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 Main: Opinion
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 Main: Classified and Legals
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Levy County journal
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00096
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: November 16, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00096

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
        page 6
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 14
    Main continued
        page 15
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 16
        page 17
    Main: Around the Courthouse
        page 18
        page 19
    Main continued
        page 20
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 21
    Main continued
        page 22
Full Text








SVY COUNTY JOURT. NA

L E^E COUNTY PAE E S W. 19 23


VOL. 83, NO. 19


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16,20061 SECTION: 22 PAGES


50 cents per copy


City says 'nyet' to


police requests


The Colors of Autumn


Save a life--your own.
Quit today.
Page 14


Treat Yourself
Page 14

OBITUARIES

I *
Mary Bilbrey
Freddy Davidson III
Shirley Eberle
Margaret Fulmer
Mary Goddard
Annie Grisham
Fannie Holmes
Carla Swails
Bobbe Williams

CONTENTS...
1


Around Levy
Opinion
Law & Courts
Levy History
Ohituaripe


Sports
Tides
l icfci d


Legals
Land Transacti
Marketplace


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Chiefland's
police force may soon increase
by two if commissioners
grant chief Robert Douglas
his request.
Douglas based his need on
"annexation and growth-we
have 45 new businesses." He
added, "I realize this costs
money but to respond quickly,
we have to have manpower.
The city is now five miles
long and two and a half miles
wide. We need new officers
as soon as we can get them."
Projected cost of the
two new spots stands at
approximately $88,500.
Commissioners also
vigorously debated a
nuisance ordinance designed
to give lawmakers the ability
to seize property from repeat
offenders. The ordinance
would set up a board
authorized to impose fines for
activities ranging from drug
sale to prostitution, criminal
street gang activity and stolen
property crimes.
As the ordinance is now


drafted, property can be
seized when an offense is
repeated twice within a six-
monthperiod. Commissioners
Teresa Barron, Rollin Hudson
and Teal Pomeroy expressed
fear that the two-time cut-
off could create hardship for
innocent victims.
"I'd hate to see an elderly
person whose'grandson is
selling drugs without them
knowing it have their house
taken," Hudson said.
Barron opted for leniency.
"I'd like to have it more
like five than two," she said,
referring to the two times in
six months.
Alice Monyei favored the
draft as written. "I say two.
They're going to know what
this ordinance says," she said,
referring to repeat offenders
and their knowledge of the
nuisance ordinance. "They're
going to know they have
three, or four more chances."
Rollins said, "I'm not for
doing something another
agency, such as the justice


See Police Page 22


2-3,5, 6, 13
4
5
5
7
8-13
12
16
16-17
ons 17-18
20-21


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan
PURVEYOR OF FRESH fruits and vegetables April Williams readies her
produce forwhat she hopes will be a bumper crop of customers.
1 r


School board


considers shortfall

BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
BRONSON-School board members learned details of a
funding shortage during their Nov. 7 meeting. Finance direc-
tor Bob Clemons said the shortage was due to diminished
numbers of students registering this year. He said the district
is short 114 students from what was forecast. Funds are ex-
pected to have a total shortfall of $612,982. Clemons said he
and superintendent CliffNorris were currently making budget
cuts. Clemons said he had requested bids on interest rates to
meet the December payroll.
Norris recognized Yankeetown principal Ann Hayes for
completion in the principal leadership academy. Several other
principals and assistants are currently in training through the
program.
School board personnel director Candy Dean said salary
negotiations recently conducted will result in a 7.54 percent
increase. The increase includes an insurance increase that the
board is picking up. The increases were approved unanimous-
ly after a motion was made by Jennefer Shuster and seconded
by Frank Etheridge.
See School Page 22


HOME OF...

* -


Journal pnoto Dy Neal I-Isner
THE WILLISTON Red Devils advanced in the playoffs. The team takes on Eustis
Friday. See Page 8 for details.

Apartments


Torie Hill
of Williston




>
zOF

r- 0
or

.- "j-n
:.

2-1


get first nod

BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
SWILLISTON-WIIJsTON
IS A STEP COSER TO BEING
HOME TO A NEW 30-UNIT
APARTMENT COMPLEX. ROSWELL
DEVELOPMENT GROUP IS
PROPOSING TO BUIID THE
AP ARIMENIS ON THE CORNER OF
SW Fl1STAVENUE AND NE 11
STREET.
WITHLACOOCHEE REGIONAL
PLANNING COUNCIL MEMBER
JASON GAICIA SPOKE TO CITY
COUNCIL MEMBERS DURING
THEIR NOV. 7 MEETING AND
ENCOURAGED COUNCIL 10 IOOK
TOWARD flEXIBIE LAND USES AND
INfiLL DEVELOPMENT AND THEN
TO CHANGE THE ZONING FROM IHE
CUIPENT fiVE ACRES 1T ONE AND

See Housing Page 22


REACH US
I
Managing Editor
Carolyn RIsner
Phone
13521490-4462


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
VETERANS WERE saluted across the county Saturday. For more on the weekend's activities, see pages 6 and 15.


Fax
(352 400-4490 Chlefland
(352) 486-5042 Bronson
Email
edltor@VlewoumarLom
Address
P.O. Box 159 Bronsn, R 32621-0159
P.O. Box 2990 Chlelnd. R 32844-2990


SUBSCRIBE
Levy, Dixie and Gllchrlst counties
$17
In-stale
$22
Out of state
$27
Locally owned and operated!


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. That's why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


INSIDE

*


v ........


I


~uaw unr~pMI~IB~"~O~-`~ I1Lkob. ~d~l~E~l(1









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Funds available to cattlemen for drought relief


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson
today announced that Florida
has been allocated $149,705
in federal funding to imple-
ment a Livestock Assistance
Grant Program. The funding
will assist agricultural pro-
ducers in their recovery from
last spring and summer's
drought.
"Our department is pleased
to work with USDA in this
program to help our produc-
ers recover from what we did
not receive last spring and
summer -- rain," Bronson
said. "Many of our animal
producers were faced with
grazing pastures normally
used to produce hay for their
winter feeding programs or
purchasing hay and feed to
keep animals in good health
or send them to market."
USDA identified eight
Florida counties for the pro-
gram, using the U.S. Drought
Monitors from March 7 to

Velvet beans:

Crop, not plot


This is not a 21st century .
Communist plot; it's a crop
in early 20th century Levy
County.
The workers and bean
plants pictured above will be
in the upcoming book Levy
County: Voices From the
Past if someone identifies the
men.
Will any of your fam-
ily pictures and stories be in
the book? Photographs and
memories are now being col-
lected.
Make sure your memo-
ries and those of others in
your family will be included.
Guidelines may be picked up
in any-Levy County library.
Send your information to
Levy Book, P.O. Box 402,
Morriston FL 32668 or e-mail
themtoshp.levybook@yahoo.
com. Questions?
For answers, e-mail or call
Drollene Brown at (352) 465-
4862.
Don't delay! Deadline is
Dec. 15, 2006.


Aug. 31, 2006, as the basis
for the selection. Any coun-
ties that were classified as
being in D-3 or D-4 drought
during that timeframe were
included. The counties are:
Bay, Escambia, Holmes,
Jackson, Okaloosa, Santa
Rosa, Walton and Washing-
ton. Commercial farmers
or ranchers with beef cattle,
farmed bison, dairy cattle,
sheep, or goats that suffered
forage production losses are
eligible for assistance.
To receive funding, eli-
gible producers will need to
complete a self-certification
application that provides the
maximum number of eligible
livestock that were on site be-
tween March 7 and Aug. 31,
2006. This application also
has a section that requires
producers to estimate live-
stock-related, expenses in-
curred because of decreased
forage supplies related to
the 2006 drought. These ex-


penses could include loss of
forage production, costs of
supplemental feed, cost of
relocating cattle to new feed
sources, increased feed trans-
portation costs, and emergen-
cy water supply needs. Pro-
ducers will not receive more
relief than their losses. Pay-
ments are subject to tax.
Producers must complete
the application for assistance
so that it is received by the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices by 5 p.m. Jan. 31, 2007,
or be postmarked by that
date. ,Applications and other
information about the pro-
gram will be available Dec.
1, 2006, from a number of
sources, including:
-- Online at http://www.
doacs.state.fl.us/ai/ under
Announcements, "Livestock
Assistance Grant Program."
-- University of Florida
IFAS Extension offices lo-
cated in qualified counties in
Florida.


-- Industry organizations:
Florida Farm Bureau, Flori-
da Cattlemen's Association,
Southeast Milk Incorporated,
Florida Dairy Goat Associa-
tion, Meat Sheep Alliance of
Florida, Florida Meat Goat
Association.
-- Farm Service Agency
offices located in qualified
counties in Florida.
Completed applications
should be mailed to, and any
questions directed to, the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices at:
Division of Animal Indus-
try
Attn: Livestock Assistance
Grant Program
407 South Calhoun Street,
Mail Stqp M7
Mayo Building, Room 323
Tallahassee, FL 32399-
0800
Telephone: (850) 410-
0900; Fax: (850) 410-0915


S~z I I


TWO FARM workers surro a


FAVOR hosts first Forever Wild speakers


FAVOR, Friends and Volunteers of Ref-
uges, Lower Suwannee and Cedar Keys
NWR present the first in the series of For-
ever Wild speakers.
The speakers, Jennifer Staiger and Jamie
Barichivich will speak on their research
on the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife
Refuge. Their goal is to monitor amphibian
populations on federal lands and to evaluate
potential causes of decline.
In response to global declines and threats
to the amphibians and reptiles, the US gov-
ernment implemented the National Amphib-
ian Research and Monitoring Research ini-
tiative in 2000.
Jennifer S. Staiger, who was born and


reared in Florida and received her undergradu-
ate degree in environmental studies at Rollins
College and a master's degree in wildlife ecol-
ogy and conservation from UF, along with Ja-
mie Barichivich, who received his degrees in
wildlife ecology at UF, have been conducting
research on these animals in the Lower Suwan-
nee NWR.
The program will be on Nov. 18 at 11 a.m.
in the Cedar Key Public Library, 466 2nd St. in
Cedar Key. All ages will enjoy this interesting
talk on snakes and other reptiles in our area.
The meeting is free and open to the public, and
coffee and pastries will be served.
Call Joan Stephens 352-463-1095 for more
information.


Thursday, Nov. 16
> Great American Smokeout, All day.
l.SRWMD, Mayo, 8:30 a.m.
History gathering, Williston Library, 10 a.m.
STransportation board, Williston, 10 a.m.
l.Exceptional Parents meeting, Bronson, 6 p.m.
SOmbudsman Council, 12:30
Friday, Nov. 17
-VFW sale, Chiefland, 9 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 18
> Church yard sale, Bronson, 7:30 a.m.
>Toys for Tots Bike Ride, Chiefland, 10 a.m.
SCraft sale, Crystal River, 9 a.m.
>Thanksgiving dinner, Bronson, 11 a.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 21
>GOP dinner, Yankeetown 6 p.m.
> Free dinner, Chiefland, 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 24
l Quilt show, Chiefland, 8 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 27
SGOP, Chiefland, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 30
Tourism meeting, Bronson, 6 p.m.
SMusic at the library, Williston, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 9
SBasket auction, Williston, 10 a.m.

Detailed descriptions of these events are contained
elsewhere in the Levy County Journal.

Tourism board to meet
The Levy County Tourist Development Council will meet
on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 at 6 p.m. at 380 South Court
St., Bronson, Florida Levy County Planning and Attorney
Conference Room.

Quilt show begins Nov. 24
The Log Cabin Quilters will hold its .23rd Annual Quilt
Show Nov. 24 through Dec. 3, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
On Saturday, Dec. 2, they will have Bluegrass Gospel Music
and will be serving a chicken and dumpling dinner. There will
be lots of crafts, quilts and baked goods. The drawing for the
quilt will be held on Sunday, Dec. 2.
The Levy County Quilt Museum is located 11050 NW 10th
Ave., Chiefland.

VFW Auxiliary plans sale
The Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW is holding a combination
craft sale, baked goods and rummage sale on Friday, Nov. 17
and Saturday, Nov. 18 at the VFW Post, 1104 S. Main St.,
Chiefland beginning at 9.a.m.

Cane grinding at Dudley set
Dudley Farm Historic State Park Annual Cane Grinding
Day will be held on Saturday, Dec. 2, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. It is
free admission.
For more information, call 352-472-1142.


Page 2


Perkins State Bank

Now Offers


SNo Minimum Balance Required


SNo Monthly Fees


PLUS


State of the Art Banking Services


PERKINS


STATE


BANK


Williston Chiefland 4 Inglis Bronson Archer
528-3101 493-0447 447-4242 486-1182 495-9944


I









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


Hayes completes Leadership Academy


Ann Hayes, Principal of
Yankeetown School, was rec-
ognized at the Nov. 7 meet-
ing of the School Board of
Levy County for completing
the Tier II Principals Leader-
ship Academy.
The North East Florida
Educational Consortium
(NEFEC) established the
Principals Leadership Acad-
emy to provide professional
development for school prin-
cipals at all levels of experi-
ence. The Tier II Academy,
funded through' the state's
DELTA (Developing Educa-
tional Leadership for Tomor-
row's Achievers) program,
Focuses on training for expe-
rienced principals. Principal
Hayes was one of the pilot
group of 25 principals select-
ed in July 2005 to participate
in the program.
"This was a great learn-
ing experience. It gave me
the opportunity to look at
everything from a different
perspective. It also gave me
the opportunity to meet with
other principals and learn
from them," said Hayes.
I Principals who apply for
the Academy must submit
evidence of effective per-
formance evaluations, and
evidence of leadership ini-
tiatives in their schools that
demonstrate student gains.
The district superintendent
and staff then review appli-
cations. The superintendent
recommends suitable candi-
dates to the NEFEC Board of
Directors, which makes the


Church


Churches plan
Thanksgivng dinner
The Beyond The Walls
ministry of ,Bronsoni
Community Church and
cooperating churches in
the Bronson area invite
you to participate in their
Thanksgiving celebration.
A free Thanksgiving dinner
will be served Saturday, Nov.
18 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in
the church parking lot (Alt.
27 and Picnic Street). There
will be food, fellowship and
gospel and praise music.


ANN HAYES, Principal of Yankeetown School, cen-
ter, displays the plaque she received in recogni-
tion of her completion of the Principals Leadership
Academy program. With her are Jennefer Shuster,
school board member representing the Inglis/Yan-
keetown area and Superintendent Clifton V. Norris.


final selection.
Training includes topics
such as: data analysis and
the continuous improvement
model; prioritizing, map-
ping, and monitoring the cur-
riculum; giving leadership to
literacy; school vision and
culture; and building partner-
ships for high performance
learning.
In addition to attending
these training, participants
must also complete a port-
folio that demonstrates ap-
plication of the knowledge
gained.
Commenting oh Hayes'
"graduation," Superinten-
dent Clifton V. Norris said,
"Ann Hayes is an excellent


principal, and now, with the
skills she has gained through
this program, she is going to
provide an even higher level
of instructional leadership."
Hayes, a resident of Crys-
tal River, has been principal
at Yankeetown School for
seven years. Previously, she
was a teacher/administrative
assistant at the school. Her
career in education spans 34
years, with 20 years spent in
Levy County schools. Asked
what she found most chal-
lenging about being a prin-
cipal, she said, "meeting the
demands and needs of all the
students." And what is most
rewarding for her? "The chil-
dren and the successes."


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


News Briefs


Music at the library
Friends of the Williston
Public Library will present
a musical of local talent in
concert, Thursday, Nov. 30,
at 7 p.m. in the library.
Dr. Lou Jensen will direct
Heidi Schwiebert on guitar
and vocal, Lisa Posteraro on
piano, Wyeth Read and Fritz
Junker on violin. Dr. Jensen
will play reeds and do vocals.
This will be a program of big
band standards, a classical
piece or two and a sing-along
to provide an entertaining and
fun evening.
Music lovers should mark
their calendars for this night.


Room in Bronson from 6-8
p.m.
At this meeting, the
presenter will be Donita
Burke, Levy County's
Learning Resource
Specialist.
The topic of her
presentation will be, "KISS-
Keep it Simple Strategies.
Burke will discuss strategies
that parents can use to help
their children if the children
are having difficulties in any
of the five areas of reading.
For more information or
questions please contact
Josie Crooms at 528-4359 or
Josiecrooms@aol.com.


Exceptional parents GOP meets Nov. 27
tomeet Nov. 16 The Levy County Repub-
Also 50 boxes of food will give away free Thanksgiving The q ter meeg o lican Executive Committee
be given to needy families, dinners on Tuesday, Nov. 21 the uery meeting l (REC)will hod its monthly
RTegisfraion 'for these boxes from 6-9 p.m. th'e"Levy County Exceptional
Registat for these boxes from 6-9 p.m. Student Parent Advisory meeting Monday, Nov. 27, at
will be taken duringthe time ,The .church is. located at .Co n will tak ; .- if. -Bell's Restaurant,~i Chief-
of our celebration and will be 1419 S.W. 2n" Court. o lfTs Nove p1et land starting l with 'eflow-
distributed at the close of ur on Thursday, Nov. 16 at the stang
distributed at the close of our Levy County School Board ship and dutch treat dinner at
celebration.
If you would like to help
or participate in the music
please contact Terrell Burge,
Pastor BCC at 281-1624.

'Elohim to host
dinner
Elohim Praise, Worship and
Deliverance of Chiefland will


Page 3


1.4i


6:30.
The REC meeting begins
at 7:30.
The REC website is www.
levyrepublican.com. ,If you
have any questions you may
contact George at 486-0036.

GOP to hear Scout
history
The history of the Girl
Scouts, presented by the local
troop, will be the program
when the Yankeetown-Inglis
Republican Club meets at
6 p.m. Tuesday, November
21 at the Inglis-Yankeetown
Lions Club on 59th St.,
Yankeetown.
Dinner will be served at
6:30 p.m. and the club is
providing the Thanksgiving
turkey. Please bring along
whateveryou:vQwuld like with
your turkey dinner to share.
Alsobrjng& yourJ~able eting.
Call Edith at 447-2622 or
Scotty at 447-2895.


di.


Preventative and
emergency
veterinary care for
all small animals and
exotics

.^BTTT W 1 a1~gT


S2;, wt'lur .ch ieflandanimanlhospihal.conuW
Log cabin next
to Tire Mart *,_,'

LWCOUNTY JOTRNAT

HE COUNY PAPER S. I2 .
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
. The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state ........................... $22
Out of state ....................... $27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadline for all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


Quilters covered homeless


children's heads
BY WINNELLE HORNE put in an envelope with your name on it
CORRESPONDENT and at the end of the show, we settle with
Log Cabin Quilters met Nov. 9 at the Levy you. We will also have food each day.
County Quilt Museum. Today .was show day. Monday we will be going to St. Francis
Martha Asbell has finished a crocheted House with a.load of what have you.
bedspread and what a beauty. It took her 10 About 80 stocking caps have been
months to make and it goes to her daughter knitted for the homeless children. We
Joann. Alice Mae has finished an umbrella. have socks, underwear and so. much
girl quilt top. She has made so many quilts more. Sometime I say, but for the grace
since she started with us in October 1983. of God that would be me.
If you have quilts, crafts or what have you We had a chicken dinner, baked, potato
please bring them in for us to hang. pie, dressing, soup, okra and tomatoes,
Be sure you have a tag, at least a 2x3 with rice, salads, coconut pie, apple cake,
your name, price or not for sale. .pound. dake,-and chocolate cake.' We had
These tags have to be large enough for 20 present.
people to see pnd please use a safety pin, no WinneellTorne is the.directbr of the
straight pins or staples. Levy C6unty'Qi't Museii, Inc.
We take care of all the sales. Your tog is :
_^__ ^_'._,


1 .


Chiefly nd fizz,
Animai nospitai
127474 NW Hwy. 19,
Chiefland
352-493-2000


Ak










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


YOUR VIEW


Our country needs art

To the editor:
With the recent midterm elections, we are all reminded of issues
that divide us. I often think of a photograph of the earth taken
from space. It reminds me that we all have common denominators
from living on a same small planet.
Some issues are non controversial. Almost everybody wants
to breathe clean air and drink clean water. Education for our
children. Health. Nourishment. Freedom of speech and religion.
Most realize that the future of our small planet rests with our
children.
One issue that should be non controversial is art education in
our schools. Art is essential to develop that child into a produc-
tive adult. Art is a universal language. Art satisfies a basic need to
create, to express and to demonstrate ideas. Art is a spoke in the
wheel of progress. Art satisfies a basic need to create a nurturing
environment. Art can express and develop the range of the human
experience. Art can express values that are common to the human
race. Art is integral in other disciplines such as law, medicine, en-
gineering and history. Art can cross artificial borders and express
common themes that all people on our small planet, no mater what
language they speak, share.
It is inconceivable, that our great country doesn't have art edu-
cation in every school.
David Leach
Main Street Framing and Art Gallery, Chiefland

'We can work together'
To the editor:
I have to respond to the allegations made in your Nov. 2
issue by several letter writers regarding the Izaak Walton In-
vestors development plans. I have made many presentations
in Yankeetown in an attempt to provide accurate informa-
tion on the project, and I will continue to do so throughout
.the permitting process. Armed with the facts, we can work
together on a smart plan for redeveloping the riverfront that
can help the local economy while preserving and enhancing
the quality of life in the community.
Our by-right plans for these properties total about 180
units, as was accurately reported by the Levy County Jour-
nal. I have talked to many people in Yankeetown who
have come to review the development plans at several open
houses and public meetings. I do not believe it is accurate
to state that the citizens of Yankeetown are "against this
development," or against redevelopment of the waterfront
in general. The town council was elected on a platform to
defend Yankeetown's zoning, and we've submitted plans
that honor that directive.. Our project is centered around
properties that are commercially zoned, and most are al-
ready commercially developed. For the single residential ,.
parcel, our "by-right" plans include lo\-densit) coristruc-
tion of eight single-family residences on a five-acre parcel.
Our plans include redeveloping the Izaak Walton Restaurant
and three existing marinas. The remaining property, site of
the Anchorage Boathouse and Preserve, is currently zoned
commercial as a "Special Marina District," which allows for
a dry rack storage facility.
Regarding the scale of the development, none of the
buildings along the Withlacoochee River will be higher than
two stories over parking, or about the height of the exist-
ing Izaak Walton Restaurant, which most residents will
agree is not too high. The dry dock buildings on Cormorant
Canal will be slightly higher, and the residential buildings
in the Anchorage Boathouse and Preserve will be three
stories over parking. Most of the resort residential units
will include parking spaces under the buildings, with some
additional on-site, street parking and off-site valet parking
on land near the proposed package plant. The project will
include retail stores and a restaurant, and most of our visi-
tors will have no reason to drive anywhere once they arrive
at our quiet retreat on the river.
The Yankeetown waterfront has been developed for
decades, and our redevelopment project will be constructed
to the much.higher standards of 21st century environmental
regulations. One of the main benefits will be a wastewater
treatment "package plant" on the north side of County Road
40 constructed at no cost to the community.
Construction of a central sewage system to protect the riv- /
er from excess nutrients is a long-standing goal of the com-
munity. In 1999, the Yankeetown Council voted to include
a need for a central sewer system in the local comprehensive
plan. According to town documents, "The need to replace
on-site septic systems with a central wastewater treatment
plant is self-evident: the potential negative impact of septic
tank leachate on the Withlacoochee River an outstanding
Florida Water, coastal resources in the Gulf of Mexico and
groundwater."
We agree, and that's why our package plant will be con-
structed to allow it to tie in to a centralized sewage treatment
Continued on page 5


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers",


Journalist let subjects tell their stories


ne of my heroes
died last week. As
I watched tributes
from his peers in broadcast
journalism, I learned he was
the hero of many.
So often it seems that we
as a culture confuse idols
with heroes. Idols get lots of
press attention these days.
Just watch any morning
news 'show to learn the
latest on your favorite
sports, movie or music
star. That latest is usually
an embarrassing moment
captured by paparazzi and
played repeatedly on TV.
But stars are not .
necessarily heroes, in spite of
their sometimes breathtaking
talent.
Stars make more money
in a year than we their fans
make in a lifetime. When
we'\dd'up the high-cost of
tickets to, see thenmt_,s;ost
of all the ads interrupting
every televised moment we
watch them, we realize how
much we pay them from our
hard-earned money. Their
riches increase dramatically
with each new movie release
or season contract.
When was the last time
your favorite star inspired
you to heroic action? I don't
think mine ever have.
So in spite of my
impatience while waiting for
the next movie or CD, I can't
say my idols have led me to
noble actions.
Heroes dedicate their lives
to helping others lead lives
that are safer or happier or
more free.
I remember my childhood
heroes. John Glenn. John
Kennedy. Patrick Henry.
My father, who went off on
exotic voyages thanks to the
U.S. Navy, and then returned
months later with slides and
tales from foreign ports.
I began watching one of
the first primetime news
magazines in the 1980s.
In the early years 60
Minutes brought together
the best from the world of
investigative journalism.
Morley Safer, Mike Wallace,


Andy
Rooney,
Diane
Sawyer.
All were
good. No
matter
their
subject
matter, CASSIE JOURNIGAN
each could Columnist
hold their
listeners
spellbound.
Ed Bradley was my
favorite. It wasn't just the
stories he presented, it was
his way of interviewing.
Whether he interviewed
a cultural icon, a political
mover and shaker or a man
on death row, he accorded
all respect. He listened more
than he spoke, and when
he did speak; he responded
'directly to what he had
heard.
Today I see so many news
anchors and reporters jeer at
those they are interviewing.
They don't give their subject
room to talk. They ask
jaded questions. They cut
off a response for the sake


of argument. Or failing to
listen, they let good stories
slip by as they race down a
list of prepared questions.
These interviewing
techniques have aroused
animosity amongst the
people. While to me
journalism is a noble career,
many view journalists as
sleazy.
Ed Bradley practiced the
fine art ofjournalism. He
shined a light on people's
actions and let those he
interviewed tell their own
stories. He always seemed
to capture the essence of his
subjects.
Our world is a better place
today because of Bradley.
He showed us how to find
the inherent dignity of every
human being. We can all
hold our heads a little higher
because that was how he
treated us. I know I will miss
him..
Cassie Journigan
is a reporter with the
Levy County Journal.
She may be reached at
cjournigan@levyjournal.
corn


Quote of the Week

A lie can travel halfway around the world
while the truth is putting on its shoes.
Mark Twain (1835 1910)



Letters to the Editor

1) Letters should be 500 words or less. Letters
over the word limit may be edited for space and clar-
ity. Letters longer than 500 words that are difficult to
edit, may be considered for guest columns.
2) Letters must be signed and bear the signature
of the author. Please include a daytime phone num-
ber (not for publication).
4) Submit your letter by noon Monday. You may
email it to editor@levyjournal.com, bring it by either
of our offices or mail it to either address on the front
page.
5) Letters by the same author will be considered
for publication every 21 days.
6) We reserve the right to reject any and all letters
submitted for consideration.

Mitss Honey says.
Miss Honey says .


COUNTY JOU
HE COUNTY PAPER EST. 1 2


Our Mission

The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
*reflect our community in everything we do.
*provide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
*record the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
*promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
*promote readership of advertising thereby fostering a
healthy economic environment.


Who We Are
Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner

Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath

Staff Writers
Cassie Journigan
Neal Fisher

Sales Representatve/Bronson
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell
Delivery/Clerical
Rhonda Griffiths


unday, Nov. 12,
2006, 6 p.m. Good
evening!.
I went to Sunday morning
service and came back
home, looked through the
Gainesville Sun and fed my
little ones.
Now they are all asleep
and I am surrounded by love,
yes puppy love. I feel like I
need a nap, too, but ifI went
to sleep now I wouldn't sleep
tonight!
I have some very good
friends down at the yard
sales at the Bronson Motel.
Yes, they are lady friends!
I baked a cake for them
to eat while sitting there


yesterday and then Margo
and I ate at the Boondocks
before we went home.
Isn't it great to have
friends and
be loved?
Later, OK'?
Here I
am again
and its
1 a.m.
Monday
and I just
had a cup
of hot MISS HONEY
chocolate
and slipped on a sweater, No,
I didn't turn on the heat! But
I might soon if it gets too
cool.


It will soon be just that,
because Thanksgiving and
Christmas are on their way.
Are you ready? Ready or
not it's on its way! Yes, Old
Tom Turkey is hiding and
St. Nick is packing his bags!
Have you been naughty
or nice all year so as to be
ahead of the game and not be
left out?
So until next time I'll say
Lord fill my mouth with
worthwhile stuff and nudge
me Lord when I've said
enough.
Until next week be sweet,
take care and God bless.
So says,
Miss Honey


Page 4


I I


Williston


did it right

There is an episode
of the Andy Griffith
Show where the
townspeople want to have a
band concert in the park for a
leisurely Sunday afternoon.
But instead of freestyling
the afternoon, they waste it
by too much planning, too
many details.
That episode ran through
my mind
Saturday
evening as
I stood in
the pavil-
ion at Lin-
ear Park in
Williston
for the Vet-CAROLYN RISER
erans Day
celebra-
tion.
Instead of wasting time
looking for bells and whis-
tles, .the city put together a
remarkable tribute to our
nation's heroes-our vets-and
the simpleness of the eve-
ning stirred the heart.
If there were anyone there
who did not get a lump in
their throat when the high
school band played all the
themes from Anchors Away
to The Marines Hymn and
the veterans stood for their
branch, then that person had
no heart.
As I watched these
veterans ranging from the
very young to the very old, I
thought of their sacrifice and
that of their family.
I am a mere 400 miles
from my family arid can
readily access them.
Sometimes the distance
seems like 4,00Q miles. I
cannot imagine being the
loved one of someone who
is actually that far away or
farther.
Williston did everything
correctly Saturday.
The only decor was the
American flag. The only
uniforms were those worn by
veterans and active service-
men.
There were no fancy trap-
pings to-take away from the
moment and the focus stayed
where it should have-on the
men and women who are
still living and who fought
to preserve our freedom of
assembly.
The music, the speakers
the clear autumn sky were as
if they were custom-ordered.
It was a Mayberry night in
a Florida setting.
The town of Williston and
Mayor Gerald Hethcoat are
to be commended for taking
the initiative to organize the
event and for giving up their
Saturday evening for those
who were willing to give
their lives for our country.
. Saturday I was not only
proud to be an American,
I was proud of this Levy
County city for its patrio-
tism.
Thank you. Thank you
again.










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006 Page 5


This Week's Arrests ,


The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests:
A 16-year-old
Williston boy charged Oct.
29 with resisting arrest.
Derrick Levon
Galloway, 27, of NE 38-"
Place charged with driving
while license suspended or
revoked-habitual violator-
and possession of cannabis,
less than 20 grams.
The Levy County Sheriff's
Office reports the following
arrests:
Cory Patrick Robinson,
37, of Archer was arrested for
possession L/T 20 marijuana,
possession of crack cocaine,
possession of ecstasy
(MDMA). Bail was set at
$42,500.
Al Furnn Woods, 68 of
Sanford was arrested for
failure to appear (FTA);
driving under the influence
(DUI). No bond was set.
Princeo. L. Altoidor, 17,
of Chiefland was arrested for
escape, battery on officer or
firefighter, resisting without
violence. Bail was set for
$30,000.
Anthony Hart, 17, of
Palatka was arrested for
escape, sniuggle contraband
in facility, criminal mischief
andresistingwithoutviolence.
Bail was set at $10,000.
Alan A. Webb, 19, of
Chiefland was arrested


for possession of cocaine,
possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and FTA
for arraignment. No bond
was set. He was also arrested
for armed burglary, three
counts of grand theft firearm,
grand theft $300. Bail was set
for $15,000.
Shane A. Gray, 35, of
Bronson was arrested for
FTA worthless checks. Bond
was set for $2,002.
Alden Davis, 53, of
Chiefland was arrested for
grand theft. Bail was set for
$2,500.

Michael S. Nettles, 29,
of Trenton was arrested for
FTA, Possession ofmarijuana
under 20 grams. Bail was set
at $600.
Jimmy Charles
Ellingham, 47, of Cedar Key
was arrested f or possession
of crack cocaine, possession
of drug paraphernalia and
FTA- DWLSR. Bail was set
for $11,000.
Cynthia Glover Brown;
49, of Chiefland was arrested
for sale of cocaine and
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set for $15,000.
Catina Glover, 48, of
Chiefland was arrested for
sale of crack cocaine within
1000 feet of church and
possession of crack cocaine.
Bail was set at $15,000.
Charles Lee Coon, 65,


of Gainesville was arrested
for FTA DWLS. He
was released on his own
recognizance.
Jeremy Michael Savacool,
36, of Stuart was arrested for
utter forged bills/check. Bail
was set for $50,013.
. Jeanette E. Thompson,
42, of Bronson was arrested
for aggravated battery
- domestic. Bail was set for
$2,500.
James H. Heintzelman,
36, of Williston was arrested
for domestic battery. Bail was
set for $3,500.
John Theodore Creal,
41, of Bronson was arrested
for lewd and lascivious
molestation and fail to register
as a sex offender. Bail was set
for $35,000.

Jonni Hill, 41 of
Chiefland was arrested for
violation of probation (VOP)
- exploitation to the elderly.
Bail was set for $3,027.78.
Dale Monroe, 39, of
Chiefland was arrested for
VOP driving while license
suspended or revoked
(DWLSR). No bail was set.
Lloyd Staley Ice, 54, of
Spring Hill was arrested for
VOP DUI. No -bond was
set.
Brian Douglas Larkin,
24, of Bronson was arrested
for VOP vehicle theft. No
bond was set.


Farm Friends 4-H elects new officers


BY JAMES CORBIN
SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL
The Farm Friends 4-H
Club met Monday, Nov. 6
to elect new officers for the
year. Youngsters were excited
to participate in the election
process.
Final results were:
President: Kelsi Alexander,
Vice-President: Justin Hiers,
Secretary: Kinsey Ward,
Reporter: James Corbin,
Chaplain: Emily Smith.
Members of the club
each brought in items .to
fill a basket which will be
donated to a special family
for the holidays. Students
were proud to participate and
gave generously, creating
a wonderful basket a local
family is sure to appreciate
and enjoy.
While it has not been
decided which club member
will show the club hog in


the Suwannee River Fair,
the enthusiasm of having
a potential champion was
shared by all.
Each member is working
diligently to prepare their


animal or project for a good
showing at the fair, and all are
looking forward to describing
their progress at next month's
meeting.


Wreck kills one Sunday

A Fanning Springs man was killed Sunday when the
motorcycle he was driving-crashed into a light pole and then
a parked vehicle.
According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Todd L. Harris,
24, was killed near US 19 and SR 26. Witnesses told the FHP
that Harris had been driving his 1996 Yamaha erratically
through Fanning Springs at approximately 100 mph.
The report states that Harris veered his motorcycle off the
east edge of the road, traveled along the shoulder for several
hundred feet and then skidded sideways.
Harris then struck a light pole, continued north and then
struck the left side of an unoccupied 1994 Chevrolet pickup
that was parked.
Harris was transported to Shands UF where he was
pronounced dead at 3:56 a.m.
This marks the sixth fatal crash in Levy County in 2006.


Bronson UMC plans holiday service


munity to attend.
For more information please call Pastor
Chacon at 486-2281.


forward to seeing the Izaak
Walton Restaurant reopened,
which is the first step in our
plans. We are ready to reno-
vate the restaurant immedi-
ately, but we can't proceed
until the town authorizes
Levy County to proceed with
issuing a building permit.
We hope the town council
will see the clear public ben-
efit of new investment and
the revival ofYankeetown as


Continue frompage 4
a destination for visitors.
We are embarking on a
long process, and I hope
everyone will agree that
working to achieve a reason-
able consensus on redevelop-
ing Yankeetown's working
waterfront is a goal that is in
the best interests of everyone
in the community.
Peter Spittler, Member
Izaak Walton Investors,
LLC


Quilter takes exception with definition


To the editor:
Re:"If it's quilted on a
machine, it's a comforter" by
Winelle Home
The definition of quilt
according to Webster's
Dictionary: 'a bed coverlet
of two layers of cloth filled
with padding (as down or
batting) held in place by ties
or stitched designs'. The
definition of comforter from
the same source: 'a thick bed
covering made of two layers
of cloth containing a filling
(as down).' Therefore: the


significant difference be-
tween a quilt and a comforter
is thickness.
Ms. Home presents a 'pur-
ist' viewpoint about quilts.
When sewing machines were
first invented, those women
who could afford one would
piece and quilt (sew the lay-
ers together) on their new
machines to demonstrate
the capabilities of those new
sewing machines.
Quilters no longer must
raise their own cotton, take
the seeds out by hand then


comb, spin and weave their
own fabric for their quilts.
Quilters can simply go to
the store and buy machine
made fabric. The same is
true regarding quilt making.
Piecing can now be done on
a sewing machine. Quilting
can also be done by machine.
The resulting product is still
a quilt.
I ask the purist: "Where do
you get your cotton seed?"
Michel Du Mont
Longarm machine quilter
Trenton (Levy)


LEVY COUNTY HISTORY
107 Years Ago

From the Levy County Clerk of Court Archives and History Dept.
Minute Book 'H" -1897-1903 p. 185, Meeting of April, 1899

The official bond of John F. Jackson as Justice of the Peace in and for
Justices Dist. No. 2 of Levy County in the sum of $500.00 with T. W. Shands &
L. B. Lewis as sureties was approved also the bond of John R. Roberts for car-
rying rifle in sum of 100.00 with W. J. Epperson, Wms. Nobles as sureties, was
approved.

On motion, it was ordered that a warrant for $1.48 in
favor of Ben Freidman also a warrant for $26.50 in favor
of H. I. Sutton be issued as Fine and Forfeiture Fund to
pay bills which were ordered paid at last meeting of the
Board.

From the Archives and History Center
Levy County Clerk's Office
Danny J. Shipp, Clerk of Court


Why Levy County? I really like the ruralness of it and there is enough here to keep me happy as far as
stores and restaurants, etc. I love the peace and quiet, the ability to own horses and livestock, and the people
who live here. I hate crowds and traffic jams and there aren't any-of those here! Did I mention that I love the
peace and quiet?
Why the newspaper? Because the help wanted ad was "blind," in that it did not reveal the company name, I
had no idea who the employer was when I applied for this job. I have worked for many different kinds of busi-
nesses and entities and had lots of office experience, so I applied for the job because of the experience they
wanted and it ended up being this wonderful newspaper.
What role do you feel the Levy County Journal plays in the community? I feel our role is important
because this paper provides an unbiased account of what is happening in local government, as well as other
community activities and happenings of interest to all age-groups of Levy Countians. We try to provide the
facts and let readers draw their own conclusions, not tell you what we think you should feel. Some may feel
that since we show both sides of an issue, we might be trying to change their view on something they don't
like, but the fact is we are simply presenting both sides of a story as it has been presented to us. If we didn't
do this, many people would be in the dark about what is going on in their city and county governments that will
affect them positively or negatively. We also provide a very reasonable way for folks to advertise their busi-
nesses and services. This paper is also the legal organ of Levy County, where we publish legal notices and
advertisements that are of concern and interest to many.
What is your favorite part of the Levy County Journal? I like different sections at different times; what-
ever is of interest to me that week. One week, it might be Carolyn's opinion piece, or an editorial written by
a concerned citizen. The next week it might be news about the Suwannee River Fair, or high school football.
Though our paper could be viewed as "small" in comparison to others, it has a broad scope for its size.
What do you like about living in Levy County? I love the beauty of the country, the peace, the quiet, the
wildlife, the fact that this is still a farming/ranching community, the people, the gatherings and events. I love
being able to look up at night and actually see millions of stars even the Milky Wayl I like the fact that you
can go to a seafood festival one weekend, canoe on the Suwannee another, ride your horses, bike the trails,
take in the Quilt Museum, eat at wonderful restaurants, plant a garden, go to church, take in a play, root for
your favorite high school team, get sloppy with free watermelon...the list is endless. Or you can simply stay at
home and be lazyl
What is the biggest risk you have taken? I have never considered myself a risk-taker; I like the safety of
sure things. But in looking back over my life I have found that I really have taken several risks after all and
they were all big when I took them. The most recent one is that I chose to move up here to God's country and
find a job that paid enough for me to survive, while my husband stayed and worked in Orlando until he could
retire. I was fortunate to get a very good job with good pay and benefits, but after working in the job for a
couple of months, I knew that the huge responsibility of it was too much for me to handle. I let my boss know
about my decision (and my husband) and stayed for 4 more months and then searched for something else
that would keep me afloat. I finally, and happily, landed here.
What is the best advice you've been given? To place my trust in God to provide for me when I seem to
have no means to provide for myself and then not to worry about anything.
What are three things you tell people about yourself? I have a widely varied work experience: I used to
be a long-distance truck driver and traveled all over the country and into Canada; I used to own and work in
a florist shop in a little town in Tennessee, and I was fully trained as a surgical technician, among many other
different jobs.
What is:
The last movie you've seen? Man of the Year with Robin Williams.
The last book you read? Lincoln the Man by Edgar Lee Masters. I didn't finish it because it was a mod-
erately difficult read and not my usual genre. It was written in 1931 about Abraham Lincoln by Mr. Masters,
whose grandfather knew Lincoln, his family, friends and associates and lived where he had lived. Mr. Masters
wrote an opposing view of Mr. Lincoln's life, both political and personal, than that which was made popular
and elevated President Lincoln's memory to that of a demigod. I will try again to read this book. We only know
what we are taught in school about certain subjects and those having to do with persons and subjects from
more than a century before are usually things that we don't question. I have learned that, even though some-
thing was taught to the masses, everything we are taught is not always strictly true!
The one TV show you can't miss? The Young and the Restless. I know! I often wonder why I watch it
myself. No one person could have as many problems of such horrific magnitude in their lives as all of the char-
acters seem to have and not kill themselves! Some days I tell myself that I am fed up and will not watch it any
more, but there I am the next day tuning in again! I am weak...WEAKI


COUNTY JOUR
COUNTY PAPER EST. 192


Save money and subscribe today.

Call Robin at 490-4462



Meet the Press
Robin Heath
Office Manager
Original Hometown:Orlando


Bronson United Methodist Church will
hold a Thanksgiving service on Wednesday,
Nov. 22 at 7 p.m.
Pastor Mario Chacon welcomes the com-


YOUR VIEW
1


ment system further inland
after one is constructed by
either the county or the mu-
nicipalities. I would suggest
that this won't take 20 years,
as one writer suggested, if
Yankeetown's leaders make
it a priority to protect the
environment from the harm-
ful effects of failing septic
systems.
Many of the residents we
have spoken with are looking


mmmmmmmlw










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


North, South honor Peterson for service during War Between the States


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
Under an ancient
cedar tree draped
with Spanish moss,
once warring! factions caine
together Saturday to
honor one of their
O\11.
Timoth\ Peterson, a
veteran \\ho ser ed in
the \ar Between the
States on both sides,
was memorialized at
Sand Pond Cemetery
in the Tidewater
region of South Le\\
Country b\ re-enactors
of the Sons of
Confederate Veterans
and Sons of Union
Veterans.
Peterson, born in Georgia
in 1835, moed to Florida
as a \oung man and married
Celia Johnson. In 1 62. he
enlisted in the 9"' Florida
Infanrm, Compan\ A of the
Confederate troops, and
ser ed until, for unknown
reasons, he \\as found dazed
and \wandering in KeN West.
In April 1864, he \was
pressed into ser ice for the
Union Arm\ and served
with the 2" Florida Cal\an,


Company A where he stayed
until he was mustered out
in Tallahassee in November
1865. It is recorded that
Peterson participated in
the Battles of F-t. Nl\ers


and Cedar KeN during
his sern ice, according to
Terry Ho\e, a great-great-
granddaughter. Peterson
%%as also a recipient of
the Distinguished Sen ice
Award.
Fifteen \ears later,
Peterson married Sarah Jane
Register and the family\
lied and prospered in the
Tide\water region. The family.
cemeterN at Sand Pond
\\as begun in 1899 \ hen
Peterson's mother-in-law


Sarah Ann was buried
there. Peterson was also
interred there in 1914.
Saturday nearly 100
people came from all
across the state to pay
their respects to
the slider and
his sen ice.
During
the half-hour
ceremony a
musket \ ith
fixed ba \onet.
a canteen with
haversack and
a knapsack,
symbols of the
army, were
placed against
Peterson's
headstone.
A breathh of evergreen,
symbolizing und ing lo\e
for the comrades of \ ar: a
single red rose, a symbol
of purity and a \reath of
grapevines, representing
v\ictore %ere then placed
alongside the army
symbols.
After readings of "The
Blue and the Gray" and
"The Unknown Dead". an
honor guard fired a 2 I-gun
salute with muskets and
cannon as the haunting
refrain of"Taps" echoed
in the distance.
"Taps are sounded.
Lights are out-the soldier
sleeps," said Commander
Ed Page of the Ocala Sons
of Union Veterans.
Also participating in
the memorial sen ice
were members of the Col.
John Marshall Martin
-Camp 730 of the Sons of
Confederate Veterans.


SYMBOLIC WREATHS
were placed at the grave
(1); a 21-gun salute
pealed 'throughout the
area (2); Great-great-
granddaughter Terry
Hoye spoke of her an-
cestor's life (3); re-enac-
tors stood watch during
the ceremony (4).


1.---`


Journal photos by
Carolyn Risner


PETERSON FAMILY matriarch, Eunita "Nita" Pe-
terson Brass, accepts the flag on behalf of her
Grandfather Timothy's service during the War
Between the States.
I1 I I 1 '.


WOMEN DRESSED as war widows represented all
the wives, mothers, sisters and fiancees of those
who never returned from battle (5,6) while Clayton
Nichols, front and Bill McClelland, ready the can-
non (7).


Page 6


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Mary Ellis Bilbrey
Mrs. Mary Ellis Bilbrey, 59, of Old Town died Saturday,
Nov. 11, 2006 at North Florida Regional Hospital after a long
illness.
Born in Orlando, she moved to Old Town from Winter
Garden in 1987. She was the first female licensed water well
contractor in the state of Florida and currently one out of only
two in the state.
Bilbrey was a member of the Florida Ground Water Associ-
ation and a member of the First Baptist Church of Old Town.
She is survived by her son, Brian Bilbrey of Tampa; daugh-
ter, Jennifer Storey of Old Town; sister, Patricia Pippin of Or-
lando; brothers, Steven Ellis of Winter Garden, James E. Ellis
Jr. of Portland, Maine and Martin Ellis of Altamonte Springs
and grandchildren, Jay Tyler Storey and Jessica Storey.
She was preceded in death by her husband Eddie Bilbrey.
: Funeral services were held Nov. 14 at the Rick Gooding
Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Royce Hanshew officiat-
ing.
Arrangements were under the care' of the Rick Gooding
Funeral Home, Cross City.

Freddy Davidson III
Frederick R. "Freddy" Davidson III, 48, of St. Petersburg,
died Nov. 9, 2006 at North Side Hospital.
Born in Gainesville, he was the son of the late F.T. and
Margery Davidson. An automotive mechanic, he was a
member of First Baptist Church, Chiefland. He enjoyed
hunting, fishing and the outdoors. He loved people, his family
and friends and his hometown of Chiefland.
Survivors include two sisters, Sandra Roberts of Chiefland
and Vicki Wolford of York, S.C.; four aunts, Betty Turner of
Augusta, Ga., Amelia Cannon and Mary Alice Hardee both of
Chiefland, Madge Reid of Texas and several cousins.
Funeral services were held Nov. 12 at Chiefland Cemetery.
Arrangements were under the direction of Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services, Chiefland.

Shirley Haven Eberle
Shirley Haven Eberle, 69, of Port St. Lucie, died at home,
Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2006.
Born May 27, 1937, she was the daughter of the late Hugh
I. and Eunice (Stapleton) Haven of Gainesville.
She lived most of her life in Windsor, Conn.. Mrs. Eberle
graduated from P.K. Yonge Laboratory School, Gainesville,
in 1955 and attended the University of Florida. She was a
member of the Hartford Audubon Society, a charter member
of the Windsor Junior Women's Club and served on the town
of Windsor Bicentennial Commission and the 350th Parade
Committee and a former member of the Windsor Historical
Society and the Civitan Club of Windsor. She also served on
the board ofRIF (Reading is Fundamental) in Windsor.
Survivors include a daughter, Karen Lynne Eberle and her
husband, Peter E. Mousseau, and a son, Frederick J. Eberle
and his wife, Robyn J. Wahl, all of Windsor, and her special



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OBITUARIES


cousins, Carol and Terry Chaires of Wellington and many
dear friends.
A private memorial service will be held on the Gulf in Cedar
Key at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made
to the American Cancer Society, 865 SE Monterey Commons
Boulevard, Stuart, FL 34996.
Yates Funeral Home, Port St. Lucie, was in.charge of the
arrangements.

Margaret Lee Fulmer
Margaret Lee Fulmer, 39, of Alachua, died at home Friday,
Nov. 3, 2006.
She was born in Jersey City, N.J. and resided in Alachua for
eight years. She was. a former beautician and enjoyed fishing.
Her greatest joy in life was spending time with her daughter
Brooke.
She is survived by her daughter, Brooke of Gainesville, her
ex-husband Thane Fulmer of Gainesville, her parents Richard
and Carol Mudd of Bronson, her brother Edward Oliver, of
High Springs, sister Debra Cooper of High Springs aunt Nina
Sullivan, of Kansas City, Kan., uncle John and aunt Linda
Sullivan of Trenton and Candace Shaw, who she counted as
a dear friend and co-mother to her daughter. She also has
numerous nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Brooke
Fulmer, c/o Debra Cooper, 243 SE Old Bellamy Road, High
Springs, FL 32643.

Mary Jobe Goddard
Mary Jobe Goddard, 81, of Archer died Monday, Nov. 6,
2006 at her home surrounded by loved ones.
A Paris, Tenn. native, she was born Oct 11, 1925. She
was the daughter of the late Carl E. Cbmpton and Myrtle I.
Compton. She was a Baptist and retired from Krispy Kreme.
Survivors include two sisters, Barbara Lee of Paris, Tenn.;
Kathy Hunter of Paris, Tenn.; one brother, Barry Compton of
Lexington, Ky.; two sons, Norman A. Parrish of Gainesville,
Charles Lynn Goddard of Bronson and daughter-in-law, Paula
Goddard; two daughters: Janice Pinkston of Waldo and son-
in-law, Wes Pinkston; Mary Beth Brown of Archer and son-
in-law, Brian Brown; six grandchildren, John Alan Boone,
Erikalynn Goddard, Katlin N. Brown, Nicole Lee, Julie
Parrish and Chris Edwards.
A private memorial was held at Haven Hospice Chapel.
The family requests that expressions of sympathy be made as
donations to E.T. York Hospice Care Center, 4200 NW 90th
Blvd., Gainesville, FL 32606.

Annie Laurie Grisham
Annie Laurie Grisham, 82, of Jacksonville died Nov. 2,
2006 after a lengthy illness. She was born in Cedar Key on
Sept. 14, 1924 and was a resident of Jacksonville since 1964.
She retired from Riverside Hospital in 1966 with 26 years
service as a nurse's assistant. She is survived by her husband,
Edward Grisham of 61 years, a sister, Lucille Connell
of Chiefland; a son, Mark Grisham of Jacksonville; two
daughters; Diane Taylor of Cedar Key and Sharon Shannon of
Jacksonville; five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
She was a member of the Normandy.,Wjdof the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She loved music and
dancing and danced with her husband on her 82nd birthday.
Funeral services were held Nov. 7 at the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Jacksonville. A graveside
service was held at Cedar Key Cemetery Nov. 8.
Funeral arrangements were under the direction of Fraser
Funeral Home.

Fannie Eliza Holmes
Fannie Eliza Holmes, 94, of Otter Creek died Nov. 6, 2006
at her residence.


th-e IR


kL -..


Nancy Bell Westhury
Enrolled Agent


Personal and Business Tax Returns
Partnership & Corporate Tax Returns
Computerized Monthly Accounting


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Page 7


She was born in Ellzey and had been a lifelong resident of
Levy County. She was a member of the Otter Creek Baptist
Church where she served as a Sunday school teacher, clerk for
the church and was in the choir. Her hobbies include sewing,
gardening, reading and quilting. She was a homemaker.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Buford H.
Holmes and also grandsons Andrew and Wayne Butler. Her
survivors include Donald and Mary Holmes ofBronson, Glyn
and Pam Holmes of Chiefland, Mary Jonel Holmes of Otter
Creek, Melba Tillis of Chiefland, Hilda Butler of Chiefland
and sister in-law: Marie Meeks of Ellzey; 10 grandchildren
and 19 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held at the Otter Creek Baptist Church
with Pastors Billy and Gene Keith officiating. Interment was
in Rosemary Cemetery in Bronson.
In lieu of flowers, make contributions to Otter Creek Baptist
Church building fund, P.O. Box 17, Otter Creek FL. 32683.
Arrangements under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funeral
Services of Chiefland.

Carla Swails
Carla Swails, 65, of Cross City died Wednesday, Nov. 8,
2006 at her home. She was born and reared in Trenton and
moved to Cross City three years ago.
She was, a member of New Prospect Baptist Church, she
loved crafts and sewing and she was also an accomplished
pianist.
She is survived by her mother, Ollie Mae Hardee of
Trenton; son, Del Swails of Cross City; sister, Lillie Barron
of Trenton; two grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Edsel D. Swail Sr.
and brothers, Frank Gray Deen and Joseph Aubrey Deen.
Funeral services were held Nov. 11 at New Prospect Baptist
Church with the Rev. Billy Robson officiating. Burial followed
at Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery in Trenton.
Arrangements were under the care of the Rick Gooding
Funeral Home, Cross City.

Barbara Lynn "Bobbe" Williams
Barbara Lynn "Bobbe" Williams of Old Town died at her
residence on Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006. She was 58.
She was born in Franklin, Penn. and was a homemaker and
beautician. She enjoyed fishing, gardening, decorating and
enjoyed the outdoors and the sun.
Survivors include her husband, Glenn Williams of Old
Town; her parents Douglas and Catherine Stewart of St.
Cloud; two daughters, Shoni Stewart of Kissimmee and
Amy Williams of Kissimmee; one son, Brian Williams of St.
Cloud; two granddaughters, JingerLynn Steward of Old Town
and Madysen Williams of St. Cloud; and one grandson, Trent
Meets of Kissimmee.
Memorial services are planned and will be announced at a
later date.
Arrangements were- by Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services,
Chiefland.

Photographs are published at
no charge with obituaries. Ask
your funeral director
for assistance.

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


age 8 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


Red Devils swim easily out of Shark Tank


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
BROOKSVILLE-
Williston scored a decisive
opening round playoff victory
against a talented Nature
Coast team as they came,
they saw and they walked out
of Shark Tank Stadium with a
26-13 victory.
But for the first quarter, the
Red Devils seemed destined
to struggle to keep up with
their opponents'version ofthe
option offense. In fact, at the
end of the first 12 minutes, it
appeared the game's outcome.
would hinge on whether or
not the Red Devils could
match the Sharks touchdown
for touchdown.
"We've seen big plays to
start games before," Williston
coach Jamie Baker said.
"The key is to keep the team
confident and realize that
there is a still a lot of game
left to play. After the first
couple of series, the defense
really locked them down.
"We put eight men in the
box and while they still got
their yards, it didn't hurt us.
And when our defense plays
well it takes a lot of pressure
off of the offense. They can
relax and it allowed us to get
the option working."
And after the Red Devils'
answer to an 80-yard scurry
by the Sharks' freshmen
running back Tevin Drake on
the first play from scrimmage
was a Rodrigo Quezada's
field goal, the answer at that
point was no.
Then the Red Devils
quickly found themselves in
the position of struggling to
match the home team's play
and scores as the Sharks' Josh
Ortiz completed a bullet pass
to Stephen-Pelaez-on fourth-
and-goal from the Williston
15 for a touchdown and the
home team followed it with a
defensive stop.
Fortunately for Williston,
Baker's coaching that the
game is four quarters long
rang true as two plays in
the early part of the second
period gave the Red'Devils
the opportunity to reinsert
their will and game plan.
With the Red Devils forced
to punt after the Sharks'
second score and trailing by
a score of 13-3, Nature Coast
committed a roughing the
kicker penalty.
With new life and the ball
now at midfield, the Red
Devils' get up and go, which
had been so crucial during
the regular season, forced its
way into the game. It was
highlighted by sophomore
Courtney Days coming of
age performance.
The flurry of punches,
which the Red Devils quickly
and directly unleashed,
resulted in 23 unanswered
points. It began with Days
ripping off a 45-yard flash
and dash. Following his
blocking around the right end
of the line, he busted through


Journal photo by NealiFisher
THE RED DEVILS' defense ran the Sharks' offense inside out as they shut down the home team's running
game.


the first wave of the defense,
his legs shifted into fifth gear
.and the play continued all the
way to the Sharks' 6-yard
line.
On the next play, Mario
Brown scored when the Red
Devils went around the right
end again.
Six plays later, Drake
fumbled the ball as the
Williston defense, agitated by
their early struggles, swarmed
the running back and separated
him from the ball with vigor.
With a new spirit and
conviction the Red Devils
went on a 10-play, 69-
yard tear, which saw ball
carriers break tackles and the
offensive line put their mark
on the game.
The Red Devils made
the most of the occasion by
taking the lead for good with
2:34 left as Days struck from'
14.-yards out .for. hi s eerii
touchdown. Once again the
play developed as it moved
around the right side of the
line.
"The offensive line blocked
really well," quarterback
Devin Timmons said. "They
are healthy and showing that
they can block. We knew
Days was going to be good.
We watch and play with him
during practice.


"He always does well
and with Minor playing less
because of a knee injury we
felt comfortable he would
come through. I think we
might have just wore them
down with the running and
our defense really motivated
us."
After gaining the lead,


the Red Devils' defense
neutralized Ortiz and Drake's
fondness for making the big
play.
The defense forced five
turnovers during the game,
but four of them came in
the second half. Days' older
brother, Courtney, recovered
two fumbles. But perhaps the


most crucial of the turnovers
came with 10:56 left in %he
game.,
Ortiz dropped back to
pass from the Sharks' 11.
Williston's defense mauled
the Sharks' offensive line and
forced the quarterback to roll
to his right. Under pressure,
he threw the ball just a tad


w ~.
Journal photos by Neal Fisher

HEAD COACH Jamie Baker, left, stalks the sidelines as his team rips off 27 con-
secutive points while the Red Devils respond to the always animated instruc-
tions of Coach Alan Baker, right.


bit too high for his intended
receiver, Preston Williams.
The receiver touched the ball
with his fingertips, but could
not get a grip on it.
The result was a tipped
ball. Jiwan James had
positioned himself in the
right place at the right time
and snagged the ball out of
the air. He continued in full
stride down the right hash
mark the remaining 23 yards
and entered the end zone
untouched. With the jaw
dropping play, the lead grew
to 26-13 and the Sharks were
all but done.
The play was the fifth score
of the season by the Red
Devil's defense.
"He [James] didn't have
coverage responsibilities but
he used his instincts," Baker
said. "He simply makes
plays."
Williston's other score was
a second 33-yard field goal
by Quezada with 8:30 left in
the third quarter. It extended
the Red Devils' lead to 19-13.
The kicker also booted four
kickoffs into the end zone,
helping Williston gain the
field position advantage.
While Williston
committed its share of game
changing miscues, Baker
acknowledged it boded
well for his team that their
turnovers were not in their
end of the field. However,
Nature Coast's turnovers
were in the Shark's end of the
field.
Drake finished with 20
carries for 126 yards, but the
Red Devils got another boost
as they shut him down after
his touchdown run.
After carrying the ball only
21 times for 98 yards on the
season, the -fobt-10, 170-''
pound Days proved his team's
versatility in its backfield and
his readiness to step into the
limelight. His final totals
were 16 rushes for a game-
high 160 yards.
In wearing the Sharks'
defense down, the Red Devils
saw a repeat of what he has
done all season. However,
he answered the question of
See Win Page 9


NOTICE OF BUDGET

AMENDMENT HEARING
The Levy County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing November 21, 2006 at
9:00 A.M. in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Levy County Courthouse, 355 S. Court
Street, Bronson, Floridafor the purpose of amending its FY 2005/2006 Budgets for the General Revenue
Fund, 911 Fund, Housing Recovery Fund, Fire Control Fund, and the Additional Court Cost Fund.


Journal pnoio Dy Neal i-Isner
IT WAS a hard day's night for Courtney Days. In
theend though his performance was a:masterpiece.


ESTIMATED REVENUES:
TAXES
LICENSES
INTERGOVERNMENTAL
CHARGES FOR SERVICES
1 FINES/FORFEITURES
MISCELLANEOUS
LESS: Statutory Reserve
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
NON OPERATING REVENUES
Interfund Transfers
CASH BALANCES FORWARD
TOTAL REVENUES & BALANCES

EXPENDITURES & RESERVES
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
PUBLIC SAFETY
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
TRANSPORTATION
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
HUMAN SERVICES
CULTURE/RECREATION
COURT RELATED
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES
NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Interfund transfers
RESERVES
TOTAL EXPENDITURES,TRANSFERS
& RESERVES


General
Revenue
Fund

16,988,678
341,000
2,568,112
455,000
.22,000
549,455
(1,046,212)
19,878,033


Housing Fire
911 Recovery Control
Fund Fund Fund


0
0
378,670
160,000
0
3,565
(27,112)
515,123


0
0
538,000
0
0
3,500
(27,075)
514,425


261,847 0
4,085,248 .248,000


0
0
0
0
0
676,000
(33,800)
642,200


0 25,000


Additional
Court Cost
Fund

0

0
0
46,400
0
0
(2,320)
44,080,

0


0 17,000 100,873


24,225,128 763,123 514,425 684,200 144,953


4,724,174
1,271,790
445,624
0
211,330
1,874,104
966.998
150,200


0
530,495
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
514,425
0
0
0


0
684,200
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
49,234


9,644,220 530,495 514,425 684,200 49,234


13,322,355 232,628
1,258,553 0


0 0 95.719


0 0 0


24,225,128 763,123 514,425 684,200 144,953


Journal photo by Neal -isher
EVEN A BOTCHED snap on a PAT attempt failed to stop the Red Devil Express
once it got rolling.


Complete details of the amended budgets are available for public Inspection at the Office of the
Clerk of the Court, Levy County Courthouse, 355 S Court Street, Bronson, Florida.
Persons are advised if they decide to appeal any decisions made at these meetings/hearings, they
will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose, they may need to insure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Game of the Week
Williston (8-3) vs. Eustis (9-2)
2005 score: did not play
Overview: Both teams played well during
the second half of their first round playoff
games last week to advance. Also, after both
teams advanced to the second round of last
year's playoffs, they entered this season's
post season as stronger and more experienced
units. What the teams learned from last
year's rin was apparent last week as both
teams rallied after falling behind early. They
remained cool, calm and didn't panic as they
worked out the kinks of getting their playoff
legs under them.
However, because of their loss to North
Marion, Williston will be playing their second
consecutive game on the road as a district
runner up.
By all accounts, as one would expect at this
point in the season, these two teams, although
using different running styles, are evenly
matched and this should be a close game.
Williston update: Williston used their
regular season finale against Newberry
to regain the momentum they had built
throughout the first eight games of the season
and they carried it into their first round date.
While it took about a quarter for the offense
to find fiftli gear and the defense to put the
clamps on the Sharks' offense, coach Jamie
Baker's squad got on a roll and looked as good
as they have all season. While their victory
over the Panthers was far from a masterpiece,
Williston played Red Devils' football and it
showed just how potent an attack they have,
both on offense and defense. The offensive
and defensive lines are peaking ,at just the
right time of the season. While the Red
Devils ar still having issues with slow starts
and fumb e t impact on the outcome of
the game has been minimal. Baker pointed
out that his team's experiences over the last
two years have been the difference in those
situations.
Coach speak: "This gives the kids an eight
win season. So they are really motivated to
win, because it is the first time in a really long
time the school has had this many victories.
A game like this lets the state know Williston
can play some football. Turnovers loomed
large (against Nature Coast) and they will
continue to loom large. I hope we don't fall
behind, but the kids realize it isn't the end of
the world.
"Eustis is a run oriented team like us. They
move well and are athletic. Their line-up is
very speedy and that is how they overcome
their lack of size."
What to look for: As is the case in any sport
on any level, the playoffs means the teams
who qualify for post season like to dance with
the girl they brought to the big event. This
means there isn't a lot of surprises as to what
the remaining teams will do and they will rely
on their strengths in their simplest forms.


By Neal Fisher
Levy County Journal

Or in other words both teams will throw
their best punches and see who is still standing
at the end of the day. 'For the Red Devils
that is their noted option offense and a speed
demon defense which causes quarterbacks
into hurrying their decisions.
For the Eustis Panthers, they counter with
a multiple formation offense that relies on
misdirection and a 4-3 defense utilizing their
speed as they force the action to the middle
of the field.
The Red Devils offense has been productive
throughout the 2006 season. Propelled by
its speed, the option running attack gained
251 yards in their first round victory and it
seems to have come of age in the last few
weeks. The Red Devils also move the ball
using their speed.
And as coach Baker alluded to, the passing
attack is efficient enough to keep defenses off
balance and gain big yards in one fell swoop
as their two completions against Nature
Coast attest to.
Add to that the Reds Devil defense's
ability to use their speed to shut down
opponents' offenses and create chaos in the
backfield and Williston seems to be hitting
their stride at exactly the right time. In fact,
the Red Devils 'defense has scored 35 points
this season.
. There isn't much surprise as to what the
Red Devils will try to do against Eustis, but
coach Baker and his staff have been good at
making adjustments throughout the season.
Eustis presents an offense different than
what thq Red Devils have seen all season and
adjustments will probably be needed.
While not willing to discuss the situations
that may require the coaches having to
anticipate making those adjustments, the
team has confidence they can translate the
changes into on the field success.
With Deonte Welch and Ivan Floyd filling
in for injured players, the Red Devils have
yet to miss a beat. Together the two freshmen
made significant contributions over the
last two weeks and proved the Red Devils'
program can sustain player losses.
However, Marquis Minor is expected to
see more playing time this week. In his steed,
Courtney Days and Welch gave Newberry
and Nature Coasts fits. With Minor back,
Eustis will have to figure out a way to keep
an eye on not just one runner, but all three
backs and limit their yardage.
While hard work is required to learn the
scheme and play at the same level as their
predecessors, the running backs who replaced
the opening day starters are so alike the team
has been able to continue to gain yards.
The running attack has also continued to
roll throughout the season, because of its
offensive line. Throwing its speed around, it
drives opponents off of the ball before they
can gain their footing and creates those holes
the backs run through.


Anatomy of a playoff victory


This week's Friday night

under the lights.


Athlete of

the Game

BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Player of the game last
week was Courtney Days-
Williston High School (RB).
Days, a sophomore, came
up: big for the Red Devil in
their biggest game of the
season.
He rushed the ball 16
times for 160 yards and
a touchdown as Williston.
rallied from an early 10-point
deficit to score a first round
victory over Nature Coast.
The sophomore made the
most of his opportunities in
spot duty during the regular
season, but with Marquis
Minor seeing limited action
and the Sharks' defense
challenging Days to beat
them, he rose to the occasion
in his first game as the team's


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Final Score: Williston 26
Nature Coast 13
Two games in One: The
Sharks stakedthemselves to
a 13-3 lead midway through
the second quarter. But the
Red Devils outscored, the
home team 23-0 for the last
two and half quarters to
claim victory.
Game summary: After
giving up long plays the
first two times the Sharks
took possession of the ball,
which led to touchdowns,
the Red Devils' defense
stymied their option
attack.
Key Plays:
1) The Sharks committed
a roughing the punter
penalty at 11:35 of the
second quarter after they
had stopped the Red Devils
from answering their
second score.
2) The Sharks then
fumbled the ball at 7:05 of
the second quarter after the
Red Devils took advantage
of the roughing the punter
penalty by scoring.
3) Jiwan James in full
stride picked off a tipped
pass and returned it 23
yards for a touchdown at
10:56 of the fourth quarter.
Why they were key
plays:
1) The Sharks offense
scored two touchdowns on
their first two possessions.
With their defense holding
the Red Devils to a lone
field goal heading into


EWin


the second quarter, the
Sharks were poised to put
Williston in a hole that would
have been very difficult to
overcome. The roughing
the punter penalty allowed
the Red Devils to regroup
and snapped Nature Coast's
stranglehold on stopping
Williston's offense up to that
point in the game.
2) After the Red
Devils scored 'following the
roughing the punter penalty,
the Sharks still had the lead
and they were still moving
the ball. With the fumble,
the Red Devil defense got
the break they needed to stop
the Sharks' offense and was
proof that they had found the
right adjustments required to
stop the home team offense.
3) The Red Devils were
sitting on 19-13 lead and
while they had shut down
the Sharks' offense since the
second quarter fumble, it was
still capable of scoring. With
James' interception it gave the
Red Devils a two-touchdown
lead, allowing, the visitors
more freedom in their play
and the comfort of running
time off the clock without
worrying about giving up the
lead.
Key defensive stat of the
game: The Sharks turned the
ball over four times on their
own side of the field. While
the Red Devils had five
fumbles of their own, they
recovered all of them and
the potential disasters were
on the opponents' side of the
field. Also four of the Red


Continuedfirom page 8


mairiian'as opposed to being called upon for spot duty.
"My hat goes out to them [Williston]," said Nature Coast
head coach Jamie Joyner. "We turned.the ball over and they
took advantage. That's what playoff football is all about."
Williston (8-3) takes on Eustis (9-2) on the road in the
second round of the playoffs tomorrow.

G.am -Summary

Wlllston -.. 3, 13 3 .7 .26
Nature CasA. i13 0; 0 0 13
O ar er '" '..
Iatu'e Cobst Drake 80-yard run (kick good)
Winiston Quezada 36-yard Field Goal
Ntfuri6"Coaa Pele15 yardc touchdown pass from Ortiz (kick
failed :.,
2nd Qurt. .. ,.
WIistn Brown 6-yard run (2 point attempt failed)
SWlilston Courtney Day 14-yard run (kick good)
3" Quarter "
Williston,'Qufezada 32-yard Field Goal
,,.4 Quarter -.: -'
Wilistonr- Jametr23-yard Interception return (kick good)
ta.. ,7.* ,

S is i W~lf stl 43,251, Days 16-160, Timmons 12-52, Minor
-7-m2?, Brown 8-14; Floydid3, Welch 4-1
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Page 9


Devil's fumbles were in
the second half, long after
they had taken command
of the game.
Key offensive stat of
the game: Courtney Days
took over the majority of
the rushing duties, due to
a knee injury to Marquis
Minor. With 16 rushes for
125 yards, the Red Devil
were able to give Minor
some much needed rest
and gave the Sharks yet
another style of running to
contend with.
Factors that produced
the 23 unanswered points:
1) Both of the Red
Devils' offensive
touchdowns were scored
running the ball behind the
right side of the ball. In
fact running the ball to the
right side of the line was so
productive the Red Devils
gained approximately three
quarters of their yardage
running the ball to that
side.
2) After giving up the
two scores in the first half,
the Red Devil defense
settled down and caused
all kinds of havoc for the.
Sharks' offense, including
over 10 hurries by their all-
district quarterback and the
turnovers.
3) With James'
interception giving the
Red Devils a 13-point
lead as the fourth quarter
waned down, Williston did
not attempt one pass while
they successfully ran the
clock out.


Congratulations Red Devils on your

,first playoff victory.

Hit 'em hard Friday in Eustis!


"Let it be said"m


I









Page 10 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Bronson Speedway ends season with metal twisting affair


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
BRONSON-Fans packed
the Bronson Motor Speedway
on Saturday night as a slight
chill in the air combined with
the disposition of the night to
send the 2006 season into the
history books with style.
Highlighted by its annual
end of the season crash-o-
rama, the 2006 finale was a
slam-bam fender grinding and
sheet metal twisting affair that
saw everyone get something
for their money.
"It was a
great show
for the fans,"
Tommy
Dunford,
general
manager of the
track, said. "We
thank Boondocks
SGrill for supporting
us and the drivers and fans
who also supported us during
the 2006 season."
The events ranged from the
annual crash-a-rama to some
of the sport's more unique and
lesser known races. Which
brings up the question of
why someone would think of
them and who would imagine
sending these machines into
this kind of combat?
However, in the spirit of
Veterans Day, before any
of the festivities began, our
nations' veterans and those
currently serving in the
military were honored.
Robert E. Lowyns of the
Tri-County Marine Corps
League and Keith Griffin
of the National Guard
were introduced during the
presentation of our nation's
flag and the national anthem.
Cub Scout Troop 514 of


Chiefland did the honors
of holding the flag while
saluting it along with the two
servicemen.
With such a variety of
oddities and novelties, the
whirl of f-stops and flashes
took center stage in the stands
as the competitors put on a
show of determination and
excitement.
The program snaked its
way through an assortment
ofunique races having just
about anything
to do with the
outdoors or
the world of
industry. The
showpiece of
those kinds
of races
was the
figure 8 school
bus contest.
Tucked in between the
daredevils' attempts for one
last grasp at glory this season
was an exhibition jump,
spin out competition and the
recognition of the speedway's
2006 champions.
But perhaps the line-ups
biggest attention came to the
monster rally. Three trucks
wowed and awed the crowd
with a variety of moves over,
under and through the dirt
piles and destroyed cars.
"The Monster Truck show
was awesome," Dunford
said. "It really stood out to
watch what those machines
can do."
This was after the audience
had a chance to survey
the machines and form
their opinion first hand at
the graceful power of the
oversized trucks before the
steel pounding action began.
Added to the festivities of


Journal photos by Neal Fisher


WELL, THAT'S going to leave a stain.


nerves of steel and gambling
was the non-racing curiosities
that made the night feel like it
was a fair, among which was
the world's largest pinball


machine and cuisine that
seemed to makes everyone's
taste buds water.
When the smoke from the
featured slashed and gashed


carnage of all kinds and
walks of life concluded with
the demolition derby, the
daredevils called it a night as
they rode of into the sunset.


But the'most important
effect was a season finale that
gave everyone a full stomach
and smiles as the fans filed
out of the speedway.
"It was great to see the
stands full of fans as the
season ended and we are
happy with the way it came
to a close."

Results
School Bus Figure 8s
1. Robert Aaron
2. Dave Ross
3. Larry Harris
Enduro Winner: William
Hinth
Roller Derby Winner:
A.J. Northrup
Skid Car Race Winner:
Joe Ringhiesen
Boat & Trailer Race
Winner: Michael Gamon
Blindfold Race: A.J.
Northrup
Reverse Race: Fred Judy
Demo Derby- Dave
Westrich


THE BRONSON Motor Speedway honored its 2006 Series during intermission.


Cooper takes the checkered fla


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SPORTS WRITER
OCALA-After a satisfying
win at his home track last
Saturday night, Robbie
Cooper took to the banks of
Ocala Speedway looking to
close out the track's 2006
season with something to
shout about.
As the checkers waved, it
was mission accomplished for
the second consecutive week
as Bronson's most famous
racing product captured his
fifth victory of the season
in the track's open wheel
modified division.
'.'~, "It is always nice to win
the last race of the season,"
:her review, there probably Cooper said. "There is some
olition derby. really great competition at
Ocala Speedway and to be



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able to win five times is really
an accomplishment. It is just
really hard to win there. I
think that the competition
at Ocala is the best class of
modifieds in the state and the
track is the hardest to drive."
With the victory Cooper
moves into the fifth position
in the series' final point
standings. Being an up and
coming driver, he splits his
time racing in several series.
Due to the different series,
the Bronson driver missed
several races the series ran
and he pointed out that he
probably would have finished
higher in the point standings.
However, he was pleased
with his fifth place finish
considering it was his rookie


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year at the track.
Unfortunately, his victory
was short lived as he finished
a disappointing seventh
Saturday night in the race
of champions at Desoto
Speedway.
"It was a real bad night and
those kind of nights are going
to happen," Cooper said.
"All you can do is learn from
them and move on. We did
learn a lot from the race and
hopefully we will be able to
put it to good use next year.
"We started bad, had
trouble in qualifying, but
once the race started things
started to get better. I thought
we might be able to make it
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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Aulsons put Black Prong on the market 'Deerly'Departed


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
BRONSON-Three years
ago Maureen and Alan Aul-
son bought approximately 90
acres of land nestled inside
the Goethe State Forest near
the city of Bronson.
Originally bought as the
Aulson's personal training fa-
cility, the couple transformed
the land into what is now
known as the Black Prong
Equestrian Center.
The couple made the trans-
formation of the land into a
public facility due to what
became a heavy demand for
an equestrian center in the
area.
Within its short existence,
the center has become world
renowned and one can find
just about every kind of en-
tity needed to participate in
the sport.
Some examples of what
exists inside the center are
on-site world class trainers,
nine regulation-size dressage
arenas, practice obstacles, a
marathon course, more than
150 miles of trails in the
Goethe State Forest and con-
venient lodging options.
However, even with the
pride of building the facil-
ity from scratch, the Aulsons
have decided to sell it due to
Alan's commitment to spend
more time in what is know as


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner
THE SOUTH gate of Black Prong Equestrian Center remains open although its
owners are looking for new buyers.


horse driving.
"The county commission
and Levy County in general
have been very helpful to us
and we are very grateful for
it, "Aulson said. "I am sad to
let it go, but it is just too much
right now with the focus and
concentration I need to con-
tinue to participate in driving.
The area is one of the largest
driving communities in the
area and we hope to keep the
facility in the horse commu-
nity."
Even though the couple is


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as far as to whom to sell the
facility to, they are requir-
ing that the buyer honors the
commitments already made
for the 2007 season.
The couple has received
several phone calls as their
weekly newsletter first indi-
cated the facility was up for
sale.
Among the other benefits
the facility has brought to the
area is an increase in both the
value of the real estate and its


subsequent development. It
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"I am most proud of it
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can hold world class shows,"
Aulson said. "We want the'
public to know it is a gem in
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The Aulsons hold private
property and will maintain a
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GRANT COTHRON and his sister Marjorie show
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of hunting season. The buck spread measured
18inches.


1Cooper Continued from page 10

I bounced off of the wall. All in all though, it was a good
season and we ended it really strong. That should give us a
boost for next season."
The number 98 special modified finished the race after his
crew made repairs, but without his original chassis intact he
limped home to the disappointing finish.
Cooper has also seized victories at Orlando Speedworld,
Columbia Motorsports Park in Lake City and New Smyrna
Speedway this season. He also set the track record at New
Smyrna Speedway.
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Page 12


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


First-year coach throws in the towel r


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Five
months ago, Bobby Rast
took over the Chiefland High
School football program
amidst the controversy
that was the firing of his
predecessor.
And after one season
and what seemed to be a
rash of negative perception
concerning how he was
handling the rebuilding of the
once proud Indians' program
among the school's staunchest
followers, Rast resigned.
In what turned out to be
Rast's only season at the helm
of the Indians' program the
team fell to its worst record in
over two decades, winning its
lone game on homecoming
night.
That win came against
Crescent City and spurred
hope that perhaps the program
was starting to bear the fruits
of Rast's injection into it.
.However, the team failed
to respond and lost its last
four games by a combined
180-39 score.


al
m

ly
he
as
;n
4,


L


Williston High School
Varsity Football
Friday 11/17 Eustis
2nd round FHSAA playoffs
Girls Soccer
Monday 11/20 @ P.K. Young
Tuesday 11/28 @ Fort White
Wednesday 11/29 @ Interlachen
Friday 12/1 @ Newberry
Monday 12/4 Hawthorne
Friday 12/8 P.K. Young
Men's Varsity/J.V. Basketball
Friday/Saturday 11/17-18 Tip Off
Classic @ Chiefland.
Tuesday 11/21 Eastside
Tuesday 11/28 @Newberry
Friday 12/1 @Chiefland
Tuesday 12/5 @ Dixie County
Friday 12/8 P.K. Young
Saturday 12/9 Daytona Beach
Shootout @ Daytona (J.V.)
Girls Varsity/J.V. Basketball
Thursday 11/16 @ St. Francis


Red Devil Final Regular
Rushing


Minor
Evans.
White
Timmons
Days
Cox
Brown
Welch
Floyd
Totals


Attempts
99
73
60
101
26
12
10
10
1
392


Passing
Completion Com
Timmons 57
Total 57

Receiving
Rec
J. James 20
White 7'
M Brown 11
Welch 3
Evans 6
T..Brown 3
C.J. James 3
Floyd 1
Whildon 3
Totals 45


Yards
575
387
358
325
101
43
42
0
0
1831


Catholic
Monday 11/20 @ The Rock
Tuesday 11/21 Interlachen
Tuesday 11/28 Chiefland
Thursday 11/30 Hawthorne
Friday 12/1 Ft. White
Tuesday 12/5 @ Newberry
Thursday 12/7 Dixie Count4
Bronson High School
Boys Varsity/J.V. Basketball
Tuesday 11/21 Newberry
Tuesday 11/28 @ Bell
Friday 12/1 @ Dixie County
Saturday 12/2 Oak Hall
Tuesday 12/5 @ Branford
Friday 12/8 @ Trenton
Saturday 12/9 @ Hawthorn
Tuesday 12/12 @ Mayo
Friday 12/15 Williston
Girls Varsity Basketball
Friday 11/17 @ St. Francis
Tuesday 11/21 @ St. John-
Tuesday 11/28 @ Bell


Season Statis


Att Yards
115 1377
115 1377


Yards
488'
202
213
129
97
75
77
13
83
1377


Tides for Cedar Key starting with Nov. 16
Day High Tide Height Sunrise. Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible
Th 16 Low 4:47AM 0.6 6:57 AM Rise 3:05 AM 21
16 High 11:00AM 3.0 5:37PM Set 3:09PM
16 Low 4:50PM 1.1
16 High 10:44 PM 3.4
F 17 Low 5:32 AM 0.2 6:57 AM Rise 3:57 AM 14
17 High 11:52 AM 3.1 5:37PM Set 3:35 PM
17 Low 5:29PM 1.2
17 High 11:14PM 3.6
Sal8 Low 6:12AM -0.1 6:58AM Rise 4:51AM 8
18 High 12:39 PM 3.2 5:36 PM Set 4:04 PM
18 Low 6:05 PM 1.3
18 High 11:44 PM 3.7
Su 19 Low 6:49AM -0.4 6:59AM Rise 5:47 AM 3
19 High 1:21 PM 3.2 5:36PM Set 4:36 PM
19 Low 6:39 PM 1.4
M 20 High 12:13AM 3.8 7:00AM Rise 6:46AM 0
20 Low 7:25 AM -0.5 5:36PM Set 5:14 PM
20 High 2:02 PM 3.2
20 Low 7:14 PM 1.5
Tu21 High 12:43 AM 3.9 7:01 AM Rise 7:47 AM 0
21 Low 8:01 AM -0.6 5:35 PM Set 5:58 PM
21 High 2:43 PM 3.1
21 Low 7:49 PM 1.6
W 22 High 1:15AM 3.9 7:01AM Rise 8:48AM 1
22 Low 8:39AM -0.6 5:35 PM Set 6:50 PM
22 High 3:24 PM 3.0
22 Low 8:26 PM 1.7


Monday 12/4 Seven Rivers
Tuesday 12/5 @ Branford
Friday 12/8 @ Trenton
Tuesday 12/12 @ Mayo
Thursday 12/14 The Rock
Boys/Girls Middle School Basketba


Monday 11/27 @ Bell
Thursday 11/30 @ Trenton
Saturday 12/2 Oak Hall (Boys)
I Tuesday 12/5 @ Yankeetown
Thursday 12/7 Chiefland
Tuesday 12/12 Yankeetown
Thursday 12/14 The Rock (Boys)

Chiefland High School
Vars), Boys Varsity/ J.V, Basketball
Friday/Saturday 11/17-11/18 (Vars)
e Chiefland High School Tip-Off
Classic
Monday 11/27 Seven Rivers
Thursday 11/30 P.K. Young
Friday 12/1 Williston
Lutheran Tuesday 12/5 @ Taylor County
.,;;( Thursday 12/7 Newberry,':"' .' ,
SFfiday-12/8 Dixie County -
Monday 12/11 Trentot-.,
Girls Varsity/ J V, Basketball
Thursday 11/16 @ Dunnellon
,&S Monday 11/20 Ft. White
tc Tuesday 11/21 Newberry_
Tuesday 11/28 Williston (Vars)
Thursday 11/30 @ The Rock (Vars
Monday 12/4 @ Ft. White
Monday 12/11 Trenton
Tuesday 12/12 @ Bell


ilaoSportsj &

NEAL FISHER
SLEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


College football is about the rivalry


Among the more painful
losses the team endured this
year was to cross county
rival Williston, Ocala Trinity
Catholic (by a 65-0 score) and
Yulee (a first year program).
Following the ouster of
Sam Holland, the new coach
had a tough road to haul in
replacing a man who led the
team to a state championship
and unparalleled success
during his tenure. However,
in the eyes of many in the
community he did little to
cultivate the faith and belief
a coach needs to have when
rebuilding a program.
Perhaps his waterloo
came when he called in sick
as the team traveled to the
Jacksonville area to face
Yulee. It also did not help his
cause that Holland remarked
on his way out the door that
"whomever the new coach
is, he is walking into a gold-
mine of talent."
That goldmine was severely
stripped from the outset of
Rast's term as the Indians'
best player and running back
bolted with Holland. The


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MINOR SURGICAL MINOR TRAUMA LACERATION REPAIR
X-RAY LABORATORY- EKG EMPLOYMENT PHYSICAL
-Podiatry Services Available-
Convenient Office Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 a.m.- 7 p.m., Fri. 7:00 6 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Noon
1113 N.W 23rd Ave., Chiefland
(Across the parking lot from Wal-Mart)
Call (352) 493-9500 for an appointment today


trend continued as sever.
of the players left the tear
during the year.
The team has quickly
fallen from grace. Th
Indians' record in 2003 wi
9-1. However since the
their records have been 6-
2-7 and this year's 1-9 mark
Cliff Norris, th
superintendent of Lev
County schools, made th
decision to relieve Holland
his duties and hire the Indian
most recent coach. Now th
position is vacant and y
again a new search begins
earnest. At the current tin
indications are that no one
being considered.
Norris was unavailable fi
comment.
Chiefland Principal Pame
Asbell indicated the decisic
to resign was up to Rast an
solely his choice.
The coach remarked h
made the decision base
on the Quarterback Club
request for his resignation.
Rast will remain
Chiefland High School as
teacher.


Looking Ahead .


Leslie Sapp B


Construction, Inc.



352-463-7589



7239 S.W. 80th Avenue tlsapp@acceleration.net
Trenton, Florida 32693 CR-C058431


3


Eager Contracting Inc.l

T- M @6@2@9elDlzlcp)~


e s Michigan prepares to travel to
y / Columbus this weekend to take
ie on their most eminent rival, the
of A Ohio State Buckeyes, the game
s' goes beyond just college football. It is what
ie any sports fan and maybe even a few devotees
et of the dramatic inkling wants.
in As if playing for the championship of the
ie nation's oldest conference, the Big Ten, a berth
is in the granddaddy of all bowls, the Rose Bowl
and a possible national title, one more time, as
or they have done several times in the past, isn't
enough, consider what the production of the
la 2006 version of 'The Big Game' brings to the
)n sport with an overwhelming flair.
id It is two teams trying to put the exclamation
point on the brilliance of a majestic season
ie against one of the sport's historically five most
ad accomplished programs in the game that makes
's or breaks their season.
It is number one versus number two on the
at final regular season weekend of 2006. It is
a two teams playing for a perfect season. It isn't
just one of the teams needing to win in order
to move onto the national championship game,
while the other squad enters the game looking
to savor the euphoria of derailing their op-
ponents' days of hard work at the last possible
moment.
It is both teams needing to win in order to
move onto the championship game. And other
than the Oklahoma-Nebraska rivalry, no other
combination of two teams have as much of a
all right to claim they should play each other in
what is essentially the sport's biggest stage, a
final four playoff game.
Adding to the foreground of its sports
splendor, the game will be played at a time of
the year and in a location when the weather
perfectly lends itself to the way football was
supposed to be played. The air will be cool
and crisp with just enough of an indication that
winter's onset is looming in the background to
make it a game about the uglies who toil in the
trenches and ground warfare.
But the weather will be clear enough to add
Just erioigh~of'the magicalPelment of swing-
inmg -t~hMibi m fiWi l 'ht f6Atl id flow: of foaf- '
ball game that a beautiful1lydxecuted pass-play
brings to a contest of this magnittide.
College football is about the rivalry. Play-
ers go to schools solely for the right to play
the end of the season rival. They live to beat
) their cross-city, state or region nemesis and
all is right with the world for the next year as
the victory against the big rival lives on. The
rivalries are so big that they are played on the


last weekend of the season.
But how many could match the gran-
deur, the pageantry and what the rivalry
between Michigan and Ohio State has
meant to the sport? It' is "the big game"
not only in the tangible sense of champi-
onships and the attention it has brought to
college"football, but also because in the
arena of drama and the aftereffects it has
created rivalry few can match.
Before this year only a handful of rival-
ries could match what this yearly battle has
brought to the table. Among the accolades
are a nationally leading 17 national titles,
74 bowl appearances, 38 bowl victories,
16 Rose Bowl championships, 70 Big Ten
titles, 47 appearances in bowls that have
become a part of Bowl Championship Se-
ries and 7 Heisman Trophy winners.
In fact, only 68 percent of the time, the
winner of the "the big game" did not claim
the Big Ten title and the automatic berth
in the BCS or Rose Bowl that goes with
it. To further illustrate the point this marks
the fifth time the two rivals play each other
being ranked first and second once among
most among any of the season ending
rivalries.
On the more non-tangible side the rival-
ry is littered with names and traditions that
make it impossible for fans to know about
it. Names like "The Big House", "The
Horseshoe", Bo, Fritz, Bump, Fielding,
Woody, AC, and Archie, traditions like the
go M blue banner and the dotting of the I
and the maize and blue and the scarlet and
gray color schemes are known nationally
and roll off the tongues of sports fans.
They are one or two word names, be-
cause there is nothing else that needs to be
said. Sports fans know what they did or.
mean. In fact, the series moniker in itself
is short and succinct. It needs no explana-
tion.
Both schools boast consecutive sellouts
of over 100 games. "The Big House" is
the largest outdoor stadium in the world.
'"The' Horseshoe" has been meashued to
carry the largest decibel aimioui'of any
outdoor stadium.
Every school has its big rival and it
means just as much to the players and
those involved with the school, but when a
series has those kinds of monikers, it is one
of the elite.

See NealPage 13









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006 Page 13


Team will rely on speed, experience INeal


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
WILLISTON-With Jason
Odom taking over the reins
of Williston's basketball pro-
gram, the team might have to
take a step backward before it
can go forward.
On the other hand, with
five returning starters who
have a world of talent they
might just give Williston
High School something to
wave their pitchfork about.
"Right now we are learn-
ing the basics and fundamen-
tals," Odom said. "The team
lost in the first round of the
district tournament last year
and played around .500, but I
think we can really improve
both this year."
"We have a lot of speed
on this team and the girls are
naturally athletic. The team
is improving every practice
and I think we will really be
playing our best as the season
progresses."
The coach takes over a
team that played a compli-
cated offense and defensive
scheme last year. With the
talent level of the team he has
installed a flexing 2-3 zone
on both offense and defense.
The offense is designed
to swing the ball around the
perimeter until the opposi-
tion wears down and gives
the Lady Devils an open shot
or an open lane for them to
drive. With the open play-
ers from top to bottom in
the paint, the defense has to
collapse down and give the
Lady Devils room to move
the ball.
The defense is a basic 2-3
static zone, but the coach has
integrated a full court 1-3-1
press into their game plan.
Look for the team to use the
natural athleticism that ,the
coach talked about to switch
back and force and tire their
opposition out.
After two pre-season
games, the jury is still out as
far as where exactly the team
is when it comes to their abil-
ity to execute Odom's new
scheme and game plan. But
they certainly have proved
they are not a team to take


lightly and improvements are
being made on regular basis.
They won their first con-
test by a 60-35 score over
Hamilton County and lost
their second game to Fernan-
dfna Beach by a narrow two
points.
The team's starting five
consists of Jasmine Smith,
Margaret Brown, Portia
Brown, Angel Floyd and
Ciearra Gordon. With four
seniors starting it is unfortu-
nate they will have to adapt
to a new system and, feel for
the game.
However, the experience
of the team will make it an
easier transition to the new
coach than a team with fewer
seniors.
Margaret Brown is the lone
starter who is not a senior.
She is a junior. But the team's
flow and rhythm begins and
ends with her abilities and
what she brings to the court.
The team's point guard is an
excellent field general, know-
ing when to pass, when to
shoot and who is in the best
position to get the ball. She
also has an excellent shot.
Odom expects her to com-
pile a strong turnover to as-
sist ratio during the season.
As the point guard, it is an-
ticipated that she would take
over the leadership role on
the team and has done so.
The team's center, Gordon,
is a powerful shot blocker
and rebounder. Using her 6-
foot frame, the long and lean
-body has become adept at us-
ing her long arms to get to the
ball and grab it.
As the team's forward,
Portia Brown complements
Gordon well. She is also a
good rebounder. Her strength
is her ability to block out in
order to get the ball. She
is an extremely aggressive
player.who gets to almost ev-
ery loose ball.
Angel Floyd line ups at the
shooting guard. Along with
Brown, she is the team's best
shooter. A slasher, she stores
in bundles and will be needed
to give the team points. She
also leads the team on the de-
fensive side of the ball, meet-


ing the opposition as they
cross half court.
The other guard is Jas-
mine Smith. She is a versa-
tile player, playing both the
wing position and point when
Brown needs a rest.
Playing in the frontcourt,
sophomore Jessica Gates
will spell the starters as she
comes off the bench. Odom
noted her energy and ability
to play bigger than she is as
well as her deceptive physi-
cal strength.
The other non-starter who
will see significant time is
Samone Kennedy. The tal-
ented guard still needs pol-
ishing, but she will have her
opportunities during the sea-
son to grow into the role that
the team needs her to play.
"We still have some things
that we need to work on, but
the improvement is promis-
ing and the preseason games
have made a difference,"
Odom said. "The demeanor
towards the game has really
changed.for the better. When
we first started we only had
six girls show up, so there.
was a lot of negativity.
"But the pre-season games
have given the team confi-
dence and it can be seen as
we get better during every
practice. They are staying
within the limits of their abil-
ity and are playing bigger
than they are. The results
as far as improving and the
players getting the most out
of their players have been
there because of it."
The team as it enters its
first season under Odom also
has grown stronger in- their
ability to see the floor better.
However, the team needs
to fine-tune their shot. They
have been working on the
fundamental of.a sound shot,
such-asisquaring to the basket
and jumping off of the right
foot. With only nine players,
depth will become a problem
if injuries become an issue.
Odom is a graduate of P.K.
Yonge and the University of
Florida. He takes over the
Lady Devils program after a
successful athletic career at
the high school level.


There is Oklahoma-Ne-
braska, Auburn-Alabama,
USC-Notre Dame and
Florida-Florida State and
they can all compete with
the credentials of "The Big
Game."
However with the scenario
that has set up the 103rd
meeting between Michigan
and Ohio State, I hereby de-
clare "the big game" is now
number one among college
football's finest rivalries.
Not only did "the big
game" add to its legacy in
stats and its national promi-


nence this year, but it has
brought the college football
season to a mouthwatering
crescendo that even the other
rivalries failed to match
when they played each other
as the top two teams in the
land.
The crescendo has come in
ways never before seen, such
as 111 press passes being
issued and a reporter from
Japan planning to attend the
game.
There has never been a
game that was in essence a
final four playoff game and


Continuedfrom page 12


this year's "The Big Game"
will be one that forever
changes the feel of how col-
lege football crowns its
national champion. It will be
the culmination of a season
in which both teams and the
game in itself will distinc-
tively add their fingerprints
to the sport in a way never
before seen.
Neal Fisher is the
sports writer for the
Levy County Journal.
He may be reached at
jcpirahna@yahoo.com.


200 FHA' las 3AF otba I hamionhi


Host leams are In bold Italics
Regional games at 7.30 p m local time unless otherwise noted
Scrooi reps report resuitsalrrangeninr to foolballifhsaa org


Football Comings and
Goings:
In the 10 and under league,
the Bronson Packers scored
an impressive '24-0 shutout
victory over the Williston
Knights.
In the 13 and inder league,
the Bronson Thunder suffered
defeat at the hands of the
other Williston team.
The football playoffs began
on Saturday, Nov. 11. Times
and opponents are still to be
determined.
Cheerleading Notes:;
The All-Star Cheerleading
squad will travel to St.
Augustine for a statewide
competition on Nov. 18. The
squad is composed of 23 girls
ranging from ages five to 23.
Soccer Doings:
Last week's soccer results:
The Bronson Little Eagles
captured a 3-0 shutout over
Newberry I in the 6 and under
league.
The Bronson Little Gators
fell to Archer by a score of
3-2.
It was not a good day for
the 8 and under league as the
Bronson Eagles I managed
to tie High Springs at 1-1.
However, the Bronson Eagles
II, by a score of 2-1, went
down to defeat at the hands
of Williston II.
In the 10 and under league,
it was the Eagles taking a 1-0
decision over Newberry II.
The Eagles fell by a 1-0
count to Alachua II in the 12
and under league.
A 2-2 tie was the final result
of the Eagles match against


Alachua I in the 14 and under World Cup, was played on
league. ,Friday, Nov. 11 and Saturday,
The league's post season Nov. 12 at the Alachua
tournament, the Alachua Recreational Center.


WILLISTON LADY DEVIL
BASKETBALL
2006-2007


JASMINE SMITH

SHARNEKA BROWN

MARGARET BROWN

ARNETRA RICHARDSON

PORTIA BROWN

ANGEL FLOYD

CIEARRA GORDON

SIMONE CANNADY

JESSICA GATES

ERICA WILLIAMS


#4

#5

#10

#12

#22

#23

#24

#25

#32

MGR.


SENIOR

SENIOR

JUNIOR

FRESHMAN

SENIOR

SENIOR

SENIOR

FRESHMAN

SOPHOMORE

SENIOR


HEAD COACH JASON ODOM

ASSISTANT COACH ANTHONY JOHNSON


T


For the best in local sports coverage,
read the Levy County Journal.


Williston High School

Lady Red Devil Basketball
2006-07 Schedule

Date Opponent Location Time.
11-14-06 Noith Marion Away 6:00

11-16-07 St. Francis Catholic Away 7:00

11-20+06 The Rock Away 5:30

11-21-06 Interlachen Home 6:00

11-28-06 Chiefland* Home 7:00

11-30-06 Hawthorne Home 7:00

12-01-06 Ft. White* Home 7:00

12-05-06 Newberry* Away 7:00

12-07-06 Dixie Co.* Home 7:00

12-11-06 P.K. Yonge* Away 7:00

12-14-06 Crystal River Away 7:30

1-05-07 Chiefland* Away 7:00

1-09-07 Dixie Co.* Away 7:00

01-11-07 North Marion Home 7:00

01-12-07 Ft. White* Away 7:00

01-16-07 Newberry* Home 7:00

01-18-07 P.K. Yonge* Home 7:00

01-19-07 Interlachen Away 6:00

01-25-07 Crystal River Home 7:00

01-26-07 Hawthorne Away 6:00

01-30-07 *DISTRICT TOURNAMENT @ P.K. Yonge*


Bronson Youth I
S ", ",', ': f


Lssl upialed FridaV November 10 2006 at 11 36 PIA









Page 14


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


ACS Great American Smokeout is today NewBriefg
i


The Great American
Smokeout is today, Nov. 16.
Lay down the cigarettes and
start your way to a healthier
you.
The American Cancer Soci-
ety today marked its 30th an-
nual Great American Smoke-
out The American Cancer
Society urges the residents
of Levy, Gilchrist, Dixie and
Lafayette counties to make
an effort to quit smoking.
Secondhand smoke is a
health hazard that contains
more than 4,000 chemicals,
including over 60 carcino-
gens. In addition to increas-
ing the risk of heart disease,
stroke, and cancer in non-
smokers, secondhand smoke
is also responsible for 35,000
40,000 deaths from heart
disease and 3,000 lung can-
cer deaths in nonsmokers an-
nually.
It's inconceivable, but
the tobacco industry spends
more than $15.4 billion per
year and ore than $42 mil-
lion per day advertising and
marketing its lethal products.
Smoke-free polices, like Flor-
ida's amendment six, cover
all workplaces and protect
workers and patrons from
.the dangers of secondhand
smoke. These policies also
allow those most vulnerable
to secondhand smoke expo-
sure the elderly, children,
and people with certain health


conditions to enjoy dining
out without compromising
their health. Neither ventila-
tion systems nor nonsmoking
sections can adequately pro-
tect people from exposure to
the free-floating poisons of
secondhand smoke.
More than 70 percent of
smokers want to quit and
attempt to do so each year,
but without help, most fail.
Smoking cessation coun-
seling and medications are
proven to help and effective-
ly improve quit rates. Tele-
phone-based services are a
convenient and effective way
to provide information and
counseling; therefore, Quit-
lines have quickly become
the most successful means
of achieving tobacco cessa-
tion for large populations,
nearly doubling the chances
that tobacco users will quit
successfully. The American
Cancer Society is dedicated
to offering help to those who
want to quit smoking. Please
call 1-800-ACS-2345 (1-800-
227-2345) to reach a Quitline
program near you.
The American Cancer So-
ciety is dedicated to eliminat-
ing cancer as a major health
problem by saving lives, di-
minishing suffering and pre-
venting cancer through re-
search, education, advocacy
and service. Founded in 1913
and with national headquar-


GETTING READY to combat smoking are, from left, Maggie Cash, Valerie
Boughanem, Principal, Matthew.Myers, Kim Nemethand Bobbie Burnett.


ters in Atlanta, the Society
has 14 regional divisions and
local offices in 3,400 commu-.
nities, involving millions of
volunteers across the United
States. For more information
anytime, call toll free 1-800-
ACS-2345.
The task force against teen
drug use is planning activities
at Bronson Middle and High
School.
Some of the activities in-
clude asking businesses to
participate by offering dis-
counts to people who turn in
the rest of their pack of ciga-
rettes because they want to'


stop smoking.
There will be a jump rope
contest during PE to prove
the importance of a healthy
heart and lungs. Students,
parents and business people
are encouraged to adopt a
smoker by enabling them to
stop smoking.
Students who do not smoke
will speak about the impor-
tance of never starting. Stu-
dents who have quit will speak
about "Quitters are winners".
Other informational activi-
ties will be helpful including
daily announcements, posters
throughout the school, and a


banner for students to sign
with ideas of ways, to stop
smoking or never starting to
smoke.
Ideas: Adopt a Smoker
and encourage them to quit
and be there for them. See
the following website: http://
www.cancer.org/docroot/
PED/ped 10 4.asp
Businesses could offer a
discount to people .who turn
in the rest of a pack of ciga-
rettes.
Other helpful websites:
http://www.quitsmoking.
com/kopykit/reports/smoke-
out.htm.


Yard sale
The New Sepulchre
Church of God, Bronson will
be holding a yard sale on
Saturday, Nov. 18 starting at
7:30 a.m. A free breakfast will
be served consisting of hot
fish and grits. New Sepulchre
Church is located at 431 Pine,
Street, Bronson.
Basket auction set
Friends of the Williston
Library will hold its annual
holiday open house and
basket auction Saturday, Dec.
9 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
the library on Noble Avenue.
Silent bids will be received
on the baskets and proceeds,
will assist in the purchase
of books, materials and4
equipment for the library. It
will also enable the Friends
to provide free educational
and entertaining programs
throughout the year.
EZDA meetings
' Enterprise Zone Develop-
ment Agency will meet Tues-
day, Nov. 28 at 9 a.m.; Levy
Abstract & Title, 50 Picnic
St., Bronson.
Tentative meetings, ifneed-
ed, will be, held in the samn
location Dec. 5 and Dec. 12I
at 9 a.m. The agenda includes
finalizing/revising the Enter'
prise Zone application.
For more information con-
tact Pam Blair, Enterprisie
Zone Development Agency
at 352-486-5470.
.L."I


Erica Alien of the Inglis Shell Station reads the




LEVY COUNTY OUROLN

HE COUNTY PAPE EST. 1 92


Also available at these locations:


Bronson
A&ABBQ
Boondocks Grill
Bronson Post Office
Courthouse-Bronson
IGA
Li'l Champ
Nobles
Pick-a-Flick
Texaco/Chevron
Van Lee's Jiffy
Cedar Key
Cypress Station
Island Jiffy #1173
Island Jiffy #3246
The Market SR 24


Chiefland
ABC Pizza
Bell's Restaurant US 19
BBQ Bill's US 19
Burger King US 19
Chiefland Flea Market
US19
Chiefland Post Office
Park Ave
Church's Chicken/Jiffy
.3000
Dollar Tree US 19
Gas Mart Yogiraj En-
terpr. Inc.
Jiffy 228o-Manatee
Jiffy 2946-Midtown
McDonald's US 19


Mya's Chinese Restaurant
Stone's BP
Sunoco, US 19
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Garden side)
Wal-Mart
US 19 (Grocery side)
Winn Dixie US 19
Winn Dixie #168

Fanning Springs
Homestead US 19
Lighthouse Rest. US 19
Noble Food Mart, US 19
Fowlers Bluff
Carter's Crossroads


Inglis
Food Ranch
US19/Inglis Ave
Shell Station US 19
Old Town
BP Station-US 19
Jiffy Store
Old Town Post Office

Otter Creek
Otter Creek Post Office

Trenton
BP-Round store on SR 2
Citgo Sunrise Food Mart
#65


Hitchcock's-Trenton
Jiffy Mart #1553
Trenton Medical Center
Trenton Post Office

Williston
BP Gas
Corner Market 121/41
Exxon
Hitchcock's
Li'l Champ 1181
Li'l Champ 1182
Li'l Food Ranch 3626
Li'l Food Ranch 4231
Raleigh General Store
Williston Post Office


Erica Allen is a resident of Inglis and is an evening CSR at The
Inglis Shell Station. When she's not busy with her customers,
Erica enjoys reading the Levy County Journal's current events.






Pick up your copy today.

You'll be glad you did.


To subscribe: call Robin at 490-4462


We accept
Visa/Mastercard
Two locations to serve you
440 South.Court St., Bronson
13 South Main St., Chiefland


i/ISA


v Journal photo by Rhonda Griffiths


Am









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


SALUTING THE LIVING


Williston pays tribute to its vets


BY CAROLYN RISNER
M ,r., ,-e| [-_f'C,1, w
\' ILLIS T(-)N-Desci ibed
as a scene Norman Rockwell
\would ha\e painted tor the
Samtrdai Evening Post. the
cit. of Williston came to-
gether Saturday to pa\ tribute
to this nation's heroes--our
military men aid \women.
From the posting of the
colors b\ ,Williston High
School's Jr. ROTC to the
moving solo of God Bles-s the
U'S. the e\enine \\as filled
with an air of patriotism and
pride.
Video clips honoring \ eter-
ans \'ere played to the more
than 150 people \'ho gath-
ered on Veterans Da\ and the
high school band mo\ed the
audience \ith the national
anthem and several patriotic
selections.
The band also played each
military, branch's theme and
veteranss stood to rousing ap-
plause when their branch \\as
noted.
"It doesn't get anymore
American than this," said
Rep. Larrm Crerul. the e\e-
ning's ke) note speaker.


Cieul commllended Ihe
25 million people \\ho
ha'e seized this country,.
noting tihe cone from all
economic, racial and so-
cial backgrounds.


"They are oul he-
roes." lie said.
\\ ith UiS solider, in
138 countries. Cretul
said, As Americans.
\e don't give up, gi\e


out or gile in. \\e press
onward holding up our
country to a high stan-
dard."


L" L


VETERANS FROM all
branches were honored
Saturday in Williston.
Some shared stories with
their comrades, above,
while others like Robert
Lowyns, left, stood proud-
ly, or Michael Thayer and
James Taylor chatted with
friends, right.


U I


III Flanders Fields
BY Lielitenaant CoI'onl I-An I. C'ra., M IE) (1 i 1 )1 ;)
Can:Jian -\rni
IN FL-AKLi4i0,5 FIELDS [ I
Iicl ecin the *l,.: rc.v, .i-.i1 r...4,
Tklt narL cLi r pl.-,..-: and in tke z k
Thme ImL. z, tilIrml e iil 1
-Sc.,rc. k.erJ:l aid t~~~Ike nz elon


L\ el iand "ere Ic' .-d, anl nol 1'e i
In Ilandorz MI

lake UP CLp qjLiarr i d1 the kfo:
T, Nou from fai? tialv np hnd s v 16--a
TkIm torch, .le %-.rL- t.." moldit 11 1,11.
i e brea- mitI ,idI, uz Li, % die
Ve hall not Lep, thruLICl P--.PpiF rOV
in Flanlz J..'bLd,.


Journal photos
by
Carolyn Risner


THE WILLISTON JUNIOR ROTC posted the colors, right,
while music from many sources mbved the crowd. Pvt.
Zach Russ, left, was among those recognized who are
currently serving our country.


I. T


Page 15


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Page 16


Classified

Deadline
Monday
2 p.m.




egals


COUNTY OT
COUNTY IAll *n T. B2 El


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


How to Place Your Ad


Call:
Fax:


Chiefland 352-490-4462
Chiefland 352-490-4490


Email: mblitch@leNvjournal.com
Visit: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland


Bronsbn 352-486-2312
Bronson 352-486-5042

440 South Court Street, Bror


Miscellaneous U


101

Personals
105
AA MEETING-for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number, tfn

NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net

125 servi,
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb

MAKO PLASTERING &
PAINTING, Quality assurance,
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096. 12/28p

130
FREE FIREWOOD, sawed. Call
486-2118. 11/16f

*FREE KITTENS -All gray, about
10 weeks old. 2 male, 2 female.
Call Cassidi at 352-577-4399.
11/16f

rentals 61


3 0

Want to
335

LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL re-
porter needs a place to lay his
head at night. Outstanding sports
writer is forced to commute three
hours and really wants to make a
home base in Levy County. If you
have a spare room, small apart-
ment or mobile home you want
to rent for $200-$300 a.month or
if you need a roommate to share
expenses, call Neal at 813-335-
1095 or 352-490-4462.

real Estate




Houses for i
410
CORNER LOT WITH 2 "Cracker
Houses" in Williston. Close to
everything, downtown, banks,
Hwy 27-A & Hwy 41. City water
& sewer, located on paved road
at NE 9th Street. $20,000 obo.
352-208-3200 cell. 11/16p
Mobile HOi
415 for Sale
SINGLE-WIDE mobile home,
2 BR with expansion, needs
work, $2000. You move at your
expense. 352-486-2248. 12/6b


Mobile Hia
415 for Sa ,
MUST SELL! MOVING out of
state. 3/2 doublewide with split
plan. 1% acres, large trees,
carport, covered back porch,
tractor and tool shed. $95,000.
Call 352-486-7027 11/16b


425 for 5
OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner: 352-624-2215, 352-236-
4579, www.ocalaforestland.com/
2nd 12/28p
LEVY COUNTY 5.31 acres,
$132,000, trees, fenced, gates,
culvert, pole barns, storage.
shed, county maintained roads,
deed-restricted. Call 407-847-
6630. 11/16p

2 ACRE BETWEEN Williston &
Morriston. Paved road frontage
on SR 121. Wooded! High and
dry! Owner financing. No down
payment. Only $359/mo; total:
$34,900.00. Call 352-215-1018.
11/16p

For Sale 5


.. .. -


510

FAT GOOSE AUCTION holding
estate auctions each Friday in
downtown Chiefland at 7:00
pm. Always-outstanding estate
merchandise. Our box lots start
at 6:30 pm. Several vintage
Lionel & American Flyer Train
sets from the early 30's, & 40's
the rare MTH Burlington Zephyr
set in its box. Large statues,
carved ivory pieces, artwork of
all types, items from 3 different
antique stores. Primitives of all
types fainting couch, crocks,
oxen yoke, great glassware, lots
of jewelry. Furniture early drop
leaf mahogany table, also a nice
mahogany sewing chest w/ glass
knobs and contents, large slab
coffee table, matching hutches,
fishing gear and all types of
smalls, tools, and lots more.
AU2738 (Bruce Denestein)
AB2565 10% BP For more info.
call Jim Morehead at (352) 356-
1065.
YardS 5
515
YARD SALE SAT. Nov. 18, 7-
?. Go North on 337 past Levy
County Jail about 4 miles to
126th Street and turn left. First
big yellow house on right. 352-
486-8141.


550 Misc
NEW MOWER & CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07
This space for sale.
Call Robin to
purchase at a low rate

490-4462


BRONSON SELF STORAGE
(352) 486-2121





HOURS: Monday Friday 10 am 5 pm
Saturday 10 am 3 pm
839 E Hathaway Ave Behind Dollar General


S Want to
WILLISTON RECYCLE Salvage
$50.00 premium for cars or
trucks. Cash for all types scrap
metal. Call today 528-3578.
12/7p

recreation 6



605
0 Boats &

MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
- Boat motors wanted, dead or
alive! 352-486-4316 12/28p

Legal


I" 9(
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NUMBER: 06-CA-662
DOREEN M. CASLE
Plaintiff,
VS,

T. RICHARD HAGIN and T.
RICHARD HAGIrASiRTRUSTEE
Together with their heirs, should
they be deceased, and any
natural unknown persons who
might be the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, unknown Tenants
or other parties claiming by,
through, under of against the
above-named defendants
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

To: T. RICHARD HAGIN
and T. RICHARD HAGIN AS
TRUSTEE
You hereby are notified that a
Complaint to Quiet Title was filed
in this court on August 10, 2006.
You are required to serve a copy
ofyourwritten defenses, if any, on
the petitioner's attorney, whose
name and address is: Sherea-
Ann Ferrer, P.O. Box 721894
Orlando Florida 32872, and file
an original with the clerk of this
court on or before December
22, 2006 Otherwise, a judgment
may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
petition. Property Description:
TRACT #63 University Estates,
an unrecorded subdivision, in
Section 16, Township 12 South,
Range 17 East, Levy County,
Florida, being more particularly
described as follows: The North
1/2 of the Southeast /4 of the
Northeast of the Northeast '
of the Northeast % of Section 16,
Township 12 South, Range 17
East, Levy County, Florida.
Witness my hand and seal on
November 6, 2006.



GATOR WOKS
COMPUTING
Soles. Repair. Upgrade
SConsulting
[e w'. M Programming
fNetworking
MR'csoA'


Computer
Training Classes


900 Ln


DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk

(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 30 Dec. 7,
2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 38-2006-CP-000057

IN RE: ESTATE OF SONIA L.
JOHNSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Sonia L. Johnson,
deceased, whose date of death
was May 23, 2005, and whose
Social Security Number is 299-
40-6564, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Levy County, Florida,
Probate. Division, the address
of which is 355 South Court
Street, Bronson,. Florida 32621.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are sAe forth be ."". "
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the

decedent and other persons
having claims ordemands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this notice is. November 16,
2006.


900 Legal


Personal Representative:
Shelia Kay Hand
17790 SE 60th Lane
Morriston, Florida 32668

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
THE LAW OFFICE OF
RICHARD M. KNELLINGER,
P.A.
Karen S. Yochim, for the Firm
Attorney for Personal
Representative
2815 NW 13h Street, Suite 305
Gainesville, Florida 32609-2865
Telephone: (352) 373-3334
Florida Bar No. 670847
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 38-2006-CP-0288
IN RE: ESTATE OF


CHARLES
AUSTIN,


FREDERICK

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estateofCHARLES FREDERICK
AUSTIN, Deceased, whose
date of death was August 4,
2006, File Number 38-2006-CP-
0258, is pending in the Circuit
Court for LEVY County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is P.O. Drawer 610,
Bronson, FL 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims ordemands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER


I00 Legal


BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this Notice is November 16,
2006.
BETTY W. AUSTIN
Petitioner
11310 N.W. 73rd Court
Chiefland, FL 32626
GREGORY V. BEAUCHAMP,
P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
P.O. Box 1129
Chiefland, FL 32644
(352) 493-1458
Florida Bar No. 178770
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

Dona Potter d/b/a Bronson
Self Storage, pursuant to the
provisions of the Florida Self
Storage Facility Act (Fla. Stat.
83.801 et sec.) hereby gives
notice of sale under said Act to
wit:
On December 9, 2006 at
Bronson ,Self.,Storage, 839 .,
Hathaway Ave., Bronson, FL
32621, Dona Potter or her agent
will conduct a sale at 10:00 A.M.
by sealed bids to the highest
bidder. Bids to be opened at
noon, with viewing from 10:00
A.M. until noon for the contents
of the bay or bays, rented by the
following person/persons.

JEANNE TURNER
P.O. BOX 1823
BRONSON, FL 32621

MELISSA DANIEL
11070 NE 110t Lane
BRONSON, FL 32621

Consists of household,
personal items or miscellaneous
merchandise, stored at Bronson
Self Storage, 839 E. Hathaway
Ave., Bronson, FL 32621. Sale is
being held to satisfy a statutory
lien.
Dated November 10, 2006

Dona Potter
PO Box 1705
Bronson, FL 32621
Phone (352) 486-2121
Sale: 12/09/06
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006


Don't go swinging


blindly...


I Let us help you give your


advertising some









L1TcoUNTY Jo[AL
FO""'^'"'" *I










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


RI ASIFID IIFRAIS


VI~IVV- -l Ur -- -- i


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE EIGHTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.:38-2006-DR-000753


Kenneth Lee Hamm, Jr.
Petitioner

and

Alicia Nicole Hamm
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

TO: Alicia Nicole Hamm
76 SE 151 Avenue,
Old Town, Florida 32680


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and, that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Kenneth
Lee Hamm, Jr., whose address
is 500 W. Park Avenue #407
Chiefland, Florida 32626 on or
before December 7, 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 355 South Court
Street, P.O. Box 610 Bronson,
Florida 32621, before service
on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
Copies for all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review theses documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
'Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme CourtApproved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in the lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on
record at the Clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic b .disclosure .. of
document1 and" information:
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.

Dated: October 27, 2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: LaQuanda Lalson
Deputy Clerk
Pub. Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 38-2005-CA-000965
DIVISION:

SALLY BLAKEWOOD,
Plaintiff,
vs.

ABIDE IN HIM MINISTRIES,
INC.And JOWANNA DOVE a/k/
a And JOWANNA M. DOVE, et


Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is given that pursuant
to a Final Summary Judgment
of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
October 30, 2006 in Case
No. 38-2005-CA-000965, of
the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for Levy
County, Florida, in which SALLY
BLAKEWOOD, is the plaintiffs)
and ABIDE IN HIM MINISTRIES,
INC, JOWANNA DOVE a/k/a
JOWANNA M. DOVE, are the
defendantss; I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
in the lobby of the Courthouse in
Levy County, in Bronson, Levy
County, Florida at 11:00 AM on
November 27, 2006 the following
described property set forth in
said Final Judgment:
Lots 35 & 37 of GREEN HILLS
SUBDIVISION as per plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 8,
Page 13 of the Public Records of
Levy County, Florida.
Tax Parcel #19464-000-00 &
19466-000-00
DATED this 30t day of October
2006.

CLERK OF THE COURT
By: Gwen McElroy
As Deputy Clerk
Publication of this notice on Nov.
9, 16, 2006 in LEVY COUNTY
JOURNAL


IN THE CIRCUIT COUF
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRC
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORII
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 382006-CA-001
Civil Division
SUN LIFE ASSURAF
COMPANY OF CANADA
Plaintiff,


HOLY FAMILY CATHC
CHURCH, DIANE CHISO
JONES and JOSEPH E. PRI
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MS. DIANE CHISO
JONES
3205 N.W. 461 Court
Ocala, FL 34482

Ms. DIANE CHISO
JONES
2501 S.W. 101 St., Apt. #
Ocala, FL 34474

YOUAREHEREBYNOTIF
that an action for interple;
and declaratory relief has t
filed against you, Diane Chis
Jones. You are required to se
a copy of your written defer
to this action, if any, on M
D. Kiser, the Plaintiffs attor
whose address is 101
Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 2
Tampa, Florida 33602, or
before December 15, 2006,
file the original with the Clel
this Court either before ser
on the Plaintiff's attorney
immediatelythereafter; other
a default will be entered agi
you for the relief demand
the complaint or petition.

DATED on Oct. 30, 2006.
Clerk of Circuit Court

By Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COUF
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRC
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORII
Case No. 38-2006-
000888


1994 GMC,
FLORIDA TAG V2
VIN 1GKCS13W9R252'
TWO HUNDRED AND THI
ONE ($231.00) DOLLARS
U.S. CURRENCY

WILLISTON POLICE
APARTMENT
Petitioner,

DEONTE DALLAS
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DEONTE DALLAS
UNKNOWN PARTIES IN
TEREST

YOU ARE HEREBY N
FIED that a complaint for Fo
ture has been filed by the W
ton Police Department, Willi.
Levy County, Florida; and
are required to serve a cop
your answer or other plea
on the plaintiffs attorney, RA
THOMAS, JR. of RAY E. TH
AS, JR. PA., at Post Office
39 Bell, Florida 32619, anc
the original answer or plea
in the office of the Clerk o1
above named Court on.or be
December 21, 2006.

IF YOU FAIL TO DO
judgment by default will be
en against you for the relief
manded in the complaint.

WITNESS my hand and
cial seal, this 2nd day of No\
ber 2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
P.O. Box 610
Bronson, FL 32621

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006



NOTICE OF INTENT '
USE UNIFORM METHOD
COLLECTING NON-AE
VALOREM ASSESSMEI

Levy County, Florida
ACounty@) hereby pro\
notice, pursuant to se
197.3632(3)(a), Florida Stati
of its intent to use the uni
method of collecting no
valorem special assessrr


IT to be levied within
unincorporated area of
UIT County, for the cost of provi
solid waste disposal services
DA residential and non-reside
properties, fire protection serve
58 and road maintenance serv
commencing for the Fiscal'
NCE beginning on October 1, 20
The County will consider
adoption of a resolution elec
to use the uniform method
collecting such assess
authorized by section 197.36
)LIC Florida Statutes, at a pi
)LM- hearing to be held at 9:00
ICE, on December 5, 2006 at
Commission Chambers, 35i
Court Street, Bronson, FIc
32621. Such resolution
)LM- state the need for the levy
will contain a legal descrip
of the boundaries of the
property subject to the
Copies of the proposed 1
ILM- of resolution, which cont
the legal description of the
305 property subject to the levy,
on file at the Office of the Co
Coordinator, 355 S. Court Sti
:IED Bronson, Florida. All intere
ader persons are invited to attend
3een In the event any pe
olm- decides to appeal any deci
erve by the County with res
nses to any matter relating to
Mark consideration of the resoll
ney, at the above-referer
East public hearing, a record of
700, proceeding may be needed
Sor in such an event, such pe
and may need to ensure tha
rk of verbatim record of the pi
vice hearing is made, which re
or includes the testimony
wise evidence on which the appe
ainst to be based. In accordance
d in the Americans with Disabi
Act, persons needing a spi
accommodation or an interpl
to participate in this procee
should contact Levy Count
(352) 486-5217, 7 days pri(
the date of the hearing.

DATED this 23r day
October, 2006.
RT By Order of:
Nancy Bell, Chair
;UIT LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDi

A Pub. Nov. 9,16, 23, 30, 2
-CA-


LOR 'NOTIP cf^ja L S Ft
Paul Barcia, d/b/a L&L Stor
292S pursuant to the provisions o
1107 Florida Self Storage facility
RTY. (Fla. Stat. 83.801, et sec.), h
IN by gives notice of sale u
said Act, to wit: On Nover
24, 2006, at L&L Storage,
DE- N.E. 200th Avenue, Willi,
Florida, Paul Barcia or his a
will conduct a sale at 9:00 Al
sealed bids to the highest bi
Bids to be opened by Noon
viewing from 9:00 AM until NI
for the contents of the sto
bay or bays rented by the fo
and ing person/persons:
IN-
Bernita Appling
4171 NE 103rd Ct.
OTI- Williston, FL 32696
)rfei-
Villis- Garrett Brown
ston, 4906 SW Second Ave.
you Cape Coral, FL 33914
Dy of
ding Mark Clayton
Y E. 10471 NE 75th St
OM- Bronson, FL 32621
Box
I file Jack Haubert
ding 2747 SW 17th Cir
f the Ocala, FL 34474
fore
Beth Matus
3190 NE 192nd Ave.
SO, Williston, FL 32696
tak-
f de- Marvin Ragland
1870 NE 32nd St., #3
Silver Springs, FL 34488
offi-
vem- Chris Rounds
'14038 NE 50th PL
Williston, FL 32696

Perry Smith
3034 G. Street
Lorain, OH 44052

Consists of household, perse
or miscellaneous items, st
at L&L Storage, 2990 N.E. 2
Avenue, Williston, Florida.
is being made to satisfy a s
tory lien.

Dated November 9, 2006


ro
OF L&L Storage
S 2990 N.E. 200th Avenue
NTS Williston, Florida 32696
(352) 528-6179
(the
rides Sale Date: November 24, 2(
action Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006


the IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
the THE
ding EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
s for IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
ntial FLORIDA
ices PROBATE CASE NO: 2006-CP-
ices 254
Year IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BER-
007. NICE P. REBELLO, a/k/a BER-
the NICE A. REBELLO
acting Deceased.
d of
ents NOTICE TO CREDITORS
632, The administration of the es-
ublic tate of Bernice P. Rebello, a/k/a
a.m. Bernice A. Rebello, deceased,
the whose date of death was June
6 S. 26, 2006, is pending in the Cir-
)rida cuit Court for Levy County, Flor-
will ida Probate Division, File Num-
and ber 2006-CP-254; the address
option of which is P.O. Box 610, Bron-
real son, Florida 32621. The names
levy. and addresses of the personal
form representative and the personal
ains representative's attorney are set
real forth below.
are All creditors of the decedent
unty and other persons having claims
reet, or demands against the dece-
sted dent's estate, on whom a copy
I- of this notice is required to be
rson served must file their claims with
sion this court WITHIN THE LATER
pect OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
the TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
ution TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
nced DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
the SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
and NOTICE ON THEM.
rson All other creditors of the de-
at a cedent and other persons hav-
ublic ing claims or demands against
cord decedent's estate must file their
and claims with this court WITHIN
al is 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
with OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
cities OF THIS NOTICE.
ecial ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
reter WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
ding SET FORTH IN SECTION
ty at 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
or to PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
of TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
A The date of the first publica-
S tion of this Notice is November
006 9, 2006.

Personal Representative:,
.E Russell,SQttSebello .>lAr. n
rage, POox3091 .:.
f the Dunnellon, FL 34430-3091
SAct
iere- Attorney for Personal Represen-
nder tative:
nber 'Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq.
2990 Florida Bar No. 0857750
ston, VanNess & VanNess, PA.
gent 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd.
M by Crystal River, FL 34429
dder. 1-352-795-1444
with Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006
loon --
rage NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
llow-
Todd Hubbard d/b/a Kips
Mini-Storage, pursuant to the
provision of the FI. Self Storage
Facility Act (Fla. Stat.83.801 et
sec.) hereby gives Notice of Sale
under said act to wit: On Dec. 8,
2006 at Kips Mini-Storage 13645
N.W. Hwy #19, Chiefland, FL.,
Todd Hubbard or his agent will
conduct a Sale at 10:00 a.m.,
by sealed bid to highest bidder.
Bids to be opened by noon with
viewing from 9 a.m. till 10:00 a.
m. for the content of the follow-
ing person/ persons:

Melissa Nutter1
P. O. Box 290
Chiefland, FL. 32644

Marline Jenkins
P. O. Box 723
Chiefland,FL. 32644

James Morris
285 S. E. 911 St.
Old Town, FL. 32680

Thomas Alderman Jr.
5650 N.W. 30 St. p
Chiefland, FL. 32626

Tonya Akins
9809 S,W. 51 Ave.
onalr Trenton, FL. 32693
:ored
00th Consists of household, per-
Sale sonal items or miscellaneous
tatu- merchandise, stored at Kips
Mini-Storage, 13645 N.W
Hwy#19 Chiefland, FL.. Sale is


being made to satisfy statutory
lien.

Todd Hubbard
Kips Mini-Storage
13645 N.W. Hwy#19
Chiefland, Fl. 32626
1-352-490-9591
Pub: Nov.16, 23, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2006-CA-675
EMC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs.

SHARON SMOKLY STANCIL
F/K/A SHARON A. SMOKLY,
UNKNOWN TENANT 1, and
any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above-
named Defendants,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given
that the undersigned Clerk of
the Circuit court of Levy County,
Florida, will on the 4m day of
December, 2006, at 11:00 o'clock
A.M. at the Lobby of the Levy
County Courthouse in Bronson,
Florida on Mondays, offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described
property situate in Levy County,
Florida:

Lot 1, Block 14, WILLISTON
HIGHLANDS UNIT 5 REPLAT,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
5, of the Public Records of Levy
County, Florida.
Together with 1994 DWMH
SHAD 24x48 mobile home
VIN# 146M8362A & VIN#
146M8362B

pursuant to the final Judgment
entered in a case pending in
said Court, the style of which is
indicated above.

Any person or entity claiming
an interest in the surplus, if any,
resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of this
Lis Pendens, must file a claim
on same with the Clerk of
Court within 60 days after the
foreclosure sale.

WITNESS my hand an official
seal of said Court this 6th day of
November, 2006.
In :accordance with the
AmericanSr With, Disabilities Act,
persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact Court
Administration at 355 South
Court Street, Bronson, Florida,
Telephone (352) 486-5100, not
later than seven (7) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1/800/955-8771,
or Voice (V) 1/800/955-8770, via
Florida Relay Services.
Danny J. Shipp
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT CO
URT

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
Frank Albert Reder
Butler & Hosch, P.A.
3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E
Orlando, Florida 32812
(407) 381-5200
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2006-CP-000210
IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES T.
VANDERGRIFF A/k/a JAMES
THEDORE VANDERGRIFF
A/k/a JAMES THEODORE
VANDERGRIFF A/k/a JAMES
T. VANDERGRIFF, JR. A/
k/a JAMES THEODOR
VANDERGRIFF
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration
of the estate of JAMES T.
VANDERGRIFF, deceased,
whose date of death was July
10, 2006, is pending in the
Circuit Court for LEVY County,
Florida, Probate .Division, the
address of which is 355 South
Court St., (P.O. Drawer 610)
Bronson, FL 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal


representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
o" demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with the
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE


OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims ordemandsagainst
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FOTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is Nov. 16, 2006.


Personal Representative
MARTIN J. STILES
9140 W. Chata Place
Crystal River, FL 34428

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GLEN C. ABBOT
Florida Bar No. 235911
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River, Florida, 34423-
2019
Telephone: (352) 795-5699
Pub: Nov. 16, 23, 2006

PUBLIC NOTICE

The School Board of Levy
County will hold a Public Hearing
at its office, 480 Marshburn
Drive, Bronson, Florida, on
Tuesday, December 19, 2006,
at 9:30 a.m. to adopt/amend the
following School Board Policies:

3.16 Charter Schools
4.18 Transfer Credits
4.25 Disposing of Surplus,
Obsolete, and Unusable
Textbooks and Instructional
Materials
5.15 Administration of
Medication During School Hours
6.20* Sick Leave
11.03* Use of Facilities

Persons having questions
concerning the proposed
adoptions/amendments should
contact Jeff Davis, Assistant
Superintendent of Administration
and Support Services, BronSon,
Florida, at (352): 486-5231.
Copies of the proposed changes
may be obtained, at cost, from
the Office of the Superintendent
of Schools, 480 Marshburn
Drive, Bronson, Florida.
Pub: Nov. 16, 2006




Buying

Tax Deeds?
JVeed to ee&= tfAe ti&&e?
&xpemienceda, ependa&te
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
eafe
efutva ote J. Weidne'
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


Page 17


Legal deadline is
5 p.m. Monday











Page 18


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Levy Land Transactions
10/21/06 10/30/06
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-Assignment, AAD
Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended Certificate of Title, AD-Agree Deed, A
Assumption of Indebtedness, AM -Assignment of Mortgage, CD-Correctoi
SDeed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed, E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgmer
Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage Modify Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, P
Probate X, QCD-Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed, WD
Warranty Deed
QCD, $10.00, L30(9) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): (s) LATALL ALLEN, LATALL MARTHA
Grantor(s): LATALL MARTHA
M, $6,000,000.00, BDY 29, 31, 32-13-19, ETC
Grantee(s): TRUST FINANCIAL LLC
Grantor(s): D&M LEVY LC, HODGE BROTHERS LLP, HODGE EDWARI
CHARLES SR, HSI LEVY LC, VH LEVY LC
WD, $350,000.00, BDY ADJACENT TO L10-11 BETWEEN (2-3) OF (2
THE REPLAT OF CORONET PARK SD, WIMH, ETC
Grantee(s): (s) RONNIE F TAYLOR REVOCABLE TRUST, TAYLOR BAF
BARA D TRUSTEE, TAYLOR RONNIE F TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): LANG BETTY B, LANG HUNTER C
WD, $175,000.00, BDY L1-3, 16-18(3) REPLAT OF CORONET PARK
Grantee(s): (s) RONNIE F TAYLOR REVOCABLE TRUST, TAYLOR BAF
BARA D TRUSTEE, TAYLOR RONNIE F TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): LANG BETTY B, LANG HUNTER C
M, $430,749.65, BDY L1-3, 16-18(3) REPLAT OF CORONET PARK
ETC
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): RONNIE F TAYLOR REVOCABLE TRUST, TAYLOR BARBAR
D TRUSTEE, TAYLOR RONNIE F TRUSTEE
WD, $10.00, BDYNE SEI/436-12-17, PARCEL #03601-015-00
Grantee(s): JLK2 LLC
Grantor(s): KLINGENSMITH JEANETTE, KLINGENSMITH JEFF
CD, $10.00, UNIT C4 CEDAR COVE EFFICIENCY CONDO II, ETC
Grantee(s): BROWN JANICE, VONASEK JOHN
Grantor(s): BROWN JANICE TRUSTEE, VONASEK BROWN TRUS1
VONASEK JOHN TRUSTEE
CD, $10.00, UNIT C4 CEDAR COVE EFFICIENCY CONDO II, ET(
Grantee(s): LEXI GROUP LLC
Grantor(s): BROWN JANICE, VONASEK JOHN
WD, $10.00, L16(B) LANGLEYESTS
Grantee(s): JLK2 LLC
Grantor(s): KLINGENSMITH JEFF, KLINGENSMITH JEANETTE
WD, $90,000.00, L22 ALLEN WADE SD
Grantee(s): HOLLAND RACHEL, HOLLAND DENNIS
Grantor(s): MCCARTHY BRENDON J
M, $72,000.00, L22 ALLEN WADE SD
Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
FIRST BANK, FIRST BANK MORTGAGE, MERS
Grantor(s): HOLLAND RACHEL, HOLLAND DENNIS
M, $10,000.00, L22 ALLEN WADE SD
Grantee(s): MCCARTHY BRENDON J
Grantor(s): HOLLAND RACHEL, HOLLAND DENNIS
M, $27,177.74, BDYE1/2 SHIN 29-14-16, ETC
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): GORE JERRY J
M, $130,150.00, L9(37) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): UMC MORTGAGE COMPANY, UNITED MORTGAGE CORP
Grantor(s): GILBERT RODONIA, GILBERT JEFFREY '
WD, $50,000.00, L3 GRACELANDSHORES SEC G, W/MH
Grantee(s): BAIR LESLIE, BAIR ROBERT
Grantor(s): COLEY CARL, COLEY CHERYL A, RAY CHERYL A, MAGIN/
CHERYLA
QCD, $2,000.00, UNIT WEEK #38 IN UNIT 9308 CEDAR COVE PHASE
ICONDO
Grantee(s): RENFROE BEVERLY
Grantor(s): LAVERY LINDA P
M, $90,000.00, L81(93) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): GTE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s): TYLER BARBARA L, TYLER SHAWN I
M, $5,000.00, L81(93) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): GTE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s) TYLER BARBARA L, TYLER SHAWN, I ,, .
M, $55,000.00, BDYNE1/4 NE1/430-13-19, PARCEL #05235-002-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): CARRILLO LESTER A
M, $50,000.00, L7-8(18) WILLISTON HGH#7
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA .
Grantor(s): CYCAN LINDA MACKEY, CYCAN THOMAS, MACKEY CYCAN
LINDA
M, $308,250.00, L7-8(8), L1-2(16), (13) MAP OF RALEIGH, ETC
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): WALKER ROBERTA
WD, $50,000.00, L40(C) GRACELAND SHORES
Grantee(s): RUSS ASHLEY R JR
Grantor(s): OSBORNE BRIAN DOUGLAS, OSBORNE DAVID JOHN,.OS
BORNE GEORGE W
WD, $120,000.00, L10(E) REPLAT OF PORTION OF CEDAR KEY M/I
VILLAGE
Grantee(s): LANG BETTY B, LANG HUNTER C
Grantor(s): DYE DEBRA LYON, DYE DANNY
QCD, $10.00, L9(27) WILLISTON HGH #14
Grantee(s): STRICKLAND CHARLES D, KOON ROCHELLE L
Grantor(s): KOON ROCHELLE L
M, $177,117.00, NO LEGAL DESC ATTACHED
Grantee(s): TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): TILSON NANCY, TILSON JAMES
WD, $107,000.00, L6-9(11) UNIVERSITY OAKS, W/MH
Grantee(s): PIAIIA JACINATE V, PIAIIA VINCENT JAMES
Grantor(s): FREEMAN CHRISTOPHER R, FREEMAN DOUGLAS K
WD, $19,500.00, L5(138) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): RAMIREZ GUSTAVO, PAOLINICARLOS
Grantor(s): FULGHUM DANIEL
WD, $17,000.00, BDYNE1/4 SW1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-033-00
Grantee(s): REID MARNELLE V
Grantor(s): RAKITIN ALAN, GREENSPAN PERRY H, PERRY H GREENS-
PAN INC
CT, $100.00, 38-06-CA-362, L14(7) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s); ALLEN ELAINE C
Grantor(s): ASH KENNETH A, ASH NANCY P, CLERK OF COURT DANNY
J SHIPP
WD, $255,168.00, L121, 124TIGER ISLAND,BDY 34, 35-13-13, ETC
Grantee(s): JENNINGS GROVER C, JENNINGS REGINA M
Grantor(s): NELSON BETTY)
WD, $10.00, L1FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): CRANE CATHI E ABBISS, ABBISS CAROLEE
Grantor(s): ABBISS CAROLEE TRUSTEE
WD, $22,500.00, L9-10(17) OLD CHIEFLAND
Grantee(s): BALLENGEE JAMES GORDON
Grantor(s): ROWE EUGENIA S TRUSTEE, ROWE GENE A TRUSTEE,
ROWE TRUST
;M, $17,500.00, L9-10(17) OLD CHIEFLAND
Grantee(s): ROWE TRUST
Grantor(s): BALLENGEE JAMES GORDON
M, $44,000.00, L71 SPANISH TRACE SD
Grantee(s): FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s): WAIN JOSEPH, WAIN TAME
WD, $60,000.00, BDY L11(B) WOODLAND ACRES, W/MH
Grantee(s): LEWMAN CASH
Grantor(s): WELCH JULIE, WELCH WILLIAM A
QCDM, $10.00, L14 QUAIL RUN
Grantee(s): ZACCHEO EILEEN
Grantor(s): ROBERTS CARMEN A
QCD, $10.00, L14 QUAIL RUN
Grantee(s): ZACCHEO EILEEN


Grantor(s): ROBERTS NATHAN G
M, $100,000.00, L36 LAZY OAKS, BDY 16, 21-12-18, ETC
Grantee(s): DAVIS B E
Grantor(s): BOYLE JOHN, BOYLE RUTH
M, $92,000.00, L30-32(8) PEACEFULACRES SD
Grantee(s): SAXON HOME MORTGAGE, SAXON MORTGAGE INC
Grantor(s): ROWE TERM, ROWE JAMES
M, $280,000.00, L61 WATERWAY ESTS #3
Grantee(s): CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s):. BARKER NANCY T JAKAB, BARKER BILL E JR, JAKAB
BARKER NANCY T
CD, $10.00, OR 883/714, L2(C) RAYS SD #1 REVISED.
Grantee(s): HOLLADAY DIANA, HOLLADAY PAUL DAVID
Grantor(s): ROETMAN ENTERPRISES, ROETMAN EMMETT


M, $33,000.00, L2(C) RAYS SD #1 REVISED
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): HOLLADAY DIANA, HOLLADAY PAUL DAVID
D- WD, $60,000.00, L16(9) CHIEFLAND COUNTRY ESTS
I- Grantee(s): KRAMER DAVID
r Grantor(s): TOVINE GINA LYNN, TOVINE WILLIAM E
nt CD, $10.00, L8-10(1)REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5, W/MH.
X Grantee(s):) WEISENBACH DAVID F, WEISENBACH ONA, WEISENBACH
-' PETER
Grantor(s): WEISENBACH DAVID F
WD, $10.00, L22(B) RIVERLAKE ESTS
Grantee(s): MCCOLLUM BONNIE D, EUNICE KENNETH M
Grantor(s):) MCCOLLUM ALLEN RAY, MCCOLLUM BONNIE DIANE
AAA, $15,000.00, OR 965/157
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK.
D Grantor(s): CARDOUNEL MERCY, CARDOUNEL ANGEL A
M, $25,000.00, L9-A BRONSON RANCHETTES, BDY 17-12-17, ETC
2) Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): COLON MARIA V, COLON CESAR
t- M, $35,000.00, L1 GREEN HILLS, W/MH
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): HARDISONCHARLES T, HARDISON GWENDOLYN G
WD, $95,000.00, L 12(3) LAKE JOHNSON ESTS #1, W/MH
-Grantee(s): MONROE PHYLIS, MONROE CHARLES
Grantor(s):) AUGUSTINUS ISABEL V, AUGUSTINUS DONALD R
WD, $80,000.00, LAM-5, AM-6, AM-7(A & G) GLEASONS TRAILER VIL-
, LARGE, W/MH
Grantee(s): AUGUSTINUS DONALD, AUGUSTINUS ISABEL
Grantor(s): BLISS VIRGIL B DECEASED, BLISS CAROL K
A M, $31,000.00, L10 SPANISH TRACE ADD #1
Grantee(s): JAMES J LESTOCK REVOCABLE TRUST, LESTOCK JAMES
J TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): BOWMAN GERALD, BOWMAN SHARON
WD, $60,000.00, L8(8) CHIEFLAND COUNTRY ESTS
Grantee(s): SPY HOLDINGS LLC
Grantor(s): GREENWOOD OF CHIEFLAND INC
r, WD, $120,000.00, L5-6(14) CHIEFLAND COUNTRY ESTS
Grantee(s): SY HOLDINGS LLC
C Grantor(s): GREENWOOD OF CHIEFLAND INC
QCD, $10.00, BDY 36-16-17, PARCEL #3930-000-00, ETC
Grantee(s): WOLCOTT RICHARD L, WOLCOTT SANDRA
Grantor(s): WOLCOTT SANDRA
QCD, $10.00, L13 CASONS INGLIS ACRES #4
Grantee(s): STEVENS RONALD W
Grantor(s): GILREATH JACQUELINE W, GILREATH JACQUELINE W
TRUSTEE, WILLIAM A GILREATH REVOCABLE TRUST -
QCD, $29,000.00, L13 CASONS INGLIS ACRES #4
Grantee(s): FAMILY HOME CENTER OF HOMOSASSA LLC
SGrantor(s): STEVENS RONALD W
QCD, $10.00, L37WITHLAOOOCHEE RIVER PARK ESTS
Grantee(s): MARTIN TED
Grantor(s): DRAKE WAYNE
WD, $65,000.00, L1,3(26) 4TH ADD TO BRONSON HTS SD, W/MH
Grantee(s): GERTNER CATHERINE, MCDOWELL ELSIE C
Grantor(s): HUTSON WILMA, HUTSON ROSCOE B
M, $52,000.00, L1,3(26) 4TH ADD TO BRONSON HTS SD, W/MH
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): GERTNER CATHERINE G, MCDOWELL ELSIE C
M, $102,000.00, BDY NW 1/4 NW1/4 17-12-17
Grantee(s): AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY INC
Grantor(s): UNDERWOOD M JANN, UNDERWOOD STANLEY R
WD, $10.00, L3ANNEX HTS SD
A Grantee(s): ERVIN LISAA, BEACH LISAA
Grantor(s): BEACH MICHAEL T
S M, $80,000.00, L3 ANNEX HTS SD
Grantee(s): BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): BEACH LISAA, ERVIN JAMES STEVEN, ERVIN LISA
3 WD, $10,000.00, BDY NW 1/4 NW1/4 21-16-16, W/MH, PARCEL#02898-
004-00
Grantee(s): MERCHANT CONNIE M, MERCHANT RONNIE V
rGrantor(s): BURKARTROBERT H JR
W7$I15,930.88s j~"oW-'~137, PARCEL #03633-000-06, "'Ef-
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): MARUCA CAROLE, MARUCA CAROLE L, MARUCA DOMI-
NIC, MARUCA DOMINIC L
E, $10.00, L12-13 SHAMROCK ACRES #1, BDY 25-14-17, PARCEL
#03743-006-OG
Grantee(s): PROGRESS ENERGY
Grantor(s): LIVING WATER LIFE CENTER INC
M, $50,000.00, BDY SEI/410-15-17, PARCEL #03778-008-OA
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): RICHARDSON GIOVANNA D, RICHARDSON WILLIAM R
WD, $130,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SW1/432-11-15, PARCEL #01680-002-00,
ETC
Grantee(s): SMITH ALESHAA, SMITH MELVIN D
Grantor(s): E & K INVESTMENTS LLC
M, $130,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SW1/4 32-11-15, ETC
Grantee(s): TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS,MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): SMITH ALESHAA, SMITH MELVIN D
QCD, $100.00, L30 LIBBY HTS
Grantee(s): STEVE SMITH CONSTRUCTION INC
Grantor(s): BAKER THOMAS J
QCD, $10.00, BDY NE1/4 NW 1/4 26-11-17, PARCEL #03223-027-00,
ETC -
Grantee(s): CRUMAN FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
Grantor(s): CRUZ ARMANDO
WD, $21,000.00, L18(42) OAK RIDGE ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC
Grantor(s): BREMER HAROLD L, BREMER DAWN M
WD, $6,500.00, L14 HIDEAWAY #1
Grantee(s): RUSH RICHARD L
Grantor(s): LITTERAL LENORA J, LITTERAL LESTER
WD, $30,000.00, L6(4) OAK KNOLL ESTATES
Grantee(s): CERCY LINDA M, CERCY CHARLES R
Grantor(s): KAHN BURT, KAHN BURT L, KAHN GLENDA R DECEASED
S WD, $32,500.00, L6(4) OAK KNOLL ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): J 0 T LLC
Grantor(s): CERCY LINDA M,CERCY CHARLES R
M, $125,000.00, BDYNW 1/4 SE1/421-12-17 & L 1(16) BRONSON HTS
SD, ETC
Grantee(s): JARRETT MILEY M, JARRETT HUGH H JR
Grantor(s): MIILICH JAY
M, $83,125.28 NO LEGAL DESC GIVEN, PARCEL #09832-000-00
Grantee(s): U S BANK NA
Grantor(s): WHITE SHANNON I
WD, $45,000.00, LOT 2-4, 3-6, 4-2, 4-3,.4-4, 4-5, 4-6, 4-7, 4-8, 4-9, 4-
10(K) MANATEE FARMS ESTS #2, SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): ORENCHAK LINDA R, ORENCHAK JERRY A
Grantor(s): ALMDALE JO ANNE, ALMDALE EARL WILLIAM
QCD, $1.0.00, L4(K) MANATEE FARMS ESTATES #2, ETC
Grantee(s): ORENCHAK LINDA R, ORENCHAK JERRY A
Grantor(s): ALMDALE JO ANNE, ALMDALE EARL WILLIAM
WD, $120,000.00, L1(D) REPLAT OF A PORTION OF CEDAR KEY MO-
BILE HOME VILLAGE
Grantee(s): THOMAS NATALIE J, CRANDLEY WILLIAM R
Grantor(s): CAMPBELL MARY S, CAMPBELL PHILLIP A
QCD, $10.00, L KING RANCH OF FLORIDA RANCHETTES 1ST ADD
Grantee(s): SLAUGHTER RE-NE V, SLAUGHTER LYNN E
Grantor(s): DEEGAN BRIAN PATRICK
WD, $10.00, BDY 7-14-19, PARCEL #05320-000-00
Grantee(s): LEGLER RICHARD D
Grantor(s): WISE JEAN, WISE HAROLD L, WISE JEANNE
QCD, $10.00, BDY 32-13-18, PARCEL #04505-019-00
Grantee(s): CATLIN MICHELLE YVETTE, CATLIN JANELL NICOLE
Grantor(s): CATLIN ETHEL L
WD, $160,000.00, L3-6 WILLISTON SAVANNAH PHASE
Grantee(s): PARK PLACE ESTATES LLC


Grantor(s): JCM SMM RENTAL, MCMILLEN ENTERPRISES
WD, $425,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SE1/44-13-19, PARCEL #04956-001-00
Grantee(s): KIRBY LAURENCE, KIRBY MICHAEL O
Grantor(s): OCONNOR LAURA, OCONNOR ERNEST G
M, $340,000.00, BDY SEI/4 SE1/44-13-19, PARCEL #04956-001-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): KIRBY LAURENCE, KIRBY MICHAEL 0
M, $63,750.00, BDY SEI/4 SE1/44-13-19, PARCEL #04956-001-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): KIRBY LAURENCE, KIRBY MICHAEL 0
M, $25,000.00, BDY SEI/4 SW1/4 31-12-19 & L7,12, BDY L9-10(27) THE
C.S. NOBLE SURVEY OF THE CITY OF WILLISTON,I



A


Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): GEIGER REBECCA S, GEIGER BRANTLEY C
M, $32,100.00, L25(64) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s): ANDERSON CATHLEEN A, ANDERSON JAMES W JR
WD, $43,000.00, L46(10) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee(s): COTHRON CARLA MANN, COTHRON PHILLIP D
Grantor(s): FRISBY MARGARET R, FRISBY JOHN L
WD, $12,900.00, L19(30) OAK RIDGE ESTS SD
Grantee(s): AULET DALMA I, MIRANDA JUAN L
Grantor(s): H B HAYNE CORP
WD, $10.00, L3(75) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5, W/MH
Grantee(s): COPELTON ANTOINETTE, COPELTON DAVID
Grantor(s): COPELTON ANTOINETTE, COUCH LISA M, LARUSSO MA-
RIA I
AAA, $100,000.00, OR 724/551, 847/413, 896/818, 980/934, 980/938,
987/457, BDY 23, 26-13-18, ETC
Grantee(s): COMMUNITY BANK & TRUST OF FLORIDA
SGrantor(s): SHARP SARA PARKS, SHARP PAUL M
WD, $125,000.00, L45 TOM KNOTTS, BDY 33-16-16, PARCEL #13577-
000-00
Grantee(s): STEINBAUM SHARI, STEINBAUM LEONARD
Grantor(s): FLORIDA LAND OF DREAMS LLC
M, $71,047.00, L2,4(35) CHIEFLAND, W/MH
Grantee(s): AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY INC
Grantor(s): SANDERS YOLANDA, SANDERS DONNELL
WD, $39,995.00, L64(32) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N
Grantee(s): QUINTERO ELVIRA, ZAMBRANO LUIS FERNANDO
Grantor(s): AMERICAN PRIME LLC
M, $33,995.75 L64(32) RAINBOW.LAKES.ESTS SEC N
Grantee(s): AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor(s): QUINTERO ELVIRA, ZAMBRANO LUIS FERNANDO
E, $1.00, L19(12) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): TURBEVILLE DONNY L JR
E, $1.00, L3(1) THE FARMS @ WILLISTON #1
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): SPARKS WANDA K, SPARKS CHARLES W JR
E, $1.00, L9-10(12)SUWANNEE RIVER HGH
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): SWS PROPERTIES LLC
E, $1.00, L5(A) LIBBY HTS MH COMM
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): CRIBBS PHILLIS E, CRIBBS TIMOTHY W
E, $1.00, L5(1) CIRCLEK RANCH, ETC
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): BARKER INC, BARKER OSBORN
E, $1.00, L4NORTHWOOD HTS
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): CSS PROPERTIES LLC, STEWART C SHAWN
E, $1.00, L17-18(4) SHERWOOD FOREST
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): MCNEIL TANYA K, MCNEIL LARRY R
E, $1.00, L14(1) TISHOMONGO PLANTATION SD
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): NIPPER FAITH R, NIPPER MERRELL I
E, $1.00, L8-9(F) ELESTON ADD
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): DALLAS RUDOLPH
E, $1.00, L 17 FIVE OAK ACRES SEC 1
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): STATES DOTTIE LOU, STATES OLIVER L, STATES OLIVER
LEWIS
WD, $10.00, L35(4) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): STRICKLAND DONNA L, STRICKLAND SELBY WAYNE
Grantor(s): S WS PROPERTIES LLC
M, $62,500.00, L35(4) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS INC, SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC
Grantor(s): (s) STRICKLAND DONNA L, STRICKLAND SELBY W
E, $1.00, BDYNE1/4 SW1/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-277-00
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): MURILLO VIDA LUCERO
E, $1.00, L18-19(8) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): CORRELL PERRICONE GINNY, PERRICONE GINNY COR-
RELL, PERRICONE ARTHUR L
E, $1.00, BDY SE1/4 SW1/433-12-18, PARCEL #04253-003-00
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): PEREZ RAUL
E, $1.00, L8(K) CEDAR KEY SHORES REPLAT
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): GEORGE JAMES A, GEORGE TERESAA
E, $1.00, L8(C) GLENWOOD ESTS
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): KOONCE DEREK K
E, $1.00, L2 HENRY TAYLOR ADD
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): MACMILLAN CATHERINE B, MACMILLAN MICHAEL
E, $1.00, BDYNE1/4 SHIN 1-12-14, PARCEL #00870-014-00
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): GOLDING MARY R
E, $1.00, BDYN1/2 N1/216-11-14, PARCEL #00633-001-00
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): CLYATT LAND TRUST, CLYATT MONT
E, $1.00, BDYNE1/4 SW1/422-14-16, PARCEL #026621-001-00
Grantee(s): CENTRAL FLORIDA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC
Grantor(s): LIMBAUCH KATHRYN L, LIMBAUCH STANTON, LIMBAUCH
STANTON D
WD, $115,000.00, L18(17) AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY
Grantee(s): SCARPATI JENNIFER S, SCARPATI ANTHONY V
Grantor(s): FISCHER ELEANOR, FISCHER FRANCIS
M, $75,000.00, L18(17) AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY
Grantee(s): EQUITY MORTGAGE GROUP INC
Grantor(s): SCARPATI JENNIFER S, SCARPATI ANTHONY V
QCD, $10.00, L5(J) FOX GROVE FARMS SD
Grantee(s): LAING YVONNE D FOSTER
Grantor(s): SUMM INVESTMENT INC
M, $52,400.00, L5(J) FOX GROVE FARMS SD
Grantee(s): PERTNOY JOSHUA
Grantor(s): LAING YVONNE D FOSTER
WD, $4,500.00, L8(14) WILLISTONHGH#14
Grantee(s): WIX KIM J, WIX JAMES
Grantor(s): LAKE PROPERTY INVESTMENT GROUP OF NORTH FLOR-
IDA '
M, $15,000.00, L5(5) WOODPECKER RIDGE
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): WHITTLE SYLVIA I, WHITTLE GERALD L
QCD, $10.00, L24(6) OAK RIDGE ESTS, WIMH
Grantee(s): RUVIO DAVID L III
Grantor(s): RUVIO DAVID L
M, $55,000.00, BDYNE1/4 NE1/46-12-18, PARCEL #03998-014-00,
ETC
Grantee(s): NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s): GOSEIN ASTRID E, GOSEIN DOMINIC
WD, $6,000.00, L16-17(20) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SECTION
Grantee(s): LAND TRUST NO5, CLARK RICHARD TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): WORLEY DENISE D
WD, $6,000.00, L16-17(20) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SECTION
Grantee(s): CLARK RICHARD TRUSTEE, LAND TRUST NO5
Grantor(s): AKIN CLARA
QCD, $6,000.00, L16-17(20) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SECTION
Grantee(s): CLARK RICHARD TRUSTEE, LAND TRUST NO5
Grantor(s): MARTIN CAROL
AAD, $10.00, OR 681/32, 712/348, L10, 12 FANNING SPRINGS WOOD-
ED ESTS
Grantee(s): HENDRICKS LUCY J
Grantor(s): CHARLES B HENDRICKS REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DA-
VID MOWREY CONSTRUCTION, HENDRICKS CHARLES B TRUST, HEN-


DRICKS PATRICIA L
QCD, $10.00, BDY SE1/4 SE1/4 2-12-14, PARCEL #00545-000-00, ETC
Grantee(s): STALVEY MARY JANE, STALVEY WILLIAM H
Grantor(s): HOOKER BARBARA F, HOOKER DEAN
WD, $44,995.00, BDY L18(14) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N, ETC
Grantee(s): MOYA GERARDO
Grantor(s): AMERICAN PRIME LLC
M, $37,051.35 BDY L18(14) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N, ETC
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): MOYA GERARDO

More on page 19










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006


Page 19


Land Transactions
M, $4,499.00, BDY L18(14) RAINBOW LAKES ESTS SEC N, ETC
Grantee(s): AMERICAN PRIME LLC
Grantor(s): MOYA GERARDO
D, $10.00, BDY SE1/4 SW 1/4 3-12-17, PARCEL #03278-128-00, &
03278-088-00
Grantee(s): (ALONSO MOLINA CYNTHIA M, MOLINA CYNTHIA M
ALONSO, RANIERI CARMEN
Grantor(s): ALONSO BELQUIS ESTATE, MOLINA CYNTHIA M ALONSO,
ALONSO MOLINA CYNTHIA M
M, $110,000.00, L120 FOREST PARK UNIT 3 PHASE II
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK, MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): DZIEKAN MARY L
WD, $200,000.00, L4(58) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): BLOODWORTH SHANNON D, BLOODWORTH TIMOTHY M
Grantor(s): STEVE SMITH CONSTRUCTION INC
M, $204,300.00, L4(58) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA
Grantor(s): (s) BLOODWORTH SHANNON D, BLOODWORTH TIMOTHY
M-
M, $27,871.64 L87(7) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): SCOTT WILLIAM, GRAMS WILLIAM SCOTT
M, $38,849.39 L6(19) JB EPPERSON ADD TO WILLISTON
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): EDWARDS LAQUWANDA, EDWARDS LAJESKI, BROWN
LAQUWANDA
M, $79,088.42 BDYNE1/4 SW1/49-13-19, PARCEL #05157-000-00
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): ZAMORAAMIER, ZAMORA FELIX R
WD, $85,000.00, L1-3(6) SUWANNEE RIVER HTS
Grantee(s): HUDSON TONYA
Grantor(s): COX H FRANK TRUSTEE, COX SHELLEY A TRUSTEE, H
FRANK COX TRUST
M, $72,649.00, L1-3(6) SUWANNEE RIVER HTS
Grantee(s): AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): HUDSON TONYA
M, $13,500.00, L1-3(6) SUWANNEE RIVER HTS
Grantee(s): LEVY COUNTY
Grantor(s): HUDSON TONYA
WD, $5,000.00, L32(30) OAKDALE HTS
Grantee(s): KHUU LINH, PHAM LINH
Grantor(s): FINANCEALL LLC


AD, $42,000.00, LAM-1 GLEASONS TRAILER VILLAGE, W/MH
Grantee(s): CARRANZAGILMA Y
Grantor(s): DAILEY LAUREN J, DAILEY ROBERT L
M, $8,500.00, L 13(13) BRONSON HTS SD
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): (s) MCCHESNEY LAURA, ULLERY DIANNA
M, $73,044.83 L29 FOREST PARL UNIT 2
Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA INC
Grantor(s): ROSA BENJAMIN, MILLER DONNA F
WD, $194,000.00, L15(54) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): HAYNES ROBERT T JR
Grantor(s): VAN PELT MARGARET B, VAN PELT RONALD P
M, $144,000.00, L15(54) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): PROVIDENT FUNDING GROUP INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, PFG LOANS INC
Grantor(s): HAYNES ROBERT T JR
MMA, $25,000.00, DOCUMENT #452299, BDY N1/224-12-13
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): SIKES JODI L, SIKES CLAUDE E
M, $74,836.32 BDY 22-12-14, PARCEL #01039-000-00
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s): LEGGETT ESTHER M, LEGGETT HENRY L
WD, $8,000.00, L30(12) OAKDALE HTS
Grantee(s): LANDBANK LLC
Grantor(s): ROBERSON JOANNA S, ROBERSON SCOTT S
QCD, $10.00, L1, 9(4) CEDAR HAVEN ESTS
Grantee(s): BELCHER PEARL R, BELCHER PEARLE R
Grantor(s): BELCHER JESSE ALLEN
QCD, $10.00, L23(1) CEDAR HAVEN ESTS
Grantee(s): BELCHER PEARL R, BELCHER PEARLE R,
Grantor(s): BELCHER JESSE ALLEN, BELCHER PEARL R, BELCHER
PEARLER
AAA, $376,321.93 OR 740/919
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): WARE OIL & SUPPLY COMPANY INC
WD, $260,000.00, L30 MANATEE WOODLANDS, BDY 31-11-14
Grantee(s): STOUT CATHLEEN, STOUT DAN
Grantor(s): HOPE DOUGLAS 0
M, $182,000.00, L30 MANATEE WOODLANDS, BDY 31-11-14
Grantee(s): TREASURE COAST HOME TEAM FINANCING CORP
Grantor(s): STOUT CATHLEEN, STOUT DAN
M, $75,000.00, L30 MANATEE WOODLANDS, BDY 31-11-14
Grantee(s):' HOPE DOUGLAS
Grantor(s): STOUT DAN, STOUT CATHLEEN
WD, $85,000.00, L11 RAINBOW HTS SD PHASE 1
Grantee(s): MCHENRY JAMES ROBERT, MCHENRY ANA MARIA
Grantor(s): GARCIA ANA MARIA, MCHENRY ANA MARIA, MCHENRY


SHINE will help with Medicare questions


SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders), a
volunteer program under the Florida Department of Elder
Affairs, will be conducting short presentations on the changes-
in the 2007 Medicare Part D: Prescription Drug Plans and
one-on-one counseling/enrollment during the Annual
Open Enrollment of Nov. 15 through Dec. 31. This is your
opportunity to enroll or change plans or to unenroll from
the program for 2007. Only those who become qualified for
Medicare, Medicaid, or Extra Help or lose their personal
drug insurance or VA drug coverage will be able to enroll in
a Part D Drug Plan during the year.' There will be limited
circumstances allowed for changing plans starting Jan. 1.
Please bring your Medicare card and either your medication
S bottles or a list of your drugs with dosages and the quantities
you take daily.to any of-the following sites:
Levy Counjty
Bronson Library 600 Gilbert St.:
Saturday, Nov. 18 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 6 1:30-4 p.m.
Chiefland Senior Center 305 SW 1st St.:
Wednesday, Nov. 29 9 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 13 9 a.m.-noon
Williston Library 10 SE 1" St.:
Saturday, Nov. 18 10 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 6 9 a.m.-noon
Yankeetown Library 11 56t St.:
Wednesday, Nov. 15 10 a.m.-noon
Saturday, Dec. 9 10 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 20 10 a.m.-noon
Gilchrist County
Bell Library 1140 S Main St.
Monday, Dec. 11 10 a.m. -noon
Trenton Library 105 NE 11t Ave:
Wednesday, Nov. 22 9 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 27 9 a.m.-noon
Dixie County
Cross City Library Hwy 19 (next to Subway):
Wednesday, Nov. 15 2-4 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 22 2-5 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 27 2-5 p.m.
Anyone who is unable to come to one of these sites may
call 1-800-262-2243 and ask for the SHINE volunteer closest
to you. You can receive assistance by phone.














i t -il ,A -"" A Ic |


The state of Florida has gone from 44 stand alone drug plans
in 2006 to 57 plans for 2007. It is very important that you
consider all your options before choosing a drug plan for next
year. All plans have changed their pricing for the monthly
premium, deductible (if any) and their drugs. Anyone can go
to the website www.medicare.gov and run the plan comparison
tool to see which plans may best suit your medication needs.
If you are on a Part I Plan in 2006, go through the 'View Your
Current Plan' tool in the box on the right side of the screen.
This allows you to compare your current plan in 2007 prices
versus other plans in ascending order of your annual costs. If
you live in Florida only part of the year, be sure to look for a
plan that is national.
There was only one gap coverage plan in 2006. This plan no
longer will cover brand name drugs in the gap in 2007. Please
check-with SHINE or www.medicare.gov for gap coverage
plans.
You may have received a notice to re-apply or you can
still apply for extra help through Social Security. You may
be eligible for extra help in paying for the plan premium,
deductible and drugs without penalty. You must meet the
following, criteria to qualify:
Single Income is $14,700 or less; assets total $11,500
or less
Couple Income is $19,800 or less; assets total $23,000
or less
Assets do not count your home or your vehicles. They do
count your cash in the bank, CDs, stocks, bonds, cash value
on your life insurance or burial policies, and any additional
property. Ask for details and an application.
The drug pricing for those also on Medicaid or receiving
extra help is changing to:
If in 2006 you paid $1 generics/$3 brand names
In 2007 you will pay $1 generics/$3.10 brand names if in
2006 you paid $2 generics/$5 brand names
In 2007 you will pay $2.15 generics/$5.35 brand names
In 2007, Medicare Part B Premium is going from $88.50/
month to $93.50/month (except incomes over $80,000/yr-- it
will be higher). The deductible on Part B is going from $124
to $131. Part A deductible is going from $952 to $992 for a
hospital stay.
Please remember that if you are unable to come to a site,
you can call 1-800-262-2243.


, hie e"J3et 'amce" t' f '/ew atit & awnitu
kome on by and Browse Local Artists' Gallery of
Equine, Western ad Landscape Art "

Antique Consignmen NMONTANA URNI
fues.-Sat. 1lam-5pm .

^ behind iAixie' at 40 hW 16t St. in WiUitw


LUNCH: MONDAY-SATURDAY 11 AM-230 PM
DINNER: MONDAY-THURSDAY 5 PM-9 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
5 PM-10 PM
Private Di~din Rowom for Specdal OccasIo.s
Beer awd Wine
Ta4e-Osd awd Catering Servie AvawadO
Now serving Pizza and auzones
ow.TV Room is open so com wsatcA teo (Gam wA usl
Holiday Specials Coming Soon
115 N.W. First Street Trenton, Florida 352-463-8494


JAMES ROBERT
WD, $10.00, L6 RAINBOW HTS SD PHASE 1
Grantee(s): MCHENRY ANA MARIA, MCHENRY JAMES ROBERT
Grantor(s): MCHENRY JAMES ROBERT
CD, $10.00, OR 420/113, L7(62) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): COLLAZOS ADELAIDA, BOTERO CARLOS A
Grantor(s): WILLISTON GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB CORPORATION
WD, $20,500.00, L7(62) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTS
Grantee(s): COLLAZOS ADELAIDA, BOTERO CARLOS A
Grantor(s): MCCURDY DALE, MCCURDY WILLIAM W, MCCURDY CHAR-
LOTTE D
CD, $10.00, L25(36) OAK RIDGE.ESTS
Grantee(s):) DE JESUS JENNIFER, DE JESUS RAMON L, DEJESUS
JENNIFER, DEJESUS RAMON L
Grantor(s): MATOS MARIA, MATOS LUIS
CT, $100.00, 38-06-CC-187, L20(5) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee(s): RANDOLPH JOHN, RANDOLPH PAULA.
Grantor(s): CLERK OF COURT DANNY J SHIPP, ELLIOTT MARILYN,
TREST LEONARD EDWARD III, TREST MARILYN
WD, $73,400.00, BDYNE1/4 NE1/4 3-12-17, W/MH
Grantee(s): WATERS MARJORIE A
Grantor(s): RICHARDSON PENNY
M, $72,824.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 3-12-17, W/MH
Grantee(s): COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): WATERS MARJORIE A
M, $90,000.00, L4(3) PLEASANT ACRES, BDY 34-16-17
Grantee(s): BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s): SPRUILL ROY, SPRUILL DONNA
M, $134,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SW1/4 29-11-17
Grantee(s): HARBOR FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK
Grantor(s): BLANCO AMPARO, BLANCO GUSTAVO
WD, $1,000.00, L24(2) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): OCONNOR WILL, COLLINS JEFFREY L
Grantor(s): COLLINS JEFFREY L
WD, $1,000.00, L8-10(2)SUWANNEE RIVER HGH
Grantee(s): OCONNOR WILL, COLLINS JEFFREY L
Grantor(s): COLLINS JEFFREY L
WD, $1,000.00, L23(2) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s):) OCONNOR WILL, COLLINS JEFFREY L
Grantor(s): COLLINS JEFFREY L
M, $28,180.06 L68(10) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): BENEFICIAL FLORIDA INC
Grantor(s): VOWLES PATRICIA M, VOWLES LARRY S
M, $13,265.15 L7(3) WILLISTON HGH SD #14
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): MCCOY ALICE E, MCCOY RICHARD V

Couples apply for marriage licenses

Bernard Lewis Wallace, TanyaLynnPresley, 12/18/84
10/28/66, and DeeAnn of Archer
LeilaniAkina, 1/14/77, both Jesse Bryan Lambert
of Williston 7/28/82, of Floral City
RayAnthony Polk, 2/5/68, and Amber Lynn Martin
and Toni Lee Pitts, 11/22/61, 10/31/86, of Inglis.
both of Archer. William Earl Couey
Gary Dale Ridgeway, 4/12/85 of Chiefland, anc
9/11/69, and Deanna Amanda Lynn Lamb, 7/485
Chenille Wasner, 11/2/63, of Trenton.
both of Chiefland. ChristopherAngeloNieves
Ryan Mark Anders, 11/23/86, of Morriston, anc
9/11/80, of Leesburg, and Jessica Lynn Huggins, 7/1/88
Joy Leazeneth Harding, ofWilliston.
6/15/85, ofWilliston. Richard Gregory Smith
Curtis Dale StacyvlJ-r:c. .2/14/76,,and.. Joanna,. Lyr
4/9/85, of Bronson, and Tedin, 9/10/82, both o
SChiefland.


Lunch Menui
kihCardn n nndSal


French Fries
Buttered Corn
Chilled Mix Fruit
Asst. Milk
Tuesday, Nov. 21
Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce


"Care for the Entire Family"


Garden Salad
Green beans
Chilled Peaches
Homemade Rolls
Asst. Milk


TRI-COUNTY

CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. Bennitt Patterson


*Available on Location: X-Rays, Physical Therapy &
Licensed Massage Therapist (MM0007612)


Most Insurance Accepted:
* Most HMO's and PPO's
* Major Medical
* Medicare/Medicaid
* Personal Injury/Auto Accidents
* Workers' Compensation



493-1540
2220 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland
(Across from Wal-Mart Super Center)


OFFICE HOURS
Monday/ Wednesday/ Friday
9a.m.- Noon &2 p.m.-6 p.m.
Tuesday 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Thursday
8 a.m.- Noon& 2p.m.- 5p.m.


~ Walk-Ins Welcome -



N S4 =Sn ,
US 9 P


THlHK BEFORE yOU STRIKE.


S.5 5. ... PhI ~. ...........


Fill Dirt & Hauling
Located On South 21I-Williston, Florida

(352) 528-3520
Office @ B&G Seed
Other Contacts
(352) 339-4713, (352) 339-2704 or (352) 339-6435 (oader operator)








Page 20 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006

Be responsible with your pets especially during the holidays


BY LINDA KEARCE
SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL
Sometimes we think that giving our pet food, shelter and
love is enough. As responsible pet owners, we must also
protect our pets from the hidden dangers that come along with
this time of year.
Pets are highly sensitive to smells, which may bring
them into the kitchen where all the cooking is happening.
Be especially sensitive to Fido or Fluffy, as they might get


underfoot, when "Tom Turkey" is coming out of the oven.
Hot drippings or other hot spills could cause scalding or burns
to your pet.
DON'T FEED pets cooled drippings. The added spices
and rich stock can easily upset your pet's digestive system.
BONES ARE DANGEROUS! Poultry bones splinter-
easily each year causing thousands of pets pain and sometimes
death.
Increased activity and visitors around the home can upset


your pet's routine. Try to keep your pet on a regular feeding
and exercise schedule.
Try to resist the temptation of dressing up your pet with
ribbons around their necks. The ribbons can tighten if caught
on something and can result in choking.
Linda Kearce works with Trenton Animal Hospital in
Trenton.


[] I[] i[]t In tii i[] I 'lB i .l] lBn [1 i[] i[lKhil[ i[] liB K]: Bi
SBeautiful 4 BR/2.5 BA house in Williston
S at 21350 NE 40th Ave., 1,630 sq. ft. with
L carport & bonus room on large corner lot. It is
S2 miles east of City Hall on C.R. 318. Listed for ,
B $125,000, thousands under appraisal! SHIP
I down payment assistance for moderate E
income families on this house is $15,600. Call l
Florida U.S.A. Realty, Inc. 352-378-3783.


1hkhoseke itora es'rngdntcaidbeauwte
The construction consists of 2x6
exterior walls, and includes a water
system, alarm system. stainless steel
dishwasher, stainless steel kitchen sink
and a stainless steel double sink in
the laundry room' It has large pantry
and laundry room with wood cabinets,
separate ice maker machinein bar area,
oversized garage at 814 sq ft. with a
Sworkbench. pumphouse! Some
k -, 5 a furniture will remain in the home.
& All of this is in the Buck Bay subdivision!
$275,000
Brand new construction!
Custom built home n golf course
community. 30 year architectural
shingles, wood floors in kitchen and
entry, 36 inch kitchen cabinets, stainless
steel appliance package. Short drive to
Manatee Springs State Park Chiefland
Golf and Country Club. shopping
I ispe dl medical, and schools. A must see!
$219,000 -.






Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliams.com GOs LLIA
MOBILE HOMES: REAL ESTATE, INC.
Whitted Mobile Home Estates 3/2 DWMH on 2 lots,
screened porch; detached carport & more. Owner fin-
ancing to qualified buyer! -$69;00- Reduced! $62,500
Park-like 5 acres with 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000.
Waterfront 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land-
scaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well. $84R8 Reduced! $76,000.
New Listing-- 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600 s.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
New Listing HANDYMAN on 5 Acres. 3 BR, 2 Bath
Singlewide that needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500.
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $41-3;-0, Reduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres -just off U.S. Alt. 27. $4Qe2-600tReduced:
'$110,000
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85hO 0 Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $-19;00 per acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corner Parcel 80 Ac at corner of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$212-600 per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres -just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines -paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
City of Trenton Small residential building lot in town -
chain link fenced, nice lawn. $39,900
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $17,500
Whitted Mobile Home Estates -2 lots ready for your mo-
bile home. One w/ shed:-$1-5-500. Reduced! $13,000
2nd one:$4&;86e Reduced! $12,500
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $139,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront- 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal 3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


L ` '-'


S ARE YOU A N


SERIOUS SELLER?

IF YOU OWN REAL ESTATE & WANT MAXIMIZED VALUE
CONTACT YOUR CURRENT
QUIC L REAL ESTATE AGENT OR ANY
OF THE REAL ESTATE
PROFESSIONALS LISTED BELOW WHO CAN EXPLAIN
THE BENEFITS OF HAVING YOUR PROPERTY INCLUDED
IN THE UPCOMING.... ..... .. .......


r* k* ** GREAT ** *

- A RTH CENLTRALORIDA

.. AR ESTATE AUCTION!!!


*HAVE YOUR PROPERTY
EXPOSED TO MILLIONS OF
PEOPLE IN THE EASTERN
UNITED STATES
& INTERNATIONALLY
*READY AND WILLING
& ABLE TO BUY
*PRE-APPROVED FINANCING
FOR BUYERS
ALL TYPES OF PROPERTY


*NO SALES COMMISSION
*NO CLOSING COSTS
*NOMINAL LISTING FEE
$1,000 TO $4,000


HOUSES CONDOS
HOMESITES
ACREAGE TRACTS
WATERFRONT
COMMERCIAL


BEN CAMPEN

AUCTIONEERS


I iesdRa l Esa teBrke -B #1901-AU#21 -AB#218


IJR


To list your home or property, call

Laura at 486-2312.

We have prices to fit every budget.
.A


I








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006. Pge 21


Workshops will inform you on agribusiness


Agritourism and nature
tourism can take many
forms. Examples include
roadside stands, fahners'
markets, overnight farm
stays, ag tours, bed and
breakfasts, hunting, U-Pick
operations, pumpkin patches,
nature based operations,
aquaculture tours, Christmas
tree farms, corn mazes, farm
animal petting zoos and wine
tasting. These attractions can
bring profits never realized
through the traditional farm
and ranch operations of
growing and selling food and
fiber. The Original Florida
Task Force, University of
Florida, Suwannee River
Valley, and VISIT FLORIDA
Share sponsoring a series of
educational workshops that
Swill help farm and land
: owners, and aquaculture
: businesses create or









'- :
i,.
' a, /.

is s
.:: ,^^ B~ ~ ^


strengthen tourism businesses
to supplement their ongoing
farm operations.
For workshop information
or comments please contact
Linda Landrum at 386-362-
1725, ext. 105.
Three Workshops:
Workshop #1, Topic:
Overview of Agritourism and
Ecotourism Opportunities
Dec. 6 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
Stephen Foster Folk Cultural
Center, White Springs.
Workshop #2, The Nut
and Bolts of Starting an
Agritourism or Ecotourism
Business
Jan. 9, 2007 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,
Camp Weed, Live Oak.
Workshop #3: Show Me
The Money and Put it All
Together.
Feb. 7, 2007, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park, Live Oak.


These workshops are $10
per person and include lunch.
By completing all three
workshops agri/eco-tourism
providers are eligible to be
included in Original Florida's
forthcoming marketing an
promotion opportunities for
the region.
SponsoredbytheUniversity
of Florida IFAS North Florida
Research and Education
Center-Suwannee Valley


http://www.OriginalFlorida.
org and VISIT FLORIDA.
The Levy County Visitor's
Bureau hopes there are
businesses in Levy County
who are looking for ways to
improve their business or start
a new one. These workshops
will provide insight and new
ways to develop additional
income for agritourism and
ecotourism businesses.


LAND CLEARING
DRIVEWAYS, PONDS, RADINFRE ETIMTE
TRACTOR WORK, ROK & DIRT...
Call: (352) 406-1117


l: Bronson Library to host

poporn and movie
S: Bronson Public Library will host popcorn and a movie
Nov. 27-at 4p.m.
The. feature film.will be The Saga of Lightning Mc-
IQueen, a hot-shot animated stock-car voiced by actor
r Owen Wilson. In route to a big race, the cocky McQueen
. .gets waylaid in Radiator Springs, where he finds the true
meaningg of friendship and family.
!:! The film is rated G and runs 116 minutes.
' Contact the library 486-2015 or Jenny Rodgers Youth
servicess Coordinator 486-5552 for more information on
Ithbese exciting events.

0 I TMM I I I I


Low Rates Easy Terms
Personal & Commercial Auto Insurance
Home* Life* Commercial
Rapid Tax Returns
"Guaranteed Lowest Down Payment"


Z~~&~$zdY: -F~~_j~iS*; -.j


UL


Find your dream home in


r.




14


t.

<;

c,




I~


TURN THIS...


,.. INTO THIS!



Find your dream
home
in the
Marketplace!


4BR .p NEW US11NGI
-- Beautiful .36 Acres Lot off of
Hwy 27 in Bronson Heights Area!
4 BR/2.5 BA$392,000 Priced to Sell! $22,000
Natalie 219-8365 MLS#753746 Natalie 219-8365 MLS#754449
NEW CONSTRUCTION!
To See Your Home on




Give Us a Call


NEW USTINGI
Nice.24 Acres Lot in Bronson. Great
for your Mobile Home or Site Built
Home! Priced to SELU$20,000
Natalie 219-8365 MLS#754443


3 BR/2 BA $149,900 4BR/2 BA $191,900
Tom 317-27A7A MI CLt 7A5435 Tom 31.7-9476 MI Sf#754:3


Block 3 BR/2BA Home $229,000
Noemi 316-5644 MLS# 754076


OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 1:00-3:00PM
501 N.Court St., Bronson
Call Noemi for details
316-5644
Refrshments willbe served


LY COUNTY JOUR L
C4 JUNTY PAPER EST. 192


Call Laura to list your house in the
Marketplace. 352-486-2312


V~










Page 22 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006
IHousing
SMHousingContinuedfrom front

to allow for greater density development so the Roswell
complex plans can move forward.
Debra Jones' motion to approve the first reading of the
proposed ordinance received unanimous approval after be-
ing seconded by Jerry Robinson. Council will hear the second
reading of the ordinance Nov. 21. The developer is trying to
acquire additional acreage at this time, according to Garcia.
Nature Coast Business Development Council executive di-
rector Pam Blair updated council members on the enterprise
zone development strategic plan. Blair will present the plan to
the board of county commissioners Nov. 21 and will then sub-
mit it to the state. "We definitely have the attention from the
state," Blair told council. A decision is expected from the state
before January 1. If the plan is approved, the county can offer
inducements to potential businesses locating within specified
zones.
Levy County Health Department employee Slande Celeste
spoke before council, seeking to enlighten council members
about the health issues facing residents, and to gain participa-
tion in an ongoing group involved in improving the health
of area residents. Celeste runs the group RICH, or Reaching
to Improve Community Health, a consortium of individuals
and organizations that strives to increase health awareness
and forge partnerships between groups working to create a
healthier populace. RICH meetings are held at 9 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month at the Levy County Health De-
partment in Bronson.


MSchool


Continued from front


Administrative superintendent JeffDavis said various con-
struction projects were moving along. Board member Paige
Brookins moved and Mrs. Shuster seconded approval of a
blue roof for Chiefland Middle School's gymnasium roof.
The board also set an executive session to discuss ongoing
litigation with Juanita Terrell. A closed session will be held
Nov. 21 to discuss the lawsuit.


Journal photo by Cassie Journigan

FATHER AND SON Bill and Joshua Allen share a hard day of fishing at Fanning Springs. Said Dad, "It's just
not a good day for fishing. Wrong day, wrong place, orwrong time." Rejoined son, "Not one has bit since
morning." Still, with the sun, the warmth, the scenic beauty, neither was frowning.


Rural health takes front and center at Bronson meeting


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
Cardiovascular disease
is high on the list of health
problems confronting Levy
County residents. Combine
that with poverty, smoking,
obesity and lack of access
to health care and you have
a picture of common causes
of death faced by area resi-
dents.


Health Department rep-
resentative Slande Celeste
spoke to Bronson's town
council Nov. 6, seeking to
both enlightencouncil mem-
bers about the health issues
facing residents, and to gain
council participation in an
ongoing group involved in
improving the health of area
residents. "Rural counties
have a poorer health sta-


tus than larger counties. We
shouldn't settle for a poor
health status," Celeste said.
The health department
hosts a committee that aims
to bring a better health out-
look to area residents. RICH,
or Reaching to Improve Com-
munity Health, is a group
of individuals and organiza-
tions that strives to increase
health awareness and forge


partnerships between groups
working to create a healthier
populace. "The purpose of
the group," Celeste said, "is
to get everyone who is inter-
ested involved in working for
better community health..
"Levy County overall has a
high poverty rate and limited
access to health care. Bron-
son's health department has
two providers and an over-


whelmed caseload," Celeste
said. She added they are cur-
rently unable to take on new
cases due to a lack of money
and space. "We are hoping
to increase awareness, and
by offering prevention pro-
grams, to give people alterna-
tives," she said.


RICH meetings are held at
9:00 a.m. the second Tuesday
of each month at the Levy
County Health Department in
Bronson. Both the public and
local government leaders are
invited to attend. For more
information call Celeste at
493-6774.


Little Women held over


SPolice


Little Women; a production of the Suwannee Valley Players
will be held over one additional weekend Nov. 17-19.
Shows on Fridays through Saturdays begin at 8 pm and on
.ntiedfrom front Sundays at 2:30 pm. Ticket prices are $8 for adults and $6
for students with ID. For more information, log onto www.
svplayers.com.


Journal pnoto Dy cassie Journigan
COMMISSIONERS RECOGNIZED RECREATION committee members who worked on the renovation of
Buie Park. Pictured are Rollin Hudson, Blake Davis, Shane Keene, Wayne Weatherford, Buie family mem-
ber Edith J. Williams, Jennifer Willis, Alice Monyei, Teal Pomeroy and Teresa Barron. Members honored
but not present include Dorothy Scott and Myron Watson.


department, should be do-
ing."
The ordinance will be ta-
bled until the Nov. 27 meet-
ing.
Chiefland commissioners
read a resolution officially
renaming a city street in hon-
or of resident Eddie Buie at
Monday's city commission
meeting. Noting Buie's de-
votion to his community, the
resolution sets aside South-


west 5t Street, from South-
west 4h Avenue to the city
boundary as Buie Park Road.
The city will now forward the
proclamation to the county
and request their reciprocal
action.
Albert Karsky presented
his water bill and asked com-
missioners to reconsider the
amount charged.
He was charged approxi-
mately $1,680 for 607,000


gallons of water. The figures,
which showed up in his Octo-.
ber bill, reflected a slow leak.
Since several times during the
past six months, his meter was
either not read or registered
incorrectly at zero.


Tthe city manager has
agreed to look into the prob-
lem. Commissioners will de-
cide how to administer the
bill at the next council meet-
ing.


FANNING SPRINGS FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS
18thAnnual
FANNING SPRINGS STATE PARK, FANNING SPRINGS, FLORI)A
DECEMBER 9,2006
EVENTS INCLUDE: Arts, CraftsAmusement Rides, Christmas Boat Parade, Rubber Ducky Race,
classic Car Show, Santa Claus, Good Food, Games, Motorcycle Showcase, Special Country & Gospel
Music, Christmas Carols. Drawings for prizes donated by local merchants and much more.
NAME
ADDRESS
TEL. FAX E-MAIL
(Only so many 110V electric hookups available, apply early,.or provide own generator)
DEAD LINE TO ENTER December 4, 2006
ARTS & CRAFTS ENTRY S35.00 TYPE
Absolutely NO Commercial Arts & Crafts permitted
No of Booths 15'X15'_ Need Electric? 110V only Yes No
FOOD CONCESSION ENTRY S100.00 TYPE
Need Electric? 110V only Yes No_
No of Booths 15'X15' Send picture, copies of Insurance & Permits & Menu
BOAT PARADE ENTRY $20.00 Length of Boat Type
1st, 2nd & 3rd place winners in small, medium and large categories. Parade @ 6:30 PM
I will provide my own insurance and other business needs. I and my associates will hold harmless the
Fanning Springs Chamber of Commerce and Festival of Lights, and all those associated with it in any
manner what-so-ever, including but not limited to, accidents & theft. I will abide by all Festival and
State Park rules and regulations. No Knives, Guns & Ammo or Fire Works permitted.

Signature
Mail to: Fanning Springs Chamber of Commerce & Festival of Lights
17456 NW US Hwy 19,
Fanning Springs, Fl 32693
(Send stamped envelope for confirmation).
Sponsored by: Fanning Springs Greater Chamber of Commerce, Festival of Lights, Inc. Committee,
City of Fanning Springs and Progress Energy
Phone 352-463-9089 or 352-463-7919 for information
Visit us @f www: fanningspringsllorida.com e-mail: fanningspringschamber@masn.com
"COME CELEBRATE WITH US"


Apply for HELP, the
HOLIDAY EXPRESS LOAN PROGRAM*
when you purchase a Year-End Tax Planner!
*Get a loan of $400 between Nov. 13 and Dec. 19.
* Purchase your custom Year-End Tax Planner. We'll
estimate your refund amount and show you how the
new tax laws may affect your tax situation.
* Bring your most recent pay stub(s) & two forms of ID,
one with a photo (e.g. driver's license & Social Security card).


IACKSON HEWIT'
ITACKAX ERUICE
Call 1-800-234-1040 or visit

102. N MAIN ST. CHIEFLAND 352-493-2855
OPEN NOW LOCATED IN CHIEFLAND RIGHT
NEXT TO BELL'S FAMILY RESTAURANT.
:u l IDo r -a l fT wO r' w(0 l A aril.'. ', ll o r0i..1 'il ,I l..1. .1 Iiu I j lq ,l C '1 ,r' I*
of YearEnd Tax Pla(mn roquir d. Lon provided by HSBC Rnk USA. N.A or bfa Bira Bnarra OonR &Tu a oom
PatlK Capitl Bank. NA loan m Ut s $6tM0 for pre approvd cusa & NtO0 Iotlll O rr erppOanlt Brank &
don HeWlitt feesded td from lowM proeeds Availabl from 1 i 3wo5 t hlioo ) h1 a rtO poidpfing) iocatlorK
Most ofircs are indeperdetpe ly ownedA wprat


When They're Gone.. Lagau


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