The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02202

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


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Full Text

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Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Paddlin’ down the Ichetucknee. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 74 45 Sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 139, No. 191 1By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com small fishing spider scrunched his legs to his body as a group of curious Fort White Middle School students peered into his world during the 15th annual Sixth Grade Day at the Ichetucknee Springs State Park on Wednesday. Surrounded by freshwater shrimp and native snails, the spider was just one of the tiny creatures on display at Marc Minno’s station on macro-invertebrates. Minno, an environmental specialist with the Suwannee River Water Management District, assisted the state park in setting up seven different exhibitions on water quality and wildlife issues facing the Ichetucknee Springs. “If we really look, we could find hundreds and thousands of living things in this ecosystem,” Minno said. “What does that tell you if you find thousands of macro-invertebrates in the spring?” Valerie Thomas, FWMS PARKnership Coordinator, asked her group of sixth-grade students. “It’s healthy,” the group chorused back. As the groups gathered at each station – snakes of North Florida, Ichetucknee archaeology, water quality – students learned how the curriculum they had been absorbing in their sixth-grade science class fit with the real world. Organized through the PARKnership program with the Ichetucknee State Park, the annual Sixth Grade Day lets the entire class of sixth-grade FWMS students leave the classroom Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA variety of preserved fish are seen in jars at Ichetuckn ee Springs State Park on Wednesday. Fort White Middle Sch ool students participated in the 15th Annual Sixth Grade Day by applying their recen t science lessons to everyday life. TOP: Jacob Howell, 13, holds a turtle. Fort White’s 6th Grade Day allows students ‘hands-on’ learning about wildlife. Park services specialist Cindy Preston (right) laughs as Fort White Middle School sixth-grader Morgan Hunter, 12, pets a red rat snake during Sixth-Grad e Day at Ichetucknee Springs State Park on Wednesday. ‘I like snakes. I just don’t like it wh en its face is near my hand,’ Hunter said.School finances looking upBy AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comAfter estimating Columbia County’s public school population, the district does not expect to require additional budget cuts to reach a 3 percent fund balance for the end of the 2013-14 fiscal year. According to the district’s Finance Director Bonnie Penner, a fiscal recovery plan was cre-ated after she realized the district would end the current fiscal year below the state-mandated amount for the fund balance. However, because Belmont Academy intro-duced a new group of students into the public school system, the district will be receiving more revenues than it originally antici-pated. “A big concern was that Belmont Academy students would just be our students, and that would be money we would have to pay them,” Penner said. “If Belmont had ended up empty-ing out Columbia Elementary, or any school, this fiscal recovery plan would be a lot different.” Currently, the fiscal recovery plan states that district should not incur any additional costs associated with Belmont students, who were initially expected to move from the school district to the charter school. The new students allow the district to meet their fiscal recovery plan, pushing the fund balance to 3.09 percent. Penner originally budgeted for Thanks to charter students, further cuts not expected. By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comP ickles and pies can win you a prize when the Columbia County Fair rolls into town Nov. 1, so long as you submit your arts, crafts or food entries before noon this Saturday. The best fudge will be judged and dresses assessed from Nov. 1-9 as part of a multi-division arts and craft exhibition, showing off local residents’ unique skills with needle crafts, toys, jewelry, baked goods, preserved foods and more. “It’s a talent a lot of us do not have,” said Linda Dowling, Complex Manager with Columbia County Resources, Inc. “I like to see the talent that other peo-ple have.... People are very creative and want to show off their works.” Leona Ratliff, a volunteer with the fair and Dowling’s mother, fondly remembered her time as a baking champion, winning the 2009 People’s Choice award for her three-layer blueberry cake. “I’d always bring this cake to parties and leave with an empty plate,” Ratliff said. “Each person that brings in an entry has a story behind it. People are proud of what they bring in, and they’ll tell you all about it and what it means to them.” Fair organizers also encourage ladies to submit their finest head threads as part of their second annual Red and Pink Hat Contest, in connection with the Red Hat Society. A cash prize of $25 will be awarded to each of the “largest, fanciest and craziest” hats submit-ted. Submissions will be accepted today and Friday from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. in the fair office, and Sat. Oct. 26 9:00 a.m. to noon in the fair-ground’s banquet hall. Entries will be judged according to the Modified Danish System (red, white and blue ribbons), with exceptional and best-of-show entries winning cash prizes. No entry fees are required. For more information, contact Linda Dowling at 386-752-8822 or ccrlinda@gmail.com. Fair’sready foryour bestefforts Lake City ReporterColumbia County Resources, Inc. Complex Manager Linda Dowling.Suspect behind bars for ‘poking’ man with knife Entries due Saturdayfor arts and crafts, baked goods, more.By STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City man was behind bars after allegedly stabbing, or as the suspect put it, “poking” a man with a kitchen knife Tuesday evening, CCSO reports. Deputies arrived at the home of Terrell Leman Johnson, 46, of 200 SE Hanover Place, after multiple eyewitnesses say they saw and heard an altercation between Johnson and another man Tuesday evening, according to the arrest report. Johnson said he placed a kitchen knife in his pocket before leav-ing his home to help a neighbor move a bed, the report said. Johnson then said he saw a man walking down the street toward him, directing several loud com-ments at him, the report said. According to deputies, Johnson said the man hit him in the side of the head, prompting Johnson to pull out the knife and “poke him” one time. Deputies said they saw two deep lacerations in the victim’s side under his blood-stained shirt. At least two witnesses reported hearing the victim say, “You didn’t have to stab/stick me, I just wanted to talk,” before see-ing Johnson and multiple men flee the scene, the report said. BUDGET continued on 3A WILDLIFE continued on 3A STABBING continued on 6A

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APPAA ,!+%#)49!,-!.!# œiV>]`>>>`}>…ˆV^"£7i>…ini>]*]>`ˆœ]7ˆi>…i'Lˆ…iVœ“ -1 "" 56).$%8 (;75(0(PLQXWHVWREXUQ /œ`>'>‡ˆœi>`ˆ>ˆœˆŽvœ…i>i>œ>V>ivœ“œ£ &9) !NEXCLUSIVE SERVICE BROUGHTTO OURREADERS BY 4HE7EATHER #HANNEL 30/.3/2%$"9 nˆ 4(%7%!4(%2 7%!4(%2()34/29 3HQVDFROD 7DOODKDVVHH 3DQDPD&LW\ 9DOGRVWD 'D\WRQD%HDFK &DSH&DQDYHUDO *DLQHVYLOOH /DNH&LW\ 2FDOD 2UODQGR -DFNVRQYLOOH 7DPSD :HVW3DOP%HDFK )W0\HUV )W/DXGHUGDOH 1DSOHV 0LDPL .H\:HVW /r*r,/1,rœ“>…ˆ}… œ“>œ*,rn*//" œ…œ>9i>œ> (),/ ,/(),/ (),/ (),/ () 24 25 26 27 28 FridaySaturday Cape Canaveral 79/62/pc79/63/pc Daytona Beach 79/58/pc76/58/pc Fort Myers 85/62/pc83/63/pc Ft. Lauderdale 84/70/pc83/69/pc Gainesville 76/47/pc74/49/pc Jacksonville 73/46/pc72/47/pc Key West 82/75/sh82/75/pc Lake City 76/47/pc74/49/pc Miami 84/71/pc84/69/pc Naples 84/64/pc80/65/s Ocala 78/49/pc76/50/pc Orlando 80/58/pc79/61/pc Panama City 72/48/s67/56/pc Pensacola 73/49/pc71/54/pc Tallahassee 74/40/s71/46/pc Tampa 82/60/s80/61/s Valdosta 72/39/s67/43/pc W. Palm Beach 82/70/pc83/67/pc 72/45 72/49 74/45 74/45 72/50 74/52 74/49 74/58 76/50 77/58 76/63 79/54 81/70 83/72 81/61 81/67 83/72 83/74 Mitchofficiallybecameahurricaneonthisdatein1998southofJamaicaintheCaribbeanSea.Arapidintensificantionperiodfollowedwherethestorm'scentralpressuredropped52mbto924mb.High WednesdayLow Wednesday 80 90 in 191942 in 2006 7858 64 Wednesday 0.00"0.87" 42.36" 2.35" 7:38 a.m. 6:50 p.m. 7:39 a.m. 6:49 p.m.11:21 p.m.12:29 p.m. Oct 26 Nov 3 Nov 10 Nov 17 LastNewFirstFull QuarterQuarter Sunrise todaySunset todaySunrise tom.Sunset tom.Moonrise todayMoonset todayMoonrise tom.Moonset tom. Record highRecord low Normal month-to-dateNormal year-to-date THU 7445 FRI 7441 SAT 7245 SUN 7647 MON 7952 WEATHER BY-THE-DAY 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 ThuFriSatSunMonTueWed 88 8989 84 87 7878 6363 68 6666 6464 Actual highActual low Average highAverage low REGIONAL FORECAST MAP for Thursday, Oct. 24 Thursday's highs/Thursday night's low 8 Very High mins to burn 20 SunnyMostly sunny Mostly sunny Light wind Mostly sunny Light wind Partly cloudy 1:12 p.m. HI LOHI LOHI LOHI LOHI LO 2013 49.24" No Rise 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 PEOPLE IN THE NEWS AROUND FLORIDA Man charged with cutting dogs MELBOURNE — A central Florida man faces ani-mal cruelty charges after authorities say he cut the throats of four of his moth-er’s six Chihuahuas. The reason? He told officials he thought his mother loved the dogs more than she loved him. The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office reports that 23-year-old Adam Christopher Kosa was cov-ered in blood when depu-ties responded to his par-ents’ home last Thursday. Kosa reportedly let himself in while his parents were visiting his grandpar-ents. Kosa told deputies he was upset and attacked the dogs because his mother loved them more than him. He told deputies he knew it was cruel and wrong, but he felt he had to cut the dogs’ throats to let his mother know exactly how he felt. Deputies say two of the dogs died, but two others were taken to an animal hospital. Kosa was being held on a $20,000 bond.Police: Jail clerk stole from inmates LARGO — A property clerk at the Pinellas County Jail faces multiple charges after sheriff’s officials say he took prescription drugs from at least five inmates. Pinellas County Sheriff’s officials say 26-year-old Alexander Lansky resigned from his job. He was arrest-ed on five counts of grand theft and five counts of pos-session of prescription pills and released from jail late Tuesday. Officials say they began investigating last week after an inmate bonded out of jail and discovered some of his prescription pills were missing from his bag. Video surveillance showed Lansky taking a bag from the property area, disap-pearing from camera view, and then returning the bag to its storage location. During an interview with Lansky, detectives say he admitted to taking about 176 pills from the stored property of five inmates.3 people accused in child’s death FORT MYERS — Three people in southwest Florida are accused in the death of a 3-year-old boy. The Lee County Sheriff’s Office says Michael Lee McMullen died Saturday after he was disciplined for behavior problems. The three were arrested Tuesday and charged with aggravated manslaughter of a child. Authorities say 45year-old Donella Trainor wrapped the boy in a blanket, tying both ends to keep him from escap-ing. According sheriff’s officials, Trainor put him face down in a crib and he screamed to be released. A short time later, the child’s grandmother entered the room and said the knots were too tight. She left the room, but the child continued to struggle. Eventually the child stopped crying and the adults thought he was sleeping. When Trainor went to wake him, she found him unresponsive.Senators to hold hearings on casinos COCONUT CREEK — Florida state senators are holding the first of four public hearings about the future of gambling in the Sunshine State. Some 60 people have already signed up to testify Wednesday during a meet-ing that will be held on the north campus of Broward College. The Senate Gaming Committee will also hold hearings in Lakeland, Jacksonville and Pensacola. Underwood to star in ‘Sound of Music’ NEW YORK T he end of the year looks busy for Carrie Underwood, and she couldn’t be happier. The six-time Grammy-winning singer will host the Country Music Association Awards for the sixth time. You can see her singing the opening on NBC’s “Sunday Night Football.” And for one night in December, she’ll star in a live television version of “The Sound of Music.” The 30-year-old star told the Associated Press on the red carpet Tuesday night at the TJ Martell Foundation gala, where she was one of the night’s honorees, that she ner-vous doing something she’s never done before. But then she realized, “None of us have. This is a live show on TV. So this is definitely a chal-lenge for all of us.” She said the live singing and acting was like “going to a Broadway show, but you’re in your living room.” “The Sound of Music” airs Dec. 5 on NBC with Underwood playing Maria alongside “True Blood” vam-pire Stephen Moyer. He portrays Captain von Trapp. Broadway vet-erans – and Tony winners – Audra McDonald, Laura Benanti and Christian Borle round out the cast as Mother Abbess, Elsa and Max. Underwood is no stranger to performing yet she felt she needed more preparation, so she showed up in New York three weeks early. “I wanted to be here and have all my lines memorized and everything and be ready for it. It’s been really wonderful,” Underwood said. “Audra and Laura are incredible. Stephen’s great. It’s nice to be surrounded by that much talent.”Holocaust survivor makes symphony debut BOSTON — A 90-year-old Holocaust survivor made his orches-tral debut with renowned cellist YoYo Ma on Tuesday to benefit a foun-dation dedicated to preserving the work of artists and musicians killed by the Nazis. Ma and George Horner received floral bouquets and a standing ovation from their audience of about 1,000 people in Boston’s Symphony Hall. They appeared to enjoy their evening, chatting briefly between numbers and walking off the stage hand-in-hand after taking a bow together. Before the performance, Ma and Horner met and embraced ahead of a brief rehearsal. Ma thanked Horner for helping the Terezin Music Foundation, named for the town of Terezin, site of an unusual Jewish ghetto in what was then German-occupied Czechoslovakia. Even amid death and hard labor, Nazi soldiers there allowed prisoners to stage performances. They played music composed 70 years ago when Horner was incarcer-ated. “It’s an extraordinary link to the past,” said concert organizer Mark Ludwig, who leads the foundation.Clooney’s ‘Monuments Men’ pushed to 2014 NEW YORK — George Clooney’s World War II drama “The Monuments Men” is being pushed to 2014 and out of the fall awards season. A spokesman for Sony Pictures said Wednesday the movie will now be released in the first quarter of next year, instead of its planned release date of Dec. 18. “Monuments Men,” which Clooney directed, co-wrote and stars in, had been expect-ed to be a top Oscar contender. The film could still compete for awards next year, but the early-in-the-year positioning suggests Sony doesn’t expect it to. Sony said the film is being delayed so Clooney can fin-ish the film’s extensive visual effects. Wednesday: Afternoon: 1-4-5 Wednesday: Afternoon: 8-4-5-2 Tuesday: 4-5-16-27-32 Correction The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifi cations will run in this space. And thanks for reading. HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter Celebrity Birthdays Q All-pro quarterback Y.A. Tittle is 86.Q Actor Kevin Kilne is 65. Q “Law & Order” doctor BD Wong is 52.Q "Duck Dynasty" star Korie Robertson is 39. Q The Cheetah Girls’ pop singer Adrienne Bailon is 29.Q Rapper Aubrey Drake Graham is 26.Q Actor J.J. Johnston is 19. Thought for Today Scripture of the Day“Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.” — Galations 6:2 “Love doesn’t just sit there, like a stone, it has to be made, like bread; remade all the time, made new.” — Ursala K. Le Guin JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterPaddlin’ down the IchetuckneeKayakers enjoy the scenery as the prepare to paddle do wn the Itchetucknee River on Wednesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterDon’t miss Trunk or TreatYoung children enjoy the candy and decorations at last year’s Trunk or Treat event. This year’s event will begin tomorr ow with a ‘Run for Your Life’ fun run at 6 p.m. and candy dis tribution beginning at 6:30 p.m. 2AWEATHERQ Associated Press Q Associated Press

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Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 3A 3A L e a v e s a r e n t t h e o n l y t h i n g OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your APR may vary based on your credit worthiness, loan amount, term of loan and vehicle. For example, a $2 5,000 loan with no money down at 1.75% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $438.96 and a final payment of $425.01, finance charge o f $1,235.45, for a total of payments of $26,323.65. The amount financed is $25,088.20, the APR is 1.9%. APR = Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-9088 and press 4 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center 1 9 % AP R 1 for up to 60 months As low as Any vehicle 2 0 08 or newer No payments until 2 0 1 4 2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! Our rates are falling too! ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Thursday, October 10, 2013 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Black & White File name: 10-10_CAMPUS_FallAutoLoan2013-BW_ LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 10/7/13 Fran Rowe, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1030 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter FGC helps Habitat for Humanity Florida Gateway College Heating, Ventilation and A/C students Cory Tucker (left) and Clarence Hutcheson work on a trunk line for an air conditioning duct at a Habitat for Humanity home being built at 875 NW Early Street. the worst-case scenario in order to prepare the dis trict, but Belmont ended up bringing an additional 193 students into the district. She believes the increase may have been attributed to the nature of Belmont Academy, a school that reached out to the large homeschool population in the county. Without the increase from Belmont Academy, the district anticipated ended the year with $989,407 in the fund balance. After the fiscal recovery plans strate gies, the final fund balance should increase to approxi mately $2,049,934. The fis cal impact of Belmont totals $1,060,527, Penner said. We had just recently seen what could happen if the district didnt treat a charter school conser vatively, she said, add ing that not managing the charter school the previ ous year had a significant impact on the budget. Last year, [the process] was viewed optimistical ly. This year, we wanted to make sure we had the worst-case scenario bud geted for. As the 2012-13 fiscal year closed in Columbia County, the district found themselves surprised with a 0.8 percent ending fund balance. But through a series of cuts, School Superintendent Terry Huddleston and Penner were able to nearly double the fund balance to 1.57 percent during the bud get process. Primarily, the cuts included not replac ing teaching positions when a teacher resigned or retired. As of the Oct. 22 School Board meeting, Penner plans to start presenting monthly budget reports to the board. The report she presented on Tuesday shows the expenditures exceeding the revenues. However, Penner said the expenditures only appear to be more than the incom ing funds because she allocated funds from an assigned fund into the cur rent budget. For example, the district had money set aside for textbooks that could only be spent on new books, so she moved those savings into the expendi tures so schools could pur chase new books. As of September, the general school fund reflects $69,450,551 for revenues and $69,511,535 for expen ditures. setting to venture to the shores of the nearby headspring for hands-on learning. The whole idea is if they see if, if they hear it and if they interact with it, theyre going to remember it, said Trini Johannesen, science teacher and FWMS PARKnership director. The purpose for the last 15 years of the pro gram has been to give the students a broad brush of the Ichetucknee Springs State Park and the animals that live here, to introduce them to the water quality issues and teach them about the headsprings. Johannesen hopes to convey to the students through the field trip that the headspring is basi cally the end of the pipeline that runs from Alligator Lake through the Ichetucknee Water Basin. Due to a recent $5,000 grant provided by the Department of Environmental Protection, the middle school decided to change the purpose of Sixth Grade Day this year to make it a preliminary introduction to the issues facing the Ichetucknee and prepare them for the Water Wonder Saturday on Nov. 23. Water Wonder Saturday, Johannesen said, will allow the students to work hands-on with the activities talked about on Wednesday. Then they will become teachers themselves as they communicate the issues to the community. According to FWMS teacher Michelle Padgett, Sixth Grade Day provides students a chance to learn in a variety of ways visually, auditorily, spatially and more. But it goes beyond that, she said, to impart con nections to make them more environmentally aware. You see those aha moments when they see things Ms. Johannesen has been talking about in class, Padgett said. They tie in whats been taught with things they know at home, and it provides them with expe riences to base learning on. Both Morgan Hunter, 12, and Elizabeth Jackson, 11, enjoyed learning about the variety of turtles that inhabit the North Florida area in Ichetucknee State Park Services Specialist Sam Coles station on tremen dous, terrific turtles. Cole introduced the students to the gopher tortoise couple, Peter and Wendy, along with their offspring Tootles. The tortoises have an immunity to upper respiratory disease, which is deadly to most turtles, and are therefore important to research at the University of Florida. We got to hold them, Elizabeth said. And also, I just love turtles basically every thing about them. Because Elizabeth lives on a farm, she thought the station would help her identify the different species of turtles that wander into her pasture. Whenever I grow up, I want to be a vet, she added. The information she learned Tuesday at the state park, especially about the animals, would help her as she contin ued through her education. Morgan agreed, adding that she wanted to be a science teacher when she entered the job field. It is essential for our students to have an outdoor lab where they can come to see the appli cation and skills theyve learned in the classroom, said Mary Keen, FWMS assistant principal. Whats so great about this type of program is its interactive, its hands-on, and it addresses the different types of learning styles of our students. Back at the water quality sta tion, SRWMD environmental specialist Darlene Saindon taught students how to mea sure the PH, the dissolved oxygen and the conductivity of the water. By measuring the different qualities, it can tell scientists where the water in the spring derived from and how to treat the pollution from each resource. Everythings connected, Saindon said. If they learn at a young age that what they do affects the drinking water and the water they can play in, then theyre more likely to make a difference in the con ditions of our environmental resources. BUDGET Continued From 1A WILDLIFE Continued From 1A By STEVEN RICHMOND srichmond@lakecityreporter.com A waitress was arrested Monday after cashing $7,000 worth of stolen checks in late September, CCSO reports. Following a complaint from 82-yearold Alphonse Fellner, investigators dis covered Monica Reppert Carter, 50, of 160 SE Mary Etta Terrace, cashed two checks belonging to the elderly gentleman for $6,000 Sept. 27 and $1,000 Sept. 30 without his consent, according to the arrest affidavit. Both checks were made to her and had her signature on the back. The affidavit said the man met Carter at a local restaurant where she worked and began a friendship with her, even tually hiring her to clean his home. During a meeting to discuss the allegations against her, Carter admit ted to cashing the checks. When told about Fellners allegations of fraud against her, she replied that he was upset that she would not be roman tic with him, and that he originally wrote the checks for her on the condi tion she pay him back after receiving her 401(k) check, according to the affidavit. Carter was arrested Monday after noon and booked into Columbia County Detention Facility on $10,000 bond. Waitress jailed on fraud charge JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Science teacher Trini Johannesen shows students an enviroscape of the Itchetucknee Springshed.

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P rotecting the young from themselves and each other easily dates back 30,000 years or more, when adult Homo sapiens tried to stop teenage hominids from jabbing each other with specially sharpened sticks they bought from unscrupulous Neanderthal shop-keepers. The government continues its long, arduous battle against youth smoking, and not without success. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week reported that cigarette smoking among mid-dle school and high school youth declined in a linear fashion between 2000 and 2011. But regulators who thought they were winning the battle when candyand fruit-flavored cigarettes were banned by the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act face another challenge. The manufacture of little flavored cigars was omitted from the ban. Now, more than two of every five teen smokers choose them, the CDC says, citing a 2011 national tobacco-use survey of nearly 19,000 students in grades six through 12. Roughly one in 30 middle and high schoolers report smoking the sweet cigars; by senior year, the rate is one in 12. While it’s illegal to sell cigarettes or cigars to consumers under 18, it’s easy for youths to find and buy the sweet cigars, which often come in small packages for less than a dollar. It seems like a harmless fad, but so did cigarettes when they first gained popularity in the early 20th century. The emphasis on cutting off tobacco sales to minors is a worth-while one because studies show that if you haven’t picked up the habit by age 21 you never will. The old Dutch proverb has it that we grow too soon old and too late smart. The words of CDC Director Tom Frieden might carry a little more weight, if not a certain finality: “The so-called small cigars look like cigarettes, addict as much as ciga-rettes and they kill like cigarettes.” Feel free to snub out your rumand-honey cigar, kid. Right now. We’ll wait. I t’s not too early to start thinking about the fair. The official start date is Nov. 1, but you only have until noon Saturday to submit arts and crafts entries and baked and canned goods for this year’s event. So get sewing, stitching and crafting.And cooking and canning.Your participation is not only much appreciated, it’s needed. After all, what’s a county fair without homemade cookies, cobblers and cakes, pickles and preserves, and so much more. The midway and rides are nice, but what makes a county fair a real hometown event is everything you put into it. (Including, of course, the livestock. More on that anoth-er day.) We hope to see you there when ribbontime comes around. And good luck to all. OPINION Thursday, October 24, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com What makes a fair, a fairToy cigars with real-world consequences A fter the 2008 financial crisis, many people suf-fered, but some didn’t. There were culpable CEOs who luxuriated as bailouts helped them weather the storm, and some said to arrest them, try them, make them pay. It sometimes seemed unimportant to the vengeful whether there had been an actual crime or not. But what about the politicians who helped create that maelstrom through the furthering of inane mortgage and other policies and have done far worse? They have been creating a major public debt that could reduce our continental grandeur to an island of distress. How about trying them and devis-ing a punishment fit for their mis-deeds? Would that be the ticket or what? No, please, it would not be. It’s not punishment we need but rec-tification. Here is what we should do: Recognize how diligently they have worked for years and years to get us in this ungodly mess and demand better -much, much bet-ter. Of course, these are frequently moral pretenders who react furious-ly at the mere suggestion they were ever wrong. But what’s at stake is huge and there are compromise solutions. They need finally to admit the true evil is a failure to refashion entitlement programs that will oth-erwise undo themselves. Restructuring Medicare, Social Security and Medicaid -and doing at least something about the new entitlement called Obamacare – is crucial. Leave them alone and their cost in another 10 years will be enough to take up half the budget. The debt is at $17 trillion now, up more than $6 trillion since President Barack Obama took office, and could easily go up anoth-er $7 trillion in that 10 years as we try to sustain these programs at the heart of our fiscal peril. When I say “peril,” I mean peril. If foreign borrowers hiked interest rates, we would have calamity on our hands. Debt of the magnitude we are looking at will surely slow our economic growth, meaning occupational and other opportuni-ties for an increasing population would be vastly diminished. We would likely not even be generat-ing enough money to pay debt interest and sustain other essential programs we now take for granted. The people who would have to deal with the worst of it are the genera-tions lined up behind us. Good luck, young’uns. Despite all of this, here’s what you find on the front page of the Oct. 21 Wall Street Journal: a story saying some liberal Democrats don’t want to negotiate entitlement reforms. They don’t even want to consider something President Barack Obama came up with, some less-than-astonishing cost adjustments in Social Security and Medicare. They have not evolved one iota from the kind of pure, unadulterated demagoguery of the past that got us where we are today. Every time someone tried to do something to strengthen entitle-ments by rendering them afford-able, these political critics barked that they were thereby forcing old people to eat dog food to survive. What Democrats want is to save the day by raising taxes a trillion dollars, which the Republicans won’t do and should not do. This solution would have many of the same economy-impeding effects as the debt itself and would be a tem-porary answer as ever bigger gov-ernment ever more encapsulated our lives. But there’s negotiating room here. We do need tax reform -reduced corporate rates, fewer loop-holes for all -as a means of more revenue along with greater growth. We also need fewer regulations of the kinds now smothering our econ-omy. We need immigration reform that keeps doors open to entrepre-neurial talents while affording less admittance to those most likely to fail and suffer. We need significant budget cuts. Maybe, just maybe, the more reasonable Democrats and the more reasonable Republicans will thwart these regressive progressives want-ing to shut down something more than the government. They want to shut down our future. And con-sidering all the possibilities of the moment -not least of them an ener-gy boom -what a future it could be if they got out of the way.Entitlements threaten to shut down U.S. future TODAY IN HISTORY Today is Thursday, Oct. 24.On this date:In 1537, Jane Seymour, the third wife of England’s King Henry VIII, died 12 days after giving birth to Prince Edward, later King Edward VI. In 1861, the first transcontinental telegraph message was sent by Chief Justice Stephen J. Field of California from San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C., over a line built by the Western Union Telegraph Co. In 1939, Benny Goodman and his orchestra recorded their signature theme, “Let’s Dance,” for Columbia Records in New York. Nylon stockings were first sold publicly in Wilmington, Del. In 1952, Republican presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower declared in Detroit, “I shall go to Korea” as he promised to end the conflict. (He made the visit over a month later.) In 1962, a naval quarantine of Cuba ordered by President John F. Kennedy went into effect during the missile crisis; the blockade was aimed at interdicting the delivery of offensive weapons to the island. In 1987, 30 years after it was expelled, the Teamsters union was welcomed back into the AFL-CIO. (However, the Teamsters disafilliated themselves from the AFL-CIO in 2005.) Q Associated Press Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Q Jay Ambrose, formerly Washington director of editorial policy for Scripps Howard newspapers and the editor of dailies in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a columnist living in Colorado. Jay AmbroseSpeaktoJay@aol.com4AOPINION

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 5A5A COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Emily Lawson at 754-0424 or by e-mail at elawson@lakecityreporter.com. Gifts and Talents showColumbia County Bethune-Cookman Universtity Alumni invites you to attend “Share Your Gifts and Talents” on Saturday, Oct. 26 at 4 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church (located on Martin Luther King Street). All proceeds will be used for scholarships for students in need. For additional infor-mation, please con-tact Minister Pauline Harrison at 752-1319. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT TONIGHTCouncil meetingThe North Central Florida Regional Planning Council meeting will take place Thursday, Oct. 24 at 7:30 p.m. (dinner will begin at 7 p.m.) at the Holida Inn Hotel & Suites, 213 NW Commerce Blvd. Please let Carol Laine (ext. 352-955-2200 x134) or Jean Strong (ext. 100) that you will be attending.Military Officers Group The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meeting Thursday, Oct. 24, at the Lake City Elks’ Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St. Happy hour starts at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m., flowered by the program. The dinner meeting is open to all active duty mili-tary officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard, and their surviving spouses. For information and reservations call Tandy Carter at 719-9706 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885. The Suwannee River Valley Chapter is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the U.S. and over-seas. The local chapter was founded in 1990.Mobile Office HoursCongressman Ted Yoho will be hosting mobile office hours at Lake City’s City Hall on Oct. 24 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Constituents will have an opportunity to meet with a member of the Congressman’s team to discuss assistance with any federal agency, flags, veteran’s claims or issues, social security claims, mili-tary academy nominations, passport assistance intern-ships and more. If you have questions, please contact our Gainesville office at 352-505-0838. These mobile office hours are free and open to the public. Oct. 25Application dueThe Apalachee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association is hosting “Wakulla Walkabout,” a regional hiking/out-doors event Nov. 8-10 at Camp Indian Springs in Crawfordville. The event kicks off at noon on Friday and runs through Sunday at 10 a.m. Registrants can come for the day or stay overnight, select some, all or no meals, and prices vary according to selec-tions made. Those who wish to order a hiking T-shirt should do so by Oct. 17. To guarantee meals and lodging, register by Oct. 25. Links to online (credit card payment) and paper (pay with check) registra-tion forms are at http://apalachee.floridatrail.org/. Direct questions and send printed registration forms and checks, payable to “Apalachee Chapter, FTA,” to Elizabeth Slack, 524 West Tharpe Street #42, Tallahassee, Florida 32303, 850-320-2760, eliza-beth.a.slack@gmail.com.Focus Fall Fun WalkStroll historic downtown starting Friday, Oct. 25 through Tuesday, Nov. 5. Maps, raffle tickets and chances for door prizes are available at member stores from Railroad to Baya along Marion Ave. The grand prize is a fan-tastic spa package. The prize drawing will be held on Nov. 5 at the Focus Downtown meeting. The winner will be notified afterwards. Look for the Focus Downtown logo on the storefront windows. For further information, contact Sandra Smith at 386-288-3673.Chicken dinnerGold Standard Lodge #167, located at 617 SW Jones Terrace, will be sell-ing chicken dinners on Oct. 25 for a $6 donation. The dinners will consist of grilled chicken, green beans, bread, and cake. Delivery is available. For further information contact Conrad Wallace at 386-697-6635.Fine Arts ShowThe Art League Of North Florida presents the 9th Annual Fine Arts Show through October 25 at the Alfonso Levy Performing Arts Center at the Florida Gateway College. The show is open to all artists 18 years or older. There is an entry fee for members and non members. The art is received from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the college. There will be a reception on Friday September 13th at 6 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center. There will be art, food and the awards presentation. The entire community is invited to attend. Applications are available at the Gateway Art Gallery 461 SW Main Blvd. or at the College at check in time. For more, call the Gallery at 752-5229 Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.Oct. 26Open MicPoetry and Spoken Word Open Mic auditions will be held on October 26 at Richardson Community Center at10:30 am. Please contact RCC for additional information at 386-754-7095.Each participant will have a maximum of 5 min-utes to perform. The poet-ry and spoken word open mic event will be held on November 16th at 6:30 pm. Admission is 2 or more non perishable “Thanksgiving” food items.Audubon Bird Talk Four Rivers Audubon will present a program featur-ing migratory birds. Betsy Martin and Judee Mundy will focus on which birds to expect and when, and which birds not to expect, when to stock your feeders and with and other bird feeding tips on attracting these avian visitors. Join Us! Saturday, Oct 26, 1:30 pm at the Lake City down-town main library. For more information contact: Judee Mundy, 386-758-9558, jmunrswi@comcast.net or Betsy Martin, 386-935-2453, betsymartin@windstream.net. Rainbow Art ShowThe community of Live Oak, FL recently lost one of our esteemed artists and owner of the Rainbow’s End Art Supplies Store, Linda Deater. Ms. Deater was recognized both nationally and internation-ally and most graciously the contents of her estate to St. Luke’s Episcopal with directions that it be sold to benefit the needy in our area. As a result, the church, the Live Oak Artists Guild, Inc. and Heritage Park and Gardens, Inc. have joined forces to host the End of the Rainbow Art Show and Sale of over 200 of her works on Saturday, Oct. 26, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, from 12 – 4 p.m. The event will be held at Heritage Park and Gardens, 1004 Helvenston Street, Live Oak, FL 32064. With your assistance, we are hoping to attract art collectors from as wide a range as possible to attend this art show and sale.Camp Good HopeCamp Good Hope and Teen Encounter will take place on Saturday, October 26, 2013 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Alligator Lake Park, Lake City. Children, teens and family members gather together in an honest, safe environment with others who have experienced the loss of a loved one and who are dealing with grief. Campers take part in therapeutic activities aimed at helping them heal through the changes at work in their lives. Adults learn how to take care of themselves while caring for their children during this challenging time. Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter is pro-vided at no cost and sup-ported by community donations and corporate sponsorships. Suggested registration deadline is October 17, 2013. To reg-ister for Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter, con-tact Vicki Myers, at 386-755-7714 Ext. 2411.Drug Take-BackThe Lake City Police Department and Drug Enforcement Administration will present the public with an oppor-tunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dan-gerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs. The “take-back” will take place on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring your medications for disposal to the Lake City Public Safety building, 225 NW Main Blvd. The service is free and anonymous. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterQuestions on crime preventionAt Tuesday evening’s Business Watch, Andy Smith, a Keipsake Body Emporium tattoo artist, asks what to do when a customer refuses to pay for services rendered. The Business Watch was organized by Focus Downtown and the Lake City Police Department in an effort to outline business owners’ rights in shoplifting scenarios and create awareness on crime prevention tips. Violet Inez ArmstrongMrs. Violet Inez Armstrong, 89, of Lake City passed away Satur-day, October 19, 2013 peacefully at Stillwaters. Mrs. Armstrong was born in Ancell, MO on Au-gust 20, 1924. She was raised on a farm and then moved to St. Louis, MO to work in a muni-tions factory during WWII. She married a man in the military and lived in numerous states and traveled overseas. She was a devoted wife, mother, grand-mother and great-grandmother. She was preceded in death by her husband, Glenn and a son, Mark.Mrs. Armstrong is survived by a daughter Karen (Jeff) Angstadt of Lake City and a son, Gregg Armstrong. She is also sur-vived by 3 grandsons, William (Mychelle) Angstadt and their daughters, Alexis and Audrey of Lake City, Douglas Angstadt of Lake City and his children, Nicholas and Lillian of Chese-peake, VA, and Brian (Holly) Angstadt of Arlington, VA.Arrangements are under the di-rection of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME DeeAnte’ D’von Gibson DeeAnte’ D’von Gibson met his untimely death on October 17, 2013. DeeAnte’, 21, was born June 9, 1992 in Lake City, Flori-da. He was educated in the pub-lic schools of Columbia County. Preceding him in death: grandfathers, Robert Jack Williams and Ollie Gibson. Left to cherish precious mem-ories; a de-voted mother, Ethel Williams (Mike); father, Donald Gib-son (Wanda); grandmothers, Hattie Williams and Margaree Gibson; sisters, Donitra Gib-son, Ebony Williams (Tony), Denisha Moody, Ebony Moody; brothers, Donald J. Gibson, De-ven Gibson; nieces, Kenyanna Jones, Zamyiah Pate; nephews, Tony Fulton, Jr., Adarius Fulton, Ja’Cardi Gibson; special aunt, Shari Alford (Elvis); special uncle, Robert Williams (Patri-cia); best friend, Jamille Tis-dale; devoted and special friend, Mariah Jernigan; hosts of aunts, uncles, cousins and friends; Funeral services for DeeAnte’ will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, Oc-tober 26, 2013 at Souls’ Harbor Church of God In Christ. 901 NE Lake Drive, Lake City, FL. Elder M.L. Goggins, Sr., Pastor. The family will receive friends from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Fri-day, October 25, 2013 at Souls’ Harbor C.O.G.I. C. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified depart-ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 6A Columbia County’s Most WantedFunded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Of ce of the Attorney General CALL (386) 754-7099 OR SUBMIT A WEB TIP ATwww.columbiacrimestoppers.netWE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies. The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise not-ed. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records. Jessie James Gibson, Jr. DOB: 02/27/1983 Height: 6’ 0’’ Weight: 160 lbs. Hair: Black Eyes: Brown Scars: Left Leg Wanted For: 2 Counts Felony Petit Theft Wanted As Of: 09/25/2013 Marqui Martez Church DOB: 08/23/1985 Height: 5’ 6’’ Weight: 185 lbs. Hair: Black Eyes: Brown Tattoos: Left Arm-Cross; Right Arm-Lil Church, M Wanted For: VOP Robbery with a WeaponNot Deadly Wanted As Of: 09/24/2013 **History of Violence** **Prior Resisting Arrest** **Prior Use or Possession of Weapon** Anyone with information on the whereabouts of these individ uals is asked to call Crime Stoppers of Columbia County. n COURTESYEgore the Eagle new campus guardianIf you visit Niblack Elementary School, you will no tice a new addition to the front office. The school recently purchased the statue of the school’s mascot and had an election for naming the eagle. Each class submit ted a name for the ballot and all students had the opportunity to cast their vote After, tallying up the votes, “Egore the Eagle” was the winning name. Both Mr. C hris Dang’s fourth grade class and Mrs. Timothea Williams’ fifth grade class submitted the name and received a popsicle party. COURTESYTarget grants beautification fundsThis fall, Five Points Elementary was the recipient of a $50 0 Target grant for the use of school beautification. Earlier this month, voluntee rs from the Target Distribution Center as well as Five Points teachers, parents and students gra ciously came out to assist in landscaping the front of the s chool. Pictured here are (back row from left): Principal Terri Metrick, Paula Kinc hen, Lisa Lee, Brandi Keen, Teresa McCullough, Tricia Mimbs, Sue Little, Kim Goswami Front row from left: Maya Goswami, Kyler Keen, Michelle VanBennekom. Congratulations to the following students for earning member-ship in the Einstein Club for mas-tery of their multiplication facts: Ethan Melvin, Riley Strosser, Colby Strickland, Bryant Rigdon, Juan Resendiz, Corey Wilson, Jaedon Stearns, Nyasha Mashava, Starr Harkins, Allyssa O’Neal, Kavien Gillyard, Diya Patel, Daniel Lee, Joseph Richards, Zach Dicks, Bling Nelson, Ellie Hingson, Jenalyn Anderson, Emily Flugrath, Mason Gray and AJ Kihei. Westside Elem.students earn EINSTEIN CLUB membership Congratulations to the following students recognized as Duke Talent Search Students through high performance on their 2013 FCAT scores: Mayar Fadhel, Bailey Lacy, Joshua Simpson, Ethan Cruz, Natalia Duarte, Sam Abbott, Megan Edge, Bryant Green, Dylan Pace, Diya Patel, Jenna Roach, Isabelle Warner, Owen Weekley, Zachary Williams, Kaiden Cannon, Mason Gray, Justin Jones, Jacob Juliano, AJ Kihei, Gabriel McCoy, and Micah Rentz. Westside Elem.recognizes Duke Talent Search Suwanee River Water Management District (District) has set aside $1.5 million this fiscal year to assist agricultural pro-ducers and nurseries with projects that will conserve water and protect water resources. Interested par-ties may apply for funding consideration for the fol-lowing type projects: This is the second year the District is offering the program. Last year, 125 agricultural producers ben-efited from the program which resulted in an aver-age reduction in groundwa-ter pumping of 5.2 million gallons per day. Through the program, 70 irrigation systems were retrofitted, 211 advanced irrigation scheduling tools were obtained, and eight special projects designed to save water were implemented. “The District is pleased to continue to support our agricultural producers through the program while expanding this assistance to nurseries to conserve our water supply and offset groundwater demands,” said District Executive Director Ann Shortelle. The deadline to apply for the program is Nov. 8. Interested parties may download an application and receive additional information atwww.mysuwanneerive r. com. For more information, please contact Kevin Wri ght at 386.362.1001 or toll free at 1.800.226.1066 (FL only).SRWMD provides cost-share program By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLocal residents will have the opportunity to rid their medicine chests of unwanted and old prescription drugs this weekend during a law enforce-ment sponsored event. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office will provide a prescription drug collection site from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday at the Park and Ride at U.S. Highway 90 and Commerce Drive, next to Arby’s. The event is being held in conjunction with the Seventh National Drug Take Back day across the country. “Any kind of prescription drugs that are either expired or people don’t need any more can be brought to the collection site,” said Mark D. Pentolino, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office public information officer. Pentolino said some times people have deceased family members and they often find old prescription and they don’t know what to do with them and this would be a good way to dis-pose of them. “It’s a good safe way to let people in the community bring that kind of stuff out and we can dispose of in a safe manner,” he said. People are asked to bring the medications in the container they were dispensed in and leave the other infor-mation on the medication container. “That way law enforcement knows what was in the bottle as well,” Pentolino said. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, which has held the event for at least three years, will have a tent set up in the Park and Ride area with Pentolino and representatives from the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office Citizen Service Patrol on hand. “I think it’s important to hold this event annually because it gets all these prescription drugs out the home and away from other family members and the potential for abuse in the family,” he said.Sheriff’s office offers drug collection site COURTESYExpired prescription drugs can be dan-gerous to keep in your medicine cabinet. FarmersExamples of eligible costshare projects are:Q Center pivot irrigation system retrofits to water more efficiently;Q New pivot controller panels, which will provide Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to avoid irrigation overlap and to avoid water-ing roads or other non-target areas; andQ Remote controlling of center pivots, to monitor or control pivots remotely from a smart phone or computer; orQ Weather stations to monitor rainfall, wind speed, soil moisture, and evapotranspo-ration.NurseriesAn example of an eligible cost-share project follows:Q Retrofits of overhead sprinklers to drip or micro-spray irrigation which spoon feeds the crops and waters more efficiently. COURTESY PHOTOSFirst Federal of Lake City supports safetyEastside Elementary Safety Patrols are hard at work trying to raise funds for their 2nd annual trip to Washington D.C. in the Spring. They are very thankful for the strong support shown from the community in helping their efforts. Most recently, First Federal of Lake City donated funds to be used towards the trip. The money will go towards reducing the cost that students have to raise for the trip. Thanks to all the commu-nity for helping the Safety Patrols reach their goal. In addition, 1st grade st udents enjoyed a great presentation by the Fire Department. Students learned how to stay safe if th eir home ever catches on fire, and many other safety tips. The Fire Department brought their “Saf ety House” for students to practice how they would get out of their home in case there was a fir e. The students enjoyed the presentation and learned many safety guidelines from the firemen. EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY ‘Safety House’ presentation According to the witness, the victim made complaints to Johnson about items he allegedly stole from him, the report noted. Johnson indicated to deputies a knife with a broken tip as the one used in the inci-dent, which was taken as evi-dence along with four nearby knives, the report said. Johnson faces a charge of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. The victim’s condition was unclear at press time. STABBINGContinued From 1A

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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 7A 7A SPONSORED BY: F OREMAN & M C I NN I S P. A ATTORNEYS THE ICHETUCKNEE PARTNERSHIP Lake City Reporter AT CHS HOME FOOTBALL GAMES One Lucky Fan randomly selected at each home game will have the opprtunity to PUNT A FOOTBALL into the back of a pickup to WIN! Aug. 30 vs. Gainesville Sept. 13 vs. Buchholz Sept. 20 vs. Terry Parker Oct. 4 vs. Orange Park Oct. 25 vs. Lee Home Game Schedule *Proceeds to benet CHS STRIPES. One fan selected randomly from the crowd will be allowed one punt attempt. Contestant must be at least 18 years old. Other restrictions apply. EVERY HOME GAME ADVANCE DRY CLEANERS Uniform Specials 471 SW 247, Suite 101 Lake City, FL Branford Crossing Across from the fairgrounds 386-755-5571 Unlimited PrePaid Wireless We Buy Used Phones Flash Phones Unlock Phones Repair Phones & Tablets Accessories for All Brands! 272 W. Duval St.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 OPEN DIVISIONSNo entry fee required for par ticipation1. Any article of merit, not listed as a LOT number will be registered under miscellaneous and the decision of the Judges will determine eligibility of premium money. 2. Any person ACTIVELY employed as a professional and wishing to exhibit will be judged in a separate category from the non-professionals. 3. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached. 4. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms. 5. All checks for premium mon ies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negotiated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/pay ee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair. 6. No person will be allowed more than one premium in connection with the same article. 7. In case of one (1) entry, the Judge will award suitable ribbon and/or premium. 8. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per individual will be accepted. 9. All items must be clean, in good condition and be the work of the exhibitor. 10. Divisions are considered OPEN CLASS unless other wise noted and exhibitors need not be residents of Columbia County. 11. Premiums will be paid for FIRST PLACE awards only and as marked in the Judges Note book, NOT from ribbons that may be attached to exhibit. 12. Judged Division will be as follows:(YD) Youth Division – open to all youth 17 & under (green).(AD) Adult Division – open to all non-professional (white).(EC) Exceptionally Challenged – This division is open to anyone who is physically challenged by the inability to use hands or arms, or anyone who is mental ly challenged (yellow). (PR) Professional Division – open to all professional (orange).13. Unsuitable exhibits or exhibitors of poor quality will be refused. 14. Competent judges will be provided and their decision will be nal. 15. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accompanied by a $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW winners, one (1) BEST OVERALL will be cho sen, accompanied by a $50.00 premium. 16. No person will be allowed more than one premium in connection with the same article. 17. Any article not claimed at the appropriate time for pick up will become property of the Columbia County Fair Board.18. PREMIUMS will be desig nated by ribbons; FIRST blue; SECOND red; THIRD white.19. ALL FIRST PLACE premiums and other claims will be paid by the Fair Association within 30 days AFTER the close of the Fair.20. NO premium will be awarded when exhibit is regarded as unworthy.21. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item Description securely attached.22. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa-tion led in on ALL registra-tion forms.23. All checks for premium monies awarded in connec-tion with the fair shall be negotiated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all mon-ies due recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.24. No person will be allowed more than one premium in connection with the same article.25. The Fair Association re-serves the right to determine all questions in connection with the Fair and to postpone, change or call o, for cause, any item or classication.26. Qualied judges will be provided and their decision will be nal.27. For further Rules & Reg-ulations please refer to each Division Section posted on our web sit at www.columbi-acountyfair.org.GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONSPoultry will be checked in on Monday, November 4, 2013 between 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm. All exhibits must be picked up Saturday, November 9 between 10:00 pm and 11:00 pm.1. All animals must be owned by exhibitor at least 30 days prior to fair.2. Poultry may not be placed in cages until approved by inspector. All animals will be tested for negative pullo rum-typhoid through a blood test. A state veterinarian will be available at check-in only.3. The superintendent reserves the right to refuse the entry of any poultry which shows signs of disease, are infested with mites, lice or eas, or are dirty. 4. The Fair Association will provide feed, water and care for the Open and Youth Poultry Show exhibits during the week of the fair.5. Exhibitors must make their own arrangements for delivery and pick-up of all exhibits. Any exhibit left after the date and time set for pick-up will become the property of the Columbia County Fair Associa tion. NO EXCEPTIONS!!!6. The Modied Danish System of judging will be used. Date for judging will be announced during check-in. No one will be allowed in the exhibit area during judging.7. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item Description securely attached.8. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.9. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipi ent/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.10. The decision of the judge is nal.11. No substitutions will be allowed. 12. Entries must be made on ocial entry form, available from the fair oce, 4-H Agents, FFA Advisors or show super intendent. Forms must be returned to Columbia County Fair Oce by October 25, 2013 at 5:00 pm.13. Open Show is opened to anyone interested in exhibiting poultry. Youth Show is open ONLY to bona de Columbia County 4-H and FFA members.DIVISIONS:1. Commercial Production: Champion and Reserve2. Large Fowl: Champion and Reserve3. Bantams: Champion and Reserve4. Waterfowl: Champion and Reserve5. Turkey: Champion and Reserve6. Miscellaneous: Champion and Reserve7. Laying Hen: (4-H and FFA members)AWARDS1. Blue, red and white ribbons will be awarded to all entries.2. Champion and Reserve of each division (youth and open) will receive a rosette.3. Best of Show (youth and open division) will receive a trophy.4. Reserve Best of Show (youth and open division) will receive a trophy.PREMIUMSYOUTH DIVISIONBlue $6.00 Red $4.00 White $3.00 Champion $8.00 Reserve $7.00 OPEN DIVISIONBlue $3.00 Red $2.00 White $1.00 Champion $5.00Reserve $4.00 NOTE: No person will be al lowed more than one premium in connection with the same article or animal.ADDITIONAL CLASSESAdditional “fun” classes may be added. These may include but are not limited to: crowing contest, ugliest bird contest, etc. Announcement of these additional classes will be posted at check-in along with awards given. GENERAL RULES andREGULATIONSRabbits will be checked in on Monday, November 4, 2013 between 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm. All exhibits must be picked up Saturday, November 9 be tween 10:00 pm and 11:00 pm.1. All animals must be owned by exhibitor at least 30 days prior to the fair.2. Rabbits must be 8 weeks of age or older.3. Each exhibitor will be al lowed a maximum of 2 rabbits, with a maximum of 6 pens per family.4. The superintendent reserves the right to refuse the entry of any rabbit which shows signs of disease, are infested with mites, lice or eas, or are dirty.5. The Fair Association will provide feed, water and care for the Open and Youth Rabbit Show during the week.NOTE: The Exhibitor is responsi ble for providing their own feed and water dishes.6. Exhibitors must make their own arrangements for delivery and pickup of all exhibits. Any exhibits left after the date and time set for pickup will become the property of the Columbia County Fair Association. NO EXCEPTIONS!!!7. The Modied Danish System of judging will be used. Date for judging will be announced during check-in. No one will be allowed in the exhibit area during judging.8. The decisions of the judge is nal.9. No substitutions will be allowed.10. Entries must be made on ocial entry, available from the Fair Oce, 4-H agents, FFA Ad visors or Show Superintendent. Forms must be returned to Columbia County Fair Oce by October 25, 2013 at 5:00 pm.11. Open Show is open to anyone interested in exhibiting rabbit. Youth show is open ONLY to bona de Columbia County 4-H and FFA members.12. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item Description securely attached.13. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.14. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipi ent/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.DIVISIONS:1. Pure Breed Champion and Reserve (New Zealand, Dutch, Netherlands, French, Lops, Rex, Flemish Giants and mini versions)2. Mixed or Cross Breeds Cham pion and Reserve3. Meat Rabbits: Champion and Reserve4. Mothers and babies, up to 8 weeks of age. Champion and Reserve.AWARDS1. Blue, red and white ribbons will be awarded to all entries.2. Champion and Reserve Champions of each division (youth and open division) will receive a rosette.3. Best of Show (youth and open division) will receive a trophy.4. Reserve Best of Show (youth and open division) will receive a trophy.PREMIUMS:YOUTH DIVISIONBlue $6.00 Red $4.00 White $3.00 Champion $8.00Reserve $7.00 OPEN DIVISIONBlue $3.00 Red $2.00 White $1.00 Champion $5.00Reserve $4.00 NOTE: No person will be allowed more than one pre mium in connection with the same article or animal. DIVISION 1Community BoothsThe Division is open to all Community Clubs in Columbia County. These exhibits are to represent the activities of community service embracing exhibits from home, communi ty, school, club work and com munity activities. Do not try to tell the whole story of the group activities in one exhibit. Let each activity have its own story and goal. Be interesting, educational and pleasing to the public. Each exhibit must have a written theme.CLASSES I and IICLUB AND ORGANIZATIONSAwards will be made on the modied Danish Systems. Awards will depend on the number of and quality of exhibits.CLASS IIICOMMERCIALAwards will be made on the basis of one Blue, one Red, one White and as many honorable mentions as exhibit quality warrants.SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING DIVISION IClasses I, II, III1. Presents overall pleasing appearance 15 points2. Uses eective caption or title sign 5 points3. Draws attention 15 points4. Promotes decision and action, 10 points5. Workmanship, Appearance(cleanliness, neatness & good condition), 30 points 6. Choice of purpose or use practical or appropriateness, 15 pointsTotal 100 pointsDivisions I & II will be judged Friday, November 1 at 9:00 a.m. DIVISION IICOLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM All exhibits will be designed to increase understanding and cooperation between the peo ple of Columbia County and the public school systems. Displays will pertain to regular, remedial and special activities of some or all of the ten (10) public day school centers and to the free evening classes of the public. Adult and Community School program. (Public school exhibits will not compete for prizes)Divisions I & II will be judged Friday, November 1 at 9:00 a.m. DIVISION IIIGENERAL CANNING / FOOD PRESERVATIONSPECIAL RULES:1. Exhibits will be registered during the following hours:Tuesday, October 22 to Octo ber 25 from 3-5 pm in the Fair Oce and on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.2. Judging will take place on Saturday, October 26 at 12 noon using the Modied Danish System.3. All entries in this Division must have been canned within the past twelve (12) months and must be the work of the exhibitor.4. USDA Guidelines must be followed as to proper canning methods and use of proper jars.5. Jar tops must be new and free from rust. Rings must be removed by the exhibitor.6. No item will be accepted for judging that has previously been exhibited at the Colum bia County Fair.7. NO premium will be award ed when exhibit is regarded as unworthy. 8. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached.9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registra tion forms.10. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check: time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and the recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.11. All entries that spoil before release will not receive premi ums. 12. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per individual will be accepted.13. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accom panied by a $25.00 premium. From all the BEST OF SHOW winners one (1) BEST OVER ALL will be chosen, accompa nied by a $50.00 premium14. All exhibits may be picked up on Monday & Tuesday, November 11 & 12, following the Fair, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.15. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.16. NO ENTRY FEES ARE REQUIRED.Arts & Crafts Open & Youth Poultry Show Open Rabbit Show Educational Exhibits Handcrafts Needle Crafts Quilting Baked Goods 4-H Laying Hen Projects Columbia County Fair General Rules Columbia County Open and Youth Poultry Show Columbia County Open and Youth Rabbit Show Columbia County Fair Education Exhibits www.columbiacountyfair.org 59th Annual Columbia County Fair Entry and Judging Information

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR LAKE CITY REPORTER 9A JUDGING STANDARDS1. Product in jar should be uniform in size and color.2. Product should be essentially free of air bubbles.3. The proper amount of head space should be allowed:Vegetables/Meats/Soups/Broth 1 inchFruits/Tomatoes 1/2 inchJelly/Honey/Conserves/But ters/Marmalades/Jams 1/4 inch4.Paran wax SHOULD NOT be used to seal product in jar or as a substitute for the water bath or pressure canner processThe Educational Committee wants to encourage all entrants to enter their canning and food preservation items in the coun ty fair. It is our hope that the above guidelines will assist you in producing a quality product. For a copy of the USDA guide lines or for more information, please call the Columbia Coun ty Fairgrounds at 752-8822.DIVISION IVCREATIVE HAND CRAFTSSPECIAL RULES:1. Exhibits will be registered during the following hours:Tuesday, October 22 to Octo ber 25 from 3-5 pm in the Fair Oce and on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.2. Judging will take place on Saturday, October 27 at 12 noon using the Modied Dan ish System.3. All entries in this Division must have been completed within the past twelve (12) months and must be the work of the exhibitor.4. All articles must be clean and in good condition.5. NO premium will be award ed when exhibit is regarded as unworthy.6. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached.7. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.8. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check: time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and the recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.9. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per individual will be accepted.10. No item will be accepted for judging that has previously been exhibited at the Colum bia County Fair.11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accom panied by a $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW win ners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be chosen, accompanied by a $50.00 premium.12. Exhibits may be picked up on Monday & Tuesday, Novem ber 11 & 12, following the Fair, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE RE QUIRED.JUDGING STANDARDS1. Overall general appearance of item.2. Use of compatible materials.3. Attention to detail and craftsmanship.4. Suitable nish consistent with technique.5. Appropriate presentation of item.DIVISION VNEEDLE CRAFTSSPECIAL RULES:1. Exhibits will be registered during the following hours:Tuesday, Oct. 22 to Oct. 25 from 3-5 pm in the Fair Oce, and on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.2. Judging will take place on Saturday, October 27 at 12 noon using the Modied Dan ish System.3. All entries in this Division must have been completed within the past twelve (12) months and must be the work of the exhibitor.4. All articles must be clean in good condition.5. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per individual will be accepted.6. No item will be accepted for judging that has previously been exhibited at the Colum bia County Fair.7. NO premium will be award ed when exhibit is regarded as unworthy.8. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached.9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.10. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check: time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and the recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accom panied by a $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW win ners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be chosen, accompanied by a $50.00 premium.12. Exhibits may be picked up on Monday & Tuesday, Novem ber 11 & 12, following the Fair, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE RE QUIRED.JUDGING STANDARDS1. Overall general appearance of item.2. Use of compatible materials.3. Attention to detail and craftsmanship.4. Suitable nish consistent with technique.5. Appropriate presentation of itemDIVISION VI: TRADITIONAL QUILTINGSPECIAL RULES:1. Exhibits will be registered during the following hours:Tuesday, October 22 to Oct. 25 from 3-5 pm in the Fair Oce and on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9-12 in the banquet hall.2. Judging will take place on Saturday, Oct. 26 at 12 noon using the Modied Danish System.3. All entries in this Division must have been made within the past twelve (12) months and must be the work of the exhibitor.4. All articles must be clean and in good condition.5. Only one (1) entry, per LOT number, per individual will be accepted.6. No item will be accepted for judging that has previously been exhibited at the Colum bia County Fair.7. NO premium will be award ed when exhibit is regarded as unworthy.8. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached.9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.10. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check: time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and the recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accom panied by a $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW win ners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be chosen, accompanied by a $50.00 premium.12. Exhibits may be picked up on Monday & Tuesday, Novem ber 11 & 12, following the Fair, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.13. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.14. NO ENTRY FEES ARE RE QUIRED.DIVISION VII: BAKED GOODS SPECIAL RULES: Bring entries and recipes1. Exhibits will be registered during the following hours:Thursday, October 31, 2:00 pm 6:00 pm2. Acceptance will be at the Ex tension Oce Meeting Room.3. Items must be on disposable bases.4. Any person employed in a bake shop and wishing to exhibit articles will be judged in a separate category.5. Exhibit item must be labeled and recipe attached to bottom.6. NO premium will be award ed when exhibit is regarded as unworthy.7. All items MUST have Name, Address, Phone Number and Item description securely attached.8. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.9. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check: time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall belong to the fair and the recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.10. Judging will take place on Friday using the Modied Danish System.11. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each Class, accom panied by a $10.00 premium. From the BEST OF CLASS in each given Division a BEST OF SHOW will be chosen, accom panied by a $25.00 premium. From the BEST OF SHOW win ners one (1) BEST OVERALL will be chosen, accompanied by a $50.00 premium.12. A PEOPLES CHOICE Contest will be held after regular judg ing is completed.This will be held in conjunction with the Opening Ceremonies at 4:00 p.m. the opening day of the Fair. Baked goods are displayed and dignitaries vote for their favorite one.13. Ribbons and awards may be picked up on Monday, November, 11 & Tuesday, November 12, after the Fair, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.14. See GENERAL RULES for detailed rules.15. NO ENTRY FEES ARE RE QUIRED. JUDGING STANDARDS1. General Appearance2. Frosting or crust3. Lightness4. Grain5. Texture6. Flavor4-H / LAYING HEN PROJECTThis show is open to 4-H and members enrolled in Columbia County Schools or an accredit ed home school program.1. Must be a bona de member of Columbia County 4-H.2. Chicks will be distributed at the Extension Oce on a designated date.3. Each child will receive 6 day old chicks to raise for the pur pose of showing at the fair.4. Members may show up to 4 pullets during the fair.5. Each hen will receive either a blue, red or white ribbon.6. Ribbon premiums will be as follows:Blue $6.00 Red $4.00 White $3.00 Champion $8.00Reserve $7.00 7. Grand and Reserve champi on trophies will be presented to the best laying hen project during the week of the fair.8. All decisions of the judges will be nal.4-H DEPARTMENT: GENERAL RULES1. Only bona de Columbia County 4-H Members with current enrollment form on le may enter articles he/she has grown, made or prepared.2. Entries must be the work of the individual and be complet ed within the last 12 months. A project book is not considered an entry, but articles made as part of the project can be entered in Class 7.3. Age groups are as follows (as of September 1):Division I, Clover Bud, age 5 to 7Division II, Junior, age 8 to 10Division III, Intermediate, age 11-13Division VI, Senior, age 14 and up4. Clover Bud participants are limited to seven (7) total entries. Junior, Intermediate and Senior participants will be limited to ve (5) entries per class (Maximum one per lot number).5. All entries will receive either a blue, red or white ribbon. Blue ribbon entries will receive cash award of $3.00.6. A BEST OF CLASS will be chosen from the blue ribbon winners in each class, accompa nied by $8.00 premium.7. Best in Class will be awarded to the best Junior. Intermediate and Senior blue ribbon entries in each class.8. No person will be allowed more than one premium in connection with the same article.9. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.10. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.11. All entries must be entered through individuals in charge of the 4-H Booth in the Enter tainment Building.12. All entries must have an ocial, fully completed entry tag attached.13. Canning exhibits must be in standard canning jars.14. Fresh Agricultural Products (Class 8) can be composed of several items arranged in an attractive display. Unusual or large specimens may be entered singly. These products should retain most of their original appearance and quality during the duration of the fair.15. A recycled item that uses “trash” to make another article.16. The 4-H Program will not be responsible for loss of valuable articles.17. Houseplants, cactus, hang ing baskets, etc. need to have been cared for by exhibitor. Must be repotted from original container.18. All “food” entries must have recipe attached. No commer cially prepared mixes can be used except when using “Quick Breads from Mixes” 4-H Project Book.SPECIAL RULES:1. Judging will take place in an “interview” setting. 4-H mem bers will present articles to judges, sit and discuss articles with the judges and receive ribbon placing all at the same time.2. Only exhibitors may meet and speak with judges. Parents are not allowed near judges at any time.3. “Best of Class” will be award ed after all exhibits have been judged. Exhibitors need not be present for “Best of Class” awards.4. Judges decisions are nal.5. Each article must have an ocial entry tag attached.6. All items needing refriger ation will be stored properly until the start of the fair.7. Judging will take place Thurs day, November 1, 2012 from 2:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.AGRONOMIC CROPS CONTESTTIME: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 20131. Show open to adults, F-H members and FFA members.2. A limit of two (2) exhibits will be allowed each entrant per category.3. An exhibit shall consist of one eighth bushel per exhibit.4. All exhibits must be of sound standard quality or better to be accepted for judging.5. All items MUST have name, address, phone number and item description securely attached.6. Premiums will not be paid without ALL correct informa tion lled in on ALL registration forms.7. All checks for premium monies awarded in connection with the fair shall be negoti ated by the recipient/payee within 60 days from the date of the check, time being of the essence. If the recipient/payee fails to timely negotiate said check, all monies due recipient/payee shall be deemed to have made an unconditional and irrevocable gift of said monies to the fair.8. Agronomic crop exhibits can be turned into the Extension Oce any time prior to the opening of the Fair or to the Fair Oce no later than 12:00 noon on Friday, November 1, 2013.AWARDSCategory I Peanuts1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $8.002nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $7.003rd Place Exhibit (White Rib bon) $5.00Category II Corn1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.002nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.003rd Place Exhibit (White Rib bon) $3.00Category III Soybeans1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.002nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.003rd Place Exhibit (White Rib bon) $3.00Category IV Wheat1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.002nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.003rd Place Exhibit (White Rib bon) $3.00Category V Other Crops1st Place Exhibit (Blue Ribbon) $6.002nd Place Exhibit (Red Ribbon) $5.003rd Place Exhibit (Yellow Rib bon) $3.00YOUTH INCENTIVE PROGRAMIn order to provide an edu cation agenda for students participating in the Livestock Programs, we realize the need to provide further training in Livestock Production and Husbandry.Exhibitors work hard to develop their projects, but from time to time need advice and direc tion on taking the project to fruition. Through the Youth Incentive Program they will learn how to contact potential buyers, sponsors, and advisors while obtaining knowledge. We have all been in a position with our jobs or personal lives, to approach someone and present a convincing discussion on an idea, but the ability was not at hand.This program will provide the following: How to develop a presenta tion How to contact potential sponsors / buyers How to respond to questions How to set goals How to work with others to the successful conclusion of the programThe Program1. All contributions will be deposited into the Incentive Program special account.2. ONLY qualied exhibitors will be allowed to participate (exhibitors whose animals do not make ending weight, etc)3. Total funds will be used in the following manner:a) Any exhibitors bid not valued at current market price, will be funded to increase the sale of their animal to an established low bid.b) Balance will then be distributed equally among all qualied exhibitors.c) Pledges and monies (mini mum of $50.00) may be sent to:Columbia County Resources, Inc, LLCPost Oce Box 1376Lake City, Florida 32056-1376to the attention of the Livestock Sale on or before November 1, 2013.d) Any exhibitor accepting funds outside this program can and will be disqualied. www.columbiacountyfair.orgColumbia County Fair Education Exhibits cont. LASSO THE FUN At the 58th Annual Columbia County FairRed & Pink Hat CompetitionNovember 1 November 9, 2012NO ENTRY FEE REQUIRED. This is our fourth year for our Red & Pink Hat Contest at the Columbia County Fair., we had some great hats last year. We invite you to show off your red or pink hat. Make your hats as DPER\DQWFUD]\RUIDQFLIXODVSRVVLEOH7KHELJJHUWKHEHWWHU7KLVLVRQFRPSHWLWLRQZKHUH\RXFDQUHDOO\VKRZRII\RXUWDOHQWEHFDXVHDSSHDUDQFHVGRFRXQWThis is so easy ladies. Just design and make your entry or entries at home and bring one of your hats or hats, to WKHIDLURIFH7XHVGD\7KXUVGD\2FWREHUIURPSPRUWRWKHEDQTXHWKDOORQ6DWXUGD\2FWREHUIURPSPDQGZLOOVWD\RQH[KLELWXQWLOWKHIDLUHQGVRQ6DWXUGD\1RYHPEHULI\RXKDYHDKDWVWDQGWRH[hibit your hat on, please bring it with you, otherwise your hats will be displayed on tables.:,10$'021(< and %5$**,1*5,*+76 722 The more hats you enter the more money \RXPD\ZLQ3UL]HVZLOOEHDZDUGHGLQWKUHHFDWHJRULHVLargest Hat $25 Fanciest Hat $25Craziest Hat $25(QWULHVPD\EHSLFNHGXSIURPSP0RQGD\7XHVGD\1RYHPEHU$IWHU1RYHPEHUDOOHQWULHVZLOOEHFRPHproperty of the fairgrounds.If you would like to enter the Red & Pink Hat Competition, just FRPSOHWHWKLVDSSOLFDWLRQRQHIRUHDFKHQWU\DQGEULQJLWZKHQ\RXVXEPLW\RXUHQWU\:HDUHVXSHUH[FLWHGWRKDYH\RXZLWKXV6RSXW\RXU'HVLJQHU+DWVRQDQGJHWUHDG\WRKDYHIXQIXQfun!!7KLVFRPSHWLWLRQZDVGHVLJQHGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHPEHUV,I\RXZDQWWRHQWHUDVDFKDSWHUSOHDVHLQGLFDWHWKDWRQ\RXUHQWU\form.Name:Category:E-Mail:Phone:Cell:Address:City:State: Zip:Check one of the following: I’m entering as an individual I’m entering as a ChapterChapter Name:For more information or questions please call 386-752-8822 or go to our website at www.columbiafair.org

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10A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 8A YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO Fastest available Internet speeds The most TV shows and movies with XFINITY On Demand on TV and online The fastest in-home Wi-Fi for all rooms, all devices, all the time The best HD experience The most live sports More Internet protection included at no additional cost Advanced home phone calling features like Text Messaging at no extra cost Offer ends 12/31/13, and is limited to new residential customers. Not available in all areas. Limited to Economy Plus Internet. After promotion, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge is $39.95. Limited to service to a single outlet. Equipment, installation and taxes extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Digital Starter TV or above required for XFINITY On Demand. XFINITY On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Internet: Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Wi-Fi claim based on August 2012 study of comparable in-home wireless routers by Allion Test Labs, Inc. Voice: Text messaging requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Call for restrictions and complete details. Comcast. All rights reserved. 30-Day Money-Back Guarantee applies to one months recurring service charge and standard installation charges up to $500. NPA132410-0029

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, October 24, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Fort White High cross country in District 5-2A meet at Bradford Middle School in Starke, girls-5 p.m., boys5:15 p.m. Q Fort White High JV football at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High football vs. Robert E. Lee High, 7:30 p.m. Q Fort White High football vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High cross country in District 3-3A meet at Apalachee Regional Parkway in Tallahassee, girls-9 a.m., boys-9:45 a.m. Monday Q Columbia High, Fort White High bowling in District 2 meet at AMF Galaxy West in Ocala, 9 a.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer vs. Columbia High at CYSA field, 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 Q Columbia High football at Middleburg High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High football at Taylor County High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 Q Columbia High swimming in District 2-3A meet at Stephen C. O’Connell Center in Gainesville, 9 a.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Bradford High, 1 p.m. CHS TIGERETTES Team raffle for Yeti Cooler The CHS Tigerette Dance Team is selling tickets for a drawing on a 64-quart Yeti Cooler, a $398 value, which will be given away at the Robert E. Lee High game on Friday. Tickets are $2 or three for $5. For details or tickets, call Teresa Feagle at 365-5241 or Tammy Williams at 288-6563. OUTDOORS Hunter safety course offered The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internetcompletion course from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 30 and 8 a.m. Nov. 2 in Lake City. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete this classroom portion must bring the onlinecompletion report with them. All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. An adult must accompany chil-dren younger than 16 at all times. For details, call 758-0525.Q From staff reports BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kemario Bell gets outside against Ed W hite High on Oct. 11 in Jacksonville. Tigers look to rebound after defeat JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders runs in the ball for a touchdown against Madison County High on Friday.Fort White meets resurgent BulldogsBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s football team is riding high after its win over Madison County High, but the Indians have a resurgent Suwannee High team coming to town. Fort White (5-0) hosts the Bulldogs (5-1) at 7:30 p.m. Friday. “We have got to stay focused,” Indians head coach Demetric Jackson said. “They are still riding on cloud nine, but we have got to get that game off our mind.” Jackson had an early practice on Monday’s teach-er workday and had to deal Indians try to remain focused against Suwannee. INDIANS continued on 2B By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAlthough injuries have been the story of the sea-son for Columbia High’s football team, all the news hasn’t been bad for the Tigers. Players are starting to get healthy after being injured earlier in the year and head coach Brian Allen expects some of them to be back in action on Friday. Trey Marshall has missed much of the year since being injured with a ruptured stomach against Lincoln High. His first action back is expected to come on Friday when the Tigers host Lee High at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. The Tigers and Generals have had polar opposite seasons. Lee (2-6) started out the season strong with a 23-15 victory against Baldwin High and had a 2-1 record after a 21-20 victory against Forrest High. The Generals also had a 41-13 loss to Ponte Vedra before entering district play. District 3-6A play hasn’t been good to Lee as they have endured five-consecu-tive losses, including an 84-0 drumming from Ed White High last week. Columbia (6-1, 3-1 district), on the other hand, started the season with six-consecutive wins before falling against Ed White, 34-17, before its bye week. The Tigers look to get back on track and qualify for the playoffs over the final two weeks of district play. Columbia travels to Middleburg High to close out the district next week Columbia hosts Lee High on Friday in district. CHS continued on 6BLady Indians set to kick it Sauls returns for 12th season as head coach of girls soccerBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — The Florida High School Athletic Association realigned classifications in soccer this season, and Fort White High is back in a big district. The Lady Indians open play against Columbia High at 6 p.m. Monday at the CYSA field. Six teams return with Fort White in District 5-2A — Bradford, Interlachen, Keystone Heights, Newberry and Santa Fe high schools and P.K. Yonge School. The district has added Eastside High and Crescent City Junior-Senior High. The teams will play each other home and away, which takes a big chunk out of a 21-game season. “That was one of my biggest complaints,” Fort White coach Perry Sauls said. “At the district meet-ing, I suggested we play each other one time. With 16 district games, every night is important.” Sauls is in his 12th seaSOCCER continued on 6BBRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s senior players (from left) Danielle Woo ley, Hollee Beach, Kasey Blanchard, Ayla Gonzalez and Amanda Kesead kic k off the season on Monday.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 4:30 a.m. NBCSN — Formula One, practice for Indian Grand Prix, at Greater Noida, India CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Winnipeg at Toronto COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at Mississippi St.FS1 — Marshall at Middle Tenn. GOLF 6 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, BMW Masters, first round, at Shanghai (same-day tape) Noon TGC — LPGA, Taiwan Championship, first round, at Yang Mei, Taiwan (same-day tape) 11 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, CIMB Classic, second round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, second round, at Longkou, China MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. FOX — World Series, game 2, St. Louis at Boston NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Preseason, Houston at San Antonio NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Carolina at Tampa Bay SOCCER 1 p.m. FS1 — UEFA Europa League, Sheriff vs. Tottenham, at Tiraspol, Moldova 3 p.m. FS1 — UEFA Europa League, St. Gallen at ValenciaBASEBALLWorld Series Today St. Louis (Wacha 4-1) at Boston (Lackey 10-13), 8:07 p.m. Saturday Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at St. Louis (Kelly 10-5), 8:07 p.m. Sunday Boston (Peavy 12-5) at St. Louis (Lynn 15-10), 8:15 p.m.FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 5 2 0 .714 152 127N.Y. Jets 4 3 0 .571 134 162Miami 3 3 0 .500 135 140Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 159 178 South W L T Pct PF PAIndianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194Jacksonville 0 7 0 .000 76 222 North W L T Pct PF PACincinnati 5 2 0 .714 148 135Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148Cleveland 3 4 0 .429 131 156Pittsburgh 2 4 0 .333 107 132 West W L T Pct PF PAKansas City 7 0 0 1.000 169 81Denver 6 1 0 .857 298 197San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PADallas 4 3 0 .571 200 155Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 169 196 Washington 2 4 0 .333 152 184N.Y. Giants 1 6 0 .143 126 216 South W L T Pct PF PANew Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103Carolina 3 3 0 .500 139 83Atlanta 2 4 0 .333 153 157Tampa Bay 0 6 0 .000 87 132 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 4 2 0 .667 168 127Detroit 4 3 0 .571 186 167Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206Minnesota 1 5 0 .167 132 181 West W L T Pct PF PASeattle 6 1 0 .857 191 116San Francisco 5 2 0 .714 176 135St. Louis 3 4 0 .429 156 184Arizona 3 4 0 .429 133 161 Today’s Game Carolina at Tampa Bay, 8:25 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Buffalo at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Miami at New England, 1 p.m.Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.San Francisco vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.Atlanta at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.Washington at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Seattle at St. Louis, 8:40 p.m.Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis, San Diego, TennesseeAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.No. 2 Oregon vs. No. 12 UCLA, 7 p.m. No. 3 Florida State vs. N.C. State, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Ohio State vs. Penn State, 8 p.m.No. 5 Missouri vs. No. 20 South Carolina, 7 p.m. No. 6 Baylor at Kansas, 7 p.m.No. 7 Miami vs. Wake Forest, Noon No. 8 Stanford at Oregon State, 10:30 p.m. No. 9 Clemson at Maryland, 3:30 p.m.No. 10 Texas Tech at No. 17 Oklahoma, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Auburn vs. FAU, 7:30 p.m.No. 13 LSU vs. Furman, 7 p.m.No. 14 Texas A&M vs. Vanderbilt, 12:21 p.m. No. 15 Fresno State at San Diego State, 10:30 p.m. No. 16 Virginia Tech vs. Duke, 3:30 p.m.No. 18 Louisville at South Florida, Noon No. 19 Oklahoma State at Iowa State, Noon No. 21 UCF vs. UConn, NoonNo. 23 Northern Illinois vs. Eastern Michigan, 3:30 p.m. No. 25 Nebraska at Minnesota, NoonGOLF Golf week PGA TOUR/ASIAN TOUR CIMB CLASSIC Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Schedule: Today-Sunday.Course: Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club, West Course (6,967 yards, par 72). Purse: $7 million. Winner’s share: $1.26 million. Television: Golf Channel (TodaySaturday, 6:30-10:30 p.m., 11 p.m.-3 a.m.; Sunday, 6:30-10:30 p.m.). EUROPEAN TOUR BMW MASTERS Site: Shanghai.Schedule: Today-Sunday.Course: Lake Malaren Golf Club, The Masters Course (7,607 yards, par 72). Purse: $7 million. Winner’s share: $1,166,600. Television: Golf Channel (TodaySunday, 6-10 a.m.). LPGA TOUR LPGA TAIWAN CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Yang Mei, Taiwan.Schedule: Today-Sunday.Course: Sunrise Golf and Country Club (6,390 yards, par 72). Purse: $2 million. Winner’s share: $300,000. Television: Golf Channel (TodaySunday, noon-3 p.m.). CHAMPIONS TOUR AT&T CHAMPIONSHIP Site: San Antonio.Schedule: Friday-Sunday.Course: TPC San Antonio, AT&T Canyons Course (6,735 yards, par 71). Purse: $1.9 million. Winner’s share: $285,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 3:306 p.m.; Saturday, 3-5 a.m., 3:30-6 p.m.; Sunday, 3-5 a.m., 3:30-6 p.m., 11 p.m.1 a.m.).BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Houston at San Antonio, 8 p.m.Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.Brooklyn at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Denver at Chicago, 8 p.m.Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.Toronto at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Indiana at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Utah vs. L.A. Lakers at Anaheim, Calif., 10 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Games San Jose at Boston, 7 p.m.Vancouver at New Jersey, 7 p.m.N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Anaheim at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.Winnipeg at Nashville, 8 p.m.Carolina at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Washington at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.Toronto at Columbus, 7 p.m.Anaheim at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Carolina at Colorado, 9 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 24, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Once Upon a Time in Wonderland (N) Grey’s Anatomy “Map of You” (N) Scandal A philandering senator. (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 NewsArsenio Hall 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Call the Midwife Antiques Roadshow “Miami Beach” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsAction News: LiveTwo and Half MenBig Bang Theory(:31) The MillersThe Crazy OnesTwo and Half Men(:01) Elementary “Ancient History” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries (N) Reign “Snakes in the Garden” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Family Guy Family Guy Modern Familya 2013 World Series Game 2: Teams TBA. (Time tentative). (N) To Be AnnouncedModern FamilyTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Parks/RecreatWelcome-FamSean SavesMichael J. FoxParenthood “Let’s Be Mad Together” NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350U.S. House of Representatives (N) (Live) U.S. House of Representatives (N) Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. Key Capitol Hill Hearings Speeches. WGN-A 16 239 307America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) How I Met/MotherRules/Engagement TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondFriends Friends King of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 27920/20 on OWN A woman is murdered. 20/20 on OWN “Black Widows” 20/20 on OWN “In Whom We Trust” 20/20 on OWN “Amanda Knox” (N) 20/20 on OWN “Death by Driving” 20/20 on OWN “In Whom We Trust” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312The Waltons “The Return” The Waltons “The Revelation” The Waltons “Grandma Comes Home” The Waltons “The Empty Nest” Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenAnger “Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. Anger “Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. CNN 24 200 202Situation Room(:28) Cross re (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) “Black sh” (2013, Documentary) Premiere. Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle “Secret’s Safe With Me” Castle “Probable Cause” (DVS)d NBA Preseason Basketball Houston Rockets at San Antonio Spurs. (N) Hawaii Five-0 Hawaii Five-0 NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobHathawaysDrake & JoshDeadtime StoriesDeadtime StoriesFull House Full House Full House Full House Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops iMPACT Wrestling (N) Rampage4Real (N) Cops MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H House “Not Cancer” House “Adverse Events” Seinfeld RhodaThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Austin & Ally Liv & MaddieWolfblood (N) Wolfblood “Irresistible” (N) Fish Hooks Jessie Austin & Ally Dog With a Blog LIFE 32 108 252Wife Swap “Beauvais/Clayton” Project Runway The winner is chosen. Project Runway (N) Project Runway All Stars Million Dollar Shoppers (N) (:01) Chasing Nashville USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitWhite Collar “Out of the Frying Pan” (:01) Covert Affairs (N) (DVS) (:02) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The Game The Soul ManThe Soul Man “Daddy Day Care” (2003) Eddie Murphy. Two unemployed fathers open a childcare facility. HusbandsHo. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Kentucky at Mississippi State. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptionBaseball Tonight (N) (Live) X Games From Los Angeles. (Taped) Women’s College Volleyball Ohio State at Penn State. (Taped) Olbermann (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -LightningLightningLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live!Inside LightningThe New College Football Show DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Trials of a T-Bird” Fast N’ Loud Fast N’ Loud “Cool Customline” Fast N’ Loud “Killer COPO Camaro” Fast N’ Loud Fast N’ Loud “Killer COPO Camaro” TBS 39 139 247Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) HLN After Dark (N) Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Co-Ed NightmaresE! News (N) Secret Societies of Hollywood The secret societies of Hollywood. (N) Hollywood Death Trip (N) Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Hidden City (N) Hidden City (N) HGTV 47 112 229My First PlaceMy First PlaceHunters Int’lHouse HuntersCousins Undercover Income Property House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Toddlers & Tiaras 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Kidnapped” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Crazy Love” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Crazy Love” HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsAmerican DareAmerican Dare ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedWild West Alaska “Fools Gold Fever” Alaska Gold Diggers (N) North Woods LawNorth Woods Law (N) Alaska Gold Diggers FOOD 51 110 231Food Court WarsChopped “Victory on the Brain” Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Chopped “Circus Spectacular” (N) Restaurant Divided “Mia Famiglia” Chopped “Cleaver Fever” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Icons of CoachingUFC InsiderThe New College Football Show (N) West Coast CustomsThe Game 365UFC InsiderThe Best of PrideWorld Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244“An American Werewolf in London” “Underworld: Evolution” (2006) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. “Red: Werewolf Hunter” (2010) AMC 60 130 254 “A Nightmare on Elm Street” (2010) Jackie Earle Haley, Rooney Mara. “Seed of Chucky” (2004, Horror) Jennifer Tilly, Voices of Brad Dourif. “Bride of Chucky” (1998, Horror) Jennifer Tilly, Katherine Heigl. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowAt MidnightKey & Peele It’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyTosh.0 South Park Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba “A League of Their Own” (1992) Tom Hanks. A women’s professional baseball league debuts in 1943. Cops ReloadedCops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Luna and K9 Sniffers” World’s Deadliest “Pack Hunters” Tiger DynastyChasing RhinosWar ElephantsTiger Dynasty NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. Coca farmers in Colombia. Yukon Gold “Big Money Throwdown” Drugs, Inc. “Cartel City: Arizona” Big Bad Wood “Tree of Terror” (N) Drugs, Inc. “Drug Kings of New York” Big Bad Wood “Tree of Terror” (N) SCIENCE 110 193 284Through Wormhole-FreemanHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow-MadeHow-MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How-MadeHow-Made ID 111 192 285I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Forbidden (N) Forbidden Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda HBO 302 300 501Legendary Nights(:45) “This Means War” (2012, Action) Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ “Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight” (2013) ‘NR’ Ender’s GameHello Ladies The Orgasm Special: A Real Sex Xtra MAX 320 310 515(5:30) “The Descendants” (2011) George Clooney. “A Night at the Roxbury” (1998) Will Ferrell. ‘PG-13’ Strike Back “Warm Bodies” (2013) Nicholas Hoult. ‘PG-13’ Co-Ed Con dential SHOW 340 318 545 “Flying Blind” (2012, Drama) Helen McCrory. ‘NR’ (:45) “Knife Fight” (2012, Drama) Rob Lowe, Jamie Chung. ‘R’ “Unhung Hero” (2013) Patrick Moote. Premiere. ‘NR’ Gigolos Masters of Sex INDIANS: Meet Bulldogs Continued From Page 1B with the rain on Tuesday. “They came out ready to go on Monday, but on Tuesday they were just going through the motions,” Jackson said. “We got their attention and I know Suwannee has got their attention.” Suwannee has won three straight district games since an open date and the last two weeks the Bulldogs have racked up a combined score of 66-6. “No. 1, they are playing good defense,” Jackson said. “They are swarming to the ball, tackling well and creating turnovers. They are playing real fast and real physical. On offense they run right at you and mix in a little passing. The biggest thing is they are playing hard.” After spotting Madison County a 7-0 lead on the second play of the game, Fort White domi-nated in a 19-13 victory. It was the Indians’ first win over the Cowboys in eight tries. “Our biggest issue is adjusting to the speed of the game,” Jackson said. “We start slow and then adjust, but when we have a chance to make a stop we have to make a stop. Our offense started good, but we have to do a better job putting points on the board.” Jackson said the Indians are giving up field posi-tion on kickoffs by not catching punts. Two missed extra points against Madison County continued a trend. “We have been running hard and blocking good, but we need to shore up our special teams,” he said.

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DEAR ABBY: I am a divorcee in my 40s who is in a committed relation-ship with a man who is also divorced. Neither of our marriages were happy ones. We stayed in them for all the wrong reasons. We have been together for three years, live together, love each other unconditionally and have talked extensive-ly about getting married. My question is, am I wrong to expect a tra-ditional proposal with an engagement ring? It is important to me that he would think enough of me to plan one. I feel if he did it for his first wife, he should do the same – or more – for me. Would it be in bad taste to mention this? — ASKING TOO MUCH? IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR ASKING TOO MUCH?: Unless one of your companion’s attributes is clairvoyance, express your feelings. He may not be aware that you would feel somehow cheated if he doesn’t come forth with a gesture that is “equal or better” than what his ex received. Consider care-fully what resulted from that first fancy proposal. An essential ingredient in a successful relationship is the ability to express one’s wants and needs to the other partner. I would only suggest that when you do, your thoughts are couched as a request and not a demand. DEAR ABBY: Enlighten me, please. A friend told me her daughter is expect-ing. She has not said one word about a boyfriend or marriage. How do I diplo-matically ask, “Who is the father?” People in my generation already knew the answer. Marriage came first. Is this now “none of my busi-ness”? The grandma-to-be has offered no clue. Can you help me out? — OUT OF THE LOOP OUT WEST DEAR OUT OF THE LOOP: If Grandma-to-be is keeping mum, you can bet there’s a reason. If the father was Prince Harry, she would be trumpeting it from the rooftops. Your friend may not know who the father is or have some other reason for not dis-closing it. Unless you want to tiptoe through a mine-field, my advice is DON’T GO THERE. DEAR ABBY: I’m a 13-year-old girl who suf-fers from what I’m afraid is obsessive-compulsive disorder. I have known for four years, but I never told my parents. I finally opened up to them a few days ago, and I thought they wanted to help. But later I heard them mock my condition and laugh about it. Abby, I thought my parents wanted to help me, but it’s becoming clear that they don’t. They have offered me therapy, but I’m scared they will mock me for that, too. Now I’m afraid to go. Should I? — O.C.D. DAUGHTER DEAR DAUGHTER: When people don’t under-stand something, unfor-tunately they sometimes laugh at it. However, are you absolutely certain that what your parents were laughing about concerned you and not something else? I find it hard to believe that loving parents would laugh at their child’s discomfort. You should by all means take them up on their offer of talking to a therapist. It is the surest way to find a solution for your problem. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let emotions mislead you. Overreacting will not help you get your way. Back off and focus on what will help improve your appearance, attitude and confidence so that you can say “no” to a bad offer. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A partnership will help you reach your life goal. Discuss responsibili-ties and long-range plans. Volunteer your time and you will gain experience and meet people who can help alter your life. Love and romance should close out your day. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Move in a direction that encourages you to use your skills wisely. Innovation and determina-tion will guide you into something prosperous. Before you take a leap in a new direction, make sure your motives and inten-tions are good. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Clear your head and rehash what’s been going on in your life. Don’t feel forced to make changes or do something because of someone else’s decision, move or change. Express your creative imagination and explore your own interests. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Keep moving. Change is good and will lead to selfimprovement. Don’t let anyone restrict or limit you. It is probably time to consider making altera-tions that allow you to be who you are without feel-ing guilty. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Step outside any deci-sion you face and you will gain wisdom and clarity regarding your options. Discuss your concerns with a good friend or rela-tive and prepare to move ahead with your plans. Don’t waste time. Make your choice and move for-ward. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Make creative sug-gestions and you will advance. Don’t let your emotions interfere with your work or your prog-ress. If someone gives you a hard time, you should reconsider your connec-tion. Someone you meet will have something that interests you. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Communication, trav-el and picking up some important information are highlighted. Let your intuition guide you. Flaunt your expertise, skills and knowledge and you will have even more opportu-nities and good fortune. Sign contracts, initiate settlements and invest in your future. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): It’s best to keep your financial situa-tion a secret for the time being. Someone will try to take advantage of you or offer you some false information. A change at home will turn out to be beneficial. Love is on the rise. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Try something new or put your talent to use in an unusual way. Concentrate on your repu-tation and status and do everything in your power to advance. An opportu-nity will arise through someone you have worked with in the past. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Say no to anyone trying to coerce you into something you don’t want to do. Voice your opinion and be prepared to con-tinue down a path that suits your needs. Love and romance are looking good and should help ease your stress. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take action. If you see something you want, go after it. Push to sign deals and to invest in something that requires your skills, talents or expertise. Invest in your-self, your home and your future. Follow your intu-ition. +++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Divorcee longs for fairy-tale proposal on bended knee Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emily Lawson, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER24, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-2011-CA-000205US BANK, N.A.,Plaintiff,v.STEVEN G. KHACHIGAN A/K/ASTEVEN GLENN KHACHIGAN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN G. KHACHIGAN A/K/ASTEVEN GLENN KHACHIGAN; UN-KNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUN-KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-ITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, APOLITICALSUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA; FLORIDAHOUS-ING FINANCE CORPORATION, Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 02, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Colum-bia County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Colum-bia County, Florida, described as:APARTOF SECTION 17, TOWN-SHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-EASTCORNER OF SECTION 17 AND RUN THENCE S 8908’48’’W,ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 17, 345.00 FEET; THENCE S 0027’24’’E, 536.08 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE S 8951’34’’E, 169.81 FEET; THENCE S 0027’24’’E, 223.18 FEET; THENCE S 8951’34’’E, 20.00 FEET; THENCE S 0029’23’’E, 264.98 FEETTO THE NORTH LINE OF MILLCREEK SUBDIVI-SION AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGES 127 & 127-AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 8951’34’’WALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF MILLCREEK, 189.96 FEETTO THE NWCORNER OF SAID MILLCREEK SUBDIVISION; THENCE N 0027’24’’W, 488.16 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. SAID LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.a/k/a 384 SE MILLCREEK CT, LAKE CITY, FL32025-3911 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Third Floor of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, on November 6, 2013 at 11:00 AM.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of this lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DIS-ABILITIES: IF YOU ARE APER-SON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COSTTO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTNANCYNYDAM ATROOM 205, COLUMBIACOUN-TYCOURTHOUSE, P.O. BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL32056, (904) 758-2163; SUNCOM 839-2163, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS NO-TICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL(904) 758-2139Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 2nd day of October 2013.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05541506October 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13-227-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff,vs.SPARKS CONTRACTORS, INC., a Florida Corporation, SPARKS CON-STRUCTION, INC., a Florida Cor-poration, JOSHUAD. SPARKS, JA-COB D. SPARKS, NAVALSTORES SUPPLIERS, INC. d/b/a/ SOUTHERN BUILDERS SUPPLYCOMPANY, DENNIS M. O’TOOLE and THOMAS ELLI-SON, Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, Court-room 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on November 13, 2013, the following described property:Parcel 1: Lot 8, Block 3, of HOLLILegalDAYHEIGHTS "Re-plat", a subdi-vision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 26, of the Public Records of CO-LUMBIACounty, Florida.Parcel 2: Lot 4 of COUNTRYLAKE IN WOODBOROUGH, PHASE 1, a subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 97, of the Public Records of COLUMBIACounty, Florida.Parcel 3: Lot 6 of ROLLING MEADOWS, a subdivision, accord-ing to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 45 and 46 of the public records of COLUMBIACounty, Florida.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: October 7, 2013.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05541503October 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13-227-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff,vs.SPARKS CONTRACTORS, INC., a Florida Corporation, SPARKS CON-STRUCTION, INC., a Florida Cor-poration, JOSHUAD. SPARKS, JA-COB D. SPARKS, NAVALSTORES SUPPLIERS, INC. d/b/a SOUTHERN BUILDERS SUPPLYCOMPANY, DENNIS M. O’TOOLE and THOMAS ELLI-SON, Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45 COUNTIIINOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, Court-room 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on November 13, 2013, the following described property:Model 2010 Summons DC4-54 Print & Cut, Serial No. 311006-1002, Col-orcontrol V6.0 RIP/Cut, 3M Cast White Vinyl-54’’, along with all ac-cessories indicated on Quote QT-10018ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: October 7, 2013.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05541504October 17, 24, 2013 BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMIS-SIONERS, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDALAKE CITY, FLORIDAINVITATION TO BIDBID NO. 2013-NThe Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids for a term contract for Herbicide Spraying at various locations around the county in the office of Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando Avenue Room 203, Post Office Box 1529, Lake City, FL32056-1529, (386) 719-2028, until 11:00 A.M. on Thursday October 31, 2013. Bid Forms and instructions may be downloaded from the Coun-ty’s web site: http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/PurchasingBids.aspThe successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with proof liability and automo-bile insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board ofCounty CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05541570October 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000679BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plain-tiff,v.LEO D. GOODWIN; ROBERTAL. GOODWIN; ANYAND ALLUN-KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS, Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN purLegalsuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Mo-tion to Cancel and Reschedule Fore-closure Sale dated September 26, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 12-2012-CA-000679 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 8th day of January, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:LOT14 BLOCK B HIDDEN ACRES, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 7, PAGES 63-64, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH A2001 DOU-BLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN#H0GA20K02844AAND H0GA20K02844B.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIESIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Phone: (386) 719-7428Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this no-tification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 26TH DAYOF SEPTEM-BER, 2013./s/B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA05541384October 24, 31, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Case No.: 2013-CA-000413NORTHERN ALACHUAHOLD-INGS, LLC, a Florida Corporation,Plaintiff,vs.DAVID PALMER if alive and if dead, his respective, unknown spouse, heirs, devises, grantees, cred-itors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against him indi-vidually, and NANCYJO LOVE-TTE, DECEASED, her respective, unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against her in-dividually, and CITIFINANCIALEQUITYSERVICES, INC., it's heirs, administrators, assigns, cred-itors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against it,Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: NANCYJO LOVETTEDECEASEDYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title as to the following de-scribed lands:SEC 10 TWN 3S RNG 16 PARCELNUMBER 02055-033LOT33 PARNELLHILLS S/D UNIT1filed against you and you are re-quired to serve a copy of your writ-ten defenses, if any, on RONALD W.STEVENS, Petitioner's attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 1444 Bronson, Florida 32621, on or before November 13, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plain-tiff's attorney or immediately there-after; otherwise a Default will be en-tered against you for the relief de-manded in the Complaint.WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on October 14, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of CourtBy: P.A. PerryPersons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact (386) 362-0500 (Voice & TDD *711) or via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771.05541534October 17, 24, 31, 2013November 7, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO.: 11-472CAWELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-TERED HOLDERS OF STRUC-TURED ASSETSECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-0SI,Plaintiff,vs.Diane R. Zwick and Wesley Zwick,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF SALE PUR-SUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of LegalForeclosure dated December 5, 2012 and entered in Case No. 11-472CAof the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judi-cial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUST-EE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF STRUCTURED AS-SETSECURITIES CORPORA-TION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2007-OSI, is Plaintiff and Diane R. Zwick and Wesley Zwick, are De-fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 3rd Floor of the Columbia County Courthouse located at 173 N. Hernando Street, Lake City, FLat 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 20 day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit:PARCEL1:Apart of the Northeast 1/4 of Sec-tion 3 Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, more particularly described as fol-lows:Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4 and run N 87 deg. 30'16" E, along the North line thereof, 659.33 feet for a Point of Beginning; thence continue N 87 deg. 30'16" E, 659.34 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest 1/4 of said Northeast 1/4; thence S 1 deg. 48'26" E 662.00 feet; thence S 87 deg. 30'16" W658.10 feet; thence N 1 deg. 54'51" W, 661.98 feet to the Point of Beginning.AND PARCEL2:Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East: Begin at the Northwest cor-ner of the Northeast 1/4 of the North-east 1/4 for Point of Beginning; run S. 87 deg. 30'27" W, 772.32 feet; thence run N 1 deg. 37' 02" W, 56.4 feet; thence run N 87 deg. 30' 27" E, 772.32 feet; thence run S 1 deg. 37' 02" E, 56.4 feet to Point of Begin-ning, being in Section 34, Township 6 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida.Together with the Right of Ingress and Egress over and across the fol-lowing described parcel: Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4, Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run N 87 deg. 30'16" E, along the North line there-of 659.33 feet; thence S 1 deg. 54'51" E, 661.98 feet for a Point of Beginning of said easement; thence N 87 deg. 30'16" E, 326.82 feet; thence S 1 deg. 48'26" E, 602.90 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30'16" E, 331.28 feet; thence S. 1 deg. 48'26" E 60.00 feet; thence S 87 deg. 30'16" W,391.28 feet; thence N 1 deg. 48'25" W602.90 feet; thence S 87 deg. 30'16" W, 343.96 feet; thence N 2 deg. 01'18" W, 60.00 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30'16" E, 77.34 feet to the Point of Beginning, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida.Street Address: 307 SWMelville Glen, Fort White, FL32038 and all fixtures and personal property locat-ed therein or thereon, which are in-cluded as security in Plaintiff's mort-gage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, this 30 day of September, 2013.Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy Clerk05541397October 17, 24, 2013 NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that on No-vember 8, 2013 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage & Record Storage of Lake City, 442 SWSaint Margaret Street, Lake City, FL32025; will sell at public sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stor-ed with the undersigned:AA-02 Octavia Sheppard-WilliamsR-05 Jacqueline Moore-StylesN-07 Ozzie JenkinsBB-36 Albeana BranscomeJ-09 Louis MajorCC-09 Roger LoveladyI-12 Katrina HillE-40 Tissie ButtsI-20 Andrea YoungH-01 Ashley NoegleI-26 Vickie DesotleT-17 Debra WilliamsK-21 Marisa CaputoK-22 Delores RhymN-01 Shirley FrancisY-31 Katreca SmithU-12 Joe DavisV-33 Keith IzykowskiT-14 Marion Knox05541756October 24, 31, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAJUVENILE DIVISIONIN THE INTERESTOF: CASE NO. 2012-62-DPT.L.ADOB:12/2/2005M.M.A.DOB:3/10/2008MINOR CHILDREN.SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-VISORYHEARING FOR TERMI-NATION OF PARENTALRIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIPSTATE OF FLORIDA:TO:Shannon Tori Chiarini (address unknown) WHEREAS a Petition for Termina-tion of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this Court regarding the above-referenced children, a copy of which is on file with the Clerk of the Court,YOU ARE HEREBYCOMMAND-ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-ble Wesley R. Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Columbia County Courthouse, Lake City, Florida, on NOVEMBER 6, 2013, A T 1 1 A.M. for a Termination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.YOU MUSTAPPEAR ON THE DATE AND ATTHE TIME SPECI-FIED HEREIN.******FAILURE TO PERSONAL-LYAPPEAR ATTHIS ADVISORYHEARING CONSTITUTES CON-SENTTO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTALRIGHTS TO THIS CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU FAILTO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAYLOSE ALLLEGALRIGHTS TOTHE CHILD (OR CHILDREN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ON FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT******Pursuant to Sections 39.802(4)(d) and 63.082(6)(g), Florida Statutes, you are hereby informed of the avail-ability of private placement with an adoption entity, as defined in Section 63.032(3), Florida Statutes. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, on the 1st day of October 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Circuit Court(SEAL)By: /s/ S. WheelerDeputy ClerkErin Londraville, Esq.Florida Bar No. 91816Children’s Legal Services1389 West US Highway 90, Suite 110Lake City, FL32055(386) 243-6037IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or imme-diately upon receiving this notifica-tion if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired or voice impaired, call 711. 05541309October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No.: 09-210CASUNTRUSTMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff,Vs.JAVIER HARRINGTON AND MA-RIANNAHARRINGTON, HIS WIFE; JOHN DOE AND MARYDOE, Defendants.NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45Notice is given that pursuant to a Fi-nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 4, 2013, entered in Case No. 2009-CA-210 pending in the Third Judicial Circuit Court in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, in which SUNTRUSTMORTGAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and JAVIER HAR-RINGTON AND MARIANNAHARRINGTON, HIS WIFE; JOHN DOE AND MARYDOE are the De-fendants, the Columbia County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder in person at the Columbia County Courthouse, third floor, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida on November 6, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., the following-described real property set forth in said Final Judgment:Lot 10, "Magnolia Place", according to the map or plat thereof, as record-ed in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 174 through 179, inclusive, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Flori-da.Address: 158 SOUTHWESTCE-DARWOOD GLEN, Lake City, Florida 32025Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 10th day of October 2013.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of Circuit Court Columbia CountyBy:/s/ B. Scippio LegalDeputy Clerk05541501October 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTYGENERALJURISDICTIONDIVISIONCASE NO. 13000390CAAXMXM&TBANK, Plaintiff,vs.RONALD P. BOONE A/K/ARON P. BOONE, et al, Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTo: RONALD P. BOONE A/K/ARON P. BOONE, 16706 SW298TH TER, HOMESTEAD, FL33030UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RO-NALD P. BOONE A/K/ARON P. BOONE, 16706 SW298TH TER, HOMESTEAD, FL33030LASTKNOWN ADDRESS STAT-ED, CURRENTRESIDENCE UN-KNOWNYOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and per-sonal property described as follows, to-wit:LOT1, BLOCK A, PICCADILLYPARK SOUTH, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 73, OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA. LYING AND BE-ING IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to file a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Nicholas J. Youtz, McCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St., Suite 660, Orlando, FL32801 and file the origi-nal with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 9th day of October 2013.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTAs Clerk of the CourtBY: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05541502October 17, 2 4 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ENACTMENTOF ORDI-NANCE BYTHE CITYCOUNCILOF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDANOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that City Council Ordinance No. 2013-2040, which title hereinafter appears, will be considered for enactment on second and final reading by the City Council of the City of Lake City, Florida, at public hearing on Mon-day, November 4, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matters can be heard in the City Council Meeting Room, City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. Copy of said ordinance may be inspected by any member of the public at the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, during regular business hours. On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the ordinance.CITYCOUNCILORDINANCE NO. 2013-2040AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE CITYCODE TO ADD ANEWSECTION NUMBER 86-110.5 TO ARTICLE III, CHAP-TER 86, WHICH PROVIDES FOR THE PERMANENTCLOSING, VACATING AND ABANDONING OF THATPORTION OF HEDGE STREETLYING BETWEEN BLOCKS I AND J OF MELROSE PARK SUBDIVISION, ASUBDI-VISIONAS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 4 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA(HEREIN "MEL-ROSE PARK SUBDIVISION"), AND FOR THE PERMANENTCLOSING, VACATING AND ABANDONING OF THATPOR-TION OF COLBURN AVENUE LYING WESTOF AND CONTIG-UOUS TO LOTS 15, 16, 17, AND 18 OF BLOCK J OF MELROSE PARK SUBDIVISION; MAKING FINDINGS; AUTHORIZING THE CITYTO CONVEYBYQUIT-CLAIM DEEDS TO EACH RE-CORD TITLE OWNER THATPORTION OF HEDGE STREETAND COLBURN AVENUE WHICH ARE CLOSED, VACAT-ED AND ABANDONED TO THE CENTERLINE OF THE VACATED STREETS WHICH ABUTTHEIR RESPECTIVE PROPERTIES; RE-SERVING EASEMENTS FOR UTILITIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEALOF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION INTO THE CITYCODE; AND PROVIDING AN EF-FECTIVE DATE.The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice conLAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2007 Yamaha Vstar 650 With attached trike kit. 4,000 miles, many extras, excellent condition. $6,500 Call 386-984-0954 1999 Mercury Grand Marquis LS 63K actual mi., all power, N.A.D.A. Aug. 2013 $5,700 $4,295 Call 352-316-6958 Leave Message Legal cerning the matter will be published. All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans W ith Disabilities Act, if any accommodations are needed for persons with disabilities, please contact Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manager, 1-386-719-5768. AUDREYE. SIKES, MMC City Clerk Notice Published On: October 24, 2013 05541753 October 24, 2013 020 Lost & Found FOUND DOG, Off 216th in Suwannee County, tan & white, male. Call 386-935-1614. Leave message. STOLEN PURPLEHEART WWII.Residence on Polk Lane October 12th or 13th. If you have any info please call 386-752-0757 060 Services 05541520 Primary Care New Office Dr.Tohmina Begum, MD Board Certified Call: (386) 438-5255 05541658 SUNRISEHome Companions Under new managment. Accepting for new clients. Rates to fit your needs when a nursing home is not the right answer for you. 386-697-9617 or 386-963-5256 100 Job Opportunities Commercial Electrician with V alid Drivers License. Please Email resumes to joel.bellman@yahoo.com CUSTOMER SERVICE/ Sales, base ++ comm., business to business. Auto Parts Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC BPA Industrial Maintenance T echnician, Experience Required in Electrical, Controls and General Millwright/ Mechanical work. Experience in Hydraulics and Pneumatics helpful. Send resume to Maintenance Technician, 3631 US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055. Person to cut my nylon material for gun cases, bags, ect. 2nd person to attend gun shows on weekends to sell same product. Hafners 386-755-6481 PROJECTMGR. For repair/remodeling projects-prior experience/ construction background. Perm/Full time position. Competitive salary/incentive/ ins/401k/vac/sick/holidays/ mileage/cell/advancement/more! Lake City office. Fax resume to Restoration Specialists Fax (352) 732-8950 Attn: Scott Ambrose W AREHOUSE APPLY in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, Lake City, BPA 120 Medical Employment 05541681 MEDICALSECRETARY Must have Doctors office experience. Proficient in Microsoft Word. 50 WPM typing required. Email resume to mafaisalmd@gmail.com or fax 386-758-5987 ADMISSIONS & MARKETING ASST. 180 bed skilled and rehab facility is looking for a dynamic, positive and experienced candidate who will assist in working with all aspects of admissions and marketing. Must have experience in a long term SNF, familiar with regulatory and payor source requirements, demonstrate effective customer focused communications, high morale and positive environment. LPN/RN degree preferred. Contact: Suwannee Health Care Center Staff Development Office;1620 Helvenston Street, Live Oak, FL32064, Tel 386-362-7860 Mederi Caretenders now hiring an experienced Home Care RN for a Clinical Manager position in our Lake City office. Must have 1 year of home care experience. 401k, sick, personal, vacation, and health insurance offered with very competitive pay. Please bring a completed resume to 3593 NWDevane Street. 386-758-3312. P/TLPN needed for medical practice. 2-3 days a week. Send resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net. PTRN needed Monday and W ednesday 8-5. ACLS certified. Email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net 140 W ork Wanted LOOKING FOR a any kind of job, laborer. Will work any day, any time. Hard worker. 386-269-2063 240 Schools & Education 05541230 INTERESTED in a Medical Career? Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp Nursing Assistant, $479 next class10/28/2013 Phlebotomy national certification, $800 next class11/4/2013 LPN APRIL14, 2014 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310 Pets & Supplies FREE TO good home 2 female Chihuahuas V ery loving. would like them to go to same home. 386-243-8577 KITTENS FREE To good home, 8 wks & 3 mo, Also 3 adult female cats 386-243-8577 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 420 W anted to Buy WILLPAY cash for your mobile home, call Jason 386-288-8379 430 Garage Sales CUL-DE-SAC SALE Rolling Meadows Sub Division Fri 25th & Sat 26th 8:00am-4:00pm. Kids toys/games, plants, antiques, patio set, furniture, several comforters, name brand clothing/purses/shoes and much much more. Located 3 miles S of Hwy 90 off 247 at 252B follow pink signs. Moving Sale everything must go. Furniture, tools, clothes, electronics. 271 NWColquitt Way. Fri 25th & Sat 26th 8:00-? PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440 Miscellaneous 42 INCH rider mower fixer upper or for parts. $65 386-292-3927 AC WINDOW unit. W orks great 8000 BTU $85 386-292-3927 All wood toddler bed with mattress and drawer underneath, $60, Call 386-963-5126 CHESTFREEZER white, works great. $135. 386-292-3927 For sale beautiful used Upright piano with bench. xcellent condition. Call 386-754-0813 V AN SEAT, gray, 2000 Chevy 3600 $40 Call 386-963-5126 WHIRLPOOL FROST free refrigerator with ice maker 18 cf $175 386-292-3927 WHIRLPOOLWASHER & Dryer, in good shape $255 386-292-3927 WHITE WHIRLPOOL Dryer Guarunteed to run good $100 386-292-3927 520 Boats forSale 1992 17 W ahoo, center console, Y amaha 150 hp, one owner, well maintained, $6,700. 755-2235, 397-3500 or 752-0442 630 Mobile Homes forRent 14 WIDE 3br/2ba Quiet Park No Pets Clean Country Living $550 Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 2bd/1ba Country setting Branford area. $550 mth plus Security 386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, $700/mo 1st+last+dep requiredlocated in Ellisville. No pets.Contact 352-870-5144 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 MOVE IN Specials 2/1 MH $450 mo. 3/2 $550/mo. Only $350 + 1st mo. to m/in. Fast Approval 305-984-5511 Center of L.C. 640 Mobile Homes forSale 2002 HORTON Singlewide 2br/2ba only $9,900 Cash, Call Paula 386-628-2193 JUSTARRIVED 32x80 Repo. Plywood floors, fireplace, Glamour bath, appliances. Call 386-752-1452 or 386-628-2193 MLS 83522 Newly remodeled home, oversized screened in back porch, lg. open kitchen, $72,500, Century 21 Darby Rogers. HeatherCraig (386) 466-9223. 640 Mobile Homes forSale USED DOUBLEWIDE 28x70 only 5K Cash. Call Paula 386-628-2193 650 Mobile Home & Land FTWHITE!3BR/2BAcute mfg home w/1,248 SqFt on 2.11 acres ONLY$55,000 DANIELCRAPPS AGCYINC (386) 755-5110 #84644 MH on 4 acres. Need TLC, Lg. square ft and very private. MLS# 84500 Results Realty $35,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 2.5Plus acres on Lake Butler Lake (1,638 sq. ft.) 3BR/2BAMH, $99,000 MLS#84727 Swift Creek Realty 800-833-0499 Mini Farm on 2 acres, fenced w/water for livestock. 2BR/2BA MLS# 82569 Results Realty $45,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Ownerfinance 3/2 S. of Lake City. Clean. Small Down $650 mth.386-590-0642 & 867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710 Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 2 BR/1.5 BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and T imco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 2BR/1 BA, 1 car garage, W/D hook up, $535 month, no pets 1 month sec, 386-961-8075 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. W est side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/1BA. CLOSE to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 A LANDLORD Y ou Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 AMBERWOOD HILLS Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. W asher/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com GREENTREE TOWNHOUSE Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Nice Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bdrm. Kitchen, dining, LR $475. mo plus sec. Incld pest control. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 REDWINE APARTMENTS Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 WINDSOR ARMS Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720 Furnished Apts. ForRent ROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. W eekly or monthly rates. 1 person $145, 2 persons $155. weekly 386-752-5808 730 Unfurnished Home ForRent 3/2 Brick Home, 1300 sf on 1/2 acre lot. $895/mo & $870/sec. dep. Rent includes lawn service. No pets. Call Mike Foster at Accredited Real Estate Services 386-288-3596 or 386-719-5600 3BD/2BA, new paint and carpet, central a/c & heat, walk to VAand DOT. $975/mo 1st+last+$500 deposit. 386-243-8043 LARGE 1BD/1BA, Highway 41 South, $500/Month, $250 Deposit, No pets 758-0057 750 Business & Office Rentals 05541069 17,000 SQ FT+ WAREHOUSE 7 Acres of Land Rent $1,500 mo. T om Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor Oakbridge Office Complex Professional Office Available 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805 Lots forSale 1 acre3 Rivers.Beautifully wooded! Owner finance, no down. $14,900. $153/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 14.69 Acre Tract off Lake Jeffrey Road, Ready for site built or MH, MLS# 82567 Results Realty $65,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Rolling Pasture Land w/oaks, Suitable for horses & cows. 10 ac. of coastal bermuda hay. MLS 84920 $169,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals 4 acres $11,500 addtl. 4 ac. Only $20,500 high & dry, ready for site built or M.H. MLS 79029 Jackie Taylor 386-397-3479 Jackie Taylor& Associates 805 Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810 Home forSale 3BR/2BABrick, 1,524 sq. ft., 2 car garage., Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty Nell orHansel Holton $139,000, 386-984-5791 MLS #85045 3BR/2BAWfamily room., fenced yard, screened back porch with fruit trees, MLS 84558 $84,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2BA, laminate floors, granite countertops, Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst $132,000 386-965-0887 MLS #84108 3BR/3.5BAon Lake Jeffrey in W oodborough, Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst $419,000 386-965-0887 MLS #84294 5.66 Acre Country Home, 4 BR/2BA, surrounded by beautiful scenic land. $229,900 Jo Lytte MLS 83810 Remax Professionals 386-365-2821 B eautiful home w/all the bells & whistles, pool, hickory floors, granite in baths. $239,900 MLS #84384 Remax Professionals 386-344-0433 Sandy Kishton Brand New Home in Mayfair S/D, 3BR/2BA, split, great room, Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar, $171,900 386-365-1548 MLS #83413 Cedar Log on 11 acres, beautiful oak floors, Mint condition. MLS 82827 $349,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 C ustom Built, bonus room., mini workshop, Must see to believe. $320,000 MLS #85025 Remax Professionals 386-344-0433 Sandy Kishton Enormous Home, 5BR/2BA, w/lg. attached in-law apt., wrap around porch, 10 acres. $389,000 Jo L ytte MLS 82964 Remax Professionals 386-365-2821 IMMACULATE 4BR/2BAbrick home at end of cul-de-sac in city! Lg family rm, fenced yd $129,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGCYINC (386) 755-5110 #85005 Large open kitchen overlooks great rm in this 3BR/2BAin Cypress Landing $120,000 DANIELCRAPPSAGCYINC. (386) 755-5110 #79633 Cedar/Stone Home, fabulous view, 2 wood burning FP. Freshly updated, so much to offer. MLS 80893 $284,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals 16 ac. & Lg. Custom home, move in cond., oaks, rolling pasture, pole barn, horse stalls. MLS 82952 $325,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Arthur Rutenberg floor plan, built by Bryan Zecher, spacious & innovative design. MLS 85059 $239,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Commerical, Lee Fla (1,800 sq. ft.) AMust See $99,900 MLS 79136 Poole Realty, Ric Donovan 386-590-1298 2,800 PLUSsq. ft. 4BR/2BA located on 1.37 ac. In Live Oak MLS 82214 $49,995 Poole Realty 386-362-4539 Home on 6 ac. fenced & cross fenced. 3BR/2BA. Detached workshop w/apt. 2nd floor. Pool. MLS 82495 $165,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Custom Built Pool Home! 3BR/2BA, 2,161 sq.ft., $279,000 #MLS 82646 35 Acres w/3,000+sq.ft. 4BR/3.5 BARanch styled, mature pecan orchard. $400,000 MLS 82968 Poole Realty, David Mincey 386-590-0157 3BR/2BARanch, Branford, great room, lg. den., entertainment porch, so many extras MLS 83172 Jackie Taylor& Associates Sabrina Suggs 386-854-0686 MLS 84398 Move in ready, Open floor plan. Split BR. Amust see $109,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 810 Home forSale Mini Farm in McAlpine, 4BR/3BAcustom brick on 20.18 ac., $295,000 MLS83692 Jackie Taylor& Associates Sabrina Suggs 386-854-0686 Beautiful homeon over 2 acres, 3BR/3BA, 2 FPs, very unique master suite, MLS 83793 Jackie Taylor&Associates Sabrina Suggs, 386-854-0686 MLS 84094 Lovely, peaceful, outside city, lg. kitchen, huge granddaddy oaks, totally fenced. $239,500 Century 21Darby Rogers 752-6575 4BR/2.5(1/2 ac.) 2,250 sq.ft., great neighborhood. $179,900 MLS#84429 Swift Creek Realty 800-833-0499 T raditional2Story (3,000 sq.ft.) great shape, built in 1937. MLS 84457 $325,000 Poole Realty, Ronnie Poole 386-208-3175 Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Lots of Space in town! 3BR/2BA, 2,123 sq.ft. $92,000 #MLS 84507 Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Reduced! Great Home! 3BR/2BA, 1,445 sq.ft. $159,900 #MLS 84610 MLS 84668 Gorgeous Log Home on 20 acres, lrg. screened porch, open island kitch. $290,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers. HeatherCraig (386) 466-9223 MLS 84683 Price Reduced, Remodeled Tri Level home, 2 Master Suites, $199,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers. HeatherCraig (386) 466-9223 Custom Built 3BR/2.5BAon 1.2 ac., custom kitchen cabinets, FP, $239,900 MLS 84686 Jackie Taylor& Associates Jackie Taylor 386-397-4379 MLS 84713 Split Bedrooms, kitchen & baths have granite counters, Landscaping galore.$162,500 Century 21 Darby Rogers 386-752-6575 2,200 SQ.ft. w/split floor plan, hardwood carpet & tile floors on 15 acres w/planted pines. $289,000 MLS 84871 Poole Realty, Nelda Hatcher 386-688-8067 3/2 on 4.67 acres, privacy & peaceful MLS 84880 Poole Realty,Kellie Shirah 386-208-3847 Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Lake Access Community! 3BR/2.5BA, 2,345 sq.ft., $249,000 #MLS 84951 MLS 84964 Gorgeous 2 Story, Lake front in Woodborough, 4/3+Bonus Rm., extras, Must See. $490,000 Century 21Darby Rogers 752-6575 3BR/3BALog Cabin (3,000 sq.ft.) custom cabinets, granite counters, lg. pool & so much more. $275,000 MLS#85039 Swift Creek Realty 800-833-0499 MLS 85072 (2) Master Suites, lots of closets, 3 full BA, Lg. great room. $165,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 85138 Beautiful well maintained w/in ground pool. Lg. screened porch over looking pool. $225,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 755-6575 Cute, affordable 2.5 acres. Building used as beauty salon, full kitchen & BA. $56,900 MLS 85156 Jackie Taylor 386-3973479 Jackie Taylor& Associates Just Reduced! 4BR brick home in Forest Country. Lots of space & 5 yr. old roof $155,000 Ron Feagle (386)288-2901 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#83403 QUIETNEIGHBORHOOD with 3BR 2BAaffordable family home for only $75,000 Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#84162 All Brick, Rolling Meadows S/D. 4BR/3BA, formal LR, Dining & office. MLS 84264 $195,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals 3BR 2BAbrick home with fireplace, renovated kitch. on 11 beautiful acres $210,000! Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#85137 Fabulous 4/3 brick home in town with new roof, lrg. screened back porch and office. $219,500 Janet Creel (386)719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#85271 Quality remodeled 2BR/2BAconc blk home w/1,040 SqFt, beautiful interior, $54,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGCYINC (386) 755-5110 #84593 Rustic Log Cabin, 2BR/1BA, Pole Barn, Great hunting getaway, over 18 acres, $94,999 Jo Lytte MLS 81761 Remax Professionals 386-365-2821 Solid Brick, 3BR/2BA, great room, kitchen w/bar. $185,000 MLS #85098 Remax Professionals 386-344-0433 Sandy Kishton 810 Home forSale Spectacular home, 1649 sq.ft. in ground pool, open floor plan. MLS 82395 $149,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Super Location Brick on one acre lot, 3BR/2BA, 1,725 sq. ft., Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar, $114,000 386-365-1548 MLS #83605 SUWANNEE RIVERFRONTAGE! 3BR/2BAw/2,056 SqFt on 1+ acre ONLY$139,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGCYINC (386) 755-5110 #82132 T urn of Century, Vintage qualities, three fireplaces, 4BR/3BA, Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Sherry $79,900 Sold As Is 386-365-8414 MLS #84235 WOODHAVEN! 3BR/2BAbrick home on 1 acre w/lots of updates MUSTSEE! $128,000 DANIELCRAPPS AGCYINC (386) 755-5110 #84875 820 Farms & Acreage 10 ACRES with w/ss/pp. Owner financed, low down payment Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830 Commercial Property HUGE 18,000HEATED SQ. FT. W arehouse and Office on 1.73 acres. $770,000 Janet Creel (386) 719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#80479 Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Motel for Sale! Fmr. Red Carpet Inn, 60 Rooms. Lake City, $350,000 #MLS 83278 Pam Beauchamp Team 386-303-2505 Great Office Location! US 90 Frontage, 1,351 sq.ft. $239,000 #MLS 84592 Reduced! Perfect home-office on SWMain Blvd., many other uses, 1,900 sf, $89,500 Janet Creel 386-719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate MLS#81207 RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter 755-5440 To place your classified ad call

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. MINIMAL INVASIVE SURGERY, HYSTERECTOMY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING, PAP SMEAR BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS $70 BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL $70 NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $70 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD M. FODA, MD CHRIS RHODEN, CNM PADI SUTHERLAND, ARNP, CNM 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Formerly Boyette Plumbing Full Service Plumbing Commercial & Residential Over 25 years experience 386-752-0776 Senior citizen and Military discount CFC1428686 Backow prevention (Installation and Certication) New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires October 31, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP 2 6 6 8 N E B A S C O M N O R R I S D R I V E ( 3 8 6 ) 7 1 9 2 4 2 4 K I D S E A T F R E E F R I D A Y S 5 : 0 0 P M 8 : 0 0 P M R e s t r i c t i o n s A p p l y SOCCER: Lady Indians in big district Continued From Page 1B needing to win both games to finish as the runner-up. The good news is, the Tigers should have a full bag of players at their dis posal the rest of the way with the possible exception of running back Lonnie Underwood, who is still nursing a hip flexor. Jake Thomas is back after being released with a shoulder injury, Allen said. The quarterback is in the bag. Were in a good situation with two in the position. Were not going to make any changes, but its a good situation of hav ing him if the call of duty presents itself. The biggest boost for the Tigers will be having Marshall, their senior lead er and Florida State com mitment, back on defense. Trey Marshall will be back, so thats good, Allen said. We want him back to form and thatll be a big boost in itself. And Allen said Marshall wont be on any specialized snap count despite it being his first game back. Hes starter, Allen said. Getting back in shape is the biggest thing. Hes practiced for two weeks. The mindset is to get him back to it. He feels good, looks good. The best treat ment for him is to get after it to where he feels confi dent. Well go as normal until the game is underway. Well pull him the same as any other contest based on a blowout or tight game unless we see something. Underwood remains in question to play this Friday, but Allen said the key is having him healthy for the playoffs. He doesnt want to risk making the injury more severe in a game he expects the Tigers to con trol. Lonnie (Underwood) is pretty much day-to-day, Allen said. Im looking at him when he ran, he wasnt back to himself yet. Especially with a game not being a major push, we dont want to discount them, but if we play close to our caliber, it should be another victory. Were not going to push the issue a bunch. We dont want him in the game if hes not 100 percent. Its not imperative that hes back this week. Well watch and monitor him. Allen said that although Underwood could proba bly play if it were a playoff game, he noticed that he wasnt himself in practice. When we did our beast, he wasnt where he was before he left off running, Allen said. Well go from there. We have two or three that we pulled up and we also have (Kemario) Bell and (Darian) Dallas. My mind is having him for postseason rather than these matchups the last two weeks. Still, Allen said its very important to go out and win these last two games so that the Tigers arent sitting at home when the playoffs roll out. Two wins would send Columbia on the road for the opening round against District 4-6A champion St. Augustine High. The Tigers wont be mathematically eliminated even with one loss over the next two weeks, but two wins would clinch the runner-up spot with a win already against Orange Park High. Orange Park and Middleburg current ly have two losses in the district. Again, we will deter mine what we do, Allen said. Well determine whether were playing with eight wins and hunting or fishing. Were putting in the same work as we do every game. Were get ting them prepared and we have to come out and play. Two more wins and well get St. Augustine at their place. A win there, and we get a chance to play Ed White at their place with a chance at redemption. son as head coach of the Lady Indians. He led Fort White to the playoffs in 2007-09, but the big dis tricts have caught up with the program. Other than P.K. we are the smallest school in the district, Sauls said. Fort White has been hit from another front, that of players leaving the program because of dual enrollment. We were expecting 17 returning players and seven came back, Sauls said. I counted up and we lost at least 25 years of experience with the ones not coming back. Kids go to school to get an education. If you had the opportunity to get col lege classes for free, what would you do? Sauls said his returning players are pretty solid, but the district looks tough er on paper. Fort White was 2-9-3 in district play last year. Keystone Heights was district champion last year and Santa Fe was runnerup. Both were knocked out of the playoffs by Trinity Catholic High, Keystone Heights after beating Crystal River in the first round. P.K. Yonge did not make the playoffs after seven consecutive years. Eastside dropped down a class where it was dis trict champion last year in 5-3A. The Rams lost to Citrus High in the first play off game. Eastside has 18 playoff appearances, while Keystone Heights and Santa Fe are next with 12 each. After games Monday and next Saturday, the Lady Indians will play double headers with the boys. CHS: Health there, now need wins Continued From Page 1B BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Fort White High head coach Perry Sauls (middle) is joined by captains Kasey Blanchard (left) and Ayla Gonzalez.