The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02298

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


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Full Text

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Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.50 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM LOCALFort White hosts Special Olympics, 3A. CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 25 TODAYS WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4A Police . . . . . . . 6A Obituaries . . . . . 5A Advice & Comics . . 5D Puzzles . . . . . . . 2B SPORTSCHS girls hoops coach faces DUI charge, 1B. 76 49Partly cloudy, 8A Fort White High School holds career fair. SUNDAY EDITION 1DPolicemans Ball: A touch of class.1C By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County Sheriffs Office deputies Thursday arrested a second suspect connected to a six-figure electronics fraud investigation, CCSO reports. Steven Lee Hankins, 50, of 305 East Duval Street, was arrested around 3 p.m. Thursday after inves tigators connected him to a seven-month investigation involving the fraud and sale of more than $200,000 worth of stolen iPads, laptops and other electronics through his local business, Hankins Computers, according to CCSO. The September 2013 investigation focused on an employee of Anderson Columbia, Inc. who was suspected of ordering items on corporate accounts and then selling them for personal gain, CCSO said in a Thursday press release. Detectives learned that many of the items were sold through a local business owned by Hankins by conducting an open source search of eBay and Amazon. Deputies believe Hankins was obtaining the electronics through Jerami Michael Robinson, a former IT specialist with Anderson Columbia who was arrested Sept. 23 when company representatives noticed discrepancies on the IT departments invoices, according to Robinsons arrest report. The investigation has confirmed that over 300 iPads and an undetermined amount of new and used computers were sold from January 2008 to September 2013, CCSO said in January.2nd suspect arrested in electronics fraud probe More than $200,000 in stolen iPads involved, say deputies. Hankins 16-WEEK CHALLENGE TO MAKE YOU GLOW Biggest Losers win bigLake City Gets Fit From staff reportsHundreds of people gathered at Florida Gateway College Friday evening to celebrate the end of the Get Fit Lake City initiative. Organized by the Lake City chapter of Altrusa International, the initiative was designed to promote well being and fitness in the Columbia County com munity. We decided to start this initiative because a report came out that listed Columbia County as the 58th most unhealthy county in the state of Florida, said Altrusan Dennille Decker. We wanted better than that for ourselves and for our community. We dont want to be known as one of the least healthiest places to live. We want to be known as one of the healthiest places to live. The evening consisted of a variety of activities including a one mile fun run for children, a 5K around FGCs campus, live entertainment and dance activities, as well as award ceremonies commemorating Columbia Countys fittest businesses and biggest losers. Temperatures dropped into the 40s throughout the cold night, leaving visitors with two options: 1) Shiver, or 2) Get up and move. All things considered, it was ideal weather for an event promoting activity and exercise. After their respective runs, local sponsors provided participants with food such as fresh fruit and chicken sandwiches for nourishment. Lake City Middle School student Chase Martin, 13, completed the 5K in 20 minutes and 35 seconds, crediting his fast time to the direction and guidance from LCMS cross country/track coach April Morris. Running has helped me lose weight and be more disciplined, Martin said. It gets to be like your best friend, you want to do it every day. Anna Rainbolt, a CrossFit Trainer at Moowatee CrossFit, clocked in at 23 minutes flat and provided comments on the benefits of fitness and exercise. You really feel more comfortable and function better, she said. Everybody should make Hundreds gather at FGC to celebrate Altrusa challenge. ABOVE: Vicki Busscher (center) celebrates after winning the female division for the 20132014 Altrusa Get Fit Lake City Biggest Loser competition Friday night. Busscher beat out Sharon Pocock and LeAnn Thomas, losing 19.77 percent of her body weight. RIGHT: Chad Moore (right) congratulates Charlie Joliffe after Joliffe was named the male 2013-2014 Altrusa Get Fit Lake City Biggest Loser. Joliffe lost 8.09 percent of his body weight, winning several prizes including a check for $1,320. From staff reportsThe Biggest Loser competition of the Get Fit Lake City Initiative encouraged local citizens to make a conscious effort to change their diet and exercise choices. In order to win, each of the 264 contestants had to weigh-in and weigh-out with trained medical professionals exactly 16 weeks apart. The award for biggest loser was given to the male and female who lost the largest percentage of their body weight over the period. The female winner was Vicki Busscher, a staff member of the Lake City Reporter who lost 27 pounds, or 19.77 percent of her body weight. She attributed much of her success to regularly walking around Lake DeSoto and making healthier eating habits at home. Im so excited, Busscher said. It wasnt easy...but I did it for myself and my family. To help her along, she remembered one of Altrusas motivational phrases from their weekly addresses: I didnt lose the weight, I got rid of it.Collect $1,300 each for their efforts Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter HANKINS continued on 6AFrom staff reportsA group of volunteers from environmentalist groups Current Problems and the Ichetucknee Alliance gathered at Cannon Sink to pick up trash and rubbish Saturday. The volunteers used paint buckets, fishing nets, canoes and other supplies to collect a variety of garbage floating around Cannon Sink, one of the main tributaries to the Ichetucknee basin. Theres a lot more trash than usual, said Fritzi Olson, Executive Director of Current Problems. All the rainy weather recently Groups gather to clean up Cannon Sink CANNON continued on 6A COURTESYTerri Skiles of the Ichetucknee Alliance scoops a plastic bottle out of Cannon Sink Saturday morning. Were trying to do whatever little bit we can, she said.VOLUNTEERING FINALE continued on 7A WINNERS continued on 7A

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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 ORLANDO A pregnant South Carolina woman pointed to the ocean, locked the doors and rolled up the windows, tell ing her three children she was “trying to take them to a better place” as she drove her minivan into the surf, authorities said. Ebony Wilkerson even tried to call off bystanders hustling to rescue her screaming children from the water, saying “every one was OK” as she left the van in the ocean, an affidavit said. Wilkerson, 32, is charged with three counts of attempted mur der and three counts child abuse causing great bodily harm. Volusia County Court Judge Shirley Green found probable cause for the charges during Wilkerson’s first appearance in court Saturday and set her bond at $1.2 million. A date for an arraignment was not released. The bystanders and beach safety officers, paying no atten tion to the mother, pulled the two girls and a boy, ages 3, 9 and 10, through the windows to safe ty Tuesday on Daytona Beach. Later, Wilkerson denied try ing to hurt her children, telling investigators she was driving too close to the water, “and the waves pulled her in,” according to the charging affidavit. Her children told investigators another story. “Mom tried to kill us,” they told detectives, according to the document. “Mom is crazy.” Former inmate files federal lawsuit FORT MYERS — A Former DeSoto County inmate has filed a $3.5 million federal lawsuit against his former jailers, alleg ing his civil rights were violat ed by a series of beatings he endured while in their custody last year. The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that Jody Holland filed the suit Friday in U.S. District Court in Fort Myer. It accuses the sheriff and four former jail ers of excessive force, deliberate indifference, battery and failure to intervene. The deputy who originally arrested Holland last year is accused in the lawsuit of false arrest. Sheriff’s officials initially denied that any staff member used force on Holland, but the Sheriff’s Office began an inves tigation after being contacted by the Herald-Tribune. The FBI and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement also started investigations of the beatings.Man sentenced to life for fatal fire JACKSONVILLE — A north east Florida man has been sen tenced to life in prison for setting a fatal Jacksonville house fire. A Duval County judge sen tenced 52-year-old Jimmie Ray Jackson Jr. on Friday. He plead ed guilty last month to murder, arson and burglary. Authorities say Cecil Ray Hepler, Patrick Bishop and John Kenney were asleep early one morning in September when a fire started. Bishop and Kenney both got out, but Helper died from burns and smoke inhalation. Police say Jackson had a dis pute with Hepler’s family since 2008, but Helper wasn’t specifi cally targeted. Area newspapers report that Jackson had two prior arson con victions, one from Texas and the other from Pinellas County.Jury recommends killer of FSU student ST. AUGUSTINE — Northeast Florida jurors have recom mended death for an escaped Louisiana inmate convicted of killing a Florida State graduate student. A St. Johns County jury made the recommendation Friday for 26-year-old Quentin Truehill, who was previously convicted of first-degree murder and kidnap ping. A judge will make the final decision. Authorities say 29-year-old Vincent Binder was found dead in an open field near Interstate 95 in April 2010 several weeks after he went missing. Area newspapers report that dep uty marshals caught up with Truehill and two other Louisiana prison escapees in Miami and linked them to Binder. Truehill’s co-defendants — 26-year-old Peter Hughes and 43-year-old Kentrell Johnson — are awaiting trials on first-degree murder and kidnapping charges. Before his escape, Truehill was serving time for manslaugh ter and armed robbery.Man gets 13 years for drag-racing death TAMPA — A Tampa Bay area man has been sentenced to 13 years in prison for a drag-racing crash that left a bicyclist dead. A Hillsborough County judge sentenced 21-year-old Lenoy Rivera on Friday. He was convicted last month of vehicular homicide. Authorities said Rivera was drag racing against Armando Perez Jr. near the University of South Florida’s Riverfront Park in February 2011 when his Ford Five Hundred reached a top speed of 92 mph in a 50 mph zone. Rivera lost control and struck 52-year-old Robert Niedbalec, who was riding his bicycle. Perez faces a trial at a later date. Rivera attorney argued for a reduced sentence because he was only 18 at the time of the crash and was extremely remorseful about what happened. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS HOW TO REAC H USMain number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com)A DVERT IS ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com)CL ASSIFI EDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CI RCU L AT IONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Saturday) 4-9-9 Play 4: (Saturday) 0-3-0-9 Fantasy 5: (Friday) 1-5-7-12-21 Florida Lotto: (Wednesday) 1-7-26-40-42-46-x4 PowerBall: (Wednesday) 3-7-9-26-54-19-x2COURTESYWedding dayA videographer captures pre-wedding celebrations at Olustee P ark Saturday, commemorating the wedding of Taylor Crews and Jared Hines. Mom accused of driving into surf goes before judge AROUND FLORIDA Photo of the Day Picture This The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. See an error? The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run on this page at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. SubmissionsCOURTESYA ski boat for Florida Youth RanchesLocal attorney Dennis Roberts (left) recently donated a twenty foot Chec kmate ski boat with a 175 horsepower Mercury motor to the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranche s. Accepting on behalf of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is Columbia County Sheriff Mar k Hunter. Producer of early Grammy, NFL telecasts dead at 93 LOS ANGELES — The producer of early Grammy and National Football League telecasts has died. Ted Bergmann’s wife, Beverly, says the veteran producer died Sunday following surgery in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 93. Bergmann started his television career at NBC in 1947. He went on to work in advertising, where he matched companies such as Coca-Cola and Colgate with entertainment properties. The group behind the Grammy Awards sought Bergmann’s help in 1962 to bring the ceremony to TV. He then produced the music awards show for seven years. Bergmann served as president of the DuMont Television Network and tele vised early NFL games and live boxing. Other TV credits include “The Arthur Godfrey Show,” ‘’Love Thy Neighbor” and “Three’s Company.” Besides his wife, Bergmann is survived by six children, two stepsons, 14 grand children and four great-grandchildren.Pistorius trial hears damaging testimony PRETORIA, South Africa — In a day of potentially damaging testimony, a former girlfriend of Oscar Pistorius said at his murder trial Friday that he once shot his gun out of a car sunroof and later cheated on her with the woman he killed last year. And a security guard recalled the athlete telling him everything was “fine” after neighbors reported gunshots coming from Pistorius’ house on the night of her death. The gripping accounts capped the first week of the televised trial of the double-amputee Olympian, whose chief defense lawyer has tried to sow doubt about the testimony of neighbors who said they heard a woman’s screams before gunshots. Proceedings have also focused on past incidents involving alleged gunplay, part of an apparent prosecution effort to portray Pistorius, 27, as a hothead who sometimes thought he was above authority. Earlier, ex-girlfriend Samantha Taylor, who cried twice during her time on the stand in the Pretoria court, said Pistorius always carried a firearm when they dated and sometimes shouted angrily at her and her friends. There were mur murs in court when Taylor said their relationship ended because Pistorius cheated on her with Steenkamp.Snowden, Assange top bill at Texas tech gathering AUSTIN, Texas — Surveillance. Online privacy. Robots. Food processing. Wearable computers. To get a sense of what’s on the minds of the tech industry’s thinkers, leaders and tinkerers, it’s a good idea to head to Austin, Texas, rather than Silicon Valley this time of the year. More than 30,000 people descend on this eccentric city for the South By Southwest Interactive Festival each March. This year, NSA leaker Edward Snowden and WikiLeaks founder and secret spiller Julian Assange are topping the bill, alongside Google Chairman Eric Schmidt, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone and Anne Wojcicki, CEO of genetics test ing company 23andMe. Snowden and Assange won’t be making the trip to Texas, however. They’ll appear on live video, since both are living as fugitives, in Moscow and the Ecuadorian embassy in London, respectively. Their inclusion illustrates how the festival is trying to balance holding on to its inde pendent roots even as it’s flooded by a barrage of corporate sponsors and threat ens to grow too big for its hometown. “We have always said that South By Southwest is a very big tent and we have all different types of people,” said Hugh Forrest, director of the interactive festi val. “This is a feature and not a flaw.” Still, it’s clear that online privacy and government surveillance is on top of the technology set’s mind this year. Snowden, the former NSA contractor who appears Monday, faces felony charges in the U.S. after revealing the agency’s mass surveillance program. Scripture of the Day When I look back on all these worries, I remember the story of the old man who said on his deathbed that he had had a lot of trouble in his life, most of which had never happened. — Winston Churchill, former Prime Minister of the UK (1874-1965) “Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves receive from God. For just as we share abundantly in the sufferings of Christ, so also our comfort abounds through Christ.” — 1 Corinthians 1:2-5 Thought for Today Q Associated Press Q Associated Press

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Florida Gateway College presentsPerspective Sponsored by: Upcoming Schedule: March 10-14 Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo with Steve Briscoe and Wanda Jones March 17-21 March of Dimes with Michelle Kemp, Mike and Laurie Williams, Chrissy Cribbs, and Aubrey Reppert 7 p.m. Monday-Friday Only on Comcast Channel 8 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 3A 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL(Next to Courthouse) TICKETS ON SALE AT THE REPORTER OFFICE 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL Tuesday, March 18, 2014at Howard Gymnasium Florida Gateway College LIMITED TICKETS AREAVAILABLE $1500General AdmissionVENDORS CONCESSIONS GREAT GIVEAWAYSGift Bags for All Ticket Holders! (386) 752-1293 WILSONS OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.netBrands to look for & more From staff reportsIts Rodeo Week in Lake City and businesses are urged to promote the event by wearing jeans and boots to work every day this coming week. The Lake City Reporter and Power Country 102.1 and the Dockins Broadcast Group are partnering to promote March 10-16 as Rodeo Week in Lake City. Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson and Power Country Operations Manager and morning show host Berry Raulerson came up with the plan to increase awareness for the Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo in Lake City. The 20th Annual Rodeo is Friday through Sunday, March 14-16 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Rodeo Arena. To help promote Rodeo Week throughout Columbia County, the Reporter and Power Country are urging businesses in the area to allow their employees to wear jeans and boots to work every day to support and promote Rodeo Week. All were asking is for everyone to wear jeans and boots every day and show your support, Wilson said. The rodeo is a great event in our community and we all need to really step up and get behind it. This is the 20th annual pro rodeo here. If we dont continue to support and promote this rodeo as a community, who will? Lets work together and make it happen. Wilson said a local business in Lake City that has at least several members of its staff decked out in rodeo attire this week can call the Reporter at 752-1293 and make arrangements to have a photo of the group published in the newspaper. Raulerson said a local business that has a majority of its personnel dress in rodeo attire can call his morning show first thing in the mornings at 755-4102 and he will give that business a mention on his show. Partner, I think its a Jim Dandy idea! Raulerson said. I think the community needs to rally around this rodeo. Rodeo is a family event and its great entertainment for the entire family. Raulerson said he was finalizing plans to broadcast his morning radio show on Tuesday on horseback to help promote the rodeo. He said he would be excited to give a shout-out to businesses who participate by dressing in rodeo attire next week. Rodeo officials in Lake City were very excited by the combined effort of the newspaper and radio station to rally the community to support the rodeo. I think this is the thing to do. Its time for all of us to Cowboy Up and show our support for this rodeo, said Steve Briscoe, Rodeo co-chairman with Columbia County Resources. This is shaping up to be one of the largest rodeos weve ever had here. Others were very excited about the concept. The rodeo is a tremendous event, said Bob Smith, owner of Smittys Western Wear and a longtime rodeo supporter. This is a pro sport coming to Lake City. They train, they work hard and were fortunate to have this type of family entertainment here in town. I love this concept of declaring it Rodeo Week in Lake City next week. Wilson urged local businesses to get behind the concept and workers, where possible, to dress in western attire, jeans and boots all week. I hope businesses will show their support for our Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo and have some fun, Wilson said. It promotes the rodeo and it might be a little free publicity for your business, too.Cowboy Up! with jeans and boots during Rodeo Week COURTESYTo support the 20th Annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo, the Lake City Reporter and Power Country 102.1 have partnered to declare it Rodeo Week in Lake City. Businesses are urged to relax their dress codes and allow their employees to wear jeans, boots and western attire to work this week to promote the rodeo. Rodeo officials and supporters gathered Friday to kick off the promotion. Top row, from left: Dennis Conway, general manager of Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge and Ram Rodeo sponsor; Steve Briscoe, Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo Co-Chair. Front row, from left: Bob and Andrea Smith, Smittys Western Wear and rodeo sponsors; Linda Dowling, Columbia County Resources; Theresa Westberry, Lake City Reporter Advertising Director; Todd Wilson, Lake City Reporter Publisher; Berry Raulerson, Power Country Operations Manager; Fred Dockins Jr., Power Country and Dockins Broadcast Group. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE On a day when temperatures never rose above 50 degrees, the warmth could be felt at a distance. The participants, some in wheelchairs, some with physical, others with mental, disabilities, were eager to compete, and their hope, pride and sense of purpose showed through. All were local Special Olympians taking part in the 2014 Special Olympics Columbia County Summer Games Friday at Fort White High School. An estimated 75-80 participants took part. In this weather, under the cloudy skies, I think thats a great turnout, said John Brown, Columbia County Special Olympics coordinator. We had 122 registered, but Niblack Elementary School, Richardson Middle School and Lake City Middle School canceled out because of the weather. Fridays competitions included track and field events as well as tennis and volleyball. Special Olympians also competed in the tennis ball and softball toss, as well as shot put. Sonia Ford-Speights, Over 75 local athletes take part in Special Olympics TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterRussell Resmondo (from left) and Gracie Robinson, Fort White High School Special Olympians, listen to an event official volunteer as they set up for a race during Fridays Special Olympics Summer Games at Fort White High School. OLYMPICS continued on 6A

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I t’s hard to believe how much time we have spent in recent weeks musing about Russian President Vladimir Putin. And we still don’t have a clue what his end game is. The first (and only) time I met Putin I tried to look into his eyes to see if I could ascertain anything about his soul. A la George W. Bush who said of Putin, “I looked the man in the eye. I found him to be very straightforward and trustwor-thy. We had a very good dialogue. I was able to get a sense of his soul, a man deeply committed to his country and the best interests of his country.” I saw nothing but two cold beady orbs. Let’s be honest here, the cyni-cal Putin resembles the ultimate James Bond villain more than a modern major potentate. Putin turned the Olympic Games into a soap opera about him. We fretted about the horrific corruption in Putin’s regime. Then we worried about terrorism springing from Russia’s war with Chechnya 300 miles from the games. We recoiled from the weirdly colored hotel water. We feared Putin’s response to the losses of his beloved hockey team. We were upset that Russian police arrested two members of Pussy Riot, the not-particularly talented but intensely anti-Putin singers. We were appalled at the anti-gay restrictions of Putin’s government and giggled when he inadvertently hugged a lesbian medalist. And then Ukraine erupted into violence, its pro-Russian puppet president fled and the world held its breath, waiting to see what Putin would do. The former KGB colonel held war games, started making threat-ening noises and ordered troops to surround Ukraine’s small military outposts. Then he ordered Russian troops to show force in Crimea, part of Ukraine. To Secretary of State John Kerry’s astonishment, Putin denied there are Russian troops on alert in Crimea. Putin said he has no intent to start a war but warned he just might have to use force to protect Russian interests. He signaled he might support Ukrainian elections. But he insisted he must protect Russia’s Black Sea Fleet off the coast of Crimea. He denounced Ukraine’s new government, calling it “the people who call themselves the government.” He lashed out at the United States, blaming the West for all the trouble. Putin is an extremely tiresome person. We are now scrambling to recall how imperialism started the World Wars I and II and what the Crimean War in the 1850s was all about and seeking European understanding on just what Putin’s motives are. (Europeans don’t know but suspect he wants to reassemble the Russian empire. They’re also worried about irritating him because his country provides a lot of their natural gas.) Some of the pundits are even sug-gesting this is a restart of the Cold War. The United States and Europe are treaty-bound to protect Ukraine from invasion or Russian force. Meanwhile, Ukraine is totally out of money, so one idea to defuse the whole mess is to pour in bil-lions of dollars. (Americans on food stamps may be on precarious terri-tory; unstable but strategic foreign governments are on firmer ground when it comes to federal dollars.) And when in doubt, we usually go with economic sanctions and then we cancel international meetings. Putin is centuries too late to go down in history as Vlad the Terrible or Vlad the Impaler. But clearly he wants a big chapter. Putin the Impenetrable doesn’t really work, but Vlad the Invader is a distinct possibility. Vlad the Diplomat seems unlikely. (Vlad the Stupid is a per-sonal favorite.) In our age of celebrity worship it always comes as a bit of a shock when somebody famous can wreak havoc on so many people with such insensitivity and such ferocity, get-ting thousands of minions to do his dirty work. Perhaps Putin didn’t think this through. Probably even he doesn’t know how it will end. We are trying to assess which is more tedious – the cold tempera-tures and snow of this dreadful win-ter or figuring out the Russian bear. It’s a tossup. OPINION Sunday, March 9, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Putin, his soul are growing tiresome C ounty manager Dale Williams will make two choices in the coming weeks that will shape the county’s long-term future. Williams will soon select a new tourist development director, and a new economic development director. The number of applications for both job postings was remarkably small. The TDC post drew only 12 applicants. Two of the candidates put in for the economic development job as well, leading one to wonder if they don’t see leading our county’s important efforts in tourism as some-thing of a consolation prize. The top choice for TDC director must be 100 percent focused on boosting our multi-million dollar tourism industry. It should be a candidate for whom the job is his or her first choice and primary focus. As for economic development director, only six applications were received, all but one from local resi-dents. Two of those candidates also want to be assis-tant county manager, which raises concerns as well. The lack of rsums sends one clear message. The current structure of answering to an economic advisory board, plus the county commission, plus the county manager, may present a tedious path to success for anyone taking this job. Also, word may have spread beyond our borders that Economic Development Advisory Board Chairman Ron Williams, whom Dale Williams has said he’ll consult in making his pick, is adamant about having some-body local in that seat. As for place of birth, we don’t see that as an important, even relevant, criterion. Pick the best candidate. Period. The best candidate will be a relationship builder, apolitical, and with a fearless agenda focused on the existing and future needs of our employment market. Of the six applicants for economic director, the most intriguing candidacy may be that of State Rep. Elizabeth Porter, our voice in the Florida House of Representatives. Porter is certainly well-positioned to steer business and commerce our way, considering her well-established ties in Tallahassee and beyond. In theory, Columbia County could benefit greatly from her skill and expertise in the political arena as she focuses her efforts directly on helping us grow. We can’t help but wonder, though, if taking this job – should it even be offered – might damage her politi-cal standing in other parts of District 10. There is no legal conflict of interest, according to counsel for the Florida House, which signed off on Porter’s application for the post. But voters outside Columbia County, in parts of District 10 now starved for business, may not see it that way. They may come to wonder just who it is she’s working for after all. Porter believes she can balance any potentially competing interests. The question is whether voters outside our borders can be convinced. Meanwhile, we wish our county manager well in making these two critically important choices. His crucial decisions will surely reverberate through the pages of local history. Politicking over vets’ benefits T rue story. A few years ago, a reader called to explain, in all sincerity, how he thought the tril-lions of dollars in the federal budget should be spent. It was simple: 1. Give the Defense Department all the money it wants. 2. Give military retirees and their families all the money they need. 3. If there’s anything left over, we can spend it on roads and schools and stuff. We remembered that conversation when we read about Senate legislation that would have pro-vided $21 billion for medical, edu-cation and job-training benefits for veterans. Democrats promoted the bill and, although veterans groups supported it, Republicans blocked it. Critics in the GOP blasted the Democrats’ plan to use money “saved” by ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to pay for the added benefits. They also objected to making more veterans without service-connected inju-ries eligible for treatment at VA facilities. They said that would swamp the system. What riled them most, however, was that Democrats were using vet-erans’ benefits to lure the GOP into a trap. Sen. Bernie Sanders, a liberal Independent who chairs the Veterans Affairs Committee, said at one point he couldn’t under-stand “how anyone could vote for tax breaks for billionaires, for millionaires, for large corpora-tions and then say we don’t have the resources to protect our vet-erans.” And after the GOP derailed the bill, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee emailed: “Mitch McConnell Votes Against Kentucky Veterans.” McConnell, the Senate’s Republican leader, is up for re-election. The Democrats’ strategy had been clear all along. If their $21 billion benefits package were approved, they would take credit for helping veterans. If it were killed, they would slam those cold-hearted Republicans for shortchanging America’s heroes. Paul Rieckhoff, CEO of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America — which supported the legislation — told The Associated Press, “Veterans are tired of being used as political chew toys.” That’s certainly how veterans were used this time. Congress ought to do better by those who’ve put their lives on the line for this country. Their benefits should be determined by what they deserve and what the nation can afford, not by the amount of political embarrassment that can be inflicted. Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q McClatchey-Tribune columnist Ann Featters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. Q Panama City News Herald Two very important decisions4AOPINION

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AnnouncementsPro Rodeo QueensThe 10th annual Miss Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo Queens Competition will be held on March 14 at the 20th annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo. Ladies age 4-18 are eligible to participate and win scholarships, tiaras, Montana Silver belt buckles, trophies and more. Applications are available at The Money Man, Smittys Western Store, school offices and the Fair office. Or, they can be downloaded at www.columbiacountyfair. org. Call 386-752-8822 for more information.CHS YearbooksHunter Printing, 1330 SW Main Blvd., has about 20 like-new 2005 Columbia High School yearbooks for just $10 each. Proceeds will go to the school museum. They also have available about 20 Pat Summerall memorial football programs from the 2013 football season, also $10.TodayGriefShareGriefShare, a grief recovery support group, will meet every Sunday through May from 4-5:30 p.m.. First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave. GriefShare is a nondenominational group and features biblical teaching on grief and recovery topics. Real help for deep hurt. Call 752-4488 for more information.March 10Honey BeesThe UF/IFAS Extension Office is offering a free presentation on Honey Bees of the World and Beekeeping History at the Columbia County School Board Auditorium on March 10 at 7 p.m.SAR meetingThe Lake City Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, March 10 at 6 p.m. at the Grand China Buffett, 345 W Duval Street. Please note this is a new location. Visitors are always welcomed. Call Ralph Wright at 386-961-9112 for more information.March 11Medicare SeminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center is hosting a free educational Medicare Seminar for residents 64 1/2 and older on Tuesday, March 11 from 5-6 p.m. Irv Crowetz will cover topics like what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll and what is covered. RSVP to 386-7553476 x107.Homeless ServicesThe monthly meeting of the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley will be Tuesday, March 11 at 4 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library West Branch. The Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley serves the counties of Columbia and surrounding counties. The network includes agencies and individuals interested in the services available to those who are homeless or threatened with homelessness. United Way of Suwannee Valley serves as the lead agency for the homeless coalition. For more information contact Jennifer Lee, Homeless Coordinator, United Way of Suwannee Valley, 386-752-5604 x 107.Senator RubioThe staff or Senator Marco Rubio will be available to discuss any issues with Social Security, Medicare, or Veterans Benefits you may be having. The public forum will be held Tuesday, March 11 from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Board of County Commissioners Office, 135 NE Hernando Ave., Suite 203. Call the Jacksonville Regional Office at 904-398-8586 for more information.Lenten LunchFirst Presbyterian Church invites the community to a Lenten Soup Lunch for the season of lent, each Tuesday from 12-1 p.m. March 11 through April 8. There is no charge to eat, but donations are accepted for local charities.Sparkleberry meetingThe Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet Tuesday, March 11 at 6:30 p.m. at Hatch Park in Branford, 403 SE Craven St. Call Betsy Martin at 386-719-0467 for more.Harold Dean Lamb Mr. Harold Dean Lamb, age 74, of Twinsburg, Ohio passed away Thursday, February 20, 2014 at Hillcrest HospiHeights, Ohio. Dean was born March 26, 1939 in Decatur, TN to Jessie and Velma (Davis) Lamb. He is survived by Josephine (Harvey) Lamb, his wife of 53 years, three sons, Time (Debbi) Lamb, Kevin (Kim) Lamb of Mantua, Ohio and Todd Lamb of Shalersville, Ohio. Six grandchildren: Josh, Alyssa, Ian, Bailey, Dalton and Dillon Lamb. Sisters: Patsy (Mike) Roberts, Darlene (James) Smith, Susan (Jimmy) Sparks, all of Lake City, FL and Chriss (Bob) Demoss of Live Oak, FL. Dean had one brother, Jesse (Donna) Lamb of Lake City, FL. Three of his special and devoted friends were; Doug Lawson, Decatur, TN; Ron Pitts, Solon, Ohio; and John Hinton, Twinsburg, Ohio. One of Deans special cousins was J.B. Wilson of Decatur, TN. He is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and cousins in Ohio, Tennessee and Florida. Dean was a US Navy veteran, a member of AEO Sailors Association, AMVETS, NRA and Cooper Development Association. He was vice-president of Bunting Bearings Corporation in Toledo, Ohio and a mem ber of Walnut Grove Baptist Church in Decatur, TN. Dean was still and active member of the Columbia High School Class of 1957 (Lake City, FL). Funeral services were held on February 22, 2014 at Shorts Spicer Crislip Funeral Home Streetsboro Chapel in Streetsboro, Ohio. Additional services were held on February 23, 2014 at Bowers Funeral Home in Decatur, TN with PasInterment followed at Walnut Grove Baptist Church Cemetery. Condolences and mem ories can be shared at www.sscfuneralhomes.com Betty Sue OCain Mrs. Betty Sue OCain, 76, of Lake City, FL died Sunday, February 23, 2014 at home following a short battle with cancer. She was born in Mason City, FL on July 26, 1937. She has resided in the Columbia County area all of her life. She was a graduate of Mason City High School. She loved spending time with her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, William Billy E. OCain Jr.: half-brothers James Loyd, Manley Loyd, Clarence Loyd: a half-sister Dolly Catherine Loyd: a sister Shirley Clemons. She is survived by her children: daughter, Patti OCain of Ft Myers, FL, daughter, Cindy (Richard) Eakes of Murfreesboro, TN, son, Ricky (Judy) OCain of Lake City, FL, and daughter, Angie (Will) Rodgers of Macclenny, FL: Her grandchildren, Tiffany (Rob) Dear, Cliff (Aimee) Greene, Zach Greene, Mary Eakes, Morgan Eakes, Ashley OCain, R.J. OCain, Hannah Rodgers, Hailee Rodgers and Hollan Rodgers: Her great-grandchildren, Madison Dear, Logan Dear, and Bryson Greene: Two sisters, Emma (Edward) Robinson, Johnnie Mae Noegel : One brother, Murray Roller Loyd all of Lake City, FL. Graveside funeral services will be conduct ed at 2:00P.M. on March 10, 2014 in the Wellborn Ceme tery, Wellborn, FL. A private family visitation was held on Monday, Feb. 24 at 3:30pm. Arrangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Fl., 32025, (386) 752-1954. HORACE E. Gene MATTHEWS Horace Eugene Gene Matthews, 75, went to be with his Lord and Savior, Friday; March 7, 2014. He was born in North Carolina, the son of the late Horace and Maude Matthews and had lived here in Lake City for the past 35 years. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, and friend, who enjoyed watching NAing his time with his family and friends. He is preceded in death by his parents, his sister Dorothy and his granddaughter, Taylor. Survivors include his devoted wife of 34 years, Barbara Jean Matthews, sons, Richard Nelson of Maui, HI, Michael & David Matthews of Suffolk, VA, and Robert (Teresa) Matthews of Starke, FL; daughters, Sheila (Scott) Gomer of Suffolk, VA, Becky (Gator) Roberts of Stockbridge, GA, and Missy Williams of Lake City, FL; Brother, Charles (Cindy) Matthews of Suffolk, VA; sisters, Joyce Brinkley, and Charlotte (Curtis) Mitchem both of Suffolk, VA; 12 grandchil dren and 2 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday; March 11, 2014 in the chapel of Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home with Dr. Rodney Baker low in Mt. Caramel Cemetery. Visitation with the family will be Monday evening; March 10, 2014 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the funeral home. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of love and encouragement for the family online at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. Mary K. Pignatore Mrs. Mary K. Pignatore, 82, went home to be with the Lord and her husband Andrew, whom she missed dearly on February 14, 2014. Mary was a beauti fully blessed daughter of Charles and Lillian Wiles. She was a loving mother of Cathy (Wayne) Pelley. Born in Passaic, NJ July 17, 1931. She married and moved to Miami, FL. Working in the insurance and banking industry. She became a proud Grandma, cherishing her two grandchildren, Chris (Candy) and Megan Pelley. She became lovingly known as Nana to her 3 beloved great-grandchil dren, Jade, Amber and Colten. 12 years ago she arrived in Lake City and became lovingly known as Mother Mary. She loved and enjoyed her dear Tuesday morning girls, and the Bonco ladies. She will be missed dearly. Shes leaving behind numerous family members and friends. Services for her Celebration of Life will be at the First United Methodist Church, 973 S Marion Ave, Lake City at 11:00 AM Saturday March 15. Walter L. Rogers Mr. Walter L. Rogers,79, of Lake City, Fl., passed away on Friday, March 07, 2014 at the VA Hospital of Lake City, after an extended illness. Born on March 9, 1934 in Co lumbia County to the late Walter and Myrtice Kennedy Rogers. After graduating from Columbia High School in 1952, he joined the Untied States Army and served his country in the Korean War. After he retired from the Army, he went into the real estate business in Lake City and retired in 2011. He was the past president of the Lake City Realtor Association, and the past president of the Century 21 Association for North Florida two terms. He was a member of Southside Baptist Church. Survivors include his loving wife of 59 years Maria K. Rogers, of Lake City, son; Walter Leon Rogers Jr., of Lake City, sister; Mary Bell Houston, of Valdosta, GA., brother; Arnold Rogers (Betty), of Lake City. He also leaves behind seven surviving grandchildren. Funeral service will be conducted at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at GatewayForest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. Ralph Rodrifollow at Mt. Olive Cemetery in Suwannee County. Visitation with the family and friends will be from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 pm on Monday, March 10, 2014 at the funeral home. In honor of Mr. Rogers you may St. Judes Children Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN. 38105 or Fisher House Foundation Inc., 111 Rockville Place Suite 420, Rockville, MD. 20850. Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 S. U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL., 32025, (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Obituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER COMMUNITY SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 5A Our of ce is proud to welcome our new provider!WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND Daina Greene, MDBoard Certi ed Healthcare ProviderMarlene Summers, CNM SPECIALIZING IN: Womens health and Primary CareNew Patients WelcomeCall today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries.Lauren Williams, ARNP The First Presbyterian Church Invites the Entire Community to the Lenten LunchesTuesday, March 11th at 12 Noon-1pm Lunches will be served every Tuesday through April 8thThere is no charge, but donations accepted for local charities.697 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FloridaFirst Presbyterian Churchwww.Fpclc.org(386) 752-0670Email: fpclc@comcast.net Lunches consist of fellowship, a selection of homemade soups and Lenten Monolgue Collection by William Dohle entitled, Encounters with the Miracle Man. OBITUARIES To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by email at elawson@lakecityreporter.com.COMMUNITY CALENDAR COURTESYGreen Eggs and Ham at Green GablesStudents from the Green Gables Learning Tree recently celebrated Dr. Seuss birthday by reading his book Green Eggs and Ham. They then got the opportunity to make green eggs and ham with the help of Thing 1 and Thing 2 from the Early Learning Coalition.

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By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com Lake City police had to twice detain an O’Brien burglar after he escaped from the back seat of an officer’s patrol vehicle Thursday night, LCPD reports. Ronald Eugene Florand, 20, of O’Brien, was arrested around 10:00 p.m. Thursday after a man at a local gas station saw the suspect attempt to bur glarize his truck, accord ing to the arrest report. The man said Florand attempted to steal tools from the back of his com pany work truck, but dropped the items and fled in a yellow passenger vehi cle, the report said. Officers later located Florand driving the vehicle with a passenger on US 90 and attempted to make a traffic stop, and claim Florand visibly noticed police tailing him with acti vated lights, the report said. However, Florand allegedly did not immedi ately stop for police and continued driving around 35 m.p.h. through at least two intersections before coming to stop at the same location where the inci dent was originally report ed, police said. He allegedly told offi cers he “was attempted to make it to this store and stated he did see [the officer’s] lights and heard [his] siren but wanted to stop here.” Florand then made a statement to police (redacted in the report) that prompted officers to detain the suspect in hand cuffs and place him in the back of a patrol vehicle, according to the report. Officers spoke with the passenger and conduct ed a search of Florand’s vehicle, finding three unopened bags of OMG and 24K Monkey Spice, a brand of synthetic marijua na, the report said. Officers also found $1,280 worth of goods the passenger said were sto len from two other vehicles burglarized during the inci dent, the report said. However, officers believe Florand also stole a $5,000 ITX combustible gas monitor and accesso ries that were not recov ered, the report said. Items including two five-gallon gas cans, a heavy duty set of jumper cables, a Dewalt skill saw, a 15 ton lifting hook and more, according to the report. However, during the course of their search, a woman approached offi cers and told them Florand had escaped through the window of the patrol vehi cle and was running east on US 90, still in hand cuffs, the report said. According to Public Information Officer Craig Strickland, maintenance personnel recently retro fitted an old investigator’s vehicle for use in patrol activities, adding equip ment used for detaining and transporting suspects that previously wasn’t present. However, personnel for got to disable the rear win dow controls, Strickland said, calling it an “over sight.” Police said the same witness was able to direct officers to a concrete cul vert where Florand was hiding, one hand free from the handcuffs, according to the report. Florand was detained and booked into Columbia County Detention Facility on $23,000 bond without further incident. Florand faces charges of operating a vehicle without a license, burglary, larceny, resisting an officer without violence, drug equipment possession and escape. POLICE REPORTS Arrested man escapes through cop car window, arrested again Florand By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com A Lake City woman sus pected of selling synthetic marijuana and prescription medications was arrested Wednesday, LCPD reports. Police served a war rant on Kimberley Hope Lane, 43, of 640 NE Lake Drive, who they suspect of obtaining and reselling illegal narcotics, including synthetic marijuana and prescription medications, according to a Wednesday press release. The arrest and seizure was a joint effort between LCPD, CCSO, FDLE and the DEA as part of the Gateway High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas initiative, the release said. According to LCPD Public Information Officer Craig Strickland, specific information about the items seized and the case itself was not available pending further investigation and forthcoming arrests. However, two of Lane’s pending charges make ref erence to opium or deriv atives thereof, according to the Columbia County Detention Facility’s web site. Lane was booked into CCDF without bond. She faces charges for the sale of opium or opium deriv atives, possession of such with intent to sell, marijua na possession with intent to sell, distribution of mar ijuana, drug equipment possession and a proba tion violation. Report: Woman arrested for selling synthetic marijuana Lane By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com Local police arrested a Lake City man suspect ed of robbing a woman at gunpoint Wednesday night, LCPD reports. However, Joseph Anthony Harris, aka “Joe Friday,” 48, of 257 Anastia Place, claimed he was the victim of a drug deal gone bad and did not rob the woman, according to the arrest report. The victim, a mid dle-aged female, said Harris approached her and asked for a lighter while she was sitting on her porch around 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, the report said. Harris then allegedly snatched her wallet and began to flee on foot before tripping on the ground, at which point a chrome and black .45 caliber Ruger handgun also fell on the ground, the report said. The victim said Harris grabbed the gun and pointed it at her, prompt ing her to spray a “whole can” of mace on him and beat him several times, according to the report. However, she said Harris was able to get up and flee the scene, at which point she returned home and called police, the report said. She said she was famil iar with “Joe Friday” and suspected he might be staying with his uncle in the Granger Mill area, the report said. Later that night, a deputy from CCSO said they’d located two indi viduals giving Harris a ride in a green GMC SUV at the corner of Washington Street and Granger Mill Road, the report said. Harris told officers that he was dropped off at the victim’s resi dence and was looking to purchase $100 worth of crack cocaine from a dealer named “Dough Boy,” police said. He added that “Dough Boy” suspected Harris of stealing crack cocaine from him, struck Harris several times and put him in a choke hold on the ground, the report said. According to Harris, at this point the victim entered the fray, struck him and pepper sprayed him before he was able to flee the scene, the report said. Police said Harris had swelling in his right eye and bottom lip, but was not in possession of any firearms or stolen prop erty. In addition, Harris claimed he did not have a gun, let alone own one, the report said. When officers made contact with the two indi viduals giving Harris a ride, they said Harris flagged them down outside Cannon Creek Mobile Home Park and were not aware if he com mitted any crimes, the report said. When police made con tact with the man who allegedly drove Harris to the alleged victim’s residence, he said he dropped Harris off and immediately drove away and did not see anyone standing outside or an altercation occur, the report said. Harris was arrest ed and booked into Columbia County Detention Facility on $100,000 bond. He faces a charge of robbery by sudden snatching with firearm or weapon. Armed-robbery suspect claims he was the victim of bad drug deal Harris The sheriff’s office has since actively tried to make contact with any of the vic tims who purchased the sto len items through Hankin’s local electronics store or via his eBay and Amazon accounts. Deputies said sever al of the items they found during the October search of Hankins Computers matched serial numbers of items fraudulently ordered on Anderson Columbia’s dime, CCSO said. In addition, they found a little over 20 grams of can nabis in Hankins’ business, according to CCSO. Hankins Computers has since been cleared out. A visit to the store’s website, www.hankins.com, contains a single page advertising the location available for rent. Hankins was arrested and booked into Columbia County Detention Facility on $270,000 bond. According to CCSO, he faces a charge of organized fraud, 21 counts of dealing in stolen property and pos session of over 20 grams of cannabis. Citizens who believe they may have been victims of the Robinson-Hankins fraud are encouraged to contact Detective Caleb Douglas at CCSO (386-758-1375) or call Crime Stoppers of Columbia County (386-754-7099) and provide paper work detailing the point-of-sale if purchased locally or seller’s username if pur chased online. HANKINSContinued From 1AFrom staff reports Students from all over the state gathered at Smitty’s Western Store Arena to participate in a series of Florida High School Rodeo Association (FHSRA) events Saturday and today. Hundreds of contestants participated in a variety of activities including steer wrestling, calf roping, breakaway roping, barrels, poles and more. The event was the sev enth of eight similar week ends leading up to a three-day state final in May where the top four competitors in each event will be sent to a national championship in Rock Springs, Wyo. Fundraising Director for the FHSRA Stacie Clair says the children who par ticipate learn many import ant values that could help them later in life. “They learn a level of respect being raised in tradi tions and family values from old-school America,” she said. “It’s a lot of hard work and perseverance, they’re learning that nothing comes easy and you have to work for what you want.” She said one of the best parts about rodeo is that students are only compet ing against themselves when they go out into the ring. Adrianna Richards, an 11-year-old from Ocala, shared some of the things she’s learned as well. “I’ve learned that to be a winner, you have to know how to lose,” she said. One of the benefits for students in FHSRA is the opportunity to earn schol arships for attending col lege. Lake City native Austin Barber won a near-full ride scholarship from the organization and now attends Ranger College in Brownwood, Texas, study ing agriculture business. “It’s helped me get where I am today,” he said. “It’s good for younger kids. It gives them an incentive to do better.” HS Rodeo gathers students from all over state head coach of the Hamilton County Special Olympics junior team, said she got involved in Special Olympics because one of her children has special needs. The Hamilton County School district sent 22 participants to the games and Speights said she’s apprecia tive there is a venue for Special Olympians to compete. “My oldest son is a Special Olympics athlete. This is a good event,” she said. “I’ve been doing it for about four years now.” The event marked the first time the Special Olympics were hosted at Fort White High School, and Brown said the school provided several volunteers for the event. Jill Huesman, Fort White High School Agri-science teacher and FFA advisor, said about 25 of her students served as volunteers. She said some of her students arrived at 7:30 a.m. to help set up and some served as special escorts to the Special Olympians to make sure they were in the right place at the right time. “They were just here basical ly to make sure everything ran smoothly and efficiently for these students because they are spe cial to our campus and we want to make sure we do the best for them,” Huesman said. Dylan Spin, 18, helped as an event volunteer. “I decided to be a volunteer because I felt it was special because as a regular student, we get to compete in sports, but the special students don’t get to attend and do all the sports that regular students would,” he said. “This is their time that we can open up all these events to them.” Deidre Houk, Fort White High School activities director and student government leadership teacher, said several of her stu dents also volunteered. “The students enjoyed it,” she said. “It’s been extremely cold, but other than the frigid weather they really enjoyed being in the atmo sphere and being able to give back to these kids. It’s heartwarming to see that they have such a willing ness and giving spirit to want to help other people.” On Saturday, Fort White High School football stadium will serve as the venue for the Area 4 Special Olympics Summer Games with participants from Columbia, Alachua, Bradford, Hamilton and Marion counties competing. TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterJosh Compton (left) places a First Place blue ribbon on Special Olympian James Shott, who won the 50 meters walking contest. OLYMPICSContinued From 3A caused it to flow from the land into Cannon Sink.” Dan Rountree, a co-found er of Current Problems in 1992 with Mike Jamerson and Sue Hart, said they began doing North Florida water clean-up after seeing trash in the Santa Fe River at O’Leno State Park. “Mike and I wanted to canoe a stretch of the Santa Fe that was closed off and filled with trash,” Rountree said, prompting him and his friends to arrange a deal with the park that allowed them to canoe and camp in the area in exchange for their volunteer cleanup efforts. Over the years, they said they found many strange items in the waters, includ ing a brass sculpture, safes, toilets and even a cremation box. Terri Skiles from the Ichetucknee Alliance canoed through the calm waters, picking up glass bottles, plastic bags and other such items. “We’re just trying to do whatever little bit we can,” she said. Fellow volunteer Valerie Thomas struggled to pry free a tire stuck in a pile of smilax, a thorny plant. “The bad thing is that there’s always people that throw [garbage] in and peo ple that pick it up,” Thomas said. “And never the twain shall meet.” COURTESYValerie Thomas picks up trash from a thicket of smilax, a thorny plant, on the banks of Cannon Sink Saturday morning. “The bad thing is that there’s always people that throw [garbage] in and people that pick it up,” Thomas said. “And never the twain shall meet.” CANNONContinued From 1A STEVEN RICHMOND/ Lake City ReporterTaylor Baldwin chases a calf during the Breakaway event at the Florida High School Rodeo Association’s visit to Lake City Saturday.

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Charles Jolliffe, who works from home as a chemistry specialist for Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, lost 22 pounds, or 8.09 percent, of his original weight. While he played basketball and ran for his workouts, he realized he had to make additional changes to his dietary habits. “Most of the day I am a good eater,” he said, “But I do have an issue with binging at night. I knew if I was going to do anything, it was to quit that.” To find motivation, he looked to his children. “The thing that drove me the most was my son with Type-1 diabetes,” Jolliffe said. “He is always strong every single day with his problem. When you look at someone that has a legitimate issue and they will never be able to over come it completely, then you just have to look at yourself and ask ‘why am I sitting around feeling sorry for myself?’” Each winner received $1,320, derived from 12.5 percent of the registration fees, along with a variety of prizes including a year-long gym membership to one of the initiative’s four participat ing gyms (Anytime, American Family Fitness, Curves and Moowatee), a photography session with Captured Memories by Esta, a medallion, plaque and other fitness supplies. Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER IN PICTURES SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 7A Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterParticipants had the opportunity to take a Zumba Fitness class Friday nig ht. Jill Adams raises the hand of Chase Martin, 13, who won the 5K race on Friday. Heather Gray (left) and Jill Adams lift up Anna Rainbolt as she is c onfirmed the first female finisher of the 5K race on Friday. Jasmine Horton performs during the Glow On! Get Fit Lake City Finale on Friday.Kayliah Gallagher (left), 11, and Vidala Parks, 11, go down a bounce slide while attending the Glow On! Get Fit Lake City Finale held at Florida Gateway College on Friday.Julie Floyd runs with her daughter, Lilah, 2, during the Fun Run race Friday. ‘All three of my stroller tires went flat but I made it,’ she said. It was difficult, but it definitely gave me more of a workout.’ Members of First Federal Bank of Florida accept a trophy for the Fittest Large Business. Teresa Morgan, owner of Morgan Law Center For Estate & Legacy Planning, accepts a trophy for the Fittest Small Business. Members of TD Bank accept a trophy for the Fittest Medium Business. Noel Cavallero, 10, crosses the finish line as the first male finisher in the Fun Run race. FINALEContinued From 1APinemount Elementary School teacher LaShonda Newton is named the overall winner for the top classroom with a record ed 581 miles. WINNERSContinued From 1A ‘[Running] gets to be your best friend. You want to do it every day.’— Chase Martin, winner of the 5K race functional exercise part of life. Once you do it, you’ll never quit.” Children then flocked to a stage area and danced to the sounds of “Fire Burning on the Dance Floor,” “Happy,” “The Cupid Shuffle” and more. Around 1,380 children from local fourthand fifth-grade classes participated in the 16-week initiative, taking time to walk/run either before school or during recess. Winners of the fittest students, schools and busi nesses were announced, detailing their achieve ments over the 16 weeks: Fittest male student—Jeremiah Byrd of Pinemount Elementary, who walked/ran 44 miles; Fittest female student—Madison Siver of Five Points Elementary, who walked/ran 36 miles; Fittest classroom—Lashonda Newton of Pinemount Elementary, whose students walked/ran a collective 581 miles; Overall school winner—Pinemount Elementary Coach Mike McRare, whose students registered a collective 1,878 miles. All students combined walked/ran 8,598 miles over the 16 weeks. The following are the results for the fittest businesses, whose employees registered the most personal hours of exercise during the project: Small category—Morgan Law Center;Medium category—TD Bank;Large category—First Federal Bank of Florida.The grand finale revealed the winners of the biggest loser competition, who won by losing the largest percent of their original body weight over the 16 weeks. There were 264 individuals vying for the title among both men and women. The male winner was Charles Jolliffe, who lost 8.09 percent of his body weight from start to finish. The female winner was Vicki Busscher, who lost 19.77 percent of her body weight. Each winner won $1,320, derived from 12.5 per cent of the registration fees, along with a variety of prizes including an annual gym membership to one of the initiatives four participating gyms (Anytime, American Family Fitness, Curves and Moowatee), a photography session with Captured Memories by Esta, a medallion, plaque and other fitness supplies. “We had no idea if it would take off or if it would be successful and it really just blew us away,” Decker said. Overall, Altrusa hoped citizens of Columbia County learned the many health benefits of proper diet and exercise.

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9 10 11 12 13REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, March 9 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 74/49 74/52 76/49 74/50 70/52 68/56 76/49 74/54 76/50 79/56 76/56 76/54 77/61 79/63 81/58 76/61 79/61 77/67Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 79/59/pc 81/66/pc Daytona Beach 78/56/pc 79/62/pc Fort Myers 82/60/pc 83/67/pc Ft. Lauderdale 80/64/pc 83/70/pc Gainesville 78/52/pc 78/57/sh Jacksonville 77/54/pc 76/58/sh Key West 79/68/pc 81/73/pc Lake City 78/52/pc 78/57/sh Miami 80/65/pc 83/70/pc Naples 78/62/pc 81/68/pc Ocala 78/53/pc 79/59/sh Orlando 80/59/pc 80/65/pc Panama City 71/55/pc 67/59/r Pensacola 69/59/pc 69/61/sh Tallahassee 77/51/pc 73/55/r Tampa 77/58/pc 78/65/pc Valdosta 77/51/pc 74/57/pc W. Palm Beach 80/62/pc 83/67/pc High Saturday Low Saturday 73 88 in 1921 30 in 1962 68 49 34 Saturday 0.00" 0.02" 1.99" 7.75" 1.24" 7:47 a.m. 7:34 p.m. 7:46 a.m. 7:35 p.m. 1:44 p.m. 2:54 a.m. 2:34 p.m. 3:40 a.m.March 16 March 23 March 30 April 7 Full Last New First Quarter Quarter A destructive cold wave gripped Alabama and Georgia on this date in 1996. Temperatures as low as single digits wiped out fruit crops that had already blossomed. When the temperature drops to 20 degrees, some developing fruit can have a 50% loss rate. Rain will fall throughout the Northwest and into northern California and portions of the northern Rockies as a cold front moves through that region. Low pressure in the Gulf will result in showers and thunderstorms across southern Texas. 84, Santa Ana, CA -18, International Falls, MNSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 44/17/.00 32/21/pc Albuquerque 50/36/.00 61/36/pc Anchorage 16/1/.00 26/9/pc Atlanta 68/42/.00 69/48/pc Baltimore 61/27/.00 49/26/pc Billings 47/29/.00 57/37/pc Birmingham 66/37/.00 67/49/pc Bismarck 39/17/.00 52/34/pc Boise 44/35/.00 53/41/r Boston 55/27/.00 36/25/pc Buffalo 33/30/.00 28/23/pc Charleston SC 69/36/.00 72/49/pc Charleston WV 61/30/.00 49/33/pc Charlotte 66/34/.00 69/44/pc Cheyenne 44/28/.00 67/37/pc Chicago 35/28/.02 39/35/fg Cincinnati 57/30/.00 47/33/pc Cleveland 37/30/.03 34/29/pc Columbia SC 39/32/.00 53/35/s Dallas 55/48/.00 57/42/cd Daytona Beach 66/48/.00 74/54/pc Denver 32/28/.11 70/37/s Des Moines 34/25/.00 54/38/pc Detroit 37/32/.16 32/27/pc El Paso 62/51/.00 61/39/pc Fairbanks 1/-18/.00 0/-26/pc Greensboro -/28/.00 64/40/pc Hartford 50/27/.00 34/24/pc Honolulu 73/68/.06 80/70/pc Houston 66/55/.00 56/51/sh Indianapolis 46/33/.00 46/33/s Jackson MS 66/39/.00 70/49/pc Jacksonville 66/37/.00 75/51/pc Kansas City 39/29/.00 57/36/s Las Vegas 66/54/.00 75/53/pc Little Rock 64/35/.00 59/44/pc Los Angeles 80/52/.00 82/54/pc Memphis 64/39/.00 59/47/pc Miami 73/57/.00 79/65/pc Minneapolis 28/15/.00 43/34/pc Mobile 64/39/.00 72/50/pc New Orleans 66/45/.00 69/55/sh New York 59/33/.00 39/30/pc Oakland 61/46/.00 66/53/pc Oklahoma City 51/35/.00 56/37/pc Omaha 35/18/.00 61/34/pc Orlando 73/48/.00 79/56/pc Philadelphia 57/35/.00 43/30/pc Phoenix 75/55/.00 81/54/s Pittsburgh 51/32/.00 38/29/pc Portland ME 46/17/.00 32/16/pc Portland OR 50/44/.01 58/44/r Raleigh -/27/.01 66/41/pc Rapid City 47/21/.00 68/40/pc Reno 57/33/.00 65/43/pc Sacramento 64/43/.00 70/54/pc Salt Lake City 55/34/.00 64/46/pc San Antonio 61/57/.00 49/47/sh San Diego 80/55/.00 77/56/pc San Francisco 59/48/.00 61/54/pc Seattle 50/44/.07 55/45/r Spokane 48/32/.00 55/37/r St. Louis 43/35/.00 51/37/s Tampa 66/45/.00 75/59/pc Tucson 73/51/.00 74/48/s Washington 64/33/.00 50/35/pc Acapulco 82/69/.00 84/71/s Amsterdam 59/32/.00 59/41/pc Athens 57/48/.00 57/44/r Auckland 73/53/.00 71/59/pc Beijing 50/32/.00 53/28/pc Berlin 55/37/.00 51/33/pc Buenos Aires 78/64/.00 77/60/pc Cairo 80/60/.00 78/57/s Geneva 59/32/.00 60/37/s Havana 80/59/.00 78/59/s Helsinki 44/33/.00 44/32/pc Hong Kong 64/59/.00 69/57/r Kingston 89/75/.00 86/73/r La Paz 60/41/.00 62/42/ts Lima 75/69/.00 78/69/pc London 60/44/.00 59/44/pc Madrid 68/37/.00 68/39/s Mexico City 75/51/.00 77/51/s Montreal 35/23/.00 35/12/sn Moscow 44/32/.00 44/33/pc Nairobi 82/60/.00 80/59/cd Nassau 75/69/.00 77/64/s New Delhi 78/53/.00 78/57/s Oslo 46/39/.00 53/48/pc Panama 87/75/.00 89/75/pc Paris 64/37/.00 62/41/pc Rio 78/73/.00 89/73/pc Rome 62/42/.00 64/39/pc San Juan PR 84/73/.00 82/71/pc Santiago 87/62/.00 87/68/s Seoul 42/30/.00 44/30/pc Singapore 89/77/.00 91/75/pc St. Thomas VI 80/75/.00 83/73/pc Sydney 82/69/.00 80/68/pc Tel Aviv 82/64/.00 86/59/ts Tokyo 48/33/.00 48/35/s Toronto 37/32/.00 33/13/pc Vienna 57/35/.00 53/33/s Warsaw 50/35/.00 48/28/pc H H H H H H H H L L 30/10 Bangor 36/25 Boston 41/31 New York 50/35 Washington D.C. 69/44 Charlotte 69/48 Atlanta 56/37 City 58/40 Dallas 56/51 Houston 43/34 Minneapolis 39/35 Chicago 59/47 Memphis 48/32 Cincinnati 32/27 Detroit 78/58 Orlando 79/65 Miami 65/45 Oklahoma 39/26 Falls 65/45 International 51/37 Louis 65/45 St. 61/34 Omaha 70/37 Denver 61/36 Albuquerque 81/54 Phoenix 57/37 Billings 53/41 Boise 58/44 Portland 55/45 Seattle 69/55 Orleans 65/45 New 68/40 City 65/45 Rapid 64/46 City 65/45 Salt Lake 73/51 Vegas 65/45 Las 77/53 Angeles 65/45 Los 61/54 Francisco 65/45 San 25/12 Anchorage 0/-26 Fairbanks 80/70 Honolulu-20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Jan Feb30 40 50 60 70 80 90S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 77 80 67 54 68 68 68 47 49 47 46 34 34 34Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High915 mins to burnPartly cloudy Light wind Partly cloudy Slight chance of rain showers Chance of rain showers Partly cloudy SUN76 49 MON79 52 TUE77 56 WED79 52 THU70 40 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO 2014 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY AND FOR A LIMITED TIME. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. OFFER SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, boat and term of loan. For example, a $30,000 loan with no money down at 4.49% for 84 months would require 83 monthly payments of $419.82 and a final payment of $406.42, finance charge of $5,145.43, for a total amount of payments of $35,251.48. The amount financed is $30,106.05, the APR is 4.59%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 Lake City 1658 W. US Hwy. 90 Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. UF Health Shands Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.Best-ofMarket rates for B OATS! 4.5 9%As low asAPR1For up to 84 months on any 2009 or newer!Limited time offer! Thru March 31}F o r f ast appro v al call 754-9088 and press 4 or visit campuscu.com today! This should get your motor running. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Sunday, March 9, 2014 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Full Color File name: -9_CMPS_BoatLoan2014-REV_LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 3/5/14 Fran Rowe, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1030 9 10 11 12 13REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, March 9 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 74/49 74/52 76/49 74/50 70/52 68/56 76/49 74/54 76/50 79/56 76/56 76/54 77/61 79/63 81/58 76/61 79/61 77/67Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 79/59/pc 81/66/pc Daytona Beach 78/56/pc 79/62/pc Fort Myers 82/60/pc 83/67/pc Ft. Lauderdale 80/64/pc 83/70/pc Gainesville 78/52/pc 78/57/sh Jacksonville 77/54/pc 76/58/sh Key West 79/68/pc 81/73/pc Lake City 78/52/pc 78/57/sh Miami 80/65/pc 83/70/pc Naples 78/62/pc 81/68/pc Ocala 78/53/pc 79/59/sh Orlando 80/59/pc 80/65/pc Panama City 71/55/pc 67/59/r Pensacola 69/59/pc 69/61/sh Tallahassee 77/51/pc 73/55/r Tampa 77/58/pc 78/65/pc Valdosta 77/51/pc 74/57/pc W. Palm Beach 80/62/pc 83/67/pc High Saturday Low Saturday 73 88 in 1921 30 in 1962 68 49 34 Saturday 0.00" 0.02" 1.99" 7.75" 1.24" 7:47 a.m. 7:34 p.m. 7:46 a.m. 7:35 p.m. 1:44 p.m. 2:54 a.m. 2:34 p.m. 3:40 a.m.March 16 March 23 March 30 April 7 Full Last New First Quarter Quarter A destructive cold wave gripped Alabama and Georgia on this date in 1996. Temperatures as low as single digits wiped out fruit crops that had already blossomed. When the temperature drops to 20 degrees, some developing fruit can have a 50% loss rate. Rain will fall throughout the Northwest and into northern California and portions of the northern Rockies as a cold front moves through that region. Low pressure in the Gulf will result in showers and thunderstorms across southern Texas. 84, Santa Ana, CA -18, International Falls, MNSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 44/17/.00 32/21/pc Albuquerque 50/36/.00 61/36/pc Anchorage 16/1/.00 26/9/pc Atlanta 68/42/.00 69/48/pc Baltimore 61/27/.00 49/26/pc Billings 47/29/.00 57/37/pc Birmingham 66/37/.00 67/49/pc Bismarck 39/17/.00 52/34/pc Boise 44/35/.00 53/41/r Boston 55/27/.00 36/25/pc Buffalo 33/30/.00 28/23/pc Charleston SC 69/36/.00 72/49/pc Charleston WV 61/30/.00 49/33/pc Charlotte 66/34/.00 69/44/pc Cheyenne 44/28/.00 67/37/pc Chicago 35/28/.02 39/35/fg Cincinnati 57/30/.00 47/33/pc Cleveland 37/30/.03 34/29/pc Columbia SC 39/32/.00 53/35/s Dallas 55/48/.00 57/42/cd Daytona Beach 66/48/.00 74/54/pc Denver 32/28/.11 70/37/s Des Moines 34/25/.00 54/38/pc Detroit 37/32/.16 32/27/pc El Paso 62/51/.00 61/39/pc Fairbanks 1/-18/.00 0/-26/pc Greensboro -/28/.00 64/40/pc Hartford 50/27/.00 34/24/pc Honolulu 73/68/.06 80/70/pc Houston 66/55/.00 56/51/sh Indianapolis 46/33/.00 46/33/s Jackson MS 66/39/.00 70/49/pc Jacksonville 66/37/.00 75/51/pc Kansas City 39/29/.00 57/36/s Las Vegas 66/54/.00 75/53/pc Little Rock 64/35/.00 59/44/pc Los Angeles 80/52/.00 82/54/pc Memphis 64/39/.00 59/47/pc Miami 73/57/.00 79/65/pc Minneapolis 28/15/.00 43/34/pc Mobile 64/39/.00 72/50/pc New Orleans 66/45/.00 69/55/sh New York 59/33/.00 39/30/pc Oakland 61/46/.00 66/53/pc Oklahoma City 51/35/.00 56/37/pc Omaha 35/18/.00 61/34/pc Orlando 73/48/.00 79/56/pc Philadelphia 57/35/.00 43/30/pc Phoenix 75/55/.00 81/54/s Pittsburgh 51/32/.00 38/29/pc Portland ME 46/17/.00 32/16/pc Portland OR 50/44/.01 58/44/r Raleigh -/27/.01 66/41/pc Rapid City 47/21/.00 68/40/pc Reno 57/33/.00 65/43/pc Sacramento 64/43/.00 70/54/pc Salt Lake City 55/34/.00 64/46/pc San Antonio 61/57/.00 49/47/sh San Diego 80/55/.00 77/56/pc San Francisco 59/48/.00 61/54/pc Seattle 50/44/.07 55/45/r Spokane 48/32/.00 55/37/r St. Louis 43/35/.00 51/37/s Tampa 66/45/.00 75/59/pc Tucson 73/51/.00 74/48/s Washington 64/33/.00 50/35/pc Acapulco 82/69/.00 84/71/s Amsterdam 59/32/.00 59/41/pc Athens 57/48/.00 57/44/r Auckland 73/53/.00 71/59/pc Beijing 50/32/.00 53/28/pc Berlin 55/37/.00 51/33/pc Buenos Aires 78/64/.00 77/60/pc Cairo 80/60/.00 78/57/s Geneva 59/32/.00 60/37/s Havana 80/59/.00 78/59/s Helsinki 44/33/.00 44/32/pc Hong Kong 64/59/.00 69/57/r Kingston 89/75/.00 86/73/r La Paz 60/41/.00 62/42/ts Lima 75/69/.00 78/69/pc London 60/44/.00 59/44/pc Madrid 68/37/.00 68/39/s Mexico City 75/51/.00 77/51/s Montreal 35/23/.00 35/12/sn Moscow 44/32/.00 44/33/pc Nairobi 82/60/.00 80/59/cd Nassau 75/69/.00 77/64/s New Delhi 78/53/.00 78/57/s Oslo 46/39/.00 53/48/pc Panama 87/75/.00 89/75/pc Paris 64/37/.00 62/41/pc Rio 78/73/.00 89/73/pc Rome 62/42/.00 64/39/pc San Juan PR 84/73/.00 82/71/pc Santiago 87/62/.00 87/68/s Seoul 42/30/.00 44/30/pc Singapore 89/77/.00 91/75/pc St. Thomas VI 80/75/.00 83/73/pc Sydney 82/69/.00 80/68/pc Tel Aviv 82/64/.00 86/59/ts Tokyo 48/33/.00 48/35/s Toronto 37/32/.00 33/13/pc Vienna 57/35/.00 53/33/s Warsaw 50/35/.00 48/28/pc H H H H H H H H L L 30/10 Bangor 36/25 Boston 41/31 New York 50/35 Washington D.C. 69/44 Charlotte 69/48 Atlanta 56/37 City 58/40 Dallas 56/51 Houston 43/34 Minneapolis 39/35 Chicago 59/47 Memphis 48/32 Cincinnati 32/27 Detroit 78/58 Orlando 79/65 Miami 65/45 Oklahoma 39/26 Falls 65/45 International 51/37 Louis 65/45 St. 61/34 Omaha 70/37 Denver 61/36 Albuquerque 81/54 Phoenix 57/37 Billings 53/41 Boise 58/44 Portland 55/45 Seattle 69/55 Orleans 65/45 New 68/40 City 65/45 Rapid 64/46 City 65/45 Salt Lake 73/51 Vegas 65/45 Las 77/53 Angeles 65/45 Los 61/54 Francisco 65/45 San 25/12 Anchorage 0/-26 Fairbanks 80/70 Honolulu -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Jan Feb30 40 50 60 70 80 90S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 77 80 67 54 68 68 68 47 49 47 46 34 34 34Actual high Actual low Average high Average lowWEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High915 mins to burnPartly cloudy Light wind Partly cloudy Slight chance of rain showers Chance of rain showers Partly cloudy SUN76 49 MON79 52 TUE77 56 WED79 52 THU70 40 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO2014

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, March 9, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS 368 NE Franklin Street | Lake City, FL 32055 Independent member of the medical staff 3LHYUPMWHY[PHSQVPU[YLZ\YMHJPUNPZYPNO[MVY`V\ @V\TH`ILHNVVKJHUKPKH[LMVYHUPUUV]H[P]L[YLH[ TLU[[OH[VHLYZ WLVWSL^P[OLHYS`[VTPKZ[HNLVZ[LVHY[OYP[PZVM[O LRULLHSLZZ PU]HZP]L[YLH[TLU[VW[PVU[OHU[V[HSQVPU[YLWSHJLT LU[0[LUHISLZ Z\YNLVUZ[VWYLJPZLS`[HYNL[VUS`[OLKPZLHZLKWVY[ PVUVM[OLRULL ^P[OV\[JVTWYVTPZPUN[OLOLHS[O`IVULHUK[PZZ\LZ\ YYV\UKPUNP[ -PUKV\[PM[OPZVW[PVUPZYPNO[MVY`V\ This is your life, without joint pain. ursday, March 20 | Noon to 1:00 p.m.Lake Shore Hospital Authority Board259 NE Franklin Street, Lake CityFeatured Speaker:Richard G. Valenzuela, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon Space is limited. RSVP at ShandsLakeShore.com or call 386-755-4007. Free knee and hip seminar WILLIAMS continued on 2B Tigers’ Williams wants to play at next level. Reynolds out as coach, will stay on as teacher. Columbia High lady hoops coach faces DUI chargeBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High will not retain Michael Reynolds as head basketball coach after he was arrested for drunk driving on March 3. Reynolds was found stranded in his vehicle in a water-filled ditch along Interstate 10 according to the Baker County Press. Baker County Sheriff’s Deputy Matt Riegel said Reynolds responded to what was initially reported as a vehicle fire near the SR 121 exit around 1:50 a.m. on March 3. The officer said that Reynolds’ vehicle was sit-ting in a foot of water and that Reynolds had tried to exit on SR 121 believing that it was the road to Lake City. Reynolds admitted to drinking alcohol in Jacksonville and failed a field sobriety test. When transferred to the Baker County Jail, Reynolds blew a .141 intoxication level. “He’s been removed as varsity girls basketball coach,” Columbia High prin-cipal Todd Widergren said. “He realizes that he made a terrible decision and there are consequences that come with our actions.” Reynolds admitted guilt to the situation and regrets his actions. “With the aide of my family and friends, I hope to get the help that I need in order to put these events behind me,” Reynolds said. The school has not given a timetable to naming Reynolds replacement with the Lady Tigers Reynolds will stay on as a teacher at Columbia High School. FILEColumbia High girls basketball coach Michael Reynolds was relieved of his position after an incident on March 3. Goals aheadBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High goalie Ty Williams saved his best for last. The senior keeper for Columbia led the North to a 5-3 victory over the South in the North Florida Senior All-Star Game at Patton Park in Jacksonville. Now Williams must decide if that was his last game or if he’ll take his tal-ents to the next level. Williams ranks in the Top-5 among saves for goal keepers in the coun-try according to Maxpreps.com, but it wasn’t exactly the kind of year he would have liked. “It was kind of a rough high school year,” Williams said. “Most of the teams took a lot of shots, so I had really good stats. I went (to the All-Star game) and didn’t really know what to expect. There’s only been a couple of people to play in it before. The other goalie didn’t show and, because they usually put two on each team, I played the whole game. I played pretty good. I made 17 saves and gave COURTESYColumbia High goal keeper Ty Williams looks to play soccer in college.

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SCOREBOARD SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 3 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, KOBALT 400, at Las Vegas COLLEGE SOFTBALL Noon FSN — UAB at East Carolina GOLF 6 a.m. TGC — Ladies European PGA Tour, Mission Hills World Championship, final round, at Haikou, China (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship, final round, at Doral 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship, final round, at Doral 7:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Puerto Rico Open, final round, at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — Virginia at MarylandESPN2 — Big South Conference, championship, at Myrtle Beach, S.C. 2 p.m. CBS — Missouri Valley Conference, championship, at St. Louis ESPN2 — Atlantic Sun Conference, championship 2:30 p.m. NBCSN — Colonial Athletic Association, semifinal doubleheader, at Baltimore 4:30 p.m. CBS — Michigan St. at Ohio St. 6 p.m. ESPNU — Boston College at N.C. State NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Miami at Chicago 3:30 p.m. ABC — Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers NHL HOCKEY Noon NBC — Detroit at N.Y. Rangers 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Chicago at Buffalo WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Big Ten Conference, championship,, at Indianapolis 3 p.m. FS1 — Big 12 Conference, semifinal, at Oklahoma City 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Southeastern Conference, championship, at Duluth, Ga. 5:30 p.m. FS1 — Big 12 Conference, semifinal, at Oklahoma City 7 p.m. ESPN — Atlantic Coast Conference, championship, at Greensboro, N.C. 9 p.m. ESPN — Pacific-12 Conference, championship, at Seattle WINTER PARALYMPICS 11 p.m. NBCSN — Events (same-day tape) 2 a.m. NBCSN — Alpine Skiing — Super-G ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, championship, at Springfield, Mass. NBCSN — Colonial Athletic Association, championship, at Baltimore 9 p.m. ESPN — West Coast Conference, semifinal, at Las Vegas ESPN2 — Southern Conference, championship, at Asheville, N.C. 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 — West Coast Conference, semifinal, at Las Vegas SOCCER 3:55 p.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Sunderand at Liverpool WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4 p.m. FS1 — Big East Conference, semifinal, at Rosemont, Ill. 6:30 p.m. FS1 — Big East Conference, semifinal, at Rosemont, Ill. 7 p.m. ESPN — American Athletic Conference, championship, at Uncasville, Conn. 9 p.m. FS1 — Big 12 Conference, championship, at Oklahoma City WINTER PARALYMPICS Noon NBCSN — Events (same-day tape) 2 a.m. NBCSN — BiathlonBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Game Miami at Chicago, 1 p.m.Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. Denver at New Orleans, 6 p.m.Sacramento at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.Detroit at Boston, 6 p.m.Toronto at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Portland at Houston, 7 p.m.Indiana at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Golden State, 9 p.m. Monday’s Games Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Atlanta at Utah, 9 p.m.Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 5 Virginia at Maryland, NoonNo. 7 Syracuse at Florida State, 2 p.m. No. 9 Wisconsin at Nebraska, 7:30 p.m. No. 17 Saint Louis at UMass, 2 p.m.No. 22 Michigan State at Ohio State, 4:30 p.m.FOOTBALLNFL calendar Tuesday — All clubs must be under the 2014 salary cap; free agency begins; trading period begins.BASEBALLSpring Training games Today Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh (ss) at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Colorado vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Monday Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Oakland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Houston vs. Washington at Viera, 6:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 10:10 p.m.MLB calendar Wednesday — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days.AUTO RACINGRace week SPRINT CUP KOBALT 400 Site: Las Vegas.Schedule: Today, race 3 p.m. (Fox, 2:30-6 p.m.). Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway (oval, 1.5 miles). Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps. CAMPING WORLD TRUCK Next race: Kroger 250, March 29, Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, Va. NHRA DRAG RACING Next event: NHRA Gatornationals, March 13-16, Auto Plus Raceway At Gainesville.Kobalt 400 qualifying At Las Vegas (Nev.) Motor Speedway Friday qualifying; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 193.278 mph. 2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 193.099.3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 192.713.4. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 192.678. 5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 192.596. 6. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 192.596. 7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.397. 8. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.335.9. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.26.10. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 191.939. 11. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 191.591.12. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 191.51. 13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.659. 14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 191.618. 15. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 191.618. 16. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 191.598. 17. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 191.496. 18. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 191.489. 19. (66) Jeff Burton, Toyota, 191.435.20. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.381.21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.934. 22. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 190.543. 23. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 190.503. 24. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 189.514. 25. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.396.26. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 189.893.27. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 189.767. 28. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 189.647.29. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 189.328. 30. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 189.261. 31. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 188.851. 32. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 188.838. 33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.686.34. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 188.429.35. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 188.271. 36. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 188.166. 37. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (33) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 42. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, Owner Points. Failed to Qualify 44. (35) Blake Koch, Ford, 186.683.45. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 186.207. 46. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 186.143.47. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 182.822. 48. (44) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 181.044. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS WILLIAMS: Smarts leads his game Continued From Page 1B COURTESYAmerican Legion hold ’emAmerican Legion Post 57’s monthly Texas Hold ’em fundr aiser was Feb. 21. Five winners split a pot of $1,750. Standing (from left) are Dee May, Art Lowes, Jason Cowart and Paul Jones. Seated are dealer Jarod Pruitt (left) and Ray Hodges. up three goals. The hardest part was communication, because you haven’t played with anybody before. It was definitely a good experience I’ll never forget.” Williams said that he hasn’t made up his mind on if he’ll definitely play at the next level, but that he is open to it if the right offer comes along. “I’m really not 100 percent sure what I’m gonna do. I want to play soccer in college. I’m just waiting on the right offer to come along. I’ve had a couple of big schools come on lately. If not, I’ll go to FGC and get my degree for nurs-ing before going on some-where.” The right offer to Williams could be on the way with a host of in-state schools looking his way. “Lately, I’ve had UCF and West Florida, Saint Leo University and Weber International want me to come practice with the team. They want a little one-on-one time to watch me play. From there, they would evaluate me and then offer or help me find a school where I can play. I’ve had offers from smaller schools out of state. I’ve had some from New York and Maryland.” Williams feels he has what it takes to play in col-lege and that a lot of his tal-ent is between his ears. “The mental aspect of the game, being a goal-keeper, is obviously physi-cally hard. People think you just stand there, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. You’re pret-ty much the quarterback of the team. It solely impacts you if a goal goes in. You have to be smart and one step ahead of everyone. I think I’ve always done a good job of not getting down on myself. I push others to be better and work hard on and off the field.” Columbia High head coach Trevor Tyler, who Williams gives a lot of cred-it toward developing him as a player, tends to agree that Williams has what it takes to move on. “His chance of playing at the next level, if he wants to do it, he can,” Tyler said. “He makes good decisions. It’s a matter of what he wants to do. He’ll do a good job for whoever gets him. His knowledge of the game (makes him special). He’s played for many years. For as big as he is, he has good speed.” Now only time will tell if Williams makes the leap. COURTESYColumbia High goal keeper Ty Williams makes a save for the Tigers in a game last season.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 3B3BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Monday Q Fort White High weightlifting hosts Indian Invitational, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High JV baseball vs. Baker County High, 6 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High tennis vs. Oakleaf High, 4:15 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Fort White High baseball vs. Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Columbia High softball vs. Gainesville High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Q Columbia High softball vs. Buchholz High, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High tennis vs. Ridgeview High, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High baseball at Chiefland High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Friday Q Columbia High softball vs. Palatka High, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Middleburg High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Fort White High baseball at Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) YOUTH WRESTLING Club registration begins Tuesday Monsta Wrestling Club registration begins at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Richardson Middle School. Parents can register children on Tuesdays and Thursdays during March. Registration fee of $75 includes USA and AAU competition cards. Practice begins March 18, and the times are 5:30-7 p.m. for middle and high school ages and 6:45-7:30 p.m. for elementary school ages. For details, call coach Kevin Warner at (352) 281-0549 or go to mon stawrestling@yahoo.com FORT WHITE CHEERING Parent meeting on Thursday Cheerleading tryouts for Fort White varsity, junior varsity and middle school squads are 9 a.m. March 22 in the high school gym. There is a tryout clinic from 3:30-5:30 p.m. March 18-20 in the gym. A mandatory parent meeting for those interested in trying out is 6 p.m. Thursday. For details, call Kathy DePratter at 497-5952, Ext. 158, or e-mail deprat terk@columbiak12.com ADULT SOFTBALL Spring sign-up ends March 21 Columbia County Adult Softball spring registration is under way through March 21. The league schedule is women on Monday, church on Tuesday, men on Wednesday and co-ed on Thursday. Team registration is $250. Registration deadline and coaches meeting are 7 p.m. March 21 at the adult softball concession stand meeting room. For details, contact columbiacountyadult softball@gmail.com or call Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168.Q From staff reports By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Football scores in district games are coming up on the wrong side for Fort White High softball. The Lady Indians lost, 8-7, at home to Keystone Heights High on Friday. Fort White (3-6, 0-4) fell by the same margin to Interlachen High in its last District 5-4A game. It was the first district win for Keystone Heights (3-6, 1-2). Fort White opened on top with two runs in the first inning. Ashley Chesney was hit by a pitch on an 0-2 count. Morgan Cushman singled and Shea Chesney singled in her sister. Shea Chesney later scored, but the production was cut short with one runner thrown out at the plate on a come-backer and another picked off third base. Keystone Heights scored three runs in the top of the second inning. Kristin Wood’s two-run triple was the big blow and she later scored on a wild pitch. Fort White tied it with a run in the bottom of the inning. Caitlyn Bruce led off with a single and Kayla Redwine bunted for a base hit. The runners advanced on a wild pitch. Kylee Crews’ ground ball to second base scored Bruce, but it turned into a double play when the runner was thrown out at third. Keystone Heights doubled its score in the third inning after loading the bases with two outs. A fly ball by Brooke Tussinger cleared the bases before she was thrown out at third on the relay from the out-field. Bruce scored her second run in the fourth inning. She doubled, moved to third on a wild pitch and scored on a sacrifice fly by Redwine. Keystone Heights pushed the lead to 8-4 with a pair of runs in the fifth inning. A sac fly by Brianna Wells and squeeze bunt by Wood brought in the runs. The two outs were the first of eight in a row retired by Fort White’s Cushman. The host Lady Indians climbed back into the game with three runs in the fifth inning, two coming after two outs. Ashley Chesney led off with a triple and scored on a fly ball by Shea Chesney. Alexa Hatcher and Chelsea Nieland singled and Bruce ripped an RBI-double for her third hit of the game. Nieland scored as Redwine added an infield hit. While Cushman was shutting down the visit-ing Lady Indians, Brittany Shellpepper did the same to the home team. She retired seven of the eight final bat-ters to preserve the win. In addition to Bruce’s three hits, Cushman, Nieland and Redwine each had two hits. Bailey Robison also had a hit. Fort White plays backto-back district games against P.K. Yonge School on Monday and Tuesday. The Monday make-up game is in Gainesville, while the Blue Wave visit on Tuesday. Santa Fe High is a road game on Thursday All games are at 6 p.m. Lady Indians fall short, 8-7 BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head softball coach Jimmy Williams talks to Hollianne Dohrn between innings on Friday.Wins all-around for CHS FridayBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comWith the baseball and softball teams in action for Columbia High on Friday night, it made for a good time in Lake City as both teams came away with shutouts. The baseball team defeated Fort White High, 7-0, behind a complete-game effort from Caleb Vaughn. The Lady Tigers handed West Nassau High a 2-0 shutout behind a two-run homer from Caleigh McCauley to seal the deal. Vaughn moved to 4-0 on the year after pitching the complete game with 14 strikeouts, three hits and one walk. “He continued to do what he has done for us all year,” head coach Heath Phillips said. “Anytime you strikeout 14 batters and only walk one, that’s evi-dent of what you’re doing as a competitor on the mound to get us a nice win.” The Tigers were also good at the plate with Alex Milton collecting three hits and Dalton Mauldin and Jordan Culp reaching base twice. Levi Hollingsworth also had a hit. Milton and Culp led the team with three RBIs each and Harrison Shubert had an RBI. Milton and Mauldin scored twice, while Hollingsworth and Tyler Myrick each scored one run. Hits weren’t as easy to come by for the Lady Tigers in a pitching strug-gle, but when Columbia needed a hit the most, Caleigh McCauley came through with a two-run homer to score Tatum Morgan in the bottom of the fifth inning. “Any game, any girl can come up and win it for us,” Columbia High head coach Jimmy Williams said. “We’re lucky to have a team full of girls like McCauley.” The Lady Tigers are also lucky to have two pitchers who can win on any given night. Ashley Shoup picked up the win after allowing six hits and striking out three batters in just over five innings. Erin Anderson came in with one out in the sixth inning to pick up the save for the Lady Tigers. “Ashley scattered a couple of hits, but she’s one of those players that just quietly comes in a does her job,” Williams said. “She’s a secret weapon for us. When you have two pitchers, it gives us an advantage over other teams that only have one arm at the end of the year.” The Lady Tigers are 9-0 after Friday’s win. Columbia will play a pair of Gainesville schools next week. The Lady Tigers host Gainesville High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday and Buchholz High at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. The baseball team didn’t fare as well on Saturday in an 8-0 loss to Wakulla. The Tigers only had three hits with Tyler Myrick, Milton and Vaughn each reaching. Hollingsworth had two walks and Culp also reached on a walk. Wakulla was big in two innings, scoring three in the third inning and adding five more in the fifth. Columbia is 8-2 after the weekend. The Tigers return to action in a rematch against Suwannee High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in Live Oak. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida senior Will Yeguete raises a cut piece of net afte r beating Kentuckey 84-65 on Saturday.UF sweeps SECAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — With strands of net behind their ears, Florida seniors Casey Prather, Scottie Wilbekin, Will Yeguete and Patric Young stopped at midcourt and kissed the floor. It was the first step toward the next goal — winning it all.Young scored 18 points in his home finale and No. 1 Florida routed 25th-ranked Kentucky 84-65 on Saturday, becoming the first team in Southeastern Conference history to go 18-0 in league play. “This is the way to go out,” Young said.

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