The Lake City reporter

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02164

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By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.com A pipeline proposed to run under the Ichetucknee River won’t be coming to Columbia County after the company building it sided with locals on the fragility of the environment. Florida Power and Light Co. contracted Sabal Trail Transmission LLC to construct the northern end of a natural gas pipeline that will run 700 miles from western Alabama to FPL’s Martin County plant. Originally, the route would have cut through the southwest portion of Columbia County, weaving under the Ichetucknee River. However, conservation groups worried that an accidental fracture in the area’s karst topography — a limestone region with underground drainage and passages caused by the dissolution of rock — could cause a change in water flow to the Ichetucknee. “We were concerned that if the company didn’t dig deep enough under the Ichetucknee River, they could somehow By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comThe City Council intends to discuss the combined communication center for emergency dispatch, and possibly the unification of city and county fire services at a Tuesday night meeting in City Hall. Recent talks between city and county offi-cials indicate a renewed inter-est in a com-bined commu-nication center. Currently, calls to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, Lake City Fire Department, emergency medi-cal services and Columbia County Fire and Rescue are taken through one dispatch center while calls to the Lake City Police Department are sent to another. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comJerry James Jackson Jr. was convicted of two counts of vehicu-lar homicide in the 2010 deaths of Ricky J. Groover and Christopher James Ratliff Friday afternoon in circuit court. A Columbia County jury of four women and two men deliberated less than an hour before return-ing the guilty verdicts. Jackson, 36, was facing two counts of vehicular homicide and failing to render aid or provide information in connection with a fatal wreck that occurred Oct. 7, 2010. Ratliff, a front seat passenger in Jackson’s vehicle, and Ricky J. Groover, driver of the other vehicle, were killed in the crash. A sentencing hearing for Jackson by Third Circuit Judge Julian Collins has not yet been scheduled. Jackson showed no emotion as the verdicts were read. Jackson was convicted of one count of vehicular homicide in the death of Groover and leaving the scene of the crash involving fatalities. The maximum sentence for that crime is 30 years. Jackson was also convicted of vehicular homicide in the death of Ratliff and could receive a maximum sentence of 15 years for the offense. Ralph Deas, Jackson’s attorney, offered a few comments fol-lowing the jury’s verdict. “We honor and respect what the jury had to say,” he said as he made his way out of the court-room. “They sat patiently and listened to all the evidence, they listened to the arguments and this is their verdict.” CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 TODAY IN PEOPLE Medical center makes donation. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A People.................. 2AOpinion ................ 4AObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 2B, 3B 92 72 T-storm Chance WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Resurfacingof US 90 tobegin Wed. Local Altrusanscheck out winterin New Zealand. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 139, No. 154 1D 6A 1AMID-COURSE CORRECTION GAS PIPELINE TO BE REROUTED Man faces up to 45years in prison for wreck that killed 2.Guilty verdict in fatal crash case City council will also consider plan to unify emergency dispatch. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterJackson at defense table Wednesday. Councilto weigh offer tounify fireservices JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterABOVE: Visitors at play at Ichetucknee Springs earlier this sum mer. BELOW: The former proposed route of a natural gas pipeline (in red) that was to run beneath the Ichetucknee River. The new route has not been determined, but will run west of the Ichetucknee, o fficials say.New route won’t pass beneath Ichetucknee Construction company now looking to build line west of sensitive springs basin. GUILTY continued on 3A Witt Johnson Federal cuts restrict food for familiesBy STEVEN RICHMONDsrichmond@lakecityreporter.comFamilies on food stamps may have to tighten their belts if Congress votes to reduce fund-ing for food assistance programs when they return to the Capitol this month. The effect will be acutely felt here. “The amount of people coming in for food is accelerating faster than the federal assistance,” said Suzanne Edwards, chief operat-ing officer of Catholic Charities of Lake City. “There are fewer grants to write, and we’re having to look for more creative ways to get food to people.” Florida Gateway Food Bank of COUNCIL continued on 7A PIPELINE continued on 3ACOURTESYFOOD continued on 7A

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actor George Maharis (Route 66) is 84. Conductor Seiji Ozawa is 77. Attorney and law professor Alan Dershowitz is 74. Comedian-actress Lily Tomlin is 73. Singer Archie Bell of Archie Bell and the Drells is 68. Singer Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees is 66. Drummer Greg Errico of Sly and the Family Stone is 64. Talk-show host Dr. Phil McGraw is 62. Radio personality and actor Phil Hendrie is 60. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 7-17-41-42 17 Friday: 5-13-19-31-35 Saturday: Afternoon: 3-7-0 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 5-8-9-0 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 3-9-11-21-24-49 x3 Grave excavation begins at reform school site MARIANNA University of South Florida researchers began exhuming dozens of graves Saturday at a former Panhandle reform school where horrific beat ings have been reported in hopes of identifying the boys and learning how they died. The digging and work at the site will continue until Tuesday, with research ers hoping to unearth the remains of four to six boys before resuming at a later date, said Erin Kimmerle, the USF anthropologist leading the excavation. After work began Saturday, relatives of one of the boys believed to be buried at the school held a private prayer at the grave sites. The family has provided DNA in hopes of finding a match with Robert Stephens. School records show he was fatally stabbed by another inmate in 1937, but his family hopes to confirm how he actually died. If his remains are found, his family says they will be reburied in a family plot in Quincy. That will be a great sense of homecoming, Tananarive Due said. The boy was Dues greatuncle. She was at the site Saturday with her son, father and husband, and said she hopes that other families will also be able to locate relatives buried there. Their families never had a proper opportunity to say goodbye to their loved ones. In a lot of cases children just disap peared, said Due, who lives in Atlanta. Former inmates at the reform school from the 1950s and 1960s have detailed horrific beatings in a small, white concrete block building at the facil ity. In 2010, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement ended an investigation and said it could not substantiate or refute claims that boys died at the hands of staff. Suspended mayor seeks re-election MIAMI The mayor of Homestead was sus pended from office after being arrested earlier this week, but that wont keep him from running for reelection. City records show that 58-year-old Steve Bateman has filed his paperwork to run in the November elec tion. The filing deadline was Friday. Bateman was arrested on corruption charges Wednesday. The investiga tion centers on Batemans $125-an-hour gig with Community Health of South Florida Inc. The company was seek ing approval from the Homestead city council to expand. Authorities say Bateman never disclosed his con sulting work. They also say Bateman sought county approval for sewer improvements for the health clinic without dis closing his job with the company. Charges filed, trooper fired WEST PALM BEACH A veteran Florida state trooper has been dismissed after Palm Beach County prosecu tors charged him with a $200,000 theft involving a side business he ran. Florida Highway Patrol officials told The Palm Beach Post that 50-yearold Robert Purser was fired Wednesday, the same day charges were filed. Court records show Purser is free on bail but do not list an attorney for him. Purser had been with FHP since 1990. Prosecutors say Pursers side business provided off-duty troopers for a Hialeah construction com pany. The off-duty troopers would close roads while maintenance was being done on Florida East Coast Railroad tracks. A court affidavit says Purser allegedly overbilled the Hialeah company, claimed hours worked when troopers werent there and overstated the number of troopers at some sites. Dog owner guilty in fatal mauling PANAMA CITY Jurors have found a Florida Panhandle man guilty of manslaughter after his 7-year-old neigh bor was mauled by his dogs. It took the jury about two hours Thursday to return the verdict against Edward Daniels. The News Herald of Panama City reports jurors found that Daniels neglected to contain his dogs on the day they got loose. He was found not guilty of tampering with evidence for washing blood from one of the dogs after the attack. Daniels testified he didnt know what had hap pened when he washed the blood off that day. Tyler Jett died in April, a week after he was attacked by two dogs while riding his bicycle. Daniels, who has no previous criminal history, faces 15 years in prison when hes sentenced. Talking parrot taken in burglary MIAMI Call it the case of the purloined par rot. Police in Miami-Dade County are asking local residents to be on the lookout for a talking parrot that was recently stolen during a burglary. NEW YORK F ox News Channels Bill OReilly has apologized for incorrectly stating that no Republicans were invited to participate in a ceremo ny this week marking the 50th anni versary of the March on Washington for civil rights and Martin Luther King Jr.s I Have a Dream speech. In fact, Republican House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor were invited but did not attend. Former President George W. Bush sent a statement in commemo ration. OReilly had made the incor rect claim on Wednesday, the day of the ceremony. The mistake entirely on me, OReilly said on his show Thursday. I simply assumed that since all the speakers were liberal Democrats, Republicans had been excluded. So heres the tip of the day: Always check out the facts before you make a definitive statement and when you make a mistake, admit it. OReilly said the Republicans made a mistake, too. He said they should have been there. Filner ends tenure as San Diego mayor SAN DIEGO Bob Filner ended his brief but tumultuous tenure as mayor Friday amid allegations that he sexually harassed women, making no public appearances on a final day that came one week after a defiant farewell speech in which the onetime civil rights activist called himself the victim of a lynch mob. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria said Filners last act as mayor was to halt a controversial remodeling of a neighborhood Jack in the Box restaurant. Gloria immediately overturned the decision, saying it exposed the city to litigation. The former 10-term congressman kept a low profile on last final day, ceding media attention to a mock celebration by accusers who gave him several parting gifts, including a mirror that attorney Gloria Allred said he can look at when asking whos to blame for his resignation. Employees in the City Hall lobby said they didnt see the 70-year-old mayor on his last day. An office receptionist had no comment. The citys first Democratic leader in 20 years turned into a virtual noshow after allegations surfaced last month that he sexually harassed women. Liberace mansion buyer plans to restore LAS VEGAS The British busi nessman who bought Liberaces 15,000-square-foot Las Vegas man sion for half a million dollars said Friday he plans to work on it relent lessly to restore it to its former glory. Martyn Ravenhill told The Associated Press from his home in Guilford, where hes preparing to celebrate his 50th birthday on Saturday, that hes been a huge Liberace fan all his life as well as a lover of Las Vegas. When you live in England and it rains every day, somewhere like Las Vegas seems quite magical, Ravenhill said. A bit like Santa Claus. He says he was looking at Liberace videos on YouTube when the video sharing site suggested a clip about the mansion in reposses sion and foreclosure. It seems such a shock to see these videos of the sad state of the Liberace mansion, Ravenhill said. He called real estate agent Brad Wolfe to inquire about purchasing the property. Foxs OReilly apologizes for false claim Wednes day: 6-7-9-19-32 PB 13 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Come, let us bow down in wor ship, let us kneel before the Lord our Maker; for he is our God and we are the people of his pasture, the flock under his care. Today, if only you would hear his voice. Psalm 95:6-7 AMANDA WILLIAMSON / Lake City Reporter Trouble-free throwing What I like about bowling is you can throw something and not get in trouble, said Robbie Wood, 10, at the Lake City Bowl Saturday. Robbie and his family went to the local bowling alley to celebrate his birthday. Associated Press Associated Press AMANDA WILLIAMSON / Lake City Reporter Donation to help parents Lake City Medical Center donated $4,000 to the Columbia County School District to help fund a mobile phone app that will enable parents to stay up to date on their childrens school. Shown during the check presentation at the School Board meeting Tuesday are (from left) School Superintendent Terry Huddleston, medical center chief nursing officer Rick Naegler, medical center CEO Mark Robinson and School Board chairman Steve Nelson.

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dislodge the rivers floor, draining it or forever alter ing its path, said Michael Foret, chairman of Three Rivers Estates Property Owners (TREPO). The original study cor ridor crossed Three Rivers Estates, a neighborhood near the Ichetucknee. Sabal Trail would have acquired a permanent easement to the first 50 feet of property owners on Central Boulevard in Three Rivers Estates. According to emails from Foret, for most owners this meant simply losing a well or a fence, but to some it meant losing a home. While I believe strongly in U.S. gas as an alterna tive to foreign oil, there was not enough informa tion presented to the neighborhood about the safety of drilling under the Ichetucknee, said Glenn Hunter, vice chairman of the TREPO. The fact that they would go west to bypass the Ichetucknee is a blessing. Ichetucknee Alliance president John Jopling also cited numerous concerns with the pro posed plan, including the obvious issue of pipeline accidents. A partner with TREPO, Jopling was concerned with the drill accidentally damaging the underground caverns that comprise the Ichetucknee Springs Basin. We could have lost most or all of the Ichetucknee from one mistake in how they dig underneath it, he said. You could have the Ichetucknee dry up over night. But Jopling praised Sabal Trail and its parent company, Spectra Energy, for listening to the com munities concerns, say ing the organizations are definitely moving in the right direction. The Ichetucknee Alliance is still taking a wait-andsee attitude on the new route, unsure whether or not it would be more environmentally sound to push the pipeline farther west. Foret has been fight ing alongside the Ichetucknee Alliance, County Commisser Rusty DePratter and local citi zens to stop the project in the area. Since the proj ect started, Foret has worked to keep an open dialogue with Sabal Trail and Spectra Energy. On Thursday, he finally met with the companys repre sentatives to see the new study corridor. The alternative route moves about three to four miles west of the Ichetucknee, leaving Columbia County entirely. The line may still run underneath the Santa Fe River because of a prec edent established by an existing pipeline already under the Santa Fe. According to Sabal Trail spokesperson Andrea Grover, investigations revealed the effects to stakeholders and the envi ronment could be mini mized by moving the trail to the west. The next step for the company is to actu ally start surveying the land, which allows them to better understand the environmental concerns and impacts. Sabal Trail will start contacting land owners in the new corri dor to request permission to survey the area. The alternative route is still not a finalized plan. Although the company still has to cross the Santa Fe River, Grover said a horizontal directional drill will be used to ensure the line runs under the rivers bed. Were really excited to have the pipeline not come across the Ichetucknee, said John Kuykendall, president of the Ichetucknee Partnership. Weve done so much to preserve it and educate the public about how important it is... The Ichetucknee has been a part of this com munity forever, and wed like to preserve that for future generations. Kuykendall added that he felt the pipeline itself was a good project, but not when it slices through one of the areas impor tant natural springs. County Manager Dale Williams said DePratter tirelessly aided the conservation efforts within his district. Both DePratter and Williams seemed happy that the company announced they would avoid the Ichetucknee Spring Basin, especially since the pipe line is such a major proj ect. It was no small feat to have them reconsider the route, Williams said. Companies doing these types of projects basically have the same power that the government has. He added that he believed the river defined the Columbia County region. You can be in Canada, he said, and they wont know where Lake City or Columbia County is. But I can tell you they will know where the Ichetucknee is. Deas said he hasnt discussed with his client whether to appeal. We havent discussed that in full and while we are disappointed with the outcome, Mr. Jackson and I will determine what to do before the sentencing, he said. After the jurys verdict was read by the clerk, Deas polled each of the jurors and then Collins excused the jury. Ratliffs family members hugged one another before the courtroom cleared, while Groovers family members went to the state attorneys office. Im very happy with the verdicts, said Rachel Hodgson, Ratliffs sister. Hodgson said shes only missed one day of the trial and she and her family are pleased with the way things turned out. She said she and her family also plan to attend Jacksons sentenc ing hearing. Ratliffs mother, Ruth Tillman, walked with Hodgson and other fam ily members and friends as they headed to their vehicles Friday afternoon when court ended. She also seemed to be relieved that a guilty verdict was returned. I was very pleased with the verdict, said Tillman. I think the state did a great job. Well be waiting for the sentencing. Weve been waiting three years for this day. Groovers family mem bers declined comment. Roberta Getzan, the assistant state attorney who prosecuted the case, said she was happy with the verdicts. We believe that the evi dence was there for the jury to find as such and were glad the jury returned a verdict as charged, she said. Getzan and other mem bers of the state attor neys office staff spoke to Groovers and Ratliffs fam ily members after Fridays proceedings, as both fami lies prepared for the next step in the legal process the sentencing hearing. A (guilty) verdict allows them a small amount of closure, Getzan said. Of course, theyre looking for ward to sentencing to see what Judge Collins decides is the appropriate sentence, but they are glad to see the verdict from the jury. They were gratified with it. We (the state attorneys office) want to thank the Florida Highway Patrol for their work in this case, Getzan continued. Through all of their efforts they were very professional and we were just very glad with the dignified manner in which both victims fami lies, Christopher Ratliffs family and Ricky Groovers family, handled themselves throughout the proceed ings. They put their trust in the judicial system and they feel the judicial sys tem has worked for them. Other charges from the case are pending. There is still a count of driving on a suspended license that remains pend ing this decision, Getzan said. The defense request ed that charge be severed, so it was not tried in this trial. It remains to be dis posed of at a later time. Fridays court proceed ings began with closing arguments by Getzan, who told the jury that Jackson drove his Jeep in a reckless manner and caused the crash. We know at the time of impact hes doing 72 mph..., she said, speaking of FHP physical evidence collected at the scene, Jackson lying in a ditch all night and calling his moth er to pick him up the day following the wreck. All those facts the state sub mits to you is reckless. The defendant oper ated the vehicle in a man ner likely to cause death, Getzan continued. He cre ated those actions. It was so fast he didnt have time to apply the brakes, thats how fast he was going. Deas countered with closing arguments that last ed more than an hour, as he methodically addressed each of the charges and Getzans take on the evi dence. He said the crash that took the lives of Groover and Ratliff was an accident. There is no doubt an accident occurred, but it was an accident, Deas said. It was an accident that left a lot of lives in shambles and a lot of ques tions because it was an accident. You cant make a crime out of an accident... Theres guesswork here. Why is there guesswork because its an accident. Getzan followed with a 30-minute response before resting and Collins recessed the court for lunch. When court resumed he gave the jury instructions and deliberations began approximately 1:05 p.m. The jury sent word it had reached its verdict at 2:01. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 3A 3A HUGE SELECTION OF MOTORHOMES, TRAVEL TRAILERS & 5TH WHEELS Factory Reps Available! On-Site Financing! JUST OFF HWY. 90 IN LAKE CITY EVERY RV PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE! COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS Aug 22nd-Sept 1st 9am-6pm THE NORTH FLORIDA RV SHOW & SALE! FREE Admission! FREE Parking! 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL (Next to Courthouse) PIPELINE: Ichetucknee to be avoided Continued From Page 1A GUILTY: Local man faces up to 45 years in prison for vehicular manslaughter Continued From Page 1A By STEVEN RICHMOND srichmond@lakecityreporter.com U.S. Rep. Ted Yoho, RGainesville, released a public statement Thursday detailing his opposition to the possible use of military action in Syria. The Founding Fathers never intended an act of war to be conducted without the consent of Congress, Yoho said in his release. If we are are to engage in military aid or action in Syria, we are engaging in an act of war against a sover eign nation. Yoho, whose district includes Lake City, said the violence in Syria was deplor able, but felt he must listen to the countless Americans and constituents who have pleaded with both my colleagues and me in Congress to not engage. A report from the British Joint Intelligence Organization said there is a limited but grow ing body of intelligence that the Syrian government led by Bashar al-Assad was responsible for an Aug. 21 chemical attack that took the lives of approxi mately 350 Syrians. President Barack Obama said that if Syria crossed a red line and used weapons of mass destruction, chemical included, it would change his calculus, implying that military interven tion would be considered. The 1973 War Powers Resolution gives the president authority to execute military action abroad without congres sional consent. However, it also stipulates that the president has 90 days to receive congressional permis sion for such action. The resolution stipulates that the president consult with mem bers of Congress at least 48 hours before military action is taken. Obama has already moved several warships into the Mediterranean. However, the president said Saturday that he would not authorize military action without the approval of Congress. Yoho Yoho: No strike on Syria without Congresss OK The fact that they would go west to bypass the Ichetucknee is a blessing. Glenn Hunter, vice chairman, Three Rivers Estates Property Owners

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C ompiling lists of defec-tive Chinese-made prod-ucts has become almost a cottage industry on the internet -defective or tainted paint, medicine, pet food, toothpaste, baby formula, toys, sea-food, vitamins, food additives and tires. Unlike harmful products, China through no fault of its own is earthquake prone. But China is a big country and the chances of any individual being affected are statistically very low, which is what they told the people in Washington, D.C., until an earthquake cracked the Washington Monument, which is still shrouded and closed for repairs. By the way, there was an earthquake in Thursday and Friday in Yunnan that damaged or collapsed over 13,000 houses. That’s why the news that China, in its quest for superlatives, is planning to take only four months next year to erect the world’s tallest skyscraper, the 2,740-foot “Sky City.” Work has already begun on the foundation for the 202-story building. The builders hope to achieve the quick construction by using prefab-ricated parts build offsite and then snapped into place, rather like giant Legos. The very top floors would house a hotel while the rest of the building would be apartments, priced by altitude. From floors 121 to 170 the apartments would range from 2,592 square feet to 5,6l6 square feet, decreasing in size until floors 16 to 30 with 648 square foot apart-ments. The 20th floor might not be a prestigious address but at least you would have a fighting chance of making it home if the elevators went out. The Chinese have become hypercompetitive with the Persian Gulf when it comes to skyscrapers. Sky City may hold the title for world’s tallest building for only five years, until Saudi Arabia finishes the Kingdom Tower, which is to be 532 feet higher. One the dead hand of Mao-style socialism was removed, Chinese real estate entrepreneurs took to construction superlatives – tallest, biggest, most luxurious – with a vengeance, fueled by cheap loans from government funded banks. Now second thoughts and fears of a real estate bubble have crept in. The Communist Party newspaper, the People’s Daily, griped that, “The vanity of some local government officials has determined the sky-lines of cities.” The Daily noted acidly that the Empire State Building, which took just over a year to build, took about two decades to fill with ten-ants and become a commercial success.Sabal Trails Transmission has chosen to reroute a proposed natural gas pipeline around the Ichetucknee River and away from that delicate ecosystem. It was a wise choice.Natural gas is a good, clean source of energy, and the trans-state pipeline, which Sabal plans to build on behalf of Florida Power and Light, will serve Floridians well. However, we saw no benefit to burying a 36-inch pipe carrying combustible gas directly beneath one of the most beautiful places on earth – and a major economic driver for the region to boot. People generally don’t want these kinds of things in their back yards, but in this case, our back yard is, indeed, someplace special. We are currently wrangling with other regions over our share of $10 million the Legislature has allocated for springs resto-ration statewide. The last thing we needed was yet another obstacle to preserving the crown jewel of North Central Florida. We applaud Sabal Transmission for recognizing that a small, mid-course correction was in order to set things right. There is still a question, of course, over whether the new, yet-to-be-determined route will be far enough from the Ichetucknee to alleviate everyone’s concerns. Along with the Ichetucknee Alliance, we’ll take a wait-and-see attitude just to be safe. Still, things are far brighter than they were just weeks ago. We also applaud Three Rivers Estates Property Owners, whose members did their homework, made their case, and let their voices be heard on the matter. Finally, County Commissioner Rusty DePratter played an invaluable role, by all accounts, in brokering this compromise. Kudos to him as well.All in all, a good example of local folks working together – and with the larger cor-porate community – to preserve the natural beauty of our home. And all without stifling the ever-present need for energy, commerce and growth. O ne potential benefit that can come from the recent March on Washington, which commemorated the 1963 civil-rights event, is a hard look at the various data comparing the current state of affairs for black America and rest of the country. For many, it has been an eyeopener to see how little progress has been made over the last 50 years in closing the economic gap between blacks and whites. I call shining light on the data a “potential” benefit, because there won’t be any benefit without real remedial action to improve the state of affairs. According to a recent Pew Research Center report, the gap in median household income between blacks and whites grew from about $19,000 in 1967 to about $27,000 in 2011 -an $8,000 increase. Two years ago, median household income was $39,760 for blacks and $67,175 for whites. The dismal gap in median household net worth has widened, too. It went from about $75,000 in 1984 -the first time such data were col-lected -to about $85,000 in 2011. Two years ago, median household net worth was $91,405 for whites and $6,446 for blacks. Fifty years after passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, isn’t it time for some new thinking? Shouldn’t black Americans be asking what can be done to achieve some real economic progress? Of course, many factors drag blacks down economically. But mak-ing one very straightforward policy change would have immediate wealth-creation benefits for blacks and all low-income Americans. It involves something I’ve written about many times: personal retire-ment accounts. A 2011 Pew study on wealth gaps among ethnic groups showed that, in 2009, 45 percent of whites and 30 percent of blacks had 401(k) and thrift savings account. Some 35 percent of whites and 11 per-cent of blacks had IRA and Keogh accounts. One can argue that with far less income available, blacks don’t have the resources to invest long term in these wealth-building accounts. And because relatively few do invest, blacks tend to have less understand-ing of the plans, creating discomfort and bias against doing it. These are exactly the reasons why low-income Americans should be able to opt out of making Social Security contributions and use the funds they are forced to pay in taxes to invest in a genuine wealth-build-ing retirement account. Let’s recall that Social Security is not an investment program. It’s sim-ply a tax on current workers that’s used to make payments to current retirees. Social Security takes 12.4 percent annually from just about every income earner. The employee pays 6.2 percent directly, and the employ-er contributes the other 6.2 percent. In 2010, The Wall Street Journal published a theoretical analysis by William Shipman and Peter Ferrara of what a couple, earning average incomes, would have accumulated over 45 years of work if they could have put that 12.4 percent of their income in an investment account instead of paying Social Security taxes. Shipman and Ferrara assumed the couple retired in 2009, right after the stock market crashed. They used actual historical stock-performance data for the 45 years from 1965. Even with the big mar-ket drop, their savings could have paid out about 75 percent more than they would have gotten from Social Security. We should also be aware that Social Security taxes are paid just up to $113,700 in income. After that you are free. So Social Security is clearly biased against wealth accu-mulation by lower-income individu-als. We, of course, can expect that liberals will start screaming if anyone proposes to allow low-income earn-ers any choice -even an option -to get out of Social Security and invest in a retirement account. Black Americans can listen to them and watch their income and wealth stagnate for another 50 years, while the wealth gap contin-ues to grow. OPINION Sunday, September 1, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Rerouting pipeline a wise decision To build black wealth, change policies Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com With 202 floors, better hope elevators work Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books.4AOPINION

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Sept. 1Pastor celebrationSoul’s Harbor Church of God in Christ, 901 NE Lake Drive, will have a birth-day celebration and musi-cal tribute honoring Pastor M.L. Goggins Sr. at 5 p.m., featuring the Homecoming Reunion of the Lake City Community Choir.Sept. 2Bible studySouls’ Harbor Church of God in Christ, 901 NE Lake Drive, will have Bible study each Monday from 7 to 8 p.m. For more information, call (386) 752-7811.Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Sept. 3Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office’s new location, 971 W. Duval St. (U.S. 90), Suite 170, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagno-sis or solutions. For more information, call the exten-sion office at 752-5384. Support groupAnother Way Inc. provides a domestic violence support group every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. If you are a current or former survivor of domestic vio-lence, call (386) 719-2702 for meeting location and an intake appointment. All services are free and con-fidential.Constitution seriesThe first in a series of classes on “The Constitution Is the Solution,” a DVD series by the John Birch Society will be at 7 p.m. at Lake City Baptist Temple, 3061 State Road 47. The series provides a practical, common-sense understanding of how the Constitution was intended to limit the government, not the citi-zens. Other parts of the series will presented each of the five following Tuesdays at the same time and location. Each class will include a DVD presen-tation and group discussion. For more information, contact Sharon Higgins by phone at (386) 935-0821 or emailshiggins@wind-stream.net.Sept. 4Elder Options boardThe Elder Options Board of Directors will meet in Conference Room A at the agency’s office, 100 SW 75th St., Suite 301, in Gainesville. The board will take action on matters to be determined by the mem-bers of the board, which may include matters such as the executive director’s report. Persons with dis-abilities should contact Elder Options at least 48 hours prior to the meeting in order to request any spe-cial assistance. For more information, call Cindy Roberts at (352) 692-5260.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Soil testingColumbia County Master Gardeners will do free soil pH testing each Wednesday at at the Columbia County Extension Office’s new location, 971 W. Duval St. (U.S. 90), Suite 170. Drop off soil samples at the office any week day during business hours. For more information, call 752-5384.Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. each Wednesday at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, con-tact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299.Newcomers lunchThe Lake City Newcomers will have a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Red Lobster on U.S. 90 West. For information, call Rose Taylor at 755-2175 or Barbara Test at 754-7227.Sept. 5Revival ThursdaysFirst Baptist Church of Lake City, 182 NE Justice St., will present “Four Great Thursdays of September” revival at 6:45 p.m. each night. On Sept. 5, the Rev. Phillip Herrington, pastor of First Baptist Church of Live Oak, will bring the message. Music for the services will be by Joe Royster of Hopeful Baptist Church. For more informa-tion, call (386) 752-5422 or visit online at www.wec-areatfblc.com.Tennis teamA meeting for teens interested in joining the USTA Junior Team Tennis will be at 6 p.m. at Columbia High School, Room 518. This is a gender-blind team so both boys and girls age 14 to 18 interested in playing USTA tennis this fall should attend. Contact coach Tabatha McMahon with any ques-tions at 755-8103. Nan S. BuchananMrs. Nan S. Buchanan, 77, of Lake City, died Friday after-noon, August 30, 2013 in the North Florida Regional Medical Center. A native of Sylvester, Georgia, Mrs. Buchanan was the daughter of the late Christopher and Lola Mae Williams Gill. She had been a resident of Lake City since 2008 having moved here from Panama City Beach, Florida. Mrs. Buchanan had been a home maker and she very much enjoyed spending her spare time bird watching, crochet-ing and needle point projects, watching the Food Network and was an avid Duck Dynasty fan. Mrs. Buchanan was preceded in death in 2010 by her husband of fifty-four years, Donald Charles Buchanan. Mrs. Buchanan is survived by her children, Donna McDonald (Alfred) of Sumner, Georgia. Glen Buchanan (Fitri) of Herndon, Virginia; and Alan Buchanan (Belinda) of Fort White, Florida; a sister, Paula Cook of Sylvester, Georgia; grandchildren, Jerry McDonald, Stacey McDonald Smith, Brett Buchanan, Cara Buchanan, Suzana Buchanan, Finna Buchanan, Ferry Buchanan and Lena Tatum; great-grandchil-dren, Kayla Smith and Jackson McDonald. Her former daugh-ter-in-law, Annette Delaney also survives. Graveside funeral ser-vices for Mrs. Buchanan will be conducted at 3:00 P.M. on Monday, September 2, 2013 in the Elim Cemetery in Fort White, Florida with Rev. Cagney Tanner officiating. The family will receive friends from 1:00-2:30 Monday afternoon at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1234. Please sign the on-line family guest book at parrishfamilyfuneral-home.com .Linda Louise Gill Linda Louise Gill, age 53, raised in Redding, CT and most recent-ly of Deep River, CT and for-merly of Dan-ville, VA and Lake City, FL, passed away in her broth-er’s home, with grace and dignity in the arms of her family on August 22, 2013. Born in Norwalk, CT, she was the daughter of the late W. Ed-ward and Mary Raymond Gill. She was the loving mother of Christopher Wykle and the dear sweet sister of Raymond (Pidge) Gill of Deep River and Judy Gill of Madison, CT. She is also survived by her Sister-in-law and caregiver, “who loved her more”, Gail Gill. s the fun lov-ing free spirited aunt of Peter Maresco and Patrick Moriarty of Madison, Ct. and Caitlin and Noelle Gill of Cromwell ,Ct.Linny as she was lovingly known, was an avid golfer and animal lover. She spent some of her happiest times on Cedar Key, Florida where she enjoyed VKLQJDQGVSHFLDOWLPHVZLWKher dear, loving and supportive friends, Gwen Powell, the late Joan Ethel and her beloved pets.At her request, and in keeping with her vivacious personality, there will be a Celebration of Linda’s Life held on Saturday, September 7th, 2013. All who wish to attend are welcome and should contact the fam-ily at 860-526-4899 for details.,QOLHXRIRZHUV/LQQ\UH quested that the extraordinary care of her home hospice team be acknowledged through do-nations to Middlesex Hospital, Hospice/Palliative Care Unit, Middletown, CT (860) 358-6200 www. middlesexhospital.org.Edgar J. Lundy III23 August 1972, George Air Force Base, California23 August 2013 Green-ville, South CarolinaGraduate Robinson High 1990, Tampa, FL, Senior Demolay Chevalier, Eagle Scout, Life Member, NESA, Graduate, Fla-gler College 1994, Member of J.F. Swartizel #251, F & AM Lutz, FL. Son’s of the American Legion Sq 57 Lake City, FL., Ze-ndah Grotto, Tampa, FL., Moroc-co Shrine Jacksonville, FL., Cub Master Pack 323 Greenville, Ordained Deacon Covenant Grace Baptist Church Greenville, Agent for Sterling Insurance.Family: LoriAnne Walker Lundy WifeKaitlyn Rose Lundy & EJ Lundy IV ChildrenEd Lundy II and Elizabeth A Lundy of Lake City ParentsJohn Harris, Un-cle State College, PAParents In-Laws Gary and Norma Walker of Tampa, FL., Sister In-Law Christina Kaddis, Brother In-Law John Kaddis, Niece Sa-mantha Kaddis, Nephew Chris-tian Kaddis of Clearwater, FL.In Lieu of Flowers donations for the Lundy family can be made to the Covenant Grace Bap-tist Church Benevolence Fund 401 State Park Road, Green-ville, South Carolina 29609.Handled by CREMATION SOCIETY OF SC WESTVILLE Lillian Y. PhilmanLillian Y. Philman, 70, for-merly of Lake City, FL, passed away August 29, 2013 in Bald-win, FL. She is survived by her daughter, Linda E. Warren (John); 7 grandchildren and 8 greatgrandchildren. A graveside service will be held at 2 P.M. Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, in Brandy Branch Cemetery, Bry-ceville, FL, with Rev. Hartford 3HHSOHVRIFLDWLQJ9LVLWDWLRQwill be one hour prior to service time at the grave. Arrangements by GIDDENS-REED FUNERAL HOME, 270 U.S. Highway 301 North, Baldwin, FL. 904-266-2337.Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified depart-ment at 752-1293. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 5A5A Florida Gateway College presentsPerspective Sponsored by: Upcoming Schedule: September 2-6 Bow Hunter Safety with Steven Robbins, FWC Regional Hunter Safety Coordinator September 9-13 Rita Dopp and John Martz, United Way Suwannee Valley 7 p.m. Monday-Friday Only on Comcast Channel 8 =da^YVn=djgh[dgLVhiZE^X`je [dg8dajbW^V8djcinGZh^YZcih )&,+H#JH=ln))& ,*'"&',* 8adhZYBdcYVn!HZeiZbWZg&AVWdg9Vn BdcYVn####################E^X`jeIjZhYVn!HZei#(IjZhYVn###############E^X`jeLZYcZhYVn!HZei#)LZYcZhYVn##############E^X`jeI]jghYVn!HZei#*I]jghYVn#####################E^X`je;g^YVn!HZei#+;g^YVn######################E^X`jeHVijgYVn!HZei#, $995* SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND”Board Certied Healthcare Provider?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. AMANDA WILLIAMSON / Lake City ReporterCheering for supportRichardson Middle School cheerleaders (from left) Tyra Bennett, Kiani Tolliver, Venita Gray, Megan McGraw and Autumn Lamonda perform cheers Saturda y in front of Publix on West U.S. 90 West to raise funds for their yearly expenses, such as travel, food and new uniforms. The cheerleading season for the school lasts through footb all and basketball season.

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From staff reports Work is scheduled to begin Wednesday on the resurfacing of U.S. 90 West in Columbia County from the Suwannee County line to just west of Brown Road, a distance of 4.5 miles, according to the Florida Department of Transportation. This project connects to the U.S. 90 West widening project currently under way from Brown Road to Lake City Avenue. So construction will be under way on nearly six miles of U.S. 90. Motorists can expect daytime lane closures Monday through Friday after 8:30 a.m., with flag gers directing traffic through the active work areas. Work will begin with minor con struction activity. Resurfacing of the roadway will begin the week of Sept. 9. In addition to remov ing and replacing 1.5 inches of asphalt, construction includes: Widening U.S. 90 to provide a right turn lane at the Shining Star Academy; Resurfacing side street inter sections; Adding 5 feet of asphalt at driveways to provide a better transition onto the roadway; Installing nearly 900 feet of guardrail on the curves near Haven Hospice and Smittys Western Store. Anderson Columbia Co. Inc. of Lake City is doing the work at a cost of $1.7 million. It should be completed later this year or early in 2014. The schedule depends on weather and unforeseen cir cumstances. The roadway was last resur faced in 2002, and an average of 9,000 vehicles travel this section of U.S. 90 each day. The posted speed limit will remain the same during con struction. Motorists should use caution when pulling out onto U.S. 90 from driveways, making sure traffic is headed in the direction they wish to travel. For additional information regarding this project or other FDOT projects around Northeast Florida, visit www.nflroads.com or call 800-475-0044. Follow the FDOT on Twitter @MyFDOT_ NEFL or http://twitter.com/ MyFDOT_NEFL. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A C U L L I G A N W A T E R S O F T E N E R S A L E A L L W A T E R S O F T E N E R & R E V E R S E O S M O S I S D R I N K I N G S Y S T E M S O N S A L E N O W P R O T E C T Y O U R H O M E F R O M H A R D W A T E R B A D T A S T I N G W A T E R & O D O R C a l l N O W f o r a F R E E N o O b l i g a t i o n I n H o m e W a t e r T e s t 8 0 0 2 3 3 2 0 6 3 C u l l i g a n N o r t h F l o r i d a c o m D e a l e r p a r t i c i p a t i o n m a y v a r y L i m i t e d t i m e o f f e r N o t v a l i d w i t h o t h e r o f f e r s S e e d e a l e r f o r d e t a i l s 2 0 1 3 C u l l i g a n I n t e r n a t i o n a l C o m p a n y D e a l e r p a r t i c i p a t i o n m a y v a r y L i m i t e d t i m e o f f e r N o t v a l i d w i t h o t h e r o f f e r s S e e d e a l e r f o r d e t a i l s 2 0 1 3 C u l l i g a n I n t e r n a t i o n a l C o m p a n y F R E E I N S T A L L A T I O N &$2 0 0 O F FO n t h e p u r c h a s e o f a n y C u l l i g a n W a t e r T r e a t m e n t S y s t e m R E N T A C U L L I G A N S Y S T E M F O R A S L I T T L E A S$9.9 5P E R M O N T HF o r t h e f i r s t 3 m o n t h s o n t h e r e n t a l o f a W a t e r S o f t e n e r o r D r i n k i n g o r D r i n k i n g W a t e r S y s t e m C U L L I G A N O F O C A L A 1 9 2 0 S W 3 7 t h A v e O c a l a F l 3 4 4 7 4 Surrendering The Secret Are you silently carrying the pain and heartache of a previous abortion? Are you tired of hiding this deep secret and suffering from the consequences? Attend this biblically based healing journey for women who have experienced the pain of abortion. Pregnancy Care Center 399 S. E. Hernando Ave. September 9th 8 Weeks 386 776 2821 386 623 6699 COURTESY The stretch of U.S. 90 from the Suwannee County-Columbia County line east to Brown Road will be resurfaced, starting Wednesday, the Florida Department of Transportation said. COURTESY New ultrasound device Donna Sandage (left), executive director of the Pregnancy Care Centers in Lake City and Live Oak; Becky Deas, executive director of Options Now in Valdosta, Ga.; and Vicky Hicks, director of the Live Oak PCC, stand with the ultrasound machine PCC recently received for use in gauging fetal health and development. By AMANDA WILLIAMSON awilliamson@lakecityreporter.com A Tallahassee woman died Friday night in a traffic crash on Interstate 75 in Columbia County. Hailey Kate Bevis, 22, was driving her 2006 Honda Civic northbound on the inter state when the vehicle began to spin, according to a Florida Highway Patrol press release. It left the east side of the road, traveling down the embankment. The Honda struck a tree before coming to a rest on the grass shoulder. The crash occured during a heavy rainstorm that passed through Columbia County Friday night, but FHP officials said Saturday that they have not yet deter mined whether the bad weather contrib uted to the crash. Bevis was wearing her seat belt at the time of the accident, FHP said. From staff reports The Florida Highway Patrol is collaborating with other states in an effort to keep the roadways safe and fatality-free over the Labor Day holiday weekend. All eight states through which Interstate 10 pass es Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California will be participating in an intensified enforcement effort called -8 on 10, One Road, One Mission. By all states working togeth er, the entire 2,460 miles of I-10 will be covered under this enforcement action. During the four-day peri od that began Friday and continues through Monday, law enforcement agencies in each state will conduct special details on I-10. The details will focus on stop ping drunk and drugged drivers, aggressive drivers, speeders and drivers who fail to move over to the left hand lane when a law enforcement, emergency or tow vehicle is parked on the side of the road. In addi tion, troopers will be check ing for distracted driving, seat belt use, improper lane changes and commercial vehicle safety. While these focus areas are something FHP does every day, it is the first time that the eight states have teamed up to ensure inter state travelers will see the same enforcement effort throughout their trip. The partnerships we have formed with the seven states along the I10 corridor show that we are serious about improv ing public safety through an intensified enforcement operation, said Col. David Brierton, director of the Florida Highway Patrol. Below are some tips to ensure travelers arrive safely at their destinations: Get plenty of rest before setting out on a long trip and allow plenty of time. Buckle up. A seat belt is your vehicles most important safety feature; Obey all speed limits; Drive sober and alert. US 90 West resurfacing to begin Wednesday Tallahassee woman dies in crash Eight states partnering on I-10 safety enforcement blitz

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I think a combined com munication center is a good thing, Mayor Stephen Witt said Saturday. It takes all of us working together to make that happen... But public safety is number one, whatever we do. As it stands now, the item is simply up for dis cussion during the meet ing. However, if the council decides to make a motion, a vote would be taken. City Manager Wendell Johnson believes the com bined communication cen ter would be more efficient and provide a benefit to the public. The main concerns for combining the services tend to be issues of trust and protocol, he added. Its been a drawn out process the last four years between the sheriffs office, the city and the county to make this work, Johnson said. Its a partnership. Everyone has to have an understanding of the proto cols and the operations of the center. According to a letter drafted by County Manager Dale Williams, the county commission approved the city and the county moving forward with current plans for their respective dispatch centers while reopening the possibilities of a com bined dispatch center. The county also reported to the city a plan to maintain current ISO ratings that includes new fire stations, manpower and equipment. The upgrades would enable the county fire department to provide services to the city for a cost. Though the plan is touted as a way to save the county money, the mayor said he has not yet weighed the pros and cons of the decision. He is unsure if the item will be brought before the council, but says it is included in the agenda. The council can decide to vote on the topic if they choose to do so. We have a great fire department, Witt said. Theyre taking care of the citizens. Right now, Im happy with our fire department. The Lake City Fire Department would likely be eliminated if the city decides to contract with the county. The meeting, set for tuesday due to the Labor Day holiday, starts at 7 p.m. in City Hall, located at 205 N. Marion Ave. Lake City is a program of Catholic Charities and a sub-distributor for Feeding America Food Bank in Jacksonville. When low-income fami lies receive less money for food, that translates into a higher burden placed on local food banks, Florida Gateway Food Banks man ager Scott Elkins said. When I first started here seven years ago, we used to receive about 30,000 to 40,000 pounds of food a month from the USDA, Elkins said. Now were down to about 15,000 pounds because the fund ing wasnt there. The average family of three participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, otherwise known as food stamps) may see a reduction of about $29 per month in food assistance once provisions from 2009 stimulus bill expire Nov. 1, according to a report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. However, that doesnt include reductions to SNAP proposed by House Republicans during nego tiations in July. The Farm Bill is a piece of legislation that is reviewed, modified and renewed every five years and covers programs such as subsidies to farming development and com merce as well as food assistance for low-income families. Historically the bill has been a hybridiza tion of Senate and House ideas. However, the version of the bill passed by the Republican majority in the House did not include SNAP as part of the leg islation. Instead, GOP represen tatives proposed address ing SNAP as a separate issue, including a pro posed $40 billion cut in funding for the program. A 2009 county-bycounty study by the New York Times revealed that 11,465, or 16 percent, of Columbia County resi dents participate in the SNAP program. The food crisis is inch ing its way up into the middle class, Elkins said. A common misconcep tion is that we just distrib ute food to the homeless. Thats a certain percent age, yes, but more and more were seeing fami lies that used to be middle class. Floridas SNAP par ticipation rate is increas ing as well. According to a study from the Food Research and Action Center, the number of individuals participating in SNAP increased about 5 percent from 3,384,489 to 3,556,098 last year. Over the past five years, Florida residents using SNAP jumped from 1,475,659 to 3,556,098. That 141 percent increase over five years was sec ond only to Nevada. Congress wont be back in session until Sept. 9, at which point it has 21 days to pass revisions to the Farm Bill. Typically, they would extend the bill for an emer gency period if theres a problem, Edwards said. But theres no guarantee of that. Theyre looking to trim every which way to come up with a balanced budget. President Obama said he would veto any bill that did not include apportion ment for SNAP or a simi lar program. The 2008 Farm Bill was vetoed by then President George W. Bush due to concerns over its size and cost. However, the bill passed after Congress overrode the veto. Edwards feared the possi bility of unrest if congress pushes food assistance money to the wayside. People are going to do whatever they can to feed their families, she said. A lot of people dont want to talk about hunger because its not pretty to talk about. Its very humil iating and nobody wants to be judged. If every family were to donate five cans of food a month, it would make a huge difference, accord ing to Edwards. Were a very rich nation, she said. If we were to give a little more of self, it would go a long way. 7A Assisted Living Life is Good Here! Adult Daycare begins at WillowBrook Assisted Living We oer: Hourly and Daily Rates are available. Adult Day Care participants receive all the care and amenities of WillowBrook. And Be Assured your loved one is in a safe environment. Pre-Registration is Required. Make your reservations early, space is limited! Please call Debbie Brannon 752-4454 1580 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 www.LifeIsGoodHere.com August 19, 2013 r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 7 5 % 50 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 7 5 % 50 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save Merchandise, offers and coupons in this event are not available at our Fiddlers Run & Salisbury Mall stores. *If youre 55 or older, take an extra 20% off storewide, or 15% off in our home & shoes departments with your Belk Rewards Card; 15% off storewide, 10% off in our home & shoes departments with any other form of payment, on your sale purchases. *Excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Better & Designer Intimates, Brighton, Buffalo, Casio, Chip & Pepper, Citizens of Humanity, Clarisonic, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Diane Von Furstenberg, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hart Schaffner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Jack Rogers, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/novelty electrics/coffee, Lacoste, ladies better swim, ladies designer, bridge & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Michael Kors Shoes, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, My Flat in London, Nanette Lepore, Nautica, Orthaheel/Vionic, Rachel Roy, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Tommy Hilfiger, Trina Turk, Trunk Shows, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wusthof; non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases, phone or special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid SEPTEMBER 3, 2013. RED DOT: **Limited exclusions in Brighton, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, My Flat in London, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags, designer sunglasses and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT BELK.COM senior Tuesday, Sept. 3 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY *See below for details. In store only 1 5 % o ff 30 % off ND New Directions tops for misses, petites & todays woman Shown, slub top Orig. 36.00, Sale 24.99 Todays woman at slightly higher prices. bu y 1 ge t 1 free ENTIRE STOCK Mens IZOD pants Classic, straight & slim t styles. Orig. 59.50 69.50 *Free item must be of equal or lesser value. Plus, 50% off mens Haggar & Louis Raphael pants Orig. 65.00 75.00 Sale 32.50-37.50 Also in BIG & TALL at slightly higher prices. playing through slim t Your Gift 6 best sellers plus a cosmetics bag with any 35.00 or more Lancme purchase (Up to a 130.00 value.) One gift per client. While supplies last. Offer valid through September 22, 2013. Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Mens & Womens T-Shirts New Arrival Backpacks Camo See our line of camowear! Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 7A FOOD: Demand expected to explode due to cuts Continued From Page 1A COUNCIL: Fire service issue on table Continued From Page 1A By STEVEN RICHMOND srichmond@lakecityreporter.com Two individuals are fac ing drug possession charg es after Lake City police found cocaine and painkill ers in their vehicle, accord ing to Lake City Police Department reports. Kyle Garan Espenship, of 2901 SW Pinemount Road, and Ramey L. Nelson, of 298 NW Akron Drive, were driving on U.S. 90 near Interstate 75 when a city police officer noticed the license plate of Nelsons vehicle was partially obscured by a metal brack et, the report said. As the officer conducted a traffic stop, he noticed Nelsons hands were shak ing uncontrollably and she had difficultly maintaining a train a thought, according to the report. Another officer arrived for backup and conducted an exterior inspection of the vehicle with the assis tance of a police dog, the report said. The dog indicated the presence of a narcotic odor, giving offi cers prob able cause to search the vehicle, the report said. A search of the vehi cles interior revealed sev eral white substances that tested positive for cocaine, along with used needles, a white spoon and pieces of cotton, police said. Officers also report finding six loose pills of buprenorphine, a schedule III painkiller used to treat heroin and methadone addictions. Espenship was taken into custody and refused to speak to police, according to the reports. Police said they released Nelson after explaining to her that the state attorneys office will be filing charges against her. Espenship was released from Columbia County Detention Facility on $6,000 bond and faces charges of possession of drugs and drug equipment. Espenship Two face charges after drugs found

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Jim, Barr, 754-04248A MORTGAGE ! APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $80,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2... and we’re starting with YOU! Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. UF Health Room H1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $5 MILLION IN 2013 MOVE your First Mortgage(from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanOR 00 We’ll save you1 50 We’ll pay you1

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, September 1, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Tigers blow away HurricanesBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High was set for game time and then came delay time. More than a two hour delay kept the Tigers from finishing off a 49-7 win against Gainesville High until the early hours of Saturday morning, but in the end head coach Brian Allen had taken the self diagnosed “monkey off my back.” The Tigers and Hurricanes played until the 4:54 mark of the first quar-ter before lightning popped and delayed the game for two hours and 15 minutes on Friday with the Tigers leading 3-0. Allen said the delay didn’t have any effect on the Tigers, however, as they would have been ready to play the game no matter the hour. Columbia had driven into Gainesville territory on its first possession before Jake Thomas threw an intercep-tion and set the Hurricanes up at the Tigers’ 33-yard line following the return. The Tigers’ defense sank their claws in, however, and forced Alex Holloway into a 50-yard field goal attempt. Trey Marshall had other plans for the Hurricanes and came through with a block to keep Gainesville off the board early. After the block, Marshall took to the offensive side and gained 30 yards on three carries out of a “Wild Tiger” formation to set Brayden Thomas up for a 32-yard field goal with 4:54 remaining. The game was delayed following the Tigers taking a 3-0 lead and when the game resumed, Columbia responded with an onside kick, which Roger Cray recovered at the Gainesville 37-yard line. “I figured coming back out we’d be ready, because the kids were ready to play tomorrow if they had to,” Allen said. “Had it been played, tonight or tomor-row, we were going to be ready. We wanted to go out and seize the moment and set the tempo.” Jake Thomas hit Akeem Williams on the first offen-sive play for 34 yards and Lonnie Underwood scored his first touchdown of the night on the next play on a three-yard run. Following the Brayden Thomas’ extra point, Columbia had a 10-0 lead. The Tigers’ next possession wouldn’t even take two plays. Underwood broke free from the Tigers’ own 48-yard line and scampered 52 yards for the score to give Columbia a 17-0 first quarter advantage. Underwood continued to carry the load for Columbia on the next pos-session and racked up 48 rushing yards before fresh-man Kamario Bell took it in from three yards for his first touchdown as a Tiger and Columbia had a 24-0 lead with 8:47 remaining in the first half. Brayden Thomas connected on his second field goal in as many attempts, this time from 28-yards out, during the Tigers’ next possession after a Carlos Vega sacked forced the Hurricanes into another three-and-out on their offen-sive try. Columbia’s only mistake, a fumbled punt, set up Gainesville for their only touchdown of the night. The Hurricanes Calaen Christian connected with Kenric Young from 28-yards out to make the halftime score 27-7. In the second half, it was more of the same for the Tigers as Underwood con-tinued to carry the load. His night would end at the 4:17 mark of the third quarter after a 10-yard touchdown run capped off Columbia’s first drive of the second half and gave the Tigers a 34-7 lead. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Trey Marshall tries to get outside agai nst Gainesville High in the Tigers’ 49-7 win on Friday CHS continued on 2B By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE As the new season kicked off with the first game, the University of Florida foot-ball program experienced a host of new experiences in a 24-6 win against Toledo on Saturday. Much of Florida’s problem last year came on the offensive side of the ball and getting off to a slow start was a typical plague that faced the Gators. Florida put an end to that with an opening drive that spanned 84 yards in 11 plays to score on an open-ing drive for the first time since 2009. Jeff Driskel completed all three of his passes includ-ing a six-yard touchdown pass to Valdez Showers for Showers’ first career touch-down. It continued to be a half of first for the Gators as Austin Hardin had his first field goal from 24-yards out sail through the uprights after replacing Caleb Sturgis to give Florida a 100 with 12:59 remaining in the first half. After Jeremiah Detmer connected on a 44-yard field goal, Florida showed more offensive grit by driving down the field to respond on a 10 play, 83-yard drive. The drive began with two Driskel passes totaling 35 yards and ended with Mack Brown’s first touchdown as a Gator. Brown took on Toledo’s defense and ran dragged himself into the end zone on a 14-yard run to give Florida a 17-3 half-time lead. Brown finished the game with 25 rushes for 112 yards and two scores. A team that finished 114th in the nation last year saw Driskel go 10-of-11 for 101 yards in the first half show-ing much needed signs of improvement in that area. When the offense slowed to start the second half, another first set up Florida’s offense for their first scor-ing drive of the second half. Freshman Vernon Hardgreaves III picked off his first pass as a Gator from Terrance Owens to set up Florida at Toledo’s 28-yard line. Gideon Ajagbe hauled in two passes on the drive including a four-yard touch-down reception to put the Gators up 24-6 after the third quarter. Again, it was a first for the Gators as it was the first time Ajagbe scored after making the switch from linebacker to fullback this season. From that point forward, it was what Florida does best under head coach Will Muschamp. The Gators elected to sit on the clock and be content with the win heading into next week. But it wasn’t just the offense producing for the Gators as the defense held Toledo to 1-of-13 on third down conversions through-out the game. Florida’s defense held Toledo to just 205 yards of total offense and out of the end zone. Florida, which picked up its 24th consecutive open-ing-day win, will travel to Maimi to take on the Hurricanes at noon on Saturday.Gators dominate opener JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida quarterback Jeff Driskel is brought down by Tol deoo’s Treyvon Hester while running the ball on Saturday. Columbia defeats Gainesville, 49-7

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for U.S. Nationals, at Indianapolis (same-day tape) 1:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Truck Series, Chevrolet Silverado 250 2 p.m. NBCSN — IRL, IndyCar, Grand Prix of Baltimore 5 p.m. NBCSN — IRL, Indy Lights, Grand Prix of Baltimore (same-day tape) 7:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AdvoCare 500 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 11:45 a.m. ESPN — FCS, Florida A&M vs. Mississippi Valley State, at Orlando 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Ohio at Louisville GOLF 8:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Wales Open, final round 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, third round 2:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness Championship, final round NBC — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, third round 5 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Shaw Charity Classic, final round 7 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Safeway Classic, final round MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. TBS — Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees 2:10 p.m. WGN — Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs 8 p.m. ESPN2 — N.Y. Mets at Washington MOTORSPORTS 8 a.m. FS1 — MotoGP World Championship, British Grand Prix, at Towcester, England Noon FS1 — MotoGP Moto2, British Grand Prix (same-day tape) SOCCER 8:25 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Manchester United at Liverpool 10:55 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Arsenal vs. Tottenham, at London TENNIS 11 a.m. CBS — U.S. Open, men’s third and women’s fourth round, at New York ——— Monday AUTO RACING Noon ESPN2 — NHRA, U.S. Nationals, at Indianapolis (same-day tape) BOXING 9 p.m. FS1 — Luis Collazo (33-5-0) vs. Alan Sanchez (12-2-1), for vacant WBA welterweight title, at San Antonio COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Florida St. at Pittsburgh GOLF 11:30 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, final round 1 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, final round MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB — St. Louis at Cincinnati or Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees 2:10 p.m. WGN — Miami at Chicago Cubs 4 p.m. MLB — Texas at Oakland or Baltimore at Cleveland 9 p.m. MLB — Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels PREP FOOTBALL 3 p.m. ESPN — Godby vs. DeMatha (Md.), at College Park, Md. TENNIS 11 a.m. CBS — U.S. Open, round of 16 7 p.m. ESPN2 — U.S. Open, round of 16BASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB Boston 80 56 .588 — Tampa Bay 75 58 .564 3 Baltimore 71 62 .534 7New York 71 63 .530 8 Toronto 61 74 .452 18 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 79 56 .585 — Cleveland 71 63 .530 7Kansas City 69 65 .515 9 Minnesota 58 75 .436 20 Chicago 56 77 .421 22 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 78 56 .582 — Oakland 76 58 .567 2 Los Angeles 61 72 .459 16 Seattle 61 73 .455 17 Houston 44 90 .328 34 Today’s Games Baltimore (W.Chen 7-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 10-9), 1:05 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 9-8) at Toronto (Happ 3-4), 1:07 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 1-2) at Detroit (Verlander 12-10), 1:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-0) at Boston (Doubront 10-6), 1:35 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 13-6) at Milwaukee (Lohse 9-8), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6) at Houston (Oberholtzer 3-1), 2:10 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 8-10) at Texas (Blackley 2-1), 3:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 6-13) at Oakland (Griffin 11-9), 4:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Chicago White Sox (Quintana 7-4) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-13), 1:05 p.m. Detroit (Fister 11-7) at Boston (Lackey 8-11), 1:35 p.m. Minnesota (A.Albers 2-2) at Houston (Clemens 4-4), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 12-8) at Kansas City (Duffy 2-0), 2:10 p.m. Baltimore (B.Norris 9-10) at Cleveland (Masterson 14-9), 4:05 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 9-6) at Oakland (Straily 7-7), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Redmond 2-2) at Arizona (McCarthy 3-8), 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 8-5) at L.A. Angels (Richards 4-6), 9:05 p.m.NL standings East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 82 52 .612 — Washington 68 66 .507 14Philadelphia 62 73 .459 20 New York 61 72 .459 20 Miami 49 84 .368 32 Central Division W L Pct GB Pittsburgh 78 56 .582 — St. Louis 78 56 .582 — Cincinnati 75 60 .556 3 Milwaukee 59 75 .440 19Chicago 56 78 .418 22 West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 79 55 .590 — Arizona 68 65 .511 10 Colorado 64 72 .471 16 San Diego 60 74 .448 19 San Francisco 60 74 .448 19 Today’s Games St. Louis (J.Kelly 6-3) at Pittsburgh (Kr.Johnson 0-1), 1:35 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 13-6) at Milwaukee (Lohse 9-8), 2:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 10-11) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-1), 2:20 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 11-5) at Colorado (Chatwood 7-4), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 3-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 13-3), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 4-10) at Arizona (Corbin 13-4), 4:10 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 2-5) at Atlanta (A.Wood 3-2), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-6) at Washington (Ohlendorf 3-0), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 0-2) at Atlanta (Maholm 9-10), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 15-8) at Cincinnati (Latos 13-5), 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 6-3) at Milwaukee (Thornburg 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 2-3) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 8-10), 2:20 p.m. San Francisco (Petit 1-0) at San Diego (Kennedy 5-9), 3:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-8) at Colorado (Bettis 0-3), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Redmond 2-2) at Arizona (McCarthy 3-8), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 6-9) at Philadelphia (Hamels 6-13), 7:05 p.m.AUTO RACINGRace week SPRINT CUP ADVOCARE 500 Site: Hampton, Ga.Schedule: Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 7-11:30 p.m.). Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-oval, 1.54 miles). Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps. CAMPING WORLD TRUCK CHEVROLET SILVERADO 250 Site: Bowmanville, Ontario.Schedule: Today, race, 2 p.m. (Fox Sports 1, 1-4 p.m.). Track: Canadian Tire Motorsport Park (road course, 2.459 miles). Race distance: 157.4 miles, 64 laps. IZOD INDYCAR GRAND PRIX OF BALTIMORE Site: Baltimore.Schedule: Today, race, 2:33 p.m. (NBC Sports Channel, 2-5 p.m.). Track: Streets of Baltimore (street course, 2.04 miles). Race distance: 153 miles, 75 laps. NHRA U.S. NATIONALS Site: Clermont, Ind.Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2, 1-6 p.m., 5-7 p.m.); Monday, final eliminations (ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.). Track: Lucas Oil Raceway at Indianapolis.Advocare 500 qualifying At Atlanta Motor SpeedwayHampton, Ga. Friday qualifying; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 189.688 mph. 2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.021.3. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 188.539. 4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 188.533.5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188.053. 6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 187.983. 7. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 187.939. 8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 187.519. 9. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 187.487.10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.475. 11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 187.424.12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 187.196.13. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 187.007. 14. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 186.931.15. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 186.736. 16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 186.673. 17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 186.579. 18. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 186.547. 19. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 186.472.20. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 186.29.21. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 186.109. 22. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 185.859.23. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 185.722. 24. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 185.592.25. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 185.399. 26. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 185.331. 27. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 185.238. 28. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 185.065. 29. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 184.886.30. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 184.732. 31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 184.523.32. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 184.499. 33. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 184.358.34. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 183.728. 35. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 182.747.36. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 182.416. 37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 38. (51) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 40. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, Owner Points.FOOTBALLNFL preseason final AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 3 1 0 .750 93 103N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 105 80Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 84 101Miami 2 3 0 .400 104 89 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 3 1 0 .750 98 67Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 77 89Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 60 111Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 90 89 North W L T Pct PF PACincinnati 3 1 0 .750 106 63Cleveland 3 1 0 .750 75 68Baltimore 2 2 0 .500 119 97Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 56 93 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 2 2 0 .500 71 104Kansas City 2 2 0 .500 82 60Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 101San Diego 1 3 0 .250 68 112 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 4 0 0 1.000 106 53Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 87 91Dallas 2 3 0 .400 78 93N.Y. Giants 1 3 0 250 71 85 South W L T Pct PF PACarolina 3 1 0 .750 92 68New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 97 80Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 66 115Atlanta 0 4 0 .000 65 108 North W L T Pct PF PADetroit 3 1 0 .750 107 63Chicago 2 2 0 .500 100 96Green Bay 1 3 0 .250 37 71Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 67 104 West W L T Pct PF PASeattle 4 0 0 1.000 110 36Arizona 3 1 0 .750 68 55San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 96 43St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 76 94 AP Top 25 games Today No. 9 Louisville vs. Ohio, 3:30 p.m. Monday No. 11 Florida St. at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS BOWLING Lightning strikes out Fort White, Hamilton CountyBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comJASPER — Fort White High football’s game at Hamilton County High on Friday was canceled. After a wait of an hour and 45 minutes to try and get the game started, a lightning bolt knocked out the stadium lights and sent fans to their cars. Athletic Director John Wilson said the schools could not come up with a free date to re-schedule the game and it would not be made up. The Indians play host to Newberry High at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6.VolleyballFort White’s volleyball team won its first match of the season on Thursday. The Lady Indians defeat-ed host Hamilton County in straight sets — 25-17, 25-22, 25-18. Leah Johnson led Fort White with eight kills and two blocks. Arianna House had seven kills. Ashley Cason had 49 assists and served up eight aces. Rykia Jackson had six digs. “The girls played in sync tonight,” coach Kelbie Ronsonet said. “Everyone worked well with one another and I finally got to see the Fort White volley-ball that we have worked so hard for.” Fort White (1-2, 0-1) travels to Newberry High for a 6:30 p.m. match on Tuesday, and will bring in Hamilton County at 6 p.m. Wednesday.JV footballDixie County High spoiled the home-opener for Fort White’s junior varsity football team on Thursday, 34-14. After a scoreless first quarter, Dixie County’s Clifford Jackson squelched a Fort White drive with an interception and returned it 85 yards for a touchdown. Jackson added touchdown runs of 61 and 69 yards as the Bears built a 20-6 halftime lead. Jabari Rivers got the Indians on the board with a three-yard touchdown run at 4:58 of the second quar-ter. The score was set up by a 42-yard pass play from Dillon Brown to Jordan Perkins. Brown connected with Carlous Bartee for a 51-yard scoring pass on the first play of the fourth quarter. Brown hit Bryson Brady for the two-point conversion, which was the final score of the game. Dixie County’s Joey Grimm scored on runs of 60 and 37 yards. Grimm and Jackson had two-point runs. Nicholas McClain had an interception for the Indians and Leevander Griffin recovered three fumbles. Fort White plays at Newberry at 7 p.m. Sept. 5. League reportsHIT & MISS Team standings: 1. Silver Ladies (4-0); 2. Ten In The Pit (3-1); 3. Strike 3 (2-2, 541 team average); 4. Spare Us (2-2, 536 team average); 5. Git Up & Bowl (2-2, 486 team average); 6. High Five (2-2, 444 team average). High team handicap game: 1. Spare Us 770; 2. Git Up & Bowl 765; 3. High Five 759. High team handicap series: 1. Ten In The Pit 2,262; 2. Strike 3 2,242; 3. Legal Ladies 2,217.(Results from Aug. 20) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. 3 Plus 1; 2. Gamblers’; 3. Knock em Down. High team scratch game: 1. Knock em Down 664; 2. Senior Moment 603; 3. WGASA 572. High team scratch series: 1. Gamblers’ 1,873; 2. You’r Up 1,856; 3. Jo’s Crew 1,734. High team handicap game: 1. Knock em Down 823; 2. Power E.N.D. S. 817; 3. 3 Plus 1 811. High team handicap series: 1. Gamblers’ 2,347; 2. You’r Up 2,345; 3. Senior Moment 2,334. High scratch game: 1. Joyce Hooper 171; 2. Betty Brown 168; 3. Joan Carman 163. 1. Tom Young 223; 2. David Duncan 192; 3. Ric Yates 183. High scratch series: 1. Debbie Walters 502; 2. Barbara Griner 461; 3. Shirley Highsmith 455. 1. Miuke Murray 584; 2. Earl Hayward 530; 3. Wayne Johns 514.(Results from Aug. 22) TUESDAY NITE MIXED High team handicap game: 1. 10 In The Pitt 828; 2. Wolf Pack 818; 3. O 2 Cool 814. High team handicap series: 1. 10 In The Pitt 2,419; 2. Wolf Pack 2,381; 3. O 2 Cool 2,375. High scratch game: 1. Maggie Battle 199; 2. Debbie Walters 197; 3. Mary Lobaugh 181. 1. Jim Lobaugh 223; 2. George Mulligan 184; 3. Steven Hayes 183. High scratch series: 1. Maggie Battle 516; 2. Mary Lobaugh 483; 3. Debbie Walters 459. 1. Jim Lobaugh 587; 2. Bill Dolly 526; 3. Steven Hayes 510. High handicap game: 1. Debbie Walters 242; 2. Maggie Battle 229; 3. Mary Lobaugh 220. 1. Jim Lobaugh 235; 2. George Mulligan 228; 3. Ron Edenfield 225. High handicap series: 1. Maggie Battle 606; 2. Mary Lobaugh 600; 3. Sherri Miller 596. 1. Jim Lobaugh 623; 2. Bill Dolly 610; 3. Steven Hayes 606. High average: Maggie Battle 172; Jim Lobaugh 195.(Results from Aug. 27) The defense got into the action on the follow-ing possession as Zedrick Woods picked up a fumble and rumbled 18 yards into the end zone for a score. J.T. Bradley ran it in on a fake extra point to give Columbia a 42-7 advantage and bring out the running clock with 3:16 remaining in the third quarter. The Tigers’ final score came courtesy of Bell as he turned in a 57-yard run and capped off the drive with a 10-yard run to close out the game with a 49-7 Columbia win. “It was definitely great to get a victory,” Allen said. CHS: Dominates Gainesville 49-7 Continued From Page 1B

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 3B 3BSPORTS Screened Pool with waterfall 3 Bed/3 Bat h, In law suit e cherry floor and cabinets, 2 Large outbuildings, large loft and on 2 acres, in a great area Call Nate A. Sweat at 386 628 1552 or Hallmarknate@weebly.com mls#84124 BRIEFS GAMES Tuesday Columbia High boys golf vs. Chiles High at The Country Club at Lake City, 2 p.m. Columbia High volleyball vs. Oak Hall School, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5) Fort White High volleyball at Newberry High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Columbia High volleyball vs. Suwannee High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Fort White High volleyball vs. Hamilton County High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Columbia High JV football vs. Madison County High, 7 p.m. Thursday Columbia High boys golf vs. Santa Fe High at Meadowbrook Golf Club, 4 p.m. Columbia High cross country tri-meet at Alligator Lake Park, 4:30 p.m. Fort White High volleyball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Columbia High football at Lincoln High, 7 p.m. Fort White High JV football at Newberry High, 7 p.m. Friday Fort White High football vs. Newberry High, 7:30 p.m. CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia High Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. Plans will be finalized to Tallahassee for the game with Lincoln High. For details, call club president Allen Masters at 292-0725. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL No Quarterback Club meeting The Fort White Quarterback Club will not meet on Labor Day. Meetings will resume on Sept. 9. For details, call club president Margie Kluess at 365-9302. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City fall registration Lake City/Columbia County Youth Baseball walk-up registration at Southside Sports Complex is 5-7 p.m. Tuesday. Cost is $75 per player. No late sign-ups will be accepted. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. Fort White fall registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseballs fall registration is 4-7 p.m. Thursday and Sept. 11, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 14 at the South Columbia Sports Complex. Five divisions are offered for ages 4-15. Cost is $50 ($45 for T-ball ages 4-6). Division are determined by age on or before April 30, and birth certificates are required if not on file. For details, call Cedric May at 623-1122 or Bill McLaughlin at (352) 871-0881. YOUTH TENNIS Meeting for USTA Jr. teams A meeting for USTA Jr. Team Tennis is 6 p.m. Thursday at Columbia High room 518. Interested boys and girls ages 14-18 should attend. For details, call coach Tabatha McMahon at 755-8103. From staff reports BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs varsity volleyball team for 2013 is (front row, from left) Meghan Yates, Kaitlyn Hill, Charlee Watson, Lacey King and Hayes Fulford. Back row (from left) are Hollianne Dohrn, Hanna Baker, Annie Milton, coach Rebecca Golden, Bree Phillips, Madison Plyn, Grace Harry and Jara Courson. Lady Tigers knock off defending state champs BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs 2013 junior varsity volleyball team are (front row, from left) Madeline McKinzie, Lynsey Sutton, Brianna Palmer, Megan Zahnle and Zoe Norris. Back row (from left) are coach Chelsea Brewington, Jazman Myers, Rilie Rittman, Jazzlynn Williams, Alaina Perry, Kaleigh Sanderson and Glendasha Johnson. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia Highs vol leyball team moved to 2-0 on the season with a four-set win over two-time defending state cham pion Lafayette High on Thursday in Lake City. The Lady Tigers knocked off Lafayette 25-6, 19-25, 25-14 and 25-11 to pick up the win. They did well and they are becoming a fam ily, Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said. They are playing together and supporting each other. Theyre having fun. Its always good to play a team that knows what its like to win. Id like to thank the student body, faculty, staff, and fans for coming out and supporting. Hollianne Dohrn led the team with eight aces in the contest. Annie Milton had 13 kills to lead the team and Jara Courson added 12 more assists. Hanna Baker led the team in assists with 22 in the contest. Columbia (2-0, 1-0 dis trict) will play on back-toback nights next week. The Lady Tigers host Oak Hall School at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday and Suwannee High at 6 p.m. on Wednesday. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Prior to Columbia Highs football game against Gainesville High, a spe cial ceremony took place at midfield to honor Pat Summerall, a Columbia High graduate, for his out standing life achievement. Summerall graduated from Columbia in 1948 and later went on to play for the New York Giants in the NFL. Summerall was not only an accomplished foot ball player, but also a mem ber of the Tigers only state championship basketball team in 1947. Summerall went on to play for the University of Arkansas and was initial ly drafted by the Detroit Lions, but his most lasting impression would come as an announcer for the NFL, Masters and tennis. Summeralls son, Kyle, spoke on behalf of the fam ily before the Tigers foot ball game. My father never forgot where he came from and always carried that smalltown mentality wherever he went, Kyle Summerall said. I think that helped him throughout his career, because he was able to relate to the every day man. Kyle Summerall said his father was an accomplished athlete, but he always preferred to talk about other people. He said that he hardly ever heard his father talk about his own achievements. He didnt talk about himself, Kyle Summerall said. I found out about a lot of his accomplishments through old photographs. People dont realize that he was a pretty good athlete. He was drafted as a defen sive end and played kicker, but a lot of people dont know that. Still, Kyle Summerall told the crowd best how Summerall would feel about being honored. He would probably say what are we doing talking about me when theres a football game to be played, Kyle Summerall said. Pat Summerall honored at Columbia game BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City Reporter Kyle Summerall accepts an honor on his father Pat Summeralls behalf prior to Columbia Highs game on Friday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 4BSports

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From staff and wire service reports T hrow on your favor ite teams jersey and break out the grill because tailgat ing season is here. Whether the party is in your backyard or outside the stadium, you can show your team spirit this season without breaking the bank. Experts are offering revelers some affordable and fun tailgate party planning tips: Pick a spot: To increase camaraderie and fun for free, get in the center of the action for every big game. Arrive early to scope out a choice tailgating headquarters. The closer you get to cam pus, the more young people you tend to see, 65-year-old tailgating veteran Ron Foreman of Lake City said. Theyve got music and dancing. It tends to get a little more wild there. Our needs tend to be different than theirs. Food and drinks: Potluck tailgating parties are the easi est and most affordable way to celebrate game days. Ask every one to bring their favorite items from appetizers to desserts. Set up several small-table grills at once so there is a variety of foods for everyone to enjoy. For snacks during the game, look at inexpensive options like pretzels, nuts and small candy bars. Chips and dip, spinach dip and cheese with crackers are also great choices. Great and easy recipe ideas can also be found online. You always gotta have fried chicken, Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt said. Sometimes well set up a crock pot to cook something during the game and then come back and eat that. And dont forget the drinks. Fill large plastic tubs and coolers with bottled water and sodas to keep all beverages cold until after the game ends. Also, pick up disposable utensils for easy clean-up, and remember that inexpensive dis posable cups, plates and napkins in your teams colors make a great addition to the party. Get in the spirit: Save 1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter Week of September 1-7, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. A golden comeback STEVE ROTHWELL By AP Markets Writer Gold is having a summer revival. The price of gold touched $1,420 an ounce this week, a three-and-a-half month high, as escalating tensions in the Middle East, volatile currency markets and renewed demand for jewelry in China and India pushed prices higher. Gold has surged 15 percent since sink ing to $1,212 an ounce, its lowest level in almost three years, on June 27. A gain of 20 percent or more would put the metal back in a bull market. Golds resurgence follows a rough ride this year. Gold slumped 4.8 percent in the first three months of 2013 as the outlook for the economy improved while inflation remained subdued. For many years prior to that, large inves tors, like hedge funds, bought the metal as a way to protect their investments against rising prices and a slumping dollar. They feared that the Federal Reserves stimu lus program could cause prices to rise. But inflation remained subdued and that reduced the need to buy gold. Also, signs in January that the dollar was strengthen ing diminished the appeal of owning gold. Then in April, the bottom fell out. A proposal that Cyprus sell some of its gold reserves to support its banks rattled trad ers, prompting concern that Spain, Italy and other weak European economies might also sell and flood the market. Gold plunged by $140 an ounce, or nine percent, on April 15 as investors unloaded their holdings. That was the biggest oneday decline in more than 30 years. While the price of gold is still down 17 percent this year, the metal is on the rise. Here are the factors driving its come back: A LITTLE INSURANCE One of the reasons people buy gold is that it offers an alternative to more tradi tional financial assets, says Mike McGlone, director of research at ETF Securities, a provider of commodity-based exchangetraded funds. When financial markets get jittery, investors often buy gold because it is considered one of the safest assets that can easily be converted to cash. As the stock market soared this year, rising as much as 20 percent, investors had less need to hold gold. That has changed the last four weeks. The Standard & Poors 500 index has lost 4 percent since reaching an all-time high of 1,709.67 on August 2. Traders are concerned about when and by how much the Fed will pare back on its stimulus, a major driver behind the markets rally. Strife in Egypt and Syria has also reminded investors that its a dangerous world out there: wars can spread and oil prices can spike, hurting economies and stock markets. Investors want to add back a little insur ance to their portfolios these days. If we lived in a perfect world, we would not need gold, says McGlone. But since we dont, we do need something that is the ultimate store of value. Investors dont need to buy gold bars or coins to invest in the metal. Exchange-traded funds are investments that are similar to mutual funds. Both can be bought and sold on exchanges. Some of these funds, such as ETFs Physical Swiss Gold Shares and SPDRs Gold Shares, allow investors to buy into trusts that invest directly in gold. HAVEN FROM STORMY CURRENCIES The Fed appears close to reducing its $85 billion in monthly bond purchases, and that has stirred up currency prices worldwide, particularly in emerging mar kets. Investors had previously borrowed in dollars at low rates and then invested in faster growing economies in Asia and Latin America. Now, that trend is reversing. U.S. inter est rates have started to climb in antic ipation of the Feds reduced stimulus. Investors are selling their emerging-mar ket holdings and converting the proceeds back into dollars. The value of the Indian rupee against the dollar has plunged by more than 11 percent in August on concerns that surg ing oil prices are pushing the country toward an economic crisis. The Indonesian rupiah has also slumped. When currency markets become vola tile, investors worldwide look to invest in safe assets that will hold their value, says Dan Heckman, a national investment con sultant who specializes in commodities at US Bank Wealth Management. Gold does fit that role, he says. JEWELRY BUYERS Speculators like hedge funds were behind the surge in gold over the last GOLD continued on 3C Tips for pre-game fun and for saving a little in the process. Tailgating on a budget or not TAILGATING continued on 2C COURTESY Football and fried foods a winning combination.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1-7, 20132CBIZ/MOTLEY Name That Company9fie`eJ\Xkkc\`e(00+#@[\Ylk\[ fek_\jkfZbdXib\k`e(00.%@dfe\ f]iflgXe[n\ekglYc`Zm`XXe@GF\Xic`\ik_`jp\Xi% N_fXd@68ejn\i1 G`eeXZc\=ff[j Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your T rivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this news paper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice How Long Is Long?QI’ve heard I should invest in stocks for the long term. But how long is that? — C.R., Pensacola, Fla.AIt’s good to shoot for at least several years, if not many years — as long as the company remains healthy and growing at a good clip, and as long as its stock price hasn’t gotten way ahead of itself. Many fortunes have been built by people who stayed invested in solid stocks for decades. Keep taxes in mind, too, because long-term capital gains are generally taxed at a lower rate than short-term ones — 15 percent for many of us, vs. our ordinary income tax rate for short-term gains. For Uncle Sam, long term is at least a year and a day. ***QI’m considering investing in a company that seems to be doing everything right: Sales and earnings have been growing at double-digit rates and there’s no debt. And yet the stock keeps fall-ing. Am I missing something really obvious? — E.D., Green Bay, Wis.AMaybe. You need to look more closely. Even steep growth rates may be lower than previous levels. Check out expec-tations, too. If the company and/or Wall Street analysts expect slower growth in the future, that can dampen enthusiasm for the stock, sending it down. Perhaps competi-tors are fast advancing on the company, or questions have been raised about its management or offerings. For investors, the company’s future matters more than its past. Then there’s the stock price itself. Since the company has been growing briskly, investors may have bid up the stock to lofty heights, well above its intrinsic value, and the price may now be settling back to more reasonable levels. Always look at a company’s big picture.Got a question for the Fool? Send it in — see Write to Us =ffcjJZ_ffc Short-Term MattersYou probably know to sock away money for retirement. But as you think about the long run, don’t for-get the short run. Without sufficient short-term savings, you may end up wiped out, or even in bankruptcy. In order to deal with financial emergencies (imagine a medical crisis or perhaps a job loss) and to pay for known upcoming expenses (such as vaca-tions, new cars and weddings), you have two main choices: (1) Save up and earn interest, or(2) Borrow the money (often via a credit card) and pay interest (at a much higher rate). The better choice should be clear. So how much should you save? It depends. Generally, aim to have at least three to six months of living expenses in an emergency fund. If you work in a field where it’s easy to find work, three months’ worth may be enough. If you’re a type-writer repairman supporting five kids, three elderly parents and six large dogs, you may want to aim for 2013 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST.BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 8/29 Gov. to call for big tax cut By GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida Gov. Rick Scott, heading into what could be a tough re-election fight, will announce that he wants to slash taxes and fees by a half bil-lion dollars in the coming year. Scott is speaking Friday to the conservative group Americans for Prosperity in Orlando. A transcript of his prepared remarks given to The Associated Press before his speech shows he plans to seek legislative approval of the cuts. The Republican governor will maintain that if Florida has a budget surplus in 2014, it should use some of the extra rev-enue to cut taxes. “It’s your money, not the government’s,” Scott’s transcript says. “Working with the Florida Legislature, we have cut taxes year after year, even while forcing government to live within its means. This year, we are committed to returning even more money to the hard-working Florida families who earn it. “ Scott will also use the speech to directly criticize former Gov. Charlie Crist. Crist, who became a Democrat last year, is expected to challenge Scott in the gover-nor’s race. The governor will criticize Crist for backing the federal stimulus signed into law by President Barack Obama. He also cites the time that Crist personally hugged Obama during a Florida stop. “My predecessor had made a name for himself by hugging president Obama’s non-stop spending — and even hugging the President,” Scott’s transcript says. “When asked about taking all the stimulus, he said he needed the money. As a result, spending and debt increased at an alarm-ing rate. ... Florida was in a hole — and for about four years — the state just kept digging.” Scott has sought tax cuts every year he has been in office, but his initial efforts encountered stiff resistance from his fel-low Republicans in the Legislature. Shortly after he was inaugurated in 2011, Scott sought tax and fee cuts of $4 billion over a two-year period. But those deep tax cuts were rejected by state legislators strug-gling with a budget deficit. Now Florida is expected to have as much as $2 billion extra on hand next year if the economy continues to recover as projected. Rep. Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland and the House budget chief, has already publicly said he wants to use part of any surplus for tax cuts. “I’m totally on board, and I’m on the team with the tax cuts,” McKeel said Friday. Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart and the Senate budget chairman, took a more cautious approach. Negron said the Legislature would give Scott’s proposal “careful con-sideration,” but he stressed he wants to keep the state’s budget reserves flush in case the recovery falters. “We don’t know how the economy is going to perform,” Negron said. Scott’s speech can be seen as an attempt to reconnect to the conservative base that helped propel him to victory three years ago. Scott angered some conserva-tives earlier this year with his decision to endorse expanding Medicaid, a key part of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Scott will argue that his “conservative, pro-growth policies” — which include modest tax cuts and cuts in state spend-ing during his first two years — have contributed to a drop in the unemploy-ment rate and helped boost the economic recovery. But Scott’s proposal could also help in a potential Crist matchup. Crist was a Republican in 2009 when he signed into law a package of tax and fee hikes that the Legislature passed in order to balance the budget. Scott does not plan in his speech to specify which taxes and fees he wants to cut. But one possible target is to roll back automobile fees that were part of that $2.2 billion package. Negron and the Florida Senate unsuccessfully pushed to cut the fees this past year, but the House scuttled the move because it relied on ending existing tax breaks to cover the costs. Liberace mansion buyer making restoration plansBy MICHELLE RINDELSAssociated PressLAS VEGAS — The British businessman who bought Liberace’s 15,000-square-foot Las Vegas mansion for half a million dollars said Friday he plans to work on it relent-lessly to restore it to its former glory. Martyn Ravenhill told The Associated Press from his home in Guilford, where he’s preparing to celebrate his 50th birth-day on Saturday, that he’s been a huge Liberace fan all his life as well as a lover of Las Vegas. “When you live in England and it rains every day, somewhere like Las Vegas seems quite magical,” Ravenhill said. “A bit like Santa Claus.” He says he was looking at Liberace videos on YouTube when the video sharing site suggested a clip about the mansion in repossession and foreclosure. “It seems such a shock to see these videos of the sad state of the Liberace man-sion,” Ravenhill said. He called real estate agent Brad Wolfe only to discover the property was under contract. That deal fell through, he says, and he flew out to see the mansion. Within 10 minutes of viewing the property he described as “just enchanting,” he decided to buy it. The two-bedroom, 10-bathroom home was built in 1962 and sits on a half-acre lot in an aging neighborhood near the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Surrounding homes are small and sell for $80,000 to $150,000, which dragged down the value of the home, said Wolfe, who represented Ravenhill in the deal. “I’m going to make it habitable and then start doing magic on it. It’s going to be a big project. I am totally open to volunteers,” Ravenhill said. He said he’s unsure if he will be able to open the doors to the public. The mansion sold for $500,000 to Ravenhill, who seemed surprised by the international attention the purchase has brought. It went for $29,000 below its list price and about $3 million less than it was sold for seven years ago. Liberace, whose extravagances were legendary, became the best-paid entertainer on the planet during his heyday from the 1950s to the 1970s. Ravenhill says the man-sion is a piece of American history that needs to be protected. Alina Hartounian in Phoenix contributed to this report. TAILGATING Continued From Page 1Cmoney and have fun by creating your own team banners to decorate your favorite tailgating spot. It is easy to create pennants, streamers and unique posters to show your spirit. Also, grab a few plain white tees and spell out your team’s name on the shirts. • Have some fun: Avoid throwing a dull tailgate party with a boom-box full of great tunes and classic tailgate games like ring toss, ladder golf or even a game of catch. “Some people like to just sit and home and watch the game on TV,” Witt said. “But it’s more fun to be down there and see everyone year after year. The atmosphere is part of it, and it’s fun to be down there amongst it.” A great tailgate can set the tone for a great game. Make this tailgat-ing season the most fun and afford-able one yet.

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By TOM RAUM Associated Press WASHINGTON President Barack Obama still calls shoring up the middle class his No. 1 pri ority, but recent events overseas and at home are overshadowing the U.S. economy as a political issue. The civil war in Syria and alleged use by Damascus of chemical weapons, political turmoil in Egypt and rev elations about the extent of the National Security Agencys surveillance pro grams are complicating Obamas efforts to keep the focus on the economy. And while the slow and uneven recovery is now 4 years old, its advance could be threatened by U.S.-led airstrikes against targets in Syria that might send already rising oil prices soaring. The eclipsing of the U.S. recovery by other pressing events could be a factor in next years midterm elec tion campaigns and in the presidential contests two years later. Also, as Obama slips more and more into lame-duck territory, his ability to shape the national agenda seems diminished. While the unemploy ment rate of 7.4 percent is still well above the 5 to 6 percent typical of a healthy economy, it has been track ing down steadily since it peaked at 10 percent in late 2009. House prices are on the rise and so is consumer spending. Big banks are reporting strong profits again and regulators are winding down investiga tions into reckless Wall Street lending practices. U.S. exports are inching up and the budget deficit is inching down. After four years of trillion-dollar-plus shortfalls, the deficit this year is expected to come in at just over $600 billion. Many European coun tries are clawing their way out of recession. Even Greece, the poster child for a troubled economy, is managing a rare budget surplus. Obama has been making campaign-style speeches around the country focus ing on longer-term growth, education, housing afford ability, infrastructure jobs and lifting the battered middle class. Republicans dismiss Obamas rhetoric as standard Democratic big-government fare and continue to emphasize what they see as govern ment overspending. I think its a hard moment, not just for the Obama administration but the whole sense we have of how we can conduct government right now, said Wayne Fields, a pro fessor who studies politi cal rhetoric at Washington University in St. Louis. Both foreign policy and domestic policy are inter acting in really complicated ways around these issues. In recent months, the economy has looked pret ty good for Obama, sug gests Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian at Rice University. Not homerun good, but theres been incremental improvement in the economy. Yet even without the crisis in Syria, two loom ing financial showdowns threaten that recovery. The first is a possible par tial government shutdown if Congress fails to pass leg islation to keep the govern ment functioning beyond the Sept. 30 fiscal-year end. The other is an expected new battle over increasing the governments borrow ing authority. The Obama administration last week said that it would hit its borrowing limit in midOctober without a higher debt ceiling earlier than widely anticipated. The national debt ceiling now stands at about $16.7 trillion. The overall debt keeps rising even as defi cits come down because the government still spends more than it takes in. Republican lawmakers say theyll support a higher debt ceiling only with off setting spending cuts. House Speaker John Boehner told a GOP fund raiser last week hell push for cuts and reforms that are greater than the increase in the debt limit. Were going to have a whale of a fight, said Boehner, R-Ohio. Some conservative Republicans, including those in tea party factions, are even threatening to use the debt-ceiling battle to defund parts of Obamas health care law. The administration is pushing back hard against the GOP threats. Our position is unequiv ocal, says White House press secretary Jay Carney. We will not negotiate with Republicans in Congress over Congress responsi bility to pay the bills that Congress has racked up period. In summer 2011, the White House and congres sional Republicans sparred for weeks over a debtlimit increase. While they finally cut a deal to avoid a government default, the prolonged dust-up led to a first-ever downgrade of the nations credit rating. The White House had been working quietly with a group of eight GOP sena tors on a possible grand compromise. But the group, dubbed the Dinner Caucus, made little head way and essentially gave up the quest. Its pretty evi dent that theres no com mon ground right now, said group member Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. Thomas Mann, a con gressional scholar at the Brookings Institution who studies governance, says control of the national agenda by any president is fleeting at best. Lyndon Johnson only exercised it early on, as did Ronald Reagan; Bill Clinton never fully had control and Obama did only during the first two years with strong Democratic majori ties. Foreign policy events often overtake presidential ambitions, as do opposi tion parties that manage to win control of one or both chambers of Congress, Mann said. I dont think the economy is less impor tant to Americans. Its more that they have come to doubt that anything con structive can emerge from Washington. The brief government shutdowns of late 1995 and early 1996 came because of bitter budget and debtceiling clashes between Clinton and Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich. Gingrich and his troops hoped voters would blame the shutdowns on the Democratic president. But polls showed they mostly blamed Republicans. Clinton and the people around him were good, said GOP strategist Rich Galen, who once worked for Gingrich and who sees peril ahead for Republicans if they cant get together on budget issues. I remem ber saying at the time that a White House that is aggressively on message is unstoppable. Galen said theres no Republican opposite to Obama and that its hard to blame former President George W. Bush any lon ger. You could say Boehner a hundred times and, out of 300 people, two would know who you were talk ing about, Galen said. If you held my head under a water faucet and said, Tell me what the Republican economic plan is, I couldnt tell you. I think what weve got to do is come up with an alternative thats easy to explain and where people go, Oh, yeah. Well, that makes sense. Lets go do that. From staff reports Increasing living space, sprucing up the exterior and improving energy effi ciency are at the top of the list for many homeowners living in older or smaller houses. But such additions and upgrades can be exten sive and costly. By making strategic upgrades, howev er, you can accomplish all these desires simply and affordably. If youre on a budget, here are some steps you can take to make your home more livable and beautiful while simultane ously reducing your utility bills: Smart Interior Design Smart decorating can improve energy efficiency. Ensure furniture is not blocking vents. Install car peting or use area rugs to make your home cozier in winter. Awnings Considering an addi tion to your home? A fab ric canopy or awning over your deck or patio is a great long-term solution to expand needed living space at a low cost. Be it an out door kitchen, living room or simply a covered deck or patio, you can make better use of your existing out door spaces with awnings. And adding awnings and solar shades to your home can extend the life of your air conditioner and save you money on ener gy bills for years to come. Recent data indicates that the shade provided by this retrofit can help reduce cooling costs in some parts of the country by more than 50 percent, accord ing to The Professional Awning Manufacturers Association. Window and doorway awnings also provide an affordable and quick boost of curb appeal by comple menting your home with splashes of color and add ing drama and impact to an otherwise ordinary faade. Consider echoing the architecture of a traditional residence or complement ing more modern-styled homes. Organize If youre short on space, expand your living area through organization. Do a sweep every few days to de-clutter. And think ver tical versus horizontal, as a narrow, tall shelving unit will take up a lot less floor space than a large trunk. Consider opting for furni ture that moonlights as stor age, such as a coffee table with a bottom shelf and beds with pull-out drawers. If closets are limited, look to under-used areas of the home, such as the foyer. For example, adding a row of hooks and a bench to your homes entryway creates a makeshift mud room and a perfect place to store coats and shoes. By opting for affordable, high-impact upgrades, you can achieve maximum liva bility, comfort and function ality in your older home. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1-7, 2013 3C 3CBiz decade. That sent gold to a peak of $1,900 an ounce in September 2011. It also priced out a large part of the market jewelry buyers in coun tries like India and China. In those countries, people have traditionally bought jewelry as a way to invest in gold. When prices slumped this spring, though, those buyers jumped back in because people in those countries bought more gold. The World Gold Council, a trade group for gold mining companies, says in a report on Aug. 15 that con sumer demand for gold surged 87 percent in China in the second quar ter, compared with the same period a year earlier. Demand in India climbed by 71 percent. Gold still remains far below its inflation-adjusted peak. It rose as high as $873 an ounce on Jan. 21, 1980. Adjusted for price increases that would be worth $2,475 in 2013. GOLD: Making a summer revival, hits 3-month high Continued From Page 1C Simple upgrades for older homes COURTESY There are plenty of simple ways to upgrade older homes. Adding an awning is one. Economy being eclipsed as top campaign issue

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C $2000.00 SIGN ON BONUS WANTED 3 SALES PROFESSIONALSAre you tired of a dead end, incoming limiting job? Are you ready for the opportu-nity to make more money, make more friends and achieve the success you know you can do?Like the Marines, North Florida Auto Sales is looking for a few good people.North Florida Auto Sales, North Florida’s Premier Pre-Owned Auto dealer is looking to expand. With over 200 pre-owned automobiles available for sale at any given time the income potential is unlimited.Must be 18 years old with a valid Driver’s license. If so contact: Bill Huggins at: 386-984-9565 or Dwight Twiggs at: 386-688-1619 to schedule an appointment for interview “NOW HIRING” LegalPUBLIC NOTICEON REQUESTFOR PROPOSALSRFP-022-2013Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 until Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. Please note that formal openings are not held. At the date and time indicated for the sub-mission deadline, the names of the respondents will be read aloud in the City Council Chambers located on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. No other information will be re-leased at that time.UTILITIES OFFICE RENOVATIONMANDATORYPRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT:Monday, September 16, 2013 AT10:00 A.M. IN THE CITYCOUN-CILCHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITYHALLLOCATED AT205 N. MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055Documents may be viewed on the City website: procurement.lcfla.com or at www.demandstar.com. Contact the Procurement Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more information.05540693September 1, 2013 020Lost & Found Lost adult male Boston Bull, black and white, last seen off South Hwy 41 on 8/28. Needs medical care. Contact 386-758-2408 Missing John Deere Tractor Year 2000 Model 790 with Bush Hog ID# V0790G4 72465 Reward outstanding. 386-752-4276 or 352-260-2991 100Job OpportunitiesDrivers: Guaranteed Home EVERYWeekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check! Call: 1-888-880-5916 05539276Lake City Reporter Ad DesignerPosition Candidates must be proficient in all Adobe CS print production programs. Send resume and digital work samples to: Dave Kimler at dkimler@lakecityreporter .com Interviews to follow for qualifying applicants. Competitive salary and benefits plan available. 05540560Alocal growing company has two open positions for EXPERIENCED Sales Person in security, cameras and surveillance for residential and commercial accounts as well as a Technician for installation of security systems. Send resume to hrsscinc@gmail.com 05540634United States Cold Storage, Inc.Transportation Clerk Minimum qualifications: High School diploma, computer skills. Work experience in transportation / logistics, Logistics Certificate. Apply in person M-F 9am-11am. 1pm-3 pm 211 NE McCloskey Ave Lake City, FL32055 EOE Drivers: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-3110 Experienced Electrician fax resume or work experience to 386-755-5443 or email hollyelec@bellsouth.net 100Job OpportunitiesExperienced Receptionist for a busy family practice. Fax resume to 386-758-7998 Local Delivery Driver wanted: CDL/Hazmat Required;$30-35 annually, based on experience Call (386)963-2848 MECHANIC NEEDED with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 P/TChild Care position avail for Sunday’s 10am 1pm & Wednesday’s from 6pm-8pm. Contact 386-344-5961 for more info. PERSONALASSISTANT/ RECEPTIONIST, Computer skills required, reply to: P.O. Box 7246, Lake City, FL32055 PROPERTYPRESERVATION JOBS Pacific Preservation Services, Inc. is a growing nationwide property preservation, inspection and construction services company that needs to add talented individuals to our team. Our business revolves around bank owned real estate in all 50 states. We service clients large and small and deliver world class service in this highly competitive industry. Territory Manager The Territory Manager is responsible for an assigned region typically made up of a number of states and is responsible for coordinating the necessary property inspection and preservation Client work order job assignments within that territory. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: work order management, escalations, management of vendors, complaints, late orders, cancellations, profitability by client, and, management and oversight of a specific team of Vendor Coordinators and Processors. New OrderCreation/Processor PPS seeks individuals to create new preservation and inspection orders, process orders completed by PPS Vendors, and perform Quality Control review for completeness and accuracy. Knowledge and Skill Requirements: Reading, writing, and arithmetic skills required, with minimum high school diploma or equivalent. Industry experience preferred but not required. Positions require knowledge of Microsoft Office and telephone protocol. Duties require professional verbal and written communication skills and the ability to type 35-50 wpm. Working Conditions: Working conditions are normal for a corporate office environment. Please submit resumes to simonegriffin@pacpres.com Seeking Assistant Principal Westwood Christian School Submit resume to 920 SW11th St. Live Oak, FL32064 120Medical Employment05540531Gainesville Women’s Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted part time for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: Tracy: (352)331-2044 120Medical Employment05540697MEDICALBILLING Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax 386-758-5987. Exp. Mammography tech p/t for private radiology office. AART& Mammography Certif. Required Fax resume to 352-331-2044 F/Tlicensed phlebotomist needed for busy medical office. M-F. Email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net. F/Tx-ray tech needed for busy practice. M-F. Benefits available Send reply to Box 05107, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 130Part Time P/TOFFICE Assistant for Medical office. People Skills, Exp. Pref., Detail Oriented. Fax resume to 352-331-2044 240Schools & Education05540620INTERESTEDin a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class9/09 /2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class9/9/2013• LPN 9/16/2013 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 420Wanted to Buy ATTENTION We buy used mobile homes! Singles or Doublewides Call Rusty at North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 05540659GUNSHOW: 9/7 & 9/8 @ The Columbia County Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City. $5 Sat 9am4pm, Sun 9am-3pm. Info: 386-325-6114 520Boats forSale 1992 17’Wahoo, center console, Yamaha 150 hp, one owner, well maintained, $6,700. 755-2235, 397-3500 or 752-0442 630Mobile Homes forRent14 wide 3br/2ba Quiet Park No Pets Clean Country Living $550 Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP & other locations 386-752-6422 640Mobile Homes forSale05540648DISPLAYHOME CLEARANCE SALE 1STCOME1STSERVE! GOVERNMENTLOANS FOR MOBILE HOMES! YOUR $700 RENT PAYMENT= ANEWHOME! CALLCLAYTON HOMES TODAY! 904-772-8031 New 28X52 3/2 Jacobsen Only 1 Left $45,900 incl del-set-ac-skirting and steps. No Gimmics! North Pointe Homes-Gainesville 352-872-5566 Free Credit by Phone till 9 PM or www.northpointemobilehomesales.com North Pointe Homes in Gainesville has the largest selection of New Jacobsen Homes in Florida. All at Factory Outlet Prices! We also have 10 display models being sold at cost. North Pointe Hwy 441 N, Gainesville-352-872-5566 705Rooms forRent Room Furnished, Clean, TV, Fridge, Microwave, Cable, Interet, Laundry. Close in. Private w/ Enterence. For more information. Contact 386-965-3477 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2/1 -1300 sqft,Good Clean Condition duplex w/ gargage. W/D hook up, CH/A, Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $485. mo $485 dep. No pets 386-697-4814 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent1br/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathedral ceilings, brick fireplace, washer/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake City area $700 mo. Smoke Free environment. 352-494-1989 3 bd, 1 1/2 ba home in Lake City; central heat/air; carport; fenced back yard $750 rent; Available 9/1 386-623-2848 3/2 brick with Florida Room, 1 1/2 ac, 2 car garage, Price Creek area. Quiet neighborhood, $875 mth. Call 386-623-2061 3br/2ba W/D, References Req. Not Pets. $875 mth & $875 Dep. Only serious inquires. 386-3973500, 755-2235 or 752-0442 730Unfurnished Home ForRentModern New Home3BR/2BA, 2 car garage, on 2 ac, 2,500sqft Fort White “3 Rivers Estates” $975 mo Call 305-345-9907. Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house w/ CHAon 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 Very Large 2bd/2ba Lake City area, garage, CH/A, $875mo 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833, www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 750Business & Office Rentals05540532#!$)#%$() %$%))%$) %"$()"*#)) ) #(#$) "&)r %$") $'")"())$)"$)) )r$()r)) n 790Vacation Rentals Scalloping!! Horseshoe Beach Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock, fish sink. wkend $395. wk $895. 352-498-5986 or 386-235-3633 alwaysonvacation.com #419-181 Scallops are here in Horseshoe Beach. Motel efficiencies just completely remodeled, sleeps up to 4 max.$99/night 352-498-5986 Smokey Mtn. Cabin Sleeps 6, Franklin, NC. $375 wkly, mth of Sept.$900, or 10/27-11/2 (Fall Foliage) $375. 386-755-0070 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale Brand New 3/2 Mayfair Sbdv. Ready To Move In. Geartz Construction 386-623-2376 820Farms & Acreage1.25 ACRES located at 152 SWLibert Glenn, Hwy 47, Lake City 32025 Contact 386-344-2800 10 beautiful acres with well/septic/power pole. Owner financed; low down payment Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment PropertyBRICK DUPLEX and frame cottage on 3 lots zoned RMF-1 near Baya/McFarlane. $129,000. 386.961.9181 Large Apt Building in Lake City located at 767 SWAlachua Ave. Needs roof and remodel, Price to Sell $55,000, 352-498-3035 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 5C Classified Department: 755-5440 Mark your calendars! Florida National GuardOPEN HOUSELive Oak National Guard Armory 1416 11th Street SW Live Oak, FL 32064Saturday, September 7th 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.nrIf you have these skills, we need to talk: • Heavy Equipment Operator• Concrete and Asphalt OperatorFor more information contact SSG Amanda NesSmithat 386-438-3968nrnn nr• 100 percent tuition assistance• Leadership skills to put you ahead of the pack Join us to … •Have your picture taken with nn™ and get his autograph •Meet Soldiers of the Florida National Guard • And so much more! Meet WWESuperstarn™from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.TM & 2013 WWE. All Rights Reserved. OPEN HOUSE Saturday and Sunday 1-4 pm Located in Mayfair Subdivision (189 SW Vann Ct., Lake City)Full Equipped Home, Ready for Move-InFor more information contact: Mike Nicholson 386-623-2376 REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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6C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 NEW 2013 CHEVROLETSILVERADO $ 18,500 Was $24,585 OR $299 MO. WAC NOW NEW 2013 CHEVROLETSONIC $16,999 NEW 2013 CHEVROLETMALIBU LS $21,999 NEW 2014 CHEVROLETCRUZE LS $17,399 NEW 2013 CHEVROLETSPARK LS $12,995 *All prices plus tax, title & license ( T T&L). all r eba t es and incentiv es assigned t o dealer Phot os f or illustra tion purposes onl y N ot r esponsible f or err ors in t ypograph y or phot ograph y S il v erado price af t er or ne w er trade in. S ee dealer f or details LENDING REPRESENTATIVES AVAILABLE T O PROCESS L OANS FOR IMMEDIA TE DISPOSAL 4 3 1 6 HWY 9 0 WEST L AKE CIT Y FL WWW ROUNTREEMOORECHE VROLET C OM C H E VY C A DILL A C NISSAN SHOP 24/7 ar www r oun t r eemo o r eche v r olet c o m w w w .Roun tr eeMo or e CHE V R O LET .c om Act Fastto get a 2013

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LIFE Sunday, September 1, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D A s a young farm wife, I always made the most of our large vegetable garden by freezing and can-ning just about everything. One year, just one year, I put up hot pepper rings to use on our Friday night piz-zas. Lesson learned: always wear kitchen gloves when working with peppers. Peppers are gaining popularity and garden space more every year as so many interesting variet-ies are being introduced. The range of colors, sizes, flavor and heat content is great, and so is the interest in cooking with these col-orful, tasty vegetables. The pepper plant, a relative of tomato, potato and eggplant, is native to Mexico and Central Peppers spice up garden and table Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFE WELCOME TO LAKE CITY, DR. MELINDA KEENER. 368 NE Franklin Street Lake City, FL 32055 386-292-8000 Melinda Keener, M.D.Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryWELCOME, DR. KEENER.Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center is proud to have Dr. Keener as a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon on our Medical Sta. She completed her plastic surgery fellowship at the University of Florida, and is looking forward to opening a general plastic surgery practice with emphasis on breast (cosmetic and reconstructive), hand and aesthetic surgery, as well as skin cancer and wound treatment. Dr. Keener is a skilled surgeon who can take care of all your plastic and reconstructive needs.For more information about Dr. Keener and our staff of expert physicians, go to ShandsLakeShore.com. Independent member of the medical staff &"&%"$#)&!"&#$!%% "$&!" &""'$"#$&"!%&%% #*"'$" %&$(&"#$%$(&!&'$'&*" &"!"'!&*!$%&"$)&&%"$$%!! %&&%$&$)$))"$!('$$ &"!+"$&%&r!nr$#$&"#$"$ &&%$&'$! "$&!$%&"&%!&'$%&&!%)$"))!%'$) !&!"!"&%&*$%!&)"$"$! "$(%&#"&%"$#" nrnrnrn rrnrn r rrrrn "&%"$#"#$&%)&" & !&&" %&*&!($"! !&"'$" '!&%!%'%&!"!" $")& By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comF orty-three hours after leaving Lake City, two local Altrusa mem-bers landed in New Zealand’s Auckland Airport for the Altrusa’s 53rd Annual International Convention in July, then spent the remainder of the trip taking in the country’s breathtaking landscape. “It was like putting Alaska and Hawaii in the same state,” said Robin Hall, a past governor of Altrusa’s District 3. “On the North Island, you have volcanoes. On the South Island, there’s glaciers and mountains... Oh yeah, and there’s approximately 45 million sheep.” Everywhere you go in New Zealand, you see sheep, she added. Hall traveled across the world with her fellow Altrusan, Sandy Furches, gathering in Rotorura at The Energy Center for the convention. Hosted by the 12 Altrusa Clubs in New Zealand, the convention reunited the two Lake City representatives with an old friend, Maria Mackay. Mackay, Altrusan and teacher, visited Lake City nine years ago on a career exchange program. Mackay reminisced with Hall and Furches about Lake City’s hospitality, especially the open doors to Columbia County’s School System and school facili-ties. Mackay even saw her first alligator in Lake City. While at the convention, Hall said she learned how to build the local club’s membership. With more members, she added, the more community service the club can accomplish. Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a non-profit organi-zation of civic-minded women dedicated to making the local community better through leadership, partnership and service. The club hosts numerous commu-nity events throughout the year, including Diva Day, the Girl’s Summit and a backpack program. The group meets internationally ALTRUSA continued on 2D Winter in New Zealand ‘It was like puttingAlaska and Hawaiiin the same state.’ COURTESY Sandy Furches, left, and Robin Hall enjoy winter in New Ze aland and a KiwiRail train ride on the Trans-Alpine r ail journey to Arthur’s Pass in the Southern Alps. ALTRUSA TRIP GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu PEPPERS continued on 2D

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By JENNIFER FORKER Associated Press Even a small slice of the big outdoors can call for big art. With some do-it-yourself ingenuity, creating artwork for an outdoor living space neednt be costly or compli cated. In a few hours, you can make a piece, large or not-so-large, that packs a visual wallop. Just keep in mind the advice of Bob Richter, interior designer and cast member of PBS treasurehunting series Market Warriors: Theres a fine line between Whats that piece of junk in your yard? and art. Landscape designer Chris H. Olsen, of Little Rock, Ark., is fond of wine bottles, repurposing emp ties in myriad ways for the garden as an artsy wall, accent lighting and art objects. Im all about fun, funky, great displays and projects that are relatively easy to do, says Olsen. To add patio privacy or garden interest, Olsen builds a wine bottle wall: vertical rows of wine bot tles inserted into a wood frame using metal rods. I love a little bling bling in the garden, and I love glass, says Olsen. Another conversation starter: Olsens bottle stars empty, corked wine bottles that are glued together to create a star shape, then hung in trees and positioned in planted pots. This and other out door DIY projects can be found in his book Chris H. Olsens Five Seasons (Leisure Arts, 2011). David Bromstad, host of HGTV Star and host designer of the networks Color Splash, says string ing a dozen or more wine bottles with lights inside them and hanging them from a pergola or other substantial structure the underside of a deck, say creates alluring outdoor lighting. The more the better, he says. If you do a ton of those, youll have an (art) installation. Bromstad recommends cutting off the wine bottles bottoms and stringing the lights through the bottles with outdoor lamp cord. Visit Pinterest, the online projects board, for images of this and other ways to use wine bottles as lighting. Bromstad is known for creating large pieces burst ing with color for his TV show clients. DIYers can do the same for an outdoor space, he says, by using out door-safe supplies: pressuretreated plywood instead of canvas, and an outdoor primer and paint. Bromstad uses Nova Color, an acrylic paint that stands up well to the elements. Distress the plywood before painting to accentu ate its roughness, he sug gests. Do drip painting a la Jackson Pollock if your artistic skills are limited. Everything that has to be outdoors has to last through the elements, Bromstad says, so you might as well make it look rough from the begin ning. Both Bromstad and Olsen say concrete blocks are useful in the garden: Stack them to build a wall, cement couch, bench or table. Make it artsy by planting the openings with flowers, herbs or other greenery. Again, Pinterest posts scads of images. Its just stacking, says Olsen. You dont even have to mortar it. One more idea from Bromstad: Hang old gutters from a fence, garage wall or along a pergolas perimeter just about anywhere, he says and plant them with impatiens or herbs. Make sure the gutters slope so water can drain. Its one big, beautiful art project, says Bromstad. Its just gorgeous. Richter roams flea mar kets for large outdoor art for himself and clients, grav itating toward antique sig nage and industrial-looking collectibles because they can weather the elements. Surfboards propped on a deck or attached to a garage wall are popular right now, he says. While art is in the eye of the beholder, Richter says care and placement is the key. Its like framing a piece of art, he says. Half of art, I think, is how you display it and where you display it. Here are directions for one DIY outdoor-art proj ect: Bottle Star (Adapted from the book Chris H. Olsens Five Seasons) Supplies: 9 assorted wine bottles, empty and corked 4 rolls of paper towels (to brace bottles) Household adhesive sealant Assembly: 1. Glue the bottoms of four wine bottles together to resemble a plus (+) sign. Let dry for four hours. 2. Where the four bottles meet, glue one additional bottle sitting up. Let dry four hours. 3. Using paper towel rolls to brace them, glue the four remaining bottles leaning upward at a 45degree angle, allowing each to dry before attach ing the next. America. In Spain, hot peppers are called chili, meaning from the country of Chili. In the U.S., hot peppers are often referred to as chili peppers. The heat, or spiciness of hot peppers comes from the compound capsaicin present in the fruit. The spiciness of different variet ies can be compared on a heat index known as the Scoville scale. This scale indicates the amount of capsaicin present. While sweet peppers such as bell and banana peppers have 0 to 100 units, extremely bit ing hot peppers such as the Trinidad Moruga scorpion pepper contain up to 1.2 million units. Most of our commonly home-grown zingers will range between 1,000 and 300,000 units. Capsaicins word mean ing is to bite, exactly what that scorpion pepper would do if eaten. There are other uses being found for this potent chemical. The pharmaceutical indus try uses this compound in pepper sprays, including mace. Arthritis treatments containing capsaicin are also being tested. Peppers are not particu larly difficult to grow, but the summer heat puts an end to their production of fruit in the summer. Work is being done to extend the pepper season in North Florida by grow ing peppers under shade structures. Check out this on-going work on the Small Farms site at solu tionsforyourlife.com. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Outdoor living calls for big art ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS ABOVE: Chris H. Olsen, tAandscape Designer, of Little Rock, Ark., created a decorative wall out of concrete blocks planted with ivy and tropical plants. Cement couches, benches and tables also can be made by stacking concrete blocks. BELOW: Olsen also created a decorative wall out of empty wine bottles by threading them onto metal poles inserted into a wooden frame. D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. PEPPERS: Bring heat to your garden Continued From Page 1D HAPPENINGS Fauls celebrate 50th anniversary Harvey and Relma Faul celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013. Harvey Faul and Relma Kirby were united in marriage on Aug. 25, 1963, at Athens Baptist Church in Lake City. Their son Glenn, his wife Michelle and their children, Andrew and Heather, live in Lake City. Their daughter Teresa Kelly and her husband Kevin live in Alachua. The anniversary was celebrated at home with a family gathering. Relma is retired from Kirby Oil Co. Harvey owns and operates Faul Equipment Sales and also farms. COURTESY Harvey and Relma Faul. Crafts By MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer ATLANTA Theres been a big shift in how many school districts take money from soda compa nies and ban junk food from vending machines, health officials say. A government survey found 44 percent of school districts banned junk food from vending machines last year, up from 30 per cent in 2006. It also found drops in how many districts took a cut of soft drink sales, received donations from soda companies, or allowed soda advertising. Those are considered positive steps in helping the nation reduce the num ber of children who are overweight and obese. But its not clear to how much impact the changes are having. The overall proportion of U.S. chil dren who are overweight or obese has been holding steady at around 17 per cent, according to govern ment statistics. Fewer schools sell junk food ALTRUSA: New Zealand Continued From Page 1D every two years. In the past, the organization has gathered in South Dakota, Florida and Puerto Rico. The International board selects the destination for the biennial meet ing. Since the Altrusa International began nearly 100 years ago, New Zealand has hosted the international convention twice. During the convention, Furches learned that her club truly cares about the community, even interna tionally. An Altrusa branch in Christchurch, New Zealand, received a grant after an earthquake ripped through the area. Despite the fact that members of the club had damage on their own homes, Furches said the woman decided to use the money to support the community. They orga nized manicures and pedi cures for the displaced local women and provided aid to local schoolchildren. I believe our club here is already a caring group of people that reach out in service, but it was very uplifting to see that hap pening on the other side of the world. Altrusans are of the same spirit.... Deb Bell, a motivational speaker in New Zealand and the keynote speaker for the convention, addressed the four gives of life, Furches said. They are: Give generously, give in, give up and forgive. Furches believed each give reflected an aspect of Altrusan philosophy. Aside from the conven tion, Hall and Furches par ticipated in a 13-day tour of the country that started at Rotorura on the North Island traversing to the southernmost city in the country, Invercargill. While the group expe rienced a wide variety of sights in New Zealand, Hall believes her favorite part of the trip was a heli copter ride to a glacier at the foot of Mt. Cook. It was just spectacular, she said. It was like being in the heavens faceto-face with the highest mountain in the country and looking at all that unspoiled beauty. For Hall, shes always had an affinity for glaciers. The trip gave her a chance to cross an item off her bucket list. She also wit nessed the breathtaking sights of New Zealand, a country whose residents take pride in their land. She said the country is very clean, most of the residents were well-trav eled and the minimum wage is $18 an hour. I would love to go back, Furches said. I would recommend it to anyone. To Furches, the most interesting part of the north island was the cul ture of the Maori culture, the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. But as the group traveled south, she enjoyed the interesting landscape. The country itself, she said, has a wide variety of climates seashores, snow, arid lands and fertile farms. God is quite an amaz ing artist, Furches said.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy KIM COOKAssociated PressQuadrilaterals, cubes, polyhedrons ... sound like 10th grade math class? Perhaps, but they’re also examples of one of this fall’s biggest trends in home decor. Crisp, contem-porary and pleasing to the eye, geometrics work well for tables, lighting, acces-sories and soft furnishings. Nate Berkus is a fan of these modern motifs, as his fall collection at Target attests. One of his favorites is a wall-mounted art piece made of hexagonal metal. His inspiration came out of a trip to a gem and min-eral show, where he saw a table of crystallized honey-combs. “They were breathtaking,” he said. A series of polyresin marble trays are embla-zoned with a scattering of rhombuses. Check out the zig-zagged enamel photo frames here as well. (www.target.com ) Restoration Hardware’s curated “Curiosities” collection includes some Belgian “maquettes” — wooden scale models used to teach architecture. The large polygonal star or pyramidal cone would make a striking accessory. (www.restora-tionhardware.com ) Canadian design duo Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler have created the Welles light fixture, a clus-ter of blackened steel poly-gons with interiors avail-able in nickel, brass or copper. (www.gabrielscott.com ) Also in lighting, Seattlebased design house Iacoli and McAllister offers open-framed rhomboid pen-dants, available in different configurations, crafted in metallics as well as fun, powder-coated colors like tomato, blue and white. (www.iacolimcallister.com) Ridgely, a Toronto studio, welds cut steel rods into crisscross shapes on screens that can be left raw or powder-coated with sev-eral different colors. They can be used as room or landscape dividers, or as wall art. (www.ridgelystu-dioworks.com ) Flor.com has a range of carpet tiles that replicate graphic patterns like zig-zags and rectangles. (www.flor.com ) At www.overstock.com circles are the focus on the Metro wool rug, with disc shapes in vibrant fall shades of rust, olive and steel blue on a charcoal background. The retailer’s Ivory Geometric Circles rug has a midcentury vibe with concentric seafoam, magenta, gold and olive swirls on a background of cream. Another Canadian talent, Renato Foti, makes tables, accessories and other home decor ele-ments out of colored glass; his Martini tables and Geo Square basins feature geo-metric shapes embedded in the hand-worked glass. (www.triodesignglassware.com ) New York designer Jill Malek’s Voyageur wallpa-per takes non-Euclidean geometry to the next level, with a range of papers print-ed with lines radiating from points, like a compass gone wild. They’re available in several color combinations, including Red Eye (white on black) and CandyLand (white on red). Her Luci Della Cita wallpaper evokes city lights at night, with spherical shapes playing across a moody, out-of-focus background. (www.jillmalek.com ) You can solve for “x’’ with one of Modshop’s side tables, with zebrawood, hickory, rosewood or oak veneer tops on sleek, chrome, X-shaped legs. (www.modshop1.com ) Finally, if you’re the crafty type, check out Brett Bara’s tutorial on creating your own geometric patch-work wall art using triangle fabric shapes in an Ikea frame. It’s so simple that you’re guaranteed an easy “A’’ in this geometry class, at least. (www.brettbara.com ) Crisp geometrics give shape to interior dcor Motifs work well for tables, lights and wall art.ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSThese publicity photos released by Restoration Hardware show scale models called maquettes which are used by architects studying form, structure and proportion. These replicas from Belgium, available at Restoration Hardware, are an inter esting way to introduce one of fall’s strongest dcor elements, ge ometrics. By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — The luckiest day of Niblett’s life had to be when he was returned to the animal shelter in Virginia where he had been adopted. Excessive barking when he was left alone in the yard earned the terrier mix his return trip in 2000. But he was soon re-adopted by Robin Robertson Starr, the chief executive officer of the Richmond Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, whose family loved him unconditionally and never left him alone again. “He is one of the most beloved pets of my whole life, my dog that I adore with all of my heart,” Starr said of the 16-year-old pooch. Many shelter workers do all they can to find the right fit the first time. They use sleepovers, “Meet Your Match” surveys, sat-isfaction guarantees, fos-ter programs and TV spot-lights on pets. Despite a rigorous approval process, there will always be bad matches. And sometimes, that works out just fine. The average shelter gets about 10 percent of its adoptees back, accord-ing to the SPCA. Shelter workers don’t want own-ers or pets to suffer from a mismatch and with fewer shelters killing unwanted animals, it’s easier on the conscience to return a pet that doesn’t work out. People return pets for a wide variety of legitimate reasons— including aller-gies, loss of a job, a death in the family — and plen-ty of questionable ones. There was the beagle that sniffed grass too hard, the dog who loved too much and the pooch who didn’t match the sofa. “We do have some wacky reasons because there are a number of wacky people out there, but the vast majority of people are very sincere and commit-ted about adoptions,” Starr said. A few months ago, Leah Morgan and her family, including 4-year-old black Lab mix Olive, spent time at Wayside Waifs in Grandview, Mo., before deciding to adopt a 9-month-old mutt named Bloo. The shelter said the previous owners could not afford him, but other prob-lems surfaced once they got him home. Bloo destroyed the blinds, the carpet, chewed through the wood trim, and shredded his ball and other toys into confetti. When put in a kennel, he urinated and acted out. He growled at everyone in the house, including her 8and 13-year-old children. “I was on edge, constantly worried that he would bite somebody,” said Morgan, who owns a yoga studio. So she took him back.“I felt a little guilty, of course,” she said. “Even after a week, you have an emotional attachment. I think he can be a good dog, I just can’t be the one to make that happen.” “We might feel like we failed,” said Dr. Emily Weiss, vice president of shelter research and development for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. “But we appreci-ate that somebody cared enough to bring them back. We want the expe-rience of living with an animal to be a good one for both parties.” Future owners are told if an animal has been returned and why. Pets returned for behavior or aggression prob-lems might be offered to a rescue organization for rehab, said Jan Selder, director of field operations for Los Angeles Animal Services. If the dog or cat needs socialization, it might be sent to a foster home. But if the problem was not the fault of the ani-mal, such as owner allergies or, say, clashing color schemes, it will immedi-ately be offered for re-adoption. Returns are even fair game on the popular adopt-a-pet segments on local TV in Los Angeles. A kitten named Bridget was adopted July 6 and returned July 10. The fam-ily said they didn’t know she would require so much attention. On July 10, Selder took Bridget to KNBC-TV and told her story. The kitty had a new home that afternoon. Every shelter writes its own return policy. While most want them back, some require them back if things don’t work out. Shelters like Hillside SPCA in Pottsville, Pa., extend their policies for life. Pets have been returned after a decade in a loving home because the owner passes away, enters a nurs-ing home or assisted living center, said the shelter’s humane police officer Janine Choplick said. Shelter workers said there was no limit to the number of times they would take an animal back. Sam, an 85-pound blood and basset hound mix with 6-inch legs and seri-ous health problems, was returned six times to the Richmond shelter. Even a basset rescue returned the dog. Carly Sgueo, Richmond’s senior man-ager of shelter operations, was the seventh and last person to adopt Sam. “He was the love of my life for several years, the most loving animal I have ever known. He would step aside and let a squirrel drink his water before he did. He was so gentle and kind,” Sgueo said. She was the kennel tech then and had taken care of Sam at the shelter so knew what to expect with his epileptic seizures, she said. She adopted him in the summer of 2004 when he was 18 months old, and had him for another six years until he died of can-cer. “We had a rocky first few months that made for a lot of Sam stories, but those stories make me smile even today,” she said. Unhappily returned shelter pets can find happiness with othersHome Decorating ASSOCIATED PRESSRobin Robertson Starr holds her dog Niblett. Starr, the chief executive officer of the Richmond Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said of Niblett “He is one of the most beloved pets of my whole life, my dog that I adore with all of my heart. I adopted him after he was returned to us,” The terrier mix was returned because he barked when the people who initially adopted him left hi m alone in the backyard. Online: Q www.richmondspca.org Q www.aspca.org Q www.animalleague.org Q www.laanimalservices.com Q www.hillsidespca. com By DAVID CRARYAP National WriterTrey Powell’s first name has an extra resonance these days. Though still a bachelor, he now presides over a family of three as the dad of twin daughters born six months ago via a surrogate mother. “I feel so lucky every day,” Powell said. At 42, he’s a new addition to the ranks of men who intentionally seek the role of single father. While some opt for adoption, oth-ers yearn to have children with genetic ties and are willing to invest $100,000 or more to make that happen. There are no firm numbers of how many men have taken this route. It’s clear-ly still a rarity, although Growing Generations, a leading for-profit surroga-cy agency in Los Angeles, says its caseload of single men has risen steadily and totaled about 25 cases last year. Experts say the driving force is generally a male equivalent of the “biological clock” that prompts some unmarried women to have children while they’re still fertile. “They say they’ve always wanted to be a dad, they haven’t found a partner that they want to start a family with, they’re getting older and just don’t want to wait ‚ the same things single women say,” said Madeline Feingold, an Oakland, Calif., psychologist who has done extensive counseling related to surrogacy. That was the case for Powell, a pharmaceuti-cal company executive in Seattle who spent three years futilely trying to adopt. “I was in an adoption pool for a year and half, didn’t get any calls and got bummed about the whole experience,” he said. “I just wanted to be a dad. Time was not on my side, and I didn’t have the luxury of waiting for an ideal mate.” Before approaching Growing Generations, Powell discussed his options at length with family members and with people who’d been through surrogacy. There was a lot of self-interrogation. “If something happens to me, who’s going to take care of my daughters? Is this an egotistical, selfish thing?” he recalled asking himself. “I had to be sure it was the right thing to do.” Now, he says, fatherhood is the focus of his life ‚ a transformation made easier because he often works from home and can afford a full-time nanny. That level of affluence is a virtual prerequisite for men pursuing the option of fatherhood via surrogacy. “We tell people to budget $125,000 to $150,000 for a single baby, and $150,000 to $175,000 for twins,” said Stuart Bell, co-owner of Growing Generations. Those figures include compensation of $8,000 to $10,000 for the egg donor, and at least $25,000 for the surrogate mother who gives birth after being impreg-nated with an implanted embryo. Though male clients have the option of enlist-ing an egg donor on their own, Bell said most make their choice from a pool of women recruited by Growing Generations. The clients aren’t told the names of the possible egg donors, but see videos of them and learn extensive details about their health, education and genetic his-tory. The process also entails psychological screening, plus detailed legal nego-tiations to minimize any chance that the egg donor or surrogate mother might claim parental rights. By the time the process is done, the aspiring father’s commitment is usu-ally apparent, said Denise Bierly, a State College, Pa., attorney specializing in adoption and surrogacy law, “With men especially, the process gets so well thought through,” she said. “They go into this having talked about it with their friends, relatives. There’s nothing spontaneous about it.” Alan Bernstein, a dad raising three surrogacy-born children in Los Angeles, describes single parenting as “an insanely hard job” and also as deeply rewarding. Via surrogacy, some men opt to be single dads

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 4DLIFE MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 2, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank (DVS) Mistresses (N) (DVS) Castle “The Fast and the Furriest” News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Tasty Treasures” The National Parks: America’s Best Idea Yosemite Valley; Yellowstone. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherMike & Molly2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyUnder the Dome “Speak of the Devil” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of Dixie “This Kiss” Breaking Pointe (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsRaising HopeRaising HopeNew GirlThe Mindy ProjectNewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy!American Ninja Warrior “Vegas Finals” Las Vegas nals. (N) Siberia “One by One” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(3:45) International Festival of Arts & Ideas: Race in America in 2050Aspen Institute--Breyer--MarshallFirst Ladies: In uence & Image Aspen Institute--Breyer--Marshall WGN-A 16 239 307(:15) 10th InningAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos The $100,000 grand-prize winner. America’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Hot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279The Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have Nots A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsBad InkBad InkBad InkBad InkBad InkBad Ink(:01) Modern Dads(:31) Modern Dads HALL 20 185 312“Mother’s Day on Walton’s Mountain” (1982, Drama) Ralph Waite. “A Walton Easter” (1997, Drama) Richard Thomas, Ralph Waite. FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier “Detour” FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Just Go With It” (2011) Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. CNN 24 200 202(5:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) The Cheshire Murders A home invasion leads to three murders. Anderson Cooper 360 TNT 25 138 245Castle Fairytale-themed murders. Castle “Undead Again” (DVS) Castle “Always” Castle “Kick the Ballistics” Rizzoli & Isles “Remember Me” Castle The team searches for a sniper. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241CopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCops MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldMary Tyler MooreThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessieLiv & Maddie“Teen Beach Movie” (2013, Musical) Ross Lynch. Phineas and FerbAustin & AllyJessie “Badfellas” A.N.T. FarmAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252“Obsessed” (2009, Suspense) Idris Elba, Beyonc Knowles, Ali Larter. “Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009) Tyler Perry, Derek Luke. “Madea’s Family Reunion” (2006) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood. USA 33 105 242NCIS A package contains two eyes. NCIS: Los Angeles “Bounty” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) Summer Camp “Winner Takes All” BET 34 124 329“Friday After Next” (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. BET Awards 2013 Chris Brown; Mariah Carey. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Live (N) (Live) e College Football Florida State at Pittsburgh. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) E 2013 U.S. Open Tennis Round of 16. From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. (N) Olbermann (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -ScubaNationInto the BlueSaltwater Exp.FSU First LookInside the RaysRays Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ LoudFast N’ Loud A windshield gets broken. Fast N’ Loud: Revved Up (N) Fast N’ Loud “Dale Jr.’s Sick Nomad” Turn & Burn “The Crown Jewel” Fast N’ Loud “Dale Jr.’s Sick Nomad” TBS 39 139 247SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Kevin Hart; Chris Kluwe; Eve. 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TLC 48 183 280Undercover Boss “Chicago Cubs” Undercover Boss “MGM Grand” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Boston Market” Undercover Boss “Tilted Kilt” Undercover Boss “Boston Market” HIST 49 120 269Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsGod, Guns &God, Guns &God, Guns &God, Guns & ANPL 50 184 282Call-WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanCall of the Wildman: Viva Live Action!Call-WildmanCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Shed (N) Bubba-Q (N) Diners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisNight of Joy (Episode 2) Performances by Christian artists. FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MarlinsShip Shape TV College Football Boise State at Washington. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 11FOX Sports Live (N) (Live) SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Super Shark” (2011) “Ghost Shark” (2013, Horror) Mackenzie Rosman, Richard Moll. “Sharknado” (2013, Suspense) Tara Reid, Ian Ziering, John Heard. “2 Headed Shark Attack” (2012) AMC 60 130 254“Above the Law” (1988, Action) Steven Seagal, Pam Grier. “Hard to Kill” (1990, Action) Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock, Bill Sadler. “Exit Wounds” (2001, Action) Steven Seagal, DMX, Isaiah Washington. COM 62 107 249Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0The Comedy Central Roast Actor James Franco is roasted. Comedy Roast CMT 63 166 327Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders“Twister” (1996) Helen Hunt. Storm chasers race to test a new tornado-monitoring device. Cops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Bad Dogs of Comedy” Caught in the Act “Fight Clubs” Built for the Kill “Great White Sharks” Wild JusticeWild JusticeWicked Tuna: Hooked UpBuilt for the Kill “Great White Sharks” NGC 109 186 276Life Below Zero “There Be Monsters” Life Below ZeroLife Below Zero “Checkmate” Life Below Zero “The Chase” Life Below Zero “Hell and High Water” Life Below Zero SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Bury Their Babies” Deadly Women “Parents Peril” Deadly Women “Love to Death” Deadly Women “Teen Terror” Twisted “The Other Brother” Deadly Women “Love to Death” HBO 302 300 501We Bought a ZooBeyonc: Life Is but a Dream“Horrible Bosses” (2011) Jason Bateman. ‘R’ (:45)“In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ Hard Knocks MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their ight. (:15)“The Lucky One” (2012, Drama) Zac Efron. ‘PG-13’ “Jawbreaker” (1999) Rose McGowan. ‘R’ Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545Dexter “Are We There Yet?” Dexter A murder hits close to home.“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’“Lawless” (2012, Crime Drama) Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy. ‘R’ MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 2, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank (DVS) Mistresses (N) (DVS) Castle “The Fast and the Furriest” News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Tasty Treasures” The National Parks: America’s Best Idea Yosemite Valley; Yellowstone. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherMike & Molly2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyUnder the Dome “Speak of the Devil” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of Dixie “This Kiss” Breaking Pointe (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsRaising HopeRaising HopeNew GirlThe Mindy ProjectNewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy!American Ninja Warrior “Vegas Finals” Las Vegas nals. (N) Siberia “One by One” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(3:45) International Festival of Arts & Ideas: Race in America in 2050Aspen Institute--Breyer--MarshallFirst Ladies: In uence & Image Aspen Institute--Breyer--Marshall WGN-A 16 239 307(:15) 10th InningAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos The $100,000 grand-prize winner. America’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Hot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279The Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have NotsThe Haves and the Have Nots A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsBad InkBad InkBad InkBad InkBad InkBad Ink(:01) Modern Dads(:31) Modern Dads HALL 20 185 312“Mother’s Day on Walton’s Mountain” (1982, Drama) Ralph Waite. “A Walton Easter” (1997, Drama) Richard Thomas, Ralph Waite. FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier “Detour” FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Just Go With It” (2011) Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. CNN 24 200 202(5:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) The Cheshire Murders A home invasion leads to three murders. Anderson Cooper 360 TNT 25 138 245Castle Fairytale-themed murders. Castle “Undead Again” (DVS) Castle “Always” Castle “Kick the Ballistics” Rizzoli & Isles “Remember Me” Castle The team searches for a sniper. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241CopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCopsCops MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldMary Tyler MooreThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessieLiv & Maddie“Teen Beach Movie” (2013, Musical) Ross Lynch. Phineas and FerbAustin & AllyJessie “Badfellas” A.N.T. FarmAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252“Obsessed” (2009, Suspense) Idris Elba, Beyonc Knowles, Ali Larter. “Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009) Tyler Perry, Derek Luke. “Madea’s Family Reunion” (2006) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood. USA 33 105 242NCIS A package contains two eyes. NCIS: Los Angeles “Bounty” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) Summer Camp “Winner Takes All” BET 34 124 329“Friday After Next” (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. BET Awards 2013 Chris Brown; Mariah Carey. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Live (N) (Live) e College Football Florida State at Pittsburgh. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) E 2013 U.S. Open Tennis Round of 16. From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. (N) Olbermann (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -ScubaNationInto the BlueSaltwater Exp.FSU First LookInside the RaysRays Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ LoudFast N’ Loud A windshield gets broken. Fast N’ Loud: Revved Up (N) Fast N’ Loud “Dale Jr.’s Sick Nomad” Turn & Burn “The Crown Jewel” Fast N’ Loud “Dale Jr.’s Sick Nomad” TBS 39 139 247SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Kevin Hart; Chris Kluwe; Eve. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) HLN After Dark (N) Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansChelsea Lately (N)The Dilemma TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods America (N) Hotel Impossible The Hotel Iguanazul. Hotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Love It or List It “Abbot-Brown Family” Love It or List It “Donovan Family”Beachfront BargainBeachfront BargainLove It or List It “Matt & Kelly” (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It James and Sharon. TLC 48 183 280Undercover Boss “Chicago Cubs” Undercover Boss “MGM Grand” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Boston Market” Undercover Boss “Tilted Kilt” Undercover Boss “Boston Market” HIST 49 120 269Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsGod, Guns &God, Guns &God, Guns &God, Guns & ANPL 50 184 282Call-WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanCall of the Wildman: Viva Live Action!Call-WildmanCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Shed (N) Bubba-Q (N) Diners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisNight of Joy (Episode 2) Performances by Christian artists. FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MarlinsShip Shape TV College Football Boise State at Washington. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 11FOX Sports Live (N) (Live) SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Super Shark” (2011) “Ghost Shark” (2013, Horror) Mackenzie Rosman, Richard Moll. “Sharknado” (2013, Suspense) Tara Reid, Ian Ziering, John Heard. “2 Headed Shark Attack” (2012) AMC 60 130 254“Above the Law” (1988, Action) Steven Seagal, Pam Grier. “Hard to Kill” (1990, Action) Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock, Bill Sadler. “Exit Wounds” (2001, Action) Steven Seagal, DMX, Isaiah Washington. COM 62 107 249Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0The Comedy Central Roast Actor James Franco is roasted. Comedy Roast CMT 63 166 327Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders“Twister” (1996) Helen Hunt. Storm chasers race to test a new tornado-monitoring device. Cops ReloadedCops ReloadedCops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Bad Dogs of Comedy” Caught in the Act “Fight Clubs” Built for the Kill “Great White Sharks” Wild JusticeWild JusticeWicked Tuna: Hooked UpBuilt for the Kill “Great White Sharks” NGC 109 186 276Life Below Zero “There Be Monsters” Life Below ZeroLife Below Zero “Checkmate” Life Below Zero “The Chase” Life Below Zero “Hell and High Water” Life Below Zero SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Bury Their Babies” Deadly Women “Parents Peril” Deadly Women “Love to Death” Deadly Women “Teen Terror” Twisted “The Other Brother” Deadly Women “Love to Death” HBO 302 300 501We Bought a ZooBeyonc: Life Is but a Dream“Horrible Bosses” (2011) Jason Bateman. ‘R’ (:45)“In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ Hard Knocks MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their ight. (:15)“The Lucky One” (2012, Drama) Zac Efron. ‘PG-13’ “Jawbreaker” (1999) Rose McGowan. ‘R’ Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545Dexter “Are We There Yet?” Dexter A murder hits close to home.“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’“Lawless” (2012, Crime Drama) Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy. ‘R’ WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge JudyJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350Varied Programs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday News(:10) Walker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw Order: CIVaried Programs TVLAND 17 106 304(11:30) GunsmokeGunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilAll My ChildrenOne Life to LiveVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Home Improve.Home Improve.Home Improve.Home Improve.The WaltonsThe WaltonsThe WaltonsThe Waltons FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202Around the WorldCNN NewsroomCNN Newsroom The Lead With Jake TapperThe Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesCastleCastle NIK 26 170 299PAW PatrolSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobTeenage Mut.Varied ProgramsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyDragnetAdam-12Emergency! 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NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityKardashianVaried ProgramsKeeping Up With the KardashiansVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. 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DEAR ABBY: Twenty years ago, my oldest sister, “Olivia,” loaned me $3,000 at a time when I was struggling to make ends meet. I promised to repay the loan at the end of the year. The time came and I wrote her a check for the full amount, but she didn’t cash it. She said she didn’t need the money and the loan was forgiven. Fast-forward 20 years: While Olivia has remained financially stable, I am now in a better place financially because of an inheritance. After learning about this inheritance, Olivia asked me for the money back! Because I can afford it, I plan on repaying her, but I can’t get over her surpris-ing request. Do you have any words of wisdom? -UNSETTLED SIBLING DEAR UNSETTLED: Your sister may have for-given the loan all those years ago because she thought repaying her would have caused you financial stress. Now that she knows you’re well able to give her the money, she would like to have it. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have been talking to “Ricky” for about two months. I’m 28 and he is 27. A couple of weeks ago we decided to date exclusively. This morning, Ricky found out that his ex is three months’ pregnant with his child. I don’t have kids and I prefer not to date men who do, let alone one who has a baby on the way. However, I do care about Ricky and could definitely see us together. After this bomb-shell, I’m not sure what I want to do. Any advice would be appreciated. -THROWN FOR A LOOP IN PHILADELPHIA DEAR THROWN FOR A LOOP: After this bomb-shell, the person who has some serious decisions to make is Ricky, Will this cause him to reunite with his ex-girlfriend? Is the baby really his child? If so, what will be his responsi-bility financially and mor-ally? If he stays with you, do you WANT to help raise another woman’s child? Until you have a better idea of what lies ahead, my advice is to do nothing, You have known Ricky for only two months, and while you could see a future for the two of you, can you also see one that includes the three -or FOUR -of you? I’m including the ex in the equation, because she’ll be a part of it. Forever. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I quit drinking three years ago. I realized I had a problem, addressed it, and I’m now sober. I never was a big drinker socially. I drank alone. When I go out with friends for dinner, they usually rack up a large liquor bill, which is evenly split. Occasionally, I’ll ask that the liquor portion of the bill be subtracted from my tab, but doing so makes me feel awkward. What’s your advice for addressing this situation? -SOBER IN THE SOUTH DEAR SOBER: Congratulations on your sobriety. A way to avoid being charged for the liquor would be to quietly advise the server at the start of the dinner that you would like a separate check. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll face changes that will cause you con-cern, but rather than com-plain or overreact, turn what you view as a lemon into lemonade. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Concentrate on new beginnings and picking up skills, information and new friendships along the way. Don’t let emotional matters stand between you and what you deserve. A day trip will encourage you to keep moving forward. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Keep your finger on the pulse. Nose your way into conversations that will keep you in the loop and on top of any opportunity that can lead to an adven-ture, love or a positive change. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take part in work-shops, a conference or a social event that will allow you to mingle and meet influential people. Present and promote. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You may not like some of the restrictions you encounter, but time is on your side and the end result will be in your favor. Incorporate love, compas-sion and understanding into your conversation and good things will happen. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Look for ways to best help others. What you offer can make a differ-ence to your community as well as to a friend or relative. Showing concern, along with sensitivity and love, will bring unexpected rewards and satisfaction. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take a back seat and let everyone else make a fuss. Don’t get sucked into melodrama or someone’s overindulgent scheme. Protect your possessions, assets and your emotions. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A trip or function that allows you to explore new possibilities should be scheduled. Positive change will bring about home and domestic improvements that will lead to greater security and stability. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You can’t please everyone, so you may as well do what’s best for you. False information will be given in hopes of get-ting your support, cash or hands-on help. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Revisit life goals you have yet to accom-plish. You’ll find a way to get closer to your dreams, hopes and wishes if you discuss your plans, inten-tions and timeline with someone you want by your side. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Take care of money matters, health and situations that may need legal documentation. Having a game plan in place will give you more confidence and encour-age you to forge ahead until you reach a destina-tion that ensures a better future. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t relax when you should be out hustling, making connections and securing your position in an economic market that requires skill, finesse and constant nurturing. A part-nership is encouraged, but put what you want in writ-ing before sharing your ideas. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Item whose name is derived from the/DWLQDTXDULXV $XWRSDUWVJLDQW3RWXVHUPD\EH3H\RWHDQGVDJXDUR5RVVLQLV:LOOLDP 7HOODQGRWKHUV /XPSLQRQHV throat )LUVWDFU\OLFILEHU6XSHUODWLYHIRU 6LULXV 5XVKMRE"+RPHVHFXULW\ V\VWHPFRPSRQHQW %LJNDKXQDV6WDWLRQHU\LWHP $EEU 30 Had/RJ$EEURQDODZ\HUV VWDWLRQHU\ &HQVXUH%HUU\XVHGWRPDNH JLQ 7KH\KDYHSOXVHV DQGPLQXVHV 42 In ___BBBSHGL0HGLFLQHODEHOLQIR3XWWLQJRXWRQDQ DQQLYHUVDU\PD\EH %RVFKV7KH *DUGHQRI(DUWKO\'HOLJKWVIRURQH /XVWURXVIDEULF 55 Provide with a TXDOLW\ 'DLV\OLNHEORRP0DVVLYHUHI0D]HH[SORUHU7XUQRYHU'LVHQFXPEHU1RWEHDW&ROODSVHV68 Drain:KLWHVXLWHG 'XNHVRI+D]]DUGYLOODLQ 6SDUWDQBBB3DUW\6RPHELRPDMRUV)DLOVWR&RXUWMXGJPHQW%DUUHWWRIJRVVLS3KRRH\85 ___ Moines87 Mentions$SSOHOLQH([SHULHQFH\RX PLJKWZDQWWRIRUJHW *XDUDQWHHG'DUZLQVWRSSLQJ SRLQWZLWKWKH )RXQGHURIWKH Missionaries of&KDULW\ (SLWRPHRIFRRO ZLWKWKH /HDGVLQJHURQ 2FWRSXVV*DUGHQ 6LQJHU3HQLVWRQ104 Einstein and &DPXV +LQWJLYLQJ FROXPQLVW 7KUHHIRUDVKRUW KROH 3RVWZDUSULPH minister 6LPSVRQFDVHMXGJHWKFHQWXU\KHUR ZLWK(O 5HOLJLRXVDUW ILJXUHV &RXQWU\FURRQHU 5DQG\ (PHUJHQF\ %URDGFDVW6\VWHPRSHQLQJ 126 Kind of treatment6WLOOJRRS\DV concrete 129 Poet/dramatist Federico Garca___ 130 Pixar movie EHWZHHQ7R\6WRU\DQG7R\6WRU\ 9HUVHZULWLQJ-HUNV6RPHVFUHHQVIRU short *ODFLDO Down 1 Goes down6XIIL[ZLWKKDUGRU soft *LUOVQDPHWKDWV DOVRDSODFHQDPH 4 Semis8QSUHSDUHG+\GURFDUERQVXIIL[%DVLOVDXFH2QHHQGRI1HZ
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFE Americans driving less as car culture wanesBy JOAN LOWYAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Driving in America has stalled, leading researchers to ask: Is the national love affair with the automobile over? After rising for decades, total vehicle use in the U.S. — the collective miles people drive — peaked in August 2007. It then dropped sharply during the Great Recession and has large-ly plateaued since, even though the economy is recovering and the population growing. Just this week, the Federal Highway Administration reported vehicle miles traveled during the first half of 2013 were down slightly, continuing the trend. Even more telling, the average number of miles drivers individu-ally rack up peaked in July 2004 at just over 900 per month, accord-ing to a study by Transportation Department economists Don Pickrell and David Pace. By July of last year, that had fallen to 820 miles per month, down about 9 percent. Per capita automobile use is now back at the same levels as in the late 1990s. Until the mid-1990s, driving levels largely tracked economic growth, according to Pickrell and Pace, who said their conclusions are their own and not the govern-ment’s. Since then, the economy has grown more rapidly than auto use. Gross domestic product declined for a while during the recession but reversed course in 2009. Auto use has yet to recover. Meanwhile, the share of people in their teens, 20s and 30s with driver’s licenses has been drop-ping significantly, suggesting that getting a driver’s license is no longer the teenage rite of passage it once was. Researchers are divided on the reasons behind the trends. One camp says the changes are almost entirely linked to the economy. In a few years, as the econo-my continues to recover, driv-ing will probably bounce back, they reason. At the same time, they acknowledge there could be long-term structural changes in the economy that would prevent a return to the levels of driving growth seen in the past; it’s just too soon to know. The other camp acknowledges that economic factors are impor-tant but says the decline in driving also reflects fundamental changes in the way Americans view the automobile. For commuters stuck in traffic, getting into a car no lon-ger correlates with fun. It’s also becoming more of a headache to own a car in central cities and downright difficult to park. “The idea that the car means freedom, I think, is over,” said travel behavior analyst Nancy McGuckin. Gone are the days of the car culture as immortalized in songs like “Hot Rod Lincoln,” ‘’Little Deuce Coupe” and “Pink Cadillac.” “The car as a fetish of masculinity is probably over for certain age groups,” McGuckin said. “I don’t think young men care as much about the car they drive as they use to.” That’s partly because cars have morphed into computers on wheels that few people dare tinker with, she said. “You can’t open the hood and get to know it the way you used to,” she said. Lifestyles are also changing. People are doing more of their shopping online. More people are taking public transit than ever before. And biking and walking to work and for recreation are on the rise.