Levy County journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00319
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Publication Date: 12/02/2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00319

Full Text





S

American ingenuity, ..
Malkin style,
Page 12








COUNAM

',THE COUNTY PAPER" EST. I


Writing about
Cedar Key,
Page 5



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Chiefland accountant Robert Beauchamp (left) and his cousin, Chiefland attorney Greg Beauchamp, say
goodbye to Dogan Cobb after greeting him warmly at the birthday celebration. The Beauchamps stood in line
waiting for their chance to talk to the legendary politician and community leader.


Among family, friends, Dogan Cobb turns 100


Story and photo by Terry Witt
Staff Writer


Hundreds of admirers and longtime friends stopped by
Bronson First Baptist Church fellowship hall Monday to shake
hands and hug Dogan Cobb at his 100"' birthday celebration.
Cobb, retired tax assessor and Bronson town councilman, is
widely known and respected in the county, as evidenced by the
number of people who lined up to give him a birthday greeting.
He was born at a turpentine camp northwest of Otter Creek
about a mile from Rocky Hammock Church. Small residential
communities formed around turpentine distilleries, which were
common in Levy County in Cobb's childhood.
His parents moved to Usher Turpentine Still while still
very young, where he was the only white child. He was 2 or 2
/2 years old when the family moved to Otter Creek, the place
where he grew up.
Deloris Joyner, 80, said her parents, the late Netty and
Edward White, played with Cobb when they were growing up
together in Otter Creek. Joiner's mother lived to be 99, her dad
age 98. She was asked to describe Cobb. She said he is a well
liked person.
"He's a special person, one of the kindest, most loving, and
one of the best people I've ever met," she said.
Cobb moved to Bronson in 1940 and served 30 years as
the county tax assessor, the predecessor of today's property
appraiser. He was never opposed for public office and was re-


elected while serving in the U.S. Army during World War 11.
His late wife Alice ran the tax assessor's office while he was
gonl..
Cobb, a Sunday school teacher for 77 years, is known for
his life as a Christian and told the assembled group of admirers
at his 100"' birthday celebration that his faith carried him
through life.
"My faith in the Lord has taken me through all these years,"
he said.
Cobb advised those in the audience that the Lord would
take care of them if they lived a life of faith.
Cobb was honored in July when the Town of Bronson
renamed the 47-year-old Bronson Town Hall after him. The
new name of the building is the Dogan S. Cobb Municipal
Center. The building was dedicated as Town Hall in 1963 when
Cobb was serving on the town council.
Cobb was a city councilman for many years and also served
as mayor of Bronson. He left city office in 1969 when the state
constitution was changed to prevent Floridians from holding
more than one office at a time. After retiring as tax assessor
in 1972, he ran again for the Bronson Town Council and was
elected.
He is a founding member of First Federal Savings and
Loan in Bronson and was part of a group that incorporated the
Rosemary Cemetery Association in 1972. The group founded
See Cobb, Page 3


50 cents


Four major


projects give


Chiefland a


new look

By Terry Witt
Staff Writer

Major face-lifts to the McDonalds
Restaurant and Chiefland Shopping Center,
the ongoing construction of a Murphy
Express gas station, and the planned
expansion of the Drummond Community
Bank drive-through facility have added a
spark to the local construction economy.
The renovation of McDonalds cost
in excess of $600,000 and the planned
expansion of the DCB drive-through is
expected to come with a similar price tag.
The upgrade of the exterior of Chiefland
Shopping Center cost in excess of $500,000.
The estimated cost of the Murphy Express
store and gas station is $831,672.
Andree and Kenneth Kocian, owners of
the Chiefland McDonalds, bought their first
McDonalds in Albany, N.Y. and eventually
owned five stores in Albany. Their
philosophy is to restore aging business
buildings and make them more profitable.
"We breathe life into it and then work to
get people who smile at people," said Ken
Kocian.
Although Andree chose nearly all the
interior and exterior artwork and design for
the new look, she said McDonalds wanted
the famous yellow "eyebrow" that swooshes
across the top of the restaurant's facade.
The complete facelift of the restaurant
has increased business. When the Kocians
bought the restaurant 35 people worked
there. The work force has increased to 50
and they are looking at the possibility of
adding five more positions.
"The look of the restaurant and the
new products and our improved operations
increased sales," she said.
The restaurant has added new equipment
and the Kocian's are attempting to improve
efficiency by reducing the number of steps
taken as employees carry out their job
responsibilities.
Giving the aging restaurant a complete
face lift was a risk, but not a gamble, they
said.
"It was a calculated risk," said Andree
Kocian, a former foreign exchange trader.
Her husband Ken is a retired New York City
police lieutenant.
Customers have reacted well to the new
See Construction, Page 18


I| 1 Bell dairy owner named


l 2072 0020 '10 Dairyman of theYear


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Story and photo by Terry Witt
Staff Writer

The owner ofNorth Florida Holsteins
near Bell was recently honored as the
2010 World Dairy Expo Dairyman of
the Year, a prestigious national award.
Don Bennick established the dairy
30 years ago and maintains a 4,000
cow herd of Registered Holsteins that
produce close to 100 million gallons of
milk annually.
Bennick owns about 9,000 head of
cattle on the 2,400 acre farm, including
milk cows, dairy heifers, steers and dry
cows.
North Florida Holsteins employs 90
people.
He is a hands-on person when it
comes to running the dairy and still
loves the work.
"It's 7 days a week and 365 days a
year. It takes a lot of devotion," he said.
""It's one of those things if you don't
have that fire in your belly it's the wrong
business to be in."
Bennick was raised in New York
State, but not on a dairy farm.
He started his own small herd of 4-5
cows in junior high school. By the time
he graduated from Cornell University


with a degree in genetics, physiology
and economics, his herd had grown to
20 cows. He rented a farm with a 35-tie
stall barn in his home county.
"1 guess it was in my blood," he
said.
Supported by a small Farmers Home
Administration loan and the cattle he
already owned, during the next 17 years
he accumulated the money necessary to
move the herd to Florida in 1980.
Bennick has led the innovation
of dairy cattle comfort with tunnel
ventilation to enhance production and
herd health.
Bennick practiced law in New
York but gave up his partnership in the
lucrative firm to take up dairying full-
time, according to Chiefland farmer Don
Quincey.
Quincey said Bennick has been a
global force in the dairy industry, taking
his expertise in dairy genetics, nutrition,
finances and other aspects of dairying to
foreign countries.
Locally Bennick is a financial force in
the community, buying feed from local
farmers, paying taxes and employing 90
people.
See Dairy, Page 5


Vol. 87, No. 22 Dec. 2, 2010


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Clay Landing Days
Margie Stansfield of Lake City demonstrates
the inkle loom as part of Clay Landing Days
Saturday at Manatee Springs State Park. For
more on the celebration, see Page 9. (Rick
Burnham)


_ ___ _I


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X/EWS

2 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Chiefland banker featured in state trade magazine


By Terry Witt
Staff Writer


Awell-known Chiefland banker appeared
on the front cover of Florida Banking
magazine in October.
Luther Drummond, chairman, CEO
and president of Drummond Community
Bank was featured in the magazine's lead
story. The headline said, "Defining a New
Normal."
Drummond said it was an honor to be
recognized by the banking industry.
"That's one of the nicest things that
ever happened. It's nice when your
peers recognize you in this way. It's very
flattering."
Florida Banking is the trade magazine
for the Florida Bankers Association.
Drummond Community Bank is the
highest rated bank in the state. The article
noted that the bank is well-capitalized,
strong, and has had top ratings every quarter
for more than 16 years. The bank has $194
million assets with offices in Chiefland,
Cross City, Cedar Key, Mayo, Trenton, Old
Town and Bell.
Drummond learned many lessons about
banking from his grandfather, the late
Luther W. Drummond. He worked for his
grandfather in the bank during summers
when he was a young man. Those age-old
lessons have led to stability at the bank.
Drummond Community Bank, which
was started in 1990, was named for his
grandfather.
One of those lessons is never to take a
second mortgage on a property if the bank
doesn't have the first mortgage. The first
mortgage guarantees the bank retains an


asset if the second mortgage is a failure.
"Banks drift away from that," Drummond
said, noting DCB always abides by that
principle.
Another lesson his grandfather taught
him is that "bad loans are always made in
good times."
"If you forget about these lessons, you
get into trouble," Drummond said.
In the bank, Drummond has instituted a
form of multi-tasking to increase efficiency
in these challenging economic times. The
employees who make loans, for example,
are equipped now to do other tasks.
Drummond visited the Cedar Key
branch recently and saw Branch Manager
Heath Davis working at the teller window.
Davis can also open accounts for bank
customers. In the past, those duties were
assigned exclusively to certain people. At
the Chiefland office, Rosemary McCall
opened accounts, "but she has other tasks
now," Drummond said.
The bank is growing carefully while not
abandoning time-tested principles.
Drummond is innovative in other ways.
He is planning to expand the drive-through
area at the Chiefland office to five lanes plus
an ATM lane. The lanes will be redesigned.
Tellers will stand behind tall vertical
windows to give customers a chance to see
the tellers at work.
He noted that in many banks drive-thru
areas appear to be an afterthought, even
though people overwhelmingly prefer to
conduct their routine banking business at
the drive-thru windows. Drummond wants
the drive-thru to be on equal footing with the
inside of the bank and to be as attractive.


Luther Drummond was featured in the October edition of Florida Bank-
ing magazine. He credits sage advice from his grandfather with the good
choices he makes as a banker.


Tiquah Cahours, 11, places a decoration on the Cedar Key city Christmas
tree as her friends watch. The tree was donated by Don and Carol Joyce. It
was brought to City Park by Kona Joe, Edie Zaprier and Scott and Andrea
Dennison.

WES taps new group of


'Students of the Month'

Congratulations to those Williston Elementary School students who earned the "Student of
the Month" status from their teachers for October! These were presented earlier in November.
As with the earlier awards ceremony, students could be tapped for academics, citizenship
or most improved; however, this month students received certificates for academics and
citizenship at the presentation held in the school's multipurpose room. Principal Marla Hiers
and assistant principal Angel Thomas hosted the gathering to which the students' parents or
guardians were invited. Fifth grade teacher Kathy Brewington had prepared the certificates
for the event.
Receiving "Student of the Month" for academics included 3rd graders Hannah Baldwin
(Mary Guinsler) and Alyssa Whitehurst (Tracy Kirby); 4th graders C. J. Strange (Teri Dixon),
Dellana Sams (Lita Halchak), Cheyenne Bell (Tina Roberts), and Ericha Turner (Joelene
Vining); and 5th graders Torie Hill (Nancy Bowman), Ilaley Wright (Kathy Brewington),
Haley Williams (Laurie Helgerud) and Ashleigh Sisti (Steve Van Zwienen). The names of the
students' teachers are in parentheses.
Citizenship certificates were presented to 3rd graders Riley Battle (Corrie Braley),
Leandrea Evans (Hillary Cribbs), Emily Barras (Lindsey Dubock), Trent Crooms (Linda
Glenn), Nathan Gloria (Jennifer Nicholson); 4th graders Garin Osteen (Kathy Clemons),
Devon Cullen (Courtney Edwards), Alicia McMullen (Neige Snider); and 5th graders Sydney
Lane (Jeanne DuBois), Maquanda Rayford (Carol Glass), Shaila Simmons (Tess Palmer) and
Ryker Gauthier (Serena Thiessen).
Many of the students'parents and relatives were in attendance. Charlie Watson, the school's
technology and lab manager, took a group photo which hangs on the "Wall of Honor" in the
school's cafeteria. (Courtesy, Lisa Statham Posteraro)


Cedar Key lights tree to


signal start of Christmas


season on the island

Story and photo by Terry Witt
Staff Writer

Cedar Key kicked off the holiday season Friday with the second annual lighting of a
cedar Christmas tree at City Park, an event that involves children as much as adults.
After the tree's 4,000 Christmas lights were turned on, the Cedar Key Chamber of
Commerce let children fasten ornaments to the tree.
Cedar Key is named in part for the cedar trees native to the island. That is why a
cedar was chosen as a tree to be decorated with Christmas lights.
"It's a community spirit and a Cedar tree in Cedar Key," said Ken Young who served
as master of ceremonies. "It's a fun community thing."
He said it took three days to string the lights. Local men donated the use of bucket
trucks to help string the lights.
The community is planning another Christmas event on Dec. 11. A lighted boat
parade will take place at as darkness arrives. Santa Clam will be present for the event.
Young said the chamber is establishing a tradition with the lighting of the Christmas
tree.
He asked for a show of hands to indicate how many of the people present lived on
the island and how many were visitors. There were quite a few more visitors than locals.
Cedar Key is a tourist destination on the Gulf of Mexico.
"I don't think we can take them in a fight," Young joked.


Williston Elementary School assistant principal Angel Thomas and
principal Maria Hiers stand on either side of the proud group of young
people who just received their "Student of the Month" certificates for
October. The monthly awards ceremony is usually held the first Friday
of the month.


The legal organ of Levy County, Florida,The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by Levy Publishing, Inc.,
440 S. Court St., Bronson, FL. 32621. Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL. (USPS 310-780).


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The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline corn The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 3


Cobb, from Page 1


the Rosemary H ill Cemetery in
Bronson.
A small photo gallery
included pictures of Cobb
serving in World War 11. One
photo showed him and another
soldier washing out a cooking
pot. Cobb was a cook who served
18 months overseas and was in
the thick of the fighting.
Longtime friend Frank
McKoy remembered playing
baseball with Cobb, probably
in 1949 and 1950. McKoy, 77,
was still in high school at the
time, but the older men including
Cobb, allowed McKoy and his
brother Clinton to play on their
team.
The older men on the team
included Buren Brice, Haskell
Hardee, Gordon Drummond,
Arnold Cowart, Luther White
and G.T. Robbins, former sheriff.
Cobb was the second baseman.
"Mr. Cobb was a good second
baseman. If the ball came into his
area, he got it," McKoy said.
Bronson, Gulf Hammock,
Trenton and Chiefland had
baseball teams at the time.
The teams played on Sunday
afternoon.
"He loved baseball," McKoy
said.
Deloris Cobb, his wife of 28
years, said she and her husband
have been very happy for their
entire married life. They have
taken many trips together.
"We get along well, all by
ourselves," she said. "We just
have a very quiet home life."
She said her husband loves
attending church services.
"Every time the door is open.
he is at church," she said.
Cobb served as a deacon at
First Baptist for many years but
recently retired.
His adult children, Mary Bird,
Sandra McKoy and Billy Cobb
were present for the birthday
celebration, along with his 1-
year-old great-granddaughter
Bailey Bird and her mother
Wendy, as well as other relatives.
Billy Cobb still goes next
door to his father's home to drink
coffee every day. He said his
father drives to the Post Office
every day and likes to see what is
happening at the courthouse. He
doesn't drive at night anymore,
but does make short daytime
trips.
The line of admirers wanting
to shake hands and hug Cobb
was continuous for more than an
hour and included notables from
throughout the county.


,. Bailey Bird, 1, is flanked by her Mom Wendy and great grand-
, mother Deloris Cobb, wife of Dogan Cobb.


Dogan Cobb is introduced by his pastor, Troy Turner, at the
start of the 100th birthday celebration at First Baptist Church
fellowship hall in Bronson.


The caption beneath Dogan Cobb's World War II photograph
said he spent 18 months overseas during his tour of duty.


Deloris Joyner, 80, greets her longtime friend Dogan Cobb,
100. She said Dogan Cobb was a childhood playmate of her
parents in Otter Creek.



,~. .


James Beauchamp gives his friend Dogan Cobb a big hug
as they exchange greetings.


AskAVet
Q. My Mini Schnauzer is I11
nonth. old and his testes ha\ c
nt1 dripped and sho~ nr sign L o
doing so. Ile is othem\ise happy
and lhealthi \ithi all require ed lhots
a;d licenses. I am o\nderini if I
should be \\ornicd and what long-
tenn etect this could ha c on his
health I do not know if this is
normal or it r ltat ae they ishoutld
drop, also \lhal, it'anytling, could
be done to correct this issue .


A. A m sale pupp 's stiles are nor, mall in tilhe

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chiefla ndai, nal(, ellsouth.l net
chieflandanimaltibellsouth.net


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OLD TOWN -NiceSWMH on.5 ofan acre.This
home comes furnished and is only minutes from the
Suwannee River and the new boat ramp and County
Park. Seller is motivated and willing to look at offers.
$22,000 (DMH-762753-JW) 352-463-6144


CHIEFLAND 1969 SWMH 12X58, 2/1.5 with
front open deck & screen porch, rear covered porch.
Home is in good condition for its age, but needs
someTLC. Outbuildings. Located in Crestfield Trading
Company on 2.53 acres. 539,900 (LMH-762306-D)
352-493-2221


TRENTON- Very nice 3/2 triple-wide MH.
Home features a large eat-in kitchen, dining area,
living and family rooms, fireplace, split floor plan,
utility shed, and attached carport. Conveniently
located to Trenton, Chiefland or Bronson. 589,900
(LMH-761454-MKH) 352-493-2221


TRENTON Nice SWMH on .38 acres in Trenton
on a paved street with city water. This 3/2 home
has great potential for owner occupants or inves-
tors. Close to schools, shopping and recreation.
$29,900 (GMH-763082-JW) 352-463-6144


HORSESHOE BEACH- Nice Furnished
SWMH on Canal. Home is located on a canal that
provides easy access to some great fishing in tihe
Gulf of Mexico has attached carport, roofover,
is furnished, deck, fish cleaning area and more.
$59,900 (DW-762728- W) 352-463-6144


CHIEFLAND- Beautiful 3/2 DW MH on
3.62 Acres just inside the City Limits. Well kept
home with split floor plan, large living room
with fireplace, park-like yard and close to schools
and shopping. $110,000 (IMH-763338-MKH)
352-493-2221


CHIEFLAND- Quaint 2/2 sw MH in a 55+
subdivision on a paved road. Home features a split
floor plan, comfortable living room, 1 car carport
and storage shed. Property backs up to Manatee
State Park and is near the golf course. $37,900
(LMH-761685-MKH) 352-493-2221


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FANNING SPRINGS Nice 2003 DW MH
on a paved street. Home is on .88 acre lot with
beautiful landscaping. Has new paint inside, and
fenced yard. Close to the Suwannee River and
State Parks/Springs. $65,000 (LMH-761277-JW)
352-463-6144


sq ft. is located on the Suwannee. Wrap around
deck & large porlc with beautiful views of te river.

out. $575,000(DW 761430D) 352-493-2221


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4 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


OBITUARIES


LEOLA WILLIAMS
Ms. Leola Williams, age 94, of Cros
City, Fla. entered into eternal rest on Nov
20, 2010.
Ms. Williams was born Jan. 01, 1916
in Monticello, Fla. to the late Ms. Phylli:
Green.
Ms. Williams was united in hol)
matrimony to the late Mr. Woodrov
Williams for 40 years.
Ms. Williams was preceded in death by
her sons, Nathaniel and Robert Campbell
and her sister, Christine Green.
Those left to cherish her loving memories
include her son Ronnie (Janet) Williams; her
grandchildren: Bruce (Sharon) Campbell
Terry Massey, Sophie (Dennis) Kirkland
Lisa (Ronnie) Paul, Franklin Hartsfield
Natalie (Daryl) Washington, Ronnie(Brandi)
Williams Jr., Crystal Williams and Christy
Williams; a host of great-grandchildren:
great-great-grandchildren; nieces, Ella Mac
McDaniel and Phyllis Geathers; as well as
many other friends and relatives.
A visitation was held at the Rick
Gooding Funeral Home Saturday evening.
Nov. 27, 2010. Funeral services were held
Sunday, Nov. 28, 2010 at the First Baptist
Church with Rev. A. Powell officiating.
Interment followed at Cross City Cemetery.
Arrangements have been placed under the
care of the Rick Gooding Funeral Home,
Cross City, Fla.

CHRISTINE LYCKE
Ms. Christine Lycke of Steinhatchee,
Fla., passed away Nov. 22, 2010 at Marshall
Health and Rehab in Perry, Fla. She was
77.
A lifelong resident of Steinhatchee, Ms.
Lycke attended the Church of God and
enjoyed painting, quilting and embroidery.
She is survived by her sons, Larry
Schultz and Kenneth Clothier, both of
Steinhatchee, Fla.; a brother, Dalton Johnson
of Texas; sisters, Ruthie Nielson and Peggy
Drawdy, both of Steinhatchee, Fla.; four
grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
A memorial service will be held Dec. 4,
2010 at 11 a.m. at Friendship Chapel Church
of God in Steinhatchee.
Arrangements have been placed under
the direction of the Rick Gooding Funeral
Home, Cross City, Fla., 352-498-5400.

SYLVIA FILLYAW
WEEKS
Sylvia Fillyaw Weeks, 86, of Chiefland,
passed away Nov. 23,2010 at Haven Hospice
of the Tri Counties in Chiefland. Born in
Luraville, Fla., she came to Chiefland in
1967. She was a member of Long Pond
Baptist Church. She was a homemaker
who loved and enjoyed her family but also
worked in the cafeteria at Chiefland High
School, served as a school teacher, and
worked at Georgia-Pacific Plywood Mill.
She enjoyed gardening, crocheting and
knitting.
Mrs. Weeks was preceded in death by
her husband, Orlando Weeks; three brothers
and two sisters.
She is survived by her children: Jimmie
Weeks (MarilynHagerman)ofSteinhattchee,
LaWanda (Herbert) Thomas of Bell, Ronnie
(Elaine) Weeks of Green Cove Springs,
and Kathy (Paul) Baker of Chiefland;
grandchildren: Shanda (Jason) Hoffian,
Brian (Lori) Thomas, Justin Lucas, Ashley
Weeks, Emily Baker, and Roni Weeks; and
a great-granddaughter, Angel.
Funeral services were held Nov 27,
2010 at Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services with
burial at Antioch Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care of
Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, 1301
N. Young Blvd., Chiefland, Fla. Online
condolences may be sent through www.
hiers-baxley.com.


FRANCES M. FLETCHER
Frances M. Fletcher, age 87, passed
away Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010 at North
Florida Regional in Gainesville. Frances
was born in High Springs, Fla. on March
12, 1923 to Robert and Mary McDonnell.
She moved from St. Pete to Williston in
1981, where she was a faithful member
of the First Baptist Church. She enjoyed
crossword puzzles, playing cards, cooking,
and crochet.
Mrs. Fletcher was preceded in death
by her loving husband, Arthur Fletcher;
her son, Christopher Fletcher; and her
granddaughter, Jamie Fletcher.
She is survived by her son, Robert
(Jerry) Fletcher and Liza Carter; her
daughter, Pamela Stiene (Ritchie); and three
grandchildren.
A visitation was held at Knauff Funeral
Home in Williston from 12-1 pm on Nov. 28,
2010. Funeral services followed at 1 p.m.
Interment was held on Nov. 29, 2010 at 11
a.m. at Rose Lawn Cemetery in Lakeland,
Fla. Arrangements are under the care of
Knauff Funeral Home in Williston.


PHILIP DAVID
WILLIAMS
Phillip Williams, known to family and
friends as Bub or Bubba, passed away on
Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, 2010 at home
with loved ones by his side.
Bub was born in St. Charles, Va., in 1926
to Myrtle Garber Williams and Thomas
Walker Williams.
Bub was preceded in death by his father,
Thomas, in 1933; his mother. Myrtle, in
1988; and two of four sisters, Pauline
Williams Roberts and Loraine Williams
Lindsey.
He married Mildred Nolan in 1947. They
had three children: Tex Williams, Donald
Williams, and Barbara Jean Williams Crow.
He moved his family from Dayton, Ohio in
1967 to the island town of Cedar Key, Fla.
Bub loved all that the small town
community had to offer and greatly enjoyed
time on the water. lHe was best known
for his master carpentry skills and was
instrumental in the construction of many
Cedar Key structures.
Bub leaves to his surviving children, Tex
of Ocala, Don of Micanopy and Barbara
of Cedar Key; sisters, Ruth Carroll and
Jackie Terry of New Jersey; grandchildren:
Michele, David, Tina, Kelby and Brandon;
six great-grand children; and long-time
companion Janice Rose the legacy of
courage, strength and love.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can be
made in Mr. Williams' memory to Haven
Hospice of the Tri-County, 311 NE 3rd St.,
Chiefland, Fla. 32626.
Arrangements are under the care of
Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, 1301
N. Young Blvd., Chiefland, Fla. Online
condolences may be sent through www.
hiers-baxley.com.
KATRINA WHONIC
DREW
Katrina Whonic Drew, age 82, passed
away Nov. 25, 2010 at Haven Hospice
in Chiefland. She was born in Marvin
Community.Ga. to Stanley and Beulah


Whonic. She lived in Starke, Fla. for some
time before moving to Williston in 1960.
While living in Williston, she became a
member of the First Baptist Church, was a
former Sunday school teacher, a librarian in
the '60s and '70s, enjoyed gardening, loved
to fish and was an avid outdoorsman.
She was preceded in death by her son,
Mike Drew, in November, 1982. She is
survived by her loving husband, James
(Jim) Drew; her son, Anthony Drew
(Cindy); five grandchildren; and three great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Nov. 30, 2010
at the First Baptist Church in Williston with
Kathy Mauldin officiating. Burial was held
at the Clifton Family Cemetery in Marvin
Community, Ga. on Dec. 1, 2010.
In lieu of flowers, the family has
requested that donations be sent to Haven
Hospice (311 N.E. 9th St., Chiefland, Fla.
32626. Arrangements are under the care of
Knauff Funeral Home in Williston.


WILLIAM 'BILL'
RICHARD SCHROCK
William "Bill" Richard Schrock, age
87, of Chiefland, Fla. passed away on Nov.
26, 2010. He was born on Oct. 25, 1923 in
Goodfield, Ill. He served in the U.S. Army
during WWII. He was a member of the First
Baptist Church ofChiefland, charter member
of Eliza American Legion Post 1971, a 30-
year member of Eliza Fire Department, a
former member of Mercer County Red Cross
Board and CPR Instructor, and coached
Little League Baseball for many years. He
retired from working at Kent Feeds as a
maintenance man in 1985.
Bill was preceded in death by his
parents. Joseph and Carrie Schrock; sister,
Marjorie Genung; and great-grandson
Dylan Stewart.
He is survived by his wife of 62 years,
Alberta Schrock; sons: Richard (Marcia)
of Manistee, Mich. and Roger (Janie)
of Bloomsburg, lPa.; daughter, Rebecca
Stewart (Steve) of Cedar Key, Fla.; six
grandchildren: Wendy (David) Fisher,
Shane (Jennifer) Stewart, and Alexis,
Morgan, Jordan and Nolan Schrock; six
great-grandchildren: Joey, Natalie, Kyle
Stewart, Morgan, Tori and Mackenzie
Fisher; brothers: Ernest (Ferris), Joseph
(Marge), and Edward (rM.ii; i, sisters, Helen
Herman and Minnie Miller; along with
many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held Nov. 30, 2010
at Knauff' Funeral Home in Chiefland.
Funeral services were held on Dec. 1, 2010
at the First Baptist Church of Chiefland,
with Reverend Gordon Keller officiating.
Interment followed at Shiloh Cemetery in
Sumner, Fla. with military honors provided
by V.F.W. Post 5625.
Arrangements are under the care of
Knauff Funeral Home-Chiefland.


ELLIE RUTH PORTER
Ellie Ruth Porter, age 102, passed away
Nov. 28, 2010 at the Good Samarian Home
in Williston. Ellie was born on Oct. 10,
1908 to Louis and Daisy Nelson. She taught
school for most of her life in cities including
Sherman, Fla., Okeechobee, Fla., Pompano
Beach, Fla. and Ocala, Fla. She moved
to Williston in 1978 and joined the Saint
Barnabas Episcopal Church. She enjoyed
reading, piano playing, writing children's
stories, singing, and visiting with family and
friends. She especially enjoyed spending
time with children.
Mrs. Porter was preceded in death by
her husband, Carl Porter Sr.; her son, Carl
Porter Jr.; and her daughter, Margaret Porter
Williams.
She is survived by her daughters,
Daisy Gleaves and Mary Shearer; nine
grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held at Knauff
Funeral Home in Williston at 11 a.m. on Dec.
2, 2010. The family has requested in lieu
of flowers that donations be sent to Haven
Hospice (311 N.E. 9th St. Chiefland, Fla.
32626) or The Shriners Hospital for Children
(2900 Rocky Point Dr., Tampa, Fla. 33607).
Arrangements are under the direction of
Knauff Funeral Home in Williston (352)
528-3481.

JOHN HENRY ZELLER
Mr. John Hemy Zeller of Old Town, Fla.
passed away Nov. 28, 2010. He was 66.
Born in Gouverneur, N.Y., Mr. Zeller was
a roofing contractor in New York, before
becoming disabled. He moved to Clearwater,
Fla. in 1983 and then to Old Town, Fla. in
2006. He enjoyed hunting and fishing and
was a Methodist.
Mr. Zeller was preceded in death by a
daughter, Barbara Anne Zeller Gorenflo; and
a brother, Chris Zeller.
He is survived by his wife, Joyce Zeller
of Old Town, Fla.; sons, Dwayne (Evelyn
Renauld) Zeller and Mark (Karen) Zeller,
both of Old Town, Fla.; brothers, Walter
Zeller of Hammond, N.Y. and Tracy Zeller
of Largo, Fla.; sisters: Linda House of
Lisbon, N.Y., Jackie Almond of Springhill,
Fla., Kristin Lemon of Clearwater. Fla. and
MelissaNelson ofNew Port Richey, Fla.; nine
grandchildren and two great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held Dec. 2,
2010 at noon at Rick Gooding Funeral Home
Chapel with Rev. Tom Almond officiating.
Interment will follow at Old McCrabb
Cemetery, Old Town, Fla. A visitation will
be held Dec. 2, at 11 a.m., one hour prior to
the service.
Arrangements have been placed under
the direction of the Rick Gooding Funeral
Home. Cross City. Florida, (352) 498-5400.
ANGELLE MARIE FREMEN
Ms. Angelle Marie Fremen of Old Town,
Fla., passed away Nov. 29, 2010 at North
Florida Regional Medical Center. She was
80.
Ms. Fremen moved to Old Town from
Gainesville, Fla. in 1977. She was a real
estate broker and salesperson with Dixie
Realty for 32 years. She was a member of
Beta Sigma Phi, Holy Cross Catholic Church,
and enjoyed flower arranging, drafting and
designing.
Ms. Fremen is survived by sons, Michael
Fremen of Charleston, S.C. and Steve
Fremen of Cross City, Fla; daughter, Toni
Fremen of Old Town, Fla; grandchildren:
Jill, Ivey, Jena, Nicole, Holly and Stephanie;
and great-grandchildren: Jami, Jaiden, Kylie
and Justin.
Funeral services will be held Dec 2, 2010
at 3 p.m. at Rick Gooding Funeral Home
Chapel. Interment will follow at Long Pond
Cemetery. A visitation will be held Dec. 1,
2010, between 6-8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Arrangements have been placed under
the direction of the Rick Gooding Funeral
Home, Cross City, Fla., (352) 498-5400.


Chiefland Middle School holds annual speech contest

The annual 4H- Tropicana speech contest at Chiefland Middle
School was male dominated this year. Ricky Kidd won the
Intermediate Division (7'" and 81' grade) with his speech entitled
"Anime." Blayde Gore led the 6'" grade division with his speech about
Helen Keller.
Ricky's speech informed listeners about anime, an animated style
of cartoon originating in Japan. Many kids are familiar with this topic,
whereas many adults, as Ricky stated in his speech, get that "glazed- .
over look in their eyes" when kids talk about anime. Ricky's favorite
character in the anime world is the guy who gets to be surrounded by -
the girls. "I wish I could be that guy!" '
Blayde's speech focused on the life of Helen Keller, a blind and
deaf girl born in the late 1800s. Her struggle to learn to communicate
in her early years was alleviated by the teacher, Annie Sullivan, who
helped her break out of her world of silence and darkness. Blayde
actually signed the first words Helen learned, "water" and "earth".
The judges'job of determining the winners was made very difficult
by the other participants. In the Intermediate division, Faith Ann
McClellan's speech, "Tubing on the Suwannee" placed second, and
Mykenzi Goolsby's speech about her cousin Cory, a member of the
military deployed to Afghanistan placed third. Second place in the 61' '
grade division went to Caleb Hardee who spoke on the animal hero,
Balto. Stacy Webster placed third with his speech on "Changes in my
Life".
Other speech contestants were: 8"' graders Kira Telgen, Kasidy --s i.' '
Schultz, Alia Donald, Auri Graham, Becca Thomas; 7' graders
-Trevor Castell, Kinsey Ward, Orlando Mallea, Caysic Douglas, "
Sierra Carruthers, Cheyenne Ahrens; 6"' graders Rosie Flores, Bailey
Beauchamp, Patrick Telgen, Sarah Stephenson, Kirnae Williams,
Emily Tummond, Jaylyn Harvey, Gage Wood, Kristen Wade. 7th and 8th grade winners (I-r) Ricky Kidd, Faith Ann McClellan, Mykenzi Goolsby receive
their awards.







NEWS
The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 5





A Cove story




Best-selling author has fallen hard for Cedar Key


Story and photo by Rick Burnham
Editor

Listen to best-selling author Terri DuLong speak, and it is easy to discover her
origins. A heavy New England accent filters through discussions about writing
and family, about living and knitting.
But if you want to find out where her heart is, just read her books.
As it turns out, DuLong, born and raised in the Boston area, and a former resident of
Paris, has fallen hard for Cedar Key.
Levy County's island community is the setting for 2009's "Spinning Forward,"
as well as the followup "Casting About," released last month. Cedar Key is also
DuLong's home, having moved there in 2005 with husband Ray, an employee of
Continental Airlines.
It was a move that initially presented minor inconveniences, and required some
research in order to adjust. But the allure of Cedar Key, where peace and tranquility are
the norm, was just too much to resist.
"It is a tradeoff," she said. "But it is well worth it. If you really make an effort, the
people are so friendly. They kinda adopted me. It is really great. I love it."
And so does Monica Brooks, who, in "Casting About," has found a new husband
- and a stepdaughter four years after moving to Cedar Key. The mother-daughter
relationship provides the main storyline and subplots involving friends and family
members, both living and having passed away, evolve nicely throughout.
But it is perhaps the Cedar Key community itself that makes both "Casting Away"
and "Spinning Forward" tick, serving as not only the setting, but a living and breathing
character as well. DuLong writes in her acknowledgments for the initial book that the
island has inspired her from the beginning.
"When I visited Cedar Key for the first time, in 1994, 1 knew I was in my element
- surrounded by water and Mother Nature," she wrote. "But when I relocated there in
2005, my love for the town deepened because I found that it was the people who were
the soul of the island.
"The locals made me feel welcome and gave me a sense of belonging. I was inspired
by their strength, their compassion for neighbors, and their love for family. Without
them, my story wouldn't have been possible ..."
"Spinning Forward" is not only the title of the first book, but the name of the yarn
store opened by New Englander Sydney Webster, who finds herself starting over after
the untimely death of her husband, and the discovery of mountains of debt brought on
by his secretive gambling habit. She takes refuge with an old college pal at her Cedar
Key bed and breakfast, and a love story soon begins to develop.


I ... ...

l l- i. !,, -
Si',;
qS1;,


Author Terri DuLong says Cedar Key is the place for her.
"It is a love story, but not a romance," DuLong said. "There is a difference."
The yarn shop is eventually bought by Sydney Webster's daughter, Monica Brooks,
setting the stage for "Casting About."
Both books are published by Kensington Books, of New York, as is the anthology
"Holiday Magic," which includes DuLong's "A Cedar Key Christmas," one of four
"novellas" that offer "heartwarming vibes," according to the publisher.
A fourth novel is due out in 2012, DuLong said.
"Spinning Forward," "Casting About," and "Holiday Magic" can be found at Kona
Joe's Island Caf6 in Cedar Key, the only location you can find them in Levy County.


Dairy, from Page 1


World Dairy Expo International Person of the Year Tadanaga Komori of Japan
Livestock Trading Corporation of Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan; Dairyman of the
Year Don Bennick of Bell; Dairywoman of the Year Liz Doornink of Jon-De
Farms in Baldwin, Wis.; and Industry Person of the Year Horace A. Backus,
Backus Pedigree Company of Mexico, New York.


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Bennick brought an
expert to his farm at one ,
point to study the body .
temperatures of his cows.
The study and Bennick's
own high-powered intellect .--,
led to innovations in the
industry such as tunnel
barns that keep a steady
flow of air over the animals
to keep them cool and
comfortable, Quincey
said. Bennick realized that
comfortable and happy
cows would eat better and
produce more milk.
"I can't say enough
good things about him.
He's a guy of integrity. If
he tells you something, you can take it to privileged to
the bank," Quincey said. award winne
Bennick's 100 percent registered herd "When I
boasts a rolling average per cow of 24,330 were certain
pounds of milk annually with 850 pounds how they sel
of fat and 650 pounds of protein, both chuckle. "I c
indicators of high grade milk. The farm has World D
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premier breeder and
exhibitor recognition.
Along with Bennick's
award, three other dairy
winners were recognized.
Dairywoman of the Year
was Liz Doornink of Jon-
De Farms in Baldwin,
Wis.; International Person
of the Year was Tadanaga
Komori ofJapan Livestock
Trading Corporation of
Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan;
and Industry Person of
the Year was Horace A.
Backus, Backus Pedigree
Company of Mexico, New
York.
Bennick said he feels
o be in their company as an
er.
look at the three of them, they
ily outstanding. I don't know
ected me," Bennick said with a
certainlyy feel honored."
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['MEws
6 Dec 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Levy County's Most Wanted


/


Melba P Alexander
Ocala
Kidnap minor interfere
custody
$50,000 bond

Sheriff's arrests


Matthew P Benson
Archer
Dealing in stolen
property
$50,000 Bond


Brandi N. Brock John H. Chastain
Archer Williston
Burglary, crim mischief, Dealing in stolen property
petit larceny $50,000 Bond
$40,000 Bond


Kenyatta D. Howard
Hawthorne
Flee elude LEO, LSOA w/o
giving info, resisting w/o
violence
$37,500 Bond


Becky M. Langford
Morriston
Fraud False Statement to
Obtain Unemployment
$2,500 Bond


Deputies arrest Chiefland man for selling crack


A Chiefland man was arrested Nov. 24 on charges of
selling crack cocaine on two occasions to an undercover
operative working for the Levy County Drug lTask Force.
Gregory Robert Roland, 54, 1123 N.W. 12'" Ave.,
CI,1 11 ii.,, was arrested on three counts of possession of
crack cocaine and three counts of sale of crack cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a church.
The sheriff's office said Roland sold three-tenths of a
gram of crack cocaine to the undercover operative on June
10 and sold two-tenths of a gram of crack for $30 on July
7.
Both sales took place on 12'1 Avenue within 1,000 feet
of Mt. Erie Baptist Church at 1216 N.W. 11"' Ave.
Samantha Carol Sears, 27, 920 E. Hathaway Road,
Bronson, expired tag.
Curtis Callen Smith, 61, 17504 N.W. 20th Ave.,
Newberry, tag attached no assigned, driving with license
suspended or revoked, possession ofcocaine, possession of
controlled substance without a prescription. Bond $2,500.
Constance Sue Squire, 60, 10710 N.E. 11' St.,
Archer, hold warrant grand theft second degree. Florida
Highway Patrol arrest.
Bennie Orval Thomas. 46, 12251 N.E. 102nd Ave.,
Bronson, domestic battery. Bond $30,000.
Michelle L. Vanhoose. 37. 265 Hardee St., Bronson,
theft, shoplifting.
Hewitt Ralph Watkins, 50. 12571 N.E. 151' St.,
Williston, possession of controlled substance without
prescription, felony battery, battery on medical provider.
Bond $75,000.
Rebecca Lee Watts. 47. 500 W. Park Ave., Chiefland,
trespass after warning. Bond $500.
Brandon Michael Yurack, 18, Ocala. disorderly
conduct, burglary of structure unarmed/unoccupied,
criminal mischief more than $200 and less than $1,000,
larceny-petit first, more than $100 and less than $300.
Bond $21,000. Williston Police Department arrest.


Guy Robert, 41, Sarasota, driving with license
suspended or revoked.
Richard T. Brooks, 66,950 N.E. 180"'Ave., Williston,
alligator poaching.
Marcus K. Chever, 28, 21431 N.E. 35"t St., Williston,
two counts of bond surrender on a charge of driving with
license suspended or revoked. Hold for Marion County
- failure to appear on charge of driving with license
suspended or revoked. Bond $12,000. Williston Police
Department arrest.
Kenneth William Colon, 22, 442 S.W. 3rd St., Otter
Creek, driving with license suspended or revoked. Bond
$500.
Robert Michael Fleming, 29, 6202 Riverside Drive,
Yankeetown, driving under the influence. Bond $2,000.
Cedar Key Police arrest.
Terri Ann Harris, 38, 7051 N.W. 105"' St., Chiefland,
two counts of obtaining controlled substance by fraud or
forgery. Bond $2,000.
Walton Hayward, 77, Gulf Hammock, kill/injure/
possess alligator or egg without authority.
Jamie Lee Hemphill, 32, 31 N.W. Williston Arms
Drive, Williston, domestic battery. Bond $7,500.
Kenyatta Daron Howard, 35, Melrose, Fla., failure
to appear driving with license suspended or revoked
(Marion County). Cedar Key Police Department arrest.
Bond $2,000.
James Walter Hunter, 24, 19860 110"' Court, Inglis,
driving under the influence. Inglis Police Department
arrest.
Miranda Lee McClain. 18. 9260 N.E. State Road 24,
Bronson, retail theft. Chiefland Police Department arrest.
Jenette Nichole Paulk, 25, 8550 N.W. 172"d Lane,
Fanning Springs, knowingly driving with driver license
suspended or revoked.
Kevin Delroy Renfroe, 28, 7371 N.E. 91" Terrace,
Bronson, drix ing with license suspended or revoked. Bond


$2,000.
Robin Elizabeth Richburg, 51, West Main St.,
Bronson, domestic battery, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. Bond
$1,500.
Clinton Adams, III, 1945 48'1 St., St. Petersburg, writ
of bodily attachment (child support). Bond $500.
William Addison, 56, 314 N.E. 3rd St., Lot E,
Chiefland, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana. Bond $2,000. Chiefland
Police Department arrest.
Jeffrey Cunigan, 21, 7571 N.W. 153rd Lane,
Chiefland, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Bond $1,500.
Kyle S. Donnelly, 23, 14353 N.E. 128th Lane,
Williston, violation of probation.
William Grady Fortner, 38, 14757 N.E. 60'" St.,
Williston, domestic battery.
Georgia Ann Hamilton, 27, Ocala, driving under
the influence with property damage, driving with license
suspended or revoked. Bond $1,500. Florida Highway
Patrol arrest.
Shantel Lakeesha Haynes, 21, 3824N.E. 210t' Court,
Williston, no driver license bond surrender.
Matthew Carl Huston, 22, 14031 N.E. 140th St.,
Williston, violation of probation. No bond.
Jane Rusby Keene, 59, 7451 N.W. 167th Place,
Fanning Springs/Trenton, disorderly intoxication. Bond
$1,000.
Chester Thourton Kendall, 32, 330 Cobb St.,
Bronson, driving with license suspended or revoked, tag
attached not assigned.
Juan Lopez, 39, Williston, no driver license, refused
breathalyzer, driving under the influence. Bond $5,000.
Illya S. Monroe, 41, 4152 N.E. 210'" Ave., Williston,
dealing in stolen property. Hold for Marion County active
warrant.


Levy deputy forced to disarm man


By Terry Witt
Staff Writer

A man carrying a concealed pistol
in his back pants pocket pulled the gun
on a Levy County sheriff's deputy in
the parking lot ofa convenience store
near Bronson Saturday and had to be
disarmed.
The sheriff's office said Jimmy
Clint Saunders, 69, of 10851 N.E.
128'" Lane, Archer, was arrested on
a charge of aggravated assault on a
law enforcement officer and improper
exhibition of a firearm.
Cpl. Todd Houchin was responding
to a different problem in the parking
lot of Discount Food Mart at 9931
N.E. State Road 24 across the highway
from Bronson Speedway when he was
approached by Saunders.
Saunders wanted to know why


Houchin was at the store and who
had called law enforcement on
him. Houchin told Saunders he was
responding to a different call but
would gladly help him if he needed
assistance.
Houchin said Saunders' behavior
became more bizarre as he began
speaking Spanish and French. Due
to his behavior, Houchin asked for
identification. Saunders produced a
Florida driver's license. Saunders
wasn't wanted by law enforcement.
Houchin gave him back his license
and told him he was free to leave.
Houchin worked the original call, but
noticed Saunders still in the parking
lot.
When Houchin walked back to his
patrol car Saunders stepped into his
path and produced a Florida concealed
firearm permit. Hlouchin told him he


I IM (H


Thomas F. Philman, Certified Operator

S PO Box 872 4 South Main
Chiefland, FL 32644
S Phone: (352) 493-4772
te (352) 493-1051
1-800-242-9224


didn't have to produce the permit and
started to walk away. Saunders said
Ilouchin was pulling his chain, so he
was going to yank the officer's chain.
Saunders reached into his rear
pants pocket and began to pull
something out. Houchin recognized
the handle of the pistol and grabbed
his arm, forcing the .380 ACP semi
automatic Walther to drop back in
Saunders pocket. The gun contained
eight unfired bullets.
Due to the fact that Saunders
displayed the gun in an open parking
lot of a convenience store without
provocation, and attempted to pull
the pistol on a uniformed deputy
sheriff in a marked patrol car, he
was arrested for felony aggravated
assault on a law enforcement officer
and improper exhibition of the gun, a
misdemeanor.


Saunders

Numbers You Should Know

Levy County Sheriff's Office
(352) 486-5111
Williston Police Department
(352) 528-4991
Chiefland Police Department
(352) 493-6777


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We.: re Here To Help!


'l I sLO AD I .C.l I i, AM EAs 352-486-1971
In '2' Hic 4iOU.Ei SFSRVICF

OFFICE LOCATED ACROSS FROM JAIL IN BRONSON "
-. .. .. . .


Levy Animal Clinic
Wade Bullock, DVM
Kendra Philman, DVM
LARGE AND SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

New Hours
M*Th 7:30-6
F 7:30-5 (352) 528-4840
Sat 9-1

. 505 S.W. 7TH STREET WILLISTON FL 32696
S "SOUTH OF THE HOSPITAL" U.S. 41 SOUTH


Quality Health Care For The Entire Family


CHIEFLAND MEDICAL CENTER


Treating Acute and Chronic Conditions
Same Day Appointments for Urgent Conditions
Minor Surgical Minor Trauma Laceration Repair
X-Ray Laboratory EKG Employment Physicals
~ Podiatry Seruices AovailabOl
Convmenient Office Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Noon
1113 N.W. 23rd \ve., Chieflaind
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)

Call (352)493-9500 for an appointment today.


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The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 7


Community Calendar


Yankeetown Women's Club shopping
Start your Christmas shopping now with better than
Black Friday prices at the Yankeetown-lnglis Woman's
Club Thrift Store. The store will have a 50 percent off sale
Dec.l-17. Shop 'til you drop from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Tuesday, Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 5-7 p.m.
(before Bingo) on Thursdays. The Thrift Store is stocked
solely by donations from club members and the community
with new merchandise arriving weekly. So gather your
shopping list and your neighbors and join us at No. 5, 56th
St. in Yankeetown.

"Live The Gift"
Chiefland High School is proud to present "Live The Gift"
Christmas Blessings 2010. Sponsored by the Fellowship
of Christian Athletes ofChiefland High School, the event is
a collaborative effort of Beta, Health Occupations Students
of America, Interact, Future Business Leaders ofAmerica,
Future Farmers of America, and the Student Government
Association to help area families in need during the holiday
season.
To participate, interested individuals should provide a
new toy or non-perishable item to Chiefland High School
through Dec. 15. Beneficiaries of "Live The Gift" are Toys
for Tots, The Children's Table, Tri-County Outreach, and
Another Way.

Chiefland book sale, Dec. 4
The Friends of the Luther Callaway Public Library in
Chiefland will conduct a book sale in conjunction with the
Chiefland Winterfest, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 4 at the
white octagon building on N.E. 1st Ave., next to the fire
station, and visible from U.S. 19. There will be hundreds of
hardcover books, paperbacks, audio books, videos, jigsaw
puzzles and children's books for sale at great prices. Hardly
anything will be sold for over a dollar and most will be
offered for much less. For more information, stop by the
library or contact "Friends" president Tom Reitz at 493-
1896, 494-5413 or tomreitz@msn.com. All proceeds go to
support the Luther Callaway Public Library.

Dudley Farm Cane Grinding Day
Dudley Farm Historic State Park will host its annual
Cane Grinding Day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 4. Visitors
will have the opportunity to step back in time to a
representative living history "cracker style" working farm.
A demonstration will be given of cane grinding the way
it used to be done when neighbors gathered to harvest the
cane, grind it at a mule-powered mill and cook the syrup
over a fat lightered fire. There will be craft demonstrations,
entertainment, food and drinks, and vendors. Admission
is $5 per carload. The farm is located on Newberry Road,
four miles east of Newberry and seven miles west of 1-75.
For more information, call (352) 472-1142 or visit www.
floridastateparks.org/dudleyfarm.

Old Town UMC Cookie Walk
The Old Town United Methodist Women will hold a
Cookie Walk from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 4. Participants can
purchase the size tin they wish to fill, walk past tables of
fancy cookies, and with a gloved hand they fill the tin with
the cookies of their choice. The funds are used to support
mission projects locally, nationally and around the world.
The church is near the traffic light in Old Town.

Williston Book Fair
The Friends of the Williston Public Library will have its
December, First Saturday Book Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Dec. 4. in the Williston City Hall Community Center.
This will be the group's last book fair before Christmas and
will be an excellent opportunity to pick up a book or two
for gifts for friends who are readers. Book lovers love used
books as long as they are clean and in good shape and if
covers, pages and bindings are whole and firm.
Some books are new or barely held. Tapes and videos
and puzzles are also available and everything is very low
priced. Volunteers to help are always sought for Thursday
night, Friday morning and Saturday for the sale and packing
up at the end.
Call Mary McDaniell at 528-5972 to volunteer or for
more information.
There is no book fair in January. This will be the last
time to stock up on books before February.

Chiefland Christmas Festival and Parade
The 2010 Chiefland Christmas Festival and Parade will
be held Dec. 4 in downtown Chiefland at the historic train
depot, Trailhead Park and the surrounding area on U.S.
Hwy. 19.
The Festival will begin at 10 a.m. with arts and crafts,
music and song, and activities for children. The lighted
parade theme "Let it Snow" starts at 6 p.m., followed by
the evening celebration that includes the lighting ceremony,
caroling and visits with Santa.
Non-profit groups are invited to sell food items or crafts
for fundraising. Choirs, musicians and other entertainers
are invited to perform. Local businesses are reminded to
enter the storefront lighting and decorating contest.
For further information or registration forms please call
the Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce at (352)
493-1849 or visit our website at www.chieflandchamber.
comn.

Kids Ranch Rodeo
Cross Brand Cowboy Church will host the Kids Ranch
Rodeo at the Williston Horseman's Park beginning at 4
p.m. Dec. 4. Sign up is at 3 p.m. Kids age 12 and under
are welcome to attend. For more information please contact
Ginny Keith at (352)221-4951.

Cedar Key Toastmasters, Gavel Club, Dec. 5
Young people of Levy County have a unique opportunity
to participate in leadership growth and public speaking as
members of the Gavel Club. The next meeting will begin
at 4 p.m. Dec. 5 in the Cedar Key Library Meeting Room.
There are no fees or dues. Gavel Club members are under
the age of 18. Toastmaster members are 18 and older.
Potential members and visitors are welcome.


For the past several meetings we have had at least two
prepared speeches per meeting. Members learn techniques
that enhance effectiveness. Stretch your horizon. Join the
Cedar Key Gavel Club or the Toastmasters Club. For more
information contact Gene Benedict at (352) 949-0411


-, , '








Dottie South and the Slackers will perform at the
Dixie Music Center Christmas Concert, set for
Dec. 5 in Old Town.
Dixie Music Center Christmas Concert
Dixie Music Center will host "An Old Town Christmas"
concert beginning at 2 p.m. Dec. 5 at 26626 S.E. 19
Highway in Old Town.. The Christmas concert is their
way to kick off the holiday season with the beautiful music
of Christmas and is an event the entire family can enjoy
together.
Choir members from the First Christian Church of
Chiefland will perform with a backup band and will sing
three Christmas favorites.
In addition, members of the Rock Bluff Band will be
on hand to sing and play several Christmas standards with
lots of harmony. Also on the bill is Naomi Cooke, who has
picked out a couple of her favorite Cristmas songs. Bruce
Miller and Robbie Blake will team up on a couple of songs
and "Dotti South and th e Slackers" will end the show with
a rousing set of many Christmas stand-bys. There will also
be performances by other special guests.
The Dixie County Historical Society will be on hand
selling refreshmentsand there will be free candy canes for
all the kids! The concert is free, but the center is asking
for donations of a non-perishable food item to be given
to the local food bank. So, bring your family, a blanket or
lawn chairs, and sit under the live oak trees and enjoy an
afternoon of the music of Christmas.

Nature Coast Business Dev. Council meeting,
Dec. 6
The Policy and Evaluation Committee of the Nature
Coast Business Development Council, Inc. will meet at
noon, Dec. 6 at Central Florida College, located at 114
Rodgers Blvd. in Chiefland. The fleeting is open to the
public.

LSWR bird walk
The Lower Suwannee Wildlife Refuge will host a bird
walk Dec. 6. The plan is foree, the group to do aivig and
stopping kind of exploration so that folks who are not ip to
fairly long walks will have an opportunity to participate. To
make it even more sociable, organizers will have the group
meet at 8:30 am. foo breakfast at Gail's Cafe in OldaTowrn
on CR 349, and then depart around 9 akm.
INrhe tour will include Yellovjacket Loop Road, Beaver
Dam Roadl and Weeks Landing Road in the nothrn most
part ofBthe refuge. CallJoyce Tanlow at 352/498-2886 for
further details.

CFC digital photography, editing
The College of Central Florida Levy Center will
offer a new two-session class for the amateur digital
photographer.
Advanced Digital Photography and Editing for the
Amateur will be offered from 6-8 p.m. on Dec. 7 and 14.
at the Levy Center, 114 Rodgers Blvd. in Chiefland. The
course fee is $49.
Students will learn advanced photo editing techniques
using Adobe Photoshop Elements software. They will also
learn how to use layers, how to combine photographs and
other advanced manipulation techniques, as well as how to
create special effects.
The class will be taught by Bill Kilborn, who has earned
the Master of Photography Degree and the Photographic
Craftsman Degree from the Professional Photographers of
America.
Anyone interested can register in person at the Levy
Center, by telephone at (352) 493-9533, or online at
CFltraining.ctedu (select Levy noncredit classes).


Players auditions, Dec. 7th & 11t`
The Suwannee Valley Players calls for auditions for
"oThe Drowsy Chapseone," the new musical comedy that is
swooping into town with tons olf laghs. The players invite
all men and women at all experience levels to audition at
7 p.m. Dec. 7 and at II a.m. ..Dec. 1 the Chiefheater, 25
East Park Ave. in Chiefland. Auditions include a cappella
vocal selection, dance audition, and script reading. People
should wear comfortable, dance or athletic clothes and
shoes.
Join the cast of this musical within a comedy crammed
full of every clich, gag and gimmick from the golden age
of musicals. Complete with a wealthy dowager, debonair
bridegroom, a harried producer, jovial gangsters posing as
pastry chefs, a flaky "ateldzig" choru(352)s girl trying to steal
the stage, a Latin lothario trying to woo the bride-to-be,
an aviatrix, anper of cose, the drowsy chapee, the new musical comedy that is
boasts thrills and surprises that take both the cast (literally) invite
and the audience (metaphorically) soaring into the rafters!
Opportunities exist foall musicians (levrmset/perc audition
bass gp.m. itaDec, ke. 7 yboads, 2-4 flua.m. Dte or trees, tombonheate, 2-3
trEampets),t Park behind-he-scenes persAuditionnel, including costume
voaesigl selectingn, set and scenery dsign/constrction anreading. People
stage and house crew.
ReJoin hear csals schedtild with cast consideration begin in
Decmfull erof Janevery cliche show rands March 25 -April 3, 20age10
on Fridegrooays and h Satrried producerays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30
p.m. Contact fairector Staccy chorus giau at (352) 246t
803 or strenteseaurprises thmail.cot takem oth the cast visitt .slaerally)s.
org opportunities exist for musicians (drumset/percussionion

WWIItrump vets Chistmas, ec. 9
design/socal World War and Veterans desill hagn/conse a tructhriston, ands
celebrationdays and Saturdaysm. Dc. at the ISundays Room in
the Cedar Cove lotel. A special guest will lead the group
in singing World War II era Christmas songs. For more


information, contact Dot Halvorsen at (352) 542-7697 or
(352) 284-6850.

Haven Hospice holiday coping program
Haven Hospice of the Tri-Counties will sponsor a
program during the holidays designed to assist individuals
and families who are coping after a loss. The program
will be held from 10-11:30 a.m. Dec. 7 and Dec. 14 at the
Hospice, located at 311 N.E. 9th St. in Chiefland. For more
information, call Alesha Smith at .(352) 493-2333.

Hummingbird program at Chiefland Library,
Dec. 9
The Friends of the Luther Callaway Public Library will
present a program on hummingbirds at 1 p.m. Dec. 9 at
the Library in Chiefland. The presenter will be John Myer.
He will discuss hummingbirds' habitat, eating habits and
tell how to attract hummingbirds to backyards. For more
information, contact Tom Reitz, President of the Friends
of the Luther Callaway Public Library, at 493-1896 or
949-5413, or at tomreitz@msn.com, or call the Library in
Chiefland at 493-2758.

Williston Ribbon Cutting
The Williston Chamber of Commerce has schedule%' a
ribbon cutting for one of its newest members, Bar Ranch
Equipment beginning at 1:45 p.m. Dec. 9, just outside
the main gate at Williston Airport, 1769, S.W. 18th St. in
Williston.

Friends of the Chiefland Library meeting and
social
The Friends of the Luther Callaway Public Library
will hold their monthly meeting at 11 a.m. Dec. 9 at the
Library, 104 N.E. 3rd Street, Chiefland, a block behind
City Hall. This month's brief business meeting will be
followed by an informal social. Prospective members and
guests are invited. The Luther Callaway Public Library is
the Chiefland Branch of the Levy County Public Library
System. For an agenda, email: tomreitz@msn.com. For
further information, call FLCPL president Tom Reitz at
493-1896 or 949-5413.

Bringing back the whooping cranes, Dec. 10
Ben Weiss, Whooping Crane Intern at Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge Complex, will give a slide
presentation on the national effort to revitalize the
whooping crane populations. The program will be held at
10 a.m., Dec. 10 at the Ellie Schiller Education Center in
the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, at 1001 Old Rock Road,
Yankeetown. Admission is free.
Weiss will discuss the captive breeding and rearing
techniques of chicks in their Wisconsin habitat and their
migration from their breeding grounds to the crane's winter
refuge at Chassahowitzka. The presentation will focus on
the annual ultralite-led migration plus their care once they
reach Florida. For more information, call (352) 447-6186
or send an email to friendswgp@bellsouth.net

Williston chili cookoff
The Williston Community Redevelopment Agency
will host its sixth annual chili cook-off to benefit the local
food bank at 6 p.m. Dec. 10 at the downtown pavilion. All.
contestants must register their entry of five quarts of chili by
5:30 p.m. at the pavilion. The entry fee of 10 cans of food
will be collected for the local food pantry. Prizes of first,
second and third place will be given for the mild and spicy
division. The chili cook-off is part of the festivities at the
pavilion along with Light Up Williston. To obtain a copy
of the official rules and registration form, please contact
Nan Mack at City Hall, 528-3060. The City of Williston
Community Redevelopment Agency is a board of volunteer
citizens under the leadership of the City Council.

Fish Fry Meal
The Ladies Guild and Fellowship Ministry of the Holy
Family Catholic Church of Williston will host a Fish Fry
Meal at 5 p.m. Dec. 10 in the Parish Hall. Admission is
$7 for adults, $6 for seniors age 70 and older, and $4 for
children age 12 and under.
Door prizes will be given away and a drawing will be
had for a free meal at the next monthly meal.

Players present "Yes Virginia, There Is A
Santa Claus"
The Suwannee Valley Players are proud to present this
year's Christmas play, "Yes Virginia, There Is A Santa
Claus" by Pat Cook. It is a delightful start to your holiday
celebrations. Bring the whole family to see the famous
editorial that appeared in 1897 in the New York Sun, the
most published editorial ever written.
"Dear Editor, is there a Santa Claus?" is a question
innocently asked by 8-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon
(Makenna Hamilton). Christmas was coming and all was
right with the world ... until her friends, Missy (Sarah
Manders) and Charly (Sydney Allen), mischievously fill
her in on the "facts" about Old Saint Nick.
Who could tell her the truth? Not her father, a doctor
(Andrew Kelly) who is always fighting against old world
cures. Not her teacher (Barbara Clemens), who is already
fed up with Christmas even though it hadn't arrived. So
Virginia writes a letter to the editor (Perry Davidson) of
The New York Sun, for her father always said, "lf you see it
in The Sun, it's so."
Virginia's letter falls into the hands of Francis P. Church
(Buddy Leaptrot), a veteran editorial writer who knows he
must answer, and must answer truthfully. And so he begins
his reply, which becomes one of the most memorable and
cherished editorials in newspaper history.
Also appearing is Katherine Woodham (Mama), Darby
Allen (Mrs. Madison), Janice Grant (Mrs. Marbury), and
Duwane Schwingel (Father Michael / Lige).
"Yes, Virginia" runs for two weekends, December 3 5
and 10 12. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Fridays and
Saturday. and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $8 for
students (K-12) and seniors (65 and over), and $10 for
adults. On Sunday, Dec. 5th, attendees can receive $1 off


admission with a new, unw rapped toy for Toys for 'lots.
The Chief Theatre is located at 25 Fast Park Ave. in
Chielland. For more information, call (352) 493-ARTS or
visit \Vwww\.s\ players. org.
See Calendar, Page 8








NEWS
8 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal



JackWilkinson Levy Campus getting bigger and bigger


By Rick Burnham
Editor

The College of Central Florida's Jack Wilkinson Levy
Campus, planned for a spot north of Chiefland on U.S. 19,
appears months from becoming a reality. Legislators in
Tallahassee are still mulling over critical funding that will
allow the school to officially break ground.
But, to their credit, CFC isn't exactly standing idly by
while politicians ponder.
The school recently announced it had purchased an
additional 3.24 acres of land, bringing the current proposed
campus to a whopping 40.44 acres. That's a far cry from
the 15.4 donated by Jack and Loy Ann Mann in 2009,
and enough to prompt words of excitement from Marilyn
Ladner, Provost and Executive Director of College Planning
for CFC's Levy Center.
"Since then (the Mann's donation), we have purchased
some additional parcels, giving us a little more than 40


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acres," she said. "It allowed us to expand our footprint of the
campus, so that we would have the room not just to begin,
but to grow as more facilities are required."
The most recent purchase, one for $575,000 that the CFC
Board of Trustees approved in mid September, will give
the school some much-needed infrastructure, long before a
shovel ever hits the ground.


"It is very exciting," Ladner said. "It has two existing
buildings and both are in very good condition. We will
use them for long-term maintenance, or perhaps technical
education, or a combination of the two."
As for actual construction, Ladner said the current
legislative session could provide the news CFC and the
tri-county area is looking for.
"We are quite encouraged that we will get good news,
hopefully this legislative session," she said. "We are working
hard to make sure that the legislature fully understands the
project and its value. We need to make sure that this project
remains a top priority for funding. It is something we cannot
confirm, but something we must work hard at to make it
happen."
The proposed campus will be named for Levy County
educator Jack Wilkinson, who bestowed $2.5 million in
June 2009. That brought the funds raised locally to nearly $4
million, and CFC used that to leverage moving its building
projects up on the list of priorities for legislators to consider.


Calendar, from Page 7


"The Real Gift" Dec. 10
D&D Dance Studios, Inc. presents "The Real Gift,"
a CIii .i[n.i. recital, beginning at 6 p.m. Dec. 10 in the
Chiefland High School auditorium. Admission will be a new
toy for local charities to benefit the community. Admission
is free for children age 12 and under.

American Legion Auxiliary fundraiser, Dec.
11
American Legion Auxiliary No. 91 will be having its
semi-monthly fundraising effort,
"inside sale," asking for only cash donations, from 8
a.m. to noon Dec. 11. The group is located by the Future
Farmers of America Arena on Hwy. 129 and CR307,
between Trenton and Bell. The group welcomes outside
vendors also. For information call (352) 463-3901.

Cookies By The Ton
Turning Point Ministries will hold its third annual
"Cookies By the Ton" sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 11.
The sale will be held at Turning Point, 16750 N.W. 60th
Ave., (Dairy Road) in Trenton.

The Turning Point Elves have been busy baking and
decorating cookies for your buying pleasure. Cookies will
be sold by weight and the customer will able to select their
own. All proceeds will be directed towards ministries of
the church.


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Festival of Trees Cedar Key Museum State
Park
The second annual Festival of Trees at Cedar Key
Museum State Park will feature a beautiful display of holiday
greenery displayed by local non-profit organizations. The
trees will be on display during museum hours of Thursday
through Monday, 10 a.m. through 5 pm. This event is free
and visitors can vote for the favorite decorated tree. Please
note there is a separate fee of $2 per person (free for children
under six) to view the museum exhibits and the Whitman
House. For more information, call (352) 543-5350.

Suwannee River Fair news
Dates associated with the upcoming Suwannee River
Fair have been released by the fair committee. They include
weigh-ins and tag-ins for feeder steers 7-9 a.m. Dec. 4;
swine 7-10 a.m. Dec. 11; and heifers 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dec. 11.
In addition, the fair book committee is selling senior
pages to be included in the fair book this year. Much like
the senior pages in the high school yearbook, these pages
give our senior participants an opportunity to look back at
their years of involvement in the fair. These pages can be
purchased through Future Farmers of America advisors or
4H leaders.
Also, it is now the time for seniors to complete their
scholarship applications. Each year, the Suwannee
River Fair awards two $500 scholarships to the selected
applicants. The deadline for submission is March 2, 2011


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(all applications must be postmarked no hand delivery).
The entry deadline for all non-sale animals is Jan. 5,
2011. This includes horse, goat, dairy cow, rabbits, and
poultry. All applications must be completed with required
entry fee and postmarked by this date. No hand delivery is
accepted.
Scholarship information and animal registration forms
can be found at mysrf.org or by calling Marti Smith at
(352) 262-1829.

Festival of Lights, Christmas Boat Parade
The 22nd Annual Festival of Lights and Christmas Boat
Parade will be held Dec. 11. The Fanning Springs Chamber
of Commerce reports that a number of various crafters have
indicated they will attend our Festival of Lights celebration.
Anyone wanting to enter their crafts, foods or more can
do so up until Dec. 7 and can download an application at
www.fanningspringschamber.com Non-profit organization
booths are free and discounts are being offered for others.
There is no entry fee for the festival itself.
Toys for Tots will have Santa all ready to greet the
children again this year at the festival. In addition, elephant
and pony rides will be offered, and music from a number
of popular artists will be available as well. The juggler that
fascinates everyone will be back too, and the Classic Car
Show will have a lot of beauties to show off.
In addition, the Suwannee River Boat Club is busy
selling those cute little yellow rubber ducks for the Duck
Race on the river in the afternoon. The Boat Parade will
follow that evening.
Finally, the chamber will hold a yard sale on Nov. 13
behind Huckleberry's BBQ. Anyone who would like to
donate items can call Velma Poole at (352) 339-2248 or the
chamber office at (352) 463-9089.

Dunnellon Farmers Market
The Dunnellon Farmers Market is held from 2-6 p.m.
each Tuesday in Dunnellon's Historic Train Depot. Call
Sam Scott at (352) 229-1030, or go to
dunnellonfarmersmarket@Qgmail.com for more
information.



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XJEWS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 9


Clay Landing Days gives springs visitors a peek into past

By Rick Burnham
Editor '

Visitors to Manatee Springs State Park Saturday got -'
lessons in history and ecology, and a free ride through '.
the park on a covered wagon as part of the annual "Clay '
Landing Days" celebration.
Actually, the covered wagon was nothing more than a f
trailer pulled by a state park pick-up truck, but it was more
than enough to take 15 or so visitors on a ride down nature O
trails filled with enactments of the early pioneer days of
Levy County. _
They included a small family living off the land in the T.;",.
wilderness; a group of Seminole Indians making camp and of Ft''
engaging in an active trade process; and the passengers of
a covered wagon that had broken its axle while traveling
through the region, keeping themselves busy with crafts
while the wagon was being repaired.
Gary and Xenia, of Dade City, Fla., gave the visitors a .....
first-hand look at cooking with a "Dutch Oven," on a pit h
with fire they built out of brush from the forest. Gary spoke Park Ranger Vicki Tis-
of the scientific process for building a fire, quizzing younger r Ranger Vicki Tis
members of the group on the three ingredients needed for eth speaks to visitors Gary, an early pioneer, demonstrates how to use a Dutch oven for visitors
fire. A young visitor answered correctly -they are heat, fuel during the Clay Landing to Clay Landing Days, held Saturday and Sunday at Manatee Springs State
and oxygen and was one of the first to receive a biscuit Days tour Park.
cooked over the pit. Each visitor got one, and ate as Gary ,
went over some of the characteristics of the American alligator. He had the head of a 4- tI
footer, and told the group that the number of inches from the end of the gator's snout to their
eyes was equivalent to the number of feet long the gator was.
None of a small group of Seminole Indians camping nearby had a gator head (yet), .. .-
but they were more than interested in trading the group horses and supplies for one of its
women, drawing laughs from the crowd.
A small group from Fanning Springs role-played Seminole Indians, including Michael
and Heather Nealey, Pam Burney, Wally Pattison, and one gentleman who would only 1. .
answer to "Bear's Heart." They answered questions from the group while Laney Burney
demonstrated the process of pounding corn to get the grits from it. Aferward, she said,
they add a lot of water to create a substance called "sofke." -
"It is usually cooking on the fire all the time," she said. "If you are hungry, you just get
some. It is good for everybody, from the little babies right on up to the older folks."
Traditional Seminole Indian music came from one corner of the camp via a flute played
by Jeremy DeBerry of Ocala. Uh oh. These early settlers were left stranded when a wheel broke on their
"They call me 'Mvhaya' which is Mikasuki for teacher," he said. covered wagon. Not to fear though, they had plenty of crafts to keep them
Mvhaya was playing a rivercane flute, or a reed flute, like a Seminole might have used. busy.
"It is native to Florida, and looks a lot like a bamboo flute," he said. "There are some
small differences, but it looks pretty much the same as bamboo." Y
DeBerry participates in a wide variety of festivals and demonstrations, and has r.. .
portrayed Seminoles of the 1830s era, as well as other Indian tribes which were common ju""
in this area prior to the arrival of the Spaniards. .. .
"I also do Scottish," he said. "On any given day, I could be in a different century." -- ,
The group walked away from the Seminole camp with an enhanced understanding of
the way the Indians lived, and moments later were at the scene of a covered wagon that
had thrown a wheel.
There, Dottie James was busy weaving products for use by pioneers young and old.
"I have been doing this living history for 20 years," she said. "All over the state."
To her left Margie Stansfield and Karen Cross, both of Lake City, were demonstrating
the use of"inkle looms" to create garments.
"It's like tinkle, without the 't'," she joked to a visitor.
In between stops, Park Ranger Vicki Tiseth provided plenty of historical facts about
the park, as well as tidbits about the foliage and animal life that could be found within the
park's borders.
"The No. 1 thing we are protecting is the spring," she said. "But in addition to the
spring, what you don't see is that we have over 14 miles of underground caves that feed
the spring. It is an ever-changing environment under there."
Tiseth added that water in the spring comes from all over Florida, up into Georgia and The Seminole Indians were a musical folk, as Dottie James is part of a
Alabama. Mvhaya (Ocala native Jeremy DeBerry) dem- group stranded on the side
"Sometimes the water can be hundreds of years old, and other times it can be from onstrates for the crowd. of the trail.
yesterday's rainfall," she said. "Something put in the ground, as far as 10 or 15 miles away,
will show up in our spring in a few days or a few weeks."
The land of the park, slightly more than 2,400 acres, is also being preserved and 4 .
managed, Tiseth added. .
"Our goal is to preserve the land as Mother Nature intended for it to be preserved, so ., .
that there will always be this little piece of Florida here for people to come and see what it .
looked like before we came in and built over the top of it," she said.
The best way to do that, she added, is through carefully planned and controlled bums. .- '.
"We really should start seeing a lot more pine trees, she said. "Before we came and
stopped the progress of fire, Florida was covered predominantly by pine trees. Huge,
magnificent pine trees. The normal pattern was that lightning would strike and it would
start a fire and it would travel all the way across the state to the other side. There was
nothing to put it out. The long leaf pines were tall enough to survive."
Tiseth gave the visitors a detailed history of park land ownership, including Issac
Hardee, and later, Ellison and Ester Ann Hardee, who sold the land to the state.
"Ellison Hardee decided that, in order to protect this land, the best way to do it was to
sell it to the state, and allow them to create a park or a reserve," she said. "And you are
looking at what we have done with it."
The day's events included the wagon rides each hour, as well as the unveiling of
several small monuments near the springhead to mark the occasion.

Daj dvi iA en "


.IVll L Ii i U.Phi th D u 4I ( iH *V inyl S id ing .
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f I1., mfl, ,Ihi,, *Skirting Laney Burney of Fanning Springs demonstrates how to pound corn down
I'.r[ iR flli to make "sofke", which she says was a great thing for the Seminole Indians
25'mENon 'iJis iflolk iH i tlld ( aO% ~i-i*i J *% Hto eat on the go.


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NEsws

10 Dec 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


First Baptist Church
I. 1 vid'Ti
511 N. Young Blvd. iUS Alt. 27)
352-493-1481
Visit us online at
%\ w .IbC'Chiefland.com
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Bible Sudy Ior all ages', 9'3 a.m.
Worship 1o.45 a.n. & 6(X) p.sm.


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
OF CHIEFLAND


Sunday:
Sunday School o:1sarn
Disciplhip How 5:o, pi
Ewinh WIship :3,p;y f


CONCORD
I-- BAPTIST CHURCH
5551NW CR 336
1 Cictland. IL 32626
S (352) 493-1219
COME JOIN US!
Sunday School................ ....... 10 a.m.
Vorshtp Service........................... I I a.m.
Diecipleship Training........... 6 p.m.
W worship Service...........................7 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer Service...........7 p.m.

Pastor Jamie Brock


Sunday School.............................................9:15 a.n
Morning Worship..............................8:00& 10:30a.n
Evening W orship................................. ........... 6:00 p.
Wednesday Night Service
AW ANA ....................................................6:30 8:15 p.r
Prayer Meeting, Youth, College & Career............7:00 p.r
~ Nursery provided for all services -


FAMILY BIBLE
CHAPEL
"The Little Church
With A Big God"
For over 16 years, continues to
present the inspirational words
of God from the Bible.
Come join us at
12 N Main Street, Chiefland
Sunday: Family Worship Service:
10:30am
463-6369
George Blythe, Pastor


Bronson Road Church
Located behwen Newano y & Bn,sson om CR 337
352-486-2S98
Sunday Schoorl r all Woa @ 9 a. n.
Sunday Wlori.h o @ ro:1 ia.m. and5 p.nm.
Wednesday activities for children, youth &
adults inrclumdc pot hick supper c@ 6 p.n.,
Setvia's 0 or p.m-. 7.o0 p
Pastor Andy Cook


Tuesday
Sr: Adult Bible Study r'-cvnt


y ,l d Shepherd
Lutheran
d 4 Church

Bible Class g:15am
Worship Service o.:3oam
352.493-4597

4 miles N ofWalmarton Hwy g1
beforet Dakota Win)y)

Otter Creek
Baptist Church
Bro. Tony Barber, Pastor
Services...
Sunday-
Sunday School 9:00am
Worship 10:00am
Wednesday-
Dinner 5:30pm
Awanas 6:00pm
Worship 7:00pm
171 SW 3rd Street Otter Creek
352-486-2112


Elzey United

Methodist Church

Corner of 336 & Hwy 24

Worship Service......... 1:00am
Sunday School..............9:45am

Pastor Terry Knight


Pine Grove Baptist Church
16655 NW CR 339
Trenton, FL. 32693
352-463-2151
www.pgbdl.com

n. Dr. Greg Douglas, Pastor
m. Rev. Rickey Whitley, Minister of
m, Evangelism& Youth
Rev. Emanuel Harris, Ministerof
m. Education& Children
m. Charles Brock, Music Director
alred Douglas, Collega & Career


ST JOHN THEEVANGEIST
CATHOLIC CHURCH
4050 N.W. Hwy. 27
493-1561 or 493-9723
Saturday Evening 5:30pm
Sunday 8:30am
Religious Education Class
Wed 6:00pm-7:10pm
pre K-12th
Father Joe McDonell


Don't see your
church here?
Help us help you
spread the good
word. Call Dana
at 490-4462
today!


The rewards of sacrifice


LEARNING HOUR: 9AM
WORSHIP: 10:14AM


u


Card ofThanks
The Pat Travers family would like to extend their
deepest gratitude to all who helped celebrate the
life of Pat Travers, shared their stories and moments
with him. We especially want to thank Paige and
the Levy County EMTs, Erica in dispatch, Johnny
Smith and all the deputies and emergency personnel
who responded to the 911 call. All your love and
support helped to make this painful event easier to
deal with. For those of you who provided food,
financial assistance, prayers, songs, flowers, plants,
chairs, firewood, phone calls, advice, concern, and
all other support .. THANK YOU.


I*dN OUR NEW
FA~CILITY8~l
CR 341 (DafiryRoad
Children's Church^B


A Non-Denominational
Faith Community


/


PASTOR: KENT ZIMMERMANN
CELL 352-949-6501


707 N. Main St.* 493-4627


First Baptist Church

Serving God & Loving People"


Wednesday
CN mr6i S .tqt, 5"'ih/pm
*V1/ Chfildrt s Pni'nm 1 0r3/w
Full/ Thnttl Youth, i-:3oym
Pmry Hou, 63,,o, n


Pastor Troy A. Turner
451 S.Court Street Bronson, FL 32621- 352.486.2282


Come and Worship at the little
county church in town...
8:45 am Sunday School
9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship
6:30 pm Sunday Evening Service
S7:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study
2 ". Reverend Priscilla Scherrah, Pastor
Bronson United Methodist Church
Tel. 352-486-2281 235 Court Street
Bronson, Florida


.4


i ?




i.g
. ,,
S,. ..?... : ;


Melvin and Sarah Jones

Singer, songwriter, evangelist and heart transplant recipient!
Melvin Jones and Wife Sarah Will Be At 66 S.E. 964th St.
In Old Town at 6 p.m. Dec. 12.



Suwannee Valley Fellowship!


Call (352) 339-2732 for more information.


Years ago my mom had a date with
this fellow who pulled up in a shiny new
Jaguar. Poor sucker thought it'd be nice
to invite us kids to go with them to the
Red Lobster. BIG mistake. However,
my six year old little brother Heath ..,
and I dived in that miniature back seat .
before mom could even try to talk him ; "
out of it. Yee-doggy. You talk about the
Clampetts coming to town? I hadn't felt
so highfalutin since we'd talked momma ...
into squealing rubber in our yellow Vega
out back of the Tasty Freeze!
Poor mom. She couldn't stop biting
her nails and looking back. I knew she
was just waiting for us to live down But Any
to her expectations. Seeing her so But AiyV
jittery made me feel plumb awful, so I with G
whomped Heath in the back of the head;
figuring he was mostly to blame. The
little booger looked up from under his cotton-white mop
top and gritted what baby teeth he had left. "Whatcha do
that for?" He demanded. He proceeded to stab me with
an ink pen, and after a short scuffle, I was forced to tell
momma on him. With that, he spit on me and went back
to writing his name on that fancy cow smelling seat. Mom
gave us her best scowl. It was her way of reminding us of
her last three dates, which we'd run off before they even
made it to the front stoop.
I don't know... Heath and I had never been too keen
on that new kid-friendly, 'Mr. Sensitive' act so popular
with the 'players' back in the 70's. Yeah, this cat had good
taste in cars, but we weren't easily fooled. Something
about him reminded us of a politician. This Red Lobster
thing was probably just a ploy to get our vote. One thing
was for sure, he hadn't done his homework. Yes, mom
was prettier than a young Ellie May, but everyone knew
the word on the street was she had a pair of kids wilder
than two lop eared monkeys raised in a hollow stump.
At any rate, Heath kept up his doodling, and I was glad.
I figured if I could keep him busy we might keep from
running off this fellow until we'd at least had a chance to
chew a heap of that fancy ocean food he'd be springing
for. I winked at momma to let her know 1 had it all under
control.
Once in the restaurant we behaved pretty well, at least
for the first four or five minutes. After that, the sugar rush
kicked in from all the candy I'd stolen from the bowl up
front. Then we commenced bouncing around like two
rookies in the Pro Rodeo bull riding finals. Heath was
closest, so momma whacked him one good. The little


1


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Wo rhItI


booger merely scrunched his nose up and
t slid underneath the table and off towards
S the restroom before I could trip him or
anything.
"1 gotta go pee-pee," he called out
Loudly across the restaurant. Some people
snickered. It was totally embarrassing.
So I yelled back, "Don't eat the toilet
mints you little munchkin!" Momma
whomped me with her menu, then
quickly turned to force a plastic smile at
that politician of hers.
A few minutes later the place was a
buzz with Heath's return. He was zipping
from table to table; his fly wide open,
doing his best "Hulk" imitation. He'd
ray... stare longingly at everyone's food and
y Sheffield then call out, "Munchkin Man!" He was
like some sort of three foot tall super
hero lounge lizard working the room.
Needless to say, that was our last ride in a Jaguar.
Poor ole' momma never even got past the first stop on the
campaign trail. I reckon I should shoulder some of the
blame, but it isn't like I didn't try to keep Heath busy.
But anyway- Obviously there are seasons in our lives
we're called to make sacrifices. Momma did, raising two
kids as a single parent. She could've pawned us off on
somebody else while she pursued her own happiness,
but she didn't. She put herself aside and stood up to
her responsibilities like a parent should. I believe that's
commendable before God. Thanks mom!
Many times I have to remind myself that if reaching
my dreams has to come at the expense of my family or
friends, then 1 probably have my sights set on the wrong
mark. What if God's ultimate plan for our lives is we
be willing to lay down our dreams to help someone else
reach theirs? (Greater love hath no man than this, that a
man lay down his life for his friends. John 15:13 KJV)
Instead of getting bitter over the sacrifices we've made,
and fretting over what might've been, maybe we should
try giving thanks for being given the opportunity to be
more like our Savior. Jesus laid down everything for us.
Who knows? With the right campaign strategy one
day we might all have one of those highfalutin Jaguars
chariots waiting on us up in heaven! 1 can almost see
momma squealing rubber out back of those pearly gates
now.
-Guy Sheffield
You can visit Guy Sheffield at his website
www.butanvwav.orq, or email him at
sfm4christ(cigmailcom.


Card ofThanks
Our sincerest gratitude for all the thoughts,
cards, flowers, foods and prayers during the
loss of our mother, Laura M. Watson.
We live among the most caring and
generous friends and neighbors in the world.
May God richly bless each of you.
The family of Mama Watson in Gulf
Hammock, Fla.








EDITORIAL

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010



Raising


canes
By Rick Burnham
Editor


My dad is in town, and when
my dad is in town, that means
someone is going to be
headed to the woods with an
ax in their hands.
Some years ago, Dad discovered that
the roots of the Myrtle bush make a right
angle just below the dirt, and that makes
for an ideal walking cane. So he took to
digging them up, sanding them to create
a smooth surface, and then painting them
- usually with some sort of Red, White
and Blue design. His walking canes get
compliments wherever he goes.
When Dad came down in July, my
nephew Stan from Gainesville took him
to the woods to collect Myrtle bushes.
Stan came back covered in mosquito bites
- around 56, as I remember. But Dad got
his walking canes, and was the happiest
86-year-old around.
So this time around it was up to me,
and Dad and I headed out Thanksgiving
morning to a deserted road in a county
not too far away. The air was cool enough
that I knew mosquitoes would not be a
problem, but that was little consolation.
Digging up Myrtle bushes can be hard
work. Dad said he wanted a dozen.
We had gone 100 or so yards down the
road when Dad called out for me to stop.
He had spotted a Myrtle bush he might be
interested in from the truck.
Here is the thing about Myrtle bushes:
If it were just a walking cane buried in the
dirt, then digging it up would be a simple
thing, and a father and son might get back
home in time to have their Thanksgiving
meal at a reasonable hour. That's not the
case though. There are any number of
roots heading out in different directions
from the main part of the plant, oftentimes
intertwining with those from other bushes
in the vicinity. Oftentimes, for every part
of the main plant you hack through, there
seems to one or two more that still exist.
They don't grow in the middle of
an open field, either. Dense forest stood
between me and the first victim, woods
so thick that I could barely see five feet in
any one direction. Seeing this, Dad offered
a few words of caution as I prepared to
plunge in.
"Watch out for rattlesnakes."
Here is the thing about reptiles: I don't
like them. And it would be my luck to
encounter one while on my hands and
knees digging away dirt to determine the
extent of the root system attached to the
myrtle bush my dad would like to make
into a patriotic walking cane. Popped by
a rattler. Nipped by a water moccasin that
had slithered out of the bog. Gnawed on by
a coral snake, and left to stagger out to the
truck and drop like a sack of potatoes.
Perhaps latched onto by a deer tick
and given a hefty dose of Lyme Disease.
Gouged by a wild sow, intent on protecting
her piglets, which just happen to be
bedding close to the Myrtle Dad picked
out. Ajungle it was.
Undeterred, I swung that hatchet with
aggression, and soon the first walking-
cane-to-be was in the back of the truck.
One down, 11 to go.
Numbers 2-4 came somewhat easy,
but I splintered the handle on No. 5, so
we left it on the forest floor. I would
See Burnham, Page 13


SI
Pol Barns
S.Rofin


S........- ,..




Americans have become captives when it

comes to purchasing oil, gas, health care


By Terry Witt
Staff Writer


Representatives in January, it is my fervent hope
they will continue to honor free market economic
concepts, but at the same time recognize that some
segments of the American economy are subject to what I call
"captive market economics."
Americans can't stop buying gasoline regardless of how high
the price rises, and the same is true when it comes to purchasing
health insurance or paying for pricey health services. They are
largely a captive of the pricing set by the sellers. And the prices
keep rising. Consumers have no control.
That's not a free market.
Americans must buy gasoline and diesel to propel their
vehicles. They can cut back on purchases when prices become
totally outrageous, but they can't stop buying petroleum products.
Gasoline and diesel prices are typically high everywhere.
In Levy County, Chiefland residents can drive 28 miles to
Williston for cheaper gasoline, but they would probably lose
whatever they gained by burning gas or diesel on the trip.
The price of health insurance is a rip off. Doctors and
hospitals are charging higher and higher prices for their services.
Health insurance companies are responding by raising their
rates. The government passed rules raising health insurance costs
higher, but did nothing to control rising costs.
In a truly free market, people shop for better prices. But in a
captive market, buyers are at the mercy of sellers. Manufacturers
and distributors can set the price and consumers have little or no
choice but to buy the product at the price set.
In the case of gasoline, you could argue that we could cut
back on driving, and that would be helpful, but the economy is
driven by fuel. If we could park our cars and commercial trucks,
we could send a message to the sellers. But that's not possible.
We must buy fuel to propel our vehicles. We are captives of
pricing.
Something has to be done to change the way captive markets
operate in this country. The American people are being gouged
on purchases of petroleum products, health services and health
insurance.
Republicans offer limited hope because they are geared more
to business economics than Democrats, but they would be lying
to themselves and the public if they claimed gasoline prices were
being driven exclusively by free market forces. I am sincerely
hoping they acknowledge that gas and oil products are not
subject to typical free market conditions. Gas and oil prices are
set in an unwholesome market. We have no choice but to pay the


OUTDOORSTORAGE (Cars,Trailers& Boats)


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Lic. No. RB29003114 1Ccess
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(352)215-9552
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kfe A ep^l^ : 7 ..HI
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218 N. Main St. (US 19) Chiefland, FL 32626
Board Cr/ d OptLornct istl .




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NOW ACCEPTING MEDICAID
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ST1' ItH ENSIlN Si TI 1
'I'NK SIIV CIS, IN.

SI.ll ilrlib;lriiiii i'liiiiillll ll 1i1,1l's II
' ll;S tllfli; I':rl l* I l Mii I llllllllilll!
i i r/ ll i li

imrl1 III IIi


price set by oil companies, speculators and to some extent, retail
outlets.
While it is true that supply and demand are factors in the
price of gasoline and health care, it is also true that there was no
plausible explanation for why retail gasoline prices shot up to $4
per gallon and higher in the summer of 2008 only to fall to $1.60
the following January. There is no plausible explanation why
gasoline prices are much lower in Williston.
On the evening before Thanksgiving, I conducted a
windshield survey of regular test gasoline prices in Chiefland,
Bronson and Williston and found that Williston was on average
16 cents cheaper per gallon than Chiefland and Bronson.
The average price per gallon for regular test among the five
Chiefland gasoline outlets and two Bronson gas outlets was $2.96
on the eve of the big holiday, while the average price at the nine
gas outlets in Williston was $2.80.
The lowest priced gasoline in the three communities was
being sold at the south Chevron station at the corner of State
Road 121 and U.S. 40 in Williston. Customers were lined up for
$2.77 per gallon gasoline. It was 22 cents per gallon cheaper than
the two most expensive stations in Chiefland.
1 filled up at one of the four Williston stations selling gasoline
for $2.79 per gallon. My total bill for the fill-up was $30.85 for
11.022 gallons of gas. I would have paid about $33 for a fill-up
had I driven back to Chiefland and filled my gas tank at one of
the two stations charging $2.99 per gallon. The lowest priced
C hiel ild station was selling regular test gasoline for $2.92 per
gallon just north of the city limits.
I read an old news story online the other day that said
Americans spent $26 billion more on gasoline through the first
nine months of 2004 than they did in 2003. Regular gasoline was
selling for an average price of about $1.52 per gallon in 2003. It
rose to about $2.03 per gallon in 2004.
Today Chiefland residents are paying on average 1.44 cents
more per gallon for regular test gasoline than they were in 2003.
I call that gouging. Petroleum products are not in short supply.
The products just cost a lot more than they did seven years ago.
Most of us are captives in this market. We have no choice but to
purchase gas at the price set by the sellers.
Until this country is free of imported foreign oil and market
speculators, the little guy will continue being gouged at the retail
pumps. The only governmental body in this country that can
change the dynamics of how oil and gas are produced, sold and
regulated, and at what price, is the United States Congress. But
the first step is to recognize that the petroleum market is not truly
free.
See Witt, Page 13


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EDITORIAL
12 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal



Airport security'?


By Thomas Sowell
Creators Syndicate


security than Israel-- and no
country needs it more, since .
Israel is the most hated target of
Islamic extremist terrorists. Yet, somehow,
Israeli airport security people don't have ,
to strip passengers naked electronically or .
have strangers feeling their private parts.
Does anyone seriously believe that we
have better airport security than Israel? Is
our security record better than theirs?
"Security" may be the excuse being
offered for the outrageous things being
done to American air travelers, but the heavy-handed
arrogance and contempt for ordinary people that is the
hallmark of this administration in other areas is all too
painfully apparent in these new and invasive airport
procedures.
Can you remember a time when a Cabinet member in
a free America boasted of having his "foot on the neck"
of some business or when the President of the United
States threatened on television to put his foot on another
part of some citizens' anatomy?
Yet this and more has happened in the current
administration, which is not yet two years old. One
Cabinet member warned that there would be "zero
tolerance" for "misinformation" when an insurance
company said the obvious, that the mandates of
ObamaCare would raise costs and therefore raise
premiums. Zero tolerance for exercising the First
Amendment right of free speech?
More than two centuries ago, Edmund Burke warned


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about the dangers of new people with new
power. This administration, only halfway
through its term, has demonstrated that in
many ways.

Attorney General call the American People
"cowards"? And refuse to call terrorists
Islamic? What other administration has had
a Secretary of Homeland Security warn law
S- enforcement officials across the country of
security threats from people who are anti-
S' abortion, for federalism or are returning
S military veterans?
If anything good comes out of the
",,,. airport "security" outrages, it may be in
opening the eyes of more people to the utter
contempt that this administration has for
the American people.
Those who made excuses for all of candidate Barack
Obama's long years of alliances with people who
expressed their contempt for this country, and when as
president he appointed people with a record of antipathy
to American interests and values, may finally get it when
they feel some stranger's hand in their crotch.
As for the excuse of "security," this is one of the least
security-minded administrations we have had. When
hundreds of illegal immigrants from terrorist-sponsoring
countries were captured crossing the border from
Mexico-- and then released on their own recognizance
within the United States, that tells you all you need to
know about this administration's concern for security.
When captured terrorists who are not covered by
either the Geneva Convention or the Constitution of the
United States are nevertheless put on trial in American
civilian courts by the Obama Justice Department, that too


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tells you all you need to know about how concerned they
are about national security.
The rules of criminal justice in American courts were
not designed for trying terrorists. For one thing, revealing
the evidence against them can reveal how our intelligence
services got wind of them in the first place, and thereby
endanger the lives of people who helped us nab them.
Not a lot of people in other countries, or perhaps even
in this country, are going to help us stop terrorists if their
role is revealed and their families are exposed to revenge
by the terrorists' bloodthirsty comrades.
What do the Israeli airport security people do that
American airport security do not do? They profile. They
question some individuals for more than half an hour,
open up all their luggage and spread the contents on the
counter-- and they let others go through with scarcely a
word. And it works.
Meanwhile, this administration is so hung up on
political correctness that they have turned "profiling" into
a bugaboo. They would rather have electronic scanners
look under the clothes of nuns than to detain a Jihadist
imam for some questioning.
Will America be undermined from within by an
administration obsessed with political correctness and
intoxicated with the adolescent thrill of exercising its
new-found powers? Stay tuned.
To find out more about Thomas Sowell and read
features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page at
www. creators. com. Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at
the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
94305. His Web site is www.tsowell.com.
COPYRIGHT 2010 CREATORS.COM


American ingenuity


By Michelle Malkin
Creators Syndicate


television
programs is "How
It's Made" on
the Science Channel. The
documentary series shows
"how the everyday objects
people use become the things
they are." From ketchup and
flip-flops, to nail clippers and
snare drums, to NASCAR :
engines, hydraulic cylinders :
and motor homes, the show
takes viewers on wondrous
autobiographical journeys of
the mundane products we too
often take for granted.
Though it originated in Canada and
has become a global phenomenon, "How
It's Made" is largely a tribute to individual
American ingenuity and American
entrepreneurs. The show's myriad episodes
spotlighting U.S. inventions also serve as
potent antidotes to the government-centric
vision that reigns in the White House these
days.


They Said It

"Here in the United States, our profession is much maligned, people
simply don't trust or like journalists anymore and that's sad."
Christiane Amanpour

"I might be in favor of national healthcare if it required all Democrats
to get their heads examined."
Ann Coulter

"If you interviewed 1,000 politicians and asked about whether the
media's too soft or too hard, about 999 would say too hard."
Bob Woodward

"Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear to be
bright until you hear them speak."
Brian Williams

"Hollywood is where they shoot too many pictures and not enough
actors."
Walter Winchell

"We in the press have a special role since there is no other institution
in our society that can hold the President accountable. I do believe
that our democracy can endure and prevail only if the American
people are informed."
Helen Thomas

"We have a product for sale called news, and I'm a salesman."
Shepard Smith

"We've got to rebuild human hearts and persuade people that hope
isn't just possible, but essential."
Tony Snow

"For sure, the American people have access to more information now
than any other people who have ever lived on earth. And I think we do
a pretty good job of sorting out what's important."
Bob Schieffer

"Good for you, you have a heart, you can be a liberal. Now, couple
your heart with your brain, and you can be a conservative."
Glenn Beck


'.,


astounding 75 foreign and
domestic patents:
--At 15, Murray
manufactured a windmill
that powered a radio
generator and sold it to
farmers in rural areas where
regular electricity was
unavailable.
--In 1951, after
observing passengers
descending airplane
stairs in the rain at Miami
International Airport, he
came up with the idea for
covered airplane boarding
ramps to protect travelers
from inclement weather
and to enable those in


wheelchairs to cross into
their terminals without having to be fork-lifted
off their planes. The walkways are now used
in airports around the world.
-- To save time and energy whenever
he needed to climb the roof to adjust his
television antenna for better reception,
Murray crafted a television antenna rotator
by attaching two strings to the antenna and
pulling them from his window. The invention
evolved into the TV antenna rotator, which
Murray's obituary reports "generated nearly
$40 million in sales over several decades."
-- Murray also invented the audible
pressure cooker, the power automotive seat,
a high-speed dental drill and the peristaltic
pump, which moves fluids through the body
without damaging cells using contractions
and expansions. The lifesaving pump paved
the-way for historic breakthroughs in open-
heart surgery and kidney dialysis -- and its
technology has been applied by the food
processing, pharmaceutical manufacturing and
chemical processing industries.
-- And to assist harried housewives in the
post-World War II era, Murray combined
the use of an interior combustion motor with
dual blades to create the electric carving
knife. It was patented in 1964, and the same
technology used to slice up your turkey was
adopted to create medical and forensic tools
now used in surgeries and autopsies.
Murray's self-interested capitalist pursuits
yielded untold benefits and conveniences
for the rest of the world. In the tale of the
mundane electric carving knife lies a profound
lesson: Liberty, not "government vision,"
yields innovation. For this priceless insight
bequeathed to us by our Founding Fathers,
Americans should give eternal thanks.
Michelle Malkin is the author of "Culture
ofCorruption: Obama and his Team of Tax
Cheats, Crooks & Cronies (Regnery 2010).
Her e-mail address is malkinblog@gmail. com.
COPYRIGHT 2010 CREATORS.COM


Last summer, President Obama opined that
the proper role of private entrepreneurs is to
fulfill "the core responsibilities of the financial
system to help grow our economy" -- and
that "at a certain point you've made enough
money." Last month, Vice President Joe Biden
boasted that "every single great idea that has
marked the 21st century, the 20th century and
the 19th century has required government
vision and government incentive."
Such command-and-control narcissism
is completely alien to the unique American
culture and marketplace that have bred so
many successful inventors. Consider the
electric carving knife that so many of you
have already used without a second thought
this holiday season. Jerome L. Murray,
the New York City man who invented
the ubiquitous kitchen appliance, was an
insatiable tinkerer from his teens until his
death in 1998 at the age of 85. He was driven
not by a social justice agenda or by the need
to "grow the economy" to boost government
employment figures, but by a constant desire
to solve problems, cut costs, satisfy his own
intellectual curiosities and pursue the profit
motive.
Murray funded his creative pursuits out of
his own pocket, not with taxpayer dollars. And
one moneymaking idea was never "enough."
According to his obituary in The New York
Times, the prolific inventor "saw no sense in
inventing something that could not be sold."
At the time of his death, Murray held an


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EDITORIAL

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 13

Burnham, from Page 11

splinter another three before our trip was complete, each muster. "That one might be too big," Dad said.
time giving the forest some choice words of frustration. The forest emitted a low, audible groan, as if every I love my dad. Best in the world. Couldn't have been
Of course, if a redneck yells in the woods and no one is tree out there was somehow connected to the root I had a better role model. Really couldn't. But when he said
around to hear it, he is probably just whistling Dixie. just severed. that I briefly entertained the thought of leaving him in
We had been out there for about two hours, and I disconnected five roots from that thing, and the plant the woods. Just drive off with him waving to me in the
driving slow down the little woods road when Dad gave would still not budge, apparently anchored by a dozen rearview mirror.
the signal to stop. There was a big Myrtle out beside the more. But 1 kept swinging, and began to utter words of Not really. Got the best dad in the world. Really. He
truck, he said. resolve. You 're coming with me. You 're not so tough. I've is.
It was big all right. The plant was as big around as a pooped bigger 'n you. "We're taking it home with us," I said. "Maybe I will
baseball. It was the Mother of all Myrtles. A walking cane Dad moved in to help, leaning on the portion above make it into a flagpole or something." He laughed. We
for an NFL lineman, the ground. And slowly, surely, it began to give, ever so would try and grind it into a very large, square walking
"Let's get it," Dad said. slightly. The hatchet came down again and again, and cane.
So I got down on my hands and knees and went each time I was certain that the whole thing would pull We ended up getting eight that day, four short of the
to pulling dense underbrush away. I dug deep into the up from the earth, and we could put the thing in the back stated goal, but enough to keep an 86-year-old man busy
ground, and discovered a system of roots that resembled of the truck. for a day or two. We drove home with seven of them in
the highway system leading into New York City. I found Finally, mercifully, the Myrtle pulled free, and, the back of the truck, and the mega Myrtle strapped to the
what I thought was a suitable place to start, reached back, sweat-drenched, I hauled it to the truck, and put it on the hood. Thanksgiving awaited, and with it all the blessings
and brought the hatchet down with all the force I could tailgate. of a memorable father-son excursion.

Witt, from Page 11


The BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico
was a governmental and corporate blunder
of extraordinary proportions. The causes
of the spill are likely to be smothered in
Democratic politics unless Republicans
can launch a legitimate investigation in the
House. I've read several stories in recent
months that suggest the explosion was
an accident. I expected as much. But the
toppling of the BP oil rig occurred less
than two days before the 40'' Anniversary
of Earth Day. I still believe the date of the
"accident" was more than coincidence. I


believe someone was trying to make an
environmental statement about oil drilling
in the Gulf of Mexico. They achieved their
purpose.
Oil drilling can be done safely in the
Gulf, but government inspectors must
operate honestly and with integrity, and
oil companies must be held accountable
for assuring that blowout preventers are
operating properly. That wasn't done in
the case of BP. The blowout preventer on
the BP rig that exploded wasn't inspected
by the government or BP. Turns out, the


blowout preventer was inoperable. That's
why so much oil spilled into the Gulf.
President Obama has lifted oil drilling
restrictions in the Gulf, but I'm told he has
left in place burdensome restrictions that
achieve the same effect as a moratorium.
I think the public held Obama and the
Democrats accountable for their ineptitude.
The November election was a sign that
Americans were angry at the Democrats.
1 hope when all is said and done that
the Republicans aren't accused of the same
stupidity. I hope they get busy working to


heal the economy. I hope they recognize
the need for a sensible energy policy that
frees up fossil fuel energy sources while
we search diligently on a parallel track for
viable alternative energy sources.
It is time for the welfare of the
American people to become the top priority
of Congress rather than simply party
politics.
I am weary of the whole mess.
Comments are welcome. Terry Witt can
be reached at 490-4462 or 220-4927, or
t. t i ., I i / .. '


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Keep it short (750
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PLANNING COMMISSION
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by the Planning Commission
on Monday, December 6, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard during
the course of action. The hearing will be held in the Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street,
Bronson, Florida. The Planning Commission is not bound to consider the petitions in the order listed in
this notice. Any of these petitions may be considered as soon as the meeting commences.
FP 5-10 Croft Land Surveying representing Shell Pond LLC, and Larry King, for a Final Plat of "Hamp-
ton Corners," a residential subdivision located in the SW 1/4 of Section 16, Township 12S, Range 18E,
(AKA Tract 1, Hampton Farms unrecorded subdivision), in Levy County. Said parcel contains 20 acres
more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will
consist of two 10 acre lots.
CUP 1-10 Cross Brand Cowboy Church, Inc. And William E. Keith III, petitioning the board for a Condi-
tional Use Permit for the development of a "Cowboy Church," (a place of worship in which sermons may
be preached from horseback, and that typically include uses that are non-typical or customarily associ-
ated with more conventional churches). This parcel will be located in that part of the SE 1/4 of the NW
1/4 of Section 34, Township 12S, Range 18E, Levy County, Florida, lying North of US 27A and East of
the centerline of NE 162nd Court. Said parcel is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural Residential
zone and contains 25.7 acres total project area.
Copies of said petitions with complete legal descriptions and subsequent staff reports will be available
for review at the Levy County Development Department. For Information call 352-486-5203. Interested
parties may appear at the meeting and be heard regarding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the County Commissioners
Administration Office at 352-486-5218.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by the Board of County Com-
missioners on Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be
heard during the course of action. The hearing will be held in the County Commissioner's Meeting
Room, The Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Board of County
Commissioners is not bound to consider the petitions in the order listed in this notice. Any of these peti-
tions may be considered as soon as the meeting commences.
Ha.Va. 9-10 Ailien Kooi, petitioning the board for a Hardship Variance to allow a second dwelling in or-
der for a family member to help care for her husband, Jack Kooi, on a parcel of land located in University
Oaks, Lot 13, Block 45, in Section 34, Township 11S, Range 17E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains
1.72 acres more or less and is located within a "RR" Rural Residential zone. Situs address: 10891 NE
109th Street, Archer, FL. 32618
FP 2-10 Patrick Durbin, representing Phyllis F. Blackwell, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of
"Blackwell Estates," located on a parcel of land lying in the NW 1/4 of Section 16, Township 12S, Range
14E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 80 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR" zone.
FP 3-10 Croft Land Surveying representing Saratoga South, LLC, petitioning the board for a Final Plat
of "Saratoga South," located in that part of the E of Section 7, Township 14S, Range 18E, in Levy
County, that lies West of SR 121; and that part of the W % of Section 8, Township 14S, Range 18E, in
Levy County. Said parcel contains 351 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/
Rural Residential zone.
Copies of said petition with complete legal descriptions and subsequent staff reports will be avail-
able for review at the Levy County Development Department. For Information call 352-486-5203. Inter-
ested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard .
regarding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring cCo,' "
reasonable accommodations to participate in this meet- p-o 2 '
ing should contact the County Commissioners Adminis- o -..- "i '
tration Office at 352-486-5218. I
SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO li I \ i
APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH FP 3-
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH K /
MEETING, A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING, AND ; \ .-'-i
FOR SUCH PURPOSE, A VERBATIM RECORD OF l
THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RECORD [
INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON \
WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. ;,'_
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 2010. -


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4AGRICULTURE/OUTDOORS

14 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal



-evy County Sialft wateI(r [Fesh wae irTides


High/ Tide
Low Times


Date

Cedar Key
Thurs 2
2
2
2
Fri 3
3
3
3
Sat 4
4
4
Sun 5
5
5
5
Mon 6
6
6
6
Tues 7
7
7
7
Wed 8
8
8
8
Suwannee
Thurs 2
2
2
2
Fri 3
3
3
3
Sat 4
4
4
Sun 5
5


Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
liver Entranc
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low
High
Low


Height/ Sunrise/


Moon % Moon


Date


Feet Sunset Time Visible


5:03 a.m.
11:37 a.m.
4:53 p.m.
10:38 p.m.
5:58 a.m.
12:36 p.m.
5:45 p.m.
11:22 p.m.
6:46 a.m.
1:27 p.m.
6:31 p.m.
12:06 a.m.
7:32 a.m.
2:12 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
12:48 a.m.
8:14 a.m.
2:53 p.m.
7:57 p.m.
1:30 a.m.
8:54 a.m.
3:31 p.m.
8:38 p.m.
2:11 a.m.
9:32 a.m.
4:06 p.m.
9:19 p.m.
e
5:03 a.m.
11:37 a.m.
4:53 p.m.
10:38 p.m.
5:58 a.m.
12:36 p.m.
5:45 p.m.
11:22 p.m.
6:46 a.m.
1:27 p.m.
6:31 p.m.
12:06 a.m.
7:32 a.m.


-0.3
3
1.3
3.8
-0.7
3.1
1.4
4
-0.9
3.1
1.5
4
-1
3.1
1.5
4.1
-0.9
3
1.4
4
-0.8
3
1.4
3.9
-0.6
2.9
1.3

-0.3
3
1.3
3.8
-0.7
3.1
1.4
4
-0.9
3.1
1.5
4
-1


7:09 a.m. Rise 3:53 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 3:04 p.m.


7:10 a.m. Rise 4:59 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 3:49 p.m.


7:11 a.m. Rise 6:04 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 4:39 p.m.

7:12 a.m. Rise 7:07 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 5:34 p.m.


7:12 a.m. Rise 8:05 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 6:33 p.m.


7:13 a.m. Rise 8:57 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 7:32 p.m.


7:14 a.m. Rise 9:42 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 8:31 p.m.



7:09 a.m. Rise 3:53 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 3:04 p.m.


7:10 a.m. Rise 4:59 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 3:49 p.m.


7:11 a.m. Rise 6:04 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 4:39 p.m.

7:12 a.m. Rise 7:07 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 5:34 p.m.


17
Mon


10
Tues


4
Wed

0

Withlac
Thurs
0


Fri
1


Sat
5

Sun


17
Mon


10
Tues


4
Wed

0


Height/


High/ Tide
Low Times
5 High 2:12 p.m.
5 Low 7:15 p.m.
6 High 12:48 a.m.
6 Low 8:14 a.m.
6 High 2:53 p.m.
6 Low 7:57 p.m.
7 High 1:30 a.m.
7 Low 8:54 a.m.
7 High 3:31 p.m.
7 Low 8:38 p.m.
8 High 2:11 a.m.
8 Low 9:32 a.m.
8 High 4:06 p.m.
8 Low 9:19 p.m.
oochee River Entrance
2 Low 5:58 a.m.
2 High 11:44 a.m.
2 Low 5:48 p.m.
2 High 10:45 p.m.
3 Low 6:53 a.m.
3 High 12:43 p.m.
3 Low 6:40 p.m.
3 High 11:29 p.m.
4 Low 7:41 a.m.
4 High 1:34 p.m.
4 Low 7:26 p.m.
5 High 12:13 a.m.
5 Low 8:27 a.m.
5 High 2:19 p.m.
5 Low 8:10 p.m.
6 High 12:55 a.m.
6 Low 9:09 a.m.
6 High 3:00 p.m.
6 Low 8:52 p.m.
7 High 1:37 a.m.
7 Low 9:49 a.m.
7 High 3:38 p.m.
7 Low 9:33 p.m.
8 High 2:18 a.m.
8 Low 10:27 a.m.
8 High 4:13 p.m.
8 Low 10:14 p.m.


Sunrise/ Moon % Moon
Sunset Time Visible


Feet
3.1
1.5
4.1
-0.9
3
1.4
4
-0.8
3
1.4
3.9
-0.6
2.9
1.3

-0.3
2.7
1.2
3.5
-0.7
2.8
1.3
3.6
-0.9
2.8
1.4
3.6
-0.9
2.8
1.4
3.7
-0.9
2.7
1.3
3.6
-0.8
2.7
1.3
3.5
-0.6
2.6
1.2


Florida Cattle Auctions Nov. 29


Monday's receipts at Arcadia (796), Lake
City (538), Ocala (572), Okeechobee (1137)
and Wauchula (396) totaled 3,439 compared
to Holiday last week and 3,630 a year ago.
Compared to two weeks ago, slaughter cows
and bulls 1.00 to 3.00 higher, feeder steers
and heifers unevenly steady, replacement
cows poorly tested. Slaughter cows 9
percent, bulls 2 percent, feeder steers over
600 lbs 2 percent, under 600 lbs 44 percent,
feeder heifers over 600 lbs 0 percent, under
600 lbs 41 percent, replacement cows 2
percent.

Slaughter Cows Boners 80-85
Wt Avg Price Avg
Range Wt Range Price
850-1170 1025 45.00-60.00 51.03
1225-1595 1361 47.00-58.00 52.25
1245-1490 1356 52.00-61.5056.13 HD

Slaughter Cows Lean 85-90
Avg Price Avg
Range Wt Range Price
800-845 828 32.00-47.00 40.39
750-845 801 35.00-39.00 37.03 LD
855-1140 979 42.00-49.50 45.79
900-980 940 43.00-43.50 43.26 LD
1210-1335 1292 46.00-50.00 48

Slaughter BullsY.G. I
Avg Price Avg
Range Wt Range Price
1090-1325 1223 57.00-61.00 58.96
1380-1455 1418 57.00-62.00 59.57 LD
1520-2140 1769 59.00-68.50 63.79

Feeder Steers and Bulls Medium


and Large 1-2
Avg Price
Range Wt
200-249 224
250-290 267
300-345 321
350-395 364
400-440 414
450-495 467
500-535 512
550-590 573
605-640 615


Feeder
Avg
Range
225-245
255-295
310-330
360-390
405-445


Range
140.00-170.00
130.00-162.50
124.00-152.50
116.00-137.50
108.00-121.00
104.00-113.00
97.00-110.00
91.00-105.00
90.00-105.00


Avg
Price
151.32
144.19
133.87
124.62
115.08
108.15
103.67
98.89
94.87


Steers and Bulls Small 1-2
Price Avg
Wt Range Price
237 110.00-135.00 121.44
276 107.50-135.00 120.49
320 119.00-122.00 119.58
383 100.00-108.00 104.48
421 87.00-100.00 94.13


Feeder Steers
and Large 2-3
Avg Price
Range Wt
200-245 217
250-295 274
300-345 329
350-395 376
400-440 417
460-485 471


and Bulls Medium

Avg
Range Price
110.00-147.50 132.64
110.00-141.00 128.21
106.00-127.50 118.64
103.00-119.00 111.53
97.00-112.00 105.58
92.00-103.00 98.06


500-545
525-535
BrahX
550-595
670-685


516 80.00-98.00 92.03
530 76.00-81.00 78.52


570 89.00-97.00
676 80.00-88.00


93.58
84.5


Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1-


Avg
Range
200-245
250-290
300-345
350-395
400-445
450-495
500-535
550-595
600-635

Feeder
Avg
Range
200-245
250-290
310-345
360-390
400-445
470-485


Price
Wt Range
224 120.00-142.50
272 108.00-137.50
323 98.00-127.50
371 93.00-115.00
418 90.00-113.00
466 89.00-103.00
517 93.00-102.00
574 90.00-96.00
617 90.00-92.00

Heifers Small 1-2
Price
Wt Range
221 85.00-100.00
268 90.00-114.00
326 80.00-96.00
378 85.00-94.00
430 69.00-91.00
478 75.00-80.00


Avg
Price
130.14
121.84
109.36
103.04
98.39
96.39
97.06
93.46
91.01


Avg
Price
92.45
102.84
90.73
88.44
84.71
77.46


Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 2-


Avg
Range
200-240
250-295
300-345
315-325
BrahX
350-395
400-445
450-495
500-545
550-580


Price
Wt
220
275
328
320

376
421
474
522
568


Range
90.00-120.00
85.00-120.00
80.00-109.00
70.00-78.00

88.00-102.00
85.00-100.00
85.00-91.00
79.00-90.00
78.00-88.00


Avg
Price
107.48
102.61
96.76
73.94

96.4
93.47
87.33
84.76
82.24


Bred Cows Medium and Large 1-2
Avg Price Avg
Range Wt Range Price
910-1075 988 50.00-68.00 56.58
1110-1135 1123 48.00-51.00 49.52
1235-1260 1248 56.00-57.00 56.49


Outta The Woods


December's traditions



include holiday hunting


By Tony Young
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission


There's finally a chill and a certain
festiveness in the air as most of us try to
take time off from work to enjoy spending
quality time with family and friends and
reflect on the passing year. Children will
be out of school on winter break soon,
and while the holiday season is upon
us, so are several traditional hunting
opportunities.
The second phase of waterfowl and
coot season comes in statewide Dec. 11
and runs through Jan. 30. In addition
to the usual hunting license and permit
requirements, duck hunters also must
have a Florida waterfowl permit ($5) and
a federal duck stamp ($15).
The daily bag limit on ducks is six,
but you need to know your ducks before
you pull the trigger, because there are
different daily limits for each species. For
instance, within the six-bird limit there
may be only one black duck, one mottled
duck, one fulvous whistling-duck and one
canvasback.
Only two of your six-bird limit may be
pintails, redheads or scaup, and three may
be wood ducks. And you may have no
more than four scoters and four mallards
(of which only two may be female) in
your bag. All other species of ducks can
be taken up to the six-bird limit, except
harlequin ducks.
The daily limit on coots is 15, and
there's a five-bird limit on mergansers,
only two of which may be hooded.
When hunting waterfowl, hunters may
use only non-toxic shotgun shells. In fact,
it's illegal for hunters even to possess lead
shot when waterfowl hunting. Only iron
(steel), bismuth-tin and various tungsten-
alloys are permissible.
For something different, try woodcock
hunting. Woodcock season runs Dec. 18
- Jan. 16. Woodcocks are excellent game
birds because they hold well for pointing
bird dogs and provide a challenging shot
when flushed. The daily bag limit is
three.
The third phase of mourning and
white-winged dove season opens Dec. 11
and runs through Jan. 9. The daily bag
limit is 15 birds.
From November on, shooting hours
for all migratory birds are one-half hour
before sunrise to sunset. You must get a
no-cost migratory bird permit where you
purchase your hunting license before you
hunt any of these birds, though.
The only firearm you can use to hunt
migratory game birds is a shotgun, no
larger than 10-gauge. Shotguns must
be plugged to a three-shell capacity
(magazine and chamber combined).
Bows also are legal.


Retrievers and bird dogs can be
useful in hunting migratory game birds.
Artificial decoys, as well as manual or
mouth-operated bird calls, also are legal
and essential gear for duck hunters.
You may hunt migratory game
birds over an agricultural field, as long
as the crop's been planted by regular
agricultural methods. However, don't
even think about "sweetening" the field
by scattering agricultural products over it
- or anywhere near it or you could wind
up in serious trouble. It doesn't matter if
you aren't the one who scattered the bait.
If you knew or should've known that
such bait was present, you're accountable
under federal law.
Some other things you can't do while
hunting migratory game birds include
using rifles, pistols, crossbows, traps,
snares, nets, sinkboxes, swivel guns,
punt guns, battery guns, machine guns,
fish hooks, poisons, drugs, explosive
substances, live decoys and recorded bird
calls, sounds or electrically amplified
bird-call imitations. It is also against the
law to shoot from a moving automobile
or boat and herd or drive birds with
vehicles or vessels.
Bobcat and otter hunting season is
Dec. 1 March 1, and there's no daily
bag or season limit on either species.
Like foxes, bobcats may be
chased year-round with dogs, but
possessing firearms during the closed
season, between March 2 and Nov.
30, is prohibited. On a few wildlife
management areas, bobcats and otters
may not be taken, so please consult the
specific area brochure before you hunt.
Whether upland bird hunting with
friends and family, shooting ducks on
the pond with your favorite lab or taking
that big bobcat as he slips up behind an
unsuspecting fawn, December has the
hunting opportunities you're looking for.
Here's wishing you happy holidays
and a successful hunting season. If you
can, remember to introduce someone new
to our great sport. As always, have fun,
hunt safely and ethically, and we'll see
you in the woods!


7:12 a.m. Rise 8:05 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 6:33 p.m.


7:13 a.m. Rise 8:57 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 7:32 p.m.


7:14 a.m. Rise 9:42 a:m.
5:34 p.m. Set 8:31 p.m.



7:08 a.m. Rise 3:52 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 3:03 p.m.


7:09 a.m. Rise 4:58 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 3:48 p.m.


7:10 a.m. Rise 6:03 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 4:38 p.m.

7:10 a.m. Rise 7:05 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 5:33 p.m.


7:11 a.m. Rise 8:03 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 6:32 p.m.


7:12 a.m. Rise 8:55 a.m.
5:33 p.m. Set 7:32 p.m.


7:12 a.m. Rise 9:40 a.m.
5:34 p.m. Set 8:31 p.m.


5~







BUSINESS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 15








YOUR CLASSIFIED AD APPEARS IN FOUR LOCATIONS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE!
FOR JUST $6 A WEEK, YOU CAN REACH 30,000 CONSUMERS WHEN YOUR AD RUNS IN THE LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL, THE TRI-COUNTY ADVERTISER, ON THE LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL WEB SITE AND
THE TRI-COUNTY ADVERTISER WEB SITE. CALL US TODAY AT352-486-23f2 OR E-MAIL USATCLASSIFIEDS@LEVYJOURNAL.COM OR FAX: 352-486-5042 DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOON

100 Miscellaneous 155 Schools & Instruction 320 RV Rental Lots 435 Commercial Property for Sale 526 Furniture 570 Swap, Barter or Trade
110 Lost & Found 200 Employment 325 Vacation Rentals 440 Vacant Land for Sale 530 Guns 600 Recreation
115 Notices 210 Help Wanted Full Time 330 Commercial Property for Rent 445 Wanted to Buy 535 Pets & Animals 605 Boat & Marine
125 Services 240 Help Wanted Part Time 340 Rooms Room-mate 500 For Sale 540 LiveStock 610 Campers, RVs & Trailers
130 Free 245 Work Wanted 345 Wanted to Rent 505 Antiques 545 Good Things to Eat 615 Motorcycles & ATVs
135 Volunteer Opportunity 300 Rentals 400 Real Estate 510 Auctions 550 Farm Products 700 Farm
140 Announcements 305 Apartments for Rent 405 Condos Apartments for Sale 515 Yard Sale 555 Automobiles 705 Farm Equipment
145 Entertainment 310 Houses for Rent 410 Houses for Sale 520 Building Materials 556 Trucks 900 Legal Notices
150 Musical Instruments 315 Mobile Homes for Rent 415 Mobile Homes for Sale 525 Appliances 560 Estate Sale




100 MISCELLANEOUS 115 NOTICES 125 SERVICES 125 SERVICES 210 HELP WANTED- 410 HOUSES
FULL TIME FOR SALE


FREE PAPERS If you are our meeting every Thursday
interested we have some night at Mt. Nebo Baptist
past issues of the newspa- Church 7:00 PM Hwy. 340
per stored here at the Levy in Bell, west of 129. Call
County Journal office in 386-935-2300 or go to www.
Chiefland at 13 South Main grace-ministry.net for more
Street (Hwy 19) ready to be info. tfnf
picked up for your projects.
Make sure to call us at 352-
490-4462 to check on avail- 125 SERVICES
ability. Tfn HANDYMAN HANDY HAL:
We take care of the small
110 LOST & FOUND jobs others don't want. Good
work for a fair price. (352)
LOST DOG: LONG POND 463-1675 or (352) 359-5301.
AREA 341/345. Short-haired tfn1/20/11ApJf1/21/11
dark brown Bull Dog with
white on nose and chest. FREE SCRAP
Answers to "Chloe." Call METAL REMOVAL
352-949-3154 or 352-221- and demolition
8112 with any information. Call Mike at 352-215-9459
tfnl2/8ApJfl2/9 tfnApJf

LOST & FOUND if you JOYNER'STREESERVICE:
have lost a pet please Licensed and insured. Free
remember to call your local estimates. (352) 542-7981
animal shelter for Gilchrist or (352) 578-5029. tfnpA
County. (352) 463-4084 tfn. -
SHEDS, SHEDS, SHEDS!
We move 'em. Best price
115 NOTICES in town. 352-493-0345. Joe's
Rollback Service. Credit
cards accepted. tfnApJftfn
ADVERTISER NOTICE ----
The Tri-County Advertiser/ CHINESE ATV PARTS
Levy County Journal does We can get most parts
not endorse, promote or en- for Chinese ATVs/dirt bikes/
courage the purchase or sale scooters. 110 youth utility
of any product or service ad- ATV $899.00 plus tax: 110
vertised in this newspaper. mini youth ATV $799.00 plus
Advertisements are the sole tax. Layaway available. Wil-
responsibility of the adver- listen Sports (352)528-6987
tiser. The Tri-County Adver- tfnAJ
tiser/Levy County Journal
hereby disclaims all liability CHEAPER
for any damage suffered as STORAGE
the result of any advertise- 10x15 ONLY $89/mo
ment in this newspaper. The All Climate Controlled
Tri-County Advertiser/Levy Many sizes to choose from
County Journal has the sole 352-528-0778
authority to edit and locate Willistonstorage.com
any classified advertisement 507 SE 6th St
as deemed appropriate. The tfnAbJftfn
Tri-County Advertiser/Levy
County Journal reserves the NEED A FENCE OF ANY
right to refuse any advertis- KIND? Call Danny, any
ing. time. 352-463-1832 or 352-
----493-5345 tfnApJftfn
HAPPY TAILS SOCIAL -
CLUB Animal and Pet A.D.ANDREWSNURSERY,
Rescue is now located in the Chiefland, Florida in
Chiefland Flea Market, booth business since 1982 in the
Red 27. Stop by and chat for wholesale nursery trade is
a bit. 352-493-0252. tfnf now selling and installing
shade trees locally. Farms,
FREE PREGNANCY TESTS ranches, homesites, etc.
Call our sales office at 352-
- Confidential Harmony 493-2496 for a quote. We
Pregnancy & Resource
Pregnancy & Rtesource install within a 60-mile radius
Center. Open Mon.l,Tues. of Chiefland, Florida. For
Thurs. 11AM-6PM Call (352) availability and photos,
493-7773 Harmony preg- visit our website at www.
nancy center PO Box 2557 adandrewsnsy.com. tfnAJ
adandrewsnsy.com, tfnAJ
Chiefland,FL. Tfn
---BOBCAT WORK $35.00/
AL-ANON MEETINGS IN hour, 2-hour minimum;
WILLISTON Join us Driveways, house slabs,
for Al-Anon meetings on in-ground swimming pools,
Monday evenings at 7 p.m. fence lines, small trees,
at the Midway Plaza located assistance brush burning,
at 13451 NE Highway 27Alt. topsoil. Call Wes Weber at
in Williston. 1-800-851-1795. 352-463-0065. tfnl/5ApJfl/6
ftfn -
BROUT'S CUSTOM
NARCONON. a nonprofit SERVICE Fence
public benefit organization Installation or Repair.
that specializes in helping Quality Work at reasonable
people with drug or alcohol prices All types. Please
addictions assessments call: 352-949-1444
and more than 11,000 local 7/20/2011AbJf7/21/2011
referrals. Call (800) 556-8885
orvisitwww.drugrehab.net DEMOLITION ON MOBILE
HOMES also will pay cash
AA MEETING FOR IN- for old/used batteries, alter-
FORMATION CALL NORTH nators, and starters. Will buy
CENTRALFLORIDAINTER- and haul junk cars. Call Mike
GROUP OFFICE at (352) at 352-215-9459. tfnApJf
372-8091 which is also a 24-
hour local hotline number. GUNS AND CONCEALED
WEAPONS PERMITS:
AL-ANON--meetsWednes- Call (352) 493-4209 for
days at 5:30pm at Chiefland information. 12/1ApJf12/2
Methodist Church, North
Main Street. For more info HANDYMAN 20 years
call 1-800-851-1795. ftfn experience. No job too big
or small. Aluminum and
ADDICTION RECOVERY carpentry licenses: Levy-
MEETING Do you Gilchrist-Dixie. Johnny
struggle with a Drug or Martin, Sr. 535-7704 or 493-
Alcohol addiction? Come to 7490 12/22ApJf12/23


ANDY'S PUMP
SERVICE & WELL
DRILLING
2" & 4" wells,
Pump &
Tank sales,
Service
& Repairs. Complete
Water Conditioning,
including iron,
sulphur removal,
water softeners, R.O. etc.
FREE WATER ANALYSIS
Financing available.
Call cell-352-578-5096
or office-352-498-3038.
State License# 2632.
1/19/11ApJfl/20/11

TURBEVILLE TREE
SERVICE Tree Removal,
trimming, stump grinding, lot
clearing. Debris Removal.
37 years experience. Donny
Turbeville Sr. 352-528-3791
12/1ApJf12/2

CARLIE'S CARPET
CLEANING &
RESTORATION We
steam-clean carpet,
furniture, tile & grout. Holiday
Specials are here. Call for
Details. (352) 361-3431
12/1ApJf12/2

HAIRTRENDZ SALON
- located on HWY 320
Manatee Rd. is welcoming
back winter & new clients.
Call for appt. with Diane
Welcher @ 352-221-3137,
or Jackie or Trenda at 352-
493-2422. 12/1ApJf12/2

MOBILE HOME &
HOME REPAIR:
Ceiling to Floor and more
Quality work low rates.
Please call Jerry at 352-
353-1344.
12/8ApJfl2/9

CARLISLE FENCE
ENTERPRISES All types
of fencing. Guaranteed
the best price and the best
quality. 352-284-7081
12/1ApJf12/2

HANDYMAN
25 years experience, all
types of carpentry, roof
repair, pressure washing,
painting -interior/exterior.
10% discount for senior
citizens. 352-949-9330.
1/12/11apjf1/13/11

COMPUTER SERVICE
& REPAIR home
networking, on-site service.
15 years experience. 352-
210-7277. 12/1ApJf12/2

HOME REPAIR -
Remodeling, Painting,
Drywall, Plumbing, Decks,
Handicapped Ramps, Baths,
Showers. Call Jim 352-
493-1900 or 352-222-2676
12/8ApJf12/9

BUILDING CONTRACTOR
- licensed and insured;
cbc017161. specializing in
remodeling and additions
to homes and businesses.
free estimates. 352-493-
5372/352-463-7207.
6/15/11apjf6/16/11

ALL TYPES CLEANING
- one-time cleaning or
monthly, bi-weekly, weekly
for homes, offices, sheds,
etc. reasonable. References
available. FREE estimates.
Call 352-486-2233 or 352-
474-9608. 12/15ApJf12/16

GET A NEW LOOK
FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
professional remodeling or
additions. inside/outside.
30 years experience.
references available, free
estimates. call 352-474-
9603. 12/1apjf12/2


TOP OFTHE LINE FENCING
- all types including fence
repair, guaranteed lowest
prices. 352-210-7228
12/1ApJf12/2

A-1 THE
BATHROOM
GUY
Top to Bottom for Less.
Floors and Fixtures.
Ceilings and Walls.
One Call Does It All.
207-999-9998
12/8ApJf12/9

SCHROEDERSPRESSURE
WASHING AND LAWN
CARE: roof blowing, debris
hauling, property cleaning,
carpentry work. excellent
rates. Fred & Lora at 352-
210-7230 12/15ApJf12/16

OWN A CUSTOM BUILT 3
BEDROOM 2 BATH HOME
FOR $100,000 or $3500
down and $700/month.
Call Rodney Wade @ 352-
949-3785 or visit www.
WadeCustomHomes.com
Several lots to choose from.
12/22ApJf12/23

LICENSED MASSAGE
THERAPIST Nikki Rae
Sun, 30 years experience.
"Have table will travel." FL
License# MA3677. 352-528-
0405. 12/29ApJf12/30


130 FREE

FREE MEALS ON WHEELS
FOR PETS: Hosted by
Happy Tails Social Club. Call
for details (352) 493-0252
ftfn

135 VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITY
FLORIDA'S LONG-TERM
CARE OMBUDSMAN PRO-
GRAM needs volunteers to
join its corps of dedicated
advocates who protect the
rights of elders residing in
nursing homes, assisted liv-
ing facilities and adult family
care homes. The program is
comprised of 17 local coun-
cils throughout the state,
and each council is seeking
additional volunteers to iden-
tify, investigate and resolve
residents' concerns. All inter-
ested individuals who care
about protecting the health,
safety, welfare and rights of
long-term care facility resi-
dents who often have no one
else to advocate for them
are encouraged to call toll-
free (888) 831-0404 or visit
the ombudsman.myflorida.
com.

200 EMPLOYMENT
START YOUR OWN AVON
BUSINESS TODAY Just
$10. No Inventory needed.
No Minimum orders. Call
Pam at 352-538-1845. tf-
nApJf

COSMETOLOGIST
WANTED Peaceful spa
setting, single station, hair
sink, color area, skilled
professional, dependable,
independent contractor. Full-
or Part-time. 352-332-5005
12/1ApJfl2/2

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS. $200 and up. 352-
771-6191. 12/8ApJf12/9


URGENT!
OWNER
OPERATORS
NEEDED.
Stepdeck/Flatbed
Regional/OTR
Paid Weekly!
85% of gross;
40% advance
904-230-4499
12/8ApJfl2/9


240 HELP WANTED-
PART TIME

RECEPTIONIST CASHIER
Cheery disposition, positive
attitude, and excellent cus-
tomer service skills are es-
sential. Must have excellent
telephone, communication
and computer skills. Drug
Free Work Place. Apply at
White Ford, 916 N. Young
Blvd, Chiefland, FL 32626.
12/8AbJfl2/9

RENTALS
CHEAPER
STORAGE
10x15 ONLY $89/mo
All Climate Controlled
Many sizes to choose
from 352-528-0778
Willistonstorage.com
507 SE 6th St
tfnAbJftfn

305 APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
WILLISTON -2 BEDROOM/1
BATH APARTMENT
central Heat/AC, $520 per
month plus $500 security
deposit. Call 352-528-5956.
12/29ApJfl2/30

310 HOUSES
FOR RENT
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH
HOUSE in the country, clean
and quiet, available NOW.
352-572-9471. 12/1ApJf12/2

2 BED/2 BATH LARGE
HOME ON 1 ACRE OF
LAND: 1,800 sq/ft, large
kitchen, all new central H/
AC, 2 large Florida rooms-
one enclosed, one screened;
8x12 storage shed. Located
20 miles from Yankeetown
in Rainbow Lakes Estates.
$750/month with first, last,
and security required. NO
pets. Call 352-489-1977
12/1ApJfl2/2


315 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
BRONSON 2 SWMH
UNITS: 2bed/2bath, 1stt
month and security deposit
required. Call 352-528-
6179 for more information.
12/1AbJf12/2


OLD TOWN VERY CLEAN
MOBILE HOME FOR RENT:
2 bedrooms with appliances,
some furniture; $435/month
with first, last, and secu-
rity. Does not include water
and electric. 352-542-8571
12/8ApJf12/9

2BED/1BATH SW with
Central Heat and A/C.
$550/month includes water,
electric, garbage. 1st, last,
and security. Off County Line
Road. No smoking, no pets.
352-463-6688 or 352-256-
3685. 12/1ApJf12/2


410 HOUSES
FOR SALE
REDUCED 3 BED/1
BATH CB newly remodeled,
carport, enclosed porch,
CH/A, woodstove/fireplace,


$86,000. City limits of
Chiefland. 352-493-4094.
12/29ApJfl2/30

MUST SELL 3 BDR/1
BATH BLOCK HOME. 100%
remodeled, central heat/AC,
new roof, fenced yard, in the
town of Cross City. $49,900.
727-423-1322 12/1AbJf12/2


415 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE

2010 JACOBSEN 3/2 on
5 acres in Trenton. $3,700
down with approved credit,
only $537/month. Owner has
financing. 352-493-9600 tf-
nApJf

1996 FLEETWOOD 3/2
-will move to your land and
set up. Owner has financing
with 3K down, $282/month.
352-493-9600. tfnApJf

2/2 16x52 bank's loss,
your gain. $261/month or
$27,500 cash with A/C, de-
livery & setup. Call Jeff 352-
496-9600 or 352-262-4531
tfnApJf

2008 JACOBSEN 4/2 2100
SQ/FT with stone fire-
place, T.N.T. walls through-
out, 18"x18" ceramic tile
floors, appliance package.
So many more options, 10K
under invoice. $500 down,
set up on your land, only
$519.47/month P&l. Call
352-262-4531 tfnApJf

3/2 ON 1 ACRE BY
OWNERS Well, septic,
power pole, Priced to sell @
$30K. For more info call 352-
318-9262. 12/1ApJf12/2

2005 SKYLINE
DOUBLEWIDE 3 bed/ 2
bath, 28x52 on 1.25 acres
in Morriston area of Levy
County. $69,900 OBO. Call
Patty at 352-509-4774.
12/22ApJf12/23


440 VACANT LAND
FOR SALE
LAND FOR SALE: 1 /4
to 2 /2 acre parcels avail-
able; low down payment,
easy terms. 352-472-4977
1/26/11ApJf1/27/11

1-1/4 ACRE WILLISTON/
MORRISTON: Beautifully
wooded parcel! Nice
neighborhood. Owner
Financing! NO DOWN
PAYMENT! Only $153/mo.
Total $14,900.00. www.
LandOwnerFinancing.
com or call 352-215-1018.
12/29ApJf12/30

1-1/4 ACRE BRONSON:
Beautifully wooded parcel.
Owner Financing! NO
DOWN PAYMENT! Only
$153/mo Total $14,900.00.
www. LandOwnerFinancing.
com or call 352-215-1018.
12/29ApJf12/30


445 WANTED TO BUY
CASH FOR YOUR COINS:
Private collector seeking
U.S. coins, older varieties,
all denominations. Paying
top dollar in cash. I pay
more than dealers, pawn,
road shows. I travel to you.
352-949-1450. tfhApJf

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS -. $200 and up. 352-
771-6191. 12/8ApJfl2/9


I


F








BUSINESS
16 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


445 WANTED TO BUY


500 FOR SALE


550 AUTOMOBILES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES


JUNK CARS BOUGHT: perfect
$150 $1,000. Call 352- Air H-
453-7159 tfnapjftfn saver
coil p
CASH FOR GOLD Never
Booth 25, yellow row, @ with
Chiefland Flea Market Freon
- Friday, Saturday, Sunday. 935-2
12/22ApJf12/23


500 FOR SALE I
Servir
ROYAL ELEGANCE CHINA, for ov
10 4 PC. Place settings beaut
w/plate, cup, saucer, and granite
bread & butter plate. Never colors
used, most in original boxes. from
$50 or $2.50 per place set- us cu
ting, min 4. 352-234-9443 or you m
profrozt@aim.com tfnAJe latest
etchin
WHOLE FISH STEAMER scribe
- large aluminum pan with at 147
removable rack with handles McCra
and large oval Italian Clas- 7 mile
sic fish platter $30 both. 352 Open
234-9443 or profrozt@aim. 8-12
com, tfnAJe appt.
3
BENKO HAND BLOWN
GLASS WATER PITCHER
- sea green rectangular; 51
crystal brandy decanter, OLD
classic glass cold drink COLL
pitcher, Mr. Coffee coffee- of old
maker, brown, and Salton slot
coffee grinder, white. $30 and c
for all. 352 234-9443 or of oth
profrozt@aim.com tfnAJe 4th fro
102 N
PWC STEARNS (US
CHALLENGER LIFE VEST to 59
turn r
- Adult Blue. Fits Chest 12/lA
36-38, 90 Ibs. Never used.
$25. 352-234-9443 or
profrozt@aim.com tfnAJe ARCH
5 p.n
lots o
FOUL WEATHER SUIT, botso
WEST MARINE Women'soo
large, red. Jacketw/retracting 12/1A
hood and overalls with front
pocket. Never used. Also
woman's large REI wind 52
pants for hiking or boating VICKI
and dry bag. $60. 352 234- New
9443 or profrozt@aim.com, Main
tfnAJe 352-4
----furnitu
WORM CASTINGS COM- Also,
POST: $5/301bs, excellent sizes.
organic fertilizer for all plants.
352-486-6912 or 727-709-
3398 tfnApJf
----HAPF
BARRELS FOR SALE: CLUB
Metal burn barrels, $10; RESC
plastic barrels, $12; open-top fencin
plastic barrels, $15; 5-gallon volunt
buckets, $1.50. Delivery Call (
available. 352-486-5860. tf- tails.
nApJf 54

A.D.ANDREWS NURSERY, CHRIS
Chiefland, Florida in SADE
business since 1982 in the LIKE
wholesale nursery trade is at FF
now selling and installing $400.
shade trees locally. Farms,
ranches, home sites, etc.
Call our sales office at 352-
493-2496 for a quote. We
install within a 60-mile radius
of Chiefland, Florida. For APAL
availability and photos, KEY
visit our website at www. Call F
adandrewsnsy.com. tfnAJ Seafo
486-0
in Ch
FRUEHAUF 24-FT Cash/
aluminum dump trailer. Used ed. tf
very little. 352-949-0222
tfnAbJf

LUMBER FOR SALE -
Pine, cherry and cypress. LOOI
Call Sammy at (352) 949- SALE
3222. ptfn tilized
free!
METAL DETECTORS: Local Pens
dealer for White's & Garrett. (352)
New, used and closeouts.
Chiefland Flea Market BARI
booth 27 yellow, Saturdays. COA,
12/15ApJf12/16 and

GE PROFILE WHITE 12/22
36'GAS COOKTOP, almost
new, $400, call 352-222- 55
0607. tfneAJ
ANY
LARGE ROOSTERS, paid L
CHICKENS AND EGGS, 352-4
quail and eggs, ducks,
geese, guineas, young 2004
pullets, goats all ages, old MARl
Avon, old books, old 78 RPM $10,
records. tfnAJ
2009
FIREWOOD dry, sea- $10,9
soned hardwood. 1/2 cord tfnAJ
$65; 1 cord $125; FREE
DELIVERY, STACKING,
KINDLING. Guaranteed 2009


quality and quantity. 352- $1
445-2854 or 352-465-8064. 4263
12/8ApJf12/9
---2005
LENNOX 13 SEER HPD 52K
042 HEAT PUMP UNIT 352-4
3.5 ton outside compression
unit only. 3 years old, in


ct condition. No inside 1992 NISSAN SENTRA,
Handler unit. Energy 82,000, cool air, new radio.
and has brand new Excellent mechanical condi-
rofessionally installed. tion. $2,500. (352) 234-9443
r had a single problem or (352) 338-1783. tfneAJ
this unit. Uses R22
S$500. tfneAJ (386)-
880 556 TRUCKS
---2004 CHEVY TAHOE -
DIXIE $13,900. Call 352-493-4263
MONUMENTS: tfnAJ
ig North Central Fla. -
er a decade. Featuring 2006 CHEVY 2500 HD -
iful bronze, marble & Crew Cab, Duramax Diesel,
e monuments in many 46K miles, $29,900. Call
and styles. Choose 352-493-4263 tfnAJ
100s of designs or let
stom design any idea 2007 CHEVY
lay have! We have the TRAILBLAZER $14,400.
gstechnoy n laserCall 352-493-4263 tfnAJ
gs and can also in-
final dates and letter----
the cemetery. Located 2006 GMC SIERRA SLT -
71 NE 512 Ave (behind Heated leather seats, Load-
ab church) Hwy 349 ed, with Warranty, $18,900.
es north of Old Town. Call 352-493-4263 tfnAJ
Tues-Fri 8-4 & Sat.
or call for after hour's DODGE RAM 3500
Toll Free 1-877-542- 2008 DODGE RAM 3500-
432 6F/1,/117AbJf Quad cab, 4x4, Cummings
diesel, flatbed, $31,900. Call
---352-493-4263 tfnAJ

15 YARD SALES
2006 GMC SIERRA SLT-
TOWN- ANTIQUES &
ECTIBLES: Hundres $18,995. Call 352-493-
ECTIBLES: Hundreds
I cookie jars; antique 4263 tfnAJ
machines; brownware
:rocks; plus all types 560 ESTATE SALE
er stuff. Dec. 3rd and
om 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. @ ESTATE SALE:
IE 629 St in Old Town. DECEMBER 3RD AND
19/98 thru Old Town 4TH. Furniture, Pool
92 St-Chavous Road- Table, Double Recliner Sofa,
ight and follow signs. Kitchen appliances (new-
pJf12/2 never used), Knick-knacks,
Christmas Decorations and
HER, DEC. 4 & 5, 8- Gifts, lots of misc. Leaving
. Multi-family sale, Florida. 6650 SE 150th Ave.
f Christmas, antiques, Morriston FL 32668 (West
household and on 464 off 41, 7 miles, then
16554 SW 132 Ave. 7/10ths of a mile south on
pJf12/2 150th Ave.) 12/1ApJf12/2


26 FURNITURE 605 BOAT & MARINE
E & FRED'S Almost 1986 MARK TWAIN 26 FT
Furniture 17 S. 2-2004 200 Suzuki 4-
Street, Chiefland, Fla. stroke (100 hrs) $16,000 (as
93-0004. Quality used is, in present condition) cash,
ire and accessories. MO, or Cashier's check only.
new mattress sets all 352-222-0607 tfnef
tfnAbJf

535 PETS 1987 BOSTON WHALER -
13'6", 40hp Mercury motor,
& ANIMALS center console, comes with
'Y TAILS SOCIAL canopy and trailer, $3,000.
I ANIMAL AND PET Call 352-528-4781. tfnAJ
OUE is in need of
g posts, wood, and PWC STEARNS
:eers for our new home. CHALLENGER LIFE VEST
352) 493-0252 for de- Adult Blue. Fits Chest
ftfn 36-38, 90 Ibs. Never used.

40 LIVESTOCK $25. 352-234-9443 or
profrozt@aim.com tfnAJe
STMAS WESTERN
)LE-17"seat, 8"gullet, FOUL WEATHER SUIT,
NEW.Canbe en FOUL WEATHER SUIT,
NEW. Can be seen
M Feed in Trenton. WEST MARINE Woman's
00 12/1ApJf12/2 large, red. Jacketw/retracting
hood and overalls with front
pocket. Never used. REI
545 GOOD Wind Pants Woman's,
HINGS TO EAT and dry bag. $60. 352-234-
9443 or profrozt@aim.com
.ACHICOLA & CEDAR tfnAJe
OYSTERS ARE INI
Flamingo Produce and
od in Bronson 352- 615 MOTORCYCLES
113 or The Deer Camp & ATUS
iefland 352-490-4868.
'EBT/Debit/CC accept- 2007 YAMAHA ROYAL
nAJb STAR MIDNIGHT VEN-
TURE 3500 miles, per-
550 FARM fect condition. Black and
PRODUCTS chrome. Samson Big Guns
exhaust. AM/FM cassette
(: LNEW HAY FOR player, cruise control, inter-
: Large rolls, highly fr- com system, bike has every-
, net-wrapped, weed thing. Garage Kept. $12,500
Coastal Bermuda-$45; obo. Call Doug at 352-346-
acola Bahia-$35. Call 0596 tfnfe
949-0222. tfnAbJf
2005 ARCTIC CAT 90ccATV
-KEPT ROLLS OF Looks good, good tires,
STAL HAY for cows runs great. $550 OBO 352-
horses $45 and $50 486-0212. 12/7ApJf12/8
Call 352-535-5203.
ApJfl2/23
700 FARM

5 AUTOMOBILES WESTERN RIDING
LESSONS team roping
JUNK CAR cash andbarrelracing lessons.4-H
p to $500. Free pickup. Horse Show coaching. Gain
45-3909 12/8ApJf12/9 confidence on our horses
or improve relationship with
MERCURY GRAND your horse. Christmas gift
QUIS 46K miles, packages available. 352-
400. Call 352-493-4263 493-9914 12/1ApJf12/2

CHEVY AVEO --
95. Call 352-493-4263 I
---------


CHEVY MALIBU J
4,995. Call 352-493-
tfnAJ
--------- i
CHRYSLER 300 -
miles, $14,900. Call
.93-4263 tfnAJ


NOTICE BY THE CITY OF
CEDAR KEY OF INTENT
TO USE THE UNIFORM AD
VALOREM METHOD OF
COLLECTION OF A NON-
AD VALOREM
ASSESSMENT
Notice is hereby given to all
owners of lands located within
the boundaries of the City of
Cedar Key that the City of
Cedar Key intends to use the
uniform ad valorem method
for collecting the non-ad
valorem assessments levied
by the City of Cedar Key as
set forth in section 197.3632,
Florida Statutes, and that the
City Commission will hold a
public hearing on December
21, 2010, at 6:00 p.m. at City
Hall, 490 2nd St., Cedar Key,
Florida.
The purpose of the public
hearing is to consider the
adoption of a Resolution
authorizing the City of Cedar
Key to use the uniform ad
valorem method of collecting
non-ad valorem assessments
levied by the City of Cedar
Key as provided in section
197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The City of Cedar Key is
considering adopting a non-
ad valorem assessment to
fund fire rescue services to
be levied for the first time
commencing Fiscal Year
October 1,2011 and annually
thereafter.
Interested parties may
appear at the public hearing
to be heard regarding
the use of the uniform ad
valorem method of collecting
such non-ad valorem
assessments.
If any person decides to
appeal any decision made
with respect to any matter
considered at this public
hearing such person will
need a record of proceedings
and for such purpose such
person may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made
at their own expense and
which record includes the
testimony and evidence on
which the appeal is based.
Dated this 18"t day of Nov.,
2010.
City of Cedar Key
By: Frances Hodges
City Clerk
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 9, 16,
2010.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-191
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH GERARD
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Elizabeth Gerard,
deceased, whose date of
death was October 19, 2010,
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Levy County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 355 S. Court St.,
Bronson, FL 32621. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHINTHETIMEPERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE


TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.


The date of first publication
of this notice is Nov. 25,
2010.
Personal Representative:
Richard L. McCombs
814 Woods Hole Circle
Statesboro, GA 30461
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
H. Michael Evans, Esquire
Attorney for Richard L.
McCombs
Florida Bar Number: 251674
20702 W. Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon, FL 34431
Telephone: (352) 489-2889
Fax: (352) 489-0852
E-Mail:
hmichaeleveanspa@yahoo.
com
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 2010.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
CASE NO.: 38-2010-CA-
000019
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TOBY BASS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure
Sale dated November 12,
2010 and entered in Case
NO. 38-2010-CA-000019
of the Circuit Court of the
EIGHTH Judicial Circuit in
and for LEVY County, Florida
wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and
TOBY BASS; JOLENE BASS
A/K/A JOLENE CALLAWAY;
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at MAIN
LOBBY OF THE LEVY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 10th day of
January, 2011, the following
described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
THE WEST 1/2 OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 12
SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST,
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A
MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO VIN #'S
FLHML3B155727275A &
FLHML3B155727275B.
A/K/A 6751 NW 45TH
STREET, CHIEFLAND, FL
32626
Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
November 16, 2010.
Danny J. Shipp
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Gwen McElroy /s/
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
Americans with Disabilities
Act If you are a person with
a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact: Ms. Jan Phillips,
Human Resources Manager
Alachua County Family/
Civil Courthouse, 201 E.
University Avenue, Room
410, Gainesville, FL 32601
Phone: 352-337-6237/Fax:
352-374-5238.
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 38-2010-CA-
000626
CAPITAL CITY BANK, a
Florida banking corporation,
Plaintiff,


vs.
DAVIS LUGO
MALDONADO,a single
person; LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA, a political
subdivision of the State
of Florida; FORT KING


STREET MASONRY,
INC.; and PRESTIGE AB
MANAGEMENT CO., LLC
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
TO WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that I, DANNY SHIPP,
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
the Eighth Judicial Circuit
, in and for LEVY County,
Florida, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment In
Foreclosure entered in the
above styled cause, will sell
at public sale the following
described property situate in
LEVY County, Florida, to wit:
LOT 5, BLOCK 74, OAK
RIDGE ESTATES, according
to the plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, page 63, public
records of Levy County,
Florida.
Said sale shall be made to
the highest and best bidder
for cash pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment
entered in the above styled
cause and will be held in the
County Commission Room of
the LEVY County Courthouse
in Bronson, Florida, on the
7th day of February, 2011,
commencing at the hour of
11:00 A.M.
All interested parties shall
be governed accordingly by
this Notice.
DATED this 17th day of
November, 2010.
(COURT SEAL)
DANNY SHIPP
Clerk of the Court
By: Gwen McElroy /s/
Deputy Clerk
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 2010.
----------
TOWN OF BRONSON
NOTICE OF QUASI-
JUDICIAL HEARING
PETITION FOR A SPECIAL
ASSESSMENT AGAINST
PROPERTY
Petition No. 2010-10
BRUMBACH
Owner: Ella Brumbach
C/O ERH, Inc
P.O. Box 614
Bronson, FI 32621
Location: 140 OakAve
Legal: Parcel # 17-12-17-
06483-000-00
Notice is hereby given that
a Quasi-Judicial hearing
will be conducted by the
Town Board of Bronson on
Monday, December 6, 2010,
at 7:00 PM, in the Dogan
S. Cobb Municipal Building
at 660 East Hathaway
Avenue, Bronson, Florida to
hear a request for a special
assessment lien against
above said property.
Enforcing Official is
requesting a lien of $4,056.00
to be placed on said property
for the cost incurred for
the demolition and debris
cleaning of building and site
that was deemed a public
hazard.
At this hearing, all
interested parties will have
an opportunity to be heard
with regard to the proposed
special assessment; and
All interested persons are
urged to attend this hearing.
Comments may be forwarded
to the Town of Bronson, PO
Box 266, Bronson, Florida
32621, or bring them to the
office of the Town Clerk at
the Town Hall in Bronson,
Florida.
If any person decides to
appeal the decision of the
Town Board with respect to
any matter considered at said
Public Hearing, he will need
to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings
is made, which includes
the testimony and evidence
upon which the Appeal is to
be based.
If any accommodations
are needed for persons
with disabilities, contact the
Clerk's Office in Town Hall at
352-486-2354.
Bronson Town Board
Bronson, Levy County,
Florida
Pub.: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 2010.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


File Number 2010-CP-184
IN RE: ESTATE OF
D. MICHAEL McNALLY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the Estate of D. MICHAEL








BUSINESS

The Levy County Journal levyjournalonline.com The County Paper, Est. 1923 Dec. 2, 2010 17


900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES 900 LEGAL NOTICES


McNALLY, Deceased, whos
date of death was Octobe
16, 2010; File Number 201C
CP-184 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Levy County
Florida, Probate Divisior
the address of which is Lev
County Courthouse, 35!
South Court Street, Bronsor
FL 32621.
The names and
addresses of the persona
representative and the
personal representative':
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the
Decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against Decedent's estate
on whom a copy of thi'
notice is required to be
served, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
Decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILE
WITHINTHETIMEPERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is: December
2,2010.
KEVIN HAROLD McNALLY
/s/
Personal Representative
9919.SW 62nd Court
Trenton, FL 32693
GREGORY V.
BEAUCHAMP, P.A. Is/
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Florida Bar No. 178770
P. O. Box 1129
Chiefland, FL 32644
(352)493-1458
Pub.: Dec. 2, 9, 2010.
----------
IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, CIRCUIT COURT,
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 38-2010-CP-
194
IN RE: The Estate of
SHIRLEY ANN HARRISON,
a/k/a SHIRLEY A.
HARRISON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of Shirley Ann
Harrison, a/k/a Shirley A.
Harrison, deceased, whose
date of death was September
7, 2010, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Levy County Courthouse,
355 South Court Street,
Bronson, Florida 32621. The
names and addresses of the
Personal Representative
and the Personal
Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is
required to be served must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST


PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHINTHETIMEPERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA


e PROBATE CODE WILL BE
r FOREVER BARRED.
- NOTWITHSTANDING THE
e TIME PERIOD SET FORT
y, ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILE[
i, TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
y AFTER THE DECEDENT'E
5 DATE OF DEATH I;
, BARRED.
The date of first publication
d of this Notice is December 2
al 2010.
e Personal Representative
s Theresa Michelle Hol
Catlett /s
e P.O. Box 97;
s Williston, FL 32696
s Attorney for Personal
,Representative:
s Katherine E. Macdonald
e Florida Bar No. 380989
s 309 N.E. 1st Street
E Gainesville, Florida 32601
3 (352) 373-6323
E Pub.: Dec. 2, 9, 2010.
F ----------
3 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
SOF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA,
S IN AND FOR LEVY
s COUNTY
s CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO
a 38-2010-CA-000425
s WELLS FARGO BANK,
SN.A., SUCCESSOR
SBY MERGER WITH
SWACHOVIA BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
v.
JEFFERSON SAMUEL
I LAMB A/K/A JEFFERSON
% S. LAMB; et al.
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
I NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN
Spursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 15, 2010
and Order to Cancel and
Reschedule Foreclosure
Sale dated Nov. 22, 2010,
Both entered in Case No.
38-2010-CA-000425 of the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash in the BOCC meeting
room in the Levy County
Courthouse, 355 South Court
Street, Bronson, FL 32621,
at 11:00 a.m. and on the 10th
day of January, 2011, the
following described property
as set forth in said Summary
Final Judgment:
The West 1/4 of the SE 1/4
of the NW 1/4 of Section 13,
Township 14 South, Range
18 East, Levy County,
Florida.
TOGETHER WITH that
certain 2000 Mobile Home,
Identification Nos. N89657A
and N89657B.
TOGETHER WITH all
the improvements now or
hereafter erected on the
property, and all easements,
rights, appurtenances,
rents, royalties, mineral, oil
and gas rights and profits,
water rights and stock and
all fixtures now or hereafter
attached to the property.
Property address: 18270
SE 42nd Place, Morriston, FL
32668
**ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IFANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60)
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. **
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on Nov.
22, 2010.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit and
County Court
By: Gwen McElroy /s/
Deputy Clerk
Gerald D. Davis, Esquire
Trenam, Kemker, Scharf,
Barkin, Frye, O'Neill &
Mullis, PA.
200 Central Avenue, Suite
1600
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
(727)896-7171
Pub.: Dec. 2, 9, 2010.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
CASE NO.: 38-2010-CA-
000460


DIVISION:
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BILLY DANIEL WEBB A/K/A
BILLY D. WEBB, et al,


E Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
E PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
H 45
D NOTICE IS HEREBY
E GIVEN Pursuant to a Fina
S Judgment of Foreclosure
S dated November 22, 2010,
and entered in Case No.
n 38-2010-CA-000460 of the
,Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for
:Levy County, Florida in
t which Household Finance
/ Corporation III, is the Plaintiff
2 and Billy Daniel Webb a/k/
6 a Billy D. Webb, Tenant #
1 n/k/a Joseph Webb, are
defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder
for cash in/on the BOCC
Meeting Room of the Levy
County Courthouse, 355 S.
Court St., Bronson, 32621,
Levy County, Florida at
11:00 AM on the 10th day of
January, 2011, the following
Described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment
of Foreclosure:
THE SOUTHEAST OF
THE SOUTHEAST % OF
STHE NORTHEAST OF
SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 13
SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST,
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
LESS RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR
STATE ROAD S-330.
TOGETHER WITH
A MOBILE HOME
LOCATED THEREON AS
A PERMANENT FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO, DESCRIBED AS
ONE(1) 1985DOUBLEWIDE
KIMBERLY MOBILE HOME
24X56, BEARING VIN
I KH52D3CK3742GAA,
TITLE # 0041545078, AND
SVIN KH52D3CK3742GAB,
TITLE # 0041550239.
SA/K/A 5051 NORTHWEST
35TH STREET, CHIEFLAND,
FL 32626
Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated in Levy County,
Florida this 22nd day of
November, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
By: Gwen McElroy /s/
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons
with a disability who need
any accommodation in
order to participate should
call Jan Phillips, ADA
Coordinator, Alachua
County Courthouse, 201 E.
University Ave., Gainesville,
FL 32601 at (352)337-6237
within two (2) working days
of receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing impaired,
please call 1-800-955-8771;
if you are voice impaired,
please call 1-800-955-8770.
Pub.: Dec. 2, 9, 2010.
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 38-2010-CA-
000656
DIVISION:
BENEFICIAL FLORIDA
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JUAN COLON BARREIRO
A/K/A JUAN COLON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
45
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 22, 2010,
and entered in Case No.
38-2010-CA-000656 of the
Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for
Levy County, Florida in which


Beneficial Florida Inc., is
the Plaintiff and Juan Colon
Barreiro a/k/a Juan Colon,
Myrna L. Feliciano Cruz
a/k/a Myrna L. Feliciano,
are defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder


for cash in/on the BOC(
Meeting Room of the Lev:
County Courthouse, 355 S
Court St., Bronson, Florida
32621, Levy County, Florid;
I at11:00AM on the 10th day o
January, 2011, the following!
,described property as se
forth in said Final Judgmen
of Foreclosure:
LOTONE (1), OF EMERALD
r FOREST, A SUBDIVISION
SAS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLA"
f BOOK "7", PAGE 45, OF
/ THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF LEVY COUNTY'
FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH THAT CERTAIN
MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO BEARING VIIN
NO. 46610522GA ANE
TITLE NO. 0066452493.
SA/K/A 5990 NORTHEAST
106TH COURT, BRONSON
FL 32621
Any person claiming ar
interest in the surplus frorr
the sale, if any, other thar
the property owner as o
the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 6(
days after the sale.
Dated in Levy County
Florida this 22nd day o
November, 2010.
Clerk of the Circuit Cour
Levy County, Florida
By: Gwen McElroy /s,
Deputy Clert
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order tc
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons
with a disability who need
any accommodation in
order to participate should
call Jan Phillips, ADA
Coordinator, Alachua
County Courthouse, 201 E.
University Ave., Gainesville,
FL 32601 at (352)337-6237
within two (2) working days
of receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing impaired,
please call 1-800-955-8771;
if you are voice impaired,
please call 1-800-955-8770.
Pub.: Dec. 2, 9, 2010.
----------
NOTICE OF INTENT TO
CONSIDER VACATING
PUBLIC ROAD
NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN
thatthe BOARDOFCOUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
will consider at its regularly
scheduled meeting on
December 21, 2010, at
9:00 a.m. in the County
Commission Room in the
Levy County Courthouse,
Bronson, Florida, the
vacation, abandonment
and closing of a portion of
road right-of-way located in
Gleason's Trailer Village, a
recorded subdivision located
in Section 18, Township 11
South, Range 16 East, Levy
County, Florida, said portion
of road right-of-way being all
that part of road right-of-way
lying north of North Shady
Lane (a 50' right-of-way),
lying east of Lot 1, Block C,
and lying west of Lot 6, Block
B of Gleason's Trailer Village,
as per plat thereof recorded
in Plat Book 3, page 20 of
the Public Records of Levy
County, Florida.
Any persons interested
in being heard concerning
the vacation, abandonment
and closing of the above-
described roadway are
encouraged to attend the
meeting.
Danny Stevens
Chair, Board of County
Commissioners
Pub.: Dec. 2, 2010

-t ', ,' I


cadfotomew
a4~d e4ew

ffl Oawa


LEVY LAND TRANSACTIONS
2/24/2010
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-
Assignment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended
Certificate of Title, AD-Agree Deed, Al-Assumption of
Indebtedness, AM-Assignment of Mrtg, CD-Correctory
Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed, E-Easement, FJDX-
Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mrtg Modify Agreement,
NL-Notice of Limitation, PX-Probate X, QCD-Quit Claim
Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed, ROWD-Right of
Way Deed, WD-Warranty Deed.

2/24/2010
536044 AD 1191 101 $20,000.00 BDY SW1/4 SE1/4
19-11-17
Grantor: KRELL NANCY
Grantees: LEWIS MICHAEL, BOSTIC STACY
536049 WD 1191 117 $8,500.00 L 9 (49) WILLISTON
HIGHLANDS # 14
Grantor: GLEASON CATHERINE H Y
Grantee: LEHMAN SANDRA L
536055 WD 1191 124 $10.00 BDYNE1/4NW1/433-
14-18, ETC
Grantors: BELL REEDUS WILLIAM, BELL SHELLEY,
ROBERTS SHELLEY,
BELL LEXI NICOLE
Grantee: BELL BENJAMIN J
536056 WD 1191 126 $10.00 L17(2M), BDY 8-12-17
Grantors: GOODIE DOLORES SWAN TRUSTEE, ELLEN
K LEGRAW TRUST
Grantee: SWAN ROBERT J
536058 WD 1191 140 $10.00 L45FOREST PARK#3
PHASE II, W/MH
Grantor: BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantee: SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
536063 QCD 1191 168 $10.00 L5(1)BRONSON
HTS
Grantors: RUVIO KERRY, PARKS KERRY
Grantee: RUVIO DAVID L
536064 QCD 1191 170 $10.00 L25-26(6) OAK RIDGE
EST
Grantors: RUVIO KERRY, PARKS KERRY
Grantee: RUVIO DAVID L
536068 WD 1191 178 $175,200.00 L20(D) PALM
POINT SD
Grantor: OCWEN LOAN SERVICING LLC
Grantee: FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
536069 WD 1191 183 $10.00 L20(D) PALM POINT
SDGrantor: FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION
Grantees: JANES GEORGE N JR, JANES PATRICIA E
536070 WD 1191 185 $0.00 L14 LORE EST,W/MH
Grantors: ALLDREDGE JERRY E, ALLDREDGE JERRY,
ALLDREDGE MACHELL P
Grantee: PERKINS STATE BANK


Copies of the Levy Countylournal

and the Tri-County
COMMUNITY
Advertisercan

be found at these


Bronson
Bronson Public Library
A&A Restaurant
Hungry Howies 27A
Dollar General
Bronson Post Office 27A
Nobles 27A
Bronson IGA
Week's Chevron 27A
Country Kitchen
Kangaroo 27A 392
Hathaway
Bronson Morris Junction
Levy Court House
Trenton
Palms Medical Center
Trenton Texaco
Fanning Springs
Sunoco US 19 Discount
Food Mart
Tackle Box
Fanning Springs Citgo
Old Town
Dollar General
Jiffy Store 25897 SE US
19
Old Town BP
Chiefland
Deke's Steakhouse
Stone's BP 13574 NW
US19
Bett's Big T
Chiefland-cont
Mya's Chinese
Restaurant
Dollar General (WD
Plaza)
Winn Dixie
Chiefland Mail & More
Jiffy 3000 (Church's
Chicken) US19/320
Jiffy 2280 Manatee
Highway 320
Bubbaque's Restaurant
Chiefland PO Park
Avenue
Igiri Gas Mart
Jiffy #2946-Midtown US
19
ABC Pizza US 19
McDonald's US 19
Bill's BBQ US 19
Burger King US 19
China 1
CVS Pharmacy US 19
Walgreen's
01


Chiefland-cont
Sunoco SE 320/19
Huddle House US 19
Dollar General Hwy.19
Hardee's
Carter's Feed Store
CR347
Chamber of Commerce
Chiefland Library
Levy County Journal
Chiefland
Hungry Howies Hwy
US19
Chiefland Chamber of
Commerce
Cedar Key
Dollar General
Island Jiffy SR24 &
Whiddon
Annies Cafe'
Jiffy #1173 by Cedar Key
PO
Cedar Key Library
The Market Place
Otter Creek
Herschel's Quik Stop US
19
Otter Creek Country
Store
Williston
Li'l Food Ranch US27A
Li'l Food Ranch SR121
Corner Market 121/41
Morriston Post Office
Winn Dixie
McDonald's
Green Shutters
Restaurant 27A
Subway 27A
Sunoco across from
High School
Williston Corner Market
Noble Ave.
Sunoco Island
Kangaroo 27A/41 553 N
Main
Williston Library
Kangaroo Express 1182
E. Noble
Hitchcock's 27A
Chevron-Noble Ave.-
across from Hitchcocks
Driftwood Restaurant
Frog's BBQ 27A
Williston Chamber of
Commerce


locations








fNEws
18 Dec. 2, 2010 The County Paper, Est. 1923 levyjournalonline.com The Levy County Journal


Construction, from Page 1
design and the LED lighting out front, which provides a brighter and more
attractive alternative to what was there before. The restaurant's restrooms were
re-done as part of the effort to improve overall customer satisfaction with the
restaurant.
The drive-through area of the restaurant was completely revamped and
expanded. The additional lane avoids the possibility of customer vehicles lining
up and extending into the roadway. The Kocian's recognized the problem early
and knew it had to be corrected.
The Kocian's also has added Wifi wireless internet capability. Customers
are often seen sitting at tables operating laptops connected to the internet. "
"People like to come in and relax," she said. B

DCB's Expansion
Drummond Community Bank is expanding its drive-through area to a total : -
of five lanes plus the ATM lane. Bank tellers will stand behind tall vertical
windows to give customers a chance to see the tellers working. l
Drive-through areas tend to be like the stepchildren of banks, according to
President Luther Drummond. Most banks put them behind the bank or next to
the dumpster or the air conditioning. Drummond wants the drive-through to be
an inviting facility to use. "- .
"We're going to make it equal to what's inside the bank," he said. '*""
Drummond anticipates beginning construction sometime in December.
The bank is waiting for approval from Progress Energy Florida to move a L
transformer that stands in the way of the planned expansion.
Chiefland Shopping Center's New Look Two customers dine at in the redesigned McDonalds restaurant in Chiefland. Th
Paige Brookins of Hudson Properties said the facelift at Chiefland d6cor is innovative and incorporates appealing colors and design.
Shopping Center emphasizes pleasantly inviting design features and color
combinations.
"This, with the remodeling of new tenant interiors, represents the final phase '.
of our planned renovation of the entire center and parking lot," she said. -f '" "."
She said renovation has been a good growth strategy for the shopping' i' ; :.
center and they hope that strategy will carry over into downtown Chiefland's ''" H
business district at large.
"We've reinvested to make the center more contemporary, physically .
attractive and shopper friendly," she said. "This has brought about positive " '- :".",;;
changes in our tenant mix, architecture, landscaping, parking and signage. Our ", I
intent, of course, is to stay current with a fresh concept while maintaining the.
original style and convenient access of our family-owned property."
Built in 1963, Chiefland Shopping Center was the first shopping center
in Chiefland. The original tenants were Thriftway, Western Auto and Griffin
Rexall Drugs. In 1971, the second expansion was completed. The anchor ..
tenant was Shop Rite.
The center is fully occupied at the present time.

Murphy Express being constructed
Murphy Express, a national discount gas chain, anticipates opening its new
convenience store and self-serve gasoline facility early next year.
The facility is being constructed at the site of a former hardware store next -
door to Chiefland Regional Shopping Center. The facility will have four lanes, ..
eight islands and 10 gas pumps. .
Murphy Express stations traditionally have been co-located at Wal-Mart
stores, but the company is not owned by Wal-Mart. The two companies have
a working relationship.
Construction was stopped for about a month because the company did Customers are taking advantage of the expanded and redesigned drive-thru. An ac
not have its Environmental Resource Permit from the Suwannee River Water ditional lane was added to increase the efficiency of the drive-thru and prevent line
Management District, according to SRWMD. The company now has its ERP of vehicles from extending into the highway during times of high traffic.
permit and construction has resumed.

S CUSTOMER SERVICE HAS BEEN OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1973

SCOGGIN S lesDept Opn hi F to 7;Seat,;ClsedSunday 3 52-493-4263
a (aSerte and Body Shop Open Mon-Frl 7:30 to 5, Call 493-4263X
S'" "B hTowng ,-.7 4 1424NORTH YOUNG BLVD,, C HIE i LAND
CHEVY i BUiCK owww .scogglnscheuybuick.com C


(-EHEVROLET-BUICK )

CPu Herlified8l l P'PRE-OWNED D

USED VEHICLES '. Es, :O- -. .F \ C"
IV-'- -- 0 MONEY

*oj MONTE CARLO SS OWAC SCVV(RNBWE
i,-,- $7,995 $| :--$ 11,895

'og (CMv AVIO C CHIV COBALT L g9 PONTIAC COUPE O
I-.: $10,995 s,.-. $ 11,995 ,.$11,995


S CHEVYTAHOE 407 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER *OS CHRVSLER loo LIMITI D. 4..
S...... $13913,99 5 955 ...$4, 5 995 LA



i 08 CHEVY SLVERADO Io MAZDA6 o HONDAACCORD

,$ ,.. $18,9695 8,995a $18,995 ,- A $8,995
vrPONTIACG6EGT *oCHETitAIHLPLVg R* BC 'oaeH COLtY ltADQ ,BOA ,i ? *a j
5rm r$'15,695 <** $ 18,995 enew 99 3


'o07 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER 'o7 FORD SPORT TRAC '07 MC ,oasoHDlSLT4X4, E
LIMITED, LEATHER-DVD ,,K MILES, LOADED S
sn.,.$ S9,995 ,,.,a,, $2o,995 .,nw 22,995 (

HEATED LEATHER SEATS i0.au 19Q795 ()TC ( | 1
Sa,.-^ $18,995 ,.,...o $20,495

THIRD SEAT, LEATHER DURAMAX DIESEL CUIMMINS DIESEL

07 CHEVY SILVERADO '09 CHEVY TAHOE .
CCEW4X4 ,iM APR.wi $25,995 DREl T1 MO ** O
',-,o'-, $24,995 Op cl,
COM.E I,,N Arlt) I-EilT~R FoI, DRAim,,, TO Br HCE) DEC.l ., 2cm ..,.Oss ei



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