Title: Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00137
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Uniform Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Levy County journal
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Publication Date: September 13, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028309
Volume ID: VID00137
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7392
oclc - 33129639
alephbibnum - 000579546
lccn - sn 95026738

Full Text
















EVY COUNTY JOURNA


-HE COUNTY PAPE R EST. 192 2




Pomeroy named mayor; Barron vice mayor Gruesome discovery

SAOAA A in Chiefland Tuesday


SA yWRIT6lNU JFRtCNIUAI
STAFF WRITER


CHIEFLAND A new mayor, vice mayor, and two
commissioners were seated during Monday's Chiefland City
Commission meeting. Teal Pomeroy was unanimously approved as
mayor by fellow commissioners after a motion by Teresa Barron
named him to that seat. Barron was unanimously appointed vice
mayor.
Pomeroy and Barron are joined by the recently re-elected Rollin
Hudson, as well as new commission members Frank Buie and
Sammy Cason. Former Mayor Betty Walker and Commissioner
Alice Monyei stepped down Monday.

In other actions, commissioners:
Voted unanimously to approve amending the five-year
capital improvement plan to include a recreation element
to the plan. This change, which adds $200,000 to the
recreation plan, will aid the city when it applies for a
FRDAP grant to complete the recently approved skate park
addition to Delma Locke Park.
Commissioners also voted unanimously to approve the
city's five-year capital improvement plan for the years
2005 2010. Commissioners agreed to the projects list in
February; however, the list was never formally approved.
Voted unanimously to authorize the city manager to
consolidate three variable rate loans into one fixed rate loan
with Capital City Bank. The new fixed rate of 5.15 percent
will be applied to a loan totaling $879,180.
Voted unanimously to approve rule changes for the rental of
Tommy Usher Center. The change allows a refund policy;
no such refund policy previously existed.
Authorized the city to use the services of Michelle Morton
of City Investigations, Inc., to complete background checks
on applicants to the vacant fire chief position. Morton
conducted such checks for the city in 2006.
Agreed to continue using last year's school crossing guard
agreement with the school board. The city had sought to
use a new agreement providing a raise to $25 daily for
these services; however, the school board said they did not
have the funds for the increase.
Unanimously approved the first reading of changing the
language in the Occupational License Tax ordinance. The
tax name was changed in the Florida Legislature to Local
Business Tax.l u


Inside FCAT]

This the nev

Isue... *** By BILL MCCREA
STAFF WRITER
Opinion/Editorial.. .2 BRONSON One of the
Around Levy County... 3,4 major oals for the Levy
County School Board is to
Communityy. .......... 5 insure FCAT success in all
Worship/Obituaries......6 district schools.
Assistant Superintendent Jeff
Around Lvy County... 7,8 Edison said that "knowing what
Levy County Sports.. 9-11 to critique" is just part of the
Outd r N ....... 12 process in mapping out the plan
for FCAT score improvements.
Tides A 13 In mapping out an FCAT
Nascar.. .... 13 plan, Edison said it is essential
to know how the students are
Around LevyCounty... ..14 doing in the classroom by using
BusinessDirectory 15i all the data and information that
is available and identifying the
LandTransactions ...16,17 content that needs to be taught.
Markcetc. 17. "Knowing what to teach is
a just a part of it," said Edison in
Classified& Legals......18 presenting his focus calendar to
Legals- .. .. 18-19 the board at the Sept. 4 morning
meeting.


Pictured left to right:
CityAttorney Norm Fugate, new Vice Mayor Teresa Barron,
Commissioner Rollin Hudson, new Mayor Teal Pomeroy,
new Commissioners Sammy Cason and Frank Buie.


OUTGOING OUTGOING
COMMISSIONER COMMISSIONER
ALICE MONYEI. BETTY WALKER


plan set for


v school year


Mike Todd, the district
accreditation director,
responded to Edison's
presentation by adding that the
feedback he has received so far
from the county's teachers has
been positive.
Todd agreed with Edison's
presentation and said that this
"information sharing" is a good
way to form a district-wide
plan. "Knowing what the other
Guys are doing helps a lot," he
reported.
Using a process called
the Florida Continuous
Improvement Model (FCIM),
teachers can find out where
their students' weaknesses are
by analyzing the data and then
tailoring instruction. FCIM is
a tool that Edison believes will
add to an FCAT improvement
by pointing out where the weak
strands of learning occur.


Edigon said that the FCIM
instruction might also be a
good way to offset the state
and district pattern of a major
decline in reading scores once
students reach the eighth grade.
"We're asking kids to
read more non-fiction," he
added. "Our plan is to place a
greater emphasis on science
and mathematics and to bring
reading into the content areas."
One of the future goals
that Ann Haynes, Yankeetown
school principal, recognizes as
vital to FCAT gains is to focus
more on a standard and not so
much on what the textbooks
have to offer. "A goal of FCIM
is to move away from the
textbooks and move towards
lessons built on a standard.
So, as the books change the
teachers can make the necessary
adjustments," said Haynes..


Two adults and nearly 40 animals were found dead in a rural
Chiefland area when the Levy County Sheriff's Department
responded to a request for a well-being check called in by an out-of-
state relative. The call resulted in a gruesome discovery Tuesday.
Found were the remains of 30 goats (quoted as a conservative
estimate), a donkey, a miniature horse, seven dogs and two adults.
Levy County Sheriff's Department Lieutenant Evan Sullivan told
The Levy County Journal late Tuesday night that the Department's
preliminary investigation of the scene revealed that the adults and
animals appear to have been deceased for possibly one to three
days. Autopsy results are pending. However, there were no signs of
neglect or disease among the animals.
Sullivan, with more than 22 years of experience in law
enforcement, said "I've never seen as many dead animals at one
crime scene."
The Levy County Animal Control Department, as well as
statewide emergency management officials and the Levy County
Health department were notified of the discovery. No health threats
to other animals or humans in the area are suspected. However,
disposal operations for such a large number of dead animals,
according to Sullivan, are problematic.
Out of respect for the family and pending notification of next of
kin, the identities of the dead cannot be released at this time, said
Sullivan. The Levy County Sheriff's Department will hold a-press
conference and issue a press release pending autopsy results and
successful notification of next of kin.m

9-11 Memorial Service

held in Williston


September 11th Memorial service was sponsored and hosted
at Perkins bank in Williston. The tradition began in 2005
with the planting of a tree and has become an annual event.
Citizens and community officials turned out to pay their
respects to the victims of the September 11 tragedy that
rocked the nation in the year 2000. Williston High ROTC gave
the honor salute and Pastor Wes Smith of Williston Church of
God led prayer. Todd Etheridge and Jana Carlisle of Perkins,
spoke in remembrance of those who lost their lives.


Bronson


results are in.
Incumbent Schuler wins Bronson
Town Council seat. Weeks takes seat of
resigning Commissioner Edith Brown.


Schuler 140 vs. Rodriguez 108

Weeks 157 vs. Mayes 91
See related story page 8


New instructional programs strengthen district
I By BILL MCCREA


BRONSON At the Sept. 4 Levy County School Board
meeting, Assistant Superintendent Jeff Edison presented some
new instructional programs.
The first program, Students Understanding Math and
Science (SUMS) has now been added to the district's
curriculum. This program is a successor of another SUMS
program, Students Using Mathematics Skillfully, which is a
multi-year math initiative that began at Bronson Elementary,
Joyce Bullock Elementary and Williston Elementary.
What is happening is a shift to science where teachers and
administrators, having completed a one-weel training session,
are now provided strategies on how to incorporate "inquiry-
based learning" into mathematics and science, said Edison.
"Chiefland Elementary and Cedar Key School have joined
the initiative as well, and the staff has attended the week-long
initial training," Edison added.
Edison said this type of training is provided district-wide
and foresees "all of our schools doing this."
Along with the training that is provided, there are also
some material gains that some of the district's principals like.
"The very nice thing about SUMS is the science kit,"
said Cheryl Beauchamp, Bronson Elementary principal. She


added, "There is enough material in the kit so that every child
has their own equipment. That takes off a lot of the prep work
a teacher normally does. "
SFor clarification, Edison said that SUMS is a three-year
process. "The first year is just math. The second year is
science and math, and the third is fully science."
Another program that is now being used in district schools
is the Florida Continuous Improvement Model (FCIM). It is a
process that allows principals and instructors to analyze data
on student performance and use the results to tailor instruction.
"The end result will be more effective and efficient
instruction for all students," said Edison.
At Yankeetown School, Ann Hayes, principal, said that
what has been effective at her institution is to start with a
small group of students and then look at all the data from the
areas of reading, math and science.
"By looking at this, the teachers found that we are the
weakest in vocabulary and the strongest in main ideas and
supporting details," said Hayes about how the FCIM process
works.
Edison said that there are many workshops, besides these
current programs, that teachers, administrators and other
staff members are attending to enhance their ability to serve
students.


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Page 2 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


OPINION/EDITORIAL


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


IN MY HUMBLE OPINION


Sharing air space with the president


FINANCIAL NEWS


Are you yckoitoaUy


By CASSANDRA JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER

Wayne and I took a lovely trip to Seattle a couple of
weeks ago. It was a return trip for me I had spent four
months there in the early 1980s. While a sailor, I had gone
as part of the commissioning crew of the submarine tender,
the USS McKee, which was being built at the Lockheed
shipyard.
I learned to love the area then for the natural beauty, the
people and the culture. I have often returned there in my
mind's eye.
Wayne's son was likewise stationed there. He loved it
so much that he chose to-remain after completing his Navy
tour.
Our trip was wonderful, filled with interesting people,
sites and sounds. We loved John's fiance, Karen and
enjoyed meeting their friends. We loved the natural beauty
of the area, and enjoyed the busy-ness of downtown Seattle.
And there is no better bread than Seattle's sourdough,
especially when paired with Dungeness crab.
Flying into SeaTac Airport was a breeze. Leaving was not
so easy. I wanted to spend more time with John and Karen.
I wanted to walk deeper into the rain forest. It would have
been fun, too, to have gone clubbing, just once, to the jazz
bars I used to frequent as a sailor.
The trip to the airport was excruciating. With a scheduled
take-off of 5:15 p.m. on a Monday, we allowed ourselves
plenty of time to navigate rush-hour traffic. Or so we
thought. We left around 2:30. We sailed along at the speed
limit for the first 15 minutes. Then we hit a massive snag.
John turned on his radio.
We learned traffic was tied up due to a Very Special
Visitor. The president of the United States had just flown
in to Seattle. Law enforcement agencies had closed down
portions of two major interstate freeways so he could be
whisked safely and quickly to his destination.
Representative Dave Reichart was running for re-election
to Congress, and the president was guest of honor at a
$1,000-a-plate dinner. Those who attended also could have
their pictures taken with the president for a mere $10,000.
The traffic snarl meant my arrival at the airport was far
under the recommended two hours needed to clear ticket
lines and security checkpoints. But I needn't have worried
about that. I sailed quickly through both, and arrived at my
gate 30 minutes before the scheduled departure time.
As we sat by the gate waiting to board, airline attendants
asked us to be ready to quickly stow all our baggage under


SHERIFFuS






SJOH
.. -: i .



U JOP


our seats. Air Force One was waiting for take-off too. If we
could load very quickly, we could perhaps get up in the air
before Air Force One requested clearance.
Seeing some passengers combining both their carry-
ons into one, I repacked my two, easily fitting both bags'
contents into the larger bag. Almost all of us stood in a queue
at the gate before being told to do so. I think we set a record
for boarding the plane and stowing our items.
Our efforts were in vain. The pilot announced the
president had boarded his plane. Air Force One would soon
taxi down the runway.
Our engines idling, we waited an hour. Once we taxied to
the runway, I could see 11 planes behind mine, all waiting to
take off. I don't know how many were able to take off ahead
of ours.
I wonder how many people were inconvenienced that
day. The snarl on the interstates created log jambs that ran
into rush hour traffic. There must have been thousands of
passengers in planes kept grounded, engines running.
I doubt if anyone would have really minded an
inconvenience had the trip been necessary. But I heard
several fellow passengers that day complain that they did not
view this trip as necessary to the running of the country.
Since the president's mode of travel was Air Force One,
taxpayers paid for that trip. We contributed to a campaign
many of us cannot even vote in.
I realize that this trip was not unique to this president.
No dqubt every president has made similar jaunts ever since
the first Air Force One was inaugurated. Which means we
the taxpayers pick up the tab for all those electioneering
campaigns.
I found one article on the cost of running Air Force One.
USA Today published an article June 1, 2004 that quoted
the cost of running that plane for just one hour at $56,800.
The president attended two fundraising events the day his
flight delayed mine. So using four-year old figures, before
fuel prices skyrocketed, the trip from his first fund-raising
expedition in New Mexico to Seattle would have been more
than $200,000. One way. I wonder how many such trips are
made prior to any November election.
No doubt, most presidential travel really is vital to our
nation's business. But I still wonder how many of our hard-
earned tax dollars are used for purposes other than that of
running the country. We taxpayers foot the bill for running
and maintaining Air Force One. When presidents ise Air
Force One to travel to political fundraisers, our tax dollars
pay the way. How can this happen, if we are a country of
free elections?.


"NEW

RADIO

SYSTEM


SHERIFF
-INNY SMITH


Hello and welcome to Your Sheriffs Corner. On Thursday,
September 6, 2007, the Levy County Sheriff's Office began to
utilize a new radio system. The new system, named Statewide
Law Enforcement Radio System (SLERS), is the culmination
of a year-long effort by the Levy County Board of County
Commissioners, Sheriff's Office and many others including
county, state, and federal agencies. The upgrade in emergency
communications is to improve all public safety communications
throughout Levy County to better serve its citizens (Emergency
Medical Services (EMS), Fire and Rescue Services, and the
Emergency Operations Center (EOC)).
The SLERS consists of several pre-positioned towers, radio
repeaters (that boost signals), microwave transmitters, power
generators, and buildings throughout Levy County, that have
been installed by the State of Florida, contracted through
a private corporation called M/A COM, (pronounced May
com). This system was initially installed to provide the state
reliable communications for all of the state's law enforcement
needs.
The Board of County Commissioners and the Sheriff's
Office have had to spend a lot of money in the past just to keep
the current system operational, even though it did not provide
optimal communications. There were several areas of the
county that had marginal radio signals and this complicated
the Sheriff's Office's ability to respond to the needs of citizens,
as well as complicating protecting and preserving the safety
of deputies and police officers who relied on the system to


Lieutenant Sullivan holds new radio


communicate true emergencies.
On one occasion, a deputy found himself on the scene
with an armed man and had no way to call for help. Although
the situation ended without further incident, it sharply
illustrated the need for all emergency communications to be
improved. The final problem occurred in June of 2006 when
lightning temporarily disabled Sheriff's Office, Fire Rescue,
and EMS communications, necessitating further expensive
repairs.
The SLERS has a very impressive track record; through all
of the hurricanes of 2004 no part of the communications system
went out. This allowed the coordination of all the emergency
responders with the needs of affected citizens in the areas where
it was deployed. It further proved its usefulness during the
strenuous fire season in North Florida in the winter of 2007. The
SLERS allows all of the police, EMS, and fire rescue personnel
to inter-communicate by the use of a computer-controlled radio
that works like a mini telephone operator, allowing units who
need to call and speak to each other the ability to do so; another
ability lacking with the previous system.
Although the SLERS was-designed primarily for state law
enforcement, it will be adapted for other emergency responders
here. Levy County law enforcement radio communications


L YLI IIE C; U V T x S. IE I
LYEY COU NTY JU N L .
C~uTYI'P0uIN !


The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780)..
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties... $17
In state ............................ $22
Out of state ........................ .$27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadline for all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
SClassified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


Publisher
A.D.Andrews
Interim Editor .
Larry Schnel
Office Manager/Chiefland
Robin Heath
Editorial Staff:
WilmaJeanAsbell
SteveJarboe
WilliamG.McCreaJr.
,CassieJournigan
Layout/Design Director
Theresa EYancey
tyancey@levyjourna1com
Sales
BeverlyHilliard


CONTACT INFORMATION:
CHIEFLAND: 13 SOUTH MAIN STREET, CHIEFLAND, FL 32644 PH (352) 490-4462 FAX (352) 490-4490
BRONSON: 440 SOUTH COURT STREET, BRONSON, FL 32621 PH (352) 486-2312 FAX (352) 486-5042


will be the first migrated over
to the new system. EMS and
EOC radio systems should be
migrated to.the new system
within the month and, finally,
the Fire Rescue radio system
shortly after that.
I feel that this
improvement is a great
achievement for the Sheriff's
Office and will greatly
enhance the agencies'
ability to provide modern
professional law enforcement
services to the citizens of
Levy County. We are looking
forward to EMS and the
Fire Department coming
online with SLERS. The
transition has been a smooth
and fluid operation. I give
special thanks to my staff
and everyone involved in
this endeavor for a job well
done.m


I


Sre~Yytto


retire e"

By MEGAN QUINN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER


Early retirement probably sounds very appealing,
especially after long days and countless hours of work.
You might envision seeing the world, visiting family
or golfing all day, but many financial planners caution
that early retirement may not be all it's cracked up to
be. And it's not the money they're talking about; it's the
psychology of early retirement.
Money seems to be the first challenge that comes to
mind when contemplating early retirement, but equally
as challenging is whether you're psychologically ready
for the transition. Let's assume you have sufficient and
reasonably dependable financial resources to see you
through an early retirement. Now consider sore of the
major psychological issues early retirees face, before
you take the plunge:
Boredom. Perhaps the number one complaint of
retirees is boredom. Daily rounds of golf can get old
quickly, especially if all your golfing buddies still
hold jobs. Boredom can be a problem in retirement
at any age, but it is especially a challenge in early
retirement because you face even more years to fill
with meaningful experiences. A good indication that
this might be a problem is if you don't currently have
outside interests, if work is your life.
Lack of job stress. Lack of job stress sounds like
a benefit of retirement, and for many it is. But while
someone age 65 or 70 might be ready for a less hectic
life, that's not necessarily the case for someone who's
50 or 55 and at the peak of their career.
Lack of social contact. Work is a major source of
social contact. Losing touch with co-workers can be
difficult under normal retirement circumstances, but
early retirement exacerbates the problem.
Differing retirement dates. It's conunon with early
retirement for only one person in a marriage to be
retiring early. The other may not have that luxury or
may not want to. That can cause friction. The working
spouse may expect the retired spouse to keep house
or may resent watching the spouse sleep in whilp he
or she midges off to work. The retired spouse tnay be
ants5 to tra\ el or mo\e. but the working spouse can't.
The friction is most common \\hen the husband retires
before the \\ ife retires, according to a Cornell Uni ersity
study.
Forced early retirement. In a sluggish economy, many
people are being laid off. and some are taking early
retirement packages. The problem here is. up to this
point, they may not ha\e thought about or planned for
retiring early. The early retirement package may sound
good, but it takes time to adjust to the idea of sudden.
early retirement.
Worries aborit money; Ideally, you've determined.
perhaps with the help of a financial planner, that you
have enough money for early retirement. Still, it's not
uncommon to worry over finances at times, particularly
if there are unexpected expenses or a bear market. These
worries can be worsened for early retirees because
they're funding a longer retirement period, perhaps
10 or 15 years longer. Plus, it could be emotionally
deflating to be forced back to work due to financial
needs.
How do you avoid or minimize these psychological
hurdles of early retirement?
Be certain you are in good financial shape.
Prepare for early retirement now, regardless of
your age. Envision what you truly want to do, how you
will succeed in these endeavors financially and how
you'll handle any psychological hurdles.
Don't retire from work, retire to something.
Simply quitting work may not necessarily create a
fulfilling, enjoyable retirement.
"Practice" your retirement with hobbies,
vacation spots and the other aspects of your vision
before you retire. Be flexible before settling on long-
term commitments, such as buying a home in a new
location.
Talk it over carefully with your spouse so
you both agree on expectations such as travel and
housework.
Consider semi-retirement. Work part time or
only a few months out of the year in a job you like
but that is perhaps less stressful. This provides a great
psychological transition into full retirement, as well as
financial benefits.

Megan Quinn is an Investment Executive with Capital
City Banc Investments and a Registered Representative
oflNVESTFinancial Corporation (INVEST). Securities,
advisory services and insurance products are offered
through INVEST, member FINRA/SIPC, a registered
Broker Dealer and registered Investment Advisor and
affiliated insurance agencies. INVEST is not affiliated
with Capital City Banc Investments, Capital City Trust
Company or Capital City Bank.







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 3


SRWMD holds final budget hearing Sept. 25 Chiefland's second in
command officer leaves
LIVE OAK The Suwannee River Water Management Assistance to communities for alternative water supply r the Sheriffs Office
District governing board conducted its first public hearing on development, stormwater management, water supply r te Ss Ofi


the fiscal year 2008 budget on Tuesday, Sept. 11, following
its regular monthly board meeting at the district office in
Live Oak.
A final public hearing on the budget will be held on
Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 5:30 p.m. in Live Oak. The proposed
fiscal year 2008 budget calls for a tax rollback rate of 0.4399
mills, or about 44 cents per $1,000 of assessed property
value. This is a three-percent decrease from last year's rate
of 0.4914 mills. Prior to this year, the millage had remained
at 0.4914 mills since the 1993 fiscal year.
The total proposed budget is $81.9 million. Program and
service delivery highlights include:


By ROZ TARTAGLIONE
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
CHIEFLAND-The Levy County Enterprise Zone
Development Agency (LCEZDA) has struck again! Stoney
Smith of Hudson Foods was presented with a check for
$967.69 sales tax refund on business equipment. The
equipment was a fire suppression system (shown in the top
left of the photo) that was installed on the property.The cost
of the system was approximately $18,000. Smith submitted
an application for the tax refund through the EZDA on July
26. Smith was presented the check on September 9. Smith
said the money will be used for expansion of his business in
Chiefland, which contributes to new growth and new jobs.
Smith is the third business owner in the county to receive
a sales tax refund on business equipment, and the first
company in the county to get two checks. Hudson Foods
has a second application for sales tax refund on business
equipment pending with the DOR. Smith purchased a
towable generator for Bar-B-Que Bill's in Chiefland. A
refund for more than $2,000 is currently under review with
the DOR. The first business to receive a sales tax refund in
the county was All Seasons Heating and Air..


YANKEETOWN-

INGLIS.


At the September meeting of the Yankeetown-lnglis
Woman's Club new officers for the year were sworn
in. Pictured from to left to right are President Eleanor
Berkley, 1st Vice President Leslie Dasch, 2nd Vice
President Lori Moree, Secretary Elizabeth Weimer,
and Treasurer Sue Mazzuca. Upcoming special
fundraisers for the year are: Italian Dinner, Fri., Oct.
26, 4pm-7pm; Craft, Yard & Bake Sale, Sat., Nov.
17, 9am-3pm; Soup-A-thon & Bake Sale, Sat., Jan.
19, 11am-2pm; Chili Cook-Off & Bake Sale, Sat.,
Feb. 16, 11am-2pm; and Education Salad Luncheon,
Wed., Mar. 19, 12 noon.


Stearns' smaller assists

Floridians at Fanning Springs
Rep. Cliff Stears, R-Ocala, sent a staffer to Fanning
Springs on Tuesday to assist anyone with congressional
business. "One of my major responsibilities is to help the
people I represent and to learn about their concerns. A member
of my staff will be available to anyone who wants to express
an opinion or needs help with a federal agency," said Steams.. ,


Attention Senior Citizens!
September 19,2007 is the
deadline to apply for
Senior Exemption
To qualify:
P] must be homesteaded in Levy County
2 must be 65 years old by Dec. 31, 2006
0 household income must not exceed
$24,237 in 2006
0 verification of income requested
2 annual application required
Francis Akins
Levy County Property Appraiser
P.O. Box 100
Bronson, FL 32621-0100
352-486-5188


development and protection, wastewater management and
water resource restoration efforts;
Updating and automating digital Flood Insurance Rate
Maps through funding provided by the Federal Emergency
Management Agency;
Land acquisition and management;
Minimum flows and levels for rivers and springs;
Groundwater and surface-water monitoring networks;
Suwannee River Partnership cost-share programs;
Updating and enhancing the district's information
technology facilities and tools, including the district Web
site.0


Journal photo by LISA STAPLES
Chiefland business man Stoney Smith and staff Left
to Right: Chris Schindler, Bruce McElroy, MaryAnn
Gould, Dennis Bradley and Stoney Smith.


Yankeetown-lnglis Woman's Club member Laura
Withrock is shown cutting the ribbon to the newly
created handicapped accessible bathroom at the
September 5th meeting. This improvement is an
example of the Club's commitment to serve our
members and communities.



Did 1Yo, K/vnoW?
On September 22, 1950 Ford M. Lincoln, Mrs.
Louise Lincoln, and Miss Virginia M. Lincoln of Williston
registered the fictitious name of the Williston Gas
Company with Jack L. Meeks, Clerk of Court.


VOTE FOR


LORAN


BROOKINS


CANDIDATE FOR
TRUSTEE CENTRAL
FLORIDA ELECTRIC CO-OP

DISTRICT 4


Levy County EZDA Presents Chiefland

Business Owner with Tax Refund Check


"LET'S WORK TOGETHER FOR EFFICIENT ECONOMICAL SERVICE"

PLEASE MARK YOUR MAIL-IN BALLOT BY SEPTEMBER 21ST
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT


1 P4


By LARRY SCHNELL
STAFF WRITER

S\EA~ILAND PO-
S0EPAR TMEWc r




493-6777,
14 EAST PARK AVE'
7-



Photo by LISA STAPLES
Lieutenant Jimmy Anderson leaves Chiefland Police
Department, and moves to Levy County Sheriffs
Department.
The Chiefland Police Department's second in command is
leaving to work for the Levy County Sheriff's Office, citing
low pay and a shortage of officers at the city job.
Capt. Jimmy Anderson will leave the department Friday
after 11 years with the Chiefland Police Department. In his
resignation letter of Aug. 31, Anderson wrote that pay was
low and that a shortage of officers created an excessive
workload.
Police Chief Robert Douglas said he has been working on
remedying the reasons cited by Anderson for several years
without making progress.
"I've asked for officers for the last two years and the
commission says the money is not there," Douglas said. "In
the proposed budget, their word is that there is no money for
more positions or to raise the pay."
Douglas said the starting annual salary for deputies for
the Levy County Sheriff's Office is $28,000, while the
city's starting salary for officers is $26,400. The Police
Department's salaries are below other law enforcement
agencies in the area, he said.
Douglas said he does not plan to immediately find a
replacement for Anderson. He said other officers will divide
his responsibilities. .


Williston Rotary
learns about foreign
exchange students
Guest speaker Edward Philman, Gilchrist County
Court Judge, an avid Rotary member, spoke at
Tuesday 's meeting. Tenth and Eleventh grade
students are encouraged to apply to become a
foreign exchange student. The country currently
participating in this
program is Germany. The
program typically last 3
weeks and is during the
summer. Opportunities




Visiting www.rotary.org

foreign youth exchange
program. The application
is downloadable and must
be completed by January
1 for the 2008 calendar
Year. The average cost
is $1500 per student.
Ed Philman can also
be reached for more
information by calling 352-
463-3400..


WOMAN'S


CLUB


I







Page 4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


LEVY




COUNTY


HISTORY
44 Years Ago

A delegation consisting ofW. B. Paterson, Buford Holmes,
Marshall Cannon and others came before the board
and discussed with the commissioners the passing of a
resolution designating hogs in the game management area
of wild game.
After hearing a number of those present, who spoke in
favor of the resolution, and having read a letter from the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, upon motion
by Commissioner Meeks and seconded by Commissioner
Fugate, the board unanimously adopted the following
Resolution No. 74:
"It shall be unlawful for livestock to run at large or stray
within the limits of Levy County, Fla., and no owner shall
permit livestock to run at large or stray upon the public
highways or lands of another person in said County, but
shall keep such livestock confined within enclosure which is
suitably and sufficiently fenced for the holding and keeping
of same."
The Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission of Florida
has established a Wild Life Management Area in Levy
Country known and commonly referred to as the Gulf
Hammock Wild Life Management Area.
A representative of Robinson Land and Lumber
Company, Inc., the owner of the vast majority of real
property included in the fenced portion of the Gulf
Hammock Wild Life Management Area, has advised the
Board of County Commissioners of Levy County that the
owner of said property has not granted to any person or
any other legal entity the privilege of killing wild hogs on
said real property and has further advised the Board of
County Commissioners of Levy County that said owner
of said property has not granted to any person or other
legal entity the right to place or keep any hogs on any
portion of the real property in the Gulf Hammock Wild Life
Management Area owned by Robinson Land and Lumber
Company, Inc.' '
Hogs are actually living in the wild and cannot be legally
claimed as domestic hogs in private ownership ranging
in the fenced portion of The Gulf Hammock Wild Life
Management Area, and it is the best interest of the public
that wild hogs in the fenced portion of the Gulf Hammock
Wild Life Management Area be declared a game animal.

Levy County Clerk's Office
Danny J. Shipp, Clerk of Court
From the Archives and History Center




I TRI-COUNTY

CHIROPRACTIC

"Care for the Entire Family" Dr. Bennitt Patterson

*Available on Location: X-Rays, Physical Therapy &
Licensed Massage Therapist (MM0007612)

Most Insurance Accepted: / OFFICE HOURS
Most HMO's and PPO's Monday/Wednesday/ Friday
Major Medical Tuesday 8a..-12:30 p.m.
SMedicare/Medicaid Thursday
Personal Injury/Auto Accidents
Workers' Compensation
~ Walk-Ins Welcome ~

493-1540 en
2220 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland I L
(Across from Wal-Mart Super Center) N-- s'uwene,


Fall at the Farm to benefit Haven Hospice


Kay and Luther Drummond of Chiefland will host Fall
at the Farm, a new benefit for Haven Hospice, at their
historically restored farm on Saturday, Oct. 13. Billed as a
"country casual evening at Rocky Hammock," the event will
feature a silent auction, music, dancing and dinner catered
by the Ivy House of Williston. Tickets are $75 per person,
and all proceeds will support unfunded patient care and
services in the tri-counties area.
"Hospice care is so easy to support because there are no
barriers," said Luther Drummond, president of Drummond
Community Bank. "It's not about race or your net worth,
what you have or don't have. It's about life. When you give
to hospice, you give to everybody. Everyone faces the end of
life, and hospice is there for that event."
"For three of my friends, Haven Hospice was like
heaven on earth," said Sinoma Brown, who serves with Kay
Drummond, Lynetta Griner and Sheree Lancaster on the
Fall at the Farm planning committee. Brown, Griner and
Lancaster also all served on the steering committee behind
Tri-Counties Hospice Care Center.
"What a blessing not to have the worry and stress of
driving 70 miles round trip to Gainesville for hospice care,"
said Brown.
"Supporting Haven Hospice is the right thing to do,"
added Brown, "and seeing the Drummond Farm is a bonus
worth the price of admission alone."
With 400 acres of virgin woodlands in a preserve of
palm and pecan trees, the farm is a beautiful setting for any
, occasion. But its vintage homestead, a late-1800's "cracker"
house that the Drummonds discovered buried beneath
tangles of vine and brambles, makes it unique. Charmed by
the curved front porch and the simplicity of the dwelling,
the couple restored the wood frame pioneer house after
exhaustive research of the area's pioneer families, who were
called "crackers" after the cracking of their whips as they
drove cattle into Florida from Georgia and the Carolinas.
"We saved what we could, replaced what we couldn't,
then put it all back together and furnished it to period," said
Drummond. Both Architectural Digest and Country Living
magazines featured the home not long after the Drummonds


LOG CABIN 1H1mITIL
Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Sept. 6, at.the Levy
County Quilt Museum. It was our day for visitors.
We welcomed Sheriff Johnny Smith who, when he can,
comes to visit and have lunch with us. We know that jobs like
his are not easy and appreciate all they give us. Some of the
officers come by and check the museum at night, and it makes
us feel safe knowing they are around. Come anytime, Sheriff
Smith.
We also welcomed Annette Garrison who works at the
Humane Society. We are helping them with recipes for
their new cookbook. The people who work with animals
do a great job. Not everyone can handle animals of all
kinds: some are sick, some need homes and some just need
attention.
Greg and six boys were out Tuesday and did so much.
We have people coie'by anid tell us ho, "great everything'"
looks, and it all goes to these boys, who work in the heat.
Sometimes we see them use the water hose to get cool.
Thanks, Lancaster.
May crafts and quilts are being finished for the Quilt
Show. Every year our show gets bigger, and we have more
come to see it.
Lunch was great with chicken, okra patties, three corn
casseroles, beans, eggs, salads, cabbage, angel biscuits,
apple pie and so many desserts, all so good. We had 21
present..
WINNELLE HORNE
DIRECTOR, LEVY COUNTY QUILT MUSEUM


Kay and Luther Drummond


completed the renovation.
For information on tickets to Fall at the Farm or being a
corporate sponsor, contact Kay Grove at (352) 271-4662.

Haven Hospice is North Florida expert in end-of-life
and palliative care and one of eight 2007 Circle of Life
Award honorees nationwide recognized as leaders in
improving the care ofpatients near the end of life or with
life-threatening conditions. Haven Hospice also has been
recognized as a Florida Pacesetter for its leadership in
promoting living wills. Licensed in Florida since 1980 as a
not-for-profit hospice, Haven Hospice has served more than
35,000 patients and families. For more information, visit
www.havenhospice.org or call (800) 727-1889.

Chamber to Host Silent Auction
WILLISTON The Chamber of Commerce will have
its next silent auction at the Central Florida Fall Harvest
& Peanut Festival. Anyone who is able to assist with the
donation of a gift is asked to please contact either Earl Ogle
at 528-4110 or Mary Kline at 528-5552. Any donation large
or small will be appreciated.,Please be sure to also include
several of your business cards so that we may advertise
those folks who provided auction items.
All proceeds from this event are used to promote the
Chamber and its businesses. '
Low-cost pet vaccination
clinic Sept. 22 in Archer


ARCHER A low-cost pet
vaccination clinic will be held
Sept. 2~ ,aytZ idwvest Eeedd, in
Archer on Hwy 41 next to the
railroad tracks. The clinic will be
held from 10 until 11:30 a.m.
The Teaching Zoo in
Bushnell sponsors the clinic as a
public service and fund-raising
project. The funds will be used
in our new secluded endangered
species and pachyderm
reproduction facility.
The public can affordably
protect their pets and support
endangered species. The


vaccinations are dog and
cat rabies, $5; distemper-
pa r o combo shots, $13; cat
distemper, $13; and kennel
cough, $12. There are no
office calls or hidden fees.
The veterinarian administers
the shots and provides legal
documentation to the pet
owner.
For more information,
please contact Mark D. Wilson,
D.V.M., zoo director and
veterinarian, at (352) 867-7788,
Marion Teaching Zoo Lis. No.
SC-10577.m


Luther Callaway Library presents


new Fla. books, manatee photography


The Friends of the Luther Callaway Library are always
adding books to the library's collection. This past month four
Florida books have been added, and you can find all of them
on the "New Books" shelf.
"Mirage: Florida and the Vanishing Water of the
Eastern U.S." by Cynthia Barnett is a must read by anyone
concerned about water and the state's increasing population.
Water is disappearing, and this book tells you why.
"Florida Horse Owner's Field Guide" by Marty Marth
is a great book for horse owners and anyone thinking about
buying a horse. It tells you what to look for in a horse and
the questions to ask. Health and Sickness, the largest chapter
in the book, has information on diseases, poisons and many
other things that will help Florida horse owners. There are
tips and quotes, places to ride and information on horse
shows.
"Florida Law: A Layman's Guide" by Gerald B. Keane


Sft inIqn ltry





We also have Power Blendz fitness additives
- Power Shake, Energizer and Fat Burner!


?Co< e & Mo t Soup and sandwich combos:
Home of the Chilly Bean" 1/2 Sammie & Soup for $5.20
c /-e wo Whole Sammie & Soup for 6.41
O-,r c fe re MT
toa'e LOA 'N 4LALk C!HICTHEN OH ECG-8 W4 .
--L.4"L' Ci'l 4 cJOI: SUJT LtITH SO9UP -F THL 4; I


aK h4ry?
14e our


2010 N.Young Blvd. Chiefland, FL.
iLocated next to Capital City Bankl
S Mon.- Thurs. 7-7 Fri. 7-9
SSat.8-9 Sun. 10-4
VISA
(352) 493-2203


is an easy-to-read book in understandable language. A good
place to go first when you have a legal question.
"The Ghost Orchid Ghost and Other Tales From the
Swamp" by Doug Alderson is full of entertaining tall tales.
From the author's notes at the end of each story, you will
learn a thing or two about Florida's swamps, creatures and
history along with storytelling tips.
The Friends of the Luther Callaway Library have a
great program on manatees coming up on Sept. 20 at 6:30
p.m. David Leach, an underwater photographer, will show
his manatee pictures and will give tips on photographing
manatees.
Mark your calendar now. The Friends will be having a
White Elephant Sale on Nov. 3 at the Tommy Usher Center.
Anyone interested in joining the Friends of the Luther
Callaway Library is welcome to come to our meetings held
at the library the second Thursday of each month at 11 a.m.m

1 A A


Fill Dirt & Hauling
Located On South 21-Williston, Florida

(352) 528-3520
Office @ B&G Seed
Other Contacts
(352) 339-4713, (352) 339-2704 or (352) 339-6435 (Loader operator)


or cus


- 1 3


~i~B


05 Z., 1 61








COMMUNITY


Events

USDA Commodity Distribution for Levy County for Anyone who ha
September the history of C
USDA Commodity Distribution for Levy County will be at to the city may
the following location at the designated time: East Park Aven
9-19-07 Williston, Lions Club, 1-2:30 p.m. 6711.
USDA is available to all eligible recipients. There will be In accordance
certification available to those who have not registered. If Act, individuals
you have any questions, please call (352) 336-0839. accommodatio
In accordance with the federal law and U.S. contact the offi
Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is contact inform,
prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, age, or disability. Manatees: Lo
The Friends of
AGILITY Trials September 14th & 15th presentation or
Trained Dog Happy Dog is hosting the NADAC AGILITY 20 at 6:30 p.m
Trials on September 14th & 15th from 6pm-midnight. For Chiefland. The
more information call 352-528-9933. You can also visit taking pictures
their web site for directions www.tangramkennels.com. prints and vide
speak about th
Humane Society holds adoption, vaccination event photographing
Saturday Sept. 15 answer session
The Humane Society of Levy County, Inc. and Levy Friends. Leach
County Animal Services will be holding an adoption event since 1975. HE
on Saturday, Sept. 15, from noon to 4 p.m. The shelter 1990. He now
and our foster homes are full, so if you want to adopt a Framing and Ai
loving companion, please come to the Levy County Animal
Service at 12055 NE 69th Lane in Bronson to adopt. We Cancellation
had great support in adoptions in the past, and your help Meeting Sept
will save a life. The City of C
A low-cost vaccination clinic will be held from 3 p.m. to has cancelled i
4 p.m. at the shelter. In accordan(
Visit www.humanesocietyoflevycounty.com or www. Act, individuals
levycountyanimal.petfinder.com to see our adoptable pets accommodatio
or call (352) 486-5705. contact the offi
East Park Aven
Train Depot Museum Committee to meet Sept. 17
The City of Chiefland Train Depot Museum Committee American Leg
will hold their regularly scheduled meeting on .Monday, Thursday, Se
Sept. 17, at 5 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Train American Legic
Depot. All interested persons are encouraged to attend, a spaghetti din
dinner will aid 1




Ongoing


Is any artifacts, pictures or information on
'hiefland which they wish to donate or loan
contact Grady Hartzog at City Hall, 214
ue, Chiefland, Fla., 32626, or (352) 493-

ce with the Americans with Disabilities
with disabilities needing a reasonable
n to participate in this proceeding should
ce of the city manager using the above
nation.

>okout Below Sept. 20
the Luther Callaway Library are hosting a
n Manatees by David Leach on September
i. in the library at 104 N.E. Third St.,
presentation will focus on methods for
of manatees in the wild and making
os. Leach will show a DVD of his work,
ie cameras and give "how to" tips on
manatees. There will be a question and
n. Refreshments will be served by the
I has been an underwater photographer
e added videography to his resume in
resides in Chiefland and owns Main Street
rt Gallery.

of Recreational Advisory Committee
.20
;hiefland Recreational Advisory Committee
ts September 20, 2007 meeting.
ce with the Americans with Disabilities
With Disabilities needing a reasonable
n to participate in this proceeding should
ce of the City Manager at City Hall, 214
ue, Chiefland, FL 32626 (352) 493-6711.

gion Dinner Sept. 20
september 20, the Sons of the Legion,
on Post 383 in Old Town, are sponsoring
ner starting at 4 p.m. Proceeds from this
the SAL in carrying-out their programs for


Conunuit Events


Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity of Suwannee Valley meets the
third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church on US 19 next to the Dakota
Winery. Volunteers encouraged. Contact Habitat at HTTP:
habitatsuwanneevalley.org or at 463-8003 or 463-7207.

Suwannee River Shrine Club Breakfasts
and Turkey Shoots 1 and 3d Saturdays
The Suwannee River Shrine Club serves a Country
Breakfast on the first and third Saturday of each month from 7
to 10:30 a.m. The breakfast costs $4 and includes eggs, grits,
sausage bacon, gravy, biscuits, coffee or tea.
A Turkey Shoot is also held that costs $3 per shot and runs
from 9 a.m. until...
The Suwannee River Shrine Club is one-half mile north of
Fanning Springs on Highway 26. Proceeds for the Suwannee
River Shrine Club are not tax deductible.

Sons of the Confederacy 3r Tuesday
The Sons of the Confederacy camp meets the third Tuesday
night each month at the Bell Community Center at 7 p.m.
Everyone is invited.
The John Hance O'Steen Camp goals are to honor our
southern ancestors and make sure they are never forgotten. We
identify and make sure their graves are properly marked with
a headstone. We are a non-hate group. We enjoy educating
people about our flag and give information on how to locate
individual's ancestors.

Area park opens
The Levy County Recreation and Parks Department has
opened Blue Springs Park to the public. With the warmer
weather, people are looking for a nice place to go and have a
picnic or take the kids to have a place to run around. So don't
delay go visit a park today!

AARP meetings start up again in September
The Williston Area AARP Chapter # 912 will meet the
second Monday of each month at the Oman (Masonic)
Lodge, 250 NE 6th Blvd., Williston, at 9:30 a.m. Visitors are
welcome. For information call (352) 528-3323.

Haven Hospice information session
Are you a care-giver? Have you or a loved one been
diagnosed with a terminal illness or in need of frequent
medical care? Haven Hospice board-certified physicians,
nurses, CNAs, chaplains and social workers can help.
Haven Hospice is available 24 hours a day, seven days a
week and has 16-bed inpatient respite care.
Haven Hospice is offering a free information session
the first Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sessions will be held at Tri-Counties Hospice Care Center
at 311 N.E. 9th Street in Chiefland. To learn more about
Haven Hospice, please call Marge Peters or Cathy Weyer
at (352) 493-2333 to register. Light refreshments will be
served.


Horse Club hosts bi-monthly trail rides
The Levy County Horse Club members elected the club
officers for the 2007-2008 term. The present officers went
unopposed and will continue in their positions for the new
term. The officers are: Dave Wilson, president; Randy Beasley,
vice president; Lenora Hale, treasurer; and Bonnie Wilson,
secretary.
The Levy Horse Club is a trail riding club that has
scheduled trail rides twice a month. All riders go at their own
pace and choose which distance trail they choose. We do have
some overnight campouts scheduled through the year. We're
family oriented, and anyone interested is welcome to join.
We meet the second Thursday of each month at Bell's Family
Restaurant in Chiefland at 7:30 p.m. Check out our Web site at
www.Flahorse.com/lchc or e-mail levy2@flalhorse.com.
The horse club holds one fundraiser each year during the
month of October. Our 7thAnnual Breast Cancer Awareness
Trail Ride, to benefit local breast cancer patients, will be
at the Tidewater Trailhead in Goethe Forest located at the
south end of CR 337. The date is Saturday, Oct. 20. A poker
run will be in the morning with fun raffles during the lunch
break. Breakfast and lunch will be available for a donation.
Overnight camping for those whom would like to come in on
Friday or stay over till Sunday is available. Trail use and camp
fees are waived for this benefit event. Water for horses and
bathroom facilities will be available.
Come join us for a great time to benefit a great cause.


John Hance O'Steen Camp

meets third Thursdays
The John Hance O'Steen Camp 770, Sons of Confederate
Veterans (SCV) of Gilchrist and Levy counties, held their
annual Picnic in August at O'Leno State Park.
This is the time the camps from all over Florida come
together to have fellowship and meet other members and
their families. There were representatives from seven
different camps present, two United Daughters of the
Confederacy chapters, one Order of the Confederate Rose
chapter, a number of members from the Black Hawk Cavalry
856, and Children of the Confederacy.
Annette Lindsey-Hutson, a member of the Olustee
Chapter 2488 United Daughters of the Confederacy, co-
hosted the event with SCV Camp 770.
The John Hance O'Steen Camp meets every third
Tuesday night of each month at the Bell Community Center
at 7 p.m.
On Sept. 18, our speaker will be First Lt. Commander
Jim Davis from St. Augustine. He will present a PowerPoint
presentation on the Civil War events surrounding the
Suwannee State Park.
Everyone is invited to attend. If you are interesting
joining the SCV, please come and receive information
concerning our organization.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 5


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


the coming year. Donations of $5 will be requested for the
dinner. Call the Post at 542-8020 for more information.

POW-MIA Day ceremony at American Legion Post
Sept. 21
September 21 is National POW-MIA Day. The American
Legion will have an impressive ceremony beginning at 1
p.m. at the Post. One of our own former POWs, Charlie
Combs, will attend. We all want to ensure that our POW-
MIAs are not forgotten and we are honoring them on this
day. Refreshments will be served after the ceremony.
For more information, please call the Post at 542-8020
or drop by and chat with the friendly bartender. She is
always helpful!

Tourist Development Council to meet Sept. 27
The Levy County Tourist Development Council will meet on
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 6 p.m. at the Visitors Bureau Office,
620 N. Hathaway Avenue, Bronson. Call 486-3396 for
more information. The meeting is open to the public.

FFA Alumni sponsor Fish Fry Sept. 28
The Chiefland FFA Alumni will sponsor a
Fish Fry on Friday, Sept. 28. The meal, served at the
Chiefland agricultural building, will include fried mullef,
hushpuppies, grits, coleslaw, baked beans, beverage and
dessert.
Serving will begin at 5 p.m. prior to the homecoming
football game. Plates will be $8 each.
New members are encouraged to join the FFA Alumni
organization. Membership dues are $25 for a couple or
$15 for an individual. Meetings are held the first Monday
night of each month.
The Chiefland FFA Alumni support the projects and
activities of the Chiefland High and the Chiefland Middle
schools. The alumni also provide scholarships to eligible
graduating seniors.

Homecoming, reunion at Beck Park Oct. 13
Gulf Hammock Homecoming and Smallwood Reunion are
Saturday, Oct. 13, in Gulf Hammock at Beck Park. Bring
a covered dish and chair. Contact Donald Smallwood at
(225) 698-9435 or Amelia Dampier at (352) 629-4438.

EZDA hosts networking event Oct. 23
The Levy County Enterprise Zone Development Agency
(EZDA) is happy to announce their first Sponsorship
Banquet to be held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, from 6:30 to
9 p.m. in Chiefland at the Tommy Usher Center. This
is the networking event of the year! All businesses are
encouraged and invited to attend. Dress is business
casual. This is a fun, casual event for networking with your
peers
Tickets are $20 each. Dinner and dessert will
be served: Bridget Merrill, senior director of rural
competitiveness and policies from Enterprise, Fla.; Daniel
Roderick, vice president of nuclear projects and
construction at Progress Energy; and Franklin Schupp,
CEO ofTri-County Hospital, will be updating us on the
most exciting projects in Levy County.
Seating is limited. Tickets will be sold on a first-come,
first-served basis. You can order your tickets by e-
mailing from the home page on our Web site at www.
LevyCountyEZDA.org. Tickets are available now.

Yankeetown Woman's Club serves Italian Oct. 26
The upcoming special fund-raiser for the Yankeetown
Woman's Club is the Italian Dinner, Friday, Oct. 26, 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m.

Quilt Exhibit Down On the Farm set for Oct. 27
The quilters of Alachua County Day Guild present the
fourth annual Quilt Exhibit Down On The Farm. Please join
us on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Dudley
Farm Historic State Park, 18730 W. Newberry Road,
Newberry. Admission is free of charge.
Besides the quilt exhibit, there is a quilt that is being
raffled, and there are live demonstrations.
Dudley Farm Historic State Park is located four miles
east of Newberry on State Road 26.
Join our quilting fun. For more information on becoming
a member, please visit us online at www.qacdq.org.

23rd Annual Down Home Days set for Nov. 3
Have you made plans yet? Nov. 3 is not far away. Come
and display your arts and crafts. This year a new sponsor
is hosting this annual event. Trenton Nazarene Church
has 10 acres of property just west of town and invites you
to rent booth space for your private showings or for your
organization's need. Live music, good food, crafts of all
kinds and loads of fun.
For information and application to participate, call
Merle at (352) 463-1057.








Now Has a Service Van Available To








Page 6 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


WORSHIP/OBITUARIES


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Bronson Community Church
318 E. Hathaway Ave TerrellBurge-Pastor
Sunday School-9:00am
Sunday Services-10:00am
(352) 486-3652
Bronson Church of God
9353 Alt Route27 Jim Waldron-Pastor
Sunday School-1 Oam
Sunday Services-11 am & 6pm
Wednesday -7pm
(352) 486-4924

Bronson United Methodist Church
235 Court St. Mario Chacon-Pastor
Sunday School-9:30am
Sunday Services-10:45am & 6:30pm
Wed. Bible Study-7pm
(352) 486-2281


t.


If you would like to see your congregation Sunday Services here
call Laura at S-d'A6-X 3 to find out more about this free listing.


First Baptist Church (Bronson)
451 S. Court St. Steven Garnett-Pastor
Sunday School-9:15 am
Sunday Worship-10:30am & 6:30pm
(352) 486-2282
The Church at Sand Hill
Hwy 24 between Bronson and Archer
Bill Howe-Pastor
Sunday School-9:30
Sunday Services-10:30 & 6pm
Wednesday-7 pm
(352) 486-8070
First Baptist Church (Cedar Key)
717 2nd St. Mike Shelby-Pastor
Sunday School- 9:45am
Sunday Services-11:00am/6pm
Wed. Bible Study & Youth Program 6pm
(352) 543-5000


New Beginnings Fellowship Church
Chuck McCollum-Pastor
Sunday Meeting-10:00am
(352) 316-0963
Concord Baptist Church (Chiefland)
5551 NW County Rd Jamie Brock-Pastor
Sunday School-1 Oam
Sunday Services-11 am & 7pm
(352) 493-1219
St. Alban's Episcopal Church-Chiefland
4.5 miles north of Chiefland Hope Koski-Priest
Sunday School-9:19am Services 8am &10:30am
Thurs. Maunday-6pm
(352)493-2770
First Baptist Church of Inglis
1001 Hwy 40 E. Bobby Thompson-Pastor
Sunday Services- 8:30am, 11am & 6pm
Sunday School-9:50am
Wed.- Adult Bible Study & Children's
Ministry-6pm Prayer meeting-7pm
Bus Route Available (352) 447-2858


Hardeetown Baptist Church
1404 NW 18th Ave Travis W. Hudson-Pastor
Sunday School-9:30am
Sunday Services-10:45am & 6:30pm
www.HardeetownBaptistChurch.org
(352) 493-4523
Pine Grove Baptist Church-Trenton
16655 NW CR 339 Greg Douglas-Pastor
Sunday School-9:15am
Sunday Services-10:30am & 6:00pm
Wed. AWANA-6:30pm, Youth & Worship 7pm
(352) 463-2151

Otter Creek Baptist Church
171 SW 3rd St. Bill Keith-Pastor
Sunday School-1Oam
Sunday Services-11 am & 7pm
Wed. AWANA program 5:30pm
(352) 486-2112


Old Town United Methodist Church
One block west of Hwy 349 CarlRainer-Pastor
Wednesday Bible Study-1 Oam
Sunday Service-9:30am/Sunday School-11 am
Saturday AA mtg.-7:30pm
Monday NA mtg.-6pm
(352) 542-7954
Cross Word Community Church (Williston)
625 SW 7th St. Lewie Fugate-Pastor
Wednesday- 7pm
Sunday School-9:45am
Sunday Services-11am & 6pm
(352)528 -0552
Yankeetown Community Church
4640 Hwy 40 W. Dennis Hamill-Pastor
Wednesday-6:00pm Sunday School-9:30am
Sunday Service -11:00am & 6:00pm
(352) 447-2384


OBITUARIES

KATHERINE L. PIPKIN

Katherine L. Pipkin, 78, passed away Sunday,
Sept. 9, 2007, at Nature Coast Regional Hospital,
Williston.
She was born on Jan. 24, 1929, in Black
Hammock, Fla., to Richard and Dorothy Middleton.
She was of the Christian faith and was a resident of
Chiefland most of her life. She enjoyed gardening
as well as reading.
Survivors include her sons, Vennis H. Pipken
Jr. of Yulee and John Wayne Pipkin of Chiefland;
daughters, Diane Williams and Shirley Matthews,
both of Chiefland; brothers, Richard, David, Daniel,
Joe and Calvin Charles Middleton; sisters, Maudie
Bacon, Mary Ann Calvert, Joanie Bank and Gloria
Jean Middleton; nine grandchildren and 19 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday, Sept.
12, at Knauff Funeral Home Chapel, Chiefland.
Arrangements were under the care of Knauff
Funeral Home, Chiefland.


Carl William Gadd and Mary Ruth Watkins, both
of Chiefland.

Johnny Ray Harris and Mary Twalia Edwards,
both of Archer.

Corey Allen Crutcher and Ashley Hughes
Harwell, both of Williston.


Birthday

F celebration 7

for John Hardee

There will be a celebration
for Mr. John Hardee's 90h birthday at
Ebenezer Baptist Church fellowship hall
Sunday, Sept. 16, from 2 until 4 p.m.
Friends and relatives are
invited to join us.
The church is


located at
12250 NE 30th Ave.,
Chiefland.


I


S .i .. .. ": Both you and your child have
,i- -, : .. M .:- : ,T ,. i- .,i* !. .
S' high expectations.
S-'1 Students can learn on a program which
oiler high-tech, Bible-centered, values-
a I o oriented curriculum. Your child can
Sibene ft from 35 years of research and
? i"-- ,. '; develode pment of our individualized
curriculum. \e believe all education
S should be higher education."
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
'1ojj K ~CREEKSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
352-486-2112- www.creeksidechristian.org
S.', .- ': ..- ; Scholarships Available Now-
Openings in K4,K5,2"-Pgrade


ALMA EMILIE HAWVER

Alma Emilie Hawver, 92, of Bell, Fla., formerly of
Tampa and originally of Philadelphia, went home
to dwell in the house of the Lord forever on Sept. 7,
2007. She was preceded in death by her husband of
48 years, Albert Otto Hawver.
She is survived by her seven children of whom she
was very proud: Emilie Lundy and husband Leonard
of Tampa, Albert Hawver and wife Darrah of Hudson,
Carl Hawver and wife Barbara of Brooksville, Marie
Callahan and husband Horace of Bell, June Adams-
Frederiksen and husband Bob of Fanning Springs,
Kathy Coleman and husband John of Oldsmar
and James Hawver and wife Judy of Tampa. One
of her greatest joys was to boast about her 21
grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren and seven
great-great-grandchildren.
She was a loyal and proud member of the Pythian
Sisters, Tampa Temple 47. Crumb cake, Polka's at
"The Matterhorn," pork and sauerkraut, German
Stollen Christmas bread, silver dollar gifts, bingo,
remembering everyone's birthday, reciting poetry,
Shirley Temple, Sleepless in Seattle, The Sound of
Music, anagrams, humming her favorite tunes and
musicals -"these were a few of her favorite things."
Alma's personal wish was to continue helping
mankind by donating her body to the Anatomical
Board for research as did her husband in 1984.
There will be a memorial service to celebrate her
life on Sunday, Sept. 16, at Wilderness Lake Preserve
Guest Lodge, Land O' Lakes, from 1 to 4 p.m. In lieu
of flowers, donations can be made to a charitable
organization of your choice in her memory.
For further information, call Marie Callahan at
(3521463-0775.


BUT


BUT

ANYWAY




SGuv E. Sheffield


Even before I gave my heart to the Lord, I'd already
begun to grow weary of gigging in the nightclubs. Now
don't get me wrong, I love picking and grinning as much as
anybody, but the whole yee-hawing, cat-calling, barroom
brawling scene was really beginning to take its toll on me.
I mean, how much second-hand smoke can a man take?
Some nights it was so thick by last call a fellow could
scarcely drag a comb through his mullet. Believe me;
the title "Lounge Lizard" isn't nearly as glamorous as it
sounds.
Maybe the times were just changing. Karaoke DJs were
all the new rage, and watching those guys pocket more
than our whole band didn't boost a musician's morale
much. Then, of course, there was that legendary night in
Covington.
We'd rolled into town to make our debut at a local
roadhouse on a sultry Saturday night. Right off, we pinned
their ears back with a rocking medley of seven or eight
songs before we let them even come up for air. The locals
had never seen the likes, but I reckon that rowdy bunch
recognized a runaway party train when it chugged into town.
Soon they were all on board and sanding the dance floor
down to a nub.
Near the end of our second set, as if on cue, they worked
up an impromptu halftime show; two ladies in the restroom
who had obviously run into some irreconcilable differences,
spilled out onto the dance floor clawing and cussing each
other something fierce, while simultaneously working a
clump of weave out of each other's head. Eventually some
brave souls waded in and broke it up, but not before they'd
each wrenched out a fist full of plugs. We just kept on
playing, though I was starting to wonder if we might not
need to drag out our emergency roll of chicken wire.
As the night plodded on things continued to deteriorate,
and it was during our last set that it happened, the incident
that'll be chuckled about in the halls of club-band folklore
forever. An elderly lady, who'd obviously engaged in her fair
share of halftime festivities, evident by a toothy grin which
was largely hit or miss, suddenly took it upon herself to head
up the band heckling committee. Between every song her
raspy smoker's voice filled the gaps with taunts and requests
for us to play some country and western. I tried to explain,
"We ain't never played either of those!"
Soon, when I bent down to take a drink, she hedged on up


Holy Family Church to

hold fish fry Sept. 14

Our Ladies' Guild and Fellowship Ministry fund-raiser.
fish fry will be held on Friday, Sept. 14, at 6 p.m. The adult
price is only $6, and for children it is $3. There are always
"take-outs" available. This fund-raiser is to help people in
our community with their financial problems.
We have door prizes of a free ticket for the next fish fry
meal. There will also be a drawing for an individual winner
to receive a small gift in appreciation of their attendance.
Holy Family Church is located at 17353 NE Alternate
Highway 27 in Williston. You may call us at (352) 528-
2893.m


Shop Down Home Days Nov. 3
The number of shopping days until Christmas are getting
fewer and fewer, so why not come on out to Down Home
Days on Saturday, Nov. 3. You can wander the grounds
and pick that special gift for someone from one of the craft
vendors there.
This year the event will be hosted by the Trenton
Community Church of the Nazarene about two miles west of
the traffic light in Trenton. The committee is still accepting
vendor applications for crafts, food, and informational and
promotional booths I: \:- ; .'-, ,
If, you)afe an interested vendor, lease contct, Merle at
(352) 463-1057.m


to the devl



to my microphone and motioned like she needed to tell me
a secret. Hesitant any rudeness might start a ruckus, I bent
an ear forward. Big mistake! Quicker'n a croc snatching a
wildebeest off banks of the Serengeti, she took hold of my
ears and latched onto my lips like a hydraulic leech!
Ears or no, ruckus or not, I whipped free of her unsolicited
lip lock and commenced spitting and spewing all over the
stage. Then I threw my guitar down and stomped back to
my amp to whip out my emergency half pint. I practically
downed the whole thing in one desperate swallow! The
whole place was laughing hysterically, especially my band
mates, who I've yet to fully forgive. I didn't care. I was too
young to die.
I reckon it all just goes to show you, if you hang out in
the devil's haunts long enough, he'll find a way to lay one on
you! And believe me, you won't like it.
If you're still hanging out in those types of places, I've
got some advice. Run! Get out while you still can. Jesus has
a better life for you MUCH BETTER.
The Lord has since brought me out into the light and
given me a fresh start, and I'm mighty beholding. So I'm
obeying the scripture below and exposing my own shame
here in hopes you won't have to learn the hard way too.
Take no part in the worthless pleasures of evil and darkness,
but instead, rebuke and expose them. It would be shameful
even to mention here those pleasures of darkness which the
ungodly do. But when you expose them, the light shines in
upon their sin and shows it up, and when they see how wrong
they really are, some of them may even become children of
light! Ephesians 5:11-13 Living New Testament
God wants us all to become children of light, and I can
prove it. You see, not only did He rescue me, He saved my
whole band. Yep, after that we all got right with the Lord.
We're still picking and grinning together too, although we
carry a different kind of emergency kit now, playing for the
Lord and all. My kit says I should forgive them for laughing
at me that night. I'm working on it.
But anyway please keep this story hush-hush. It's
kind of embarrassing. Plus I don't want that dear old lady
to come tracking me down. I've got too much to live for
now. I'm praying for her, hoping she'll find the Lord, and
maybe a good dentist, but I'd like to continue to do it from a
respectable distance.
-GUY SHEFFIELD


Guy E. Sheffield, of Hernando Mississippi, is the president of the nonprofit ministry SoulFood, www.soulfoodministries.org. You
may email him at all4christ@comcast.net.


ZezC


A .







LEVYCOUNTYJOURNAL AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 7


ESE committee hosts back-to- Levy Count 4H Roundup set for Sept 15
& rh" 1 QhWI IAhZ1 I 5


ScIIUUhI col1erence ll I:l
The ESE Parent Advisory Committee is hosting its second
annual back-to-school conference and Agency Fair Saturday,
Sept. 15, at Bronson Elementary School. Registration will
begin at 8:30 a.m., and the conference will end at 2 p.m.
Presently over 115 local and regional agencies have
committed to participate, providing displays and information
about their services. Several great presenters have also
committed and will present on topics of interest to all
parents. All parents and students are encouraged to attend
and all interested members of the community are welcome.
The Grand Prize of a "family pack" of four admission
tickets for Wild Adventures Theme Park in Valdosta, Ga., is
again being donated by radio station WOGK (K-Country).
Some lucky family will be the winner. It may be you, but
you have to attend to win.
For further information about the back-to-school
conference or other ESE Parent Advisory Committee
information, please contact Josie Crooms at the ESE office,
486-5240..



PASS -fmey says...



Sunday, Sept. 9, 10 p.m. Hi! Here I sit
with a chair full of love. Yeah "puppy
love." Sweet Pea is on my shoulder,
Little Bit is on the back of my chair and
Sugar Bugger is on the footrest. Now if
that isn't love, you tell me, and yeah,
Misty is on the couch. I know for sure
these little ones love me. Oh yeah, they
do too, and I love them also. Uh huh I
do too. Good night.
Monday, 6 a.m. Good morning! I just
made a cup of hot chocolate and let
the little ones out the back door, except
Sweet Pea, and he is sticking close to
me. He is up on the back of my chair
keeping a close watch on me, and
Misty has come back to sit beside me.
Isn't it great to be loved, even if it is only
by my little dogs? Nuff said!
Hush, Donald, I know you and Mary
love me too, and also Barbara Shewey,
sne never forgets me. I guess I'll wash
a few clothes today after I come back
from the Journal, A & A Restaurant and
Dollar General. Yes, I make my rounds
most every day and visit with my friends,
both black and white. Oh where would
I be without all of you?
Well, I believe I'll shut up, get up and
get dressed, take this to Wilma Jean
and make my rounds. So until next week
take care, and may the Good Lord
take a liking to you.

Nuiff sid,

Miss H-ovney


TOWN OF BRONSON
HAS TENTATIVELYADOPTED
A BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR
2007-2008

A PUBLIC HEARING TO MAKE A
FINAL DECISION
ON THE BUDGET AND TAXES
WILL BE HELD ON

SEPTEMBER 17, 2007
6:30 P.M.
BRONSON TOWN HALL
660 E. HATHAWAY AVENUE
BRONSON, FLORIDA



S r

Hugh's
Concrete & Masonry Inc.
5790 NW 135 Street
Chiefland, Florida 32626
Hugh S. Keen Owner


Phone
352-493-1094


Fax
352-490-5329


Free Estimates
Foundations Slabs Brick Block Stone
Fireplaces *
Complete Concrete & Masonry Services
Licensed and Insured.
Serving the Tri-County Area for 20 years

I I I
.


Each year the Levy County 4-H opens their year by
having a roundup. Roundup marks the official first day of the
4-H year for Levy County youth and volunteers. This year it
will be on Saturday, Sept. 15.
The morning will begin at 8 a.m. with the Hartley
Barbeque contestants registering to compete for making
the best barbeque chicken. There are three age categories,
and the winners receive checks and awards. For more
information on the barbecue contest, please contact Muriel
or Haley at 486-5131.
At about 10 a.m., the project book displays will be set up,
and all youth and adults will be able to see the project areas
that are offered by the Levy County 4-H. There will also be
displays made by each of the 4-H Clubs in Levy County.


The clubs will be displaying what their club offers and the
activities their club participated in last year.
Levy County 4-H is open to all youth ages 5 to 18, as of
Sept. 1, 2007, without regard to race, creed, color, religion,
disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affiliations.
All adults wishing to help individual clubs or specific
activities are encouraged to attend and see what each club
has to offer. There are also countywide clubs that will be
offering demonstrations and the opportunity to sign up
and help out with the activities and events in which they
participate.
The morning will culminate with a barbeque chicken
lunch provided by the Levy County 4-H.m


TOWN OF BRONSON FINAL BUDGET SUMMARY
FISCAL YEAR 2007/2008
*THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE TOWN OF BRONSON ARE 2.51% MORE
THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.*


GENERAL ENTERPRISE
FUND WATER FUND


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT
FORWARD

ESTIMATED REVENUE:


Taxes:
Ad Valorem Taxes
Sales & Use Taxes

Other Revenue:
Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Franchise Fees
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL REVENUE FROM OTHER
FINANCING SOURCES


ENTERPRISE
SEWER FUND


TOTAL
BUDGET


$ 354,000.00 $ 98,650.00 $ $ 452,650.00


Millage Per $1000
3.2000


117,018.00
$ 100,986.00


132,500.00
202,554.00
10,000.00
3,500.00
60,000.00
10,200.00


193,400.00



300.00


$ 418,754.00 $ 193,700,00


114,500.00 $
(70,000.00)


440,400.00


$ 10,500.00


44,500.00 $ 450,900.00


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES $ 990,758.00 $ 292,350.00 $ 44,500.00 $1,327,608.00
EXPENDITURES / EXPENSES
General Government ;210.750.00., $ 90,175.00 $ 300,925.00
Public Safety $ 142,284.00 $ 18,500.00 $ 14,500.00 $ 175,284.00
Physical Environment $ 145,809.00 $ 92,350.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 243,159.00
Transportation $ 115,800.00 $ 23,700.00 $ 139,500.00
Debt Service $ 45,145.00 $ 7,000.00 $ 52,145.00
Human Services $ 40,495.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 45,495.00
Financial & Administrative $ 240,475.00 $ 35,625.00 $ 25,000.00 $ 301,100.00
Reserve $ 50,000.00 $ 20,000.00 $ 70,000.00

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES $ 990,758.00 $ 292,350.00 $ 44,500.00 $ 1,327,608.00

THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE
MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASE


The Town of Bronson has tentatively adopted a measure to increase its
property tax levy.


Last year's property tax levy:
A. Initially proposed tax levy.......... $ 109,861
B. Less tax reductions due to Value Adjustment Board


assessment changes................$
C. Actual property tax levy..............$


This year's proposed tax levy....... $


(3,387)
113,248


123,174


and Other


All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing on the tax
increase to be held on:


DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:


SEPTEMBER 17, 2007
6:30 PM
BRONSON TOWN HALL
660 E. HATHAWAY AVE.


BRONSON, FL 32621


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the budget will
be made at this hearing.


d







Page 8 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Meter reader's negligence causes distress City residents


WILLISTON -Approximately 40 Williston residents
packed the City Council room, to standing room only,
during the Sept. 4 regular City Council meeting. Avis
Seabrook, acting as spokeswoman for an East Williston
community group, presented the problem: the residents'
latest utility bills, especially water and sewage charges, were
considerably larger than expected.
Seabrook provided council members with folders
containing supporting examples. She also argued that utility
meters were not being read and provided photographs of
residents' meters obscured by dense vegetation, debris and,
in one case, an ant colony. In the ensuing general discussion,
other residents voiced similar concerns and claimed their
meters had gone unread for months. A smaller number of the
residents also complained of alarmingly large electricity use
charges.
Finance Director Mark Shiefer, whose office is
responsible for preparing utility bills, acknowledged that
billing discrepancies discovered by his staff or residents'
complaints raised suspicions of negligence by a recently
hired meter reader. The employee, after receiving three
months of on-the-job training, was assigned his own route
in May. The staff's suspicions were confirmed in July: the
meter reader substituted imaginary estimates in lieu of meter
readings. In most cases, the meter reader's estimates were
lower than actual use. The meter reader's employment was
terminated soon after.
Subsequently, reliable meter readers have read the
neglected meters. Current utility bills reflect corrections
that, in many cases, resulted in higher than usual water
use charges. Sewage charges are calculated based on a
residence's water cofisumption, so sewage charges were also
higher. The billing staff is screening the current bills, and
where substantial corrections are noted, letters explaining
the adjustments will be sent to the residents. This action is in
process.
Lively discussion, sometimes heated, followed Shiefer's
explanation. Councilman Cal Byrd, Public Works Director
James Arrington and City Manager James Coleman joined
Shiefer in attempting to answer the residents' questions,
responding to their accusations and informing the city's


position and limitations for relief. Council President Jones
maintained order.
Responding to one resident, recipient of an extraordinary,
larger-than-usual water bill, Shiefer suggested a water leak
in the residence's plumbing. The resident was adamant there
was no leak. Shiefer related two incidents wherein leaks
approaching a million gallons of water use between monthly
readings had gone unnoticed.
Councilman Byrd explained that a resident may ask that
his or her Water meter be checked for accuracy. The cost for
the test, $25, will be borne by the city if the meter is shown
outside specifications; otherwise, the resident pays the fee.
Shiefer cautioned that, in his experience, a majority of the
meters tested measured less than the actual flow.
Shiefer is committed to work with any resident, on a
case-by-case basis, toward resolving utility bill concerns.
His commitment seemed to satisfy most of the complaining
residents. The responsibility rests with residents to present
their case to Shiefer's staff.
In another water matter, the First Baptist Church
developed a water leak that went undetected until a meter
reading revealed extraordinary water use. A city staff
member notified church officials, who took immediate action
and corrected the leak. Eleven days separated the date of the
meter reading and when notification was given. Pastor Tony
Chubb petitioned for relief of the excess sewage charges and
water use charges for the 11 days.
The excess sewage charges were refunded, but City
Manager Coleman said the city's notification was a only
a courtesy. The excess use discovery was not made by the
meter reader but subsequently by staff preparing the bill,
and the leak occurred on private property inaccessible to city
workers. Consequently the city could not be held responsible
for any time between the discovery and its notification.
In other business, the council unanimously approved
a change in waste collection charges. The current rate of
$13.50 per single container per month will rise to $16.88.
Mayor Gerald Hethcoat presented Williston Firefighter
Daniel Smith with a Certificate of Recognition. On July 24,
Smith, responding to an emergency call, aided a mother in
giving birth to a healthy baby boy.m


may soon see

insurance

decreases

By CASSANDRA JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER

CHIEFLAND He may be gone, but it is not likely he'll
be soon forgotten. That is, if Chiefland homeowners begin
to see drops in their insurance bills as a result of actions
taken by former Fire Chief Dave Burnett. Such drops are J
expected, now that the city has earned a better rating on its
fire suppression services.
An ISO survey was conducted under the helm of Burnett
to determine the abilities of the city's fire protection system.
ISO, a private corporation, studies municipal fire protection .
systems and assigns a number based on three factors: a city's.
fire alarm and communication system, fire department, and
water supply system.
Chiefland's prior rating was 7. After the survey was
completed in June, ISO changed that number to a 4, an
indication of better fire service and a factor in lowering fire
insurance rates. The company rates communities on a.scale
from 1 to 10, with 1 being the best fire suppression. The new
classification will take effect Dec. 1.
Chiefland earned a credit of 8.25 percent of a possible 10
for receiving and handling fire alarms, a 28.84 percent of a
possible 50 on the fire department, and 30 of a possible 40
percent on the water supply.
According to ISO, most insurers use the public protection
classification to determine premiums charged to residential,
commercial and industrial properties.
Interim Fire Chief John Ward told commissioners
Monday that the new rating was earned primarily through
the efforts of Burnett, who recently left the city for a positions
in Plant City.


Police negotiations Seawall variance denied for


at impasse


second time in Cedar Key


By CASSANDRA JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER

Negotiations between the Florida Police Benevolent
Association the union representing Chiefland police and
the city of Chiefland have broken down, city attorney Norm
Fugate told Chiefland commissioners Monday.
The city and the union have been unable to agree on six
articles, one of which concerns wages. Other articles on
which the two parties could not agree include probation
period pay, hours of work and overtime, vacation time and
grievance procedures.
Since no formal impasse notice has been received,
Fugate recommended that the city continue to try to come
to agreement with the union. He also recommended the city
enlist the services of Leonard Dietzen, a Tallahassee-based
attorney with the firm Rumberger, Kirk and Caldwell, should
a formal impasse notice be received.
Lack of a new agreement does not mean the city will do
without police services. By law, police must continue working
under their old agreement until a new one replaces it..


LCEZDA sets


The Florida Department of Revenue (DOR) has provided
guidelines concerning sales tax refund of building materials.
If an individual is an owner and is going to do the
labor for rehabs, the owner must have all receipts for the
rehab project. The receipts must show which materials are
purchased. If a contractor does the rehab work, the contractor
must also save the receipts that show which materials were
purchased.
Every Jan. 1, the property appraiser assesses new
or rehabilitated property. The property is not due to be
reassessed until Jan. 1 of the year after the work is complete.
For example, if you built a building in August 2007, it will
be assessed in January 2008. Assessments will be available
in July 2008. Business owners can then make application.
Applications are due by Aug. 30, 2008. A business owner
must spend at least $8,600 to qualify for a building materials
refund.
If a business owner has questions, please contact Pamela
W. Blair of the Levy County Enterprise Zone Development
Agency at www.LevyCountyEZDA.org or call (352) 486-
5470.n
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MINOR SURGICAL MINOR TRAUMA LACERATION REPAIR
X-RAY LABORATORY. EKG EMPLOYMENT PHYSICAL
-Podiatry Services Available
Convenient Office Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 a.m.- 7 p.m., Fri. 7:00 6 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Noon
1113 N.W 23rd Ave., Chiefland
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)
Call (352) 493-9500 tor an appoIntntment today


By BILL MCCREA
STAFF WRITER

It is becoming increasingly difficult to build on
commercially zoned property in Cedar Key.
Robert Solano is having a tough time convincing
the Cedar Key Commission that he needs a seawall to
protect his property from storm damage before he begins
construction of a 2,000-square-feet motel, which he needs to
generate revenues to pay his property taxes.
Solano's problem stems from a city code that the
commission is standing behind. It states that there has to
be an existing structure when granting a variance to build
a seawall. He first petitioned the commission over a month
ago for a variance to the coastal setback, which is now 50
feet from the high water mark, because his property on State
Road 24 is of limited width.
"The property is about 85 feet at the widest part and 70
feet at the narrowest point," Solano said. He added that with
a 50-foot setback from the water and a 30-foot setback from
the county road, "You don't have anywhere left to build."
When owning a parcel of commercially zoned property
such as Solano's, it is almost imperative to build a business


By BILL MCCREA
STAFF WRITER

BRONSON Franklin Schuler was glad to
win back seat four of the Bronson City Council,
defeating newcomer Mark Rodriguez, to continue
serving in what will be his third term.
Schuler is a graduate of Bronson High school and
has lived here for 31 years.
"I've worked in the Levy County Sheriff's Office
for over 17 years and have been on the Town
Council for eight years," said Schuler.
The sewer problem in Bronson is a major concern
of Schuler. He has seen completion of phase one of
the expansion and would like the work to continue.
"Because of the lack of funds," Schuler said,
phases two and three have not been completed.
Before the election, Schuler said that he would
like to work with the mayor and other council
members to finish the sewer project. "We are
currently seeking ways to finance this project
and the Jackson House. After these projects are
complete, maybe we can find grants for lighting
improvements for the sidewalks and in the city
parks."
Another issue Schuler would like to see resolved
is the paving of all city streets.
"I feel like if you live in Bronson, you shouldn't
have limerock roads ... you should have pavement
and sidewalks," he said.
Schuler's wife, Shirley Thomas Schuler, is a
teacher at Bronson Middle School.
They have two daughters and two sons who all
work in Bronson.m


to pay the high property taxes that are about $10,000 a
year.
The commission also denied his variance because of the
city code that states that coastal setbacks exist as a way
of protecting coastline, the land's natural way of handling
storm water. However, for Solano that means one of the
worst-case scenarios for a property owner. Commissioner
Gene Hodges pointed out that if storms were washing the: ,
land away, the owner could not build a bulkhead as a way of
protecting it.
Commissioner Sue Colson explained to Hodges that the
city codes for coastal property represent what the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection has established.
Colson said the DEP guidelines state that although
seawalls can protect coastal property from wind and water
damage, a bulkhead can even contribute to the erosion of the
land if the waves "... go up over the seawall and cause the
land behind it to subside."
Colson suggested a workshop arranged with the help of ''
the DEP to educate coastal property owners on the many
ways to protect their property. Her motion died for the lack
of a second.
The commission voted 2-1 against Solano's petition..


ARREST REPORTS

THE INGLIS POLICE DEPARTMENT REPORTS THE
FOLLOWING ARRESTS:
Douglas W. Grant: 39, of Crystal River was arrested for
driving while license suspended or revoked.

THE SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT REPORTS THE FOLLOWING
ARRESTS:
Donna Gail Baker: 31, of Bronson was arrested for
possession of a controlled substance.
Milton Don Bishop: 66, of Inglis was arrested for computer
pornography and transmission of pornography by electric
device.
Steven Wayne Cowan: 33, of Monticello was arrested for
vehicle theft $10,000 or more and fraud and illegal use of
credit card.
Scott D. Driggers: 37, of Archer was arrested for larceny theft
more than $300 but less than $5000.
Charles Ray Harris: 49, of Williston was arrested for grand
theft and dealing in stolen property.
Gay Hill: 38, of Ocala was arrested for obstruction of justice-
tampering.
Joseph A. Jacobs: 33, of Old Town was arrested for a
controlled substance without a prescription.
William Charles Kearney: 18, of Williston was arrested for
grand theft and trespassing.
Bruce E. Schultz: 47, of Orlando was arrested for violation
of probation-lewd lascivious act presence of child-Jessica
Lunsford Act issues noted. Amendments to Florida law
requiring stricter guidelines for sexual defenders and sexual
predators.
Kevin Eric Young: 27, of Inglis was arrested for resisting with
violence.
Leon Bernard Wiggins: 41, of Bronson was arrested for
kidnapping.
Tarius R. Williams: 25, of Chiefland was arrested for two
charges of possession of a controlled substance with intent to
distribute.

THE WILLISTON POLICE DEPARTMENT REPORTS THE
FOLLOWING ARRESTS FOR:
Poulette De Jesus Soto: 19, of Williston was arrested for
warrant-fraud/false police report/false information.
Vanessa Fay Robinson: 48, of Williston was arrested for
possession of a controlled substance and intent to distribute
controlled substance.


guidennes for sales Schuler wins
tax refunds on

building materials back seat four







LEVY COUNTY SPORTS


Brochetti and Brown


serve up a Red Devil win

By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 9


Former Red


Devil Pitcher to


play for Santa Fe


Returning to the same gym where only 12 days earlier they
lost the Fall Classic championship by just 2 points, the Williston
Lady Red Devils came ready to play.
The Lady Red Devils took game one, 25-17, on several
kill shots by Margaret Brown and some tremendous serves by
Mallary Brochetti.
Game two featured some
excellent floor play by the
Lady Eagles Brittany Smith,
who also reeled off several
great serves to tie the game at
15-15. But it was kill shots by
the Lady Red Devils Margaret
Brown and Marscella Sneed
that propelled the Lady Red /
Devils to a 20-16 lead. After
a Lady Eagle timeout, it was
Angela Massa who pulled the
Lady Eagles to within 1 point
at 21-20. As play continued,
Lady Red Devil Mallary
Brochetti had two great
returns, and Laurin Howard
Williston Lady Red Devil Heat
served up the final 2 points for slams an ace serve for the La
the Lady Red Devils, giving


them a 25-20 win in game two.
Game three provided the most
Down 10-7, the Lady Red Devils
straight points for the Lady Red ]
to freeze the Lady Eagles and pr
returns.
Now trailing 13-10,.the Lady:
the Lady Eagles back into the gat
again tiedat 15, 16, and 17 point
pulled ahead and Elizabeth Gay s
Eagles on two straight powerful
Eagles a 25-20 win and sent the r
Game four got started with the
out to a 7-1 lead with several ace


The Red Devils continued to pull away and held a commanding
lead throughout game four. Again it was sophomore Mallary
Brochetti controlling play at the net and senior Margaret
Brown hammering home several kill shots. Sophomore Kayla
Thorington made several outstanding digs, while freshman


Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE
her Porter watches the ball after teammate Mallary Brochetti
dy Red Devils.


t exciting game of the match. Laurin Howard and senior Heather Porter delivered some great
Margaret Brown served up 6 serves along the way. The Lady Red Devils went on to win
Devils, as her serves seemed game four, 25-12, to take the match.
event them from making solid
JV Lady Red Devils hand Eagles first loss of season
Eagles Angela Massa served After jumping out to a 3-0 season record, the Lady Eagle
me to tie, 14-14. The game was junior varsity volleyball team hosted a regular season match
s each before the Lady Eagles versus the Williston Lady Red Devils.
sealed the win for the Lady The Lady Red Devils took the first game in easy fashion, 25-
serves. This gave the Lady 10, as the junior varsity Lady Red Devils scored 12 points off
natch to game four. serves by Julie Fugate.
e Lady Red Devils jumping The Lady Red Devils ended the match in two straight games
serves by Mallary Brochetti. as they held on for a 25-20 win in game two:.


By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER

Williston Red Devil
baseball fans will
remember the 2006
history-making Red Devil
baseball team that started
off 18-0 before their first
loss. This 2006 team also
went undefeated in district
play. Part of the reason for
this team's success was
pitcher Justin Mauldin,
who was 10-0 in his 10
starts for that winning Red
Devil team.
After going to
Jacksonville Community
College on a scholarship,
Mauldin transferred to
Santa Fe Community
College as a walk-on this.
past summer. He made
the team and will start his
first game for the Saints
this coming Sunday in
Winter Haven in a four-


.--. "=~--_^ -a




Journal photo by
STEVE JARBOE
Former Williston Red
Devil pitcher Justin
Mauldin will play in his
first game for Santa Fe
Community College on
Sunday.


team tournament. He will be going against either South
Florida Community College or Palm Beach Community
College.
Mauldin said that he feels his new college team will
have a very good season. He is doing great in school and
is excited to be a Santa Fe Community College Saint.


Chiefland Lady Indians attend Bell invitational

By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER

Chiefland vs. Interlachen
After dropping two matches at Friday evening's Bell Bulldog Invitational Tournament,
both two games to zero, the Chiefland Lady Indians rebounded strong on Saturday morning.
Matched against the Interlachen Lady Rams, who were 1-1 on Friday evening in their two : ... ..__
matches, the Lady Indians under Coach Emily Gore came to play. -"..... i -
The Interlachen Lady Rams were undefeated in their regular season before coming to .... j
Friday's tournament, where they had their first loss of the young season. :
But it was the Lady Indians who started out game one playing aggressive volleyball, and '
several of their players had some powerful ace serves on their way to a 25-15 win in game
one. Lady Indian Amye Grieves closed out the win with three powerful serves, unreturned
by the Lady Rams. .
As game two got started, the tide reversed, and Lady Ram Amanda Powell came up with -
seven kill shots that found the floor on the Lady Indians' side of the net. The Lady Indians i.."-'
were down in game two, 21-11, before making a great run as they cut the lead to three points .. ... -
at 22-19. After a Lady Ram time-out, it was Lady Ram Kim Traxier who served the Lady ..-- _
Rams to the win, 25-20, and sent the match to a tie-breaker game. Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE
Game three saw the Lady Indians volley their way td a 13-7 lead with some of the longest No.2, Amye Grieves, goes up after the ball for the Lady Indians at Friday's Bell Bulldog
volleys between points of the entire tournament. The Lady Indians closed out the game, 15- Invitational Tournament.
11, for the win and the match.


Chiefland vs. Trenton
The Chiefland Lady Indians faced the Trenton Lady Tigers in their consolation match for
fifth place. The Lady Indians played another excellent game as they won game one, 25-14,
with little challenge from the Lady Tigers.
Game two started with the Lady Indians pulling out to a 2-1 lead before Lady Tiger
Alexis Dixon pounded home three ace serves en route to a 9-2 run for the lead.
The Lady Indians could never come back from this Tiger run, and Trenton went on to win
game two, 25-13, again forcing the tie-breaker game for the match.
The Lady Indians won the serve, and this game was very exciting with one spectacular
play after another. The game was tied at 4-4 and again at 5, 6, 7 and 8 before the Trenton
Tigers pulled out the win, 15-10, for the match.
The eight teams playing in the Bell tournament were Bell, Chiefland, Trenton, Baker
County, MaClay, Cornerstone, Meadowbrook and Interlachlen.


Lady Indians
Varsity/Jr. Varsity Volleyball Schedule


DATE

9/13/07

9/18/07

9/20/07


9/24/07

9/25/07

- 9/27/07'

10/2/07

10/4/07

10/8/07

10/11/07

S10/16/07

10/18/07


10/22-26


OPPONENT


FortWhite

Trenton

PKYonge


Bronson

The Rock (varsity only)

Dixie

Newberry

FortWhite

Trenton

Williston

The Rock

Bronson

DistrictTournament


PLACE

HOME

AWAY

HOME

AWAY

HOME

AWAY

HOME

AWAY

HOME

HOME

AWAY

HOME

PkYonge


4" - -. '-d '' ,
Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE
The ball appears to be sitting on top of the net as the Chiefland Indians and Trenton Tigers look
on at Friday's Bell Bulldog Invitational Tournament,


Head Coach: Emily Gore

Principal: Pam Asbell


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


TIME

5:30/7

5:00/6:30

5:30/7:00

5:00/6:30

7:00

5:30/7:00

5:30/7:00

5:30/7:00

5/6:30

5:30/7:00

7:00

4:00/5:30

TBA


--- ~~~


fraa

"-`--~


~Tl;i







Page 10 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


LEVY COUNTY SPORTS


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Red Devils pull


off second win


By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER

Friday night at Booster Stadium, the Williston Red
Devils and Chiefland Indians faced off for the county rival
football game. With a come-from-behind win for the Red
Devils, 28-27, this young team showed a lot of promise. At
the same time, Chiefland fans were left feeling that things
were getting better for their team under new head coach
Ajay Ulmer.
After Chiefland won the coin toss and took the first ball,
Red Devil defense held them and forced a punt. The kick
went off the side of the punter's foot, and the Red Devils
took over the football at their own 45-yard line.
Red Devil Travis Evans got 4 yards to the 49. On the
next play, Chris Morrow was hit hard in the back field, but
he delivered a more solid hit to the would-be tackler than
he received and scooted around the left end 51 yards to the
end zone. The point-after kick by Simma made the score
7-0 for the Red Devils.
After the Indians were unable to move the football, they
were forced to punt again. The Red Devils then went to the
air as quarterback Devin Timmons hit CJ James for about
26 yards down to the Indians 25-yard line. Then it was
Travis Evans to the 9-yard line, then Evans to the 3-yard
line, then Evans in for the touchdown. The Simma kick
made the score 14-0 for the Red Devils early in the second
quarter.
After a punt started them out at their own 7-yard line, the
Indians were finally able to get the ball into the Red Devil
side of the 50-yard line midway through the second quarter.
They continued to drive with several long runs by Stephen
Davis down to the Red Devil 1-yard line. Tommy Sheffield
took the football in for the Indians' first score of the season.
The kick by Garrett Schmidt %%as good. and the score \\as
now Williston 14 and Chiefland 7.
As the third quarter got undenrway. the Indians scored
again and tied the game at 14-14. After the teams
exchanged possessions several times, the Red De ils turned
the ball over two times inside their own 10-vard line. One
of the turnovers \was a high snap from center that sailed
oier punter Isaac Floyd's head. With a \ery short field, the
Indians were able to score and take a 21-14 lead on the 3-
yard run b\ Michael Durr for the touchdown and the good
kick b\ Schmidt.
The Red Devils then lost their second fumble inside their
o\wn 10-yard line. The Indians were able to score on a one-
vard run again by Michael Durr. This time the snap from
center \\as mishandled, and quarterback Daniel Galpin tried
to run the point after but \\as stopped short of the goal line.
The Indians now had a 13-point lead.
With eight minutes remaining in the game. Red De\il


quarterback Devin Timmons .
calmly engineered a 77-
yard drive in just over three
minutes down to the Indians l
3-yard line. Courtney Days '
took the handoff and scooted
into the end zone for the :
touchdown. The Simma kick _
made the score 27-21. The
young, improving Red Devil *
defense held the Indians to
four-and-out, and the Red
Devils got the football back
with about two minutes
remaining in the game.
Quarterback Devin
Timmons hit a wide open Journal photo by STEVE JAR
CJ James at the Chiefland With Ms. Wise, honorary
10-yard line on a beautiful Heathcoat tosses the co
pass that James seemed to
lose concentration on, and the
football slipped right through
his hands stopping a sure touchdown.
With 1:55 on the clock, Red Devil running back Travis
Evans scooted through the line and cut outside for a
brilliant 43-yard run down to the Indian 4-yard line.
Red Devil Deonte Welch then took the handoff from
Timmons into the end zone to tie the game at 27-27.
Simma's kick was right through the uprights giving
the Red Devils a 28-27 lead with just over one minute
remaining:


BOE
y Red Devil captain, looking on, Williston Mayor Gerald
in to start Friday night's game against Chiefland.


The Indians downed the kickoff and ran several running
plays but were stopped on short gains on every play. On
their lasf play, the Indians tried a double reverse handoff
That was fumbled, and the Red Devils took possession of
the football. Red Devil quarterback Devin Timmons took a
knee twice to end the ball game.
The 2-0 Red Devils travel to Ocala Trinity Catholic
Friday night, while the 0-2 Indians are at home to host
Hamilton County. Both games start at 7:30 p.m.m


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Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE


Red Devil Cheerleaders


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Tutrey Shoo







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


LEVY COUNTY SPORTS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 11


STUDENT ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

The Levy County Journal is proud to cover our area's student athletes in all the schools in Levy County. You read about their accomplishments in athletics
in our weekly Sports Section. Now it is time for you to get to know more about these outstanding young students in Levy County.
We will be featuring both male and female student athletes from a different school each week throughout the school year. We hope you enjoy getting
to know a little more about these students.
Bronson High School was the first school selected to begin our weekly Student Athletes of the Week series.


FEMALE STUDENT


ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER

Bronson High School senior
Jessica Blankenship is this week's
female student athlete of the week.
Jessica has enjoyed a very
positive and busy schedule while
attending Bronson schools from
Bronson Elementary through -
She began her senior year with
an outstanding 3.6 GPA in the
classroom and is a teacher's aide.
She also works on the Bronson year
book.
Jessica belongs to the Fellowship
of Christian Athletes and is excited
about belonging to the Youth Crime
Watch Club. She is also a proud
member of the Beta Honor Society.
In the classroom, Jessica enjoys
mathematics and picked Ms.
Hallman as one of her many favorite
teachers at Bronson High School. *.
Jessica has been a cheerleader
and has also played basketball and
volleyball since seventh grade. She
is certainly proud to be one of two- B1
seniors returning this year to the Lady Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE
Eagles volleyball team. The Lady JESSICA BLANKENSHIP
Eagles won the district championship
the last two seasons, and Jessica is.hoping for a repeat this season.
Jessica attends the Jonesville Baptist Church and says her best friend is her mother,
Cindy. "She has always been very supportive of me and has always been easy to talk with
about anything and everything," said Jessica.
When it comes to her athletic teams, Jessica was quick to point out that her volleyball
coach, Sherrie Schuler, has always been a role model to her and has been very supportive of
her in all of her school activities.
Jessica plans to enroll at Santa Fe Community College after her graduation from Bronson
High School and then to enroll at the University of Florida.
The Journal would like to congratulate Jessica Blankpnship for being chosen as this
week's student athlete of the week. .


MALE STUDENT


ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
Bronson High School sophomore
Kelby Barber is this week's male
student athlete of the week.
Only a sophomore, Kelby has
been a very busy young man while
attending school at Bronson from
elementary school to his sophomore
year at Bronson High School.
., .ai Kelby has played on the varsity.
S '' 'football team as the Eagles starting
Quarterback for the past three
Seasons. He also plays on the
SEagles basketball and baseball
teams, where he is looking forward
Sto starting his fourth season on both
Iof these teams.
With this very busy schedule,
Kelby maintains a 4.0 GPA and is
also very active in other school and
S classroom activities.
Kelby is president of the
FFA and is the sophomore class
Vice president in the Student
S- Government Club. He belongs to
Sthe Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Sand is a member of the Beta Honor
Society. He also attends the First
S Baptist Church in Bronson with his
family.
Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE He is a very impressive young
KELBY BARBER man, both on the athletic fields and in
his classroom and club activities.
Kelby has high praise for all his coaches that have helped him to improve in all three
sports each year he has competed.
His most memorable moment in his sports career at Bronson occurred in the Blue and
Orange game when he was in the seventh grade and quarterback of the middle school
team. He threw the winning touchdown pass for his team and was then hit and clobbered
by a varsity teammate.
Kelby plans to pursue a career in agriculture at the University of Florida but has not
chosen a particular field at this time. He is also hoping for either an academic or an
athletic scholarship from the university after his graduation from Bronson High School.
The Journal congratulates Kelby Barber for being chosen as this week's student athlete
of the;week. .. ... ,:-


Trenton Lady Tigers take all vs. Bronson Lady Eagles


By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER
The Trenton Lady Tigers did not lose a single game on their
home floor in three volleyball matches against the Bronson
Lady Eagles last Thursday night.
The first match of the evening saw a more aggressive
Trenton Middle School team take down the Bronson Middle
School Eagles in two straight games, 25-17 and 25-12.
As the junior varsity ladies took the floor for the first game,
it was clear early on that the Lady Eagles were outmatched in
almost every aspect of the game. Lady Tiger Jessica Perryman
wrapped up the game with nine straight serves that saw only
two balls returned by the Lady Eagles. The Lady Tigers took
the game, 25-6.
In the second game, the junior varsity Lady Tigers
continued to dominate by taking the game, 25-13, and the
match.
The varsity match started with Lady Eagle freshman Brittany
Griffin putting Bronson in front, 9-3, on several ace serves. The
Eagles added 3 more points off several great volleys by the
entire team.
The Lady Tigers came roaring back with senior Lady
Tiger Casey Fischer nailing two straight kill shots from long
distance, tying the game at 15-15. Fischer added several more
kill shots to help outscore the Lady Eagles and give the Lady
Tigers the win in game one, 25-17.
It was all Lady Tigers in game two as they jumped out to an
early lead and never looked back, winning game two, 25-14.
The Lady Eagles would not go away as game three got
started. After the Lady Eagles found themselves trailing, 24-
16, just one point from ending the match, the Lady Eagles
scored 5 straight points with the crowd behind every serve
to pull within 3 points at 24-21. The next serve went wide of
the line, and the Lady Tigers won game three, 25-21, and the
match.


BRONSON

ALUMNI &

FRIENDS

Please join us for a fun-filled
celebration of our Bronson Reunion
on Saturday, September 22
beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the park
in Cedar Key. There will be a fish fry
and entertainment. Please spread the
word to your classmates and friends.
For more information call (352)
486-2470 or send e-mail to
eagles@bkcypress.com..


Journal pholos by STEVE JARBOE
Righl: The three Trenton Lady Tiger seniors are, from
left. Casey Fischer, Danielle White and Taylor Garner:

Below: Lady Eagle Jessica Blankenship returns a kill
shot high over the net to keep a long volley alive in last
Thursday's game against the Trenton Lady Tigers.


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Page 12 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


OUTDOOR NEWS


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Saltwater fishing tournament


to benefit March of Dimes


The employees of Gainesville Regional Utilities and the
City of Gainesville's general government are organizing their
annual Healthy Babies Trout and Redfish Saltwater Fishing
Tournament for Saturday, Oct. 13, in Cedar Key.
The tournament benefits the March of Dimes in its fight to
prevent birth defects and to ensure that all future babies are
born.
The tournament, open to everyone, will be held at the
Cedar Key public boat ramp starting at safe light and ending
at 4 p.m. Participants can pre-register by mail or at the boat
ramp the morning of the tournament. The entry fee is $90 per
boat, limit three persons per boat. Any person under the age
of 18 must fish with a consenting adult.
Over 20 local businesses are participating as sponsors of
this year's tournament. For more information, contact Eric
Chapman at (352) 334-3400, ext. 1082, or e-mail him at
chapmanej@gru.com.
The March of Dimes is a national voluntary health


agency whose mission is to improve the health of babies by
preventing birth defects, prematurity and infant mortality.
Founded in 1938, the March of Dimes funds research,
education, advocacy and community services programs to
save babies. For more information, visit the March of Dimes
Web site www.marchofdimes.com or its Spanish Web site at
www.nacersano.org.m


From high atop the skiff's poling platform, an eagle-eyed'
guide points toward an opening in the mangroves. On the
front deck, fly rod at the ready, an eager angler sees it, too:
a giant bull redfish (Sciaenops ocellatus) is tailing near the
cover, in search of an easy meal. For fear of spooking the
fish back into his wooded confines during high tide, the
angler quickly and quietly casts a large counterfeit squid in
front of the cruising giant. The fish's approach is silent, but
once it decides to take the bait, the sound of broken water
quickly becomes a mixture of splashing and fly line being
pulled through the rod guides at high speeds.
Commonly referred to as a redfish or even a red drum,
anglers in pursuit of this popular coastal game fish play
out this scene with regularity these days. Found from
Massachusetts to Florida on the Atlantic coast and from


Mexico to Florida on
the Gulf Coast, redfish
numbers are on the
rebounds thanks to the
united support provided
to it by sportsmen and
women around the
country. Once highly
coveted for its meat,
redfish which inhabit
'warm, shallow coastal
waters were netted by, ,
commercial operations
intent on becoming
wealthy over the demand
for redfish meat. The great
taste of blackened redfish
nearly spelled the species'
demise in some areas,
until concerned groups
banded together to lobby.
state, local and federal
governments to end the
wide-spread commercial
netting and to impose slot
and creel limits.
Today, populations of
the redfish throughout its


Recired Ior l ii, le ilro.ughoul Ihtors i i hc
liIceio icoisll icsidenoi forI COnutImF thlic cdih
c nDO one of' hc mo -i oughl ifler 5.ilulwarer
gime I bh in North .i\rerici. ill thc i-h ile
minr1 lInra g is high poprlJllluo. thab k i eCfllor
trom cuDsceriillOD-mindcd sporl.mcra ,nd wriome


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a -d i dI S,.rcLJ cIW n M0c iflh' II&-IL .ifl.
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Thbul 15nr t ucujidncd Ile i8e-Ic~ n~.'
mcinn v. idL. cnid AodlcA s,, Lii., p.j.iulu
~(tIi hr g.. I a d.n cc t' rio ut .uy m~cci *t ;nc.
Ii ?Q. 4 tci4j 1.,dli u ., tl I F.1o. .idchct
No- .d Karuu.8 A Fda.,8 Dri Sys -"2 2OV7


original North American coastal home range are stable and
- in some cases increasing. Whether it's fighting industrial
water pollution that harm fish hatches and reduce food
supplies or lobbying for protection of the species, anglers
on the piers and jetties of the Texas Gulf Coast can catch
redfish the same as the backcountry, shallow-water anglers
of Venice, La., and Mosquito Lagoon, Fla.
From tournament organizations raising awareness of the
this remarkably hard-fighting fish-to local residents and
businesses realizing the economic impact that hearty redfish
populations can bring, more people than ever have taken
a vested interest in the future of this member of the drum
family.
One of the most iconic of all the coastal North American
fish, the redfish features an easily distinguishable dot (or
dots) on its tail, which sticks out of the water as the fish.
cruises around, searching the soft bottom for shrimp, crabs
and baitfish. With its large, pale lips indicative of the drum
family and a muscular, streamlined body, the redfish is


ferocious when hooked. Anglers in search of a challenge
prefer sight casting to tailing redfish, while others employ
spinning and casting equipment and lure the fish with all
manner of modern tackle. Revered for its role throughout
history in the lives of coastal residents for centuries, the
redfish is now one of the most sought-after saltwater game
fish in North America, all the while maintaining its high
population, thanks to efforts from conservation-minded
sportsmen and women.
On Saturday, September 22, 2007, millions of Americans
will celebrate the success of the redfish and many other
species as part of National Hunting and Fishing Day
activities that will be going on nationwide. National Hunting
and Fishing Day began after a presidential proclamation in
1972 that sets aside the fourth Saturday of each September


The r difib alao knowr ,a the red drum
a o hfnneI o tnc '; cit n bfojnd irom
M 'lachmtcris a Florida on the Atlantic
Coto, tud from Nlc~icn to Florida on The
Gulf C.c"rr!.
The tiul iduli uebehi of a rtedish i trunder
40 paitid. but can reach into the 90 pournd
A .\ tedlath tn IC6e up m 20 )caia, or moic.
Spartniig o oco I torn .Aug~ast to Nov-nbet



U r. MW -
7 00c or more d k I.
nic Ui III 11-ii

tIc lip Niii the ~
)r d!rc'oF"t CIEL 11, 14d 41)lii1[..;.


One ofi tlte ri,:.sfc it
coioml Norhb Ameri
IC-1r it reiurrhmdo a
ull. hlct iclld, OutC
the c ih crn,t,ri tojnd
Ihr he :ot htociu- ior ts
ind bjufvh


Fi ibe rtet i-
d. .archirq
shrimp. orib


N T I, 0 r A L
F-[.rN'1INcn AND FISHING
>WI\ "


for the event. Since then, national, regional, state and local
organizations have staged thousands of open house hunting-
and fishing-related events everywhere from shooting ranges
to suburban frog ponds, providing millions of Americans
with a chance to experience, understand and appreciate
traditional outdoor sports.
The careful redfish conservation efforts of the past have
given millions of people the thrill of seeing the fish tailing
in the shallow, coastal waters, to have the chance to fight
one with a rod and reel and when local regulations allow
- enjoy its table fare. Conservation groups, sportsmen and
women and wildlife watchers alike are all stakeholders in the
future of the redfish, to ensure that the species keeps bending
rods and thrilling anglers well into the future.
National Hunting and Fishing Day, formalized by
Congress in 1971, was created by the National Shooting
Sports Foundation to celebrate the conservation successes
of hunters and anglers. National Hunting and Fishing Day is
observed on the fourth Saturday of every September.m


Resurfacing delay on State Road 24


The resurfacing of State Road 24 between Cedar Key and
Rosewood, previously scheduled to begin Monday, Sept. 10,
is postponed until Sept. 24 due to a need for new equipment
on the project.
APAC Southeast Inc. of Jacksonville is waiting for
delivery of a new piece of equipment to start work on the
project. The contractor has approximately six months to
do the work and feels they can complete the project in the
time given, though starting two weeks later than originally
planned.

Work on the project will include:
Removing and replacing existing pavement;
Adding five-foot paved shoulders;
Modifying drainage to bring it up to current
standards;
Replacing existing guardrail;
Adding new traffic railing to the Haven's Creek
Bridge;
Replacing the curb and gutter at the intersection of
County Road 347;
Constructing paved entrances to SW 69t Street, SW
80h Street, SW 110th Avenue, SW 111th Terrace, SW
113t Terrace and SW 125th Court.


The work will require daytime lane closures during
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Motorists should allow an
additional 15 minutes to reach their final destination when
lane closures occur. Flaggers will be used to direct traffic,
and those entering State Road 24 from a driveway or side
street without a flagger present should wait for traffic to pass
in the direction in which they wish to travel to avoid running
head on into oncoming traffic.
The speed limit will remain the same during construction;
however, speeding fines are doubled when workers are *
present. Work will be suspended for major holidays such as
Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years.
Approximately 2,200 vehicles a day travel this section of
State Road 24. It.was last fully resurfaced in 1978, although
a maintenance resurfacing project repaved part of it in 1992.
The project is expected to be complete by the spring of
2008. APAC Southeast Inc. of Jacksonville was hired by
the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to do the
work at a cost of $5.5 million.
For additional information regarding this project,
contact the Public Information Office at (800) 475-0044
or chip.skinner@earthtech.com. For information about
FDOT projects around northeast Florida, visit www.
northfloridaroads.com.


Snakebite

season still

cause for


concern this fall

Post-Summer Antivenom
Availability Remains Critical

Labor Day may mark the unofficial end of summer,
but snakebite season is still going strong. In fact,
approximately 20 percent of reported venomous bites
take place during the months of September and October.
Although the majority of snakebite incidents occur in
the southern half of the U.S., every state had at least one
reported bite last year.
Thanks in part to the availability of antivenom,
widespread educational efforts and heightened media
attention, only about a dozen North American crotalid
bites result in death each year. An estimated 8,000
people are bitten annually, and the number of bites
in any given season depends on a variety of factors
including geography, rainfall and temperature.
"Some areas of the country have experienced
higher than average rain fall this year, while others are
experiencing drought. Both situations can persuade
snakes to move into populated areas in search of food or
water," said Erica L. Liebelt M.D. FACMT, Associate
Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine
Director, Medical Toxicology Services UAB School of
Medicine.
"Unfortunately, we see numerous cases of a snake
biting someone twice or biting two people because of
a botched effort to catch or kill it after the first bite.
People often want to capture the snake for identification
purposes, but we don't need to see the snake to treat the
patient. And, we don't want people bringing a snake into
an ambulance or a hospital, even a dead one, especially
since snakes still have a bite reflex for a short time
after death," stated Dr. Liebelt. "The important thing
is to get the victim to a hospital as quickly and calmly
as possible. Infants, children and adults should all be,
treated with antivenom if they have a mild to moderate
envenomation."
CroFab Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab
(Ovine) is the only widely available antivenom for
the management of patients with minimal or moderate
North American crotalid snakebite envenomations
in the United States (this includes pit vipers such as
rattlesnakes, copperheads and cottonmouths/water
moccasins). "We are working in partnership with the
poison control centers to encourage every hospital to
stock adequate supplies of antivenom, even if they
expect to see just one snakebite patient a year," said
Jackie Beltrani,.Director, f Institutional, Sales and
Specialty Marketing for Fougera, themarketer of
CroFab. "Our goal is to ensure that no patient has
to lose valuable treatment time being transferred to
another hospital because the initial hospital didn't stock
antivenom."

About CroFab
CroFab is indicated for the management of patients
with minimal or moderate North American crotalid
envenomation. Early use of CroFab (within 6 hours of
snakebite) is advised to prevent clinical deterioration and
the occurrence of systemic coagulation abnormalities.
The term crotalid is used to describe the Crotalinae
subfamily (formerly know as Crotalidae) of venomous
snakes that includes rattlesnakes, copperheads and
cottonmouths/water moccasins. With the exception
of coral snakes, CroFab can treat mild to moderate
envenomations from any venomous snake indigenous to
the United States.
CroFab works to stop venom from destroying tissue.
It does not reverse the damage already done by the snake
venom. The more time that elapses between the time of
bite and the time of treatment the greater the chance of
complications. The phrase "Time is Tissue" is often used
to articulate the need to treat bites quickly to prevent
tissue damage.
In October 2002, Fougera assumed responsibility for
the distribution Of CroFab from Savage Laboratories.
Both companies are divisions of Altana Inc. CroFab
, was developed and is manufactured by Protherics PLC.

Important Safety Information
The most common adverse events reported in
clinical studies were mild or moderate reactions
involving the skin and appendages (primarily urticaria,
rash or pruritus), which occurred in 14 out of 42
patients. Two patients experienced severe allergic
reactions (severe hives and a severe rash and pruritus)
following treatment. One patient experienced recurrent
coagulopathy due to envenomation, which required re-
hospitalization and additional antivenin administration.
In clinical trials, recurrent coagulopathy (the return of
a coagulation abnormality after it has been successfully
treated with antivenin), characterized by decreased
fibrinogen, decreased platelets and elevated prothrombin
time, occurred in approximately half of the patients
studied. Recurrent coagulopathy may persist for 1 to
2 weeks or more. One patient discontinued CroFab
therapy due to an allergic reaction. Patients with


allergies to papain, chymopapain, other papaya extracts
or the pineapple enzyme bromelain may also be at
risk for an allergic reaction to CroFab. For additional
information on adverse events, please refer to the full
prescribing information for CroFab available at www.
snakebitenews.com.


About Fougera
Fougera is a leading manufacturer and distributor of
a wide range ofmulti-source topical and ophthalmic
pharmaceuticals in prescription and over-the-counter
dosage forms, as well as treatments for emergency/
critical care. n


Plenty of fight left in the


redfish thanks to conservation


1


-~-- ---- ---- ---- --- -----1


_I~__ ~__ __ ___ _~_ ____~^ ^ __ _ _I~_~_


"rmmumollmler);Aml









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page13


Back-porch interview with legendary coach C. Doyle McCall


By STEVE JARBOE
SPORTS WRITER

After meeting Coach, as he is affectionately called by all who
know him, at Chiefland's first two football games, I sat down with
him on Sunday afternoon to talk about his very interesting life and,
of course, some Indian football.
It all began on Oct. 14, 1928, in the newly named town of Gulf
Hammock, Fla. The town was formerly known as Gun Town,
according to Coach's mother, and she also told him he was the first
baby born in the newly named Gulf Hammock.
Coach attended Bronson High School where he played
basketball. That's right, he played basketball. This was the period
of time that World War II was going on, and there were just no men
around to coach football in the area. He also told me that during
this time Williston High School had a woman football coach, Joyce
Bullock.
When he graduated from Bronson High School, Coach was 6 feet
two inches tall and weighed a slim 235 pounds. He was awarded
a half scholarship, which was all the colleges would offer back in
the 40's, to play basketball at the University of Florida. He and his
father went to sign the papers, and football coach Barry Wolf saw
him and asked if he would like to play football. Coach told him he
had never played football but had always wanted to.
He had already started playing for Florida when Mississippi
Southern University offered him a full scholarship to play football
for them, and he accepted. However, in the 40's no freshmen played
for the university, and he was sent to one of the many junior colleges
to play.
Coach wound up at Perketon Junior College in 1947. From there
he went to Chipola Junior College in Marianna, Fla., so he could be
closer to home, and to his high school sweetheart. Home was now
the mill town of Otter Creek. Coach then went to the University of
West Alabama, where he played football for three years and received
his degree in 1951.
It was also in June of 1951 that he married Ann Renfore, his high
school sweetheart. With a bright gleam in his eyes, Coach said he
guessed he would keep her after 56 years.
In 1952, Leon Yielding hired Coach at Chiefland High School as
the boys' coach. This meant he was the only coach, and he coached
everything: football, basketball and baseball.
Coach was in for a big surprise when he took the job. They
played six-man football, which he had never seen before. After that
season of six-man football and playing football on the outfield of the


Journal photo by STEVE JARBOE
C. Doyle McCall stands in his living room by a wall of plaques
displaying a lifetime of his accomplishments in sports.

baseball field, Coach went to the new principal, James Parker, and
told him that either six-man football left or he was leaving. Parker
agreed that it was time for 11-man football.
Now Coach had an 11-man football program and team, but no
field to play on. So he went to Mont Clytt, who owned the property
next to the school, and told Clytt of his dilemma. Clytt told him to
just move the fence back, take the space he needed and use it for a
football field.
This was the field that Coach used from 1952 until 1963 and
where his 1961 team won the state championship.
After the 1963 season, the school, board was going to add on
to the school and was going to build right where the football field
was. The only problem was that the school board did not own this
property. So they had to purchase it and went on with the building
project.
It was alsoin a 1963 game between Chiefland and Dixie County
that a young Chiefland player named Wayne Pridgeon suffered a
fatal neck and spinal cord injury during the game. Coach went to the
hospital where the doctors told him that Pridgeon's injury was an
injury that had a one in 33,000 chance to happen.
The school was again without a football field but, more sadly, had
just gone through a very traumatic time with the loss of one of their


young athletes. "This was one of the most trying times in my life,"
said Coach. "I really started to call it quits, and get out of coaching.
It hurt me deeply to lose this young man."
Then Coach said it was the people of Chiefland and the
surrounding area, who got behind him with their support and their
love for him, who helped him get through this difficult time.
"The school board gave us zero funding," Coach told me as he
made a big zero with his finger and thumb. So he contacted some
people he knew for materials, and everyone that had a dump truck, a
grader or a tractor pitched in during the summer.
The community came together, working together showing love
and support. The donations from people in the community came
in when they needed them, and together the community built the
present football stadium at Chiefland High School.
The football field was dedicated at the opening game of the 1964
season and appropriately named Wayne Pridgeon Stadium.
Coach went on to coach the Chiefland football teams for 25 years
until 1977. He retired from coaching football but not from Chiefland
High School. He had compiled a very impressive 162-78-16 record
over his 25 years as head coach. Looking at his trophy wall in his
home, he said "They did have tie games back in those days."
Coach became the dean of boys at the high school and then was
promoted to assistant principal. He was the principal his last five
years at Chiefland High School before he retired after 39 years with
the Levy County School Board in 1991.
In 1988, Coach was inducted into the Florida Athletic Coaches
Hall of Fame. Then eight years after his retirement in 1999, Coach
joined the Florida High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame.
I just had to ask Coach about his name and the fact that
everyone affectionately calls him Coach. Coach replied with a
big smile and said he would bet me that half of the students that
went through Chiefland High School never knew his real name
and probably thought the "C" in C. Doyle McCall stood for
Coach.
After 39 years at Chiefland High School, 25 of those years as
head football coach, and 16 years after his retirement, it was only
appropriate for the residents of Chiefland, the Chiefland Quarterback
Club and the school board to unanimously agree not to forget the
man who brought tradition and pride to his community.
The Chiefland football field will now be known as Wayne
Pridgeon Stadium at C. Doyle McCall Field.
Oh yes, by the way, for those of you who don't know, Coach's
real name is Cecil Doyle McCall.m


Levy County Saltwater and Freshwater Tides
DAY HIGH TIDE HEIGHT SUNRISE MOON PERCENT MOON
/LOW TIME /FEET SUNSET TIME VISIBLE
Cedar Key


ay 13 High 3:13 AM 3.9 7:16 AM Rise
13 Low 9:36 AM 0.4 7:40 PM Set
13 High 3:43 PM 3.9
13 Low 9:47 PM 0.9
14 High 3:34 AM 4 7:16 AM Rise
14 Low 10:08 AM 0.4 7:39 PM Set
10b, cj.jl High i,, 1. 40i2-iPMW!w 3. ..L. i i


9:04 AM
8:41 PM


9:58 AM
9:10 PM
*;1


NASCAR SCHEDULE


9/16
9/23
9/30
10/7
10/13
10/21
10/28
11/4
11/11
11/18


Sylvania 300
Dover 400
Kansas 400
UAW-Ford 500
Bank of America 500
Subway 500
Georgia 500
Dickies 500
Checker Auto Parts 500
Ford 400


Loudon, NH
Dover, DE
Kansas City, KS
Talladega, AL
Concord, NC
Martinsville, VA
Hampton, GA
Fort Worth, TX
Phoenix, AZ
Homestead, FL


Saturday 15 High 3:56 AM
15 Low 10:40 AM
15 High 4:56 PM
15 Low 10:37 PM
Sunday 16 High 4:21 AM
16 Low 11:15 AM
16 High 5:38 PM
16 Low 11:05 PM
Monday 17 High 4:50 AM
17 Low 11:56 AM
17 High 6:29 PM
17 Low 11:36 PM
Tuesday 18 High 5:25 AM
18 Low 12:49 PM
18 High 7:41 PM
Wednesday 19 Low 12:16 AM
19 High 6:12 AM
19 Low 2:02 PM
19 High 9:26 PM
Suwannee River Entrance
Thursday 13 High 3:1,9 AM
13 Low 9:54 AM
13 High 3:49 PM
13 Low 10:05 PM
Friday 14 High 3:40 AM
14 Low 10:26 AM
14 High 4:25 PM
14 Low 10:30 PM
Saturday 15 High 4:02 AM
15 Low 10:58 AM
15 High 5:02 PM
15 Low 10:55 PM
Sunday 16 High 4:27 AM
16 Low 11:33 AM
16 High 5:44 PM
16 Low 11:23 PM
Monday 17 High 4:56 AM
17 Low 12:14 PM
17 High 6:35 PM
17 Low 11:54 PM
Tuesday 18 High 5:31 AM
18 Low 1:07 PM
18 High 7:47 PM
Wednesday 19 Low 12:34 AM
19 High 6:18 AM
19 Low 2:20 PM
19 High 9:32 PM
Withlacoochee River Entrance
Thursday 13 High 3:20 AM
13 Low 10:31 AM
13 High 3:50 PM
13 Low 10:42 PM
Friday 14 High 3:41 AM
14 Low 11:03 AM
14 High 4:26 PM
14 Low 11:07 PM
Saturday 15 High 4:03 AM
15 Low 11:35 AM
15 High 5:03 PM
15 Low 11:32 PM
Sunday 16 High 4:28 AM
16 Low 12:10 PM
16 High 5:45 PM
Monday 17 Low 12:00 AM
17 High 4:57 AM
17 Low 12:51 PM
17 High 6:36 PM
Tuesday 18 Low 12:31 AM
18 High 5:32 AM
18 Low 1:44 PM
18 High 7:48 PM
Wednesday 19 Low 1:11 AM
19 High 6:19 AM
19 Low 2:57 PM
19 High 9:33 PM


4 7:17 AM Rise 10:53 AM


7:38 PM Set


7:17 AM Rise
7:36 PM Set


7:18 AM Rise
7:35 PM Set


7:18 AM Rise
7:34 PM Set

7:19 AM Rise
7:33 PM



7:16 AM Rise
7:41 PM Set


7:17 AM Rise
7:39 PM Set


7:17 AM Rise
7:38 PM Set


7:18 AM Rise
7:37 PM Set


7:18 AM Rise
7:36 PM Set


7:19 AM Rise
7:35 PM Set

7:19 AM Rise
7:33 PM



7:15 AM Rise
7:39 PM Set


7:15 AM Rise
7:38 PM Set


7:16 AM Rise
7:37 PM Set


7:16 AM Rise
7:35 PM Set

7:17 AM Rise
7:34 PM Set


7:17 AM Rise
7:33 PM Set


7:18 AM Rise
7:32 PM


9:42 PM


11:49 AM
10:17 PM


12:46 PM
10:58 PM


1:43 PM
11:45 PM

2:38 PM


9:05 AM
8:41 PM


9:59 AM
9:10 PM


10:54 AM
9:42 PM


11:50 AM
10:17 PM


12:47 PM
10:58 PM


1:44 PM
11:46 PM

2:39 PM


2007 NASCAR Nextel Cup

Miscellaneous Statistics
[Complete through Chevy Rock & Roll Saturday, September 8thl

Budweiser Pole Award Standings
Jeff Gordon 6
Ryan Newman 4 *
Kasey Kahne 2
Dave Blaney 1'
Clint Bowyer 1
Kurt Busch 1
Dale Earnhardt Jr. 1
David Gilliland 1
Denny Hamlin 1
Jimmie Johnson 1
Jamie McMurray 1
Casey Mears 1
Reed Sorenson 1
J.J. Yeley 1
Manufacturers' Championship (PointsWVVins)
Chevrolet 211 (19)
Ford 144 (4)
Dodge 135 (3)
Toyota 82 (0)
Owner Leaders (Car tt)
Jeff Gordon (48) 5060
Rick Hendrick (24) 5040
Joe Gibbs (20) 5030
Georgetta Roush (99) 5020
Roger Penske (2) 5020
J.D. Gibbs (11) 5010
Teresa Earnhardt (1) 5010
John Henry (17) 5010
Rick Hendrick (5) 5010
Richard Childress (31). 5010
Richard Childress (29) 5010
Raybestos Rookie of the Year
Juan Montoya 218
David Ragan 204
Paul Menard 176
David Reutimann 156
A.J. Allmendinger 108
Last Event
RACE: Chevy Rock & Roll 400
SITE: Richmond International Raceway
LAPS: 400
MILES: 300
PURSE: $5,057,510
WINNER: Jimmie Johnson
RUNNER-UP: Tony Stewart
TIME OF RACE: 03 hours, 16 minutes, 03 seconds
AVERAGE SPEED: 91.813 m.p.h.
MARGIN OF VICTORY: 3.007 seconds
CAUTION FLAGS: 12 for 70 laps
LEAD CHANGES: 15 among 10 drivers
LAP LEADERS: Jimmie Johnson (Pole), Jeff Gordon (1-25), Casey Mears (26-31),
Ryan Newman (32-64), Paul Menard (65), Gordon (66-166),
Carl Edwards (167-181), Johnson (182-183), Denny Hamlin (184-200),
Gordon (201-235), Clint Bowyer (236-239), Gordon (240-269),
Tony Stewart (270-296), Johnson (297-337), Kyle Petty (338-339),
Johnson (340-400).
Next Event
DATE: September 16, 2007
RACE: Sylvariia 300
SITE: New Hampshire International Spoedway, Loudon, New Hampshire
LAPS: 300
MILES: 317.4


9:03 AM
8:40 PM


9:57 AM
9:09 PM


10:52 AM
9:41 PM


11:48 AM
10:17 PM

12:45 PM
10:58 PM


1:41 PM
11:45 PM


2:36 PM


Thursdc



Friday







Page 14 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


21st Century after-school programs


now at Williston Middle School

By BILL MCCREA
STAFF WRITER

WILLISTON Because of a 21st Century Learning Center federal grant, Williston
Middle School (WMS) will now have after-school programs.
WMS joins Bronson and Chiefland middle schools in having learning centers that help
students with homework, FCAT remediation, tutoring, character education, technical
education, nutrition and physical education, drug prevention and education and occasional
field trips.
The program will also host two parent nights per month that will offer reading assistance,
computer skills and GED information.
After-school programs began Sept. 4 at all three campuses and will take place Monday
through Thursday from the end of the school day to 5:30 p.m. It is a free program and will
also provide students with a snack and a bus ride home if the proper 911 address is given.
Each school will have an information night, and applications for the program will be
presented at a scheduled open house for each school.
The limit is 75 students per school, "with the focus being placed on students who have
scored a level one or two on the FCAT," said Carol Jones, vocational education coordinator.
To learn more, contact Paul Carlson, CMS after-school coordinator, at 493-6011; Dennis
Bell, BMS coordinator, at 486-5261; or Ernst Kordgien, WMS principal, at 528-2941.m


AsevMy OftRte Arf:h k0o5ty


ywmrd ;d, art ;wie J ay


Take pets safely along for the ride


Labor Day weekend
signaled the end of vacation
season, and many dogs and
cats joined their owners for
a final summer getaway.
Although car trips can be
stressful for many household
pets, experts agree that they do
not have to be if drivers take
some simple precautions.
"There are more than
135 million household dogs
and cats in the nation," said
Ray Palermo, director of
public relations for Response
Insurance, a national car
insurer. "They're members
of the family, and when we
take a driving vacation, they
are often along' for the ride.
Unfortunately, too many
drivers do not take the time
to prepare them for long
trips," Palermo added.
If the pet is not used to car
trips, try a few test runs to
help acclimate them for the


ride. Spending time in the car
while parked and short drives
to nearby destinations are an
easy start.
Cats should be kept in a
carrier, and dogs should be
held in a restraining harness.
This will help stabilize
your pet if there is a sudden
movement or crash.
Feed your pet a little less
than you would normally.
Since too much water can
upset their stomachs on
the road, limit water by
providing ice to chew. And,
don't forger to pack some
toys and any other favorite
items or bedding.
When traveling to places
your pet is not familiar
with, it is particularly
important to have a collar
with an ID tag that includes
both your permanent and
vacation addresses and
phone numbers. Bring a


photo of your pet in the
event you need to put up
"Lost Pet" posters. Many
veterinarians and animal
welfare organizations also
offer microchip identification
implants.
Dogs like to stick their
heads out of the car window,
but this is very unsafe. Small
stones and debris become
dangerous projectiles at
highway speeds.
Never leave your pet in a
car in warm or hot weather.
Even with windows open or
parked in the shade, interior
temperatures can quickly
rise to lethal levels. Pack a
first-aid kit with tweezers
and alcohol for tick removal,
cloth bandages and topical
antiseptic.
More information on this
and other safety topics is
available at www.response.
cor/safety.m


Former Levy County coach

arrested for sexual battery of child


The time has come to turn
in our fiscal reports to Florida
Consumer Services. So if all
who have not, please turn in
your sheets with signatures on
the petitions of our mission
statement regarding a Senior/
Community Center where
Assembly of Fine Artists could
exhibit and sell their artwork.
To make it easier for you,
on Sept. 15 we will hold a
combination yard sale and.AFA
Tailgators Art Show Sale on
the front yard of 657 SE 136
Avenue (aka County Road
55A), Old Town, a half mile
from Dixie Nut House offHwy
19/98. There will be signs and
balloons out at each end with
arrows. Please come a day
or two earlier to help make
preparations.
The sale will start as early
as you can get here. We'll have
two sections: used items and
artwork.-Anyone-who has-been
invited to exhibit with us in
the past is invited to join us.
The use of a clothes rack will
be available, and we can run
clothes lines as well. People
also like to look through boxes
as well. Select your spot and
bring an umbrella for cover
during sunny moments and
possible showers
I'm told it's best to have


Ten free live oak trees will
be given to each person from
Florida who joins The Arbor
Day Foundation during
September 2007.
The free trees are part of
the nonprofit foundation's
Trees for America campaign,
a program dedicated to
environmental stewardship'
through the planting of trees.
"These magnificent
wide-spreading trees will
be picturesque additions to
any landscape," said John
Rosenow, president of the
Arbor Day Foundation.
"They were selected because
of the shade and special
beauty they provide. Live
oaks grow rapidly when
young and may live to be
centuries old. They will also
add to the proud heritage
of Florida's 120 Tree City
USA communities. For three
decades, Tree City USA
has supported community


items priced. That's your
choice. The money is yours,
but as in the past the Assembly
would appreciate 10 percent of
your sales.
A last-minute check by a
volunteer accountant would
be appreciated to check our
fiscal figures. We all know we
had more activity, shows and
petitions than in the past as
well as fund-raisers, but we
also know that revenue did not
come in as well as in the past.
Donations were way down with
only an artist carrying the load.
Just as with other organizations,
expenses continued with
increases on everything. Please
let's not let the lack of money
dampen our goals. Let's add
bake and plant sales.
There is a porch overhang,
where some items can be hung
or displayed, and some seating
for the weary moments.
.-People-will-be-traveling- -
to the Christian Expo, aka
Sportsman Expo, on North
349 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
It would seem smart for us to
set up earlier and stay later. If
you don't want to bring your
own lunch, there are many great
eateries within two miles of us,
plus a terrific new produce stand
by Old Town traffic light.
If you stay into the evening


forestry across Florida, and
planting these trees will
make this tree-planting
tradition even stronger."
The trees will be shipped
postpaid between Oct. 15
and Dec. 10, at the right
time for planting. The 6- to
12-inch trees are guaranteed
to grow, or they will be
replaced free of charge.
Planting instructions are
enclosed with each shipment
of trees.
Members of the Arbor
Day Foundation will also
receive The Tree Book,
which includes information
about tree planting and care.
To receive the free trees,
send a $10 membership
contribution to Ten
Live Oaks, Arbor Day
Foundation, 100 Arbor
Avenue, Nebraska City,
Neb., 68410, by Sept. 30, or
join online at www.arborday.
org.m


Clark, Gary Mason Holmes, Mary Angela Jackson, Virgil Lee McClain, Reginald Eugene Pignanelli, Charles Kelley Robertson (Hendricks), Kimberly
Chiefland W/M Bronson W/F Trenton B/M Chiefland B/M Morriston W/M Old Town W/F
DOB: 08-04-1979 DOB: 10-13-1969 DOB: 08-02-1984 DOB: 05-11-1987 DOB: 04-02-1966 DOB: 09-19-1974
Battery, Intimidate Witness Larceny Hit and Run, Fail to Stop High Speed Flee Elude Law Writ of Bodily Attachment Passed Forged-Altered Instrument
$3,000 Bond $2,000 Bond At Crash Enforcement Officer $500 Purge $3,000 Bond
$2,000 Bond $5,000 Bond
Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having any information about the above individuals is asked to please contact the Levy County Sheriffs Office at 352-486-5111 or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477.


you can take in the delightful
play written by our local
playwright accompanied by
local musicians. The cost is
reasonable, and it's just up the
street from us at the Historical
Society.
I believe this will be the first
time that Old Town will have
so many events going on in the
same day within two miles of
each other. Bon appetite and
great buys to boot!

Barbara Moore


Guy Bubba Nail, 39, was arrested for one count of capital
sexual battery on a child less than 12 years of age and three
counts of sexual battery on a child between the ages of 12 and
18 years of age. Bond is $175,000.
The abuse occurred between 2000 and 2006 in Levy County,
Fla. Nail was a former teacher and assistant football coach at
Trenton High School from 1998 to 2003. From 2003 to 2005,
Nail was employed at Chiefland High School as an assistant
football and baseball coach. Nail is currently employed at
Enterprise High School in Alabama from 2005 to present as an
assistant football coach.
The investigation has revealed that no abuse has occurred
on school property, but We are asking if any child has had
an encounter with Bubba Nall in an inappropriate manner to
contact investigator Lauree Allen at (352) 486-5111, ext. 303..


GUY BUBBA NALL


Conscientious, Detail-Oriented Employee
Wanted to Pick Up and Deliver the
Levy County Journal
Must have: Clean Driving Record
Ability to Operate Cargo Van
Customer Service Orientation
Cash Handling and Record Keeping Experience


fN


Arbor Day Foundation

gives free live oaks


Sales Experience Preferred
$150 Guaramiled Base+Commission


Join us at

eileW eount Jfoumnal -

Levy CounWs

Legal Journal of Recrd








CONTACT THE
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL

352 490-4462
FOR MORE INFORMATION


I _


griffRMLIE







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


BUSINESS/SERVICE DIRECTORY


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 15


WAYS TO WELLNESS


SEIDMAN
This week's way to wellness discussion involves yoga
and Ayurveda. Yoga is an ancient science of life developed
thousands of years ago in the East, and Ayurveda is the
documentation of the study of the yogic way of life.
Here in the West, yoga is recognized by many as a health
and fitness regime. Anyone who practices yoga finds their
quality of life improving on many levels: physical, mental,
emotional and spiritual. There are as many different kinds of
yoga as there are fast food, and all are based on ideas of how
to live written thousands of years ago.
I began teaching exercise lessons in 1982, never knowing
the poses I was "making up" were yoga asanas (poses) and
had been in existence and documented for thousands of
years. Long stretches with deep.breathing made my body
feel much better than the aerobics I was certified to teach,
and balancing while breathing was helping my attitude
toward life. With two growing boys, ages 2 and 4, I figured I
needed all the help I could get.
In 1996 I began reading everything I could get my hands
on about yoga and realized this was something I could do
on my own on a daily basis. I had survived a few near-death
experiences, endured a divorce and undergone an extremely
invasive "female" surgery. At the age of 40, I found myself
tired, gaining weight and unhappy and realized it was time
to take my life into my own hands. Yoga seemed to be the
answer.
I bega~, a sincere daily practice studying many types
of yoga: hatha, karma, mudra and kriya. I found all the
traditions very foreign and tremendously educational,
and the more I studied the more I wanted to learn. These
traditions were helping me focus and improving my outlook
on life.


Yoqja fjar Wetite


The most effective tradition became increasingly evident
as I lost weight and gained self-esteem doing daily, hour-
long kriya-hatha asanas. Not only did I feel and look better,
I began to look at the world with a smile on my face, all the
time. Each and every yoga class I have attended, whether I
have been the student or the instructor, has been a wonderful
experience, always providing me with a deeper insight
towards wellness.
"Yoga" literally means yoke in Sanscrit, and produces a
union between our mind, body and spirit generally resulting
in better health overall.
The term "Ayurveda" is another Sanskrit word meaning
the science of life. Ancient civilizations studied life and
explained how we were all just bits of energy, part of a
continuum, part of the same energy source. Quantum physics
explains it in scientific terms; we are all made up of "wave
lengths." The physicists of the 1920's and 1930's proposed
these theories, and today these are accepted as facts. We are
all made up of energy; every human body is simply waves of
energy cloaked as matter.
Think about this, the subatomic particles in our bodies
have as much space between them proportionately as the
stars and planets have around and between them.
Every thought we have is comprised of a "wave" of
energy and affects our physical body as well.
When we take care of our human bodies and focus on
our breath (vital energy), we gain access to our intuition; we
experience heightened awareness and tap into the universal
knowledge.
When we focus and breathe and believe in ourselves, our
dharma (natural path) becomes evident; our lives become
easier, and we are inspired to make good choices.
Yoga is a nondenominational practice and can be tailored
to each individual,; it is something different for everyone. I
heard a broadcast of an interview on a nationwide feed to a


local radio station a few weeks ago with Sting, a well-known
and well-respected musician. He explained that, for him,
"yoga is about exercise." After the interview was over, they
played his song, "Every Breath You Take, Every Move You
Make, I'll Be Watching You," and even though I had heard
the song over a hundred times, I never realized it was about
God watching us breathe, stretch and live.
Yoga's traditions were developed thousands of years ago
to.help people live in the world and its practices are still
valuable today. It simply helps us learn who we are and
teaches us how we can be our best. What a wonderful way to
wellness.
Wishing you health and happiness,
ia"e

Diane Jackman Seidman
Natural Health Care Advocate for The Center,
Wellness Coach and Certified Yoga Instructor


Disclaimer: Whenever you are going to attempt any changes
in your lifestyle we recommend you talk to your physician
first. They should be aware you are making some changes
for the sake of your health and they can help you track your
progress to wellness.
For more information on yoga, Ayurveda and other ways
to wellness please, contact The Center, A Center for
Complementary Healthcare, Susan Snelling, Acupuncture
Physician, RN, MAOM, Chiefland, at (352) 493-7993 or
HealinTheEarth@aol.com, HealinTheEarth Enterprises.


BUSItNESS/SERVIC


mm ..w .


S*


w sm*


a..






3521558-4109 Free Estmates

MAC JOHNSON ROOFING
104 Southwest 266th Street Newberry, FL 32669
352.472.4943 or 866.376.4943
Website:
vwwv.macjohnsonroofing.com
g. L)a :i; : ""(4


For all your construction needs
Crane Services Dumpsters
Construction Debris


P.O. Box 367
Newberry, FL 32669


Office: 352-472-7707
Toll Free: 1-866-919-7707


Thomas F. Philman, Certified Operator
PEO Box 872 4 South Main
Chiefland, FL 32644
Phone: (352) 493-4772
(352) 493-1051
mil t"o 1-800-242-9224


H ai ng. *l g I [. .
ALES N HEAT ''yn;j : ING& A/C

Stat Cet o'ifi [ed [CAC 057426 .


Contact Theresa to

place your ad in the

Business Service

Directory and be seen

in all of Levy County and

surrounding areas!


tyancev@levyjiournal.com

or call

(3521486-2312


SE LF NS T R A G e -' ;I.
of Williston F \, y"
7570 NE 18511 Court Williston, FL 32696 .


Climate Controlled Units Available

(3521 529-0019


32-"29.0019
1
U.S. Hwy. 41 and CR 335


BRONSON SELF STORAGE




839 E Hathaway Ave Behind Dollar General
HOURS: Monday Friday 10 am 5 pm
Saturday 10 am 3 pm(352) 486-2121



CONTACT U

TODAY TO PLAC

YOUR AD EREI


ALLEN ALUMINUM INC.

Screen Rooms Vinyl Siding
Carports Skirting
Decks Roof Overs
David Allen
Free Estimates 352-490-8970 Mobile 352-221-0040
Licensed & Insured Mobile 352-493-3377


LANE' S

XA 1])WA RE
Your complete lawn, garden, and outdoor power equipment sales
and service center. We service all brands. Appliance parts and repair.
sharpblades@earthlink.net
352-528-5251 NETEL 157*1751 1902
STIHLC

Offering a Complete Line of Supplies for your Mobile
Home Repair or Remodeling New and Surplus


Trim
-Plumbing
*Roofing -Vinyl Supplies ,. Monday- Thursday,
*Doors -Electrical- m: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
*Skirting *Aluminum Supplies Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
*Power Poles -Set-UP Supplies Sat. 8:00 to 1:00
.Windows .Liquid Pool Chlorine 14237 N.W. U.S.
*Screen Made (352) 490-9900 Hwy.19 Chiefland

Keep on Flushing
A&M
Plumbing Enterprises Inc.
Remodel, Re-Pipe, New Construction,
Mobile Home Hook-Ups and Water Heaters.
Serving the Tri-County area.
Bronson (352)486-3509.

d M -7,1111


Low Rates Easy Terms
Personal & Commercial Auto Insurance
Home* Life Commercial
Rapid Tax Returns
"Guaranteed Lowest Down Payment"


v








Page 16 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


LAND TRANSACTIONS


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Levy Land Transactions
8/28/07-8/30/07
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-
Assignment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended
Certificate of Title, AD-Agree Deed, Al-Assumption
of Indebtedness, AM -Assignment of Mortgage, CD-
Correctory Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed,
E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-
Mortgage Modify Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation,
PX Probate X, QCD-Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed,
TBRD-Timber Deed, ROWD-Right of Way Deed, WD-
Warranty Deed


D (RE-RECORDED)
$10.00L88(10) FANNING
SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee BLANCHARD JEAN
Grantee BLANCHARD JAMES
J
Grantor BROOKINS PAIGE S
D $10.00L6(37) UNIVERSITY
OAKS, W/MH
Grantee LUSNIA ROBERT JD
Grantor RITCHIE VIRGINIA L
Grantor RITCHIE BRUCE A
M $86,000.OOTRACT 73
WINDING RIVER PRESERVE,
BDY 11-11-16, PARCEL
#21822-073-00, ETC
Grantee PILOT BANK
Grantor KNAPP & SONS INC
Grantor KNAPP AND SONS
INC
WD $15,000.00TRACT 432
UNIVERSITY ESTATES, BDY
10-12-17
Grantee VAZQUEZ DEANNA
Grantee VAZQUEZ OWEN
Grantor ORTIZ HORTENSIA
Grantor ORTIZ ABIMAEL
WD $100.00L25 CASONS
INGLIS ACRES #4, W/MH
Grantee SCOTT PAMELA SUE
Grantee SCOTT REX WADE
Grantor HOEQUIST ADISON L
WD $37,500.00L25 CASONS
INGLIS ACRES #4, W/MH
Grantee SINGH ANITA
Grantee SINGH RAJENDRA
Grantor SCOTT PAMELA SUE
Grantor SCOTT REX WADE
WD $9,000.00TRACT 168
UNIVERSITY ESTATES, BDY
16-12-17
Grantee NICHOLS DAVID
Grantor CORTES MARY
Grantor CORTES SAMUEL
WD $1,744,750.00BDY 13,
14-14-16, ETC, PORTION
OF PARCEL #02600-000-00,
02599-000-00, 02598-000-00
Grantee HIERS JODIE
Grantee HIERS LL JR
Grantor PLUM CREEK
TIMBERLANDS LP
E $10.00BDY N3/4 13-14-16,
ETC
Grantee HIERS JODIE
Grantee HIERS L LJR
Grantor PLUM CREEK
TIMBERLANDS LP
M $1,970,000.OOBDY 13, 14-
14-16, ETC
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor HIERS JODIE L
Grantor HIERS L LJR
Grantor HIERS JODIE
WD $103,000.00L9(B) D D
ALLENS FIRST SDTO THE
TOWN OF INGLIS
Grantee YORK DAVID
Grantor LAWRENCE OLIVIA M
Grantor CARTER WAYNE M
M $91,350.00L9(B) D D
ALLENS FIRST SDTO THE
TOWN OF INGLIS
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA
NA
Grantor YORK DAVID
M 1$17,000.00L9(B) D D
ALLENS FIRST SDTO THE
TOWN OF INGLIS
Grantee LEVY COUNTY
Grantor YORK DAVID
WD $100,000.OOBDY L1-4(31)
CEDAR KEY, ETC
Grantee MCPHERSON JOHN
K
Grantor CEDAR KEY
BUILDING & DESIGN INC
WD $11,000.00L6(48)
WILLISTON HGH #14
Grantee RICKHEERAM
ROBERT
GrantorTHEARD EUGENIA
GrantorTHEARD LEONEL
WD $10.00L6(55) UNIVERSITY
OAKS
Grantee COUGHLIN
MONIQUE
Grantee COUGHLIN DONALD
Grantor STRAGELLA JOSEPH
M 1$198,900.00L6(55)
UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT
UNION
Grantor COUGHLIN
MONIQUE E
Grantor COUGHLIN DONALD
M
M $135,000.00SAYS
PROPERTY IS LOCATED IN
MARION COUNTY PROPERTY
Grantee COUNTRYWIDE


HOME LOANS INC
Grantee MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC
Grantee MERS
Grantor HAMAN ANDREA L
WD $10.00L22(6) RAINBOW
LAKE ESTATES SEC N
Grantee PRICE FAMILY TRUST
Grantor PRICE ARDIS L
Grantor PRICE DENIS J
WD $10.00L11(8) RAINBOW
LAKE ESTATES SEC N
Grantee PRICE FAMILYTRUST
Grantor PRICE ARDIS L
Grantor PRICE DENIS J
WD $10.00L18-19(G)
CASONS INGLIS ACRES #9
Grantee PRICE FAMILYTRUST
Grantor PRICE ARDIS L
Grantor PRICE DENIS J
M $24,000.00L53(7) FANNIN
SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee COPLON LINDA L
Grantee COPLON JIMMY J
Grantor JOHNSON PAMELA L
Grantor JOHNSON DAVID
WD $75,000.00L5(A)
WOODLAND ACRES SD, ETC
Grantee ALVAREZ GLORIA C
Grantee ALVAREZ GABRIEL
Grantor BUENING ROGER A
Grantor GOETHE ANDREA M
M $49,000.00L5(A)
WOODLAND ACRES SD, ETC
Grantee BUENING ROGER A
Grantee GOETHE ANDREA M
Grantor ALVAREZ GLORIA C
Grantor ALVAREZ GABRIEL
WD $3,200.00L10(5)
WILLISTON HGH #12
Grantee PURSLEY SHELLEY
NEWTON
Grantee BRYAN RICHARD
ALLEN
Grantor GILREATH
JACQUELINE W
Grantor GILREATH
JACQUELINE TRUSTEE
Grantor GILREATH WILLIAM A
ESTATE
Grantor WILLIAM A GILREATH
REVOCABLE TRUST
M $64,800.00L10(5)
WILLISTON HGH #12, W/MH

Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor PURSLEY SHELLEY
NEWTON
Grantor BRYAN RICHARD
ALLEN
WD $18,000.00L13(141)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES
Grantee RILEY REX
Grantor MORDAUNT MARK G
TD $275,000.00#4973-05,
L7 BDY 20-12-19, PARCEL
#04717-000-00
Grantee WHITEHURST
CATTLE CO
Grantor GEORGE DAVID
ESTATE
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
TD $16,000.00#755-00, BDY
SE1/4 NW1/4 26-12-17,
PARCEL #03563-003-00, ETC
Grantee RUCCIONE
ANTHONY
Grantor CASTANO JOSE
MARIA
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
TD $17,000.00#2581-00,
L11(23) OCALA HGH WEST
Grantee GULF ATLANTIC
ENTERPRISES LLC
Grantor EMERSON KARl
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNY J SHIPP
TD $9,000.00#2624-00,
L5(10) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee SOUTHERN FOREST
GROVE LLC
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNY J SHIPP
Grantor LEMONT FRANCES G
Grantor LEMONT ROBERT F
TD $11,000.00#4716-05,
TRACT 441-442, BDY 15-12-
17, PARCEL #03408-023-00
Grantee SOUTHERN FOREST
GROVE LLC
Grantor LUGO CARLOS F
RIVERA
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
Grantor LUGO CARLOS F R
TD $8,000.00#4508-05, BDY
NW1/4 NE1/4 26-1 1-17,
PARCEL #03223-022-00


Grantee FLORIDA LAND
INVESTMENT GROUP INC
Grantor CACERES A D
Grantor CACERES FRANCISCO
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
Grantor DE CACERES AIDA
DELGADO
TD $10,100.00#767-01,
TRACT 185-186 UNIVERSITY
ESTATES, BDY 16-12-17
Grantee SOUTHERN FOREST
GROVE LLC
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
Grantor HATCHER KENNETH L
Grantor HATCHER SHARON
TD $3,500.00#2265-00,
L19(16) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
Grantee WHITEHURST
CATTLE CO
Grantor DEMBINSKI VICTOR L
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
TD $5,000.00#2264-00,
L18(16) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
Grantee WHITEHURST
CATTLE CO
Grantor DEMBINSKI VICTOR L
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
TD $9,200.00#3373-00, L11
UNIVERSITY OAKS MANOR
Grantee LUSNIA ROBERT J
Grantor LEGRA ELIAS SR
TRUSTEE
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
TD $6,600.00#2748-00,
L7(33) WILLISTON HGH #14
Grantee SOUTHERN FOREST
GROVE LLC
Grantor LEGRA ELIAS SR
TRUSTEE
Grantor CLERK OF COURT
DANNYJ SHIPP
QCD $10.00L3(52)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES
Grantee HELMICH ROBERTA
A
Grantee HELMICH JAMES E
Grantor AJ BUILDERS INC
M $125,500.00L3(52)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES
Grantee WELLS FARGO BANK
NA
Grantor HELMICH ROBERTA A
Grantor HELMICH JAMES E
QCD $10.00L5(30)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES
Grantee HELMICH JAMES E
Grantee HELMICH ROBERTA
A
Grantor AJ BUILDERS INC
M $103,000.00L5(30)'
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES
Grantee WELLS FARGO BANK
NA
Grantor HELMICH JAMES E
Grantor HELMICH ROBERTA A
M $118,000.OOBDY 3-14-18,
ETC
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor HALE FREDDIE
Grantor HALE FREDDIE B
Grantor HALE MARJORIE
M $50,000.00BDY 3-14-18,
ETC
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor HALE FREDDIE
Grantor HALE FREDDIE B
Grantor HALE MARJORIE
D $10.00BDY NE1/4 NW1/4
1-12-14, PARCEL #00861-000-
00
Grantee 416 5TH STREET
TRUST
Grantee SANTIAGO RON
TRUSTEE
Grantor MCCLAIN DEBLIN
Grantor MCCLAIN DONALD G
QCD $10.00L8(4) NOBLE
ESTATES, BDY 29-14-18
Grantee ELIZABETH ANN
GUNTER REVOCABLE TRUST
Grantee GUNTER ELIZABETH
ANN TRUSTEE
Grantor GUNTER ELIZABETH
ANN
SM 1$19,000.OOBDY L82
WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
PARK ESTATES
Grantee MARTIN FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION
Grantor LAMB LAWRENCE
M $27,000.OOBDY SE1/4 36-
10-15, W/MH


Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor MIZE WILBUR F
Grantor MIZE WILBUR F
TRUSTEE
Grantor WILBUR F MIZE
REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST
M 1$60,000.00BDY E1/2
SE1/4 29-14-16, PARCEL
#02701-001-OA
Grantee SUNSTATE FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION
Grantor FARNBACH GRADY
LEE
Grantor SMITH ALINE M
WD $10.00BDY SE/14 NW1/4


7-11-15, PARCEL #01503-002-
00(PORTION OF), ETC
Grantee WEEKS LEAH
Grantee WEEKS MILLARD III
GrantorWATSON KATHIE S
Grantor WATSON JUSTIN D
CD $10.OR 1065/879, L57
HIDEAWAY #2, W/MH
Grantee WILLIAMS JEFFREY R
Grantor BEACH VICKI
M $25,000.00L57 HIDEAWAY
#2, W/MH
Grantee SCHONBRUN
HARVEY TRUSTEE
Grantor WILLIAMS
KATHERINE
Grantor WILLIAMS JEFFREY R
WD $20,000.OOBDY 29-15-
13, PARCEL #00383-000-00
(PART)
Grantee SILLS ROYT III
Grantor DANIEL KENNETH
WD $35,500.00L2(M) OAK
RIDGE ESTATES #1, W/MH
Grantee DE RODRIGUEZ
LUCIA CALDERON
Grantee RODRIGUEZ
CLEMENTE III
Grantor ALFONSO NANETTE
Grantor OLAVARRIA NORMA
Grantor OLAVARRIA CECILIO
DECEASED
WD $10.00BDY SE1/4 3-11-
14, PARCEL #00548-004-00,
ETC
Grantee WEBSTER LENORAT
Grantee WEBSTER ROBERT
STACY
Grantee WEBSTER ROBERT S
Grantor WEBSTER ROBERT
STACY ,
Grantor WEBSTER LENORA
GrantorTOMPKINS LENORA
A
Grantor RICHBURG LENORA
ANN
Grantor LAYFIELD LENORA T
M $75,000.OOBDY SE1/4 3-11 -
14, PARCEL #00548-004-00,
ETC
Grantee WACHOVIA
MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Grantee MERS
Grantee MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC
Grantor WEBSTER ROBERT
STACY
Grantor WEBSTER ROBERT S
Grantor WEBSTER ROBERT
STACEY
Grantor WEBSTER LENORA T
E $10.00L12(9) BRONSON
HTS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor BGM REAL EST INV
E $10.00BDY NE1/4 NW1/4
35-12-17, PARCEL 403597-
007-00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor WOOD MARTIN D
E $10.00L6(12) WILLISTON
HGH #12
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor M&S HOMES &
PROPERTIES INC
E $10.00L1(9) SUWANNEE
RVR HGH
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MCDONALD
CAROLYN A
Grantor MCDONALD JERRY
W
E $10.00L6(45) WILLISTON
HGH #12
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor HARDING SUSAN C
Grantor HARDING RICHARD
A
E $10.00L68 SPRINGSIDE
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor LAFORTUNE
CLAUDETTE
Grantor LAFORTUNE
LAWRENCE
E $10.00L12(C) WILLISTON
HGH #9
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor GRIFFIN VIRGINIA B
Grantor GRIFFIN ARTHUR L III
Grantor GRIFFIN ARTHUR L
E $10.00L14 HIDEWAY #3
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC


Grantor STOCKBAUER
DONALD C
E $10.00PARCEL B, L14
CRESTFIELD TRADING CO. #1,
BDY 19-12-14
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor GOMES JOSEPH A
Grantor GOMES MARIA
Grantor GOMES MARIA L
Grantor JMJ TRUST
E $10.00L2(D) WILSON
ESTATE
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC


Grantor MURPHY JEROME R
Grantor MURPHY LINDA N
Grantor MURPHY ROGER
E $10.00L18(3) WILLISTON
HGH #11
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor DAMIANO CORINNE
Grantor DAMIANO CORINNE
K
E $10.00L3(J) MANATEE
FARMS ESTATES #2
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MICKLE CARLEY
Grantor MICKLE CARLEY S
Grantor MICKLE THELMA
CHRISTINE
E $10.00L15(C) COUNTRY
ESTATES
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor BEASLEY RENEE
TRUSTEE
Grantor JONESBORO FAMILY
LAND TRUST
E $10.00BDY NW1/4 20-11-
15, PARCEL #01592-000-00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor LANE CAROLYN
Grantor LANE EARL E
E $10.00L4, BDY L5(E)
GLEASONS TRAILER VILL
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor EDGMAN REBECCA J
E $10.00L6(10) FANNING
SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor WOODS WENDY N
E $10.00L15-16(6) GREEN
HGH PARK
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor PEREYRA NANCY L
Grantor ROSADO ISMAEL JR
E $10.OOBDYW1/2 NW1/4
35-16-15, PARCEL #02996-
005-00, ETC
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MASHBURN JAMES H
E $10.00L2(L) MANATEE
FARMS EST
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor HUDGINS JAMES D
Grantor HUDGINS VALERIE
Grantor HUDGINS JIM
E $10.00L2(18) WILLISTON
HGH #14. .
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MCCLASKEY JAMES I
Grantor MCCLASKY JAMES
E $10.00L19, BDY L18(31),
BDY 32-15-13, PARCEL
#08682-007-00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor HUDGENS SUSAN B
Grantor HUDGENS ROBERT K
E $10.00L25-27(H3) L26(H2)
JEMLANDS SD
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor HAMIL TERRY
E $10.00L14(16) UNIVERSITY
OAKS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor CIPOLLA DAVID M
Grantor FREDERICK JESSICA
A
E $10.00BDY SW1/4 NE1/4
15-12-17, PARCEL #03408-
090-00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor PALKA STEPHEN M
Grantor PALKA LINDA A
E $10.00L45 SILVER OAKS
PHASE ONE
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor ORR PATRICIA A
MMA $50,000.000R 995/285,
BDY SW1/4 NW1/4 34-14-18,
PARCEL #04643-001-00
Grantee CITIBANK NA
Grantor NOBLE JUDY
Grantor NOBLE NORMAN
M $45,000.00L2(C) BAKERS
SD REVISED
Grantee COUNTRYWIDE
BANK FSB
Grantee MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC


Grantee MERS
Grantor ALVAREZ SUSAN A
WD $77,500.00L18-19(5)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES, W/MH
Grantee ENGLEHART KEN F
Grantee ENGLEHART
VICTORIA A
Grantor BOWEN KENNETH M
M $62,000.00L18-19(5)
WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTATES, W/MH
Grantee SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE INC
Grantee MERS


Grantee MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC
Grantor ENGLEHART
KENNETH F
Grantor ENGLEHART
VICTORIA A
WD $14,000.00L2(43)
RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES
SEC N
Grantee WILMOT MARIA
Grantee WILMOT VINCENT
Grantor BUILDERS PROPERTY
GROUP LLC
M $31,000.00L11(A)
WILLISTOH HGH #4
Grantee WACHOVIA BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor FARMER PAMELA
Grantor FARMER JOHN F
M $15,000.OOBDY 29-11-16,
PARCEL #02403-004-00
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA
NA
Grantor CHAUVIN MARILYN
M $30,000.00L94 FOREST
PARK #3 PHASE I
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA
NA
Grantor SHEPPARD JAMES E
Grantor SHEPPARD
CHRISTINE
WD $70,000.OOBDY SE1/4
NW1/4 19-12-14, PARCEL
#01020-001-00, ETC
Grantee SMITH LEAH ANN
Grantee SMITH STEPHEN
Grantor SKELTON RONALD
Grantor ST JOHN RONALD
Grantor ST JOHN RONALD JR
WD $70,000.OOBDY SE1/4
NW1/4 19-12-14, PARCEL
#01020-001-00, ETC
Grantee SMITH LEAH ANN
Grantee SMITH STEPHEN
Grantor LEVY COUNTY DAIRY
W D $70,000.0BDY SE1/4
NW1/4 19-12-14, PARCEL
#01020-001-00, ETC
Grantee SMITH LEAH ANN
Grantee SMITH STEPHEN
Grantor SKELTON RONALD
Grantor ST JOHN RONALD JR
WD $70,000.OOBDY SE1/4
NW1/4 19-12-14, PARCEL
#01020-001-00, ETC
Grantee SMITH LEAH ANN
Grantee SMITH STEPHEN
Grantor LEVY COUNTY DAIRY
M $240,000.OOBDY SE1/4
NW1/4 19-12-14, ETC
Grantee DRUMMOND
COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor SMITH LEAH ANN
Grantor SMITH STEPHEN
M $44,000.00L40(11)
FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee DRUMMOND
COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor OSTEEN JAMES D
QCD $100.00L3 SUWANNEE
HTS REPLAT
Grantee SWAIN STACY
Grantee SWAIN MARK E
Grantor JOHNSON SHIRLEY E
M $18,003.44BDY N1/2
NW1/4 31-11-15, W/MH, ETC
Grantee DRUMMOND
COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor BEDDOW ELIZABETH
QCD $10.00L7-8(15)
WILLISTON HGH #7
Grantee RODRIGUES BERTA
Grantee RODRIGUES,
MANUEL
Grantor RODRIGUES BERTA
Grantor RODRIGUES MANUEL
Grantor RODRIGUES-MANUEL
JR
WD $25,000.00L5(31)
UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee MONTILLA
ARGENTINA
Grantor ADDISON DEBRA C
Grantor ADDISON CARL E
WD $27,900.00BDY NE1/4
SE1/4 3-13-18, PARCEL
04374-002-00 & 04379-000-
OO0(PART), ETC
Grantee LIPPMANN ALBERTA
LENA
Grantee LIPPMANN SCOTT
LANE
Grantor NOBLES JAMMIE
Grantor NOBLES ANTHONY
M $49,312.21 L1 (14) VILLAGE
OF GREEN THUMBS
Grantee WELLS FARGO
FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA
INC
Grantor DOMENICO


BRIDGETT E
Grantor DOMENICO JOSEPH
A
M $75,500.00L2 COUNTRY
WALK ESTATES #1, W/MH
Grantee EDWARD JONES
MORTGAGE LLC
Grantor KAMINSKI DELORIS
WD $10.00BDY NE1/4 SW1/4
17-11-14, PARCEL #00641-
002-00, ETC
Grantee RIFE PATRICIA
Grantee RIFE SAMMY
Grantor GRIFFETH PATRICIA
MURPHY








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


LAND TRANSACTIONS/MARKETPLACE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 17


Grantor RIFE PATRICIA
Grantor RIFE SAMMY
CD $10.00BDY NE1/4 NW1/4
15-12-17, PARCEL #03408-
062-00
Grantee BAEZA DIAZ EVELYN
Grantee DIAZ EVELYN BAEZA
Grantor COLON ALCIDES
CORTES
M'$85,000.00L3
MEADOWVIEW ESTATES 1 ST
ADD
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor STUTSMAN LOIS
ANN
Grantor STUTSMAN ROBERT
K
Grantor STUTSMAN ROBERT
KIRK


M $60,000.00L31 TRIPLE
CROWN FARMS SD # III
Grantee CHARTER ONE BANK
NA
Grantor SHRIGLEY ELIZABETH
A MURPHY
Grantor SHRIGLEY ROBERT
M $69,336.75L13 NORTH
SOUTH ESTATES #1, BDY 18-
12-18, W/MH
Grantee TRIAD FINANCIAL
SERVICES INC
Grantor CHARLES AMY
ELIZABETH
WD $10.00BDY NW1/4
NW1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL
#03233-015-00
Grantee BROTHERS
INVESTMENT GROUP LTD CO


Grantor LORIE J P
Grantor LORIE JANET
Grantor LORIE LUIS H
Grantor LORIE NIDIA R
WD $20,000.OOBDY NW1/4
NW1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL
#03233-015-00
Grantee CONNELLY
MATTHEW
Grantee CONNELLY CAROLYN
L
Grantor BROTHERS
INVESTMENT GROUP LTD CO
MMA $22,000.00OR
1048/668, L6(6) BRONSON
HTS SD
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA
NA
Grantor MYERS RAYMOND


M $100,000.00BDY 4-13-19,
PARCEL #04976-000-00, ETC
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA
NA
Grantor NEAL CAROLYN D
Grantor NEAL JAMES M
M $157,000.00BDY NE1/4
NE1/4 5-12-18, ETC
Grantee SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE INC
Grantee MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC
Grantee MERS
Grantor VINSON CYNTHIA L
Grantor VINSON LAWRENCE
R
WD $16,202.00PARCEL 29
HOLIDAY FARMS, BDY 6-12-


18, ETC
Grantee MALLADY K C
Grantor FLORIDA TIMBER CO
D $10.00L1 MORRISTON
OAKS
Grantee YOUNG MEGHAN
Grantee YOUNG JASON
Grantor LAPIERRE CAROL
Grantor YOUNG RONNIE
ESTATE
WD $39,500.00L1 B.J.
SIMPSON SD #1
Grantee EDWARDS
SOLOMON
Grantor EDWARDS WILLIAM S
Grantor EDWARDS MINIQUE
M $50,000.00L1 B.J. SIMPSON
SD #1
Grantee DRUMMOND


COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor EDWARDS
SOLOMON
M $71,900.00L3(16)
BRONSON HTS SD
Grantee PATRIOT HOMES INC
Grantor JOSEPH HEATHER M
Grantor BLATCHFORD
MICHAEL DEAN
WD $30,000.00L5(1 8) OCALA
HGH WEST
Grantee CARIDI JENNIE
Grantor GEELAN PATRICIA
Grantor MOSCHIANO SUSAN
M $82,059.72L5(18) OCALA
HGH WEST, W/MH
Grantee 21ST MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
Grantor CARIDI JENNIE


Contact us to place your

listings in the Marketplace

BRONSON

Phone (352) 486-2312

Fax (352) 486-5042

or

CHIEFLAND

Phone (352) 490-4462

Fax (352) 490-4490


liii *..11S' .. *' "
.
:"H ...-: .- ;- :. -:. . S 4:-2: 1 0

If you are looking for a real nice place Lovely well maintained 2/2 DW MH on 1 beautifully Beautiful 2 bedroom 2.5 bath home on
at an affordable price this is the place landscaped acre. Manyextrassuch as 10'X28'covered front 5 beautifully landscaped acres MOL. This
Everything is brand new: floors, carpet porch, chain link fenced back yard, pole bar, storage shed/ home features large dining area, large living
workshop, RV P,n o .,.,oi',.r i:i.:f,,,,i citrustees, grape room, sewing room or office or 3rd bedroom,
stove, rerig, iswasher, cabinets, arbor concrete patio, 16' X 25' attached family room with screened porch, covered deck, guest house
bathroom, etc. Come take a look. $59,000. fireplacelgrill beautiful landscaping, & MORE. This is one that and a lot more. $198,500. (DR-757079-JW)
(LMH-754965-RH) 493-2221 1-,u5.l l. ,: Ippre:ii $159900 (GMH.753410-J4 463-6144



A ,. --. rmm" "


SUNSET, GULF AND.MARSH VIEWt Newly 3 BR, 3 BA CBS HOME ON 10 ACRES. Beautiful new concrete block home with
remodeled, 2 BR 2 BA home located in the town
of Suwannee at the mouth of the magnificent Paved road, fenced & cross fenced. 3 open living room with cathedral ceilings,
Suwannee River! Suwannee is a quiet, peaceful, septic tanks, 4" wells, fish pond, over 2000 screened in back porch and oversize 2 car
fishing village you can enjoy for your weekend sq ft of heated living area. 2 large barns garage. This 3 bedroom 2 bath home also has
getaways or retire here. Manatee and bird with plenty of room for animals. Minutes to 20 acres fully fenced for your horses or cows. It
watching, grouper fishing in the gulf, boating on has a newly dug pond ready to stock with fish.
thp, 'evo 07an nn 1nW,'rtJ'lA'L 11 e Ru'). n, nn town. $299.500. ILR-755802-D) 493-2221 V40n nnfn ,1 -,rV"n-r, am ," 1 ,9


Smith & Associates,
bsgmac.com Inc.


GMAC
.... . '- A. IA
. .. .,i ,: " ," "


, 1 0IiU, HIUUOI Nn rULLAiNpDlU lU 130-31lU

. --_- .


SECLUDED PARADISE DWMH ON 5 ACRES. Fenced/
x fenced next to Manatee St Park. Park like setting
w/huge old oaks. Deck area, large enclosed screened
porch, fireplace. Paved road. Close to SuwaneeRiver
boat ramp.Amust see forthis price!!! MLS: 757289
$137,000 RUSS HALLETT, Realtor665-9901




WATERFRONT BEAUTYII Spacious home on canal in
Suwannee. 312 cedar home-2 stall attached boathouse/
basin, 2 car carport, workshop/garage, covered patio, covered
fish-cleaning area, & cypress potng/storage shed. Beautifully
landscaped-gazebo, garden area & fruit trees. Inside- so many
extras and custom design. Call today to view this special home!
MLS: 755446 $990,000 LISA BAXTER, Realtor949-1649
P I '. I I: : '. i E
CERTIFIED
Service You Deserve. People You Trust?
352-493-4200 Chiefland
Irad Smith Licensed Real Estate Broker


Find your


dream home


in the


Marhetplaee!


McMUilen Surveying, Inc.
40 South Main Street, Williston, Florida, 32696
Phone: (352) 528-MAPS (6277) Fax: (352) 528 271
Em ail-' ,, rr, :; r-, ,
W eb ,.-.-.:.i .r. i -
"YOUR LOCALLAND SURVEYOR"
FLORA LirCENES PSM 546%AN-.La 6821
FREE PRICE QUOTES
WE NOW ACCEPT VISA/MASTER CARD

WE'VE EXPANDED TO MEET YOUR NEEDS
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

MORTGAGE BOUNDARY TOPOGRAPHIC PLATS
FAMILY DIVISIONS LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS
LARGE SIZE PRINTING/SCANNING NOTARY SERVICE


Regina Goss

Licensed Real Estate Broker
www. gosswill ams.com


GOSE WILLIATIS
REAL-ESTATE, INC.


5 ACRES With this 2000 model 3 BR, 2 Bath DW
MH. Screened front porch, large decks, 24'X 30'
Garage. Ready fpr quick occupancy. $125,000.00


VACANT LOTS FOR SALE COMMERCIAL LISTING NEW FIVE OAKS LISTING!
ACRES PRICE MLS#
0.17 S51,900 756486
0.25 515,000 755772
0.25 $15,000 755774 h J''
0.25 S15,000 755832 I- ,
1.00 S40,000 756117
1.03 S20,000 755921 0.30 ACRE LOTl 10.00 ACRE LOTS!
1.25 S47,900 756001 Commercial property ght off of 27 Altin Bronson city 3BR/2BA acreage can be divided and offers the
2.00 539,900 754595 limits. Ready for new retail store, daycare, etc. BRING following features: hot tub, covered picnic pavilion
8.40 S525.000 756432 All nFFFPsR $1irm ui LS 7n79o4 J .oni a .r1.. P n1onnoik. I vM7W 4 7-ISni,,lf.: 10 Q9


MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE
BR/BA PRICE MLS#
.fP 2P;, S62,500 755884
?.- ., -e S 579,500 756309
.BP i.t 5- 99,900 755217
31iF' L S99,900 756144
3. -E.A 5149,900 756048
3BR/2BA 5179,900 756306
4BR/2BA 5110,000 754537
4BR/2BA S189,000 756060
;RP/ORA 1ndflA 9 755817


1.88 ACRES With this 3 BR, 1 Bath site built home.
2 single car garages, enclosed rear porch, pole barn
& more. Needs a little TLC. A deal at $127,900.00

See other listings at www.gosswilliams.com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


'. 1, -- ..- 1 1 .. ... .. ... - F - ,1 -.









Page 18 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007


CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CHECK ONE: 0415 Mobile Homes for Sale
100 MISCELLANEOUS 0435 Commercial Property for Sale
0105 Personals 500 FOR SALE
0110 Lost & Found 0505 Antiques
0115 Notices 0510 Auctions
0125 Services 0515 Yard Sales
0130 Free 0525 Appliances
200 EMPLOYMENT 0535 Pets & Animals
0210 Help Wanted/Full-time 600 RECREATION
0240 Help Wanted/Part-time 0605 Boats & Marine
0245 Work Wanted 0610 Campers &'RVs
300 RENTALS 0615 Motorcycles & ATVs
0305 Apartments for Rent 700 FARM
0310 Houses for Rent 0705 Farm Equipment
0315 Mobile Homes for Rent 800 TRANSPORTATION
0330 Commercial Property for Rent 0810 Automobiles
0345 Wanted to Rent 0820 Trucks
400 REAL ESTATE 0825 Vans
0405 Condos & Apartments for Sale 900 LEGALS
0410 Houses for Sale
TO SUBMIT YOUR CLASSIFIED (DEADLINE 2 P.M. MONDAY):
MAIL TO: Levy County Journal P.O. Box 2990, Chiefland, FL 32644
CHIEFLAND OFFICE: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32644
Phone: Chiefland 352-490-4462 Fax: Chiefland 352-490-4490
BRONSON OFFICE: 440 South Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621
Phone: 352-486-2312 Fax: 352-486-5042 Email: editor@levyjoural.com


------ ----i------- E-u
NAME I

ADDRESS


CITY STATE ZIP PHONE

USE SPACE BELOW FOR YOUR CLASSIFIED TEXT
(UP TO 20 WORDS $5.00 PER WEEK, EACH ADD'L WORD 100 EACH)


CHECK # OF WEEKS TO RUN
01 0203 04 05 06


PLEASE ATTACH CHECK (MADE PAYABLE TO LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL) OR FILL OUT THE FOLLOWING:
OMASTERCARD VISA (CHECK ONE) .CARD # EXP.


SI. -- - -- - - -- -- - I. IIIIIIIIIIII


WANT TO BUY OLD CANVAS
popup trailer to use for parts.
Call Roland at (352) 257-3051.
9/13/p





NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes, in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals
.Call (800) 556-8885 or visit
www.drugrehab.net tfn



AA MEETING--for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local ho-
tline number. ffn




FLORIDA'S.LONG-TERM CARE
OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM
needs volunteers to join its
corps of dedicated advocates
who protect the rights of elders
residing in nursing homes,
assisted living facilities and
adult family care homes. The
program is comprised of 17
local councils throughout the
state, and each council is
seeking additional volunteers
to identify, investigate and
resolve residents' concerns. All
interested individuals who care
aboul protecting their 'health,
safety, welfare and rights of
long-term care facility residents
who often have no one else
to advocate for them are
encouraged to calltoll-free (888)
831-0404 or visit the program's
web site at http://ombudsman.
myflorida.com. tfnf


FARMER IMMEDIATE
OPENING: 'Only experienced
farmerorpersonswith agricultural
background need apply, active,
semi-retired or retired. Call Jay
Mac Matthews at 352-535-5720
or A. D. Andrews Nursery 352-
493-1199.





CHIEFLAND POLICE
DEPARTMENT is accepting
applications for one (1) fulltime
police officer. Applicant must
pass background check,
physical, drug screening,
possess valid Florida driver's
license, and have current Florida
Police Standards. Position open
until filled. Applications may be
obtained at Chiefland Police
Department located at 14 East
Park Avenue. EEO. 9/20b


THE CITY OF CHIEFLAND
IS SEEKING A FIRE CHIEF.
Chiefland Fire Rescue proudly
protects 2,200 residents within
the city limits and approximately
6,000 in Levy County. They
operate out of two stations that
protect a primarily rural area. The
department is a mostly volunteer
department. The position also
serves as the city's emergency
management and safety director.
Applicant must have a current
State of Florida Certificate of
Compliance as a firefighter II
and current State of Florida
EMT certification. Applicant
is required to hold a current
Florida Fire Inspector certificate
or obtain one within one year of
employment. An A.S. degree
in Fire Science is preferred.
Starting Salary range $34,648-
$41,200. Submit resume
and application to Chiefland
City Hall, 214 East Park
Avenue, Chiefland, FL. 32626.
Applications can be obtained at
City Hall or at www.chiefland.
govoffice.com Deadline:
October 1, 2007. DFW EOC.
9/13, 9/27b


COME JOIN THE JOURNAL
TEAM! News Correspondents-
Cover local events in your area.
Photographic skills a must.
Experience preferred. Deadline
driven, but flexible schedule.
Compensation commensurate
with experience. Expenses/
mileage reimbursement. Fax
resume/clips to 490-4490 attn:
Editor. tfnf




FOR RENT OAKWOOD
APARTMENTS IN BRONSON. 2
BR 1 BA with utility room, $600/
month. Call Karen at 352-538-
3141. tfn





/2 ACRE WILLISTON/
MORRISTON. Paved road
frontage on SR 121. Beautifully
wooded! Owner financing. NO
DOWN PAYMENT. Only $205/
mo; total: $19,900.00. Call 352-
215-1018. 10/4p


1.25 ACRE WILLISTON/
MORRISTON area. Beautifully
wooded. Nice neighborhood.
Owner financing. NO DOWN
PAYMENT! Only $359/mo; total:
$34,900.00. Call 352-215-1018.
10/4p


1 ACRE-BRONSON. Beautifully
wooded lot just off paved street.
Owner financing. NO DOWN
PAYMENT. Only $307/mo; total:
$29,900.00. 352-215-1018.
10/4p




HOUSE FOR SALE 4BR/1 BA,
1,200 sq. ft. w/800 sq. ft. concrete,
block workshop. All on beautiful
lot with a dozen 100 year oaks.
1.3 acres. House needs TLC -
handyman's dream. Sacrifice at
$87,500. (352) 233-8186.




10 ACRES WITH 3/2 MOBILE
HOME in Chiefland, Fla. Price
negotiable. Contact (321) 258-
2504. 9/13p


SPANISH TRACE 5 ACRES
WITH 2/2 mobile home.
Chiefland area, furnished.
Motivated seller. Call Lisa Baxter
(352) 949-1649 or (352) 493-
4200- GMAC. 9/27 p






NEW MOWER & CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers.
Beauchamp Saw Shop. 352-
493-4904 tfn


LUMBER FOR SALE pine,
cherry and cypress. Call Sammy
at (352) 949-3222. tfnb



GATOR WORKS

COMPUTING
Sales. Repair. Upgrade
Consulting
| c K Programming
ANeirworklng
ERTIFIEO


Computer
Training Classes


FAT GOOSE AUCTION this
Friday in downtown Chiefland
at 6:30 pm. 19' Bay Liner
"Capri" inboard/outboard 4
cyl with trailer, 2 American
Flyer "L" gauge train sets
from 1950's. All types of other
furniture to include "Ames
area dinning room sets and
several other ultra-modern
pieces of furniture, tamps &
small tables from same area.
Along with tables, chairs, sofa
w/ matching chairs,- nesting
tables. book cases, desks. A
nice large grandfather clock -
price reduced. Lots of unusual
collectibles, large load of estate


jewelry just came in. Noritake
sets, fish mounts, early crocks,
large collection of collectible
plates, "Franklin Mint" military
models, artwork, primitives,
huge dough bowl. Belgium
made Browning over& under
"Super-posed" Pigeon grade
3 "Fighting Cocks" (very
rare shotgun). Don't forget this
week we are selling large lots
of estate merchandise either
in box lots or table lots. Like
always lots more of all types
of stuff. AB2565 10% BP.
For more information call Jim
Morehead al (352) 356-1065.
9/13b


VY COUNTY JOURA,.
EI COUINTV PAPER ST. 1 2-.'-


Also available at these locations:


Bronson
A&A Restaurant
Boondocks Grill
Bronson Post Office
Courthouse
Hungry Howie's .
IGA
Li'l Champ
Nobles
Old Country Market
Pick-a-Flick
Texaco/Chevron
Lee's Grocery

Cedar Key
Annie's Cafe
Cypress Station
Faraway Inn
Island Jiffy #1173
Island.Jiffy #3246
The Market

Chiefland
ABC Pizza
Bell's Restaurant
BBQ Bill's
Breezy Acres Campground
Burger King
Chiefland Flea Market
Laundromat
Chiefland Post Office
Church's Chicken/Jiffy 3000
CVS
Gas Mart
Jiffy 2280-Manatee
Jiffy 2946-Midtown
McDonald's
Mya's Chinese Restaurant
Stone's BP
Sunday's Coffee & More
Sunoco
Wal-Mart (Garden side)
Wal-Mart(Grocery side)
Winn Dixie (inside)
Winn Dixie (outside)

I.- ------


I have enclosed a check or money order for
(payable to Levy County Journal)


VISA or Master Card #


Fanning Springs
Citgo/Waco Food Store # 6
Gas Mart/Waco Food Store # 14
Homestead Restaurant
Lighthouse Restaurant

Fowlers Bluff
Carter's Crossroads

Inglis
Food Ranch
Shell Station

Morriston
Morriston'Post Office

Old Town
BP Station-US 19
Jiffy Store
Old Town Post Office

Otter Creek
Hershel's Quick Stop & Deli
Martin's Country Store
Otter Creek Post Office

Trenton
BP-Round store
Hitchcock's
Trenton Medical Center
Trenton Post Office


Williston
McDonalds
Frog's BBQ Pad
Billy Jack's
BP Gas
Corner Market
Exxon
Green Shutters
Hitchcock's
Li'l Champ.1181 -
Li'l Champ 1182
Li'l Food Ranch 3626
Li'l Food Ranch 4231
Raleigh General Store
Sunoco #65
Sunoco #464
Subway


Yankeetown
Post Office
Fisherman's Park


e care
riders
about our readef r
Thank you for
r r I
ou
eading the
jC
L L vj rl
evy County
JoumaL


4' c'z1


Expires


Name

S Address


City State Zip Phone

Mail in your request today to: Levy County Journal, P.O. Box 2990, Chiefland, FL 32644-2990 VS
or you can call us at (352) 490-4462 to subscribe by phone.


I'


!II Lfil


I~ E -


r~ --






Watch for us in these locations.

New locations added weekly!


The Levy County Journal: the county newspaper of record
Subscribe today!!!
Tri-County Area (Levy, Dixie, Gilchrist) $17.00 per year
In State $22.00 per year Out of State $27.00 per year


-t







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL LEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.38-2007-CA-000802

JOHN MIDDLETON, TTEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NARCISO TORRES BATIS,
also known as NARCISO
TORRES BATES,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: NARCISO TORRES
BATIS
Jardines Fagot 15R29
Ponce, Puerto Rico
007331

AS WELL AS any and all
other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against
him, or his respective heirs,
administrators and assigns,
as well as all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to quiet title to the
following property in Levy
County, Florida, to wit:
Tracts No. 24 and 55,
legally described as: The
south 2 of the NE % of
the NE 1 of the NW 4 of
the NE /4 and North %
of the SE the NE 1/4of
the NW 4ofthe NE of
Section 16, Township 12
South, Range 17 East,
Levy County, Florida.
(Parcel No. 03416-104-
00)
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is Post .Office
Box 1354, Bronson, Florida
32621, on or before September
24, 2007 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
Dated this 16 day of August


2007.
i1


DANNY'J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court
By: Melissa Allen
Deputy Clerk


(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Aug. 23, 30, Sept. 6,
13, 2007
----------

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION.
CASE NUMBER:
38-2007-CP-0000217-

IN RE: ESTATE OF:
EDNA M. ZQLDEK,
Deceased.

AMENDED NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
(SUMMARY
ADMINISTRATION)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered in the estate of Edna M.
Zoldek, deceased, File Number
38-2007-CP-0000217, by the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Post Office
Box 610, Bronson, Florida
32621; that the cash value of
the estate is $0, (not included
is homestead and exempt
property) and that the names
of those whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
Jenise Ann Failla

Aka Jenice Failla
19309 SW 64th Street
Pembroke Pines, Florida
33332

Christine Delgatto

Fka Christine Lombardo
331 Mooney Pond Road
Selden, New York 11784

Kimberley Lombardo
12 Apple Blossom Lane
East Patchhog, New York
11772

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having


claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this of this notice is
served within three months after
the date of the first publication
of this notice must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER. THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice is
Sept. 6, 2007.


Law Office of Michael Koch
By: Michael Koch
Florida Bar No. 0149683
118 East Park Avenue
Chiefland, Florida 32626
Telephone: (352) 493-1616
Facsimile: (352) 493-1619

Pub.: Sept. 6, 13, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 38 2007 CA
000447
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHAWN HART, ETAL,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION


TO:
SHAWN
Current
NW 69th
33076


HART
Residence: 10668
Street, Parkland, FL


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:

SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED
EXHIBIT 'A'
TRACT 20
A parcel of land in the SW
% of Section 16, Township
12 South, Range 18 East,
Levy County, Florida being
more particularly described
as follows:

For a Point of Reference,
commence at the NW
corner of the South /2 of
Section 16, Township 12
South, Range 18 East,
Levy County, Florida:
thence S 89021'27" E,
along the North line of said
South of Section 16, a
distance of 1367.96 feet,
to the intersection with a
line being parallel with and
1362.48 feet East of the
West line of Section 21,
Township 12 South, Range
18 East; thence S 00034'41"
E, along said parallel line,
57.50 feet, to the South right
-of way line of Levy County
Road C-335 (NE 75th
Street); thence S 89002'40"
E, alohg said right of way
line, 617.15 feet, to the
Point of Beginning, thence
S 89002"40" E, along said
right of way line 616.90
feet, to the centerline of a
60 foot easement known as
Pine Forest Drive; thence
S 01012'18" E, along said
centerline, 1388.18 feet;
thence S 89025'19" W.
631.86 feet; thence N
00'34'41" W, 1404.61 feet,
to close on the Point of
Beginning.

Subject to and together with
that 60' ingress, egress and
public utilities easement known
as Pine Forest Drive and those
10 foot public utility easements
lying on each side of said Pine
Forest Drive, all as described
in Exhibit "E" of the Declaration
of Covenants and Restrictions
for Hampton Farms.

Subject to and together with
the Equestrian Easement
described in Exhibit "E" of
the Declaration of Covenants
and Restrictions for Hampton
Farms.


-,--


Subject to the Water Quality
Buffer described in Exhibit "F"
of the Declaration of Covenants
and Restrictions for Hampton
Farms along the North 75 feet
thereof.

Subject to an Entrance
Feature Easement in
the Northeast corner
of the above described
parcel being more
particularly described
as follows: For a Point of
Beginning, commence
at the Northeast corner
of the above described
parcel, also being the
intersection of the South
right of way line of Levy
County Road C-335 with
the centerline of Pine
Forest Drive: thence S
01012'18" E, along the
East line of the above
described parcel and
said centerline of Pine
Forest Drive, a distance
of 150.00 feet; thence
N 52057'28" W, 254.48
feet, to a point on the
North line of the above
described parcel and
the said South right
of way line; thence S
89002'40" E, along said
North Line of the above
described parcel and
said right of way line,
200.00 feet to close on
the Point of Beginning.

has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any,
to it, on Marshall C. Watson,
P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800 NW
49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or
before October 12,2007, a date
which is within thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this
Notice in the (Please publish in
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL),
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against your
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
If yui&B a person with
Disabilities who need any
accommodation to participate
in this proceeding, you are
entitled at no cost to you
to the provisions of certain
assistance.. Please contact
the ADA Coordinator at Court
Street, Bronson, FL 32621 or
Telephone (3352) 486-5276
prior to such proceeding. If you
are hearing impaired call 1-
800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 27th day
of August, 2007.
Danny J. Shipp
As Clerk of the Court
By: Gwen McElroy
As Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 6, 13, 2007-


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No: 38-2007-CA-832

JULIUS FLAG
Plaintiff,
vs.

LA SHAWN BROWN F/K/A
LA SHAWN TURNBULL and
any known or unknown natural
person, the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or known or unknown
person who is known to be dead
or is not known to either dead
,or alive and SUNDOWNER
.PROPERTIES, INC., A
FLORIDA CORPORATION,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LASHAWN BROWN
F/K/A LASHAWN BROWN and
SUNDOWNER PROPERTIES,


INC., a Florida Corporation,
Defendants, and to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against Defendants,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right
title or interest in the property
herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
you have been designated as
defendant in a legal proceeding
filed against you for Suit to
Quiet Title and Reformation
of Deed. The action involves
real property in Levy County,
Florida, more full described as


follows:
Lot 8, Block 15, The
Replat of Williston
Highland Unit 5, In
Sections 5 and 6,
Township 14 South,
Range 18 East

The action was instituted in the
Eighth Judicial CircuitCourt, Levy
County, Florida, and its styled
JULIUS FLAG vs. LASHAWN
BROWN F/K/A LASHAWN
BROWN and SUNDOWNER
PROPERTIES, INC., A
FLORIDA CORPORATION, a
Corporation.
You are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to the action on Janet
C. Neris, Neris & Associates,
P.A. Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 6625 Miami Lakes
Drive Suite 214, Miami Lakes,
FI 33014, on or before Oct.
5, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this court
either before service on Janet
C. Neris, Neris & Associates,
P.A. or immediately after
service; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
The Court has authority in
this suit to enter a judgment or
decree in the Plaintiff's interest
which will be binding upon
you.
DATED: August 21, 2007
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Eighth Judicial
Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 13, 20, 27, Oct. 4,
2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2007-CA-000861

FREDDIE L. MATTHEWS,
Plaintiff,
vs.

The RESPECTIVE HEIRS,
ADMINISTRATORS AND
ASSIGNS OF DAVE
MAT-dWi~i,/k/a DAV~ '
MATTHEWS, a/k/a DAVID
MATTHEWS, DECEASED;
AND VERNELL DAVID'
MATTHEWS, DECEASED;
AND JOE MATTHEWS,
DECEASED; AND
ETOY MATHEWS HILL,
DECEASED; and WILLIE
HAMPTON MATTHEWS,
DECEASED,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Heirs, administrators and
assigns of
DAVE MATHEWS a/k/a DAVE
MATTHEWS
a/k/a DAVID MATTHEWS,
Deceased

Heirs, administrators and.
assigns of
VERNELL DAVID
MATTHEWS, Deceased

Heirs, administrators and
assigns of
JOE MATTHEWS, Deceased

Heirs, administrators and
assigns of
ETOY MATHEWS HILL,
Deceased

Heirs, administrators and
assigns of
WILLIE HAMPTON
MATTHEWS, Deceased

AS WELL AS any and all
other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against each
of them, and their respective
heirs, administrators and
assigns, as well as all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to quiet title to the


following property in Levy
County, Florida, to-wit:
West % of the Northwest
1 of the Southwest 1/ of
Section 20, Township 13
South, Range 16 East,
Levy County, Florida.
Containing 20 acres,
more or less.
(Parcel No. 02536-000-
00)
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve.a
copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiff's attorney,


whose address is Post Office
Box 1354, Bronson, Florida
32621, on or before October 19,
2007 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
Dated this 4th day of Sept.
2007.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 13, 20, 27, Oct. 4,
2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1995 MERCURY COUGAR
2-DOOR
WHITE IN COLOR
TAG #110-2JP
VIN #1MELM62W7SH643230
Case No: 38-2007-CA-000878

JOHNNY M. SMITH, JR.,
SHERIFF,
LEVY COUNTY SHERIFFS
OFFICE
Petitioner,

JAMES PENDLEBURY,
Respondent.

,NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JAMES PENDLEBURY
P.O. BOX 91
CHIEFLAND, FLORIDA 32644

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Complaint for Forfeiture
has been filed by the Levy
County Sheriff's Office in Levy
County, Florida; and you are
required, to serve a copy of
your answer or other pleading
on Plaintiff's Attorney Ronald
W. Stevens, Esquire, at Post
Office Box 1444, Bronson,
Florida 332621, and file the
original answer or pleading
in the office of the Clerk of
the above named Court on or
before the 19th day of October

IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO,
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and
official seal, this 6th day of
Sept., 2007.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
P.O. Box 610
Bronson, FL 32621

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 13, 20, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$1,100.00 U.S. CURRENCY
Case No: 38-2007CA-000885
.JOHNNY M. SMITH, JR.
SHERIFF,
LEVY COUNTY SHERIFFS
OFFICE
Petitioner,

RAULNEY MACON ,
Respondents.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RAULNEY MACON
3101 NE 15TH ST.
APT L-98
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
32609

YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Complaint
for Forfeiture has been filed
by the Levy County Sheriff's
Office in Levy County, Florida;
and you are required to serve
a copy of your answer or other
pleading on the Plaintiff's
Attorney Ronald W. Stevens,


Esquire, at Post Office Box
1444, Bronson, Florida 32621
and file the original answer or
pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the above named
Court or or before the 19th day
of October, 2007.
IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO,
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
Witness my hand and official
seal, this 6t' day of September,
2007.

DANNY J. SHIPP


Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
P.O. Box 610
Bronson, FL 32621
By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 13, 20, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2007-CA-000890

PERKINS STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALLEN E. MILLER,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALLEN E. MILLER
POST OFFICE BOX 1418
11190 NE 91sT COURT
BRONSON, FLORIDA 32621

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
THAT an action Complaint to
Foreclose Mortgage on the
following property in Levy
County, Florida:
Lot 3, 5-OAK ACRES
SECTION 2, an unrecorded
subdivision in Section 28,
Township 11 South, Range
17 East, Levy County, Florida,
more particularly described as
follows:

For a point of reference,
commence at the
Southwest corner of
Section 28, Township
11 South, Range 17
East; thence run N.
00032'13" E., along
the West line of said
Section 28, a distance of
770.04 feet to the Point
of Beginning; thence
continue N. 00032'13"
E., 355.00 feet; thence
N. 88020'59" E., parallel
with the South line of
Section 28, a distance
of 632.11 feet to the
Westerly right of way
line of a 60 foot street
(known as Acorn
Avenue); thence S
00029"08" W., along
said right of way line,
354.99 feet; thence S.
88020'59" W., 63243
feet sto close,.on the
Point of Beginning.

has been filed against you,.and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on Norm D. Fugate,
plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is Post Office Box
98, Williston, Florida 32696
on or before October 19,
2007 and file the original with
the clerk of this court either
before service on plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED on September 7,
2007.
DANNY J. SHIPP
As Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
As Deputy Clerk
Pub: Sept. 13, 20, 2007


Levy County Planning
Commission
Notice of Workshop
Notice is hereby given that
,the Levy County Planning
Commission will hold a
workshop on September 25,
2007 at 6:30 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as may be heard, at
the Levy County Courthouse,
Board of County Commissioner
meeting room, 355 South Court
Street, Bronson, Florida. The
purpose of the workshop is to
discuss proposed EAR-based
amendments to the Goals,
Objective and Policies of the
Future Land Use Element and
Map Series of the Levy County
Comprehensive Plan.
Pub: Sept. 13 & 20, 2007


Buying

Tax Deeds?
JVeed to. ceea the title?
Experienced, D)ependa6e
Serwice and
Reasonable
Rates!
Cauf
Cnew&atte J. Weidnwt
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007 Page 19






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Savings Programs to find out


more about energy-efficient
new construction and get
a list of qualified builders
that can help you create the
energy-efficient home of your
dreams.
Dear STW Guy: I've lived in
my home for the last 20 years,
and although I still love it, it
does not seem to be getting
better with age. It's always
hot in the kitchen, stuffy in
the living room and drafty in
the hall, no matter what the
temperature! And even though
the kids have moved out, my


house seems to be using more
electricity than ever. What
gives? Home Uncomfortable
Home
Dear Uncomfortable: Sounds
like you need to start with
a Home Energy Check from
Progress Energy. It's an
amazing service that helps
you find areas where you can
save more energy maybe by
fixing a leaky duct, upgrading


Progress Energy


insulation or replacing an
inefficient heating and cooling
system.
Don't waste another minute
- call 888.302.8348 or
visit savethewatts.com right
now, and find out how to
get valuable energy savings,
incentive and possible
tax credits and a more
comfortable home.


SAVE THE WATTS
.COM
@2007 Progress Energy Florida, Inc.


~TA~J :1 ;I.1 h I n~'a~~'A'AA'A i fI ~ I' Im miie I i'RuI mi t~ r 1 mI I iiI M (r] : 1o i I n l rZ E:mwu m


.SWAPYOUR RIDE)


AS I For MOS. 4 5$ 00 CASH"
AS APR OR Up To S BACK
AS On select models in stock. See salesman for details.


2007 FOCUS'


2007 FUSION


UpTo $SOO* To

s2,000* *s,50O* ,


2007 2007 2007 2007 EDGE
MONTEGO MUSTANG FREESTYLE 0
UDTo- UpTo Up To $, 00 To


4,500* *1,000*


*4,5s00


$1,500*


2007 MILAN 2007 2007
EXPLORER EXPEDITION


W-- To1 .-a

AND $500*


UpTo UpTo

*2,500* *2,000*


2007 F-15Q S2007 2008 F-250
SU2007 -15SUPERCAB SUPERCAB
SUPERCW F-150 4X4
UpTo UpTo UpTo

*2,500 3,000 3,000*


IS" CASHM CORRBAL "



BRONCO F-150 SUPERCAB CAMR
#465 4,995* #469 9,994* #463 $3,4



GMC SAVANNAH VAN DODGE HI-TOPVAN
#394 4,899* #472 4,990


EXPLORER SPORT
#415 $,9998


DAKOTA #458
SAL,$6,490*



LARIAT SUPERCREW
#163 $11,993


Owner
Loyalty
Available!
'08 Super
Duty


$1000
See Salesman
For Details.


THE AREA'S BEST SELECTION OF LATE MODEL

PRE-OWNED CARS, TRUCKS AND SUVs!
SKIN -l~a~rc9;.o -- Uj- -..- I1- --L:r I !JIM


"04 F-250 XLT Crew Cab 4WD
Auto, Dual Pwr. Seats, 6-Disc CD, TrailerTow,
NewTires & More! #407
SALE $20,494*


uo r- IOU oupercaD
#274
SALE $20,996


Ib explorer taale d auer
Loaded, 8K Miles. #421
SALE $24,996


uIoport Irac
175K Miles, V8, Auto. #411
SALE S24.497T


'05 F-350 4x4
Diesel. #370
SALE $24,995*


v Ciefla T MERCURY 8
916 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland Toll Free 1 -888-864-4582


"The Works" I
I Genuine Motorcraft Oil & Filter Change
*Rotate & Inspect FourTires
*Inspect Brake System A $ .
*Test Battery $ 5
I Check Air and Cabin Filters Value
*Check Belts and Hoses
*CheckWiper Blades 99 5
*Top Off All Fluids
S*Multi-Point Inspection
A great value in maintenance -
oil change, tire rotation, thorough inspection
I and morel Up to 5 qts. Motorcraft Oil.
Taxes, disposal fees and diesel vehicles extra.
Valid Only With Coupon. Offer Exires 9-24-07.


*Prices net of rebate, plus tax, tag and $224.95 document fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Art for illustration
purposes only. In stock units only. (W.A.C.) = With approved credit,'financing with Ford Motor Credit Co. Prices may
include FMCC financing. Incentives and rebates subject to change. Rebates may include Owner Loyalty. See dealer for
details. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit financing.


UO ExpeltiUUll
Eddie Bauer. #452
SALE $25,995*


I u r-ZSU trew aD 4X4
Diesel. Lariat. #450
SALE $36,496 I


k ilyll T-1 I Mi1II' nou Toii-:1q1&7 5J .s i n Im7WZAi'I I IIII T EI *


WINDSTAR
#467 5,995*


FIJ 016


Ir 1 1 IC ~


'Il-r


L, i~'l r


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r.rrt"T.,i 19 MA


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