<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Main: Around Levy County
 Main: Opinion
 Main: Around Levy County conti...
 Main: Obituaries
 Main: Around Levy County conti...
 Main: Sports and Recreation
 Main: Around Levy County conti...
 Main: Levy Through the Lens
 Main: Around Levy County conti...
 Main: Classified and Legals
 Main: Around the Courthouse
 Main: Around Levy County conti...
 Main continued














Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00099
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: December 7, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00099

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
    Main: Obituaries
        page 6
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 13
    Main: Levy Through the Lens
        page 14
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 15
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 16
        page 17
    Main: Around the Courthouse
        page 18
        page 19
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
    Main continued
        page 24
Full Text









EYX COUNTY JOURNAL

=HE E COUNTY PAPET EST. I902


VOL. 83, NO. 22


INSIDE

I


Festival of Light and
Christmas Parade!
This Weekend


Oops!
Page 24

OBITUARIES

Montine Birdsey
Barbara Carpenter
Jack Doefler
James Dyals
Zeno Hatcher
Inez Hemphill
Elsie Herriott
Corey Knappins
Carolyn Long
Christopher Maruna
Dorothy Newton
Daryl Polk
William Redmond
Cody Roberts
Clementine Smith
Johnetta Smyth
Allen Soncrant
Buford Williams Jr.
CONTENTS...



Around Levy 2-3,5, 6, 14-15
Opinion 4
Law & Courts 5
Obituaries 6-7
Sports 8-13
Tides 13
Classified 16
Legals 17
Marketplace 22-23
HOME OF...

I


Gregory and Darius
Days
of Raleigh


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7,20061 SECTION: 24 PAGES


BOCC joins efforts to Passing Thro

improve Hwy. 26 corridor

BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-With Florida just about bursting at the seams
from new growth, a group of government bodies are hoping to
be proactive concerning the transportation issue.
Gerry Dedenbach gave a presentation to the Levy County
Board of County Commissioners Tuesday on why they should
join forces with Newberry, Trenton and Gilchrist County to
present a unified transportation plan.
The new group, call the Regional Transportation Advisory
Group (TAG), was created to plan ahead for development
along the Highway 26 corridor. The group will look at
deficiencies in the current roadway system, and by working
together, will share future road building duties.
The plan is called transportation concurrency, which
essentially means counting cars, to ease congestion.
Roads are graded A-F based on traffic patterns and flows.
Currently Newberry has a "D" for its Highway 26 corridor
and if nothing is.done to upgrade it, by 2020, it will be failing.
Both Trenton and Gilchrist County received "Cs". While there
is little of Highway 26 in Levy County, Dedenbach pointed out
it will affect Highway 19 which runs through Levy County.
"Is this going to cost us any money?" Dedenbach asked.
"Hopefully not."
He said the county could rely on its staff from planning and
zoning to represent it on the TAG board, whose purpose is
to solve traffic congestion, pool resources to attract roadway
funding and share planning concepts.
Keith Ashby, city manager of Newberry, said growth is out
of control all over the state and local government is the only
one that will fix it. "I don't think you have anything to lose,"
he said.
The commission voted to join TAG and appointed Kathy
Winburn, Dick Tummond and Lilly Rooks to serve as its
representatives.
In other business, the commissioners voted unanimously 5-
0 to allow AMVETS Post 444 a special exception for alcohol
consumption on its premises.
The planning commission had denied the application 3-
2, but the county commissioners said there was little, if any,
difference in this special exception compared to the one IT'S OFFICALI The'Ch
recently given to AMVETS Post 88 his way into Chieflan
For more photos on the dc
and 21.
See BOCC Page 24



Day of infamy brings



call to serve to many


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
Two days are burned into the American
super-conscience as dates "living in infamy."
Then, as now, thousands of young citizens
jumped up and answered the call to fight for a
country under attack.
Wayne Hart, just 15 at the time of the
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, waited two
years to enlist. He enlisted at age 17-"I tried
to go in earlier, but they said my heartbeat was
too fast. They told me to leave the girls' alone
and quit smoking.
"My mother signed for me to enlist; I was
one of the youngest," he recently said.
As a Navy man, Hart had to grow up fast.
The destroyer to which he was assigned, the
USS Endicott (DD 495; reclassified DMS
35), saw its share of battles. Hart was serving.
as a lookout watch when his ship got a call
to aid two English vessels taking a pounding


from two German corvettes-small convoy
patrol vessels-off the southern coast of
France. The British had been trying to
dislodge German forces ashore when they
were cornered by the German boats. Hart's
ship was sent in.
"We made it all the way into the harbor
and out again, even though it was loaded
with all kinds of mines." Once they got into
the harbor, Hart said, "We made all kinds of
racket to distract them."
When his destroyer got to within a few,
thousand yards of one German ship, the
American skipper, Commander' John
Bulkeley, gave the order to fire. Nothing
happened. The guns, which had just been
used to attack to coastline, were red-hot from
battle. Their breeches would not open.
The commander again gave the order to
fire, and again nothing happened. Finally
gunners loaded their guns by hand and


50 cents per copy


)ugh


Journal pnoto Dy uarolyn KRsner
Iristmas season is now underway as Santa Claus made
d Saturday night during the annual Christmas parade.
ay's events, sponsored by the chamber of commerce, see pages 20


WAYNE HART-then and now.
pounded the breeches shut with mallets. Soon all the guns
were firing, albeit intermittently.
The British ships, one of which was commanded by Douglas
Fairbanks Jr., escaped under 'cover of a smokescreen. The
Endicott continued the battle, taking advantage of their close
positioning to pound one then the other German ship.
"We got those limey boats out, and sunk the corvettes,"
recalled Hart.
The Endicott crew suffered one casualty and took a hole in
her side. She also took 169 prisoners. "We had to rescue all

See Hart Page 23


Accident claims lives of Williston teens


S9 P2 ###







i=
-rn



;ow
C-(h
G)
-

The town ofWilliston and a
great portion of Levy County
are mourning the loss of two
Williston students, killed
last week in an automobile
accident.
Cody Wayne Roberts, 17;
was driving north in a light
rain on Alternate Highway
27 Wednesday, Nov. 29 when
he lost control of his vehicle
in light rain.
He had been traveling in
the inside lane when and had
switched to the outside lane
in an attempt to pass other
traffic.


His vehicle, a 2001 Toyota
pickup truck, fishtailed, slid
onto the east shoulder of the
road and traveled across a
* drainage ditch before striking
a stand of trees near NE 155
Avenue.

Roberts and a passenger,
Corey Thane Knappins, 18,
were pronounced dead at
the scene by Levy County
Emergency Medical Service
personnel.
The other passenger, Amber
Renee Bradley, 18, was taken
to Shands UF Hospital in


serious condition.
All three were students
at Williston High School.
Neither Roberts nor his
passengers were wearing seat
belts. The accident occurred
at approximately 3:35 p.m.

Corporal L. Ward of
Florida Highway Patrol
investigated the accident.
Complete obituaries for
the young men can be found
on page 6.
The Williston High School
Ladies Soccer Team talks
about Bradley on page 11.


REACH US

Managing Editor
Carolyn lisner
Phone
(3521490-4482


Fax
(3521490-4490 Cblefland
(3521486-5042 Bronson
Email
editor@levloumal.com
Address
Pr. Iu15 BrIau. L 32621-015
P.O.Ba2990 b llegnin.R32644-2990


SUBSCRIBE
Lev, DBxe and Gilchrist counties
In-state
$22
Outofstate
$21
Locally owned and operated!


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. That's why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


I







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


Dance, Dance, Dance



















STUDENTS FROM the
Florida School for the Deaf
and the Blind entertained
fellow students at Bronson
Middle-High School last
week. The troupe kept the
beat and put smiles on a
lot of faces with their up-
beat dance steps and atti-
tude.





Journal photos
by Carolyn Risner




S VP holds auditions this weekend


Auditions for Once Upon a Mattress, pre-
sented by the Suwannee Valley Players will
be held at the Chief Theatre, 25 E. Park Ave.,
Chiefland on Friday. Dec. 8, at 7 p.m.. and Sat-
urday, Dec. 9; at 10 a.m.,
Needed: Men and women 'of various ages
.from 18 75, a few parts also for children:
Please prepare a song and bring your own


music or tape. There will be a few read-
ings from the script.
Rehearsals., wilj,,b scheduled with cast
-consideration from Jan. 5 --March7,;2007.
Show dates ae,; MaJch 8-11, 15-18.,
For more information contact Mary at:
phone (386) 375-8206.


News Briel


Williston cantata
The Williston Church of
God will be performing its
annual Christmas Cantata on
Saturday, Dec. 16 at 7 p.m.,
and Sunday morning, Dec.
17 at 10:45 a.m. The cantata,
"The Heart of Christmas,"
written and arranged by Mike
Speck, is a mixture of narra-
tion, a few carols and a vari-
ety of songs written specifi-
cally for this musical.
There will be a nursery
provided. The church is lo-
cated at 225 SE 4th St.
For further questions, you
can call the church office at
528-5982.

Book signing set
Karen Huxtable, librarian
at Bronson Public Library,
announces that Larry Cawley,
author of "Tears of the Civil
War," will be at the library to
sign his book, Thursday, Dec.
7, from 6-8 p.m.
The author says, "We will
take you on a journey that is
sometimes gruesome, often
unbelievable, and always
interesting and informative."
History buffs are urged
to come to this program for
author Cawley's remarks and
a chance to get a signed copy
of the book.

Basket auction set
Friends of the Williston
Library will hold its annual
holiday open house and
basket auction Saturday, Dec.
9 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
the library on Noble Avenue.
Silent bids will be received
on the baskets and proceeds
will assist in the purchase
of books, materials and
equipment for the library.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2006


Conmiunty CAendar








Thursday, Dec. 7
NWWII vets meet, Fanning Springs, 11:30 a.m.
NBook signing, Bronson, 6 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 8
> Christmas Parade, Williston, 6 p.m.
Fish Fry, Williston, 5 p.m.
> SVP auditions, Chiefland, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 9
l Basket auction, Williston, 10 a.m.
> Festival of Lights, Fanning Springs, 9 a.m.
SBoat Parade, Fanning Springs, 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 10
1 Toys for Tots fund-raiser, Bronson, 2 p.m.
S-Victorian holiday,Haile Plantation, noon
Thursday, Dec. 14
> Legislative delegation, Bronson, 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 16
~.Cantata,Williston Church of God, 7 p.m.
Detailed descriptions of these events are contained
elsewhere in the Levy County Journal.


Fetsival of Lights

slated for Saturday
Fanning Springs Festival of Lights is Saturday, Dec. 9.
There will be a classic car show in addition to the many
booths with food and gifts.
Mom and dad get can karoke while the kids do the bouncing
moonwalk or climbthe Rock Wall.
Santa will also be on hand to receive wish lists.
There are many great prizes to win, all donated by our local
merchants, so make sure you stop by the chamber booth and
get your tickets. There will be a drawing every hour for these
prizes and winners will be announced on the stage.
SAnd don't forget the rubber duck race and the boat parade
at 6:30 p.m.
There will be a $5per vehicle gate fee, up to eight people
per car, at the Fanning Springs State Park this yer..-.Handicap
parking only will be available at the \\ayside'"Park in the
evening for the boat parade.


itun~of Vanrons







J '.

-. ___; r1
,... ., .
14.. -r I'~-rl
RPA I J'
--~U~ .


SFanninS prings

Saturday December 9, 2006


Festival of Lights

& Boat Parade


9 am penng ereon
10amCh de3s arok


Santa in Santa Land
12 noon ipma cGg chad,

tDUCKY RACE 330PM b
DRAWINGS FOR GIFTS
(EVERY HOUR)
CLASSIC CAR SHOW 9AM- 3PM
(AWARDS@2PM)
GOOD FOOD,
ART & CRAFTS, RIDES,
ROCKWVALLL& GIANT~r InF!

Lighted Boat Parade
on the Suwmnnee RiverI


.- $O-i s .ft fe


beg~'ming at 6:3oPM "

Sponsored by Fanning' springs Chamber of Commerce,
Fanning Spnings State Pari, City of banning Springs,
Progress E-nerg9 and Pure Water Wildemess
Fanning Springs State Park
Faring 9:00am-9:00pm
$5.00 per car 463-9089 or 463-7919


Page 2


OREFLEICT1ot
A Patriotic Tribut.
m -


3-he Y'ienuma


" A rr"T'T T A "l'-re












LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


SRWMD will meet Tuesday

Meeting set in Live Oak
On Tuesday, Dec. 12 the Suwannee River Water
Management District's Governing Board will meet at 9 a.m.
at district headquarters, Hwy. 49 and 90 East, Live Oak.
The meeting is to consider district business and conduct
public hearings on regulatory and land acquisition matters. A
workshop will follow the governing board meeting.
All meetings, workshops, and hearings are open to the
public.


Fish fry benefits the needy

The Ladies Guild and the $6 and the child's price is There will be door prizes of
Fellowship Ministry of Holy $3. There are always take a free ticket to the following:
Family Church, Williston will outs available. This fund- fish fry meal and a drawiiig
have a fish fry at the church raiser is held to help people for an individual winner with
on Friday, Dec. 8 at 5 p.m. in our community with their a small gift in appreciation
The adult price will, be financial problems. for attending this dinner.



Book lovers should go west


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
WILLISTON-Booklovers,
take heart. A new store,
Always Books II in Williston,
carries an interesting, eclectic
selection of both fiction and
non-fiction.
The selection of books is
based on what the community
requests. Owner Georgia
Meyer, who runs the original
Always Books at Rainbow
Lake Estates in Dunnellon,
said, "Our customers always
let us know what to buy."
Patient browsers should
be able to find something
in any subject that interests
them-from novels both new
and classic to books for kids,
books on Florida's natural
history, home decorating
and repair, crafts, gardening,
cookbooks, military history,
health and fitness to study
guides.
Between the two stores,
Meyers stocks approximately
20,000 volumes. Nearly 8,000
of them are at the Williston
store. Their stock includes
both used and new books.
Some are rare or old volumes.
"I recently sold a first edition
of a Mark Twain," Meyer
said. It was a special edition,
leather-bound."
Meyer collects as well as
sells books. She had hoped
to keep one old book she had
purchased, a poetry collection
by Sir Walter Scott, until one
of her customers spied it.
"A gentleman came in and
asked about it. Since I wanted
to keep it I asked more money
than I thought he would want
to pay. He bought it anyway.
So I lost that beautiful leather-
bound book."
Always Books II is run
by Lori Pick-Shaffer. Meyer
says, "She's very outgoing.
She knows the community
and she's never met a stranger.
I've got the book expertise,
and Lori's great with the
people."


Got a
news tip?
Call Carolyn
at 490-4462-


Of her job, Pick-Shaffer
says simply, "It's my dream
come true. Georgia's a great
boss. We even share the
same birthday--Jan. 29."
Pick-Shaffer held a banking
position before. managing
Always Books II.
Meyer said, "We are
happy to be in Williston, and
we hope we can make the
community proud. of us. We
will gradually increase our
collection. We've got several
more shelves to put in for
children's books and for adult
nonfiction."
The books are a family
affair-Meyer's husband
built all the shelves to hold
the books. Books also line
the hallways and front rooms
of the, Meyers' home, for it is
their house that serves as the
original bookstore.
"We've had our store 12
years. I feel fortunate to have


had it that long, since we've
seen so many businesses
come and go in this time,"
said Meyer.
As a career librarian,
Meyer is ready to help with
book searches and advice for
that hard-to-please reader.
"We also take call-in orders,
and do offer discounts on
new books."
If you would like to trade
some of your books for those
you haven't read, call Always
Books. Meyer is interested in
buying non-fictionbooks fall
varieties, from transportation
to military history, newer
business books, natural
history, the. arts and some
biographies.
Always Books II is located
on Main Street across from
city hall and is open Monday
through Friday from 9:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Their hours
on Saturday run from 9:30
to 2:30.


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan
STORE MANAGER LORI Pick-Shaffer takes a mo-
ment to relax with the characters in one of the
shop's many books.


P/




IIIE ClOUJTTV PAPIi ESIT. 12co ,L
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state .......... .... .... $22
Out of state ......................... $27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadlinefor all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


Keep on Flushing

F A&M
Plumbing Enterprises Inc.

Remodel, Re-Pipe, New Construction,
Mobile Home Hook-Ups and Water Heaters.
Serving the Tri-County area.


Bronson (352)486-3509.


Did you know that virtually all adults believe a smile Is an important
social asset? An array of options are available from AACD member dentists
to give you the smile you have always desired.
For your smile consultation, contact:
Robert E. Mount, Jr., DDS PA
Offering Cosmetic Dentistry that
Makes You Proud of Your Smile!
TMJ Evaluation & Treatment Zoom Bleaching
One Appointment Crowns Preventive Dentistry
Most Insurance Accepted New Patients Welcome!
110 E. Park Avenue, Chiefland (352) 493-1416


Remember to have a
designated driver when
attending holiday parties.


Page 3


History book

deadline hears


The deadline for inclu-
sion in Drollene Brown's
book, Levy County: Voices
from the Past is Dec. 15.
Don't miss your turn to
tell your family's stories.










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


YOUR VIEW


Reader blasts newspaper

To the editor:
I write with concern about the undisguised bias of your
"news" articles and "reporting" of county issues. The cur-
rent edition, November 30, 2006, is the finest example of
fawning and toadyism I have seen in some time.
SYour special edition pictorial of the "Davis family"
politicians did a great job of white washing the fact that the
school board has "miscalculated" the number of students
thereby necessitating a loan of 2.250 million dollars at a cost
of1 00,000.
Somehow the fact that 114 students not enrolling in the
school system could end up costing close to 20,000. per
student plus the cost of borrowing the funds!
In addition to a sorry job of overseeing the finances, the
Board will now give itself a raise of 1,000. in annual salary
.fr attending how many meetings per month?
'In the real world this type of inept performance would be
rewarded with termination, but in the very special land of
Levy county it is rewarded with a pay increase.
Contrary to what can only be your impression, the read-
ing public is not all on medication of some sort. The idea
that you call yourselves reporters or worse yet journalists is
astounding.
It appears that your talents for writing lean more elo-
qiuently to the location, preparation and consumption of any
type of food and should be pursued instead of attempts at
factual reporting.
Eve B. Jensen
Cedar Key


Citizens of Williston unite
To the editor:
SI am writing this letter and asking for the citizens of
Williston to Unite. We are faced with a ongoing problem that
his been festering in this community for quite some time
nrw. No its not rape, drugs, speed, or even home invasion.
Its improper turn signals, window tint, cracked windshields,
atr pressure in tires to low, blown tag lights, muffler to loud,
e t.....These violations of the law have overwhelmed our
lqcal law enforcement and I am calling on the good hearted
citizens of Williston to help put a stop to it. These law
breakers are changing what was once a loving community.
Imagine driving next to a individual whose windshield was
cracked or Tag light blown. Do you realize how dangerous
tiis, is to the other drivers on the road.
I am suggesting that the citizens of this community take
charge of the roads and when you see and individuaLwho's
tillight is out-or they do not use a turn signal or any menial
infraction that you safely ask them'fto pull over and wait
v1hile you contact the Chief of Police Dan Davis and have
him send one of his crack police officers over and write a
citation and sniff the vehicle for contraband. We can not
14t this type of offense gi unpunished. I am asking for this
favor as a result of the overload of our current police force
i4 apprehending our young high school children. They have
dbne such an outstanding job in hiding and laying in wait
like a jackal pouncing on young prey. Further more I want'
t4 commend officers Fred Morris and Officer Stewart in
tlneir passionate pursuit of the local gang "Williston Boys"
(4 group of southern redneck fun loving kids) and their
enforcement of the heinous crimes of blinker, tint, mufflers,
e.t... .They have successfully written enough tickets to
got one young man's license suspended and the other with
enough points to get suspended. If you see these fine officers
oti the street thank them for there diligence in taking these 2
fite young boys off the streets of Williston. You won't have
tq worry about that cracked windshield or loud tail pipe or
npt using that turnsignal anymore from either of these two
"Williston Boys". License Revoked.... Forever!!
:As a sign of my compassion of these crimes I placed
rqyself under citizen's arrest today for driving around with
a racked windshield. I almost handcuffed, arrested and
hitchhiked to the county jail for this wicked offense to be
processed.
Luckily I gave myself a break and let myself off with a
warning. And a promise to get it fixed.
:I can only hope that my.diligence in this matter will make
me a better person, that is if I live long enough!
Glenn Harris


Quote of the Week
: The most wasted day of all is that
during which we have not laughed."
-Sebastian R. N. Chamfort


Our Mission
The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
.*reflect our community in everything we do.
*provide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
record d the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
* promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
*promote readership of advertising thereby fostering a
healthy economic environment.


,'"Copyrighted Material

-Syndicated Content /

Available from Commercial News Providers"



Ano ,, I


S a


'Tis the season to go broke


know I have just a
bit of Scrooge living
in me. So Christmas,
with its cloyingly
sweet songs, excessive
gift giving and weight of
expectations, often finds me
short on holiday spirit. *
I blame Scrooge for more
than my ho-hum Christmas
attitude, although his ideas
come to the forefront at this
time of year. Scrooge tells
me someone else is trying
to control my emotions
when I'm standing in line
at an amusement park.
He screams when I hear
a particularly sappy song
about love or guilt on the
radio, or when I'm reading
those little sentimental email
messages from well-meaning
iai3quaiktances. vv ,-;, -
You know the ones I'm
talking about-they'tale
forever to download, and
when you finally can open
the message you get cutesy
little poems with smiley
faces all over them and a
toe-tapping jingle in the
background. They begin
with the subject line, "Send
this back to me puhleeze..."
Then comes the message: "If
you love me half as much
as I love you, you will say
a blessing and send this to
100 of your very best friends
and the one who sent this
to you." Such messages
often end with a threat-"if
you don't send this within
10 minutes of reading it,
you will forever know
only doom and gloom and


disappointment."
Every year I get presents
from people I don't know
very well. They are almost
always things I would
never use.
Painted
tin cans
hanging
on a string
with a sign
at the top
that says
"redneck
wind CASSIE-IOURSNIGI
wind
chimes." Columnist
chimes I
Rag riugs
made of every color found
on earth except those I use
in my house. Little brass
miniature decorations with
so many intricate parts that
they defy any attempt at.



I Point


hopelessly out of sync with
my country casual style.
My former boss once used
the term "gifts wrapped in

because I've received so
many over the years.
I don't buy many gifts.
I try to remain immune
to the annual season of
praise be to conspicuous
consumerism that begins
the day after Thanksgiving,
so-called Black Friday. Yes,
it is hard. We are assaulted
on all fronts with the buy
silly campaign--even the


morning news anchors sing
a measured advertisement
cadence, enticing shoppers to
spend, spend, spend.
Black Friday is a weird
term and one of the most
singularly appropriate
names I have ever heard.
After all, it's used to mark
the beginning of a buying
frenzy. It may bring retailers
the desired black as opposed
to red ink, but how often
does all that buying bring
anything but more debt for
the masses?
I know because I've been
there. The year I first drew
what I then thought of as
a middle class salary, I too
rushed out and bought gifts
for everybody I could think
of.. I bought all that stuff
on credit. My credit card
balances were so high it took
Sme three years to pay off
Isix weeks of shopping for
I foolish treasures.
That's why I now tap my
toe to John Lennon's song
during the annual Christmas
shopping season: Imagine
no possessions; I wonder if
you can; No need for greed
or hunger, a brotherhood of
man; imagine all the people,
sharing all the world...
I find life with relatively
few possessions and limited
obligations to be simple and
serene. Just the way I like it.
Cassie Journigan
is a reporter for
this newspaper. She
may be reached at
cjournigan@levyjournal.
com


Adopt a Katrina family this Christmas


J ust because Hurricane
Katrina hit so many
months ago, doesn't
mean it's not still impacting
the lives of many American
families, especially during
the holiday season.
Businesses, families, orga-
nizations, and individuals are
being invited to share their
holiday spirit with families
still struggling with the hard-
ships caused by Hurricane
Katrina through an online


program that matches people
with families still in desper-
ate need.
Would-be donors can visit
www.adopt-a-katrina-fam-
ily.com on the Internet to be
electronically matched with
families and given their wish
lists which include such ba-
sic needs as blankets, school
supplies, dishes, baby food
or cleaning supplies.
Toy donations also are be-
ing accepted to help brighten
up bleak holidays for these
families.
The Adopt-a-Katrina-
Family Project's Web site is
helping meet the needs of
Katrina. survivors without
hassles or long lines. The
site instantaneously matches
a donor's goodwill with a
family's immediate need.
The concept for adopt-a-
katrina-family.com is simple:
one family helping another.
Those who wish to offer
assistance, as well as those in
need, can simply register on
the Web site. The site easily
matches the requests made
by Katrina survivors with
an appropriate donor, then
facilitates contact between
the two.
The Adont-a-Katrina-Fam-


ily Project also follows-up
with both parties to ensure
the match is working and the
needs are being met.
Ten days after Katrina
struck, California business-
man Mark McLaughlin
commissioned and funded
the Adopt-a-Katrina-Family
Project because, like most
Americans, he was frustrated
that help was not reaching
those in need.
The site also serves up
personal stories from survi-
vors. "Some of the requests
we've received are heart-
breaking," says McLaughlin.
"We have survivors who are
in need of items as small
as cleaning supplies, baby
formula or school supplies.
They just need to get back
on their feet, and most of
them are not in a position to
wait for other help to come
through. This site makes
it possible to help people
today."
A list of online suppliers
is posted on the Web site
to assist donors with easily
filling a family's needs. For
more information visit www.
adopt-a-katrina-family.com
on the Internet.


Who We Are
Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner


Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath
Staff Writers
Cassie Joumigan
Neal Fisher

Sales Representative/Bronson
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell
Delivery/Clerical
Rhonda Griffiths


If I agreed

with you,

we'd both be

wrong, right?

love Christmas. I love
all things associated
with Christmas. I ea-
gerly anticipate the holiday
even when I know there will
be nothing under the tree-
like right now.
That's because Christmas
is more
than.parties
and shop-
ping and
presents
we'll never
use.
Christ-
mas is a
f g CAROLYN RISNER
feeling, an
attitude.
Unlike my co-worker there
to the left, I get wrapped up
in the season.
My cards are written and
addressed waiting for Dec. 1
to mail. I send a plethora of
cards-even to people I see
every day. Why? Because we
all enjoy faking something
out of our mailboxes that's
not a bill and reminds us that
we crossed someone's mind.
I buy gifts for close
friends-and occasionally an
acquaintance, just because I
saw something that brought
their face to mind and I
wanted them to know they
are remembered and loved.
In Bealls the other day, I
saw a leather purse that said,
"Pat-
ty he Counterpoint
lovesrb
this
time of year." It was clear-
anced at $2. l .bughi it
and mailed itto a former
co-worker; Patty, because it
brought her to mind. Postage
was $4. It was the best $6
spent because Patty wrote
me a lovely note that said
receiving the unexpected
made an otherwise bad day
tolerable.
That's what Christmas
gift-giving is for me. I de-
light more in what I choose
for others than what I receive
because I know that the gifts
I give, whether $5 or $500,
are given with love and
thought.
Like Cassie, I have my
share of strange and unusual
presents (a metal chicken
and a feather boa-covered
lamp aiong them) and
rather than gripe about them,
I feel special that someone
took the time tobuy a gift,


thinking of me. Surely that
counts for something?
I don't charge. I pay as I
go and I shop all year-look-
ing and waiting for the one
thing I know someone will
enjoy.
Black Friday is just
another day because it's not
worth it to fight the masses
to save a few bucks. My time
is more valuable than that.
I adore the get-togethers,
the baking I start right after
Thanksgiving and wrestling
with the lights that somehow
got tangled even though they
weren't when you put them
up last year.
It's tradition. And comfort.
It's about acknowledging
the good in others and look-
ing for it in yourself.
It's about sacrifice and
selflessness this time of the
year more than any other.
Who among us has not gone
without so our child could


have that special toy? And
wasn't the smile on his face
worth it?
So thank you very much,
Cassie, I'll take Christmas
and all its hurriedness and
expense. I'll even take the
See Carolyn Page 5


Page 4


L Y COUNTY JOUR L
E C COUNTY PAPER EST.- 192


___ .









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


This Week's Arrests


The Levy County Sheriff's
Office reports the. following
arrests for:
Justin M. Schreppel,
15, of Chiefland was arrested
for burglary dwelling
structure or conv. armed,
larceny over $300 under
$20,000 and accessory after
the fact. Bail was set at
$22,500.
David Scott Sinhom,
15, of Chiefland was arrested
for burglary dwelling
structure armed and larceny
over $300 under $20,000.
Bail was set at $15,000.
Susan Frances
Kornhaber, 42, of Dunnellon
was arrested for 2 counts of
domestic battery. Bail was set
at $5,000.
S Todd Jason
McMillan, 23, of Chiefland
was arrested for aggravated
battery. Bail was set at
$10,000.
Roderick L. Dawson,
26, of Cross City was arrested
for domestic battery. Bail was
set at $5,000.
Thomas B. Whitt, 22,
of Morriston was arrested for
domestic battery. Bail was set
at $2,500.
Klaytin Adams, 27,
of Chiefland was arrested for


domestic battery. Bail was set
at $3,500.
Julian Saunders,
45, of Inglis was arrested
for failure to appear (FTA)
battery. Bail was set at
$5,000.
Teresa Elmarie
Childs, 21, of Williston was
arrested for sale of crack
cocaine, possession of crack
cocaine and resisting arrest
without violence. Bail was
set at $14,000.
Jeanette Louise
Marks, 45, of Archer was
arrested for two counts of
violation of probation (VOP)
- possession of controlled
substance (Alachua). No
bond was set.
Amanda Kay Harvey,
23, of Newberry was arrested
'for FTA fraud insufficient
funds under $150. She
was released on .her own
recognizance.
Mary E. Watkins, 25,
of Chiefland was arrested for
FTA for compliAnce. Bond
was set at $277.50.
Levi Holder, 21,
of Morriston was arrested
for FTA larceny petit of
gasoline. Bail was set at
$5,000.
ChaCha Thretta


Latson (Harris), 41, of
Williston was arrested for
VOP- larceny theft $300 less
than $5,000. Bail was set at
$10,000.
Darrell Lance
Urquhart, 29, of Williston
was arrested for 2 counts VOP
- possession of cocaine, sale
of cocaine and FTA battery.
Bail was set at $10,000.
John Paul Jones, 33,
of Chiefland was arrested
for cultivation of marijuana,
possession firearm during
commission of felony,
possession of marijuana less
than 20 grams and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bail
was set at $9,500.
Gary Allen Schott,
44, of Inglis was arrested for
larceny $300 less than $5,000.
Bail was set at $10,000.
Kelly Ray Sexton,
Jr., 22, of Ocala was arrested
for FTA no motor vehicle
registration, non resident tag
exemption not allowed and
violation of drivers license
restrictions. Bail was set at
$10,000.
Kenneth Alton Ash,
38, of Bronson was arrested
for DWLSR. Bail was set at
$1,000.
Casey Buesing, 22,


~ -~ I~
J ~~5 ~~ t
Lth X* _lr\ BI~
a I~i~D
.ih di i^
*S~d2
9 ':f; ?` ~.*
pi P 16 51
~ i~ 5* ;r
~ u .


: h kr


Secondhand smoke contains deadly gases like hydrogen cyanide that can
be especially harmful to your kids sweet kids Don't pass gas. Takeit outside. If
Dontpassgas.org 1 888-NO-PASS-GAS .- ..u.w.,-,


of Cedar Key was arrested for
VOP 2 counts of possession
L/T 20 grams. Bail was set at
$570.
Kathryn J. Bailey, 20,
of Cedar Key was arrested
for VOP possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bail was set at
$367.50.
Carlos Alonso, 28,
of Ocala was arrested for no
valid driver's license; Bail
was set at $500.
Calvin Jerard
Preston, 21, of Hawthorne
was arrested for permitting
unauthorized operator
to drive, possession of
paraphernalia and possession
of L/T 20 grams cannabis.
Bail was set at $4,500.
William C. Munk, 19,
of Bronson was arrested for
flee and attempt to elude and
no motor vehicle registration.
Bail was set at $2,000.
Rodriquez Vintrell
Brown, 35, of Williston was
arrested for a Marion County
warrant. Bail was set at
$910.00.


The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
Kristopher R:
Butcher, 18, of Williston was
arrested for no motorcycle
endorsement.
Garrett F. Wheeler,
20, of Morriston was
cocaine, possession of
crack cocaine with intent


to distribute, possession of
cannabis less than (L/T) 20
grams and driving while
license suspended or revoked
(DWLSR) with knowledge.

Jose Merced-Roque,
27, of Bronson was arrested
for driving under the influence
(DUI).


Toys for Tots fund-raiser set

The Tri-County Marine Corps League 1018 is sponsoring
a Toys for Tots Fund-raiser this Sunday, Dec. 10 at Cole's 4
Comers beginning at 2 p.m.
There will be two bands performing, a buffet, raffles, ddor
prizes and more. Please join the League and bring new ahd
unwrapped toys for the children. For more information call
Trudy at 215-4818 or Lonnie at 283-0635.



MCarOlyn Continued from page,4

unstylish Muu-Muu that one of your close friends gave you.
And watch out, Cassie. Santa may not visit you and all
your Scroogeness, but I know where you live and boy do I
have a surprise for you!


Meet the Press



Rhonda Griffiths
Delivery/Clerical
Original Hometown:
Baltimore, Md.


Why Levy County?
We searched for a year online until
we found a Realtor who would take
our move seriously. Within 38 hours
we were in Florida looking all around
for eight hours to eventually land
in Levy County and this is where
my husband and Lfound.our dream
property.

Why the newspaper?
The ad wanted a delivery person t_,
and since I am a people person it
only seemed to make sense.

What role do you feel the Levy
County Journal plays in the community?
It provides detail on events going on in the area whether it is local government or the
community. Coming from a big city I think the fact that it covers all of the high school sports
and events is a wonderful part of the paper.

What is your favorite part of the Levy County Journal?
The Land Transactions and the weekly arrests.

What do you like about living in Levy County?
The rural atmosphere, it fascinates me that in order to go to Wal-Mart I have to drive
'25 miles, I love it!

What is the biggest risk you have taken?
Well, really there are,two (1) Moving to Florida and (2) When I was 20 years old, I
wanted to go bungee jumping and as you can see it went well and even though I
loved it and would do it again, I don't recommend it.

What is the best advice you've been given?
You can be your own worst enemy.

What are three things you tell people about yourself?
I enjoy real estate and all that it encompasses. That I am a fan of Shakespeare so
much so that I took a summer college semester just about Shakespeare and his
writings. You will always know where you stand with me.

What is:

The last movie you've seen?
At the movie theatre it was The Guardian and on DVD it was Cars.
The last book you read?
Currently I am in the middle of Iris Johansen'sFace of Deception but, the
last completed novel was Iris Johansen's Body of Lies.
The one TV show you can't miss?
Only one hmm... well it would have to be NCIS.




L CY COUNTY JOURL
L .-E COUNTY PAPER EST. 1 92 -


I M


Ashley, Mandy Raye Campanile, Joseph Wiley Davis, Shelena Garrison Davis, Walter E. Moore, James Dennis Sanders, Varsell
Williston W/F Morriston W/M Chiefland B/F AKA Suitor, David Old Town W/M DOB: 05-10-1950 Williston B/ DOB: 04-02-1985
DOB: 12-02-1979 DOB: 09-10-1980 DOB: 02-05-1977 Chiefland W/M DOB: 11-26-1944 FTA Possession Marijuana with FTA Possession Marijuana
FTA DWLSR Knowingly FTA DWLR for HTO VOP Possession Cocaine Fraud Impersonation, Giving Intent to Sell/Manuf./Deliver & Less Than 20 Gms
$5,000 Bond $5,000 Bond $10,000 Bond False Name on DL $5,000 Bond Possesion Greater Than 20 Gms $5,000 Bond
Bond $22,500
Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having any information about the above individuals is asked to please contact the Levy County Sheriffs Office at 352-486-5111 or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477


Page 5


: ~
~
; :
r. .' ~ .
: I L


;
.r


; 1
r ~ ; ''









Pane 6


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Montine Birdsey
Montine W. Birdsey, 79, ofAlachua died Nov. 27, 2006 in
Venice.
Mrs. Birdsey was a retired business owner in the live bait
industry.
She was preceded in death by her husband, David O.
Birdsey.
Survivors include her son, Monty G. Birdsey ofEnglewood;
son, Lamar Birdsey of High Springs, daughter, Cindy Birdsey
of Miami and son Tim Birdsey of Port Charlotte, four
grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Services were Dec.l at the Cedar Key United Methodist
Church. Burial followed at the Cedar Key Cemetery.
Expressions of sympathy may be expressed with flowers
or a contribution in memory of Mrs. Birdsey to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation. 8382 Baymeadows Road, Suite 9,
Jacksonville, FL 32256.
Arrangements were under the care ofHiers-Baxley Funeral
Services, Chiefland.

Barbara Jean Carpenter
Barbara Jean Carpenter, 70, of Chiefland, died Nov. 30,
2006 in Chiefland.
She was born in Flint, Mich. and came to this area eight
years ago from West Branch, Mich. She was an EMT Special-
ist and a Methodist.
Ms. Carpenter is survived by Joseph C. Johns, of Chief-
land; sons Paul James Reed and Clifford Frank Reed, both
of Gladwin, Mich.; daughters Vera Lynn O'Rourke of Pewa-
mo, Mich. and Jeanie Mae Gordon of Gladwin Mich.; seven
grand-children and five great-grandchildren.
Funeral arrangements were under the care of Knauff Fu-
neral Home, Chiefland.

Jack Doefler
Jack Arthur Doefler, 82, of Cedar Key, FL died in Cedar
Key op Nov. 26, 2006.
Born in Ft. Wayne, Ind., he 'moed to Cedar Key from
Ft. WAyne in 1983. M. Dorfler graduated from the Rose
Hullman Engineering School in Terre Haute, Ind. with an
electrical degree.
A construction engineer, he retired from Hagerman
Construction Co. in Ft. Wayne, Ind. after 31 years.
He is preceded in death by his first wife, Mary Dickinsen
Dorfler.
He is survived by his wife; Shirley A. Dorfler of Cedar
Key; daughter Anne Dorfler of Naples and grandson, Thomas
Dorfler Downing f Palm Bay.
Arrangements were under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral
Services, Chiefland.
r
James Dyals
James Timothy Dyals, 34, of Old Town died Friday, Dec.l,
2006 as the result of an accident.
Mr. Dyals was a lifetime resident of Dixie County and a
member of the Central Baptist Church in Cross City.
He is survived by his parents, Danny and Judy Dyals of Old
Town and many uncles, aunts, cousins and friends. He was
preceded in death by his brother, Humperdink.
Funeral services were held Dec. at the Rick Gooding Fu-.
neral Home with the Rev. David Downing officiating. Burial
followed at the Old Town Cemetery.
Arrangements were under the care of the Rick Gooding Fu-
neral Home, Cross City.

Zeno Godfrey Hatcher
Zeno Godfrey Hatcher, 89, of Homosassa died Tuesday,
Nov. 28, 2006 at Hospice of Citrus County, Inverness.
Mr. Hatcher was born in Groveland and came to Homosassa
from Horseshoe Beach. He was a real estate agent, and had
served in the US Navy during WWII, the
Korean and Vietnam wars.
He was a member of St. John the Evangqlist
Catholic Church. He enjoyed'fishing and deer
hunting and will be remembered as Marie's
Man.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Marie
Hatcher.
Survivors include a sister, Eunice Christie of
Navarre; a close friend of 40 years, Gladys Knapp of Lake
Panasofkee; and numerous nephews and nieces.
Services for Mr. Hatcher were held Dec. 4 at Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell. In lieu of flowers the family
asks that donations be made to Hospice of Citrus County.
Arrangements were under the care of Knauff Funeral
Home.

Inez Hemphill
Inez Penny Hemphill, 96, of 246 NE llth St., Williston,
died Monday, Nov. 27, 2006, at her residence. Services for the
homemaker were held Dec.2 at Unity Temple of Deliverance
Outreach Center, Williston, where the Rev. Willie Alvernon
Battles is pastor/officiant. The Rev. Mack Edwards delivered
the eulogy. Burial followed at the Saint Joseph Cemetery,
Archer.
Arrangements were under the care of Duncan Brothers'
Funeral Home, Gainesville.


OBITUARIES


Elsie Herriott
Elsie Pauline Herriott, 95, of Meredith, N.H. died Saturday,
Sept. 9, 2006, in Meredith, N.H.
Mrs. Herriott was born in St. Louis, Mo. on December 2,
1910. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert R.
Herriott, in 1975 and her daughter, Jeanne Wittenberg, in
1993.
Mrs. Herriott moved to Gainesville in 1962 from Pekin, Ill.
and lived there until November 2005. Mrs. Herriott and her
husbandjoined the Peace Corps in 1972 and went to Botswana,
Africa to serve. After her husband's death, she returned to
Africa in 1977 and worked there until 1980. She lived a long
and interesting life, including working as a bookkeeper, until
she was 89 years old. In 1988, Mrs. Herriott received an.award
from the Florida Department of Labor titled "You're Still
Ticking", for her ability to still be employed and contributing
to the working world.
She is survived by one son, Mark Herriott, of Trenton
and three daughters, Julie' Carter of Bristol, N.H., Roberta
Elkins, of Newberry and Pat Kollar of Tucson, Ariz., five
grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.
A memorial service was held Dec. 2. In lieu of flowers,
please send memorial gifts to Missionary Ventures,
International/Africa Ministries, P. O. Box 593550, Orlando,
FL 32859-3550. Please designate the gift in memory of Elsie
P. Herriott with acknowledgement to Roberta Elkins, 306 SW
127th Street, Newberry, FL 32669.

SCorey Knappins
Corey Thane Knappins, 18, of Williston, died Nov. 29,
2006 in Williston.
He moved here from Hudson 10 years ago. He worked as a
cow hand with Thomas Cattle Co. He was a senior at Williston
High School, a member of FFA and the Honor Society and
was taking college courses. He loved animals and loved to
listen to music.
He is survived by his father Jeff Knappins, Williston;
brother Christian Knappins, Williston; paternal grandparents
Edwin and Janice Knappins, Hudson; maternal grandfather
Claude James Valentine II, Leesburg,; maternal grandmother
Lois VanMarum and many aunts and uncles.
Funeral services will be held at the Corer Stone Assembly
of God Church Williston Saturday, Dec. 9, at 1:30 p.m.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


He was preceded in death by parents, William and Mary
Redmond, and a sister, Betty Hicks.
Memorial services were held Dec. 3 at Ellzey Methodist
Church. Expressions of sympathy can be made to Ellzey '
Church Building Fund, PO Box 25, Otter Creek, FL 32683,
or VFW Post, PO Box 409, Chiefland, FL 32644.
Arrangements were under the care of Heirs-Baxley Funeral 4
Services, Chiefland,

Cody Roberts
Cody Wayne Roberts, 17, of Williston, died Nov.29, 2006,
in Williston.
Cody was a life-long resident of Williston. He was born on
May 17, 1989 in Ocala. He worked for Thomas Cattle Co and
was a senior at Williston High School where he was a member
of FFA, on the Homecoming Court, voted most attractive in
his class and was a founding member of the Williston Boys.
He loved hanging out with his friends and was very much into
trucks.
He is survived by his mother, Lori Denise Munden and step-
father, Danny Munden, Williston; brothers, Justin Staicil,
Dunnellon and Garret Munden, Williston; sister, Ashley '
Munden, Williston; paternal grandparents, Pam and Wayne
Adams, Anderson, S.C. and maternal grandparents, Marti and
Gary Woodard.
He was preceded in death by his father, John Edwards
Roberts.
Funeral services were held Dec. 3 at the Thomas Cattle Co.
Interment followed at Orange Hill Cemetery. Arrangements
were under the care of Knauff Funeral Home, Williston.

Clementine Smith
Clementine Le Count Smith, 91, of Archer died Nov. 27,
2006 at her home. Mrs. Smith was born in Lukens (near Cedar
Key) and moved to Archer in 1945. : .
She wae a member of Archer First Baptist Church, a 64- :
year member of Eastern Star Chapter 138 in Archer. She :'
enjoyed growing flowers and crocheting.
Survivors include a daughter, Eleanor L. Downing, and

her husband, Sam of Inglis; sister, Mary Elizabeth Pooser ;I
Smith; grandchildren, Lane Downing and wife, Renee,of Old d
Town; Donna McClelland and husband, Roy of Homosassa;
Deana Tumlin and husband, Thomas 'of Old Town; Troy
Smith and wife, Sherilyn of Archer; Travis Smith and wife, '


Carolyn Long Tally of Cleveland, Tenn.; Tracey Smith and wife, Debbie .-
Mrs. Carolyn S. Long, 59, of Williston died Nov. 28, 2006 of Fort White; Tresha Langford and husband, Bill of Orange
at Haven Hospice in Chiefland. She was a retired'nursing Park and Tara Sauls of Williston, 26 great-grandchildren and
instructor at S.F.C.C. She was very active in community three great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death
service, served on the Methodist Church board, pastor/ by husband, Russell H. Smith; son, Lloyd Jackson-"Buddy' '
parish committee and former church secretary, was a nursing Smith; brothers, Joseph A. Pooser and Lloyd A. Pooser; sister
instructor at S.F.C.C, and was a member of the Woman's Jacqueline Eatman.
Club. She received the State of Florida Nursing Instructor of ,
the Year award in 2002. She was also a member of the nursing Allen Soncrant
sorority Sigma Theta Tau. Allen Earl Soncrant, 67, of Chiefland, died Dec. 1, 2006 at
A member of the First Methodist Church of Williston, home.
she received her ASN Degree from C.F.C.C., her bachelor's Mr.' Soncrant was a retired truck driver for White
degree from FTU and her m, 's degreSaty,--l YL4heo(onstru~tioat < i iBgj cu ., c -' .llu
family, grandchildivwarymmIh. She,also n4oedthe theeiatt ,r.Borr Br-fi'Bff6, ( fhie'#%e "f~-26t8i ffM l ?lr975. fe'
traveling and the 20Q6.Ga4orBasketball Team. had a greart-s'se of'hlifuit ai'' fijo.yeti, fi ~tlig and':
She is survive~by her mother Viola Smith, Williston; football. His family came first, enjoyed"school functions and
husband 'Bernard E. Long, Williston; daughters Penelope activities with the children.-He' enjoyed
(Kennedy) Boyer, Williston; Jennifer (Brian) Thompson, going on cruises with.his wife, Mary Ann. '
Gainesville; step-daughters Wendy Welch, Orlando, Christina He enjoyed animals and pets. ;
Haynes, Orlando; sister Cathy Hitchcock (Alan), Alachua; He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann i
brothers Donald (Connie) Smith, Winter Haven; Michael Soncrant, Chiefland, son and daughter-in-
(Cindy) Smith, Williston. A memorial service was held at law, Reggie "Buddy" and Dawn Fletcher
the First Methodist Church of Williston Nov. 30 with Pastor of Wellington, Nev.; daughter and son- q
David Paul officiating. in-law, Ginger and William Wheeler of !
Cedar Key; daughter, Angela Fletcher of
Christopher K. Maruna Ocala; daughter and son-in-law, Katherine
Christopher K. Maruna, 47, died in Chiefland. Mr. Maruna "Suzie" and Steven Taylor of Bronson;
was born in Washington, D.C. and moved to Chiefland in daughter and son-in-law Cathy and Tony Fuleky of Toledo,
2000 from Grass Valley, Calif. Ohio; Sally Thompson, sister of Genoa, Ohio; Gary Soncrant, -
He was preceded in death by his mother, Grace L. Maru- brother of Rossford, Ohio; Darlene Wolf, niece of Chiefland;
na. many nephews and nieces and 10 grandchildren.. :
He is survived by his father and stepmother, Arthur D. and He was preceded in death by parents, Clinton and Loretta ',
Arlene Maruna of Chiefland; two brothers, Michael D. Maru- Soncrant, sisters, Nadine Durrance, Nancy Toth, Bonnie J
na of Largo and David C. Maruna and sister-in-law Debbie Wetzel, Jackie Thompson and Max Soncrant and brother,
Maruna, of Orlando; two nephews, Time Maruna and Josh Clinton Soncrant Jr.
Maruna, both of Orlando. Expressions of sympathy may be made to Levy County
Arrangements were under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral Humane Society PO Box 678 Bronson, FL 32621
Services, Chiefland. Arrangments were under the direction of Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services, Chiefland.


Daryl Polk
Daryl W. Polk, 84, of Bell, a glass cutter, died Nov 25, 2006
at North Florida Regional Medical Center.
He was a member of Mt. Horab Baptist Church and a
member of Hillsborough Masonic Lodge #25 in Tampa.
He is survived by his loving family and friends.
Funeral services were held Nov. 29, at Watson Funeral
Home Chapel, Trenton with Pastor Randy Peters conducting
the services. A Masonic graveside service followed at Day
Cemetery
Arrangements were under the care of Watson Funeral
Home, Trenton.

William Redmond
William "Dwight" Redmond, 76, of Chiefland, died at the
VA Medical Center Nov. 30, 2006.
Mr. Redmond was a retired consultant for the seafood
industry, also serving as seafood representative
Sin Venezuela, and being honored with being
'recognized as Don Dwight Redmond.
He was an AP Player of the Week, University
of Tulsa and an avid football fan. He graduated
from Lakeland High School and Florida
Southern College, with a business degree. He
was a member of the Gulf Hammock Hunting
Club, VFW Men's Auxiliary. He served in the
U.S. Army.
Survivors include his wife, Carolyn of Chiefland; Walter
and Debra Redmond, son and daughter-in-law of Beverly
Hills; Robin and Karen Redmond, son and daughter-in-law
of Kingston Springs, Tenn.; Keith and Amie Brink, son and
daughter-in-law of Lady Lake; Layne Redmond of Florida,
daughter; Susan Redmond, daughter, of Bradenton; Kim
and Danny Pate, daughter and son- in-law of Salt Lake City,
Utah; Hank Hicks, brother-in-law of North Carolina; and nine
grandchildren.




4


Buford Williams Jr.
Buford Cleveland "Junior" Williams, Jr., 62, ofArcher, died
Tuesday, Nov. 28,2006 in Shands at UF, Gainesville. Retired
cable splicer for Bell South, he was a native of Bainbridge,
Ga. and moved to Archer from Gainesville six years ago. He
was a member of the Communications Workers of America
Union, Pioneers of America, Gainesville Bowling and he was
of the Baptist faith.
He is survived by his wife, Catherine "Cathy" Pyne
Williams, Archer; sons, Scott Williams, Hawthorne and
Tommy Williams, Gainesville; daughters Tammy Kosinski
and Cheryl Zingaro, both of Archer; brothers, George
Williams, Bronson, Bobby Williams, Groveland, Butch
Williams, West Palm Beach, Richard Williams, Bronson;
sisters Mary Jones, Gulfport, Miss., Clara Schwitzer, Dallas,
Texas, Miriam Moon, Scotland, Ga., Ann King, Bronson, and
Barbara Sellers, Bainbridge, Ga.; grandchildren Kari Wells,
Krystina Williams, Heather Williams, Scott James Williams,
Jr., Lynsey Rowlands, Cody Rowlands, Kyle Kosinski,
Trent Kosinski, Keeli Zingaro and Kenzli Zingaro; great-
granddaughter Erika Wells and numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Dec. 1 at Forest Meadows Funeral
Home Chapel, with Bro. Keith Turner and the Rev. Russell
Woodard officiating. Burial followed at Forest Meadows
Memorial Park-West, Gainesville.
In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the kidney
research department, Shands at UF, Gainesville, FL 32610.
Arrangements were under the care of Moring Funeral
Home, Melrose.
More Obituaries on page 7
R. a "I
:....









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Faircloth finds a first at WES


BY LISA STATHAM POSTERARO
SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL
WILLISTON-Fifth
grader Noah Faircloth took
the first place medallion at
the school-wide Tropicana
sponsored-speech contest at
Williston Elementary School
last week.
Faircloth used a unique
twist dialogue to get
across his message with
two imaginary characters
conversing about smoking
that first cigarette. The final
outcome? "Don't do it!"
Faircloth will compete in
the county-wide competition
at Bronson Middle/High
School Dec. 7. He placed
third as a fourth grader last
year. His parents are Tamara
and Rodney Faircloth and his
teacher is Sherry Scott.

Fourth grader Cammeron
Smith placed second with
"A Journey Back in Time," a
speech about dinosaurs. Her
teacher is Sarah Corliss.
A tie occurred for third
place between fourth grader
KadiClineinStaciPloshnick's
class and Christina Harvey
in Kathy Brewington's fifth
grade class.
Kadi's baby sister found
herself the. subject of her
big sister's speech about


SPEECH CONTEST WINNERS from Williston Elementary School include Noah
Faircloth, first place; Cammeron Smith, second place; and Kadi Cline and
Christina Harvey, who tied for third place.


her literal "birth day," and
Christina's speech about
chocolate resonated true for
many listeners.
Fourth grade judges were
former WES teacher Nancy
Bowman, local real estate
agent Kathleen Lowyns
and local historian Phyllis
Griffin. Fifth grade judges


were Perkins State Bank
vice president Marion Cason,
former GFWC Williston
Woman's Club president
Nancy Etheridge and former
high school math teacher
Naomi Petteway.
The Rev. Johnnie Jones III,
former principal Dalne Dola
and Cedar Key postmaster


and former GFWC Williston
Junior Woman's Club
president Annette Kordgien
judged the final competition
which also included speeches
by four other contestants:
fifth grader Michaela Melton,
fourth grader Branden
Spillane, fifth grader Chelsea,
Starke and fourth grader


It's Here!




r, ::









T -4, !g
S.









Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
IT'S BEEN some 23 years in the making and at
last the story is ready to be told. The History of
the Levy County Quilt Museum and the Log Cab-
in Quilters hit the stands last week and museum
director Winnelle Home, pictured, is pleased as
punch. Compiled by Toni Collins from Home's
journals, the 159-page books is all color and
depicts the museum's beginnings through both
word and photos. Each page chronicles the lives
of the men and women who would not give up
on making a home for their love of quilting. The
books retails for $15 and copies are only avail-
able at the Quilt Museum.


City manager earns above


average evaluation


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
WILLISTON-Failure to move to Levy
County cost the Williston city manager points
on his annual evaulation.
Scoring a 3.7 out of a possible 5.0, most
councilors' concerns regarded Jim Coleman's
failure to:move into the community, accord-
ing to Council President James Cason said.
The president also pointed out that Cole-
man does many things right, especially in
the area of economic development. Cason's
recommendation to give Coleman a 5 percent
pay increase caused silence on the floor.
Cason then passed the gavel to vice presi-
dent- Steve Holcomb so he could make the
motion from his recommendation. The mo-
tion failed for lack of a second.
Councilor Jerry Robinson then polled the
town's workers in attendance to find out how
many lived in Williston and/or Levy County.
From the finance officer to the police chief,
many did not.
Councilwoman Debra Jones, on speaker
phone from a business trip in Clearwater,
asked, if any of those polled had employment
contracts that specified they would move.
According to Jones, Coleman was supposed
to move to the area by Dec. 31, 2005.
"As far as I'm concerned," Jones said,
"he's in default of his contract."
Cason then asked if there was a motion for
a pay increase.
It was agreed unanimously to give Cole-
man an additional 1 percent increase to go
with the 3 percent cost of living adjustment
(COLA) he received in October.
It was during this action that Cason clari-
fied he had not asked for a 5 percent increase
on top of the 3 percent-but 2 percent to make
a total of five.
City Clerk Barbara Henson was also eval-
uated. She received a score of 4.7 and was
given an addition 1 percent to accompany her
COLA.
Robinson then had the floor with the first
of three proposals to but a referendum on the
ballot that would allow Williston voters to


change the city charter.
"I thought we had already killed this," Hol-
comb said. (All three measures were handily
defeated in previous elections.)
Robinson asked the council listen with an
open mind.
The first proposal was to' increase council
members' terms of office from two years to
three".--, i .. ..
When voters turned down the measure in
July 2004, it was to increase the terms to four
years.
Robinson said the reasoning behind the
three-year term limits were many, but in-
cluded saving money because fewer elections
would be funded and smoother transitions on
the council.
Coleman said he was afraid voters did not
understand what-they were voting on before
and suggested an education campaign be
launched.
The council voted to allow the referendum
with a 3-2 vote. Jones and Cal Byrd were the
dissenters.
Robinson's proposals to have the city man-
ager oversee the police and fire departments
and remove the clerk position from a charter
officer died on the floor.
In other business, the council agreed that a
new city hall is vital.
Property the size' of six standard city par-
cels is needed to accommodate the growth.
Discussion centered around finding an ex-
isting building or building a new one before
Holcomb made a generic motion to sell city
hall and move into a new location.
Police Chief Dan Davis had suggested the
city consider buying the old Winn Dixie build-
ing and moving its offices there. He said what
the city didn't use could be leased to garner
income for the city.
Davis said potential clients might be people
like the public defender and state's attorney's
office who could relocate from Bronson.
Davis said those offices answered to
Gainesville and Williston was closer and had
better roads than Bronson.


x


THE WINDING RIVER Garden Club of Yankeetown-Inglis urges the public to at-
tend its sixth annual "Christmas In the Park" celebration Sunday, Dec. 10 at 2
p.m. Held at theWinding River Park at the corner of Riverside and 56th Streets
in Yankeetown, refreshments will be served while entertainment is provided by'
a local musician with sing-along caroling. Santa Claus will arrive by boat with
gifts for the kids. Bring a lawn chair while enjoying the holiday festivities. For
further information, contact President Eleanor Berkley at 447-3899.



Center looking for donations,


to help those less fortunate


Harmony Holistic Healing
Center Inc. is asking for do-
nations to help those in need
in our community.
A non profit organization,
all donations are tax deduct-
ible. The group helps electric,
water and it has a food pan-
try.
"We take elderly around
that can't drive, we take them


to pick up prescriptions and help
them get their prescriptions. We
take them to the grocery store,
doctor appointments.
"We help get clothes and
shoes when we can. We try to
find them jobs. Gas to go to
work. We give away handicap
equipment, and children's vita-
mins. We try to help with their
needs no matter what. We try


to help everybody all year
long. We do not judge,"'
said a spokesman for the
organization.
They will also feed those
in need Dec. 23 from 4-6
p.m.
For more information on'::
how you can help, donate'.
or if you need assistance,
call 486-6229.


OBITUARIES


Dorothy Newton
Dorothy E. Newton, 79, of Fanning Springs, died Monday,
Dec. 4, 2006 in Gainesville
She is survived by her husband, Thomas P. Newton of Fan-
ning Springs; daughter, Candace Rayl of Castle Rock, Colo.;
granddaughter, Alia Rayl of Longmont, Colo.; sisters Gloria
Rump of Mission, Kan.; Marilyn Spofford of Salem, Ore.;
Nancy Scofield of Wichita, Kan.; Judith Barnes of Wichita,
Kan.; brothers, Richard Garrison of Yukon, Okla.; Homer
Garrison Jr. of Shawnee, Kan. ; Douglas Garrison of Derby,
Kan.; David Garrison of Highlands Ranch, Colo. and William
Garrison of Glenwood Springs, Colo..
A memorial service will be held Friday, Dec, 8 at 10 a.m. at
the Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services in Chiefland.
Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral
Services, Chiefland.


Johnetta Smyth
Johnetta Dondeville Smyth, 80, of Chiefland died in Chief-
land on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006.
She was born in Memphis, Tenn. and was a homemaker.
She is survived by her daughters, Beverly McLean of Chief-
land and Linda Freygang of Miami; grandchildren, Sean Frey-
gang, Dawn Smyth, Mary McLean Ledson, John McLean and
Michelle Freygang; great-grandchildren, Katherine Ledson,
Claire Ledson, Zane McLean and Dwayne Smyth.
Services will be held on Monday, Dec. 11 at 11 a.m. at St.
Johns The Evangelist Catholic Church in Chiefland.
Burial will be at the Florida National Cemetery in Bush-
nell.
Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral
Services, Chiefland.


Ben Detwiler hoped to make the world a bettor place.
That hope died when he was killed by a drunk driver.


What should you do to stop a friend from driving drdnk?
Whatever you have to.
Friends don't let friends drive drunk.

PO W 'pwtft


0
W p.wf.m


Page 7


---










PagLEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7,2006


Lady Ea;

BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
BRONSON-The
Eagles had a tough
hoe when the season
and they are still
their lumps, but in
their woes, they are
gaining strength.'
"We have a long
way to go," head
coach Greg Hamilton
said at the beginning
of the year. "We
are basically an
inexperienced team.
The girls have
to learn the most
basic of things, like
preparing for a game
and playing as a
team."
With four difficult
losses to open the
season one might
think the assessment
is the same, but
Hamilton's opinion
is different.


gles felled by in

Neisha Williams, a talented
5-feet 11-inch center who was
Lady expected to be a center and a
row to power inside, is out with a
Started knee injury. Joining her on


taking


: "They have a lot to
learn still, butthey are
getting more excited
about basketball,"
Hamilton said.
'They are understanding it is
an emotional game and they
have to play in such a way.
They are playing hard and
are beginning to buy into the
Vision I am selling them..
S"Those things might not
seem like much, but they are
the foundation to building
4 program from the ground
4p. I think the experience
they are getting, this year,
especially with the adversity
they are going through now
will be beneficial." '
SThe team has also been
hit with the injury bug in the
early going.


the injured knee list is point


guard Crystal Gordon. Both
are expected to find out how
much time they will miss
later this week.
The team's other point
guard and only returning
player, Angel Mitchum has
also as of yet to take the field
due to injuries. The team was
severely set back by physical
disease too as bronchitis
struck shooting guard Morgan
Elton.
To further illustrate the
team's ailments, junior guard,
Nikki Lever, has played, but
with injured ribs since the
season began.


jury, illness


"The injuries have been
tough," Hamilton said. "They
have really hurt us this-season,
but the girls who are playing
now are getting time and they
are improving every game.
Right now things
are difficult,
but we are
playing a lot of
underclassman.

"So we have a
groupthatwe can
teach as a group
how to play and
win together.
They will grow
together as a
whole unit.
They have a
great attitude
and in time that
will show on the
scoreboard."
Moriah Smith
and Elizabeth
Gay have
Accounted for
about 80 percent
of ; the team's
offense.
SWith Jessica
Thomas taking
over the point
guard duties, the nucleus of an
inside-outside combination
is forming.
Barbara Clemmons has
also made contributions from
her shooting guard position,
All the players except for
Gay, who is a sophomore, are
freshmen.
The team losses are to
Seven Rivers, St. Francis,
St, John Lutheran and Bell.
They will be looking, for
their first win as they take
on Seven Rivers again and
in upcoming contests versus
Branford, Trenton, Mayo and
the Rock.


L


IEa SpOarta AL
NEAL FISHER
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


jJ1


Rebuilding took innerfaith


Have often been asked with negative
connotations why it has meant so
much to me and I have allowed
myself to go through a difficult
struggle to be a successful sports reporter and
actor.
My answer: because in sports and film
and television I found encouragement and
inspiration. In those days when I faced
little support to pursue what I thought
was important and could be significant to
someone else, I turned to the men and women
in these areas that I looked to as role models
for guidance.
I often asked myself in my youth what
would a specific person I looked up to'do
in a certain situation. Most of the time, my
answer was since they believed in themselves
and what they were trying to accomplish, I
should do the same. To me when a person is
an example in that way to a young person, it
is a worthwhile influence and inspiration.
'In the three months since I started working
at the Levy County Journal I have rambled
somewhat profusely about the men and
women who have shaped me in just that way.
And then there is the story of Marshall
University. It is in its own right an
inspirational story and I 'am happy to see that
it is finally getting the credit it deserves as a
true life look at what can be accomplished
if you believe example through the major
motion picture, "We are Marshall."
Marshall University is located in
Huntington,W. Va., a city located on the Ohio
border and within 50 miles of where along
with Kentucky the three states meet. Its main
source of income is mining.
With that backdrop, it is comparable
to Levy County in the fact it is small
community where everybody knows
everyone and football is a collective


happening. Even when the team isn't
winning, it is still the centerpiece of the
community and the following is just as
intense in both good and bad times.
In 1970 during the throes of its
nineteenth year of a record under .500 in
the last 26 seasons, the Thundering Herd
football team boarded a plane after another I
loss. This time it was to East Carolina. The:
plane never made it back to Huntington.
In horrible conditions with low visibility,
it fell from the sky less than 50 miles from
its destination. All 75 players, coaches and
administrators onboard were killed. The
video footage left little to the imagination
as to the possibility of anyone surviving.
Large metal parts over 20 feet wide were
ripped whole from the chassis and those
pieces of the plane that stayed intact were
burned to a crisp. Even if someone had
survived the initial impact, the plane was
so contorted from the top down they would
have been crushed under the weight of the
frayed and pressurized steel.
To this day, there has never been a
greater loss of lives in one incident
involving sports travel.
After many long weeks of inner
searching, the university and community
decided to continue its football program.
Amidst many protesters and complaints, the
Thundering Herd took to the field the next
year.
And as expected, with the scene of a
destroyed football program and devastated
community still fresh in their minds, they
won only two games.
In fact it wasn't until 12 years later, in
1984, under Stan Parrish's guidance, they
claimed a winning record as they went 6-


See Neal Page


P"s~


A 100,000 .MILE WARRANTY! SIERRA 900 ..-.. .. A
BUICK STABILITRAK HANDLES



24/7 Roadside Assistance ON ALL SURFACES
& Courtesy Transportation SEE SIERRAS STRENGTH
9for 5 years! IN TOWING/TRAILERING



StabiliTrak, Automatic, ded, V, AM/FM CD,
advanced Safety A/C Chrome Wheels!
MSRP #70331 #70243
$24,395



CONSUMER REPORTS BEST BUY EXCELLENT VALUE!
Sor 9 s or M s

$17,998* 1229 m 11,998* or 229- 19,998* o 99
*39 month closed end lease.$1625 down plus tax tag,title $ 399.50 dealer *39 month closed end lease. $1676 down plus tax,tag,title $ 399.50 dealer *39 month closed end lease. $1600 down plus tax,tag,title $ 399.50 dealer 4

ii -'m;711ill iv iIy I 1 H I'f I I ;Il IID :1 m1l I I i 411i i:L O NIWY
,fee.10,000 mi/yr,$.20/miforoverage, See de aler for details fee.10,000 mi/yri, ,fee.10,000 mi, $2/mi for overage. See dealer for details.



Quiet Tuning US Gov2eWHEELrn
W U.&Government"DRIVE
27A S Safety Rating7 lo oe -W
#70379



CONSUMER REPORTS* BEST BUY BEST FUEL ECONOMY IN ITS CLASSIC

19,998' or* 269 MS p20,998 or 3291. .26,998' or 399*

*39 month closed end lease. $1700 down plus tax,tag,title $ 399.50 dealer *39 month closed end lease. $1875 down plus tax, tag, title $ 399.50 dealer *39 month closed end lease. $1600 down plus tax,tag,title $ 399.50 dealer
fee. 10,000 mVyr, $.20/mi for overage. See dealer for details. fee. 10,000 mi/yr, S.20/mi for overage. See dealer for details. fee. 10,000 mi/yr, $.20/mi for overage. See dealer for details.
Pre-owned vehicles are plus tax and title,WAC.*All vehicle prices areplustax,tagtltle, and must Include dealer Installed options and dealer fee of $399.50. Prices Include $2,000 down cash or trade equity,and Buick owner loyalty where applicable
and $500 auto show discount. Prices subject to change due to manufactures incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale due to aggressive pricing and early print deadlines. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for
typographical errors. Sorry, all prior sales excluded.


EAGLE BUICK GMC Sat 8:30-6 30-8

1275 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, FL 34446 i

1-352-795-6800 1-888-745-2599 B"* O M


I


m-










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


P.K. Yonge massacres Chiefland's Indians


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
After a run of successive
playoff appearances, the
Chiefland Indians entered
the 2006 season with hopes
of contending for the district
title. On the other hand,
with such a young and
inexperienced squad that
lacks the physical overtones
of some of the state's other
playoff teams, it might be
another long season.
With two games last week
against district powerhouses,
P.K. Yonge and county rival
Williston, the verdict could
be swinging towards the latter
conclusion.
Speed, speed and more
speed coupled with height
is a dangerous combination
when a team looking for it
plays another one that has it.
And so was the case
when P.K. Yonge came to
Chiefland. They started the
game with a tempo that was
too much for the Indians and


continued to put the heat on
with a variety of defensive
traps and slashing offenses.
The game was expected to
show the difference between
the two team's talents and
physical abilities and that
was what happened.
The Indians tried to slow
down the visitors high
powered octane game, but
it was to no avail as P.K.
Yonge got off to a 22-5 lead
at the end of the first half and
then increased it to 47-11 at
halftime. The game did little
to help prepare the Indians
for their annual showdown
with county rival Williston.
P.K. Yonge 22-25-13-16-
76
Chiefland 05-06-06-06--
-26

Statistics:
Points-Chiefland:
Sheffield-8, Jackson-
7,Galpin-6, Durr-3,
Sprawling-2
The junior varsity team


took its bruises against P.K.
Yonge as well, but did show
some ability to play with the
visitors. They kept it close
throughout the first half as the
intermission brought a 22-15
deficit for the home team.
The Indians rallied with two
runs late in the half to cut the
lead from a 13-point deficit.
With the junior varsity
team existing to facilitate the
talents and skills of its players
so they can play at the varsity
level, there was reason to
believe this group of players
might be ready to make
the varsity team a playoff
contender in the future.
"When a team is the number
one high school in the state
its junior varsity squad has
talent," Head Coach Mike
Lundy said. "On top of that
all of their players returned
from last year. They excel
at the JV level. But to be
able to hang with them for
a half shows some steady
improvement and that the
guys can play.
*"We just got winded and
outmanned in the second
half. I was pleased with our
defense and we showed some
confidence in our shooting and
when we had the ball. I was
proud of the kids, they didn't
give up and kept running the
offense and defense."
P.K. Yonge came out in the
second halfwith an assortment
of full court traps and presses.
It wore the Indians down and
accomplished their goals of
tiring the home team out.


P.K. Yonge
-53
Chiefland
--24


12-10-19-12--

06-09-07-02-


Statistics:
ieani ts acs Journal photo by Neal Fisher
Chiefland-Points: Jackson-
8, Wasson-7, Rualnd-4, UP, UP AND AWAY. At least that was what P.K. Yonge could say as they out re-
Manalastas-3, Tyson-2 bounded Ciefland by a large:margin enroute to an impressive victory.


Journal photo by Neal Fish
JOE MANALASTAS had trouble corraling a rebound
but it was one of many problems Chiefland encoun-
tered against P.K. Yonge.




















An alternative to knee replacement may
be a minimally invasiveprocedure called
Partial Knee Resurfacing.
This procedure could be your answer to
arthritis pain and get you walking again.
In most eases:
Back to physical activities in 4 to 6 weeks
No physical therapy
No blood transfusions
One night hospital stay
Call for a seminar reservation or more information

1- 888- 685-1594 (tolfree)


Williston Public Library
10 SE 1st Street
(Old Perkins
State Bank Bldg)
Williston


Florida Knee
& Orthopedic
Pav ilion r

Largo Medical Center


-4 : -
~5s.. :i
4' '.~i

-e t. 2 -~ f.-~~,
.;-d-~ ,.,


.? ~w'
4-n ;
.4,


"" "" "* ,.,,, ': ** ^ r ...' ^
....." -" i '* "
*' '.' '- .* ^ 5 :, i*'?" 2 -
. .

*'- .. .. .. '.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ *' *. ^ ^ 'H ^
. : 5::, .? ,o ",..



THELASII3ANI( ".'l~i .:- -"."M'WT*'f*.^".
*.* .. .. 5,.,: .: : ^ -- ,. i, ,
J I A. S-1 ..: ;-.




." a, ... .."it* ..'....JF ',,- ..'2 : ..' I .
: .: -. .. 4 ^ -s ** '
*"* *'- ,. .. '*. _^ ^ *3. % '" *.', *" _2
-r ..^ ^ ^ ^



'. .' *' *.': _, t,* %, .. 7. ... .-, .. .
.. ~ ~._ -" : '7 n v,- i-. t- ,.. ; t--,' .
-. .- ,, ,,,
.. -: ; i-.g' /- ., .
r .. :" "- "li "-E


," .: .. :- ,] -; ; ; ,,~ -= .
..: -_ .7 -Hi ,- r ..


;.i:"~ '~Ji
~
F4... ''' Ss ~'
~C,
r~P
--
I--
--I
I~ ~


Sad but true. Everyone else is a branch of a larger bank based miles
from here. There is a difference. Give us a call and we'll help you move
your account and even pay for your first order of checks.

DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK

Member ED.I.C.


Page 9


.'r










Page 10


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Red Devils ignite, engulf Indians


55


-24


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-Known for
its intensity and the prestige
that comes from winning
the yearly battle, Chiefland
and Williston renewed their
cross county rivalry as two
teams looking to accomplish
different missions.
Chiefland entered the game
looking forward to its first true
test of the season in judging
where the program is. With
three freshmen taking to the
court this year,, their mission
was to slow down the high
powered Williston express in
order to utilize their body to
body style.
Williston entered the game
looking to run and use its
speed to wear down and
tire out Chiefland. After
losing their opening game
to perennial state power,
Eastside (Gainesville) the
Red Devils' high powered,
quick strike transition offense
created by pressure defense
was beginning to round into
form again.
But as the players jaunted
onto the court, the looks and
expressions on the faithful
of both schools ignited
two communities to play
basketball for more than the
sake of sports.
It was a well needed event
to reflect on the lives of the
two Williston students lost
last week and to express hope
for the third student involved
in the tragic automobile
accident. At the same time
it was an experience to give
the communities strength to
return to the normal.
"We want to give a special
thanks to Chiefland for
their thoughts and,prayers,"
Williston head coach, Qeorge
Miller said. "This has
obviously been a difficult
time, but Chiefland's concern
and the fact that they feel
close to our community is
really something we need
right now.
"Coach Webber is really a
class act. I know right now
their program is a little bit
down and how he has his
kids carry themselves during
the difficult times reflects on
him. The community is about
class individuals and the way


"We still have a tendency to
use our hands and not our feet
on defense, but the players are
getting back into the swing of
playing basketball. We are
looking like a team capable
of playing some ball again."
The Red Devils upped
their record to 2-1 overall
and 2-0 in district play. They
face three district teams this
week, including perennial
state power and are playing
in the Daytona Beach Shoot-
out. Chiefland's record now
stands at 1-2 overall and 0-2


in district play.
The Indians face two
district opponents this week
as well as Bell.


Statistics Will iston:
Hopkins-10, J. James-10,
Coleman-8, T. Brown-7,
Thomas-6, C.J. James-
4, Timmons-2, Welch-2,
C. Days-2, Johnson-2, M
Brown-2.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

AFTER PASSING the rock, Mario Brown stumbles but even with two left feet,
Williston ran to a.53-24 victory in the cross-county rivalry.


they handled things was a big
help to us-in getting back to
some'sense df normalcy."
- Aftier"- :: an emotional
moment of silence to honor
the students involved in the
accident, the Red Devils
showed little effects of a
difficult week and the still
somewhat painful good-bye
lingering in the background
atmosphere.
Opening the game with a 10-
0 run, Williston jumpstarted
the tempo and state of affairs
within the contest with its take
no prisoner transition offense
and its pressure defense,


QUALITY HEALTH CARE FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
F LAND
RDICAL,
CENTER, LLC.
TREATING ACUTE AND CHRONIC CONDITIONS
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS FOR URGENT CONDITIONS
MINOR SURGICAL MINOR TRAUMA LACERATION REPAIR
X-RAY LABORATORY. EKG EMPLOYMENT PHYSICAL
-Podiatry Services Available-
Convenient Office Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 a.m.- 7 p.m., Fri. 7:00 6 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Noon
1113 N.W 23rd Ave., Chiefland
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)
Call (352) 493-9500 tfor an appointment today



Branson SelfStoae


which persistently harassed
the Indians into-attempting
actionn they we&e n6fot eady
for "2' *
The first quarter ended
with a 15-5 score and the Red
Devils increased their lead to
25 points by halftime.
As is the case usually in
smaller communities the
athletes play several sports
and with a roster full of
football players, the Red Devil
basketball team showed it is
ready to mount another run in
the district and in the playoffs
after about two weeks of
adjusting to another sport.


Williston's passes were
crisp and :clean. especially
as they ran the court. Their
defense cut down open spaces
quickly and. left the Indians
with little room to maneuver,
both in its half-court and full-
court offenses.
"These kids go year round,"
Miller said. "So, they are
usually in good physical
shape. But they need some
time. to make the adjustment
and I think we are beyond that
point. We believe it is our
defense that creates offense
and we definitely played our
best defense to date.


WILLISTQN'S JV VICTORY might have seemed like
slight of hand, but their 6-0 run to close out the
game was due to a well-crafted pressure defense.




Leslie Sapp j


Construction, Inc.


352-463-7589


7239 S.W. 80th Avenue
Trenton, Florida 32693


Christmas Specials:
Existing customers will receive $10.00 off your rent for
referring a NEW customer.
New Customers only:
Pay for 2 months rent in advance andget your
3rd month free (one time move in speaal) or get 25% off
your rent for up to 3 months.


Ted S. Yobo, DVM-aWieLealie, DVM
jadce Linkous, MRCVS l1Brady,DVM W

S Dental CareI w n Food I Gwon~g
led ccimhioneIBoaing IEaryAMDvp.O Z

WOrcrp Idenowons I Meidri & Sugy
SOnDineeseTreabnentIPup&ItfetPlan
Large Animal Haul-In Available

24RHEREMERGNCY I SEIMCIHUH


;,W I Hi


-lotia i


6031Lnl~R dEii
UWLLWUMI.IIWIW


Williston
09---55
Chiefland
--24


15-20-11-

05-05-06-08-


tlsapp@acceleration.net
CR-C058431


U


- - ---


H


slla~~oPPli~slt~~s3oj~W
~xlOEB3I
~99899$










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7,2006


Lady Devils making run for district title


11/28
Ft. White 3
Williston 1
Record: 3-3 (overall), 1-2
'(district)
The Lady Devils fell to
.500 for the second time this
season and lost their second
consecutive district game as
the team came out flat.
Ft. White made them .pay
as they stormed to a 3-0 lead
in the first 20 minutes. The
Lady Devils outplayed the
home team for the final 40
minutes, holding them to zero
shots on goals. Unfortunately,
tas head coach Max Aguirre
pointed out, that is all a good
..team like Ft. White needs and
'it is hard to win when trying
to dig out of such a hole.
The team switched several
players to new positions as the
coaching staff tried to shore
up its defense with speed
land creativity in order to
pass it out of their own zone.
Suzie Smith was moved to
sweeper, replacing Mindy
Hughes who is recovering
from mononucleosis. Mimi
Marks de Martino was shifted
to the fullback position from
midfield. Second string goalie
rHeather Porter was called to
duty as the other fullback.
i Also, a diamond formation
,vas adopted for the defense


and one midfielder is required
to drop back to the top of it
when the ball is in the Lady
Devils' zone.

11/29
Williston 1
Interlachen 0
Record: 4-3 (overall) 1-2
(district)
Only minutes after
receiving the news that their
former teammate, Amber
Bradley, had been taken to
Shands Hospital with life-
threatening injuries and the
death of two fellow students,
the Lady Devils arrived at
Interlachen. With heavy
hearts the team took the field
looking to dedicate a victory
to the fallen Red Devils.
They jumped on the home
team quickly and set the tone
and tempo.
I While the final score was
only a one goal deficit, the
Lady Devils were never
seriously challenged as the
emotions of the night and the
recent personal and tactical
changes paid dividends.
The team was able to create
offensive passing from
its defensive zone as it
pushed the ball quickly into
Interlarchen's zone and put
pressure on them throughout
the whole game.


Striker Lucia Bemal scored
the game winner at the twenty
minute mark of ihe first half
after receiving a pass on the
top left corner of the crease.
She was left alone and beat
the goalie after several quick-
touch passes moved the ball
up the field on the left side.
Lillian Alonzo's pass as she
crossed midfield created the
spacing for the tic-tac toe
passing which left Beral
open.

12/1
Williston 2
Newberry 1
Record: 5-3 (overall), 2-2
(district)
Playing their fourth
consecutive road game and
their sixth away contest
during the season's first half,
the team once again looked
as dominant as the coaching
staff envisioned it could be.
With the position and
tactical changes now a matter
of fact, the Lady Devils for
the second game in a row
controlled the play as they
passed the ball quickly out
of their zone due to their
speed and creativity in the
backfield.
Williston's dominance
was reflected in the team's
final shots on-goal, 14-3. In


addition they had possession
of the ball for approximately
70 percent of the game.
Coach Aguirre credits the
team's recent turnaround to
the team's ability to gel after
the changes, but, especially
the play of the backfield.
In the last 25 minutes of
play it has given up one goal
and allowed the Lady Devils
to hold possession of the
ball in their offensive zone
for nearly twice the amount
of time as their opponents.
Communication is the catalyst
of the successful gelling.
Sarah Gaskins scored both
goals in the first 20 minutes
following passes from Amber
Aguirre at the top of the
offensive zone, which' set
up her up with one-on-one
breakaways.
With the victory the Lady
Devils concluded the first
half of their season with a
two game winning streak
as they return home for five
consecutive games and the
opportunity to make a run at
the district title for the first
time in the program's history.
Compiled by Neal Fisher
Levy County Journal Sports


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

WITH MORE SPEED and creativity from its defense,
midfielder Amber Aguirre and the rest of the Lady
Devils have been able to push the ball up field
quicker.'


Ladies pulling for former teammate


S Journal photo by Neal Fisher
IBY MAKING PERSONAL changes in their defense, Lillian Alonzo (#9) and the
rest of the offense have been harrassing goalkeepers a lot more.


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
For most followers of sports
teams, they only see the side
of the glory and prestige that
comes with wins, but there
are also the long bus trips and
the personal issues.
The result is athletes often
spend more time with each
other, their coaches and
administrators than. their
families. Spending so much
time together, teammates,
coaches and administrators
become family to each other
and it continues even when
they move on.
And with the special and
unique closeness within the
Williston High School's
soccer team, Amber Bradley,
even though, she could not
return to the team this year


is still an integral part of the
team in every sense.
"I have never met anybody
'who didn't like Amber," head
coach Max Aguirre said.
"She was always upbeat and
never shied away from being
friends with anyone. She
was the kind of kid whom
everyone wants to be with,
because she never limited
herself to. friendships :\\ith
certain groups of students.
:, '.Shewas .definitely tone
of the players who are


responsible for where we
are now. Even though she
isn't playing this year,' we
think of her as one of us and
a big reason for our success
this year was because of her
personal relationships with
all of us."
Bradley, who is in critical
condition at Shands Hospital
at the University of Florida,
was the lone survivor of the
automtbbile aeeident,/ which
d X ..' *


See Amber Page 12


Thomas F. Philman, Certified Operator

/"=- P.O Box 872 4 South Main
S' Chiefland, FL 32644
4 Phone: (352) 493-4772
Ste NEIWSTAASOl (352) 493-1051
Megaelm- 1-800-242-9224







David Renaud D.V. M. Kathy Bowker D.V. M.
greater Chiiefand Chfiamber o Commerce
2006 PBusiness o te year

^Affordable Quality Medicine & Surgery
SConvenient Appointments Available






More.- Fri. 8 am 3 6pm

Sat. 9am 12 noon

AS~lY ni


Fill Dirt & Hauling
Located On South 12-Williston, Florida

(352) 528-3520
Office @ B&G Seed
Other Contacts
(352) 339-4713, (352) 339-2704 or (352) 339-6435 (Loader operator)








Nancy Bell Westbury
Enrolled Agent
* Personal and Business Tax Returns
* Partnership & Corporate Tax Returns
* Computerized Monthly Accounting

New Monthly Clients
Welcomed !






712 North Main Street, Chiefland 493-4996


prr


Page 11


A~

i .I~f


I i









Page 12 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Lady Devils burning up court


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-Following
the cancellation of Tuesday
night's game against Chiefland
and the contest against
Hawthorne the evening
before, the Lady Devils took
to the court without missing
a beat.
The game was
changed to an
away game at the
last minute, but
the enthusiasm of
beginning district
play was not the least
bit tainted as they
once again rolled to a
big first quarter and halftime
leads.
The formula for the leads
was once again defense and
rebounding. The Lady Devils
went to a half court press,
which caused Ft. White's
ball handlers problems
with seeing the passing
lanes and taking away their
options. Turnovers from the
defensive pressure and the
transition game, which also
was induced by Ft. White's
inability to keep possession
of the ball, sparked the team
high percentage shots and
multiple runs.
The rebounding was led
by the inside trio of Ciearra
Gordon, Jessica Gates and
Portia Brown as the team out
rebounded their opponents by
double digits. The rebounding
led to multiple opportunities
for second and third chance
baskets as well as limited the
opponents' number of shots.
Defense and strong
rebounding are becoming the
hallmark of this undefeated
:team and even though it might
:be repetitious, the result was



q
I


another victory.
With the cancellation of
two games this past week,
the Lady Devils get their first
full week of district play.
The victory over Ft. White
was huge step in getting
prepared for the district grind
as well as getting back to a
sense of normalcy
following the
tragedy that befell
the community last
week.
"The girls were
really excited
S about getting into
district play," Head
Coach Jason Odom
said. "Of course with what
happened last week, that was
put on hold, but the girls came'
out against Ft. White and got
the district schedule off to a
good start like we needed to.
The real season starts with
district play, and I think we
can use our height and speed
to our advantage. The girls
are doing a good job of using
them so far."
Perhaps the most important
factor in those comments
is the fact that the team is
learning how to use their
height and speed as well as
their body.
This is especially
important considering all of
their opponents so far this
season did not match up well
with Williston's physical
attributes.
The front line has become
adept at holding the ball above
their shoulders after claiming
a rebound, decreasing their
chance of losing it and
increasing their opportunities
for tip ins.
Defense and rebounding


continue to key theirvictories.
It might not be pretty but the
team is learning that coach
Odom's philosophy can
carry a team a long way if it
is played with intensity and
they have bought into it. So
far it has allowed the team to
play without having to rely
on their weaknesses.
However, the team needs
to improve their free throw
shooting as they went only
11-33 in the victory against
Ft. White. They also need
to become more selective
with their shots when in their
offense.
"Once again we are
winning, but we need to get
more selective as we get
into district play," Odom
said. "We've been able to
overcome this, but district
play is going to be tougher.
"We have to take the
higher percentage shots if we
are going to win, especially
against P.K. Yonge. But
the girls are learning it with
experience and I think we can
really challenge anybody we
play for the victory. It will be
a big couple of weeks and we
will learn about ourselves."
The lady Devils play
Newberry and Dixie County
this week and then finish
the semester with contests
against P.K. Yonge, and
Chiefland.
12/1
Williston 13-10-13-17---
53
Ft. White 06-04-13-04---


27
Record 5-0
Statistics:
Williston
Brown-15, C.
A. Floyd-12,



points: M.
Gordon-13,
J. Gates-6,


*Amb


claimed the lives of two of
her friends and fellow high
school students last week.
One of the reasons the
soccer team felt such a,
significant loss when Bradley
did not return to the team
this year, was because her
desire to befriend such a wide
and varied range of students
within the school carried over
onto the soccer team.
"She is very close to
many of the players, both
underclassmen and the
upperclassmen, regardless of
what walk of life they come
from," Sarah Gaskins, who
plays striker for the team and a
close friend of the senior since
they were in kindergarten,
said.
"When she played, she was
just really fun-loving and a
great example to all us. She
played and practiced hard and
made all of us feel like we
belonged on the team.
"She was always ready to
take the field and her love
for the sport was contagious.
That example really continues
to motivate us. She loved
soccer and this team and even
though she doesn't play with
us anymore, we think she still
would do whatever it takes
to help us and anyone on the
-team."
Her love for the sport began
during her freshman year. She
watched a friend play soccer
and was instantly hooked.
The next year, she was given
an outlet to express her new-
found passion for the sport as
the Lady Devils' soccer team
began play.
Bradley decided not to
return to the team this year
due ,to a conflict of time
availability with her employer,
Winn-Dixie.
The affection she has for
the sport was also seen in her


development as a player.
A tenacious player with
height, she took to the
backfield and became one of
the team's stalwarts during
the team's first two years,
which were marked with
difficult losses and growing
pains.
"She was a solid and
consistent player," Aguirre
said. "We could put her back
on defense and know she
would do her job. Forwards
had a difficult time beating
her, which is what a defensive
player is supposed to do.
Her defensive play has also
carried into this year.
"When we put her in a
certain position, we could
expect the responsibilities
of it to be taken care of. It
wasn't easy for her, but she
had a huge impact on our
defense improving this year.
I think the way she handled
it was because, she is such a
down to earth person. The
girls often get together with
her on the weekends and
include her because of it."
Despite the closeness of
sports teams, differences
occur between individuals
and Bradley was often at the
center of mediating them.
The result of her efforts in
that capacity is also being felt
on the team today.

Bronson Y


Continuedfrom page 11
On the lighter side, she
was known to sing a specific
Mexican song during warm-
ups. "She was always in
a good mood." Gaskins said.
"It fired us up and got us
ready to play." Gaskins said.
That was why she was such a
great example.
"It was difficult to play the
night of the accident, because
she is still such a part of team
and it goes beyond just what
she did on the field. So, we
knew we had to go out and
play for her. We dedicated
the game to her and the boys
who died. The soccer team is
still one of the most important
things to her."
Among, the other thing
Gaskins noted on that list was
her involvement in the church
she attends and cheerleading.
The soccer team will hold
fund-raising events in the
future to help pay for her
medical expenses.
Amber Aguirre, one of
the team's tri-captains,
summed up the team's
affection for Bradley and her
contributions to what could
be a team making its first
playoff appearance this year.
"We love her and are
looking out for her," Aguirre
said. "We want to her to come
to the games again, so we can
celebrate with her again."


The recreation league will hold its annual award ceremony
on Dec. 16. The festivities will began at 9 a.m. with adults
and children playing each other in their yearly clash. The
league's cheerleaders will perform during the game.
After the game, the business at hand will begin as football
accolades will be awarded, followed by the cheerleading
squad receiving their honors
A barbecue lunch will be served at noon. Afterwards soccer
takes center stage. The annual parents vs. children game will
be played. The ceremony concludes with the black and white
checkered ball sport honoring their best.


Haven Hospice is north Florida's expert in end-of-life and palliative care.



Our mission is to act as a caring, compassionate HAVEN for residents


of our communities who are dealing with life-limiting illness or loss.


Experience our Commitment to Caring


A\dt


For more information on how HAVEN HOSPICE

can help you, please call (800) 727-1889,

or visit our Web site at www.havenhospice.org


7l


HAVEN

H O S P I C E


qwm mormm m mw Im- ----


k IV


Licensed as yur community-ased, not-forprofit hospic










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Page 13


Dozen remain in linkster's winning bracket


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
CHIEFLAND-After pro-
ducing an exciting first round,
the new format being used for
the Chiefland Women's Golf
Association annual handicap
tournament passed its first
test in the form of a winner
and losers bracket.
Using a double elimination
and match play format, con-
sistency and shooting for par,
instead of trying to use skills
above and beyond the normal
is the order of the day. With
its emphasis on avoiding all
or nothing high risks shots
in favor of setting up a hole
with several high percent-
age swings, excitement and
the right number of surprises
continued.
"Changing the format to
match play and double elimi-
nation has made this a tour-
nament of par play," Marilee
Leonard, the association's
president, said. "Of course
it is always important to play
for par.
"But with the Rye Grass
slowing the greens down,
there weren't any birdies in
the second round. It is im-
portant to have a style that is
solid and steady. Those who
play with a style where they
don't beat themselves are do-
ing well."
With one loss apiece after
the first round, eight golfers
were faced with the proposi-
tion of being eliminated after
two matches. When the dew
'off of the fairways melted,
Jan Hendrix, Maggie Knapp,
Mary Lindsey and Denise
Boyle were eliminated.


Jan Hendrix fell to the sur-
prising 16th seed Betty Beck
by several holes. Playing her
best golf of the year, Beck
pared the fourth hole with
a chip-in. The result was a
two-hole lead and she contin-
ued to gain momentum, while
Hendrix was never able to get
into a rhythm.
As the tournament's fifth
seed Maggie Knapp became
the tournament's biggest sur-
prise when she was included
in the first group of players
who were eliminated, being
upset twice. Freida Martin
tagged Knapp for the second
time with a four-stroke vic-
tory.
Mary Lindsey rallied sev-
eral times to stave of elimi-
nation in her match against
Leonard, but the consistency
of the tournament's second
seed was too much.
In a nip and tuck affair,
Leopard maintained a one-
hole lead for most of the
match until the fourteenth
and fifteenth holes, when
she used the pressure of the
course's obstacles to put the
upstart away.
With the pressure of the
match moving into its fi-
nal phases, she successfully
played for par, and succeeded.
Lindsey failed to do the same
kinder the demands of the mo-
ment. The final score was
three holes.
After a 25-year career in the
postal system, Denise Boyle
is enjoying the opportunity
to play in her first match
play tournament. However,
the tournament's fourteenth
seed was forced to exit stage


Weal
The next two years produced seven and then six wins.
But from those humble years a run of 21 consecutive sea-
sons of success comparable to some of the sport's most pres-
tigious programs emerged.
It included 13 seasons of double digit win totals, a gradual
progression from Southern Conference champions to the
Diirision I-AA title to acceptance into Division.I-A and then
perennial Mid-America Conference title holders.
During that period they claimed two Division I-AA na-
tional championships, six appearances in that game, Six
Southern Conference titles, six MAC divisional-titles, have
won the MAC conference championship five times and have
earned berths in seven bowl games.
In previous columns I have written with great details
about the rise of men and women who have inspired me. I
do not know enough to do the same about Marshall's rise
from what could be described as a disaster one would only
see in a feel-good Hollywood movie to their success as the
winningest program in the nineties and a consistent top 20
team in Division I-A.
But I can say that when I think about the footage I remem-
ber seeing as a child in the'70s and '80s of the wreckage of
the plane after it fell from the sky as compared to now when
I see the Thundering Herd on television with their accolades
and the look of a football program with pride and tradition, it
is truly something that should never be forgotten.
Because in the story of the Thundering Herd's rise literally


BRONSON SELF STORAGE
(352) 486-2121




HOURS: Monday- Friday 10 am -5 pm
Saturday 10 am 3 pm
839 E Hathaway Ave Behind Dollar General




?ft JN.Ii
FREEMAN~iB


Now Has a Service Van Available To
Handle Your Plumbing Needs and
Make House Calls.


Con tr ct onAn W te He te R pai sEt .


'p


DINIU CO. (352) 498-0703 (352) 210-0062
S Licensed*Insured'Free Estimates

Walter Freeman State Certified
Master Plumber #CF057595
0 M"-#IM; wf -O X--


left by the more experienced
Arma Beauchamp. Beau-
champ won by four strokes
playing the more consistent
game, scoring several pars.
With the new format the
excitement and surprise an
upset of a top seed is always
possible and the tournament
saw such a situation for the
second round in a row. This
time the tournament's num-
ber one seed, Barbara Ahola,
found herself in the loser's
bracket after her second
match.
A former champion, Ahola
was upset by the eighth seed,
Pat Renaud. The match was
decided on the last hole as
Renaud gained par.
"Renaud is a steady, solid
player," Leonard said. "She
doesn't beat herself. She is
probably the best example of
the kind of player that lends
itself to the format we are us-
ing. She plays for par and
forces her opponents to be
as steady as she is. That is a
tough combination to beat."
It left the event without its
top two seeds in the winner's
bracket.
With the door left open for
an easier road to the champi-
onship match of the winner's
bracket after the fall of the
tournament's number one
seed, Betty Altieri remained
in the hunt. She also contin-
ued to ring in the new format
by making competition as
dramatic as possible.
Her second sudden death
victory in as many matches
came over Fran Ice. She
emerged with the victory on


the second hole of the play-
off as she got the ball within
inches of the green in two
strokes. When golfers play
the hole they usually need
three strokes to get the ball
on the green.
Nancy Klugg's upset of
Leonard in the first round
was the biggest of the tourna-
ment at that point. However,
Klugg's play in the upset
did not carry into the second
round as the tenth seeded
Ruth Baker took advantage
of playing a lower seed.
Baker, after also defeating
a higher seed in the first round
continued to use her handicap
to her advantage and Klugg's
suddenly disappointing put-
ting game as she rolled to a
four hole victory.
The winner bracket's high-
est remaining seed, Patsy
Sheppard continued to make
a claim that she is the golfer
to beat as she held off a de-
termined Jeannie Clark.
While Clark remained close
throughout the match, Shep-
pard's game was a touch too
refined for the solid, but oc-
casionally mistake prone
sixth seed.
"So far, the girls are really
excited and I have never seen
such a high level of interest,"
Leonard said. "It is a bless-
ing to be able to play in such
beautiful weather and all
the golfers have a chance to
win. That is really why we
changed the format."
After its first two rounds
the tournament is left with 12
golfers as the winner's brack-
et has been sliced to four par-


Continued from page 8
from the ashes there is a host of inspiration and examples of
what can come if one pushes ahead with an honorable inten-
tion despite the lack of support and faith others might have.
To rise from the ashes to the success Marshall University
has achieved took an indestructible inner faith that never wa-
vered despite the length of time it took before they became a
champion and is the work of many.
These are some of the same reasons I. have adopted the
men and women I have previously written about as my he-
roes and inspirations. They have overcome people telling
them their admirable ambitions could not be achieved.
My hope as the movie "We Are Marshall" is finally re-
leased is it depicts that part of the story, not just the physical
reconstruction of a football program. After all, that is the
difference between those who live life and those who just
muddle through it.
With the passage of time Marshall's story has become a
footnote to many, but it is important to rehash. It is a story
that demonstrates the difference I previously wrote about is
the people who inspire others to rise from the ashes, even in
the face of doubters, to pursue their goals and dreams just as
the Thundering Herddid.

ThbEinng iaWut Cwcrpef? N~w conmsder
tihe Ersesting Beadt*g eT YILE?
VisitourModem Showroom Todaytosee
alithelatestinTiledesign. Over 500 stylesofwall
& 5000floortilesamples to choose from.

WHOLESALE TILE
810 East Thrasher The Yellow Building on RT 24
352-486-0063
Porcelain/Ceramic/Marble/Granite
Kitchen Backsplash and Countertops
Contractor Discounts/Setting Materials and Tools
Largest Selection Around at Unbeatable Prices
Mon-Fri 9am-6pm Saturdaj 9am-4pm


NiWip ( 352)-528-0369

Great Selection for Gift Giving

from Children's Books to Non-Fictin


ticipants. The four golfers
who were eliminated were
replaced by the same amount
of participants who lost in the
winner's bracket.

Second Round Result's
Loser's Bracket
#16 Betty Beck defeated
#9 Jan Hendrix
#13 Freida Martin defeated
#5 Maggie Knapp
#2 Marilee Leonard de-
feated #7 Mary Lindsey
#11 Arma Beauchamp de-
feated #14 Denise Boyle
Losers in loser's bracket
were eliminated from tourna-
ment

Winner's Bracket
#8 Pat Renaud defeated
#1 Barbara Ahola
#4 Betty Altieri defeated
#12 Fran Ice
#10 Ruth Baker defeated
#15 Nancy Klug
#3 Patsy Sheppard defeat-
ed #6 Jeannie Clark

Third Round Schedule
Loser's Bracket
#16 Betty Beck vs. #6
Jeannie Clark
#13 Freida Martin vs. #15
Nancy Klug
#2 Marilee Leonard vs. #12
Fran Ice
#1 Barbara Ahola vs. #11
Arma Beauchamp

Winner's Bracket,
#8 Pat Renaud vs. #4 Betty
Altieri
#10 Ruth Baker vs. #3 Pat-
sy Sheppard


Athlete of

the Week
Selected by
Neal Fisher


Suzie Smith
Sweeper
Williston Soccer

After opening the season
with a 3-2 ho-hum record,
the Lady Devils' coaching
staff made several changes
to shore up its defense.
Among them was Smith
being moved to the sweep-
er position.
The coaches wanted to
be able to push the ball up
the field and out of its zone
quicker and with more
ease.
Smith, the fastest player
on the team, has adjusted
to her new position with
little difficulty and it has
resulted in accomplishing
exactly what the coaches
wanted when they made
the changes.
The team has dominated
play since the changes and
as the team's sweeper, ball
control and its movement
starts with Smith near flaw-
less play.
In building its current
three game winning streak,
the defense has given up
only two goals and the of-
fense has held possession
of the ball almost twice as
long as their opponents.


Printing Legal Forms t NCR Forms Fax Copies
Notary Greeting Cards Office Supplies Lamination
PC Sales PC Repairs t PC Parts Ink Cartridges


310 Main Ave A Bronson A Mon-Fri 10-5
| I th White& BNue aUi ng 3 00 P insWn15 l |





TRI-COUNTY

CHIROPRACTIC

"Care for the Entire Family Dr. Bennitt Patterson

*Available on Location: X-Rays, Physical Therapy &
Licensed Massage Therapist (MM0007612)

Most Insurance Accepted: OFFICE HOURS
SMost HMO's and PPO's Monday/Wednesday/Friday
9a.m.-Noon & 2 p.m.-6p.m.
Major Medical Tuesday 8a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
SMedicare/Medicaid Thursday
Personal Injury/Auto Accidentsa.m.-
SWorkers' Compensation
~ Walk-Ins Welcome ~

493-1540
2220 N.Young Blvd.,Chiefland I
(Across from Wal-Mart Super Center) N I


Tides for Cedar Key starting with Dec. 7
Day High Tide Height Sunrise Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible
Th 7 High 1:56 AM 4.0 7:13 AM Set 9:54AM 95
7 Low 9:29 AM -0.8 5:34 PM Rise 8:12 PM
7 High 4:10PM 2.8
7 Low 9:04 PM 1.6
F 8 High 2:40 AM 3.9 7:14AM Set 10:39 AM 90
8 Low 10:10AM -0.5 5:34 PM Rise 9:15 PM
8 High 4:49 PM 2.7
8 Low .9:48PM 1.5
Sa 9 High 3:26AM 3.6 7:15AM Set 11:17AM 83
9 Low 10:50AM -0.2 5:35 PM Rise 10:15 PM
9 High 5:27 PM 2.7
9 Low 10:36PM 1.5
Su 10 High 4:15AM 3.4 7:15AM Set 11:49AM 74
10 Low 11:30AM 0.1 5:35PM Rise11:11 PM
10 High 6:05 PM 2.7
10 Low 11:30PM 1.4
M11 High 5:12AM 3.1 7:16AM Set 12:18 PM 65
11 Low 12:11PM 0.4 5:35 PM
11 High 6:45 PM 2.8
Tu 12 Low 12:32AM 1.2 7:17AM Rise 12:04AM 56
12 High 6:22 AM 2.8 5:35 PM Set 12:44 PM
12 Low 12:55 PM 0.7
12 High 7:26 PM 2.9
W 13 Low- 1:43 AM 1.0 7:17AM Rise 12:57AM 47
13 High 7:44 AM 2.5 5:36 PM Set 1:10 PM
13 Low 1:45 PM 1.0
13 High 8:10 PM 3.0








Psane 14


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


LEVY THROUGH THE LENS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Let's Pretend!


Journal photo by Laura Catlow
"POP" THANAVATI Vithyayiranont, left, an exchange student from Thailand,
and J. D. Shouse browse the selection of books at the recent Bronson High
School Book Fair.


PHYLLIS COWART
ladles out the soup at
the Bronson United
Methodist Church
Bazaar. The bazaar
was held to raise funds
for the improvements
project for the facility
that houses the Tuesday
Night Ministry. For
information call Cowart
at 486-2860.

Journal photos
by Laura Catlow


Journal photos by Laura Catlow
THE CLERK OF COURT'S staff always takes Halloween seriously and this
year was no exception. In the Traffic Division, the gang took a trip to Oz.
Pictured, from left, Lion- Kay Hallman, Scarecrow-ChaRue Sandlin, Tin
Man- Chandra Jordan, Dorothy- Nikki Barwick, Wicked Witch of the West-
Ilene Polo. The Basement Crew, bottom, extended an invitation to Dine
with the Cannibals at the Ritz, were from left, Donna Cicale, Chrissy Jor-
dan, Melinda Bass and Virginia McDonald.
,.. r4c .- V


Finding Their Place in History


[oIu A


Low Rates Easy Terms
Personal & Commercial Auto Insurance
Home Life* Commercial
Rapid Tax Returns
"Guaranteed Lowest Down Payment"


LUNCH: MONDAY-SATURDAY 11 AM-23U0 PM
DINNER MONDAY-THURSDAY 5 PM-9 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
P; pA-ln PA


LEVY COUNTY residents are finding out how
they can record their stories in Drollene Brown's
upcoming book Levy County: Voices From the.
Past. Clockwise from upper left, Sally Baylor, of
Chiefland and Charles K. McDonell, of Cedar Key,
met with author Drollene Brown in Cedar Key.
Dorothy Pullings and Ruth Roberts Douglas met
in the workroom of the Williston Public Library on
Nov. 16 to share stories of old Morriston. Abbye
Jean and William E. Richner, of Hom osassa, and
Dot Cason (standing), of Yankeetown, met on Nov.
28 at the A.F. Knotts library in Yankeetown. They
shared some rip-roaring tales of their childhood.
Al Sistrunk, of Keystone Heights (seated), and Al
Brown, of Morriston, look over a recent newspaper
article about one of Sistrunk's ancestors. The two
men met at the Bronson Public Library on Nov. 9
to discuss family histories. Martha Parrish, Mon-
tre Hardee Mayer and Leila Ramsdell shared bit-
tersweet memories of old Chiefland when they
met at the Luther Callaway Library in on Nov. 15.


MakeYour Christmas reservations by Friday,Dec22
and New Years reservations Friday,Dec29

















115 N.W. First Street Trenton, Florida 352-463*8494


Photos courtesy of by Drollene Brown


Iw~rr


- *-*", *r-


ci










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Page 15


Savvy banking puts $ in city coffers


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIELFLAND-Chiefland will soon see its bank accounts
bringing in an additional $6,700 a month, thanks to one
commissioner who insisted a banking discussion be added to
Monday's agenda.
City commissioners voted on changing the bank where
their checking accounts and CDs are held at Commissioner
Teal Pomeroy's urging.
Although the banking management discussion was on the
agenda for last week's meeting, it did not appear this week.
At the onset of last week's meeting commissioners voted to
postpone all business to Dec. 4.
SPomeroy mentioned the absence of the item on the Dec.
(4 meeting agenda and requested the discussion be added,
Prompting some on the commission to suggest bringing it up
during the next meeting Dec. 11.
Pomeroy, not to be dissuaded, led the discussion, pointing
out that city funds currently held at Capital City Bank could
earn more money elsewhere.
Both Chiefland's checking accounts and certificates
of deposit (CDs) are held at Capital City Bank. The city's
Checking accounts are held in money market accounts and
draw 4.55 percent interest. Interest rates on the city's CDs
run from 4.55 percent for six-month bonds, to 5.23 percent on
CDs that mature in both 12 and 24 months.
Capital City, Drummond and Perkins State Bank all
submitted bids for holding city funds. Pomeroy made a
motion to change the money market accounts to Drummond,
who offered.the highest rate of 4.6 percent interest, and to
change the mature CD accounts to.Perkins who offered the
'highest rate at 5.4 to 5.5 percent. Rollins Hudson seconded
'the motion, clearing the way for its unanimous approval.
Commissioners also voted to give resident Albert Karsky a
refund on a high water bill he recently received.
Karsky paid the city approximately $1,600 in water bills
after his meter failed to pick up any usage for a period of five
months. Betty Walker and Alice Monyei opposed the vote.
.Pomeroy motioned and Barron seconded the vote to pay the
Refund, and Rollin Hudson made the third.of the split three
two vote. Karsky will be refunded $1,500, leaving the city
$100 for five months usage. His normal consumption runs
about $20 per month.
In other actions, commissioners:
Voted to allow an application for a large-scale
,rezoning amendment to the comprehensive plan to go before
the Department of Community Affairs for approval. Chris
Hardee, Faunita Hardee and Gene Roe are seeking to have
270 acres rezoned to allow 2.5 dwellings per acre for a total



SHINE offers



,Medicare aid


TERESA BARRON- RECEIVES certificate from
her completion of Advanced Institute for Elected
Officials, a course presented by Florida League
and Cities and John Scott Dailey Florida Institute of
Government. The course was taught in Tampa Oct.
20-21.

of 675 dwellings in a proposed subdivision that runs roughly
parallel to Highway 19, from south of County Route 320. to
just north ofNW 120th. Pomeroy made the motion and Monyei
seconded it before it was passed unanimously.
The Hooper/Fowler annexation passed its final reading
with a motion by Hudson, a second by Monyei. Pomeroy cast
the lone no vote.
Unanimously passed Lois Livingston's request for
rezoning of 87 acres behind Wal-Mart from R-1 to C-1.
The change will allow medical and retail spaces. Pomeroy
motioned and Barron seconded.
Unanimously passed a request by Walter Baynard and
Company to rezone nearly 19 acres east of Wal-Mart for retail
use. The motion was made by Monyei.
Unanimously accepted the final reading to include several
Long Pond subdivision units into the city's annexation.
Voted to accept the bids placed by Community Programs
Consulting, Inc. and DRMVP for the community development
block grant project. Community Programs Consulting will
perform the application preparation and DRMP will provide
engineering.
Heard details on an impact fee report prepared from
Melissa Proctor of Government Services Group.


Have you taken advantage
of SHINE's free, confidential
and unbiased help on
Medicare Part D for 2007?
SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders), a
volunteer program under the
Florida Department of Elder
Affairs, will be conducting
short presentations on the
changes in the 2007 Medicare
|Part D: Prescription Drug
Plans and one-on-one
icounseling/enrollment during
!the Annual Open Enrollment
through Dec. 31.
This is your opportunity
'to enroll or change plans
for 2007. Only those
who become qualified for
Medicare, Medicaid, or Extra
Help or lose their personal
'drug insurance or VA drug
coverage will be able to enroll
in a Part D Drug Plan during
2007. There will be limited
circumstances allowed for
,changing plans starting Jan.
1.
Please bring your Medicare
card and either your
medication bottles or a list of
your drugs with dosages and
the quantities you take daily
to any of the following sites:
Levy County

Wednesday, Dec. 13 2-4
p.m.
Chiefland Senior, Center
305 SW 1st St.:
Wednesday, Dec. 13 9
:a.m.-noon
Williston Library 10 SE 1st
St.:
Yankeetown Library 11
56t St.:
Saturday, Dec. 9
10 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 20
10 a.m.-noon
Gilchrist County


Bell Library 1140 S Main
St.:
Monday, Dec. 11
10 a.m.-noon
Trenton Library 105 NE
111 Ave:
Wednesday, Dec. 27 9
a.m.-noon
Dixie Contty
Cross City Library Hwy 19
(next to Subway):
Wednesday, Dec. 27
2-5 p.m.
Anyone who is unable to
come to one of these sites
may call 1-800-262-2243 and
ask for the SHINE volunteer
closest to you. You can
receive assistance by phone.
The state ofFloridahas gone
from 44 Stand Alone Drug
Plans in 2006 to 57 plans for
2007. It is very important that
you consider all your options
before choosing a drug plan
for next year. All plans have
changed their pricing for the
monthly premium, deductible
(if any), and their drugs.
Anyone can go to the website
www.medicare.gov and run
the Plan Comparison tool to
see which plans may best suit
your medication needs. If
you are on a Part D Plan in
2006, go through the 'View
Your Current Plan' tool in
the box on the right side of
the screen. This allows you
to compare your current plan
in 2007 prices versus other
plans in ascending order of
your annual costs. If you
live in Florida only part of
the year, be sure to look for a
plan that is national.
Please remember that if
you are unable to come to a
site, you can call 1-800-262-
2243 to contact your SHINE
volunteer for information and
enrollment assistance.


FRANCIS EASTMAN, who held a 21-year adminis-
trative post with the Levy County Road Department,
celebrates her recent retirement. Over 100 cowork-
ers, family and friends turned out for her farewell
party. Of her fellow staff, Eastman said, "The one
thing I'm going to miss is seeing all my fellow work-
ers."
Photo right courtesy of Sharon Knowles



Dental services available

for emergency work


Harmony Baptist Association has partnered with the
University of Florida's College of Dentistry and local dentists
to provide emergency dental work.
They have also partnered with the state of Florida and
the Levy and Gilchrist County Health Departments to find
patients.
You are probably eligible if you are on Medicare, Medicaid,
go to the health department or your child is on free lunches.
We will make appointments on a first come first serve basis
for children above 16 thru adults. So if you need extractions
ONLY and you think you are eligible, visit the mobile dental
unit at First Baptist Church of Chiefland, Dec. 7 and 8 from
noon until 5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.
Look for the yellow sign that says "Dental".
Limited screenings will continue at the Dental Unit.


Teacher of the


Week

Rebecca Childs

School: Joyce Bullock Elementary School

Your name, grades/subjects you teach and years
experience: Rebecca Childs. Reading coach (first year).
I have taught kindergarten, first and second grades for a
total of eight years.

Where did you go
to school? St. Leo .
University. Major? -
Elementary Education.

Favorite subject in
school: Reading!

What made you
decide to teach? .I love
children and wanted to
make a difference in their
lives. Also, I wanted to
share my love of learning
with them.

Other careers before this one? Secretary; customer
service.

Where are you from? Trenton

Family: Husband Eric; four children: Hannah, Micaiah,
Jacob and Sarah

Your hero(s): My parents

Your most unforgettable moment while teaching:
Every time a stood understood a difficult concept-it's
amazing to watch the "light" come on!

Favorite off-duty activities: Reading (of course);
Williston High School football games; church activities;
being with my family.

Words of wisdom: I will borrow a quote from Ron
Clark, Disney's teacher of the year: "I just love, what
happens when kids learn." It's all about the children!


Butterfly Wings 4-H


Club meets Sunday


The Levy County Butterfly Wings 4-H Club will hold
its next meeting at 3 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Extension Of-
fice.
They meet the second Sunday of the month, This club
specializes in butterfly monitoring/gardening/outings and
is open to all youths regardless of race, creed, color, re-
ligion, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations.
The Butterfly Wings Club is looking for youth ages
5-18 throughout Levy County to come and learn about
butterflies.
For additional information, call Reta Scott at 871-
3371.


i


What do you the give the person who has everything? A gift subscription to theI Ii I II r r
LevyCouty ournl. allRobn an orer ourChritma prsens toay.490446









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Page 16


U lassified




iand
Deadline:
Monday
2 p.m.





Legals



LEVY COUNTY JOURNll
I~'JLJ-||iE COUNTYr PAI'ENI BE.T. lI2! g P..


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


Call:
Fax:


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property.
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


Chietland 352-490-4462
Chiefland 352-490-4490


Email: mblitch@levviournal.com
Visit: 13 South ain Street, Chiefland


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


Bronson 352-486-2312
Bronson 352-486-5042

440 South Court Street, Brons6


Personals
105
AA MEETING--for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number. tfn

NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net


115 Notice"
EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location, has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352-221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b

WAY DOWN ON THE SUWAN-
NEE RIVER. OTTER SPRINGS
RV P AK.!,S, NO. -qFN-TO
THE PUBLIC. Come enjoy THE
GREAT OUTDOORS, at OT-
TER SPRINGS RV RESORT.
More than 820 pristine acres
along the beautiful Suwannee
River, with two-second magni-
tude springs. Level, pull thru, full
hook up RV sites, tent camping,
cabins, swimming pool, two bath
houses, picnic building, spring
house lodge, small church and
much more. These facilities
are also available for meetings,
weddings, retreats, scouts and
special events. CHECK US OUT
NOW IF YOU ENJOY CAMP-
ING, FISHING, HIKING, CA-
NOEING, SWIMMING, BIKING,
AND BIRD WATCHING Day,
week or monthly rates. WWW.
OTTERSPRINGS.COM. OR
CALL 352 463-0800 OR 800
883-9107 12/14b


125 Service
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb

MAKO PLASTERING &
PAINTING, Quality assurance,
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096. 12/28p


Commer U
330 Property form
EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352- 221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b
Want to R


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL re-
porter needs a place to lay his
head at night. Outstanding sports
writer is forced to commute three
hours and really wants to make a
home base in Levy County. If you
have a spare room, small apart-
ment or mobile home.you want
to rent for $200-$300 a month or
if you need a roommate to share
expenses, call Neal at 813-335-
1095 or 352-490-4462.

Real Estate




Houses fdr r
410 R
BUILDER'S HOME, 2BR/
2BA, screen room, garage,
appliance allowance, 1 acre,
$167,500. (352) 339-0373, www.
homewebsales.com 12/7&21p
Land.i
425 for Sal

OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner: 352-624-2215, 352-236-
4579, www.ocalaforestland.com/
2nd 12/28p


Auction U
910


FAT GOOSE AUCTION this
Friday in downtown Chiefland
at 7:00 pm. Always-outstanding
estate merchandise. Our box lots
start at 6:30 pm. Great primitives,
Maytag wringer washer, art
work, huge load of estate jewelry
from 2 different estates, several
early pocket watches, great
glassware, collection of framed
paper money, vintage Black
Forest Cuckoo clock, 10 ton log
splitter, early "gone with the wind"
lamp, several other nice lamps.
Nice antique furniture of all
types along with other furniture
bedroom sets, livingroom sets,
all types of small tables & desks,
Mahogany drop leaf dining room
table w/ matching hutch, 1991
Chevy S10 Blazer 4X4, patio
sets, sewing & craft supplies, all
types of smalls, load of hand tools
and lots more. AU2738 (Bruce
Denestein) AB2565 10% BP. For
more info. call Jim Morehead at
(352) 356-1065. 12/7

Miscellany U
550 ,.
NEW MOWER & CHAIN SAW
SPATS, Stihl, Hi va r PdY,, i
r urHrio' Sears TD.Br'9gg
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07
FIREWOOD FOR SALE Dry,
split and delivered. 4x8 stack
(1/2 cord)-$75.00. Full cord-
$140.00 486-2701. 12/7b

S60 Want to

WILLISTON RECYCLE Salvage
$50.00 premium for cars or
trucks. Cash for all types scrap
metal. Call today 528-3578.
12/7p


For Sale


501 Recreation


FAT GOOSE AUCTION will be
holding our special Christmas
auction on Sunday December
10th at 2:00 pm. We will have
a large supply of brand new
merchandise something for
all ages, along with all types of
great primitives, bronze statues,
and other antiques & collectibles
from different estates to include
jewelry and nice furniture. Mark
your calendar for this auction.
Remember this Sunday at
2:00 pm. AU2649 (John Roshio)
AB2565 10% BP. For more info.
call Jim Morehead at (352) 356-
1065. 12/7


MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
- Boat motors wanted, dead or
alive! 352-486-4316 12/28p








needs.
48-21


BUILDING INSPECTOR/ZONING OFFICIAL
The Town of Otter Creek is accepting applications for an
experienced Building Inspector/Zoning Official for part time
employment. Located 24 miles NE of Cedar Key and 35
miles SW of Gainesville, Otter Creek has a population of
138. For details call 352-486-4766 or 352-486-4413. Deliver
resume before noon on December 18, 2006 to 555 SW 2nd
Ave., Otter Creek, or mail to P.O. Box 65, Otter Creek, FL
32d83-0065 or fax to 352-486-4794. An EOE.
Pub: Dec. 7, 14,2006




Exactech, Inc
2nd Shift Manufacturing Positions
Finisher position with great pay and benefits. Responsibilities include performing polishing
& burring operations; blasting; cleaning; & degreasing orthopedic implants. High School
diploma or equivalent required. Must have good mechanical ability, hand skills, and basic
blueprint reading. Send cover letter, resume and salary history to
humaun.esources@exac.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 38-2006-CA-000244
JOHNNIE W. ALEXANDER,
Plaintiff,
V.


VISHNOODAT T.
THACKURDEEN AND
JOHN A. CRAIG,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

The undersigned Clerk of the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
gives notice that he will sell the
following property to the highest
bidder for cash, or as provided
in the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure After Default dated
November 27, 2006, pursuant to
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes:

The description of the property
to be sold is:

Beginning at the point on
the North line of Section
2,48in.,Townsh.ip 12 -uth,
Range 18 East, withinlfhe-
Arrendondo Grant, where
the North line of said Section
intersects the eastern edge
of the right-of-way of S.R.
#5, also known as Federal
Highway Number 41, in the
Town of Raleigh,, and from
this as the point oltbeginning
run South-easterly along the
extreme eastern edge of the
said highway and parallel


therewith a distance of 210
feet; thence East a distance
of 210 feet; run thence in
a North-westerly direction
and parallel with said
highway and first line herein
described, to the North line
of Section 24 in Township
12 South, Range 18 East
within the Grant, a distance
of 210 feet more or less;
run thence West along the
North line of said Section 24
to the point of beginning, a
distance of 210 feet more or
less (which said land is on
the East side of S.A.L.R.R.
Company's tract). All lying
and being in Levy County,
Florida.
AND
That part of fractional
Section 24, Township 12
South, Range 18 East, inside
the Arrendondo Grant, Levy
County, Florida, being more
particularly described as
follows:

Commence at the
intersection of the East
right-of-way line of U.S.
Highway No. 41 (State Road
No. 445) with the North line
of said fractional Section
24 for a point of reference;
thence run South 26 05'20"
E,,t ~,a3ngsaid E.ast ,ightv-
of-way, line -or U S Highway
No 41-; a distance of 231.96
feet to an iron pipe at the
intersection of said East
right-of-way line with a fence
line running Easterly for a
Point of Beginning; From
said Point of Beginning run
South 88'52'22" East, along
said fence line a distance
of 236.14 feet to an iron
pipe; thence run South 26'
05'20" East, parallel to a


perpendicular, a distance
of 210 feet from said East
right-of-way line a distance
of 321.00 feet to a concrete
monument; thence run
South 63 54'50" West,
perpendicular to said East
right-of-way line, a distance
qf 210.00 feet to an iron
pipe at the intersection with
said right-of-way; thence
North 26'05'20" West, along
said East right-of-way line
a distance of 429.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning.
LESS AND EXCEPT the
Southerly 48.56 feet thereof;
and LESSAND EXCEPT the
Northerly 10 feet thereof.

The time and place of the
foreclosure sale is the front door,
of the Levy County Courthouse,
on the 355 Court Street,-,
Bronson, FL 32621 18th day of
January, 2007, at 11:00 a.m., or
as soon thereafter as may be
possible. The foreclosure sale,
by the Clerk of the Court will be
pursuant to the Final Judgment,
of Foreclosure After Default in.
the above captioned action. The
name of the Clerk making the
sale appears below..

WITNESS my hand and seal
this 1st day of December, 2006.
.DANNY J. SHIPP
CLE.RF QF THE COURT

BY: Gwen McElroy
DEPUTY CLERK,
[COURT SEAL]

Robert W. Bauer


18 NW 33d Court
Gainesville, FL 32607
Pub.: December 7, 14, 2006
----------


How to Place Your Ad


4i e-re are armazing PUSStLiItis whenl
)-w IPCI YI AII c.lild's r1iiiI to rcuidifig. Log
Orlto tile Ibrbrary of GorigreSS Web sit:
Ww.lOc.gov alld let til jourltey begh).


U:


liOuIId~ldRavil k M4. uilhIIM hIRbkbf aONO= Iikal saMOW 40i8 89 Itf-*IWI C U s IMCRS Uab Wk.4
~aaV~lltpwl~ ODI~UI~00


I I a I i I





I










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Legals 90


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FLORIDA
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 38-2006CA-
000308
DRUMMOND COMMUNITY
BANK,
A Florida banking corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.

NICOLE A. SQUIRES, as
Personal Representative of
the ESTATE OF JOHNNIE
THURSTON SQUIRES, a/
k/a JOHNNY T. SQUIRES,
Deceased, and NICOLE A.
SQUIRES, individually, FELICITY
ELIZABETH SQUIRES, a minor
child by and through.her natural
guardian, VERNIE ELIZABETH
CANNON, and SAMANTHA N.
SQUIRES, a minor child by and
through her natural guardian,
NICOLE A. SQUIRES,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that
pursuant to Summary Final
Judgment Determining
Beneficiaries of JohnnieThurston
Squires a/k/a Johnny T. Squires
and Summary Final Judgment
of Foreclosure and Summary
Judgment for Damages dated
the 271' day of November, 2006
in Case Number 38-2006CA-
000308 of the Circuit Court of
the Eighth Judicial Circuit in and
for Levy County, Florida, in which
Drummond Community Bank, a
Florida banking corporation, is
the Plaintiff and NicoleA. Squires,
as Personal Representative of
the Estate of Johnnie Thurston
Squires, a/k/a Johnny T. Squires,
Deceased, and NicoleA. Squires,
individually, Felicity Elizabeth
Squires, a minor child by and
through her natural guardian,
Vernie Elizabeth Cannon, and
Samantha N. Squires, a minor
.child by and through her natural
guardian, Nicole A. Squires,
ar the Defhidaits, I will sell
tod'the higd~dt lafd '"5est bidder
for cash at the front lobby of
the Levy County Courthouse,
Bronson, Levy County, Florida
at 11:00 A.M. on the 22nd day of
December, 2006, the following
described property set forth in
the Order or Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

Lots 21 ,through 28,
inclusive and Lots 49 through
56, inclusive, Block 40,
CEDAR KEY HEIGHTS,
SECTION A, according to
the plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 17, public
records of Levy County, FL.
Together with a 1994 Weston,
Single Wide Mobile Home
Title Number 66931205
and Identification Number,
GAFLR75A61162WE.

DATED THIS 27TH DAY OF
NOVEMBER, 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Court
By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(Seal)
Pub: Nov. 30, Dec. 7, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH. JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NUMBER: .06-CA-662
DOREEN M. CASLE
Plaintiff,
VS

T. RICHARD HAGIN and T.
RICHARD HAGINAS TRUSTEE
Together with their heirs, should
they be deceased, and any
natural unknown persons who
might be the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, unknown Tenants
or other parties claiming by,
through, under of against the
above-named defendants
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

To: T. RICHARD HAGIN
and T RICHARD HAGIN AS
TRUSTEE
You hereby are notified that a
Complaint to Quiet Title was filed
in this court on August 10, 2006.
You are required to serve a copy
of yourwritten defenses, if any, on
the petitioner's attorney, whose
name and address is: Sherea-
Ann Ferrer, P.O. Box 721894
Orlando Florida 32872, and file


an original with the clerk of this
court on or before December
22, 2006 Otherwise, a judgment
may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
petition. Property Description:
TRACT #63 University Estates,
an unrecorded subdivision, in
Section 16, Township 12 South,
Range 17 East, Levy County,
Florida, being more particularly
described as follows: The North
% of the Southeast /4 of the
Northeast % of the Northeast 1/4
of the Northeast % of Section 16,
Township 12 South, Range 17
East, Levy County, Florida.
Witness my hand and seal on
November 6, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk

(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 30 Dec. 7,
2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION ,
CASE NO: 38-2006-DP-0204
IN THE INTEREST OF:

C.W. (M) DOB: 03/27/05
Minor Child.

NOTICE OF SUIT FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS AND PLACEMENT
FOR ADOPTION

THE STATE OF FLORIDA

TO: JAMON WALKER
Address unknown

You are hereby notified that
a petition under oath has been
filed in the above-styled Court
for the termination of your paren-
tal rights to C.W., a male child
born March 27, 2005, in For-
rest County, Mississippi, and for
permanent commitment of the
child to the Department of Chil-
dren and Family Services foi the.
subsequent adoption. You are
hereby commanded to be and
appear before the HONORABLE
MAURICE GIUNTA',JUDGE OF
THE'CIRCUITd O'URf bR THE
GENERAL MAGISTRATE, at the
Levy County Courthouse, Bron-
son, Florida, on the 17th day of
January, 2007, at 9:30 a.m. for
an Advisory Hearing.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY
APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES
CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL
TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
AS A PARENT TO THE NAMED
CHILD.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO
HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY
BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD
ONE, THE COURT WILL AP-
POINTAN ATTORNEY TO REP-
RESENT YOU.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four (4) consec-
utive weeks.in The Levy County
Journal at Bronson, Florida.
WITNESS my hand and as
the clerk of said Court and the
Seal therefore, this 14 day of
November, 2006.
DANNY SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Court Seal)

By: J. Marino
Deputy Clerk
JOANN M. HUMBURG, ES-
QUIRE
Florida Bar Number 831328
Child Welfare Legal Services
Post Office Box 356
Trenton, FL 32693
(352) 463-4026
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. -2006CA-000729


MARK P. SULLIVAN and
NANCY J. SULLIVAN, husband
and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.,
ROBERT WERNER and-
LORETTA WERNER, husband
and wife, if married, if alive, and
if dead, their respective un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, under
or against them individually,


Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERT WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

LORETTA WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to Quiet Title as to the fol-
lowing described lands:
The South % of tract No. 5,
in an unrecorded subdivision for
HORIZONS ENTERPRISES,
INC., BY WILLIAM D. PARRISH,
dated October 2, 1971, more par-
ticularly described in that War-
ranty Deed recorded in or Book
380, Page 692, public records of
Levy County, Florida. Said tract
assessed together with a 1973
Parker, singlewide mobile home
bearing ID#13GCM013642 and
title #5967532, located thereon.

TAX PARCEL #: 04101-002-
OH
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on RON-
ALD W. STEVENS, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Box 1444, Bronson, FL
32621, on or before Dec. 29,
2006, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereaf-
ter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Nov. 13,
2006.

Clerk of Court
By: Gwen McElroy

Persons with disabilities re-
questing reasonable accom-
modations to participate in this
proceeding should contact (352)
374-3639 (Voice & TDD) or via
Florida Relay Service at (800)
955-8771.
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY C6UN-
TY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO':," V812006CA-
00d 'c'" ;'u*3 8' ,S o qe
'R6NAIt KwRIG-HT""
Plaintiff,
vs.

ROLAND WILLITS and CYN-
THIA WILLITS, his wife, and,
any and all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under and
against the herein named indi-
vidual! defendants(s) who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties
may claim an interest as spous-
es, heirs, devisees, grantees,
or other claimants; JOHN DOE,
JANE DOE OR ANY KNOWN
OR UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION, the names being
fictitious to account for parties in
possession,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROLAND WILLITS
345 COUNTY ROAD 110
CARTHAGE, MO. 64836

CYNTHIA WILLITS
345 COUNTY ROAD 110
CARTHAGE, MO. 64836

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint to Foreclose as to the
following described lands in Levy
County, Florida:
THE N 1 OF LOT 112, FOR-
EST PARK, UNIT II, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 27, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.

TAX PARCEL ID# 10615-001-
00

A lawsuit has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, on RONALD W.
STEVENS, Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is Post Office
Box 1444, Bronson, FL 32621,
on or before January 5, 2007,.
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before ser-
vice on Plaintiff's attorney or im-


mediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Nov. 22,
2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Nov. 30, Dec.7, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 38-2006CA000954
THE ESTATE OF SARAH
LOUISE DOWNS, KENNETH
NOBLE, FLORENCE
WILLIAMS, EARLYNNE MABLE
HARPER, DONA COWARD
AND LEONARD GOLSON, all
individuals,
Plaintiff,
vs.'
ABRAHAM A/K/A ABRAM
SPIKESAND ELLAA/K/A ELLEN
SPIKES, his wife, PHILLIP D.
VACHON, ADELIA I. VACHON,
EZRA HENSON, BARBARA
HENSON, WOODROW P.
HENDERSON, NANCY L.
HENSON,WILLIEMAEGIBSON,
JOHNNY A. MCINTYRE and
BERNICE MCINTYRE
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO THE ABOVE STYLED
DEFENDANTS AND ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN'

YOUARE HEREBYNOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on
the following property located in
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, to
wit:
Property ID # 13-12-18-
04059-000-00; Property Short
Legal Description: 10.50 Acres
parts of E 2 of SW 1 of SE
4 & W1/2 of SE 14 of SE /4
Less tract Sold in Deed Book
N, Page 71, Deed Book 23,
Pages 667, Deed Book 30,
Page 112 & Deed Book 29,
Page 110.
CONTAINING 10.5 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of written defenses, if any,
to it on KIMBERLY S. DAISE,
P.A. plaintiffs' attorney, whose
address is 1747 Van Buren
Street, Suite 870, Hollywood, FL
33020-5190, and file.the original
with the Clerk of Court at 355
South Court Street, Bronson,
FL 32621 on or before January
12, 2007; otherwise a default will
be entered'against you for, lhe
relief demanded in the corriaint
petition. bns

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a reasonable
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should, no later
than seven (7) days prior, contact
.the Clerk of the court's disability
coordinator at Telephone Voice/
TDD (800) 955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and the,
seal of this Court this 27"t day of
November, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7,, 14, 21, 28, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006-DR-000-960
KENNIETH GIBSON
Petitioner
and

DONNA GIBSON
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DONNA GIBSON
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on. KENNIETH
GIBSON, whose address is 356
SE 10" Street, Ocala. FL 32656
on or before January 11, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 355 S. CT. St. or
P.O. Box 610, Bronson, FL32621
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.


Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Courts office notified
of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Address, Florida Family Law'
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules .of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-30-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Melissa Allen
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
CONSIDER VACATING
PUBLIC ROAD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
will consider at its regularly
scheduled meeting on December
19, 2006, at 10:30 a.m. in the
County Commission Room in
the Levy County Courthouse,
Bronson, Florida, the vacation,
abandonment and closing of the
following described roadway:
All that part of Bay Street lying
north of the northerly line of Pine
Street, located in Hales Addition
to the Town of Cedar Key, Florida,
as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page
22 of the public' records of Levy
County; Florida.
Any persons interested in being
heard concerning the vacation,
abandonment and -closing of
the above-described roadway
is encouraged to attend the
meeting.

NANCY BELL
SChair, Board of County
Commissioners
Pub. Dec. 7, 2006


Public Notice
All interested parties within
Levy County are hereby advised
that the Levy Board of County
Commissioners/ .DBA Nature
Coast Transit is applying to
the ,Florida" Department of
Transportation-.-for -.-a--eapital-
gra'-t~i-tTSseon.,5310 and"
for operating assistance under
the Section 5311 and 5311f of
the Federal Transit Act of 1991,
as amended, for the purchase of
transportation related equipment
and operational funding to be
used for the provision of public
transit services within Levy
county.

A Public Hearing has been
scheduled for December 18,
2006 at 970 East Hathaway
Ave. Bronson, Florida 32621,
for the purpose of advising all
interested parties of service
being contemplated if a grant,
is awarded, and to ensure that
contemplated services would not
represent a duplication of current
or proposed services provided
by existing transit or para transit
operators in the area.

This hearing will be
conducted if and only if a
written request for the hearing
is received by December 13,
2006.

Requests for a hearing must
be addressed to Nature Coast
Transit Levy Board of County
Commissioners, P.O. Box 310
Bronson, Florida 32621, and a
copy sent to Florida Department
of Transportation, 2198 Edison
Avenue-MS 2813, Jacksonville,
Florida 32204. Attn: Gwendolyn
Pra.
Pub.: Dec. 7, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR GILCHRIST
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 21-2006-DR-0350
PAULA EDMONDS
Petitioner
and

GEORGE EDMONDS
Respondent.


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: GEORGE RAYMOND
EDMONDS
15591 NW 41t Terr.
Trenton, FL 32693

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on PAULA


Page 17


EDMONDS, whose address is
15591 NW 41st Terr., Trenton,
FL 32693 on or before January
3, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at
P.O. Box 37, Trenton, FL 32693
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.,
Dated: 12-1-06
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


By: Kendra Cathey
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21,28, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006-DR-924
CASHA DAY MARTIN
Petitioner
and

DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DAVID GORDON MARTIN
Address Unknown

YOIyARE 'NOTIFIED that an'
action as een fired against.
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on CASHA
DAY MARTIN, whose address,
is 8650 NW 127" PI., Chiefland,,
FL 32626'on or before January
10, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court,
at 355 S. Court St. or P.O.,
Box 327, Bronson, FL 32621
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Courts office. You may
review these' documents upon,
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of:
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Family Supreme Court-
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: 11-9-2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT.
COURT'


By: Deanna K. Dobbins
[Court Seal}
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Dec. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2006
I


CLASSIFIED & LEGALS


Buying

Tax Deeds?
aJeed to ceaw the titie?
&xpe'idenced, Sependa&e
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
eate
eiadette J. Weidnet
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


_ ____ __ ___ _









Page 18


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7,2006


Levy Land Transactions
10/31/06 -11/03/06
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-Assign-
ment, AAD-Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended Certificate of Title,
AD-Agree Deed, Al-Assumption of Indebtedness, AM -Assignment
of Mortgage, CD-Correctory Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed,
E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage
Modify Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, PX Probate X, QCD-
Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed, WD-Warranty
Deed
WD $68,000.00, L23-24(2) WHITTEDS MOBILE HOME ESTS,
W/MH
Grantee BROWN HENRY
Grantor(s) TERWILLIGER ROY WALTER, TERWILLIGER ROY W
SR, TERWILLIGER ROY W, TERWILLIGER ROY SR
M $150,000.00, L18 GREENWOOD ACRES
Grantee(s) TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s) KILPATRICK TERESA ANN, KILPATRICK JOHN STE-
VEN
D $10.00, BDY SWI/4 SE1/41-17-16, ETC
Grantee SELLNER DIANNE N
Grantor(s) SELLNER JOSEPH T ESTATE, SELLNER JOSEPH T II
D $10.00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/41-17-16
Grantee SELLNER WILLIAM T
Grantor(s) SELLNER JOSEPH T ESTATE, SELLNER JOSEPH T II
D $10.00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/41-17-16
Grantee SELLNER JOSEPH T II
Grantor(s) SELLNER JOSEPH T ESTATE, SELLNER JOSEPH T II
D $10.00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/41-17-16
Grantee SELLNER TERRIEL
Grantor(s) SELLNER JOSEPII T ESTATE, SELLNER JOSEPH T II
M $57,267.59, L15 CEDAR KEY SHORES #4
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s) SANDLIN MYRA C, SANDLIN VIRGIL
M 1 $55,000.00, L17-18(3) SUWANNEE RIVER HTS
Grantee SUN STATE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) TOLENTINO MARIO C, TOLENTINO TERESA M
WD $102,000.00, L50 TRIPLE CROWN FARMS #1
Grantee(s) SLOAN BARBARA, SLOAN ALFRED PERRY
Grantor DEXTER KELLY
D $10.00, BDY 19, 30-11-16, PARCEL #02371-000-00, 02409-
000-00
Grantee MUNN MARLENE
Grantor(s) MUNN GLADYS ESTATE, KING ZELMA, MUNN MAR-
LENE
D $10.00, BDY 18, 19-11-16, PARCEL#02372-000-00, 02368-
000-00
Grantee KING ZELMA
Grantor(s) MUNN GLADYS ESTATE, KING ZELMA, MUNN MAR-
LENE


M $318,000.00, UNIT 1-C OLD FENIMORE MILL CONDO, ETC
Grantee(s) WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION, MERS,
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) TROY KATHLEEN, TROY GREGORY C
WD $43,000.00, L2 SUWANNEE ACRES
Grantee(s) HUGHES DEWEY EDWARDS, HUGHES DOUG E
Grantor(s) HUGHES DEWEY EDWARD, WISE.RITAR
M $36,000.00, L2 SUWANNEE ACRES
Grantee WISERITAR
Grantor HUGHES DOUG E
WD $33,000.00, L5(58) REPLAT OF WILLISTONHGH#5
Grantee(s) MILLS JULIA J, MILLS JACK H
Grantor(s) SAPOLLNTK LYNN D, SAPOLLNTK LUIS
M $227,500.00, L5(58) REPLAT OF WILLISTONHGH#5
Grantee HOME PARTNERS CREDIT CORP
Grantor(s) MILLS JULIA, MILLS JACK H
WD $50,000.00, L3(11) JB EPPERSON ADD TO WILLISTON
Grantee(s) NICHOLS ALFONSO, NICHOLS JANIE BELLE
Grantor(s) NICHOLS JANIEB, WILLIAMS TUCKER JR, COX
BETTY, WILLIAMS JIMMIE
M $40,000.00, L3(11) JB EPPERSON ADD TO WILLISTON
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s) NICHOLS ALFONSO JR, NICHOLS JANIE BELLE
WD $10.00, L5(16) WILLISTONHGH#12
Grantee HOOVER TERRENCE M
Grantor(s) DE HOOVER GENARA MACEDO, HOOVER GENARA
MACEDO DE, HOOVER TERRENCE M
WD $75,000.00, L5(16) WILLISTON HGH #12, W/MH
Grantee(s) SACHER SHIRLEY L, SACHER GEORGE K
Grantor HOOVER TERRENCE M
M $67,521.79, L5(16) WILLISTON HGH #12, W/MH
Grantee WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s) SACHER SHIRLEY L, SACHER GEORGE K
M $115,200.00, L 14SOUTHERN PINES
Grantee AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY
Grantor(s) VANCE RONALD, VANCE SANDRA K
WD $110,000.00, BDY W1/4 NE1/44-13-19, W/MH, PARCEL
#04929-002-00
Grantee(s) BROWN JAMES C JR, BROWN AMANDA Y
Grantor LOVETT BETTY FRAZIER
M $82,500.00, BDY W1/4 NE1/44-13-19, W/MH
Grantee MATTCOLE INVESTMENTS LLC
Grantor(s) BROWN JAMES C JR, BROWN AMANDA Y
M $27,500.00, BDY W1/4 NE1/44-13-19, W/MH
Grantee LOVETT BETTY FRAZIER
Grantor(s) BROWN JAMES C JR, BROWN AMANDA Y
M $108,700.00, L2(C) BRONZE-SUN ACRES SD, BDY 34-11-17
Grantee CHASE BANK USA NA
Grantor(s) LEFFERT THERESA MARIE, LEFFERT JERRY JO-
SEPH
M $29,000.00, L2(C) BRONZE-SUN ACRES SD, BDY 34-11-17
Grantee CHASE BANK USA NA


Grantor(s) LEFFERT THERESA MARIE, LEFFERT JERRY JO-
SEPH
WD $35,000.00, L1(25) WILLISTONHGH#7
Grantee (s) SIMMONS HERMINIA M, SIMMONS DAVID L
Grantor(s) GIUSTI SYLVIAA, GIUSTI JOSEPH
WD $60,000.00, L23 SPANISH TRACE ADD #1
Grantee(s) TOLENTINO TERESA, TOLENTINO MARIO.
Grantor(s) SUAREZ ROBERTO PEDRO, SUAREZ ORESTES
JESUS
WD $159,000.00, L9(A) NORTHWOOD ESTS
Grantee(s) WHITEHURST BILLIE JO, WHITEHURST DANIEL EM-
METT III
Grantor(s) COCHRAN MARLA, HIERS JOHNNY, TITERS MARLA
KAY
M $65,200.00, L9(A) NORTHWOOD ESTS
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s) WHITEHURST BILLIE JO, WHITEHURST DANIEL EM-
METT III
WD $45,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SW1/48-13-18, PARCEL #044409-
001-00, W/MH
Grantee(s) ETHERIDGE G FRANK, ETHERIDGE NANCY W
Grantor BELLAMY BURTON W
WD $175,000.00, L2(8) THE FARMS AT WILLISTON INC #1
Grantee HARDWICK DEBORAH)
Grantor BARBER LYNNE
M $175,000.00, L2(8) THE FARMS AT WILLISTON INC #1
Grantee(s) TRI STAR LENDING GROUP, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, PINNACLE
FINANCIAL CORPORATION
Grantor HARDWICK DEBORAH)
CD $10.00, L17(B) WAKONDA ESTS
Grantee(s) LANDRY ELLSWORTH P, LANDRY SABRA L
Grantor LANDRY SABRA L
CD $10.00, OR 841/244,L15-15A WEBSTER JOHNSON'S, BDY
30-15-13
Grantee(s) WHITTALL LAURA E, WHITTALL DONALD E
Grantor QUAD T RANCH CORPORATION
WD $100.00, L2(1) DEERWOOD, W/MH
Grantee(s) GUY SHEILA, GUY DALE
Grantor FILLMON ANTHONY WAYNE
WD $25,000.00, L2(1) DEERWOOD, W/MH
Grantee(s) SOLANO BRIAN, SOLANO ROBERT
Grantor(s) GUY SHEILA, GUY DALE
WD $199,900.00, L65 BUCK BAY PHASE It
Grantee(s) RUSSEL CHRISTY JO, RUSSEL JAY JR
Grantor PRIZAMENT ELI
M $199,900.00,-L65 BUCK BAY PHASE It
Grantee HOMEBANC MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Grantor(s) RUSSEL CHRISTY JO, RUSSEL JAY JR

Continued on page 19


Jessica Gleason of IGA in Bronson reads the





SEVY COUNTY JOURN


Also available at these locations:

Also available at these locations:


Bronson
A&ABBQ
Boondocks Grill
Bronson Post Office
Courthouse-Bronson
IGA '
Li'l Champ
Nobles
Pick-a-Flick
Texaco/Chevron
Lee's Grocery
Cedar Key
Cypress Station
Island Jiffy #1173
Island Jiffy #3246
The Market SR 24


Chiefland
ABC Pizza
Bell's Restaurant US 19
BBQ Bill's US 19
Burger King US 19
Chiefland Flea Market
US19
Chiefland Flea Market
Laundromat
Chiefland Post Office,
Park Ave
Church's Chicken/Jiffy
3000
CVS
Dollar Tree US 19
Gas Mart Yogiraj En-
terpr. Inc.


Jiffy 2280-Manatee
Jiffy 2946-Midtown
McDonald's US 19
Mya's Chinese Restaurant
Stone's BP
Sunoco, US 19
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Garden side)
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Grocery side)
Winn Dixie US 19
Winn Dixie #168

Fanning Springs
Homestead US 19
Lighthouse Rest. US 19
Noble Food Mart, US 19


Fowlers Bluff
Carter's Crossroads

Inglis
Food Ranch
US 19/Inglis Ave
Shell Station US 19


Old Town
BP Station-US 19
Jiffy Store
Old Town Post Office

Otter Creek
Hershel's Quick Stop & Deli,
Hwys. 19.24
Otter Creek Post Office


Trenton
BP-Round store on SR 2
Citgo Sunrise Food Mart


#65
Hitchcock's-Trenton
Jiffy Mart #1553
Trenton Medical Center
Trenton Post Office


Williston
BP Gas
Corner Market 121/41
Exxon
Hitchcock's
Li'l Champ 1181
Li'l Champ 1182
Li'l Food Ranch 3626
Li'l Food Ranch 4231
Raleigh General Store
Sunoco #65, Hwy.
27/N. Main St.
Sunoco #464, Hwys.
27/SW 4th
Williston Post Office


Jessica Gleason, a customer service representative at the
Bronson IGA, along with her "helper" Amanda Lang, left are
catching up on this week's latest in the local sports and rec-
reation from the Levy County Journal.



Pick up your copy today.

You'll be glad you did.


To subscribe: call Robin at 490-4462


We accept
Visa/Mastercard
Two locations to serve you
440 South Court St., Bronson
13 South Main St., Chiefland


VISA


- ~Journal photo by Rhonda Griffiths










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Page 19


Land Transactions

M $151,000.00, L71 WATERWAY ESTS 93, ETC
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) COMPTON GISELA S, COMPTON GISELA S TRUST-
EE, COMPTON WARREN R, COMPTON WARREN R TRUSTEE
WD $470,000.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/430-14-19
Grantee(s) JIMENEZ VIVIAN, JIMENEZ DOMINGO
Grantor(s) DEFILIPPO TERRY ANN, DEFILIPPO ANDREW
M.$329,000.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 30-14-19
Grantee(s) NATIONAL CITY BANK, MERS, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, FIRST FRANKLIN
Grantor(s) JIMENEZ DOMINGO F, JIMENEZ VIVIAN M
WD $194,900.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/430-14-19
Grantee(s) JIMENEZ DOMINGO, JIMENEZ VIVIAN
Grantor(s) DEFILIPPO TERRY ANN, DEFILIPPO ANDREW
M $189,900.00, BDY.SE1/4 NE1/4 30-14-19
Grantee(s) DEFILIPPO TERRY ANN, DEFILIPPO ANDREW
Grantor(s) JIMENEZ DOMINGO, JIMENEZ VIVIAN
WD $90,000.00, BDY 33-14-16, W/MH
Grantee(s) ALEXATOS LEWIS M JR, SMITH LOIS M
Grantor(s) BRANNAN HELEN, BRANNAN JAMES
WD $170,000.00, L7-8(8) OAKVILLA
Grantee PILARO RAYMUNDO M
Grantor(s) BRANNAN KENNETH M, BRANNAN SHARON C
M $157,500.00, L7-8(8) OAKILLA
Grantee(s) ATTORNEYS MORTGAGE SERVICES, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor PILARO RAYMUNDO M
WD $287,000.00, BDY L17-20(6) MAP OF THE SOUTHERN
PART OF THE CITY OF CEDAR KEY
Grantee(s) WILCOX MARCIA E, WILCOX JAMES
Grantor ROSSETTI WALTER D
M 1 $182,000.00, BDY L17-20(6) MAP OF THE SOUTHERN
PART OF THE CITY OF CEDAR KEY
Grantee SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) WILCOX MARCIA E, WILCOX JAMES
MMA $133,000.00, OR 618/936, 686/866, 794/472, 883/296,
987/702, BDY 32-13-18, PARCEL #04505-033-00
Grantee AMSOUTH BANK
Grantor(s) KALBACK CHARLENEA, KALBACK RICHARD F, KAL-
BACK CHARLENE S
M $55,000.00, L7(26) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5
Grantee ALLSTATE SERVICING INC
Grantor KEMMERER GRANT L
WD $235,000.00, L9-10(11) OCALA HGH.WEST
Grantee PYLES DELLA
Grantor(s) DOUGLAS LEARY KAREN, LEARY HENRY J SR,
LEARY KAREN DOUGLAS
M $211,500.00, L9-10(11) OCALA HGH WEST
Grantee WELLS FARGO BANK NA
Grantor PYLES DELLA K
WD $230,000.00, L23-24(5) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee PQPIKAS DONALD J JR
Grantor MUMPOWER CHARLOTTE E
WD $24,900.00, L3(10) WILLISTON HGH#12
Grantee MILLER TIM
GrantorADM HOLDINGS LLC
M $22,400.00, L3(10) WILLISTON HGH#12
Grantee ADM HOLDINGS LLC
Grantor MILLER TIM
WD $129,000 00, L 4SROLLING OAKS'S BDY 29-14-18. W/MH
G ntee(s) M .RIE ~ DANIELj jB23 ,IAIH
Grantor(s) EVE~ROLE MARGIE A, EVERSOLE THOMAS W
M $116,000.00, L14 ROLLING OAKS, BDY 29-14-18, WIMH
Grantee FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY
Grantor(s) MAZARIEGOS MYRIAM, MAZARIEGOS DANIEL
M $1,500,000.00, BDY SE1/4 NW1/41-14-17,ETC
Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor SOLLEY IDA ARLENE
WD $5,500.00,L32, 34(19)BRONSON HTS SD 3RD ADD
Grantee RODRIGUEZ SABRINA
Grantor(s) CRUZ CARMEN, CRUZ HECTOR M
M $250,000.00, UNIT B-301NATURES LANDING CONDO, ETC
Grantee(s) BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, MERS,
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC 'REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s) RUSSELL LYNNE C, RUSSELL JEFFREY R
AAA $200,000.00, OR 1018/226, L22-23, BDY L21(1) YAN-
KEETOWN
Grantee GTE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) AKINS CASANDRA L, MULLER WALTER
M $213,247.00, L 1(2) JEANNEHEIBNER SD
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA

Grantor(s) WOLFSONLO, MASER. ROSLYN A, WOLFSON LOIS
A;
M $86,250.00, L25, 27(15) BRONSON HTS SD 3RDADD
Grantee MIDFIRST BANK.,
Grantor(s) SPRAGUE PAULA M, SPRAGUE DANNY LAWRENCE
M $367,000.00, L6 SMALL RANCH SD #2
Grantee BANK QF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s) YSIDRON BEVERLY, YSIDRON ANTHONY SR
M 1 $43,498.00, L1 (B) CARSONS INGLIS ACRES #8, W/MH
Grantee SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) WILDEY RACHEL M, WILDEYANTHONY)
AD $73,792.66, L46(10) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/ MH
Grantee(s) ATCHISON HOPE A, ATCHISON LARRY


Grantor(s) COTHRON CARLA MANN, COTHRON PHILLIP D Grantor(s) WASSON TAYLOR, LEE CLAYTON
WD $30,000.00, BDY 25-11-14, PARCEL #00690-001-00 QCD $10.00, L23 FOREST PARK #1
Grantee CASTELL TIM Grantee(s) ALDAY CHARLES R, ALDAY JUDY
Grantor HARPER MARY H Grantor ALDAY JUDY
QCD $2,500.00, BDY L6(3) EAST WILLISTON WD $36,995.00, L22(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee HEMPHILL JAMIE LEE Grantee(s) NUNEZ ADRIAN, NUNEZ JANET H
Grantor DALLAS RUDOLPH GrantorAMERICAN PRIME LLC
QCD $10.00, BDY 36-16-17, PARCEL #03926-001-00, ETC M $31,445.75, L22(36) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee(s) WOLCOTT RICHARD L, WOLCOTT SANDRA Grantee AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor(s) WOLCOTT RICHARD L, WOLCOTT SANDRA Grantor(s) NUNEZ ADRIAN, NUNEZ JANET H
MMA $14,000.20, OR 991/239, BDY NE1/4,SE1/413-12-18, PAR- M 1 $40,000.00, BDYNE1/4 NE1/418-11-17 & L2 STATION
CEL #04078-006-00, ETC ACRES
Grantee OCALA NATIONAL BANK Grantee FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) STEPHENS KENNETH, STEPHENS PHYLLIS Grantor(s) COWART PHYLLIS, COWART JACK A
QCD $10.00, L11(24) UNIVERSITY OAKS M $50,000.00, L11-14(2) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee NORDAN SHAWN Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s) RYDECKI KARL F, RYDECKI GRACE N Grantor(s) ROCKS JAYNE V, ROCKS KEITH B
M $65,000.00, BDYNW1/4 NE1/42-12-14 WD $10.00, L4(29) RAINBOW ESTS SEC N
Grantee CARNLEY CAROL N
Grantee BANK OF AMERICA NA Grantor(s) NASH JD, NASH JACOB D
Grantor(s) TARQUINIO FRANCIS, TARQUINIO SHIRLEYA WD $140,000.00, L2(A) CASONS INGLIS ACRES #3
M $53,900.00, L11(14) UNIVERSITY OAKS Grantee(s) BOYD SHIRLEY M, BOYD DAVID E SR
Grantee(s) CHAMPION MORTGAGE, KEY BANK NATIONAL AS- Grantor(s) MOORE JUDITH A, MOORE LLOYD L JR, MOORE
SOCIATION LLOYD L
Grantor HOLDEN ADRIAN R M $24,056.07, L16(B) USHERS ADD TQ CHIEFLAND
M $25,000.00, L270(18) UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 14-12-17, Grantee CAPITAL CITY BANK
W/MH Grantor JENKINS MARY L
Grantee SCHONBRUN HARVEY TRUSTEE M $70,000.00, BDY 20-12-19, PARCEL #04713-003-00
Grantor(s) WARD SUSAN J, CLARK GEORGE T Grantee(s) DITECH COM, GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
QCD $10.00, Ll11 FOREST PARK III PHASE I MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
Grantee SNOWDEN MICHELLE D INC
Grantor SNOWDEN TERRELL P Grantor(s) WHITE KIMBERLY M, WHITE CHRIS D
QCD $100.00,. BDY 32-12-19, PARCEL #04886-000-00 M $10,000.00, L4(12)B&R SD #5, BDY 32-12-18
Grantee BIG 0 CORPORATION Grantee(s) USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, USAA FSB
Grantor(s) PHILLIPS TAFT CYNTHIA DECEASED, TAFT CYNTHIA Grantor(s) CREMEANS ANDREA E, CREMEANS STEVEN B
PHILLIPS DECEASED, TAFT THOMAS A M $28,959.11, BDY SW1/4 SE1/4 2-11-14, ETC
M $251,000.00, L1 KINDRED SPIRITS FARM SD Grantee CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES INC
Grantee(s) AMSOUTH BANK, MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC Grantor TRAIL DALE
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC WD $10.00, L8 CEDAR KEY SHORES #7
Grantor(s) ORLOWSKI JAMES L, ORLOWSKI ELIZABETH S Grantee(s) KOPEC REVOCABLE TRUST, KOPEC FRED JR,
M $28,000.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 26-13-15, PARCEL #01967- KOPEC FRED, KOPEC FRED JR TRUSTEE, KOPEC FRED
000-00, W/MH, ETC TRUSTEE
Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK Grantor KOPEC FRED JR
Grantor(s) CURRY DON NEWTON JR, CURRY LILA MAE M $23,000.00, BDY NW1/4 6-12-18, PARCEL #04001-006-00,
CD $10.00, OR 984/35, L77-78, 84 BUCK BAY PHASE 4 ETC
Grantee KUMINKAA ELIZABETH Grantee PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor MEEKS & MANN LC Grantor HERRON JAY FREDERIC
M $225,000.00, L84 BUCK BAY PHASE4 WD $10.00, L82 SPRINGSIDE A MOBILE HOME SD
Grantee(s) AMERIS, TM COUNTY BANK Grantee(s) LIGAMMARI DEBRA J, DEMPSEY VALERIE C
Grantor(s) KUMINKAA ELIZABETH, KUMINKA GARY Grantor ALTERS JANE E
AAA $11,409.59, OR1042/311 WD $35,000.00, BDY SW1/4 NE1/4 3-12-14, PARCEL #00939-
Grantee DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK 000-00, ETC
Grantor(s) GOLDING MARY R, MARYS LITTLE LAMBS INC Grantee WADLEY.CLIFTON KIRBY
WD $10.00, L12(9) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5 Grantor BECKHAM WAYLAND D
Grantee(s) DORVAL LINDA WILEY TRUSTEE, FAMILY TRUST OF M $70,500.00, L2(37) OAK RIDGE ESTS
LINDA WILEY DORVAL, LINDA WILEY DORVAL FAMILY TRUST Grantee(s) KIRKPATRICK REVOCABLE TRUST, KIRKPATRICK W
Grantor(s) DORVAL LINDA W, DORVAL RICHARD A R TRUSTEE
WD $167,500.00, L10(4) WOODFIELDS SD Grantor CENTRAL STATE CONSTRUCTION INC
Grantee(s) WASSON TAYLOR, LtE CLAYTON WD $10.00, L5(7) WILLISTONHGH #12
Grantor(s) WALDRON OVADA L, HILL BRANDON B, HILL BRAN- Grantee(s) MCNULTY ROBERT TROY JR, PONCIER KATHLEEN
DON, HILL OVADA L, HILL OVADA JEWEL.
M $150,750.00, L10(4) WOODFIELDS SD Grantor MCMILLION MABEL
Grantee(s) TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP, WD $10.00, L1 WILLIAMS QAKS
JME~, tRTGAGE -f~CTNI.R iSRTION SYSTEMS U Grantee(s) WILLIAMSPARNICKA. WILLIAMS WENDYJILL
S- .raiitor WILLIA19PARKNICRA_- .


Couples seek marriage licenses


Joseph Michael Licairi,
2/16/85, and Holly Amber
Mercer, 10/31/85, both of
Williston.
S David James Wilcox,
3/30/84, of Archer and Crys-
tal AnnWilt, 8/15/82.
SDonald W. Emrick, 4/3/73,


and Stephanie Lyn Rich,
10/25/82, both of Williston.
Pavel Blaho, 6/27/35, and
Karen L. Baver, 7/28/50, both
ofWilliston.
Rafael Colon Rivera,
10/4/78, and Lefsy Merari,
Maldonado Diaz, 12/25/79,


both ofBronson.
Anthony Yates, Jr.,
11/14/70, and Robin Lynn
Wilerson, 12/23/65, both of
Williston
Blake Nicholas Fessendon,
4/5/83, and Danielle Leigh
Lowell, 12/19/84.


What's cooking in Levy schools?


Monday. Dec. 11
Pizza
Mixed Salad
Buttered Corn
Peach Cobbler
Tuesday, Dec. 12
Lasagna w/Ground Beef
Tossed Salad
Green Beans
Chilled Mixed Fruit
Hot Garlic Roll
Wednesday. Dec. 13
Hamburger on Bun
Oven Fries
Lettuce/Tomato/Pickle
Cherry Pie


Thursday. Dec. 14
Turkey & Dressing
Mashed Potatoes
Green Beans


Mixed Fruit Cup
Homemade Rolls.
Friday, Dec. 15
Manager's Choice
1 --II


GATOR WORKS
COMPUTING
Sales. Repair. Upgrade
S Consulting
I6 IProgramming
Q 0Networking
A inCrOSOft'
C.R'IIFED


Computer
Training Classes

4W.ParkAve
j m S hiefl


Building and Development
Your Custom Home Specialist

Locally Owned and Operated By
Steve and Karen Smith

Office: (352) 486-4290 Mobile: (352) 538-1388
or (352)-538-3141
stevesmithconst@aol.com

f Personal Attention

'4 Quality Craftsmanship & Materials

Framing and Concrete Finishing








Page 20


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Winter comes to Chiefland


A LIGHT MISTY rain fell
most of the day, but it didn't
dampen spirits at Chiefland's
Christmas and Winter Festi-
val.
From eight booths three
years ago to 56 Saturday,
Chiefland Chamber President
Bob Williams is more than
happy with the way the holi-
day kickoff has progressed.
There was something for
everyone at the all-day event
and smiles were on every-
one's faces: 1) Local artist
Bob Robinson talks about his
cracker art with a potential
customer 2) Raven Hamby
demonstrates how to make
music with his hand-crafted
didgerdoos 3) Diners en-
joyed chili and hotdogs out of
the rain 4) chamber of com-
merce members kept things
moving smoothly 5) Vendor
Nikki Kosch took the chill in
stride and wrapped up in a
blanket 6) Samantha Schraer
of Girl Scout Troop 48 count-
ed change for a customer 7)
McKenzie Story, 4, and her
sister, Julie, 6, enjoyed their


candy canes 8) Chiefland Friends
of the Library made sure folks had
plenty of reading for rainy days 9)
Joan Thomas, Meveree Pope, Ann
Langford and Pam Johnson of the


Levy-Gilchrist Retired Educators
Association were all smiles and
10) Loren Wood, 8, and Brittni
Craft, 6, knew just how to stay dry
and still enjoy the festivities.


r7


I."


IE


'o-I


r, '-,
1


***


r2Z 77


i1.-77


OF LIBRARy
-_ ^^^^"^^B


n.I



S'4
, '._

m ,"', c


Journal photos
by Carolyn Risner


-Ii&


F,


t~~ /I:


Y~Y~.


~ ~~a~

I-"Za;



aS"


.c-^ -"


PL


i n k


i ..r
Y
..


'
rfR


--\ i.


-Q::


~i~









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Page 21


Christmas in Chief and


Light rains and chiHy tempera-
tures didn't daunt parade lovers
Saturday as the Greater Chief-
land Chamber of Commerce
welcomed the Christmas sea-
son with its annual motorcade.
From marching bands to hors-
es and fire trucks, people lined
the streets for a glimpse of holi-
day magic and the appearance of


Santa Claus.
Chiefland's own Barbara
Lunsford acted as the parade's


grand marshal.
Winners of this year's float
contest were:
1st-Central Florida Electric
SCooperative
2nd-Bell's Tree Service
3rd-Hardeetown Baptist Church


rnIr e
~~b~
''' :r
dl~i~Yc~:~ cu
~.~ ~ 53` ii


-4..'
"" ,e ,
-,,r ,l :. .'
iiPiP'


\


Journal photos by
Carolyn Risner


- .-


L4


.f~~. I
p Y.


IM'r


--
I' l l_


w 6til


I -


*1IP


I.,,

.4
~1~
""'


Cll



B


ra ^:


I


AL---::


tii








Page 22


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMEBR 7, 2006


Thomas family welcomes.Baby Bo
Andrew and Angel
Thomas ofTrenton welcome
the birth of their son, Bo,
born Sept. 27, 2006. He
weighed 71bs., 5 oz. and
was 18 inches long. He
joins his brother Tyler and
sister CeCe.
Maternal grandparents
are Robert and Gloria
Hastings of Chiefland.
Paternal Grandparents are
John Doyle and Lorene
..9 / Thomas of Cross City.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Olin and Helen Hastings
of Trenton; paternal Great-
grandparents are Horace and
Hazel Thomas of Trenton
S. and Bessie Jones and the late
Foy Jones of Old Town.


If you're not subscribing,

you're losing money. Call today


Brown-Waite given empty grocery bags


Aware of labor concerns
facing agriculture, this fall
Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
tion embarked on a unique
way to have members send a
personal message and visual
reminder to their member of
congress.
This weekCongresswoman
Ginny Brown-Waite was pre-
sented with a visual reminder
of the importance of having
workers for Florida's agri-
culture industry when. nearly
200 grocery bags signed by
Farm Bureau members were
delivered to her at her office
in Brookesville.
The Florida Farm Bureau's
"Empty Grocery Bag Cam-
paign" kicked off in August.
The concept was to have
each Farm Bureau member
attending their county's an-
nual sign an empty brown
paper grocer bag. They could
also write a short message to
their congressman, sharing
their unique concerns about
immigration.


"Border security and a
safe, affordable domestic
food supply are both vital to
our national security," said
Kevin Morgan, director of
the Florida Farm Bureau's
agricultural policy division.
"We believe that immigra-
tion reform must be done in
a comprehensive manner that
includes border security, en-
forcement and a viable legal
guest worker program."
The grocery bags were af-
fixed with a label on one side
with a message that read,
"Border security and enforce-
ment is vital to our national
security. A safe, affordable
and abundant domestic food
supply is too! Support com-
prehensive immigration re-
form providing legal guest
workers to harvest our crops
or this bag may remain emp-
ty."
During each county Farm
Bureau annual meeting,
members were given the op-
portunity to sign these bags


and include their addresses so
that the members of congress
would know the bags came
from constituents in their dis-
trict.
"We know there is a great
need for an available work-
force for our producers,"
Morgan said.
More than 4,000 bags were
signed by Farm Bureau mem-
bers across the state.
"The strength of Farm Bu-
reauis our grassroots activities
and this campaign has been a
great exercise in utilizing our
membership on such a critical
federal issue to Florida," said
Casey Welch, Florida Farm
Bureau's National Affairs
Coordinator."Our goal is to
show each Congressman that
our members are concerned."
Brown-Waite thankedFarm
Bureau members for bringing
the bags and the issue to her
attention. She said the bags
would be sent on to Congress
in Washington D.C.


FOR
: T .. ir k l j ":.




... rd


TRN THIS...

... INTO



VY COUNTY JOU AL
.`Iii COUNTY PAPER EST. 12 .


Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate B
www.gosswilliams.co


broker R4
GOSS WLLIAMS


MOBILE HOMES: REAL ESTATE, INC.
Whitted Mobile I~saep~i9 2 DWMH on 2 lots,
screened porch, d acnitd carport & more. Owner fin-
ancing to qualified buyer! -$69-600Reduced! $62,500
Park-like 5 acres with 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000.
Waterfront 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land
escaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well. $84-00. Reduced! $76,000
New Listing 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600's.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
HANDYMAN on 5 Acres. 2 BR, 2 Bath singlewide that
needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500. Owner financing
available.
COMMERCIAL:
City of Trenton 2 corner lots with 2300 sf warehouse.
Just off of 129. $89,500.00
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $13000 Reduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres -just off U.S. Alt. 27. $1-20-00 Reduced:
$110,000
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85-;60 Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $1-9;t0Tper acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corer Parcel 80 Ac at corer of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage; large oaks.
-$--+2-;0per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres -just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
City of Trenton Small residential building lot in town -
chain link fenced, nice lawn. $39,900
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $17,500
Whitted Mobile 4 endn 2 lots ready for your mo-
bile home. On Sae Pu. Reduced! $13,000
2nd one: $1-500. Reduced! $12,500
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $139,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal 3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


U


ARE YOU A



SERIOUS SELLER?

IF YOU OWN REAL ESTATE & WANT MAXIMIZED VALUE

S- CONTACT YOUR CURRENT
QUICKLY REAL ESTATE AGENT OR ANY
OF THE REAL ESTATE
PROFESSIONALS LISTED BELOW WHO CAN EXPLAIN
THE BENEFITS OF HAVING YOUR PROPERTY INCLUDED
IN THE UPCOMING. .... .. .. .. .... ...


*** *** GREAT *, **

NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

S REAL ESTATE AUCTION!!!

*HAVE YOUR PROPERTY. *NO SALES COMMISSION
EXPOSED TO MILLIONS OF -NO CLOSING COSTS
PEOPLE IN THE EASTERN *NOMINAL LISTING FEE
UNITED STATES $1,000 TO $4,000
& INTERNATIONALLY
*READY AND WILLING PREFERRED REAL ESTATE
& ABLE TO BUY AUCTION LISTING AGENTS:
*PRE-APPROVED FINANCING KenCornell,Realtor 'larkCoben
FOR BUYERS Cornell & Associates EYEMARK Realty.
ken@CprnellRE.com mark@eyemakrealty.com
ALL TYPES OF PROPERTY -4000.60
Bill Thompson Robert Lusnia
HOUSES CONDOS Sunbelt Corporate Advisors Hometyle Realty
HOUSES* CONDOSwjt01@bellsouth.net BeautlfduArcher, FL
352-380-0404 352-495-9915 ,
HOMESITES KaylaSosnow Jack Myers, Lic. R.E.Broker
A EA E TRACT Gore-Rabell Real Estate Campus Realty
ACKayla@treedtyproperties.net jackm@campusrealty.org
WATERFRONT 352-328-7474 352-318-5442
WATERFRONT-I
Gilles Maillart Barbara Miller
COM M ERCIAL Sunbelt Corporate Advisors Prudential Preferred Properties
Incl051@bellsouth.net bmiller@prudentialgainesville.com
352-380:0404 352-494-5449




BEN CAMPEN

AUCTIONEERS













To list your home or property, call Laura at 486-2312.
We have prices to fit every budget.










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Page 23


1 Hart


Germans in the water," Hart
said.
"They were just trying to
kill us, and we had to haul
them up out of the watef
and put them on our boat."
Hart said that while most of
the prisoners survived, some
were too badly injured.
"A few of them didn't
survive. We had to put them
in those flame-proof bags
we covered our mattresses in
and put a rock between their


legs." After the chaplain said
prayers, the dead were sent to
a watery grave. "We probably
buried about 10," Hart said.
Those who lived were
transferred to an American
vessel serving as a prisoner-
of-war boat a few days later.
When the Endicott returned
to her homeport of Brooklyn,
N.Y., Hart recalled a welcome'
reception.
"Any bar we'd go to, we
couldn't hardly buy a drink.


I remember a bar called
Friendly 's-there's a bar
named Friendly's in every
town-we'd tell them what
ship. we were on and they'd
all buy our drinks."
Hart has scars from fighting
in World War II-he has a
hearing disability. Yet his
attitude is unaffected, or even
enhanced, from his battle
years.
His grin and humor are
ever-present: "I've enjoyed


Continued from front
my life. I've done everything
I wanted to do," he said.
Although the Endicott is
decommissioned, hermemory
lives on.
"The ship's bell is hanging
in the chapel at Camp David,"
Hart said.
"And there's a bronze bust
of our skipper in the Annapolis
naval academy. Commander
Bulkeley is one of the most
decorated military officers in
U.S. history."


Put home heating costs on ice


Winter weather can take a toll
on personal finances as hom-
eowners raise the thermostat to
counter cooling temperatures.
Maintaining a comfortable cli-
mate indoors is one of the largest
monthly expenses a homeowner
faces. According to Mary Carac-
cioli, financial expert and host of
"Money Matters Today" on CN8,
The Comcast Network, one of
the best ways to save money on
your monthly bills is to focus at-
tention on home heating conser-
vation.
"Forty-five percent of your en-
ergy bill goes to heating or cool-
ing your home," Caraccioli says.
"This is a great area to target if
you are looking to lower your
household expenses this win-
ter."
Caraccioli offers the follow-
ing seven easy ways to reduce
household heating costs:
1) Inspect your equipment:
Before it gets cold outside, take
a look at your furnace, or hire a
professional, to make sure it is in


TURN THIS...


good working condition. "Starting
early eliminates the chance of
being charged a premium price
for work when you need it most
-- not leaving you to the mercy of
the contractor," says Caraccioli.
"Should something be broken,
you will have the time to shop
around for the best price for re-
pair or replacement."
2) Upgrade: Energy-efficient
equipment can save money by
reducing the amount of energy
needed to power the appliance.
Plus, these models can offer
added financial benefit, Carac-
cioli says. "Many energy-efficient
products qualify for federal tax
credits," she offers. "This saves
you money on your tax bills, just
remember to keep the dated
receipt handy for filing." When
shopping for furnaces, look for
high Annual Fuel Utilization Ef-
ficiency (AFUE) ratings. The
national minimum is 78 percent
AFUE, but there are "Energy
Star" models that are more than
90 percent AFUE.


3) Turn down the thermostat:
Don't spend money heating your
house while no one is in it. Set
the temperature to something
below comfort level, but high
enough to prevent damage in-
side the home. "Programmable
thermostats are a good invest-
ment because they allow tem-
peratures to be set for specific
times during the day," Caraccioli
say. "The heat can turn on before
you get home from work, and
go off when the family retires.to
bed."
4) Let the light in: Simply
opening curtains or blinds dur-
ing the day lets warm sunlight
into a home, naturally heating
the room. "Also, cutting back
branches and bushes around
the windows allows more sun-
light to enter a room," Caraccioli
suggests.
5) Draw the drapes: Consider
hanging heavy curtains during
cold months. Closing the drapes
at nighttime can provide an ex-
tra layer of protection from drafty
windows.


S -". .
Very Nice 22 SW MH only a couple of blocks
from the Suwannee River and a boat ramp. This
partially furnished MH has a fenced yard, 8 X 12
screened patio, 9 X16 screened porch, 6X10
storage shed & canopy carportfor the car or
boat Priced to sell. $78,000. (DMH-753191J)
463-6144


Lovely2/2DW MHonapondW5woodedacs. REDUCED Lovely 3 bedroom 2 bath
This h6mesits on the bank ofan old dug out home in County Club Community. This
pondorrockmine, thatisfulloffishandistotally home has an open design with nice view
surrounded by naturalFloridawoods.12X12 ofthe patio and poolarea.is a well
Sun Room that couldbe easily mad in toa third maintained and fully landscaped home in
bedroom.***$135,000. a beautiful county setting. $198,000.
(DMH-753109JW)4636144 (LR-753002RH) 352493-2221
m~*sli-i ~-. l '7 "


S-.W, ... UPSCALE SUWANNEERIVER CANAL HOMEII
"--'. Exquisite 3 BR. 25BA home is a one minute
S canal nde to the majestic Suwannee River and
BRAND NEW, CUSTOM BUILT LOG HOME! This Gulf of Mexicol With atwo-stall boathouse,
South of Chiefland 2 bedroom (could be gorgeous log home sits on a beautiful, park-like 1 concrete seawall, workroon/utility storage,
changed to 3 Br.) 2 bath older block home Acre, Inside this home you are surrounded by the large lotwl Irigation, fish cleaning area,
warmth of wood from top to bottom. The kitchen elevator, screened deck, dual outdoor swings.
remodeled wlopen floor plan, wood flooring, and baths have marble tile & custom cabinets w/ Inside, beautiful pecan wood floors, pecky
screened porch. All on 10 beautiful acres granite counter tops. It offers plenty of space with 4 cypress walls, fireplace, breakfast bar, bonus
wlpaved road frontage. $292,000. bedrooms & a bonus space upstairs. Enjoy your room/office, dual ac, generator, hurricane
w/paved roadfr e. $ peaceful yard ihile sitting on your large front or windows, lust too many extras to mentionll


.. INTO THIS!


Find your dream

home
in the
Marketplace!




L VYCOUNTY JO L
IE COUNTY PAPER EST. 192



Call Laura to list your house in the
Marketplace. 352-486-2312


BRONSON HEIGHTS LOT
Beautiful .36 acres lot off of Hwy 27
in Bronson Heights Area!
\5 Acres $289,500 Priced to Sell! $22,000
536 Karrn 538-3141 Natalie 219-8365 MLS# 754449


* I


he ship's prisoners


1r


c /i!36~r!

bkja :.~








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2006


Rooks takes Bell to task over minutes


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-For the sec-
ond time in as many months,
the Levy County Board of
County Commissioners dealt
with whether or not to alter
official minutes of meetings.
At the conclusion of
Tuesday's regular meeting,
Commissioner Lilly Rooks
said minutes from the Oct. 3
meeting had been altered by
the addition of a footnote that
the board specifically did not
want added.
Rooks said the minutes
that she had been given for
review were not the minutes
that were presented at an eve-
ning meeting in November.
The minutes in question
date back to the Sept. 25 pub-
lic hearing where Chairman
Nancy Bell said she wanted
to set the millage at 7 per-
cent. In October, Bell said it
had come to her attention that
she had misspoken during the
hearing and she asked a foot-
note be added to those min-
utes to reflect she had meant
mills.
After a 10-minute discus-
sion, the board chose not to
second a motion by Tony
Parker to allow the footnote.
When the minutes were
presented, the footnote was
there.
"I want to know who gave
authority [for the footnote],"
Rooks said.
Clerk of Court Danny
Shipp said he had consulted
with his attorney who said
there was no problem. with
attaching the footnote.
When Rooks pressed why
an attorney consultation had
taken place, Teresa Gulledge,
who records the minutes of
the meeting, said Bell had
.asked her.
Shipp said he had given
Gulledge permission to add
the footnote.
Rooks made a motion to
remove it from the Sept. 25
minutes. Bell said the attor-
ney said there was nothing
wrong with the addition.
"There may not be," Rooks
conceded, "but there was a
motion and it died for lack of
a second." Rooks went on to
say that the minutes she had
been given to review were
not the ones presented for a
vote. "I don't like getting a
copy at the last minute be-


EIOCC
Continued from front
The veterans' group has
outgrown its clubhouse in
Williston, where it has met
for five years. Members pro-
vided documentation and tes-
timony that they had never
had problems in the Williston
location and didn't foresee
any in the future.
Members of the post and its
auxiliary spoke of the numer-
ous charitable deeds they do
and cited the club's canteen
as a money-maker that allows
them to do their work.
Only one person, Ma-
rie Wells, spoke against the
exception, telling the com-
missioners that she and her
neighbors had no idea when
the AMVETS located to her
residential neighborhood that
alcohol consumption would
be allowed. She said she did
not oppose the group, only
the drinking because of the
proximity to her property.
Also Tuesday, Judge Jo-
seph Smith came to the com-
mission pleading for some ac-
tion to be taken on the heating
and air conditioning. Smith
spoke of the often unbearable
climate in the courthouse and
said they needed relief.


Anyone who attended the
September hearings in Court-
room A knew what the judge
meant. Jackets and long
sleeves did little to make any-
one comfortable.
The board agreed to con-
sult an engineer to determine
what is needed before hiring
a heating and air specialist.


cause of something you don't
like," she told Bell.
Commissioner Danny Ste-
vens seconded the motion
because the original intent of
the board was not include the
footnote.
The motion passed 4-1 with
Bell dissenting and Shipp au-
thorized Gulledge to strip it
from the record.
In other business, Rooks
said she had learned from
reading the newspaper that
it was allegedly Shipp whom
Anne Brown, the county at-
torney, had harassed. This is-


sue was presented two weeks
ago during Brown's evalua-
tion.
"What is harassment?"
Rooks asked Shipp.
The clerk said it had pri-
marily come from former
employee Susan Haines, who
now works for Brown. He
said much of it concerned
obtaining board minutes and
at least three people had tried
to take minutes. He said his
staff in the basement and fi-
nance departments had also
cited instances and he termed
it harassment.


Vision meeting cancelled

The city of Chiefland Vision Committee meeting previ-
ously scheduled for Tuesday, Dec.12 at 6 p.m. at city hall has
been cancelled.
For more information, contact Jennifer L. Willis, project
and finance coordinator at 352-493-6711.


Thank you for reading the

Levy County Journal


Engineering firm told 'no thanks'
BY CAROLYN RISNER It was also noted that Capri does not have
MANAGING EDITOR employees in Bronson, but close by in Ho-
Despite a persuasive argument that the mosassa and Ocala.
town needs its own building department, Council members thanked Brown but reit-
members of the Bronson Town Council said erated they are content with the current way
they're happy with the way things are cur- of doing things.
rently operating. In other business, the council agreed an
Walter Brown of Capri Engineering re- engineer's second opinion is needed on a
turned for the second time Monday night to proposed subdivision off CR32.
pitch his company's services. Brown said Lee Mills usually handles the town's engi-
fees charged and collected would pay for the neering work but he is the engineer of record
work his company would perform and the on the Hailey Jordan Development.
town would incur no cost. The subdivision's planner is asking for a
From issuing building permits to site in- variance to the planning code that would al-
spections, Capri would be a one-stop place low a single ingress/egress to the develop-
for a building department. ment rather than.the two that are required.
Mayor Beatrice Mongo was first to ex- Council members expressed concerns
press her concern about the proposed permit about fire situations and traffic congestion
fee. Currently Bronson charges $25 and Ca- that make arise from the proposed 152-home
pri has proposed $100. development.
Mongo said the huge increase may stunt Attorney Ronald Stevens suggested that
Bronson's growth, an independent engineer review the plans
Brown said the fee could be reduced to and the variance before the council takes any
$75-still three times higher than the cur- action.
rent cost. "The advantage of going with Ca- In action, the council
pri," Brown said, "is it will never cost you a Agreed to offer Jim Cornelius the
dime." He said because they now pay some- position of town manager/attorney. The job
one an hourly rate for this service, if it takes description needs to be tweaked but council
a while, the $25 permit fee is not paying the members believe that can be done as they
bill and someone else-namely the citizens proceed. The vote was 2-1 with Melody
of Bronson-are picking up the tab through LaFlam dissenting. Councilman Aaron Ed-
ad valorem taxes. mondson was absent from the meeting.


Current tax law allows small business owners a tax deduction -


For Full-SizeTrucks and Cargo Vans (greater than 6,000 Ibs. GVWR):
Deduct a maximum of $108,000, depending on the number of vehicles
purchased in the first year. In other words, if you only buy one, you are
allowed to deduct the entire purchase price, including any amount
financed. Qualifying vehicles include all F-150 Regular Cab, SuperCab
& CrewCab models with a greater than 6 ft. bed, all F-250 through F-750
Super Duty, and E-Seriec Cargo Vans.


For Full-Size SUVs &.PassengerTrucks (greater than 6,000 Ibs. GVWR):
Deduct a maximum of $25,000, plus your normal 20% depreciation on
the balance, all in the first year. Qualifying full size SUVs include
Explorer, Exporer Sport Trac, and all MY'06/MY'07 Expeditions. Pass-
enger trucks qualify as an SUV according to tax law and would there-
fore include all F-150 SuperCrew, 4 Dr. models (due to less than 6 ft.
bed).


F-150 XL F-150 4x4 XL F-150 Supercab Mountaineer F-150 Supercrew
Reg. Cab 4x2. #6T0110 VS, Auto, Reg. Cab. #6T0103 XLT Tow & Go. 4x2. #6T0271 #6T0145 4x2. #6T0280
MSRP $21,095 MSRP $26,745 MSRP $29,740 MSRP $29,885 MSRP $32,010
fORPICS- VaUR PREef YOUR PRICE- YOUR RCS YOUR PRC-o p -
.3.. "2191474 i,7i* $22,973 $23,153


F-250 Grand Marquis LS
Reg. Cab, 4x2. #6T0288 Ultimate. #6C0063
MSRP $28,035 MSRP $33,120
YOUR PRICE YOUR PRICE.-
$22,381* $23,923*


F-150 Supercab F-150 Supercrew
4x4. #6T0113 DEMO- 4x4. #6T0223
MSRP $34,212 MSRP $39,125
YOUR PRICR YOUR PRICE -
$25,124* 28,905*


Expedition XLT F-250 Crew Cab Expedition Expedition 4x4 F-250 Crew Cab 4x4
Keyless, Leather. #6T0016 Diesel, 4x2. #6T0340 Eddie Bauer. #6T0305 Eddie Bauer. #6T0368 Lariat, Diesel. #6T0177
MSRP $41,365 MSRP $37,075 MSRP $42,810 MSRP $45,680 MSRP $47,050
YOUR PRICE YOUR PRICE YOUR PRICE YOUR PRICU YOUR PRICE -
29,4772* $29934* $32,996* *$ 001 -$38,742"

Wishing you the happiest Christmas ever From Our Family to Your Family!

I =i' -OWJWl CLEAWAIfMCE SLEf I


U'0rFar dxpedition
#187 $12.495*


I 96 Ford Taurus
#203o3.498*


t2nR$6.995


#176$8.4giB


99i-150u upercab 4x4, XLI
#211i *10.99!


I qpul ih IM


10 OO=F
Any Service Work
When you bring in a new unwrapped
toy to benefit the Toys For Tots
program. Must have coupon.
Expires12-15-06. 916 N. Young Blvd., C


*Prices net of rebate, plus tax, tag and $224.95 document fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Art for illustration purposes only. In stock units
only. See dealer for details. (W.A.C.) = With approved credit, financing with Ford Motor Credit Co. Prices may include FMCC financing. Incentives
and rebates subject to change. Rebates may include Owner Loyalty. See dealer for details. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit financing.


Drive a Little .tl SMUa
crmSC More... l arLOxSt

OldTown / A

All Road ....
ad tO r onson
WHte Par i / \_. \
nClelall y Y"<1 wills m
e t GulfHto mmock Ocal
**Incilis
Website: www.whitefordmercury.com


YI :" / i AITOillFFl l f rIm :gIIW i Ih-ll. P hI r .a i I I ,, I S 1 a -p r i .iT~r llrrlc


'03 Ford F-150 XLT '05 Explorer Sport Trac #094 '04 Ford Supercrew '04 Ford Expedition '04 F-250 Crew Cab 4x4
#127.Tonneau Cover 17,988 #200 18,995 .#209 22,495* #21 28,995


Super CoupeT-Bird 1 Owner....5,495* '06 Mustang #168................... Y17,498 '06 Fusion #135...................... 18,498* '06 Freestyle #167..................20,998
'06Taurus #004 '11,998 '06 Milan #134 ........................18,498 '04 F-150 Supercrew 4x4 #200..18,995' '06 Expedition #011 ......:........25,988*


MERCURY
hiefland Toll Free 1-888-864-4582


. I


I