The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02398

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


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Full Text

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LOCALFormer city utilities chief dies, 3A. CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 124 TODAYS WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4A Local . . . . . . . 6A Obituaries . . . . . 5A Advice & Comics . . 3D Puzzles . . . . . . . 4B SPORTSFootball camp preps future Tigers, 1B. 95 74Chance of showers, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.50 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM SUNDAY EDITION Reaching out to teach1D 1CInfinity Con draws 200+7A Hotel owners: Fire fee undue burdenBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLocal hotel owners are questioning a proposed 71 percent fire assessment rate hike and urging city officials to postpone the increase. The proposed rates would jump from $.0758 per square foot to $.1293 per square foot. Local hotel owners Nick Patel and PJ Patel, who are also business partners, said they cant understand how the 71 percent rate hike was determined. We have not received the data yet, Nick Patel said. We requested the data, hopefully well get the data to analyze it further. We were shocked to see that hotels are going to have to bear the brunt of the increase when everyone [else] is going down. The proposed assess ment for commercial establishments decreased about 10 percent, and the proposed rate for industrial/ warehouse space dropped 42 percent. City officials said the study was done scientifically, and in a fair manner. They say there is little to no flexibility now to reduce the proposed rates. The purpose of the fire assessment study is to assure equitable distribution of the costs throughout the categories of property owners in the city, said Grayson Cason, Lake Citys assistant city manager. Every property owner category is paying their fair share of the cost. Nick Patel said since commercial space increased by approximately 500,000 square feet from 2009 2014, the years covered in the study, officials Say 71% hike should at least be put on hold. Governor has financial stake in natural gas pipeline RATE HIKE continued on 7ABy MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comGov. Rick Scott not only offered political support for construction of a major natural gas pipeline to run through Florida, but backed the project financially as well. According to BrowardBulldog. org, Scott invested millions in more than two dozen entities that produce and/or transport natural gas, including Spectra Energy Corp., the company behind construction of Florida Power & Lights 474-mile Sabal Trail Transmission Pipeline, which will run from Alabama to Florida, crossing through neighboring Suwannee County along the way. Scotts stake in Spectra was reported to be $53,000. Representatives of the Scott administration told BrowardBulldog.org that the governor wasnt aware of the investment because it was part of a blind trust, which means he had no knowledge or influence over the funds being spent. However, BrowardBulldog.org reports that Floridas blind trust law is ineffective at veiling public officials investments. In fact, the online newspaper reports, the governors investments are a matter of public record, as the state law is trumped by the public reporting requirements of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The pipeline was first proposed by an official of FP&L appointed to Scotts transition team in 2010, Owns shares in the company hired to build pipeline, which will cross beneath Santa Fe. PHOTOS COURTESY | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY EMILY LAWSONBACKGROUND: Stories in 1927 and 1928 editions of the Lake City Reporter describe an unusual archaeological find alongside U.S. 41; CENTER: The sites purported discoverer and his two sons; LEFT, RIGHT: An admission ticket to the site; FOREGROUND: Supposed mummified human remains.Folks still recall supposed archaeological discovery along US 41 in 1927Secret of the tombs lives onBy SARAH LOFTUS Lake City Reporter Back in the 1920s, U.S. Highway 41 looked nothing like it does today. It was the road everyone took into Lake City and beyond. Interstates didnt exist, and people werent in as much of a hurry. Instead of rushing to their destinations, people stopped to see things as they traveled. Along U.S. 41 in Lake City were all kinds of tourist attractions a small zoo, fresh fruit markets and juice stands, things that probably couldve been found on any Florida highway. But there was also something Sales tax holiday coming TOMBS continued on 6A SCOTT continued on 3A

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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 BONITA SPRINGS A southwest Florida wait ress has dubbed the trio of naked hamburger thieves who broke into an eatery “dumb, dumber and dumbest.” Waitress Nancy Sansevieri was still laughing after police released surveillance video Wednesday showing the col lege-aged men — two naked and one clad in underwear — steal ing 60 hamburgers from Doc’s Beach House in Bonita Beach. Police say the men broke in early Sunday and left a trail of red peppers on the beach. Doc’s general manager Lou Bangert told the News-Press of Fort Myers that he’s never witnessed such a crime in the restaurant’s 27-year history. Thieves have broken in and taken money from the cash register, but he says no one has ever slammed through a door completely naked looking for beef. Geese cause flap at retirement home EDGEWATER — Two Australian magpie geese are causing quite a flap in a central Florida retirement community. The geese — who residents have named Lucy and Rickey — apparently love the swimming pool. While residents would prefer the geese to stay on the lake, they’ve gotten used to it. But Tuesday someone picked up the female goose and took her to an area near the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuse. The Daytona Beach NewsJournal reports Lucy returned to Hacienda Del Rio on Wednesday, flying some nine miles. Wildlife officials say it’s a fed eral offense to drop an animal in the refuge. And it’s against state laws to release any animal into the wild that’s not native to Florida. Residents say Lucy and Ricky may eventually go to a wildlife rehabilitation center.Slaying of law prof a seeming mystery TALLAHASSEE — Detectives say Florida State University law school professor Daniel Markel was shot in the head — but won’t say whether he was shot from the front or back. They say he was gunned down at his home in broad daylight but won’t say if he was found inside the house or outside. They released a photo of a vehicle of interest, but wouldn’t confirm exactly where the car was seen or even the make and model. But they have made one detail perfectly clear: Whoever did it wanted Markel dead. Last Friday’s shooting of the popular lawyer has stunned his friends, colleagues and residents of his well-to-do community in Florida’s state capital, who demanded to know whether Markel had surprised an armed burglar or robber. No, Police Chief Michael DeLeo said this was a premeditated murder. Tallahassee police spokes man David Northway released photos of a vehicle of interest Wednesday and asked for any one with surveillance in the area to contact police. The car appears to be a silver or light green Toyota Prius, though police will not confirm that. CrimeStoppers has increased a reward for information lead ing to an arrest from $1,000 to $3,000. Markel, 41, was born in Toronto, was the father of two boys and a 2001 graduate of Harvard Law School. He practiced white-collar criminal defense and civil litigation before joining the Florida State law school as a faculty member in 2005. He was tenured in 2010. Bob Jarvis, a Nova Southeastern University law pro fessor, said there are numerous reasons police withhold crime details from the public, even when seeking tips. Prosecutors worry about affecting the jury pool, and police are always con cerned with false confessions and copycat criminals, he said. “It’s a way to test anybody who’s either making a confes sion, who’s trying to pin the blame on somebody else,” Jarvis said. “It’s a truth-telling test. “You don’t want confusion. If there’s something unique about the killer or the killer’s M.O., you’d like to keep that under wraps.” Markel finalized a contentious divorce from his ex-wife, Wendi Adelson, in 2013. The two had equally split custody of sons Benjamin and Lincoln, but they had follow-up litigation over money settlements. At one point, Adelson, who also teaches law at Florida State, hoped to move back to her hometown in South Florida. “She’s a basket case, she’s totally, totally shocked over what happened,” said Adelson’s law yer, Jimmy Judkins. “Gone from having children with two parents to children with one parent with no warning.Trapper called to town over wild hogs LAKEWOOD RANCH — After wild hogs spent months tearing through lawns and common areas, costing homeowners hun dreds of dollars, some southwest Florida officials have hired a trapper to remediate the hog havoc. About five homes and sev eral common areas in the Lakewood Ranch community near Bradenton have been hit by hogs in the last few weeks. Danny Young, who runs Sarasota-based Caught Hog Hunting and Trapping, has cap tured 16 hogs since he was hired by the district in March. The Bradenton Herald reports that the pigs travel several miles each day. They love to toss dirt and grass to look for shrubs, roots and bugs. In the spring, they crave acorns. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS HOW TO REAC H USMain number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com)A DVERT IS ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com)CL ASSIFI EDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CI RCU L AT IONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Saturday) Unavailable as of press time Play 4: (Saturday) Unavailable as of press time Fantasy 5: (Friday) Unavailable as of press time Florida Lotto: (Wednesday) 16-32-36-44-48-52-x3 PowerBall: (Wednesday) 4-10-12-22-31-3-x5TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterIce cream for breakfastCierra Bryant (clockwise), Sophia Butler, Kylie Smith, Ria Patel an d Esha Patel get ice cream from Tim Van-Skyhawk and Mike Mershon during Saturday’s Ice Cream for Breakfast “Scoops of H ope” event at the Holiday Inn and Suites. Naked thieves take burgers from SW Fla. eatery AROUND FLORIDA The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. See an error? The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run on this page at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. SubmissionsJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA walk in the parkArt Butler walks laps around Lake DeSoto as a stress releiver on Fri day. Ricky Martin to judge ‘The Voice ... Mexico’ MEXICO CITY — And the fourth and final judge for “The Voice ... Mexico” is: Ricky Martin. The Puerto Rican pop star will join Yuri, Julion Alvarez and Italian song stress Laura Pausini as the judges for the singing contest. Mexico’s Televisa network announced that Martin will be the fourth judge in a statement Thursday, saying that “all his experience and musical abilities will be available for the next season of The Voice ... Mexico.” Martin previously was a coach on “The Voice Australia.” The fourth edition of “The Voice ... Mexico” begins Sept. 7.Baldwin, LaBeouf share NYC role — defendant NEW YORK — Alec Baldwin and Shia LaBeouf never ended up sharing a Broadway stage as planned last year, but real-life dramatics landed both of them Thursday in a distinctly less celebrated venue: Manhattan criminal courts. Both stars appeared in courtrooms a few blocks apart for separate disorderly conduct cases. LaBeouf is charged with disrupting a Broadway performance, while Baldwin was accused of getting belligerent with police who said they stopped him for riding a bicycle the wrong way down a one-way street. Their shared court date was just a coincidence, but it paired stars who have become known for acting up, not just for acting. “Looks like you have a short fuse,” Manhattan Criminal Court Judge John DeLury told Baldwin while looking over the allegations against him; they’re violations, not crimes. After Baldwin repeatedly said he’d pay a fine for the May 13 encounter — though the judge said he was just asking for an apology — DeLury put the case on track to be dismissed if the actor avoids re-arrest for six months. It’s a common outcome for low-level cases in Manhattan. “Can you stay out of trouble, Alexander?” DeLury asked. “Sure, sure,” Baldwin said.“Be a good boy from now on. Have a good day!” Meanwhile, LaBeouf’s lawyer and prosecutors said they were trying to resolve his case. He’s accused in court papers of playing a boorish role in the audience at “Cabaret” last month, smoking cigarettes, yelling at the actors onstage, and swearing at secu rity guards and hollering as he was escorted out: “Do you know who I am?” The actor, whose publicist has said the episode stemmed from an alcohol problem and that LaBeouf has since gotten treatment, stood solemnly before a judge during the brief appear ance. He and his lawyer, G. Robert Gage, declined to comment as they left court amid a swarm of cameras and microphones. LaBeouf is due back in court in September. LaBeouf, 28, and Baldwin, 56, were slated to co-star last year in a revival of Lyle Kessler’s play “Orphans,” but LaBeouf pulled out over creative dis agreements — and then publicly tweet ed private emails from Baldwin and others involved in the show. (“Sorry for my part of a dis-agreeable situation,” LaBeouf wrote to Baldwin in one mes sage; Baldwin apparently wrote back: “I don’t have an unkind word to say about you. You have my word.”) Best known for starting in the first three “Transformers” movies, LaBeouf has made headlines for his off-screen behavior in the past year. He apologized this winter for bor rowing the story line and dialogue for a short film from a graphic novel writer. In February, he walked out of a Berlin Film Festival news conference for the movie “Nymphomaniac Volume I” and then wore a paper bag — emblazoned with “I am not famous anymore” — over his head at the red carpet premiere. Scripture of the Day Perhaps they are not stars, but rather openings in heaven where the love of our lost ones pours through and shines down upon us to let us know they are happy.— Eskimo ProverbHave mercy upon me, O God,According to Your lovingkindness;According to the multitude of Your tender mercies, Blot out my transgressions.Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,And cleanse me from my sin.— Psalm 51:1-2 Thought for Today Q Associated Press Q Associated Press

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comDave Clanton, the city of Lake Citys former Executive Director of Utilities, died Wednesday. He was 55 years old. Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt called Clanton a good friend. I had a lot of respect for Dave. Not only was he a great employee with the city, he was one of my favorite people, Witt said. Me and Dave had become good friends and actually visited back and forth, kept in touch and I considered him a good friend. Clanton began working with the city in September 1987 at the citys wastewater treatment plant as the maintenance superintendent. He was promoted to Wastewater Treatment Plant director in 1998. He received the City of Lake City Achievement Award in 2005. Clanton was promoted to the Executive Director of Utilities position in August 2007. He retired from the position February 28, 2014. Clanton also served as interim city manager from February July of 2009. Wendell Johnson, city manager, said when he was appointed city manager, Clanton was serving as the interim city manager. I got to know a little bit about him during the transition process, Johnson said. It speaks volumes for Daves abilities and his value to the city, for the council to appoint him to the role of interim city manager. Clanton was executive director of the citys utilities when Johnson moved to Lake City as the city manager. My relationship with Dave was always respectful with a very good level of professional respect for each other, Johnson said. He did a great job during his tenure. He was well liked by all employees and I never heard anybody say anything negative about Dave. It was sad when I found out he was sick. The last time I met with Dave, thats when he told me he was going to have to retire because of his heart condition. I enjoyed working with Dave. He will be missed. Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 3A SALES ART CLASSES GIFT SHOP Call for Detals 386-752-5229JEWELRYInstructor: Linda Schenavar Magnetic Jewelry August 4th 10:00 a.m. to Noon August 25th 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. WATERCOLORInstructor: Wally Reichert Wonder of Watercolor August 11th 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. August 18th 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ARYLICSInstructor: Dottie List Poppin Action Acrylics August 14th 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (Acrylics for Children 14-18 years) August 25th 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Acrylics for Adults) August 28th 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (Acrylics for Children 14-18 years) Instructor: Kelli Ronsonet Girls Night Out August 20th 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. YUPOInstructor: Jeanne Van Arsdall Girls Night Out August 6th 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. PHOTOGRAPHYInstructor: Herb Ellis Close Up In Nature August 2nd 10:00 a.m. to Noon Instructor: Terri Sherrod Shooting In Manual August 23rd 10:00 a.m. to Noon WOODWORKINGInstructor: Charles Kime August 9th 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. August 16th 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. MIXED MEDIAInstructor: Jeanne Van Arsdall Paint Your Art Out August 30th 10:00 a.m. to Noon 168 N. MARION AVE. LAKE CITY, FLNext to Wards Jewelers in Historic DowntownAUGUST ART CLASSES 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 8 / 1 5 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A the newspaper reports. In May and June 2013, Scott signed into law two bills to streamline permitting for the pipeline. The five members of the Florida Public Service Commission, all appointed by Scott, later approved the $3 billion project unanimously. The pipeline would be used as a passageway for up to 1.1 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day to travel to an FP&L plant in South Florida. Environmentalists from Columbia and surrounding counties have been uneasy about the project for fear the pipeline would have detrimental effects on the ecology and economy of the area. The first route proposed by Spectra went directly under the Ichetucknee River, raising concerns for the Ichetucknee Alliance, and threatening Floridas environment and eco-tourism industry. There is very porous limestone in those areas, said Lucinda Merritt, secretary of the Ichetucknee Alliance. It was just a bad idea when the state has paid so much to preserve it. Merritt said once Spectra submitted a route avoiding the Ichetucknee, the alliance decided it would not contest the pipeline itself. There are, however, still groups in the area that remain opposed to the project. Putting a pipeline anywhere near in a sinkhole-laden environment could be horrific if something went wrong, said Our Santa Fe River President Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson. Our organization is still very much opposed. GreenLaw, a non-profit Georgia law firm specializing in environmental issues, has filed objections to the project and said it would be a major emitter of pollutants that could harm the air quality and climate for its surrounding cities. The firm has specific concerns about the damage the pipeline could bring to the states longleaf pine forests. The Environmental Protection Agency has questioned whether there is another way to complete the task of moving gas to the FPL plant, saying that the pipe could create a public hazard. It has requested that any progress on the project avoid high functioning, high quality and rare systems. We are still in opposition to putting a pipeline in the springs heartland that is Florida, MalwitzJipson said. This is the most prolific area of springs in the entire state, and I will not support putting a gas-filled pipeline in its corridor. An individual identifying herself as Nancy Argenziano, a Republican former legislator who represented Columbia and Suwannee counties in the Florida Senate and later served on the Florida Public Service Commission, said in an online comment to the BrowardBulldog.org article that PSCs support of the pipeline should come as no surprise to anyone. Members of the PSC do as they are directed by the ... utilities and they take the heat with the promise that they will get reappointed to the high-paying position, she wrote. SCOTT Continued From 1A Former city utilities chief dies at 55 FILEMayor Stephen Witt (left) and utilities director Dave Clanton display a proclamation recognizing Florida Water Professionals Week during a city council meeting last year. Clanton, who suffered from a heart condition, passed away on Wednesday. Clanton served as interim city manager in From staff reportsIf you need to make party changes or register to vote for the Aug. 26 primary election, you must do so before Monday, July 28. All address changes can be made prior to election day. Signature updates must be made prior to the start of canvassing of absentee ballots. Stop by the office of Liz P. Horne, Supervisor of Elections, 971 W Duval St. Suite 102. Update voter info Monday Court OKs Docs vs. Glocks lawBy BRANDON LARRABEEThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEEA federal appeals court has upheld the states controversial docs vs. glocks bill, overturning an earlier court ruling that had blocked part of the law from being enforced. In a 2-1 ruling, a threejudge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the state Legislature had the right to pass the law, which includes provisions restricting doctors and other medical providers from asking questions about gun ownership during medical visits. In order to protect patients, physicians have for millennia been subject to codes of conduct that define the practice of good medicine and affirm the responsibility physicians bear, Judge Gerald Tjoflat wrote. In keeping with these traditional codes of conduct --which almost universally mandate respect for patient privacy --the Act simply acknowledges that the practice of good medicine does not require interrogation about irrelevant, private matters. The majority found that the National Rifle Associationbacked law, known as the Firearm Owners Privacy Act, has only an incidental effect on physicians speech. The appeals court rejected a decision by a U.S. District Judge, who ruled last year that legislators couldnt prove that gun rights would be jeopardized or that patients who own firearms might face discrimination.

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To the Editor:I have had the privilege of observing Celena Crews’ efforts for several years. Her achievements with her students at Columbia High School are outstanding. As a recipi-ent of a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering and as a teacher of high school chemistry I can appreciate the challenge it can be to teach math and science to high school students. But Celena Crews goes above and beyond the normal for a teacher. Her students gain valuable experience by being involved in a hands-on robotics team to compete against other high school teams around the country. Every year her teams do well and seem to get better each year. What impresses me the most is the demeanor of her students. Every time I meet them as a group or individually they are courteous and well mannered. They speak politely to me and their use of English is excellent. Her students have what it takes to succeed as engineers and scientists in the work world. They have the ability to understand complicated mathematics, they have the skills to design and assemble a workable robot, and they have the command of English in order to communicate with the public, in a professional manner, exactly what they are doing. Well done Celena Crews! I can just imagine the competition at Columbia High School in the 2014-15 school year for the students to win a spot on your up and coming robotics team. Kenny Merriken Lake City OPINION Sunday, July 27, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Emily Lawson, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com J ake Rush, the Alachua County attor-ney and fantasy role-playing enthusiast who covets U.S. Rep Ted Yoho’s seat in Congress, really isn’t going about it the right way.Earlier this month Rush launched an attack ad, not at Yoho himself, but on his son, cit-ing the young man’s having landed a “cushy” internship on Capitol Hill despite his “lengthy arrest record.” It was a major blunder, whether Rush knows it or not. Voters in this district don’t take kindly to attacks on candidates’ kin. Personal matters are just that.Rep. Yoho then gave his son space on his campaign webpage to respond. Tyler Yoho said his internship was by no means “cushy” and that he got the job all by himself. He also addressed his misdemeanor arrests for disorderly conduct, drunken intoxi-cation and more, calling them “poor choices.” And with that, the show was on.One of the great failings of Congress these days is the inability to get things done. Rush’s attempt to divert attention from the critical issues at hand to Tyler Yoho’s youth-ful indiscretions shows he would fit right in on Capitol Hill. Not your finest hour, counselor.As for Rep. Yoho, please rest assured that no one cares what idiocy your son may have engaged in as a college student. There is no need to give him room on your website to respond to further attacks, should they come. America is at a critical juncture just now.There’s more at stake here than the drunken antics of anybody’s son, brother, cousin or aunt. Let’s stick to the issues, and see where that takes us. A circus in congressional District 3 Q Associated Press LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Gwen Lake Park: It’s an ecosystem, folks! TODAY IN HISTORY In 1890, artist Vincent van Gogh, 37, died of a selfinflicted gunshot wound in Auvers-sur-Oise, France. In 1914, transcontinental telephone service began with the first test phone conversation between New York and San Francisco. In 1957, Jack Paar made his debut as host of NBC’s “Tonight Show.” In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act, which created NASA. 1981, Britain’s Prince Charles married Lady Diana Spencer in a resplendent ceremony at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. (The couple divorced in 1996.) ‘The activist is not the man who says the river is dirty. The activist is the man who cleans up the river.’ — H. Ross Perot L et me explain the problems of Gwen Lake and their causes. On virtually every side of Gwen Lake there is a hill. I live on one such hill. Living on a hill on the lake gives me an excellent viewpoint to see just what a few of the problems are.The sandbarA sandbar is typically formed by sand and/or silt. Most sandbars are formed by waves. There aren’t any waves to speak of in Gwen Lake. There are, however, many hills around the lake and one large hill in particular is the patently obvi-ous source of the sand and silt. If you were to stand on that sandbar (pictured on page 3A of the Sunday, July 6 edition), then you could see the hill to which I am referring. In this instance, the sandbar in Gwen Lake has been caused by watershed erosion. Lack of planningTropical Storm Debby did not cause a sandbar in Gwen Lake. That was two years ago. Lack of planning caused the sandbar. If you happen to drive past the side of lake where the sandbar is located then you will notice that the street is also cov-ered with sand. Willow Drive is two blocks long and was just repaved three months ago, a job that took at least three weeks. Brilliant sand now covers the newly paved portion of the street. It looks like dirt road. A newly paved road covered with watershed erosion. Did I mention Lake City was given some of the land in question? Now Public Works wants $90,000-100,000 to remove the sand? The sand that came from the top of the hill? From the land they may or may not have gotten for free? Will the removed sand be placed back on top of the hill again? And all for the low price of $90,000-100,000? The litterThere’s no real litter problem to speak of at least in and around Gwen Lake. From the house on the hill, I can see maybe three styro-foam cups and a soccer ball sitting on the algae on the lake. Styrofoam cups do not break down easily, but they do release chemicals when they get wet. Not so good, but not the cause of any real problem when it comes to Gwen Lake. It is not the Great Pacific garbage patch if you know what I mean (don’t know? Google it!) which, by the way, is a very real environmental problem. Millions of tons of garbage are dumped into the oceans annually — there is your story on litter. Three styrofoam cups and a soccer ball sitting on top of green algae, not so much. Nothing two Cub Scouts, a canoe, and a fishing net couldn’t handle in all of about 20 minutes. The algaeThe cause? It’s scientific. I’m no marine biologist, but I’m sure there is a qualified teacher in Columbia County that could describe the process and how best to reverse the overabundance of algae. We can’t really control nitrogen levels because algae use the nitrogen gas from the air, but we could maybe lower the phosphorus levels in the lake. Or just remove the algae from the lake? Or add some algae-eating fish/herbivores. It’s an ecosystem, folks! It’s also a park. It’s in Lake City. Are we not proud of our lakes? It’s in the name, folks! ‘Multiple agencies’Everyone reading this newspaper has seen the “multiple agencies” movie before. You know the one where the people in a neighbor-hood try and get multiple agencies involved in a matter of importance and no one is exactly clear who is responsible and nothing gets done until a hippie brings a guitar to a town hall meeting and sings a tune. I don’t write or sing songs, but I can tell you this: absent joint accountability, municipal efforts almost always fail. Knowledge, collaboration, and incentive win. Organization also wins. City Hall can’t do this? Public works can’t do this? We can. If you are going to live in a city called “Lake City,” then be proud of your lakes. As Perot states, the real activ-ist gets out there and cleans up the mess…. So how about it? Friday the 1st at 10 a.m. across from the sand-bar at Gwen Lake Park. P.S.We will need someone with a canoe or a jon boat and a depend-able fishing net. In praise of Celena Crews Marshall Morper Q Marshall Morper lives in Lake City. ‘It’s in Lake City. Are we not proud of our lakes? It’s in the name, folks!’ 4AOPINION

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 5A David Edward Clanton Mr. David Edward Clanton, 55, of Lake City, passed away on Wednesday July 23, 2014 at the North Florida Regional Medi cal Center in Gainesville after a sudden illness. He was born in Melbourne, Florida on January 20, 1959 to the late William and Delma Jo Clanton; and has lived in Lake City the past 32 years. He worked for the City of Lake City for the past 27 years served as interim City Manager; retir ing as the Executive Director of Utilities. He was very involved with the FWPCOA (Florida Wa ter, Pollution and Control Opera tors Association) currently serv ing as the Secretary-Treasurer; +HORYHGEHLQJDVWDWHRIFHU+HORYHGWRVKDQGDOVRORYHGto spend time with his children and grandchildren. He was a very loving Husband, Father and Grandfather. He is survived by his loving wife of 25 years: Peggy Clan ton of Lake City; sons: MSgt *UDQJH&RIQ1LNNLFXUUHQWO\stationed in Kabul, Afghani VWDQ0DWWKHZ&RIQRI/DNHCity and Tyler Clanton of Lake City; daughter: Jennifer Sandell (Keith) of Tallahassee; brother: Terry Clanton (Meri) of Hen dersonville, N.C. and his be loved English Bulldog: “Buck”. Eight grandchildren and numer ous nieces, nephews and other extended family members and friends also survive. Funeral services for Mr. Clan ton will be conducted on Mon day July 28, 2014 at 1 P.M. in the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home. Interment will follow in Forest Lawn Me morial Gardens. Arrangements are under the direction and care of the DEES-PARRISH FAMI LY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, 32025. Please sign the online guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com John Lovick Ley Mr. John Lovick Ley, 88, of Lake City passed away peace fully on Thursday, July 24, at his residence surrounded by his loving and devoted family fol lowing an extended illness. He was born in Key West to the beloved John and Camilla Ley, and preceded in death by his loving sis ter, Cookie. John served in the United States Army/Air Corp as a tail gunner. John and Barbara moved to Lake City in 1995 after John retired from the print ing business. John was a lov ing and devoted husband, and an awesome father, grandfather, and great grandfa ther. John will be waiting in Heav en for his beloved wife of 67 years Barbara, son John (Nikki) daughters Crystal (Carrol) and Emily (Ray), grandchildren; Dean (Deborah), Deanna (Mark), and Andrea (Shawn), four great grandchildren; Elaine, Austin, Mason (Cassidy), and J.D., one great-great grandson, Colton and his devoted dog, Russell. Funeral services for Mr. Ley will be conducted at 11:00 AM on Monday, July 28, 2014 at Parkview Baptist Church with 3DVWRU0LNH7DWHPRIFLDWLQJVisitation will be one hour prior at the church. Internment with military services will be at For est Lawn Memorial Gardens. Ar rangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 US Hwy 441, Lake City, Fl 32025. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. Roy Pascal Douberley, Jr. Mr. Roy Pascal Douberley, Jr., 88, of Lake City, passed away peacefully on Saturday July 26, 2014 at his residence following an extended illness. He was born in Orlando, FL on December 20, 1925 to the late Roy Pascal Dou berley, Sr. and Lena Leila Nettles Douberley. He was a Butcher by trade; working for many years in the Orlando area and owning his own Grocery Store before moving to Lake City in 1972. He worked for Scaff’s Market for many years as a butcher and UHWLUHGLQ+HORYHGWRVKand bird hunt; he also loved to garden and raise cows, which he continued to do after retire ment. He also was an avid Flori da Gator Fan. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; he was also a Navy veteran. He is preceded in death by his son: James Walter Douberley and sister: Doreatha Malloy. He is survived by his loving wife of 63 years: Martha Bradford Douberley of Lake City; son: Dwight Roy Dou berley (Yvonne) of Lake City and daughter: Cynthia “Cindy” Murrill (Jesse) of Lake City. Six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren also sur vive along with many extended family and friends. Funeral services for Mr. Dou berley will be conducted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 11 A.M. in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Price Creek Ward (Old Country Club Road) with Bishop Jeff Thomas presiding. Interment will follow in Ebenezer Cem etery. The family will receive friends from 10-11 A.M. (one hour prior to the services) at the church. Arrangements are under the direction and care of the DEES-PARRISH FAMI LY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, 32025. Please sign the online guest book at www.parrishfamilyfu neralhome.com Volunteer Mentors Needed )RUORFDOQRQSURW\RXWKSURJUDP0XVWKDYHKHDUWSDVVLRQIRUDWULVN \RXWK3D\VVWLSHQGRIPHQWRU HYHQWPLQKRXU %DFNJURXQGVFUHHQUHTXLUHG Contact: (386) 292-3547 DZDUG#WZLQRDNVRUJ WILSON’S OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net YETI 20 & 30 oz. Rambler Cups“Keeps your drink as cold as science allows.”New New Design of Tervis Tumblers have arrived! Sandals Selection on Sale OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified depart ment at 752-1293.Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by email at elawson@lakecityreporter.com.COMMUNITY CALENDAR CPAAA FundraiserThe Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association is hosting a garage sale fundraiser Sept. 5-6 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Flea Market. Proceeds from the fundraiser will help purchase safety equipment for Lake City Police Department’s K-9 unit and officers. Please drop off items for dona tion (excluding clothing) at the vacant parking lot across from LCPD, 225 NW Main Blvd, Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.Poker RunAmerican Legion Riders Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd., will have a poker run Saturday, August 2. Registration will be from 8-9:30 a.m. Cost is $15 for the first hand and $10 each additional hand, or buy six hands for $50 and get a meal at the end of the ride. The ride will con sist of four stops, ending at the Legion. There will be drawings, raffles, food and full bar and entertain ment. Call 386-697-0288 for more information.Smokey’s BirthdayForest Rangers of the Suwannee Forestry Center will host a 70th birthday party for Smokey Bear at the Lake City Mall on Aug. 9 from 12-2 p.m. The Columbia County Forestry Queens will also be pres ent. COMING July 27Karaoke with MarkVFW Post 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, will have Karaoke with mark on Sunday, July 27. Wings, shrimp and burg ers will be served from 1:30-3 p.m. Karaoke will start at 2 p.m. The event is open to the public. Call 386-752-5001 for more information.HomecomingDaySpring Missionary Baptist Church will cel ebrate homecoming on July 27 at 11 a.m. Revered Stacey Lewis from Beaumont, Texas will present the message. Gospel Harmonieers will offer special music. Dinner will be served fol lowing the service. The church is located at 849 NE Congress Ave.July 30‘Young Da Vinci’The Art League of North Florida, The Friends of the Library, and the Columbia County Library are offering free art class es entitled “The Young Da Vinci Program” at the West Branch of the Public Library. Registration is July 30 from 10 – 11:30 a.m. The classes will be held Thursday, July 31, Friday, August 1, and Saturday, August 2 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m each day. The pro gram is for children ages 10 through 14. The classes are taught by profession al artists. Thursday’s class will be taught by Jane Kopp and will be “The Basic Techniques of Acrylics”; Friday’s class will be taught by Helen Beaty and will be “The Art of Vincent Van Gough”; Saturday’s class will be taught by Carol Ghionzoli and will be “Got your Goat: Painting in Watercolor.” The class space is limited and is offered on a first-come basis. For additional infor mation call the Gateway Art Gallery at 752-5229.Aug. 1Operation ChristmasOperation Christmas Child and Chick-fil-A will host a community fundrais er event at Chick-fil-A Friday, Saturday, and Monday Aug. 1,2, and 4 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Donate school sup plies valued at least $2 and receive a coupon for an original chicken sandwich. Half of the collected school supplies will go to Columbia County Schools and half will go to Operation Christmas Child for shoeboxes.Wine and CheeseThe Gateway Art Gallery invites the com munity to a wine and cheese and “Art Affair” on Friday, Aug. 1 from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Gallery. There will be a special presen tation of “Art in North Florida.” The showing is made up of several artists that capture the beauty of North Florida in his or her unique style and medium.Friday JazzThe first First Friday Jazz event will be Aug. 1 from 6-10 p.m. at Track Sports and Entertainment Club, 164 NE Railroad St. Ben Grier, Andreal Gambles and Lynn Branscome will be performing. A $10 cover charge will be taken at the door. Food and drinks will be available. Call Pam Cooley at 407-690-0776 for more.Aug. 2Poker RunAmerican Legion Riders Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd., will have a poker run Saturday, August 2. Registration will be from 8-9:30 a.m. Cost is $15 for the first hand and $10 each additional hand, or buy six hands for $50 and get a meal at the end of the ride. The ride will consist of four stops, ending at the Legion. There will be drawings, raffles, food and full bar and entertainment. Call 386-697-0288 for more information.Cooking CompetitionNew Mt. Pisgah AME Church, 345 NE Washington St., will host a cooking competition Saturday, Aug. 2 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Set-up begins at 7 a.m.; judg ing will begin at noon. Categories and regis tration costs are: Pound Cake — $25; Sweet Potato Pie — $15; Barbecue — $75 (Includes one meat entry: ribs, chicken, or brisket. Each addition al entry is $25.) Bounce houses and a sampling of the area’s best food will be available throughout the day. A food auction will take place after the com petition. Call Roosevelt Lake at 386-466-8697 or Kwan Morgan at 704-654-0058 for more.Aug. 6Lake City NewcomersLake City Newcomers and Friends will meet at Gator’s Dockside (in the Publix Shopping Center) on Wednesday, Aug. 6 for a Friendship Lunch. Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. For more info contact Rose Taylor, 755-2175.Aug. 9CHS ‘84 ReunionThe CHS Class of 1984 will hold its 30th High School Reunion on Saturday, Aug. 9 from 6-11 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall. Cost is $40 per person. Start the weekend early with a meet & greet at Gator’s Dockside, Friday, Aug. 8 at 7 p.m. Make payments to www.payitsquare.com/collect-page/28609 or visit the Facebook page CHS Class of 1984 30th Reunion. You may also call Kelli K. Ronsonet at 386-397-9482. Candidate ForumIt’s About My Efforts, Inc. will host another can didates forum on 107.9 Aug. 9 beginning at 10:30 a.m. There will be a meet and greet with the candi dates in the radio station reception area following the forum at 12:30. The station is located at 463 N. Marion Street.Smokey’s BirthdayForest Rangers of the Suwannee Forestry Center will host a 70th birthday party for Smokey Bear at the Lake City Mall on Aug. 9 from 12-2 p.m. The Columbia County Forestry Queens will also be pres ent.Mystery at the LibraryThe Columbia County Public Library is hosting an after-hours Library Mystery on Saturday, August 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Main Library. Participants will work in teams, follow ing a string of clues, to solve the mystery of who committed the crime. The event is for adults only, and registration is limited. Pre-registration is required. Please call Katrina at 758-1018 to reserve your spot. If you would like to create your own team, gather up to 5 people and register as a team. Individuals or groups of less than 5 who register will be put with others to make a team. This program is spon sored by the Friends of the Library and is free and open to the public. Aug. 12Medicare SeminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free educa tional Medicare Seminar on Tuesday, Aug. 12 from 5-6 p.m. Irv Crowetz will moderate the seminar. Subjects covered will be: What you need to know; when to enroll; what is covered; and is a supple ment needed. RSVP to 386-755-3476 x 107. SVTA MeetingSuwannee Valley Transit Authority will meet Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 6 p.m. at its head quarters, 1907 SW Volyes St., Live Oak. The public is invited to attend.Aug. 13Lake City Newcomers Lake City Newcomers will have their regu lar luncheon meeting Wednesday, Aug. 13 at 11 a.m. at Eastside Village on Baya Ave. The program will be the annual bingo game. For additional info please call Joan Wilson 755-9897. Aug. 14Retirement SeminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center will host a Retirement Seminar reviewing when to retire, social security, pension/IRA income, Medicare, and other insurance needs. Moderators will be Sidney Thompson and Irv Crowetz. The seminar will be held Aug. 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Seating is limited to RSVP to 755-3476.Early LearningThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. will have an executive/finance com mittee meeting Thursday, Aug. 14 at 1:30 p.m. at 1104 SW Main Blvd. Call Stacey DePratter at 386-752-9770 for more.Aug. 15CHS ‘74 ReunionThe CHS Class of 1974 will hold its 40th Class Reunion on August 15 and 16. Friday, August 15 will consist of an informal get-together at Gator Dockside at 7 p.m. Saturday, August 16 will be the reunion at Quail Heights Country Club. Social hour will begin at 7 p.m.; a DJ will perform from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. The cash bar will be available all night along with hor d’oeuvres. Cost is $25 per person or $50 per couple. Send your registration and check payable to CHS 1974 Class Reunion, 223 SE Lillian Loop Apt. 102 (Lake City) no later than August 1. Contact Tonia Edenfield at 386-961-6328 with questions. Aug. 16CHS Class of ‘72The CHS Class of 1972 will have a 60th birthday party on Saturday, Aug. 16 from 5:30-11 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. Cost is $15 per person if paid by Aug. 5 then will increase to $20. Price includes bar becue dinner. Checks payable to Class of 1972, 81 SE Anastasia Street, Lake City. Call Charles Tannachion at 386-752-3621 or Kent Harriss at 386-365-7086 with ques tions. Information and a registration form can be found on the CHS Class of 1972 Facebook page.Aug. 20Early LearningThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. will have a board meeting Wednesday, Aug. 20 at 9 a.m. at 1104 SW Main Blvd. Call Stacey DePratter at 386-752-9770 for more.Aug. 27Q&ARep. Ted Yoho (R-Gainesville) announces mobile office hours at Lake City City Hall, 205 N Marion Ave., hosted by his local con stituent advocates on August 26 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.VOLUNTEERShands LakeShoreThe Auxiliary at Shands Lake Shore Hospital is looking for drivers for the golf cart. If you are 18 or older and would like a vol unteer opportunity, consid er driving the golf cart for 4 hours per week. Stop by the gift shop to pick up an application or call 386-292-8000 x 21216 to receive an application by mail.Lake City MedicalLake City Medical Center is looking for volun teers. Please call 386-758-3385 for more information or visit the hospital’s web site at Lakecitymedical.com or you can stop by the front desk and pick up a paper application.

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that couldn’t be found elsewhere, something that attracted hun dreds, including travelers and townsfolk alike: caverns that sup posedly held petrified remains of prehistoric humans. For 25 cents, people could stop at the site, now near a Dollar General store across from Columbia High School, and go down into the cave to see what was said to be the remains of a man and two women. A Lake City Reporter article from July 1, 1927 describes the petrified man, whose head and shoulders were visible, as having “a pronounced forehead, large eyes, a small stub by, thickish nose and ... a thick-lipped mouth framed by heavy bulldog like jaws.” The female bodies were much more refined, the article says. James Gray, a Lake City native who published a book in 2008 on the story of the remains called “The Lake City Tombs,” describes the women’s bodies as showing “a marked contrast to the brutish appearance of the man.” But still to the average person, none of the bodies looked much like mummified human remains. Even Gray admitted, “To someone not accustomed to looking at or studying fossils, they appeared largely as decaying rock.” When visitors ventured into the cave, they also saw a shelf displaying a gold breast plate, ancient jewelery and stone slabs with hieroglyphic writings carved into them, which were purported ly found during an excavation of the land in the late 1920s. Was it a hoax?Even back then, many believed it was. But locals, whether they studied the history of the tombs or lived it, still enjoy telling the tale.The beginningsThe man behind the discovery was Marquis Edmund G.F.R. Du Mazuel, who served in the Naval Reserve during World War I. On June 15, 1927, his company, Kas-So Kitch-E-Mon-E-Toosa-Ne-Ah Limited, known as K.V.S., was boring a 16-inch well to drill for oil and while searching for a lost a bit discovered the bodies 63 feet below the surface, according to a July 1, 1927 Lake City Reporter article. Hundreds of people from the area rushed to the site, the article says. Gray wrote in his book that DuMazuel’s findings became the site of a pilgrimage. Now the land is nothing more than a grassy area near a Dollar General, and most people drive by it with no idea what once was there. Most weren’t even alive then. But some Lake City residents remember when the tombs were the talk of the town. Marie Kennon, who was born in 1928, lived across the street from the site until 1938. She said she doesn’t remember seeing the bodies or hieroglyph ics but remembers going down into DuMazuel’s caverns as a child. Kennon described them as “long hallways.” She and other young children would run around playing in them, she said. “I was so young,” Kennon said. “I don’t remember too much.” James Montgomery, a retired Columbia High School history teacher, remembers the contro versy surrounding the tombs. Were there really petrified bodies and hieroglyphic writings or was it just made up to be a tourist attraction? “You had two sides of it,” Montgomery said. Those who believed and those who didn’t. And everyone had an opinion, he said. Personally, he has never had an opinion on the authenticity of the tombs, he said. But according to a Lake City Reporter article from April 20, 1928, then-editor Herbert L. Dodd saw the petrified bodies and was sold. The article tells his tale of going down into the caverns and how he saw the remains clearly enough that he believed they real ly were petrified bodies. He wrote in the article, “... I am fully convinced that there is no fake as regards the genuineness of the petrified bodies. I examined them thoroughly with an electric light which I held. “The faces of the petrified remains, and that part of the bodies visible, were full of small indentations, something like the depressions in the face of a per son who has had the smallpox, and were not smooth like a statue sculptured from stone,” he wrote. People still have strong opin ions on whether Du Mazuel really found prehistoric human remains. Gray, author of “The Lake City Tombs,” wholeheartedly believes the caverns and everything Du Mazuel claimed to find in them were the real thing. He states it in his book as a fact: the petrified remains are genuine. Also in his book is a report from four geologists who visit ed the site and assessed what they saw. Two believed that what DuMazuel found was “undoubted ly only the filling of a lime rock wormhole that had solidified,” Gray wrote. The other geologists, Br. A Bauer and Eugene Volvick, believed what was found was in fact petrified remains. There’s no record of any assess ment of the supposed hieroglyph ics. Volvick wrote in the Lake City Reporter on July 1, 1927 that although random, and perhaps “a freak of nature,” there really were petrified bodies. He explained that the fossils show progression through different prehistoric eras. Bob Jordan, a local attorney who now owns the land where DuMazuel supposedly found the petrified remains, falls on the nonbeliever side of the debate. He said the tombs were proba bly a tourist attraction — one of many along U.S. Highway 41. “He was like a P.T. Barnum kind of guy,” Jordan said. “He always had an angle.” Back in the 1920s, science wasn’t nearly as advanced, so there were a lot of attractions like DuMazuel’s, he said. “People could say all kinds of things, and there was no way to prove it,” Jordan said. “Back then, they looked like bodies, so he said they were.” When DuMazuel discovered the tombs in 1927, hundreds of locals, along with folks passing through, were coming to see the petrified remains, but there were also many who thought the tombs were bogus, Gray wrote in his book. About a month after DuMazuel discovered the tombs, a few nonbelievers — “hooligans” as Gray calls them in his book — put dynamite in the caverns and blew them up, severely damaging the caverns and the purported mummies. As a result, DuMazuel closed the tombs. In December of that year, a Romanian foreign dignitary, Princess de Stourza, came to see the tombs while in the U.S., Gray reports. The tombs were closed at the time, but Gray allowed her to visit anyway. She was so impressed with the caverns, she donated $1,000 to DuMazuel. And with that money, DuMazuel reopened the Lake City tombs on March 16, 1928. However, DuMazuel wasn’t sure that’s what he wanted to do at first. He planned to seal the hole for good and only decided to reopen it after being persuaded that leaving the tombs open could advance science, Gray wrote. Despite his initial doubts about reopening the tombs, DuMazuel had grand plans for them. He wanted to build an under ground tunnel system that would start with the bodies and ancient artifacts and end with a “shrine of Christendom” -an underground chapel for prayer and worship, Gray wrote. But in 1931, tragedy struck his family. His younger son, Jean DuMazuel, accidentally shot his oldest son, Alexander, accord ing to a Sept. 25, 1931 Lake City Reporter article. The boys were playing in their house when Jean picked up a gun left in the home by the hired help. The article says he picked up the gun, aimed it at his brother and accidentally pulled the trigger. People at the time said Gray was never the same after that. He buried Alexander in an above-ground tomb on the property where the tombs were and had a priest bless the land. His ornate plans for the tombs never came to fruition, and around the start of World War II, DuMazuel left Lake City. No one knew why he left, and it’s unclear if the tombs closed when he left or if they were already closed. The Lake City Reporter does report they closed some time in the 1930s, DuMazuel’s efforts at piquing the interest of archaeologists at the University of Florida and elsewhere having failed. Once DuMazuel left Lake City, talk about the tombs seemed to cease. No more newspaper arti cles, and no mention of DuMazuel or the tombs.The tale rebornThe Diocese of St. Augustine bought the land from a tax deed sale, and it seems like that could’ve been the end of the Lake City Tombs tale. But Gray kept the story alive.Fascinated by the whole epi sode, in 1967 Gray assembled a team to excavate the land where the tombs supposedly were locat ed. They found the tunnels DuMazuel had constructed, but after digging about 45 feet, the crew literally hit a dead-end — a layer of solid clay that was so dense as to be impene trable. They hadn’t given up, but when they returned the next weekend, they found that the hole they had dug was filled with water. Gray and his team waited for the water to drain, but it never did. Without a lot of money, there was nothing they could do, and that’s where their excavation ended. But Gray, determined to tell the story of the petrified remains, pub lished “The Lake City Tombs” in 1982 and republished the book with additional information in 2008. In 2005, the land changed hands for the first time in more than 60 years. Jordan bought the land as an investment from the church and is working to sell it off as commercial lots. So far, he has only sold one acre to the Dollar General. Jordan said while the Lake City tombs aren’t talked about too much anymore, the topic does come up on occasion. “Every now and then, someone calls me asking about the tombs,” he said. And so the story lives on. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 < Call (850) 584-8887 LAKE PLEASANT AGRITIMBER LLC Young Pre-Commercial Planted Pines Age 7 and older Are you tired of waiting for your pine trees to grow up to be a saleable crop? Do you want to “monetize” your planted pine crop for cash NOW? Do you want to keep the pine straw income? Do you have at least 40 acres of pines? TOMBSContinued From 1A COURTESYTOP: Land owner Bob Jordan stands in a field behind the Dollar General store along U.S. Highway 41 where the tombs were located. ABOVE: James Gray during his 1967 expedition to reach the tombs.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comAnime, indie films, comic books and people dressed like characters from each genre were in Lake City Saturday for the inaugural #Infinity Con 14. The event was held at the former downtown arts center location and attracted more than 200 people within the first two hours of the event three to four times more than event organizers were expecting. Ray Hancock and Nathan Boeckman, event coordinators, said things went better than expected. We started out thinking well do this thing because we like comic books and nerdy things and maybe theres 50 or 60 other people in Lake City that would want to come hang out, Hancock said. The event featured more than 25 vendors selling comics, posters, DVDs, T-shirts, video games and a variety of other items. There were also panels discussions focusing on making independent films or giving tips on how to start role-playing game communities locally. This kind of shows that Lake City was really yearning for something like this, Boeckman said. They need events where the kids can come out and have a lot of fun thats a safe environment. Hancock said they also produce a nerd podcast and they wanted to have an event where everyone could attend and celebrate what they are all nerdy about and Infinity Con was born. Some people may be nerdy about football and some people may be nerdy about comic books we just wanted to get everyone together with common interests to hangout and have a good time, he said. Pleas Bethea came to the event dressed as Neo from the Matrix movies and Guess Bethea was dressed in an X-man Wolverine costume. Both are from Lake City. Pleas Bethea, who said he is accustomed to attending larger events, said the Lake City event was pretty good, considering its new. It was nice to have a local event because it was the first time Guess was actually able to come to one, he said. Its the first year they are doing it and obviously the first year is always the hardest. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 7A 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL(Next to Courthouse) should expect more fire calls from commercial establishments. We find the study to be a bit flawed, Nick Patel said. It hurts the industry that has the smallest footprint. If the proposed 71 percent fire assessment increase is implemented, Holiday Inn and Suites general manager Rod Butler said the hotel will pay $11,098 annually. Holiday Inn and Suites currently pays $6,490 for its fire assessment. In the last two years the fire department has been called to the hotel on four occasions and all four occasions were false alarms, Butler said. If the assessment were to go up to $11,098 were paying close to over $5,000 a call. Nick and PJ have five hotels they manage and operate and Nick Patel said he is currently paying $17,890 annually for fire assessment fees. If the rates go up, theyll pay $30,414 for fire assessment fees each year. Cason said fire rates are based on the size of the building as well as how much combustible material there is, along with fire department capabilities and historical fire call data. Its not just the call data that drives the costs, he said. Its also what you have to have to be prepared to fight the fire including your equipment, manpower and the like. Cason noted that several hotel/motels in the city are multi-story structures and a few years ago the city had to purchase a ladder truck for fires in just such settings. Nick Patel said theyve spoken about the proposed rate with city officials. We are talking with the decision makers city council members and hopefully they will take a practical approach here, he said. Nick Patel admitted that time is not on their side as they try to educate other local hotel/motel owners about the proposed assessment increase. The city council is expected to set the fire assessment rate during its Aug. 6 meeting. The council members have expressed concerns and I just hope that such a large increase will not take place, he said. However, Mayor Stephen Witt said there was little flexibility in deviating from the study. The rate studies are done supposedly by professionals that put in the right information and based on what their process shows is what is supposed to be fair to each group, Witt said. Its supposed to be something that we dont have any flexibility. We cant just say lets raise this one or that one or lets change the percentages. By law, I think we have to go with the rate study if its appropriate. If theres a flaw in it, then we need to look into that, figure it out and do the right thing. I have a lot of concerns for the hotel owners and their position and we just need to look and see if the rate study was done right and why it did make that kind of increase. Cason said he did not see how the proposed rate could be adjusted. He said the fire department budget is extremely lean. When you go through an analytical process like this, which is very complex, and quite large to ensure all the property owner categories pay their portion, it basically is what it is, Cason said. Its just a mathematical calculation. Fire assessment fees go to fund the Lake City Fire Departments $1.91 million budget. Revenues generated from the fire assessment will not fund the entire budget for the fire department because some properties are exempt. The citys general fund supplements the fire assessment revenue to pay the remainder. This is quality fire protection services for the City of Lake City at minimal costs, Cason said. The fire assessment study released last week was the first major analysis the city has had done for fire protection services in about five years. Cason said he does not recall there being such an increase in any one category during previous fire assessment rate studies. That is a large percentage increase, but its a small portion of the overall cost of the fire protection services, he said. RATE HIKEContinued From 1A Inaugural Infinity Con draws 200-plusWhen Lake City Community College became Florida Gateway College back in 2010, it wasnt just a name change. Though it was done in part to recognize the colleges five-county service district we do also serve students outside of Columbia County, you know it also gave the college the ability to expand its future program offerings and better prepare our community for the future. This expansion allowed colleges like FGC the ability to begin adding four-year programs that, before, you could only find at the university level. Of course, there were a number of criteria attached to what programs could be added, but what a lot of it boiled down to was this what four-year programs could best benefit the college community? Health care programs are a major focus for community colleges. Theres a reason for that according to Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., no sector since 2001 has been as consistent in employment growth year after year, and no sector has as many occupations with a two-year training focus. Thats definitely good news if youre thinking about a health care profession. The Nursing & Health Sciences field is a strong one at Florida Gateway College. We offer various programs, from Registered Nursing to Patient Care Technician to Phlebotomy. These courses can take anywhere from one semester to two years to complete, and this is in a continually growing occupational field. And many of our graduates can find jobs at our area hospitals, which include Lake City Medical Center and Shands Lake Shore Regional Hospital, who hire many of our graduates. So, I feel its pretty obvious why we chose the first baccalaureate in the colleges history to have a health care focus. We introduced the Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 2012 as a way for nurses to take their skill sets further. The program is designed for a student who has an associate degree in nursing and currently holds a Registered Nursing license. Its goal is to provide these students with enhanced education that focuses on community and population-focused care, leadership, management, and research learning experiences. Graduates from this program also are qualified for supervisory positions such as nurse managers and patient unit coordinators. And Im sure the increase in the paycheck doesnt hurt, either. Since introducing the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program we have already seen great success. We have eight graduates in our inaugural graduation class and that was only one year after we launched the program! Well celebrate another 10 graduates next month. The program is growing. And that has been helped by changes in our admissions policy. During our first year, we required that applicants have at least one years field experience before they could be accepted into the program. Weve done away with that if you graduate in May with your associate degree in Nursing and have your Registered Nursing license, you can start in the BSN program that fall. The program is also seeking accreditation, which should be approved in the coming year. This accreditation was something that couldnt be applied for until it had existed for two years. Nurses are vital to the continually growing health care field, and Florida Gateway College will continue to train the best and brightest. For more information about the program, or for any questions, you can contact Jan Medford at (386) 754-4352 or at janice.medford@fgc.edu. And if youre interested in setting up a guided tour of the Florida Gateway College campus, please call (386) 754-4246. TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterJustin Baker (from left), Jennifer Crosby and Robert Boswell, dressed like characters from cartoons, video games and movies, chat during Saturdays #Infinity Con 14 event. More than 200 people, many of them in character, attended the inaugural event. Organizers had expected much smaller crowd. A look at the four-year programs at FGC Troy RobertsPublic Information Coordinator Florida Gateway College Troy Roberts is the public information coordinator at Florida Gateway College. He can be reached at troy. roberts@fgc.edu.

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7a 1p 7p 1a 6 a N A TIONAL FORECAST MAP 3 p.m. toda y N A TIONAL FORECAST : LAKE CITY ALMANA C KEY T O CONDITIONS: c=cloud y dr=drizzle, f=fair fg=fog h=hazy i=ice, pc=par tly cloud y r=rain, s=sunn y sh=sho w ers, sn=sno w ts=thunderstor ms, w=wind y SUNSunrise today Sunset today Sunrise tom. Sunset tom. MOONMoonrise today Moonset today Moonrise tom. Moonset tom. UV INDEX T odays ultra-violet radiation risk for the a r ea on a scale f r om 0 FYI An exclusive service brought to our readers by The W eather Channel. SPONSORED B Y City YESTERDAYS N A TIONAL EXTREMES High: Low: INTERNA TIONAL THE WEA THER WEA THER HIST O R Y CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W Pensacola T allahassee Panama City V aldosta Daytona Beach Cape Canaveral Gainesville Lake City Ocala Orlando Jacksonville T ampa W est Palm Beach Ft. Myers Ft. Lauderdale Naples Miami Key W est TEMPERA TURESNor mal high Nor mal low Recor d high Recor d low PRECIPIT A TIONMonth total Y ear total Nor mal month-to-date Nor mal year-to-date to 10+. H H H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L L L L 27 28 29 30 31REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, July 27 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 95/76 95/77 95/74 95/76 92/76 88/79 94/74 94/76 94/74 97/77 92/76 94/74 88/77 90/79 92/76 88/81 90/77 90/81Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 94/77/pc 91/75/ts Daytona Beach 94/77/pc 92/75/ts Fort Myers 93/76/pc 93/76/ts Ft. Lauderdale 93/79/ts 92/78/ts Gainesville 94/75/pc 91/72/ts Jacksonville 95/76/ts 92/73/ts Key West 91/82/ts 91/81/ts Lake City 94/75/pc 91/72/ts Miami 90/78/pc 91/78/ts Naples 90/77/pc 91/77/ts Ocala 94/75/pc 91/73/ts Orlando 95/79/pc 93/79/ts Panama City 90/78/ts 88/75/pc Pensacola 89/79/ts 88/77/pc Tallahassee 96/75/ts 92/69/ts Tampa 93/79/pc 91/77/ts Valdosta 98/74/ts 92/68/pc W. Palm Beach 90/78/ts 92/78/ts High Saturday Low Saturday 91 100 in 1952 67 in 1988 90 72 73 Saturday 0.00" 13.10" 30.35" 28.27" 5.16" 6:46 a.m. 8:27 p.m. 6:46 a.m. 8:26 p.m. 7:24 a.m. 8:45 p.m. 8:16 a.m. 9:20 p.m.Aug 3 Aug 10 Aug 17 Aug 25 First Full Last New Quarter Quarter Hurricane Hunters fly through tropical cyclones to provide a better understanding of the systems to forecasters on the ground. On this date in 1943, U.S. Air Force Colonel Joseph Duckworth became the first person to fly through the eye of a hurricane. Showers and thunderstorms will be likely from the Great lakes, through the Northeast, Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic. Strong to severe storms will be possible over the Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic. 105, Needles, CA 28, Stanley, IDSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 80/61/.00 82/67/ts Albuquerque 91/72/.00 94/69/ts Anchorage 59/55/.00 68/50/pc Atlanta 88/70/.00 93/76/pc Baltimore 87/64/.02 88/71/ts Billings 75/54/.00 87/58/s Birmingham 91/66/.00 95/75/pc Bismarck 77/57/.00 75/53/pc Boise 75/58/.00 98/66/pc Boston 82/64/.00 81/71/ts Buffalo 77/61/.00 81/63/ts Charleston SC 91/73/.00 96/79/pc Charleston WV 82/63/.00 84/66/ts Charlotte 88/68/.00 96/75/pc Cheyenne 81/66/.00 79/54/pc Chicago 81/68/.00 84/62/ts Cincinnati 81/66/.00 85/64/ts Cleveland 81/62/.01 81/63/ts Columbia SC 91/72/.00 89/61/pc Dallas 98/80/.00 99/79/pc Daytona Beach 91/73/.00 94/77/ts Denver 70/66/.00 82/60/pc Des Moines 86/71/.00 80/62/pc Detroit 81/61/.00 82/63/ts El Paso 95/75/.00 100/77/pc Fairbanks 57/41/.00 67/47/pc Greensboro 88/69/.00 95/72/pc Hartford 79/63/.00 82/69/ts Honolulu 82/77/.00 87/77/pc Houston 93/77/.00 95/77/pc Indianapolis 82/66/.00 85/64/ts Jackson MS 93/72/.00 94/75/pc Jacksonville 89/73/.00 95/76/pc Kansas City 82/74/.00 86/61/s Las Vegas 100/87/.00 105/85/pc Little Rock 93/73/.00 97/73/pc Los Angeles 81/68/.00 86/68/pc Memphis 91/72/.00 95/73/pc Miami 88/75/.21 90/79/pc Minneapolis 81/72/.00 75/60/ts Mobile 89/73/.00 93/76/pc New Orleans 91/78/.00 91/77/ts New York 79/70/.00 84/71/ts Oakland 75/62/.00 78/60/fg Oklahoma City 99/73/.00 98/70/pc Omaha 87/72/.00 84/59/pc Orlando 93/75/.00 96/76/ts Philadelphia 78/69/.22 87/71/ts Phoenix 98/82/.00 107/87/pc Pittsburgh 82/63/.01 82/65/ts Portland ME 75/59/.00 76/64/ts Portland OR 71/57/.00 89/62/s Raleigh 87/69/.00 97/76/pc Rapid City 78/59/.00 81/55/s Reno 86/61/.00 95/66/pc Sacramento 90/66/.00 101/64/pc Salt Lake City 88/66/.00 97/72/ts San Antonio 82/76/.00 98/76/s San Diego 75/69/.00 73/68/pc San Francisco 73/60/.00 71/60/fg Seattle 72/57/.00 83/58/pc Spokane 79/55/.00 92/67/s St. Louis 99/73/.00 90/65/pc Tampa 88/79/.00 93/79/ts Tucson 95/73/.00 99/78/ts Washington 87/73/.00 88/72/ts Acapulco 89/77/.00 91/80/pc Amsterdam 75/62/.00 78/62/ts Athens 89/75/.00 91/75/s Auckland 57/42/.00 55/51/pc Beijing 96/69/.00 95/64/s Berlin 84/62/.00 84/68/pc Buenos Aires 51/41/.00 53/48/pc Cairo 91/75/.00 89/77/pc Geneva 71/60/.00 75/55/ts Havana 89/77/.00 91/69/pc Helsinki 87/59/.00 86/59/s Hong Kong 87/78/.00 89/80/ts Kingston 89/80/.00 93/82/pc La Paz 53/32/.00 53/26/pc Lima 62/59/.00 64/59/cd London 82/64/.00 82/62/s Madrid 95/68/.00 98/69/s Mexico City 73/53/.00 78/57/pc Montreal 77/60/.00 77/66/pc Moscow 78/62/.00 78/53/pc Nairobi 75/59/.00 73/57/ts Nassau 89/82/.00 89/78/s New Delhi 96/82/.00 95/82/pc Oslo 75/62/.00 86/57/pc Panama 91/78/.00 93/77/ts Paris 75/62/.00 77/60/r Rio 69/64/.00 75/64/r Rome 78/69/.00 86/64/pc San Juan PR 88/81/.00 89/78/pc Santiago 91/75/.00 93/75/pc Seoul 87/69/.00 78/64/r Singapore 89/82/ 91/80/ts St. Thomas VI 89/82/.00 90/79/pc Sydney 66/53/.00 64/48/r Tel Aviv 87/71/.00 87/73/pc Tokyo 91/78/.00 91/78/s Toronto 73/62/.00 75/64/pc Vienna 82/57/.00 84/60/pc Warsaw 82/66/.00 84/66/cd 74/64 Bangor 81/71 Boston 85/72 New York 88/72 Washington D.C. 96/75 Charlotte 93/76 Atlanta 98/70 City 99/78 Dallas 95/77 Houston 75/60 Minneapolis 84/62 Chicago 95/73 Memphis 85/65 Cincinnati 83/64 Detroit 96/78 Orlando 90/79 Miami 94/68 Oklahoma 72/50 Falls 94/68 International 90/65 Louis 94/68 St. 84/59 Omaha 82/60 Denver 94/69 Albuquerque 107/87 Phoenix 87/58 Billings 98/66 Boise 89/62 Portland 83/58 Seattle 91/77 Orleans 94/68 New 81/55 City 94/68 Rapid 97/72 City 94/68 Salt Lake 103/83 Vegas 94/68 Las 78/66 Angeles 94/68 Los 71/60 Francisco 94/68 San 68/52 Anchorage 67/47 Fairbanks 87/77 Honolulu 60 70 80 90 100 110 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 91 89 91 92 93 90 89 71 71 70 71 71 73 73Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Extreme13mins to burnSlight chance of storms Slight chance of storms Chance of storms Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms SUN95 74 MON94 74 TUE90 70 WED92 70 THU90 68 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LOForecasts, data and graphics WSI 7a 1p 7p 1a 6 a N A TIONAL FORECAST MAP 3 p.m. toda y N A TIONAL FORECAST : LAKE CITY ALMANA C KEY T O CONDITIONS: c=cloud y dr=drizzle, f=fair fg=fog h=hazy i=ice, pc=par tly cloud y r=rain, s=sunn y sh=sho w ers, sn=sno w ts=thunderstor ms, w=wind y SUNSunrise today Sunset today Sunrise tom. Sunset tom. MOONMoonrise today Moonset today Moonrise tom. Moonset tom. UV INDEX T odays ultra-violet radiation risk for the a r ea on a scale f r om 0 FYI An exclusive service brought to our readers by The W eather Channel. SPONSORED B Y City YESTERDAYS N A TIONAL EXTREMES High: Low: INTERNA TIONAL THE WEA THER WEA THER HIST O R Y CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W Pensacola T allahassee Panama City V aldosta Daytona Beach Cape Canaveral Gainesville Lake City Ocala Orlando Jacksonville T ampa W est Palm Beach Ft. Myers Ft. Lauderdale Naples Miami Key W est TEMPERA TURESNor mal high Nor mal low Recor d high Recor d low PRECIPIT A TIONMonth total Y ear total Nor mal month-to-date Nor mal year-to-date to 10+. H H H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L L L L 27 28 29 30 31REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, July 27 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 95/76 95/77 95/74 95/76 92/76 88/79 94/74 94/76 94/74 97/77 92/76 94/74 88/77 90/79 92/76 88/81 90/77 90/81Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 94/77/pc 91/75/ts Daytona Beach 94/77/pc 92/75/ts Fort Myers 93/76/pc 93/76/ts Ft. Lauderdale 93/79/ts 92/78/ts Gainesville 94/75/pc 91/72/ts Jacksonville 95/76/ts 92/73/ts Key West 91/82/ts 91/81/ts Lake City 94/75/pc 91/72/ts Miami 90/78/pc 91/78/ts Naples 90/77/pc 91/77/ts Ocala 94/75/pc 91/73/ts Orlando 95/79/pc 93/79/ts Panama City 90/78/ts 88/75/pc Pensacola 89/79/ts 88/77/pc Tallahassee 96/75/ts 92/69/ts Tampa 93/79/pc 91/77/ts Valdosta 98/74/ts 92/68/pc W. Palm Beach 90/78/ts 92/78/ts High Saturday Low Saturday 91 100 in 1952 67 in 1988 90 72 73 Saturday 0.00" 13.10" 30.35" 28.27" 5.16" 6:46 a.m. 8:27 p.m. 6:46 a.m. 8:26 p.m. 7:24 a.m. 8:45 p.m. 8:16 a.m. 9:20 p.m.Aug 3 Aug 10 Aug 17 Aug 25 First Full Last New Quarter Quarter Hurricane Hunters fly through tropical cyclones to provide a better understanding of the systems to forecasters on the ground. On this date in 1943, U.S. Air Force Colonel Joseph Duckworth became the first person to fly through the eye of a hurricane. Showers and thunderstorms will be likely from the Great lakes, through the Northeast, Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic. Strong to severe storms will be possible over the Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic. 105, Needles, CA 28, Stanley, IDSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 80/61/.00 82/67/ts Albuquerque 91/72/.00 94/69/ts Anchorage 59/55/.00 68/50/pc Atlanta 88/70/.00 93/76/pc Baltimore 87/64/.02 88/71/ts Billings 75/54/.00 87/58/s Birmingham 91/66/.00 95/75/pc Bismarck 77/57/.00 75/53/pc Boise 75/58/.00 98/66/pc Boston 82/64/.00 81/71/ts Buffalo 77/61/.00 81/63/ts Charleston SC 91/73/.00 96/79/pc Charleston WV 82/63/.00 84/66/ts Charlotte 88/68/.00 96/75/pc Cheyenne 81/66/.00 79/54/pc Chicago 81/68/.00 84/62/ts Cincinnati 81/66/.00 85/64/ts Cleveland 81/62/.01 81/63/ts Columbia SC 91/72/.00 89/61/pc Dallas 98/80/.00 99/79/pc Daytona Beach 91/73/.00 94/77/ts Denver 70/66/.00 82/60/pc Des Moines 86/71/.00 80/62/pc Detroit 81/61/.00 82/63/ts El Paso 95/75/.00 100/77/pc Fairbanks 57/41/.00 67/47/pc Greensboro 88/69/.00 95/72/pc Hartford 79/63/.00 82/69/ts Honolulu 82/77/.00 87/77/pc Houston 93/77/.00 95/77/pc Indianapolis 82/66/.00 85/64/ts Jackson MS 93/72/.00 94/75/pc Jacksonville 89/73/.00 95/76/pc Kansas City 82/74/.00 86/61/s Las Vegas 100/87/.00 105/85/pc Little Rock 93/73/.00 97/73/pc Los Angeles 81/68/.00 86/68/pc Memphis 91/72/.00 95/73/pc Miami 88/75/.21 90/79/pc Minneapolis 81/72/.00 75/60/ts Mobile 89/73/.00 93/76/pc New Orleans 91/78/.00 91/77/ts New York 79/70/.00 84/71/ts Oakland 75/62/.00 78/60/fg Oklahoma City 99/73/.00 98/70/pc Omaha 87/72/.00 84/59/pc Orlando 93/75/.00 96/76/ts Philadelphia 78/69/.22 87/71/ts Phoenix 98/82/.00 107/87/pc Pittsburgh 82/63/.01 82/65/ts Portland ME 75/59/.00 76/64/ts Portland OR 71/57/.00 89/62/s Raleigh 87/69/.00 97/76/pc Rapid City 78/59/.00 81/55/s Reno 86/61/.00 95/66/pc Sacramento 90/66/.00 101/64/pc Salt Lake City 88/66/.00 97/72/ts San Antonio 82/76/.00 98/76/s San Diego 75/69/.00 73/68/pc San Francisco 73/60/.00 71/60/fg Seattle 72/57/.00 83/58/pc Spokane 79/55/.00 92/67/s St. Louis 99/73/.00 90/65/pc Tampa 88/79/.00 93/79/ts Tucson 95/73/.00 99/78/ts Washington 87/73/.00 88/72/ts Acapulco 89/77/.00 91/80/pc Amsterdam 75/62/.00 78/62/ts Athens 89/75/.00 91/75/s Auckland 57/42/.00 55/51/pc Beijing 96/69/.00 95/64/s Berlin 84/62/.00 84/68/pc Buenos Aires 51/41/.00 53/48/pc Cairo 91/75/.00 89/77/pc Geneva 71/60/.00 75/55/ts Havana 89/77/.00 91/69/pc Helsinki 87/59/.00 86/59/s Hong Kong 87/78/.00 89/80/ts Kingston 89/80/.00 93/82/pc La Paz 53/32/.00 53/26/pc Lima 62/59/.00 64/59/cd London 82/64/.00 82/62/s Madrid 95/68/.00 98/69/s Mexico City 73/53/.00 78/57/pc Montreal 77/60/.00 77/66/pc Moscow 78/62/.00 78/53/pc Nairobi 75/59/.00 73/57/ts Nassau 89/82/.00 89/78/s New Delhi 96/82/.00 95/82/pc Oslo 75/62/.00 86/57/pc Panama 91/78/.00 93/77/ts Paris 75/62/.00 77/60/r Rio 69/64/.00 75/64/r Rome 78/69/.00 86/64/pc San Juan PR 88/81/.00 89/78/pc Santiago 91/75/.00 93/75/pc Seoul 87/69/.00 78/64/r Singapore 89/82/ 91/80/ts St. Thomas VI 89/82/.00 90/79/pc Sydney 66/53/.00 64/48/r Tel Aviv 87/71/.00 87/73/pc Tokyo 91/78/.00 91/78/s Toronto 73/62/.00 75/64/pc Vienna 82/57/.00 84/60/pc Warsaw 82/66/.00 84/66/cd 74/64 Bangor 81/71 Boston 85/72 New York 88/72 Washington D.C. 96/75 Charlotte 93/76 Atlanta 98/70 City 99/78 Dallas 95/77 Houston 75/60 Minneapolis 84/62 Chicago 95/73 Memphis 85/65 Cincinnati 83/64 Detroit 96/78 Orlando 90/79 Miami 94/68 Oklahoma 72/50 Falls 94/68 International 90/65 Louis 94/68 St. 84/59 Omaha 82/60 Denver 94/69 Albuquerque 107/87 Phoenix 87/58 Billings 98/66 Boise 89/62 Portland 83/58 Seattle 91/77 Orleans 94/68 New 81/55 City 94/68 Rapid 97/72 City 94/68 Salt Lake 103/83 Vegas 94/68 Las 78/66 Angeles 94/68 Los 71/60 Francisco 94/68 San 68/52 Anchorage 67/47 Fairbanks 87/77 Honolulu 60 70 80 90 100 110 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 91 89 91 92 93 90 89 71 71 70 71 71 73 73Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Extreme13mins to burnSlight chance of storms Slight chance of storms Chance of storms Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms SUN95 74 MON94 74 TUE90 70 WED92 70 THU90 68 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LOForecasts, data and graphics WSI 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 OUR RATES CALL FOR A rffnfftb www.campuscu.com Call 386-754-9088 and press 4 Visit your local service centerMembership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!3Lake City 1658 W. US Hwy. 90 Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. UF Health Shands Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Sunday, June 29, 2014 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Full Color File name: -29_CMPS_JoyrideAutoLoan_LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 6/26/14 Anne Powell, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1024 No money down!2 Lower your payments with terms up to 84 months!OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. OFFER SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 1. Credit approval required. Your APR may vary based on your credit worthiness, loan amount, term of loan and vehicle. For example a $35,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.0% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $617.68 and a nal payment of $601.38, nance charge of $1,920.95, for a total of payments of $37,044.50. The amount nanced is $35,123.55, the APR is 2.0%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. For qualied buyers. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Save money by renancing your loan with CAMPUS! LOW RATE AUTO LOANS AS LOW AS APR1for up to 60 months

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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comThe Coach Brian Allen Future Tiger Camp was Friday at Columbia High. Eighty-six athletes from pre-K to middle school grade levels signed up for the annual camp, spon-sored by the Columbia High Quarterback Club. All received a T-shirt and hot dog lunch. “It is actually a very good crowd,” CHS head coach Brian Allen said at the camp. “You know how important I feel the youth of the com-munity are. That is one of the main reasons for me coming back home.” Allen recruited varsity Tigers to help with the camp. There were stations for quarterbacks, running backs and receivers, line-men, defensive backs and linebackers. “It is major to get guys coming out on their day off,” Allen said. “Maybe (the campers) will take something away from here for Pop Warner and rec league ball.” Lake City Reporter SPORTS Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, July 27, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Color-coded by time-of-day Know just when to take your medicine Detachable and portable Take your medicine on the go Clean and convenient packaging Simpler and easier than pill boxes Filled by your pharmacist Eliminates worry of mixing up medications Bring this ad to your community pharmacy for a1-month free trial You’ve got better things to do than worry about medication.Take control with Dispill 2014 Dispill-USA. All rights reserved. DISPILL and the DISPILL LOGO are registered trademarks of Dispill-USA Inc. 2014 Cardinal Health. All rights reserved. CARDINAL HEALTH, the Cardinal Health LOGO, and ESSENTIAL TO CARE are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. (6/2014) Find a Dispill pharmacy near you: www.Dispill-USA.com/sample Youth football camp benefits players of all ages. CAMP continued on 2BFuture Tigers gather JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterWillie Jernigan, 13, works on his hand placement while hitting a pad under the watchful eye of Tiger players an d fellow athletes at the Brian Allen Future Tiger Camp at Columbia High on Friday. The camp drew 86 partic ipants from pre-K to middle school grade levels.

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From staff reportsThe Columbia Crushers made a valiant run in the championship bracket of the USSSA Fast-Pitch Girls 18 & Under B World Series in Orlando. It included playing four games in the losers brack-et on Friday and winning three of them. Columbia was finally eliminated by the Razorbacks (White), 2-0, late Friday. The Razorbacks lost to the Germantown Titans 18U ‘96 in the third round. The Titans made the win-ners bracket final and lost to Killin Time. In the losers bracket final rematch the Razorbacks got their revenge, then faced Killin Time having to win twice. The Razorbacks forced an “if necessary”game, but Killin Time won the World Series final, 7-4. After qualifying for the championship round with a 2-0-1 record in pool play, the Crushers won their first two games in the win-ners bracket — 10-2 over Brevard Breeze Elite and 8-3 over South Florida Contenders 18U. A 3-0 loss to the Carolina Rebels late Thursday dropped the Crushers into the losers bracket. Columbia then defeated Cumberland County Magic 18U Blue (10-0), South Florida Contenders 18U (12-2) and Delaware Fillies Fastpitch (3-2) before fall-ing to the Razorbacks. Columbia was the fourth team left standing in the 32-team championship bracket. The Crushers got to play at Champions Stadium, the Braves Spring Training field and the USSSA Pride home field.9U Southeast RegionalThe Columbia Timber Rattlers missed out on making the championship bracket with a 9-4 loss to Glen Allen late Thursday. West Raleigh and Glen Allen played in the cham-pionship final with West Raleigh winning 14-5. SCOREBOARD SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, The John Wayne Walding 400 2 p.m. NBCSN — Formula One, Hungarian Grand Prix (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Sonoma Nationals (same-day tape) CYCLING 9 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, final stage, Evry to Paris GOLF 6 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Russian Open, final round Noon ESPN2 — The Senior British Open Championship, final round 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Canadian Open, final round 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Canadian Open, final round TGC — LPGA, International Crown, final round HORSE RACING 5 p.m. NBC — Thoroughbreds, Haskell Invitational, at Oceanport, N.J. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. TBS — Toronto at N.Y. Yankees 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco SOCCER 4 p.m. FS1 — International Champions Cup, AC Milan vs. Manchester City, at Pittsburgh 6 p.m. FS1 — International Champions Cup, Liverpool vs. Olympiakos, at Chicago TENNIS 4 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Atlanta Open, championship 6 p.m. ESPN2 — World TeamTennis, finals, Washington at Springfield VOLLEYBALL 3:30 p.m. NBC — World Series of Beach Volleyball, women’s/men’s finals, at Long Beach, Calif. (same-day tape) ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Noon MLB — San Diego at Atlanta 7 p.m. ESPN — Toronto at Boston SOCCER 10 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, Los Angeles at SeattleBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB Baltimore 57 45 .559 —New York 54 48 .529 3 Toronto 54 50 .519 4Tampa Bay 50 53 .485 7 Boston 47 56 .456 10 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 57 43 .570 — Kansas City 52 50 .510 6 Cleveland 51 52 .495 7Chicago 50 54 .481 9Minnesota 46 56 .451 12 West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 63 39 .618 — Los Angeles 61 41 .598 2 Seattle 53 50 .515 10 Houston 42 61 .408 21 Texas 41 62 .398 22 Today’s Games Toronto (Happ 8-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Greene 2-1), 1:05 p.m. Boston (Peavy 1-9) at Tampa Bay (Archer 6-5), 1:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Carroll 4-6) at Minnesota (Pino 1-3), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 2-4) at Kansas City (B.Chen 2-2), 2:10 p.m. Miami (Ja.Turner 3-6) at Houston (Oberholtzer 2-7), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 12-5) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 2-7), 3:35 p.m. Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 5-5) at Seattle (Elias 8-8), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 11-3) at Texas (Mikolas 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Milwaukee (Lohse 11-4) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 6-8), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Dickey 8-10) at Boston (Buchholz 5-6), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 5-4) at Texas (Darvish 9-6), 8:05 p.m. Oakland (J.Chavez 8-6) at Houston (Peacock 3-7), 8:10 p.m.NL standings East Division W L Pct GB Washington 56 44 .560 —Atlanta 55 48 .534 2 Miami 49 53 .480 8 New York 49 54 .476 8 Philadelphia 45 58 .437 12 Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 58 46 .558 —Pittsburgh 54 48 .529 3 St. Louis 54 48 .529 3 Cincinnati 51 51 .500 6 Chicago 42 59 .416 14 West Division W L Pct GB San Francisco 57 46 .553 — Los Angeles 57 47 .548 San Diego 46 56 .451 10 Arizona 44 59 .427 13 Colorado 42 60 .412 14 Today’s Games Washington (Fister 9-2) at Cincinnati (Latos 2-2), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (Nuno 0-1) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 4-8), 1:35 p.m. Miami (Ja.Turner 3-6) at Houston (Oberholtzer 2-7), 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (deGrom 4-5) at Milwaukee (J.Nelson 1-1), 2:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 12-5) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 1-0), 2:20 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 8-7) at Colorado (F.Morales 5-5), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Stults 3-12) at Atlanta (Minor 3-6), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 11-5) at San Francisco (Y.Petit 3-3), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games San Diego (Kennedy 8-9) at Atlanta (E.Santana 9-6), 12:10 p.m. Arizona (C.Anderson 6-4) at Cincinnati (Bailey 8-5), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 11-4) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 6-8), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (A.Burnett 6-9) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 9-8), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 6-5) at Miami (Eovaldi 5-6), 7:10 p.m. Colorado (Flande 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (Wada 0-1), 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Worley 3-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-7), 10:15 p.m.AUTO RACINGRace week SPRINT CUP BRICKYARD 400 Site: Indianapolis.Schedule: Today, race, 1 p.m. (ESPN, noon-4:30 p.m.) Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway (oval, 2.5 miles). Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps. FORMULA ONE HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX Site: Budapest, Hungary.Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (CNBC, 7:30-10:30 a.m., NBC Sports, 2-4:30 p.m.). Track: Hungaroring (road course, 2.72 miles). Race distance: 190.53 miles, 70 laps. NHRA SONOMA NATIONALS Site: Sonoma, California.Schedule: Today, final eliminations (ESPN2, 9 p.m.-midnight). Track: Sonoma Raceway. Brickyard 400 lineup At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Saturday qualifying; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 188.47 mph. 2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 187.77.3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 186.893.4. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 186.765. 5. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 186.455.6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 186.193. 7. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 185.943. 8. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Ford, 185.924. 9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 185.828.10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 185.705. 11. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.468. 12. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 184.991.13. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 185.468. 14. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 185.391. 15. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 185.254. 16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 185.128.17. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 185.048. 18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 184.991.19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 184.9.20. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 184.869.21. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 184.74. 22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 184.426. 23. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 183.887. 24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 183.61. 25. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 184.449. 26. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 183.726. 27. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 183.692. 28. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 183.565. 29. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 183.539. 30. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 182.867. 31. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 182.656. 32. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 182.574.33. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 182.245. 34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 182.072.35. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 181.866. 36. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 181.815. 37. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, owner points. 38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, owner points. 39. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, owner points. 40. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, owner points. 41. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, owner points. 42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, owner points. 43. (37) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, past champion. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS CAMP: Tigers teach and also learn Continued From Page 1BIn the head coach’s way of thinking, the teacher becomes the student. “Our older guys are out there taking them through their drills,” Allen said. “It helps them understand what we are teaching them. You have to know it well to teach it. You see stuff you are saying daily in practice and they are relaying that to the kids. That is super important and beneficial.” Tiger running back Lonnie Underwood volun-teered and was working at one of the stations. “This is helping the program with those coming up and with us coming out and teaching them stuff,” Underwood said. “I was going to come as soon as Coach told us about it.” Underwood’s advice to the younger players: “Stay with it and keep trying.” Summer workouts for CHS ended on Thursday, and the Tigers were allowed to wind down. “We threw them a bone on Wednesday and Thursday,” Allen said. “They have had 20 hard days, 23-24 days for those who went to camp. We had a big barbecue on Thursday. We let them bring video games from home and put them on our big projectors.” Fall practice begins Aug. 4 and Allen’s advice is to stay active during the 10 days off. “Make sure you are doing some running or other activity, so you don’t lose what you have gained over the last three months,” Allen said. Allen said he will have to be at the school. “These guys want to be here, so I have to come and open the place up,” Allen said. “To be special, you have to put the work in and they want to be here. That’s why they are reap-ing the benefits.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterDarian Mayo, 11, catches a pass at the Brian Allen Future Tiger Camp.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterJaedyn Thomas, 13, moves through an agility course at the Brian Allen Future Tiger Camp on Friday.Crushers make strong run at 18U World Series

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There were 23 players, who teamed up with a pro, for The Open Blitz on July 19. Robbie Kerby/Sergio Garcia won first place in the A division with a +17. Bruce Ford/Adam Scott came in second with a +16. Best individual round went to Steve Thomas with a +4. Eli Witt/Jim Furyk won first place in the B division with a +22. Bruce Gibson/Garcia came in second with a +14. Best individual round went to Steve Peters with a +7. Skins winners were: Kerby (No. 1), Ford (No. 4), Don Howard (No. 5), Rick Cahill (No. 6) and Witt (No. 10). The Saturday Blitz costs $15 plus cart fee and is open to anyone. You must tee off by 9 a.m. Call the pro shop for a tee time. The team of Casey Clemons, Pete Skantzos and Josh Boris won the top honors in the July 17 Thursday Night Scramble with a 6-under par. The threesome also won the pot hole, which was No. 17. The Thursday Night Scramble. Cost is $23 for members and $30 for non-members. There were 19 players in the Sunday Blitz on July 20. Don Howard came in first place with a +5. Bob Randall and Mickey Willcox tied for second with a +4. Mike Gough and Steve Thomas came in fourth with a +2. Closest to the pin winners were: Dell Sanders (No. 5), A.J. Lavin (Nos. 7 and 15). Skins winners were: Don Howard (No. 8), Jim Carr (No. 9) and Thomas (No. 18). The Sunday Blitz costs $20, plus cart fee, and is open to anyone. Caroline Stevens won first place in the Ladies Day “low net” on Tuesday with a 67. Katrina Counts and Nancy Edgar tied for second with a 69. Chip-ins were Katrina Counts (No. 13) and Caroline Stevens (No. 15). There were 26 players in the Wednesday Blitz. Jonathan Allen won first place in the A division with a +5. Dennis Crawford and Mike McCranie tied for second with a +4. Ed Snow won first place in the B division with a +9. A.J. Lavin came in sec-ond with a +7. Dell Sanders came in third with a +6. Skin winners were: Crawford (No. 4), Charles Timmons (No. 13), McCranie (No. 15) and Chad Hunter (No. 17). The pot hole was No. 15 and McCranie won the $100 kitty with his birdie. A new pot starts Wednesday. The Wednesday Blitz costs $13 (plus optional pot), plus cart fee, and is open to anyone. Good Old Boys results:Q Match 1 — Jerry Jobe, Bob Sonntag and Paul Davis def. Marc Risk, Jim Bell and Bobby Simmons, 11–10; Q Match 2 — Bob Wheary, Jim McGriff, Tom Elmore and Dan Stephens def. Shelton Keen, Joe Persons, Stan Woolbert and Mike Spencer, 10–5, and Ed Snow, Eli Witt, Jim Stevens and Bill Rogers, 10–4. Top scores were: Snow 73 (35-38), Elmore 74 (36-38), Jobe 77 (40-37), Risk 77 (40-37), Elmore 78 (40-38), Keen 79 (41-38) and Simmons 79 (39-40). For information and tee times, call the pro shop at 752-2266 or check out our website at www. thecountryclubatlake city.com Upcoming events: Q Monday-Friday, final golf clinic; Q Saturday, Mayo Rotary Club (course closed until 1:30 p.m.); Q Aug. 4-8, final tennis camp; Q Aug. 9, The PGA Blitz. The Columbia High girls golf team benefit was a huge success. Thank you to everyone who came out to support the local high school girls team. First-place team members were Gary Newcomb, Chris Beckman and George Poultney with a 60. Taking second place in the tournament was the team of Donnie Thomas, Matt Soucinek and George Tuning with a 61. Taking third was the team of Rob Cassube, Tiara Carter and Doug Peeler with a 62. Mega-skins went to team members Luke Soucinek, Bob Sonntag and Wallace Christie Jr. The Friday Dogfight winner was Tim Tortorice with a +9. Second place was a tie with Kevin Parks and Jason Watts both at +2. Skins winners were Gary Newcomb with three, Parks with two, Tortorice and Watts. Closest to the pin winners were Jack Tuggle on Nos. 5 and 15, Tortorice on No. 11, and Ricky Crawford Jr. on No. 17 Monday’s Top of the Hill winners were: first-Tim Tortorice at even; second-Jack Tuggle at -3; Jerry Snowberger at -8. The Wednesday Blitz winner was Rick Cahill with a +10. Close behind in second was Jim Munns with a +7. In third was Randy Heavrin with a +4. Skins winners were Ricky Crawford Jr., Bob McGraw, Kevin Parks, Heavrin and Munns. Closest to the pin winners were McGraw on No. 3, Chet Carter on No. 5, Keith Hudson on No. 11, Cahill on No. 15 and Jack Tuggle on No. 17. The Wednesday Scramble winning team members were Mike Kahlich, Chris Hewitt and Danny Harrington with a -6. To reserve a tee time, call the pro shop at 752-3339. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 3B3BSPORTS QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Nicki Newmans COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Carl Ste-Marie BRIEFS GOLF REPORTS CHS FOOTBALL Booster tickets available Monday Columbia High football booster season tickets, parking passes and gifts will be available for pickup at McDuffie Marine & Sporting Goods beginning Monday. For details, call Quarterback Club president Randy Thomas at 623-0097. CHS SWIMMING Parents meeting set for Tuesday A mandatory parents meeting for Columbia High or other eligible ninth-12th-grade students interested in joining the CHS swim team is 6 p.m. Tuesday in room 130 of school board building 2, directly across from the pool. Important papers that must be completed prior to participating will be distributed. Conditioning begins Aug. 4. A team meeting is planned for 3:30 p.m. Aug. 18 with practice beginning the next day. For details, call Linda Richardson at 965-7071 or coach Mary Kay Mathis at 397-6661. YOUTH GOLF Ste-Marie Junior Golf Clinic Carl Ste-Marie’s final summer Junior Golf Clinic is 8-11 a.m. Monday-Friday at The Country Club at Lake City. Cost is $65 for club members and $80 for non-members and includes drinks and snacks. Registration is at The Country Club at Lake City; clinics are limited to 20 participants. For details, call Ste-Marie at 752-2266 or 623-2833. YOUTH BASEBALL Voices for Children tourney The Voices for Children Charity Baseball Tournament is Aug. 9-10 at Southside Sports Complex. Format is double elimination with USSSA rules. Game balls will be provided. Age groups are 12U ($375 entry fee), 11U ($325 entry fee) and 10U ($300 entry fee). There will be awards for first and second place. For details, call Elizabeth Price at 758-1170 or Stephen Smith at 867-1387. ADULT SOFTBALL Open meeting set for Aug. 8 Columbia County Adult Softball’s annual open meeting is 7 p.m. Aug. 8 in the meeting room at the Southside Sports Complex adult fields. There will be election of officers for 2014-15. Only currently registered players are eligible to vote. For league information, go to ballcharts.com / CCAdultsoftball. FORT WHITE BABE RUTH Election meeting set for Aug. 12 Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball has its annual meeting for elections to all positions at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 12 at the South Columbia Sports Park board meeting room. Interested parties should call Jackie Brooks at (386) 527-2555 or send a letter to P.O. Box 44, Fort White, FL 32038, and plan to attend the election meeting.Q From staff reports Lady Tigers event deemed a successCOURTESYTiara Carter of Lake City hits during the Gainesville Jr Golf Tour at Ironwood Golf Club in Gainesville. Carter shot an 80 to win the Girls 16-18 division. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterLEFT: Bryce Wilson works out of the bunker during Junior Go lf Camp at Quail Heights Country Club.RIGHT: Evan Wheary practices on the putting green during the C arl Ste-Marie Junior Golf Clinic at The Country Club at Lake City. Kerby/Garcia win Open Blitz

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T hirty miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico is not a place you’d expect to find a kayaker fishing. Did that get your attention? I’ll preface this article by stating the fact I’m not a kayak expert. I know a lot of people that fish out of them, and love them. I also firmly believe that one day I’ll join these fanatics, and start fishing some of the tough-to-get-to water (fresh and salt) in our area. My last kayak experience was two summers ago, and we had a storm blow up on us quickly. (Doesn’t that seem like a summer theme?) I’m a large human being — 6-foot-5, 220 pounds — and I’m not known for my speed. Never have been. I was so slow in fact that my nickname in basketball was “slow motion” because when I ran as fast as I possibly could, it looked like I running in slow motion — literally. I embraced it, and decided to simply post up in basketball, and try to hit as many home runs as possible in baseball. It worked for me, as I set several school records, even though I couldn’t outrun an overweight sloth. On this particular trip we had to move very quickly when the storm started bearing down on us. I took a few photos of the end-of-the-worldlooking clouds shortly before I attempted to board my kayak. Those photos never made it. As I tried to quickly get in the kayak, I jumped up quickly as the air tem-perature plummeted, and I jumped so fast, and so far, that I ended up on the other side of the kayak — upside down! My iPhone didn’t mix well with the saltwater and I had a long paddle back to shore, soaked and wet and scared of the impending storm. Fast forward to some guys that actually know what they’re doing. A few months back, a group of kayakers discussed fishing for tarpon at the Skyway Bridge on the forum at TheOnlineFisherman.com “There was a lot of concern about the tidal flow at the bridge,” said Paul Piscopo, a local kayaking angler. “Some liked the idea of going beyond the flats and the norm with their ‘Yaks.’ A new adventure packed with the thought of hooking bigger fish. From that the first Amber-Yak-Attack was born.” There were seven kayaking anglers in total who participated, hosted on a party boat from Hubbards Marina and captained by Mark Hubbard. The want-to-be offshore kayakers were put through a few tests to prove they would be able to handle the possible conditions. “A week before the event we had to take our kayaks to show that we could right our kayak if it were to tip over, and also show that we wouldn’t freak out if we had something big on the end of the line,” said Andrew Hill, who moved to the Tampa Bay area 12 years ago from Joliet, Ill. “They basically tied a 20-pound dive belt to a fishing pole and threw it in the pool, and we had to reel it up.” Tuesday afternoon’s storms cleared and Wednesday arrived with clouds that eventually cleared. As the seven anglers entered the calm water, the feeling of being 30 miles offshore in a kayak was one they will never forget. “I was a bit nervous about being out in the open like that, in 100 feet of water,” Hill said. “As soon as I was in the water, that little bit of fear went away and I went into fishing mode. “I just sat there for a minute just taking it all in,” said Chris Wegescheide. “The deep, clear blue Gulf of Mexico and realizing I was so far out in it on a kayak! Awesome!” Prior to this trip, Wegescheide had never been fishing offshore, nevertheless on a kayak. “It felt awesome to be out there in a kayak with crystal clear blue water and schools of amberjacks under you,” said Andrew Benak. The anglers immediately began catching and landing their share of amberjack up to 32 inches with mangrove snapper and sharks as well. Butterfly jigs seemed to be the ticket for the amberjack, while the sharks ate pinfish, and the snapper ate cut sardines on light leader. “I caught five amberjack and I feel like I got a good workout,” Wegescheide said. “It was amazing to look down and see huge schools of amberjack swimming below me. I also saw barracuda and a probably 150-pound goliath grouper chasing the fish I was trying to land.” This may be the start of a new yearly adventure. Each angler said they couldn’t wait to do it all over again. “I would absolutely do it again,” Benak said. “Not a doubt in my mind.”Q Rob Chapman IV is a tournament-winning angler and outdoorsman from Lake City. He’s an award-winning marine artist, a graduate of Florida Gateway College and of Jacksonville University. He is currently the Coordinator of Marketing, Web, & Graphics Production at FGC, and is active both in the outdoors and designing for outdoors companies throughout the world. He’d love to hear from you! Send your reports, photos, and articles to rob@outdoors360.com 4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04214BSports utdoors 360 OUTDOORS 360 Rob Chapmanrob@outdoors360.com Kayak fishing PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANShayne Edge sent this photo of a monster bass he caught ‘ somewhere in Florida.’ PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANPam Carswell caught a nice 16-pound red off horseshoe last weekend PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANAaron Barber and Lacrecia Williams with a beautiful Isl amorada sailfish.PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANRyder Higgs requested his photo make Outdoors360, so here you go big guy.PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANPace Murray, aka Paceman, with a sweet bass.PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANMike Moses (right) caught this 38-pounder out of Suwanne e.

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1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter Week of Sunday, July 27-Aug. 2, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. PATIENT-FRIENDLY LOCATION LAUREL A.WARWICKE, M.D. Radiation Oncologist CANCER CARE EXPERTISE Dean McCarley, M.D. Bobby Harrison, M.D. Martin Holzman, M.D. Uma Iyer, M.D. Gainesville 352.331.0900 Lake City 386.755.0601 cccnf.com Back-to-school tax holiday coming TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Tyler Lankford, a Star Tech Computer Center technician, adjusts an iMac all-in-one computer. Star Tech plans to extend back-to-school sales tax savings throughout August. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Belk sales associate Debbie Manchester checks out Priscilla Campbell and her daughter, Bailey, 9, who bought shoes on Friday. No sales tax next weekend on electronics, clothing, more By TONY BRITT and CARTER JACKSON Lake City Reporter L ocal merchants have increased their inventory and are ready for shoppers looking to take advantage of the annual sales tax holiday, whether theyre shopping for electronics, school supplies or clothing. The annual Back to School sales tax holiday is set for Aug. 1-3. Legislation was passed to create a three-day sales tax holiday that will begin at 12:01 a.m., Friday, August 1 and end at midnight, Sunday, August 3. During this period, no Florida sales tax or local option tax will be collected on sales of clothing, footwear, and certain accessories selling for $100 or less per item, on certain school supplies selling for $15 or less per item, and on the first $750 of the sales price for computers and certain computer-related accesso ries when purchased for noncommercial home or personal use. Personal computer-related accessories include: Keyboards, computer mice, per sonal digital assistants, monitors, other peripheral devices, modems, routers, and non-recreational software, regardless of whether the accessories are used in asso ciation with a personal computer base unit. Computer-related accessories do not include furniture or systems, devices, software, or peripherals that are designed or intended primarily for recreational use. Electronics Bryant D. Jennings, Star Tech Computer Center owner, plans to extend the sales tax holiday at his store for the entire month. We have done for several years a type of sale or amnesty sale where there will be no extra charge as the sales tax is set, he said. We do that for the whole month of August. That is a big deal and brings in a lot of people. I expect more traffic than last year because this is the second year the state has announced that computers and computer-related items have been added to the back to school sales tax holi day. Jennings said the reason the store does the sales tax amnesty for the whole month is because some people want to HOLIDAY continued on 2C

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, JULY 27-AUG. 2, 20142CBIZ/MOTLEY Name That Company@kiXZ\dpiffkjYXZbkf(0). Xe[k_\?fkJ_fgg\ji\jkXliXekj% Kf[Xp#YXj\[`eDXipcXe[#@dX_fj$ g`kXc`kp^`Xekn`k_XYflk+#'''cf[^$ `e^gifg\ik`\jXe[e\Xicp.''#''' iffdj`e.)Zfleki`\jXe[k\ii`kfi`\j% DpYiXe[j`eZcl[\dpfne]cX^j_`g eXd\#Xcfe^n`k_I\eX`jjXeZ\?fk\cj# I\j`[\eZ\@ee#Jgi`e^?`ccJl`k\j#>Xpcfi[ ?fk\cjXe[K_\I`kq$:Xickfe%@nXjXg`f$ e\\i`eX`ic`e\ZXk\i`e^`ek_\(0*'jXe[k_\ \ok\e[\[$jkXpcf[^`e^Ylj`e\jj`ek_\(0/'j# Xe[\m\e\ek\i\[k_\Zil`j\Ylj`e\jj`e(0.)%@e (0,.@fg\e\[k_\nfic[j]`ijkdfkfi_fk\c%@iXb\ `eXYflk(*Y`cc`feXeelXccp%N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! card’s highest rate taking effect, or whether new purchases will face regular (or steep) interest charges while only the transferred balance enjoys the 0 percent rate. s"ESURETOCONSIDERALLTHECOSTS involved in transferring a bal-ance. Your new card may feature 0 percent interest, but it might also charge a balance transfer fee of between 3 percent and 5 percent. If you’re transferring $25,000 and are being charged a 4 percent fee, that’s a $1,000 charge. Make sure that your interest savings will make that cost worthwhile. Note, too, that you may need to have a good credit rating in order to qualify for a good balance-transfer deal. If you qualify and go for it, consider consolidating debt from several cards onto one low-rate card in order to simplify your finan-cial life. Check with your current lender, too — if you have a good record with them, you might get a lower interest rate just by asking. Learn much more about debt and credit at fool.com/how-to-invest and review some available cards at sites such as indexcreditcards.com and cardhub.com K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ 0ROFITS"REWINGStarbucks’ global empire features more than 20,000 stores, and its busi-ness is firing on all cylinders, offering little sign of market saturation or damage from competition. Even in the U.S., where Starbucks has reached a significant level of market penetrationsame-store sales increased by a vigor-ous 6 percent during the quarter that ended March 30. Total sales in the China/Asia-Pacific region jumped 24 percent in the quar-ter, with 174 net new store openings. China is on track to become Star-bucks’ largest market outside of the U.S., and the company’s international growth is just getting started. Starbucks is the leading mobilepayments retailer, with 14 percent of purchases now made with mobile phones. 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Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smarte st) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entr ies to Fool@fool. com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice Taken PrivateQWhat does it mean when a company is taken private? — L.J., Shenandoah, IowaAThink of how a company “goes public” via an initial public offering (IPO), selling a chunk of itself in shares on the stock market. Companies can go in the opposite direction, too, becoming private again if their shares are bought back and no longer trade publicly. In 2011, Hugh Hefner took his company, Playboy Enterprises, private in a $207 million deal. In an effort to regain control over the company, and presumably because he thought its stock was underval-ued, Hefner offered shareholders a premium over the going price. He had to raise his bid, too, to deflect other bidders. Last year, Michael Dell, in partnership with a private equity firm, took his struggling computer com-pany, Dell, private in a far-bigger, $25 billion deal. And right now, lululemon athletica founder Chip Wilson is looking into taking his company private, as well. ***QIs “buy and hold” the best investment strategy? — K.V., Greenville, North CarolinaASuper-investor Warren "UFFETTHASSAIDTHATHIS favorite time to sell is “never.” "UTSUCCESSFULINVESTING isn’t as simple as just never selling. Many have made mil-lions by holding shares of great companies for decades, through ups and downs. Think of it as buying to hold. In other words, don’t buy a stock and then just blindly hold it for years. You need to check up on your holdings regularly. Fortunes can change, even for the best companies. So carefully select promising companies, intending to hang on for the long term — as long as they remain healthy and growing.Got a question for the Fool? 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The fine print can alert you to possible problems, such as if a single late payment will trigger the 2014 T HE M OTLEY F OOL /D IST BY U NIVERSAL U CLICK 7/24 get a great deal but other-wise can’t because their paychecks don’t come in during the few short days of the state sales tax holi-day. “We do the whole month so people aren’t left hang-ing,” he said. “We also allow customers to use layaway holding that keeps the sales tax amnesty the exact same.” Jennings said customers making back to school tax holiday purchases mostly buy portable electronics. He said the store usually sells some desktop com-puters, but most of the people who come during the event will buy tablets, laptops and smaller devic-es for their kids. With the $750 cut-off line, Jennings said the store attempts to give con-sumers the most for their money. “Everything that we sell under the $750 cut-off mark is in incred-ible condition,” he said. “Everything else is the top-of-the-line equipment like gaming centers or brand new material. We will specifically build machines that hit the $749 mark, that way people can still get the top-of-the-line material and get the best deal off the sales tax amnesty. The $750 mark covers most everything in our store. Once you get in to the hundreds of dollars on a machine, the sales tax really starts to make an impact on how much you pay. That is why we do this for the entire month.” Jordan Brian, owner of Florida Cell Repair, also said the sales tax holi-day was a good time for consumers to purchase phones as well as tab-lets and other electronic devices. “We are excited about doing this for Lake City and Fort White,” he said. “This is a good time to buy phones and tablets from Florida Cell Repair. We are excited about this weekend seeing that we will also be having more sales to go along with our products.” During the sales tax holiday, no tax is due on the sale or purchase of any school supply item with a selling price of $15 or less per item.ClothingFor clothing no tax is due on the sale or pur-chase of any article of clothing, wallet, or bag, including handbags, back-packs, fanny packs, and diaper bags (excluding briefcases, suitcases, and other garment bags) with a selling price of $100 or less per item. Bob Smith, Smitty’s Western Store owner, said the sales tax holiday is a great break for everyone. “Everyone who needs help or just wants to take advantage of this opportu-nity should do it,” Smith said. “Above all, I think this is great for the com-munity. It is a great time for people to shop local because the local com-panies they are going to have more leeway with their sales on top of the tax break. The officials in Tallahassee did a great job of being conscientious of those who are in need and giving everyone a break in these recovering times. This tax break and Christmas are great times for mom and pop stores to give back to communi-ties.” Smith said the tax holiday is great because you can save the sales tax for every item that sells for under $100. “It used to be $50 but has since been raised,” he said. “As a company, we will probably have 90 percent of the store on sale on top of the sales tax holiday, so the savings for those who need it and those who want to take advantage are going to be incredible.” Smith is looking forward to the event. “As a store, we are very community oriented,” he said. “That is why I am so excited about this tax holiday is because it is for our community. That is why people should stay and shop local. It is very important for people to be aware of this holiday. If you don’t know about it, then you can’t take advan-tage of it.” Jason Zink, Belk manager, said the sales tax holiday usually draws additional shoppers to the store. “During the back to school sales tax holiday, it gets pretty wild around here,” he said. “It doubles our usual Saturday busi-ness. These days are going to be great for everyone. The sales tax holiday is not specific to kids or to adults with kids but any-one who needs clothing items can come by and use this opportunity.” In addition to the sales tax event, Zink said the store has many other dis-counts. “Every $30 purchase, you get $10 off,” he said. “We are going to have a lot of door-busters as well. This is definitely the best time to shop.” Belk has also partnered with the United Way of Suwannee Valley to give back to the community through the event. “We are partnering with United Way on these dates (August 1-3) for a jean drive,” Zink said. “When you donate your gently used or new jeans, you get $5 off in the store. The cool thing about this jean drive is that these jeans are going to local teenagers in the commu-nity.” HOLIDAYContinued From 1C Lockout looms as Met contracts set to expireBy MIKE SILVERMANAssociated PressNEW YORK — Figaro might not be getting married anytime soon. Mimi and Rodolfo might not fall in love in that cold Parisian garret. And Macbeth might never murder his way to the throne. That’s the bleak scenario at the Metropolitan Opera, where fractious labor negotiations threaten to disrupt the new season for the first time in more than 30 years. This week, the company’s general manager, Peter Gelb, vowed to lock out union members — cutting off pay and health insurance — unless they settle before contracts expire July 31. And that seems unlikely, given that the Met and unions representing the orches-tra and chorus are only now sitting down to serious negotiations on management’s demands for pay and benefit concessions averaging 16 percent to 17 percent. Unions for stagehands and other backstage work-ers have been meeting with management but remain far from agreement. The Met says deep cuts are essential if the company is to avert financial ruin, while the unions say the money problems have result-ed from Gelb’s bad management and could be addressed by cost savings that include fewer and less lavish new productions. “We need to impose a lockout because otherwise we have no ability to make them take this seriously,” Gelb said in an inter-view Thursday. “The short-term pain is something we’d have to live with in order to provide long-term survival.” Joe Hartnett, who is coordinating negotiations for six units of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, counters: “We are willing to tighten our belts if Peter Gelb is willing to cut up his credit cards. It’s more than just our labor costs that’s the problem.” The last time there was a work stoppage at the Met, in 1980, the company locked out its unions for 11 weeks. The orchestra players eventually won their demand that they be required to play only four perfor-mances a week instead of five, but the cur-tailed season didn’t open until December (symbolically, not with an opera but with a performance of Mahler’s “Resurrection” symphony). It’s unclear how long a lockout might last this time, but it could hamper prepara-tions for the season, which is set to open Sept. 22 with a new production of Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” followed on con-secutive nights by Puccini’s “La Boheme” and Verdi’s “Macbeth.” The Met is unique among American opera companies in both the length of its season (seven performances a week from September to May) and the size of its house (3,800 seats and an additional 200 standing room spots). The way Gelb sees it, the Met is facing a crisis brought on by declining attendance and “donor fatigue,” the unwillingness of wealthy supporters to keep providing unlimited support for a failing institution. Last season the company reported a deficit of $2.8 million on a budget of more than $300 million, of which more than $200 million went for pay and benefits to the Met’s unions and its principal singers. That deficit might not sound like a lot, but Gelb said it “could have easily been $20 million to $30 million if I had not been calling up our donors and getting them to fill the gap.” If the unions would agree to concessions, Gelb said, the savings of more than $30 million annually would inspire the board to carry through a plan to double the company’s relatively anemic endow-ment of $253 million and guarantee future financial security. Gelb said he won’t cut union members’ base pay, but wants to trim “high-end” health and pension benefits and eliminate “excessive work rules that trigger over-time on a daily basis.” As an example of inflated pay, the Met has cited singers in its chorus making $200,000 a year. But Alan S. Gordon, executive direc-tor of the American Guild of Musical Artists, which represents chorus members, called that figure misleading. He said their base salary is $104,000, “and everything else is overtime caused by his productions. He wants us to work overtime with no pay.”

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Classified Department: nrrrCLASSIFIEDn5C www.sitel.com FULL TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE! LOOKING FOR:Technically sound & sale oriented candidates FREE Satellite TV Service! VALUED AT $3,000 Earn Up to $10.35 P er Hour Within Y our First 6 Months! Under NEW Leadership 2010 Mercury Grand MarquisExcellent condition, loaded, leather seats. 23,900 miles.$14,800386-365-7474, Terry Want to sell it quickly? Call Melissa: 386-754-0401 LOCAL & REGIONAL WORK EXPERIENCED DRIVERS NEEDED Immediately! Class A CDL, Minimum age 23, good MVR and job history required. APPLY ONLINE ATPritchettTrucking.com Home ImprovementsKIPTHE HANDYMAN Carpentry, drywall, painting, clean outs, window washing Kip Pickering 203-206-2867 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With A rtwork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalNOTICE OF UNCLAIMED MON-IESNotice is hereby given, pursuant to F.S. 116.21, of the following un-claimed monies deposited or collect-ed by the office of the Clerk of Court of Columbia County. Persons claim-ing any interest in such funds or any portion of them shall file their writ-ten claims with the Clerk of Court prior to September 1, 2014, and shall make sufficient proof to the Clerk of his ownership. Unless claim is filed within such time as aforesaid, all claims in reference thereto are forev-er barred. Any remaining unclaimed monies will be paid into the Fine and Forfeiture Fund of Columbia County on or before September 25, 2014. Signed and dated this 21st day of Ju-ly, 2014, at Lake City, Columbia County, Florida.Daleroy D Richards 8.15Davon R Mosby 18.00Robert LTurner 10.00OIG Title & Escrow 68.00Chinh D Nguyen 6.00Ricardo Juarez 500.00B & B Food Store 83.75Patrick M Virgo Jr 6.00Wagner & Hunt PA100.00Cenlar Loan Admin 6.00Mark ANegron 6.00Evelyn Thomas 19.00Christopher J Walker 15.21Peoples State Bank 100.00Midland Funding LLC 100.00Garvin E Garling 35.00Terrell D Kannady 60.00Jerry Hutcherson 130.00US Dept VA100.00Sierra Title LLC 36.00Cynthia Stephens 43.05Wendy Pittman 250.00Zwicker & Assoc 9.00Jefferey Keith 150.00Edward Slattery 16.00Ronald Waldron 6.00Justin R Kain 15.00Aquilla LLamar 15.00Jody D Austin 15.00Theardrick D Richardson 15.00Jacob TStarling 75.00Mark J Mead 15.00Wayne LJernigan Jr 15.00Amy Sharlow 7.76Cody R Coontz 15.00Johnny Edwards 15.00Levin R Lewis Jr 15.00Timothy WPruitt Jr 15.00John Z Bacon 15.00Barbara M Richards 30.00Timothy B Halks 15.00Kellie LMoore 15.00Verlene M Griffin 15.00Christopher D Schneiders 15.00Annie LStewart 15.00Dale AYoung 15.00Vicki Salzer 5.60Peter M Durrill 15.00Scott AHarmon 15.00David AWilson 15.00James Earls 5.60Edward Johnson 12.16Julie AGibbons 15.00Shane S Hill 30.00Scott K Grinnell 15.00Rhonda LSherrill 15.00Lawrence Lacourse 6.50Donna G Pepper 15.00Hunter H Tilton 15.00James Singleton 5.12Tiea Trowbridge 181.22Katrena Bryant 5.24Horace Powell Jr 6.20William J Boozer 15.00George Fulton 15.00Kaylin Hall 5.26Brian PCannady 15.00Brenda S Howard 30.00Johnathan M Marchi 15.00Jonnie LNorris 15.00Raymond Miller 65.52Jessica Cohen 6.20Darren AKelley 15.00Tami M Lapham 30.00Bonnie B Mattson 15.00Kelly ADusen 15.00Jason K Malone 15.00Walter S Schamel 15.00Joshua Dennard 5.3605546160July 27, 2014 010Announcements CHURCH AVAILABLE For non-denominational Pastor and congregation 386-752-5267 100Job Opportunities05545691Rountree Moore Automotive Group. Seeking highly motivated individual for sale position. Great income potential with benefits. No experience necessary. Call Chris Shelley today to set up your interview 386-758-6171 05546187LOCALCOMPANY seeking F/Tdependable employee experienced in Excel, Data Entry, 50WPM typing and answering multiple phone lines, and filing. Send Resume to: ssoffice386@gmail.com 100Job Opportunities05545946INSTRUCTOR/ COORDINATOR, AAEDUCATION (164 Days–Tenure Track) Teach college level courses, advise students, develop schedules, curriculum development, help with budgeting and planning. Allocate time for scheduled teaching assignments, office hours during which the students may have access to the instructor, and for planning and support for programs. Requires Masters degree with at least 18 graduate credit hours in an appropriate area and teaching experience.Desirable Qualifications:Clinical Educator Training, ESOL Endorsement, Reading Endorsement, valid Teaching Certificate. Five years or more experience teaching in a K-12 setting.sssINSTRUCTOR/ COORDINATOR, EDUCATOR’S PREPARATION INSTITUTE (164 Days–Tenure Track) Teach college level courses, advise students, develop schedules, curriculum development, help with budgeting and planning. Allocate time for scheduled teaching assignments, office hours during which the students may have access to the instructor, and for planning and support for programs under them. RequiresMasters degree and 18 graduate credit hours in an appropriate area and teaching experience in a preK-12 public school setting. Desirable Qualifications:Clinical Educator Training, ESOL Endorsement, Reading Endorsement, valid Teaching Certificate, online course development and teaching experience.sssSalary:Based on degree and experience. Review of applications will begin: Immediately, open until filled Position details and applications available on web at: www .fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: human.resources@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment 05546079Homes of Merit is looking for “experienced” help in the following areas: Framing, Electrical, Siding, Shingles, & Trim Apply in person at 1915 SE State Road 100, LC, FL32025 05546163ROWLAND TRANSPORTATION Regional positions available now! Excellent benefits: 401K w/match, paid vac, health ins. & much more. Good driving record required.Reefer exp. is a plus. We need drivers who live in or near the Lake City / Live Oak areas! It is possible you may be able to keep your truck at home.Apply online, in person, or call 352-567-2002 ext. 163 or ask for SAFETY. 05546174SALES/ESTIMATOR For repair/remodeling Projects-prior experience/ Construction background. Perm/Full time Lake City Ofc. Competitive salary/incentive/ ins/401k/vac/sick/holidays/ cell/advancement/more! Send resume or apply in person Restoration Specialists, 244 NW9th St. Ocala 34475 Fax (352) 732-8950 Attn: Eric Ehrlund (352) 425-2901 cell EEhrlund@ RestorationSpecialists.com EOE/DFWP 05546175CustomerService Representative The Lake City Reporter seeks a dynamic individual for Customer Service Representative. This full time job will require multi-tasking and computer skills. Apply in person or send resume to: Mandy Brown 180 E Duval St Lake City, Fl 32055 or email:mbrown@lakecityreporter.com NO PHONE CALLS 100Job OpportunitiesActivity Director Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the immediate opening of Activity Director. Candidate should be certified in the State of Florida and must have a minimum of two years experience as an Activity Director. Resumes may be faxed to 386-752-8556 or apply in person at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center, 1270 SWMain Blvd, Lake City, FL 32025 EOE Crew person needed for Lake City and surrounding areas. Weed eating required for this job. Some overnight stay with per diem. $9.00 per hr. starting pay. Apply by phone. Frank 772-528-3778 Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 Epiphany Catholic School seeking Guidance Counselor& PT Speech Therapist Please call 752-2320 for more information Experienced Electricians & Helpers needed Apply by Phone 386-752-6082 Family Support Specialist Non-Profit organization is seeking a highly motivated professional to work with families in determining their needs for child care assistance and resources.Experience in Social Services or related field preferred.Salary $12.02-$21.63, plus benefits.Bilingual in English/ Spanish preferred Send resumes by August 7, 2014 to: Early Learning Coalition Attn: HR, 1104 SWMain Blvd Lake City, FL32025 or fax to 386-752-8094 FULL-TIME COOK II $8.42 perhr 2 yrs experience commercial kitchen cooking preferred. Requirements: HS Diploma/ GED, current First Aid/CPR,dependable transportation. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Apply at: 236 SWColumbia Ave, Lake City OR Apply Online: sv4cs.org E-mail/fax resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386)754-2220 Call 754-2225 EOE Industrial Maintenance Technician Experience Required in Electrical, Controls and General Millwright/ Mechanical work. Experience in Hydraulics and Pneumatics helpful. Send resume to Maintenance Technician, 3631 US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055. Maintenance Director Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the immediate opening of Maintenance Director. Minimum of two years experience in a Nursing Home required. Must possess good knowledge of life safety requirements and state regulations. Resumes may be faxed to 386-752-8556 or apply in person at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center, 1270 SW Main Blvd, Lake City, FL32025 EOE Processor/Closer: Title agent seeking someone familiar with all aspects of real estate closings. Competitive pay and bonuses. Resume/References to nuttdjs@aol.com StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc 120Medical EmploymentCaretenders Home Care is looking for F/TOT, RN, & Clinical Team Assistant, P/TPRN RN, with home care experience. Please apply in person with a resume at 3593 NWDevane St. Lake City, FL. 32055. F/TLICENSED phlebotomist needed for busy medical office. M-F. email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net 240Schools & Education05545675INTERESTED in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $499 Day 7/28/14 • Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class8/4/2014• LPN 9/15/14 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CHIHUAHUA 6-8 pounds real sweetie, Family friendly. $50 386-292-3927 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Big Roper Side-by-side Refrigerator/Freezer $250 Call 386-288-2909 For sale: 2 Honda RANCHERES ATVs $2500 each, 3 point hitch fertilizer spreader $350, Tow behind lawn sweeper $100 Wooden desk $150 & misc tools. Live Oak, Karen 386-249-0493 Frigidaire Refrigerator w/ice maker, late model, cream, nice, $245 386-292-3927 GE Front load Washer on pedestal, lg capacity, white great shape $285 OBO 386-292-3927 Harmaral 500 power chair lift, in good working condition. $500 386-288-6354 WHIRLPOOLELECTRIC Stove, White, Clean, Works great $135 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $450 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP& other locations 386-752-6422 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba SW, Handicap accessible, $500mth, $500 dep. Ater 2PM call 386-438-9371 640Mobile Homes forSaleBrand New 2015 5BR/3BA$69,900 Setup & delivered 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny.com No Money Down! Use your land. 3BR w/ porch $399/mo4BR w/ porch $499/mo 904-259-4663 OwnerFinancing 3/2 S. of Lake City. Clean. Small Down $750 mth. 386-590-0642 & 867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Palm HarborHomes limited time offer! $5K towards any exterior package. We have 24 wide, 26, 28 & 30 wide homes. 3 stock units reduced 26K, Homes from the $60's plantcity.palmharbor.com or 800-622-2832 *Se habla espanol 650Mobile Home & LandLand/Home Package 1021 NE Cummings Way. 3BR/2BACity water & sewer $69,900 Call 904-259-4663 or 386-288-2374 Land/Home Package 158 Michelle Place 3BR/2BAon 2/5 acres $74,900 904-259--4663 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent$530 mo $530 dep. 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A NO PETS 386-697-4814 GREATAREA West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $675-$750 plus SEC. 386-438-4600 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $145, 2 persons $155. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR/1BA Very clean, fresh paint, carport,No Pets at this time. $625/mo & $625/dep 288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, in town, $650mo. + dep. No Pets. Call 386-758-0057 3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the country. Credit check required. $500. mo. $500 Deposit No Pets!! 386-752-3225 750Business & Office RentalsOAKBRIDGE OFFICE Complex Professional Office Available 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 770Condos ForRent 3br/2ba W/D, excellent condition, new paint, pool access, CH/A References Req. Not Pets. $880 mth & $880 Dep. 752-0442, 397-3500, or 755-2235 790Vacation Rentals Scalloping in Horseshoe Beach $99/nightly includes tax. Tastefully remodeled efficiency, sleeps 4, cable, picnic tables, grill plus washer/dryer ect. Scalloping starts June 28 Call now 352-498-5405 or 352-498-5986 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage1/2 acre lots; Ownerfinancing $ 300 down; $ 77 per month Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road. Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd Owner Financing! NO DOWN! $59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018. www .LandOwnerFinancing.com .,,$,++'To place your classified ad call ’

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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, JULY 27-AUG. 2, 20144CBIZPot: Not legal everywhere in Colo.The Associated PressDENVER — Pot may be legal in some states — but the neighbors don’t have to like it. Marijuana and hemp have joined wacky paint colors and unsightly fences as common neighborhood disputes facing homeown-ers’ associations. Though a few HOAs have willing-ly changed their rules to accommodate for legal mar-ijuana use or home-grow-ing, many more are banning home pot smoking. Homeowners’ associations can’t ban members from using marijuana in their homes when it’s legal. But if neighbors can see or smell weed, the law is clear — HOAs have every right to regulate the drug as a nui-sance, or a threat to children along the lines of a swim-ming pool with no fence. “The fact that people may be legally entitled to smoke doesn’t mean they can do it wherever they want, any more than they could walk into a restaurant and light up a cigarette,” said Richard Thompson, who owns a management consulting company that specializes in condominium and hom-eowner associations. Thompson said his home condo development in Portland, Oregon, is a prime example of how marijuana’s growing accep-tance has sparked neigh-bor conflicts. “As soon as spring and summer come around, we hear complaints about mar-ijuana smoke because peo-ple are out on their patios and they have the windows down,” he said. It’s not clear how many homeowners’ associations have confronted marijuana conflicts in the 23 states with some form of legal marijuana. But lawyers who specialize in HOA disputes, as well as a Colorado regu-latory agency that advises HOAs, say there are grow-ing conflicts among neigh-bors who want to smoke pot and others who don’t want to see it or smell it. “What we’re really seeing more now is regulating the associations’ common areas,” such as smoke wafting onto playgrounds or others’ porch-es, said Erin McManis, an attorney in Phoenix whose firm represents hundreds of Arizona HOAs. The Carrillo Ranch homeowners association in Chandler, Arizona, earlier this year took the rare step of withdrawing a proposed ban on residents smoking medical marijuana in their front and backyards and on their patios. The HOA planned a meeting on the topic in March, but withdrew the proposal after many resi-dents opposed the ban as too harsh. “This is a personal-freedom issue where people were going to dictate how other people should live,” Carrillo Ranch resi-dent Tom LaBonte told The Arizona Republic in February, when the HOA dropped its proposal. HOA lawyers say the Carrillo Ranch case illus-trates the value of HOAs when the law changes, as with marijuana. “Coming together and working on issues is some-thing associations have been doing for a long time,” McManis said. “We’re hope-ful that’s how it’s going to go forward now with medi-cal marijuana.” Smoke isn’t the only neighbor complaint posed by loosening marijuana laws. Growing pot and hemp is prompting neigh-bor disputes, too. A suburban Denver retiree learned the hard way this spring that he needed neighbors’ permis-sion before growing hemp. Jim Denny, of Brighton, Colorado, learned about marijuana’s non-intoxicat-ing cousin and decided to try the crop on a 75-by-100-foot plot in his yard. But Denny’s hemp plot ran afoul of his homeown-ers’ association, which ruled the hemp experiment unacceptable. “As soon as they heard about it, they said, ‘We’re not going to let anyone grow marijuana here,’” Denny said. “I explained to them that hemp is not marijuana, but they were dead-set against it.” So with his hemp plants about 2 feet tall, Denny invit-ed hemp activists to come transplant them to some-where without opposition from a homeowner associa-tion. Denny sold the plants for about $3 each, a good price for a plant whose seeds can cost up to $10 each because it can’t be imported. Hemp activists volunteered to pay Denny’s fines for flouting the HOA, which could have run to $600 a day. But Denny decided that living peacefully with his neighbors trumped making a political point. “I had people calling up and saying, ‘It’s just a shame; we’ll pay your fines all the way through to the end.’ But I decided in the end not to fight it,” said Denny, a technical writer and former software engi-neer. “At the end of the day, I live here.” Air travel a leap of faith for passengersThe Associated PressWASHINGTON — Airline travel requires passengers to make a leap of faith, entrusting their lives to pilots, airlines, air traffic con-trollers and others who regulate air travel. Even after a week of multiple tragedies in worldwide avia-tion, “There isn’t much that we can do to manipulate how we fly as passengers. But we also shouldn’t worry too much,” says Phil Derner, founder of the avia-tion enthusiast website NYC Aviation. With one passenger plane being shot out of the sky and two crashing during storms, aviation experts said there was no pattern suggesting a huge gap in airline safety measures. “One of things that makes me feel better when we look at these events is that if they all were the same type event or same root cause. Then you would say there’s a systemic problem here, but each event is unique,” said Jon Beatty, president and CEO of the Flight Safety Foundation, an airline industry-supported non-profit in Alexandria, Virginia, that promotes global aviation safety. Less than 1 in 2 million flights last year ended in an accident that damaged a plane beyond repair, according to the International Air Transport Association. The sta-tistic includes accidents involving cargo and charter airlines in its data as well as scheduled pas-senger airline flights. This week’s aviation disasters have the poten-tial to push airline fatalities this year to over 700 deaths — the most since 2010. And 2014 is still barely half over. The misfortunes began July 18 when Malaysia Flight 17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine with 298 people on board. It’s still uncertain who fired the mis-sile that destroyed the plane, but Ukrainian officials have blamed ethnic Russian rebels, and U.S. officials have pointed to circum-stantial evidence that suggests that may be the case. Global aviation leaders will meet in Montreal next week to initiate discussions on a plan to address safety and security issues raised by the shoot-down of the Malaysia Airlines jet, an aviation official said late Thursday. The official spoke on condition of ano-nymity because he wasn’t autho-rized to discuss the issue publicly by name. The shoot-down doubled Malaysia Airlines’ losses this year. The mysterious disappear-ance of Malaysia Flight 370 with 239 people on board in March combined with the destruction of Flight 17 amount to more than twice the total global airline fatal-ities in all of last year, which was the industry’s safest year on record. Ascend, a global aviation industry consulting firm head-quartered in London, counts 163 fatalities in 2013 involving pas-senger-carrying airliners with 14 seats or more. On Wednesday, a TransAsia Airways plane crashed in Taiwan in stormy weather trailing a typhoon, killing 48 passengers, injuring 10 passengers and crew, and injuring five more people on the ground. The next day an Air Algerie flight with 116 passengers and crew disappeared in a rainstorm over Mali while en route from Burkina Faso to Algeria’s capi-tal. The plane’s wreckage was later found near Mali’s border with Burkina Faso. The plane was operated for the airline by Swiftair, a Spanish carrier. Derner said passengers can’t do much about the path of their flights, and should leave it to aviation officials to learn the right lessons from the downing of the Malaysian flight. For all that is out of the passengers’ control, though, there are still steps that travelers can take to be well informed, select solid airlines and practice good safety habits. Some tips:TRACKING FLIGHTS : FlightAware.com can show what path a specific flight has flown the past few days, which can give passengers an idea of what to expect on their own flight. However, flight plans typically aren’t loaded until an hour or two before a flight, and change all the time. Within the United States, passengers can track a flight’s planned path with the WindowSeat flight tracker app: http://download.cnet.com/WindowSeat-Lite-Flight-Tracker-Timer/3000-20428_4-75503094.html SAFETY RECORDS: AirSafe. com offers airline-by-airline and model-by-model information on fatal plane crashes and other fatal events. It also shows crashes by regions of the world. Aviation-safety.net, a service of the Flight Safety Foundation, lists recent safety problems, offers informa-tion on emergency exits and other safety information, and has a database of safety issues stretching back to 1921. ASSESSING THE AIRLINE: The European Union keeps a list of airlines that are prohibited from flying there. If an airline makes that list, avoid it. http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/safety/air-ban/index_en.htm It’s also a good idea to see if a carrier is a member of the International Air Transport Association, the trade association for the world’s airlines. If they’re not, they might not have met the group’s safety standards. http://www.iata.org/about/members/pages/airline-list.aspx GOOD HABITS: AirSafe. com, run by former Boeing safety engineer Todd Curtis, offers 10 tips for safe flight. These include choosing larger aircraft and non-stop flights. Once onboard: listen to the safety briefing, keep over-head bins free of heavy items, keep seatbelts fastened during flight, listen to flight attendants, don’t bring hazardous materials, let flight attendants pour any hot drinks, don’t drink too much and keep your wits about you. http://www.airsafe.com/ten_tips.htm Deadly fungus killing trees in EvergladesThe Associated PressMIAMI — A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading. Then there’s a bigger problem — the damage may be leaving Florida’s fragile wetlands open to even more of an incur-sion from exotic plants threatening to choke the unique Everglades and under-mine billions of dollars’ worth of restora-tion projects. Since first detected on the edge of Miami’s western suburbs in 2011, laurel wilt has killed swamp bay trees scattered across 330,000 acres of the Everglades, a roughly 2 million-acre system that includes Everglades National Park. The fungus is spread by the tiny redbay ambrosia beetle, which likely arrived in this country in a shipment of wood packing material. The same fungus also plagues commercial avocado trees and redbay trees elsewhere in Florida and the Southeast. While the state has been working with the avocado industry to mitigate the damage, there’s been no way to contain it in swamp bay or redbay trees. Experts say the best defense would be stopping invasive pests from crossing U.S. borders in the first place. Hundreds of millions of redbay trees have succumbed across six states since 2002, said Jason Smith, an expert in forest pathology at the University of Florida. “It’s amazing how much of an impact this one little tiny beetle that’s no bigger than Lincoln’s nose on a penny has done,” Smith said in a recent interview. “And it continues to spread.” This summer, Smith will survey the national park for living swamp bay trees to collect samples in the hopes of propagat-ing new trees resistant to the pathogen from their cuttings or seeds. The South Florida Water Management District, the state agency that oversees Everglades restoration, also plans to ramp up its moni-toring and maintenance of the tree islands where swamp bays are found. The damage is easily spotted from the air and from the highway that cuts across the Everglades. Gray skeletons of swamp bays that died in the pathogen’s first wave and newly dead trees that have turned dry and brown mar the dark green tree islands that dot the vast expanse of pale sawgrass. Each tree island is losing up to half its tree canopy, said LeRoy Rodgers, the water management district’s lead invasive species biologist. That’s worrisome because invasive plants may work their way into those open spaces — like weeds in a garden, but worse. Old world climbing fern, melaleuca, Australian pine and Brazilian pepper are the invaders that particularly worry state and federal caretakers of the Everglades. Like the invasive Burmese pythons that are blamed for dramatic drops in the populations of native mammals in the wetlands, the plants have established a home in South Florida’s sunny and wet climate. The exotic plants can transform sawgrass prairies into impenetrable thick-ets, and they fuel explosive fires that kill native plants adapted for less intense burns. They’re not a food source for native wildlife, and in coastal areas, their roots can disrupt the nests of endangered sea turtles. They’re so tenacious and difficult to remove that even if Smith finds a way to propagate swamp bays to replace the ones lost, the invasive plants could prevent them from taking root. “We already have these problems with invasives that are almost too daunting. When you add laurel wilt to the mix, it’s only going to get worse,” said Tylan Dean, chief of biology at Everglades National Park. Nonnative plants currently comprise 16 percent of the flora in the Everglades, according to a congressionally mandated restoration progress report published last month by the National Research Council. Billions of dollars have been pledged for Everglades restoration projects that span decades, but those funds are mostly focused on restoring a more natural flow of freshwater through the wetlands south to the Florida Keys. In spite of the disturbances they cause, invasive species haven’t been factored into Everglades restoration planning beyond treating invasive plants that spread during construction, and there’s little funding or manpower available to fight them back, according to the report. “In Everglades restoration, we have a mantra: we want to get the water right,” Rodgers said. “But if we cannot deal with the invasive species, we can get the water right but not get the Everglades we thought we were getting.” Obama wants limits on US company mergers abroadThe Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Staking out a populist stand ahead of the midterm elections, President Barack Obama on Thursday demanded “economic patriotism” from U.S. corporations that use legal means to avoid U.S. taxes through overseas merg-ers. “I don’t care if it’s legal,” Obama declared. “It’s wrong.” Obama and congressional Democrats are pushing to severely limit such deals, a move resisted by Republicans who argue the entire corporate tax code needs an overhaul. At issue are companies that enter into arrangements with foreign companies, shifting their tax addresses overseas while retaining their U.S. headquarters. “They’re technically renouncing their U.S. citizenship. They’re declaring they are based someplace else even though most of their operations are here,” Obama said at a technical college in Los Angeles. “You know, some people are calling these companies corporate deserters.” He also charged that such companies are “cherry-picking the rules.” Though Obama included a proposal to rein in such mergers and acquisitions in his 2015 budget, his speech marked a new, more aggressive focus on the subject. The push came amid a developing trend by companies to reorganize with foreign entities through deals called “inversions” partly to reduce their tax payments in the U.S. It also came ahead of the fall political campaign as Democrats seek to draw sharp contrasts with Republicans by portraying them as defenders of corporate loopholes. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and oth-ers have been drawing praise from liberal arms of the Democratic Party for their overtly populist positions. The growth of inversions has also concerned Republicans, but by and large they have called for a broader tax overhaul that would reduce corporate rates. A total of 47 U.S.-based companies have merged with or acquired foreign busi-nesses over the past decade in inversions, according to the Congressional Research Service. The issue gained attention earlier this year when Pfizer made an unsuccess-ful attempt to take over British drugmaker AstraZeneca. The deal would have allowed Pfizer to incorporate in Britain and thus limit its exposure to higher U.S. corporate tax rates

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By AVALYN HUNTERSpecial to the ReporterFORT WHITEPrior to World War II, few rural Southerners got more than an 8th-grade education. Seventy years later, high school graduation with sufficient preparation to go on to college or a technical school is the expected standard. As expectations for education have risen, so have the requirements for teachers. Once the province of local school boards, teacher qualifications are now set by the Florida Department of Education. The goal is to certify teachers who can meet the demands of passing on knowledge in an increasingly technical society. Tammy Collier is an example of the level of training new teachers require. A new hire in the mathematics department at Fort White High School, she has spent the last four years in rigorous preparation for her new role.The art of teachingYou have to have a bachelors degree to teach, but its not just about knowing a subject, she explained. In addition to math courses, I had a lot of courses on pedagogy thats the art of teaching. I had to learn about child development and behavior, theories of learning, how to structure a classroom, and how to develop lessons. Modern teacher education emphasizes hands-on learning as well. You learn a lot about teaching in the classroom, but its all theory, Collier said with a laugh. Practicums and your internship are where you learn how to apply that theory. Youre supervised by an experienced teacher, so its a chance to get your feet wet before you plunge into teaching on your own. As part of her bachelors program at Saint Leo University, Collier rotated through three one-semester practicums at three different schools, teaching one day a week during each. Her internship took place at a fourth school and was more intense, putting her in the classroom five days a week. One good thing about the way Saint Leos does things is that I rotated through schools in different settings and served different demographic groups. I also taught a different grade during each practicum, Collier said. It gave me experience in teaching children from differing subcultures and at differing levels of maturity and behavior. Some of them were a little rough, but thats part of the challenge of being a teacher. You have to reach them at the level theyre on and work from there.Teachers are tested, tooStudent teachers must pass three tests before they can be certified in Florida. The first is a general knowledge test given in the second semester of a student teachers junior year. As a senior, a student teacher must pass a professional exam on teaching skills and a test covering a specific content area such as math, science, social sciences or language arts. Graduation and attainment of a teachers certificate are only the beginning of a teachers education. Besides learning from experience gained in the classroom, teachers are required to engage in continuing education in pedagogy and their subject areas to maintain their certifications. Many choose to go on to graduate degrees as well. Colliers transition from student to teacher means that it isnt just her four daughters who are looking forward to the new school year with a mix of anticipation and nerves. They dont have to report until August 18, Collier said. I have to go in next week to pair with a veteran teacher. For the next two weeks, Im going to be asking a lot of questions about the system where things are, how to get computer access, how to make use of the technology they have available. Im a little nervous, but its just a matter of finding out the thousand and one little things I need to know to be ready to teach. LIFE Sunday, July 27, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Lake City Reporter Story ideas? Contact Editor Robert Bridges754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Allergy Testing & TreatmentSpecializing in adult medical care including:386-719-2540www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com Medicare, Blue Cross, Tri-Care and most insurance plans acceptedLocated in the Lake City Mediplex Building404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FLLocated in the Lake City Mediplex Building404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FLS O U T H E R NINTERNAL MEDICINES O U T H E R NINTERNAL MEDICINE Now Accepting New Patients Al Otero, PA-CSOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINEis proud to announce Al Otero, PA-C is joining our group We arrived at the harbor in Oak Bluffs on Marthas Vineyard from Hyannis on the ferry. Upon our arrival, we decided to do a bus tour that would take us around to the other five towns on the 100 square mile island. We ended up with a private tour on a van instead of with a group on an old school bus. Our tour guide was Russell. (On a side note, we spent an adequate amount of time researching him on the Internet after we got back to our room, based on a few comments he made. During our tour he shared so much history, not only about the island, but a little hint at times about himself. He was born and raised on the island. After going online, we found out he was a retired civil engineer, hydrologist and once the county manager. Hes been retired since 2012 and now runs around the island giving tours wearing flip flops and sporting a pony tail. Who knew? Just goes to show you, dont judge a book by its cover). He started the tour by taking us out to Ocean Park where there are a lot of Victorian-inspired homes. During this stretch of the ride he explained that each township has a different flair. For example, Oak Bluffs is more bohemian, where Edgartown is more refined and where the rich and famous mostly stay. I think those two towns are the only wet ones of the six, too. During the ride, Russell explained about the geology of the island, like how 15,000 years ago rock debris from glaciers and ice sheets helped form TRAVEL TALES Sandy KishtonTouring Marthas Vineyard TRAVEL continued on 4D ABOVE: Tammy Collier is seen at her graduation from Saint Leo University with her husband Joe Collier. COURTESY PHOTO Tammy Collier walked the path from student to teacher in just 4 years.TeachReaching out to Taking a trip?Take the Lake City Reporter with you. Subscribe to our E-edition. Call 755-5445 or fax 752-9400.

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 2DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JULY 27, 2014 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsWipeout “Blind Date: Falling for You” Pairs of single contestants compete. (N) Rising Star (N) (Live) Castle “Dressed to Kill” News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4News4JAX at 6PMThe Insider (N) Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Wolfe in Sheep’s Clothing” Criminal Minds “Slave of Duty” NewsSports ZoneNews4JAXArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -After You’ve GoneAfter You’ve GoneMy Wild AffairLast Tango in Halifax (N) Masterpiece Mystery! “Poirot, Season 12: The Big Four” Vicious (N) Austin City Limits “Phoenix” 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) (:01) Big Brother (N) Unforgettable “A Moveable Feast” (N) Reckless “Bloodstone” (N) Action Sports 360(:35) Castle 9-CW 9 17 17Doc TonyMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneMusic 4 UBeer GeeksLocal HauntsMedium in the RawI Know JaxDaryl’s HouseJacksonvilleLocal HauntsThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30The SimpsonsThe SimpsonsAmerican DadBob’s BurgersThe SimpsonsThe SimpsonsFamily GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Modern FamilyModern Family 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsAmerican Ninja Warrior The Dallas nals course; Salmon Ladder. (DVS) Chicago Fire “A Dark Day” Chicago PD “8:30 PM” (DVS) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This WeekQ & ABritish House of CommonsRoad to the White HouseQ & A WGN-A 16 239 307(4:30)“The Matrix Revolutions”“The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles. Manhattan (Series Premiere) (N) (:10) Manhattan Secrets dominate every facet of life. (:20) Bones TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby Show(:43) The Cosby Show “Total Control” The Cosby ShowKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next Chapter Beyonc. Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now? (N) Oprah’s Master Class Sharon Stone. Oprah: Where Are They Now? A&E 19 118 265Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty(:02) Duck Dynasty(:32) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “A Taste of Romance” (2011)“Just Desserts” (2004) Lauren Holly, Costas Mandylor. “Puppy Love” (2012, Romance) Candace Cameron Bure, Victor Webster. The Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(4:50)“Thor” (2011, Action) Chris Hemsworth. (:25)“Captain America: The First Avenger” (2011, Action) Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell. The Strain “Gone Smooth” (N) (:01) The Strain “Gone Smooth” CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) Weed 2: Cannabis MadnessThe Hunt With John WalshThe Hunt With John Walsh (N) Death Row StoriesThe Hunt With John Walsh TNT 25 138 245“Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith, Bill Pullman. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. (DVS) The Last Ship “Lockdown” (N) (:01) Falling Skies (N) (:02) The Last Ship “Lockdown” NIK 26 170 299The ThundermansThe ThundermansHenry Danger “The Danger Begins” Full HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriends(:36) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar RescueBar Rescue A bar with a golf theme. Bar Rescue “Brawlin’ Babes” Bar Rescue “Hostile Takeover” Frankenfood (N) FrankenfoodBar Rescue “I Smell a Rat” MY-TV 29 32 -The Rockford Files “Piece Work” Kojak “Therapy in Dynamite” Columbo Thriller “The Premature Burial” Alfred Hitchcock Hour DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyAustin & AllyDog With a BlogJessieLiv & Maddie (N) I Didn’t Do It (N) Austin & Ally (N) Girl Meets WorldPhineas and Ferb “Star Wars” Liv & MaddieLiv & Maddie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“The Ugly Truth” (2009)“You Again” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. Witches of East End (N) (:01) The Lottery “Rules of the Game” (:02)“You Again” (2010) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSatisfaction Grace joins the workforce. BET 34 124 329(5:00)“Just Wright” (2010) Queen Latifah, Common, Paula Patton. Sunday Best The top 10 perform duets. Sunday Best The top 10 perform duets. Vindicated (N) Vindicated (N) VindicatedVindicated ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball: Sunday Night Countdowna MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants. From AT&T Park in San Francisco. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209E World Team Tennis Finals: Teams TBA. (N) 2014 CrossFit Games (N) (Live) NHRA Drag Racing Sonoma Nationals. From Sonoma, Calif. (N Same-day Tape) SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSport FishingSport FishingShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFishing the FlatsAddictive FishingPro Tarpon TournamentScubaNationTravis Johnson DISCV 38 182 278Naked and Afraid “Beware the Bayou” Naked and AfraidNaked and Afraid “Damned in Africa” Naked and Afraid: Uncensored (N) Naked and Afraid (N) Naked and Afraid: Uncensored TBS 39 139 247“Due Date” (2010, Comedy) Robert Downey Jr., Zach Gali anakis. (DVS)“The Hangover” (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (DVS) (:15)“The Heartbreak Kid” (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan. HLN 40 202 204Forensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) HuckabeeFOX News SpecialStosselHuckabee E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the Kardashians (N) Botched “Boob Freak!” (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians TRAVEL 46 196 277Bikinis & BoardwalksBikinis-Board.Bikinis-Board.Big Time RVBig Time RV (N) Mega RV CountdownAmerican Grilled “Floribbean Flames” Man v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lBeachfront BargainBeachfront BargainFlipping the Block (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Sister Wives “Four Wives in Two RVs” Sister WivesSister Wives “Every Brown Revealed” Sister Wives “Tell All” (N) Escaping Alaska (Series Premiere) (N) Sister Wives “Tell All” HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “KISS and Sell” American Pickers “Frank’s Holy Grail” Mountain Men “Hell on Ice” Mountain Men “Death Trap” (N) To Be Announced(:03) American Pickers “Odd Fellas” ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot “Bobo’s Backyard” Finding Bigfoot “Search for the Yeti” Finding Bigfoot “Biggest Search Yet” Investigation at Skinwalker Canyon. (N) Ice Lake Rebels “Winter is Coming” Finding Bigfoot “Biggest Search Yet” FOOD 51 110 231Food Network StarChopped “Cleaver Fever” Guy’s Grocery Games (N) Food Network Star (N) Cutthroat Kitchen (N) Cutthroat Kitchen “Tso Good” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookKenneth CopelandCre o DollarDavid FSN-FL 56 Bull Riding Championship. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 12 World Poker Tour: Season 12UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour: Season 12 World Poker Tour: Season 12 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Dinoshark” (2010) “Mega Shark vs. Mecha Shark” (2013) Christopher Judge. Sharkmania: The Top 15 Biggest Baddest Bloodiest Bites (N) Sharkmania: The Top 15 Biggest Bites AMC 60 130 254(4:30)“Shooter” (2007) Mark Wahlberg. “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal, Ian Holm. Halt and Catch Fire “Up Helly Aa” (N) Halt and Catch Fire “Up Helly Aa” COM 62 107 249(5:55)“Superbad” (2007, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Michael Cera, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. “Superbad” (2007) Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens hope to score booze and babes at a party.“Year One” (2009) Jack Black. CMT 63 166 327Cops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeDog and Beth: On the HuntCops ReloadedCops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283She WolfSuper VultureQueen of the WarthogsHoney BadgersAmerican BeaverQueen of the Warthogs NGC 109 186 276ExplorerNazi Underworld Secrets of Hitler and his inner circle. Bannockburn: The Real Bravehearts Brave Scotsmen face an English army. (N) Bannockburn: The Real Bravehearts SCIENCE 110 193 284Most Outrageous Acts of ScienceOutrageous Acts of ScienceMythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” MythBusters “Motorcycle Water Ski” MythBusters “Fire in the Hole” MythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” ID 111 192 285Fatal EncountersDateline on IDOn the Case With Paula ZahnDateline on ID “Fatal Attraction” (N) Deadline: Crime With Tamron Hall (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“Batman Begins” (2005) Christian Bale. ‘PG-13’ (:20)“Getaway” (2013) Ethan Hawke. ‘PG-13’ True Blood “Karma” (N) The Leftovers “Gladys” (N) Last Week To.True Blood MAX 320 310 515“Runner Runner” (2013, Drama) Ben Af eck. ‘R’ (:40)“The Rock” (1996) Sean Connery. Alcatraz Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco.“Man of Steel” (2013, Action) Henry Cavill, Amy Adams. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:25)“Legally Blonde” (2001) Masters of Sex “Kyrie Eleison” Ray Donovan “Uber Ray” Ray Donovan “Gem and Loan” (N) Masters of Sex “Fight” (N) Ray Donovan “Gem and Loan” MONDAY EVENING JULY 28, 2014 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelorette (Season Finale) Andi faces a decision. (N) (:01) The Bachelorette (N) (Live) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4News4JAX at 6PMNews4JAXEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) News4JAXArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -WUFT News at 6Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow (N) Antiques RoadshowPOV “Fallen City” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half Men2 Broke GirlsMomMike & MollyTwo and Half MenUnder the Dome “Reconciliation” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne2014 Young Hollywood Awards Honoring young stars. (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Be a MillionaireBe a MillionaireModern FamilyThe SimpsonsMasterChef “Top 12 Compete” (N) Hotel Hell “Monticello Hotel” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxModern FamilyTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Running Wild With Bear GryllsAmerican Ninja Warrior “Miami Finals” Top competitors face the nals course. NewsTonight Show CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) U.S. House of Representatives (N) (Live) Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. WGN-A 16 239 307America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosManhattan(:10) Manhattan TVLAND 17 106 304Walker, RangerAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279NY ERNY ERNY ERNY ERDateline on OWNDateline on OWN “Down by the River” Operation Change “South Africa” (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265The First 48Criminal MindsCriminal Minds “Safe Haven” Criminal Minds “Devil’s Night” Longmire “Counting Coup” (N) (:02) Longmire “Counting Coup” HALL 20 185 312The Waltons “The Statue” The Waltons Ben plots to win girl. The Waltons “The Woman” The MiddleThe MiddleThe MiddleThe MiddleThe Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Captain America: The First Avenger” (2011, Action) Chris Evans.“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” (2011, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Carla Gugino.“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” (2011, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Carla Gugino. CNN 24 200 202Situation RoomCross re (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Morgan Spurlock Inside Man “Privacy” CNN Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 TNT 25 138 245Castle “The Squab and the Quail” Castle “Still” (DVS) Major Crimes “Two Options” Major Crimes “Cutting Loose” (N) (:01) Murder in the First (N) (:02) Major Crimes “Cutting Loose” NIK 26 170 299Henry Danger “The Danger Begins” Sam & CatEvery Witch WayFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriends(:36) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. Premiere.“Couples Retreat” (2009) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. Four couples endure therapy sessions at a tropical resort.“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldGet SmartThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Liv & MaddieLiv & MaddieDog With a BlogJessieAustin & AllyI Didn’t Do It“Hannah Montana: The Movie” (2009) Miley Cyrus, Billy Ray Cyrus. Dog With a BlogA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders Hobbyist hoards. Hoarders “Roy; Loretta” Hoarders “Kathleen; Scott” Hoarders “Randy; Vicki: Update” Hoarders “Manuel & Carla” (:01) Bring It! USA 33 105 242NCIS A soldier is targeted by terrorists. NCIS A veteran confesses to murder. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) Rush “Don’t Ask Me Why” BET 34 124 329106 & Park “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“The Color Purple” (1985, Drama) Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, Margaret Avery. Based on Alice Walker’s portrait of a rural black woman. The GameThe Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park in Boston. (N Subject to Blackout) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter Special (N) Arm WrestlingArm Wrestlingf MLS Soccer Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders FC. (N) SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingRays Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays (N) Don ZimmerDestination Polaris DISCV 38 182 278Street Outlaws “Top 5 List Shake-Up” Street OutlawsStreet Outlaws: Full Throttle (N) Street Outlaws OKC racers compete. Fat N’ Furious: Rolling Thunder (N) Street Outlaws OKC racers compete. TBS 39 139 247SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe Good LifeConan HLN 40 202 204Forensic FilesForensic FilesJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Forensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansE! News (N) Live from E!The SoupKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernCoaster WarsCoaster WarsBizarre Foods America “Portland” Bizarre Foods America (N) Bizarre Foods America “Denver” Bizarre Foods America HGTV 47 112 229Love It or List It “Wendie & Dave” Love It or List It “The Fowler Family” Love It or List It “Neilson Family” Love It or List It “Wendie & Dave” House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “Byrne Family” TLC 48 183 280Extreme CouponExtreme CouponUndercover Boss “Orkin” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Roto-Rooter” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Orkin” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsIce Road Truckers “Into the Vortex” Ice Road Truckers “Snow Bound” (N) (:03) In Search of Aliens ANPL 50 184 282Lost Treasure HuntersLost Treasure Hunters (N) Lost Treasure Hunters (N) Lost Treasure Hunters “Mutiny” (N) Lost Treasure Hunters (N) Lost Treasure Hunters FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveGuy’s Grocery Games “Weight For It!” Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives (N) Eating AmericaDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchTrinity FamilyLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord (N) (Live) FSN-FL 56 -Ship Shape TVMarlins Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins. From Marlins Park in Miami. (N) Marlins Live! (N) Inside the Marlins World Poker Tour: Season 12 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Malibu Shark Attack” (2009) “Swamp Shark” (2011, Suspense) Kristy Swanson, D.B. Sweeney. “Ghost Shark” (2013, Horror) Mackenzie Rosman, Richard Moll. “Mega Shark vs Crocosaurus” AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Rocky II” (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. “Rocky III” (1982) Sylvester Stallone. A merciless contender forces Rocky into a title match.“Rocky IV” (1985) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. COM 62 107 249(5:56) South Park(:27) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Steve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedDog and Beth: On the Hunt NGWILD 108 190 283Predator BattlegroundWorld’s Weirdest “Freaky All-Stars” World’s Deadliest “Night Stalkers” Monster Fish “Franken sh” Monster Fish “India’s River Devil” World’s Deadliest “Night Stalkers” NGC 109 186 276Brain GamesBrain GamesGoing DeepGoing DeepBrain GamesBrain GamesBrain Games (N) Brain Games (N) Going DeepGoing DeepBrain GamesBrain Games SCIENCE 110 193 284Most Outrageous Acts of ScienceSurvivorman “Canadian Boreal Forest” North America “Born to Be Wild” North America “No Place to Hide” Mutant Planet “India” (N) North America “Born to Be Wild” ID 111 192 28520/20 on ID A woman is gunned down. I (Almost) Got Away With ItI (Almost) Got Away With ItI (Almost) Got Away With ItI (Almost) Got Away With ItI (Almost) Got Away With It HBO 302 300 501(4:55) GravityLast Week To.“Now You See Me” (2013, Comedy-Drama) Jesse Eisenberg. ‘PG-13’ “Love Child” (2014) ‘NR’ (:15)“Gravity” (2013, Science Fiction) Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515(5:50)“Mission: Impossible” (1996) Tom Cruise. (:45)“Paci c Rim” (2013, Science Fiction) Charlie Hunnam, Diego Klattenhoff. ‘PG-13’ “Lethal Weapon 2” (1989, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:45)“Scent of a Woman” (1992) Al Pacino. ‘R’“The Last Exorcism Part II” (2013) Ashley Bell. ‘PG-13’ Masters of Sex “Fight” Ray Donovan “Gem and Loan” Masters of Sex “Fight” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalWe the PeopleSupreme JusticeDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4News4JAX at NoonPaid ProgramSteve HarveyAmerica’s CourtSupreme JusticeThe Queen Latifah ShowThe Dr. Oz ShowNews4JAX at 5PMNews4JAX 5-PBS 5 -Dinosaur TrainDinosaur TrainSuper Why!Thomas & FriendsPeg Plus CatCat in the HatCurious GeorgeCurious GeorgeArthurArthurR. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge JudyJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Steve Wilkos ShowThe TestPaternity CourtPaternity CourtDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsExtraDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(11:00) Key Capitol Hill Hearings Varied Programs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsLaw & OrderLaw & OrderLaw & Order: Criminal IntentLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304(11:19) GunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanza(2:50) BonanzaWalker, Texas RangerWalker, RangerVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Home & Family Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieThe Waltons FX 22 136 248MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202Legal View With Ashleigh Ban eldWolf CNN Newsroom With Brooke BaldwinCNN Newsroom With Brooke BaldwinThe Lead With Jake TapperThe Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesCastleCastle NIK 26 170 299Varied ProgramsSanjay and CraigRabbids InvasionOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobiCarlyiCarly SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs CopsVaried ProgramsCopsCops MY-TV 29 32 -The Rockford FilesGunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyAdam-12Adam-12Emergency! DISN 31 172 290Varied Programs Dog With a BlogVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherGrey’s AnatomyVaried ProgramsGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329Varied Programs MovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterVaried ProgramsSportsCenterColl. Football LiveNFL InsidersNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209Numbers Never LieFirst TakeVaried Programs SportsNationQuestionableYou Herd MePaul FinebaumOutside the Lines SUNSP 37 -(:30) MLB BaseballVaried Programs DISCV 38 182 278Sins & SecretsVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Cleveland ShowCleveland ShowAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadKing of QueensKing of QueensFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204HLN Now HLN Now Forensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360OutnumberedHappening NowThe Real Story With Gretchen CarlsonShepard Smith ReportingYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Food ParadiseBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280Four WeddingsVaried Programs19 Kids-Count19 Kids-Count19 Kids-Count19 Kids-CountIsland MediumIsland MediumSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Pit BossDirty JobsDirty JobsDirty JobsGator BoysNo LimitsCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Pioneer Wo.Barefoot ContessaSandra Lee10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaPioneer Wo.Varied Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsTrinity FamilyVaried ProgramsJames RobisonVaried ProgramsThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -MLB BaseballVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:00) MovieMovieVaried Programs (:45) Movie COM 62 107 249(10:48) MovieVaried Programs (:25) Futurama(4:56) Futurama(:26) Futurama CMT 63 166 327(11:30) MovieVaried Programs NGWILD 108 190 283World’s WeirdestVaried Programs Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276LockdownAlaska State TroopersBorder WarsVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs ID 111 192 285Blood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & AlibisVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(:15) MovieMovieVaried Programs (:45) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(10:15) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs (:15) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(10:30) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 3D MOVING PARTSBY ERIC BERLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ No. 0720 ACROSS1 Swaddles, e.g.8 *Turn, as a wheel12 Edible plant extract19 Be too fearful to20 Former Nebraska senator James21 Burger go-with22 Yolk surrounder23 Bit of sweat24 Most hip25 Low numero26 Cowboys’ activity29 Cologne conjunction30 Slushy drink32 Kitten sounds33 Detailed plans35 Use a straw39 Idea41 Hides away43 *Words of praise44 Thingamajig45 Strangle47 Cartoon dog49 Italian dish that needs much stirring51 Openly defy53 *Royal messenger57 Tony-winning musical with the song “Find Your Grail”60 Long March participant61 Not ___ (none)63 Raised transports64 Unchanged66 Classic muscle cars67 Not just slow69 Theater supporters72 See instructions78 Wise men79 Is on the brink81 Get rid of85 ___ menu86 Eagle’s org.88 *Piddling89 Smear91 Locks up again95 Painterish96 Plain to see98 Stir up100 Trickster of American Indian mythology101 Close overlap of fugue voices104 Attack109 K.C.-to-Detroit dir.110 She rules112 Indigenous114 Caroled116 “___ deal?”117 Prix ___118 Sci-fi’s Hubbard119 Appeared in print121 Beast of burden123 Young seal124 Many ski lodges128 Legitimate129 Formed from a mold133 Babble on134 Cathedral area135 Stay-at-home workers?136 Tot-watched137 Peevish state138 Asparagus unit DOWN1 One of eight Eng. kings2 Informal turndown3 Email, say4 Used tire5 Pay to play6 Glad-handing sort7 Two-channel8 *Upbraids9 Field team10 Mushroom11 Reach, eventually12 Cpl.’s inferior13 Stir up14 *Great in number15 Card combinations16 Low number17 Checks at the door, say18 W.W. II craft27 Soccer blooper28 Bother30 Neither blue nor red?: Abbr.31 Say sweet words32 Some dresses34 Saucier’s boss36 In the mood37 Tenor from Naples38 Don of “The Andy Griffith Show”40 Sticky stuff41 Mex. miss42 41-Down’s room46 Convenience-store sights48 Slow, hard progress50 Stepped in for52 French fine53 Witch54 “___ Enchanted”55 Mideast currency56 701, once58 Bone: Prefix59 Fictional estate62 Chanteuse Eartha65 State with the motto “Oro y plata”68 Half sister of Ares69 Greedy sort70 Bird: Prefix71 “Undo” mark73 Overseas prince74 Box office75 ___ Plus76 Actor Dullea77 Latin “was to be”80 Underhanded81 Three-ingredient treats82 World capital where Monopoly is banned83 Football team84 Terrible86 *Old West robber87 “Shaddup!”90 *Not rough92 Like the cry “Veni, vidi, vici”93 Abbr. in some city names94 Old West transport97 Shortening in recipes?99 Spanish “that”102 Windy City paper, with “the”103 Election-night data105 One of the Windward Islands106 Facility for small planes107 Nobel-winning writer Andric108 N.F.L. Hall-ofFamer Dawson111 Former transportation secretary Norman113 Large-scale evacuation115 *Newton subject117 Choice cut120 Latin “you love”122 Sitarist Shankar123 Nickname for Jos124 P.D. alert125 Brother’s title126 Poke fun at127 Collection130 Prankster131 Bishop’s domain132 Classic fantasy game co. 12345678910111213141516171819 2021 22 2324 2526272829 303132333435363738 394041 4243 44 4546 4748 4950 5152 5354555657 585960 6162636465666768697071 72 7374 757677 78 79 80 8182838485 868788 8990919293949596 9798 99 100101102103104105106107108109110111 112113 114115116117118 119120121122123 124125126127128129130131132 133 134135 136 137138Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). The answer to each starred clue must have two consecutive letters removed before it is written into the grid. These letters will move to a pair of circles elsewhere in the puzzle. (In all cases, new words will be formed.) The nine letter pairs, when properly arranged, will spell an appropriate answer at 72-Across. CADREGOTLAWABIDES UNREELORRENERECENTBOYSWILLBEBOYSORELSE IDEOGODVANTOMEANA CERNATMIYAMWHATIYAM AUNTIERAIDSMERE WHATSDONEISDONESIDED EAREDERSTGAMUT ESTARFMAMAREMARKVASTELMSRARENOTING ITAINTOVERTILLITSOVER LILTERPITAOKRARISE TERRORSEWSALAESA ADDERARKSACRES SLOTSHATERSGONNAHATE WIRESETONBLOUSE ITISWHATITISAVGWABE VEGHURLROERAGSMUTERAGONENOUGHISENOUGH LAMESTRIPEAUTOUSLE SLIMESSPYRPMSTEER Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. DEAR ABBY: I am a woman in my 30s. Every morning I walk my dog in the park near my house. Each morning I see the same maintenance man in the park and he stares at me in a way that makes me uncomfort able. I have tried saying “Good morning,” but he doesn’t reply and just continues to stare. I don’t think I should have to stop frequent ing the park because this creepy man works there. Is there a way I can confront him about his staring without making the situation more uncomfortable? — DOG WALKER IN SAN FRANCISCO DEAR DOG WALKER: Has it occurred to you that the man may be mute, or perhaps doesn’t speak English? Talk to some of the other women who frequent the park and ask if this happens with them, too. There may be an explanation for his behavior, and he may be perfectly harmless. If you are still uneasy after that, contact the parks department. But I’d hate to see someone lose his job who might be concerned only about whether you’re picking up after your dog. DEAR ABBY: When my son visits me, he stays in a hotel with his family instead of in our home. When he visits his parents-in-law, he stays in their home. His in-laws would consider it disrespectful if he didn’t. He used to stay here before he got married. His siblings and I feel hurt and disrespected, and we also think it is inappropriate. When his siblings visit, they stay at our home. My wife died 19 months ago. I know if she were here, he wouldn’t even think of staying anywhere else. How should I (and my other children) handle this? — PROUD DAD IN NEVADA DEAR PROUD DAD: The important thing is that they are visiting and sharing good times with you, not where they stay. I’m sure they have their reasons for wanting to sleep at the hotel. At the end of the evening, they may crave some private conversation. Or, your daughter-in-law may feel uncomfortable now that your wife is gone. The way I would handle it is to simply ask them why, without being confron tational. DEAR ABBY: When I attended the recent funeral of a family mem ber, I saw someone walk up to the open casket and begin taking photos of the deceased. Then, if that wasn’t enough, the person asked the deceased’s caregivers to pose by the body! I feel it was in extremely poor taste. Am I wrong? I know I’ll see the “photographer” again at future funer als. — BAFFLED IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR BAFFLED: In some cultures it is not offensive to take photos of people in their coffins; it is accepted, and relatives cherish these last mementos of their loved one. If you follow that logic, then it’s understandable that having a photo of the deceased with the peo ple who cared for him or her at the end would be desirable. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Getting out of the house and away from any controversy that is brewing around you will do you good and help you put things in perspective. Avoid any one looking for a fight. Positive changes will bring good results. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Talk any pressing matter through calmly. Getting worked up over nothing will lead to domestic problems. Stick to your budget regardless of the pressure you may face to loosen up the cash flow. Focus on love and romance, not unnecessary spending. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Day trips, visiting people you enjoy being around and talking about plans for the future will all lead to interesting chang es in the way you move forward personally and professionally. Get whatever offer you receive in writing and sign on the dotted line. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You may not like change, but it can lead to an interesting opportunity and improve your standard of living. Put a little backbone into what needs to be done and move forward without looking back. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Consider unusual investments that show promise and have the potential to turn a dream into a reality. Present what you have to offer and you will find a way to invest in your attributes. Keep it simple and build a solid future. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A day trip or time spent with people working toward a similar goal will open up doors to new partnerships that offer unexpect ed contributions. Love is on the rise and a unique development will lead to a better domestic situation. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t rely on others when you should be taking care of whatev er it is you want to see happen. Waiting for help will make you look lazy and lead to criticism. Make positive personal chang es that prove you do your fair share. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Make plans to do things that are within your budget, but be sure to bring appreciation from the people you want to impress. A seminar that offers suggestions regarding a cost-ef ficient lifestyle will help you manage money matters. Love is highlighted. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Investigate a financial opportunity. There is money to be made, but you must do your homework in order to pick the best and most feasible offer. Positive changes at home will improve your love life. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Relationships will be unpredictable. Don’t feel you have to overspend in order to please and impress someone. Your charm and innovative, cost-efficient ideas should be enough to make someone you love happy. If not, re-evaluate your relationship. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Emotions will well up and situations will get blown out of proportion if you don’t compro mise. Weigh the pros and cons and consider how you can keep the peace and enjoy your day. Too much of anything will lead to trouble. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You can secure your finan cial position if you go over your investments and bank state ments. Taking care of respon sibilities will ease your mind. Once you have a budget to work with, plan to do something fun with someone you love. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word Everyday walk in the park is marred by silent man’s stare Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER BIRTHDAYS Norman Lear, 92; Jerry Van Dyke, 83; Bobby Gentry, 70; Peggy Fleming, 66; Betty Thomas, 66; Bill Engvall, 57; Christopher Dean, 56; Julian McMahon, 46; Triple H, 45; Maya Rudolph, 42; Seamus Dever, 38; Taylor Schilling, 30; Indiana Evans, 24. SUNDAY CROSSWORD

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@ comcast.net the island. He also told us that the many rocks used to build fence-like walls around the perimeters of the properties were pulled straight from the fields. Raising sheep was popular; in fact when the British came during the Revolutionary War, they forced the locals to give them all of their sheep to feed the soldiers. He also pointed out locations where scenes from the movie Jaws was filmed. Very cool! Our next stop was the gravesite of John Belushi; a nice little spot in the front of the cemetery. He was interred twice; According to our guide, he was actually moved from his original spot because all of his visitors tore up the grounds trekking back to his space. His tombstone has a New England classic slate design, complete with skull and crossbones that reads, "I may be gone but Rock and Roll lives on. Interestingly enough, Russell said that often bottles of beer and joints are left on his headstone. We didnt find anything like that, but we did see money scattered about coins that were left instead. When he was moved from that spot they located an unmarked tombstone so he could rest in peace. Apparently, John and his wife had bought a summer home on the island three years prior to his death. We had more of the same interesting tidbits on our way back around to Oak Bluffs and had lunch at Nancys. Its on the water with a deck overlooking the harbor. This was the first stop where we tried the lobster rolls weve been hearing about and boy, were they good lots of large clumps from the claws on a buttered and toasted bun and hmmm hmmm!!! Marthas Vineyard had a lot to offer and touring it the way we did gave us a great overview. Another place to check off the bucket list! TRAVELContinued From 1A Follow the 5 Ds to avoid mosquitosMosquitos have a way of ruining many outdoor activities. Not only are mosquito bites irritating and painful, but they can also transmit serious diseases. An outbreak of Chikungunya, a disease caused by a mosquito transmitted virus, has sickened more than 300,000 people in the Caribbean so far this year. On July 17, two Florida residents reportedly contracted this disease from mosquitos in Florida. There is no vaccine for this virus. Learn more at http://www.cdc.gov/chikungunya. To protect ourselves, we can follow the 5 Ds recommended by the Department of Health: Drain standing water, stay inside from Dusk to Dawn, Dress to minimize exposed skin, and use Deet repellents. There are repellents that work and there are so-called repellents that just dont provide any protection from bites. The effectiveness of a repellent is measured by the length of protection from bites after just one application. This length of time is called the Complete Protection Time, or CPT. The CPT is different for each of the many brands of repellents that we have to choose from at the store. If the mosquitoes dont bite you for three hours after you apply a repellent, then it has a protection time of three hours. Keep in mind that what works for you may not work the same for others members of your family. Other factors that determine how long a repellent works are humidity, temperature, swimming and activities. The Centers for Disease Control recommend Deet, Picaridin, and Oil of Lemon-Eucalyptus as active ingredients for repellents. The active ingredient is the substance which actually keeps the pests away. To get a product with the best protection, look for one of these three ingredients on the label. Read the label for appropriate age and application rates. And never use a repellent that does not have EPA approval on the label. Deet is a synthetic chemical used in many different insect repelling products. Mosquitos are not killed by the chemical, but they do avoid skin treated with Deet. Deet also repels gnats, ticks, mites, and blood-sucking flies. Generally, the higher percentages of Deet offer better protection. This chemical, used now for 46 years, is safe when the label directions are followed. Beware of product advertisements that sound too good to be true. Products containing Citronella have a very short protection time, if any at all. Products that simply strap onto the wrist were shown to have zero protection. To see the protection test results of many products go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ IN419. Become informed before you buy. There are devices on the market that claim to spray, zap, or scare away mosquitoes. Bug zappers are devices that have been around for decades. They attract mosquitoes with ultraviolet light and then electrocute them. Studies have shown, however, that the population of biters is not really reduced. Other types of flying insects are zapped more often than mosquitos. Maybe just the sound of constant zapping makes us feel more bug proofed. According to the Federal Trade Commission, the claims that ultrasonic sound devices repel mosquitoes are false. The products are battery operated and are said to emit sounds that frighten the mosquitos. The devices dont kill or repel mosquitoes, and they dont protect us or our pets. Get the most for your money, stay safe and be an educated consumer. COURTESY UF/IFASAedes aegypti: The yellow fever mosquito.GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@u.edu D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Birth Announcement: Its a boyRobert James WeatherspoonU.S. Army Warrant Officer Robert J. Bobby Weatherspoon and former U.S. Army Spc. Ashley Brown Weatherspoon announce the birth of their son, Robert James on May 2 in Seoul, Korea. Robert James weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and measured 19 inches. He joins Destiny, 11 and Jasmine, 7. Grandparents are James and Lillie Brown of Orangeburg, SC, and Robert and Deborah Weatherspoon of Lake City. Great-grandparents are Richardean Brown and the late James Brown of Orangeburg, SC; Albert and Louise Mack of Orangeburg, SC; Ophelia Lucas and the late James Lucas of Jacksonville; and the late Calvin and Bernice Weatherspoon of Madison. MarriageShefchik weds BhaskarDr. and Mrs. Girish and Prema Bhaskar of Lake City are pleased to announce the wedding of their son, Sudhir Bhaskar, to Lori Beth Shefchik, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul and Jan Shefchik of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. The wedding was July 26 at Baileys Harbor, Wis. The groom graduated from Columbia High School in 1998. He works as the E-commerce Manager at the corporate headquarters of Inter Continental Hotel Group in Atlanta, Ga. The bride is employed as an Assistant Professor of Accounting at the Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. Upcoming weddingCox and Banis to wedRandy and Cheryl Cox, of Lake City, announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their daughter, Lesley Megan Cox, of Gainesville, to Patrick Casimir Banis, of Gainesville, son of Richard and Trisha Banis, of Sebring. An August wedding is planned. Cox is a 2003 graduate of Columbia High School and a 2007 graduate of the University of Florida with a degree in Public Relations and Business. She is employed as Executive Director of Sebastian Ferrero Foundation. Banis is a 1998 graduate of Sebring High School and a 2002 graduate of the University of Florida with a degree in Business Administration. He is employed as an Agency Development Manager at Tower Hill Insurance Group. CHS ReunionThe CHS Class of 1984 will hold its 30th High School Reunion on Saturday, Aug. 9 from 6-11 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall. Cost is $40 per person. Start the weekend early with a meet & greet at Gators Dockside, Friday, Aug. 8 at 7 p.m. Make payments to www. payitsquare.com/collect-page/28609 or visit the Facebook page CHS Class of 1984 30th Reunion. You may also call Kelli K. Ronsonet at 386-397-9482. CHS ReunionThe CHS Class of 1974 will hold its 40th Class Reunion on August 15 and 16. Friday, August 15 will consist of an informal get-together at Gator Dockside at 7 p.m. Saturday, August 16 will be the reunion at Quail Heights Country Club. Social hour will begin at 7 p.m.; a DJ will perform from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. The cash bar will be available all night along with hor doeuvres. Cost is $25 per person or $50 per couple. Send your registration and check payable to CHS 1974 Class Reunion, 223 SE Lillian Loop Apt. 102 (Lake City) no later than August 1. Contact Tonia Edenfield at 386-961-6328 with questions.SHS ReunionThe SHS Class of 1984 will hold its 30th Class Reunion on Saturday, Oct. 25 starting at 6:30 p.m. at The Brown Lantern, 417 E. Howard St., Live Oak. Dress is casual. Cost is $40 per person. A cash bar will be available at a discounted price for wine and bottled beer. Entertainment is provided by DJ Kickin' Kevin Thomas. RSVP to shs1984reunion@gmail. com by Aug. 15. Payment must be received by Sept. 15. Make check/money order payable to Class of 1984 and send to Class of 1984 Sue Swann Ratliff P.O. Box 120 McAlpin, FL 32062. The Holiday Inn Express is offering a lodging discount: $112.57 per night with a minimum of 10 rooms reserved. Reservation deadline is Oct. 6. Questions? Email shs1984reunion@gmail. com.Dont miss your class reunionDa Vinci ProgramThe Art league of North Florida, The Friends of the Library, and the Columbia County Library are offering free art classes entitled The Young Da Vinci Program at the West Branch of the Public Library. Registration is July 30 from 10 11:30 a.m. The classes will be held Thursday, July 31, Friday, August 1, and Saturday, August 2 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day. The program is for children ages 10 through 14. The classes are taught by professional artists. Class space is limited and is offered on a first-come basis. For additional information call the Gateway Art Gallery at 752-5229.Artists Wanted for ExhibitionThe Live Oak Artists Guild will be presenting their annual fine arts exhibition September 8-19. All artists, age 18 or older, are eligible and invited to submit an application. Applications and with an entry fee of $25 for members or $35 for non-members must be submitted by August 22. A photo or digital image must be submitted with the application. Applications are available at The Frame Shop & Gallery and the Suwannee River Regional Library. Or, artists may download/print the application from: http://theloag.blogspot.com/. If you have any questions, please contact Glinda Pennock at 386-364-9363. Autumn Artfest 2014 awards will be determined by the entries and donations received. Art in the area