Title: Levy County journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028309/00061
 Material Information
Title: Levy County journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Levy County journal
Publisher: R.B. Child
Place of Publication: Bronson Fla
Publication Date: March 2, 2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bronson (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Levy County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Levy -- Bronson
Coordinates: 29.448889 x -82.636389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began May 1, 1928.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 17 (Aug. 1, 1929).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028309
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7392
oclc - 33129639
alephbibnum - 000579546
lccn - sn 95026738

Full Text










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COUNTY PAPEiR EST. 192


VOL. 82, NO. 34


THURSDAY, MARCH 2,2006 1 SECTION: 18 PAGES


50 cents per copy


INSIDE

i


Golden Anniversary
Page 16



T i,


Nature's intention
Page 17

OBITUARIES


Roy Anderson Jr.
Aura Arney Jr.
Blanca Arnold
Lucy Boettcher
Jerry Gamble
George Jackson
Wilbur Johnson
Berkey Knavel
Joseph Land
Herbert Langford
Viva McPhearson
Pennell Norman
Donald Smith
Oscar Whitaker
Lee Wood
Larry Young Sr.

HOME OF...
i


William Veal Jr.
of Bronson


CONTENTS ...

i


Around Levy 2, 3,10-11,17
Opinion 4-6
Obituaries 7
Tides 7
Levy History 7
Law & Courts 8
Sports 9
Classified 12
Legals 13-14
Land Transactions 14-16


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50)


The race


is on!

Three candidates for the
Sept. 5 election are already
out of the starting gate and
have made their intentions
known with Levy County's
Election Superintedent Con-
nie Asbell.
With formal declaration
still months ahead, Asbell's
office reports that three po-
tential candidates have al-
ready submitted their initial
paperwork for candidacy.
Hoping to fill the county
commission seat in District
2 is Democrat Brett Sandlin
who resides on NW 174th
Street, Trenton. That position
is currently held by Nancy
Bell.
Incumbent Commissioner
Lilly Rooks, also a Demo-
crat, of District 4 has already
declared her intent to once
again run for that position.
Rooks has a Cedar Key ad-
dress.
Running in the non-parti-
san race for the county school
board is Rick Turner of Wil-
liston who hopes to claim the
District 5 seat now held by
Jennefer Shuster.
Candidates may file/quali-
fy until June for the Septem-
ber election.


They're Not Kidding__


Journal photo Dy Miriam litCn
ERICKA DRUMMOND, right, explains to a kindergarten class from Chiefland Elementary what goats like
to eat and how they forage while Katelyn Jenkins takes the students on the tour of the petting zoo. Both
Ericka and Katelyn are members of the Chiefland Middle School FFA Chapter. Watching the goats are,
from left, Lydia Bend, Christopher Barwick, Delanie McKintire, Katelyn Jenkins, Quintia Levon, Teiera
Watkins and Brian Phimerling.


se | City manager lacks full endorsement


Journal photo by Miriam Blitch
We all know one and on Friday night Willum Cuth-
bert will be face to face with his for an unseem-
ingly long time. It's The Nerd, a comedy by Larry
Shue that debuts March 3 for three consecutive
weekends at The Chief Theatre in Chiefland. The
cast, members pictured, have been in rehearsal
for months. For more on the show, see page 16.


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGING EDITrOR
Rodney Russ is Chiefland's
newest city manager although
there was no doubt in the
room Monday night that two
commissioners didn't want to
be his boss.
Betty Walker and Alice
Monyei, the two commis-
sioners who opposed his ini-
tial hiring in February, stuck
to their guns this week when
the time came for final ap-
proval.
Walker and Monyei had
made no bones about the fact
they believed Russ was nei-
ther educated nor qualified, to
manage the city.
Vice Mayor Walker was
the first to broach the subject
when Mayor Teresa Barron
asked for the commission's
decision.
"I think we need to read-
vertise," Walker said. "We


advertised for one thing and
we took another."
Walker said it was only
right to readvertise the po-
sition because other people
who also lacked the college
degree and experience may
have applied had they known
the commission wasn't going
to stick to its qualification re-
quirements.
"He has no experience ei-
ther," Walker said. "No grant
experience. We're going
backward and not forward."
Barron quickly defended
Russ, telling the commission-
ers that his references were
wonderful, people around
town liked him and he was
honest.
"Honest?" Monyei scoffed.
"When he falsified his educa-
tion?".
For the next 10 minutes
there was a seesaw between
Walker and Monyei and the


supporting commissioners
who defended their decision
to pick Russ from all the can-
didates.
Russ is not a college gradu-
ate, but has completed course-
work at FSU. His resume
listed that he was at FSU four
years.
Walker continued that
Russ, by his own admission
during the interview, had not
worked with large budgets
nor had he written grants.
"We can't turn this man
loose on this city," she said.
Monyei looked into the au-
dience at Russ, who was at-
tending the meeting with his
wife.
"I wouldn't do this to the
city," Monyei said. "If.I were
you, I'd back off."
Commissioner Teal Pome-
roy interrupted Monyei to

See Manager Page 17


Time to get ready for spring color


BY D.T. PENDLETON
F.C.H.P., A.S.H.T.
CORRESPONDENT
Spring is almost here
on for four or five more
and you will be rewar


you didn't' get
your fall plant-
ing completed
by November,
just wait.
What else is
there to do then?
Plenty!
ORGANIZE


Look at your beds. How are
they arranged? If you want to
simplify your labor, organi-
zation is key. Now is a great
time to plan changes and cor-
rect mistakes you made in the
past.
Decide the best way to


REACH US

Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner
Phone
(3521490-4462


work in the garden for you.
If you like annuals, and most
of us can't resist even a few, I
. Hang like to bunch them together in
weeks one bed. If you want to keep a
ded! If mixed bed, try planning a spot
in the center for
annuals or maybe
a row across the
U 'ar, front of the bed.
4..-Flo .w" Grouping annuals
together makes it
S '- -.... easier to change
them out season-


ally without having
to work around and possibly
damaging your perennials.
My mailbox bed is a mixed
bed with annuals across the
front and a specific color

See Garden Page 17


Fax
(3521490-4490 Chlefland
(3521486-5042 Bronson
Email
editor@levyjourifal.com
Address
P.O. Box 159 Bronson, FL 32621-0159
P.O. Box 2990 Chiefland, FL 32044-2990


ADD SOME COLOR TO your mailbox area with beautiful annuals.


SUBSCRIBE
levy, Dixie and GIlchrlst counties
$17
In-state
$22
Out of state
$27


The Levy County Journal
believes in good stewardship of
the land. That's why we print
on 100 percent
recycled newsprint.
Protecting our future TODAYI


S A


a












Page 2 LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Chiefland Chamber Honors
Journal photos by Miriam Blitch


Cornerstone
Baptist
Cornerstone Baptist
Church and its pastor, the Rev.
Marc Pargo, invites you and
your family to their revival
meetings March 19- 22.
The revival meetings will
be held at the Fort White
Community Center-just past
the high school.
The Rev. Dean Webb from
South Carolina will proclaim
God's word each meeting.
Webb has pastored .in Fort
White, Trenton and other
churches in Florida.
Also the renowned vocalist,
the Rev. Mark Shaw will lead
in singing.
A supper will be promptly
served from 6- 6:45 p.m.
For those with children
from birth to 3 years old, a
nursery will be provided.
For more information, call
386-497-3106.
Elohim Tabernacle
of Praise
It's revival time at Elohim
Tabernacle of Praise, located
at 486 School St., Bronson.
The church extends an
invitation to attend for a three-
night revival March 3-5.
Services will be at 7:30
nightly and will be held in the
sanctuary.
Speakers will be Pastor
Curtis Stacy Sr. and Minister
Alecia Stacy.
The theme for the services
will be "Run the Race"
(Hebrews 12:1-2). They
are under the leadership of
Apostle Aaron and Pastor
Agnes Edmondson, pastors.
Dr. Linda Davis Williams
will be the overseer.
If you need directions or
more information, call Sister
Alfreda Freeman at 352-486-
1319.

Church yard sale
The New Sepulcher Church
of God will hold a big yard
sale on March 4 at 267 N.
Pine St., Bronson. Some of
the foods that will be available
are: chicken wings, French
fries, brownies, cupcakes,
potato pies and drinks.

KoC auction
The Knights of Columbus
will hold their annual auction
Saturday, March 4 at 11 a.m.
under the pole barn at Holy
Family Catholic Church,
Williston.
Hot dogs and soda will also
be available.


WELCOMING Sundays and More Coffee Shop to town were, from left, Taylor
Wasson, Tommy Harrington, Diane Mealer, Tom Allen, Lisa Allen, Jeff Ruland,
Kerrie Ruland, RayAnne, Gaddis, A. J. Walker and Darlene Barnhill.


MCNULTY REALTY in Fanning Springs was welcomed into the chamber. Cut-
ting the ribbon are, from left, Darlene Barnhill from Tri-County Uniforms, Diane
Mealer of Three Sisters, Pat Orr, Patrica McNulty, Royce Barber, Teresa Miller
all of McNulty Real Estate and Tommy Harrington of Subway.
Iv ,5-'u '"


CURVES HAS reopened and on hand to welcome the new owners wer, from
left, Darlene Barnhill, Tommy Harrington, Becky Gill MD, Lisa Staples, owner
of Curves, A J Walker, Ray Anne Giddis and Diane Mealer


* ^ Shear EXpressions
S The Jfair Experts

Cuts-Co or-Yfighfighfits-Penns
Y. 486-6899 ..

Locatedsouth of Bronson on M-ighway 27-A


Q EyY COUNTY JO URNAL
E COINI I'ApLiR l,'s i --*-'1
The legal organ of Levy County, Florida
The Levy County Journal is published every Thursday by
Levy County Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 159, Bronson, FL 32621.
Periodicals postage paid at Bronson, FL (USPS 310-780).
Postmaster: Send address changes to:
LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
P.O. Box 159
Bronson, FL 32621

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie Counties ... $17
In state .............. .............. $22
O ut of state .................... .. $27

Reproduction of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission is
prohibited. The paper cannot be responsible for any
unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The publisher's
liability for an error will not exceed the cost of the
space occupied by the error.
Deadline for all news and advertising copy is 'i p.m. Monday.
Classified deadline is 2 p.m. Monday


1[CaeonAsel nurnc gec


Low Rates Easy Terms
Personal & Commercial Auto Insurance
Home Life Commercial
Rapid Tax Returns
"Guaranteed Lowest Down Payment"


"Care for the Entire Family"


TRI-COUNTY

CHIROPRfACTIC

Dr. Bennitt Patterson


*Available on Location: X-Rays, Physical Therapy &
Licensed Massage Therapist (MM0007612)


Most Insurance Accepted:
* Most HMO's and PPO's
SMajor Medical
* Medicare/Medicaid
* Personal Injury/Auto Accidents
Workers' Compensation


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(Across from Wal-Mart Super Center)


OFFICE HOURS
Monday / Wednesday / Friday
9 am.- Noon & 2 p.m.-6 p.m.
STuesday 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Him sday
8 a.1m.- Noon & 2 p.in.- 5 p.m.

~ Walk-Ins Welcome ~


-N


News Briefs

Craft vendors needed
Attention all craft and food vendors. The AARP Spring
Fest and Craft Show will be held Saturday, April 8 at the
Linear Park in Williston. Local non-profits are also invited
to attend, as the purpose of this event is to benefit non-profit
organizations.
For more information and applications contact M. Craig at
352/528-3323 or e-mail macraig@webkraft.net. Applications
are also available at the Williston Library, Chamber of
Commerce and newspaper offices.

World War II vets to meet
All World War II veterans are invited to attend the next
meeting on Thursday, March 9, at 11:30 a.m. at the Carriage
Inn Restaurant in Cross City. John Howell will use this
meeting to take a group photo.
Richard Egles shared his WW II experiences with the vets
in February. He was assigned to a blimp crew. Blimps used
dept charges and torpedoes to carry out their assignments to
report and destroy enemy subs. Donald Dubois also served as
a blimp crewman. These men confirmed the many difficulties
they encountered while airborne.
Join them March 9, and bring your spouse, a friend or a
fellow veteran.
If you have any questions call Dick Halvorsen 352-542-
6797 or Billie Cooper 352-493-9368.

Healthy Start conference set
Healthy Start of North Central Florida will meet with a
conference call on Wednesday, March 8 at 2 p.m.
The public is invited. Please call Celia Paynter at 352-
313-6500, ext. 118 if you need additional information.

AARP speakers available
Adelia and Dave Vachon, of Levy County, are helping
AARP Florida educate community members in this area
about state plans to force Floridians age 60+ to join HMOs
to receive Medicaid long-term care services. AARP President
Judy Thames announced.
AARP volunteers throughout the state will be presenting
educational talks on plans to change Medicaid's role in
providing long-term care, how those changes would affect
thousands of families and older people in this area, and on
a recent AARP survey measuring Floridians' options'about
Medicaid HMO long-tem care.
If you would like more information on arranging for an
AARP volunteer to present information about Long Term
Care Options to your organization or group, please call Susan
Caceres toll-free at 1-866-595-7678.

Commodities will be distributed
USDA Commodity Distribution for Levy County will be atri
the following locations at the designated time:
March 3 Bronson, Ag. Building, Hwy. 27,12:30-2 p.m..-
March 3 Otter Creek, Town Hall, 2:30-3p.m.
March 9 Town Of Inglis, Community Center, from 1-2
pm
March 11 Chiefland, Methodist Church, 707 Main Street,
10-11 a.m.
March 16- Williston, Lions Club, 1:30-3 p.m.
USDA is available to all eligible recipients. There will be
certification available to those who have not registered. If you
have any questions please call 352-336-0839.

Shamrocks against MD
During the days leading up to St. Patrick's Day, local students
are taking the time to participate in Shamrocks Against Dystrophy
campaign to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
Continuing a 20-year MDA tradition, Sch6ols throughout
Southwest Georgia and Northwest Florida are each donating $1
to fight neuromuscular diseases by buying and signing shamrock
mobiles and hosting a variety of special events.
The funds raised in the 2006 Shamrock Campaign will
aid programs and services for those individuals affected by
neuromuscular diseases in the Northwest Florida and Southwest
Georgia area.
If your school may be interested in the Shamrocks Against
Dystrophy program, please contact Chris Parzik at (850) 681-
6763 for more information.

Bronson Self Storage

(352) 486-2121
Hours:
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.
W Check Out Our Prices On


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1.4,











LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Veterans honored for service, dedication


BY JEFF SIRMONS
STAFF WRRI IR
Ginny Brown-Waite
remembers peeling the
aluminum off of her parents'
cigarette cartons and saving it
as a child.
"We were still saving the
foil for 15 years after the
war," she said in a speech to
Levy County's war veterans
in Chiefland.
Brown-Waite, a U.S.
Congresswoman who
represents some of Levy
County, said that, even 60
years after the war, she "wants
to support those who were
willing to give their lives for
this country."
On Wednesday, Feb. 22,
she gave out medals, ribbons
or coins to county residents
who served in World War
II, the Korean War or the
Vietnam War.
"The veterans who served
in World War II were a part of
the best generation," Brown-
Waite said.
Merle Snell, a Korean War
veteran who participated in
the Inchon prisoner exchange,
received the most accolades,
which included a Good
Conduct Medal, National
Defense Service Medal,
Korean Service Medal and
the United Nations Service
Medal.
"Everything went smooth,"
Snell said of the prisoner
exchange. "It was really
a joyous time to see our
prisoners released and to
release theirs."
Snell added the best time
during the war was the
signing of the armistice.
He concluded that he hopes
those who serve in the war
against terrorism will soon
have closure.
"I feel for those men and
women over there," Snell


Journal photo by Jeff Sirmons
VIETNAM VETERANS, from left, Donald Miller, Everett Mills and David Parks
receive Vietnam Commemorative coins from Congresswoman Ginny Brown-


Waite (far left.)

said. "At least we knew who
our enemy was. Anybody
over there could be the enemy.
It's scary to think about."
Brown-Waite said those
who serve overseas are not
any less deserving than the
veterans she congratulated.
"It's important that we
don't pull out too soon before
a functioning democracy is
created," she said. "What
they're doing over there is
rebuilding a country that
could be our true ally."
Having visited Iraq, Brown-
Waite said it is a dangerous
place but that our military
was winning.
"The families back home


keep reading that bombs are
always exploding and people
are always dying, but actually,
the situation is getting much
better," she said. "The number
of insurgent attacks are way
down, and pretty soon, we
will have trained enough Iraqi
soldiers so they can secure
the country themselves."
Lt. Col. William Coutts
addressed the veterans
after receiving a coin
commemorating his service
in three wars.
"The Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post is more than just a
place where old people come
to. drink," he said. "We iget
together and support the right


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people for the right job."
Others receiving awards,
either medals or commemo-
rative coins included: George
Hermnnanson Combat Action
Ribbon
Guy Thompson Bronson
- Korean War Service Medal
Sam Wasson Chiefland
- Korean War Service Medal
Gerald Hartter Williston-
-WWII coin
Sidney Dini Williston,
Hubert Jarrell Bronson,
Alfred Mclnnis Chiefland,
Wilbur Summerall Willis-
ton, David Parks Trenton,
Stephen Pomeroy Chief-
land--all Vietnam coins.


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Personal Attention


Quality Craftsmanship & Materials


) Framing and Concrete Finishing


"Lti/b ad
"Let it be w ite


Yankeetown Women

offering salad lunch
BY DAWN MARIE CLARY
SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL
Tired of heavy winter fare? After the chilis and the soups,
it's time to lighten up with some spring salads.
The Yankeetown Woman's Club will hold its annual Salad
Luncheon on Wednesday, March 15 at noon.
The event is an elegant affair, open to the public and this
author's personal favorite.
For a donation of $5, you can sample a smorgasbord of
salads. The event is called the Education Salad Luncheon
and all proceeds are used to help the Yankeetown School or
scholarships.
The Woman's Club awards from three to four scholarships
every year to local college bound youths.
Eleanor Berkley runs the event and she can be contacted at
447-3899 for more information.
The Yankeetown Woman's Club is located at #5 56th St.,
Yankeetown.


Save a life and

win an afghan


LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers Civitan Re-
gion will hold a special prize
drawing for all blood donors
at the Chiefland Donor Cen-
ter, 120 E. Rodgers Blvd. Ev-
eryone who gives blood at the
Chiefland Donor Center any
time between Wednesday,
Feb. 1, and Friday, March 31,
can enter to win an afghan
hand crafted by Sylvia Lane.
"We are grateful for our
continuing community part-
nership with Chiefland Wal-
Mart," said LifeSouth District
Director Carolyn Quintanilla.
"They graciously provided
the materials to create this
special afghan."
The drawing for the afghan
will be held March 31. Each


donor will also receive a rec-
ognition item and compli-
mentary cholesterol screen-
ing. Blood donors must be at
least 17 years old, weigh 110
pounds or more and show
photo I.D.
For more information,
readers may call LifeSouth at
(888) 795-2707.
LifeSouth is the sole blood
supplier for 39 medical facili-
ties in 17 counties in North
Central Florida including
Shands at UF, the VA Medi-
cal Center, and North Florida
Regional Medical Center.
LifeSouth is a nonprofit, vol-
unteer blood center supplying
more than 110 medical cen-
ters in Florida, Alabama and
Georgia.


Subscribe and save! Call Robin at 490-4462


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L COLN.I JO \L


Page 3


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


' YOUR VIEW '


Apology accepted, but...


To the editor:
In last week's Levy Journal, my opponent
wanted to "set the record straight." She stated
that the "Moe" quotation was "meant to bring
a little levity to the situation and to not cast
any aspersions in Mr. Robinson's direction."
First, I accept Ms. Hager's apology. How-
ever, running for public office, in any form,
at any time or place is not, should not be a
laughable matter. If the people of-Williston
want to elect a comedian to represent them on
the city council, then they should vote for my
opponent.
In Williston we are experiencing a large
amount of growth and it is going to take
serious people to address this situation and
prepare for the future, not one who would ap-
proach this office with "levity."
My opponent went on to say, "I attended
several council meetings ......I failed to see
Mr. Robinson voice an opinion on any of the
issues presented."
I would like to point out a few things and
help educate my opponent about serving on
the council. I'm sure, by now, she knows that
prior to a council meeting we are given the
next meeting's agenda with supporting docu-
mentation. Prior to this, if a council member
has a question it is discussed with the city
manager. If there are questions or concerns
after we have digested the packet, we investi-
gate those questions and/or concerns prior to
the meeting.
If every council member questioned every
matter that came up in a meeting we would
literally be at the meeting all night. Where
there is a need or when questions present
themselves, some of the answers may come
out in the discussion that takes place and most
of the time any question is answered during
that discussion. My opponent needs to learn


that on-going involvement with city mat-
ters and preparation prior to a city council
meeting is a must.
Her statement, "I attended several coun-
cil meetings," leaves some doubt. While it
is true I have seen my opponent in a few
meetings, mostly this year, for the life of
me I have not seen her attend "several"
meetings. Even the meetings she has at-
tended, she has remained silent but her
husband has made comments. I have yet to
hear a word from her in any of the meet-
ings that she has attended.
Referring to the above about my op-
ponent attending meetings and not hearing
me voice an opinion, I do take exception.
Perhaps she wasn't listening or perhaps she
turned a deaf ear when I was speaking or
perhaps she was not in attendance.
Again, serving in any elected position is
a serious responsibility, not one of levity.
Knowledge, preparation, listening, not only
in meetings, but to the people who elected
you is for serious people. It is the respon-
sibility of any public official to do the best
he or she can and that best should only
have one end result in mind, the people
who are being served and who are counting
on you to do the right thing.
I take my position on the city council se-
riously and I strive to do the best I can for
the people of Williston. Being on the Wil-
liston City Council is not a stage for levity
but for serious minded and responsible
people. These are serious times in need for
serious people to serve those who elected
them. After all Ms. Hager, I am a Williston
City Councilman.
Jerry Robinson
Williston


Don't let another domino fall


To the editor:
I learned with dismay and
apprehension the developer
Izaak Walton Investors,
LLC plans to construct two
massive riverfront resort
complexes in Yankeetown.
This was the hometown of
my childhood, and the one to
which I hope to return upon
retirement. It was then, and
remains at the moment, a
classic small town in a pure
sense, where a resident can
raise their children in an
atmosphere of community.
Sadly, the number of
places a child can take a
bike ride in relative safety
have become few, yet
Yankeetown remains as one.
Development at the scope
of this proposal, bringing
almost-overnight expansion
of huge proportions
(assuming 2 persons per
unit, should the proposed
units fill, the population
would increase over 50
percent) would not only
destroy the character of the
town, but would pose some
very tangible hazards and
environmental degradation:


The Withlacoochee
River is an Outstanding
Florida Waterway, this
development would
render this designation a
meaningless farce, with
storm water runoff and
petroleum products polluting
the river
The Withlacoochee
is a designated Manatee
Protection Zone; 128 boat
slips accommodating boaters
of all levels of experience
with these animals means
many more will be injured
and killed
Vessels tip to 60 ft.
in length, even in small
numbers, will create
significant and dangerous
navigation problems on the
river
The logistics of
hurricane evacuation will be
complicated
Existing infrastructure
of roads, water supply and
sanitation is insufficient
and expansion to support
a commercial enterprise
is not in the interest of the
taxpaying citizen
The individuals


Quote of the Week:

If you want to know what God thinks of
money, just look at the people he gave it to.
Dorothy Parker (1893 1967)


LEWY COUNTY JO
E COUNTY PAPER IEST



Our Mission

The Levy County Journal is published to serve the people
of Levy County as the leading information source that
empowers the community while never
compromising our principles.
We:
*reflect our community in everything we do.
* provide leadership that contributes to the betterment of
our community,
* record the history of our county and make a difference
in the quality of life for our residents and merchants.
*promote readership of community events that foster
better citizens.
*promote readership of advertising thereby fostering a
healthy economic environment.


proposing this development
are disinterested in the
preservation of a way of life
or spirit of our community.
This is simply a matter of
capitalism and property
owner's rights. Readers
who hold this community
spirit dear and have chosen
to locate here because of
what the area is, not what it
can become, are urged to not
rely upon others to pursue
active resistance. Follow
the course of events in this
matter in this newspaper
and other sources, write
the various permitting and
approval agencies, express
yourself in any forum that
may be of value. Don't
sit back and let another
domino fall, as the Nature
Coast becomes another
developer's cash cow at the
expense of our lifestyle and
environment.
Thank-you for your
consideration.
Eric P. Weber
Yankeetown property
owner in
Panama City


Mor opnio


Who We Are
Managing Editor
Carolyn Risner

Office Manager/Chlefland
Robin Heath
Photographer/Production
Miriam Blitch
Staff Writer
Jeff Sirmons
Sales Representative
Laura Catlow
Typesetter
Wilma Jean Asbell


"Copyrighted Mi


material


; Syndicated Contentr-


Available from Commercial News Pi






J e


i


roviders"
-*h


U-O .-


Government should reduce expenses


To the editor:
It is with great interest that
I read about the exploitation
of Waste Pro by its custom-
ers, the citizens of the city
of Chiefland. It seems that
someone left 124 bags of
garbage next to his trashcan.
This is admittedly an un-
reasonable amount. But I'm
wondering why Waste Pro
didn't just leave a bunch of
it there? The company execs
may express public shock at
such a suggestion. Indeed,
Mr. Burgoyne of Waste Pro
,is quoted as saying,. "Waste ,
Pro had no choice but to ,,.
clean up the debris rather
than leave the city a mess."
So, it is time to put them
in remembrance of a few
things. A while back, gar-
bage on this road was picked
up at 8 a.m. Being that it had
always been picked up in the
late afternoon before, no one
had their garbage at the curbs
except one neighbor. Waste
Pro certainly had an easy
time of it that day! (Does
that take some of the sting
out of the 124 bag event?)
Another neighbor called to
complain and received a re-
buke. "Read your contract,"
she was told. "It says pick up
starts at 8 a.m. You have to
have your can out by 8!"
Then they did come and
pick up her garbage, but left
everyone else's. All those
cans of garbage standing at
attention at the curbs were
neglectfully passed by. I
called the next day and re-
ceived the same rebuke, but
I requested that they come
again and pick up not only
my garbage but also that of
all my neighbors. This they
did. So how many trips was
that? Three! How expensive
was that? And whose fault?
Waste Pro justifiably "ate the
cost."
Eating the cost is one of
the things the company is


complaining about. Should
we pay for that?!
Having soundly learned
our lesson, we did for a
number of weeks have our
garbage out by 8 a.m., but
it NEVER again has been
picked up at 8. The company
reverted back to its late after-
noon service for this road.
Prior to this, the city of
Chiefland decided (unan-
nounced, to my knowledge)
to run a truck through the
neighborhoods the day
after Waste Pro picked up
the trash. This is generally
yard litter and such, and it
was picked up every two
weeks. (I say "was" because
now it suddenly seems that
it's picked up only once-a
month.) Waste Pro left one
square of old carpet on the
ground. You had to look hard
to see it, but the very next
day the city workers did see
it, and I was charged $20
because they picked it up!
I'm already paying Waste
Pro to do that. Why didn't
the city charge Waste Pro for
their inefficiency? After all,
I had done my job by putting
it out there. Now, it seems I
was also responsible to go
behind Waste Pro to make
sure they did theirs.
On another occasion, I did
extensive pruning and trim-
ming on the south side of the
house and piled the litter on
the south curb for pick up. It
was passed by and left there.
When I called, I was told
that the yard trimmings were
in the wrong spot! They had
to be where I usually pile
them. HELLO. I don't have
a copy of the contract. Can
someone please read me that
part?
So, let's review.
1). When Waste Pro made
a return trip for a neighbor's
garbage, they left everyone
else's. It would have been


Miss Honey says


,M onday, Feb. 26,
2006. Good
morning, Isn't
it great to wake up and find
you're still in the Land of the
Living? And find your bed is
not your cooling board, and
your family, three little dogs,
who love you? Can you beat
that?
Sweet Pea is in Jim's
chair. Peewee is asleep on
the back of my chair and Lit-
tle Bit is beside me sleeping!
Hush, Donald, they really
do love me! And, yes, I love
them, too! They never leave
you alone or forget you! This
is not a pity party, just the


reasonable and cost efficient
to pick up everyone else's
at the same time and avoid
"eating the cost" of three
trips.
2). When they picked up
trash, they left a piece of
carpet, causing the resident
to "eat the cost" of their inef-
ficiency.
3). When they determined
that trash was in the wrong
spot, they left it, and had to
again "eat the cost" of mak-
ing an immediate second trip
to pick it up.
The question is again:
If you didn't wantto pick
up 124 bags of garbage,
why didn't you just leave
it? Maybe no one would
call and it could stay there
indefinitely or maybe the city
would pick it up and charge
for it. Why suddenly change
your way of doing business?
No one should put out 124
bags. That's outrageous. But
how often does it happen?
Once? Does it prove that you
deserve additional compen-
sation because you chose to
pick it up this time? Or do all
the times that you chose not
to pick up garbage and trash
prove that you deserve less
compensation? I suggest that
the company will experience
more profit simply by being
more efficient in its opera-
tions. Getting everything the
first trip is certainly more ef-
ficient than going back for it.
I, for one, am opposed to
paying a cent more for water,
sewer, and garbage which
all appear on the same bill.
The price is already exor-
bitant, and the penalties for
paying late are excessively
punishing. A governing body
that cares about its citizens
should look hard at ways to
reduce these expenses rather
than increasing them.
B. McLean
Chiefland


00 0


simple
truth.
Here
I sit, my
pen in
hand,
just as
dumb as
any man.
My mind
won't
work, I
cannot think, 1 do believe my
brain is on the blink! Hush,
Donald, I do have a brain,
uh huh, do, too, ask Peewee.
Ha, ha!
I think I'll finish this and
take it down to the Journal


and come back and bake a
cake, because I want some.
Make you fat? Well, just
more for someone to love!!
I've been looking at Taste
of Home recipes and I can't
look at these without want-
ing to bake.
I'm getting careless, I
dropped a dish, and it broke
of course, and I got a cut on
my ankle. I did this last night
and it's sore this morning,
not bad, just sore.
Well it's after 9 a.m., I
better shut up, get up and get
busy! Hush, I do get busy

See Honey Page 6


p 4


Page 4


L












LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


YOUR VIEW




Yankeetown situation prompts thought


Reader asks mayor of Yankeetown who she represents; says she has power for peace


To the editor:
This is a copy of a letter
to the Mayor of Yankeetown
delivered Feb. 24.
It is imperative that this
letter be read by area resi-
dents before the upcoming
Yankeetown Town Meeting
on March 7.

Dear Mayor Johannassen:
In the St. Petersburg
Times article on Feb. 22
you expressed fear that the
developers "could put up
40 aluminum buildings"
that "would look terrible."
Are you implying, Madam
Mayor, that you believe Mr.
Spittler, Mr. Sherman, and
Izaak Walton Investors LLC
are the kind of folks who
would do something vindic-
tive if they didn't get their
way? If that's your opinion,
why consider negotiating
with them at all? If your
fears are correct, what's to
keep them from vindictive
behavior late in the game
if we give in to all of their
demands but one?
I trust that your ultimate
stance on the issue will be
based not on fear of repri-
sal, but on sound principles
in the best interest of your
constituents.
You are "the chief
executive officer" of Yan-
keetown. As such, is not
your job to protect the
health, safety and welfare
of Yankeetown residents,
by executing the law (i. e.
the current Town Charter &
Comp Plan), not to provide
exceptions for outsiders for
their own bottom line?
That being the case, you
might want to apprise town
citizens of the following:
1. What can the cur-
rent developers do if the
Town Council votes against
accepting their development
proposal? ...NOTHING.
Nothing outside the law
(i.e. our Town Charter and
Comp Plan), that is. (You
probably realize by now that
the reason the developers
have proposed to work with
the town is to get around
the restrictions of our cur-
rent Comp Plan and zoning
ordinances.)
2. Have the develop-
ers offered to fund sewer
and water for current resi-
dents? .. NO. Their letter
specifically states: "The
design of this [wastewater
treatment] system will be
based not only on the re-
quired needs of the develop-
ment, but will incorporate
design details to allow for
expansion if needed IN THE
FUTURE, (i.e. "for future
development" of their own.)
NOTHING is mentioned
about the present needs of
current residents in this (or
any other) area.
3. At what cost to the
developers are they dangling
the promise of using some
of their receipts to suppos-
edly help with our grant pro-
cess for sewer and water? .
.NONE.
4. Have the devel-
opers offered to write &
submit grant applications at
their expense? . NO.
5. Are they offering
to pay for water and sewer
hookups if the grants are
successful? . NO.
6. Did they offer to
pay for new water pipes &
installation APART FROM
THEIR DEVELOPMENT?
.NO.
7. Did they offer to
pay for the cost of a venue
to give their marketing


presentation? NO. We, the
taxpayers, footed the bill.
8. Will they deliber-
ately build structures that
are deploringlyy ugly" out
.of spite, especially since Mr.
Spittler is an architect with
a reputation to protect? NO.
Not if they are professional
and not if they want to profit
from their investment.
9. Do they need the
help of the Mayor and Town
Council every step of the
way to implement their de-
velopment plan? .. .YES.
Furthermore, I am sure
counsel has explained to you
that, according to the docu-
ments attached to their Feb.
13, 2006 "letter of request
to enter into a development
agreement," they have
closed only on properties
on Highway 40, not on any
riverside commercial prop-
erties. The other docu-
ments are preliminary title
opinions. Entering into an
agreement would give the
developer the opportunity to
get significant concessions
from Yankeetown without
risking significant capital.
As for future commer-
cial development, I believe
few would object to the
professional restoration of
Izaak Walton and I, for one,
would welcome a bakery.
Even a mom and pop cof-
fee shop or bistro would be
nice. Certainly a bait shop
is in order. These are small
businesses tiati tie current
population would support.
It's the massive scale, the
dredging and drilling and
filling and cutting that we
find so alarming that would
do irreversible harm to our
beautiful flora and fauna.
Even worse is the attitude
that it's theirs to destroy.
Also alarming is the increase
in population that would
greatly tax our resources and
infrastructure and bring with
it crowds of tourists, lights,
noise, and crime, the lack of
which makes Yankeetown a
truly unique community in
this 21st century.
It is my understanding that
the three people who would
negotiate the agreement with
the developers are:
1. Mr. LaCroix, the
attorney recommended by
the council member already
under contract with the de-
velopers,
2. yourself, who has-
publicly admitted to being
intimidated by the develop-
ers, and
3. the new zoning officer
whom you will recommend
to the town council.
Many would welcome
limited commercial develop-
ment to "dress up the town"
a bit and to meet some of the
needs of our residents with-
out significantly increasing
the population or negatively
impacting the flora, fauna,
aquifer and infrastructure.
Mr. Spittler, Mr. Sherman,
Sand Izaak Walton Investors,
however, think BIG. Their
business plans require it.
Any compromise we offer
might not be grand enough
for their consideration and
we'd be stuck with a "com-
promise" that would only
compromise us, its citizens
and our lost town.
Don't worry. This isn't
our only chance. There are
other developers out there,
maybe even some with less
intrusive designs on our
town.
If some of the towns-
people have seemed hostile,
please realize it is only a re-


action to a perceived threat.
They want to know where
your alliances lie. It's diffi-
cult to follow a leader if one
is uncertain of the road down
which one is being led.
This development has
already cost our town thou-
sands of taxpayer dollars,
just to pay attorney's fees
and to host the developer's
marketing presentation. If
you enter into an agreement
with them, it could cost the


town tens of thousands of
dollars more in ongoing
attorney's fees. The present
course has alienated many
townspeople from the town
government. Passions are
running high. Tempers have
flared. Angry words have
been exchanged.
You can change all this.
.If you truly want to lead,
then do so. Refuse to be
cowed by developers. Unify
your town by taking up the


banner and leading the fight
to save its heart and soul. In
doing so, may you regain
the friendly, pleasant smile
we associated with Citizen
Johannassen before she be-
came Mayor Johannassen.
The upcoming decisioti
is the most important our
town has ever faced. You and
the Council have the power
to restore peace to our once
quiet little town. The future
of Yankeetown hinges on


your answer to the following
question: Whom, Madam
Mayor, do you represent?
Thank you for reading
this and (hopefully) taking
the ideas herein under con-
sideration. I sincerely hope
your answer will help the
citizens of this tiny commu-
nity breathe a little easier.
Patricia Candela
Yankeetown


Yankeetown development destroys the Nature Coast


To the editor:
PROS: Amount to nothing.
1.Local jobs.
Construction jobs will be created and also maintenance
jobs after development. Most will be low-paying labor.
High-paying jobs come from outside, with more traffic con-
gestion, as our retired residents and working poor have not
the required skills.
2.Tax revenue
The tax base and revenue will increase but does not offset
local government cost for additional services.
3.Local purchases in stores
In the short term it will increase revenues to local busi-
ness. However, development follows development and
chain stores then push out the small businesses.
CONS: The true cost to you.
1. Complete loss of character of the Town and it's "Qual-
ity of Life."
The developer, Izaak Walton Investors LLC, say they want
to protect thisbut the magnitude of the plans say otherwise:.,
Yankeetown has very little commercially-,zoned property,-.,,...
forcing additional commercial development into Inglis. This
destroys the "Quality of Life" that both towns want.
2. Increase property taxes of homes and businesses due to
increased property value.
The low income and fixed income of our residents will
force many out of their homes. Even the 3 percent cap may
be too much.
3. Increase to the present population by as much as 50
percent or more.
One reason people move to this area is the quiet and
tranquility, without the congestion of living on top of one
another. This development changes forever the density of
the population.
4. Major damage to the River will result with the filling
in for four-story buildings, and dredging of the shoreline for
more wet slips.
5. Major increase of traffic through Inglis and Yankeetown
for the proposed volume of 40 percent permanent and 60
percent temporary resident requirement for a high-hazard
area. Residents, visitors and guests, plus vehicles and boats
will be constantly on the move.
Residents already have difficulty backing out of drive-
ways. The two county roads and local streets may need
to be widened, and inadequate for heavy loads. Weights
are presently capped at 5 tons. Construction trucks, heavy
equipment and machinery mean expensive maintenance of
roads.
6. The impending impact on marine life and for the
endangered West Indian manatees is not tolerable. The
Withlacoochee River is a core manatee habitat. Additional
boat traffic will stress this species more. There is a remnant
population of Gulf Sturgeon under the protection of the Na-
tional Marine Fisheries.
7. Major usage and drawdown of the Yankeetown water
affecting the Floridan Aquifer. Solution channels created by
bringing saltwater up the Barge Canal 11 miles inland could
contaminate the aquifer and our drinking water. The bottom
of this river is .the top of the aquifer.
Yankeetown is working on a new water system and
infrastructure but that capacity could be exceeded by the
development requirements. Florida water tables are drop-
ping with each new development and southern counties are
looking our way for their water needs. Our resources must
be conserved so we don't meet their fate. Over develop-
ment is the fast train to meet this destiny.
8. Major negative impact of additional watercraft traffic
on the river and the Gulf.
Expect accidents and loss of life for people, manatees and
all marine life with exceeding the capacity of the river.
9. To install the sewer plant for the development means
the streets will have to be torn up. Sink holes then open up
as has happened in other areas where the karst limestone is
disturbed. Pollutants then enter the aquifer. No retention
ponds are planned, but covered parking areas, dry docks and
high buildings cover the waterfront.
The health, safety and welfare of the citizens is threatened
from raw sewage flowing from their sewer plant location on
lowlands.
10. The Withlacoochee River is an Outstanding Florida
Waterway. Pollutants of oil and other chemicals washing
into the river also impacts the environment and all wildlife.
The resulting damage cannot be reversed.
11. Riverside Drive would cease to exist as it is now. It is


a curving, narrow road that has grand old oak trees, not only
lining the sides of the street but down the median as well.
This street exemplifies the charm and character of Yan-
keetown. Development would mean widening of this road
and the trees would have to go. Additional safety equipment
and fire apparatus could not navigate Riverside Drive as it
stands now.
12. Yankeetown would have to organize a first-class fire
department as the proposed height of the buildings will re-
quire a hook and ladder engine and properly trained and paid
fire fighters. Volunteers are presently all that is needed and
additional ones are not available in this community of 600,
mostly retired, residents
13. The proposed covered dry boat storage is against pres-
ent zoning. Machinery would have to be constantly moving
boats around with noise and diesel fumes affecting residents.
14. The project will destroy the "Jewel of the Nature
coast" and the last frontier of Old Florida. The wildlife and
tranquil setting will be lost forever. The people here should
decidetwhatitheir future should be afidriot some developer
whose stated purpose isto.make money.
Purchasing land does not give them the right to trample on
existing land owners. The Constitution gives everyone the
right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, but not the
right to infringe on others' rights. The developers threaten
the Town that if they do not get what they want they will
install a "by right project", which will not be a pretty sight.
15. The issue of police protection. Yankeetown has no
police force or a tax base for one. That leaves the expense to
fall on the Levy County taxpayers for Bronson deputies to
drive 40 miles.
16. This proposed development affects not only the 2,000
residents of Inglis and Yankeetown. It affects Levy and
Citrus Counties. They each share the River to the centerline.
No plans for stonnrm water drainage or sharing Town costs of
service. Stand tall now to prevent over development or sit in
the ruins of your dreams as they crash around your ears.

Drinda Merritt, Inglis Planning Commission Chairman
Betty Berger
Yankeetown

Disney has nothing over Levy


Once when I was
but a child of
about 10, my
Dad took me
to a magical place. It was
a town not too far from
Orlando where the grass was
greener and the paint was
whiter.
The people smiled and
gave little waves as we drove
by in his small white con-
vertible-a stark contrast to
the cars in the area, which
were mostly Plymouths or
Model Ts.
We were in Celebration, a
village designed by Disney
to capture the 1950s small-
town life craved by many at
the time.
There was a malt shop
with a juke box playing
Elvis. Cute teenage girls
with roller skates delivered
hamburgers and shakes right
to your car (I thought they
were infested with cooties,
but my older brother had a
crush on our platinum blonde
waitress).
After lunch, we saw a
movie, I think it was Snowi
White, on the silver screen.
We had a blast, but really,
the joke's on Disney.
I just thought it was funny
that Disney spent millions on
white picket fences and Main
Street commercial strips-


the very same structures
found in each
of the towns
in Levy
County.
Granted,
Williston,
Chiefland,
Bronson or
Inglis aren't
as classy as
Celebration,
but all of
them are
quaint, ru- JEFF
ral towns. SIRMONS
The people Columnist
smile at
you and
are helpful.
I was walking around
Williston on Sunday after-
noon and all I wanted was a
rootbeer float with a cherry,
on top so I could feel like I
was part of a community that
existed 30 years before I was
born.
I'm not saying Levy
County towns are stuck in
the past. All of the towns are
growing rapidly and are ac-
commodating to the growth.
I'm just saying it's nice
to know I'm working in an
environment Disney spent
millions to recreate.
Jeff Sirmons is a staff
writer for the Levy County
Journal.


Page 5










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


OPINION


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Why I added a palindrome to my life


Less than a year in
Levy County and
already my repu-
tation is becom-
ing well known.
1 suppose I shouldn't be
surprised.
After all, whenever I am
at a function where food is
served, while everyone else
is standing in line hovering
over barbecue, fish and grits,
I am the lone guest stalking
the dessert table.
A lot of folks consider
themselves crunchy/salty
types.
I am not one of those.
No, I prefer the rich
decadence of pastries, cakes
and pies and would forego a
wonderful meal for the heav-
enly dessert, if faced with a
choice.
I believe it's a genetic


condition. My mother d
care for sweets, but my
father couldn't live with
them.
When supper was ov
if there wasn't a cake to
had, he made do with si
jelly and a biscuit--anyt
sweet to complete his m
Fried apple pies were
downfall. I remember a
teen-ager making a batch
him while he was in toy


THINKING OUT
LOUD




Carolyn Risner


didn't because my mother
in the breadbox frc
hout I love buffets. I
choice of dozens o
er, and yes, 1 admit, I
)be most of them.
ome On a cruise, by t
thing dinner, the server h
neal. not ask which exot
his I wanted--I got the
s a At a dinner rece
ch for everyone at my tal
wn and ahhed about d


one Sat- was savoring the homemade
urday. I coconut pie.
must have Blake Davis was sitting
fried 30 at my table and before I
pies that knew it, we bonded with
day. the promise to exchange pie
By recipes. Blake held up his
nightfall, end immediately. I'm still
less than trying to work off the pounds
a dozen from dessert so I can work
remained- my way to the cookbooks in
-and only my kitchen.
r hid them Saturday, I was with an-
om him. other group and I remarked
love the to the woman in front of me
)f desserts that I was a dessert connois-
sample seur.
Ron Queen overheard
the second and was tempting me with
knew to descriptions of the glories he
tic dessert had seen on the dessert table.
-m all. Before long, he and I were
ntly, while evaluating each brownie,
ble oohed each confection and deciding
inner, I which was the best. I think


Ron might be a closet dessert
freak, too.
With all that's going on
in my life: children, friends,
work and well, just life, it's
no wonder I take comfort in
the Girl Scout cookie stash
I've hoarded or delight in
the To Die for Pound Cake I
make.
Stressed spelled backward
is desserts and if man--or
woman--wasn't meant to as-


1 Honey


suage the stress with dessert,
the palindrome wouldn't
have existed.
All addicts make excuses
for their addiction. I'm no
different.
That's mine. I'm sticking
to it.
And if you think I need an
intervention, I'll be glad to
cooperate. But first let's talk
it over in Suwannee over a
piece of key lime pie.


Continued from page 4


once in a while, but when you live alone you can do as you
please, as long as you don't please to do too much.
Until next week take care, and if and when you pray, say
a prayer for me. God is good and He loves me, even if I am
not always lovable. Thanks Eddie, you are a sweet young
man, may God bless you always.
Miss Honey


ngtim




ercha,


U~3VO~


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LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


ORITUARIES


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Mayo
Joseph Land
Nowberry
Herbert Langford
Old Town
George Jackson
Trenton
Wilbur Johnson
Donald Smith
Lee Wood
Williston
Oscar Whitaker
Berkey Knavel


Roy Turner Anderson Jr.
Roy Turner Anderson Jr. of Bell died Saturday at his home.
He was 69.
Mr. Anderson was born in Birmingham, Ala. He worked as
a real estate appraiser/specialist for the state of Kentucky and
later for the Alabama Power Co., from which he retired after
29 years of service.
His two passions were horses and flying.
He was preceded in death by his son, Tommy Anderson and
his daughter, Susie Lamberth.
Survivors include his wife, Pamela Vaughan Anderson of
Bell; a daughter, Mary Ann Roberts of Newnan, Ga.; four
grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Arrangement by Watson Funeral Home in Trenton.

Aura J. Arney Jr.
Aura J. Arney Jr. of Bell died Sunday, Feb. 19, 2006 He
was 89.
Mr. Amey was born in Oak Park, 11. He moved to Bell
eight years ago from Sherwood, Mich.
He was a tool and die maker.
He was a Protestant.
Survivors include daughters Maron Bigler of Coldwater,
Mich., Ethel Howell of Colon, Mich., and Carol Marler of Ar-
lington, Texas; sons Harold /Arney of Bell, and Roy Arney and
Kurt Arney, both of Sherwood, Mich.; sisters Marion Holy
of Battle Creek, Mich., and Margaret Frey of Leslie, Mich.;
brothers Erwin Arney of Sherwood and Elwin Arney of Battle
Creek; and 17 grandchildren.
Arrangements by Watson Funeral Home in Trenton.

Blanca Arnold
Blanca "Blanche" Arnold of Bronson died Thursday,, Feb.
23, 2006 at the Manor Nursing Home in Gainesville. She was
87.
Mrs. Arnold was born in Key West and she moved to .the
Bronson area more than 22 years ago.
She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Bronson.
She was preceded in deathbydher.husbandYJoseph Arnold..
Survivors include her son; Orlando "Pete'"Bravoi of Bron-
son; a daughter, Olga Estevez of Bronson; sisters Alice Parra
of Key West and Rose Prough of Gainesville; seven grand-
children; 13 great-grandchildren and four great-great- grand-
children.
Arrangements by Knauff Funeral Home in Williston.

Lucy Boettcher
Lucy Boettcher of Bronson died Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2006 in
Gainesville. She was 84.
Mrs. Boettcher was born in Plant City and moved to Levy
County in 1958 from St. Petersburg.
She was a homemaker.
She was a member of Bronson Church of God.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Emil A. Boettch-
er.
Survivors include daughters Mary B. Meeks of Bronson
and Barbara Sache of Chiefland; sons Carl Boettcher of Ar-
cher and Donald Rogers of Chiefland; 14 grandchildren; and
16 great-grandchildren.
Arrangements by Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services in Chief-
land.

Jerry Gamble
Jerry Gamble of Albany, N.Y., died Saturday, Feb. 18, 2006
He was 58.
Mr. Gamble was born in Chiefland. He moved
to New York in 1963.
He was a laborer and served in the U.S.
_ Army.
He was educated in the Levy County voca-
tional school system.
Survivors include his wife, Cheryl Gamble
of New York; his father, U.L. Gamble of Chief-
land; sons Eugene Gamble of Gainesville, Oli-
ver Tyler and Shawn Outlaw, both of New York; a daughter,
Ebony N. Gamble of New York; sisters Betty Walker, Shirley
Smith, Debbie Dexter and Sylvia Walker, all of Chiefland,
and Fannie Bernard of Williston; brothers Ulysses Gamble
Jr., Willie Gamble and Wilbert Gamble, all of Chiefland; and
six grandchildren.
Arrangements by Carnegie Funeral Home in Chiefland.

George Theodore Jackson
George Theodore "Ted" Jackson of Old Town died Wednes-
day, Feb. 22, 2006 at his home after a long illness. He was
78.
Mr. Jackson was born and raised in Philadelphia. He also
lived in Fort Lauderdale before moving to Old Town in 1989
{ when he retired.
SHe worked with General Electric in its Space
; |and Missile division on the Apollo mission. He
s ~later joined the Burroughs Corp. and then be-
. came a licensed general contractor involved in
, ?office building construction in South Florida.
He served in the U.S. Army Air Force and
served in Japan and Korea. He received a Pur-
ple Heart.
He graduated from Temple University with a degree in me-
chanical engineering technology.
He was a life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
5625 in Chiefland and a first commander and life member
of Tri-County Chapter of the Military Order of the Purple


AREA DEATHS BY CITY


Donald Wayne Smith
Donald Wayne Smith of Trenton died Saturday, Feb. 18,
2006 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center af-
ter a brief illness. He was 68.
Mr. Smith was born in Newberry and was a
lifelong resident of the area.
He was an automobile mechanic with Fire-
stone.
He served in the U.S. Navy. He was a mem-
ber of Union Baptist Church.


Albany, NY
Jerry Gamble
Bell
Roy Anderson Jr.
Aura Amey Jr.
Viva McPhearson
Bronson
Blanca Arnold
Lucy Boettcher
Chiefland
Larry Young Sr.
Gainesville
Pennell Norman


Heart.
Survivors include his wife, Adelaide H. Jackson of Old
Town; a stepson, William G. Harper of Fort Lauderdale; a
stepdaughter, Jane Harper Shuluk of New York City; a broth-
er, John A. Jackson of Queensbury, N.Y.; and a grandson.
Arrangements by Rick Gooding Funeral Home in Cross
City.

Wilbur C. Johnson
Wilbur C. Johnson of Trenton died Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2006.
He was 67.
Mr. Johnson was born in Dresden, N.Y. He moved to Tren-
ton more than 15 years ago from O'Brien.
He was an automobile mechanic.
He enjoyed building motorcycles and three-wheelers.
Survivors include his wife, Rosella Johnson of Trenton; a
son, Scotty Hagan of Trenton; and brothers Eugene M. Eber
of Trenton and James Dewire of Brandon, Vt.
Arrangements by Knauff Funeral Home in Chiefland.

Berkey E. Knavel
The Rev. Berkey E. Knavel of Williston died Wednesday,
Feb. 22, 2006 at his home. He was 90.
The Rev. Knavel was born in Winber, Pa., and moved to
the Gainesville area more than 18 years ago from St. Simons
Island, Ga.
He retired after 50 years as a minister from the Church of
the Brethren, and later served as a chaplain with Hospice for
more than 10 years.
He was an artist and enjoyed woodworking, gardening and
reading.
Survivors include his wife, Elva Knavel ofWilliston; daugh-
ters Lynnea Detwiller of Holidaysburg, Pa., Kathy Hoover of
Harrisburg, Pa., and Marylee Blough of Thomasmills, Pa.;
stepsons Barry Wayne Eisaman and Roger Alan Eisaman,
both of Williston; a brother, Dean Knavel of Lexington, Ky.;
sisters Elsie Dull and Phyllis Berkey, both of Johnstown, Pa.;
seven grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren.
Arrangements by Knauff Funeral Home in Williston.

Joseph Albert Land
Joseph Albert Land of Mayo died Wednesday, Feb. 22,
2006 in Perry. He was 85.
Mr. Land was a lifelong resident of Lafayette County.
He was an electrician. He served as a city council member
for eight years and on the school board for 20 years.
In the 1950s, he ran movie theaters in Mayo, Branford,
Alachua and Trenton. He played the fiddle and played in the
Suwannee River Jamboree.
He was a member of the Mayo Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Marie Cross Land,
and a daughter, Mary Jane Land.
Survivors include a son, Willie Joe Land of Mayo; daugh-
ters Barbara Lancaster of Luraville, Deborah M. Sullivan of
Mayo and Abbie Koon of Tallahassee; 13 grandchildren and
25 great-grandchildren.
Arrangements by Joe P. Burns Funeral Home in Mayo.

Herbert Langford
Herbert Mitchell Langford of Newberry died Saturday, Feb.
25, 2006 at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Gaines-
ville. He was 78.
Mr. Langford was born in Gilchrist County
and was a lifelong resident of the area. He was
a retired salesman.
He served in the U.S. Army and was a mem-
ber of the Baptist church.
Survivors include his daughters, Charlene
Darrah of Starke and Diane Nipper of Trenton;
stepdaughters Donna Smith of Cedar Key and
Debbie Johnson of Gainesville; son Neil Langford of Gaines-
ville; stepsons David Corbitt, Wayne Corbitt and Cary Corbitt;
a brother, Ernest Langford of Panama City; 13 grandchildren;
and 15 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his
wife, Azalea Thrift Langford.
Arrangements by Watson Funeral Home.

Viva A. McPhearson
Viva A. McPhearson of Bell died Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2006 at
the Lake City Medical Center of natural causes. She was 81.
Mrs. McPhearson was born in Fordsville, Ky., and moved
to Bell in 1972 from Clearwater.
She worked in electronics assembly.
She was a Baptist.
Survivors include sons Robert Gary McPhearson of Bran-
ford and Aaron McPhearson of Lake City; a daughter, Linda
Henderson of Branford; a brother, James Basham of Orlando;
a sister, Ida Hickey of Spring Hill; 15 grandchildren; 43 great-
grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
Arrangements by Evans-Carter Funeral Home in High
Springs.

Pennell Norman
Pennell "Nana" Norman of Gainesville died Friday, Feb.
24, 2006 at her residence. She was 78.
Mrs. Norman was born in Henryetta, Okla., and moved to
Gainesville from Hollywood 27 years ago.
She was a homemaker and was trained as an emergency
medical technician. She also worked as a fashion model in
New York City. She enjoyed sewing, baking and was an avid
gardener.
She attended Northwest Baptist Church.
Survivors include three daughters, Terry McKenzie of
Gainesville, Sunny Russo of Brodsville, Pa., and April McK-
enzie of Philadelphia, Pa.; a son, William Randall "Randy"
McKenzie of Archer; a grand-daughter and caregiver, Nicole
Lawrence of Gainesville; four other grandchildren; and 10
great grandchildren.
Arrangements by Milam Funeral Home.


Survivors include his wife of 30 years, Doris Annette Smith
of Trenton; daughters Barbara Sceals and Deborah Morgan,
both of Gainesville; stepsons Carl Lyod Justice of Asheville,
N.C., and Eddie Hanson and James Davis, both of Lake City;
a sister, Nadine Davis of Cross City; two grandchildren; and
five great-grandchildren.
Arrangements by Milam Funeral and Cremation Services
in Gainesville.


Oscar G. Whitaker
Oscar G. Whitaker of Williston died Wednesday, Feb. 22,
2006 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in
i Gainesville. He was 86.
Mr. Whitaker was born in Ensign, Mich.,
and moved to Williston more than 24 years ago
from Michigan City, Ind.
He was a member of the Holy Family Catho-
lic Church and also belonged to the Williston
Golf and Country Club. He enjoyed golfing.
Survivors include sisters Esther McKinney
of Michigan City, Mary Spencer of Dallas and Velma Johnson
of Portage, Ind.
Arrangements by Knauff Funeral Home in Williston.

Lee Wood
Lee Wood of Trenton died Feb. 12 at North Florida Re-
gional Medical Center after a long illness. He was 80.
Mr. Wood was bom in New Orleans and moved to Trenton
in 1980.
He worked as a sales representative for World
Publishing Co., Fawcett and CBS Publishers.
After retiring, he operated a landscaping busi-
ness.
He was an avid bridge player and achieved
the rank of LifeMaster in the American Con-
tract Bridge League.
He was active in the community in projects
such as Project Vote Smart, the Sierra Club and
Save Our Suwannee.
He served in the U.S. Army Air Force.
Survivors include sons Randy Wood of Farmington, Minn.,
and Jeff Wood of Park City, Utah; daughters Patti Mahar of
Princeton, N.J., Robyn Shanahan of Woodside, Calif., and
Teri Jorgensen of Holladay, Utah; and eight grandchildren.
Arrangements by Worth Cremation Service of Florida.

Larry Lorenzo Young Sr.
Larry Lorenzo Young Sr. of Chiefland died Feb. 14 at his
home. He was 49.
Mr. Young was bom in Chiefland and moved back to Chief-
land in 2004 from New York.
He was a laborer with Buie Construction.
He attended Levy County schools in Bronson.
Survivors include his wife, Carolyn Young of Gaines-
ville; daughters Valerie Barnes of Rochester, N.Y., LaShon-
da Young and Kimberly Daniels, both of Bronson, Vanessa
Hayes of Jacksonville and Ebony Young of Gainesville; sons
Larry Lorenzo Young Jr. of South Carolina, Larry Lorenzo III
of Bronson and Bennie Goldwire of Chiefland; a stepdaugh-
ter, Kimberly Lewis of Gainesville; stepsons Ricky Austin of
Chiefland, Antonio Lewis, Travis Lewis and Nadrick Mor-
rison, all of Gainesville; his stepfather, David Wimberly of
Gainesville; sisters Mary Bowers of Chiefland, Vivian Hilery,
Barbara Sue Milton, Linda Sue Smith, Nadena Lovett Ever-
son, Evon Knight, Jacquelyn Robinson and Lakeisha Lovett,
all of Lakeland; brothers Luther Young, Archie Nelson and
James Leon Lovett, all of Lakeland, Monroe Lovett of Madi-
son and Erie Lovett of Chiefland; and 28 grandchildren.
Arrangements by Carnegie Funeral Home in Chiefland.


LEVY COUNTY HISTORY
February 27, 2006
75 years ago
Minutes Book "M"
October 1, 1931, the sealed bid of Allen Deans' for
cutting wood for the Court House and Jail was received
and a contract was awarded to him at $3.25 per cord,
delivered and stacked at the Court House.
Upon motion, the Clerk of this Board is hereby
authorized and directed to prepare a list of the lands in
the County upon which State Certificates are
outstanding and that this list be delivered to "some one"
in the county who is familiar with the land lines and the
locations of real estate in the county, so he may ride all
such property where outstanding state certificates exist,
and post and report all trespassing for prosecution.
From the Archives & History Center
Levy County Clerk's Office
Danny J. Shipp, Clerk of Court


Tides for Cedar Key starting with March 2
Day High Tide Height Sunrise Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible
Th 2 High 3:13 AM 3.7 6:56 AM Rise 8:37 AM 5
2 Low 9:27 AM 0.0 6:32 PM Set 9:47 PM
2 High 3:21 PM 3.7
2 Low 9:54 PM -0.5
F 3 High 4:02 AM 3.4 6:55 AM Rise 9:12AM 12
3 Low 9:57 AM 0.4 6:33 PM Set 10:54 PM
3 High 3:49 PM 3.8
3 Low 10:40 PM -0.5
Sa 4 High 4:52 AM 2.9 6:54AM Rise 9:49AM 20
4 Low 10:25 AM 0.9 6:34 PM Set 12:00 PM


4 High 4:18 PM 3.8
4 Low 11:29 PM -0.4
Su 5 High 5:48 AM 2.5 6:53 AM Rise 10:30 AM 30
5 Low 10:53 AM 1.2 6:34 PM
5 High 4:52 PM 3.7
M 6 Low 12:27 AM -0.1 6:52 AM Set 1:04 AM 40
6 High 7:01 AM 2.1 6:35 PM Rise 11:16AM
6 Low 11:21 AM 1.5
6 High 5:34 I'PM 3.5
IT'u 7 Low 1:43 AM 0.1 -- 6:51 AM Set 2:05 AM 51
7 High 9:00 AM 1.9 6:35 PM Rise 12:07 PM
7 Low 11:57 AIM 1.8
7 High 6:35 PM 3.2
W 8 Low 3:24 AM 0.2 6:50 AM Set 3:01 AM 61
8 High 11:34 AM 2.1 6:36 PM Rise 1:03 PM
8 Low 1:49 PM 2.0
8 High 8:10PM 3.0-












LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Williston police to work on accreditation

City lacks money for program


BY JEFF SIRMONS
STAFF WRITER
Despite running out of
funds for accrediting the
Williston police force, the city
council voted 4-1 to continue
on with the program.
"Accrediting the force
makes us better prepared for
situations we may not have
normally planned for," Police
Chief Dan Davis said. "It also
helps us fight lawsuits because
we have all information filed
and readily available."
The process of accreditation
has cost more than $25,000
over the last three years but,
if everything goes as planned,
the force will be inspected
by other police forces for


accreditation within six
months.
"It brings them to a certain
standard, which is important
for security, but it costs
the community," Mayor R.
Gerald Hethcoat said. "Once
they get it, they must maintain
the files and train officers-it
creates a lot of work."

No other city police force
in Levy County is accredited.
However, the Levy County
Jail has been accredited
since 2003 and just received
reaccredidation on Feb. 7.
Davis believes his force
should be accredited to
ensure that there is a policy
for almost every situation


that every officer obeys.
"Basically, we're not
creating pie in the sky orders
that nobody abides by," Davis
said. "The accreditation
makes sure our officers learn
and act within the policies we
create for any situation."
One topic the accreditation
process addresses is the use
of force, Davis said.
"We're establishing a
use of force continuum that
increases or decreases based
on the situation at hand,"
Davis said.
For example, during
training, an officer would
learn exactly when it was
appropriate to use a gun or
when pepper spray could do


the job just as effectively.
Councilman SteveHolcomb
was the lone dissenter. He
said the cost of the program
outweighed the rewards.
"The program has taken
too long to develop," he said.
"It's just not worth it."

In other city news, the
commission unanimously
agreed to pursue a contract
with Florida Gas Utilities
that allows Williston to pay
40 cents less than the market
value of natural gas over the
next 20 years.
"I really don't see how we
could go wrong with this,"
Councilwoman Debra Jones
said.


Hager, Robinson share campaign thoughts


Editor's Note: Levy County Journal reporter JeffSirmons
posed the same questions to Lindsey Hager and Jerry Robin-
son, who are seeking the same seat on Williston's City Coun-
cil. Mayor Hethcoat advised Sirmons as to which issues are
important. The city election is March 7.
Question: How do you plan to help manage Williston's
growth?
Hager:
(a) Make a comprehensive plan that defines the
City Limites with room for expansion within reason
(b) Work in conjunction with the County Zoning
board in joint planning of densities outside of the city.
(c) Maintain water/sewer services to inside the city limits
only. All residences with city water/sewer available to
them, who are inside the city, must be connected to it within
(1 year) or have a lein placed on their property by the city.
(d) Preclude any attempts by the county to allow new
sub-divisions that would need urban levels of services and
facilities, without the ability to collect taxes to finance such.
(e) Supports establishing an impact fee so the developers
pay for the growth and not the taxpayers.
Robinson:
-supports establishing an impact fee so that any growth will
pay for itself.
-carefully observe city annexation, of neighborhoods to
ensure they will use cityutilities as well as tq make sure the
city utilities can handle the added use.
2) Do you support expanding Williston's
airport? Why or why not?


Hager:
The Williston airport is located in a high density residential
area that is continuing to grow. The concept of turning it
into a regional airport would place undue hardship on the
residences in the general area as well as the flight paths. There
is adequate room at the airport for low-impact industries, and
this area should be investigated.
Robinson:
Of course I support expanding the airport. We just renovated
a runway to make the airport more accessible. Hopefully,
this will make the nearby industrial park more attractive for
businesses, which would be good for our economy.
3) What can be done to improve the services provided
to Williston residents?
Hager
Sewer systems may not be adequate for the additional
burden of almost 600 to 800 new homes. Water could also be
another problem, maintaining quality and enough. Drainage
of rain water is little or none in parts of the city, especially
older residential areas. During some roads, and yards are
continuously flooded.
Robinson
Right now we're establishing a roll-off system for solid
waste almost exclusively for developers. This helps keep our
city clean, and could also create revenue for the city.
Also, with growth to approximately 1,500 homes, we need
to come up with a strategic plan for the expansion of all
utilities without raising taxes on current taxpayers.


Sheriff's department makes burglary arrests


The Levy County Sheriff's
Office reports the following
arrests:
Sherry Ann Baker, date of
birth (DOB) 01/09/74, of In-
glis was arrested on an active
warrant for battery on person
over 65 years old and crimi-
nal mischief on 02/20/06.
Bail was set at $10,000.
Ralph A. Miller DOB
04/25/50, was arrested on an
active Levy County warrant,
for failure to appear for driv-
ing while license suspended
or revoked, on 02/19/06. Bail
was set at $2505.
Raymond Turner, DOB
03/17/67, of Morriston was
arrested on a Levy County
warrant for aggravated assault
with deadly weapon with in-
tent to kill on 02/17/06. Bail
was set $5,000.
Toni Michelle Fitzgerald,
DOB 10/21/75, of Morris-
ton was arrested on a Levy
County warrant for failure
to appear for resisting officer
with violence, on 02/17/06.
Bail was set at $2,500.


- Paula Ruth Davis, DOB
10/02/64, of Chiefland was
arrested on an active Levy
County warrant for violation
of probation for petit theft on
02/17/06. No bail was set.
Marty Lynn Wilson, DOB
12/28/65, of Bronson was
arrested on an active Levy
County warrant for violation
of probation for petit theft on
02/17/06. No bail was set.
Curtis Leon Dallas, DOB
11/30/82, of Williston was
arrested on a warrant for
two charges for failure to
appear for driving while li-
censed suspended or revoked
on 02/17/06. Bail was set at
$5,000
Ryan John Taft, DOB
09/12/86, of Trenton was ar-
rested on a Levy County war-
rants for failure to appear for
possession of drug parapher-
nalia on 02/17/06. Bail was
set at $2,500.
Justin Enck, DOB
08/27/81, of Mount Ville was
arrested on a Pinellas Coun-
ty for defraud innkeeper by


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credit card, on 02/18/06. Bail
was set at $25,013.
Jared E Hawkins, DOB
09/09/87, of Williston was
arrested on an active Alachua
County warrant for failure
to appear for burglary on
11/19/06. No bail was set.
Michael A. Roque, DOB
11/19/80, of Hialeah was ar-
rested on a Miami/ Dade
County warrant for grand
theft third degree and pos-
session of less than 20g mari-
juana and drug paraphernalia
on 02/19/06. Bail was set at
8,500.
Leon McCray, DOB
08/23/54, of Chiefland was
arrested on a Levy County
warrant for violation of pro-
bation for sale and possession
of cocaine with in 1000 feet
of a church on 02/22/06. No
bail was set.
Cody A. McClurg, DOB
09/14/88, of Williston was
arrested on a warrant for
burglary and grand thefton
02/23/06. Bail was set at
$10,000.








upon the name of the Lc
Reg.Nur# shall be saved
47233796
I* Ik ;P


Craig A. Pitts, DOB
09/06/90, of Williston was
arrested on felony charges for
armed burglary on 02/23/06.
Bail was set at $50,000.
Paulette Curtis, DOB
08/24/68, of Chiefland was
arrested on a Levy County
warrant for violation of pro-
bation for felony welfare
fraud, on 02/24/06. She was
released on her own recogni-
zance.
Brain Craig, DOB
05/22/88, of Archer was ar-
rested on a Levy County war-
rant for violation of proba-
tion for burglary and grand
theft and criminal mischief
on 02/23/06. Bail was set at
$20,000.
Jeffrey D. Patterson, DOB
11/03/83, of Bronson was ar-
rested for sale and possession
of cocaineon 02/22/06. Bail
was set at $50,000.
James Littleton Stephens,
DOB 2/17/79, of Citrus
Springs was arrested for es-
cape and resisting with out
violence on 02/22/06. Bail
was set at $20,000.


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Sheriffs Corner


BY JOHNNY SMITH
LEVY COUNTY SHERIFF
Hi, everyone. Welcome to
this week's Sheriff's Corner.
It is still very,
busy with
burglaries,
thefts, child
abuse and
sexual abuse
calls taking
up most of
our effort.
We are also continuing to
prepare for hurricane season,
sexual offender verifications
and the rest of the year in
general.
I'd like to talk about DNA
as this week's focus. I'm
sure many of you have heard
about DNA and probably
know quite a bit about how
law enforcement uses DNA
in investigations. To us,
DNA or deoxyribonucleic
acid, is similar to fingerprint
analysis in how matches are
determined. We use DNA
and fingerprints to link a
suspect to the scene of the
crime. We compare the sam-
ple found at the scene to the
suspects known sample. To
make a match in DNA, there
has to be enough identifying
features. However, if even -
one feature of the DNA or
fingerprint is different, then
it's determined to not come
from the suspect.
DNA is the basic or fun-
damental building block for
an individual's entire genetic
makeup. A persons DNA is
the same in every cell. It is
also in virtually every cell
of the body. That means that
DNA is in a person's blood,
skin cells, semen and saliva.
And these are parts of a body
that are often investigated
in criminal acts. It is also in
tissue, organs, muscle, brain
cells, bone, teeth, hair, mu-
cus, perspiration, fingernails,
urine and feces.
DNA evidence is a good
tool to link people to scenes
and also crimes. Identical
twins are the exception to the
"DNA is different for every-
one rule". DNA found at a
crime scene can either link
the suspect to the evidence
or eliminate a suspect, just
like with fingerprints. Also
if DNA is found at a number
of scenes, those crime scenes
can be linked to the same
perpetrator locally, statewide
and nationally.
I'd like to let everyone
know that we are already
meeting and talking about
the avian or "bird" flu situ-


ation. As you know many
are predicting a pandemic
associated with this flu. Our
concern has to do with POD
locations when a vaccine
becomes available. As you
may remember POD stands
for "point of distribution".
We use that terminology
for hurricanes also instead
of comfort station. We will
keep you informed as things
develop or change. This is
a very important topic for
many reasons. One has to do
with how many people in the
workforce might be affected.
This years virus's and flu
have given us a small idea
of what it's like when large
numbers of people become
ill and can't go to their jobs.
I hope everyone is taking
precautions.
Secondly, I'd like to re-
mind you of a statute change
we've talked about before.
That is the statute that cov-
ers a man who is 24 years
of age and who has sexual
intercourse with a person
16 or 17 years of age. We
are hearing that this statute
will change to include more
age categories. This statute
is there do to the increased
number of offenses within
the age constraints. Parents
and guardians, younger and
younger girls are engag-
ing consensually with men
24 years of age and older.
This is a very serious charge
with long term effects for all
involved.
Next, I'd like to report
that our efforts on behalf of
animal cruelty investigations
are continuing. We will be
meeting with members of
Animal Control, the Sheriff's.
Office, County Commission
and others who are capable
of having an impact in this
area. I'll keep you informed.
Lastly, we received an
e-mail from a Michigan
resident who was angry
with the way we administer
the sexual offenders in our
county and state. The writer
indicated that offenders
only had to report address
changes and register with the
Sheriff's Office. The writer
indicated he might sue the
state to get the law removed.
First of all he is wrong in his
understanding of the statute.
Offenders report twice in
a year. Plus our checks are
designed to help protect chil-
dren under the Jessica Lun-
sford Act. We also learned
the writer is a sex offender
in Michigan.


Have the Levy County Journal

delivered to your mailbox

every week. Call Robin

at 490-4462.





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Page 8










LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


SPORTS


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Levy County Schools Gear Up

Let's Play Ball.....


Race season is here

'Start your engines'


iA, "t4ji


CEDAR KEY SHARKS SOFTBALL TEAM, from left, Coach Aaron Hademan, Jordan Watson, Krystal Har-
vey, Christina Collins, Hannah Gordan, Katelyn Allen, Courtney Cress and Assistant Coach Jimmy Lawer-
ence. Front row, Miranda Haire, Michelle DiMaggio, Savannah White, Kendra Harden, Krystal Donald and
Kayla Ingram.


I I


CEDAR KEY SHARKS BASEBALL TEAM, from left, Steven Poole, Evan Ly-
ons, Carlos Frota, Jeremy Clepper, lan McNulty, David Bishop and Coach Joe
Bishop. Front row, John Henry, Aaron Esposito, Jacob Crosby, Ryan Alford and
Joshua Loyd.


WILLISTON JV TEAM, back, from left are Coach Miller, C.J. James, Charlie Hilton,
Deonte White, Matt Ladd, Taylor Bryant. Middle, Brent Stegall, Thomas Ratch-
ford, Brandon Scott, Damon Ming, Chris Morrow, and Coach RobynMcLeod.
Front, from left, Carl Gilley, Aaron Suggs, Cody McLeod,J ared Mills and Cody
Bryant


CHIEFLAND VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM, back from left, includes Tres Crosby,
L.B. Carvey, Ory Pitts, Joey Harris and Daniel Galpin. Middle, Coach Kyle Par-
nell, Coach Adam Gore, Bryan Hassell, Chad Hodges, Brandon Goins, Isaac
Hardee and Coach Lawrence. Front, Eddie Carter, Michael Rome, Justin Hill
and Kurt Shelly.


CHIEFLAND JV BASEBALL TEAM back, from left, Coach Janey Hinds, Chase
Gregory, Jeremy Hayes, Tommy Sheffield, Matt Williams and Coach Chaney.
Middle, Matt Goins, Dane Cathron, Micheal Perkins, Zack Tyson, Kory Hancher,
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Page 9


The cars and stars of the
ASA Late Model Series
Southern Division will chris-
ten the upcoming season and
invade the fast 1/3 mile high
banked paved oval of the
Bronson Motor Speedway
just 15 miles southwest of
Gainesville, in Bronson, Flor-
ida. Cars and drivers from all
over the United States will
make this one of the best late
model shows in Florida this
year!
The inaugural Coors Light
100 is set for Friday and Sat-
urday March 3 and 4. Joining
the ASA Late Model Series
will be a full show of Super
Mini Cup Cars and Wild &
Crazy Figure 8s. The Coors
Light 100 along with qualify-
ing, and the 25 Lap GM Parts
Performance Shootout (Last
Chance Race) Super Mini
Cups and Figure 8s will make
up a full night of exciting rac-
ing!
The first official event of
the 2006 Season for the ASA
Late Model Series will surely
draw waves of interest from
teams from both the North-
ern and Southern Divisions
as well as those running the
televised Challenge Divi-
sion. Especially those teams
looking to get acclimated to
the template body and crate
engine set up. Just a few of
the up and coming hot shoes
we are expecting are Matt


Martin, Dalton Zehr, Jay
Middleton and David Pollen,
Jr. Also some ASA National
Tour and Late Model driv-
ers like Greg Stewart, Mike
Alexander, Jr., Peter Cozzo-
lino and Butch Miller, who is
mentoring some young men
from the Northern Division.
The day before the Inaugu-
ral Coors Light 100, Friday
March 3, the Bronson Motor
Speedway will host an all day
test and tune for the teams of
the ASA Late Model Series to
get some much needed track
time in preparation for the
2006 Season Opener! Prac-
tice will be from 2-9 p.m. and
race fans can come out and
watch from the grandstands
free of charge! There will be
an open practice for all divi-
sions on Thursday from 4-
8:30 p.m..
On Saturday, the pit gates
open at 8:30 a.m. and practice
begins at 12:15 p.m. Grand-
stands will open at 4 p.m. and
qualifying will begin at 4:30
p.m. Racing is set to begin
at 7 p.m. with the Super Mini
Cup Car Heat Races followed
immediately by the GM Per-
formance Parts Shootout.
The Coors Light 100 is set to
get the green flag at approxi-
mately 8:30 p.m. Following
the Coors Light 100 ASA
Late Model Series race will
be those Wild & Crazy Fig-
ure 8s!


Alt--
e--











page 10


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Outstanding school board employees named


Following are brief profiles
of the employees of the
School Board of Levy County
who have been selected as
the 2006-2007 Educational
Staff Professionals (ESPs) of
the Year at each school, and
the individual selected from
that group to be District ESP
of the Year.
The ESPs of the Year are
selected by their peers at each
school, and the District ESP
of the Year is chosen by a
panel of the ESPs of the Year
from the previous year.
Those selected have been
recognized at their schools,
and they will also be honored
at "A Night of Excellence"
on April 25 at Williston High
School. The Levy County
Schools Foundation and the
School Board of Levy County
sponsor this event.
For more information,
please contact Donna Brooks
or Wanda Rader at the
School Board Office, 486-
5231. E-mail addresses are:
brooksd@levy.kl2.fl.us or
raderw@levy.kl2.fl.us

KATHY McCAIN,
CEDAR KEY and
DISTRICT ESP OF THE
YEAR
Kathy McCain, the 2006-
2007 District ESP of the year,
is a Pre-K Specialist at Cedar
Key School. She says that the
children
are the
best part
Sof her

"The

ulike the


about
my job is working with the
children. Their humor and
honesty brighten my days,
and how they see the world
gives me hope for tomorrow.
The children that I learn
with every day keep me
grounded in what is really
important. My students help
me appreciate all of the little
things in life."
Kathy has a Childhood
Development Associate
Degree (CDA), which
qualifies her to be a Lead
Teacher at the Pre-K level,
a position she has held for
the past five years. She has
been employed by the School
Board for 18 years. She says
the best thing about being at
Cedar Key school is thefamily
atmosphere. Whenever a need
is made known everyone pulls
'together to meet that need.
Working with very young
children has its own special
challenges, but the biggest
one for Kathy is "trying to
explain the injustice in the
world to them."
When confronted with
such challenges, she reminds
herself of her .central belief
that "life is a precious gift
from God, treat it as such."
Children occupy Kathy's
freetimetoo, since her favorite
leisure activity is enjoying
her five grandchildren. Her
hobbies include reading
and sewing. Kathy and
her husband, James, are
the parents of three grown
children, Hermon, Jamie
and Albert. She is a native of
Levy County and graduated
from Chiefland High School.
Her favorite quote is,
"Children do not care how
much you know until they
know how much you care."
-Author Unknown

KATHERINE
MANUEL, BRONSON
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
ESP OF THE YEAR
Katherine Manuel,


Assistant Lunchroom
Manager at Bronson
Elementary School, has been
a School Board employee for
three years.
Katherine's pleasure in her
job is reflected in the way she
describes it: "It's more like


a home

than a
cafeteria,
comes to the challengesbut with
faces in a job that boils downger
pots and

", love."
When it
comes to the challenges she
faces in a job that boils down
to making sure children are
well fed, it's not surprising
that Katherine's main concern
is always "Making sure I
have enough food and being
on time to serve it."
Katherine says that
Bronson Elementary is an
excellent place to work
because "the people make
you feel welcome and glad to
be here."
Asked to sum up her
philosophy, she advises others
to "use your life wisely and
be a good example for others.
We only go down this path
Oncee"
In her free time, Katherine
enjoys singing and writing
songs, cooking, helping others
and working for her church.
She also enjoys watching
action movies and relaxing
with her husband, Leonard,
when she gets a chance.
She has two daughters, one
stepdaughter and one stepson,
and seven grandchildren.
Katherine's favorite quote
is: "I can do all things through
Christ who strengthens me"
and her favorite motto is "It
will be alright,"

MICHELE
STUDSTILL, BRONSON
HIGH SCHOOL ESP OF
THE YEAR
Michele Studstill has been
a Data Entry Clerk at Bronson
High School for three years,
and has a total of five years of
service with the School Board
of Levy
County.

says the
best part
of her
job is
that she
is always ,
busy and ..
"there's
never
a dull
moment." That type of job
can also be challenging, and
Michele notes that sometimes
it's hard to go home when she
knows there is still work to be
done.
For Michele, BHS is a great
place to work because of the
students.
"They have a great spirit
and I always learn something
from them."
Her outlook on life puts the
emphasis on integrity and she
summarizes her viewpoint
with this anonymous quote:
"If you don't stand for
something, you'll fall for
anything."
As for what she enjoys in
her free time, Michele says
family time with husband,
Clint, and her children, Lane,
6, and Brent, 21 months is
very important. She adds
that one of her fun things to
do is "cleaning, believe it or
not. I also enjoy shopping
and spending time with my
children," she concludes,
"but usually not together!"

MERC1 BINGAMAN,
CHIEFLAND
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
ESP OF THE YEAR
Merci Roberson Bingaman,
a life-long Levy County
resident, has worked in the
Chiefland Elementary School
lunchroom for four years and
obviously enjoys her job.


"Our children are precious
gifts, and it's a real honor
to work where everyone in
Chiefland sends their greatest
asset,theirchildren,tobetaken
care of and taught. I consider
myself very privileged to be a
part of Chiefland Elementary


School." '
Merci
notes that
while the
general

doesn't
k no w


school o
service, in the local
community it carries
"celebrity status."
"It's a great rush of pride
when you are out in the
community and a child
yells, 'I know her. She's my
lunchroom lady,'" explains
Merci. "1 love being around
the children. I get to see all of
them, from our precious pre-
schoolers to our 'big shot'
fifth graders. We get to make
them happy by, of course,
feeding them!"
Merci says that the biggest
challenge of her job is
confronting the reality that
for some children in the
community, the meal they get
at school may be their only
meal of the day.
For Merci, the key to living
a good life is generosity.
"I believe you get what you
give in life, so give freely and
with your whole heart, and be
blessed abundantly."
Her favorite quote is a verse
from the Bible, Joshua 24:15,
"As for me and my house, we
serve the Lord."
Spending time with family
is Merci's favorite pastime.
She has two children, Nina,
15, and Randall, 11. She and
her family are active in their
church, and also enjoy going
to the movies and playing
games together. Her hobbies
include cooking and baking.
"I love to surprise someone
special with homemade
goodies just out of the blue!"

JANICE BIEHL,
CHIEFLAND MIDDLE
SCHOOL ESP OF THE
YEAR
Janice Biehl has 21 years of
service with the School Board
of Levy County and for the
past 15 years has worked in
the lunchroom at Chiefland
Middle School.
Janice says that the best
part of her
job is "the
students
a n d
my co-
workers."
She also
adds that
she likes
a to cook,
a definite
plus in her position!
Janice notes that she and
other lunchroom staff face
the constant challenge of
"preparing healthy, nutritious
meals that meet the new
'Nutrikids' guidelines, but are
also flavorful and something
the kids will eat."
For Janice, faith is very

her philosophy, she puts it
this way: "Religion first and
everything else behind that."
In her free time, she enjoys
camping, working in the yard,
or trying out new recipes.
She and husband, Curtis,
have four grown children, six
grandchildren, and two great-
grandchildren.
Janice's motto is,. "Don't
worry about it, I'll do it!"

SYLVIA HASTINGS,
CHIEFLAND HIGH
SCHOOL ESP OF THE
YEAR
Sylvia Hastings, a long-
time member of the custodial
staffatChieflandHighSchool,
has 15 years of service with
the School Board of Levy


County.
Sylvia says that because
she has spent so many years at
CHS, she knows her job and
the people she works with,
and that is what makes her job
rewarding.
"I like the teachers and


staff and administrators," she
says, "I like everything about
Chiefland High School!"
She also takes pride in a job
well done and gets great
satisfaction out of being able
to say, "I know my job is done
when I leave."
Sylvia believes that a
positive
attitude is
essential
to a good
life, and
that it is
important
to"cherish -.
e ver y
day as it
comes." Her favorite quote is
"Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you."
In her spare time, Sylvia
enjoys fishing and "being
with my grandkids." She also
enjoys watching TV, listening
to music and cooking.
She and her husband, Edbert
are the proud grandparents of
four, with another on the way.
A native of Gilchrist County,
she has three adult children,
Sylvia, Carl and Byron.

EUFEMIO
CORTES-COLLAZO,
JOYCE BULLOCK
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
ESP OF THE YEAR
Eufemio Cortes-Collazo
has five
years of
service
with the
School

of Levy
County
a n d
works nd
as an
ESOL aide at Joyce Bullock
Elementary School.
He loys,hisjqb,,espq6i g y,
"the kids' bright eyes,404,
big smiles that can move the
whole world." He says JBES
is a good place to work, "with
lots of very nice friends and
tiny, loving human beings
anxious to learn."
Sometimes, his biggest
challenge in the classroom is
"getting a smile from a crying
child," while at other times
it is finding the best way to
reach students so they can get
the most from their lessons.
As a retired teacher with 35
years of service in his native
Puerto Rico, Eufemio still
enjoys working with children
and believes that helping
students make the most of
their abilities is the best use
of anyone's time.
"Dare to do and you'll get
it," he advises his students,
adding,* "Smile! God gave
you the power to change the
world."
Even when the school
day is over, Eufemio enjoys
tutoring youngsters. His
favorite hobbies include
reading, cooking and
gardening. The father of three
grown children, he is now a
proud grandfather of six.

MARJORIE
MAYTON, WILLISTON
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
ESP OF THE YEAR
Marjorie Mayton has been
working in the Williston
Elementary School
lunchroom for eight years,
and has been a SBLC
employee for 13 years.
Marjorie's specialty is
.'.. baking,
Sand she
aI wa y s
feels


when the


students
take time
to tell her
that they
enjoyed
their meals. She says working
at Williston Elementary is a
pleasure because "everyone
works together for the good
of the whole school."


She believes that life is "a
gift from God" and tries to
live her life by the Golden
Rule: "Do unto others as you
would have them do unto
you."
In her free time, Marjorie
enjoys reading, sewing,
working in her yard, and
gardening.

DEBORAH BURGMAN,
WILLISTON MIDDLE
SCHOOL ESP OF THE
YEAR
Deborah Burgman, is a
custodian at Williston Middle
School, a position she has held
for seven years. Originally
from Dunnellon, Deborah
has four children and is the
proud grandma of seven
grandchildren.
Deborah says that one of
the best
things
abhours and
her job is
that she
is within people I work
walking ,
distanceof
he home! Golden Rule,
She also others as you would
likes them do unto you," as a
reguiding principal of her life,
hours and
the holiday time she has off to
spend with family and friends
However, what she likes most
of all is "the people I work
with and theakids."
She cites the Golden Rule,
"Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you," as a
guiding principal of her life,
and points out that it is also
important "to be kind to one
another, and respectful of
each other.
When she isn't at WMS,h
she likes to spend time with
her mother, going to garage
sales and taking her out to
church and to Sbo 'se y p
breakfast Wahph:2egstseth
chance, she likes to travel.

CECIL OSTEEN,
WILLISTON HIGH
SCHOOL ESP OF THE
YEAR
Cecil OSteen, who works as
abus driver andintheWilliston
High School lunchroom, has
20 years of service with the
*. 1 I School
I. o Board
I of Levy
S County,
h -,i all of it
spent at
,-WHS.
Asked
what he
likes best
about
both
his jobs, Cecil said it was
the students in both cases.
He added that he especially
enjoys getting to know his
riders "and making sure
they get home safely." As a
long-time driver, he notes
that "many of the students
that ride today are children
of students that rode my bus
when I first started driving."
He says that the "friendly
and warm-hearted staff at
WHS help make both his jobs
more enjoyable."
"I am honored and blessed
that Williston High School
chose me to be their ESP of
the Year," he adds.
Of course, safety is always
uppermost in Cecil's mind
when he's driving, and he
says the biggest challenge is
keeping an eye out for unsafe
drivers and making sure the
students stay in their seats
and ride safely.
In the lunchroom, one of
his main concerns is the short
amount of time the staff has
to get all the students through
the serving lines and fed.
Cecil offers some simple


advice that exemplifies his
outlook on life: "Live each
day to its fullest and treat
your neighbor as yourself."
"I love to fish," says Cecil
when asked what he does
in his free time. He also
enjoys reading the newspaper


and watching television,
and playing with his three
grandchildren, Gabrielle,
Kelby, and Garin. A native
of Dixie County, He and
wife, Janice, have two grown
children.
Cecil's favorite quote is,
"This is the day the Lord has
made, let us rejoice and be
glad in it."

RANDY LIGI,
YANKEETOWN SCHOOL
ESP OF THE YEAR
Randy Ligi, Head
Custodian at Yankeetown
School, has been employed
by the School Board for one
year, but has over 35 years of
experience in the janitorial
field. As head custodian,
he supervises a staff of four
workers.
He says Yankeetown
School is a great place to
work.
"I enjoy the teachers and
staff, who
appreciate
the job I
do. The
principal
is a great i
boss who
has faith
and trust
in my "
capability
to get the
job done."
Randy also notes that the
"beautiful park-like setting"
of the campus is another
advantage.
As for what he likes best
about his job, he says that
he enjoys that fact that it is
not routine and adds that he
takes pride in getting repairs
done and problems solved in
a timely manner. He says the
on-going challenge of his job
is making sure that the entire
qtbpu e ito maintained in a
B ,safe, and cleaioeadition.
Randy believes the key to
success in life is hard work.
"With hard work, life's
problems have a way of
working out, and usually in a
good way."
One of Randy's hobbies
is collecting Beatle
memorabilia, so it's not
surprising that his favorite
quote is "Life is what happens
to you while you're busy
making other plans," which is
attributed to the Beatles' John
Lennon.
Besides listening to the
Beatles and other music,
Randy's leisure activities
include camping, fishing, and
singing karaoke.

KATHLEEN WALKER,
HILLTOP ALTERNATIVE
SCHOOL ESP OF THE
YEAR
Kathleen Walker has been
employed
a by the
School

of Levy
County

and has
been Lab
Manager
at Hilltop Alternative School
for the past two years.
"What I like best about my
job," says Kathleen, "is the
diversity of responsibilities
and the opportunity to interact
with our students. I especially
enjoy meeting and working
with kids who come to us
from all over Levy County.
The reasons students come
to Hilltop are as different
as the students themselves.
Although the majority of
our students spend only one
semester at Hilltop, they make
great strides academically,
socially and behaviorally."


Motivating those students
so that they can make such
gains is one of the biggest
challenges of her job, says
Kathleen, but the rewards are

Continued on page 11











LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Quilters glad to be


back to normal


BY WINNELLE HORNE
CORRESPONDENT
Log Cabin Quilters
met Thursday, Feb. 23,
at the Levy County Quilt
Museum.
For another year we can
get back to normal. Four
trips to Tampa are over,
everything is back home
and now we are planning
our appreciation day for
April 1.
This is very important to
us and we want everyone
to know how much we
appreciate what they have
done.
We hope to have an all
day program with bluegrass
and gospel music. We will
have refreshments of all
kinds and we will be sending
out invitations to several
businesses that mean so
much to us, but more about
that later.
Nick Turner and 10 boys


*ESP


were out Tuesday to work
and help Ken Sullivan with
a new ramp. They started
cleaning flowerbeds,
mowed and so much for us.
Thanks, Lancaster.
Lots of quilting went on
with sometimes five at a
quilt.
We welcomed Lois Fink
back after many weeks
of family sickness. Cleo,
Prevatt is doing so well and
we are always happy when
our members are all well.
Lunch was Peach Cobbler
day, or so it looked like. All
was good with cauliflower
casserole, sweet potatoes,
fried and casserole, lots
of salads, corned beef and
sauerkraut and crackers and
candy. We had 27 members
and six guests present.
Winnelle Horne is
the director of the Levy
County Quilt Museum.


Continued from page 11


worth the hard work
"The best part of working at Hilltop is how closely we get
to work with our students. It is a pleasure and truly rewarding
when we get to see students experience tremendous growth
and maturity in such a short period of time."
Kathleen believes in focusing on the present, and sums up
her outlook on life this-way: "The past is gone; learn from
it and move on." Her favorite quote is from William of St.
Thierry, a 12th century monk: "Do not wonder what others
are like but to the best of your ability, imagine what they can
become through your influence."
Her extracurricular activities include "playing, watching,
and coaching volleyball," watching basketball, reading, and
gardening. However, Kathleen's favorite pastime is spending
time with family. She and husband, Chuck, have four grown
children, Derek, Kiel, Brent and Carly, and are the proud
grandparents of Jaiden, 5 and Kieran, 3.

-DEWAYNE WILLIAMS,
DISTRICT OFFICE ESP OF THE YEAR
Dewayne Williams has been employed in the District
Maintenance Department for four years. As a carpenter,
much of his time is spent working at the
various schools in the county and he says
i he enjoys the interaction with students
S and staff as he goes about his work.
However he points out that the work can
be a challenge since he may be called on
to perform a wide variety of tasks in the
course of a day.
Asked about his philosophy he says he
believes it is best to follow your dreams
and "live the life the way that makes you
happy, not the way someone else wants
you to live."
A native of Otter Creek, Dewayne
graduated from Bronson High School.
A veteran of the Gulf War, he served 21 years in the United
States Air Force, retiring in 2002.
In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his wife
Holly and other family and friends. He also likes to hunt and
fish, enjoys NASCAR racing, and is a collector.
His favorite quote is, "You don't have to be a farmer to be
outstanding in your field."

MELBA TILLIS,
TRANSPORTATION ESP OF THE YEAR
Melba Tillis has been a bus driver for 10 years and has 13
years of service with the School Board of
Levy County. She plans to retire at the
end of the year.
Melba's present bus route covers the
Bronson area, and she enjoys meeting
and greeting the children who ride with
her each day. As is the case with all
school bus drivers, safety is a constant I.
challenge, and one that is never far from
Melba's mind as she makes her rounds.
A grandmother who enjoys taking
her grandkids fishing, Melba also enjoys working around
the house where she raised her six children. She believes in
taking things "one day at a time," and her motto is: "Live and
learn."


Mayor to students: You can overcome


BY BEVERLY MCLEAN
CORRESPONDENT
Hilltop School in Bronson
celebrated Black History with
poetry walk presentations by
students and by a presentation
given by Mayor Beatrice
Mongo about growing up
black in Bronson.
The students explored the
writings of African American
poets such as Maya Angelou
and Langston Hughes, chose
poems that "spoke to them"
in regards to their personal
experiences or chose those
that opened up new vistas of
understanding.
They then made visual and
oral reports. Many students
also wrote poetry themselves.
In fact, one young man wrote
a poem during Mongo's
speech and presented it to her
afterward.
Another, Patrick in 8th
grade, read this selection
from Langston Hughes to
open the event:

A Dream Deferred

What happens to a
dream deferred?

Does it dry up
* like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore-
And then run?
Does it stink like
rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over-
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?


Mayor Mongo, a native of
Bronson, shared that she does
not like making speeches,
but-said, "I'll do-it for you,"
ope&irng her arms to the entire
student body, which in turn
responded to her with full.
attention and gratitude.
She told the personal and
poignant stories of her and
her family's experiences with
poverty, social rejection, and
horrifying injustices.
"Adversity comes," she
said, "but no matter what you
face, you can overcome. You
can be successful."
Her daughters, Carle
and Edtrice, and a close
relative, Isaiah Parker, who


Youth League

plans carnival

Bronson Youth League will
be holding its first Spring
Fling Carnival March 25 at
the Bronson Town Park for
baseball and softball opening
day.
The league is expecting
scheduled games with area
towns from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m.
The league is looking for
craft/hobby vendors who
want to rent spaces for a
small charge. Sorry no food
vendors will be accepted.
All proceeds benefit the
Bronson Youth League.
For more information you
can contact Brenda Roberts
at 352-486-4991 or 352-486-
6649


BEATRICE MONGO was the guest speaker at Hill-
top School's Black History Month celebration where
Patrick Wnek, right, is principal.


ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL Arnette Hall donned tradi-
tional African garb during Black History Month.


provided singing and music
at intervals during the speech,
accompanied Mongo.
The mayor grew. up in.
poverty, without many things
including electricity and
running water. She and her
seven siblings toted water
daily from two miles away.

They also worked in the
fields to help provide an'
income. But because their
mother valued education, she
developed an ingenious plan
by which each day a different
child would work while the
others attended school. In this
way they all missed as few
days as possible 1 in 8.


ISPECALEVE IN 2006


Opening day is Saturday
It's time to play ball... in Chiefland.
This Saturday, March 4, spring sports kicks off in Chiefland
at Strickland Park. at 10 a.m. Commissioner Alice Monyei is
scheduled to throw out the first ball.

WHOLESALE TILE NORTH
Largest Selection,
Best Prices,
Ray & Heidi

352- 986-0063
Hours: 9-6 Mon.- Fri.
9-4 Sat.
810 E. Thrasher St.
(RT,24) Bronson I
m


Poverty, however, was not
the most difficult adversity in
Mongo's life.
'Rejection' was. 'She "took
a hard look at racism and
concluded, "This is not right.
This is not what God has
planned for me."
Because of the old Jim
Crow laws which was
government sanctioned race
discrimination until 1964
and beyond, young Mongo
knew how it felt to be denied
entrance to a restaurant, to
be denied the use of public
restrooms and water fountains
and to be prohibited -from
entering a public park or
library.


ASA LATE MODEL SERIES
COORS LIGHT 100!
BIGGEST LATE MODEL
SHOW IN FLORIDA! MATT
MARTIN, JAY MIDDLETON,
DALTON ZEHR & MANY
MORE LATE MODEL
HOT SHOES!
SATURDAY MARCH 4TH
GRANDSTANDS OPEN AT 4PM
QUALIFYING AT 4:30
PLUS SUPER MINI CUP CARS
& WILD & CRAZY FIGURE 8'S!
ASA LATE MODEL SERIES
COORS LIGHT 100 PRACTICE
FRIDAY 2-9 PM GRAND-
STANDS OPEN!
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT


As she entered fifth grade,
the schools were integrated
and she began to dream of the
new opportunities this social
change might provide.
At that tender age, high
on her list was the dream of
being a cheerleader. She soon
discovered, however, that
cheerleaders were elected
by the majority vote of the
student body.
Consequently, she and
other minorities did not
stand a chance. It appeared
as though she'd never realize
fulfillment of her dream.
"But by 9th grade, the
school realized that this was
unfair. The teachers began
choosing the cheerleaders
based on their performance
and other factors and I got to
be a cheerleader."
Mongo dropped out of
high school for a while, but
upon determining that "I was
not going to live in poverty,"
she returned, graduated and
continued on to graduate
from FSU.
As a public servant, she
finds her greatest rewards are
in making life better for the
residents of Bronson.
Regarding injustices faced
by her family, the mayor
shared a terrifying story
about her uncle and three
other men who were falsely
arrested for rape. The men
were beaten and shot before
going to trial.
"One man had over 400
bullet holes in him," she
said. Her uncle survived this
murderous ordeal, but spent
11 years in prison before he
was cleared.
Sharing in the family's
characteristic perseverance
and determination, he
overcame his unjust suffering
and is now a partner in
Nashville's largest air
conditioning business.
The mayor encouraged the
students to "Put God first; get
your education; and when
adversity comes, remember,
'I can do all things through
Christ who strengthens me.'"
Teacher, Mrs. Frances
LaSalle organized the
project. In attendance were
Superintendent Cliff Norris,
Assistant Superintendent
Jeff Davis, Hilltop Principal
Patrick Wnek and Assistant
Principal Arnette Hall.


BRONSON, FLORIDA


Track is Located...

15 miles southwest of Gainesville on Hwy 24!

9, 2 1 2?6


We depend on our readers for story ideas. Call us
today if there's something you think others should
know. 490-4462 or 486-2312


Page 11


BES March Events
Calendar
Friday, March 3. KIA
meeting in Mrs. Trimm's
room
Thursday, March 9, FLNc
5:30-7 p.m. in Computer'
Lab.
SAC meeting at 6:30 p.m4.
.Monday, March. 13,
Suwannee Fair' 'ay. 'N6
school
Tuesday, March 14Teacher'
Workday/ No students
Wednesday, March 15,
Early release at 12:15 p.m.'
Thursday. March 16, Early'
release day at 12:15 p.m.,
Friday, March '17, Artists
in the Schools Program.











Page 12


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006, LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Classified


Ht Deadline:
n Monday






Legals



L VY COUNTY JOURNAL


100 MISCELLANEOUS
105 Personals
110 Lost & Found
115 Notices
125 Services
130 Free
200 EMPLOYMENT
210 Help Wanted/Full-time
240 Help Wanted/Part-time
245 Work Wanted
300 RENTALS
305 Apartments for Rent
310 Houses for Rent
315 Mobile Homes for Rent


330 Commercial Property
for Rent
345 Wanted to Rent
400 REAL ESTATE
405 Condos & Apart-
ments for Sale
410 Houses for Sale
415 Mobile Homes for
Sale
435 Commercial Property
for Sale
500 FOR SALE
505 Antiques
510 Auctions


515 Yard Sales
525 Appliances
535 Pets & Animals
600 RECREATION
605 Boats & Marine
610 Campers & RVs
615 Motorcycles & ATVs
700 FARM
705 Farm Equipment
800 TRANSPORTATION
810 Automobiles
820 Trucks
825 Vans
900 LEGALS


How to Place Your Ad


Call: Chietland 324~)4-b
Fd\: Chiellind 3'2-00441I
Email: mlth'lv'ord~o
Visit: 13 South Mainm Streett. Chiefland


0BroI on 32-4StS-et B o12

440 Sotlth Court Street, Bronson


Miscellaneous"





0 Personals

AA MEETING--for information
call North Central Florida Inter-
group Office at (352) 372-8091
which is also a 24 hour local hot-
line number, tfn

ADDICTION HELP
Narconon, a nonprofit
organization dedicated to helping
those with drug addictions, is
here to help residents of Levy
County. For help, call 1-800-556-
8885.tfn/nc

NARCONON ... a nonprofit
public benefit organization that
specializes in helping people
with drug or alcohol addictions
offers FREE assessments and
more than 11,000 local referrals
through the 800 line. Drug
addiction can be overcome
and Narconon can help. Call
(800) 556-8885 or visit www.
drugrehab.net

Lost and Foun
110 A.
IF YOU'VE lost an animal, 'dog
or cat, please contact the Levy
County Animal Control at 486-
5138 www.levycountyanimal.
petfinder.org. Tfnf


125 Service U
TREES, TREES, TREES. Langs-
ton Tree Services, Inc. Call (352)
490-4456. tfnb '

T & J TREE SERVICES. Li-
censed and insured, free esti-
mates, 17 years experience, and
24-hr. emergency service. Call
352-486-6297.

Employment




Help Want
210 Full time
QUALITY HAIRDRESSER want-
ed. Sheer Expressions-Bronson.
352-486-6899.2/23-4/13b

GM BODY SHOP MANAGER.
Salary plus commission. Call
Victor at 352-493-4263 or fax re-
sume to 352-493-1815 Scoggins
Buick Chevy. Inc. tfnb
Help Wante'
240 Part tim eU
THE LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL
has an immediate opening for a
newspaper delivery route. Ap-
plicants must provide their own
transportation, have a valid Flor-
ida driver's license and be avail-
able every Wednesday afternoon
to stock newspapers in stores
and coin racks. You will train
for two weeks with our current
driver before undertaking the job
on your own. If interested, call



GATOR WOR KS
COMPUTINi
Sales. Repair Upgrade
SC.iniulting
II' i ,JProframmn,,

... ..., C II I 1 D C

Computer
Training Classes


A. g


Help Wnt
240 Part timno
Carolyn at the Chiefland office
at 352-490-4462 on Thursday or
at the Bronson office at 352-486-
2312 on Friday. Please provide
references. Phone calls will not
be accepted on any other days.
This is the perfect job for a retir-
ee, mature student or someone
who needs a little extra cash.

P/T TUTORS needed immedi-
ately. Locations throughout Levy
County. $18-25/hour 1-888-434-
2582 3/2, 3/9p

Real Estate 4




Want to B U!
445 ,-
LAND WANTED-timber and land
tracts of 1,000 acres or more.
Wanted for immediate acquisii-
tion. All cash buyers. ,Contact
Mark Allender, Broker 352-281-
S3767 2/23,3/2P
Land.
450
5 ACRES for sale in restricted
subdivision on paved road off
SR 24 Levy County. $90,000. 18
miles to Shands. 352-495-3927.
3/23p


Regina Goss
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.gosswilliams.com

MOBILE HOMES:


For Sale


501


Auction u
510 '-

SOUTHERN AUCTION MAR-
KETING, 15991 Hwy. 27A, Wil-
liston, Monday night, March 6,
at 7:00 p.m., Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437, AB2240, 10% buyer's
premium. Computer desk, rock-
er/recliner, 4-drawer file cabinet,
dry sink dresser w/ mirror, office
chair, glassware, fine art and
jewelry. Contact 352-528-2950.
3/2b.
Miscellane u


NEW MOWER & CHAIN SAW
PARTS: Stihl, Husqvarna, Ayp,
Murray, Sears, MTD, Briggs,
Kohler, Robin, and Honda.
Blades for most mowers. Beau-
champ Saw Shop. 352-493-4904
1/7/07


Classified

deadline is 2

p.M. Monday!


GOSSWILLIAMS
REAL ESTATE, INC.


1 Acre Tree shaded lot with this 1999 SWMH close to
town. $75,000
1.67 Acres Older SWMH w/additions. Barn. Close to
town. $75,000
2 Acres 2q Sold H with almost 2000 sf. $125,000
Fowlers Bluff Older MH on 2 lots. $55,000
LOTS & ACREAGE:
7.45 Acres on U.S. Alt. 27. $130,000
8.9 Acres -just off U.S. Alt. 27. $120,000
5 Wooded Acres Gilchrist County, some pecan trees.
$85,000
100 Acres Williston area, pines, oaks, holly & more,
small ponds. $19,000 per acre
Corner Parcel 80 Ac at corner of 2 paved roads, planted
pines. $15,000 per acre
80 Acres 1/4 mile paved road frontage, large oaks.
$12,000 per acre
Bronson Heights 1 Sold scattered trees. $24,900
20 Acres just 5 miles from town, paved road.
$15,000 per acre
Riverfront Lot 100' on Suwannee River, beautiful wood-
ed lot just down from public boat ramp & park. Has
power DO NOT guarantee building status. $75,000
COMMERCIAL:
City of Chiefland -.2nercial & residential tract on
Park Ave., ma Slities. $330,000
HOMES:
City of Chiefland 2 or 3 BR, 1 BA home on U.S. Alt. 27,
garage & screen porch. $129,900

Details and photos at www.gosswilliams. com
102 S. Main Street, Chiefland, FL 32626
Office: 352-493-2838 Evenings: 352-493-1380


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
AND
FOR LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION:
FILE NO.: 38-2006-CP-28
In re: THE ESTATE OF
KATHRYN ANNE STRICKLIN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the es-
tate of Kathryn Ann Stricklin,
deceased, whose date of death
was October 27, 2005 and
whose Social Security Number
is 265-90-1389, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Levy County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Levy County
Courthouse, Post Office Box
610, Bronson, Florida 32621.
The names and addresses of
the personal representatives and
the personal representatives' at-


torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST.PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH


Near Cedar KeyFlorlda-Lovely 2/2conCreteoIOCKStUCCO OVIELOOIlNGl LAKE MOLIIs IN SUWAVNNEt! Tlis
home on 30 + /-acres offers plenty of peace & quiet with 2BR/2BA DWMH is on a deep water lake only minutes
an abundance of wildlife to watch from your screened by boat in freshwater canals to the Suwannee River
porch.Small pond stocked with bass & brim.Large great and the Gulf of Mexico. It has a 2 stall boathouse,
c Pond c'stokscreenedafishsLleaning&Igstorage room, Florida roon
room & stainless appliances in the kitchen Two car wi views of the lake and orange, grapefruit and
garage, separate workshop and security system. Close to tangerine trees. The Home id completely furnished,
Cedar Key & convenient to Chiefland. Approved for an includes 2 boat and is waiting for you to come enjoy
additional family residence $495,000. (LR-751199- D) our excellent fishing and quiet way of life! $299,900.
352-493-2221 (LMH-750459-K) 352-493-2221


ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is March 2, 2006.

Personal Representatives:

Kathryn A. Hainsworth
12735 Camp Creek Road
Manhattan, MT 59741

Rebecca Will
707 SE 1st Street
Williston, FL 32696

Attorney for Personal Represen-
tatives:

TAYLOR & TAYLOR P.A.
By: James J. Taylor, Jr.
Florida Bar No. 334057
Post Office Box 2000
Keystone Heights, Florida
32656
(352) 473-8088 (telephone)
(352) 473-8488 (facsimile)
Pub: Mar. 2, 9, 2006


I ......, ,.. I, .-
w/sprinkler through out & much more. Close to schools, Walmartonlyinutes to Ie Suwannee River
shopping,the Suwannee River & only 30 minutes to tile Affordable 3 bedroom concrete block home in City of VFaartng Springs State Park Approxinately 30
Gulf of Mexico, It is priced to sell. "SHOWN BY APPOINT- Chiefland. Large enclosed barn/workshop, Priced to minutes to Gulf of Mexico. No sigh Per sellers
MENT ONLY!"' $115,000. (DMH-751291-JW) 352-463- sell.$94,500.(LR-751309) 352-493-2221, Request, $47,000. (LMH-751160-JW) 352-463-


Levy County Board of County Commissioners has employment opportunities for:
Administrative Assistant II
Paramedic
Park Attendant
For job qualifications, closing dates and application contact Levy County Human
Resource Office, Post Office Box 310, Bronson, Florida 32621.-'
Phone: 352.486.5219 Fax: 352.486.5167 E-mail: levybocc@&icuit8'.org'

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION- DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


Legals


mmliq


aVM














LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CLASSIFIED & LEGALS


Page 13


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 38-2005-CA-000884

DIVISION:
WILLIE L. KING, JR. and LINDA
A. KING,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ROBERT L. COLEMAN and
LINDA COLEMAN, if living, and
if deceased,the unknown spous-
es, heirs, devisees, grantees, as-
signees, trustees and creditors
of said' named Defendants, and
all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under, or against said
named Defendants, and all par-
ties having or claiming to have
any right, title, or interest in the
property herein described,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERT L. COLEMAN, if
living, and if deceased, the un-
known spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, trustees
and creditors of said named De-
fendant, and all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against said named Defendant,
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title, or interest
in the property herein described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title to the
following real property in Levy
County, Florida:
A tract of land in Section 32,
Township 12 South, Range 19
East, Levy County, Florida, be-
ing more particularly described
as follows:
Commencing at the Southeast
corner of the Southwest One
Quarter (SW %) of said Section
32; thence N 0159'39" East, a
distance of 1330.62 feet to the
Southeast corner of the North-
east One Quarter of the South-
west One Quarter (NE1/4 of SW
%) of said Section 32: thence
South 8950'51" West along the
South line of the Northeast One
Quarter of the Southwest One
Quarter (NE % of SW %) of Sec-
tion 32, adistanceof50.04feetto
the Westerly Right-of-Way line of
State Road No. S-331-A; thence
North 0159'39" East, along said
Westerly Right-of-Way a dis-
tance of 60.04 feet; thence South
8950'51" West, parallel with the
South line of the Northeast One
Quarter of the, Southwest One
Quarter (NE % of SW ) of Sec-
tion 32, a distance of 597.49 feet
to the Point of Beginning; thence
continuing South 8950'51"
West, a distance of 161.76 feet;
thence North 01059'39" East, a
distance of 135.07 feet; thence
North 8950'51" East, a distance
of 161.76 feet; thence South
0159'39" West, a distance of
135.07 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any,
to Plaintiffs' attorney, Claude
R. Moulton, 2014 North Laura
Street, Jacksonville, Florida
32206, on or before March 31,
2006, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs' at-
torney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF THIS COURT on Feb-
ruary 15, 2006
DANNY J. SHIPP CLERK OF
THE COURT

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 9, 16,
2006
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR
LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 38-2005-CA-000444
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CODY E. BENNETT, a single
person,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that I, DANNY SHIPP, Clerk of
the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit, in and for Levy
County, Florida, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment in
Foreclosure entered in the above
styled cause, will sell at pub-
lic sale the following described


property situate in LEVY County,
Florida, to wit:
A tract of land lying in UNIT
1, LAKE JOHNSON ESTATES,
as per Plat Book 5, Page 38


of the public records of Levy
County, Florida, said tract be-
ing described as follows: Begin-
ning at the Southeast corner of
Lot 1, Block 2, of UNIT 1, LAKE
JOHNSON ESTATES, thence N
00016'39" E., along the East line
of said Lot 1, 25.48 feet; thence
N 81 00'38" E., 208.08 feet to the
West right of way line of a 50 foot
graded road; thence S 0859'22"
E., along the said right of way
line, 75 feet to the Northeast
Corner of Lot 4 of Osteen Sub-
division as per plat recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 3 of the public
records of Levy County, Florida;
thence S 81 00'38" W., along the
North line of said Lot 4, 163.28
feet; thence S 00016'39" W.,
along the West line of said Lot 4,
175.00 feet; thence N 4909'20"
W., along the Northeasterly side
of Lots 8, 9, and 10, Block 2 of
said UNIT 1, LAKE JOHNISON
ESTATES, 317.92 feet; thence
N 8719'32" E. along the South
side of Lots 1 and 2 of said UNIT
1, LAKE JOHNSON ESTATES,
185.46 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning. TOGETHER WITH A 1982
EAST Single Wide Mobile Home
located thereon bearing I.D.
#S48S142FK3490GA.
Said sale shall be made to the
highest and best bidder for cash
pursuant to the Final Judgment
entered in the above styled cause
and will be held at the front door
of the Levy County Courthouse
in Bronson, Florida, on the 13th
day of March, 2006, commenc-
ing at the hour of 11:00 A.MI.
All interested parties shall be
governed accordingly by this No-
tice.
DATED this 15th day of Febru-
ary, 2006.
DANNY SHIPP
Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT QF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 38-2005-CA-001023
JUDGE: M. Giunta
IN RE: FORFEITURE OFA 1995
CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLAS-
SIC
VIN: 1G1BL52W5SR117563,

NOTICE OF COMPLAINT

TO: ANY AND ALL PERSONS
WHO CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL
PROPERTY:


1995 CHEVROLET
PRICE CLASSIC,
1GIBL52W5SR117563


CA-
VIN:


NOTICE is given pursuant to
Sections 932.703 and 932.704,
Florida Statutes (2004) that
the DEPARTMENT OF HIGH-
WAY SAFETY AND MOTOR
VEHICLES (Department), act-
ing through its division, the
Florida Highway Patrol, seized
the above-described personal
property on October 20, 2005,
in Levy County, Florida, and is
holding the personal property
pending the outcome of forfeiture
proceedings. All persons or enti-
ties who have a legal interest in
the subject property may request
a hearing concerning the seized
property by contacting the un-
dersigned. A complaint has been
filed in the Circuit Court of the
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
in and for Levy County, Florida.
On, November 14, 2005, the trial
court entered an order finding
probable cause. If no claimants
appear within 20 days, the De-
partment will be seeking a final
order of forfeiture.
Dated: 02/14/06
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES J. CRIST, JR.
ATTORNEY GENERAL
MARK S. DUNN
Assistant Attorney General
Florida Bar No. 471852
Office of the Attorney General
The Capitol, Suite PL-01
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050
Telephone (850) 414-3300
Facsimile: (850) 488-4872
Petitioner's Counsel
Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 2006


Buying

Tax Deeds?
Aeed to. cieet e titee?
&xpetienced, Dependa6e
Sewice and
Reasonable
Rates!
Ca&
eCuvtitte J. Weiddws
ATTORNEY AT LAW
(352) 486-3753


Legal deadline is

5 p.m. Monday


PLANNING COMMISSION

A public hearing on petitions as described below will be conducted
by the Planning Commission on Monday, March 6, 2006 at 6:30
p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard during the
course of action. The hearing will be held in the County Commis-
sioner's Meeting Room. The Levy County Courthouse, 355 South
Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Planning Commission is not
bound to consider the petitions in the order listed in this notice.
Any of these petitions may be considered as soon as the meeting
commences.

PP 2-06 Pardue Land Surveying representing Janet Cribb, pe-
titioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Cribb's Estates," a
subdivision located in Manatee Farms Estates Unit 1, a Replat of
Lots 27 and 28, Block A, in section 21, Township 11S, Range 14S,
in Levy County. Said parcel contains 10 acres more or less and is
located within a "RR" Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will
consist of three 3.36 acres more or less residential lots.
PP 5-06 Pardue Land Surveying representing Jack and Loyann
Mann, petitioning the board for a' Preliminary Plat of "Mann's Re-
serve," a subdivision located in the E 1A of the NW , in Section
11, Township12S, Range 14E, in Levy County. Said parcel con-
tains 80.75 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR"
Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of
eight 9 acre more or less residential lots.
PP 14-05 Pardue Land Surveying representing 602 Plaza, LLC
petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "Quiet Place," a subdivision
located in the N of the W 1/2 of the W 1A of Section 32, Town-
ship 11S, Range 14E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 110.77
acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Ru-
ral Residential zone.
FP 22-05 Pardue Land Surveying representing M.E. McDougal,
petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "Oak Meadows Phase II,"
a subdivision located in part of Section 10, Township 11S, Range
14E, in Levy County. Said parcel contain 36 acres more or less
and are located within a Rural Residential "RR" zone. This subdivi-
sion will consist of thirty-one 1 acre more or less residential lots.
PP 3-06 McMillen Surveying representing Gator Oaks, LLC, peti-
tioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Gator Oaks," a subdivi-
sion located in the NW % of the SW , in Section 35, Township
11S, Range 17E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 40 acres
more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural
Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of four 9 acre more
or less residential lots.
PP 4-06 Croft Land surveying representing John A. & Clara
Church, petitioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Church's
Acres," a subdivision located in the NE % of Section 9, Township
13S, Range 19E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 26 acres
more or less and is located within the Williston Municipal Service
District. This parcel has a land use designation of "LDR" Low Den-
sity Residential and a zoning designation of "RR" Rural Residen-
tial. This subdivision will consist of four residential lots.
PP 6-06 Croft Land Surveying representing Hal Baerg, petitioning
the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Meadow Oaks," a subdivision
located in a portion of the E of the SE %, of Section 2, Township
13S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 60.2 acres
more or less and is located within the Williston Municipal Service
District. This parcel has a land use designation of "LDR" Low Den-
sity Residential and a zoning designation of "RR" rural Residential.
This subdivision will consist of seventy-one 1/ acre more or less
residential lots.
FP 1-06 Croft Land Surveying representing.Ernest O'Conpr, pe-
titioning the board for a Final Plat of "Oak Glen," a subdivision
located in the SE of the SE %, in Section 4, Township 13S,
Range 19E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 6.23 acres more
or less. This parcel is zoned "RR" Rural Residential and has a land
use designation of "LDR" Low Density Residential. Located within
the Williston MSD. This subdivision consists of six 1 acre more or
less residential lots.
FP2-06 Croft Land Surveying representing William and Vicki Win-
kle, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of "Twin Oaks," a subdi-
vision located in the NE % of the NE % of Section 17, Township
13S, Range 18E, Levy County, Florida. Less and except the North
50' thereof for road right-of-way and the West 336.39 feet thereof.
Said Parcel contains 29.52 acres more or less and is located with-
in an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision
will consist of three 9 acre more or less residential lots.
PP 7-06 Parrish Land Surveying representing Ralph Raperto, pe-
titioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Confederate Acres,"
a subdivision located in a part of the NW % of the NW %, of Sec-
tion 33, Township 10S, Range 15E in Levy County. Said parcel
contains 10 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR"
Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of
one 10 acre more or less residential lot.

Copies of said petitions with complete legal descriptions and sub-
sequent staff reports will be available for review at the Levy Coun-
ty Development Department. For Information call 352-486-5203.
Interested parties may ;appear at the meeting and be heard re-
garding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the
County Commissioners Administration Office at 352-486-5218.

SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEAL
ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WIH RESPECT TO ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING, A RECORD OF
THE PROCEEDING, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, A VERBATIM
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RE-
CORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON
WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS

A public hearing on each petition as described below will be con-
ducted by the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, March
7, 2006 at 10:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be
heard during the course of action. The hearing will be held in the
County Commissioners' Meeting Room, the Levy County Court-
house, 355 South Court Street, Bronson, Florida. The Board of
County Commissioners is not bound to consider the petitions in
the order listed in this notice. Any of these petitions may be con-
sidered as soon as the meeting commences.

Ha.Va. 2-06 Delores M. Clayton, petitioning the board for a Hard-
ship Variance to allow a second dwelling in order to care for her
daughter (Dolores Clayton) and grandchildren (Kalynn Morgan,
Clay and Brandon Whitney), on a parcel of land located in Oak
Ridge Estates, Lots 6 and 7, Block 6, in Section 23, Township 12S,
Range 17E, in Levy County. Said parcel is located within an "RR"
Rural Residential zone.


Ha.Va. 3-06 Lillian Smallenberger, petitioning the board for a Hard-
ship Variance to allow a second dwelling in order for her grand-
daughter (Jacqueline St. John) to help care for her on a parcel of
land located in Woodland Farms, Lot 2, in Section 15, Township
13S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 9.70 acres
more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural
Residential zone.


Ha.Va. 4-06 Maria del C. Sanchez, petitioning the board for a
Hardship Variance to allow a second dwelling in order for her
daughter (Carmen J. Varela) to care for her on a parcel of land lo-
cated in University Oaks, Lot 1, Block 15, in Section 27, Township
11S, Range 17E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 1.25 acres
more or less and is located within a "RR" Rural Residential zone.
SVA 1-06 Pardue Land Surveying representing Janet Cribb, peti-
tioning the board for a Variance from the Subdivision Regulations,
Section 50-580 (a) Length to Width Ratio, located in Manatee
Farms Estates Unit 1, a Replat of Lots 27 and 28, BlockA, in Sec-
tion 21, Township 11S, Range 14S, in Levy County. Said parcel
contains 10 acres more or less and is located within a "RR" Rural
Residential zone.
PP 2-06 Pardue Land Surveying representing Janet Cribb, pe-
titioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Cribb's Estates," a
subdivision located in Manatee Farms Estates Unit 1, a replat of
Lots 27 and 28, BlockA in Section 21, Township 11S, Range 14S,
in Levy County. Said parcel contains 10 acres more or less and is
located within a "RR" Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will
consist of three 3.36 acre more or less residential lots.
PP 5-06 Pardue Land Surveying representing Jack and Loyann
Mann, petitioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Mann's Re-
serve," a subdivision located in. the E of the NW 14, in Section
11, Township 12S, Range 14E, in Levy County. Said parcel con-
tains 80.75 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR"
Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of
eight 9 acre more or less residential lots.
FP 20-05 Pardue Land Surveying representing Eli Beasley and
Felicio Arevalo Puerta, petitioning the board for a Final Plat of
"Beasley Acres," a subdivision located in part of Section 13, Town-
ship 11S, Range 15E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 31.23
acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Ru-
ral Residential zone.
PP 3-06 McMillen Surveying representing Gator Oaks, LLC, peti-
tioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Gator Oaks," a subdivi-
sion located in the NW % of the SW %, in Section 35, Township
11S, Range 17E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 40 acres
more or less and is located within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Residen-
tial zone. This subdivision will consist of four 9 acre more or less
residential lots.
,SVA 2-06 Croft Land Surveying representing John A. & Clara
Church, petitioning the board for a Variance from the Subdivision
Regulations, Section 50-580 (a) Length to Width Ratio, located in
the NE % of Section 9, Township 13S, Range 19E, in Levy County.
Said parcel contains 26 acres more or less and is located within
the Williston Municipal Service District. This parcel has a land use
designation of "LDR" Low Density Residential and a zoning desig-
nation of "RR" Rural Residential.
PP 4-06 Croft Land surveying representing John A. & Clara
Church, petitioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Church's
Acres," a subdivision located in the NE % of Section 9, Township
13S, Range 19E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 26 acres
more or less and is Jocated within the Williston Municipal Service
District. This parcel has a land use designation of "LDR" Low Den-
sity Residential and a zoning designation of "RR" Rural Residen-
tial. This subdivision will consist of four residential lots.
PP 6-06 Croft Land Surveying representing Hal Baerg, petitioning
the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Meadow Oaks," a subdivision
located in a portion of the E 1 of the SE %, of Section 2, Town-
ship 13S, Range 18E, in Levy County. Said parcel contains 60.2
acres more or less and is located within the Williston Municipal
Service District. This parcel has a land use designation of "LDR"
Ldw Denslity Residential ahdia' zoning designation of "RR" Rural
Residntial. This suibdi'ision will consist of seventy-one / acre
more or less residential lots.
FP 19-05 Croft Land Surveying representing Quality Land De-
velopment (Ron Waker), petitioning the board for a Final Plat of
"Whispering Heights," a subdivision located on a parcel of land
in the SW /4 of Section 3, Township 14S, Range 18E, in Levy
County. Said parcel contains 40 acres more or less and is located
within an "A/RR" Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. Said plat will
contain four 10 acre more or less residential lots.
FP 21-05 Croft Land Surveying representing B & S Land, LLC
and Ash Investment Co., petitioning the board for a Final Plat of
"Saddlebrook Farms,P a subdivision located in the SE % of the SW
and the W /2 of the SW % of the SE of Section 22, Township
12S, Range 17E, in Levy County, less and except the South 25'
thereof for right-of-way of LCR 102. Said parcel contains 60 acres
more or less and is located with an "RR" Rural Residential zone.
This subdivision consists of six 9 acre more or less residential
lots.
PP 7-06 Parrish Land Surveying representing Ralph Raperto, pe-'
titioning the board for a Preliminary Plat of "Confederate Acres,"
a subdivision located in a part of the NW of the NW , of Sec-
tion 33, Township 10S, Range 15E, in Levy County. Said parcel
contains 10 acres more or less and is located within an "A/RR"
Agriculture/Rural Residential zone. This subdivision will consist of
one 10 acre more or less residential lot.

Copy of said petitions with complete legal descriptions and subse-
quent staff reports will be available for review at the Levy County
Development Department. For information call 352-486-5203.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard re-
'garding the proposed petitions. Any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in this meeting should contact the
County Commissioners Administration Office at 352-486-5218.

SHOULD ANY AGENCY OR PERSON DECIDE TO APPEALANY
DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING, A RECORD OF
THE PROCEEDING, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, A VERBATIM
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS REQUIRED, WHICH RE-
CORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON
WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2


I















Page 14


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


CLASSIFIED & LEGALS


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 38-2006CA-000090
MAXENE FONTIL and MARIE
R. FONTIL,
Plaintiffs,

vs.

JOHN B. RIPPERE, III, if mar-
ried, if alive, and if dead, his re-
spective unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors
and all other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against him
individually,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: JOHN B. RIPPERE, III
18 QUEENSWREATH WAY
IRVINE, CA 92715

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to Quiet Title as to the fol-
lowing described lands:

Rainbow Lakes Estates,
Block 12, Lot 7, O.R. Book 154,
Page 404, according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book
3, page 27, public records of
Levy County, Florida, Section
24, Township 15 South, Range
17 East.
TAX PARCEL # 06836-011-00

filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on RON-
ALD W. STEVENS, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Box 1444, Bronson, FL
32621, on or before March 24,
2006, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Feb. 7,
2006.
Persons with disabilities re-
questing reasonable accom-
modations to participate in this
proceeding should contact (352)
374-3639 (Voice & TDD) or via
Florida Relay Service at (800)
955-8771
Pub: Feb: 16, 23, Mar. 2, 9,
2006

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
WATER TOWER GROUNDING
SYSTEM

The City of Chiefland hereby
requests proposals from electri-
cal engineers to provide a quote
to design a grounding system to
help eliminate equipment failures
due to lightning strikes.
The ranking criteria to be used
to evaluate the proposals may
be obtained from Jennifer Willis,
Finance and Project Coordina-
tor, City of Chiefland, 214 East
Park Avenue, Chiefland, Florida,
32626 (352) 493-6711.
Sealed proposals must be
marked; "Sealed Proposal for
Water Tower Grounding System"
and be received by 4:30 PM on
March 22, 2.006 to the attention
of Finance and Project Coordi-
nator. Sealed proposals will be
opened publicly at City Hall on
March 23, 2006 at 10:00 AM
and will be available for public
inspection immediately upon
opening. The City reserves the
right to refuse any or all propos-
als for any reason.
Pub.: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 38-2005CA-
001146
FRANK T. ORGILL and
ALICE J. ORGILL, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
CLARA C. PATTERSON, if
married, if alive, and if dead,
her respective unknown,
spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against her individu-
ally,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
CLARAC. PATTERSON
5106 Prince Valiant
San Antonio, Texas 78218


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to Quiet Title as to the
following described lands:


Lot 23, Block 10, Rainbow
Lakes Estates Section "N"
according to plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, Page
27, public records of Levy
County, Florida.
Said lands being subject
to those Restrictions, Cov-
enants, Conditions, Reser-
vations and Easements in
Deed Book 77, Page 13 and
in Deed Book 109, Page
138, and Right-of-Way Ease-
ment to Sumter Electric Co-
operative, Inc., as recorded
in Deed Book 80, Page 52,
public records of Levy Coun-
ty, Florida.
TAX PARCEL #06833-010-
00
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any,
on RONALD W. STEVENS,
Petitioner's attorney, whose
address is Post Office Box
1444, Bronson, FL 32621,
on or before March 31, 2006,
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Feb. 16,
2006


FL 32621, before service on Pe-
titioner or immediately thereafter.
If you fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of this
Court's office notified of your cur-
rent address. (You may file No-
tice of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future pa-
pers in this lawsuit will be mailed
to the address on record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Flor-
ida Family Law Rules of Proce-
dure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and in-
formation. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.
Dated February 24, 2006.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
LaQuanda Latson
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
Pub: Mar. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2006

IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA


DANNY J. SHIPP uase No. 38,-ZUU5-CC-0495
Clerk of Court CILL-Z CORP, a Florida corpora-
erk of tion,


By: Gwen McElroy

Persons with disabilities re-
questing reasonable accom-
modations to participate in
this proceeding should con-
tact (352) 374-3639 (Voice
& TDD) or via Florida Relay
Service at (800) 955-8771.
Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 9, 16,
2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 38-2005-CA-0446
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Cody E. Bennett, a single man,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that I, DANNY J. SHIPP, Clerk
of the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit, in and for Levy
County, Florida, pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment In
Foreclosure entered in the above
styled cause; will sell at pub-.
lic sale the following described:
property situate in LEVY County,
Florida, to wit:
TRACT 31, ROLLING ACRES,
being more particularly described
as: The West 1 of NW 'A of SW
% of NE %4 of NW %4 of Section
27, Township 12 South, Range
17 East, Levy County, Florida,
LESS AND EXCEPT the North
25 feet thereof.
Said sale shall be made to the
highest and best bidder for cash
pursuant to the Final Judgment
entered in the above styled cause
and will. be held at the front door
of the Levy County Courthouse
in Bronson, Florida, on the 13th
day of March, 2006, commenc-
ing at the hour of 11:00 A.M.
All interested parties shall be
governed accordingly by this No-
tice.
DATED this 15th day of Febru-
ary, 2006
DANNY J. SHIPP
Clerk of the Court

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Feb. 23, Mar. 2, 2006
-----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 38-2006- DR-000138
DAN RAY KRIEGER,
Petitioner
and
SHARON KAY KRIEGER,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: SHARON KAY KRIEGER
7334 N.E. Jacksonville Rd.
Ocala, FL 34474

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAN
RAY KRIEGER, whose address
is 21560 SE 73rd PL, Morriston,
FL 32668 on or before 4-11-06,
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 355 South Court
Street, P.O. Box 610, Bronson,


Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL O. CHAMBLEE,
Defendant,
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that in ac-
cordance with the Final Judg-
ment Foreclosing Lien entered
on February 20, 2006 in Civil
Action No. 38-2005-CC-0495, in
the County Court, in and for Levy
County, Florida, in which CILL-Z
CORP., a Florida corporation,
was the Plaintiff, and MICHAEL
O. CHAMBLEE was the De-
fendant, I will sell to the highest
bidder for cash in the Lobby of
the Levy County Courthouse in
Bronson, Florida, at 11:00 AM
o'clock on Monday, April 3, 2006
the real property described as
follows, to-wit:
Count 1:
Lots 1 through 5 and 48 through
52, Block 5, MIDWAY HEIGHTS,
according to the plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, Page 3,
public records of Levy County,
Florida.
(Parcel No. 06785-000-00)
and
Count II:
Lots 10 through 13 and 40
through 43, Block 5, MIDWAY
HEIGHTS, according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page 3, public records of Levy
County, Florida.
(Parcel No. 06785-005-00)
Dated this 22nd day of Febru-
ary 2006.
DANNY J. SHIPP
CLERK OF COURT

By: Gwen McElroy
Deputy Clerk
Pub: Mar. 2, 9, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 38 2005
CP 000152
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
VINCENT MARCUS TRIGG,
Deceased.


AMENDED
NOTICE TO CEDITORS
The administration of the es-
tate of Vincent Marcus Trigg,
deceased, whose date of death
was June 5, 2005, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Levy
County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, File Number 38 2005 CP
000152; the address of which
is 355 South Court Street Bron-
son, Florida 32621. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS 'SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is March 2, 2006.
Personal Representative:

Corrine Maxine Mobsby Trigg
350 Hudson Street
Inglis, FL 34449
Attorney for Personal Represen-
tative:

Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq.
Florida Bar No. 0857750
VanNess & VanNess, PA.
1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444
Pub: Mar. 2, 9, 2006

NOTICE OF SALE

The following vehicle will be sold
at public auction, free of all prior
liens, per FI Stat 713.78 at 10:00
AM on March 17, 2006 at Lien-
or's address. No titles, as is,
cash only.

04Chev 1G1ND52F74M633448
Lienor: Bronson Lube Inc
555 N Hathaway Ave
Bronson FL 32621
Phone: 352-486-2100

Interested parties, contact:
State Filing Service, Inc.
(772) 595-9555
Pub: Mar. 2, 2006


16. A

-edir- s
-Il


PUBLIC NOTICE


Application for MINOR'REPLAT
Bronson Park Development, LLC
Proposal for
BRONSON PARK DEVELOPMENT, LLC
Consisting of
Portions of lots 3462-1, 3462-2 & 3462-2
Consisting of 8 acres MOL
Town of Bronson, Levy County, Florida

PUBLIC HEARING

A Public Hearing on the minor replat
Will be held before the Town Council on
MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006 @ 7:00 P.M. or
As soon thereafter as possible
At Town Hall
Pub: March 2, 2006




More land transactions can be

found on page 15 and 16


Levy Land Transactions
2/2/06 2/07/06


Transaction Code: AAA-Agree Additional Advances, AD-
Agree Deed, Al-Assumption of Indebtedness, CD-Correc-
tory Deed, CT-Certificate of Title, D-Deed, E-Easement,
FJDX-Final Judgment Divorce X, MMA-Mortgage Modify
Agreement, NL-Notice of Limitation, QCD-Quit Claim Deed,
TD-Tax Deed, WD-Warranty Deed

M, $110,982.65, L10 MEREDITH HILLS, BDY 4-12-17, ETC
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): ROBINSON JULIE S, ROBINSON AARON L II
WD, $10,000.00, L2(7) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): TOOKE MARK T
Grantor(s): ASHE STEVEN BENNETT, ASHE GARY ALAN, ASHE CARO-
LYN C
WD, $30,000.00, L1, 4(7) FANNING SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): TOOKE MARK T
Grantor(s): ASHE CAROLYN C
QCD, $10.00, L15(71) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): LOPEZ SAAVEDRA VALENTIN, SAAVEDRA VALENTIN LO-
PEZ
Grantor(s): LOPEZ RIVERA VALENTIN, RIVERA VALENTIN LOPEZ
QCD, MORT $10.00, L7 BRONSON HILLS ESTATES TYPE II SD, W/MH
Grantee(s): CAMP FRANCINE E
Grantor(s): CLARK DIANNE DAILEY
QCD, MORT $10.00, L1 (52) UNIVERSITY OAKS, W/MH
Grantee(s): CAMP FRANCINE E
Grantor(s): CLARK DIANNE DAILEY, DAILEY MATTHEW JOHN
M, $114,916.59, BDY NW114 SE114 8-12-17, ETC, PARCEL #03356-
003-00
Grantee(s): HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III
Grantor(s): WOODLEY ANNIE J, WOODLEY ROOSEVELT JR
WD, $10.00, L7 OAK RIDGE EQUINE CENTER, BDY 8-14-18, PARCEL
#04547-009-00
Grantee(s): BONE FAMILY REVOCABLE TRUST OF 2000, BONE LISA M
TRUSTEE, BONE ROBERT D TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): BONE LISA, BONE ROBERT
M, $500,000.00, L7 OAK RIDGE EQUINE CENTER, BDY 8-14-18
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): BONE FAMILY REVOCABLE TRUST OF 2000, BONE LISA
M TRUSTEE, BONE ROBERT D TRUSTEE, FULLER MARCIA, FULLER
RICHARD
CD, $10.00, CC MARION COUNTY, L6(8) OCALA HGH WEST, CC
Grantee(s): ONEILL BRUCE A
Grantor(s): MILLER FAMILY TRUST, MILLER HAROLD W TRUSTEE,
MILLER HELEN C TRUSTEE
CD, $10.00, L1(26) OCALA HGH WEST
Grantee(s): LEGACY PROPERTY INVESTMENTS LLC
Grantor(s): ERJAVEE RONALD
M, $354,000.00, L10 FOREST MEADOWS SD, ETC
Grantee(s): BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, MERS, MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): QUINONES NELLY
CD, $10.00, L6(14) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): SUAREZ CARLOS, SUAREZ SULAMI
Grantor(s): CINTRON MENDEZALCIDES, MENDEZALCIDES CINTRON, >
RIVERA MARIA JUDITH
CD, $10.00, CC MARION COUNTY, L 14(55) WILLISTON HGH G&CC
Grantee(s): MARTINEZ ILICH, MARTINEZ VITERBO
Grantor(s): ARROYO ADRIAN MONJLEA, MONJLEAADRIAN ARROYO,
MORENO SEPULVEDA LUZ MINERVA, SEPULVEDA LUZ MINERVA
MORENO
CD, $10.00, CC MARION COUNTY, L25(21) RAINBOW LAKES ES-
TATES SEC N
Grantee(s): QUICK PARCEL LLC
Grantor(s): NANGLE VICTORIA
QCD, $10.00, L22(B) WILLISTON HGH #4 ., .
Grantee(s): GRANT HOLDINGS..LLC,.,-. -. -,- .
Grantor(s): GRANT WINSTON J
QCD, $10.00, L20(55) WILLISTON G&CC
Grantee(s): GRANT HOLDINGS LLC
Grantor(s): GRANT WINSTON J
M, $70,400.00, L17-18(1) PEACEFUL ACRES SD
Grantee(s): PRECISION FINANCIAL INC, MERS, MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): EVERS RONALD, EVERS STACY
WD, $32,000.00, L12(49) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): CORDERO KARMIN M, CORDERO ANGEL D
Grantor(s): RIPROCK HOMES INC
WD, $340,000.00, L70 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 11-11-16
Grantee(s): LEVY COUNTY 54 VENTURES LLC
Grantor(s): AMERICAN LAND PARTNERS INC, FL LAND PARTNERS
LLC, NATIONAL LAND PARTNERS LLC
M, $306,000.00, L70 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 11-11-16
Grantee(s): SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC
Grantor(s): LEVY COUNTY 54 VENTURES LLC
WD, $290,000.00, L72 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 11-11-16
Grantee(s): FEINGOLD KATE, SCHECHTER STUART, SESSATHOMAS,
BERMAN BONNIE, SCHECHTER RACHEL
Grantor(s): AMERICAN LAND PARTNERS INC, FL LAND PARTNERS
LLC, NATIONAL LAND PARTNERS LLC
M, $261,000.00, L72 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 11-11-16
Grantee(s): BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s): SCHECHTER RACHEL, SCHECHTER STUARTA, SESSA
THOMAS, BERMAN BONNIE,.FEINGOLD KATE
QCD, $10.00, BDY NE1/4 SE1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL #03233-132-00
Grantee(s): WEST KATHLEEN, WEST DONALD
Grantor(s): WEST KATHLEEN
MMA, $300,000.00, OR 916/286, L1(C) BRONSON VILLA, ETC
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): KEETON ADA MARIE, KEETON JAMES L, KEETON JAMES,
KEETON ADAMARIE B
QCD, $10.00, L4 SPRINGSIDE SD
Grantee(s): MICHEVSKI LUBCHO
Grantor(s): MICHEVSKI LAURETTA
WD, $18,000.00, L21(28) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): SUNCOAST INVESTORS REALTY LLC
Grantor(s): ALVARADO LUIS
WD, $28,900.00, L21(28) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): KROUCH ROBERT
Grantor(s): SUNCOAST INVESTORS REALTY LLC
WD, $24,900.00, L11 SOUTHERN PINES
Grantee(s): AKERS INVESTMENTS LL.
Grantor(s): MCDOUGAL NATHAN G SR
M, $25,272.76, Lil SOUTHERN PINES
Grantee(s): AKERS MARY E
Grantor(s): AKERS INVESTMENTS LLC
WD, $75,000.00, L38-39 SPRINGSIDE MOBILE HOME SD, W/MH
Grantee(s): WALKER ANNE K, WALKER DANNY J
Grantor(s): HOUSTON EDITH M, HOUSTON JAMES
WD, $135,000.00, L4 ARROWHEAD MEADOWS
Grantee(s): WADE RODNEY D
Grantor(s): AUSTIN INGE, AUSTIN WILLIAM D
M, $110,000.00, L4 ARROWHEAD MEADOWS
Grantee(s): AUSTIN INGE, AUSTIN WILLIAM D
Grantor(s): WADE RODNEY D
WD, $4,390.00, L15, BDY L14(D) COLFAX CITY
Grantee(s): LINDAA BAYNARD IRA, PENSCO TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s): W LB INC, WALTER BAYNARD & COMPANY
WD, $4,390.00, L13, BDY L14(D) COLFAX CITY
Grantee(s): OWEN F BAYNARD IRA, PENSCO TRUST COMPANY
Grantor(s): W LB INC
WD, $115,000.00, L13(A) CAMP AZALEA
Grantee(s): MORRIS EILEEN L, MORRIS GEORGE E SR
Grantor(s): ROBINSON ROBERT W
M, $35,000.00, L13(A) CAMP AZALEA
Grantee(s): ROBINSON ROBERT W
Grantor(s): MORRIS EILEEN L, MORRIS GEORGE E SR


M, $60,000.00, BDY SW114 SW1/4 29-12-14, ETC
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): WHITEHURST KAREN L, WHITEHURST MICHAEL W
WD, $2,000.00, L25(36) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
Grantee(s): MATOS MARIA, MATOS LUIS
Grantor(s): CYR JACQUELINE A, CYR TERRY S
WD, $10.00, L29-31(28) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): HENSEL CONSTANCE V
Grantor(s): HENSEL SCOTT C ESTATE, HENSEL CONSTANCE V


p &


i















LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Around the Courthouse


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


Pane 15


Levy Land Transactions

QCD, $10.00, L17(5) KING RANCH OF FLA RANCHETTES
Grantee(s): CRAIG SUSAN GAIL, CRAIG RODNEY D
Grantor(s): MOORE TERESA KELSO, KELSO MOORE TERESA
WD, $56,000.00, L15-16(144) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BELLIER GENEVIEVE
Grantor(s): ABK PROPERTIES INC
CD, $10.00, L1 (32) WILLISTON HGH #7
Grantee(s): MARRERO BENJAMIN JR
Grantor(s): LOVENGUTH GEORGE A
QCD, $10.00, L10(73) OAK RIDGE ESTATES SD
Grantee(s): HELMUTSAUS GROUP INC
Grantor(s): EMMER RYAN
WD, $14,900.00, L10(73) OAK RIDGE ESTATES SD
Grantee(s): RICKETTS MONTHIA
Grantor(s): HELMUTSAUS GROUP INC
WD, $189,000.00, L2(93) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): JACKSON JAMES FLOYD
Grantor(s): EAGER CONTRACTING INC
M, $142,545.00, L2(93) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s): JACKSON JAMES FLOYD
WD, $400,000.00, BDY 36-12-18, ETC, PARCEL #4291-000-00
Grantee(s): CIRASUOLA FRANK, CIRASUOLA JOYCE
Grantor(s): URQUHART DOROTHY DELL
M, $279,000.00, BDY 36-12-18, ETC
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): CIRASUOLA FRANK, CIRASUOLA JOYCE E
WD, $10.00, L6(4) NOBLE ESTATES
Grantee(s): DENMARK VERNON L, DENMARK RUTH ANN
Grantor(s): DENMARK VERNON L, DENMARK RUTH ANN
WD, $350,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SE114 21-12-17, ETC, PARCEL #03538-
002-00
Grantee(s): SHAS TEEN FRED
Grantor(s): SMITH MARCIA K, SMITH JOHNNY M JR
WD, $350,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SE1/4 21-12-17, ETC, PARCEL #03538-
002-00
Grantee(s): MARTIN JACQUELINE SMITH
Grantor(s): SHAS TEEN FRED
WD, $350,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SE1/4 21-12-17, ETC, PARCEL #03538-
003-00
Grantee(s): SHAS TEEN FRED
Grantor(s): HULLANDER JACQUELINE S, MARTIN JACQUELINE SMITH
M, $215,000.00, BDY SE1/4 SEI/4 21-12-17, ETC
Grantee(s): SMITH MARCIA K, SMITH JOHNNY M JR
Grantor(s): SHAS TEEN FRED
WD, $200,000.00, L2 LORALEI ACRES
Grantee(s): DE CASTRO QUIROS TOMAS, DE CASTROQUIROS TOMAS
Grantor(s): KELLY DOROTHY, KELLY TODD
QCD, $10.00, L22 LAKE BONABLE ESTATES, BDY 25-15-17
Grantee(s): POTT JAMES T
Grantor(s): POTT TAMARA L NICHOLS, NICHOLS POTT TAMARA L
M, $150,000.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 30-14-19, ETC, PARCEL #05421-
003-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): DEFILIPPO TERRYANN, DEFILIPPO ANDREW J
M, $50,000.00, BDY 24-15-17, ETC, PARCEL #03808-001-00
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): JOHNSTON LYNDA S
M, $36,000.00, L1(2) HILL CREST HTS, ETC
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): GRAVES CHUCK, WYNN CYNTHIA M
WD, $10.00, L20(98) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BROWN FREDDIE, BROWN JUDY RENEE PRINCE
Grantor(s): BROWN FREDDIE, BROWN JUDY RENEE PRINCE
M, $55,000.00, L20(98) WILLISTONHGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): AIG FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, MERS, WILMINGTON FINANCE
Grantor(s): BROWN FREDDIE, BROWN FREDDIE L, BROWN JUDY
RENEE PRINCE
WD, $470,000.00, L10(G) CEDAR KEY SHORES #1
Grantee(s): PANDION DREAM LLC
Grantor(s): BERGMAN MAXINE G TRUSI- ,Ri'MAII RAL'H G :
TRUSTEE, RALPH G BERGMAN AND MAXINE G BERGMAN LIVING
TRUST
WD, $30,000.00, L26-27(3) OAK RIDGE ESTATES, W/MH
Grantee(s): RATHAY MONIQUE HARWOOD, HOLDER WILLIAM T
Grantor(s): DAILEY LAUREN J, DAILEY ROBERT L
M, $106,000.00, L4(3) REPLAT OF (3&4) OF NEWSOME ESTATES
Grantee(s): SECURED FUNDING CORP, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): ADKINS LINDA M, KYLE TONY M, KYLE LINDA M
M, $21,000.00, L85 SPRINGSIDE, W/MH
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): HAMILTON DIANE L
M, $80,000.00, L 12 CEDAR KEY SHORES #6B
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): BOYER ANN M
QCD, $10.00, BDY 36-14-16, ETC, PARCEL #04652-008-00
Grantee(s): ASTLING NEOTA TRUSTEE, NEOTA B ASTLING
REVOCABLE TRUST
Grantor(s): ASTLING JOSEPH T
M, $99,000.00, L16-17 MEADWOLAND ESTATES #1
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): BYRD LINDA M, BYRD JERALD M SR
QCD, $10.00, BDY NW 1/4 NE1/4 4-12-17, PARCEL #03286-018-00
Grantee(s): SCHRECKENGOST DONALD, SCHRECKENGOST FRANK
Grantor(s): SCHRECKENGOST TIMOTHY M
WD, $90,000.00, L3(4) EPPERSON HTS
Grantee(s): JEFFERS JOHN P
Grantor(s): CIRASUOLA JOYCE, CIRASUOLA FRANK
M, $72,000.00, L 3(4) EPPERSON HTS
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): JEFFERS JOHN P
QCD, $10.00, L7(33) REPLAT OF WILLISTON HGH #5
Grantee(s): PHAGOO RAMDEHOLL
Grantor(s): PHAGOO FREDDY DASRAT
WD, $255,000.00, L8(C) STEEPLECHASE FARMS, W/MH
Grantee(s): AULSON MICHELLE JEANINE
Grantor(s): SHROPSHIRE MELODY G, SHROPSHIRE GARY W
M, $84,969.32 BDY NW1/4 SW1/4 4-13-19, ETC
Grantee(s): SUNTRUST BANK
Grantor(s): J W BOYD CO INC
WD, $88,500.00, BDY NE1/4 NW 114 4-11-14, W/MH, PARCEL #00562-
010-00
Grantee(s): BAYS CYNTHIA, BAYS BRIAN
Grantor(s): WILLIAMS SHARON, WILLIAMS.THOMAS WAYNE
M, $30,000.00, L5(7) WOODFIELDS SD
Grantee(s): CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION
Grantor(s): GUTA MARIA E, LAUZAN JULIAN R
QCD, $10.00, L11-12(11) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
M, $7,900,000.00, BDY 12-14-17, ETC, SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): NEW FRONTIER BANK
Grantor(s): SOUTHEAST DAIRY COMPANY LLC
WD, $185,000.00, L49 EXECUTIVE HOMES
Grantee(s): GOMEZ GRISEL M
Grantor(s): HAYES DONNA M, HAYES MICHAEL L
QCD, $639.00, L22 HIDEAWAY #1, W/MH
Grantee(s): MCKEE DANIEL L
Grantor(s): MCEATHRON GLEN
QCD, $639.00, L22 HIDEAWAY #1, W/MH
Grantee(s): MCKEE DANIEL L
Grantor(s): DANIELS DAWN MICHELLE MCEATHRON
WD, $16,500.00, L16(127) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): LABRADOR LORETTA, LABRADOR YEISEL


Grantor(s): WHITE E JOHN
WD, $35,900.00, L55 SILVER OAKS SD PHASE 3
Grantee(s): KELLEY LOGAN M
Grantor(s): ROYAL ARMS LLC
M, $28,400.00, L55 SILVER OAKS SD PHASE 3
Grantee(s): ROYAL ARMS LLC
Grantor(s): KELLEY LOGAN M
WD, $34,900.00, L92 SILVER OAKS SD
Grantee(s): ADAIR STEPHANIE B, ADAIR JIMMIE P
Grantor(s): ROYALARMS LLC
M, $354,000.00, BDY NE1/4 3-14-18, ETC, W/MH, SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): CARROLL LAWRENCE W JR TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): MITCHELLALMERON J, MITCHELL ELAINE G
WD, $22,000.00, L15(10) BRONSON HTS, W/MH
Grantee(s): FINA EMMETT


Grantor(s): WOODS BILLIE JO
WD, $10.00, BDY NW1/4 NW1/4 8-14-16, PARCEL #02573-00000
Grantee(s): MITCHELL WENDY L REED, LONG WILLIAM E, REED
MITCHELL WENDY L
Grantor(s): LONG HENRY W
M, $16,000.00, L3-10(3) TOWN OF RALEIGH
Grantee(s): 1ST CU OF GAINESVILLE
Grantor(s): GIBSON EDDIE JR, GIBSON WILLIE MAE, GIBSON L
AWRENCE, GIBSON LAWARENCE
Grantor(s): GRAHAM ELIZABETH GIBSON, MELENDEZ SHANA,
GIBSON SANDRA
QCD, $10.00, L18(97) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L13(96) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L59(33) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L15(43), L6-7(48), L12, 16-17(70) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L32(30) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L15(19) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L3007) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L61(30) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L2(30) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L16(30) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L39(29) RAINBOW LAKES ESTATES SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L22(98) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L 10(123) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L22(27) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L2(113) WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
$10.00, L25-26(23) WILLISTON HGH G&CC EST
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L3(10) WILLISTON HGH G&CC EST
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L1(52)WILLISTONHGHG&CCEST
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
QCD, $10.00, L9(35) RAINBOW LAKES EST SEC N
Grantee(s): BLUE PEARL LLC
Grantor(s): BLUE PEARL DEVELOPMENT INC
WD, $10,500.00, L3(7) GREEN HGH PARK
Grantee(s): PINILLOS CONSUELO
Grantor(s): COLON LOURDES R, MALDONADO DANIEL
M, $37,000.00, L9 FOX RUN
Grantee(s): HOME LOAN CENTER INC, LENDINGTREE LOANS, MERS,
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): MILLS SUZANNE M
WD, $88,632.00, L7 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED EST 1ST ADD
Grantee(s): MCGUIRE KRISTINA
Grantor(s): EMRICH PATRICIA, EMRICH DANNY
M, $117,650.00, L7 FANNING SPRINGS WOODED EST 1ST ADD
Grantee(s): NEW WAVE MORTGAGE INC
Grantor(s): MCGUIRE KRISTINA
WD, $57,500.00, L8 CASONS INGLIS ACRES #4, W/MH
Grantee(s): SOPER MARGARET
Grantor(s): FANNIE MAE, FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION
M, $80,157.00, L1-2(D) REST HAVEN SHORES
Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK N A
Grantor(s): PEARCE BETTY LOUISE, PEARCE KAYE BUTLER
M, $386,750.00, L1 HARTFORD FARMS, BDY 8-12-18, ETC
Grantee(s): SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): MUSTAFA KAREN M, MUSTAFA IVAN A
WD, $31,500.00, L20(117) WILLISTON HGH G&CC EST
Grantee(s): MOHAMMED SHAHEED
Grantor(s): ST JOHNS PROPERTY TRADERS LLC
M, $25,200.00, L20(117) WILLISTON HGH G&CC EST
Grantee(s): FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY
Grantor(s): MOHAMMED SHAHEED
WD, $165,000.00, BDY5-17-16,ETC
Grantee(s): IZAAK WALTON INVESTORS LLC
Grantor(s): WEHR LINDA G, WEHR CHRIS C
WD, $315,000.00, L96 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 3, 10-11-16, ETC
Grantee(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
Grantor(s): AMERICAN LAND PARTNERS INC, FL LAND PARTNERS
LLC, NATIONAL LAND PARTNERS LLC
M, $286,888.53 L96 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 3, 10-11-16, ETC
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
WD, $825,000.00, L97 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 3,10-11-16
Grantee(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
Grantor(s): AMERICAN LAND PARTNERS INC, FL LAND PARTNERS
LLC, NATIONAL LAND PARTNERS LLC
M, $668,941.50, L97 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 3,10-11-16
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
WD, $275,000.00, L98 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 2,3,10,11-11-
16, ETC
Grantee(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
Grantor(s): AMERICAN LAND PARTNERS INC, FL LAND PARTNERS
LLC, NATIONAL LAND PARTNERS LLC
M, $249,975.00, L98 WINDING RIVER PRESERVE, BDY 2,3,10,11-11-
16, ETC
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Grantor(s): PATELANIL, PATEL KIRAN
WD, $15,000.00, L19(62) OAK RIDGE EST
Grantee(s): NAZAIRE CAROLLE
Grantor(s): DOPPLERDAVE INC
WD, $1,857,300.00, BDY 1-13-16, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): PROPERTY PLUS DEVELOPER LLC
Grantor(s): COTHRON PHILLIP D, HOLMES JAMES D
M, $1,450,000.00, BDY 1-13-16, ETC, SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): SARASOTA INVESTMENT TRUST LLC
Grantor(s): PROPERTY PLUS DEVELOPER LLC
M, $300,000.00, BDY 1-13-16, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): COTHRON PHILLIP, HOLMES DONALD
Grantor(s): PROPERTY PLUS DEVELOPER LLC
WD, $9,800.00, BDYSW1/4 NW1/4 29-11-17, PARCEL 03233-254-00,
03233-260-00
Grantee(s): BOX RUTH, BOX ARNOLD


Grantor(s): WOMBLE GLENDA K, WOMBLE WILLIAM R
WD, $267,000.00, L19-20(16) AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY 1ST SD
Grantee(s): MILLER ARDEAN R
Grantor(s): SCHLEEDE LORI, SCHLEEDE JOHN F
M, $213,600.00, L19-20(16) AF KNOTTS LAND COMPANY 1ST SD
Grantee(s): SCHLEEDE LORI, SCHLEEDE JOHN F
Grantor(s): MILLER ARDEAN R
WD, $5,000.00, L30(33) OAK RIDGE EST, WIMH
Grantee(s): MORALES ALBERTO
Grantor(s): DOMENECH FRANCISCO R
WD, $425,000.00, L52 WATERWAY EST #2
Grantee(s): AWARE INVESTMENTS LTD PARTNERSHIP
Grantor(s): IRVINE GEORGIANNA C, IRVINE GERALD J
E, $10.00, BDY N1/2 SE1/4 26-13-15, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): MEEKS RUSSELL JR


Grantor(s): MEEKS MARY JANE, MEEKS RUSSELL S SR
WD, $29,500.00, BDY Ni/2 SE1/4 26-13-15, ETC, PARCEL # 01935-006-
00
Grantee(s): HICKMAN LYNDA SUE, HICKMAN JOHN R
Grantor(s): MEEKS RUSSELL S JR
CD, $1.00, L24 (36) OAK RIDGE EST
Grantee(s): MATOS MARIA
Grantor(s): CYR JACQUELINE A, CYR TERRY S
QCD, $10.00, L2 HUDSON SD, BDY NW114 NE1/4 12-17-16, ETC
Grantee(s): TRIGG CORRINE MAXINE MOBSBY
Grantor(s): DYE SONDRA J, LONG BESSIE B
WD, $300,000.00, L2 HUDSON SD, BDY NW 114 NE1/4 12-17-16, ETC
Grantee(s): LECANTO RIDGE INVESTMENTS LLC
Grantor(s): TRIGG CORRINE MAXINE MOBSBY, TRIGG VINCENT
MARCUS DECEASED
M, $98,035.88 L2 HUDSON SD, BDY NW1/4 NE1/4 12-17-16, ETC
Grantee(s): TRIGG CORRINE MAXINE MOBSBY
Grantor(s): LECANTO RIDGE INVESTMENTS LLC
M, $52,800.00, L28-29(P) ELEANOR VILLAGE
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): AITCHISON JUNE E, FARROW FRED
CD, $10.00, L9(29) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): REAL ESTATE AND SUNSHINE INC
Grantor(s): MOUNT MARION D, MOUNT WILLARD H
E, $10.00, BDY 20-12-19, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): MOXLEY TISHA N, MOXLEY JONATHAN LEIGHTON
Grantor(s): WHITEHURST CATTLE COMPANY
E, $10.00, BDY 29-12-18, ETC SEE IMAGE
Grantee(s): MOXLEY TISHA N, MOXLEY JONATHAN LEIGHTON
Grantor(s): WHITEHURST ADAM, WHITEHURST ADAM E, WHITEHURST
AMBER, WHITEHURST V E IV
WD, $23,711.00, BDY SE1/4 NW114 32-10-15, PARCEL # 01408-004-00
Grantee(s): MORALES SHEILA KIM
Grantor(s): ASBELL MICHAEL, CARTER PATRICIA, CAVENAUGH
JANICE
WD, $100.00, L2(H)CASONS INGLIS ACRES #9, W/MH
Grantee(s): REINHART DOROTHY
Grantor(s): HUNTER BRENDA M
WD, $33,000.00, L2(H) CASONS INGLIS ACRES #9, W/MH
Grantee(s): WILLIAMS JAMES C JR
Grantor(s): REINHART ROGER R, REINHART ROGER, REINHART
DOROTHY
WD, $80,000.00, BDY NW1/4 SE1/4 2-17-16, ETC, PARCEL 03029-006-
00
Grantee(s): SPECK GLENN
Grantor(s): BETTERS JOHN
WD, $10.00, L6(6) BRONSON HTS SD
Grantee(s): MEYERS RAYMOND
Grantor(s): GILBERT LOUTA, JANNEY E LOU, JANNEY E LOU
TRUSTEE, EMMA EDWARDS JANNEY TRUST, BOYER SHARON A,
MARTIN SHARON A
WD, $12,500.00, L4(3) WILLISTONHGH #14
Grantee(s): INTER COUNTY REAL ESTATE INC
Grantor(s): PRIDDY DONNA M, PRIDDY ROBERT,PRIDDY ROBERT E
M, $75,000.00, L14(E) RIVER FOREST SD
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): JENNINGS LAWRENCE JR, JENNINGS LAWRENCE W JR,
JENNINGS WENDY, JENNINGS WENDY G
WD, $8,000.00, L1 (3) GREEN PATCH COUNTRY EST
Grantee(s): BOIKE JOSEPHINE M
Grantor(s): CARRYER CARL E
WD, $60,000.00, L15 MEADOWLAND EST #1, W/MH
Grantee(s): BYRD LINDA M, BYRD JERALD M SR
Grantor(s): EDENFIELD LINDA L, EDENFIELD MONTE W
M, $22,000.00, L15 MEADOWLAND EST #1, W/MH
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): BYRD LINDA M, BYRD JERALD M SR
WD, $8,000.00, L1(L) CASONS INGLIS ACRES #1
Grantee(s): SUNCOAST INVESTORS REALTY LLC
Grantor(s): GROSS SHIRLEY A
WD, $34,900.00, L1 (L) CASONS INGLIS ACRES #1
Grantee(s): DEVITO WpISS DEBRA, CHRISTIAN NICOLE, LINDSEY
MARGARET A, WEISS DEBRA DEVITO
Grantor(s): SUNCOAST INVESTORS REALTY LLC
AAA, $71,800.00, OR 916/712
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): ROBERTS GREGORY D, ROBERTS SUSAN L, ROBERTS
SUSAN LYNETTE
WD, $3,000.00, L16(34) OAK RIDGE ESTATES
Grantee(s): MANUEL KATHERINE, MANUEL LEONARD
Grantor(s): GOLDING MARY R
M, $66,628.21 L77(10) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX,
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): ATKINS ALPHEUS S, ATKINS EVA M
CD, $10.00, OR 992/505, BDY 20-16-16, ETC, PARCEL #02882-001-00
Grantee(s): JONES WILLIAM JASON, JONES MOZELLE D TRUSTEE
Grantor(s): JONES MOZELLE H TRUSTEE, JONES WILLIAM M
TRUSTEE, WILLIAM M JONES AND MOZELLE H JONES LIVING TRUST
QCD, $10.00, L90(10) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX
Grantee(s): PERRY DEBORAH, PERRY DONALD L SR
Grantor(s): PERRY DEBORAH
WDIM, $51,000.00, L90(10) FANNIN SPRINGS ANNEX, W/MH
Grantee(s): W ALTER BAYNARD & COMPANY, GIBB DON, PREVATT
LEWIS
Grantor(s): PERRY DEBORAH
MMA, $15,000.00, OR 882/166
Grantee(s): PERKINS STATE BANK
Grantor(s): WORTHINGTON ESTHER, WORTHINGTON FRED T
M, $113,000.00, L3 IVEY ACRES
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): HART JOHNATHAN R
WD, $213,600.00, L3 SIENNA COVE
Grantee(s): BAKER RUTH E, BAKER CHARLES S
Grantor(s): CAPLIN JENNIFER, CAPLIN ALAN
WD, $50,000.00, L 14 SUMNER PLACE
Grantee(s): BARRETO SERGIO
Grantor(s): SANDERS CATHY S, SANDERS ROBERT M
M, $40,000.00, L14SUMNERPLACE
Grantee(s): CAPITAL CITY BANK
Grantor(s): BARRETO SERGIO
QCD, $100.00, L13(3) WILLISTON HGH #11
Grantee(s): KIM YOUNG HEE, KIM NATHANIEL W
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L15(3) WILLISTON HGH #11
Grantee(s): KIM YOUNG HEE, KIM NATHANIEL W
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L14(3) WILLISTON HGH #11
Grantee(s): KIM YOUNG HEE, KIM NATHANIEL W
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L10(4) HILL CREST HTS
Grantee(s): KIM ALEXANDER H
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L11(11) WILLISTON HGH #7
Grantee(s): KIM ALEXANDER H
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L12(11) WILLISTONHGH #7
Grantee(s): KIM ALEXANDER H
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L9(4) HILLCREST HTS
Grantee(s): KIM ALEXANDER H
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
QCD, $100.00, L1(F) REPLAT SUNNY HGH SD
Grantee(s): KIM YOON
Grantor(s): KIM YEONG JA
MMA, $15,000.00, DOC #453331, L84 ROLLING ACRES, BDY 27-12-17,
ETC
Grantee(s): AMSOUTH BANK
Grantor(s): CREWS PEGGY, CREWS JOSEPH DONNELL
M, $436,000.00, BDY 22-12-18, PARCEL #04114-001-00


Grantee(s): AMSOUTH BANK
Grantor(s): OWENS SYLVIA D, OWENS JAMES B
CORRECTORYDEED $10.00, L3(120)WILLISTON HGH G&CC ESTATES
Grantee(s): AJ BUILDERS INC
Grantor(s): ST NICK LAND INVESTMENTS INC
M, $50,000.00, L17PRAIRIEESTATE
Grantee(s): BANK OF AMERICA NA
Grantor(s): CASILLI SHERYL ,CASILLI CHRISTOPHER
AAA, $5,048.65 OR 786/267
Grantee(s): DRUMMOND COMMUNITY BANK
Grantor(s): MCCAIN MALCOLM ALBERT

Continued on page 12


11 1












Page 1


LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


Y UE.ID NU0RA COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2006


White Ford celebrates 50th anniversary Woman's Club offers


Representatives from Ford
Motor Company present rep-
resentatives from White Ford
Company with 50th Anniver-
sary Award.
Jack Bennett, Orlando Re-
gional Sales Manager, ex-
pounding on the Award stated
"...few businesses nationally
and even fewer internation-
ally, reach the 50-year mile-
stone and I congratulate you
on this achievement. Your
success, in your [community]
Zone has helped our region
earn recognition as one of the
leaders in the nation."
From modest beginnings at
a Williston dealership, Luther
White Sr. became a Partner
and Franchised Ford Dealer
in 1954. Shortly thereafter,
the dealership was relocated
to Chiefland and continued to
grow.
In 1995 the Service De-
partment doubled service ca-
pacity by expanding the exist-
ing building. Later, the Retail
Parts and Counter department
was modernized for ease of
customer convenience..
In 2001, White Ford Mer-
cury attained Ford Blue Oval
and Mercury Advantage cer-
tification and continues to
exceed service, customer
satisfaction and customer re-
tention benchmarks. In 2003,
upgraded halogen lighting
was installed for vehicle in-
ventory and the remaining lot
and parking areas were paved.
Speedliner, the industry lead-
er in sprayed-in bed liner
application technology, was
added during 2005 and a new
building was equipped for
onsite application. Numerous
awards include ranking 4th of
77 dealers in the South East
District and becoming one of
only three dealers to earn the
distinction of Silver Medal-
lion Elite Club three years in
a row; 2003, 2004, 2QQ.5, The
service team includes six Ford
Certified technicians and two
Master Certified technicians.


KATE BORGMAN, Zone I Manager, Jack Bennett, Orlando Regional Sales Man-
ager, Mrs. Luther [Juanita] White, Donald J. Barrett and Ms. Nancy Bennett
were on hand for the award presentation.


VINTAGE vehicles commemorating 50 years in business were showcased at
White Ford.


The dealership training pro-
gram is constant and ongoing
to provide quality and value
for our tri-county customers.
"We appreciate our loyal
customers and those that
have visited with us over
the years" said Don Barrett,
managing partner. "We credit
reaching this golden anni-
versary to the support and
confidence :WhAve received
from our customers in the tri-
county area."
Expressing his appreciation


Levy Land Transactions
MMA, $50,000.00, OR 895/151, 906/772, 989/467
Grantee(s): BROWN HENRY J
Grantor(s): KELLIN CAROL ANN, KELLIN THOMAS W
WD, $35,000.00, BDY SW1/4 SW1/4 16-16-16, ETC
Grantee(s): ANDRESEN KURT, KRAFT LEAF
Grantor(s): HUDSON DIANE C, RUSSO JOSEPH F
M, $10,000.00, BDY 6-13-19
Grantee(s): FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION
Grantor(s): HAFERS HELEN
QCD, $10.00, BDY SE1/4 NE1/4 34-11-14, ETC
Grantee(s): BISHOP DEAN A
Grantor(s): BISHOP MARY, BISHOP JESSE E
WD, $100,000.00, BDY SWI/4 SE1/4 32-12-14, ETC, PARCEL# 01114-
006-00
Grantee(s): BETTS TERRY, CREWS CARROL
Grantor(s): MCINNIS ALFRED BRUCE
M, $71,917.33 BDY SW1/4 SE1/4 32-12-14, ETC
Grantee(s): WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, BETTS TERRY
Grantor(s): CREWS CAROL
WD, $400,000.00, BDY NW1/4 NE1/4 29-12-14, W/IVIH, PARCEL
#01094-001-00
Grantee(s): BLANCO GENARO, BLANCO LIDIA
Grantor(s): HAYCOCK BERYL W, HAYCOCK PAMALA J, HAYCOCK T R,
HAYCOCK TODD R
M, $20,000.00, BDY NE1/4 NW1/4 28-12-17, ETC
Grantee(s): FINA EMMETT R, MASSAALBERT
Grantor(s): MASSA PHYLLIS ELAINE TULLY
WD, $95,000.00, BDY LL5-16(23) J B EPPERSON ADDITION TO
WILLISTON
Grantee(s): BROWN CALVIN
Grantor(s): SEALS FRANCES B, SEALS BUFORD
M, $85,500.00, BOY L15-16(23) J B EPPERSON ADDITION TO
WILLISTON
Grantee(s): COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): BROWN CALVIN
M, $100,000.00, BDY NE1/4 NW1/4 26-14-18, ETC
Grantee(s): CHARLES SCHWAB BANK NA
Grantor(s): GOODWIN ALLENE JULIA, GOODWIN KENNETH E
WD, $180,000.00, L18-19, BDY L17, 20(23) JB EPPERSON ADDITION
TO WILLISTON
Grantee(s): BROWN CALVIN
Grantor(s): SEALS FRANCES B, SEALS BUFORD
M, $144,000.00, L18-19, BDY L17, 20(23) J B EPPERSON ADDITION
TO WILLISTON
Grantee(s): COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS INC, MERS, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC
Grantor(s): BROWN CALVIN
WD, $6,900.00, L16-18(1-1) JEMLANDS, BDY 29-12-14, ETC
Grantee(s): CLARK MARIA, CLARK RONALD T
Grantor(s): BREWSTER INA D, BREWSTER ALBERT T
WD, $262,500.00, UNIT B-203 NATURES LANDING CONDOMINIUM, ETC
Grantee(s): VALLADARES ROGELIO R
Grantor(s): KELLY CHERYL H, KELLY LLOYD G
M, $195,000.00, UNIT B-203 NATURES LANDING CONDOMINIUM, ETC
Grahtee(s): EVERBANK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS INC, MERS
Grantor(s): VALLADARES ROGELIO R
WD, $37,000.00, L6(3) WOODPECKER RIDGE #2
Grantee(s): FLANDERS LISA, FLANDERS MICHAEL
Grantor(s): GOSS MARY P
WD, $15,500.00, BDY SEI/4 NE1/4 19-11-17, PARCEL #03161-037-
00
Grantee(s): OROZCO CARLOS
Grantor(s): WOMBLE GLENDA K, WOMBLE WILLIAM R
WD, $23,500.00, L9(29) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): LEWIS BARI
Grantor(s): REAL ESTATE AND SUNSHINE INC
M, $13,650.00, L9(29) UNIVERSITY OAKS
Grantee(s): S &P CAPITAL CORPORATION
Grantor(s): LEWIS BARI


to the staff during the Anni-
versary Celebration he added
"on behalf of Mrs. White,
we thank each of you for the
contribution and the role you
play in making our team ef-
fort a success. Everybody,
from the detail department,
parts counter person, sales
department and service tech-
nicians to the person who an-
swers the phone is instrumnen-
tal for our business to thrive
and be successful. Some of
us have been here for many


years and some of us are new
[to the dealership] but we all
fit into the White Ford Fam-
ily. It takes a team effort and
again, we thank you."
Until his death in Novem-
ber 2004, Luther White Sr.,
president, played an active
role at White Ford Mercury.
He is missed, but his vision
of serving and supporting
the tri-county area lives on.
During the 50th Anniversary
Celebration, vintage vehicles
from a golden era were also
on display.


Perkins Financial Grop

plants seeds for education -':-
JL| T.,-


Perkins Financial Group
today announced the cre-
ation of its Seeds fori Educa-
tion Program, a community
relations program to support
a variety of K-12 education-
al programs throughout the
institution's service market.
"We believe we can make
more of an impact with our
community relations efforts
and volunteer hours by em-
phasizing educational pro-
grams for our area students,"
said Todd Etheridge, vice
president of Perkins Finan-
cial Group. "Community
service has been a hallmark
of our business since Roy P.
Perkins opened the doors of
Perkins State Bank almost a
century ago. We believe the
education of our area's chil-
dren is particularly impor-
tant to our community'."
The Seeds for Educa-
tion Program will include a
number of programs for the
area's elementary, middle
and high schools.
The program will kick-
off this spring with the es-
tablishment of the "Perkins
Financial Group President's
Scholarship", a 4-year,
$6,000 ($1,500 a year to
the recipient for four years)
scholarship that will be
"awarded to an area high
school senior each year who
best demonstrates the val-
ties of the Perkins family
of businesses: service and
trust.
"Each of our Nix area
high schools will nominate
one senior fobr this scholar-
ship," continued Etheridge.
"One of the 3ix students
will be chosen to receive


the 4-year, $6,000 scholar-
ship; the other five students
will each receive a one-time
$500 scholarship."
In addition, Perkins Fi-
nancial Group will begin a
program to plant a live oak
tree at each area elementary
school in honor of the cen-
tury-old live oak tree at the
Perkins State Bank location
in Williston and to empha-
size the importance of en-
vironmental issues to area
elementary students.
"The live oak. tree has
long been a symbol of our
company and signifies the
strength and longevity Per-
kins Financial Group has in
providing financial services
to the citizens of north cen-
tral Florida," said President
Frank Etheridge.
The company will also
continue providing report
card jackets to each of the
elementary schools in the
service area and will look
for additional programs for
contributions and volunteer
opportunities for education-
al needs.
"We are very excited
about this new community
relations program and look
forward to working with our
employees and customers to
identify other opportunities
to improve the educational
programs for our area stu-
dents," said Todd Etheridge,
who will manage the Seeds
for Education Program.
Perkins Financial Group
includes Perkins State Bank,
Nature Coast Insurance and
Nature Coast Financial Ser-
vices, Inc.


several scholarships


On May 3, several students
will be recipients of $500
college scholarships courte-
sy of the Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club.
The awards are open to
students who reside in Yan-
keetown or Inglis, attended
Yankeetown School and
graduated from or will gradu-
ate from Dunnellon High
School or Crystal River High
School.
Also eligible are home
schooled seniors, those who
are attending college and
maintain a 3.0 GPA, and
those who have worked after
graduation but now have con-
crete plans for resuming their
education.
Applicants must satisfac-
torily complete a personal
essay and questionnaire. In
addition, family structure
and income and teacher's or
counselor's recommenda-
tions will be considered.
Those who meet the crite-
ria may obtain an application
from the A.F. Knotts Library


on 56th Street in Yankeetown
or from guidance counselors
at Dunnellon or Crystal River
High Schools.
Selection will be made by
members of the Yankeetown-
Inglis Woman's Club Educa-
tion Committee.
Awards will be granted in
the student's name and social
security number to the school
of his/her choice upon admis-
sion. If the Club is not prop-
erly notified of the school
and admission, the scholar-
ship will be forfeited and the
amount reverts back to its
treasury.
Completed applications
should be mailed to the Yan-
keetown-Inglis Woman's
Club Education Committee,
PO Box 298, Yankeetown,,
FL 34498 so they will be
received NO LATER THAN
April 1.
If further information is
needed, prospective appli-
cants may call Education
Committee Chairwoman El-
eanor Berkley at 447-3899.


Scholarship deadline is April 3
The Emma Belle Townsend Scholarship is given annually
to an individual enrolled in the Levy County Schools. This
includes public high schools, charter schools, home schools
and special education students.
Applicants must be a graduating senior, a resident of Levy
County and have a grade point average between 2.0 GPA and
3.0 GPA.
Applications have been mailed to high school guidance
counselors. They are also available by mail through a request
to the Levy County Extension Office (352) 486-5131. The
2006 deadline for submission of applications is April 3.


The Nerd comes to


Chiefland in March


Suwannee Valley Players
will debut The Nerd, a come-
dy in two acts by Larry Shue.
The Story: Now an aspir-
ing young architect in subur-
bia, Willum Cubbert has often
told his friends about the debt
he owes to Rick Steadman,
a fellow ex-GI whom he has
never met but who saved his
life in Vietnam.
He has written to Rick to
say that, as long as he is alive,
"You will have somebody on
Earth who will do anything
for you" -- so Willum is de-
lighted when Rick shows up
unexpectedly at his home on
the night of his 34th birthday
party.
But, his delight soon fades
as it becomes apparent that
Rick is a hopeless bumbling
oaf with no social sense,
little intelligence, and less
tact. Rick's continued pres-
ence among Willum and his
friends leads to one uproari-
ous incident after another, un-
til the normally placid Willum
finds himself contemplating
violence, a dire development


which, happily, is staved off
by the surprising twist ending
of the play.
Performances are March
3-5, 9-12, 17-19 (three con-
secutive weekends, with a
special 'student/senior night'
performance on March 9.)
Performances begin at 8 p.m.
on Thursday, March 9 and
Friday and Saturday nights,
with Sunday matinees at 2:30
p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults
and $4 for students and chil-
dren over five years of age.
All children under six are ad-
mitted free, (but may have to
sit in a lap). All productions
are held at the Chief Theatre,
25 E. Park Ave., Chiefland.
Tickets can be purchased
from ticket outlet Suwannee
Valley Internet and Comput-
ers (114 S. Hwy 19), or cast
members, or at the box office
in the theatre 45 minutes be-
fore curtain.
For: more information
visit www.svplayers.com
or contact the theatre at
352-493-ARTS or email at:
SVPlayers@aol.com


AS THE 2006 Legislative Session draws near, school
food service workers converged on the Capitol to
promote the issues important to good nutrition for
students of all ages. Among those visiting was Kelly
Mashburn, school lunchroom manager of Bronson
Elementary. She met with Rep. Kendrick (D) Carrabelle
to discuss current nutrition policies and the proposed
changes currently filed for consideration this year.
Changes range from the removal of high fructose corn
syrup products in food service programs to school
year opening dates to mandates in wellness policies.
Rep. Kendrick said, "It is always a pleasure to hear and
understand the issues and concerns that are important
to constituents of District 10 and those that directly
affect areas of their expertise."


RECYCLE. RECYCLE. RECYCLE.












LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL


AROUND LEVY COUNTY


THURSDAY, MARCH 2,2006


LSNWR:


'We're all about wildlife habitat'


BY CAROLYN RISNER
MANAGINoG Elo OR
With more than 52,000
acres of land in Dixie and
Levy Counties, the Lower
Suwannee National Wildlife
Refuge is more than a little
work for the men and women
who call it home base.
Last Saturday, the Refuge
played host to the community
as it showcased the work it
does, and the natural habitat
it strives to protect.
Under the management of
Kathy Whaley, the men and
women of the Refuge work
tirelessly to provide the con-
ditions necessary for native
wildlife to sustain itself for
generations to come.
Of particular concern on
this Refuge are the gopher
tortoise, the indigo snake, the
salt marsh vole, the Gulf stur-
geon, the Florida pine snake,
the manatee, the bachman
sparrow and the swallowtail
kite.
"Fire is the most impor-
tant thing in this refuge,"
said Michael Legare, deputy
manager, who explained that
through controlled bums,
they are able to protect the
focus of their mission: the
wildlife.
Legare told guests about
each threatened or endan-
gered specie and how they
can help with preservation.
"A lot of what we do is
maintenance," he said, ex-
plaining how road work,
burns, logging and recre-
ational hunts are vital facets
to the conservation theme.
For those who wonder
what happens to the animals
during a controlled bum, Le-
gare allayed their fears.
"Most escape," he said.
Years and years of adapta-
tion plays into the methodol-
ogy and very,f ,wci ger.,r,,
harmed or die as a result of
the management technique.
While much of the Refuge
is forest lands where the tim-
ber is cut and sold by loggers,
the harvest is not about the
money.
"We're all about the wild-
life habitat," said Vic Doig,
the prescribed bum special-
ist.
Doig and Dan Barrand de-
voted a portion of the after-
noon to an information ses-


CONTROLLED fire is the best management practice
and here Wildlife Service employees demonstrate
one of several ways to control it.


sion about timber and burn
practices.
"Fire is the best manage-
ment practice on the Ref-
uge," Barrand said, echoing
Legare's earlier words.
It is the staff's goal to either
maintain the land or return it
to the way it was thousands
of years ago.
"We want to make it look
untouched by man," he said.
"There are two natural
forces that shape ecology,"
Doig said. "Fire and water.
It's what shapes all of Flori-
da.
"Our forests here are noth-
ing like they were . .fire is
good and wildlife has evolved
over the years because of fire.
They have learned to adapt,
hide and survive."
Prescribed burning con-
verts the vegetation beneath
the planted pine stands to en-
sure a more diverse habitat.
With a 10-year manage-
ment plan in place, the forest-
er hopes to get the pines out
of the wetland so the cypress
trees can grow freely again.
Loggers harvest much of
the Refuge and monies gar-
nered from timber sales are
paid to the federal govern-
ment.


In turn, each year, the fed-
eral government sends Levy
and Dixie counties a check in
lieu of taxes.
Last year more than
$90,000 was remitted to each


county.
The Refuge is also a mecca
for hikers, fishermen, hunters
and bird watchers.
Wildlife observation is best
during early morning hours
and the evening with bet-
ter viewing conditions in the
spring and winter,
Wading birds such as the
white ibis, herons and egrets
are often spotted along road-
side ditches, as are wild tur-
keys.
American alligators are
commonly seen in the wet-
lands areas, and everyone
cautions that visitors bring
their insect repellent when
they come for a trek.
Vehicles are restricted on
designated areas and no ATVs
may roam the premises.
Camping is not permitted
either, but enthusiasts will
find Shell Mound close by.
Pets are allowed but must
be on a leash and no horses
are permitted on the Refuge.
With over 40 miles of im-
proved roads, hiking and
wildlife observation is avail-
able year-round. Another 50
miles of unimproved roads
may prove challenging for
hikers and bicyclists.
During Saturday's open
house, Refuge workers took


VISITORS were taken into the heart of the refuge
during one of several hayrides. In the forest, log-
ging and habitat conservation were discussed.


guests on a hayride in the for-
est.
Different types of veg-
etation were pointed out and
they got to see up close the


results of a controlled burn
and logging operations.
Lunch was a Cracker Bar-
becue, complete with chick-
en, ribs and swamp cabbage.


GUESTS WERE treated to a Cracker Barbecue that
featured chicken, ribs and swamp cabbage.


I Manager


Continued from front


Russ had been forthcoming in the interview about not having
a degree.
"I make . Pomeroy began, but was cut off by Monyei
who made a motion to readvertise the position. Walker sec-
onded.
"We've been without a manager five months," Barron
stressed before calling for the vote.
Monyei's motion to readvertise failed 2-3.
"We're making a serious mistake that will harm the citizens
of the city," Monyei said. "I am totally appalled."
The grant issue was raised again with the mayor reminding
them that the city's grant writer had not written grants either
but after a class was more than capable.
"We're not going to train him for anything," Monyei said.
Both she and Walker agreed that they found Russ a nice,
affable person.
"He just can't do this job," Monyei said.
Pomeroy then made a motion to hire Russ. It was quickly
seconded and approved 3-2 with Walker and Monyei dissent-
ing.
Likewise when the three commissioners who favored
Russ's employment set his salary at $55,000 a year, the two
commissioners opposed the motion.
Neither would they vote for his one year contract.
At the end of the meeting Mary Golding came from the
back of the audience and urged the commissioners to come
together for the betterment of the city.
"A house divided against itself cannot stand," she said.
"We made a decision and now we need to pick up and move
forth."
Russ, who had remained silent throughout the meeting,
stood. "I offer my hand in friendship with no acrimony,"
he said. He pledged to work hard for the city and his efforts
themselves would allay the fears of the two who opposed his
employment. "I appreciate your candor."
"If I hurt your feelings," Monyei said, "I'm sorry. But I will
support you."
Walker was last to take on the goodwill gesture.
"I'm going to work with you," she said, "but I'm going to
be watching you."


l Garden Continued from front


scheme for annual groupings through the center. This year I
did red white and blue in honor of our troops. It was not easy
to find blue.
I leave plenty of space to allow me to plug in the summer
annuals in March while they are small. They can be rooted
in the bed and ready to bloom when I am ready to yank the
pooped out pansies and petunias in June. I cover EVERY
hard freeze to protect blooms.
Last year I made a colossal mistake. I lined the front of
the bed with gorgeous, tiny black-eyed susans. Problem was,
they were 36" tall! This meant they obscured the whole bed
behind them. I moved them in October and I hope they have
rooted in. They will make a great grouping when they bloom.
I should have looked at the tag before I planted.
WATER
Spring is the season to evaluate your garden's water and
fertilizer needs. Try to keep material that needs a lot of water
grouped together, especially if it is difficult to water.
My mailbox garden is four acres away from water. I only
water by hand in June and July. Twice a month, a put a 55-
gallon water barrel on the back of the truck. I dip my watering
can in and water the garden by hand. You can bet I will not do
this more than I have to. I only have a few select plants that
need to be watered more than just rainfall provides.
I water new annuals and perennials every day for two weeks
once I change them for the season, after that, they are on their
own.
Make sure you water the morning before a freeze. Your
plants will thank you.
ENRICH
This is the time to turn over the unsuccessful areas of your
beds. Amend with mushroom compost, cow manure, top soil
or garden compost. Organic amendments need about 30 days
to start to break down into yummy garden food. My favorite
combination is cow manure and mushroom compost. Remem-
ber to pull weeds and apply a granular pre-emergent weed
killer. Amendments are full of weed seeds.
Organic gardeners can also add organic fertilizers such as
bone meal, blood meal, cottonseed meal, greensand and al-
falfa. My cat Pookie loves helping with the alfalfa, especially
if he can stick his head in the meal bucket! (not really good
for him)
Roses like to have a top dressing of cow manure in the fall
but if you were busy with the holidays, get going now. A 50
quart bag of Black Kow manure can be divided between two
rose bushes.


Make sure you water the roses well. Make a ring of manure
around the rose. The ring should be about 4" outside the main
canes and about 3" tall. Water the rose again. The rain will
wash the rest in slowly as winter drifts away. Top the cow
manure off with 1 cup bone meal and one cup blood meal. It
is better to do this in the fall but it is not too late now.
MULCH
New mulch should be decided on now. Pine straw is great
for material such as azaleas, camellias, hollies, bleeding heart
vine and other acid loving plants. Pine straw is even better if
you have it free for the raking in your yard. Folks in Gaines-
ville can't even find it to buy!
Pine mulch comes in three sizes. Fines, small and medium.
Fines are best for annual and perennial gardens like my mail-
box garden. Fines also make it easier to change out seasonal
material because fines move easier. Fines can be more dif-
ficult to locate as bagged product and are more available as
bulk product. Ask for pine bark mulch, not nuggets.
Small or mini-nuggets work well for new shrubs or small
shrubs like Red Ruffles Azaleas. Mini-nuggets should be ap-
proximately 1" in size. They are readily available at many
stores. It is acceptable to use mini-nuggets if you don't know
what else to use.
Large chips are great for tree beds and beds of grasses and
border grass. A few smaller plants are OK but concentrate
those in a grouping where smaller bark can be used.
Cypress mulch is good for walkways, driveways, tree bur-
ms and ornamental grass beds. Cypress packs down well and
may sometimes make it difficult for water and nutrients to
penetrate. It is not suitable at all for seasonal annuals unless it
is tiny chips and not the more common shred.
Calculate the quantity of mulch you will need now and you
can budget for later. I like using bags because I can stretch my
budget over time. I also don't have a lot of time to work in my
garden and I can spread a few bags at a time. Bagged mulch
also stores well. The average bed needs 2" 3", although
many suppliers recommend 4" for weed control. Remember
to apply the pre-emergent weed killer before and after the ap-
plication of any mulch.
Roses don't need mulch unless they are planted in the win-
ter. In that case, use pine straw if possible. Move mulch out
12" from the canes in the spring and keep as thin as possible
until winter protection is needed.
If you have a larger budget and more time, go with bulk de-
liveries. It works out to about the same price. Dad likes to get


his mulch delivered Friday and spends the weekend spreading
it out. Whatever works. Use 2" 3" deep.
PRUNE
No pruning or deadheading now, except for mums. Prun-
ing encourages new growth and we still have at least four
weeks to go. Wait. Lots of folks like to prune crepe myrtles in
the spring but I like to prune when they are done blooming.
This keeps the mockingbirds away a little longer. Take the
tree down by about 1/3 in height.
Mockingbirds like the seeds but will chase the little birds
away to protect the seeds. It is true; crepe myrtles bloom on
new growth and that is why some folks prune now. Pruning
now will also trigger new growth that could get damaged in
any last hard freezes. So, prune your crepes after flowering
and avoid all that trouble.
SEEDS
I go through my garden seeds now. I pull out anything that
looks really old. Seeds only have a certain shelf life. Most
seeds will last about a year but try them anyway. I have some
Roma tomatoes coming up in six packs. They are about 3
years old but they are sprouting!
Sometimes I buy seeds I don't know how to grow. I know
now I will never try blue lobelia again but sweet alyssum is
easy, even for children. You won't know what you can grow
if you don't try.
Tomatoes sprout well too. If you never try anything else,
tomatoes are the way to go. Just remember, seeds must be
started early, as soon as you see the first tomato plant in the
market, start your seeds. Remember to protect your seedlings
from the frost.
Leftover seeds should be saved in jars of like seeds. Save
annuals and perennials with like seeds and label by season.
Next year as the seasons roll around the jar of seeds will make
great starters for a children's garden, and what a mixture of
color.
If you like to sow your seeds directly into the ground, don't
use pre-emergent weed killer, your flower seeds won't ger-
minate.
April will be here soon enough, use March to plan your
beds, choose your mulch and sort your seeds.
Send any questions to Devora at the paper. Hopefully I can
answer them.

D.T. Pendleton resides in Chiefland where she special-
izes in estate garden management.


Page 17









Pane 18LEVY COUNTY JOURNAL THURSDAY, MARCH 2 2006


%-. lAir .s. .s ,. .......... ar&


9 99


1 -


T 0'ff 71''11~TT~kAAaii


White Ford starts its 52nd Year with a Customer Appreciation

S"MArMch is TrUSMonth" Sale
on All Rangers and F-Series in Stock!


F-Series


The Best Selling Vehicle in the industry


2006
Ranger XL
Reg. Cab,
4 Cyl., 5 Spd., AC,
Vinyl Seats,
AM/FM Stereo.


2006


St. #135 MSRP $16,045.00
YOUR PRICE


1I2, 99800*

XLT Supercab


*Limited Slip 3.55
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eTrailerTow & Go Discount
*AM/FM Stereo w/Single CD
*Air Conditioning


bt. # 085 iVSRP $29,490U
*Tilt & Cruise
*Power Door Locks & Windows
*40/20/40 Premium Cloth
Seats & More


F-150 XL
Reg. Cab, V6, 5 Spd.,
40/20/40 Vinyl Seats,
AC, AM/FM/CD.


St. #184- MSRP $20,155.00
YOUR PRICE

$14,999*


$


2006 F-250 4x4 FX4


V8, 6 Spd., Limited
Slip, Trailer Hitch &
Brake Controller,
AM/FM/CD,
lilt & Cruise.


St 00- MSP2 0.


St. #090 MSRP $29,205.00
YOUR PRICE

$24,15800*


1 t9'

Per MO.


Plus Sales Tax
39 Mo. Lease -
Up to 12,000
Miles Per Year


2006 Mercury
C Grand Marquis GS
1. i*AM/FM Stereo W/Single CD
. *8-Way Pwr. Driver Seat W/Lumbar
*Speed Control/Tilt Wheel
*Illuminated Entry
*Power Windows, Locks and Mirror
*3 Yr./36,000 Mile Warranty
*24-Hr. Roadside Assistance


2006 Mercury Milan Premier
*2.3L 1-4 Engine with 5-Speed Automatic
S17" 14-Spoke Machined Aluminum Wheels
*AM/FM In-Dash 6-Disc CD W/MP3 & 6 Speakers
*5-Pass. Leather Seating *Air Conditioning
*6-Way Pwr. Driver Seat W/Lumbar
*Tilt/Telescope Steering Wheel
W/Audio & Cruise Control
*4-Wheel Disc Brakes With ABS
*3 Yr./36,000 Mile War. 24-Hr. Roadside Assist.


Lincoln-Mercury Owners Loyalty St. # 042- MSRP $21,715.00
St. # 012- MSRP $25,555.00St#4 -$ 1
t Plus Sales Tax t Plus Sales Tax
$260 39 Mo. Lease Up to 1 39 Mo. Lease Up to
2 9 9 Per MO. 12,000 Miles Per Yiar Per MO. 12,000 Milei Per Uear
tPlus sales tax. Grand Marquis Net Cap Cost $21,024.10; Residual $10,222.00; 1.75% APR W.A.C. Cash due at signing $2,125.00; (Mercury-Lincoln Owner Loyalty -$2,000-$125.00). Milan Net Cap Cost $19,528.01; Residual $10,640.35; 2.25% APR
W.A.C. Cash due at signing $1,197.00. Mariner Net Cap Cost $19,218; Residual $10,591.45; 2.25% APR W.A.C. Cash due at signing $2,100. Mountaineer Net Cap Cost $26,092.17; Residual $16,675; 3.25% APR W.A.C. Cash due at signing $3,090.00.
F-150 S.C. Net Cap Cost $27,495; Residual $14,572.80; 2.75% APR W.A.C. Cash Due at Signing $1,885.45. All leases plus sales tax. Mileage figures based on EPA estimates.


Ub 1-ord -conoiine Ulub
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U4 I--1Iu 5upercrew
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'04 Ford F-250 Supercab '05 Ford F-150 Supercab 4x4
Lariat, Gas Engine. #947 Spray In Bedliner. #930
Was ow 8,88$ Was O 1W
$20,995 NOW $18, 888* $21,995 NOW I 9VUW8
.... r .


'04 F-250 Supercab
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'03 Expedition XLT 4x4
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'04 Mercury Sable
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'05 Mustang Coupe
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Grand Marquis LS
Low Miles. #815
Now 1$,995'


'05 Mustang Convertible
Auto, V6, Low Miles, Clean. #916
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-u' I-ocus
3 to Choose. #827, #828, #829
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'u0 uncoln lowncar
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Was NOW 48
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"The Works"
*Genuine Motorcraft Oil & Filter Change
*Rotate & Inspect FourTires
I Inspect Brake System
*Test Battery A $42.95
*Check Air and Cabin Filters Value
I *Check Belts and Hoses
*Check Wiper Blades 95
*Top Off All Fluids
*Multi-Point Inspection ,
I A great value in maintenance -
oil change, tire rotation, thorough inspection
and morel Up to 5 qts. Motorcraft Oil.
Tua di lf ulnaa lapsanud di a, ;l YChirlCO CAtra.


MERCURY


taxes, disposal fees and diesel venices extra.
Valid Otly With Ctupon. Offer Expires 3-3-06.
ValidlyWimomoupon erExs3-3 .. 916 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland 352-493-4297
*Prices net of rebate, plus tax, tag and $224 document fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Art for illustration purposes only. In stock units only. See dealer for
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