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Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00100
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: December 14, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00100

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
    Main: Levy Through the Lens
        page 6
    Main: Obituaries
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 13
    Main: Levy Through the Lens
        page 14
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 15
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 16
        page 17
    Main: Around the Courthouse
        page 18
    Main: MarketPlace
        page 19
    Main continued
        page 20
Full Text









VEY COUNTY
. E COUNTY PAPER


SOU 192NA
* EST. 192


VOL. 83, NO. 23


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14,20061 SECTION: 20 PAGES


50 cents per copy


Nuclear plant may come to S. Levy


I





Will it or won't it?
Page 2


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
Hoping to keep up with
the growth that is inundating
the state of Florida, Progess
Energy announced Tuesday
its plans to possibly build a
nuclear power plant in South
Levy County.
Some 3,000 acres, located
seven miles inland from the
Gulf of Mexico, was cho-
sen from over 35 other sites
around the state for the com-
pany's next phase of develop-
ment.
"Our commitment is to


provide reliable and afford-
able energy to more than 1.6
million customers every day,"
said Jeff Lyash, Progress En-
ergy's president and CEO.
The preferred site is only
eight miles from the compa-
ny's Crystal River Nuclear
Plant. While another unit
could have been added at the
Crystal River site, Lyash said
putting it on another location
reduced risk factors like hur-
ricanes and tornadoes.
"Eight miles makes a huge
difference in terms of liabil-
ity," Lyash said Tuesday.


He added that security
around such facilities are only
second to that of military in-
stallations.
A decision to build a plant
will not be made for at least a
year, the company announced
through a press release, but
site selection is critical to
ensure that nuclear power re-
mains open and viable for the
future.
Lyash said his company is
in agreement with state and
federal leaders that nuclear
power must be a part of a bal-
anced approach, along with


gas and coal, to meet the de-
mands of the state's growth.
Nuclear power is the least
costly energy and the least
volatile, Lyash explained. It is
also the best for the environ-
ment, he added, since it does
not emit any greenhouses
gases that are associated with
global climate change.
The preferred site, and sub-
sequent plant, if it comes to
pass, will allow the company
to do long-range planning,
Lyash said.
If construction is approved,
as many as 2,000 construction


workers will be needed to
build the $2.5 billion facility
and it will employ about 500
people, the CEO said.
Progress Energy plans to
document the need for anoth-
er power plant to the Florida
Public Service Commission
in late 2007 and the next year
file an operating license.
If everything goes accord-
ing to plan, Progress Energy
will then decide if it will
build the South Levy plant.
If it is feasible, construction
could begin in 2010-2011
and be completed in 2016.


Banquet
Page 3


OBITUARIES

I
Helen Carver
Flauda Key
Patricia Merrow
Barbara Robinson

HOME OF...


John Tyler Nilsen
of Bronson
CONTENTS...



Around Levy 2-3,5, 6, 14-15
Opinion. 4
Law & Courts 5
Obituaries 7
Sports 8-13
Tides 11
Classified 16
Legals 17
Marketplace 19


Race card played at


commission meeting
BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-One local resident is so dissatisfied with city
leaders that he turned up at Monday's commission meeting to
tell them about it.
Local business' owner and resident Robert "Bob" Williams
read a statement to commissioners shortly before the
conclusion of Monday's regular meeting. A copy of the letter
was given to the Levy County Journal after the meeting.
Williams read, "I feel that this commission is a poor
Example of leadership when it comes to the long-term effects
on decisions made for our city. Race is obvious and that needs
to be terminated...
"My comment is to the actions of the commission to hire
a city manager and the decision made. It's evident that as
commissioners homework has not been done as it relates to
the candidates...Of the candidates listed in the paper, only two
did not come with excess baggage such as bankruptcies.."
"Of. the two, that didn't Mr. Bonner and Mr. Brock, I
received an unsolicited visit from Mr. Bonner army office in
Bronson inquiring about the city. Some things were said in
confidence and will remain, but the one thing that stood out:
which was not in confidence was the fact that he clearly stated
that if hired, he had contacts outside Chiefland that could offer
the city better banking."
Chiefland city commissioners had two special meetings last
week to hear from several candidates applying for the city
manager vacancy. At the conclusion of the second meeting,
commissioners requested background investigations be made
of two.
Williams spoke in favor of interim city manager Matt
Brock, who was not among the two short-listed candidates.
He said, "You had an interim city manager with the education
and ability to negotiate with Tallahassee, willing to move to
this city and live, who had done more for the city during his
couple months as interim than his predecessor had done the
whole time he was here..." \
Williams said the local newspapers failed to perform their
duty: "No one is above the law; the paper need toilet the
people know what's going on so that they can make informed
decisions," adding, "oh, maybe that's the problem, our papers
are afraid to print the real news."
Williams also said commissioner Teal Pomeroy had "over
seven criminal misdemeanor charges." He also leveled
charges that one of the commissioners' children was involved
in criminal activity.
See Chiefland Page 20'


Safe Under Santa's Watch


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
THE MCMILLANS of Williston are thrilled with their early Christmas present,
a new daughter, who was snug in her brother's arms and watched over by
Santa himself during festivities at Linear Park Saturday night. Formore photos
of the night's activities, see pages 14 and 15.


Rezoning requires comp plan amendment


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
StAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Three
Chiefland homeowners
seeking to turn 270 acres of
agricultural zoned land into
residential-thus clearing the
way for a potential large-scale
subdivision-received good
news from commissioners
Monday.
Commissioners voted to
allowanapplicationforalarge-
scale rezoning amendment to
the comprehensive plan to
be resubmitted to the state's
Department of Community
Affairs (DCA).


REACH US

Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner
Phone
(3521490-4462


If DCA approves the
comprehensive plan change,
residents in the vicinity
of Manatee Springs Road
could find themselves in
a neighborhood with 675
additional homes. However,
according to building
and zoning manager Bill
Hammond, there are currently
no plans for a development
on the drawing board.
The proposed site, an
approximate mile-long strip
of land, runs roughly parallel
to Highway 19. Northwest
110 Street lays directly to its
south. It crosses County Route


Fax
(3521490-4490 Chlefland
(3521486-5042 Bronson
Email
edltor@levlounal.com
Address
P.. Box159 Brnson R 32621-0159
P.. Box 2990 Chlelandi R32844-2990'


320 and ends at the northern
boundary of Strickland Park.
The land owned by Chris
Hardee, Faunita Hardee and
Gene Roe is currently zoned
for one dwelling per 10
acres.
The rezoning must receive
approval from DCA since
changes will need to be made
to the city's comprehensive
land use plan.
The DCA has stated three
objections to the amendment
request already submitted by
the city. The objections pertain
to impacts that would occur
in the areas of transportation,


potable water and public
schools. The city must
respond to these objections to
the satisfaction of the DCA in
order for its comprehensive
plan amendment to take
effect.
The city hopes the DCA's
objections to the transportation
issue will be solved by
reducing the maximum
proposed development in
their original plan from four
units per acre to 2.5.
To answer the DCA
objection to the potable
water impacts, the city
says it now has a recently


SUBSCRIBE
Levy, DIle and GIchrist cauntles
$17

outef stte
2
Locally owned and operated!


approved water capacity
permit from Suwannee River
Water Management District.
The city's resubmitted
response also says that the
existing comprehensive plan
anticipates a 2020 population
of 3,255, .reflecting an
approximate growth rate of
about 43 persons per year.
The city believes that given
this growth rate, the water
supply as is will be adequate.
Regarding impacts to the
school, the city's answer to
the DCA is that it is already
See Plan Page 20


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. Thats why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


* &


INSIDE

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Page 2


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Hospital decision


due this Friday


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CH IEFLAND-Local
residents hoping to have
ready access to health care
should find out tomorrow if
they can count on having a
new hospital within the next
few years.
A decision from the state's
Agency for Health Care
Administration is due no later
than the close of business day
Friday, Dec. 15.
Ameris Health Systems
wants to build the hospital
directly behind Chiefland's
Wal-Mart store.
The hospital will hold 60
beds and should be completed
in 2009. Construction costs
are estimated to be around
$75 million, according to
Ameris representative. Frank
Schupp.


The Agency for Health Care
Administration (AHCA) is the
state's watchdog over health
policy and planning and is
responsible for licensing and
inspecting health facilities as
well as approving certificates
of need. Providers must,
submit and receive approval
on a certificate of need before
a hospital can be built or
expanded.
This is Ameris' second
attempt to build a hospital in
Chiefland. The state denied
the group's 'initial request
in 2005. Schupp said, "I am
cautiously optimistic that
AHCA will approve this
request."
Williston's Nature Coast
Regional Hospital is opposing
the attempt to bring Chiefland
a hospital.


Tot Donation


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
The Bronson Fire Department, represented here
by David Reinstra and Jerry Horton, recently
made a donation to Toys for Tots volunteer Loni
Golotto.




SAVE GAS & CA$H I


Randy Stefanelli Agency

493-2016

Give a gift that lasts a year-a subscription
to the Levy County Journal.


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


News Briefs


Williston cantata
The Williston Church of God will be performing its annual
Christmas Cantata on Saturday, Dec. 16 at 7 p.m., and Sunday
morning, Dec. 17 at 10:45 a.m. The cantata, "The Heart of
Christmas," written and arranged by Mike Speck, is a mixture
of narration, a few carols and a variety of songs written spe-
cifically for this musical.
There will be a nursery provided. The church is located at
225 SE 4th St.
For further questions, you can call the church office at 528-
5982.

Relay meeting set
The 2007 Chiefland Relay for Life Planning Committee
will hold its next committee meeting on Monday, Dec. 18
from 6 to 7 p.m. at Capital City Bank, located at 2012 North
Young Blvd. in Chiefland.
For more information please call American Cancer Society
Staff Partner Jamie Bellamy at 1-888-295-6787, Ext. 119.

Vespers at Good Shepherd
A series of mid-week vespers services will be held at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church starting at 7 p.m. on Dec. 20
during the coming Advent Season.
These services will be preceded with the serving of a
potluck meal starting at 6 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall.
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church is located approximately.
three miles north of Wal-Mart on Highway 19 next to the
Dakotah Vineyards.
For more information, call the church office at 493-4597.

Fair meeting planned
The Levy County Fair Association will hold its monthly
meeting on Dec. 14 at 6 p.m. at the Williston Community
Meeting Room at city hall, 50 N.W. Main St.
All interested in the county fair are welcome to attend.
The Dec. 18 meeting has been cancelled do to the holi-
days.


St. Albans announces services
The services for Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 at St. Alban's
Episcopal Church, Chiefland, are as follows:
8 a.m. Holy Eucharist
10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
10:30 p.m. Carol sing
11 p.m. Midnight Mass
The public is invited to attend all services. There will be no
service on Christmas Day.

Business council to. meet
The Nature Coast Businesspevelopment Council, Inc. will
hold its regular meeting on Friday, Dec..15 at 8:30 a.m.:a6the.
Levy County School Board Office located'at 480 Marshbtrn
Dr., Bronson.


Oelrich opens district office

Sen. Steve Oelrich (R-Cross Creek) has opened his district
office in Gainesville, located at 4131.NW 28th Lane, Suite 4,
which is just off of 43rd Street.


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Community Caendlr







Thursday, Dec. 14
Fair meeting, Williston, 6 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 15
Business Council, Bronson, 8:30 a.m.
-AARP driving course, Chiefland, 9 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 16
> Bowers' reception, Yankeetown, 10 a.m.
>Pet vaccinations, Bronson, 3 p.m.
loCantata,Williston Church of God, 7 p.m.
SNAACP banquet, Chiefland, 7 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 18
d Relay for Life, Chiefland, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 19
> Video bash, Bronson, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 20
O Vespers, Good Shepherd Lutheran, Chiefland, 7 p.m.
Detailed descriptions of these events are contained
elsewhere in the Levy County Journal.

And then there were two
BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-While Chiefland does not yet know who its
next city manager will be, it is known who did not make the
final short-list. After hearing from five short-listed candidates
last week,, commissioners voted to request background
investigations on two: Brian Johnson of Augusta, Ga. and
Grady Hartzog of Newberry. The investigations will be-
completed before commissioners make their decision.
Johnson and Hartzog each received votes from Teal
Pomeroy, Teresa Barroi and Rollins Hudson. Interim city
manager Matt Brock failed to make the cut after receiving
two votes-from Mayor Betty Walker and commissioner
Alice Monyei.
Grady Hartzog served in various capacities for the city of
Newberry for 30 years before retiring in 2004. In his role as
mayor and acting city manager, he administered a $5.5 million
budget and managed 50 employees. Before serving as"mayor
and city manager, Hartzog worked as Newberry's building
inspector and superintendent of the sewer system. He owned
furniture shops in Newberry, Trenton and Georgia from 1989
until 2001.
Brian Johnson served active duty in the U.S. Army. In his
last roleAass commanding officer 'of` l900-persot0 military
commnuni, he was responsible 'fbri a '$'i1f) flon budget
and 18 supervisory-level personnel. 'HeI' als6 oversaw the
community's daily operations, public works, budgeting and
land use management. He received a master's degree in public
administration from the University of Georgia.
Ofthe commissioners'choices for the short-list, Walker said,
"I was disappointed. I thought we were moving forward-
seems like we're doing more backing up."
Of interim city manager Brock; commissioner Teal
Pomeroy said, "We were worried about his work history. He's
had several jobs in the last few years."
Commissioners will decide whom to hire for city manager
during their Dec. 18 meeting.


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Carol Saunders wins quilt


BY WINNELLE HORNE
CORRESPONDENT
Log Cabin Quilters met
Thursday, Dec. 7 at the Levy
County Quilt Museum.
The Quilt Show is over. It'
was again great. Everyone
had a good time and met new
visitors as well as old.
Two quilts were finished
and hemmed. We will leave
everything as is until after
Christmas and then we put in
two new ones to be decided
on later.
/
Our new quilt is being put
together and it will be the one
we will give away next Quilt
Show, more about it later.


The last day of the show
we were ready to draw the
winning ticket when Larry
Houchen and his wife came
in.
He told us his son Capt.
Houchin of the Levy Co.
Sheriff's Office was coming
by to make sure we are safe.
He checks the door and we do
appreciate what these officers
do for us. We asked Larry to
draw the winning ticket for
us.
Our winner is Carol
Saunders of Williston and
when we called her she was
one happy lady. She said she
had never won anything and
to win a quilt made her day.


We now getting ready for
the state fair and we also have
our bus trip in the making.
More next week about it.
Pat, Doris and Carol spent
the day making a cape to
wear to church. There was a
lot of laughing and learning
that went on. Carol is new at
sewing, but doing great.

Lunch was great with
chicken and dumplings,
meatballs, fruit salad, lots of
all kinds of good food and lots
of desserts. Sixteen members
were present.
Winnelle Home is the
Director of the Levy County
Quilt Museum.


Another Way receives grant


Another Way, Inc. has received a $25,000
grant from Altria, Inc. and the National
Network to End Domestic Violence. The
grant will allow Another Way to initiate an
economic empowerment program that will
serve program participants from the six-county
area it serves.
This project will. emphasize working with
women not only on their domestic violence
issues but with areas of economics such as
job counseling, budgeting, credit restoration,
financial planning and instruction in preparing
their tax returns as well as advanced earned
income tax credit.
Executive director Donna Fagan said, "Very
often victims of domestic violence are forced


back into unsafe situations due to the lack of
financial resources that would allow them to
be economically self-sufficient. We are very
excited about the initiation of this project
and anticipate it will allow the women
who participate in this program to develop
employment and financial skills that will last
them a lifetime."
Another* Way is a domestic violence and
rape crisis center serving Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette and Levy
counties.
To speak to a counselor or get information
about Another Way's services call (800)
500-1119, push 2..


NAACP banquet announced


The president of the
Tri-County NAACP, Al
Joseph Carnegie, invites the
community to attend the 16th
S Annual Tri-County NAACP.
Freedom Fund Banquet.
This year the. banquet will
be a Christmas Extravaganza
featuring, entertainment from
.around the Tri-County area.
The banquet will be held at
the Tommy Usher Pineland
Center in Chiefland on
Saturday, Dec. 16 starting
at 7 p.m. Tickets may be


purchased from any NAACP
member.
The highlight ofthe banquet
will be the announcement
of the Tri-County NAACP
Elected Official of the Year
and the Andrew Lee Merit
Award.
-Additionally,, the- NAACP
will announce their First
Annual Business of the Year.
For additional information
contact Alice Monyei at (352)
490-6166 or Mary Golding at
352-463-6169.


Reception will honor retiring librarian Cherie Bowers


A reception honoring re-
tiring librarian Cherie Bow-
ers will be held on Saturday,
Dec. 16 from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. at the A. F. Knotts Pub-
lic Library in Yankeetown.


T h e
Friends of
the Library
is hosting the
open house
to honor


Bowers' 20 years of service
to the library.
From its beginning in 1959
at the back of the Knotts'
real estate office with 1,000
donated books, the Knotts


Library has been a source
of pride for the Inglis-Yan-
keetown community.

In her 20 years, Bowers
has seen changes in the way


the library serves the comr- for learning new ways of ac-
munity. .cessing information.
The old 3 x 5 card catalogs
have almost literally morphed The A. F: Knotts Public Li-
into Internet searches and li- brary is located at 1.1 56th St.
braries have become centers in Yankeetown.


Ben Detwiler hoped to make the wotld a better place.
Thai hope dice whlin Irn was killed by a drunk driver,
What should you do to stop a friend from driving drunk?
Whatever you have to.
Friends dont let friends drive drunk.





.2 COUNTY PAPER EST. t2
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state ............................. $22
Out of state ......................... $27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadlinefor all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


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The Gathering Place


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inweH .-r---c


. 1 ,









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


YOUR VIEW
I


Fly Lady's guide to


holiday gift giving
Last December we replaced school teacher gifts
(three kids times a teacher and an aide, plus the mu-
sic teacher, the art teacher, the enrichment teacher
...) with a single check to the school's library fund. We sent
thank you notes to the teachers telling them about the gift in
their honor and the principal asked
the kids to help suggest some pur-
chases for the library. This went over
so well that we did the same thing at
the end of the school year. Thanks for
all you do! in Virginia.
*Rather than a Christmas / Winter
Holiday gift I often give a Thanks-
lJ s i giving present to my daughters teach-
ers. We have a really nice bread store
that makes very gourmet breads. I've
<-*-- given a nicely wrapped loaf of bread
the day before Thanksgiving with
a small note such as: "We are very thankful for the gift of
wonderful teachers" Sincerely, _
*Everyone can use extra bread if they are having Thanks-
giving, they can bring the bread if they are going someplace
and since it's food, definitely not clutter (except maybe on
my hips...but that's a different issue!)
*As a former child care provider, some of the best gifts I
got from the families I cared for were actually not gifts for
ie.......they were gifts for my inhome child care. Some fami-
lies would bring me large lots of construction paper, paints,
playdough, crayons, pencils, gallon jugs of apple juice,
Costco size boxes of crackers, cheerios, juice boxes, large
chunks of cheese, bags of apples and grapes, and sometimes
would even ask(and then purchase) what toy I've been really
wanting for the day care. Of course, all of this is nonclutter
because we used it all!!!
*I do a lot of baking at Christmas and every year we
give our neighbors a plate with assorted goodies. One older
couple really looks forward to and appreciates them because
she isn't able to bake like she used to. They have said that
the traditional holiday goodies really make it feel more fes-
tive for them.
*When I was in middle school, our neighbor hood pulled
together and painted an elderly neighbor's house. She was
sooo happy! That was 16 years ago and I still remember how
good.-lfelt to see.he~'so happy about.it! It-does't have to ..
be pafg1'fL ..:fW n, ralif ceirig-sno'
trom~id'ewalks etc. are wonderful "' ..fl. .

See Fly Page 5


Letters to the Editor
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it to either address on the front page.
5) Letters by the same author will be
considered for publication every 21
days.


Quote of the Week

"People take different roads seeking
fulfillment and happiness. Just because
they're not on your road doesn't mean
they've gotten lost."
.-H. Jackson Brown, Jr.


The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
*reflect our community in everything we do.
*provide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
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*record the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
*promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
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"Copyrighted Material


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Available from Commercial News Prov



I s
Si m4b


It's the miraculous time of the


W en Williston's
Jackie West
watches a
Christmas parade, it is with
*the child-like wonder most
of us can recall from our
youths.
But for Jackie, every day
she wakes up inspires that
kind of wonder because this
woman knows how precious
life is and how quickly it can-
be snuffed out.
A few years back, Jackie,
a mother of two, was criti-
cally burned over 65 percent
of her body.
A kitchen fire, started from
a pan of grease left there by
a relative, woke her from a
sound sleep.
Panicking, she
ran into the kitchen,
grabbed the pan and! I
attempted to throw it
out the back door.
In doing so, the
flames went higher
and Jackie was
caught in the engulf-
ing fiery inferno.
For three months,
she lay in a coma-
induced state in the JACi
burn unit at Shands
while her body tried to
heal and doctors fought for
her life.
When she awakened,
suddenly it was June, not
the March night when the
tragedy occurred.
Her then two-year-old son,
Willie, didn't recognize her.
"I was pink all over," said
the youthful, polite, black
woman.
After a seemingly unend-
ing series of surgeries and
skin grafts, Jackie started her'
own road to recovery. She
learned to walk again and
because of a tracheostomy,
speak again.
Only recently the trach
was removed and her throat,
still inflamed and muscularly
weak, has begun to heal. But
breathing-and walking-are
still difficult and works in
motion.
Jackie wears the dark
black scars that cover her
legs, arms, stomach and
back like a badge of honor
because it reminds her daily


THINKING OUT
LOUD





Carolyn Risner


how blessed she is.
"If you had told me I
would be burned in a house
fire and almost died five
years ago, I wouldn't have
believed it," she said Friday
as we stood on the street cor-
ner waiting for the Williston
Christmas parade to begin.
I just shook
my head,


KIE WEST

for her child
a fixed budg
ing the smal
Things we t(
granted.
Like the ii
of breathing
As Jackie
most people
But she has I
breathe and
the action as
aware of run
when we ha'
it.
Once the
gan, Jackie t
alongside he
I couldn't he
the obvious
face as she v
and Willie sc
candy tossed
motorcade.
"Thank yo
each and eve
one threw a:
Roll in our d
"God bles
merry Christ
And then
This feeling
Cassie chose
week for an.
tion. Why I1
minutes befo
started. Why
close to the
the corer. V
at the stone t
rather than n
the street.
I was supp
I was suppos
Jackie West.
to hear her sl
Why?
Certainly
this is not the
tive tale one
Christmas.


Jackie West to
chapter in her lif
turned it into soi
better.
No longer is a
given and every
sees or does bec
from the Creator
Sunrises are n
ular. Fresh air is
and breathing on
is phenomenal. (


a.a ,aediti 4 In:- more precious an
gTi Pa 4F 4r-0 d ,j3i traordinary>, evei
mination it must And watching
have taken-is parade is a mom
taking-to reha- in time, evidence
bilitate herself beaming faces c
and forge on reporter's camera
with life. dark December
Disabled There may no
now, Jackie of presents unde
can't work. Christmas tree ti
She spends her but there is no d
time caring the gift she and
ren, living on will share is the
;et and enjoy,- together.
1 things in life. They will laugh
oo often take for will remember a
enjoy the day-ev
involuntary reflex of it.
As I turned to
pointed out, my car, I extended
simply/breathe. and told her how
had to learn to enjoyed talking
is as aware of I meant it.
. much as we are But as quickly
ming a 5K race went up, it came
ven't trained for Jackie and I hug,
the main street o
parade be- "God bless yo
ook her place in unison. "Have
:r children and Christmas."
?lp but notice Jackie West m
delight on her it, but she is the
watched LaKayla I will receive thi
camper for the For through he
1 by those in the the remarkable v
dies herself, I wa
)u," she called Her life, her st
cry time some- willingness to sh
mint or Tootsie ed me of the mir
direction. own life-the one
s you. Have a to get dusty on tl
mas." my memory.
it struck me. Her fortitude t
ig of why every day and pu
this particular front of the other
Arizona vaca- to look beyond c
had arrived 30 and enjoy this m
:re the parade what it is.
I chose to park I believe in mi
antique store on know a few.
/hy I stopped And during thi
able and bench season, when the
love closer to. miracle of all cai
in the form of a I
?osed to be there. forget the gift I v
sed to meet and the giver wh
I was supposed me while waiting
tory. Christmas parade
Carolyn Risne
a story such as managing editor
e happy, fes- Levy County Jo
wants to hear at She may be reach
editor@levyjoui


Larolyn KRsner
Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath
Staff Writers
Cassie Joumigan
Neal Fisher
Sales Representative/Bronson
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell
Delhlery/Clerical
Rhonda Griffiths


No fear


offlying


I flew cross-country
last week. Flying is
always an opportunity
o I eagerly await. I love
iders" the chance to be at an airport
with all
1 kinds of
people
from all
over the
world. I
love going
someplace
different,
seeing CASSIEJOURNIGAN
places I've Columnist
never seen
before.
There is nothing like the
exhilaration of flying. I
year love the feel of ajet engine
revving up, and then gaining,
gaining, gaining in speed as
the big bird lifts itself off the
Or is it? ground.
When I Wonderful too for me is
drove to- chance to take a bird's-eye
ward Bron- view of our planet. I love
son on 27A, looking down at the land
I couldn't with its hodge-podge of
help but be city buildings, its orderly
uplifted and little rows of colored boxes
inspired at for homes, and especially
one wom- the wild places--the
an's story. fields of many colors, the
aok a bad dark forests, the verdant
fe and has mountains and meandering
mething rivers.
This is a big land in which
anything a we live-a very big land. I
thing she don't much care to spend a
homes a gift lot of time in cities, and I am
r. always greatly heartened to
nore spectac- see just how much natural
incredible land remains. When I spend
n your own too much time at ground
Children are level viewing cities; steadily
nd life is ex- eating away at our nd ural
n if it's not.: 1 .d. lad'I bein td'thiiib;there
a Christmas will soon be left no trees, no
Lent captured rivers, no land in which to
ed by three roam free.
captured by a 'My plane last week
a on a cold, touched down in the very
night. big land of the American
t be a score Southwest. Wayne and I flew
r Jackie's to Phoenix to see our son and
his year, his girlfriend. The thrill of a
doubt that new topography was merely
her children a byproduct of the visit. But
gift of being what a byproduct it was.
'The city itself was
;h. They interesting. It was clean-no
nd they will trash littered the streets
very minute or sidewalks. And huge.
Mountains liberally surround
head toward a vast flat valley. Some of
ed my hand the mountains look like dead
v much I volcanoes. Others are classic
with her-aid butte shapes. One resembles
an animal so much that
as my hand it is named "Camel Back
down and Mountain."
ged there on Looking at Phoenix with
f Williston. its areas of urban sprawl
u," we said as well as its natural areas
a merry led me to think about Levy
County. Our area is beautiful
ay not know in an entirely different way.
best present Comparing the two led me
s year. to wonder: will Levy too
er story and become plagued by urban
vay she han- sprawl? I have seen so many
as changed, trees felled in recent years.
:ory, her Real estate signs are up
iare remind- everywhere, promising huge
acles in my tracts of land for sale on
-s that tend the cheap. I watch building
he shelf of after building going up as
progress rapidly gobbles up
o get up nature.
it one foot in I wonder if we will
Inspires me become another version of
ircumstance urban sprawl. I hope we will
moment for work at keeping our green
spaces. Maybe I'm just
racles. I sentimental, but sociologists,
planners and medical
is Christmas scientists agree. Research
greatest completed by Amy Zlot,
ne to earth who works at the Oregon
baby, I won't Department of Human
vas given Services, and Tom Schmid
o blessed at the Centers for Disease
g on a Control, indicates that people
e. who live in communities rich
er is the in recreational opportunities
r. of the are more fit than those whose
urnal. communities offer little or no
:hed at park space.
rnal.com.


See Cassie Page 5


A &


Page 4


Ij COUNTY JOUR L
L E COUNTY PAPER EST. 192

Our Mission w to e A re
Managing Editor


I


:S









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


This Week's Arrests


The Levy County Sheriff's
Office reports the following
arrests for:
S Monique L.
DeLoach, 21, of 'Chiefland
was arrested for violation of
probation (VOP) worthless
check, 3 counts of worthless
check (Okeechobee) and
worthless check over 150
dollars (Okeechobee). Bail
was set at $5,000.
James Ausherman,
27, of Bronson was arrested
for 2 counts VOP possession
of marijuana over 20 grams,
VOP tampering with physical
evidence and VOP sale of
marijuana. Bail was set at
$20,000.
Nickie Errol
Williams, 37, of Old Town
was arrested for failure to
appear (FTA) driving under
the influence (DUI). No bond
was set.
Alexandria Howard,
34, of Bronson was arrested
for VOP sale of cocaine.
He was released on his own
recognizance.* C h a r les
Anderson Amburgey, Jr.,
43, of Fort Worth Texas was
arrested VOP DUI. No bond
was set.


*F]


Leah K. Davison,
28, of Williston was arrested
for VOP 8 counts worthless
check. No bond was set.
Jose A. Dorantes,
29, of Fanning Springs was
arrested for VOP DUI. No
bond was set.
Lee Clarenace Lewis,
Jr., 19, of Williston was
arrested for VOP resisting
without violence (ROV). No
bond was set.
Rachel E. Duffy, 23,
of Chiefland was arrested for
VOP possession of controlled
substance. Bail was set at
$500.

Gary Michael
Calhoun, 46, of Alachua
was arrested for possession
of cocaine, possession
of cocaine with intent to
distribute, possession of drug
paraphernalia and driving
while license suspended or
revoked (DWLSR). Bail was
set at $22,500. .
Tammy Lynn
McDonald, 39, of Old Town
was arrested for FTA-
purchase cocaine/possession
paraphernalia. No bond was
set.


Shelena Garrison
Davis, 29, of Chiefland was
arrested for VOP possession
of cocaine. Bail was set at
$10,000.
Decoda Kadarrell
King, 19, of Williston was
arrested for flee elude police
- high speed fleeing/eluding,
nonmoving traffic violation
- DWSLR. Bail was set at
$20,000.
Melinda Louise
Rankin, 31, of Ocala was
arrested for FTA- DWLSRC.
Bail was set at $5,000.
Timothy W. Rankin,
42, of Ocala was arrested
for FTA DWLSR and FTA
attach tag not assigned. Bail
was set at $2,000.
S Tony Lee Diamond,
26, of Ocala was arrested for
VOP grand theft. No bond
was set.
P Charity Duncan, 19,
of Chiefland was arrested for
VOP grand theft. No bond
was set.
.* Holly Christina
Brooks, 21, of Ocala was
arrested for resisting without
violence.
Clinton Thomas
Butler, 19, of Williston was


arrested for 3 counts VOP
- larceny petit 1st offense,
3 counts of VOP petit 1st
offense, VOP petit theft
and VOP damage property
criminal mischief. No bond
was set.
Jeffrey Thane
Knappins, 43, of Williston
was arrested for aggravated
assault domesticc violence).
He was released on his own
recognizance.
Virginia Ritchie,
38, of-Bronson was arrested
for domestic battery. She
was released on her own
recognizance.
Vivian Bailey, of
Chiefland was arrested for
VOP grand theft. No bond
was set.

The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
Shannon Michele
Smith, 23, of Williston was
arrested for DWLSR.
MauriceAvery Rowe,
20, of Archer was arrested for
warrant reckless driving with
property damage, domestic
battery and possession with
intent to distribute.


Watching for your

child's drug usage signs


Hi, everyone and
welcome to the
Sheriff's. Corner.
This week's corner will re-
turn to the topic of drug abuse
and our children.
So far we've talked about
communication and how im-
portant a good relationship
with your child or children
is. But we know that as our
children grow into preteens
and teens, mood swings and
unpredictable behavior are
frequent occurrences. Spot-
ting alcohol and drug abuse
becomes difficult.
So let's talk about some of
the signs your child might ex-
hibit if they were starting to
abuse drugs.
Your child might become
withdrawn, depressed, tired
and careless about personal
grooming. Your child might
become hostile and unco-
operative, even frequently
breaking curfew. The rela-
tionship you've been working
on can deteriorate. Your child
may start hanging around
with a new group of friends.
Also possible is a grades' de-
crease in school. Attendance
may also become a problem.


r Another pos-
sible sign may
be a loss if in-
terest in hob-
bies, sports and
other favorite
activities.
Physical
JOHNNY signs might in-
SMITH clude a change in
eating and sleep-
ing patterns. Up
all night and sleeping during
the day may be witnessed.
Your child's eyes may be red-
rimmed and/or their nose is
runny even if they don't have
a cold. Your child may have a
hard time concentrating. And
household money may be
disappearing.
In addition, pipes, roll-
ing papers, small medicine
bottles, eye drops and butane
lighters may now be in your
house.
If any of these indicators
show up, parents should start
discussing what steps to take
so they can present a united
front. More next week. Take
care.

Johnny Smith is the Levy
County Sheriff.


I '7


'y


*Each year we give our son's teachers gift certificates to a
nearby coffee shop. Flybaby in Holland Landing
*Teachers LOVE a note from a parent that for once isn't
complaining about something. Take a few minutes and
"thank" the people who work so hard to give your children
the best education possible! Frankfort, Ky.
*Take the time to write your clergyperson a note saying
how much his or her ministry means to you. As a pastor's
wife I can tell you that this means more to us than anything
you could buy. We have saved all the thoughtful letters and
cards we have received over the years and reread them often,
especially when we need a "lift". From Maine
*For over 20 years my DH has been giving "Cashew
halves" in 9 oz. tins. When we were married (13 years, thank
you very much) I joined him in delivering. Now that we
have kids the delivery of the nuts has become a family tradi-
tion on Chist as Eve., ...
We pile'all.-fur.kids (now ages 11,;9, 7 and 6) into the
van. Then we wrap them (the cashew tins- lol) in shiny silver
mylar liquor bags found in liquor stores around the holidays.
Next, we make a hole-punch into our family photo and tie
it with a pretty ribbon around the opening of the silver bag.
This becomes our christmas gift to many, many friends,
neighbors, teachers, service workers (mail carrier, garbage,
etc.). It's quite inexpensive (approx. $2.50) because we buy
the 60 to 70 cans when they're on sale in October. And we
save postage because we don't have to mail as many Christ-
mas photo cards. We have worked out a route and we sing
Christmas songs as we drive. The kids love taking turns run-
ning up to the door and ringing the bell. We wave and shout,
"Merry Christmas," wait for the kid to get back into the van
(lol), then drive off. If they're not home we leave the nuts on
the door step. People know we're nuts, and I like the idea it's
not clutter for them. Flying Mary Poppins in St. Paul
*When my boys were toddlers, 'several of our friends had
toddlers the same age. We had a Christmas party as a gift
to our FRIENDS. They got two hours of free time to wrap
gifts, go shopping, reconnect with each other, or whatever,
while we entertained the children. We had very simple
games (pin the nose on Rudolph), reindeer games (running
and leaping), and a little craft project. Afterward we invited
the. parents over for chili and enjoyed their company. This
was a favorite tradition when our children were younger.
- Flybaby in Georgia
*As a teacher I can tell you, we would love classroom
supplies! Either ask what we are running low on or buy a
little goodie bag of the basics. Tissues, pencils, paper, glue,
scissors, erasers, tape, notecards, etc. We will love you for it.
Flying in Virginia
*A collection of beautiful stickers, if they use them to mo-
tivate the children. That way they don't have to spend a dime
on such an.item, and it spares them a trip to the store.
For my children' teachers, at the end of the school year
I give them a card telling them that I have made a donation ,
to the school library for the purchase of more books and
have each child write them a letter saying how this teacher
has helped them learn and grow. When my children were
younger they felt these were not "real gifts" as they were not
tangible, so I then would include something that could be
used up like a candle or bouquet. My father taught post-sec-


Continue from page 4
ondary and received many, many bottles of wine over the
years, and as a non-drinker he was able to bless others he
knew would be more appreciative.
Being a primary school teacher, I have received a lot of
mugs, beauty products, photo frames, chocolates...the list
could go on. A lot of these are recycled as presents to others.
The best gift I ever received as a teacher was a voucher. My
voucher was for a book store as I love books. However a
department store voucher would also be a great idea. This
way the teacher can purchase something they like and need.
Rather than adding another mug to their already' cluttered
cupboards. Australian Flybaby
*For my two tenant farmers who are brothers, one item
I am going to give to each of them is a container of dispos-
able tar and bug wipes. They can use the wipes on the farm
equipment or the pickups. There is no need to give them
anything td'll*hect y~ ijn their h6iies. Hbosier Farm Fly-
, baby (in-Indiana)a -.. .. ..
*For teachers: a movie coupon (or for the real special one:
the booklet which has two tickets for free admission and
a bucket of popcorn). So very often, the teacher has been
working at a hectic pace since the beginning of school year
to the holidays. This is a little bit of luxury for them which
doesn't clutter their classroom or home. Instead, they have a
few hours of fun during a busy time.
And this year I know we are making a donation to the
local Habitat for Humanity office for our relatives but you
could specialize your donation in many ways. Just get cre-
ative: for somebody you know with cancer it could be to the
American Cancer Society, or if they have diabetes it could
be to the American Diabetes Association. And local food
banks would always appreciate donations and since every-
body eats it's the perfect clutter free gift for anyone!
I have decluttered myself and made holiday presents all
based on one plant. This plant (called a prayer plant) throws
off babies, which I had never clipped. Having these babies
hanging off the plant is actually unhealthy for the plant. So
I clipped the babies as part of superfling boogie week (there
were 27, amazingly enough...). I got the potting soil from
an old bag in the garage, plus a pile from the yard. I used
flower pots from old, dead plants that I had been saving for
no reason. I have the newly potted ones all assembled on an
old washing machine tray (the under-machine thingie) on
the deck. Now I have a ton of clutter recycled into very nice
little presents! Fluttering in North Carolina
*I make Pampering Packs. In a cellophane bag I put a
tealight, a bath bead or bath bomb, a pack of matches, and a
few individually wrapped chocolates. Attached with ribbons
are the directions: Light the candle; lock the door. Drop bath
bead into warm bath. Get into bath, eat chocolates. Result:
complete relaxation. Serves one. They're very inexpensive
to make, and they get used up in one night, guilt free. Cana-
dian FlyBaby in Montreal, Quebec
*For teachers: a gift certificate to a teaching supply store.
Or supplies for the classroom. To get specific ideas for
what's needed, simply volunteer in the classroom (to see
what's there) and talk to the teachers) (to find out what's
needed/desired).
*Another idea for teachers: a gift certificate to a spa/salon
so they can have a pampering session.


Journal pnoto oy .,Carolyn rIsner
LOCAL AUTHORITIES are investigating graffiti
vandalism that occurred in the Rosewood com-
munity in the night hours of Dec. 7. Several signs
for at least a mile were spray painted with racial
slurs and vulgarities. By noon Friday, most prop-
erty owners along the way had either covered or
removed the signage. The sign above is behind
a fence several yards off the highway and on pri-
vate property. Calls to the Levy County Sheriff's
Office were not immediately returned.


*Cassie
e Continue from page 4
Other studies point to a correlation between peaceful
urban neighborhoods and plenty of trees. Trees draw
people out-of-doors. Once outside, people interact with -
their neighbors. People with strong neighborhood ties are
healthier-physically and mentally.
Levy County and its environs have acre after acre of
green space. I only hope our elected representatives-and we
the people-work to maintain the natural beauty that is our
portion of the Nature Coast.
Cassie Journigan is a reporter for the Levy County
Journal. She may be reached at cjournigan@levyjournal.
com.


Dispose of your flag properly

Tattered United States flags are being collected by the Ladies
Auxiliary of the Chiefland Veterans of Foreign Wars. The flags
will be disposed of in a dignified manner as prescribed by the
94th Congress, Public Law 344 of the Federal Flag Code. If
you have a worn flag, you may drop it off in a collection box
in the Board of County Commissioners' office at the Levy
County Courthouse in Bronson. For more information please
call the post at 493-1159.


CE (, J~~FUV


Benaviaez, erry Lee CampDell, Jonn >.
Inglis W/M Chiefland W/M
DOB: 01-06-1986 DOB: 01-15-1965
FTA, Attach Tag Not Assigned VOP DUI/Possess Marijuana
$1,000 Bond No Bond


Galloway, Derrick. L.
Williston B/M
DOB: 07-31-1978
VOP Possession Marijuana
No Bond


Pearce, Christina April
Cross City W/F
DOB: 08-28-1983
FTA, DWLSR Knowingly
$10,000 Bond


Thompson, Robert T.
Williston W/M
DOB: 12/07/1986
VOP Worthless Check
$2,500 Bond


wnte, amuel is
Bronson W/M
DOB: 07-16-1983
VOP No Valid D/L
No Bond


Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having any information about the above individuals is asked to please contact the Levy County Sheriffs Office at 352-486-5111 or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477.


A 4


Page 5


Rosewood Vandalism


KIM K-AN:4: 1









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


LEVY THROUGH THE LENS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Feral cat neutering program needs money


Job Well Done


CEDAR KEY-An all-volunteer staff is committed to hu-
manely putting a stop to the overpopulation of feral cats on
the island of Cedar Key.
At this time the group relies completely on the support of
Cedar Key citizens, business owners and tourists for fund-
ing.
Veterinary assistance is provided by River City Commu-
nity Animal Hospital, a 501C-3 non-profit organization offer-
ing reduced fee mobile spay and neuter service for feral cats.
RCCAH (www.rccah.org) will visit Cedar Key monthly and
requires a minimum of 35 cats to be neutered per trip.
Levy County Humane Society, a 501C-3 Non-Profit Orga-
nization, provided the group with 20 new feral cat traps ex-
pressly for the Trap-Neuter-Release (TNR) project and will
also be providing much needed assistance each month with
the pre-and post-surgery preparations and recovery.
Phase One of Operation Cedar Key began in October with
the guidance of Cats Angels, Inc SPCA of Fernandina Beach
and the veterinary and volunteer group of Operation Catnip
in Gainesville.
A total of 47 feral cats were trapped from the areas of Dock
Street, First Street, corer of First & G and Whiddon/HWY
24. An additional 12 kittens were removed off island for adop-
tion. Phase Two was recently completed with the assistance.of
Cats Angels and RCCAH.
A total of 33 cats were neutered/spayed and 11 kittens tak-
V


Library Donation


en off island for adoption. Areas of capture were scattered
throughout Dock Street, First Street, 6th & 7th along G Street,
Lions Club building, Gulf Blvd., Paroda, E. Point Road and
the cemetery.
Cedar Key is well on its way to taking responsibility and
educating the public on how to care for feral cat overpopula-
tion through humane TNR programs. To date 80 free-roaming
cats have been successfully neutered/spayed and 23 kittens
were removed to a No Kill Shelter for adoption.
The volunteer group seeks approximately $1,700 per month,
estimating 20 females at $50 each and 20 males at $35 each.
Check donations should be made .out to: River City Com-
munity Animal Hospital and write 'Operation Cedar Key Fe-
ral Cats on the check. Drop off at the Faraway Inn on Third
and G Street or mail to Faraway Inn, P.O. Box 370, Cedar
Key, FL 32625-0370.
Phase Three of our TNR program will begin on Wednes-
day, Thursday and Friday Jan. 10-12, 2007. Trapping of the
feral cats will be done on Wednesday and Thursday, surgeries
will be performed on Friday and cats released late Saturday to
their original place of capture.
If you have questions, would like to volunteer, want infor-
mation on how to start your own community TNR program
or want to make a donation please contact Doreen Bauer at
352-543-5330.



Go paddle your canoe (or

kayak) at Manatee Springs


December marks the
beginning of Manatee
Springs State Park winter
paddling program. Every
Friday at 8:30 a.m., the park
offers a guided canoe/kayak
trip on the spring run and
out into the Suwannee River.
December also is the time of
year park visitors can expect
to see manatees returning
from other areas of the Gulf
Coast seeking refuge from
the colder waters of the Gulf
of Mexico.
"For park visitors, the
milder temperatures of winter
offer relief from the humidity
and insects often encountered
in the summer," says Sally
Lieb, park manager. "The
water of the Suwannee River
is often clearer in the winter
making it an ideal opportunity
a to seemanatees as you paddle
the river," Lieb added.
Participants should have


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
RED UNDERHILL of Jacksonville stopped by the
Levy County Journal office last week to visit and
make a donation to the county's libraries of the
biography, Tex Ritter: America's Most Beloved
Cowboy by Bill O'Neal. Underwood and the au-
thor are friends and he was also friends with the
late Ritter.





SBig John's Supply
Plumbing, Well, Irrigation.
Watersoftners, Iron Filters,
Pool Supplies


ma*324065


A4 r'e e'et a9t ce" f Jou a4it a & Swaming
AN Come on by and Browse Local Artists' Gallery of
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SMONT.LNA RNIl T
A SueS-Sat. 11am-5pm ',

--ehind 99ie' at 4M VW 16t St. in Wia ton

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Low Rates Easy Terms
Personal & Commercial Auto Insurance
Home* Life* Commercial
Rapid Tax Returns
"Guaranteed Lowest Down Payment"


Going to a holiday party? Make
sure you have a designated
driver. Arrive Alive.


at least some paddling
experience but the trip is easy
to moderate and does not
require advanced paddling
skills.
The paddle departs the
kayak/canoe ramp at the
spring run at 8:30 a.m. and
is limited to the first 10 boats
registered on the day of the
paddle.
The paddling trips will
continue through the last
Friday in March 2007. The
trip is free with a paid park
admission if you have your
own boat. Those needing a
rental canoe or kayak can
make arrangements with
Suwannee River Tours at352-
949-0379 no later than 5 p.m.
on Thursday, the day before
the paddle.
For more information call
John Lohde, park services
specialist at 352-493-6823.


Safe driving course set
A safe sriving program for seniors will be held on Friday,
Dec. 15 in the community room of the Capital City Bank
branch near Winn Dixie Plaza in Chiefland.
This class is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. There will be a
short break for a light lunch (to be provided) and then the class
will continue into the afternoon until completed. Certificates
of completion will be given that should be sent to the auto
insurance company issuing the coverage in order to get the
discount as required in Florida.
This course is normally given over two days but is being
offered in one day for this time only. For more information
and to register please call 352-493-7597.


* Complete Veterinary Services:-
Ted S.Yoho DVM Marie Lealie, DVM
Jackie Linkous, MRCVS Jill Brady. DVM
--la- Denial Care I Pecription Food I Grooming
8 Vhccinations I Boardng I EarlyAM Drop-Off
Microchip Identificaltons I Medldne & Surgery,'
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CD 2--- lm 603&Nf nSL-T m
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Journal photo by Carolyn Risnef
WILLISTON COUNCIL President Jake Cason, left,
congratulations Councilor Jerry Robinson on re-i
cently completed continuing education for gov-;
ernment leaders.


amne bash Dee: 19 at 6 p.m. .
he' library will have ani Xbox andsnacks. .Yot are.a
encouraged to bring controllers, .
The library has.games such as Halo2, Need For Speed
Underground. Trivial Pursuit,,NFL Blitz, and many, mmaniy,
.more. .
Also, this month the:7 to 10-year-old ptogram,will be'
mqke-n-lake Christmas Craft event Dec.. 19 at 5:30 p.mia .:
The kidstillU be able to create se6ral Christmas cr fts i
.to take horie and..share w..hteirk loved ones during the -:
iholt y-;sigSn. Craftsoinuide snowfhke headbandl j 'S
Il dg- tags,. reindeer: headbands, ornam it? and.i4C~t a
9 Car .. -. .. .
SF ;or movie informationn contact your local librarian -i
8-62015 or Jenny Rodgers, Youth' Services Coordinator,...
.. 4.
;

Morriston resident pens

book of inspirational poetry

Julie Welch of Morriston has published Bird's Words.
Welch's religious and moral beliefs are her inspiration for
writing this book of poetry, but she also includes many loves
poems after being disappointed and let down in love. Someti
times life is funny, sometimes sad and heartbreaking. Some-
times we try to get others to see things from our perspective.
Each poem has a meaning and a story behind it. "
Welch was born in 1964 in North Central Florida. Althougli
everything seemed normal at her birth, her parents soon real.
ized that there were complications. After 14, she was diagj
nosed with Turner's Syndrome, which is a rare chromosome
disorder. Short stature, learning disabilities and other medical
problems are associated with this disorder. Early on, Welc"
learned to laugh at herself through life's ups and downs. Shd
has always enjoyed writing, especially involving topics abo
which she feels passionately.










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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


iATHSBNJ~ITY
*PMt:rw
sin OWPI .
a4 bi0on
a ri Ab i 6 6
'''


Helen Carver
Helen Joyce Carver, 70, of Bronson died Dec. 7, 2006 at
North Florida Regional Medical Center.
S Mrs. Carver was born in Providence, Ky. She was a
homemaker and Baptist. Mrs. Carver loved to travel. She
never met a stranger and loved her family very much.
Survivors include daughters, Diane Hafers, Jeanie Tyler,
Carolyn Jones, Janet Carver Lemnah, Melissa Van Cleave,
Tina Haire and Pamela Floyd; sisters, Wilma Harris and
Rebecca Light and a brother, Ronald Beard, 21 grandchildren;
20 great-grandchildren.
SFuneral services were Dec. 10 at Williams-Thomas Funeral
Home Westarea, with Pastor Wayne Saylor conducting
the service. Burial followed the service at Newnansville
Cemetery in Alachua.


OBITUARIES


Flauda A. Key
Flauda A. Key of Chiefland died Dec. 9, 2006 in
Gainesville. She was 91.
She was a native of Chiefland and was part of the first
graduating class of Chiefland High School. She was a cook
for Betts Big T for 35 years. She was a member of Mt. Zion
Church of Jesus Christ.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Luther J. Key
and sons, Carroll Jackson Key and James Key.
Survivors are her sons, Wilbur Gene Key of Milledgeville,
Ga., Ted Galen Key of Sebring, Paul Gwain Key of Chiefland,
and Dennis Loraine Key of Opelika, Ala.; 12 grandchildren;
16 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
Services were held Dec. 12 at 11 a.m. at Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services, Chiefland, with Pastor Huggins officiating.
Burial followed at Galilee Cemetery in Chiefland.

Patricia Merrow
Patricia Allen Merrow died Dec. 3, 2006 in Gainesville.
Born in Syracuse, N.Y., she was a retired administrative
secretary.
She is survived by her husband, Edward Merrow of


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Gainesville; daughters; Pamela Oatman of -Syracuse, N.Y.
,Lori Lewis of Virginia, Wendy Neugent of West Port, Mass.,
Stacey Wilkerson Brorison; son Jonathan Merrow of Marietta,
Ga.; sister; Judith Rounds of California; brother William
Tibitts and sister-in-law Evelyn of Baldwinsville, N.Y.; 10
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
A private memorial service will be held at a later date.

Barbara Robinson
Barbara Ann Brookins Robinson,72, of Gainesville died
Saturday, Dec. 2, 2006 at her residence.
A homemaker, Mrs. Robinson was preceded in death by
her husband, Everett Robinson.
Survivors include her son, Jack Altman III (and Bernice)
of Gainesville; stepson. Henry Robinson (and Alice) of
Gainesville; daughter, Gloria Brereton (and Fitzgerald) of
Miramar; step-daughter, Henrietta Robinson of Williston; 10
grandchildren and 14 step-grandchildren.
Services were held Dec. 9 at Nolan Missionary Baptist
Church, Raleigh, with the Rev. James W. Ramsey officiating.
Arrangements were under the care of Duncan Brothers'
Funeral Home, Gainesville.


Photographs are published at no charge with obituaries.


Unansweredprayers, thanks


SIt's big alright," Angie said to the real estate lady. It
was her weak attempt to find a positive.
As her husband, I knew too well Angie didn't
really want to be wearing that smile.
Sure enough, as soon as the agent turned her back, it
molded into a glare, aimed at me. I guess I deserved it. Even
the real estate lady didn't seem too thrilled about driving
way out here for this eye sore.
: The agent led us out onto the back deck where she tried
to spin a dilapidated pier on a dried up lake into a stunning
view.
"Be careful near that rail," she warned, "Wouldn't want
you to fall over." She stomped her high heel, "The flooring
still seems good though."
SUnfortunately her stomp awakened a wasp nest. We
made a mad dash back inside where that same heel caught
in some peeling linoleum and sent her sprawling across the
floor most un-lady- like. Scrambling to her feet she quickly
gathered her books and what was left of her composure.
"Well," she managed, "I think I'll give you two a chance
io look around. I'll.be in my car."
As she wobbled off I shrugged, "Now, Angie, this house
has more square feet for the money than any other house in
the listings. It's just a fixer upper."
She cocked her head, "A fixer upper? The grass is four
feet tall out there." She inched into the living room like she
might be expecting to find a family of bears hibernating
thbre. "I do like this crown molding though," she admitted,
"and that rock fireplace."
It was crazy. For every negative the old place did offer
some hint of redemption. It was huge and the expandable
area upstairs was large enough to land a crop duster. The lot
S itself might have been beautiful before the lake dried up and


BUT ANYWAY






Guy E. Sheffield


they started
dumping old
tires in it.
Finding
our original
trail, we
came out at
the road and
the agent
lady rolled
down her


window about an inch.
"What'd you think?" she asked.
"It's big," Angie smiled. "We'll give you a call."
It's always been hard for me to walk away from a scrap
heap. Growing up monetarily challenged you are just sort
of conditioned to the fact that any diamonds-you find will
probably need a little polishing.
I cut my teeth pestering pawn shops, fleecing flea markets,
and grazing garage sales, so even as we drove back towards
the paved roads I couldn't help picturing the possibilities
for that old house. It was within our budget and all I would
have to do is learn some light carpentry, roofing, dry wall,
and electrical skills and we'd be ready to move in within a
couple of months.
The next day I began to pray that God would give us the
place. I even tried to persuade Angie to stay with me if I
made an offer on it.
"-'-Whdfi PWdM cohViided'she w6ildT'c&llFd'the real estate''
lady. No answer. I called again, no answer. None of my
messages were being returned either.
I was getting really upset until I ran into an old friend and


for nothing

told him about the place. He looked at me like I was stupid.
"Dude," he said, "That's like the worst drug neighborhood
in the state. They call it crack alley." He went on to describe
it with a little too much detail. "Wow," I admitted, "I was
about to move my family there."
You know sometimes I hear people complaining because
they think their prayers were not answered the way they
wanted. Then I hear others gossiping about how it was
because they didn't have enough faith. It can all get a
little silly. Maybe their prayers got answered according to
Romans 8:28?
I don't know about you, but the more I grow in the Lord
the more I'm glad that sometimes my prayers don't get
answered. If they did I would have gotten divorced and
re-married at least ten times in the sixth grade alone! How
would you like to live in "The World According to Guy"? I
don't think so.
When my children gripe about my answer to a request
it really doesn't lead me to think they are having faith in
me as a dad. I wonder how our heavenly Father feels. Of
all people, shouldn't we trust that He knows best? Don't
misunderstand me. I'm not saying don't pray. I'm saying
pray harder, and listen longer. Determine to study the Bible
and learn how to pray according to God's will for your
situation. Jesus prayed, "Father, if you are willing, please
take this cup of suffering away from me. Yet I want your
will, not mine." Luke 22:42 NLT.
But anyway, if you're that real estate lady, I'd just like to
say it was very rude of you not to return my calls. "Thanks!"

Guy E. Sheffield, of Hernando, Miss. is the president of
the nonprofit ministry SoulFood.


Are heroes born?
Or are they made?
Inside every child is a hidden strength, an unknown
ability, a hero waiting to be discovered. in after school
pi'ogiTrrI 6 gIl 1sr v rd in ill rlai i r, iachvlIo'e
scholastic, athletic and creative, Activities that help
them realize they have a potential to do better and
eacri lurthmr r r.1iM eri ri irTiljnc B 3i:e I. ih,
end, that' what makes a hero, Let us know you want
after school programs in your area.
Call 1-00-USA-LEARN

imS


A CHILD IS HELPLESS. YOU ARE NOT.
www.afterschoolalliance


f.;Afterschool programs
Helping kids find the hero within.


For the Dec. 28, 2006 p itition date, all copy
B 7 "iiridav Dec 22.


For t


"J Y, PF@ L* X ---&.77 --- A- .


We will be closed Christmas Day, Monday ec.


he Jan. 0),7 publication da al an advertising

By 5 p.m. Fri y,


1 be closed New ar's Day, Monai n. 1


E EY COUNTY JOURNAL

TB IIE COUNTY PA PEER EST. 192

M w i-


Page 7


_71


-dww-w


r


**" -*'*- .. .











Page8 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Upsets mark women's golf tourney

BY NEAL FISHER T. ... _-. to:.. tournament as she took Patsy Sheppard. B
SPORT WRITER in another step towards her goal tournament's 10th s
tThe Chiefland Women's .-of making her way through a one-hole lead after
Golf Association's annual the waters of the loser's Baker was another


handicap tournament move
into its middle stages as 12
golfers continued to press on
in their pursuit of adding to
their list of holiday cheer a
prestigious title.
Once again, with the change
to a double elimination and
match play format, when the
dew from the greens melted,
four more women were
eliminated from play.
"This is a tournament that
gives the mid handicappers
and the higher ones a chance
to win," Marilee Leonard, the
association's president, said.
"It makes the field equal
even before we step onto the
course and it is even unusual
at times for the higher seeds
to win."
After the winners' bracket
was shaved from eight golfers
to four competitors in the
previous round, the women
who found themselves on the
short side of the scorecard
were matched up with the
participants already fighting
for survival in the loser's
bracket.
The result was once again
a grocery list of surprises and
close matches that made the
tournament an exciting arid
eventful affair.
The built-in disadvantage
for the lower handicappers
came to fruition for number
one seed Barbara Ahola.
After winning her first round
match in convincing fashion
she was summarily dismissed,
from the tournament with two
consecutive losses.


KEEP YOUR HEAD down and look for the sweet spot. That's what these
ladies of the Chielfand Women's Golf Association practice during tour-
ney play.


In the winner's bracket, she
succumbed to Pat Renaud's
crushing consistency and
then found herself in a match
with another lower seed who
was playing her steadiest and
finest golf of the year.
Although she parlayed an
impressive round of 88, it
was no match for the llth
seeded Arma Beauchamp
who dropped over 11 strokes
off her average score in this
particular match.
With the upstart raising
the quality of her game, she
made sure she advanced as
she forced the tournament's
number one seed to cut at
least one stroke off of her


average score on over half of
the holes. Beauchamp won
by four holes.
In suffering her second
consecutive defeat, Ahola ran
into another opponent who ran
off a string of several regular
and net pars. Beachamp's
consistency was produced by
a strong putting game and it
was spearheaded~by a regular
par on the third hole.
With the unexpected
situation of the tournament's
number one seed falling out
of the event because of her
opponent's hot streak, Betty
Beck and Freida Martin made
the most of the opening.
For as much as the


tournament's feel and the
players' approach was
changed by the elimination of
its top seed, the same could
also be said of the opposite
end of the spectrum.
The lowest seed, Betty
Beck, staved off elimination
for the second consecutive
match with a four-hole
victory over Jeannie Clark.-
In defeating the tournament's
sixth seed, Beck continued her
potent play from the previous
round as she scored net pars
on over half of the holes.
After becoming the
tournament's biggest first
round upset, Leonard
sustained her place in the


bracket by besting Fran Ice in
a tight nip and tuck affair.
Ice captured some of the
momentum with a prolific
chip-in on the third hole and
rode it until the turn.
Leonard, finding the
consistency she said would
be needed to win this
tournament, matched her hole
for hole until the turn. After
extending that lead to two
holes by the time they came
to 16th fairway, for the second
consecutive match, she took
advantage of the lake on the
hole. Leonard's experience
and proficiency took over as
she won the hole and put the
match out of reach.
The other match in the
loser's bracket emphasized
the advantage lower seeds
have in this tournament as
Freida Martin took on Nancy
Klug.
Klug, the 15th seed, earned
a ticket to play at least
three games with her first
round victory over Leonard.
However, she quickly lost
her touch in the next round,
particularly her putting game.
It continued against Martin.
Klug was also hindered by
physical problems, reducing
any possibility of her swing
being used as a part of her
arsenol.
The winner's bracket saw
Pat Renaud defeat a game
Betty Altieri.
Then in the tournament's
most exciting match to date
the tenth seeded, Ruth Baker
took a two-hole victory over


aker, the
eed, held
17 holes.
;r lower


seed that upped her game.
She remained steady and
true to her average, putting
pressure on the tournament's
number three seed. Among
the reasons for being able to
maintain her average score
were multiple putts from at
least 20 feet.
"The top six seeds in this
tournament have all lost
at least one match. Those
handicappers have really
taken advantage of their
opportunity to shine. They
feel it is their tournament
to win and they are really
shining. They are enjoying
it."


Third Round Results
#16 Betty Beck defeated
#6 Jeannie Clark
#13 Freida Martin defeated
#15 Nancy Klug
#2 Marilee Leonard
defeated #12 Fran Ice
#11 Anna Beauchamp
defeated #1 Barbara Ahola
(Losers .in losers' bracket
were eliminated from
tournament)

Winners' Bracket
Semifinals
#8 Pat Renaud defeated #4
Betty Altieri
#10 Ruth Baker defeated
#3 Patsy Sheppard

Losers' Bracket Fourth
Round Schedule
#2 Marilee Leonard vs. #11
Anma Beauchamp
#16 Betty Beck vs. #13


Love -f thr"gam- kicked soccer program into existence


BY NEAL FISHER,
SPORTS WRITER
As the only school in Levy
County with a soccer team,
Williston High School al-
ready holds an unusual place
within the region, but it may
soon also be known as a pro-
gram of tradition.
Four years after taking the
field for its first-ever game,.
the Williston soccer team is
coming of age while enjoying
its best season to date. But
before the team could start
to think about winning be-
coming convention, the pains
and difficulties of building a
program from scratch created
the hardships from which the
program was born.
Shannon and Amber Agu-
irre have played soccer al-
most their entire lives. The
whole family believed a team
at the school would have long
lasting benefits to both the
community and the players.
This was because, even
though, a significant part of
the affinity for the two sis-
ters and their father, is tied
to their love for the sport and
what they mean to the com-
munity within the Bronson
Recreational League they
and their friends still needed
another outlet of play.
In doing so, they also
wanted to bring a new source
of student and athletic par-
ticipation to Williston High
School.
"We always felt that soccer
was the one sport that was
ours," Amber, who is now a
senior and one of the team's
tri-captains said. "I have been
playing it since I was in the
third grade. We thought we
could bring it to the school
and share it with others.
"When I step onto the soc-
cer field I feel an adrenaline
rush and now I see the same
with my teammates. When
we first went to the school,
(with the proposition) I had
gained so much from playing


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

THE TEAM struggled in their first three years, often doing the mambo while try-
ing to find the right combination-of how to pursue their philosophy of controlling
the midfield.


soccer, like patience and re-
lying on a team and I wanted
others to play the sport so
they could gain those types
of things too."
The first step in making the
team a reality was gathering
a group of girls who wanted
to play. It was also the hard-
est part of the process, but
eventually 22 girls answered
the call.
The girls along with their
parents and people who fol-
lowed the school's athletic
department first went to the
school's principal and the ath-
letic director (neither are no
longer at the school). Then
they explained the proposi-
tion to the school board.
The proposition was met
with halfhearted responses
at first, but the large turnout
'of adults, some who had no
children attending the school,


swayed the powers that be in
the direction of considering a
soccer team would be of ben-
efit to all parties. The large
support outside of the would
be players was also a definite
contrast to the youth league
as there is a lot more family
backing at the high school
level.
"When Amber and Shan-
non came to me with the idea
of starting a soccer program at
Williston High School I was
excited about bringing all the
things it has given me .to the
community and it has been
great to be able to play sports
year round," Midfielder and
one of the other tri-cpatains
Kaitlyn Guinsler, said.
"I would like for the girls
who follow us to see getting
the program started and get-
ting it to the point where it is
now as a message of never


giving up. It was hard to get
it started but we kept pushing.
And since we started playing,
it has been hard and there are
still some obstacles, but we
are making progress."
"When we first started
there was less than ten people
in the stands. But now we get
about 60. It's not much, but
it is definitely better than be-
fore. And that is how a pro-
gram gets known."
With the approval finally
being granted, the team be-
gan playing in 2003, three
years after the sisters and
their father first broached the
subject. Shannon was a se-
nior at the time.
Their father, Max, who
was among the parents voic-
ing their support from the
beginning, volunteered to
coach the team from its earli-
est stages. Including his time


at-the helm of the Lady Dev-
ils he has coached soccer for
12 years. His experience with
the sport made him an obvi-
ous choice. Juan Colina and
Ray Douyard are the assistant
coaches.
"Having a soccer team
means a whole new oppor-
tunity for many of the stu-
dents," Amber said. "A lot
of students who have athletic
ability, but no team to display
them with, now have that op-
portunity to sense feeling like
part of a team.
"Since we were new, we
didn't have tryouts or turn
anybody away. The program
is setup for the players to
learn the game. We enjoy'
it, because it is unique to
the girls at 'Williston High
School, just like football is to
the boys. And just like foot-
ball is unique to the boys, we
feel soccer is unique to us."
While the Aguirre sisters
and Guinsler spearhead the
initiative, it didn't make much
of a difference in attracting
experienced soccer players.
Eighteen of the girls had no
soccer experience and
with so many players
without any soccer
experience, it showed
as the team ackward-
ly muddled its way
Through its first three
seasons.
However, this year
has been a turning
point for the team.
The team's impressive
record through twelve
games is a direct con-
nection, to the nine
seniors on the squad
and the introduction '2-:
of passing certain ele-
ments of the Williston
way and play from one
generation to the next. ALO
The season started te
the t
without the burden of s e
having to start over at ite
the most basic level of inte
g..:..


teaching fundamental skills.
In addition, this is allowing
the younger players to devel-
op those skills and be ready
to step in when the seniors
graduate.
"This year we started doing
some of the things earlier, like
conditioning and it has been a
big help," Guinsler said. "We
wouldn't have been able to
do that the last three seasons,
because the players had to be
taught what to do.
"The seniors and juniors
are now in a position to help
and show the others what to
do, instead of having to be
taught it themselves. I think
we are now at the point where
if we get the girls who follow
us started early, in' the ninth
grade, they will have time
to develop their basic skills
before they are forced to see
significant time."
Anything worth doing
in life is never easy and as
the Lady Devils are spread-
ing their pitchforks, they are
showing why.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
NG WITH Kaitlyn Guinsler,
er Aguirre has been with
:eam for all four years of
distance and have been an
Iral part in the team's evo-
n.









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Lady Devils take two more victories


-12/4
Williston 5, Hawthorn 1
Record: (6-3) overall,.2-2
(district)
After finishing the first
1 half of the season and with
Sa two-game winning streak,
b the Lady Devils began the
Stretch run of the season with
an impressive victory. The
; game was the first of a five-
c game home stand and gave
the Lady Devils the strength
Sof playing impressively
heading into their district
showdown against perennial
Powerhouse P.K. Yonge.
However, only seven
* minutes into the match, the
- team found. itself behind
when Hawthorn's midfielders
i. pushed and then crossed
* the ball in front of the Lady
< Devils' goal. Their striker
was left open and found the
net with ease.
The goal seemed to wake
the Lady Devils out of their
, funk as the team began
playing with the energy and
Y, thrust they had in winning
the previous two games.
L Their defense pushed the ball
up fast to the offensive zones
, and created opportunities for
the offense by giving them
t the rock in one-on-one and
r. odd man opportunities.
Sarah Gaskins scored off a
comer kick 15 minutes into
the game to tie it. Amber
Aguire connected for the
Second goal of the game
seven minutes later. Kaitlyn
G Guinsler upped the lead to 3-
1 with 14 minutes left in the
half. Lucia Bernall scored
the last two goals to put the
game on ice.

12/8
Williston 3, P.K. Yonge 2
Record: 7-3 (overall), 3-2
(district)
In a hard-fought,. highly
intense contest, the Lady
Devils extended their winning
streak to four games and
upped their district record
to 3-2, The game produced
Four red cards among the two


teams as the upstart Lady
Devils took another step
towards a possible berth in
the post-season by defeating
the district's best. With one
game left against Ft. White
the Lady Devils in only their
third year are in the middle of
the chase for a playoff berth.
A win in that final contest
would give the Red Devils
a strong position towards
earning that playoff berth.
Amber Aguirre assisted
on all the goals, which were
scored by Kaitlyn Guinsler.
The team pushed the ball up
quickly from the backfield
approach worked once again.
Each of the three goals started


when Aguirre received passes
from the defense and with
one-on-one opportunities
pushed the ball up the field
to the crease. Aguirre made
three pinpoint passes within
15 feet of the goal to put
Guinsler on P.K. Yonge's
goalie's weak side..
However, the team got off
to another slow start, falling
behind by a 1-0 score before
Guinsler scored twice to give
the Lady Devils the lead. The
teams exchanged goals before
the Lady Devils notched
the winning score with five
minutes left in the first half.
Neal Fisher
LCJ Sports


Big Game Hunter

\


NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASE


THE PREVIOUS NOTICE PLACED BY THE
TOWN OF BRONSON HAS BEEN DETERMINED
BY THE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE TO BE
IN VIOLATION OF THE LAW, NECESSITATING
THIS SECOND NOTICE.


Last year's property tax levy:
A. Initially proposed tax levy.........$


75,739


B. Less tax reductions due to Value Adjust-
ment Board and Other assessment chang-


es. ........... $


661)


C. Actual property tax levy.............$


This year's proposed tax levy.......$


76,400


104,368


All concerned citizens are invited to attend a pub-
lic hearing on the tax increase to be held on:


DATE:


LILLY ROOKS of Rosewood took down this
eight-point buck at the Rocky Creek Hunt Club
in Otter Creek.


DECEMBER 19, 2006


TIME: 6:00 PM
PLACE: BRONSON TOWN
HALL
660 E. HATHAWAY
AVE.
BRONSON, FL 32621


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax in-
crdase and the budget will be-made at-this hear-
ing.


TOWN OF BRONSON .
FINAL BUDGET SUMMARY
FISCAL YEAR 2006-2007

*THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE TOWN OF BRONSON ARE 67.73% MORE
THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.*


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT
FORWARD


ESTIMATED REVENUE:


GENERAL ENTERPRISE
FUND WATER FUND


ENTERPRISE
SEWER FUND


TOTAL
BUDGET


$ 501,010.00 $ 45,500.00 $ $ 546,510.00


Millage Per $1000
.3.2000


Taxes:


Ad Valorem Taxes
Sales & Use Taxes


Other Revenue:
Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Franchise Fees
Interest Earned/Other

TOTAL REVENUE FROM OTHER
FINANCING SOURCES


$ 104,368.00
$ 94,903.00


$ 116,500.00
$ 148,550.00
$ 11,575.00
$ 4,000.00
$ 46,451.00
$ 13,200.00


$ 340,276.00


207,500.00 $


$ 250.00


207,750.00


275,000.00 $


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REDUCE. REUSE. RECYCLE.


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES $1,040,557.00 $ 253,250.00 $ 275,000.00 $ 1,568,807.00 I

EXPENDITURES / EXPENSES

General Government $ 152,548.00 $ 80,175.00
Public Safety $ 208,235.00 $ 10,000.00
Physical Environment $ 175,925.00 $ 82,075.00 $ 275,000.00
Transportation $ 135,725.00 $ 23,500.00
Debt Service $ 46,149.00 $ 7,000.00
Human Services $ 31,500.00 $ 5,000.00
Financial & Administrative $ 240,475.00 $ 25,500.00

Reserve $ 50,000.00 $ 20,000.00

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES $1,040,557.00 $ 253,250.00 $ 275,000.00 $ 1,568,807.00


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE
MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


OFFICE OF THE ABOVE


A i


Page 9


Thomas F. Philman, Certified Operator

,-f PO Box 872 4 South Main
Chiefland, FL 32644
Phone: (352) 493-4772
B (352) 493-1051
BM" 1-800-242-9224


599,000.00


275,000.00 $ 823,026.00










Page 10


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


SChampions


Fila nce
any years ago
oir*@^a.Fridta3 -Pe^ *'io til RobnI watched
Mn'day.
F iW i ^ M .. 1Williams
explain that the pterodactyl
V was proof positive of God's
W Ies ssense of humor. Sometimes
:th .I am not sure if that is true,
!Gir- but I can say many years
& later I am convinced that he
was at least correct about
Qa whomever is in charge of the
Bi. sports world has a sense of
,~Boy; -humor.
i' I would definitely call it
Thu-~l, ironic. As a sports fan and
T n I now as a sports reporter,
T a this irony seems to have
Happened time after time
During my lifetime.
StiBut I think whomever it
i ei is that is in charge of the
sports world wanted to
ro s, b 'ib c include a tiew circumstance
rs l in my list of top five most
..Thurs stanPbly ironic situations when this
We ear's national championship
9TVe game is played, because as
CGir isVit..it j .: a lifelong fan of both the
!No es l i: University of Michigan and
o pam s phil Florida State athletics, I
will be watching the arch-
Senemies of both of those
o tt m for team schools playing in the title
game.

h w ants to i the process of choosing
t t o s ore nipornt, to
who should play in the
championship game is
BY NEAL FISHER uncomfortable to begin with
SPORTS WRITER and the irony seems as if
WILLISTON-While December and January is often known it was created as a way to
as a time to reflect on the achievements of the year, the Lady conciliate the difficulties of
Devils entered the second half of the season doing anything determining in a clear-cut
but resting on their laurels. manner whom should play in
At 8-3, the team has compiled its best mark since it began the game.
play three years ago and with its current five game winning That part of the irony is
streak, Williston is not only getting stronger as the season that Michigan was involved
progresses, but finds itself as a viable contender for their in the shaping of the game,
district's title. not once but twice.
"Understandably since we were a new team, there was a Of course, the first time
sense that we had learned to lose," head coach Max Aguirre was when the Wolverines
said. "But now we dontt't'just expe'cto make a g6bd' hoWfi g played and lost tliio State
We e3ipet lo wim. I klid~ fans hear aclEh need to change in their big everytii' is on
the culture of losing a lot, but it is one of the most basic the line, number one versus
differences between losing and winning. number two clash on Nov.
"Soccer is not just about running to the ball. Players need 17.
to understand the ball is the fastest thing on the field and Then the big controversy
the program's philosophy reflects that. The girls are now of whether Florida should
understanding why we use the theories we do and how to play Ohio State or if
make them work. We want to own the midfield game.. If a Michigan deserved another
team does that, it is very likely they will win." shot at the Buckeyes
With that in mind, the team's quartet of "workhorses" at the ensued, with Urban Meyer's
midfield position has become exactly what the coaching staff's politicking at the center
philosophy wants them to be, the centerpiece of the team's or at least that is what the
ability to move the ball both defensively and offensively. Wolverine nation made it.
Amber Aguirre, Kaitlyn Guinsler, Lillian Alonzo and Abby However, the irony of the
Rodriguez have controlled and found open spaces to operate circumstances that brought
the Lady Devils' offense. us to the decision of who will
The midfield game began to thrive after the coaches made play in the championship
some personal changes in the defensive backfield. Not a game is really proof of
just how uncomfortable
See Mid-year page 12


System U graesVntltinSysem
Duc Fariato Sle0 Srvc



,4A je" Si ", rd 52-63-111~



Stehe NW oANAR *I-O 6 N 325230
1 0


;hips not always about champions


e Sportsa% I

NEAL FISHER
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


the atmosphere and the.
conditioning of involvement
with college football has
become and the powers that
be need to acknowledge it.
Obviously with Michigan
and Florida having no way to
play each other to determine
who should play Ohio State,
the decision had to be made
off the field. I will probably
never be convinced that
if the two teams played,
Florida would win.
Nonetheless, starting
with Michigan's head coach
Lloyd Carr, many fellow
members of the Wolverines'
nation have complained
about Urban Meyers
politicking.
As a Michigan fan, I find
this stance rather perplexing.
Instead of worrying about
what Meyer is doing, what
the coaching staff, the1
administration, the players
and the fans should be
complaining about is that
the Wolverines didn't get the
job done when they had the
chance again.
Understandably, I was
disappointed when the
announcement was made that
Florida, not Michigan was
chosen to play in Glendale,
Ariz. on Jan. 8, but I do not
think it was necessarily the
wrong choice. I am far from
convinced that if Michigan
were chosen, the outcome of
the game would be different
frornth.Novo 1,7 outcome.--
I make this statement
because throughout Lloyd
Carr's tenure at Michigan,
he has consistently been out-
coached in almost every "big
game."
This is particularly true
of the last six years. An
abbreviated list includes
a 1-5 record against Ohio
State's coach, Jim Tressel,
a 1-3 mark versus Charlie
Weiss of Notre Dame and he
is winless in three attempts
against Pete Carrol, the
leader ofthe Trojans.
I do believe Meyer's
politicking had some,
albeit a minor, role in


T;6~'s'~T.. 'es Tr e


the Gators jumping the
Wolverines in the final
polls and their inclusion in
the championship game.
However, what truly
influenced the voters was
simply the fact Michigan lost
when they had their chance
to secure a berth in the
championship game.
A team could beat another
squad nine out of 10 times,
but if the unit that wins
only once does it in any of
the NCAA championship
tournaments, they would
move on. Because there
are no second chances in
the tournament and most
people feel they had their
opportunity to prove they
were the better team.
College football might
not crown its champion
via a tournament, but it is
still deciding who the best
team is. So, if Michigan
was the only one-loss team
remaining they would be
the only choice by default,
but in a situation where two
teams had the same number
of losses, it is hard to justify
using different logic.
So, it is hard for me to
argue Michigan should be
going to Glendale when they
lost with so much at stake.
To me listening to Carr
say Florida is going to the
championship game because
of Meyer's politicking is but
a grasp at straws to explain
the uncomfortable situation


of not being chosen to play
in the championship game
after another painful loss to
an elite team determined the
decision.
While Michigan is the
team involved this year in
the school that was unfairly
left out of the championship
game controversy, it is
not the first and will not
be the last to make such a
complaint.
College football's
crowning of its
national champion is an
uncomfortable process,
because rarely do two teams
stand head and shoulders
above the others. This trend
will not change anytime
soon.
The actions of tradition-
rich schools year after
year:looking to explain
their non-inclusion in the
championship game by
complaining about the other
colleges only makes this
process more uncomfortable.
And if the powers that
be in college football do
not want to change the
way it crowns its national
champion, then the least they.
can do is understand that in
exchange, this is what they
will deal with on a yearly
basis.
Neal Fisher is the
sports writer for the
Levy County Journal.
He may be reached at
jcpirabna@yahoo.com.


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Indians lose three in week


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
With every team in the
Indians' district pushing a
transition game and athletic
pressure defenses, Chiefland
could not afford to turn the
ball over and shoot poorly,
but that is exactly what they
did in three games last week.
The Indians turned the ball
over 103 times in thee games.
The result was three losses
and a 1-5 record as the team
tries to find itself.
Improvement is coming,
but against teams with the
speed and athleticism that the
Indians played the amount
was too little to net a victory.

12/5
Taylor County 60
Chiefland 32
Record: 1-3 (overall), 0-2
(district)
Taking to the road, the
Indians turned the ball over
40 times and shot less than 20
percent from the field.
The team played a game
contest, but using the old
adage of each turnover
leading to at least one point
for the other team, they gave
up at least 40 points.
The decision making of
the ball handlers showed a lot
of room for improvement as
their turnovers led to Taylor
County's forcing the tempo
and feel of the game with
a fast pace. The team was
behind at halftime 33-11,
before cutting the lead to


14 points. However, Taylor
County's 14-0 ruin crushed
the Indians to end the game.


Chiefland
16---60
Taylor County
10---32

Statistics:
Chiefland:
17, Donald-7,
Sheffield-2, Durr-2


-69
Chiefland


17-06-08-16--


13-20-11- Statistics:
Chiefland: Donald-
05-06-11- 18, Galpin-9, Jackson-9,
Sheffield-6, McClendon-3,
Henry-2.


Jackson-
Galpii-4,


12/7
Newberry 69
Chiefland 47
Record: 1-4 (overall) 0-3
(district)
The Indians continued
to turn the ball over as they
returned home for the first
of four consecutive games
in Chiefland. They reduced
their turnovers from 40 to
33 and the improvement put
them only one point behind
Newberry at halftime, 24-23.
They reduced their turnovers
to 18 in the first half, but
Newberry stormed to an
insurmountable lead in the
third as they took advantage
of a dozen miscues by the
Indians. The Indians' lack
of depth was the primary
cause. Going only seven
deep against Newberry's use
of their fill roster, the Indians
found themselves physically
tired and without the stamina
of their opponents. The
visitors outscored Chiefland
by 18 points in the quarter.
Newberry 13-11-26-19--


Lady Devils


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
12/5
,j, ,jhNawberry 55 ..
Williston 53'
Record 5-1 (overall), 2-1
(district)
After falling behind by
as many as 13 points in the
first quarter, the Lady Devils
rallied to end the first quarter
only four points behind.
As they had throughout
the season their defense and
rebounding was their strength
as they fought their way back
in the first quarter.
However, it was also, for
the first time this year, their
defense was erratic and off
and on. While not as weak
as it was in the first quarter,
the Lady Devils fell off after
the first quarter run got them
back into the game.
They were outscored by
five and six points in the
second and third quarters,


2-


respectively.
:The result was an 1
deficit entering the
Sstanza. Thy, foug
to close the gap witl
points in the final 15 s
but missed three oppor
to score the game v
basket before suffering
first defeat of the seas
Head coach Jason
estimated 16-18 poin
scored by Newberry
because the Lady
failed to get back on
after they had the b
the visitors were able
one of their players o
Williston's side of th
The Lady Devils we
hurt by fouls as two
committed five offense
Williston 14-12-
-53
Newberry 18-17-


12/8
Dixie County 58
Chiefland 57
Record: 1-5 (overall), 0-4
(district)
The Indians continued to
lower their number and it
showed in the final score.
In reducing their turnovers
to 30, for the first time since
their opening game win, they
were in the contest throughout
the second half. After falling
behind by a score of 16-5 at
the end of first quarter, the
Indians rallied to make it a
one-point game at halftime.
After a nip-and-tuck third
quarter Dixie County rambled
off nine three pointers in the
final stanza to win the game.
The Indians for the fourth
consecutive game shot less
than 20 percent from the
field.

Dixie County 16-08-20-
14---58
Chiefland 05-18-19-15-
--57
Statistics:
Chiefland: Sheffield-17,
Jackson-13, Henry-7, Galpin-
6, Donald-6, Jackson-6, Durr-
2.


1 for week

-55
11 point Statistics:
e final Williston:
attack Poijntig ; M,,. Broqwn28,
hin two C. Gordon-13, Floyd-5, P.
seconds, Brown-5, J. Gates-2.
tunities Rebounds: P. Brown-14,
winning M. Brown-12.
ig their Assists: M. Brown-9.
on. Steals: J. Smith-3.
SOdom
ts were 12/7
simply Dixie County 52
Devils Williston 61
defense Record: 6-1 (overall), 3-1
)all and (district)
e to get The Lady Devils returned
)pen on home after their first loss of
e court. the season and their last game
-re also before taking on perennial
players district and state powerhouse
es. P.K. Yonge. They returned to
12-15--
See Ladies Page 13
06-14--


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Tid for Cedar Key starting with Dec. 14
Day High Tide Height Sunrise Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible
Th 14 Low 2:56AM 0.7 7:18AM Rise 1:49AM 37
14 High 9:11AM 2.4 5:36 PM Set 1:36 PM
14 Low 2:41 PM 1.3
14 High 8:54 PM 3.1
F 15 Low 4:02AM 0.4 7:18AM Rise 2:41 AM 28
15 High 10:30 AM 2.5 5:36 PM Set 2:03 PM
15 Low 3:38 PM 1.5
15 High 9:37 PM 3.3
Sa 16 Low 4:58AM 0.0 7:19 AM Rise 3:36 AM 20 -
16 High 11:36AM 2.6 5:37 PM Set 2:34 PM
16 Low 4:34 PM 1.6
16 High 10:19PM 3.4
Su 17 Low 5:46AM -0.3 7:20 AM Rise 4:34 AM 13
17 High 12:32 PM 2.8 5:37 PM Set 3:10 PM
17 Low 5:24 PM- 1.6
17 High 11:00PM 3.6
M 18 Low 6:31AM -0.5 .7:20AM Rise 5:35AM 7
18 High 1:21 PM 2.8 5:37 PM Set 3:52 PM
18 Low 6:11 PM 1.7
18 High 11:40PM 3.7
Tu 19 Low 7:13AM -0.7 7:21AM Rise 6:36AM 3
19 High 2:05 PM 2.9 5:38 PM Set 4:41 PM
19 Low 6:55 PM 1.7
W 20 High 12:21 AM 3.8 7:21 AM Rise 7:37AM 0
20 Low 7:53 AM -0.8 5:38 PM Set 5:39 PM
20 High 2:47 PM 2.9
20 Low 7:37 PM 1.6


Page 11


DESPITE TIPPING off district play with three consecutive wins against
the likes of Ft. White, the Red Devils found they were no match for P.K.
Yonge's athleticism and ability to run. Story on page 12
I


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Page 12 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Wave sweeps over Devils

BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-After the Red Devils laid the smack down on
Dixie County in the fourth quarter to up their district record to
3-0, they got their shot at toppling the big, bad juggernaught
of P.K. Yonge.
The two teams met with matching and undefeated district
records of 3-0, but despite a host of athletes who could run,
jump and fly with the best of them, that is where the similarities
ended.
Facing a trio of seniors from P.K. Yonge who have already
signed with major division I-A programs, Williston was
outmatched and "out-athleted" from the tip-off as the visitors
ramble off two consecutive 8-0 runs to start the game.
They led 30-18 at halftime and finished off the Red Devils
with a 22-point scoring advantage in the second half. The
final score was 77-43.
Georgia Southern commitment Willie Powers led the Blue
Wave with 20 points. Arnette Hall added 14. Myk Brown
pitched in with 13. Williston was paced by Jerrell Hopkins' 16
points. Williston's big-gun Jiwan James was held to 10
points.

Bronson Yoi


Softball Doings
The Levy Lightning took
home yet another title as they
claimed the championship
of the Babe Ruth Christmas
Tournament.
The 16 and under team
defeated both Oviedo
(Orlando) and Longwood
(Orlando) by a combined
score of 32-4 in the
preliminary round.
In the championship round
they fell to Atlantic Beach by
a single run, 5-4 to set up
one game for all the marbles
scenario.
The Lightning responded
with a dramatic 1-0 win.

Award ceremony
The recreational league


will hold its annual award
ceremony on Dec. 16. The
festivities will begin at 9
a.m. with adults and children
playing each other in their
yearly clash. The league's
cheerleaders will perform
during the game.
After the game the business
at hand will begin as football
accolades will be awarded,
followed by the cheerleading
squad receiving their honors
A barbecue lunch will be
served at noon. Afterward
soccer takes center stage.
First the annual parents vs.
children game will be played.
The ceremony concludes
with the black and white
checkered ball sport honoring
their best.


-'~ :4 r.j%..Y ..4.


SPORTS & RECREATION


N :" ;Athlet -;of the
Kaitlyn Guinsler In.the kmidst of.the Lat y Devils
n. ifelde D'v s' .. .__a;ga e .:; __'. _
Y
* As 'one of the Lady harrmiered together tW .:
-Devils' tri-captains, consecutive games in
;'Guinsler has:livediiptQh er which she scored a hat i
:role of leader.' trick.. ..
:* 'eading,by example she .Her. three, goals.
"has scored eight goals in against P.K. Yonge.
the Lady Devils' fast three toppedd the. diStrict and
games. state giant putting the Lady which"


SMid-year
coincidence, their five-game winning streak also started at the
same time.
For the first time in its existence the team also has speed.
After trying several tactical strategies during its first five
games, the coaches decided they could exploit their opponents'
weaknesses best by deploying its newfound speed in the
backfield.
When the Lady Devils found the right personal alignment
for its backfield, the difficulty they had in pushing the ball up
field to the midfielders and begin odd man breaks became a
key to their ability to control the game and the ball.
Allison Norman and Lauren Foreman remained at the
fullback positions. However, Suzie Smith, the team's fastest
player, was moved to the sweeper position after an injury to
team tri-captain Mindy Hughes. Smith was playing stopper.
It gave the defense a solid and experienced player to take
charge and direct their attempts to move the ball up field
quickly. Backup goalie Heather Porter was moved into the
stopper position.
The team also placed its speed at the striker position. With
Sarah Gaskins' and Lucia Bernal's speed they are receiving,
the ball with much more space to maneuver and are often in
one-on-one match-ups as once again, moving the ball up field
quickly is the reason.
"We are keeping the ball but of the defensive zone,"'
midfielder and tri-captain Amber Aguirre said. "That opens
up scoring opportunities and limits the opposition's ability to
score. With the speed we have when the defense gets the
ball out of our zone, it allows us to cross the ball through the
middle of the field.
"Which is hard for defenses and goalies to stop, especially
when the ball is moving quickly. We have really come a long
way since the first game and the team's idea of controlling the
midfield with speed is coming of age. It has really given us a
solid defense and offense. With the way we are playing, we
rally have a good shot at the district title."
Those aspirations of a district title were enhanced with a
hard fought 3-2 victory over P.K. Yonge last Friday. The Blue
Wave is the beast of the district and in order to win it, a team
must defeat them. The Lady Devils split their seasoi sferies


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Week -
in position to earn becomes'amore *in. ta:i
their -.fi .t-ever. -.

Sas they -upped' seasonaran ag
their district tieas-ite '
record to 3-2 ~ith.i~'Gai
onq,4istrict gaie,.b -g-:
remr ni-g:'. '
The' ftea4r' s oin
Overall recordd i:
is current-ly 8S e
.'-.***'^^^ .^ ^*


Continued from page 10
with them and now sit in the runner-up spot only one game
behind the Blue Wave.
With a 3-2 record in district the Lady Devils have only
one more opportunity to make a push for a post-season berth
against Fort White on Jan., 5, but a win:puts them in the
position of the odds being in their favor for a playoff berth.
After starting the season with the difficult task of playing
six away games in their first eight contests, the team also has
the muscle of a string of home games in the second half. They
begin it with five consecutive home games and play at Booster
stadium seven times.
"Playing at home is huge,"'Amber Aguirre said. "The long
road trips can make a team drowsy and we were missing
something. But we still did go 2-2 and had some good play.
Now we get to play almost all of our remaining games at
home and with the inspiration and fire it gives us, we should
be able to play even better and continue our run."
Surviving the change in its personal, for the first time in its
existence the team's communication took on the form of the
reason for its greatest strength and has been key in creating
the open space and the odd man rushes.
"Our greatest strength is our unity," Max Aguirre said. "It
has really come together since the communication began
improving. Communication was our weakness. Improving '
it has really changed, the possibilities we have. Whoever
receives a pass has multiple options. We can get the ball
down the wings.
"And the players have much more open space when they
receive the pass, because the passers'know where to kick
it to. Trying to use our speed and passing the way we do,
communication is what makes it possible to push the ball like
we have been. The girls can lead each other to the open space
with communication."
Among the remaining non-district games that can determine
the outcome of the Lady Devils' season are two match-ups
with Vanguard. The coaching staff is looking for the team
at this point to become a little bit more polished and with its
reputation as a contending state titlest every year, they will
force the Lady Devils to smooth over the rough edges in their
quest to make a'name for themselves. :: :;-


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66i In









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Page 13


Deadline, address change


for history book


Those wishing to par-
ticipate in the book Lety,
County): Voices From the
Past should address their
submissions to Drollene P.
Brown/7651'SE 118 Av-
enue/Morriston FL 32668-
4843.
This change of address
is necessary because the
Morriston Post Office has
mistakenly. returned pack-
ages addressed to the box
number given in previ-
ous newspaper articles
and literature distributed
in the Levy County librar-
ies. Some photos and fam-
ily stories were delivered
properly, but more were
returned to senders.
Author. Drollene Brown
urges readers to re-send
their information to the
street address given above.
She regrets the error and
apologizes for any. prob-
lems this mistake has
caused.
Brown's book will be
published in late 2007 by
Southern Heritage Press.
Based on family stories
and photos contributed by
Levy County residents and
former residents, the book
will contain a history that
cannot be found elsewhere.
Brown reminds contribu-
tors that.dates or approxi-
mate dates are crucial so
that each entry may be
placed appropriately rela-
tive to other entries.
Families included so far
are: Allen, Andrews, Bay-
lor,,Barker, Burnett, Butler,
Callaway, Cason. Clyatt.
Cobb, Collier, Creech,
Davis, DIease, .Douglas,
Duden, Durrance, Foster,
Geiger, George,. Griffin,


Goethe site for holiday rides


Levy County's Goethe State Forest is host
to a variety of equestrian events throughout
the year and is the ideal location for endur-
ance rides. As part of the Goethe Forest En-
durance Series, two such endurance rides are
scheduled during this holiday season.
On Dec. 16, the Goethe Benefit Chal-
lenge will commence. This AERC, SEDRA
and SERA sanctioned 25/50/100 ride travels
mostly sandy and grassy terrain with some
gravel. Water stops will be available along
the trails. Profits from this ride help support
Goethe State Forest's shared trail system.
Vet checks, performed by Dr. Doug Shear-
er, are scheduled for 1 p.m. on Friday, Dec.
15. Camp can be set up at the "46", the pri-
vately owned property of Dr. Anne Christo-
pherson. Riders are recommended to bring
corrals and electric pens, and water spigots
Share available for use. There will be a grounds
fee for each horse. Camp is on 46 acres in
Steeple Chase off County Road 326. Partici-
pants can contact Co-Ride Manager Helen
Koehler via phone (352) 486-7040 or e-mail
blackprong@aol.com. For an entry form and
to learn more about this sport, go to www.
distanceriding.com.
The second scheduled endurance event is
the Gator Run, beginning Jan. 4 and running
through Jan. 6. There are three days sched-
uled and each ride has a different distance
and ride time limit: Jan. 4, 55 miles, time
limit not yet posted; Jan. 5 and 6, 25 miles in
6 hours and 50 miles in 12 hours, including
hold times.
The ride is open to all equines, howev-
er, the 25 mile ride requires equines to be at
least four years of age and the 50 mile ride
requires the horses are at least 5, years old.


Participating horses need to be physically fit
and conditioned before the event. All riders
are required to be American Endurance Ride
Conference (AERC) members or riders can
become a day member for the event.
The staging area for the ride is at the Tide-
water trailhead, located on County Road 337,
near Dunnellon. Participants can contact
Ride Manager Connie Claudill via phone or
email for an entry form to enter the event.
Ride fees are $60 for the 25 mile ride and
$80 for the 50 mile ride. Non-AERC mem-
bers will be charged an additional $15 fee per
day. Daily fees include dinner. Riders are
welcome to camp at a $10 per night charge.
Southeastern Levy County is home to the
main portion of this state forest, which cov-
ers more than 53,000 acres. Goethe State
Forest includes a variety of natural habitats,
including old-growth longleaf pines, scrubby
flatwoods, cypress swamps and sand hills. In
Levy County, horseback riders find excellent
trail riding opportunities at Goethe State For-
est year round and access is available at three
different trailheads: Tidewater, Apex and
Black Prong. Both the Tidewater and Black
Prong trails are included in the Division of
Forestry's "Trailtrotter" program in which
riders are rewarded with patches and cer-
tificates after riding a number of designated
trails.
For more information on the upcoming
endurance rides or the Goethe Forest Endur-
ance Series, contact Connie Claudill at (352)
486-6739 or enduroride@aol.com or by vis-
iting www.DistanceRiding.com. For more
information on the Goethe State Forest and
other Levy County tourist destinations, visit
www.visitnaturecoast.com.


Levy school lunch menu announced


A FAMILY PORTRAIT in 1928 or 1929: father
Singleton Gray Barker, mother Mamie Matthews
Barker, son Cecil Gray' Barker and daughter
Martha Dell Barker [now Green]. Photos such as
this one will appear in Levy County; Voices From


Gunnels, Hardee, Helvenston.
Hodges, King, Lewis, Low-
man, McCloud, McDonell,
Mills, Neal, Phelps, Priest,
Pullings, Richberg, Roberts,-
Robinson, Rodgers,' Ross,
Schlemmer, Smith, Stevens,
Thornton, Tyndale, Wadley,


MLadies
ELadies


P.K. Yonge. They returned to
Their game of tenacious de-
fense throughout the contest
i and strong rebounding.
However, for the second
Consecutive game, the Lady
Devils came out flat and their
Defense was up and down.
SDixie County led after the
First period 13-9, before the
Lady Devils lock-down de-
fense came into play.
SThey took a nine-point
lead into halftime and ex-
tended it to 15 points-before
the defense failed them. They
Visitors, keyed by an 8-0 run
to finish the third period,
had crept to within one point
| when the quarter ended.

The Lady Devils did just
enough with their defense
and rebounding to gradually
extend their lead by a point
Here and there in the fourth.
Odom creditedAngel Floyd
as key in the Lady Devils de-
fense coming alive when it
had to. She had five steals
and forced several turnovers,
,which led to double-digit
figures for easy and transi-
Stion baskets. However, the
team, once again ran into foul
Trouble as two players com-
Smitted the maximum number
: allowed.

f Dixie County 13-10-19-
10---52
Williston 09-21-13-
7 -17--61

V, Statistics:
Williston:
iPoints: Floyd-23, M.
Brown-19, P Brown-9, Gor-
don-6, Gates-2, J. Smith-2.
Rebounds: P. Brown-21,
Floyd-9, Gordon-8
Assists: M. Brown-8


Steals: Floyd-5
The Lady Devils conclude
their first half of the season
with three games this week.
Two of the games were re-
scheduled and could be a
stumbling block. Among the
games are district and cross-
county rival Chiefland.
The Lady Devils have been
something of a surprise win-
ning their first five games and
starting the season off with
a 6-1 record. Their defense
and rebounding under first
year coach Jason Odom has
been vastly improved and the
strength of the team.
It will be counted on even
more as Williston heads
down the final stretch off
their season. However, they
have accomplished the goal
of getting of to a good start.
with both their overall and
district records.


Wellman, Whitman, Wil-
son, Wood, Worthington,
and Yearty.
Due to delays caused
by the erroneous return of
mailed items, the deadline
for everyone participating
will now be Jan. 15, 2007.


Continued from page 11
They will be tested by P.K.
Yonge and the rest of the dis-
trict when they meet them for
the second time.
"Of course we would have
liked to be 3-0 in the district,
but the loss to Newberry is
something that we can use,"
Odom said. "It will give
them a great deal of experi-
ence heading into the second
half of the season. They real-
ize they can be beaten if they
don't play up to their poten-
tial."
"We have yet to put togeth-
er a complete game, but they
learned this week we have to
fight for every point on every
possession in most games.
It was important we won,
despite not playing our best
game and for them to come
and get a win after Newberry,
it is big in regaining momen-
tum."


is coming to the Bronson Branch of
Perkins State Bank
You are invited to come
see Santa & have your
picture taken!
ridy, December 15th 3pm n 5p


Pt RK IN SStAt1r B-N K.
Member FDIC


Monday, Dec. 18
Hot Dog on Bun
Baked Beans
Coleslaw
Chilled Peaches
Asst. Milk
Tuesday. Dec. 19
Taco w/Cheese


Buttered Corn
Lettuce/Tomato
Buttered Rice
Apple Pie
Asst. Milk
Wednesday. Dec. 20
Oven Fried Chicken
Mashed Potatoes w/Gravy


Buttered Broccoli
Chilled Mixed Fruit
Homemade Rolls
Asst. Milk
Thursday. Dec. 21
Winter Holiday
Friday, Dec. 22
Winter Holiday


OGI j' 951 East HathawayAve

SBronson,FI



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Don11 A '


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


S NE.IE HTH GUORHTY VE1


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Walking in a Williston Winter Wonderland


Christmas Parade 2006


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Page 15


Lets Light Up Williston


Linear Park, Christmas 2006


I


"- 3 ;-:'pt
I.: x""iL. ^^'^S
It ,'


JACKIE WEST, top right,
and her children LaKayla
and Willie enjoyed the pa-
rade and were thankful for
the time they have togeth-
er.


pw-)


THESE REINDEER weren't fly-
ing Friday night. They were just
trying to stay warm.


THE JOLLY OLD ELF,
TOP, stuck around long
enough to get some last
minute gift requests.


WHAT A SLY ONE! He's
always under the mistle-
toe.


s,~FS~p


THE WILLISTON Junior
Woman's Club, right,
were the ones with the
plan Friday. With hot
chocolate, coffee and
pizza, their booth was a
refuge from the cold.


A.,


A
;5F.


CarOU11 r"sner
,,,Oly


ILt 414,. 41


-C --


ACCOMPANIED BY a guitarist, young musicians played recorders and treat-
ed those in the pavilion to songs of the season.


AS LONG AS you have a blanket and a good
friend with you, you can endure the cold.


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Page 16






classified

_An Deadline:
1Monday
2 p.m.




egals



LEVY COUNTY JOUR
i TOUVtIITY PA P E ST-. .1


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


How to Place Your Ad
Call: Chietland 352-490-4462 Bronson 352-486-2312
Fax: Chietland 352-490-4490 Bronson 352-486-5042
Email: mblitch@'lev-iournal.com
Visit: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland 440 South Court Street, Bronso
.4A


Miscellaneous *


101

Personals l
105
AA MEETING--for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number. tfn
NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net

Notice,"
115 C
EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352- 221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b
WAY DOWN ON THE SUWAN-
NEE RIVER. OTTER SPRINGS
RV PARK IS NOW OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. Come enjoy THE
GREAT OUTDOORS,. at OT-
TER SPRINGS' RV" RESORT.
More than 820 pristine acres
along the beautiful Suwannee
River, with two-second magni-
tude springs. Level, pull thru, full
hook up RV sites, tent camping,
cabins, swimming pool, two bath
houses, picnic building, spring
house lodge, small church and
much more. These facilities
are also available for meetings,
weddings, retreats, scouts and
special events. CHECK US OUT
NOW IF YOU ENJOY CAMP-
ING, FISHING, HIKING, CA-
NOEING, SWIMMING, BIKING,
AND BIRD WATCHING Day,
week or monthly rates. WWW..
OTTERSPRINGS.COM. OR
CALL 352 463-0800 OR 800
883-9107 12/14b

I,25 Servic
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb

MAKO PLASTERING &
PAINTING, Quality assurance,.
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096..12/28p

Rentals 301




Commerce i
330 Property for '
EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352- 221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b

I'LL BE HOME FOR Christmas-
if you can give me a ride there.
Levy County Journal editor is
looking for a ride with a family
headed toward North Georgia
Dec. 21-23 and returning Christ-
mas Day/night. If you're headed
toward Macon, Athens or Atlan-
ta and have room for one more,
call Carolyn M-F at 490-4462 or
email editor@levyjournal.com.
I'll share gas expense and help
drive, if you like.


335 Want to


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL re-
porter needs a place to lay his
head at night. Outstanding sports
writer is forced to commute three
hours and really wants to make a
home base in Levy County. If you
have a spare room, small apart-
ment or mobile home you want
to rent for $200-$300 a month or
if you need a roommate to share
expenses, call Neal at 813-335-
1095 or 352-490-4462.

Land
425 for Sala
OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner: 352-624-2215, 352-236-
4579, www.ocalaforestland.com/
2nd 12/28p

For Sale 50


.tioi


7i0q
Farm Equip"
705
FOR SALE: Used 6-foot Disc
with sixteen 14- inch blades.
Best Offer call 352-542-9753.

Transportation


80 '

Trucks
1820
2000 DODGE DURANGO SLT
- 4x4 V-8, leather, third row, rear
A/C, clean. Wife-driven, very
good shape. $8475 OBO. 486-
3720 or cell: 221-5149. 12/14p
1987 MAZDA Pickup 2 door.
CD player. Runs good. Needs
new front tires, $1,300. Call 486-
4202, cell 870-3909 1/4/07p


FAT GOOSE AUCTION this '.egals
Friday in, downtown Chiefland
at 7:00 pm. Always-outstanding
estate merchandise.. Our box 90
lots start at 6:30 pm. Primitives,


signed .,art .work, lots, of,, nice.
estate jewelry-*sopldin tray lots,
nice ladies diamond ring, and
a diamond & gold wedding
set his & hers, early pocket
watches, great glassware, 10 ton
log splitter, Victorian Mahogany
saddle chair, Eastlake chair
& matching marble, top table,
several hutches along w/ 3 nice
corner hutches. Very nice 6
legged mahogany drop-leaf table
&'chairs. Enamel top butterfly
.table, other furniture bed room
sets some early some modern,
all types of small tables & desks,
Chevy S10 Blazer'4X4, patio
sets, all types of smalls, load
of hand tools and lots more.
AU992 (Ron Jamerson) AB2565
10% BP. For more info. call Jim
Morehead at (352) 356-1065.
12/14
SOUTHERN AUCTION
MARKETING, 15991 Hwy 27-
A, Williston, Monday night,
Dec. 18t" at 7:00 p.m., Col. Joel
Kulcsar AU1437, AB2240, 10%
buyer's premium. 1995 Dodge
pickup truck, washer and dryer,
GE side-by-side refrigerator,
hand trucks, ceramic kilns, sofa
sets, dinette set, hand tools,
glassware, jewelry and coins.
Contact 352-528-2950. 12/14b

Miscellan
550
NEW- MOWER & CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07

Want to
560
PAYING CASH for DISH-network
receivers and yellow smart cards.
Call Jeff, 352-949-5601. 12/14p

Recreation 60


I 601
S Boats & M
605 -
MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
Boat motors wanted, dead or
alive! 352-486-4316 12/28p


. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
D.A.M. Properties, LdtP?,ifWe-q
house Division, d/b/a L&L Stor-
age, pursuant to the provisions
of the Florida Self Storage Facil-
ity Act (Fla. Stat. 83.801, et sec.),
hereby gives notice of sale un-
der said Act, to wit: On Decem-
ber 29, 2006, at L&L Storage,
2990 N.E. 200th Avenue, Willis-
ton, Florida, D.A.M. Properties,
LLP, Warehouse Division, by
and through its agent, will con-
duct a sale at 9:00 AM by sealed
bids to the highest bidder. Bids
to be opened by Noon with view-
ing from 9:00 AM until Noon for
the contents of the storage bay
or bays rented by the following
person/persons:

Bernita Appling, 4171 N.E.
103rd Ct., Williston, FL 32696
Brandy and Bruce Boston, PO
Box 331, Williston, FL 32696
Katherine Dillon, 11790 SE
Sixth St. Williston, FL 32696
Jerry Dorman, PO Box 375,
Bronson, FL 32621
Takila Harris, 21110 NE 40th
Ave., Williston, FL 32696
Stephanie Jones, PO Box
S101, Reddick, FL 32686
Linda Ottaiano, 19650 NE
30th St, Williston, FL 32696

Consists of household, per-
sonal, or miscellaneous items,
stored at L&L Storage, 2990 N.E.
200th Avenue, Williston, Florida.
Sale is being made to satisfy a
statutory lien.

Dated December 11, 2006

L&L Storage
2990 N.E. 200th Avenue
Williston, Florida 32696
(352) 528-6179
Sale Date: December 29,
2006
Pub: Dec. 14, 21,2006

NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to a Writ of Execution
issued out of the County Court
for Levy, Florida on the 12th day
of October, 2006 in the cause
wherein SUNSTATE FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION was Plaintiff
and DAVID WESTRICH, JR.
was Defendant, being case
number 38-2005-SC-619 in said
Court, I Johnny Smith, as Sher-
iff of Levy County, Florida have
levied upon all the right, title and
interest of the Defendant, DAVID


I iLegals
W~~ J&


WESTRICH, JR. in and to the
following described property.

1994 Ford F-150 pickup truck
VIN # 1 FTEX15N6RKB26361

On the 17th day of January,
2007 at the Levy County Sher-
iffs Office Impound Lot located
at 9150 N.E. 80th Avenue, Bron-
soh, Florida at the hour of 11?00
a.m. I will offer for sale and sell
all of the said Defendants right,
title and interest in the above de-
scribed property at public auction
and will sell the same subject to
prior liens, encumbrances, and
judgments, if any, to the high-
est bidder for cash'in hand, the
proceeds to be applied as far as
may be to the payment of costs
and the satisfaction of the de-
scribed execution.
Johnny Smith, Sheriff
Levy County, Florida

In accordance with the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special. accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
agency sending the notice not
later than five working days prior
to the proceeding at the address
given on the notice. Telephone


1900Legals1
900 -1
(352)-486-5207.
Pub: Dec. 14, 21, 28, 2006
Jan. 4, 2007


Cal

Laur


/Pet Sitters
and much more!

Domestics-Equines-Exotics

Pet and House Sitting

call 352-327-1436


Low rates


References Available


BUILDING INSPECTOR/ZONING OFFICIAL
The Town of Otter Creek is accepting applications for an
experienced Building Inspector/Zoning Official for part time
employment. Located 24 miles NE of Cedar Key and35
miles SW of Gainesville Otter Creek has a population of
138. For details call 352-486-4766 or 352-486-4413. Deliver
resume before noon on December 18, 2006 to 555 SW 2nd
Ave., Otter Creek, or mail to P.O. Box 65, Otter Creek, FL
32683-0065 or fax to 352-486-4794. An EOE.
Pub: Dec. 7, 14,2006


SWarmest Thoughts


SBest: Wishes



From All Of Us


ForA Wonderful Holiday



AndA Very Happy New Year




:fi ."",. ...


DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
CEDAR KEY CHIEFLAND CROSS CITY OLD TOWN TRENTON
Member F.D.I.C. LENE


f


- I 1 9


i











LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


ChASSIFIED a LEG-ALS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Legals 90


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO: 38-2006-DP-0204
IN THE INTEREST OF:

C.W. (M) DOB: 03/27/05
Minor Child.

NOTICE OF SUIT FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS AND PLACEMENT
FOR ADOPTION

THE STATE OF FLORIDA

TO: JAMON WALKER
Address unknown

You are hereby notified that
a petition under oath has been
filed in the above-styled Court
for the termination of your paren-
tal rights to C.W., a male child
born March 27, 2005, in For-
rest County, Mississippi, and for
permanent commitment of the
child to the Department of Chil-
dren and Family Services for the.
subsequent adoption. You are
hereby commanded to be and
appear before the HONORABLE
MAURICE GIUNTA, JUDGE OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT OR THE
GENERAL MAGISTRATE, at the
Levy County Courthouse, Bron-
son, Florida, on the 17th day of
January, 2007, at 9:30 a.m. for
an Advisory Hearing.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY
APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES
CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL
TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
AS A PARENT TO THE NAMED
CHILD.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO
HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY
BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD
ONE, THE COURT WILL AP-
POINTAN ATTORNEY TO REP-
RESENT YOU.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four (4) consec-
utive weeks in The Levy County
Journal at Bronson, Florida.
WITNESS my hand and as
the clerk of said Court and the
Seal therefore, this 14 day of
November, 2006.
DANNY SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Court Seal)

By: J. Marino
Deputy Clerk
JOANN M. HUMBURG, ES-
QUIRE
Florida Bar Number 831328
Child Welfare Legal Services
Post Office Box 356
Trenton, FL 32693
(352) 463-4026
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. -2006CA-000729.
MARK P. SULLIVAN and
NANCY J. SULLIVAN, husband
and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ROBERT WERNER and-
LORETTA WERNER, husband
and wife, if married, if alive, and
if dead, their respective un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, under
or against them individually,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERT WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

LORETTA WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to Quiet Title as to the fol-


lowing described lands:
The South V of tract No. 5,
in an unrecorded subdivision for
HORIZONS ENTERPRISES,
INC., BY WILLIAM D. PARRISH,
dated October 2, 1971, more par-
ticularly described in that War-
ranty Deed recorded in or Book
380, Page 692, public records of
Levy County, Florida. Said tract
assessed together with a 1973
Parker, singlewide mobile home
bearing ID#13GCM013642 and
title #5967532, located thereon.


TAX PARCEL#: 04101-002-
OH
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on RON-
ALD W. STEVENS, Petitioner's
attomey, whose address is Post
Office Box 1444, Bronson, FL
32621, on or before Dec. 29,
2006, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereaf-
ter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Nov. 13,
2006.

Clerk of Court
By: Gwen McElroy

Persons with disabilities re-
questing reasonable accom-
modations to participate in this
proceeding should contact (352)
374-3639 (Voice & TDD) or via
Florida Relay Service at (800)
955-8771.
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 38-2006CA000954
THE ESTATE OF SARAH
LOUISE DOWNS, KENNETH
NOBLE, FLORENCE
WILLIAMS, EARLYNNE MABLE
HARPER, DONA COWARD
AND LEONARD GOLSON, all
individuals,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ABRAHAM A/K/A ABRAM
SPIKESAND ELLAA/K/A ELLEN
SPIKES, his wife, PHILLIP D.
VACHON, ADELIA I. VACHON,
EZRA. HENSON, BARBARA
HENSON, WOODROW P.
HENDERSON, NANCY L.
HENSON,WILLIEMAEGIBSON,
JOHNNY A. MCINTYRE and
BERNICE MCINTYRE
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO THE ABOVE STYLED
DEFENDANTS AND ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:

YOUARE HEREBYNOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on
the following property located in
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, to
wit:
Property ID # 13-12-18-
04059-000-00; Property Short
Legal Description: 10.50 Acres
parts of E 2 of SW 4 of SE
1/4 & W of SE % of SE 1/4
Less tract Sold in Deed Book
N, Page 71, Deed Book 23,
Pages 667, Deed Book 30,
Page 112 & Deed Book 29,
Page 110.
CONTAINING 10.5 ACRES;
MORE OR LESS.
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of written defenses, if any,
to it on KIMBERLY S. DAISE,
PA. plaintiffs' attorney, whose
address is 1747 Van Buren
Street, Suite 870, Hollywood, FL
33020-5190, and file the original
with the Clerk of Court at 355
South Court Street, Bronson,
FL 32621 on or before January
12, 2007; otherwise a default will
-be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
petition.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should, no later
than seven (7) days prior, contact
the Clerk of the court's disability
coordinator at Telephone Voice/
TDD (800) 955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 27m' day of
November, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF


THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006-DR-000-960
KENNIETH GIBSON
Petitioner
and

DONNA GIBSON
Respondent.


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DONNA GIBSON
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on KENNIETH
GIBSON, whose address is 356
SE 101h Street, Ocala. FL 32656
on or before January 11, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 355 S. CT. St. or
P.O. Box 610, Bronson, FL 32621
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Courts office notified
of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family. Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-30-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Melissa Allen
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR GILCHRIST
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 21-2006-DR-0350
PAULA EDMONDS
Petitioner
and

GEORGE EDMONDS
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: GEORGE RAYMOND
EDMONDS
15591 NW 41stTerr.
Trenton, FL 32693

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on PAULA
EDMONDS, whose address is
15591 NW 41st Terr., Trenton,
FL 32693 on or before January
3, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at
P.O. Box 37, Trenton, FL 32693
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a .default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 12-1-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT


COURT


By: Kendra Cathey
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA


Case No.: 38-2006-DR-924
CASHA DAY MARTIN
Petitioner
and

DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on CASHA
DAY MARTIN, whose address
is 8650 NW 127" PI., Chiefland,
FL 32626 on or before January
10, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
at 355 S. Court St. or P.O.
Box 327, Bronson, FL 32621
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-9-2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Deanna K. Dobbins
[Court Seal] ,
DepyuyGlej .M.A.
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

SCASE NO. 38-2006-CA-000244
JOHNNIE W. ALEXANDER,
Plaintiff,
v.


VISHNOODAT T.
THACKURDEEN AND JOHN A.
CRAIG,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

The undersigned Clerk of the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
gives notice that he will sell the
following property to the highest
bidder for cash, or as provided
in the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure After Default dated
November 27, 2006, pursuant to
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes:

The description of the property
to be sold is:

Beginning at the point on
the North line of Section
24, in Township 12 South,
Range 18 East, within the
Arrendondo Grant, where
the North line of said Section
intersects the eastern edge
of the right-of-way of S.R.
#5, also known as Federal
Highway Number 41, in the
Town of Raleigh, and from
this as the point of beginning
run South-easterly along the
extreme eastern edge of the
said highway and parallel
therewith a distance of 210
feet; thence East a distance
of 210 feet; run thence in
a North-westerly direction
and parallel with said
highway and first line herein
described, to the North line
of Section 24 in Township
12 South, Range 18 East
within the Grant, a distance


of 210 feet more or less;
run thence West along the
North line of said Section 24
to the point of beginning, a
distance of 210 feet more or
less (which said land is on
the East side of S.A.L.R.R.
Company's tract). All lying,
and being in Levy County,
Florida.
AND
That part of fractional
Section 24, Township 12


South, Range 18 East, inside
the Arrendondo Grant, Levy
County, Florida, being more
particularly described as
follows:

Commence at the
intersection of the East
right-of-way line of U.S.
Highway No. 41 (State Road
No. 445) with the North line
of said fractional Section
24 for a point of reference;
thence run South 26 05'20"
East, along said East right-
of-way line of U.S. Highway
No. 41, a distance of 231.96
feet to an iron pipe at the
intersection of said East
right-of-way line with a fence
line running Easterly for a
Point of Beginning; From
said Point of Beginning run
South 88'52'22" East, along
said fence line a distance
of 236.14 feet to an iron
pipe; thence run South 26
05'20" East, parallel to a
perpendicular, a distance
of 210 feet from said East
right-of-way line a distance
of 321.00 feet to a concrete
monument; thence run
*South 63 54'50" West,
perpendicular to said East
right-of-way line, a distance
of 210.00 feet to an iron
pipe at the intersection with
said right-of-way; thence
North 26'05'20" West, along
said East right-of-way line
a distance of 429.00 feet'
to the Point of Beginning.
LESS AND EXCEPT the
Southerly 48.56 feet thereof;
and LESS AND EXCEPT the
Northerly 10 feet thereof.

The time and place of the
foreclosure sale is the front door
of the Levy County Cburthouse,
on the 355 Court Street,
Bronson, FL 32621 18th day of
January, 2007, at 11:00 a.m., or
as soon thereafter as may be
possible. The foreclosure sale
by theClerk of the Court will be
pursuant to the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure After Default in
the above captioned action. The
name of the Clerk making the
sale appears below.

WITNESS my hand and seal
this 1st day of December, '2006.
... ~..... DANNY'V'SHIPP'-
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: Gwen McElroy
DEP.JTY CLERK
[COURT SEAL]

Robert W. Bauer


18 NW 33rd Court
Gainesville, FL 32607
Pub.: December 7, 14, 2006
-----"-----


ADVERTISEMENT

The Levy County Board of
County Commissioners hereby
gives notice that bids will be
accepted from qualified bidders
for the following work:
Demolition and disposal of the
existing 10,400 square foot
fishing pier and reconstruction
of a new facility of the same
dimensions at Cedar Key,
Levy County, Florida.

Approximately 180 days will
be allowed for construction.

Sealed bids will be received at
the office of the Levy Coordinator,
P.O. Drawer 310, Bronson,
Florida, until 10:00 A.M. ( local
time), Monday, February 12th,
2007. A pre-bid meeting will
be held at the City of Cedar
Key Town Hall on Thursday,
December 21st, 2006 at 10 A.M.
Bidding Documents will not be
issued after Friday, January 19th,
2007 at 5 P.M.

A Proposal Guaranty of not
less than five percent (5%)
of the total actual bid, in the
form of either a certified check,
cashiers check, trust company
treasurers check, bank draft of
any national or state bank, or a
Surety Bid Bond, made payable
to the Levy County Board of
County Commissioners, must
accompany each bid. A check or.
Draft in an amount less than five
percent (5%) of the actual bid
will invalidate the bid.

All work is .to be done in
accordance with the Plans,
Specifications, and Special
Provisions to accompany
the Florida Department of
Transportation Standard
Specifications for Road and
Bridge Construction 2004.

Any person or affiliate who has
been placed on the convicted
vendor list following a public
entity crime may not submit a
bid to or contract with a public
entity crime may not submit a bid
to or contract with a public entity
for construction of a public work
as set forth in Florida Statute,
Chapter 287.133. Bidder shall
certify to, eligibility in the bid
proposl- '

Bidding Documents at a cost of
one' hundred dollars ($100.00)
per set plus applicable sales tax
may be obtained from:
Mills Engineering Company
P.O. Box 778
Bronson, Florida 32621
Phone: (352) 486-2872 FAX:
(352) 486-2498

The right is reserved to accept or
reject any or all bids.
Pub: Dec. 14, 21, 2006



Buying

Tax Deeds?
NJeed to cdew the titde?
&iperienced, Dependa&e
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
'eaee
ehvdeotte J. Weidnwt
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


Legal deadline is 5 p.m. Monday


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Page 17


%pamru~~pmm Ew %W m~mrmmv










Page 18


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Levy Land Transactions
11/5/06 11/22/06
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-Assign-
ment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended Certificate of Title,
AD-Agree Deed, AI-Assumptton of Indebtedness, AM -Assignment
of Mortgage, CD-Correctory Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed,
E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage
Modify Agreement, NL-Notice df Limitation, PX Probate X, QCD-
Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed, WD-Warranty
Deed
WD $45,000.00, L5-6(38) OLD CHIEFLAND, W/MH
Grantee(s) EHLING PHILIP F, EHLING VADA C
Grantor(s) MEALER DIANE S, MEALER ROY L
AAA $75,000.00, OR 1016/974
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s) PEARSON RACHEL F, PEARSON JOHN C
QCD $10.00, L10 CEDAR PINES #3,W/MH
Grantee KLINE NANCY D
Grantor KLINE KEITH E
WD $55,989.00, L10 CEDAR PINES#3,W/MH
Grantee GADDIS DELBERT S JR
Grantor KLINE NANCY D
WD $6,000.00, BDY 16-15-13, ETC
Grantee HUEY LESTER W JR
Grantor(s) LENORAAYOUNG FAMILY TRUST, SKEHAN SANDRA
LYNN TRUSTEE, SMITH JUGLE EVERETT III TRUSTEE
M $269,600.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/4 26-10-15, PARCEL #21055-
000-00
Grantee(s) COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) MAYNARD WALLACE, MAYNARD DONNA
QCD $10.00, BDY NW 1/4 SE1/4 8-12-17, ETC, PARCEL#
033555-002-00
Grantee BELFORD ELAINE KAY
Grantor(s) MALONE ALLIE MAE, MALONE EARNEST, MALONE
ERNEST
WD $69,000.00, L27 ROLLING OAK SD
Grantee CHOON JASON
Grantor STROUP MARY ANN
CD $10.00, OR 668/368, L 11-12 NORTHWOOD HTS
Grantee HEMINGWAY MARY R
Grantor HEMINGWAY BRIAN R
WD $21,500.00, L 12 NORTHWOOD HTS
Grantee BAKER THOMAS
Grantor HEMINGWAY MARY R
WD $20,750.00, L11 NORTHWOOD HTS
Grantee BAKER THOMAS
Grantor HEMINGWAY MARY R
M $32,000.00, L10-12EDEN ACRES, W/MH
Grantee PETERSON PHYLLIS
Grantor TABER DEBI


QCD $10.00, L11,13(A) USHERS ADD
Grantee(s) GENT CORTEZ, BOWERS KATRINA D
Grantor BOWERS KATRINA D
WD $75,000.00, L13-14(7) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee SMITH BRANDON K
Grantor PERKINS STATE BANK
M $56,250.00, L13-14(7) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor SMITH BRANDON K
M 1 $17,500.00, L13-14(7) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee LEVY COUNTY
Grantor SMITH BRANpON K
M $56,500.00, L2 WILLISTON SAVANNAH PHASE 1
Grantee(s) TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor CAMPBELL HEATHER
WD $515,000.00, L4(4) REPLAT OF BLK 3-4 OF NEW SOME
ESTS
Grantee POVEROMO CHARLES RAYMOND
Grantor(s) LEWIS JILL M, LEWIS WAYNE A
M $351,400.00, L4(4) REPLAT OF BLK 3-4 OF NEWSOME
ESTS
Grantee WORLD SAVINGS BANK FSB
.Grantor POVEROMO CHARLES RAYMOND
QCD $10.00, L14-16 CRACKERTOWN .
Grantee(s) MICHAELS JILL P, MICHAELS EDWARD
Grantor MICHAELS JILL P.
QCD $150,000.00, BDY N1/2 NW 1/4 20-13-15, PARCEL
#01881-003-00
Grantee ALL GOOD COMMERCIAL DOOR & GLASS CORP
Grantor MOORE JOHN P
AAD $10.00, OR 649/26
Grantee(s) HARP CHRISTIE, FITZSIMMONS CHRISTOPHER
Grantor(s) COX KIMBERLY, COX MARK, LEVY COUNTY DEVEL-
OPMENT CORPORATION
QCD $10.00, L3-5 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 12-12-17
Grantee(s) HARP CHRISTIE, FITZSIMMONS CHRISTOPHER,
FITZSIMMONS CHRISTIE
Grantor LEVY COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION INC
M 2 $10,000,000.00, BOY 14, 15, 21, 22-12-15, ETC
Grantee FARM CREDIT NORTH FLORIDAACA
Grantor WILLIAMS HERITAGE LLP
WD $150,000.00, BDY S1/216-13-18
Grantee PRATT MARLAINA
Grantor NIPPER REBA L
M $130,000.00, BDY S1/216-13-18
Grantee WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK FA
Grantor PRATT MARLAINA
M $102,009.37, BDY SW1/4 NE1/4 36-11-14, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s) NATURE COAST PROFESSIONAL CENTER LIMITED


LIABILITY, NATURE COAST PROFESSIONAL CENTER LLC
M $92,000.00, L10BULLOCKS SD
Grantee(s) AEGIS LENDING CORPORATION, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor BURR MARCIA K
M $152,000.00, L3(129) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s) AEGIS LENDING CORPORATION, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) ASBELL LAMAR DOUGLAS JR, ASBELL PAIGE B
QCD $10.00, L46(H) STEEPLECHASE FARMS
Grantee DURAN ANA VICTORIA
Grantor(s) DURAN LUIS A, DURAN LUIS ALEJANDRO
QCD $100.00, L2(1.6) JB EPPERSON ADD TO THE TOWN OF
WILLISTON
Grantee TRI COUNTY PROPERTY INVESTMENT GROUP LLC
Grantor(s) AGOSTO WANDA, AGOSTO MARIO
WD $32,995.00, L62(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee MACHADO JOSE
GrantorAMERICAN PRIME LLC
M $23,982.72, L62(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor MACHADO JOSE
M $40,000.00, L7-10(31) BRONSON HTS 4TH ADD
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor FRAZIER CURTIS
WD $10.00, OR 933/429, L13-14(5) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee WALKER WILMA D
Grantor(s) WALKER WILMA D, WALKER WILLIAM-M
WD $10.00, L15(5) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee WALKER WILMA D
Grantor(s) WALKER WILMA D, WALKER WILLIAM M
M $75,000.00, L15 RAINBOW HTS PHASE 1
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s) BOOTH EDWARD I SR, BOOTH MARIA J
M $1'88,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SW1/4 9-13-19, PARCEL #05155-
000-00
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor MEYER DEBRA
M $100,000.00, L3-4(1) WILLIAMS HOMES
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s) BOYNTON PAULINE J,'BOYNTON THOMAS S
WD $5,000.00, L424 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 14-12-17
Grantee SD SANFORD INC
Grantor WATLINGTON. EVANGELINA'
WD $145,000.00, L13(4) PINERIDGE ESTS
Grantee(s) HAUBERT LEONARD G, HAUBERT CARRIE ANN K
Grantor METZ JOAN P
M $137,750.00, L13(4) PINERIDGE ESTS
Grantee(s).COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS,
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) HAUBERT LEONARD G, HAUBERT CARRIE ANN K


Kelley Valentine of Jiffy 2280 Manatee in Chiefland reads the





EMY COUNTY JOURNAL

.J E COUNTY PAPER EST. 1923


Also available at these locations:


Bronson
A&A Restaurant
Boondocks Grill
Bronson Post Office
Courthouse-Bronson
IGA
Li'l Champ
Nobles
Pick-a-Flick
Texaco/Chevron
Lee's Grocery
Cedar Key
Cypress Station
Island Jiffy #1173
Island Jiffy #3246
The Market SR 24


Chiefland


ABC Pizza rant


Bell's Restaurant US 19
BBQ Bill's US 19
Burger King US 19
Chiefland Flea Market
US 19
Chiefland Flea Market
Laundromat
Chiefland Post Office
Park Ave
SChurch's Chicken/Jiffy
3000
CVS
Dollar Tree US 19
Gas Mart Yogiraj En-
terpr. Inc.
Jiffy 228o-Manatee
Jiffy 2946-Midtown
McDonald's US 19
Mya's Chinese Restau-


Stone's BP
Sunoco, US 19
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Garden side)
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Grocery side)
Winn Dixie US 19
Winn Dixie #168

Fanning Springs
Homestead US 19
Lighthouse Rest. US 19
Noble Food Mart, US 19
Fowlers Bluff
Carter's Crossroads

Inglis
Food Ranch
US 19/Inglis Ave


Shell Station US 19

Morriston
Morriston Post Office


Old Town
BP Station-US 19
Jiffy Store
Old Town Post Office

.Otter Creek
Hershel's Quick Stop & Deli,
Hwys. 19.24
Otter Creek Post Office


Trenton
BP-Round store on SR 2
Citgo Sunrise Food Mart
#65
Hitchcock's-Trenton


Jiffy Mart #1553
Trenton Medical Center
Trenton Post Office


Williston
BP Gas
Corner Market 121/41
Exxon
Hitchcock's
Li'l Champ 1181
Li'l Champ 1182
Li'l Food Ranch 3626
Li'l Food Ranch 4231
'Raleigh General Store
Sunoco #65, Hwy.
27/N. Main St.
Sunoco #464, Hwys.
27/SW 4th
Subway
Williston Post Office


Kelley Valentine, an evening CSR at the Chiefland Jiffy 2280
Manatee, enjoys reading the opinion section of the
.Levy County Journal when she comes into work.



Pick up your copy today.

You'll be glad you did.


To subscribe: call Robin at 490-4462


We accept
Visa/Mastercard
Two locations to serve you
440 South Court St., Bronson
13 South Main St., Chiefland


VISA


T I -I-


I .








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2006


Page 19 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


This is a large 3 bedroom 2 bath home on almost 1 acre lot right off of
the Manatee Springs Road. It is in an excellent location, dose to
Chiefland for shopping and Manatee Springs State Park for swimming
or the Suwannee Riverfor fishing! The golf course is right down the
road for a game or two! The home has new carpet and vinyl, new
metal roof, new septic, new4" well! Ready to move in!
MLS#750176 $89,500


ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS is the best way to describe this recently
Remodeled pool home on an oversized 1.60 acre lot int the city of
Chiefland. So many upgrades, from the Italian marble Roman style
bath to the fully operational pool house with a kitchen and
bathroom that you will need to see for yourself.


MLS#754228


$290,000


and
many possibilities!
$150,000
ML SUPER OPPORT#754330
This 7.12 acres consist of two parcels so you could use one and
sell the other or use together! There are two mobile homes on
the front 2.60 acres that are currently being rented out for $700
per month.You could build your home in the back and keep
rental income. It all sits on 429.71 +- US 27 paved road
frontage! See MLS 754328 and 754329 for more details. It is a
Hwzt 3C C !flv


WE ALSO HAVE ACREAGE

1/2 ACRE TO 4S3 ACRES.

PLEASE CALL US

FOR PRICES.


1yatueestsu ay
WehaeacrageVst w aiteralt omfrdeal






Call Laura to list your house ii

the Marketplace. 352-486-231


itis a fact:
While people
: enjoy the Inter-
S'net for its instant,
gratification,
I" when it comes
Sto shopping for a
'house they want
to- hold something
in their hands
while they browse
for thei"(deam
home: Thaft'swhy
more and'fimore'
Realtors are com-
. .
Fing to the Market-
"place. Why don't
you core ;al0ngi
too? Call Laura
.at 486-2312 to
reserve your ad
space today,


3BR/2BA 5 Acres $289,500
M LS#754536 Karen 538-3141


NEWLISTING!
Beautiful 2 Acres lot in Chiefland off
Hwy 27. Great for your builder or mobile
home.Seller will consider all offers!
$50,000
Natalie 219-8365 MLS# 754595


REDUCED!
1.24 Acre Lot already cleared & perfect
for your Custom Home or Mobile Home
SELLER IS MOTIVATED!
BRING ALL OFFERS! $25,000
MLS# 753739 Natalie 219-8365


NEW CONSTRUCTION! LUXURY! INVEST(
-


3BR/2BA "Thfe West Virginia i
Built by'Steve Smith Construction
$151,900 MLS# 754568


RAS3C


.-- -" r -"-2='i,
hlecenitly remodaledl 196 3 2 SA Ml on J.l 1 Il 3, -, 'COUfLE'.Vi 'I-iC.ILCt'1 t -I I EfLc L HEKC'Li. Haur'l-r" unique opprinjJntlr) 5re
beautiful acres in Paradise HammockThis home has THERE IS PLENTY OF STORAGE SPACE WITH EXTRA LARGE hunting camp located in Otter Creek,Florida.
new carpet,vinyl,AC/Heat, pump forthe well,2car CLOSETS AND HUGE STORAGE/WORKSHOP BUILDING.THIS 2/1 SWMH with 16' x 36' bedroom & living
carport w/light,9 X 12 storage shed w/electricall of IS A PEACEFUL COUNTY SETTNG WrTH A LOTOF room addition. Full electric power,private
this and more that is located just off paved road.This POSSBILTIES.COME AND MAKE AN OFFER THEN ENJOY road access through hunting club and
is one that you must see to appreciate. $72,900. TE QUIET,SENERITY OF YOUR PROPERTY.$109, 00. timber company land.Must See! $165,000.
(DMH-7:.2334- JW 4.? c. 54190o143-2221 (LMH-753018-D1493-2221


HOI E AWA,'lFROMl M mI- rtlE ISJUWAfrJ HayFarm-42Acrehayfarm forsalew/2BR,2
LOOK Two DW Mobile Homeson 9Acres All Being Sold BR 1 3/4 BA on large freshwater lot.Two bath frame home w/western cedarsiding.Home
If L LOOKTwo DWI mobile Homeson 9AcresAIIeingSold w/l\ftS e a rea, bath ^S e Se Tn edBeigngSlme
S ? VN Together For Only $250,000.Thefirst DW MH is a 1998 4/2 stall boat house w/lifts, fish cleaning area, site has century old oaks & is nicely landscaped
with 2240 Sq.Ft.,that has recenlty been remodeled.The large & small utility sheds & workshop w/board fencing. Pastures are fenced & cross
second almost new DW MH is a 2005 3/2 with 1344 Sq Ft. downstairs. Upstairs, wonderful custom fenced with two 60 x 57 hay barns & one 50 x 100
There is plenty of room to have horses, goats, chickens, made cabinets, ceilings and many other pole barn w/workshop & stalls.Two 4" wells & one
cattlea gardenand moreThe property is mostlycleared features the Owner made himself, make 8" well for irrigation.Approx.40 acres of improved
with some wooded areas left forthe deer tcofeed in,and i this home a must see. Great for entertain-
located off the beaten path at the end of a culdesac. ths home a must see. Great fo entertain- coastal hay.Additional land available.Call for
$250,000.DMH 753736 JW 463-6144 ing! $350,000. (DW-754062-JH) 542-9007 Details! $1,000,000. (LR-753225-D) 493-2221
02 CalfraFEEmWENEoTiNSl c i
Aceae Homes Farms, Waterfront, Commercial^^^BI^
1Cl utW mfs- weNvi l ^M ^^ mK~. fi JitySSSES


S MOBILE HOMES: n.A' E-tTrAT ,"..
Whitted Sold lome Estates 3/2 DWMH on 2 lots,
screened porch, detachedcarport & more. Owner fin-
ancing to"qualiied ibbuver!'$ 69-6O'Reducedl, $62,500
Park-like 5 acres wi~th 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000..Owner financing possible.
Waterfront 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land
escaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well. $84-;00. Reduced! $76,000
New Listing 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600 s.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
Handyman on 5 Acres. 3 BR, 2 Bath singlewide that *
needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500. Owner financing
available.
Dixie County -Just off Spillars, NEW 3/2 DWMH on
1.5 acres. Ready for your family. $97,500.
COMMERCIAL:
City of Trenton 2 corner lots with 2300 sf warehouse.
Just off of 129. $89,500.00
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $1-30;000 Reduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres- just off U.S. Alt. 27. $4-16-T0. Special!
- $10,000 per acre
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85-001 Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. -$-9600Tper acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corner Parcel 80 Ac at corner of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$1-2000 per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres- just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
City of Trenton Small residential building lot in town -
chain link fenced, nice lawn. $39,900
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $1-7-;50- Reduced: $16,000.
Whitted Sold ~ ome Estates -2 lots ready for your mo-
bile home. One w/ shed: $15,500. Reduced! $13,000
2nd one: $1-5-0i. Reduced! $12,500
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $159,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront- 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal 3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380



Find your dream home


in the Marketplace


Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliams.com


GOsswiLLIAMS


MOM"











*Chiefland
When asked about the
charges Williams referred to,
commissioner Teal Pomeroy
said that he had once sold
alcohol to a 20-year old,
and that he had been twice
charged with battery by a
girlfriend in a relationship
gone bad. Pomeroy owned
and managed a bar prior to
serving as a commissioner.
Records at the Levy County
Clerk's Office revealed that
Pomeroy has had five charges
against him. He was charged
in 1999 with a boating
infraction-for failure to use
a diving flag. Adjudication
was withheld and Pomeroy
paid a $25 citation fee.
He was also charged that
year with selling liquor to
someone under the age of
21. The state dropped those
charges that December. In
2000, he was charged with a
health and safety infraction.
Although the records did not
indicate the precise infraction,
a clerk's office representative
said that this was likely a code
violation such as failure to
remove debris from property.
He pled guilty and paid a
$55 fine. In 2002, he was
twice charged with battery.
One charge was dropped
due to insufficient evidence
and the other was dropped
for "lacking prosecutorial
merit."
Williams concluded,
"Several ofthe commissioners
representing us should resign
and get their lives in order.-
On a final note, the "N" word
that I'm identified by doesn't
bother me...I'm an outsider
even with some members
within the black community
because I don't play games or
jump on bandwagons."
Although Williams is
director of the Levy County
Housing Authority and
president of the Greater
Chiefland Chamber of
Commerce, he said that
he was not speaking on
behalf of either of the two
organizations, but rather as a
business owner and manager
in Chiefland.
Pomeroy maintained that
Williams was speaking with a
political agenda in mind. "He
hired a private investigator
to look into my background
during the elections last
August. He was running two
campaigns. (for candidates for
city commissioners) at the
time-for Debra Houska and
Sharon Livingston. He has an
extensive political agenda."
Houska was employed
in the housing office with
Williams at the time of the
election. Williams was listed
as Livingston's campaign
treasurer during the run up
to the elections held last
August.
Pomeroy went on to say
that while Williams had
complained about the manner
in which city manager
candidates were selected, at
no time had Williams called
him to express his opinion.
"My number's listed in the
phone book. He could have
called with his advice."
When she was called for
comment after the meeting,
commissioner Teresa Barron
said she felt that Williams
was "a little over the top.
I felt like I was being
coerced--if I didn't vote his
way, even my children would
be threatened.;. Citizens
need to stand up. There is

* Plan
Continued from front
working with an assistant
superintendent to the school


board, Jeff Davis, who was
formerly a defacto member
of the city's planning board.
The proposed development
could add an additional
410 students to the city's
schools.
Commissioners voted
Monday to resubmit the
request to DCA for approval.
The motion was made by Teal
Pomeroy, seconded by Teresa
Barron and unanimously
passed by all.


PRE-O WFIED


9 r- iou oupercan Lariat
#214 2,995*


'05 Ford IEscape 02 F-150 upercao bxU
#10,33,7 5* 20715 995


Wishing you the happiest Christmas ever -

From Our Family to Your Family!

During this holiday season, we would especially like to thank
the many armed services volunteers who unselfishly defend
our country and our freedoms. May God bless you all! Toyo Tots Proram!






Act Quickly ... 2006 Tax Year Ends Dec. 31st, 2006


For Full-SizeTrucks deduct a maximum of $108,000, depending
on the number of vehicles purchased in the first year.
Qualifying vehicles include all F-150 Regular Cab,
SuperCab & CrewCab models with a greater than 6 ft. bed,
all F-250 through F-750 Super Duty, and E-Series Cargo Vans
g greater thia h 6,000i IbS. GVWR. (See your tax advisor for complete details.)


F-150 XL Reg. Cab 4x2 F-150 4x4 XL
#6T0110. MSRP $21,095 #6T0103- MSFP $26,745
YOUR PRICE .. 15,996* YOUR PRICE .. 19,474*


F-150 Supercrew
DEMO. #6T0223 MSRP $39,125
(Greater than 6 Ft. Bed)
YOUR PRICE *28,905*





F-250 CreW Cab
Diesel. 4F.TC0Jr r.S P 1 -075
YOUR PRICE 829,934*


F-250
#6T0288 MSRP $28,035
YOUR PRICE .. $21,988*


F-150 Supercab XLT
#6T0271 MSRP $29,740
YOUR PRICE .... *21,178*


F-150 Supercab 4x4
#BT0119 MSRP $38,325
YOUR PRICE .28,525*


For Full-Size SUVS Qualifying vehicles
include Explorer, Explorer Sport Trac
and all '06/'07 Expeditions.
For PassengerTrucks (greater than 6,000
Ibs. GVWR). Passenger trucks qualify as
SUVs according to tax law and would
therefore include all F-150 SuperCrew 4
door models with less than 6 ft. bed.
Deduct a maximum of $25,000 plus your
normal 20% depreciation on the balance,
all in the first year. (See your tax advisor for details.)


F-150 Supercrew
4x2
#6T0280- MSRP $32,010
(Less than 6 Ft. Bed)
YOUR PRICE ... *23,155*


expeaition ALl
#6T0016- MSRP $41,365
YOUR PRICE.: .29,772*


,a5sS*


Larja Lihesel
#6T0202 MSRP $47,271
YOUR PRICE 8,939*


Expedition 4x4
Eddie Bauer.
6T0368 MSRP $45,680
YOUR PRICE.. *35,001*


- #040


EAMCE
SCT-Bird *3,495'
'02 Kia Optima SE .....#221 *6,995'
'02 Grand Marquis ...#176 8,498"
'02 F-250 4x4 ...........#14610,498'
'99 GMC 1500 4WD .#157*10,498"
'O6Taurus ..................#00oo4 11,998'
'02 Expedition ........#187*12,495"
'03 Supercrew ........#163*13,995"
'05 Santa Fe ..............#145 14,998"
'04 Supercrew .........#200 *18,995'
'05 Mustang ..............#218 *15,995'
'06 Escape XLT.......#969*16,498'
'03 Supercrew .........#12716,498'


S'4LE!
'04 Freestar SEL ........#9*16,995'
'06 Mustang ..............#168*17,498'
'05 SportTrac ...........#094*17,988'
'06 Milan .....................#134 18,498'
'06 Fusion ....................#135*18,498
'06 Montego .............#169*18,983'
'04 Supercrew 4x4 #200 18,995'
'06 Montego .............#151 19,495'
'06 Freestyle .............#167 20,998'
'04 Expedition .........#209*22,495'
'06 Explorer E.B. .....#056*24,995'
'06 Expedition ..........#011 25,988'


f''J.A'JII .~-S.1.-J4I.I ~Drive a Little Bell SAM"
SCr&oMorer.. 0 lOT O i
Ne~ ny Gainerville
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Website: www.whitefordmercury.com


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See .riI 1=1... Save More GREEN!


Any Service Work I
When you bring in a new unwrapped MRU
toy to benefit the Toys For Tots MERCURY
program. Must have coupon.
Expires 12-22-0. 916 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland TOll Free 1-888-864-4582


*Prices net of rebate, plus tax, tag and $224.95 document fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Art for illustration purposes only. In stock units
only. See dealer for details. (W.A.C.) = With approved credit, financing with Ford Motor Credit Co. Prices may include FMCC financing. Incentives
and rebates subject to change. Rebates may include Owner Loyalty. See dealer for details. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit financing.


A Wr7,~y nA AAl MrsliM.7 II & *i Vi 'I *. .W A A2AA Al '"iP @ii I.


Continued from front
no civility here. Attacking
the commissioners is one
thing. But you don't attack
someone's children."
Mayor Betty Walker had no
comment regarding Williams'
letter.

Vaccinations set

for Saturday

On Saturday, Dec.16 from
3-4 p.m., Levy County Ani-
mal Services will host low
cost pet vaccinations at the
Levy County Animal Servic-
es Shelter, 12055 NE. 69th
Lane, Bronson, .off C335 at
the Levy County Landfill.
Rabies vaccinations are
needed for the quality of the
environment and the protec-
tion of our pets. Rabies vac-
cinations will be $8 for dogs
and cats.
Remember your pet's safe-
ty during the holidays is just
as important. Table scraps
and leftovers can cause up-
set tummies and/or diarrhea.
Chocolate is toxic to your
pets!


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, DECEMEBR 14, 2006 Page 20











THE GREATER Chiefland
Chamber of Commerce
welcomed guests to its an-
nual holiday mixer Tuesday
evening. Guests enjoyed a
bounty of food and good
conversation highlighted
by the cheery mood of the
season.










Journal photo by
Cassie Journigan


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