The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02284

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Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comBefore Sundays 38th re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee, it was announced that a $1 million grant has been awarded to build a new museum there. The money comes by way of a grant from Hill Truck Rental Foundation of Orlando. Founder Copeland Hill, who died in 1997, was a trucker in his early days and on trips, he often stopped and visited battlefields. He developed a love of Civil War battlefields, said Gary Dickinson, president of the Olustee Citizen Support Organization, a 501c3 non-profit that produces the re-enactment each year. Every year we spend money on the (battle re-enactment), but we always manage to make a little money and weve been keeping that money to build a museum, Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM SCHOOLSRMS students take home Latin Forum ribbons, 6A. CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 11 TODAYS WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4A Schools . . . . . . . 6A Obituaries . . . . . 5A Advice & Comics . . 4B Puzzles . . . . . . . 3B SPORTSTwo e lementary schools field archery teams, 1B. 76 47Partly cloudy, 2A Blue versus GreyFull report, this edition. $1M for Olustee Museum JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterJeffrey McClanathan, president of the Hill Truck Rental Foundation, presents a check for $1M to Gary Dickinson (right), president of the Olustee Citizen Support Organization before the re-enactment on Sunday. MUSEUM continued on 7ABy DARA KAMThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE Gun owners would be able to apply for concealed weapons licenses at their local tax collectors offices under a National Rifle Associationbacked measure approved unanimously by the Senate Agriculture Committee on Monday. Florida has more than a million concealed weapons licens-Tax offices may start accepting gun license applications3 missing kids last seen here PERMITS continued on 7A By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comLaw enforcement are on the lookout for three missing Miami children last seen in Lake City, according to a missing child alert from FDLE. Erin Pena, 12, Derick Pena, 7 and Steven Pena, 8, all of Miami, were last seen on the 2000 block of West US 90 near TD Bank in Lake City, according to the alert and LCPD Investigator Craig Strickland. Investigators believe the children may be traveling in a 2014 white Nissan Altima with Florida tag U291LR, and may be with 32-yearold Carrie Weingarth, FDLE said. The children are around threeand-a-half to four feet tall with dark brown/black hair and brown eyes, the alert said. Erin Pena was wearing a blue polo shit, khaki pants and gray and orange tennis shoes the last he was seen, FDLE said. Weingarth is white, 5-foot1-inch tall with black hair, brown eyes and a weight of 130 pounds, the alert said. Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of these children are encouraged to call FDLE at 1-888356-4774, the Miami-Dade School Police Department at 305-775-7682 or 911. Erin Pena Derik Pena Steven Pena Brannon Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterUnion artillerymen send a barrage of cannon fire to keep Confederate troops at bay during Sundays re-enactment.By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comThousands of visitors gathered to witness the 38th Annual Battle of Olustee Re-enactment Sunday afternoon, honoring the sesquicentennial anniversary of Floridas most significant Civil War battle. The blue and grey traded volleys of musket and cannon fire for an hour and a half, the sky filled with black powder fog and smoke rings. One by one, standard-bearers fell as troops aimed for their opponents flags, aiming to damage enemy manpower and morale. Palmetto shrubs, launching haphazardly through the sky, took a brunt of the battles bombardment as well. To those without a knowledge of the battle itself, the outcome seemed uncertain as momentum see-sawed precariously to either side during the thick of the fighting. That is, until one pivotal momenta small group of Confederate infantry broke rank and dashed into the no mans land between the two opposing sides, reaching for the Unions 35-star banner that had fallen with its carrier. The crowd gave a raucous cheer as the soldiers returned to Weather perfect for 38th annual battle. Gunsmoke fills the air as Confederate re-enactors look to take down the Union front line Sunday. BATTLE continued on 7A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA dance on the eve of battleJeanie Wilks and Randy Sweet enjoy square dancing while at the 35th Annual Blue-Grey Square Dance held at Rountree-Moore Toyota Showroom on Saturday. Weekend saw biggest turnout since Olustee Festival foundedBy AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com Even though the economic impact of the Olustee Festival is still being calculated, the Columbia County Tourist Development Council officials said Lake Citys businesses benefited from an influx of visitors over the weekend. According to Paulette Lord, marketing director for the TDC, the annual event was very successful, drawing big crowds both Friday and Saturday. Normally, the Olustee Festival attracts 20,000 people to Columbia County, but an additional 5,000 people joined this year to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the battle. Lord believes the festival received the largest turnout since its inception 36 years ago by the Blue-Grey Army, Inc. Lake City restaurants reported positive feedback on weekend business, Lord said, adding that Texas Roadhouse and Olive Garden specifically told her they had seen an increase. Many of the hotels in town were nearly at capacity, and the Olustee Festival vendors stated TURNOUT continued on 7A WeingarthThousands cheer as 150th goes off without a hitchRe-living history

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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Page E ditor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 AR OUND FL ORIDA Man beaten over chicken footTAMPA Police in Tampa say a man is facing manslaughter charges after he beat his roommate to death in a dispute over a chicken foot. Authorities say 52-yearold James Jugo was arrested after the beating death of 56-year-old Benjamin Calderon on Saturday. The Tampa Bay Times reported Monday that the fight started after Calderon took the chicken foot from a skillet where Jugo was cooking. An autopsy showed Calderon suffered internal bleeding after being hit numerous times on the face, neck and elsewhere. A witness told police that she saw Jugo hit Calderon with a board. Jugo was jailed on $15,000 bail. Court records did not indicate whether he had hired a lawyer. Public records show Jugo has been arrested 19 times previously in Florida.A rtist smashes $1M vase MIAMI A South Florida artist is facing a criminal charge after police say he smashed a $1 million vase at Miamis new art museum to protest what he called its favoritism for international rather than local art. Maximo Caminero, 51, was charged with criminal mischief after Sundays incident at the Perez Art Museum Miami. According to a Miami Police Department arrest affidavit, a security guard told officers that Caminero picked up a colored vase by Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei. When told to put it down, the security guard said Caminero smashed it on the floor. Caminero, a painter who lives in Miami, declined comment when reached by telephone Monday. He said he will have an afternoon news conference Tuesday. Im going to answer all the questions, he said.Plane crashes into lake, kills 1WELLINGTON Authorities say one person has died after a small plane crashed into a South Florida Lake. Palm Beach County Fire Rescue officials say the single-engine aircraft was found partially submerged in a Wellington lake Monday afternoon. One person was dead inside the cockpit. The Palm Beach Post reports that the Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Sonex, a fixed-wing, amateur-built experimental aircraft. Only the pilot was on board the plane. The pilots name has not been released. The plane went down near the private Wellington Aero Club and also close to a local dog park.23 shark attacks leads worldGAINESVILLE Florida was the world leader in unprovoked shark attacks last year with 23, easily most in the United States and more than twice the number as any other country, according to a report released Monday. None of the Florida attacks was among the 10 fatal incidents around the world, according to the University of Floridas International Shark Attack File. Sharks have a lot more to fear from us than we do from them, said George Burgess, who maintains the shark file. Statistically, shark attacks are extremely rare, especially considering the number of humans that enter the water each year. 18 19 20 21 22Wednesday Thursday Cape Canaveral 79/66/pc 82/70/pc Daytona Beach 78/61/pc 82/65/pc Fort Myers 82/63/pc 85/66/pc Ft. Lauderdale 81/70/pc 83/73/pc Gainesville 79/54/fg 81/59/pc Jacksonville 77/54/pc 80/59/pc Key West 79/71/pc 81/73/pc Lake City 79/54/fg 81/59/pc Miami 83/70/pc 83/72/pc Naples 79/63/s 81/68/pc Ocala 79/55/fg 82/59/pc Orlando 81/61/pc 84/65/pc Panama City 69/58/pc 69/61/pc Pensacola 67/61/pc 69/63/pc Tallahassee 78/52/pc 78/59/pc Tampa 78/62/pc 81/65/pc Valdosta 79/52/pc 80/59/pc W. Palm Beach 81/69/pc 83/72/pc74/49 74/50 76/47 76/49 67/56 68/56 76/49 76/58 76/49 79/58 76/58 81/54 79/63 79/67 83/59 77/59 81/63 77/70 Today in 1997, a massive Andean mudslide buried two Peruvian villages, killing 300 people. The inhabitants of Ccocha and Pumaranra were actually evacuated from the villages prior to the mudslide, but their refuge higher up the mountain put them in the path of the slide. High Monday Low Monday 70 85 in 1928 23 in 2007 73 46 37 Monday 0.00" 0.42" Test 5.20" 1.89" 7:07 a.m. 6:21 p.m. 7:06 a.m. 6:22 p.m. 9:53 p.m. 8:57 a.m.Feb 22 March 1 March 8 March 16 Last New First Full Quarter Quarter Sunrise today Sunset today Sunrise tom. Sunset tom. Moonrise today Moonset today Moonrise tom. Moonset tom. Record high Record low Normal month-to-date Normal year-to-date TUE76 47 WED79 52 THU81 56 FRI79 56 SAT79 56WEATHER BY-THE-DAY 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon 76 58 61 64 64 74 73 41 48 39 30 43 38 37Actual high Actual low Average high Average low REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Tuesday, Feb. 18 Tuesday's highs/Tuesday night's low 7 High mins to burn 20Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms Slight chance of storms 9:33 a.m.HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO 20140.75" 10:50 p.m. 94-year-old Heimlich maneuver namesake pens memoirCINCINNATIThe surgeon who wrote the book on saving choking victims through his namesake Heimlich maneuver has now penned a new book: his memoir. Dr. Henry Heimlichs views on how the maneuver should be used and on other innovations he has created or proposed have put him at odds with some in the health field. But he hopes his recently published memoir will preserve the technique that has cleared obstructions from windpipes of choking victims around the world for four decades and made his name a household word. I know the maneuver saves lives, and I want it to be used and remembered, the 94-year-old retired chest surgeon told The Associated Press this month. I felt I had to have it down in print so the public will have the correct information. Heimlich says thousands of deaths reported annually from choking prompted him in 1972 to seek a solution. Over the next two years, leading a team of researchers at Jewish Hospital in Cincinnati, he successfully tested the technique by putting a tube with a balloon at one end down an anesthetized dogs airway until it choked. He then used the maneuver to force the dog to expel the obstruction. By 1974, I knew I needed to get the maneuver to the public as soon as possible to save lives, he said. He appeared on radio and television shows including Good Morning America and Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and started hearing from people who had used the maneuver or been saved by it. His autobiography is entitiled Heimlichs Maneuvers: My Seventy Years of Lifesaving Innovation.Snake-handling pastor dies from snake bite MIDDLESBORO, Ky. A snake-handling pastor who appeared on the National Geographic television reality show Snake Salvation has died after being bitten by a snake during a weekend church service. Jamie Coots was handling a rattlesnake at his Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church in Middlesboro when he was bitten on the hand Saturday night, another preacher, Cody Winn, told WBIRTV. After the bite, Coots dropped the snakes, but then picked them back up and continued on. Within minutes, Winn said Coots headed to the bathroom. He had one of the rattlers in his hand, he came over and he was standing beside me. It was plain view, it just turned its head and bit him in the back of the hand ... within a second, Winn said. When an ambulance arrived at the church at 8:30 p.m. Saturday, they were told Coots had gone home, the Middlesboro Police Department said in a statement. Contacted at his house, Coots refused medical treatment. Emergency workers left about 9:10 p.m. that night. When they returned about an hour later, Coots was dead. Scripture of the Day Common sense is in spite of, not as the result of education. Victor Hugo, French novelist (1802-1885) Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. Romans 8:35, 37 See an error? Thought for Today The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakeci tyreporter.com. Submissions The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question, or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. Thanks for reading. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterNueva named I ndependent Carrier of the Y earJoe Smith (from right), Lake City Reporter circulation district manager, presents Jorge Villa Nueva and Jordana Smith with a plaque for Independent Carrier of the Year on Friday. Also pictured is their 18-month-old daughter Estella. Photo of the Day Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Monday) 6-0-4 Play 4:(Monday) 0-9-5-3 Fantasy 5: (Sunday) 7-13-20-31-34 Associated Press HOW TO REACH USMain number ........ (386) 752-1293 Fax number .............. 752-9400 Circulation ............... 755-5445 Online ... www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is published Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permission of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges ..... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityre porter.com)A DVERTI S ING ......... 752-1293 (ads@lakecityre porter.com)C L ASSIFIE DTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon .... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)C I RCUL AT I O NHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or service related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or service related credits will be issued. Circulation ............... 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Associated Press QUICK HITS

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By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com Canons thundered in the distance as the Confederate troops prepared to march across the Olustee battlefield toward the Union Army. Small groves of trees exploded as the artillery found its mark, sending palm fronds spiraling into the air. A gathering of student government members from Niceville balanced on their knees, smart phone cameras aimed at the battle unfolding in front of them. The audience overflowed from the bleachers at the historic site, and mixed in with the crowd were teenage representatives from the Florida Association of Student Councils. The purple-and-grey shirts of FASC, worn by the Niceville student government and their more than 1,000 peers, distinguished members of the statewide organization from the rest of the crowd. After leadership workshops at Columbia High School, FASC shuttled students to Baker County to participate in the important milestone in Southern history. The Florida Association of Student Councils consists of more than 200 middle and high schools from throughout the Sunshine State, who work together to bring growth in student leadership development, participation in student activities and student engagement in civic affairs. This year, the FASC State Convention was held in Columbia County to coincide with the Battle of Olustee re-enactment. Its great to actually see history happen, said Dylan Broxson, from Niceville High School. Its probably the best lesson you can learn. As a generation of technology and social media, its amazing to see a generation dedicated to do-it-yourself and fighting for what they believe in. Each year the FASC State Convention is held in a different part of the state, and must educate participating students about the region. Weston-based Cypress Bay High School student Michelle Sierra said she believes the statewide conference provides a way for student government members around Florida to learn about each other and the different cultures. According to Michelle, the Olustee re-enactment presented a realistic experience for her and her fellow students. Every year, we get to do something interesting, said Kim Nemeth, advisor for Bronson High School. This, by far, has been the most creative Ive been a part of. In class, the students get to learn about the Civil War, but they dont get to see it. Bronson High School student body president Kayse Chorvat agreed. For most students, class consists of the teacher lecturing about the subject, but at Olustee she got to witness firsthand what it was like to be in 1864. She believes the hands-on experience is a more effective teaching method and easier to remember. Most of the students seemed excited to watch the re-enactment, including Ashli DeFina and Fernando Tolan from McArthur High School. Over the course of the state convention, Ashli said locals repeatedly told her how realistic the experience can be. I want to see people get quote-unquote shot, Fernando said, adding that the event reminded him of Back to the Future III. Ive seen re-enact-From staff reports As the Civil War invaded downtown Lake City, the South American alpaca took center stage at The Oaks Equestrian Center over the weekend for a statewide exposition and auction. The two-day event featured an alpaca petting zoo and obstacle course. Nearly 250 alpacas from across the country participated in the show hosted by the Florida Alpaca Breeders Association. A relative of the llama, the alpaca was judged on its fleece and its breeding. One reason we [hold the show] is to promote our alpacas, said Jean Riley, event coordinator and owner of Alpaca Magic in Homosassa. It lets people know what alpacas are all about and lets them touch the alpacas fine fleece. According to Riley, alpaca fleece can be compared to cashmere. Its a soft, fine material. Since alpacas arent yet popular in the United States, people wont see many alpaca products in stores. However, Riley predicts an increase in the coming years. The alpaca expo also provided guests the chance to purchase a wide variety of products produced from the alpacas coat, including hats, sweaters, blankets and more. The Miller-McMahan Alpaca auction sold 44 animals to Florida buyers. Despite the ongoing Olustee festival, Riley said the expo had a good turnout. The Florida Alpaca Breeders Association holds the event annually, but Riley is unsure if it will return to Lake City next year. In the meantime, she encourages the public to visit a nearby alpaca farm to learn about the alpaca lifestyle. For more information on alpacas and the association, those interested can visit the associations website at flalpacas. com. Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOC AL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 3A Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership MeetingThe Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership and the Columbia County Health Department have come together to form a partnership in order to create a tobacco free community. The partnership focuses on policies that effect our youth. In the New Year, we would like to focus on multi-unit housing cessation programs and promote the various tobacco cessation programs available to our community. We invite all community members, service workers, and school aged youth to attend the upcoming meeting to discuss tobacco-related issues in our county. Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting 134 SE Colburn Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 Monday, February 24, 2014 Time: 12:00pm All partnership meetings are open to the public. For more information on how to make a difference in your community through your local Tobacco Free Partnership, please contact Shomari Bowden Columbia County Health Department (386) 758-1066 or With State Farm behind you, you can look forward to whats ahead. Like 97% customer satisfaction with claims plus discounts up to GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY. Whos got your back and your back pocket?Just ask our 40 million State Farm customers.State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL*Discounts may vary state to state. Based on a 2008 internal State Farm claims department national study. 1103158.1 40% John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 www.johnkasak.com COURTESYAlpaca fleece can be compared to cashmere, according to event coordinator Jean Riley.All about the fleece at Alpaca Expo Concerts series continues with world-renown organist OliveraBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comHector Olivera, a world-renown organist, will let his experienced fingers glide across his organs keys and hopefully strike a chord with local music lovers during a Community Concerts of Lake City event Friday evening. Olivera will perform at the Florida Gateway Colleges Levy Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the door for $20 per adult or $5 for K-12 student. (Cash or check at the door or by credit card at www. communityconcerts.info.) Olivera, who is making his third concert appearance in Lake City, will be playing on both a Rodgers Trillium Organ and a Roland Atelier AT-900 touring organ. The stage will be filled with the organs and an array of speakers. David Murdock, Community Concerts of Lake City past president and board member, said Olivera performs all the popular classic organ music, such as Bach and Ride of the Valkyries. We decided to bring Olivera back because he was very popular the last time we had him several years back, Murdock said. We had near a full house with him and several requests to bring him back. He really is a sight to behold playing the organ. Murdock said Olivera can play Flight of Bumble Bee on the organs pedals with his feet. In addition to the concert, Olivera is scheduled to host an invitation-only student outreach program at noon on Thursday for at the Levy Performing Arts Center which is expected to be attended by up to 100 local students. The program is for local middle and junior high band, choral and keyboard students. Barbara Ann Carpenter, a Community Concerts of Lake City board member who oversees the programs student outreach program, said the local children will probably never have an opportunity like this again. Hell bring a few students up on the stage and ahead of time they will have learned a few short pieces of music and hell show them how to improvise and make that piece amazingly good, she said. Hes just wonderful. He is unbelievably good. Since entering the Buenos Aires Conservatory as a prodigy at age six, Maestro Hector Olivera has become one of the most sought after and revered concert organists of our time. Born in Buenos Aires, Olivera began playing the pipe organ when he was three years old. At age five he played for the legendary Eva Pern; at 12 he entered the University of Buenos Aires and by 18 he had performed for heads of state and celebrities throughout Latin America. When offered a scholarship at Juilliard School of Music in New York, he moved to the United States. Three years later, Oliveras professional concert career was launched when he won the AGOs National Improvisation Contest. Olivera has performed solo concerts throughout the USA, Europe, Asia, Australia, Central and Latin America and as a guest soloist with prominent symphony orchestras worldwide.ORGANIST COMING TO TOWN COURTESYHector Olivera will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. Tickets are available at the door for $20. Evening of Elegance this weekendFrom staff reportsThe Greater Lake City Community Development Corporation, Inc. invites the community to an Evening of Elegance on Saturday, Feb. 22 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Exhibition Hall. Dress code is black and silver formal attire. Admission is $30 per person. Entertainment will be provided by Phillip (Jazzdad) Thomas of Gainesville and Tony Buzzella of Lake City. For tickets call 386-7529785 or 904-635-2021. Student councils from all over state gather for Olustee history lessonments on television and thought they would be pretty cool to watch in person. Ocoee High School student Cooper Neal thought the Olustee Battle re-enactment seemed pretty real, especially the canon fire. After each canon blast, the sound echoed through the forests and shook the ground. Its important for people to realize these things happen and theyve happened before, he said. It puts things in perspective. People complain, but things back then were a lot worse. Browsing through the demonstrators and encampments made Cooper appreciative for the luxuries he has today. But not all the students seemed as enthusiastic about witnessing Civil War history. Coral Springs student Sam Keiley said he was confused to hear so many chants from the audience supporting the South. As I come from a different culture, a more urban city, Im not used to such an event, he said. People should start to open their eyes to see we are the United States of America, instead of the Confederate States of America. For Sam, the Battle of Olustee wasnt the most enjoyable experience, but he did say it was an experience. Auburndale High School student Shannon ONeal was warned by a re-enactor before entering a sutlers tent. Be careful, the re-enactor said, you might learn something if you enter. Shannon enjoyed the Civil War-themed event so much she plans to return next year with her family. And, like the rest of the FASC students, Shannon felt like she learned more from wandering the Olustee re-enactment than she could from an American History classroom. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterCypress Bay High School students Alexandra Quintana (left), 15, and Michelle Sierra, 17, take pictures with their cellphones as Confederate soldiers march past them on their way to the battlefield during the 38th Re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee on Sunday. More than 1,000 students from student government associations from all over the state visited the re-enactment while taking part in the Florida Association of Student Councils State Convention held at Columbia High School. This is something really cool seeing the community come to re-enact a battle that part of history. This binds together the community, Sierra said.

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I f you’re 45 or older, you might want to pay attention. You younger folks also should pay attention. For those 45 and older, here’s the deal: Just because you can’t recall information immediately doesn’t mean you are experienc-ing cognitive decline. You’re a little slower on the draw simply because your brain is stuffed with all kinds of accumulated knowledge, and information takes a while to swim to the top. For you younger sprouts, take note: You might be quicker on the recall, but that’s because you don’t have as much to recall. And the swim is not as difficult. Now, I’ve simplified this theory quite a bit — we with great accumu-lated knowledge are not impressed with complexity — but every-thing I’ve said is true, according to Michael Ramscar, a linguistics researcher at the University of Tbingen in Germany. Ramscar and his team have just released a report arguing that stud-ies on memory ask the wrong ques-tions. Let’s say we ask a 20-year-old and a 70-year-old to memorize a list of items, and then recall them. The 20-year-old may very well win that battle, but Ramscar says the test doesn’t address the size and content of each subject’s existing memory. The older person knows more; in fact, his brain may be as full as a tick on a black and tan coonhound. The brain of the whippersnapper, on the other hand, has beau coup storage space. Memory, like a fish, travels faster when the water isn’t crowded. Ramscar started looking into this matter years ago after reading a paper saying that cognitive decline starts as early as age 45. And since he was 45 at the time, he decided, by George, that can’t be right. Thus, his study and his theory. Sounds good to me, but then Denise Park said that yes, as we age, we know more stuff. “There’s a reason we don’t have 20-year-olds running the world,” she said in an article in the National Geographic Daily News. But at the same time, she said, we can’t ignore the obvi-ous: that the brain deteriorates with age just as every other body part does. But be ye not discouraged, Older Person. Denise Park — Ph.D., co-director of the Center for Vital Longevity, who is probably in her early 50s, someone with a lot of accumulated knowledge in her brain — said this: “I would argue that the amount of knowledge allows us to compensate for the slowdown.” And then she added, “I strongly believe that our everyday perfor-mance does not decline with age.” Sure, we who are eligible to join the AARP might be slower to retrieve stuff, but the older brain has piled up a whole lot of stuff from which to retrieve, useless though much of it might be. I like Ramscar’s conclusion. He wants us to picture our aging brains not as declining, but as being full, sort of like a 70-year-old man’s stomach after a sumptuous Thanksgiving dinner. That means, according to my aging brain, it’s nap time. OPINION Tuesday, February 18, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com The Obamacare roller coaster Older brains: Slower on the draw, but much fuller Q The Tampa TribuneT he Affordable Care Act’s threat to the economy is illustrated by this: The White House itself routinely chooses to ignore the law, and arbitrarily revises its provisions. The administration seems to understand that once the law is fully enforced, it will kill jobs and chill enterprises, and wants to put off the economic reckoning as long as possible. Yet supporters blissfully ignore these tacit acknowledgements of a looming disaster and insist all will be hunky-dory once Obamacare is fully implemented. Don’t buy it. Instead of trying to refashion the law on the fly, President Obama should work with Congress on a comprehensive overhaul. Last year the administration delayed for a year — until 2015 — the requirement that businesses with 50 or more employees offer health insurance or pay a fine. This week it added another year’s delay. It also is allowing firms with 100 or more workers to offer health insurance for only 70 percent of full-time workers in 2015 and 95 percent in follow-ing years. This, though the law clearly mandates 100 percent. The president also has ignored the act’s specific directives in providing delays on the mandate for individuals to buy health insurance and in allowing individuals to keep insurance that did not include the expanded coverage dictated by the law. The administration is treating the law — not to mention the Constitution — with amazing elasticity, but its motives are understandable. Just as critics warned, the overreaching law will kill jobs, increase costs and cause Americans to lo se the health care coverage that works best for them. Many small businesses will stop hiring additional full-time workers to avoid the 50-worker limit and the resulting penalties. Other businesses will sim-ply drop employee coverage, leaving workers to find something on the exchanges. As the Congressional Budget Office analysts found, wages are likely to be cut as businesses pass on the cost of any penalties or additional costs to workers. Yet advocates continue to ignore the mounting evidence of the law’s damaging consequences. It is interesting how Obamacare supporters spun the CBO finding last week that the law would cost the workforce 2.5 million jobs by 2024.... The accumulation of such alarming economic facts about the Affordable Care Act does seem to be getting the administration’s attention. But its reaction, so far, has been to delay and dissemble. It’s probably too much to expect anything different. If the president would candidly confront the health-care law’s failings, he could be credited with an act of memorable political courage, one that would merit the nation’s gratitude. UAW stumbles in southern voteT he United Auto Workers’ failed invasion of the South has all the ear-marks of the old “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” philosophy mixed with more than a touch of anti-unionism inherent in the region’s distrust of collective bargaining led by outsiders. The hourly workers at Volkswagen’s Chattanooga, Tenn., plant surprised UAW leaders in an election they thought was in the bag and the first step to organiz-ing foreign auto plants throughout the South. They had based their optimism on the fact VW said it would not oppose the plan and that workers would be seduced by the establishment of a joint management/worker council that would have serious input into operations. What the UAW apparently missed somehow was the longstanding ani-mosity toward unions in that part of the country where independence is a cherished concept and suspicion of outside influence from the North is virulent. Many workers apparently were convinced that the UAW had a big hand in what had occurred in Detroit. It would be hard to argue otherwise although management deserves at least an equal share in the decline of the U.S. auto industry over three decades. Unions thrive when working conditions are inadequate and often oppressive. The industrial revolution that saw the creation of America’s might in heavy industry was replete with examples of the maltreatment and exploitation of the American work force. As the automobile became the driving force in the American economy, the United Auto Workers under the Reuther brothers (Walter, Victor and Roy) fought valiantly to increase the share of the benefits for those doing the work. They were almost too successful, ulti-mately raising wages and benefits and retirement programs to a level that left the companies far less able to meet the world competition that was to come. Management on the other hand bought labor peace year after year by granting concessions it knew had a disastrous potential. Why? Because the companies could both sell all their cars and at the same time pass along to the consumer a healthy increase each year to cover the burgeoning costs. The Golden Auto would just continue laying its wonderful eggs forever. Except when it couldn’t any longer because suddenly the Japanese and others were making a better, higher-quality goose. In addition they were doing so with non-union workers. The word went out that if you bought one of these cars it was safe once again to get one built on Monday or Friday because the full work force showed up every day. All this, of course, is a bit of over simplification. There were numerous other factors that can be stirred into the mix of the rise and fall of the U.S. auto industry. But essen-tially, it seems, the reasons behind this UAW setback are clear. The working conditions are good and there are prospects of even better times from a company that appar-ently treats it workers well.... Overshadowing all of this is an economy that is still struggling to regain its post 2008 vitality. That uncertainty carries with it the specter, real or not, of sudden job loss. VW’s workers, like those everywhere, have serious concern about rocking an employment boat that currently seems on an even keel. It is a real fear, and one can hardly blame them despite the fact the manufacturer is one of the most stable leaders in the Western world. Would signing up with the UAW have given these workers some-thing they now don’t have? Who knows? The movement to allow those who don’t want to pay dues or assessments while at the same time turning over their collective bar-gaining rights to the UAW seems to me to be loaded with danger. How long would it take before resent-ment among the paying and non-paying members boiled over into a serious labor unrest? The fact is the UAW, whether it knew it or not, had an upstream paddle to settle into a region it has long sought and it still does. Phil Hudginsphudgins@cninewspapers.com Q Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community Newspapers Inc. Dan K. Thomasson Q Dan Thomasson is an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune and a for-mer vice president of Scripps Howard Newspapers. Readers may send him email at: thomassondan@aol.com.4AOPINION

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Mary Jane Andrew Ms. Mary Jane Andrew, 74, died at her residence on Sunday February 16, 2014 after a brief illness. She was the daughter of the late James Russell and Lil lian Marian George Brewster. She had made her home in Lake City for the past nineteen years after moving from Tampa, FL. She is survived by four daugh ters Marcie Bryson, Lynwood, WA.; Faye Haffner Grisham, OR.; Jennifer Mott, Lake City, FL and Donna Andrew Center ville, GA. One sister Geraldine Ruth McMinn Sunriver, OR; six grandchildren also survive. Funeral services will be con ducted Wednesday February 19, 2014 at the Dees Parrish Family Funeral Home at 2:00 P.M. with 5HYHUHQG1HDO+RZDUGRIFLDW ing. Visitation with the family will be one hour prior to service time. Interment will follow in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Lake City, FL. DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME is in charge of all arrangements 458 South Marion Avenue Lake City, FL 32025. Please sign guess book at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Janice Dobeck Mrs. Janice Dobeck ,76 of Live oak FL, passed away peacefully to be with our Lord, on Friday January 17, 2014 at her daugh ters home in Jasper FL. She was born in Chicago, Illinois on December 16, 1937 to Earl and Grace Haner. She married Wal ter Dobeck on January 8, 1955 in Chicago, Illinois. Mrs. Janice Dobeck loved to travel in her RV, tending her garden, playing bingo, and spending countless hours with her grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, her sister, Jennetta Haner, her son, Scott Dobeck and her husband Walter Dobeck She is survived by two sis ters, Jeneva and Judith and three daughters, Vivian Do beck of Decatur, IL, Susan (David) Legalley of Wasilla, AK, Patricia (Billy) Daven port of Jasper, FL, and one son, Jeremy (Tammy) Dobeck of Live Oak, FL,; six grandchil dren and one great grandchild.Private family ser vices were held at home.GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of com fort for the family online at, www.gatewayforestlawn.com Tracy Marie Deas Mrs. Tracy Marie Deas, 42, a resident of Live Oak, Florida passed away February 12, 2014. Mrs. Deas was a lifelong res ident of Suwannee County. She was of the Baptist faith. She was employed with the Dept. of Corrections for six teen years of service and had retired in 2013. She loved spending time with her family and friends and was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She was a graduate of Suwan nee High School Class of 1989. Survivors include her husband, Charles Deas, Live Oak, Florida, her daughter: Brooke Nicole Deas, Live Oak, Fl. two sons: Charles Tyler (Alex) Deas and Phillip Kyle Deas both of Live Oak, Florida. Her mother and fa ther: Phillip and Janet Northrup Higdon, Live Oak, Florida. Two Brothers: James “Jimmy” Higdon, White Springs, Fl. and Scotty Higdon, Live Oak, Flor ida. One grandchild, Charles Mason Deas, Live Oak, Florida.Funeral services will be con ducted Tuesday February 18, 2014 at 3:00 P.M. in the Chapel of Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home. Interment will follow in the Live Oak City Cemetery, Live Oak, Florida. The fami ly will receive friends Tuesday February 18, 2014 from 1:00-3:00 P.M. just prior to the service at the funeral home. Arrange ments are under the direction of DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave. Lake City, Fl. 32025. Please sign the guestbook atparrishfamilyfuneralhome.com. Michael Eugene Jenkins Mr. Michael Eugene Jenkins, Sr., 62, passed away Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at the Vet erans Admin istration Hos pital in Lake City, Florida. He was born December 29, 1951 to Charles E. Jenkins and Goldie Cook-Jenkins in Jack sonville, Florida. He loved music and playing the drums, as well as, making people laugh. Michael was a loving and proud Father and Son. Michael is preceded in death by his Mother, Goldie Cook-Jenkins and his Sis ter, Donna K. Underwood. Mr. Jenkins is survived by his Father: Charles E. Jenkins, Brother: James E. Jenkins, Sr. (Susan), Daughter: Tonya D. Nix, Son: Michael E. Jenkins, Jr. (Barbara), four Grandchildren, Taylor Kintz, Larry M. Jenkins, Caydon Mann, Destiny Hewiett, one Great Grandson Blane Jen kins, two Nephews: Michael A. Jenkins, James E. Jenkins, Jr. and one Niece: Malisa Grest. A Memorial Service will be scheduled at a later date. Arrangements trusted to ICS CREMATION & FUNERAL HOME, 357 NW Wilks Lane Lake City, Florida. 386-752-3436 www.icsfuneralservices.com Thomas FrancisKennedy II Thomas Francis Kennedy II, 74, passed away, Wednesday, January 29, 2014 at the Suwan nee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice). He was born in St. Petersburg, Florida, to the late Thomas and Maxine [Robbins] Kennedy and had lived in Co lumbia County for the past 12 years. His real home however, was the circus business. He was raised with the circus and trav eled with various ones his whole life. He owned Kennedy Con cessions and had been involved with Food Concessions with Amusements since the 1960’s, including the 1967 Worlds Fair in Montreal, Canada. He had been a part of the Columbia County Fair for the past 37 years. Survivors include his loving wife, Juanita Kennedy; sons, Thomas F. (Tammy) Kenne dy III of Gibsonton, FL, Cole Kennedy of Riverview, FL, and Robbin Kennedy of Gibsonton, FL; daughter, Candice (Jason) Kennedy-Caruso of Seffner, FL; daughter in law, Terry Kennedy of Zephyrhills, FL; 5 grandchil dren and 2 great grandchildren. Memorial services will be held at 5:00 p.m., Sunday af ternoon, February 23rd, 2014 in the Columbia County Fair grounds Banquet Hall with 3DVWRU'RQ0RVOH\RIFLDW ing. The family will receive friends following the services. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of com fort for the family online atwww.gatewayforestlawn.com Nelda Ray Cantey King Mrs. Nelda Ray Cantey King, 82, of Lake City, Florida went to be with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ on February 17, 2014. She was born on February 4, 1932 in Normangee, Texas to the late Herman Olen and Janie [McComack] Cantey. Nelda was a faithful member of First United Methodist Church and a member of Ruth Sunday School Class. She also volunteered at the Christian Service Center for 44 years and was a Past Presi dent of the Board of Directors. She was the loving wife of Jack L. King for 64 years and a devot ed mother to Phyllis Allen (Ed) of Jacksonville, FL and Ronald King (Tammy) of Lake City, FL; loving grandmother to Matthew Allen & Patrick Allen both of Jacksonville, FL and Nina King of Lake City, FL; two sisters, Tommie F. Bright of Highlands, TX and Doris E. Samford of Tenaha, TX; numerous nieces, nephews, and loving friends. All friends and family are in vited to a Celebration of Her Life, at 12:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 20, 2014 at First Unit ed Methodist Church of Lake City. The family will have pri vate graveside services in For est Lawn Memorial Gardens. ,QOLHXRIRZHUVSOHDVHPDNHa remembrance to the First Unit ed Methodist Church of Lake City, 973 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 or to the Christian Service Center, P.O. Box 2285, Lake City, FL 32056. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of love & comfort fro the family online at, www.gatewayforestlawn.com Gregory Lee McDonald Mr. Gregory Lee McDonald, age 53, of Jasper, FL. passed away Monday, February 17, 2014 at his home in Jasper following an ill ness of some time. Greg was a na tive and lifelong resident of Jasper. He was born on October 6, 1960 to Wayne and Dorothy Herndon McDonald. Greg was a carpenter by trade, working independently for many years as well as work ing in the mobile home manufac turing industry. He was employed most recently in the maintenance department for Hamilton County Board of Commissioners. Greg had a very unique personality and was loved by everyone who knew him. His determination for life was unmatched and he be came an inspiration to his family and friends. Greg was a member of Jasper First Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife of almost 35 years, Deborah Bell McDonald of Jasper; one daughter, Gretchen Vergara and her husband Eddie of Gaines ville, FL.; his parents, Wayne and Dorothy McDonald, Jas per, FL.; two brothers, Kirk McDonald, Lake City, FL. and Richie McDonald, Mayo, FL.; one sister, Lisa Carter, Jasper, FL.; two grandchildren, Aid en and Carter Vergara both of which he loved beyond measure. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, Feb ruary 19, 2014 at Jasper First Baptist Church. Interment will follow in Evergreen Cemetery. The family will receive friends between the hours of 5:00-7:00 P.M. Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at Harry T. Reid Funeral Home, Jasper, FL.,QOLHXRIRZHUVFRQWULEX tions may be made to Haven Hospice, 6037 West US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL. 32055. HARRY T. REID FUNERAL HOME Jasper, FL. is in charge of arrangements. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER COMMUNITY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 5A Vance Cox Agent/Owner"VUP)PNF#VTJOFTT-JGF 386.752.2345 Phone 877.322.7143 Fax 386.965.4120 Cell vance.cox@brightway.combrightway.com742 SE Baya Dr., Suite 102Lake City, Fl 32025 nnrnnrnrr n n rnn rn Construction/Debris Containers Available755-7060n Delivered to your job site today Jay Poole, AAMS Financial Advisor846 S W Baya DriveLake City FL 32025386-752-3545www.edwardjones.com Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by email at elawson@lakecityreporter.com.COMMUNITY CALENDARBlack History (Events are scheduled through out the community by various agencies and organizations. For more information about local efforts, visit www.itsaboutmyef forts.org.)Feb. 22CDC Black Tie Fundraiser Banquet at 6 p.m. at the County Fairgrounds. Admission is $30. Contact Ann McKellum at 904-635-2021 for more.Feb. 26Festival and Talent Show at 11:30 a.m. at the Florida Gateway College Pines Square. Admission is free. Contact Amy Dekle at 386-754-4317 for more.Feb. 28Closing Ceremony and Elders Banquet at 6 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center. Admission is free. Contact M. Mcallister at 386-867-1601 for more.AnnouncementsSave the dateCARC’s 21st annual Bowla-thon will be held Saturday, March 15 at 1 and 3 p.m. Door prizes will be given away all after-noon; grand prizes are awarded to bowlers that raise the most money. Call 752-1880 x 105 for more info and to register your team.CHS YearbooksHunter Printing, 1330 SW Main Blvd., has about 20 like-new 2005 Columbia High School year books for just $10 each. Proceeds will go to the school museum. They also have available about 20 Pat Summerall memorial football programs from the 2013 football season, also $10.Five WishesHospice of Nature Coast offers Five Wishes workshops at the Wings Education Center. Five Wishes has become America’s most popular living will because it is written in everyday language and helps start and structure important conversations about care in times of serious illness. Five Wishes lets your family and doctors know: Who you want to make health care decisions for you when you can’t make them / The kind of medical treatment you want or don’t want / How comfortable you want to be / How you want people to treat you / What you want your loved ones to know. The group will meet when 6-8 interested people have signed up. Call Larry Geiger at 755-7714 or 866-642-0962 for more.TODAYHazardous wasteThe Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Northeast District will hold a free workshop regarding the handling of commercial hazardous waste and the storage of used oil. The workshop will be held Tuesday, Feb 18 at the Florida Gateway College, Wilson S. Rivers Library. To register for this workshop or for additional information, please contact Dwayne Mundy at Mundy@ncfrpc.org or (352) 955-2200.Art LeagueThe Art League of North Florida invites the community to its monthly meeting on Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church. There will be dinner, a short business meeting and a presentation from representa tives of Michaels.VFW BingoVFW Post 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, hosts Bingo quarter games every Tuesday from 12-3 p.m. and 6:30-9:30 p.m. These are open to the public. Call 386-752-5001 with questions.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office’s new location, 971 W. Duval St. (U.S. 90), Suite 170, and ever Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Support groupAnother Way Inc. provides a domestic violence support group every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. If you are a current or former survivor of domestic violence, call 386-719-2702 for meeting location and an intake appointment. All services are free and confidential.Feb. 19Class of ’46The CHS class of 1946 will have their quarterly luncheon at Phish Heads on Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Call Lenvil Dicks at 961-1104 for more. John Lanier in revivalGospel singer John Lanier will be participating in a revival at New Beginning Church on Sunday, Feb. 16 through Wednesday, Feb. 19. Sunday times are 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Weekday times are 7 p.m. Call 755-5197 or 755-6422 for more information.Feb. 20Camera ClubThe Branford Camera Club will meet on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 7 p.m. at Cuzin’s Restaurant. The program will discuss an introduc tion to PhotoShop Elements — a quick fix to any picture that didn’t quite meet your expectation. Mark your calendars for other upcoming events: Field Trip to Cedar Key, Saturday, February 15. Field Trip to the Battle of Olustee, Sunday, February 16. Regular monthly meeting, Thursday, March 20: Program will be an “Adventures of a Master Photographer,” featur ing Master Photographer John Renaud. Contact Carolyn Hogue, Program Chair, 386-935-2044 for more.Success with rosesThe UF/IFAS Extension is hosting a workshop entitled, “Success with Roses in North Florida,” on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 5:45 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library. Admission is free.Feb. 21Annual Prayer LuncheonThe North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System will be hosting an Annual Prayer Luncheon at the Lake City VA Medical Center Auditorium on Friday, Feb. 21 at 11 a.m. in celebration of Black History Month. The theme for the luncheon is “Golden Jubilee in Civil Rights.” Please confirm your attendance by calling 352376-1611 x5316 or by email ing eustace.morrison@va.gov before Monday, Feb. 3. Tickets will be given out upon arrival at the luncheon. Invitations can be displayed in the windshield of your car to serve as a parking permit.Stand Down 2014Florida Crown Workforce Board, Inc. will host a Homeless Veterans’ Stand Down on Friday, Feb. 21 at American Legion Post #57, 2602 SW Main Blvd. The event is free and will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The program will provide non-perishable food packs, clothing, personal hygiene items, VA enrollment, VA claims assistance, job information and more. Transportation from Dixie and Gilchrist counties will be provided by AMVETS Post 88. Pick up points are: 7:30 a.m. at Cross City Library, 8 a.m. at former One Stop Office in Old Town, 8:30 a.m. at Train Depot in Trenton.Hector OliveraThe Levy Performing Arts Center at Florida Gateway College will host Hector Olivera on Friday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Olivera has performed all around the world and has been a guest soloist for prominent symphony orchestras. This year a new “flex ticket” system is being offered, where each ticket can be used at any Lake City Community Concert. Members also get a pass admitting them to all “Live! At Dowling Park Artist Series” concerts. Single concert tickets are $20/adult and $5/student K-12 See www.communityconcerts.info or call (386) 466-2013, or visit the Lake City Chamber of Commerce for details.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 BulletinBoardNEWS ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS Name Brand Gently Used Childrens ClothingLook for the color dots on Sale items(Across from the fairgrounds)NEW MERCHANDISE ARRIVING DAILY Y our savings federally insured to at least $250,00 0 and backed by the full f aith and credit of the United States Government National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agenc yNCUAFree Checking with NickelBack Auto Loans Mortgages Visa Credit Cards Membership is open to everyone who lives, works, worships, attends school or regularly conducts business in Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist or Levy Countywww.SunStateFCU.org Lake City Branches 1605 West US Hwy, 904 386-755-4097 619 Marion Ave. (inside VA hospital), 386-752-7894 CL ASS NOTES To leave an anonymous message on a possible dangerous situation concerning Columbia County schools, call toll-free, (866) 295-7303. To leave an anonymous message on a possible truancy problem in Columbia County schools, call 758-4947. Items for the school page should be dropped off or mailed to: Emily Lawson, Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055; faxed to (386) 754-9400; or e-mailed to elawson@lakecityreporter.com by 5 p.m. Thursdays. C ALEND AR COURTESYMelrose Parks Young A rtists of the MonthMelrose Park Elementary Schools Young Artists of the Month for January are (front row, from left) 2nd grader Gavin Bolstein, 1st grader Marlin Haywood, Kindergartner Dwayne Ryan, (back row, from left) Assistant Principal Michael Allen, art teacher Betsy Ward, 4th grader NaHaviya Paxton, 5th grader David Freeman, 3rd grader Skyler Foy, Principal Laurie Ann Fike. The Young Artist of the Month program is a business partnership activity between the Columbia County School District and Sunstate Federal Credit Union, Mix 94.3, Lake City Advertiser and Pizza Boy Pizza.State tests for Home Education studentsFrom staff reportsHome Education students are eligible to take state mandated assessment tests with the Columbia County School District at no charge. If you are interested in participating in this administration, please contact the Home Education office at 758-4935 or by email to simmonsm@columbiak12.com The deadline for FCAT Reading, Math, Science and End of Course Exams (EOC) is March 7. Information on the site and daily schedule will be determined prior to the administration of testing and sent to you in written form. Career DayEpiphany Catholic Schools is hosting a Career Day on Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 8:30-11 a.m. in the church social hall.Retired EducatorsThe Columbia County Retired Educations will meet Thursday, Feb. 20 at the School Board Adult Center (room 120) at 1 p.m. Please bring your volunteer hours. Any retired person interested in education is invited to attend. Call Mr. Brown at 752-2431 for more. Calendar Items COURTESYS.A.I.L. students place at Latin ForumJared Miranda (from left), Brendan McMahon, Caly Williams, Jordyn Thoreson and Hannah Lee, Richardson Middle S.A.I.L. 6th graders, smile for a photograph after competing and placing at the Florida Junior Classical League Regional Latin Forum in Jacksonville Feb. 8. The students are members of the RMS S.A.I.L. Latin Club and earned the following awards at the competition: McMahon took third in the couples costume category and fifth in the softball throw, Williams took second in the javelin throw and third in creative games, Thoreson took first in the 200 meter dash and Lee took third in the couples costume along with McMahon.Tuesday, Feb. 18FIVE POINTS ELEMENTARY Mid -Terms & Retention letters go home; DA Model Lesson for KindergartenWESTSIDE ELEMENTARY3rd Grade Parent Night at 6 p.m.SUMMERS ELEMENTARYYoung Writers to 94.3 Radio StationLANGUAGE ARTS CITMeeting @ CCSD Administrative Complex, room 207, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.RMSWolf Baseball vs Hamilton at 4 p.m. / Home; Wolf Softball vs Hamilton at 4 p.m. / HomeFWHSIndian Boys Weightlifting vs Union & Bradford; Indian JV/V Baseball vs Newberry / Away; Indian V Baseball vs PK Yonge / Away: 6 p.mCCESchool Advisory Council (SAC) meeting in Media Center at 6 p.m.EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY Reading Night in from 3-6 p.m.LCMSFalcon Baseball & Softball vs Suwannee / Home at 4 p.m.; FFA meeting from 3:10-4:10 p.m.Wednesday, Feb. 19WESTSIDE ELEMENTARYPlay for classes of Heather Giebeig, Melinda Jerome, Jessica Melgaard & Nancy RowanFIVE POINTS ELEMENTARYWriting Professional Learning Community with assigned facilitators in classrooms for all grade levels from 2:30-3:30 p.m. // Family and Community Engagement meeting at 11:45 a.m.@ Quail Heights Country ClubLCMSGrade Level Department Professional Learning Community meeting with Year Long Electives; School Advisory Council (SAC) meeting in Media Center at 8:05 a.m.; Sams Club from 11 a.m. 1:30 p.m.Thursday, Feb. 20EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY Volunteer Appreciation Drop-In from 7:30 8:30 a.m.NIBLACK ELEMENTARYVolunteer Appreciation Drop-In in Media Center from 9-10:30 a.m.RMSVolunteer Appreciation Brunch at 10 a.m.; Chess Club at 3:10 to 4:30 p.m.FIVE POINTS ELEMENTARYScience Night from 5-6:30 p.m.PINEMOUNT ELEMENTARYSchool Advisory Council (SAC) meeting at 5 p.m.WESTSIDE ELEMENTARY Bingo for Books from 6-7 p.m.; Book Fair openLCMS Professional Learning Community Team meeting from 8-8:30 a.m; Volunteer Appreciation Brunch, room 709 at 10:30 a.m.; Falcon Baseball vs Hamilton / Home at 4 p.m.FWHSIndian JV/V Baseball vs Union / Away at 4:30/7 p.m.; Indian V Softball vs Suwannee / Away at 6 p.m.CCEScience Fair judging from 8-11 a.m.Friday, Feb. 21INSTRUCTIONAL COACHESMeeting @ CCSD Administrative Complex, room 227 from 8 a.m. 3 p.m.RMSChorus to Disney (through Sunday)FIVE POINTS ELEMENTARYScholastic Book Fair open daily from 8 a.m. 10:30 a.m.FWHSIndian JV/V Baseball vs Santa Fe / Away at 4/7 p.m.; Indian V Softball vs Keystone / Away at 6 p.m.FWMSIndian Baseball & Softball vs Williston / Away at 5 p.m.LCMSFalcon Solo & Ensemble Band to Buchholz High Schoool: TBA

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 7A Dickinson said. “That was the idea when we were building up the extra cash.” “We had actually already had a plan in place for a museum through an earlier small grant for a study that was done with the Parks Department and CSO that identified the needs,” Dickinson said. “We had a plan in place and we were able to give that to Hill Truck Rental Company Foundation representatives, they liked what they read and they said, ‘Here’s $1 million’.” Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park manag er Michelle Waterman said plans for a new museum have been in the works for more than 20 years. “We’ve just made a quan tum leap here within the last year once we got this additional money,” added Dickinson. “That was our ultimate goal. If you go back and look at our annual reports it’s in all of them — our ultimate goal is to build a museum at Olustee.” He said efforts are already underway to secure additional funding. “We’re already reaching out to Jacksonville and folks in Lake City who have an interest that have money that can go to a 501c3 orga nization like ours and do some good,” Dickinson said. Waterman said the muse um that’s currently on site was originally an outdoor pavilion that was enclosed and made into a museum. It was erected in 1949 and enclosed in 1977. Before then it was nothing more than a breezeway with a small gift shop and bath room and another breeze way to the Battle of Olustee Monument. The second breezeway has since been torn down. “We want a museum that is not going to stagnate,” Dickinson said. “We want a museum that is going to have new exhibits, so when people come next year what they’ll look in there and see won’t be the same stuff they saw the year before.” Officials are uncertain when construction on the new museum will begin. “We’re essentially in that process now,” Waterman said. “We’re putting infor mation out and looking for design firms.” Dickinson said dona tions are welcomed as they continue with fundraising efforts. Waterman agreed and noted that additional finan cial support is important. “While $1 million is a very large amount of money, we’re looking at doing addi tional things in the future that we could use continued the sea of gray with the Union’s star spangled banner in tow. “I liked when they charged and went ‘boosh boosh,’” said 10-year-old Valdosta native Payten Pope, mimicking the sound of artillery. As the dust settled and the re-enactors returned to the field, a soldier played “Taps,” the U.S. military’s traditional musical nod to fallen warriors. Payten’s mother, Farrin Pope, said tears welled in her eyes as re-enactors and visitors listened to the bugler’s tune. “When they played ‘Taps,’ I got emotional,” Pope said, who first heard the song at the funeral of her World War II veteran grandfa ther when she was 15. She connected his service to those who fought for the Confederacy and Union—coun trymen who fought to protect their beliefs and way of life. “I can’t imagine what they went through,” Pope said. “It makes you realize we take so much for granted.” Husband and wife Peter and Mary Smith, visiting from New Port Richey, came to this year’s re-enactment for their mutual love for history. “It’s interesting to see how they sacrificed so much for their cause,” said Peter Smith. “I didn’t realize this battle was one of the bloodiest, percent age-wise,” said Mary Smith. At the battle’s conclusion, sol diers from both sides formed a line along the spectator’s viewing area, raised their rifles to the sky and fired—a sign of appre ciation to all those who attended the re-enactment festivities and continue to support the cultur al exploration of 19th century American history. Official crowd estimates were not available as of press time Monday. sales this year were good. “I think generally if you just looked at the crowd, you could tell we did good business,” she said. “In the Walmart parking lot, there were more out-of-county tags than I’ve ever seen.” However, Lord said there were several events in town over the weekend that drew tourists to Columbia County, including an alpaca expo and a high school leadership conference. As a result, it will probably be hard to separate Olustee’s impact from the boost pro vided by the other events. The TDC plans to send surveys to the local restau rants, as well as receive complete occupancy fig ures from hotels in the county. Lord said she is anxious to see what the numbers are for Lake City’s largest annual event. Businesses, she said, look forward to it each year. They tend to show their support by advertis ing the Olustee Festival on their marquees or donating their respective wares. es and the number is grow ing. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has eight region al field offices where gun owners can apply for the permits in person, but demand is so high that the wait at some locales is six months for an appoint ment. “Tax Collectors’ offices are already set up across the state,” said Columbia County Tax Collector Ronnie Brannon. “We’ve got the staff in place and can provide that additional service to the citizens. So, why not?” Brannon pointed out that tax offices would only collect applications and forward them to the Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Tax collectors would have no role in issuing the licenses themselves. Still, Brannon thought it a worthwhile proposal. “I think it would serve the people of Columbia County better,” he said. “We have cameras, fin gerprint machines, the staff...Anything we can do to help serve the people, that’s what we’re here for. Bring it on.” Making it easier for gun owners to get concealed weapons licenses, which require some training, could make Floridians safer, said NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer. “They become a little more conscious of the responsibility of gun own ership,” Hammer, who esti mates that there are 8 mil lion gun owners in Florida, said. “I think it can’t hurt.” Under the proposal, tax collectors would be able to charge an extra $22 on top of the $70 fee for new applications and an addi tional $12 for renewals, which cost $60. The coun ty officials already process photos, fingerprints and other things associated with the concealed carry applications. The costs don’t include $42 for back ground checks, which will still be handled by the agriculture department. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services offices in Fort Walton Beach, Jacksonville, Doral, Orlando, Punta Gorda, Tallahassee, Tampa and West Palm Beach are two-hour drives for some gun owners, many of whom prefer to hand over their paperwork in person because of past delays pro cessing the applications by mail. Clerks at the regional offices can also ensure that applications contain all of the items necessary to be processed, another time-saver. Applications now take about 35 days to process once received by the department, accord ing to spokesman Aaron Keller. Several years ago, the department had a backlog of up to six months to get the appli cations processed, which by law are required to be completed within 90 days. MUSEUMContinued From 1A TURNOUTContinued From 1A PERMITSContinued From 1A Photos by J ASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterUnion soldiers carry a fallen comrade to a medical tent as Confeder ate front lines advance. BATTLEContinued From 1A A field surgeon looks for injured soldiers left behind Union lin es. County’s champion places 3rd at Jacksonville regionalsBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com Columbia County’s spelling bee champ placed third after a “heart-pounding” conclusion to the Florida Times-Union Regional Spelling Bee in Jacksonville Saturday. Eighth grade Lake City Middle School student Jack Duarte and 13 other coun ty champs from North Central Florida competed for over an hour at the Hicks Auditorium of Jacksonville, vying for a spot at the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. later this year. Duarte was among the final three, successfully spelling words like “contigu ous,” “salmonella,” “tsunami,” “androcen tric,” “protagonist,” and “boudoir.” “It was actually very intense,” said father Diogenes Duarte. “I don’t remem ber the exact number of rounds, but Jack went at least 10 to 12.” Duarte’s final swan song? “Libretto,” an Italian word describing texts used for large musical pieces like operas, musi cals, religious cantatas and ballets. “By that point I was just kind of not nervous anymore, I was in the groove of things,” Jack Duarte said. “But my heart was still pounding—definitely an adrena line rush.” He said the experience taught him vital lessons he could use later in life. “It’s given me definitely more self con fidence in front of people,” he said. “And I’ve learned a few lessons in terms of talking and speaking in front of people. It allowed me to get good public speaking experience, which will help me in high school and college.” Jack Duarte didn’t go home emp ty-handed—he won a college-level Merriam Webster dictionary, a Webster New World thesaurus, $100 and a $25 gift certificate to Barnes & Noble. Aubrey Townsend from Green Cove Springs in Clay County was the runner-up with eighth grade Daniel Samraj from Gainesville the winner of the regional competition. This will also be Jack Duarte’s last spelling bee, as students are ineligible once they pass the eighth grade or turn 16 years of age. “We’re very proud of him,” Diogenes Duarte said. “We had a great time and he enjoyed it. I was a great experience.”SPELLING BEE FILEJack Duarte, a Lake City Middle School eighth grader, placed third at the Regional Spelling Bee held in Jacksonville.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOC AL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Robert Smalls, a Civil War heroBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comAbolitionist leader Frederick Douglass made a special appearance at Olustee Battlefield to tell visitors the role of blacks during the Civil War, including the story of Robert Smalls, who helped paved the way for blacks in the military. Douglass, portrayed by John Anderson of Daytona Beach, told visitors about the role blacks played in the workforce, emphasizing their importance outside of menial jobs as well. The story of these people is such that they were living and existing as working Americans as we understands Americans to be today, he said. Smalls, while a slave himself, became a skilled worker in Charleston, S.C.s maritime industry, working various jobs as a dockworker, sail maker and eventually pilot (or wheelman, as blacks were known) of the CSS Planter, a transport ship used by the Confederacy. One evening in 1862, the Planters Confederate officers left the ship in the care of Smallsbut unbeknownst to them, he had different plans. Smalls, disguised in the captains clothes, piloted the Planter out to sea, taking seven enslaved crewmembers, the ships supplies and valuable Confederate intelligence with him, including a CSA secret signal codebook and maps of mines placed around Charleston harbor. He also made a stop to pick up his family and the families of his fellow crew, who were hiding at a nearby wharf. Hoisting a white flag of surrender, Small made contact with the Union blockade and turned over the Planter to the U.S. Navy. President Lincoln, impressed with Smalls cunning, awarded him $1,500 ($34,000 in todays standards) and granted him a personal audience two weeks later. Historian say Smalls account of the escape to Lincoln helped convince the president to allow blacks to serve in the Union Army. The opportunity of war gave [blacks] reasons...to demonstrate their potential for patriotism, Douglass (Anderson) said, adding they wanted to show [abolitionists opponents], We are courageous, disciplined, intelligent and all those other things you dont want to believe we are. Smalls went on to serve in the U.S. House of Representativesrepresenting South Carolinas fifth and seventh districts over two non-consecutive terms. A variety of locations and vessels now bear his name, including Fort Robert Smalls in Pittsburgh and a U.S. logistics support vessel bearing his name.Ice storm keeps 200 re-enactors from festivalBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comMother Nature plays a huge role in each Battle of Olustee Re-enactment as well as the annual Olustee Battle Festival. This year an ice storm and other inclement weather kept about 200 re-enactors from participating. Included among them were a majority of re-enactors from the 54th Massachusetts. Faye Bowling Warren, executive director of the Blue-Grey Army, which hosts the Olustee Battle Festival, said she was also told about the 54th not being able to attend by the Florida Park Service, which is in contact with the re-enactor groups. Ive heard there were quite a few re-enactors groups trapped by the weather, she said. In fact, many of re-enactors that I talked to at the re-enactment, said they came in a day later simply because they could not get though particularly the New York group. They were hit hard by bad weather up there. Warren said weather often plays a key role in Olustee weekend. Many people try to take the three day wekend with the extra day off on Monday for Presidents Day for a little trip South, she said. If the weather holds them up they have to reschedule their whole program. Warren said the weather here is also critical for the Olustee Battle Festival. We can have a good day one day, but the next day might be terrible, she said. This year the weather held out beautifully here for all three days, something for which organizers were thankful. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA re-enactor listens as Frederick Douglass impersonator John Anderson tells the story of Robert Smalls, a self-made free man, who stole a Confederate transport ship, the C.S.S. Planter, from the Charleston Harbor and handed it over to the U.S. Navy. Frederick Douglass shared the story of the self-made free man. Medallions one of many ways to remember 150th Battle AnniversaryBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee was an historic occasion and the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park Citizen Support Organization did not let the moment pass without issuing a commemorative medallion. We think these medallions are just a great way to be able to hold onto that history and to commemorate this event, so everybody gets one, said Andrea Thomas, park service specialist. All of our re-enactors that were on the field received a coin at check-in. The medallion is approximately the size of a half-dollar coin. On one side is the inscription: February 20, 1864. Floridas largest Battle of the Civil War. Nearly 11,000 men engaged in Battle at Olustee. Almost 3,000 were killed or wounded. WWW.BattleofOlustee.org The other side of the medallion contains a printed image of the Olustee Battle Monument, built in 1912 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, with the words th Anniversary above and Battle of Olustee below. About 4,500 of the medallions were made, but the CSO is also selling them on their website. The medallions arent the only commemorative items available. Hats, key chains, steel coffee mug tumblers and a DVD were also created and are being sold for the sesquicentennial event. They put it all together and we had them come down and film it last year and the year before so that way we could present it on the 150th Anniversary, Thomas said. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comClement Lindsey and his daughter Annette LindseyHutson play a key role in staging the annual Battle of Olustee Re-enactment. Although they are rarely seen on the battlefield, their behind-the-scenes work is enjoyed by thousands each year when palm fronds explode, flying 50 feet into the air. Clement Lindsey and Lindsey-Hutson are in charge of the pyrotechnics at the annual event. When the re-enacement cannons fire, they are only firing black powder. However, because of the small explosive charges the Lindseys have plaved on the battlefield beforehand, the audience gets to see dirt, palm fronds and other debris fly as of a cannon ball has struck. Our job is to go out there and set up on different sides, my daughter on one side and me on the other, and we set up charges, Clement Lindsey said. Lindsey lives near High Springs and has been working with the Olustee Battle Re-enactment pyrotechnics for close to three decades. Lindsey said there were nearly 100 charges set up on each side of the battlefield for Saturday and Sundays historic military re-enactments. The charges are set in advance for different sized explosions. We add trees, palms and we like to put charges in the trees so it sort of blows up, Lindsey said, noting no pine trees are harmed, but some small shrubbery was. We like to add that to it and we add different sized charges, that way when the cannons fire normally would be different sizes and different sized explosions, he added. We just like to put a variety in there and add to the re-enactment. Its a lot of work, but its a lot of fun once you smell that smoke. Lindsey said they travel far and wide for their work. Sometimes they do too good of a job. When we did the first (performance) at the Battle of Natural Bridge, they fired off and we set off the charge, they stopped the battle because they thought we were using live ammunition, he said. Pyrotechnics add to the re-enactment. There are designated areas on the Olustee Battlefield where the pyrotechnics can be placed for the explosions. Archeologists reviewed the area and marked places where the explosions wouldnt do any harm. Lindsey and his daughter lie on the field during re-enacrments so make sure no re-enactors are on the charges when they are set to go off. If somebody wants to go out in glory, we tell them which way to head and we set it off for him and he can die with a charge, he said. You can be within three feet of a charge when it goes off and its not going to hurt you. Youll feel sand and heat, but it wont hurt you.Pyrotechnicians make the show sparkle and shine JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterPyrotechnicians Annette Lindsey-Hutson and her father, Clement Lindsey, are responsible for the spectacular explosions on the battlefield, including those that have uproot a number of trees, sending them dozens of feet in the air.Many of the re-enactors that I talked to ... said they came in a day later simply because they could not get through particularly the New York group. They were hit hard by the weather up there. Faye Bowling Warren, executive director of the Blue-Grey ArmyIf someone wants to go out in glory, we tell them which way to head and we and he can die with a charge. Clement Lindsay, Olustee pyrotechnician

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER WEEKEND IN PICTURES TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 9A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterDancing the night awayEric Lincke twirls Jane Johnson while dancing at the 35th Annual Blue-Grey Square Dance at the Rountree-Moore Toyota Showroom on Saturday. AMANDA WILLIAMSON/ Lake City ReporterSewing in the sutler’s tent‘I’ve always been a seamstress, but I found a niche for my sewing skil ls,’ said Camilla Donnelly, seamstress for Carolina Belles: His tory Clothing Reproductions for Ladies and Children. ‘There’s a lot of people who do men’s clothing, so there wasn’t much o f a need there.’ Donnelly and her two daughters, Dixie and Belle, have been participating in the re-enactment for as long as they can remember. According to Donnelly, it has become a fa mily hobby. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLast-ditch effortWith dwindling resources, including scarce ammunition, Confe derate troops make a last-ditch effort to drive the invading Northern ers back into the woods during the re-enactment of the Battle of the Olustee on Sunday. RIGHT: Rebel soldiers break their formation as cannon fire hits dangerou sly close to home. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMelding two centuries into oneA member of the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, Battery C, rubs a can non sponge across the face of Steve Lynch, of Newburyport, Mass., following the battle re-enac tment on Sunday. Lynch’s great grandfather, Jeremiah Hogan, was one of the ori ginal soldiers that fought at the Battle of Olustee.

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10A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 150th goes off without a hitchBATTLE OF OLUSTEE RE-ENACTMENT Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMorale is boosted after word of reinforcements spreads throughout the front lines. BELOW: Re-enactors pay their respects to the fallen soldiers who gave their lives during the Battle of Olustee. A Confederate soldier runs toward his fellow troops after capturing the American flag from enemy lines. LEFT: A flag bearer is brought down by a bullet during the 38th Re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee on Sunday. Union soldiers attempt to keep rebel forces at bay during a skirmish on Friday.

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By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Bullseyes are back for two Columbia County schools. Westside Elementary and Epiphany Catholic School have fielded archery teams and will compete in Floridas Sixth Annual NASP State Tournament at Easton Newberry Archery Center on Saturday. Richardson Middle School first offered archery in Physical Education class in 2006, according to Steven R. Robbins, FWC Regional Hunter Safety Coordinator and Florida NASP State Coordinator. Equipment was transferred to Lake City Middle School, which fielded a team to compete at state with Fort White Highs middle school. Westside and Epiphany recently began archery in P.E. Lake City Middle School still offers archery in class, but no longer com petes in the tournament. We started last year with fourthand fifthgraders shooting during P.E., Westside coach Andy Bennett said. This is our first year with a competi tive team. We had a tour nament of champions last year for fourth-graders and have a good handful of the winners on this team. We invited some other shooters from class. We thought this state competition would be neat and it was something we were able to pull off. It is nice to do something different. Westside has more than two dozen students on the competitive team. Two are Megan Edge and Terrick Ponds, both 11. We get to shoot and do things we usually wouldnt be allowed to do, said Edge, who plays softball and comes from a sports fam ily. I have to watch a lot of sports and this is one of my favorites. When we started the program, I got a bow for Christmas. I think our team will do very good. Ponds also plays football and took up archery as a fourth-grader at Westside. It is a teamwork event, Ponds said. You get to work with friends. There is nothing bad about it, but you have got to be serious. I get nervous about the com petition and playing against other schools. I dont get a bullseye every time, but I try my best to get them. Coach Paula Redmond said Epiphany added archery by popular demand. Last year we asked the student body what they would be interested in. For archery we got in touch with Steve Robbins, Redmond Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, February 18, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Grand Opening February 20th 3-6pm FOOD FUN PRIZES 3405 S. US HWY 441 Lake City, FL 386-243-9191 CAR AUDIO HOME AUDIO MARINE COMMERCIAL ARCHERY continued on 3B Bullseyes are back Westside, Epiphany School field archey teams TIM KIRBY /Lake City Reporter Members of the Epiphany Catholic School archery team are (front row, from left) James Cothran, Sergio Ceruto, Turner Crews, Callie Pierce, Kylie Parris, Sofia Arata and Maggie Cope. Back row (from left) are Nathan Simon, Alexandra Bedoya, Alaina Anschultz, Veronica Rosenbaum, coach Paula Redmond, Lane Green, Ethan Thomas and James Norris. TIM KIRBY /Lake City Reporter Members of the Westside Elementary archery team are (front row, from left) Jamiel Cray, Bronson Dumas, Trent Steedley, Zach Dicks, A.J. Kihei and Gracey Rogers. Second row (from left) are Brandon Waldron, Josef Walker, Ty Wehinger, Mason Gray, Trey Hingson and Kinley Keen. Third row (from left) are Daisha Poulnot, Daniel Prince, Zachary Williams, Kavien Gillyard, Ashley Carrillo, Jacob Juliano and Christian Roldan. Back row (from left) are Frank Kramer, Terrick Ponds, Tatyana Murphy, Kayla Smith, Megan Edge, Adrianna McClellan and Kierston Tracy. Andy Bennett is coach.

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By MARK LONGAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — Richard Childress pumped his fist above his head, emphatically celebrat-ing his grandson’s latest accomplishment. It was a rare show of emotion from the usually stoic team owner. Then again, this moment was far from normal. Austin Dillon took the iconic No. 3 — the number the late Dale Earnhardt drove to 67 wins and six of his seven cham-pionships — out of pseudo-retirement and put it back atop the scoring tower at Daytona International Speedway. Dillon might as well have grabbed the larg-est Earnhardt tribute flag ever made and waved it all around NASCAR’s most famous track. “The 3 is special to all of us,” Childress said. “The family, the Earnhardt fam-ily, to every one of us, but I think it’s special because Austin, our family, is in the car.” Dillon will be the talk of the Daytona — and of all of racing — for the next six days after winning the pole for Sunday’s seasonopening Daytona 500. The famed number already was in the spotlight as Childress decided to put it back on track in the Sprint Cup Series for the first time since his driver and friend’s fatal accident in the 2001 Daytona 500. Dillon made its return an emphatic one. “The legend of Dale has lived on for a long time and is going to continue to live on forever,” Dillon said before his pole-sitting run. “Dale Earnhardt is not just famous because of the num-ber. He is Dale Earnhardt. He was a hero in every-body’s mind, including myself. ... That’s the cool-est thing about everything that’s going on.” Fans still lamenting the loss of Earnhardt may have mixed emotions about see-ing another driver in the No. 3. But those closest to the “Intimidator” welcomed its return. “I think it’s great for Austin and Richard, grand-son and grandfather being able to come together and doing something like that with a number that’s been in their family for so many years,” Dale Earnhardt Jr. said. “It has a lot of history inside their family. ... I’m happy for them.” Childress kept the stylized version of the No. 3, but tweaked the color scheme. He switched it from a white number with red trimming to a red number with black trimming. That was enough to satisfy Dale Sr.’s mother, Martha, who had been uneasy about seeing it back on the track. “I know it was Richard’s number when he drove and this is his grandson, and I understand that,” Martha Earnhardt said in an inter-view with Fox Sports 1. “As long as they don’t make it look like the No. 3. If they painted it a different color, I can sort of deal with it, but I don’t want to see the black No. 3 there just like Dale’s.” Others just knew it was time. And NASCAR certainly was onboard with it. Industry leaders have pro-moted the return of the No. 3 as one of the biggest story lines heading into the season. “I think everybody had reservations at one point in time,” former Earnhardt crew member Danny “Chocolate” Myers said. “Then you think about it and grow into it and realize it’s just time.” Myers drove from North Carolina to Daytona Beach on Sunday, listening to qualifying on the radio and going through the tear-filled euphoria of Dillon’s 196 mph run to the ner-vous wait afterward, mak-ing sure it held up. It did, and Myers arrived just in time to hug Dillon in Victory Lane. “I had my moment, I won’t lie to you,” Myers said. “It’s a big deal for me, and the 3’s part of it. “But this is a kid I got to see grow up. I’m a Dale Jr. fan, not because he’s Dale Earnhardt Jr. and not because he’s Dale Earnhardt’s son. But because he’s a kid I got to see grow up. It’s the same with Austin, and that’s means a lot to it. To do this today, it’s a big, big deal.” Engine builder Danny Lawrence explained why better than everyone else. “It’s no secret that when we lost Dale, we rode an adrenaline for a little while there,” said Lawrence, who started with the company before the 1998 Daytona 500. “When you’ve got a guy that’s driving for you that’s your friend and to me the best race car driver out there, it’s just about impossible to recover from that.” But Dillon’s given the team a shot in the arm, especially after lean years. The next step is getting the No. 3 back in Victory Lane. If that happens, look for Childress to really let loose in celebration. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at MississippiESPN2 — Texas at Iowa St.ESPNU — NC State at ClemsonFS1 — Villanova at ProvidenceNBCSN — George Washington at Richmond 9 p.m. ESPN — Iowa at IndianaESPNU — Georgia at TennesseeFS1 — Butler at St. John’s 11 p.m. ESPNU — Utah St. at San Diego St. SOCCER 2:30 p.m. FS1 — UEFA Champions League, Barcelona at Manchester City ——— WINTER OLYMPICS (All events taped unless noted as live) NBC 3 p.m. Men’s Speedskating — 10,000 Gold Medal Final; Men’s Nordic Combined — Individual K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final 8 p.m. Women’s Alpine Skiing — Giant Slalom Gold Medal Final; Men’s Freestyle Skiing — Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Women’s Bobsled — Competition; Women’s Short Track — 3000 Relay Gold Medal Final 1 a.m. Women’s Short Track — 1000 Competition NBCSN 7 a.m. Men’s Hockey — Elimination Round (LIVE) 10 a.m. Men’s Speedskating — 10,000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Men’s Nordic Combined — Individual K-125 Large Hill, Cross-Country Noon Men’s Hockey — Elimination Round (LIVE); Women’s Bobsled — Competition 5 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 3 a.m. Men’s Hockey — Quarterfinal (LIVE) 5:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Snowboarding — Parallel Giant Slalom Gold Medal Finals; Women’s Cross-Country — Team Sprint Gold Medal Final (LIVE) MSNBC Noon Men’s Hockey — Elimination Round (LIVE) CNBC 5 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Curling — Tie Breaker USA 5 a.m. Women’s Curling — Semifinal (LIVE)BASKETBALLNBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 —Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 37 14 .725 — Atlanta 25 26 .490 12 Washington 25 27 .481 12Charlotte 23 30 .434 15 Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 — Chicago 27 25 .519 13Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 — Houston 36 17 .679 2 Dallas 32 22 .593 6 Memphis 29 23 .558 8 New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 12 .782 — Portland 36 17 .679 6 Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 Denver 24 27 .471 17Utah 19 33 .365 22 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 — Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Golden State 31 22 .585 5 L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 Today’s Game Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.New York at Memphis, 8 p.m.Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m.San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m.New York at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Brooklyn at Utah, 9 p.m.San Antonio at Portland, 10 p.m.Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. NBA calendar Thursday — Trade deadline, 3 p.m.April 16 — Last day of regular season. April 19 — Playoffs begin.May 20 — Draft lottery.June 5 — NBA Finals begin. AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 16, total points and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv1. Syracuse (64) 25-0 1,624 1 2. Florida (1) 23-2 1,543 3 3. Wichita St. 27-0 1,489 44. Arizona 23-2 1,427 25. Duke 20-5 1,296 86. San Diego St. 22-2 1,232 57. Cincinnati 23-3 1,157 108. Kansas 19-6 1,129 79. Villanova 22-3 1,020 610. Saint Louis 23-2 1,019 12 11. Creighton 21-4 991 1811. Louisville 21-4 991 1313. Michigan St. 21-5 788 914. Virginia 21-5 752 1715. Iowa 19-6 721 1616. Wisconsin 21-5 609 2117. Iowa St. 19-5 597 1118. Kentucky 19-6 579 1419. Texas 20-5 577 1920. Michigan 18-7 421 1521. UConn 20-5 382 2422. Memphis 19-6 204 2023. UCLA 20-5 168 —24. Ohio St. 20-6 133 2225. Gonzaga 23-4 112 — Others receiving votes: North Carolina 54, Arizona St. 45, Pittsburgh 21, SMU 21, Stephen F. Austin 8, Oklahoma 7, New Mexico 3, VCU 2, Green Bay 1, Kansas St. 1, Louisiana Tech 1.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 5 Duke at Georgia Tech, 9 p.m.No. 6 San Diego State vs. Utah State, 11:05 p.m. No. 8 Kansas at Texas Tech, 8 p.m.No. 9 Villanova at Providence, 7 p.m.No. 11 Louisville vs. South Florida, 7 p.m. No. 14 Virginia at Virginia Tech, 9 p.m. No. 15 Iowa at Indiana, 9 p.m.No. 17 Iowa State vs. No. 19 Texas, 7 p.m. No. 18 Kentucky at Mississippi, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No. 1 Syracuse vs. Boston College, 7 p.m. No. 2 Florida vs. Auburn, 7 p.m.No. 3 Wichita State at Loyola of Chicago, 8 p.m. No. 4 Arizona at Utah, 10 p.m.No. 7 Cincinnati at UCF, 7 p.m.No. 10 Saint Louis at George Mason, 7 p.m. No. 11 Creighton at Marquette, 8 p.m.No. 23 UCLA at California, 10:30 p.m.No. 24 Ohio State vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 5 Duke at North Carolina, 9 p.m.No. 13 Michigan State at Purdue, 7 p.m. No. 21 UConn at Temple, 9 p.m.No. 22 Memphis at Rutgers, 7 p.m.No. 25 Gonzaga at BYU, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Syracuse at No. 5 Duke, 6 p.m.No. 2 Florida at Mississippi, Noon No. 3 Wichita State vs. Drake, 8 p.m.No. 4 Arizona at Colorado, 9 p.m.No. 6 San Diego State at New Mexico, 10:05 p.m. No. 7 Cincinnati vs. No. 11 Louisville, Noon No. 8 Kansas vs. No. 19 Texas, 7:30 p.m. No. 9 Villanova vs. St. John’s at Wells Fargo Center, 1:30 p.m. No. 10 Saint Louis vs. George Washington, 8 p.m. No. 14 Virginia vs. Notre Dame, 2 p.m.No. 15 Iowa vs. No. 16 Wisconsin, Noon No. 17 Iowa State at TCU, 4 p.m.No. 18 Kentucky vs. LSU, 4 p.m.No. 22 Memphis vs. Temple, 9:30 p.m.No. 23 UCLA at Stanford, 6 p.m.No. 24 Ohio State vs. Minnesota, 6 p.m. No. 25 Gonzaga at San Diego, Midnight Sunday’s Games No. 11 Creighton vs. Seton Hall, 5:02 p.m. No. 13 Michigan State at No. 20 Michigan, Noon No. 22 UConn vs. SMU, 2 p.m. USA Today Top 25 Record Pts Pvs1. Syracuse (32) 25-0 800 12. Florida 23-2 752 43. Wichita State 27-0 747 24. Arizona 23-2 679 35. Louisville 21-4 618 86. Duke 20-5 611 97. San Diego State 22-2 591 58. Kansas 19-6 554 79. Cincinnati 23-3 526 1110. Saint Louis 23-2 513 1211. Villanova 22-3 506 612. Creighton 21-4 423 1713. Virginia 21-5 416 1614. Michigan State 21-5 406 1015. Iowa 19-6 375 1516. Kentucky 19-6 302 1317. Texas 20-5 278 1918. Wisconsin 21-5 255 2119. Iowa State 19-5 227 1420. Michigan 18-7 159 1821. UConn 20-5 158 —22. Gonzaga 23-4 128 2423. Ohio State 20-6 97 2024. Memphis 19-6 85 2225. UCLA 20-5 72 — Others receiving votes: Oklahoma 31, North Carolina 22, Kansas State 19, Pittsburgh 17, SMU 7, Stephen F. Austin 7, Arizona State 6, New Mexico 6, Louisiana Tech 2, West Virginia 2, California 1, Nebraska 1, VCU 1.FOOTBALLNFL calendar Feb. 19-25 — NFL scouting combine, Indianapolis. March 3 — Deadline for clubs to designate franchise or transition players. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 18, 2014 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. The Goldbergs(:31) Trophy WifeKiller Women “Daughter of the Alamo” News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 NewsArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -WUFT News at 6Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Grand Coulee Dam: AmericanThe Rise and Fall of Penn StationFrontline “Generation Like” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenNCIS A Navy lieutenant goes missing. NCIS: Los Angeles “Omni” (:01) Person of Interest Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries Star-Crossed “Pilot” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce “Diwali” The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Be a MillionaireBe a MillionaireModern FamilyThe SimpsonsAmerican Idol “15 Girls Perform” Fifteen female singers perform. (N) NewsAction News JaxModern FamilyTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneThe Olympic Zone XXII Winter Olympics Alpine Skiing, Freestyle Skiing, Bobsled, Short Track. (N Same-day Tape) News CSPAN 14 210 350Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Sen. CorkerKlobuchar(:06) Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Capitol Hill WGN-A 16 239 307America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos “Flightplan” (2005, Suspense) Jodie Foster, Peter Sarsgaard. How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGilligan’s IslandGilligan’s IslandGilligan’s IslandGilligan’s IslandLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKirstie (:36) The Exes OWN 18 189 279Iyanla, Fix My Life The Haves and the Have Nots The Haves and the Have Nots The Haves and the Have Nots (N) The Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have Nots A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie “The Race” The Waltons “The Indiscretion” The Waltons “The Heartache” The Waltons “The Lumberjack” Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011, Science Fiction) James Franco, Freida Pinto. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) Freida Pinto CNN 24 200 202Situation Room(:28) Cross re (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Live (N) (Live) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle Castle runs into an old ame. Castle “Sucker Punch” Rizzoli & Isles “Crazy for You” (:01) Rizzoli & Isles “Cuts Like a Knife” (:02) Rizzoli & Isles (:03) The Mentalist “Paint It Red” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSam & Cat AwesomenessTVFull House Full House Full House Full House Full House Full House Friends (:36) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:30) “Bad Boys” (1995) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. “Law Abiding Citizen” (2009, Suspense) Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler, Colm Meaney. “Death Sentence” (2007) Kevin Bacon, Garrett Hedlund. Premiere. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Bones A body is found in a crater.d College Basketball Duke at Georgia Tech. (N) Bones Remains emit a green glow. DISN 31 172 290Jessie Austin & Ally Dog With a BlogLiv & Maddie “Meet the Robinsons” (2007) Daniel Hansen Phineas and FerbJessie Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm Good Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252Wife Swap External vs. internal beauty. Dance Moms Dance Moms (N) Dance Moms Christi isolates herself. Kim of Queens (N) (:01) Kim of Queens USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “This Christmas” (2007) Delroy Lindo. Premiere. A reunion at the holidays tests family ties. Being Mary Jane “Hindsight is 20/40” Being Mary Jane “Hindsight is 20/40” ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Kentucky at Mississippi. (N)d College Basketball Iowa at Indiana. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptiond College Basketball Texas at Iowa State. (N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) Olbermann (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -SeminoleInside Israeli Bask.d College Basketball Wake Forest at Maryland. (N) Seminole SportsGatorZone Women’s College GymnasticsThe Game 365 (N) 3 Wide Life DISCV 38 182 278The Devils Ride Restoring reputations. The Devils Ride “New Blood” Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts (N) Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts TBS 39 139 247Seinfeld Seinfeld “The Pen” Seinfeld Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCougar Town (N) Big Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204What Would You Do? Jane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) RightThisMinuteRightThisMinuteForensic FilesForensic Files FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansE! News (N) “He’s Just Not That Into You” (2009, Romance-Comedy) Ben Af eck, Jennifer Aniston. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods America Dangerous Grounds “Golden Triangle” Border Rico (N) Border Rico Bizarre World “Bali” HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsProperty VirginsHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lScoring the DealScoring the Deal TLC 48 183 280Untold Stories of the E.R. 90 Day Fiance “Didn’t Expect This...” My 600-Lb. Life “Paula’s Story” My 600-Lb. Life “James’ Story” (N) 900 Pound Man: RaceMy 600-Lb. Life “James’ Story” HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Alaska: Big America Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsRestorationRestorationRestorationRestoration ANPL 50 184 282Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Rattle & Roll” Chopped Oysters cause problems. Chopped “Better Saffron Than Sorry” Chopped “Liver and Learn” Chopped “Bacon Baskets!” Diners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372The 50th Anniversary of the Civil Drive Thru HistoryThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoyce MeyerJoseph PrinceSteven FurtickPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UFC InsiderIcons of CoachingInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Milwaukee Bucks. (N Subject to Blackout) Magic Live! (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 12 SYFY 58 122 244Face Off “Dragon’s Breath” Face Off Artists must build a rock star. Face Off A supernatural silhouette. Face Off “Cryptic Creatures” (N) Opposite Worlds “Struggle” (N) Face Off “Cryptic Creatures” AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Pearl Harbor” (2001, War) Ben Af eck, Josh Hartnett. “Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane. A woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ship. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowKroll ShowTosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Kroll Show (N) Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba The Dukes of Hazzard “Jude Emery” “Major League” (1989) Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen. A ragtag team tries to turn its poor performance around. NGWILD 108 190 283Science of Cats How cats evolved. World’s Deadliest “Lady Killers” Great Migrations “Need to Breed” The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. PolGreat Migrations “Need to Breed” NGC 109 186 276Building Wild “Log Jam” The Legend of The Legend of Building Wild “Log Jam” Building Wild “Backwoods Bus” (N) Mennonite Made (N) Building Wild “Backwoods Bus” SCIENCE 110 193 284Species of Mass Destruction Through Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-Freeman ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda Ice Cold Killers “Guns, Gold & Murder” Redrum (N) Redrum Obsession: Dark Desires (N) Ice Cold Killers “Guns, Gold & Murder” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) Real Time With Bill Maher (6:50) “Prometheus” (2012, Science Fiction) Noomi Rapace. ‘R’ True Detective Girls Looking True Detective MAX 320 310 515(4:45) “The Game” (1997) ‘R’ “A Night at the Roxbury” (1998) Will Ferrell. ‘PG-13’ “Bullet to the Head” (2012) Sylvester Stallone. ‘R’ Banshee “Armies of One” (10:50) “Payback” (1999) ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:55) “Coach Carter” (2005, Drama) Samuel L. Jackson. ‘PG-13’ (:15) “Alex Cross” (2012, Action) Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox. ‘PG-13’ House of LiesEpisodes Shameless Fiona ends up in jail. Big return for No. 3Daytona 500 qualifying At Daytona International Speedway Sunday qualifying; race Feb. 23 (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph. 2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852. Failed to Qualify 3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 195.818.4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712.5. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296.7. (88) Dale Earnhardt. Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse. Jr., Ford, 195.004. 10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919. 11. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894. 12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776. 13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658.14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637. 15. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582.16. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582. 17. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574. 18. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574. 19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544. 20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523. 21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502.22. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477. 23. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422. 24. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.410. 25. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.380. 26. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334.27. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108. 28. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078. 29. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066. 30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815. 31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736. 32. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.732. 33. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594. 34. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.428. 35. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365. 36. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 192.905.37. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798. 38. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.695. 39. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538.40. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 192.328.41. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291. 42. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 192.135.43. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.061.44. (52) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 191.493. 45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.480. 46. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.347.47. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.685. 48. (93) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, 189.542.

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3BSPORTS Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 3B ARCHERY: State bound Continued From Page 1B BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Fort White High baseball vs. Newberry High, 4:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High in region semifinal, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Fort White High boys weightlifting vs. Union County High, Bradford High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball vs. Gainesville High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Thursday Q Fort White High softball vs. Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Lafayette High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High baseball at Union County High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Friday Q Columbia High tennis vs. Oak Hall School, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Q Columbia High softball vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball at Wakulla High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) CHS SOCCER Banquets set for Feb. 28, March 1 Columbia High’s soccer program has awards banquets planned for 6:30 p.m. Feb. 28 (boys varsity and JV) and March 1 (girls varsity and JV) in the CHS auditorium. Deadline to purchase tickets from coaches Lindsay McCardle and Trevor Tyler is today. For details, call Tyler at 623-3025. FORT WHITE SOCCER Banquet planned for Sunday The Fort White High varsity and middle school soccer banquet is 5 p.m. Sunday in the middle school cafeteria. Cost for adults is $5 at the door. RSVP to Michelle Glenn at 497-5952, Ext. 251. CHS FOOTBALL Fundraiser set for Saturday The Columbia High Quarterback Club has a fundraiser planned for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Harvey’s supermarket. For details, contact Randy Thomas at tazllc@gmail.com ADULT BASKETBALL Open play under way at RCC Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox Park North is sponsoring adult (18 and older) open basketball. Play is 8-10 p.m. Tuesdays at Richardson Community Center. Cost is $2. For details, call Chris Craft at 292-1210. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats seeks 12U players The North Florida River Rats 12U travel team is seeking 3-4 committed players to complete its spring roster. For details, call Kim Albritton at 365-0950.Q From staff reports said. “He said if we do it in conjunction with the school we might get a grant so we introduced archery in P.E. for fourth through eighth grades. This is the first year we have had a team and everybody who wants to be a part of it can be a part of it. It creates more of a level playing ground.” Redmond plans to take a contingent of 14 to the state competition. Sofia Arata, 10, also a softball player, and Turner Crews, 11, are on the team. “I am excited about the state competition,” Arata said. “I think it is fun to shoot and a fun time with friends.” “I like getting to be part of a team for school,” Crews said. “You get to spend time with friends and come together like a big family and have fun. You don’t have to be a super ath-lete. It is one of my favorite sports besides baseball.” Robbins is a tireless advocate for the sport. “There are now over 400 schools trained through-out Florida,” Robbins said. “These elementary chil-dren are competing at the highest level for archery in the state.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida forward Dorian Finney-Smith (10) yells out after c enter Patric Young rips a slam dunk during the Gators’ 69-36 home win over Texas A&M on Feb. 1. UF ranked No. 2Associated PressSyracuse is still No. 1 in the AP college basketball poll, but it is no longer a unanimous choice. The Orange (25-0), who won two games in the final seconds last week, are on top for a third straight week but they received 64 first-place votes Monday from the 65-member national media panel. They were a unanimous choice the last two weeks. Florida (23-2), which won at Kentucky on Saturday, moved from third to second and received the other first-place vote. Joe Rexrode of the Detroit Free Press changed his No. 1 vote from Syracuse to Florida. “Simply put, I watched both teams play both games last week and I think Florida is the best team in the country,” Rexrode said. “That’s pretty much it.” This is the Orange’s 17th week all-time on top of the poll, tied with Illinois for 14th place on the No. 1 list. Next up would be Michigan, which has been No. 1 for 22 weeks. UCLA holds the all-time mark with 134 weeks on top. Wichita State (27-0), the only other unbeaten Division I team, moved from fourth to third while Arizona, which lost to Arizona State last week, dropped from second to fourth. Duke moved from eighth to fifth.COURTESYWarner fifth at state wrestlingColumbia High’s Kaleb Warner won fifth place in the 132 -pound weight class at the FHSAA Wrestling Finals in Lakeland on Saturday. Warner was 32 in his weekend matches. He lost to eventual champion Dylan Lucas of Brandon High in the semifinals and to Anthony Hauser (fourth place) of Oakleaf High in wrestleb acks. He defeated Kolin Stapp of Jensen Beach High for fifth place. Tanis Taylor was seco nd and Andrew Smith was third. Indians host Raiders in region semifinalTIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders cuts down the net after the Indians defeated Santa Fe High for the District 5-4A title. From staff reportsThe last time teams played this many times was in a playground pick-up. Fort White High’s basketball team hosts Santa Fe High at 7 p.m. today in the region semifinal round of the state playoffs. It will be the fifth time the teams have played this season. Fort White holds a 3-1 edge, having swept the Raiders in the regu-lar season and posting a 61-53 win in the District 5-4A championship game. Santa Fe defeated the Indians during the Hitchcock Basketball Challenge tournament, hosted by the Raiders. Melton Sanders scored 31 points in the tourna-ment game. He scored 17 in the championship game to bolster the 21 points from Qarin Porter. Chris Cottrell added 13 points in the title game. Today’s winner will play the Lake Highland Prep/Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy winner.

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DILBERT BABY BLUES DEAR ABBY CELEBRITY CIPHER BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 4B DEAR ABBY: You were wrong to advise “Starting Anew in Ohio” (Nov. 7), the mother of a 10-year-old girl who want-ed the bigger bedroom in their new house, to have her kids draw straws. When the girl made the request, her older brother said he didn’t care. The time to have drawn straws was when the girl first made the request, not two months afterward. The girl is at an age when children can be particularly sensitive about trust issues, and the boy is old enough to know that words have con-sequences. If the parents reverse course now, the girl will learn that her parents’ promises mean nothing, and the boy will learn that he doesn’t have to worry about what he says because he can always change it later. These are not good lessons to teach children. That the father would bow to the boy’s request made the situation worse. Maybe he’d think twice if he realized his daughter will now always doubt his word. — JUDY IN OHIO DEAR JUDY: You are not the only reader who told me my answer wasn’t up to my usual standards. In fact, not a single person who wrote to comment agreed with me, and their points were valid. Their comments: DEAR ABBY: Your solution won’t keep the peace in that household; it will end it. The daugh-ter will learn her parents can’t be trusted to keep a promise; the son will think he can take anything he wants from his sister because, as the male, he gets his way. No, Abby, a promise is a promise. And if there’s any lesson more important to teach our children, I can’t imagine what it is. — HOLLY IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR ABBY: This is the time to teach that 12-year-old “young man” to be a man of his word. He made the decision that his sister could have the room. The daughter had the guts to ask for what she wanted. Good for her for asking for what she wants. Now they should draw straws to determine the outcome? The message this sends to the children is, “If you’re older, you can get what you want. If you make a promise, you can break it.” The daughter should not lose out on what she was prom-ised. — DANIELLE IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: May I offer a suggestion? The children should be told that each year around the anniversary of their mov-ing to the new house that they will change rooms. It may take some effort and energy, but the ben-efit would be that both brother and sister get to experience the larger bed-room. It will teach them to compromise. — TAMI IN COLORADO DEAR ABBY: Having been through this type of situation as a child, I can tell you it destroyed my trust in my mother. Believe me, this will have far-reaching and unin-tended repercussions in that little girl’s life. A promise is a promise! — CANDACE IN THE ROCKIES HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Stay in line. Don’t ask or look for trouble. Meddling will lead to an argument. Protect your rep-utation and show compas-sion for those around you. It’s better to be safe than sorry. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Chase your dreams. Plan a vacation, sign up for a course or indulge in something that will help build your confidence. Put romance at the top of your list and make plans to social-ize or engage in a one-on-one evening of fun. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Jump into action at work and establish a posi-tion that will raise your profile. Don’t feel the need to overspend when what’s required is dedication, hard work and concern for oth-ers. Push your way to the forefront using class, dignity and mindfulness. ++++ CANCER (June 21July 22): Frustration is likely if you are dealing with a friend, child or part-ner who is trying to guilt you into something. Think before you act and you will avoid making a mistake. An unusual offer will enhance your life. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Look for a chance to show off your skills. You will draw scrutiny if you make an unusual choice. A money deal or move to a better location will require suf-ficient legwork before you set your plans in motion. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A sudden change in your financial situation is likely if you have bought into a get-rich-quick scheme or overspent on something you don’t need. An event that is geared toward connect-ing with old colleagues or friends will bring you inter-esting opportunities. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Self-reliance is your best bet. Don’t count on any-one at home to agree with your plans or help you out. Talk to the people who share your concern or interest and move forward. Equality in any partnership you form will be a must. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Trust in your judgment and your abili-ties. Develop your ideas and don’t be afraid to be a little different. Travel plans should be made but not executed until a later date. Romance will help improve your relationship with some-one you think is special. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Check out what everyone around you is doing before making a move. Emotional matters at home can be resolved if you are willing to make a couple of changes. Listen to what others say, but get the facts before responding. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t be daunted by what others do or say. Step around any negativity you come up against. Go it alone and you will reach your goal. Lean toward a conservative deal and ques-tion anyone trying to sell you the impossible. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Get involved in something that will enhance who you are and what you can do. Don’t feel the need to pay for others or to take on a burden that doesn’t belong to you. Concentrate on getting ahead, not on helping someone else advance. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): Put your ideas out there and get involved in events or organizations that can use your expertise and talents. What you have to bring to the table will also be your calling card for new opportunities and adventures. Romance is highlighted. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Dad who defers to son sends wrong message to daughter Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS George Kennedy, 89; Toni Morrison, 83; Milos Forman 82; Yoko Ono, 81; Dennis Young, 67; Jess Walton, 65 ; Juice Newton, 62; John Travolta, 60; Vanna White, 5 7; Matt Dillon, 50; Dr. Dre, 49; Roberto Baggio, 47l M olly Ringwald, 46; Jillian Michaels, 40; Eden Woods, 9.

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Classified Department: 755-5440LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY18, 20145B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY/DIVORCE Other Court Forms Asst. Exp'd. / Reasonable 386-961-5896 LegalWewill sell the following tenants units at Community Self Storage 814 SWState Road 247/Branford Hwy., Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 1:00PM.WE SELLFOR CASH ONLY. 386-961-9926.BRENDAFLEMINGHousehold GoodsPATRICIAKING (2 units)Furniture & Household GoodsKIMBERLYPALMERPersonal PropertyDEBRAGRIFFISHousehold, BoxesELIZABETH BOYETTFurniture & Household GoodsSARAH WEBBHousehold GoodsROBERTCLARIDYFurniture & Household GoodsGABRIELLE LAMBERTFurniture & Household GoodsLATORRIS BROWNHousehold GoodsLYNN BRANSCOME (2 units)Furniture & Household GoodsDANIELG PALMERFurniture & Household GoodsWE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REFUSE ALLBIDS.Cash only, 10% Buyers premium, Nyle Wells #AU3814.05543377February 18, 25, 2014 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12-2013-CA-000599JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION,Plaintiff,vs.NANCYM. HARRYA/K/ANAN-CYM. BROWN A/K/ANANCYB. BROWN, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF ACTIONTo: OWEN L. HARRYLast Known Address: 468 SWRan-dolph Circle, Fort White, FL32038Current Address: UnknownANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PAR-TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTSLast Known Address: UnknownCurrent Address: UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing property in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida:LOT10, SANDYPINES SUBDIVI-SION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 32-32A, PUBLIC RECORDS COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.A/K/A468 S WRANDOLPH CRT, FORTWHITE, FL32038has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Alber-telli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL33623, and file the original with this Court either before February 25, 2014 service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Com-plaint or petition.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 27th day of Janu-ary, 2014.Clerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05543344February 11, 18, 2014 LegalIN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDIC-TION DIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2012-CA-000161THE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON TRUSTCOMPANY, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A. AS SUC-CESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE,Plaintiff,vs.PATRICIAM. LUCAS AND WIL-LIAM P. LUCAS, et. al.,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated January 28, 2014, and en-tered in 12-2012-CA-000161 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEWYORK MELLON TRUSTCOMPANY, NATIONALASSOCI-ATION FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff and PATRICIAM. LUCAS; WILLIAM P. LUCAS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). P. Dewitt Cason as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056, at 11:00 AM on April 30, 2014, the following described prop-erty as set forth in said Final Judg-ment, to wit:COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF BLOCK 2, MCFARLANE PARK, ASUBDIVI-SION IN THE WESTERN DIVI-SION OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TOPLATON FILE IN THE OF-FICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTIN PLATBOOK B, PAGE 5, AND RUN WESTALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID BLOCK 2, PROJECTED WESTERLYADISTANCE OF 40 FEETTO THE WESTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF OLD STATE ROAD NO. 1; THENCE RUN N 03 DEGREES 56’E ALONG SAID WESTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 22.4 FEETTO THE SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF WESTDUVALSTREET; THENCE RUN S 88 DEGREES 55’WALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 535.25 FEETFOR APOINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN SOUTH, PARALLELTO EASTLINE OF BURK STREET, 104.75 FEET; THENCE RUN S 88 DE-GREES 55’WPARALLELTO SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF WESTDUVALSTREET, 79.25 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH PARALLELTO SAID EASTLINE OF BURK STREET, 104.75 FEETTO SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF WESTDUVALSTREET; THENCE RUN N 88 DEGREES 55’E ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 79.25 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.Dated this 31st day of January, 2014.P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ P.A. PerryAs Deputy Clerk05543397February 18, 25, 2014 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIRCUITCIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 09-254 CATHE PATRIOTGROUP, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,Plaintiff,vs.GREEN OAK ESTATES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and GREEN OAK HOLDINGS, LLC, a Florida limited liability com-pany,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 29, 2014 in Case No. 2009-254 CAin the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-cial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, in which THE PA-TRIOTGROUP, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, is the Plaintiff and GREEN OAK ES-TATES, LLC, a Florida limited lia-bility company, and GREEN OAK HOLDINGS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, are the DefendLegalants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on February 26, 2014 at 11:00 a.m., on the third floor of the Columbia County Court-house at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, the following de-scribed real and personal property lo-cated in Columbia County, Florida:SEE EXHIBITS “A” AND “B” AT-TACHED HERETOEXHIBITALEGALDESCRIPTIONPARCEL1:BEGIN ATTHE SE CORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE S 8708’52” W, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 1030.64 FEET; THENCE N 0143’26” W, 255.19 FEET; THENCE N 3635’08” E, 161.30 FEET; THENCE N 8044’01” E, 259.87 FEET; THENCE S 7123’22” E, 469.42 FEET; THENCE S 8906’21” E, 115.36 FEET; THENCE N 4233’44” E, 83.45 FEET; THENCE N 8816’34” E, 59.13 FEETTO THE EASTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4; THENCE S 0143’26” E, ALONG SAID EASTLINE, 286.91 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.PARCEL2:THE WEST40 ACRES OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NW1/4 LYING EASTOF INTERSTATE HIGHWAYNO. 75 IN SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:BEGIN ATTHE NWCORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12 AND RUN THENCE N 8705’54” E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SEC-TION 12, ADISTANCE OF 1282.45 FEETTO THE NE COR-NER OF SAID SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 12; THENCE CONTINUE N 8705’54”E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12, ADISTANCE OF 77.90 FEET; THENCE S 0146’24” E, 1336.09 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12; THENCE S 8732’23” W, ALONG THE SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 12, ADISTANCE OF 77.89 FEETTO THE SE CORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SEC-TION 12; THENCE CONTINUE S 8732’23” W, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12, ADISTANCE OF 1049.00 FEETTO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF INTER-STATE HIGHWAYNO. 75; THENCE N 2452’36” W, ALONG SAID NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAYNO. 75, ADISTANCE OF 573.07 FEETTO ITS INTER-SECTION WITH THE WESTLINE OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12; THENCE N 0222’45” W, ALONG SAID WESTLINE OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 12, ADISTANCE OF 795.75 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.PARCEL3:PARTOF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 AND PARTOF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULAR-LYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1 AND THENCE S 0158’02” E, 179.61 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONU-MENTON THE SOUTHEASTER-LYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF TROYROAD AND THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE N 4752'53” E, ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 1343.88 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONU-MENTMARKING THE SOUTH-WESTERLYCORNER OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRE-CORDS BOOK 924, PAGE 1374 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 4919’00” E, ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLYLINE OF SAID LANDS, 105.03 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTER-LYLINE OF SAID LANDS; THENCE N 4016’10” E, ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLYLINE OF SAID LANDS, AS MONUMENT-ED, ADISTANCE OF 46.06 FEETTOTHE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF APROPOSED ROAD, SAID POINTBEING ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH AND HAVING ARADIUS OF 1105.92 FEETAND ACEN-TRALANGLE OF 0822’39” AND BEING SUBTENDED BYACHORD HAVING ABEARING OF S 7021’19” E, AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 161.56 FEET; THENCE EASTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 161.70 FEETTOAPOINTON THE EASTLINE LegalOF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE S 0201’25” E, ALONG SAID EASTLINE ADISTANCE OF 584.62 FEETTO THE NE CORNER OF THE AFOREMENTIONED NE 1/4 OF THE SW1/4; THENCE S 0201’25” E, ALONG THE EASTLINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 221.82 FEETTOITS INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLYMONUMENTED LINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 104 OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 0214’31” W, ALONG SAID WESTERLYLINE, ADISTANCE OF 176.36 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SWCORNER OF BLOCK 2 OF SAID SUBDIVISION; THENCE N 0651’16” W, 231.99 FEET; THENCE S 8937’31” W, 244.87 FEET; THENCE N 1331’17” W, 345.72 FEET; THENCE N 0437'36” E, 49.57 FEET; THENCE N 1858’33” W, 87.43 FEET; THENCE N 6720’46” W, 79.24 FEET; THENCE S 7656’47” W, 57.65 FEET; THENCE S 4842’30” W,119.55 FEET; THENCE S 7317’12” W, 117.55 FEET; THENCE S 0357’09” E, 215.41 FEET; THENCE S 7414’43” W, 34.58 FEET; THENCE N 8039’33” W,59.35 FEET; THENCE S 3434’44” W, 84.51 FEET; THENCE N 6905’04” W, 47.02 FEET; THENCE S 8532’45” W, 79.93 FEET; THENCE S 4855’38” W,87.29 FEET; THENCE S 2428’53” W, 52.95 FEET; THENCE S 5756’59” W, 129.10 FEET; THENCE S 1643’12” E, 135.48 FEET; THENCE S 3627’21” W, 98.17 FEET; THENCE S 1919’11” W, 105.40 FEET; THENCE N 5756’54” W, 97.68 FEET; THENCE N 0136’01” E, 275.38 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPTTHE FOL-LOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL:COMMENCE ATTHE POINTOF INTERSECTION OF THE EASTLINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THE NORTHWESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF OLD TROYROAD AND RUN S 0211’15” E ALONG SAID EASTLINE ADISTANCE OF 65.81 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF OLD TROYROAD; THENCE CONTIN-UE S 0211’15” E ALONG SAID EASTLINE 322.68 FEETTO APOINTON THE ARC OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTHAVING ARADI-US OF 1105.92 FEETAND ATO-TALCENTRALANGLE OF 3654’50”, ALSO BEING THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S 0211’15” E, STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE 83.70 FEETTO APOINTON THE ARC OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTHAVING ARADI-US OF 1185.92 FEETAND ATO-TALCENTRALANGLE OF 3654’50”; THENCE RUN NORTH-WESTERLYALONG ARC OF SAID CURVE 320.56 FEETTHROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 1529’15”; THENCE RUN S 8403’47” W, ADISTANCE OF 40.28 FEETTO THE SOUTHEAS-TERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF OLD TROYROAD; THENCE RUN N 4743’36” E, ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 89.37 FEET; THENCE RUN S 4925’19” E ADISTANCE OF 104.92 FEET; THENCE RUN N 4807’32” E, ADISTANCE OF 46.19 FEETTO APOINTON THE ARC OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTHAVING ARADIUS OF 1105.92 FEETAND TOTALCENTRALANGLE OF 3654’50”; THENCE RUN SOUTH-EASTERLYALONG ARC OF SAID CURVE 162.56 FEETTHROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 825’19” TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA.PARCEL4:PARTOF THE WESTHALF OF SECTION 1 AND PARTOF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 2 AND PARTOF THE NE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 11 AND PARTOF THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SEC-TION 12, ALLBEING IN TOWN-SHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICU-LARLYDESCRIBED AS FOL-LOWS:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE S 0255’51” E, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SECTION 1, ADISTANCE OF 438.28 FEETTO ITS INTER-SECTION WITH THE SOUTH-EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD 247 AND THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE S 4035’52” W, ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 962.60 FEETTO ABEND IN SAID LINE; THENCE S 2637’15”W, STILLALONG SAID LINE, 103.08 FEETTO ABEND IN SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE; THENCE S 4039”26”W, STILLALONG LegalSAID LINE, 768.73 FEETTO THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH-EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD 247 AND THE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF INTERSTATE 75; THENCE S 2451’03”E, ALONG SAID EASTERLYLINE OF IN-TERSTATE 75, ADISTANCE OF 977.63 FEETTO ITS INTERSEC-TION WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 2; THENCE CONTINUE S 2451’03”E, ALONG SAID EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 1440.53 FEETTO ITS IN-TERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SAID NE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 11; THENCE N 8753’36”E, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 329.07 FEETTOTHE SWCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 12; THENCE N 8708’52”E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 251.52 FEET; THENCE N 0143’26”W, 255.19 FEET; THENCE N 3635’08”E, 161.30 FEET; THENCE N 8044’01”E, 259.87 FEET; THENCE S 7123’22”, 469.42 FEET; THENCE S 8906’21”E, 115.38 FEET; THENCE N 4233’44”E, 83.45 FEET; THENCE N 8816’34”E, 59.13 FEETTO APOINTON THE EASTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 12; THENCE N 0143’26”W, 1047.33 FEETTO THE NE CORNER OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4; THENCE N 0231’09”W, 335.16 FEETTO THE SWCORNER OF THE NORTH 3/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SEC-TION 1; THENCE N 8651’31”E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH 3/4 ADISTANCE OF 1299.79 FEETTO THE SE CORNER OF SAID NORTH 3/4; THENCE N 0201’25”W, ALONG THE EASTLINE OF THE WESTHALF OF SAID SECTION 1, ADISTANCE OF 1621.53 FEETTO APOINTON THE MONUMENT-ED SOUTH LINE OF “QUAILHEIGHTS”, ASUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 104 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 8838’38”W, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 35.44 FEETTO THE SWCORNER OF SAID “QUAILHEIGHTS” AS MONU-MENTED; THENCE N 0214’31”E, ALONG SAID WESTLINE, 300.04 FEET; THENCE N 0651’16”W, NOWDEPARTING FROM SAID WESTLINE, 231.99 FEET; THENCE S 8937’31”W, 244.87 FEET; THENCE N 1331’17”W, 345.72 FEET; THENCE N 0437’36”E, 49.57 FEET; THENCE N 1858’33”W, 87.43 FEET; THENCE N 6720’46”W, 79.24 FEET; THENCE S 7656’47”W, 57.65 FEET; THENCE S 4842’38”W, 119.55 FEET; THENCE S 7317’12”W, 117.55 FEET; THENCE S 0357’09”E, 215.41 FEET; THENCE S 7414’43”W, 34.58 FEET; THENCE N 8039’33”W, 59.35 FEET; THENCE S 3434’44”W, 84.51 FEET; THENCE N 6905’04”W, 47.02 FEET; THENCE S 8532’45”W79.93 FEET; THENCE S 4855’38”W, 87.29 FEET; THENCE S 2428’53”W, 52.95 FEET; THENCE S 5756’59”W, 129.10 FEET; THENCE S 1643’12”E, 135.48 FEET; THENCE S 3627’21”W, 98.17 FEET; THENCE S 1919’11”W, 105.40 FEET; THENCE N 5756'54”W, 97.68 FEET; THENCE N 0136’01”E, 275.38 FEET; THENCE N 0158’02”W, 179.61 FEETTO THE NE CORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE S 8753’22”W, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 936.25 FEETTO APOINTON THE AFOREMENTIONED SOUTH-EASTERLYLINE OF STATE ROAD 247; THENCE S 4035’52”W, ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 525.82 FEET; THENCE S 0423’35”E, 408.57 FEETTO THE NWCOR-NER OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK (ORB) 755, PAGE 1165 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 6243’52”E, ALONG SAID LINE, 258.09 FEET; THENCE N 4954’41”E, 104.11 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS BOULEVARD, A50 FOOTWIDE PRIVATE ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYAS PRESENTLYESTABLISHED; THENCE S 4153’08”E, ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 472.19 FEET; THENCE S 4807’27”W, NOWDE-PARTING FROM SAID R/W, 124.84 FEET; THENCE S 0906’45”W, 186.84 FEET; THENCE S 0900’02”W, 51.73 FEET; THENCE S 0318’07”E, 176.07 FEET; THENCE S 8937’04”W, 101.43 FEET; THENCE S 2514’44”W, 575.05 FEETTO APOINTON THE EASTERLYEXTENSION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF “10TH FAIR-WAYVILLAS” AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGES 42 AND 42-AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLegalLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 8428’35”W, 155.42 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTLINE OF THE AFOREMEN-TIONED SW1/4 OF SECTION 1; THENCE N 0255’51”W, ALONG SAID WESTLINE, 1552.80 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING. COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPT:“COVEYCOURT”, ASUBDIVI-SION AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGES 168 AND 169 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT:PARTOF THE SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWN-SHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NWCORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE S 0258’37”E, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SEC-TION 1, ADISTANCE OF 1353.03 FEETTO THE NWCORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE N 8719’30”E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 771.80 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE S 0640’32”W, 256.19 FEET; THENCE S 1221’50”W, 101.70 FEET; THENCE S 1414’41”W, 696.62 FEET; THENCE S 0855’52”E, 58.68 FEET; THENCE S 5840’45”E, 143.22 FEET; THENCE N 1414’41E, ALONG THE WESTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS BOU-LEVARD, 808.00 FEET; THENCE N 2445’32”E, STILLALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY24.08 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFTHAVING ARADIUS OF 100.00 FEETAND ACENTRALANGLE OF 3853’14”; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 67.87 FEETTOTHE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 1407’42”W, STILLALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 301.56 FEETTO APOINTON THE AFOREMENTIONED NORTH LINE OF SAID SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4; THENCE S 8719’30”W, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, 50.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DE-SCRIBED LANDS COMPRISE LOTS 1 THROUGH 8 OF AN UN-RECORDED SUBDIVISION.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT:COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN S 258’37”E, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SEC-TION 1, ADISTANCE OF 1353.03 FEETTO THE NORTHWESTCORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4, SECTION 1; THENCE N 8719’30”E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 (SOUTH LINE OF NW1/4 OF SW1/4) ADISTANCE OF 872.82 FEETTO THE EASTLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS BOULE-VARD AND THE POINTOF BE-GINNING; THENCE S 1407’42”E, ALONG SAID EASTLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS BOULEVARD 291.43 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TOTHE RIGHTHAVING ARA-DIUS OF 150.00 FEETAND ATO-TALCENTRALANGLE OF 3853’14”; THENCE SOUTH-WESTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE, QUAILHEIGHTS BOULEVARD ADIS-TANCE OF 101.81 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 2445’32”W, ALONG SAID EASTLINE, QUAILHEIGHTS BOULEVARD 19.51 FEETTHENCE S 1414’41”W, STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE, QUAILHEIGHTS BOULEVARD 832.49 FEET; THENCE S 6514’28”E, 50.18 FEET; THENCE N 5115’01”E, 163.06 FEET; THENCE N 1414’41”E, 48.39 FEET; THENCE N 4055’24”E, 99.85 FEET; THENCE N 0023’56”E, 230.00 FEET; THENCE N 4920’01”E, 131.92 FEET; THENCE N 0029’39”W, 493.40 FEET; THENCE N 2942’15”W, 51.49 FEET; THENCE N 1445’39”W, 136.90 FEET; THENCE N 4201’18”W, 75.00 FEET; THENCE N 7555’13”W, 105.12 FEETTO APOINTON THE AFOREMENTIONED EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE; THENCE S 1407’42”E, 66.49 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS COMPRISE LOTS 1 THROUGH 9 OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVI-SION.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: BEGIN ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF LOT9, AS SHOWN ON THE PLATOF 10TH FAIR-WAYVILLAS, ASUBDIVISION AS DESCRIBED AND RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 5 ATPAGES 42 AND 42AOF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 2514'11”W, ALONG THE SOUTHERLYPROLONGATION OF THE EASTLINE OF SAID

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6BLAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY18, 2014 Classified Department: 755-5440 LegalLOT9, 56.10 FEET; THENCE N 6502’35”W, 94.97 FEETTO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT9, THENCE N 8430’38”E, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 110.53 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF LOT9, AS SHOWN ON THE PLATOF 10TH FAIRWAYVILLAS, ASUBDIVI-SION AS DESCRIBED AND RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5 ATPAGES 42 AND 42AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 2514’11”W, ALONG THE SOUTHERLYPROLONGA-TION OF THE EASTLINE OF SAID LOT9, 56.10 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S 2514’11”W, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYPRO-LONGATION 63.15 FEET; THENCE S 8430’38”W, PARAL-LELWITH THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT9, 88.07 FEETTO THE WESTLINE OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST; THENCE N 0258’37”W, ALONG SAID WESTLINE, 102.56 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF SAID LOT9, THENCE N 8430’38”E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT9, 34.03 FEET; THENCE S 6502’35”E, 94.97 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT:COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN S 0243’04”E, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SECTION 1 ADIS-TANCE OF 439.67 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTHEASTER-LYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 247 (BRAN-FORD HIGHWAY), SAID POINTALSO BEING THE POINTOF BE-GINNING; THENCE N 4033’35”E, ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 247 (BRANFORD HIGHWAY) ADISTANCE OF 66.36 FEET; THENCE S 0240’50”E, ADISTANCE OF 386.30 FEET; THENCE S 0235’21”E, ADISTANCE OF 218.20 FEETTO APOINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TOTHE NORTHEASTHAVING ARADIUS OF 43.18 FEETAND CENTRALANGLE OF 6446’45”; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE ADISTANCE OF 48.82 FEET; THENCE S 6644’54”E, ADISTANCE OF 248.69 FEET; THENCE S 6858’07”E, ADIS-TANCE OF 326.16 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH HAVING ARADIUS OF 350.00 FEETAND ACENTRALANGLE OF 3727’23”; THENCE SOUTH-EASTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE ADISTANCE OF 228.81 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 7334’31”E, ADIS-TANCE OF 50.04 FEETTO THE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS TER-RACE (APRIVATE ROAD); THENCE S 1405’47”E, ALONG SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADISTANCE OF 363.55 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TOTHE WESTHAVING ARADI-US OF 150.00 FEETAND ACEN-TRALANGLE OF 3853’19”; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE BEING ALSO SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS TER-RACE (APRIVATE ROAD) ADISTANCE OF 101.81 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 2447’25”W, STILLALONG SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADISTANCE OF 19.51 FEET; THENCE S 1416’34”W, STILLALONG SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADIS-TANCE OF 803.66 FEET; THENCE N 7543’26”W, ADISTANCE OF 49.84 FEETTO THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF QUAILHEIGHTS TERRACE (APRIVATE ROAD); THENCE N 1416’34”E, ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADIS-TANCE OF 808.00 FEET; THENCE N 2447’25”E, STILLALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADISTANCE OF 24.08 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TOTHE NORTHWESTHAVING ARADIUS OF 100.00 FEETAND ACENTRALANGLE OF 3853’12”; THENCE NORTH-WESTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE BEING ALSO SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADISTANCE OF 67.87 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 1405’47”W, STILLALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ADIS-TANCE OF 301.85 FEET; THENCE S 8718’41”W, ADISTANCE OF 99.29 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVE OF ACURVE CONCAVE TOTHE NORTH HAVING ARADIUS OF 400.00 FEETAND ACENTRALANGLE OF 2347’17”; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE ADISTANCE OF 166.07 FEETTO THE POINTOF TAN-GENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 6854’02”W, ADIS-TANCE OF 322.15 FEETTO THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF “10TH FAIRWAYVILLAS”, ASUBDIVI-SION RECORDED IN THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 6639’37”W, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID “10TH FAIRWAYVILLAS” ADISTANCE OF 296.55 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTLINE OF SECTION 1; THENCE CONTINUE N 6639’37”W, ADIS-TANCE OF 6.00 FEET; THENCE N 0235’21”W, ADISTANCE OF 282.07 FEET; THENCE N 0240’50”W, ADISTANCE OF 333.13 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 247 (BRANFORD HIGH-WAY); THENCE N 4033’35”E, ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 247 (BRANFORD HIGHWAY) ADISTANCE OF 6.63 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING.PARCEL5:COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-EASTCORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, LegalFLORIDAAND RUN S 226’E, ALONG THE EASTLINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 800.37 FEETTO THE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 93 (I-75); RUN THENCE N 2450’W, ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 865.07 FEETTO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4; RUN THENCE N 8728’E, ALONG SAID LINE 329.65 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. EX-CLUDING LATERALDITCH. CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT“B”PERSONALPROPERTYDE-SCRIPTIONDebtor: Green Oak Estates, LLCALLOF DEBTOR'S INTERESTAS LESSOR IN AND TO ALLLEASES RELATING TO THE RE-ALESTATE, AS MORE FULLYDESCRIBED IN EXHIBITAOF THIS FINANCING STATEMENT, AND ALLOTHER LEASES, TEN-ANCIES, RENTALARRANGE-MENTS, SUBLEASES, AND GUARANTIES OF PERFORM-ANCE OR OBLIGATIONS OF ANYPARTYTHEREUNDER (IN-CLUDING ANYLETTER OF CREDITRIGHTS) RELATING TO SAID REALESTATE OR ANYPARTTHEREOF, HERETOFORE OR HEREAFTER MADE AND EN-TERED INTO BYDEBTOR (IN-CLUDING ALLAMENDMENTS, EXTENSIONS, AND RENEWALS THEREOF) AND ALLRENTS, IS-SUES, PROCEEDS (INCLUDING, BUTNOTLIMITED TO, ANYPROCEEDS DERIVED FROM THE REDEMPTION OF ANYLET-TER OF CREDIT), PROFITS, IN-COME, AND PAYMENTS, RE-GARDLESS OF TYPE OR SOURCE, ACCRUING OR TO AC-CRUE OR DERIVED FROM, OR RELATING TO, THE REALES-TATE (WHICH ARE PLEDGED PRIMARILYAND ON APARITYWITH THE REALESTATE AND NOTSECONDARILY);ALLRIGHT, TITLE AND INTER-ESTOF DEBTOR IN ANYAND ALLBUILDINGS AND IM-PROVEMENTS OF EVERYKIND AND DESCRIPTION NOWOR HEREAFTER ERECTED OR PLACED ON THE SAID REALES-TATE AND ALLMATERIALS IN-TENDED FOR CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, ALTERA-TION AND REPAIRS OF SUCH BUILDINGS AND IMPROVE-MENTS NOWOR HEREAFTER ERECTED THEREON, ALLOF WHICH MATERIALS SHALLBE DEEMED TO BE INCLUDED WITHIN THE REALESTATE IM-MEDIATELYUPON THE DELIV-ERYTHEREOF TO THE REALESTATE, AND ALLMACHI-NERY, MOTORS, ELEVATORS, FITTINGS, RADIATORS, AWN-INGS, SHADES, SCREENS, AND ALLPLUMBING, HEATING, LIGHTING, VENTILATING, RE-FRIGERATING, INCINERATING, AIR CONDITIONING AND SPRINKLER EQUIPMENTAND FIXTURES AND APPURTENAN-CES THERETO; AND ALLITEMS OF FURNITURE, FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENTAND PERSONALPROPERTYOWNED BYDEBTOR USED OR USEFULIN THE OPER-ATION OF THE REALESTATE, BUILDINGS AND/OR IMPROVE-MENTS, OR OTHERWISE RE-LATED TO THE REALESTATE; AND ALLRENEWALS OR RE-PLACEMENTS THEREOF OR AR-TICLES IN SUBSTITUTION THEREFORE, WHETHER OR NOTTHE SAME ARE OR SHALLBE ATTACHED TO SAID BUILD-INGS OR IMPROVEMENTS IN ANYMANNER;ALLRIGHTTITLE AND INTER-ESTOF DEBTOR IN ALLSINGU-LAR THE TENEMENTS, HEREDI-TAMENTS, EASEMENTS, AP-PURTENANCES, PASSAGES, WATERS, WATER COURSES, RI-PARIAN RIGHTS, DIRECTFLOW, DITCH, RESERVOIR, WELLAND OTHER WATER RIGHTS, WHETHER OR NOTAD-JUDICATED, WHETHER TRIBU-TARYOR NONTRIBUTARYAND WHETHER EVIDENCED BYDEED, WATER STOCK, PERMIT, OR OTHERWISE, SEWER RIGHTS, RIGHTS IN TRADE NAMES, LICENSES, PERMITS AND CONTRACTS, AND ALLOTHER RIGHTS, LIBERTIES AND PRIVILEGES OF ANYKIND OR CHARACTER IN ANYWAYNOWOR HEREAFTER APPER-TAINING TO THE REALES-TATE, INCLUDING BUTNOTLIMITED TO HOMESTEAD AND ANYOTHER CLAIM ATLAWOR IN EQUITYAS WELLAS ANYAFTER-ACQUIRED TITLE, FRANCHISE, OR LICENSE AND THE REVERSION AND REVER-SIONS AND REMAINDER AND REMAINDERS THEREOF;THE RIGHTOF DEBTOR IN AND TOTHE NAME BYWHICH THE BUILDINGS AND ALLOTHER IMPROVEMENTS SITUATED ON THE REALESTATE ARE COM-MONLYKNOWN AND THE RIGHTTO MANAGE AND OPER-ATE THE SAID BUILDINGS UN-DER ANYSUCH NAME AND VARIANTS THEREFORE;ALLFUNDS NOWOR HERE-AFTER HELD BYSECURED PARTYUNDER ANYPROPERTY RESERVE AGREEMENT(IN-CLUDING ANYPROCEEDS DE-RIVED FROM ANYLETTER OF CREDIT) OR ESCROWSECURI-TYAGREEMENTOR UNDER ANYOF THE TERMS OF THE SE-CURITYAGREEMENTPUR-SUANTTO WHICH THIS FI-NANCING STATEMENTIS GIV-EN OR UNDER ANYOF THE OTHER DOCUMENTS EVIDENC-ING OR SECURING THE TRANS-ACTION SECURED BYTHE SE-CURITYAGREEMENTPUR-SUANTTO WHICH THIS FI-NANCING STATEMENTIS GIV-EN, INCLUDING, BUTNOTLIM-ITED TO, ANYLOAN AGREE-MENT;ALLOF DEBTOR'S PAYMENTINTANGIBLES, LETTER OF CREDITRIGHTS, INTERESTRATE GAPAGREEMENTS, TEN-ANTIN COMMON AGREEMENTRIGHTS, AND ANYOTHER CON-TRACTRIGHTS OF BORROWER RELATED IN ANYMANNER TO THE OWNERSHIP, OPERATION, OR MANAGEMENTOF THE RE-ALESTATE, OR THE BUILD-INGS OR IMPROVEMENTS NOWOR HEREAFTER ERECTED OR PLACED ON THE SAID REALES-TATE, AS WELLAS ANYAND ALLSUPPORTING OBLIGA-TIONS, AND ALLPROCEEDS, RENEWALS, REPLACEMENTS, AND SUBSTITUTIONS THERE-FORE; LegalALLFUNDS, ACCOUNTS AND PROCEEDS THEREOF IN ANYWAYRELATING TO THE REAL ESTATE WHETHER OR NOTSUCH FUNDS, ACCOUNTS OR PROCEED ARE HELD BYLEND-ER UNDER THE TERMS OF ANYOF THE OTHER DOCUMENTS EVIDENCING OR SECURING THE TRANSACTION SECURED BYTHE SECURITYAGREE-MENTPURSUANTTO WHICH THIS FINANCING STATEMENTIS GIVEN, INCLUDING, BUTNOTLIMITED TO BANKRUPT-CYCLAIMS OF DEBTOR AGAINSTANYTENANTRELAT-ED IN ANYWAYTO THE REALESTATE AND ANYPROCEEDS THEREOF; PROCEEDS OF ANYRENTS; INSURANCE PROCEEDS FROM ALLINSURANCE POLI-CIES REQUIRED TO BE MAIN-TAINED UNDER ANYOF THE OTHER DOCUMENTS EVIDENC-ING OR SECURING THE TRANS-ACTION SECURED BYTHE SE-CURITYAGREEMENTPUR-SUANTTO WHICH THIS FI-NANCING STATEMENTIS GIV-EN AND ALLAWARDS, DE-CREES, PROCEEDS, SETTLE-MENTS OR CLAIMS FOR DAM-AGE NOWOR HEREAFTER MADE TO OR FOR THE BENEFITOF DEBTOR BYREASON OF ANYDAMAGE TO, DESTRUC-TION OF OR TAKING OF ANYOF THE REALESTATE, BUILD-INGS, AND/OR IMPROVEMENTS OR ANYPARTTHEREOF, WHETHER THE SAME SHALLBE MADE BYREASON OF THE EXERCISE OF THE RIGHTOF EMINENTDOMAIN OR BYCON-DEMNATION OR OTHERWISE;ALLOF THE AFORESAID PROP-ERTY, RIGHTS, AND PROCEEDS (INCLUDING ANYPROCEEDS OF REALPROPERTYWHICH MAYBECOME PERSONALPROPERTY) OWNED BYDEBT-OR AND PLACED BYITON THE REALESTATE OR USED IN CONNECTION WITH THE OPER-ATION OR MAINTENANCE OF THE REALESTATE, BUILDINGS OR IMPROVEMENTWHICH DOES NOTCONSTITUTE A"FIX-TURE" AS SUCH TERM IS DE-FINED IN THE UNIFORM COM-MERCIALCODE; ANDALLFIXTURES AND PROCEEDS THEREOF RELATED TO THE RE-ALESTATE, BUILDINGS OR IM-PROVEMENTS.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.P.DeWITTCASON is the Clerk of the Court making the foregoing sale, Third Judicial Circuit, Columbia County, Florida.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 29 day of January, 2014.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05543316February 11, 18, 2014 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE FOURTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACase No. 12000538CAAXMXBANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plain-tiffVs.GARYMILLER A/K/AGARYW. MILLER; JAMIE WATKINS A/K/AJAMIE D. WATKINS N/K/AJAMIE MILLER, Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Default Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated January 20th, 2014, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00am at Columbia County Clerk of Court, Third Floor, 173 N.E. Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 on May 21st, 2014, the following de-scribed property:LOT3, SPRING FOREST, AC-CORDING TO MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 5 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TO-GETHER WITH A1996 REDM DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME. VIN #FLA14610582AAND FLA14610582B, TITLE #71207532 AND 71207533 RP#12344931 AND 12344933Property Address: 240 Southwest Bramble Court, Fort White, FL32038ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.Dated: January 31, 2014WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on January 31, 2014.CLERK: P. Dewitt Cason-sP.A. PerryDeputy Clerk of Court05543399February 18, 25, 2014 LegalIN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 122012000455CAXXXXU.S. BANK, NATIONALASSOCI-ATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST2006-CW1,PLAINTIFF,VS.JAMES D. MCNAIR, ETAL,DEFENDANT(S).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-closure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Columbia, Florida, on April 23, 2014, at 11:00 AM, at 3rd Floor of courthouse – 173 N.E. Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32055 for the following described property:LOT7, BLOCK 1, WOODLAND GROVE, UNITNO. 1, ASUBDIVI-SION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 63, PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. No-tice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.Dated: January 31, 2014By: /s/ P.A. PerryDeputy Clerk of the CourtFebruary 18, 25, 2014 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13000553CAAXMXGREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,Plaintiff,v.BRIAN M. FAILLE, DECEASED, ETAL.,Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIE-NORS, TRUSTEES, AND CRED-ITRS OF BRIAN M. FAILLE, DE-CEASED, DECEASED, AND ALLCLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PAR-TIES, NATURALOR CORPO-RATE, AND WHOSE EXACTLE-GALSTATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-DER OR AGAINSTBRIAN M. FAILLE, DECEASED, DE-CEASED, OR ANYOF THE HEREIN NAMED OR DESCRI-BED DEFENDANTS OR PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN AND TO THE PROPERTYHERE-IN DESCRIBED.Current residence unknown, but whose last known address was: 174 SWPETUNIAPL, LAKE CITY, FL32025-3146YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing property in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, to-wit:COMMENCE ATTHE SE COR-NER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND RUN NORTH 0040’WEST, ALONG THE EASTLINE OF SAID SW1/4 OF NE 1/4, 161.66 FEET, RUN NORTH 8822’WEST726.72 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 8922’WEST105.00 FEET, RUN NORTH 0040’WEST125.00 FEETTO THE SOUTH LINE OF ROSE DRIVE, RUN SOUTH 8922’EASTALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF ROSE DRIVE, 105.00 FEET, RUN SOUTH 0040’EAST125.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING, BEING THE SAME AS LOT32, BLOCK AIN AZALEAPARK, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVI-SION IN THE SW1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDAhas been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plain-tiff’s attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716, on or be-fore February 25, 2014 or within thirty (30) days after the first publi-cation of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, FL32056-2069, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediate-ly thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint pe-tition.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administration at 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-ance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 28th day of January, 2014.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05543343February 11, 18, 2014 100Job OpportunitiesStylist wanted Full time/Part time. No clientele needed, 4 busy locations. Guaranteed pay w/ commission Call Darlene 386-984-6738 100Job Opportunities05541098The Lake City Reporter, a daily newspaper seeks Independent Contractor Newspaper Carrier for the Lake City & Lake Butler route. Apply in person during normal business hours Monday Friday 8am 5pmNO PHONE CALLS 05543483Suwannee Valley Grassing, Inc. is accepting applications for TRUCK DRIVER Must have a valid Class ACDL. Must be able to work weekends as req’d. Normal work week is MonFri. Some out of town work. Apply in person: 3100 Hwy 441N & Cason Rd; north of Five Points. Approx. 0.5 mi south of I-10, across from the Target Distribution Center. All applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen. Females are encouraged to apply. Applications accepted until position is filled. EEO & DFWP Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to ken_n_steve@yahoo.com or mail: ATT: Human Resources, 466 SWDeputy J Davis Ln, Lake City, FL32024 CustomerService Champion needed to provide chat, email, and telephone support for a National Nursing Continuing Education website. The job details, qualifications, and application is online at eyespike.com Mederi CareTendersHomecare is now hiring for a FToffice person. Must have experience in medical billing, HR, payroll, filing, answering phones, and customer service. Please bring your resume and apply in person to 3593 NWDevane Street Lake City, Fl. 32055. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. PART-TIME CHURCH SECRETARY Wellborn Baptist Church is seeking to fill a position for a part-time church secretary. The duties include weekly bulletin monthly newsletter preparation, written correspondence, answering the phone, scheduling, purchasing office supplies, and recording keeping. Aperson qualified for this position must have strong computer skills with Microsoft Office, i.e. Word, Excel, Outlook. Other skills needed include familiarity with the use of the Internet, precise accounting and database entry. This person must have excellent typing and proofreading abilities & must exhibit good people skills. Hours are Monday through Friday 8:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. (20 hours) Please respond by sending your resume to Wellborn Baptist Church, PO Box 228, Wellborn, FL32094 or fax to 386-963-1565. SCAFF’S NOW accepting applications MEATCUTTER, PT/FT, benefits incl., paid vac., sick leave, profit sharing, dental ins., credit union. Apply in person 41 N. & Long Street. Drug Free Workplace. 120Medical EmploymentAwell-respected pain management group in Lake City, FLis seeking a full time Physician Assistant/Nurse Practitioner Monday to Friday, no weekend or night call. Competitive salary, plus bonus, health insurance, malpractice insurance, 401K, 26 day/year PTO and $1500 for CME per year. Clinical experience in pain management is preferred, but not required. Please fax your CV to 386-719-9662. Billing : Experienced & Proficient in all aspects of Billing Coding & EHR Fax resume to 386-758-5628 Experienced Office Manager needed for busy medical office. Employee supervisory skills is a must. Please email resumes to surgeryhealthcare@gmail.com PALMS MEDICAL Group is currently hiring for (1) Full Time Dental Hygienist & (1) Full Time Dental Assistant in our Lake City office. Please visit our webpage at www.palmsmg.org or email your resume to dsonnier@palmsmg.org. 140Work Wanted Mature, experienced CNA reliable, reasonable. Avail. as needed. Have a homebound patient? Looking for employment call Didi 386-365-9097 or 752-8861 170Business OpportunitiesTURN KEY Business. Completely equipped restaurant. Serious inquiries only. Priced to sell. Call 386-288-5722 240Schools & Education05542832INTERESTED in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $499next class2/24/2014• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class4/14/2014• LPN APRIL14, 2014 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 420Wanted to Buy K&H TIMBER We Buy Pine Hardwood & Cypress. Large or small tracts. Call 386-288-6875. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 05543453Wanted: Aerial photos (or photos w/pumps & hoses) during Tropical Storm Debbie 6/146/29, 2011 Will pay cash for right ones. 935-1388 630Mobile Homes forRent14 WIDE 2br/2ba Quiet Park No Pets Clean Country Living $475 Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 2 & 3 Bedroom newer Mobile Homes clean, quite Mobile Home Park. Offer senior citizen discount. 386-234-0640 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP& other locations 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH, Avail. Feb 23. washer/dryer, Incl: water, elect. & garb. Dep & referrences For more info. 386-965-3477 2BD/1BACOUNTRY setting, Branford area. $480/mo plus sec 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Large clean 3br/2ba Branford area. $550/mo +sec. Call 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com ROOM Available Feb. 19. 1 adult, Furnished, Clean, TV, Fridge, Microwave, Cable, Laundry. Close in. Private w/ Entrance. For more information. Contact 386-965-3477 640Mobile Homes forSaleCentury 21-Darby Rogers MLS85478 2160 sqft. DW, lovely oaks, 4 spacious BR $69,900 752-6575 Century 21-Darby Rogers MLS85683 DWwith new A/C, covered back deck, D/W, fireplace. $60,900 752-6575 Palm HarborHomes 55+ Community Special! $5K for your old home! Many models to choose from Call John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details 650Mobile Home & Land4 acre owner finance in Live Oak, well, SWMH, needs major renovation, septic, on paved road, $1,000 down 352-498-3035 Centry 21/Darby Rogers HeatherCraig 466-9223 MLS 84272 Reduced 3/2 MH on 8.2 ac. fenced & cross fenced. Wood laminate, well maint. $124,900 Denise Milligan-Bose Realty Inc 397-3313 4BR/2BADW, 2040 sqft,workshop, screened porch, covered deck, security system. MLS84966 $110,000 Remax/TaylorGoes (386)344-7662 MLS85466 Beautiful 3/2 DWMH. Many upgrades, wood laminate floors, large kitchen. $69,000 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent $100 off 1st mo rent!1, 2 & 3BR apts.$89 DepositPools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong AptsCall forourlow rent rates386-758-8455 2BR/1BAAPT. CH/A $500. mo $500 dep. No pets 386-697-4814 2BR/2BADUPLEX w/garage $700mth Plus Deposit Call 755-6867 Nice Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bdrm. Kitchen, dining, LR $475. mo plus sec. Incld pest control. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $145, 2 persons $155. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2br/1ba on Eloise Street $500/mo, $500/sec 386-397-3258 3BR/2.5BAon Ichtucknee River $900/mo, $900/sec & 1br/1ba $600/mo, $600/sec 386-397-3258 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City ReporterREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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Classified Department: 755-5440LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY18, 20147B 730Unfurnished Home ForRentHOUSE FOR Rent or Sale, Beautiful Blackberry Farms Subdivision on 2.5 acres, 3br/2.5ba, 2 car garage attached workshop and much more. $1,700/mo. For more info please call 954-464-0173 750Business & Office RentalsOAKBRIDGE OFFICE Complex Professional Office Available 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Denise Milligan-Bose Realty Inc 397-3313 Building lot, high & dry, great area to build your dream home. MLS76668 $27,000 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3800 SF TWO STORY5/3 block/frame, metal roof, dual AC and kitchens, private acre near Lk Jeffrey Hwy/ Moore Rd $147,000. 386.961.9181 BRICK DUPLEX plus vacant lot near Baya/McFarlane $97,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 Canal Front home 3 stories high, 3br/2ba, elevator, boat house with lifts $299.00 Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#86056 3BR/2BA1662 sqft, Quiet neighborhood, lg master suite, tray ceiling, storage shed MLS 80447 $138,900 Remax Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 Reduced! 3BR/2BA, 2318 sqft fenced,formal dining & breakfast, plus guest quarters, MLS 84810, $245,000 Remax, Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 Reduced! 4BR/3BA, 3026 sqft Solar heated in ground pool & hot tub. MLS 85805 $309,000 Remax, Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 2 for 1! Two homes on 4 beautiful acres, in-groud pool, must see! Reduced to $199,999 Ron Feagle (386)288-2901 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#82182 Affordable 3br/2ba brick home, new metal roof, fenced, only $53,500! Teresa Spradley (386)365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#83655 AWESOME 2 story home on 5+ acres with additional home for inlaws or rental! $299,000 Anita Tonetti (386)697-3780 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#85544 Patti Taylor/Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty 623-3896 MLS71594 Piece of history Folk Victorian 2 story, FP, dbl deck porches $139,900 Poole Realty County living 2700 plus sqft w 3br/2.5ba & 3 car garage. 4640 sqft barn on 38 ac. $539,000 MLS78336 Nelda Hatcher 688-8067 Remax/Sandy Kishton (386)344-0433 MLS81329 Open plan 3br/2ba fully equipped kitchen, LR w/dining, new carpet throughout. $101,500 Poole Realty Custom 2 story log on 8 ac. Bay windows 3br/3ba, MBR downstairs. MLS81654 William Golightly 590-6681 $214,900 Patti Taylor/Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty 623-3896 MLS83483 3br/3ba on 1 ac. Front & back porches w/outside fireplace $79,900 Denise Milligan-Bose Realty Inc Eastside Village Retirement community DW. Great location, 55 plus to live MLS83963 $50,000 397-3313 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 Nice 1851 sqft 3br/2ba brick, great neighborhood, w/wood burning stove. $162,900 MLS84201 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 MLS84294 3br/3.5ba, made for entertaining, deck overlooking pool & lake. $419,000 Century 21/Darby Rogers, HeatherCraig 466-9223 MLS 84561 Custom in mint condition, open floorplan, custom kitchen. 44x14 ft screened porch. $199,900 Poole Realty Goregeous 3br/2ba DWMH on 1 ac in Mayo split floor plan w/lg Master br. $95,000 MLS84597 Nelda Hatcher 688-8067 3BR/2BA, 1445 sqft, h/w floor, eat at bar, soaker tub, privacy fence, detached home office. MLS84610 $159,900 Remax Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 MLS84613 3br/2ba, great rm, 2 car garage. $124,900 Century 21-Darby Rogers MLS84713 Move in ready. Split BRs, granite in kitchen & bath, great room & so many extras. $145,000 752-6575 810Home forSale Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty MLS84942 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 3br/2ba, 1300 sqft, 2 car garage, fenced, CB block & stucco. $129,900 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 MLS84978 Breathtaking rolling hill view, 3.629 sqft on 2 acres, pool & workshop. $279,900 Remax/Sandy Kishton (386)344-0433 MLS85025 custom built 3br/2.5ba w/runway access. Lots of extras, finished guest/bonus rooms $320,000 4BR/2BA, 2770sqft, Lots of room, his & her closets, open patio, pretty landscape. MLS85116 $174,900 Remax Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 Spacious! 3BR/2BA1680sqft excellent backyard view, newer A/C, roof & plumbing. $64,900 MLS85274 Remax Pam Beauchamp 303-2505 Century 21/Darby Rogers HeatherCraig 466-9223MLS 85308 Well maintained custom built, Cannon Creek Airpark. 1900 sqft hanger. $349,999 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 MLS85333 Brick in Forest Plantation, upscale kitchen, Master Suite w/jacuzzi & more. $278,000 Patti Taylor/Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty 623-3896 MLS85509 Marion Pl, gated com. Custom brick, many upgrades, corian countertops & more $189,900 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85584 Loaded w/country charm. 3 spacious brs, lg open living & dining, galley style kitchen $59,900 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 MLS85632 Airpark Home, custom 2 story w/cedar walls, master w/FP, hangar, guest cottage, pool on 3.4 ac. $295,000 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85657 Pool on 3/4 ac. Lg 4br/2ba, 2000 sqft sits in Spectacular S/D. $209,000 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85679 walk to Sante Fe River, Modular home on 1 ac, new flooring & appliances $109,900 Century 21-Darby Rogers MLS85750 Home surrounded by grandaddy oaks, 3br/2ba, need of some work. $139,900 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 MLS85755 Lg eat-in kitchen, lg family & living rooms, screened back porch. $145,000 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85769 Clean, well kept Log on 3.88 ac 1br upstairs, garage can be workshop $195,200 Century 21-Darby Rogers MLS85795 new construction. Quality, split floor plan, covered porch, 2 car garage. $158,900 752-6575 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85813 Split floor plan, 3br/2ba, screened in Lanai overlooks lg yard. 1/2 ac lot $149,900 Remax/TaylorGoes (386)344-7662 MLS85826 Beautiful 4/3 home on 4 ac. Fireplace, lg rooms, lots of cabinets & more. $107,000 Remax Jo Lytte 365-2821 3br/2ba, city, dbl garage, landscaped, high ceilings, good counter space. MLS85832 $115,900 Remax/TaylorGoes (386)344-7662 MLS85838 Short sale gorgeous 4/3, abundant upgrades, lg bonus rooms, in-ground pool, hot tub & more $244,900 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85840 4br/2ba, lg master br. carpet, ceramic tile, glamour tub $169,000 Remax Jo Lytte 365-2821 MLS85844 3BR/2BAon 9.37 ac of pure country. Wood burning F/P, 2 stall barn, small tackroom & so much more $188,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 MLS85853 Eastside Village 2br/2ba, open floor, F/P, Fla Room. $84,900 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85869 Hills of Windsor Estate, custom built brick on 3 ac. Breathtaking grandeur $750,000 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85885 Farmhouse located on 10 plus acres. Oaks, plenty of pasture $137,800 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85903 Two-story on 4ac. w/outside workshop. 3br/2ba, move in ready. $210,000 Remax Jo Lytte 365-2821 4BR/2BA, new roof, full acre lot. Conveniently located near town. MLS85930 $114,900 Remax/Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS85941 River Get-away, Three River Estates. 3br/2ba, 1300 sqft $84,900 Poole Realty 1800 plus sqft. Great room, fireplace, screened porch MLS85947 (386) 362-4539 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85962 Two Master Suites, Lots of closets, lg great room, 3 full bath, small shed & more. $156,750 Century 21-Darby Rogers MLS85971 3br/2ba brick, features fenced back, small pool & custom shed. Alot of bang for your buck. $129,900 752-6575 Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty MLS85979 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Brick, spacious, 4br/2ba, fireplace, lg utility, screened porch. $119,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 365-1548 MLS85979 Brick spacious 4br/2ba, fireplace, lg utility, screened porch $119,900 Century 21-Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS85980 Move in ready, fenced yard, open floor plan, lg yard. $139,900 810Home forSale On golfcourse, nice 1800 sqft 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, enclosed patio, $145,000 Must see! 386-752-3991 or 386-397-4550 Poole Realty Custom built, 2br/2ba, 1500 sqft, huge screened in back porch & fireplace. MLS84918 Sylvia Newell 590-2498 Remax/Sandy Kishton (386)344-0433 MLS84833 Spacious DW3br/2ba w/fireplace & screened back porch. Fenced yard $39,900 820Farms & Acreage1/2 ACRE lots; great distance from Lake City, Live Oak & Branford. Owner financing: $300 down; $77 per month Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road. Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd Owner Financing! NO DOWN! $59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018. www .LandOwnerFinancing.com LOADED Hunting camp on 89 acres with everything (call for list) you need! @299,000 Rob Edwards (386)965-0763 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#85131 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Talor 365-1548 MLS84261 10.9 ac lot, paved streets, barn, well, power pole & more $64,900 Daniel Crapps Agency 755-5110 MLS85200 140 ac, Suwannee Co. appx 25 acres open, natural hardwood, ponds, $1500/acre Poole Realty 21 acres w/5 acres of planted pines MLS85566 $45,500 386-362-4539 830Commercial PropertyCommerical Building on 4 acres, US 90 East frontage, Live Oak $275,000 (386) 719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#83689 890Resort Property Bluegreen Vacations Timeshare! Hundreds of beautiful vacation destinations!! Paid $10,000, asking $5,000. Call 386-330-6993. SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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