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Levy County journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00095
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Creation Date: November 9, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579546
oclc - 33129639
notis - ADA7392
lccn - sn 95026738
System ID: UF00028309:00095

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Around Levy County
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 5
        page 6
    Main: Obituaries
        page 7
    Main: Sports and Recreation
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 13
    Main: Classified and Legals
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
    Main: Around the Courthouse
        page 17
    Main: MarketPlace
        page 18
    Main: Around Levy County continued
        page 19
    Main continued
        page 20
Full Text









L EY COUNT JOUR A

COUE 0 TY PAPE ES 1 9 2


VOL. 83, NO. 18

INSIDE


0 e ,./


50 cents per copy


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,20061 SECTION: 20 PAGES


REBELS WITH A CAUSE


Taxpayers tell BOCC they can't survive tax hike


We Salute Veterans
Pages 13,20


Book Fair
Page 13

OBITUARIES

I
Eunice Brewton
Jim Brooks
Bonnie Hardee
Dan Lucero
Donna McDonald
Charles Nobles


CONTENTS...



Around Levy 2-3,5,6, 13
Opinion 4
Law & Courts 5
Obituaries 7
Sports 8-12
Tides 11
Levy History 14
Classified 14
Legals 14-16
Land Transactions 16-17
Marketplace 18-19
Election Results 20


r-3O T

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BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-The threat of a
tax revolt hung in the Bronson
air Tuesday after a half dozen
people pled for relief from
the county commissioners.
Bill Phillips, chief
spokesman for the group
of disgruntled taxpayers,
asked for a compromise on
the millage rate. He cited
last year's budget increase
of 18 percent and this year's
increase of 26 percent as too
much, stating, "I can't run my
business like that."
Phillips said his taxes are
up 50-60 percent over last
year and he and his wife
aren't sure where the money
will come from to pay them.
"How can you budget for
the unknown?" He asked then
chided the commissioners,
"Shame on you for not
listening to us Sept. 11. It's
like you put your fingers
in your ears and went blah,
blah, blah while people were
speaking."
Phillips called the increased
budget and 7.91 millage rate
legalized extortion and said
the commissioners' move
would undoubtedly bankrupt'
some. He said the higher
taxes will cause some Cedar
Key merchants to close their
businesses. Phillips also
pointed out that per capital,
the income in Levy County
is $20,000 annually, 'over
$11,000 behind the rest of the
state.
"You don't get this many
at a regular board meeting
on a Tuesday morning or an


Journal photo by Carolyn Risner


SCORES OF UNHAPPY taxpayers, many wearing shirts that said "Levy County Tax Rebels"', packed the
county commission meeting Tuesday to plead for mercy. They were told the process is too far gone to
change anything for this year.


election day during work
hours unless they're boiling
over," he said referencing the
audience that not only filled
the commissioners' meeting
room, but overflowed into the,
hall and foyer.
Jimmy Statham followed
Phillips and called for fiscal
responsibility. "We trusted
you when we elected you.
We want to trust you again,"
he said, calling for county


government to live within its
means.
Bruce Wilson posed the
question to Commissioner
Sammy Yearty, "Had property
values not gone up the way
they did, ho\\ would the
county have managed?"
Yearty said the county
would have made do, the way
it had in the past.
S"Every dollar comes out of
someone's pockets," Wilson


said. "This is real money
coming from real people--
your neighbors." Wilson said
it was as if the county had
won the lottery. "People are.
bleeding the money and you
find a way to spend it," he
said.
Williston's Dave Bibby
again spoke on behalf of
senior adults, many of
whom are unable to retire
due to the rising costs of


healthcare and taxes. He
urged the commissioners to
find avenues for a broader tax
base by having an economic
development plan.
"And when we go to Cedar
Key to enjoy ourselves," he
warned, "we'll be going into
a ghost town. Cedar Key will
be the first victim."
Judy Paradiso, owner, of

See Revolt Page 20


BOCC changes non-agenda item policy


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-Discrepancies in the policy to hear
non-agenda items were cleared up Tuesday when
the county commissioners adopted a clear one to
replace the vague policy on the books.
County Coordinator Fred Moody said the policy
in the commissioners' books states that non-agenda
items can be heard if they are "accepted by motion."
Moody said it was unclear what that meant.


Varoom!


Chairwoman Nancy Bell referenced minutes
from a Jan. 16, 2001 meeting that said non-agenda
items must be agreed upon by a unanimous vote.
It was the same case last month when Bell
at first refused to hear a non-agenda item from
Commissioner Sammy Yearty. At that meeting,
Yearty asked something be heard because it was
time-sensitive but Bell opposed his request. After a
few minutes of debate, she conceded and the issue
was heard and voted on.


Susan Haines, now in the county attorney's
office, was the one who presented the information
back in 2001. She told the commissioners Tuesday
that it was a workshop and the information was
presented to show what other counties were
doing.
Bell cut Haines off in mid-sentence, telling her,
"I know, Susan. I have it right here."

See Policy Page 20


Levy says no to


tax referendum


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

AFTER SEVERAL bridesmaid finishes this year, Robbie Cooper leads the
pack wire to wire at his home town track. For more on the race, see page. 10.


REACH US

Managing Editor
Carolyn lisner
Phone
(3521490-4462


Fax
(3521490-4490 Chleland
(3521488-5042 Bronson
Email
edltor@levylounal.com
Address
P.. Ox 159 Bronson, F 32621-0159
P.O. Box 2990 CleflMni. FL 32644-2990


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
Not quite half of Levy
County's registered voters
participated in 'Tuesday's
general elections. Of the
24,141 voters registered,
11,447-just over 47
percent- voted. Many of
those stood in pouring rain
while waiting their turn at the
polling stations.
The following.are elections
results as of press time.
Numbers are presented to the
nearest tenth of a percent:
Stan Griffis with 50.4
percent of the vote held a
photo finish lead over Steve
Pennypacker with '49.6
percent in the run for eighth


SUBSCRIBE
Lev, Dixie and Glchrist counties
$17
In-state
$22
Out ofstate
$27
Locally owned and operated!


circuit court judge. Griffis,
a resident of Levy County,
received just over 59 percent
from Levy County voters.
Voters rejected the
lone county referendum
which would have allowed
commissioners the authority
to grant property tax
exemptions to new businesses
and expanding existing
businesses. Nearly 61 percent
of voters said no.
Democrat Bill Nelson will
keep his U.S. Senate seat after
receiving 61 percent of the
vote. Republican Katherine
Harris sought to oust him.
Republican Ginny Brown-
See Vote Page 20


The Levy County Journal
believes In good stewardship of
the land. That's why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


asl









Page 2 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL AROUND LEVY COUNTY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER, 2006



First grade holds game Co mu0ty C en

show family night

Students and parents at Brorison Elementary got a taste of
Hollywood game shows at the latest Family Learning Night.
On Thursday, Oct.26, the first grade team hosted a fun-filled
evening of learning games designed like those on television.
Students got a chance to participate in some friendly competi-
tion with their parents as they played Jeopardy, complete with
buzzers and specially designed math questions flashing on a .
monitor. r I Thursday, Nov. 9
"The kids and parents had a great time together and the Friends of the Library, Chiefland, 11 a,m.
electronic game system added just the right touch of fun and ---- Family Fun Night, BES, 5:30 p.m.
realism," said Candace DeBerry, a first grade teacher. Donna -Memorial Service, Haven Hospice, 6 p.m.
Loudermilk displayed a low-tech version of the same game Friday, Nov. 10
that she uses in her classroom to review key points taught I0-Italian dinner, Yankeetown, 4 p.m.
during the week. "The kids love it and it is so easy for me. Saturday, Nov. 11
I just write down key questions from different subject areas. O P rQuilt Exhibit, DudleyState Farm, 9 a.m.
Then when it's time to review, we have a -great game!" said MemoGirl Scout Bash, Black Prong
Loudermilk. Ir Veterans Day ceremony, Williston, 6 p.m.
Parents were thrilled to learn that that they could go to the I Monday, Nov. 13
Title I Parent /Teacher Resource Lab and get their own game Relay for Life meeting, Chiefland, 6 p.m.
for home. The team displayed several other resources that are 4 Tuesday, Nov. 14
available to parents from the lab. ,O '-UMC Bazaar, Bronson, 10 a.m.
Students and parents also enjoyed counting games, mul- o-Book Fair, Bronson, 2:30 p.m
tiplication toss, face painting, and book character dress-up. Photos courtesy of Salinda M. Nobles Thursday, Nov. 16
"I think the night was a wonderful success. We gave parents HiSRWMD, Mayo, 8:30 a.m.
some ideas for working with their kids at home, there was O Transportation board, Williston, 10 a.m.
something here for everyone, and we had fun in the process," .TExceptional Parents meeting, Bronson, 6 p.m.
said first grade teacher, Dianne Bedford. E Ombudsman Council, 12:30
The next Family Learning Night, hosted by the Special Saturday, Nov. 18
Area Team, is Thursday, Nov. 9, from 5:30-7 p.m. .. Toys for Tots Bike Ride, Chiefland, 10 atm.
Op-Craft sale, Crystal River, 9 a.m.
>Thanksgiving dinner, Bronson, 11 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 24
NQuilt show, Chiefland, 8 a.m.
Detailed descriptions of these events are contained
elsewhere in the 4evy County Joumal.


Tourism board to meet
The Levy County Tourist Development Council will meet
on Thursday, Nov.30, 2006 at 6 p.m. at 380 South Court
St., Bronson, Florida Levy County Planning and Attorney
S, Conference Room.

AT BRONSON ELEMENTARY, Gaby Derrico and Relive yesteryear at
her mom enjoy a counting game (1). FAITH HEATH
and Austin Homan play Multiplication Toss with a OUr COunty libra
-,. ."-- BES volunteer (2)..KATIE BEDFORD gets her face yr library
iA ... ,painted (3), and 1ST.GRADE TEACHER Donna Lou-
dermilk explains a Jeopardy game she uses in her Meniories of days gone by will be the therieat The Chief-
classroom (4). land Public Library on Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 10:30 a.m.
to noon. The same topic will be discussed at the Williston
Public Library on Thurs., Nov. 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, as
previously announced.


..-M D R ...1 -30,. .











DINNR-.MONDAY.TI.lRSDAY 5.PM-9,P. -




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...... ...._ 4P







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FR,.Y ,- -..._7 S- ..


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Sad but true. Everyone else is a branch of a larger bank based miles
from here. There is a difference. Give us a call and we'll help you move
-P voite Di Roomli Speda Ocou your account and even pay for your first order of checks.
. ansO a tdaotis sec eaeo DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK


Holiday Specials Coming Soon
115 N.W. First Street Trenton, Florida 352-463-8494


Member F.D.I.C.










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Restoration will begin on Lutterloh building


Cedar Key Historical Society secures $50K grant


CEDAR KEY-The Cedar
Key Historical Society has
been awarded a $50,000
planning grant from the
Florida Department of
State, Division of Historical
Resources. The grant is for the
restoration of the Lutterloh
building which houses the
Cedar Key Historical Society
museum.
The historic building,


built by John B. Lutterloh in
1871, has withstood several
hurricanes but has developed
major structural problems
that do not meet current
building codes. The building
will be lost to the community
if its deteriorated condition is.
not addressed.
The Cedar Key Historical
Society established the
museum in 1979 in the


Lutterloh building and the
Andrews House was added in
1995.
The two buildings house
exhibits depicting and
explaining Cedar Key's rich
history. These exhibits include
Cedar Key's involvement in
the Civil War, its maritime
history, the Florida railroad,
the lumber industry, including
cedar processing for pencil


manufacturing, the palm fiber
and brush industry '.and the
seafood industry.
There are replicas of the
Seahorse Key lighthouse, the
city pier, as it appeared in
the late 1880s and 1930s and
the 19th century steamboats.
The museum also displays
many old photographs and
it is custodian of extensive
historical archives.


The Society sponsors
monthly historical talks
from October through April
(except December) free to
members and open to the
public. The museum features
self-guided walking tours and
guided tours can be arranged
by phoning the museum at
352-543-5549. Its website is
www.cedarkeymuseum.org.
The museum attracts more


than 8,000 visitors annually
and is therefore an economic
as well as an educational
and cultural asset to the
community. Open hours are
1 to 4 p.m. Sunday through'
Friday and 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. on Saturday. During
the restoration, the historic
Andrews House .with its
railroad, fiber and brush and
medical exhibits will remain
open to the public.


.
TWO SOURCES disagree about what this building was. It was either the Or-
ange Hill School or the Orange Hill Church. Perhaps it was both. Information
to settle the question would be greatly appreciated.


Levy students walked to school in mud


"When I was your age, I had to walk five
miles to school in the snow..." So goes the line,
or something like it, that children have heard
for generations. Instead of walking in snow in
Levy County, however, trudging students were
more likely to struggle through mud. Roads in
the,early 20thcentury were dirt.
Florida's school bus system began in 1925.
Before that time, children in Levy County
walked to school or traveled there on horse-
back or by horse and buggy. Orange Hill
School, a two-room schoolhouse, was where
many youngsters from the farm community
started their formal school training.
If the building was still standing in 1941, it
was probably demolished to make way for the
U.S. Army Airbase built at Montbrook. The
school was located in the northwest corner of


the woods at the entrance to the air base.
Do any readers have more information
about the Orange Hill School? More impor-
tant, will your or your grandparents' child-
hood memories be in the upcoming history
of Levy County?
SEach of us has, a story about life in Levy
County way back when. The new book,
Levy County: Voices From the Past, will be
poorer without your story.
Make sure your memories and those
of others in your family will be included.
Send them to Levy Book, P.O. Box 402,
Morriston FL 32668 or e-mail them to shp.
levybook@yahoo.com. Questions? For an-
swers, e-mail or call author Drollene Brown
at (352) 465-4862. Don't delay! Deadline is
Dec. 15, 2006.


Scouts collect goods for our military


Over 100 local Girl Scout
will participate in the second
annual Barnyard Bash at
the Black Prong Equestrian
Center on Saturday, Nov. 11.
As part of the event, Girl
Scouts will collect goods
to send overseas to active
military personnel serving in
Iraq and Afghanistan.
Girl Scouts from Levy,
Dixie and Gilchrist counties
will come together for the
Barnyard Bash where they
will enjoy hayrides, compete
in a pumpkin caving contest,
build a bonfire and participate
in many other fun activities.
"Barnyard Bash is one of
many exciting activities that
we have planned for the girls


for this year," says Lindsay
Fox, Membership Specialist
for the Girl Scouts of Gateway
Council.
"We like to combine
community service with
our activities because it
teaches our girls to be
responsible members of their
community."
Photo Frost in Williston
has agreed to help ship some
of the supplies to the soldiers.
Any other businesses
interested in helping. with
the cost of shipping should
contact Lindsay Fox at 866-
868-6307.
For more information about
the Barnyard Bash, how to
make donations, and how to


get involved with Girl Scouts,
please contact Lindsay Fox at
866-868-6307.
Girl Scouts of Gateway
Council, Inc. serves more
than 17,000 girls and 7,000
adults in 16 counties in North
Florida.
Membership is open to all
girls grades K-12 and adults
age 18 or older, regardless
of race, color, ethnicity,
creed, national origin, socio-
economic status, or ability.
For information on
registering a girl or
volunteering your time
and talents with local Girl
Scouts, contact Girl Scouts
of Gateway Council, Inc. at
866-868-6307.


News Briefs


Quilters will honor
veterans
Dudley Farm Historic State
Park will host "A Tribute to
Veterans" Saturday, Nov. 11
from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at its
Newberry Road location.
Presented by the Quil-
ters of Alachua County Day
Guild, the day will feature a
display of patriotic themed
quilts, quilt documentation,
demonstrations and a silent
auction.
For more information
contact: Joy Avery at 352-
215-4761.
Exceptional parents
to meet Nov. 16
The quarterly meeting of
the Levy County Exceptional
Student Parent Advisory
Committee will take place
on Thursday, Nov. 16 at the
Levy County School Board
Room in Bronson from 6-8
p.m.
Atthis meting, the presenter
will be Donita Burke, Levy
County's Learning Resource
Specialist.
The Jpit of her
presentation will be, "KISS-
Keep it Simple Strategies.
Burke. will discuss strategies
that parents can use to help
their children if the children
are having difficulties in any
of the five areas of reading.
For more information or
questions please contact
Josie Crooms at 528-4359 or
Josiecrooms@aol.com.

Relay Kickoff
planned
The 2007 Chiefland Relay
for Life Planning Committee
will hold its 'Team Kickoff
Meeting on Monday, Nov. 13
from 6 to 7 p.m. at Capital City
Bank, located at 2012 North
Young Blvd. in Chiefland.
For more .information
please call American Cancer
Society Staff Partner Jamie
Bellamy at 1-888-295-6787,
Ext. 119.

Vet to be honored
The relatives and
descendants of Timothy
Peterson (1835-1914), will
hold a memorial service at the
Sand Pond Family Cemetery
on Saturday, Nov. 11 at 11
a.m. Peterson, a veteran of
the Civil War, served in both
the Confederate and Union
armies.


The ceremony will be under
the direction of Commander
Ed Page, ^.,
Ocala Sons
of Union
Veterans and
Commander
John P.
Deakins,
Col. John
Marshall Martin
Camp 730, Sons of
Confederate Veterans.
The Sand Pond Family
Cemetery is located on SE
125th Lane, 1/2 mile east of
CR 337 and 2 miles north
of CR 336, Tidewater, Levy
County, Florida. The public
is invited to attend and a
light lunch will be. served
by the family following the
ceremony. Sandwich meats,
cheese and drinks will be
provided but we ask that
those who attend bring a
covered dish and a chair.
For more information or
questions, please call Mrs.
Euneda (Peterson) Brass at
(352) 489-4281.

NMemorial service,,
slated
Haven Hospice in Chief-
land will hold an Evening of
Remembrance Memorial Ser-
vice at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov.
9 at the center at 311 NE 9th
St., Chiefland.
"The holidays are special
times when we join with
family and friends to cel-
ebrate seasonal traditions," a
spokesman said. "But they
also have a way of reminding
us of our grief. While usually
filled with joy, these days can
be very difficult to face after
the death of a loved one. Join
us for a time of sharing and
support at our bi-annual me-
morial services."

Transportation
board to meet
The Levy County
Transportation
Disadvantaged Coordinating
Board will meet on Thursday,
Nov.16, at 10 a.m at the
Williston City Hall, located at
50 N.W. Main St., Williston.
The board meeting will be
open to the public.
If you have any questions
you may contact Douglas
J. Correia, senior planner at
dcorreia@wrpc.cc or call at
352-732-1315 ext. 235.


Commodity
distribution set
USDA Commodity
Distribution for Levy County
will be at the following
locations at the designated
time:
Nov. 9- Town Of Inglis,
Community Center, from 1-2
p.m.
Nov. 11 Chiefland,
Methodist Church, 707 Main
St., 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Nov. 15 Williston, Lions
Club, 1-2:30 p.m.

SRWMD sets
meetings
On Thursday, November
16 the Suwannee River
Water Management District's
Governing Board will meet
at 8:30 a.m. at the Lafayette
County Commission Room,
Mayo.
The meeting is to consider
district business and conduct
public hearings on regulatory
and land acquisition matters.
A Governing Board
workshop will begin at
2:30 p.m. at the Fiddler's
Restaurant, 1306SE'Riverside
Drive, Steinhatchee.
On Friday, Nov. 18, the
Suwannee River Water
Management District's
Governing Board will meet
at 8:30 a.m. at the Fiddler's
Restaurant for a District
Programs Workshop.
All meetings, workshops,
and hearings are open to the
public.

Music at the library
Friends of the Williston
Public Library will present
a musical of local talent in
concert, Thursday, Nov. 30,
at 7 p.m. in the library.
Dr. Lou Jensen will direct
Heidi Schwiebert on guitar
and vocal, Lisa Posteraro on
piano, Wyeth Read and Fritz
Junker on violin. Dr. Jensen
will play reeds and do vocals.
This will be a program of big
band standards, a classical
piece or two and a sing-along
to provide an entertaining and
fun evening.
Music lovers should mark
their calendars for this night.


Email your news to
editor@levyjournal.com
If it matters to you,
it matters to us.


L COUNTnY JO L
S1 HE t'OUNTY PAPER EST. I9aKI I-.
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state ............. .............. $22
Out of state ...... ........... ...... ..$27
Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadlinefor all news and advertising copy is 5 p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


Service Van Available To Handle Your
Plumbing Needs and Make House Calls.




Levy & Gilchrist Co. (352) 493-3801
Dixie Co. (352) 498-0703 (352) 210-
0062
Licensed*Insured'Free Estimates
SWalter Freeman State Certified
Master Plumber #CF057595
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Page 3









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


YOUR VIEW


Time to make a difference
To the editor:
Today thinking about our town, I was trying to take an
honest look at the community. How are our children doing?
How are the youth? What about our single parents? What
about the broken marriages?
Then the real questions, what can I do to make a
difference? According to Thorn S. Ranier "The Bridger
Generation", the generation-between 1927 and 1945-65
percent of America was a Bible based believer.
The baby boomer generation which was people born
between 1946-1964 had 36 percent Bible-based believers.
Now the Bridger's or millennial's born between 1984 now
have only 4 percent a Bible-based believer.
Now I know that I am not a rocket scientist, however, it
doesn't take one to realize now is the time to do something
different. Isn't it time to gather together in one accord and
make a difference in our community?
Ask yourself everyday, what have I done to make a
positive difference for my town. Now is the time, reach out,
show love. and make a difference.
Chuck McCollum
New Beginnings Fellowship

Our roots are in agriculture
To the editor:
This Thanksgiving Day, as we gather with family and
friends to count our blessings, let's give thanks for the
bounty we enjoy not just on this holiday, but every day. The
safe, plentiful food that is available to us, and the products
used to produce the clothing, housing, medicines, fuel and
other productsmwe use on a daily basis, didn't just appear in
a store. They got there thanks to a tremendous partnership of
farmers and ranchers, processors, brokers, truckers, shippers,
advertisers, wholesalers and retailers.
In appreciation of this farm-city partnership, the President
of the United States annually proclaims the week leading up
to and including Thanksgiving Day as National Farm-City
Week. On the seven days leading to and including Thanks-
giving Day, Farm-City Week is celebrated nationwide. What
are we celebrating? The American economy is strong thanks
to the interdependence of farms and cities.
As the president of the Levy County Farm Bureau, I
would like to encourage local residents to take a moment
this holiday season to appreciate the partnership that makes
our food supply safe, affordable and abundant.
Rural and urban residents are "Partners in Progress" who
produce the products, pgsume the products, and make them
readily available throughan efficient.production and market-:
ing chain. Farmers and ranchers are just the beginning of
that chain. Farm workers, researchers, processors, shippers,
truck drivers, inspectors, wholesalers, agribusinesses, mar-
keters, advertisers, retailers and consumers all play impor-
tant roles in the incredible producti\ity that has made our
nation's food and fiber system the envy of the world.
Levy CLounty has deep roots in agriculture. All of our best-
known festivals have their basis in agriculture. From Wil-
liston's peanuts to Chiefland's watermelons and even Cedar
Key's seafocLd, these events bring folks together to celebrate
harvestng of our locally grown commodities.
Here in Levy County there are nearly 900 farms with
about ] S0,314 acres in agricultural production. Levy ranks
fifth in the state in value of livestock and second in the state
or the \alue of aquaculture items produced.
The county also ranks first in the amount of corn produced
for silage, second in the number of acres'of peanuts planted
and sixth for amount of acreage used for forage.
Total receipts from the sale of crops and livestock in Levy
County rose to $83 million in 2002 based upon a report
released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis at the U.S.
Department of Commerce. This was a nearly 50 percent
increase from the value in 1997, the last time the census of
agriculture was conducted.
Neither the farm nor the city can exist in isolation. In-
stead, the interdependence of the two creates jobs, products,
markets and relationships that make our economy and nation
strong. Join with us in recognizing Levy County agricultural
producers and allied industries and the contributions they
make to the economy.
Next week, as we celebrate Thanksgiving, let's remem-
ber the vital farm-city partnerships that have done so much
to improve the quality of our lives. Rural and urban com-
munities working together have made the most of our rich
agricultural resources, and have made significant contribu-
tions to our health and well-being and to the strength of our
nation's economy. For this, we can give thanks.
Brad Etheridge, President
Levy County Farm Bureau


--

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dew


Our brave new world ofpol


W e live in strange
political times.
Remember
the elections of 2000?
Thousands of votes were
thrown out because of
hanging chads.
The chads, elections
officials assured us,
prevented accurate vote
counting. Butterfly ballots
were said to be a problem.
So difficult for people to use,
more difficult to determine
what voters intended when
they punched holes beside
candidates' names.
The solution? Expensive
touch-screen machines.
I have problems with
the new machines. I'm not
alone. My husband, who has
computer savvy beyond that
of most of us, insists on a
paper ballot.
Wayne worked with
computers long before most
of us had any idea of their
existence. Before our current
crop of new voters were even
born, in fact. He worked first
as a sailor, then for defense
contractors in weapons
defense. He understood
networks, hardware and
software from a position of
ship-to-ship, ship-to-shore,
ship-to-plane and ship-to-
target.
Wayne has seen first-hand
how computers work and
how they fail. He knows how
information travels along
the electronic superhighway,
and how easy it is for
hackers to access privileged
communications.
I talked to a friend the
other day who voted early.
She was delighted with the
new system. "I just handed
them my driver's license,
went to my station and
voted, got a plastic card,
went and showed the clerk
my plastic card, and got my
license back," she said. "It
was really great."
"Aren't you wondering
whether the same machine
identified both you and your
choices to anyone else?" I
asked. Turns out she hadn't
thought about that.
Maybe I'm just too picky


about who knows what about
me. For years I've been
railing against corporations
that maintain huge databases

everyone
else who

done
anything
in our
society
requiring
the use CASSIE JOURNIGAN
hef sen Columnist
ofan
identifying
number. I feel invaded upon.
The concept of big brother
rings a bell, bringing me a
particularly unsatisfying "a-
ha" moment.
These corporations
compile just about every
detail that can be found out
about somebody. And not
just anybody. You. Your:
spouse. Your kids. Your
neighbors. Data on every
single person in the United
States.
CNN aired a story last
week about the rise of.a
new marketing technique
politicians are using. Micro-
targeting firms compile
information from the
databases and then sell them
to political parties. Not just
any information. Things I
consider privileged. What
elections I have participated
in, how I'm registered, and
more. How many and what
kind of pets I have. My
income level, the car I drive.
Where my kids go to school.
The list goes on and on.
I found one micro-targeter,
TargetPoint Consulting, on
the internet. Their list of


information sot
telephone surv(
groups, town h
and "intercepts
know what the;
"intercepts" bu
gives me chills
Their websit
they have "The
to construct ex]
information pr
individual's lift
life style chara,
The firm goes
that all this infi
allows them to
individual's att
behaviors. It se
that candidates
information car
their message t
voter's vulnera
Such techniq
work. Once agE
to their website
exclusive supp
MicroTargeting
and data to the
National Comr
Bush-Cheney '
and several Foi
companies, Tar
Consulting offi
standard in vot
management."
I thought pol
supposed to sei
Now it appears
voters who are
diced and serve
politicians. Ha'
broken through
Orwell's brave
Cassie Jour
is a reporter ft
Levy County 3
She may be re
ejournigan@l
corn


Quote of the Week

"The way a team plays as a wh<
mines its success. You may have
est bunch of individual stars in the
but if they don't play together, the
won't be worth a dime."
E


And I thought I

was well-read


s a decades-long
.reader and lover
Sof books, I was
thrilled when, last Christmas,
my children gave me Trivial
Pursuit-Book Lovers 'Edi-
iders" tion.
I immediately wondered
with whom
I would
play. Cer-
tainlv not
Denise,
because ex-
cept for se-
rial murders
and lust-in-
the-dust ro- CAROLYN RISER
mance, her
field of reading is limited.
And so it stayed on the
, shelf until this weekend
Stics when a friend and I got it
down and gave it a whirl.
urces includes Like any other Trivial
eys, focus Pursuit game, we knew there
all debates would be brainiac questions
s." I don't but neither of us knew the
y mean by entire game was designed for
it the term book editors and librarians.
Innocuous categories like
e says authors, classics and chil-
ability dren's books suddenly meant
haustive nothing to us.
files of an Example: What feminist
e cycle and scholar penned the children's
cteristics..." favorites Be Boy Buzz and
on to state Happy to Be Nappy? An-
ormation swer: bell hooks.
predict an Example: What middle
itudes and name did free-form author
eems to me T.C. Boyle adopt in his
who buy this teens, then drop in his for-
n then tailor ties? Answer: Coraghessan.
o appeal to a Example: What S-word
abilities. "ran like water" in the title
ques must of Devra Davis' Tales ofEn-
ain, according vironmental Deception and
e: "As the the Battle Against Pollution?
lier of Answer: Smoke.
g research Two ho'irsifito'the game I
Republican had two "pieces of pie"; my
nittee, the opponent had one.
04 campaign Truth be told, most of
rtune 500 the answers we got cor-
getPoint rectly were only because the
ers the gold book had been made into a
er-relationship movie-and even those often
perplexed us.
liticians were Both of us were frustrated
rve the people, at our ignorance and though
Sto be the I offered to put the game
sliced and back on the shelf where it
ed up to the had set for 11 months, he
ve we finally wouldn't hear of it.
Sto George And so, when life gives
, new world? you lemons, you make lem-
nigan onade.
or the We then turned Trivial
Journal. Pursuit into charades-and it
ached at still took an hour to com-
evyjournal. plete. Have you ever tried
acting out the words cement
or Bill Veeck?
The game is back in the
game cabinet now and I am
still scratching my head as to
how a seemingly well-read
person could be so ignorant.
ole deter- Next week look for this
the great- only-played once edition to
S rld show up on ebay, where it
e world, will be listed under Games
club for Mensa members.
As for me? I'm headed for
counseling. I must be a ter-
abe Ruth rible mother since I deprived
my children of Happy to be
Nappy. How will they ever
function in society now?


[ Y COUNTY JOU
E COIurTY PAPER EST. 02


Our Mission

T11 Ie y County Journal is published to serve the people
of y O 9yUnty as the leading information source that
~iepowera the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
(A ot w- ommniuunity in everything we do.
*pYrfjye ^dr#bip that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
*rF id i0hiikfy of our county and make a difference
in Mtlj LiYty of Jjfe for our residents and merchants.
'p*jp(oGAt' 1-tao..-i -tlJip of community events that foster
better citizens.
*pP',',,'..'*: -.~.- J-)hip of advertising thereby fostering a
lc .ir, economic environment.


Who We Are
MiHilng ldter
Carolyn Ri:ner
Ofllee M ger/eflflaniI
Robin Heath
Itff Wrters
Cassie Journigan
Neal Fisher
sM I irepmsMPntOt/Brosson
Laura Catlow
Tpeserttr
Wilma Jean Asbell
elalvery/Clerlcal
Rhonda Griffiths


Miss Honey says ...


M onday, 7 a.m. Good morning!
Isn't it great to wake up alive
and well in the land of the
living and know all is well in our corner
of the world? And to know I am loved
by so many friends, and yes, my little
boys (dogs) love me, too, and you better
believe I love them, too, even ihouilg they
jump on me while playing and scratch my
arms. They are still my little boys!
Before I forget, let me say thanks again
to the young lady who works at Shakers
who bought a doll for me at the Dollar
Store. May God bless her always, I went
with Margo to some yard sales last week
and had a very pleasant time. Isn't it great
to have friends? Also God bless my friend
Dixie down at the Bronson Motel.
Yes, I am surrounded by love, mostly
puppy love. Misty is on the footrest, Little
Bit on the arm and Sweet Pea on the floor


by my chair. Now you try and tell me that isn't
love, but Jesus surrounds these little ones as
well as me with His love, yes, unfailing love!
I saw an old friend Cleo from Williston
Sunday after church and had a
nice chat with her.
I ask God to bless and
comlir the man who I talked
i who had lost his Dad to
lath. I asked God to bless
and comfort him and give him
plcauc and heal his broken
heart, as only God can. I know
because I lost mine in 1987
and I still miss him. I was
MIS HNONEY always Daddy's girl and he
was my best friend.
I have so much to do today, but no one to
make me do it, so it will get done on my on

See Honey Page 5


Page 4


I~L~I_









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Six new developments get the green light


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITOR
BRONSON-Levy
County is on the grow
again as the board of county
commissioners approved
six final plats and four
preliminary plats Tuesday
morning.
Given the go-ahead
were Gilchrist Farms (Kay
Drummond, developer, eight,
nine-acre or more tracts),
Stancel Farms (Drummond L.
Investments Ltd., developer,
18 eight-21 acre tracts), Bel-
Air Estates (Rachel Paxton
Blair, developer, two 10-
acres lots), Gosman Acres


(Calvin Gosman Jr. and Sheila
Gosman, developers, three,
one-acre lots), Living Water
Farms (William and Martha
Wilson, developers, 20 acres)
and Starcrest (William and
Linda Hovanec, developers,
four lots).
Preliminary plats were
given to Cottonwood Farms
(Jay Huber, developer, ten
10-acre lots),' Cher-a-lin
Plantation (Brent and Linda
Cramer and Johnie and Cheryl
Steele, developers, two 10-
acre tracts), Austin Hills
(Fred Shasteen, developer,
15 one-acre lots) and Bridle
Trace Phase II (Southeast


Dairy Co. LLC, developer,
66 10-acre lots).
It was Bridle Trace that
generated the most interest,
both at Monday night's
planning commission meeting
and Tuesday at the county
commission meeting.
Because the development is
so vast, planning commission
member Ron Grant said he
was concerned about the
impact that size development
could have on the county,
especially in the area of
emergency services.
With developments Bridle
Trace Phase I and Saratoga,
there could be as many as 126


This Week's Arrests .


single family homes in the
area which could affect roads,
infrastructure and services.
"What we're still pushing,"
Grant said Monday, "is an
area the size of Bronson (739
acres) on a two-lane road.
I feel like we are taxing our
emergency services."
Rob, Corbett from the
building department said the
county can also count on
Bridle Trace III.
Because this development
abuts the Goethe Forest, there
are also concerns about what
could happen to the woods.
Michael Penn, from the
forestry service, said no one
had contacted his agency
about the development but
there are warnings people
should hear when land abuts
the forest. In addition to the


necessary prescribed burns to
keep the woods healthy, Penn
saidhe is also concerned about
exotic invasive vegetation
getting into the forest.
Also under zoning
Tuesday, the commissioner
granted a special exception
to AMVETS Post 88 which
will allow them to consume
alcoholic beverages at their
new clubhouse site. The
AMVETS have purchased
land near Bronson Motor
Speedway and plan to build
there in the near future.
Conditions were placed on
the exception including: the
clubhouse cannot be sold as
-a business in the future, the
hours ofalcohol consumption,
a landscaping plan and no
outdoor consumption except
during fund-raising events.


In other business, the
BOCC:
Heard grants were
approved to resurface CR
339 and widen and resurface
CR 327.
Placed CR 104 on
the paving list and entered
a contract with Nation Land
Company who will contribute
$70,000 toward the paving.
Chairwoman Nancy Bell
opposed the decisions, saying
she had not had enough time
to study the contract.
Appointed Tonya
Hiers to the Nature Coast
Transit Local Coordinating
Board.
Saw EMS Director
Marie Wells present an
Automated External
Defibillator to the Chiefland
Golf and Country Club.


The Levy County Sher-
iff's Office reports the fol-
lowing arrests for:
Robert Keene, 16,
of Bronson was arrested for
armed burglary, two counts
of larceny over $300 less
than $20,000 and producing
marijuana.
Jesse Keene, 17, of
Bronson was arrested for
armed burglary, two counts
of larceny over $3000 less
than $20,000 and producing
marijuana. Bail was set at
$35,000.
Michael Roque, 25,
of Hialeah was arrested for
possession of marijuana and
drug paraphernalia. Bail was
set at $10,000.
S Thiago Velasquez,
22, of Odessa was arrested
for violation of probation/
parole (VOP). No bond was
set.
Jennifer C. Currie,
29, of Lakefand was arrested
for fraud credit and petit lar-
ceny. Bail was set at $5,000.
Ronald L. Speck,
36, of Williston was arrested
for driving while license was
suspended/revoked ( DWL-
SR). Bail was set at $500.
David Charles Dun-
can, 46, of Morriston was
arrested for fraud dispose
of property U/lien. He was
released on his own recogni-
zance.
Scott 'A. Farr, 46,
of Holiday was arrested for
two counts of fraud goods
and property. Bail was set at
$6,000.
Sandra J. Joshua, 47,
of Williston was arrested for
VOP battery and VOP -no
valid driver's license. On the
first offense, she was released
on her own recognizance.
Second offense bail was set
at $500.
Salas Rodrigo, 19, of
Quincy was arrested for fail-
ure to appear (FTA) -DWL-
SR with knowledge). He was
released on his own recogni-
zance.
S- James Venable, 19,
of Williston was arrested for
VOP possession of mari-
juana and VOP DUI and
VOP possession of alcohol
by minor. No bond was set.
'Rickie M. McKay,
47, of Inglis was arrested for




YOUR VIEW

i


VOP possession of para-
phernalia. Bail was set at
$2,500 or $500 cash to pro-
bation.
Robert Grossman,
33, of Bronson was arrested
for VOP forgery and VOP -
uttering altered bill. No bond
was set.
LeeDawn C. Colson,
36, of Chiefland'was arrested
for aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon without in-
tent. Bail was set at $20,000.
John N. Clark, 40, of
Morriston was arrested for
disorderly intoxication and
resisting arrest without vio-
lence.
Sandra V. Markham;
49, of Archer was arrested for
VOP petit theft. Bail was
set at $5,000.
Robert Creason Hob-
by, 27, of Williston was ar-
rested for possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana.
Bail was set at $2,500.
Janice'A. Bell, 55, of
Archer was arrested for vio-
lation of domestic no contact
order and violation of pretrial
release. First offense bail was
set at $10,000. Second of-
fense, she was released on
her own recognizance.
Richard.Joseph Swift,
34, of Gulf Hammock was
arrested for VOP criminal
mischief and FTA damage
property criminal mischief.
First offense no bond was set.
Second offense bail was set at
$5,000.
Tito Oscorio, 29, of
Bell was arrested for VOP
-NVDL. Bail' was set at
$2,000.
Donna G. Baker, 31,
of Bronson was arrested for
DUI violation pretrial re-
lease. Bail was set at $5,000.
Susie Ann Bennett,
50, of Chiefland was arrested
for two counts of VOP pos-
session of crack cocaine. No
bond was set.
Frank L. McCain, Jr.,
27, of Cutoff, LA. was arrest-
ed for failure to register as a
sex offender. Bail was set at
$10,005.
Geno Kendall Mc-
Neil, 44, of St. Petersburg
was arrested for refusal to
sign citation. Bail was set for
$500.
Amber Blue Smith,






Continue from page 4


Say 'no' to voting machines
To the editor:
Bring Our Paper Ballots Back...
In response to Ted Wilkins' letter printed last week titled
"We need the paper ballot" BRAVO! Well said!
I echo your every word Mr. Wilkins. It is most definitely
all about the verifiable paper ballot vote.
Let's just say "no" to the electronic voting machines in
Levy County. It is the right of the electorate, not our elected
officials who have somehow chosen this path of destructive
gadgets for us.
Anyone who runs for Supervisor of Elections on the
"destroy the machines ticket" has my vote, too!
Until then, protest vote using an Absentee Ballot.
J. Blubaugh
Teena Blubaugh


Bronson not ready to be in housing game


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER
BRONSON-A Ft. Laude.rdale-based
developer hoping to build houses in
Bronson tried to sell their services to town
council Monday.
Joe Bain of Warren Development Inc.,
said the firm builds concrete block, single-
family detached homes.
The group has just broken ground on
a project in Marion County, according
to WDI's Woodard Warren. He said the
company also provides real estate services,
home inspections, renovations, financial
aid access and property management. The
group is hoping to set up an office in the
north central Florida area.


Council member Edith Brown questioned
WDI's representatives on their sometimes
confusing presentation: "Just what are you
expecting from us?"
Bain mentioned the surplus land the city
owns, and asked what plans the city had in
place. He said WDI would build infill-type of
housing, rather than subdivision development.
He then added, "You have an abundance of land
at a very cheap price."
Brown said, "We're not in the housing
business."
Mayor Beatrice Mongo told the group that
council needed to hear exactly what the group
could offer to the city.
Council also heard from Capri Engineering's
Walter Brown.
See Bronson.Page 18


27, of Lutz was arrested for
VOP leaving scene of acci-
dent. Bail was set at $5,000.
George Rennick, 44,
of Chiefland was arrested for
disorderly intoxication and
resisting without violence.
Bail was set at $3,500.
Pamela Jean Korey,
41 of Jacksonville was arrest-
ed for possession of crack co-
caine and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bail was set at
$16,000.
Esmaiel Shaikhoud,
53, of Ocala was arrested for
NVDL. He was released on
his own recognizance.
Daniel Auka Meza,
22, of Williston was arrested
for VOP NVDL and no DL.
First offense, no bond was
set. Second offense bail was
set at $2,000.
S Brian D. Larkin, 24,
of Bronson was arrested for
domestic battery and battery.
Bail was set for $10,000.
.Anthony -Osceola
Lee, 18, of Williston was
arrested for domestic vio-
lence/battery. Bail was set for
$1,500.
Amie C. Perdue, 22,
of Bronson was arrested for
domestic battery. She was
released on her own recogni-
zance.
Chastity Nicole Bax-
man, 25, of Cedar Key was
arrested for aggravated bat-
tery. Bail was set for $5,000.
The Williston Police
Department reports the
following arrests for:
Mitchell F. Cooper,
29, of Archer was arrested for
driving while license revoked
(DWLR) habitual traffic
and for resisting without
violence.
George Lewis
Walker, 27, of Fort White
was arrested for DUI.
NicoleDanielleSilva,
18, of Ocala was arrested for
possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and drug
paraphernalia.
Douglas Raymond
Parks, 30, of Williston was
arrested on a Marion County
Warrant VOP.
Linda J. Alavez, 39,
of Naples was arrested on a
Collier County warrant for
writing a forged instrument
and petit theft.




I Honey

Continue from page 4
time, whenever the notion
strikes!
Hush, Donald, you would
be lazy too if you didn't have
Mary to give you a push! Uh
huh, would to.
Haven't seen my little
buddy Glen in a while,
wonder where he is hiding?
And Terry Tillis, one of my
little buddies, where, oh
where are you?
I guess I've said enough,
so until next week so long,
take care and may the good
Lord take a liken to you.
So says,
Miss Honey


Page 5


Meet the Press

Carolyn Risner
Managing Editor
ugrilnabiHometown: Virgie, Ky.

















Why Levy County?
The lure of warm winters and the call of the Gulf.

Why the newspaper?
Because I like to eat. I wanted to be a writer from the time I was 10 years old, but the odds of
writing novels that can fuel my food habit were too great to wager. Newspapers provide the
need to write, plus it pays the bills.

What role do you feel the Levy County Journal plays in the community?
The weekly newspaper is the community's best history archive. We record who won the steer
show right alongside the government meetings. Because the LCJ strives for unbiased reporting,
I believe readers can take our product to the bank when it comes to knowing who the movers
and shakers are in the county and make informed decisions on how they will act on issues.

What is your favorite part of the Levy County Journal?
Obituaries. I am fascinated with death and enjoy reading the oddities in the obits that speak
volumes about the lives the people led. Recently someone's obit contained, "He enjoyed
M*A*S*H* reruns." I knew instantly what kind of person he had been.

What do'you like about living in Levy County?
I love the rural atmosphere and the fact that so much of the land has been set aside for
conservation/preservation. That means there will never be any development and people will be
able to enjoy the pastoral settings for years to come.

What is the biggest risk you have taken?
Moving to Levy County-alone. I left a secure job with an established company, said goodbye to
my three children and all the other people I love to gamble on a place I never had heard of.

What is the best advice you've been given?
My late father was full of adages. I thought I wasn't paying attention to him then but years later
I find myself saying, "As my dearly departed father would say ..." First and foremost, he told
me to "never get above your raisin'." That means remembering your roots and where you came
from.

What are three things you tell people about yourself?
I have a warped sense of humor, I don't take myself seriously and I am loyal.

What is:
The last movie you've seen? At the theatre-Lake House. Save your money. It's bad.
At home? Something equally horrible on Lifetime.
The last book you read? Ain't She Sweet? by Susan Phillips.
The one TV show you can't miss? Lost. Don't mess with me at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
And Heroes. I've started taking my Monday dinner break at 9 p.m. just to catch it.




LEVY COUNTY JOURL
HE COUNTY PAPEIRl EST. 192


/









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


CHS names honor students


Chieflard High School
announces the following
honor roll students for the
first nine weeks:
A Honor Roll
Rachel Allen, Zachary
Andrews, Jacki Barber,
Chaquille Bennett, Mallory
Billings, Kali Bowen, Jessica
Burkel, Nick Carlson.
Rebecca Chatterton,
Brittany Davis, Johnathan
Davis, Cassandra Dixon,
Erika Drummond, William
Durrance, Pamela Gonzales;
Jimmy Guerry, Brittney
Hall, Isaac Hardee, Kristen
Hardin, Jamie Harris, Kenny
Harris, Luis Herrera, Adam
Hiers, Chad Hodges, Megan
Jerigan, Brittney Kruser,
Sara Matheny.
Andrea O'Ffill, Johnathon
Palmer, Jessica Parker, Cindy
Pollard, Amanda Prevatt,
Cole Rollison, Jessyca
Ruland, Seth Sache, Casey
Sims, Morgan Smith.
Saundra Stephens, Amber


Tindale, Christen Trail,
Brooke Williams, Matthew
Williams, Megan Webb, El
Som Wong, Frederick Wong.
A/B Honor Roll
Kara Alexander, Trace
Alexander, Bianca Alston,
Karen Alvarez, Kaley
Andrews, Logan Andrews,
Schelia Armstrong.
Emily Baker, Lauren
Barker, Alexandra Barron,
Josh Bell, Chase Brookins,
Hillary Brooks, Bob Bray,
Jesse Bryan, Cassey Burnett,
Ashley Byrd.
Edward Carter, Ethan
Carter, Troy Chancey,
Elizabeth Chatterton, Amber
Collins, Bobby Crane, Tyler
Crane, Ashley Davis, Zachary
Desilets.
MarthaEdmundson, Kirstie
Fernandez, Krashelle Fisher,
L.D. Fisher, Amelia Futch,
Jerrica Grimsley, Melinda
Harris, Shelby Hastings,
Amanda Heinz.
Mary Heinz, Nicole


Hemenway, Kali Hicks, Chase
Home, Krysten Johnson,
Landayle Jones, Tamara
Ann Jones, Autumn Jordan,
Danielle Kearns, Rachael
Keels, Lamar Kellam.
Sina Khaleel, Yousef
Khaleel, Raichel Kirkland,
Cassie Labat, Briana
Maldonado, Shawn Mallory,
Tiffani Mathis, Easton
McGinty, Hayley Miller,
Myles Mitchem.
Charissa Morris, Megan
Nail, Felicia Neal, Danielle
Parrish, lesha Patterson,
Randal Perryman, Tabitha
Perryman, Ory Pitts.
Truitt Renaud, Cassie
Richburg, Amanda Rood,
Paolla Rosa-Gomes, Tina
Russell, Adrienne Schwingel.
Anthony Sinacola, Dakota
Talton, Brittani Thorpe,
Kierra Trent, Zachary
Tyson, Megan Weatherford,
Rebekka Wilkerson, Rebecca
Zboralski.


BES names honor students


Bronson Elementary
School announced its honor
roll for the first nine weeks:

18 Grade
Bedford
All A
Bradley Brower
Sean Hensley
Shailya Maruca
Ryan Mueggenberg
Gladys Rivera
Brady Tarbox
AB
Christian Alicea
Ethan Church
Kylee Owens
Lainey Taylor
Bray
AB
Anya Tapia
Loudermilk
All A
None
AB
John Bottoms
Angelica Bradley
Mathew Dillon
Myrna Fuentes
Katelyn Teague ,
Deberrv
All A
Emilie Kosbab
Brianna Quinn
AB
Josiah Hamilton
Chelsea Hollinshead
Elijah Kalinowski
Taeya Meayes
Michael Owens
Alexus Scott
Storm Spillers
Mikell
All A
Jayce Antis
AB
Skylar Bazin
Kassandra Mcgee
Sohn
All A
Austin Griffis
Alice Huber
Hawk Hunter
Riley Thomas
Cordell Wilkerson


If it's quilted 0
BY WINELLE HORNE
CORRESPONDENT
Log Cabin Quilters met
Thursday, Nov. 2, at the Levy
County Quilt Museum; Our
weather is so wonderful.
Seems we have waited for
cool weather a long time and
now it's here. Soon we will
be wishing for it to be warm.
We take it one day at a time.
A lady from Old Town
brought in an old crazy quilt
that was over 150 years old.
We love to see these quilts
and wonder at the work that
they did so long ago. She
wanted to know how to take
care of it in the future and
some said one thing and
some another. I said to take
care of it very carefully.
These old quilts cannot be
washed, cannot be hung, but
can be put on a bed to look
at, but never used.'
We are trying to help


AB
Kathryn Lott
Brittany Neal
Enya Tapia
2nd Grade
Bradley
All A
Lauren Moore
AB
Christian Garcia
Shelby Pitts
Fredericks
All A
Remi Cannon
Jacobb Copen
Amanda Thompson
AB
Zachary Conover
Anthony Renna
Oto Rivera
Thomas ,Wilson ..
Hammond
AB
Harley Crain
Ruben Robles
Elizabeth Sharp
Hogle
All A
Alex Moore
Tryston Smith
Ryan Spaulding
Dory Turner
AB
Dalton Aldrich
Joshua Gillespie
Dj Harris Jr.
Hannah Huseth
Bj Ijames
Olivia Kalinowski
Alyssa Mann
Autumn Sanchez
Alan Clay Whitney
Pomeroy
All A
Caleigh Robinson
Will Thompson
AB
Austin Calton
Sabrina Cope
Jessica Hogge
Sebastian Lee
James Stalnaker
Alexis Tarbox
Tyler Voorhees
Robertson


n a machine, it'
people take care of quilted
quilts. Theyare treasures
and when hand quilted,
that makes them so special.
Today many quilt tops
are appliqued and pieced,
then they are finished on a
machine. Hand quilting is
slowly going out because
sometimes you get in a
hurry. If it's machine quilted,
that makes it a comforter.
We put out about 16 quilts
a year with sometimes four
or five at each quilt. We have
these going all year and once
in a while it takes months to
quilt. Done on a machine it
takes a few hours and that's
why we push to take care of
your quilt. A quilt is not a
quilt until it's hand quilted.
Machine quilting makes it a
comforter.
Lunch was great with fried
sweet potatoes, sauerkraut,
cheese and macaroni, chicken,


All A
Wayne Shipp
AB
Alexis Benitez
Jessica Carbonaro
Katelyn Crowley
Lizet Flores
3rd Grade
Carlisle
AB
Jan Gonthier
AB
Keina Byre.
Jennifer Hill
Hoss Marino
Allie Phillips
Scot White
Nobles
All A
Faith Heath
Jacob Williams
AB
Austin Homan
Tyler Homan
Clayton Lott
Dogan Mccoy
Camiel Theis
Brooke Zane
Lewis
All A
Kaylyn Miller
AB
Zachary Brunelle
Bon
AB
Michael Dunn
Staci Fisher
Miranda Martinez
4h Grade
Knecht
AB
Cheyenne Ralosky
Trimm
AB
Ravin Thomas
Ty Barber
Joshua Porter
Perryman
AB
Neal Manning
Devon Roberts
Briana Wilson
Dasilva
AB
Justin Grant


s a comforter
biscuits, lots of salads and all
kind of pumpkin cake and
apple pie, all so good and 16
were present.
Winnelle Horne is the
director of the Levy County
Quilt Museum.

Quilt show

begins Nov. 24
The Log Cabin Quilters
will hold its 23rd Annual Quilt
Show Nov. 24 through Dec.
3, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
On Saturday, Dec. 2, they
will have Bluegrass Gospel
Music and will be serving a
chicken, and dumpling dinner.
There will be lots of crafts,
quilts and baked goods. The
drawing for the quilt will be
held on Sunday, Dec. 2.
The Levy County Quilt
Museum is located 11050
NW 10th Ave., Chiefland.


PATRONS OF the arts
descended on Cedar
Key last month to view
the works of Irene Sal-
ley and Jiri Lonsky. A
portion of sales was do-
nated to the Tri-Counties
Care Center.






Art lovers turn out for Hospice


A crowd gathered Oct. 15 for "Art and Mu-
sic by the Sea," a benefit for the Haven Hos-
pice Tri-Counties Hospice Care Center Capital
Campaign.
The event was hosted at the Cedar Key
home of David Etherington and JeffDunn and
was an opportunity to view and purchase the
works of painter Irene Salley and sculptor Jiri
Lonsky, with a portion of the proceeds benefit-


ing the care center campaign.
The Tri-Counties Care Center, which cel-
ebrated its first anniversary Jan. 19, 2006,
serves the needs of patients living in Dixie,
Gilchrist, Levy and part of Alachua coun-
ties.
Haven Hospice is licensed as a commu-
nity-based, not-for-profit hospice serving
North Florida since 1980.


Yankeetown women plan dinner


" Withl Thanksgiving just
around the comet, there 'ill
be many holiday dinners to
attend.
The Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club will be offer-
ing dinner with a different
flair Friday, Nov. 10 from 4
p.m.-7 p.m. at #5 56th St. in


Yankeetown.
An Italian dinner will
consist of lasagna, stuffed
shells, homemade sauce, gar-
lic bread, salad, drinks and
spumoni ice cream for a $6
donation.
After enjoying a nice din-
ner, the Thrift Shop will be


open for your shopping plea-
sure and you can shop for
Christmas gifts among some
lovely handmade craft items.
All proceeds will go to-
wards donations the club
makes each year and main-
tenance of the A.F. Knotts
Library.


LA dBvjs


November 11th is Veterans Day!


VETE


Throughout America's history, military veterans served
their country with honor, commitment and courage.
As thousands of Americans in uniform wage war
against terrorism around the globe, let us never waiver
in our support for them and their families.
To all veterans, from all wars, we say,
"Thank you."

RANS DAY i
., '
_I l ;;~ 91- ,. :: ,6' '. I L .".:


THE go to the Legion website,
AMERICAN a/ TEVY COUNTY JOURNAL www.legion.org,
LfEGION J~ ... ......*. .. ,. -J send an electronic greeting card
to a veteran


Page 6


I LI 1








LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


I I


AREA DEATHS BY. (
.Tranton -I "


Chieffand
Jim Brooks
Fitzgerald, Ga.
Donna McDonald


Eunice Brewton
Mrs. Eunice F. Brewton, 70, of Williston died Oct. 26,
2006.
She was born Sept. 26, 1936 to the late Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Frazier in Allendale, S.C. She had lived in Williston since the
early 1960s.
Surviving are, three sons, Charles Frazier Sr. ofPhiladelphia.
Pa.,William C. Brewtonrand Maurice James of Williston; two
daughters, Barbara Brewton and Andra Bostick of Williston;
three brothers, Willie Frazier of Allendale, S.C., Joe Lewis
Frazier of Green Cove Springs and Ernest Frazier of Corona,
N. Y.; seven grandchildren and one great- grandchild.
Funeral services were held Nov. 4 at Allen Chapel A.M.E
Church. Burial followed in the New Hope Cemetery in
Williston.
Carnegie Funeral Home, Chiefland was in charge of
arrangements.

Jim Brooks
Jim Brooks, 73 of Chiefland died Oct. 31, 2006 in
Gainesville.
He was a native of Corbin, Ky. and moved to Chiefland
after living in Orlando from 1957 to 1990 and Ocklawaha
from 1990 to 1999.
He served in the US Army. He was a
member of Mason #329 in Orlando. Mr.
SBrooks was a member of the Concord
Baptist Church in Chiefland. He served as
Past worship leader and deacon.
He is' survived by his wife,
Nina Brooks of Chiefland;
sons James Andrew (Judy)
Brooks of Winter Garden
and Douglas Norman Brooks of Chiefland;
daughters Donna Haan of Newnan, Ga. and
Peggy Ann (Dennis) Abell of Oviedo; sister
Jean Ayers of Savannah, Ga.; and brother Hugh
Brooks of Macintosh and eight grandchildren.
Services were held Nov. 4 at Concord Baptist Church of
Chiefland with Bro. Jamie Brock and Bro. Larry Massey
officiating. Burial followed Monday at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Concord
Baptist Church Building Fund, 5551 NW CR 336, Chiefland,
FL 32626.
Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services, Chiefland was in charge of
arrangements,.

Bonnie Hardee
Boinie Lou Hardee, 57, of Trenton, died Monday, Oct. 30,
2006.
She was born in Rockwood, Tenn. She was a cashier and of
the Baptist faith.
Ms. Hardee enjoyed being outdoors, fishing and hunting
and loved spending time with her grandchildren.
Survivors include son, Grady (Karen) Mills of ChieflandL;
two daughters, Yolanda (Mark) Collins of Carrabelle and
Tonya (Richard) Burnett of Chiefland; three brothers, Roy
Denton Williams of Chiefland, Chester Williams of Chiefland
and Darrell "Cowboy" Webb of Trenton; sister, Pearl Smith of
Chiefland; nine grandchildren and two great- grandchildren.
Services were held Nov. 3 at Charles Strickland Memorial
Chapel, Knauff Funeral Home Chiefland with Pastor Mark
Collins officiating. Interment was at Antioch Cemetery.


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OBITUARIES


church Announcoe


Bronson UMC to host bazaar
Anzonetta Epperson Circle of the Bionson United Methodist
Church will be holding its Annual Christmas Bazaar on
Tuesday, Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
Lunch will be served consisting of soup, muffin, dessert
and tea for $4.
Come, bring a friend and enjoy the crafts, foods and gifts.

Churches plan Thanksgivng dinner
The Beyond The Walls ministry of Bronson Community
Church and cooperating churches in the Bronson area invite
you to participate in their Thanksgiving celebration.
A free Thanksgiving dinner will be served Saturday, Nov.
18 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the church parking lot (Alt. 27
and Picnic Street). There will be food, fellowship and gospel
and praise music.
Also 50 boxes of food will be given to needy families.
Registration for these boxes will be taken during the time
of our celebration and will be distributed at the close of our
celebration.
If you would like to help or participate in the music please
contact Terrell Burge, Pastor BCC at 281-1624.

Cliefland UMC
Randy Shelnutand the, Diie Echoes will appear in cm _
cert Saturday, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist
Church of Chiefland.
A donation will be requested at the door. Children under
12 years of age are free when with an adult. A nursery will be
provided.
The church is located at 707 N. Main St. For information,
call the church office at 352-493-4627 or Elvira Westbury at
352-221-0327 .

Photographs are published at no
charge with obituaries. Ask your
funeral director for assistance.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Page I


IIU- l Vl .


~were
saying our
goodbyes in
the school
parking
lot when
momma just
completely
misjudged
my maturity
level.


BUT ANYWAY






Guy E. Sheffield


"Here son," she said, handing me her camera. "Take a few
pictures on your field trip." Well, I gulped like I'd swallowed
my tonsils. Did she remember I was just in the fourth grade?
She went on to show me how to change the film and handed
me four extra rolls. Then, to top it off, she had the audacity
to shove $40 in my pocket without making it perfectly clear
it was for meals only. I wiped off her kiss and boarded that
big chartered Greyhound for Chicago thinking I might be
the next Michelangelo, or some other famous guy that takes
pictures.
For the first '01 rintithe .I'as the talk of the bus;~ having
my own camera. I -Sif f ly set about organizftigrtf'
shots to capture the full excitement of a bus load of kids
away from home for the first time. I even snapped a few
of the bus driver as he began popping his blood pressure
medication. We were all having big fun. As the trip wore
on everyone's enthusiasm began to wane, so I turned my
attention to landscapes.
For many miles I purposed to capture the beauty and
essence of central Illinois as seen from Interstate 55. Maybe
I have a little paparazzi in my blood too because I snapped at
least a roll of the kids as they began to nod off and the drool
began to flow. Basically, what I am saying is that before we
See Guy Page 19
U-


th-e IIR


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Dan A. Lucero
Dan A. Lucero, 76, of Trenton, a retired physical therapist,
died Nov. 2, 2006 at the VA Hospital in
SGainesville.
He was preceded in death by his son, Dan
Lucero Jr., and daughter, Derba Perryrnan.
Survivors include wife, Eva Smith Lucero of
Trenton; daughter, Diana Woodall of Arkansas;
brother, Levi Lucero of Colorado; six
grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Nov. 7 at the
Watson Funeral Home Chapel, Trenton with the Rev. Marvin
Parsley officiating. Burial followed in Trenton Cemetery.

Donna McDonald
Donna Meeks McDonald, 60, of Fitzgerald, Ga., died Noc.
3, 2006 at the Life Care Center.
Bor July 18, 1946 in North Platte, Neb., she was a daughter
of the late Eddie E. Meeks and Kathryn Kelley Weatherford.
She graduated from Bronson High School in 1964 and had
lived in Fitzgerald for the last 22 years.
She was a: former resident of Wichita Falls, Texas and
Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska. While in Alaska, she
worked at the State Museum of Alaska. She was a sitter for
the sick and the elderly and was a member of the Church of
Unity.
Survivors include her husband, Arthur McDonald; children


I


Cathy O. Richburg of Chiefland, Karen M. Purdy and
Brenda Kay Turner of Gainesville; Kenny S. (Dana) Corbin
of Old Town, James Arthur McDonald and Richard Edward
McDonald both of Louisville, Ky., Myrtis Ann (Chris) Pope of
Abbeville, Ga.; Michelle Cribb and Rex ALlen McDonald both
of Mesquite, Texas; three sisters, Sheryl Ondrias of Houston,
Texas, Mary Ann (Ronald) Wood ofAltha, Rhonda Baludree
of Tampa Bay; a brother, Robert (Denise) Herrod of Houston,
Texas; 23 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by a sister and one great-grandchild.
Funeral services were held Nov. 5 at the Paulk Funeral
Home Chapel in Fitzgerald with the Rev. Terry McDonald
officiating. Interment followed in the Evergreen Cemetery.

Charles Nobles
Charles Wayne Nobles, infant, of Williston, died on Oct.
27, 2006 at Shands at University of Florida in Gainesville.
Survivors include his parents, Charles Heath and Jessica
Salena Nobles of Williston; paternal grandparents Ronnie
and Charlene Nobles of Williston; maternal grandparents
William and Salena Koon of Morriston; uncle Jared Nobles of
Williston; aunts, Sara Koon and Amanda Koon of Morriston.
Graveside services were held Nov. 1 at Orange Hill
Cemetery, Willistoh with Pastor Jim Waldron officiating.
Arrangements were under the direction of Knauff Funeral
Home, Williston.



The zeal that sets a


city on a hill












Page8 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Red Devils on fire; head to playoffs


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Even with a chill in the
air due to the descending
temperatures, the Red Devils'
offense made no never mind
to the conditions as they
scored a 17-14 victory over
Newberry.
The Panthers' rally during
the last 18 minutes gave
the homecoming crowd
cause for concern, but in the
end, the Red Devil. offense
accomplished just enough
ihile it was on its roll to hold
off the visitors in the waning
moments.
Even with the unusual
conditions creating something
of an off-handed background
and a list of mounting injuries
the Red Devils offense scored
17 points in the first two and
a half quarters. Playing with
several new roster additions,
the roll was huge in building
their confidence as they head
into post-season play.
"It was a hard-fought
game," Senior wide receiver
Jiwan James said. "It was
a defensive game and their
coverage changed a lot against
our running game. That is
why we had to have some big
plays from the passing game.
"Devin (Timmons) came
through with making those
big plays to move the team.
Welsh and Floyd helped us out
a lot on defense. We lost two
backs, but the replacements
stepped up and our offensive
line really blocked well."
Freshman Deonte Welch
scored what turned out to be
the winning points in dramatic
and play-saving fashion.
Timmons rolled out- to his
right "fr6ti the iRed' DIils'
14-yard line on first down
and slung a pass with just the
right touch inside a pocket of
three Panther defenders.
The pass found its way
into the space between the
defenders at midfield after it
eluded the outstretched hands
of defensive back Coulter
Knoblauch by inches. Welch
then tipped the ball. Making
the endless hours of tip drills
in practice pay off, he grabbed
the end over end pigskin out
of the air and continued in
stride to the end zone.
He would add another catch

I


The Red Devils recovered
the onside kick with less than
a minute left and ran the clock
out to end the rally.
While Williston's offense
was a compilation of soft
authoritative announcements,
its defense made yet another
commanding statement to
end the season. Newberry's
standout running backAntwan
Ivey did gain 125 yards on 28
carries, but for the first time
this season, he did not score
and most of his yards came
in the fourth quarter when the
Panthers were in desperation
mode.
"I thought our defense did
great, he's (Ivey) a great back


and for us to be able to hold
him to 125 yards, I think our
kids obviously stepped up to
that challenge," Baker said.
"Newberry never gave up
and for our kids to be able to
pull it out, I was proud."
Devin Timmons completed
only four passes, but they
accounted for 145 yards and
the touchdown. Marquis
Minor added 72 rushing
yards. Williston rushed for a
total of 96 yards.
And so it is onto the
playoffs, which could
have a huge impact in the
program's growth. They
travel to Brooksville Nature
Coast (8-2) for tomorrow's
first round playoff game.


Game Summary


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
PANTHERS RUNNING back Corey Ivey finds the going tough as he tries to run
between the tackles.


to finish with two receptions
and 114 yards in his first start.
However, the touchdown
catch made it game, set and


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
CHRIS MORROW signals
it's now or never as the
fourth quarter starts.


match for the Red Devils as
they head into the playoffs
with a season-ending win.
"It was a great play and it
started with Timmons putting
it right where it needed to
be," Baker said. "He made
the catch, because he has
confidence in himself and
Timmons. It was a case of a
great athlete making a great
catch, because he kept his
concentration and focus."
With the victory, the team
ended the season with its
highest win total in Baker's
three years at the helm. The
team also accomplished
its goal of finishing 7-3 as
opposed to 6-4,as they. head
intdOt1Ht' layoffs' .- r -,,,t,
"It is huge for thfe'team to
be going into the playoffs
with seven wins," Baker said.
"They now have a chance
to win eight or more games,
something this group of
seniors have never done.
"They enter the playoffs
with something positive, but
I think we aren't satisfied.
And we feel that we are good
enough to beat the teams we
need to beat. The seniors can
say they left something better
than they found it and that
will be a huge factor in the
playoffs."


The Red Devils opened
the scoring with Rodrigo
Quezada's 31-yard field goal
as the first quarter came to an
end. They made the score 10-
0 in the second quarter when
Marquis Minor scampered
nine yards up the middle for
a touchdown.
The Panthers gave Red
Devil nation cause for
concern in the fourth quarter.
Guy Brown scored on a
29-yard option and Xavier
Woods bolted up the middle
for a three-yard touchdown
run. He made the final score
a three-point affair after
scoring on the subsequent
two-point conversion.
i .'^'\ "^iiv i !'


Newberry
Williston


0 0 0 14 14
3 77 0 17


1"' Quarter
Williston Quezada 31-yard field good
2nd Quarter
Williston Minor 9-yard run (kick good)
3" Quarter
Williston Welch 86 yard reception from Timmons
4h Quarter
Newberry Brown 29-yard run (kick failed)
Newberry Woods 3-yard run (run good)


Statistics
Rushing
Williston: 24-91, Minor 12-60, Timmons 5-23, Brown 1-12L.
Floyd 1-0, Welch 4- -4.
Passing
Williston: 4-9-146-0-1, Timmons 4-9-146-0-1. 2
Receiving
Williston: 4-9-146-1, Welch 2-115-1, James 1-18, Floyd --
13. '-
Interceptions "
Williston: 1, Welch 1 .


206 66A las oobal hapinsip


Journal photo by Neal Fisher

NOT ONLY DID Deonte Welch score in his first varsity start, he leads the charge
for quarterback Devin Timmons.


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Siftc wcck

This week's Friday night

under the lights
By Neal Fisher
,Levy County Journal


'Williston (7-3) vs. Nature Coast
(Brookesville) (8-2)
2005 score: did not play
Overview: Despite the failure to win the
District 5 title, the Red Devils enterthe playoffs
a stronger and more experienced team than
last year. However, their loss to North Marion
will haunt them for as long as they are still
in the playoffs. The loss cost the Red Devils
the opportunity to play at home as the district
champion and put them in a tougher bracket.
North Marion plays 5-5 Citrus. By all accounts,
these two teams are evenly matched and this
'should be a close game. Losing very few players
between the two teams, look for the same in this
year's contest.
Williston update: Williston used their game
against Newberry to regain the momentum they
had built throughout the first eight games of the
-season. While their victory over the Panthers
;was far from a masterpiece, the Red Devils' list
;of mistakes they had created the week before
.was significantly cut down to a minimal few.
Coach speak: "There is a big difference
between entering the post season 7-3 and 6-4,
Baker said. "With that difference, the kids are
still motivated and they are looking forward to
representing their school and the community
they come from in the playoffs. They take a lot
of pride in the school and the community they
Come from. I think if we eliminate the mistakes
and turnovers we can play with anybody. It's
the playoffs and we have the experience.
We didn't do ourselves any favors by losing to
North Marion, but we played on the road before
;and we have the ability to win in any stadium."
SWhat to look for: As is the case in any sport
on any level, the playoffs means the teams who
qualify for post season like to dance with the
irl they brought to the big event. This means
there isn't lot of surprises as to what the
remaining teams will do and they will rely on
their strengths in their simplest forms.
Or in other words both teams throw their best
punches and see who is still standing at the end
of the day.
The Red Devils' offense has been productive
throughout the 2006 season, gaining at least 200
yards in every game. Propelled by the option


running attack, which seems to have come
of age in the last few weeks, the Red Devils
move the ball using their speed.
And as coach Baker alluded to, the
passing attack is efficient enough to keep
defenses off balance and gain big yards
in one fell swoop. Add to that the Red
Devils' defense ability to use their speed to
shut down opponents' offenses and create
chaos and there isn't much surprise to what
the Red Devils will do.
When the Red Devils avoid the turnover
jinx, they execute extremely well as their
470 yards against North Marion is the most
significant proof of this phenomenon. If
they can manage the kind of yards they
did against a perennial state champion
contender they should be able to continue
to do the same this week.
Injuries have played a key role in.
Williston's season too. Partially by design
and with some luck, the whole team from
player to player is loaded with speed. Speed
means they can plug different players into
any position, particularly in the backfield.
'While hard work is required to learn
the scheme and play at the same level as
their predecessors, the running backs who
replaced the opening day starters are so
alike they have been able to continue to
gain yards.
The running attack has also continued to
roll throughout the season, because of its
offensive line. Throwing its speed around,
it drives opponents off of the ball before
they can gain their footing and creates
those holes the backs run through.
That speed applies for all positions
as Deonte Welch had the, biggest play of
last week's game from the wide receiver
position. He caught a tipped ball and then
out ran the defense to the end zone. He also
plays in the secondary with Ivan Floyd,
another freshman with tremendous speed.
Together the two freshmen made significant
contributions last week and proved the Red
Devils' program can sustain player losses.
Look for the same in the playoffs.


Bronson Youth L


Jn the 10 and under league,
the Bronson Packers play
the Williston Knights this
Saturday at 8 am.
In the 13 and under league,
the Bronson Thunder also
play Williston. Their game is
scheduled for 3 pm.
The All-Star Cheerleading
squad will tra el to St.
Augustine for a statewide
competition on November
11. The squad is composed
of 23 girls ranging from ages
five to 13.

Last week's soccer results:

The Bronson Eagles
defeated the Bronson Gators


in the 6 and under league by a
score of 3-0.
The 8 and under league
featured both Bronson teams
capturing victories. The


Eagles team #1 defeated High
Springs by a score of 2-1.
The final score of the Eagles
team #2 was a 2-1 victory
over Alachua.
In the 10 and under league,
it was the Eagles taking a 3-


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0 decision over the Williston
Sharks.
The Eagles suffered a 3-2
loss to Alachua in the 12 and
under league.
A 0-0 tie was the final result
of the Eagles match against
Alachua in the 14.and under
league.

There were no football
games played last week.


Who's who on Williston's offense


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Speed! Speed! Speed!
Coaches constantly refer
to it as being the great
equalizer and the tool can be
the difference in achieving
unparalleled success. In
three short years, Williston's
head coach Jamie Baker has
transformed the Red Devils
into a speed machine that is
capable of going deep into
the playoffs.
They don't just have
it. They know how to use
it, particularly as a way to
offset bigger teams. While
their defense is of the highest
caliber and has been a strong
suit of the team, the Red
Devils' noted option attack
could be the difference as the
Red Devils travel to Nature
Coast (Brookesville) to open
the playoffs.
Devin Timmons (Junior)/
Quarterback- The third year
starter has come into his own
.during his career at Williston.
He doesn't put up big eye-
popping stats, but his decision
making in running the option
attack is reliable.
He himself runs the ball
effectively enough to set
up the other backs for long
gains and gets the ball in the
right hands at the right time.
He often laterals the ball
to the other backs after he
has cleared the first wave of
defenders.
He has not completed
over 10 passes in any one
game this season, yet they
are extremely valuable when
defenses put more than seven
defenders in the box. With the
threat of Timmons being able
to go long, opposing defenses
have to think twice about
stuffing the box to stop the
rim and the Red Devils often
use the pass to put themselves
in scoring position in one fell
swoop.
Mario Brown (Senior)/
Halfback: With injuries to


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the original starting backs,
Brown has become a key
player in the Red Devil
arsenal. While his statistics
are also far from eye-popping,
his contributions have set up
the big gains for the men who
get the bulk ofthe carries. His
speed has been important
in forcing opposing
defenses to
keep an
eye on
him and
spread
their players
across the
field. As the
only senior in
the backfield, his
steady and calm influence as
well as his big gains at key
times in ball games has been
invaluable as a model forth
other backs.
Deonte Welch/Ivan Floyd
(Freshmen)/Halfback:
Starting their first game last
week against Newsome they
both had big contributions.
With significant playing time
under their belts now, the two
freshmen should have an even
bigger role in the offense as
the playoffs 'progress. They
also are loaded with the kind
of speed that can be used as
a decoy and when carrying
the ball. All three are
excellent blockers and have
,:no problems with leading the
end around the Red Devils
often run.
Marquis Minor
(Freshman)/Courtney Days
(Sophomore)/Fullback:
Despite the freshman tag
Minor has been the man
responsible for the bulk of
the carries recently. He has
had big statistical games and
some with lesser yardage
gained. However as is the
case with every other player
in this offense, his gains


I


affect the game in intangible
ways and his speed wears
downs defenses. Although he
doesn't see as many carries
as Minor, Days is used in the
same manner and he gives
Baker the ability to continue
to gain yardage using the
same plays.
Jiwan James (Senior)/
Wide Receiver-Tight End-
Running Back: The senior
has come into his own
as a jack of all trades
on offense. He rarely
touches the ball more
than eight times
.per game, but those
few touches are often the
difference between the Red
Devils winning and losing.
Using his 6'4" frame, he
can out jump most defensive
backs and catch balls in mid-
stride. He gives Timmons the
ability to go deep and throw
jump balls when he gets into
trouble. Along with Welch,
the Red Devils now have a
potent: 1-2 receiving punch.
They will not see many
passes thrown to them, but
those passes can turn a game
around or put it on ice.
The offensive line: As is the
case with most playoff teams,
the offensive line has played
well all season without much
recognition. Furthermore as
talented and as much speed
as the skill players have, it
would be worthless without
the protection of the line.
They are an experienced
crew, boasting two juniors
and three seniors as well
as a sophomore. Perhaps
quickness is a better word
than speed to describe why
they are good. They promptly
get leverage on the defense
by getting lower on the drive

See Preview Page 11


Page 9


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Page 10 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Native son takes the victory lap


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
Starting the final race
of Florida's Gulf Coast
Modified Series in fourth
place in the points' standings,
it was far from a. surprise
that Robbie Cooper won last
Saturday night's-feature race
at Bronson motor speedway.
Nonetheless when the 50-
lap feature event came to
an end with Cooper taking
the checkered flags, the fans
rose to applaud the feel good
story.
In leading the race from
start to finish, the Bronson
native and his Jimmy Cope/
MusicMoose.com sponsored
automobile dominated the
field and left little to the
imagination. At least as far
as whom the eventual winner
would be.
"It was a good weekend
and a good way to end the
season," Cooper said. "It's
the best series in the state as
far as the competition. There
has been five or six winners
this year and to be included
among them is an honor.
"To win at home is always
sweet, but to win after having
the best day of my life become
one of the worst in the
blink of an eye is especially
rewarding."
In May, Cooper broke
several ribs racing at the
Speedway. He was leading
the race at the time.
In taking his first career
series victory, Cooper
started on the outside pole
next to Hinegardner. He
nudged his front bumper
inside Hinegardner's chassis
entering the first turn of the
first lap and by the time they
exited the second turn, the
only lead change of the night
occurred.


Journal photo by Neal Fisher
HEY, THOSE directions were wrong. Actually, the legend cars wait for their fel-
low racers to finish qualifying Saturday night.


Not only had Cooper seized
the lead with an imposing
move at the outset of the
race, but he made sure the
race was for all intents and
purposes over. Along with
Hinegardner and Lee Collins,
Cooper broke away from
the pack on the first lap, but
they never challenged for the
lead.
Three yellow flags flew
throughout the race. Every
time, Cooper along with the
eventual second and third
place finishers, separated
themselves from the field.
But neither of the contenders
could get close enough to
Cooper to set him up for a
pass.
"I think the most important
thing in winning at the track
is being patient," Cooper
said. "It isn't a track where
the driver can win on the


first lap. I learned a lot from
Collins and Hinegardner. So
to beat those guys was very
special too."
With his third place finish
in the race, Collins clinched
the series title. Hinegardner
took the second position in
the points standings. Cooper
moved up one spot to claim
third place in his rookie
season in the series.
The Bronson native will
race his modified automobile
at Desoto Speedway on
Saturday in their annual race
of champions. All entries are
by invitation only.
Robbie Storer of Zephyr
Hills captured the Florida
Mini-Stock Challenge race,
holding off Jason Randell of
Lakeland. Richard Elkins
of Auburndale claimed
the Southern Sportsmen
Series race, outlasting Craig


Cuzzone of Lakeland.
The track closes out the
2006 racing season with its
annual crash-a-rama and
various other curiosity races.

Florida Gulf Coast
Modified Series
1. 98 Robbie Cooper,
Bronson 2. 1H Mike
Hinegardner, Largo 3. 89 Lee
Collins, Immokalee
Florida Mini-Stock
Challenge
1. 9 Robbie Storer,
Zephyrhills 2. 91 Jason
Rendell, Lakeland. 3. 24
Chris Thornton, Clearwater
Southern Sportsman
1. 55 Richard Elkins Jr.,
Auburndale 2. 97 Craig
Cuzzone, Lakeland 3. 78
Arthur Conquest, Bronson


BY NEAL FISHER
SPORTS WRITER
With 23 years at the
helm, Bronson's basketball
program, head coach Greg
Beckham will call upon his
reserve of experience in
leading a group of talented
players into the 2006
season.
That reserve of coaching
experience is
being called
upon, because
Beckham will
be leading
a relatively
inexperienced
group of
varsity players
onto the
hardwood on
November 16
as they begin their season
with their pre-season tip-
off classic.
At the current time, th4
Eagles have yet to name'
their fifth starter. The four
known starters are Kendrick
Nordstrom, Bobby Collins,
C.J. King and James River.
Nordstrom and Collins
are seniors, while King
and Rivers come into
their sophomore season
after starting on last year's
varsity season.
"Even without naming
that fifth starter yet, I
think this is a team that
can contend for the district
title," Beckham said.
"They are a hard-working
group who will have good
chemistry. It will take
a few games, but I am
pleased and excited about
the season, because of the


!character of these young
men."
"Our junior varsity and
middle school coaches do
a good job of teaching the
fundamentals. And the
tradition of winning gives
the current group of players
sopnething to work for and
expectations."
Dione Thomas, Terrence
Dukes and
J e r e m y
Mayes join
the other four
players as
Eagles who
are expected
to see
significant
time this
year. All
three players
also started on the junior
varsity team last year.
However, even with as
much promise as there is
with'the core of this year's
teani, unfortunately for the
:agles, they will still have
to overcome the handicap
created by the loss of.two
starters from the 2005-2006
season.
Te.dtwo starters will miss
this eason due to school
related issues and the
Eagles will have to replace
their experience.
After, prowling the
sideline for 23 years,
Beckham has established a
foundation on defense and
that style vill continue this
season. The Eagles will
play a man-to-man defense
and varying; full court
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II










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


NFC AFC
South South
New Orleans 6 2 .750 198 159 Indianapolis 8 0 1.000 121 87
Atlanta 5 3 .625 167 164 Jacksonville 5 3 .625 175 114
Carolina 4 4 .600 137 163 Houston 2 6 .250 131 196
Tampa Bay 2 6 .250 102 173 Tennessee 2 6 .250 120 216
North North
Chicago 7 1 .875 116 23 Baltimore 6 2 .750 171 111
Minnesota 4 4 .500 130 135 Cincinnati 4 4 .500 175 168
Green Bay 3 5 .375 162 200 Pittsburgh 2 6 .250 177 176
Detroit 2 6 .250 162 203 Cleveland 2 6 .250 133 171
East East
N.Y. Giants 6 2 .750 194 144 NEngland 6 2 .750 88 64
Dallas 4 4 .500 223 164 NYJets. 4 4 .500 160 193
Philadelphia 4 4 .500 206 160 Buffalo 3 5 .375 124 163
Washington 3 5 .375 162 190 Miami 2 6 .250 133 158
West West
Seattle 5 3 .625 165 177 San Diego 6 2 .667 248 134
St. Louis 4 4 .500 180 197 Denver 6 2 .667 141 98
S Francisco 3 5 .250 143 238 Kansas City 5 3 .625 183 169
Arizona 1 7 .125 134 196 Oakland 2 6 .250 92 164


The Week Ahead


WILLISTON
Varsity Football
Friday 11/10 Nature
Coast (Brooksville)
1 st round FHSAA playoffs
Girls Soccer
Friday 11/10 @ Fort White
Monday 11/13 @ Haw-
thorne
Wednesday 11/15 New-
berry
Monday 11/20 @ P.K.
Yonge
Wednesday 11/29 @
Interlachen
Men's Varsity/J. V Bas-
ketball
Friday/Saturday 11/17-18
Tip Off Classic @ Chief-
land


Tuesday 11/21 Eastside
Tuesday 11/28 @New-
berry
Girls Varsity/J.V Bas-
ketball
Tuesday 11/14 @ North
Marion
Thursday 11/16 @ St.
Francis Catholic
Monday 11/20 @ The
Rock
Tuesday 11/21 Interlachen
Tuesday 11/28 Chiefland
Thursday 11/30 Haw-
thorne
BRONSON
Boys/Girls Basketball
Tuesday 11/14 Seven
Rivers
Friday 11/17 St. Francis


CHIEFLAND
Boys Basketball
Friday/Saturday 11/17-
11/18
Chiefland High School
Tip off Classic
Girls Basketball
Monday 11/13 @ P.K.
Yonge
Tuesday 11/14 @ Dixie
County
Thursday 11/16 @ Dun-
nellon
Monday 11/20 Ft. White
Tuesday 11/21 Newberry

Call Neal at 490-4462
to add your sporting
events to The Week
Ahead.


1Eagles


Continuedfrom page 10


*Preview


Continued from page 9


presses to create pressure.
The team will use a varia-
tion of the flex offense as
they look to push the ball up
the court and create an up-
tempo game where they can
get high percentage shots
from the field.
Nordstrom will line up
S at the off guard position as
his shooting touch will be
counted on. King is the point
guard. Rivers looks to add
firepower from the small for-
ward position. While Collins
is the Eagles big man, play-
ing both the-big forward and
center positions.
"I think with the personnel
we have, the offense and de-
fense we will play will be the
best fit for the team," Beck-
ham said. "We have Nord-
strom who is one of the best
in the area and is an excellent
shooter. But the team as a
whole is better than a group
of shooters.
"The defense is strong, be-
cause it is what the program
is based on and our size can
cause match-up problems.
We are not particularly big,
but we have speed and quick-
ness. Which means we can
push the ball up the floor on
offense and defensively we
can force teams into a faster
pace than they would like.
The team will have a core
of eight players and then there
will be two or three players
who we will have to develop.
But I think those two or three
players can contribute by the
end of the season. They are
hard workers who have desire
to get better and contribute."


Nonetheless, for now the
team enters the season with a
lack of depth, which can be a
weakness. The team's lack of
height will also be a concern.
They max out at 6"2".
Besides their speed and
quickness, they are a bet-
ter than average free throw
shooting team and are par-
ticularly strong at kicking
the ball out for to set up open
shots. The coach also thinks
they will have a strong chem-
istry and their hard playing
style will be strengths as the
season progresses.
Last year, the Eagles as-
sembled an 18-8 record and
the year before they went 26-
2. However, despite those
records, Mayo upset the team
in the semifinals of the dis-
trict tournament. Mayo went
on to lose to Trenton in the
championship game of the
district tournament.
This year's tournament
is being held at Bronson.
Looking at the schedule, both


those games will be critical
for the Eagles as the coach
thinks even with the players
the team has lost, they still
have the need and will play
with the urgency it requires
to beat those teams en route
to contending for the district
title.


The other teams in the dis-
trict are'Bell and Branford.
Among the non-district
games, which will play a
pivotal role in this season is
their regular-season opener
against Newberry on Nov. 21
and Jan. 30.


2006-2007 Bronson Varsity
Boys Basketball Schedule*
11/16 pre-season classic
11/17 preseason classic
11/21 Newberry
11/28 @ Bell
12/1 @ Dixie County
12/2 Oak Hall
12/5 @ Branford
12/8 @ Trenton
12/9 @ Hawthorne
12/12 @ Mayo-
12/15 Williston
12/28 Bronson Holiday Classic
12/29 Bronson Holiday Classic
12/30 Bronson Holiday Classic
* thru December



Low Rates Easy Terms
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off of the line of scrimmage and use it to get position in the
trenches.
The defensive line up is as follow:
Defensive Line:
Cevonta Heagle-Senior
Barry McNeil-Junior
Chris Morrow-Sophomore
Trip Fugate-Junior
Linebackers:
Kapree Thomas-Senior
Corey Days-Senior
Shavonte Johnson-Senior
Defensive Backs
Todd Brown-Senior
Jiwan James-Senior
Brandon Scott-Sophomore
Deonte Welch-Freshman
Ivan Floyd-Freshman


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Tides for Cedar Key starting with Nov. 9
Day High Tide Height Sunrise Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible
Th 9 High 2:51AM 4.1 6:51AM Set 11:17AM 85
9 Low 10:27AM -0.4 5;41 PM Rise 9:27 PM
9 High 5:10 PM 2.8
9 Low 9:56 PM 1.8
F 10 High 3:35 AM 3.8 6:52 AM Set 12:05 PM 77
10 Low 11:17AM 0.0 5:40PM Rise 10:29PM
10 High 6:05 PM 2.6
10 Low 10:45 PM 1.9
Sa 11 High 4:27 AM 3.5 6:53 AM Set 12:46 PM 67
11 Low 12:12PM 0.3 5:40PM Rise 11:29PM
11 High 7:05 PM 2.5
11 Low 11:49PM 1.9
Su 12 High 5:35 AM 3.2 6:53 AM Set 1:21 PM 58
12 Low 1:13 PM 0.6 5:39 PM
12 High 8:04 PM 2.6
M 13 Low 1:11 AM 1.7 6:54AM Rise 12:26AM 48
13 High 7:03 AM 3.0 5:39PM Set 1:50PM
13 Low 2:17PM 0.8
13 High 8:54 PM 2.7
Tu 14 Low 2:38AM 1.5 6:55AM Rise 1:21AM 38
14 High 8:37 AM 2.9 5:38PM Set 2:17PM
14 Low 3:16 PM 0.9
14 High 9:36 PM 2.9
W15 Low 3:51AM 1.1 6:56AM Rise 2:13AM 29
15 High 9:56 AM 2.9 5:38 PM Set 2:43 PM
15 Low 4:07 PM 1.0.
15 High 10:11 PM 3.2


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Page 12


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS & RECREATION


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Midway through, the NFL is full of surprises


that grown men and
women who have the
ability to analyze and
reason how events will take
their course, lose all validity
in their ability to think when
sports is involved. And
that is particularly true with
football.
So, as the NFL season
moves into the second half
of its season there is a rather
lengthy list of teams that
have for better, or worse
surprised the talking heads
with their performance.
While this is not
unexpected, I find the
content and the reasoning
behind these surprises to be.
Every year it seems there
is a majority of people who
are involved in some form
with the NFL who scratch
their head and say "What
haaaaaaaaaappened?
Several teams fall into
this category such as the
New England Patriots,
the Chicago Bears and the
Miami Dolphins.
However, whether it has
the most substance or not,
the trials and tribulations of
the defending champions
always top the list of
what happened and the
atmosphere of the NFL
revolve around them.


And while it might be a
somewhat simplistic view
of what has happened to
the defending champion
Pittsburgh Steelers season,
'the Sports Guy can explain
why their season was dead
upon the season's arrival.
Granted, I am surprised
the Steelers' record has
fallen all the way to a paltry
2-6. But did we really think
they would be better than
.500 given the woes of Ben
Roethlisberger.
Fair or unfair, a
quarterback's play can
directly determine a team's
fortunes and the environment
of the clubhouse. The
Pittsburgh quarterback fits
into the town's blue-collar,
man-up way of life and
deservedly has received his
share of positive attention.
However, while he did
quarterback his team to the
world championship, he did
have his moments where his
play was shaky up to and
including the Super Bowl.
He still needed seasoning
and maturing as this season
approached.
And that was before he
hung up his pads for the
off-season, which saw him
have a near fatal motorcycle
accident .and then an
emergency appendectomy.


Add to that a concussion and
the Pittsburgh Steelers have
a man who needs to take care
of healing physically and
emotionally on a personal
level, before worrying about
dealing with the rigors of
winning in the NFL.
While his desire to
play and fight through the
personal demons physical
injuries cause as well as the
wear and tear they create on
the body is admirable, his
line of work is a far cry from
the normal job.
Most people have jobs
where they can return to
while still healing, but
playing in the NFL is a field
where employees get hit by
large men who inflict pain
and impact upon bodies.
Players take the field with
injuries. This comes as no
surprise, but players do not
expect to get better on the
field. If they can keep their
injuries from getting worse,
it is a good day.
Fair or unfair, the
quarterback can be directly
responsible for a team
winning or losing and he
has to be all there in every
aspect of the game. The kind
of injuries Roethlisberger
suffered are not the kind
of injuries that heal within
days.


FT/a Sports &6j

NEAL FISHER
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


They are the kind of
injuries that even if there are
no mental effects, as far as
being afraid of getting hurt
again, the body still needs
several weeks to learn how
to function again.
Playing quarterback in
the NFL, as many first .
round picks will attest to,
is difficult enough when
healthy and all faculties
are working right, let alone
when someone has suffered
the kind of injuries the
Pittsburgh quarterback has.
While Bill Cowher proved
he was among the NFL's
best coaches last year, he
made a horrible decision
when deciding to start Big
Ben. The quarterback needs
rest and his backup, Charlie
Batch, has proven time and
time again he is capable of
winning.
With Big Ben not getting
the rest he needed, he has
made the kind of mistakes
that make coaches gray


before their time and it has
cost the not so defending
champions dearly.
Furthermore, the
Pittsburgh Steelers were
the last seeded team in
the American Football
Conference. last year. While
they earned the Super Title
by defeating the top three
seeds in their conference and
the top team in the National
Football Conference, they
were not thought of as
capable of winning the title
until the playoff reached the
semifinals.
They got hot at just the
right time and showed
throughout the season that
they had problems if players
got hurt. So, here we are in
the same position.
Add to that the loss
of several key players,
including Antwain Randal-El
and the uproar over whether
Cowher calls it a career at
the end of the season, the
champion's fall should not


be a surprise.
By the way, does this
sound familiar to Buccaneer'
fans out there? Which brings
me back to my original
point.
A huge part of sports
is about learning from
successful franchises and
individuals. When one
team wins a title, the other
franchises start copying
them., Yet over the past
decade almost every team'
has fallen hard the year
after winning the title, often
failing to make the playoffs.
And it is amazing to me
that teams who through
sound judgment and using
their brains win the NFL
title, can't seem to learn how
to avoid the fall from grace
the next year even with the
what not to do examples the
preceding champions have
set.
Neal Fisher is the sports
writer for the Levy County
Journal.


,..-2: 0 ;. 2 06


-I -


I I


rsa~ ~aLr ~L~st


d









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Page 13


Veteran s


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
STAFF WRITER

Veterans Day
celebration will
honor those who
have given years or even
their lives so the rest of us
could live freely.
Selfless giving seems to
run deep in these men and
women. They often return
from war to. continue serv-
ing their families and their
communities.
One local veteran finds as
much pleasure in giving as
do his recipients in receiv-
ing.
Chiefland resident Thom-
as Brown and his wife Bev-
erly recently participated in
Grandparents Day at Chief-
land Elementary.
"Many of the children
didn't have a grandparent
there, so their classmates
shared. I'll never forget
it. Little Antwan Bennett
just kept looking at me and
looking at me. He finally
came up and chose me to
be his grandpa for the day,"
Brown said.
"Antwan made Thomas
a peanut butter and jelly
sandwich, and he ate it,
which really surprised me,"
added Mrs. Brown.
"I like peanut butter,
and I like jelly, but I don't
like them together. But I
liked Antwan's. I ate it all,"
Brown said.
Brown began giving to
his country as a young man
in the early 1950s, when he
was called to serve in the
U.S. Army.
His hitch took him from
a new bride, whom he'd
married while on leave after
basic training. They didn't
know then he would soon
find himself in a war, or that
his service would mean they
would spend their first 13
months apart.
Brown found himself in
Korea working in an Army
motor pool, where he was
assigned five tanks. All had
been blown up, and he put
them all back together again.
He eventually was respon-
sible for a virtual flotilla of
vehicles-22 tanks, 2 jeeps,


e one of devotion


round and round. He'd ask
me to do something and I'd
tell him I couldn't because
it was a sergeant's job. I
was only a corporal. Fi-
nally he sent me to school.
When I got back to camp,
he had sergeant's stripes
waiting for me. That's how
I made staff sergeant.
"When I got ready to
leave he told me how he'd
appreciated everything
I'd done. We were getting
ready to turn our fleet over
to the (South) Koreans. The
tanks all had all the colors
flying. Everything looked
really good."
Kimmel wanted Brown
to stay in the Army and
go to helicopter school.
Such a path would have
started with Brown going
to school to learn to repair
them, and then on to pilot
training.
But with his wife and
baby waiting for him back
home, he opted for civilian
life.
He saw his first child
Clyde when he was already
four months old. The next
time he saw him, Brown
said, "He was a little'tubby
tux-walking and talking."
The couple had another
five children. Their fam-
ily has now grown to 16
grandchildren and nearly AIs
many great-grands.
These days Thomas
Brown shares his time with
family and church.
"We've been members
THOMAS AND BEVERLY Brown are still sweethearts after 53 years. The wall behindat First Baptist Church of
them holds photographs of their many children, grandchildren, and great-grand-Chiefland for 15 years," Mrs.


children.


a water wagon, supply trailer
and a deuce-and-a-half-a
tractor-trailer rig capable of
carrying two tons of equip-
ment.
His base camp was about
10 miles from the demilita-
rized zone.
His duty never took him to
that no-man's-land: "All my
tanks went up there and they
all came back. I kept them
well-maintained."
He did leave base many
times to perform roadside
repairs on vehicles.
"They all had rebuilt Japa-


nese engines in them. Those
engines weren't good at all.
They broke frequently,"
Brown said.
Before he left, he had re-
placed every vehicle's engine
with brand-new American-
made Continental engines.
It was the older Japanese
engines that provided a par-
ticularly memorable roadside
service call. "The whole tank
fleet was frozen in between
two mountains. We couldn't
get them off the frozen
roads. We tried everything
to get them loose. We finally


took the center guide treads
off the tanks and turned them
around'sE :they would act
like spikes. We used cables
and pulled them out. We
were up for 72 hours getting
those tanks back to camp.
Then we had to turn around
and go back for the supply
truck, which was also stuck."
When I finally got back, I
slept the clock around," he
recalled.
Brown remembers well the
man who ran the base. "Cap-
tain Kimmel was the head
honcho. He and I used to go


Brown said: She's a Sunday
school teacher and he's a
deacon and member of the
maintenance committee. -
They sing in the choir
and both are Sam's Club
members-Senior Adult
Ministries. Sam's members
visit local nursing homes
monthly.
"It's a real nice church,
and we're growing," Brown
said.

So too grows our coun-
try, due in no small part to
the sacrifice made by the
Browns and countless other
veterans and their families.


Teacher of
the Month
Chiefland
Elementary

Your name, grades/
subjects you teach and
years of experience:
Tammy W. Crosby, 3"'
grade, 22, years experi-
ence.
Where did you go to
school? University of
Flor -I
ida; .
major:
Ele-
m e n -
tar y
Educa-
tion
Fa-
vorite "f ;rr 4
sub-
ject in school: History
What made you de-
cide to teach? My choice
to teach was inspired by
the challenge of teaching
young minds something
new and exciting.
Other careers before
this one? Lifetime pro-
fession (so far).
Where are you from?
Trenton, Florida
Family: Husband,
Bobby Crosby; Sons Tres
Crosby, 17, and Kane
Crosby, 12
Your hero(s): Chil-
dren, because they see
life through different eyes
than adults.
Your most unforgetta-
ble moment while teach-
ing: Many unforgettable
moments! There's some-
thing new to add to the
list everyday.
Favorite off-duty ac-
tivities: Spending time
with my family. Working
in my yard.
Words of wisdom: Be
humble and gentle: be ;
patient, bear with one an- I
other in love. (Ephesians
4:2)
If you could pass on
advice, what would it
be? "They won't care
what you know until they
know that you care." I




Manager search

narrowed down


4-H teaching youth


how to be orators


Levy County began co-spon-
soring the Tropicana Public
Speaking program in 1969.
Since then there have been
thousands of Levy County
youth learning how to write
and present speeches.
This program is open to all
youth grades 4 & 5 for the
Elementary Division-grade 6
for the Middle Division and
grades 7 & 8 for the Immedi-
ate Division.
Tropicana sponsors the el-
ementary and middle division
and the Levy County Board
of County Commissioners/4-
H sponsors the intermediate
division. Currently, most of
the schools in Levy County
Participate in this educational
event. Schools have received
their educational materi-
als for their classroom 'and
school contest. This program
will culminate in the county-
wide contest on Dec. 7 at 7
p.m. at the new Bronson High
School.
Several years ago the Levy
County 4-H opened the con-
test to home schooled chil-
dren. Due to the inability
of 4-H to contact the home
school youth, 4-H encourag-
es those home school parents
who would like their children
to participate, to contact the
4-H office, Evelyn or Brenda
at 486-5131 for the informa-


tion and teaching curriculum.
If there is enough interest
with the home school youth,
the Levy County 4-H will
provide practice sessions
and a home school contest
in preparation for the county
contest.
All materials for this edu-
cational event are provided
to teachers, including the
relevant Sunshine State Stan-,
dards.
Awards are provided for
the classroom, ribbons, and
for the school, medals. At
the county level, plaques are
given for three places plus a
full scholarship is given to 4-
H Residential Camp for the
winning presentation.
Judges for the county con-
test come form the University
of Florida Oral Communica-
tions Department. Each year,
they provide superior assis-
tance with the youth and in-
put for improvements.
Everyone is invited to the
Levy County 4-H/Tropicana
Public Speaking Contest.
Come out and hear the
wonderful job our teachers.
are doing encouraging and
supporting the youth of Levy
County in what is perhaps the
most difficult and challeng-
ing opportunity we can pro-
vide our youth-speaking in
front of a crowd.


BY CASSIE JOURNIGAN
S. .STAFF WRITER
CHIEFLAND-Interim city
manager Matt Brock tops the
shortlist of candidates hoping
to win Chiefland's top paid
post.
Of the six short-listed can-
didates, only Brock received
the full five votes in a special
..-' meeting Monday.

-. ". .. Tramel of Cottondale, Clyde
S M [ITTLE R S. Forbes Jr., of Trenton;
r.~. .,.. Lyndon L. Bonner of Ocala:
Brian L. Johnson of Athens,
Ga. and Grady Hartzog, Sr.
of Newberry. Thirty-four
W candidates sent resumes to
the city.
In the next stage, commis-
sioners will interview short-
listed candidates.
Interviews will be held in
Journal photo by Rhonda Griffiths open meetings Nov. 28 and 2'9
MARY'S LITTLE LAMBS, located on 62nd Avenue, Chiefland, opened its doors at 6 p.m. Background checks
Oct. 20 to provide a learning center for children. Owners Mary Golding and will then be conducted.
Cheryl Shelton, pictured with Seth, are committed to a positive experience for A city manager is expected
their charges and welcome children ages 1 to 6 years old. "Nothing is too good to be hired in a special meet-
for my babies," Golding said, adding that the hard work she has put forth is a ing Dec. 18.
gift to the community.


Rolling Thunder salutes vets; will roll into Chiefland


The monthly meeting for
Rolling -Thunder, Inc.,
Florida Chapter 7 will take
place on Veterans Day, Sat-
urday, Nov. 11, 10 a.m., at
the VFW 2170 West Veterans
Lane, Beverly Hills.. Veter-
ans Day is the day set aside
to thank and honor ALL those
who served honorably in the
military-in wartime or peace-
time.


"The major objective of
Rolling Thunder, Inc. is to
publicize POW-MIA issues:
to educate the public that
many American prisoners of
war were left behind... and to
protect future veterans from
being left behind should they
become prisoners of war-
missing in action."
Rolling Thunder, Inc
is a non-profit organization.


They are NOT a motorcycle
club or a veterans organiza-
tion. Although many of its
members ride motorcycles, a
person does not have to own
or ride a motorcycle to be a
member, just the time and
willingness to be an advocate
for our troops, veterans, and
POW/MIA's. Rolling Thun-
der, Inc., Florida Chapter
7 is currently enrolling new


members. For more informa-
tion contact Ray Thompson,
president, (813) 230-9750
/ e-mail ray@rtsurvey.com
or Jim Stepanek, secretary,
(352) 489-1644, / e-mail
imcrazyjim@aol.com. You
may also visit their website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com.
The Saturday, Dec. 9 meet-

See Toys Page 17


A p


nn~-~Y









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Page 14


l classified

Deadline
Monday
and




Legals



LB COUNTY JOU
W E COUNTY PAPER EST. ,92


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS-
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


How to Place Your.Ad


Bronson 352-486-2312
Bronson 352-486-5042

440 South Court Street, I


Call:
Fax:


Chiefland 352-490-4462
Chiefland 352-490-4490


Email: mblitch@lev joumal.com
Visit: 13 South Main Street, Chiefland


Miscellaneous-.


ioU

Personals
105"
AA MEETING-for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number, tfn

NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals.
Call (800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net


TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb

MAKO PLASTERING &
PAINTING, Quality assurance,
residential & commercial. Stucco,
drywall repair, interior hardcoats.
CC#1555, insured. Rick Layman,
ofc: 352-486-4316, fax: 352-486-
2804; John Layman, home: 352-
486-7096. 12/28p'- .
This, 9acI a r sale.
Call Robin to
purchase at
a low rate
490-4462

Employment


20
Help Wan,
210 Full tirri
MAID SERVICES Looking
for PT/FT person. Must be
dependable, hard-working, non-
smoker with clean background,
bondable and clean driving
record. Call 352-486-2245 and
leave message. 11/9b

rentals


3

Condominrl I
320 -
GREEN LEAF CONDOMINIUMS
Gainesville, 2BR 2% BA, all
appliances (incl. washer/dryer).
Fenced back yard. Asking $650/
mo., first, last & security deposit.
Call 352-486-2493, leave
message. 11/9p

Real Estate 4



Houses fo
415
PALM HARBOR FACTORY
Liquidation Sale. 2006 Models
Must Go! Modular, Mobile & Stilt
Homes. 0% DOWN When You
Own Your Own Land!! FREE
Color Brochure. 800-622-2832.
11/9b


H415 ouses fI

CORNER LOT WITH 2 "Cracker
Houses" in Williston. Close to
everything, downtown, banks,
Hwy 27-A & Hwy 41. City water
& sewer, located on paved road
at NE 91 Street. $20,000 obo.
352-208-3200 cell. 11/16p,


425 for S.
OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
lots $500 down, $199/month.
Owner:. 352-624-2215, 352-236-
4579, www.ocalaforestland.com/
2nd 12/28p
LEVY COUNTY 5.31 acres,
$132,000, trees, fenced, gates,
culvert, pole barns, storage
shed, county maintained roads,
deed-restricted. Call 407-847-
6630. 11/16p
% ACRE BETWEEN Williston &
Morriston. Paved road frontage
on SR 121. Wooded! High and
dry! Owner financing. No down
payment. Only $359/mo; total:
$34,900.00. Call 352-215-1018.
11/16p
Want 'e


515 Yard,

YARD SALE. Furniture, toys,
books, clothes. Lots of things.
Saturday 9 a.m. until 3 pm.. 295
N. Court Street, Bronson, next to
Making Waves Salon. 11/9p
8 FAMILY YARD SALE Saturday
November 11,2006, 8-4. 2 Miles
W. ofWilliston Alt.27 across from
Master Lube PSE ,Baby,- G
Bow, arrows, case like new, 7-N-
1 game table, trick bike, Reese
trailer hitches, brown wicker
loveseat, couch, loveseat, rocker,
curio cabinet, exercise machine,
king-size comforter sets, linens
Brighton, purses & wallets,
even-flo carseat-stroller combo,
pac-N-play toys, home stereo
system, clip-on high chairs,,
Raggedy Ann dolls, name brand
clothing, all sizes newborn 2X,.
much more. 11/9b
Miscell
550
NEW MOWER $ CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/14/07


ETHIIGAL-tmUNTSER R' WaInti tOVY Recreatioi
lease small piece' fidiaenpdo:fot n l
hunting. Rick Layman, 352-486-
7096. 11/219b 6

For Sale
I 165 Boats &L

I MOBILE MARINE SERVICE
IAuti Boat motors wanted, dead or
IAuct alive 352-486-4316 12/28p


1510 "U
FAT GOOSE AUCTION holding
estate auctions each Friday in
downtown Chiefland at .7:00
pm. Always-outstanding estate
merchandise. Our box lots start
at 6:30 pm. There are vintage
Asian items, large statues,
carved ivory pieces, super art
work oil on canvas pictures.
Items from 3 different antique
stores. Nice primitives 1800's
leather fainting couch, crocks,
ox yoke, great glassware.
Furniture 8 legged drop leaf
table, large slab coffee table,
matching hutches, fishing gear
and all types of smalls, tools,
and lots more. AU2738 (Bruce
Denestein) AB2565 10% BP. For
more info. call Jim Morehead at
(352) 356-1065. 11/9b


92 HONDA 4-STROKE 45 hp
motor, low hours, like new,
comes with controls and prop.
$1500. 352-275-1213 11/2,9b

Legals


.. 91
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2006-CA-
000888
IN RE: ONE RED IN COLOR
1994 GMC,
FLORIDA TAG V292S
VIN 1GKCS13WqR2521107


.MAIN STREET FRAMING

S& ART GALLERY
ow locatioportraltfor dth ho Idays-
352-493-4747
David & Susan Leach
10-5 Mon-Fri 329 S. Main St
10-2 Saturday Chlefland, FL
i0 -

ZONING OFFICIAL/CODE
ENFORCEMENT OFFICIAL TOWN
OF YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
The Town of Yankeetown is accepting applications
for an experienced Zoning and Code Enforcement
Official for part time employment, minimum 20 hours.
Additional hours required depending on workload.
Located in the southwest corner of Levy County on
the Withlacoochee River, an outstanding Florida
waterway, Yankeetown has a population of approxi-
mately 700. For details call 352-447-2511. Deliver
Resume & cover letter before 12:00 noon 11/15/06 to:
Town of Yankeetown, 6241 Harmony Lane, P.O. Box
280, Yankeetown, Florida 34498-0280 or Fax to 352-
447-0774. An EOE


TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY
ONE ($231.00) DOLLARS IN
U.S. CURRENCY.
WILLISTON POLICE DE-
PARTMENT
Petitioner,
DEONTE DALLAS
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DEONTE DALLAS and
UNKNOWN PARTIES IN IN-
TEREST


YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a complaint for Forfei-
ture has been filed by the Willis-
ton Police Department, Williston,
Levy County, Florida;, and you
are required to serve a copy of
your answer or other pleading
on the plaintiffs attorney, RAY E.
THOMAS, JR. of RAY E. THOM-
AS, JR. P.A., at Post Office Box
39 Bell, Florida 32619, and file
the original answer or pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the
above named Court on or before
December 21, 2006.
IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO,
judgment by default will be tak-
en against you for the relief de-


manded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and offi-
cial seal, this 2nd day of Novem-
ber 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Levy County, Florida
P.O. Box 610
Bronson, FL 32621
By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006


TOWN OF YANKEETOWN, REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PLANNING AND ZONING CONSULTING SERVICES
The Town of Yankeetown is seeking a proposal or proposals from an individual or individuals, firm or
firms, with expertise in zoning and planning to provide on-call contract support to the Town by serving as
staff to the Town Zoning Official for the following services:
Review and comment on zoning permit applications for compliance with the Town's Comprehensive
Plan, Zoning Ordinance, and infrastructure concurrency requirements.
Review rezoning applications for conformance with the Town's Land Use Development Regulations
and compile, for Zoning Official use, detailed assessments with supporting documentation and
comments for project reviews conducted.
Review and comment on proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments for conformance with the Town's
Comprehensive Plan and State of Florida regulations.
Assist the Zoning Official with growth management issues and periodic reviews of the Comprehensive
Plan.
,*. Asigs th A pqpng Official with.regard to amendments to the Zoning Ordinance,,including-periodic ,
..,c~ipansive review of the Zoning QOri-itali~~ MIM ,! .H er? r*',I imh'o ?r. ,
Advise the Zoning Official with regard to, and participate as a technical resource in the negotiation of
Development Agreements.
Meet with Town staff or applicants as requested by the Town to coordinate and communicate
application review comments.
Provide other services as requested by the Town staff or Council.
Proposals should include names and resumes of company employees who will be providing these contract
services. The Proposer must demonstrate sufficient experience n code enforcement, comprehensive land use
planning and zoning, and governmental permitting with regard to the services to be provided.
FEE STRUCTURE
The proposer shall detail fees for services which may be upon an hourly rate, a fixed rate of compensation per
month, including costs along with an hourly rate for matters beyond the agreed upon scope of services, or a
fixed rate for specific types of items or service. Consideration will be given to, among other things,
experience, educational background and professional licenses or certificates held, proximity of the proposer
to the Town of Yankeetown and practical availability of the proposer, and resources and staffing of the
proposer.
RESPONSES
All responses shall be delivered to the Town of Yankeetown, Town Clerk, no later than 12:00 noon,
November 15, 2006, and should be addressed to:
Town Clerk, Town of Yankeetown
6241 Harmony Lane
P.O. Box 280
Yankeetown, FL 34498-0280 Pub.: Oct. 26, Nov. 2, 9, 2006


LEVY COUNTY HISTORY
(. Bit of History of Cnefland
by Hazel R. Etheridge, 1979)

From the Levy County Clerk of Court Archives and History Department; Searchfor Yesterday
VoL 2, Ch. 20, p. 18

SHow long has the City of Chiefland, located in Levy County in Northwest Cen-
tral Florida been in existence, and what was it like in its early days?

SAt-the time of the arrival of the Spaniards in Florida in the 16th Century, marking
the beginning of the.historical era in this state, the inhabitants of this area were the
Timucuan Indians, whose ancestors had migrated to this area from Asia by cross-
ing the Bering Straits and the North ACqontinent. Relics of their culture a
have been found that prove they o ad a sttle t at Cedar Keys and appar-
ently roamed all through this afa southward to Ocala. These people were tall,
well-built, and intelligent. Their horres were a circular arrangement of poles with
palm-thatched roofs.

S There is evidence tat the p rl s r ern ando .le,.oto, and his men
sais, ho had

U"ov-r these
ih eyfJi been

t ; Sen io di i na eks," moved ifto this area in the
J".io t .S-ordshhow that some white settlers
H im.)here .Ws. .a settlement at t.a.near present-
w:l.b eree ek.iftaei s and-their-tibesmen lived. peaceably-
s whileirr.g m ming. This -issaid to'be the origin.
e Wiiefs But all: es t'ne d to remain i


S" .- r the Archives and History Center-
'- Levy Cointy Clerk's Office
S. ,. .. DannyJ. Slipp, Clerk of Court .
"- -'^"- L',' ..-' : .'- ,,'-"- .,, -~ ;. :, '". 1,^ ._ "- ., ",:' ., ,,i,


I .










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


-AIAB IFIFD a LEGAILS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Page 15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2006-CA-000828
PERRY H. GREENSPAN,
INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ARTHUR W. FARROW, if
living, but if deceased, his heirs,
administrators and assigns;
WILLAIM A. FRITZ, JR. and
HAROLD FRITZ,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:ARTHUR W. FARROW
Deceased

WILLIAM A. FRITZ, JR.
Deceased

HAROLD FRITZ
Deceased

AS WELLAS any and all other
parties claiming by, through,
under, or against ARTHUR W.
FARROW, WILLIAM A. FRTIZ,
JR. and HAROLD FRITZ, or their
respective heirs, administrators
and assigns, as well as all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in
the property herein described.
-YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet title to the following
property in Levy County, Florida,
to-wit:
West % of the SW 1 of the
NE % and the NE % of the SW
1/4 of Section 19, Township 11
South, Range 17 East, Levy
County, Florida.
(Parcel No. 03161-170-00)

has been filed against you
and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is Post Office Box
1354, Bronson, Florida 32621,
on or before November 17, 2006
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service o Plaintiffs attorney or
immediatelythereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.
Dated this 12" day of October
2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Deanna Dobbins
Deputy Clerk
SPub: Oct. 19, 26,
Nov. 2, 9, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2006-CA-000817
RICHARD W. LeGRAND and
LYNDOLA. LeGRAND,
Plaintiffs,

vs.

THE HEIRS,
ADMINISTRATORS AND
ASSIGNS OF FRED J.
CIANCIULLI, Deceased,
including PASQUALINA
CIANCIULLI, JOSEPH
CIANCIULLI and MARIAN
CIANCIULLI,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
PASQUALINA CIANCIULLI
275 Sickles Avenue, #3
New Rochelle, NY 10801

JOSEPH CIANCIULLI
273 Sickles Avenue
New Rochelle, NY 10801

MARIAN CIANCIULLI
4355 Kissena Blvd.
Flushing, NY 11355

ANY AND ALL OTHER
HEIRS, ADMINISTRATORS
AND ASSIGNS OF FRED J.
CIANCIULLI, Deceased, if any
there be
Address Unknown

AS WELL AS any and all
other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against THE
HEIRS, ADMINISTRATORS
AND ASSIGNS OF FRED


J. CIANCIULLI, Deceased,
including PASQUALINA
CIANCIULLI, JOSEPH
CIANCIULLI and MARIAN
CIANCIULLI, or their respective
heirs, administrators and assigns,
as well as all parties having or


claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet title to the following
property in Levy County, Florida,
to-wit

Lots 21. and 22, Block E,
,ROSEWOOD PARK UNIT
NO. 1; according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book
3, Page 16, public records of
Levy County, Florida.
(Parcel No. 08995-000-00)

has been filed against you
and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiffs' attorney,
whose address is Post Office Box
1354, Bronson, Florida 32621,
on or before November 24, 2006
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs' attorney or
immediatelythereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint dr petition.'
Dated this 9* day of October
2006.

DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Oct. 19, 26,
Nov. 2, 9, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 38-2006-CA-000818
PERRY H. GREENSPAN and,
DEANNA GREENSPAN,
Plaintiffs,
vs.

HEIRS, ADMINISTRATORS
AND ASSIGNS OF THELMA
BERGAN, also known as
THELMA BESSIE BEGAN;
RUTH MANNING and ZELDA
McCAIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO;
HEIRS, ADMINISTRATORS
AND ASSIGNS OF THELMA
BEGAN,
Deceased
Address Unknown

RUTH MANNING
4301 Mt. Herbert
San Diego, CA 92117

ZELDA McCAIN
4301 Mt. Herbert
San Diego, CA 92117,

AS WELL AS any and
all other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against the
HEIRS, ADMINISTRATORS
AND ASSIGNS OF THELMA
BERGAN, also known as
THELMA BESSIE BEGAN;
RUTH MANNING AND ZELDA
McCAIN, ortheirrespective heirs,
administrators and assigns,
as well as all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet title to the following
property in Levy County, Florida,
to-wit:
The East % of the
Southeast % of the Northwest
% of the Southwest % of the
Northwest % of Section 25,
Township 14 South, Range
17 East, Levy County,
Florida
(Parcel No. 03743-079-
00)


:has been
and you are,


filed against you
required to serve


a: copy of your written defenses
to it, if any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiffs' attorney,
whose address is Post Office Box
1354; Bronson, Florida 32621,
on or before November 24, 2006
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs' attorney or
immediatelythereafter; otherwise
a default Will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.
Dated this 9"h day of October
2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)


Pub: Oct. 19, 26,
Nov. 2, 9, 2006


IN THE CI
O
EIGHTH JU
IN AND
COUNTY
Case No. 38-2(
RICHARD W
LYNDOLA. I


vs.

BARBARA
MORALES


NOTICE OF
TO: BARB
MORALES.
424 Pach
Hato Rey

AS WELLAs
parties claimir
under, or agair
VDA. de MORA
administrators
as well as all
claiming to ha\
or Interest in th
described.
YOU ARE N
action to quiet ti
property in Lev
to-wit:

Lot58, Bl
LAKES ES1
N, accordir
thereof reco
3, Page 27,
Levy County
(Parcel N

has been f
and you are r
a copy of your
to it, if any, on
WEIDNER, PI
whose address
1354, Bronson
on or before Nc
and file the
Clerk of this C
service on Pla
immediatelythe
a default will b
you for the re
the Complaint
Dated this 9
2006.




E

(Court Seal)
Pub: Oct. 19


RCUIT COURT SEARCH FOR A HEAD IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IF THE START GRANTEE OF THE
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN LEVY, GILCHRIST AND 8T JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
SFOR LEVY DIXIE COUNTIES, FLORIDA IN AND FOR
, FLORIDA A Head Start program Levy, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
006-CA-000819 Gilchrist, and Dixie Counties, CIVIL DIVISION
V. LeGRAND and Florida needs a new sponsor. CASE NO: 38-2006-CA 718
LeGRAND, The U.S. Department of Health WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiffs, and Human Services, Adminis- AS TRUSTEE FOR MASTR
tration for Children and Families, ASSET BACKED SECURITIES
is looking for community-minded, TRUST 2005-OPT1,
community-based organizations Plaintiff,
R. VDA. de -- including faith-based organi-
zations -- that are interested in vs.
Defendants. operating a quality Head Start
program that provides compre- JONATHAN GIFFORD
ACTION hensive services, to low-income A/K/A JONATHAN D.
ARA R. VDA. De preschool children from ages GIFFORD, et al,
three to the: age when children Defendants.
iin Marin Street enter kindergarten. Applicants
, PR 00917 may be nonprofit or for-profit NOTICE OF ACTION
organizations, within, the com- TO: SHANNON GIFFORD,
S any and all other munity. The funding available for SPOUSE OF JONATHAN,
ng by, through, this program is $1,879,424. With GIFFORD
nst BARBARA R. these funds, the previous grant- '(LAST NOWNADDRESS)
ILES, or her heirs, ees served 268 children. How- 322 SE 5 thStreet, Williston,
and assigns, ever, it is up to each applicant Florida 32696
parties having or to propose what it believes to be (LAST KNOWNADDRESS)
ve any right, title the maximum number of children 2909 Maple Run Drive Madison,
ie property herein and families that it can serve in a Wisconsin 53719)
high quality Head Start program (:CURRENT RESIDENCE
O1TIFIED that an with the total funding (including UNKNOWN) .
tle to the following the applicant's proposed match-
y County, Florida, ing funds) that is available for YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
this effort. Interested applicants an action for Foreclosure of
should contact the ACYF Opera- Mortgage on the following
ock36, RAINBOW tions Center at (866) 796-1591 describe property:.
TATES SECTION or HSB@dixongroup.com to re-
ng to the Plat ceive pre-application materials LOTS4AND5,BLOCK3, MAP
rded in Plat Book and additional information. The OR OAK VILA, ACCORDING
public records of announcement is also available TO THE PLAT THEREOF
V, Florida. at www.grants.gov under CFDA RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,.
o. 06895-042-00) 93.600. The closing date for re- PAGE 39, PUBLIC RECORDS
ceipt of applications under this OF LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
iled against you announcement is December 20,
required to serve 2006 at 4:30 p.m. eastern time. has been filed against you
written defenses Selection of a successful Head and you are required to serve a
I CHARLOTTE J. Start applicant will be made in copy of your written defenses, if
plaintiffs' attorney, accordance with 45 CFR 1302, any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson,
is PostOfficeBox Subparts A and B and 45 CFR P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff,
i, Florida 32621, Part 74. ACF welcomes pub- whose address is 1800 NW
november 24, 2006 lic comments from parents and 49T STREET, SUITE 120 FT.
original with the area residents. The intent of the LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or
court either before public cominent is not to solicit before Dec. 8,2006, a datewhich
intiffs' attorney or support for a specific applicant is within thirty (30) days after the
areafter;otherwise but to obtain information on.the first publication of this Notice in
e entered against needs of the service area un- the LEVYCOUNTY JOURNAL
lief demanded in der this announcement. Corn- and file the original with the
orpetition. ments can be sent to the ACYF Clerk of this Court either before
Ith day of October Operations Center via e-mail or service on Plaintiff's attorney or
by mailing to: 118 Q Street NE, immediatelythereafter; otherwise
Washington DC 20002. a default will be enteredagainst
DANNY J. SHIPP t;Pub.: Nov.2, 9, 2006 .' ,you for the relief demanded in
"'GClZ'bfOourt -"' thtecomlaint. aq w w
I TIHiE CIRCUIT COURT OF If you are a person with
u, a ,e a.. person.with
3y: Gweh McElroy THE EIGHTH Disabilities who need any
Deputy Clerk JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, accommodation to participate in
IN AND FOR this proceeding, you are entitled
, 26, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA at no cost to vou to the provisions


Nov. 2, 9, 2006

SEARCH FORAN EARLY
HEAD START GRANTEE
IN LEVY, GILCHRIST AND
DIXIE COUNTIES, FLORIDA
An Early Head Start program
in Levy, Gilchrist, and Dixie
Counties,. Florida needs a new
sponsor. The U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services,
Administration for Children arid
Families, is looking for commu-
nity-minded, community-based
organizations -- including faith-
based organizations that are
interested in operating a quality
Early Head Start program that
provides comprehensive ser-
vices:to low-income pregnant
women and children from birth
to age 3. Applicants may be non-
profit or for-profit organizations
within the community. The fund-
ing available for this program is
$1,095,834. With these funds,
the previous grantees served
106 children. However, it is up to
each applicant to propose what
it believes to be the maximum
number of Children and families
that it can serve in a high qual-
ity Early Head Start program
with the total funding (including
the applicant's proposed match-
ing funds) that is available for
this effort. Interested applicants
should contact the ACYF Opera-
tions Center at (866) 796-1591
or HSB@dixongroup.com to re-
ceive pre-application materials
and additional information. The
announcement is also available
at www.grantslgov under CFDA
93.600. The closing date for re-
ceipt of applications under this
announcement is December
20, 2006 at 4:30 p.m. eastern
time. Selection of a successful
Early Head Start applicant will
be made in accordance with 45
CFR 1302, Subparts A and B and
45 CFR Part 74. ACF Welcomes
public comments from parents
and area residents. The intent
of the public comment is not to
solicit support for a specific ap-
plicant but;to obtain information
on the needs of the service area
under this announcement. Com-
ments can be sent to the ACYF
Operations Center via e-mail or
by mailing to: 118 Q Street NE,
Washington DC 20002.
Pub.: Nov. 2, 9, 2006


Case No.:38-2006-DR-000753

Kenneth Lee Hamm, Jr.
Petitioner

and

Alicia Nicole Hamm
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

TO: Alicia Nicole Hamm
76 SE 151 Avenue,
Old Town, Florida 32680


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Kenneth
Lee Hamm, Jr., whose address
is 500 W. Park Avenue #407
Chiefland, Florida 32626 on or
before December 7, 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 355 South Court
Street, P.O. :.Box 610 Bronson,
Florida 32621, before service
on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded Irn
the petition.
Copies for all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review theses, documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme CourtApproved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in the lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on
record at the Clerk's office,'
WARNING: .Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.

Dated: October 27, 2006
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: LaQuanda Lalson
Deputy Clerk
Pub. Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23
/f


of certain .assistant. Please
contact the ADA Coordinator at
Court Street, Bronson, FL 32621
or Telephone (352) 486-5276
prior to such proceeding. I you
are hearing impaired call 1-800-
955-8771.

WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 25t day of
October, 2006.
Pub: Nov. 2, 9, 2006
NOTICE OF CLOSED
EXECUTIVE SESSION OF
THE EEVY COUNTYt SCHOOL
BOARD

COMES NOW, the
undersigned, as the attorney for
The Levy County School Board
and gives this Notice pursuant to
Florida Statute 286.011(8)(d) that
The Levy County School Board
will hold a Closed Executive
Session on November 21, 2006
beginning at 10:30 A.M. or as
soon thereafter as may be heard,
at the School Board Meeting
Room, 480 Marshburn Drive,
Bronson, Florida, to discuss
pending litigation in the case of
Juanita Terrell, Petitioner, vs.
School Board of Levy County,
Respondent, Levy County Circuit
Court Case # 38-2006-CA-148.
Attending this session will
be School Board Members
- Elizabeth "Beth" Davis, Billy
Morrison, Frank Etheridge,
Rick umner; Paige Brookins;
Superintendent of` Schools,
Clifton V. Norris; Board
Attorney, Sheree H. Lancaster;
Special Board Attorney, Lisa
J. Augspurger; and a court
reporter.
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED
this 7' day of November, 2006.

SHEREE H. LANCASTER, PA.
By: Is/Sheree H. Lancaster
Attorney for Levy County School
Board
109 East Wade Street
Post Office Box 1000
Trenton, Florida 32693
(352) 463-1000
Florida Bar No. 602922
Pub.: Nov. 9, 2006


Legal
deadline is
5 p.m. Monday


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 38-2005-CA-000965
DIVISION:

SALLY BLAKEWOOD,
Plaintiff,
vs.

ABIDE IN HIM MINISTRIES,
INC.And JOWANNA DOVE a/k/
a And JOWANNA M. DOVE, et


Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE


Notice is given that pursuant
to a Final Summary Judgment
of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
October 30, 2006 in Case
No. 38-2005-CA-000965, of
the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for Levy
County, Florida, in which SALLY
BLAKEWOOD, is the plaintiffs)
and ABIDE IN HIM MINISTRIES,
INC, JOWANNA DOVE a/k/a
JOWANNA M. DOVE, are the
defendantss; I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
in the lobby of the Courthouse in
Levy County, in Bronson, Levy
County, Florida at 11:00 AM on
November 27, 2006 the following
described property set forth in
said Final Judgment:
Lots 35 & 37 of GREEN HILLS
SUBDIVISION as per plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 8,
Page 13 of the PublicRecords of
Levy County, Florida.
Tax Parcel #19464-000-00 &
19466-000-00
DATED this 30" day of October
2006.

CLERK OF THE COURT
By: Gwen McElroy
As Deputy Clerk
Publication of this notice on Nov.
9, 16, 2006 in LEVY COUNTY
JOURNAL

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case o 2 -6b6206A'6i 58
Civil Division
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE
COMPANY OF CANADA
Plaintiff,

vs.

HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC
CHURCH, DIANE CHISOLM-
JONES and JOSEPH E. PRICE,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MS. DIANE CHISOLM-
JONES
3205 N.W. 46" Court
Ocala, FL 34482

Ms. DIANE CHISOLM-
JONES
S2501 S.W. 10" St., Apt. #305
Ocala, FL 34474

YOUARE HEREBYNOTIFIED
that an action for interpleader
and declaratory relief has been
filed against you, Diane Chisolm-
Jores. You are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses
to this action, if any, on Mark
D. Kiser, the Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 101 East
Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 2700,
Tampa, Florida 33602, on or
before December 15, 2006, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on the Plaintiffs attorney or
immediatelythereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.

DATED on Oct. 30, 2006.
Clerk of Circuit Court

By Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Nov. 9,16, 2006


Buying

Tax Deeds?
,Need to deta' the title?
E&pwienced, Dependa8e
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
Cafe
eAaweoue a. Weidnew
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


~1~~~11 le~ ~ 31111~











Page 16


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CLASSIFIED & LEGALS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


gals 9 OWNEF
egais THE EX
09FOR AS
CATION
ERTY; P
I LOREM
HISTORY
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FOR Cl
USE UNIFORM METHOD OF OR NOI
COLLECTING NON-AD VIDING
VALOREM ASSESSMENTS OF PRO
PROVIDE
ITY; PR(
Levy County, Florida (the CLAUSE
ACounty@) hereby provides EFFECT
notice, pursuant to section All pe
197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, they dec
of its intent to use the uniform sions m;
method of collecting non-ad va- ing, they
lorem special assessments to be proceed
levied within the unincorporated pose, th
area of the County, for the cost that a ve
of providing solid waste disposal feeding
services for residential and non- includes
residential properties, fire pro- dence ul
tection services and road main- to be bas
tenance services commencing Any p
for the Fiscal Year beginning on able acc
October 1, 2007. The County will pate in t
consider the adoption of a reso- tact the
lution electing to use the uniform Administ
method of collecting such' as- 486-5211
sessments authorized by section Nancy B
197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a Levy Co
public hearing to be held at 9:00 County
a.m. on December 5, 2006 at Pub. Nov
the Commission Chambers, 356.
S. Court Street, Bronson, Flori- NOTI
da 32621. Such resolution will Paul Ba
state the need for the levy andpursuant
will contain a legal description of Florida
the boundaries of the real prop- (Fla. Sta
erty subject to the levy. Copies of by gives
the proposed form of resolution, said Act
which contains the legal descrip- 24, 2006
tion of the real property subject NE. 200
to the levy, are on file at the Of-
Florida, I
fice of the County Coordinator, will cond
355 S. Court Street, Bronson, sealed b
Florida. All interested persons Bids to b
are invited to attend. viei
In the event any person de- for the c
cides to appeal any decision by b or
the County with respect to any ing pers
matter relating to the consid-ng peers
eration of the resolution at the.
above-referenced public hearing, 4171 NE
a record of the proceeding may Williston
be needed and in such an event,
such person may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of theGarr
4906 SW
public hearing is made, which re- 4906
cord includes.the testimony and Cape
evidence on which the appeal is
to be based. In accordance with 141
the Americans with Disabilities Bronson
Act, persons needing a special
accommodation or an interpreter
to participate in this proceeding a747Sc
should contact Levy County at Ocala,
(352) 486-5217, 7 days prior to
the date of the hearing. Beth Mat
3190 NE
DATED this 23rd day of Octo- Willistori
ber, 2006.
Marvin R
By Order of: MarinRE
Nancy Bell, Chair 1870 NE
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA Siver S
Chris Ro
Pub. Nov. 9, 12, 23, 30, 2006 14038 N
Williston,
NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCE 2006-15 Perry Sn
BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY 3034 G.
COMMISSIONERS OF LEVY Lorain, C
COUNTY, FLORIDA. NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN the proposed Consists
Ordinance relating to providing, or misce
for Ad Valorem Tax Exemptions at L&L S
for Historic Properties, the title Avenue,
for which hereinafter appears, is being
will be considered for enact- tory lien.
ment by the Levy County Board
of County Commissioners, at a Dated Nc
public hearing on Tuesday, No-
vember 21, 2006 at 9:30 a.m., or L&L Stor
as soon thereafter as the same 2990 N.E
may be heard, in the Board of Williston,
County Commissioners Meeting (352) 521
Room, Levy County Courthouse,
Bronson, Florida. Copies of said Sale Dat
Ordinance may be inspected by Pub: No\
any member of the public at the
Office of the Board. of County IN THE
Commissioners located at 535 S.
Court Street, Bronson, Florida, EIGHTI
during regular business hours or IN AND
contact by phone at (352) 486-
5217. On the date, time and PROBAT
place first abdve-mentioned, all 254
interested persons may appear IN RE:
and be heard with respect to the NICE P.
proposed Ordinance. NICE A.
ORDINANCE 2006-15
AN ORDINANCE OF LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROVID- NOTI(
ING FOR AD VALOREM TAX The;
EXEMPTIONS FOR HISTORIC tate of B
PROPERTIES; PROVIDING
FOR TITLE, INTENT AND DEFI- Bernice
NATIONS; PROVIDING FOR whose d
EXEMPTIONS FOR IMPROVE- 26, 2006
MENTS ON HISTORIC PROP- cuit Coui
ERTIES AND FOR HISTORIC ida Prob


PROPERTIES OPEN TO PUB- 'ber 2001
LIC; PROVIDING THE TYPE of which
AND LOCATION OF HISTORIC
PROPERTY FOR WHICH EX- son, Fi
EMPTIONS MAY BE GRANT- and add
ED; PROVIDING A DESIGNA- represent
TION FOR REVIEW OF APPLI- represent
CATIONS FOR EXEMPTION; forth bel
PROVIDING FOR THE APPLI- All cre
CATION FORM, PROCESS, and othe
AND METHOD OF REVIEW; or dema
PROVIDING FOR A COVE-
NANT WITH THE PROPERTY dent's e


E FOR THE TER
EMPTION; PROV
;SESSMENT CLA
OF HISTORIC F
PROVIDING FOR/
TAX EXEMPTION
RIC PROPERTY
CERTAIN COMME
PROFIT USES;
FOR NOTIFICi
OPERTY APPRA
IING FOR SEVEF
OVIDING A REPE,
E; AND PROVIDING
rIVE DATE.
rsons are advised
;ide to appeal any
ade at this public
y will need a reco
ings and, for suc
ey may need to e
*rbatim record of th
is made, which
the testimony an
pon which the apl
sed.
person requiring re
ommodations to r
his meeting should
County Commiss
ration Office at
8.
ell, Chair
. Board of
Commissioners
v. 9, 2006

CE OF PUBLIC SI
rcia, d/b/a L&L St.
t to the provisions
Self Storage facili
t. 83.801, et sec.),
s notice of sale
, to wit: On Nov
I, at L&L Storage,
0th Avenue, Wi
Paul Barcia or his
uct a sale at 9;00
ids to the highest t
be opened by Noo
from 9:00 AM until
contents of the st
ays rented by the i
on/persons:

pppling
103rd Ct.
,FL 32696

irown
I Second Ave.
iral, FL 33914

lyton
E 75th St
, FL 32621

ubert
/17th Cir
L 34474

tus
192nd Ave.
, FL 32696

Ragland
32nd St., #3
rings, FL 34488

unds
E 50th PL
,FL 32696

lith
Street
)H 44052

'of household, per
illaneous items,
torage, 2990 N.E.
Williston, Florida
made to satisfy a


november 9, 2006

age
E. 200th Avenue
, Florida 32696
3-6179

e: November 24,
,. 9, 16, 2006

CIRCUIT COUR1
THE
H JUDICIAL CIRC
FOR LEVY COU
FLORIDA
*E CASE NO: 200

THE ESTATE OF
REBELLO, a/k/a
REBELLO
Deceased.

CE TO CREDITOR
administration of.t
ernice P. Rebello,
A. Rebello, dece
ate of death was
i, is pending in th
rt for Levy County
ate Division, File
3-CP-254; the ad


is P.O. Box 610,
ida 32621. The n
resses of the pe
tative and the pe
tative's attorney a
ow.
editors of the dec
r persons having
inds against the
state, on whom a


:M OF
HIDINGG
SSIFI-
PROP-
D VA-
N FOR
USED
RCIAL
PRO-
ATION
NISER;
RABIL-
ALING
IG AN

that, if
y deci-
hear-
)rd the
h pur-
ensure
ie pro-
record
id evi-
peal is

eason-


of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN


3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE


Levy Land Transactions
10/17/06 10/20/06
Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, A-Assignment, AAD-
Assign Agree Deed, ACT-Amended Certificate of Title, AD-Agree Deed, Al-
Assumption of Indebtedness, AM -Assignment of Mortgage, CD-Correctory
Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed, E-Easement, FJDX-Final Judgment
Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage Modify Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, PX
- Probate X, QCD-Quit Claim Deed, TD-Tax Deed, TBRD-Timber Deed,
WD-Warranty Deed


partici- D, $613,000.00, BDY SE1/4 16-14-18
d con- Grantee(s): COULTER PAMELA W,
.ioners Grantor(s): LEGLER PAMELA GREENE TRUSTEE, LEGLER
(352) HENRY S TRUSTEE, PAM & HENRY LEGLER TRUST, LEGLER
PAMELA GREENE
M, $429,100.00, BDY SE1/4 16-14-18
Grantee(s): LEGLER PAMELA GREENE TRUSTEE, LEGLER
HENRY S TRUSTEE, PAM & HENRY LEGLER TRUST
Grantor(s): COULTER PAMELA W, COULTER WAYNE R
QCD, $10.00, L6-8(5) CEDAR KEY
ALE Grantee(s): JUDY RICHARD H, JUDY SONYA R
orage, Grantor(s): DAVIS JOLIEJ, JUDY SONYA R, ASHCRAFT DACE J
of the AAA, $3,092.00, OR 890/82
ity Act Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
,here- Grantor(s): KINGSBURY EDMOND
under M, $116,900.00, L13 LONG POND LANDING ADD 1, W/MH
ember Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
,2990 Grantor(s): DUEHRING JANE, DUEHRING JAY
Iliston, WD, $10.00, L3(63) UNIVERSITY OAKS
agent Grantee(s): TRIMM TERRY N
AM by Grantor(s): TRIMM MARGARET A, TRIMM JAMES Z
bidder. WD, $10.00, L9(63) UNIVERSITY OAKS
n with Grantee(s): TRIMM JOHN R, TRIMM JAMES Z, TRIMM MARGA-
Noon RETA
torage Grantor(s): TRIMM MARGARET A, TRIMM JAMES Z
follow- WD, $10.00, L2(63) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): TRIMM JAMES Z li, TRIMM JAMES Z, TRIMM MAR-
GARETA
Grantor(s): TRIMM JAMES, TRIMM JAMES Z,: TRIMM MARGA-
RET A
M, $112,000.00, BDYNW1/4 SW1/423-12-14, ETC
Grantee(s): TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKERMORTGAGE CORP,
MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s): WILLIAMS KRISTI L, COULTER DAVID LEE, COUL-
T FER KRISTI L,, COULTER KRISTI LYNN -
WD, $5,000.00, BDYL1,31-32(E) COLFAX CITY
Grantee(s): LACKEY PATTY J, LACKEY MICHAELR
Grantor(s): TAYLOR EVA, TAYLOR HENRY 0
M, $6,000.00, BDY L1-4,31-32(E) COLFAX CITY
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): LACKEY PATTY J, LACKEY MICHAELR
WD, $89,900.00, L48-49(C)SUWANNEE RIVER SPRINGS SD
92, W/MH
Grantee(s): STANGER BILLIE A, STANGER JOHNN
Grantor(s): PRESTON DIANA J, PRESTON CHARLES R
WD, $46,500.00, L14-16 UNIVERSITY ESTATES, BDY 12-12-17
Grantee(s): AVIS ELIZABETH, AVIS ALAN GEORGE
Grantor(s): KANTER IRVING M, KANTER MARIA, KANTER MA-
RIA DELIA BERNATE
QCD, $10.00, L1(10) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): RIEDEL LORI, RIEDEL STEVE R
Grantor(s): DOWNS WARREN W
QCD, $10.00, L2(10) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): RIEDEL LORI, RIEDEL STEVE
Grantor(s): DOWNS WARREN W
WD, $10.00, BDY SWI/4 SW1/432-11-15
Grantee(s): GAITOR ANTHONY L, GAITOR DORIS JONES,
JONES CORINE, JONES CORRINE
Grantor(s): JONES CORINE, JONES CORRINE, GAITOR DORIS
sonal, JONES
stored MMA, $2,500.00, OR 983/653, L13 PRAIRIE ESTATES
200th Grantee(s): OCALA NATIONAL BANK
. Sale Grantor(s): PRITCHARD EDWARD C, PRITCHARD CAROL J
statu- .M, $90,000.00, L33 LAKE BONABLE ESTATES, BDY 25-15-17
Grantee(s): PROVIDENT FUNDING GROUP INC, MERS MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, PFG
LOANS INC
Grantor(s): DEONIS TERESA
M, $302,250.00, UNIT 8-F OLD FENIMORE MILL CONDO, ETC
Grantee(s): FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ARIZONA, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): JAMES GAIL B, JAMES LEWIS SAMUEL III
WD, $19,500.00, BDYNE1/4 NEI/429-11-17, PARCEL #03233-
2006 063-00, 03233-153-00
Grantee(s): FARMER MICHAEL J
Grantor(s): LORIE FAMILY TRUST, LORIE JORGE PABLO
T OF TRUSTEE, LORIE JANET ANN TRUSTEE
M, $84,245.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL #03233-
DUIT 063-00, W/MH
NTY, Grantee(s): TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
6-CP- INC
Grantor(s): FARMER MICHAEL, GRIFFIN DEBORAH D
BER- WD, $112,850.00, BDY EI/216-14-14, PARCEL #01283-006-00,
BER- ETC
Grantee(s): NAVARRETE MARTHA, LEAR ROGER
Grantor(s): BUCKLAND KRISTI L, BUCKLAND JEFFREY M
WD, $20,000.00, L3, 24(42) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
RS Grantee(s): MALDONADO GRACIELA, DIAZ LORENZO
he es- Grantor(s): ANAMCHARA INVESTMENTS INC
a/k/a M, $90,800.00, L6-8(13) OAKVILLA SD
eased, Grantee(s): MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
June SYSTEMS INC, GATEWAY FUNDING DIVERSIFIED MORTGAGE
e Cir- SERVICES LP
, Flor- Grantor(s): GEIGER AMY I, MCMULLEN ROBERT V, MCMUL-
Num- LEN ROBERT VIII.
Dress WD, $100.00, BDY 13, 24, 25-12-16 & 18, 19-12-17, ETC
Bron- Grantee(s): DEAN CANDACE H, DEAN GRADY E, DEAN AU-
lames DREY C
rsonal Grantee(s): DEAN WILBUR F
rsonal Grantor(s): DEAN AUDREY C, DEAN GRADY E, DEAN WILBUR
ire set F
WD, $45,000.00, L6,8(64) REPLAT OF BLOCKS (56,67,58,63-
;edent 64) OF CHIEFLAND
claims Grantee(s): NATURE COAST LLC
dece- Grantor(s): WHITE MARY ANN
copy WD, $45,000.00, L2,4(64) REPLAT OF BLOCKS (56,67,58,63-


OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publica-
tion of this Notice is November
9, 2006.

Personal Representative:
Russell Scott Rebello
PO Box 3091
Dunnellon, FL 34430-3091

Attorney for Personal Represen-
tative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq.
Florida Bar No. 0857750


VanNess & VanNess, P.A.
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444
Pub: Nov. 9, 16, 2006


Deadline for
legal
advertising is
5 p.m. Monday


64) OF CHIEFLAND
Grantee(s): NATURE COAST LLC
Grantor(s): MAXWELL SHERRY WORLEY, MAXWELL HOMER
NEWT, MAXWELL HOMER NEWT JR, MAXWELL SHARON
WORLEY
) QCD, $10.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/4 1-12-14, PARCEL #00870-014-
00 &OB
Grantee(s): GOLDING MARY R
Grantor(s): ANDERSONELOG
QCD, $10.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/4 1-12-14, PARCEL #00870-014-
00 & OB
Grantee(s): GOLDING MARY R
Grantor(s): FLANDERS BARBARA, ADKINS PERNELL
WD, $175,000.00, L3(C) US 19 #8 ADD SD
Grantee(s): MARYS LITTLE LAMBS INC
Grantor(s): ANOTHER WAY INC
M, $190,358.02, L3(C) US 19#8ADD SD &BDYNE1/4 SE1/4 1-
12-14, W/MH
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): GOLDING MARY R, MARYS LITTLE LAMBS INC
CD, $10.00, BDY SW1/4 NW 1/4 25-14-17, PARCEL #03743-
084-00
Grantee(s): MCWILLIAMS ESMERELOA, WHITTON KENNETH
Grantor(s): GREENSPAN PERRY
M, $157,250.00, L 10(B) NORTHWOOD ESTATES
Grantee(s): AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, MERS MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): GRAELL ANTONIO, GRAELL ELIZABETH
M, $180,000.00, L14 GULF RIDGE, BDY 33, 34-14-13
Grantee(s): AMERIS
Grantor(s): KOLIS ROBIN, KOLIS RICHARD
. WD, $22,500.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 34-15-15, PARCEL #02177-
000-00, ETC
Grantee(s): B & B LAND TRUST, BICKEL TERRY G TRUSTEE,
DEUTSCH HAROLD T, DEUTSCH SHIRLEY D, MADISON ONE
PROPERTIES LLC
Grantor(s): LOWE PERCY, LOWE PERCYL
WD, $10.00, L23 PRAIRIE ESTATES, W/MH
Grantee(s): BOWMAN ROBIN C, BOWMAN FRANK
Grantor(s): WEBER BEVERLY, WEBER RICHARD T
M, $198,900.00, L2 WINDY VALLEY
Grantee(s): TAYLOR BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP,
MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s): PARRISH BRIAN E, PARRISH BRIAN ERIC, PAR-
RISH:DAWNM' ; 1.
WD, $3,500.00, L12(A) PINEHURST SD
Grantee(s): WOODARD LETHASA VERTICE
Grantor(s): DALLAS RUDOLPH, RUSSELL MARILYN
CD, $10.00, OR 1003/209, L19 LEMAR RANCHETTES
Grantee(s): ELLEN F NAIL LIV-
ING TRUST, NAIL ELLEN F TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): NAIL ELLEN F
M, $115,000.00, BDY S1/2 12-15-17, W/MH, PARCEL #03785-
016-00
Grantee(s): DUNNELLON STATE BANK
Grantor(s): NAIL ELLEN F, NAIL ELLEN F TRUSTEE, ELLEN F
NAIL LIVING TRUST
M, $49,500.00, L33(4) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX,W/MH
Grantee(s): AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, MERS MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): NEALEY HEATHER M, NEALEY MICHAEL
M, $150,000.00, L13(1)AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY FIRST
SD
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK, "MERS MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): BRAXTON MARILYN, BRAXTON BEN
AAA, $95,000.00, OR 627/299, L6 HUBBARD SD, BDY 2-17-16
Grantee(s): SUNTRUST BANK
Grantor(s): GULLING MARY L
WD, $100.00, L18(A) WILLISTONHGH#1
Grantee(s): HAMPTON MICHELLE L, HAMPTON KEVIN
Grantor(s): HAMPTON KEVIN, HAMPTON MICHELLE L, WHITE
MICHELLE L
M, $370,000.00, L54 BUCK BAY PHASE II
Grantee(s): MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC, MORTGAGE LENDERS NETWORK USA INC
Grantor(s): WERNER POLLY, WERNER MARY
M, $190,000.00, L7 DEER HILLS
Grantee(s): USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, MERS MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): FINNEN MICHELLE L, FINNEN SCOTT ALLEN
WD, $382,500.00, L2(2) AF KNOTTS LAND CO. FIRST SD YAN-
KEETOWN
Grantee(s): AYER BERNARDINE A, AYER CLIFFORD B III
Grantor(s): VELETT DARIA H, VELETT GREGORY R
M, $160,000.00, L2(2) AF KNOTTS LAND CO. FIRST SD YAN-
KEETOWN
Grantee(s): MERRILL LYNCH CREDIT CORPORATION, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): AYER BERNARDINE A, AYER CLIFFORD B III
M, $32,097.48, BDYNE1/4 NE1/422-13-18, PARCEL #04470-
002-00
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): SEGRIFF KATHY E, SEGRIFF WILLIAM E
M, $50,000.00, BDY NE1/4 NW 1/4 26-12-14, ETC
Grantee(s): MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC, OAK STREET MORTGAGE LLC
Grantor(s): JORDAN VADA R
M, $200,000.00, BDY S1/2 2-14-18, PARCEL #04523-003-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): GOULD ALICE, GOULD JOSEPH P
AAA, $34,536.83, OR 973/396
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): PARDUE SANDRA M, PARDUE MICHAEL L
M, $150,000.00, BDYL11RIVERSIDE SD
Grantee(s): FLORIDA CITIZENS BANK
Grantor(s): NORTHWEST SEAFOOD INC
WD, $10.00, L36 SMALL FARMS #1, BDY 31-14-19, W/MH
Grantee(s): PINKSTON FAMILY TRUST, PINKSTON JOEL PAT-
RICK TRUSTEE, PINKSTON SANDRA ARLENE TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): PINKSTON SANDRAARLENE, PINKSTON JOEL
PATRICK
WD, $50,000.00, L3(H) US 19 #1 ADD
Grantee(s): ROESCH ANITAM, ROESCH KENNETH M
Grantor(s): TAYLOR EVA, TAYLOR HENRY 0

More on page 15










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


WD, $100.00, BDYSE1/4 SE1/414-11-15
Grantee(s): BEAUCHAMP RAQUEL L, BEAUCHAMP JEFFREY
D
Grantor(s): BEAUCHAMP VIRGINIA J, BEAUCHAMP JERRY A
WD, $46,000.00, BDYNEI/4 NE1/42Q-16-16, ETC
Grantee(s): GONZALEZ HENRY
Grantor(s): CHAMBLISS JUDITH K, CASTELLANO NELSON V
ESTATE
M, $46,000.00, BDY NE1/4 NE1/4 20-16-16, PARCEL #02876-
003-00, ETC
Grantee(s): COLONIAL BANK NA
Grantor(s): GONZALEZ HENRY D JR, GONZALEZ HENRY
WD, $10.00, BDY S1/2 SE1/4 24-11-15, PARCEL #01624-002-
00, ETC
Grantee(s): JACK R LENNON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST,
LENNON JACK R TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): LENNON BLANCHE E DECEASED, LENNON JACK R
WD, $10.00, BDY W1/4 SE1/4 24-11-15, PARCEL #01619-000-
00, ETC
Grantee(s): JACK R LENNON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST,
LENNON JACK R TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): LENNON BLANCHE E DECEASED, LENNON JACK R
WD, $149,500.00, UINT 13 PARK PLACE OF CEDAR KEY
CONDO
Grantee(s): BEAR LONNA C
Grantor(s): HESS MARY L
M, $156,800.00, UNIT 8-E OLD FENIMORE MILL
CONDOMINIUM, ETC
Grantee(s): M & T MORTGAGE CORPORATION, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): BEAR LONNA CARROLL
WD, $10.00, L8 CEDAR KEY SHORES #7
Grantee(s): KOPEC FRED JR
Grantor(s): KOPEC FRED, KOPEC FRED JR. KOPEC FRED
JR TRUSTEE, KOPEC FRED TRUSTEE, KOPEC REVOCABLE
TRUST
M, $855,000.00, L8 CEDAR KEY SHORES #7
Grantee(s): AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): KOPEC FRED JR
WD, $1.00, BDYN1/2 W1/4 6-14-19, PARCEL #05285-004-00,
ETC
Grantee(s): UNDERWOOD ROSWITHA, UNDERWOOD
NORMAN
Grantor(s): KREUZERWALTRAUD, KREUZER WOLFGANG
M, $84,000.00, BDY SW1/4 NE1/4 26-13-15, PARCEL#09445-
000-00, ETC
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): LOMBARDO RICHARD V, LOMBARDO HEATHER
WD, $298,000:00, L9-10(27) MAP OF THE SOUTHERN PART
OF THE CITY OF CEDAR KEY
Grantee(s): COWART MOLLY L, COWART CHRISTOPHER A
Grantor(s): DYER NANCYM, DYER ALFRED C JR
M, $218,000.00, L9-10(27) MAP OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF
THE CITY OF CEDAR KEY
Grantee(s): DYER NANCY M, DYER ALFRED C JR
Grantor(s): COWART MOLLY L, COWART CHRISTOPHER A
M, $189,000.00, L6 SIENNA COVE
Grantee(s): AMERICAN MORTGAGE EXPRESS CORP, MERS
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): CAPLIN JENNIFER, CAPLIN ALAN
WD, $145,000.00, UNIT 19 PARK PLACE OF CEApR,,KEy,
CONDO O, .0 .
Grantee(s): COGNIZANT COMMUNICATION CORPORATION
Grantor(s): PRS PROPERTIES LLC
QCD, $10.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/4 1-12-14, PARCEL #00870-014-
OB
Grantee(s): MARYS LITTLE LAMBS INC
Grantor(s): GOLDING MARY R
M, $101,250.00, L1-2(13) WILLISTON HGH #5, W/MH
Grantee(s): 1ST CU OF GAINESVILLE
Grantor(s): LUKE JOHNE, LUKE LISA J
WD, $64,000.00, BDYW1/4 NE1/429-11-17, W/MH, PARCEL
#03233-142-00
Grantee(s): SABLONE CARRIE, SABLONE ROGERF
Grantor(s): SECRETARY OF HOUSING & URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
M, $57,600.00, BDYNW 1/4 NE1/4 29-11-17, WIMH, PARCEL
#03233-142-00
Grantee(s): NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s): SABLONE ROGER F'
WD, $10.00, L31(C) RIVERSIDE SD #2 YANKEETOWN
Grantee(s): HERMANN WILLIAM K
Grantor(s): HERMANN MARTHA J, HERMANN WILLIAM K
M, $216,000.00, L31(C) RIVERSIDE SD #2 YANKEETOWN
Grantee(s): EVERBANK
Grantor(s): HERMANN WILLIAM K
MORTGAGE $216,000.00, L31(C) RIVERSIDE SD #2
YANKEETOWN
Grantee(s): SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
Grantor(s): HERMANN MARTHA J, HERMANN WILLIAM K
WD, $10.00, L4 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): BROYLES KIMBERLY L BAILEY
Grantor(s): BAILEY THOMAS
CD, $10.00, L5 FAWNWOOD ESTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): POWERS KAREN C, POWERS WILLIAM C,
GIBSON KAREN C
Grantor(s): KINGDG, KINGDW, KING INVESTMENTS
M, $100,000.00, L4(A) RAYS SD #1 REVISED
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): BOYD DAVID E JR,. BOYD DAVID E SR, BOYD
SHIRLEY M
WD, $5,000.00, L25(6) OAK RIDGE ESTS
Grantee(s): DIAZ ROSA, DIAZ PEDRO
Grantor(s): PARKS KERRY
M, $124,000.00, L213 UNIVERSITY ESTS, BDY 3-12-17, ETC
Grantee(s): OCALA NATIONAL BANK
Grantor(s): ESPINOZA ESPERANZA, ESPINOZA HU GO B
M, $22,600.00, L6-9(14) TOWN OF MONTBROOK, W/MH,
ETC
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): SAUL BLAKE LEE MONTGOMERY, MONTGOMERY
SAUL BLAKE L, SAUL BLAKE L MONTGOMERY,
MONTGOMERY SAUL BLAKE LEE
CD, $10.00, L55-57(2) VS 19 NO 2 ADD
Grantee(s): BSSLCC
Grantor(s): SHREVE SHARON
M, $175,000.00, L55-57(2) US 19 NO-2 ADD
Grantee(s): SOUTHERN LENDING INC
Grantor(s): BSSLCC


E, $5,000.00, BDY 27, 28-16-16, ETC
Grantee(s): JONES TIMOTHY
Grantor(s): PLUM CREEK TIMBERLANDS LP
M, $46,530.59 BDY SE1/4 NW1/419-12-18, PARCEL #04101-
002-OM
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): BARDEEN KATHY A, BARDEEN GARY L
QCD, $1,00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/4 3-12-17
Grantee(s): TAMARIT GEORGE
Grantor(s): TAMARIT HERIBERTO
CD, $10.00, L14-15 PRAIRIE ESTS


AROUND THE COURTHOUSE


Grantee(s): SUSAN M SULLIVAN TRUST
Grantee(s): SULLIVAN SUSAN M TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): SULLIVAN SUSAN
M, $43,390.21, L2 WOODLAND SD
Grantee(s): CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES INC
Grantor(s): SIMS PEGGY ANN
QCD, $10.00, BDYNW1/49-12-17, PARCEL #03380-013-00, ETC
Grantee(s): DONOFRIO DARYL JOSEPH
Grantor(s): DONOFRIO LYNDA M, DONOFRIO VINCENT L
QCD, $10.00, GOVT L18, BDY 35-16-15, PARCEL #02268-000-
00
Grantee(s): CHURCH OF CHRIST IN INVERNESS INC
Grantor(s): KOONTZ FLOYD
WD, $10.00, L10.(52) WILLISTON HGH #12, W/MH
Grantee(s): PARTHHREE DOLORES A
Grantor(s): WHITE MICHAEL
QCD, $1.00, L14-16(D) PINEHURST SD
Grantee(s): PENNY JANICE F
Grantor(s):' COX CHARLOTTE GRAHAM, COX CHARLOTTE G
MMA, $100,000.00, OR 878/918, BDY SE1/4 20-14-19, PARCEL
#05388-001-00
Grantee(s): AMSOUTH BANK
Grantor(s): ANDERSON KAREN A, ANDERSON MILES C
WD, $23,000.00, L1(35) WILLISTONHGH#14
Grantee(s): WHITE SHANNON I
Grantor(s): PROCESSING SOLUTIONS INC
M, $34,000.00; L45-46(A) SUWANNEE RIVER ESTS
Grantee(s): DITECH COM, GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Grantor(s):. BRADY LEWIS SUE E, LEWIS JOHNC, LEWIS SUEE
BRADY
QCD, $10.00, L9-10(7) OAK VILLA SD
Grantee(s): CASH KIMBERLY DIANE, CASH KENNETH'WAYNE


SHINE will help wit
YTIO XA12 *3S ~. 2 ,a....
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance"Nds of 'Elders), a
volunteer program under the Florida Department of Elder
Affairs, will be conducting short presentations on the changes
in the 2007 Medicare Part D: Prescription Drug Plans,and
one-on-one counseling/enrollment during the Annual
Open Enrollment of Nov. 15 through Dec. 31. This is your
opportunity to enroll or change plans or to unenroll from
the program for 2007. Only those who become qualified for
Medicare, Medicaid, or Extra Help or lose their personal
drug insurance or VA drug coverage will be able to enroll in
a Part D Drug Plan during the year. There will be limited
circumstances allowed for changing plans starting Jan. 1.
Please bring your Medicare card and either your medication
bottles or a list of your drugs with dosages and the quantities
you take daily to any of the following sites:
Levy County
Bronson Library 600 Gilbert St.:
Saturday, Nov. 18 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 6 1:30-4 p.m.
Cedar Key Library 460 2nd St.:,
Wednesday, Nov. 13 2-4 p.m.
Chiefland Senior Center 305 SW 1st St.:
Wednesday, Nov. 29 9 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 13 9 a.m.-noon
Williston Library 10 SE 1st St.:
Saturday, Nov. 18 10 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 6 9 a.m.-noon
Yankeetown Library 11 56th St.:
Wednesday, Nov. 15 10 a.m.-noon
Saturday, Dec. 9 10 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 20 10 a.m.-noon
Gilchrist County
Bell Library 1140 S Main St.
Monday, Dec. 11 10 a.m. -noon
Trenton Library 105 NE 11t Ave:
Wednesday, Nov. 22 9 a.m.-noon
Wednesday, Dec. 27 9 a.m.-noon
Dixie County
Cross City Library Hwy 19 (next to Subway):
Wednesday, Nov. 15 2-4 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 22 2-5 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 27' 2-5 p.m.

Anyone who is unable to come to one of these sites may
call 1-800-262-2243 and ask for the SHINE volunteer closest


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Page 17


Grantor(s): CASH KIMBERLY DIANE, CASH KENNETH WAYNE
M, $103,200.00, L9-10(7) OAK VILLA SD
Grantee(s): HOMEBRIDGE MORTGAGE BANKERS CORP,
MERS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC
Grantor(s): CASH KIMBERLY DIANE, CASH KENNETH WAYNE
M, $49,000.00, L3(C) CEDARS MOBILE HOME PARADISE
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): ATLANTIC GULF LITTLE NECK INC, ATLANTIC
GULF LITTLENECK INC
WD, $12,000.00, L9-10(1) OAK VILLA
Grantee(s): MENDEZ ISMEAL
Grantor(s): ROSS HARDWARE INC
CD, $10.00, BDYNE1/4 SE1/4 2-14-18, PARCEL #04526-001-00
Grantee(s): BREWINGTON WILLIAM VAUGHN
Grantor(s): BREWINGTON WILLIE M DECEASED,
BREWINGTON NETTLE MAE
CT, $100.00, 38-06-CA-499, L29(141) WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTS
Grantee(s): ALEXANDER J KEVIN
Grantor(s): CLERK OF COURT DANNY J SHIPP, PERRY
JESSICA DURAN, PERRY STEPHEN
M, $116,000.00, BDYNE1/4 SE1/4 25-12-18, W/MH, ETC
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Graptor(s): BATTLE CYNTHIA FLETCHER, BATTLE REGINALD
TODD
CT, $100.00, 38-06-CA-496, L27-28(76) WILLISTON HGH G&CC
ESTS
Grantee(s): STEWART ELLEN
Grantor(s): CLERK OF COURT DANNY J SHIPP, PERRY
JESSICA DURAN, PERRY STEPHEN









DAVE JOHNSON leads a
group of birders during
last weekend's Cedar
Key Birds and Wildlife
Experience. The group
ambled throughout Ce-
dar Key identifying the
many bird species found
there.




Joutnal photo by
Wayne Journigan



1 Medicare questions

to you.. You can receive assistance by phone.
The state of Florida has gone from 44 stand alone drug plans
in 2006 to 57 plans for 2007. It is very important that you
consider all your options before.choosing a drug plan for next
year. All plans have changed their pricing for the monthly
premium, deductible (if any) and their drugs. Anyone can go
to the website www.medicare.gov and run the plan comparison
tool to see which plans may best suit your medication needs.
If you are on a Part D Plan in 2006, go through the 'View Your
Current Plan' tool in the box on the right side of the screen.
This allows you to compare your current plan in 2b07 prices
versus other plans in ascending order of your annual costs. If
you live in Florida only part of the year, be sure to look for a
plan that is national.
There was only one gap coverage plan in 2006. This plan no
longer will cover brand name drugs in the gap in 2007. Please
check with SHINE or www.medicare.gov for gap coverage
plans.
You may have received a notice to re-apply or you can
still apply for extra help through Social Security. You may
be eligible for extra help in paying for the plan premium,
deductible and drugs without penalty. You must meet the
following criteria to qualify:
Single Income is $14,700 or less
Assets total $11,500 or less
Couple Income is $19,800 or less
Assets total $23,000 or less
Assets do not count your home or your vehicles. They do
count your cash in the bank, CDs, stocks, bonds, cash value
on your life insurance or burial policies, and any additional
property. Ask for details and an application.
The drug pricing for those also on Medicaid or receiving
extra help is changing to:
If in 2006 you paid $1 generics/$3 brand names
In 2007 you will pay $1 generics/$3.10 brand names if in
2006 you paid $2 generics/$5 brand names
In 2007 you will pay $2.15 generics/$5.35 brand names
In 2007, Medicare Part B Premium is going from $88.50/
month to $93.50/month (except incomes over $80,000/yr-- it
will be higher). The deductible on Part B is going from $124
to $131. Part A deductible is going from $952 to $992 for a
hospital stay.
Please remember that if you are unable to come to a site,
you can call 1-800-262-2243 to contact your SHINE volunteer
for information and enrollment assistance.


I Toys


Continued front page 13


ing will be followed by Marine Corps Reserves. There
a noon bike run from the will also be a Remembrance
VFW, Beverly Hills to White Table Ceremony held.
Ford Mercury, in Chiefland NEW, unwrapped toys
to support the US Marine may be dropped off in the
Corps Reserve Toys for collection box at White Ford
Tots program. Donations of Mercury. Cash donations
money and new unwrapped are also accepted. For more
toys will be presented to informationaboutthe2006US
representatives of the US Marine Corps Reserve Toys




C 19/ Ad P


For Tots, come into White Center at (888) '864-4582,
Ford Mercury of Chiefland, visit www.whitefordmercury.
call the Customer Care com or www.toysfortots.org


Hand-Tossed Doug Made Fresh Dai

CW
I 0( P[ZZ4 COMPA ,,

S$1.00 off any_ 6Iza
I One coupon per customer
I Goodthru11/30:06 4i' | "



OpenD Sunday, Tiesday, Wednesday, thursday, and Friday








Page 18 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2006


Toys for Tots Run set

The annual Nature Coast Toys for Tots Run will be held
Saturday, Nov. 18. Sign-up is free and will be at Bell's
Restaurant on Highway 19 in Chiefland from 10 to 11:45 a.m.
Bring a new, unwrapped toy to.hand to a uniformed Marine
Corps reservist at the end of the ride at Charlie's Bar.
All toys will be distributed to children in the Tri-County
area.
Both two and three-wheeled bikes will participate. No
cars will be allowed to travel with the run for the safety of
motorcyclists.
Call Charlie's Bar at (352) 498-3977, Hutch at (352) 493-
2653 or Tom "Barney" Fife at (352) 284-1093 for more
information.


*Bronson
Capri proposes to provide the town with as-needed building
engineering services. Under the Capri contract, the town
would be required to turn over 80 percent of all permit fees to
the engineering firm as payment for services. No action was
taken on the presentation.
Council members also heard from Pam Blair, executive
director of Nature Coast Business Development Council. They
unanimously passed a motion approving Blair's application
for the county enterprise zone strategic plan. If the state
approves the application, the county can offer inducements to
potential businesses locating within specified zones.
Fire department captain Jerry Horton urged council
members to attend a county commission meeting Dec. 5 at 7
p.m. He said a rumor is Williston wants to take control of fire
services out of Bronson.


Continued from page 5
Horton also invited council members and the public to
attend a controlled burn firefighters will conduct on an
abandoned trailer on Marshburn Drive. That fire will be set
Nov. 27 at 5 p.m.
Council unanimously approved the fire department's
purchase of an ejector fan. Such a fan is required equipment
on a fire truck.
City attorney Ronald Stevens presented council with a
proposal by James Cornelius to serve in both the city's.half-
time attorney role and as half-time city manager. A committee
which will include Stevens will be convened to consider
Cornelius' proposal.
Council vice mayor Aaron Edmondson did not attend
Monday's meeting.


This Week's Feature


I AT U ENIO I


2-STORY WATERFRONT HOME: Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-bath home with
2-car garage, fireplace, 3 covered porches. 1738 square feet, new roof, new
heat pump/AC, new air ducts throughout, upstairs completely furnished.
Screened porch overlooking freshwater canal, only 200 yards direct access
to the Suwannee River. Freshwater fishing at its best in your own backyard;
saltwater fishing in the Gulf of Mexico just 20 minutes away. 1.5 acres of land
with perimeter posts up and ready for fencing, 390 feet of canal frontage and
fishing dock with a boat slip. $285,000.
Presented by:
Goss Williams Real Estate,
102 S Main, Chiefland, FL 32626 (352) 493-2838


Beautiful 4 BR/2.5 BA house in Williston
U at 21350 NE 40th Ave., 1,630 sq. ft. with
a carport & bonus room on large corner lot. It is
2 miles east of City Hall on C.R. 318. Listed for
g $125,000, thousands under appraisal! SHIP
-."dwn pahy; fnt assistance for moderate :
L income families on this house is $15,600. Call L
Florida U.S.A. Realty, Inc. 352-378-3783. .
BL l ia nlI n al l t t alB alB llH


Lcn dR lE ae rkr21 0 AaA


Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliams.com


GOss WILLIAMS


MOBILE HOMES: KEAL .TiAli, Icu.
Whitted Mobile Home Estates 3/2 DWMH on 2 lots,
screened porch, detached carport & rhore. Owner fin-
ancing to qualified buyer! -$69;00T Reduced! $62,500
Park-like 5 acres with 2/2 SWMH. Double carport
& screen porch additions. Immaculate inside and out.
A must see. $110,000.
Waterfront- 2/1 SWMH with porch additions located on
canal lot in Fanning Springs. Canal is access to
Suwannee River. $149,900.
Hideaway Adult Park 2 BR, 2 Bath, DWMH on land-
scaped lot. Carport, storage & screen porch additions.
Includes private well. $84-680. Reduced! $76,000.
New Listing 3 BR, 2 Bath DW MH with over 1600 s.f.
Just south of Chiefland on paved road. Includes large
Barn. $102,500. Additional acre available for $35,000.
New Listing HANDYMAN on 5 Acres. 3 BR, 2 Bath
Singlewide that needs a little TLC. Bargain at $72,500.
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $-306-00 Reduced: $105,000
8.9 Acres -just off U.S. Alt. 27. $4-260 tReduced:
$110,000
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85;600 Reduced to $76,500!
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $19;00J per acre. Reduced to $15,000 per
acre. Motivated seller.
Corer Parcel 80 Ac at corer of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres -1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$42-500 per acre. Reduced! $11,000 per acre.
20 Acres just 5 miles from town, payed road.
$15,000 per acre
160 Acres Adjacent to Goethe Forest over 100 Ac plant-
ed pines -paved road access. $10,000 per Acre
City of Trenton Small residential building lot in town -
chain link fenced, nice lawn. $39,900
Bronson Heights 1/4 Acre lot on NE 94th Terr., ready
for MH or SHIP home. $17,500
Whitted Mobile Home Estates 2 lots ready for your mo-
bile home. One w/ shed:-$4-500: Reduced! $13,000
2nd one:-$4-5i;66 Reduced! $12,500
10-Acre Tracts 4 to choose from. Great location close to
Golf Course. Priced $125,000 to $139,000.
HOMES:
Waterfront- 1.5 Acres w/ 390' on canal 3/2 home par-
tially furnished. Immaculate. $285,000.
Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. cor
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380









LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2006


Page 19


Take time to read

Book fair begins Nov. 13


Bronson Middle/High
School will host a special
book fair from Scholastic,
called the Exchange, from
Nov. 13-17. On Nov. 14
from 2:30--7 p.m,, the book
fair will be open for a, one
night event in conjunction
with Family Literacy
Night.
The Exchange will
feature a wide range of
books for young teens and
adults, including mystery
and adventure novels,
fantasy trilogies, sports
guides, anime, cookbooks,
graphic novels and the


latest bestsellers from
mote than 150 publishers.
The Exchange will open
each day from 9:15 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Cash, check or
credit cards may be used to
purchase books through the
Exchange.
Book fair attendees can
also help build classroom
libraries by purchasing
books for teachers through
the Classroom Wish List
program.
Proceeds will also be;
used to purchase essential
classroom resources and
support school projects.


Vets to be honored in

Williston Saturday
Williston will be holding a Veteran's Day Celebration, Nov.
11 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Linear Park Pavilion. The guest
speaker for the event will be Rep. Larry Cretul. The Williston
High School Band will also perform. Bring a.lawn chair.


*Guy
we reached the windy city, I had taken all four rolls offilm and I
couldn't wait to getto the hotel so I could buy another $40 worth.
It wasn't until I returned home several pounds lighter,
toting a suitcase full of mostly exposed film that the
full scope of my mom's 'misjudgment came to light.
However, I'm happy to report she didn't beat me or
anything. She forgave me. Now that's a good momma!
It may sound funny, but in many ways I wish I could get
back the excitement for life that would cause me to shoot a
half roll of film documenting a bus lavatory.
Nowadays if I even got on a bus full of kids I'd probably
be the one needing blood pressure medicine. I don't pay
attention to landscapes and I hardly ever work up a good
belly laugh over drool puddles or other bodily functions
anymore. (My wife suggests that it's because they're
becoming a bit too familiar to me.) Anyway, I understand we
all have to grow up, but do we have to lose our zeal for life?
Speaking of zeal for life, what about our zeal for the ONE
who is eternal LIFE? In so many ways ourpassion for Jesus is
the main factor that not only determines our attitude, but our
altitude.
When I stir myself up in His love and remember what
Jesus has done for me, when I ponder on what He is
preparing for me, I can always just seem to soar above
the pull of this old fallen world. When I don't, it drags me
down so that my light no longer illuminates His Gospel.
Oh, how I wish the glorious hope that I have in Jesus would
emanate from my every fiber, even in the least of my everyday
dealings. For I've tasted of the goodness of God and realize
there's no fulfillment in becoming entangled again with the
cares of this world. Yet so many times I fail. I find myself just
dragging along through life complaining with the worst ofthem;
backbiting and causing strife. It's not that I want to bring shame


Continued from page 7
on the Lord. I would never want to hurt Him, but even with my
best intentions I often slide back from where I know I need to be.
In those times I find myself needing to repent and return
to my first Love. Jesus once said to a lukewarm church, As
many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore,
and repent. Revelations 3:19. Even I can figure out that
calling on God's mercy and repenting would be much better
than enduring His chastening!
So it's not uncommon to hear me pray, "Lord, forgive
me. Fill me with Your Holy Spirit. Return unto me the joy
of my salvation and the fullness of my relationship with
You. I want to be Your light; a city set on a hill for You."
The Lord always forgives me. Now that's a good Dad!
But anyway, momma must've lost that camera because
after I gave it back I never saw it again. I guess it's all right.
Photography seemed to be awfully expensive anyway. Eating
regular turned out to be much more fulfilling.
Guy E. Sheffield of Hernando, Miss. is the president of
the nonprofit ministry SoulFood. You may email him at
4christ@midsouth.rr.com.


Ombudsman council to meet
North Central Florida Long-Term Care Ombudsman Council
will hold its November monthly meeting on Thursday, Nov.
16 at Haven Hospice of North Central Florida, 4200 NW 90th
Blvd. The meeting begins at 12:30 p.m.
The North Central Florida Long-Term Care Ombudsman
Council is a part of Florida's Long-Term Care Ombudsman
Program. The council is made up of local ombudsmen whose
goal is to improve the quality of life and care of residents of
long-term care facilities, including nursing homes, assisted
living facilities, adult family care homes and skilled nursing
units in area hospitals.


-,Wo -IM
SYN aRuleg, eatr 5240-21 is Bxer Rato 3294-14


TURN THIS...


..INTO THIS!


T Find your dream
home
in the
Marketplace!


LIEY COUNTY JOURL

E COUNTY EPAPEM 1ST. 1 92;


Call Laura to list your house in the
Marketplace. 352-486-2312









Page 20 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2006


MRevolt
Blue Grotto, told the audi-
ence, "People in Cedar Key,
you are not alone." Paradiso
said she and her husband, Ed,
are ready to leave Levy Coun-
ty because they feel they have
been sup-
pressed


"You
by the
county

crush
us," she
told the
commis-
sion.
After L
nearly an hour of remarks
from the unhappy taxpay-
ers, Chairwoman Nancy Bell
deferred to the county attor-
ney for an explanation on the
county's position.
Anne Brown, county attor-
ney, told the group, in short,
the county's jurisdiction over
the matter is now null because
the state legislature governs
the timing of the millage.
Brown said the millage
and budget have been set and


MPolicy


there is no process that can
reverse the board's Septem-
ber decision.
When several taxpayers
asked the county at least in-
vestigate a reversal and per-
haps grant them refunds, Bell
reiterated there is no admin-
istrative process to change
things at this point. And that
without changing the millage
and budget, there can be no
refunds.
Someone in the audience
mentioned the Boston Tea
Party and wondered if that
was the recourse they should
take.
Phillips said there may be
a tax revolt
and the
county will
not get its
taxes.
Com-
missioners
urged the .,
citizens
to attend STATHAM
a Dec. 1 4
meeting of the state's legis-


Continued from front


Commissioner Tony Parker said he was the one who had
made that motion in 2001 and it was never his intent to de-
lay county work. Bell said it wasn't fair to the citizens or the
board to hear items that require study and research.
Barney Cannon of Chiefland asked why the commission-
ers, when presenting a non-agenda item, couldn't state the
subject matter when making a request. Cannon said the com-
missioners are voting whether or not to hear the abstract when
the subject is not named.
Parker agreed, saying issues often arise that need action
before the next scheduled meeting. Commissioner Sammy
Yearty said the county may have lost grant money due to its
inability to hear non-agenda items.
Bell countered with,"Why have cut offs?"
Yearty then made a motion to hear non-agenda items if it
were a majority vote to do so. Parker seconded the motion.
Commissioner Danny Stevens referenced the 2004 hurri-
cane season as a time when the board perhaps did not hear
items it should have and may have cost them money. "We've
done the county a disservice by not hearing non-agenda
items."
"You're gutting the agenda," Bell said, calling for the vote
while Stevens was still speaking. Stevens continue to talk but
Bell put the motion and second on the floor and it passed 3-1
with her dissension. Commissioner Lilly Rooks had left ear-
lier for a doctor's appointment.


lative delegation to air their
concerns but even that didn't
set well with some in atten-
dance.
The owner of Castaways
Resort in Cedar Key shouted
above the din as people filed
into the hall, "We shouldn't"
have to. That's why we hired
you-to do our business for
us."
Commissioner Tony Parker
offered to meet with a spokes-


1Vote


Continuedfromfront
man for the group or the
group itself to explain why
the commission set the mill-
age at 7.91.
"You say you don't un-
derstand why we did what
we did," Parker said. "I'll be
glad to meet with you and
tell you." Parker also noted
that no more than two people
have called him to ask why
he.supported the 7.91 mill-
age rate.


Continuedfrom front


Waite held on to her U. S. House of Representatives seat,
winning 60 percent of the vote to challenger John Russell's
(Democrat) 40 percent.
Another republican will find himself in the governor's man-
sion. Republican Charlie Crist garnered 51 percent of the vote
to Democrat Jim Davis' 46 percent.
Republican Bill McCollum won his bid for attorney general
with 52 percent of the vote against Democrat Walter "Skip"
Campbell's 48.
Democrat Alex Sink will become the state chief financial
officer after her 54 percent beat out Republican Tom Lee's 46
percent.
Incumbent Republican Charles H. Bronson remains com-
missioner of agriculture with his 56-44 percent lead over
Democrat Eric Copeland.
Voters said yes to three state supreme court judges (R. Fred
Lewis-66 percent, Barbara Joan Pariente-68 percent and Peg-
gy A. Quince-68 percent) seeking to retain their seats.
District appeals court judges wanting voters to allow them
to remain seated (Edwin B. Browning, Jr.,-65 percent, Brad
Thomas-65 percent and Peter D. Webster-65 percent).
All constitutional amendments on the ballot passed. These
included:
Amendment No. 1, controlling the way legislators
spend money (60 percent).
Amendment No. 3 requires that proposed state consti-
tution amendments be approved by at least 60 percent of the
voters rather than a simple majority (58 percent).
Amendment No. 4 sets aside tobacco settlement funds
for tobacco education and prevention (61 percent).
Amendment No. 6 increases the maximum additional
homestead exemption for low-income seniors from $25,000
to $50,000 (76 percent).
Amendment No. 7 provides an additional discount on
homestead tax for combat-disabled veterans who were Florida
residents when they entered military service (78 percent).
Amendment No. 8 protects private property taken by
eminent domain from being transferred to a person or private
entity without a vote by 3/5 of the legislature (69 percent).
Amendments 2 and 5 were not voted on.


How Levy Voted

Katherine Harris (R) 4847
Bill Nelson (D) 6298
Floyd Frazier 31
Brenda Noah 71
Brian Moore 49
Roy Tanner 34

Virginia Brown-Waite (R) 5162
John Russell (D) 3660

Charlie Crist (R) 6316
Jim Davis (D) 4558
Max Linn 300
Richard Dembinsky 31
John Smith 70
Karl Behm 39

Bill McCollum (R) 6045
Skip Campbell (D) 4736

Tom Lee (R) 5080
Alex Sink (D) 6046

Charles Bronson (R) 7151
Eric Co eland(D 3947

Stan Griffis 6355
Stephen Pennypacker 4358

Ed Jennings (D) 2617
Steve Oelrich (R) 4465

Yes 5673
No 4449

Yes 7324
No 3273

Yes 6207
No 4415

Yes 8108
No 2614

Yes 8338
No 2317


No 3104

Yes 4100
No 6452


C