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 Main: Opinion
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Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00101
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: December 28, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00101

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
        page 6
    Main: Obituaries
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 10
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
        page 13
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
    Main: Around the Courthouse
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
    Main continued
        page 20
Full Text
























COUNTY JOUR

-HE COUNTY PAPER EST. 192


VOL. 83, NO. 25


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28,20061 SECTION: 20 PAGES


50 cents per copy


Legislators hear need for tax reform


One of our own:
Page 6


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
It was a given that state
legislators would hear from
irate taxpayers angered
over rapidly rising property
assessments. They also
entertained the requests ofcity
and county commissioners
and other local officials eager
to see their pet proj ects benefit
from state funding Dec. 14.
County Commissioner
Tony Parker prefaced his
address by speaking of a
need for tax reform, saying
it is time the government


looks at alternative forms of
generating revenue. "We are
trying to alleviate.the burden.
on certain groups," he said,
adding that the existing tax
structure is "devastating to
certain groups.'"
Rep. Charles Dean,
chairman of the recent
legislative delegation, said the
state is trying to develop new
ideas on the issues of taxes
and insurance. He perceives
an unfairness underlying
assessed taxes on commercial
and residential properties.
"I assure you, this is on the


agenda," promising that state
lawmakers will be studying
these issues in the upcoming
legislative session.
State Sen. Steve Oelrich
asked, "Where does themoney
go?" He also wondered why
counties did not have a lot
more money, considering the
taxes collected.
Parker said Levy County
"has been trying to play catch
up for a number of years."
He added, "Caps have helped
higher income more .than
low-income families." He
also said that because the
/ '


county is expected to grow
rapidly in the, next few years,
there is a need to "build our
services and be ready when
new residents come in."
. Oelrich asked whether
Parker felt the county was
dropping deeper into a hole
because of growth.
Parker responded, "Yes,
sir," and added that if the
county would cut back on
services, the need for higher
taxes wouldn't be so extreme,
but that the county would then
not be able to provide some
services to residents.


County Commissioner
Lilly Rooks spoke of a
need for countywide road'
improvements, maintenance
and repair to two aging water
distribution systems and
courthouse infrastructure
needs.
County Commissioner
Nancy Bell spoke of taxes
businesses must pay. That
tangible items such as
electronic equipment are
neter removed from a
business depreciation list

See Reform Page 20


Tourney time
Pages 8-10




OBITUARIES



Shirley Chestnut
Edward Cunningham Jr.,
Ernest Jelks
Lenora McCullough
James Pender Jr.
Robert Rapa
Big Boy Williams


CONTENTS... .' .



Around Levy 2-3,5, 6
Opinion 4
Law & Courts 5
Obituaries 7
Sports 8-12
Classified 14
Legals 15-16
Land Transactions 17-19
Marketplace 19


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Low student enrollment

affects more than budgets
BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
SLevy County's lower student enrollment figures this year
produced a major impact on the school board's budget,
prompting the need for the board to borrow money to pay
December salaries. As previously reported, the board had
voted to borrow on a short-term note.
School board members, and a public who wanted to learn
the reasons for the projected shortfall, heard how estimates
are made during their Dec. 19 meeting.
Ed Lovely, MIS and technology director, explained the
process educators use in estimating student levels. The FTE
(full-time equivalent) projection process is a state-approved
means of estimating student numbers for the upcoming
school year. Schools are state-funded based on the number of
students enrolled.
The projection process uses statistical models provided
by the state. Besides considering historical data, educators
consider economic indicators, legislative changes and known
impacts, such as subdivisions that may be being developed.
Enrollment estimates, and their corresponding expected
state funds, are a major factor in an upcoming school year's
budget.
According to the state's education commission, Florida has
experienced slower enrollment growth over the past decade.
Nearly half of the state's counties experienced a decline
in enrollment this year. According to the state education
department's (DOE) website, lower enrollment figures are
probably due to taxes, rising real estate costs and recent
hurricanes.
Lower enrollment figures may do morethan impact the local

See Budget Page 20


Looking Ahead


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan
WITH HER 2006 appointment book filled, Christina Smith readies next
week's-and next month's-calendar. Smith manages husband Larry's and
son Shannon's law firm in Chiefland.
1 r


Hospital need, failing government top stories of 2006


COMPILED BY
CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
T throughout 2006,
three dominant
themes seemed
to be on the lips of Levy
Countians more than
any other: the need for a
hospital, the ongoing saga
of the failed Yankeetown
government and higher
taxes.
By year's end, two of
the three came to definitive
conclusions: the state denied
the certificate of need for
the hospital, but Ameris, the
company wanting to build it,
will appeal and Yankeetown
government has settled down
and regrouped with new


citizens at its helm.
The issue of higher
property valuations and
subsequent tax bills are still
bitter pills to swallow and
as we move into the new
year, some say before they
swallow, they'll rebel.
Now a look back at the
year that was.
January
"Can you hear me now?"
Levy County's 2006 began
with a businessman asking
the county commission to
jump on board plans for a
cell tower he was erecting
near the jail.
The Levy County Journal
and the peopleof the area
sustained a tremendous
loss when Ken Doughtery,


long-time journalist, died
suddenly two days after
Christmas.
The town of Bronson
debated how to handle
impact fees at its first council
meeting of the year.
The Chiefland Walking
Club trotted off to a good
start.
The Williston Red Devils
took the holiday Hitchcock
Classic and were featured in
a front-page photo.
Armegy DeVore,
engineering equipment
operator at the Lower
Suwannee Wildlife Refuge,
retired after 18 years with
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service.
The city of Chiefland


pared down its manager
candidate list to four at its
first meeting of the year.
Making the list were Rodney
Russ of Anthony, Gregg
Griffin of Ocala, Charles
A. Gambaro Jr. of Oviedo
and James A. Woods of
Southport.
Members of the Levy
County School Board met
with the county commission
to discuss impact fees.
Education leaders predicted
tremendous student
population growth as one of
the main reasons to consider
the fees.
Kelby Barber represented
Levy County in Tallahassee
as the best speller around.
His winning word was


"methanize."
Water woes and the ghost
of the previous mayor
continued to haunt the town
of Bronson. Council learned
of a second water meter
that had not been read at
the jail, thereby costing the
town a significant amount of
money.
Residents in Williston
were asking for interested
parties to help them start a
Rotary Club.
A picture page paid
tribute to Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. after Williston
residents held a march and
commemoration in his
honor.

See Year Page 12


REACH US
I
Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner
Phone .
13521490-4462


Fax
1352 490-4490 Chlefland
(3521486-5042 Bronson
Email
edltor@leuneurnal.com
Address
PO. ox 150 BMnsnR 32621-05
P.L Bi 2890 Cilalnd R 32644-2990


SUBSCRIBE
Lev, Dixie and Gilchrlst counties
$17
In-sate
$22
Out fstats
$21
Locally owned and operated!


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. That's why we prim
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


INSIDE
l


I


Ilr ,, ,









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Small business workshop set
A workshop called "Running Your Business ... advice from
Gainesville business owners, past and present, to help you" '
will be held on Thursday, Jan. 18, from 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
in the SCORE office in downtown Gainesville in the SUN .
Center; Suite 104E; 101 Southeast 2nd Pl.; Gainesville
For more information telephone: (352) 375-8278.
The fee is $10 in advance ($15 at the door). Registration in
advance is recommended. For a registration form please call
the SCORE office. p .
SCORE, "Counselors to America's Small Business," is
a non profit, nationwide resource partner of the U.S. Small
Business Administration.

Radio license exam is Jan. 13 MR. Po0E, MISS JONES-
Radio license exam is Jan. 13 MR. P0olE MISS JONES


The Levy County-Amateur Emergency Service will be
conducting Amateur Radio License Exams, Saturday, Jan. 13
starting at 9 a.m. in the Williston Community Center, 50 NW
Main S., Williston.
Seating is limited. Pre-registration is required.
Please bring the following:
*Photo I.D.
*Social Security number or FRN
*Original -AND- two photocopies of your amateur radio
license (FCC form 660)
*Original -AND- two photocopies of CSCEs (if claiming
credit)
The'license exam fee is $14 cash.
For exam information/pre-registration, email
WM3B@yahoo.com, or call 352-225-0200 prior to noon,
Jan. 10.

Fire victims need assistance
Ron and Kim Fisher and their six children recently lost
their home to a fire. The couple and their six children, ranging
in age from 8-16, would appreciate any help that you can give..
The Tri-County Uniform shop has set up a Benefit Account
for the family at Perkins State Bank in Chiefland. For more
information please call 352-490-5600.


BES to participate in


national survey


Bronson Elementary
School has been selected to
participate in the National
Assessment of Educational
Progress (NAEP),r'' 'also
known as the Nation's Report
Card. NAEP is an ongoing
assessment of what our
country's children know and
can do in various academic
subjects. The school's
participation will be beneficial
in painting a picture of what
our nation's school children
are learning.
A random sample of
fourth grade students will be
selected for the assessment.
All responses are confidential
and no results will be reported
to or about individual students
or schools.
NAEP data and results are
often used by policy makers
to make decisions regarding
education. To help guide
these decisions, NAEP asks
students about their school
experience, background, and
what teachers teach in the


classroom. These questions
do not address beliefs or
attitudes. Students may skip
any question or part of the
assessment 'thatete ?'d olot'
wish to answer.
"W "". appreciat-' ""'"the'
participation of each student
who is selected; however,
participation in NAEP is
voluntary. Students. who do
participate in NAEP will
gain valuable test-taking
experience.
Parents who do not want
their child to participate' are
requested to send written
notification to Mrs. Cheryl
Beauchamp by Jan. 15.
For more information
about NAEP and to view
sample test questions on-line,
please visit the website of the
National Center for Education
Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/
nationsreportcard, anid
Florida's NAEP website at
http://www.fim.edu/doe/sas/
naephome.htm.


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Miss Jones, Mr. Poole


plan spring wedding


Dwayne and Andrea Jones
announce the engagement
of their daughter, April Ann
Jones, to Joshue Rye Poole,
son of Herbert and Toni Poole
of Chiefland.
The bride-elect is the
maternal granddaughter of
Marjorie Watson of Chiefland
and Dillard Watson, formerly
of Chiefland, and the paternal
granddaughter of Richard
and Barbara Hammock of
Trenton.
Miss. Jones is a 2006
graduate of Chiefland High


School and attends Santa Fe
Community College, where
she is pursuing a nursing
degree.
The future groom is the
maternal grandson of Frank
and Ann Moody of Chiefland
and the paternal grandson of
the late Louie and Lois Poole
of Trenton.
Mr. Poole is a 2004
graduate of Chiefland High
School and is currently
working for Hugh's Concrete
as an apprentice mason. A
spring wedding is planned.


Diabetes classes start Jan. 25

Have you been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes? Then this
class is for you! You will get information and motivation to
help you adopt positive lifestyle changes. Learn to control
your blood glucose levels which help reduce long-term health'
risks, find out what your test results really mean and learn to.
create healthy meals all at one place.
To see if you are eligible to participate or for more
information, please contact the UF IFAS Levy County
Extension at 352-486-5131. This program is sponsored by
the University of Florida IFAS Extension. UF IFAS Levy
* County Extension and the Levy County Health Department.
.&slasKe will begin Thursday, Jan. 25 and be held weakly for.
nine weeks. They will be held at the Levy County Agricultural.
Rifldin k at 625 N:Hatfaway Ave.in BIronson. Classes start'
at 9:30 a.m. and run until 11:30 a.m. Health screenings will
also be held.


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SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS FOR URGENT CONDITIONS
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-Podiatry Services Available-
Convenient Office Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 a.m.- 7 p.m., Fri. 7:00 6 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Noon
.1113 N.W 23rd Ave., Chiefland
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)
Call (352) 493-9500 for an appointment today


Service Van Available To Handle Your
Plumbing Needs and Make House Calls.




Levy & Gilchrist Co. (352) 493-3801
Dixie Co. (352) 498-0703 (352) 210-
0062
? Licensed*Insured*Free Estimates
Walter Freeman State Certified
Master Plumber #CF057595


Monday, Jan. 1
o Ribbon cutting, Bronson, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 2
Soil and water meeting, Bronson, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 4
Business Council, Bronson, 8:30 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 18
> Small business workshop, Gainesville, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 9
*Marker dedication, Cedar Key, 10 a.m.
PPEnterprise Zone meeting, Bronson, 9 a.m.
Detailed descriptions of these events are con-
tained elsewhere in the Levy County Journal.



Lumber industry to be

recognized on Cedar Key


The Society of American
Foresters and the Florida
Department of State's Divi-
sion of Historical Resources
is sponsoring the installation
and dedication of an histori-
cal marker in Cedar Key at 10
a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 9.
The marker will com-
memorate the importance of
the early lumbering industry
to the development of Cedar
Key, Levy County and indeed
to North Florida during the
1800s and early 1900s. The
industry was largely respon-
sible for the Florida Railroad
being built from Fernandina
to Cedar Key in 1861 provid-
ing access and transportation
to north-central part of the
state.
The marker will be placed.
on the property of the Far-
away Inn at the corer of 3rd
and G streets adjacent to the
site of the Eagle Pencil Com-
pany's cedar slat mill which


operated there from 1876 un-
til 1896.
Other large mills included
the Fenimore Saw and Plan-
ing Mill on Way(Cedar) Key
and Faber Pencil Company's
cedar and the Suwannee
Lumber Company's pine mill
on Atsena Otie during the
mid and late 1800s. There
was also a large sawmill at
Lukens on the mainland and
the Cummer Lumber Compa-
ny's Cypress mill at'Sumner.
The Standard Manufac-
turing Company's Fiber and
Brush Factory produced fiber
and brushes from cabbage
palms on the old Feniinore
mill site on Way (Cedar) Key
from 1910 until 192.
There will be speakers
representing the Society of
American Foresters, the Levy
County Commission, the city
of Cedar Key and the Cedar
Key Historical Society.


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Major Medical Tuesday 8a.m.-12:30p.m.
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Page 2









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


News Briefs


School board gives subs raises


Soil and Water meeting slated
The Levy Soil and Water Conservation District Board will
hold its regularly scheduled monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 2 at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the USDA
Service Center in Bronson.

Business Council to meet
The Nature Coast Business Development Council, Inc. will
hold its regular meeting on Thursday, Jan. 4 at 8:30 a.m. at
the Levy County School Board Office located at 480 Marsh-
bur Dr. Bronson. The agenda is pending.

Enterprise Agency to meet
The Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Tues-
day, Jan. 9 at 9 a.m. at Levy Abstract & Title; 50 Picnic St.,
Bronson.
The agenda includes an update on the Enterprise Zone ap-
plication, the 2007 meeting schedule and the budget.

Ribbon cutting planned
The Bronson Chamber of Commerce welcomes Rachel
Pearson and Candy Bouquet to downtown Bronson, located
at 150 N. Hathaway Ave. Candy Bouquets are an alterna-
tive to flowers and are available for every occasion or just
because. The chamber will help host its grand opening cel-
ebration and ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday, Jan. 1 at
5 p.m.


AARP needs tax-aide workers
Learn to prepare tax returns for electronic filing through
the AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Program and receive IRS
certification.
Volunteers work in the county libraries of Chiefland, Tren-
ton, Cross City and Perry and the civic center in Steinhatchee
in assisting folks in their communities with tax preparation.
Free classes start in January. Some expense reimbursement
available.
Call Bob at 352-463-8936 or email rcburkhardt@earthlink.
riet for more details.

Dispose of your flag properly
Tattered United States flags are being collected by the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Chiefland Veterans of Foreign Wars.
The flags will be disposed of in a dignified manner as
prescribed by the 94th Congress, Public Law 344 of the Federal
Flag Code.
If you have a worn flag, you may drop it off in a collection
box in the Board of County Commissioners' office at the Levy
County Courthouse in Bronson.
For more information please call the post at 493-1159.


Levy Fair Association plans

two January meetings
The Levy County Fair Association will meet Jan. 11 and
23 at 6 p.m. at the Williston community meeting room at city
hall, 50 N.W. Main St.


S A IA 1


Fill Dirt & Hauling
Located On South I21-Williston, Florida

(352) 528-3520
Office @ B&G Seed
Other Contacts
(352) 339-4713, (352) 339-2704 or (352) 339-6435 (Loader operator)



.L Y COUNTY JOUPAPBST
'HE^ C PAPER 12, L
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state ............................. $22
Out of state ...................... $27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadlinefor all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
School board members unanimously approved wage
increases for substitute teachers, bus drivers and other school
employees during their Dec. 19 meeting.
Employees will receive their salary increases after the first
of the year. Some changes correspond to the state's minimum
wage increase, which will be $6.67 per hour after Jan. 1.
Substitutes with a high school diploma will earn $8.25 per
hour. Those with associates degrees or at least 64 hours of
college credit will receive $8.75 per hour, while college
graduates will earn $10 per hour. All are increased by 50 cents
per hour. Long-term substitutes, bus driver subs, journeymen,
foremen and project managers will also receive the 50-cent
increase. Other non-instructional subs and day laborers will
go from $6.40 to $6.67 an hour.
Of the wage increases, Superintendent Cliff Norris said,
"When offering salaries we need to be very competitive to


attract quality people."
Board member Beth Davis made a motion to revisit salaries
at the end of this year's legislative session. Her motion passed
unanimously.
Board members also heard about plans being made to deal
with major growth that could impact area schools. Jeff Davis,
assistant superintendent of administration, presented a state-
funded grant agreement between the school board and the
state's Department of Community Affairs.
The grant will provide $25,000 for development of a plan to
be used should the county experience a surge of urban growth.
State law requires that comprehensive plans have contingency
plans to address major, sudden growth, according to Norris.
Norris also recognized Cedar Key principal Sue Ice for her
recent completion of a leadership training program. Ice said
of the course, "It was a very involved program. The parts most
valuable to me were about personnel issues."


SUPERINTENDENT CLIFF NORRIS, Robert Lowyns, Ron Russ, Don Boyd, Sherry Hallman and Sheila
McKeon were the guests of honor at the BMHS Veterans' Day observation. Principal Valerie Boughanem
introduced the guests and opened the flag folding ceremony. Students Jermey Mayes, Sarah Roldan,
Corinne Keeton and Anthony Spadavecchia assisted honored military guests with the flag folding while
Mr. Lowyns explained the meaning of each fold. The teacher veterans shared their feelings about Veter-
ans' Day. The marching band played the National Anthem and the assembled students sang God Bless
America and recited the Pledge of Allegiance.

Have your say on how Florida can improve voting


Secretary of State Sue M.
Cobb announced that the pre-
liiiiinary draft of the updated
federal Help America Vote
Act (HAVA) of 2006 state
plan, presented by the Flori-
da HAVA Planning Commit-
tee, will be posted on the De-


apartment of State's. website.
The plan will be posted for
30 days from through Jan. 22
with a link for public com-.
ment.
The 13 member HAVA
Planning Committee, ap-
pointed by Secretary Cobb


Sig John's Supply,
Plumbing, Well, Irrigation,
4 Watersoftners, Iron Filters, A
Pool Supplies


U. till


-i A


JIM


and chaired by former Sec-
retary of State Jim Smith,
was tasked with reviewing
the plan that establishes how
Florida will use the federal
funding to improve voting
systems, voter education,
train poll workers and to car-


ry out other activities to im-
prove in the administration
of elections.
After being posted for.30
days, the plan will be submit-
ted to the Election Assistance
Commission for a 30-day
posting in the Federal Reg-
ister.


Chieflan
ima Hspta



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Preventative and
emergency
veterinary care for
all small animals and
exotics

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.o Tire ar
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a- he a e6d nte ve= .t Ad gwnw
1 Come on by and Browse Local Artists' Gallery of
Equine, Western and Landscape Art
Antique Consignment
A gueo.-Sat. llam-5pm ft
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Page 3


Thomas F Philman, Certified Operator

,- EPO Box 872 4 South Main
Chiefland, FL 32644
Phone: (352) 493-4772
iB* r d!c^ 3(352) 493-1051
i l 1-800-242-9224


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


YOUR VIEW
I

Nuclear power concerns shared
To the editor:
Nuke Power: "Still to this day, we don't have a good way
to treat the waste."
"This is just too dangerous...Still to this day, we don't have
a good way to treat the waste."
"...There are 103 nuclear power reactors in the United
States producing about 20 percent of the country's electricity.
The last nuclear plant was licensed in 1978, the year before
the Three Mile Island disaster, but didn't open until 1987
Despite the potential benefits...
"Nuclear power has proven to be too costly and too risky,"
said Tom Smith of Public Citizen's Austin office. "The in-
dustry can't generate electricity without billions of dollars in
subsidies."
When the first ( South Texas Project in Texas) finally
opened in 1988, it was eight years behind schedule and car-
ried a price tag that ballooned $4.5 billion over initial projec-
tions. Five years later, after setting records for productivity
and reliability, the facility sat idle for a year amid a barrage
of problems with federal regulators who found fault with
plant maintenance, engineering and management.
The construction delays and management problems also
gave rise to lengthy litigation against original contractor
Brown and Root and managing partner Houston Lighting &
Power that was not resolved until the mid-1990s.
Luke Metzger of Environment Texas voiced many of the
same concerns as Smith.
"This is just too dangerous," he said. "Still to this day, we
don't have a good way to treat the waste."
The South Texas Project stores'spent nuclear fuel on-site
in concrete and stainless steel containment pools. It plans to
store the waste from its new units in the same way until the
federal government creates a permanent disposal facility.
A National Academy of Sciences report released least year
questioned whether the industry fully understood all the safe-
ty and security concerns involved in storing a large amount
of spent nuclear fuel on-site..."
Glen Garner
Bronson

Who are we kidding?
STo the editor:
Through a violent and divisive campaign of fabrication
and intimidation over the past nine months the town of
Yankeetown has, with the help of the governor's office,
had forced down its throat through special election, a
town leadership that is as consistently dishonest as the
methods they used.fobludgeon out.of office the people
who were trying to operate a legitimate town government.
No thoughtful person can believe there was a fair election
when their entire campaign was, in light of recent FDLE
recommendations to the States Attorney, based on lies.
The campaign promises of these people of open,
democratic government and respect for landowners rights
were simply lies. All actions of this leadership to date
demonstrate an in-your-face strategy to delay and ultimately
stop development at any cost including the financial ruin of
Yankeetown. Citizens who are not in lockstep with their
prearranged agenda are arrogantly dismissed.
In their psychopathic drive to prevent development in
Yankeetown this mayor and council make decisions on the
fly that are violations of sound business practice and appear
to have abandoned any semblance of fiscal responsibility
and accountability. Yankeetown is currently faced with
developments in the range of $140 million. During a recent
town meeting the mayor and council against the advice
of not only the town attorney but also a local attorney
who specializes in real estate, hired a local, unqualified
person with no zoning experience over several other highly
qualified applicants. The mayor and each council person
made statements on the record that their candidate is the
least qualified. Then, they hired him. There followed
discussion of hiring a professional zoning person to train the
unqualified person just hired. This is ludicrous. Why did we
not just hire an experienced professional?
More egregious is the hiring of a separate zoning
consultant to oversee the review of major projects requiring
detailed site plan review. Now we have two zoning
officials. At what cost? The town received a number
Continued on page 5


Quote of the Week

"Be who you are and say what you feel
because those who mind don't matter
and those who matter don't mind."
~ Dr. Seuss


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers".


do.v


Reaching the unreachable star

or most of my life, THINKING OUT that can't be
my mother made LU beat.
New Year's Eve a LOD .4) I re-
special time in our solve to talk
family. I less, listen
With the clock ticking more and re-
downward on the old year, flect often.
my mother saw Dec. 31 as 5) I re-
yet another day to rid her Carolyn Risner solve to in-
cupboards and refrigerator of Carolf n vite friends
Christmas snacks. over for a
She achieved this by host- real meal more than I have.
ing a very informal evening I already have a few things I am a pretty good cook but
of heavy hors d'oeuvres and in mind for the coming year. when you live alone, you
her infamous non-alcoholic And by sharing them on the tend to rely on Stouffer's
punch for family and friends printed page, there will be at and the Red Baron more
who wanted to stop by, play least one person, maybe two, than you should. And let's
catch-up and eat yet again., who will hold me account- not forget the peanut butter.
Starting right after dinner able for that which I set out I should own stock in Peter
the folks would start drop- to do. Pan and Jif.
ping by and usually by 10 1) I resolve to ride my 6) I resolve that when I
everyone was in place-gath- bike more. I actually enjoy do watch television, I am
ered-areund the dining-reem--my aneient-aged-standard----going to-watch-the20-mov-
table eating, laughing and touring bike and I enjpy ., ies Tom loaned me instead
talking about their lofty reso- taking it for a spin around of Law and Order reruns or
lutions for the new year. Chiefland-once I get on it. Bonanza. After all, I pretty
In my hearty-eating fam- It's getting it out the kitchen much have the dialogue
ily, at least a dozen would door and getting on it that I memorized.
vow to lose 30, 40 or 50 have the problem with. 7) I resolve to get my
pounds in the coming year. 2) I resolve to be more home office organized. It
No one set a realistic goal sociable. Throughout the also functions as my library
and of course, no one ever Christmas season, I managed and storage unit. I did well
lived up to their resolve to make almost every party for a while but now it looks
when it came to biscuits, and open house I was invited like a war zone. I will sift,
gravy and fried pork chops. to, even if I only stayed 30 sort and throw away until I
Someone else would vow minutes. have a workable work space.
to quit smoking, another I realized how much I had 8) And my biggest resolu-
drinking, someone else curs- been missing by declining tion is to educate Cassie and
ing. invitations through the year.- Annette on pop culture.
And myr family, the nay- Besides, I have just about The women must have
sayers they are, never offered caught up on all the Law and lived in a cave the last 10
words of encouragement, Order: SVU reruns. years and I am taking it as
just rolling eyes and shaking 3) I resolve to write, yes, my personal crusade to bring
heads as they muttered under actually hand-write, more them into the know about
their breaths, "Sure you will. letters to my children. We life outside CSPAN and the
Sure you will." email often but my youngest MacNeil-Lehrer Report.
I have kept a diary/journal told me that he enjoyed the And with those eight
for as long as I can remem- three-page letter I wrote him things to focus on the next
ber and on the first page on a steno pad while one of 365 days, it won't give much
of each new year, I would my government meetings time to mope, or ponder, or
itemize my own resolutions lulled. dwell.
and by the time Valentine's There's something about Until Feb. 14, at least.
Day rolled around, I would holding a letter in your hand Happy New Year!
read with dismay that I had
not kept any of them and my Letters to the Editor
spirit was broken.to the Editor
A few years back, I de- 1) Letters should be 500 words or less. Letters over
cided we set ourselves up to the word limit may be edited for space and clarity. Letters
fail by setting goals that are longer than 500 words that are difficult to edit, may be
almost always unattainable, considered for guest columns.
That's when I decided that 2) Letters must be signed and bear the signature of the
resolutions are good, but author. Please include a daytime phone number (not for
they have to be realistic publication).
With 2007 on the horizon, pu


Miss Honey says...


L EY COUNTY JOURA
L.J^E~COUNTY .PAPER EST. 1 ,L
MWho We Are
Our Mission Managing Editor


The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
*reflect our community in everything we do.
*provide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
*record the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
*promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
*promote readership of advertising thereby fostering a
healthy economic environment.


CaroilynRisner
Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath
Staff Writers
Cassie Journigan
Neal Fisher
Sales Representatve/Bronson
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell
Deliverv/Clerical
Rhonda Griffiths


Dec. 26, 2006 Good
morning! 'Tis the day
after Christmas and I've sat
here alone except for Jesus
and my little boys (dogs).
They don't know they are
dogs! And I'll not tell them!
No, I didn't go to my
sister's after all, but stayed
home this Christmas and just
did whatever pleased me and
the little ones. They had ham
and cheese for Christmas
lunch and I had a can of
chicken noodle soup. But
don't worry, I had food in
the freezer just didn't cook
or bake.
Just sat here all day in


my gown
and did
nothing!
Hope
everyone
had a
very good
Christmas.
As for me,
I really did
enjoy the MISS HONEY
day and
Mary and Donald brought
me an angel for Christmas
and I really am surrounded
by love. Yes, puppy love.
Little Bit is on the back of
the recliner behind my head.
Sugar Bugger is in my lap,


Promises


of a new


year

T he beginning of a
year always reminds
me of presents.
Take an unopened
calendar.
Especially I
those big.
colorful
ones,
plastic-
wrapped of
course. Just
holding one
sets me to CASSIE 10URNIGAIN
dreaming Columnist
about what
its unfolding may reveal.
I like opening the
calendar for the first time
and looking for my favorite
memory days-birthdays,
anniversaries and holidays.
Is my anniversary this year
on a work day? Such a good
day to play hooky, and do
something fun and foolish
with Wayne.
I love seeing the cartoon,
quote or picture selected
by the calendar designer to
describe each month. I like
looking at the spring and
summer months when we are
experiencing a cold winter.
However, I never look at
winter pictures during warm
weather.
But most especially, I like
looking at each month and
wondering what will unfold
during those days marching
from one to 31 in little boxes
across the page.
And every year when I
look at-my new calendar, I '!
wonder when I. will see the..
fulfillment of my new year's
resolutions.
I've noticed as I get older
that often my resolutions
follow me year after year.
I don't worry about that-I
figure I'm just perfecting the
technique or new habit until
I finally get it right.
My 2007 resolutions begin
with prompts to celebrate
life. I will watch one recent
movie a week, or read a
recent novel. I've been in
a cultural vacuum since
our son moved out and left
for college. Carolyn keeps
getting after me for failing
to notice new books, new
movies, new music. So
Carolyn, I count on your
help.
I will also renew old
friendships or take the time
to develop new ones each
week. That could mean a
visit to someone close by
or a hand-written letter to
someone far away.
I resolve to spend less time
as a consumer and more time
as a conserver. This means
calling all-stops to spending
money foolishly--no more
shoes and purses, trinkets,
or craft supplies, without
giving away a like item from
my wardrobe, or finishing a

See Cassie page 11



Misty is in the front window
and Sweet Pea is on the
couch sleeping. Now if that
isn't love tell me what is!
Yes, unconditional love.
My friend Becky also gave
me a nice basket of goodies.
So I'll say thanks to all of
you. Hope you had a very
Merry Christmas and that all


your wishes came true!
Oh yeah, Barbara, where
are you? I didn't see or hear
from you. Hope you had a
very Merry Christmas too.
Until next week I'll say
Happy New Year and may
the Good Lord take a liking
to you!


}
A


Page 4









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


This Week's Arrests
-.... .**


The Levy CountySheriff's
Office reports the following
arrests for:
Joseph Walter
Burnette, 27, of Sunrise
was arrested for failure to
appear (FTA) drivers license
suspended, revoked. Bail was
set at $2,500.
Sammy Lee Carr, 39,
of Florida City was arrested
for aggravated fleeing and
eluding LEO, tampering
with physical evidence, no
driver's license, giving false
name to LEO and possession
of counterfeit controlled
substance. $12,500.
Shannon Michele
Smith, 23, of Williston was
arrested for violation of
probation(VOP)-kidnapping
interference with custody.
Bail was set at $2,000.
Joseph Lindsey, 36,
of Homestead was arrested
for tampering with physical
evidence and possession
of counterfeit controlled
substance. Bail was set at
$4,000.
Ernest M. Eason, 40,
of Clearwater was arrested
for FTA arraignment -
possession of marijuana and
paraphernalia. Bail was set at
$2,000.
WilliamE.Nordheim,
37, of Brandon was arrested
for VOP DWLSR habitual
offense. No bond was set.
Roger Hughes, 28, of
Tampa was arrested for FTA
- DWLSR (Taylor County).
Bail was set at $250.
S Frank McCain, 28, of
Cutoff, La., was arrested for
VOP statutory rape Douglas
County, Ga. No bond was
set.
Kevin Duane Blom,
46, ofNewberry was arrested
for larcenynover,-$300 under
$20,00a;: iBail ,wasi. set ,.at
$5,000.
Marcel A. Harris, 17,
of Gainesville was arrested
for battery on detention
facility staff.
Gerald Lavern Ross,
Jr., 35, of Gainesville was
arrested for 2 counts of lewd
and lascivious battery on
child u/16. Bail was set at
$50,000.
Tony Jerome Whittle,
47, of Chiefland was arrested
for VOP possession of
paraphernalia. No bond was
set.
S Terry Carl Dukes,
Jr., 18,, of Bronson was
arrested for FTA for case
management. He was released
on his own recognizance.
Tammy I. McDonald,
40, of Old Town was arrested
for VOP purchase cocaine,


possession of paraphernalia.
Bail was set at $10,000.
Walter Alexander
Burs, 35, of Gainesville was
arrested for FTA disorderly
conduct, resisting. Bail was
set at $3,500.
Brian Stone, 45,
of Inglis was arrested for
domestic battery. Bail was set


at $5,000.

The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
David W. Howard, Jr.,
23, of Williston was arrested
for theft shoplifting.
Eddie Don Wesley,
61, of Williston was arrested


for driving with license
suspended or revoked
(DWLSR) with knowledge.
Donald E. Parton, 57,
of Bronson was arrested for
driving under the influence
(DUI) and unassigned tag.


Chiefland reports 2006



police activity, arrests


BY ROBERT DOUGLAS
CHIEFLAND POLICE DEPT.
The number of battery arrests has reduced
from 15 in 2005 to 11 in 2006.
The number of assault arrests has decreased
by more than half. From 15 in 2005 to six in
2006.
The number of burglaries from. 2005 to
2006 has reduced from 99 to 68. Thirty-one
less burglaries were committed in 2006. We
believe this is due to the increase in drug
arrests, which historically is the main cause
of crime reduction.
The number of thefts from 2005 to 2006 has
reduced from 328 to 298. Thirty less thefts
were committed in 2006.
The number of drug arrest from 2005 to
2006 has increased from 91 to 149. Fifty-eight
more drug arrest were made in 2006.


The numbers of arrest are a direct result of
how this proactive approach to fighting crime
will reduce the amount of crime that occurs in
a community that adopts this policy.
The police officers and the chief of police
made a decision in December of2005 to reduce
the amount of crime by becoming a proactive
agency. The zero tolerance approach to drug
activity in our city is a perfect example of what
can be accomplished when the citizens and
the police work together to attack a problem.
Our commitment to the citizens of Chiefland
is to protect the quality of life that we now
enjoy. We will continue to fight the good fight
and with the help of God make Chiefland the
safest place in America to live.
May God bless Chiefland and may God
bless America.


Make sure your child is buckled in


In a continuing effort to
keep our children safe the
Chiefland Police Department
would like to make the
public aware that per Florida
State Statute 316.613, child
restraint devices are required
for children traveling in
motor vehicles operated on
any public roads. For children


three years and younger,
a federally approved child
restraint device is required.
For children four through five
years old, a separate carrier,
an integrated child seat, or
seat belt may be used.
The safety of our children
traveling in motor vehicles
is the responsibility of the


parent or guardian who
operates vehicles on the
public roads. The Chiefland
Police Department will
enforce these laws to ensure
the safety of our children.
The fine for violation of
this Statue is $117.50. We
appreciate your attention to
this issue.


Talk to your children


about illegal drugs


Hello, everyone.
Welcome to the
last Sheriff's
Corer of 2006. I hope
everyone had a wonderful
holiday. I also hope New
Year's and 2007 brings
everyone joy and health.
We'll finish our drug abuse
topic this week.
Crack/cocaine is a huge
problem and a heavily
abused drug. Cocaine can be
snorted or dissolved in water
and injected. Crack can be
heated and smoked in a pipe.
Both can cause addiction,
elevated blood pressure and
respiratory rate, paranoia,
seizures, heart attack,
respiratory failure and death
from overdose.
Some of the other drugs
like heroin, Rohypnol, PCP,
LSD, mushrooms, GHB
and Ecstasy have their
place in our history. They
remain dangerous and all
can be abused. If you have
questions on any of these,
give us a call. There just
isn't room for all of the
information to be given out
here.
Now, let's finish up
with some things you, as
a parent or guardian, can
do. Remember, children
are much more vulnerable
to drugs and other risky
behavior. Continue your
dialog you began when your
child was younger. Stay
involved with your children


/ i l in all respects.
If possible,
arrange to have
your children
looked after
and involved
in an activity
from three to
JOHNNY five pm. Clubs,
SMITH sports, music
etc. are great.
If your child is
unattended make
sure they feel your pressure
and wishes. Give them a
schedule and set limits.
Get to know the parents
of your child's friends.
Exchange phone numbers
and addresses. Call parents
whose house is to be used
for a party. Make sure the
party doesn't include alcohol
or other illegal substances.
Don't be afraid to check
the party yourself. Set
curfews andenforce them.
Let them know if they're
not home on time, you're
out looking. Encourage and
maintain open dialog with
your children about their
experiences. Let them know
you love and trust them, but
not the world around them.
I hope this topic has some
good information for you.
If you have questions you
can call us and we'll do
everything we can to help.
Have a wonderful New Year.
Take care.
Johnny Smith is sheriff
of Levy County.


Quilters thankful fora good 2006


BY WINNELLE HORNE
CORRESPONDENT
Log Cabin Quilters met
Thursday, Dec. 211t at the
Levy County Quilt Museum.
Quilting has started on our
next raffle quilt and for
another one we have to find
its name. Sometimes we
have to get our thinking caps
on and remember what was
priced. Lunch was great, as
usual. We had 13 members
present.
Our many thanks go out
for a wonderful year and the
many of our 66 members who
come out each week to quilt
and help where needed.
Thanks to the many visitors
who come out and help us to


M Letters


professional organizations
that incorporate the elements
under one roof to handle all
of our zoning requirements
including major projects.
The mayor and council
dismissed these in favor of
a Tallahassee based, $100,
per hour consultant who
will likely need additional,
costly professional help to
complete the task at a cost
likely higher than the fully
integrated organizations.
Again, why did we not
hire the most qualified


keep our heads above water.
Thank you to the boys,
Jarrod and other officers who
come each week to keep the
museum clean and everything
running, planting our
vegetables, mowing, and the
many chores it takes to keep
us going. Now we are at 900
boys who have worked since
we started in April 1996.
Thanks for all the fabric,
frames and sewing needs
that we can use and sell for
the upkeep of our building.
Sometimes we have bags full
of goodies that everyone can
go through and use.
Thanks to Gary Taylor who
builds our frames and all the
wood things that make our


Continued from page 4


professionals?
Councilman Candela made
a statement to the effect that
cost is not the issue right
now. I contend sir, that cost
is the only issue. It is not
your money to spend on -
divisive, anti-development
rampages. It is the
taxpayers' money. The town
has a budget. The mayor
and council are accountable
for every cent spent before
it is spent. So, Madame
Mayor, the questions are,
has financial impact analysis


been done in support of
your actions to date? Have
cost projections been run?
What is our current spending
against budget? How and
when were unbudgeted
expenditures justified and
the budget amended? Can
we assume that supportive
documentation is available
to us in town hall? You are
obligated t9 provide the
answers to these questions to
the people of Yankeetown.
Carl Mazzuca
Yankeetown


quilting so much better.
Thanks to Ken Skelton for
all the electric work he does.
Most of all, thank our Lord
for keeping the Holy Spirit
here each day, to keep us safe
and watch over our museum.
Winnelle Horne is
director of the Levy County
Quilt Museum.
f


BuLh Detwiler 1101N'(I to Imidiu i10% wnrki a bmicitr pIlace
ThIiat hop diCI whro h Ite wVs killed by a drunkc(riVar.
V.'ii a should you rdo to smio a friend from driving orvnO
AWhaav.wr yoiii hve to
Friends don't let friends drive drunk,
N YL DU O


Building and Development
Your Custom Home Specialist
Locally Owned and Operated By
Steve and Karen Smith

Office: (352) 486-4290 Mobile: (352) 538-1388
or (352)-538-3141
stevesmithconst@aol.com


Personal Attention

A, Quality Craftsmanship & Materials

_ti Framing and Concrete Finishing


C-J40 C WJrK7


Hernandez, Jose Manuel McElroy, Kenneth Hugh Robertson, Elizabeth Taylor, Wayne Carter Vigliotti, Michael A. Watson, Dewayne Emmitt
Otter Creek W/M Cross City W/M Williston B/F Bronson B/M Bronson W/M Homossassa W/
DOB: 12-24-1978 DOB: 10-09-1973 DOB: 08-04-1971 DOB: 12-2-1950 DOB: 1-28-1964 DOB: 07-15-1966
Sexual Offender Failed to VOP Grand Theft VOP Petit Theft FTA, DWLSR Knowingly FTA, No Motor Vehicle Registration Burglary w/Assault or
Register as Sexual Offender No Bond No Bond $5,000 Bond $1,000 Bond Battery & Aggravated Battery
$25,000 Bond $50,000 Bond
Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having any information about the above individuals is asked to please contact the Levy County Sheriff's Office at 352-486-5111 or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477.


Page 5


'Let it be said"w
,'L t t b wi tte


E IT WAKE,,








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


U.S. transition team helps train Iraqi


soldiers to replace Coalition Forces


BY LANCE CPL. NATHANIEL
SAPP
COMBAT CORRESPONDENT
2ND LIGHT ARMORED
RECONNAISSANCE BATTALION
RAWAH, Iraq Iraqi sol-
diers are meeting their U.S.
counterparts' expectations
here, developing crucial mili-
tary skills to eventually re-
lieve Coalition Forces of se-
curity operations, according
to U.S. forces partnered with
the Iraqis here.
Moreover, Iraqi soldiers
from the 2nd Battalion, 3rd
Brigade, 7th Iraqi Army Di-
vision one of several Iraqi
Army battalions in western
Anbar Province are provid-
ing daily assistance to Co-
alition Forces in the form of
thorough security operations,
according to U.S. troops
here.
"The Iraqi soldiers are com-
mitted to making this work,"
said U.S. Army Maj. Wade
Bastian, officer-in-charge of
a U.S.-led Military Transition
Team here. "They're patriotic
and know what they're fight-
ing for the freedom and
safety of their country."
Since June, Iraqi soldiers
have worked daily with a
U.S.-led Military Transition
Team a group of Coalition
servicemembers assigned to


Photo by Lance Cpl. Nathaniel F. Sapp
CPL. BRETT HANCHEY, a 20-year-old infantryman
from Chiefland and an Iraqi soldier, work .together
to question locals about recent insurgent activity
during a Dec. 8, 2006 patrol in Anah, Iraq. Marines
from the Camp Lejeune, N.C.-based 2nd Light Ar-
mored Reconnaissance Battalion arrived in Iraq
three months ago and began conducting security
operations in this area of the Al Anbar Province, 150
miles northwest of Baghdad.


mentor Iraqi Army units in
developing military skills in
everything from gathering
information to completing
operations.
"We want the battalion to
have battle space and stand
on their own logistically,"
said Bastian, who added that


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the Iraqi Army battalion here
is doing a "greatjob" in intel-
ligence gathering.
"But they need to work on
analyzing it a little more to
see how it can best help them
in the long term," said Bas-
tian.
Better pay and leave
While the soldiers of 2nd
Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 7th
Iraqi Army Division re-
ferred to in short as "2-3-7"
by U.S. Marines and soldiers
here still have a way's to
go before they are given the
stamp of approval to replace
Coalition Forces completely
in this region, Marines say
the Iraqi soldiers are instru-
mental to counterinsurgency
operations in the area.
"They're good at inter-
acting with the people, they
See Iraq Page 11


S'

Allyourfooingn

WAREHOUSE
FLOORING.,
OUTLET
352-528-WOOD(9663
OPEN to the PUBLIC
824 N. Main St.
Williston, FL


Community Educators Clubs

looking for new members

Are you looking'for something educational, and fittn
to do? Then look no 'further. Levy County Home and
Community Educators are your answer.
Members meet locally in four communities of Levy
County. Meeting days ate as follows:
Chiefland second Tuesday of.the month at 1 p.m. at
the Hide-a-Way Clubhouse at-NW 111 'Avenue.
Williston second Wednesday of the month at 10 a.m.
at the First United Methodist Church .at 213 West Noble
Ave.
Curryville'- third Tuesday of.the month at 2 p.m. at
*member's homes.
Bronson third Wednesday at 9:30 am.. at the Levy
County Agricultural Center at 625 North Hathaway Ave.
Members have a variety of educational programs featuring
family, consumer and health topics. They also complete'-
service projects, such as surgical dolls and caps for cancer
patients, with many volunteer hours and donate miopey to
local charities. Special trips and "get together" have alsoi
been known to happen; .
The four clubs combine to sponsor the Emma Belle
Townsend Scholarship for a B-C student from our local
schools. Details can be found at the schools.
If this sounds like an aftswer to you; please call the 'UF
IFAS Levy County ExtensionrOffice at (3-2) 486-513 Ifor-
directions to a club near your home .




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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Shirley Chestnut
Shirley Connell Chestnut, 63, died Wednesday, Dec. 20,
2006 at Shands at Alachua General following a short illness.
Mrs. Chestnut, a resident of Williston, was preceded in
death by her husband of 26 years, Jack Chestnut. Prior to
her husband's death, Mrs. Chestnut worked for the Veterans'
Hospital in Gainesville. Her father, her mother and her brother
preceded her in death.
She is survived by another brother, two sisters, and her
step-children.
Funeral services were held Dec. 26 at Purcell Funeral Home,
Bushnell. Burial followed at Florida National Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care of Purcell Funeral Home,
Bushnell.

Edward Cunningham Jr.
Edward Cunningham Jr. of Williston -died Monday, Dec.
18, 2006 at Williston. He was 70.
He was born in Detroit, Mich. and came here from Oscoda,
Mich. 10 years ago. He was a construction
worker. He served in the Marine Corps in
Special Operations, was an auxiliary officer
with the Williston Police Department and was
a Baptist. He loved woodworking and hunting.
He is survived by his wife of nine years,
Bonnie Robison Cunningham of Williston;
sons, Rodney Cunningham of Williston,
Todd Cunningham of Oscoda, Mich., Edward
Cunning of Tennessee, David Robison of Lake City, Darrin
Robison of Phoenix, Ala.; brothers, Alfred Cunningham of
Georgia, Ronald Cunningham of North Carolina and Dennis
Cunningham of Virginia; sister, Anita Grant ofMichigan; eight
grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.
Funeral services were held Dec. 21 at the Knauff Funeral
Home Chapel with Brother James Ledford officiating.

Ernest Jelks
Mr. Ernest Jelks, 71, died Dec. 18,2006 at Haven Hospice
in Chiefland.
Mr. Jelks was of the Baptist faith.
Survivors include wife, Viola Jelks, Williston; children,
Connie Jelks, Micanopy; Mimi Jelks, Gainesville; Yolanda
Jelks, Williston; Sharon Jackson, Orlando; Dennis Jelks,
Daytona Beach; Vincent Jelks, Williston; Jerome Jackson,
Dhnnellon; Ernest Jelks, Raleigh, Fredrick Jelks, Hartford,
Conn.; stepsister, Thelma Peacock, Gainesville; 19
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at New Hope Baptist Church,
Williston Dec. 23. Burial followed in New Hope Cemetery ,
Williston.
Funeral services were under the care of Carnegie Funeral
Home, Chiefland.

Lenora McCullough
Mrs. Lenora McCullough, 76, of Gainesville, died Dec. 18,
2006 at North Florida Regional Hospital in Gainesville.
She was a Methodist and a homemaker.
Mrs. McCullough was formerly a resident of Webster. After


OBITUARIES


she became ill she moved to Old Town to the home of her
daughter.
Survivors include children, Carolyn Simmons, Old Town;
Leon Harvey, Ridge Crest, Calif.; David McCullough, Ocala;
Bruce McCullough, Bronson; Delores James, Webster; Fawn
McCullough, Webster; Dennis McCullough, Webster; and
Ruby McCullough, Duluth, Ga.; siblings, Herman Duggs,
.Webster and Edward Duggs, Beaufort, S.C.; a host of
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. McCullough were held at Picken
Temple United Methodist Church, Old Town, Dec. 23.
Committal service were held at Sumter County Evergreen
Cemetery in Bevilles Corner.
Funeral Services were under the care of Carnegie Funeral
Home, Chiefland.

James Thomas Pender Jr.
James Thomas Pender Jr. of Chiefland died Sat., Dec. 16,
2006 at Haven Hospice in Chiefland.
He was born in Homestead and came here from Summerfield
in 1980. He was a Christian and enjoyed listening to music.
He is survived by his mother, Caridad Golan Pender of
Chiefland; a sister, Orieta George of Chaumont, N.Y. and
other family and friends.
Arrangements were under the care of Knauff Funeral Home,
Chiefland.

Robert Rapa
Robert Karlis Rapa, 43, of Old Town died Saturday, Dec.
16, 2006 at Shands at the University of Florida, from injuries
sustained in an auto accident.
Mr. Rapa was a cement contractor and was well known in
this area for his workmanship. He enjoyed fishing, boating
and cooking out with his family and friends on his beloved
Suwannee River.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Page


He is survived by his mother, Carolann Pulissi of Old Town;
father, Karlis (Giant) Rapa of Old Town; sister, Tammara Lis-
ton of Chiefland;.uncles, John Rapa and Charles Jagade and a
host of cousins. He was preceded in death by his paternal and
maternal grandparents.
Funeral services were held Dec. 21 at the Rick Gooding
Funeral Home with Pastor Graham Glover officiating. Burial
followed at the Old McCrabb Cemetery.
Arrangements were under the care of the Rick Gooding
Funeral Home, Cross City.

Thomas "Big Boy" Clyatt Williams
Thomas "Big Boy" Clyatt Williams of Chiefland died
Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2006 at North Florida Regional Medical
Center. He was 77.
Mr. Williams was born in Levy County and
was a lifelong resident. He was a road supervisor
with the Department of Transportation, was a
U.S. Army Veteran and a member of Mt. Zion
Church of Jesus Christ.
He is survived by his wife of 57 years Arie
Mae Nichols Williams of Chiefland; sons,
Thomas Wayne Williams and David Wayne
Williams, both of Chiefland; a daughter, Terry
Arlene Williams of Chiefland; a brother, Franklin "Jabo"
Williams of Arcadia; sisters, Corrine Broxton of Archer and
Frances Murph of Jacksonville; three grandchildren; and one
great-grandchild.
Services were held Dec. 23 at the Chlarles Strickland
Memorial Chapel, Knauff Funeral Home, Chiefland.
In lieu of flowers the family requests donations to be made
to Mt. Zion Church of Jesus Christ.
Arrangements were under the care of KnauffFuneral Home,
Chiefland.


Smiling in the face of adversity


O ur cheap pop-up
canopy was torn
and suffering
greatly from a
morning of
unrelenting
40 mph gusts.
Its thin frame
was now
mangled and
twisted worse k ,
than a tuba in ;
a train wreck.
"We shouldn't
.have pulled
this little ole'
thing out," I grumbled in
earshot of our soundman
Tommy. He just shrugged
and continued to hover
over our music ministry's
precious sound equipment
like a mother hen. The sky
was already beginning to
sputter. This was turning out
to be a festival to remember.
Our best efforts to stake
down, rope off, and duct tape
things eventually became


Sutile in the face of the
approaching thunderstorm.
Somewhere along the line
we had stubbornly missed
BUT ANYWAY


I


Guy E. Sheffield


our opportunity to unplug
and head for the hills.
Now the only hope for our
electronic gear was for us
to manually anchor the
canopy and wait it out. I
must admit, I would have
preferred just to run. I felt
like a human ground rod
standing there holding
that quivering aluminum
frame as the thunder clouds
began to boom overhead.


The flashes of lightning were
literally sending chills up-my
spine.
Our drummer, Troy, and


his boy Chris, along with
a fellow musician we'd
See Guy Page 10


Ixxe^
i
4


For the Jan. 4,


pub "fon date,


all copy d advertising


By 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 29
^~A I


We will closed


j Mondai


Day,


1


L( COUNTY JOURNAL
H E COUNTY PAPER EST. 192
w, : ,ij,. ; ^ --


ft


_ _ ______ _


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age 8 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Red Devils dethroned in Hitchcock Classic


Bronson s Eagles


take third


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
They came, they saw,
they rallied, and they took
'the lead several times at the
Hitchcock's Tournament
held at Santa Fe High School
as Williston, Chiefland and
Bronson represented Levy
County.
In the end though, the
authority with which the
three schools have played at
the tournament during its ten-
year run, was put on hold for
at least this year as all three
teams were eliminated from
title possibility by the end of
the second day. i
"I was hoping for good
crowds, we got that and I
was hoping for good games
and we got that," Santa Fe
head coach and tournament
organizer, Scott McDaniel
said after the first day. "I hope
the games will be exciting all
the way down to the finish."
Bronson placed the highest
among the Levy County trio
of schools finishing making it
to the third place game.
Williston added a
fifth place to their list of
accomplishments as they
compiled a 2-1 record.

First Round Action
Bronson 49
Union County 45
The first game of the
afternoon set the pace for
the rest of the contests as
Bronson prevailed by a 49-45
score over Union County.
In a defensive rough and
tumble production, the Eagles
received, ,fout., free:; throws
with 3.8 seconds left. They
made all four free throws to.
take the lead and chilled the
aspirations of a Union County
victory.
Jeremy Mayes was fouled
driving to the basket and
.then Columbia's head coach
received a technical foul.
Mayes found the net. on both
of his free throws and Bobby
Collins put the game out of
reach as he made the two
technical shots to squeeze out
the 49-45 victory.
Terrance Dukes scored a
game-high 16 points for the
Eagles (5-5). Union County,
(5-4), was led by Chris
Ederfield and Ted Young.
They scored 12 and 10 points,
respectively. Young entered
the game as Union County's
leading scorer averaging over
20 points per game. Holding
him to only 10 points was
also a key to the victory.


Union County 11-15-06-
13---45
Bronson 09-15-09-
16---49
Statistics:
Bronson: Dukes-15,
Thomas-8, Rivers-8, Mayes-
7, Collins-5, King-4, Barber-
2.

Palatka 66
Williston 58
Coming into this year's
tournament as the team with
the bullseye on their chest
by virtue of claiming the
championship ,last year, the
Red Devils were eliminated
from the possibility of being
added to the list of repeat
winners early.
A combination of their own
faults and Palatka's eagerness
to use them to maximize
their 'talents and athleticism
destined the defending
champions to a first round
defeat.
In a seesaw contest, the Red
Devils cobbled together a 6-
0 run at the end of the third
quarter of found themselves
holding a 42-37 edge.
Despite Palatka's intense
and persevering play, they
maintained that lead over the
hard charging Panthers for
most of the final period, but
Palatka continued to steadily
whittle the lead away.
"We have to understand,
we are no longer the hunters,"
assistant coach Curtis Stacy
said. "We are now the hunted.
We have gained respect.
Everybody gets ready to play
us. And we have to be ready
to play.every nigh t.. .
:"We didn't concentrate
like we needed to in practice.
That is both the coaches' and
players' fault. We played
well, but not for the full game
and those small moments of
lapses cost us the game."
The Panthers eventually
took the lead in the closing
minutes. Jiwan James, who
finished with .a team-high
26 points, hit a pair of free
throws as Williston reclaimed
the lead at 55-54 with 2:45
left in the game.
But the Panthers then took
the lead on a lay-up as their
point man drove through the
lane and dished the ball into
the post. They then closed
out the game with a 12-3
run. Their downfall was free
throw shooting. The Red
Devils made only six of 18
attempts, while
Palatka canned 18 of 21.
"We need to learn to close


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
AFTER GAINING tournament expereince in the
Hitchcock's tournament, Isaac Floyd was one of a
trio of freshmen who wil be counted on this week-
end at Vanguard.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
AFTER PLAYING the host school tight in its first game, Chiefland slipped and
slided against Williston's high-powered transition game.


teams out," assistant coach
Curtis Stacy said. "We had
them up by ten. Even though
they are a talented team like
us with athletes, we had the
chance to do it, because they
made some mistakes and we
scored off of them using our
transition game. They have
the kind of athletes that if we
don't put them away when
we have the opportunity they
will come back."
"Missing all those free
throws in the final period was
why they got back in and then
we let them run and penetrate
at our end of the court after
we had the ball and scoring
opportunities. Our goal is
to win the district and make
a run deep into the playoffs.
Palatka is the type of team
we will face and need to beat.
This should be a wakeup
call."
Stacy estimated the Red
Devils gave up 10-14 points
because Palatka was able to
penetrate from the top of the
paint following Williston's
failure to get back on defense
after they had possession of
the ball.
Williston came close to
forcing someone else other
Herman McRae on the
Panthers' to beat them, but in
the end his tenacious scoring
was too much as he dropped
26 points on the Red Devils'
defense.
The game highlighted
itself with six ties and 12
lead changes. The Red Devils
record fell to 6-3.

Williston 12-13-17-16---
58
Palatka 16-08-15-27---
66
Statistics:
Williston: J. James-26,
Kapree-6, C. James-6,
Hopkins-5, K. Coleman-4,
Brown-3, Timmons-3, Floyd-
3, Foxworth-2.

Santa Fe 82
Chiefland 57
With the return of Jarius
Wimberly and Stephen Davis,
Chiefland looked much better
and played its most complete
game to date this year. The
Indians also got a boost
from the absence of Santa
Fe's leading scorer Chanci
Miller (23.5 points per game)
and starter Stephen Lott for
violating team rules.
However, the end result was
the same for the Indians who
fell for the eighth consecutive
time.
But until the last ten
minutes, the game's outcome
was in doubt as Chiefland
stayed within a run of tying
the game. They momentarily


fell behind by as many as
17 points in the first, but
cut the score to nine at
halftime and to 39-37 with
2:33 left in the third quarter.
However, keyed by full court
pressure defense and half
court trap, which eliminated
the space the Indians needed
to dribble the ball or make
passes, the Raiders closed out
the period with an 11-1 run.
They then ran the Indians
into a slew of turnovers in
the final stanza as Santa Fe
outscored Chiefland bya :32-a
19 counftto secure a berth in
the semifinal round. Lester
Jackson led Chiefland with a
game-high 20 points.
"We played them tough
*and gave them a game until
the last ten minutes," head
coach Dennis Webber said.
"But we have trouble with the
playersbalancing themselves
correctly in order to make
the space we need to dribble
the .ball and pass. Good
coaching picks it up and that
is what they did in the last ten
minutes.
"We got caught on the
sidelines and against the time
line and we couldn't move
back to the center of the court.
There was no spacing for us
to do that. Then our rotation
was not good when we tried
to get back on defense. We
gave up around 15 turnovers,
which is a good improvement
for us, but at least half of them
were in the last ten minutes."
Greg Milliken and Steven
Shipwash each scored 20
points for Santa Fe (5-3),

Chiefland 04-17-17-17---
55
Santa Fe 17-13-20-32---
82
Statistics:
Chiefland: L. Jackson-
20, Sheffield-13, Henry-8,
Sprawling-6, Donald-3, M.
Jackson-3, Limburch-2.

Second Day Action
Winner's Bracket
Columbia 77
Bronson 32
After slowing down Union
County's offense in the first
game, Bronson took on the
state power with little success.
The Tigers, ranked eighth in
Class 5A, advanced to the
semifinals of the tournament
by downing Newberry by a
final tally of 69-55.
In order to counteract
Columbia's height and
strength advantage the Eagles
would have had to play a
perfect game. They did not.
Columbia jumped out to
5-0 and 11-3 leads before
ending the quarter with a
17-point bulge. Columbia's


more athletic, quicker
and experienced players
continued to steal and ran
the Eagles into submission,
literally and figuratively.
"We did not compete as
well as we could have, but it
wouldn't have changed the
outcome," head coach Kelly
Beckham said. "We weren't
contesting any shots and
when a team shoots long and
medium range like they do,
the smaller squad needs to
have some kind of distraction
to slow them down.
"The difference between
last night and tonight was
simply they were a more
talented team and played like
it. But after playing them,
even as big as the margin of
the loss was, we shouldn't
be intimidated and be more
comfortable against the other
teams on our schedule."

Bronson 07-12-04-09---
32
Columbia 24-21-14-14---
73
Statistics:
Bronson: Dukes-10,
Barber-8, King-4, Rivers-4,
Collins-3, Mayes-2, Mercer-
1.
Consolation Bracket
Williston 70
Chiefland 28
The cross county rivals
laced up their sneakers to play


each other for the second time
in three weeks. This time
they met with the backdrop
of the Red Devils dealing
with the disappointment and
licking their wounds from a
first round loss, while looking
to strengthen those very same
issues which cost them in
the opening game still in the
hopes of preparing for a long
playoff run.
The return of. Jairus
Wimberly and Steven Davis
made a world of difference
for the Indians in their firqt
round game. And the Indianis
entered the consolation
game with that noteworthy
difference in mind as well
as a team whose evolution
was continuing with certain
objectives after playing
the home team tight for 22
minutes.
The Indians kept it close
throughout the opening
quarter as the score was
a close 11-6 after the firit
eight minutes. However, the
Indians' turnovers, spee ,
quickness and ability to run
offensively and defensively
for four quarters overcame
them.
The.Red Devils scored the
first eight points of the quarter
and then added six morph
tallies after the Indians put
the ball in the basket. Theyj
then finished out the half by
forcing the Indians into four
consecutive turnovers. They
scored off all of them and the
score read 34-15 at halftime,
"We had a great first
quarter," Webber said. "Our
goal was to 'hoil them to
15 points and we did that,
but then their speed, size
and quickness devoured us.
When we turned the ball over
a couple of times we broke
down fundamentally.
"Anytime a team turns the
ball over more than 15 times
in a game, it lowers their
chances of winning to lesi
than 30 percent."
The Indians had '2
turnovers to only five assists


Chiefland
-28
Williston
--70


06-09-09-04--

11-23-26-10-
!.J


Statistics:
Chiefland: Wimberly-9,
L. Jackson-4, Sprawling-
4, Donald-3, M. Jackson-3
Dials-2, Galpin-2, Davis-. ,










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Levy roundballers take to the tourney floors


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
SOn the heels of the
S Hitchcock tournament, all
three Levy County teams will
continue the holiday tradition
of participating in local
tournaments.
Williston travels to Ocala
Vanguard to partake in the
'mix known as the Kingdom
ofthe Sun tournament. While
Bronson invited Chiefland to
spend a part of the holiday
season at its own end of the
calendar year affair.
The Bronson Holiday
Tournament -Bronson
High School
The Bronson Holiday
"Tournament might not get the
national and state attention
as the Kingdom of the Sun
Tournament does, but it is in
its own right an event worthy
'of high prestige as it invites
some of the best small schools
'from the state and country on
,an annual basis.
In tipping off for the 15th
time this year, it reaches a
milestone. In its existence
it has come to be known as a
tournament of quality as over
the years it has averaged four
'bf its eight teams qualifying
for the playoffs.
SThe single elimination
tournament also places all of
its teams from first to eighth:
And this year's field
consists of three teams which
played in the Hitchcock's
tournament at Santa Fe High
School this past weekend.
"It is known for bringing in
excellent talent from smaller
schools," Chiefland High
School head coach Dennis
Webber said. "They bring
in the best competition from
around the tri-county area
and sometimes go out of the
area.
In all the years I have
been here, it has always had
a strong field. The teams
are capable of playing with
the bigger schools and they
are the type of squads that
improve with every game.
SThe kind ofimprovement that
wins district titles and leads
'to playoff runs. So, when
you accept the invitation, you
better lace up the sneakers
and be ready to play."
The Indians will be making
their second consecutive
appearance in the tournament
and come in with a 1-9 record.
They open the tournament
against the Trenton Tigers.
Despite their record, they
might make some noise as
they recently got Jairius
Wimberly and Steven Davis
back.
The host team, Bronson,
poomes into the tournament
with a better record of 6-6,
but it is below their usual
'expectations. Their first
round win against Union
County at the Hitchcock's
S tournament should provide
;some much needed reference

r'wi~aia -i~


towards the strengths of the
Eagles.
They are looking to
rebound from a thrashing by
state power Columbia in the
second round, but the loss
should help in dealing with
the inexperience of playing
title contenders. The Eagles
played against a team which
was physically bigger and
stronger than them, by virtue
of their higher classification.
That experience should
be an assist in dealing with
the physical attributes of the
schools in their tournament.
Bronson plays its first game
against Dixie County.
Both coaches want this
to be a tournament that will
help their teams improve on
their weaknesses and gain
experience in using their
strengths as they head into
the meat of their district
schedule.
The other first round games
are Westshore vs. Middleburg
and Lafayette vs. Newberry.
Bronson will play one of the
teams in the former game
in the second round, while
Chiefland's game is in the
same bracket as the latter
contest.
The tournament runs from
Thursday to Saturday.
After losing to state ranked
Columbia by less than ten
points in the first round of the
Hitchcock's tournament, they
enter the tournament as the
favorite.

The Kingdom of the Sun
Tournament -Vanguard
High School (Ocala)
It began 32 years ago and
since its inaugural event,
Vanguard High School has
made their annual Kingdom
of The Sun Tournament
one of the nation's premier
basketball events.
With 10 players who are
presently playing basketball
in the NCAA and five athletes
who are currently inked to an
NBA contract, the tournament
invites teams from all across
the nation and high school
coaches know of it from coast
to coast.
Heading that list of players
are the Orlando Magic's
Duane Howard and the
NCAA's defending champion
Florida's Brandon Powell and
Chris Richards.
"It is an honor to be invited
to this tournament," Williston
head coach George Miller
said. "It isn't just a premiere
tournament in the state of
Florida. It is a premiere event
nationally. Fans get to see a
group of talent they normally
wouldn't see. Coach Haley
doesn't invite just anybody.
"To be invited is truly a
sign of respect among the
coaches and players. Being
a smaller school, there are
some things that are uniquely
special to us and getting an
invite to this tournament is


one of them. After advancing
to the regional finals last
year, we expect to face the
same caliber of teams in the
playoffs again. These are the
same type of teams."
After tasting post-
season victory last year,
the Red Devils enter this
year's Kingdom of the Sun
Tournament as an experienced
team playing against such a
high level of talent, but they
want to use it as a continuing
step in their development as
a high. powered transition
team.
They come into the
tournament after finishing
2-1 at the Hitchcock's
tournament, which includes
a disappointing first round
loss. The catalyst of the loss
was missed free throws and
the failure to get back on
defense.
SThose issues have been the
Red Devils' Achilles' heel
this year and this tournament
will an opportunity to change
them. By playing such an
eclectic group of high quality
teams, they will be forced to
do it for every game.
The experience of seeing
the need to do it for every
game during the tournament
should make them continue
that mental state for the rest
of the year.
"We can't live off of last
year's accomplishments,"
assistant coach Curtis Stacy
said. "This tournament has
some great competition and
we will have to come in ready
and play like we haven't
accomplished anything. We
have the opportunity to use
this tournament as a way to
get prepared for every game
as if we are playing playoff
caliber teams.
"The teams we play at the
tournament prepare that way
and we need to start doing it
for every game as well. That
is why they are not just known
in their states, but nationally.
Being that this is our second
year in the tournament,
we know the caliber of
competition we will face and
we learned from facing them
last year that we need to think
that way."
Williston will count on its
four starting seniors and a
deep rotation, both played
significant role in the team's
two victories during the
tournament at Santa Fe.
The tournament is a double
elimination event among 16
teams. Among ihe sixteen
teams vying for the coveted
title is defending champion,
the Eagles of Columbia,
Georgia.
They finished last season
with a 32-1 record en route
to the class 4A championship
in their state and have three
starters who have already
signed letter of intents to play
at the next level.
They boast a starting squad

,:'t l .'


In the second game this season, between the Levy County rivals, Williston
dominated Chiefland again as even when the Red Devils couldn't coral the ball
the Indians turnover count was in the 30s.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

AFTER A DISAPPOINTING loss in the first round, the fans saw what could be in
2007 as Williston played its best game of the tournament against Chiefland.


of three seniors and two
juniors. Their coach, Phil
McCrary, entered this season
with a career record of 367-
169.
They also won the
tournament title in 1982.
The Red Devils play in
the bracket opposite the
defending champions, but
they truly indicate the class
of the tournament.
Aiiiong' the other t&ams
included in this year's field are
nine which qualified for post
season play in their respective
state, seven which won their
district or conference title,
and three which earned berths
in their state finals.
Seven teams are guided
by coaches with at least 300
wins and 10 programs have
men at the helm who have
claimed at least 200 wins.
The gaudiest records are held
by St. Petersburg Lakewood's
Daniel Wright, and the host
school's coach Jim Haley.
They have compiled stellar
marks of 600-258 and 619-
234, respectively.
Six of the coaches who
bring teams to this year's
tournament have been
directing high school teams
for at least 20 years and
11 have been stalking the
sidelines for at least 11 years;
The Cincinnati LaSalle


Lancers return after a two-
year absence. The 2002
champions they are another
team .to keep an eye on as
they return all five starters
from a 15-9 season.
The event's reputation is
such that this year's field
also includes Fresno, Calif.'s
Edison Tigers, who come
off of a 25-6.season, three
teams.from Georgia and one
from the Bluegrass State of
Kentucky.
The Red Devils take on
the North Marin Colts in the
first round. They will face
either the host team or Ocala
Keystone Heights in the
second round.
"We need to improve our
free throw shooting," Miller
said. "If you don't shoot at
least 70 percent, you aren't
going to win. We will
be playing teams that are
fundamentally sound and we
need to to do the same. We
have the ability to do it and
know how to do it. It is a
matter of us doing game after
game.
"We have to get our outside
shooting game working
consistently and handle the
ball better than we did at
Santa Fe. That is why a team
plays in a tournament like
this. It is the opportunity for
us to get ready for'February


and March by getting our
fundamentals to the point
they will be ready to carry us
for a run at the district title
and the post-season.
"Haley does a great job
at not only organizing the
tournament, but by pairing
the teams according to
their levels so they. get the
experience of. workingg: on
their fundamentals.
Despite an' uniiisu'Al 1-11
record last year, the host team
is a good pick for dark horse.
Miller pointed out Haley's
ability to get his team rolling
in this tournament as he
prepares them for February
and March and his 34-years
of experience.
The tournament showcased
some of its "rock 'em-some
'em in your face talent" on
Tuesday with a three-point
shootout and a slam-dunk
contest.
It also gives the players
the chance to play in front of
recruiters who work for some
of college's biggest names.
"It isjust a great opportunity
to get recognition, both for
the program and our players,"
Stacy said.
Williston enters the
tournament with an 8-3
record.


. T------ ",-.- !"--.'- ..-:-.-'..i' ^..'^^

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defense as -the lndiias', problems with.' While:t.etu iov s ,ti ..I
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SIndians committed 25 turnovers, wiio h is i's s, p. o.'.', ',
their-lowesttodate, butTrenton'pointsoff :"


Page 9









Paue 10


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OCY V E.ID NU0RA UNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Ruth Baker wins Chiefland golf championship


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Obviously, itisn'ttheLPGA
championship or Pebble
Beach, but nonetheless,-Ruth
Baker earned the right to strut
her stuff and walk with the
grace of a champion for the
next few weeks.
That's because last
Tuesday when she walked
off the 18th green of the
Chiefland Golf and Country
Club it was with the title
of the Chiefland Women's
Golf Association's annual.
handicap championship.
"It was nice to win it,"
Baker said. "I played well
and my putting got a lot
better, but to my good fortune
some of the women I played
had bad days. I think my
game got a lot better, simply
because I retired in March
from nursing and I have had
a lot of time to practice since
then."
In doing so, she defeated
by a game Betty Altieri by
two holes in the finals using
the newly minted match play
format. Baker quickly put a
stranglehold on Altieri as she
took a five-hole lead through
the first nine greens.
Altieri, who reached the
finals by navigating her way
through the final rounds of
the loser bracket, mounted a
furious rally on the back nine.
She scuttled her way back into
the match with winning shots
on four consecutive holes, the
13th through the 16th.
It tightened Baker's lead to
one hole. But, even with her
game not quite as strong as
it had been on the front nine,
Baker maintained enough
of her stroke to withstand
the charging Altieri on the
seventeenth fairway.
She got her ball on the
green in two strokes and then
two putted to score a birdie,
while Altieri netted a par.
The combined score ofeach
golfer itself was close. Baker
shot a 46, while Altieri scored
a 47 in the front nine, but
with match play the winner
is determined by who wins
the most holes. In order for


Altieri to win she would have play. Renaud didn't do Baker said. "The next day
had to short a lower score, anything to outweigh Altieri's after I won the title, most of
"Altieri played consistent play," Leonard said. the ladies were already there
golf for the whole tournament With the title, Baker will when we meet for our weekly
and she needed to do it one have her name engraved on gathering.
more time against Baker in the the plaque of tournament "They all acknowledged
finals," Marilee Leonard, the championships in the me as a champion when I
president of the association, clubhouse and she receives walked in, so I gave them a
said. "She still had a several gifts as well. bow. We always have that
consistent round of golf, but "The association is a great kind of comraderity and
it wasn't quite as consistent group of women and to play friendship among ourselves,
as her previous matches had with them and beat them but it still felt good to hear
been. Baker didn't play quite was fun and a challenge," the words."
as well in this match, either,
but her play was better than Indians
Altieri's and she made the
. shots when she had to. Baker were minimized and had a lesser impact than in their previous
is a scrapper and it came games. Coach Dennis Webber summed up the half as "excellent."
through when she had to hold He felt to hold a team to 16 points in a half that had a superior height
offAltieri." advantage showed marked improvement and a mental tenacity
In claiming the needed to win consistently.
championship, Baker However, facing a team with a distinct height advantage and
compiled a 5-0 record. deeper bench took its toll on the Indians. Ft. White outscored them
Along with Altieri, Pat 30-10 in the second half.
Renaud was the tournament's Their turnovers came at critical points and led to easy transition
most consistent golfer. They baskets for Ft. White as they had trouble handling the ball in a tired
faced each other in the losers' state.
bracket finals. Altieri was The Indians lowered their turnover total again. This time it was
dropped into the loser's 23, but the Indians also less than 25 percentfrom the field again.
bracket after losing to Renaud Ft. White 05-11-14-16-46
in the winners' bracket semi- Chiefland 13-07-03-07-30
finals. Chiefland:
While Renaud's loss to Points: L. Jackson-9, Donald-8, Sheffield-6, M. Jackson-3,
Baker in the winners' bracket Galpin-2, Henry-2.
championship set up the finals N Guy
of the losers' group, just met named Allen, each bravely moored a comer. Daryl, the
In their rematch, it was event coordinator, better known as "Fire-ant", had also shunned
Altieri who built a somewhat the safety of the nearby buildings to rush to our aid. Obviously
spacious lead through the his nickname didn't just stem from his red locks, for his face
first half of their match. After was equally ablaze with the glory of the Lord and a zeal that
the front nine holes she held he just couldn't conceal. Months worth of his hard work and
a three-hole margin. She planning were turning to mud, yet he still donned a smile that
increased it to a final tally threatened to swallow his ears.
of four holes on the next Even as the world around us grew dark, Fire-ant's big smile
fairway, became contagious. The air was violently charged, the big bad
Altieri scored eight pars, wolf was huffing and puffing, but under our collapsed little hut
including a half dozen on the laughter began to abound. The mood within gave wings to the
front nine to put Renaud in phrase, "Peace in the midst of the storm." As the wind and the
the position of having to make rain began to pound against the very foundations of our faith, I
some notable shots if she was believe each man realized that he had been right to build upon
to benefit from the difference the Solid Rock. I even detected the strong aroma of warriors
in the golfers' handicaps. excited to be counted worthy to suffer for the gospel's sake.
However, even though, she We don't get too much of that down here in the Bible belt you
continued to play consistent gow.
gol f,t;here were nospectacular:` .... ,.,
golhere were no spectacular "IFlt;betthose peopledonating-blood are glad they did, -
plays 'hch alod ed Renau"d Fire-ant joked. He was referring to the protection those riding
to make a charge at any time it out in the 'Mobile Blood Bank' bus were enjoying. Before I
during the match.
"They were the two most
consistent golfers in this
tournament and shot close to
their average in this match,
but the difference in their
handicaps never came into


The revealing of the plaque
with her name engraved on it
is scheduled for May. The
names on the plaque begin
with the years in the mid-
'70s.
This was the second time
Baker competed in the annual
handicap tournament. She
was the tournament's runner-
up two years ago.


Losers Bracket Final
#4 Betty Altieri defeated
#8 Pat Renaud

Tournament Finals
#10 Ruth Baker defeated
#4 Betty Altieri

2006 Chiefland Women's
Golf Association's Annual
Handicap Tournament
Champion
Ruth Baker


Continued from page 9
While the Indians entered the Hitchcock Classic in the throes of a
seven game losing streak, there is reason for hope.
Forward Stephen Davis and Guard/Forward Jairus Wimberly
returned this week in time for the Hitchcock classic at Santa Fe
High School in Gainesville.
Ryan Sprawling is also close to returning from a knee injury
which has kept him on the sidelines throughout the first half of the
season. Coach Webber will have a deeper and more talented bench
with which to work with.
It should help avoid situations like the one they incurred against
Ft. White. He is working with the players to increase their defensive
intensity in practice, so they will be used to dealing with it in game
situations.
In his words, since the defensive pressure in games is greater
than what they face in practice they aren't used to it and it leads to
turnovers. The coaches need to get the team more acclimated to
playing at a higher and tougher level.


Continued from page 7
realized the greater significance of what I was actually saying I
replied, "I guess you could say, 'They are saved by the blood!'"
We all chuckled. We all knew what that meant, because we all
were too. I reckon if we Christians who claim:to trust in the
blood of Jesus would ponder on it a while we'd all be more apt
to stand up and smile in the face of adversity. After all, how can
you scare a man or back him down when he realizes to die in
the line of duty will only bring him promotion? The blood of
Jesus has removed the sting of death for the maturing saint. You
simply can't kill a man who knows he possesses eternal life,
especially one who has already died to the things of this world!
Brothers and sisters, we are not from here; just passing through,
taking up our cross and following our Lord to a higher place.
The blood of Jesus has transferred our citizenship to a better
Kingdom.
But anyway, just the mere thought of that precious blood
seemed to anchor my soul. So what if the whole awning blew
away with us in it? For we know that if our earthly house of this
tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of Go4, qn house
not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 2 Corinthians 5:1.
Guy E. Sheffield of Hernando, Miss. is the president of the
nonprofit ministry SoulFood.


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Y


I









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Continued from page 6


know the customs," said Cpl. Joshua Tavener, a 23-year-old
Marine squad leader from Aurora, Colo. "A lot of them are
good translators, and they can get a better feel of the mood in
the area."
Moreover, more Iraqi soldiers are staying on the job, thanks
to an improved administrative'system that ensures that sol-
diers are being paid on time, and in full, according to U.S.
military leaders here.
In the past, Iraqi soldiers were paid sporadically, even go-
ing several months with no pay. U.S. commanders believe
pay problems to be one of the top reasons for desertion in the
ranks earlier this year.
2nd Battalion, 3rd Brigade lost upwards of 200 soldiers due
to desertions and other reasons before Bastian's team arrived
this past summer, said Bastian.
"We had some higher-ranking officers being paid lower
than enlisted soldiers and some soldiers not getting paid at
all," said Bastian.
Now, an improved administrative system and more fre-
quent and consistent pay, as well as regular leave, is keep-
ing Iraqi soldiers on the job, according to Marines who work
daily with Iraqi soldiers here.
. The increasing stability of the Iraqi Army's leave system
should not only help retain forces, but increase them, Marines
here say.
Iraqi Government support crucial to development
While dozens of U.S. transition teams like Bastian's work
daily to develop Iraqi soldiers' professional military skills
through Iraq, it's ultimately the support of the Iraqi Govern-
ment that will keep Iraq's police and military forces success-
ful, according to outgoing U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald
H. Rumsfeld.
"The Iraqi Government has to take charge of their own
country...and they're working on it," said Rumsfeld during
an address to U.S. troops at Al Asad airbase, Iraq, Dec. 9.
"We simply have to prepare the Iraqi Government to have the
capacity to govern and take care of themselves."
Out of 112 Iraqi Army battalions, 90 have taken the lead in
military operations in their areas, according to Gen. George
W. Casey, Jr., commander for Multi-National Forces-Iraq.
"We've said all along that we wanted to give the Iraqis the
capability to conduct independent counterinsurgency opera-
tions, and that is the program that we are currently on," said
Casey during a Department of Defense news briefing last
month.
Coalition Forces' goal is to eventually turn over control of a
safe and secure region to fully capable Iraqi Security Forces.
In support of this plan, Iraqi soldiers partner with U.S.
military forces to combat insurgents and provide security. In
Rawah, Iraqi soldiers accompany Marines from 2nd Light
Armored Reconnaissance Battalion during patrols, at vehicle
checkpoints and provide a presence in the local communities
in this region of Anbar Province.
The Camp Lejeune, N.C.-based battalion of Marines ar-
rived just more than two months ago, relieving a Califorhia-


based Marine unit.
Murder and intimidation
Iraqi soldiers and Marines provide security in Rawah and
Anah two Euphrates River cities located 10 miles apart and
150 miles northwest of Baghdad.
Insurgents find the area to be a convenient place to set up
operations and "pipeline" weapons and terrorists, Marines
here say. Coalition and Iraqi Security Forces are tasked with
disrupting insurgents' activity, and maintaining security con-
ditions that will allow for local governance and economy to
flourish.
"The local people are scared of the insurgents and they're
scared of us," explained 1st Lt. Dillon Taylor, a 27-year-old
Marine platoon commander from Lewistown, Mont. "They're
scared of us because they think that by helping us, they will
get caught in the middle and they or their families will get
hurt."
By killing local Iraqi police and civilians, insurgents used a
"murder and intimidation" campaign to not only help disband
the majority of police in the area this past summer, but to also
scare citizens from trying to rise against the insurrection.
While some police officers remained on the job, they were
nowhere near the numbers needed to be an effective force
when the 2nd LAR Battalion arrived three months ago, Ma-
rines here say.
Today, Iraqi police number about 90 now in Rawah. When
the Marine battalion arrived here several months ago, the
number of Iraqi police on the job was in the teens, according
to Lt. Col. David Little, officer-in-charge of the police transi-
tion team for Regimental Combat Team 7.
But as security conditions improve, the Marines are count-
ing on recruiting to continue to bolster the police force's num-
bers.
More Iraqi police needed, Iraqi soldiers fill in void
In the meantime, Iraqi soldiers must fill the void left by
Iraqi police forces. The Iraqi soldiers' jobs are more vital, as
they now hold more responsibility to show local people that
Iraqi Security Forces will be able to keep them safe, said Bas-
tian.
"The leadership of the (Iraqi) battalion has really stepped
up since our move to Rawah," said Bastian. "They always
seem to be a part of the solution."
According to Bastian, although the Marines here still have
a lot ofinfluence over operations the Iraqi soldiers conduct,
the leadership of the Iraqi battalion is responding well to the
increased responsibilities with a "can-do attitude."
"They're hard workers, they do everything that we do,"
said Cpl. David Mann, a 23-year-old squad leader from Aik-
en, S.C. Mann, an infantryman, works side-by-side with Iraqi
soldiers here.
"We include them in every aspect, including our patrolling
briefs, in order to give them a better feel for what's going on
and how we work," said Mann.
Though problems, progress is steady
That experience with the Marinesihas paidioff, as the Iraqi,
11rxnI Sr'. [I(.-* m noijJ5 n'ii, \A *"r i''! nB


soldiers now conduct some patrols without being accompa-
nied by Coalition Forces. They are also getting better at com-
municating using their chain-of-command to accomplish
missions. more quickly and effectively, at the "lowest level
possible."
"Their chain of command has progressed immensely, es-
pecially with their small unit leadership," said Taylor. "Their
sergeants have begun taking responsibility and control of the
soldiers under them."
Now, Iraqi soldiers are beginning to adopt the Marines'
methods on utilizing small-unit leadership relying more on
junior personnel to accomplish the missions.
Since the MTT here began working with Iraqi soldiers al-
most six months ago, the battalion's administrative organiza-
tion has continued to improve steadily, which in turn helped
alleviate past pay problems, said Bastian.
"Because of the pay problems, the retention rate was ter-
rible," said Bastian.
While the Iraqi battalion's progress leaves Marines here op-
timistic about the region's future, there are still challenges to
over come, such as the current vacation system used by the
Iraqi Army to grant its soldiers monthly leave.
After serving 20 days on the job, Iraqi soldiers here get
10 days off, or "leave." The result is their battalion is never
staffed at 100-percent.
Ten days off means Iraqi soldiers need to learn everything
about what happened while they were gone before they can
become fully effective again, some Marines say.
The leave has positive and negative impacts on the Iraqi
battalion's progress, said Bastian.
Culturally, the Iraqis have close family and tribal ties, so
the time spent home acts as a rejuvenator they come back
charged up and ready to get back to work, he said. But time
away from the unit is time that could be spent training and
developing the soldiers, said Bastian.
"There's a certain way to work with the Iraqis. When it's
done right, everything goes smoothly," said Bastian. "That's
what we're working on now- understanding each other's cul-
ture so we. can find solutions."
F'~! -,,, ~ ~ --i ...:- ''t- --il .


Toys for Tots Ride 2006


BIKERS OF all ages-from
those attending middle school
to those old enough to be
their grandparents-turned
out for last month's second
annual Nature Coast Toys for
Tots Run. More than $3,600
cash and $2,500 in toys were
collected by uniformed Marines
at the Dixie County end of the
motorcycle route. Nearly 130
bikes were entered. The group
plans on holding a run again
in 2007. Be looking for the
event to occur on the Saturday
before Thanksgiving.

Photos by Cassie Journigan


I Cassie

project I've already started.
I will not resolve to lose
weight. I instead resolve to
add more exercise to my day.
Now an afternoon walk will
enhance my morning regime
of yoga.
I will replace my meal
skipping and junk food
snacking with a resolve to
eat five vegetables and fruits
each day.
Much as I would love
to win the lottery, I know
that is highly unlikely to
happen. Florida's lottery
website says the likelihood
of hitting all six numbers on
the weekly jackpot is 1 out
of 22,957,480. I don't know
much about math but that
doesn't look too promising.
So I resolve to set aside an
Andrew Jackson from my
paycheck each week.
Finally, I resolve to spend
one day a week working on


Continued from page 4
my own writing-that long-
unfinished novel may or may
not be a bestseller. But I'll
never know till I try. And
at my age, I can't count on
being around till doomsday
to write it.
There. I've written them
down. I've told someone
else. I've made my
resolutions specific, time
bound, and achievable. I
think that's pretty much
the requirements all those
positive-thinking gurus say
we must make in order to
achieve our goals.
So next year at this time
maybe my only resolutions
will be to continue on the
path I began in 2007. Who
knows.
Anybody ready to race
with me to see who gets to
goal first?
On your mark; get set-
GO!


Page 11


ElIraq









Page 12 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


2006: The Year That Was ... In Levy County


Continued from front


Lamb led about 40 citizens
who supported a hospital
coming to Chiefland. The
citizens met with hospital-
representatives at the Tommy
Usher Center to discuss the
planning stages of the effort.
The city of Williston was
faced with a housing boom,
as apartment complexes and
single family units were
springing up throughout
town.
Bronson High School
students and alumni bid
farewell to the H.A. White
Gym, during halftime of a
basketball game. Because
of construction on a new
school, the gym will no
longer be home to Eagle
athletics.
The Bronson AMVETS
auxiliary paid tribute to
Carmen Fragola, a volunteer
at Bronson Elementary
School, by donating a supply
closet in his honor.
The city of Williston
honored Councilman Cal
Byrd during a meeting. Byrd
has served on the council for
the last 23 years.
North Florida Chapter
of the Police Benevolent
Association presented
members of the Chiefland
Woman's Club with a plaque
of appreciation for their
years of supporting all the
local law enforcement.
February
Chiefland Vice Mayor
Betty Walker complained
during a commission
meeting that the Nature
Coast walking trail was
overgrown with foliage
and not safe to use.
Discussion ensued about
who was responsible for the
maintenance.
Tom Willey, a Bronson
resident, was featured in an
article about his work with
refugees.
mi6dLdse"Hager announced
her intent to vie for the
Williston City Council seat
held by Jerry Robinson.
Bill and Deena Sanders
were the feature photo on the
front page. The couple was
married in medieval dress at
the Hoggetowne Fair.
The Chiefland Chamber of
Commerce was looking for
the person who would fill the
role of Citizen of the Year.
Previous winners include
Dennis Webber, Sammy Ca-
son, R.D. Skelton and Doug
King.
Beer sales were limited
at the first Bronson Music
Festival to be held at Bron-
son Motor Speedway. The
county board of commis-
sioners said a footprint was
already in place that limited
alcohol sales on race days
and they were sticking to it.
The GED program at the
Levy County Jail is helping
inmates set a better course
for their lives.
The town of Bronson
honored Bob O'Connor for
his 30 years of service as a
volunteer fireman.
The town also refused to
negotiate with former Mayor
Jamie Griffin on some items
he believed he was entitled
to. Council maintained the
items were paid for with


town funds and Griffin was
not getting them.
Chiefland Police Chief
Robert Douglas canvassed
the city with flyers noting the
Town's sex offenders. Pic-
tures of those known were
printed.
The Superintendent's
Gala netted over $23,000 for
scholarships.
Jacob Douglas was named
a Levy District Scholar.
The city of Chiefland
named Rodney Russ as its
city manager. Russ, a Marion
County native, previously
worked in the tax collector's
office.
The fight in Yankeetown
began when citizens started
their protest against a devel-
opment that would include a
marina and housing units.
Carolyn Cohens of Chief-
land was featured on the
front page for her latest
book, which featured a picto-
rial on the black history of
Levy County.
Vince Nazworth, a senior
at Bronson High School, was
awarded a plaque from the
Juvenile Justice Committee
for his out standing improve-
ment in school and toward
the community.
March
Betty Walker and Alice
Monyei were vocal in their
opposition to hiring Rodney
Russ as Chiefland's new
manager. Both women felt
that he was not honest on his
application and lacked the
advertised credentials.
The Suwannee Valley
Players debuted The Nerd at
its theatre.
Qualifying began for two
seats on the board of county
commissioners and two on
the school board.
Vietnam veterans were
h inord ,inny Brown-
Waite at a ceremony,at,the .
Chiefland VFW.
The opinion pages were
filled weekly with letters
protesting the development
in Yankeetown.
The Lower Suwannee
Wildlife Refuge hosted its
first open house with lunch
and demonstrations about
life and work in the refuge.
The fate of a Community
Development Block Grant
for Bronson was up in the air
after it appeared construc-
tion on the Hungry Howie's
would not be complete by
deadline. If not complete
and a construction extension
was not approved, the town
would have had to repay $1
million of the grant.
Jerry Robinson retained
his council seat in Williston,
beating Lyndsey Hager 111-
75.
Carol McQueen, who was
appointed the county's tour-
ism director in January, said
tourism will soon be Levy
County's biggest industry.
Carlton Pierce was named
Friends of Manatee's presi-
dent at its annual meeting.
Vandals struck the green-
house at Chiefland High
School, doing more than
$4,700 in damage. Two
students were charged in the
incident.
Cedar Key residents


AH, THE dreaded FCAT. Students and teachers alike braced for another round
in March.


turned out en masse to
protest what they consid-
ered a threat to aquatic life.
Linda Young of Clean Water
Network Florida spoke on
the hazards that could harm
the clam industry if Buckeye
Florida, located in Perry,
discharged water into the
Fenholloway River.
Seventeen people were ar-
rested on cocaine charges in
Fanning Springs.
Stewart Wasson was
named Citizen of the Year
by the Chiefland Chamber of
Commerce.
South Levy firefighters got
a new tanker truck valued at
over $194,000.
The city of Chiefland was
presented a $200,000 check
from the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
for renovations to Buie Park.
The decision of Williston's
city manager to move the
airport maintenance worker.
igtQ#W,public wqrkS49parrii
ment unsettled many-ata*,.; /
March meeting.
Chiefland Fire Chief
David Burnett wanted to
apply for a grant that would
allow his department to have
a thermal imager, which
would be beneficial in locat-
ing missing persons in dense
areas or helping evacuate
people in buildings that are
smoked filled.
April
The fishing pier at the
No. 4 bridge in Cedar Key
opened March 31 to the de-
light of anglers everywhere.
Library fines were waived
during April as encourage-
ment for readers to return
over due books.
The Levy County Quilt
Museum celebrated its 10t
anniversary and its director,
Winnelle Home, received the
Helping Hand Award from
the Florida Sheriffs' Youth
Ranch at Camp Carruth.
The editor of the Levy
County Journal was given
and tour of the Buckeye
Florida facility in Perry,
after a demonstration in
Cedar Key earlier this year
protested the company.
The article showcased the
paper mill's stand on the
environment.
Hospital investors were
serious about bringing a
hospital to Chiefland, and


THE BRONSON AMVETS auxiliary paid tribute to Carmen Fragola, a volunteer
at Bronson Elementary School, by donating a supply closet in his honor.


mounted a public relations
campaign to involve local
governments and citizens.
The All-County Band
performed under Conductor
Dr. JeffTraster in concert at
Chiefland High School.
Emma Powers were
recognized as Levy County's
Outstanding Overall All Star.
At the annual meeting
of the Levy County
Cattlemen and Landowners'
Association, guests were
told they needed to learn to
deal with Best Management
Practices.
Katherine Harris, looking
to be one of Florida's next
U.S. senators, politicked in
Yankeetown.
Ameris filed a Certificate
of Need with the state for a
hospital in Chiefland.
Marie Wells of the Levy
County Emergency Medical
Services showed off one
of five automatic external
defibrillators'(AEb) that' :!'
were acquired through a
grant. Each AED is valued
at $2,500. The equipment
will be used in the county
parks, the courthouse, the
school board office and the
sheriff's department.
May
The town of Bronson
was forced to pass along an
increase in garbage rates
and elevated the fee to
consumers by 14 percent.
The AMVETS Post 88
in Bronson sponsored this
year's Wild Hog Canoe
Race on the Waccasassa
River. Proceeds from the
event benefitted the Levy
Association for Retarded
Citizens.
Bicycle thieves from
Arkansas were caught in the
act in Chiefland.
Chiefland City
Commission took umbrage
with reporting from the
Chiefland Citizen and
blasted the paper for
inaccurate reporting during a
commission meeting.
Williston FFA took
top honors at the state
competition in Farm
Business Management.
Members Rairia Martinez,
Hillary Coram, Logan
Brooks and Walker Bullock
competed in the most
difficult category at the state
level.
The people of Yankeetown
filed a recall petition against
Mayor Joanne Johannesson
charging malfeasance. The
mayor denied all wrong
doing.
Walkers turned out to
support the American Cancer
Society's Relay for Life
fund-raiser.
Ameris, the company
wanting to build a hospital in
Chiefland, took several local
dignitaries on a tour of their
facilities in Alabama and
Georgia to show what the
company is capable of.
Residents in Inglis
complained to the county
commission that leash laws
are necessary after several
violent attacks in their
neighborhood.


Two more Yankeetown
council members resigned,
as well as the town attorney
and the zoning, official.
The Suwannee Valley
players debuted The Chalk
Garden at the Chief Theatre.
A prescription card was
made available to every
Levy County resident that
will save them money at the
drug store. The card comes
at no cost to the citizens
and only a $500 annual
membership fee for the
county.
The Log Cabin Quilters
took a day-long tour of the
Sheriffs' Boys' Ranch near
Live Oak.
Following a month-
long trend, the clerk and
deputy clerk of Yankeetown
resigned.
The Chiefland Rotary Club
netted more than $10,000
for scholarships during its
annual fishing tournament.
Levy County's finest, its
class &f2006, was featured


IT WAS a rough night at
City Commission when c
voed to fire their city mango
termintaed three long-timi

in several pictures from area
graduation ceremonies.
June
SChiefland geared up for
the 52nd annual Watermelon
Festival.
Photos from a Memorial
Day commemoration on
Cedar Key were featured,
reminding people we have
not forgotten.
Thousands of Suwannee
clams came floating to the
top of the water, alarming
folks who live along the
river. Biologists at the
University of Florida said
there was no need for
concern, as the die-off was
part of the natural process.
Former Williston
Councilman Justin Landon
was found guilty on 17
counts involving sexual
crimes with a girl 14 years
old.
In a move that shocked
the community, School
Superintendent Cliff Norris
fired Chiefland High School
football coach Sam Holland.
Scores of people protested
the action at the next school
board meeting, but the
superintendent stood firm in
his decision.
Alberto, the only tropical
storm to hit Levy County
in 2006, dumped inches of
rain, but caused no damage.
Feeling it better to be safe
than sorry, residents in the


western part of the county
were evacuated inland to
wait out the hurricane that
never happened.
The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement grabbed
computers from Yankeetown,
but never publicly said what
they were looking for.
Desiree Painter, the
director for the Nature Coast
Transit Authority, received
top honors at a state meeting.
Mayor Joanne
Johannesson sued -
Yankeetown because of the
recall effort by local citizens.
She claimed she was not
given due process.
Teal Pomeroy and Teresa
Barron were opposed in the
Chiefland Commission race
by Debra Houska and Sharon
Livingston.
Yankeetown government
came to a grinding halt the
last weeks of the month
because there was no one
around to run things.
George Hermansen,
long-time, veterans' service
officer, retired and moved to
Alabama.
Chiefland Commissioners
heard plans for a new
condominium complex to be
located near the post office.
Students who work the
summer at Lower Suwannee
Wildlife Refuge were
recognized in a feature
article.
July
A recall attempt in
Yankeetown failed and more
of its workers and elected
officials resigned.
Levy County property
values escalated 43 percent.
Property Appraiser Francis
Akins said the increase was
due, in part, to 18 months
of increased market value
and property sales. The city,
of nglis has, th highest
municipal millage rate in the
county.
The
Bronson
Chamber
of
Commerce
began to
wonder if
it would
St find a
home for
the l evyo
County
-Fair in
Time.
the Chiefland Efforts
commissioners to find a



clbr ated w ith a photo page
er after he hadly ctioe
e employees. were
Sillitonfol stymied at
every opportunity.
Bobby Rast was named
Chiefland High School's new
football coach.
Clamerica 2006 was
celebrated with a photo page
depicted the July 4 activities.
Williston folks also got
a picture page for their
patriotic display.c
A Morriston man was
killed in a motorcycle
accident and Ralph's Burger
House in Chiefland was
robbed.
Amelia Erwin talkedabout
her lifelong love of teaching.
Ameris Health Systems,
the company hoping to
receive a certificate of.
need to build a hospital in
Chiefland, asked for financial
support to help it offset some
of its costs.
The board of county com-
missioners turned down a
$200,000 grant to enhance
Henry Beck Park. Commis-
sioner Sammy Yearty said
adjacent property owners
to the park had called and
expressed concern about the
proposed enhancements and
added none of them had been
given an opportunity to voice


their opinions. Yearty also
said the river was probably
the major attraction to Henry
Beck Park and its use is
limited.

See Year Page 13









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Page 13


2006: The Year That Was .


.. In Levy County


VETERANS, AND fellow Levy Countians remem-
bered the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001.


Robert Philpot and Chris
Wilder, agriscience teachers
at Williston High School, re-
ceived Outstanding Alumni
Awards during a ceremony
hooted by Florida Associa-
tion of Agriculture Educators
(FAAE).
Bronson resident Denise
Blackburn penned an inspi-
rational book called Lean-
ing on God: For Answered
Prayers.
The 16-18'year-old Babe
Ruth baseball team from
Chiefland is the state cham-
pion of Florida and repre-
sented'Levy County and the
state in'the South Eastern
Toufiniment July 27 in
Ndrther ygir ia :,

$gil Ph% m 'ad'Teres'"
Barron imng onto their com-
mission seats in the cit' of
Chiefland by a 3-1 margin.
Frances Bumett shared her
very personal story of losing
irr eyesight. Burnett suffers
from iacular degeneration.
The Levy County Board
of County Commissioners
voted to deny the city of
Willitodn's request for funds
to upgrade their communica-
tions equipment. The board
agreed that the ordinance
which governs the funds is
specific that the fees are col-
lected f6r the betterment of
the county.
Business owners in the
unincorporated areas of the
county learned they would
pay higher fire' assessments.
Former Chieflanid Police
Chief J.C. Corbin died. He
was 84 and was remembered
as a man who enjoyed a
good prank.
The new high schooiat
Bronson was dedicated and
officially opened with. an
open house.
The Board of Directors
forNatire Coast Business
Development Council, Inc.
named Pamela Blair as its
nlew executive director.
A Chiefland man drowned
at Fafiinig Springs.
A task force was formed
for the Levy County Fair.
Chiefland City Manager
Rodne) Russ fired three
long-time city employees.
Axed were Mary Ellzey,
clerk; Bill Hammond, build-
ing and zoning director; and
Shane Keene, water depart-
ment supervisor. The three
terminations led to Russ'
own employment demise,
because the next week, the
city commission overrode
his decision, reinstated the
three arid sent Russ packing.
The Lions Club in Cedar
Key sold its clubhouse to the
city for $950,000.
Several veterans received
medals of commendation
long after their military ser-
vice ended. In ceremonies at
Chiefland City Hall, Ginny
Waite-Brown presented


medals to Thomas Brown,
William Rees Edward Burke
and George Lampka.
A block of candidates
dedicated to controlling
growth in Yankeetown swept
the city elections.
Former Williston City
Council member Justin
Landon learned he would
have the next six years to
.ponder his misdeeds from
a prison cell when he was
sentenced after being found
guilty on 17 counts, includ-
ing lewd and lascivious acts
against a minor under the
age of 16, interference with
parental custody and expos-
ing a minor to pornography.
S September
Commnissiouer Nancy Bell
hung onto her post, narrowly
defeating Justin Wasson,
Brett Sandlin and Cracker
Johnson for the District 2
seat.
With the county's new
budget in the works, com-
missioners asked Sheriff
Johnny Smith to trim his
request for a $1.5 million
increase.
The city of Chiefland
agreed to annex 949 acres
on both sides of Hwy. 19/98 .
north.
The county board of com-
missioners rolled the millage
back to 7.9 mills but unhap-
py taxpayers said it wasn't
enough.,
In an eeny, meeny, miny,
moe situation, the Chiefland
City Commission finally
elected Betty Walker as its
new mayor.
Chiefland's Chamber of
Commerce honored two
businesses in this year's
Greater Chiefland Chamber
of Commerce Industry Ap-
preciation Day. Suwannee
Valley Veterinarian Clinic
received the Small Business
Award while White Ford
Mercury won the Large
Business Award.
Levy Countians remem-
bered the fifth anniversary
of the terrorist attacks on the
World Trade Centers. The
city of Cedar Key held a
tribute to remember the lives


that were lost.
Yankeetown Mayor
Joanne Johannesson'resigned
her position in a letter to
Gov. Jeb Bush dated Sept.
19. citing a political situa-
tion that she said was getting
ready to "spiral once again
into the divisive chaos that
has consumed (the town)."
She added that an elected
official has "challenged the
landowners to initiate litiga-
tion."
The town of Bronson
celebrated climbing out of
the red and into the black
after two years of financial
struggle.
Drollene Brown of Mor-
riston announced her intent
to write a book about Levy
County using the personal
stories and photographs of
individuals.
County Commission
Chairwoman Nancy Bell
stood alone on a motion to
eliminate the county attorney
office and reduce the millage
from 7.9 mills to 7 mills.
A round up of drug users
and dealers resulted in 19 ar-
rests for the city of Chiefland
and Matt Brock was named
the interim city manager.
October
Gov. Jeb Bush refused to
dissolve the city of Yan-
keetown and turn the city's
functions over to Levy
County, despite the request
from the city's former mayor.
Levy County's library
system was thrown into a
tailspin when it was learned
that the county's insurance
provider required all volun-
teers to have drug testing.
The libraries once boasted 50
volunteers but were reduced
to one when the policy went
into effect.
Chiefland City Commis-
sion yvted that properties
annexd.B to9egtJxq suld'
have to abide by the ordi-
nance that prohibits alcohol
sales on Sunday.
Levy County farmer
Tommy Harper was recog-
nized as one of eight Santa
Fe River Basin farm produc-
ers involved in the Suwannee
River Partnership CARES
program. He received his
award for exceptional envi-
ronmental stewardship.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture designated 29
Florida counties, including
Levy County, as primary
natural disaster areas due to
losses caused by drought and
strong spring winds that oc-
curred from March 1, 2006
to the present.
The people of Cedar Key,
banded together to protest
high property values and tax
bills. Throwing an old-fash-
ioned tea party, they built a
bonfire to cast those dreaded
bills into and sending a
smoke signal to the county
commission that they were
furious with the state of
things.'
Chiefland city leaders
decided that preparing for,
and managing, growth, is the
number one concern facing
their town today.
The county commission
debated its policy on hear-
ing non-agenda items after
Chairwoman Nancy Bell
said it had to be a unanimous


LITTLE WOMEN played to packed houses at the
Chief Theatre.


THE RED DEVILS of Williston High School had a phenomenal season and made
it to the state playoffs.


decision to do so.
The Cedar Key Seafood
Festival was spotlighted in
pictures that featured Nep-
tune, mermaids and dancing
clams.
Shadow Trailers an-
nounced plans to relocate in
Williston. The plant, to be
located in Horseman's Park,
will eventually employ about
150 people.
Renovation was completed
at Fort Fanning and guests
were invited to tour the
brick-lined sidewalks that
lead to the banks of the
river and connect the park's
amphitheater area to the
Nature Coast State Trail.
The park is only partially
completed. Future phases
will include installation of
kiosks depicting the fort's
history and building a trail
under the bridge to connect
the fort 'with Fanning, Springs
StatePark:- ".k), .... II
November
The Suwannee Valley
Players debuted Little Wom-
en at their Chief Theatre.
Julie and Roy Norton
announced plans to develop
three city blocks in Cedar
Key. The development will
include six historic buildings
which are currently being
restored. New buildings will
not be historic renovations
but will be designed in a
style compatible with the late
1800s.
Heather Sakowski, a
student at Chiefland High
School, was recognized as
outstanding Cooperative Di-
versified Education Student.
The Usher Classic golf
tournament raised over
$32,000 for Shands. Taking
home the Bankers' Chal-
lenge prize was Campus
USA Credit Union, with
players David Barber, Peter
Subach, David String and
Lyle Schreck.
The Williston Red Devils
spent the better part of
the 2006 season putting
themselves in position to win
the District 5-Class 3A title.
For the first seven games of
their schedule that is exactly
what they did, but they fell
just short in clearing the
last hurdle, falling to North
Marion 27-21.
Charlie Crist was elected
the state's new governor
and Levy voters said a
resounding no to a tax
abatement referendum
during the general election.
Hundreds of angry citizens
packed the courthouse to tell
the county commission they
could not survive this year's
large tax increase.
The Cedar Key Historical
Society was awarded a
$50,000 planning grant from
the Florida Department of
State, Division of Historical
Resources to restore the
Lutterloh building which
houses the Cedar Key
Historical Society Museum.
The city of Chiefland
began its search for a new
city manager and by mid-


month had a short list of six
Candidates.
School board members
learned details of a funding
shortage that was due to
diminished numbers of
students registering this
year. The district was short
114 students from what was
forecast and funds were
expected to have a total.
shortfall of $612,982.
Williston was a step closer'
to being home to a new 30-
unit apartment complex.
Roswell Development Group
is proposing to build the
apartments on the corer of
SW First Avenue and NE 11th
Street.
Timothy Peterson, a
veteran who served in
the War Between the
States on both sides, was
memorialized at Sand Pond
SCemetery in the Tidewater
region of South Levy County
by re-enactors of the Sons' ','
of Confederate Veterans and
Sons of Union Veterans.
The Williston Red Devils
went to the state playoffs and
won their first game. The
season ended for the team
when they were bested by
Eustis 22-6.
The Levy County Board
of County Commissioners
agreed to begin negotiations
to buy property near the
courthouse and begin
working with an architect on
plans for additional space
needed for its expanding
offices.
The Suwannee River
Water Management District
(District) governing board
issued a Phase I Water Short-
sage Advisory to remain in
effect district-wide until
further notice.
County Attorney Anne
Brown came under fire
when Bronson resident
C.W. Gilbert blasted her
performance during a county
commission meeting. During
that same meeting, the
commissioners evaluated
Brown and all except
Chairwoman Nancy Bell
found her work satisfactory.
Bell said if it were up to her
alone, Brown would be fired.
Cedar Key students got
to experience clamming up
close as they seeded clams
in the Gulf as part of their
science lesson.
Chiefland's Loy Ann and
Jack Mann donated 15.4
acres of land to Central
Florida Community College.
December
A new group, called the
Regional Transportation
Advisory Group (TAG),
was created to plan ahead
for development along
the Highway 26 corridor.
The group will look at
deficiencies in the current
roadway system, and by
working together, will share
future road building duties.
Wayne Hart was the
featured seaman during a
salute to Pearl Harbor Day.
This year marked the 65th
anniversary of the "day that


will live in infamy."
The county mourned
the death of two Williston
High School students. Cody
Roberts and Corey Knappins
were killed when the truck
driven by Roberts hit a stand
of trees off Highway 27A.
Williston City Manager
Jim Coleman received a less
than enthusiastic evaluation
at the city council meeting.
The Levy County Quilt
Museum celebrated the
release of its book detailing
the history of the museum.
Copies are available from
Winnelle Hore for $15
each.
County Commissioner
Lilly Rooks chastised
Chairwoman Nancy Bell
for authorizing a change in
the board's minutes after the
board agreed not to change
them.
Chietland and Bronson
were having a difficult time
on the basketball court this
season. Area teams have
handily defeated the Levy
schools.
Progress Energy
announced that its preferred
site for a nuclear power plant
is in South Levy County.
Once all the state and
federal hoops are jumped
through and approved, the
plant could open by 2016
and employ as many as 500
people.
Bob Williams said race
is a factor in decisions
made by the Chiefland City
Commission. Williams made
several allegations against
city commissioners during
a meeting and said local
papers are afraid to print the
truth.
Chiefland City Council
narrowed its manager
position down to two and
after a background race,
selected Grady Hartzog of
Newberry as the man to
oversee city operations.
Cedar Key residents
are looking for additional
funding to continue
neutering the island's feral
cats. The volunteer group
needs about $1,700 a month
to keep up with the cat
population.
The state of Florida denied
Ameris' application for
a certificate of need for a
hospital in Chiefland. With
only one letter opposed and
more than 5,000 in support,
Ameris will appeal the
decision.
Students at Cedar Key
School remembered a
classmate with a memorial
shark dedicated to his-
memory. D.J. Emanuel was
killed in a freak accident
earlier this year.
Two pages of photos
showcased the FFA Sub-
Region awards held at
Hardeetown Baptist Church.
The county commissioners
and the city of Cedar Key
agreed to divide roads and
bridges for maintenance
purposes and eventually
the city will take over Dock








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Page 14


U classified

HA Deadline
NMonday.
-and 2 p.m.




egals


LVY COUNTYJO


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


How to Place Your Ad


Call: Chiefland 352-490-4462
Fax: Chiefland 352-490-4490
Email: mblitch@lev-journal.com
Visit: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland


Bronson 352-486-2312
Bronson 352-486-5042

440 South Court Street, Bronso
..


10

105 Personals
AA MEETING--for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number, tfn
NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net

IAM IN POSSESSION OFa 1979
Cadillac 2-door yellow Coupe
DeVille, VIN: 6D47S99270283.
Anyone claiming ownership,
write to 5951 NE 87t Avenue,
Bronson, FL 326221. 1/18p

125. Service" U
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb
MAKO, !!,PLASTERINGs &
PAINTING, Quality -assurance,
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096. 12/28p
CONCEALED WEAPON
PERMIT anytime. Contact
Kulhman Judah, 352-493-4209.

rentals 3



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310 .
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real Estate

401


Land
425 for SalE


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lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner: 352-624-2215, 352-236-
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champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07

Recreation 60l



Boats &M
605 1.
MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
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Transportation

80.

810 Automobl
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good exterior. $1800. 352-535-
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Trucksinr
820 -
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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CLASSIFIED a IFRALS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Page 15


legals 90(


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA:
CASE NO.: 38-2006CA000954
THE ESTATE OF SARAH
LOUISE DOWNS, KENNETH
NOBLE, FLORENCE
WILLIAMS, EARLYNNE MABLE
HARPER, DONA COWARD
AND LEONARD GOLSON, all
individuals,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ABRAHAM A/K/A ABRAM
SPIKESAND ELLAA/K/A ELLEN
SPIKES, his wife, PHILLIP D.
VACHON, ADELIA 1. VACHON,
EZRA HENSON, BARBARA
HENSON, WOODROW P.
HENDERSON, NANCY L.
HENSON,WILLIE MAE GIBSON,
JOHNNY A. MCINTYRE and
BERNICE MCINTYRE
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO THE ABOVE STYLED
DEFENDANTS AND ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:

YOUARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on
the following property located in
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, to
wit:
Property ID # 13-12-18-
04059-000-00; Property Short
Legal Description: 10.50 Acres
parts of E % of SW 1 of SE
'* & W % of SE 1 of SE %4
Less tract Sold in Deed Book
N, Page 71, Deed Book 23,
Pages 667, Deed Book 30,
Page 112 & Deed Book .29,
Page 110.
CONTAINING 10.5 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of written defenses, if any,
to it on KIMBERLY S. DAISE,
P.A. plaintiffs' attorney, whose
address is 1747 Van Buren
Street, Suite 870, Hollywood, FL
33020-5.190, and file the original
with the Clerk of Court at 355
South Court Street, Bronson,
FL 32621 on or before January
12, 2007; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
petition.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should, no later
than seven (7) days prior, contact
the Clerk of the court's disability
coordinator at Telephone Voice/
TDD (800) 955-8771.'
WITNESS my hand. and the
seal of this Court this 27" day of
November, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006-DR-000-960
KENNIETH GIBSON
Petitioner
and

DONNA GIBSON
: Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DONNA GIBSON
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on KENNIETH
GIBSON, whose address is 356
SE 10= Street, Ocala. FL 32656
on or before January 11, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 355 S. CT. St. or
P.O. Box 610, Bronson, FL32621
before service on Petitioner or


immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of


the Circuit Courts office notified
of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-30-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Melissa Allen
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN .THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR GILCHRIST
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 21-2006-DR-0350
PAULA EDMONDS
Petitioner
and

GEORGE EDMONDS
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: GEORGE RAYMOND
EDMONDS.
15591 NW 41st Terr.
Trenton, FL 32693

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on PAULA
EDMONDS, whose address is
15591 NW 41st Terr., Trenton,
FL 32693 on or before January
3, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of.this Court at
P.O. Box 37, Trenton, FL 32693
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current-address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 12-1-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT

By: Kendra Cathey
[Court
Seal}Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7,14,21, 28, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006-DR-924
CASHA DAY MARTIN
Petitioner
and

DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on CASHA


DAY MARTIN, whose address
is 8650 NW 127th PI., Chiefland,
FL 32626 on or before January
10, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
at 355 S. Court St. or P.O.
Box 327, Bronson, FL 32621
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents


in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-9-2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Deanna K. Dobbins
[Court Seal]
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE

Notice is hereby given' that
pursuant to a Writ of Execution
issued out of the County Court
for Levy, Florida on the 12th day
of October, 2006 in the cause
wherein SUNSTATE FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION was Plaintiff
and DAVID WESTRICH, JR.
was Defendant, being case
number 38-2005-SC-619 in said
Court, I Johnny Smith, as Sher-
iff of Levy County, Florida have
levied upon all the right, title and
interest of the.Defendant, DAVID
WESTRICH, JR. in and to the
following described property.

1994 Ford F-150 pickup truck
VIN # 1FTEX15N6RKB26361

On the 17th day of January,
2007 at the Levy County Sher-
iffs Office Impound, Lot located
at 9150 N.E. 80th Avenue, Bron-
son, Florida at the hour of 11:00
a.m. I will offer for sale and sell
all of the said Defendants right,
title and interest in the above de-
scribed property at public auction
and will sell the same subject to
prior liens, encumbrances, and
judgments, if any, to the high-
est bidder for cash in hand, the
proceeds to be applied as far as
may be to the payment of costs
and the satisfaction of the de-
scribed execution.
Johnny Smith, Sheriff
Levy County, Florida

.In accordance with the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
agency sending the notice not
later than five working days prior
to the proceeding at the address
given on the notice. Telephone
(352)-486-5207.
Pub: Dec. 14, 21, 28, 2006
Jan. 4, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE::38-2006-CP-000 276

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
ABBIE VONCILE HAYES
Decedent

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of ABBIE VONCILE
HAYES, deceased, File
number:38-2006-CP-000 276 is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Levy County, Florida, Probate
division, the address of which
is 355 South Court Street, P.O.
Box 610 Bronson, Levy County,
FL 3262, and that the names
and address of the personal
representative and personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:


All personsonwhomthis notice
is served who have objections
that challenge the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE


DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court.
WITHIN LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMSAND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE is December 21, 2006..


Personal
EARL LANE


Representative:


Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative
/s/ B. Larry Smith
SMITH LAW FIRM, LLC
B. LARRY SMITH,. ESQUIRE
FBN 152687,
B. SHANNON SMITH,
ESQUIRE
FBN: 0022028
322 East Park Avenue
Chiefland FL 32626
352-490-5353/fax: 352-490-
5337
Pub.: December 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE


CHRISTOPHER C. PRAEFKE,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CHRISTOPHER C. PRAEFKE,
IF ANY; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF FORECLSOURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
Dec. 13, 2006 entered in Civil
Case No. 38 2006-CA-688 of the.
Circuit Court of the 8TH Judicial
Circuit in and for LEVY County,
Bronson, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at THE MAIN LOBBY at
the LEVY County Courthouse
located at 355 South Court Street
in Bronson, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 16th day of January, 2007
the following described property
as set forth in said Summary
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 3, BLOCK "B",
BRONZE SUN ACRES, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION
IN THE SE % OF SECTION 34,
TOWNSHIP 11 SOUTH, RANGE
17 EAST, LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA. BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 11
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST;
THENCE RUN S. 89003'00"
W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE
OF SECTION 34, A DISTANCE
OF 450.15 FEET TO THE
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF A 50 FOOT STREET
(KNOWN AS BAHIA DRIVE):
THENCE N. 0058'06" E.,
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 2151.19 FEET TO THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF A 50 FOOT STREET;
THENCE S. 8903'00" W.,
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-
I


WAY LINE 475.13 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE S.
8903'00" W., 225 FEET;
THENCE N. 0057'00" W.,
503.29 FEET TO THE SOUTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF L.C.R.
119; THENCE N. 8943'29"
E, ALONG THE SAID RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE 225.02 FEET;
THENCE S. 00*57'00" E., A
DISTANCE OF 500.64 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of
the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 13th day of
December, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit court
By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)

THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. University Drive Suite
500
Plantation, FL 33324
(954) 233-8000'
06-57269(PHHM)

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, persons with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the LEVY County Courthouse at
904-486-5276, 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE EIGHTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY
CASE NO. 38-2006-CA-811
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,'
Plaintiff,


OF JEFFREY JOSEPH
THOMAS, f
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated December 11,
2006, and entered in Case No.
38-2006-CA-811, of the Circuit
Court of the Eighth Judicial
Circuit in and for Levy County,
Florida, wherein SUNTRUST
MORTGATE, is a Plaintiff and
JEFFREY JOSEPH THOMAS,
IF LIVING; AND IF DEAD, THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND
ALL.OTHERPARTIESCLAIMING
AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER ORAGAINST JEFFREY
JOSEPH THOMAS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JEFFREY JOSEPH
THOMAS; are the Defendant. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at Front Lobby of
the Levy County Court House,
355 Court Street, Bronson,
Florida 32621, at 11:00 a.m. on
January 8, 2007, the following
described property a set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:

SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION
ATTACHED HERETO AS
EXHIBIT "A"
Tract 30-N, WINL. .G RIVER
PRESERVE, an unrecorded
subdivision, which Tract is more
particularly described as follows:
A parcel of land in Section 27,
Township 11 South, Range 16
East, Levy County, Florida, said
parcel being, more particularly
described as follows:
For a Point of Reference,
commence at the SW corner of
Section 27, Township 11 South,
Range 16 East, Levy County,
Florida;' thence N 00 degrees
27'44" E, along the West line of
said Section 27, a distance of
32.34 feet, to the Northeasterly
right of way line of Levy County
Road C-339; thence S 68
degrees 36'33" E, along said
right of way line, 247.24 feet to a
point lying within the headwaters
of the Waccasassa River; thence
N 24 degrees 52'09" E, generally
along said River 1675.13 feet,
thence departing said River, run


.N 76 degrees 04'37" E, 2684.59
feet, to a point of the Western
boundary of the Cobb Road
Easement Area as described
on Exhibit 'C' of the Cobb Road
Easement Agreement recorded
in Official Records Book 806,
Page 377, also being a point
on a curve concave to the
East, having a radius of 211.72
feet, and through which point
passes a radial bearing of N
67 degrees 38'05" E; thence,
along said Western boundary
until otherwise noted, run
Northerly, along the arc of said
curve, through a central angle
of 31 degrees 45'50", a distance
of 117.38 feet, to the Pont of
Tangency of said curve; thence
N 09 degrees 23'55" E, 205.17
feet to the Point of Curvature of a
curve concave to the Southeast,
having a radius of 316.50 feet;
thence Northeasterly, along
the arc of said curve, through
a central angle of 12 degrees
21'27", a distance of 68.26
feet, to the Point of Beginning;
thence, departing said Western
boundary, run N 84 degrees
23'14" W 2646.39 feet, to a point
lying within said headwaters of
the Waccasassa River, thence
N 00 degrees 28'38" E, 909.38
feet; thence S 73 degrees
19'39" E. 2939.41 feet, to said
Western boundary of the Cobb
Road Easement Area, also
being a point on a curve concave
to the West, having a radius of
188.62 feet, and through which
point passes a radial bearing of
S 82 degrees 23'05" W; thence
Southerly, along said boundary
and the arc of said curve, through
a central angle of 55 degrees
50'24" a distance of 183.83 feet,
to the Point of Tangency of said
curve, thence S 48 degrees
13'29" W, along said boundary,
60.17 feet, to the Point of
Curvature of a curve concave to
the Southeast, having a radius
of 316.50 feet; thence Southerly,
along said boundary and the arc
of said curve, through a central
angle of 26 degrees 28'07", a
distance of 146.21 feet, to close
on the Point of Beginning.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than -the property
owner as, of-the date- of the lis
pendensimust fileaclaimawithin
60 days after the sale.

DANNY J. SHIPP
As Clerk of the Court
By: Gwen McElroy
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 11th day of Dec., 2006

IMPORTANT
In accordance with -the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a reasonable,
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should, no later
than seven (7) days prior, contact
the Clerk of the Court's disability
coordinator at 3524865315, PO
Box 310, BRONSON, FL, 32621.
If hearing impaired contact (TDD)
via Florida Relay System.

Submitted by:
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33312
STelephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF
RESOLUTION
VACATING PUBLIC ROAD

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, at its
regular scheduled meeting on
December 19, 2006, vacated,
abandoned and closed the
following described roadway:
All that part of Bay Street lying
north of the northerly line of Pine
Street, located in Hales Addition
to the Town of Cedar Key, Florida,
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page
22 of the Public Records of Levy
County, Florida.
A Resolution vacating said road
was duly adopted.

NANCY BELL
Chair, Board of County
Commissioners
Pub. December 28, 2006


8T JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, vs.
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA JEFFREY JOSEPH THOMAS,
GENERAL JURISDICTION IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE
DIVISION UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
CASE NO.: 38-2006-CA-688 DEVISEESP, GRANTEES,
PF---- IMORTG~ASEIGNEES, LINIRS,
CORPORATION, '/'Pl CREDITORSS, TRUSTEES
CENDANT MORTGAGE AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CORPORATION CLAIMING AN INTEREST
PLAINTIFF BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
VS. AGAINST JEFFREY JOSEPH
THOMAS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE










Page 16


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CI A1IFIFlE R IIFAILS


--~~W UUW WEE U u -- --l


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE .
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND
FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 38-2006-CP-266
IN RE: ESTATE OF

JOHN MACK WRIGHT,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of JOHN MACK WRIGHT,
deceased, whose date of death
was February 2, 2006; whose
social security number is 041-
60-3267, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Levy County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 355 South Court Street,
Post Office Box 610, Bronson,
Florida, 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons who have claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated
claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
who have claims or demands
against he decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidat6d claims, must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE
IS DECEMBER 21, 2006
Personal Representative:
Michelle M. Wright
206 E. Cason Blvd.
Inglis, Florida 34449


Attorney for F
Representative:
James L. Richard
Florida Bar No. 243477
808 SE Fort King Street
Ocala, FL 34471
(352) 369-1300
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006


Personal


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Dona Potter d/b/a Bronson
Self Storage, pursuant to the
provisions of the Florida Self
Storage Facility Act (Fla. Stat..
83.801 et sec.) hereby gives no-
tice of sale under said Act to wit:
On January 13, 2007 at Bron-
son Self Storage, 839 E. Hatha-
way Ave., Bronson, FL 32621,
Donna Potter or her agent will
conduct a sale at 10:00 A.M. by
sealed bids to the highest bidder.
Bids to be opened at noon, with
viewing from 10:00 A.M. until
noon for the contents of the bay
or bays, rented by the following
person/persons.

Harriett Perry
PO BOX 721
Williston, FL 32696

Sandra Tapia
12270 NE 1108th Terr.
Archer, FL 32618

Consists of household, per-
sonal items or miscellaneous,
stored at Bronson Self Storage,
839 E. Hathaway Ave., Bronson,
FL 32621. Sale is being held to
satisfy a statutory lien
Dated December 18, 2006.

Dona Potter
PO Box 1705
Bronson, Fl 32621


Buying

Tax Deeds?
NAeed to dee tfe titt e?
experienced Dependafe
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
ECaT
e&mai tea 1. Weidiws
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


Phone (352) 486-2121
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006


NOTICE OF PROPOSED
RULES

NOTICE OF PROPOSED
RULES: Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
Chapters 40D-3 and 40D-4b,
Florida Administrative Code
(F.A.C.).
Summary of the Proposed
Rules:
Rule40D-3. F.A.C.. Regulation
of Wells: The amendment of
Rule 40D-3.042, F.A.C., clarifies
the District's existing practice
that allows the construction
of a multi-zone monitor well
under a single well construction
permit. The amendments to
Rules 40D-3.101, 40D-3.411,
and 40D-3.531, F.A.C., address
requirements for permitting and
constructing water wells. The
rules reference forms used to
permit wells and document well
construction and abandonment.
Several of the referenced forms
have been updated and the
District proposes to amend the
rules to reference the current
forms. The proposed amendment
of Rule 40D-3.531, F.A.C., also
reorganizes the rule to clarify
the permitting requirements for
well abandonment and to clarify
how a referenced form should be
used. The reorganization does
not substantively change the
rule.
Rule 40D-40. F.A.C., General
Environmental Resource
Permits: The amendment
of Rule 40D-40.301, F.A.C.,
Conditions for Issuance of
General Permits for Minor
Surface Water Management
Systems, revises the existing
rule to delete language that
restricts the activities considered
for permitting threshold purposes
to dredging and filling. The
amendment also adds language
to clarify that activities evaluated
pursuant to this rule include not
only those activities occurring
in, but in, on or over wetlands or
other surface waters.
THE PERSON TO BE
CONTACTED REGARDING
THE PROPOSED RULES, AND
SA-COPY OfTHE PRELIMINARY
DRAFT OF *EACH,,IS;,K.ar lE.
West, Deputy General Counsel,
Office of General Counsel, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, FL
34604-6899, (352) 796-7211,
extension 4651. The District does
not discriminate on the basis
of disability. Anyone requiring
reasonable accommodation
should contact Dianhe Lee at
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4658; TDD
only: 1-800-231-6103.
Pub.: Dec. 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 8th
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY
Case # 38-2006-CA-917


Division #

UNC: Washington Mutual Bank,
Plaintiff,
-vs-

William Douglas Sise, Jr.; Bonnie
J. Sise; Unknown Parties in
Possession #1; Unknown Parties
in Possession #2; If living, and
all Unknown Parties claiming
by, through, under and against
the above named Defendant(s)
who are not known to be dead
or alive, whether said Unknown
Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF ACTION
FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO:
Bonnie J. Sise, WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 2929
SOUTHWEST 28TH PLACE, LOT
336, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
32608.
Residence unknown,
if living, including any
unknown spouse of the said
Defendants, if either has
remarried and if either or both
of said Defendants are dead,
their respective unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors,
lienors, and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against
the named Defendant(s);
and the aforementioned
named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendants and
such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendants as may
ibe infants, incompetents or
otherwise not sui juris

YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action has
been commenced to foreclose
a mortgage on the following real
property, lying and being situated
in Levy County, Florida, more
particularly described as follows:
LOT 3, BLOCK 6, OF
BRONSON HEIGHTS,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED INPLAT BOOK
.3, PAGES 33 AND 34, QF
THE PUBL -,,9 FIECR S
OF LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH A DOUBLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME, YEAR:
2005; MAKE: DESTINY
SOUTHERN PINES, VINS:
DISH00749A& DISH00749B,
PERMANENTLY AFFIXED
THEREON.
more commonly known as 9350
Northeast 670t Street, Bronson,
FL 32621.
This action has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO
& FISHMAN, LLP, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 10004
N. Dale Mabry Highway, Suite
112, Tampa, FL 33618 within


thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this notice and file
the original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
there after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 18t day of
December 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Circuit and County Courts

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 28, 2006
Jan. 4, 2007

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT
TO FIND THE
LEVY COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENTS IN
COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 06-2-NOI-3801-
(A)-(I)

The Department gives notice of
its intentto find theAmendment(s)
to the Comprehensive Plan
for Levy County, adopted by
Ordinance No(s). 2006-11, 2006-
13 and 2006-14 on November
9, 2006, IN COMPLIANCE,
pursuant to Sections 163.3184,
163.3187 and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Levy County
Comprehensive Plan
Amendments) and the
Department's Objections,
Recommendations and
Comments Report, (if any), are
available for public inspection
Monday through Friday, except
for legal holidays, during normal
business hours, at the Levy
County Planning Department,
380 South Court Street, Bronson,
Florida 32621.
Any affected person, as
defined in Section 163.3184,
F.S. has a eight to petition
for an administrative hearing
to challenge the proposed
agency determination that the
Amendment(s) to the Levy
County Comprehensive Plan'
are irn Compliance, as defined
in iOmubseetrd-J'l-' .3I)84($i ,
F.S.Iil T)he o petitiortn etlUst vbe
filed within twenty-one (21)
'days after publication of this
notice, and must include all of
the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-
106.201, F.A.C. The petition
must be filed with the Agency
Clerk, Department of Community
Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100, and a copy
mailed or delivered to the local
government. Failure to timely
file a petition shall constitute a
waiver of any right to request
an administrative proceeding
as a petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a
petition is filed, the purpose of the


administrative hearing will be to
present evidence and testimony
and forward a recommended
order to the Department. If no
petition is filed, this Notice of
Intent shall become final agency
action.
If a petition is filed, other affected
persons may petition for leave to
intervene in the proceeding A
petition for intervention must be
filed at least twenty (20) days
before the final hearing and must
include all of the information and
contents described in Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A
petition for leave to intervene
shall be filed at the Division
of Administrative Hearings,
Department of Management
Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3060. Failure to petition
to intervene within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiver
of any right such a person has to
request a hearing under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or to
participate in the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative
hearing petition is timely filed,
mediation is available pursuant
to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a),
F.S. to any .affected person
who is made a party to "the
proceeding by filing that request
with the administrative law
judge assigned by the Division
.of Administrative Hearings.
The choice of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to an
administrative hearing.

-s- Mike McDaniel, Acting Chief
Office of Comprehensive
Planning
Division of Community Planning
Department of Community
Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100
Pub: Dec. 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Case No.: ,38-20,0.5-CA-:1049.
GLENN I,!WILLIAMS and ;.a
ANNA J. WILLIAMS, his wife,
Plaintiffs,

vs
DANIEL M. BULLINGTON, and
any and all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under
or against the herein named
individual defendants) who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties
may claim an interest as spouses,


heirs, devisees, grantees, or
other claimants; JOHN DOE,
JANE DOE OR ANY KNOWN
OR UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION, the names being
fictitious to account for parties in
possession
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that, pursuant to a Summary
Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated Dec. 18, 2006, Case No.
2005CA-1049 of the Circuit
Court of Levy County, Florida,
in which GLENN E. WILLIAMS
and ANNA J. WILLIAMS, his
wife are the Plaintiffs, and
DANIEL M. BULLINGTON, is
the Defendant, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
in the lobby at the Front Door of
the Levy County Courthouse, in
Bronson, Florida, at 11:00 A.M.
on the 22nd day of January 2007,
the following described property
set forth in the order of Summary
Final Judgment.

Lots 14 and 15, Block C,
Country Estates, according to
plat of record in Plat Book 3,
page 42, office of- the clerk of
the circuit court for Levy County,
Florida.
Together with a 1969 Herli Mobile
home bearing ID#GS12622031
and title #13530719 situated
thereon.

TAX PARCEL ID# 6714-
004-00

DATED this 20t day of
December, 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 28, 2006
Jan. 4, 2007


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the Notice Cneratl Pennit

on 28 acres to serve Renovation known as Izaak Walton Lodge Restaurant

The project is located in Levy County, Section(s) 5o

Township 17 South, Range 16 East. The permit applicant

is Izaak Walton Investors, .LC whose address is 2026 Aaron Place, Clearater, Florida 33760

The permit No. is 47031837.001


The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday through
Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District (District) Brooksville Headquarters 2379 Broad Street Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899


NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this permit
may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of
Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the substantial interests of each person
requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's action, or final action; (2) state all material
facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts;
and (3) otherwise-comply with Chapter28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing must be filed with
and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within14 days for
an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of Sovereign Sub-
merged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a
waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and
120.57,F.S.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing
of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the position taken by it in
this notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any
such final decision of the District on the application have the right to petition to become a party to
the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute regarding the
District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a request for hearing.

42.00-09 (Rev 03/06)


PLANNING COMMISSION
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by
the Planning Commission on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at 6:30 p.m. or as soon
thereafter as the matter may be heard during the course of action. The hearing will be
held in the County Commissioners' Meeting Room," The Levy County Courthouse,
355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Planning Commission is not bound to
consider the petitions in the order listed in this notice. Any of these petitions may be
considered as soon as the meeting commences.
PP 35-06 Croft Land Surveying representing Prinston Jean-Glaude, Elima
Napoleon and Alie Brutus, petitioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Airport
Meadows," a subdivision located in the NE % 6f Section 11, Township 13S, Range
18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 25.7 acres more or less and is located
within the Williston Municipal Service District. This subdivision will consist of
approximately forty '/ acre residential lots. The zoning designation is "RR" Rural
Residential and the land use is "LDR" Low Density Residential.
Copies of said petitions with complete legal descriptions and subsequent staff
reports will be available for review at the Levy County Development Department.
For information call 352-486-5203. Interested parties may appear at the meeting
and be heard regarding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the County
Commissioners Administration Office at 352-486-5218.
SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEAL ANY DECISION
MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
SUCH MEETING, A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING,AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE,
A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RECORD
INCLUDES THE TESTIMONYAND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO
BE BASED.
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006


BOARD OF COUNTY

COMMISSIONERS
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by the
Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, January 2, 2007 at 10:00 a.m. or
as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard during the course of action. The
hearing will be held in the County Commissioners' Meeting Room, The Levy County
Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Board of County
Commissioners is not bound to consider the petitions in the order listed in this notice.
Any of these petitions may be
considered as soon as the
meeting commences. -
SE 6-06 Ralph Eng of Eng -
Denman & Associates, Inc. s
representing Eddie Hodge, '
petitioning the board for a
Special Exception to operate
a Permanent wood chipping d
business (pine shaving mill),
on a parcel of land located i I i
in the SE % of Section 29, '
Township 13S, Range 19E, in
Levy County. Said parcel is a "
portion of Parcel No. 05230- -
000-00 and will consist of 14.9
acres more or less. This parcel
is located within an Agriculture/
Rural Residential "AIRR" zone.
Copies of said petition with complete legal descriptions and subsequent staff
reports will be available for review at the Levy County Development Department.
For information call 352-486-5203. Interested parties may appear at the meeting
and be heard regarding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the County
Commissioners Administration Office at 352-486-5218.
SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEAL ANY DECISION
MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
SUCH MEETING,A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING,AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE,
A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RECORD
INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO
BE BASED.
Pub: Dec. 21, 28, 2006










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Levy Land Transactions
11/5/06 12/1/06
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-Assign-
ment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended Certificate of Title
AD-Agree Deed, Al-Assumption of Indebtedness, AM -Assignmer
of Mortgage, CD-Correctory Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed
E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage
Modify Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, PX Probate X, QCD
Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed, WD-Warrant
Deed

QCD $10.00, BDY NE1/4 SW1/428-12-18, PARCEL #04208-
000-00
Grantee(s) DELONEY MARK, WADE EMMA
Grantor WADE EMMA
CD $10.00, OR 691/824, 710/143, BDY 17,19, 20, 29, 30-16-17
ETC, SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s) R1999 TIMBERLANDS LLC, RAYONIER FOREST
RESOURCES LP, RAYONIER TIMBERLANDS OPERATING COMI
PANY LP, RAYONIER WOODLANDS LLC
Grantor JEFFERSON SMURFIT CORPORATION
WD $100.00, L10-11(2) FOWLERWAYSD
Grantee(s) SCHMIDT JOHN C, GRIFFIN LAURA
Grantor(s) ADAMS LAURA, GRIFFIN LAURA
WD $31,000.00, LI-4(19) TOWN SITE OF TUCKAHO
Grantee(s) BELLFLOWERS IRENE W, BELLFLOWERS EUGENE
R
Grantor PERICCIUOLI FOSTER W
M $24,800.00, LI-4(19) TOWN SITE OF TUCKAHO
Grantee PERICCIUOLI FOSTER W
Grantor(s) BELLFLOWERS IRENE W, BELLFLOWERS EUGENE
R
WD $95,000.00, L15(H)STEEPLECHASE FARMS,:ETC
Grantee(s) REYNOLDS FAMILY TRUST, REYNOLDS ROBERT F
TRUSTEE, REYNOLDS CATHARINE M TRUSTEE
Grantor BALARSKI THOMAS A
M $108,333.00, UNIT #3-B OLD FENIMORE MILL CONDO
PHASE 2, ETC
Grantee JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA
Grantor(s) PARKINSON JANICE R, PARKINSON FRANK A
WD $40,000.00, L14(7) UNIVERSITY OAKS, W/MH
Grantee(s) HUGHES JANE A, HUGHES HAROLD W
GrantorALLEN ELAINE C
WD $76,000.00, L5-6(17) OCALA HGH WEST, W/MH
Grantee WARSHEL KEVIN P
Grantor(s) GREENSPAN DEANA, GREENSPAN PERRY H
WD $130,000.00, L5-6(17) OCALA HGH WEST, W/MH
'Grantee RATHER MARY T
Grantor WARSHEL KEVIN P
M $63,600.00, L5-6(17) OCALA HGH WEST, W/MH
Grantee(s) GREENSPAN DEANA, GREENSPAN PERRY H
Grantor RATHER MARY T
WD $18,000.00, BDY N1/2 N1/235-12-17, PARCEL #03597-007
00, ETC
Grantee WOOD MARTIN D
Grantor(s) HARPER JANE M DECEASED, HARPER EARL J
SM $20,000.00, BDY L11(B) WOODLAND ACRES SD
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor WINNINGHAM NORMAN
'WD $64,377.00, L6 INGUNA HILLS SD, BDY 28-12-17
Grantee(s) CALLAHAN TOM, WOOD JILL, CALLAHAN SHIRLEY
Grantor WOOD JILL
;. WD $7,000.00, BDY.15-12-18. PARCEL #04021-006-00
Grantee(s) GOUGE.DANIEL V,.THACKER OHERYI-LIYNN .
,?rlhtor BEWMqETTFWMLLAtrWALL ^' i 'l
WD $10.00, L5(7) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS. :
Grantee(s) WHITE MICHELLE S, WENDLING ALICE, ANDERSON
JERALDYNE P, ENRIGHT CONSTANCEJ
Grantor GIFFORD ROE W
SM $24,706.90, L12-C CASON INGLIS ACRES #6, W/MH
Grantee CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES INC
Grantor SUKEY JOSEPH
WD $10.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 1-16-16, ETC
Grantee VILLAGE PINE MOBILE HOME PARK LLC
Grantor OBERT ROBERT V
WD $10.00, BDY 30-14-1,8, ETC
Grantee RUSTIC ACRES PROPERTIES LLC
f Grantor OBERT ROBERT V
WD $10.00, L4 OF THE 174TH ST SD, PARCEL #21732-000-0C
'Grantee MCDOUGAL NATHAN G SR
Grantor SMITH ROY A
M $196,000.00, L4(13) MAP OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF
THE CITY OF CEDAR KEY, ETC
Grantee SPH MORTGAGE LLC
Grantor(s) BRIDGES SAMUEL B, KING MELANIE S
S WD $49,000.00, L21(2) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee(s) WILLIAMS TERESAA, WILLIAMS RALPH A
Grantor REO MANAGEMENT 2004 INC
M $44,000.00, L21(2) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, WIMH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) WILLIAMS TERESAA, WILLIAMS RALPH A
M $50,000.00, .BDY NE1/4 SE1/410-12-17, W/MH, PARCEL
#03393-001-00,,ETC
Grantee(s) AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) ARNOLD LYNDA, ARNOLD ROBERT VINCENT
MMA $2,200.00, OR 980/12, L43 REPLAT OF L14-19(B) SU-
WANNEE RIVER ESTS, ETC
Grantee OCALA NATIONAL BANK
Grantor WI-IODEN GLORIA)
WD $130,000.00, L6-7(31) MAP OF WILLISTON
Grantor FEATHER RUTH
M $130,000.00, L6-7(31) MAP OF WILLISTON ,
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
QCD $10.00, L5 LAURELWOOD, W/MH .
Grantee SHUTTS RONALD MARSHALL
Grantor SHUTTS MELISSA ELIZABETH'
WD $10.00, .L2 COUNTRY ACRES, W/MH
Grantee HUDDLESTON ANNA LEE
Grantor HUDDLESTON ROBERT
WD $40,000.00, L2 COUNTRY ACRES, W/MH
Grantee MILLER TIMOTHY
Grantor HUDDLESTON ANNA LEE
M $30,000.00, L2 COUNTRY ACRES, W/MH
Grantee MATSON MARK A
Grantor MILLER TIMOTHY
M 1 $45,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SW1/4 20-13-18, PARCEL #04466
000-00
Grantee SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor ESTES JOANN MULLINS
M $5,500.00, BDY NE1/4 NW 1/4 10-12-17, PARCEL #03397-


104-OA
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor MIRANDA DEBRA
M 1 $80,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/4 1-17-16, PARCEL #63009-
005-00
Grantee SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) HUGHES LINDA G, HUGHES JOHN
M $125,000.00, L29(93) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s) AMPRO MORTGAGE, MERS, UNITED FINANCIAL
MORTGAGE CORP
Grantor SHASTEEN FRED
COT $100.00, 38-06-CA-361, L5(E) OAK RIDGE ESTS #1,
W/MH
Grantee LEVY COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


Grantor(s) GOODSON RACHAEL, CLERK OF COURT DANNY J
SHIPP, GOODSON DUANE DECEASED
QCD $35,000.00, L8(B) LANGLEY ESTS
Grantee(s) LEWIS JILL M, LEWIS WAYNE A
SGrantor(s) NORRIS DANA, NORRIS TOMMY
t WD $7,000.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-
S130-00
Grantee COLLINS JEFFREY L
Grantor RUSSELL JACK D
y QCD $15,000.00, L4(C) NORTH SOUTH EST #2
Grantee COLLINS JEFFREY L
G.rantor(s) ROSSBOROUGH CARL W, ROSSBOROUGH R C
TRUSTEE
M $245,000.00, BDY 32-15-13, ETC
Grantee(s) AMERIS, AMERICAN BANKING COMPANY
Grantor BRYAN SEAN C
WD $30,000.00, BDY L12(3) VILLAGE OF GREEN THUMBS
DEV INC
Grantee GARCIA LOIDA D
I- Grantor(s) SANCHEZ MARION, SANCHEZ NICHOLAS
M $20,000.00, BDY L12(3) VILLAGE OF GREEN THUMBS DEV
INC
Grantee(s) SANCHEZ MARION, SANCHEZ NICHOLAS
Grantor GARCIA LOIDA D
WD $13,500.00, L460 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 10-12-17
Grantee(s) HUGHES LAURI, HUGHES PATRICK
Grantor DOPPLER DAVE INC
WD $37,500.00, L1-2(2) CORRECTIVE PLAT OF OAK FOREST
ESTS
Grantee LUSNIA ROBERT JD
Grantor(s) LUNDY MICHEL, JEAN DENIS HONORINE, DENIS
HONORINE JEAN
WD $115,000.00, L31 OCALA WEST, BDY 25-14-18
Grantee(s)ACHESON ELIZABETH K, CHRISTENSEN BRIAN R
Grantor(s) CORTESE SHANNA LYN, ROY LYNDA
M 1 $180,000.00, BDY W1/2 NW1/4 20-14-18, IV/ME, PARCEL
#04591-000-00
Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) WILLIAMS KAREN S, WILLIAMS DANNY L
WD $4,000.00, L26(45) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee CALLS EDWARD
Grantor SUAREZ OSCAR
WD $4,000.00, L27(45) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee CALLS EDWARD
Grantor SUAREZ OSCAR
M $97,604.59, L15-17(F) ELEANOR VILLAGE
Grantee CENTURY 21 MORTGAGE
Grantor(s) HARRINGTON SUSAN P, HARRINGTON THOMAS D
M $206,112.90, L1PARKVIEW
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s) HUDSON NINA, HUDSON JAMES ROLLIN JR
M 1 $22,000.00, L6(C) SUNSHINE SAVANNA, W/MH
Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
- Grantor(s) VIERA CLARA E, VIERAALCANGEL
WD $25,000.00, BDY 29-11-17, 25-14-17, PARCEL #03233-091-
00, 03743-037-00, 03743-034-00
Grantee(s) RAKITIN ALAN, PERRY H GREENSPAN INC
Grantor COLLINS JEFFREY L
WD $375,000.00, L6 WOODLAND FARMS, BDY 18-14-18
Grantee SOTOLONGO WILFRED O A
Grantor(s) NELSON PETRENA M, NELSON RICHARD
M $300,000.00, L6 WOODLAND FARMS, BDY 18-14-18
'Grantee(s) FIRST FRANKLIN, MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATIQINSYSTEMS INC, NATIONAL CITY BANK
Grn'teoe.SOTOLQN'-aQWILFRED 0' ':::
M $76W)00O0q&6 WOODLAND FARMS, BDY 1-l 4-18 i
Grantee(s) FIRST FRANKLIN, MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, NATIONAL CITY BANK
Grantor SOTOLONGO WILFRED O A
QCD $10.00, L2(38) WILLISTON HGH #14
Grantee(s) RUSS MARYANN, RUSS MICHAEL J
Grantor(s) RUSS MARY ANN, LUTTER MARY ANN
WD $48,000.00, L6(55) WILLISTON HGH #5 REPLAT, W/MH
Grantee(s) HARDESTY WANDAA, HARDESTY ROGER L
Grantor(s) CASSEL PAMELA S, CASSEL LARRY E
M $255,000.00, BDY 15, 22-12-18, PARCEL #04115-009-00,
ETC
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s).SOSA MARIAA, SOSAANDRESN
M $69,550.00, L18(A) WILLISTONHGH#1
Grantee(s) LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK FSB, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) HAMPTON MICHELLE L, HAMPTON KEVIN
WD $10.00, BDY SW1/49-11-15, ETC
Grantee(s) GRAHAM MARY A, GRAHAM KENNETH A
Grantor GRAHAM KENNETH A
WD $950,000.00, BDY 32-15-13, PARCEL #08761-000-00, ETC
Grantee TURBEVILLE HUGH
Grantor(s) RICHARD GEYER REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST,
GEYER RICHARD E TRUSTEE
M $170,950.00, L6(C) MORGAN FARMS SD
Grantee WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK
Grantor MURPHY CHRISTINE A
WD $1,519,846.00, L12 BDY L9-11(23) JB EPPERSON ADD TO
THE TOWN OF WILLISTON, SEE IMAGE
Grantee GRAND UNION REALTY LLC
Grantor(s) COMMERCIAL NET LEASE REALTY INC, NATIONAL
RETAIL PROPERTIES INC
CD $10.00, OR 712/502, BDY SE1/4 SE1/4 30-11-14, PARCEL
#00754-002-00
Grantee LEVY COUNTY
Grantor CAPITAL CITY BANK
WD $275,000.00, BDY NW1/415-14-14, PARCEL #01276-002-
00, 01276-003-00, ETC
Grantee(s) DAVISON REBECCA, SPADOLINI ALFRED
Grantor(s) POMEROY MATTHEW T, POMEROY STEPHEN G,
MERTZ PAIGE E
WD $35,000.00, L49 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 10-12-17
Grantee(s) ROBERTS CAROLYN, ROBERTS HUBERT C
Grantor FARROW FRED J
M $30,0b0.00, L49 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 10-12-17
Grantee FARROW FRED J
Grantor(s) ROBERTS CAROLYN, ROBERTS HUBERT C
M $35,000.00, BDY SW1/4NW1/429-11-17, W/MH
Grantee SCHONBRUN HARVEY TRUSTEE
Grantor(s) MUNDEN MARCELLE ANN, MUNDEN JAMES S
M $87,500.00, BDY NE1/4 SW1/4 32-12-19, PARCEL #04833-
- 001-00
Grantee ADVANTAGE ONE MORTGAGE CO
Grantor PITTS LINDA
WD $36,995.00, L25(28) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee ARTTA JOSE VICTOR
Grantor AMERICAN PRIME LLC


M $31,445.75, L25(28) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor ARITA JOSE VICTOR
WD $10,000.00, BDY L21B(C) CASONS INGLIS ACRES #10, SEE
IMAGE
Grantee(s) SHELTON MARY R, SHELTON JOHN S
Grantor(s) JOHANNESSON DANIEL R, BORDEN GERALD PAUL
M $10,469.44, L14(39) WILLISTON HGH #7, IV/ME
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) HINTON BRENDA, HINTON BRENDA C, HINTON RICH-
ARD
WD $150,000.00, BDYNE1/4 SE1/41-13-14, PARCEL #01153-
002-00


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Page 17


Grantee(s) FINA EMMETT, FOXALL LAURA
Grantor(s) CREARY PHYLLIS L, CREARY BENNY L
M $67,060.17, L29 SD OAK MEADOWS PHASE 1, W/MH
Grantee WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor SMITH JANICE E
M $76,500.00, BDYNE1/4 SE1/4 31-11-17, W/MH
Grantee(s) EQUITY ONE FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY, EQ-
UITY ONE INC
Grantor(s) HALL TERESA R, HALL RICHARD M JR
M $62,300.00, BDYNE1/4 SE1/419-11-17, PARCEL #03161-350-
00
Grantee(s) EQUITY ONE FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY, EQ-
UITY ONE INC
Grantor(s) HENICK DOROTHY, HENICK GENE
M $61,891.83, BDY L12(2) JEANNE HEIBNER SD
Grantee BENEFICIAL FLORIDA INC
Grantor(s) COLE LINDA KAY, COLE DOUGLAS E
SM $155,983.34, L52 TRIPLE CROWN FARMS SD #1
Grantee HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor MERRITT CHERYL L
Grantor MERRITT GLENN R
M $127,698.63, L2 ANNEX HTS SD
Grantee HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s) HOGAN TIMOTHY A, HOGAN LINDA C
M $375,000.00, L5(G) RIVER FOREST
Grantee(s) MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC, WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s) BURKE KATHLEEN T, FAHEY EDWARD
M $10,000.00, L2(33) OCALA HGH WEST
Grantee BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s) DEJUSUS MARILUZ, DEJUSUS MARILUZ, ORTOLAZA
SERGIO
WD $29,950.00, L6(13) WILLISTONHGH#7
Grantee(s) BUNTON MARK N, MARCHAND JAMES R
Grantor COLEY CARL
SWD $29,950.00, L6(13) WILLISTONHGH#7
Grantee(s) BUNTON MARK N, MARCHAND JAMES R
Grantor COLEY CARL
M $26,950.00, L5(13) WILLISTONHGH#7
Grantee COLEY CARL LEE
Grantor(s) BUNTON MARK N, MARCHAND JAMES R
M $26,950.00, L6(13) WILLISTONHGH#7
Grantee COLEY CARL LEE
Grantor(s) BUNTON MARK N, MARCHAND JAMES R
NT $91,418.70, OR 1041/788, L5(61) REPLAT OF WILLISTON
HGH #5
Grantee DIRECT MOBILE CONNECTIONS
Grantor PETERS RAYMOND P
M $91,418.70, L5(61) REPLAT OF WILLISTONHGH#5
Grantee US BANK NA
Grantor(s) PETERS MARY E, PETERS RAYMOND P
M $35,000.00, L 11(6) DEER RUN SD
Grantee WELLS FARGO BANK NA
Grantor(s) JOYNER BETH, JOYNER THOMAS 0 JR
M $14,152.00, L 10MOONLITE BAY SD, BDY 36-16-17
Grantee(s) COMMONWEALTH TRUST, FOGLE GEORGIA M
TRUSTEE
Grantor RALSTON ROBERT T
WD $4,000.00, BDYNW1/4 SW1/412-12-17, PARCEL #03400-
197-00
Grantee(s) MATOS ROSALINA, MATOS MAYBELLINE RIVERA
Grantor H B HAYNE CORP
WD $25,000.00, L8(20) WILLISTONHGH#14
Grantee(s) BRYANT MICHAEL WAYNE, CASON TANYA, LEA
GrihtoiWRIG Ht-R 'AL
r4 t 02A ONHGH#14'
Gr'te'eWRIG'YHT RONALD K..
Grantor(s) BRYANT MICHAEL WAYNE, CASON TANYA LEA
WD $105,000.00, L48,50(A) MANATEE SPRINGS TERRACE SD,
ETC
Grantee NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOMINEE SERVICES INC
Grantor HAYFORD HAROLD J
WD $105,000.00, L48,50(A) MANATEE SPRINGS TERRACE SD,
ETC
Grantee(s) LEWIS CLAUDE, BALBIER MICHELLE M
Grantor NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOMINEE SERVICES INC
M $105,000.00, L48,50(A) MANATEE SPRINGS TERRACE SD,
ETC
Grantee(s) WILMINGTON FINANCE INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) LEWIS CLAUDE, BALBIER MICHELLE M
M $62,400.00, L9(A) REPLAT OF SUNNY HGH, W/MH
Grantee(s) COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) GEBHARDT DAVID L, GEBHARDT RUBY M
M $160,000.00, L9 KING RANCH, BDY 26-14-18, ETC
Grantee NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Grantor JOHNSON DIAL C
M $116,000.00, L7(B) WILLISTON HGH#1
Grantee WELLS FARGO BANK NA
Grantor(s) DOUGLAS CYNTHIA B, DOUGLAS GEORGE MAY-
NARD
WD $4,500.00, BDYNE1/4 NW 1/4 25-14-17, PARCEL #03743-
073-00
Grantee(s) GRAIKA GARY, GRAIKA SCOTT, GRAIKA DON, GRAI-
KAJOHN
Grantor JONES JOAN P
WD $23,000.00, L12(18) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5
Grantee(s) ASHE CANDICE P, ASHE ROBERT L JR
Grantor COLLINS JEFFREY L
M $18,400.00, L12(18) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5
Grantee(s) USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, USAA FSB
Grantor(s) ASHE CANDICE P, ASHE ROBERT L JR
WD $10.00, UNIT WK#521N EVEN YEARS, UNIT #304 CEDAR
COVE PHASE 1 CONDO
Grantee(s) KNOX LIVING TRUST, KNOX GRACE A TRUSTEE
Grantor KNOX GRACEA
M $12,500.00, BDYNE1/4 NE1/419-11-17, IV/ME, PARCEL
#03161-108-OC
Grantee FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF AMERICA
Grantor(s) TAYLOR LAURA K, TAYLOR TIMOTHY ORVA
WD $10.00, BDYNW1/4 NW1/419-11-17, PARCEL #03161-105-
00
Grantee(s) LINDSAY HOLLY W, LINDSAY JOHN C
Grantor WHITEHEAD FRANCES ROLLINS
QCD $10.00, L5(4) B&R SD #6
Grantee(s) GRANT CHAUNTEL L, GRANT JHANELLE 0
Grantor CARTES NATALJA
QCD $10.00, L6(4)B&RSD#6
Grantee(s) GRANT CHAUNTEL L, GRANT JHANELLE 0
Grantor CARTES NATALJA
M $82,000.00, BDY 16-13-18, PARCEL #04450-001-00
Grantee JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NA


Grantor(s) CHERBONNEAU BRUCE V, CHERBONNEAU LORI
M $832,000.00, L2-4(3) YANKEETOWN AF KNOTTS LAND CO'S
S D
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s) BERRY JULIE C, BERTA JOHN H
QCD $20,000.00, L1 KING RANCH OF FLORIDA RANCHETTES
1ST ADD
Grantee(s) POTANTUS SUSAN, POTANTUS JAMES
Grantor(s) SLAUGHTER LYNN B, SLAUGHTER RE-NE V
WD $34,535.00, L9(27) WILLISTON HGH #12, W/MH
Grantee NADEAU ARMAND A
Grantor KAHLERT GEORGE
Continued on page 18


_____ ____ __ _











Page 18


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Levy Land Transactions

CD $10.00, OR 1302/253, BDYNW1/4 SW1/429-11-17, PARCEL
#03233-021-00
Grantee COLLINS JEFFREY L
Grantor ALTANY RONALD L
WD $30,000.00, BDYNW1/4 5W1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-
021-00
Grantee(s) OCONNOR SUZANNE, CAMACHO JOSEPH
Grantor COLLINS JEFFREY L
WD $5,900.00, L5(15) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS, ETC
Grantee(s) GERMAINE WAVELL, GERMAINE ORPHA
Grantor(s) LEHMAN REVOCABLE TRUST, LEHMAN PHYLLIS M
TRUSTEE, LEHMAN WARREN P TRUSTEE
M $82,516.13, BDY E1/2 NW 1/4 26-15-17
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s) FESSENDEN BLAKE N, JENNINGS TARA
WD $10.00, BDY 6-17-16, PARCEL #03127-000-00, ETC
Grantee SCHOOL OF FISH LLC
Grantor OESTERLE RALPH Ell
WD $10.00, BDYNE1/4 SW1/4 12-15-14, PARCEL #01366-000-
00
Grantee(s) KELLY ALAN, SAPP WILLIAM E, KELLY MARION, KEL-
LY JOEY
Grantor(s) MCMILLIAN SHANE A, SAPP WILLIAM E
WD $10.00, L1 CAPTAINS COVE
Grantee OESTERLE RALPH Ell
Grantor OESTERLE CLARA R
E $10.00, L5-7(A-M) GLEASONS TRAILER VILL
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantoy AUGUSTINUS DONALD
E $10.00, L4(58) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) BLOODWORTH SHANNON D, BLOODWORTH TIMO-
THY M
E $10.00, L3(C) US 19 #8 ADD, ETC
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MARYS LITTLE LAMBS
E $10.00, L 14(1) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) BURT PAMELA, ADKINS ALYSSA
E $10.00, L24(A) US 19 #1 ADD
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) BOUSE JOHN P, BOUSE TERESA H
E $10.00, L176-181, 214-218, 141-147,,OTTER CREEK
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) KEITH CELEISA H, KEITH STEVEN L SR
E $10.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL #03233-036-
OA
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor FLETCHER CAROL J,
E $10.00, L 102(6) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor ATWELL JAMES B
E $10.00, L9-10(6) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) PEREZ GUSTAVO, GRACIA SONIA RIVERA
E $10.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 26-12-17, PARCEL #03563-011-
00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor DODD CHARLES M
E $10.00, L5(19) BRONSON HTS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) CARVER.CATHERINE A, CARVER HUGH E JR
E $10.00, BDYNE1/4 SW1/410-12-17,- PARCEL#03394-009-
S.. B
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor STOTT SUSAN M
E $10.00, L7(29) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor PERRYMAN CARROLL T
E $10.00, L5(13) WILLISTONHGH#12
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor MULLINS PEGGIE M
E $10.00, L1PINEWO ODESTS#2
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor CAMPBELL CHERYL LYNN
E $10.00, BDYNW1/4NW1/428-11-14, PARCEL #00746-009-00
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) MCLELLAND BETH, MCLELLAND MATTHEW
E $10.00, L2(E) OAK GROVE ESTS
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) GILMORE JOANNE, GILMORE THOMAS W
E $10.00, L15(8C) MEADOWS OF BEAUTIFUL BRONSON
Grantee CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s) PATEL DEEPAL, PATELARTI
WD $92,000.00, L21(A) US 19 #1 ADD, W/MH
Grantee(s) BOUSE TERESA H, BOUSE JOHN P
Grantor(s) BENVENUTTI CAROLA, BENVENUTTI JIMMY E, BEN-
VENUTTI JAMES E
M $57,000.00, L21(A) US 19 #1 ADD, W/MH
Grantee(s) BENVENUTTI CAROLA, BENVENUTTI JIMMYE, BEN-
VENUTTI JAMES E
Grantor(s) BOUSE TERESA H, BOUSE JOHNP
WD $12,000.00, L3(42) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee(s) BERRIOS NANCY, NAVARRO YOLANDA
Grantor(s) MALDONADO GRACIELA, DIAZ LORENZO
WD $25,000.00, L465 UNIVERSITY ESTATES, BDY 3-12-17
Grantee(s) SIMPSON TAMSON G, SIMPSON THOMAS E SR
Grantor(s) WORTHINGTON INEZ, WORTHINGTON LLOYD
M $5,500.00, L49-50 UNIVERSITY OAKS MANOR
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor KNIGHT RHONDAA
WD $16,000.00, L22-23(B) SUNSHINE SAVANNA
Grantee(s) ARVATZ RUTH, ABDMASEH REDA
Grantor(s) SLACK KELLI, SLACK JAMES W, SLACK BELMA JEAN,
SLACK JOHN WILLIAM
WD $300,000.00, L3(E) CEDAR KEY SHORES #1
Grantee(s) WILSON FAMILY LIVING TRUST, WILSON B PARKS
TRUSTEE, WILSON AMELIA D TRUSTEE
Grantor(s) PRESTON SHARON W, PRESTON JAMES F
WD $37,000.00, L35 OAK MEADOWS PHASE 1
Grantee GARCIA SHARON
Grantor(s) ANNAN KAWLA P, ANNAN MOHANLALL
M $14,376.71, L35 OAK MEADOWS PHASE 1
Grantee(s) ANNAN KAWLA P, ANNAN MOHANLALL
Grantor GARCIA SHARON
M 1 $34,250.00, L3-4(4) PEACEFUL ACRES SD
Grantee SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) PRICE SHEENA L, PRICE SHEENA
WD $10.00, BDYNW1/4 NE1/435-11-14
Grantee FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF CHIEFLAND
INC


Grantor(s) LANE EVELYN, LANE LLOYD
WD $48,000.00, L18(A) MANATEE SPRINGS TERRACE
Grantee HILL SANDY
Grantor(s) REEMSNYDER CECELIA, REEMSNYDER RICHARD-
WD $63,000.00, L35 HIDEWAY 93, W/MH
Grantee LAZZELL RONALD D
Grantor(s) LANGOHR ANN M, LANGOHR MARVIN A
M $540,000.00, BDY 2, 3-14-18, W/MH, ETC
Grantee GM 1 PARTNERSHIP
Grantor(s) MITCHELL ELAINE G, MITCHELLALMERON J JR
M, $26,000.00, L11(13) OCALA HGH WEST, W/MH
Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT UNION


Grantor(s) MCVEY WENDY, MITCHELL DANA S
M $45,000.00, L1(3) OAK KNOLL ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s) BYRUM VADAD, BYRUM EDWARD E
Grantor GLOVER CANTINA
WD $100,000.00, L5(63) REPLAT OF WILLISTONHGH#5,W/MH
Grantee(s) GILBERT COLLEEN ELIZABETH, GILBERT JAMES K
JR
Grantor(s) PENCE FAMILY REVOCABLE TRUST, PENCE FRAN-
CES B TRUSTEE
WD $120,000.00, L9 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTS 1ST
ADD
Grantee(s) GORNTO MARY JO, GORNTO JOHN M
Grantor(s) COOK AMBER LORRAINE, COOK KYLE DAVID
M $96,000.00, L9 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTS 1ST
ADD
Grantee(s) SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, MERS
Grantor(s) GORNTO MARY JO, GORNTO JOHN M
M $12,000.00, L9 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTS 1ST
ADD
Grantee(s) SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, MERS
Grantor(s) GORNTO MARY JO, GORNTO JOHN M
M $50,000.00, L25-26, 9-10(B) ELESTONS ADD TO WI.LISTON,
ETC
Grantee(s) DALLAIRE ARTHUR J JR TRUSTEE, DALLAIRE AR-
THUR J TRUSTEEGrantor(s) REYNOLDS LISA S, REYNOLDS MI-
CHAELL
QCD $5,000.00, L38 LINCOLN HTS SD
Grantee PENNY CHRISTINE
Grantor DALLAS RUDOLPH
MMA $60,000.00, OR 582/647, L4(6) THE FARMS AT WILLISTON
INC #1
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s) ABAYAN BETTY D, ABAYAN ALFONSO
WD $60,000.00, L8-9(22) MAP OF WILLISTON
Grantee BOYER KENNEDY SR
Grantor TUNKS NANCY A
WD $16,000.00, BDYNW1/4 SW1/4 12-12-17, PARCEL #03400-
025-00
Grantee(s) STRENGTH LORA, STRENGTH DAVID J
Grantor RIVAS ANTONIO DIAZ
WD $216,000.00, L1-2 GATOR OAKS
Grantee D & R CONSTRUCTION SERVICES INC
Grantor GATOR OAKS LLC
M $151,200.00, L1-2 GATOR OAKS
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor D & R CONSTRUCTION SERVICES INC
M $25,000.00, L8(A) WILLISTONHGH#4
Grantee WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s) ADAMS LYNN M, ADAMS SCOTTY D
M $174,250.00, L1(B) WINDING OAKS ESTS
Grantee(s) QUICKEN LOANS INC, MERS, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) ROWE ALICE C, ROWE CHRISTOPHER M
M $48,100.00, L7(C) SUWANNEE RIVER SPRINGS SD #2 OF
MANATEE SPRINGS AREA, W/MH
Grantee(s) TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s) LONG LYNDA R, LONG CHARLES H
M-1 $290,000.00, L2(4) THE FARMS AT WILLISTON INC #1
Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) KIDD CLAUDE RAY, KIDD PEGGY JO
M $104,703.00,.DYNE1/4 W1/4 5-13-.19. PARCEL #05052-0Q1-
00, W/MH
Grantee(s) MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) HICKS CURTIS, HICKS PEARLIE MAE
M $63,298.82, L74(7) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s) CALLOWAY THERESA, CALLOWAY STEVEN ALAN
M $93,983.94, L1-6(36) CORRECTED MAP TO PORTION OF
OLD CHIEFLAND
Grantee BENEFICIAL FLORIDA INC
Grantor(s) ETHERIDGE CHERYL D, MEEKS CHERYL E
M $156,003.31, BDY SE1/4 26-12-17, PARCEL #03560-012-00,
ETC
Grantee HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s) RUIZ MICHELLE LEE, RUIZ GREGORY M
E $10.00, BDY SW1/435-14-16
Grantee(s) BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVE-
MENT TRUS, STATE OF FLORIDA ITT FUND
Grantor(s) FLORIDA ROCK INDUSTRIES INC, MULE PEN QUAR-
RY CORPORATION
QCD $10.00, L7 UNIVERSITY ESTS
Grantee SANTANA MARIO
Grantor SANCHEZ OLGA
WD $82,400.00, L36-37(5) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee STRICKLAND ELRIA D
Grantor HILLMAN LINDA C
M $65,920.00, L36-37(5) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee CHASE BANK USA NA
Grantor STRICKLAND ELRIA D
M $16,480.00, L36-37(5) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee CHASE BANK USA NA
Grantor STRICKLAND ELRIA D
M $61,161.48, GNES ALACHUA COUNTY PROPERTY
Grantee CTTIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES INC
Grantor(s) DAQUANNA MICHELE M, WHITEHEAD CURTIS ED-
WARD
WD $100.00, L 12 NORTHWOOD HTS

Grantee BAKER THOMAS
Grantor HEMINGWAY MARY R
M $56,673.55, L7(54) WILLISTON HGH #5 REPLAT, W/MH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) GOODNIGHT WANDAA, HARDESTY ROGER L
QCD $100.00, BDYNW1/4 NW1/413-12-18, PARCEL #04039-03-
00
Grantee SINGH ANJANIE
Grantor EMMANDRANAUTH DAPHNE
M $19,500.00, L7(6) B&R SD #2, IV/ME
Grantee SMITH JAMES H
Grantor(s) SALAH CARMEN, GARCIA ROBERTO
M $60,000.00, L6(6) BRONSON HTS SD
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor MYERS RAYMOND
M $154,000.00, BDYNW1/4 NE1/418-14-19
Grantee CHASE BANK USA NA
Grantor(s) VERTOMMEN EARL N, VERTOMMEN LAVONDA V


M $112,000.00, BDY NE1/4 24-11-13, PARCEL #00086-016-00
Grantee(s) AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) BAYLOR GLORIA, BAYLOR ROBERT
M $113,500.00, L13-14(5) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee(s) FOUNDATION FINANCIAL GROUP, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) CARRASQUILLO JUDITH M, ROSADO OMAR
E $10.00, BOY 22, 23-13-18, PARCEL #04472-000-00(PART OF)
Grantee(s) WATSON AVERY D JR, WATSON EVA JEAN
Grantor BROOKS DOROTHY R
WD $1.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 23-13-18, PARCEL #04472-000-
00, ETC
Grantee(s) PENNEY JOAB BROOKS, BROOKS DOROTHY R


Grantor BROOKS DOROTHY R
WD $10.00, L2(5) WOLF SPRING HILLS, W/MH
Grantee MILLER TIMOTHY J
Grantor(s) MILLER FRANCES S, MILLER THOMAS I
QCD $10.00, L4 SUWANNEE ACRES, W/MH
Grantee(s) FRANCELLA FOSTER PAYNE LIVING TRUST, PAYNE
FRANCELLA FOSTER TRUSTEE, PAYNE REUBEN BUCKNER III
TRUSTEE, REUBEN BUCKNER PAYNE III LIVING TRUST
Grantor(s) PAYNE FRANCELLA F, PAYNE REUBEN B III
QCD $6,475.00, UNDVD 1/2 INTEREST, L33 HIDEAWAY #3
Grantee(s) LANGOHR ANN M, LANGOHR MARVIN A
Grantor(s) KLUG NANCY M, KLUG FRANK R
M $198,500.00, L17(4) AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY 1ST SD
Grantee(s) CAPITAL CITY BANK, MERS, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) LAURENT MARTHA E, LAURENT JOHN F
WD $59,000.00, L5-12(19) TOWN SITE OF TUCKAHO
Grantee(s) ALBERT DEBRA L, ALBERT CLARENCE L
Grantor PERICCIUOLI FOSTER
M $53,000.00, L5-12(19) TOWN SITE OF TUCKAHO
Grantee PERICCIUOLI FOSTER
Grantor(s) ALBERT DEBRA L, ALBERT CLARENCE L
WD $31,500.00, L8 OAK MEADOWSPAHSE2
Grantee WILLIAMS JACQUELINE R
Grantor ME MCDOUGAL INC
M $91,200.00, L8 OAKMEADOWS PAHSE 2,W/MH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor WILLIAMS JACQUELINE R
WD $90,963.14, L85-86 CAROLYN SD, W/MH
Grantee KAZDAL RICHARD
Grantor(s) HOZIAN JEANETTE V, HOZIAN JOSEPH W
WD $209,000.00, L4(C) WILSON ESTS
Grantee(s) HIGGINS SHERI C, HIGGINS DAVID G
Grantor(s) BIRD JODI, BIRD ALAN
M $167,200.00, L4(C) WILSON ESTS
Grantee(s) REGIONS MORTGAGE, REGIONS BANK
Grantor(s) HIGGINS SHERI C, HIGGINS DAVID G
WD $110,000.00, L34 TIGER ISLAND, BDY 10-14-13, ETC
Grantee EASY ENTERPRISES INC
Grantor GLASS MICHAEL V
QCD $100.00, L35 TIGER ISLAND, BDY 10-14-13, ETC
Grantee EASY ENTERPRISES INC
Grantor KIDWELL MICHAEL WAYNE .
M $131,450.00, L34-35 TIGER ISLAND, BDY 10-14-13, ETC
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor EASY ENTERPRISES INC
QCD $10.00, L30 LIBBY HTS.
Grantee BAKER THOMAS J
Grantor STEVE SMITH CONSTRUCTION INC,
QCD $10.00, L192 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 3-12-17
Grantee STEVE SMITH CONSTRUCTION INC
Grantor(s) SMITH KAREN, SMITH STEVE
QCD $10.00, L42(A) MANATEE SPRINGS TERRACE, W/MH
Grantee WOODLEY JOHNNIE Q
Grantor(s) WOODLEY RICHARD, WOODLEY DORA
WD $10.00, BDY El/2 16-12-19, PARCEL #04680-001-00
Grantee(s) GALYEAN PATRICIA L, GALYEAN LAWRENCE M
Grantor(s) GALYEAN LAWRENCE M, GALYEAN PATRICIA L
M $968,000.00, L2-3(8), L7, 10-11(3) TOWN OF WILLISTON,
ETC
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor WILLISTON BUSINESS PLAZA ELC
M $53,000.00, L7(B) CAMELLIA PLANTATION PHASE 2 SD
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor BOYER KENNEDY SR
WD $12.500.00,L1 9-20(2)B&R SD #5
Grantee(s) MUNDEN JULIE H, BIES DARREN J
Grantor GILREATH JACQUELINE W
M $9,436.62, L19-20(2) B&R SD #5
Grantee GILREATH JACQUELINE W
Grantor(s) MUNDEN JULIE H, BIES DARREN J
WD $10.00, BDY S1/4 GOVT L5, BDY 24-12-18, PART OF PAR-
CEL #04152-001-00
Grantee(s) SANDLIN SHARON A, SANDLIN DAMON W
Grantor(s) SANDLIN BONITA P, SANDLIN ARTHUR M
WD $10.00, BDYNE1/4 NW 1/4 11-13-18, W/MH, PARCEL#04421-
000-00, ETC
Grantee METRIE PATRICIA
Grantor BELL COARSE F JR
QCD $10.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 27-16-16, PARCEL #02933-
000-00
Grantee JONES TIMOTHY MICHAEL
Grantor(s) JONES MOZELLE, JONES W M, JONES WILLIAM M
M $52,798.35, L73 SPRINGSIDE MH SD
Grantee CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES INC
Grantor(s) PRAEFKE JEANETTE M, PIAEFKE RUSSELL M
QCD $10.00, L12 LYNN OAKS #2
Grantee BARRIEAU STEVEN R
Grantor(s) ISAKSON BECKY B, BARRIEAU STEVEN R, GUERRIN
BECKY B
D $10.00, L7-8(2) PEACEFUL ACRES SD
Grantee ANDERSON BETTIE L
Grantor(s) ANDERSON BETTIEL, ANDERSON EMIL C ESTATE,
ANDERSON EMIL ESTATE
M $32,000.00, L23(7) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX,W/MH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) MILLER BRUCE E, MILLER SHELBY R, VAUGHN MILL-
ER SHELBY R, MILLER SHELBY R VAUGHN
M $30,000.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 15-12-17, W/MH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor LEBRONJUSTAR
M $31,000.00, L8-9(2) WILLISTON HGH #14
Grantee BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s) BISESI DOMINIC, BISESI DOMONIC
E $10.00, BDY 20-14-16
Grantee INTERAMERICAN INTERNATIONAL CORP
Grantor PLUM CREEK TIMBERLANDS LP
WD $165,000.00, BDY NW U4 NE1/4 29-14-16, PARCEL #02704-
000-00, ETC
Grantee BELLAMY BURTON W
Grantor INTERAMERICAN INTERNATIONAL CORP
M $115,500.00, BDYNW1/4 NE1/429-14-16, ETC
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor BELLAMY BURTON WILL
M $120,000.00, L66 FOREST PARK #3 PHASE I
Grantee(s) TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor KURTZ NANCY M
QCD $10.00, L2-3(3) SHERWOOD FOREST
Grantee GORRIN NADIA
Grantor(s) GORRIN NADIA, GORRIN FELIPE


WD $10.00, L4(46) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s) SALVATORE ZOTTOLA AND MARIE ZOTTOLA REVO-
CABLE TRUST, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE TRUSTEE, ZOTTOLA MA-
RIE TRUSTEE
Grantor(s)'ZOTTOLA MARIE, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE
WD $10.00, L3(46) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s) SALVATORE ZOTTOLAAND MARIE ZOTTOLA REVO-
CABLE TRUST, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE TRUSTEE, ZOTTOLA MA-
RIE TRUSTEE
Grantor(s) ZOTTOLA MARIE, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE
WD $10.00, BDYNW1/4 SW1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-056-
00, 03233-056-OA, ETC
Grantee(s) SALVATORE ZOTTOLA AND MARIE ZOTTOLA REVO-
Continued on page 19


111I ~1 1 1a mom -










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006


Page 19


Levy Land Transactions

Grantee(s) SALVATORE ZOTTOLA AND MARIE ZOTTOLA REVO-
CABLE TRUST, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE TRUSTEE, ZOTTOLA MA-
RIE TRUSTEE
Grantor(s) ZOTTOLA MARIE, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE
WD $10.00, BDYNW1/4 SW1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-056-
00, 03233-056-OA, ETC
Grantee(s) SALVATORE ZOTTOLA AND MARIE ZOTTOLA REVO-
CABLE TRUST, ZOTTOLASALVATORE TRUSTEE, ZOTTOLA MA-
RIE TRUSTEE
Grantor(s) ZOTTOLA MARIE, ZOTTOLA SALVATORE
QCD $10.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 36-12-14, PARCEL #01136-001-
00, ETC
Grantee(s) JACK J LEWIS TRUST, LEWIS JACK J TRUSTEE
Grantor LEWIS JACK J
QCD $10.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 36-12-14, IV/ME, PARCEL
#01136-001-00, ETC
Grantee(s) JACK J LEWIS TRUST, LEWIS JACK J TRUSTEE
Grantor LEWIS JACKJ
WD $10.00, #4 CEDAR KEY SHORES
Grantee(s) MEADE EDWINA, MEADE JAMES R
Grantor(s) SENSEHIG ERMA, SENSEHIG CARL
WD $497,206.00, BDY L3 CEDAR KEY SHORES #7, ETC
Grantee(s) CEDAR KEY CITY OF, CITY OF CEDAR KEY


Grantor(s) MEADE EDWINA, MEADE JAMES R
M $397,206.25, BDY L3 CEDAR KEY SHORES #7, ETC
Grantee(s) MEADE EDWINA, MEADE JAMES R
Grantor(s) CEDAR KEY CITY OF, CITY OF CEDAR KEY
CD $10.00, L49 UNIVERSTIY ESTS, BDY 15-12-17
Grantee(s) ROBERTS CAROLYN, ROBERTS HUBERT C
Grantor FARROW FRED J
CD $10.00, L6-9(11) UNIVERSITY OAKS,W/MH
Grantee(s) PIAZZA JACINTA V, PIAZZA VINCENT JAMES
Grantor(s) FREEMAN CHRISTOPHER R, FREEMAN DOUGLAS K
WD $36,995.00, L30(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee(s) ASTAIZA SANDRA P, CORTEZ CARMEN
Grantor AMERICAN PRIME LLC
M $31,445.75, L30(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor(s) ASTAIZA SANDRA P, CORTEZ CARMEN
WD $123,334.00, L14(B) LANGLEYESTS
Grantee(s) EDMUNDSON MARY, LEWIS JILL, LEWIS WAYNE A
Grantor(s) MCCANN STACEY, WILLIAMS DANNY L
M $54,000.00, L 12 CA/L-A-BETT MEADOWS,W/MH
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor STEPHENS JOHN W SR
WD $120,000.00, BDY 32-12-13, PARCEL #00170-000-00
Grantee(s) MCCOLLOM PENNY L, MCCOLLOM WILLIAM R
Grantor(s) BEACH ALMA JEAN, BEACH CARL E, SINCLAIR ANITA
KAY


Marriage licenses issued
William Cleveland Smith, 2/2/46, andAlam Merlene Tracy,
10/2/38, both of Trenton.
Richard Alexander Dasch, 5/25/46, and Leslie Waugh
Young, 12/1/64, both of Yankeetown.
Tom Norman Tylelr, Jr., 4/3/82, and Jennifer Leigh Hodge,
2/16/76, both of Bronson.
Kevin Robert Shorette, 8/11/71, and Cherie Lynn Ferree,
7/23/73, both of Bronson.
Albert Clay Miller, 1/17/74, and Barbara Shalene Miller,
9/2/69, both of Williston.
Charles Larry Cain, 8/4/51, and Laura Lee Long, 7/20/72,
both of Chiefland.
Cole Adams Barnett, 3/1/82, and Karla Deutenberg Lewis,
11/18/76, both of Williston.
Michael Gregory Obear, 1/31/73, and Savanaha Lyn Hamm,
1/7/78, both of Dunnellon.
Robert Kirk Stutsman, 9/23/55, and Lois Ann Smith,
10/15/53, both of Chiefland.
Ishmael Shalome Mosley, 5/14/84, of Gainesville, and Amy
Danielle Bussom, 12/17/86, of Bronson.
Thomas Charles Lewis, 4/29/59 of Morriston, and Regina
Marie Johns, 11/16/66, of Orange Springs.


TURN THIS...


COUNTY JOUR:
COUNTY PAPER EST. 192


...INTO THIS!


- 0Find,
home
in the
Marketplace!


Call Laura

to list your

house in the

Marketplace.

352-486-

2312

Make that

dream home

a reality!
x'. i' il .' ill(-.mt r (1 ; _.-


,e S Lovely %, lma-r ir,t2red 2 DWMH .)r, I
beautifully landscaped a7e Many e.1rr.: :ui
,i,- h;/ 31,' ,, 2e :oihed llol p:,Lichd'ali hlnk
Sr,.ceD n iMH-,n I e 3e, 2o horr. 3 ,, c y ofGiiefland4BIedroomr,2BathCBHomeinGty *fenced backyardpolebamstoragesed/
comer loton a pavedstreet and featuresnewpaint UmitsofChiefland.CentralH/Afieplace.Endosed workshop,RVport,akoi/goldfishpond,citrus
new metal oof,newAC,newwell,recently installed trees,grapearbor,concretepatio,16'X25'
ceramictileandwoodflooringdressingarea in master carportmakesa4th bedroomorderi.Convenientto attachedfamilyroomwithfireplace/grill
bath,andmoreClosetotheSuwanneeRiver,Shopping, schools&shopping.btywater&sewerpavedstreet utifullandscapingMREThiseisonethat
batShland uo xo.h pi n $3 .(-754 &) 2 you must seetoapprediateApproximatly
School,and the Gulf of Mexico.Sho6v By Appointment $130,000. (LR-753479-D) 352-493-2221 45 minutes to Gainesville$159,900.
ftn&AW7)5l-a MS- "


-I-iSntiRMNS rHPAHUISC! Inis 2/i cypress Doara -
ofChieflad-2 bedroom (could be and batten cabin is perfectforyour getaway 38 1/2 acres on beautiful, clean,
Sb m uld b weekends in Suwannee! With a two stall spring fed Wekiva River. Located
changed to 3 Br.) 2 bath older block boathouse,fish cleaning area,sundeck'on top of on West side of US 19 in Gulf
home remodeledw/openfloorplan, the boathouse with c nal, marsh and sunset Hammock, FL. Looking for a
woodflooring,screened porch. Allon 10 view, justminutes to the Suwannee Riverand the peaceful existence ere it is.
beautiful sres /paved road frontage. Gulf of Mexico.VERYAFFORDABLY PRICED,this is Includes 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
beautifulacresw/paved roadfrontage the one you've been looking for $350,000 mobile home. $650,000. (LW-
$292,000.(LR-753206-K) 493-2221 (DW-753824-JH) 542-9007 754044)493-2221
Calfo FE mretaalss.W


Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliams.com

MOBILE HOMES:


OSSWILLIATS
REAL ESTATE, INC.


Park-like 5 acres with 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000. Owner financing possible.
Waterfront 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land
escaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well." $84-00. Reduced! $76,000
New Listing 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600 s.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
t Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
Handyman on 5 Acres. 3 BR, 2 Bath singlewide that
needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500. Owner financing
available.
Dixie County Just off Spillars, New 3/2 DWMH on
1.5 acres. Ready for your family. $97,500.
COMMERCIAL:
City of Trenton -2 corner lots with 2300 sf warehouse.
Just off of 129. $89,500.00
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27.--$4-368;OReduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres -just off U.S. Alt. 27. $110,000. Special!
$10,000 per acre
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85;600T Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $-9-000 per acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corer Parcel 80 Ac at corer of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$12~,00 per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres -just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $4q-500 Reduced: $16,000.
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $159,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront- 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal -3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
5 Acre Lot- in Bronson, well, septic, power, $70;000.
Reduced! $65,000
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. cor
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


II


omm mwmmm mm









Page 20 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2006

Habitat hopes to break ground


BY D.J. DAUBE
SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL
We wish all a Merry
Christmas and Happy.New
Year!
We're hoping to break
ground on our first Habitat
home in 2007.
We've closed on a lot in
Dixie County and working
on qualifying a family there!


What a blessing it will
be when they see their new
home being started.
We've had several profes-
sionals and businesses help
us thus far. We still need
others.
We meet the third Mon-
day of every month at the
Good Sheperd Lutheran


*Budget


Church on US# 19, two
miles north ofWal-Mart at
7:30 p.m. Hope to see you
there!
If you're unable to attend
but would like to help or
need a home call 463-7207.
Habitat for Humanity of
Suwannee Valley, Inc. http://
habitatsuwanneevalley.org


Continuedfrom front


school budget during a given school year. Again, DOE states,
"Slower growth in student enrollment will impact Florida's
teacher shortage and districts' ability to meet the increasingly
stringent requirements of the class size amendment...Now
that class size averages must be calculated at the school-level
averages, many schools need additional teachers to remain in
compliance to avoid the requirement to shift their operating
funds to capital budgets."
As far as next year's projections, Superintendent Cliff
Norris said, "We predict no growth. We are predicting the
exact same number of students next year as this year."


*Reform
causes undue hardship on
small business owners, Bell
maintained. Bell owns a
Chiefland-based accounting
firm.
Chiefland interim city
manager Matt Brock said
his city would be asking
for approximately $1
million in community block
development grant (CBDG)
funds for utility infrastructure
upgrades. He said the city
needed the funding as "a
proactive way of addressing
future.growth."
Inglis commissioner Dick
Kellman said his city would
also be seeking CBDG
funding. He said Inglis would
be asking for $600,000 to
fund engineering projects
including a 13-acre retention
pond.
Williston Mayor Gerald
Hethcoatinformedlegislators
that his city needed help with
a number of economic issues
such as the airport industrial
park, railroad spur and
insurance.


Stony Smith presented a
request 'for $1 million for
a Fanning Springs'sewer
project. Suwannee River
Water Management District
deputy executive director
David Still appeared with
Smith.
School Superintendent
Cliff Norris' request would
cost the state no money but
instead would give school
boards control over their
academic calendar. When
the state sets the academic
,calendar, conflicts occur.
On this year's calendar as
set by the state, Norris told
legislators, "The FCAT now
falls on the same date as the
Suwannee Fair. The school


calendar should rest withthe
local school board," he said.
Circuit Court Judge
Joseph Smith told legislators
the eighth district needs
an additional circuit court
judge. He also spoke about
the overcrowded county
courthouse and its heating
and cooling problems. "Every
nook and cranny is filled...We
need funds now to alleviate
problems and. address future
growth." he said.
Sheriff Johnny Smith
asked lawmakers to consider
a career service act modeled
on Columbia County. "This
would provide a sense of
protection to all staff," he
said. Chairman Dean affirmed
his support.


U ~Io~I.1!1! Lr!, AE A~I.I,:~! U.J i YV


Smith & Associates, MU i M I AAl

bsgmac.com RealEst
Brad Smith Ucensed Real Estate Broker


0 d
312=hoe o') Sac


JakShfl


Sd Ds






13 Wll


Sol i65 Dys


3/2 WMH n 2. ac


"23414 SE 49 HW
-~ A .- I g
do2 43 (3,) 4


ccL'- --,


Robin Haskins
CrackL;,r Johnson
Lloyd Lane
Doris Rogers
Debbie Lashley
Kristine Bradley
Katrina Havelock
WT Riley
Sylvia Rutledge Neal Wilkerson