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Levy County journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00097
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: November 23, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00097

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
    Main continued
        page 6
    Main: Obituaries
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
    Main continued
        page 15
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 16
        page 17
    Main continued
        page 18
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 19
    Main continued
        page 20
Full Text









EYN COUNTY JOURNAL

E COUNTY PAPER U*EST. 1923


VOL. 83, NO. 20


INSIDE

i


Jave a blessed

Thanksguiing!

'i
^-^

tn *^^|H


Move over,
Bobby Flay!
Page 6


OBITUARIES
I
Peggy Edwards
Pearlie Holt
J.R. Swilley
Robert Zickafoose

CONTENTS ..



Around Levy 2-3,5,.6, 15
Opinion 4
Law & Courts 5
Obituaries 7
Sports 8-14
Tides 12
Classified 16
Legals 16-17
Marketplace 18-19.

HOME OF...
i


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23,2006 1 SECTION: 20 PAGES


Courthouse needs


room to grow

BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
With more people comes more government and with more
government, the need for space becomes essential.
The Levy County Board of County Commissioners agreed
Tuesday to begin negotiations to buy property near the court-
house and begin working with an architect on plans for ad-
ditional space needed for its expanding offices.
County Coordinator Fred Moody said the committee work-
ing on the space problem had offered a preliminary concept
to keep court-related offices in the main courthouse and seek
an annex, for offices such as the tax collector and property
appraiser. Some 22,000 square feet is needed and should ac-
commodate the growth for the next 20 years.
Additional building space will also mean more parking-up
to 100 spaces.
In other business Tuesday, the board passed an ordinance
that could exempt certain historic properties from ad valorem
taxes.
Originally brought to the board by Stanley Bair of The Is-
land Hotel, the ordinance will cover property on the National
Historic Registry that is open to the public at least 20 hours
each week and could mean as much as a 50 percent reduction
in assessments.
Currently two Levy County properties fall into that cat-
egory, according to the county attorney and approximately
$4,300 is now spent on taxes.
A state agency will determine which properties are eligible,
the attorney said and then it will be up to the county commis-
sioners to decide how much, if any, tax relief is given.



Groundwater Leovl
@.kbeua -O#


50 cents per copy


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan
KINDERGARTENERS ACROSS the county have unusual ideas on how to
cook a turkey and this week we're sharing those recipes with you on page
6. And while not everyone is skilled in the -kitchen, the students in Mrs. Ivy
Dix's class at Bronson Elementary were more than happy to line up and tell
everyone what they're thankful for.



SRWMD issues water advisory


LIVE OAK-The Suwannee River Water
Management District (District) governing
board today issued ii Phase I Water Shortage
Advisory that will remain in effect district-
wide until further notice.
The district covers all of Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Su-
wannee, Taylor and Union counties, and por-
tions of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Jefferson,
Levy and Putnam counties.
No mandatory restrictions are in place, but
water managers are calling on all residential,
commercial, agricultural and industrial users to
voluntarily reduce water consumption through
conservation measures.
Lack of rainfall has created a moderate
drought throughout the Suwannee River basin
in Florida and Georgia, according to the Na-
tional Weather Service (NWS).
Most areas of the District are experienc-
ing low or extremely low groundwater and


surfacewater levels due to below-average
monthly rainfall.
With a cumulative 12.17-inch rainfall
deficit, the year ending Oct. 31, 2006 is the
eighth driest year since 1931.
New record monthly lows were observed
at the Aucilla River near Lamont, the Stein-
hatchee River near Cross City, and for the
second month in a row, the Santa Fe River
near Fort White. The end-of-month reading
at the Withlacoochee River near Pinetta tied
the historic monthly low at that station, after
setting a new low last month.
Water shortage advisories are issued by
the District in accordance with Florida Stat-
utes and the Florida Administrative Code,
which give them authority to implement
water shortage plans.
With the NWS predicting a return to El

See Water Page 19


Appraiser defends property assessments


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Rotarians
had a special item on their
menu at last week's meeting.
As member Don Barrett put
it, Rotary invited property
appraiser Francis Akins
to speak to the group on
"How the county cow ate.
cabbage on how the property
appraiser's office works."
According to Akins, the
period between 2003 through
2005 saw unprecedented
sales and property values
in the area. Speaking in
sometimes nearly inaudible
tones, he said, "This was
something we had never
seen," he said. "It is the duty
of the property appraiser to
keep up on what the county
is doing," he added.
Akins said that during this
timeframe, the county was
running approximately 900
recordings a month. In prior
years, the appraiser's office
saw an average of 220 to 230
per month. He added that


REACH US

Managing Editor
Carolyn llsner
Phone
(3521490-4462


the newer purchases were
mostly vacant lands, and that
buyers were often out-of-
town speculators.
He noted lots in the
Rainbow Lakes Estates
subdivision. "They were
running at three or four
thousand a lot. All of a
sudden they started coming
in from South Florida and the
land jumped up to $65,000."
He added that one property
had sold six times in a year.
Akins said his office has
recently run numbers that
indicate the real estate market
has stalled. His office has
also noticed some reduced
prices. "People have different
motivations for buying,' and
different motivations for
selling," he said. However,
he does not think values will
drop significantly.
In terms of assessment
values, Akins said that his
office could have gone
higher than they did. "We're
up 43 percent. I'm not proud
of that, but we feel it was a


Fax
(3521490-4490 Chlefland
13521486-5042 Bronson
Email
edltor@liVylourMal.com
Address
P.O. Box 19 Bronson, R 32621-0159
P.O. Bx 2990 Chlelland, R 32644-200


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan


LEVY COUNTY PROPERTY Appraiser Francis Akins
told members of the Chiefland Rotary last week that
appraisal is an art, not a science.


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Leaw, Bxe and Scllmst aucentl
$11

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conservative increase," he
said. .He added that in spite
of the hike, the county is still
running "below the margin,'!
and that prices "are not going
to come down as quickly as
they went up."
He said his office is
required to assess properties
on 80 percent of market
value, and that assessed
values are actually running
between 60 and 70-percent.
Akins said Levy County
was audited by the state this
year. The blind audit was
conducted by an independent
contractor. Such contractors
normally come from another
part of the state according
to Akins. He added, "Any
appraisal book out there will
tell you appraisal is an art,
not a science."
He said that should
property values start going
down, appraisals will follow-
-unless your Levy County
home is a second home. "In

See Akins Page 19


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. That's why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


Cliff Berry
of Inglis



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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


No more sinking feeling


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
: CHIEFLAND-The sinkhole is fixed! While residents of the
block behind Chiefland Farm Supply no doubt were already
aware, commissioners only heard the official announcement
during last Monday's commission meeting.
'Commissioners also considered an annexation
implementation plan. Several services will now be required
by residents and businesses in the newly annexed areas and
plans need to be made to do this. Interim city manager Matt
Brock said he would bring implementation plan updates to
each commission meeting as they become available.
Commissioners took the following additional actions:
S Micky Morgan, from Chiefland Area Athletic
Association, requested approval of his plan to apply for a grant
for equipment for an all-condition soccer field. While winning
the $100,000 grant is seen as a long shot, commissioners
unanimously approved the request following a motion by
Teresa Barron.
S Heard and unanimously passed two industrial property
lease agreement renewals, one a lease to Marcus Hall and the
other to Robert Coarsey. The new one-year leases come with
rent increases due to rises in insurance.
S Heard and tabled the final reading of the Hooper/
Fowler voluntary annexation request. Commissioners raised
several questions during the reading such as whether a
potentially large subdivision should be allowed to be annexed
into the city without having to hook up for water and sewer


connections.
Unanimously approved the final reading oftheAsbell
voluntary annexation request after a motion was made by
Alice Monyei and seconded by Rollin Hudson.
Unanimously passed the first reading of an ordinance
allowing the city to collect assessments from Long Pond
Landing units within city limits. The assessments are for road
maintenance. The motion was made by Barron, seconded by
Pomeroy, and unanimously passed.
Passed a motion to purchase hurricane shutters from
Kane Screen for $20,800. Purchase is contigent upon receipt
of a grant. Motion made by Barron, seconded by Monyei,
passed unanimously.
Passed an amended fiscal year 2006 budget for the
general fund. Relates to grant monies already spent. Pomeroy
motioned, Monyei seconded, unanimous passage.
Decided to have one meeting in December instead of
two. The second meeting would have occurred Dec. 25.
S Allowed two days of holidays in December-the 25th
and 26th.Normally, the 24th and 25th is given. Tuesday was
given in lieu of the 24th, which falls on a Saturday this year.
Monyei moved, Pomeroy seconded, unanimously passed.
Unanimously passed the minutes from the Oct. 23
and Nov. 6 meetings.
Learned from fire chief David Burnett that the
department has purchased two new defibrillators with grants
from the Florida Department of EMS.


More than $6K raised for Lupus Foundation


A large crowd of area
residents turned out for
the second. Lupus Fund-
raiser held in honor of Dina
Roberts Wasson Oct. 14 at
the Suwannee River Shrine
Club near Fanning Springs.
;'The evening was a big
success for the Lupus
Foundation as $6,150 was
raised.
'October was Lupus Month
nationwide and the date of
the event was chosen for that
reason.
r Maggie McQueen and
Michael Keffer of the Lupus
Foundation of America,
Greater Florida Chapter, Inc.
attended the event.


Michael McElroy of
Trenton was the emcee for
the event. Friends and family
came from near and far to
participate in the yearly
event.
Barbecue dinners were
served and cookbooks were
sold to raise funds. Also a
raffle was held for jewelry
and a gun.
Tommy Dean of Bronson
was the auctioneer for a
beautiful quilt made by
Kathryn Estes of Branford.
The quilt featured the purple
ribbons used as a logo by the
Lupus Foundation. Michelle
Walker Crawford purchased
the quilt.


r ,
: '



JOSH WASSON
Dean also auctioned off a
basketball signed by Gator
coach Billy Donovan and



Tammy Crosby purchased it.
Several people baked cakes
to be auctioned off also.
Harold and Martha
Reynolds of Trenton, who
sang a special song they wrote
for Dina, provided musical
entertainment. The Philman
Family band also played for
the event.
Josh Wasson, who is Dina's
son, spoke and told everyone
how his mother was always
there for him. Michelle
Walker Crawford prepared
a Powerpoint presentation,
which included photos from
Dina's life.


Community Calenda







Friday, Nov. 24
SQuilt show, Chiefland, 8 a.m.
Fun at Manatee State Park, 10 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 25
> Light display, Chiefland, 6 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 27
> GOP, Chiefland, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 30
STourism meeting, Bronson, 6 p.m.
S Music at the library, Williston, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec.2
S.Divorcing parents' class, Chiefland, 9 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 9
o Basket auction, Williston, 10 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 10
Victorian holiday,Haile Plantation, noon
Detailed descriptions of these events are contained
elsewhere in the Levy County Journal.


Tourism board to meet
The Levy County Tourist Development Council will meet
on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 at 6 p.m. at 380 South Court
St., Bronson, Florida Levy County. Planning and Attorney
Conference Room.

Quilt show begins Nov. 24
The Log Cabin Quilters will hold its 23rd Annual Quilt
Show Nov. 24 through Dec. 3, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
On Saturday, Dec. 2, they will have Bluegrass Gospel Music
and will be serving a chicken and dumpling dinner. There will
be lots of crafts, quilts and baked goods. The drawing for the
quilt will be held on Sunday, Dec. 2.
The Levy County Quilt Museum is located 11050 NW 10"
Ave., Chiefland.

Cane grinding at Dudley set
Dudley Farm Historic State Park Annual Cane Grinding
Day will be held on Saturday, Dec. 2, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. It is
free admission.
For more information, call 352-472-1142.


Happy Thanksgiving. Have a safe and happy holiday!


S Did you know that virtually all adults believe a smile is an important
sbcial asset? An array of options are available from AACD member dentists
to give you the smile you have always desired.
For your smile consultation, contact:
Robert E. Mount, Jr., DDS PA
Offering Cosmetic Dentistry that
Makes You Proud of Your Smile!
TMJ Evaluation & Treatment Zoom Bleaching
One Appointment Crowns Preventive Dentistry
Most Insurance Accepted New Patients Welcome!
110 E. Park Avenue, Chiefland (352) 493-1416
m-m. sw


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If it Doesn't say



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Join many other area
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Page 2


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1113 N.W 23rd Ave., Chiefland
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)
.-Call (352) 493-9500 for an appointment today


_ _


I
I
"''










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Manager list pared to five


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Although
Chiefland commissioners
chose six candidates to
interview for the city manager
position, the shortlist has
dropped to five. The sixth,
Brian Johnson, dropped out
to take a position in South
Carolina.
'The remaining five will be
interviewed during two open
meetings at city hall next
week.
Lyndon Bonner and Jerry
Tramel are scheduled to meet
commissioners / Tuesday,
Nov. 28 beginning at 6 p.m.
Matt Brock; Grady Hartzog,
Sr. and Clyde Forbes will be
interviewed Wednesday, Nov.
29 from 6 to 9 p.m. -
Chiefland interim city
manager Matthew Brock,
of Gainesville, was 'the
city administrator for Live
Oak from August 2003
until October 2005. He was
responsible for a $15 million
budget and 95 employees.
He received a $1.4 million
legislative appropriation,
improved a nonconforming
regional waste management
system using state and federal
grants, oversaw a 2,500-acre
annexation and completed
community development
block grants.
He created a capital
improvement program, and
long-term strategy for utility
infrastructure.
He served as Dundee,
Florida's town manager from
March 2000 to August 2003.
Prior to this time was served
three positions in Luray,
Virginia's government-as


town manager, director of
public works, and assistant
director of public services.
Brock served in the U.S.
Marine Corps as both active
duty infantry and reserve
administrative officer from
1972 to 1997.
He earned a masters degree
in public administration from
University of Virginia. He
earned a bachelor degree
in economics from James
Madison University. He
has worked for the past 12
years in local government
positions.
Lyndon Bonner, of Ocala,
was the city manager for
the city of Bunnell from
2002 to 2006. While there
he managed investment
funds, negotiated agreements
with Florida Department of
Transportation, and acquired
and administered state
infrastructure grants. He
also served as the city lobby
representative in Florida and
Washington D.C.
He served as the director of
public services for Dunnellon
and a planner with the city of
Wildwood. He has a master's
in business administration
from Webster University in
St. Louis, Missouri and a
bachelors from the University
of Florida.
He lists as key skills water
and wastewater development
and feasibility analyses.
He has about 13 years
experience in local
government.
Clyde Forbes, of Trenton,
describes himself as an
entrepreneurial manager.
He has served primarily
as a manager of railways


throughout his career. He has
been president of Florida West
Coast Railroad since 1987. He
received his bachelor degree
from Northeast Missouri
State College in 1964.
Grady Hartzog, of
Newberry, served in various
capacities for the city of
Newberry for 30 years before
retiring in 2004. In his role
as mayor and acting city
manager, he administered
a $5.5 million budget and
managed 50 employees.
Other positions he held for
Newberry include building
inspector and superintendent
of the sewer system. He
owned three furniture shops
in Newberry, Trenton, and
Georgia from 1989 until
2001.
Jerry Tramel, of
Cottondale, has a doctorate
degree in business
administration, a masters in
business management, and
bachelors degrees in business
and science education.

He has served as the city
manager of Sneads since
September 2004. He lists the
achievement of completing a
motel, shopping center and
plaza at Sneads.
Prior to his current role, he
workedassenioradministrator
at The Landings at Sea Forest
in New Port Richey and as the
senior director of Stratford
Landing, Florida Housing
and the Affordable Housing
Project in Tallahassee.
His resume list highlights
the skills of development,
budgeting, public speaking
and emergency disaster.


County attorney gets scrutinized


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-County Attorney Anne Bast
Brown is doing an above satisfactory job,
four of her employers agreed.
However the fifth said if she had the power,
she would ask for her resignation.
Brown's annual evaluation came Tuesday
after two residents spoke on her office.
The first, C.W. Gilbert of Bronson, told the
commissioners that Brown had accosted him
after a recent meeting and demanded to know
who he had referred to when he had said a
county employee was harassing department
heads.
Gilbert said Levy County residents are not
happy with "this half million dollar attorney"
and told the commissioners that in future, if
any questions were to be asked ofhim by the
county attorney, they would be in.public.
Dave Bibby of Williston asked the commis-
sioners to put the attorney controversy behind
them and move forward. He said the decision
to keep the full-time attorney position had
been made by a majority of the boaid and it
was time to get on with life.
"It's not a healthy thing," Bibby said of the
controversy that began in September when
Commission Chairwoman Nancy Bell wanted
to eliminate the full-time position and return
to the former way of handling legal matters-
on retainer.'
When it came time for Brown's evaluation
and request for a merit raise, Commissioner
Danny Stevens got things started by com-
mending Brown on her work.
He said he was very satisfied and thought
she has handled matters well considering the


caseload she has.
S"You look out for the county," Commis-
sioner Lilly Rooks said, adding Brown's ef-
forts in working with department heads made
it easier to understand her budget process.
Sammy Yearty and Tony Parker echoed
the sentiments but it was Chairwoman Nan-
cy Bell who put the fly in the ointment.
Bell said that she rated Brown's perfor-
mance as less than satisfactory-and for many
reasons. She said her requests had been met
with resistance and there were written and
verbal complaints from staff and citizens
alike.
In fact, in her evaluation of Brown, Bell
failed to give the attorney any satisfactory
marks.
Scoring started at 1 (the worst) and went
to 4 (excellent). Brown's evaluation, by the
chairwoman, was all ls and 2s.
Bell was especially harsh in the category
of working effectively. Out of six items,
Brown received all 1s with the exception of
a 2 for leaving a strong work ethic and a de-
sire for professionalism.
"If it were my singular decision as your em-
ployer," Bell wrote, "I would ask for your
resignation."
The other commissioners did not agree
and with Yearty's motion and Parker's sec-
ond, the board agreed to give Brown the
same merit raise that had been given other
department heads.
Bell opposed the raise.
Brown has been employed with the county
since March 2004. The evaluation is for the
entire work period, not just recent events.


THIRTEEN MEMBERS of the Bronson High School Class of 1966 gathered re-
cently at the Cedar Cove Restaurant in Cedar Key for a Hawaiian luau as they
celebrated their 40-year class reunion. Classmates attending were: Jaynace
(Barber) Williams, Steve and Mary (Cobb) Bird, Louia Gilbert, Don Hagan, Tom
Havens, Larry Lee, Basil May, Mary Jo (Perryman) Summers, Linda (Robinsor)'
Baynard, Audrey (Smith) Castell, Ramona (Swilley) Barber and Alvin Wilker-
son. Also in attendance were former BHS teachers John and Sylvia Rutledge,'
who coincidently, were the recipients of the 1966 BHS Yearbook Dedication
for their years of service to Bronson High School. Class president Mary Bird
opened the program by asking the group to remember three classmates who'
have passed away-Linda (Goodson) Barnes, Johnny Griffin, and Barbara'
(McElveen) Pepper. A seat was reserved and a photograph of each was on
display for these three beloved classmates. As part of the reunion activities;
classmates received a complimentary collection of '60s music from classmate'
Louia Gilbert and his wife Nancy. Louia also provided some beautiful garden':

plants to be presented as door prizes. After an evening of good fellowship-
food and remembrance of old times, guests were entertained by a slide show
presentation of "Snapshots through the Years" presented by Owen Baynard;
husband of classmate Linda Robinson Baynard.



Quilters give thanks early


BY WINNELLE HORNE
CORRESPONDENT
Log Cabin Quilters met
Thursday, Nov. 16 at the
Levy County Quilt Museum.
It was our favorite day as
we celebrated Thanksgiving
as an appreciation day for all
that goes on at the museum,
friends and husbands who
put up with the wives who
come each week.
We welcomed Robert
Douglas, Chief of Police of
Chiefland, Jimmy Anderson,
Chiefland Police Dept. and
Scott Anderson, Levy Coun-
ty Sheriff's Department.
It was turkey day. Jarred


Jones, Lancaster correc-
tional officer, who fried our
turkeys and the food that
was so much we filled three
big tables with chicken and
dumplings, dressing, gravy,
cranberry sauce and dozens
of dishes. Doris Beauchamp
cut the turkey. The desserts
were so many and everyone
had a great time.
As soon as lunch was over,
the quilts and crafts were out
to see what went where. It.
takes several days to set ev-
erything up. Pat, B.J., Cleo,
Marge, James, _Alice Mae,
Carol,' Betty and others got
busy and the quilt room is


full of all kinds of crafts. The
quilts will hang in the great
room, as will be working on
to show how we only hand
quilt. The day was great; ev-
eryone went home with a full
stomach as well as food for
supper.
Our show starts Nov. 24
and we run 10 days. We look
forward to seeing old friends'
as well as new. This our 23Trd
Quilt Show.
We had 55 present.

Winnelle Home is the di-'
rector of the. Levy County
Quilt Museum.


News Briefs


Music at the library
Friends of the Williston
Public Library-will present
a musical of local talent in
concert, Thursday, Nov. 30,
at 7 p.m. in the library.
Dr. Lou Jensen will direct
Heidi Schwiebert on guitar
and vocal, Lisa Posteraro on
piano, Wyeth Read and Fritz
Junker on violin. Dr. Jensen
will play reeds and do vocals.


This will be a program of big
band standards, a classical
piece or two and a sing-along
to provide an entertaining and
fun evening.
Music lovers should mark
their calendars for this night.

GOP meets Nov. 27
The Levy County Repub-
lican Executive Committee
(REC) will hold its monthly


meeting Monday, Nov. 27, at :
Bell's Restaurant in Chief-
land starting with fellow-
ship and dutch treat dinner at
6:30.
The REC meeting begins
at 7:30.
The REC website is www.
levyrepublican.com. If you
have any questions you may:
contact George at 486-0036.



..


L COUNTY JOU LT
IKlE CONTY PAP IS ST. 2( L
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
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Page 4


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


YOUR VIEW


Take time to say thanks

:The soul at its highest is found like God, but
an angel gives a closer idea of Him. That is all
aft angel is: an idea of God."
:: -Meister Eckhart

*:Life without thankfulness is devoid of love
aid passion. Hope without thankfulness is
Iacking in fine perception. Faith without thank-
filness lacks strength and fortitude. Every
virtue divorced from thankfulness is maimed
arid limps along the spiritual road.
:: -John Henry Jowett

':Our rural ancestors, with little blest,
':Patient of labour when the end was rest,
Indulged the day that housed their annual
grain,
With feasts, and off'rings, and a thankful
strain.
-Alexander Pope

Thanksgiving Day is a jewel, to set in the
hearts of honest men; but be careful that you
do not take the day, and leave out the grati-
tude.
-E.P. Powell



Miss Honey says...

ood morning! Here sits Miss Honey, poor ole soul,
got no money, but a heart of gold, may she rest in
peace in this old chair and puppy love, yes every-
where. Hush, Donald, these little dogs love me and yes, I
love them, too.
I know God loves me and takes care of
me, and yes, He is always near. He sup-
plies my every need. Oh, where would I be
without Jesus?
.A friend and Ihad lunch at the Hill Top
Restaurant yesteiiay.- All in all, it was-a
very nice day. Thanks, Brody, for the box.
of candy and God bless you always.
SHope everyone has a very good Thanks-
giving Day and enjoys Ole Tom Turkey
aind all the trimmings, but don't eat too MISS HONEY
much, because we will only have a month
until Christmas and turkey again.
Don't eat too much or you won't want it again for Christ-
mas. And Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without it, yes
turkey and dressing, sweet potatoes, fruit salad, fruit cake,
baked ham and all the other fixings.
*Kelly's lima beans last Christmas were my favorite! Yes,
KeIly, they were the best and I did enjoy them. I am not kid-
dihg, I really did enjoy them, so you can do a repeat if you
like, OK? I'll enjoy them again.
Well, I believe I will shut up, get up and take this down to
the Journal and try to get a few things done today. So until
next week God bless, and take care. Happy Thanksgiving.
Always,
Miss Honey


Letters to the Editor
1) Letters should be 500 words or less. Letters
over the word limit may be edited for space and clar-
jty. Letters longer than 500 words that are difficult to
edit, may be considered for guest columns.
2) Letters must be signed and bear the signature
of the author. Please include a daytime phone num-
ber (not for publication).
4) Submit your letter by noon Monday. You may
email it to editor@levyjournal.com, bring it by either
of our offices or mail it to either address on the front
page.
5) Letters by the same author will be considered
for publication every 21 days. ,


l 4YCOUNTY JOI
I COUNTY PAPEII ES


Our Mission

The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
:of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
*reflect our community in everything we do.
'Iprovide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
*record the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
*promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
*promote readership of advertising thereby fostering a
healthy economic environment.


OPINION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Cranberry

L ast week I instruct-
ed Cassie to find
"thankful art" for
this week's newspaper.
She looked at me with a
blank look on her face and I
repeated my request.
"You know, thankful art-
for Thanksgiving-and that
pretty much rules out every-
one I know."
For the next few days, I
thought about what I had
said.
This time of the year, most
everyone takes time to say
thanks for all that which we
have received all year long.
Ideally, we should all be
thankful each day but I think
we tend to get bogged down
with jobs, family, finances, ,,
health-concerns and forget to
: reflect daily on the, things we
have, and then dwell on that
which we do not.
Typically when you ask
children what they are most
thankful for, they answer,
"Mama and daddy."
And if I asked you, you
might respond in a similar
fashion. "My wife. My chil-
dren. My family."
But how many of us take
the time to tell the people in
our lives what they mean to
us? I mean, more than just an
"I love you" before you hang
up the phone?
How many of us write a
letter or tell someone face to
face how knowing them has
changed our lives, enriched
us, made us better people?
I had that opportunity last
Wednesday.
I had to attend to some
business in North Georgia
and after it was concluded, I
swung by Northeast Georgia
Bank to see Margaret Ayers.
Margaret, now in her 70s,
has worked at the bank since
she was 17 years old-more
than 60 years. She is also a
mover and a shaker in her
community-UDC, Lions
Club, Historical Society,
RDC. There was a time


Who We Are
Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner
Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath
Staff Writers
Cassie Journigan
Neal Fisher
iales Representative/Bronson
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell
Delivery/Clerical
Rhonda Griffiths


sauce isn 't the only ge)


when you flipped open
paper and Margaret wo
on every other page bec
of her community invol
ment.
In any case, ever sine
moved here, Margaret h
sent me random cards a
notes, just to say, "Thin
of you."
I went by Wednesday
tell her how much it me
and how her notes seen
arrive at times I needed
ing up the most.
Both of us were a litt
teary-eyed as we bared
ings. And you know, it
good to say thank you a
really, really mean it.
It's time we all tell pe
how much they mean te
how they influence us.
Many times people it
us without ever known
if you pass on an encou
ing word, it can make ti
difference in their life-j
like the one they made
yours.
Coming south on 1-7:
wondered what I would
this week... wondered
could I publicly give th
for outside the usual lov
ones, job, community.
When Ken died last
December, I wasn't sur
would ever find someoi
who could step into his
and be not only an unbi
professional journalist,
friend as well.
In the ensuing seven
months, a succession o
writers, interns and war
nabes all tried to fill tha
void.
But it wasn't until Ca
came along that, at long
last, something gelled.
stepped up to the plate,
swung and took off. Les
than a month later, Nea
came to bat and was roi


*,


THINKING OUT ing the bag
on her heel
LOUD As a
veteran
I reporter ani
Editor, let
me assure
you the gel
Carolyn Risner isn't always
present.
Sometimes
the it never materializes and
uld be when it doesn't, it makes
cause work unbearable.
Ive- Because reporters and edi
tors often work ungodly lon
:e I hours together, it's best they
has can get along and if they're
nd able to share a personal mo
Hiking ment every now and again,
all's the better.
rto Having competence, inte
?anti,., ligence, wit and compassion
led to in the workplace is wonder-
lift- ful.
So from a work aspect, th
le editorial gel is worth giving
feel- thanks for this year.
felt I am also thankful for my
and Wednesday night dinner
companions-the Wednesday
people Wackos.
o us, Every week, anywhere
from two to 10 of us gather
pact for dinner and laughs. The
g and only rule-be yourself.
rag- The conversation gets
he rowdy; the laughter more
lust than boisterous, but when I
in leave, I know that not only
has my body been fed, but
5, my spirit as well. This unrul
write group of people has taken
What me in, loved me and made
anks me feel welcome. For that, I
ved am thankful.
And what kind of person
would I be if I didn't give
e I thanks for:
ne Used book stores, digital
shoes photos, text messaging, a
ased, second chance at love;
but a Sweet tea, hot coffee,
friends with pools, warm
winters. Bailey's, Law and
f Order reruns on USA, Easy
1- Cheese;
it The snooze button,
chicken strips, the delete ke:
issie Google and our readers-whi
g keep me employed?
She May you have a wonder-
ful Thanksgiving today and
ss every day-and remember
I you don't have to say thank
mund- you only in November.


ow m q


to share Thanksgiving. Just
the people with whom I
choose to share each day of
the year.
Cassie Journigan
is a reporter for the
SLevy County Journal.
She may be reached at
cjournigan@levyjournal.
corn
I


Have a safe and happy

Thanksgiving

from your

county newspaper.


VY COUNTY JOUR


SAn attitude

ofgratitude


Thanksgiving
is my favorite
holiday. I see it
as the embodiment of the
Constitution's preamble:
"We the
people of
the United
States,
in order
to form
a more
perfect
union,
establish CASSIE JOURNIGAN
justice, Columnist
ensure
domestic
tranquility, provide for the
common defense, promote
the general welfare, and
secure the blessings of
liberty to ourselves and our
posterity..."
S A harvest feast symbolizes
Thanksgiving. Talk about
the blessings of liberty-
Thanksgiving means a
leisurely day surrounding a
table filled with vegetables,
meats and pies.
,d As for domestic
tranquility, what better
picture than that of family
and friends sitting down to
share the feast?
This year when I sit down
to Thanksgiving dinner I will
be thankful for many things.
I feel incredibly lucky to
have been born in America.
SOurs is a government
g established by "we the
people."
I have plentiful freedoms.
I relish the ability to speak
my mind, and I am thankful
I do not risk being jailed to
- do this. I am thankful for
the freedom to find my ownm, ,
belief in a higher power. I am
thankful for easy access to a
e relatively inexpensive higher
education. I am thankful that
I can contribute-or not-to
the political process.
In this time of wars being
fought on two fronts, I am
thankful to those who serve
in the military, putting their
lives on the line for the rest
of us. I am thankful to the
parents who bear the painful
burden of having children in
harm's way.
I am thankful to be alive
at this moment in time.
As a lifelong student, I
y have access to a wealth of
- information. At its most
basic level, this means I
know how to stay healthy. I
can live longer and healthier
than generations of even 50
years ago.
On a more esoteric level,
I can develop an interest in
just about any subject and
know that articles and books
are easily available to me.
I am thankful my career
allows me to share what
I've learned, and thankful
to all those who support and
encourage me.
I am thankful to live in a
o community graced with so
much natural beauty. The
lovely Suwannee, the Goethe
Forest, the salt flats and
beaches along the coast.
I am thankful for my
friends and neighbors. Each
place I've lived seems to
have its own spirit animating
its members.
I love the characteristics
I find in people here.
Levy County residents are
inquisitive, involved and
very friendly. Just the kind of
people with whom I choose


?i
,r









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


This Week's Arre


The Chiefland Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
Frank Peter Berotas,
50, of Trenton was arrested
for retail theft petit.
Brian Emerson
Norris, 27, of Chiefland was
arrested for reckless driving,
fleeing/attempting to elude an
officer.
Peggy Mae Lara, 25,
of Trenton was arrested for
retail theft.
Vecas Verley Waugh,
Jr., 20, ofTrenton was arrested
for 2 counts ofresisting officer
with violence, leaving crash
scene with property damage,
disorderly conduct, criminal
mischief, possession of drug
paraphernalia and resisting
officer without violence.,

The Levy County Sheriff's
Office reports the following
arrests for:
Raymond C. Mann,
44, of Chiefland was arrested
for domestic battery. Bail was
set for $3,500.
Catherine F.
Swineford, 54, of Williston
was arrested for domestic
battery. She was released on
her own recognizance.
Kjella Looney, 18,
of Old Town was arrested
for domestic battery. She
was released on her own
recognizance.
S Robert I. Mobley,
24, of Chiefland was arrested
for two counts of domestic
.battery. Bail was set for
$5,000.
Lyall Scafer, 49,
of Archer was arrested for
child abuse. Bail was set for
$40,000.
S Paul Dudley Gill, 49,
of Cedar Key was arrested for
domestic 'aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon. Bail'
was set for $7,500.
Mitchell Franklin
Cooper, 29, of Williston was
arrested for grand theft. Bail
was set for $15,000.
S Larry Joe Colson, Jr.,
33, of Cedar Key was arrested
for disorderly intoxication.
Bail was set at $1,000,
JonathanA. Clemons,
22, of Chiefland was arrested
for sale of cocaine and
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $30,000.
Barbara J. Hodge,
42, of Fanning Springs
was arrested for failure to
appear (FTA) driving while
license suspended or revoked
(DWLSR) knowledge.
Christopher E.
McQuay, 23, ofChiefland was
arrested for FTA possession
of cocaine. FTA possession
of paraphernalia. Bail was set
at $25,000.
Reginald Vincell
Adams, 21, of Chiefland was
arrested for sale of cocaine
and possession of cocaine.
Bail was set at $30,000.
Scarlet Jean Moore,
50, of Punta Gorda was
arrested for scheme to
defraud Alachua, four counts
of worthless checks and
uttering a forged instrument.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Maria P. Morytko,


52, of Ocala was arrested for
driving under the influence.
James Charles
Patterson, 17, of Williston
was arrested for burglary and
larceny over $300.00. Bail
was set at $10,000.
Robert Gaines, 21,
of Williston was arrested for
DWLSR Marion order to
take. No bond was issued.
Charlotte Creech, 45,
of Morriston was arrested for
writ of bodily attachment.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Whitney S. Dallas,
19, of Williston was arrested
for possession of marijuana
less than (L/T) 20 grams. Bail
was set for $2,500.
Brandie Lynn Moon,
27, of Old Town was arrested
for FTA larceny over
$300.00 under $20,000. Bail
was set for $5,000.
John Kelly Golladay,
48, of Cross City was arrested
for fraud obtain property
over $150.00. Bail was set at
$3,500.
Charles Anthony
Presutti, 27, of Bronson
was arrested for violation of
probation (VOP) DWLSR.
No bond was set.
Boyd Chandler,
29, of Inglis was arrested
for warrant writ of bodily
attachment. He was released
on his own recognizance.
Kalista V. Campbell,
29, of Chiefland was arrested
for possession of cocaine and
possession of cocaine with
intent to distribute. Bail was
set at $2,500.
S Bascil J. Buie, 24,
of Chiefland was arrested for
possession of cocaine with
intent to distribute, possession
of cocaine, possession of
marijuana L/T 20 grams and
possession with' intent to
distribute. Bail was set at
$2,500 for one charge and
he was released on his own
recognizance for the others.
Byron Matthew
Hiers, 33, of Romeo was
arrested for writ bodily
attachment.
Sherthia Adams
Collie, 31, of Williston was
arrested for refusal to sign
traffic citation.
Frederick Arthur
Mills, Sr., 49, of Dunnellon
was arrested for failure to
report violation of injunction.
No bond was set.
11 Zachary Benoit, 21,
of Bradenton was arrested
for VOP sale of cocaine and
robbery. No bond was set.
Matthew D. Jones,
21, of White Springs was
arrested for VOP possession
of marijuana and possession
of paraphernalia. No bond
was set.
Winifred Green, 40,
of Tallahassee was arrested
for FTA criminal contempt.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Charles Emanuel
Smith, 25, of Bronson was
arrested for obstruction of
justice. He was released on
his own recognizance.
Alfonza Creg Brown,
33, of Williston was arrested
for failure to register as


sexual offender. Bail was set
for $25,000.
Kurtis Daniels, 21,
of Bronson was arrested for
possession of crack cocaine
with intent to distribute and
FTA trespassing/criminal
mischief. Bail was set for
$15,000.
Larry J. Donald, 49,
of Cedar Key was arrested
for two counts of possession
of cocaine and two counts of
sale of cocaine. Bail was set
at $50,000.
Mark Jeffery
Strickland, 27, of St.
Augustine was arrested for
VOP DWLSR, VOP -
possession of marijuana and
possession of paraphernalia.
Bail was set at $2,500.
Victor G. Partin, 56,
of Bronson was arrested for
obstruction ofjustice and FTA
larceny/criminal mischief.
Bail was set at $ 25,000.
*. George Pierce, 45,
of Chiefland was arrested
for VOP possession of
methamphetamine .and
VOP possession of
methamphetamine with intent
to sale. No bond was set.
0 John C. Hall, 41,
of Bronson was arrested
for possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bail was set at
$2,500.
Michael Shannon
Lane, 30, of Inglis was
arrested for aggravated assault
with intent to commit felony,
'fire weapon into dwelling,
flee attempting to elude/resist
officer and no motorcycle
endorsement. Bail was set at
$55,000.
Raymond Louis
Frazier, 19, of Williston
was arrested for DWLSR
and resisting arrest without
violence.
,Alan iRayJesk, 51,,
of Chiefland was arrested
for resisting arrest without
violence. Bail was set for
$2,500.
Jethro H. White, 19,
of Williston was arrested for
possession of LT 20 grams of
cannabis and possession of
drug paraphernalia. Bail was
set at $5,000.
Jennifer Christina
Currie, 29, of Lakeland was
arrested for VOP deal stolen
property/false verification to
pawn broker. No bond was
set.

The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
Chadwich Tyrone
Robinson, 24, of Williston
was arrested for lewd or
lascivious battery.
Kent Jared McGee,
22, of Williston was arrested
for cannabis L/T 20 grams
and drug paraphernalia.
Segundo Antonio
'Juan Ruiz, 20, of Williston
was arrested for throwing
deadly missiles, driving under
the influence (DUI), criminal
mischief and possession of
alcohol under 21.
Rachel J. Burnett,
32, of Morriston was arrested
for burglary of a conveyance
and possession of stolen
.property.


MEMBERS OF THE Bronson Sr. FFA Chapter attended the 79th National FFA
Convention in Indianapolis, Ind., where they were recognized as one of the"
Star chapters in the National FFA Chapter Award Program. Pictured, from left,
Darren Weems, Sara Shouse, Anthony Spadavecchia, Rachel Brannan, Jessica:,
Southard and FFA advisor Marcia Smith, far left. The award program is spon-
sored by Land O'Lakes Foundation and Toyota as a special project of the Na-
tional FFA Foundation. It is one of many ways FFA members are encouraged
to make a real difference in the lives of fellow students, as well as in their com-
munities.



Entertainment was simple in Levy


Young people in Otter
Creek, as in the rest of Levy
County in the early 20th
century, did not complain
about having nothing to do
for entertainment. Consider
Mildred Yearty, a fourth
generation Floridian, who
was born in Otter Creek in
1912.
Mildred swam. in Otter
Creek with her siblings,
Orton and Marie, and she
hunted and fished with Orton
and their father.
When':the children got a
little oIdeW tidy attended th i
dances hosted by The Gulf
Hammock Patterson-McInnis
Lumber Company. Held at
the wooden Gulf Hammock
Hotel, the dances featured
live music.
Each summer Mildred's
father moved his dentistry
practice to Cedar Key,
bringing the entire family
along to stay at the Cedar
Key Hotel/Boarding House.
He believed Cedar Key to be
healthier than Otter Creek in
the heat and humidity of that
season.
Read more about Mildred
Yearty, who married W.
Randolph Hodges in 1933,
in Levy County: Voices
From the Past, the book for
which information is now
being gathered by the author,
Drollene Brown.
Is your family in the book?
Don't be left out. The author
wants your stories. Dates
-or approximate dates-are
important because all the
stories will be woven together


MILDRED YEARTY HODGES as young woman.


into one narrative about Levy
County memories.
There will be a meeting
at the Yankeetown Public
Library on Nov. 28 at 3 p.m:
Come meet the author, share
your stories, and get some
pointers on how to submit
your stories. You do not have
to come to a meeting to be in
the book. Guidelines may be
picked up at any Levy County
public library.


Send your stories and-.
photographs to Levy Book,',
P.O. Box 402, Morriston FL.
32668 or e-mail them to shp.
levybook@yahbo.com.
Questions? For answers, e-
mail or call Drollene Brown
at (352) 465-4862. Deadline
is Dec. 15, 2006, but those
who notify Drollene that
they need more time will be
granted an extension, till Jan.
15, 2007.


Celebrate with a Victorian holiday
Come enjoy a Victorian Holiday whisper their stories of holiday festivities over
Celebration at the Historic Haile Homestead a hundred years ago. Sip some hot cider as yo'd
onSunday, Dec. 10, noonto4p.m. Admission browse a selection of home-baked goodies,
is free! Stroll through the 1856 Homestead and our very special holiday ornaments, sold
decked out in an array of traditional greenery to benefit the operation of the Homestead.
and Victorian finery. Come dressed in Victorian costume and
There is something new and different capture the holiday 'spirit from a time long
every year! Enjoy classical holiday music ago!
performedbylocalmusicians.Listencarefully For more information call 352-36-9096 or
as the Homestead's famous "Talking Walls" e-mail hailedocent@yahoo.com.


~IEU~~' (~ ( J Jl~TU7V]L


Howard, Alexandria P.
Bronson B/M
DOB: 02-25-1972
VOP, Sale, Possession Cocaine
$10,000 Bond


Latson, Chacha' T.
Williston B/F
DOB: 07-06-1965
VOP Larceny
$10,000 Bond


McMahan, Roy L. Jr.
Chiefland W/M
DOB: 03-17-1987
VOP No Valid D/L
$5,000 Bond


Madden, Buddy J.
Inglis W/M DOB: 08-18-1978
FTA Reckless Driving, Attempt
Elude LEO, Poss. Marijuana
$35,000 Bond


Martinez, Joseph R. III
Trenton W/M
DOB: 09-28-1980
FTA Battery
$5,000 Bond


Mizell, Joanna Erin
Williston W/F
DOB: 12-23-1985
VOP Utter Forged Instrument'
$10,000 Bond


Anyone knowing the whereabouts or having any information about the above individuals is asked to please contact the Levy County Sheriff's Office at 352-486-5111 or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-877-349-8477.


Page 5


Got a news tip? Call Carolyn at 490-4462


AID -








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


The Levy County Journal asked kindergarten, students:


How do you cook a turkey?"


"I'm going to eat turkey. It's
going to be a turkey named
Burt. I didn't get a turkey yet.
We're going to get him from
Wal-Mart and cook him in a
pan that's very huge. He's going
to be a very big turkey. I'm the
cook helper. I like to eat turkey.
I ate one a long time ago-his
name was Gert. But I would
rather like Burt instead."
Makayla Gillespie
BES


"We're going to celebrate
on Tuesday. We're going to
have a feast. Tomorrow I go
to breakfast with Santa. For
Thanksgiving we're going
to have turkey, English peas,
mashed potatoes, ham and
meat. My momma's going to
cook; my grandma's going to
help. I'm going to stir the peas.
My grandpa's going to cook
the turkey because he's the
best cooker. He's going to put
some stuff in it and he's going
to cook the turkey and the ham.
We're going to have Oreos
with white frosting. They taste
like something I like. The taste
different than regular Oreos."
Katie Bedford
BES


"We're going to hang up
sticker books. My friends are
coming over-six. We're going
to cook turkey in our stove.
We'll have corn, apple pie. My
mom and me will make the pie
in our stove. I'm going to dress
up with my horsey shirt and
horsey pants. I have a pony at
home named Stormy Troubles."
Brianna Brower
BES


"If we had company I'd like
to have Samantha's mom. I like
Thanksgiving because I like
turkey. First you got to kill it
and then you roast it. And then
you eat it."
Grace Heath
BES


"We're going to cook our
turkey in the oven. We've
been singing our songs for
Thanksgiving. We learned
"Grinding Corn," "A Turkey
Named Burt," and "T is for,
Thanksgiving." I'm thankful for
my room. I'm thankful for my
mommy. I'd like Samantha to
come over."
Skylar Runion
BES


"We're learning about
turkeys and Indians. We're
going to West Virginia for
Thanksgiving. We're going
to see my grandpa and my
grandma. We're going to have
turkey. You have to put the
turkey in the oven. Then you
let it cool off. Then y6u eat it.
That's all."
Kenny Kelly
BES .


"Thanksgiving is about
turkey and mashed potatoes '
and having fun. And then you
give thanks. I'm thankful for all
the people and all the animals
and all the things they've done
for us. My mommy's going to
cook the turkey. She puts a little
thermometer in it and when
you hear it go "Pop," then it's
done. Then it's ready to eat. We
usually have mashed potatoes
and gravy and corn. I think we
ieed extra tables."
Samantha Bechtold
BES


: "My mom had to ask my
dad how to cook the turkey.
My mom is Claudia and dad
is:Buddy. You cook it for five
minutes in the oven in butter."
Haley McMichen
JBES


. l,.-'.-i l'i .. .; i
"My momma's going to
shol'i e tiwt&~~dk turkey.
We're probably going to have
something to drink. Then some
corn dogs. Then tacos. My
cousin is coming over and my
other friend."
Kendarius Mincey
BES


"We're going to have;
chicken. We're going 'o cook it
with a grill. We'll have salad,
mashed potatoes and gravy. It's
just going to be my daddy and
mommy and baby sister."
Caleb Coffman
BES


"Put butter on it and cook it "Cook it for six minutes with
20 minutes on the stovee." butter in the oven and then you
Hanna Garboski eat it."
JBES Jermon Collins
JBES


"Putit on the stove for four "Just bake it in the oven for
minutes. Cook it with sugar, salt six minutes."
and stuffing in it. Gabriel Foster
Erin Sowards JBES
JBES






tT&MIl1
j ^^t~liC/


"You put it in the oven with
eggs in it, but I don't know how
long."
Kellie Guillot
JBES"


"Cook it on the stove for one
minute and put sugar, salt and
pepper on it."
Samantha Werner
JBES


"You cut off tifi' wi igs first ."
then cook it for one minute in
the oven." t
Grayson Geiger .
JBES

4









g














"My daddy's going to kill a
turkey. I don't know who will
pull off all the feathers. Then
you cook it for 20 minutes.
We're having dressing, corn, .
and meat. We're probably going "
to be full from the meat because i
of he turkey. And ice cream for
dessert."
Madison Baynard
CES


Compiled by
Cassie Journigan
and
Rhonda Griffiths


S"I'm going to tell my friends
'thank you' so they can be my
friends. We're going to have
bacon and turkey and greens
and mashed potatoes. My dad
cooks the turkey for about
10 hours. He's going to be
camping and then he'll kill.the
turkey. He'll cook it when he
gets home."
Jarvius Mason
CES


"I'm going to say thank you
for the turkey and the cherry
pie. My grandma's going to
cook the turkey. I don't know
yet how to cook it but my
grandma is going to tell me.
I'm going to have stuffing and
chicken and bananas."
Mya Thorp
CES


"Thanksgiving is cool stuff.
I'm going to paint. We're going
to have oatmeal. We're going to
hunting camp for Thanksgiving.
I'm going to play and bring my
bike. My daddy's going to hunt
for all kinds of stuff. And then
we're going to cook it in the
oven."
Aiden Home
CES


"On Thanksgiving they
kill turkeys. And they cook
pies. Blueberry. I like it. I like
oranges. The turkey has to cook
for one minute or two minutes.
We're going tohave it at our
house."
Nicholas Padgett
CES


"For Thanksgiving we're
going to say hi. My poppa's
going to cook turkey. He's
going to put it in the oven and
keep it in for 20 minutes. Then
you eat it. I like it. We're having
little red berries, the ones I like.
Cranberries. I like oranges and
bananas too."
Dominic Maynard
CES


Page 6


Have a

safe and

happy

holiday!


1w


~",~Lc~/J1C~~









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


= AREA DEATHS BY CITY

'hI flahnd. Gainesvlle
...P.eggy Edwards Pearlie Holt '
SoberZkafose J.R. Swilley ,

.



Peggy Edwards
Ms. Peggy Lee Edwards, 54, of Chiefland, died Nov. 7,
2006 at Nature Coast Regional Hospital in Williston.
She was a customer service representative and a member of
Lighthouse Word Church of Chiefland.
Survivors inlcude a daughter, Minique Edwards and a son,
William Edwards both of Chiefland; four grandchildren,
Cedrick Bowers Jr., Courtney Bowers, Chelsea Edwards
and Elijah Edwards; three sisters, Annie Lisbon Servern of
Maryland, Mildred Murphy of West Palm Beach and Angela
Wright of Brooklyn, N.Y.; four brothers, Thurman Wright of
r Virginia, Donald Wright of Chiefland, Timothy Caldwell of
New York and Micah Williams of West Palm Beach.
Funeral services were held Nov. 19, 2006 at the Lighthouse
Word Church in Chiefland with George Kearns officiating.
Burial followed in Chiefland Community Cemetery.
Services were under the care of Carnegie Funeral Home,
Chiefland.

Pearlie Holt
Pearlie M. Holt, 90, died Nov. 18, 2006 in Gainesville.
Mrs. Holt was a homemaker and a member of Oak Park
Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her husband, John Amos
Holt, and son, Claude Copeland.
She is survived by her daughter, Imojean Ingersoll of Gaines-
ville; sons, Bobby L. Holt of Hawthorne, Paul Copeland of
Bronson and Paul Martin of Arcadia; nine grandchildren, 17
great-grandchildren and 11 great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Nov. 20 at Williams-Thomas
Funeral Home with Dr. Don McGarity officiating. Burial fol-
lowed in Jonesville Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care of Williams-Thomas Fu-
neral Home, Downtown, Gainesville.

J.R. Swilley
The Rev. J.R. Swilley, moderator of the North Florida,
Georgia, Primitive Baptist Association, died Thursday, Nov.
9, 2006.
The Rev. Swilley served as leader and pastor of Mt. Olive
Primitive Baptist Church, Gainesville for 29 years.
Funeral services for the Rev. Swilley were held Nov. 18, at
Damascus Missionary Baptist Church, Madison.
Arrangements were under the care of Chestnut Funeral
Home.


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Robert Zickafoose
Robert Lee Zickafoose, 70, ofChiefland, died
Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2006 at Haven Hospice of
the Tri Counties.
Born in Urbana, Ohio, he was a truck driver
and a US Air Force veteran who served during
the Korean War. He was also a member of the
VFW post.
Survivors include his companion of 18


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Page 7


years, Gloria Vanskyhawk of Chiefland; three daughters,
Marianne Zickafoose of the Carolinas; Dawn (Rob):
Bates of Shipshewana, Ind. and Fawn (Troy) Goodrich'
of New Tripoli, Pa.; a son Kevin (Karolyn) Zickafoose of
Middlebury, Ind.; a brother, Eddie Zickafoose of Sturgis,
Mich.; 14 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Earl Zickafoose
and Mary Cheney Zickafoose.
A memorial service was held Nov. 21 at the VFW Post in
Chiefland.


Who do you say that I am?


n 11-year-old can
become a mite
fidgety out in the
woods with a big 12-gauge
killing stick laid across his
knobby knees, especially
knowing it's loaded to the
gills with double aught
buckshot. Clearly dad was
right in trusting me though.
I had endured my BB gun
years with only occasional
window breakage and,
shucks, my little brother
Heath still had both his eyes.
I hadn't shot him at all since
I'd moved up to my little
.410 shotgun. You figure it's
just natural for a dad to want
to promote a fellow with a
record like that. Besides,
he had said we were out
of .410 shells and he sure
didn't want to miss the last
day of the season. I
wallowed out a place in the
leaves under an old oak that
morning and encouraged
myself that dad would
surely be back to get me
before dark this time. I
tried to recall a little of his
impromptu gun safety lecture
but my mind wouldn't
slow down. Maybe it was
.all that black coffee I'd


t h e I I R SI

U S


BUT ANYWAY






Guy E. Sheffield


snuck out of his thermos?
Anyway, all I could seem
to remember was asking,
"Why you got on so much
orange today dad?" He
said you could never be
too careful with all those
rookie hunters out in the
woods. I smugly agreed.
He slipped off holding
tightly to tree line and was
almost out of sight before I
whipped that worn walnut
stock up to my cheek and
started threatening all the
squirrels. I began to pity
the poor deer that was fool
enough to walk past me.
Looking back, I needn't
have.
Later that afternoon
I jerked awake. Several
questions arose in my
mind. How did those deer
tracks get there? How mad


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Enrolled Agent


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712 North Main Street, Chiefland 493-4996


would dad
actually be if
I did shoot a
squirrel with
buckshot? I
also began
to question
whether dad
had said the


gun was on
safety if the
button was poked in or out.
This began to worry me to no
end. If dad came back and I
didn't have the gun on safety
he'd whomp me good. The
more I thought about it the
more confused I became. If
the red was showing did it
mean stop, or fire? After much
reasoning I convinced myself
that I must have knocked the
safety off during my nap,
because everyone knew red
meant to stop. So I reached
down and clicked it back on.
I slid my finger in that trigger
housing to give her a little
pull just to prove I was right


when "BOOM"! The gun .
jarred clean out of my lap
and nearly felled a big i:
neighboring tree. Needless*l
to say, I carefully gathered.
the gun back up, along
with my eyeballs, and
clicked that little button
back the other way. I
could have sworn I heard
the sound of squirrels
chuckling.
I quickly learned that
there was only one way to
properly operate that gun's-'
safety, and if you were
going to handle it you'd
best be versed in the truth..
More than most I reckon
I've proved it's not wise
to jump to conclusions on
matters where there are no
gray areas. Thankfully I
would get another chance
as far as that gun was
concerned. However, a lot

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PUBLIC NOTICE

Application for CONCEPT REVIEW
Hailey Jordan Development, LLC
Proposal for
LOUIA C. GILBERT
Consisting of
Parcel #03291-004-00, 5-12S-17E
Town of Bronson, Levy County, Florida

PUBLIC HEARING

A Public Hearing on the proposed subdivision concept
Will be held before the Town Council on
MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2006 @ 7:00 P.M. or
As soon thereafter as possible
At Town Hall
If any person decides to appeal any decision of the Town Council
With respect to any matter considered at this hearing
he or she will
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and for such purpose may need to
Ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made.
Publish November 23, 2006
.Donna Conquest, Town Clerk


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Page 8 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Red Devils end season with 22-6 fall to Eustis


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
EUSTIS-The second round
game of the state playoffs had
ong since been settled by
tie score of 22-6, but as the
fiial few seconds of the game
tbked away, the faces of the
red Devil players said it all.
- Their stares and blank
expressions as they watched
the Eustis Panthers run out
tie clock expressed the final
etnotions of their season.
0:Perhaps some ofthe players
,ere wondering why they
couldn't get their powerful
jition attack in gear. Perhaps
some were thinking of how'
the Panthers' speed was the
quickest they had faced all
season. Or perhaps some
*.ere thinking that if they had
avoided the turnovers, they
right have been able to stay
i the game.
t: In any case the Red Devils,
as: much as their schedule
prepared them for a long run
ihfo the state playoffs were
j t half a step too slow for
t4e Panthers' defense and
the home team was just half
4 second too quick in their
4icision for Williston.
4,"A lot of the things that
;e've been able to do in the
past were hard to get going,"
Williston Coach Jamie Baker
said. "They have two solid
athletes at the defensive ends
that shut down our option
game and made it tough to
get outside the tackles. The
difference was they had the
speed to compete with us and
used it to their advantage."
,,Or in other words, for the
first time this season the Red
Devils played a team they
oould not, at least for portions
of-the game, overpower with
their speed and were unable
tqorun the ball. ....
And if a team can't runrthe
ball in the post-season, it is
difficult to win.
In shutting down
Williston's running- attack,
Epstis' defense showed it
was, at'the very least, as quick
and overpowering in using it
as,the Red Devils have been
this season.
; They failed to allow the
Red Devils' ball carriers to
cross the line of scrimmage
with any consistency as they
met the runner when he hit
the point of attack time after


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

QUARTERBACK DEVIN TIMMONS finds room to roam for one of the few times against Eustis.


time.
It held the Red Devils'
regular season leading rusher,
Marquis Minor, to 8 yards on
6 carries, as the visitors, in
the second half, were forced
to attempt to use their passing
game as its principal mode of
moving the ball downfield.
The first quarter ended in a
0-0 score. However from
the start of the .game, the
Panthers' speed and home
field advantage was gradually
swinging the ebb and flow of
the game in favor of the home
team.
The first crack in the Red
Devils'. ability to overcome
the surprising deficiency came
when Eustis' quarterback
Courtney Keith zipped a
perfectly thrown pass to
Akeem Dumham as he was
breaking across midfield.
Dumham then turned
upfield, outrunning the
secondary with his speed
before and after the catch
and galloped the remaining
distance for an 82-yard strike.
The two-point conversion
was good and the half ended
with the Panthers holding an


8-0 lead.
The Red Devils needed to
regain some of their physical
drive using their speed at
the line of scrimmage and
made some very decisive
adjustments at halftime.
Williston sacked Keith to
end the Panthers' opening
drive of the second half
and then moved the ball
to the Panthers' 36-yard
line. The big plays were
three completed passes by
Timmons for 10, 10 and 11
yards, two of which were on
third and long.
Timmons then completed
a '36-yard touchdown, strike,
to C.J. James with a perfectly
thrown ball over the defensive
back's outstretched arms.
The drive chewed up four
and a half minutes and took
eleven plays after it began
at the Red Devils' 32-yard
line. It gave the Red Devils
a second opportunity to make
their strength a positive factor
again.
"I told the team before the
game that the perfect football
game has never been played,"
Eustis Head Coach Steve


Moser said. Mistakes are
going to be made, the key is
how a team responds."
And respond Eustis did,
as they swung the speed
factor back to their side in a
matter of about five minutes.
Eustis returned the ensuing
kick off 37 yards to their
40-yard line. Running back
Brandon Evans then sprinted
up the middle twice for 12
yards.
The Red Devils for the first
time during the season were
being manhandled by their
opponents' speed.


Eustis jammed the ball
down Williston's defense
with a mix of inside-outside
running plays and found
themselves at the visitors' 32
yard line with 2:12 left in the
third quarter.
Evans powered through
the tackles and stomped into
the end zone as the Panthers
opened up some wide lanes.
With the game on the line,
Williston needed to score
once again. While the
defense was beginning to
show signs of deteriorating
in the face of the Panthers'


speed, the offense was not yet.
overwhelmed by it.
But after they had moved,
the ball to the Panthers' 21-
yard line, the Red Devils
fumbled and gave the home
team the ammunition they
needed to take the starch out
of what effectiveness the
visitors' had.
Evans ran for a first down!
on a fourth-and-4 from the'
Williston 1"5 to keep the drive
alive. Then Eustis scored on
a 10-yard dash by Anthony;
Murphy, which accounted
for the final score in the 22-6
victory.
"We have to execute the
offense well," said Baker.,
"We executed well against,
the average teams, but we've,
got to be able to execute
against the good teams. We
established the ability to
move the ball on a couple of
drives, but against a team like
this, it just isn't enough.
"That will come with
maturity. Our defense played
well, but they got wore out.
You can't just keep having
three and outs on offense andi
expect the defense to hold up
for the whole game."
Evans rushed for 106
yards and a touchdown,
while Murphy added 69
yards rushing and another,
touchdown.
Timmons was 7 of 16 for 85
yards with two interceptions.,
He gained 46 yards rushing,
on 15 carries. Courtney Days
finished with 22 yards on!
13 carries. The Red Devils,
finished the season with ai
record of 8-4.


For more on the Red Devils,
see pages 9 and 10


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
COACH ALAN BAKER instructs the defensive troops how to negate Eustis'
speed during halftime.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
WILLISTON'S EXPLOSIVE ground game found the going tough against an
equally explosive Eustis defense.


SGame Summary
Williston 0 0 6 0 6
SEustis 0 8 8 6 22

;2nd Quarter
Eustis Keith to Dumham 82-yard yard touchdown pass
3rd Quarter
NWilliston Timmons to C.J. James 36-yard touchdown pass
,Eustis Evans 32-yard touchdown run
E4th Quarter
,Eustis Murphy 10-yard touchdown run


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


A look at the 2006 Williston Red Devils:


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Aug. 25
Williston 38
P.K. Yonge 0
Record: 1-0
After starting the 2005
season with a 1-4 record,
the coaches primed the Red
Devils to be ready for their
opening game. The last thing
Williston wanted to do was
fight from another hole for
the second consecutive year.
The players responded to the
coaches' warnings as they
took advantage of playing
at home and a P.K. Yonge
team that would not get on a
roll until mid-season. They
scored two touchdowns in the
first quarter and never looked
back. The Red Devils got
their first taste of the option
running attack and they liked
the flavor as they gained 150
yards and allowed quarterback
Devin Timmons to complete
four well timed passes. Two
of the completions were for
touchdowns.
Sept. 1
Williston 42
Chiefland 7
Record: 2-0
After opening the season
with an impressive victory,
the Red Devils traveled to
their cross county rival's
stadium. When the smoke
cleared, the result was the
same. The option attacked
for the second week in a row
was run to near perfection by
the offense and the defense
made another statement by
holding the Indians to a late
touchdown. The offense
accumulated 338 yards on
the ground and 175 yards
through the air. Marquis
Minor. in what would be the
first of many big games, led
the way with 108 yards on 19
carries.
Sept. 8
Ocala Trinity Catholic 28
Williston 10
Record 2-1
After opening the season
with two impressive victories
against lesser foes, the Red
Devils welcomed last year's
class 2B state champs.
They had learned from their
mistakes of the previous year
in avoiding a bad start, but
Snow it was time to get down
to business. The option
offense, which the team had
run with such gracefulness
and efficiency in their two
victories received its first
test of the season. The
defense also had its first test
of the season after it gave
39 points last year. Both the
offense and defense played
much better, but in the end,
the Celtics experience and
strength were too much for
the home standing team.
Trailing by a score 14-10
midway through the third
quarter, the Celtics took over
the ball and with a mix of
running and passing plays
foundthe rhythm that had
made them the state champs.
The drive ended with a seven-
yard touchdown pass and the
game was effectively over.
The team stood toe to toe with
the champs for the first thirty
minutes, but the Red Devils
just didn't have enough to
close the deal against the
elite team. It would be the
first of four losses that would
prove it along with the Red
Devils tendency to turn the
ball over.
Sept. 15
Williston 41
Dunnellon 14
Record 3-1
The Red Devils' loss
showed it had some work to
do before it was ready to claim
victories over the state's very


best, but their demolition of
Dunnellon proved they could
rebound fromdisappointment.
They also made sure they got
off to a good start in district
play. The defense was the
star of this game, forcing four

I


turnovers and scoring the first
of five times this season. The
rushing attack was once again
running at peak performance
as it accrued over 200 yards
and gave the passing game
what it needed to be effective.
With the victory the Red
Devils vanquished the first
of two critical district foes it
needed to if it was to reach
the post-season. The win
removed the cultural setback
of losing to Dunnellon the
year before and was a key
game in moving the program
forward. In what would be
the first of several second
quarter explosions the Red
Devils scored 21 points to
take control of the game.
Sept. 22
Dixie County 23
Williston 19
Record 3-2
Once again the Red Devils
played a valiant and solid
game, but in the'end they
could not close the deal.
Dixie County would also
qualify for the playoffs in
class 2A and the Red Devils
fell again to an elite program,
done in by turnovers and the
failure to build on a second
quarter explosion. The team
propelled by its defense
scored all 19 points in the
second to take a 19-9 lead
into halftime. Dixie County's
touchdown in the third
quarter came after a turnover
and their game winner in the
fourth came after the Red
Devils committed a penalty
on third and short, which
forced them to punt. The
defense scored nine points
in the second quarter and
forced two turnovers, which
accounted for the other ten
points. The defense also
stopped Dixie 'Conty's star
running back Rodney Scott,
holding him to only 61 yards.
But they could not keep him
out of the end zone as his
second touchdown came with
5:36 left in the game. That
touchdown coupled with
Timmons' interception on the
subsequent drive showed the
elite teams make plays to end
games, while the Red Devils
still were not there.
Sept.29
Williston 35
Walton 34
Record: 4-2
The Red Devils would
encounter yet another test of
their improvement and if they
were ready to take the next
step towards becoming an
elite program. This time the
test was playing on the road,
and while the term 'passing
with flying colors' was far
from accurate, the Red Devils
came home with their fourth
victory of the year. The
option offense compiled 310
yards and the defense another
seven points, but they could
not close the deal. Williston
allowed Walton to get back
in the game time and time
again as they scored three
times on plays of 38 yards
or more. And for the second
consecutive week, the Red'
Devils would find themselves
behind by at least two scores
at the end of the first half.
Falling behind early would
become a problem for the Red
Devils. However, Courtney
Days showed the future of
the program, rushing for 98
yards. The game propelled
the Red Devils into the second.
half of the season as they won
four of their last five games.

Oct. 13
Williston 40
Santa Fe 20
Record: 5-2
Playing their third
consecutive game on the road
and with Dunnellon's upset of


defending district champion
North Marion the previous
week, the coaching staff
hammered it into the players'
thoughts that they could not


take this opponent lightly.
The -players responded
with their second district
victory of the year. However,
Red Devils spotted Santa Fe
14 points on turnovers in the
first quarter, before scoring
40 unanswered points.
They game was tied at 14-
14 at halftime. With their
rushing game running not
quite as efficiently as it had
in the previous weeks, the
Red Devils went to the air.
Timmons," made sure "Santa
Fe paid for shutting dbon the
running game. He made as
big an impact as one player
can make in a single contest
using as few plays as possible.
His final statistics read 8-9 for
342 yards and a touchdown.
Even with the defense's
stout play, which included
another score, the Red Devils
still were being haunted by
turnovers and slow starts.
Their win though, but them
atop the district standings
with a 2-0 record.
Oct. 20
Williston 37
West Port 14
Record 6-2
After dealing with the need
to overcome slow starts and
turnovers, the Red Devils
made sure their chances of
a district title would not be
derailed against West Port.
They stormed to a 23-0 lead
at the end of the first quarter
and the scoreboard read 30-0
at halftime. The Red Devils'
big game against North
Marion, which was expected
to be for the district title
loomed on the horizon as next
week's opponents. But the
Red Devils showed no effects
of the long awaited match-up
being only a week away. The
defense scored nine points and
stopped West Pport on every
one of their possessions in the
first half. The offense scored
three touchdowns as Minor
rushed for 124 yards and
two of the scores. The team
compiled 262 yards rushing
as Timmons spearheaded
the attack with his decision-
making and leadership. And
so it was onto North Marion
and the contest everyone had
been waiting a year for.
Oct. 27
North Marion 27
Williston 21
Record: 6-3
The long awaited game
against North Marion was
indeed for the district title.
AWilliston win and they
were the outright champions.
A loss and then things got
complicated as they could
have wound up in a three-way
tie for the title with North
Marion and Dunnellon. The


final statistics read over 300
yards, of total offense for the
Red Devils, their most all
season, and 198 more than
North Marion. Yet, they
failed to win the crown as they
committed everypossible type
of mistake a team can make.
Turnovers, penalties, bobbled
kick returns, a missed 27-
yard field goal, giving up 1-4
points off of their turnovers,
a failed attempt to score on a
4th and 1 late in the game and
a dislocated elbow to running
ba,1tjTjv y isEvans doomed;
the Red bDevils. In addition
their penchant for slow starts
and allowing the other team
to get in front came to the
forefront one more time.
From the opening kickoff to
the final gun, it seemed the
Red Devils were poised at
any moment to take the lead
and force North Marion ipto
playing their best game of the
season, but the Red Devils'
litany of mistakes kept the
visitors in front all night. And
when the final gun did sound,
it was "what could have been
and what should have been
for the Red Devils". Minor
and Timmons led the running
game with 151 and 93 yards
respectively. Timmons
also threw for 214 yards,
but he also had three passes
intercepted. Fortunately,
news broke shortly after the
game that Dunnellon had
lost and, therefore, the Red
Devils had clinched a berth
in the state tournament as the
district runner-up.
Nov. 3
Williston 17
Newberry 10
Record: 7-3
After the frustrating and
disappointing loss to North
Marion the week before, the
Red Devils needed a win as
they entered the playoffs.
Coach Jamie Baker readied
the troops for a game that
failed to have any playoff
implication for either team
by addressing the issue of
the difference between 7-
3 and 6-4. The Red Devils
responded. The game was
something of a ho-hum affair,
but in the end the Red Devils
did just enough to get the
victory. They figured out how
to avoid the slow start, which
had plagued them throughout
the. season as they raced to a
17-0 lead in the second half.
Deonte Welsh and Ivan Floyd
came up in their first start,
due to injuries. Welsh scored
what would be the winning
score on an 86 yard pass
play after the ball was tipped.
Minor led all rushers with 60
yards, while Timmons threw
for 146 yards. The team had


only one turnover. The win
gave the team its highest total
under Baker and its most in
over two decades. And so for
the second year in a row it
was onto the playoffs and the
chance to erase the issues of
three difficult losses during
the regular season.
Nov.10
Williston 26
Nature Coast 13
Record 8-3
Trailing. 13-3 midway
through the, second quarter,
the Re ,deyils, did -ipt, 19pok
like a team that had won its
last regular season game, nor
four of its last five, nor it was
ready to compete with post-
season teams. Then a funny
thing happened, they were the
benefactors of a roughing the
punter call. Forced to punt
trailing by ten points, the Red
Devils needed to turn the tide
quickly or their season might
have been over. Nature
Coast committed the penalty
as Juwain James punted and
with new life, the Red Devils
drove to a touchdown. They
then forced a turnover, which
led to another score within'
minutes of the first one.
The result was a 16-13 lead.
Rodrigo Quezada added a
field goal to up the lead to six
and suddenly the Red Devil
train was rolling as they made
it look like it was nothing at
all. James scored off of an
interception early in the fourth
quarter sealed the deal. After
the penalty and turnovers,
their speed' came to light as
they got to the point first and


Journal photo by Neal Fisher '


were able to gain the corner,
time after time, wearing thde
Sharks' defense and offenses
down by the end of the game:
Days, shouldering the burderin
of the running attack as Minort
saw limited duty, due to art
injury, gained 160 yards. The
team gained a total 251 yards
,on the ground. And so it was-
onto the second round and
once again the opportunity
to erase an issue that was at'
the forefront of this season's
drama.
Nbv:.T7'
Eustis 22
Williston 6
Record: 8-4
On a cool and clear night,'
the Red Devils' season came'
to an end as they bowed out'
off the playoffs at the hands'
of a team that was simply i'
tad bit better in every phase
of the game. Their loss .to
North Marion, which sent'
them on the road as the
district's runner-up didn't
hurt them in their first round'
game. But against Eustis
in the round of 16, it was.a
major factor. Eustis' speed:
was more than the Red:
Devils could handle as theyi
limited Williston to less thari
150 total yards. Eustis used
their speed as the Red Devil:
had used theirs all seasori
and walked into the regional
finals with an impressive ai.di
effective victory. And so fbot
the second season in a ro':
the Red Devils' season endc
in the second round of the'
state playoffs.


Anatomy ofa play l
BYNEA ,'ma ,, ': ,-. .-


follQwitrg their eon. h, e
the first round and failed t tle yes
against Williston. Eustis ad llInpl I34
first quarter,.but the Panthers spe? deteAte
Devils' ability to gain, thepoint. afattijhci: otghI E
opening period, It-came toi fril' ti'~tn 6 h g r
moments of the thirdand a the entirety -' ot
quarters. '. .,
Game Suinimary: Aft'ea isoixile ss.iruit w'
both teams wege tying tp posidimthe
control of.the stylo~e;ti h,' .gicmd
dominant iii ~te ec'ohdhiid. Tha' ,t i ni"-t
zone .twice aM'd siilt4odoWm i Uisix
lone score madejt a gapi. e.thet
ey Play:' '
1), Eulis' quartqrbaice~Cq
w ith Akem : unliam., for .8-
'second quarter.' ,.
2) .iqustis runrinmg baokflBra iob 9 t
kickoff following Willi. iji'S sc retoth, '
yard line. '.:' '.
3):. Followifig the 'soqo that-tiIhil iO va


Page 9









Page 10


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Last time under the lights


Congratulations,


Red Devils on a


smoldering season!


Anatomy


kickoff return, the Red Devils fumbled the ball at the Panthers'
21-yard line.
Why they were key plays
1) In high school football it is unusual to have a 0-0 tie
midway through the second quarter. It signals two defenses
are ahead of the offenses and the team that breaks it gets a
huge advantage in establishing their style of play. Not only
did the Panthers gain the tangible advantage of an 8-0 lead,
but the touchdown created the atmosphere for the Panthers to
gain control of the game using their style of play.
2) Football is a game of momentum and emotional
movement. Following the Red Devils' touchdown they
trailed by a score of 8-6 and the opportunity to get back into
the game was present, both physically and mentally. Eustis
immediately snatched it from Williston on both fronts. With
excellent field position, the kickoff return also led to the
Panthers second touchdown which made it 16-6 and forced
Williston to go to their passing game.
.- 3) Although the Panthers' offensive speed was too much
for the Red Devils defense to contend with, the offense had
kept Williston in the game. Trailing 16-6 after the second
Eustis touchdown, Williston offense seemed primed to at
least keep the visitors in the game. The fumble ended that
position as a long and impressive drive went for naught. The
t.


fumble for all intent and purposes sealed the outcome of the
game in Eustis' favor as Williston had given up too much,
both tangibly and mentally to overcome the final mistake and
come from behind.
Key defensive stat of the game:
The Red Devils turned the ball over three times as the
Panthers' defense used its speed to its advantage. Although
the Red Devils had some gains of significant yardage, they
were minimized by the turnovers as the Panthers' speed
caused a feeling among the visitors of "being pushed back
on their heels". Unlike last week's game, the Red Devils'
turnovers led to scores by the Panthers and happened when
the game's outcome was still in doubt.
Key offensive stat of the game:
With Marquis Minor ready to assume some of the load
rushing the ball after his injury and Courtney Days having a
superb day in his stead last week, the running game seemed
to be in good shape. However, as a combined unit, they were
held to less than 50 yards and the team was choked as a whole,
gaining under 100 yards.
If a team can't run the ball in the playoffs, it is highly
unlikely they will win. In addition with the running game
shut down, the Red Devils had to rely on their passing.
Williston's passing game is effective as a supplemental means


Continued from page 9
to gain yards, not as a primary method. Forced to rely on
its passing in that situation, the results were predictable as
the Red Devils scored one touchdown, but almost every other
play was incomplete or gained insignificant yards.
Other factors that overwhelmed the Red Devils:
1) Speed! Speed! Speed! For the first time this year,
the Red Devils faced a team that had as much speed as they
have, if not more. The Panthers in many ways looked like
a carbon copy of what the Red Devils had done during their
regular season. They established the point of attack early and
gradually enforced their style of play through it.
2) A significant contribution of the Red Devils' ability
to gain yards was wrapped up in their ability to move
quarterback Devin Timmons outside of the pocket where his
decision making could be utilized to its fullest impact. With
the speed Eustis presents, the Red Devils had trouble moving
-Timmons outside of the pocket and Head Coach Jamie Baker
alluded to his team having problems with it even after they
made adjustments.
3) While they played hard and continued to fight, the
Red Devils seemed increasingly uneasy as the game wore on
about being in the environment they were in. It seemed to
at least partially make them a little bit more cautious in their
approach.










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Lady Devils have come a long way in short time


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-Williston
might not be the most well
known program on Florida's
high school athletic map, but
starting the season with a
record of 3-2 they are heading
in the right direction.
After opening the season
with a loss to Interlachen, the
Lady Devils have rambled
off three straight victories to "
get the good start every team /i "
desires.
"We started the program :
two years ago, so it is
understandable why we didn't
have a lot of upperclassmen," .
Head Coach Max Aguirre
said. "But now that we have
had a couple of years to get
the girls into the program, we
have a good mix of youth and
seniors in our third year and
that should be a big help."
The Lady Devils in their
two previous years have
experienced both a successful
season and a disappointing
campaign.. They compiled a
7-4 record in their first year, "
but slipped to a 5-9-2 mark
last season.
The drop in their record
came after the Lady Devils .0, .
were accepted into their Z (4
current district in their second ;r-!
year. They played as an ...v, .: .
independent their first year. Journal photo by Neal Fisher
With the move, the team SPEED, SPEED, SPEED. For the first time in the history of the program, the
faced stiffer competition. Lady Devils can create scoring opportunities with it.
However, that stiff


The offense requires the
ability of communication and
with the experience of being
a third year team this was one
of the ideas the team could
focus' on in fall practice.
"I believe if a team can
pass the ball as a weapon, it
can beat anybody," Aguirre
said. "It gives the team the
ability to control the play. It
is an effective way to get high
percentage shots and open up
space for the shooter. The
formation and our talent also
allows us to move into a 4-5-1
if we need to play defense."
The team's good start
has also come because of a
newly found depth. While it
is not quite as deep as most
established programs, this
year's squad has more than
they did in their first two
years as they go five deep
on the bench and have two
goalkeepers. In their first
two years all the starters had
to play the entire 40 minutes
in almost every game.
Their starting goalie,
Sandra Garcia, is in her
second year and is quick
off of the mark and good at
controlling the ball once she
gets her hands on it.


The three captains of the
team are Mindy Hughes,
Kaitlyn Guinsler and Amber
Aguirre. All three have been
with the program since their
first year. Hughes is the
team's rock as she directs
the defense from the sweeper
position, while the two other
Lady Devils are midfielders.
Once again, while their
speed might not be quite as
impressive as most of the
established programs, it has
shown a strong improvement.
Led by striker Suzie Smith
the team is now in a position
to match up with other squads
for periods of time during
their games.
With the difficult task of
establishing a foundation in
its first two years, the team
also had the opportunity
to significantly upgrade its
chemistry and conditioning
during the off-season and so
far it has paid dividends.
"The first two years, the
program had to start off with
nothing," Aguirre said. "We
had to do a lot of things most
teams don't have to, starting
with the basics. But now

See Soccer Page 12


competition will be a benefit
to the team as they now have
an idea of what to expect in
district play this year.
Aguirre is ,also pleased
that the team spent their fall
practices working on the
specifics ofthe game, not the
basics like they ic d to in their,
first two seasons.'
"With the mix of seniors and
youth that we have, the team
focused on running some set
plays and the modifications
that our offense and defensive
formations can use," Aguirre
said. "We could practice on
some of the more advanced
things, like set plays and how
to adjust the formations in
specific situations.
"We, didn't have to try to
cram a lot of things into a
short period of time and it is


a lot easier to get ready for
the season when the team
practices just a few things,
instead of trying to learn
everything from the basics to
the more advanced stuff."
The team's strength is in
it .passing and accordingly
..runs a.4-4-2 formation, (.t\o
Sfr si,- two midfielders and
four defenseman) switching
from last year's set-up of a
3-4-3.
The switch came in order
for the team to be able to use
its passing as a strength. The
formation allows for the team
to create passing lanes as it
moves upfield.
The midfielders become
forwards and the offense is
designed for the players to
move in triangles, allowing
them to make crisp, tic-tac-toe
passes through the defense.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher


THE 4-4-2 FORMATION offers opportunities for one-
on-one match ups.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher


NOW IN THEIR third year, the Lady Devils' basic soc-
cer skill, such as dribbling and controlling the ball,
are being coupled with more specific ideas.


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23 Low 9:19AM -0.6 5:35 PM Set 7:49 PM
23 High 4:08 PM 2.9
23 Low 9:05 PM 1.7
F 24 High 2:30AM 3.9 7:03AM Rise 10:39 AM 9
24 Low 10:02.AM -0.5 5:35 PM Set 8:52 PM
24 High 4:55 PM 2.8
24 Low 9:50 PM 1.7
Sa 25 High 3:16AM 3.8 7:04AM Rise 11:26AM .16
25 Low 10:49AM -0.4 5:34 PM Set 9:58 PM
25. High 5:46 PM, 2.8
25 Low 10:44PM 1.7
Su 26 High 4:10AM 3.6 7:05AM Rise 12:07PM 25
26 Low 11:42AM -0.2 5:34PM Set 11:04PM
26 High 6:39 PM 2.8
26 Low 11:50PM 1.6
M 27 High 5:19AM 3.4 7:05AM Rise 12:44PM 35
27 Low 12:39PM 0.1 5:34PM
27 High 7:32 PM 2.9
Tu 28 Low 1:07 AM 1.4 7:06AM Set 12:08AM 46
28 High 6:46AM 3.1 5:34PM Rise 1:17 PM
28. Low 1:41 PM 0.4
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Page 11










Page 12 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS a RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


.RUSSELLMANIA


There


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-Most
people's perception of the
Jack Russell Terrier is a
warm, fuzzy and cuddly
creature playing with a
childlike innocence, but it
was originally bred to hunt.
: With that in mind, the
Sunshine State Jack Russell
Terrier Club's primary
purpose is to educate people
about the breed, to be a group
that has fun with the strain
of dog and to preserve and
work the creatures as well as
protect, maintain and promote
(for educational purposes)
the acceptable standard of the
animal.
One of the means by which
the club achieves its purpose
is through its biggest annual
event, Russellmania, and this
year's competition was its
biggest and best yet.
' "The competition this year
was very successful," Sandy
Grimmel, the treasurer of the
SSJRTC and co-owner of
Oaks Edge Terrier Kennel,
said. "We got a lot of
compliments and the owners
enjoyed themselves. The
Jack Russells had a lot of
fun, too. The show has really
grown and it has become
well known throughout the
country.
-"We are really proud to
le known for putting on a
classy show. Everyone in the
state works together and the
individuals are very helpful.
That is something that isn't
always common. The terrier
people really come together
and that has been a big part of
Russellmania's success."
In fact, participants
camei- from- as 'far' away as
Bedf6rdshi~r, Enigliifd' and
Livonia, N.Y. for the fourth
edition of Russellmania on
the weekend of November
3-4 at Williston's Horseman
Park.
It consisted of six
sanctioned classes or as they
are officially called, classes,
Conformation, Racing, Go
to Ground Flash, Agility,
Superearth, and Trailing/
Locating, as well as three
non-sanctioned events for
non-members of the SSJRTC.
All dogs must be between 10"
and 15" in size.
,The event also included
a competition for child and


s more to the terrier than meets


Photo courtesy of Sandy Grimmel
THE JACK RUSSELL Terrier was originally bred to
hunt.


youth handlers. Handlers
between the ages of five
and nine competed in the
child's division while those
between the ages of 10 and
16 competed in the youth
division
The children's division
held only the conformation
competition while the
handlers between the ages of
10 and 16, in addition to the
conformation competition,
put their best friend through
their paces in the form of go-
to ground and agility.
The younger divisions also
included a verbal question
and answer section and the
terriers themselves were not
judged.


Spread out over 131 classes,
approximately 275 terriers
competed in the sanctioned
events. The more notable
winners were dogs from Jacks
B Quick Kennel and RaShar
Jack Russell Terriers Kennel.
Both kennels are located in
Florida and have attained
national recognition.
"It is really quite a sight
to see the Jack Russells do
their thing," Michael Schenk,
president of the Humane
Society of the Levy County,
said. "People come from
all over Florida and I know
of an owner who came from
Virginia.
"We really look forward
to the annual event because


it helps a number of
organizations out, including
ours and it is so exciting to
watch. The dogs really show
some unique skills and the,
people get to see it."
The club uses volunteers
from the Humane Society
of Levy County to catch the
dogs and return them to their
owners as well as for the
Required paperwork.
In exchange, $500 is
donated to the Humane
Society. It is used for a variety
of functions and purposes,
but the most notable uses
are for the development of
a new building, adoption of
the pets, the facilitation of
animal rescue, educating the
public about the need for
getting their pets neutered
and spayed and the reduction
of euthanasia.
"By volunteering for
Russellmania, it gives us
another outlet to let people
know we are here," Schenk
said. "We work with adoption
and rescue organizations
throughout the nation and
have some great pets that are
waiting to be adopted."
The Humane Society will
kick off its fund-raising drive
for the building in the next
two to four weeks.
2006 marked the third year
the club used volunteers from
the Humane Society.
Russell Rescue
Incorporated also benefited


the eye


from Russellmania. John and
Judy Tyno, who are SSJRTC
officials, purchased two
lounge chairs, which were
raffled off at the competition.
The SSJRTC then made a
donation matching the funds
obtained from the raffle.
"The Sunshine State
Jack Russell Terrier Club's
parent organization is the
Jack Russell Terrier Club of
America and holds .a similar
national event in October.
The judges for state events,
including Russellmania,
are licensed by the national
organization.
"We have a- statewide
network where there is
comradery and an exchange
of information," Grimmell
said. "Most of the time, there
is a lot of secrecy. The new
terrier owners talk to the older
ones. We think it is a benefit
to our organization and the
people in the state. The
reputation of Russellmania is
really d testament to it."
In the mid to late nineteenth
century, the English reverend,
Jack Russell, bred this strain
of dog to hunt foxes. Their
job is to flush the fox out of
the brush, where the hunters
can get a clear shot.
The SSJRTC holds two
events that are 'scored
every year. Their next such
event will be the Sunshine
Showdown on March 31-
April 1.








1; c .?? u.es^a, y!ariety of











: tradckn and
.-tin
einbeo tlh quarry Tha
orftY reand accuracy. The'


Athlete of

the Week
Selected by
Neal Fisher

Ciearra Gordon-
Williston Girls
Basketball
With a new coach,
system and philosophy,
the senior Lady Devil has
started the 2006 season
with two performances
announcing her arrival.
She has scored a
combined 31 points and
grabbed over 20 rebounds
in the two games as
the Lady Devils have
established an inside
presence with Gordon.
With new coach
Jason Odom installing a
defensive oriented culture,
she has taken to the Lady
Devils' focus of stopping
the opposition. In doing
so, she has reached a level
of maturity needed for a
senior expected to be a
leader on the squad.


ISoccer
Continued from page 11

we have a couple of years
under our belts, we are
beginning to have the little
things that teams need if they
are going to be successful.
"We don't have to worry
about things like how ,to
throw the ball in or the rules
or conditioning and what to
do if a key player gets hurt.
This year
we can do
something,
but we
still have
some areas
we need'tbf'
work on."
T h e
defense is still learning
responsibilities and the
position in general, making
Hughes'leadership even-more
vital to the team's success.
Even with their good start,
there is still a need to keep
their eyes on the big picture
as they head into the meat
of their schedule with five.
district games in their next
six contests.
And then the Lady Devils
will find out just how far they
have come.


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Page 13.


Golf team shows steady improvement a


agement and putting, came
to light as they played the
regionals at Hale Planta-
tion. The longer a drive, the
less accurate it is. With the
course featuring tight fair-
ways, the team could not hit
their drives as far in lieu of
losing the accuracy needed to
get the ball on the fairways.
Since the drives were not
as long as the Red Devils
usually hit them, they often


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-Eventhough
Williston's golf team finished
seventh out of nine teams in
the regionals, the season end-"
ed with the same steady im-
provement the squad showed
during the regular season.
"I was pleased with the sea-
son," head coach John Lott
said, "Of course you always
want to finish better than sev-
enth in the regionals,
but it was an improve-
ment. We finished last
among nine teams two
years ago and in the dis-
tricts we moved up from.
third to second. So, we
improved at both tour-
naments and the team
got better as the season
went on.
"The golfers know
what their weaknesses
and strengths are and
they worked hard on
their weaknesses and
understanding how
to use their strengths.
They ended the season
looking to improve on
them during the off-
season. This year will
definitely be a building
block for the future."
Due to the school's small-
er size, the team consisted
of only six golfers, but the
experience the. team gained
this year will be invaluable
next season as the Red Devils
fielded only one senior this
year.
Juniors Kirby King and
Kevin Rice will be the team's
most seasoned players' next
year. Trevor Sanso and Jef-
frey Brannon gained a wealth
of experience as sophomores
this year and freshman A.J.
Collins will come back in
2007 after finishing with the
lowest score at the regionals.
Chris Dunn waste team's
only senior this year.
The team shot a score of
352 over 18 holes at the re-
gionals and finished the regu-
lar season with a 5-6 record.
The Red Devils biggest
weaknesses, course man-


Tlu Sports &%I

NEAL FISHER
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


His time meant the world


options were limited to two
golfers' scores, whereas other
teams have at least three.
In fact, Lott went as far as
to indicate he felt his team
lost four matches, because
it had to suspend one of its
members after he threw his
golf club. Without the depth,
the Red Devils' fourth golfer
made or broke the team's for-
tunes and they had only one
golfer to use in its final spot.
Among the
team's strengths,
which it will
build up next
year, is their
chemistry and
understanding
of -each mem-
Sbers' strengths
and weaknesses.
Lott was pleased
the team learned
fromits mistakes,
in particular the
club throwing
incident.
The players*
are also taking
steps to contin-
ue playing year
round, which is
something else
that isn't always
present at small-
er schools.
"I was pleased with our
season," Lott said. "The guys
made it a pleasure to coach
them and that was a part of the
improvement. It was fun to
coach them, because of their
enthusiasm and their desire
to improve. I didn't have to
beg them to want to practice.
They wanted to learn about
the game being more than
just swinging a golf club.
"They learned to respect
the game and understand it
is a gentlemen's game. Next
year we will have seniors,
which is something that
hasn't happened.in a':while.
With the experience we will
have, when it come to swing-
ing the clubs as well as the
other part of the game like it
being a gentleman's contest
will be a big part in us con-
tinuing to improve."


The Week Ahead


Lady linksters prep for tourney


Williston High School
Girls Soccer
Tuesday 11/28 @ Fort White
Wednesday 11/29 @ Inter-
lachen
Friday 12/1 @ Newberry
Monday 12/4 Hawthorne
Friday 12/8 P.K. Young
Monday 12/11 Forest
Men's Varsity/J.V. Basketball
Tuesday 11/28 @Newberry
Friday 12/1 @Chiefland
Tuesday 12/5 @ Dixie
County
Friday 12/8 P.K. Young
Saturday 12/9 Daytona
Beach Shootout
@ Daytona
(J.V.)
Monday 12/11 Ft. White
;Wednesday 12/13 @ Haw-
thorne
iFriday 12/15 @ Bronson .
'Girls Varsity/J.V. Basketball
!Tuesday 11/28 Chiefland
iThursday 11/30 Hawthorne
Friday 12/1 Ft. White


Tuesday 12/5 @ Newberry
Thursday 12/7 Dixie County
Monday 12/11 @ P.K. Young
Thursday 12/14 @ Crystal
River
,Bronson High School
Boys Varsity/J.V. Basketball
Tuesday 11/28 ( Bell
Friday 12/1 @ Dixie County
Saturday 12/2 Oak Hall
Tuesday 12/5 @ Branford
(Vars)
Friday 12/8 @ Trenton
Saturday 12/9 @ Hawthorne
Tuesday 12/12 @ Mayo
Friday 12/15 Williston
Girls Varsity Basketball
Tuesday 11/28 @ Bell
Monday 12/4 Seven Rivers
Tuesday 12/5 @.Branford
Friday 12/8 @ Trenton
Tuesday 12/12 @ Mayo
Thursday 12/14 The Rock
Boys/Girls Middle School
Basketball
Monday 11/27 @ Bell
Thursday 11/30 @ Trenton


Saturday 12/2 Oak Hall
(Boys)
Tuesday 12/5 @ Yan-
keetown
Thursday 12/7 Chiefland
Tuesday 12/12 Yankeetown
Thursday 12/14 The Rock
(Boys)
Chiefland High School
Boys Varsity/ J.V. Basketball
Monday 11/27 Seven Rivers
Thursday 11/30 P.K. Young
Friday 12/1 Williston
Tuesday 12/5 @ Taylor
County
Thursday 12/7 Newberry
Friday 12/8 Dixie County
Monday 12/11 Trenton
Friday 12/15 Ft. White
Girls Varsity/ J. V. Basketball
Tuesday 11/28 Williston
(Vars)
Thursday 11/30 @ The Rock
(Vars)
Monday 12/4 @ Ft. White
Monday 12/11 Trenton
Tuesday 12/12 @ Bell


Ladies take to the court


11/14
Williston vs. North Marion
Record: 1-0,
Outscoring the Colts by 12
points in the first half, the Red
Devils opened their 2006 sea-
son by getting off the schneid
in their first opportunity. The
27-15 spurt was propelled by
the Red Devils' tenacious de-
fense and their rebounding.
They opened the game with
a double digit lead and main-
tained it throughout the rest
of the game as the offense
scored off of the defense's
press, which increasingly


wore the visitors down. The
key to the defense was Coach
Odom's constant changing of


personal.

WHS
-51


NMHS 08-07-09-11---


Points:
Floyd-12,


M. Brown-24,
Gordon-10, P.


Brown-4, Gates-1.
Team Field ,Goals: 19,
Team Free Throws: 12-20.

11/16
Williston vs. St. Francis


Catholic
. Record: 2-0 The Lady Dev-
ils continued their approach
of tight defense and strong re-
bounding for the second con-
secutive game with the same
result. However, this time
the difference was on the of-
fensive end. Ciearra Gordon
led the way with double digits
and rebounds as she used her
height advantage effectively.
The team gradually extended
its lead throughout the first
three quarters

See Court Page 14


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
CHIEFLAND-The Chiefland Women's Golf
Association hits the links every Wednesday, but
over the course of the next few weeks they will
embark on an annual tournament.
Looking to up the stakes in a new format, they
geared up for their annual Handicap Champion-
ship Tournament with the qualifying round last
week. Twenty women were reduced to 18. They
then vied for 16 spots and seedings.
"It puts a different emphasis on the competi-
tion," Marileel Leonard, the association's tour-
nament chairman, said. "It is something that is
fun and neat. The tournament used to have a
winner's bracket and a consolation bracket and
the golfers who lost in the winner's bracket were
eliminated. This way it gives those golfers an
opportunity."
This year's tournament marks the first time it
will be a double elimination and match play af-
fair. Players are eliminated only after their sec-
ond loss.
Matches will be played during the associa-
tion's regular course time on Wednesdays at the
72 par stroke course and at an agreed upon time
between the two opponents.
With the new format, the tournament is ex-
pected to take several weeks to complete as there
is the possibility that as many as nine matches
will be needed to determine a champion.
As opposed to "stroke play" where each in-
dividual is competing against the whole field,
'match play' involves one-on-one competition.
The winner is determined by who wins the most
holes.
With the tournament being a handicap event,
before starting their match the golfers subtract
their handicap from the other player's handicap.
The player with the higher handicap then receives
a stroke on the most difficult holes according to
the difference. If the number of strokes is,still
not equal to the difference an additional stroke is
received for each hole until the golfers are even.
For example, with an 11 handicap, Barbara
Ahola has the lowest handicap of the golfers in
the tournament. Her first round opponent is Betty
Beck, who has a 35 handicap. Ahola has to give
her opponent 24 strokes, one shot on each of the


six most difficult holes and another stroke
on each of the course's 18 holes.
"Match play can be very exciting and,
very hard on the golfers with lower handi-,
caps," Leonard said. "The handicap
makes the competition very competitive,
and gives everyone a fair opportunity at
winning. It makes for a fun day and tout'
nament."
In qualifying, Leonard got a chip-in oin
the second hole for a birdie. Ahola, Rutl
Baker and Barbara Powell also birdieda
holes. The four birdies were the lowest
the qualifying round has seen in severa-
years.
The winner's name will be added to the'
plaque hanging in the entrance of the club;;
house and will receive a monetary prize
on the last day of seasonal play in May.,
The association also held their month'
ly luncheon and meeting following the.
qualifying round for the handicap tourna-:
ment. Carol Healy was the guest of honor
at the luncheon. The group reviewed
the schedule for the holidays, particularly
their plans regarding Christmas and weri;
thanked for their help with the Rye Grass:;
Tournament held last month. '!
Anyone interested in more information,
can call the golf course at 493-2375.
First Round matches are as follows!i;
(handicap scores in parenthesis)
Barbara Ahola (-11) vs. Betty Beck
(-35)
Marilee Leonard (-12) vs. Nancd
Klug (-34)
Patsy Sheppard (-13) vs. Denise
Boyle (-33)
Betty Altier (-17) vs. Freida Mar-
tin (-30)
Maggie Knapp (-19) vs. Fran Ice (-
29)
Jeannie Clark (-20) vs. Arma Beau-
champ (-26)
Mary Lindsay (-21) vs. Ruth Baker
(-26)
Pat Renaud (-23) vs. Jan Hendrix
(-25)


had to settle for the ball being
a distance from the hole and
hence forcing them to rely
on a putting game that needs
work.
While it was not an issue at
the regionals, the team is still
learning that sometimes a re-
ward-risk shot is not always
the best approach and when it
is appropriate. -
Another weakness the team
faces, as is often the case at
a smaller school, is its lack
of depth. Lott pointed out
that usually in high school
matches the top three golfers'
scores on each side are.about
the same.
So, the outcome of the
match often comes down to
the fourth golfer and that is
where the lack of depth hurts
the Red Devils. Without the
depth, none of their golfers
could have an off day as their


...


MOM%


I


I


14-13-11-13--


sometime between my
fifth and sixth birth-
day I became a fan of
the University of Michigan's
athletics. By the time I cel-
ebrated my sixth birthday, the
people who were involved in
the Wolverines' athletic de-
partment were family to me.
And the father was Glenn
E. 'Bo' Schembechler. Grow-
ing up in the states' of Michi-
gan and Ohio, to college foot-
ball fans, he was the face of
the University.
Seventeen years ago he
called it a coaching career, but
to many people, he was, still
is and always will be Michi-
gan football. In fact, I was 21
years old before I knew of an-
other Michigan head coach.
The two coaches who have
followed him were assistants
under Schembechler.
So when news broke of
Schembechler's passing last
Friday, my emotions were
spurred, because a huge, al-
most indescribable part of
my childhood which had in-
fluenced my growth as a man
and an adult were no more.
Schembechler was larger
than. life, especially in Michi-
gan. Even those who do not
follow sports knew of him.
He was on television often as
the Wolverines got more me-
dia coverage than other pro-
fessional or college teams in
the state.
He was often called upon
to appear at humanitarian
ev.eg.ts..giqas Jerry .Lewis.',
telethon .anyd to speak at c6n-
ferences. He was often quot-
ed and referred to as parents
and teachers tried to make a
point with their children and
students.
The answer as to why his


and hurried passers into mis-
takes.
His legacy was sealed on a
cold, windy November day i ,
1969 as his Wolverines, unf
derdogs by two'touchdowns,,
upset the defending national
champions, Ohio State, and
claimed their first Rose Bowl
berth under Schembechler. ,,
With that victory Schem-
bechler's legacy became the
stuff of legends in Michiga#
and college football lore. It
not only put Michigan on the
map again, but it made the
Ohio State-Michigan rivalry.
matter again to the nation.
The luster of a once proud
rivalry was back and his name.
would forever be one of col-
lege football's most romantic,
monikers.
Everything about him-
screamed Michigan. The;
tenor of his name belonged
to the coach of a mid-western
university. It implied he won
with a physically dominating
rushing attack and sicking a
Doberman pincher like de-
fense' on quarterbacks.
His nickname came to him
because his younger sister
could not pronounce the word
brother. But it came to char-
acterize him, simple, to the
point and with a statement. ,;
He looked the part. He
thought the part. And when
he spoke, he humbly sounded.
like the man who made Mich-:
igan athletics matter again. ,
This was obvious when he
turned down the headqpoch-,
ing position at Texas A&Ml,
in 1983. In lieu of an offer,
that would have increased his,
salary by almost 50 percent,
he simply said, "I belong at

See NealPage 15


SCHEMBECHLER
persona was so huge: After a
once proud program had fall-
en on hard times, he guided it
to unparallel success and left
a legacy which lives on.
Since 1969, the year
Schembechler arrived in Ann
Arbor, the Wolverines have
never tasted a losing season.
They have made 32 consecu-
tive bowl appearances, sent
over 200 players to the NFL,
compiled 17 seasons of at
least ten wins, forged 26 sea-
sons of nine or more victo-
ries and claimed the national
championship in 1997.
Even though he never won
a national title, Schembechler
wasa coach's coach. He won
in a college football world
much more rough and tumble
than the current game.
And he did it through sim-
ple means.
He was tough as nails,
determined and disciplined.
His teams mimicked him.
, They ran,the ball until.the,op-
ponents' tongues were hang-
ing out of their mouth in the
fourth quarter.
The defense was big and
bruising. They stopped the
run by taking advantage, of
size and speed mismatches








Page 14


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Bronson Youth League HappeB


Football Comings and
Goings
Playing in the 10 and under
youth league, the Bronson
Packers completed their
season with a 35-12 victory
over Newberry II. The team
finished the 2006 season with
a 5-2-1 record, clinching first
place in their conference.
'The team was led by
quarterback Joshua Smith's
solid play as he threw for
a touchdown and ran for
another.
Brock Brower was on
the other end of Smith's
touchdown heave. He ran the
ball 65 yards after he caught
it.
Brandon Quinn finished
off two of the Packers' drives
with rushing scores and
Jimmy Jones added a another
six points as he found the end
zone as well.
The Bronson Thunder
completed their season last
week with a disappointing
defeat to Williston.
Soccer Doings:
The city of Bronson has
two champions as both the 13
-and under and 12 and under
teams won their divisions
with victories in their post-
season tournaments.
The 10 and under team
placed second in their
division, falling in the finals
of their division.
Bronson I in the 8 and
j


under league fell in the
semifinals, placing third in
their division.
The other team in the 8 and
under league, Bronson II, also
lost in its semifinal match and


settled for third in its division
as well.
The Bronson I squad
finished third in their
division after making it to the
semifinals.


The other team in the 6 and
under league placed one spot
better, second, as Bronson II
made it to the championship
game before losing.


THE LEVY LIGHTNING All-Stars Cheerleaders placed first in their division at
the annual Ancient City Diamond Classic in St. Augustine on Nov. 18. The
cheerleaders competed in the recreational cheer and dance division. The
trophy and other keepsakes of their victory and trip will be displayed inside
Bronson's Town Hall. The team is composed of 23 girls ranging in age from'
5-13.


SCourt


Continuedfrom page 13


Lady Devils' pressure defense forced the visitors into
committing double digit turnovers in their desperation to get
back into the game.
WHS 09-13-15-14---51
SFC 05-07-08-12---32
Points: Gordon-21, M. Brown-13, Floyd-13, Smith-3,
Gates-1
Team Field Goals: 19, Team Free Throws: 9-27
Even though district play is what determines who qualifies
for post-season play, the need to get off to a good start is
essential for all teams. The Lady Devils with their 2-0 start
have accomplished the first of what will be many goals this
season.
The team gets its next test as it plays its third game on the
road against The Rock. They then return to Williston for their
first home game, which will be followed by a span of seven
days without any games.
Without a lot of depth the team is going to live or die with
its pressure defense. So far it has come up big as both game
summaries indicate. It has consistently caused all kinds of
havoc and chaos, both in its full court and half court forms.
A significant portion of the team's scoring has come from
turnovers. In two games the defense has given up an average
of only 33.5 points. The defense has been especially important
to a team adjusting to a new coach and learning how to use
a high dosage of raw talent to its benefit, because the offense
has been inconsistent.
"The offense has shown flashes of brilliance and there have
been times in the first two games that it has worked the way it
should," Head Coach Jason Odom said. "But it is still a work
in progress.
"We are particularly hurt by our lack of depth on the
offensive end, because we only have one or two scorers and
we have had two players foul out so far this season. We have
to play smarter basketball when it comes to avoiding getting
into foul trouble."
The team also needs to improve its free throw shooting. It
has made only 21 of 47 shots for a paltry 45 percent.


Imad Lodhi of Exxon in Williston reads the




lEY OUNJ2..Y JO2UAR NA


s aBIE COUNTY PAPER EST. 1 92


Also available at these locations:


Bronson
A&ABBQ
Boondocks Grill
Bronson Post Office
Courthouse-Bronson
IGA
Li'l Champ
Nobles
Pick-a-Flick
Texaco/Chevron
Lee's Grocery
Cedar Key
Cypress Station
Island Jiffy #1173
Island Jiffy #3246
The Market SR 24


Chiefland
ABC Pizza
Bell's Restaurant US 19
BBQ Bill's US 19
Burger King US 19
Chiefland Flea Market
US19
Chiefland Post Office
Park Ave
Church's Chicken/Jiffy
3000
Dollar Tree US 19
Gas Mart Yogiraj En-
terpr. Inc.
Jiffy 228o-Manatee
Jiffy 2946-Midtown
McDonald's US 19


Mya's Chinese Restaurant
Stone's BP
Sunoco, US 19
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Garden side)
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Grocery side)
Winn Dixie US 19
Winn Dixie #168

Fanning Springs
Homestead US 19
Lighthouse Rest. US 19
Noble Food Mart, US 19
Fowlers Bluff
Carter's Crossroads


Inglis
Food Ranch
US 19/Inglis Ave
Shell Station US 19
Old Town
BP Station-US 19
Jiffy Store
Old Town Post Office

Otter Creek
Otter Creek Post Office

Trenton
BP-Round store on SR 2
Citgo Sunrise Food Mart
#65


Hitchcock's-Trenton
Jiffy Mart #1553
Trenton Medical Center
Trenton Post Office

Williston
BP Gas
Corner Market 121/41
Exxon
Hitchcock's
Li'l Champ 1181
Li'l Champ 1182
Li'l Food Ranch 3626
Li'l Food Ranch 4231
Raleigh General Store
Sunoco
Williston Post Office


At the family-owned Exxon of Willison, Imad Lodhi is the assis-
tant manager. He flips to the Marketplace first each Wednes-
day evening when he gets his Levy County Journal.




Pick up your copy today.

You'll be glad you did.


To subscribe: call Robin at 490-4462


We accept
Visa/Mastercard
Two locations to serve you
440 South Court St., Bronson
13 South Main St., Chiefland


- JJournal photo by Rhonda Griffiths


A\ i


VISA3









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Page 15


ENeal


Continued from paage 13


Michigan."
Perhaps his finest moment as a sports fig-
ure came in 1989 when he fired Bill Freider
on the eve of the NCAA basketball tourna-
ment. Freider had accepted the head coach-
ing position at Arizona State, but wanted to
coach the Wolverines in the tournament.
Schembechler, then the athletic director,
once again simply said, "We want a Michi-
gan man to coach Michigan." In a difficult
situation with no right or wrong answer, he
believed it was a matter of loyalty above all
else, made a decision and never wavered from
it, despite unflattering remarks about him and
the decision.
That was the essence of Bo Schembechler,
a sports figure who made my childhood what,
it was supposed to be. Every fall I knew I
could count on Schembechler to do all the
things he was known for one more time. It
was a comfort to me, gave me perspective
on what it takes to be successful and what it
means.
In my first opinion piece I wrote about Dale
Earnhardt, the man who I consider my great-
est inspiration, particularly as a child. Ii my
childhood he made me believe obstacles and
adversity were but the test of true character
and he was my example of never giving up if
I believed in something.
But Schembechler was the man who taught
me what to do about it and how to achieve
success the right way. Through the vehicle of
football, he taught me, there was a right way
and wrong way to do things. And the wrong
way is what lazy people do.
He taught me the little things are what
are important in achieving success, because
they are the fabric by which the hard work
is done.
He talked of organization, punctuality,
planning ahead, hard work and taking re-

*Guy


of times the difference in
a truth or a lie can mean
life or death, or worse.
Worse? Yes. For example,
who do you say Jesus is?
There is so much historical
evidence documenting Jesus'
actual existence here on earth
that even the most hardened
scoffers have trouble reason-
ing away His earthly life, or
e'en His death and resurrec-
t6n. Some i eligions even ac-
knowledge Jesus in their false
teachings.
They admit He was a great
prophet, or say He was a good
man. They do not want to be
so ignorant as to belittle the
impact His teachings have
had on. the world. After, all,
loosely tying in with the Truth
often causes a lie to become
somewhat more palatable.
Inevitably, however,- upon
closer study you will find that
they refuse to acknowledge
Jesus' deity and they deny


sponsibility for one's actions. These were
the type of little things that were the under-
tones of his success and for it I grew into a
better man whose success is because of his
example.
As a coach he could be terse, difficult and
incorrigible, but as a person he could light
up a room, because he valued loyalty, taking
responsibility for one's own talents and ac-
tions as well as making a difference. He was
a larger than life figure who was at heart a
common man with the same fears and aspira-
tions as the rest of us.
He was a complicated person outside of
football, but he never swayed from the core
values of who he was as a football coach
when it came to how he conducted himself in
good and bad times on and off the field.
Because of that, the nation, the state of
Michigan and young men like me are better
off for it.
He, along with Eamhardt, Bobby Bowden,
Nolan Ryan and Mark Messier were or are the
men who instilled in me the aspiration to be
a journalist. My greatest hope as a journalist
was or is to interview them one day, because
they were the sports figures whose example
molded me into the person I am today.
Mitch Albom, the Detroit Free Press Col-
umnist and the author of Schembechler's
biography, said upon the coach's death: "He
died last Friday, but it was not his time. His
time was Saturday afternoons in the fall as
he stood on the sidelines at the Big House
(Michigan Stadium)."
I was never blessed with the fortune to
meet Schembechler, but his time meant the
world to me as I drew comfort, strength, en-
couragement and a sense of how to pursue
my goals the right way from his example,
To that I say, your time meant the world to
me. May you rest easy, my hero.


His position as LORD. Can
they walk in the gray area
on this matter? Is there one?
Do you want to pull the trig-
ger on something like this
and just hope you're right?
In merely accepting Jesus
as a good man many have
clearly already discredited
themselves and proved that
they cannot possess absolute
truth. For, Jesus' saith unto
'hii~ I am the way, the truth,
and the life: no man cometh
unto the Father, but by me.
John 14:6 KJV. It came from
His own lips. Either these are
the ravings of a lunatic or Je-
sus is actually who he claims
to be. He cannot be a good
man and a lunatic! Who is
He?
The Bible further says of
Jesus, For it stands in scrip-
ture: "See,J am laying in Zion
a stone, a cornerstone chosen
and precious; and whoever
believes in him will not be put


Divorcing parents class set

Parent Education and Stabilization training, as required
by the state of Florida when parents divorce with children,
is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
four-hour training provides important information regarding:
(1) legal aspects; (2) emotional aspect for both parents and
children;' (3) family relationships; (4) financial responsibility
to. a child; and (5) issues regarding spousal or child abuse.
Pre-registration is required at least three days prior to the
scheduled training. For more information or to make reserva-
tions, call CFCC Levy Campus at 493-9533. The cost of the
training is $34.


Continuedfrom paage 7
to shame." To you then who
believe, he is precious; but
for those who do not believe,
"The stone that the builders
rejected has become the very
head of the comer," and "A
stone that makes them stum-
ble, and a rock that makes
them fall 1 Peter 2:6-8 NRSV.
But anyway, where do you
stand with Jesus? Is He your
solid'rock, or are yoiu stum-
bling over Him? Don't spend
your life staring down the
barrel of despair one breath
away from eternal disaster.
Jesus is the Messiah. Why
don't you let Him be your
safety? Listen.
Without a proper under-
standing of who Jesus really
is and an acceptance of His
Lordship in your life you will
one day die and spend eter-
nity in hell. BOOM! It is my
prayer that this will jar you to
your senses.


Basket auction set

'Friends of the Williston
Library will hold its annual
holiday open house and bas-.
ket auction Saturday, Dec. 9
from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
the library on Noble Avenue.
Silent bids will be received
on the baskets and proceeds
will assist in the purchase of
books, materials and equip-
ment for the library.


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID

The City of Cedar Key is hereby accepting bids Friday, December 8, 2006 at 3:00 PM in
the City Commission Chambers. City Hall, 490 2nd Street, Cedar Key, Florida at.which
time and place Bids will be opened and read for the following:

Construction of one picnic pavilion, 6 single picnic shelters, one quadruple picnic
shelter, two triple shelters and the renovation of the existing gazebo at the Cedar Key
City Park.

A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on November 30th at City Hall Commission Chambers
located at 490 2nd Street, Cedar Key, FL.

PLANS &SPECIFICATIONS may also be obtained at the Cedar Key City Hall. There will
be a refundable deposit of $150 per set.

Bidders must submit complete and detailed specifications of the product or service, which
Bidder proposes to supply. Each bid must be accompanied by Bid Surety, bond or certified
check in the amount of 5% of the bid, as guarantee which may be forfeited and retained by
the City in lieu of its other remedies if a successful Bidder's proposal is accepted by the
"City and he shall fail to execute and return to the City the required contract. Please note
that the time period for completing this project is 100 consecutive calendar days from the,
issuance of the Notice to Proceed by the City of Cedar Key.

The right to reject any and all bids or to accept the bid or any item of any bid deemed most
advantageous to the City of Cedar Key and to award contracts accordingly is expressly
reserved to the authority of the City Commission of the City of Cedar Key.

Bids will not be received after the time specified for the opening of the bids. Bids received
after the hour appointed will be deemed invalid and returned unopened to the Bidder.
Pub. Nov ember 23, 2006


Manatee

plans

weekend of

fun
For those not enamored
of the black Friday shop-
ping frenzy, visit Manatee
Springs State Park for a
refreshing diversion.
On both Friday, Nov. 24
and Saturday, Nov. 25, the
park will host a variety of
entertaining and enlight-
ening activities including
wagon rides, historical re-
enactors of frontier days
and other activities.
Activities run from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. both days.
For more information, call
493-6072.

Light display

begins Nov. 25
Santa and his helper, "The
Humane Society of Levy
County, Inc.", want to share
the Spirit of Christmas with
the Community.
For a few days each year
the world becomes a place
for only the young at heart,
no problems or worries, just
smiles and laughter. Please
come and enjoy this won-
derland of twinkling lights
beginning Saturday, Nov. 25
through Christmas Day.
You can drive through if
you're in a hurry or you can
park your car and walk down
Candy Cane Lane. A dazzling
display of 150,000 dancing
lights on 2 1/2 acres will mes-
merize you.
The light display will be
held nightly 6-9 p.m. from
Nov. 25 through Christmas
Day at 7550 NW 51st Ct.,
Chiefland (in Spanish Trace
Subdivision).
Remember happiness to a
child is the warmth of a puppy
and happiness to a puppy is
the warmth of a full tummy.
All donations are welcome
and will benefit The Humane
Society of Levy County, Inc.


NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCE

BYTHE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed ordinances will be
considered for enactment by the Levy County Board
of County Commissioners, at a public hearing on
Tuesday, December 5, 2006 at 10:00 a.m., in the
Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room,
Levy County Courthouse, Bronson, Florida. Copies
of said Ordinance are available at the Levy County
Planning Department. For information call 352-486-
5405. Interested parties may appear at the meeting
and be heard regarding the proposed ordinance.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-17
AN ORDINANCE OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROVIDING THAT THE LEVY COUNTY CODE
BE AMENDED BY AMENDING SECTIONS 50-301
THROUGH 50-304 OF SUCH CODE; PROVIDING
FOR AMENDMENTS TO THE CONCURRENCY
MANAGEMENT PROGRAM; PROVIDING FOR
CREATION OF NEW SECTION 50-305 OF SUCH
CODE; PROVIDING FOR PROPORTIONATE
FAIR-SHARE MITIGATION; PROVIDING -FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING A REPEALING
CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-16
AN ORDINANCE PURSUANT TO SECTIONS
163.3177, 163.3184, AND 163.3187, FLORIDA
STATUTES AMENDING THE CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT OF THE LEVY
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR TRANSMITTAL; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

All persons are advised that, if they decide to
appeal any decisions made at this public hearing,
they will need a record of the proceedings and
for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence upon
,which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodations
to participate in this meeting should contact the
County commissioner's Office at 352-486-5218.

Pub: Nov 23 & 30, 2006 .



Don't drink and drive and

remember-buckle up!


PLANNING COMMISSION
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by the Planning Commission on Monday, December
4, 2006 at 6:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard during the course of action. The hearing will be held in the
County Commissioner's Meeting Room, the Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Planning
Commission is not bound to consider the petitions in the order in this notice. Any of these petitions may be considered as soon
as the meeting commences.
PP 24-06 David Stonecypher of Dynan Group representing Feaster Development Corp., petitioning the board for a'Prelimi-
nary Plat of "Ivey Run Estates," a subdivision located in the SW % of the SE Y of Section 36, Township 12S, Range 18E, in Levy
County. Said parcel contains 10 acres more or less. This subdivision will consist of.three residential lots. This parcel has a land
use designation of "MDR" Medium Density Residential and a zoning classification of R" Residential and is within the Williston
Municipal Service District.
FP 19-06 Croft Land Surveying representing R. Gaited Ranch, LLC, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "R. Gaited Ranch
II," a subdivision located in the SE % of Section 20, Township 13S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 30 acres
more or less and is located within an "AIRR" Agricultute/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of three 10 acre
more or less residential lots.
FP 20-06 Croft Land Surveying representing Perry and Deana Greenspan, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "Serenity,"
a subdivision located in the NW % of Section 15, Township 12S, Range 17E in Levy County. Said parcel contains 6.24 acres
more or less and is located within a "RR" Rural Residential zoning. This subdivision will consist of one 6.24 acre residential lot.
FP 22-06 Croft Land Surveying representing Robert P. & Laveme G. Sandlin, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "Ancient
Oaks Estates," a subdivision located in the N 1/2 of Section 25, Township 12S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains
50 acres more or less. This subdivision will consist of three residential lots.
SE 6-06 Ralph Eng of Eng, Denman & Associates, Inc. representing Eddie Hodge, petitioning the board for a Special Excep-
tion to operate a Permanent wood chipping business (pine shaving mill), on a parcel of land located in the SE K of Section 29,
Township 13S, Range 19E, in Levy County. Said parcel is a portion of Parcel No. 05230-000-00 and will consist of 14.9 acres
more or less. This parcel is located within an Agriculture/Rural Residential "ANRR" zone.
Copies of said petitions with complete legal descriptions and subsequent staff reports will be available for review at the Levy
County Development Department. For information call 352-486-5203. Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard regarding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting should
contact the County Commissioners Administration Office at 352-486-5218.
SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO
ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING, A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, AVER-
BATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
Pub.: Nov. 23, 30, 2006


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
A public hearing on each petition as described below will be conducted by the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday,
December 5, 2006 at 10:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard during the course of action. The hearing will
be held in the County Commissioner's Meeting Room, the Levy County Courthouse, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida.
The Board of County Commissioners is not bound to consider the petitions In the order listed in this notice. Any of these petitions
may be considered as soon as the meeting commences.
PP 24-06 David Stonecypher of Dynan Group represent-
*ing Feaster Development Corp., petitioning the board for a
Preliminary Plat of "Ivey Run Estates," a subdivision locat- MU .
ed in the SW % of the SE % of Section 36, Township 12S,
Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 10 acres
more or less. This subdivision will consist of three residen- -
tial lots. This parcel has a land use designation of. "MDR"
Medium Density Residential and a zoning classification of
"R" Residential and is within the Williston Municipal Service MUM
District.
SE 5-06 Michael Shoemaker representing the AMVETS
Post 444 of Florida, petitioning the board for a Special Ex-
ception for On-Premises Consumption of Alcohol within a T
chartered and private club or lodge, on a parcel of land lo-
cated in B & R Unit 6, Unrecorded, Lot 2, Block 1, in Section -- -
30, Township 12S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel
contains' .52 acres more or less and is located within a "RR"
Rural Residential zoning.
Copies of said petition with complete legal descriptions
and subsequent staff reports will be available for review at
the Levy County Development Department. For information
call 352-486-5203. Interested parties may appear at the
meeting and be heard regarding the proposed petitions. Any
person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the County Commissioners Admin-
istration Office at 352-486-5218.
SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEALANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO
ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING, A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, AVER-
BATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPOu WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, 2006









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Page 16


U lassified


Deadline
Monday
2 p.m.




egals



CL COUNTYJO
HL COUNTY PAPER ,S!T. B2 L


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


How to Place Your Ad


Call:
Fax:


Chiefland 352-490-4462
Chiefland 352-490-4490


Email: mblitch@levyjournal.com
Visit: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


Cost $5 pe<
week, '
20 words qo
less,
every worci
after that 14
cents


Bronson 352-486-23
Bronson 352-486-50

440 South Court Strei


Miscellaneous


o10

Personal
105 -
AA MEETING-for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number. tfn

NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
.specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net


115 Not
EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352-221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b

WAY DOWN ON THE SUWAN-
NEE RIVER. OTTER SPRINGS
RV PARK IS NOW OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. Come enjoy THE
GREAT OUTDOORS, at OT-
TER SPRINGS RV RESORT.
More than 820 pristine acres
along the beautiful Suwannee
River, with two-second magni-
tude springs. Level, pull thru, full
hook up RV sites, tent camping,
"cabins, swimming pool, two bath
houses, picnic building, spring
house lodge, small church and
much more. These facilities
are also available for meetings,
weddings, retreats, scouts and
special events. CHECK US OUT
NOW IF 'YOU ENJOY CAMP-
ING, FISHING, HIKING, CA-
NOEING, SWIMMING, BIKING,
AND BIRD WATCHING Day,
week or monthly rates. WWW.
OTTERSPRINGS.COM. OR
CALL 352 463-0800 OR 800
883-9107 12/14b


1125 Servi
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb

MAKO PLASTERING &
PAINTING, Quality assurance,
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096. 12/28p

This space for sale.
Call Robin to
purchase at
a low rate


490-4462


Employment ..


203

Help WO
210 Full l
FULL TIME ACCOUNTING
POSITION, Local professional
accounting firm has an immediate
opening for a full time accounting
position. We are a full service
accounting firm providing audit,
tax, and business management
services. An accounting degree
is preferred, but business related
experience will be considered.
Non-Smoking office. Mail or fax
resume and cover letter to P.O.
Box 1777 Chiefland, FL 32644,
(Fax) 352-493-7107. 12/30b

CHIEFLAND POLICE
DEPARTMENT is accepting
applications for fulltime police
officers. Applicant must pass
background check, physical,
drug screening, possess valid
Florida driver's license, and have
current Florida Police Standards.
Positions open until filled.
Applications may be obtained
at 14 East Park Avenue. EEO.
11/30b

Work Wa'i


LICENSED DRYWALL HANG-
ER residential or commercial.
Remodels, new construction.
386-365-7932. 11/23p

rentals 3


31i


330 Property f |

EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL
SITE has about 700 feet on
east side of HWY.'s 19, 27, 98
and SR 55 in Fanning Springs.
This beautiful location has
median cross-over and curb
cuts. Call Gerri, 352 463-0700
or 352- 221-4056 for rental
information. 12/14b

Want to
335
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL re-
porter needs a place to lay'his
head at night. Outstanding sports
writer is forced to commute three
hours and really wants to make a
home base in Levy County. If you
have a spare room, small apart-
ment or mobile home you want
to rent for $200-$300 a month or
if you need a roommate to share
expenses, call Neal at 813-335-
1095 or 352-490-4462.



Recycle


I Land. an
425 for Salm
OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner: 352-624-2215, 352-236-
4579, www.ocalaforestland.com/
2nd 12/28p

For Sale


54fl


1 Auctio

FAT GOOSE AUCTION will
be holding another great
auction this Friday in downtown
'Chiefland at 7:00 pm. Always-
outstanding estate merchandise.
Our box lots start at 6:30 pm. A
40-year collection of Budweiser
items even the large revolving
pocket watch, all types and kinds
of primitives wind keg, chicken
crate, scythes, enamelware deco
dining room table, wash stand -
even a child's wash stand, near
mint Maytag ringer washer, great
art work, super organ & bench,
vintage trains American Flyer
& Lionel, estate jewelry, carved
ivory pieces. Items from different
antique stores. Ciocks,;'p yoke,
great glassware. F'urniture
several pieces to include a
large slab coffee table, matching
hutches, fishing gear and all
types of smalls, tools, and lots
more.AU2738 (Bruce Denestein)
AB2565 10% BP. For more info.
call Jim Morehead at (352) 356-
1065. Have a wonderful & safe
Thanksgiving. 11/23b
Miscellan U


NEW MOWER & CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07
Want to
1560
WILLISTON RECYCLE Salvage
$50.00 premium for cars or
trucks. Cash for all types scrap
metal. Call today 528-3578.
12/7p


recreation 1


60|

Boats & A
605 I
MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
Boat motors wanted, dead or
alive! 352-486-4316 12/28p







y ou r Ie


egals


91

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO: 38-2006-DP-0204
IN THE INTEREST OF:

C.W. (M) DOB: 03/27/05
Minor Child.

NOTICE OF SUIT FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS AND PLACEMENT
FOR ADOPTION

THE STATE OF FLORIDA

TO: JAMON WALKER
Address unknown

You are hereby notified that
a petition under oath has been
filed in the above-styled Court
for the termination of your paren-
tal rights to C.W., a male child
born March 27, 2005, in For-
rest County, Mississippi, and for
permanent commitment of the
child to the Department of Chil-
Sdren and Family Services for the-
subsequent adoption. You are
hereby commanded to be and
appear before the HONORABLE
MAURICE GIUNTA, JUDGE OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT OR THE
GENERAL MAGISTRATE, at the
Levy County Courthouse, Bron-
son, Florida, on the 17th day of
January, 2007, at 9:30 a.m. for
an Advisory Hearing.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY
APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES
CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL
TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
AS A PARENT TO THE NAMED
CHILD.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO
HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY
BUTARE UNABLE TO AFFORD
ONE, THE COURT WILL AP-
POINT AN ATTORNEY TO REP-
RESENT YOU.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four (4) consec-
utive weeks in The Levy County
Journal at Bronson, Florida.
WITNESS my hand and as
the clerk of said Court and the
Seal therefore, this 14 day of
November, 2006.
DANNY SHIPP
,Clerk.of the Circuit Court
(Court Seal)

By: J. Marino
Deputy Clerk
JOANN M. HUMBURG, ES-
QUIRE
Florida Bar Number 831328
Child Welfare Legal Services
Post Office Box 356
Trenton, FL 32693
(352) 463-4026
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006


900 Le'


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. -2006CA-000729
MARK P. SULLIVAN and
NANCY J. SULLIVAN, husband
and wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ROBERT WERNER and-
LORETTA WERNER, husband
and wife, if married, if alive, and
if dead, their respective un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, under
or against them individually,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERT WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

LORETTA WERNER
58-15 BROWN PLACE
MASPETH, NY. 11378

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to Quiet Title as to the fol-
lowing described lands:
The South % of tract No. 5,
in an unrecorded subdivision for
HORIZONS ENTERPRISES,
INC., BY WILLIAM D. PARRISH,
dated October 2,1971, more par-
ticularly described in that War-
ranty Deed recorded in or Book
380, Page 692, public records of
Levy County, Florida. Said tract
assessed together with a 1973
Parker, singlewide mobile home
bearing ID#13GCM013642 and
title #5967532, located thereon.

TAX PARCEL #: 04101-002-
OH

filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on RON-
ALD W. STEVENS, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Pgst
Office Box 1444, Bronson, FL
32621, on or before Dec. 29,
2006, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereaf-
ter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
,WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Nov. 13,
2006.

Clerk of Court
By: Gwen McElroy

Persons with disabilities re-
questing reasonable accom-
modations to participate in this
proceeding should contact (352)
374-3639 (Voice & TDD) or via
Florida Relay Service at (800)
955-8771.
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, Dec. 7, 14,
2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2006-CP-000248


Legc
900 a


Division:
IN RE: ESTATE OF

CLIFFORD WARREN
DIGHTMAN A/K/A CLIFFORD
W. DIGHTMAN A/K/A CLIF-
FORD DIGHTMENN A/K/A C.W.
DYGHTMAN A/K/A C.W. HE-
BAN
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the es-
tate of Clifford Warren Dightman
a/k/a Clifford W. Dightman a/k/a
Clifford Dightmenn a/k/a a/k/a
C.W. Dyghtman, a/k/a C.W. He-
ban, whose date of death was
October 29, 2005, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Levy County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Post Office Box
610, Bronson, Florida 32621.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's.
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served.,
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate. must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT, FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this notice is Nov. 23, 2006.

Personal Representative:
Morris Dightman
1324 North Liberty Lake Road
#204
Liberty Lake, Washington
99019

Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Thomas E. Slaymaker, Es-
quire
Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.
Attorney for Morris Dightman
Florida Bar. 398535
Slaymaker and Nelson, PA.
6027 South Suncoast Boule-
vard
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-1204
Pub: Nov. 23, 30; 2006


WHAT

TO LEARN




WITH A S


IN MINUTES.




*IS BRAIN LOST.


Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssoclatlon.org or 1-888-4-STROKE
AmericanStroke
Association.

@2004 American Heart Association
Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation


BRONSON SELF STORAGE
(352) 486-2121





HIOURS: Monday Friday 10 am 5 pm
Saturday 10 am 3 pm
839 E Hathaway Ave Behind Dollar General


Notice of Public Hearing
The Levy County Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on Monday
December 4, 2006 at 6:30 p.m. In the Board of County Commissioners Meeting
Room, Levy County Courthouse, Bronson, Florida.
The Planning Commission will consider a proposed ordinance amending sections
50-301 through 50-304 of the Land Development Code related to concurrency
management and creating a new section 50-305 providing for proportionate fair
share mitigation. The Planning Commission will review the proposed ordinance
for consistency with the Levy County Comprehensive Plan. Any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the
County Commissioner's Office at 352-486-5218.
Pub. Nov 23 & 30


Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


-I I










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CLASSIFIED & LEGALS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Page 17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE EIGHTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA


Case No.:38-2006-DR-000753

Kenneth Lee Hamm, Jr.
Petitioner

and

Alicia Nicole Hamm
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR.
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

'TO: Alicia Nicole Hamm
76 SE 151 Avenue,
Old Town; Florida 32680


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Kenneth
Lee Hamm, Jr., whose address
is 500 W. Park .Avenue #407
Chiefland, Florida 32626 on or
before December 7, 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 355 South Court
Street, P.O. Box 610 Bronson,
Florida 32621, before service
on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
Copies for all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may.
review theses documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the /
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice-of Current Address,
Florida Supreme CourtApproved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in the lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on
record at the Clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic -disclosure of-
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.

Dated: October 27, 2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: LaQuanda Lalson,
Deputy Clerk
Pub. Nov. 2, 9,16, 23


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
USE UNIFORM METHOD OF
COLLECTING NON-AD
VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

Levy County, Florida (the
County) hereby provides
notice, pursuant to section
197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes,
of its intent to use the uniform
method of collecting non-ad
valorem special assessments
to be levied within the
unincorporated area of the
County, for the cost of providing
solid waste disposal services for
residentiaJ and non-residential
properties, fire protection services
and road maintenance services
commencing for the Fiscal Year
beginning on October 1, 2007.
The County will consider the
adoption of a resolution electing
to use the uniform method of
collecting such assessments
authorized by section 197.3632,
Florida Statutes, at a public,
hearing to be held at 9:00 a.rimr
on December 5, 2006 at the
Commission Chambers, 356 S;
Court Street, Bronson, Florida
32621. Such resolution will
state the need for the levy and
will contain a legal description
of the boundaries of the real
property subject to the levy.
Copies of the proposed form
of resolution, which contains
the legal description of the real
property subject to the levy, are
on file at the Office of the County
Coordinator, 355 S. Court Street,
Bronson, Florida. All interested
persons are invited to attend.
In the event any person
decides to appeal any decision
by the County with respect
to any matter relating to the
consideration of the resolution
at the above-referenced
public hearing, a record of the
proceeding may be needed and
in such an event, such person
may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the public


hearing is made, which record
includes the testimony and


evidence on which the appeal is
to be based. In accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special
accommodation or an interpreter
-to participate in this proceeding
should contact Levy County at
(352) 486-5217, 7 days prior to
the date of the hearing.

DATED this 23rd day of
October, 2006.

By Order of:
Nancy Bell, Chair
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

Pub. Nov. 9,16, 23, 30, 2006


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

Todd Hubbard d/bla Kips
Mini-Storage, pursuant to the
provision of the FI. Self Storage
Facility Act (Fla. Stat.83.801 et
sec.) hereby gives Notice of Sale
under said act to wit: On Dec. 8,
2006 at Kips Mini-Storage 13645
N.W. Hwy #19, Chiefland, FL.,
Todd Hubbard or his agent will
conduct a Sale at 10:00 a.m.,
by sealed bid to highest bidder.
Bids to be opened by noon with
viewing from 9 a.m. till 10:00 a,.
m. for the content of the follow-
ing person/ persons:

Melissa Nutter
P.O. Box 290
Chiefland, FL. 32644

Marline Jenkins
P. 0. Box 723
Chiefland,FL. 32644

James Morris
285 S. E. 911 St.
Old Town, FL. 32680

Thomas Alderman Jr.
5650 N.W. 30 St.
Chiefland, FL. 32626

Tonya Akins
9809 S.W. 51 Ave.
Trenton, FL. 32693

Consists of household; per-
sonal items or miscellaneous
merchandise, stored at Kips
Mini-Storage, 13645 N.W
Hwy#19 Chiefland, FL.. Sale is
being made to satisfy statutory
lien.

Todd Hubbard
Kips Mini-Storage
13645 N.W. Hwy#19
Chiefland, FI. 32626
1-352-490-9591
Pub: Nov.16,.23, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2006-CA-675
EMC MORTGAGE


CORPORATION

vs.


Plaintiff,


SHARON SMOKLY STANCIL
F/K/A SHARON A. SMOKLY,
UNKNOWN TENANT 1, and
any unknown heirs,( devisees,
granees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above-
named Defendants,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given
that the undersigned Clerk of
the Circuit court of Levy County,
Florida, will on the 4t day of
December, 2006, at 11:00 o'clock
A.M. at the Lobby of the .Levy
County Courthouse in Bronson,
Florida oh Mondays, offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to
the highest. and best bidder for
cash,: the following described
property situate in Levy County,
Florida:

Lot 1, Block 14, WILLISTON
HIGHLANDS UNIT 5 REPLAT,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
5, of the Public Records of Levy
County, Florida.
Together with 1994 DWMH
SHAD 24x48 mobile home
VIN# 146M8362A & VIN#
146M8362B

pursuant to the final Judgment
entered in a case pending in
said Court, the style of which is
indicated above.

Any person or entity claiming
an interest in the surplus, if any,
resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of this
Lis Pendens, must file a claim
on same with the Clerk of
Court within 60 days after the
foreclosure sale.


WITNESS my hand an official
seal of said Court this 6th day of
November, 2006.
In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities Act,
persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact Court
Administration at 355 South
Court Street, Bronson, Florida,
Telephone (352) 486-5100, not
later than seven (7) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1/800/955-8771,
or Voice (V) 1/800/955-8770, via
Florida Relay Services.
Danny J. Shipp
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT CO
URT

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
Frank Albert Reder
Butler & Hosch, P.A.
3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E
Orlando, Florida 32812
(407) 381-5200
Pub:,Nov. 16, 23, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2006-CP-000210
IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES T.
VANDERGRIFF A/k/a JAMES
THEDORE VANDERGRIFF
A/k/a JAMES THEODORE
VANDERGRIFF A/k/a JAMES
T. VANDERGRIFF, JR. A/
k/a JAMES THEODOR
VANDERGRIFF
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration oftheestate
of JAMES T. VANDERGRIFF,
deceased, whose date of death
was July 10, 2006, is pending in
the Circuit Courtfor LEVY County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 355 South
Court St., (P.O. Drawer 610)
Bronson, FL 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is -required to-be served
must file their claims with the
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims ordemands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FOTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is Nov. 16, 2006.

Personal Representative
MARTIN J. STILES
9140 W. Chata Place
Crystal River, FL 34428

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GLEN C. ABBOT
Florida Bar No. 235911
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River, Florida, 34423-
2019
Telephone: (352) 795-5699
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NUMBER: 06-CA-662
DOREEN M. CASLE
Plaintiff,
VS


T. RICHARD HAGIN and T.
RICHARD HAGIN AS TRUSTEE
Together with their heirs, should
they be deceased, and any
natural unknown persons who
Might be the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, unknown Tenants
or other parties claiming by,
through, under of against the
above-named defendants
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

To: T. RICHARD HAGIN
and T. RICHARD HAGIN AS
TRUSTEE
You hereby are notified that a
Complaint to Quiet Title was filed
in this court on August 10, 2006.
You are required to serve a copy
of yourwritten defenses, if any, on
the petitioner's attorney, whose
name and address is: Sherea-
Ann Ferrer, P.O. Box 721894
Orlando Florida 32872, and file
an original with the clerk of this
court on or before December
22, 2006 Otherwise, a judgment
may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
petition. Property Description:
TRACT #63 University Estates,
an unrecorded subdivision, in
Section 16, Township 12 South,
Range 17 East, Levy County,
Florida, being more particularly
described as follows: The North
% of the Southeast % of the
Northeast /4 of the Northeast /
of the Northeast % of Section 16,
Township 12 South, Range 17
East, Levy County, Florida.
Witness my hand and seal on
November 6, 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk

(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 30 Dec. 7,
2006



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 38-2006-CP-0258
IN RE: ESTATE OF


CHARLES
AUSTIN,


FREDERICK

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of the
estate of CHARLES FREDERICK
AUSTIN, Deceased, whose
date of death was August 4,
2006, File Number 38-2006-CP-
0258, is pending in the Circuit
Court for LEVY County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address..
of which is PO. Drawer 610,
Bronson, FL 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claimsordemands against
decedeilt's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD -SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this Notice is November 16,
2006.
BETTY W. AUSTIN
Petitioner
11310 N.W. 73rd Court
Chiefland, FL 32626
GREGORY V. BEAUCHAMP,
P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
PO. Box 1129
Chiefland, FL 32644
(352)493-1458
Florida Bar No. 178770
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 38-2006-CP-000057

IN RE: ESTATE OF SONIA L.
JOHNSON
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Sonia L. Johnson,
deceased, whose date of death
was May 23, 2005, and whose


Social Security Number is 299-
40-6564, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Levy County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 355 South Court
Street, Bronson, Florida 32621.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claimsordemandsagainst
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
SThe date of the first publication
of this notice is November 16,
2006.
Personal Representative:
Shelia Kay Hand
17790 SE 60th Lane
Morriston, Florida 32668

Attorney for Rersonal
Representative:
THE LAW OFFICE OF
RICHARD M. KNELLINGER,
P.A.
Karen S. Yochim, for the Firm
Attorney for Personal
Representative
2815 NW 13th Street, Suite 305
Gainesville, Florida 32609-2865
Telephone: (352) 373-3334
Florida Bar No. 670847
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

'Dona Potter d/b/a Bronson
Self Storage, pursuant to the
provisions of the Florida Self
Storage Facility Act (Fla. Stat.
83.801 et sec.) hereby gives,
notice of sale under said Act to
wit:
On December 9, 2006 at
Bronson Self Storage, 839 E.
Hathaway Ave., Bronson, FL
32621, Dona Potter or her agent
will conduct a sale at 10:00 A.M.
by sealed bids to the highest
bidder. Bids to be opened at
noon, with viewing from 10:00
A.M. until noon forthe contents
of the bay or bays, rented by the
following person/persons.

JEANNE TURNER
P.O. BOX 1823
BRONSON, FL 32621

,MELISSA DANIEL
11070 NE 110th Lane
BRONSON, FL 32621

Consists of household,
personal items or miscellaneous
merchandise, stored at Bronson
Self Storage, 839 E. Hathaway
Ave., Bronson, FL 32621. Sale is
being held to satisfy' a statutory
lien.
Dated November 10, 2006

Dona Potter
PO Box 1705
Bronson, FL 32621
Phone (352) 486-2121
Sale: 12/09/06
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

NOTICE OF PROPOSED
RULES:

Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District, Chapters 40D-
1 and 40D-4, Florida Administra-
tive Code (F.A.C.).
Summary of the Proposed
Rules:
Rule 40D-1, F.A.C., Procedur-
al: The amendment of Rule 40D-
1.607, F.A.C., Permit Processing
Fee, revises the permit applica-


tion processing fee thresholds
for Environmental Resource
Permits to more accurately re-
flect statutory requirements and
creates a fee waiver for certain
petitions for formal wetland de-
terminations filed pursuant to
District rules.
Rule 40D-1, F.A.C., Proce-
dural: The amendment of Rule
40D-1.659, F.A.C., Forms and
Instructions, incorporates by ref-
erence revisions to the Proposed
Well Construction Location and


Design Form. The proposed re-
visions to the form request addi-
tional information concerning the
design of the proposed well, in-
cluding pipe diameter, estimated
depth of the well pump, and the
depth of any well screen. Other
revisions to the form include cor-
rections of grammatical errors or
inconsistent references.
Rule 40D-4, F.A.C., Individual
Environmental Resource Per-
mits: The amendment of Rule
40D-4.021, Individual Environ-
mental Resource Permits, re-
vises the definitions of General
and Individual Environmental
Resource Permits to remove ref-
erences to the authority of Dis-
trict staff to deny applications for
such permits. Pursuant to the
amendment, all such denials will
go to the Governing Board for fi-
nal action.
SRule 40D-4, F.A.C., Individual
Environmental Resource Per-
mits: The amendment of Rule
40D-4.331., F.A.C., Modification
of Permits, updates a reference
to the form used for certain envi-
ronmental resource construction
permits (General Environmental
Resource Permit Application for
Modification Related to Outpar-
cel Construction Within Permit-
ted Commercial Projects, Form
No. LEG-R.001.00(2/05)).
THE PERSON'TO BE CON-
TACTED REGARDING THE
PROPOSED RULES IS:.Karen
E. West, Deputy General Coun-,
sel, Office of General Counsel,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
SFL 34604-6899, (352) 796-7211,,
extension 4651. The District
does not discriminate on the ba-.
sis of disability. Anyone requir-
ing reasonable accommodation
should contact Dianne Lee at-
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4658; TDD
only: 1 800-231-6103.
Pub.: Nov. 23, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 38-2006-CA-'
0000899

D.A.M. PROPERTIES, LLP, a
Florida Limited Liability Partner-
ship,
Plaintiff,
vs.

EARNEST F. ATKINSON, a
single person; ROSE M. HIMES,'
a single person; and HOUSE-'
HOLD FINANCE CORPORA-
TION III,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ARNEST F. ATKINSON
505 Blitch Street
Bronson, FL 32621

ROSE M. HIMES
505 Blitch Street
Bronson, FL 32621

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-"
fenses, if any, to it on GREGORY -
V. BEAUCHAMP, PA., Plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 1129, Chiefland, FL 32644-
1129, on or before December
29, 2006, and file the original.'
with the Clerk of this Court either:
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on November
15, 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Nov. 23, 30, 2006



Buying

Tax Deeds?
Jeed to cdeat t&e title?
&rfpetienced, DependaKe
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
eaet


CAwi&}e J. Weidnef
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


Email your legals to
rheath@levyjournal.com


Deadline is
5 p.m. Monday


~111~~11 --- ~- --------







Page 18 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


Randy Boyce wins American flag

Assembly of Fine Artists winning raffle
ticket for a 3X5 stitched American flag was
won by Randy Boyce on Veterans Day.
It was presented to his parents Louise and
Barry Boyce of Bell during Trenton's Farm-
ers Market Nov. 18 by President Barbara
Moore. After purchasing the winning ticket
during a visit with his parents. he returned to
New Jersey.
Upcoming event for AFA is the Designer
Fashion Design Competition. They have a
Diana looka Ike to encourage design of gar-
ments suitable for any one of the many func-
tions Diana was accustomed to being involved
with. There will be a $25 fee for two designs .
being entered. Designers are to be their own
ihodels or use one of their friends.
BARRY BOYCE, LOUISE BOYCE, BARBARA MOORE.


4e "3et ^Pace" (' ywS- a d t J wmio
| Local Artists' Gallery of
Equine, Western and Landscape Art

H Antique Consignmyept


i M MNONTANA FURNITURE I
j' &ind ixie' at 4(C ,11W lit St. in 'lifti.,ton
S'ue. sday-Saturday Ham-5pi -


-" -. L


T RNTHIS...

+.. INTO



SEC COUNTY JOIIt
IIJ IIE COUNTY PAPER EST

Beautiful 4 BR/ 2.5 BA house in Williston
o at 21350 NE 40th Ave., 1,630 sq. ft. with L
"j carport & bonus room on large corner lot. It is
> 2 miles east of City Hall on C.R. 318. Listed for
' $125,000, thousands under appraisal! SHIP K
down payment assistance for moderate KI
Income families on this house is $15,600. Call i
Florida U-.SARealty, Inc. 352-378-3783. L



Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliamscom ol'-WILLIA
GOSSWILLIAMS
MOBILE HOMES: REAL ESTATE, INC.
Whitted Mobile Home Estates 3/2 DWMH on 2 lots,
screened porch, detached carport & more. Owner fin-
ancing to qualified buyer! -$69;00 Reduced! $62,500
Park-like 5.acres with 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000.
Waterfront- 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
'Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land-
scaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well. $8469N. Reduced! $76,000.
New Listing 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600 s.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
New Listing HANDYMAN on 5 Acres. 3 BR, 2 Bath
Singlewide that needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500.
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $1-30;60 Reduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres just off U.S. Alt. 27. $128f60;tReduced:
$110,000
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85-600 Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $-9;00t per acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corer Parcel 80 Ac at corner of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$4-25T00 per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres -Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
City of Trenton Small residential building lot in town -
chain link fenced, nice lawn. $39,900
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $17,500
Whitted Mobile Home Estates -2 lots ready for your mo-
bile home. One w/ shed:-$--5;580. Reduced! $13,000
2nd one:-$1~-6 Reduced! $12,500
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $139,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront- 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal 3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


S ARE YOU A


SERIOUS SELLER?
IF YOU OWN REAL ESTATE & WANT MAXIMIZED VALUE
CONTACT YOUR CURRENT
QUICKLY REAL ESTATE AGENT OR ANY
OF THE REAL ESTATE
PROFESSIONALS LISTED BELOW WHO CAN EXPLAIN
THE BENEFITS OF HAVING YOUR PROPERTY INCLUDED
IN THE UPCOMING ................... ..........

** ** ** GREAT *

NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

REAL ESTATE AUCTION!!!

*HAVE YOUR PROPERTY *NO SALES COMMISSION
EXPOSED TO MILLIONS OF *NO CLOSING COSTS .
PEOPLE IN THE EASTERN *NOMINAL LISTING FEE
UNITED STATES 11,000 TO $4,000
& INTERNATIONALLY R,
READY AND WILLING PREFERRED REAL ESTATE
& ABLE TO BUY AUCTION LISTING AGENTS:
-PRE-APPROVED FINANCING Ken Cornell, Realtor Mark Cohen
FOR BUYERS Cornell & Associates EYEMARK Realty
SU ken@CornellRE.com mark@eyemarkrealty.conr
ALL TYPES OF PROPERTY 352281-4o 352-222-5609
Bill Thompson Robert Lujnla
HO SES CONDOS Sunbelt Corporate Advisors Homestyle Realty
wjt0l1@bellsouth.net Beautiful Archer, FL
352-380-0404 352495-9915
HOM ES ITES Kayla Sosnow Jack Myers, Lc. RE. Broker
ACREAGE TRACTS Gore-Rabell Real Estate Campus Realty '
| R Kayla@treecityproperties.net jackm@campusrealty.org, .. .
W WATERFRONT 352-328-7474 352-318-5442 '
WATERFRONT .
Gilles Mallart Barbara Miller
COM MERCIAL Sunbelt Corporate Advisors Prudential Preferred Properties ,
nc105 @bellsouth.net bmiller@prudentialgainesville.tom
352-380-0404 352-494-5449




8BEN CAMPEN

AUCTIONEERS

Lie s o"elEsaeBrkr- # 19901 O










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SWater

Niflo weather patterns this
winter, District officials hope
winter rains will replenish
the water resources to levels
where the advisory no longer
is needed. Until then, they
offer some important water-
saving tips:
a. Reduce lawn/landscape
irrigation.
b. Don't water between 10
a.m. 4 p.m.
c. Install an automatic rain
shutoff switch on irrigation
system.


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


Continued from front Akins


d. Plant drought-resistant
trees, plants and grasses.
e. Equip hoses with auto-
matic shutoff nozzles.
f. Wash vehicles infre-
quently and only on porous
surfaces.

g. Use a broom or blower
- not a hose to clean side-
walks, driveways, parking
areas.
h. Fix leaky faucets and
toilets, which can waste up to
100 gallons per day.


i. Replace older fixtures
with low-flow devices.
j. Don't let the water run
while brushing teeth, shav-
ing, or washing dishes.
k. Take shorter showers;
staying under five minutes
can save 1,000 gallons per
month.
1. Don't use toilet as a
waste basket.
m. Use appliances ef-
ficiently (run full loads in
clothes washer and dish-
washer).


this case," Akins said, "your homestead is over
there. We see where the mail goes."
Next year will not produce any significant
relief for property owners according to Akins.
He said, "Whatever is going to happen in 2007
has to happen between now and Dec. 31."
WhileAkins offered no relief for overburdened
property.owners, he did offer a note of sympathy.
"Real estate has gotten risky. For those hanging
on, I appreciate them. It's gotten very tough,
very competitive."
Akins distributed flyers that included a notice
of allowable increases to assessed values for


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006 Page 19


Continuedfrom front

any one year. Amendment 10, passed
in November 1992, capped the annual
assessment increase allowed to the lower
of either 3 percent of the previous year's
value, or the percentage increase in the
national consumer price index. Amendment:
10 applies to residential homestead'
property only, and does not apply to new
construction or to property improvements-
for the year the improvements were made.
In years subsequent to that initial year,
the 3 percent of consumer price index
percentage applies.


Increase the value of your home


If you're like most, your home
is your biggest investment and
you want to get the most money
possible when you sell it.
Getting top dollar for your
house means it needs to look
its best when you put it on the
market. It's got to be clean and in
good repair both inside and out
for good "curb appeal."
Your home needs to be the
spiffiest one on the block, but
you don't want to break the bank
going for the gold.
According to Sid Davis, a real
estate expert and author of the
new book "Home Makeovers
That Sell: Quick and Easy Ways
to Get the Highest Possible
Price" (AMACOM Books), some
simple, inexpensive tricks can
help you get your home in shape
as you begin to look at it through
a perspective buyer's eyes.
"For less than $1,000 you can
oftentimes move your house to.
the next level and increase its
value significantly," says Davis.
"Some improvements will take,
virtually no money and simply
require investing a bit of time


and some old-fashioned elbow
grease."
De-clutter should be first on
your list. Getting rid of excess
furniture, pictures and knick-
knacks will make a home look
more spacious and livable. Also,
have your home professionally
cleaned. Along with de-clutter-
ing, this can give your home a
new look. According to Davis,
one homeowner he knows did
this and was so impressed by the
improvement that she decided to
stay put and not sell.
If your home is dated and
needs upgrading, start with the
kitchen. Many times you can
keep the cabinets and re-stain,
paint or replace the doors and
hardware to cut costs. Replace
the countertops with what simi-
lar homes have in your area. For
example, don't go granite if oth-
ers have laminate. You won't get
the cost back. The same is true
for the flooring, appliances and
fixtures.
Tiling counters can be a fun,
low cost and creative do-it-your-
self project. If you're new to lay-


ing tile, many home centers have
tiling classes and rent the tools
needed. Do-it-yourself kitchen,
bath and entryway tile floors can
create'great looking results and
add much more than the cost to
your home's value. By shopping
around you can get some great
deals on discontinued tile, sales
and overstocks.
Upgrading the bathrooms also
doesn't have to be costly, says
Davis, who stresses concentrat-
ing on new lights, mirrors and
paint to give a boring bathroom
new life.
Indeed, paint is one of the
best low-cost ways to dress up
your home and add to its value.
Check out model homes and
decorator magazines for popular
color schemes. Avoid bright and
off-beat colors these can actu-
ally lower a home's value.
Don't forget the outside. Curb
appeal is also critical. De-clut-
ter and make the yard attrac-
tive. Green and trimmed lawns,
attractive flower gardens and
fences in good repair add value.
Paint or stain wood fences and
sheds.


Recently remodeled & upgraded SWMH on .47
ac. Home has a 14 X 28 addition on the front,
8X14 addition on the rear; 8 X 24 covered deck,
8X12 storage shed. There is new carpet, ceramic
tile & bathrooms have been upgraded. These are
just a few of the upgrades you will find. $60,000.
(DMH-751098-JW) 463-6144 or 542-0009


Absolutely Gorgeous is wena you Will finn wnen you
see tis ery cian & il.kmalintained 3J2 Fweetwood
DWMH srinn on 6 beautifully landscaped acres On
tih In-side tnis homed fenlire wood bmmlng firwpidce
9spadr iEi ainng room walR.in closets. Il master bam
Mskylight, pantry, equipped tot gas Or electric sooe &
heating & more. On the outside this home has a New
solar insulated roof, New covered front & back
porches, New AClHeat Pump, 3 car detached carport,
212& 10x10 sheds, 24x40 worshopfgarage, 2"& 4"
wells water conditioner. The property is fenced & gated,
& can be divided Into two 3-acre lots. $165,999. DMH


', living room is very open which lends to
the spacious feel with a magnificent fire-
place, entertainment center & cathedral
This Beautiful 3 Br. 2 Ba. triple wide home near ceiling. It has the qualities of a site built
Manatee Springs State Park, Chiefland Fl. home with 1792 square feet of living
Easy commute to Gainesville or Ocala. Home space. This 5 acre property is partially
features den, family room with fireplace and cleared with scattered trees & has an
plenty of room with over 1900 sq ft $109,900. exterior shed. This is a must see home &
(LMH-K) 493-2221 ready for your family to move Into.
$147,500. (DMR-753376-CS) 493-2221
or. -.di


HOME ON LARGE FRESHWATER LOT in
Suwannee 3BR/2BA home convenient to the
marina minutes to the Suwannee Rver & the
Gulf of Mexico, large hving room large
sunroom & large kitchen, great for
SUNSET GULF AND MARSH ViEWI Naly entsrjr3ning The outside hasa 621 storage
remodeled, 2 BR 2 BA home located In the town of shed that could be easily converted to a
Suwannee at the mouth of the magnificent Su- guest room, also is a 11x32 covered deck at
wannee Rlverl Suwannee is a quiet, peaceful, fish- the edge of the canal with fish cleaning area,
ing village you can enjoy for your weekend get- storage area & 2-stall boathouse with lifts
ways or retire here. Manatee & bird watching, The home is currently under renovation &,
grouper fishing in the gulf, boating on the river. would be the perfect home away from home
e2 nn0n I unu '- iLI 4 9aannt $375.000. IDW-753964-JH) 542-9007 1


TURN THIS..


INTO THIS!


Find your dream

home
in the
Marketplace!




COUNTY JOUR
L, HE COUNTY PAPER EST. 192: L



Call Laura to list your house in the
Marketplace. 352-486-2312


4 BR/2.5 BA$392,000
INatalie 219-8365 MLS#753746


S NEW USTNGI
Beautiful 36 Acres Lot off of
Hwy 27 in Bronson Heights Area!
Priced to Sell! $22,000
Natalie 219-8365 MLS#754449


NEW USTINGI
Nice.24 Acres Lot in Bronson.Great
for your Mobile Home or Site Built
Home! Priced to SELU$20,000
Natalie 219-8365 MLS#754443


3BR/2BA Home Built by
Steve Smith Construction
.$151,900 Tom317-2476


... ustI o th resonsto istwit us


Lisik Baxte.7-
1 352-9 -]


I Pending I







LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2006


',


en you do your holiday shopping right here in Levy County,
i 'll do more than find great gift ideas. By supporting local busi-
nesses with your shopping dollars, you're supporting our local
economy as well, and that's good for evenione. Our local mer-
zchants are stocked with the season's best gift ideas for evenione
oni your list, and you can't beat the convenience of shopping right
here in town. Plus, you'll enjoy the friendly, personalized service
of merchants who truly appreciate your business. So this year,
kip the mall and check out the merchandise offerings right here at
home you'll be glad you did!







nd tie p~ct gift o y iiu- eade"-
Great Selection for Gill giving
1 from Cllildren Books to Non-Fiction


G a IIt l ata a


T C


I_ invites you to a Lpecial even
Friday, November 24 and
Saturday, November 25
S Come by and see our many holiday specials
S and enijo holiday refreshments with us.
C Come and Bring a Friend
-Beginning November 24, our holiday hours will be
NMonday-FridaylO a.m. -6 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Palm Court
15 N. Young B4-1
^-"* 352-493-1 77,7


4:t4.


,I w
I) be 11


t


Silk Sunshine

Florals
For quality, Service
and Price
Eddie and Inga Hatch
.- Teleflora Florist
Phone: 352-493-0788
425 N. Main Street
Chiefland, Florida


airisimas

Fjj tifacilL


* Hours : Tue. Sat.
10:00


Closed Tharnd~i\-n~n
- 4:30


Flaiitingo
Produce
and
Searool
iDirectl\% acro-;- from
Perlin Bank.
2.A\ Bron46n
()pe~n dml..,.~~:


486 1)113


1aney'a

Antique St &i4ft


HUGE LINE OF DIXIE CLASSIC
AND DLVE OUTflTHERS T-SHIRTS
"NEW" Yankee Candles
Antiques
River Ranch Rustic Furniture
Antler Lighting
Gator FSU Memorabilia & Gifts
Sterling Silver Jewelry
Handbags
Collectibles
Scrapbooking Shop Inside Mall
NEW GIFT WRAP AREA
OPEN HOUSE
NOVEMBER 24 &25
Highway 19, Chiefland
352-493-1921


/,


I


TUhe Picket Fenc
SHoliday Shopping
begins here!
150 East Hathaway
Bronson, Fl. 32621
352-486-3000


Come oled a special gift
for te one you treasure.


I


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