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UF00028309 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Levy County journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00325
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Publication Date: 4/7/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
sobekcm - UF00028309_00325
System ID: UF00028309:00325

Full Text




The Turtle

Kraals

page 7


Sad Face Story

Completed

page 16


LEVY COUNTY'S ONLY LOCALLY-OWNED WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


EV


The County Seat Newspaper Est. 1923


50 cents


Vol. 87, No. 40 April 7, 2011


Levy County

School Board n

Minutes

page 10


Contents

Public Safety........ ........2
Opinion .......................... 3
Calendar.................... 4-5
W orship .......................6.
Schools...................... 10
Recreation ................... 11
Lifestyle ....................... 12
Classifieds .....................13
And Finally.....................16


Levy County

Fair Schedule

Gate Schedule
Thursday: 4:00 PM -10:00 PM
Friday: 4:00 PM Midnight
Saturday: 10:00 AM Midnight
Sunday: 12:00 AM 9:00 PM


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Residents and visitors flocked to the Cedar Key Arts Festival last weekend to enjoy art, entertainment and lots of good food. Turnout was
very good according to event organizers. Photo by Linda Cooper, Staff


Crystal River Nuclear Plant to

Remain Out of Service for Now


Engineering analysis under way
Progress Energy Florida has notified the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission (NRC) and the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC)
that the Crystal River Nuclear plant will remain out of service while the
company conducts a thorough engineering analysis and review of the new
delamination. Options to return the plant to service will be analyzed after
the report is complete. The company cannot estimate a return to service
date for CR3 at this time.
In mid March, final retensioning of tendons within the Crystal River
Nuclear plant containment building was suspended while engineers
investigated evidence of an additional delamination (or separation)
resulting from the tendon retensioning work. The initial damage occurred
in late 2009 in the concrete at the periphery of the containment building
while creating an opening in the structure to facilitate the replacement of
the steam generators inside. The unit was already shut down for refueling
and maintenance at the time the damage was found.
The plant has been shut down since September of 2009 and there
continues to be no threat to public health and safety. Progress Energy
continues to coordinate repair and restart plans with Nuclear Regulatory
Commission officials.
"The Crystal River Nuclear Plant has been an important asset in
providing carbon-free, reliable power for decades to our customers,"


Levy County Fair Opens

Thursday Night


The time has come for the Levy
County Fair with all the midway fun,
scrumptious food, beauty, talent and
craft contests, and the music. Starting
Thursday April 7th and entertaining
through Sunday April 10th there is
something for everyone.
The venue is the Williston Airport
Industrial Park on Highway 41 South in
Williston across from Horseman's Park.
One low gate admission includes it all.
General admission $10.00. Seniors 62
and over $5.00. Family plans available.
For more admission information go to
levycountyfair.com
Starting at 4 p.m. the gates will open
with ceremonies, Presentation of Colors,
2010 Queens, the Star Spangled Banner
and Pledge of Allegiance. Slated for
5:30 p.m. and on is: Williston School
of Dance, Reggie Stacey, "Suwannee
Cracker" Robinson, "Lil Man", and
Amber Denice for starters.
Craft judging will begin on Friday,
April 8th at 10 a.m. for sewing, crafts,
textiles, food preservation, art, wood
sculpture, photography and horticulture.
The main stage will open at 4 p.m. with
entertainment and dancing, the Miss
Levy County Fair Rehearsal, the Junior
Karaoke contestants will sound out their
talents at 7 p.m. and the South Bound
Band takes off at 8:30 p.m. with the
dance floor open.
Make sure to save some energy for
Saturday April 9th as the gates will
k YA


open at 10 a.m. at the main stage and
the Meat Goat Show and the Poultry
Show start at 10:30. The Karaoke
Finals will commence at 11 a.m. at the
main stage. The Dairy Goat Show
starts at 12 p.m. and the Rabbit Show
at 1:30 p.m. The Hogtown Heelers
entertain at 3 p.m. at the main stage
followed by Jamming in the Park.
There will be an Encore Performance
of the Karaoke Winners at 5:30 p.m.
leading into the South Bound Band at
6:30 and you will need your dancing
shoes. The Shane Wooten Band jams
out the evening at 8 p.m. and the dance
floor will be open.
Sunday April 10th gates open at
12 noon and the Baby Farm Animal
Encounter will be available from 12:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. At the main stage Lillian
McClendon's Gospel Singers will sing
the message starting at 1 p.m. followed
by the Kirby Singers, God's Will, and
the Morriston Baptist Church Band.
The large livestock will be showing for
the Steer Show at 1:30 and the Heifer
Show at 3:40 p.m. At 4 p.m. A Touch
of Class Trio will certainly entertain
everyone with their brand of music and
the Trashy Art Barrels Auction will
start at 5:30 p.m. All the beauties show
up at 6 p.m. for the Miss Levy County
Fair Pageant and the Little Miss Levy
County Fair Pageant with the gates
sadly closing around 9 p.m.


said Vincent Dolan, president and chief executive officer of Progress
Energy Florida. "We are doing a careful and systematic review of the
new delamination and the options to return the plant to service. In the
meantime, nuclear safety remains our top priority. The plant remains shut
down and in a safe condition. We will continue to provide energy from
other company and purchased resources to meet our customers' needs for
reliable electricity."
Progress Energy maintains insurance for property damage and
incremental costs of replacement power resulting from prolonged
accidental outages through Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited (NEIL).
As of December 31, 2010, the company has spent approximately $150
million on the repair and $290 million on replacement power costs.
NEIL has paid $181 million during that time period. Of the $181
million received, $117 million covered replacement power and $64 million
covered repair costs.
The Crystal River Nuclear Plant is located near Crystal River, Fla. and
is capable of generating 860 MW of power to help serve Progress Energy
Florida's 1.6 million customers. The plant went into service in March of
1977. Its current license expires in 2016. The company filed for a license
renewal with the NRC in 2008, requesting an additional 20 years of
operation.


Jumping Sturgeon

Migrating Up

Suwannee River
By Karen Parker, FWC

They're back. Gulf sturgeon are beginning their annual
migration back into the Suwannee River this month.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) reminds boaters to slow down and be aware that these
fish are returning and will begin jumping.
People have been injured in accidental collisions with the
jumping sturgeon, but 2010 was a very good year for boaters
on the Suwannee. There were no reported encounters between
boaters and sturgeon last year.
"Even though we had a quiet season in 2010, remember that
just one person getting hurt is too many," said Maj. Lee Beach,
regional law enforcement commander for the FWC's North
Central Region, based in Lake City. "We want people to be
aware that Gulf sturgeon are returning to the Suwannee, and
the risk of injury to boaters does exist."
continuedon page 7


www.levyjournalonline.cor


Found Photo











No one identified any of
the group pictured in last
week's Found Photo item. If
you can identify any of these
folks, please email us at
editor@levycounty.com and
tell us the story.


I


1:1









PUBLIC SAFETY

2 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.co The Levy County Journal


Levy County Jail

Booking Report

Total Inmates Currently Booked: 45
Levy County Sheriff's Department
Ables, David Darrell, 31, of Fanning Springs: DWLSR-
HABITUAL;
Anthony, Daniel Michael, 39, of Orlando: ATTEMPT
BURGLARY/RESIDENCE, DISORDERLY
INTOXICATION;
Broat, Mark Edward, 21, of Williston: GRAND THEFT;
Cabral, David Joseph, 18, of Bronson: DRUG.-POSS.
COCAINE;
Chever, Marcus Kissinger, 28, of Williston: POSS. OF
CONTROLLED SUB X2, SALE OF CONTROLLED
SUB. X2;
Erlandson, Jonathan Robert, 27, of Inglis: BURGLARY OF A
DWELLING, GRAND THEFT, HOLD CITRUS CO./
VOP-GRAND THEFT;
Kearney, William Charles, 22, of Williston: GRAND THEFT;
Lewis, Brittany Lynn, 23, of Gainesville: HOLD FOR
COURT;
Murphy, Freddie Lee, 30, of Alachua: HOUSE FOR US
MARSHALL;
Philmon, Daniel Keith, 46, of Old Town: VOP-GRAND
THEFT;
Ridenour, Fredrick Richard, 23, of Chiefland: AGG.
BATTERY/DOMESTIC W/DEADLY WEAPON;
Rivera, Jorge Luis, 25, of Bronson: FTA-MISREP. OF
INSURANCE, FTA-ATT. TAG NOT ASSIGNED, FTA-
FRAUD ILLEGAL USE OF CREDIT CARD, FTA-
BATTERY-TOUCH OR STRIKE;
VanHoose, Michelle L., 37, of Bronson: DWLSR
(HABITUAL);
Wesley, Eddie Khaudfty, 37, ofNewberry: VOP-GRAND
THEFT, VOP-UTTERING FORGED INSTRUMENT,
VOP-DWLSR IN FOR COURT;
Woodley, Sierra Symone, 20, ofWilliston: VOP-POSS. OF
MARIJUANA L/T 20GRMS LEVY COUNTY WRNT.
Chiefland Police Department
Hernandez, Jose Martinez, 29, of Old Town: NO DL;
McGuire, Melinda Arlene, 46, of Old Town: DISORDERLY
INTOXICATION;
Patrick, Coree, 35, of Chiefland: DOMESTIC AGG. ASST.
W/DEADLY WEAPON, FLEEING/ATTEMPT TO
ELUDE;
Turner, Candy Latoya, 27, of Chiefland: DWLSR, RWOV,
HOLD PINELLAS CO./DWLSR;
Williston Police Department
Figueroa, Juan Alberto, 19, of Williston: NO VALID DL;
McGee, Kent Jared, 26, of Williston: SALE OF
CONTROLLED SUBST, POSS. OF CONTROLLED
SUBST;
Sanders, Steven Michael, 22, of Ocala: HOLD MARION
CO/OBTAINING PROP. BY MEANS WORTHLESS
CHECKX2;
Florida Highway Patrol
Alvarado, Carlos Cano, 31, of Cross City: HOLD DIXIE CO/
FTA-NO VALID DL, OPERATE MOTOR VEHICLE
W/O VALID DL, DUI W/PROPERTY DAMAGE;
Inglis Police Department
Boase, Rowdy Buck, 26, ofInglis: DOM. BATTERY;
Total Inmates Currently Booked and Released: 52
Levy County Sheriff's Department
Arnold, Cris Alan, 48, of Englewood, Fla.: DWLSR;
Bean, Bobby Lee, 23, of Bronson: READMIT DWLSR;
Billups, Jerald Samuel, 35, of Inglis: FTA-LARC-PETIT
FIRST OFFENSE;
Blackerby, Rebecca Ann, 24, of Bronson: DWLSR-
HABITUAL;
Blundy, James Patrick, 41, Lincolnton, Ga.: PETIT THEFT,
DEALING IN STOLEN PROPERTY;
Boals, Donald Everett, 63, of Archer: DWLSR-PERM.;
Brown, Ronald Franklin, 28, of Bronson: DOMESTIC
BATTERY;
Cunigan, Jeffrey Greg, 21, of Chiefland: HOLD GILCHRIST


Levy County's Most Wanted


Cannon, Melton Grimm,Jerry LeeJr
Chiefland Old Town
FTA TRESPASS, P VOPO DWLSR
LARCENY NO BOND
NO BOND


James, Kendra
Williston
VOP BATTERY
NO BOND


CO./BURGLARY W/ARMED, HOLD GILCHRIST
CO/GRANDTHEFT III;
Donahue, Sean Ryan, 22, ofInglis: VOP-BURGLARY
(CITRUS CO.), HOLD CITRUS/VOP-BURG. UNOCC
DWELLING:
Dowell, Michelle Angelic, 37, of Bronson: FRAUD/FALSE
STATEMENT TO OBTAIN UNEMPL;
Garcia, Indalecio Cortes, 30, of Trenton: NO DL-NEVER
HAD ONE;
Gardner, Michael Thomas, 25, of Old Town: FAILURE TO
APPEAR DWLSR KNOWINGLY;
Hernandez-Cast, Mariano, 39, of Bronson: NO DRIVER'S
LICENSE;
Heyde, Dawn Melinda, 49, ofYankeetown: DOM. BATTERY;
Kendrick, Donald Ralph, 48, of Bronson: BATTERY ON LEO
(EMT);
Ortiz, Carlos Javier, 19, of Bronson: POSS. CANN. W/
INTENT TO SELL OR, SALE CANNABIS;
Perez, Yulimilet Noa, 22, of Gainesville: DWLSR
HABITUAL;
Spain, Carol Earlene, 25, of Trenton: HOLD/MARION CO
WRIT OF BODILY ATT.;
Strong, Kenneth Eugene, 49, of Chiefland: WRIT OF
BODILY ATTACHMENT;
Sullivan, Robin Dawn, 43, of Trenton: DOMESTIC
BATTERY;
Williston Police Department
Beers, Manuel Dewayne, 22, of Decatur, Ga.: POSS OF
COCAINE, POSS L/T 20GRMS MARIJ, POSS
PARAPH (PIPEX2);
Sallet, Felton Bernard, 45, of Gainesville: DWLSR X5 WITH
KNOWLEDGE;
Wheeler, Bernard, 54, of Williston: HOLD MARION
COUNTY;
Whetstone, Brittany Noelle, 22, of Williston: FAILURE TO
APPEAR-GRAND THEFT, FAILURE TO APPEAR-
PASS FORGED INSTRUMENT.
Chiefland Police Department
Berry, Dennis James, 58, of Chiefland: HOLD-OHIO STATE
XENIA PDX3;
Carter, Kinisha Shareen, 32, of Cross City: HOLD DIXIE
CO/STALKING, RETAIL THEFT, HOLD DIXIE CO/
VOP/DWLSR, VOP-DISORDERLY CONDUCT;
Cedar Key Police Department
Cournoyer, Tamara Deaton, 37, of Cedar Key: DIS. INTOX.,
RWOV X2, DWLSR-KNOWINGLY;
Inglis Police Department
Delmain, Sean Michael, 25, of Dunnellon: HOLD CITRUS
CO/VOPPOSS MARIJ M/T, HOLD CITRUS CO
WRNT-VOP/DEALING;
Gadson, Brandon Wayne, 21, of Grant, Mich.: LOITERING
AND PROWLING, POSS OF METH, POSS OF
COCAINE, POSS OF ROXICODONE, POSS OF
HYDROCODONE, POSS OF MARIJ. L/T 20GR,
POSS OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA;
Spears, Tammy Lee, 24, ofInglis: LOITERING AND
PROWLING;
Townsend, Rex Timothy, 54, of Crystal River: DWLSR.
Florida Highway Patrol
Missey, Steve Allen, 44, of Bronson: OPERATE A
MOTORCYCLE W/O LICENSE, DWLSR-1ST OFF.

OTICE
o the Florida Department
unity Development Block '' 1
irs ($600,000.00). These

blight; or
r blight; or -9


Locklin, Brianna Sterling, Timothy
Gainesville Bronson
VOP BATTERY VOP BATTERY
NO BOND NO BOND


Wrenne, Michael
Gainesville
VOP ASSAULT
NO BOND


FDOT to Motorists:

Work Zone Safety
During Work Zone Safety Awareness Week, Florida
Department of Transportation (FDOT) officials remind
motorists to drive carefully in construction zones. The national
campaign, held April 4-8, is conducted annually at the start of
road construction season.
Drivers and their passengers account for most of the deaths
in construction zone crashes, according to FDOT statistics.
Improving safety in construction zones includes encouraging
drivers to follow the posted speed, minimize distractions and
be alert.
In 2009, the most recent statistics available, 97 people were
killed and 6,305 people were injured in Florida work zone
crashes. For the second year in a row, the number of annual
deaths has dropped below 100.
"Staying alert and focused are always critical to safe driving,
particularly in and around work zones," said Ananth Prasad,
FDOT Assistant Secretary for Engineering and Operations.
Outreach efforts during the week include public service
announcements, information displays and message boards at
rest areas and welcome centers to educate motorists about work
zone safety.
FDOT urges motorists of all ages to drive safely in work
zones by following these safety tips:
1. Be alert: Expect anything to occur when entering a work zone.
2. Don't tailgate: Unexpected stops frequently occur in work
zones.
3. Don't speed: Note the suggested speed limits in and around
the work zones.
4. Don't change lanes in the work zone: Any time saved just isn't
worth the chance.
5. Minimize distractions: Avoid changing the radio station and
using cellular phones while driving in the work zone.
6. Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their
equipment.
In our area we can put these safety precautions to work at:
Levy County: U.S. 27A Resurfacing from Southeast 10th
Street in Williston to the Marion County line (3 miles). D.A.B.
Constructors, Inc. of Inglis began January 3, 2011 and should
finish in 250 days (Fall of 2011).
Dixie County: State Road 349 Resurfacing from Old Town
to the Lafayette County line (15.5 miles) and adding turn lanes
at Spiller Highway and County Road 353. Anderson Columbia
Company of Lake City began September 28, 2010 and should
finish in 250 days (Summer of 2011).


Focus on Fire Safety:

Smoke Alarms


Every year, approximately
2,600 Americans die in home
fires. Over half of these deaths
(52%) occur between the hours
of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., when
residents are typically sleeping.
Smoke and toxic gases from a
home fire are as deadly as heat
and flames. Just two or three
breaths of toxic smoke can
render you unconscious. The
majority of fire victims die or
are injured from exposure to
smoke and toxic gases, such as
carbon monoxide, not actual
burns. In addition, smoke
obscures vision, decreasing your


ability to escape.
Smoke alarms save lives,
prevent injuries, and minimize
property damage by detecting
fires early and alerting
residents, allowing crucial time
to escape. The risk of dying
from a fire in a home without
working smoke alarms is twice
as high as in a home that has
working smoke alarms.
Working together we can
prevent fires.
Danny Wallace
Public Information Officer,
Williston Fire Rescue


Help Your Firefighter at Free Workshop


The Florida Division of Forestry is sponsoring
a Firewise Workshop in Chiefland, with support
from the Friends of the Luther Callaway Public
Library on Tuesday, April, 19 from 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. at the Tommy Usher Community
Center located at 506 SW 4th Avenue in
Chiefland. This workshop is free, includes a
BubbaQue lunch and is open to all homeowners
and residents in the community. The goal is to
help homeowners learn simple actions they can
take to prevent wildfire from destroying their
homes and community.
Wildfires happen so learn how to protect your


home, your community, and your firefighter.
The wildland firefighters can protect you but
they need your help. This free workshop will
include interactive presentations, videos, talks
by local fire experts, free educational materials
such as CDs, posters and brochures. ,And, the
free dinner.
You can register online at fireinflorida.org/
firewise-community-workshops/. For more
information you can call Elise Cassie at 352-
359-0722 or email her at ecassie@normandeau.
com


.1











Warrant LEVY- DIXIE GILCHRIST
Warrant Turn& SURROUNDING AREAS352-486-1971
in Welcome! 24 HOUR SERVICE
O1r Iit rLOnCSTED ACROSS FIrOM JAIL. IN BROSON 3*'- 1 i


FIRST PUBLIC HEARING N(
The Town of Otter Creek is considering applying t
of Community Affairs (DCA) for a Small Cities Comr
Grant (CDBG) of up to Six Hundred Thousand Dolls
funds must be used for one of the following purposes
1. To benefit low and moderate income persons;
2. To aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or


3. To meet other community development needs of recent origin having a
particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and
immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community and where
other financial resources are not available to meet such needs.
The categories of activities for which these funds may be used are in the
areas of housing, neighborhood revitalization, commercial revitalization, or
economic development and include such improvement activities as acquisition
of real property, loans to private-for-profit business, purchase of machinery
and equipment, construction of infrastructure, rehabilitation of houses and
commercial buildings, and energy conservation. Additional information
regarding the range of activities that may be undertaken will be provided at the
public hearing. For each activity that is proposed, at least 70% of the funds
must benefit low and moderate income persons.
In developing an application for submission to DCA, the Town of Otter Creek
must plan to minimize displacement of persons as a result of planned CDBG
activities. In addition, the Town of Otter Creek is required to develop a plan to
assist displaced persons.
A public hearing to receive citizen views concerning the community's economic
and community development needs will be held at the Town of Otter Creek
Town Hall on Monday, April 18, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as
possible. For information concerning the public hearing contact: Ms. Rosemary
Severino, Town Clerk, Town of Otter Creek, 555 SW 2nd Avenue, Otter Creek,
Florida 32683. Telephone (352) 486-4766.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location.
Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the
visually impaired should contact Ms. Severino at least five calendar days prior
to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking
person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Ms. Severino at
least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be
provided. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this
meeting should contact Ms. Severino at least five calendar days prior to the
meeting.
A Fair Housing/Equal Opportunity/Handicap Accessible Jurisdiction.
,Pub. April 7, 2011.









OPINION

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 3


Measuring Force


By Thomas Sowell
Creators Syndicate


ou don't just walk up to ,
the local bully and slap him
across the face. If you are
determined to confront him,
then you try to knock the
living daylights out of him. ;" -
Otherwise, you are better off
to leave him alone. .
Anyone who grew up in
my old neighborhood in
Harlem could have told you
that. But Barack Obama
didn't grow up in my old
neighborhood. He had a much more genteel upbringing,
including a fancy private school, in Hawaii.
Maybe that is why he thinks he can launch military
operations against Moammar Qaddafi, while promising not
to kill him and promising that no American ground troops
will be used.
It is the old liberal illusion that you can measure out force
with a teaspoon, not only in military operations micro-
managed by civilians in Washington, like the Vietnam war,
but also in domestic confrontations when the police are
trying to control a rioting mob, and are being restrained by
politicians, while the mob is restrained by nobody.
We went that route in the 1960s, and the results were not
inspiring, either domestically or internationally.
The old saying, "When you strike at a king, you must kill
him," is especially apt when it comes to attacking a widely
recognized sponsor of international terrorism like Colonel


Qaddafi. To attack him without destroying his regime is
just asking for increased terrorism against Americans and
America's allies. So is replacing him with insurgents who
include other sponsors of terrorism.
President Obama's Monday night speech was long on
rhetoric and short on logic. He said: "I believe that this
movement of change cannot be turned back, and that we
must stand alongside those who believe in the same core
principles that have guided us."
Just what would lead him to conclude that this includes
the largely unknown forces who are trying to seize power
in Libya?
Too often in the past, going all the way back to the days
of Woodrow Wilson, we have operated on the assumption
that a bad government becomes better after the magic of
"change." President Wilson said that we were fighting the
First World War to make the way "safe for democracy." But
what actually followed was the replacement of autocratic
monarchies by totalitarian dictatorships that made previous
despots pale by comparison.
The most charitable explanation for President Obama's
incoherent policy in Libya-- if incoherence can be called
a policy -- is that he suffers from the long-standing blind
spot of the left when it comes to the use of force.
A less charitable and more likely explanation is that
Obama is treating the war in Libya as he treats all sorts of
other things, as actions designed above all to serve his own
political interests and ideological visions. Whether it does
even that depends on what the situation is like in Libya
when the 2012 elections roll around.
As for the national interests of the United States of
America, Barack Obama has never shown any great
concern about that.


President Obama started alienating our staunchest allies,
Britain and Israel, from his earliest days in office, while
cozying up to our adversaries such as Russia and China, not
to mention the Palestinians, who cheered when they saw on
television the collapse of the World Trade Center on 9/11.
Many people in various parts of the political spectrum
are expressing a sense of disappointment with Obama. But
I have not felt the least bit disappointed.
Once in office, President Obama has done exactly what
his whole history would lead you to expect him to do--
such as cutting the military budget and vastly expanding
the welfare state.
He has by-passed the Constitution by appointing power-
wielding "czars" who don't have to be confirmed by the
Senate like Cabinet members, and now he has by-passed
Congress by taking military actions based on authorization
by the United Nations and the Arab League.
Those who expected his election to mark a new "post-
racial" era may be the most disappointed. He has appointed
people with a track record of race resentment promotion
and bias, like Attorney General Eric Holder and Supreme
Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
Disappointing? No. Disgusting? Yes. The only
disappointment is with voters who voted their hopes and
ignored his realities.
To find out more about Thomas Sowell and readfeatures by
other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate web page at www.creators.com. Thomas
Sowell is a seniorfellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA 94305. His Web site is www.tsowell.
com. COPYRIGHT 2011 CREATORS.COM


Obama's Energy Fables


President Obama is currently promoting
his new energy plan. After a bruising battle
over "cap and trade" last year, Obama has
set his sights this year on another target -
oil and natural gas companies. Vilifying
"big oil" might be good politics, but it's bad
policy. If we are going to get serious about
energy solutions, we first need to separate the
facts from the fables.
Fable: Oil and gas companies aren't paying
their fair share of taxes.
U.S. oil and natural gas companies pay
considerably more of their profits in taxes
than other industries such as technology and
financial services. In fact, the industry pays
an effective corporate income tax rate that is
70 percent higher than roughly three in 10
S&P industrial companies.
As for those billion-dollar subsidies oil
and gas companies supposedly enjoy, they
don't exist. The industry gets tax deductions,
as any business does, but they are far less
generous than those enjoyed by others in
the energy sector. While oil and gas receive
slightly more than 1 percent of government
energy R&D funding, renewables receive 22
times as much funding.
Fable: Oil and gas industry profits are
"excessive".
Many lawmakers have long pushed to
increase taxes on oil and gas companies.
After all, oil and gas companies are, in
President Obama's words, "doing just fine,"
receiving near record profits. Why not spread
the wealth?
The trouble is that oil and gas companies
are not as flush as lawmakers make it seem.
Like other commodity businesses, oil and
gas profits are highly cyclical, making them
prone to booms and busts. According to
PricewaterhouseCoopers, in all but four of
the 20 years from 1987 through 2006, oil
and gas companies actually earned a lower
return on their capital investment than
other industries. This is a key measure of
comparative economic performance.
Also, while the industry's revenues can
be large in good times, the costs of finding
and producing oil and natural gas are
always steep. With much of the world's
conventional oil and natural gas reserves
already developed, companies are turning to
increasingly expensive non-conventional and
offshore projects to meet the nation's energy
demands. Whereas land-based drilling is
relatively cheap, as low as $20 per barrel,
production costs for offshore oil can run
between $60-$70 per barrel. Oil sands are
even higher.
Fable: Taxing oil and gas companies will
reduce the national debt.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-
NV) and Congressional Democrats recently
proposed in a letter to House Speaker John
Boehner (R-OH) to cut tax breaks for oil
and gas companies to help pay down the
national debt and restore fiscal order.
Besides the fact that oil and gas companies
are already paying their fair share of taxes
(see fable one), there is another problem


with this argument, namely, the oil and
gas industry is a cash cow for government
already.
According to data from the U.S. Energy
Information Administration (EIA), between
1981 and 2008, U.S. governments collected
more in taxes from the oil industry than the
industry earned in profits for shareholders.
Raising taxes on the industry even more
will only discourage investment, reduce
exploration and production, and eliminate
American jobs.
Fable: Oil and gas are "yesterday's energy".
Or so President Obama claimed in his
State of the Union speech and elsewhere. But
if we judge it by who's actually meeting the
nation's energy needs, oil and gas are clearly
today's energy and will remain so for a long
time despite any pronouncements to the
contrary. Together they represent our largest
source of energy supplying more than 60
percent of all U.S. energy needs, compared
to just 8 percent for all renewables. While
renewables are expected to grow in coming
years, analysts say that even by 2035, more
than half of the nation's energy demand will
still be met by oil and natural gas.
Oil and gas will remain our major source
of energy for the foreseeable future because
they are still the most cost-effective energy
source. To be in business, renewable energy
requires lavish subsides from government-
yet it still out-prices fossil fuels. According
to EIA, electricity from wind costs nearly
50 percent more than from natural gas.
Corn-based ethanol isn't any better. Cornell
University professor David Pimentel
estimates that it takes about 1.3 gallons of oil
to produce a single gallon of ethanol.
Economics will always trump wishful
thinking.
Fable: Raising taxes on oil and gas
companies will bring us closer to a "clean"
energy future.
Oil and gas companies pour billions of
dollars into alternatives to conventional
energy-from geothermal to wind, from
solar to hydrogen power, from biofuels to
lithium ion batteries. In fact, University of
Texas researchers found that from 2000
to 2008 the oil and gas industry invested
more in alternative energies than the federal
government and all other U.S. industry
combined. And thanks to technological
improvements in energy efficiency and
conservation, the federal government reports
we use about half as much energy for every
dollar of GDP today as we did in 1973.
For all the presidential finger pointing, the
oil and gas industry is not the problem. Oil
and gas are necessary parts of our current
energy supply and, along with renewables,
will play a critical role in securing America's
energy future. If President Obama wants his
new energy plan to succeed, he'll abandon
energy fables and start dealing with realities.
Lawrence]. McQuillan, Ph.D., is director
ofBusiness and Economic Studies at the
Pacific Research Institute. Contact him at
I 0 .. .. .. .... :. .


Project Gunrunner: Obama's

Stimulus-Funded Border


Nightmare
By Michelle Malkin
Creators Syndicate

Buried in Barack Obama's failed trillion-
dollar stimulus program was a $10 million
bloody border racket that has now cost
American lives. 'his goes far beyond the
usual waste, fraud and abuse underwritten
by progressive profligacy. It's bloodstained
government malfeasance overseen by
anti-gun ideologues -- and now anti-gun
ideologue Attorney General Eric Holder will
"investigate."
Welcome to Project Gunrunner. Prepare
for another Justice Department whitewash.
First, some background. Like so many
border programs run amok, Project
Gunrunner was the spawn of Beltway
bipartisanship. It was established in 2005 as
a pilot project under the Bush administration
and run by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives. The intended
goal of the program's sting operations:
stop illicit firearms trafficking along the
Southwest border through close surveillance
of undercover gun purchases and coordinated
intervention with Mexico. The deadly result:
federally sanctioned gunwalking of high-
powered weapons from U.S. officials right
into the hands of drug cartel killers.
By 2008, Project Gunrunner's bureaucratic
fiefdom had expanded rapidly along the
U.S.-Mexico border and into the nine U.S.
consulates in Mexico. The office raked in $2
million more through the little-scrutinized
Merida Initiative, which Hispanic vote-
pandering Republicans rammed through in a
war supplemental bill. Despite warnings from
the DOJ inspector general that tracking and
assessment measures needed improvement,
the payroll exploded from a few dozen to
more than 200 by 2009. Under the Obama
administration, ATF reaped another $21.9
million to expand Project Gunrunner (nearly
half from the stimulus boondoggle), and
the White House has requested almost
$12 million more in fiscal year 2011
appropriations for the program.
Project Gunrunner's reach and authority
continues to grow despite dire, prolonged
warnings from insiders and whistleblowers
that countless monitored guns have been
passed on to violent criminals without being
intercepted as planned. Following up on leads
first published at www.cleanupatf.org and the


blogs of gun rights advocates David Codrea
and Mike
Vanderboegh,
CBS News
reported
last month
that Project -
Gunrunner o
"allegedly
facilitated
the delivery
of thousands
of guns into
criminal hands."
One of those guns was used by Mexican
gang thugs who murdered U.S. Border Patrol
Agent Brian Terry last December. At least six
veteran ATF agents and executives stepped
forward to expose how ATF presided over
the purchase of hundreds of high-powered
rifles and pistols -- over the objection of
the very private gun shops that the Obama
administration's anti-gun zealots have
vilified.
One whistleblower familiar with Project
Gunrunner's Phoenix offshoot, dubbed
"Operation Fast and Furious," told CBS
News: "'The numbers are over 2,500 on that
case by the way. That's how many guns were
sold -- including some 50-calibers they
let walk." The weapon used in the Mexico
slaying of U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement Special Agent Jaime Zapata
has also been linked to Project Gunrunner
surveillance operation subjects.
As investigative watchdog Republicans
Sen. Charles Grassley and Rep. Darrell Issa
step up pressure on the administration to
come clean this week about who knew what
and when, Obama denied any knowledge
of Project Gunrunner on Spanish-language
Univision TV. He blithely allowed that
"there may be a situation here in which a
serious mistake was made. If that's the case,
then we'll find out and we'll hold someone
accountable."
Coming from a man who appointed crime-
coddling, accountability-evading, open-
borders corruptocrat Eric Holder to uphold
the law, that is a bloody, cruel joke.
Michelle Ma/kin is the author o/f"Culture
of Corruption: Obarna and his Team of Tax
Cheats, Crooks & Cronies" (Regincty 2010).
Her e-mail address is mnalkinblog@gmail.conm.
COPYRIGHT 2011 CREATORS.COM


L YY COUNTY JOUR
I F, 1N4 T I*,b I Ill 1, T- VA2 P I ,


LEVY
PUBLISHING, LLC
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NEWS

4 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Levy County Community Calendar


DUNNELLON
Florida Friendly Gardening at Dunnellon Library,
Apr. 12-26
The Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Committee of the
Master Gardeners will be offering a four-day seminar on Florida
Friendly Gardening, beginning Tuesday, April 5 and ending
Tuesday April 26. Each 2-hour session will begin at 2 p.m. at
the Dunnellon Library. These sessions are designed to help you
save money and time while tending to your landscape in a way
that does no harm to our environment.
If you attend all four sessions, you may request a Florida Yards
and Neighborhoods committee come to visit your landscape to
answer landscaping questions that you have about your yard and
advise you about problem areas you may have. We can suggest
plants, identify plant material, and offer other advice to make
your gardening easier.
Topics to be covered include:
April 12 Lawns; April 19 Watering efficiently and
effectively, mulching, composting, and recycling; April 26 -
Managing pests, attracting wildlife to your yard.
Seating is limited. Come early to register. There is no
charge for the classes, but we will have materials related to the
information presented available for sale.

U. S. Naval Sea Cadets at Dunnellon, Apr. 30
The Manatee Division of the Sea Cadets will be at the
Dunnellon Wal-Mart again on April 30th from 9:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. to recruit for this awesome youth group. Come meet
our cadets and get more information on joining the fun. Ages 11
to 17. Contact our Commanding Officer LTJG Todd Dunn at
352-212-5473.

WILLISTON
Williston Rotary Club Egg Hunt, Apr. 9
It's that time again! Join us for a fun-filled morning of
hunting for Easter Eggs at the John Henry Celebration Park
located at 100 NW 4th Street in Williston on Saturday, April
9th at 11 a.m. Come for food and fun and to fin out more about
the Williston Rotary Club. For more information call 352-374-
5600 ext.8857.

AARP Chapter 912 to meet, Apr. 11
Barbara Thomas will speak about "Seniors vs Crime" at the
April 11th meeting of AARP Chapter #912. We meet at 9:30
a.m. on the 2nd Mon. each month in the Holy Family Catholic
Church Hall at 17353 NE Hwy 27 Alt in Williston.

Williston Lions Club events
The Williston Lions Club is located at 401 SE 6th Avenue in
Williston where we have regular events throughout the week and
month for all to participate. We are looking for new members
and volunteers so if you want to help out the community and have
something enjoyable to do, come and see us. Our meetings are
held every month on the 2nd Tuesday of the month and guests are
very welcome. We will be planning future events so your assistance
in this matter is greatly appreciated. If you need to reach us by
phone call 352-342-7525.
Thursday Bingo @ 7 p.m. We offer 2 Jackpots. If an attendee
brings a friend, that attendee will get a free card.
Saturday Farmers Market and Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m.

Devil's Den Evenings in Spring event, May 7
The Devil's Den is hosting an Evenings in Spring event
featuring the S-Connection's Aerial Dance performance and a
Play and Sing-a-long with the Den House Band. There will be
food vendors, desserts, soft drinks, beer and wine availability.
Tickets are $5 and can be reserved now. Devil's Den is located
at 5390 NE 180 Ave in Williston. For more information call
352-528-3344.

Two Hawk Hammock Summer Camp,
June 6-10 and 13-17
Williston is the home to Two Hawk Hammock and their
youth summer camp. This is a very different camp activity for
the creative at heart. Your child can explore circus arts with
trapeze and chiffon, horseback riding, music, arts & crafts
and outdoor adventures! Your son or daughter can have a truly
unique experience with quality performing arts instructors, all
while enjoying the beauty of natural North Florida.
Featured Activities are: Aerial, Trapeze, Aerial Silks,
Equestrian, Vaulting, Horseback Riding, Rock Band, Journal
Making, Soap Making, Archery, Outdoor Games.
AGES 10 16. Spaces limited, so Register Today! Call or
email for Registration Form: 352-316-0682 or email to corey.
souza@yahoo.com
June 6th 17th; Monday Friday, 9:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
$70/day or $300/week. Lunch $7/day or bring your own.
17950 NE 53rd Lane, Williston, FL 32696
352-528-7668/352-316-0682 or visit us at www.
twohawkhammock.com



NOTICE


CITY OF CEDAR ]

CITY ELECTION MAY


AND IF NECESSA

A RUN OFF ELECTI(

May 24, 2011


Seat Number 3:


Dave Feigin


CHIEFLAND
Free Tax Assistance in Levy County in Chiefland on Apr. 9
This New Year, North Central Florida has a unique
opportunity to rejuvenate its economy, one tax return at a time.
Volunteer tax preparers will work to award eligible citizens
with an Earned Income Tax Credit, a government initiative
that has funneled millions of dollars back into communities
around the nation. The last session will be held at the Chiefland
Senior Center, 305 Moore in Chiefland on Apr. 9, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Call 211 to make an appointment. Contact Mindy
Underberger, with any questions at 352-331-2800.

Chiefland FFA Alumni Fishing Tournament,
Apr. 15 & 16
The Chiefland FFA Alumni Fishing Tournament will begin
with the Captain's Meeting and Dinner on April 15 at 6 p.m. at
the'Chiefland High School Ag Building. One member of the
team must be present.
On April 16 at Safe Light in the morning from the CHS Ag
Building the tournament will begin and continue to a 4:30 p.m.
weigh-in. The Entry Fee is $100 per boat which includes the
Captain and Mate and $25 per extra person.
Some of the prizes are: $300 for Biggest Red Fish, $300 for
Biggest Speckled Trout, and $500 for the Biggest Bag (based on
a 30-boat entry).
For entry forms or just more information contact: CHS Ag
Building at 352-493-6030 or Brook Ward at 352-535-5337 or
chieflandffaalumni@yahoo.com
Let's support our FFA.

CHS 2011 College and Career Fair Apr. 21
The 2011 College and Career Fair presented by the Chiefland
High School Student Government will take place on April 21st,
2011 in the Chiefland High School gymnasium starting at 9
a.m.

Chiefland High School Classes of 1950-1965
Reunion, April 23
The multi-year reunion is getting closer on Saturday, April
23, 2011 at Otter Springs Campground so get your forms in
to Lynn as soon as possible. This is for the 1950 -1965 classes
of Chiefland High School. The Reunion is open for anyone
who wants to attend and we would love to have as many of our
teachers as possible. The Reunion is open to all whether or not
you graduated with the class or not, we would love to see you.
Patricia Prentice Mangus of Wyoming and her sister Linda of
Jacksonville have notified us they will be there and are looking
forward to visiting with everyone. Also, Sammy Wimberly will
be entertaining us with his band so we can sit back and relax and
catch up with old friends. The cost is $20.00 per person and the
money needs to be turned in by April 10. For more information,
please call Lynn Pirrman Crutchfield at 352-542-0356, Earlene
Campbell Crews at 352-493-4825 or Myrtice Bailey Scabarozi
at 352-493-2292.

Chiefland Rotary Club Fishing Tournament, May 14
Here is your chance to win big this year. The Chiefland
Rotary Club is holding their Fishing Tournament on May 14,
2011 starting at 7 a.m. at Cedar Key with cash and prizes up
to $7500. There will be $1000 for the biggest redfish, $1000
for the biggest trout, and $50 for biggest trash fish from list.
The Best Bag of 2 redfish and 5 trout will win you $2000. The
Captains' Meeting and Calcutta will be on Friday, May 13, with
the social at 6:30 p.m. and the dinner at 7 p.m. at the Cedar
Key Community Center. There will be a FREE Goody Bag and
T-Shirt for each entrant. Call Robert or Jeff Beauchamp at 352-
493-4808 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for more information and to
get your entry form.

YANKEETOWN-INGLIS
Yankeetown-lnglis Woman's Club Pancake
Breakfast, Apr. 16
Looking for some place to spend a relaxing morning
being waited on? Stop by the Woman's Club on 56th St. in
Yankeetown, Saturday, April 16 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and let
us spoil you. That's right, all the cooked-to-order buttermilk
pancakes you can eat, sausage, juice and coffee, $5 adults and $3
children 10 and under. What better way to enjoy the first days
of spring, than to let someone else do the cooking .
For you bargain shoppers, the Thrift Store will be open for
your shopping pleasure with a HUGE SALE, everything will
be 50% OFF! To make it even better, the Friends of the AF
Knotts Library are having their Spring Book Sale right next
door. Grab your friends and neighbors and enjoy the morning
at the Yankeetown-Inglis Woman's Club. As always, all the
proceeds from our fundraising events are given back to the
communities in the form of donations to: Yankeetown School,
the local Volunteer Fire Rescue Departments, the AF Knotts
Public Library, families in need and many more. By supporting
our events, you're supporting your communities. See you on



Su M, 'Tu -"E Thi FI S3n
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 0 11 1 2 13 1 4 1 5 16
KEY 17 18 19 202 222 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 3)J
S3, 2011 [ o .) j__


Free information
in the privacy
of your home.


* Cash Now for Your
Home Equity
Keep Title to Your Home
No More Payments
No Credit Requirements
Must be 62+ Years Old


-lOienya


April 16th for the best Pancakes you'll ever eat!! Call the club at
447-2057 for information.
TRENTON
Mother's Day and Father's Day Sale Extravaganza at
Turning Point, Apr. 9
Please come and join us at Turning Point Ministries, 16750
NW 60 Ave. in Trenton, on Saturday April 9th from 1 to 6
p.m. We want to make it easier for you to shop for that special
someone. We will have items for women and men at our one-
stop shopping extravaganza.
There is something for everyone so don't miss the excitement.
Come and support your local Independent Consultants and
Turning Point Ministry.
We are also having a silent auction with all the proceeds
going to Turning Point Ministry. There will be items to bid
on from the community, such as: Avon, Arbonne, Blessings
Unlimited, Dov Chocolate Discoveries, Nature Burst, Pampered
Chef, Premier Designs Jewelry, Scentsy, and Thirty One.
For more information call us at 352-463-1882. We hope to
see you there.

FANNING SPRINGS
Public Meetings to Review Nature Coast State Trail
Management Plan, Apr. 7
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Office of Greenways & Trails (OGT) will host two
public meetings in Fanning Springs on April 7, concerning the
proposed draft update to the Management Plan for the Nature
Coast State Trail. Interested parties are invited to attend either
or both of the scheduled meetings. Comments may also be
submitted by mail to: DEP Office of Greenways &Trails, 3900
Commonwealth Blvd., MS 795, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3000 or
by email to Robin.Turner@dep.state.fl.us.

All written comments must be received by
April 5, 2011.
To view a copy of the proposed Management Plan, visit
FloridaGreenwaysAndTrails.com.
The public meetings will take place: Thursday, April 7, 2011
from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. for the Public Meeting, and at 1:30 p.m.
for the Advisory Group Meeting, both at Fanning Springs State
Park located at 18020 NW Highway 19 in Fanning Springs, FL
32693.

Suwannee River Garden Club Spring Garden
Festival, Apr. 9
The Suwannee River Garden Club's Spring Garden Festival
at Fanning Springs State Park is being held on April 9, 2011. If
you are a Garden Club member and plan to participate in and
or donate items to the event please contact Anne Zubler, Event
Coordinator, at your earliest convenience.
The Fanning Springs State Park is hosting the festival
with a beautiful variety of native plants for sale and featuring
environmentally friendly techniques for watering, fertilizing and
pest control practices for the home gardener.
You can learn the best techniques at workshops on irrigation,
plant fertilization and pest management presented by University
of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the
Nature Coast Master Gardeners Association.
There will be demonstrations on xeriscaping and guided walks
showcasing native landscaping in the park, as well as native and
ornamental plant sales, food, children's games and live music.
There will be drawings for free plants and prizes all day.
For more information about the event, visit www.
FanningSpringsGardenFestival.com.
For more information, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.
This event is Free with park admission and will take place
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sat. Apr. 9, 2011 at the Fanning Springs
State Park at 18020 N Hwy 19 in Fanning Springs.
For more information on The Suwannee River Garden Club
please contact Joan Pryor via her e-mail address, joan_pryor@
hughes.net or she may be reached by telephone at the following
number: (352) 542-2211.

OLD TOWN
AARP Safe Driving Class in Old Town, Apr. 15
Florida state law requires that any insurance company doing
business in the state must give a discount to those completing
an AARP Safe Driving Course. Here is your chance to save
some money in discounts and get updated information on newly
enacted motor vehicle and traffic laws.
The sessions are open to licensed drivers age 50 and older. The
course fee is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members.
The fee covers all instructional material plus the 3-year
insurance discount certificate. No driving test will be given.
Please call Lee Miller at (352) 498-5004 to register for the
one-day class being held at the Old Town First Methodist
Church on April 15, 2011 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dixie Music Center To Hold Spring Recital, April 16
Dixie Music Center will have its annual spring recital
Saturday, April 16th at 4:00 p.m. Hosted by the Dixie County
Historical Society, the recital will be held at the Dixie County
Cultural Center (old Old Town Elementary School) on the
corner of Hwy. 349 S. and 55A in Old Town.
This year the store welcomes Elizabeth Schlaupitz as its
new keyboard and voice teacher. She has several keyboard and
vocal students performing at the recital. Also performing will
be guitar students under the guidance of Bruce Miller. His
students always offer a wide range of musical styles which are
fun for the audience.
There will be a reception of light refreshments on the
grounds following the recital and members of the Dixie County
Historical Society will be on hand to answer any questions
about their organization.
Dixie Music Center is now in its twentieth year of service to
the community. For information, please call 352-542-3001.


NRY

)N ON


Pat O'Neal

Dale Register

Pub.: April 7, 2011.


,I.. r* 1 ni ,
1 i ,;!P'"-1 o' i

Thomas F Philman, Certified Operator

PO Box 872 4 South Main
Chiefland, FL 32644
Phone: (352) 493-4772
e J (352) 493-1051
B M e ~1-8300-242-9224


_ I CI









NEWS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 5



County-Wide Events


Genealogy Society Meeting, Apr. 10
The Genealogy Society of Levy County will meet on
Sunday, April 10th at 2:00 p.m. This month's meeting will
be held at the Dixie County Cultural Center (formally the
Old Town School), located at 761 SE Hwy 349, Old Town.
We'll be given a tour of the Center and learn about the
historical and genealogical resources that are available. The
public is invited.

Levy County Farm Bureau Scholarships
Levy County Farm Bureau is accepting applications
for our 2011 Academic & Career/Technical Scholarship
Awards. Deadline for applications is April 29, 2011. Please
call 352-493-4780 for details.

SRWMD Governing Board meetings, Apr. 12 and 25
On Tuesday, April 12, 2011, the Suwannee River Water
Management District's Governing Board will meet at 9 a.m.
at District Headquarters, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, Florida
32060. The meeting is to consider District business and
conduct public hearings on regulatory and land acquisition
matters. A workshop will follow the Governing Board
meeting.
On Monday, April 25, 2011, 1 p.m., a Governing Board
teleconference meeting will be held at District Headquarters
in Live Oak, Florida
All meetings, workshops, and hearings are open to the
public.

World War II Veterans Meeting, April 14
On Thursday April 14th all WW II veterans are invited to
attend our regular monthly meeting. It will be held at 11:30
a.m. at the Salt Creek Restaurant in Suwannee. Bring your
spouse, a friend or a fellow veteran and join the camaraderie.


Boomtown Days


Are you ready to have
some fun and to be
entertained? If so, join
us for Boomtown Days
Dunnellon on April 15, 16,
and 17. Boomtown Days is
right around the corner!
The following are just a
few of the bands who are
scheduled for Saturday,
April 16th and Sunday,
April 17th.
"Generations" has
been performing in West
Central Florida since 2007
at numerous corporate
special events, weddings,
bars, parties and top night
clubs. Having established
themselves as one of the
areas top bands, they play
great Rock, Pop, Dance,
Blues, and Country hits
from the '50s to 2010. See
Ronnie Prestridge on Drums
and Vocals, Randy (Shades)
Irwin on Guitar and Vocals,
and Erich McMann on Bass
and Vocals on Boomtown
Stage 2 from 2 to 3 p.m. on
Sunday, April 17th.
We will also have Dave
and Terri Hartman of Citrus
County who will entertain
festival goers Saturday
from noon to 1:15 pm on
Boomtown Stage 1 at First
Realty parking lot. They
have been playing music
together since they married
in 1971. They took their
band on the road in 1978
and currently play an eclectic
mix of songs, original or
covers, that may have a
bluegrass, country, jazzy,
rock, blues or folk origin but
all with an interesting story
to tell.
What was is it like in
Dunnellon back in the
Boomtown Days of 1910?
This year a Dinner Theater
Play will be presented at
the Historic Dunnellon
Depot in April. "Dunnellon
Justice," a melodrama of
crime and punishment by
local author Duke Stoetzer,
is the story of the outrageous
murders of Robert Turner
and James Barfield in
Juliette on Nov. 12, 1895,
and the subsequent vigilante
lynching of Frank James
and Joseph Balsamo. It is
based loosely on Dunnellon
history and is presented
by The Greater Dunnellon
Historical Society and
Dunnellon Chamber of
Commerce on Boomtown
weekend, Friday and
Saturday, April 15th and
16th. Doors open at 6:30
p.m. at the Train Depot,
12061 S. Williams St. in
Dunncllon.
*' Tickets are $20 and


include a pulled pork dinner.
Tickets are available at
the Dunnellon Chamber
of Commerce, 20500 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., 352-489-
2320. Seats are limited and
tickets will be sold first come,
first served. Please purchase
tickets together if you would
like to be seated together.
Advance tickets are $2.00
for Saturday, $2.00 for
Sunday. Prices at the event
gates will be the same but are
"Cash Only." Free admission
for Kids ages 12 and under.
More information to be
announced in the upcoming
weeks. You don't want to
miss Boomtown Days 2011!


If you have questions call Virginia Lewis at 352-528-2310
or Dot Halvorsen 352-542-7697.
God bless all of our veterans and God bless America, the
land of the free because of the brave.

Levy County Schools Cycle for Education Apr. 16
If you want to get a guaranteed t-shirt with your paid
registration fee for the Cycle for Education ride the deadline
is March 25. The Levy County Schools Foundation is
again hosting the Cycle for Education ride on the Nature
Coast State (Greenway) Trail on April 16 with kickoff
from 8 to 10 a.m. Registration will be at the Chiefland
Shopping Center at 102 North Main St. Hwy 19/98 in
Chiefland with a complimentary lunch served from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. The ride will include Levy, Gilchrist, and Dixie
counties from Chiefland to Fanning Springs to Cross City
and even cross over the Suwannee River. Come and join
us to help our schools. There will be refreshments along
the way also. The registration form can be found at www.
levyschoolsfoundation.org and click the Cycle for Education
link.

SHINE Answers Questions about Medicare, Apr. 20
Do you have questions about your options for Medicare,
Medicare/Medicaid, Disability, Supplemental Insurance,
Part D Prescription Drug Plans, or Medicare Billings?
If you do, come see SHINE, a volunteer program with the
Florida Department of Elder Affairs,
for one-on-one counseling. SHINE provides free,
unbiased and confidential assistance. If you cannot come to a
site call the Elder Helpline at 1-800-262-2243 to be referred
to a SHINE Volunteer. SHINE will be at the Chiefland
Senior Center on Wed, April 20th, from 1:30-3:30 p.m.


Annual Wild Hog Canoe and Kayak Race Activities
Gearing Up.
"Get ready for a wild ride! It's that time of year again when
AMVETS Post 88 gears up for the Wild Hog Canoe &
Kayak Race, April 30. Registration begins at the Waccasassa
Bridge just west of Bronson at 7:30 a.m. Lots of good food
and entertainment as well as prizes for everyone to win. For
more information, please visit http://www.wildhog.wetpaint.
com. You can also call Margie McGarva at 352-486-2535 for
a brochure to be mailed to you. Let's all get out and support
LARC!

LC Cattlemen and Landowners' Association
Meeting, Apr. 21
The Levy County Cattlemen and Landowners' Association
is having its spring meeting on Thursday, April 21, 2011
at 7:00 p.m. The location is Don Quincey's home on the
Suwannee River.
Anyone interested in joining is invited to attend. If you
would like additional information call the Levy County
Extension office (353-486-5131) or the secretary-treasurer
(352-528-3119).

Catchin' a Cure Fishing Tournament, Apr. 29-30
The Relay for Life Catchin' a Cure" fishing tournament
is going to be held on April 29th and 30th this year. The
Captain's Dinner/ Registration will be held at 7:00 p.m.
at the Waccasassa Fishing Club on the 29th. Fishing will
be from safe light to 4 p.m. on the 30th The entry fee is
$150.00 per boat (2 persons) and $25.00 per additional
person. This will be a Redfish / Trout tournament and no
other fish will be weighed. All proceeds will be donated
to the American Cancer Society to help the fight against
Cancer. Feel free to call me Karlton Norton @ 352-528-
3309 or e-mail any questions to me at Kreelinl@aol.com


Try Something New for Children and


Nature Awareness
By FWC's Bob Wattendorf

Children and nature. It doesn't get more wholesome and
natural than that. So, why all the fuss and need to designate
April as "Children and Nature Awareness Month"?
The unfortunate facts are that Americans are becoming
more tethered to electronic screens, joysticks and keypads
than they are to the panoramic view, sights and sounds of
unbridled nature, or the feel of a fishing rod in their hands
and fresh soil beneath their feet. According to the Keiser
Family Foundation, the amount of screen time increases
with age, and schoolchildren are already spending 7.5 hours
a day on electronic media!
Research published by the American Heart Association
reported that people who watched four hours or more of
TV per day were 80-percent more likely to die from heart
disease and 46-percent more likely to die from any cause,
based on a six-year study that involved 8,800 adults with no


Tourist Development Council
Award Presentation
During the March 29, 2011 Levy County Tourist
Development Council regular meeting, Chairperson
Helen Koehler presented board member Debra Jones
with an appreciation plaque for her many faithful years of
outstanding support, enthusiasm and dedicated service to
the Levy County Tourist Development Council. Mrs. Jones
served on the Council from 2002 till 2011.
-..J
Ii

aramswasms mmi.

Rain Cleaning Water Heater Repairs & Installatinn
New Construction Remodeling
Service Work Complete Line of Plumbing Fixtures
SSewer Repair Available ,'aai ni a
State Certified #CFC057595 Fully Licensed & Insured


TnrCounly s Prnemierr Plumbina Conlraclor' ,-",

V S111'atnnlie ai/?e fI

VETERINARY CLINIC
~I Daid Renaud. D.l.M. Ihalh\ Bowker. D.A.M.

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Month
history of heart conditions.
The amazing thing was that intense physical activity
did not necessarily offset the sedentary time spent sitting
around. This is one reason scientists think the current
generation of youths may be the first in history to have a
shorter lifespan than their parents' lifespan.
Moreover, youths may suffer from attention deficit
disorder, depression and low school grades due to lessened
work productivity because of this trend. Richard Louv,
author of"Last Child in the Woods," called it "nature
deficit disorder."
There is good news, though. The cure is simple: Children
and adults should get outdoors and enjoy free "playtime" in
nature.
The great news is that active, nature-based recreation
is fun, inexpensive and widely available year-round
throughout Florida.
continuedon page 10


II I # u"


Across
1. ___ singers, Eng.
renaissance a cappella vocal
ensemble
9. Disgustingly
15. Foreignness
16. Bully
17. Dry-___
18. ___ tiger from India
19. And others, for short
20. Those who fail to win
22. Cheat (slang)
23. Brouhaha
24. Conclusion
25. on Iown the Road"

Down
1. Official who carries a
ceremonial staff (pl.)
2. In sum (2 wds)
3. Become less in amount or
intensity (2 wds)
4. "Get !"
5. Setting lor TV's "Newhart"
6. Hlighlander
7. Fertilizer, e.g.
8. Landlord (pl.)
9. Daik area
10. Orders to plow horses
11. PC linkup
12. T'ankless wretch
13. Mediated


26. Bed board
28. By way of, briefly
29. Chipped in
30. Blonde's secret, maybe
31. Revoked, as a law
33. Limerick, e.g.
35. A chip, maybe
36. Enter illegally (2 wds)
39. "Much About
Nothing"
42. Succinct
43. Mint
44. Guns
46. Golden Triangle country


14. Made a short, sharp cry
21. A specialist in the theory
oflearning
25. Ingratiate
27. Native American tents
28. Arduous journey
29. Amazon, e.g.
32. It's now or never
(acronym)
34. Big galoot
36. Area overgrown with
large coarse Ierns
37. A vigorous reprimand (2
wds)
3S. Writes in symbols, esp.


47. Alliance acronym
48. Iumfries denial
49. Columbus Day mo.
50. Country whose capital is
Warsaw
52. Charge
53. Decrees
55. Caribbean coffee-flavored
liqueur
57. Safe
58. Native of country whose
capital is Tallinn
59. Being
60. Subs (2 wds)


music
40. Ancient Roman silver
coins, often called pennies
41. ___ cancer, affects women
42. A woman's loosely fitting
shirt
45. Closed automobile with a
liont and rear scat (pl.)
47. Snoopy
50. Chipper
51. Computer info
52. Harry 1Potter's tool
54. _generis
56. Back-to-work day
(abbrev.)


For this week's crossword puzzle answers, visit our 116b site at www.le'v.journalonline.con
Click on the Brain 7iaser tab to find the answers.









WORSHIP

6 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


First Baptist Church

511 N. Young Blvd. (US Alt. 27)
352-493-1481
Visit us online at
www.fbcChiefland.com
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Bible Sudy for all ages 9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pr..


4 First Baptist Church

Serving God & Loving People"


Sunday:
hSur'iSty Wlerho:r r'sam
D'ssy/e.shi Ho'r 5,
giwefri 'tshit,' i-f vp"


Tuesday
Sir. A/lit Bil Study r n


Wednesday
Rtl/'ihl Chil ri,; Pr.Cnmtr uri 'n;r
Fui/l Thn,ttle Yo, t r:',i
PItI;,\t ,ira roruy'r


Pastor Troy A. Turner
451 S. Court Street Bronson, FL 32621- 352.486.2282

Worship Notices

Chiefland UMM Breakfast, Apr. 9
The Chiefland United Methodist Men will meet for breakfast at
8 a.m. on Saturday April 9, 2011 in the Fellowship Hall of the First
United Methodist Church 707 North Main Street in Chiefland.


Worship Directory

I i,,nA d Snhehrrd I


Lutheran
-Chutrh


Elzey United

Methodist Church

Corner of 336 & Hwy 24

Worship Service......... 11:00am
Sunday School..............9:45am


Pastor Terry Knight


St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church Fish Fry and ~ ;. : 7:0l0
Yard Sale Revr
The St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church will hold a fish fry ., ," .. ..'
Friday, April 1 and Friday April 8, at the church on 27A from 5 to 7 Bron
pm. April 1 will have dining in or to go dinners. Tel. 352-486-2281
The April 8 fish fry will be to go only after the spring yard sale
the same day from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Yard Sale will continue on
Saturday, April 9, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. We have a large assortment
of furniture, appliances, clothing and household items. Come early for the best choices! We are still
accepting items if you are downsizing or have treasures you no longer have room for.
Creekside Christian Yard Sale Fundraiser, Apr. 8 & 9
Creekside Christian School will be holding a HUGE Yard Sale on Friday and Saturday, April 8 &
9 from, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. All proceeds will be going to help students attend the Regional Convention.
Please come out and support our students and their families while finding some awesome treasures!
All items from furniture, exercise equipment, clothes, baby items, women's and men's clothing, fishing
items, hunting items, you name it we've got it! The school is located at Otter Creek Baptist Church at
171 SW 3rd Street in Otter Creek. For more information call (352)486-2112.
Spring Clean-Up at Cedars of Lebanon Cemetery, Apr. 9
The annual clean-up day at Cedars of Lebanon Cemetery, located 6 miles north ofInglis, will be
Saturday, April 9, 2011, beginning at 9 a.m. at the cemetery. Many area (ole' timers) gather for the clean-
up and then enjoy a covered dish lunch. Bring your lawn chairs. For more info, please call (352) 339-3384.
Mother's Day and Father's Day Sale Extravaganza at Turning Point, Apr. 9
Please come and join us at Turning Point Ministries, 16750 NW 60 Ave. in Trenton, on Saturday
April 9th from 1 to 6 p.m. We want to make it easier for you to shop for that special someone. We will
have items for women and men at our one-stop shopping extravaganza.
There is something for everyone so don't miss the excitement. Come and support your local
Independent Consultants and Turning Point Ministry.
We are also having a silent auction with all the proceeds going to Turning Point Ministry. There will
be items to bid on from the community, such as: Avon, Arbonne, Blessings Unlimited, Dov Chocolate
Discoveries, Nature Burst, Pampered Chef, Premier Designs Jewelry, Scentsy, and Thirty One.
For more information call us at 352-463-1882. We hope to see you there.
Freedom Forum at First Baptist of Chiefland, Apr. 12
The Liberty Counsel will be hosting a Pastor and Church Leader Freedom Forum at the First Baptist
Church of Chiefland on US Alt 27, on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. The Liberty Counsel's
Senior Litigation Counsel Harry Mihet will conduct the Forum which will cover many subjects crucial
to pastors and their congregations, concerning life, liberty and the morality of our nation.
Do not miss this opportunity to become informed of our legal rights. This forum is not about a
political party but about voting and promoting righteousness in our nation. There is no cost to you. All
pastors and concerned Christians are invited to attend. Refreshments will be served.
For more information contact Teresa Crissman of the Liberty Counsel at 1-800-671-1776.
Fish Fry and Lite Lunch at Holy Family Catholic Church
The Fish Fry at Holy Family Catholic Church Parish Hall will be on Friday April 8th from 5 to 7
p.m. We are Located 3 miles N. of the town of Williston on Hwy 27A. Fish, French fries, hushpuppies,
drinks, dessert and your choice of two sides of baked beans, coleslaw, or grits will be served.
Adults $7, Senior Citizen Meal (slightly smaller portion) $6, and Children $4 (Under 12). Take out
orders welcome. Come and join us for good food and a fun family atmosphere.
Also, we invite the community to share a Lite Lunch with us on Wednesday April 20th, from 12
p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Parish Hall. Everyone is welcome and there is no charge or obligation of any
kind. Come enjoy a meal and fellowship.
Bronson United Methodist Church Holy Week Events Schedule
Sunday School: April 17th at 8:45 a.m. Easter Sunday Sunrise Service: April 24th at


Palm Sunday: April 17th service at 9:45 a.m.
Maundy Thursday Service: April 21st at 7 p.m.
Good Friday Meditation: April 22nd at Noon.
Saturday, April 23rd at 8 p.m. Drama Group
Presentation of Easter Story (outside) followed
by ice cream social in fellowship hall.


6:30 a.m. (outside) with Drama Group
Presentation of Easter Story followed by
breakfast in fellowship hall.
Sunday School on Easter April 24th at 8:45 a.m.
Sunday Service on Easter April 24th at 9:45 a.m.


i CONCORI)
S BAPTIST CHURCH
", 5551 NW CR 336
S(hiicland. F- 32626
(352) 493-1219
COME JOIN US!
Surndl; Scliii.......................... 10 a.m.
W\ori hi Service .................. II... 1 a.m .
)isciplcship Training................... p.m.
orhi Ser ice........................ 7 p.m.
Wed. Niihl Prayer Sern ice...........7 p.m.


Pastor Jamie Brock

ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST
CATHOUC CHURCH
4050 N.W. Hwy. 27
493-1561 or 493-9723
Saturday Evening 5:30pm
Sunday 8:30am
'- Iiulli:., Education Class
Wed 6:00pm-7:10pm
pre K-12th

Father Joe McDonell


FAMILY BIBLE
CHAPEL
"The Little Church
With A Big God"
For over 16 years, continues to
present the inspirational words
of God from the Bible.
Come join us at
12 N Main Street, Chiefland
Sunday: Family Worship Service:
10:30am
463-6369
George Blythe, Pastor


Otter Creek
Baptist Church
Bro. Tony Barber, Pastor
Services...
Sunday-
Sunday School 9:00am
Worship 10:00am
Wednesday -
Dinner 5:30pm
Awanas 6:00pm
Worship 7:00pm
171 SW3r d Street- Otter Creek
352-486-2112


Pine Grove Baptist Church
16655 NWCR 339
Trenton, FL. 32693
352-463-2151
www.pgbcfl.com

Sunday School............................... ................9:15a.m. Dr. Greg Douglas, Pastor
Morning Worship.............................8:00& 10:30a.m. Rev. RickeyWhitley, Ministerof
Evening Worship................................ 6:00p.m. Evangelism& Youth
Wednesday Night Service Rev. Emanuel Harris, Minister of
AWANA ..................:......................... 6:30- 8:15 p.m. Education & Children
Prayer Meeting, Youth, College & Career............7:00 p.m. Charles Brock, Music Director
~Nursery provided for allservices ~ Jared Douglas, Collega & Career


Bibkl Class g:isa5n
Worship Service 1o:3otanh
352.493.4597


4 miles N rof/ Wtallmart o Hny I/
(Ibefir' Dakota Wincry)

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
OF CHIEFLAND

9:00 a.m.
Sunday School
10:15 a.m.
worship
r. :"id 5:00 p.m.
Youth

707 N. Main St.- 493-4627


Co

I 8:45
9:45
6:301


Non-Denominational
Faith Community


PASTOR: KENT Z IMMERMANN
CELL 352-949-6501 I


The Miracle of Life and the


Labor of Love


"You sure it's not just that Braxton Hicks
fellow knocking again?" I exclaimed. I was
as excited as the next guy about the birth of
his first child, but we'd already had one false
alarm and I'd just gotten to sleep here!
"No, I think this is really it honey," Angie
replied.
I swung my feet to the floor, rubbing
my eyes with both fist. By the time they'd
adjusted my wife was already waddling off
to the car like she could do the whole thing
without me. I started to get mad, but she was
so cute, with that big watermelon belly.
We weren't checked into a hospital room
until late, and even there I could scarcely
get a wink of sleep, especially with all the
poking and prodding they were doing on
Angie. It was really annoying. I was trying to
be supportive, but it was clearly unfair how
she got the bed while I got stuck in the stiff
old arm chair. Angie looked at me like I was
crazy when I suggested we take turns.
The baby was not very cooperative either.
Little Kailey, as we had dubbed her, was
obviously in no hurry to leave the nest. The
whole next day we played hurry up and wait,
and every time I'd try to nod off that dumb
machine would start beeping. I started to
get mad, but Angie just looked so cute lying
there having her little contractions.
By late evening the whole thing had begun
to resemble some weird sort of hostage
negotiation. Little Kailey had apparently
barricaded herself in and seemed willing to
wait us out. I called to her, tried to reason,
but she wouldn't come out. In desperation
the nurses set up a perimeter around Angie
and the doc snuck in and broke her water.
This covert operation was pulled off with


Obituaries


such surgical
precision
I began to
wonder why
these doctors i-
say their just
practicing
medicine. Yet
their efforts
yielded little But
effect, and ButAnyway...
the standoff with Guy SheFfiel4
continued
throughout the night and on into the next
morning. Eventually the nurses announced
that Kailey was threatening to make an
appearance. They promised after a big push
or two we should all be able to get some
sleep. (Of course, later I was to find out
different, since after the baby is born is when
the real sleep deprivation begins.)
Angie started to push. Right off I was glad
I'd gone to the Lamaze class. Her breathing
was all over the place! Frankly I'm not sure
she would've been able to get through the
next two hours without my coaching. Yes,
TWO HOURS!!! Poor thing; sweating,
working so hard, trying to be brave. You'd
have felt so sorry for me. Angie had it pretty
rough too. In fact, she had nearly strained her
eyeballs out of socket by the time the doctor
finally came in.
"Oh," the Doc said, "It looks like baby
girl just needs to be straightened up a bit.
You've been pulling her around a corner." The
doctor made a little push on Angle's side and
immediately the baby's head began to come
out. "Hold on Mrs. Sheffield," she said in all
her early morning freshness, "Don't get in a
continued on page 7


VIRGINIA I. SAMPLE
Virginia I. Shample of Fanning Springs, Fla.,
born on May 20, 1924, passed away on March 28,
2011. She was 86 years of age.
She was born in Coshocton, Ohio to Harvey
and Edna Caley. She was of the Christian faith.
She worked as a nurse for most of her life. She
moved to Fanning Springs in 1982 from Crystal
River, Fla. She enjoyed working crossword
puzzles, watching baseball and spending as much
time as she could with her grandchildren.
Mrs. Shample is survived by her sons: James
Shample and Michael Shample, both of Ohio,
Steven Shample of Fanning Springs, and Kevin
Shample of Gainesville; daughter Karen Burnett
of Old Town; six grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren.
The family plans on holding a private memorial
service at a later date.
Arrangements are under the care of Knauff
Funeral Home-Chiefland.
JEREMYMELDAU
Jeremy Meldau of Gainesville, born April 16,
1984, died Tuesday, March 29, 2011. He was 26
years of age. He was born in Troy, Ohio, and was
the owner, operator of Sunshine Home Repair in
Gainesville. He graduated, with honors, from
South Fork High in Stuart, Fla. and received his
construction certification from Florida Atlantic
University School of Agriculture. Jeremy was a
hard worker who was caring and giving, always
helping others. He was a loving son, brother and
father, who always wanted to make his daughter
proud.


Jeremy is survived by his father Fred Meldau
of Stuart and his mother Helen (Marvin) Nichols
of Chiefland; brothers: Randy Meldau ofJensen
Beach, Paul Meldau and Stephen Meldau,
both of Palm City; sister Melissa (Frank) Vega
ofJonestown, Pa.; his fiance Ashley Edge of
Gainesville; his daughter Kierstie Joy Meldau
of Gainesville; stepbrother William (Amy)
Nichols of Castle Rock, Colo.; stepsisters: Susan
(Howard) Anguish of Belleview, Sharon (Wayne)
Williams of Chiefland, Mary Nichols (Sherman)
of Raleigh, and many nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Saturday, April 2,
2011 at 1 p.m. at Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services
in Chiefland with Rev. Marvin Parsley officiating.
Burial followed in the Chiefland Cemetery.
Visitation was held Friday, April 1, 2011 from 6-8
p.m. at the funeral home.
Arrangements were placed under the care of
Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, 352-493-0050.
On line condolences may be sent through our
website at www.hiers-baxley.com.
REBA MAE FENDER GRIFFIN
Reba Mac Fender Griffin of Bronson and
Panama City Beach, Fla., born October 29, 1924,
went to be with the Lord on the morning of
March 30, 2011 with her daughter Gloria holding
her hand. Heaven and her family rejoiced in her
arrival. Reba was home, at peace, and had lived
a very full and happy life. She was 86 years of
age. She was born in Macon, Ga. the youngest of
five children born to Percy L. Fender and Bessie
Carter Fender. The Fender family moved to
Bronsofn when Reba was two and she enjoyed 83


years in the community. Reba graduated from
Bronson High School in 1942. She had major
skills on the basketball court playing for Bronson
High School and the Bronson Ladies Town
Team. After graduating, she attended business
school at Camp Roosevelt in Ocala.
Reba married the love of her life, Theron
Johnson Griffin, Sr. on July 7, 1945. They spent
50 wonderful years together sharing the birth of
two children, Gloria Jean and Theron "Johnny"
Johnson Jr. Reba used her business skills working
with the Levy County Health Department, Levy
County Judge's Office, Levy County Clerk's
Office, as a legal secretary, and Levy
County Abstract and Title Company where
she retired in 1976. Reba was a member of the
First Baptist Church of Bronson where she served
the Lord as church clerk for 29 years, Sunday
school teacher, and church pianist. After retiring
she took pleasure in traveling, spending time
with her family, tackling crossword puzzles and
playing card games entertaining herself for hours
with Solitaire. She was fond of the nature that
surrounded her and riding the lawn mower gave
her the chance to take in tle beauty. She liked
feeding the wild turkeys and deer that grazed on
her property. In the later years Reba participated
in the Senior Center in Chicfland where she made
many new friends. For the last two years slhe has
lived in Panama City Beach, Florida with her
daughter and son--in-law, Thomas Dillard.
Reba was preceded in death by husband
Theron; son Johnny; and grandson Fred Iillard.
Reba is survived by her daughter Gloria G.


Dillard (Thomas); three granddaughters: Laura
Campbell Olhme (Marty), Stephanie Griffin
(Brian Bechdel), and Dana Griffin Gutierrez
(Sidney); three great-grandchildren: Olivia
Bechdel, Ana Ohme, and Amelia Gutierrez and
a host of nieces and nephews who love and will
miss her.
A praise and worship service was held Saturday,
April 2, at First Baptist Bronson with interment
at Rosemary Hill Cemetery, Rev. Troy Turner and
Dr. Jerry Nash officiating.
Arrangements were under the care of Knauff
Funeral Home, Williston.
Memorial gifts may be made to the First
Baptist Church of Bronson Building Fund or
Covenant Hospice, 5041 North 12th Avenue,
Pensacola, Fl 32504.
LINDA MARIE SHYER LEE
Ms. Linda Marie Shyer Lee of Old Town
passed away Saturday, March 26, 2011 in a house
fire at her home. She was 48.
Linda was born in Miami, Florida. She moved
to Old Town, from Gainesville, in 1996. She was
a CNA who enjoyed watching NASCAR, fishing,
hurricane chasing, photography and writing
poetry.
She is survived by son, Casey Shyer of
Gainesville; daughters, Jessica Shyer and Brittany
Perkins, both of Old Town-; parents, Stanley and
Marilynn Shyer of Hlernando, Fla. and Betty and
Merric Alcxander of Old Town; brother Stanley
Todd Shycr of St. Petersburg, Fla.; sisters, Pamela
Postle of Old Town and Brenda Cra\wtord of
Mclntosh, Fla.; continued on par 7


A


/ 1 T//7 7 ) /f'7t


LEARNING HOUR: 9AMl
\VORSH P: 10:14AM


ome and Worship

am Sunday School
am Sunday Morning Worship
pm Sunday rF, .i oi Service
pm Wednesday Bible Study
erend Priscilla Scherrah, Pastor

ison United Methodist Church
235 Court Street
Bronson, Florida


---- - ------- ----- 110110M
IN OUR NEW I
FACILITY i
OR 341 (Dairy Road)

Children's Church

Wed. Night
Learning Time 7pm





~









NEWS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 7


-rby s 01'
.WA4 A L.IV I I


Illustration by Alexander Key
Late one night somewhere south of Cedar Key, a boat was tied out from a campfire
built high on the sandy shore. Around the fire lounged several rough men who made
their living on the sea. They'd had their supper, tossing scraps of oily mullet skin with
crumbles of fry bread to a jip dog among their crew. A younger man had stoked the fire with
knots of lightered pine and driftwood from along the low berm separating the beach from a
saltwater lagoon behind. The flames cracked and popped cheerfully into the dark. A silent
web of lightning low on the Gulf's horizon went unnoticed while the men sweetened their
cups with scuppernong wine from a masonry jug.
In what happened next, they may first have credited the wine's potency for playing some
trickery. Suddenly a deafening rumbling and snorting sound arose from the sea sounds
stranger than any they knew. Growing louder, shapes as large as river-smoothed boulders
began to appear from where the boat was banging about. In what seemed a single horrific
instant, these heavy silhouettes were upon them. Like a great herd of buffalo stampeding up
from the sea, a clashing of thick shells and scrambling of great flippers ascended upon the
sandy camp. It was a vast shoal of sea turtles in their laying season advancing rapidly over
abandoned bed rolls, scattering the campfire, and sending the yelping dog down the dark
beach after the men. This invading marine armada was headed for the lagoon where they
were accustomed to waiting out bad storms.
This event would have occurred in the late 1800s, when turtling in Florida's waters was
at its apex. Given the scarcity of these great reptiles today, it takes a flight of imagination to
conceive how plentiful they were earlier. Once, their migrations might prevent sailing ships
from passing for hours at a time. Historical accounts tell of vast shoals of the green turtle,
in particular, so thick that "... a man could walk from the back of one to another for quite
a distance." Hundreds at a time might be spotted in a single shoal (as these groupings were
called), adrift in the warm green waters of the Gulf.
Green turtles were most prized because their meat was truly delectable when cooked as
steaks or stew meat. One culinary delight, Green Turtle Soup, had lately become popular
as far away as the cafes of London and Paris. Combs, hair berets and implements as letter
openers and guitar picks made from turtle shell were also fashionable. Craftsmen in "scale
work," as the making of such items from the scale of tortoise shell was called, favored most
the hawksbill turtles for these purposes.
The harvesting of sea turtles was done by both land and sea. Boats of "conchs" out of
Key West and "coasters down from the Cedar Keys" plied the Gulf waters for turtles taken
in great nets or harpooned "pegged" as the act was known (thus providing the origin of
exclamations such as "She sure had him pegged") .
The typical turtling net was a hundred feet long and eight feet deep with meshes a foot
square. These would be set between working skiffs and buoyed by cork floats along the top
line. Whether set upon a sited shoal or set "on chance," large numbers could be corralled and
captured with their flippers tangled in the net.


Sturgeon continuedfrom page 1
In 2006, FWC officials began working on a public
awareness campaign to alert boaters to the risks of jumping
sturgeon.
"We posted signs at each boat ramp along the Suwannee,
explaining the risk of colliding with these fish," Beach said.
"Our officers will be on water patrol during this period and
into the summer months in a continued effort to educate
boaters about these jumping fish."
What's the best course of action for avoiding a collision?
"We recommend boaters reduce their speed to reduce the
risk of impact and to give people more time to react if they do
encounter a jumping sturgeon," Beach said. "The FWC also
recommends that all boaters wear their life jackets."
The Suwannee River appears to support the largest viable
population of Gulf sturgeon in Florida. Biologists estimate
the annual population at 10,000-14,000 fish, averaging
approximately 40 pounds each. Adult fish spend eight to
nine months each year spawning in the river and three to
four of the coolest months in Gulf waters.
Biologists are unsure why sturgeon jump. Theories include
that the fish jump to communicate or as a dominance display.


Obituaries continuedfrom page 6
grandchildren: Alexandria, Kayla, Bristol and Elizabeth and many
other loving family members.
A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 9, 2011 at 2 p.m.
at the Trail Riders Club.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Jessica Shyer
Fund at Drummond Community Bank.
GEORGE F.JONES
Mr. George F. Jones, born on May 26, 1936, passed away on
Friday, April 01, 2011 at Ayers Health & Rehabilitation Center.
He was 74 years of age. He was born in Trenton to C.V. and Aline
Jones. He was a lifelong resident of Gilchrist County.
Mr. Jones was a farmer and he loved to be outside working on
his farm. He was a Seventh Day Adventist being a member of the
Jennings Lake Seventh Day Adventist Church.
He is preceded in death by his parents C.V. Jones and Aline
AsbellJones.
He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Kathryn Hutchins Jones
of Trenton.; three sons: Steve (Renae) Gothard of Boise, Idaho,
Wayne (Marvine) Gothard of Cross City and William (Cathy)
Jones of Gresham, Ore.; a sister, Evelyn Green of Trenton; three
brothers: James Jones, C.V. Jones, Jr., and Earl Jones all of Trenton,
six grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral Services are being held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011 at
2 p.m. in the chapel at Watson Funeral Home with Pastor Anthony
Crawford officiating. Interment to follow at Jennings Lake
Cemetery. Visitation was held on Tuesday, April 5, 2011 from 5 to
7 p.m. at Watson Funeral Home.
Arrangements under the care of Watson Funeral Home in
Trenton, Fla. (352) 463-8888.
JAMES G. WILKERSON
James G. Wilkerson Sr. of Chiefland, Fla., born on January 19,
1939, passed away on April 2, 2011. He was 72 years of age.
He was born in Cedar Key to Porter and Inez Wilkerson. He
was a native of Levy County and moved back to Chiefland in
1983 after retiring from the City of Gainesville as a firefighter.
He was of the Methodist faith and a member of the First United
Methodist Church of Cedar Key. He was also a member of the
Gulf Hammock Hunting Club and the International Association
of Firefighters Local 2157 in Gainesville. H e enjoyed hunting,
fishing, watching TV especially John Wayne movies and was a
great supervisor.


The Turtle Kraals

The pegging of turtles required a different set of skills. Usually two men, one to skull from
the aft and another, the "striker," at the bow, would stalk turtles floating idly about on the
silken swells. The striker only needed to be close enough to plant his harpoon in the massive
shell bobbing by. But the rodeo was on after that, as the large and powerful swimmers -
some weighing as much as 800 pounds would immediately run out the rope in a race
for the bottom. So many were their numbers at times that it would be necessary to tie the
harpoon's rope off to five gallon kegs, let to exhaust the giant sea creatures and to mark their
location. Otherwise, pegging boats might be dragged two miles or more in these desperate
flights for freedom.
In either case, there was nothing pretty about the method of such harvests. First, there
was the awkward and cumbersome matter of wrestling the mammoth turtles into their boats.
The usual techniques required that the harpoon be chopped from its shell and the turtle be
heaved and rolled helplessly on its back for uploading to schooners headed for market. Shore
harvest, the practice of "turning" turtles, had particular dangers as well, not the least of
which was competition with other creatures in the hunt for the turtles' obscure nests of eggs,
The most formidable competitor was the Florida black bear. Bears didn't take kindly to
human encroachment on their beach buffet. Bears took their feast raw, of course. But the
coastal folk preferred the eggs fried or dried, pickled or put into the making of breads or pies.
The prized yellow eggs called "yelks" were the green turtle's eggs taken from captured
females. Eggs dug from their sandy obscurity were white. Loggerheads were considered
inedible, as one contemporary report illustrates. It is told that a Captain Watkins showed up
in Cedar Key about 1890 with 5,000 loggerhead eggs to sell, but purportedly couldn't even
give them away.
Some of the "coasters," as those living on the islands off Cedar Key were called, kept their
catch in pens on the shore These were referred to as kraals (from an Afrikaner word). This
was a common practice up and down the coast for penning and fattening turtles for market.
Freshly-slaughtered turtles were always preferred. So fattening the languishing beasts on
mangrove leaves and wild parsley and then holding them for market-bound schooners, served
to increase their value.
The epicenter of the turtle industry developed down in Key West. As many as 800 turtles
a day might be delivered. On arrival at the schooner docks, turtles were slid upon their backs
down wet ramps. Often their heads and flippers were removed by axes then and there, a
bloody business and not for the faint of heart.
Among the industry's major players was a Frenchman, one Armand Granday, who opened
his turtle cannery in 1849. Granday had been a chef for prominent families in the northeast.
Now a restaurateur in his own right, he also made his famous soup consume in kitchens on
the dock beside his large kraals. So immense were these kraals, with sometimes hundreds
of turtles a day being deposited from schooners, they would become one of Florida's first
tourist attractions. By 1890, Granday's turtle enterprises formed the dominant industry on
the island.
By 1947, however, the turtling business in Florida was virtually at an end. The turtles
caught for some years thereafter were lugged in by large schooners from the waters of
Moskitos Keys, east of Nicaragua. These vessels offloaded at Key West several times a year
and were sufficient to keep the business up in some fashion until 1971. That's when the
animals came to be classified as "endangered" by conservationists worldwide. Among the
most famous of the turtling schooners was the A.M. Adams, the last to unload at Key West.
The turtle boats, having gone the way of their cargo, are now also endangered yet remain a
rare and fascinating sight. And sometimes, just sometimes, while cruising these same waters
that Cayman schooners once sailed, we might see a great green turtle or two out sunning in
the briny blue.


"I have seen these collisions referred to as 'attacks.'
However, these fish are in no way attacking when they jump.
They are simply doing what they have been doing for millions
of years ... jumping. They aren't targeting the boaters,"
Beach said.
Gulf sturgeon can get quite big, exceeding 8 feet and 200
pounds.
"They have five rows of rock-hard scutes along their sides,
back and belly. When sturgeon and boaters collide, the
results can be devastating," Beach said.
State and federal laws protect sturgeon, just like bald
eagles, panthers and sea turtles.
"These fish can't be harvested," Beach said.
To report sturgeon collisions, call 888-404-FWCC (3922).
"If anyone is involved in an incident with a jumping
sturgeon, please report it to the FWC. With the data
received, we can get a better overall view of where the fish are
jumping and get the word out to the public," Beach said.
For more information about Gulf sturgeon, go to
MyFWC.com/Research and click on "Saltwater," then
"Sturgeon."


James was preceded in death by his first wife Margaret
Wilkerson; son Christopher H. Wilkerson; and brother Raymond
Wilkerson.
He is survived by his wife of 2 years Marilyn Wilkerson; sons:
James G. Wilkerson Jr.(Sandra), Woodrow P. Wilkerson(Stacey),
Charles D. Wilkerson(Jean), William B. Wilkerson, Andrew D.
Wilkerson(Faylea); sisters Irene Hardin and Cleo Allen(William);
nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.
A visitation is being held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011 from 6 to
8 p.m. at KnauffFuneral Home-Chiefland. No funeral services are
scheduled. In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made
to your local volunteer fire department.
Arrangements are under the care of Knauff Funeral Home-
Chiefland.
RONNIE LEE BOWEN
Ronnie Lee Bowen, born July 29, 1947, passed away Friday,
April 01, 2011. He was 63 years of age.
Mr. Bowen was born in Montezuma, Ga. to Isaac and Lillian
Bowen. Ronnie graduated from Andrew Jackson High School in
1965 and continued his education at St Johns River State College
and Stonier Graduate School of Banking. Ronnie was an All
City star football player, an avid golfer and played basketball and
baseball. Ronnie was a member of Norwood Baptist Church. He
was a long time banker retiring from Sun Bank as vice president in
1993.
Ronnie was preceded in death by his mother Lillian; his father
Isaac; and his brother Royce.
Ronnie is survived by his wife Mary Ann ofJacksonville,
Fla.; son Ronnie Jr. of Gainesvillc; daughter Kimberly (Tommy
Menscer) Bowen of Fayetteville, NC; brother Michael of Lily, Ga.;
brother-in-lawJoseph (Annette) Driggers of Beverly Hills, Fla.;
sister-in-law Carol Driggers of Beverly Hills, Fla.; two grandsons
Troy and Tyler Menscer of Fayetteville, NC; uncle and aunt Walter
and Mabel Bowen of Ga.; several nieces, nephews and cousins.
Special thanks to all the physicians and their staff for their care
during his illness. We are forever grateful.
A funeral service for family and friends will be held in the chapel
of Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Fla. on Friday, April
8, 2011 at 1 p.m. A viewing will be held 1 hour prior to service.
Ronnie will be laid to rest in New Prospect Church Cemetery, Old
Town, Fla.


EVYCOUNTYJOURNAL
THE COI'NT' PAPER EST. 1923

Subscri$25/year in Levy County
$30/year in Florida
$35/year Outside Florida




The family of Brenda L. Dean would like to thank
everyone for the outpouring of love, concern and
generous love offerings given and shown to our family
during the loss of our daughter Brenda. May God
Bless each of you for blessing our family with much
love, cards, phone calls, home visits, food brought to
our home, and to the ladies of First Baptist Church of
Bronson for the wonderful, delicious food prepared for
all of us after the funeral; also for taking time to stand
by our side through visitation and Brenda's funeral.
Even if you just had us on your thoughts and in your
hearts and took the time to pray for our family during
this time, we thank you.
From gratefid hearts,
Sandra andJohn Morris Dean and family;
Teresia andJohn, Karen and Katie, Sabrina and
Crystal


Guy Sheffield continued from page 6
hurry. Let me get my scrubs on." I growled. Angie did too.
But anyway- All anger ceased once little Kaileyjoined us.
She was so beautiful. She instantly stole our hearts. I turned
to clutch Angle's hand. Our lives had been forever changed.
Such love for her welled up in my heart. Angie and I would
ride together on a higher plain now. She had been truly
amazing; heroic in my eyes.
The whole process had been miraculous to me; the
conception, the pregnancy, and now concluding with the
birth. I couldn't explain away what I'd just witnessed. God
is real. Adding a few more million years to the evolutional
theories I'd clung to at the time would never satisfy or
quench the questions arising from the wonderment of this
birth. How could this bundle of love I now held in my arms
have ever spun from a glob of pond scum? Ridiculous!
I'd just witnessed the miracle of life, the labor of love, and
the inherent struggle a woman endures to bring them forth.
It caused me to become deeply aware of my new role as dad.
1 must become a man. How could I possibly walk away the
same little boy when I'd just been privileged enough to brush
up against the hand of God at work?
It wasn't long after our hospital stay that we began
attending Church as a family. There I eventually gave my life
to Jesus and was born again. Ironically, the Lord had used
one birth to help facilitate another! It's cool, now little Kailey
and I can grow up together. (When 1 was a child, I spoke and
thought and reasoned as a child. But when 1 grew up, I put
away childish thing. 1 Corinthians 13:11 NLT)
-Guy Sheffield
YoY can visit Guy at his website vorww.biutanyway.org, or
e-mail him at guy.sheffield@butanyway.org.








NEWS
SApril 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal



Cedar Key Arts Festival Celebrated


under Clear Skies

Almost as magically as a scene from the Wizard of Oz, the stormy skies of the last
week of March cleared last Friday morning to allow the transformation of Second
Street for the Old Florida Celebration of the Arts. As in the past, this 47th Annual
Spring Arts Festival could not happen without the help of numerous organizations, tireless
volunteers, and a dedicated group of individuals working behind the scenes over the past year
to prepare for the event that attracts thousands to Cedar Key.
Thanks to the efforts of the City, overseen by City Administrator Greg Lang, the ruts and
bumps of recent road work were smoothed away by the Ciraco crew early Friday morning.
Before the day was done the artists and a team of volunteers, coordinated by the OFCA
Event Coordinator Mandy Cassiano, filled the streets with art booths and City Park was
made ready for hungry visitors.
The weather could not have been more perfect all weekend as visitors and purchase award
patrons enjoyed browsing museum quality artwork within the 118 booths that lined Historic
2nd Street. Saturday evening artists and sponsors attended the 5th Annual Cedar Key Arts
Center Reception and Award Ceremony where 16 different artists were awarded prizes and \
ribbons (*see list of winners below).
Throughout the weekend beautiful flute and harp music was heard thanks to the Celtic
Duo, Lisa Lynne and George Tortorelli, who played both Saturday and Sunday in front of
the new Welcome Center. Whitey Markle and the Swamprooters entertained the crowd at
the park on Saturday while the Ernie Evans Trio played Sunday. Eighteen non-profit food
vendors sold everything from corn-on-the-cob to root beer floats in addition to traditional Best in Show winner Jean Yao. Photo by Bill Flood.
Cedar Key seafood dishes. Chris Ford, Committee Park Chairman, said "Numerous
vendors reported this to be a very successful weekend fundraiser for their organizations and
many sold out of food." Tom Deverin, who coordinated the efforts of the first 'Sustainable
Festival' in Cedar Key, said over 25 Cedar Key students worked hard and really enjoyed
instructing visitors how to properly recycle at the trash and recycling stations set up
throughout the park.
Although the estimated number of visitors is not yet available from the Department of
Transportation and visitor surveys have not yet been summarized, Event Coordinator Mandy
Cassiano reports that numerous positive comments were received about the quality of the
event and the hospitality of our community. She and her committee (Cindy Leiner, Chris
Ford, Janet Cook, and Bev Ringenberg) extend thanks to all the volunteers, community,
businesses and sponsors that helped make this event possible. A special thank you to Title
Sponsors, Drummond Bank and Palms Medical Group, in addition to the Cedar Key Lion's
Club and the Cedar Key Arts Center who support the event in multiple ways.
By Monday afternoon, city workers and volunteers just as miraculously cleared the park
and streets before the rain returned that evening. Just another magical weekend in Cedar
Key's paradise.


Crafts on display include figures in a variety of mediums. These especially caught the
eye. Photo by Linda Cooper, Staff


Celtic Duo Lisa Lynne Harp & George Tortorelli Bamboo Flute.
Photos by Michelle Pearson


The Crews Celebrate
50 Years
On Saturday, April 16th, 2011, Buddy
and Earlene Crews will celebrate 50
years of marriage at Hardeetown Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall.
The Crews were married April 10,
1961 at the First United Methodist
Church in Chiefland. From this union
has come two sons, Shelton and Dawn
Crews of Tallahassee and Steven Crews
of Chiefland and four grandchildren:
Alyssa and Brian Crews ofTallahassee,
and Cole and Nicole Crews of Orlando.
The celebration will be from 2 p.m.
to 5 p.m. and we invite all our friends
to come and share this time with us. No

MUST SELL 49,000
Drastically reduced to $115,000






V .. : ,. .

3/2 DWMH with fireplace on 11.6 acres.
Shed w/carport. Enclosed pole barn with
shop. 20'x32' outbuilding with restrooms. 2
wells and irrigation. Doublewide has complete
new roof. 2006 appliances including washer
and dryer. Central Heat/Air. Zoned AG/
Forestry, near Goethe National Forest, 3 mi
to Bronson, 6 mi to Black Prong Equestrian
Center. Doublewide is currently rented. Owner
financing with $48,000 down.
Call (352) 577-4412.


Historic Street Busy shoppers on Saturday afternoon. Photos by Michelle Pearson


New Permit-Tagging Study

Needs Anglers' Help


invitations will be sent locally
and we request no gifts.
Family and friends are gifts
enough.


Levy
Animal Clinic

Dr. Wade Bullock, DVM
Dr. Charlotte Dow, DVM


louse Calls Available
Quality Medicine
Friendly Service
Competitive Pricing


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's (FWC) Fish
and Wildlife Research Institute and the
Bonefish & Tarpon Trust need anglers to
assist with a study about permit in Florida
waters. Project Permit participants will
help biologists obtain information on this
economically important fish.
Anglers can assist biologists by tagging
and sampling DNA from any permit they
catch and release. Participants will mark
each fish with a dart tag and obtain a small
fin clip from the dorsal or anal fin of the
fish. 'The information from the tags and
DNA samples will improve biologists'
understanding of permit movement and
distribution. Although the program is
relatively new, biologists already have
documented a
S---. tagged permit
'."i\ -.' "' that had
traveled more
Than 40 miles
s- ^! *-^
wm -


M Th 7:30 a.m 6 p.m.
Fri. 7:30 a.m 5 p,.m
Sat. 9 a.m tp.m.


AX~t C1~l~ A 6
52-58-480


along the east coast of Florida before being
captured again.
Fish and Wildlife Research Institute
scientists will also compare permit DNA
samples to determine whether all the tagged
fish come from the same genetic stock.
Resource managers can use this information
for regulating the permit fishery.
The Bonefish & Tarpon Trust proposed
the collaborative study after obtaining a
grant from Costa Del Mar, which agreed to
supply funds for the tagging kits for three to
five years.
Anglers who would like to participate in
Project Permit can obtain a free, easy-to-use
tagging kit by e-mailing ProjectPermit@
MyFWC.com or by calling 800-367-4461.
Each kit contains enough material to sample
five fish.
For more information on Project Permit,
visit MyFWC.com/Research, click on
"Saltwater," scroll down to "Saltwater Fish"
and click on "Permit."








NEWS
The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 9


I I
Non-profit food vendor group'Pirates in Paradise' winner of most artistic booth
competition. Pirate Allison Nelson and Pirate Bobby McCabe of Cedar Key.
Photos by Michelle Pearson ___I


Jr


2011 Winners
Best of Show: Jean Yao, Ft. Lauderdale
Best 3-Dimensional: Terry & Vickie Hunt, Arcadia Four
Best 2-Dimensional: Susan Daupinee, Cedar Key Mich
Awards of Excellence
Emily Cheek Painting
Ted Elder Sculpture
William Flood Photography
Joseph Frye Ceramics
Jinsong Kim Ceramics
William Lindley Wood
Richard Shamel Jewelry
Mike Segal Painting
Susan Sorrento Jewelry
John Townsend Sculpture
Joe Wujcik Wood
Tony Krysinsky Mixed Media
Roy Slade of Tampa Judge

Found Photo

In Fall of 2003, a Levy County Journal Staffer discovered
a white box full of photographs that may or may not
have run in earlier editions of the newspaper. The box
was unmarked, and the photographs remain unidentified
and unclaimed.Hence the name of a new feature: Found
Photo. We ask our readers to take a look and see if they can
identify the folks in the photo, as well as the story behind it.
idniyteflsithphtswelathstybeidt.


'all or write to us. Send it to us at PO Box 299u,
Chiefland, FL 32644-2990 or at lcjadvertiser@
levyjournal.com.


WE PAY TOP DOLLAR

S.OR GOLD, DIAMONDS,
EOINS & CURRENCY

l7 493-7414
CHIEFLAND REGIONAL SHOPPING CENTER


Sam Kates, of St Augustine, said, "Cedar Key inspires me." Photos by Michelle Pearson


-legged festival goer peruses art selections. Photos by
elle Pearson
TV Series Comes to

Cedar Key
The quiet community of Cedar Key woke up last week to
the hustle of TV cameramen shooting different segments of
the How to do Florida" TV series which will begin airing
in ten Florida broadcast markets June 2011 through August
27, 2011 then start airing on SUN SPORTS from October
2011 through March 2012.
The TV series will feature How To Go Kayak Fishing
and How To Do A Clambake (in Florida) with both
segments featuring the beautiful community of Cedar Key.
The Levy County Visitors Bureau began communications
with the Crawford Group TV company last year in an effort
to showcase Cedar Key's access to the Big Bend Saltwater
Paddling Trail and Levy County's Fresh from Florida clam
industry.
Tom Liebert of Kayak Cedar Keys assisted in securing
kayak fishing expert Al Clements for all kayak fishing
segments with the film crew staying on an extra day in
Cedar Key to film Mr. Clements catching fish from his
kayak.
Leslie Sturmer, Rose and Rory Cantwell assisted
Executive Chef and Culinary Ambassador Justin Timineri of
the Florida Department of Agriculture's Fresh from Florida
program for How to do a Clambake, which turned out to be
a spectacular Low Country Boil instead of a clambake. Stay
tuned for the TV series to start airing in June 2011 on ABC
Orlando, Tallahassee, Ft. Myers, Sarasota; CBS Miami,
WJXT Jacksonville; WTVW West Palm Beach; WJHX
Panama City; with Tampa and Gainesville added for Season
Two.
COMMUNITYNEWS CONTRIBUTORS
Ever had a hankering to be a crime reporter?
Are you drawn to getting information about
events and news in your area?
The Levy County Journal would like to hear from you.
Write your stories our stories. You don't have to have a
degree in journalism, just a nose for interesting happenings
in Levy County. Just contact us at 490-4462 or e-mail
editor@levyjournal.com and help us be your community
bulletin board to the rest of Levy County.


CHIEFLAND MEDICAL CENTER

~~Caring for the health of yourfamify
S-Call for an
appointment:
,.-, 493-9500

- OPEN
N.- Mor .. Fri. 0S a n 5r,- m
.. I Sat. 830oa n FHon
Walk-ins Welcome!
1113 N.W. 23rd Ave.
Chiefland


Cedar Key Garden Club

Tour Takes Place April 23

Join us for a Garden Tour on April 23 at 10:30 a.m. We
will meet near the corner ofF and Second Streets to see
several gardens in that area. You may park along F and along
Second near 8010 F Street. We will use golf carts for the
homes nearby and carpool to homes farther away. All are
welcome; bring your guests. For more info, call Marci at
813-215-0050 or Roger at 321-698-1688 or 352-543-5232.


Log Cabin Quilters


L_ -
The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, March 31 at the
Levy County Quilt Museum. The weather was bad for a
while. The worst of it was to the north of us yet we did get
the much-needed rain. A new quilt was put in the frame to
be hand quilted.
Greg and six boys were out Wednesday. They got a lot
done. We have a lot of mums that were cleaned out if you
want some. They planted another blueberry plant and cleared
out around the sign in the front yard. Thanks Lancaster.
Thursday lunch was good with chicken and rice, corn,
potato patties, potato salad, butter beans, macaroni salad,
pecan cake and so much more.
WinnelleHorne

David Alien

Aluminum
*Vinyl Siding 'Carports
Roof-Overs Decks ;
*Screened Roomss *Skirting .i '"




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Crab Legs Fried Shrimp# Boiled Shrimp Fish Filngers Mullet,
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SCHOOLS

10 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Pre-School
Storytime
These programs use books
and music to present young
children with the concept
that books, reading, and
libraries are fun and enjoyed
at all ages. The programs last
30 minutes.
Bronson Public Library
Monday April 18, 2011 at
10:30 a.m. Easter theme
Luther Callaway Public
Library
Monday April 11 2011 at 11
a.m. Animal Theme
Monday April 25 2011 at 11
a.m. Easter Theme
Cedar Key Public Library
Tuesday April 12 2011 at 11
a.m. Animal Theme
A.F. Knotts Public Library
Tuesday April 12 2011 at 3
p.m. Animal Theme
Tuesday April 26 2011 at 3
p.m. Easter Theme
Jenny Rodgers,Youth
Services Coordinator, Levy
County Public Library System
352-486-5552


LUON


MONDAY
April 11, 2011

Macaroni & Cheese w/Ham
or Chicken Sandwich
Mixed Vegetables
Salad w/ Spinach/ Broccoli
Home Made Wheat Rolls
Chilled Peaches/ Apple
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%
April 18, 2011

Pop Corn Chicken or
Hamburger on Bun
Oven Fries/ Mixed
Vegetables/Carrot/Celery
Sticks w/ Dip
Apple Wedges/ Pineapple
Tidbit
Assorted Milk 1%-2%
April 25, 2011
Corn Dog or
Philly Cheese Sub.
Cole Slaw /Baked Beans /
Tater Tots
Peach Cobbler/ Orange
Wedge
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%


TUESDAY
April 12, 2011

Pizza or Chicken Fingers
Salad/ Veg. Blend Winter
Buttered Green Peas
Chilled Applesauce/ Orange
Assorted Milk 1%- 2%



April 19, 2011

Lasagna or Pizza
Tossed Salad/Green Beans
Buttered Broccoli
Chilled Peaches/ Banana
Home Made Wheat Rolls
Assorted Milk 1%- 2%



April 26, 2011
Chili Con Carne w/Beans
Ham/Cheese Sub.
Buttered Corn/Salad
Green Beans
Apple Pie/ Banana
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%


WEDNESDAY
April 13, 2011


Chicken Pattie or
Hot Dog on Bun
Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy
Corn/ Collard Greens/ Corn
Hot Home Made Corn Bread
Orange Slices/Jruited Jello
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%

April 20. 2011
Hamburgers on Bun or
Hot Dog on Bun
Lettuce/Tomato/Oven Fries
Cole Slaw
Orange Wedge/ Mixed Fruit
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%



April 27, 2011
EARLY RELEASE
Pizza
Oven Fries/Carrot Sticks w/ Dip
Buttered Corn
Orange Wedge/ Chilled Peach
Assorted Milk 1%- 2%


THURSDAY
April 14, 2011


Corn Dog or
Philly Cheese Sub.
Cole Slaw /Baked Beans /
Tater Tots
Peach Cobbler/ Orange Wedge
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%

April 21, 2011
Oven Fried Chicken or
Hot Ham & Cheese Sub.
Mashed Potato w/Gravy
Steamed Cabbage
Chilled Mixed Fruit/ Apple
Home Made Corn Bread
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%

April 28, 2011
Spaghetti w/ Meat Balls or
Hamburger on Bun
Buttered Carrots/ Salad
Winter Mix
Chilled Mix Fruit/ Apple
Wedge
Home Made Garlic Rolls
Assorted Milk 1 % 2 %


FRIDAY
April 15, 2011


Toco w/Ground Beaf& Cheese
Cheese Burger on Bun
Lettuce/Tomato/Tater Tots
Buttered Corn
Chilled Mixed Fruit / Apple
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%

April 22, 2011

NO SCHOOL







April 29, 2011
Macaroni & Cheese w/Ham or
Chicken Sandwich
Mixed Vegetables
Salad w/ Spinach/ Carrot Sticks
Home Made Wheat Rolls
Chilled Pears /Orange
Assorted Milk 1% or 2%


In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department ofAgriculture policy, this institution isprohibited from discriminating on the base of race, color,nationslorgin, sex, age, or disability.


Nature Awareness continuedfrom page 5

I am the chairman of the Get Outdoors Florida! Coalition
that seeks to connect youth to the outdoors through active,
nature-based recreation to help them lead happier, healthier
and smarter lifestyles and to become better resource stewards.
Imagine my pride when my grandson, Luke, said recently that it
was so much more fun to be outdoors that watching TV reruns
or playing interactive video games that quickly become boring.
This April, find a way to connect with a child or two you care
about and enhance their prospects for a happier, healthier and
smarter future by getting them outdoors. A variety of events
will be taking place around the state and country, giving many
people the chance to find something fun to do outdoors with
children.
Children and Nature Awareness Month is all about that.
One special opportunity, if fishing is your thing, is the Free
Freshwater Fishing Weekend on April 2-3, during which you
can fish in any open public freshwater fishing body throughout
Florida, without purchasing a license (all other rules apply). The
Outdoor Foundation considers fishing one of the key gateway
activities to other forms of outdoor recreation.
This April consider becoming an Anglers' Legacy
Ambassador. Anglers' Legacy is simply about making a promise
to introduce somebody new to fishing. There is no membership
fee and no obligation. Visit AnglersLegacy.org and complete the
pledge, entering FLFWC as the partner code.
Check out these websites for places to go, things to do, and
information about the benefits of getting outdoors.
GetOutdoorsFlorida.org; ChildrensWeek.org;
ChildrenandNature.org;
MyFWC.com; FloridaStateParks.org; Florida Youth
Conservation Centers Network: FYCCN.org ; The Youth Go
Outside Initiative: YouthGo.gov
Instant licenses are available at MyFWC.com/License or by
calling 888-FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356).


Chiefland High School Reunion News


Our multi-year class reunion is getting closer so we need
to hear from you if you plan to attend. We have a few more
missing classmates -class of 64- Kirk Shiver and Charles
Newton. We've found Linda Prentice.
Coach and Ann McCall and George "Red" Coleman are
planning to attend.
We'll be at Otter Springs Campground located between
Fanning Springs and Hart Springs. It has just been
remodeled and has a wheelchair ramp and accessible
bathrooms. There's lots of parking available and the meal is


catered. We just need you to let us know that you're coming.
We need to get a head count so we will have plenty to eat.
Don't forget. It's Saturday, April 23 and registration starts
at 4 p.m. Come early and watch our host (the class of 57)
decorate the place or just enjoy the springs area. The Lodge
has a covered porch that is perfect for catching up with your
classmates.
For more information, call Lynn Pirmann Crutchfield at
352 542 0356 or Earlene Campbell Crews at 352 493 4825 or
Myrtice Bailey Scabarozi at 352 493 2292


From the 1956 CHS yearbook, a photo of the 4H girls club members, 5th grade and up.


S& School Board of Levy County

s Meeting March 8, 2011
Proso P.lnrid


BES Offers Technology Bridge


to Students at Home


All Bronson Elementary School parents
and guardians have access to a new system
this year a communication system that
also serves as a secure website to monitor
your student's academic success. Student
assignments, grades, and progress are posted
on this secure site through individual student
access information. In order to gain your
parent/guardian access to this site, you must
present your photo identification to the front
office at Bronson Elementary School, as
well as complete a brief access form. Upon
completing these steps, you will receive your
personal access code and password to login to
Skyward.nefec.org. On their main site, you
will see the drop down menu for the district,
this is where you would select Levy. On the
next drop down menu, you select Student/
Family Access. Once you are logged in, you
will be able to see your child's grades, as well
as communicate with their teachers) via
message.
This is a huge advancement in technology
for our school, and we are excited to use it!
What better way is there to keep up to date
on the projects your child is working on, as
well as the progress they are making in class?
In addition to Skyward, the Bronson
Elementary School website also provides


various sites and bits of information that
are important for you to be aware of.
Ticket2Read is a website that we are using
at BES this year, to encourage students to
read. This is an interactive site that provides
meaningful practice of the skills being taught
in the classroom, while also rewarding them
with interactive activities at the completion
of each activity. Ticket2Read is available
to your students not only in class, but also
during Family Learning Night each month,
as well as at home. If you are interested
in your child's login information tor
Ticket2Read, please see their reading teacher
for that information.
Another program we will be implementing
at BES is VmathLive. This is another
online program that provides effective and
meaningful math instruction for our students
in grades 2 through 5. The more engaged
students are in learning, the more effective
the instruction is. VmathLive is also
available on campus, as well as at home or
from any computer that has internet access.
Login information for this program will
be available in the new few weeks through
your child's math teacher. Please be on the
lookout for this information to be coming
home, if you have a child in 2nd through 5th
7 grade.
Caryl M. Carlisle, BES
Reading Coach
352-486-5281


,eiS .. All Dental

)D.FAN O


March 8, 2011
5:30 p.m.


The School Board of Levy County met in
regular session this 8th day of March, 2011 at
5:30 p.m. with Chairman Rick Turner, Paige
Brookins, Beth Davis, Cameron Asbell, Robert
Philpot. Board Attorney Sheree Lancaster was
absent.
Expulsion Hearings: The Board heard
information regarding recommendation for
expulsion. After the parentss, student, and school
official identified themselves, were sworn in by
the court reporter and had given testimony, the
following action was taken by the Board.
1) Student 11-17 (student, parent and
grandparents present): Robert Philpot moved
with second by Cameron Asbell to approve the
recommendation of the Superintendent that
the student be expelled for the remainder of
the 2010-2011 school year and the 2011-2012
school year, with the opportunity to enroll at
Hilltop Alternative School and to receive anger
management counseling while enrolled at Hilltop.
Motion carried.
2) Student 11-16 (student and parents present):
Robert Philpot moved with second by Cameron
Asbell to approve the recommendation of the
Superintendent that the student be expelled for
the remainder of the 2010-2011 school year and
the 2011-2012 school year, with the opportunity
to enroll at Hilltop Alternative School pending a
baseline drug test and testing every 30 days while
enrolled at Hilltop. Drug testing will be at the
parent's expense. Motion carried.
Amendment ofAgenda: Board Chair Rick
Turner then amended the Agenda for good cause,
stating that B) 1. Superintendent Request All
Offices Closed Thursday March 17, 2011 would be
added. Beth Davis moved to amend the Agenda
with second by Robert Philpot, motion carried.
Superintendent Request All Offices Closed
Thursday, March 17,2011: Superintendent
Hastings informed the Board that he has closed
all District and
School Offices
S0 on Thursday,
March 17,
0 D D 2011 during
Spring Break
Slai.'j Wceek in an
'.iT ,i aiii -. ". elllort to reduce
lI a s I. NtlSll t, utility costs
--UM.-lM.'..- 'irll- anid to reward
12-mnonth
-ei employees who
727-422-3043 arc required


to work during Spring Break Week. The Board
agreed.
District Report
1. REVISED "Approved Field Trip List":
As requested at the February 8, 2011 Board
Meeting, Jeff Edison presented the current field
trip guidelines for review with the Board. He
then reviewed information from various theme
park websites that featured educational programs.
Next, he asked Bob Clemons to review field trip
costs with the Board. Mr. Edison said that the
recommendation of the Educational Team would
be to let the Principal at each school make the
determination that a field trip was educational
and should be allowed. After discussion,
Cameron Asbell moved that District field trip
guidelines be revised as follows: All field trips
must be educational in nature, and that it will
be the responsibility of the Principal to adhere
to that with pre-trip and post-trip activities
being required from the teacher, and that the
current field trip billing system will stay in place.
Second by Paige Brookins, motion carried. Mr.
Edison asked the Board for direction regarding
allowing field trips on student days and allowing
them to use school buses for transportation.
After discussion, Beth Davis moved to revise the
Field Trip Guidelines to allow students to take
field trips during the school day and that school
buses can be used for transportation and that
the cost of the substitute teacher, when needed,
is added to the cost of the trip, to be paid by the
sponsoring organization that is paying for the trip.
After discussion, Robert Philpot moved to table
the motion until the next regularly scheduled
meeting or longer in order to give more time for
consideration with second by Paige Brookins,
motion carried.
2. Method of Instruction Gradual Release
5 "E's": Patrick Wnek instructed the Board in
Explicit Instruction (Gradual Release Model) and
Inquiry-based Instruction (5 E's) with a power
point presentation.
3. RTTT Project 6 Update: Barb Rivers
reviewed Section 6 of the Race To The Top
Grant with the Board, updating them on how
the l)istrict is complying with and implementing
Section 6.
Request to Advertise for Public Hearing:
Jeff Edison requested that the Board approve
advertisement for public hearing to be held April
5, 2011, ior the purpose of adopting School Board
Policy 3.24 Service Animals. Paige Brookins
moved to approve the request to advertise for
Public learning on April 5, 2011, second by
Cameron Asbell, motion carried.
Final Award RIP Financial Advisor SB1LC
401(k) Plan Board Chairmnan Rick Turner
continued on pawr 15


Bronson Florida









RECREATION

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7,2011 11


Night Prowls a Fun Way to Involve Kids


During spring and summer months, as temperatures
warm up, nocturnal creatures that are usually quite secretive
become more active and easier to locate. This is the perfect
time of year to go out with children for a night prowl.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are working
to reverse the growing trend of our youth spending too much
time inside.
One way you can interest your children in nature is to take
them on a night walk. We often overlook the wildlife that
come out at night, and this is a great way to get your children
excited about conservation.
Insects are particularly active on warm nights. Try looking
for fireflies, moths and crickets. An easy way to look at them
closely without causing injury is to capture the insect in a
clear jar and cover the top with cheesecloth held down by a
large rubber band around the rim. (Remember to release the
insects once you are done). Cicadas are a favorite with kids,
as they are strange looking, make very loud sounds and are
fun to handle.
Owls, such as barred, great horned and eastern screech,
are often quite vocal at night. Learning the calls with your
children and listening for them is a lot of fun, especially if
you learn to call back. Chuck-will's-widows also call actively
on moonlit nights. They sing loudly, mimicking their name.
During the spring, you may also hear our state bird, the
northern mockingbird, singing his heart out to attract a
mate. These birds learn more than 100 songs over the course
of their lifetime.
Bats are also a favorite with children. Watch for bats
feeding on insects near streetlights, along woodland edges or
over water. They are active from sunset to sunrise, although
you are more likely to see them just at dusk when there is still
a little ambient light.
Flying squirrels are also nocturnal. Though they don't
really fly, they can glide up to 150 feet and are adept at
sneaking seeds at bird feeders. They are more difficult to see
than bats, as they require forests with tall trees from which
to glide.
Skunks and armadillos are usually more active during


the night and are fun to watch as they forage for food.
Armadillos can't see very well, so you can sneak up fairly
close if you are quiet.
Frogs and toads fascinate kids, and there are more than 25
native species in Florida. These amphibians sing on spring
and summer nights, especially if there has been a recent rain.
Learning their calls can be challenging, but fun. If there is
a source of water nearby, you're likely to find some. If you
catch any, don't forget to wash your hands well after letting
them go.
Remember to be respectful of the animals you observe.
Always handle insects and amphibians gently and return
them where you found them. Also, white or bright lights at
night can disturb wildlife, so try to minimize the amount
of light you use. The best method is to use a red filter for
your flashlight. Red lights don't bother wildlife as much,
so you are likely to see more animals scurrying around. In
addition, if you want to attract more nocturnal animals to
your backyard, consider installing owl boxes, bat houses or a
shelter for tree frogs.
Learn about the animals yourself, so that when you do
run across one, you'll have some fun facts to pass along to
your kids when they ask questions. Or, look up any animals
you find with your children when you get back inside;
go to MyFWC.com/Wildlife. Cornell University Lab of
Ornithology has a good bird guide, and the University of
Florida's Florida Wildlife Extension lists frogs and toads.
Also, your child might enjoy combing through BugGuide.
net for moths and other insects, using the clickable guide.
Make your nature adventures a regular feature, and your
children or grandchildren will begin looking forward to
getting outdoors. This is quality family time. Remember to
make it fun and a hands-on experience. Soon your children
will be telling you about the critters, and you will have
helped create a future
conservationist. For other ideas
how you can preserve Florida's Lev C iou t
natural heritage and get
children outside, go to DAY HIGH TID
MyFWC.com/Youth. ILOW TIM


EVY COUNTYJ A $25/year in Levy Count
I .J T '
Subscribe! $35/year Outside Florid


Florida Cattle Auctions Weekly Summar

Bartow, FL FriApr 01, 2011 USDA-FL Dept ofAG Market Ne

At the Florida Livestock Auctions; Cattle receipts at 9 markets; Okeechobee, Lakelar
Webster, Ellisville, Arcadia, Wauchula, Ocala, Madison and Lake City, receipts total
6,080 compared to 6,307 last week, and 5,960 last year. According to the Florida Fed
State Livestock Market News Service: Compared to one week ago, slaughter cows ste
2.00 lower, bulls unevenly steady, feeder steers steady to 3.00 higher, heifers steady to
higher, replacement cows steady to 2.00 lower.


This week/Last week/Year ago
Steers over 600 lbs 2% 1% 1%
Steers under 600 lbs 35% 38% 38%
Heifers over 600 lbs 1% 1% 1%
Heifers under 600 lbs 35% 32% 36%
Feeder cows 1% 3% 2%
Slaughter cows 20% 22% 19%
Bulls 6% 3% 3%


Slaughter Cows Breakers 75-80
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range
1200-1590 1429 63.00-84.50
1600-1995 1709 62.00-83.00

Slaughter Cows Boners 80-85
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range
800-1195 1044 64.00-84.00
1060-1160 1125 83.50-87.50
845-1150 996 50.00-69.00
1200-1950 1328 68.00-85.00
1250-1440 1371 85.50-90.00
1225-1465 1323 65.00-71.00

Slaughter Cows Lean 85-90
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range
655-745 711 50.00-71.00
700-745 727 38.00-60.00
760-845 806 55.00-70.00
750-840 793 38.00-61.00
850-1190 982 -51.00-74.00
850-1175 951 39.00-64.00
1270-1445 1351 64.00-75.50


SlaughterBulls Y.G. I
Wt Range Avg Wt
1040-1495 1377
1000-1445 1274
1500-2150 1681
1690-2110 1899
1510-1755 1579


Price Range
79.00-98.00
66.00-87.00
80.00-103.00
92.00-101.00
78.00-87.00


Avg Price
78.71
75.13


Avg Price
74.63
85.38 HD
64.11 LD
77.13
87.37 HD
67.79 LD


Avg Price
60.81
50.40 LD
61.08
50.84 LD
65.93
54.21 LD
71.2


Avg Price
87.93
77.22 LD
92.45
96.07 HD
83.07 LD


Feeder Steers andBullsMedium andLarge 1-2
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price
200-245 221 175.00-212.50 190.05
250-295 270 170.00-200.00 183.97
300-345 320 160.00-187.50 174
350-395 369 155.00-182.50 169.43
400-445 423 145.00-179.00 161.29
450-495 467 138.00-165.00 153.44
500-540 517 132.00-157.50 145.74
550-590 571 124.00-142.50 132.6
600-635 617 118.00-132.50 125.88
650-690 663 110.00-125.00 117.61
715-745 729 110.00-114.00 111.26

Feeder Steers andBulls Small1-2
Wt Range AvgWt Price Range Avg Price
250-295 274 120.00-190.00 158.89
305-340 322 116.00-172.50 144.93
360-390 374 110.00-167.50 139.98
400-440 415 108.00-160.00 136.14

Feeder Steers andBulls Medium andLarge 2-3
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price
200-245 221 122.50-185.00 162.35
250-295 274 198.00-182.50 158.31


270-275
300-345
300-345
350-399
350-399
400-445
400-425
BrahX
450-495
450-480
BrahX
500-540
505-540
BrahX
555-595
660-690
700-740


Feeder Heifers Medium
Wt Range AvgWt
200-245 221
250-298 275
300-345 318
350-399 372
400-445 419
450-495 465
500-545 520
550-590 567
605-645 623
670-690 678
715-740 732
750-775 765


120.00-127.50123.7
135.00-172.50
110.00-135.00117.3
123.00-167.50
110.00-127.50115.4
115.00-160.00
95.00-125.00

115.00-150.00
94.00-115.00


Cedar Key
Th 31 High
Th 7 High
y 7 Low
7 High
7 Low
a F 8 High
8 Low
8 High
Sa 9 Low
S9 High
Ws 9 Low
9 High
id, Su 10 Low
ed 10 High
eral- 10 Low
ady to 10 High
M 11 Low
11 High
11 Low
2 BrahX 11 High
151.68 Tu 12 Low
6 BrahX 12 High
147.14 12 Low
2 BrahX 12 High
141.51 W 13 Low
115.98 13 High
13 Low
1 322 13 High


102.88


114.00-135.00 124.63
91.00-102.00 96.68


103.00-125.00
97.00-115.00
100.00-111.00

and Large 1-2
Price Range
145.00-180.00
140.00-165.00
130.00-157.50
128.00-148.00
124.00-146.00
121.00-142.00
117.50-135.00
104.00-128.00
104.00-127.00
101.00-113.00
96.00-105.00
95.00-99.00


FeederHeifers Small1-2
Wt Range AvgWt Price Range
205-240 225 125.00-145.00
255-280 269 125.00-145.00
300-325 313 115.00-130.00
360-395 378 114.00-135.00
458-475 467 120.00-127.50

Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 2-3
Wt Range AvgWt Price Range
200-245 221 110.00-155.00
250-295 274 107.50-146.00
300-345 322 110.00-140.00


320-325
350-399
360-395
400-445
450-495
500-545
550-580
650-680
740-745


323
371
378
423
468
521
564
668
743


115.74
105.42
106.99


Avg Price
156.7
151.21
145.4
136.83
134
129.36
124.49
118.5
113.14
107.78
99.82
96.75


Avg Price
135.38
135.75
122.8
125.51
123.68


Avg Price
134.57
132.83
127.94


112.50-120.00116.28 BrahX
107.50-135.00 124.29
108.00-120.00113.72 BrahX
102.00-128.00 119.75
110.00-127.50 118.71
102.00-120.00 113.89
101.00-116.00 109.65
90.00-107.00 99.21
90.00-93.00 92


Bred Cows Medium and Large 1-2
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range
905-1095 981 64.00-99.00
1115-1170 1144 70.00-88.00
1320-1430 1375 77.00-78.00


Avg Price
77.94
76.54
77.52


Cow CalfPairs Medium andLarge 1-2
Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price
905-1080 951 600.00-980.00 852.02


SRWMD To Open


ATV Trails in April
Those who enjoy riding all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) will
soon have a place to ride in Lafayette County for a few months
before the start of hunting season. The Suwannee River Water
Management District (District) will allow ATV riding at its
Mallory Swamp tract from April 9 to Sept. 11.
The pr.,pert) provides 38 miles of ATV trails that will be
open to the public during daylight hours only.
"The trails feature plenty of open space arid the opportunity
to ride alongside nature," said Edwin McCook, District land
management specialist.
The District strongly cautions all riders to practice safety
and follow all regulations for the area. Regulations include:
All persons operating an ATV are required to have a daily
special-use authorization (SUA) in their possession while
riding. SUAs are available at th1i ATV p irking irea kio.-k
Rider. 16 icar .ir old 'r \,iriL n r rnut be ac.,'manipdned by a
P.a -,nt or le~il guardian \lhu is required t[., ti. n the STiA
Riders mn -rt rav on dJesinated tratl. an.rd '..be- p..-.red

A complete list of rules and an ATV train rl mp are available
on the Dil.rrit', Maillorv Swamp Iebpage, 'which is available
at www.mysuwanneeriver.com/recreation>Best Recreational
Opportunities.
Other recreational activities at IMallorv S' a.nip incll.de
wilditie viewingo, fishing, hunting, bicl ching, hiking and
-,,-rs.eback riding.
Fo'r n i-re int>.'rrriation crrnact the District at 3 6..3t62.1001
,-,r qil. 2nn.lh Fi I FL toll 'reei.
.\LCLce t.: the N lallor\ S amip tract !nrm I alao:
Travel ~-:ith on SR 51 to CR 360, turn leftt; r.oael 11
milee, s,:'uthe.i-t ,rn CR 3n0; the pavenierit rnds and the road
beico.,ril- di r Crapps T:.'\er R..ad'; conrtin.te -1 rnile. to the
entrance irno Nallor) Swamp.



< AR RI 1 1 M


E
IE


12:35 AM
5:01 AM
10:27 AM
4:10 PM
11:21 PM
5:44 AM
11:00 AM
4:45 PM
12:06 AM
6:38 AM
11:41 AM
5:28 PM
1:01 AM
7:47 AM
12:38 PM
6:25 PM
2:10 AM
9:10 AM
2:01 PM
7:48 PM
3:29 AM
10:24 AM
3:39 PM
9:29 PM
4:43 AM
11:19 AM
5:03 PM
10:58 PM


Suwannee River Entrance


Th 7
7
7
7
F 8
8
8
Sa 9
9
9
9
Su 10
10
10
10
M 11
11
11
11
Tu 12
12
12
12
W 13
13
13
13


High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High


5:07 AM
10:45 AM
4:16 PM
11:39 PM
5:50 AM
11:18 AM
4:51 PM
12:24 AM
6:44 AM
11:59 AM
5:34 PM
1:19 AM
7:53 AM
12:56 PM
6:31 PM
2:28 AM
9:16 AM
2:19 PM
7:54 PM
3:47 AM
10:30 AM
3:57 PM
9:35 PM
5:01 AM
11:25 AM
5:21 PM
11:04 PM


Withlacoochee River Entrance


Th 7
7
7
F 8
8
8
8
Sa 9
9
9
9
Su 10
10
10
10
M 11
11
11
11
Tu 12
12
12
12
W 13
13
13
13


High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High


5:08 AM
11:22 AM
4:17 PM
12:16 AM
5:51 AM
11:55 AM
4:52 PM
1:01 AM
6:45 AM
12:36 PM
5:35 PM
1:56 AM
7:54 AM
1:33 PM
6:32 PM
3:05 AM
9:17 AM
2:56 PM
7:55 PM
4:24 AM
10:31 AM
4:34 PM
9:36 PM
5:38 AM
11:26 AM
5:58 PM
11:05 PM


HEIGHT SUNRISE MOON % MOON
/FEET SUNSET TIME VISIBLE

3.2 7:23 AM Rise 5:32 AM 12
2.9 7:15 AM Rise 9:31 AM 9
1.1 7:54 PM Set 11:48 PM
3.9
-0.3
2.8 7:14 AM Rise 10:20 AM 16
1.3 7:54 PM
3.8
-0.2 7:13 AM Set 12:42 AM 24
2.6 7:55 PM Rise 11:14 AM
1.4
3.7
0 7:12 AM Set 1:32 AM 33
2.5 7:55 PM Rise 12:12 PM
1.6
3.5
0.1 7:11 AM Set 2:20 AM 43
2.5 7:56 PM Rise 1:13 PM
1.7
3.2
0.2 7:09 AM Set 3:04 AM 54
2.6 7:56 PM Rise 2:16 PM
1.6
3.2
0.2 7:08 AM Set 3:45 AM 65
2.9 7:57 PM Rise 3:21 PM
1.2
3.3

2.6 7:15 AM Rise 9:31 AM 9
1 7:54 PM Set 11:49 PM
3.4
-0.3
2.5 7:14 AM Rise 10:20 AM 16
1.2 7:55 PM
3.3
-0.2 7:13 AM Set 12:43 AM 24
2.3 7:55 PM Rise 11:14 AM


7:12 AM Set 1:33 AM
7:56 PM Rise 12:12 PM


7:11 AM Set 2:21 AM
7:56 PM Rise 1:13 PM


7:10 AM Set 3:04 AM
7:57 PM Rise 2:17 PM


7:09 AM Set 3:45 AM
7:58 PM Rise 3:22 PM



7:14 AM Rise 9:30 AM
7:52 PM Set 11:47 PM


7:13 AM
7:53 PM


Rise 10:19 AM


7:12 AM Set 12:40 AM
7:54 PM Rise 11:13 AM


7:11 AM Set 1:31 AM
7:54 PM Rise 12:11 PM


7:10 AM Set 2:18 AM
7:55 PM Rise 1:12 PM


7:09 AM Set 3:02 AM
7:55 PM Rise 2:16 PM


7:07 AM Set 3:43 AM
7:56 PM Rise 3:20 PM









LIFESTYLE

12 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonlinecom The Levy County Journal


How to Build Raised Garden Beds for Vegetables and Flowers


Raised vegetable beds and raised flower gardening beds offer
improved soil, accessibility, and the ability to plant closer together
than non raised bed gardens. Raised vegetable gardening is quickly
becoming the most productive way for suburban or urban gardeners
to use their backyard projects to produce food and cut flowers as
well as live a more sustainable lifestyle. This article will go over the
basics of building raised bed gardening including raised garden bed
supplies, considerations for raised-bed frame placement and soil
improvement.
Things you'll need:
Building materials for sides and ends;
Building materials to support the corners;
Soaker hose;
garden soil, peat moss, sand and/or compost.
1. Choose a location for the raised vegetable bed garden. When
growing vegetables in a raised-bed they should receive at least 6
hours of sunlight a day. Forced to choose between early morning
and evening sun, place the raised-bed garden where it will receive
early morning sun to start the growing process earlier each morning
stimulating plant productivity. Locate the raised-bed garden where
it is convenient to the kitchen if growing vegetables and convenient
to a water source for watering.
2. Repurpose materials you already have to build the raised-bed
gardens, or purchase raised-bed frames. Purchase raised-bed frames
at the local garden center or online. Ask or search for supplies by
using the terms; wooden raised beds, garden boxes, planter boxes,
raised-bed kits etc.
Gardens raised as little as 6 inches will provide the opportunity


to improve the soil, ease the gardening chores, and allow more
densely planted gardens.
Decide the size of the garden that is needed. Tomatoes, peppers
and eggplant will need one-foot square. Beans, lettuce and herbs
can be planted across and entire foot instead of planting in rows.
Squash and zucchini will need to spill over the edge or provided
three square feet per plant.
Raised-bed gardens should be long and thin so that the soil is
never stepped on. The vegetables or flowers are all harvested from
the sides and should be within arms reach.
Based on all of the above considerations, sketch out an optimal
size for your raised-bed garden or gardens. Buy or gather materials
to create the sides and secure the corners. If there will be more than
one garden, create a walk way between the raised-bed gardens.
Freshly purchased pressure treated wood should never be used
for vegetable gardens because of the risk of chemicals leaching
into the soil. For raised vegetable gardens made of wood, consider
buying raised garden bed corners which are usually metal and made
to align two regular wood boards. The corners will last for decades
while the wood boards will need to be changed every few years as
they are exposed to water and soil and begin to rot.
If repurposing existing resources such as changing a backyard
swingset into a garden when the children have grown, consider
applying a layer of paint to the aged pressure-treated wood.
3. Improve the soil so that it can sustain the dense planting of a
raised-bed garden. There are many things the gardener can do to
modify the soil to provide perfect conditions for growing vegetables
or growing flowers. Decide if you will be using your raised-plant


beds for organic vegetable gardening, if so, buy only soil, mulches
and fertilizers that are labeled as organic products.
The first few years will require attention to improve the soil. This
can be done inexpensively with homemade compost or it can be
done instantly by purchasing prepared soil mixes and additives.
If improving the soil with homemade compost, use a mulching
lawnmower with a bag attachment to capture all grass clippings
during summer and mulched leaves during the autumn. Set up a
compost pile or just dig deep holes in the raised garden beds and
bury the grass and leaf clippings for the worms to compost. Make
sure the uncomposted materials are deep enough that they will
not compete for nitrogen with the roots of plants while they are
decomposing. Turn over the soil with composted materials every
autumn and every spring. Within a year the soil will be greatly
improved, within three years it will be rich and dark. An indicator
of soil health is the number and size of worms, pay close attention
to the worm population.
Purchasing garden soil for the raised garden beds, mark where
the garden bed frames will be set. Turn up the existing soil with
a shovel or rototiller, add the purchased garden soil, peat moss,
compost, sand and other additives. Continue to turn this over until
all elements are equally mixed.
4. Watering a raised-bed garden is important, the smaller volume
of soil will dry out quickly. Using a soaker hose is an efficient use of
water because the water is delivered directly to the soil in the garden
beds. Water first thing in the morning once a week if the has been
no rain. Encourage deep root growth by watering with an inch of
water weekly.


How to Use a Rain Barrel System
Rain barrels collect rain water nd have blocks placed side by side. You can use other
become a popular way for homeowners to get materials if desired, but the rain barrel must
water for their landscapes and gardens. The be elevated in order for the water to drain
rain barrel system consists of a large barrel, a out of it properly.
tube that is connected to the home's downspout 4. Install a fine mesh screen, such as window
or gutter, and a garden hose that connects to screen, over the top of the rain barrel. This
a faucet at the bottom of the barrel. When it mesh screen serves to prevent leaves from
rains, the water runs off of the roof and into clogging up the barrel and to prevent access
the barrel, where it remains until needed. Rain to mosquitoes which will lay eggs in the
barrel systems are also an environmentally water. To install it, remove the top lid from
friendly way to conserve water usage. the rain barrel, place the wire mesh over the
Things you'll need: top of the barrel and then place the top back
Flexible gutter tubing; onto the barrel.
Cinder blocks; 5. Wait until there has been rainfall and attach
Wire mesh; a garden hose to the faucet located near the
Garden hose. bottom of the rain barrel. Stretch the other
1. Make sure the rain barrel is properly attached end of the hose to the location that you
to the downspout of the home. Insert flexible want to water and then turn the handle of
rubber gutter tubing to the downspout and the faucet on the barrel counterclockwise
insert the other end three to four inches to open the flow of water. Turn the handle
into the top opening of the rain barrel. The clockwise to stop the flow of water, when
length of the tubing will vary based on how you are done.
far away from the downspout the rain barrel 6. Drain the barrel of water after each rain
is located. during winter months (in moderate climates
2. Place the rain barrel in a location that is out with periodic freezes The barrel should
of direct sunlight. Sunlight will cause algae never be more than 75 percent full to allow
to grow inside the tank. for expansion as the water freezes.
3. Place the rain barrel on top of two cinder -By KimberlyJohnson




Hassle-Free Suppers to Savor


When there's a chill in the air, cozy up to the table with
dishes that feed the soul as well as the stomach. This melt-
in-your-mouth Slow Cooker Pot Roast with Onions is a
complete dinner with very little fuss. A bowl of Broccoli,


The Easiest Vegetables to

Grow in a Backyard in Florida


With lubtrupi..l, v.arn, r,urn\
teinperatures, Fl.rmida is a prime pllacc tor
vegetablee garden rang \ear-ri.'und. Since imost
cvgetabl. can there t hhre i theSunlune State,
narrow your choices b\ selecting the easiest
vegetables to grow tlhr.-giiih spring, summer,
fall and winter. C('onider \,iir specific
Florida region when planting vegetables, as
weather varies from the northern panhandle
to the southern tip.
Spring
From February to May, cool-weather
crops will grow in most areas of Florida,
specifically the south. The easiest crops
to grow in spring in the Sunshine State
are lettuce, turnips, potatoes, tomatoes,
carrots, collards, okra, beets, sweet corn,
squash, green tea, zucchini and cucumbers.
Watering needs for the vegetables will vary
depending on the variety, but spring is drier
than Florida's rainy summers, so you may
need to water more to keep the plant soil
moist.
Summer
Summer is probably the best season
to grow vegetables in northern Florida,
particularly because May launches the state's


dinner in no time. And the recipe for Quick and Healthy
Potato Casserole-serves up a creamy, comforting side dish
from the microwave in minutes.
Onions and Wisconsin potatoes add a savory quality to


r.mnv -ej. 'n 'Veieriabl_.. that Ir.i c humidity,
uch: a.s pLppcrs, herbs and rrrnamine letruc.e
are the easiest to grow. In southern Florida,
chouUe .Lcgetables that also prefer heat From
Mjva t,: September, eas; vegetables to gr,--w
include qi.uah. onion, pumpkin, eggplant.
c:len, br.,ccoli and biussel sprouts.
\\Vaterirg needC depend on the vegetable
variety butt i i a good idea to plant
vegetable:; that prefer a- rainy emnironrment.
since rite sunminmr seaT'-in has the mn:'t rain
Fall and Winter
With ioDor temperatures and not much
rain, the fall may be th casieut time to
grow vegetables in a Florida backyard. You
may need to water more during fall and
winter, however, as these seasons are drier
than spring and summer. From October to
November, plant beans, Swiss chard, beets,
kale, leeks, parsnips, cauliflower, garlic and
endive. In December, you can plant large
onions, potatoes, English peas, cabbage,
broccoli, herbs and carrots. Consider your.
specific region, since northern freezing
temperatures in months like December and
January can kill many vegetables.
-By Lauren Wise


sources of potassium, fiber and vitamin C, and cost only
pennies a serving.
To find more recipes your family will savor, visit www.
wisconsinpotatoes.com and www.onions-usa.org.


Bacon and Cheddar Chowder makes a hearty lunch or simple these three recipes. Best of all, onions and potatoes are good


Quick & Healthy Potato Casserole
Serves 6
1 1/4 pounds Wisconsin Yukon Gold
potatoes, very thinly sliced
1 cup quartered and thinly sliced onion
1 cup shredded reduced-fat sharp cheddar
cheese
1/2 teaspoon Italian herb seasoning
1/2 cup stock or reduced-sodium broth
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
Spray an 8-inch microwave-safe baking
dish with nonstick cooking spray. Place 1/3
of the potatoes and 1/2 of the onions on
bottom of dish and sprinkle with 1/3 of the
cheese and 1/2 of the herbs. Repeat layers,
then top with the last 1/3 of the potatoes,
layering potatoes so that there is a solid
layer of potatoes with no gaps; sprinkle with
remaining cheese.
Stir together stock, Dijon and garlic salt
and pour over potatoes. Cover with plastic
wrap and microwave on HIGH for 20
minutes. Use oven mitts to remove dish from
microwave; carefully remove cover from dish
(due to steam build-up) and serve.
Optional: Preheat oven to 400F and place
casserole in oven for 5 to 10 minutes or until
casserole is golden brown before serving.
Slow Cooker Pot Roast with Onions
Serves 4 to 6
1 (2 1/2-pound) boneless beef sirloin tip or
chuck roast
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 1/2 pounds yellow onions, trimmed and cut
into 1/2-inch slices
1 pound Wisconsin red potatoes, trimmed
and halved
1/2 pound carrots, trimmed, peeled and cut
into 2 to 3-inch pieces
2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, stripped
from stems
1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
(stems removed)
2 cups tomato juice
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1/2 cup red wine (or additional beef broth)
2 tablespoons flour
Pepper and salt to taste (optional)
1 Trim fit from beef roast. Place roast in


bottom of 5 to 6-quart slow cooker. Spread
horseradish over surface of meat. Top and
surround roast with onions, potatoes, and
carrots. Sprinkle with thyme and rosemary
and pour in tomato juice and beef broth.
Cover and cook on high setting for 6 to 8
hours or until beef is fall apart tender.
Mix wine (or beef broth) with flour and
pour mixture around meat in slow cooker.
Gently stir flour mixture into existing sauce
without disturbing the meat. Replace cover
and cook on high setting for 15 minutes or
until thickened. Before serving, season with
pepper and salt to taste and garnish with
sprigs of rosemary.
Broccoli, Bacon and Cheddar
Chowder
Serves 6
8 slices bacon, chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
lonion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt and Dash cayenne pepper
3 cups milk
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
12 ounces Wisconsin red skinned potatoes,
cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce, if desired
2 10-ounce boxes frozen chopped broccoli,
thawed
Heat large pot over medium heat.
Add bacon and cook until crispy, about 5
minutes. Remove bacon with slotted spoon
and transfer to paper towel lined plate and
reserve. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons fat.
Add butter and onion and cook for 6 minutes
or until softened. Add flour and cook,
stirring for another 2 minutes or until foamy.
Whisk in salt, cayenne pepper, milk and
chicken stock and cook until it becomes
smooth and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add
potatoes and cook for 10 to 15 minutes or
until potatoes are tender.
In bowl, toss cheddar with flour to coat.
Stir in cheese, a handful at a time,
whisking after each addition until smooth.
Add in hot pepper sauce if using. Add
thawed broccoli and stir to heat. Do not boil.


Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.
Ladle soup into heated bowls and garnish
with reserved bacon.
Storage Tips
Onions and potatoes pair well together
in lots of recipes. They also like similar
storage conditions, but can spoil if stored in
proximity to each other. Follow these quick
tips for the best possible shelf-life.
-Store potatoes and onions separately.
Store onions in cool, dry, well-ventilated
places, optimally, at a temperature between
450F and 550F, but not in the refrigerator.
Potatoes require similar storage conditions,


but they also need darkness and should kept
at 50oF or less to avoid sprouting.
Potatoes can be stored in perforated
plastic bags or paper bags to extend their
shelf-life.
Onions should NOT be stored in plastic
bags. Lack of air movement reduces
storage life.
Don't wash potatoes or onions (or any
produce for that matter) before storing.
Dampness will promote early spoilage.
Chopped or sliced onions can be stored
in a sealed container in your refrigerator
for up to 7 days.


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For this iweck's :1 ordi Searrtch ansi ers, visit oiur IVr si/ ii t wuvi./riv joiuri lonllin'. co
Click on th/ Brain T'liscr table to/i fin the link to our ianosn, rs.









CLASSIFEDS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 13



LEVY U ^^4 f^NAL fl a sIf S I.l C d S

100 Miscellaneous 200 Employment 330 Commercial Property for 435 Commercial Property for 526 Furniture 600 Recreation
110 Lost 6 Found 210 Help Wanted Full Time Rent Sale 530 Guns 605 Boat & Marine
115 Notices 240 Help Wanted Part Time 340 Rooms for Rent 440 Vacant Land for Sale 535 Pets & Animals 610 Campers, RVs 8 Traiers
125 Services 245 Work Wanted 345 Wanted to Rent 445 Wanted to Buy 540 LveStock 615 Motorcycles & ATVs
130 Free 300 Rentals 400 Real Estate 500 For Sale 545 Good Things to Eat 700 Farm
135 Volunteer Opportunity' 305 Apartments for Rent 405 Condos Apartments for 505 Antiques 550 Farm Products 705 Farm Equipment
140 Announcements 310 Houses for Renl Sale 510 Auctions 555 Automobiles 900 Legal Notices
145 Entertainment 315 Mobile Homes for Rent 410 Houses for Sale 515 Yard Sale 556 Trucks
150 Musical Instruments 320 RV Rental Lots 415 Mobile Homes for Sale 520 Building Materials 560 Estate Sale
155 Schools & Instruction 325 Vacation Rentals 525 Appliances 570 Swap Barter or Trade DEADUNE: FRIDAY, NOON


110 LOST


REWARD LOST
CHIHUAHUA Audrey is a
9-year-old, brown/tan female
Chihuahua lost on Mar. 19.
Last seen near 4448 NE 142
Ave behind the BP station
between Bronson and
Williston. NOT an outside
dog. Please call Jerad at
352-281-4039 or email
jerads3d@embarqmail.com
4/21Jp

115 NOTICES
ADVERTISER NOTICE -
The Levy County Journal
does not endorse, promote
or encourage the purchase
or sale of any product or
service advertised in this
newspaper. Advertisements
are the sole responsibility
of the advertiser. The Levy
County Journal hereby
disclaims all liability for any
damage suffered as the
result of any advertisement
in this newspaper. The Levy
County Journal has the sole
authority to edit and locate
any classified advertisement
as deemed appropriate.
The Levy County Journal
reserves the right to refuse
any advertising.

HAPPY TAILS SOCIAL
CLUB Animal and Pet
Rescue is now located in
the Chiefland Flea Market,
booth Red 27. Stop by and
chat for a bit. 352-493-0252.
tfnf

FREE PREGNANCY TESTS
- Confidential Harmony
Pregnancy & Resource
Center. Open Mon.,Tues.,
Thurs. 11AM- 6PM Call
(352) 493-7773 Harmony
pregnancy center PO Box
2557 Chiefland,FL. Tfn

AL-ANON MEETINGS IN
WILLISTON Join us
for AI-Anon meetings on
Monday evenings at 7 p.m.
at the Midway Plaza located
at 13451 NE Highway 27 Alt.
in Williston. 1-800-851-1795.
ftfn

NARCONON a nonprofit
public benefit organization
that specializes in helping
people with drug or alcohol
addictions assessments
and more than 11,000
local referrals. Call (800)
556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net

AA MEETING FOR
INFORMATION CALL
NORTH CENTRAL Florida
Intergroup Office at (352)
372-8091 which is also a 24-
hour local hotline number.

ADDICTION RECOVERY
MEETING Do you
struggle with a Drug or
Alcohol addiction? Come to
our meeting every Thursday
night at Mt. Nebo Baptist
Church 7:00 PM Hwy. 340
in Bell, west of 129. Call 386-
935-2300 or go to www.
grace-ministry.net for more
info. Tfnf


125 SERVICES


JOYNER'S TREE
SERVICE: Licensed and
insured. Free estimates.
(352) 542-7981 or (352) 578-
5029. tfnpA

SHEDS, SHEDS, SHEDS!
- We move 'em. Best price
in town. 352-493-0345. Joe's
Rollback Service. Credit
cards accepted. TfnApJftfn

A. D.ANDREWS NURSERY,
CHIEFLAND, FLORIDA -
in business since 1982 in
the wholesale nursery trade
is now selling and installing
shade trees locally. Farms,
ranches, homesites, etc.
Call our sales office at 352-
493-2496 for a quote. We
install within a 60-mile
radius of Chiefland, Florida.
For availability and photos,
visit our website at www.
adandrewsnsy.com. TfnAJ

BROUT'S CUSTOM
SERVICE Fence
Installation or Repair.
Quality Work at reasonable
prices All types. Please
call: 352-949-1444
7/20/2011AbJf7/21/2011

NEED A FENCE OF ANY
KIND? Call Danny, any
time. 352-463-1832 or 352-
493-5345 tfnApJftfn

IS YOU'RE A/C UNIT
READY FOR SUMMER?
Call Bud the A/C Man for
a $50 Spring Inspection.
Licensed and Insured. Call
(352) 213-5216. 4/7Jp

HANDYMAN-
25 years experience. All
types of carpentry, roof
repair, pressure washing,
painting interior/exterior.
10% discount for senior
citizens. 352-949-9330.
4/28Jp

TAX-TIME: Let me help
with your taxes. 23 years
experience. Reasonable
Rates. Al @ (352) 328-8875.
4/14Ap

GUNS AND CONCEALED
WEAPONS PERMITS:
Call (352) 493-4209 for
information. 3/10Jp

LICENSED MASSAGE
THERAPIST Nikki Rae
Sun, 30 years experience.
"Have table will travel." FL
License# MA3677. 352-528-
0405. 4/7Jp

HANDYMAN: 20 years
experience. No job too big
or small. Aluminum and
carpentry licenses: Levy-
Gilchrist-Dixie. Johnny
Martin, Sr. 535-7704 or 493-
7490 4/21Jp

130 FREE
FREE MEALS ON WHEELS
FOR PETS: Hosted by
Happy Tails Social Club. Call
for details (352) 493-0252
ftfn

135 VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
FLORIDA'S LONG-TERM
CARE OMBUDSMAN
PROGRAM needs
volunteers to join its corps
of dedicated advocates who
protect the rights of elders
residing in nursing homes,
assisted living facilities and
adult family care homes. The


Last Week's Crossword
I" I-I I F, ] I ,

s i i I
LI P:!iiii11 .l
T,7--w

C E




r [. 1


135 VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
program is comprised of 17
local, councils throughout
the state, and each council
is seeking additional
volunteers to identify,
investigate and resolve
residents' concerns. All
interested individuals who
care about protecting the
health, safety, welfare and
rights of long-term care
facility residents who often
have no one else to advocate
for them are encouraged to
call toll-free (888) 831-0404
or visit the ombudsman.
myflorida.com. tfn
155 SCHOOLS AND
INSTRUCTION
READY FOR A
CHANGE?
Be A CNA!
No Diploma or GED
Required if age 18.
Train & Test
in a professional
environment
Quest Training
352-493-7330
4/28Jb
210 HELP WANTED
START YOUR OWN AVON
BUSINESS TODAY! Just
$10. No Inventory needed.
No Minimum orders. Call
Pam at 352-538-1845.
tfnApJf

DRIVERS: DEDICATED
RUNS!
Top Pay, Weekly
Home-Time
for Solo's and Teams
Consistent Freight with
Werner Enterprises
1-888-567-4862
4/7Jp
300 RENTALS

CHEAPER STORAGE
10x15 ONLY $89/mo
All Climate Controlled
Many sizes to choose
from 352-528-0778
Willistonstorage.com
507 SE 6th St
tfnAbJftfn

310 HOUSES


ABSOLUTE AUCTION!
3/2 Waterfront
May 7 Inglis
352-726-7533
Ed Messer Auctions
messerauctions.com
5/5Jp
440 VACANT LAND
AND LOTS









THE PERFECT RETREAT:
40 acres off 326 in Gulf
Hammock, FL. Three
buildable lots of 5+ acres
each; remaining acreage
is all contiguous and has a
lime rock bed walking trail.
Well on site. Five minutes to
Waccasassa Fishing Club.
Call 352-748-1182 or email
reggie@oxfordland.com
4/14Jp


440 VACANT LAND
AND LOTS
LAND FOR SALE: 1 % to 2
1/2 acre parcels available; low
down payment, easy terms.
352-472-4977 4/28Jp

WILLISTON: 80x140 LOT.
Mobile home ready with light
pole, water pump, and septic
tank. $200/down. $15,000.
Al @ 352-328-8875. 4/14Jp

1-1/4 ACRE BRONSON/
WILLISTON: Beautifully
wooded parcel! Nice
Neighborhood. Owner
Financing! NO DOWN
PAYMENT! Total $14,900.00
Only $153/mo. www.Land-
Owner-Financing.com or
call 352-215-1018. 5/26Jp

4 ACRES WILLISTON:
Secluded country setting.
Gorgeous Oaks with cleared
homesite. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN PAYMENT! Total
$44,900.00 Only $462/
mo. www.Land-Owner-
Financing.com or call 352-
215-1018. 5/26Jp

1 ACRE MORRISTON:
WELL, SEPTIC & POWER
ALREADY INSTALLED!!
Cleared homesite! Nice
Neighborhood. Owner
Financing! No Down
Payment! $29,900.00. Only
307.56 / mo www.Land-
Owner-Financing.com or
call 352-215-1018. 5/26Jp

ACRES WILLISTON:. 6671
NE 131 Ave. WELL SEPTIC
& POWER! Gorgeous Oak
Shaded Homesite! Fenced!
Perfect for Horses! Owner
Financing! NO DOWN
PAYMENT! $74,900.00
Only $657.30/mo www.
Land-Owner-Financing.
com or call 352-215-1018.
5/26Jp

2/3 ACRE BRONSON:
Beautifully wooded parcel!
Just 1 blk off HWY 27. Owner
Financing! NO DOWN
PAYMENT! Only $132/mo.
Total $12,900.00. www.
Land-Owner-Financing.com
or call 352-215-1018. 5/26Jp


500 FOR SALE
A.D.ANDREWS NURSERY,
CHIEFLAND, FLORIDA
- in business since 1982
in the wholesale nursery
trade is now selling and
installing shade trees locally.
Farms, ranches, home sites,
etc. Call our sales office at
352-493-2496 for a quote.
We install within a 60-mile
radius of Chiefland, Florida.
For availability and photos,


500 FOR SALE


visit our website at www.
adandrewsnsy.com. tfnAJ

LUMBER FOR SALE -
Pine, cherry and cypress.
Call Sammy at (352) 949-
3222. ptfn

DIXIE MONUMENTS:
Serving North Central Fla.
for over a decade. Featuring
beautiful bronze, marble &
granite monuments in many
colors and styles. Choose
from 100s of designs or
let us custom design any
idea you may have! We
have the latest technology
in laser etchings and can
also inscribe final dates and
lettering at the cemetery.
Located at 1471 NE 512 Ave
(behind McCrab church)
Hwy 349 7 miles north of
Old Town. Open Tues-Fri
8-4 & Sat. 8-12 or call for
after hour's appt. Toll Free
1-877-542-3432 6/2/11Jb

BARRELS FOR SALE:
Metal burn barrels, $10;
plastic barrels, $12; open-top
plastic barrels, $15; 5-gallon
buckets, $1.50. Delivery
available. 352-486-5860.
6/2/11Jb


515 YARD SALE


HUGE YARD SALE at
Creekside Christian School,
Friday and Saturday from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 171 SW 3rd
Street in Otter Creek. See
you there! 4/7Jp
535 PETS FOR SALE
HAIRLESS CHINESE-
CRESTED PUPPIES: 4 with
hair (powder puff), 3 without
hair. Health Certificates.
$600/each. 352-528-0546
ask for Bob or Angie. 4/14Jp
550 FARM
PRODUCTS
LOOK NEW HAY FOR
SALE: Large rolls, highly
fertilized, net-wrapped,
weed free! Coastal
Bermuda-$45; Pensacola
Bahia-$35. Call (352) 949-
0222. tfnAbJf
615 MOTORCYCLES
SUZUKI 2004 1300 GSXR
HAYABUSA, chrome
wheels, chrome Yoshimura
4N1 header, 11K miles,
plum/black, custom extras,
great tires, sharp bike, fast.
$5400 OBO. Trades? Also,
2008 ADLY Thunderbike
moped, pearl white/green,
800 miles, almost new,
$995 OBO. 352-486-0212
4/21Jp


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
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4 WEEKS FOR ONLY $20!

It's Our Journal 20/20 Special:
Your Ad of 20 Words or Less for 4 Consecutive
Weeks, No Changes. $20,
100 Each Additional Word.
Email classifieds@levyjournal.com






STORAGE a
(Cars,Trailers& &24/7
Boats) Access




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rooms, front porch, ready JUNK CARS BOUGHT:
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EGALS

14 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


EA


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2010-DR-
1155
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
DAWN GROVE,
Petitioner,
and
RUSSELL GROVE,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO:
RUSSELL GROVE
816 Tennessee Avenue
Etowah, TN 37331
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed
against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any,
to it on DAWN GROVE, c/o
Lorraine H. Sherman, Esq.,
P.O. Box 268, LaCrosse, FL
32658 on or before April 28th,
2011, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at
Levy County Clerk of Court,
355 South Court Street,
Bronson, FL 32621 before
service on Petitioner or im-
mediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office
notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's of-
fice.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules
of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of plead-
ings.
Dated: March 16, 2011.
(Court Seal)
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Lindsey Polk /s/
Deputy Clerk
Pub.: Mar. 24, 31, Apr. 7,
14, 2011.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 38-2010-CA-
000019
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TOBY BASS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure
Sale dated March 18, 2011
and entered in Case NO.
38-2010-CA-000019 of the
Circuit Court of the EIGHTH
Judicial Circuit in and for
LEVY County, Florida where-
in WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and TOBY
BASS; JOLENE BASS A/K/A
JOLENE CALLAWAY; are
the Defendants, The Clerk of
the Court will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash
at MAIN LOBBY OF THE
LEVY COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the
2nd day of May, 2011, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4
OF SECTION 35, TOWN-
SHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE
14 EAST, LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH A MOBILE HOME
LOCATED THEREON


AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE
THERETO VIN #'S FL-
HML3B155727275A & FL-
HML3B155727275B.
A/K/A 6751 NW 45TH
STREET, CHIEFLAND,
FL 32626


Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date
of the Lis Pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
March 23, 2011.
Danny J. Shipp
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Gwen McElroy /s/
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
Americans with Disabilities
Act If you are a person with
a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact: Ms. Jan
Phillips, Human Resources
Manager Alachua County
Family/Civil Courthouse, 201
E. University Avenue, Room
410, Gainesville, FL 32601
Phone: 352-337-6237/Fax:
352-374-5238.
Pub.: Mar. 31, Apr. 7, 2011.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 38-2011 CP
0045
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK S. MICHAEL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of JACK S. MI-
CHAEL, deceased, whose
date of death was February
19, 2011, File Number 38-
2011-CP-0045, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Levy
County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which
is Levy County Courthouse,
355 Court Street, Bronson,
FL 32626. The name and
address of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice has
been served must file their
claims with the court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the de-
cedent and persons having
claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTAND-
ING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
YEARS OF MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this no-
tice is March 31, 2011.
Personal Representative:
DONALD LAWRENCE
Post Office Box 2799
Chiefland, FL 32644
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
R. LUTHER BEAUCHAMP
Florida Bar No. 110207
LAW OFFICE OF
R. LUTHER BEAUCHAMP
Attorney for Personal
Representative
19 NE Third Street
Post Office Box 10
Chiefland, FL 32644
Telephone: 352/493-2525
Pub.: March 31, April 7,
2011.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Dona Potter d/b/a Bronson
Self Storage, pursuant to
the provisions of the Florida
Self Storage Facility Act (Fla.


Stat.83.801 et. sec.) hereby
gives notice of sale under
said act to wit:
On April 30, 2011 at Bron-
son Self Storage, 839 E.
Hathaway Ave., Bronson,
FL 32621 Dona Potter or her


agent will conduct an open
auction sale at 9:00 a.m. by
(auction, sealed bid or yard
sale) to the highest bidder.
Bids to begin at 9:00 a.m.
when auctioning will start for
contents of the bay or bays,
rented by the following per-
son/persons:
Elizabeth Fish
P O Box 539
Bronson, FL 32621
Shawn Richev
247 NE 74 Street
Old Town, FL 32680
Cara Lambert
4802 SW 46 Street
Gainesville, FL 32608
Christophere Burns
15650 NW Hwy. 19
Chiefland, FL 32626
William Linehan
2950 NE 150 Avenue
Williston, FL 32696
Darrell Hamilton
5256 Walmsley Road
Decatur, IL 62521
Consists of household, per-
sonal items, miscellaneous
merchandise, stored at
Bronson Self Storage, 839
E. Hathaway Ave., Bronson,
FL 32621. Sale is being held
to satisfy a statutory lien.
Low bids may not be ac-
cepted.
Dated: April 4, 2011.
Bronson Self Storage
Dona Potter
PO Box 1705
Bronson, FL 32621
Phone: (352) 486-2121
Sale Date: April 30, 2011
Pub.: April 7, 2011 &April
14, 2011

NOTICE OF INTENT
TO APPLY
The Town of Otter Creek is
hereby issuing a notice of in-
tent to apply for a Water and
Waste Loan/Grant from the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture, Rural Utilities Service,
in the Levy County Journal
which has general circula-
tion in the Otter Creek/ Levy
County area.
Pub.: Apr. 7, 14, 2011.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 38-2011-CA-
00081
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
SUMMER TILLIS; CUR-
TIS PERRY, II; UNKNOWN
HEIRS of Debra Courtney
Morris f/k/a Debra L. King
f/k/a Debra Lee Courtney
Perry, deceased; CAPITAL
ONE BANK, a corporation;
and ATLANTIC CREDIT &
FINANCE, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
DEBRA COURTNEY MOR-
RIS f/kla DEBRA L. KING
f/k/a DEBRA LEE COURT-
NEY PERRY, Deceased
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to recover dam-
ages under a note and fore-
close a mortgage on the
following property in Levy
County, Florida:
Parcel No. 4 of an unre-
corded plat of Lot 5, Block
B, of MANATEE FARMS
ESTATES, UNIT NO. 1,
being more particularly
described as follows:
For a Point of Reference,
begin at the Northwest
corner of Lot 5, Block B,
MANATEE FARMS ES-
TATES, UNIT NO. 1, as of
plat in the Public Records
of Levy County, Florida,
and run S.89059'57"E. a
distance of 383.12 feet
to establish the POINT
OF BEGINNING; from
said point of beginning,
continue S.8959'57"E. a
distance of 254.00 feet,
run thence S.0039'33"E.
a distance of 171.49 feet,
run thence N.89059'57"W.
a distance of 254.00 feet,
run thence N.0039'33"W.
a distance of 171.49 feet
to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
WITH right of ingress and
egress from Bay Street
(County Road) over 40


foot easement.
has been filed against you,
Summer Tillis, Curtis Perry,
II, Capital One Bank and
Atlantic Credit & Finance,
Inc., and you are required
to serve a copy of your writ-


ten defenses, if any, to it on
Plaintiff's attorney, E. Dylan
Rivers, whose address is
Ausley & McMullen, Post Of-
fice Box 391, Tallahassee,
Florida 32302, on or before
May 13, 2011, and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before ser-
vice on Plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
DATED on April 1, 2011.
DANNY J. SHIPP
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: Gwen McElroy Is/
Deputy Clerk
Pub.: April 7, 14, 2011.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
UCN:38-2010-CA-1361
Instrument # 549233
OR BK 1223 Pages 850-3pg(s)
RECORDED 02/08/2011 at
11:18AM
Danny J. Shipp, Levy County
Clerk, Florida
DEPUTY CLERK MB
HARRY DOUGHERTY, an
individual,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MIKE PAVLIN, an individual
and BEULAH PAVLIN, an
individual,
Defendants.
NOTICE FOR
FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned Danny J.
Shipp, Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Levy County, Flor-
ida will on April 25, 2011 at
eleven o'clock, a.m. (11:00
a.m.) in the Lobby of the
Levy County Courthouse at
355 S. Court St., Bronson,
Florida offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the
highest bidder for cash, the
following described prop-
erty situated in Levy County,
Florida, to-wit:
Part of the Northwest 1/4
of Section 28, Township 13
South, Range 18 East, Levy
County Florida, more partic-
ularly described as follows:
Commence at the South-
west corner of the said
Northwest 1/4 of Section
28, thence N 89057'25" E
along a South line thereof,
420.21 feet to the Point of
Beginning (POB); thence
continue N 89057'25" E a
distance of 313.41 feet to
the Westerly Right of Way
(ROW) line of State Road
121; thence N 19029'09"
E along said ROW line,
259.95 feet; thence S
89057'25" W a distance
of 408.12 feet; thence S
0152'19" E along the East
line of the West 420.00
feet of the said Northwest
1/4 of the Section 28, a
distance of 245.12 feet to
the POB.
pursuant to the Final Sum-
mary Judgment of Foreclo-
sure entered in the above
referenced case.
IF YOU ARE A PER-
SON CLAIMING A RIGHT
TO FUNDS REMAINING
AFTER THE SALE, YOU
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK NO LATER
THAN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO
FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL
NOT BE ENTITLED. TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY
THE OWNER OF RECORD
AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
WITNESS my hand and
official seal of said Court,
this 7th day of February,
2011.
(COURT SEAL)
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
By: Lindsey Polk Is/
As Deputy Clerk
Pub.: April 7, 14, 2011.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC
MEETING OF THE NORTH
FLORIDA BROADBAND
AUTHORITY OPERATIONS


COMMITTEE
The North Florida Broad-
band Authority ("NFBA") an-
nounces a meeting of the
NFBA Operations Commit-
tee that all interested per-
sons are invited to attend.


The NFBA is a legal en-
tity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions
of Section 163.01, Florida
Statutes, and an Interlocal
Agreement among Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jeffer-
son, Lafayette, Levy, Madi-
son, Putnam, Suwannee,
Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities
of Cedar Key, Cross City,
Lake City, Live Oak, Monti-
cello, Perry, White Springs
and Worthington Springs,
Florida.
The NFBA's Operations
Committee meetings will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on the
first Thursday of each month
February 3, 2011; March 3,
2011, April 7, 2011; May 5,
2011; June 2, 2011; July 7,
2011; August 4, 2011; Sep-
tember 1, 2011; October 6,
2011; November 3, 2011;
December 1, 2011; at the
Cabot Lodge Board Room,
3726 SW 40th Boulevard,
Gainesville, FL 32608. The
NFBA's Operational Com-
mittee meeting will be to
conduct general business of
the committee.
If a person decides to ap-
peal any decision made by
the NFBA with respect to
any matter considered at
the meeting, such person
will need a record of the
proceedings and may need
to ensure that a verbatim
record is made, including
the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with
the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act, persons needing
special accommodation or
an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding or have
any questions please con-
tact Faith Doyle, Clerk to the
NFBA Board at (877) 552-
3482 or (407) 629-6900 at
least one (1) business day
prior to the date of the meet-
ing.
Pub.: Apr. 7, 2011.
----------
NOTICE OF WORKSHOP
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) announces the
following workshop to which
all interested persons are in-
vited:


Lost River Preserve Dedica-
tion event: Governing and
Basin Board members may
attend to participate in a
planting, tour the preserve
and learn about the habitat
restoration project.
DATE/TIME: Saturday, April
16, 2011; 8:30 a.m.
PLACE: Cockroach Bay
Preserve, 1123 Canal Street,
Ruskin FL 33570
A copy of the agenda may
be obtained by contacting:
Marti.McGuire@noaa.gov
NOAA Restoration Center at
(727)551-5785.
For more information,
you may contact: Lou.Ka-
vouras@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad
Order EXE0130).
Anyone requiring reason-
able accommodation as pro-
vided for in the Americans
with Disabilities Act should
contact the District's Human
Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; tele-
phone (352) 796-7211, ext.
4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL
only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL
only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@
swfwmd.state.fl.us
Pub.: Apr. 7, 2011.
----------
NOTICE OF IMPOUND
To Whom it May Concern:
You are hereby notified
that the following described
livestock:
One (1) Angus bull, black
with white belly, yellow tag
in each ear
is now impounded as stray
livestock with an agent for
the Levy County Sheriff's
Office and the amount
due by reason of such im-
pounding is $152.50 as of
04-07-11 (plus the cost of
advertising). The livestock
was picked up in the area of
the 400 block of NW County
Road 345 in Chiefland, Flor-
ida. The above described
livestock will, unless re-
deemed within 3 days from
the date hereof, be offered
for sale at public auction to
the highest and best bidder
for cash.
LCSO report # 1110634.
Johnny Smith, Sheriff
Levy County, Florida
Pub.: April 7, 2011.


LEVY LAND TRANSACTIONS
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances,
A-Assignment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended
Certificate of Title, AD-Agree Deed, Al-Assumption of
Indebtedness, AM-Assignment of Mrtg, CD-Correctory
Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed, E-Easement,
FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mrtg Modify
Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, PX-Probate X,
QCD-Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber
Deed, ROWD-Right of Way Deed, WD-Warranty Deed
For further research go to the Property Appraisers website
athttp://www.levypa.com/.

03/12/2010
536707 E 1192 759 $10.00 TRACT 47 UNIVERSTY EST
Grantor: JF DEVELOPMENT CORP
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536708 E 1192 760 $10.00 BDY L20(22) NORTH
CHIEFLAND
Grantors: KING D W & KING MARILEE
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536709 E 1192 761 $10.00 BDY SW1/4 SW1/4 19-11-17
Grantors: NASH ALAN & NASH DEBORAH
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536710 E 1192 763 $10.00 L12(53) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantor: KLEM JAMES D
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536711 E 1192 764 $10.00 L11(8) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantors: MARTIN WALTER & MARTIN MARY
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536712 E 1192 765 $10.00 TRACT 322 UNIVERSITY EST
Grantor: COX THERESA
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536713 E 1192 766 $10.00 L1(M) OAK RIDGE EST
Grantor: GILREATH JACQUELINE W TRUSTEE
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC &
WILLIAM A GILREATH REV TRUST
536714 E 1192 767 $10.00 BDY SE1/4 SW1/4 3-12-17, ETC
Grantor: BEST FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536715 E 1192 768 $10.00 BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 4-11-15
Grantors: AMAN DAVID & AMAN KELSIE
Grantees: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC.
536716 E 1192 769 $10.00 L5(l) GRACELAND
SHORES REPLAT
Grantors: FARR AUDRA C, FARR CLARENCE V
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536717 E 1192 770 $10.00 BDY SE1/4 NE1/4
26-13-15
Grantors: BLACKWELL ROBERT, BLACKWELL JANET
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE,
INC









NEfws

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 April 7, 2011 5


536718 E 1192 771 $10.00 L29-30(B) FRUITLAND HTS
Grantor: HOPE MARY M
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536719 E 1192 772 $10.00 L22(26) 4THADD TO
BRONSON HTS SD
Grantors:MATOS ANTONIO,MATOS EMILY
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536720 E 1192 773 $10.00 BDY SW1/4 SE1/4
19-11-17
Grantors: STEINBACHER TIMOTHY, STEINBACHER
DONNA
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536721 E 1192 774 $10.00 L24 OAK MEADOWS
PHASE 2
Grantor: FORGETTE WILLIAM D
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536722 E 1192 775 $10.00 L9 5 OAKS ACRES SECT 1
Grantors:WILKERSON SCOTT A,WILKERSON SHEILA A
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536723 E 1192 776 $10.00 L6, BDY L7(16) BRONSN HTS
SD
Grantor: CREWS JOSEPH D JR
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536724 E 1192 777 $10.00 L23 BDY L24 CEDAR KEY
FLYING CLUB EST
Grantors: ALTONEN LYNN, ALTONEN GLORIA
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536725 E 1192 778 $10.00 BDY NW1/4 NE1/4 6-12-18
Grantor: SMITH BLAKE M,
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536726 E 1192 779 $10.00 BD N1/2 N1/2 29-12-18
Grantor: ROBINSON TYRONE L SR
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536727 E 1192 780 $10.00 BDY SE1/4 SW1/4 20-11-15
Grantor: DEENTERRIEA
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536728 E 1192 781 $10.00 BDY NW1/4 NE1/4 12-12-17
Grantor: LAST JOANNE
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536729 E 1192 782 $10.00 BDY NE1/4 NW1/4 6-15-16
Grantor: WATSON DEWITT T III
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536730 E 1192 783 $10.00 BDY W1/2 8-13-14
Granto:r ET USHER FAMILY TRUST
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536731 E 1192 784 $10.00 BDY 26-13-14
Grantor: LEGACY TIMBER LLC
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536732 E 1192 785 $10.00 L23 HIDEWAY#3
Grantors: SCHAAF WILLIAM R JR, SCHAAF ROSE MARIE
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536733 E 1192 786 $10.00 L10 FIRST ADD TO
BRONSON HTS SD
Grantor: ORTIZ DAVID G
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536734 E 1192 787 $10.00 L13(9) BRONSON HTS
Grantor: KRAMER JOHN D
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536735 E 1192 788 $10.00 BDY SE1/4 NW1/4
24-11-14
Grantor: BOYETTE L R
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536736 E 1192 789 $10.00 L5(3) WILLISTON HGH #12
Grantor: GONZALEZ BRAD K
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536737 E 1192 790 $10.00 IL31 CEDAR KEY HGH
Grantor: FINDLEY BRUCE, FINDLEY CATHERINE
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536738 E 1192 791 $10.00 L6(C) WILLISTON HGH #9
Grantor: CONNOLLY BRENDA
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536739 E 1192 792 $10.00 BDY NE1/4 SW/14
29-11-17
Grantors: LEAHEY KAITLIN R, SPURR JEFFREY
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536740 E 1192 793 $10.00 BDYSW1/426-10-14
Grantors: ST JOHN RONALD P, ST JOHN MARCIA A
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536741 E 1192 794 $10.00 BDY NW1/4 19-12-14
Grantor: KENNETH A BETTER JR LIVING TRUST
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536742 E 1192 795 $10.00 BDY W1/2 N3/4 29-12-18
Grantor: ROBINSON HENRIETTA
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
536743 E 1192 796 $10.00 L5(39) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantor: LOUDERMILK ANTHONY
Grantee: CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
INC
3/15/2010
536778 WD 1192 851 $0.00 L11(30) REPLATWILLISTON
HGH #5
Grantors: HALSALL PETER HALSALL CHRISTINE
Grantee: CHESSMATE THOROUGHBREDS
INTERNATIONAL LLC


Brian Smith Builders, Inc.
LicNo. RB290031149730 SW 67th Street

Cedar Key, FL 32625

.(352) 543-9552
(352) 215-9552 (352,543-6643


LC School Board Meeting continuedfrompage 10


reminded the Board that they will be voting on the selection of
the SBLC Financial Advisor for Employee's 401(k) Plan between
Capital City Bank and Lentz-Dodd Financial Group, explaining
that members would cast their vote by secret ballot, with Board
secretary Pam Morrison counting the votes. After all ballots had
been counted, the Superintendent announced that the Lentz-
Dodd Firm was selected by majority vote. Lentz-Dodd received
4 first place votes; Capital City received 1 first place vote. (See
supplemental minutes).
Superintendent Employee Recommendation Lillie Law.
Superintendent Hastings reminded the Board that in January Lillie
Law was suspended by the Board from her position as a bus driver
with pay until tonight's board meeting. He said he is recommending
that the Board continue her suspension without pay until the March
22, 2011 Board meeting at which time a public hearing will be
held with all information regarding the situation presented by legal
council, including video tapes, for Board consideration with a final
decision to be made on Ms. Lillie Law and her employment with
the School Board. After discussion, Beth Davis moved to approve
the Superintendent's recommendation, second by Cameron Asbell,
motion carried.
Minutes: Paige Brookins moved with second by Beth Davis, to
approve the minutes of the February 22, 2011 Board Meeting as
submitted with the Board Agenda. Motion carried.
Consent Agenda: After discussion Paige Brookins moved with
second by Beth Davis to approve the following items on the consent
agenda, including additions/corrections as recommended by the
Superintendent, motion carried.
GENERAL
Employee Status
1. Phoebe G. Papadi, BMHS Language Arts Teacher,
resignation for retirement, effective June 10, 2011.
2. Cynthia G. Smith, JBES, Lab Assistant, resignation from
employment to participate in DROP, beginning February 1, 2011
and ending January 31, 2016.
3. Tami Wain, Personnel Clerk, internal transfer to Fiscal Clerk,
Personnel Department, effective March 9, 2011.
4. Deborah J. McAndrew, YTS Food Service Worker,
resignation for retirement, effective March 11, 2011.
5. Alan Bontya, WHS Teacher, resignation, effective June 10,
2011, and payment for any unused leave.
6. Carmen J. Doyle, CKS Teacher, exiting DROP, effective June
10, 2011 and payment for any unused sick leave.
Illness-In-Line-Of-Duty Leave Requests:
1. Lori McClellan, WMS Teacher, February 23, 2011, (3.0 hrs.).
2. Awilda Perez, WHS Teacher, February 16, 2011, (.75 hr.)
3. Sonya Schmidt, CMS Teacher, February 10, 14, and 16, (1.5
hrs. each day) and February 17, 2011, (3.5 hrs).
c) Family Medical Leave Requests:
1. Jennifer L. Deluca, WHS Math Teacher, April 18 through
June 10, 2011.
2. Mary Edmondson, BES Teacher, February 25 through March
24, 2011, to run concurrent with Worker's Comp Leave, per
contract.
d) Professional Leave Requests:
1.Betty Barber, Food Service Coordinator, March 5-9,
2011, School Nutrition Association (SNA), LAC Conference,
Washington, D.C., paid from project #41000, travel and hotel paid
by SNA.
2. Dr. Gina Tovine, Assistant Superintendent, February 24
(p.m.) 25, 2011, FL Organization of Instructional Leaders
(FOIL) Orlando, paid from project #10073.
3. Joseph Wain, Transportation Training Supervisor, March
28-31, 2011, Lake Yale Leadership Training, Eustis, FL., paid from
project #17800.
4. Marcy D. Young, District SEDNET Coordinator, March
30 April 2, 2011, Addressing Challenging Behavior Conference,
Clearwater Beach, paid from SEDNET project #40234F2011.
5. Dr. Rosalind Hall, District Director ESE/SES, May 4-6,
2011, FL Dept. of Ed. Transition Vision ESE Conference, Ponte
Vedra, paid from project #14926.
6. Laura Brown, District Pre-K Coordinator, March 30-April
1, 2011, National Training Institute Addressing Challenging
Behavior for Young Children; Clearwater Beach, paid from Pre-K
ARRA funds project #43231.
Recommendations:
1. ESE Other Personnel Services (OPS) positions as Board
Approved February 22, 2011 with the appointment of the
following:
Ella Ackerman CES; Lorall Crow WES; Sylvia Edmundson
-WHS.
Clydene Morehouse CMS (splitting hours with Kelly Gore).
2. Establish an Other Personnel Services (OPS) position at
Yankeetown School to provide tutoring for middle school students
in math, effective March 22 through May 31, 2011, not to exceed a
total of 192 hours as indicated by times cards and paid from Title I
Funds, Project #40241 F2011.
3. Michael Ahrens, School Bus Driver, effective March 1, 2011,
vacancy.
4. Anna C. Kroll, District Finance Officer, effective March 7,
2011, replacing Robert Bilden and providing an overlap for training


purposes.
5. Nellie Gladwell, WHS Math Teacher, effective March 21,
2011, temporary replacement of Jennifer L. Deluca.
6. Payment of Supplements to the following personnel for
supplemental activities during the 2010-2011 school year.
WHS-SP460-Girls Varsity Softball-Carl R. Williams-Amend
02/18/11; SP461-J.V. Softball-Carl R. Williams-Amend 02/18/11;
BHS-SP152-MS Baseball-Leaundary Bell-02/18/11; HAS-SP241-
ESOL Endorsement-Sandra Foster-08/16/10; CMS-SP241-ESOL
Endorsement-Julie Gerhard-08/16/10; WMS-SP542-Track
- MS-Greg Yancey-02/23/11; WES-SP241-ESOL Endorsement-
Maria Hiers-07/01/11; CMS-SP241-ESOL Endorsement-Julie
Gerhard-08/16/11; BES-SP411-Reading Endorsement-Kristin
Pomeroy-09/16/10.
7. Shari Cone, CES ESE Teacher Aide, release from employment
during probationary period, effective March 7, 2011.
8. CKS ESE Other Personnel Services (OPS) position as Board
Approved February 8, 2011, with the appointment ofJordan
Collins to the position, effective February 9, 2011.
9. Establish an Other Personnel Services (OPS) position at
the District Office to provide security at night Board Meetings
beginning February 8, 2011, paid a minimum of 3 hours as
indicated on time cards from general funds. The position will be
filled on a rotating basis with current Sheriffs Deputies from the
Levy County Sheriffs Department.
FINANCE:
a) General Fund Budget Summary for February 2011
b) Budget Amendments #5-A and #5-B
c) Amendment of Instructional and ESP Salary Schedules to
allow payment to the
following personnel for:
Skyward Workshops for Data Clerks and other personnel as
listed below specific for each school, located at the Bronson Tech
Lab, Data Clerks and personnel to be paid regular rate of pay not
to exceed 10 hours per workshop and not more than 50 hours total
each participant, as submitted on times cards, paid from project
#37707:
Names: Angie Doty (CKS), Wanda Cartel (YTS), Kari Wasson
(CES), Lori Barker (CMS), Linda Jones (CHS), Mandy Pritchett
(BES), Michele Studstill (BMHS), Frances Munden (BES),
Sandy Langford (WES), Dedee Mcleod (WMS), Deborah Jerrels
(WHS), Tonya Godkin (HAS), Kathleen Walker (Summit), Selina
Surles (BES), and Janet Neal (District ESE)
Dates / Times of Workshops (Saturdays):
February 26, 2011 8:00 am 6:00 pm; March 5, 2011 8:00 am -
6:00 pm; March 12, 2011 8:00 am 6:00 pm; March 19, 2011 8:00
am 6:00 pm; and March 26, 2011 8:00 am 6:00 pm
AMEND Translation Services for the 2010-2011 SY, previously
Board approved November 2, 2010, to translate critical district
and school documents as needed, up to and not to exceed 200
total hours, paid regular rate of pay as indicated by time cards
from the following funds as deemed appropriate-Title 111 project
#40293F2011, Title I project #42412F2011, IDEA/ESE project
#40230F201 I and Instruction and Curriculum Development
Services project # 18320: Maria Sosa.
beginning February 23, 2011, regular rate of pay as indicated by
timecards and paid from ESE IDEA Part B project #40230F201 1:
Up to 54 hours total: Pauline Brown BMHS; Kelly Gore CMS
(splitting hours with Clydene Morehouse),Up to 24 hours total:
Amy Parks CKS (aide)
WES After School Remediation Programs -paid regular rate
of pay as indicated by time cards, paid from Title I funds project
40241 F2011: amend to add Carol Glass, Elizabeth McLean, Linda
Glenn and Hillary Cribbs.
School Wide Positive Behavior Support Coaches for the 2010
- 2011 SY, paid regular rate of pay as indicated by time cards from
project #13441: WHS Jennifer Dola amend to not to exceed
$500.00.
Superintendent's Comments / Recommendations: The
Superintendent informed the Board that employees throughout
the district are working hard to learn and successfully implement
the Skyward system. He said not just data clerks, but guidance
counselors, teachers and the district staff have also put in many
extra hours on it. He also reminded the Board that Bob Bilden is '
leaving the School Board and commended him on his dedication
and hard work to get the job done. He told the Board that Ann
Kroll has been hired to replace Bob Bilden as District Finance
Officer and will be a great addition to the staff. He briefly discussed
the current budget situation, assuring the Board that the district
will be diligent to make sure our educational system is intact.
Board Comments: Board Member Paige Brookins reminded the
Board that the Suwannee River Fair will be held during March and
requested Board permission to purchase animals at the Fair on the
Board's behalf. All Board members agreed to allow Mrs. Brookins
to purchase animals at the Fair on their behalf, including the
Superintendent who will be out of town during Fair time.
There being no further business to come before the Board,
meeting adjourned with the Board going into Executive Session for
the purpose of negotiations discussion.
ATTEST: APPROVED:
Robert O. Hastings, Secretary Rick Turner, Chairman


IfC O ULi '"INT JQ. fL
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Complete and clip this coupon and send it with a check, money order, or credit card information to PO
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AqND FINALLY
16 April 7, 2011 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Cedar Key Arts Festival


High School Winners


High School Art Competiton Winners: 1st Place Shea O'Sheen of Cedar Key; 2nd Place Clare Brown of Cedar Key;
3rd Place Sara Stolfus of Williston. Photos by Michelle Pearson


Cedar Key Garden Club April

Garden of the Month


The Cedar Key Garden Club is pleased to announce that our April Garden of the Month is the lovely yard of Jannie
Williams at 357 Second St., Cedar Key. The variety and color of plants causes one to stop and take notice while
heading down Second Street toward the park. Although compact, its beauty is breathtaking and encompassing.
Please join us in congratulating her. Marci Wilcox, CPCU


io -- i ,


6 Please conserve water,
both indoors and outdoors.
6 Please follow the year-round
Landscape Irrigation Rule.
In spring and summer,
choose no more than
two days per week to
water your landscape,
but not between the
hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m..
and water only as much as your
landscape needs.

To learn more visit www. mysuwanneeriver com


c-1.-.
.. .. *.

" '. no
^.^^^^l k
*-..-1-'' .-


Sad Face Story

Completed
Kathy Hilliard
Staff Writer
On March 13, 2011 Williston lost a very special lady,
Monica Gladwell Cain, to cancer. Her impact on the lives of
those around her was so great that boyfriend Fred Shasteen
put a Sad Face on the pasture fence to let the world in on
their grief. And we noticed.
Last week the Levy County Journal spoke out about the Sad
Face and requested that the story be told. And Fred told us.
He was sad to lose his best friend.
Monica had lived in Orange Park and Jacksonville and
came to Williston to work in the family livestock business.
She had a great passion for life and loved traveling, giving
thoughtful gifts, planning parties and lending a helping
hand. Fred described her as honest, wonderful, and a class
act.
Monica believed that raising her daughter, Jessica Cain
G rimes, was her greatest accomplishment in life and had just
welcomed into the world her first grandchild, Serenity Faye
(Grimes, and so Monica's legacy of giving goes on through
another generation. Kindness knows no boundaries and
N lonica's story came to us through the kindness of a Sad
Face placed for all of Levy County to see. To us, that is a
v, wonderful story so we told it.


Levy Library

Easter

EggHunt
** Hunt


The Levy County Public Library System will be having
Easter Egg Hunts at the library branches. Kids of all ages
.ire welcome to attend the events. The library system will be
applyingg all plastic buckets and eggs to decorate. The kids
"ill use the buckets as a basket for the egg hunt. Some of
the eggs will have a surprise in them. Kids will be able to
take their eggs and buckets home with them. Large groups
are welcome, but please let your librarian know in advance.
Luther Callaway Public Library Chiefland
Thursday April 14, 2011 at 4:30 p.m.
Bronson Public Library
Monday April 18, 2011 at 4:30 p.m.
A.F. Knotts Public Library
Tuesday April 19, 2011 at 3 p.m.
Williston Public Library
Thursday April 21, 2011 at 4:30 p.m.
For more information please contact your local librarian
orJenny Rodgers, youth services coordinator, 352-486-5552.


HUGE
CLEARANCE SALE
',. *i G E.
Buy One Get One 1/2 off
;! s.PRIL top:.-, pants and shoes
already reduced prices
'"omens dress slacks,
L .ies .- $5 while i'eJy last