The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02288

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


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Full Text

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Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.50 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM LOCALRoxie wins the Doxie Derby 3A. CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 15 TODAYS WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4A Local . . . . . . . 8A Obituaries . . . . . 3A Advice & Comics . . 3D Puzzles . . . . . . . 2B SPORTSCHS softball field in final phase 1B. 74 54Thunderstorms, 10A SUNDAY EDITIONCHS student to study at top tech school. LIFE1D OSCARSMark Kirby previews Best Picture nominees.4D By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comWhat do Alexandre Dumas, Bob Dylan, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Clint Eastwood, Victor Hugo, Charles Lindbergh and Lake City resident John Swihart have in common? As of Friday, theyre all Knights of the Ordre national de la Lgion d'honneurThe National Order of the Legion of Honour, the highest award granted by the nation of France. During a ceremony at Tallahassees Museum of Florida History Friday, 96-year-old WWII veteran Swihart was awarded the Legion of Honor Medal with four fellow veterans from the war. In commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Normandy landings coming this June, the French government decided to grant the honor to all living American veterans who fought on French soil during World War II. Your decision to fight for freedom during World War II was an admirable act, demonstrating your courage and selflessness, wrote Philippe Ltrilliart, Miamis Consul General of France. The solidarity you lent our country and people as a soldier will never be forgotten; be assured that we are eternally grateful. Swihart served as a first lieutenant with the U.S. Army Air Corps (which later became the Air Force) during the war, in charge of briefing and interrogating bombing crews before and after missions. After he joined in 1943, he participated in the Ardennes, Rhineland, Northern France and air offensive Europe campaigns for a total of 173 missions, earning four bronze service stars along the way before his retirement as a captain in 1960. He was also commended for his work supporting resupply efforts to the underground French resistance movement. A native of Dickinson, N.D., Swihart said he was honored to help defend Americas first ally. I was glad to do something for France, he said. I dont know that people recognize the importance of the support that France gave the States during the American Revolution...I feel some of the liberties, which I enjoy, were a benefit from France. STEVEN RICHMOND/ Lake City ReporterJohn Swihart, a 96-year-old veteran of World War II, holds a letter written to him by Philippe Ltrilliart, Miamis Consul General of France, honoring Swihart for his courage and selflessness during the war and declaring him a Knight of Frances Legion of Honor.Local veteran receives French medal of honor SWIHART continued on 5A Photos by PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the ReporterFirst responders from CCFD, CCSO, LCFD, Lifeguard and FHP help prepare numerous patients for transport to area hospitals after a church van crashed and rolled over around 8:15 Friday morning just north of the US 90 overpass on I-75 North. Two lanes of I-75 north were closed, as well as the northbound on-ramp, for hours during the investigation.TRAGEDY STRIKES ON I-75By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comTwo adults are dead and a teenager is in critical condition after a New Port Richey church van suffered a tire failure that caused it to flip on Interstate 75 near the U.S. 90 exit in Lake City. Seven others, mostly children ages 12-16, were hurt. The group, from First Baptist Church of New Port Richey, was headed to a youth winter camp near Atlanta, according to church officials. Jeff Novak, 52, the driver, and Michalanne Salliotte, 44, both of New Port Richey, were pronounced dead at the scene, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Jacob Newton, 14, also of New Port Richey, suffered critical injuries. Newton was transported to UF Health Shands in Gainesville, along with Jared Leach, 14, no hometown listed, and Javen Andrews, 13, of Hudson. Newton was listed in critical condition, Leach in serious condition. Andrews suffered minor injuries according to FHP. As of Saturday, Newtons condition was unchanged. The child is still in critical condition, Florida Highway Patrol Troop B public information officer Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace said Saturday afternoon. The crash occurred at 8:15 a.m. Friday in a northbound lane of I-75 at the 427 By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comWhen a van carrying 10 members of First Baptist Church of New Port Richey crashed here Friday, killing two and injuring eight, word of the tragedy spread quickly throughout Columbia Countys community of faith. Pastors from Beulah Baptist Association, along with local businesses, were up to the challenge. Within minutes an effort was organized to find survivors a place to stay while family members headed to Columbia County or Gainesville where some were getting medical care. Some local ministers went to Lake City Medical Center to offer their support to crash victims. The Rev. James Roberts, Beulah Baptist Association mission strategist, said he received a call around 8:50 a.m. Friday from Ken Edenfield, Old Providence Baptist Church pastor, asking that he open the Beulah Baptist Association building following a fatal accident on Interstate 75. A charter bus carrying about 50 young people, also from First Baptist Church of New Port Richey, was traveling with the van, but was not involved in the accident. In Locals step in to help injured A Columbia County Sheriffs Deputy and a trooper from the Florida Highway Patrol at the scene of a fatal crash Friday morning. The crash occurred on I-75 North near the US 90 northbound on-ramp. Two killed, eight injured in crash of New Port Richey church van. HELP continued on 5A CRASH continued on 5A MARIJUANA: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW, 8A.

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TALLAHASSEE T ax cuts, stiffer sex offend er laws, expanding school vouchers and, as always, the state budget will be among the issues Florida legislators will consider over their annual 60-day session that begins short ly. But so will legalizing half-gal lon beer growlers, raising the speed limit to 75 mph in some areas and finally making it legal for unmarried men and women to have sex in the homes they share. Hundreds of bills have already filed for the session beginning March 4 — some mundane, some making a political point, some dealing with major policy changes and some that could affect Floridians’ everyday lives. And most will never make it to Gov. Rick Scott’s desk when law makers go home the first week end in May. The House and Senate leaders say, though, they will not be taking a step back and coasting during an election year, when many contentious issues are often left for another time. “We really wanted to continue to push the envelope this year and not waste a session,” House Speaker Will Weatherford said. Weatherford and Senate President Don Gaetz have laid out a five-point work plan for the session dealing with education; making the state more military friendly; making broad-based tax cuts; protecting children, the elderly and other vulnera ble Floridians; and addressing government pension costs and ethics. “The thought was we want ed it to be bigger and broader and hopefully bolder than the agenda we had last year,” said Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. But one issue that seems to be debated every year at the Capitol — gambling — won’t be high on the priority list of either lawmaker. “We’re both very skeptical about gambling,” said Gaetz, R-Niceville. There will be a push to cre ate casino resorts, particularly in Miami, as there have been the last few years. Gaetz and Weatherford aren’t closing the door to the idea, but Gaetz said there first needs to be a holistic look at Florida’s gambling indus try in general to clean up laws and regulations that have been patched together over the years. And there’s also the compact with the Seminole Indian Tribe that allowed exclusive gam bling rights for their casinos in exchange for what’s approaching $1 billion in payments to the state over the last four years. A portion of the agreement allowing blackjack and other card games at the tribe’s casinos expires in August 2015. How Scott handles negotiations with the tribe could also affect what the legislature does. More important to the leaders are changes in other policy, like expanding a corporate tax credit for companies that give private school vouchers to low-income students. They also want chang es in the state retirement system similar to a failed proposal last year that would have required all future public employees to have individual investment accounts similar to 401 (k) plans instead of a guaranteed pension. They want to build on ethics laws passed last year by further strengthening penalties for those who don’t follow them and to apply standards required of elected state officials to local officials.State to get nearly $1.5 M in settlement TALLAHASSEE — Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi says that the state will receive nearly $1.5 million as part of a national settlement with a Pennsylvania drug maker. Endo Health will pay almost $193 million to resolve claims that it improperly marketed the shingles treatment Lidoderm for unapproved uses like treating lower back pain. The company will pay $171.9 million in civil false claims set tlements largely to the U.S. gov ernment, but some of the money is going to 47 states. Endo also agreed to pay $20.8 million as part of a deferred prosecution agreement. Bondi’s office said that Endo’s alleged conduct caused false claims to be submitted to the Florida Medicaid program. Endo said it was pleased to resolve the issue, and it has pro grams in place to help it comply with the agreements.Woman sues Wells Fargo over gun rules TAMPA — A Tampa woman is suing Wells Fargo after she was fired for bringing a gun to work. Ivette Ros is 37 and a single mother. She told the Tampa Tribune in a story published Saturday that she felt safer hav ing the weapon with her at the Oldsmar branch bank so she could protect other employees from potential robbers. Ros has filed a federal lawsuit, alleging she lost her job as bank manager for exercising her con stitutional right to bear arms. A Wells Fargo spokeswoman declined to talk about the court case but said the company has clear rules prohibiting employ ees from bringing weapons onto its premises. The company offers an exception in states where individuals are allowed to keep weapons in their locked vehicle in a company parking lot. 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Q Associated Press PEOPLE IN THE NEWS HOW TO REAC H USMain number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com)A DVERT IS ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com)CL ASSIFI EDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CI RCU L AT IONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Saturday) 0-1-0 Play 4: (Saturday) 2-5-5-7 Fantasy 5: (Friday) 1-13-27-29-33 Florida Lotto: (Wednesday) 9-14-29-31-32-36-x2 PowerBall: (Wednesday) 1-17-35-49-54-34-x3JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterCCA holds graduation ceremonyBrandon Rothenburg, a youthful offender at Corrections Corporation of America, gives his tes timony during a graduation of the faith-based Life Principles Commu nity Program Friday after noon. Thirty-four youthful offenders graduated from the program. Legislative session to be a mix of priorities AROUND FLORIDA Photo of the Day The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. See an error? The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run on this page at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. SubmissionsJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterSound Line shows off accessoriesSound Line Design owner Will Talmadge (from left) shows off some of his latest car accessories to Stephen Witt, Miss Columbia High School 2013 Kelston Sund, 18, and Ronnie Brannon during a ri bbon cutting ceremony on Thursday. High-wire walker sets sights on Georgia gorge ATLANTA — Daredevil tightrope walker Nik Wallenda is setting his sights on a new goal: the nearly 1,000-foot deep Tallulah Gorge in the northeast Georgia mountains. The Georgia gorge holds special meaning for Wallenda, since his great-grandfather Karl Wallenda crossed it on a high wire on July 18, 1970. “To be able to walk literally in his footsteps is what my life’s about,” said Nik Wallenda, who discussed the idea in an interview hours after he crossed a 100-foot-high tightrope inside the Georgia Dome in Atlanta on Feb. 8. Nik Wallenda says he’s already vis ited the gorge near the Georgia town of Tallulah Falls, and he’s considering attempting the feat within the next three years. “Hopefully we can make it happen,” Wallenda told the AP. The Georgia gorge walk would add to accomplishments that include his tele vised crossing of Niagara Falls in June 2012 that gained international attention. Last year, he crossed the Little Colorado River Gorge in the Grand Canyon area of Arizona. After his crossing of the gorge, Karl Wallenda later plunged to his death while trying to walk a cable between two buildings in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1978.SOCHI SCENE: Loser gets Bieber? CHICAGO — Looks like the U.S. gets Justin Bieber. At least, one Chicago-area company thinks so. Command Transportation this week put up an electronic sign along one of the area’s major expressways that featured pictures of U.S. and Canadian hockey players with the headline, “Loser Keeps Bieber.” The pop star is a Canada native but lives in the United States. The Americans lost 1-0 to the Canadians on Friday at the Sochi Olympics. The sign had a picture of Chicago Blackhawks stars Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews (pronounced Tayvz). Kane plays for the U.S. and Toews plays for Canada. A picture of pop star Justin Bieber was in between the hockey players. Command Transportation owner Danny Zamost says he often puts sports-themed messages on his sign. “Good, clean fun,” he calls it.265 Anne Frank books vandalized in Tokyo TOKYO — Anne Frank’s “The Diary of a Young Girl” and scores of books about the young Holocaust victim have been vandalized in Tokyo public libraries since earlier this year. The damage was mostly in the form of dozens of ripped pages in the books. Librarians have counted at least 265 damaged books at 31 municipal libraries since the end of January. Japan and Nazi Germany were allies in World War II, and though Holocaust denial has occurred in Japan at times, the motive for damaging the Anne Frank books is unclear. Police are investigating. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga called the vandalism “shameful” and said Japan would not tolerate such acts. The New York-based Anti-Defamation League, a civil rights group fighting anti-Semitism, praised Suga’s remarks. The league’s national director, Abraham Foxman, called for a full inves tigation and asked Japan’s government “ to carefully consider if this act of disre spect for the memory of the millions of Jewish victims who lost their lives in the Holocaust requires a new look at educa tional initiatives regarding the Holocaust and anti-Semitism.” He said that while there has been some history of “journalistic and literary anti-Semitism in Japan, these kinds of incidents are in fact quite rare.” Scripture of the Day “Love has been perfected among us in this: that we may have boldness in the day of judg ment; because as He is, so are we in this world. There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love. We love Him because He first loved us.” — 1 John 4:17-19 Thought for Today Change might not be fastDQGLWLVQWDOZD\VHDV\But with time and effort,almost any habit can be reshaped.— Charles Duhigg, New York Times staff writer (born 1974) Q Associated Press

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Jean S. GodowskiMrs. Jean S. Godowski, 76, passed away February 14, 2014 in Lake City, Florida. She was born to the late Thomas Milford and Lillian Milligan-Mil ford, February 23, 1937, in Iselin, New Jersey. Jean was a member of the Ladies Auxilia ry American Legion Post 57 in Lake City, FL and VFW post 2636 in Iselin, New Jersey. She loved to go shopping and spending time with her family. Mrs. Godowski is pre-deceased by two Brothers, William Milford, Donald Milford; two Sisters, Alberta Nemeth and Ruth Curtis. Jean Godowski is survived by her Loving Husband Richard Godowski of Lake City, FL; three Daughters, Debbie Turi of Spotswood, NJ, Jackie White of Kingsley, PA, Kathleen Hicks of San Antonio, TX; DaughterN-Laws, Dawn Ackerman of Chesilhurst, NJ, Kathleen Bennett, Gilroy, CA, Jackie Burke of South River, NJ; two Sisters; Gail Vining of Lake City, FL, Joan Milford of West Bend, WI; two Brothers, Richard Milford of Toms River, NJ, Edward Milford of Rahway, NJ; one Neice, CherCurtis, Micheal Milford, Nicholas Milford, Jason Vining; eight Grandchildren, Deanna Turi, Ryan Ackerman, Kaitlin Ackerman, Corrin Ackerman, Cobi White, Roselin Stiles, Michael Thomas Stiles and Daniel Burke. The family requests no services at this time; a private memorial will be held at a later date. Arrangements trusted to ICS CREMATION AND FUNERAL HOME 357 NW Wilks Lane Lake City, FL 32205 386-752-336. www.icsfuneralservices.com Leslie Ann MorrowMs. Leslie Ann Morrow, 27 of Lake City, passed away on Thursday, February 20, 2014 at the Lake City Medical Center following a brief illness. Leslie was born in Gulfport, Mississippi and had lived in Lake City for the past 8 years. Leslie was a graduate of the Hope Christian School in Tampa, FL, class of 2004. She was currently working as the Assistant Manager at the Quality Inn of Lake City. She loved spending time with her two nephews who had her heart and helping special needs children. Survivors include her father and mother, Buddy and Karen Morrow; two sisters, Danielle Williams and Heather Morrow; and two nephews, Jeremiah and Christopher Williams all of Lake City. Funeral services for Ms. Morrow will be conducted on Monday, February 24, 2014 at 2:00 PM at the Tabernacle Baptist Church with Pastor Mike Norating. Private interment will follow at Friendship Baptist Church Cemetery in Jasper. Visitation with the family will be from 1-2:00 PM, one hour prior to the service at the church on Monday. be made in memory of Leslie Ann Morrow to, The Gabriel Home, 6900 Daniels Parkway, Suite 29 Box 384, Ft. Myers, FL 33912. Arrangements are under the direction of GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. Please sign the guestbook at www.guerryfuneralhome.netRonald Wayne Sapp, Jr.Mr. Ronald Wayne Sapp, Jr, 33, of Lake Butler, passed away suddenly on February 18, 2014 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Ronald was born in Jacksonville, FL on May 9, 1980 to Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. and Regina Grace Price. Ronald lived most of his life in the Lake City area, having moved to Lake Butler eight years ago. Ronald was an avid time with his family, especially his kids. Ronald was a carpen ter in the construction industry. Ronald is survived by his father: Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. of Callahan; mother: Regina Grace White Michelle Lobenthal of Lake Butler; sons: Brandon Wayne Sapp of Lake Butler; Jacob Allen Sapp of Lake City and Kage Brady Sapp of Lake Butler; daughters: Christian Alese Harvey of Wellborn and Lana Darlene Sapp of Lake Butler; two step-sons: Sean Lobenthal and Kaleb Renaldi both of Lake Butler; brother: Richard Lee Sapp (Chelsea) of Branford and sister: Robin Renee Sapp of Orlando also survive. Memorial services for Mr. Sapp will be conducted on Tuesday February 25, 2014 in the chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home with Rev. John ments are under the care of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME of Lake City, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL, 32025. Please sign the online guestbook at www. parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comPatricia Ann SedberryMrs. Patricia Ann Sedberry, 76, passed away peacefully at St. Marys Hospital in Huntington WV on February 11, 2014. She was born in Indianapolis, Ind. on August 11, 1937 to Furman Danner and Virginia Niles Danner. Patricia was preceded in death by her husband Gene T. Sedberry. Pat married her husband and raised her children in Fort Lauderdale, FL and moved to Lake City when Gene retired from the FLPD. They moved to Barbousville, WV a few years later and Pat returned to Lake City after his death. Left to cherish her memory are her children Mike Sedberry (Zelda) of Hurricane, WV and Patricia Daly of Lake City, FL. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Kristan Daly, Matthew Daly and Lauren Daly. The family would like to thank Dr. Todd Gress and Dr. Mike Collins for their caring treat ment throughout her illness. A memorial service will be held at Dees Parrish Funeral Home in Lake City, FL on Monday, February 24 at 4:00p.m. in the chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home, with to the Columbia Association of Retarded Citizens, 512 SW Sisters Welcome Road, Lake City, FL 32025 in honor of her granddaughter, Kristan Daly. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL, 32025. Please sign the guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comObituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-04 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2014 3A 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL(Next to Courthouse) WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Daina Greene, MDBoard Certied Healthcare ProviderMarlene Summers, CNM SPECIALIZING IN: Womens health and Primary CareNew Patients WelcomeCall today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries.Lauren Williams, ARNP Dr. Greg Borganelli is retiring.He would like to thank all the people of Lake City, Live Oak and surrounding communities for their continued trust and support over the years. He would like to introduce Dr. Allison Johnston, who is a well trained pediatric dentist. She will be taking over all pediatric dental services for Dr. Borganelli. The entire staff (Suzanne, Nadine, Sandi, Kristin, Cindy, Laci, Shannon and Jan) will remain in the practice and look forward to working with Dr. Johnston and your family. WILSONS OUTFITTERSWilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Yeti Coolers & Case Knives (In Stock)10% off Giant Reef Sandal Sale...25%-30%off Giant Reef Sandal Sale...25%-30% Camo Tervis Tumblers Edgar L. Redish Happy Birthday#88We Love You!Daddy, Poppy, Brother and Friend Off to the races at the Doxie DerbyBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comDachshund dapple, long haired, smooth coats, wire, black and tan, red or brown and three sizes in the variety were the stars of the day at the Columbia County Fairgrounds livestock area Saturday. With names like Roxie, Dax, Oscar, Gracie or Teddy Woo-Woo, it appeared as though the short-legged, long-bodied dogs were destined for stardom from birth. It wasnt Dog Day Afternoon, but it could have been called Dachshund Day. Instead it was the Columbia County Doxie Derby where the small dogs competed in a variety of contests for fundraisers. The purpose of todays event was just to have a great time, good family fun and also fundraising for Covenant Pet Trust and DARE dogs and rescue. (Dachshund Adoption Rescue and Education), said Judy Delbene, a Columbia County Doxie Derby coordinator. Event organizers said 40-50 dogs competed in the days events and of the hundreds of people who attended the event, Delbene said about 70-80 percent appeared to have brought their dachshunds. Saturdays event marked the second time a Doxie Derby has been held in the area. The last time, the Doxie Derby took place at North Florida Animal Rescue. Ive participated in these events on a national basis with my dogs and we just had fun, she said. We enjoyed it and we brought it to this area to have fun, too. In addition to the fundraising, the event offered the opportunity for one pet owner to participate in a National Doxie Derby. Karin Slifker, of Orlando, and her dog, Roxie, claimed that honor by besting the field as the pooches raced throughout the day. Slifker has a right to travel to Findlay, Ohio, to participate in the National Dachshund Races. Photos by TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterA trio of Dachshunds race in the Columbia County Doxie Derby Saturday afternoon at the Columbia County Fairgrounds livestock area. An estimated 40-50 dogs participated in contests throughout the day during the fundraiser. Dr. Debbie Griffin (left) presents Karin Slifker and her dog, Roxie, with an award and ribbon after Roxie won her race, earning an opportunity to compete in the National Dachshund Races in Findlay, Ohio.Feb. 24Aglow LighthouseThe Lake City Aglow Lighthouse will hold their monthly meeting on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the New Beginnings of Life Church, 184 Windswept Glen. Pastor Charm Green will be the guest speaker. Call Polly at 386935-4018 or Annette at 386-497-2033 for more. CALENDAR Educational meetingSave Our Suwannee, Inc. will host a free, education meeting at the High Springs Community Center, 330 NW Santa Fe Blvd., on Monday, Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. Guest speakers Allen W. Hodges and Tatiana Borisova will give a presentation entitled, Significant Economic Contribution of Springs. The meeting is open to the public.

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T here was a need and they went. They dropped what they were doing and they answered the call. It was that simple. Friday morning’s van crash on Interstate 75 was another terrible, tragic freeway wreck. Adults, chil-dren, and a church group from First Baptist Church of New Port Richey, no less. A church group. Headed for a joyful time at camp, but affected by a brutal example of bad things hap-pening to good people. It was an awful scene.Our first responders from all branches of law enforcement, med-ical responders, fire departments and emergency crews from all local departments got there in seconds and did their job with amazing pro-fessionalism. We expect that, and be honest, we all take it for granted as citizens. When their job takes them to a mass casualty, it takes things up a notch and shows us just how fortunate we are to have this group working for us in Lake City and Columbia County. What happened next was the proverbial “more to the story.” About two hours after the crash, it became evident the story we were covering was much more than a wreck. Our quick commu-nity response became the story. Local ministers, citizen volunteers and several restaurant own-ers in Lake City all answered the call as word of the wreck filtered through town. They all did so immediately and without thought for everything else on their sched-ules. The outpouring of pastors from many different churches was amaz-ing. Also, there were professionals from the nearby Lake City Medical Center, business people, and local restaurants providing food and drinks for the shocked and strand-ed youth traveling on another bus in the caravan. Some volunteers who showed up to help were there to listen, a shoulder to cry on. Some served food and drinks. Others prayed. Regardless of the need, Lake City people were there to meet it. We all know that’s what we’re all supposed to do — step up and help. But, seeing the few who acted and hearing the stories of individu-als making a specific and detailed connection with these victims reso-nated as truth. Knowing that these people who were in action share our community as home was mov-ing in itself. As you read on our front page today, the volunteers realized they didn’t know any of these traumatized people they helped. They probably will never see them again in this life. But, volunteers answered the call when they were needed and they made a positive difference. Sometimes you only get one chance to do the right thing. A win-dow of opportunity opens for only a few moments, a need arises. On Friday morning, our Lake City vol-unteers — clergy and others — set the right example for all of us. OPINION Sunday, February 23, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Tend to county business first Volunteers set example in crisis I f the county commission wants to spend money in Fort White, we’re all for it. There’s plenty of opportunity in southern Columbia County, both in infrastructure and elsewhere. Roads come to mind, for instance. Just keeping them properly graded and in good repair would be more than welcome to residents there. What about flood control?Some much-needed cash might go a long way toward at least easing a continual problem in Three Rivers Estates and elsewhere in southern Columbia County. But first things first.Before the county authorizes more large capital outlays of any kind, it should tend to current business. Namely, the ongoing nightmare that is the Bascom Norris connector road project. Every day this multi-million dollar, decade-long project remains unfinished, the bill goes up by thousands, and costly change orders appear to be never-ending. On Thursday commissioners acknowledged yet another new Bascom Norris bill, this one in the amount of $214,000. It’s still not clear just how much this deba-cle will cost us before it’s finally over. Let’s settle our accounts there first.Once that project is finally put to rest, the good citizens of southern Columbia County deserve to have at least $200,000 spent there to improve their quality of life – on roads, flood control or whatever they see fit. The county is flush with cash. Commissioners should either spend some of it – but only in areas that fall under their jurisdiction as a taxing entity – or roll back the millage and start taking less from the hard working folks of this area. We fully support any needed improvements at any public school in Columbia County. However, the school district is a mighty taxing authority in its own right. Simply put, it needs to live within its means. Since November, the county has spent more than $500,000 on improvements to county schools. Commissioners voted to spend $200,000 in upgrades to the Columbia High softball field because, they said, it would promote sports tourism. Presumably, the championship games of travel-league tournaments will be played there once it’s finished. Then came CHS football. Another $140,000 went to resodding the field, said to be in terrible shape. That will pay off one day too, we’re told, once other elements of the stadium are refurbished and we start luring statewide track meets to Columbia County. Then, on Thursday, just over $224,000 for locker rooms at Fort White High. The Columbia County School District is nearly broke, and while the county sees it as its responsibility to step in, we think they are going about it the wrong way. A no-interest loan would have sufficed nicely in all these instances. Commissioners should put election year politics on hold and tend to county business first. Parting words from econ chief To the Editor:I thought it would be appropriate for me to express my appreciation to the Columbia County community for allowing me and my family the opportunity to call Lake City home these past couple years. Linda, Peyton and I have thoroughly enjoyed being a part of the Lake City/Columbia County community and will miss the abundance of good things that we all enjoy here in North Florida. I arrived here in December 2012 and commuted back and forth to Alabama until June 2013, when my youngest son, Peyton finished his sophomore high school year in Alabama. I’m really proud of him and the adjustment he’s made to Columbia High School where it looks like he’ll be graduating with honors in just a few more months. In 2012 I believed strongly that Columbia County had a unique opportunity to be very successful in attracting new growth and develop-ment. Maybe I was a little nave in thinking that this was almost a given but I still feel the same way in 2014. Certainly, it is important to recognize and understand the real-ity that change is never easy and almost always resisted. The dif-ficulties of running a new economic development department proved to be a real challenge but were ulti-mately overcome. The Economic Development Department is a county department and designed to function by work-ing with an Advisory Board with ultimate authority resting with the Board of County Commissioners. If my math is correct, the chain of command from the depart-ment level all the way through the Economic Development Advisory Board, Division Manager, County Manager and Board of County Commissioners, includes about 15 people. Communicating in this envi-ronment is cumbersome and diffi-cult to say the least but, I think, this obstacle was overcome as well. The Economic Development Advisory Board made my job a plea-sure. I can’t say enough good about the citizens who volunteer their time and give a lot of effort and energy to serve on the Economic Development Advisory Board. These folks are important members of our community and deserve to be applauded for their selfless, servant attitudes. Over the last two years I have had the pleasure of working with most all of our existing indus-try here in Columbia County. Hopefully, these relationships will continue to be built and even closer ties will exist in the future. Target Distribution, U.S. Cold Storage, Timco, New Millenium, Mayo Fertilizer and others represent hundreds of millions of dollars in capital investment in this com-munity and employ our friends and neighbors. Their future looks awfully bright. In addition, the healthcare and aviation sectors in our community hold a great deal of promise and growth potential going forward. One of the primary reasons I chose to work in Columbia County was the unique partnership the community has with Plum Creek. Large, privately held industrial sites are rare and offer huge potential for development and new job creation. Plum Creek has been a fantastic partner throughout this region but especially to Columbia County. They have invested many millions of dollars in the preparation of their 2,600-acre industrial site. I have no doubt that great things will happen at the NFIP. The Columbia County community should be proud of their partnership with Plum Creek and thrilled to be the home of the North Florida Intermodal Park. In conclusion, I have been blessed beyond belief to have met and developed friendships with so many here in Lake City and throughout the region. If you all continue to work together and encourage one another this commu-nity has unlimited potential. Sincere best wishes,Jesse W. Quillen LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter.4AOPINION

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STEVEN RICHMOND/ Lake City ReporterPictured is Swihart’s Knight medal of the French Legion of Honor. The order was established by Napoleon Bonaparte on May 19, 1802 and is the highest honor bestowed by the French Republic. Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 5A Despite his extensive achievements and ser vice, Swihart accepted the award with humility. “I’m delighted, but I don’t know that I partic ularly deserve it. There are maybe others that are more deserving than I am,” Swihart said. “There was nothing that I personally did that was spectacular. I didn’t kill any Germans with my bayonet, but I helped get the bombers to the targets.” He also reflected on the place veterans hold in modern society. “I think [people] owe a certain debts to veterans,” Swihart said. “We’re different from politicians, because the politicians go in and sit down in an office someplace, whereas a veteran puts or has put his life on the line. This is something people should recognize, and I think people do. It’s a part of patrio tism.” SWIHARTContinued From 1A all, nearly 60 people need ed someplace to stay until they could return home. Roberts said volunteers from Lake City Medical Center, Southside Baptist Church, Hopeful Baptist Church, Parkview Baptist Church, Old Providence Baptist Church and Christ Central Ministries were there within 90 minutes to offer whatever help was needed. “They were volunteer ing to begin the process of praying with, encourag ing, feeding and helping to see whatever needs were present and to be able to meet those needs as we could,” Roberts said. Local restaurants Arbys, Chick-fil-A, Subway, and Hungry Howies provided food for the crash victims. Michelle Moore, Lake City Medical Center direc tor of marketing, said that throughout the day LCMC employees dropped off food and checked on the trav elers at the Beulah Baptist Association office. “The Lake City Medical Center provided break fast, lunch and snacks for the church members who were at the Beulah Baptist Association office waiting for family members to arrive as well as getting updates on their friends and loved ones who had been involved in the acci dent,” she said. Mike Tatem, Parkview Baptist Church pastor, said he went to the Beulah Baptist Association office while survivors were wait ing for their friends to be discharged from the hos pital. He said they provided food and counseling for the group. “They’re a youth group heading out to go to camp and all of a sudden they have a tragedy like this, where you don’t know the extent of the damage done to their group and their leaders — I just went to be some kind of moral sup port for them if they need ed a shoulder to cry on or they needed somebody to talk to,” Tatem said. “We just wanted to be there because in times like that it’s nice to have like-mind ed people around. “I was just amazed at the response of our com munity,” Tatem continued, explaining how Lake City Medical Center staff and local businesses responded to the tragedy. “I could just stand there and serve sweet tea to some of these kids who were hurting and griev ing. I was able to do that because of the businesses in our community and the way they responded.” Roberts said the gener ous show of support from area churches may serve as an example for some of the young people involved in the crash. “Some of these young people, for them, this was probably their first expe rience with a real trage dy and out of that I hope they were able to see how the faith community responds,” he said. The larger group on the chartered bus spent approximately six hours at the Beulah Baptist Association office before getting back on the road, while another group remained at the building for more than eight hours. Roberts said he had many thoughts on seeing area residents in the local community come togeth er to help the youngsters begin the healing process. “There were a couple of different denominations represented and that says to me that we don’t have to agree on every point of theology to labor togeth er,” he said. “It’s always encouraging to see folk roll up their sleeves and get the job done.” Dustin Busscher and Jeff Hogan, from Christ Central, were among a contingent of local church representatives who went to the Lake City Medical Center to offer spiritual and moral support to victims. Busscher said while at the hospital he met some one from First Baptist Church of New Port Richey who had just told the group about the confirmed fatali ties from the crash. “We just prayed togeth er,” he said. “None of their team felt like they could pray aloud at that moment so I just prayed for peace,” Busscher said. Busscher, who said he has more than 12 years experience as a youth min ister, said it was important to be there for the crash victims. “We are the body of Christ, which means we are all one church. There is only one Jesus and only one heaven and that’s where we’re all going and we need to reach out and help each other,” he said. “I know that their pastor was on his way and they had tons of support, but it wasn’t here. Even though I never met them and I’ll probably never see them again, it was just the right thing to do — to help other churches in need, really to help anybody in need, but especially a fel low church.” Rodney Baker, pastor of Hopeful Baptist Church, was also at the hospital to help comfort crash vic tims. “We knew there was hurt and we knew there was need,” he said. “This group of young people was going to a youth camp and I just thought we should go there and minister and love on the youth pastor and kids. It’s really a ministry of presence, just being there letting people know you will do anything they need just to pray with them.” Baker said he and some other local pastors prayed with the First Baptist Church of New Port Richey youth minister. Baker said he also spent time talking to and pray ing with man who drove from New Port Richey to comfort his daughter fol lowing the crash. Baker said the man told him, “The ones that passed away are happy in heaven and it’s us that are suffering here.” “He was making refer ence to his wife because his wife was one of the ones who had passed away,” Baker said. “He said he drove all the way from New Port Richey to com fort his daughter, because his wife – her mother – had just passed away.” HELPContinued From 1Amile marker, near the U.S. 90 on ramp. The entrance ramp to northbound I-75 from westbound U.S. 90 and two northbound lanes of I-75 were closed for about two hours following the wreck. According to FHP, Novak was northbound in the center lane in a 2002 Ford E-350 van when the tread separated from the left rear tire. The van trav eled onto the east shoul der of the roadway and overturned. According to FHP, “several” of the vehi cle’s occupants were ejected. Pace said FHP crash investigators have not yet deter mined how many times the van flipped, but it came to final rest on its left side. “It’s unknown at this time until inves tigators can get more in-depth with the investi gation to figure it out,” she said. The remaining passen gers, Oliver Newman, 12, New Port Richey; Jared Gress, 14, Odessa; Eric Paules, 12, Trinity; Corinn Salliotte, 16, New Port Richey; and Sherri Paules, 45, Trinity, were taken to the Lake City Medical Center with minor injuries. Most were treated and released. Corinn Salliotte is the daughter of Michalanne Salliotte, who died in the crash, local church offi cials said. Novak’s daughter, 18, was a passenger on a char ter bus that was accom panying the van but not involved in the accident. Pace said the two women in the van were just travel ing with their children. Pace said Novak is the regular church van driver. David Boozer, Columbia County Fire Department Chief, was one of the first to arrive at the scene. “When I got there, there were a lot of teenagers spread out across the area in a close proximity of the van,” he said. “A major ity of them were sitting together just comforting one another.” He said many of the teens appeared to be in shock. “Bless their hearts, they were having to deal with a lot in a short amount of time,” he said, noting some had minor injuries such as bruises, bumps and scrapes. Boozer said a few Good Samaritan motorists stopped to help as best they could. Pace said first respond ers handled the scene well. “A unified effort got those kids out of here and where they needed to be quickly and efficiently,” she said. Vehicles from the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office and the Lake City Police Department blocked the on ramp as FHP conducted the crash investigation. Firefighters and two tow truck drivers remained at the scene and quietly gath ered crash victims’ person al items such as jackets, blankets, CDs and pillows and put them back in the van. Sandy Tice, Chances for Children child advocate, helped counsel some of the young crash victims. “You had a lot of kids that were extremely upset wor rying about their friends, the adults, the kids at the hospital and also wanting their parents because of how upset they were,” she said. “It was difficult to see children that upset and to see children afraid, but they had a lot of good people working with them today from the sheriff’s office, fire department, local youth pastors and the pastors that were with them. I think every child was able to talk through their fears, contact parents and they left where they were not basically still in a state of shock.” Boozer said a charter bus traveling with the van was ahead of it when the wreck occurred. When the van crashed, the charter bus returned and later went to the Beulah Baptist Association office, across the street from the Lake City Medical Center, where many of the crash victims with minor injuries were taken for treatment. Three local restaurants — Arbys, Chick-fil-A, Subway and Hungry Howies — provided food, as the Beulah Baptist Association office became a stag ing area for crash vic tims waiting for their families. Lake City Medical Center employees also provided food and checked in on the travelers at the Beulah Baptist Association office. The charter bus was carrying approximately 53 additional people. “The community really came together,” Boozer said. “The area’s churches stepped up and took care of this church and its youth group. I was just amazed at the outpouring. It’s nice to know that’s what our com munity is made of.” CRASHContinued From 1ATire failure can have many causes By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.com A tire malfunction has been listed as the primary cause of a traffic crash that claimed the lives of two New Port Richey residents traveling in a church van here Friday. According to safercar. gov, underinflated tires and overloaded vehicles are the leading causes of tire failure. The website suggests motorists check their tire pressure at least once per month. What caused the tire failure in this case is unknown. Manufacturing defects can often be the culprit as well. Sgt. Tracy Hisler-Pace, Florida Highway Patrol Troop B public informa tion officer, said if some one were to experience a tire malfunction while driv ing, the first thing they should do is remain calm. “You don’t want to slam on your brakes and you don’t want to swerve off the road immediately,” she said. Depending on circum stances, the situation may be out of the driver’s hands. Still, Pace said take remove your foot from the accelerator and allow the vehicle to slow down. When it’s safe enough to do so, start attempting to move the vehicle off the roadway and onto either the shoulder or emergen cy lane, so the vehicle can come to a complete stop. She suggested motor ists check their tires reg ularly for tire pressure and inflate them to the manu facturer’s suggested levels as well as look for signs of wear. “Look for wear and tear and see whether the tread appears to be in good condition,” she said. “Motorists should look for things that may be in their tire like some type of a nail and you want to make sure nothing has punctured the tire which could contrib ute to compromising the integrity of the tire.” From staff reports Director Leroy Clark will hold auditions for High Springs Community Theater’s production of “PROOF,” by David Auburn, on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 24-25 at 7 p.m. Auditions are open to the public. There are roles for two men and two women: Catherine (25) is an emo tionally-fragile math genius; Claire (29) is Catherine’s sister and a selfish, con trolling career woman. Robert, their father, is a famous math genius gone mad. Hal (28) is a genuinely sweet graduate student and nerd. Performance dates are April 11 – May 4. Auditions Monday Tire maintenance tips and what to do should your tire fail on the road. ‘The community really came together... The area’s churches stepped up and took care of this church and its youth group. I was just amazed at the outpouring. It’s nice to know that’s what our community is made of.’ — David Boozer, Columbia County Fire Department Chief WHAT TO DO Q Remain calmQ Don’t slam on brakesQ Don’t swerve off roadQ Stop accelerating and allow vehicle to slow downMaintenanceQ Look for signs of wearQ Check tire pressure monthly

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Florida cows aren’t just for the beefBy AVALYN HUNTERSpecial to the Reporter FORT WHITE A sk someone a question about Florida agricultur al products, and chances are he won’t say “milk.” While the state has had a cattle industry since the days when it was a Spanish colony, it has largely focused on beef cattle. Nonetheless, Florida does have a siz able dairy industry as well, with many farms passing through genera tions of the same family. The men and women who run these farms are proud of their work, their stewardship of the land, and their heritage — a heritage Wayne Oelfke is working to pass to another generation at Fort White High School. This year, Oelfke saw his work beginning to bear fruit with Fort White’s first-ever dairy exhibition team, which represented the school at the recent Florida State Fair. Dairy farming runs deep in Oelfke’s blood. A fourth-generation farmer who grew up on a family dairy in Ohio, he and his family ran a Florida dairy operation for some 25 years. Along the way, the Oelfkes were named 2002 Dairy Farm Family of the Year at the 39th annual Florida Dairy Production Conference and received numerous other awards. Oeflke is no longer involved in hands-on dairy farming, as he and his wife sold their herd in 2007. But Oelfke (who hold degrees in educa tion and animal science) remains involved in the industry as a teacher after a brief stint at the Dairy Research Center of the University of Florida. And, like fellow agricul tural sciences teacher Jill Huesman, he puts in a lot of extra hours working with the school’s FFA chapters. Fort White’s FFA stu dents are no strangers to top company. Both the middle and high school chapters earned three-star ratings, the highest pos sible, from the national organization for the 2012-2013 school year. They have also done well in past competitions at the state fair, particularly with swine. This year, FFA members Rebecca Bailey, Kimberly Bailey, Mark Conners, Danielle Wooley, Taylor Gebo, Taylor Miller, and Caleb Cribbs exhibited swine at the fair, coming away with five blue ribbons and five red ribbons between them. Austin Maddox and Alison DeLoach haven’t wasted any time bringing the new dairy exhibition team up to the same stan dard. After showing the grand champion heifer and reserve grand cham pion heifer, respectively, at the Columbia County Fair last November, the two stepped up to state fair competition and came away with honors. Competing against exhibi tors from across the state at the Youth Dairy Show for active FFA and 4-H members, Maddox and DeLoach both finished in the top 10 in dairy showmanship, while their animals finished in the top five in their classes. They and their teammates from two other FFA chapters in their region also received numerous compliments from visitors (including members of the state’s agriculture department) on the cleanliness and attractiveness of their sec tion of the barn and the care and presentation of their animals. “It’s great to get that kind of respect for a new program,” Oelfke said. “It took a lot of effort from the students. They were up every morning by 5:30 and they were usually at the barn until nine or ten at night. They have every right to take pride in what they accomplished and they have stirred up a lot of interest among their fellow students.” Oelfke is quick to deflect any credit for his teaching as part of his stu dents’ success. “They did it themselves,” he said. “They spent I don’t know how many hours washing, clipping, grooming and training their heifers, as well as keeping record books, studying animal health, and preparing talks on vaccinations and the use of antibiotics in livestock management. A lot of credit goes to the kindness of Alliance Dairies in Trenton, Florida, as well; they’re the ones who made good-quality heifer calves available to lease to us.” Despite Oelfke’s mod esty, teachers like him are a necessity in modern agriculture, which to him is a showcase for applied science and mathemat ics. “You can’t get by in agriculture these days without a working knowl edge of science and math these days,” he explained. “For example, if a soil chemistry analysis comes back recommending the application of 20 pounds of nitrogen to the acre of your farm and you are using a 20-10-10 fertilizer (20 percent nitrogen, 10 percent phosphate, 10 percent potash), you have to calculate how many pounds of nitrogen a given bag has and from that, how many bags you will need to make the rec ommended application. Running a dairy farm requires a good knowl edge of business math as being able to understand and use soil science, basic genetics, nutrition science, and scientific animal management prac tices.” Like most modern farmers, Oelfke also understands the impor tance of running sustain able, environmentally friendly farming oper ations and tries to pass this on to his students as well. “We’re currently working on a research project on managing fertilizer and water for the Nutrients for Life’s Helping Communities Grow outreach program and on an aquaponics project in which we raise tilapia and use the waste water to fertilize and sustain a hydroponics garden,” he said. “We’re also working on setting up a greenhouse to supply greens and vegetables for school lunches.” Oelfke knows that not many of his students will stay in agriculture throughout their adult lives. The work is physically demanding, and when animals are involved, a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week commitment is required. Nonetheless, he believes that the study of agricul ture teaches his students important life lessons. “There’s no better place to learn a good work ethic,” he says. “And the lessons they learn in leadership, research, and public speaking from participating in FFA – those stick around for life. Seeing my students learn and apply those lessons makes me glad that I’m a teacher.” Fort White FFA students take dairy exhibition to state fair. ANDREA BAGBY /Special to the ReporterAustin Maddox and Alison Deloach show their prize-winning Holstein heifers at the State Fair. By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com While the national real estate market hit an 18-month low in January, housing sales in Columbia County saw a year-over-year boost last month. Closed sales in the coun ty rose to 37 in January, a modest increased over 30 the same time last year. Pending sales also rose from 32 in January 2013 to 43 in January 2014, slightly above the monthly average for the past three years. “[Closed] sales have been creeping up and pend ing sales are up—that’s a good sign,” Dan Gherna of the Lake City Board of Realtors said. Although the number of new listings (75) is at its highest point since October, there was still an 8.5 per cent reduction compared to January of last year—“a good sign,” Gherna said. “It’s simple supply and demand,” he added. “Less inventory and a tighter mar ket indicates prices may rise due to lack of competition.” However, for January at least, median ($100,000) and average ($102,046) sale pric es were both down from last year’s January numbers and below the average for 2013. The National Association of Realtors reported January home sales nation wide were at their lowest level since July 2012. Media analysts chalked up the poor national report to a bevy of winter storms and inclement weather that froze out investors and new homebuyers—factors that didn’t play a significant role in local numbers.Higher housing sales than nation

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In a prepared statement, the Florida Department of Health said it will follow the law and not speculate on any future action. However, information on how the legalization of medical marijuana might be implemented can be gleaned from the proposed amendment language. Q&A 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com With an amendment to legal ize medicinal marijuana on November’s ballot, Florida has a strong possibility of becoming the first Southern state to allow doc tors to treat debilitating conditions with the drug. The Florida Supreme Court approved wording on Jan. 27 that will appear as a ballot ini tiative during the midterm elec tions later this year. According to a poll by Connecticut-based Quinnipac University released last November, 82 percent of Florida voters support legal izing marijuana for medical purposes. Already 20 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medici nal cannabis, including Alaska, Oregon, Maine, Illinois, Delaware and Montana. Florida’s Amendment 2 requires a 60 percent majority vote to become law. While polls show most Floridians want to see medic inal marijuana win approval this November, law enforce ment gener ally remains opposed. The Florida Sheriff’s Association has taken a formal posi tion against passage. Both the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office and the Lake City Police Department believe the legalization of medicinal marijuana could present operation al problems for enforcement. Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter took a stand against the amendment. “I think it’s a slippery slope,” Hunter said. “We’ve got 20 other states who have tried this and they’re suffering the effects right now.” Too many unknownsBoth Hunter and University of Florida pharmacy professor Paul Doering stated that the amend ment as it stands now leaves too much up in the air. Will children need parental consent? How will the state regulate the health issues required to acquire medicinal mar ijuana? Does the drug even work? Who will sell it? How will it be mon itored? How will employers handle drug tests? “It’s so easy to say: ‘We ought to make marijuana legal so we can help people with debilitating dis eases get better.’ Who is going to argue with that?” Doering said. “At the same time, somebody needs to figure out how to con trol it so it doesn’t get into the wrong hands.” Lake City Police chief Argatha Gilmore said the legalized drug use could cause the department to re-evaluate a number of protocols that are in place for people under the influence of various drugs. “I believe the decision that has been made to take issue before the citizens for a vote is the right decision,” Gilmore said by email. “I, like most of my fellow police chiefs, are waiting to see what the out comes of these decisions are. But whatever the deci sion may be, we stand ready to make the appropriate adjust ments to keep our community safe.” While Gilmore is uncertain if the amendment will pass, she believes Lake City residents would not be in favor of legalizing medical marijuana. A ‘glimmer of hope’United for Care campaign man ager Ben Pollara said marijuana is a pretty safe substance — no one on record has ever overdosed or died from the drug. “There are certain people who are prescribed pain medicine who become addicted, but I think that comparison with marijuana is something of a stretch,” he said. “There isn’t a lot of opposition in medical marijuana in Florida. It’s much more difficult to find some one who is against this...” According to Pollara, much of the criticism comes from large anti-drug groups. Their arguments, he said, tend to be against marijuana in gen eral and not the drug as a medicine. United for Care, the group that got the measure placed on the November ballot, said there are thousands of suffering individuals in Florida who are desperate for another treatment option. They’ve already tried traditional pain med ication and may even have con sulted their doctor about medici nal marijuana, he said. However, they are presented with the fear of being labeled a criminal should they test the drug’s capabilities. “For a lot of people, marijuana presents a glimmer of hope that may make their lives better,” Pollara said. “They just want the option of trying it. It may work, it may not.” FDA process of approvalThere exists within the Federal Drug Administration a process of approval before a medication finds its way to pharmaceutical shelves, Doering said. Drugs are usually not approved based on anecdotes, expe rience or beliefs, but on scientific fact. “It’s like the opposite of the legal system,” he said. “In drug approval language, the drug is ineffective or unsafe until proven otherwise.” While Doering believes the can nabis plant has potential beneficial qualities, he would say the same for most plants. However, the near ly limitless number of marijuana strains complicates legitimate sci entific study. Each plant type — for example, Gainesville Green or Purple Haze — has different array of chemicals. The medical community is split, he said, but most likely not down the middle. Most scientists and researchers would say medicinal weed is not a good thing. Following doctor’s orders“I just think most people have come to the belief that if your doc tor advises you to seek a course of treatment — whether it’s exercise, yoga, a multivitamin or marijuana — then you should be able to fol low their recommendations without being a criminal,” Pollara said. “A lot of people who aren’t marijuana fans, who don’t believe it should be legal, are for medical marijuana.” Medical marijuana can be smoked, ingested, or applied as a lotion. People find that it can ease pain, control nausea, stimulate the appetite and encourage relaxation. However, the Office of National Drug Control Policy states marijuana is a schedule I drug, meaning it has a high potential for abuse and not currently accepted medical use in the United States. “Technically speaking, marijua na is still illegal by federal law,” Doering said. “If the feds wanted to do so, they could come down with a heavy hand.” By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE — Delbert Mullins is among Columbia County’s strongest supporters of Florida’s medical marijuana initiative, having been jailed by local authorities in 2011 for growing and smoking his own marijuana to treat his chronic illnesses. A disabled 64-year-old Vietnam-era veteran, Delbert Mullins was arrested on Aug. 10, 2011 after airborne law enforcement officials spotted two mar ijuana plants growing in the backyard of his Fort White home, according to his arrest report. Mullins said he grew his own marijuana because Medicare stopped pay ing for his prescription of Marinol, a synthetic cannabinoid substitute, and it was too costly and dangerous to find cannabis on the streets. He said he used cannabis to treat his chronic pain associated with severe back and neck pain, heart dis ease, arthritis and Hepatitis C. Although Mullins was prescribed Demerol, an opioid narcotic designed to treat the pain, he said he dislikes taking the medication because of its hab it-forming nature and potential for abuse. “I think the [medical marijuana initiative] is a good thing,” he said. “I don’t have any concerns about it. It’s going to be abused, but so are prescrip tion drugs.” Mullins faced several felony charges that could’ve landed him 11 years in jail, but was instead granted a plea deal, having to pay just over $600 in fines and court costs, court records show. Since then, the couple have actively campaigned for medical marijuana legalization, participating in Federal Marijuana Lobby Day in Washington, D.C. last June. Karen Mullins was critical of the Florida govern ment’s apprehension toward legalizing marijuana for medical uses. “Florida is a nanny state because they don’t permit people to eat, drink or smoke what they want to,” she said. “But it’s OK to drink alcohol and smoke ciga rettes, which are far more harmful than cannabis.” Mullins admitted to going through a bout of alco hol abuse before he kicked his habit in 1983, and argued the effects of alcohol were far more destruc tive than cannabis. “A doctor once asked me the difference between drinking and smoking marijuana,” he said. “I said, ‘about 90 m.p.h.,” referring to an incident when a drunk man driving 90 m.p.h. struck Mullins, con tributing to the injuries he currently suffers. “People will abuse it regardless of whether it’s legal or not,” Karen Mullins said. “But there are people who need it. In some cases it’s curing cancer and helping people with seizure conditions to have fewer seizures...It’s medicine and a God-given plant. It’s a natural thing.” Medical marijuana What you need to know about the proposed constitutional measure.‘I think it’s a slippery slope. We’ve got 20 other states who have tried this HUK[OL`YLZ\HLYPUN[OL LHLJ[ZYPNO[UV^— Mark Hunter, Columbia County Sheriff WIKIMEDIACOMMONS>OVJV\SK\ZLTLKPJPUHSJHUUHIPZ& Individuals who have a licensed KVJ[VYZJLY[PJH[LZ[H[PUN[OL`X\HS PM`MVYTLKPJHSTHYPQ\HUH8\HSPM`PUNWH[PLU[Z^PSSILPZZ\LKHPKLU[PJH[PVUJHYKI`[OL-SVYPKH+LWHY[TLU[VM/LHS[O^OPJOT\Z[ILWYLZLU[LKH[[OL[PTLVMW\YJOHZL;OLJHYK^PSSHSZVWYV]L[VSH^LUMVYJLTLU[[OH[[OLPUKP]PK\HSJHUSLNHSS`JHYY`THYPQ\HUHMVYTLKPJPUHSW\YWVZLZ>OH[TLKPJHSJVUKP[PVUZ^V\SKX\HSPM`&(JJVYKPUN[V[OLHTLUKTLU[KLIPSP[H[PUNTLKPJHSJVUKP[PVUTLHUZJHUJLYNSH\JVTHWVZP[P]LZ[H[\ZMVYO\THUPTT\UVKLJPLUJ`]PY\Z/0=HJX\PYLKPTT\ULKLJPLUJ`Z`UKYVTL(0+:OLWH[P[PZ*HT`V[YVWOPJSH[LYHSZJSLYVZPZ(3:*OYVOUZKPZLHZL7HYRPUZVUZKPZLHZLT\S[PWSLZJSLYVZPZVYV[OLYJVUKP[PVUZMVY^OPJOHWO`ZP JPHUILSPL]LZ[OH[[OLTLKPJHS\ZLVMTHYPQ\HUH^V\SKSPRLS`V\[^LPNO[OLWV[LU[PHSOLHS[OYPZRZ(WO`ZPJPHUJLY[PJH[PVUJHUVUS`ILHJX\PYLKHM[LY[OLWO`ZPJPHUOHZJVUK\J[LKHUL_HTPUH[PVUVM[OLpatient and a full review of the patient’s TLKPJHSOPZ[VY`>OLUJV\SKVULZ[HY[\ZPUNTLKPJHSTHYPQ\HUHSLNHSS`&0M[OLHTLUKTLU[WHZZLZ[OLLM MLJ[P]LKH[LPZ1HU;OL+LWHY[TLU[VM/LHS[OT\Z[PTWSLTLU[YLN\SH[PVUZZP_TVU[OZHM[LY[OH[KH[LHUKILNPU PZZ\PUNPKLU[PJH[PVUJHYKZ^P[OPUUPULTVU[OZ0M[OL+LWHY[TLU[MHPSZ[VPZZ\LJHYKZ[OLKVJ[VYZJLY[PJH[PVU^PSSZLY]LHZSLNHSPKLU[PJH[PVU>OH[HIV\[MLKLYHSSH^&4HYPQ\HUHTLKPJPUHSVYV[OLY^PZLYLTHPUZPSSLNHS\UKLYMLKLYHSSH^/V^ L]LY[OL6IHTHHKTPUPZ[YH[PVUOHZchosen not to enforce the prohibition PUZ[H[LZ[OH[OH]LSLNHSPaLK\ZLVM[OLKY\NMVYTLKPJPUHSW\YWVZLZ>OLYL^V\SKTLKPJHSTHYPQ\HUHILZVSK&;OLZ[H[L^PSSSPJLUZL4LKPJHS4HY PQ\HUH;YLH[TLU[*LU[LYZ[VHJX\PYLcultivate, possess, process, transfer, transport, sell, distribute, dispense or HKTPUPZ[LYTHYPQ\HUHWYVK\J[ZJVU[HPU PUNTHYPQ\HUHYLSH[LKZ\WWSPLZVYLK\ JH[PVUHSTH[LYPHSZ[VX\HSPM`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`VMHSSX\HSPM`PUNWH[PLU[Z(SSYLJVYKZ^PSSILJVUKLU[PHSL_JLW[MVYTLKPJHSVYSH^LUMVYJLTLU[W\YWVZLZ/V^L]LY[OLHTLUKTLU[KVLZUV[WYV OPIP[LTWSV`LYZMYVTYLX\PYPUNKY\N[LZ[ZBy AMANDA WILLIAMSON | awilliamson@lakecityreporter.com For local couple, a personal issue.COURTESYDelbert and Karen Mullins pose outside Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. after campaigning for medical mari juana legalization during Federal Marijuana Lobby Day last June. Delbert Mullins, who is disabled, was arrested after local authorities found marijuana plants growing in the backyard of his Fort White home. They are holding a re-creation of a story on Delbert that ran in the Dec.11, 2011 Lake City Reporter. Delbert Mullins faced up to 11 years in prison for growing medicinal marijuana in 2011. ‘I don’t have JVUJLYUZHIV\[ P[B4LKPJHSTHYP Q\HUHDPZNVPUN[V ILHI\ZLKI\[ZV HYLWYLZJYPW[PVU drugs.’ — Delbert Mullins

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23 24 25 26 27REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, Feb. 23 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 72/58 74/56 74/54 72/59 67/56 65/61 76/54 79/61 79/56 81/65 81/65 83/63 85/68 85/70 85/65 77/63 83/67 81/70Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 79/65/sh 81/64/sh Daytona Beach 75/62/sh 76/62/sh Fort Myers 84/65/sh 83/66/sh Ft. Lauderdale 85/69/sh 83/67/pc Gainesville 72/55/sh 73/55/sh Jacksonville 67/53/sh 71/55/sh Key West 81/70/pc 80/70/pc Lake City 72/55/sh 73/55/sh Miami 84/70/sh 83/68/pc Naples 78/64/sh 80/65/pc Ocala 75/57/sh 75/56/sh Orlando 79/63/sh 79/64/sh Panama City 67/59/r 68/55/ts Pensacola 70/55/ts 68/50/sh Tallahassee 73/55/ts 75/53/ts Tampa 79/63/sh 78/63/sh Valdosta 73/55/ts 73/54/r W. Palm Beach 84/69/sh 83/66/sh High Saturday Low Saturday 71 86 in 1945 28 in 1958 75 46 61 Saturday 0.00" 0.42" 0.75" 5.78" 2.47" 7:02 a.m. 6:25 p.m. 7:01 a.m. 6:25 p.m. 1:47 a.m. 12:39 p.m. 2:46 a.m. 1:38 p.m.March 1 March 8 March 16 March 23 New First Full Last Quarter Quarter Parts of Hawaii can receive over 400 inches of rainfall annually, but most coastal areas receive between 25 and 30 inches. On this date in 1997, Honolulu received 2.18 inches of rainfall in the previous 24-hour period. This is equivalent to 1/10 of the city's average annual amount. Rain and snow will fall from the Mid-Atlantic through the Ohio Valley. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will be possible from the Lower Mississippi Valley to Florida. Rain will fall over western Washington, with snow over the Rockies. 89, Immokalee Regional Airport, FL -9, Rugby, NDSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 50/30/.00 43/22/fl Albuquerque 59/28/.00 65/38/pc Anchorage 21/18/.00 27/17/s Atlanta 62/39/.00 69/47/pc Baltimore 60/28/.00 58/31/cd Billings 24/13/.08 14/2/sn Birmingham 64/36/.00 69/42/pc Bismarck 19/6/.00 14/-3/pc Boise 40/31/.00 53/36/pc Boston 50/34/.00 45/27/sh Buffalo 39/35/.00 31/15/pc Charleston SC 70/44/.00 73/50/cd Charleston WV 60/32/.00 55/27/sh Charlotte 63/35/.00 71/42/pc Cheyenne 36/21/.00 36/25/sn Chicago 34/21/.00 25/9/pc Cincinnati 57/37/.00 42/20/sn Cleveland 45/37/.00 35/16/fl Columbia SC 54/33/.00 38/19/pc Dallas 73/48/.00 73/45/fg Daytona Beach 71/63/.00 80/63/ts Denver 34/20/.00 50/29/pc Des Moines 34/26/.00 26/13/pc Detroit 37/30/.00 27/13/pc El Paso 71/50/.00 75/53/pc Fairbanks -8/-22/.00 7/-24/s Greensboro 63/34/.00 68/38/pc Hartford 50/24/.00 43/25/sh Honolulu 81/72/.00 79/70/pc Houston 69/48/.00 76/60/sh Indianapolis 53/30/.00 35/16/pc Jackson MS 63/36/.00 71/47/ts Jacksonville 70/61/.00 75/56/ts Kansas City 42/29/.00 37/20/pc Las Vegas 66/48/.00 73/48/pc Little Rock 70/34/.00 62/33/pc Los Angeles 73/52/.00 70/54/fg Memphis 66/37/.00 61/33/pc Miami 82/73/.00 84/71/pc Minneapolis 14/5/.00 14/-3/pc Mobile 66/41/.00 65/53/ts New Orleans 68/46/.00 75/60/ts New York 53/34/.00 48/30/cd Oakland 55/44/.00 61/46/pc Oklahoma City 69/39/.00 49/30/pc Omaha 37/27/.00 31/19/pc Orlando 78/64/.05 83/64/ts Philadelphia 57/30/.00 56/32/cd Phoenix 73/51/.00 81/53/pc Pittsburgh 52/37/.00 41/19/fl Portland ME 46/30/.00 39/22/fl Portland OR 42/30/.00 50/40/pc Raleigh 62/36/.00 70/39/pc Rapid City 26/19/.00 25/9/pc Reno 52/30/.00 62/31/pc Sacramento 64/41/.00 69/44/s Salt Lake City 50/34/.00 54/34/pc San Antonio 56/47/.00 84/62/fg San Diego 68/54/.00 62/53/pc San Francisco 60/46/.00 57/50/pc Seattle 39/37/.05 41/33/sn Spokane 30/26/.00 30/19/sn St. Louis 62/32/.00 38/20/pc Tampa 77/69/.21 78/65/pc Tucson 75/44/.00 80/49/pc Washington 63/34/.00 61/33/cd Acapulco 84/73/.00 84/71/s Amsterdam 50/39/.00 50/37/pc Athens 64/44/.00 64/50/s Auckland 77/68/.00 80/64/pc Beijing 42/28/.00 46/28/pc Berlin 50/33/.00 51/32/s Buenos Aires 78/69/.00 77/66/s Cairo 75/64/.00 77/55/s Geneva 48/32/.00 50/32/pc Havana 86/44/.00 87/60/pc Helsinki 37/32/.00 35/32/r Hong Kong 66/57/.00 64/57/pc Kingston 87/75/.00 87/75/s La Paz 60/41/.00 57/42/ts Lima 82/68/.00 78/69/pc London 53/41/.00 53/46/pc Madrid 55/28/.00 53/33/s Mexico City 73/50/.00 78/51/pc Montreal 41/33/.00 37/19/s Moscow 30/19/.00 32/30/pc Nairobi 77/59/.00 80/57/pc Nassau 84/75/.00 82/69/ts New Delhi 68/55/.00 73/51/ts Oslo 44/41/.00 50/48/r Panama 91/75/.00 89/75/ts Paris 50/41/.00 50/39/r Rio 95/75/.00 91/73/pc Rome 62/46/.00 60/39/ts San Juan PR 84/73/.06 84/69/sh Santiago 86/68/.00 84/66/pc Seoul 42/32/.00 46/32/pc Singapore 89/78/.00 89/77/ts St. Thomas VI 82/73/.42 84/74/r Sydney 75/66/.00 75/64/r Tel Aviv 84/55/.00 84/57/s Tokyo 48/35/.00 46/32/s Toronto 37/33/.00 35/21/s Vienna 48/42/.00 48/37/cd Warsaw 46/32/.00 48/32/pc H H L L L L 39/18 Bangor 45/27 Boston 51/28 New York 61/33 Washington D.C. 71/42 Charlotte 69/47 Atlanta 49/30 City 72/44 Dallas 76/60 Houston 14/-3 Minneapolis 25/9 Chicago 61/33 Memphis 43/20 Cincinnati 27/13 Detroit 82/65 Orlando 84/71 Miami 63/40 Oklahoma 8/-11 Falls 63/40 International 38/20 Louis 63/40 St. 31/19 Omaha 50/29 Denver 65/38 Albuquerque 81/53 Phoenix 14/2 Billings 53/36 Boise 50/40 Portland 41/33 Seattle 75/60 Orleans 63/40 New 25/9 City 63/40 Rapid 54/34 City 63/40 Salt Lake 71/47 Vegas 63/40 Las 64/54 Angeles 63/40 Los 57/50 Francisco 63/40 San 29/18 Anchorage 7/-24 Fairbanks 79/70 Honolulu-20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Dec Jan Feb20 30 40 50 60 70 80S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 69 75 78 82 84 75 75 33 38 42 52 48 61 61Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Moderate440 mins to burnIsolated storms and rain showers Chance of rain showers Partly cloudy Chance of rain showers Cloudy Slight chance of rain showers SUN74 54 MON70 54 TUE72 54 WED67 40 THU58 40 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO 2014 10A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEA THER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 23 24 25 26 27REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, Feb. 23 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 72/58 74/56 74/54 72/59 67/56 65/61 76/54 79/61 79/56 81/65 81/65 83/63 85/68 85/70 85/65 77/63 83/67 81/70Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 79/65/sh 81/64/sh Daytona Beach 75/62/sh 76/62/sh Fort Myers 84/65/sh 83/66/sh Ft. Lauderdale 85/69/sh 83/67/pc Gainesville 72/55/sh 73/55/sh Jacksonville 67/53/sh 71/55/sh Key West 81/70/pc 80/70/pc Lake City 72/55/sh 73/55/sh Miami 84/70/sh 83/68/pc Naples 78/64/sh 80/65/pc Ocala 75/57/sh 75/56/sh Orlando 79/63/sh 79/64/sh Panama City 67/59/r 68/55/ts Pensacola 70/55/ts 68/50/sh Tallahassee 73/55/ts 75/53/ts Tampa 79/63/sh 78/63/sh Valdosta 73/55/ts 73/54/r W. Palm Beach 84/69/sh 83/66/sh High Saturday Low Saturday 71 86 in 1945 28 in 1958 75 46 61 Saturday 0.00" 0.42" 0.75" 5.78" 2.47" 7:02 a.m. 6:25 p.m. 7:01 a.m. 6:25 p.m. 1:47 a.m. 12:39 p.m. 2:46 a.m. 1:38 p.m.March 1 March 8 March 16 March 23 New First Full Last Quarter Quarter Parts of Hawaii can receive over 400 inches of rainfall annually, but most coastal areas receive between 25 and 30 inches. On this date in 1997, Honolulu received 2.18 inches of rainfall in the previous 24-hour period. This is equivalent to 1/10 of the city's average annual amount. Rain and snow will fall from the Mid-Atlantic through the Ohio Valley. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will be possible from the Lower Mississippi Valley to Florida. Rain will fall over western Washington, with snow over the Rockies. 89, Immokalee Regional Airport, FL -9, Rugby, NDSaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 50/30/.00 43/22/fl Albuquerque 59/28/.00 65/38/pc Anchorage 21/18/.00 27/17/s Atlanta 62/39/.00 69/47/pc Baltimore 60/28/.00 58/31/cd Billings 24/13/.08 14/2/sn Birmingham 64/36/.00 69/42/pc Bismarck 19/6/.00 14/-3/pc Boise 40/31/.00 53/36/pc Boston 50/34/.00 45/27/sh Buffalo 39/35/.00 31/15/pc Charleston SC 70/44/.00 73/50/cd Charleston WV 60/32/.00 55/27/sh Charlotte 63/35/.00 71/42/pc Cheyenne 36/21/.00 36/25/sn Chicago 34/21/.00 25/9/pc Cincinnati 57/37/.00 42/20/sn Cleveland 45/37/.00 35/16/fl Columbia SC 54/33/.00 38/19/pc Dallas 73/48/.00 73/45/fg Daytona Beach 71/63/.00 80/63/ts Denver 34/20/.00 50/29/pc Des Moines 34/26/.00 26/13/pc Detroit 37/30/.00 27/13/pc El Paso 71/50/.00 75/53/pc Fairbanks -8/-22/.00 7/-24/s Greensboro 63/34/.00 68/38/pc Hartford 50/24/.00 43/25/sh Honolulu 81/72/.00 79/70/pc Houston 69/48/.00 76/60/sh Indianapolis 53/30/.00 35/16/pc Jackson MS 63/36/.00 71/47/ts Jacksonville 70/61/.00 75/56/ts Kansas City 42/29/.00 37/20/pc Las Vegas 66/48/.00 73/48/pc Little Rock 70/34/.00 62/33/pc Los Angeles 73/52/.00 70/54/fg Memphis 66/37/.00 61/33/pc Miami 82/73/.00 84/71/pc Minneapolis 14/5/.00 14/-3/pc Mobile 66/41/.00 65/53/ts New Orleans 68/46/.00 75/60/ts New York 53/34/.00 48/30/cd Oakland 55/44/.00 61/46/pc Oklahoma City 69/39/.00 49/30/pc Omaha 37/27/.00 31/19/pc Orlando 78/64/.05 83/64/ts Philadelphia 57/30/.00 56/32/cd Phoenix 73/51/.00 81/53/pc Pittsburgh 52/37/.00 41/19/fl Portland ME 46/30/.00 39/22/fl Portland OR 42/30/.00 50/40/pc Raleigh 62/36/.00 70/39/pc Rapid City 26/19/.00 25/9/pc Reno 52/30/.00 62/31/pc Sacramento 64/41/.00 69/44/s Salt Lake City 50/34/.00 54/34/pc San Antonio 56/47/.00 84/62/fg San Diego 68/54/.00 62/53/pc San Francisco 60/46/.00 57/50/pc Seattle 39/37/.05 41/33/sn Spokane 30/26/.00 30/19/sn St. Louis 62/32/.00 38/20/pc Tampa 77/69/.21 78/65/pc Tucson 75/44/.00 80/49/pc Washington 63/34/.00 61/33/cd Acapulco 84/73/.00 84/71/s Amsterdam 50/39/.00 50/37/pc Athens 64/44/.00 64/50/s Auckland 77/68/.00 80/64/pc Beijing 42/28/.00 46/28/pc Berlin 50/33/.00 51/32/s Buenos Aires 78/69/.00 77/66/s Cairo 75/64/.00 77/55/s Geneva 48/32/.00 50/32/pc Havana 86/44/.00 87/60/pc Helsinki 37/32/.00 35/32/r Hong Kong 66/57/.00 64/57/pc Kingston 87/75/.00 87/75/s La Paz 60/41/.00 57/42/ts Lima 82/68/.00 78/69/pc London 53/41/.00 53/46/pc Madrid 55/28/.00 53/33/s Mexico City 73/50/.00 78/51/pc Montreal 41/33/.00 37/19/s Moscow 30/19/.00 32/30/pc Nairobi 77/59/.00 80/57/pc Nassau 84/75/.00 82/69/ts New Delhi 68/55/.00 73/51/ts Oslo 44/41/.00 50/48/r Panama 91/75/.00 89/75/ts Paris 50/41/.00 50/39/r Rio 95/75/.00 91/73/pc Rome 62/46/.00 60/39/ts San Juan PR 84/73/.06 84/69/sh Santiago 86/68/.00 84/66/pc Seoul 42/32/.00 46/32/pc Singapore 89/78/.00 89/77/ts St. Thomas VI 82/73/.42 84/74/r Sydney 75/66/.00 75/64/r Tel Aviv 84/55/.00 84/57/s Tokyo 48/35/.00 46/32/s Toronto 37/33/.00 35/21/s Vienna 48/42/.00 48/37/cd Warsaw 46/32/.00 48/32/pc H H L L L L 39/18 Bangor 45/27 Boston 51/28 New York 61/33 Washington D.C. 71/42 Charlotte 69/47 Atlanta 49/30 City 72/44 Dallas 76/60 Houston 14/-3 Minneapolis 25/9 Chicago 61/33 Memphis 43/20 Cincinnati 27/13 Detroit 82/65 Orlando 84/71 Miami 63/40 Oklahoma 8/-11 Falls 63/40 International 38/20 Louis 63/40 St. 31/19 Omaha 50/29 Denver 65/38 Albuquerque 81/53 Phoenix 14/2 Billings 53/36 Boise 50/40 Portland 41/33 Seattle 75/60 Orleans 63/40 New 25/9 City 63/40 Rapid 54/34 City 63/40 Salt Lake 71/47 Vegas 63/40 Las 64/54 Angeles 63/40 Los 57/50 Francisco 63/40 San 29/18 Anchorage 7/-24 Fairbanks 79/70 Honolulu -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Dec Jan Feb20 30 40 50 60 70 80S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 69 75 78 82 84 75 75 33 38 42 52 48 61 61Actual high Actual low Average high Average lowWEATHER BY-THE-DAY Moderate440 mins to burnIsolated storms and rain showers Chance of rain showers Partly cloudy Chance of rain showers Cloudy Slight chance of rain showers SUN74 54 MON70 54 TUE72 54 WED67 40 THU58 40 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO2014

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 23, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Field of dreams Columbia High softball complex in final phase before opener By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High already has the best softball team in the state of Florida. It is striving to have the best facility. The Lady Tigers were approved on Nov. 21 for renovations to the Class 6A State Champions field. The Columbia County Commission approved $200,000 in funding to the Columbia County School District for the renovation to the girls softball field. Unfortunately, with the approval coming so close to the beginning of the regu lar season, there was not enough time to complete all the renovations prior to the beginning of the season. Columbia chose this week to reshuffle the home slate in order to finish por tions of the renovations and unveil the state cham pions on March 4 against Middleburg High. The Lady Tigers were originally scheduled to open up the home schedule on Feb. 19. Its going to be one of the top five facilities in the state, Columbia head coach Jimmy Williams said. Just having a game at home this season was a bit of a miracle according to the head coach as the Lady Tigers planned for the possibility of playing home games at Southside Recreational Complex. Williams said that the Lady Tigers set their sched ule up in August before approval was made for the stadium to be renovated, but he never gave up hope after the approval that the Lady Tigers would play at Columbia High this season despite the obstacles. Theres wait time on some of these things we want to get, Williams said. You place your order, but you dont get them the next day. You have to wait three or four weeks. Some things you have to bid out. Theres a process you go through that just makes it where you cant get things over night. Not only was their time in getting certain materials in order to complete the renovations, but Williams said there was no doubt this wouldnt be a rush job. Theres the need for a plan that way youre not just piecing things together, Williams said. We turn it over to the county and they have policies. Dealing with taxpayer money, you have to go through a process. Were trying to get the best price for our money. The procedure allows for gen erations from now to get the benefit from this. Even when Im gone, the facility will be better than it was when I got here. My dad always told me, take what I got and make it better. Williams heads up a build ing construction class at the high school and the Lady Tigers have found ways to save time and money through the classroom. It has helped a lot in being able to do the demoli tion part, Williams said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High head coach Jimmy Williams is seen in the visiting dugout area, which still needs some minor construction and tweaking before it is completely finished. CHS continued on 3B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today ATHLETICS 3:30 p.m. NBCSN — USA Indoor Track & Field Championships, at Albuquerque, N.M. AUTO RACING Noon FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Carquest Auto Parts Nationals, at Chandler, Ariz. (same-day tape) BOWLING 3 p.m. ESPN — USBC Masters, at North Brunswick, N.J. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, semifinal matches, at Marana, Ariz. 1:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Thailand, final round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape) 2 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, championship match, at Marana, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — Michigan St. at Michigan 1:30 p.m. NBCSN — Yale at Columbia 6 p.m. ESPNU — Florida St. at PittsburghFS1 — Providence at Butler 8 p.m. ESPNU — Arizona St. at UtahFS1 — Southern Cal at California NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City 3:30 p.m. ABC — Chicago at Miami 9 p.m. ESPN — Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers SOCCER 8:25 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Swansea City at Liverpool 10:55 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Tottenham at Norwich WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Duke at Notre DameFS1 — Georgetown at Villanova 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Kentucky at Texas A&M 3 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma St. at Texas Tech 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Maryland at Georgia Tech WINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 7 a.m. Men’s Hockey Gold Medal Final, Sweden vs. Canada (LIVE IN ALL TIME ZONES) 2 p.m. Men’s Cross-Country 50km Freestyle Gold Medal Final; Four-Man Bobsled Gold Medal Final Runs 8:30 p.m. Closing Ceremony Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Syracuse at Maryland ESPNU — Oklahoma St. at TCU 9 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma at Kansas WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Penn St. at NebraskaFS1 — Oklahoma at BaylorBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Game L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 3:30 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 6 p.m.Orlando at Toronto, 6 p.m.Sacramento at Denver, 8 p.m.Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m.Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m. NBA calendar April 16 — Last day of regular season. April 19 — Playoffs begin.May 20 — Draft lottery.June 5 — NBA Finals begin.June 16 — Draft early entry withdrawal deadline. June 26 — NBA draft. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 11 Creighton vs. Seton Hall, 5:02 p.m. No. 13 Michigan State at No. 20 Michigan, Noon No. 22 UConn vs. SMU, 2 p.m.FOOTBALLNFL calendar Feb. 19-25 — NFL scouting combine, Indianapolis. March 3 — Deadline for clubs to designate franchise or transition players. March 8 — Clubs are permitted to contact and enter into contract negotia-tions with certified agents of players. March 11 — All clubs must be under the 2014 salary cap; free agency begins; trading period begins. March 23-26 —Owners meetings, Orlando April 7 — Clubs that hired a new head coach after the end of the 2013 regular season may begin offseason workout programs. May 2 — Deadline for restricted free agents to sign offer sheets. May 7 — Deadline for club to exercise right of first refusal for its restricted free agents. May 8-10 —2014 NFL draft, New York.BASEBALLMLB calendar Tuesday — Mandatory reporting date.March 12 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 22-23 — Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona, Sydney. March 26 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2014 salary. March 30 — Opening day in North America, Los Angeles Dodgers at San Diego. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. June 5 — Amateur draft.July 15 — All-Star game, Minneapolis.July 18 — Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 27 — Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 — Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Sept. 30 — Postseason begins.Oct. 22 — World Series begins.AUTO RACINGAt Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019.2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852.3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574.4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477.5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544.6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042.7. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894.8. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078.9. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211.10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919.11. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.061.12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776.13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658.14. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334.15. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108.16. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.41.17. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736.18. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.732.19. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707.20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523.21. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365.22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.695.23. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538.24. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 192.135.25. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 195.818.26. (52) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 191.493.27. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.38.28. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582.29. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.685.30. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712.31. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798.32. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637.33. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296.34. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.004.35. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582.36. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574.37. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502.38. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422.39. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066.40. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815.41. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594.42. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.428.43. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 192.328. Failed to Qualify 44. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.347.45. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291.46. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.48.47. (93) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, 189.542.48. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 192.905.49. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford. SCOREBOARD 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jason Plyn avoids a wild pitch again st Fort White High earlier this season.Tigers, Indians both pick up winsBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s baseball team remained undefeated on the year after disman-tling Wakulla High, 7-3, in a road game on Friday. Caleb Vaughn pitched the complete game and allowed three earned runs, but also struck out six batters and didn’t issue a walk. “He threw 83 pitches and competed all night,” Phillips said. “It was anoth-er night with no walks. He gave up nine hits, which is unusual for him, but he battled through it and made pitches when it counted. He got what he needed with ground balls. The defense played well behind him without one error. Your starter goes seven innings with 83 pitches, and you’re most likely going ot win that game. He actually drove in a run (Kaleb Thomas) after trailing in the first inning to make the game 1-1. Dalton Mauldin drove him in on a double to make it 2-1.” The Tigers scored an additional run in the second inning when Tyler Myrick reached on an error to score Mauldin. Leading by only a run heading into the sixth inning, Alex Milton broke the game open in the Tigers’ favor with a two-run homer to make the score 5-2. Thomas scored on a fielder’s choice from Vaughn to make it 6-2 and Kaleb Rossignal came in on a wild pitch. Columbia (5-0) will host rival Suwannee High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday.Indians baseballFort White High picked up a 6-1 win at Union coun-to improve to 3-2 on the season. Rhett Willis picked up the win after pitching six innings and allowing two hits. He struck out 11 batters. Austin Dupree got the save with two strikeouts in the final inning. He was also effective at the plate with two hits on the night, a run and an RBI. Willie Carter and Willis each had homers for the Indians. Willis tied the game in the second inning with a solo shot and Carter gave the Indians a 3-1 lead with a two-run version in the fifth inning. Kodey Owens and Tyler Parker also had hits in the contest. “We had great pitching on the mound and went right at hitters,” Fort White head coach Rick Julius said. “Our defense played better and we had timely hitting. We competed from start to finish.” Fort White travels to P.K. Yonge at 7 p.m. on Wednesday.CHS softball remains undefeated on seasonBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comWhen a team is good, it doesn’t always take its best effort to win a game. Columbia High softball coach Jimmy Williams said that was the case with the Lady Tigers in a 10-6 win on the road against Lafayette High. The Lady Tigers were able to pick up a 10-6 win behind Erin Anderson, but the pitcher didn’t have much help in the field as Columbia had three errors in the contest — something uncharacteristic for the defending Class 6A state champions. The Lady Tigers were good at the plate. Kayli Kvistad, Brandy Morgan and Hollianne Dohrn each had doubles in the contest. Dohrn and Morgan had two hits and Kvistad reached base three times. Kamdyn Kvistad also had two hits. Still, the focus after the game wasn’t the hitting for Williams. He knows that the Lady Tigers have to play well in all aspects of the game to repeat. “We didn’t play very good defensively,” Williams said. “We made some errors. I was not happy with the way we played. We may have came in and taken them lightly. We can’t get in the mode where we’re just going to think we can get off the bus, show up and win. We’ve got to put it together every night.” The Lady Tigers improved to 5-0 with the victory. Columbia’s game at Suwanne High on Friday was called off due to uplay-able field conditions as a result of rain. The game had not been rescheduled as of Saturday. Columbia travels to Middleburg High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday for a district contest.Fort White softballFort White High fell to Suwannee High, 7-2, to fall to 1-4 on the year. Morgan Cushman took the loss behind a night that saw four Suwannee bat-ters reach base on multiple occassions. Suwannee pitcher Jordan Roberts helped her own cause by reaching base four times and had two RBIs. The Lady Bulldogs are 5-1 on the season. Fort White hosts Branford High at 6 p.m. on Thursday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2014 3B3BSPORTS “We were able to take down the bleachers and move them to make room for the workers to get in there and take down fences. This allowed the trucks to get in there and do the poles for the netting. We were able to salvage some stuff to save some money. We’re in the process of putting the old bleachers back. Even though it’s the old bleach-ers, it’s still amazing to see how good the facility is looking. You can see the whole field, which is pretty rare. Our infield clay is the same stuff the New York Yankees use. It’s almost like you have to come out here and look at it.” But it isn’t just the fields, dugouts and view that is better. Williams said it’s hard to turn anywhere in the stadium without seeing some sort of improvement either already completed or in the process of reno-vation. “We took every single area of this complex and made it better,” Williams said. “From corner to cor-ner, there’s been some type of improvement. The dug-out is almost like you’re in your living room. It looks super professional. It took a lot of coordinating.” Williams was sure to mention that this wasn’t just a wonderwork of his own doing, but that a lot of people had input in completing this process, including superintendent Terry Huddleston, who is excited to see the finished product. “Upon completion, the softball field will be a pre-mier facility in Florida,” Huddleston said. “We’re certainly thankful for the partnership with the board of county commis-sioners to help facilitate the improvements to the field. I wish the total proj-ect could be completed by the first home softball game, but because of bid requirements and deliv-ery timetable that makes it impossible to make the project finished in time for our first home game.” Huddleston also noted that the facility won’t be just in use for the Lady Tigers, but the county will also benefit from the improve-ments. Championship games from state softball tournaments will now be played at the high school. “The program and the girls being 6A state cham-pions helped facilitate this,” Huddleston said. “It’s a great facility for Lake City and Columbia County, especially when the cham-pionship game is played at this facility.” The plan was first outlined by County Commissioner Dale Williams at the Nov. 21 meeting. “They will agree to allow it to be used for recre-ational tournament play when needed,” Williams said. “That shouldn’t be a difficult agreement to pre-pare.” Commissioner Ron Williams said that the field will be the “jewel” of the Southside Complex — even though it is located at the high school. The jewel couldn’t have been completed without Fred Gaylard (director of school maintenance) and his crew according to Williams as well as Mike Null, Lex Carswell, and County Commissioners Stephen Bailey and Bucky Nash who were all instrumental figures in putting the Lady Tigers on their own field this season. “Without them rolling up their sleeves and get-ting involved, we probably wouldn’t be where we are at,” Williams said. “I am just thankful to be where we are, because I was thinking it’d be way later. I was thinking it’d be way too much to get done dur-ing the season. It’s pretty amazing to be able to pull it off and it’s going to be beautiful.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterJimmy Williams (right), Columbia High School softball h ead coach, explains to Tad Cervantes his improvement plans to the school’s softball field. Those improvements include redoing the dugouts, the installation of a 32-foot high nettin g, moving the field five feet forward, new field irrigation, an extension on both bullpens new seating behind home plate, a new knee wall and a warm-up area for five pitchers. CHS: Will debut new field March 3 Continued From Page 1B COURTESYShrine Club hold ’em fundraiserThe Lake City Shrine Club’s monthly Texas Hold ’em fund raiser was Friday. Twenty-two players participated and the club made $350. Winners of the $1,000 payout are: Dennis Smith, $225 for fourth place (from left); Bob Holt, $32 5 for first place; Phil Bishop, $225 for second place; Amanda Green, $225 for third plac e. GOLF REPORTS Persistence pays off for GilbertFinally! Canadian visitor Lise Gilbert aced No. 5 for her first hole-in-one after playing the game for 52 years. Bob Randall (+4) came from far back in the pack with birdies on the last three holes to win the A flight of Saturday’s blitz. Terry Hunter and Randy Somers finished a point back. Steve Peters (+4) had the only plus score in B flight to top Mike Carr by four points. Jerry Smith and Mike Carr tied for third with -2. Bruce Gibson, Casey Clemons and Randall chalked up two bird-ies apiece, and Dennis Crawford had one. Terry Hunter tallied two birdies to forge a first-place tie with Steve Patterson in the A flight of Sunday’s blitz at +5. Codi Hudson poured in five birdies but only man-aged a third-place tie with Joe Paul and Hank Rone at +4. Steve Peters and John Brewer fought to the day’s second first-place tie at +6 in B flight. Dave Mehl was two points behind the winners, followed by Eddy Brown, Brandon Goss and Russ Adams tied for fourth at +3. Closest to the pin winners were Joe Paul on Nos. 5 and 7, Mike Gough on No. 15 and Randy Sommers on No. 17. Buddy Slay, Jerry Smith and Jim Carr split the skins pot with Hunter and Hudson. The ladies paired up to play in the LGA two-person best ball match. Anita West and Peggy Radcliffe were in full sync in posting a net 61 for the win. Carol Felton and Suzi Davis tied Ann Bormolini and Gloria Rowley for sec-ond with net 65. Natalie Bryant scored the day’s only chip-in on No. 2. The Wednesday blitz was washed out, leaving both pot holes in play. Two Good Old Boys racked up eagles on par-4 holes. Jim McGriff scored his deuce on No. 18 and Jim Stevens had his on No. 4. In team play, the first match was close when the foursome of Bobby Simmons, Tom Elmore, Steve Peters and Dan Stephens edged the team of Ed Snow, Jerry West, Joe Persons and Stan Woolbert by a 5-4 count. The second match featured fivesomes and ended in a walk-over for Jim McGriff, Bill Wheeler, Rhea Hart, Dennis Hendershot and Bob Wheary by a 9-5 score over Marc Risk, Jim Bell, Nick Whitehurst, Jim Stevens and Emerson Darst. Risk (37-38-75) returned to the medalist spot after a two-week absence. Snow, McGriff and Woolbert all shot 79. The MGA Stress Ball tournament is Saturday beginning with a blind draw at 7:45 a.m. Sign up by 5 p.m. Friday. Bridgestone has a ball fitting clinic on March 1, and Callaway Golf will have a club demonstration day on March 15. COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff Toss tournament on SaturdaysThis month’s event is the popular Toss Tournament. On every hole the player is allowed one free toss or throw of the ball to get either out of trouble or clos-er to the hole. As veterans of the format will tell you, it isn’t how far you can toss the ball, but how well you can control the distance. Getting the ball to stop by the hole to give you a tap-in putt is the ticket to a low score and low scores increase the fun factor for the tournament. Players of all abilities are invited to play. The tour-nament tees off at 9 a.m. Saturday, with lunch after the round included in the entry fee. Sign up by 5 p.m. Friday or call 752-3339. Wednesday Blitz results had Frog Niewisch and Billy Jones sharing first place at +4. Randy Heavrin was second at +1 and Al Cohoon was third at even. Skin winners were Ricky Crawford (2), Jack Tuggle and Niewisch. Closest to pin winners were Wallace Christie on No. 3, Crawford on No. 5, Niewisch on No. 11, Larry Boone on No. 15 and Heavrin on No. 17. Friday Dogfight results: first-Wallace Christie +5; second-Larry Boone +4 Skin winners were Chet Carter (4), Randy Heavrin, Jack Tuggle and Boone (2). Closest to pin winners were Dave Zeman on No. 3, Tuggle on No. 5, Wallace Christie on Nos. 11 and 17, and Carter on No. 15. The Sunday Scramble had the team of Bob Feasel, Robbie Feasel and Soon Boong Lee taking first place with a +4 performance. No winner was pulled in the pot portion of the tour-nament, allowing a rollover pot for the first time in three weeks. Upcoming events:Q March 1, Branford Rotary Club Tournament; Q March 15, Christ Central Ministries Tournament; Q April 5 MGA/RountreeMoore 3-Player Open Scramble. QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Nicki Newmans BRIEFS FORT WHITE SOCCER Banquet planned today The Fort White High varsity and middle school soccer banquet is 5 p.m. today in the middle school cafeteria. Cost for adults is $5 at the door. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats seeks 12U players The North Florida River Rats 12U travel team is seeking players to complete its spring roster. Players cannot turn 13 before May. 1. For details, call Kim Albritton at 365-0950.

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