. Second was made by Comm. Drew and the MOTION CARRIES. HUMAN RESOURCES Jacqueline Martin, Human Resource Manager Present proposed Memorandum of Agreement with FirstLab to participate in the Florida Department of Transportation and FirstLab, ird party Administrator (TPA), Florida Statewide Drug & Alcohol Testing Services contract RFP-11/12-9004DC, e ective August 22, 2012. Mr. Moody presented on behalf of Mrs. Martin the Memorandum of Agreement with FirstLab to participate in the FDOT and FirstLab, ird party Administrator, Florida Statewide Drug & Alcohol Testing Services contract, e ective August 22, 2012. Mr. Moody explained this will allow the County to piggy-back with FDOT and FirstLab for Statewide Drug & Alcohol Testing Services resulting in a cost savings for the county. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the Memorandum of Agreement as requested. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. CORRESPONDENCE Karen Blackburn Request approval for 2013 County Holidays. Mrs. Blackburn presented the proposed 2013 County Holidays listed below to the Board for approval. Holiday Observed New Years Day Tuesday, January 1, 2013 Martin Luther King Day Monday, January 21 2013 Good Friday Friday, March 29, 2013 Memorial Day Monday, May 27,2013 Independence Day ursday, July 4, 2013 Labor Day Monday, September 2, 2013 Veterans Day Monday, November 11,2013 anksgiving ursday, November 28 & Friday November 29,2013 Christmas Tuesday, December 24 & Wednesday, December 25,2013 Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the 2013 County Holidays as presented. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. LIBRARY Lisa Brasher, Director Request approval of the 2012-2013 Annual Plan of Service; required for State Aid to Libraries. Ms. Brasher requested Board approval of the 2012-2013 Annual Plan of Service; required for State Aid to Libraries. Comm. Bell made a motion to approve the 2012-2013 Annual Plan of Service as requested. Second was made by Comm. Johnson and the MOTION CARRIES. PUBLIC SAFETY David Knowles, Director A. Request approval to purchase twenty (20) SCBA cylinders for Levy County Fire Rescue. Ten-8 Fire Equipment, Inc. is the sole-source provider of this product in the State of Florida. Mr. Knowles requested Board approval to purchase twenty (20) SCBA cylinders for Levy County Fire Rescue from Ten-8 Equipment, Inc. in the amount of $16,960. ese new cylinders will replace the existing outdated cylinders currently in use. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the purchase of twenty (20) SCBA cylinders for Levy County Fire Rescue from Ten-8 Equipment, Inc. as presented. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. B. Request approval to purchase a pumper truck from Ferrara Fire Apparatus. e. Department would also like to request to waive the bid process as this is a unique opportunity to purchase the unit at a signi“ cant cost savings. Mr. Knowles requested Board approval to purchase a pumper truck from Ferrara Fire Apparatus. e unit was traded in by Crystal River Fire Department with a trade in value of $35,000. Ferrara Fire Apparatus has agreed to sell the apparatus to Levy County for the trade in value amount. is truck will replace a 1972 unit which is obsolete. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the purchase of a pumper truck from Ferrara Fire Apparatus in the amount of $35,000 as requested. Second was made by Comm. Joyner and the MOTION CARRIES. ROAD DEPARTMENT Bruce Greenlee, Administrative Road Superintendent Request to place Levy County Road 1024 a/k/a NE 131 Avenue on the paving list. Mr. Greenlee requested Board approval to place LCR 1024 a/k/a NE 131 Avenue on the paving list. After discussion among the Commissioners, Comm. Joyner made a motion to approve placing LCR 1024 a/k/a NE 131 Avenue on the paving list. e motion fails for lack of a second. Yankeetown Mayor, Dawn Clary asked Mr. Greenlee if the Road Department could mow in town before the Seafood Festival. Mr. Greenlee answered the Road Department has been contacted and will be mowing before the festival. SHIP Shenley Neely, Director Requesting a motion to approve Annual Reports submitted to Florida Housing Finance Corporation. Ms. Neely requested Board approval of the Annual Reports submitted to Florida Housing Finance Corporation. Comm. Drew made a motion to approve the Annual Reports submitted to Florida Housing Finance Corporation. Second was made by Comm. Bell and the MOTION CARRIES. SOLID WASTE Benny Jerrels, Director Request approval of the 2012-2013 Small County Consolidated Grant Agreement for State Assistance and authorize the Chair to sign the Agreement. Mr. Jerrels requested Board approval and Chairmans signature on the 2012-2013 Small County Consolidated Grant Agreement for State Assistance. Comm. Bell made a motion to approve the 2012-2013 Small County Consolidated Grant Agreement for State Assistance and authorize the Chairman to sign as requested. Second was made by Comm. Drew and the MOTION CARRIES. COUNTY ATTORNEY Anne Bast Brown Request approval of a Lease Agreement for Wireless Communications Equipment Facilities with North Florida Broadband Authority. Atty. Brown requested Board approval of a Lease Agreement for Wireless Communications Equipment Facilities with North Florida Broadband Authority. Approval of this Lease Agreement allows a lease of tower space at the Beck Park tower site. Comm. Bell made a motion to approve the Lease Agreement for Wireless Communications Equipment Facilities with North Florida Broadband Authority as presented. Second was made by Comm. Johnson and the MOTION CARRIES.continued on page 10A

PAGE 9

The Levy County Journal 9ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 CITY OF CHIEFLAND CITY COMMISSION MEETING October 22, 2012 CITY OF CHIEFLAND CITY COMMISSION MEETING November 13, 2012 e Chie” and City Commission met in Regular Session at City Hall. Mayor Pomeroy called the meeting to order at 6:05 P.M. MEMBERS PRESENT: Teal Pomeroy, Mayor-Commissioner Teresa Barron, Vice Mayor-Commissioner Frank Buie, Commissioner Sammy Cason, Commissioner Rollin Hudson, Commissioner MEMBERS ABSENT: None ALSO PRESENT: Grady Hartzog, City Manager Norm D. Fugate, City Attorney Robert Douglas, Police Chief James Harris, Fire Chief Visitors Wayne Weatherford and Liz Smith of the Chie” and Area Athletic Association came to invite the Commissioners to CAAAs annual Halloween carnival at Strickland Park on October 27th from 5:00 … 8:30 p.m. Wayne also wanted to introduce Liz to the Commissioners since she will be taking on more duties at CAAA, and maybe coming before the Commission to give them updates on his behalf in the future. City Manager – Grady Hartzog e City Manager had no agenda items; he did have something under correspondence later though. Police Chief Robert Douglas Chief Douglas asked the Commissioners to give the Mayor permission to sign the annual Equitable Sharing agreement. He stated that he had already signed the agreement, and that at the Mayors request he had brought the agreement before the Commission for permission to have the Mayor sign it. e Mayor said he had asked for this to come before the Commission because he had some questions about the form, and since the money was not actually coming from the Federal government, but from the Sheri It was explained to the Mayor that this form requires you to show all pass through monies received from other agencies, and this was why we “ ll out the form for the Federal Government. e Mayor then said he would agree to sign the form without the need for a formal motion being made. Chief Douglas then asked permission to apply for a JAG Direct grant to be used for computer replacements in his o ce in the amount of $1,484. It was funds that had been left over from grants that were not used in the last cycle in 2011, and this amount had been designate for Chie” and. e dispatch center and Chief Douglas needed replacement computers, and these monies would help to pay for the replacement for those computers. is is a reimbursement grant. e Vice Mayor made a motion to allow the Police Chief to apply for the JAG D grant. Commissioner Cason seconded motion, which was approved 5-0. Chief Douglas requested permission to accept the award of the 2012-13 Bullet proof vest grant. Chief said that manufactures only warranty their vests for about three years. Commissioner Hudson asked what they did with the old vests, and the Chief told them they used them in practice sessions. e Vice Mayor made the motion to accept the 2012-13 Bullet proof vest grant award and authorize the Mayor and City Manager to sign all grant related documents. Commission Cason seconded the motion, which was approved 5-0. Fire Chief James Harris Chief Harris gave an update on a “ re that occurred at 217 SW 4th St, near Commissioner Buies home. It involved a 25 passenger van, and church. e van was a total loss, but the church was not really damaged. e “ re department had a three minute response time in getting to the “ re. Captain Perryman gave the Commissioners a breakdown of the “ re scene. ey had used the “ re dog to see if there was any accelerant used to start the “ re. ey could not get a hit on anything though with the dog. e case was still under investigation with the Fire Marshalls o ce though. Captain Perryman also gave an update on Fire Safety week which was Oct. 7-13 and all of the school visits they had done. Fire Chief Harris then made the request to the Commission to “ ll his vacant Captains position which he had been “ lling by rotating in part-time “ re “ ghters. He said this Captain would “ ll the third shift. e Vice-Mayor made a motion to allow Chief Harris to “ ll the vacate Captains position. Commissioner Cason seconded the motion. Commissioner Hudson asked what the di erence was between “ lling the position with part-time people and a permanent, and if he had the money. e Chief tried to explain that he had always had this position, and it had been “ lled before, but he had left it un“ lled recently because he had no one quali“ ed. Commissioner Hudson asked what the di erence between a part-time and fulltime person was, and if there would be a pay increase and was told there would be a pay increase. e fulltime people are eligible for retirement and insurance, the hourly rate is about a dollar more for the fulltime than the part-time. e Mayor asked about repayment of the outstanding debt owed by the Fire Department to General Funds, and if the Fire Department had a plan to pay it back yet. e Commission then talked about the matter of debt for a while. e City Manager then reminded the Mayor that they still had a motion and second on the ” oor. e Mayor then took the vote on motion to hire the fulltime Fire Captain which passed 4-1 (the Mayor dissenting). City Attorney Norm Fugate No reports. Old Business None Commissioners New Business Commissioner Buie asked if we had received a Fire Marshall report yet on the burned down home across from the Senior Center and the Fire Chief said he had not received a report yet. Public Comment Mrs. Sylvia McCullar asked about the timers on the lights at the public buildings and parks, now that it was getting darker earlier would they be adjusted or did that happen automatically. e City Manager said he would make sure that someone checked all of the timers. She also asked about the Ten Commandments monument and if it was coming back, the Commissioners told her they were not sure since it had been removed at the request of the person who donated it. Vice-Mayor Barron asked the City Manager about the mold report from his o ce, in City Hall. She wanted to know what was being done about it. Commissioner Hudson asked if the Insurance would pay for the repairs. He said he did not think so, since they were not sure when it occurred but they would ask again. Mr. Grady said they needed to bring in another consultant to look at what needed to be done to remove the mold. Commissioner Hudson said it needed to be taken care of, and to “ x it, the Vice Mayor agreed. e Commission asked if he knew the source, and Mr. Grady said they were not sure, it could be, leaks in the windows, the slab, the weep holes in the foundation, and until they get someone in they are not sure exactly how bad it is. Mr. Grady said some of the work could be done by our sta and some of it would be done by the consultant. Correspondence Withlacoochee Regional Planning Council responded to the Citys request to lower their fees by saying that it would not be fair to lower the fee for Chie” and and not for other local governments. ey added that if Chie” and decided they did need their services they would be happy to work with us on an agreement at that time. e City Manager handed out a complaint to the Commissioners he had received from a group calling themselves the Citizens Watch of Levy County, about several issues relating to codes violations at Flea Market, which the City Manager had turned over to Mr. Hammond for investigation. e Commissioners discussed the fact that they were not familiar with this group, and would wait to see if any violations were found. e City Manager said that sta was working on putting up the Christmas decorations before the “ rst week in December. e Vice-Mayor asked if we could not cut back the trees at the Train Depot this year. Regular Commission Meeting Minutes – October 8, 2012 Commissioner Cason moved to approve the regular meeting minutes of October 8, 2012 meeting. Commissioner Buie seconded the motion. Motion passed 5-0. ere being no further business to discuss, the meeting adjourned at 7:00 PM. Attest; Grady Hartzog, City Manager M. Teal Pomeroy, Mayor/Commissioner Recorded by: Laurie Copeland, Financial Project Coordinator e Chie” and City Commission met in Regular Session at City Hall. Mayor Pomeroy called the meeting to order at 6:02 P.M. MEMBERS PRESENT: Teal Pomeroy, Mayor-Commissioner Teresa Barron, Vice Mayor-Commissioner Frank Buie, Commissioner Sammy Cason, Commissioner Rollin Hudson, Commissioner MEMBERS ABSENT: None ALSO PRESENT: Grady Hartzog, City Manager Blake Fugate, City Attorney Robert Douglas, Police Chief James Harris, Fire Chief Student of the Month Mayor Pomeroy recognized the following students for their excellence in the classroom: J. R. Hudson Chie” and Elementary School Kendall Watson Chie” and Middle School e nominee from Chie” and High School Jake Marrall was not in attendance. Visitors: Mr. Schupp: Wanted to give the Commissioners an update regarding the Hospital project. He provided them with an updated Certi“ cate of Need and time line for the project. He told them that with the new Certi“ cate of Need the hospital group had a total of 10 months to have the work done, and this would be bene“ cial with securing the last of the “ nancing for the project. He let them know he would be here at the site visit this ursday for the grant too. Dr. Richardson: Spoke to the Commission about some fund raising projects that the Centennial Committee was working on. He showed them the examples of the brick pavers the group wanted to sell, and asked permission to place a large sign in front of Bills o ce advertising the sale of the pavers. He gave the Commissioners a drawing of what the knee wall would like that the pavers would be installed on. e wall will be in front of Bills o ce. He then asked permission to place the sign advertising the sale of the pavers in front of the Building & Zoning o ce. He also said they would have a booth at the Christmas Festival, and they were having another event called Chie” ands Got Talent too. Along with the Silver coins they were already selling. e Commissioners asked if they had a price yet for the bricks and Dr. Richardson said the bricks cost $20, and they were thinking of selling them for $50. e Commission agreed to allow the Committee to place the sign in front of the Building and Zoning O ce, and asked them to get with Mr. Hartzog concerning the placement of the sign. City Manager Grady Hartzog Reschedule or Cancel Second December Commission MeetingMr. Hartzog told the Commissioners that since the second regular December City Commission meeting fell on the approved Christmas Eve holiday, as well as the following day being Christmas therefore the Commission was being asked to cancel or reschedule the second December meeting. Since traditionally there is little business tills time of year the recommendation was to cancel the second meeting. Vice Mayor Barron made a motion to cancel the second regular December Commission meeting. Commissioner Cason seconded. Motion passed 5-0. Contract Agreement for Fireworks with Ashley Pyrotechnics, Inc. Mr. Hartzog told the Commissioners that the City Attorney had reviewed the contract and had no concerns about the City signing it. Blake Fugate sitting in for Norm stated that the one change that had been made was to make the contract between the City and Ashley Pyrotechnics, Inc. e Contract requires us to pay 50% up-front prior to the show, and 50% after the, and interest is due if we do not pay. Bill Hammond is the Citys agent, and the City is required to supply security, and Ashley has to provide its own insurance, and permits for the event. Mr. Hartzog asked Bill Hammond to speak to the Commission regarding the contract matters. e Vice-Mayor asked if Bill had bid this out or not, and Bill said he had not exactly bid it out, but he had called around to other “ rms, and this was the best deal. He said they had seen this companies work at a Rotary function, and it was by far one of the best “ reworks displays he had seen. e ViceMayor said she would still like to have something in writing that stated what exactly we were getting for the money. e Mayor asked if the Centennial Committee had the 50% down payment required, and Bill said yes. e Mayor said he was okay with the contract and was sure the Committee had done its due, diligence. Commissioner Hudson said his only concern was about the insurance. e Mayor asked for Bill to have them provide a copy of what they will be doing and their insurance. Commissioner Hudson made the motion to enter into the contract with Ashley Pyrotechnics, Inc. for the “ reworks dated April 6, 2013. Commissioner Buie seconded the motion. e motion passed 4-1, with the Vice Mayor dissenting. Bill also gave the Commission a brief overview of the schedule of the events Friday night opening ceremonies, Saturday turkey calling, BBQ, Chili Cooking, Parade, Fireworks etc. e events will take place at the Usher Center, Train Depot, and Strickland Park. 2011/2012 Budget Adjustment and Re-Advertisement Mr. Hartzog informed the Commission that we needed to re-advertise the 2011/2012 budget prior to December 1, by State Statute. Because the Auditor will not be able to review the records prior to re-advertisement the issue of the Fire Department budget would have to be resolved at a later time should they “ nd a correction was needed. Commissioner Cason made the motion to re-advertise the 2011-2012 budgets. Commissioner Buie seconded the motion. e Vice Mayor asked if a correction had been made to the Fire Departments contingency line, and was told noŽ. e City Manager said that once this years budgets audit is done we can make the correction. e Vice-Mayor said she was not asking about correcting this years funds Laurie said she understood what the Vice-Mayor was asking about but that she had not been given direction by the Auditor to make that correction to the budget. If during this audit process they are given the direction to make that correction they can. ey knew that there was a question about the County “ re funds and with changing from general fund to the special fund in the middle of a “ scal year there has been some confusion so they are going to make sure that everything is corrected. e Mayor asked for a vote on the motion, which was approved 4-1, with the Vice Mayor dissenting. Police Chief Robert Douglas Chief Douglas gave the Commissioners an update on the 3rd Annual Veterans Day Parade which took place Monday, in Williston. He said Wal-Mart had donated hot dogs for everyone that participated. He said that our Fire Truck had come in handy when one of the Citizens on Patrol Cars caught “ re. He said also there would be an upcoming Jail and Bail event for the Centennial Committee as a fundraiser. He also said they had arrested a copper thief. He said that Randy Wilkerson had seen someone taking wire out by Strickland Park and they caught them with 1/4 mile of Comcast copper wire. ey were trying to get the new company that had taken over from Comcast to see if they wanted to prosecute or not. Fire Chief James Harris No report. City Attorney Blake Fugate Clarks Display Lawsuit Blake gave an overview of the memo that had been included in the Commissioners packet letting them know that Norm had asked the Judge to grant the City a Summary Judgment on December 17, 2012, and if so, then the case would be over. is was mainly based on the rule that Cities and Counties can only budget on an annual basis, and folks doing business with them should know that. Fire Assessment Timeline He just let them know this timeline was how things would go and we were at the “ rst step in the timeline. Resolution 12-16 Blake let the Commission knows this did not need to be approved tonight just reviewed. Review of Advertisement for Non-Ad Valorem Special Assessment Blake told the Commission that the ad needed to go to the paper and appear for four consecutive weeks, before everything is “ nal. Vice-Mayor Barron made the motion to approve advertising for the public hearing. Commissioner Cason seconded the motion. Mr. Grady asked if the amount of the assessment needed to be in the ad, and Blake said no, this just gives you the ability to send this to the Property Appraiser saying you mightŽ do an assessment. e Mayor then took the vote which passed 4-1, which the Mayor dissenting. Laurie informed them that the Ad had already gone to the paper with the “ rst one scheduled to run that week, and the next three ursdays. Inserted Revised Language verbatim from recording as requested at Nov 26th meeting: e City Attorney says to answer your question about numbers you were asking about. ey went down to Inglis to answer their question if the County assessed just the people in the Town of Inglis for the same amount that the County was assessing for their Fire Department that they wouldnt be any more dollars than what they were already funding that “ re department. So the Town of Inglis has done away with negotiations for the future. So the dollar amount was more than su cient to end the negotiation.ŽReplacing: Blake then informed the Commission that because of the information that Inglis had received on the County “ re assessment cost it was no longer interested in merging with the County “ re department anymore. Old Business None Commissioners New Business Commissioner Hudson had asked the City Manager to prepare a history of the City Expenses from 2006/07present, including the amount of cash on hand, the total amount of grants, the total amount of road paving, water line extension funded with both city and grant funds. Commissioner Hudson wanted to show that the City had been spending the Citys money wisely, and that in September 2014, the remaining loans will be paid o and the City should be debt free. e City Manager went through the various department budgets, and expenses, showing how everything was accounted for. Commissioner Hudson asked Mr. Hartzog to emphasize how much City money we had spent on roadway paving and water line expansion. Commissioner Hudson wanted to stress that continued on page 12A

PAGE 10

The Levy County Journal10ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 December 17, 2012December 18, 2012December 19, 2012December 20, 2012December 21, 2012Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce and Homemade Garlic Bread or Roll Hot Dog on Bun w/Ketchup/Mustard Tater Tots Tossed Salad w/ Spinach Apple/Diced Chili Con Carne w/ Cheese BBQ Chicken Melt Carrot/Celery Sticks w/Dip Steamed Broccoli Homemade Cornbread Orange/Fruited JelloManager’s ChoiceManager’s ChoiceManager’s ChoiceIn accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the base of race, color ,nationsl orgin, sex, age, or disablity.LEVY COUNTY SCHOOLS LUNCH MENUby Lisa Statham Posteraro photos by Patty Gri th and Joelene Vining Over the years people from every corner of the world have come to live in the United States of America. e end result, a country which Francis Scott Key called the land of the free and the home of the brave,Ž boasts a culturally diverse populationƒbut still ALL American! Music celebrating that diversity meshed with traditional patriotic melodies was featured at the recent PTO program entitled Americans We,Ž performed by the 4th and 5th graders at Williston Elementary School. Music teacher Lynne No“ directed the groups who had memorized all the lyrics. Some songs were accompanied by CD instrumentation; the rest were accompanied by Lisa Posteraro, who played the schools baby grand. Physical education teacher Erin Owen, along with No“ choreographed the group movements during the singing; art teacher Helen Darling assisted students with their speaking parts. Technology guru Charlie Watson put together the accompanying PowerPoint presentation. Students Anthony Gri th and Dylan Washburn played the role of Uncle Sam as they paraded around the audience, waving the American ” ag. e 4th graders performed the show earlier in the day for the veterans who had attended the Veterans Day ceremony at WES. Prior to the performances, the safety patrollers hosted a fund raising pizza supper. e teachers whose students performed included 4th grade instructors Kathy Clemons, Teri Dixon, Tracy Kirby, Lita Halchak, Nancy Priest, Tina Roberts and Joelene Vining as all as 5th grade teachers Nancy Bowman, Kathy Brewington, Jeanne DuBois, Laurie Helgerud, Serena iessen and Steve Van Zwienen. Were looking forward to our next PTO program put on by the 3rd grade classes. It, too, is patriotic in natureƒits called 'Merry Christmas, Red, White and Blue' and they will perform on ursday, December 13th, at 6:00,Ž said No“ All programs are held in the schools multipurpose room. Prior to the performance, the WES Safety Patrol will host a fund raiser pizza supper in the Wildcat Caf.‘Americans We’ Honors DiversityWES 4th, 5th graders put on patriotic PTO program While enjoying their complimentary breakfast, the guest veterans are treated to the performance of Americans WeŽ by the 4th gr aders at Williston Elementary School. Joining the veterans were Sgt. Francisco Velez and his Jr. ROTC students from Williston High School, who were invited to present the co lors, and Josiah Rivera and John Julian, who played TapsŽ during the Veterans Day ceremony before breakfast. Maclayne McGowan, as Lady Liberty, holds her torch as she sings along with her classmates pictured in the background. Students could volunteer for speaking or singing parts and were featured in the front of the stage before each musical number. Anthony Gri th, dressed as Uncle Sam, parades around the performance venue during one of the musical numbers in the production entitled Americans We.Ž Classes Resume Tuesday, January 8, 2013 Medical Alert for SeniorsMedical Alert Monitoring 24/7 Free Equipment Free Shipping Easy Setup Nationwide ServiceHELP AT THE PUSH OF A BUTTON!Call Today:1-888-468-9073 NOTICEThe School Board of Levy County has set their meeting times for the coming year for the 1st Tuesday after the 1st Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. and two weeks thereafter at 9:00 a.m. The Board also voted to cancel the January 8, 2013 Board Meeting. Board Meetings are held at the School Board Of ce located at 480 Marshburn Drive, Bronson, Florida. Please contact the School Board at 352486-52321 if you have questions. Pub.: Dec. 13, 2012 COMMISSIONERS’ REPORTS Comm. Joyner reminded everyone of the Veterans Day Parade coming up on the 12th in Williston and asked if the other Commissioners would like to ride together. Comm. Johnson informed the other Commissioners he would be resigning from the North Florida Broadband Authority and requested appointment of a new Commissioner. e Board agreed to have the alternate Commissioner, Comm. Drew attend in his place for the upcoming meeting on November 14th in Monticello at 11 :00 A.M. or Mr. Moody if Comm. Drew cannot attend. Comm. Drew extended her thanks to all those she had worked with as this would be her last meeting serving as Commissioner. THERE BEING NO FURTHER BUSINESS TO COME BEFORE THE COMMISSION, THE MEETING ADJOURNED AT 10:13 A.M. ATTEST: Clerk of Court, Danny J. Shipp BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS LEVY COUNTY, FL Chairman, Danny StevensBoCC Nov. 6, 2012 continued from page 8A

PAGE 11

The Levy County Journal 11ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Sudoku e answers for this weeks sudoku puzzle will appear in next weeks issue. Last week’s Sudoku 110 LOST115 NOTICES115 NOTICES 135 VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES 440 VACANT LAND FOR SALE 500 FOR SALE Classifieds Journal Levy County LOST MALE AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD – Blue merle neutered 45lb male, answers to Jo-Jo wearing metal Fursaver collar, is microchipped. Last seen Sunday 10/21 at CR 102 and NE 137 Court in Williston. Please call Ken Araujo at 352/577-5556 12/27Jp115 NOTICESADVERTISER NOTICE — The Levy County Journal does not endorse, promote or encourage the purchase or sale of any product or service advertised in this newspaper. Advertisements are the sole responsibility of the advertiser. The Levy County Journal hereby disclaims all liability for any damage suffered as the result of any advertisement in this newspaper. The Levy County Journal has the sole authority to edit and locate any classi ed advertisement as deemed appropriate. The Levy County Journal reserves the right to refuse any advertising. --------FREE PREGNANCY TESTS – Con dential Harmony Pregnancy & Resource Center. Now open Mon. thru Thurs. from 11 AM to 6 PM. Call (352) 493-7773 or write to us at Harmony Pregnancy Center, P. O. Box 2557, Chie and, FL. tfnJf --------AL-ANON MEETINGS IN WILLISTON — Join us for Al-Anon meetings on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Midway Plaza located at 13451 NE Highway 27 Alt. in Williston. 1-800-8511795. ftfn --------NARCONON — a nonpro t public bene t organization that specializes in helping people with drug or alcohol addictions assessments and more than 11,000 local referrals. Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www. drugrehab.net --------AA MEETING — FOR INFORMATION CALL NORTH CENTRAL Florida Intergroup Of ce at (352) 372-8091 which is also a 24hour local hotline number. --------ADDICTION RECOVERY MEETING Do you struggle with a Drug or Alcohol addiction? Come to our meetings held the 1st and 3rd Thursday night of the month at Mt. Nebo Baptist Church 7:00 PM – Hwy. 340 in Bell, at the ashing light, west of 129. Call 386/9352300 or Kevin Craven at 352/463-8700 or go to www.grace-ministry.net for more info. Tfnf --------Guardian ad Litem Be the one to advocate for abused and neglected children who have never been told they are loved, smart, strong, worthy…that they are Somebody. Don’t wait to be the one to give them hope. No special background needed. Legal and staff support provided. The next class starts June 12th. Orientations held every 4th Thursday from 12-1 pm at 102 N. Main St, Chie and. For more info, call 352/4936051 or go to www.gal. alachua. .us. Only 50% of children in Levy County have an advocate to stand up for them. Call today – 352/4936051 Visit today – www.gal. alachua. .us Tfn Jf --------NEW OPEN NA MEETING IN CEDAR KEY The United Methodist Church at SR 24 and 4th in Cedar Key is hosting a new N.A. meeting on Thursdays at 7 p.m. This is an Open Meeting for A.A. members as well as N.A. members. tfnf125 SERVICESSHEDS, SHEDS, SHEDS! — We move ’em. Best price in town. 352-493-0345. Joe’s Rollback Service. Credit cards accepted. TfnApJftfn --------GUNS AND CONCEALED WEAPONS PERMITS: Call (352) 493-4209 for information. 1/3/13 Jp135 VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIESFLORIDA’S LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advo-cates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The program’s local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents’ concerns. Special training and certi cation is provided. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents -who often have no one else to advocate for them -are encouraged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the program’s Web site at http:// ombudsman.my orida.com. The local council meets at Haven Hospice of North Central Florida, 4200 NW 90th Boulevard in Gainesville to discuss the program’s current activities and give the public a chance to provide comments about long-term care facility issues. These public meetings begin at 12:30 p.m. Concerned citizens and those interested in volunteering are welcome to attend. tfnf210 HELP WANTEDCASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS. $300 and up. 352771-6191. 12/27Jp300 RENTALSCHEAPER STORAGE FIRST Month FREE Climate Controlled Down from Dollar General in Williston 352/528-0778 tfnJp440 VACANT LAND FOR SALE1 ACRE IN BRONSON: Beautifully wooded parcel! Nice Neighborhood. Owner Financing! NO DOWN PAYMENT! Total $12,900.00 Only $132/mo. www.LandOwnerFinancing. com or call 352-215-1018. 12/13Jp --------4 ACRES WILLISTON: Secluded country setting. Gorgeous Oaks with cleared homesite. Owner Financing! NO DOWN PAYMENT! Total $39,900.00 Only $410/mo. www.LandOwnerFinancing. com or call 352-215-1018. 12/13Jp --------1 ACRE MORRISTON: WELL SEPTIC & POWER ALREADY INSTALLED!! Cleared homesite. Nice Neighborhood. Owner Financing. No down Payment! $29,900.00. Only 307.56/mo. www. LandOwnerFinancing. com or call 352/215-1018. 12/13Jp --------5 ACRES WILLISTON:. 6671 NE 131 Ave. WELL SEPTIC & POWER! Gorgeous Oak Shaded Homesite! Fenced! Perfect for Horses! Owner Financing! NO DOWN PAYMENT! $59,900.00 Only $525.67/mo www. LandOwnerFinancing. com or call 352/215-1018. 12/13Jp445 WANT TO BUYCASH PAID FOR JUNK CARS. $300 and up. 352771-6191. 12/27Jp500 FOR SALEDIXIE MONUMENTS: Serving North Central Fla. for over a decade. Featuring beautiful bronze, marble & granite monuments in many colors and styles. Choose from 100s of designs or let us custom design any idea you may have! We have the latest technology in laser etchings and can also inscribe nal dates and lettering at the cemetery. Located at 1471 NE 512 Ave. (behind McCrab church) Hwy 349 – 7 miles north of Old Town. Open Tues-Fri 8-4 & Sat. 8-12 or call for after hour’s appt. Toll Free 1-877-542-3432 6/9/13Jp --------BEANIE BABIES & BEANIE BUDDIES. Large collection will sell as a group or individually. Call 352-262-4169 for more information. tfnJe --------LUMBER FOR SALE — Pine, cherry and cypress. Call Sammy at (352) 9493222. ptfn --------THE BUBBLY BATH LIFT holds up to 350 pounds. $400 or best offer. (352) 490-4485. Jftfn515 YARD SALEWILLISTON – DEC. 15, 8 AM until ?? West of Williston off Alt. 27 to rst road past the BP station, south to 5550 NE 137 Terr. Trailer axles, ceramic kiln and mixer, molds, furniture. Something for everyone.540 LIVESTOCKREGISTERED TENNESSEE WALKING HORSE MARE: Big bay mare with excellent pedigree. Excellent broodmare, not trained to ride, halter handled, with same family since birth. Regularly trimmed, shots and wormings, healthy. 10 years old, $300 OBO. Must nd good home before end of year. Call 386/935-2880 or 386/854-0331 for more information. tfnJe --------REG. BRANGUS BULLS – 2 to 5 years old available, gentle dispositions, cert. herd, $2,000/ea. call 352215-1018. 12/13Jp550 FARM PRODUCTSCOASTAL BERMUDA HAY – large round rolls, fertilized, barn stored. Excellent quality. $60/roll. Bahia $40/roll. Call 352215-1018. 12/13Jp555 AUTOMOBILESANY JUNK CAR – cash paid up to $300. Free pickup. 352-445-3909 12/27Jp 4 WEEKS FOR ONLY $20!It’s Our Journal 20/20 Special: Your Ad of 20 Words or Less for 4 Consecutive Weeks, No Changes. $20, 10¢ Each Additional Word. Email classi eds@ levyjournal.com Read the Levy County Journal classi eds 24/7/365 online @LevyJournalOnline.com CLASSIFIED ADS CHIEFLAND MEDICAL CENTER 1113 N.W. 23rd Ave. Chie and(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)OPENMon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m.5 p.m.Sat. 8:30 a.m. NoonWalk-ins Welcome!Call for an appointment: 493-9500

PAGE 12

The Levy County Journal12ADecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 After a round of shopping the other night, my husband Barry and I stopped in Trenton at a restaurant called HobosŽ for some supper. I am glad we did. e food is excellent and freshly done including the shrimp. You can tell when you bite into a juicy shrimp if it is fresh and if it was hand breaded … and the fried shrimp at Hobos “ ts the bill. e steak fries are big with crunch on them and the cole slaw is fresh. Barry had the shrimp and cheesy grits that also included some sausage. He was impressed. e new owners, Glenn and Rebecca Gavitt, have done a wonderful job not only with the menu and choice of chefs but also with the decor. Our server Sam was very attentive and courteous and as we spoke about the Trenton Tigers game he said even though they lost, next year was a new year to try again. If you are looking for a nice place to eat with some original atmosphere, Hobos will deliver. e theme is railroads. From the wood ” oors, to the tables with embedded memorabilia of old train tickets and pictures, to the 100-year-old rafters that Glenn worked hard to save as part of the ambiance and old-fashioned water glass window panes … it was just beautiful and Rebeccas Christmas decorations were perfect. Hobos is in the same building that was  e Olde Boarding House.Ž In fact, the owner of the building Hobos is in used to also have the HomesteadŽ restaurant on US 19 just north of Chie” and where you could get the best seafood bu et ever, and all-you-can-eat bu ets that were never short of meat or delicious sides. And here is a bit of news for anyone who was also sad to see the Homestead close down … remember that awesome broccoli salad? Well, the 65-years-young ladies that used to make that wonderful concoction, that cannot be duplicated, also make it for the Gavitts at Hobos. Yep, you can get it again. But call them to check and see because it is not yet a daily thing, just when the ladies are in to make it. Hobos is a real place to take company or your special spouse or friend for great atmosphere, friendly service, wonderful food and a touch of nostalgia. e Gavitts show a love of and respect for the things of yesteryear and it is a pleasure to be there. e menu includes: Fried Green Tomatoes, Choo Choo Shrimp, homemade soup and salad bar (this is where the broccoli salad is), Coastline Fried Steak, Chicken Kettle Pie, Shrimp and Grits, Conductors Chops, baked sweet potatoes, cinnamon baked apples or Hobo bread, Blackened Bluecheese Burgers, Club Caboose sandwiches, and desserts including an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae. e menu is diverse and should please anyone including the childrens menu. Coming in January will be endless re“ ll nightly specials on certain days with Orient Express, Santa Fe night with tacos and MamaMia night. ere are even free re“ lls on drinks. You can call ahead and order pick up service on all meals. Give Hobos a call at (352) 463-7000 or better yet go there and enjoy the wonderful atmosphere and dining. Hobos is located at 115 NW First Street in Trenton just one block west of the light on SR 26 and 129, turn north, and Hobos is on the left facing onto the Capital City bank. Plenty of parking behind the building and some parking right on First Street.Miss the Homestead Restaurant? – Try Hobo’s in TrentonLog Cabin Quilters e Log Cabin Quilters met ursday, December 6 at the Levy County Quilt Museum. Several worked on the blue quilt in the frame and we selected a new quilt to be given away at the end of next years Quilt Show. We did get pictures of this years winner. On Wednesday, we were very pleased to have several ladies out from Ayers Nursing Home. e ladies had a great visit and we hope they will come back soon. ( e rocking chairs were busy.) Starting in January, we will be having a yard sale/craft show the “ rst Saturday of each month. e public is invited to join us and set up a table on the grass. In February, well be having a Fish Fry on the “ rst Saturday and hopefully some entertainment. Dont forget to visit our webpage for more pictures of the Museum items http://www.thelevycountyquiltmuseum.org. We are located at 11050 NW 10th Ave which is about 1 mile o Alt 27 on CR134. Our phone number 352/493-2292. Our items are Made in AmericaŽ and by local crafters. Alice Mae Haire who worked on the quilt an d Karen Rutter who won this quilt at the end of our Quilt Show last week. Congratu lations Karen, we are very happy for you. PLUS, get 20%* off other gifts! 33%*SAVE*Your 33% discount is applied to “Santa’s Workshop” regular site price. Plus, take 20% off the regular price of products over All for: $29.99 +s/h$19.99+s/h33%*offSantas WorkshopThis festive mini-Christmas tree is sure to brighten up the holiday season. Enjoy Hurry! Order right now and get Santas Workshop for the unbelievable direct LOW PRICE OF JUST $19.99+s/hVisit ProFlowers.com/Fresh or call 888.706.2142 Wednesday and Thursday, D ecember 19 and 20, 2012 12:30 pm – 6:30 pm Joyce Bullock Elementary Cafeteria EVERYTHING IS ONLY $5.99! Thousands of Books and Gifts! $$$ from every item sold will be donated to: Relay for Life Sponsored by: Joyce Bullock Elementary School Williston, Florida 32696 Mitchs Gold & Diamonds Ellie Slovaks grandmother followed the Ranger into the o ce to guarantee that Ellies would be the “ rst Youth Hunt Permit on record at the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge for 2012. I want to be able to tell her that I got her permit already,Ž she said. One hundred doe tags were distributed by the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge in order that youth could take antlerless deer during the 3-day Youth Hunt at the Refuge. All the permits were claimed by youth from 8 counties in Florida. ese numbers would convince many that the southern hunting culture is alive and well in 2012, but thats not the case. Unfortunately, nowhere near one hundred young hunters were brought to the woods this past weekend. e Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge has continually o ered Youth Hunts for more than a decade, but this year management added Family Hunts. During Youth Hunts, the adult is the mentor giving direction, but cannot hunt nor carry the gun. e Family Hunt allows the mentor to hunt alongside the youth hunter. In fact, up to two youths can accompany the mentor, making this a much more engaging hunt. You still have an opportunity to engage your youth hunters in 3-days of hunting, December 21-23, just before the holiday. FAMILY HUNTS allow an experienced adult hunter to bring up to 2 youth hunters all can hunt together. FREE permits are available for hunters of the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge by calling 352/493-0238. e permit includes Refuge-speci“ c regulations, a map, and all hunt dates as well as information about the annual Hunter Working Group meeting on May 4, 2013. — story and photo courtesy of Pam Darty, Refuge Ranger, Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys Nat'l Wildlife Refuges FREE Three-Day Family Hunts Dec. 21-23After hunting the Refuge Youth Hunt for several years, Ellie Slovak got her deer. $25 /year in Levy County $30 /year in Florida $35 /year Outside FloridaSubscribe! Your Locally-Owned Paper of Record since 1923JournalLevy County even though the reserves had gone down we had spent the money wisely on infrastructure for the roads and water lines. Public Comment None Correspondence Mr. Grady let the Commissioners know that Representative Bembry had closed his o ce in Chie” and. e Mayor suggested that the City Manager send him a letter thanking him for all his hard work on behalf of Chie” and, and include Teresa Watson as well. Mr. Grady said he had rented the other half of the new Industrial Park building for at least three months to a company building utility trailers. Mr. Grady told the Commission that the new sidewalk project was completed and looked good. e Vice-Mayor said she appreciated the City Managers hard work on the project. Mr. Grady said he had given each one of the Commissioners a report about the mold “ ndings in City Hall and would like them to review it for discussion at the next meeting. He said they may need a second opinion but they would talk about it later. e Mayor said he wanted to talk about the Christmas Parade at the next meeting. Approval of Regular Meeting Minutes October 22, 2012 Commissioner Cason made the motion to approve the Regular Meeting Minutes from October 22, 2012. Vice-Mayor Baron seconded the motion. Motion passed 5-0 ere being no further business to discuss, the meeting adjourned at 7:30 PM. Attest; Grady Hartzog, City Manager M. Teal Pomeroy, Mayor/CommissionerRecorded by: Laurie Copeland, Financial Project CoordinatorChie and City Meeting Nov. 13,2012 continued from page 9

PAGE 13

www.levyjournalonline.com L e v y L i f e Levy LifeLEVY COUNTY JOURNAL VOL. 89, NO. 23 50 CENTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923SECTION BOn November 5, 2012, a group of Levy County High School students toured Santa Fe College in Gainesville. e purpose of the trip was to give the students a “ rst-hand look at the career and technical programs o ered at the college. ey were able to visit the Welding, Auto Mechanics and Health Sciences programs. e students gained a wealth of knowledge about a variety of vocations and about possibilities for future employment. ey ended their trip by having lunch in the food court along with the college students!„ picture and story submitted by Pamela J. ompson, M. Ed, Levy County School BoardLevy County Students Visit Santa Fe College Williston Middle School Named ‘Play 60 Super School’ by NFL – Receives $10,000.00 Grant When Coach Trent Viau received an email from a colleague, advising him about a grant opportunity from the NFL worth $10,000.00 he considered deleting the email, thinking there was little chance that a small rural middle school in Levy County could ever be fortunate enough to win such a large amount of money. But the more he read about the grant, the more convinced he became that Williston Middle School would be a perfect pick for such a grant. In order to qualify, schools had to answer three questions related to celebrating the return of the NFL season, the PE environment at their school and their commitment to educating their students about the importance of health and wellness. In addition to the questions an essay had to be included, describing why the school would be a good choice as the grant recipient. Coach Viau said the questions were pretty easy to answer and the essay was obvious, because WMS is situated in a small town where athletics and physical health are important to our community and WMS is housed in a very old facility that needs many upgrades in the area of sports and physical education equipment. Along with the written submission Coach Viau held an NFL Fan Day where students and sta dressed in the colors of their favorite team and took pictures of the events. After Coach Viau submitted the grant application, the waiting began. Coach Viau watched daily for the announcement of the winner. When the news came that WMS had been named a winner in the Play 60 Super School Contest, the entire campus could hardly contain their excitement. e school is looking forward to a visit from the NFL and the award of $10,000.00, which will be used to purchase equipment for the physical education program at WMS. For more information about the contest and the rewards visit http://n” superschool.teamdigital.com/o cial-rules.php Way to go Coach Viau … and thank youŽ NFL. „ story and photo submitted by Pamela Asbell, Principal of Williston Middle School e Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is announcing the 2013 Python Challenge’ with its goal of increasing public awareness about Burmese pythons and how this invasive species is a threat to the Everglades ecosystem, including native wildlife. As part of the Python Challenge, both the public and Floridas python permit holders are invited to compete to see who can harvest the longest and the most Burmese pythons. On Jan. 12, the Python Challenge’ Kicko will initiate a month-long program of harvesting Burmese pythons from public lands, and the public can see and learn more about these large constrictors. e kicko is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the University of Floridas Fort Lauderdale Research & Education Center, which will hold its invasive species open house that day.  e FWC is encouraging the public to get involved in helping us remove Burmese pythons from public lands in south Florida,Ž said Kristen Sommers, head of the FWCs Exotic Species Coordination Section. By enlisting both the public and Floridas python permit holders in a month-long competitive harvesting of Burmese pythons, we hope to motivate more people to “ nd and harvest these large, invasive snakes. e Python Challenge gives people a chance to sign up for a competition to see who can catch the longest or the most pythons. Part of the goal of the Python Challenge is to educate the public to understand why nonnative species like Burmese pythons should never be released into the wild and encourage people to report sightings of exotic species,Ž Sommers said. We also expect the competitive harvesting of Burmese pythons to result in additional information on the python population in south Florida and enhance our research and management e orts.Ž Grand prizes of $1,500 for harvesting the most Burmese pythons will be awarded to winners of both the General Competition and the Python Permit Holders Competition, with additional $1,000 prizes for the longest Burmese python harvested in both competitions. Funding for the prizes is provided by Python Challenge’ sponsors. e largest Burmese python documented in Florida was more than 17 feet in length. Complete information on the Python Challenge’, including how to train and register for the competitions and more about upcoming south Florida events, is available at PythonChallenge.org.FWC Announces 2013 Python Challenge™ Burmese Python continued on page 10B

PAGE 14

The Levy County Journal2BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Final selections will be chosen based on artistic excellence and originality. Each submission will also be evaluated on how e ectively it will read outdoors when enlarged to billboard size (16 feet wide by 12 feet high 4.88 m high by 3.81 m wide). Final selections will be made by a three judge panel of art professionals. For complete details, go to: embracingourdi erences.org to see requirements and download an applicaiton Submissions must be postmarked by Mon., Jan. 7, 2013. Only artists selected for display will be noti“ ed directly. Winning selections will be announced on Facebook in March 2013. LikeŽ us and be among the “ rst to view the 2013 exhibit.Cedar Key City Council Meeting Dec. 18 e Cedar Key City Council meets every third Tues. at 7 p.m. at the Cedar Key City Hall with the next meeting on Dec. 18. e Cedar Key Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) meets the “ rst Tues. of each month at 6 p.m. with the next meeting being on Dec. 4 at City Hall. City Hall is located at 490 2nd Street … 352/543-5132.YANKEETOWN-INGLISYankeetown-Inglis Woman’s Club All women in the Yankeetown-Inglis area are invited to join us on the “ rst Wednesday of every month at 12 noon for social mingling, with the meeting starting at 12:30 PM. We have Yoga on Mon. mornings 8:30-10 AM. Were mixing it up with di erent DVDs at Zumba on Tues. and urs. mornings at 9 AM. No charge for classes, but we are asking for donations to cover the overhead. Bingo and the Chuck Wagon Caf Stop by the Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club urs. evenings from 5:307:00 PM and check out whats for dinner...eat in or take-out. e ladies will be serving up sandwiches, salads, desserts, hotdogs, sausages and hamburgers. e homemade specials for December are: Dec 13th Shrimp Creole for $5.00; Dec. 20thStu ed Cabbage for $3.50 and Dec. 27thPizza by the slice, $2.00 each.. Tues. thru Sat. 10 AM -2 PM. and urs. 5 PM -7 PM before Bingo.... en stay and play Bingo. Cards and specials are $1 each and you can play all games for as little as $6. Check our website: www.yiwomansclub.com, follow us on Facebook or call 352/447-2057 for information. e Second to None rift Shoppe at the YankeetownInglis Womans Club is stu ed to the gills with holiday cheer! Stop by the shop on 56th St., Yankeetown and check out the specials for December: 50% OFF mens clothes and shoes, womens slacks, jeans, shoes and purses, plus selected housewares. Make plans to drop by soon because the shoppe will only be open until December 15th. e Womans Club volunteer elves need a short break to recharge and will be back in action January 2nd for those after-Christmas specials. Questions? please call the shoppe at 352/447-2057 to “ nd a cheerful answer.Inglis Council Meeting Jan. 8, 2013 e Town of Inglis next regular Commission meeting will be on Jan. 8, 2013 at 6 PM in the Commission Room. City Hall, 135 Hwy. 40 West, Inglis … 352/447-2203. Meetings are held the second Tuesday of each month. Yankeetown Town Meetings ere will be a Board of Trustees Workshop on urs. Dec. 13 at 5:30 PM. A Special Council meeting will be held on Dec. 17 at 7 PM. e next Regular Board of Trustees meeting is Jan. 3, 2013 at 5:30 PM. City Hall is at 6241 Harmony Lane, 352/447-2511Cleaning For a Reason – for Cancer PatientsIf you know any woman currently undergoing chemotherapy, please pass the word to her that there is a cleaning service that provides free housecleaning … once per month for four months while she is in treatment. All she has Levy County Community Calendar BRONSONBronson Parks & Recreation Bronson Parks & Recreation would like to extend the opportunity to anyone who would like to be considered as a coach for the Spring Baseball, Softball and T-Ball season. If you are interested please call Curtis Stacy at 352-486-2354. Friends of the Bronson LibraryChocoholics DreamŽ Basket Ra e and Childrens Christmas Party Do you dream of a basket full of chocolate? en you need to come to the Bronson Library and purchase a ra e ticket ($1 for 1 ticket or $5 for 6 tickets) before Sun., Dec. 16th. We will have a drawing for our Chocoholics DreamŽ Basket at the end of our annual Childrens Christmas Party which will be held on Sun., Dec 16 from 1 to 3 PM. Santa will be there, stu ed stockings for the kids and refreshments for all. ere will be a reading of Twas the Night Before Christmas. For more information, call the Bronson Library at 486-2015.Bronson Town Council Meeting Dec. 17 e next meeting of the Bronson Town Council will be on Mon. Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Dogan S. Cobb Municipal Building. City Hall … 352/486-2354.Bronson FFA Alumni Selling Christmas Trees e Bronson FFA Alumni Organization will be selling Christmas Trees again this Holiday season at the red light in Bronson. e Frazer “ r trees will range in size from 6 feet to 8 feet tall. Most trees will be $35 with the trees nearing 8 feet being sold for $40. All proceeds go to the Bronson FFA Alumni Organization to be used for scholarships for FFA students. To pre-order a tree, contact Amanda Huber at ahuber@svic.net or 486-5032; Jennifer Bray at brayj@levy. k12.” .us; or Jeannie Norris at norrisj@levy.k12.” .us. Pre-ordered trees were picked up and paid for by Nov. 27, 2012. Now, all trees will be on sale at the red light in Bronson. Tree sales will be during daylight hours until all trees are sold. Get your trees early. ese are very nice trees and are far less expensive than lots plus you will be helping the FFA students at Bronson Middle High School. Levy County Republican Executive Committee e Levy County Republican Executive Committee meets at 7 PM at the Bronson Restaurant in Bronson, Florida on the 3rd Monday of the month. Come at 6:30 and get a meal Dutch Treat and mingle. www.levyrepublicans.comGreater Bronson Area Chamber of CommerceMembership fees are $25 for individuals and $50 for businesses. We are welcoming new members! If you are interested, please contact bronsoncoc@gmail.com or laci_ lynn@hotmail.com. If you would like more information about joining the Greater Bronson Area Chamber of Commerce or about meeting times, please email info@bronsoncoc.com OTTER CREEKOtter Creek Council Meeting Dec. 17 e Otter Creek Town Council will conduct their regular meeting on Mon. Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. at the Town Hall.GAINESVILLEQuilt Exhibition at Trinity United Methodist Church Thru Jan. 6Join the Quilters of Alachua County Day Guild (QACDG) at Trinity United Methodist Church quilt exhibition, located at 4000 NW 53rd Avenue in Gainesville, that includes quilts that go on beds, quilts that hang on walls, and “ ber art creations in a showcase. e quilts and other works of “ ber art will remain on display in the churchs art gallery through Sun., Jan. 6. Art gallery hours are Mon. through urs., 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fri. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sun., 8 a.m. to noon. e gallery is closed Saturday. For more information, contact Judy Kavanagh, (386) 518-6402, or Grace TeSelle, art exhibit committee, (352) 3728673, at Trinity United Methodist Church, (352) 376-6615.CEDAR KEYCedar Key Arts Center December 2012 WorkshopsGallery Openings: “Florida’s Eden: Visions for the Region” opened Sat., Dec. 1st. e show features the work of 16 regional artists in media spanning photography, painting, and craft. Jacqui Collett, exhibition curator for Floridas Eden carefully selected pieces that depict and represent the Regions stunning natural and cultural assets. Come and see the results which include solar, green building, a green marina, aquaculture, recycling, local culinary, art, heritage story telling, and more! is is both creative community development and aware tourism at its very best. Visit and support their worthy e orts. Every WednesdayBoat Builders, 9 a.m., earldorothy@ bellsouth.net Plein Air Painting from the Ground Up (starting Dec. 11) with Ray Hassard, has been CANCELLED Dec. 16 – 22: Open Studio. Embracing Our Di erences, an annual outdoor juried art competition, is seeking visual art submissions interpreting our theme of enriching lives through diversity.Ž e exhibit uses art to deepen community awareness that standing up against hatred and respecting the beliefs of others is not only a way of thinking and feeling, but most importantly, of acting. Artists, photographers, professionals, amateurs, teachers, students all ages everyone can participate. National and international submissions are encouraged. ere is no entry fee and you may submit more than one entry. Your submission must be an original concept and may not be a copy or reproduction of the work of another. Levy County Saltwater and Freshwater Tides DAY HIGH TIDE HEIGHT SUNRISE MOON % MOON /LOW TIME /FEET SUNSET TIME VISIBLECedar KeyTh 13 High 12:27 AM 4.2 7:18 AM Rise 7:26 AM 0 13 Low 7:51 AM -1.2 5:36 PM Set 6:15 PM 13 High 2:31 PM 3.2 13 Low 7:41 PM 1.3 F 14 High 1:16 AM 4.2 7:18 AM Rise 8:26 AM 0 14 Low 8:38 AM -1.2 5:36 PM Set 7:22 PM 14 High 3:15 PM 3.2 14 Low 8:29 PM 1.2 Sa 15 High 2:05 AM 4.2 7:19 AM Rise 9:19 AM 3 15 Low 9:23 AM -1 5:36 PM Set 8:29 PM 15 High 3:57 PM 3.1 15 Low 9:17 PM 1.1 Su 16 High 2:56 AM 4 7:19 AM Rise 10:05 AM 9 16 Low 10:06 AM -0.7 5:37 PM Set 9:34 PM 16 High 4:36 PM 3.1 16 Low 10:07 PM 1 M 17 High 3:47 AM 3.7 7:20 AM Rise 10:47 AM 16 17 Low 10:47 AM -0.3 5:37 PM Set 10:36 PM 17 High 5:13 PM 3.1 17 Low 11:00 PM 0.9 Tu 18 High 4:42 AM 3.3 7:21 AM Rise 11:24 AM 26 18 Low 11:28 AM 0.1 5:38 PM Set 11:35 PM 18 High 5:52 PM 3.1 18 Low 11:57 PM 0.8 W 19 High 5:44 AM 2.9 7:21 AM Rise 12:00 PM 36 19 Low 12:09 PM 0.5 5:38 PM 19 High 6:33 PM 3.1 Suwannee River EntranceTh 13 High 12:33 AM 3.7 7:18 AM Rise 7:27 AM 0 13 Low 8:09 AM -1.1 5:36 PM Set 6:15 PM 13 High 2:37 PM 2.8 13 Low 7:59 PM 1.2 F 14 High 1:22 AM 3.7 7:19 AM Rise 8:26 AM 0 14 Low 8:56 AM -1.1 5:36 PM Set 7:23 PM 14 High 3:21 PM 2.8 14 Low 8:47 PM 1.1 Sa 15 High 2:11 AM 3.7 7:20 AM Rise 9:19 AM 3 15 Low 9:41 AM -0.9 5:37 PM Set 8:30 PM 15 High 4:03 PM 2.7 15 Low 9:35 PM 1 Su 16 High 3:02 AM 3.5 7:20 AM Rise 10:06 AM 9 16 Low 10:24 AM -0.7 5:37 PM Set 9:35 PM 16 High 4:42 PM 2.7 16 Low 10:25 PM 0.9 M 17 High 3:53 AM 3.3 7:21 AM Rise 10:47 AM 16 17 Low 11:05 AM -0.3 5:37 PM Set 10:37 PM 17 High 5:19 PM 2.7 17 Low 11:18 PM 0.9 Tu 18 High 4:48 AM 2.9 7:21 AM Rise 11:25 AM 26 18 Low 11:46 AM 0.1 5:38 PM Set 11:36 PM 18 High 5:58 PM 2.7 W 19 Low 12:15 AM 0.8 7:22 AM Rise 12:00 PM 36 19 High 5:50 AM 2.6 5:38 PM 19 Low 12:27 PM 0.5 19 High 6:39 PM 2.7 Withlacoochee River EntranceTh 13 High 12:34 AM 3.8 7:16 AM Rise 7:25 AM 0 13 Low 8:46 AM -1.1 5:35 PM Set 6:14 PM 13 High 2:38 PM 2.9 13 Low 8:36 PM 1.2 F 14 High 1:23 AM 3.8 7:17 AM Rise 8:24 AM 0 14 Low 9:33 AM -1.1 5:35 PM Set 7:21 PM 14 High 3:22 PM 2.9 14 Low 9:24 PM 1.1 Sa 15 High 2:12 AM 3.8 7:17 AM Rise 9:17 AM 3 15 Low 10:18 AM -0.9 5:36 PM Set 8:29 PM 15 High 4:04 PM 2.8 15 Low 10:12 PM 1 Su 16 High 3:03 AM 3.6 7:18 AM Rise 10:04 AM 9 16 Low 11:01 AM -0.7 5:36 PM Set 9:33 PM 16 High 4:43 PM 2.8 16 Low 11:02 PM 0.9 M 17 High 3:54 AM 3.4 7:19 AM Rise 10:45 AM 16 17 Low 11:42 AM -0.3 5:36 PM Set 10:35 PM 17 High 5:20 PM 2.8 17 Low 11:55 PM 0.9 Tu 18 High 4:49 AM 3 7:19 AM Rise 11:23 AM 26 18 Low 12:23 PM 0.1 5:37 PM Set 11:34 PM 18 High 5:59 PM 2.8 W 19 Low 12:52 AM 0.8 7:20 AM Rise 11:59 AM 36 19 High 5:51 AM 2.6 5:37 PM 19 Low 1:04 PM 0.5 19 High 6:40 PM 2.8 continued on page 3BWeather Forecast http://www.accuweather.com/en/us/bronson/32621/daily-weather-forecast/332291 STEERS: LOW HIGH AVG LAST WEEK 150-199 130.00 212.50 172.50 200-249 125.00 212.50 168.30 250-299 138.00 210.00 179.16 300-349 128.00 187.50 158.93 350-399 126.00 166.00 140.18 400-449 126.00 161.00 134.50 450-499 125.00 140.00 130.71 500-549 125.00 140.00 129.44 550-599 128.00 138.00 133.20 600-700 130.00 132.00 131.00 HEIFERS: 150-199 135.00 170.00 148.38 200-249 130.00 168.00 147.86 250-299 135.00 158.00 146.50 300-349 128.00 166.00 144.07 350-399 128.00 142.00 134.00 400-449 126.00 135.00 128.00 450-499 128.00 132.00 130.00 500-599 125.00 126.00 125.50 COWS : 500-600 76.00 123.00 104.04 600-799 60.00 110.00 84.18 800-999 60.00 100.00 74.53 1000-1199 63.00 110.00 76.01 1200-1399 64.00 85.00 76.09 1400-1599 65.00 89.50 76.72 1600-UP 70.00 82.50 77.78 BULLS : 1000-1500 77.50 96.50 85.77 1500-UP 91.50 107.00 99.87 PAIRS : 400.00 1250.00 850.00 TOTAL : 795.00 North Florida Livestock MarketWednesday December 5, 2012Compared to last week, slaughter cattle were steady to a couple dollars stronger. Yearlings were steady on the lighter end (under 300 lbs) but a couple of dollars higher on the heavier end. Circle H Ranch of Brooker, Fla. topped the slaughter bullmarket with $107 and UF Dairy Unit of Gainesville, Fla. topped the slaughter cow market with $89.50. Deas Brothers of Jennings, Fla. topped the replacement cow market with $123 bought by DH Cattle and Elmer Rudd of Jacksonville, Fla. topped the replacement bull market with $115 bought by Har D Ranch. Tommy Davis of Bell, Fla. sold the high pair at $1250 bought by Joe Bullard and the high price yearling went to Rush Creek Ranch at $212.50 sold by Gateway Farms. Check us out on the web at www.north” oridalivestock. com for our market report, news and upcoming events or drop us a line at n” m@att.net

PAGE 15

The Levy County Journal 3BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923Community Calendar continued from page 2Bto do is sign up and have her doctor fax a note con“ rming the treatment. Cleaning for a Reason will have a participating maid service in her zip code area arrange for the service. is organization serves the entire US and currently has 547 partners to help these women. It is our job to pass the word and let them know that there are people out there that care. Be a blessing to someone and pass this information along. http://www.cleaningforareason.org/. ank you … from the Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club.WILLISTONWilliston Lions Club Events e Williston Lions Club is located at 401 SE 6th Avenue in Williston where we have regular events throughout the week and month for all to participate. We are looking for new members and volunteers so if you want to help out the community and have something enjoyable to do, come and see us. Our meetings are held every month on the 2nd Tuesday of the month and guests are very welcome. We will be planning future events so your assistance in this matter is greatly appreciated. If you need to reach us by phone call 352/3427525. ursdays: Bingo @ 7 p.m. We o er two Jackpots. If an attendee brings a friend, that attendee will get a free card. Saturdays: Farmers Market and Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.Williston City Council Meeting Dec. 18 e Williston City Council meets at City Hall on the “ rst Tuesday after the “ rst Monday of each month and again in two weeks on Tuesday after the “ rst one at 7 p.m. in the Williston City Council Room. e next Council meeting is Dec. 18. City Hall is at 50 NW Main Street, Williston, 352/528-3060. Relay for Life Book Sale Fundraiser Dec. 19 & 20 Joyce Bullock Elementary School is hosting a Books are FunŽ Fundraiser for Relay for Life on Dec. 19 & 20 from 12:30 to 6:30 PM in the cafeteria. Everything is $5.00 for this Holiday Sale with thousands of books and gifts. Come and do your Christmas shopping and help out Relay for Life. Levy County Autism Support Group Autism 4 Parents & Understanding U are hosting monthly meetings on the last Tuesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at 40 NW 1st Street in Williston. For more information: 352/529-1010. Each month a new topic is introduced and valuable resources are shared. Our online web site for information is: www.autism4parents.org/DUNNELLONRainbow Springs Santa Over the Rainbow Starts Dec. 14Santa Over the Rainbow, our annual winter event, is upon us. Dates are: Dec.14 through the 16, Dec. 21 through 23, and Lights Only, Dec.26 and 27. e Park will open at 6 PM and gates will close at 8:30 PM. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be arriving about 7 PM on the Rainbow River by pontoon sleigh. Again this year John and Karen Wynne are donating the use of their boat to be decorated as the sleigh. Walk through the park and enjoy the beauty of the light displays that your neighborhood volunteers have been working on since November to create. Enjoy listening to some of the musical groups such as the Shade Tree Pickers, the James Brothers and others who also volunteer their talents to help create this event. Relax and enjoy the lights on the Veranda with a cup of hot cocoa or hot apple cider from our concession stand. Our gift shop will be open for those last-minute purchases. Linda Booth is again coordinator for event. Admission for Santa Over the Rainbow is still only $1 and children 5 and under are free. You can have your photo taken with Santa and Mrs. Claus for only $2. Yes, well-behaved animals are welcome, on a leash (or cage), but please wait until the children have their chance to visit Santa. We all hope to see you at the park.CITRUS COUNTYAARP Safe Driving CoursesFlorida is a mandated State and any insurance company doing business in Florida must give a discount to those completing an AARP Safe Driving Course. Open to all 50 and older. Contact your agent for discount amounts. Update yourself to earn a discount and get newly enacted motor vehicle and tra c laws. Course fee is $12 for AARP members and $14 all others. Call the listed instructor below to register. Crystal River, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs Jan. 15 & 16, 1 PM … 4 PM, Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-5640933. Inverness, Hernando, Floral City Jan. 15 & 16, 9 AM … 12 PM., at Citrus Memorial Health Systems Auditorium, call Don Slough at 352-344-4003.CHIEFLANDFriends of The Chie and Library Board Meeting Dec. 13 e Friends of the Luther Callaway Public Library (FLCPL) Board of Directors, will hold their monthly meeting at the Library, at 11:00 a.m. on urs. Dec. 13. Members, prospective members and guests are welcome at all meetings. For further information, call FLCPL president Tom Reitz at 493-1896 or 949-5413 or email at: tomreitz@ msn.comHardeetown Baptist Church Christmas Cantata Dec. 15 & 16Hardeetown Baptist Church will present two performances of Christmas Where, When and WhyŽ on Sat., Dec. 15 and on Sun. Dec. 16, both at 6:00 PM. We will be serving light refreshments after the performances. e church is located at: 1716 NE 14 St. in Chie” and.Chie and City Commission Meeting Jan. 14, 2013 e Chie” and City Commission meets at City Hall on Mondays with the next meeting being in Jan.17 of 2013 as the Dec. 24 meeting is cancelled. e Recreation Committee will meet on Dec. 20 at 12 PM at City Hall. City Hall is located at 214 E. Park Avenue, Chie” and, 352/4936711.AARP Tax Aide Needs VolunteersWant to help with tax preparations in our communities? Tax Aide needs volunteers and also instructors and computer technicians. Luther Callaway Library is the Chie” and tax site. For more information about classes in January call Bob at 352/463-8936 or email: rcburkhardt@ earthlink.netGILCHRIST COUNTYAARP Meeting Dec. 18 at Lodge of Otter Springs.A Very Merry Christmas to all of our 194 members; its been a great year with the leadership of our board under the direction of our President David (Duke) Lang. Im sure that when the “ nal tally is in, Barbara Bader, our Community Service reporter will tell us that we have reached our goal of 25,000 volunteer hours. is months meeting at 10:30 AM at the Lodge of Otter Springs on Dec. 18 will be the installation of our 2013 o cers; the slate is headed by our new President Jimmy She eld. Entertainment this month will be provided by Cowboy Dave, who will lead us in many of our favorite Christmas Carols. Bring you voice for a Merry Sing AlongŽ Cowboy Dave, the Philman Family Band, the AARP Choir and many other local artists have performed on the new Christmas CD that is being sold throughout our county for $5.00 each with the proceeds going to the Food Pantry of Gilchrist County. I will have CDs at the meeting for sale. ey make excellent Christmas Gifts for family and friends. Faye She eld, our Hospitality Chairlady, and her able crew, which includes many of the best cooks in our county, has informed me that we will be having ham, so please bring salads, vegetables, desserts, and drinks to round out our Christmas Banquet. See you at the meeting with CANS IN HAND. Norm ContiAmerican Legion Post 91 Christmas Party Dec. 20Come join us for Bingo every Tuesday evening at our smoke-free and alcohol-free Bingo Hall at 4200 S. US Hwy 129 between Trenton and Bell across from the Field of DreamsŽ with doors open at 6:30 PM and games at 7 PM. Bingo Games are open to the public. Free co ee is provided or during the cooler winter season free hot chocolate. e American Legion was formally chartered in 1919 by returning WWI veterans who saw a need for a strong national veterans organization. eir diligence and vision led to creation of the Veterans Administration and the GI Bill of Rights. e Bill of Rights has been amended as needed on a continuous basis ever since and largely at the relentless e ort of the American Legion. e American Legion Family at Post 91 has several goals for this current membership drive during the months of December and January. Together, members of e American Legion, e American Legion Auxiliary, the Sons of e American Legion, and the American Legion Riders make up what is known as e Legion Family. All four organizations Around the Nature Coast Levy County Libraries Pre-school Storytime ese programs use books and music to present young children with the concept that books, reading, and libraries are fun and enjoyed at all ages. e programs last 30 minutes. Bronson Public Library Monday, Dec. 17 @ 10:30 AMWRPC Board of Directors Annual Meeting Dec. 13 e WRPC Board of Directors Annual Meeting is scheduled for urs., Dec. 13. e Nominating Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m., prior to Open House at 6:00 p.m., and the Annual Meeting at 7:00 p.m. e meeting will be held at the Withlacoochee Regional Planning Council o ce, located at 1241 S. W. 10th Street, Ocala, FL 34471-0323. Refreshments/Covered Dishes for the Open House are to be provided by the WRPC Board Members. Board Members Spouse/Guest is invited to attend. Ms. Roberts will be contacting all WRPC Board Members to coordinate their refreshment/covered dish contributions. All of these meetings are open to the public.WWII Vets and Proud of It Meeting Dec. 13World War II Vets and Proud of It will meet urs. Dec. 13, which is the 2nd ursday of the month, in Williston at Melanies Diner at 11:30 AM. Any questions, please contact me, Virginia Lewis at 352/528-2310. Bring a spouse or friend with you. Hope to see you there.Fla. Long-term Care Ombudsman Meeting Dec. 13Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents -who often have no one else to advocate for them -are encouraged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs Web site at http://ombudsman.my” orida.com. e local council will meet on Dec. 13 at 12:30 p.m. at Haven Hospice of North Central Florida, 4200 NW 90th Boulevard in Gainesville to discuss the programs current activities and give the public a chance to provide comments about long-term care facility issues. A short video introducing the program will play 15 minutes prior to the meeting.SHINE Looking for VolunteersDo you have 16 hours a month to help Seniors in your community? SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) needs volunteers. Call 1-800-96-ELDER (or 1-800-963-5337) to train as a SHINE volunteer. SHINE is a statewide volunteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder A airs, o ering counseling and assistance with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, prescription drug assistance, supplemental insurance and Medicare fraud. We will train you fully at no cost to you. e upcoming SHINE training consists of: € Orientation (two hours) … January 11, 2013 from 1 PM to 3 PM; € Basic Training (three days) … February 13, 14 + 15, 2013 from 9:30 AM to 4 PM; € Mentoring (six sessions) scheduled as convenient. All training to take place at ELDER OPTIONS, 100 SW 75th Street (Tower Rd) in Gainesville. Mentoring will be arranged with an experienced SHINE counselor in the community in which you live. Registration is Required by December 28, 2012. Meals are provided and mileage reimbursed. If you live more than 50 miles from Gainesville, you have the option of staying in a hotel and receiving full reimbursement during SHINE training. SHINE is dedicated to providing free and unbiased information and counseling through a dedicated network of volunteers, empowering Florida Seniors, their families and caregivers, to make informed healthcare choices. For additional information or to request a SHINE Volunteer Application Packet, call 352-692-5264 or toll free: 1-800-963-5337.Pet Pics with Santa PawsFurr-Ever Furtography will be taking pics with your pet and Santa Paws at Trenton Floral & Gifts on Dec. 15, 16, 22, 23. For $9.95 you will get a CD with “ ve poses and you must sign a waiver to use the pics. For more information call Teri at (352) 949-3767.LGREA Meeting Dec. 17A large contingent of the Levy/Gilchrist Retired Educators Assoc. met on Mon. Nov. 19 at Beef O Bradys in Chie” and. e guest was Leslie Alphonso from Another Way, Inc. Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Center. Its mission is to o er counseling, support and shelter to survivors of domestic and sexual violence in addition to providing a positive alternative to violence thorough community education. Ms. Alphonso spoke of emotional, psychological, sexual and physical abuse with indicators of abuse … bruises, truancy, failing grades, loss of self esteem, indecision, use of drugs and alcohol, pregnancy and constantly being on edge.Ž is organization serves both men and women. e next LGREA meeting will be held at the Ivy House on Mon. Dec. 17 in Williston at 10Ž30 AM. We invite former educators to visit and join. Delia Long, LGREA reporter. Levy County BoCC Dec. 18 e Levy County Board of County Commissioners will meet on Tues. Dec. 18 at 9 AM in the meeting room in the courthouse located at 355 S. Court Street in Bronson. Donate Shoes to Help Millions Worldwide & See a Play Dec. 18Soles4Souls, the international shoe charity is ramping up e orts to help individuals in need this Christmas. And Creekside Christian School is getting on board to help. e charitys international and domestic partners redistribute shoes so millions of children and adults can receive their “ rst pair of shoes. Please join Creekside Christian School in this initiative to collect gently worn footwear, and possibly improve the quality of someones daily life. DROP OFF SPOTS: Merle Norman in Chie” and and Creekside Christian School in Otter Creek. Creekside Christian School will be performing, Christmas Shoe TreeŽ, a play about Soles4Souls on Dec. 18 at 7:00 PM. Everyone is welcome to attend. We are asking for a donation of a pair of shoes for admission and a love o ering will be taken to help with the cost of shipping the collected shoes. For more information on how to get involved and donate, visit www.giveshoes.org. Or call 352-486-2112 or email Ginny at ginnyloukeith@bellsouth.net PUBLIC MEETING NOTICEThe Legislative Committee of FLOW (Florida Leaders Organized for Water) will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, December 17, in the Taste of Dixie Diner Conference Room, 16840 SE 12 Avenue (Hwy 19), Cross City, Florida 32628.Lucinda (Lu) Merritt for FLOW/Florida Leaders Organized for Water lumerritt@windstream.net 386-454-0415

PAGE 16

The Levy County Journal4BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 continued on page 5B W o r s h i p D i r e c t o r y Worship Directory Come and Worship 8:45 am Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 7:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study (except 3rd Wednesday)Reverend Priscilla Scherrah, PastorTel. 352-486-2281 Bronson United Methodist Church235 Court Street Bronson, Florida Serving God & Loving PeopleŽ Sunday:Sunday School 9:15 am Morning Worship 10:30 am Discipleship Hour 5:00 pm Evening Worship 6:30 pmTuesday:Sr. Adult Bible Study 10:00amWednesday:Church Supper 5:30pm RA/GA Childrens Program 6:30pm Full Throttle Youth 6:30pm Prayer Hour 6:30pmPastor Troy A. Turner 451 S. Court Street Bronson, FL 32621352.486.2282 of Bronson First United Methodist Church of Chiefland Otter Creek Baptist ChurchBro. Jason Jones, PastorServices ... SundaySunday School 9:00 am Worship 10:00 am WednesdayDinner 5:30 pm Awanas 6:00 pm Worship 7:00 pm171 SW 3rd Street Otter Creek 352-486-2112 Pine Grove Baptist Church16655 N. W. CR-339 Trenton, Florida 32693352-463-2151www.pgbcfl.net Blended Worship ........................................................ 8:00 a.m. Sunday School ............................................................ 9:15 a.m. Contemporary Worship ............................................. 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ......................................................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Services: AWANA ...................................................................... 6:30 p.m. Prayer Meeting, Youth, College & Career ..................... 7:00 p.m.~ Nursery provided for all services ~Dr. Greg Douglas, Senior Pastor Pastor Rickey Whitley, Assoc. Pastor/Youth Pastor Emanuel Harris, Education/Children Pastor Jared Douglas, Collegiate/Missions Pastor Josh Ryals, Music Ellzey UnitedMethodist ChurchCorner of 336 & Hwy 24 Worship Service ............ 11 a.m. Sunday School. ...............10 a.m.Pastor Doug Fleming Manatee Springs Church of ChristSunday 10 a.m. .............................Bible Study 11 a.m.......................Worship Period 5 p.m. .......................Worship Period Wednesday 7 p.m. ...............................Bible StudyMinister Gene Dumas352-542-0657 or 352-493-7775Our goal is to Speak where the Bible speaks and be silent where the Bible is silent.Ž We seek Bible authority for the things that we believe and practice. 11450 NW 76th Terr., Chieand Church CalendarFish Dinner at Holy Family Catholic Church Dec. 14 e Fish Dinner, fried or baked, at Holy Family Catholic Church Parish Hall will be on Friday Dec. 14 from 5 to 7 PM Adults $7, smaller portion $6, children under 12 $4. Lite Lunch is free and will be on Wed. Dec. 19, from 12 to 1:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome to share a hot meal and fellowship. Angel House rift Store is open Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. every weekend. We are located 3 miles N. of Williston on Hwy 27A. Cookie Sale at Turning Point Ministry Dec. 15Turning Point Ministry will hold its Annual Cookie Sale … Cookies by the Ton … from 9:30 to 1:00 PM on Saturday, Dec 15 at the church facility at 16750 NW 60th Ave (CR 341) just outside Trenton. e Sale will feature some of the best cookies youll ever eat!! Co ee and cookies will also be available for your eating pleasure that morning. Proceeds will bene“ t all activities of the ministry. Please call the Ministry at 352/463-1882 or Ruth Davis at 352/462-8804 for further information.Children’s Christmas Fun Day at Parsons Memorial Church Dec. 15Parsons Memorial Presbyterian Church is hosting a Childrens Christmas Fun Day on Dec. 15 from 10 AM to 1 PM. Come join us for a fun “ lled day as the children enjoy decorating cookies, bible stories, music, crafts and as always food. Children ages 3 to 12 are welcome. Contact Donna Brown for more info at 352-489-5274. ObituariesSHARON MEEKSSharon Meeks, of Bronson passed away on Friday, November 30, 2012 at the age of 60. Sharon was a loving daughter, sister, aunt, wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. Sharon was preceded in death by a brother, Roddy Southall and a nephew, Terry Karr. She is survived by her stepfather and mother, Roger and Lorraine Southall; sister, Donna Karr; daughters, Lynda Motes and Kimberly Goggin; grandchildren: Brittany Johns, Dylan Dupree and Jessica McLaughlin; and great-grandson Aaiden Johns and last but not least Wayne the sweetest thing Ive ever knownŽ Meeks. Arrangements are under the care of Knau Funeral Home in Chie” and.MINNIE MELBA DELANEYJanuary 29, 1926 … December 4, 2012 Mrs. Minnie Melba Delaney of Old Town passed away Tuesday, December 4, 2012. She was 86. Mrs. Delaney was born on January 29, 1926 in Fletcher, Lafayette County, Florida. She worked in the Dixie County school system for many years in the lunchroom and as a custodian. She worked with the Dixie County 4-H for many years and enjoyed “ shing, raising animals, gardening, cooking, canning and spending time with children. She was a member of Woodman of the World and Rock Sink Baptist Church. She is survived by sons, Sidney Joe (Dorothy) Dees of Citrus Springs and Lowell Allen ( elma) Dees of Old Town; daughter, Susan (Mike) Dees Ergle of Alachua; 11 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. A graveside service was held Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. at Rock Sink Baptist Church Cemetery with Rev. Jim Hurst o ciating. Arrangements have been placed under the care of the Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352/498-5400. EMMA MARIA MERCADOMiss Emma Maria Mercado of Old Town passed away Wednesday, December 5, 2012. She was 10 years old. Emma was a student who recently moved to Old Town from Wallace, North Carolina with her family. She enjoyed singing, drawing, climbing, playing guitar, “ shing and life in general. She attended Faith Baptist Church. Emma is survived by her mother, Evelyn C. Lohn of Old Town; brother Robert Nessler of Old Town; sisters, Rachel Nessler of Wallace, North Carolina and Shirley Nessler of Old Town; and grandmother, Evelyn S. Lohn of Old Town. Services were held Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. at Faith Baptist Church with Rev. Dwayne Kight o ciating. A visitation was held at the church one hour prior to the service. Arrangements were placed under the care of the Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352-498-5400. It Takes a Real Dummy to Be a Know It AllIt was the winter of 85, and I dont think the good folks of Utah knew quite what to think about this Mississippi boy hitting their pretty white ski slopes in my bright orange FedEx work jumpsuit. Chances are they were a bit relieved when I got back on that big cargo jet to Memphis. I shouldve known I was out of my element the minute I tried on those crazy ski boots. ey tilted me forward so bad I could practically sweep the ” oor with my nose hair. Probably a big factor as to why I slid o out of control as soon as I stepped out of the lodge and toppled all those innocent bystanders waiting for the ski lift. At that point I probably shouldve considered everyones strongly worded advice, and took some ski lessons. I was just too hard headed. e way I “ gured, I could always work on my stopping and turning techniques once I got to the top of the mountain. Even in those leaning boots, I stood well over 6 foot. So when that chair lift came by, it caught me low behind the calf and folded my legs like a cheap suit. One ski got trapped under the chair and ” opped right o Before I knew it I was being hauled up into the air with a warm sock dangling out in the mountain breeze. I didnt know what to do. So I jumped. I was only ten or “ fteen feet up, so I survived the fall. However, the lift operator wasnt too pleased. In fact, he was madder than a wet hen about having to pull that big lever and shut down the whole mountain. I reckon he cussed me four days past Sunday. Now I didnt cotton to that sort of treatment, so I started for him, intent on showing him another use for those ski poles. However, with my limited snow skills, I couldnt make it back up the hill. My legs were just too intent on parting company. Eventually the guy had to come and help drag me back up. My temper had sort of “ zzled by then, so I just got back in the line and waited quietly. Eventually I made it up the mountain, but it might be noted that my whole snow skiing experience went downhill from there. When I “ nally tumbled to the bottom sometime around noon, I had two little words forever etched in my mind; SKI LESSONSŽ. What is it about submitting to instructions that causes our human nature to rebel so? Am I the only one who has wobbly furniture in my house because of this? If youre like me, you dont even look for the instruction manual until youve gotten so confused youve screwed your shirt tail to your shoe. I guess thats why I tumbled down hill for so many years of my life. Regrettably I toppled many innocent bystanders along the way. I can testify its awfully hard keeping your skis pointed in the right direction on these slippery slopes of life without humility. My life has often ended up so discombobulated Id have to stick my head out of my orange leg hole just to breathe! ankfully, I “ nally admitted my need for some sort of operators manual, and what do you know? ere was one right there on the co ee table. Its called the Bible. Turns out, the Bible was written by our Manufacturer! (For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. 2 Peter 1:21 KJV) Gods the one who designed us, so who better to show us how our lives are supposed to be assembled? e Lord even provides an eternal lifetime guarantee to those who will put their trust Him. It was an o er I couldnt refuse. I “ nally hopped o the throne of my own life and gave Jesus His rightful place as KING. Now when I need repairs or assistance, I simply call the 24hr help hotline. Jesus is always personally manning the line. But anywayWhy dont you give Him a call? Dont wait until the Lift Operator has to pull the lever on you. I guess what Im trying to say is, It takes a real dummy to be a know-it-all.Ž Now dont go arguing with me. I know Im right-Guy She eld 5-27-06 But Anyway www.butanyway.org Recorded MarriagesDecember 4, 2012Michael John Mauro, 6/21/60, to Susan Lee Eck, 1/1/51, both of Morriston. Roy Dwayne Sperry, 7/25/62, of Trenton, to Bonita Bandella Ridgely, 4/3/60, of Williston.December 6, 2012Christopher Michael Gober, 11/2/93, to Amanda Marie Patterson, 1/7/91, both of Chie” and. Help Kids Learn The True Joy Of Giving(NAPS)„Even with all the hustle and bustle of the holidays, showing your children the true spirit of the season can be done„and be fun. Here are eight easy ways parents can help children experience the joy of giving during this holiday season and throughout the years to come. 1. Spirit for heroes: Send the love and warmth overseas to troops during this holiday season. Create a care package to send to a soldier you may know or through an organization that handles shipping. Check the armed forces websites, such as www.army.mil or www.navy.mil, to see what is acceptable to send. 2. Homemade centerpieces: Create a homemade centerpiece to give to family and friends for their holiday tables. A gumdrop spice-candy tree is a great project for children to work on. Place gumdrops on toothpicks and stick them into a small Styrofoam tree. Arrange the gumdrops so the colors vary in this creative centerpiece. 3. Holiday hope chests : Have your children create holiday hope chestsŽ by decorating shoeboxes or plastic containers with wrapping paper and stickers. Fill these chests with small toys and art and school supplies to deliver to children at nearby shelters or hospitals. 4. Senior center cheer: Bring holiday cheer to a local senior center for those who are unable to visit their families during the season. e children can sing carols, read holiday classics and enjoy a nice chat with the seniors in their neighborhood.

PAGE 17

The Levy County Journal 5BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Obituaries continued from page 4Bplace high importance on preserving our American traditions and values, improving the quality of life for our nations children, caring for veterans and their families, and perhaps most importantly, teaching the fundamentals of good citizenship. It is no secret that WW II veterans and Korean War era veterans have long been the backbone of Post 91. Unfortunately these loyal members are now few in number. Post 91 encourages quali“ ed veterans from the Vietnam War era, Lebanon/Grenada con” icts era, Panama con” ict era, and the Persian Gulf con” icts era to join and get involved. Many local veterans may be unaware that anyone who has served since 1990 is now eligible (in addition to other war eras) and includes National Guard and Reserve veterans. Be proud you qualify!! American Legion Post 91 is forming an American Legion Riders chapter for military veterans who served honorably anywhere during the Congressionally-designated wartime eras and have a motorcycle. Sons of American Legion members are also eligible. e “ rst group will be considered charter members. Contact our Legion Rider chairman Richard Czarniak or our 2nd Vice Commander Sherry Hayes-Luzader. Post 91 invites all of our Legion members and Auxiliary members to our Post 91 Christmas Party during our monthly meeting on urs., Dec. 20. A traditional Christmas turkey dinner will be served and a gift exchange of a gift which not over $10.00 in value and not gender-speci“ c. Please contact Post Adjutant LaVern Bradley or 1st Vice Commander Rod Lacey so we can plan on how much food needs to be prepared. We are still looking for recently separated veterans who have a strong desire to give back to their community by promoting Americanism, Veteran Advocacy, and, Pride of OwnershipŽ in our community. American Legion Post 91 is a non-pro“ t, nationally accredited Veteran Organization. To learn more call 1st Vice Commander Rod Lacey at (352) 221-2352 or visit us on the web at www.facebook.com/ AmericanLegionJamersonShe eldPost91 For God and Country!! Rod Lacey, 1st Vice CommanderCROSS CITYDAV Auxiliary Events e Cross City Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary is located at 125 SE 165 Ave. (Airport Road) and hosts Bingo every Wed. and Sat at 6 p.m. at the Chapter Hall.BRANFORDBranford Camera Club Meets Dec. 13 e Branford Camera Club will meet the 2nd urs., Dec. 13. is will be our annual Christmas party a time for sharing Christmas goodies, good company, and your most special photos! Well start our meeting at 7:00 PM as usual, come early if you want to have dinner together. Well share our Christmas goodies after our meeting starts at 7. So, bring some goodies to share and a memory stick full of photos. If youll divide your photos into several categories with 5-6 photos in each, well be able to give each member an opportunity to show some pictures, and then go around again as time permits. Well have an open forum discussion topics as they come up J. If you have program and/or “ eld trip ideas, please share those too. We will review the guidelines for our 2013 Spring Photo Critique, and begin making plans for the new year. Mark Your Calendar: Our January meeting will be on the third urs., Jan. 17, 2013. For more information, please contact: Esta Eberhardt, Creative Consultant, 386-623-0111; Carolyn Hogue, Program Chair, 386-935-2044; Dick Madden, Technical Consultant, 386-935-0296; Skip Weigel, Technical Consultant, 386-9382.Community Calendar continued from page 2BPATRICIA LYNN ARMSTRONGPatricia Lynn Armstrong of Fanning Springs, Florida entered into her eternal resting place on ursday, December 6, 2012 in Texas at the age of 44. Lynn was a Loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister and daughter. Lynn recently retired with 20 years of law enforcement from the Lancaster Correctional Institution. After retiring Lynn went on to graduate from City College for her phlebotomy license and had already been accepted to the College of Central Florida for her RN license. While waiting to start school again in the fall she was currently employed at Wal-Mart in Chie” and. She leaves behind her husband, Tony Jones of Fanning Springs; son, Phillip Wayne Armstrong and “ ance Alycia Grezlecki of Webster, Massachusetts; daughter, Schelia Armstrong and son, Airman Bruce Brown and son Dilan Jones all of Fanning Springs; mother, Margaret (William) Rains of Old Town; father, Franklin (Glenda) Stephens of Bell; sisters, Diane (Keith) Turner of Bell and eresa (Gina) Stephens of St. Petersburg; brother, James Stephens of Broken Arrow, Florida; uncles, urman Williams of Pineville, Kentucky and Edmond Williams of Old Town; niece, Stacy Turner of Bell; and grandchildren, Joe, Eli and Savannah all of Fanning Springs and Phillip Wayne Armstrong III of Webster, Massachusetts. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, December 14, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. in the chapel at Watson Funeral Home with Mr. urman Williams o ciating. Arrangements under the care of Watson Funeral Home, 426 W. Wade Street, Trenton, FL. 32693 (352) 463-8888. Online condolences or to sign the guest book at www. watsonfhtrenton.comGEORGE HAMILTON PIERCEAugust 15, 1961 … December 8, 2012 George Hamilton Pierce of Bronson passed away on December 8, 2012 at the age of 51. He was born on August 15, 1961 in Lake Whales, Florida to Jack and Margaret Pierce. He worked as a laborer in construction most of his life. He moved to Bronson 12 years ago from Raleigh, Florida. He was of the Christian faith and attended the Church of the Nazarene. He was in the Orange County Air Boat Association. He enjoyed working on cars, “ shing, air boating, mud bogging, being outdoors and spending time with family and friends. He is survived by his son, Tye Pierce; daughter, Cassie Pierce; brothers, Sharrod Clyde Pierce and Dale Hamilton Pierce; sister, Virginia France (Bill); grandchildren: Zachery H. Pierce, Molly C. Callahan and Salem D. Starling; cousins, Travis Owen and Treva Johnson. e family plans on holding a memorial service at a later date. Arrangements are under the care of Knau Funeral HomeWilliston.ERNEST LEON PATTERSON, SR.June 17, 1927 … December 8, 2012 Ernest Leon Patterson, Sr. KayoŽ was born in Lulu, Florida on June 17, 1927, to Lonney Bryan Patterson Lovelace and George M. Patterson and went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus ChristŽ on Saturday, December 8, 2012. He remained and passed away in his home of 60 years after a lengthy illness, with his son, Ernest, being his fulltime caregiver and friend. Earlier in his life he served in the United States Army. He worked at the Shell plant in Archer, worked for Whitehurst Road Construction, was an old time cowboy riding the range out on Paynes Prairie, a mechanic for Brasington Cadillac in Gainesville, ran the J.P. Ranch in Chie” and, Gainesville and Ocala Livestock markets, and all this while keeping up with his own 130 acre farm in the sandhills of Levy County. He was a past member of Concord Baptist Church and current member of Archer Baptist Church, being a deacon in the past of both and loving to sing the wonderful gospel songs. He loved his Lord, his wife, Loretta, whom he lost to an extended illness last year, and his family. Mr. Patterson was preceded in death by his father, George M. Patterson; mother Lonney Bryan Patterson Lovelace; and his grandparents that helped raise him, Elizabeth Alvenia Bryan Cason and step-grandfather James Lafayette Cason. He is survived by his son Ernest Leon Patterson, Jr. (Trina) and their children Lane and Bailey; daughter, Rose Marea Rao (Krishna) and their children Ryan, Michael and Kristina. He was an only child, but grew up with his Aunt Jimmie Cason Sapp as a very close sister and step-brother Charlie Lovelace (Leona) Visitation was held on Monday, December 10, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. at Knau Funeral Home. Services were held at the funeral home at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, December 10th with Reverend Dr. Ray Scott and Doctor James Jackson o ciating. Burial followed at Orange Hill Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations can be made to the Archer Baptist Church, Attn: Bereavement Committee, P.O. Box 248 Archer, FL 32618. Arrangements are under the care of Knau Funeral HomeWilliston.BETHANEY SWANSONJanuary 26, 1955 … December 8, 2012 Bethaney Swanson died December 8, 2012 in her home in Williston, Florida at the age of 57. Bethaney was born in Owasso, Michigan on January 26, 1955 to Kenneth and Helen Gooding. Bethaney met Jeremy Swanson while attending college. ey married July 30, 1977. In 1982, the Swanson family moved to Indiana to begin ministering to their new local community. is season was “ lled with adventurous times homeschooling, bike riding, sledding and trips to the library with her young sons. In 1987 the family loaded up a Ryder truck and moved to Williston. 1990 proved to be an exciting year with the birth of her daughter and her real estate career with Harriett Downs Real Estate. Bethaney quickly fell in love with Williston and Williston quickly fell in love with her. Bethaney was a lover of life and servant of God, family and her community. She loved sunshine, planting ” owers, laughing and dancing. She was a magnetic and loyal friend adding light and adventure to every situation. On Good Friday, April 22, 2011 Bethaney was diagnosed with colon cancer, she fought long and hard and with optimism and a smile. She was fully healed when she stepped into the arms of Jesus and left a legacy of life well lived. Bethaney is survived by her husband Jeremy of 35 years; her children: Benjamin, Israel (Allyson) and Hannah (Jordon); and grandsons Noah and Zeller on the way; her brothers Bill and Rick Gooding and sister eresa. Visitation will be held on Saturday, December 15, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the Williston Church of God with a memorial service to follow at 10:00 a.m. Arrangements are under the care of Knau Funeral HomeWilliston.DONALD EDWARD SORRELL SR.Mr. Donald Edward Sorrell, Sr. of Fanning Springs passed away Saturday, December 8, 2012 at the age of 81. Mr. Sorrell served in the United States Air Force serving during the Korean Con” ict. He moved to Fanning Springs in 1987 from Geneva, Florida. He worked as a HVAC technician for Johnson Controls for 10 years before opening his own air conditioning business, Suwannee Refrigeration, in Fanning Springs. He was a member of the Fanning Springs Moose Lodge, VFW Life Member, Post 6827, American Legion, and Fraternal order of Eagles. He enjoyed playing and singing music, “ shing, sports of all kinds and spending time on his computer. He was a Jehovahs Witness. He is survived by his wife Shirley Mae Sorrell of Fanning Springs; sons: Donald Edward Sorrell, Jr. of Clearwater, Dennis Sorrell of St. Petersburg, Woodrow Wilson Jones of Tallahassee and Jesse Albert Jones of Gainesville; daughters: Kathy (Rick) Bramel of Tampa, Donna Stewart of Louisville, Kentucky, Kelly Simrell of Martinsburg, West Virginia, Loretta Ann Kelly of Tallahassee, Glenna Lanor Jones of Old Town and Charley Marie Braswell of Ponce DeLeon, Florida; sister, Charlotte Ottman of Louisville, Kentucky and several grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Arrangements have been placed under the care of the Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352/498-5400.HOOVER CARLTON MUNDENJanuary 2, 1929 … December 9, 2012 Hoover Carlton Munden of Williston, Florida passed away on December 9, 2012 at the age of 83. He was born on January 2, 1929 in Morriston, Florida to Isacc and Lizzie Munden. He has lived in Morriston all of his life. He was very active in the Williston Church of God where he served as an usher for many years. He worked for the State of Florida for 5 years, worked 5 months as a civilian worker for the United States Government, was a heavy equipment operator for Whitehurst Construction for 15 years and the University of Florida for 19 years and retired on March 1, 1995. He enjoyed hunting, “ shing, gardening, watching college football and was an avid Gator fan. He is survived by his wife of 64 years Marlene Munden; son, Daniel Rhett Munden ( eresa); daughters: Nancy Cook (Cecil), Darlene Ecker, Shirley Ulmer (Gary) and Debra Pettry (Johnny); brother, Ben Munden; sisters, Macy Adams and Wilma Johnson (Bill); nine grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Visitation for Mr. Munden is being held on ursday, December 13, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at the Williston Church of God with services at 11:00 a.m. with Reverend Wes Smith and Brother Keith Langford o ciating. Interment is to follow at Orange Hill Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers the family asks that donations be made to the Williston Church of God. Arrangements are under the care of Knau Funeral HomeWilliston.JEFFREY JAMES REPPY JR.Je rey James Reppy, Jr., 12, of Chie” and passed away December 10, 2012 at his home. Born in Ocala he has spent his life in this area. Je rey was in the 4th grade at Chie” and Elementary School. He attended Hardeetown Baptist Church. He loved being outdoors hunting and “ shing, playing soccer and football and enjoyed video games. Je rey was preceded in death by his cousin Mikey Nolin Jr., GrandPa Harry Garner, and uncle Steven Russell Reppy. He is survived by his mother, Susan Garner (Lamar Epperson) of Chie” and; father, Je Reppy, Sr. of Bronson; brother, Dakota Buncik of Chie” and; sister, Sierra Parkhouse of Bronson; maternal grandparents, Mary and Gerald Ward of Chie” and; paternal grandparent Frank Lowman (Sherry Watson) of Williston; and tons of cousins, aunts and uncles. Graveside services will be Saturday December 15, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. at Ebenezer Cemetery. Visitation will be Friday, December 14 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, 1301 N. Young Blvd., Chie” and, FL 32626, 352493-0050. On line condolences may be sent through our website at www.hiers-baxley.comJAMES SOLOMON LORDMr. James Solomon ShortyŽ Lord of Cross City passed away at the age of 70 on Monday, December 10, 2012 at North Florida Regional Medical Center. Mr. Lord was a lifelong resident of Dixie County. He graduated from Dixie County High School in 1962 and then began a lifelong career as a stumping contractor in the turpentine industry. He enjoyed hunting and gardening and going to work. He was a member of the Breaking Chains Ministries. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Barbara Lord of Cross City; son, Jon (Erin) Lord of Cross City; daughter, Amanda (Lance) Jones of Jena, Florida; brother, Gerald Lord of Old Town and four grandchildren. Funeral services were held Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. at the Rick Gooding Funeral Home Chapel with Pastor Shaun Campbell o ciating. Interment followed at New Prospect Baptist Church Cemetery. A visitation was held Tuesday, December 11, 2012 between the hours of 6 and 8 p.m. Arrangements have been placed under the care of the Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352/498-5400. 352-486-38806 a.m. to 10 p.m. 7 DAYS A WEEK157 N. Hathaway Ave., Bronson BRONSON RESTAURANT CHRISTMAS DINNER FEAST 352-490-49066 a.m. to 10 p.m. 7 DAYS A WEEK1/4 mi. N of Walmart on East side of US 19, Chie” and 310 Dock Street, Cedar Key352-543-5738Banquet Facilities Available! Fresh Seafood and Prime Rib MealTurkey & Dressing Baked Ham Roast Beef Homemade Mashed Potatoes Zipper Peas Mustard Greens Macaroni & Cheese Sweet Potato Souf” Squash Casserole Green Bean Casserole Cole Slaw Potato Salad Creamed Corn Fresh Baked Rolls Pumpkin Pie Banana Pudding Red Velvet Cake Peach CobblerClosed Christmas DayMerry Christmas! OPEN Christmas Day 11-3 16758 Highway 19, Cross City352-498-1004 Christmas Day

PAGE 18

The Levy County Journal6BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 CITY OF WILLISTON, FLORIDA CITY COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012DATE: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012 TIME: 7:00 P.M. PLACE: WILLISTON CITY COUNCIL ROOM CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL MEMBERS:Mayor R. Gerald Hethcoat President Jason Cason Vice-President Norm Fugate (Absent) Councilman Cal Byrd Councilman Charles Goodman Councilman Elihu Ross Interim City Manager Oel Wingo City Clerk Fran Taylor City Attorney Fred KoberleinOPENING PRAYER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAGPresident Cason called the meeting to order at 7:03 p.m. Mayor Hethcoat led the opening prayer followed by the Pledge of Allegiance to the ” ag.ITEM – 1 – ADDITIONS, DELETIONS, CHANGES AND APPROVAL OF THE AGENDAPresident Cason advised a request had been submitted to add the Fall Festival Special Event Application with fee waiver request to the agenda and that it should be declared as an emergency to add it to the agenda. e event was scheduled to be held in Linear Park on October 18th. Councilman Goodman advised that the event would replace a long held event in the City and was being implemented by a citizen who must obtain corporate sponsorship for support and concluded the item should qualify as an emergency. Councilman Goodman moved to add the Fall Festival Special Event Application to the 10-2-2012 Agenda. Councilman Byrd seconded the motion. On vote, the motion passed unanimously, 4-0.ITEM – 2 – CONSENT AGENDACouncilman Goodman moved to approve the Agenda as amended. Councilman Byrd seconded and the motion carried, 4-0. Councilman Goodman moved to remove the Minutes from the September 30th meeting and place them under old business for review. Councilman Byrd seconded. e motion passed by general consent.ITEM – 3 – STUDENT OF THE MONTH PRESENTATIONMayor Hethcoat presented the Student of the Month recognitions to JBES student Angelino Butto, Williston Elementary student Bridget Barley and Williston Middle School student Rachel Bachmann.ITEM – 4 – PUBLIC PARTICIPATION – None. ITEM – 5 – OLD BUSINESS A. REVIEW AND APPROVAL: MINUTES FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 BUDGET HEARING AND INVESTITUREPresident Cason noted that each Council member had been provided with an email of comments from Vice President Fugate and of his request that the comments be read aloud. ey were presented for consideration a copy was provided to the City Clerk to be incorporated into the minutes of the meeting. Councilman Goodman noted that the minutes from the September 30th Budget Hearing indicate vote tallies of 5-0. He stated that since he was not present, the vote totals were actually 4-0 and directed that those errors be corrected. Councilman Goodman then moved to approve the September 30, 2012 minutes from the Budget Hearing with those changes. Councilman Byrd seconded and the motion passed, 4-0.B. RESOLUTION: ADOPTING CITY CLERK JOB DESCRIPTIONCouncilman Cason stated that although the Interim City Manager and City Clerk were given the task of coming to a singular job description, this was not what is included in the packet. Councilman Goodman stated that in the charter provisions a prior Council has determined that the City Clerk shall work under the day to day supervision of the City Manager. He stated the Council could change that provision if it so desired but that his issue with the item was that Council has made this decision and the question as to who the Clerk should answer to has already been answered clearly in the Charter. He noted that when the Clerk was hired it was stated that the position was not clearly de“ ned and the provision was already in place so he did not believe that the item was brought to Council properly. If there is a question whether the description is illegal then it should be brought up by the Council. President Cason con“ rmed with City Attorney Koberlein that the Council was not able to change the Charter and that what was done previously was accomplished within the job description of the City Clerk. City Attorney Koberlein advised that it was his understanding is that the Charter gives the Clerk de“ ned roles and functions and since it would be illegal to void the Clerks duties in the Charter, the Council attempted to express what the Clerk should do in addition to the city charter. He stated that the City Manager does not have any authority over the Clerk in the Charter as the citizens have voted on that issue and made it clear. Councilman Byrd stated that he believed that Vice President Fugate originated this and what he was attempting to do was bring the organization back in line with the Charter noting that the past Council gave partial control of the City Clerk to the City Manager. City Attorney Koberlein stated it he did not have a problem with what he believed the Council wanted in outlining speci“ c duties in this job description as there has not been a vote on that matter. Councilman Goodman clari“ ed that there are jobs the Clerk is required to do by Charter that cannot be removed or changed by the City Manager and that the issue is beyond those. He stated the Charter duties of that position do not require the entire work period and that the City had a very capable person that has the ability to do things beyond the Charter. He concluded that it is not the Charter duties that are in question in this entire matter but rather the other things that a capable Clerk can do far more. Councilman Goodman continued by specifying that Williston has CouncilManager form of government which a ords the manager the job of managing the city. Mr. Fugate made it clear that his concern was separation of powers. A strong city manager could overwhelm a weak City Clerk and cause them to do things outside the charter. It is a viable concern that will not be answered by this resolution. It is my opinion this resolution made by prior council meets law and does not violation the charter and simply expounds on issues under the purview of the Manager of the City. President Cason then reviewed Resolution 2012-22 as originally proposed and included on page 7 of the agenda packet. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that her proposal noted the separation of powers and the Charter duties of the Clerk. She stated that within the job duties she attempted to reach the opinion of the original Council regarding additional duties. However, there are duties that should be stricken such as bene“ ts, payroll management and insurance to ensure they did not create a bifurcation of duties. She stated that two duties were added that she felt still fell under the auspices of the Charter. e “ rst is related to special events which are an extension of the Council and a public relations e ort for the community. e second duty added was to assign the Clerk to serve as Pension and Airport Board secretary, as needed. She agreed the way the former Council modi“ ed them looked a little suspect by having a Resolution worded this way that says the citizens have spoken, this is what the City Clerk does. She added that with the economy, there is times where the City Manager might say, Ms. Clerk could you take on this special project and help us to move forward and this is what she advised she was trying to accomplish. She stated she was trying to compromise. President Cason recounted that at last meeting, Council considered the “ rst Resolution 2012-22 that states that there is an unclear chain of command and that the City Clerk should be responsible to report to the City Council and this Resolution included language from 3.04 regarding the Clerks Charter duties. At that point in time it was his understanding that the sta prepare a job description that is mutually agreed upon. Councilman Goodman stated it was his understanding that the only question is whether the Clerk reported to the Council or if it was illegal to have the Clerk reporting to the City Manager. ere are speci“ c duties assigned by the Charter and those duties shall not be infringed upon by the City Manager. e Council made a decision that day to day operations not de“ ned by Charter shall be at the direction of the City Manager. He added that these are management issues not for Council that deals with policy only. Councilman Byrd stated he believed the issue is the previous document that describes the current relationship between the Council management and Clerk leaves room for question and confusion. He added that because it is not in the form of a resolution the idea was to present a resolution that could be adopted to eliminate the confusion and that designates that the City Clerk would work for the City Council. He added that this problem was created in 2009 when the Clerk was put under direction of the City Manager. He commented on Section 3.02 of the Charter and stated that the job description is described by Item F. He noted his frustration over the confusion on the issue and the documents provided. He emphasized the need to clear up the item. City Attorney Koberlein reviewed Item F stating it is a catch all clause that states to perform other duties as required by law or the City Council and added that each one of the Charter O cers have that phrase included under their Charter description. He stated the Charter O cer is appointed by the City Council and serves at the pleasure of Council. President Cason noted that Item 10-A page 1 was established in the minutes of that meeting. He advised that item states that in 3.02 of the Charter the Council determined the Clerk shall work under the direction of the City Manager. He concluded it could easily be read to contradict with the Charter. Councilman Goodman pointed out the portion that provides for the Council to decide and stated it was his belief the Council did not overstep the Charter when it was adopted. President Cason noted it was adopted by Council giving an opinion in a meeting and having it read into the minutes. Councilman Byrd asked if the issue could be clari“ ed by motion to delete that portion of the resolution. City Attorney Koberlein suggested that if Council is going to change or delete any portion, it should be done by resolution because a resolution is an expression to tell people by what you intended to do. He advised minutes are not a transcript and the resolution should be presented to form an intention. Councilman Byrd asked if Resolution 2012-22 would eliminate the conclusion that was created at that time. City Attorney Koberlein responded that the group could review the recordings but still might all di er in opinions. However, if Council adopted a resolution to take action, there would not be a need to worry about 2009 from this point. Councilman Byrd asked if the Resolution 2012-22 would solve the problem. City Attorney Koberlein responded that it would with regard to the issues stemming from 2009. President Cason advised that he did not believe Council would reach a conclusion at this point in time because there were di erent versions of the Resolution presented and the Clerk and Manager did not come to the individual job description as expected. He suggested Council move on to the next item and that this item be brought back with all information presented in a timely manner for Council to be able to speak on an informed basis. Interim City Manager Wingo stated she would like clari“ cation of intent so she and the Clerk could try to compromise on job description. She stated that if Council intent is that the Clerk reports to the Council and does Charter duties and other duties as assigned by the City Manager then that is direction needed. Councilman Goodman responded that in addition to the standard charter duties the City Manager may, as needed, assign other duties to the City Clerk to maximize the use of city resources. He added that such duties are under the management of the City Manager and the Clerk shall report to the Manager and the status of these assignments. e City manager shall notify the council on assigned duties. He stated that is what was in favor of. President Cason stated that is the background but he is concerned with developing a resolution based on the issue. e “ rst resolution that was read earlier was the previously recommended action. He stated that Council needed to decide if the Clerk will report to the City Council or if the Clerk will report to the Council regarding all Charter related duties and responsibilities and the City Manager for other duties, as needed. Councilman Byrd stated that the way he understands the Charter is that the City Clerk reports directly to Council. He stated he believed if the City Manager asks the City Clerk to work on something that the Clerk should have one boss and that is the Council. If there is a problem under that arrangement then Council could address that issue but that is the way he understood the Charter to be written. President Cason stated a motion would be in order to direct sta to prepare a resolution that clari“ es the issue as to whether or not the clerk reports to Council only or to the City Manager as needed. Councilman Goodman moved that the City Clerk in addition to the standard Charter duties reports to the City Manager on other duties and to have a resolution that says the City Manager may, as needed, assign additional duties to the City Clerk to maximize the use of city resources and ensure organizational e ciency. e said duties are under the direction of the City Manager. Councilman Ross seconded.Maria Sresovich addressed the Council and stated that original 2009 Council decision was initiated by what she considered to be a corrupt manager who was misusing his power and that this led to many problems. She stated she was not at that meeting but has been to everyone since because it was totally unacceptable and the Charter intended these things to be separate. She stated that Ms. Taylor is very capable and Ms. Wingo is very capable and they both will continue to do great jobs and that she wanted to clarify that this is not a case of the clerk not wanting to pitch in and help. She advised it is not a case of the City Manager taking advantage of the clerk. She stated she did not believe it was a matter of the Clerk doing less or the City Manager doing more but rather a matter of the issue created by the 2009 clause. She asked if the Resolution could specify that the Clerk will continue duties as were established before 2009 with the idea to clear the job descriptions out and have them work together and until Council develops speci“ cs later on. President Cason stated that this issue was discussed a conversation with Mark Durbin who is a retired City Manager who performs a great service for all cities in his Range Rider capacity. He noted Ms. Taylor was present regarding this discussion. Mr. Durbin had stated that in situations where the City Clerk answers only to the Council, the position should be clerical only to avoid confusion as to lines of authority. President Cason also noted Mr. Durbins opinion had been that the City Clerk should work directly for the City Manager. He stated that he did not disagree with the 2009 council that Council can determine the structure in whatever way it sees “ t but to that end, the way it was done is suspect. He stated he is not certain he supported the motion as presented simply because he did not feel like he has had time to grasp all aspects of the issue. He then called for a vote on the motion. On vote, the motion failed 2-2 with President Cason and Councilman Byrd opposed.C. DISCUSSION AND DIRECTION: GOLF CART ORDINANCECouncilman Goodman introduced the topic stating this is a motion to create a City ordinance allowing the use of a golf cart in the city limits on City roads for the use of residents to allow them to take their children to the park without having to use a car. He advised that the City Attorney has put a lot of e ort into reviewing this topic. He stated he was asking for a motion to begin the process of creating an ordinance that allows the use of golf carts on our City streets. Councilman Byrd seconded. Police Chief Strow stated that the motion concerns him because of the potential to have a slow moving vehicle crossing the high speed state highway. He stated he has gone to one golf cart fatality at the Villages. He advised that there are a lot of restrictions that need to be applied. He suggested the Council look at Cedar Key to see what kind of problems they have had. He emphasized that crossing the state road troubles him and safety is concern. Councilman Ross pointed out that there are no federal roads in Cedar Key. Mayor Hethcoat stated he was looking at proposing this previously and there are pros and cons involved such as the legality of driving on main arteries versus side streets, whether the carts are street ready, licenses, insurance and the safety. He stated it became so involved, he never presented it. President Cason stated that the motion is to allow Council and sta to move forward in that direction. He stated his appreciation for the Chiefs opinion. Grace Marino addressed the Council and advised she is Mr. Goodmans neighbor. She stated her husband will not get a golf cart because they would not be able to drive it. She stated it would be nice to save the gas and pointed out that her friends (Angie and Stephanie) were also present to support the motion. City Attorney Koberlein advised an ordinance will not be completed any time soon and that, in the process, FDOT would need to consider the volume speed character of motor vehicles. On vote, motion failed 2-2 with President Cason and Councilman Ross opposed.D. DISCUSSION AND DIRECTION: WHOLESALE POWER RFPPresident Cason introduced the topic by noting that Council had previously scheduled to release the Wholesale Power RFP on Oct 8 and the decision before Council is to release the RFP on October 8th, not release the RFP or set the time at a later date. Councilman Ross moved to suspend the RFP inde“ nitely. Councilman Goodman seconded. Councilman Ross stated that in his opinion there was not anything bad or wrong with the proposal that has been made by Progress Energy. He stated if it were a bad proposition then he would say the Council needs to look at others. e other question is should Council look at other proposals or could the City lose the one already presented and lose the elimination of costs that are associated with it. He advised that his understanding was that there is a possibility of close to 1 Million dollars in savings with what Progress Energy has laid out and he did not want to lose that. He stated that although Vice President Fugate did indicate that in the federal bidding process the agency will typically get the best deal by going out for bids but if the City already has a good one Council needs to move on and get the savings for the City. He recalled that Progress Energy had a contract the previous day that could be done and completed by Friday with no need to continue on with the RFP. He stated his motion is to suspend the RFP and that Council seriously consider accepting the proposal that has already been made by Progress Energy who has been dealing with Williston for 75 years. Councilman Byrd mentioned that Council might handicap its position on negotiations if they discussed the topic further. He added if the RFP was going to be suspended, then Council needs to do so and move on to the negotiation stage. Councilman Goodman stated he wanted to clarify that suspending means Council is postponing the process and can return to it at any time. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that Stephen Bloom and CJ Zimoski consulted with one another and tried to make sure they had as much information as possible in regards to what Progress Energy has proposed so Council would have all the information needed. In addition, sta consulted with Mr. Finklea by phone. She stated that one of her concerns is what are the projections are for the market and where is the market going. She stated that sta has been told that the market will begin to tighten in 2018 and 2019. All of the providers except Progress Energy expect it to tighten in 2018 and 2019 and because of CR3 their market is going to tighten even more. She stated their projects for their load will start coming down 2016-17 and it says something about their willingness to work with the City of Williston. Also, Progress is out with an RFP for additional supply energy. at is just information to help Council get a feel for where they are. e other consideration is the transitional cost. All of those things get rolled into the competitive bid. What Council should be aware of is that the o er that is on the table is for 2014 to 2016 only. ere is nothing in writing about 2013 at this point so that should be kept in mind if Council is going to suspend the process.

PAGE 19

The Levy County Journal 7BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 In reviewing the proposal, Progress Energy took the Mt. Dora contract and inserted the City of Williston into it (Option A) which is 6.95 and 4.00. Option B does not o er the 4.00. e big savings is in the nonfuel charge in going from 10 to 4. President Cason stated that only reason Progress Energy o ered Option B is that the City was going out for RFP and the minute that they discover the RFP has been suspended, Council is basically telling them those are the rates the City will pay. Councilman Goodman stated he failed to see that could be construed as losing negotiating power. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that the RFP time line is extremely tight with the proposals being returned in February to begin negotiating in March. She emphasized the importance of preserving Councils ability to go out to RFP and extend the contract by the time delayed via the RFP process. She noted her agreement with President Cason in terms of negotiating power. Councilman Byrd stated he had two issues. First, he did not want to abandon this issue at this meeting and wanted someone to explain something to him. Council did need a motion on the ” oor to discuss this. Council should keep in mind that Progress Energy does make a living doing negotiations and the Council does not. He stated he would like to see the motion provide an end time. Along those same lines he noted he has been through this process with Progress Energy four times and Council needs to make the date certain that they have to give the City their “ nal o er. He stated that if the Council just decides to suspend inde“ nitely, there will be no ground to stand on. President Cason moved to amend striking the word inde“ nitely and inserting the words November 7th. Councilman Byrd seconded. President Cason clari“ ed that, as amended, the motion is that the RFP process is suspended until November 7th at which time the RFP will be published. For clari“ cation it will not be published on October 8th. On vote the motion passes unanimously 4-0. Interim City Manager Wingo advised that the next step is to have sta with the assistance of the attorneys and FMPA to hammer out the agreement. President Cason stated he wanted sta to tell them the City wants Option D presented in the contract at the next council meeting. Councilman Goodman stated the point of the entire motion was to move forward with negotiations and get a “ rm proposal. President Cason stated he wanted to go back to Progress Energy and tell them Council wants something at less than what they o ered: the Option D. Councilman Byrd stated that he prefers having closed strategy sessions to establish what Council is looking for on this contract. President Cason stated what Council needs to do is direct sta to have Progress Energy provide Council with a formal and complete proposal in writing. Councilman Goodman stated his desire for sta to do so quickly. Councilman Byrd asked if Council was stating its bottom line as Option D. President Cason replied that if they provided Council Option D, he would be willing to move to approve it. Councilman Byrd suggested the Council be aggressive and go to them with these “ gures. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that Option D is what the market is and that is the agreement with Mt. Dora and the City of Williston is saying give it to us beginning January 1st. President Cason stated that unless there were objections, Council will direct sta by consensus to continue negotiations with Progress Energy Florida letting them know that Council desires Option D as pricing on the extension.ITEM – 6 – NEW BUSINESS A. RESOLUTION: APPROVING LEASE AGREEMENT WITH NORTH FLORIDA BROAD BAND AUTHORITY Je Hendry of the NFBA addressed the Council. He advised the NFBAs job is to promote economic development for business and industry in this region. He noted the leases were forwarded to City Attorney Koberlein and that NFBA has had leases approved for this community. e purpose for the broadband authority was to create a network. He stated there are 92 towers in the network and NFBA is seeking in kind assets to expand broadband access to internet. He stated the City has two towers that would enable the broadband authority to utilize access to the internet in this region. He stated NFBA has this arrangement in Bronson and Chie” and. is is about bringing access to high speed internet to this region. e model is comprised of 12 counties and 7 cities to bring down funds to assist in building this broadband network. ere is about 75% of this region that is under served with regard to internet access in this region. is lease is designed to alleviate that. Councilman Goodman con“ rmed with Mr. Hendry that the NFBA had been in existence since July 2010, is a non-pro“ t governmental authority that was created through an interlocal agreement and that approval of this request will not serve to help a private business compete with other private businesses through use of city utilities and city property. Mr. Hendry stated that by utilizing that in kind asset the NFBA can make middle mile assets accessible to companies. Councilman Goodman then con“ rmed that the companies using the middle mile assets would then pay NFBA for the use of the network and the funds would go back into the non-pro“ t governmental authority for infrastructure costs, etc. Councilman Goodman summarized that essentially NFBA is asking the communities to be far-sighted enough to see that these services might bene“ t our citizens and the City is being asked to donate the facilities to make it available to companies to sell to our citizens. Mr. Hendry added that there is a potential for future revenue sharing with regard to these services at the end of these leases. Councilman Goodman con“ rmed with City Attorney Koberlein that the City could be exposed to liability as a result of this proposal. On questioning about infrastructure the City might have to add, Mr. Hendry responded that the structural analysis has already been done and the City would not incur any costs. Councilman Ross questioned Mr. Hendry on the dimensions of the equipment that would need to be attached to the water tower. Mr. Hendry stated the sizes range from as small as three of the Council name plates to 2 feet in diameter. Councilman Ross con“ rmed the equipment consists of communications dishes as opposed to towers. Mr. Hendry stated that Williston has one of the NFBA towers and NFBA has an in core network that allows the network to extend out further and to penetrate further into rural areas. Mr. Hendry stated the best opportunity for NFBA to put together an application for the funding was to take a regional approach and to put counties together. 99% of the funding has been invested in capital infrastructure. e NFBA is not a direct connect to citizens or businesses. President Cason questioned how this agreement might a ect current providers, like Webkraft that current o ers hi-speed internet in the Williston area. Mr. Hendry stated that with this agreement if they could access middle mile assets through the NFBA, then they could do so at a much reduced rate. Many of the bigger providers do not have facilities to reach out into the rural area. is could increase competition and drive costs down for the customers. With regard to Century Link customers, the incoming providers have an opportunity to buy access as well. e NFBA is considered an open access network and any provider must be bought at the same costs. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that it would facilitate a more competitive and cost e ective rate for customers. Mr. Hendry added that it would also increase access. Mayor Hethcoat added that it would allow consumers like Palms Medical in Trenton to transmit x-rays, etc. that they were not able to do previously. Councilman Ross con“ rmed with Mr. Henry that the City would have the option to cancel the lease. Councilman Goodman moved to approve resolution 2012-24. Councilman Byrd seconded. City Attorney Koberlein stated that if Council does approve Resolution 2012-24, the City will need to direct the administration to require an inter-modulation study which will determine if frequencies will interfere with other facilities. Councilman Ross con“ rmed the initial period of the agreement would be for 7 years. On vote the motion passed unanimously, 4-0.B. RESOLUTION: APPROVING DEBT WRITEOFFSStephen Bloom advised this was a bookkeeping item and that sta determines which accounts are deemed uncollectible as a part of this process. He stated the budget includes a certain amount to account for this write-o which is included but that this does not end the collection process as the city has utilized services of a debt collection company. He stated that as part of this process, the City must identify what is deemed uncollectible. President Cason con“ rmed with Mr. Bloom that this action will not adversely impact the year end numbers. Councilman Ross moved to approve resolution 2012…25. Councilman Byrd seconded. Maria Sresovich stated she was curious as to the bad debts that fell under the utility over-charges and if those accounts were included under refunds. She asked if the refunds were factored into the bad debt accounts. Mr. Bloom con“ rmed that the refunds were applied to these accounts prior to them being “ nalized. On vote, the motion passed unanimously. 4-0.C. RESOLUTION: APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO THE SEVERN TRENT CONTRACTInterim City Manager Wingo advised that these amendments are consistent with discussions held during 2012-13 budget development at which time the sta determined that it would save dollars to turn payroll over to Severn Trent so the City could move forward with reorganization. Mayor Hethcoat stated that he thought Severn Trent was already doing payroll and that is why there was a part-time person assigned. Mr. Bloom advised that was not the original intent and that the part-time person was assigned initially as an accounting clerk. Councilman Goodman con“ rmed the agreement stated Mr. Bloom could be expected to come to Williston a maximum of 15 times a year. However, Mr. Bloom responded that he believed it should state that as a minimum so it would not be limited to 15 times per year. President Cason con“ rmed with Mr. Bloom that Exhibit B had changed because at the time the contract was developed, the term was limited to one year. Councilman Byrd moved to approve 2012-23. Councilman Ross seconded. On vote, the motion passed 40.D. RESOLUTION: APPROVING RECREATION SCHOLARSHIP GUIDELINESInterim City Manager Wingo stated that this is one of the most fun assignments she has been given and that she enjoyed working with these citizens. She advised that the group is “ nding out that there are a lot more resources in town than anticipated. She explained that the fund is being set up to help ensure no child goes unserved. She said the program has been expanded beyond athletics with a simple application that is used in other cities to keep it simple for the families to complete. She is requesting Councils approval of the application and process. e process requires that the programs in the community must apply to participate and be approved by the City as one that will receive funds. e provisions ensure these organizations are not for pro“ t and have met all the insurance requirements and that they are properly screening their providers and coaches in accordance with the law. Upon becoming approved, children participating within the designated programs can then apply for a scholarship. Interim City Manager Wingo advised that the actual review committee for scholarship recipients will consist of one representative from each approved program. As the recommendations come in, sta will review and then have that committee convene to make determinations on the applicants. Once the check is written it will be made out to the parent and the program. She advised that most of the process comes from the recommendations of that group. Mayor Hethcoat con“ rmed that residence would be veri“ ed through utility bills and birth certi“ cates. Interim City Manager Wingo stated that, in addition, the families will be providing the Levy County form approving free or reduced lunch. Mayor Hethcoat added that this part of the process is to ensure fairness in verifying for our citizens that recipients live inside the City. President Cason advised that is probably the largest problem he has with the program because the youth leagues are made up primarily of people that do not live in the city limits. He expressed his wish to have the possibility to allow all of the participants to apply. He stated he is not opposed to limiting it to residents only this “ rst year but the original idea was to try to help bolster our youth athletic programs to potentially increase business within the city. Mayor Hethcoat stated he believed this provided time to address that issue with the County because the City is stepping up and the Council can ask the County to put up some funding as well. Councilman Goodman moved to approve Resolution 2012-26. Councilman Byrd seconded. Councilman Byrd stated he would like to comments made by Vice President Fugate on the nonpro“ t requirement. Some discussion was held related to the idea of requiring approved organizations to be designated as not forpro“ t or otherwise demonstrate that they are non-pro“ t. President Cason detailed that in the current plan as written it states that eligible programs must have a 502(3)(c) designation or other not for pro“ t designation and that this other category is vague. He advised that Vice President Fugate is asking to include the language that describes what makes the organization a not for pro“ t. ere was further discussion related to tax “ ling requirements. Councilman Goodman advised that he did not see the need to make this change at this point but added that if Council becomes aware of groups taking advantage in how the money is used a change should be made at that time. Councilman Byrd clari“ ed that he was satis“ ed with the motion as stated. On vote, the motion carried, 40.ITEM … 7 … PUBLIC PARTICIPATIONJennifer Collins addressed the Council regarding the Fall Festival special event application. She explained that her manager had submitted the application and that she had already received support from three of the churches that would have a booth. Several people she attended school with volunteered along with relatives with some donations of funding and candy. She had created ” iers for the event encouraging people to participate by having a booth or donating candy or funding. Councilman Goodman pointed out that the application date is requesting the 28th for the festival. Miss Collins advised she was not aware it was a Sunday until earlier in the day. Consensus was to change the date to October the 27th which is a Saturday. President Cason con“ rmed with Chief of Police Strow that there will be su cient police scheduled in the event that there was a large turnout for the Festival. Councilman Goodman moved to approve waiver of the fees and con“ rmed with City Attorney Koberlein that activities will be covered under City insurance Carolyn Ten Broek, Editor of the Williston Pioneer asked what the costs were for the Police Department to cover the event. Police Chief Strow advised it will cost nothing because the individuals will volunteer. Mrs. Ten Broek asked Miss Collins about advertising the event. Miss Collins responded that they were not hoping for a very small crowd but would not be able to handle thousands of participants as we normally see for Trail-of-Treaters. On vote to approve the fee waiver and Fall Festival, the motion passed unanimously, 4-0. Mrs. Ten Broek asked Council if there would be a meeting on November 6th, Election Day. Consensus of the Council was yes.ITEM … 8 … CITY MANAGERS ANNOUNCEMENTS … None. ITEM … 9 … COUNCILORS ANNOUNCEMENTSCouncilman Goodman stated that receiving the agenda packet at noon on Sunday of this size prior to a Monday meeting places an undue burden upon the Council. He stated he would like the City Manager and City Clerk to make every e ort. He asked if there was a cut-o date. Interim City Manager Wingo advised she did have a cut o for sta to have items to here by noon on Tuesday, with another deadline to have it to the Clerk by Wednesday. However, the past week, due to issues, the packet was not submitted to the Clerk until after 3:30 p.m. on Friday. Councilman Goodman advised that it is unacceptable to submit an agenda hundreds of pages in length to expect him to be fully versed. He added to please in the future try to get the agenda out earlier. Councilman Goodman advised that he understood there are times when there may be a problem but emphasized the importance of timely receipt of the packet. Interim City Manager Wingo stated her commitment is to have it to the Clerk by Wednesday afternoon. Councilman Goodman advised Clerk Taylor that he did not receive the complete packet by email and only received the Agenda. City Attorney Koberlein stated that Mr. Goodman had given him undue credit on the Golf Cart ordinance advising that it was prepared by the administration. He complimented them on their work. ITEM … 10 … ADJOURNMENT Councilman Byrd moved to adjourn. e meeting was adjourned at 9:54 p.m. ____________________________________ Jason S. Cason, City Council President ____________________________________ Frances V. Taylor, City Clerk Oh what fun it is to bank at Drummond Community BankSee any of the Ladies and Gentlemen at Drummond Community Bank for detailsDrummondBank.comMember FDIC

PAGE 20

The Levy County Journal8BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 38-11-CA-942 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-1 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1, Plaintiff, vs. CARMEN A. ROBERTS A/K/A CARMEN ROBERTS, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 6, 2012 and entered in 38-11-CA-942 of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and for Levy County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-1 ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1, is the Plaintiff and CARMEN A. ROBERTS A/K/A CARMEN ROBERTS; ASSET ACCEPTANCE, LLC are the Defendant(s). Danny Shipp as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Main Lobby, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621, at 11:00 AM on January 28, 2013, the fol lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 14, QUAIL RUN, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 7th day of December, 2012. (COURT SEAL) Danny Shipp Clerk of the Court By: Lindsey Polk /s/ As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Alachua County Courthouse, 201 East University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 at (352) 337-6237 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im paired call 711. Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. -----------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011 CA 001125 SEC.: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, v. MICHELLE LEE LINDSEY AKA MICHELLE LINDSEY; DWAYNE LINDSEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; AND UN KNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or der to Reschedule Foreclo sure sale dated December 3, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2011 CA 001125 of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and for Levy County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 28th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in the Main Lobby of the Levy County Court house, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida 32621, relative to the fol lowing described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SE OF THE NE OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 11 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN EAST 200 FEET TO ESTABLISH A POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM THIS POINT RUN EAST 245 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 90 YARDS; THENCE RUN WEST 245 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 90 YARDS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; LESS THE RIGHT OF WAY OF C-320, F/K/A STATE ROAD S-320. Property address: 6171 NORTHWEST 115TH STREET, CHIEFLAND, FL 32626-0000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Ms. Jan Phillips, ADA Coordinator Alachua County Court house, 201 University Ave nue, Gainesville, FL 32601; Phone: (352) 337-6237 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear ance. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 711. DATED AT BRONSON, FLORIDA THIS 5th DAY OF December, 2012 DANNY J. SHIPP CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Lindsey Polk /s/ Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. ----------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 38-2012-CA000431 SEC.: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, v. DERICK DAY ; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Or der of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 6, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 38-2012-CA000431 of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and for Levy County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 28th day of January, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in the Main Lobby of the Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida 32621, relative to the following de scribed property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 12, 13, AND 14, BLOCK O, ELEANOR VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 4A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2009 LIVE OAK MODEL #L-2564A DOUBLEWIDE MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL #LOHGA10810812A & SERIAL #LOGHA10810812B, HUS LABEL #GEO1485626 & #GEO1485625 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Ms. Jan Phillips, ADA Coordinator Alachua County Court house, 201 University Ave nue, Gainesville, FL 32601; Phone: (352) 337-6237 Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. ----------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 38-2011-CA000617 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, VS. SHIRLEY KULCSAR a/k/a SHIRLEY L. KULCSAR, individually; UNKNOWN SPOUSE, IF ANY, OF SHIRLEY KULCSAR; THE PERKINS STATE BANK, a Florida corporation; JOHN DOE, FICTITIOUS NAMES REPRESENTING UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION; JANE DOE, FICTITIOUS NAMES REPRESENTING UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION; IF LIVING, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants SECOND RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo sure dated June 20, 2012 in Case No.: 38-2011-CA-000617 of the Eighth Judicial Circuit, in and for Levy County, Florida, in which WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and SHIRLEY KULCSAR a/k/a SHIRLEY L. KULCSAR, individually; THE PERKINS STATE BANK, a Florida corpora tion; and JOHN DOE, FIC TITIOUS NAMES REPRE SENTING UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, n/k/a Jay Dee, et al are the Defendants, I will sell to the high est bidder for cash at the Levy County Courthouse, 355 S. Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621, Board of County Commission Room or Lobby, at the hour of 11:00 a.m. on February 18, 2013, the following de scribed property set forth in the Final Judgment of Fore closure: PARCEL NO. 1: FOR POINT OF BEGINNING, COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE E 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWN SHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST; THENCE RUN S 0143’47” E, A DIS TANCE OF 61.64 FEET TO A POINT IN THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 500 (US 27-A); THENCE RUN N 7102’13” W, ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 500, TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE N 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE RUN S 8828’01” E, A DIS TANCE OF 185.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING. SAID LAND LYING AND BEING IN THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 2: FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE, COM MENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE E 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST; THENCE RUN S 8828’02” E, A DIS TANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE S 8828’02” E, A DISTANCE OF 362.08 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THAT PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 344, PAGE 705, PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 0142’47” E, A DIS TANCE OF 208.44 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 344, PAGE 705, AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 500 (US 27A); THENCE RUN N 7102’13” W, ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 500, A DISTANCE OF 386.87 FEET; THENCE RUN N 0142’47” W, A DIS TANCE OF 93.66 FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN NING. SAID PARCEL LYING AND BEING IN THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 4: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33 AND IN THE SW 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL LOWS: FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SEC TION 33-12-18; THENCE RUN N 8833’01” W, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE S 0147’23” E, 208.44 TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 500 (US 27-A); THENCE S 7102’13” E, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 292.69 FEET; THENCE N 1536’43” W, 309.82 FEET TO CLOSE ON THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at (352) 337-6237, at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap pearance. If you are hear ing or voice impaired, please call 711. DATED this 6th day of December, 2012. Clerk of County Court By: LaQuanda Latson /s/ Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. ------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 38-2012-DR0810 JAMES A. BAILEY and MARION M. BAILEY, Petitioner, and ROBERT F. BEDSOLE, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT F. BEDSOLE ADDRESS UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for temporary custody by extended family has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on the petitioner’s attorney, whose name is EDITH R. RICHMAN, and whose address is P.O. Box 10, Archer, Florida 32618, on or before December 21, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida 32621, either before service on petitioner’s attorney or im mediately thereafter; other wise a default will be en tered against you for the relief demanded in the peti tion. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon re quest. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) WARNING: Rule 12.25, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED November 16, 2012. DANNY J. SHIPP Clerk of the Court By: Lindsey Polk /s/ As Deputy Clerk Pub.: Nov. 22, 29, Dec. 6, 13, 2012. --------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 38-2012 CA 000408 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL SHAWN RIZER A/K/A MICHAEL S. RIZER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL SHAWN RIZER A/K/A MICHAEL S. RIZER; DAVID H. RIZER A/K/A DAVID RIZER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID H. RIZER A/K/A DAVID RIZER; STEPHANIE RIZER; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; LEVY COUNTY CLERK OF COURTS; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): MICHAEL SHAWN RIZER A/K/A MICHAEL S. RIZER (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN); UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL SHAWN RIZER A/K/A MICHAEL S. RIZER (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN); DAVID H. RIZER A/K/A DAVID RIZER (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN); UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID H. RIZER A/K/A DAVID RIZER (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK 11, FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT 2009 LIVE OAK HOMES MOBILE HOME VIN #LOHGA10810514A; TITLE #101346073 AND VIN #LOHGA10810514B; TITLE #101346030 a/k/a 7070 NW 165TH STREET, TRENTON, FLORIDA 32693has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 11, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL and file the origi nal with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; oth erwise a default will be en tered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 355 S. Court Street, Bronson, Fl 32621, Phone No. (352)374 3639 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 26th day of November, 2012. DANNY J. SHIPP Clerk of the Court By: Gwen McElroy /s/ As Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. --------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 38-2012-CA000513 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A HAZEL et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To Robert A Hazel 821 Virginia Woods Lane Orlando, FL 32824 Robert A. Hazel 19591 Southeast Vicki Street Inglis, FL 34449 Robert A. Hazel 1910 SW 42nd Way Gainesville, FL 32607 Robert A. Hazel 1910 SW 42nd Way Apt A Gainesville, FL 32607 Robert A. Hazel 4732 Walden Circle Apt 1214 Orlando, FL 32811: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in LEVY County, Florida: Lot 16, Block C, Cason’s Inglis Acres Unit 9, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 49, Public Records of Levy County, Florida. Together with a 1984 TLDW mobile home bearing ID # 2246A & 2246B, commonly known as: 19591 Vicki Dr, Inglis, FL 34449 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jacob A. Thomas, c/o Johnson & Freedman, LLC, the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose LEGAL NOTICES

PAGE 21

The Levy County Journal 9BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 address is 400 Northridge Road, Suite 1100 M/S 27, Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350, within 30 days after the first publication date: December 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or imme diately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: November 30, 2012. As Clerk of the Court By: Deanna Dobbins /s/ As Deputy Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. ------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 38-2012-CA000566 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. MICHAEL J. FARMER A/K/A MICHAEL FARMER; DEBORAH D. GRIFFIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. FARMER A/K/A MICHAEL FARMER; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION DEBORAH D. GRIFFIN Last Known Address: 8950 NE 118th Lane Bronson, Florida 32621 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 17700 SW 38th Ave. Rd. Ocala, FL 34473 ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is un known if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defen dants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi tors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the prop erty described in the mort gage being foreclosed herein YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Levy County, Florida PARCEL I: WEST 1/2 OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN SHIP 11 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND PARCEL II: EAST 1/2 OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWN SHIP 11 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 DESTINY MANUFAC TURED HOME, SERIAL NO(S), DISH02568A/B This property is located at the Street address of: 8950 NE 118th Lane, Bronson, Florida 32621 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before January 11, 2013 a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attor ney, or immediately there after; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 26, 2012. (COURT SEAL) DANNY J. SHIPP CLERK OF THE COURT By: Gwen McElroy /s/ Deputy Clerk IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN’S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Alachua County Courthouse, 201 East University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601, at (352) 337-6237, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if your are hearing or voice im paired, call 711. Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. ------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 38-2012-CA000648 JEROME W. DARLING and SANDRA J. DARLING, his wife; Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF MARY FRANCES JOLLEY, TIFFANY MARIE WHITE and THERESE MARY CALDWELL, CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES; TIFFANY MARIE WHITE; THERESE MARY CALDWELL; RAYMOND PATRICK CARBONE; LAURA M. KINNEY; RAYMOND MICHAEL KINNEY; ROLAND PHILLIP KINNEY; CAPITAL ONE BANK; ALL AMERICAN FINANCIAL ASSOCIATES, INC.; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Laura M. Kinney, 14130 NW 76 Avenue, Trenton, FL 32693 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Levy County, Florida: Lot 3 of FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTATES First Addition, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 1, Public Records of Levy County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on THOMAS M. EGAN, Char tered, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 2107 SE 3rd Avenue, Ocala, FL 34471, on or before thirty days from the date of first publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either be fore service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on November 27, 2012. (COURT SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Gwen McElroy /s/ Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. -----------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 38-2012-CA000648 JEROME W. DARLING and SANDRA J. DARLING, his wife; Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF MARY FRANCES JOLLEY, TIFFANY MARIE WHITE and THERESE MARY CALDWELL, CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES; TIFFANY MARIE WHITE; THERESE MARY CALDWELL; RAYMOND PATRICK CARBONE; LAURA M. KINNEY; RAYMOND MICHAEL KINNEY; ROLAND PHILLIP KINNEY; CAPITAL ONE BANK; ALL AMERICAN FINANCIAL ASSOCIATES, INC.; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Roland P. Kinney, 14130 NW 76 Avenue, Trenton, FL 32693 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Levy County, Florida: Lot 3 of FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTATES First Addition, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 1, Public Records of Levy County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on THOMAS M. EGAN, Char tered, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 2107 SE 3rd Avenue, Ocala, FL 34471, on or before thirty days from the date of first publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either be fore service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on November 27, 2012. (COURT SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Gwen McElroy /s/ Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. -----------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000616 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL BOOTH, et aL, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MICHELLE LYNN BOOTH, F/K/A MICHELLE L. ROGERS Last Known Address: 617 NW 9TH CIR, WILLISTON, FL 32696 Also Attempted At: 5321 RESSIE DR, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32218 AND 835 A ST, LINCOLN, NE 68502 Current Residence Unknown MICHAEL BOOTH Last Known Address: 617 NW 9TH CIR, WILLISTON, FL 32696 Also Attempted At: 5321 RESSIE DR, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32218 AND 835 A ST, LINCOLN, NE 68502 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: Lot 1, Block 2, Pineridge Estates, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, page 24, Public Records of Levy County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, PA, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before January 9, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Under the American with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis tance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at (352) 337-6237, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 711. If you are deaf or hard of hearing and require an ASL interpreter or an assisted listening de vice to participate in a pro ceeding, please contact Court Interpreting at inter preter@circuit8.org WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 5th day of December, 2012. DANNY J. SHIPP Clerk of the Court By: Deanna Dobbins /s/ As Deputy Clerk Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. -----------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 38-2012-CA000668 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, v. RAYMOND L. CLARK; KATHERINE M. CLARK; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RAYMOND L. CLARK Last Known Address: 700 Avenue K Matamoras, PA 18336 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 9251 NW 130 Street Chiefland, FL 32626 Previous Address: 83 Gibbs Road Andover, NJ 07821 TO: KATHERINE M. CLARK Last Known Address: 700 Avenue K Matamoras, PA 18336 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 9251 NW 130 Street Chiefland, FL 32626 Previous Address: 83 Gibbs Road Andover, NJ 07821 TO: ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is un known if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defen dants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi tors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the prop erty described in the mort gage being foreclosed herein YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Levy County, Florida, has been filed against you: LOT 28, DOE RUN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 60, PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 1994 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME BEARING I.D. # FLFLP70A21951CG AND #FLFLP 70B21951CG. This property is located at the street address of: 9251 NW 130 Street, Chiefland, FL 32626. YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before January 9, 2013 a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff’s Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s Attor ney, or immediately there after; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Levy County Journal WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on December 5, 2012. (COURT SEAL) Danny J. Shipp CLERK OF THE COURT By: LaQuanda Latson /s/ Deputy Clerk IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN’S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Alachua County Courthouse, 201 East University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601, at (352) 337-6237, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im paired, call 711. Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. ------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 38-2012-DR000835 Division: Jose Esteves, Petitioner and Tammy Esteves, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: TAMMY L. ESTEVES Last Known Address: 6851 NE CR 337 Bronson, FL 32621 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jose Esteves, whose address is 6851 NE CR 337, Bronson, FL 32621 on or before December 31, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 355 S. Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621 before service on Petitioner or im mediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon re quest. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current ad dress. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s of fice. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: November 20, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Deanna Dobbins /s/ Deputy Clerk Pub.: Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 20, 2012. ---------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.38-2012-CP-000167 IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES W. deVARENNES, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of CHARLES W. deVARENNES, Deceased, whose date of death was November 7,2012; File Number 38-2012-CP -000167 is pending in the Circuit Court for Levy County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS December 13, 2012. /s/ Gregory V. Beauchamp Ancillary Personal Representative P. O. Box 1129 Chiefland, FL 32626 /s/ GREGORY V. BEAUCHAMP, P.A. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 178770 P. O. Box 1129 Chiefland, FL 32644 (352) 493-1458 Pub.: Dec. 13, 20, 2012. ------------------NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING All interested parties within Levy County are hereby advised that the Levy County Board of County Commissioners/ Levy County Transit is ap plying to the Florida De partment of Transportation for capital and operating grants under Section 5310 and 5311 of the Federal Transit Act of 1991, as amended, for the purchase of vehicles to be used for the provision of public transit services and operating assistance within Levy County. A Public Hearing has been scheduled for December 18, 2012 at 355 South Court Street Bronson, Florida 32621, for the pur pose of advising all inter ested parties of service be ing contemplated if a grant is awarded, and to ensure that contemplated services would not represent a dupli cation of current or pro posed services provided by existing transit or paratransit operators in the area. This hearing will be conducted if and only if a written request for the hearing is received by December 12, 2012. LEGAL NOTICEScontinued on 11B

PAGE 22

The Levy County Journal10BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Many partners, including the University of Florida, e Nature Conservancy, e Future of Hunting in Florida, the Wildlife Foundation of Florida and Zoo Miami, are involved in the Python Challenge’. Florida currently prohibits possession or sale of Burmese pythons for use as pets, and federal law bans the importation and interstate sale of this species. e Python Challenge’ will conclude with a free Awareness and Awards Event on Feb. 16 at Zoo Miami. Educational talks and exhibits will be available for all ages, with chances to encounter live Burmese pythons, meet the experts who research and capture them, and learn about protecting the precious resources of the Everglades ecosystem, including its native birds, mammals and reptiles. e winners of the General Competition and Python Permit Holders Competition will be presented with their awards. 2013 Python Challenge™ continued from page 1B By Master Sgt. omas Kielbasa Florida National Guard Public A airs Fourteen Soldiers from the Florida Army National Guards B Company, 2nd Battalion, 151st Aviation Regiment (Security and Support), returned to Cecil Commerce Center in Jacksonville, December 7th following a 10-month deployment to the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. e Florida National Guard Soldiers left for the mission in early February 2012. Using LUH-72 Lakota helicopters, the unit conducted aerial reconnaissance and security operations as part of Task Force Libertys Southwest Border Security mission. e unit was supporting U.S. Customs and Border Protection along the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Texas.  is was a great mission for this command,Ž said Maj. Don Baker after arriving in Jacksonville. It was perfect for a (Security and Support unit). We were out supporting the Border patrol, and it was very much a traditional Army mission … the Border patrol just happens to be like the Infantryƒwe spotted things along the border, reported them to (Border Protection agents) and theyd go and make the apprehensions.Ž is Florida National Guard unit was one of the “ rst Security and Support units to deploy in support of a domestic mission. e unit conducted more than 259 missions in support of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and safely ” ew more than 1,000 hours. e e orts of B Company resulted in 2,619 apprehensions and during the last 10 months the crews were responsible for the con“ scation of more than 10,000 pounds of illegal drugs with an estimated street value in excess of $9 million, according to Florida Army National Guard State Aviation O ce.Florida National Guardsmen Return from SW Border Mission Calypso Blue, a giant leatherback from Panama, “ nished in “ rst place in Sea Turtle Conservancy's (STC) annual Tour de Turtles Migration Marathon. Calypso Blue, sponsored by Atlantis Paradise Island, swam 3,268 miles in 97 days. Tour de Turtles is a threemonth-long, online sea turtle migration-tracking marathon. is year, audiences followed the migration of “ fteen turtles on www.tourdeturtles.org, an interactive website which allowed people to track and adopt their favorite sea turtle. "It was very rewarding to join forces with so many organizations to support sea turtle conservation through the 2012 Tour de Turtles program," said Michelle Liu, Vice President of Marine Aquarium Operations, Atlantis, Paradise Island. "It was exciting to track the movements of Calypso Blue, the leatherback sea turtle and Atlantis' o cial swimmer, who traveled almost 3,500 miles during the marathon." In addition to the distance competition, each turtle competed in the Causes Challenge. e Causes Challenge encouraged Tour de Turtles visitors to learn more about di erent threats to sea turtles and ways that people can make a di erence for these threatened and endangered species. e turtles' causes ranged from light pollution to beach renourishment and plastic debris. Not only did Calypso Blue win the migration marathon, but she also won the Causes Challenge, collecting more than $10,000 towards raising awareness about the impacts of commercial trawl “ sheries to sea turtles.Calypso Blue, a Giant Leatherneck, Wins Sea Turtle Migration Marathon An adult female loggerhead sea turtle released on July 29, 2012 with a satellite transmitter after nesting in the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, Florida.An adult female leatherback sea turtle encountered nesting on Blu Beach, Panama on the night of May 28, 2012. Call-Only Savings Just For You!10% OFFA Single Item $99+*And Say*Some Exclusions Apply Offer Ends December 31st, 2012Call 1-877-506-8553Over 55,000 products from the industrys top brands for musicians at every skill level „only at Musicians Friend!SAVEMORE10 Calypso Blue is now o the northeast coast of the United States and will likely continue her migration to Europe. In the migration marathon, Karma, another leatherback from Panama sponsored by RFQ-Hub, took second place, swimming 2,986 miles for the cause of commercial longline “ sheries. Lady Marmalade, a loggerhead from Florida sponsored by e Body Shop Foundation, came in third, swimming 2,580 miles for the prevention of oil spills.

PAGE 23

The Levy County Journal 11BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 Across Down 1. Gators cousin 5. Hamsters home 9. Co eehouses 14. 100 kurus 15. Building additions 16. Adult (2 wds) 17. Support paid by divorced spouse (pl.) 19. Star bursts 20. Comprende?Ž 21. After-bath wear 22. Young haddocks split and boned for cooking 23. Course of study outline (pl.) 25. Absolute 26. AladdinŽ prince 27. Big game 28. A ict 31. e “ nal irritation 35. Small hand drum in India 37.  anks ___!Ž (2 wds) 38. Overhangs 40. Big losers nickname? 41. Recipient of a gift 43. For a song (2 wds) 45. Absolutely!Ž 46. Cool!Ž 48. ___ v. Wade 49. Do-nothing 51. Advise 55. Resembling a pine cone 57. ink (over) 58. Get a move on 59. Kind of battery 60. Global 62. Moved back and forth while suspended from above 63. ... or ___!Ž 64. Your turnŽ 65. Schoolteachers disciplinary strap 66. Cold oneŽ 67. Cautious Crossword Puzzle1. Category 2. Life of ___ 3. Architectural projection 4. Video maker, for short 5. Member of a religious community 6. Accuseds need 7. Delight 8. Cousin of -trix 9. Musical performance without theatrical staging 10. Prior to, old-style 11. Pleasing 12. Good grief!Ž 13. Attends 18. Certain exams 22. ___ CriedŽ (1962 hit) 24. Ca e ___ 25. Ratty place 27. Lifeboat lowerer 29. Hip bones 30. Aladdins ___ 31. Disney dog 32. ___ vera 33. Daughters husbands (hyphenated) 34. ___ OReilly on M*A*S*HŽ 36. Bloodless 39. Leisurely walker 42. Blow up 44.  ings ___ be worse.Ž 47. Moray, e.g. 50. ___ list (college) 51. Invoke misfortune 52. Hindu deity 53. Downy duck 54. Apprehensive 55. Check this out!Ž 56. Field of DreamsŽ setting 57. Blemish 60. Fly catcher 61. Awesome!Ž e answers for this weeks crossword puzzle will appear in next weeks issue. BRONSON SELF STORAGE500 Commerce St., Bronson, FL 32621352-486-2121 Cameras, NEW Lighting & 24/7 AccessOUTDOOR STORAGE$25.00 and up JournalYour Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923Levy Countycall 352-490-4462 or email advertising@ levyjournal.com Requests for a hearing must be addressed to Levy County Board of County Commissioners/Levy County Transit, P.O. Box 310 Bronson, Florida 32621 and a copy sent to Florida Department of Trans-portation 2250 Irene Street, MS-2813, Jacksonville, Florida 32204. Attn: Phillip Worth. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he or she will need a record of the pro ceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a ver batim record of the pro ceedings is made, which record includes the testi mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. NOTICE REGARDING THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceed ing should contact the OF FICE OF THE COUNTY COMMISSION no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at (352) 486-5217, Bronson, Florida. Pub.: Dec. 6, 13, 2012. -----------------NOTICE OF SALE OF LIVESTOCK To Whom It May Concern: You are hereby notified that I will offer for sale and sell at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described livestock: 1 (one) Cow At 11;00 o’clock, A.M., on the 19th day of December, 2012 at the following place: Levy County Landfill/Large Animal Impound, 12051 NE 69 Lane, Bronson, Florida 32621, to satisfy a claim in the sum of $420.00 (plus advertising) for fees and expenses for feeding and care and costs hereof. LCSO report#: 12031892. Johnny Smith, Sheriff Levy County, Florida Pub.: Dec. 13, 2012. -----------------LEGAL NOTICESOrnan Masonic Lodge No. 117 Elects New O cers 2013 On Monday December 3rd 2012, Ornan Lodge No. 117 F&AM elected its o cers for 2013. e new o cers are Br. E.W. BillŽ Catsulis, Worshipful Master; Br. Casey Harding Stamper, Senior Warden; Br. Richard J. Roberts II as Junior Warden; Br. Glen Garner, Lodge Secretary and Br. Richard Roberts, Treasurer. e appointed o cers are Br. Reverend Delbert King, Chaplain; Br. Dwight C Fields as Marshall; Br. David Bruce Alford as Senior Deacon; Br. John Michael Pursley, Junior Deacon; Br. Hugh Lawrence, Senior Steward; Br. Carl Pinkston, Junior Steward; and Br. Steve Nichols as Tyler. Ornan Lodge meets twice a month on the “ rst and third Mondays at 7:30 p.m. e public installation will be held at the Lodge on Saturday December 29th, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. preceded by a luncheon at 12:30. All friends of Ornan Lodge are welcome e Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) unanimously decided Wednesday, Dec. 5, on a draft 2013 Gulf of Mexico gag grouper recreational season. After discussing several options and hearing public testimony from 26 people, Commissioners at their meeting in Apalachicola chose draft options that, if approved in February, will make most Gulf state waters consistent with the current federal season, with the exception of a four-county region. e current proposed federal season for Gulf gag grouper is slated to start July 1 and end when the annual catch target (the number of “ sh that can be harvested for that year within the rebuilding plan) is expected to be met, which will likely be sometime in November or early December. e federal season ending date should be “ nalized in spring 2013. e Commissioners proposal included an April 1 through June 30 season in state waters o the counties of Taylor, Je erson, Wakulla and Franklin. According to the proposal, the four-county region will not open during the July 1 through November/December federal season. Monroe County is excluded from the Gulf of Mexico season because it is included in the Atlantic season for gag grouper. Similar to our reasons for making this change last season, moving the 2013 season to April through June for this four-county region is anticipated to have an insigni“ cant impact to the resource but a signi“ cant impact to the local economy and the culture,Ž said Commissioner Brian Yablonski.  is at least gives the Big Bend area a chance to “ sh. Without this exception, the Big Bend is in essence left out because the “ sh are o shore during the federally proposed season.Ž e Commission asked sta to work with federal “ shery managers in gathering data on the e ect this proposal may have on the length of the federal season and bring back this information to the February Commission meeting.  e important thing is it looks like we are going in a positive direction for next year,Ž said Commissioner Ron Bergeron about the proposed federal season, which potentially will be lengthened in 2013. Other options considered by the Commission included full consistency with the federal season in all state waters, split seasons that would open in spring and winter, and regional seasons. e 2012 recreational gag grouper season was July 1 through Oct. 31 in all federal and most state waters with the exception of state waters o Taylor, Je erson, Wakulla and Franklin counties, which were open April 1 through June 30 instead. Public comment on this draft rule can be sent to Marine@MyFWC.com or can be given by calling 850/487-0554.FWC Discusses Gulf Gag Grouper Recreational Season for 2013A cooperative initiative by the Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) is under way to enhance regional water levels by capturing signi“ cant quantities of water to recharge the Upper Floridan aquifer at strategic locations. e districts recently hired a contractor to develop four conceptual regional recharge projects to replenish the Upper Floridan aquifer. is study is one element of the larger aquifer replenishment initiative. Potential sources of recharge water include reclaimed water and surface water within both districts. e contractor has completed the “ rst task that included summarizing the hydrogeologic data, examining potential sources of water to recharge the Upper Floridan aquifer and identifying water quality treatment requirements for the ranges of reclaimed water sources and surface water sources. e study area generally consists of the northeastern portion of SRWMD and the northernmost counties in SJRWMD. e next task will involve evaluating hydrologic and hydrogeologic data, developing aquifer recharge conceptual project designs and modeling the conceptual projects. e “ nal task involves producing a feasibility report that includes cost estimates for each of the recharge project concepts and developing an implementation schedule.North Florida Aquifer Replenishment Initiative Moving Forward e Silver Springs Alliance (SSA) announced the launch of a statewide campaign to help state o cials make Silver Springs the next state park. And the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks held a public workshop on Wednesday December 12 at 7 PM with the public invited at Vanguard High School cafeteria in Ocala to discuss this very issue. Currently, Palace Entertainment, a private for-pro“ t company, holds a lease from the State of Florida to operate the Silver Springs Attraction, which is located near Ocala. Recently, however, Palace o cials expressed interest in giving up the lease, and turning management of the resource over to the State of Florida or another entity. As the states number one advocate for Silver Springs„ we are convinced that the choice is clear: there is no better steward than the Florida State Park System which could restore and manage this treasured resource,Ž said Andy Kesselring, president of the Silver Springs Alliance (SSA), an Ocala-based, non-pro“ t organization that works to protect the springs ecosystem. Floridas State Park Service„which has been nationally recognized for managing the best park system in the country„is the most quali“ ed organization to restore and preserve this publicly-owned natural and cultural resource in perpetuity,Ž Kesselring said. In addition, the state already owns the property at Silver Springs, which means there would be no acquisition costs for the public.Ž As an attraction, Silver Springs has been under private management for more than 100 years as a pro“ t-motivated enterprise, often to the detriment of the natural springs environment Like so many other springs in Florida, Silver Springs is in a state of environmental decline which could be reversed by sound state management,Ž said Dr. Bob Knight, a springs scientist and advisor to state and federal environmental agencies. e SSA formed in May 2012 to advocate for protection, restoration, and preservation of Silver Springs and the Silver River in Marion County. In keeping with that mission, we believe the most important thing we can do is to build public support and encourage state legislators to commit the necessary resources to the Division of Parks and Recreation to “ nally combine the Silver Springs Attraction and the contiguous Silver River State Park into an integrated state park,Ž Kesselring said. If that happens, Silver Springs would be just the latest tourist attraction to transition to a public resource. Homosassa, Weeki-Wachee, Rainbow, and Wakulla springs are all former attractions which are now popular springsbased Florida state parks that are also compatible with the natural environment.  is is a once in a lifetime chance for the State of Florida to rescue and preserve our states icon, Floridas Silver Springs,Ž Kesselring said. Florida DEP Holds Public Meeting to Hear Advocacy Group on Making Silver Springs a State ParkLegal Notices continued from page 9B

PAGE 24

The Levy County Journal12BDecember 13, 2012www.levyjournalonline.com Your Locally-Owned County Paper of Record since 1923 STUFFED CHICKEN BREASTSStu ng: 1 cup cooked and drained spinach 1/2 cup ricotta cheese1/2 cup shredded mozzarella or Gorgonzola cheese4 slices cooked bacon, crumbled salt and pepper 1 large egg Sauce: 1/2 cup dry white wine 1/2 cup chicken stock 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard Juice of one lemon salt and pepper Chicken: 2 (8 Oz) boneless chicken breast halves salt and pepper 2 tablespoons oil In a bowl combine the “ rst 4 stu ng ingredients and mix well. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the egg, mix and set aside. In a saucepan combine the wine and stock. Bring to a boil and reduce till slightly thickened. Whisk in the mustard and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside. Place chicken breast between 2 sheets of plastic wrap or inside a freezer bag. Pound Elizabeth’s KITCHENeach to an even 1/4 inch thickness. Divide the stu ng and mound it in the center of each. Fold the bottom edge over the stu ng and roll until completely wrapped. Secure with a toothpick. Season each breast with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat.Add the chicken and cook turning until browned. Cover the skillet and turn the heat to low. Cook about 5 minutes more. Remove the chicken from the pan onto a cutting board. Pour the sauce into the skillet on high heat. Scrape and stir the sauce. Slice the chicken into medallions and divide among the plates. Spoon sauce over each.FRIED CREAM CORN1 egg separated 1/2 cup milk 3/4 cup creamed corn 1 tablespoon butter 1 cup ” our 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt Beat egg yolk and add the rest of the ingredients. Beat the egg whites until sti peaks form and fold into the mixture. Drop by tablespoons into 370 degree oil. On Sunday, December 2, 2012, the Williston Middle School Jr. Beta Club left for Orlando to compete at State Convention against 37 middle schools and 1600 students. It was an eventful three-day journey as it was the “ rst year attending convention for many Beta members as well as WMS new Beta Sponsor, Tanya Taylor. is years convention theme was e Heart of Beta" and WMS Beta students represented the "heart" of Williston with leadership, con“ dence, and passion. Josette Covarrubias and Haylee Baker put on a stunning pointe ballet and singing special talent performance leaving the entire club speechless. Arts and crafts submissions by Maggie Knott, Mariella Zapata, Mariah Weldon, Connor McCoy and Josette Covarrubias showcased Williston Middle School students artistic abilities. e Living Literature Committee crafted a masterpiece from a scene from e Hobbit" with WMS Jr. Beta President, Rachel Backmann, as Bilbo, Gabe Pena as Bard and Emily Ous as the Elvenking. Other Beta members put their academic talent to the test competing in Quiz Bowl and Academic tests and 8th grader, Robbie Sistrunk, brought home his second consecutive second place win in the Spelling Bee. State Convention was an amazing experience for everyone who attended and WMS Beta members returned home proud of their e ort, leadership, and accomplishments. It's true "Beta Makes Our Heart Beat"! „ story and photos by Tanya Taylor, 8th Grade AVID Business Teacher, Jr. BETA Sponsor, WMSWMS Jr. Beta Club Attends State Convention Jr. Beta Members leave WMS on Sunday. Robbie Sistrunk showing o his second consecutive Spelling Bee Win. Call 7 days a week 8am 11pm EST Promo Code: MB07121-888-496-9630 Call now and save over $850 this year on TV!Prices valid for 12 months. Requires 24-month agreement PACKAGES UNDER $50 Packages start at justFOR 12 MONTHSEveryday price $24.99/mo Join Nicole and John and start saving today!Nicole went back to basics and saved $312! John got in the game with a wide range of sports, movies and more & saved up to $850! NO ONE CAN COMPARE TO DISH! THE COMPETITION DOESNT STACK UP YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO LARGEST CABLE PROVIDERS BLOCKBUSTER @ HOME Get over 100,000 movies, shows and games by mail, plus thousands of titles streamed to your TV or PC* Requires broadband internet; must have HD DVR to stream to your TV.The most HD channels Lowest All-Digital Prices Nationwide Award-Winning HD DVR FREE Installation in up to 6 rooms For 3 months.PREMIUM MOVIE CHANNELS SAME DAY INSTALLATIONIN UP TO 6 ROOMSWhere available. CALL TODAY INSTALLED TODAY!Blockbuster @Home (1 disc at a time): Only available with new qualifying DISH service. For the rst 3 months of your subscripti on, you will receive Blockbuster @Home free (regularly $10/mo). After 3 months, then-current regular price applies Requires online DISH account for discs by mail; broadband Internet to stream content; HD DVR to stream to TV. Exchange online rentals for free in-store movie rentals at participating Blockbuster stores. Oer not available in Puerto Rico or U.S. Virgin Islands. Streaming to TV and some channels not available with select packages. Digital Home Advantage plan requires 24-month agreement and credit qualication. Cancellation fee of $17.50/month remaining applies if service is terminated before end of ag reement. Online Bonus credit requires online redemption no later than 45 days from service activation. After applicable promotional period, then-current price will apply. $10/mo HD add-on fee waived for li fe of current account; requires 24-month agreement, continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing. 3-month premium movie oer value is up to $132; after 3 months then-current price applies unles s you downgrade. Free Standard Professional Installation only. All equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Upfront fee, monthly fees, and lim its on number and type of receivers will apply. You must initially enable PrimeTime Anytime feature; requires local channels broadcast in HD (not available in all markets). HD programming requires HD t elevision. All prices, packages, programming, features, functionality and oers subject to change without notice. Oer available for new and qualied former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Prom otional and Residential Customer agreements. Additional restrictions may apply. Oer ends 1/31/13. HBO, Cinemax and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Oce, Inc. SHOWTIM E is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Netix is a registered trademark of Net ix. Inc. Redbox is a registered trademark of Redbox Automated Retail, LLC. All new customers are subject to a one-time, non-refundable processing fee. FREE FOR 3 MONTHSwith qualifying packages. Oer based on the discounted $5 price for the Blockbuster @Home. One disc at a time, $10/mo. value. $99.00 Customer Installation Charge. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $35.99 per month ($1,295.64). Form of payment m ust be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or savings account. Oer applies to homeowners only. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. C ertain restrictions may apply. Oer valid for new ADT Authorized Dealer customers only and not on purchases from ADT Security Services, Inc. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other oer. Licenses: AL-10-1104, AZ-ROC217517, CA-ACO6320, CT-ELC.0193944-L5, DE-07-212, FL-EC13003427, EC13003401, GA-LVA205395, IA-AC-0036, ID-39131, IL-127.001042, IN-City of Indianap olis: 93294, KY-City of Louisville: 483, LA-F1082, MA-1355C, MD-107-1375, Baltimore County: 1375, Calvert County: ABL00625, Caroline County: 1157, Cecil County: 541-L, Charles County: 804 Dorchester County: 764, Frederick County: F0424, Harford County: 3541, Montgomery County: 1276, Prince Georges County: 685, Queen Annes County: L156, St. Marys County: LV2039R, Talb ot County: L674, Wicomico County: 2017, Worcester County: L1013, MI-3601205773, MN-TS01807, MO-City of St. Louis: CC354, St. Louis County: 47738, MS-15007958, MT-247, NC-25310-SP-LV, 16 22-CSA, NE-14451, NJ-34BF00021800, NM-353366, NV-68518, City of Las Vegas: B14-00075-6-121756, C11-11262-L-121756, NY-Licensed by the N.Y.S. Department of State UID#12000286451, OH-53 891446, City of Cincinnati: AC86, OK-1048, OR-170997, Pennsylvania Home Improvement Contractor Registration Number: PA22999, RI-3428, SC-BAC5630, TN-C1164, C1520, TX-B13734, UT-6422 596-6501, VA-115120, VT-ES-2382, WA-602588694/PROTEYH934RS, WI-City of Milwaukee: 0001697, WV-042433, WY-LV-G-21499. For full list of licenses visit our websit e www.protectyourhome.com. Protect Your Home … 3750 Priority Way South Dr., Ste 200, Indianapolis, IN 46240. **Crime data taken from http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/gallery/posters/pdfs/Crime_Clock.p df What a Christmas Party we are having at the Williston Arms Apartments on Dec. 15 at 2 PM with Santa riding in on a Harley at 2:30 PM, said Carol Perkins, manager. We have had a wonderful outpouring of help from not only AmVets Post 444, Ladies Auxiliary, but also the Bronson Volunteer Fire Department, AmVets Post 88 Bronson, a local business owner who wishes to remain anonymous and many more. We have one childs bicycle we will have a drawing for. It is not new but it was donated and Lanes Yardware donated a new tire and tube for it. Little things mean a lot, especially for some of our residents at this time of year. I sincerely hope this will be a Christmas to be remembered by all and that 2013 will be just as good, if not better.Ž Santa on a Harley and Crybaby in a Santa Suit … What a Christmas Party! If you would like to help with this Christmas event you can call Carol Perkins, Manager of Williston Arms Apartments, Bronson Villas and Bronson Village Apartments at 352/5283352.