The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02393

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By EMILY STANTONestanton@lakecityreporter.comThe fallout of the 2010 primary election still lingers in Columbia County as the 2014 primary approaches. The wife of one candidate remains under indictment for alleged voter fraud, and isnt scheduled to have her next court appearance until after early voting begins. Betty Jefferson, wife of District 10 City Councilman Eugene Jefferson, was arrest ed along with another CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 08 TODAYS WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4A Local . . . . . . . 6-7A Obituaries . . . . . 5A Advice & Comics . . 3D Puzzles . . . . . . . 4B SPORTSIndians head to Fellowship of Christian Athletes, 1B. 88 70Chance of storms, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.50 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM SUNDAY EDITION Wilderness Trail big draw for tourists.1C Fort White FFA is Floridas Finest.1DTime to shutter Shining Star. OPINIONCharges pending against teacherBy MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comA man was shot in the chest and killed Friday after an argument over a woman, according to police, and a suspect has turned himself in. Tommy E. Freeman, 39, was found lying face down on the ground in the back yard of 698 SE Nassau Street, where police arrived at 6:02 p.m. after receiving a report of gunshots. Freeman was transported to Shands of Lake Shore, where he was pronounced dead from a single gunshot wound to the chest, according to an LCPD news release. The suspect, Delvin Devonte Wilson, 20, turned himself in to police at 10 a.m. Saturday accompanied by several family members, Voter fraud case lingers Will not be settled before the start of early voting Aug. 16. Subject of CCSOs Pinemount probe is identified. Ivery Jeerson4A LINGERS continued on 6A SUSPECT continued on 7A Local man says medical marijuana is the answer to his chronic health problems and to his prayers. Sheriff Mark Hunter contends ballot measure is too vague and will lead to wrong people getting the drug. By MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comDespite the criticism that the medical marijuana movement has received, Delbert Mullins is hopeful that Amendment 2 will pass this November. The ballot measure would allow licensed physicians to prescribe marijuana for medical purposes. Mullins, a 65-year-old Vietnam War veteran, was arrested on Aug. 10, 2011 after officers in a law enforcement helicopter spotted two pot plants growing in the backyard of his home in Fort White. He started growing the plants to treat his many chronic illnesses, including back and neck pain, heart disease, Hepatitis C and arthritis. Being in pain all the time was just really depressing, he said. And the cannabis helped a lot with the depression, too. Before he started growing pot in small amounts, he was taking between 10 and 15 prescribed medications a day. The medicines would make him extremely nauseous and were very expensive. His medication was costing us about $600 a month, Karen Mullins said. His income is about $650 dollars a month. She said her husband would use the marijuana to ease his pain, not to get high. They would pull the plants before they matured and produced buds, in order to ensure a lower level of THC, she said. THC is what gives marijuana users the feeling of euphoria, or high. Not that I think a little euphoria for a dying or suffering patient is a bad thing, but thats not what he was using it for, Karen said. She explained that marijuana can be ingested by other means than smoking. I would make glycerin, and a drop under his tongue would stop his migraine headaches at the onset, she said. The medicines just dont work as well as the cannabis. The glycerin mixture would also usual-By MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.com Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter said that the problem with Amendment 2 is that it is unclear. There needs to be a candid discussion about what is classified as medical and what is classified as recreational, Hunter said. Once we get that defined we can address the issue, but I think what is happening is the folks who want it recreationally are using medical patients as a path to that. Hunter said he fears that the vagueness and lack of specificity in the law will make it too easy for citizens to but marijuana whether there is real medical need or not. Laws cant be made up as they go, he said, it needs to be clear how it can be prescribed, who prescribes it and how patient eligibility is determined. As a member of the Florida Sheriffs Association, Hunter recently helped draft a resolution to express concern about the legalization of the drug. The FSA said its priority is to protect the safety of Floridas citizens, and it believes that Amendment 2, if passed, will interfere with that. Florida sheriffs believe that approving broad exceptions to current state and federal law that would allow doctors to authorize use of marijuana for virtually any reason with little regulation will hurt children and families and lead to a lower quality of life for all, the resolution said. The organization is worried that the legalization of medicinal marijuana will lead to widespread use amongst healthy citizens, as well as children. The teen marijuana usage rate in Colorado, a state that recently legalized the drug for recreational use, is 50 percent above the national average, according to FSA. I am not opposed to medical marijuana by any means, Hunter said. What I am opposed to is not having it defined and not being clear. Karen, Delbert Mullins HunterNurseryman says No to the lure of marijuana money JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterKenneth Witt, owner of the G & K Nursery, said the cons vastly outweighed the pros when it came to starting a marijuana farm. Although he said he could have potentially earned millions of dollars, the moral implications would have been too much to bear. Whats the word on weed?June jobless numbers up slightly here CON continued on 6A PRO continued on 6ABy SARAH LOFTUSsloftus@lakecityreporter.comThe Columbia County Sheriffs Office says battery and child cruelty charges are warranted against a Pinemount Elementary School kindergarten teacher who allegedly spanked her students with rulers and paddles. State Attorney Jeff Siegmeister said hes still reviewing the case and is unsure if hell file charges against Mary Lee Rachal. However, he said he does know this is not a case of battery. Siegmeister said corporal punishment is legal in Florida, and hes not sure what charges, if PENDING continued on 7A By EMILY STANTONestanton@lakecityreporter.comUnemployment rates went up in June for Columbia County, according to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. Unemployment was at 6.1 percent for June, a 0.2 percent increase from Mays 5.9 percent. However, unemployment was 1 percent lower than June 2013s unemployment rate of 7.1 percent. Florida has a 6.2 percent unemployment rate. In 2013, it was 7.4 percent. The national unemployment rate is 6.1 percent for June. Prior to June, Floridas unemployment rate had been less than or equal to the national rate for 13 consecutive months, according to FDEO. The Columbia County labor force decreased from 31,924 in May to 31,724 in June. A difference of 218. This is still larger than the labor force in June 2013, which was 31,446. Employment levels also decreased. In June 29,787 people in Columbia County were employed. In May 30,032 people had jobs. MORE INSIDESee report on state jobless rate for June, Page 1C. Unemployment ticks up to 6.1%.1 shot, killed in spat over a womanBy MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comAfter thinking long and hard about applying to become a licensed medical marijuana grower for the state of Florida, 81-year-old Lake City farmer Kenneth Witt has decided against it. Many Florida farmers are considering the venture if Amendment 2 passes in November, but according to Witt, its a gamble and the stakes are high. The constitutional amendment will allow for up to five growers statewide. Growers will be chosen based on WITT continued on 6ALCPD: Suspect turns self in, invokes right to counsel. Wilson

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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 SPRING HILL T wo men hired to clean out a vacant Tampa Bay area house thought they found a mannequin hanging in the garage. They cut it down and hauled it to the local dump, where landfill workers realized it was actually a human body. Hernando County Sheriff’s officials on Thursday said the 33-year-old Spring Hill man apparently committed suicide several weeks ago and his body was in a “state of decomposition similar to mummification.” Israel Lopez and Adam Hines told authorities they thought the former renters had left a “Halloween-like” hoax. Lopez hauled the debris to the landfill while Hines continued cleaning. Landfill workers spotted the remains and called deputies. Lopez was questioned when he brought a second load to the dump. Hines and the property owner were also questioned. An investigation continues. Worker dies of electrocution ST. AUGUSTINE — Police say a refrigeration company worker was found dead of apparent elec trocution on the roof of a north east Florida convenience store. The St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office reports that 47-year-old Robert Wagner of Orange Park had been working on a cooling unit at the Kangaroo convenience store. A police officer on patrol at 2:30 a.m. Thursday found the body after noticing a ladder on the side of the building. Wagner worked for Integrity First Refrigeration of DeLand. An official cause of death will be determined by an autopsy. Area newspapers report that this is the second apparent elec trocution in the county in three weeks. Police say a 24-year-old was found dead on the roof of anoth er business June 25 after work ing on the lighting. Boy, 11, helps save drowning toddler INDIAN ROCKS BEACH — Authorities say an alert 11-year-old boy helped save a toddler from drowning in an Indian Rocks Beach hotel. The Tampa Bay Times reports 3-year-old Dominic A. Cicco was swimming in the Holiday Inn pool with his father, Vincent Cicco on Thursday afternoon when Riley Cooper noticed something was wrong with the boy. He helped the 42-year-old father pull the child from the water. Some nearby adults per formed CPR on the child and called 911. The child was taken to the hospital. Officials say he is expected to survive. Paramedic resigns after drug arrest PINELLAS PARK — A Pinellas Park firefighter and SWAT paramedic has resigned after he was accused of selling prescription drugs. Pinellas Park spokesman Tim Caddell says 38-year-old James A. Comer submitted a handwrit ten resignation late Wednesday. The Tampa Bay Times reports Comer was arrested Saturday on 16 counts of dealing or possessing drugs. His medical license was suspended and he was placed on paid leave, pend ing an investigation. Comer also worked part-time in the emergency room at Northside Hospital. Reports show he was arrest ed in the hospital parking lot. Officials say he had 184 prescrip tion pills, including OxyContin, morphine and hydromorphone. Comer remained in the Pinellas County Jail on Thursday morning. It’s not known whether he’s hired a lawyer. Police: Father beats accused child abuser DAYTONA BEACH — Police say a Daytona Beach father beat an 18-year-old man unconscious after finding him sexually abus ing his son. Authorities say the father called 911 early Friday after he walked in on the alleged abuse. When officers arrived they found Raymond Frolander motionless on the living room floor. He had several knots on his face and was bleeding from the mouth. The Daytona Beach NewsJournal reports the father — who was not identified by police — told investigators he walked in as Frolander was abusing the boy. Police did not release the boy’s age, but Frolander is charged with sexual battery on a child under 12. Frolander is being held with out bail. It was not known wheth er he’s hired a lawyer. The arrest affidavit says Frolander admitted the abuse. Boy accused of stealing school bus PARKER — Officials say the 12-year-old boy arrested after stealing a school bus earlier this summer is accused of stealing another bus. The boy was arrested Wednesday after he was stopped for erratic driving in the Florida Panhandle. The News-Herald of Panama City reports the boy found a key left hidden in a school bus at Parker Elementary School after a bus driver finished his route and drove to Franklin County, west of Panama City. Bay District Schools safety and security officer Mike Jones says the boy had just been released from the Department of Juvenile Justice a day earlier. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS HOW TO REAC H USMain number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com)A DVERT IS ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com)CL ASSIFI EDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CI RCU L AT IONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Friday) 3-7-2 Play 4: (Friday) 7-0-6-6 Fantasy 5: (Thursday) 3-8-10-15-26 Florida Lotto: (Wednesday) 3-6-8-33-35-37-x2 PowerBall: (Wednesday) 5-15-18-26-32-35-x3EMILY STANTON/ Lake City ReporterTree splitsA tree more than 20 feet tall lies split down the middle at 9221 County Roa d 131. It is believed the tree was struck by lightning.Human remains mistakenly brought to landfill AROUND FLORIDA The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. See an error? The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run on this page at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. SubmissionsJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterCooling offMarissa Anderson (from left), 8, and her brothers, Nicholas, 9, and Da meon, 10, play in the fountain at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Sandusky son alleges even worse abuse HARRISBURG, Pa. — Jerry Sandusky’s adopted son Matthew said in a television interview Thursday that his sexual abuse at the former Penn State coach’s hands consisted of oral sex, a more serious allegation than he made to detectives two years ago. Matthew Sandusky spoke on “Oprah Prime” about abuse he says occurred when Jerry Sandusky would tuck him in during overnight stays at the Sandusky home in central Pennsylvania, after being instructed to wear only underwear or blue mesh shorts. Jerry Sandusky would tickle, blow on his belly and wrestle on the floor, he said, and the encounters would gradu ally become more sexual. “Then it’s, then as I now know, it’s oral sex,” he told Oprah Winfrey. “He’s doing that to you and it’s very confus ing, it’s very confusing for you because you have a reaction, you know. It’s something that you at that time you definitely don’t know what’s happen ing.” The claim of oral sex was specifically denied in an audiotape of his 29-minute interview with police detectives that NBC obtained at the time of Jerry Sandusky’s 2012 trial. Matt Sandusky told investigators two years ago that Jerry Sandusky had rubbed along or against his genitals but that he did not recall any pene tration or oral sex. He said then that he was getting therapy and memories were coming back to him. He told police he came forward to correct the record from his own grand jury testimony. “So that they can really have closure and see what the truth actually is. And just to right the wrong, honestly, of going to the grand jury and lying,” Matt Sandusky said two years ago. He was not called to testify, and Jerry Sandusky has not been charged with any crime in relation to his adopted son. Filmmakers speak out on Allman train crash SAVANNAH, Ga. — Two filmmakers charged in a train collision that killed a camera assistant while shooting a movie about singer Gregg Allman said Thursday her death “will haunt us forev er.” But they insisted they committed no crimes that put their crew in harm’s way. “Midnight Rider” director Randall Miller and Jody Savin, his wife and busi ness partner, issued a joint statement two weeks after a grand jury indicted them on charges of involuntary man slaughter and criminal trespassing in southeast Georgia. Their attorney, Don Samuel, said Thursday he entered a not guilty plea on behalf of the California-based couple. The filmmakers had just begun shooting their movie based on Allman’s life on Feb. 20 when a freight train plowed into their crew on a railroad bridge southwest of Savannah. Six crew members were injured and 27-year-old camera assistant Sarah Jones of Atlanta was killed. “This devastating loss of Sarah, a young crew member who was just start ing out with us, will haunt us forever,” Miller and Savin’s statement said. “Our hearts are broken, our spirits are bro ken.” Sheriff’s investigators said the film makers climbed onto the train trestle without permission from CSX Railroad, though they had permission from another company to shoot on property it owned surrounding the tracks. The indictment charges Miller and Savin with unintentionally causing Jones’ death by trespassing on the rail road bridge. The filmmakers went onto the train trestle even after CSX denied them access, the indictment says. “This was not a crime: we never had criminal intent; we would never know ingly or intentionally put anybody’s safe ty at risk,” Miller and Savin’s statement said. Scripture of the Day When I look back on all these worries,I remember the story of the old manwho said on his deathbedthat he had had a lot of trouble in his life,most of which had never happened.— Winston Churchill, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1874-1965) I will praise You with uprightness of heart,When I learn Your righteous judgments. I will keep Your statutes;Oh, do not forsake me utterly!How can a young man cleanse his way?By taking heed according to Your word.— Psalm 119:7-9 Thought for Today Q Associated Press Q Associated Press

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By SARAH LOFTUSsloftus@lakecityreporter.comTwo local teens have been critically injured in ATV accidents in recent months, and theyre not the only ones. Three other ATV accidents in Columbia County in 2014 have also left people injured, Florida Highway Patrol data shows. And there probably have been even more crashes, as not all ATV accidents are reflected in the data. If someone gets in an ATV accident and goes to the hospital, the hospital typically reports it to FHP, and then FHP decides whether to file a report. The danger the machines pose is well known, but over the years that hasnt stopped the carnage. In 2013, there were eight ATV crashes in Columbia County reported to law enforcement. According to data provided by FHP, six of those left people injured, one fatally. In 2012, 11 ATV crashes were reported. Eight resulted in injuries. Ten ATV accidents were reported in 2011. Six people were injured, and one died. Data from ATVSafety.gov shows that there were 327 reported deaths related to ATV crashes in the U.S. in 2011. The site estimates that there were about 107,500 visits to the emergency room from ATV accidents in 2011. Statistics for 2012 and 2013 were unavailable. ATVs have a high center of gravity, which makes them naturally unstable. FHP Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace said many of the accidents happen because people drive too fast. Cristy Carson, a local paramedic with Lifeguard Ambulance Service, said she believes high speed is the No. 1 cause of accidents. There are many different kinds of ATVs, but many will go as fast as 70 mph. Often times, people dont realize that, she said. Theyre deceptive they look small and almost like toys, Carson said. You see this little thing and think it cant do that much damage, she said. But it can. However, theyre every bit as powerful as a motorcycle in many cases. But unlike a motorcycle, which will often slide away from the rider in a crash, an ATV will often land on top of the rider. A lot of the times when it does roll over, it will roll on top of the person, Carson said. Couple that with the fact that ATV riders often dont wear helmets, and you have a recipe for tragedy. This kind of accident often causes head, neck, chest and spinal injuries, she said. Hayley Lewis, 19, one of the local teens who was recently severely injured in an ATV accident, had an accident of this nature. On June 28, she was driving her friends ATV without a helmet when she lost control, causing it to flip. Lewis is suffering from severe head injuries from the accident. But Lewis isnt alone. According to the Mayo Clinic website, head injuries are the primary cause of deaths associated with ATV accidents. Helmets can prevent some injuries but not all. Some studies suggest that helmets could reduce the risk of fatal head injury by 42 percent and the risk of nonfatal head injury by as much as 64 percent, the Mayo Clinic site says. Carson said ATV riders should always wear helmets because even though they wont prevent all injuries, they will help to prevent critical head trauma. They do make a huge difference in protecting the head, skull and brain, she said. Personally, I wouldnt get on one without a helmet. Besides rollovers, many ATV accidents are caused by drivers running their ATVs into something, such as fences or trees, Carson said. Brent Fout, the other local teenager who was critically injured in an ATV accident this year, did just that. The 17-year-old wasnt wearing a helmet when on March 21 he sideswiped a fence while driving his ATV with friends in Lafayette County near Branford. He had a minor concussion and broke a vertebrae and some ribs from the crash. He also fractured the top of his neck and was left paralyzed from the ribcage down. Carson said from this kind of accident, drivers usually fracture their pelvises and femurs. When ATV drivers hit something head on, theyre usually thrown forward off the vehicle, but while theyre being thrown, they typically hit the handle bars, which causes their injuries. Carson said ATVs should be driven in big, open areas where youre unlikely to hit anything. She also advises people to ride in an area where theyre familiar with the terrain, she said. ATVs can be fun, but you cant be reckless when driving them, Carson said. Her advice? Know the vehicle. Know how fast it can go, know how many people can safely ride it at once, and know what its capable of, Carson said. Read the manual that comes with the ATV and observe all safety warnings. You have to make sure youve done your research and take the proper safety precautions. Anytime you drive anything, you have to use caution when you operate it, Carson said. When crashes occur, somethings missing, Hisler-Pace said. That may be a helmet, other safety gear such as googles, or simply knowledge about ATVs. Carson said she has responded to ATV accidents in which threeand four-yearolds have been injured after crashing while driving ATVs. Children under the age of 16 should not drive adult ATVs. Theyre simply not big and strong enough to handle the machines. Something else ATV riders do thats unsafe is ride with passengers, Carson said. Most ATVs are not safe for multiple people, and if an ATV can handle two people, it will say so in the manual, she said. Again, it all goes back to knowing your vehicle. It doesnt matter whether the passenger is sitting behind the driver or is a child in the drivers lap -its unsafe unless the ATV manual specifically says two people can ride it, Carson said. If someone is sitting behind the driver, it makes the ATV less stable and increases the passengers odds of flying off, according to the Mayo Clinic website. When a child sits in an adults lap on an ATV, it changes the way the adult drives it and decreases maneuverability. Be cautious. Just like with a car, ride it safely and with due care. Its not a toy, Carson said. It looks like a toy .... But its not. Injuries attributed to high speed and lack of respect for the vehicles power. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 3A 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL(Next to Courthouse) ATV crashes adding up locally Stevens Murray Lake Weaver Anderson GaskinsBe cautious. Just like with a car, ride it safely and with due care. It looks like a toy. But its not. Christy Carson, 6 busted in drug stingBy MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comLocal officers have conducted several undercover drug operations within the city, resulting in the arrest of six local residents Tuesday. According to a Lake City Police Department news release Friday, the operations were conducted by officers from the LCPD Criminal Interdiction Unit, along with members from the the Columbia County High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Initiative. The operation is ongoing and more arrests are expected, according to a release. Five of the arrestees were from Lake City, including Kody K. Murray, Kylie L. Stevens, Eric J. Weaver, John R. Gaskins and William C. Lake. Murray, 24, was charged with one count of delivering and distributing drugs and is being held on a $30,000 bond. Stevens, 30, was charged with four counts of drug possession and is being held on a $30,000 bond. Both Weaver, 23, and Gaskins, 50, are being held on $30,000 bonds each for one count of delivering and distributing drugs Lake, 33, is on a $32,000 bond for resisting an officer and possession of both drugs and drug equipment. Stevens, 30, was for possession of a controlled substance, LCPD said. She has since been released on $20,000 bond. Jasper resident Daniel J. Anderson, 31, was charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance and one count of delivering and distributing drugs. He is being held on a $40,000 bond. According to LCPD spokesman Craig Strickland, more information will come as more arrests are made. I dont know how much longer the investigation will continue, Strickland said. Because we have been pretty successful catching them so far. Man pawned stolen $9,000 pendant for $5, says CCSOBy EMILY STANTONestanton@lakecityreporter.comA man who allegedly pawned a $9,000 emerald pendant for $5 last year has been jailed. Jordan Cayne Dees, 19, of 4146 288th Terrace, Branford, was arrested on charges of violating the Florida Pawnbroking Act and dealing in stolen property, according to the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. On Dec. 19, 2013, a man contacted CCSO in reference to a stolen piece of jewelry being sold in Columbia County, the report said. The man said he reported a theft of several items from his Branford residence, including a $9,000 emerald pendant. The Suwannee County Sheriffs Office investigated and arrested Dees, the report said. Dees admitted to SCSO that he sold the pendant to Money Man Pawn in Lake City for $5. The emerald pendent was returned to the owner, who paid Money Man the $5 they spent on the item, CCSO said. Dees was arrested Thursday and booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility. He has since been released on $5,000 bond. Dees Local woman faces drug chargeBy EMILY STANTONestanton@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City woman was arrested on charges of drug possession after 10 milligrams of oxycodone was allegedly found in her purse Thursday, according to the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. MaryJean Kathleen Ledford, 37, of 801 SW Alfalfa Ave., was a passenger in a vehicle that officers conducted a traffic stop on at the intersection of Arrowhead Road and State Road 47. The driver was not wearing a seat belt, CCSO said. The driver was given a written warning. Officers then got permission to search the vehicle, CCSO said. In plain view the passengers purse was open and close to the drivers seat, according to the report. Officers saw small pieces of ripped and folded napkins in the purse, CCSO said. Two pills were located in each napkin, the report said. Ledford identified the pills as tramandol, police said. She stated the pills were hers but could not provide a prescription. Ledford reportedly told officers she got the pills in Kentucky in January but trashed the bottles they came in. Ledford was transported to the Columbia County Jail on a charge of drug possession without incident. Ledford

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R epublican Sen. John Cornyn and Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar, both from Texas, presented a bill last week to address the most urgent aspect of the immigra-tion crisis: finding a mechanism to return unaccompanied Central American minors to their countries as quickly as possible. Lawmakers should give this bill serious consid-eration. Congress must place the highest priority on stanching the immigra-tion flow by telling would-be immi-grants that they won’t succeed in attempts to flood our borders and remain here illegally. The message they’re currently receiving from smuggling organizations is that they are sheltered from immediate deportation because of a 2008 U.S. law designed to combat child sex trafficking. “It shows how creative the criminal mind can be,” Cornyn said of the smugglers, who reap millions in profits from migrants and pass the proceeds to the Mexican drug cartels that control access to the border. Cornyn correctly notes that the current crisis is not a border-secu-rity problem. These youths are not evading capture. In fact, they’re sur-rendering immediately, having been told by smugglers that U.S. deten-tion is just a temporary obstacle. Given the high levels of poverty and violence back home in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, the incentive is high for children to attempt the danger-ous run for the U.S. border. They need the strongest possible signal — planeloads of deportees return-ing home in defeat — to understand that this is not a route to success. The Cornyn-Cuellar bill would dramatically speed up removals by adding 40 more immigration court judges and reducing wait times for youths to appear for removal hearings. Under the 2008 law, unac-companied minors are guaranteed a hearing to determine whether they would face persecution or exploita-tion if returned to their countries. The court process can take months, during which time they are released to live with family members or care-givers. Nearly half never return for their hearing. When word of this process reaches back home, thousands more migrants follow. Cornyn wants to cut the wait time to within seven days of an initial screening and potentially get them on a plane back home shortly thereafter. This bill wouldn’t address the estimated 57,000 children who already have entered since October and are protected by the 2008 provi-sions. It would, however, handle the additional tens of thousands almost certain to arrive in coming months. Cornyn didn’t have a cost figure for this plan but expects it to be a frac-tion of the $3.7 billion White House plan to address the broader immi-gration crisis. Members of Congress, of course, can politicize and debate this pro-posal into oblivion. But voters want solutions now, not more stalemates. And Central Americans need to receive an immediate, unequivocal message: Stay home and don’t risk your lives or money on a fruitless journey. OPINION Sunday, July 20, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Emily Lawson, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com L ast year when Shining Star Academy of the Arts received its first F grade, principal Tony Buzzella warned we shouldn’t have expected too much of the charter school in its first year of operation. It takes a while to get a new system up and run-ning, he said. We’ll do better next time. It was obvious there was a problem.One doesn’t take on so grand a task as founding a school, then expect anything less than excellence. Children’s futures are at stake, and if every detail wasn’t in place, the entire ven-ture should have been put on hold. We hoped to see the improvement Buzzella promised, but it did not happen. While the school did make considerable gains, they weren’t nearly enough to escape another F in 2014. Under state law that means Shining Star will be closed, barring a successful appeal. We encourage the state department of education to deny any appeal quickly and lock the doors on a failed experiment that has damaged the educational outlook of so many local stu-dents. Buzzella has aggressively defended his school from the start — though sometimes with less than perfect candor. After Shining Star scored 248 points out of a possible 800 in its opening year, h e placed the blame squarely on the shoulders of his students. Part of his mission, Buzzella said, was t o take in the kids who were already furthest behind and needed help the most. At the very least, he said, the low-performing students held their own or actually showed some gains during two brief semesters with him. That statement was inaccurate.An examination of school records showed that Shining Star students generally fared worse in their new surroundings than they had in public schools the previous year. When called on to explain the inconsistency, Buzzella suggested his students had been so thoroughly indoctrinated by the faulty educational methods of our public school system that it would take them more time to recover. Now he says he will need yet another year to set things right. He shouldn’t get it.Buzzella’s heart may be in the right place, but good intentions aren’t nearly enough when young students’ futures are at stake. In addi-tion, taxpayers have already spent $2.6 million funding a school that just isn’t getting the job done. Buzzella’s bold experiment has failed badly. The state needs to step in and put an end to it. It’s time to shutter Shining Star Odd ways of dealing with our problems Q Dallas Morning News W e Americans are mar-velously inventive when it comes to dealing with our piques. That clever Speaker of the House, Rep. John “The Tan Man” Boehner, R-Ohio, figured that by suing the president he could: 1. Anger the White House2. Appeal to tea partyers3. Look as if he is actually doing something. A lawsuit would be historic; neither the House nor the Senate has ever sued the president over a poli-cy difference. Strangely, this could give the courts more power, which most conservatives don’t want. Obama is facing lawsuits because he says he’s so tired of Congress doing nothing that he is going to use his power to promulgate execu-tive actions, long a tool of frustrated White House occupants. (Obama has issued 182; George W. Bush issued 291; Bill Clinton issued 364; George H.W. Bush signed 166; Ronald Reagan, 381.) Thus while dozens of measures get tabled, the House is busily hold-ing hearings about suing Obama. Ironically, Republicans want to sue Obama for delaying parts of Obamacare, which they fought tooth and nail. (Did we mention that this is the most “do-nothing” Congress in his-tory? Did we note that even though it hasn’t done anything about any-thing, including immigration reform and the bankrupt highway trust fund that’s supposed to fix winter potholes and crumbling bridges, Congress is about to take a vacation for much of the rest of the year? Can we sue Congress for taking our money under false pretenses?) Constitutional lawyers say Boehner’s ploy is somewhat sopho-moric and that no court would take it seriously. Boehner doesn’t care; it gives him a chance to go before TV cameras and spout off furiously about the president although every-body knows Capitol Hill elevator operators have more clout than the speaker. President Obama looked Boehner in the eye (well, stared down Constitution Avenue — they never actually meet these days) and said: “Bring it on.” And how about that billionaire venture capitalist Tim Draper in California who says the state is so ungovernable that he is spending buckets of money to get an initia-tive on the ballot so Californians may vote on splitting into six states? This would have the effect of mak-ing Silicon Valley one of the richest enclaves in the world, while the Central Valley would be very poor. This appears to be the latest equivalent of gerrymandering where the party in power redesigns legislative districts to favor itself. And then there is the effort to rewrite voting requirements to pre-vent whole groups of people such as blacks or Hispanics or poor people who might tend to vote a certain way, say Democratic, from voting. This is being done so uniquely that other countries are fascinated: Arbitrarily refusing to take certain forms of identification such as stu-dent IDs; requiring poor people to travel hundreds of miles to get long-forgotten birth certificates; chang-ing voting hours to make it difficult for the working poor to vote. Another innovative way Americans are voicing antipathy is by blocking buses carrying children who have been gathered up after illegally crossing the southern U.S. border to try to find relatives and escape drug cartels, gang violence, prostitution and early death in such countries as Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. Thus, terrified children who have traveled a thousand miles or more by themselves are intimidated by adults shouting a welcome of “Go home!” Obama has been very stern here; he is vowing to send them back to the vile neighborhoods from whence they came. In fact, for five years in a row, Obama has set record highs for officially deporting undocumented people. Someone is sure to propose chiseling off “give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearn-ing to breathe free; the wretched refuse of your teeming shore; send these, the homeless, tempest-tost, to me” from the base of the Statue of Liberty. That might help those foreigners get over the idea they’re welcome here. And if they keep coming, we’ll sic Boehner on them. Thwarting migrant smugglers Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q McClatchey News Service columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986.4AOPINION

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER COMMUNITY SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 5A To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by email at elawson@lakecityreporter.com.COMMUNITY CALENDAR L A K E C I T Y C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y M E E T I N G C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t h a t t h e L a k e C i t y C o m m u n i t y R e d e v e l o p m e n t A g e n c y f o r t h e C i t y o f L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a w i l l h o l d a m e e t i n g o n M o n d a y J u l y 2 1 2 0 1 4 a t 6 : 3 0 P M i n t h e C o u n c i l C h a m b e r s l o c a t e d o n t h e s e c o n d f l o o r o f C i t y H a l l a t 2 0 5 N o r t h M a r i o n A v e n u e L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a T H E P U R P O S E O F T H E M E E T I N G I S : D i s c u s s i o n F a a d e g r a n t s R e s o l u t i o n 2 0 1 4 0 2 A p p r o p r i a t e f u n d s f o r l a n d p u r c h a s e C I T Y C O U N C I L M E E T I N G T H E C I T Y C O U N C I L O F T H E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A WI L L M E E T O N M O N D A Y J U L Y 2 1 2 0 1 4 A T 7 : 0 0 P M I N T H E C O U N C I L C H A M B E R S L O C A T E D O N T H E S E C O N D F L O O R O F C I T Y H A L L A T 2 0 5 N O R T H M A R I O N A V E N U E L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A A l l i n t e r e s t e d p e r s o n s a r e i n v i t e d t o a t t e n d t h e m e e t i n g s i d e n t i f i e d a b o v e S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f y o u r e q u i r e s p e c i a l a i d o r s e r v i c e s f o r a n y o f t h e m e e t i n g s i d e n t i f i e d a b o v e a s a d d r e s s e d i n t h e A m e r i c a n D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t p l e a s e c o n t a c t t h e C i t y M a n a g e r s O f f i c e a t ( 3 8 6 ) 7 1 9 5 7 6 8 A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k Michael Diebold Allison, MD Dr. Michael Diebold Allison, age 61, passed away recently at his home in Lake City, Florida. He was born on January 27, 1953 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to Joe and Hazel Allison. Michael grew up in DeLand, Florida, and graduated from DeLand High School, class of 1971. He attended Stetson University where he graduated with honors, and received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry. Upon completion of his BS degree, Michael earned a Doctor of Medicine degree, and a Masters Degree in Public Health at the University of Miami. Dr. Allison served as a physician in communities throughout Florida for many years. Michael is survived by his beloved wife, Janis, and his adult children, Shannon and Shane. Michael is also survived by his mother, Hazel Allison, of DeLand, and his brothers Steven Ray Allison Edwards, Jack Allison, and Carson Allison. He was preceded in death by his father, Joe Allison. Friends and family are invited to celebrate Michaels life on Tuesday, July 22, 2014, at 3:00 p.m. at Stetson Baptist Church, 1025 West Minnesota Avenue, DeLand, Florida. A reception at the church will immediately follow the memorial service. be made to the Shane Allison Custodial Fund, Surety Bank, 990 North Woodland Boulevard, DeLand, Florida 32720. The family is comforted by knowing that Michael is in the arms of his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.Alma Love Sparks Alma Love Sparks, 93, went home to be with her Lord & Savior on Monday; July 14, 2014 at Still Waters ALF. She was born in Roxboro, North Carolina to the late Andrew and Nola [Cozart] Clayton and had lived in Lake City for the past 18 years, having moved here originally from Baltimore, Maryland. She was a loving mother, grand & great grandmother who enjoyed cooking, sewing and making crafts, and serving as a member of the Lake Shore Hospital Auxiliary. Her biggest joy was the time she spent with her family, especially her grandchildren. She loved serving the Lord and was a devoted member of Columbia Baptist Church and will be dearly missed by her loving church family. She is preceded in death by her parents, her brothers, Raymond & Dameron Clayton; sisters, Eula Long, Ruby Horton, and Janie Pecarina; sons, Stephen & Sterling Sparks; daughter Denise Edwards and her devoted husband of 53 years Glenn James Sparks. Survivors include her son, Gary (Barbara) Sparks of Lake City, FL; daughter, Rebecca (J.Ivan) Weaver of The Villages, FL; sisters, Nettie Wrenn of Roxboro, NC and Myrtice Clayton of Charlotte, NC; grandchildren, Bethany, Stephen, and Laura; great grandchildren, Morgan, Kayla, and Conner also survive. Private family services will be held at a later date. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family online at www.gatewayforestlawn.comObituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES EMILY STANTON/Lake City ReporterRelaxing and readingLinwood Birdsong relaxes at Alligator Lake Park Friday afternoon by listening to his radio and reading the cowboy novel The Trailsman by Jon Sharpe. Artists Wanted for ExhibitionThe Live Oak Artists Guild, in partnership with the Suwannee River Regional Library, will be presenting their annual fine arts exhibition September 8-19. All artists, age 18 or older, are eligible and invited to submit an application.Application Deadline: Applications and with an entry fee of $25 for members or $35 for non-members must be submitted by August 22. A photo or digital image must be submitted with the application. Applications are available at The Frame Shop & Gallery and the Suwannee River Regional Library. Or, artists may download/print the application from our blog: http://theloag.blogspot. com/. If you have any questions, please contact Glinda Pennock at 386-364-9363. Awards: Autumn Artfest 2014 awards will be determined by the entries and donations received. A minimum of $3000 will be awarded. Artwork selected for these awards will be exhibited at a special Featured Exhibition at the Suwannee River Regional Library.Da Vinci ProgramThe Art league of North Florida, The Friends of the Library, and the Columbia County Library are offering free art classes entitled The Young Da Vinci Program at the West Branch of the Public Library. Registration is July 30 from 10 11:30 a.m. The classes will be held Thursday, July 31, Friday, August 1, and Saturday, August 2 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m each day. The program is for children ages 10 through 14. The classes are taught by professional artists. Thursdays class will be taught by Jane Kopp and will be The Basic Techniques of Acrylics; Fridays class will be taught by Helen Beaty and will be The Art of Vincent Van Gough; Saturdays class will be taught by Carol Ghionzoli and will be Got your Goat: Painting in Watercolor. The class space is limited and is offered on a first-come basis. For additional information call the Gateway Art Gallery at 752-5229.CPAAA FundraiserThe Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association is hosting a garage sale fundraiser Sept. 5-6 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Flea Market. Proceeds from the fundraiser will help purchase safety equipment for Lake City Police Departments K-9 unit and officers. Please drop off items for donation (excluding clothing) at the vacant parking lot across from LCPD, 225 NW Main Blvd, Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.Poker RunAmerican Legion Riders Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd., will have a poker run Saturday, August 2. Registration will be from 8-9:30 a.m. Cost is $15 for the first hand and $10 each additional hand, or buy six hands for $50 and get a meal at the end of the ride. The ride will consist of four stops, ending at the Legion. There will be drawings, raffles, food and full bar and entertainment. Call 386-697-0288 for more information.ANNOUNCEMENTSJuly 20Mens BreakfastVFW Post 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, will host a Mens Auxiliary Breakfast fundraiser on Sunday, July 20. Cookedto-order breakfast will be served from 9-11 a.m. The fundraiser is open to the public. Call 386-752-5001 for more information.July 21SCORE WorkshopA SCORE Entrepreneurs Workshop will be held Monday, July 21 from 6-8 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. This workshop is for people who are thinking about starting a business or are in business already and need expert advice. There is no cost to attend but an RSVP is required. Call 386-7522000.July 23Q&ARep. Ted Yoho (R-Gainesville) announces mobile office hours at Lake City City Hall, 205 N Marion Ave., hosted by his local constituent advocates on July 23 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.July 24LOUD ConferenceChrist Central Ministries is hosting a LOUD Youth Conference for students to discover Gods purpose for their lives. The conference is July 24-26 at Christ Central. Admission is $30. To register or to get more information go to www. loudcon.org.Estate PlanningLake City Attorney Teresa Byrd Morgan will offer a free estate planning workshop on Thursday, July 24 at 10 a.m. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Call Shana Miller at 386-755-1977 to RSVP.July 25Garage SaleThe Shands Lake Shore Auxiliary will hold its annual garage sale on Friday, July 25 in the first floor conference room of Shands Lake Shore from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The garage sale benefits the auxiliarys continuing education scholarship program. The public is invited to see the pre-Christmas gift shop merchandise along with other donated garage sale items. July 26Ice Cream for BreakfastHoliday Inn & Suites Hotel is taking part in the national fundraiser Ice Cream for Breakfast to benefit Give Kids the World Village and invites the community to attend an ice cream social on Saturday, July 26 at the hotel, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 352-2847445 for more information.RHS Class MeetingRHS Class of 1970 will hold its monthly meeting July 26 from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center. All 1970 class members are invited to attend. Call Dennis Murphy at 386697-3739 for more.July 27Karaoke with MarkVFW Post 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, will have Karaoke with mark on Sunday, July 27. Wings, shrip and burgers will be served from 1:30-3 p.m. Karaoke will start at 2 p.m. The event is open to the public. Call 386-752-5001 for more information.Aug. 1Operation ChristmasOperation Christmas Child and Chick-fil-A will host a community fundraiser event at Chick-fil-A Friday, Saturday, and Monday Aug. 1,2, and 4 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Donate school supplies valued at least $2 and receive a coupon for an original chicken sandwich. Half of the collected school supplies will go to Columbia County Schools and half will go to Operation Christmas Child for shoeboxes.Friday JazzThe first First Friday Jazz event will be Aug. 1 from 6-10 p.m. at Track Sports and Entertainment Club, 164 NE Railroad St. Ben Grier, Andreal Gambles and Lynn Branscome will be performing. A $10 cover charge will be taken at the door. Food and drinks will be available. Call Pam Cooley at 407-690-0776 for more.Aug. 2Poker RunAmerican Legion Riders Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd., will have a poker run Saturday, August 2. Registration will be from 8-9:30 a.m. Cost is $15 for the first hand and $10 each additional hand, or buy six hands for $50 and get a meal at the end of the ride. The ride will consist of four stops, ending at the Legion. There will be drawings, raffles, food and full bar and entertainment. Call 386-697-0288 for more information.Aug. 9CHS ReunionThe CHS Class of 1984 will hold its 30th High School Reunion on Saturday, Aug. 9 from 6-11 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall. Cost is $40 per person. Start the weekend early with a meet & greet at Gators Dockside, Friday, Aug. 8 at 7 p.m. Make payments to www. payitsquare.com/collect-page/28609 or visit the Facebook page CHS Class of 1984 30th Reunion. You may also call Kelli K. Ronsonet at 386-397-9482. Aug. 12Medicare SeminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free educational Medicare Seminar on Tuesday, Aug. 12 from 5-6 p.m. Irv Crowetz will moderate the seminar. Subjects covered will be: What you need to know; when to enroll; what is covered; and is a supplement needed. RSVP to 386-7553476 x 107. SVTA MeetingSuwannee Valley Transit Authority will meet Tuesday, Aug. 12 at 6 p.m. at its headquarters, 1907 SW Volyes St., Live Oak. The public is invited to attend.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 woman, Linda Ivery, on April 13, 2013. Betty Jefferson faces 24 felony and two misdemeanor violations of state election laws and two counts of intimidation. Ivery is charged with six felony and two misde meanor counts of election law violations and two counts of intimidation. Florida Department of Law Enforcement officials said the allegations leading to their arrests stem from the election of Jefferson to the District 10 city council seat on Aug. 24, 2010. The two allegedly asked voters to sign absentee ballots that were already com pleted, fraudulently obtained absentee bal lots and attempted to influence or decieve people into signing absentee ballots. Eugene Jefferson was re-elected after defeating Adee Farmer, Tammy Perry Harris and Clarence Tucker Jr. with 69.7 percent of the vote in 2010. According to a 2010 report by FDLE, “of the 377 ballots cast in favor of Eugene Jefferson to win the recent primary elec tion, between 236 to 255 of those ballots were absentee ballots that [Supervisor of elections Liz] Horne’s staff can attribute to [Betty] Jefferson’s efforts.” It is not clear what role if any she will have in the 2014 campaign as Eugene Jefferson seeks another term. Betty jefferson could not be reached for comment. Eugene Jefferson told the Reporter his wife is not helping with his campaign this time. Ivery answered a phone call from the Reporter, but when asked about her pend ing case responded with, “Have a blessed day, sweetheart,” and hung up. Ivery and Betty Jefferson surrendered to authorities April 9, 2013. Both pleaded not guilty at their arraignments May 6, 2013. Eighth Circuit State Attorney William P. Cervone was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to prosecute the case. Assistant State Attorney Brian Kramer is handling the case on his behalf. Eugene Jefferson is running against Adee Farmer and Harold Perry to keep his seat. Early voting for the Aug. 26 primary starts Aug. 16. The pair’s next court date is Aug. 18. However, there’s no guarantee the case will be closed any time soon. Since their arrest, Jefferson and Ivery have had numerous continuances, including one on July 14. LINGERS Continued From 1A ly help with nausea, one of his worst symptoms. “If he had too much medicine he would throw up,” Karen said. “And he has to eat before he can have his med icine again, but he can’t eat when he’s nauseous. It’s just a lose-lose cycle.” Mullins was bailed out by his wife following his arrest, and after an out pouring of community support, prose cutors worked out a deal to keep him out of jail. But it was a frightening ordeal.“It wiped us out financially,” Karen said. “It was scary and expensive and traumatic, and in addition to every thing else he has going on, he didn’t need that.” Afterward, she and her husband decided to become activists to fight for medical marijuana. They traveled to Washington, D.C. in June 2013 to campaign for legal ization during the Federal Marijuana Lobby Day, as well as to California, where Delbert became a certified patient. Medical marijuana is legal in that state. Karen said she hopes one day he can also carry a certification as a patient in Florida. “We were just growing a few plants out back, not bothering anyone,” Karen said. “He’s not an offender, he is a patient; He’s not a criminal, he is a sick veteran who is trying to feel less horrid.” The couple agreed that the recent passing of the Charlotte’s Web med ical marijuana bill by Rick Scott is a great start for the state. The bill legalized the use of a spe cific non-euphoric strain of marijuana, called Charlotte’s Web, that is used to treat patients with diseases like epi lepsy, Lou Gehrig’s and cancer. “The complete legalization of canna bis could help so many people,” Karen said. “If it is used the right way it isn’t to get you stoned, it is to medicate.” “There are so many people suffer ing from pain, I hope the legalization comes sooner than later,” she contin ued. “They say they need to study it more, but come on, cannabis has been used medicinally for thousands of years.” Delbert said the answer to that is simple: “If you tell a lie long enough, people will start believing it.” Karen said they aren’t saying that the drug won’t be available on the street, because that will simply never be true, but the passing of this amend ment is not meant to increase illicit use. “All drugs are abused,” Delbert said. “So yes, there is a potential for abuse, but there is much, much more potential for good.” The couple will likely get their wish, if numerous polls are any indication. Since Amendment 2 was placed on the ballot in January, numerous polls have shown 70-80 percent approval for the measure. Constitutional amend ments in Florida require 60 percent voter approval for passage. PROContinued From 1AHunter explained that without clari fication, he and his deputies will have trouble performing their duties. “It is hard for us to do any enforce ment on it without a clear understand ing of the law we are enforcing,” he said. “It’s just too loose.” He suggested having pharmacies distribute the marijuana to patients so that the release of the medication can be controlled and documented. He also noted that, with legalization, there will be problems with patients driving under the influence without a presumable test for it. The only way to test that is blood draws, and that is very time consuming, he said. Hunter said he cannot support the measure without knowing what is acceptable and what is not under its terms. “I will enforce whatever laws the people vote for and need to abide by, because that’s what my job is,” he said. “But we need a level playing field from the state, we need to know the enforcement that can and should be taken.” CONContinued From 1A how long they have been in business, as well as the effectiveness of their business plan. Witt meets state criteria to become a grower. He’s just decided he doesn’t want it. “As a Christian I just don’t feel it’s right to grow something that will cause a big problem,” Witt said. “There are so many bad effects it could have on our future generations, and I don’t want to add to that.” Witt, a former Columbia County Commissioner, opened G & K Nursery on County Road 349 in 1992 and has since been providing landscaping services to Lake City, Jacksonville, Live Oak and Valdosta, Ga. He said he first considered adding mar ijuana to his list of plants after realizing how much money he could make. “We would make lots more than we are growing other plants, that’s for sure,” he said. Witt said after research revealed just how difficult, time consuming and expen sive the marijuana business can be. “You have to have a guard on duty at all times,” he said. “And you have to have a serious fence to protect your field.” There are many other costs as well, including an initial $150,000 licensing fee and a $5 to $10 million bond. “The government tells you how many hours a week and what times of day you have to be open,” he said. “Plus I don’t want somebody getting so addicted to it that they show up at my home or on my property when we’re closed, wanting drugs I can’t sell.” Witt said that each plant in a state regulated dispensary must be labeled with a tag issued by the government, and workers must participate in a background check before they are hired. After he realized there were both pros and cons to the situation, Witt decided to talk to his Sunday school teacher and pas tor to make a decision. “I realized that I just couldn’t justify it,” he said. “It didn’t fit with my beliefs and I didn’t see it to be morally right.” Witt said that although he could’ve made much more money, that is not what he thinks life is about. He is satis fied sticking with the plants he has been growing for years and hopes the amend ment doesn’t pass. “You have to have a certain amount of money to live,” he said. “But you also have to have peace in your heart.” WITTContinued From 1A Slate of political rallies set to start TuesdayBy SARAH LOFTUSsloftus@lakecityreporter.comThe first major political forum for the August primary election is scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday. The event, sponsored by the Columbia County Republican Executive Committee, will be held at the Fort White Community Center. The forum allows candidates to tell the public why they should vote for them. Both Republican and Democrat can didates running for county positions, city council and school board seats are allowed to speak at the forum, said Buddy Hines, the head of the Columbia County Republican Executive Committee. The event is free to the public, and dinner will be served beginning at 6 p.m., Hines said. After dinner is served, each candidate will be given three minutes to speak. During the candidates’ speeches, there will be an old-fashioned cake auction, he said. Hines said he isn’t yet sure how many candidates will be attending, but he expects there to be about 100 people members of the public there to hear them — somewhat fewer than there were at the first forum during the last election cycle. The reason he expects fewer people is because the school superintendent and sheriff are not up for reelection, he said. “They usually bring a lot of people out,” Hines said. This is the first of four political forums scheduled by the local Republican Party for candidates running in August prima ries. The second forum is scheduled for July 29 at 6 p.m. at the Lulu Community Center. The third one is set for August 12 at the Mason City Community Center, also at 6 p.m. The final rally is set for August 19, a week before the election, at the Columbia County Fairgrounds at 6:30 p.m. Early voting begins August 16, accord ing to the county supervisor of elections website.

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By MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comFor the Lake City Shrine Club, Saturday was Christmas. For 14-year-old Dustin Connor, Saturday was the day he got a brand new, shiny blue, motorized Corvette race car from Santa. The club, known for Having Fun & Helping Kids, held its fourth annual Christmas in July Saturday to celebrate the children it has helped for so many years. Shrine Clubs nationwide raise money for children who are physically disabled or injured get medical services at no cost to their families. The local group previously held the event in December, but found the holiday season was too busy. In December you just cant find a day that everyone can make it, said Shrine Club member Tracy Ogden. We thought, why not have it in July, when people have more time and kids are out of school. The event featured food, family and fun for Shrine children and their families. Any child who has received medical care from a Shriners hospital is considered a Shrine child from that point on, and can continue to receive services until they are 18, said club vice president Ernest Ogden. He and his wife were in charge of planning this years event, which included a real life Santa and Mrs. Claus with presents for all. Each child was called up to Santas lap to receive a personalized gift purchased by the shriners. After Dustin, who was born with spina bifida and has been a Shrine Child since he was just 16 months old, opened his racecar from Graves, he explained that he was happy because blue is his favorite color. Not only can Shrine kids like Dustin count on a summertime Santa and presents in July, but on a lifetime of support financially, physically and emotionally from the organization that claims them as its own. Once they are under us, we consider them our children, Ogden said. He and about 10 other Shriners meet once a month to plan fundraisers and events. Money from their efforts, along with donations, help pay for local children to travel to and receive treatment from doctors at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Tampa. Dustins parents said the Shrine Club has made a tremendous difference in their lives and that of their sons. You are able to connect and network with other families who are going through the same challenges as you, said Dustins mother Jennifer Connor. When you have so much going on with the disability itself, its hard to be sociable outside of that world, but here, even though we all have different stories, we have similar things going on. She said her first visit to the Shriners Hospital in Tampa was overwhelming because the staff was so eager to help her son. They taught us more in that first visit than we learned in 16 months from other doctors, said Dustins father William Conner. The Shriner people are amazing, its just something you have to experience. He recalled a time when he saw Shriner nurses wheeling a childs hospital bed outside for a group volleyball match. They took the bed and all out there because they believe that no kid gets left out, he said. When it comes to med time, they want to have to look for you, not know youre in your room. Those are the things that just really got me. His wife agreed and said hospital staff does everything it can to get children motivated and outside. They arent going to let a kid sit inside their room and mope and feel sorry for themselves, she said. Iris Roberts, now a 17-year-old junior in high school, said her experience with the organization has been similar. She became a Shrine Child when she was three years old after doctors discovered that she had severe scoliosis. My back was pretty much shaped like a upsidedown question mark, she said. I had back braces from the time I was three, until I was 12. Roberts said even when she was young, she was never afraid. I always loved going to the Shriners Hospital because they didnt make me feel weird, I felt normal, she said. I would always think to myself, This is OK, I am OK, because they are all here. She said she is very proud of her accomplishments, but cant help but recognize the fact that none of them would be possible without the Shriners. I hope I never outgrow being a Shriners kid, Roberts said. This club and these people have made me who I am. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 7A 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 8 / 1 5 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A Volunteer Mentors Needed Contact: (386) 292-3547 WILSONS OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net YETI 20 & 30 oz. Rambler CupsKeeps your drink as cold as science allows.New New Design of Tervis Tumblers have arrived! SandalsSelection on Sale any, will apply to her. I may have legal limits on what I can do, he said. If Im unable to (file charges), it will be because the law prohibits it. Rachal broke the schools policy on corporal punishment, the report says, but Siegmeister said hes unsure if what Rachal did was illegal. In May, the Florida Abuse Hotline received four calls saying Rachal, 43, had abused eight of her students, the report says. Its unknown how long she had allegedly been spanking them. ` All of the children in Rachals class were interviewed by CCSO. According to the report, seven children said they were spanked by her, and two wouldnt say if they had been. Of the other 10 children in her class, nine said they witnessed their peers being punished. Rachals students told CCSO she takes them in the closet to spank them, the report says. One child said he heard his classmate get spanked in the closet and that Rachal left the boy in the closet until he stopped crying. Another one of her students said she often spanks students in the closet and leaves them there until they stop crying. According to the report, another student said Rachal takes her students in the closet and hits them with a wooden paddle. Another child in the class said when she takes students into the closet to spank them, she leaves the door open and turns off the lights. A parent whose child was in the class told CCSO she once heard Rachal yelling at her students as she walked toward the classroom. The woman said Rachal was embarrassed when she saw her. Another mother said she saw Rachal yelling at a student on a field trip so loudly that she believed it was an out-of-control parent, the report says. According to the district policy, corporal punishment can only be used if approved by the principal beforehand. The principal must approve a teachers use of corporal punishment, and after that, the teacher can use it without contacting the principal. However, another adult must be present when corporal punishment is administered. Corporal punishment can only be used under the rules set by the principal, the CCSO report says. And the last requirement is that the teacher must send a written letter home to the childs parents, explaining why the child received corporal punishment. According to the report, Rachal broke all of these rules. If Siegmeister can legally file charges, he said hell then look at the case and determine if it has merit. PENDINGContinued From 1Aaccording to an LCPD news release. He invoked his right to an attorney and did not speak with police. Eyewitnesses at the scene told LCPD Officer Kevin Johns and other investigators about the incident, allowing officials to quickly identify Wilson as a suspect. Officers deduced that Wilson had left the scene with Ramona D. Cook, the owner of the apartment Freeman was found in, the release said. They left in a blue Oldsmobile owned by a friend. After leaving the scene, Wilson and Cook drove the car to its owner, who was at work at the time of the shooting, and told him about what had happened, according to LCPD Public Information Officer Craig Strickland. The owner, who was uninvolved in the shooting, took his car back and drove to the scene to speak with police, Strickland said. LCPD Investigator David Greear and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement were called in to process the crime scene. Once again, our community has experienced another senseless act of violence which claimed another life. But at the same time, our citizens came forward and cooperated with police to voice what they saw, LCPD Chief of Police Argatha Gilmore said in a prepared statement. Due to this, a vehicle and two suspects were immediately identified and through concern of the suspects family members, he turned himself in, only a few hours later. Wilson is being held at the Columbia County Detention Center without bond on charges of homicide. SUSPECTContinued From 1A Shriners host Christmas in July FreemanMEGAN REEVES/ Lake City ReporterDustin Connor, 14, holds his new blue motorized race car, a present he received from the Shriners. Nice try, he said to his brother, but this is mine. Local branch looks out for kids all year. MEGAN REEVES/ Lake City ReporterIris Roberts, now a 17-year-old junior in high school, thanks Santa Jay for her gift at the Lake City Shrine Clubs Christmas in July program Saturday. Roberts has been a Shrine Child since she was three years old and hopes she never outgrows it. MEGAN REEVES/ Lake City ReporterJabob Kuzyk, 5, plays with homemade moonwalk shoes at the Lake City Shrine Clubs Christmas in July Saturday.

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7a 1p 7p 1a 6 a N A TIONAL FORECAST MAP 3 p.m. toda y N A TIONAL FORECAST : LAKE CITY ALMANA C KEY T O CONDITIONS: c=cloud y dr=drizzle, f=fair fg=fog h=hazy i=ice, pc=par tly cloud y r=rain, s=sunn y sh=sho w ers, sn=sno w ts=thunderstor ms, w=wind y SUNSunrise today Sunset today Sunrise tom. Sunset tom. MOONMoonrise today Moonset today Moonrise tom. Moonset tom. UV INDEX T odays ultra-violet radiation risk for the a r ea on a scale f r om 0 FYI An exclusive service brought to our readers by The W eather Channel. SPONSORED B Y City YESTERDAYS N A TIONAL EXTREMES High: Low: INTERNA TIONAL THE WEA THER WEA THER HIST O R Y CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W Pensacola T allahassee Panama City V aldosta Daytona Beach Cape Canaveral Gainesville Lake City Ocala Orlando Jacksonville T ampa W est Palm Beach Ft. Myers Ft. Lauderdale Naples Miami Key W est TEMPERA TURESNor mal high Nor mal low Recor d high Recor d low PRECIPIT A TIONMonth total Y ear total Nor mal month-to-date Nor mal year-to-date to 10+. H H H H H H L L L L L L 20 21 22 23 24REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, July 20 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 90/72 88/72 88/70 88/72 88/74 85/77 88/70 90/74 88/72 92/76 90/74 94/74 90/77 90/79 92/76 90/79 90/77 90/81Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 90/75/ts 90/78/ts Daytona Beach 89/74/ts 89/76/ts Fort Myers 92/74/ts 90/74/ts Ft. Lauderdale 90/79/ts 90/80/ts Gainesville 88/72/ts 89/72/ts Jacksonville 88/74/ts 89/74/ts Key West 91/81/ts 90/82/ts Lake City 88/72/ts 89/72/ts Miami 91/78/ts 91/79/ts Naples 90/75/ts 91/78/ts Ocala 88/73/ts 89/73/ts Orlando 92/76/ts 91/78/ts Panama City 87/76/ts 86/76/ts Pensacola 86/79/ts 87/77/ts Tallahassee 89/72/ts 90/72/ts Tampa 91/74/ts 90/75/ts Valdosta 89/71/ts 90/72/ts W. Palm Beach 90/79/ts 91/80/ts High Saturday Low Saturday 91 101 in 1899 63 in 2011 90 72 73 Saturday 0.00" 9.84" 27.09" 26.96" 3.85" 6:42 a.m. 8:31 p.m. 6:42 a.m. 8:30 p.m. 1:44 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 2:27 a.m. 4:15 p.m.July 26 Aug 3 Aug 10 Aug 17 New First Full Last Quarter Quarter While not necessarily specific to this date, an interesting statistic occurred from May 30th to the beginning of fall in 1588. During this time period, the sea claimed 50 ships of the Spanish Armada, killing 4,000 men. The sea claimed more Spanish ships than the English did during that time period. Showers and storms will develop across the Appalachian states, and also much of the South. A few showers won't be out of the question over the higher elevations of the Intermountain West either. The middle of the country will stay largely dry. 99, Yuma MCAS, AZ 37, West Yellowstone, MTSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 77/61/.00 83/62/pc Albuquerque 84/71/.00 95/71/pc Anchorage 62/57/.01 64/49/sh Atlanta 80/69/2.10 84/69/ts Baltimore 79/66/.00 82/68/cd Billings 80/60/.00 96/62/pc Birmingham 82/71/.05 86/71/ts Bismarck 78/51/.00 93/64/pc Boise 75/62/.00 94/69/pc Boston 71/63/.00 75/62/cd Buffalo 70/62/.03 77/65/ts Charleston SC 87/72/.00 88/72/ts Charleston WV 72/64/.55 82/65/ts Charlotte 73/66/.04 84/69/ts Cheyenne 86/55/.00 90/61/pc Chicago 79/57/.00 83/67/pc Cincinnati 72/62/.01 83/67/ts Cleveland 70/63/.10 80/66/pc Columbia SC 80/59/.00 87/67/pc Dallas 75/68/.00 93/76/pc Daytona Beach 89/75/.00 91/74/ts Denver 68/59/.00 97/64/pc Des Moines 81/64/.00 85/70/pc Detroit 72/66/.01 83/63/pc El Paso 95/78/.00 100/78/pc Fairbanks 55/53/.03 57/48/sh Greensboro 77/66/.01 82/65/ts Hartford 78/59/.00 81/60/pc Honolulu 82/77/.00 89/76/ts Houston 84/73/.00 92/78/ts Indianapolis 71/57/.00 82/65/pc Jackson MS 75/69/.00 89/68/pc Jacksonville 88/73/.00 88/73/ts Kansas City 65/59/.00 89/71/pc Las Vegas 100/86/.00 103/81/pc Little Rock 77/64/.00 88/69/pc Los Angeles 73/66/.00 80/65/pc Memphis 75/66/.00 87/72/pc Miami 91/78/1.51 91/78/pc Minneapolis 77/66/.00 87/73/pc Mobile 82/73/2.39 89/73/ts New Orleans 84/75/.60 90/76/ts New York 78/70/.00 76/65/pc Oakland 70/62/.00 71/59/fg Oklahoma City 77/64/.00 92/71/pc Omaha 81/62/.00 91/74/pc Orlando 91/75/.00 93/75/ts Philadelphia 80/70/.00 83/67/pc Phoenix 98/88/.00 107/82/pc Pittsburgh 68/63/1.06 81/63/ts Portland ME 75/57/.00 75/58/pc Portland OR 71/63/.00 73/59/r Raleigh 82/66/.00 83/66/ts Rapid City 82/60/.27 96/66/pc Reno 91/68/.00 88/63/ts Sacramento 78/59/.00 86/63/pc Salt Lake City 91/70/.00 91/70/ts San Antonio 75/73/.00 95/77/pc San Diego 73/69/.00 70/65/pc San Francisco 70/60/.00 66/59/fg Seattle 71/59/.00 71/56/sh Spokane 80/62/.00 82/59/pc St. Louis 82/63/.00 87/70/pc Tampa 89/78/.00 92/77/ts Tucson 95/75/.00 101/77/pc Washington 84/73/.00 83/69/cd Acapulco 91/82/.00 91/80/pc Amsterdam 93/68/.00 87/66/cd Athens 86/66/.00 91/73/ts Auckland 55/37/.00 53/50/pc Beijing 98/78/.00 98/75/pc Berlin 89/64/.00 89/64/s Buenos Aires 66/50/.00 64/50/s Cairo 91/73/.00 89/73/s Geneva 84/59/.00 89/64/pc Havana 93/69/.00 93/71/s Helsinki 78/57/.00 75/60/ts Hong Kong 91/82/.00 91/80/ts Kingston 89/80/.00 89/80/ts La Paz 53/30/.00 51/30/ts Lima 66/60/.00 66/60/pc London 82/68/.00 82/62/ts Madrid 82/68/.00 80/60/cd Mexico City 73/55/.00 77/53/ts Montreal 78/62/.00 80/66/cd Moscow 77/55/.00 77/51/s Nairobi 80/53/.00 78/55/ts Nassau 87/78/.00 89/80/pc New Delhi 91/78/.00 93/77/pc Oslo 62/57/.00 80/53/pc Panama 91/77/.00 91/78/ts Paris 86/69/.00 86/68/cd Rio 75/66/.00 75/59/pc Rome 91/69/.00 91/66/s San Juan PR 89/79/.10 90/78/ts Santiago 91/73/.00 91/73/pc Seoul 87/77/.00 87/69/ts Singapore 91/82/ 89/80/ts St. Thomas VI 88/79/.04 90/80/pc Sydney 57/46/.00 60/51/r Tel Aviv 86/73/.00 86/73/pc Tokyo 78/71/.00 80/71/ts Toronto 66/60/.00 75/62/pc Vienna 86/62/.00 86/68/s Warsaw 84/62/.00 82/60/s 77/58 Bangor 75/62 Boston 80/65 New York 83/69 Washington D.C. 84/69 Charlotte 84/69 Atlanta 92/71 City 93/75 Dallas 92/78 Houston 87/73 Minneapolis 83/67 Chicago 87/72 Memphis 84/68 Cincinnati 83/64 Detroit 93/77 Orlando 91/78 Miami 86/63 Oklahoma 86/67 Falls 86/63 International 87/70 Louis 86/63 St. 91/74 Omaha 97/64 Denver 95/71 Albuquerque 107/82 Phoenix 96/62 Billings 94/69 Boise 73/59 Portland 71/56 Seattle 90/76 Orleans 86/63 New 96/66 City 86/63 Rapid 91/70 City 86/63 Salt Lake 101/79 Vegas 86/63 Las 74/65 Angeles 86/63 Los 66/59 Francisco 86/63 San 65/49 Anchorage 57/48 Fairbanks 89/76 Honolulu 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 90 90 88 86 90 90 90 70 71 71 71 69 73 73Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High820 mins to burnChance of storms Chance of storms Slight chance of storms Chance of storms Chance of storms SUN88 70 MON86 70 TUE88 72 WED94 72 THU92 72 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LOForecasts, data and graphics WSI 7a 1p 7p 1a 6 a N A TIONAL FORECAST MAP 3 p.m. toda y N A TIONAL FORECAST : LAKE CITY ALMANA C KEY T O CONDITIONS: c=cloud y dr=drizzle, f=fair fg=fog h=hazy i=ice, pc=par tly cloud y r=rain, s=sunn y sh=sho w ers, sn=sno w ts=thunderstor ms, w=wind y SUNSunrise today Sunset today Sunrise tom. Sunset tom. MOONMoonrise today Moonset today Moonrise tom. Moonset tom. UV INDEX T odays ultra-violet radiation risk for the a r ea on a scale f r om 0 FYI An exclusive service brought to our readers by The W eather Channel. SPONSORED B Y City YESTERDAYS N A TIONAL EXTREMES High: Low: INTERNA TIONAL THE WEA THER WEA THER HIST O R Y CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W Pensacola T allahassee Panama City V aldosta Daytona Beach Cape Canaveral Gainesville Lake City Ocala Orlando Jacksonville T ampa W est Palm Beach Ft. Myers Ft. Lauderdale Naples Miami Key W est TEMPERA TURESNor mal high Nor mal low Recor d high Recor d low PRECIPIT A TIONMonth total Y ear total Nor mal month-to-date Nor mal year-to-date to 10+. H H H H H H L L L L L L 20 21 22 23 24REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, July 20 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 90/72 88/72 88/70 88/72 88/74 85/77 88/70 90/74 88/72 92/76 90/74 94/74 90/77 90/79 92/76 90/79 90/77 90/81Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 90/75/ts 90/78/ts Daytona Beach 89/74/ts 89/76/ts Fort Myers 92/74/ts 90/74/ts Ft. Lauderdale 90/79/ts 90/80/ts Gainesville 88/72/ts 89/72/ts Jacksonville 88/74/ts 89/74/ts Key West 91/81/ts 90/82/ts Lake City 88/72/ts 89/72/ts Miami 91/78/ts 91/79/ts Naples 90/75/ts 91/78/ts Ocala 88/73/ts 89/73/ts Orlando 92/76/ts 91/78/ts Panama City 87/76/ts 86/76/ts Pensacola 86/79/ts 87/77/ts Tallahassee 89/72/ts 90/72/ts Tampa 91/74/ts 90/75/ts Valdosta 89/71/ts 90/72/ts W. Palm Beach 90/79/ts 91/80/ts High Saturday Low Saturday 91 101 in 1899 63 in 2011 90 72 73 Saturday 0.00" 9.84" 27.09" 26.96" 3.85" 6:42 a.m. 8:31 p.m. 6:42 a.m. 8:30 p.m. 1:44 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 2:27 a.m. 4:15 p.m.July 26 Aug 3 Aug 10 Aug 17 New First Full Last Quarter Quarter While not necessarily specific to this date, an interesting statistic occurred from May 30th to the beginning of fall in 1588. During this time period, the sea claimed 50 ships of the Spanish Armada, killing 4,000 men. The sea claimed more Spanish ships than the English did during that time period. Showers and storms will develop across the Appalachian states, and also much of the South. A few showers won't be out of the question over the higher elevations of the Intermountain West either. The middle of the country will stay largely dry. 99, Yuma MCAS, AZ 37, West Yellowstone, MTSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 77/61/.00 83/62/pc Albuquerque 84/71/.00 95/71/pc Anchorage 62/57/.01 64/49/sh Atlanta 80/69/2.10 84/69/ts Baltimore 79/66/.00 82/68/cd Billings 80/60/.00 96/62/pc Birmingham 82/71/.05 86/71/ts Bismarck 78/51/.00 93/64/pc Boise 75/62/.00 94/69/pc Boston 71/63/.00 75/62/cd Buffalo 70/62/.03 77/65/ts Charleston SC 87/72/.00 88/72/ts Charleston WV 72/64/.55 82/65/ts Charlotte 73/66/.04 84/69/ts Cheyenne 86/55/.00 90/61/pc Chicago 79/57/.00 83/67/pc Cincinnati 72/62/.01 83/67/ts Cleveland 70/63/.10 80/66/pc Columbia SC 80/59/.00 87/67/pc Dallas 75/68/.00 93/76/pc Daytona Beach 89/75/.00 91/74/ts Denver 68/59/.00 97/64/pc Des Moines 81/64/.00 85/70/pc Detroit 72/66/.01 83/63/pc El Paso 95/78/.00 100/78/pc Fairbanks 55/53/.03 57/48/sh Greensboro 77/66/.01 82/65/ts Hartford 78/59/.00 81/60/pc Honolulu 82/77/.00 89/76/ts Houston 84/73/.00 92/78/ts Indianapolis 71/57/.00 82/65/pc Jackson MS 75/69/.00 89/68/pc Jacksonville 88/73/.00 88/73/ts Kansas City 65/59/.00 89/71/pc Las Vegas 100/86/.00 103/81/pc Little Rock 77/64/.00 88/69/pc Los Angeles 73/66/.00 80/65/pc Memphis 75/66/.00 87/72/pc Miami 91/78/1.51 91/78/pc Minneapolis 77/66/.00 87/73/pc Mobile 82/73/2.39 89/73/ts New Orleans 84/75/.60 90/76/ts New York 78/70/.00 76/65/pc Oakland 70/62/.00 71/59/fg Oklahoma City 77/64/.00 92/71/pc Omaha 81/62/.00 91/74/pc Orlando 91/75/.00 93/75/ts Philadelphia 80/70/.00 83/67/pc Phoenix 98/88/.00 107/82/pc Pittsburgh 68/63/1.06 81/63/ts Portland ME 75/57/.00 75/58/pc Portland OR 71/63/.00 73/59/r Raleigh 82/66/.00 83/66/ts Rapid City 82/60/.27 96/66/pc Reno 91/68/.00 88/63/ts Sacramento 78/59/.00 86/63/pc Salt Lake City 91/70/.00 91/70/ts San Antonio 75/73/.00 95/77/pc San Diego 73/69/.00 70/65/pc San Francisco 70/60/.00 66/59/fg Seattle 71/59/.00 71/56/sh Spokane 80/62/.00 82/59/pc St. Louis 82/63/.00 87/70/pc Tampa 89/78/.00 92/77/ts Tucson 95/75/.00 101/77/pc Washington 84/73/.00 83/69/cd Acapulco 91/82/.00 91/80/pc Amsterdam 93/68/.00 87/66/cd Athens 86/66/.00 91/73/ts Auckland 55/37/.00 53/50/pc Beijing 98/78/.00 98/75/pc Berlin 89/64/.00 89/64/s Buenos Aires 66/50/.00 64/50/s Cairo 91/73/.00 89/73/s Geneva 84/59/.00 89/64/pc Havana 93/69/.00 93/71/s Helsinki 78/57/.00 75/60/ts Hong Kong 91/82/.00 91/80/ts Kingston 89/80/.00 89/80/ts La Paz 53/30/.00 51/30/ts Lima 66/60/.00 66/60/pc London 82/68/.00 82/62/ts Madrid 82/68/.00 80/60/cd Mexico City 73/55/.00 77/53/ts Montreal 78/62/.00 80/66/cd Moscow 77/55/.00 77/51/s Nairobi 80/53/.00 78/55/ts Nassau 87/78/.00 89/80/pc New Delhi 91/78/.00 93/77/pc Oslo 62/57/.00 80/53/pc Panama 91/77/.00 91/78/ts Paris 86/69/.00 86/68/cd Rio 75/66/.00 75/59/pc Rome 91/69/.00 91/66/s San Juan PR 89/79/.10 90/78/ts Santiago 91/73/.00 91/73/pc Seoul 87/77/.00 87/69/ts Singapore 91/82/ 89/80/ts St. Thomas VI 88/79/.04 90/80/pc Sydney 57/46/.00 60/51/r Tel Aviv 86/73/.00 86/73/pc Tokyo 78/71/.00 80/71/ts Toronto 66/60/.00 75/62/pc Vienna 86/62/.00 86/68/s Warsaw 84/62/.00 82/60/s 77/58 Bangor 75/62 Boston 80/65 New York 83/69 Washington D.C. 84/69 Charlotte 84/69 Atlanta 92/71 City 93/75 Dallas 92/78 Houston 87/73 Minneapolis 83/67 Chicago 87/72 Memphis 84/68 Cincinnati 83/64 Detroit 93/77 Orlando 91/78 Miami 86/63 Oklahoma 86/67 Falls 86/63 International 87/70 Louis 86/63 St. 91/74 Omaha 97/64 Denver 95/71 Albuquerque 107/82 Phoenix 96/62 Billings 94/69 Boise 73/59 Portland 71/56 Seattle 90/76 Orleans 86/63 New 96/66 City 86/63 Rapid 91/70 City 86/63 Salt Lake 101/79 Vegas 86/63 Las 74/65 Angeles 86/63 Los 66/59 Francisco 86/63 San 65/49 Anchorage 57/48 Fairbanks 89/76 Honolulu 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 90 90 88 86 90 90 90 70 71 71 71 69 73 73Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High820 mins to burnChance of storms Chance of storms Slight chance of storms Chance of storms Chance of storms SUN88 70 MON86 70 TUE88 72 WED94 72 THU92 72 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LOForecasts, data and graphics WSI 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 8A ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Sunday, July 20, 2014 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Full Color File name: -20_CMPS_HotCarSale2014_LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 7/16/14 Fran Rowe, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1030 Lake City 1658 W. US Hwy. 90 Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. UF Health Shands Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. Oer only available 7/24/14/27/14 and may not be combined with any other oer. 1. Credit approval required. Your APR may vary based on your credit worthiness loan amount, term of loan and vehicle. For example, a $35,000 loan with no money down at 2.0% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $617.68 and a nal payment of $601.38, nance charge of $1,920.95, for a total of payments of $37,044.50. The amount nanced is $35,123.55, the APR is 2.0%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.T omlinsonMotor Companya t N OS W E AT deals.H o t sale. c ar July 24 27 only! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!3 for up to 60 months 2 As low as %APR1ON ANY VEHICLE AT THE SALE!CAMPUS USA Credit UnionsView inventory online atwww.tomlinsonmotorco.com352.372.0313 3580 N. Main St., Gainesville NO PAYMENTS until October 2014!2 $200 CASH BONUS from T omlinson M o t or C ompan y when you purchase a vehicle at the sale Pricing up to $5,000 below NADA retailStop by any CAMPUS Service Center, call 754-9088 and press 4 or visit campuscu.com to get Pre-Approved today!

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, July 20, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS CHS SOCCER Fundraiser at Firehouse Subs The CHS Soccer Booster Club has a fundraiser from 6-7:30 p.m. Monday at Firehouse Subs on U.S. Highway 90 west. For details, call Jim Beach at 386-697-1571. CHS SWIMMING Parents meeting set for July 29 A mandatory parents meeting for Columbia High or other eligible ninth-12th-grade students interested in joining the CHS swim team is 6 p.m. July 29 in room 130 of school board building 2, directly across from the pool. Important papers that must be completed prior to participating will be distributed. Conditioning begins Aug. 4. A team meeting is planned for 3:30 p.m. Aug. 18 with practice beginning the next day. For details, call Linda Richardson at 965-7071 or coach Mary Kay Mathis at 397-6661. YOUTH BASEBALL Voices for Children tourney The Voices for Children Charity Baseball Tournament is Aug. 9-10 at Southside Sports Complex. Format is double elimination with USSSA rules. Game balls will be provided. Age groups are 12U ($375 entry fee), 11U ($325 entry fee) and 10U ($300 entry fee). There will be awards for first and second place. For details, call Elizabeth Price at 758-1170 or Stephen Smith at 867-1387. ADULT SOFTBALL Open meeting set for Aug. 8 Columbia County Adult Softball’s annual open meeting is 7 p.m. Aug. 8 in the meeting room at the Southside Sports Complex adult fields. There will be election of officers for 2014-15. Only currently registered players are eligible to vote. For league info, go to ballcharts.com / CCAdultsoftball. OUTDOORS Bowhunter ed. course Aug. 8 A bowhunter education course will be offered at the Osceola Range at 8 a.m. Aug. 9. Students need to pre-register for the course by calling the FWC office at 754-1654. For details, go to steven.robbins@MyFWC.com SWIMMING Aquatic Complex summer hours The Columbia Aquatic Complex is open with the following hours: 1-5 p.m. for the public and 1-7 p.m. for members Monday though Friday, and 1-7 p.m. Saturday. Water aerobics are offered at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Lap swimming is 5:30-7 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.Q From staff reports Faith and football JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High football players flip tractor tires during s ummer conditioning drills on Thursday. Indians head to FCA this week JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High quarterback DJ Jackson looks for an open receiver during summer conditioning drills on Thursday. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — According to head coach Demetric Jackson, Fort White High’s football team could use a few blessings when it comes to health. There’s no better place to find those than on the football field than the Fellowship of Christian Athletes Football Camp in Deland. The Indians will travel to Deland this week where the traditional week of faith and football takes place. Jackson believes it’s a place that Fort White can grow on and off the field. “Our numbers are not quite where they have been the last few seasons,” Jackson said. “We’re short on seniors and we’ve got some players dealing with injuries. We go to FCA this week, and that’s an oppor-tunity for the spirit side to come together. We’ll have the opportunity to do a lot of team building.” Jackson said that the FCA Camp has been some-thing that he looks forward to every season and dat-ing back to his first season attending the camp, each year has provided a special memory. “I remember the first year we went, and a kid I didn’t really thing would do much really took to it and it helped mold him,” Jackson said. “I saw him the other day and he’s got a little girl and a family. He’s doing really well for him-self. That’s the kind of thing this camp brings out.” Jackson said that Christianity isn’t forced on the players, but the values of the religion are good for his team no matter what faith, culture or background they come from. “It’s about teaching these kids to be men,” Jackson said. “Christianity isn’t forced, but we’re teaching hopeful values. We’re relat-ing the Bible to football. The kids don’t realize it in high school, but as coaches, the things we teach about work ethic and commitment, that translates to the workforce and to their family. It helps them mature so they know how to make a commitment to their job and to their family.” On the football side of thing, there’s also much to learn. “It’s a critical part of the year,” Jackson said. “We’ll go against some solid defense, multiple fronts and multiple offenses. You have to learn fast and I think it gives us a good head start every season going to this right before the beginning of fall camp.” Fall camp will begin on Aug. 4. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High offensive linemen get a taste of 7-on-7 wo rk during Thursday’s summer conditioning drills. ‘It’s a great way to get those guys in shape,’ offensive line coach Doug Peeler said.Summer gives chances for players to stand outBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comSummer is a time that can bring surprises in both forms. For Columbia High, they have been of the pleas-ant variety this summer. Head coach Brian Allen said that a number of play-ers have made names for themselves this summer, but that they’ll need to con-tinue to impress this fall to earn their playing time. Derontae Jordan has stepped into the secondary, and he’s a player that Allen said jumps out at you in practice. “He’s been impressive,” Allen said. “He’s on Roger Cray’s side and when those two come at you, there’s a collision. They’re going to break some balls up this fall. It’s hard to throw to their side. He’s a safety that’s going to be as good as anybody we’ve had at the position and that includes Trey Marshall.” Allen said the receivers this year may be the best he’s had in a long while. “Latrell Williams is a good one, but needs to be consis-tent,” Allen said. “He’s got the most athletic ability of anyone on the team. Caleb Carswell is the veteran of New faces impress Allen in conditioning. CHS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING Noon NBCSN — Formula One, Grand Prix of Germany, at Hockenheim, Germany (same-day tape) 2 p.m. NBC — Global Rallycross, at New York 2:30 p.m. ESPN — NHRA, Mile-High Nationals, at Morrison, Colo. 3 p.m. NBCSN — IndyCar, Indy Toronto, race 2 6 p.m. NBCSN — Indy Lights, at Toronto (same-day tape) 7 p.m. NBCSN — GP2, at Hockenheim, Germany (same-day tape) CYCLING 8 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, stage 15, Tallard to Nimes, France GOLF 6 a.m. ESPN — British Open Championship, final round, at Hoylake, England 3 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Marathon Classic, final round, at Sylvania, Ohio 5 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Boise Open, final round, at Boise, Idaho HORSE RACING 5:30 p.m. FS1 — Thoroughbreds, Eddie Read Stakes, at Del Mar, Calif. and Coaching Club American Oaks, at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:30 p.m. TBS — Kansas City at Boston 4 p.m. WGN — Chicago Cubs at Arizona 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis SOCCER 5 p.m. ESPN2 — National Women’s Soccer League, Boston at PortlandBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB Baltimore 52 42 .553 —Toronto 49 47 .510 4New York 47 47 .500 5 Tampa Bay 44 53 .454 9 Boston 43 52 .453 9 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 53 38 .582 — Kansas City 48 46 .511 6 Cleveland 47 47 .500 7Chicago 45 51 .469 10Minnesota 44 50 .468 10 West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 59 36 .621 — Los Angeles 57 37 .606 1 Seattle 51 44 .537 8 Houston 40 56 .417 19 Texas 38 57 .400 21 Today’s Games Cincinnati at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.Texas at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.Cleveland at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.Kansas City at Boston, 1:35 p.m.Houston at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.Seattle at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.Baltimore at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.Baltimore at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.N.Y. Mets at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NL standings East Division W L Pct GB Washington 51 42 .548 —Atlanta 52 43 .547 — New York 45 50 .474 7 Miami 44 50 .468 7 Philadelphia 42 53 .442 10 Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 53 43 .552 —St. Louis 52 44 .542 1 Cincinnati 51 44 .537 1 Pittsburgh 49 46 .516 3 Chicago 40 54 .426 12 West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 54 43 .557 — San Francisco 52 43 .547 1 San Diego 41 54 .432 12 Colorado 40 55 .421 13 Arizona 40 56 .417 13 Today’s Games Cincinnati at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.San Francisco at Miami, 1:10 p.m.Colorado at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.Milwaukee at Washington, 1:35 p.m.Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.N.Y. Mets at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.San Francisco at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.Washington at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.N.Y. Mets at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS the group. We’ve got a fresh-man in Nate Maxwell that’s going to be a good one. It’s probably the best group since I’ve been here.” Of course the Tigers will still want to run the ball and they’ll have to get the ball to the receivers efficiently. “The quarterback play has been up and down,” Allen said. “We have the ability to be very good. We’ve got to go from good and get over that edge to great.” Jake Thomas is the surefire starter this fall, but Allen said that the good news for the Tigers is that Davin Schuck has devel-oped well behind him. For both varsity players, the key is to bring more precision to the things they already do well. “We need to deliver the ball where the receivers can catch it on time,” Allen said. “We’re missing open guys. I think we’re going against the best guys we’re going to see coverage wise, but there’s some stuff that we need to get done in the next month.” Columbia will wrap up summer conditioning drills at the end of this week before Allen gives the team a week off to recover before the fall practice begins at 8 a.m. on Aug. 4. Columbia will begin the regular season against Gainesville High at 7 p.m. on Aug. 28 in Gainesville. CHSFrom Page 1B BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s volleyball team held a youth team camp over the weekend. Pictured are (front row, from left) Lauren Bailey, Lauren Wilson, Madiso n Lipscomb, Olivia Anshultz, Mikayla Collins, Tiara Carter, Haley Shallar, Daycee Ma bile, Joelyn Myers, Mackenzie Conklin, coach Heather Benson (back row, from left), Alain a Perry, Kayle Nelson, Hanna Baker, Glendasha Johnson, Myra Wintons, Madison Plyn, Zo Norris and Megan Zahnle. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Hanna Baker works with Mikayla Colli ns on Friday.Lady Tigers work with youthBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comNew Columbia High volleyball coach Heather Benson introduced herself to the future with the Lady Tigers Youth Volleyball Camp this weekend at the high school. The camp was to prepare the future of the volleyball program while also helping this year’s team. “It’s a fundraiser for us so that we can raise money for new uniforms,” Benson said. “It’s also a chance to help them get ready for their season.” Benson said a variety of volleyball techniques were used at the camp. “We’re working on rotation, serving, passing, blocking and hitting,” she said. Benson said one of the coolest aspects of the camp was that it wouldn’t be only her working with the youth, but instruction from the current crop of Lady Tigers. “I think, looking back to when I played, that I looked up to the older girls,” Benson said. “I know in high school that I looked up to what the college players were saying. I think that this will help the young girls a lot, because they look up to the varsity players and to have them helping will help them.” Overall, it’s an opportunity to give back. “This weekend I am looking forward to seeing what our future tigers look like and getting them ready for their season,” Benson said. “This is also an oppor-tunity for our athletes to give back to the community and help inspire younger girls to continue working hard towards their dreams.” BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterGolfing for the Lady TigersGolfers George Poultry (from left), Gary Newcomb, Jacob Br yan, Chris Beckman, Carol McGraw, Todd Carter, Tim Tortice, Jason Watts and Brantley Stephens stop for a photograph while playing in the Lady Tigers Golf Tournament at Qua il Heights Country Club on Saturday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 3B3BSPORTS BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterLearning the fundamentalsTammy Carter Gainey works with golfers at Quail Heights on Thursday as part of a junior golf clinic. Photos by BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterBrothers Jackson ( ABOVE ) and Jett Addison ( BELOW ) work on their golf game as part of the Carl Ste-Marie Junior G olf Clinic at The Country Club at Lake City on Thursday. We have received a good amount of rain and sun, allowing the greens to progress into beautiful, smooth-putting greens. When mid-August hits, we will start laying new greens on the Creeks side. Course maintenance is progressing and taking shape. Friday Dogfight winner with a +9 was Ricky Crawford Jr., who putted for an outstanding eagle on No. 18 to seal the deal. Taking second place with a +6 was Soon Lee. Skin winners were Al Cohoon, Tim Tortorice and Lee, with Randy Heavrin taking two and Crawford taking four. Closest to the pin winners were Gerald Smithy on No. 3, Bob McGraw on No. 15 and Heavrin on No. 17. Monday’s Top of the Hill winner in a close race was Jack Tuggle with a +4. Bob McGraw was sec-ond with a +3 and Jerry Snowberger was third with a +2. Wednesday Blitz had a tie for first with Mike Kahlich, Keith Hudson and Tim Tortorice all at +6. Taking fourth with a +4 was Chuck Slaymaker. Skin winners were Keith Denmark, Mark Wilson, Slaymaker, Hudson (2) and Kahlich (3). Closest to the pin winners were Denmark on No. 3, Randy Heavrin on No. 5, Kahlich on No. 11, Gerald Smithy on No. 15 and Wilson on No. 17. Wednesday Scramble had a huge turnout. Despite the weather the players pushed on and battled it out. The scramble came down to a one-hole play-off and a chip-off between team members Phillip “Flip” Russell, Ricky Crawford Jr. and Brantley Stevens against team members Todd Carter, Jacob Bryan and Richard Simmons. Crawford drew first blood in the chip-off, but was defeated by Bryan who came within inches of the hole. The Wednesday Scramble pot is growing and rolled over for the sec-ond week in a row. To schedule a tee time or for questions call 752-3339. QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Nicki Newmans GOLF REPORTS Crawford seals deal with eagle Scrambles throughout week The team of Bryce Hawthorne, Will Norris and Curtis Mixon won the top honors in the Thursday Night Scramble on July 10 with a 7-under par. The pot hole was No. 6 and was won by the team of Luke Soucinek, Shelton Keen and Tony Johnson. The Thursday Night Scramble is open to anyone at a cost of $23 for members and $30 for non-members. Call the pro shop by 5 p.m. to sign up. We had 30 players in the Saturday Blitz on July 12. Jason Self won first place in the A division with a +5. Jordan Hale came in second with a +3. Steve Patterson and Dave Mehl tied for third with a +2. Ron Bennett won first place in the B division with a +9. Eli Witt came in sec-ond with a +8. Bob Randall came in third with a +7. Skins winner were: Mike McCranie (No. 2), Alan Moody (No. 6) and Hale (No. 18). The Saturday Blitz costs $15, plus cart fee, and is open to anyone. You must tee off by 9 a.m. Call the pro shop to make a tee time. We had 22 players in the Sunday Blitz on July 13. A.J. Lavin and Steve Peters tied for first place with a +7. Charles Timmons came in third with a +6. John Brewer, Mike Carr, Mike Gough and Shelton Keen tied for fourth with a +3. Closest to the pin winners were: Lavin (No. 5), Terry Hunter (No. 7), Jim Carr (No. 15) and Tom Wade (No. 17). Skin winners were: Lavin (No. 5), Peters (No. 8), Steve Patterson (No. 9) and Timmons (No. 14). The Sunday Blitz costs $20, plus cart fee, and is open to anyone. Tee off at anytime. Call the pro shop to make a tee time. Cynthia Lucia won first place in the Ladies Day “build a nine” with a 29 on Tuesday. Peggy Radcliffe and Anita West tied for sec-ond with a 31. Anita West had a chip-in on No. 4. We had 26 players in the Wednesday Blitz. Buddy Slay won first place in the A division with a +5. Mike Gough came in second with a +3. Jordan Hale came in third with a +1. Pete Skantzos and Charles Timmons tied for first place in the B division with a +5. Mickey Willcox came in third with a +4. Skin winners were: Timmons (No. 3), A.J. Lavin (No. 5), Gough (No. 6), Slay (Nos. 8 and 13) and Mike Jacobs (No. 14). The pot hole was No. 7 and no one birdied it; therefore, the $46 pot car-ried over. The Wednesday Blitz costs $13 (plus optional pot), plus cart fee, and is open to anyone.Tee off at anytime. Call the pro shop to make a tee time. Good Old Boys results:n Match 1 — Ed Snow, Eli Witt and Joe Persons def. Tom Foley, Larry Ward, Paul Davis and Tom Elmore, 6–4; n Match 2 — Shelton Keen, Monty Montgomery, Nick Whitehurst and Jim Bell def. Rob Brown, Bobby Simmons, Jim McGriff and Dan Stephens, 8–5, and Bob Weary, Emerson Darst, Stan Woolbert and Bill Rogers 8–4. Good scores were: McGriff 76 (36-40), Persons 78 (40-38), Darst 79 (40-39), Witt 79 (41-38) and Snow 79 (41-38). For information, call the pro shop at 752-2266 or check out our website at www.thecountryclubat-lakecity.com. Upcoming events: Q July 21-25, Tennis camp; Q Friday, Pairings Party; Q Saturday, MGA 400; Q July 28-Aug. 1, Golf clinic; Q Aug. 2, Mayo Rotary Club (course closed until 1:30 p.m.); COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsG ag grouper season began for our home waters earlier this month. I fished for gags a grand total of one time last year, and hoped to at least double that (or maybe quadruple it, in case my wife is reading) this year. Our family typically heads to Anna Maria Island for the 4th of July. My uncle owns a beach condo, and graciously lets us use it anytime we want during the summers. Yes, I know we’re lucky — very lucky. Additionally, Caleb Grimes and his family always open their family festivities to our family. I’ve been going to his beach houses for close to 30 years, and now my wife and daughters, along with my parents and siblings, attend regularly. We play beach volleyball, eat red, white and blue snacks, ride the boat and waves, and get our own private fireworks show. With gag season in past years opening around July, we typically celebrated with these fireworks, and offshore fishing. What’s more American than that? Two years ago, this annual trip produced a trip for the ages. My brother-in-law, Greg Dasher, drove from Dallas just to make this trip (or maybe it was the whole family thing). We departed just after sunrise in Caleb’s 29-foot Proline with a boat full of guys not named Grimes. Speaking of which, there is not a more unselfish human being than Caleb. He lets us use his boats (yes, that’s plural — he has an inshore and offshore boat) basically anytime we want. We typically fish with Caleb, his oldest son, Kyle, or any of his three daughters. On this trip they were all booked, so we cleared the boat ramp just after sunrise and loaded the bait well with frisky threadfin and pinfish. We were greeted with slick calm skies and scattered thunderstorms way in the distance as we throttled towards a 20-mile area of hard bottom. Within 30 minutes all of a sudden the skies started to darken. The scattered storms way off in the distance started growing at an incredible rate, and soon we were surrounded by white water, dark skies and electricity. I don’t know how to fully explain the next two hours, but we’ll say the seven of us didn’t talk a lot, and simply kept driving towards the least nasty looking weather. That was it. Go for the faint light. Sometimes it felt like we were in a dark room with only a flashlight. Eventually a gap opened towards Mexico, and we headed due west. We weren’t going home for a while, as it was blacker than oil towards the ramp, so we started fishing. First line in yielded a nice red snapper. The next line brought up a big red grouper. Then we caught a solid mangrove snapper, then more snapper, and more grouper. We fished for the next three hours of the most incredible sustained offshore bite I’ve ever experienced. We filled two fish boxes with red snapper to 15 pounds and red grouper to 15 pounds, along with mangroves, bee liners and mahi mahi. It didn’t end there. We headed in almost 20 miles with storms still lighting up the mainland, and went after gags. The next five drops produced gags to 15 pounds. After an hour we had limited on gags. Here’s the funniest part of this offshore slaughter: I found a bag of this fish in my outside freezer today — two years later! Snapper and grouper don’t go to waste, and somehow there was so much fish that this bag had pulled a Houdini inside my chest freezer. We later unanimously admitted that was the most scared any of us had been, to a man. We were the only brave ones (cough ... idiots) with a trailer still at the ramp — literally. There was one lone fisherman, and he hopped in his truck after we loaded up the boat. He then proceeded to cut us off right as we were pulling out. We were baffled. He then whipped out a badge. He was undercover FWC. Forty-five minutes later he had emptied two fish boxes, multiple coolers and a converted live well. Each time he thought he was done, we said one more spot. We had counted multiple times throughout the day, but when you’re talking close to 100 different fish, can you be exactly right? He repeated to us many times that with all the boats he had checked, no one had caught fish that day. Every boat he checked was coming up with either zero fish, or just a couple. All he kept repeating was, “Are you serious?” We seriously ended up with EXACTLY the limit on gag grouper, red grouper, red snapper and more. We were lucky in every sense of the word with the weather, the bite, and the fish count. Ironically the name of Caleb’s boat is “Legal Limit.” Attorneys raised him, and both he and his wife are attorneys. Can you imagine if the fishing vessel “Legal Limit” had an “illegal limit?” We proceeded to go to the house to clean fish for the next several hours, and as luck would have it (again) we had just enough Ziploc bags!Q Rob Chapman IV is a tournament-winning angler and outdoorsman from Lake City. He’s an award-winning marine artist, a graduate of Florida Gateway College and of Jacksonville University. He is currently the Coordinator of Marketing, Web, & Graphics Production at FGC, and is active both in the outdoors and designing for outdoors companies throughout the world. He’d love to hear from you! Send your reports, photos, and articles to rob@outdoors360.com utdoors 360 Time for gagging grouper PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANChris Williams caught this nice red snapper and big m angrove snapper within site of land off the Panhandle. PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANBrittany Pinner & Brady Pratt with a sweet bounty of inshor e species.PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANThis dolphin was caught in Islamorada by Maney Stalvey PHOTO COURTESY ROB CHAPMANRob Chapman is joined by his father Bob (left) and Jon athan Allen (right) on a fishing expedition. OUTDOORS 360 Rob Chapmanrob@outdoors360.com

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Lake City Reporter Week of Sunday, July 20-26, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section CColumbia, Inc.Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Allergy Testing & TreatmentSpecializing in adult medical care including:386-719-2540www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com Medicare, Blue Cross, Tri-Care and most insurance plans acceptedLocated in the Lake City Mediplex Building404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FLLocated in the Lake City Mediplex Building404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FLS O U T H E R NINTERNAL MEDICINES O U T H E R NINTERNAL MEDICINE Now Accepting New Patients Al Otero, PA-CSOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINEis proud to announce Al Otero, PA-C is joining our group If you enjoy hiking and biking, the Suwannee River Basin offers excellent opportunities for leisurely walks or overnight hiking trips. Both on-road and off-road trails invite bicyclist to explore the area. Trails are available to meet or challenge the riding skills for your entire family. If horseback riding appeals to you, the Suwannee River Basin offers lots of opportunities to enjoy scenic trails.By GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida led the nation in job growth in June, a sharp turnaround from the previous month. But the addition of more than 37,000 jobs wasnt enough to push down the states unemployment rate significantly. Floridas unemployment rate was 6.2 percent or a slight dip of 0.1 percent from May. The jobless rate has remained largely flat for the first half of 2014. And for the first time in more than a year, Floridas rate is higher than the national rate. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.1 percent. Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who has made job creation a central focus of his re-election campaign, did not focus on the unemployment rate on Friday, choosing instead to emphasize the number of new jobs that were added. This news is great for Florida families, and Florida continues to have great success in our states economic recovery, said Scott, who announced the new job numbers during a press conference held in Bonita Springs. Florida led the nation in job losses in May, so the news that the state had rebounded in June is good for Scott. The Republican incumbent ran for office four years ago, promising to create 700,000 jobs over the jobs created by normal growth. The governor has continually suggested that his policies have aided the states gradual recovery, although that assertion has drawn skepticism and criticism, especially from his political opponents. Economists have warned this year that the states unemployment rate will not drop as sharply as it once did. The states economy is recovering, but it is a much slower and drawn out recovery than previous ones. A new economic overview released this week by Floridas Office of Economic and Demographic Research predicted that it will take a few more years to climb completely out of the hole left by the recession. As the recovery takes hold, people begin looking for work again and thats reflected in the monthly unemployment totals. Back in December, for example, there was an estimated 584,000 people out of work. The June numbers put the total of jobless Floridians at 597,000. The new numbers show Walton County in Floridas Panhandle had the lowest unemployment rate at 3.4 percent, while the highest jobless rate in the state is 10.4 percent in Hendry County.States jobless rate dips slightly in June Though number still higher than national rate. Wilderness Trail a big draw PHOTOS COURTESY METRO CREATIVE IMAGESYou can paddle, hike, bicycle, horseback ride, camp, fish, boat and watch wildlife on the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail. Cool, clear springs offer opportunities to swim, snorkel and scuba dive. These activities draw thousands of out-of-town visitors to the area each year.By MEGAN REEVESmreeves@lakecityreporter.comWHITE SPRINGS Florida is well-known for the sand and sunshine that make up many of its famous beaches, but many dont know about the world-famous river that winds throughout Florida history and culture. The Suwannee River Wilderness Trail in White Springs features a kayaking, canoeing, fishing, swimming, camping and more, all revolving around the slow-flowing Suwannee River. The river was made famous by Stephen Fosters song Old Folks at Home, which is set on the river. The trail runs about 170 miles along the river to the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, with recreational, cultural and historical sites along the way. Visitors who stay for the day can enjoy wildlife viewing, shopping and several other recreational activities. There are shops, galleries and museums to help visitors explore the small town life of Old Floridas history, as well wilderness adventures like biking, hiking and horseback riding. All the while pumping money into the local economy. The slow movement of the river gives visitors of all ages the chance to experience its springs, sandbars and rocky banks as they float. Children enjoy swimming and snorkeling to see the beautiful underwater wildlife living in the river. Visitors can extend their adventures by staying overnight along the river in either campgrounds, cabins, hotels or bed and breakfasts, all of which are situated around and close to the river. Along with these accommodations, there are both platforms and hubs along the trail. Platforms are covered areas with fans and electricity. This is a great place for visitors paddling the river to stop and take a break or set up camp. Restrooms and showers are available also, accommodating up to 10 people. Hubs are other stops along the river that feature towns or parks for visitors to explore, supplying several goods and services to trail visitors. Because of the array of activities offered along the trail, a trip to the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail is one that can entertain families and groups of all ages. Packages and prices for day and overnight trips can be found at www.suwanneeriver.com or by calling 386-294-1120. Trail outfitters will specialize trips to best fit groups and preferences.Economy continues to benefit from recreation on the Suwannee River. SCORE WorkshopA SCORE Entrepreneurs Workshop will be held Monday, July 21 from 6-8 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. This workshop is for people who are thinking about starting a busi ness or are in business already and need expert advice. There is no cost to attend but an RSVP is required. Call 386-7522000.Estate PlanningLake City Attorney Teresa Byrd Morgan will offer a free estate planning workshop on Thursday, July 24 at 10 a.m. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Call Shana Miller at 386-755-1977 to RSVP.Business BriefsThe slow movement of the river gives visitors of all ages the chance to experience its springs, sandbars and rocky banks as they float.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, JULY 20-26, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Name That Company@kiXZ\dpiffkjYXZbkf(//.n_\e XnXkZ_dXb\iXkk_\E`ggfe>Xbb` ZfdgXepY\^XedXb`e^i\\[fi^Xej% @defnk_\nfic[jcXi^\jkdXb\if]X]lccc`e\f]dlj`ZXc`ejkild\ekjXjn\cc Xjjgfikj\hl`gd\ek#j\d`Zfe[lZkfij# ifYfkj#]lie`kli\#Xggc`XeZ\j#Xl[`f&m`jlXc gif[lZkj#dXZ_`e\kffcjXe[dlZ_dfi\%@ \m\efneXe[ilejfd\AXgXe\j\i\jfikj% @e X[[`k`fe#@\eZfdgXjjk_\j\gXiXk\cpdXeX^\[ m\_`Zc\ZfdgXepk_Xk`jefnk_\nfic[jj\Zfe[$ cXi^\jkdfkfiZpZc\dXb\iXe[XcjfdXb\j^fc] ZXikj#flkYfXi[\e^`e\j#jefndfY`c\j#nXk\im\_`$ Zc\jXe[dfi\%8kjfd\gf`ek#@_Xm\\m\ef]]\i\[ ]`Y\i^cXjj$i\`e]fiZ\[YXk_klYj%N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! strategy based on predicting short-term price changes in securities, which is virtually impossible to do. s0RIMERATE The interest rate that lenders charge their best, most reli-able customers. s2EALRETURN The inflationadjusted returns of an investment. For example, the stock market averaged an annual return of about 10 percent during the 20th century. If you subtract the annual inflation rate over the same time period, roughly 3 percent, you arrive at the real return – approximately 7 percent annually. s3ECTORFUND A mutual fund that invests its shareholders’ money in a relatively narrow market sec-tor, such as technology, energy, the Internet or banking. s5NDERWRITER A brokerage firm that helps a company go public in an initial public offering (IPO). The firm underwrites (vouches for) the stock. When a company has been brought public, the shares have been underwritten. s6OLUME The amount of a stock (expressed in shares or dollars) that is traded during a specified period. Learn more at WIKIFOOLCOM &OOLSAURUS and INVESTOPEDIACOM DICTIONARY K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ Banking on Capital One FinancialIt may seem like you’ve arrived too late to profit from stocks trading near their 52-week highs, but that’s not always the case. Consider Capital One Financial Corporation (NYSE: COF), the successful consumer and commercial banking franchise with a strong market position in credit cards, auto loans and home loans. Capital One has a convincing track record in growing its core business segments and has become the 13th-largest domestic bank in terms of total assets. Thanks to cyclical tail-winds generated by higher consumer spending, Capital One’s business segments should experience signifi-cantly higher demand, which should translate into higher share prices. Indeed, in May the bank recently reported its first uptick in domestic credit card loan growth in almost a year. (A recent study by CardHub ranked Capital One first in offering cards with the fewest limitations on their rewards.) Capital One is resilient. During the financial crisis, its losses were small and it exceeded 2006 profitability levels as early as 2010. Thanks to its strong balance sheet, the bank plans to funnel back substantial amounts of cash to shareholders in the form of dividends and share buybacks. Capital One is worth considering for your portfolio. Its recent P/E ratio of 11.6 is below its five-year average of 14.1, and it offers a 1.4 percent divi-dend yield. (The Motley Fool owns shares of Capital One Financial.) The Motl ey Foo l To Educate, Amuse & Enrich 8jbk_\=ffc Dp;ldY\jk@em\jkd\ek Not the Best OptionI bought shares of Netflix at $10 per share. I watched it get to the high $50s and then swoon, falling to the mid-$40s. I decided to get some income from the stock, so I sold a call option on it with a $60 strike price, so that whoever bought the option could buy my shares for $60 during a certain period. Well, that was dumb. Netflix moved past $60 so quickly that it made me dizzy. I got my $60 per share, but I missed so much more. Lesson: Ride your big winner the few times you have one and use trailing stops to lock in profits — J.M.L., San Diego 4HE&OOL2ESPONDS You’re right; with Netflix shares recently surpassing $470 per share, you missed a bundle. It might help to think about each of your holdings and jot down why you’re holding it — say, for income or for growth. And be careful with trailing stop-loss orders, which instruct your broker to sell if the stock falls by a certain amount. They could eject you from the stock prema-turely, due to temporary volatility.Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap! C8JKN<cfYXcI\jkXliXekj%Kf[Xp@jgfikdfi\k_Xe+'#'''\Xk\i`\j`edfi\k_Xe(),Zfleki`\jXe[k\ii`kfi`\j#Xe[@\dgcfpjfd\(%,d`cc`feg\fgc\^cfYXccp%@iXb\`edfi\k_Xe(*Y`cc`feXeelXccp#n`k_XYflk.'g\iZ\ekf]k_Xk^\e\iXk\[XYifX[%@e)'()#@fg\e\[XYflk]`m\e\ni\jkXliXekjg\i[Xpflkj`[\k_\L%J%N_fXd@68ejn\i1Pld9iXe[j 7RITETO5S Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice. Seek Wide MoatsQWhat does it mean when a company is said to have a moat? Surely it isn’t headquar-tered in a castle, right? — G.L., MilwaukeeAWell, think of a company as being an imaginary castle. If it has a wide moat, it will be well defended, making it hard for any enemies to attack it. In business jargon, an economic moat refers to sustainable com-petitive advantages that a company may have that protect its market position and defend against com-petitors or would-be competitors. Examples include brand power, switching costs, patents, economies of scale and barriers to entry. It’s hard for upstarts to compete against a powerful brand, and hard for any company to enter certain indus-tries where start-up costs are steep (think airplane manufacturing, for example). Switching costs can keep many customers from chang-ing to a different cellphone carrier or platform. ***QI noticed recently that trading in General Motors stock was “halted” for some reason. What’s halting all about? — B.W., Pensacola, FloridaATrading halts are called when a company is about to announce some big news or when there’s a big order imbalance that needs to be corrected. Trad-ing was halted for General Motors because there was “news pending” — the company announced a big new round of recalls (7.6 million vehicles) and a big increase in the cost it expects to incur repairing the recalled vehicles. Trading was halted for about half an hour. The stock had been up by less than 1 percent before the halt, and when trading resumed it was down more than 1 percent. Trading was halted in GM’s stock so that no one would be buying or selling shares without the benefit of the new information.Got a question for the Fool? Send it in — see Write to Us =ffcjJZ_ffc Defining TermsSeasoned and beginning investors alike can be confused by financial jargon. Hone your financial literacy with this mini-glossary: s!MERICAN$EPOSITARY2ECEIPT !$2 A receipt for the shares of a foreign-based company held by a U.S. bank that entitles the share-holder to all dividends and capital gains of the underlying stock. ADRs trade like stocks on U.S. exchanges, providing a way for Americans to invest in foreign-based companies in the U.S. instead of through an over-seas exchange. s"ASISPOINT Most often used relating to changes in interest rates. One basis point is 1/100th of a per-centage point. s)NSTITUTIONALINVESTORS These include pension funds, insurance funds, mutual funds and hedge funds. s-ARGINACCOUNT A brokerage account that permits the owner to borrow money to buy securities. Margin accounts shouldn’t be used by inexperienced investors, or those who are putting money at risk that they can’t afford to lose. s-ARKETTIMING An investment 2014 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 7/17 Associated Press ORLANDO — Union officials say Walt Disney World has reached a tentative labor agreement with its largest union group that raises starting hourly pay from a little over $8 to $9 this year. The agreement announced Friday raises starting hourly pay to $9.50 next year and $10 in 2016. Union members will vote whether to approve the pro posed contract on Aug. 1. The contract covers 21,000 full-time workers at the Florida-based theme park resort, which has around 45,000 full-time and 25,000 part-time employees. Union officials say the contract freezes employee health care costs in 2015. Disney World and union officials have been negotiating since March, when the previous contract expired. Disney World reaches contract agreement with union workers By STEVEN DUBOISAssociated Press PORTLAND — Two attorneys general from the Northwest have sued the companies responsible for the popular 5-Hour Energy drink, alleging they engaged in deceptive advertising. The Oregon lawsuit filed Thursday in Portland contends 5-Hour Energy falsely claims customers get extra energy and focus from a unique blend of ingredients, when the boost actually comes from a concen trated dose of caffeine. The suit also targets claims that users don’t experience a crash when the effects subside and that the product is OK for adolescents. Oregon has been part of a group leading a 33-state investi gation into the accuracy of the product’s claims. Washington state’s attorney general filed a similar lawsuit Thursday in King County Superior Court in Seattle. Other states are expected to file suit as well, said Kristina Edmunson, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Justice. The lawsuits name Living Essentials LLC and Innovation Ventures LLC as defendants. 5-Hour Energy spokeswoman Melissa Skabich said the compa ny will defend itself against what Skabich called civil intimidation. “When companies are being bullied by someone in a position of power, these companies roll over, pay the ransom, and move on,” Skabich said in a statement. “We’re not doing that.” Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum said 5-Hour Energy violated the state’s Unlawful Trade Practices Act. The lawsuit seeks monetary penalties as well as refunds to all Oregon buyers of the decaffeinated version of the product, which, according to the lawsuit, provides no extra energy or alertness. “Plainly and simply, in Oregon you cannot promote a product as being effective if you don’t have sufficient evidence to back up your advertising claims,” Rosenblum said. She and 5-Hour Energy have been in a tug-of-war over that evi dence for more than a year, with her department seeking unre dacted information showing how the formula for 5-Hour Energy provides its asserted benefits. The heavily advertised energy drink was introduced a decade ago, and the lawsuit estimates it is sold at more than 100,000 retail locations in the United States. The state officials investigat ing 5-Hour Energy say they are concerned about safety. The Food and Drug Administration said in November 2012 that it had received more than 90 reports over four years about illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths after the consumption of 5-Hour Energy. The FDA said, however, that the reports did not prove that the energy drink caused the problems. States sue 5-Hour Energy over ad claims Thirty-three states investigating product’s claims of ‘unique blend of ingredients.’ By RYAN NAKASHIMAAP Business Writer LOS ANGELES — Microsoft announced the biggest layoffs in its 39-year history Thursday, outlining plans to cut 18,000 jobs in a move that marked the CEO’s sharpest pivot yet away from his predecessor’s drive for the company to make its own devices. Although some cuts had been expect ed ever since Microsoft acquired Nokia’s mobile-device unit, the number amounted to 14 percent of the Microsoft workforce — about twice what analysts had estimated. The cuts will include some 12,500 jobs associated with the Nokia unit — nearly half of the 28,000 employees Microsoft brought on board in April through the acquisition. When the cuts are complete, the company will still have about 10,000 more employees than before the Nokia acquisition, with an overall headcount of 109,000. In a public email to employees, CEO Satya Nadella said the changes were needed for the company to “become more agile and move faster.” The move also pushes Nokia to focus solely on the Windows Phone operating system. Nadella is clearly backing away from former CEO Steve Ballmer’s strategy of getting Microsoft to make its own smartphones and tablets. “He’s making a pretty serious game-changing strategy move away from hardware,” said Michael Turits, managing director of equity research for financial services company Raymond James & Associates. Nadella indicated that Microsoft will largely abandon low-price Nokia Asha phones — which work on their own non-Windows operating system — and reverse a strategically questionable move by Nokia in February to launch a line of phones called “X’’ that supported rival Google Inc.’s Android platform. Microsoft to cut 18,000 jobs Associated Press LONDON — Glum news for “Glee” — Britain’s High Court ruled Friday that the musical TV show must change its name because it breaches the trademark of a chain of comedy clubs. A judge told Twentieth Century Fox that it had to re-name the series in Britain, though the order won’t take effect until an appeal has been heard. The studio was sued by Comic Enterprises, which operates a string of venues called The Glee Club. Judge Roger Wyand ruled in favor of Comic Enterprises in February, saying there was a “likeli hood of confusion” between the two brands. Fox said it would appeal, and argued that ordering a name change would be unnecessary, unfair and disproportionate. But the judge concluded Friday that “Glee” had to go. “I find it hard to believe that the cost of the re-titling and publicizing of the new name would be so prohibi tive compared to the value of the series,” he said. “I was told many times during the course of the trial how this series is a ‘blockbust er.’” The judge said it was pos sible the Court of Appeal would take a different view, so he put the re-naming order on hold until appeal judges have analyzed the case. UK court orders TV show ‘Glee’ to change its name

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Classified Department: nrrrCLASSIFIEDn3C www.sitel.com FULL TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE! LOOKING FOR:Technically sound & sale oriented candidates FREE Satellite TV Service! VALUED AT $3,000 Earn Up to $10.35 Per Hour Within Y our First 6 Months! Under NEW Leadership 2010 Mercury Grand MarquisExcellent condition, loaded, leather seats. 23,900 miles.$14,800386-365-7474, Terry Want to sell it quickly? Call Melissa: 386-754-0401 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With A rtwork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 Home ImprovementsKIPTHE HANDYMAN Carpentry, drywall, painting, clean outs, window washing Kip Pickering 203-206-2867 ServicesATTORNEY– CHILD SEX ABUSE LAWSUITS at DAYCARE (2011) – No Statute of Limitations Christopher Parker-Cyrus, Esq. 200 NE 1STSt., Gainesville, FL 32601 352-346-3569 LegalEFFECTIVE AUGUST31, 2014Jeffrey Glenn, DOIs closing his practice located at:Lake City Bone & Joint3140 NWMedical Center Lane, Suite 130Lake City, Florida 32055 and relocating to The Orthopedic Institute146 SWOrthopaedic CourtLake City, FL32024phone (386) 755-9215To obtain a medical records release please call:386-755-972005545780June 29, 2014July 6, 13, 20, 2014 060Services ATTORNEY– CHILD SEX ABUSE LAWSUITS at DAYCARE (2011) – No Statute of Limitations Christopher Parker-Cyrus, Esq. 200 NE 1STSt., Gainesville, FL 32601 352-346-3569 100Job Opportunities05545691Rountree Moore Automotive Group. Seeking highly motivated individual for sale position. Great income potential with benefits. No experience necessary. Call Chris Shelley today to set up your interview 386-758-6171 05545847Ad DesignerPosition Candidates must be proficient in all Adobe CS print production programs. Send resume and digital work samples to: Dave Kimler at dkimler@lakecityreporter .com Interviews to follow for qualifying applicants. Competitive salary and benefits plan available. EOE FULL-TIME COOK II $8.42 perhr 2 yrs experience commercial kitchen cooking preferred. Requirements: HS Diploma/ GED, current First Aid/CPR,dependable transportation. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Apply at: 236 SWColumbia Ave, Lake City OR Apply Online: sv4cs.org E-mail/fax resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386)754-2220 Call 754-2225 EOE WEISER SECURITY SERVICES, INC Full Time Position for Class D Security Officer 40hrs Permanent (2nd shift 12:30pm to 8:30pm) Officers needed to fill in for vacations and call outs Floaters will get first choice when full time position opens APPLYON LINE, weisersecurity.com OR IN PERSON, Monday thru Friday from 9:00am until 12:00pm at TIMCO, 5530 E. Hwy 90 (Airport), or at Florida Crown Workforce, 1389 Hwy. 90 W. Suite17005546132Job openings require at least 2 yrs exp in Cabinetmaking, Wooden Furniture Assembly, OR Trim/Finish Carpentry. Assembly/ Production work, some hand tools required. Benefits include paid vacations, and paid holidays. Wages commensurate with exp. Apply in person at Marlow-Hunter, LLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua, FL 100Job Opportunities05546073ACCOUNTCLERK II (Cashier) Process payments, balance daily deposit and prepare bank deposits, administer petty cash and change fund requests, assist students with account inquiries and general questions. Requires high school diploma or its equivalent plus three years business office, cash handling and/or customer service experience. Special consideration will be given to applicants with an Associate Degree or Certificate in a related area.Knowledge of business arithmetic, basic business practices and procedures. Knowledge of Word, Excel, and Outlook. Skill in use of a calculator and cash register. Ability to exercise effective oral and written communication. Ability to perform work in a timely manner, work well under pressure and work in a team environment. Salary:$23,373 annually plus benefits Application Deadline: 7/28/14 Position details and applications available on web at: www .fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: human.resources@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment 05546079Homes of Merit is looking for “experienced” help in the following areas: Framing, Electrical, Siding, Shingles, & Trim Apply in person at 1915 SE State Road 100, LC, FL32025 05546089ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, GRAPHIC DESIGN, GAMING, AND SIMULATION 164 Duty Days Tenured Track Teach a variety of courses in the Computer Science Department to include digital media, gaming, and computer programming. Requires Masters Degree in Digital Arts & Sciences, Computer Science, Graphic Design, Instructional Systems or related field with emphasis on gaming and simulation. Demonstrated background and understanding in the application of software in the areas of design, web, interactive media and gaming; and in computer programming. Desirable Qualifications: Doctorate in Digital Arts and Sciences, Computer Science, Graphic Design or related field with emphasis on gaming and simulation. Demonstrated skills in 2D and 3D computer modeling and animation. Industry certification in applicable software. Salary: Based on degree and experience. Review of Applications Will Begin: Immediately, position open until filled. Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and copies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www .fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: human.resources@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment Crew person needed for Lake City and surrounding areas. Weed eating required for this job. Some overnight stay with per diem. $9.00 per hr. starting pay. Apply by phone. Frank 772-528-3778 100Job OpportunitiesDrivers, CDL-A : Home EVERY Weekend! ALLLoaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease, No Money Down. 1-888-880-5916 Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 Epiphany Catholic School seeking Guidance Counselor Please call 752-2320 for more information Experienced Electricians & Helpers needed Apply by Phone 386-752-6082 Hiring Full Time: Management experience only apply. Sales experience a plus. Lake City, FL Call Ed Newman 904-540-2314 Industrial Maintenance Technician Experience Required in Electrical, Controls and General Millwright/ Mechanical work. Experience in Hydraulics and Pneumatics helpful. Send resume to Maintenance Technician, 3631 US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055. Industrial PainterNeeded Sandblaster/Painter for structural fabricated steel. Apply in person at 3631 East HWY90;Lake City FLNO PHONE CALLS Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Wage dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg Boyette @ Columbia Grain 755-7700 Processor/Closer: Title agent seeking someone familiar with all aspects of real estate closings. Competitive pay and bonuses. Resume/References to nuttdjs@aol.com PTPosition assisting funeral home owner & staff. Some after hours & weekend hours. Contact Bill Guerry 386-752-2414 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc TEACHERS $8.71$11.07 hr Infant/Toddler(birth-3) Pre-school (ages 3-5) Openings in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette & Suwannee Counties APPLYONLINE at www.sv4cs.org Or E-mail / fax resume to: employment@sv4cs.or g Fax (386) 754-2220 Call 754-2225 EOE WELDER NEEDED Valid Welder Cert Required Able to read/understand various measuring devices. Apply in person. Grizzly Mfg 174 NE Cortez Terr Lake City WELDER NEEDED-QIA Must be familiar with Stick Weld & Mick Weld; read tape and drawings. Apply in person at 3631 East HWY90;Lake City FLNO PHONE CALLS 120Medical EmploymentF/TLICENSED phlebotomist needed for busy medical office. M-F. email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net 240Schools & Education05545675INTERESTED in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $499 Day 7/28/14 • Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class8/4/2014• LPN 9/15/14 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $450 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP& other locations 386-752-6422 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba SW, Handicap accessible, $500mth, $500 dep. Ater 2PM call 386-438-9371 640Mobile Homes forSaleBrand New 2015 5BR/3BA$69,900 Setup & delivered 904-259-4663 waynefriermacclenny.com No Money Down! Use your land. 3BR w/ porch $399/mo4BR w/ porch $499/mo 904-259-4663 OwnerFinancing 3/2 S. of Lake City. Clean. Small Down $750 mth. 386-590-0642 & 867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com New Palm Harbor Velocity Models! 3/2 starting in the 50's, 4/2 starting in the 60's Limited time offer!! 800-622-2832 *Se habla espanol 650Mobile Home & LandLand/Home Package 1021 NE Cummings Way. 3BR/2BACity water & sewer $69,900 Call 904-259-4663 or 386-288-2374 Land/Home Package 158 Michelle Place 3BR/2BAon 2/5 acres $74,900 904-259--4663 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent$545 mo $545 dep. 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A NO PETS 386-697-4814 2BR/1BA. CLOSE to town. $600/mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 GREATAREA West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $675-$750 plus SEC. 386-438-4600 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $145, 2 persons $155. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR/1BA Very clean, fresh paint, carport,No Pets at this time. $625/mo & $625/dep 288-8401 3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the country. Credit check required. $500. mo. $500 Deposit No Pets!! 386-752-3225 Rent to own $675 mth 3 bd 3 bth 397 NE Montana StLake City, FL Call (850) 386-3204 750Business & Office RentalsOAKBRIDGE OFFICE Complex Professional Office Available 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 770Condos ForRent 3br/2ba W/D, excellent condition, new paint, pool access, CH/A References Req. Not Pets. $880 mth & $880 Dep. 752-0442, 397-3500, or 755-2235 790Vacation Rentals Scalloping in Horseshoe Beach $99/nightly includes tax. Tastefully remodeled efficiency, sleeps 4, cable, picnic tables, grill plus washer/dryer ect. Scalloping starts June 28 Call now 352-498-5405 or 352-498-5986 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale OWNER FINANCING 3BR/2BAon 2 acres, $152,000 or possible lease to own. 386-752-5035 X 3710 7 days 7-7 owner/broker ABar Sales, Inc. 820Farms & Acreage4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road. Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd Owner Financing! NO DOWN! $59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018. www .LandOwnerFinancing.com 940Trucks 1997 GMC Sonoma w/extended cab and topper. Runs excellent, interior excellent., 4 new tires, $3000 SOLD 950Cars forSale 2010 Mercury Gran Marquis Excellent condition, loaded/leather seats 23,900 miles $14,800 Terry 386-365-7474 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440. PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter ’

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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, JULY 20-26, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Associated Press NEW ORLEANS — Louisiana and four other states will soon be selling federal duck stamps online, joining eight other states that already do. “Anyone, regardless of what state you live in, may purchase an E-Stamp online through any of the states,” according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service web site. Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Virginia also were recent ly chosen for the feder al E-Stamp option, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries said in a news release Thursday. Louisiana’s online sales will begin Aug. 1. The federal depart ment’s website links to state sites in Arkansas, Florida, Maryland, Texas, Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota and Wisconsin for online duck stamp sales. “It is important that you have a printer so you will be able to print the elec tronic stamp,” the federal website notes. Hunters who buy the stamp online get a confir mation number that they can use for 45 days. Within that time, the government will mail a stamp certified by the U.S. Postal Service. After 45 days, the hunt er must carry the actual stamp while hunting. Hunters will also be able to buy a temporary federal E-Stamp from any retail vendor selling Louisiana hunting licens es, the Louisiana depart ment said. “If you experience prob lems during your purchase of the online stamp or with the receipt of your duck stamp, please contact the state from which you made the purchase, since that information will be in their system,” according to the federal website. “Do not contact the Federal Duck Stamp Office.” Four more states to sell duck stamps Florida now one of 12 states to sell the E-stamp. WIKIMEDIA COMMONSOld duck stamps like this had to be signed by the hunter in order to be legally used. By STEPHEN WRIGHT and KELVIN CHANAP Business Writers HONG KONG (AP) — Hit by two astonishing tragedies in quick succession, the Malaysia Airlines brand may become the airline industry’s equivalent of asbestos or News of the World: toxic to the public and, experts say, impossible to redeem. Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed over eastern Ukraine on Thursday with 298 people aboard by what American intelligence authorities believe was a sur face-to-air missile. Just four months earlier, a Malaysia Airlines jetliner carrying 239 people disappeared about an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur. The jet has still not been found, a source of profound unease for travelers and the aviation industry. “I can’t comprehend of anything they can do to save themselves,” said Mohshin Aziz, an aviation analyst at Maybank in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. “Perception-wise it really hits home,” Aziz said. “It’s very difficult to fight against negative perception.” Even before the Flight 370 mystery, state-owned Malaysia Airlines was in serious financial trouble. In an industry infamous for impoverishing shareholders and irking customers, Malaysia Airlines had long stood out for its years of restructurings and losses. The Flight 370 disaster along with the often erratic response of Malaysia Airlines and the Malaysian gov ernment deeply scarred the carrier. Now, the once proud national airline is facing the unthinkable again. University student Dayne Rodgers, waiting for a flight to Brisbane, Australia at Incheon International Airport in South Korea, said even very cheap fares might not convince him to fly with Malaysia Airlines. “I don’t know if my Mum would let me,” he said.Already losing about $1.6 million a day, there will be “no miracles” for Malaysia Airlines, said Aziz, the Maybank analyst. Before the Ukrainian disaster, his opinion was the airline didn’t have the capacity to sur vive beyond a year. The airline’s share price plummeted 11 percent Friday. Ukraine has accused pro-Russian separatists of shooting down the plane flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. The rebels denied it. Unlike Flight 370, the responsibility for which is pinned with Malaysia Airlines, the second disaster appears largely beyond the airline’s control. It may, however, face questions about why it continued with flight paths over eastern Ukraine, which is the heart of a violent rebellion against Kiev, when some airlines were circumventing the country. The flight route was declared safe by the International Civil Aviation Organization. For air travelers in Asia, who have a multitude of options thanks to a budget airline boom, the latest inci dent will make the Malaysian carrier even less attrac tive. Its brand in the rest of the world, where it became known largely because of the Flight 370 mystery, is now even more closely associated with the worst fears of fliers. Josh Gokul, a 25-year-old Australian student on a layover at Incheon, said he had flown with Malaysian Airlines before and its service was “fantastic.” But he is now “very hesitant” about using the airline. “Flying is scary enough.” Within Malaysia, the shock is palpably raw.“I was stunned,” said 48-year-old shopkeeper Reezal Mohamed. “It’s unbelievable.” Malaysia Airlines has been in the red for the last three years. Last year, its losses ballooned to 1.17 billion ringgit ($363 million), nearly three times larger than its 433 million ringgit loss in 2012. As a state-owned flag carrier, it is required to fly unprofitable domestic routes, and its strong union has resisted operational changes. Nimbler discount rivals such as Air Asia have expanded rapidly, while Malaysia Airlines has been like a supertanker, slow to change direction. For some travelers, the airline’s poor financial health is more concerning for the future than the two disas ters. “Last time I saw them, the plane was almost empty and so I suspect, probably losing a lot of money,” said tourist Ricky Leong as he checked in for a Malaysia Airlines flight from Hong Kong to Kuala Lumpur. “They’re not going to maintain their fleet and there’s going to be issues in the future.” After the disappearance of Flight 370, the biggest backlash emanated from China because its nationals were the majority of passengers on the flight. Hopes for a recovery in that crucial market might now be set back. Tongcheng Network Technology, which operates the Chinese ticket booking website ly.com, suspended all flight ticketing and hotel bookings involving Malaysia Airlines after Flight 370 vanished. “Now there’s this plane crash, we would be very unlikely to consider resuming it in the future,” said the manager of its public relations department, who only gave her surname, Zhang. Crisis and risk management expert Kuniyoshi Shirai at A.C.E. Consulting in Tokyo said Malaysia Airlines must take dramatic steps such as replacing top exec utives in response to the disaster, which he blamed partly on the airline for flying over war-torn eastern Ukraine. “Otherwise, you cannot regain the trust of either consumers or investors,” he said. Double disasters may now taint Malaysia AirlinesBRANDING DAMAGE WIKIMEDIA COMMONSAfter Flight 370 disappeared earlier this year and Flight 17 was downed this week, Malaysia Airlines may now be seen as the airline industry’s equivalent of asbestos: toxic to the public. By PAOLA FLORESAssociated Press EL ALTO, Bolivia — Alicia weaves through El Alto’s stalled traffic under a blazing sun, hawking colorful woven flowers to grumpy drivers and lovers. With luck, the 12-yearold and her mother will together muster $18 by day’s end, all the while keeping watch over her younger brother and sister, ages 8 and 6. “It is difficult for my moth er to sell alone because she has to look after my sib lings,” said Alicia, who nor mally goes to school in the afternoon but is using her vacation to help her mother by working the entire day. As her siblings sleep, her mother knits the flowers that Alicia sells. While most of the world is trying to diminish child labor, Bolivia has become the first nation to legalize it from age 10. Congress approved the legislation early this month, and Vice President Alvaro Garcia signed it into law Thursday in the absence of President Evo Morales, who was traveling. The bill’s sponsors say lowering the minimum work age from 14 sim ply acknowledges a real ity: Many poor families in Bolivia have no other choice than for their kids to work. The bill offers work ing children safeguards, they say. “Child labor already exists in Bolivia and it’s difficult to fight it. Rather than persecute it, we want to protect the rights and guarantee the labor secu rity of children,” said Sen. Adolfo Mendoza, one of the bill’s sponsors. Under the legislation, 10-year-olds will be able to work as long as they are under parental supervision and also attend school. It sets 12 as the minimum age for a child to work under contract. They also would have to attend school. “To eliminate work for boys and girls would be like eliminating people’s social conscience,” Morales said in December in support of unionized young workers who marched on Congress to prevent it from ratifying a bottom-end work age of 14. “The president gave us his support. He also worked as a boy, herding llamas,” Rodrigo Medrano, head of the Union of Boy, Girl and Adolescent Workers, told The Associated Press. He said there is no alternative in a society where half the population is poor. Jo Becker, the children’s rights advocacy director at New York-based Human Rights Watch, disagrees. “Bolivia’s move is out of step with the rest of the world,” she said. “Child labor may be seen as a short-term solution to eco nomic hardship, but is actu ally a cause of poverty.” Becker said people who start work as children end up with less education and lower earnings as adults. They are then more likely to send their own children to work, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. Bolivia should instead invest in ways to lift fami lies out of poverty, she said. It already does in a limited way, paying a per-child sub sidy of $28 a year to fami lies whose children attend school. Carmen Moreno, an International Labor Organization official work ing to reduce child labor, said Bolivia’s law contra venes a U.N. con vention designating 14 as the minimum work age. It also runs against the regional current. Mexico has set age 15 as the min imum and Chile age 16, Moreno said. The U.N. agency says child labor is down one-third globally since 2000, with Latin America and the Caribbean together accounting now for just 13 million of the planet’s esti mated 168 million working children. A 2008 study done by the ILO and Bolivian gov ernment found that 850,000 children ages 5 to 17 were working in Bolivia, roughly half in the countryside and half in the cities. Nearly nine in 10 were in the worst kinds of jobs, includ ing sugar cane harvesting and underground mining, a proven life-shortener. More recent sta tistics are lacking, but it’s esti mated that 1 million Bolivian children work reg ularly, accounting for 15 per cent of the workforce. They toil in textiles, on farms and as street vendors, coca leaf pickers and porters at markets. One in three don’t attend school, studies show. For Alicia, a childhood of play and leisure is not an option, especially since her father died two years ago. She says some days she is so tired from standing constantly that studying is difficult. “There are days when I want to go out and have fun like those children I see go to the movie the ater, but I see the effort my mother makes and I forget about all that,” she said. “How can I rest when she doesn’t?” Bolivia legalizes work for children as young as ten WIKIMEDIA COMMONSBoliva’s Vice President Alvaro Garcia, signed into law Thursd ay the bill to legalize children as young as ten to work. The bill’s sponsors say lowering the minimum work age from 14 simply acknowledges a reality: Many poor families in Bolivia have no other choice than for their kids to work. The bill offers working children safeguards, they say. ‘There are days when I want to go out and have fun like those children I see go to the movie theater, but I see the effort my mother makes and I forget about all that. How can I rest when she doesn’t?’ — Alicia, 12

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LIFE Sunday, July 20, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Lake City Reporter Story ideas?Contact Editor Robert Bridges754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com r nn Do you have leg pain when you walk? Do you have cramping or numbness in your legs? These could be signs that you have a circulatory problem called Peripheral Arterial Disease. Dr. Matheen Khuddus, a cardiologist at Lake City Medical Center, will discuss the signs and symptoms of PAD and what can be done to treat this disease. Please call 386-719-9371 to reserve your spot for this informative cardiovascular seminar. Seating is limited. LakeCityMedical.com TUE S DAY, JULY 22, 3-4 PM L ake City M edical Center Classroomsnr n W ith all of the wonderful fruits and vegetables available right now I thought I would share a few old fashioned recipes that will allow you to enjoy summer tastes all year long. I promise the effort it will take to make them will be worth the trouble. Of course we can find many homemade jams, jellies and sauces in shops and stores but they just aren’t the same as the ones we prepare ourselves. This is an old recipe from my Aunt Lu who died about 50 years ago. She made this relish every summer and it was always a special treat for all of my family. Tomatoes are perfect right now so give it a try and serve it next time you cook white acres, butterbeans, etc. It is also really good on a hot dog or sandwich.Aunt Lu’s Tomato RelishQ 12 lg. ripe tomatoes, peeled and cut into eights Q 4 green peppers, chopped Q 2 medium onions, chopped Q 1 cup sugar Q 1 cup vinegar Q 2 tsp salt Q 1 Tbs ground allspice Q Tbs pepper Directions:Combine all ingredients in a large Dutch oven; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, simmer, uncovered for 2 to 2 hours or until desired degree of thickness, stirring often. Spoon tomato mixture into hot sterilized jars leaving inch head space. Adjust lids; process in boiling water bath for 5 min utes. Yields around 6 pints. Note: You may also use canne d tomatoes e.g. Fresh Field diced tomatoes but fresh is so much better. Pickles I make these pickles year round. They have become my favorite. The first time I ate them at a friend’s house I couldn’t wait to make them myself. They take about 15 minutes to make and one day later you are eating Summer specials with fresh fruits and vegetables Taste Buddy Mary Kay Hollingsworth is taking the summer off. The column will continue by our other Taste Buddy Genie Norman. TASTE BUDDIES Genie NormanTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE continued on 4D By AVALYN HUNTERSpecial to the Reporter FORT WHITE F ort White High School’s middle and high school FFA chapters came away with major awards from the state FFA convention held July 1-4 in Orlando. Not only were the mid dle and high school chapters both recognized as Premier Chapters and “Florida’s Finest” chapters, awards reflecting overall excellence, but several individual students are now in contention for national hon ors.Nutrients for LifeTaylor Miller and Taylor Gebo placed first in the state for their presentation based on the Nutrients for Life project in which they were participants. Because of their win, they were able to apply for the chance to make their presentation at the National FFA Convention, which will take place October 29-November 1 in Louisville, Kentucky.Specialty Animal ProductionAnother top honoree from FWHS is Stephen O’Quinn, who placed first in Specialty Animal Production in the 2104 Proficiency Awards Program. His award recognizes exceptional accomplishments and excellence in a Supervised Agricultural Experience program, a planned, practical activity con ducted outside class time with the intent of developing and applying agricultural knowledge and skills in a real world environment. Like Miller and Gebo, he is now under consideration for the opportunity to showcase his work at the national convention.Two finalistsThe middle school FFA chap ter earned a $3,000 award for the school by placing second in the Nutrients for Life project competition, marking the third straight year that FWHS has finished in the top three. But that may not be the complete story. Their project, which drew its inspiration from the work of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning agricultural scientist Norman Borlagh, is one of two finalists remaining from projects submitted by 144 schools competing for the opportunity to present at the 2014 World Fertilizer Conference. The conference will take place in San Francisco in September and is expected to draw delegates from some 60 countries worldwide. “I can’t begin to tell you how proud I am of these kids,” said FWHS agri cultural technology teacher Wayne Oelfke, who togeth er with agricultural science teacher Jill Huesman oversees the Fort White FFA chapters. “They have worked incredibly hard and deserve all the credit for what they’ve accomplished. We are real ly blessed to have these wonderful young people in our school, and all of Columbia County can be proud of them.” Fort White FFA named ‘Florida’s Finest’ COURTESYFrom left: Joan Kyle, of Nutrients for Life, stands with Fort White FFA member Taylor Gebo and FWHS agricultural technology teacher Wayne Oe lfke, who hold the second-place award plaque for Fort White Middle School’s reco gnition at the state FFA convention in Orlando earlier this month. Three high school students can apply to present at National FFA Convention.[The students] have worked incredibly hard and deserve all the credit for what they’ve accomplished.— Wayne Oelfke, Agricultural Technology teacher at Fort White High School

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 2DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JULY 20, 2014 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWipeout “Flush Hour” (N) Rising Star (N) (Live) Castle “Deep Cover” News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Flight Risk” Criminal Minds “Outfoxed” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -After You’ve GoneAfter You’ve GoneMy Wild Affair (Series Premiere) Last Tango in Halifax (N) Masterpiece Mystery! Police corruption and misconduct. (N) Vicious (N) Austin City Limits 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) (:01) Big Brother (N) Unforgettable “Cashing Out” (N) Reckless “Blind Sides” (N) Action Sports 360(:35) Castle 9-CW 9 17 17I Know JaxMeet the BrownsDaryl’s HouseMusic 4 UBeer GeeksLocal HauntsMedium in the RawI Know JaxDaryl’s HouseJacksonvilleLocal HauntsThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30The SimpsonsThe SimpsonsAmerican DadBob’s BurgersThe SimpsonsThe SimpsonsFamily GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Modern FamilyModern Family 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsAmerican Ninja Warrior The nals course in Venice, Calif. (DVS) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitChicago PD “Conventions” NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This WeekQ & A “Fred Kaplan” (N) British House of CommonsRoad to the White HouseQ & A WGN-A 16 239 307a MLB Baseball(:45) 10th InningFunny VideosManhattan ProjectSalem The town is rocked. Salem “Children Be Afraid” Salem Anne nds herself in danger. Salem Alden nds himself a target. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Our America With Lisa LingOur America With Lisa LingOprah Prime Matthew Sandusky. Oprah: Where Are They Now? (N) Oprah’s Master Class (N) Oprah Prime Matthew Sandusky. A&E 19 118 265Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty “Stand by Mia” Duck DynastyDuck DynastyLone Star Lady (N) Lone Star Lady (N) (:02) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Meet My Mom” (2010) “Straight From the Heart” (2003) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy. “For Better or for Worse” (2014) Lisa Whelchel, Kim Fields, Antonio Cupo. The Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(5:00)“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance)“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. Bella and Edward marry. The Strain “The Box” (N) (:02) The Strain “The Box” CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Special ReportThe Hunt With John WalshThe Hunt With John Walsh (N) Death Row Stories (N) The Hunt With John Walsh TNT 25 138 245(5:45)“The Dark Knight” (2008) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. (DVS) The Last Ship “El Toro” (N) (:01) Falling Skies “Mind Wars” (N) (:02) The Last Ship “El Toro” NIK 26 170 299iCarly “iNevel” The ThundermansSam & CatSam & CatFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriends(:36) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar RescueBar Rescue “Scoreboard to Death” Bar Rescue “Muscle Madness” Bar Rescue “Grow Some Meatballs!” Frankenfood (N) FrankenfoodBar Rescue “Critters and Quitters” MY-TV 29 32 -The Rockford Files “Feeding Frenzy” Kojak Kojak targets morphine peddlers. Columbo “Murder by the Book” Episode directed by Steven Spielberg. Thriller “Terror in Teakwood” Alfred Hitchcock Hour DISN 31 172 290JessieJessieJessieGirl Meets World“Zapped” (2014) Zendaya, Spencer Boldman. (:45) JessieDog With a Blog(:35) JessieAustin & AllyLiv & Maddie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Missing at 17” (2013) “Guilty at 17” (2014, Drama) Erin Sanders, Alex Paxton-Beesley. Premiere. Witches of East End (N) (:01) The Lottery “Pilot” (:02) The Lottery “Pilot” USA 33 105 242“2 Fast 2 Furious” (2003, Action) Paul Walker, Tyrese, Eva Mendes. “Fast Five” (2011) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. Dom Toretto and company ramp up the action in Brazil. (DVS) Satisfaction “Pilot” (DVS) BET 34 124 329(5:00)“Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) Tyler Perry, Sharon Leal. Sunday Best (N) Sunday BestVindicated (N) Vindicated (N) VindicatedVindicated ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball: Sunday Night Countdowna MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209f Women’s Soccer30 for 30 2014 Open Championship Final Round. From the Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England. SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSport FishingSport FishingShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFishing the FlatsAddictive FishingPro Tarpon TournamentScubaNationTravis Johnson DISCV 38 182 278Naked and Afraid “The Pain Forest” Naked and Afraid “Paradise Lost” Naked and Afraid “Blood in the Water” Naked and Afraid: Uncensored (N) Naked and Afraid “Jungle Love” (N) Naked and Afraid: Uncensored TBS 39 139 247“Daddy’s Little Girls” (2007, Romance) Gabrielle Union, Idris Elba. (DVS)“Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family” (2011) Tyler Perry. (DVS) (:15)“Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009, Comedy) Tyler Perry. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Forensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) HuckabeeFOX News SpecialStosselHuckabee E! 45 114 236(5:00)“Sex and the City” (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall. Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the Kardashians (N) Botched Reality star seeks help. (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians TRAVEL 46 196 277Xtreme WaterparksXtreme WaterparksXtreme WaterparksWorld TallestXtreme Waterparks: World’s Best II (N) Coaster WarsCoaster WarsAmerican Grilled “Going Whole Hog” Man v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229Flip or FlopFlip or FlopFlip or FlopFlip or FlopBeachfront BargainBeachfront BargainFlipping the Block (Series Premiere) (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Who Do You Think You Are?Who Do You Think You Are?Sister WivesSister Wives “Every Brown Revealed” Return to Amish “The Shunning Truth” Sister Wives “Every Brown Revealed” HIST 49 120 269Mountain Men Rich tests his dogs. Mountain Men Rich defends his home. Mountain Men “Call of the Wild” To Be Announced(:03) The Hunt “Predator or Prey?” (:03) Mountain Men “Rite of Passage” ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedFinding Bigfoot “’Bama Bigfoot” Call of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanFinding Bigfoot “Bobo’s Backyard” (N) Finding Bigfoot (N) FOOD 51 110 231Food Network Star “Vegas Pool Party” Chopped “Fig Out” Guy’s Grocery Games “Weight For It!” Food Network Star (N) Cutthroat Kitchen (N) Cutthroat Kitchen “The Rice Stuff” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookKenneth CopelandCre o Dollar“Jesus” (1979, Historical Drama) Brian Deacon, Rivka Neuman. FSN-FL 56 Bull Riding Championship. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 12 World Poker Tour: Season 12UFC Unleashed (N) Auto Racing World Poker Tour: Season 12 SYFY 58 122 244(4:30)Lockout“Alien 3” (1992, Science Fiction) Sigourney Weaver, Charles S. Dutton, Charles Dance. Aliens on the Moon: The Truth Exposed A different take on 1969 moon landing. Aliens on the Moon: Exposed AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone. “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black. Premiere. Halt and Catch Fire “The 214s” (N) Halt and Catch Fire “The 214s” COM 62 107 249(5:55)“Tommy Boy” (1995, Comedy) Chris Farley, David Spade. (7:59)“Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. Tosh.0Tosh.0(:31) Tosh.0 CMT 63 166 327Bruce AlmightyCops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops ReloadedSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeCops ReloadedCops ReloadedDog and Beth: On the Hunt NGWILD 108 190 283Into the AbyssSeahorses: Freaky FishSuper sh: Blue n TunaMega PiranhaKiller ShrimpSuper sh: Blue n Tuna NGC 109 186 276Ultimate Survival AlaskaUltimate Survival AlaskaHow To Survive the End of the WorldHow To Survive the End of the WorldHow To Survive the End of the WorldSurviving the Apocalypse (N) SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeAlien Encounters 3 “The Aura” The Unexplained FilesThe Unexplained FilesNASA’s Unexplained FilesThe Unexplained Files ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID “The Fugitive” On the Case With Paula ZahnOn the Case With Paula ZahnDateline on ID “Deadly Deceit” (N) Deadline: Crime With Tamron Hall (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501(4:40)“42” (2013) ‘PG-13’ (6:50)“The Internship” (2013, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. ‘PG-13’ True Blood “Lost Cause” (N) The Leftovers “B.J. and the A.C.” (N) Last Week To.True Blood MAX 320 310 515(5:40)“Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters” (2013) ‘PG’“The Great Gatsby” (2013, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire. ‘PG-13’ “Riddick” (2013, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel, Karl Urban. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:30)“The Last Exorcism Part II”Masters of Sex “Parallax” Ray Donovan “Yo Soy Capitan” Ray Donovan “Uber Ray” (N) Masters of Sex “Kyrie Eleison” (N) Ray Donovan “Uber Ray” MONDAY EVENING JULY 21, 2014 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelorette “The Men Tell All” (N) (:01) Mistresses (N) (DVS) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 NewsArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -WUFT News at 6Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow (N) Antiques Roadshow Tiffany lamp. POV Young dancers train for championship. (N) Tavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half Men2 Broke GirlsMomMike & MollyTwo and Half MenUnder the Dome “Revelation” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneWhose Line Is It?Whose Line Is It?Seed (N) Backpackers (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Be a MillionaireBe a MillionaireModern FamilyThe SimpsonsMasterChef “Top 13 Compete” (N) Hotel Hell Meson De Mesilla. (PA) NewsAction News JaxModern FamilyTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Last Comic StandingAmerican Ninja Warrior “St. Louis Finals” The nals course in St. Louis. (N) NewsTonight Show CSPAN 14 210 350Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. WGN-A 16 239 307America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Walker, RangerAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Police Women of CincinnatiPolice Women of CincinnatiDateline on OWN “Deadly Sanctuary” Dateline on OWNOperation Change “Lebanon” (N) Dateline on OWN “Deadly Sanctuary” A&E 19 118 265The First 48“Gladiator” (2000) Russell Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix. A fugitive general becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. Longmire “Harvest” (N) (:02) The Lottery “Pilot” HALL 20 185 312The Waltons “The Con ict” The Waltons “The First Day” The Waltons “The Thoroughbred” The MiddleThe MiddleThe MiddleThe MiddleThe Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(5:00)“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1”“Wanted” (2008, Action) James McAvoy, Morgan Freeman, Angelina Jolie. Tyrant “Pilot” Tyrant “State of Emergency” CNN 24 200 202Situation RoomCross re (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Morgan Spurlock Inside ManCNN TonightAnderson Cooper 360 TNT 25 138 245Castle Fairytale-themed murders. Castle “A Dance With Death” Major Crimes “Jane Doe Number 38” Major Crimes “Two Options” (N) (:01) Murder in the First (N) (:02) Major Crimes “Two Options” NIK 26 170 299iCarlyThe ThundermansSam & CatEvery Witch WayFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriends(:36) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“John Carter” (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins.“Wrath of the Titans” (2012, Fantasy) Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes.“John Carter” (2012) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldGet SmartThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Girl Meets WorldGirl Meets WorldAustin & AllyLiv & MaddieDog With a BlogI Didn’t Do ItJessieAustin & AllyDog With a BlogJessieAustin & AllyLiv & Maddie LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Tami; George” Hoarders “Adella; Teri” Hoarders “Deborah and Jim: Update” Hoarders “Stacey; Roi: Update” Hoarders “Randy; Vicki: Update” (:01) Little Women: LA USA 33 105 242(5:00)“Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. (DVS) WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) Rush “Pilot” (DVS) BET 34 124 329106 & Park “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“The Janky Promoters” (2009) Ice Cube. Shady concert promoters get in over their heads. “Stomp the Yard” (2007, Drama) Columbus Short. A troubled dancer enrolls in college. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at New York Yankees. From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (N Subject to Blackout) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (Live) Arena Football Tampa Bay Storm at Spokane Shock. Veterans Memorial Arena. (N) Olbermann (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaSport FishingSport FishingShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFishing the FlatsAddictive FishingPro Tarpon TournamentScubaNationTravis Johnson DISCV 38 182 278Street Outlaws “Go Back to Tulsa” Street Outlaws “Top 5 List Shake-Up” Street Outlaws: Full Throttle (N) Street Outlaws “What’s Up Doc?” (N) Fat N’ Furious: Rolling Thunder (N) Street Outlaws “What’s Up Doc?” TBS 39 139 247SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe Good LifeConan (N) HLN 40 202 204Forensic FilesForensic FilesJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Forensic FilesForensic FilesForensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Botched Reality star seeks help. E! News (N) Live from E!Prince GeorgeKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernCoaster WarsCoaster WarsBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods America “Austin” HGTV 47 112 229Love It or List It, TooLove It or List It “Niru & Alok” Love It or List It “Abbot-Brown Family” Love It or List It “Heidi & Greg” House HuntersH Hunt. Int’lLove It or List It “Jody & Sam” TLC 48 183 280Dates From HellDates From HellUndercover Boss “NASCAR” Undercover Boss “Mack Trucks” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Frontier Airlines” Undercover Boss “NASCAR” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsIce Road Truckers “Rushin’ Roulette” Ice Road Truckers “Into the Vortex” (:03) Biker Battleground Phoenix ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceTo Be AnnouncedFinding Bigfoot “Bobo’s Backyard” Call-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanFinding Bigfoot “Bobo’s Backyard” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchTrinity FamilyLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord (N) (Live) FSN-FL 56 -Ship Shape TVMarlins Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Miami Marlins at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (N) Marlins Live! (N) Inside the Marlins World Poker Tour: Season 12 SYFY 58 122 244(4:30) “Vikingdom” (2013) Spartacus: Blood and Sand(:05) Spartacus: Blood and Sand(:10) Spartacus: Blood and Sand(:15) Spartacus: Blood and Sand “The Thing in the Pit” (:20)Cyclops AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Volcano” (1997, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche. “Jurassic Park” (1993) Sam Neill, Laura Dern. Cloned dinosaurs run amok at an island-jungle theme park. “Jurassic Park” (1993) COM 62 107 249(5:56) South Park(:27) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:40) Reba(:20) RebaRebaRebaSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeSteve Austin’s Broken Skull ChallengeCops ReloadedCops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283Jobs That Bite! “The Hog Fixer” World’s Weirdest “Happy Hour” World’s Deadliest “Lady Killers” Monster Fish “Amazon Shocker” (N) Monster Fish “Giant Cat sh” World’s Deadliest “Lady Killers” NGC 109 186 276Going DeepGoing DeepGoing DeepGoing DeepBrain GamesBrain GamesBrain Games (N) Brain Games (N) Going DeepGoing DeepBrain GamesBrain Games SCIENCE 110 193 284The Unexplained FilesAlien Encounters 3NASA’s Unexplained FilesClose EncountersClose EncountersClose EncountersClose EncountersNASA’s Unexplained Files ID 111 192 285Medical DetectivesMedical DetectivesDateline on ID “Suspicion” Dateline on ID “Toxic” Dateline on ID “Graduation Night” I (Almost) Got Away With It (N) Dateline on ID “Toxic” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)Epic(:45) “Taken 2” (2012, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. ‘PG-13’ Last Week To.“The Newburgh Sting” (2014) Premiere. ‘NR’ True Blood “Lost Cause” The Leftovers MAX 320 310 515(5:30)“The Heat” (2013) Sandra Bullock. ‘R’ “Man of Steel” (2013, Action) Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon. ‘PG-13’ “The Hangover Part III” (2013) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ Criminal Desires SHOW 340 318 545(5:50)“A Case of You” (2013) Justin Long. ‘R’ (:25)“Legally Blonde” (2001) Reese Witherspoon. Masters of Sex “Kyrie Eleison” Ray Donovan “Uber Ray” Masters of Sex “Kyrie Eleison” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalWe the PeopleSupreme JusticeDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsSteve HarveyAmerica’s CourtSupreme JusticeThe Queen Latifah ShowThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -Dinosaur TrainDinosaur TrainSuper Why!Thomas & FriendsPeg Plus CatCat in the HatCurious GeorgeCurious GeorgeArthurArthurR. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge JudyJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Steve Wilkos ShowThe TestPaternity CourtPaternity CourtDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsExtraDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350Key Capitol Hill Hearings Key Capitol Hill Hearings Key Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsLaw & OrderLaw & OrderLaw & Order: Criminal IntentLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304(11:49) GunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaWalker, Texas RangerWalker, RangerVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Home & Family Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieThe Waltons FX 22 136 248MovieVaried Programs Two and Half MenVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202Legal View With Ashleigh Ban eldWolf CNN Newsroom With Brooke BaldwinCNN Newsroom With Brooke BaldwinThe Lead With Jake TapperThe Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesCastleCastle NIK 26 170 299Varied ProgramsSanjay and CraigSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobiCarlyiCarly SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs CopsVaried Programs MY-TV 29 32 -The Rockford FilesGunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyAdam-12Adam-12Emergency! DISN 31 172 290Varied Programs LIFE 32 108 252How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried ProgramsGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329MovieVaried Programs Movie Just Keke ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterColl. Football LiveNFL InsidersNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209Numbers Never LieFirst TakeVaried ProgramsSportsNationQuestionableYou Herd MePaul FinebaumOutside the Lines SUNSP 37 -(:30) MLB BaseballVaried Programs DISCV 38 182 278Sins & SecretsVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Cleveland ShowCleveland ShowAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadKing of QueensKing of QueensFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204HLN Now HLN Now Forensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360OutnumberedHappening NowThe Real Story With Gretchen CarlsonShepard Smith ReportingYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityKardashianVaried ProgramsKeeping Up With the Kardashians TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Food ParadiseBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings19 Kids-Count19 Kids-Count19 Kids-Count19 Kids-CountVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Pit Boss XLDirty JobsDirty JobsDirty JobsGator BoysNo LimitsCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Pioneer Wo.Barefoot ContessaSandra Lee10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaPioneer Wo.Varied Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsTrinity FamilyVaried ProgramsJames RobisonVaried ProgramsThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -MLB BaseballVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254Movie MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs (:25) Futurama(4:56) Futurama(:26) Futurama CMT 63 166 327MovieVaried Programs NGWILD 108 190 283World’s WeirdestVaried Programs Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276LockdownAlaska State TroopersBorder WarsVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs ID 111 192 285Unusual SuspectsUnusual SuspectsVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(:15) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:45) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs (:45) Movie SHOW 340 318 545MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 3D DEAR ABBY: I am a young woman hoping to find “The One.” But I have come to realize that I’m not the normal female. I don’t get manicures or go shopping. (I hate shop ping!) When I meet a guy, he likes that I’m “me,” but if we get serious, then I’m either “too independent,” “too outspo ken” or “not girly enough.” I don’t want to change myself or pretend to be someone I’m not. One minute they like that I’m independent and can fend for myself; the next they don’t like that I don’t depend on them to pay bills, etc. Why is it always a double standard? Men like strong women until they are with one. Then they can’t handle it. Maybe I’m too much for the men where I live. Is it possible for me to find someone? — INDEPENDENT FEMALE IN LOUISIANA DEAR INDEPENDENT FEMALE: Welcome to the wonderful world of dating. While some may think of dating as a popularity contest, it’s really more like sifting for a gold nugget. It takes a lot of people years to strike gold -and it’s the same with dating. Is it possible to find someone? Absolutely! But it takes time, stamina and a sense of humor to survive the process. DEAR ABBY: I had a baby girl a month ago and I live with my in-laws. My husband isn’t here right now because of his job. They are great and very help ful, but I never have any private time with my daughter. Every time she cries, my sisters-in-law pick her up. When she wants to sleep, they always take her away from me to put her to sleep. Even when I breastfeed, they are always in the room with me. I can’t seem to tell them no or ask them to get out of the room. I mean, they are very helpful, and they are leaving in a month for another country, so I under stand they want to be with her as much as they can. However, I would still like some time alone with my daughter. Advice? — NEW AT THIS IN HOUSTON DEAR NEW AT THIS: As a mother, it’s up to you to assert yourself and do what is right for your baby. Find the courage to tell your in-laws that you are grateful for their assistance but want privacy when you nurse the baby. It is important that your daughter bond with YOU, and if your sisters-in-law are always tending to her needs, it may be more difficult for you when they leave. I’m sure your pediatrician would back you up. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take a day trip or get involved in community events. Offer your expertise and let your creative imagination lead to extraordinary changes at home. Delays while traveling can be expected. Don’t let emotional woes lead to an alter cation. ++ TAURUS (APRIL 20-May 20): Problems at home or at work will spin out of control if you or someone else overreacts, is indulgent or starts an argument. Step back from any situation that appears to be out of control. You’ll do best to focus on personal improvements. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Take a look at your attributes and you’ll find a way to utilize your strengths to improve a situation that someone you care about is facing. Don’t let interference from someone showing possessive or jealous traits hold you back. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take on a responsibility that allows you to show off your skills. Taking action is the best way to get attention, and if executed prop erly, will lead to an opportunity you cannot refuse. Add a unique twist to whatever you do. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t leave too much time to think about an emotional situation that develops. You are best to keep busy making whatever alterations are required at home or within your relationships with others before anyone has a chance to interfere. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Difficulty with an important relationship will snowball if you have been insensitive. Reverting to something you used to enjoy doing together will help reverse the problem. Use your charm and you will get your way. Put love first. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Open your doors to friends and family. What you offer will be recip rocated and lead to greater stabi lization in your personal life and partnerships. Don’t let your emo tions cloud your vision regarding a work-related matter. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t slow down when you should be speeding up. Take control and make things happen. Focus on important relationships and discuss plans for the future that will help improve your living situation. Romance is highlighted and will bring about a deeper con nection. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Stay calm and look at each situation methodically. Arguing will be a waste of time and result in unwanted changes. You are best to nurture the relationships that mean a lot to you. Aggressive behavior will backfire. Use reason over muscle. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There is money to be made. Develop a creative idea and look for a unique way to present and promote what you have to offer. Using social media will work in your favor. Plan something special for someone you love. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A relationship will lead to good fortune and positive changes at home. Working alongside some one who shares your interests and concerns will bring you closer together. However, question some one’s motives if money is involved. Put love first. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your ability to express your thoughts and feelings will help you gain ground at work or at home. Short trips or attending a function that will add to your knowledge and experience will be enlightening and entertaining. Love is in the stars. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word Dating scene is frustrating for strong young woman Q Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER BIRTHDAYS Diana Rigg, 76; Kim Carnes, 69; Carlos Santana, 67; Muse Watson, 66; Donna Dixon, 57; Chris Cornell, 50; Terri Irwin, 50; Enrique Pena Nieto, 48; Reed Diamond, 47; Josh Holloway, 45; Sandra Oh, 43; Omar Epps, 41; Ray Allen 39; Judy Greer, 39; Pavel Datsyuk, 36; Gisele Bundchen, 34; Julianne Hough, 26; Paige Hurd, 22. SUNDAY CROSSWORD WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENTBY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ No. 0713 ACROSS1 Fighting group6 Understood9 Scientific truth12 Lives18 Opposite of wind up20 Bobby on the ice21 Memphis-toNashville dir.22 Like yesterday23 Classic excuse for some misdemeanors26 Intimidating words27 Prefix with -graphic28 Mercury, but not Earth29 Workman’s aid30 Heavy work32 Carrier to Tokyo33 World’s largest particle physics lab, in Switzerland34 Many a drive-thru installation35 Declaration from Popeye38 ___ Anne’s (popular pretzel purveyor)41 Smugglers’ worries42 ___ mortal43 Doubt-dispelling words from Lady Macbeth48 Follower of lop49 Follower of lop50 Formerly, once51 Spectrum53 “Alea iacta ___” (“The die is cast”)54 Mutt’s mutter?57 “When You’re Good to ___” (“Chicago” song)60 Aside, e.g.63 Encyclopedic65 Frequent features of John Constable landscapes68 Atypical70 Bearing in mind72 Famous Yogiism76 Traditional Gaelic singer77 Falafel holder78 Food often with pentagonal cross sections79 “All ___”80 Holy ___82 Makes loop-theloops?84 Chicken ___ diable86 Spanish “that”87 One summing things up89 They may come with covenants92 Property areas94 Match game?97 Words dismissive of detractors102 Send, in a way103 Urge to attack104 Top choice105 Expression of resignation109 Baseball stat.110 “Did gyre and gimble in the ___”: “Jabberwocky”114 Take it easy115 Cast116 Sushi topper, maybe117 Hardly highbrow reading118 Material blocked by parental controls119 Fantasy title character whose name is one letter different from the creature he rides121 “We will tolerate this no more!”125 Least plausible126 Certain wardrobe malfunction127 Filler of la mer128 Mess up129 Covers with goo130 Austin Powers, e.g. 131 Record stat132 Guide DOWN1 Like some measures2 Cell part3 Whirlpool product4 Strike a chord5 “Gross!”6 Source of great profit7 Mercury or Earth8 District in Rome9 Sheldon’s apartmentmate on “The Big Bang Theory”10 “___ questions?”11 Emmy-winning drama four years in a row, with “The”12 Some memory triggers13 Stereotypical beatnik accessory14 Hard water15 Pushed back16 Capture17 Fuming19 Bonding molecule24 Kind of ticket25 Howl31 “My, my!”36 Card game with a “Chairman”37 Ape39 Letters of certification?40 Ending for how or who, for Shakespeare43 One that’s a bore?44 Fights45 Where prints may be picked up46 Movement47 Send in troops, say48 Some wrestlers52 Bonkers55 Went back over56 Rapper ___ Rida58 Juin preceder59 1968 live folk album61 “Tender Is the Night” locale, with “the”62 Mideast legislature64 Determines the concentration of a dissolved substance66 Team V.I.P.67 Ocho – dos69 Certain ruminant71 “Summer Nights” musical73 Colorful, pebble-like candies74 Bit of trip planning: Abbr.75 Roth ___81 Take up again, as a case83 Yearbook sect.85 Small power sources88 Ones that warn before they attack90 Former employer for Vladimir Putin, for short91 Sunny room93 Reams94 Takes a turn95 Strict96 Work for a folder98 What you might be in France?99 Degree of disorder in a system100 Pop stars?101 Bit of wisdom103 Pushes aside106 “___ Baby Are You?” (1920 show tune)107 Debt note108 Rocker Bob111 Beguile 112 Corn chip since 1966113 Clear sky120 Pip122 Barely beat123 Chance, poetically124 Refusals 1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132 3334353637 3839404142 434445 464748 49 505152 53545556575859606162 636465666768697071 72737475 76 777879 80818283848586 87888990919293 949596979899100101102103 104 105106107108109110111112113114115116117118119120121122123124125 126127128 129 130131132Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Note: The circled letters, when read clockwise, will reveal a quote from Gertrude Stein. ADINSRESTUPFACTOTUM BIDETINTONEIRRITATE ASTORFRANCISSCOTTKEY SCAPELOFTAHHISEREEIGHTEENFOURTEENSIR YTDSEAGREEN BRITISHPUBSONGADOBES LIVEILLERCLAIROL ICYASSETSLENOROSY SOLSTOAGASOLSOW THESTARSPANGLEDBANNER AMIHEMICNCAABIO PAGEERSTALTAIREEN ECUADORSOIRSELIA PEERINWHITNEYHOUSTON YOKOHAMARNC ADEPRISONEREXCHANGE MICAHIRTROBEARIEL BALTIMOREHARBORPOSTE INAWHILEOTOOLEPLAIN TATTOOEDDELTASYENTA Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword.

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T he world this spring lost the beloved and hon ored author, Gabriel Garcia Marquez. He was born in Columbia in 1927 and died in Mexico in 2014. Mr. Marquez was a novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, and journalist whose writings won many awards, not the least being the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. Some believe he was one of the world’s greatest writers. The Library has a number of his works, including Love in the Time of Cholera, The General in His Labyrinth, and One Hundred Years of Solitude that can be found in F MAR. Also lost recently were famous writers Tom Clancy, Janet Daily, Peter Matthiessen, Elizabeth Jane Howard, and Vince Flynn. They covered the gamut of political thrillers, romance, and historical novels. Matthiessen won the 2008 National Book Award and reworked his epic trilogy into one volume, Shadow Country: a New Rendering of the Watson Legend (F MAT). His setting is turn-of-the-century Florida Everglades.Elizabeth Jane HowardElizabeth Jane Howard was an English novelist who wrote about how World War II changed English life in the Cazalet Chronicle which later became a BBC series, the Cazalets. The Library has Confusion (F How) and Marking Time (F How).Janet DaileyJanet Dailey was the first romance writer to move from light, catego ry fiction published by Harlequin to “single title fiction” that consistent ly made the New York Times best seller lists. Until her death last year, Dailey lived on Table Rock Lake in the Missouri Ozarks. One of my library staff, when we lived in Wisconsin, had a vacation home there and would go to author programs at the local public library. Dailey was one of the authors she met and it was quite a thrill for her. Dailey wrote contemporary romance fiction, including Western romances. Janet Dailey books can be found in the Library’s fiction collec tions.Vince FlynnVince Flynn’s main character was Mitch Rapp and Flynn’s genre was the political thriller. American Assassin ( F FLY) was Mitch’s first story and was made into a feature movie. There are thirteen Mitch Rapp thrillers and the Library also has Flynn’s books on CD and in Large Print.Tom ClancyWhat can I say about Tom Clancy? He was a prolific writer of both fic tion and non-fiction, with his Jack Ryan series prob ably being his best known. The subject of his fiction was often international espionage during and after the Cold War. However, he also wrote naval histories. Did you know he was a Maryland insurance sales man before he published his first novel Hunt for Red October? Before it could be published, Clancy was asked to cut 100 pages of technical naval information from the story. Many of his novels became feature films and television series. You can find his fiction works in the Library in F CLA, PB CLA, CDF CLA (audio book), and LPF CLA (large print fiction). His navel histories are mostly in 358-359, but you will want to check the Library’s online catalog for the exact call numbers. 4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 20, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingsworth are Columbia County residents who love good food and fun. Their column on their favorite recipes appears twice a month. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. them. They are sweet and crispy, sort of like a bread and butter pickle. I decided after I made my first jar that I would not ever be making pickles from fresh cucumbers again. I use them for egg, tuna or chicken salad. I love them placed on a cracker with a piece of cheese. I chop them up with tomatoes, cucumbers and green onions, add salt and pepper and drizzle some of the pickle juice over the combo and it makes a salsa kind of con diment. I make this every time I have butterbeans or peas and spoon it on top of them and it is abso lutely memorable. My Mother always made this long before we knew what salsa was, so I always say that this is Miss Alline’s salsa. Rather than use the large dills I often get the baby dills. They usually come in 24 oz jars so this will make two batches.Lazy Woman’s PicklesQ 46 0r 48 oz jar KOSHER dill crispy whole pickles Q 1 cup vinegar Q 3 cups sugar Q 1 tsp mustard seed Q 1 tsp celery seed Q 18-20 whole cloves Directions:Drain and slice the pick les, rinse and place back in the rinsed jar. Heat the vin egar, sugar and spices stiff ing until it comes to a boil. Remove from heat after the mixture has become clear and all sugar is melted. Pour over the sliced pick les in the jar. Place in the refrigerator and let them stand for at least 24 hours. The longer they stay in the refrigerator the crisper they become. Important: don’t use any dill pickle except Kosher dills Another family favor ite is Pear Relish. This one may be a challenge since the pears have to be “hog pears” or they are sometimes called “sand pears.” These are not sold in stores so you have to find someone who has a pear tree and then be really nice to them. They are very hard and are almost like a crisp Granny Smith apple. They usu ally produce a large crop and most of them are ready to pick at the same time. Think that is why they called them hog pears cause so many were available all at once and rather than let them go to waste they were fed to the hogs. So, if you are lucky enough to find these pears don’t miss this opportunity to make something really good. The recipe that Mary Kay and I use is from the Plains (Georgia) Pot-Pourri cookbook dated 1976 and compiled by the Plains Jr. Woman’s Club. Numerous recipes by the former President Jimmy Carter’s family are includ ed and all the recipes are handwritten, not typed with the person’s name who submitted them. This recipe was from Miss Annie Mae Brannen.Pear RelishQ 2 gallons of hog/sand pears (about 2 gallons) Q 5 medium onions Q 6 red peppers Q 2 lbs. sugar Q 5 cups vinegar Q 1 tbs. salt Q 1 tbs. mixed spices (pickling spice) Q 1 tbs. turmeric Directions:Peel pears and grind them with onions and pep pers with a food chopper. Add all other ingredients and when it comes to a full boil, cook for 30 min utes. Spoon mixture into hot sterilized jars leaving inch headspace. Place lids and adjust tops, process in boiling water bath for 5 min utes. Carefully remove from water bath and let cool. Lids will pop as the cool. Tighten lids. If you have never preserved fruits or veg etables please check out www.freshpreserving.com by Ball. It gives you step by step instructions on how to properly and safely perform the water bath technique. Even if you have made this type of recipe before it doesn’t hurt to refresh your mem ory. I challenge you to make at least one of these rec ipes cause I know that you will be as pleased as punch with the results and bet you it will become a favorite in your family too. WIKIMEDIA COMMONSGenie’s ‘Lazy Woman’s Pickles’ are sweet and crispy, like a bread and butter pickle. TASTEContinued From 1A COURTESY Jackson and White to wedLinda G. Lucas and Curtis Jones, of Lake City, announce the engagemen t and upcoming marriage of their daughter Linda Louise Jackson to Craig Roderick White, son o f Charlie and the late Ruth White, of Lake City. The wedding is planned for Saturday, July 26 at 3 p.m. at Falli ng Creek Missionary Baptist Church. A reception will follow at American Legion on South Hwy 4 1. The bride-to-be graduated from Columbia High School in 1989. She is employed by the Columbia Co unty School Board as a Student Care Attendant. She enjoys participating with Deep Creek Ruff Rider s, riding four wheelers, fishing, hunting and dancing. The groom-to-be graduated from Columbia Hig h School in 1984. He is employed at the Department of Transportation. He is active in the Bass Fishing Clu b, Buck Club, and is president of Deep Creek Ruff Riders. He enjoys fishing, hunting, riding horses and his four wheeler. Friends and family are invited to attend the couple’s wedding ceremony and rece ption on Saturday, July 26.WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTSA memorial to beloved authors lost in 2014 Debbie Paulson386-758-1018 Q Debbie Paulson is the director of the Columbia County Public Library. Tim and Sylvia Atkinson, of Lake City, announce the engagement and upcoming wed ding of their daughter Sharma Lyn Atkinson, of Jacksonville, to James Larry Staten, Jr., son of Larry and Judy Staten, of Lake City. The wed ding is set for Saturday, Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church. A combined recep tion/graduation celebration will be held after the bride graduates in December. The bride-to-be attended Brigham Young University and Rush University, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in nursing in 1992. She is currently completing graduate school at the University of South Alabama and will graduate as a Family Nurse Practitioner in December 2014. The groom attended Lake City Community College and Tallahassee Community College. He retired from Walmart Stores Inc. after 20 years as an Assistant/Co-manager. He is currently employed at Lowes Home Improvement as a Department Manager. Friends and family are invited to attend the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom respectfully request that no gifts be brought and feel that your presence at the wedding is your gift to them. COURTESYAtkinson and Staten to wed in August BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTScott and Amy Hunter of Littleton, Colo., proudly announce the birth of their daugh ter, Kinley Marie Hunter. Kinley was born September 6, 2013 at Swedish Hospital in Englewood, Colo. She joins her four-year-old sister, Rylee Makenna Hunter. Kinley weighed 7 pounds 10 ounces and measured 19 and three-quarter inches. Her grandparents are Ed and Jackie Hunter of Lake City, and John and Penny Kindred of Loveland, Colo. Her great grandparents are Martha Brown of Lake City, and Joy Kindred of Bradenton. Kinley Marie Hunter Weddings and EngagementsIf you were recently engaged or have an upcoming weddin g and would like to announce it in the Lake City Reporter VWRSE\RXURKFHDW(DVW'XYDO6WUHHWWROORXWan announcement form.