The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02283

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.50 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM LOCAL NEWS Assistant County Manager search down to fifteen applications, 3A. CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 140, No. 08 TODAY’S WEATHER Opinion . . . . . . 4ALocal . . . . . . . 3AObituaries . . . . . 5AAdvice & Comics . . 5D 2B . . . . . . . 4B SPORTS CHS’s Warner has wrestling in his blood, 1B. 65 36 Mostly sunny, 12A Happiness is looking for you, says Bob Denny. SUNDAYEDITION 1DWilliams sets goal of 2,000 jobs.1C BATTLE OF ANNIVERSARY TH Olustee weekend Full coverage of History is at hand TODAYQ 8:30 a.m. Presentation of colors. Q 9 a.m. Shuttles begin to leave from Lake City Airport and Baker County Prison. Q 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Park opens to the public. Admission at gate: $10 adults, $5 children and preschool children free. Q 1:30 p.m. 38th Annual Olustee Battle Re-enactment. By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com The Blue and Grey will clash once again at Olustee Battlefield as thousands of re-enactors and visitors gather today to cele brate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee and its 38th Annual Re-enactment. Event organiz ers expect a packed house, meaning visitors arriving just in time for the show may face standingroomonly options. However, guests are free to use their own fold-out chairs if bleacher seating is not available. Instead, those wishing to view the re-enactment at 1:30 p.m. should arrive with plenty of time to spare, taking into account a hike that could span well over a mile from car to battlefield. Parking on the grounds is restricted to members of the media, organizers, re-enactors and individuals with special pre-approved access. Visitors typically park along U.S. 90, leaving their cars on the side of the road and hoofing it to the park. Again, the line of cars is likely to extend a mile or more from the park’s entrance in either direction as more guests arrive for the battle. However, the Blue-Grey Army’s “park n’ ride” shuttle service is available for visitors looking to avoid the hassle near the park’s entrance. The shuttles leave from Lake City Airport and the Baker County Prison Center beginning at 9:00 this morning. Three buses serve each location, so wait time should be minimal. Entrance to the park itself is $10 for adults and $5 for students. The shuttle service costs $2 per adult and $1 for students. Preschool children are admitted free to the shuttle service and park. Sutler’s row, a collection of period merchants selling their merchandise, will be open to the public throughout the day as well. Outside food or drink, including alcohol, are prohibited. A variety of food and non-alcoholic bever age vendors will be present on site. The National Weather Service of Jacksonville forecasts a mostly sunny forecast for today with a temperature of 43 degrees at 9:00 a.m. and 67 degrees at 3:00 p.m. With winds upward of eight m.p.h. and an abundance of shaded areas in the park, cool to cold weather attire is recommended. While ear plugs will be available free of charge near the park’s entrance, be advised that ele ments of the battle re-enactment are extremely loud. Pets are not allowed at the bat tlefield or park. For more information, call 877635-3655. TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterAn unidentified Confederate re-enactor salutes the viewing stand during Saturday’s Olustee Battle Festival Parade. YOU MAY WANT TO BRING ... A light coat, as winds will reach about 8 miles per hour and many parts of the park are shaded. Unless you arrive early you may also wish to bring folding chairs, as bleacher seating is limited.Viewer’s guide to the battleBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com The grand finale to the 150th Anniversary Battle of Olustee weekend will give visitors an opportu nity to witness the tactics Confederate and Union soldiers used during Florida’s largest battle of the Civil War. Around 2,000 re-enac tors will gather at 1:30 p.m. today about half a mile north of the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park entrance—the same land upon which over 10,000 Union and Confederate soldiers fought over 150 years ago. While event organiz ers announcers will help guide visitors through each of the battle’s phases, the sound and How are they different? Differences between the re-enactment and the actual battle‡7KHUHHQDFWPHQWZLOOIHDWXUHVROGLHUV7KHDFWXDO EDWWOHKDGXSZDUGVRI2IWKH8QLRQVROGLHUVZHUHNLOOHGZRXQGHGDQGPLVVLQJ2IWKH&RQIHGHUDF\ZHUHNLOOHGZRXQGHGDQGVL[PLVVLQJ ‡'XULQJWKHRULJLQDOEDWWOH&6$DQG8QLRQOLQHVZHUHDPLOHRUVR ORQJQRUWKWRVRXWK ‡(DFKVLGHZLOOKDYHFDQQRQVGXULQJWKHUHHQDFWPHQW7KH 8QLRQKDGSLHFHVRIDUWLOOHU\DQGWKH&6$GXULQJWKHKLVWRULFEDWWOH ‡,QWKHDFWXDOHQJDJHPHQW&RQIHGHUDWHWURRSVUHFHLYHGVXSSRUW IURPDODUJHSLHFHRIDUWLOOHU\PRXQWHGRQDWUDLQFDUSRVLWLRQHGRQWKHUDLOURDGOLQHWRWKHVRXWK ‡7KHWK0DVVDFKXVHWWVWKHILUVWDOOEODFNUHJLPHQWRIWKH86 $UP\ORDGHGZRXQGHGVROGLHUVLQWRDQHDUE\UDLOFDUDWWDFKHGURSHVDQGSXOOHGWKHHQWLUHPDVVE\KDQGWRWKHVDIHW\RI8QLRQHQFODYHVVHYHUDOPLOHVHDVWRIWKHEDWWOHILHOG ‡%OHDFKHUVZHUHQRWSUHVHQWGXULQJWKHDFWXDOEDWWOH SCHEDULE TACTICS continued on 6A Re-enactor’s been around since beginningBy AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com Tom Jessee hasn’t missed an Olustee re-enactment since they started 38 years ago. Now, the Lakeland resident serves as Commanding General of the Confederate troops for the Olustee battle — an honor that car ries an immense amount of work. Jessee traveled to the battlefield site approximately 12 times over the past year to ensure Sunday’s re-en actment would run as smoothly as possible. “It’s not really like a general in a war, but more like I’m directing a production,” he said. The Commanding General is responsible for directing troops, laying out the campsite and guid ing staff officers to their positions. Jessee started re-enacting as a pri vate 48 years ago, and has worked his way up in ranks over the years. “I’ve always been interested in the history of the war,” he said. “When I was 18, I met some people who were doing re-enacting. I’ve been doing it ever since.” On a personal level, Jessee loves the people he meets through the annual events. But he also enjoys the fact that he is able to celebrate America’s history alongside his fel low re-enactors and history buffs. “If we weren’t doing a re-enact ment here at the battlefield, hardly anyone would know it was even here,” Jessee said. “This is some thing that’s hard to explain, but it connects me to my ancestors. I’m doing the same thing they did.” The Olustee Battle Re-enactment tries to stay as close to reality as possible. Participants must remove their 21st century devices from sight, including their cars, their cell phones and other modern day lux uries. Each re-enactor tries to stay in character for the duration of the three-day event. But sometimes, Jessee said, it can be hard. Depending on the questions asked by visitors, re-enactors must leave character to answer appropri ately. If, for example, Jessee were asked what happened at the Olustee AMANDA WILLIAMSON/ Lake City ReporterNearly 48 years spent re-enacting has taught Commanding General Tom Jessee what a battalion of men marching sounds like, what food cooked on a smoky campfire tastes like and what it feels like to curl up with a blanket outdoors. His love of history attracted him to the hobby, and he’s learned more par ticipating on the field than he could from a textbook. Says he’s more like a director than a general. JESSEE continued on 6A This edition

PAGE 2

Malcolm X family upset with Nicki Minaj for photo NEW YORK — Malcolm X’s family and estate said Nicki Minaj’s use of a famous photo of the black nationalist with a rifle in his hands and juxtaposing it with a racial slur for her new song’s artwork is disrespectful and offensive. In an exclusive statement to The Associated Press on Friday, Malcolm X’s daughter, Ilyasah Shabazz, said Minaj’s use of the picture “in no way is endorsed by our family.” “Ms. Minaj’s artwork for her single does not depict the truth of Malcolm X’s legacy,” Shabazz’s statement said. Minaj apologized Thursday. She pulled the artwork after she was crit icized on social media platforms for using the photo for the cover of her new male-bashing song, “Lookin (Expletive) (Expletive).” The title uses the N-word. Minaj said the single cover was “never the official artwork.”Rodman out of rehab: ‘I’m not an alcoholic’ MIAMI — Dennis Rodman checked into an alcohol-rehabilitation center to reevaluate his life, not give up drinking. “I needed to decompress from all the things I was going through,” Rodman said Friday by phone from Miami. “I was trying to get this game going and get everything going in North Korea. “It was a lot.” Rodman recently spent three weeks in a New Jersey-based facility when he returned from his latest trip to North Korea. He organized a group of retired NBA players to travel to North Korea for that exhibition game. He suffered an angry meltdown during a CNN inter view and also sang “Happy Birthday” to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the start of the friendly game. Rodman said he will return to the rehab center every six months “to see where I’m at.” The 52-year-old Rodman, who won five championships with the Detroit Pistons and Chicago Bulls and was one of the NBA’s fiercest rebounders and most colorful personalities, denied he was an alcoholic. “I’m not an alcoholic,” he said. “An alcoholic drinks seven days a week. I don’t drink seven days a week.” Rodman said he planned to return to North Korea and defended his friend ship with Kim Jong Un. “The people over there are not bad people,” he said. Rodman and Kim struck up a friendship when the basketball-play er-turned-celebrity first traveled to the secretive state last year.NBC producer’s job is to create moments STAMFORD, Conn. — At 3:30 a.m. the morning before the Olympics started, Brian Gilmore was glancing at the giant television screen that dominates a work room at NBC Sports Group’s headquar ters when something caught his eye. A luge competitor from India, Shiva Keshavan, had fallen off his sled during a training run and, somewhat miraculously, had hoisted himself back on while speed ing down the course. Gilmore shouted across the room for someone to capture the video and asked colleagues whether they had ever seen anything like it. No one had. Gilmore posted the video on NBC’s Olympics’ website and within a few days, more than 1.5 million people watched it. Gilmore, a senior director at NBC Sports, is assigned to create viral videos for the Olympics. His job is to find moments — wacky, heartbreaking or heartwarming — to break out and post in the hope of gen erating the most online traffic possible. “Our job is to find things that can resonate,” said Gilmore, who works with some four dozen people responsible for monitoring streams of every competition in Sochi and breaking out clips for high light packages. Somewhat improbably, Keshavan’s clip was the NBC Olympics site’s most popular clip for several days. JACKSONVILLE A Florida man has been convicted of three counts of attempted second-degree murder after an argument over loud music out side of a convenience store. A mistrial was declared Saturday on a first-degree murder charge after the jury couldn’t agree on it. The 12 jurors also found 47-year-old Michael Dunn guilty of shooting into an occupied car. Dunn was charged with fatal ly shooting 17-year-old Jordan Davis of Marietta, Ga., in 2012 after they got into an argument over the music that was coming from Davis’ parked vehicle. Dunn fired 10 shots, hitting the vehicle nine times. Also in the vehicle were three friends of Davis. Dunn claimed he acted in self-defense, testifying that he thought he saw a gun pointed at him from Davis’ vehicle. Wrong-way SUV owner threatened TAMPA — The owner of a sport utility vehicle driven the wrong way down a Florida inter state says there was nothing he could have done to stop a fiery crash that killed five people. Scott Enfinger of Tampa told reporters Friday that he has received threats on social media since the crash early Sunday that killed Enfinger’s friend Daniel Lee Morris and four University of South Florida fraternity brothers. Authorities say Morris was observed just after 2 a.m. Sunday speeding the wrong way down Interstate 275. A few min utes later, Morris crashed head-on into a car carrying the four fraternity brothers. The fire was so intense that it took Florida Highway Patrol days to identify Morris’ body. Hours earlier, Morris had been at a barbecue at Enfinger’s home. Enfinger said that as the party continued into early Sunday, Morris went inside the home and then drove out of the driveway in Enfinger’s Ford Expedition, which he took without asking. Enfinger said he ran barefoot after Morris when he saw his SUV speeding away, then turned around and urged the other par tygoers to call the police. Morris had had a few mixed drinks but he had not been act ing strangely until he suddenly left, Enfinger said. “There is nothing I could do to stop this,” Enfinger said. “If I could, I would have moved heav en and earth. Unfortunately, I had no way of seeing this one.” Enfinger said the threats he’s received on social media prompt ed him to leave his home with his fiancee and their children for several days.Man found guilty in wife’s 2011 killing NAPLES — A southwest Florida jury has found a man guilty of second-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of his estranged wife at a hospital. Jeffrey Moretz was convict ed Friday in Collier County. His wife died at the scene at a Naples hospital where she was visiting a co-worker in July 2011. Court records showed the couple were divorcing and in foreclosure. Moretz turned the gun on himself after shooting his wife, but he survived. Sentencing is set for March 21. Hospice worker fired after getting cancer WEST PALM BEACH — Hospice of Palm Beach County raised its CEO’s pay 30 percent to $710,537 the same year a mother of three said the orga nization fired her because she could work only 30 hours a week while fighting breast cancer — a situation the hospice’s founder called “outrageous.” The pay was revealed in finan cial records for 2011 requested by The Palm Beach Post last year but not released until 2014 by the nonprofit hospice. Its founding mission: to provide pal liative care for people with termi nal illnesses including cancer. Mitsy Tucker said she was a secretary coordinating care for patients at home when she was stunned to receive a termination letter saying her last day would be Dec. 19, 2011. In her own letter, Tucker pleaded with CEO Dave Fielding to help her under stand why she was fired six days before Christmas. “The termination happened during one of the most difficult times of my life, a very chal lenging time frame where I was being treated for breast cancer,” Tucker wrote. She said she could work only 30 hours a week after a leave for a double mastectomy because she needed continuing treat ment, including chemotherapy. A termination letter reminded her, “Failure to return to full duty after completion of Family Medical Leave may result in termination of the employee’s employment.” Hospice officials declined to confirm or dispute Tucker’s account, but the founder of the organization found it troubling. 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 Q Associated Press Q Associated Press PEOPLE IN THE NEWS HOW TO REAC H USMain number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com)A DVERT IS ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com)CL ASSIFI EDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CI RCU L AT IONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued.Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Winning Lottery Numbers Cash 3: (Saturday) 2-1-4 Play 4: (Saturday) 3-1-1-1 Fantasy 5: (Friday) 10-20-29-33-34 Florida Lotto: (Wednesday) 5-8-19-34-41-49-x4 PowerBall: (Wednesday) 36-44-49-52-57-1-x2COURTESYCampus Credit Union supports United WayCampus Credit Union Branch Manager Diana Parker presented a check for $1,000 to Eddy Hillhouse, Plant Manager, Purina Animal Nutrition and General Campaign Chair, United Way of Suwannee Valley, and Rita Dopp, Executive Director, United Way of Suwannee Valley, in the lobby of the new Campus Credit Union branch on US 90 in Lake City. The check represents the local employees’ contributions and corporate donation in support of United Way of Suwannee Valley.Loud music shooting declared mistrial AROUND FLORIDA The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. See an error? The Lake City Reporter accepts photographs and caption information to run on this page at the discretion of the editor. If you would like to see your organization in the newspaper, send the picture and information to associate editor Emily Lawson at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. SubmissionsCOURTESYCounty winners in Americanism Essay contestPictured are ninth and tenth grade winners: John Elliot, first place (front row, from left); Eva Kirby, second place; Kaleb Thomas, third place. Eleventh and twelfth grade winners: Rachael Johnson, first place; Shelbi Fennel, second place; Priyanlca Pattel, third place. Third and fourth grade win ners: Seth Grubb, first place (back row, from left); Jamari Jones, second place; Bailey Dicks, third place. Fifth and sixth grade winners: Colby Strickland, first place; Madison Lipscomb, second place; Logan Dicks, third place. Seventh and eighth grade winners: Jessica Harris, first place; Heidi LaPlant, second place; Kyler Larsen, third place. The contest was sponsored by the Elks Club. Scripture of the Day “Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.” — Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. He who does not love does not know God, for God is love. In this the love of God was manifested toward us, that God has sent His only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through Him. In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the pro pitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another.” — 1 John 4:7-11 Thought for Today QUICK HITS

PAGE 3

From staff reports The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Northeast District, in partnership with the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council and the North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee, will hold a free workshop regarding the handling of commer cial hazardous waste and the storage of used oil. The workshop will be held Tuesday, Feb. 18 at the Florida Gateway College, Wilson S. Rivers Library. Topics discussed will include hazardous waste identification, universal waste regulations, and used oil and used oil filter management standards. This training is an exam ple of the department’s continued efforts to work directly with the commu nity, and to successfully drive higher rates of envi ronmental compliance throughout the state. Hazardous waste is a discarded substance that, because of its con centration, physical, or chemical characteris tics, may pose a sub stantial or potential haz ard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, disposed, or transported. Common regulated wastes at small busi nesses may include solvents, paints, corro sives, spent batteries, fluorescent tubes and high intensity light bulbs containing mercury, used oil and used oil filters. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s, Northeast District Hazardous Waste section inspects and/or permits businesses that generate, transport, treat, store or dispose of haz ardous waste, used oil and used oil filters, or universal wastes in order to protect the environ ment from the improper handling and disposal of these wastes. Space is limited, so reg ister early. To register for this workshop or for addi tional information, please contact Dwayne Mundy at Mundy@ncfrpc.org or (352) 955-2200. 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL(Next to Courthouse) Gmjg^[]akhjgm\lgo]d[ge]gmjf]ohjgna\]j“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHER’S, WE UNDERST A ND” Daina Greene, MDBoard Certied Healthcare ProviderMarlene Summers, CNM SPECIALIZING IN:Q Women’s health and Primary CareNew Patients WelcomeCall today for apersonal appointment:386-755-0500449 SE Baya DriveLake City, Florida 32025www.dainagreenemd.com?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries.Lauren Williams, ARNP 3A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424‘Get Fit’ endsBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.com What began as an ambi tious 16-week initiative to get residents to make healthier choices has prov en to be a life-changing pro gram for Columbia County. Get Fit Lake City is a health campaign intro duced to the community by the Altrusa Club of Lake City with a goal of getting residents, especially chil dren, to make healthier decisions when it comes to diet and physical activity. The 16-week program saw a fittest business, fittest school and biggest loser competition come to an end on Friday. The winners will be announced during a special event set for March 7. “We are very excited about the Get Fit Lake City project,” said Mantha Young, president of Altrusa International of Lake City. “It’s been extremely suc cessful and all the people have now weighed out that weighed-in and they are cal culating how many pounds have been lost. We have some people who have lost 10 percent of their body weight and we have many success stories that we will be sharing that night.” Young said many who participated in the biggest loser weight competition saw great results. More than 250 people signed up, but the numbers dwindled over time. “There wasn’t as many people who weighed out as weighed in,” she said, noting a registered nurse kept all the statistics in the weight loss competition and the statistics were kept confidential. The Get Fit Lake City Finale will take place 5:30 9:30 p.m. Friday, March 7 at the Florida Gateway College with a 5k “After Glow” race, in which partic ipants will be adorned with various “glow” accessories, a Fun Run and dance party. “We’re asking everybody to get fit, get funky and get your glow on,” Young said. The event will feature live entertainment, bounce houses, funky fitness, contests, food vendors and other activities. At 6 p.m. a one mile Fun Run for children in kinder garten through fifth grades will take place. The entry fee is $5 or free with a school mileage club mem ber voucher. At 7 p.m. the “After Glow” 5k race will take place. There is a $10 entry fee. For more information or to register, visit www.lakecity.altrusa.org or call 752-3690. At 8 p.m. award winners will be announced for the Top Male and Female Biggest Loser contests, Fittest Business and Fittest School. “We’re just looking at having a really good time out at the college,” Young said. The Get Fit Lake City fit ness initiative was designed to challenge local adults and children to become healthier through more physical activity, changes in diets and making healthier choices about life. Young said she knows the initiative has positively impacted the lives of many residents. “I heard from the regis tered nurse before she gave tabulations, she said we need to video some of these because they are just unbe lievable,” she said. “A lot of people only lost four or five pounds, but they started working out and their blood levels or cholesterol levels came down or they went from a ‘couched potato’ to a ‘5k’ person in this period. The program has had a broad impact and that’s just the adults.” Young said the chil dren participating in the program want to walk or run each day to earn Get Fit Lake City tokens. For every mile children walk or run, they get a token. “It became fun to them to get different tokens to put on their necklaces,” she said. “It became a club for them to be able to do that. That had a huge impact on the children.” Young said there are plans in the works to contin ue the program next year. “Altrusa is looking at the possibility of doing this again next year, but making some changes that we have seen that would make it easier and a little bit different — easier on the community and easier on the club,” she said. Report: Robbery suspect nabbed after foot chaseFrom staff reports An alleged robber bailed out of his car during a pur suit by Columbia County Sheriff’s Deputies and was apprehended after a foot chase early Saturday, CCSO said. Robert Bogosta, 29, handed the clerk at the S&S store at 3919 N US 441 a note demanding money and appeared to be going for a gun, according to a CCSO news release. The clerk complied. However, the clerk had locked the door through which Bogosta tried to leave, prompting him to smash it with a fire extin guisher and flee, the release said. The fire extinguisher struck a customer who was approaching the door but he was unhurt, according to the release. Deputies said the money and other evidence were recovered from Bogosta’s car. The news release did not indicate the time of the robbery but jail records show Bogosta was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility at 4:37 a.m. Records show Bogosta, of 117 NW Knights Avenue, faces charges of robbery (no firearm or weapon), fleeing/eluding police, criminal mischief, agga vated battery, resisting an officer with violence and driving with a suspended license. He was ordered held without bond. By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com County Manager Dale Williams said he was closer to selecting a person to fill the vacant assistant county manager seat and ideally become the next county manager in the future. “Right now we have a top 15,” Williams said. “If you compared their applications with the job description, those people at least met the minimum require ments.” Out of an original 50 applicants, these 15 will now face addition al scrutiny and interviews from Williams and his staff: UŽˆ],œ>`p`“ˆˆ>ˆi Support Manager, Alachua County Board of County Commissioners; Uœ]/œip*iˆœ'n…ˆiv of Staff / Vice Mayor, Broward County; Uˆ…>]ˆV…>ip->i} Director / Business and Strategic Services, St. Lucie County; U“œ]>“ip*iˆœ' Deputy City Manager, City of Leesburg; Uii]œ`>p,'>i> Transportation Development Engineer, Florida Department of Transportation; UˆŽi]'ˆpˆ> County Administrator, Taylor County; U'i]ip'ˆi Owner / Past School Board Member, Columbia County; Uœ`>]*>ˆVŽpˆ>nˆ Manager, Unalaska, Alaska; U>']>ˆ`pn'i->vi Manager, Columbia County, FL; U'V>]>p/œ Administrator, Town of Estill, S.C.; U"ˆ]iˆ>pˆ>->i œi]/…ˆ`'`ˆVˆ>nˆV'ˆ U*ˆV…>`]*>“i>p Administrative Services Director, >VŽœnœ']> U-Vœ]ip*iˆœ'ˆ>Vi Director, Columbia County Clerk of Courts; U-'}}]/ipnˆ>>}i] Keystone Heights, Fla.; U7>`]-Vœpn…ˆivˆ>Vˆ> Officer / Assistant Superintendent of Business Services, Alachua County Public Schools. “The goal now is to narrow the list of 15 down to the top three or four,” Williams said. “That doesn’t mean the people not on the list weren’t good people or excellent candidates...Their skillset was maybe in one area and since this is an assistant county manager posi tion, we’re looking for people with a broader set of skills, not just a specific area.” Although the final decision ulti mately rests with Williams alone, he said he would seek the input of his department heads and division managers during his deliberation. “All top management will have an opportunity to comment on the final selection,” he said. “I do value the opinion of others and I want them to be a part of this process.” According to Williams, the ideal candidate should excel in two aspects of the job: The tech nical aptitude to maneuver pub lic finance, budgeting, rules and regulations and matters of human connection, such as the ability to relate to others, approach conflict resolution and overall personality. He said there will be several interviews with the candidates to weed out those who appear quali fied on paper but lack the appropri ate interpersonal communication skills. Interviews may include a few curveballs—for example, Williams said he may present candidates with past county issues and see how they develop solutions. “I can give them some actual examples based on past history on things that have happened,” Williams said. “The way I resolved them may have been correct, maybe not—I’m not perfect—but I’ll get some idea based on prior history if their response makes sense or not.” Williams has served as Columbia nœ'“>>}iˆVi>'>1984, but warned against expecta tions his successor will last as long. “The nature of the job doesn’t set itself up for long-tenured manag ers,” he said. “Most are nomadic, working five to seven years and packing up and moving.” He said he plans to continue the selection process over the coming weeks.Assistant county manager search narrowed to fifteen Thomas Man faces robbery chargeBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com >i“>> behind bars after lying to a gas station convenience store clerk about a snake in the bathroom and stealing a handful of cigarettes Friday morning, CCSO reports. Travis Ryan Pound, 24, œv>i]>>ii`ˆhis room at a local hotel around 2:45 a.m. Friday after deputies received a report that a man match ing his description stole packs of cigarettes from a nearby Shell convenience store, according to the arrest report. The store’s clerk said a man wearing a gray hood ie and blue jeans entered the store, went to the bathroom and emerged moments later, claiming there was a snake loose in the bathroom, the report said. When the clerk returned to the store, snake-free, he saw the suspect taking cigarettes from behind the counter, deputies said. When confronted, Pound allegedly grabbed the clerk by both arms and said “I will kill you” before throwing him to the ground and fleeing the scene, according to the report. With the assistance of K9 officer Zombie, depu ties tracked the suspect back to Americas Value Inn, where a receptionist confirmed a man match ing the clerk’s description entered just moments ago, the report said. Deputies said a woman answered the door to Pound’s room, was informed of the robbery allegations, pointed to the bathroom door and said “Travis, what did you do?” Pound emerged and showed deputies a Wal-mart bag containing three packs of Newport ciga rettes—the same items stolen from the Shell store, the report said. The suspect also con fessed stealing the items and roughing up the clerk, the report said. Pound said he was high on crack, a substance which “makes him do things he doesn’t want to do,” said he was con cerned for the well-being of the clerk he threw on the ground and asked deputies for help with his addiction, according to the report. Pound was booked into Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. He faces charges of larceny, robbery without a weapon and a probation violation. Williams Pound Free waste workshop this Tuesday

PAGE 4

O lustee weekend has been absolutely spec-tacular. The downtown portion of the festival was excellent on Friday and Saturday. The craft and food vendors delivered, the live musical entertainment was excellent, the parade was out-standing, and the overall apprecia-tion for this historic occasion seems to have been embraced by all who attended. The 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee weekend so far has been a great success. Today, a record number of re-enactors will commemorate the Battle of Olustee near the spot where on Feb. 20, 1864, Confederate soldiers defending Lake City stopped advancing Union troops near Ocean Pond. On that day, a total of 2,807 men from both sides were killed or wounded. This afternoon, hundreds of reenactors will take to the battlefield and commemorate that pivotal day in American history. These living historians give all of us a bonus as we get an accurate glimpse into what a soldier’s life was like in the 1860s. From the re-enactors to the festival organizers, this entire weekend of remembrance and commemora-tion would not be possible without the work of several hundred volun-teers. Sponsors finance the event, but the work gets finished because our community is blessed with peo-ple who have a passion for giving back. They work to make sure this historical event is preserved and is woven into the fabric of Columbia County culture. The Olustee Festival and its battle re-enactment have become an integral part of our county’s sense of place. None of us here today cre-ated this history, but we remember it for its historical significance in our region. Thanks to all the sponsors and volunteers who make it happen. And thanks to everyone who came out to enjoy the sesquicenten-nial edition of the Olustee Battle Festival and Re-enactment. This weekend has been a community scrapbook moment. OPINION Sunday, February 16, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities — “Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com History unfolds at 1:30 Olustee weekend: A scrapbook moment Q Associated Press T he sesquicentennial march has been gathering steam for going on three years now, as towns across America mark the mile-stones of our darkest moment. Now it is our turn to observe the 150th anniversary of the day the Civil War came to our front door. Confederate and Union re-enactors will recreate that moment 15 miles east of town this very afternoon. Olustee may not have been a decisive stop in the war, but it was surely a pivot point for Lake City. The experience has permeated our culture every day since, for a century and a half. Today we pay homage, not to suffering and death, but to our own past. These annual re-enactments tell the story, in some measure, of who we are – both as a small town in North Florida and as a nation. It’s a tale we never get tired of hearing.Our appointment with history is at 1:30 p.m. Better not be late, as seating is limited.Comcast-Time Warner deal makes senseS ay this about the deal announced Thursday for Comcast to buy Time Warner Cable: It’s big. Big price tag of $45 billion. Big combined subscriber base of 30 mil-lion households. And, big risk of a veto from government antitrust reg-ulators, whose approval is needed for the deal to proceed. Remember when AT&T wanted to acquire T-Mobile in a similarly big acquisition? President Barack Obama’s administration blocked that merger in 2011. In our view, that transaction should have won approval. Combining the wireless carriers made business sense and would have helped consumers receive improved services. For the same reasons, we’re inclined to favor a tie-up between the No. 1 and No. 2 cable operators. There’s another reason why such a combo play doesn’t bother us, even though it looks like a classic case of a big new company with more pric-ing power and market dominance: American consumers have never had so many options for digital video news and entertainment, and those options are growing. Americans raised in an era of only three network TV channels now have computer, smart phone and TV access – a wealth not only of content, but of platforms to deliver that content. As this diversity of service options rapidly expands, the reflexive distrust of big-com-pany mergers loses its oomph. In this realm consumers rule: They increasingly have the freedom to abandon any provider that tries to gouge them. In sum, the initial worries about a Comcast-Time Warner deal seem overblown. We doubt that consum-ers would be stuck paying more for cable and broadband service, as some critics fear. We also doubt that content providers such as ESPN or The Weather Channel (now in a standoff with satellite provider DirecTV) would lose bargaining power in their future negotiations with a combined cable behemoth. How so? For starters, Comcast and Time Warner operate cable sys-tems with little overlap. In most of their markets, the two giants don’t compete. Time Warner is big in New York City, for instance, and Comcast in New Jersey and Connecticut. Anticipating an objection from fed-eral antitrust lawyers, Comcast said Thursday it would divest about 3 million subscribers in competitive markets if the deal wins approval. The government might reasonably require more divestitures – but prob-ably not many more. Another factor that would keep the merged company honest is the competition among delivery platforms. For years now, cable operators have lost customers not so much to each other as to the likes of AT&T, Verizon and DirecTV. Those competitors are expected to con-tinue gaining market share against cable, whether or not this merger wins approval. Content providers routinely pit cable, telco and satellite operators against each other in nego-tiating deals. If Comcast dropped a popular channel that its archrivals in the same market still offered, its customers would bolt – a mutiny not possible in earlier decades when only cable or clunky antennas could provide content. Today, though, Internet TV services such as Netflix and Hulu hold the potential to compete against or even cripple cable. It hasn’t hap-pened yet: Most users of those Web services also subscribe to pay TV. But as streaming improves and Internet companies perfect their business models, we expect to see an online challenge to cable that would provide ever more checks and balances in the marketplace. Don’t be startled if, someday, tech-nology improvements by its rivals render the cable industry extinct. Comcast has volunteered to make additional concessions in the inter-est of online competition. It would, for instance, extend conditions imposed on its acquisition of NBC to a Time Warner deal. That would include supplying its programming to Netflix and other providers, and giving competitors equal speed and access on its broadband network. The sluggish economy works in favor of a merger. Since the Great Recession, fewer new households have formed, which cuts into the number of newly occupied homes for cable to colonize. The weak recovery has left a larger share of households unable to afford pay TV no matter how much they want it. The cable audience isn’t growing and won’t any time soon. These weak growth prospects and competitive challenges put a premium on efficiency. Comcast says the merger would result in significant cost savings, which ulti-mately would give it more latitude to offer its customers better deals. Consumers also stand to benefit from investments Comcast has made in its systems, such as high-tech Xfinity branded products. In announcing the deal, the company pledged to deliver superior video, higher broadband speeds and the fastest in-home Wi-Fi to more households. We know: promises, promises. Cable operators have a spotty his-tory of delivering on bold claims. But cable companies have no choice but to keep modernizing, or their customers will desert them for non-cable alternatives. Our bottom line: If Comcast and Time-Warner are allowed to merge, bigger will lead to better. Q Chicago Tribune TODAY IN HISTORY On this date:In 1804, Lt. Stephen Decatur led a successful raid into Tripoli Harbor to burn the U.S. Navy frigate Philadelphia, which had fallen into the hands of pirates. In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee ended as some 12,000 Confederate soldiers surrendered; Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s victory earned him the nickname “Unconditional Surrender Grant.” In 1868, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was organized in New York City. In 1918, Lithuania proclaimed its independence from the Russian Empire. (Lithuania, which was occupied by the Soviet Union, then Nazi Germany, then the Soviet Union again during World War II, renewed its indepen-dence in 1990). In 1923, the burial chamber of King Tutankhamen’s recently unearthed tomb was unsealed in Egypt by English archaeologist Howard Carter. In 1937, Dr. Wallace H. Carothers, a research chemist for Du Pont who’d invented nylon, received a patent for the synthetic fiber. In 1945, American troops landed on the island of Corregidor in the Philippines during World War II. In 1959, Fidel Castro became premier of Cuba a mont h and a-half after the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter.4AOPINION

PAGE 5

5A LAKE CITY REPORTER COMMUNITY SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 James Warren “Jim” Arnold Mr. James Warren “Jim” Ar nold also known as “Chief”, “Mr. Seminole” and “Papa Jim”, 83 of Lake City, passed away peacefully in his sleep Thursday morning February 13, 2014. Jim was born in Bain bridge, Georgia on September 27, 1930 to the late Jessie Frank Arnold and Kitty Williams Ar nold. Jim was many things to many people; but he was well known and well-remembered for his love of Florida State. In 1950, he joined their bud ding FSU football program as a defensive end. He spent two years at FSU; then served four years in the Navy in Jackson ville and Norfolk, VA and en joyed four years of football with them. He then later returned to FSU for another 2 years of foot ball. Since then, his passion for the garnet and gold has never waned. Jim taught industrial arts for a number of years at Lake City Junior High before join ing the state DMV. In 1976; he co-founded the Lake City Sem inole Boosters Club. He was an DYLGKXQWHUDQGVKHUPDQZKRalso had a “green thumb” grow ing large peanuts and crafting his own jelly from mayhaws that were handpicked. Jim was also a member of the Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church. He was preceded in death by his two brothers: Dan Willis Arnold and Jesse Frank Arnold; and two sisters: Mary Cambrom and Myra Thomas. Jim is survived by his lov ing wife of 56 years: Patricia Weeks “Pat” Arnold of Lake City; daughter: Denise Arnold Kirby (Tim) of Lake City; son: James Emmet “Packy” Arnold (Holly) of Tallahassee; sisters: Kitty Henderson of Louisiana and Betty DeWitt of Jackson ville. Three grandchildren: Miles Kirby, Eva Kirby and Emily Arnold also survive. Funeral Services for Mr. Ar nold will be conducted on Mon day, February 17, 2014 at 11 A.M. in the Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church with 5HY/RXLH0DEU\RIFLDWLQJInterment will follow in For est Lawn Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends Sunday afternoon February 16, 2014 from 2-5 P.M. at the funer DOKRPH,QOLHXRIRZHUVWKHfamily requests that donation be made to the Wesley Memo rial United Methodist Church, 1272 SW McFarlane Ave, Lake City, (386) 752-3513. Arrange ments are under the care of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL, 32025. Please sign the on line guestbook at www.parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com. Billie M. Bielling On February 13, 2014 Mrs. Bil lie M. Bielling passed away at North Florida Regional Medical Center after an arduous illness. Known to many as “Ms. B” or “Nanny”, Billie was born to John Dawkins and Bessie Queen Mc Carley on March 24, 1930. She grew up on her Grandfather Fate Harden’s timber land in Union and Columbia Counties. She at-tended elementary school in Ma son City and Middle School in Providence and then graduated from Union County High in Lake Butler, all in the State of Florida. During these times she re ceived voice and piano les sons from local instructors and was an accomplished So prano. Many throughout her life enjoyed and marveled over her beautiful voice in church, weddings and funerals. (She could break the crystal!) After marrying her husband of 50 years, Jesse R. “Jack” Bielling, Jr., they began a ca reer in agriculture producing acres and acres of vegetables in the Providence area. The last few years of her life she enjoyed vegetable gardening again. Upon a career change for Mr. Bielling, “Ms. B” worked with a local Credit Bu reau in Lake City, Fl. Moving to Tallahassee, Fl, with Mr. Bielling’s work, “Ms. B” con tinued her work with a Credit Bureau in Tallahassee during the Mid 60’s. After returning to Lake City, FL in the late 60’s for Mr. Bielling to contin ue his career with the Florida Department of Transportation, “Ms. B” began a career in the Banking Industry with local Savings and Loans. New Ac counts and Customer Relations became her forte, because of her people skills and glowing personality. She completed her career as personal assistant to the editor/publisher of The Lake City Reporter. (Work she thor oughly enjoyed.) During this time, she was a dedicated wife, mother and grandmother, often times feeding the multitudes and maintaining their home. After retirement “Ms. B” and Mr. Bielling spent most of their time at their beloved home in 6XZDQQHH)/VKLQJDQGSUH paring southern style meals for neighbors and friends, was a routine activity. Soon after Mr. Bielling passed away in 1999, “Ms. B” made Suwannee her permanent residence. She resided there until her death. Nothing pleased “Nanny” more than talking about her children, grandchildren and great grand children. She was a faithful member of the Suwannee Bap tist Church where she was an ac tive member of the church choir. “Ms. B” was preceded in death by her parents John and Bessie McCarley, her infant daughter, Susan Marie and her husband Jesse R. (Jack) Bielling, Jr. She is survived by sons Da vid Reginald “Reggie” Bielling (Patti) Lake City, Jesse R. “Jimmy” Bielling, III (Kathy) Providence, Grandchildren Jor dan Catherine Bielling Horne (Justin), Jesse R, Bielling, IV (Lynsi), Betty Rees Bielling and Mari Hines McKanna (Betty’s Sister), Great-Grandchildren Justiss Cait Horne, Jacklynn Marie Horne and Jesse R. “Jax” Bielling, V. She is also survived by her sisters Betty Jo (Glenn) Howard, Dukes, FL, Bobbie Sue Vincent, Green Cove Springs, FL, Gertrude (Jack) Huber, Or lando, FL, many adored niec es and nephews and a host of supportive and caring friends. Funeral services for “Ms. B” will be conducted at Noon on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 in the Providence Village Baptist Church with Rev. Fred Edwards DQG5HY'D[6XPPHUDOORI ciating. Interment will follow in the Old Providence Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends for ONE HOUR prior to the service at the church. The family requests LQOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVEHmade to the Suwannee Baptist Church, P.O. Box 147, Suwan nee, Florida 32692 in memory of Billie M. Bielling. Arrange ments are under the care of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL, 32025. Please sign the on line guestbook at www.parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com. Loree Sally Jackson Mrs. Loree Sally Jackson went home to the Lord on Thursday, February 13, 2014 at the age of 97. She was sur rounded by her family and loving caretakers from Haven Hospice and Stillwater Assist ed Living Center. Mrs. Jackson was born in Mayo, Florida on August 7, 1916. She was pre ceded in death by her parents, Thomas and Lula Hurst, her husband Mr. B.L. “Jack” Jack son, sons, Wayne and Stacey Jackson, brothers, Roscoe and Rudolph Hurst, sisters Juanita Hurst, Eloise Calhoun, Irene Brown and Geraldine Futch, son-in-law Bob Harris, and grandsons Brent Johnson and Michael Kelly. Mrs. Jackson was a founding member of the Southside Baptist Church. She loved her family dearly and enjoyed cooking, reading, working crossword puzzles and sewing in her spare time. Mrs. Jackson is survived by her son, Randall (Vicky) Jack son, daughters Joaun Harris and Lynn (Walt) Davis, sister Tommie Lou (Bernard) Jack son, grandchildren Travis San dlin, Todd (Sarah) Sandlin, Ashley (Heath) Phillips, De nise Stewart, Wayne (Kathy) Stewart, Brent (Becky) Kelly, Scott Stewart, Brian (Laura) Stewart, Jeff (Kimber) Jack son, Wayne (Kelly) Jackson, and Toria (Rick) Andrews and Debbie Johnson. She is the great-grandmother of Jimmy and Steven Kelly, Holly Hale, Stephen Stewart, Rachel Chris tie, Gracelynn, Sydnie Loree, Alex, Adam, and Avery San dlin, Jeffery, Logan, Colton and Ryder Jackson, Katelyn Johnson and Simon Andrews, Michael, Trace and Trent Stewart. She is also survived by two great-great grandchildren, Liam Hale and Cameron Christie. Her loving caretakers Joyce Anderson and Becky Capasso also survive. Funeral services for Mrs. Jackson will be conducted at 3:00 P.M. on Monday February 17, 2014 in the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home with Dr. Ralph Rodriquez RIFLDWLQJ7KHIDPLO\ZLOOUH ceive friends for ONE hour prior to service time on Monday. In terment will follow in Memorial &HPHWHU\,QOLHXRIRZHUVWKHfamily requests that memorial donations be made to the Ha ven Hospice of the Suwannee Valley, 6037 US Highway 90 West, Lake City, FL 32055 or to Stillwater Assisted Living Facility, 507 NW Hall of Fame Dr., Lake City, FL 32055. Ar rangements are under the direc tion of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234 please sign our on-line family guestbook atparrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Ezra P. Yocum, Jr. Mr. Ezra P. Yocum, Jr., age 85, passed away Thursday, Feb ruary 13, 2014 in North Florida Regional Medi cal Center. He was born Oc tober 26, 1928 on a turpentine still near Lochloosa, Florida to Ezra P. Sr. and Cornelia May Matthews Yocum. Mr. Yocum was educated in Duval County Schools and graduated from Landon High School in 1947 and went on to graduate from The University of Florida in 1952. He joined the US Army after high school graduation, serving two years and then served again after graduating from UF as 1st Lieutenant in Korea. He, along with his fa ther, son and grandson was an Eagle Scout and he was a scout master for 10 years in Marian na and High Springs, FL. Mr. Yocum retired from the US Postal Service in 1993 after 32 years as a Fort White rural let ter carrier. He enjoyed playing EULGJHJROQJUHDGLQJJDU dening, square dancing, travel ing, and was an avid Gator fan. But, most of all, he enjoyed the bi-weekly lunches with his high school buddies – Ed, George, David and Jim. Mr. Yocum was a member of First Pres byterian Church of Lake City. He is survived by his wife, Linda Yocum; children, Kar en Perry (Mike), David Yocum (Holly), all of Gainesville, FL and Susan Rauch (Lauren) of Castaic, CA; grandchildren, Ada Rauch of Princeton, NJ, Maya Rauch, Castaic, CA and Trevor Yocum (Stephanie) of Gainesville, FL; sisters, Bess Wikles (Gilbert) of Carthage, MO, Bridget Keinenberger (Car men) of Glencoe, MN and Mary McNeely (Joe) of Lebanon, IN and sister-in-law, Janet Yocum of Gainesville, FL. He was pre ceded in death by his brothers, Horace “Matt” Yocum in 1996 and John C. Yocum in 2012. A Memorial Service will be held Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 2:00 p.m., in The First Presbyterian Church of Lake City with The Rev. Don Mos VDRIFLDWLQJ7KHUHZLOOEHDprivate family burial in Haw thorne Cemetery. Please visit his memorial page at www.williamsthomasfuneralhome.com.FOR FURTHER INFORMA TION WILLIAMS-THOMAS HAWTHORNE (352) 481-4599 Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake &LW\5HSRUWHUVFODVVLILHGGHSDUW Succeeding in MarriageWorkshop on Saturday, February 22, 2014 at Victory Christian Teaching Ministries, Inc. 445 S.W. Alachua Ave. Lake CityFor more information call 386-697-5740 or e-mail victoryhouse445@gmail.com Our family would like to thank the community for the outpour of love towards our family and Brady. We wish we could send every single person a thank you card but it would be so overwhelming. Thank you for all the notes, words of expression, cards, food, owers, and donations that will help us in these expenses (medical and funeral) that are quite overwhelming. If anyone wanting to donate they still can at Cache Valley Bank, Gunnison Bank or Zions Bank in Brady’s name. Brady would have been honored to know that he was thought of so highly and missed by so many. We understand that Brady had unique relationships with so many people from all ages and lifestyles. He loved everybody unconditionally. Brady brought so much happiness to those with his smile and laughter and we will miss him everyday until we see him again. Thank you again with much love, Dave and Allison Simons and family. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDARQ To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by email at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. Black History (Events are scheduled throughout the community by various agencies and organi zations. For more informa tion about local efforts, visit www.itsaboutmyefforts.org.)Feb. 17Teen Summit (includes prizes, a mock trial, teen talk, games and college information) from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Community Revival Center. Admission is free. Contact Dre Cray at 386-292-2725 for more.Feb. 22CDC Black Tie Fundraiser Banquet at 6 p.m. at the County Fairgrounds. Admission is $30. Contact Ann McKellum at 904-635-2021 for more.Feb. 26Festival and Talent Show at 11:30 a.m. at the Florida Gateway College Pines Square. Admission is free. Contact Amy Dekle at 386-754-4317 for more.Feb. 28Closing Ceremony and Elders Banquet at 6 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center. Admission is free. Contact M. Mcallister at 386-867-1601 for more.Feb. 16Joyce Igo in concertJoyce Igo, a soloist from West Virginia, will be in concert at Glad Tidings Assembly of God, 1571 E Ducal Street, on Sunday, Feb. 16 at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. All are welcome to attend.Feb. 17SCORE WorkshopThere will be a SCORE Entrepreneur’s Workshop on Feb. 17 from 6-8 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library. The work shop is free to attend but reservation is required. Call 386-752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com.SAR meetingThe Lake City Chapter of The Sons of The American Revolution will hold its monthly meeting on Monday, Feb. 17, at 6 p.m. The meeting will take place at Guang Dong Restaurant, in the Lake City Mall. There will be an awards ceremony for mem-bers. Visitors are always welcome. For more infor mation, call Ralph Wright at 386-961-9112.Feb. 18Hazardous wasteThe Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Northeast District will hold a free workshop regarding the handling of commercial haz ardous waste and the storage of used oil. The workshop will be held Tuesday, Feb 18 at the Florida Gateway College, Wilson S. Rivers Library. To register for this workshop or for additional information, please contact Dwayne Mundy at Mundy@ncfrpc.org or (352) 955-2200.Art LeagueThe Art League of North Florida invites the commu nity to its monthly meet ing on Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church. There will be dinner, a short business meeting and a presentation from representatives of Michaels.Feb. 19Career DayEpiphany Catholic Schools is hosting a Career Day on Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 8:30-11 a.m. in the church social hall. Class of ’46The CHS class of 1946 will have their quarterly luncheon at Phish Heads on Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Call Lenvil Dicks at 961-1104 for more.John Lanier in revivalGospel singer John Lanier will be participating in a revival at New Beginning Church on Sunday, Feb. 16 through Wednesday, Feb. 19. Sunday times are 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Weekday times are 7 p.m. Call 755-5197 or 755-6422 for more information.Feb. 20Camera ClubThe Branford Camera Club will meet on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 7 p.m. at Cuzin’s Restaurant. The program will discuss an introduction to PhotoShop Elements — a quick fix to any picture that didn’t quite meet your expectation. Mark your cal endars for other upcoming events: Field Trip to the Battle of Olustee, Sunday, February 16. Regular monthly meeting, Thursday, March 20. Contact Carolyn Hogue, Program Chair, 386-935-2044 for more.Retired EducatorsThe Columbia County Retired Educations will meet Thursday, Feb. 20 at the School Board Adult Center (room 120) at 1 p.m. Please bring your volunteer hours. Any retired person interested in education is invited to attend. Call Mr. Brown at 752-2431 for more.

PAGE 6

6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 fury of warfare can overwhelm their commentary. Heres what the audience can expect to see during this years re-enactment: The first phase of the battle will feature a light skirmish between individual infantry on the battlefield re-enactment area as advance troops from each side make first contact with their opponents CSA from the west (left side), USA from the east (right side). A vanguard of Union cavalry will arrive to support the skirmishers, forcing the Confederates to retreat west toward the bulk of their army lying in wait. To guard against the cavalry, the Confederates will form an infantry squarea formation made popular during the Napoleonic wars in Europewhere troops will gather in a square shape with soldiers facing in all four directions, similar to the testudo formation used by ancient Roman soldiers. When they do that, theyll become an easy target for the first advancing Union artillery, said Captain Frank Ofeldt, Commander of the Union Artillery. That Union artillery will see this opportunity to really inflict a great deal of causalities. Theyll swing into action and basically two guns will come online and fire on that square, forcing it to break up. Their retreat into the wooded area will give the Confederates time to reorganize and return to the field of battle in force with additional cavalry and artillery support. At this time, other Union artillery units are arriving and the first really big opening of the battle is the Federal and Confederate artillery duking it out with each other, Capt. Ofeldt said. Theyll keep firing back and forth with each other and the Union infantry will arrive on scene. Theyll take the field and the Confederate infantry will come up even more in force and start firing away at each other. The lines of soldiers will continue to advance to the point that 11 cannons on each side are firing at one another, aiming over the heads of their own infantry in front of them, trading volleys while infantry and cavalry engage one another. The battle will start to see-saw back and forth a little, Capt. Ofeldt said. The Confederate firing will start to slacken, theyre running out of ammunition. So they start to withdraw and it becomes kind of quiet on the battlefield. The Union army is just sitting there because they think theyve won the day. However, unbeknownst to the federal forces, the brief reprieve from battle will give CSA troops ample time to gather more ammunition. Theyll return in force once again, overwhelming the complacent Union troops. At this time, the commanding general of the Union troops realizes the battle is pretty much lost, theres no way to hold, he said. The bulk of the Union troops have been used up, the ammo has already been depleted, theyll start retreating back. The audience will then get a glimpse of the vital role black troops played during the war. [The Union] has one more element to throw in the fight and thats Colonel Montgomerys brigade, the black troops, the 54th Massachusetts and first North Carolina, Ofeldt said. Theyll come on and hold the field long enough for the rest of the Union army to retreat to safety. However, the Confederates do not pursue the retreating troops in blue, but instead requisition the spoils of war rifles, cannons, horses, clothing and other supplies left in the wake of the Unions retreat, including prisoners of war. The 38th Annual Re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee will conclude around 2:45 p.m., putting a close to one of the largest spectacles in Columbia Countys history. Battle 150 years ago, he couldnt answer the question with historically correct information if he remained in his role. A soldier living in 1864 wouldnt know what was going to happen on February 20, he said. As many Civil War battles commemorate their 150th anniversary this year, Jessee and his wife, Gail Jessee, have plans to visit the historical sites. Over the summer, they attended Gettysburg. May will find them at the Battle of Resaca, part of the Civil Wars Atlanta Campaign that started after Union Gen. William Sherman invaded Georgia. From there, the Jessees will follow the path of history to the Battle of Atlanta, which set the stage for Shermans march to the sea. For Jessee, re-enacting teaches him how people lived, how the troops fought, and how soldiers braved the elements to defend their land. Youll learn more about history than you would by reading it, he said. What does artillery sound like? What do men sound like as they march down the road? Whats it like to sleep outside curled up in a blanket? As a Commanding General, he even has to take into consideration factors that would not be an issue in modern society. Time plays a major role in many of the battles, and it can be Jessees enemy. If he needs to alert a man a couple miles away, how long would it take to get him the message? Without cell phones, it could take a while. How long does it take to march a brigade of men one mile? Jessee must know in order for the Olustee event to run smoothly. I wanted to learn, and this is just one way to do it, he said. I guess people are kind of born that way. The 38th Annual Olustee Battle Re-enactment commences at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday.Coleman kicks off ceremoniesBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comAmid clear skies, sunshine and some of the best weather Columbia County has seen this year, President Abraham Lincoln (played by Tad Allen) officially declared open the 150th Anniversary Battle of Olustee Festival at noon on Friday. A slew of local officials were flanked by the opening ceremony emcee and Blue-Grey Commanding General Tom Coleman on stage at Olustee Park downtown, who introduced the group one-byone to several hundred visitors. A few historical dignitaries made appearances as well, including CSA President Jefferson Davis (the Rev. J.W. Binion) and CSA General Robert E. Lee (James Mack Adams). The warring presidents set aside their differences for a brief moment to officially opened the three-day festival, honoring the soldiers who fought and died just 16 miles east of the city and their relatives who held down the fort on the civilian front of Americas bloodiest war. You all are friends for now, Gen. Coleman said to the presidents. But as soon as this is open, were back to war. TACTICSContinued From 1A TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterRiding through the paradeColumbia County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina waves to the crowd during Saturdays Olustee Battle Festival Parade. JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterPresident Abraham Lincoln officially kicks off the Olustee Battle Festival at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Pictured are James Adams (from left), playing Gen. Robert E. Lee; Tony Buzzella; Tad Allen, portraying Lincoln and J.W. Binion as Jefferson Davis.OPENING CEREMONIESYou are all friends for now, but as soon as this is open, were back to war. Tom Coleman, Blue-Grey Commanding General JESSEEContinued From 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterPinemount chorus performsThe Pinemount Elementary School Chorus performs in downtown Lake City during the Olustee Battle Festival. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterUp close and personalCade Clayton, 8, looks at miniature figurines at the Olustee Battle Festival on Friday.

PAGE 7

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.com Thousands of people flocked to Florida’s first state park Saturday and watched as re-enactors staged a “mini-battle” to illustrate the various skir mishes in the days leading up to the Battle of Olustee. Vehicles were parked a mile away in each direc tion from the entry gates at the Battle of Olustee Historic State Park where more than 2,000 re-enac tors have converged to re-enact the only major battle fought on Florida soil during the Civil War — the Battle of Ocean Pond — which later became known as the Battle of Olustee. The bleachers at the battlefield site were filled and a standing-room-only crowd patiently watched the action unfold. Audience members used cell phones, digital camer as and more to mark the event. Small children sat on the shoulders of many adults who were standing, so they could see above the battlefield’s reeds or watch troop activity in the pine forest adjacent to the battlefield. Michael Bair, scoutmas ter with Troop 622 of Belle Glade, brought four scouts to the mini battle. “The kids are always thrilled to watch the action going on,” he said. “They ask a lot of questions and learn a lot of the historical event. They show a lot of interest in it, that’s one of the reasons we keep com ing to such things.” Gen. Thomas Jessee, commander of the Confederate troops at the Battle of Olustee re-en actment, said Saturday’s mini battle went well with no injuries or other prob lems. “It was entertaining to the crowd,” he said. “The purpose was to show the skirmishing leading up to the Battle of Olustee.” Jessee said re-enactors from several states partici pate in the mini battle and it’s the first time they’re all together during Olustee weekend. He said the mini battle serves as an oppor tunity to get them on the field, see how they act under the different com manders, and prepares them so they can get ready for today’s re-enactment. 7A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath, 3398 H/C sq. ft. for $89,000. Seller wants fast sale! Formal living and dining, family room with fireplace, large kitchen, florida room, 2 car garage.Call today for an appt to see. MLS#86363 Cute bungalow style home on 4.32 acres. 2/2 with room for a 3rd bedroom. Gorgeous custom cabinets. Property is fenced and cross fenced, with pasture and oak trees. Will make great mini farm or rental property. Make an offer. MLS #86423 Custom 4 bedroom home, 4453 sq. ft. under roof for $269,900. Wood flooring, custom cabinets, fireplace, with lots of upgrades this home has it all. Owner financing offered or lease with option to buy. Call Susan now. MLS#85144 Just Reduced! Custom home on 3.38 acres. Like new! 3/2 w/2 car garage. Enjoy the peaceful views from front and back porch. Conveniently located to Lake City, High Springs, Alachua and Gainesville. MLS #84910 You will be pleasantly surprised when you enter this cozy, well maintained home. Updated with newer metal roof, cabinets, appliances, and more shows how well cared for this home is. For just $36,500. MLS #86424 Home Sweet Home describes this well cared for cottage style home. Starting with the white picket fence, to the cozy livingroom, to screen porches, you will love the interior and outdoors. Just $38,500. MLS #86439 Susan Holton Eagle 386-623-6612 susanholton@bellsouth.net Ask about 100% QDQFLQJ DQGRZQHU QDQFLQJ By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com With a cry of “go home, Yankees, go home,” Confederate re-enactors opened fire against a small battalion of Union soldiers during a skirmish at Lake DeSoto Friday evening, giv ing visitors their first taste of warfare during this year’s Battle of Olustee Festival. Visitors also had an opportunity to see half of a re-enactment of the battle of the iron clads between the Merri-mack and Monitor—the latter of which was absent due to strong winds. Roughly 50 re-enactors traded volleys on a small clearing near the lake, fall ing one by one, succumb ing to the rigors of war in mock mortality. An 1841 model bronze six-pounder cannon fired from the Confederate ranks as well, blighting Union soldiers, delighting visitors and frightening ducks. The USS Merrimack drifted nearby, albeit under the historically accurate title CSS Virginia, so named after the Confederacy reclaimed the ship follow ing a botched Union attempt to destroy it. However, the Merrimack’s arch-neme sis, the USS Monitor, did not make an appearance during the battle due to compli cations with the weather. “It was too windy and they couldn’t get across the lake,” said Blue-Grey Second Lieutenant Ken Hohmann, who constructed the min iatures from small boats adorned with painted ply wood 18 years ago. “The trolling motor wasn’t strong enough. I’m very disappointed, but we’ll rec tify it for next year.” Blue-Grey Executive Director Faye Bowling Warren reflected on the Monitor’s demise on Lake DeSoto. “I guess there was a mal function,” she said. “That’s war for you.” All things considered, the skirmish on the lake tied up the first day of one of Lake City’s biggest events of the year. “It’s been a great success so far,” Mayor Stephen Witt said. “And it looks like it’s going to be a great weekend.” He encouraged citizens to attend not just the big battle re-enactment on Sunday, but all the other festival-specific events sur rounding the battle, as well. “It’s incredible to go out to the battlefield, not just during the battle, and see the re-enactors camping and hear their music and learn about their medical treatment,” he said. At the end of the skir mish, Warren and Blue-Grey Commanding General Tom Coleman dis tributed certificates of par ticipation and yellow rib bons to all the re-enactors who fought on the banks of Lake DeSoto. “We like to have the skir mish because it encourages the re-enactors to come to town,” Coleman said. “It also creates enthusiasm for the big re-enactment on Sunday.” Currents complicate — but do not dampen — Lake DeSoto skirmish Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterConfederate artillerymen fire a shell at Union soldiers during a skirmish around Lake DeSoto on Friday. BELOW: The CSS Virginia patrols the waters of Lake DeSoto. ‘We like to have the skirmish because it encourages the re-enactors to come to town... It also creates enthusiaism for the big re-enactment on Sunday.’— Tom Coleman, Blue-Grey Commanding General Crowd packs bleachers at Olustee ‘mini-battle’ JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterUnion artillerymen cover their ears as they fire at Confederate soldiers on Saturday.‘The kids are always thrilled to watch the action going on... They ask a lot of questions and learn a lot of the historical event. They show interest in it — that’s one of the reasons we keep coming to such things.’— Michael Bair, scoutmaster of Boyscout Troop 622

PAGE 8

8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOC AL SUNDAY FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424Fallen soldiers remembered in Oaklawn serviceBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comUnknown soldiers who fought and died at the Battle of Olustee were solemnly remembered Friday morning during a memorial ceremony at Oaklawn Cemetery. More than 50 people attended the 30-minute event that kicked off the weekend of the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee. The Oaklawn Cemetery Memorial Ceremony, sponsored by the Blue-Grey Army, was held in tribute to soldiers who fought at the Battle of Olustee and died on the battlefield or from wounds they received in battle. There are more than 100 unknown soldiers buried at a gravesite in the cemetery. Keith W. Kohl, re-enactor and living historian from the Ocala area, served as the events keynote speaker. Kohls address chronicled the Battle of Olustee and actions leading to the largest Civil War Battle fought on Florida soil. He said the words like, honor, devotion, duty and sacrifice are the right terms by which to remember the fallen soldiers, but their memories should not become obscured because the terms are sometimes overused. Its up to us, the people who are here, to carry on their memory that we do not allow the words to become commonplace, he said. Those words do apply to these people. Following the ceremony Kohl said it was an honor to address the audience at the memorial service. As a re-enactor, historian, and presenter, Ive been asked to present in many places, he said. Anytime anyone has enough faith in my humble ability to do a speech or presentation its honorable and it honors me. But to do it here on a place where Civil War soldiers are laid to rest or any hallowed grounds where Americans are laid to rest, that is even more of an honor to me. Following Kohls address, members of the Olustee Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy laid a wreath at the base of the monument in honor of the soldiers buried at the gravesite. We laid the wreath in memory of all the soldiers that were killed in the war, as well as in memory of all the soldiers that have given their lives for our freedom, said Ann Brown, past president of the Olustee Chapter of the UDC as well as past president of the Florida Division of the United Daughter of the Confederacy. Brown also spoke the significance of laying the wreath on the gravesite during the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee. Its a very special feeling, she said. Its an honor for me to lay the wreath for all of our men who have stood up for our country, she said. Faye Bowling Warren, Blue-Grey Army executive director, said the Oaklawn Ceremony has been a part of the Olustee Battle Festival for more than 20 years and noted the event was started by the late Dr. Alfonzo Levy. He pushed this event because it was a healing process, she said. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterKeith Kohl delivers a speech while speaking at the Oaklawn Cemetery Memorial Service Program on Friday. Linda Williams (from left) president of the Olustee Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, past presidents Ann Brown and Annette Lindsey-Hutson pose for a photograph after placing a memorial wreath near a monument at the Oaklawn Cemetery memorial service program on Friday.Honor. Devotion. Its up to us to carry on their memory that we do not allow the words to become commonplace. Keith W. Kohl, re-enactor and living historian By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comNearly 150 years ago on Feb. 20, 1864, approximately 155 unidentified Confederate troops laid down their lives at the Battle of Olustee protecting a cause they were willing to die for. The sacrifice, devotion and heroism of those 155 men was honored at a ceremony Friday morning. In addition, the names of local soldiers who died at the Battle of Olustee were read aloud as a reminder of who they were. A gravestone sits at the entrance way to a portion of Oaklawn Cemetery that reads: In This Area Are Buried 155 Unknown Confederate Soldiers Killed in Battle of Olustee or died in Confederate Hospital 1864-1865. Friday morning Sons of Confederate Veterans members from the region gathered to honor their fallen forebears. We gather here each year to honor, remember and celebrate the lives of the 155 Southern soldiers who died as a result of the battle as well as those Southern soldiers who did not perish then, but have since crossed over to the other side, said SCV past commander Earl Stanley, the events keynote speaker. These men fought gallantly for their families, their neighbors, their states and their nation. They also fought and died for ideals that were very much a real part of life then states rights and honor. We also gather here each year to make sure that their history, the history of their South and our South is accurately and properly preserved and that the good names of these and other soldiers who fought here and in every other battle engaged in by the South during that war are never dishonored, he continued. We are here to preserve the legacy of these soldiers of the Confederacy, so that future generations may understand the motives that galvanized not only these men, but also the entire South, to defend what they believed in... Following Stanleys address a Sesquicentennial marker was unveiled at the gravesite containing six Confederate troops. The markers inscription reads: Battle of Olustee Sesquicentennial: In Memory of the 155 Confederates and veterans interned in Oaklawn. Dedicated 14, Feb., 2014. Battle of Olustee Camp 1463 Sons of Confederate Veterans, Lake City. The marker was donated by OT Davis Monuments of Gainesville. Capt. David Eversole, an SCV member, was a member of the color guard that fired a volley in salute of the fallen Confederate troops and other veterans. He said he was proud to participate in the program on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee. It was very special to me because one of my ancestors is buried here, he said. He was killed at the Battle of Olustee at 16 years old. This is an honor to the soldiers and the brave honor the brave. White, black, blue or gray, it doesnt matter a soldier is a soldier and the brave honor the brave. Were here to honor these brave men. Robert Tucker, Sons of Confederate Veterans Battle of Olustee Camp 1463 commander, said the marker is to honor the fallen. The marker pays respect to all the guys who perished at the Battle of Olustee, he said. It befell our SCV Camp 1463 to commemorate the (150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee) with a marker forever for people visiting the cemetery or their descendants to always remember the sacrifice they made. In addition to the names of local troops who died at the Battle of Olustee, Tucker also called out the names of an additional 41 known Confederate veterans, one a woman who worked in the medical department of the Confederate States of America. Its important to call their names each year to remember them too, Tucker said. They are just as great of a hero as those troops that died. We need to remember them too, because they had their own sacrifices. Though they lived and became veterans, we honor them, too.New sesquicentennial marker unveiled Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City ReporterMike Null (right) and his grandson, Tyler Sandlin, 13, pay their respects to the soldiers who gave their lives during the Battle of Olustee in front of a sesquicentennial marker that was unveiled during the Confederate Memorial Service at Oaklawn Cemetery on Friday. Joe Kurtright (from left), Dee Wolford and Craig Wolford sing Amazing Grace during the Confederate Memorial Service Friday morning.In Memory of the 155 Confederates and veterans interned in Oaklawn. Dedicated 14, Feb. 2014. Battle of Olustee Camp 1463 Sons of Confederate Veterans, Lake City.

PAGE 9

Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 9A 10th Annual! Feb. 20, 21 & 22, 2014 Feb. 20, 21 & 22, 2014 Feb. 20, 21 & 22, 2014 FEBRUARY 20, 21 & 22, 2014AFAMILY FESTIVALSoundby BLUE RIDGE SOUND MUSIC RAIN OR SHINE!COVEREDPAVILIONPROVIDEDSecurity Guards On Duty NO Alcoholic Beverages, Smoking or Pets Allowed in Concert Area Stricly Enforced WE RESERVETHE RIGHTTO REFUSE ADMISSIONTO ANYONE10th ANNUAL!CONCESSIONS & HOT FOODCamperHook-ups (Water & Electric) (386) 328-1281NO VIDEO OR AUDIO RECORDINGSHERRY BOYD, M.C.GOLDWING EXPRESS(Friday, 21st) (Friday, 21st)It is better to build boys than to mend men380 BOYS RANCH ROADPALATKA, FLORIDA 32177For tickets, complete details and free mailing list, contact: Adams Bluegrass, LLC P.O. Box 98 Dahlonega, GA 30533 Phone: (706) 864-7203 www.adamsbluegrass.com DAILEY & VINCENT(As seen on RFD-TV) (Thursday 20th) (Thursday, 20th) (Thursday, 20th)THE PRIMITIVE QUARTET SHOWTIMES:(Ticket Prices Do Not Include Camping)RESERVED GATE ADVANCE GENERAL ADMISSION THURSDAY, 12 Noon 10 p.m.(Open stage at 11 a.m.) ......... $30.00 ............. ..................$35.00 FRIDAY, 12 Noon 10 p.m.(Open stage at 11 a.m.) ...............$30.00 ............. ..................$35.00 SATURDAY, 12 Noon 10 p.m.(Open stage at 11 a.m.) ......... $30.00 .............. ..................$35.00 3-DayAdvance(WeekendTicketSpecial)* .............................$75.00 .............. ..................$85.00 ChildrenAges 6-13, $15.00 per day, 3 days ........................... $40.00 .............. $35.00 $35.00 $35.00 $85.00 $45.00..................$45.00 Children Under 6 .............................................................................................................. FREE with Parentrfnntbnnr Tickets not mailed: processing fee on credit cards: ($3.00 per 3-day ticket, $2.00 per 1-day ticket) rbnnnQuality Inn & Suites (386) 328-3481 Crystal Cove Resort (386) 325-1055 Sleep Inn & Suites (386) 325-8889 AskforSpecialBluegrass Rates AT ALL MOTELS PLEASE BRING LAWNCHAIRS.rf bn **** Queen of Bluegrass RHONDA VINCENT & THE RAGETHE BLUEGRASS BROTHERS Country Legend of the Year GENE WATSON (Saturday, 22nd) & The Farewell Party Band LARRY SPARKS & THE LONESOME RAMBLERS (Friday, 21st) (Friday, 21st)KODY NORRIS & THE WATAUGA MOUNTAIN BOYSTHE GIBSON BROTHERS THE SELDOM SCENE (Friday & Saturday 21st & 22nd)DRY BRANCH FIRE SQUADCODY SHULER & PINE MOUNTAIN RAILROAD THE LITTLE ROY & LIZZY SHOW (Saturday, 22nd) (Saturday, 22nd) (Saturday, 22nd) (Friday, 21st)(Saturday, 22nd)THE STEVENS FAMILY & FULL CIRCLEMARTY RAYBONJIMMY FORTUNE WITH DAILEY & VINCENT(Thursday, 20th) (Thursday, 20th) 20082010 IBMA Entertainer of the Year(Thursday, 20th)THE JAMES KING BANDIBMA-Entertainer of theYear 2013Adams Bluegrass, LLC Present:TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE GATE DURING FESTIVAL TICKETS AVAILABLEAT THE GATE 10th 10th Annual! Annual! 10th ANNUAL! SHERRY BOYD, M.C. Adams Bluegrass, LLC Present: ITS BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL TIME NOTICE OF MEETING COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE CITY OF LAKE CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee for the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 4:30 P.M., in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. NOTICE OF MEETING ADVISORY UTILITY COMMITTEE MEETING CITY OF LAKE CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Advisory Utility Committee for the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Tuesday, February 18, 2014, at 5:30 P.M., in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS AS FOLLOWS: National League of Cities Service Line Warranty Program Hatch Mott MacDonald SR 47 & I75 Septic Tank Elimination Grant Fund Anderson Columbia 6 inch Natural Gas Main Extension Design/Permitting ProposalKicklighter 1.5 MGD Wastewater Treatment Plant Update on Distribution Water Loss CITY COUNCIL MEETING THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL MEET ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2014 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA All interested persons are invited to attend any of the meetings identified above. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Managers Office at (386) 719-5768. AUDREY E SIKES, MMC Finding a niche: Civil War sewingBy AM AND A WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com A ribbon-covered hoop glided from the end of Dixie Donnellys crossed sticks as she demonstrated Graces, a popular 1860s game for young ladies, to a gathering of eager visitors at Olustee Battlefield Friday. Dressed in a pink, homemade Victorian dress, 18-year-old Dixie works alongside her mother each year to educate the public about childrens games, as well as historic clothing for ladies and children. Both Dixie and her sister, Belle, were inspired by their mothers love of the era. Camilla Donnelly grew up in Lake City, so the Olustee re-enactment has always been a part of her life. However, for 25 years, she drifted away from her hometown to work as a youth educator at Disney World. In a way, the experience prepared her for what she now does with her family during Olustee weekend. Ive always been a seamstress, but I found a niche for my sewing skills, she said. There are a lot of people who make mens clothing. There wasnt much of a need there, but there are not a lot of people who do period-correct, authentic childrens clothing. Approximately 15 years ago, Donnelly visited the battlefield with her small child and loved the atmosphere. She decided then to sew her own dress for the next annual Olustee event. Her family participated in the nighttime ball held for re-enactors only, and she realized how different it was when all the visitors had left. The music playing, the camp fires, it really takes you to another place and time, Donnelly said, adding that she had always been a history buff. She fell in love with re-enacting. Donnelly began crafting dresses for herself and her growing family. To be as authentic as possible, she thoroughly researches each dress through the Internet or womens periodicals from the 1800s. Many of her creations are copies of originals, she said. The time it takes to craft each dress just depends on the task at hand a ball gown would take much longer than a simple dress, she said. Eventually, people began asking for her help to create clothing for the Olustee Festival. Because of the need, she decided to focus on women and childrens clothing. While she doesnt sell her dresses at the re-enactment, Donnelly does carry fabric samples with her to the site in case people are interested in ordering a dress from her in the future. Instead, she sells small childrens toys, such as slingshots, Graces sets and yo-yos. The toys she teaches about and the items she has on display could be found in an 1860s home. The Donnelly family attends six to eight events each year, from South Carolina to Alabama. Over the summer, they visited the 150th Anniversary of Gettysburg. Despite her participation in events across the South, Donnelly wanted to expand locally. She started a small womans group in Lake City to encourage locals to learn more about their ancestry. The group meets once a month to study Victorian life as experienced by the periods women. Since both Belle and Dixie grew up living a re-enactors life, they too have fallen in love with the Civil War. I like to dress up and pretend Im not myself, Dixie said. You can be whatever you want to be. Its an easier way of learning. Since her mother works as a seamstress, Dixie can design a dress she wants instead of selecting from the stores available styles. Currently, she has four outfits three dresses and a catineers outfit. Its a wonderful family hobby, Donnelly said. AMANDA WILLIAMSON/Lake City ReporterBoth of Camilla Donnellys children Dixie and Belle have been participating in the re-enactment for as long as they can remember. According to Donnelly, it has become a family hobby. Pictured are Belle Donnelly (back left), Camilla Donnell and Dixie Donnelly (front). Thousands of students experience living history at battlefieldBy AM AND A WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com From her hoop skirt to her red-and-white socks, Ann Brown explained her Victorian-era wardrobe to a cluster of students from Shining Star Academy of the Arts all curious to know what kept her skirt so rounded. With Olustee weekend in full swing, students from all over Florida flooded the historic site Friday afternoon. Park officials estimate between 2,500 to 5,000 students will converge over the weekend on the land once occupied by Floridas bloodiest battle of the Civil War. According to Brown, adjutant for the Blue-Grey Army, Inc., the event provides children the opportunity to see history come alive. The kids can look through the books, but its just not very exciting for them, Brown said. When they come out here, they get to see how it was. Its living history, and that makes it fun for them. It may even make them want to study their history. Shining Star Academy of the Arts students explored Olustee Battlefield for the first time ever as a school group. In its second year of existence, the charter school visited the downtown Battle of Olustee Festival last year, but not the re-enactment in nearby Baker County. Our school has an emphasis on patriotism, on Americanism, said Abigail Dubi, Shining Star administrative assistant. We want our students to know the truth of history, not just what they read in their textbooks. Theres no easier way to teach a student than to show them. All 192 Shining Star students at the park couldnt wait to explore the various sections from the demonstrators and the sutlers to the encampments of Civil War soldiers. Like most of the other children, the group was interested in the childrens games such as Graces, a game of catch played with a hoop and the medical demonstrations. Cannons echoing into the distance quickly drew the attention of Shining Star fourth-grade student Zachary Rogers on Friday. I want to see the cannon shot right in front of me and also buy something for 10 bucks, he said. His fellow classmate Emily-Jane Curtis had never been to the park before, but fulfilled her wish to learn something new about the events history before leaving. She was surprised to discover the event sat in the exact site where Confederate and Union soldiers clashed 150 years earlier. For a brief moment Friday, Emily-Jane said she felt like she had stumbled through time to the historic Confederate soldiers campsite. Period-style tents formed lines through pine forests, surrounded by antique boxes and smoldering campfires. Horses trotted behind soldiers dressed in Confederate gray, waiting for the next days battle to commence. I thought we were going back in time, then I would see a car drive by, she said. Emily-Janes experience is one shared by many of the children who pass through the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park during re-enactment weekend. They get to step back in time and see a piece of history, said Andrea Thomas, a Florida State Park service specialist. At a young age, they learn in school about how things formed between the North and the South, but out here they can actually see the history. SHINING STAR ACADEMY AMANDA WILLIAMSON/Lake City ReporterSpring Sperber (from left), Kylia Burris and Olliyiah James, Shining Star Academy of the Arts students, examine the dress of Ann Brown, adjutant for the Blue-Grey Army, Inc.

PAGE 10

10A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 From re-enactments to wedding vows, couple marries on Olustee BattlefieldBy AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com As Pamela Officer walked down the aisle toward her future hus band, camp fires smol dered in the distance. The plain white tents of the Confederate troops became the backdrop to her wedding as she exchanged her vows with Timothy Oliver during Olustee weekend at the historic battlefield. Friends and family attended the Saturday evening ceremonies dressed in Civil War fash ions. Officer and Oliver exchanged vows, prom ising until death do they part, in front of an altar decorated with local flora and fauna. An enlisted man’s wedding, the services were simple and beau tiful. Georgia Volunteer Battalion Chaplain Joey Young married the couple in a Baptist-style ceremo ny. A reception featuring beef stew, corn, ham and bread rolls followed the ceremonies. Traditional 1860s decor dotted the table. “It was like coming home, walking down the aisle and knowing who you’re going to be with for the rest of your life,” Officer said. “I knew from the time we survived our first re-enactment.” Oliver, a four-and-a-half year re-enactor and First Sergeant with Company C of the 61st Georgia Volunteers, said the couple decided to get married during a re-enactment event ever since his wife participated in the Battle of Chickamauga in September. “It’s a common interest of ours,” Oliver said, “and a good opportunity to something fun. ... It’s like a destination wedding. Some people get married on surfboards, some get married while skydiving. This is just one way to do it, and it’s something we both like to do.” The two selected Olustee because the battle is celebrating its 150th anniversary, but the loca tion also happened to be closer to Officer’s family. Oliver’s son, Colin, served as the best man. He was dressed, along with his fellow grooms men, in full Confederate regalia. “I’m glad to see that he’s found someone,” Colin Oliver said. “It was great to be a part of it and an honor to be there for him.” Prior to the wedding, Officer and her two brides maids spent several hours Saturday morning prepar ing. All three women wore elaborate dresses for the ceremony. “All I can say is these women were made of strong stuff,” bridesmaid Mimi Gonzales said. “I couldn’t believe how much work went into dressing us.” Both women were sur prised when their friend told them she planned to do a period wedding, but knew that the event would be just like Pam. Gonzales said she was excited to participate because she had never done anything like it before. According to brides maid Amy Barrett, Officer purchased the attire for both of her bridesmaids. However, the dresses would probably end up in Officer’s collection on Civil War-era fashion to be worn at future re-enactment events. “I would have shown up like Scarlett O’Hara,” Gonzales said, adding she had no idea what the style was in the 1860s. “We wish her all the best. This was an amazing experience for me.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterTim Oliver and Pamela Officer, both of Valdosta, were married at the Confederate camp site following the Civil War ‘mini-battle’ on Saturday. Festival-goers look back at America’s history in Olustee By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.com Thousands of people from far and wide flocked to downtown Olustee Park to celebrate the opening day of the 150th Anniversary Battle of Olustee Festival, reflect ing on the region’s history while enjoy fun, food and festivities. Visitors got a taste of local history and cuisine, shuffling between groups of period re-enactors and vendors hawking funnel cakes and tasty treats. “I like looking back on [the Civil War], looking back on how the South and the North interacted with Native Americans,” said Fort White High senior and thespian Katherine Crosby, who claims Chickasaw ances try. Crosby and fellow Fort White High acting col league Brandi Smith were part of what they called a “Medicine Man Show” just minutes earlier and were enjoying a reprieve from their bulky costumes in the shade. “I like to look back to see what the women did without men,” Smith said, referring to a period of female self-sustainabili ty during the Civil War that would make Rosie the Riveter proud. “The women had to take over.” Alex Roberts, a bass guitarist in the Columbia High School Jazz Band, said he looked forward to participating in the parade, which took place Saturday. “[The Battle of Olustee] is certainly something we look back at,” Roberts said. “It was a huge event in America’s past. The fes tival helps us look back at it...It’s a fun communi ty event that brings out a lot of people.” However, performing Friday after noon worked up an appetite in the young bassist. “I’m excited about the food,” Roberts said. “I’m all about the elephant ears.” James Adams, who returned for his sev enth year as Olustee’s General Lee re-enactor, said he enjoys coming to Columbia County every year. “I always look for ward to it,” Adams said. “They way I’m treated by the community and the event organizers, we’ve all become really good friends.” He also said he was proud to represent such an important figure in what he called one of the most defining periods in American history. “It determined the future of our country, whether we were going to be one coun try or two,” he said. “We’ve only had one [Civil War], thank goodness.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterPaulette Jones (left) shows Charlene Couchon, of Lake City, how she looks in a cap while visiting the Olustee Battle Festival on Friday. PATRICK SCOTT/ Special to the ReporterJoy Gatewood (right), of the Columbia County Health Department, gives Bobbi Wilson, of Branford, a free flu shot Saturday at the downtown Olustee Battle Festival. “It didn’t hurt,” Wilson said. PATRICK SCOTT/ Special to the ReporterRhonda Anderson (center), of Lake City, picks out a sample of pepper jelly with family and friends as Tom Brown looks on Saturday afternoon at the downtown Olustee Battle Festival. “We love it here,” Anderson said.‘[The Battle of Olustee] is certainly something we look back at... it was a huge event in America’s past. The festival helps us look back at it... It’s a fun community event that brings out a lot of people.’— Alex Roberts, bass guitarist in the Columbia High School Jazz Band

PAGE 11

Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 11A You just couldnt imagine the horror of it allBy AM AND A WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com Are there any more wounded? yelled the assistant surgeon, holding a cigar between his blood-soaked fingers. Are there any more wounded? A red-stained sheet covered the work table behind him, surrounded by a medical team of nurses, surgeons and doctors. On the ground, severed limbs collected in a pile. Beyond the medical tent, a row of wounded Civil War soldiers recovered from their battle wounds and the subsequent medical treatment that followed. The doctors treated gunshot wounds to the gut, pulled shrapnel from a leg, and amputated an arm. During the Civil War, though, the treatment happened fast, without sanitation and with nothing to dull the pain. The quicker the doctors moved, the more men they treated, the more lives they could save, said Olustee Battle re-enactor Brad Cox. The fast-paced performance by re-enactors at Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park demonstrated how brutal treatment tended to be. Approximately 100 people gathered around the medical tent Saturday for a demonstration on Civil War-era field-dressing techniques. The demonstration was supposed to start at 1 p.m., but began early for unexplained reasons. It seemed very authentic based on things Ive read, said Jesica Cox, whose husband portrayed a steward in the demonstration. The cauterizing, that was life-like. You could smell it and see it burning. According to Adrian Cox McCabe, coordinator of the medical demonstration and superintendent of nursing, the performance was intended to show visitors how barbaric treatment tended to be in the 1860s. The bloodiness, the lack of pain medication and the disregard to sanitation meant Civil War soldiers faced terrible odds even after receiving aid for their wounds. Because there was no time to stitch wounds, doctors cauterized bullet holes. Due to the nature of Civil War weaponry, a bullet wound to an arm or leg often meant amputation. McCabe said she included wounds in the demonstration that would have been common during the Civil War. Not everybody would have died from the wounds, but instead from the infection, she said, adding that infection set in as a result of poor hospital conditions. [The demonstration] was very small compared to how it really was. They would have been treating hundreds of people. Similar to history, the doctors didnt take the time to clean their supplies between wounded. As a result, blood splatters stained the sheets, their clothes, the medical instruments and more. Field Surgeon Brandon Hiotts arms were covered in the fake blood by the end of the performance, smears of it streaking his face. It would have been much more intense in real life, he said. The screaming would have been ear-piercing. The smell... More men died from infections than wounds. Sanitation wasnt a concern during the war, he added, since the doctors were not aware of bloodborne pathogens. They were just trying to stop the bleeding, said Hiott, who works as a paramedic in Bradenton. Frequently, the doctors would move from one man still covered with his blood to working on another wounded patient. Jan Bowyer traveled from Newnan, Ga., to the annual Olustee Battle re-enactment to watch the medical demonstration. The Newnan-Coweta Historical Society plans to include its own medical demonstration this year at the Battle of Browns Mill re-enactment. After watching the medical personnel at the Olustee re-enactment, she said she thought the details were very authentic to the horrors of the Civil War. Medical treatments were in there early stages, and the Olustee demonstrations were able to portray that primitiveness, she added. You just couldnt imagine the horror of it all, Bowyer said. As the audience dispersed after the demonstration, one girl in a white hoodie walked away covered in blood. Throughout the demonstration, blood squirted from the soldiers wounds. We warn the audience if you are sitting close, you may get blood on you, McCabe said. In the past, guests have passed out from the gruesomeness of the re-enactment. However, this year, the audience seemed less squeamish. Occasionally people turned away or gasped, but everybody stayed on their feet. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMedical staff hold down a patient as a surgeon cauterizes a gunshot wound during a medical demonstration on Saturday.ARE THERE ANY MORE W OUNDED?It would have been much more intense in real life... The screaming would have been ear-piercing. The smell... More men died from infections than wounds. Brandon Hiott, field surgeonCIVIL WAR MEDICAL PROCEDURESMusic is a part of history and helps tell Olustees storyBy T ONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCivil War period tunes are commonly played by musical groups during the annual Battle of Olustee weekend. Musicians with drums and flutes groups, brass instruments or stringed instruments add flavor to the event by evoking emotion through music. Members of the 11th North Carolina Regimental Band take pride in the music they play during Olustee weekend and received huge ovations after each of their performances on Saturday at the battlefield. The ensemble, from Fayetteville, North Carolina, has been participating in Olustee weekend for more than 12 years. Its very exciting to perform at the battlefield on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee, said Lee Roach, chief musician of the band. That was a long time ago in the Civil War, a bad time, but also a time that cant be forgotten. Its very exciting to be able to be here on the 150th Anniversary even though historically we werent here. There are 14 musi cians in the unit, which is composed of E-flat and B-flat brass instruments and two percussionists, playing bass drum and snare drum. Roach said the unit has performed at other re-enactments such as Gettysburg, Pa., Manassas, Va., Vicksburg, Miss., and Fredericksburg, Va. Throughout the days of the Battle of Olustee re-enactment the unit moves to different areas of the park and performs period music. As everybody is getting ready for the battle, we provide music of the period, Roach said. Everything we played was written before 1865. Music is a part of history and it provides emotion and we help tell the story through music. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterBand members perform a concert before the minibattle on Saturday. TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterParade marshals presented with plaquesTom Coleman, Blue-Grey Army Commanding General, stands with Gen. Thomas Jessee, commander of Confederate troops; Gail Jessee; Susan Graffweg; Gen. James Permane, commander of Union troops and Faye Bowling Warren, Blue-Grey Army executive director. Coleman and Warren presented Thomas Jessee and James Permane with plaques for serving as parade grand marshals during the 36th Annual Olustee Battle Festival parade on Saturday.

PAGE 12

12A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEA THER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 16 17 18 19 20REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, Feb. 16 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 67/36 63/38 65/36 67/38 65/50 63/50 67/36 65/45 67/38 70/49 68/47 70/41 74/56 76/59 74/52 70/54 76/58 72/65Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 74/55/pc 79/61/pc Daytona Beach 71/52/pc 77/57/pc Fort Myers 80/58/s 83/62/pc Ft. Lauderdale 78/64/pc 80/68/pc Gainesville 73/47/pc 78/52/pc Jacksonville 72/48/pc 77/53/pc Key West 78/68/pc 79/70/pc Lake City 73/47/pc 78/52/pc Miami 79/64/pc 81/68/pc Naples 77/61/pc 79/63/pc Ocala 75/48/pc 79/53/pc Orlando 74/55/pc 80/60/pc Panama City 68/56/pc 68/58/pc Pensacola 67/60/pc 68/59/pc Tallahassee 74/48/pc 75/52/pc Tampa 75/57/s 77/61/pc Valdosta 73/47/pc 75/51/pc W. Palm Beach 78/62/pc 79/67/pc High Saturday Low Saturday 70 85 in 1932 16 in 1899 62 45 48 Saturday 0.09" 0.42" 0.75" 4.97" 1.66" 7:09 a.m. 6:19 p.m. 7:08 a.m. 6:20 p.m. 8:03 p.m. 7:48 a.m. 8:58 p.m. 8:22 a.m.Feb 22 March 1 March 8 March 16 Last New First Full Quarter Quarter A fairly accurate description of a Minnesota winter can be summed up in one word...cold. Pokegama, Minn. lived up to this characteristic on this date in 1903 when it recorded a temperature of -59 degrees to set a state record for the coldest temperature ever. Rain and mountain snow will be widespread from the Northwest and northern California into the northern Rockies. A weakening area of low pressure will produce light snow from the upper Ohio Valley into northern New England. 87, Santee, CA -23, Land O' Lakes, WISaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 32/24/.05 22/4/pc Albuquerque 64/37/.00 71/40/pc Anchorage 23/9/.00 23/11/fl Atlanta 46/34/.05 59/40/pc Baltimore 36/33/.06 33/19/cd Billings 45/33/.00 48/30/fl Birmingham 45/32/.00 61/39/s Bismarck 27/16/.00 32/20/i Boise 41/40/.35 47/30/sh Boston 34/28/.03 28/12/pc Buffalo 24/21/.01 17/4/sn Charleston SC 59/50/.07 61/37/pc Charleston WV 35/23/.15 38/24/fl Charlotte 46/39/.15 52/30/pc Cheyenne 48/28/.17 55/28/pc Chicago 24/6/.00 26/17/pc Cincinnati 28/16/.00 34/23/sn Cleveland 24/17/.00 24/7/sn Columbia SC 26/10/.00 38/31/pc Dallas 66/37/.00 71/57/fg Daytona Beach 68/46/.01 66/45/s Denver 54/36/.00 63/34/pc Des Moines 24/6/.15 31/23/cd Detroit 23/7/.00 25/7/sn El Paso 77/50/.00 82/55/pc Fairbanks 1/-9/.00 1/-18/sn Greensboro 41/35/.15 47/26/pc Hartford 30/19/.05 26/6/pc Honolulu 77/71/.00 78/70/sh Houston 64/48/.00 73/62/fg Indianapolis 21/3/.00 30/20/cd Jackson MS 52/30/.00 67/50/pc Jacksonville 63/48/.08 65/38/pc Kansas City 34/13/.00 41/32/pc Las Vegas 68/51/.00 78/48/pc Little Rock 48/25/.00 61/48/pc Los Angeles 77/52/.00 73/53/pc Memphis 43/26/.00 58/47/pc Miami 77/55/.00 77/62/pc Minneapolis 18/0/.11 22/20/pc Mobile 59/39/.00 69/50/s New Orleans 59/46/.00 67/53/pc New York 37/28/.00 30/17/pc Oakland 57/50/.00 59/44/pc Oklahoma City 64/28/.00 66/47/pc Omaha 41/18/.00 38/30/pc Orlando 71/46/.00 70/47/s Philadelphia 37/33/.08 29/19/pc Phoenix 81/54/.00 85/56/pc Pittsburgh 28/21/.04 28/14/fl Portland ME 32/18/.00 31/8/sn Portland OR 44/43/.36 48/42/r Raleigh 45/37/.27 49/28/pc Rapid City 48/32/.00 58/28/pc Reno 66/55/.00 58/29/sh Sacramento 59/52/.00 65/39/r Salt Lake City 53/42/.00 54/34/r San Antonio 59/50/.00 80/57/fg San Diego 75/53/.00 69/54/fg San Francisco 57/53/.00 56/48/pc Seattle 46/41/.04 46/40/r Spokane 42/33/.00 38/32/sn St. Louis 27/12/.00 35/26/pc Tampa 64/57/.01 69/50/pc Tucson 84/52/.00 86/53/pc Washington 39/35/.07 36/22/cd Acapulco 86/71/.00 86/71/s Amsterdam 53/46/.00 51/41/pc Athens 60/44/.00 60/44/s Auckland 73/57/.00 73/59/pc Beijing 39/19/.00 44/24/s Berlin 51/41/.00 53/44/r Buenos Aires 73/66/.00 78/71/pc Cairo 59/51/.00 60/51/r Geneva 59/37/.00 59/39/r Havana 80/37/.00 78/57/s Helsinki 32/30/.00 32/32/fg Hong Kong 59/48/.00 57/55/pc Kingston 87/75/.00 86/75/ts La Paz 57/35/.00 57/39/pc Lima 78/68/.00 78/68/cd London 50/46/.00 53/35/r Madrid 50/44/.00 53/35/r Mexico City 73/48/.00 75/46/s Montreal 21/17/.00 28/6/pc Moscow 37/33/.00 35/24/pc Nairobi 80/60/.00 80/59/ts Nassau 78/68/.00 82/66/pc New Delhi 62/50/.00 64/44/pc Oslo 44/37/.00 46/44/r Panama 89/77/.00 89/77/ts Paris 55/44/.00 53/41/pc Rio 86/75/.00 91/69/ts Rome 66/41/.00 66/48/pc San Juan PR 86/75/.00 84/72/pc Santiago 87/68/.00 87/68/pc Seoul 44/33/.00 44/30/s Singapore 89/77/.00 87/77/ts St. Thomas VI 84/77/.01 84/74/r Sydney 80/70/.04 75/71/r Tel Aviv 66/50/.00 66/46/r Tokyo 44/32/.00 53/41/ts Toronto 26/19/.00 28/8/pc Vienna 50/35/.00 51/33/pc Warsaw 44/26/.00 48/33/pc H H H H H H H H H H H H L L L L 22/5 Bangor 28/12 Boston 29/15 New York 36/22 Washington D.C. 52/30 Charlotte 59/40 Atlanta 66/47 City 74/57 Dallas 73/62 Houston 22/20 Minneapolis 26/17 Chicago 58/47 Memphis 34/22 Cincinnati 25/8 Detroit 70/50 Orlando 77/62 Miami 61/38 Oklahoma 16/10 Falls 61/38 International 35/26 Louis 61/38 St. 38/30 Omaha 63/34 Denver 71/40 Albuquerque 85/56 Phoenix 48/30 Billings 47/30 Boise 48/42 Portland 46/40 Seattle 67/53 Orleans 61/38 New 58/28 City 61/38 Rapid 54/34 City 61/38 Salt Lake 76/47 Vegas 61/38 Las 68/53 Angeles 61/38 Los 56/48 Francisco 61/38 San 23/12 Anchorage 1/-18 Fairbanks 78/70 Honolulu -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Dec Jan 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 70 73 76 58 61 62 62 37 38 41 48 39 49 48Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High820 mins to burnMostly sunny Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Partly cloudy SUN65 36 MON72 45 TUE77 50 WED79 52 THU79 54 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO 2014 ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Sunday, February 9, 2014 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Full Color File name: 2-9_CMPS_SwitchSaveSmile-Card_LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 2/5/14Fran Rowe, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1030Switch. Save. Smile.Take control of your credit with CAMPUS! No annual fee No balance transfer feeApply today at campuscu.com! for the life of the balance transfer when you transfer a balance from your bank credit card to a CAMPUS VISA Platinum Card. 6 8 % BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL Offer is for a limited time only! 1 Offer only available on 1/1/14 4/15/14 and may not be combined with any other offer. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. There are costs associated with the use of this card. For specific information call 800-367-6440 or write us at P.O. Box 147029, Gainesville, FL 32614. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.Lake City 1658 W. US Hwy. 90 Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. UF Health Shands Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.APR1 16 17 18 19 20REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Sunday, Feb. 16 Sunday's highs/Sunday night's low 67/36 63/38 65/36 67/38 65/50 63/50 67/36 65/45 67/38 70/49 68/47 70/41 74/56 76/59 74/52 70/54 76/58 72/65Monday Tuesday Cape Canaveral 74/55/pc 79/61/pc Daytona Beach 71/52/pc 77/57/pc Fort Myers 80/58/s 83/62/pc Ft. Lauderdale 78/64/pc 80/68/pc Gainesville 73/47/pc 78/52/pc Jacksonville 72/48/pc 77/53/pc Key West 78/68/pc 79/70/pc Lake City 73/47/pc 78/52/pc Miami 79/64/pc 81/68/pc Naples 77/61/pc 79/63/pc Ocala 75/48/pc 79/53/pc Orlando 74/55/pc 80/60/pc Panama City 68/56/pc 68/58/pc Pensacola 67/60/pc 68/59/pc Tallahassee 74/48/pc 75/52/pc Tampa 75/57/s 77/61/pc Valdosta 73/47/pc 75/51/pc W. Palm Beach 78/62/pc 79/67/pc High Saturday Low Saturday 70 85 in 1932 16 in 1899 62 45 48 Saturday 0.09" 0.42" 0.75" 4.97" 1.66" 7:09 a.m. 6:19 p.m. 7:08 a.m. 6:20 p.m. 8:03 p.m. 7:48 a.m. 8:58 p.m. 8:22 a.m.Feb 22 March 1 March 8 March 16 Last New First Full Quarter Quarter A fairly accurate description of a Minnesota winter can be summed up in one word...cold. Pokegama, Minn. lived up to this characteristic on this date in 1903 when it recorded a temperature of -59 degrees to set a state record for the coldest temperature ever. Rain and mountain snow will be widespread from the Northwest and northern California into the northern Rockies. A weakening area of low pressure will produce light snow from the upper Ohio Valley into northern New England. 87, Santee, CA -23, Land O' Lakes, WISaturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Albany 32/24/.05 22/4/pc Albuquerque 64/37/.00 71/40/pc Anchorage 23/9/.00 23/11/fl Atlanta 46/34/.05 59/40/pc Baltimore 36/33/.06 33/19/cd Billings 45/33/.00 48/30/fl Birmingham 45/32/.00 61/39/s Bismarck 27/16/.00 32/20/i Boise 41/40/.35 47/30/sh Boston 34/28/.03 28/12/pc Buffalo 24/21/.01 17/4/sn Charleston SC 59/50/.07 61/37/pc Charleston WV 35/23/.15 38/24/fl Charlotte 46/39/.15 52/30/pc Cheyenne 48/28/.17 55/28/pc Chicago 24/6/.00 26/17/pc Cincinnati 28/16/.00 34/23/sn Cleveland 24/17/.00 24/7/sn Columbia SC 26/10/.00 38/31/pc Dallas 66/37/.00 71/57/fg Daytona Beach 68/46/.01 66/45/s Denver 54/36/.00 63/34/pc Des Moines 24/6/.15 31/23/cd Detroit 23/7/.00 25/7/sn El Paso 77/50/.00 82/55/pc Fairbanks 1/-9/.00 1/-18/sn Greensboro 41/35/.15 47/26/pc Hartford 30/19/.05 26/6/pc Honolulu 77/71/.00 78/70/sh Houston 64/48/.00 73/62/fg Indianapolis 21/3/.00 30/20/cd Jackson MS 52/30/.00 67/50/pc Jacksonville 63/48/.08 65/38/pc Kansas City 34/13/.00 41/32/pc Las Vegas 68/51/.00 78/48/pc Little Rock 48/25/.00 61/48/pc Los Angeles 77/52/.00 73/53/pc Memphis 43/26/.00 58/47/pc Miami 77/55/.00 77/62/pc Minneapolis 18/0/.11 22/20/pc Mobile 59/39/.00 69/50/s New Orleans 59/46/.00 67/53/pc New York 37/28/.00 30/17/pc Oakland 57/50/.00 59/44/pc Oklahoma City 64/28/.00 66/47/pc Omaha 41/18/.00 38/30/pc Orlando 71/46/.00 70/47/s Philadelphia 37/33/.08 29/19/pc Phoenix 81/54/.00 85/56/pc Pittsburgh 28/21/.04 28/14/fl Portland ME 32/18/.00 31/8/sn Portland OR 44/43/.36 48/42/r Raleigh 45/37/.27 49/28/pc Rapid City 48/32/.00 58/28/pc Reno 66/55/.00 58/29/sh Sacramento 59/52/.00 65/39/r Salt Lake City 53/42/.00 54/34/r San Antonio 59/50/.00 80/57/fg San Diego 75/53/.00 69/54/fg San Francisco 57/53/.00 56/48/pc Seattle 46/41/.04 46/40/r Spokane 42/33/.00 38/32/sn St. Louis 27/12/.00 35/26/pc Tampa 64/57/.01 69/50/pc Tucson 84/52/.00 86/53/pc Washington 39/35/.07 36/22/cd Acapulco 86/71/.00 86/71/s Amsterdam 53/46/.00 51/41/pc Athens 60/44/.00 60/44/s Auckland 73/57/.00 73/59/pc Beijing 39/19/.00 44/24/s Berlin 51/41/.00 53/44/r Buenos Aires 73/66/.00 78/71/pc Cairo 59/51/.00 60/51/r Geneva 59/37/.00 59/39/r Havana 80/37/.00 78/57/s Helsinki 32/30/.00 32/32/fg Hong Kong 59/48/.00 57/55/pc Kingston 87/75/.00 86/75/ts La Paz 57/35/.00 57/39/pc Lima 78/68/.00 78/68/cd London 50/46/.00 53/35/r Madrid 50/44/.00 53/35/r Mexico City 73/48/.00 75/46/s Montreal 21/17/.00 28/6/pc Moscow 37/33/.00 35/24/pc Nairobi 80/60/.00 80/59/ts Nassau 78/68/.00 82/66/pc New Delhi 62/50/.00 64/44/pc Oslo 44/37/.00 46/44/r Panama 89/77/.00 89/77/ts Paris 55/44/.00 53/41/pc Rio 86/75/.00 91/69/ts Rome 66/41/.00 66/48/pc San Juan PR 86/75/.00 84/72/pc Santiago 87/68/.00 87/68/pc Seoul 44/33/.00 44/30/s Singapore 89/77/.00 87/77/ts St. Thomas VI 84/77/.01 84/74/r Sydney 80/70/.04 75/71/r Tel Aviv 66/50/.00 66/46/r Tokyo 44/32/.00 53/41/ts Toronto 26/19/.00 28/8/pc Vienna 50/35/.00 51/33/pc Warsaw 44/26/.00 48/33/pc H H H H H H H H H H H H L L L L 22/5 Bangor 28/12 Boston 29/15 New York 36/22 Washington D.C. 52/30 Charlotte 59/40 Atlanta 66/47 City 74/57 Dallas 73/62 Houston 22/20 Minneapolis 26/17 Chicago 58/47 Memphis 34/22 Cincinnati 25/8 Detroit 70/50 Orlando 77/62 Miami 61/38 Oklahoma 16/10 Falls 61/38 International 35/26 Louis 61/38 St. 38/30 Omaha 63/34 Denver 71/40 Albuquerque 85/56 Phoenix 48/30 Billings 47/30 Boise 48/42 Portland 46/40 Seattle 67/53 Orleans 61/38 New 58/28 City 61/38 Rapid 54/34 City 61/38 Salt Lake 76/47 Vegas 61/38 Las 68/53 Angeles 61/38 Los 56/48 Francisco 61/38 San 23/12 Anchorage 1/-18 Fairbanks 78/70 Honolulu -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Dec Jan 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 70 73 76 58 61 62 62 37 38 41 48 39 49 48Actual high Actual low Average high Average low WEATHER BY-THE-DAY Very High820 mins to burnMostly sunny Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Partly cloudy Partly cloudy SUN65 36 MON72 45 TUE77 50 WED79 52 THU79 54 HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO HI LO 2014

PAGE 13

By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s Kaleb Warner has wrestling in his blood. It’s his passion. It’s a family tradition and it’s something that has brought him to the top of the sport in the state of Florida. Warner made his second trip to the FHSAA State Wrestling Finals this week-end with the Class 2A com-petition in Lakeland. He felt he had as good of a chance as winning as any wrestler there going into the competition. “I feel I have a legitimate shot,” Warner said. “I have the No. 11 kid in the nation in my bracket, but if I get past him it’s right there.”From staff reportsGolfers who dream of owning a course will soon get that chance. The Quail Heights Country Club proper-ty will be offered to the highest cash bidder in foreclosure proceedings at the Columbia County Courthouse at 11 a.m. Feb. 26. The offering stems from Circuit Civil Division Case No. 09-254. The Patriot Group, LLC out of Delaware is the plaintiff vs. defendant Green Oaks Estates, LLC of Florida. A final judgment of fore-closure on the suit was entered on Jan. 29. Quail Heights general manager Chet Carter said part of the settlement required the property to be offered for sale under foreclosure. “It is just a legal thing,” Carter said. “The Patriot Group owns it and is bid-ding with its own money and I would say there is a 95 percent chance they will get the property. Once The Patriot Group controls the property, then they can market it.” The legal description of the Quail Heights proper-ty took six columns in the Lake City Reporter’s clas-sified section on Tuesday. Carter said the last appraisal he saw on the property was $1.85 million, which will scare off buy-ers, and keep the course intact for the future. “There is nothing in this that says the course is going to close,” Carter said. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 16, 2014 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com WARNER continued on 3B Kaleb Warner gets his moxie on the mat from family. Quail Heights offered for sale under foreclosure proceedings Wrestling tradition COURTESYColumbia High wrestler Kaleb Warner shows off trophies, awards and medals from his years of competition.TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterOlustee Blue Grey 5K Individual winners at the Olustee Blue Grey 5K on Saturday are (front row, from left) Dalton Howes, Sara Guthrie, Michael O’Rourke, Sandi Raulerson, Ed Morse, Shayne Barber, Emma Tucker and Chet Croft. Back row (from left) are Chase Martin, Jimmy Salazar, Linda LaMott, Christine Moor, Bridget Morse and Cassie Pierron. Story and complete list of winners is on page 3B.1BSPORTS

PAGE 14

By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s baseball team had back-to-back barnburner wins at home. The Indians beat Buchholz High 11-10 on Saturday afternoon, one day after a 10-9 district win over Bradford High. In both games, Fort White gave up the lead late and rallied to a victory. The most dramatic win came Friday on a walk-off home run by Corey Pentolino in the seventh inning. On Saturday, the Indians scored three runs in the bottom of the sixth inning without getting a hit. Austin Dupree got the win against Buchholz in relief of Brent Beach. Beach pitched into the fifth inning. Dupree relieved and worked out of a jam. However, he gave up four runs in the sixth inning as the Bobcats took a 9-8 lead. Willie Carter had two home runs for three RBIs against Buchholz. He also went 2-for-3 with two RBIs and a home run against Bradford. Pentolino was 3-for-4 against Bradford with three RBIs and two runs scored. He had what proved to be the deciding RBI against Buchholz with a sacrifice fly. Trace Wilkinson was 2for-3 against Bradford with a double and had an RBI-double against Buchholz. Both Jayson Brock (RBI, three runs scored) and Rhett Willis (two RBIs, run scored) were 2-for-3 against Buchholz. Kodey Owens (run scored), Steve Giardina (RBI) and Beach had singles. Fort White trailed Bradford 8-2. Tyler Parker relieved Owens in the second inning and held the fort until the seventh. Carter relieved and got the win. “Tyler carried the load,” Fort White head coach Rick Julius said. “The big-gest thing is the kids are starting to believe in them-selves. Each day somebody else is stepping up to the plate. We are not relying on one guy to carry the load.” Fort White (2-1) hosts Newberry High at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday. League reportsLake City Bowl league results: HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. Spare Us (13.5-2.5); 2. Legal Ladies (9-7); 3. Ten In The Pit (9-7). High team handicap game: 1. Ten In The Pit 778; 2. High Five 755; 3. Legal Ladies 716. High team handicap series: 1. Silver Ladies 2,233; 2. Spare Us 2,191; 3. Git Up & Bowl 2,142. High handicap game: 1. Linda Herndon 230; 2. Cythe Shiver 222; 3. Cathy Pelley 212. High handicap series: 1. Sharon Tuning 619; 2. Susan Mears 605; 3. Harriet Woods 603.(Results from Jan. 28) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Lucky Strikers; 2. Gamblers’; 3. Power E.N.D.S. High team scratch game: 1. Power E.N.D.S. 765; 2. Jo’s Crew 666; 3. Quirky Quad 638. High team scratch series: 1. You’r Up 1,970; 2. Gamblers’ 1,962; 3. Ups and Downs 1,838. High team handicap game: 1. Power E.N.D.S. 922; 2. Jo’s Crew 842; 3. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 840. High team handicap series: 1. You’r Up 2,459; 2. Ups and Downs 2,414; 3. Gamblers’ 2,397. High scratch game: 1. Judy Johnson 191; 2. Elaine Nemeth 185; 3. Vy Ritter 182. 1. Wayne Johns 235; 2. Lee McKinney 209; 3. Earl Hayward 204. High scratch series: 1. Susan Mears 517; 2. Debbie Walters 489; 3. Shirley Highsmith 463. 1. Mike Murrey 612; 2. David Duncan 574; 3. Lee Evert 553. High handicap game: 1. Vy Ritter 242; 2. Elaine Nemeth 237; 3. Judy Johnson 225. 1. Wayne Johns 259; 2. David Duncan 247; 3. Earl Hayward 231. High handicap series: 1. Susan Mears 688; 2. Debbie Walters 639; 3. Betty Brown 623. 1. Jim Burnett 649; 2. Lee Evert 646; 3. Mike Murrey 645.(Results from Jan. 23) SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Awesome Four (109-67); 2. Jo’s Crew (103-73); 3. Spoilers (102-74). High team handicap game: 1. Awesome Four 891; 2. Pin Droppers 839; 3. Jo’s Crew 827. High team handicap series: 1. Perky Pals 2,412; 2. Double Up 2,396; 3. Outcasts 2,349. High handicap game: 1. Betty Carmichael 227; 2. Vy Ritter 222; 3. Janie Posey 220. 1. Ross Meyers 239; 2. Dan Ritter 235; 3. David Duncan 227. High handicap series: 1. Ann Soliz 637; 2. Yvonne McRae 636; 3. Peggy Duncan 616. 1. Ric Yates 642; 2. Vernon Black 636; 3. Jim Grimsley 620.(Results from Jan. 28) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Roger’s Automotive (110-70, 79,063 handicap pins); 2. Joker’s Wild (110-70, 77,656 handicap pins); 3. Bias Well Drilling (104.5-75.5). High scratch game: 1. Roger Webb 276; 2. Shane Hill 268; 3. (tie) Ted Wooley, Teo Parra 256. High scratch series: 1. Shane Hill 763; 2. Josh Bisque 686; 3. (tie) Dale Coleman, Roger Webb 660. High handicap game: 1. Shane Hill 304; 2. Roger Webb 300; 3. (tie) Ted Wooley, Teo Parra 277. High handicap series: 1. Shane Hill 871; 2. Bryan King 753; 3. Josh Bisque 734. High average: 1. Zech Strohl 223.08; 2. Dale Coleman 216.28; 3. Robert Stone 216.01.(Results from Feb. 3) TGIF Team standings: 1. The Incredi-Bowls (14-6); 2. M & M’s w/Nuts (13-7, 12,575 handicap pins); 3. Alvin & The Chickmonks (13-7, 12,497 handicap pins). High team handicap game: 1. The Incredi-Bowls 931; 2. Bowling 101 898; 3. Gutter Dusters 886. High team handicap series: 1. Fun Tyme Travel 2,592; 2. M & M’s w/Nuts 2,580; 3. Bowling 101 2,565. High scratch game: 1. Bonnie Hood 209; 2. Ida Hollingsworth 208; 3. Carol Younger 205. 1. Cody Howard 244; 2. Bill Duncan 237; 3. (tie) Bill Coleman, David Adel 236. High scratch series: 1. Ida Hollingsworth 556; 2. Karen Coleman 531; 3. Bonnie Hood 506. 1. Bill Duncan 662; 2. David Adel 649; 3. Bill Coleman 626. High handicap game: 1. Carol Younger 264; 2. Bonnie Hood 260; 3. Melissa Underwood 251. 1. Bill Coleman 272; 2. Brett Reddick 255; 3. Cody Howard 251. High handicap series: 1. Carol Younger 680; 2. Bonnie Hood 659; 3. Cindy Moravec 658. 1. Bill Coleman 734; 2. Dann Shepard 695; 3. Bill Duncan 692.(Results from Jan. 31)Youth leaguesMAJORS SCRATCH Team standings: 1. Hammer Time (167-121); 2. King Pins (155.5-132.5); 3. The Prodigies (142.5-145.5). High scratch game: 1. Linden Barney 215; 2. (tie) Sara Johns, Sara Sykes 176. 1. Chris Byrd 240; 2. Brandon Shrum 204; 3. Jimmy Milewski 201. High scratch series: 1. Linden Barney 554; 2. Lauren Snipes 499; 3. Sara Johns 486. 1. Chris Byrd 620; 2. Jimmy Milewski 540; 3. Brandon Shrum 523. MAJORS Team standings: 1. Pin Breakers (40-32); 2. The Chase Is On! (38.5-33.5); 3. The Strike Dragons (36.5-35.5). High scratch game: 1. Callie Pierce 156; 2. Amanda Schmitt 146; 3. Tiffany Ritch 143. 1. Christian Shepard 201; 2. Cory Lyons 187; 3. Christian Shepard 176. High scratch series: 1. Callie Pierce 435; 2. Amanda Schmitt 422; 3. Tiffany Ritch 405. 1. Christian Shepard 521; 2. Cory Lyons 448; 3. Carson Lyons 402. BANTAMS High handicap game: 1. Aliyah Rouse 172. 1. Lucky Nixon 202; 2. Darin Handy 155. High handicap series: 1. Aliyah Rouse 496. 1. Lucky Nixon 534; 2. Darin Handy 429.(results from Feb. 1) SCOREBOARD SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Daytona 500 GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, final round 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, final round TGC — Champions Tour, ACE Group Classic, final round, at Naples 5 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Women’s Australian Open, final round (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Wisconsin at Michigan 3 p.m. FS1 — Oregon St. at Oregon 5 p.m. FS1 — Villanova at Creighton 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Rutgers at LouisvilleESPNU — Notre Dame at Boston College 7 p.m. FS1 — Georgetown at St. John’s 8 p.m. ESPNU — Colorado at Southern Cal MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 7 p.m. NBCSN — Moe’s Southwest Grill Classic, at Jacksonville NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — All-Star Game SOCCER 8:30 a.m. FS1 — FA CUP, round five, Swansea City at Everton WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at TennesseeESPN2 — Teams TBAFS1 — Baylor at Texas 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Teams TBA ——— WINTER OLYMPICS (All events taped unless noted as live) NBC 3 p.m. Men’s Cross-Country — 4x10km Relay Gold Medal Final; Women’s Snowboarding — Snowboard Cross Competition 7 p.m. Figure Skating — Ice Dancing Short Dance; Men’s Alpine Skiing — Super-G Gold Medal Final; Women’s Snowboarding — Snowboard Cross Gold Medal Final; Women’s Speedskating — 1500 Gold Medal Final; Two-Man Bobsled — Competition 11:35 p.m. Men’s Biathlon — 15km Mass Start Gold Medal Final NBCSN 7:15 a.m. Men’s Hockey — Slovenia vs. United States (LIVE) 10 a.m. Figure Skating — Ice Dancing Short Dance (LIVE) 2 p.m. Men’s Biathlon — 15km Mass Start Gold Medal Final 5 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 3 a.m. Women’s Curling — United States vs. South Korea CNBC 4 p.m. Men’s Curling — United States vs. Sweden USA 7:30 a.m. Men’s Hockey — Russia vs. Slovakia (LIVE) Noon Men’s Hockey — Finland vs. Canada (LIVE) 5 a.m. Men’s Curling — United States vs. Switzerland (LIVE) ——— Monday BOXING 10 p.m. FS1 — Champion Paul Mendez (14-2-2) vs. Raul Casarez (20-4-0), for IBA Continental middleweight title; feather-weights, Manuel Avila (13-0-0) vs. Enrique Quevedo (15-6-1), at Salinas, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — North Carolina at Florida State NBCSN — Delaware at Towson 9 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma St. at BaylorESPNU — MVSU at Southern WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Maryland at Duke ——— WINTER OLYMPICS (All events taped unless noted as live) NBC 3 p.m. Women’s Biathlon — 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final; Men’s Snowboarding — Cross Competition; Men’s Freestyle Skiing — Aerials Competition 8 p.m. Figure Skating — Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final; Men’s Snowboarding — Cross Gold Medal Final; Men’s Freestyle Skiing — Aerials Gold Medal Final; Men’s Ski Jumping — Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final 1:01 a.m. Two-Man Bobsled — Gold Medal Final Runs NBCSN 7 a.m. Women’s Hockey — Semifinal, United States vs. Finland-Sweden winner (LIVE) 10 a.m. Figure Skating — Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 1:30 p.m. Men’s Ski Jumping — Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Women’s Biathlon — 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final 5 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 3 a.m. Men’s Hockey — Elimination Round (LIVE) 5:30 a.m. Men’s Nordic Combined — Individual K-125 Large Hill, Ski Jumping MSNBC Noon Women’s Hockey — Semifinal, Canada vs. Switzerland-Russia winner (LIVE) CNBC 5 p.m. Women’s Curling — Denmark vs. BritainBASKETBALLAll-Star rosters (Today at New Orleans) EASTERN CONFERENCE Starters Player Pos Ht Wt Carmelo Anthony, NY F 6-8 235Paul George, Ind F 6-8 221 LeBron James, Mia F 6-8 250Kyrie Irving, Cle G 6-3 191Dwyane Wade, Mia G 6-4 210 Reserves Chris Bosh, Mia F-C 6-11 235DeMar DeRozan, Tor G 6-7 216 Roy Hibbert, Ind C 7-2 290Joe Johnson, Bklyn G 6-7 240Paul Millsap, Atl F 6-8 253John Wall, Was G 6-4 210Joakim Noah, Chi C 6-11 232 Head Coach: Frank Vogel, IndianaTrainer: Wally Blase, Atlanta WESTERN CONFERENCE Starters Player P Ht Wt i-Kobe Bryant, LAL G 6-6 205Kevin Love, Min F 6-10 243Kevin Durant, Okl F 6-9 230Blake Griffin, LAC F 6-10 251Stephen Curry, GS G 6-3 185 Reserves LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F 6-11 240Dwight Howard, Hou C 6-11 265James Harden, Hou G 6-5 220Damian Lillard, Por G 6-3 195Dirk Nowitzki, Dal F 7-0 245Tony Parker, SA G 6-2 185Chris Paul, LAC G 6-0 175r-Anthony Davis, NO F-C 6-10 220 Head Coach: Scott Brooks, Oklahoma City Trainer: Jon Bishop, New Orleans (i-injured, will not play; r-replacement) 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 BOWLING Tigers beat Hornets By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s baseball team got its second strong pitching perfor-mance, this time in a 3-1 home win over Lafayette High on Friday. Caleb Vaughn took the mound for the Tigers and retired the first 18 bat-ters he faced. Only one reached base and that was on a passed ball following a strikeout. Vaughn totaled nine strikeouts including four in a row at one point. “Caleb threw a great game,” Columbia High head coach Heath Phillips said. “He worked ahead all night and that is what we are trying to instill. Pound the zone and let the defense work for you. We can’t ask any more from him.” Lead-off hitter Dalton Mauldin got the Tigers on the board in the first inning. He hit a long fly ball to right that twisted the fielder around and went off his glove for a triple. Tyler Myrick followed with a sac-rifice fly. Levi Hollingsworth was hit by a pitch to start a two-run fourth inning. With one out Alex Milton doubled down the left-field line. Hollingsworth later scored and Milton moved to third on a wild pitch. Kaleb Thomas scored Milton with a sacrifice fly. Myrick had a two-out single in the third inning and Mauldin singled with one out in the fifth inning. Hollingsworth legged out a lead-off double in the sixth inning, but stayed at second. “We have got to be better on our approach in that situation moving runners,” Phillips said Lafayette’s run in the sixth inning was unearned. Logan Hewitt broke up the no-hitter with a slow dribbler that got past the pitcher. Afteran error Mark Hoehn hit a RBI-single to the opposite field. Myrick came out from behind the plate to finish the game for CHS with a 1-2-3 seventh inning. CHS won the JV game, 5-0. Columbia (2-0) travels to Hamilton County High for a 7 p.m. game on Tuesday. Barnburner wins for Indians JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High pitcher Brent Beach fires to the plate.2BSPORTS

PAGE 15

By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comThe annual Olustee Blue Grey 5K was Saturday morning in Lake City. The race began on the south side of Lake DeSoto and, after one lap around the lake, wound around to U.S. Highway 90 east and to the finish and timing ramp on the east side of Lake DeSoto. There was a good crowd to take advantage of the cool, windy conditions. “I think we had about 150 runners for the 150th anni-versary of Olustee,” race director Michelle Richards said. “That was our goal. They have been doing this for over 30 years, I think. We at Step Fitness have done it six years.” Richards said proceeds from the race go to the Eye of the Tiger and Tiger Tales running clubs. Sunbelt and Central State were the major spon-sors. Other sponsors were Car X Performance, Fierce Environmental, Fit 2 Run, Step Fitness, Flourish Massage, Firehouse Subs, Attorney Sandra K. Haas, Vinyl Decor and D & S Lighting. Richards presented her Director’s Award to Shayne Morgan for being the first to register for the race, and said sign-up for 2015 will begin in August. She gave special recognition to Tina Williams of First Federal for “bringing in more than 30 runners.” Brian Duck was recognized for his wheelchair participation. In team competition, First Federal won Overall Walking and First Federal 2 won the Corporate Award. The Overall School Award went to Lake City Middle School and Step Fitness 2 won top Running Group. The Open Women winner was Bridget Morse, 13, of Lake City in 19:18. Open Men winner was Michael O’Rourke, 30, of Largo in 18:45. Masters Women winner was Linda LaMott, 41, of Lebanon, Tenn., in 21:48. Masters Men winner was Ed Morse, 48, of Lake City in 19:30. Age group winners were: Q 65 & up — Sara Guthrie; Q 55-64 — Mary Toigo and Jim Moses; Q 45-45 — Meagan Phelps and Jimmy Salazar; Q 35-44 — Sandi Raulerson and David Robison; Q 25-34 — Christine Moor and Chet Croft; Q 19-24 — Lindsay McCardle and Shayne Barber; Q 15-18 — Emma Tucker and Dalton Howes; Q 11-14 — Carrie Pierron and Chase Martin; Q 3-10 — Teagan McCoy and Adam Goelz. From staff reportsColumbia High’s Kaleb Warner placed fifth in the 132-pound division at the FHSAA Wrestling Finals in Lakeland. Warner pinned Jonathan Crunkiton in 4:00 and defeated Andy Hernandez 8-4 on Friday. On Saturday, he lost 18-2 to Dylan Lucas and 4-2 to Anthony Hauser before regrouping to defeat Kolin Stapp 5-3. At 145 pounds, Jake Maguire lost to C.J. Trammell, 6-3, pinned Dylan Perrow in 1:47, and was pinned by Joey Nadotti in 2:49. At 138 pounds, Dustin Regar was pinned by Bryce Belsinger in 3:20 and lost 15-0 to Corey Tisdel.Fort White softballFort White High’s softball team beat Bronson High, 10-7, at home on Thursday. Ashley Chesney had two doubles, two singles and scored three runs. Emily Roach had a double and scored a run. Chelsea Nieland and Kylee Crews both singled and scored. Morgan Cushman struck out 14. Fort White’s game at P.K. Yonge School has been moved to Feb. 24. Warner had 99 takedowns this season, which makes him one of the bet-ter wrestlers in the state on his feet. But when the match goes to the ground, Warner isn’t bad either. “I’m good on top and not many people can hold me down,” Warner said. He has aspirations to take his love of wrestling to the next level and has a few places in mind, although he’s only a junior. “Old Dominion has been in contact as well as Northern Illinois,” Warner said. “I have a bunch of Division II and Division III schools as well. The good thing is that I have a 4.0 GPA and I’m in dual enroll-ment, so that helps with college.” Warner’s relationship with his sport is a little dif-ferent from most athletes as well, because he can’t leave wrestling at school when he comes home. His dad, Kevin, is also his head coach. “It’s constant,” Warner said. “I come to practice and train hard, then we go home and we talk. We also get all kinds of extra work over the summer, which helps.” Warner said although his dad gets on to him like any coach, he doesn’t get his feelings hurt. “I take it as constructive,” Warner said. “He gets on to me and it goes a little deeper than it would with another coach, but we learn how to fix it.” If anything, Warner has said that his relationship with his father has only grown stronger because of wrestling. “It definitely has, because this is what we do 24/7,” Warner said. “It’s a lifestyle. My dad wrestled in high school and when I was in sixth grade, I figured I’d give it a try. He volunteered to be the coach and they couldn’t find anyone else, so he ended up being the head coach.” After college, Warner has a few options and he could use his wrestling skills in the future, but he also has his head in the books. “I’ve thought about MMA (Mixed Martial Arts), but my goal is to get into a good school and get a good degree,” Warner said. “MMA is an option that I can try out, but my primary goal is education and get-ting on a good career path. I have to manage all the academics and the wres-tling will follow. I could always coach.” Like father, like son. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 3B BRIEFS WARNER: Dad coaches Continued From Page 1B GAMES Monday Q Columbia High JV baseball at Baker County High, 4 p.m. Tuesday Q Fort White High softball at P.K. Yonge School (postponed) Q Fort White High baseball vs. Newberry High, 4:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High in region semifinal, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Fort White High boys weightlifting vs. Union County High, Bradford High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball vs. Gainesville High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Thursday Q Fort White High softball vs. Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Lafayette High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High baseball at Union County High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Friday Q Columbia High tennis vs. Oak Hall School, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Q Columbia High softball vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball at Wakulla High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club election Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. Election of officers is planned. For details, call Margie Kluess at 365-9302. T-BALL Recreation Dept. sign-up in March Registration for Lake City Recreation Department T-ball is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 8 for all returning players and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 15 for new players. Age divisions offered are 4-5 and 6-7. Fee is $50 and proof of age is required. Parents may select teams, but rosters are limited to 15 players per team. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats seeks 12U players The North Florida River Rats 12U travel team is seeking 3-4 players to complete its spring roster. For details, call Kim Albritton at 365-0950. YOUTH BASKETBALL Johnson hoops academy offered Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North is sponsoring the Tony Johnson Basketball Academy from 8:30-10 a.m. Saturdays beginning March 1 at the Richardson Community Center gym. Cost for the four-week academy is $30. The first 15 boys ages 8-15 to register will be accepted. A signed permission form is required. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095.Q From staff reports Warner places fifth at state Morses win at Olustee Blue Grey 5K TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterRace director Michelle Richards signs up runners for the Olustee Blue Grey 5K on Saturday. TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterFun Run throngThere was huge participation for the 34th Annual Blue-Grey Running ‘Reb’ 1 Mile Fun Run on Saturday. The event is sponsored by Lake City Parks & Recreation Department. The top three girls and boys runners receive awards in six age groups from 4 & under to 13-14. Overall winners also are crowned. The run is around Lake DeSoto in downtown Lake City.3BSPORTS

PAGE 16

4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 4BSports 2588 US HIGHWAY 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL 32055 800.536.8168 WERE ALWAYS OPEN ONLINE @WWW. RMFORD .COM r f n tttMSRP: $31,555 $2,000 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH $1,555 RTM DIS COUNT = $28,000 2014 FORD EXPLORER 2014 FORD FUSION SMSRP: $22,695 $500 FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CASH $2,695 RTM DISCOUNT = $19,500 UP TO r b n t APR 48 MONTHS OFF MSRP 2014 FORD MUSTANGMSRP: $22,995 $500 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH $1,000 RTM DIS COUNT = $28,000 r f n UP TO t APR 48 MONTHS OFF MSRP V6 COUPE $ 12000 OFF MSRP UP TO F 150 s ALL 2013 FORD ROUNTREE MOORE FORD,YOUR VOLUMELEADER!**VOLUME LEADER OF ROUNTREE MOORE DEALERSHIP FAMILIY. REASONS REASONS MOORE MOORE TO BUY RTM FORD