<%BANNER%>

The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02054

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02054

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comSlavery never ended.Today, 27 million people suffer daily on farms and in factories and broth-els around the world, according to the End It Movement, an national organization dedicated to ending modern-day slav-ery. Two Lake City college students, Katherine Mathis and Sarah Elkins, have decided not to sit by and watch. They worked with local gym owner Michelle Richards to organize the Running for Freedom 5K, which will be held on Saturday to support the cause. “Slavery is something that’s not really spoken about,” Mathis said. “Not many people know that it is going on today.” According to the End It Movement website, there are more people enslaved today than ever before. Human trafficking exists in 161 countries across the globe, including the United States. Mathis, 19, and Elkins, 18, plan to donate 100 percent of registration fees from the race to the End It Movement. Currently, registration is $30, but it will be $40 on the day of the race. The race will start at 8 a.m. at the courthouse. Registration will be from 7 to 7:45 a.m. After attending the Passion 2013 conference in Atlanta, where Pastor CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Barbara Walters set to retire. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2ABusiness ................ 1CAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 3B, 5B 79 55 Isolated T’storms WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEW SPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Workingto be morewelcoming. Alligator LakeSpring Festivalon the way. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 304 1D 1C Girls join modern slavery fight Saturday race to raise funds for movement. CAUSE continued on 3A Jobless ratedrops again Unemployment in Columbia County falls to 6.9 percent.By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County unemployment rate dropped to 6.9 percent in February, from 7.5 percent in January. Meanwhile the state’s unemployment rate fell to 7.7, the lowest since October 2008 when it was 7.4 percent and well below the 9 percent rate of February 2012, according to state Department of Economic Opportunity figures released on Friday. Neighboring counties, except for Baker County, have lower unemployment rates than Columbia County. Alachua claims the lowest rate at 5.6 percent, with Union County following at 6.3 per-cent, Gilchirst County at 6.4 percent and Suwannee County at 6.6 percent. Baker County falls slightly below the national average at 7.4 percent. Florida’s rate is the same as the national 7.7 percent unem-ployment figure, a key psycho-logical marker of how the state is doing. The unemployment rate in the state has gone down even as the labor force has grown, according to DEO statistics, meaning that the drop is most-ly attributable to actual job growth, not people leaving the labor force. DEO counted the non-seasonal workforce last month at 9.35 million, up from 9.27 million a year ago. Columbia County’s workforce grew from 30,707 in January to 30,886 in February. Monroe County had the state’s lowest unemployment rate last month at 4.2 percent, followed by Walton, Okaloosa, Alachua and St. Johns coun-ties — all below 6 percent. Hendry County in south-cen-tral Florida had the highest jobless rate in the state at 10.8 percent. By ERICA WERNERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Big business and labor have struck a deal on a new low-skilled worker program, removing the biggest hurdle to completion of sweeping immigra-tion legislation allowing 11 million illegal immigrants eventual U.S. citizenship, a person with knowledge of the talks said Saturday. The agreement was reached in a phone call late Friday night with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, U.S. Chamber of Commerce head Tom Donohue and Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, who’s been mediating the dispute. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of a formal announcement, said the deal resolves disagreements over wages for the new workers and which indus-tries would be included. Those disputes had led talks to break down a week ago, throwing into doubt whether Schumer and seven other senators crafting a comprehensive bipartisan immigration bill would be able to complete their work as planned. The deal must still be signed off on by the other senators working with Schumer, includ-ing Republicans John McCain of Arizona and Marco Rubio of Florida, but that’s expected to happen. With the agreement in place, the sena-tors are expected to unveil their legislation the Deal may open path to immigration reform DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterYoung participants line up for the start of the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market’s second annual Easter egg hunt at Wilson Park Saturday. Egg scramble over fast AMANDA WILLIAMSON/ Lake City ReporterKatherine Mathis, 19, and Sarah Elkins, 18, at Lake DeSoto.JACKIE KITE/ Special to the ReporterThe scramble begins as youngsters grab up some of the 1 ,000 Easter eggs at Wilson Park Saturday morning. Kids grab up treats in second annual Wilson Park hunt.By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comAn inflatable slide and bounce house, along with live enter-tainment, created excitement at the second annual Easter egg hunt at Wilson Park as children waited for the signal to stuff the more than 1,000 colored plastic eggs into Easter baskets. At the signal to go, more than 200 children, grouped by age in three separate areas, rushed to the eggs and stuffed them into baskets. The hunt was over fast, as the children picked the park clean in about 3 minutes. But while the eggs were still on the grass, the parents took pictures, and Jackie Kite, Lake City’s community redevelop-ment administrator, waited to hand out prizes. HUNT continued on 3A DEAL continued on 6A Big business, big labor agree on solution to sticking point regarding unskilled workers. You’re closer than ever to nationally ranked health care for your child.To nd out about all the services at Wolfson Children’s Specialty Center, call 386.758.1811 (option 1). 164 NW Madison Street • Historic Downtown • Lake City, FL 32055 • wolfsonchildrens.org/columbiacounty 1A

PAGE 2

NEW YORK B arbara Walters plans to retire next year, ending a television career that began more than a half century ago and made her a trailblazer in news and daytime TV. Someone who works closely with Walters said the plan is for her to retire in May 2014 after a series of special programs saluting her career. The person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Thursday. Walters, 83, was hospitalized earlier this year after falling and cut ting her head while leaving a party in Washington and remained out of work after developing the chicken pox. Largely retired from ABC News already, her main work is at The View, the daytime hit she created in 1997. Her television career began in 1961 when she was hired as a writer for the Today show. She graduated quickly to on-air work and became the shows co-host before leaving in 1976 to become co-anchor of ABCs evening news with Harry Reasoner the first woman in such a role for a television network. The pairing ended quickly and Walters settled into a role as ABC News cajoler-in-chief, competing ferociously to land newsmaking interviews with heads of state and stars of the day. She regularly did interview specials, including an annual show with the most fasci nating people of the year, and was co-host of /20 for two decades, much of the time with Hugh Downs. She described The View as the dessert of her career, a gathering of women chatting about the hot top ics of the day and interviewing visit ing presidents and actors eager to reach a daytime audience. Stephen Baldwin admits he failed to pay NY taxes NEW CITY, N.Y. Stephen Baldwin, the youngest of four broth ers in show business, said Friday hes looking forward to clearing the wreckage of my past. Step 1 will be coming up with $300,000 for the tax man. Baldwin, 46, admit ted in Rockland County Court that he failed to pay New York state income taxes for 2008, 2009 and 2010. Under a plea bargain, he gets to stay out of jail so he can make some money and can have his record wiped clean if he pays the taxes within a year. His total bill in taxes, interest and penalties is $400,000, but state Supreme Court Justice Charles Apotheker said $100,000 had already been paid. Baldwin, currently appearing on All-Star Celebrity Apprentice, said he never intended to avoid paying taxes and got in trouble by trusting others. Unfortunately, I got some really bad suggestions and advice ... from lawyers and accountants, he said outside court. Rapper Lil Wayne says hes an epileptic NEW YORK Lil Wayne says hes an epileptic and has had sei zures for years. In an interview with Los Angelesbased radio sta tion Power 106 on Thursday, the 30year-old rapper said epilepsy caused his most recent health scare earlier this month, when he was rushed to a hospital. Wayne said he had three back-toback seizures. The Grammy winner says: Ive had a bunch of seizures, yall just never hear about them. Wayne says he couldve died and that the recent seizures were a result of just plain stress, no rest, over working myself. He released his 10th album, I Am Not a Human Being II, this week. Hell embark on a 40-city tour in July with rappers T.I. and Future. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor William Daniels (St. Elsewhere) is 86. Actor Richard Chamberlain is 79. Actress Shirley Jones is 79. Country singer-songwriter John D. Loudermilk is 79. Musician Herb Alpert is 78. CORRECTION Blaiyze Neeley is emergency management services coordi nator with Lake City Medical Center. City Clerk Audrey Sikes is not a relative of Stephanie Dumas. They were misidentified in captions of photos in Tuesdays paper. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 12-30-39-44 10 Friday: 10-26-27-29-36 Saturday: Afternoon: 6-1-3 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 1-3-3-2 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 19-24-25-26-28-44 x2 Lawmakers plan more money for schools, pay raises TALLAHASSEE Floridas economic turnaround is giving state legislators a chance to do something they havent done in years. Fueled by growth that is adding to the states bot tom line, both the House and Senate on Friday unveiled rival $74 billion spending plans that would boost the states budget by roughly 6 percent. It likely means more money for public schools, the first pay raise in six years for state workers, and possibly even a tax break for those wanting to buy a new computer. If you are to look at our budget and say whos the big winner this year ... the big winner is education, said House Speaker Will Weatherford. This years budget proposals are a stark turn around from those of the past few years that either included deep cuts to the states public schools and universities or relied on tax increases. Lawmakers have until early May to pass a new state budget that will cover state spending from July 1 to June 2014. While there are differences in the rival plans theres not enough to keep legislators ending their work on time. Legislators: Keep health insurance TALLAHASSEE Florida legislators plan on keeping the cost of health insurance low for state leaders. Gov. Rick Scott pro posed having himself and other high-ranking state officials pay the same for health insurance as rankand-file workers. But new budgets unveiled by the House and Senate on Friday would keep health insurance pre miums the same as they are now. The governor along with the three elected mem bers of the Cabinet as well House members pay no more than $400 a year for health insurance. The 40 members of the Florida Senate earlier this year started paying the same as career service employees. Thats nearly $2,200 a year for family coverage. Florida spends $1.9 billion to cover roughly 170,000 state workers, university employees and retirees. Most of the money comes from taxpay ers, not premiums. Man shoots dog to reclaim finger BRADENTON A preliminary investigation supports a fathers account of shooting and killing a dog that bit his 11-year-old son in order to recover the boys severed pinky, a Manatee County Sheriffs report said. The boy was at his home Friday evening when he approached the dog in its cage. As the boy stuck his hand through the slots to pet the dog, the animal bit his left hand and severed the childs pinky finger, according to the report. The childs father took the dog out of the cage and shot it multiple times. The father then removed the severed finger from the dogs stomach and waited for emergency responders to arrive, the report said. The boy was airlifted to All Childrens Hospital in St. Petersburg for treat ment. His condition was not immediately released by authorities. Officials said the boys forearm may also have been broken in the attack. The report said a pre liminary investigation sup ports the fathers account of the accident. He was not identified in the report. Manatee County Animal Control removed the dogs remains from the home. State to get $6M for pest control TALLAHASSEE Florida will receive $6 million in federal funding to help control disease and eradicate pests that threat en the states agriculture, including Giant African Land Snails. In a statement sent Friday, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam said the money is coming from the federal Farm Bill. In addition to the giant snail mitigation project, the money will help pay for detector dog teams, citrus research, avocado protection and a honey bee survey. It will also fund the Travelers Dont Pack a Pest Outreach Program, which cautions people not to bring harmful insects, diseases and bacteria from other locales when entering Florida. Skeletal remains found in woods CRESTVIEW Investigators in northwest Florida are seeking infor mation on any unreported missing person after find ing skeletal remains in a wooded area. Crestview police tell the Northwest Florida Daily News that the remains found on Thursday will be sent for DNA testing to try to match it with a missing person. Police say a group of teenagers discovered the remains behind a lowincome housing develop ment. A police statement says the remains appear to have been in the area for a long time. A tent was found nearby. Jesus Stomp teacher on leave BOCA RATON Florida Atlantic University has placed on leave an instructor who had stu dents stomp on pieces of paper with Jesus written on them as part of a les son. The school said in a statement Friday that Deandre Poole was put on leave for safety reasons and to prevent disruption of the universitys activi ties. The statement says Poole will not teach class es, keep office hours or be present on campus. Barbara Walters to retire next year Wednes day: 7-37-43-48-52 PB 16 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture He was despised and rejected by mankind, a man of suffering, and familiar with pain. Like one from whom people hide their faces he was despised, and we held him in low esteem. Surely he took up our pain and bore our suffering, yet we considered him punished by God, stricken by him, and afflicted. Isaiah 53:3-4 ASSOCIATED PRESS Crucifuxon re-enactment The Family Life Church of God in Archer had young men re-enacting the crucifixion of Christ on Friday by standing on crosses as part their celebration for the religious weekend. In the mornings, the young men took 15-minute turns on the crosses, and as the weather warmed later in the day they lengthened the stay to an hour. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS President Barack Obama speaks to Barbara Walters during his guest appearance on ABCs The View in New York in 2010. Walters plans to retire next year, end ing a television career that began more than a half century ago. Baldwin Wayne 2A

PAGE 3

Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 3A JACKIE KITE/ Special to the ReporterShana Banana, a Gainesville-based singer and songwri ter (at center in hat), performs for the assembled children HUNT:Continued From Page 1A Kite said this year’s event was a success, and thanked Parkview Baptist Church for helping entertain the children. The church pro-vided the inflatable slide and bounce house. Shana Banana, a Gainesville children’s singer and songwriter, per-formed for the crowd. Kite said the planning for next year’s Easter egg hunt has already begun, and she expects it to be larger than this year. “This is only our second year,” Kite said. “It’s going to grow even more. We are going to have to expand next year.” The Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce sponsored the event and placed gold and silver plastic eggs among the Easter eggs. Abbie Chasteen, chamber marketing director, said the silver and gold eggs held paper slips that chil-dren exchanged for gift cards. She said some of the prizes were donated by businesses. CAUSE: Girls plan fundraiser race to help end-human-traffi cking movement Continued From Page 1ALouie Giglio promoted the End It Movement, Mathis decided she wanted to raise money to help the organization. Since the movement began in December, it has raised about $174,000. Three weeks after leaving the conference, jogging inspired Mathis to come up with they idea for the Running for Freedom 5K. “I was thinking I really wanted to do something to help,” she said. “People do 5Ks for all dif-ferent causes. Why couldn’t I do one for End It? The idea literally just came from God.” While this is the first event she has organized for End It, Mathis has participated in the organization’s other campaigns, such as its Social Media Blackout Day. Supporters of End It aban-doned the Internet for an entire day to honor those who remain voiceless. On Saturday, community volunteers will read stories from people who escaped slavery. Three of them are between the ages 20 to 25, the same age as the victims whose lives they will share with the runners. “I’m reading their stories, and I think I would fall for the same ploy,” Mathis said. “The Super Bowl happens to be one of the biggest avenues for human traf-fickers to scout.” Elkins believes it’s important to hold the event in her com-munity because she wants Lake City residents to be aware of the issue. People think slavery is a thing of the past, she said, but it isn’t. The Passion Conference made her realize the issue still existed, she said, and she hopes the 5K will do the same for those attend-ing the event. “I might have heard someone talk about modern-day slavery once before, but I kind of blew it off,” she said. “The Passion Conference was the first time I thought this might be real.” This is the first time Richards has organized a race for college-age students, but she said it has been amazing to see the group so dedicated to a cause. “I know Americans know that there’s slavery in the world, but I don’t think they have the aware-ness or defense to protect them-selves and their families from it,” she said. “Running the race brings awareness to the cause, but they also bring awareness to a healthy lifestyle.” Mathis and Elkins recruited a group of friends, community members and local businesses to support their cause. Several businesses, including Concept Construction and Edwards Jones, have sponsored the event, providing drinks and more for the runners. More than 25 people, mainly members from Mathis’ church, gathered together to help bring her dream to life. The group — all college age — has worked to gather sponsors, create posters and educate the public about the race and the End It Movement. “I’m doing it to shine a light on slavery,” Mathis said. “To run the 5K is a way the community can help do something about it. We’re giving them an avenue to help and donate to the cause.” 3A

PAGE 4

L ies can destroy people! However, truth can dis-solve lies. The NAACP national office has allowed and supported some local branch offi-cials to override the Preamble, the Vision Statement, the Mission Statement, and all principles upon which the NAACP was founded – the Constitution. The two state NAACP officials came to Lake City without full dis-closure to the local branch last year and called for the resignation of Police Chief Argatha Gilmore (black female) — all without a shred of credible evidence. Then suddenly at this meeting a picture surfaced (taken at the Olustee Festival parade) showing the chief with her arms around several men – it was said that the chief was cavorting with the Ku Klux Klan – she must resign or be fired! At a Lake City City Council meeting a myriad of charges were leveled against Chief Gilmore by John Mayo, Dale Landry, Rev. R. L. Gundy, President of the SCLC, and others. But when the chief stood to defend herself, all of her accusers had vacated the premises. “Where are my accusers?” she asked. None could be found. Later, NAACP state president Adora Obi Nweze asked the Columbia County Executive Committee to execute a resolution requesting the resignation of Chief Gilmore. The committee refused to support the idea. Glynnell Presley, secretary, was made the scapegoat. Presley appeared to be the reason that the Executive Committee failed to support State President Adora’s call for a resolution. It was alleg-edly said that the Presleys had to be punished, they’re getting “too big.” Adora is a member of the NAACP 64 member National Board of Directors, along with Leon Russell, Vice Chair of the National Board, and Roslyn Brock, Chairperson. All are from the state of Florida and appear to support Adora, since none of them returned calls, emails or let-ters to the Pressleys. Mrs. Bernice D. Presley was two times voted president of the Columbia County Branch. Trumped-up charges were brought against her by state president Adora, who forwarded them to the national office. Article X, Section 4(a) of the NAACP Constitution, the law that Mrs. Presley was said to have violated, does not (in my opin-ion) comport with Mrs. Presley’s dismissal. Scenario: As a Silver Life NAACP member, another NAACP member enters my house and steals sums of money. Am I supposed to seek the NAACP for a solution and restitution, or the police? This is tantamount to what happened to Mrs. Presley; she sought legal protection and was vic-timized by the NAACP four times: (1) she was removed as NAACP president; (2) her Silver Life membership was revoked; (3) the NAACP hired a lawyer to personally represent another member against her, a Silver Life NAACP member, and (4) she was made to suffer embarrassment and humiliation. Mrs. Presley was given 15 days to appeal the NAACP’s bogus deci-sion. She immediately complied. However, some 80 days later, after three return-receipt letters were mailed to the NAACP leadership, 12 emails were forwarded requesting a hearing date. NO RESPONSE! None of the NAACP national lead-ers had the literary decorum to reply. This violates all principles of democracy, decency and cour-tesy! And it circumvents the 5th Amendment’s due process clause. In the meantime, justice delayed is justice denied! Mrs. Presley was suspended because she defended herself against another member. The NAACP National office used NAACP money to hire a lawyer to defend this woman (a member less than a year) against Mrs. Presley (a long-term Silver Life member) involving a personal matter. Up to this point I have remained silent in anticipating a hearing, thinking that the hearing would correct and restore normalcy to the branch. However, it appears that the national office has no intentions of providing a hearing, though the NAACP Constitution, Article X, Section 7 states, within 60 calendar days of the receipt of the complaint “. . make findings and recommen-dations regarding the complaint.” But I guess when you cannot defend your actions, you refuse to conduct the hearing, and you fail to communicate hoping that the issue will go away. In the meantime, my family and I have been subjected to attempted bullying, threats, mean-spiritedness, mischaracterizations, injustice, unfairness, and vindictiveness by so-called leaders on the NAACP local, state and national levels. My reason for resigning earlier this month after 30-plus years as secretary of this Columbia County Branch NAACP is because of the mistreatment, unfairness and the injustice perpetrated on my wife, my family and me, and, the failure of the local branch to support me as a long-time warrior for the communi-ty and the NAACP. How can I con-tinue to serve an organization that violates the very basic principles and tenets of which the NAACP is founded? How can I continue to serve an organization that expends NAACP funds to pay legal fees to fight my family and me in the court-room for personal issues of another individual? How can I continue to support and serve an organization that violates its Constitution, yet it expects me to obey and adhere to it. How can I continue to support and serve an organization that discrimi-nates against me, and my family? The organization, as I see it, is fast losing its relevance, focus and purpose. It is becoming, in my opinion, a social club instead of a premiere civil rights organization. As for me, I will continue to fight for justice, equality, and democracy until all, without regard to race, gender, creed, or religion, enjoy equal status. I remain ever committed to the struggle. God bless you. OPINION Sunday, March 31, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman I magine a youngster twice victimized — once by the horrific crime of sexual abuse, then by a legal process that is supposed to provide justice. It hap-pens on too many occasions, in too many court-rooms. ... Lauren Book hopes to change that. Book speaks from experience. She was once the victim of a sexual abuser who was the family’s nanny. Refusing to remain the victim, she has become the champion for sexually abused children whose voices wouldn’t otherwise be heard. She has started a non-profit, called Lauren’s Kids, and every year pushes the Florida Legislature to change laws in a way that helps those who’ve been abused. HB 7031 is her latest effort at reform. The bill would align Florida law with the federal Adam Walsh Act by tightening provisions on when someone can have their status as a sexual offender changed, raise the penalties for people who expose themselves to children and add requirements that judges must consider in determining bail. The highlight, though, is a proposed change in the rules regarding hearsay evidence. Currently in child sex-abuse cases, unless the victim is 11 or younger, most information obtained outside of a jury’s presence can’t be used in court because it’s considered hearsay. Older children must wait weeks, months, sometimes years, before deciding whether to recount the sordid details of their abuse in open court, or forgo testimony altogether. HB 7031 would raise the age for the hearsay exception to 16, allowing the early, more accurate accounts by older children to be used during trial. The bill has its safeguards. Defense attorneys would still have adequate tools, like the deposition process, to make credible cases on behalf of their clients. And a judge would still make the final call of whether the information gathered during that initial interview should be admitted or not. But it would help prevent what all too often occurs today: young victims, robbed by time, struggling on the stand to present clear and convincing testimony about their abuse. It doesn’t hurt that Lauren is the daughter of Ron Book, one of Florida’s most influential lobbyists and biggest money raisers for political candidates. Book’s name opens doors in Tallahassee and, this time, the benefactors are young abuse victims who stand to gain from his daughter’s singular focus. As an advocate, Lauren Book has a string of accomplishments, from her annual awareness-raising walks to Tallahassee, to obtaining $1.5 million from the state in 2011 to develop an age-appropriate violence-prevention curriculum for kindergarteners. Her greatest success, however, came after overcoming four years of sexual assault from an employee who had been considered part of the family. In 2002, Waldina Flores was sentenced to 15 years for sexual battery by a custodian and 15 years for lewd or lascivi-ous molestation on a child under 16. Young Lauren took the high road: “I really don’t wish any harm on Waldy,” she told the court. “I forgive her for her weak-nesses, which have hurt me.” ... While providing safeguards for the wrongly accused, the Florida Legislature should work with her to turn this good idea into state law. Fix law that limits testimony from sex-abuse victims Why I resigned as NAACP secretary ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Glynnell PresleyQ South Florida Sun-Sentinel HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Today is Sunday, March 31, the 90th day of 2013. There are 274 days left in the year. On this date:In March 31, 1932, Ford Motor Co. publicly unveiled its powerful flathead V-8 engine; although it was not the first eight-cylinder engine, it was the first to be affordable to many people. In 1931, Notre Dame college-football coach Knute Rockne, 43, was killed in the crash of a TWA plane in Bazaar, Kan. In 1976, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that Karen Ann Quinlan, who was in a per-sistent vegetative state, could be disconnected from her respirator. (Quinlan, who remained uncon-scious, died in 1985.) In 1995, Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez, 23, was shot to death in Corpus Christi, Texas, by the founder of her fan club, Yolanda Saldivar, who was con-victed of murder and sentenced to life in prison. In 2005, Terri Schiavo, 41, died at a hospice in Pinellas Park, Fla., 13 days after her feeding tube was removed in a wrenching right-to-die dispute. Q Associated Press Q Glynnell Presley lives in Lake City.4AOPINION

PAGE 5

Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 5A TODAY Resurrection Sunday Glad Tidings Assembly of God, 1571 E. Duval St., will have Resurrection Sunday services at 10:30 a.m. Church youth will present a skit. Daniel and Mona Harris will pres ent special music, and Evangelist Jim Willett of Michigan will deliver the word. For more informa tion, call (386) 365-1533 or visit online on Facebook or at gtlakecity.org. Sunrise service A Sonrise communion service will be from 7 to 7:45 a.m. at Annie Mattox Park. The preacher will be Pastor Joy L. Gallmon. Easter service Wellborn Baptist Church will have an Easter service beginning at 10:30 a.m. The church choir will perform It Would Take a Cross, followed by a worship ser vice. The church is on U.S. 90 at Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. Visit our website at www.wellbornbaptist. com or call (386) 963-2231 for more details. Sunrise service The Greater Truevine Baptist Church will have an Easter sunrise service at 6 a.m. For information, contact the church at (386) 755-9247.Resurrection Sunday Faith in Christ Anglican Church invites the com munity to experience Resurrection Sunday at 10 a.m. The church is at 282 Magical Terrace. For more information, call Father Don Wilson at (386) 2089882. Sunrise service Wellborn United Methodist Church will have an Easter Sonrise service at 7 a.m. at the Wellborn Community Association park west of County Road 250 in Wellborn. The Rev. Matt Dillard, pastor of the Glory to God Ministries in Wellborn, and Dr. Parker, pastor of the Wellborn and Huntsville UM churches, along with Pastor James Jones of Allen Chapel in Wellborn, will conduct the service. A free public breakfast will be offered at the Wellborn UMC fel lowship hall following the service. Easter services Easter worship service will be at 11 a.m. at the Wellborn United Methodist Church, 12005 County Road 137 in Wellborn, and at 3:30 p.m. at the Huntsville UMC on Lake Jeffrey Road in Lake City. The two church es will then join Pine Grove UMC and New Harmony UMC for a cluster Easter service with special pro gram at the First United Methodist Church in Live Oak, beginning with a 6 p.m. potluck supper. Sunrise service Falling Creek Chapel will have an Easter sunrise ser vice at 7 a.m. Breakfast will be served after the service. For more information, call 755-0580. Easter celebration New Life Outreach Ministries on Highway 47 will have Easter ser vice at 11 a.m., followed by a celebration and din ner. Activities will include bounce houses and an egg hunt with prizes. For more information, call Pastor Russell McDaniel at 4385157 or Brother Ken at (386) 288-8044. Easter brunch, events The LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, will have Easter brunch and family activi ties from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Rose Mary Catering will serve an all-you-can-eat brunch, featuring omelets and crepes made to order, carved honey ham, fresh fruit and cheeses, decadent desserts, traditional break fast and lunch items. Cost is $14.95; half price for chil dren 3 and younger. The Easter Bunny and an egg hunt will be at12:30 (do not have to eat to attend). Have your family photo taken to benefit Senior Services in Columbia County Call (888) 845-0925 for details or reservations. or email shane@rosemary catering.com. Easter services Tustenugee United Methodist Church will have an Easter sunrise ser vice at 7 a.m., followed by breakfast on the grounds. Regular services will be at 11 a.m., followed by din ner and an egg hunt. The church is on County Road 131, one mile south of County Road 18 in Fort White. Gun show Cliffhangers Gun and Knife Show and weapons class will be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Columbia County Fairgrounds. For more information, call (386) 3256114. April 2 Support group Another Way Inc. pro vides a domestic violence support group every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. If you are a current or former sur vivor of domestic violence, call 386-719-2702 for meet ing location and an intake appointment. All services are free and confidential. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagno sis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. April 3 Gardening program A prgram, Hydroponic Gardening for the Homeowner, will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Agricultural Extension Center at 8202 County Road 417, off U.S. 90 between Lake City and Live Oak. Cost is $15 if registered before March 22; $20 afterward. The fee includes a starter kit. Dress for hands-on activities, and take a bag lunch. For more information, call the exten sion office at (386) 3621725. Friendship luncheon Lake City Newcomers and Friends Club will have its Friendship Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Ruby Tuesdays, across from Cracker Barrel. For more information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Partnership event Partnership for Strong Families will have its 10year celebration from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be David Abramowitz, Northeast Region manag ing director for the state Department of Children and Families. Coffee, tea and light desserts will be served. The event will be at Best Western Plus Gateway Grand, 4200 NW 97th Blvd., Gainesville. For informa tion, contact Parry Carroll at (352) 244-1626 or patri cia.carroll@pfsf.org. April 5 Choral program A Male Chorus Showcase will be at 7 p.m. at New Mount Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal Church, 345 NE Washington St. Call (386) 752-1830 for more informa tion. Line dancing Take 5 on Highway 84 in Valdosta, Ga., (1407 W. Hill Ave.) is open for line dancing. Beginner lessons will be from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the firs and third Friday each month. Cost is $2 for adults and $1 for stu dents. Call (229)455-2267 for more information. Church fundraiser Abundant Life Church, 675 State Road 100, is sell ing tickets for a grilled chicken dinner to raise money for the church build ing fund. The dinner will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 14 on the church grounds. For tickets or more informa tion, contact Pastor Tanner at (386) 984-0310. 5A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. 934 NE Lake DeSoto Circle, Lake City, FL (Next to Courthouse) COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Korean War-era veterans honored American Legion Post 57 Commander Art Lowes (from left) is pictured with Vic Vasco, Lawton Skipper, Capt. Aaron McDaniel, Kenneth Key, James Sutherland and Paul Robert during a recent ceremony where Korean War-era veterans were honored for their service.

PAGE 6

6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Egg decorating at Lifestyle Enrichment Center Photos by TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter ABOVE: Jackie Samper helps Christian Owens dye an egg during an Easter egg decora tion contest Friday at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center. At least 40 seniors teamed with more than 20 children from the Moms Club of Lake City, Girl Scout troops 163 and 332, Cub Scout Troop 85 and Boy Scout Troop 85 for the event. The eggs were being prepared for a fund raiser being held today at the center, 628 SE Allison Court. The Rose Mary Catering Co. and the center are hosting a Family Easter Brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. LEFT: James Robinson Jr. hands a decorated egg to Girl Scout leader Mychelle Albury. The senior volun teers and youngsters decorated more than 90 hard-boiled eggs during the competition. Area attorneys join forces against foreclosure From staff reports WHITE SPRINGS The Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park will host the 25th Annual Antique Tractor and Engine Show next week end. Antique tractors and farming equipment reflecting 200 years of rural American history will be on display. Demonstrating the craftsmanship and durability of American farm machinery, participants will operate working equipment and compete in tractor races. Visitors will be able to watch demonstrations of wheat threshing, shingle milling, corn grind ing and unusual engines for every day purposes. Exhibits will include collections of flywheels, hit-andmiss engines, water pumps, vintage pedal tractors, antique cars and farm equipment. Competitions for adults will include tractor pulls, barrel races and a blind race. Children can participate in pedalpowered tractor races, an old-fash ioned game of needle-in-a-haystack or a rooster-crowing contest. Food concessions will include root beer floats, hamburgers and hot dogs, barbecue and kettle corn. On Saturday afternoon, an antique tractor parade will feature everything from customized lawn tractors to restored farm machinery. Admission to the public is $5 per vehicle with up to eight passengers. For more information, call (877) 635-3655 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org/ stephenfoster. Tractor show coming to Foster Center From staff reports Due to a temporary increase in fund ing, many previously ineligible Florida residents facing foreclosure may now take advantage of free legal services as the states most experienced housing attor neys are banding together to address ris ing foreclosure rates. Three Rivers Legal Services is happy to have an opportunity to extend our services at this time to a greater number of homeowners in dire straits and those who are continuing to struggle during this economic downturn and recovery, said Allison Thompson, executive director of Three Rivers Legal Services. We are grateful to be a part of the solution. These efforts could not have come at a better time. Floridians today face a foreclosure filing rate double the national average. In fact, Floridas foreclosure rate has now been the highest in the nation for the fifth consecutive month according to RealtyTrac, which monitors real estate trends nationwide. Free legal aid services are now available to any Florida resident who owns their primary home and meets certain income requirements (low to moderate income). Any eligible resident with questions or concerns about the foreclosure process should not hesitate to call to get advice, even if no formal action has been taken. Lawyers and advocates at Three Rivers Legal Services are available Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. to address a wide range of issues, includ ing short sales, bankruptcy, and how to lower mortgage payments. Experts will also be on hand to advise residents who belong to a homeowners or condo association. It often comes as a surprise to many members of these associations to learn that even if they are current on their mortgage, failure to pay homeowners or condo association fees may put them at risk of foreclosure. Individuals who could benefit from these free services should contact Three Rivers Legal Services to schedule a consultation as soon as possible. Funding is limited and expires on June 30. The Lake City branch of Three Rivers Legal Services is located at 334 NW Lake City Ave. and can be reached by phone at 752-5960. DEAL: Business, labor agree on solution to roadblock Continued From Page 1A week of April 8. Their mea sure would secure the bor der, crack down on employ ers, improve legal immigra tion and create a 13-year pathway to citizenship for the millions of illegal immi grants already here. Its a major secondterm priority of President Barack Obamas and would usher in the most dramatic changes to the nations fal tering immigration system in more than two decades. The AFL-CIO and the Chamber of Commerce, longtime antagonists over temporary worker pro grams, had been fighting over wages for tens of thou sands of low-skilled work ers who would be brought in under the new program to fill jobs in construction, hotels and resorts, nurs ing homes and restaurants, and other industries. Under the agreement, a new W visa program would go into effect begin ning April 1, 2015, accord ing to another official involved with the talks who also spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of a for mal announcement. In year one of the pro gram, 20,000 workers would be allowed in; in year two, 35,000; in year three, 55,000; and in year four, 75,000. Ultimately the program would be capped at 200,000 workers a year, but the number of visas would fluctuate, depending on unemployment rates, job openings, employer demand and data collected by a new federal bureau pushed by the labor move ment as an objective moni tor of the market. A safety valve would allow employers to exceed the cap if they can show need and pay premium wages, but any additional workers brought in would be subtracted from the following years cap, the official said. The workers could move from employer to employer and would be able to peti tion for permanent resi dency and ultimately seek U.S. citizenship. Neither is possible for temporary workers now. The new program would fill needs employers say they have that are not cur rently met by U.S. immigra tion programs. Most indus tries dont have a good way to hire a steady supply of foreign workers because theres one temporary visa program for low-wage non agricultural workers but its capped at 66,000 visas per year. 6A Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting The Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership and the Columbia County Health Department have come together to form a partnership in order to create a tobacco free community. The partnership focuses on policies that effect our youth. In the New Year, we would like to focus on multi-unit housing cessation programs and promote the various tobacco cessation programs available to our community. We invite all community members, service workers, and school aged youth to attend the upcoming meeting to discuss tobacco-related issues in our county. Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting All partnership meetings are open to the public. For more information on how to make a difference in your community through your local Tobacco Free Partnership, please contact: Lauren Pinchouck Columbia County Health Department WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net New Shipment Sandals Mens Womens Children New Shipment We have added to the Sale Rack...30% off Fla., FSU, U. of Miami Boots Galore Margaret Love from your family NOTICE OF WORKSHOP MEETING CITY OF LAKE CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a Workshop Meeting on Monday, April 1, 2013. The meeting is scheduled for 6:00 P.M., in the Council Chambers located Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to hold a City Council Photo Session. taken during this meeting. COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING CITY OF LAKE CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Lake City Community Rede Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to consider the following item: Faade Grant Application CITY COUNCIL MEETING THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL MEET ON MONDAY, APRIL 1, 2013 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA AUDREY E SIKES, MMC City Clerk

PAGE 7

Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 7A 7A r e d d o t 7 5 % 50 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save r e d d o t 7 5 % 50 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd, Buffalo, Casio, Citizens of Humanity, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Hart Schaffner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/novelty electrics/coffee, Lacoste, ladies better swim, ladies designer, bridge & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, My Flat in London, Nautica, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Trunk shows, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, Wusthof; non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid April 2, 2013. RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, My Flat in London, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT senior Tuesday, Apr. 2 stronger % OFF EXTRA 20 senior *See below for details. In store only 1 5 % o ff Everything youve told us you love. All inside our exclusive cosmetic bag featuring an original Lilly Pulitzer print. Choose Your Deluxe Gift Size Moisturizer, Resilience Lift Creme (shown) or DayWear Creme. Plus Advanced Night Repair, Pure Color Crystal Lipstick, Sumptuous Mascara, Este Lauder pleasures Body Lotion and Exclusive Lilly Pulitzer Print Travel Mirror *Offer good while supplies last. Quantities limited. One gift to a customer, please. Coupon excluded Our best sellers free 30-50 % off Better sportswear from Rafaella, Madison, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh & more for misses & petites Orig. 24.00-119.00, Sale 11.99-82.99 Imported. Also available in todays woman sizes at slightly higher prices Pre-Easter celebration at B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple COURTESY PHOTOS Jayden Burch (from left), Jaleiah Burch, Exaulted Ruler Carlos Brown, an unindentified boy, Makayla, Jacquline and firefighter Chad Cervantes pose for a photo in front of a fire engine at the B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple Pre-Easter celebration held on Sunday, March 17, at Alligator Lake. Gracie dons a Columbia County firefighters jacket at the PreEaster celebration. The B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple organized the event. Exaulted Ruler Brown said approximate ly 100 people attended. Easter baskets containing items donated by local businesses such as Sysco Foods, TD Bank, First Federal Saving Bank and the Brothers and Daughters of the Lodge and Temple, were handed out to the children. Four-year-old Makayla wears a firefighters hat at the PreEaster Celebration hosted by the B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple at Alligator Lake on March 17.

PAGE 8

8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8A AUTOLOAN MillionDollar ! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $1 MILLION IN 2013 MOVE your Auto Loan (from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanWe’ll save you at least We’ll pay youOR 50 1 25 1 ... and we’re starting with YOU! 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $12,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.

PAGE 9

Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, March 31, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS RUNNING Freedom 5K run set for April 6 The Freedom 5K to benefit End it Movement, a movement to bring an end to human trafficking and slavery, is April 6. Register online at www. stepfitnessonline.com or active.com with a $30 registration fee. All early registrants will receive a free shirt. Day of race registration is available with an additional $10 fee. The race will be chip timed by Step Fitness Race Management and 1st Place Sports. For details, call race director Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Q From staff reports GAMES Monday Q Columbia High tennis in District 5-3A tournament at Jonesville Tennis Center in Gainesville, TBD Q Columbia High baseball at Valdosta High, 5 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High tennis in District 5-3A tournament at Jonesville Tennis Center in Gainesville, TBD Q Fort White High softball vs. Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Wednesday Q Columbia High, Fort White High track at Oak Hall Invitational, 3 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Bishop Kenny High, 7 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High weightlifting in District 2-2A sectional at Oakleaf High, 2:30 p.m. Q Fort White High track at Florida Relays, TBA Q Columbia High softball vs. P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Dixie County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High softball vs. Hernando High, North Marion High at Shocker Park in Ocala, 3, 4:45 p.m. (JV-4:45 vs. Yulee High) Q Fort White High softball vs. Bradford High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Robert E. Lee High, 6 p.m. Saturday Q Fort White High weightlifting in District 4-1A sectional at Baker County High, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Ponte Vedra High at Shocker Park in Ocala, 1 p.m. (JV-9 a.m. vs. Lake Weir High; 1 p.m. vs. East Ridge High) ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida’s Will Yeguete dunks against Florida Gulf Coast d uring the second half of a regional semifinal game in the NCAA college basketball tournamen t on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Florida slams “Dunk City” By STEPHEN HAWKINSAssociated PressARLINGTON, Texas — Florida Gulf Coast put on one last show at the NCAA tournament. The high-flying kids from “Dunk City” — the No. 15 seed few people even knew of on Selection Sunday — were hitting 3-pointers, had a highlight alley-oop and seemed like they were just getting started against one of the big schools from Florida. SEC regular-season champion Florida, the No. 3 seed, was getting an all-too-close look at what every-body has enjoyed watching this March. But Michael Frazier’s only two baskets of the night got the Gators on their own run, and FGCU’s improbable NCAA tourney run to the round of 16 came to an end just before mid-night Friday. Frazier’s 3-pointers came from the left side, directly in front of the FGCU bench, to start a 16-0 run late in the first half. That put the Gators ahead to stay on the way to a 62-50 victory. “Stepping into a situation like this where you have everybody against us, we’ve got to block everything out. Just treat this like a road game,” said Mike Rosario, who led the Gators with 15 points. “I thought we did a great job of blocking every-thing out and focusing on the next play.” Florida is going to its third straight NCAA regional final, even after the Eagles jumped out to an early 11-point lead. The Gators (29-7) and their roster filled with NCAA Gators knock off Florida Gulf Coast to reach Elite 8. GATORS continued on 2B Man of the mat Cole Schreiber a four-time state qualifier. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Cole Schreiber was a four-time state qu alifier in wrestling. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comCole Schreiber spent several years on a diamond, but it turned out a mat was more to his liking. The Columbia High senior began wrestling in middle school and ends his career as one of the most successful wrestlers in Tigers history. Schreiber is a four-time district champion and three-time regional champion. His high school record is 166-23. Schreiber qualified for the state meet four years and placed three times, finishing runner-up by the slimmest of margins last month. He placed third as a junior and sixth as a sopho-more. “I played little league baseball 5-6 years, but was never really interested,” Schreiber said. “Wrestling was a challenge. It was something just on me. I didn’t want to rely on any-body else.” Schreiber started by wrestling five matches as a seventh-grader at Lake City Middle School. “I was still not very good in the eighth grade, but I won the North Florida Championship that year and wanted to see how far I could go in it,” he said. Schreiber’s early wrestling was mostly rough-housing. “I liked throwing my little brother Wyatt around,” he said. Weighting in at 80 pounds, Schreiber got him-self thrown around in his introduction to high school wrestling. “I wrestled in the 103pound weight class that summer at Lake Gibson and won two matches, and one was a forfeit,” Schreiber said. “I had to gain weight.” Schreiber wandered into wrestling practice as a freshman and later found out about the progression from regular season to the meets that counted. “I didn’t know anything about district or state,” Schreiber said. “I thought that maybe I could make it to state.” At the end of the season he faced a major test. “My first district match went to triple overtime,” Schreiber said. “With 5 sec-onds left, I had an escape to tie it up. I won the match in triple overtime, but lost to the same kid at region.” Schreiber’s first visit to state was an eye-opener. “By the end of region, I WRESTLING continued on 5B

PAGE 10

SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today BOWLING 2:30 p.m. ESPN — PBA, Tournament of Champions, at Indianapolis COLLEGE BASEBALL 2:30 p.m. FSN — TCU at Texas Tech GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Trophee Hassan II, final round, at Agadir, Morocco 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Houston Open, final round, at Humble, Texas 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, Houston Open, final round, at Humble, Texas MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Texas at Houston MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2:20 p.m. CBS — NCAA Division I tournament, regional final, Michigan vs. Florida, at Arlington, Texas 4:55 p.m. CBS — NCAA Division I tournament, regional final, Louisville vs. Duke, at Indianapolis NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. WGN — Detroit at Chicago NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — Chicago at Detroit 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Boston at Buffalo TENNIS 11:30 a.m. CBS — ATP World Tour/WTA, Sony Open, men’s championship match, at Key Biscayne, Fla. WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN — NCAA Division I tournament, regional semifinal, Notre Dame vs. Kansas, at Norfolk, Va. 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I tournament, regional semifinal, Duke vs. Nebraska, at Norfolk, Va. 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I tournament, regional semifinal, Oklahoma vs. Tennessee, at Oklahoma City 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I tournament, regional semifinal, Baylor vs. Louisville, at Oklahoma City Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Boston at N.Y. Yankees 1:30 p.m. WGN — Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh 4 p.m. ESPN — San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Philadelphia at Atlanta 10 p.m. ESPN2 — St. Louis at Arizona NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Colorado at Detroit WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I tournament, regional final, Delaware-Kentucky winner vs. Connecticut-Maryland winner, at Bridgeport, Conn. 9:30 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I tournament, regional final, Stanford-Georgia win-ner vs. California-LSU winner, at Spokane, Wash.BASKETBALLNBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB x-New York 45 26 .634 — x-Brooklyn 42 30 .583 3 1/2Boston 38 34 .528 7 1/2 Philadelphia 29 43 .403 16 1/2 Toronto 27 45 .375 18 1/2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB z-Miami 57 15 .792 — x-Atlanta 40 33 .548 17 1/2 Washington 26 46 .361 31Orlando 19 54 .260 38 1/2 Charlotte 17 55 .236 40 Central Division W L Pct GB x-Indiana 46 27 .630 — x-Chicago 39 32 .549 6Milwaukee 35 36 .493 10Detroit 24 49 .329 22 Cleveland 22 49 .310 23 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 55 17 .764 — x-Memphis 48 24 .667 7 Houston 39 33 .542 16 Dallas 36 37 .493 19 1/2 New Orleans 25 48 .342 30 1/2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 53 20 .726 — x-Denver 50 24 .676 3 1/2Utah 37 36 .507 16 Portland 33 39 .458 19 1/2 Minnesota 26 45 .366 26 Pacific Division W L Pct GB x-L.A. Clippers 49 24 .671 — Golden State 41 32 .562 8 L.A. Lakers 37 36 .507 12Sacramento 27 46 .370 22 Phoenix 23 50 .315 26 x-clinched playoff spotz-clinched conferenceNBA schedule Friday’s Games Orlando 97, Washington 92Boston 118, Atlanta 107New York 111, Charlotte 102Philadelphia 97, Cleveland 87Toronto 99, Detroit 82Memphis 103, Houston 94Minnesota 101, Oklahoma City 93Miami 108, New Orleans 89San Antonio 104, L.A. Clippers 102Denver 109, Brooklyn 87 Utah 105, Portland 95 Saturday’s Games Dallas 100, Chicago 98Orlando at Atlanta (n)L.A. Clippers at Houston (n)Memphis at Minnesota (n)Charlotte at Philadelphia (n)Oklahoma City at Milwaukee (n)Brooklyn at Utah (n)Indiana at Phoenix (n)L.A. Lakers at Sacramento (n)Portland at Golden State (n) Sunday’s Games Cleveland at New Orleans, 6 p.m.Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m.Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m.Miami at San Antonio, 7 p.m.Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Houston, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.Boston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.Indiana at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. NCAA tournament EAST REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Thursday Marquette 71, Miami 61Syracuse 61, Indiana 50 Regional Championship Saturday Marquette vs. Syracuse (n) ——— SOUTH REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Friday Michigan 87, Kansas 85, OTFlorida 62, Florida Gulf Coast 50 Regional Championship Sunday Michigan (29-7) vs. Florida (29-7), 2:20 p.m. ——— MIDWEST REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Friday Louisville 77, Oregon 69Duke 71, Michigan State 61 Regional Championship Today Louisville (32-5) vs. Duke (30-5), 4:55 p.m. ——— WEST REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Thursday Ohio State 73, Arizona 70Wichita State 72, La Salle 58 Regional Championship Saturday Ohio State vs. Wichita State (n) ——— FINAL FOUR At The Georgia DomeAtlanta National Semifinals Saturday, April 6 Midwest champion vs. West champion, 6 or 8:30 p.m. South champion vs. East champion, 6 or 8:30 p.m. National Championship Monday, April 8 Semifinal winners, 9 p.m. Conference records Through Saturday (Selections in parentheses) Conference W L Pct.Missouri Valley (2) 4 1 .800Big Ten (7) 12 5 .706Atlantic Coast (4) 6 3 .667Southeastern (3) 4 2 .667Atlantic Sun (1) 2 1 .667Big East (8) 9 5 .643Atlantic 10 (5) 7 5 .583Pacific-12 (5) 5 5 .500West Coast (2) 2 2 .500Colonial (1) 1 1 .500Conference USA (1) 1 1 .500Ivy (1) 1 1 .500M. Eastern Athletic (1) 1 1 .500Big 12 (5) 3 5 .375Mountain West (5) 2 5 .286America East (1) 0 1 .000Big Sky (1) 0 1 .000Big South (1) 0 1 .000Big West (1) 0 1 .000Horizon (1) 0 1 .000Metro Atlantic (1) 0 1 .000Mid-American (1) 0 1 .000Northeast (1) 0 1 .000Ohio Valley (1) 0 1 .000Patriot (1) 0 1 .000Southern (1) 0 1 .000Southland (1) 0 1 .000S. western Athletic (1) 0 1 .000Summit (1) 0 1 .000Western Athletic (1) 0 1 .000Sun Belt (2) 0 2 .000 NIT Quarterfinals Wednesday Iowa 75, Virginia 64BYU 79, Southern Mississippi 62Baylor 79, Providence 68 ——— At Madison Square GardenNew York Semifinals Tuesday BYU (24-11) vs. Baylor (21-14), 7 p.m.Maryland (25-12) vs. Iowa (24-12), 9:30 p.m. Championship Thursday, April 4 Semifinal winners, 9 p.m. Women’s NCAA OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Today Oklahoma (24-10) vs. Tennessee (26-7), 4:35 p.m. Baylor (34-1) vs. Louisville (26-8), 7:05 p.m. Tuesday Regional Championship Semifinal winners ——— SPOKANE REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Saturday Stanford (33-2) vs. Georgia (27-6) (n)California (30-3) vs. LSU (22-11) (n) Regional Championship Monday Semifinal winners ——— NORFOLK REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Today Notre Dame (33-1) vs. Kansas (20-13), 12:04 p.m. Duke (32-2) vs. Nebraska (25-8), 2:32 p.m. Regional Championship Tuesday Semifinal winners ——— BRIDGEPORT REGIONAL Regional Semifinals Saturday Kentucky 69, Delaware 62Connecticut 76, Maryland 50 Regional Championship Monday Kentucky (30-5) vs. Connecticut (324), 7:30 p.m. ——— FINAL FOUR At New Orleans ArenaNew Orleans National Semifinals Sunday, April 7 Oklahoma City champion vs. Spokane champion, 5:30 or 8 p.m. Norfolk champion vs. Bridgeport champion, 5:30 or 8 p.m. National Championship Tuesday, April 9 Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.BASEBALLSpring Training Friday’s Games N.Y. Mets 7, St. Louis 2Minnesota 8, Boston 3Detroit 8, Tampa Bay 3N.Y. Yankees 4, Washington 2Kansas City 5, Cleveland 1Toronto 1, Philadelphia 0Houston 6, Chicago Cubs 6, tie, 10 innings Texas 5, San Diego 4Chicago White Sox 7, Milwaukee 2Cincinnati 2, Arizona 1L.A. Dodgers 9, L.A. Angels 8San Francisco 3, Oakland 1 Saturday’s Games Baltimore 7, N.Y. Mets 1Toronto 10, Philadelphia 4Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 3, tieBoston 4, Minnesota 2Chicago Cubs at Houston (n)San Diego vs. Texas at San Antonio, Texas (n) Chicago White Sox at Milwaukee (n)Cincinnati (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz. (n) Seattle vs. Colorado at Salt Lake City, Utah (n) Cincinnati (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz. (n) San Francisco at Oakland (n)L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels (n) Baseball calendar Today — Opening day, Texas at Houston. Active rosters reduced to 25 players.AUTO RACINGRace week NASCAR SPRINT CUP Next race: STP Gas Booster 500, April 7, Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, Va. Last week: Kyle Busch raced to his first victory of the season after rivals Denny Hamlin and Joey Logano wrecked on the final lap at Fontana. Hamlin and Logano made contact racing side-by-side in the final lap of their first race since they confronted each other a week ear-lier at Bristol. Hamlin is expected to be sidelined at least six weeks. Online: http:// www.nascar.com CAMPING WORLD TRUCK Next race: Kroger 250, April 6, Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, Va. IZOD INDYCAR Next race: Grand Prix of Alabama, April 7, Barber Motorsports Park, Birmingham, Ala. Last week: Andretti Autosport’s James Hinchcliffe won the season-open-ing race at St. Petersburg for his first IndyCar victory. Online: http:// www.indycar.com FORMULA ONE Next race: Chinese Grand Prix, April 14, Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai. Last week: Red Bull’s Sebastian Vettel won the Malaysian Grand Prix. Online: http:// www.formula1.com NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACING Next event: SummitRacing.com NHRA Nationals, April 5-7, The Strip at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Las Vegas. Online: http:// www.nhra.comHOCKEYNHL schedule Friday’s Games Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 4, SODallas 5, Minnesota 3Anaheim 2, Chicago 1Columbus 6, Calgary 4 Saturday’s Games Philadelphia 3, Boston 1Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Islanders 0Nashville at Colorado (n)Carolina at Winnipeg (n)Toronto at Ottawa (n)N.Y. Rangers at Montreal (n)Washington at Buffalo (n)New Jersey at Florida (n)Los Angeles at Minnesota (n)Vancouver at Edmonton (n)Phoenix at San Jose (n) Today’s Games Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.Washington at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.Los Angeles at Dallas, 6 p.m.Anaheim at Columbus, 6 p.m.Boston at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.Colorado at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.St. Louis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Anaheim at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Calgary at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 2BSPORTS tourney experience were just too strong and too good. FGCU matched its season low for points. Once Frazier hit his shots, things just rolled downhill for the Eagles (26-11), whose program is so new they were only in their second season of eligibil-ity for the tournament. The baskets started a 4 1/2-min-ute span when the Eagles couldn’t even get off a shot. They missed their only field goal attempt while turning the ball over four times in that stretch. The slump finally ended when Sherwood Brown, the Eagles dreadlocked senior showman, made a layup in the final minute to get Florida Gulf Coast back within 30-26 by halftime. “When they started their run, we didn’t have the energy we had in the other two games,” said Eagles forward Chase Fieler. “We weren’t playing with the same fire we were before.” FGCU players walked down the steps off the raised court at Cowboys Stadium at the break with their heads down — much different from the team that looked so loose and ready for a good time after an early 11-0 run — similar to extended spurts they had in upsetting No. 2 seed Georgetown and No. 7 seed San Diego State. The Gators play Michigan in the South Regional final at Cowboys Stadium on Sunday. They are trying to get to their first NCAA Final Four since consecu-tive national champion-ships in 2006 and 2007. Michigan overcame a 14point deficit earlier Friday and beat No. 1 seed Kansas 87-85 in overtime. After the Gators turned up the defensive pres-sure, the most fun team this side of the Harlem Globetrotters was suddenly having a lot fewer laughs. Those spectacular dunks and alley-oops weren’t there and Florida forced 20 turnovers. Scottie Wilbekin added 13 points for Florida and Casey Prather 11. Brown led FGCU with 14 points, and Fieler had 12. Fieler started the Eagles’ big run, the only one they’d have, with a 3-pointer from the top of the key before a few plays of the sort that earned them their “Dunk City” moniker. After Brett Comer stole a pass, he ran down the court and threw up an alley-oop pass for the trailing Brown, who delivered a slam that sent the announced crowd of more than 40,000 into a frenzy — except for those in Gator orange. Comer then flipped another backward pass to Bernard Thompson for a 3-pointer. Then Fielder had another 3-pointer — less than 3 minutes after the first one — for a 15-4 lead only six minutes into the game. Could the first No. 15 seed to make it into the round of 16 actually go fur-ther? Not against Florida, the team that had been here so many times before. The FGCU run came too early, leaving the Gators plenty of time to recover. After Frazier’s second 3, Enfield angrily called time-out. But that didn’t stop the Gators surge. Rosario knocked away a pass inside to Eric McKnight, sending the break the other way. Casey Prather grabbed an offen-sive rebound, and with his back to the basket, basi-cally flipped the ball over his head — and it went in. McKnight missed two free throws after that, and Wilbekin penetrated for a short jumper to tie the game at 24. Rosario hit a go-ahead 3-pointer after a steal by Will Yeguete. Eddie Murray had a steal for Florida Gulf Coast, but Patric Young took it right back and got it to Boynton. He made the layup while being fouled, and added the free throw for a 30-24 lead. The Eagles has 12 turnovers in the first half — one less than they had in each of their first two NCAA tourney games. They took twice as many shots (32-16) as Florida, but that wasn’t enough. There was still 10 minutes left on the halftime clock when FGCU returned to the court, and players started taking shots even as their mascot was on the court doing a halftime rou-tine. But Florida scored the first seven points of the second half. Boynton drove for a layup and was fouled before making the free throw. Rosario then drove for a shot off the glass and after another FGCU turn-over had a floater that rat-tled in before Enfield called timeout with his team sud-denly down 37-26. But they never threatened and soon their NCAA run was over. GATORS: Will play Michigan next Continued From Page 1B

PAGE 11

LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 3B3BSPORTSKirkman back with Rangers in 2013 ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas Rangers relief pitcher and Lake City native Micha el Kirkman is left upended after making a throw to the plate on a grounder from Seattle Mariners Kyle Seager in the seventh inning of a baseball game on July 14 in Seattle. The Mariners’ Jo hn Jaso was out at home on the play. Kirkman was announ ced as part of the Rangers opening day roster this week. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas Rangers relief pitcher Michael Kirkman throws a p itch against the Baltimore Orioles on Aug. 21 in Arlington, Texas. The Orioles won 5-3. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas Rangers’ Michael Kirkman delivers a pitch again st the Boston Red Sox in the eighth inning of a game at Fenway Park in Boston on Aug. 6. The R ed Sox won 9-2. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas Rangers’ Michael Kirkman delivers to the Minneso ta Twins during a game on Aug. 26 in Arlington, Texas. The Twins won 6-5. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas Rangers pitcher Michael Kirkman looks from the d ugout in a game last season.

PAGE 12

4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 4BSports Gateway Challenge a local success COURTESY PHOTOThe inaugural Florida Gateway Challenge Open Martial Ar ts Tournament was March 16 in the Howard Conference Center at Florida Gateway College. Martial arts schools from Ocala, Cross City, Tallahassee, South Georgia, and as far away a s Dothan, Ala., were represented by students. The tournament was sanctioned by the North Amer ican Sport Karate Association and the World Martial Arts and Kobudo Association. Promo ters and directors were (front row, from left) Jany Horne (scorekeepers/timekeepers), A.J. Horn e and Pete Lindboe (event coordinator). Back row (from left) are Hanshi Andy Horne (promoter), Charlie Lane (arbitrator/promoter of Gator Nationals World Karate Champi onships), PJ Lindboe (technology) and Sensei Laura Lindboe (founder/promoter ). COURTESY PHOTOIn an open tournament students from a variety of martial arts styles compete in events like traditional and open forms, traditional and open weapons, and point fighting. There are more than 200 available divisions. All ages and belt ranks test their skills against students of similar age and rank. Representing the Academy of Martia l Arts (front row, from left) are: Nate Angelo, first place-Open Weapons/third place-Fighting; Jordan Shanks, first place-Fighting; Tanner McDaniel, third place-Fighting; Yac ine Fadhel, third place-Fighting. Back row (from left) are: Brian Cashwell, first place-Fighti ng; Toby Register, first place-Fighting; Hanshi Andy Horne, instructor; Sensei Laur a Lindboe, owner/instructor; Peter Shanks; A.J. Horne, first place-Traditional Weapons a nd second place-Traditional Forms; Chandler Parish, first and second place-Fighting (tw o divisions). COURTESY PHOTORepresenting Ron Frazier’s North Florida Academy of Marti al Arts (from left) are: Will Wiggins, third place-Traditional Forms and first pla ce-Fighting; Jamal Pascal, second place-Traditional Forms and first place-Fighting; Jacob Ha gue, second place-Traditional Forms and third place-Fighting; Wyatt Gilbert; Dominic End el, second place-Traditional Forms and first place-Fighting. COURTESY PHOTOJordan Shanks is prepared for fighting. COURTESY PHOTOChandler Parish squares off against a competitor. COURTESY PHOTOStudents from Larry Taylor’s Family Karate in Cross City are ready for the event. COURTESY PHOTOTwo competitors fight at the Florida Gateway Challenge Open Martial Arts Tournament. COURTESY PHOTOForms were a part of the Florida Gateway Challenge Open M artial Arts Tournament.

PAGE 13

LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 5B5BSports was just tired,” Schreiber said. “I walked into state that first year and saw how big it was and I choked. My first opponent threw me clear across the mat. I lost 17-6 and was pinned in my second match. I was two-and-out my first time at state.” Schreiber would be ready for the wrestling postseason from then on. “In the 10th grade I decided I wanted to place at state, to shoot for the top six,” Schreiber said. “In the 11th grade my goal was to place in the top three and this year it was to get into the finals.” Scheiber achieved his senior goal and lost 3-2 in the final to defending champion Donoven Hough. In the path to the final, Schreiber defeated Mike McDonald 7-6. McDonald had beaten him twice in a Christmas tournament at Osceola High. Schreiber said the win was the high-light of his senior season. “I had beaten everybody in the top six at state except Donaven,” Schreiber said. Wrestlers throughout the state are a fraternity and Schreiber listed several of the friends he has made through the sport — Evan McCall, Victor Espana, Charles Culbirth and Chase Robinson of Fleming Island High, Resean McArther and Tristin Summers of Lincoln High, Zack Malik of Wakulla High, Arron Galung of Creekside High and Jon Gardner of Gainesville High. “I have friends from all over the state from wres-tling,” Schreiber said. “You go to a tournament and you see guys you have known forever.” Schreiber also has benefited from the coaching of Ryland Wagner of GHS and the Gainesville Takedown Club, and P.J. Colbert of Fleming Island. “When I went into the ninth grade, (Wagner) let me come to his room and helped me a lot,” Schreiber said. “He took me wres-tling all around with his team. (Colbert) helped me a lot with technique, training and mental tough-ness. “I want to thank (Kevin) Warner and (Allen) Worley. They were my high school coaches during the season and they did a good job with me.” Schreiber’s parents, Brian and Karen, have been with him all the way. His dad did the training research and how to gain weight in the early years, then how to cut weight when Cole needed to slim down his senior year. The family travels to tourna-ments and mom takes the pictures. Schreiber has one more big meet on the horizon — the Senior Nationals in Virginia Beach on April 5-7. “I think this will be my last big tournament,” Schreiber said. “I kind of want to get more into aca-demics. I want to finish my AA at Florida Gateway College and enter the school of engineering at Florida.” Schreiber has been contacted about helping to coach, so he may stay in the sport that he loves. “My advice it to try it out,” Schreiber said when asked what he would say to a young athlete looking for a sport. “If they don’t like it, they won’t stick with it. If they enjoy it, they can keep going with it.” Schreiber definitely fell into the latter category. “It has been about as close to a Disney-story ending as you could have got,” he said. WRESTLING: Schreiber may coach Continued From Page 1B JON GARDNER /Special to the ReporterCole Schreiber squares off against Zachary McClinton of Middleburg to win his third regional championship on Feb. 9. Associated PressARLINGTON, Texas — Trey Burke made up for one of his worst starts with the best shot of his life. Burke bounced back from a scoreless first half to score 23 points, includ-ing a long 3-pointer in the final seconds of regulation, and Michigan rallied to beat Kansas 87-85 in the South Regional semifinals Friday night. The fourth-seeded Wolverines wiped out a 10-point Kansas lead in the last 3 minutes of regulation, and Burke gave them their first lead since early in the game with another long 3 to open Michigan’s scoring in overtime. The Wolverines (29-7) reached the regional finals for the first time since the Fab Five era 19 years ago, the last time they were in the round of 16. Ben McLemore had 20 points for the Jayhawks (31-6), who looked to be on their way to a third straight regional final before Michigan’s improbable rally. Instead, they became the third No. 1 seed to fall in this tournament, joining Gonzaga and Indiana. The Wolverines will play Florida in the regional final Sunday. MIDWEST REGIONAL DUKE 71, MICHIGAN STATE 61INDIANAPOLIS — Seth Curry shot Duke right into the regional finals — and put Mike Krzyzewski on the verge of another mile-stone. Curry scored 29 points and the Blue Devils beat Michigan State 71-61 to advance to the regional final in the NCAA tourna-ment. If No. 2 seed Duke (30-5) beats top-seeded Louisville (32-5) in Sunday’s regional final, Krzyzewski would tie John Wooden’s record with 12 Final Four trips. Third-seeded Michigan State (27-9) just couldn’t keep up with Curry and Duke’s shooters. Keith Appling had 16 points for the Spartans, and Adreian Payne finished with 14. Curry’s sixth 3-pointer of the game broke a 38-38 tie early in the second half, sending Duke on a 9-0 run. It also matched the school record for most 3s in an NCAA tourney game, most recently accomplished by Jason Williams on March 22, 2001, against UCLA. The Blue Devils never trailed again. Rasheed Sulaimon had 16 points and Mason Plumlee finished with 14 for Duke.LOUISVILLE 77, OREGON 69INDIANAPOLIS — Louisville survived its first test. Russ Smith matched his career high with 31 points to lead three Cardinals in double figures, and top-seeded Louisville showed it can win close games, too, posting a narrow victory over Oregon. Kevin Ware added 11 and Gorgui Dieng had 10 points and nine rebounds for Louisville (32-5), which has won 13 straight. Coach Rick Pitino improved to 11-0 in the regional semifinals of the NCAA tournament. The 12th-seeded Ducks (28-9) at least made a game of it late. After Louisville went up 66-48 with 9:01 left, Oregon made six straight field goals to close to 70-64 — the closest anyone’s been to the Cardinals in a couple of weeks. But Kevin Ware scored on a layup and Chane Behanan threw down a monstrous dunk to put the game out of reach. Still, Oregon is only the second team to be with-in single digits at the buzzer during Louisville’s run. E.J. Singler’s 15 points led five Ducks in double figures, and the Ducks had only 12 turnovers — one fewer than the Cardinals. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Michigan rallies to beat Kansas, will meet Florida Final Four earns first members on Saturday ASSOCIATED PRESSMarquette guard Trent Lockett (22) shoots user pressure fr om Syracuse forward C.J. Fair (5) during the first half of the E ast Regional final in the NCAA men’s college basketball tournament, Saturday in Washington.Associated PressWASHINGTON — Jim Boeheim calls this year’s Syracuse team his best defensive group ever. Hard to argue, based on the suf-focating performances that put the Orange in the Final Four. Using its trapping, shotchallenging 2-3 zone to perfect effect for 40 min-utes, No. 4-seeded Syracuse shut down No. 3 Marquette 55-39 in the East Regional final Saturday to earn Boeheim his first trip to the national semis since a freshman named Carmelo Anthony helped win the 2003 NCAA title. “It’s a great thing,” Boeheim joked afterward. “We go once every 10 years.” Fittingly, a matchup between schools from the soon-to-break-apart, rough-and-tumble Big East became quite a struggle on the offensive end. Syracuse (30-9) was led by senior for-ward James Southerland’s 16 points. Marquette (26-9) hadn’t scored fewer than 47 points this season. But this time, Marquette kept turning the ball over, seeing its shots blocked or just plain missing. Wichita State defeated Ohio State and will play the Orange in the Final Four.

PAGE 14

6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 MON.-FR. 9A M -7P M SAT 9A M -6P M SUN CLOSED 2588 US HIGH WAY 90 LAKE CITY, FL 32055 800.650.2199 www.RountreeMoore FOR D.com ROUNTREE MOORE FORD FEATURED PRE-OWNED.......................................$5,000 .........................................$5,000 ............................................$5,500 ...................................$6,000 ........................................................$7,500 ..............................$8,000 ............................................$8,500 .....................................$9,000 ...........................................$9,000 ................................$10,000 ......................................$10,500 .......................................$11,000O ................................$12,000 ..........................................$12,500 .....................................$12,500 ........................................................$13,000 ...........................................$13,500 ............................................$13,500 ....................................$14,000 ......................................$14,000 .........................................$14,000 GET R ECOG NIZED ANYWHER E YOU G O... W HEN YOU BUY AT R OUNTR EE MOOR E FO R D! F -150SXT $ 331 PER MO.* F USION $ 256 PER MO. F LEX $ 369 PER MO. $ 362 PER MO. EXPLOR E R M USTANG PER MO. $ 301* ESCAPES PER MO. $ 301* FIESTA PER MO. *NEW 2013 FORD FOCUS ONLY PER MO. 2013 SPRING SA V INGS SPRING SA L E S E V ENT GOING ON NOW!

PAGE 15

1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of March 31-April 6, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County By DINA CAPPIELLO Associated Press WASHINGTON The Obama administrations newest anti-pollution plan would ping American driv ers where they wince the most: at the gas pump. That makes arguments weighing the cost against the health benefits politically potent. The proposal to reduce sulfur in gasoline and tighten auto emission stan dards, released Friday, would raise gasoline prices by less than a penny per gallon, the Environmental Protection Agency says. But the oil industry points to its own study putting the Working to be more welcoming By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com L ake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce is working on a project to visually welcome people by erecting signs along roads lead ing into Lake City. During a December chamber board planning session for 2013 potential projects, members dis cussed reintroducing Welcome to Lake City, Columbia County signs at various locations around the community. The concept was unanimous ly supported by the chamber board and has sort of been in an incubating phase, Chamber of Commerce president Joel Foreman said. Foreman said the plan is to have the signs erected on the arterial roads leading into the city. The signs would feature plac ards of local civic organizations that help fund the project. We would obviously like to have some chamber recognition on there and perhaps recogni tion for a chamber member who might help subsidize the costs of the sign, Foreman said. Earlier this month Columbia County Commissioners unani mously voted to support the project after Foreman made a presentation during a county commission meeting. Foreman plans to make a similar presenta tion for city officials. Chamber officials have not determined how many signs would be erected. Were getting endorsements from the county and the city to move forward and one of the first things well do is site selec tion with those two entities, Foreman said. We want to have cooperation from our govern mental entities on site selection to make sure were not in viola tion of any laws or creating any sort of issues with traffic. We would love to have a sign on every major road coming in, maybe five to seven signs. Right now, were so early in the pro cess we cant quantify it. The chamber is hoping to finance the project privately. Foreman said the chamber is primarily composed of private businesses and is accustomed to funding its operations creatively in the same manner the private sector funds operations. What were looking for from the public entities is primarily sweat equity and things like that, he said. When it comes to the money that well need to actually design and build the signs, were going to try to get funding from our civic organiza tions and chamber members who might be willing to help on a community project. The maintenance moving forward we would fund through sponsorship of the signs. A small banner at the bottom of the sign could tell which local business provides sponsorship for it. Its not a big marketing mes sage, but sort of a community service, Foreman said. With the project still in the planning and design phase, Foreman said, it could be months before the first signs emerge. It will be the end of 2013 before we could get things set up, he said. I hoped we would break ground on something like this this year. I would love to be able to have it done by the end of this year, but just being realis tic, these things dont ever hap pen super fast. My main concern at the present is that the project gets real good legs under it and Project to locate signs at city entry points gets started. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter The Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce has plans to build signs that will welcome people as they enter Lake City along major roads. From left: chamber board member Jimbo Haley, chamber president Joel Foreman and Abbie Chasteen, chamber marketing director, discuss the project Thursday. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SIGNS continued on 2C GAS continued on 3C Cleaner gas rule would mean increased prices at the pump 1CColumbia Inc. 1CColumbia Inc. 1CColumbia Inc. know treatment. know technology. know hearts. We For more information on our cardiac program, visit ShandsLakeShore.com or call 386-292-8000 368 NE Franklin Street | Lake City, FL 32055 | ShandsLakeShore.com What makes us your best choice for cardiac care in Lake City? We oer full-time cardiology care and we are the only local facility with a University of Florida cardiologist on sta and available for local visits. Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center provides an extensive range of technologically advanced treatments delivered by board-certied cardiac specialists. We know hearts. Services include: catheterization Jacksonville Cardiology

PAGE 16

By JOAN LOWYAssociated PressWASHINGTON — It’s a good bet that in the not-so-distant future aerial drones will be part of Americans’ everyday lives, performing countless useful functions. A far cry from the killing machines whose missiles incinerate terrorists, these generally small, unmanned aircraft will help farmers more precisely apply water and pesticides to crops, saving money and reduc-ing environmental impacts. They’ll help police depart-ments find missing people, reconstruct traffic acci-dents and act as lookouts for SWAT teams. They’ll alert authorities to people stranded on rooftops by floods and monitor evacu-ation flows. Real estate agents will use them to film videos of properties and surround-ing neighborhoods. States will use them to inspect bridges, roads and dams. Oil companies will use them to monitor pipelines, while power companies use them to monitor trans-mission lines. With military budgets shrinking, drone makers have been counting on the civilian market to spur the industry’s growth. But there’s an ironic threat to that hope: Success on the battlefield may contain the seeds of trouble for the more benign uses of drones at home. The civilian unmanned aircraft industry worries that it will be grounded before it can really take off because of fear among the public that the technology will be misused. Also prob-lematic is a delay in the issuance of government safety regulations that are needed before drones can gain broad access to U.S. skies. Some companies that make drones or supply support equipment and services say the uncertain-ty has caused them to put U.S. expansion plans on hold, and they are looking overseas for new markets. “Our lack of success in educating the public about unmanned aircraft is com-ing back to bite us,” said Robert Fitzgerald, CEO of The BOSH Group of Newport News, Va., which provides support services to drone users. “The U.S. has been at the lead of this technology a long time,” he said. “If our government holds back this technology, there’s the freedom to move elsewhere ... and all of a sudden these things will be flying everywhere else and competing with us.” Since January, dronerelated legislation has been introduced in more than 30 states, largely in response to privacy con-cerns. Many of the bills are focused on preventing police from using drones for broad public surveil-lance, as well as targeting individuals for surveillance without sufficient grounds to believe they were involved in crimes. Law enforcement is expected to be one of the bigger initial markets for civilian drones. Last month, the FBI used drones to maintain continuous sur-veillance of a bunker in Alabama where a 5-year-old boy was being held hostage. In Virginia, the state General Assembly passed a bill that would place a two-year moratorium on the use of drones by state and local law enforcement. The measure is supported by groups as varied as the American Civil Liberties Union on the left and the Virginia Tea Party Patriots Federation on the right. Gov. Bob McDonnell is proposing amendments that would retain the broad ban on spy drones but allow specific exemptions when lives are in danger, such as for search-and rescue operations. The legislature reconvenes on April 3 to consider the amendments. “Any legislation that restricts the use of this kind of capability to serve the public is putting the public at risk,” said Steve Gitlin, vice president of AeroVironment, a leading maker of smaller drones, including some no bigger than a hummingbird 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF MARCH 31, 2013 that it’s moving forward towards the final goal.” Foreman grew up in the area, and he recalled from his youth a sign on the south side of town off U.S. 441 that welcomed people into Lake City. “That’s been long gone, and we’ve never had this kind of signage,” he said. “I’d like to see our community step up and have something like that. Sometimes these things just flat out take time, but if we don’t invest the time now... You have to start with one step and that’s what we’re trying to do now.” Anyone who wants to offer ideas or support for the project can contact the chamber at 752-3690. SIGNS: Project in works Continued From Page 1C Senior portfolio manager accused of insider tradingBy LARRY NEUMEISTERAssociated PressNEW YORK — A senior portfolio manager for one of the nation’s largest hedge funds was arrested Friday, accused of joining an insider trading conspiracy that the government said made more than $6 million illegally for the powerhouse investment company founded by billion-aire businessman Steven A. Cohen. The arrest broadens the government’s probe of trad-ing practices at SAC Capital Advisors, which manages $15 billion. Two weeks ago, the Securities and Exchange Commission said that two affiliates of SAC Capital would pay more than $614 million in what federal reg-ulators called the largest insider trading settlement ever. The settlement is sub-ject to court approval. In the latest development, Michael Steinberg, 41, pleaded not guilty Friday to insider trading charges only hours after being arrested at his Manhattan apartment. The charges were lodged in an indictment unsealed in U.S. District Court in New York City. Steinberg, who has worked more than 15 years at SAC Capital Advisors and its Sigma Capital Management unit, was released on $3 mil-lion bail. Assistant U.S. Attorney Antonia Apps told Judge Richard Sullivan that Steinberg made no state-ments to authorities after his arrest. Steinberg’s attorney, Barry Berke, said in a state-ment that his client “did absolutely nothing wrong.” He said Steinberg’s trading decisions were based on detailed analysis along with other information he prop-erly obtained. “Caught in the crossfire of aggressive investigations of others, there is no basis for even the slightest blem-ish on his spotless reputa-tion,” he said. In a statement, SAC Capital said Steinberg “has conducted himself profes-sionally and ethically during his long tenure at the firm.” Drone aircraft industry worries about growing privacy backlash ASSOCIATED PRESSFlight test pilot Alex Gustafson carrys an InsituScanEagle u nmanned aircraft in preparation for a flight in Arlington, Ore. It’s a good bet that in the notso-distant future aerial drones will be part of Americans’ everyday lives, performing countle ss useful functions.2CBIZ/MOTLEY 2CBIZ/MOTLEY 2CBIZ/MOTLEY

PAGE 17

By SETH BORENSTEINAP Science WriterWASHINGTON — More than four out of five Americans want to prepare now for rising seas and stronger storms from climate change, a new national survey says. But most are unwilling to keep spending money to restore and protect stricken beaches. The poll by Stanford University released Thursday found that only one in three people favored the government spending mil-lions to construct big sea walls, replenish beaches or pay people to leave the coast. This was the first time a large national poll looked at how Americans feel about adapting to the changes brought on by glob-al warming, said survey direc-tor Jon Krosnick, a professor of political science and psychology at Stanford. The more indirect options the majority preferred were making sure new buildings were stron-ger and reducing future coast-al development. New building codes rated the highest with 62 percent of those surveyed favor-ing it. Three in five people want those who are directly affected by rising seas to pay for protec-tion, rather than all taxpayers. Krosnick said the low favorability of sea walls and sand replenishment “reflect the pub-lic’s fatalistic sense that it’s more realistic to just give up the beach than to try to save it when other storms in the future will just wash it away again.” The nationally representative survey of 1,174 Americans con-ducted online by GfK Custom Research has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.9 percentage points. University of Miami geology professor Harold Wanless, who wasn’t involved in the survey, said he was at a Miami Beach meeting on Thursday with busi-ness and political leaders on how to try to keep from losing their “hugely expensive” land. But they are afraid of spend-ing money in vain attempts that won’t work. There are three ways the public can deal with the effects of ris-ing seas on beaches, said coastal geology professor S. Jeffress Williams of the University of Hawaii. He is an expert on sea level rise and methods of adapt-ing to it. You can “hold the line” with expensive sea walls, retreat and leave the beach, or compro-mise with sand dunes and beach replenishing. Sand dunes helped protect the New Jersey town of Seaside Park more than its dune-less neighbor Seaside Heights when Superstorm Sandy hit last fall, said Laurie Mcgilvray, a govern-ment coastline science expert. Williams said the public’s attitude about not doing much to protect current beach develop-ment would be fine if it were 100 years ago. “But we’ve got tremendous trillions of dollars of a tourist economy that depends on the coast. “You should expect that if you are going to use the coast, you need to put some money in to maintain it,” he said. But people surveyed said money is an issue. When it came to the general question of who should pay to protect the coast, 60 percent of the public said it should be paid for by local property owners and businesses, not the general tax-payers. And when it comes to specific solutions, about 80 per-cent of those surveyed said the money should come from local property taxes, not federal or state income taxes. Nearly half, 47 percent, said the government should prohibit people from rebuilding struc-tures damaged by storms. The survey also found that 82 percent of the public believes global warming is already hap-pening. About three out of four people said rising sea levels caused by global warming is a serious problem. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF MARCH 31, 2013 3C Americans oppose paying for beach repairs ASSOCIATED PRESSPeople walk along the shoreline in Navarre Beach on Wednesday. Santa Rosa County has received $1.76 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to rep lace sand on the beach that was washed away during Tropical Storm Debby last June. The S&P 500 index notches a record. How did we get here? By MATTHEW CRAFTAP Business WriterNEW YORK — The stock market notched another record. Three weeks after the Dow Jones industrial aver-age blew past its all-time high, the broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index joined it in the history books. The S&P 500 gained six points on Thursday to close at 1,569.19, top-ping its previous peak by four points. That previous record stood since Oct. 9, 2007. The S&P 500 may generate fewer headlines than the Dow, its older stock-index sibling, but it’s the market gauge favored by professional investors. That’s largely because it covers a wider swath of companies — 500 as opposed to 30. Like the Dow, the S&P 500 has now recovered all of its losses from the Great Recession and the finan-cial crisis that followed. Investors who held on and put their dividends back into the market have fared even better. An investment of $10,000 in the S&P 500 on Oct. 9, 2007, would be worth $11,270 today. Anyone brave enough to put $10,000 in the S&P 500 at the market’s bottom on March, 9, 2009, would have $25,200. Q: What’s driving the stock market to a new high? A: Since the S&P 500 bottomed out in March 2009, the economy has pulled out of a recession and started growing. Companies are making record profits quarter after quarter, they’re hir-ing in greater numbers, and the housing market is finally recovering. The economy has expanded for 14 quarters in a row. The Fed has helped, too. By keeping interest rates near record lows, the cen-tral bank has encouraged people to move money out of savings accounts that pay next to nothing and into stocks and other investments. Pundits often argue that the Fed’s efforts have created the illusion of a strong stock market. But that argument misses the big picture, says Mark Luschini, chief invest-ment strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott. People buy a stock to own a share of the company’s profits, and those profits keep climbing. Earnings for the S&P 500 hit $103 per share last year. That’s up from $84 in 2007 and $61 in 2009. “This isn’t all smoke and mirrors,” Luschini says. “Corporate profits are at all-time highs.” Q: What about inflation? How does that affect the record? A: When inflation is taken into account, the S&P 500 is still far from its peak. On March 24, 2000, the index hit 1,527. With inflation added to it, that peak works out to 2,065, according to calculations from JPMorgan Chase. Q: The Dow just hit a record three weeks ago. What’s the difference between the two indexes? A: The Standard & Poor’s 500 index takes a company’s market value into account. That means that the most valuable companies in the index — Exxon Mobil and Apple — can move the index more than smaller companies like Avon Products and Hormel Foods. A $1 move in Exxon Mobil moves the S&P more than a $1 move in Hormel. In contrast, the Dow takes a company’s stock price into account. Every change of $1 in any of the 30 Dow stocks moves the index by the same number of points, roughly seven. That gives more sway to companies with higher stock prices. It’s easier for a $100 stock to rise $1 than it is for a $10 stock. As a result, the oil giant Exxon Mobil, with a mar-ket value of $406 billion, has less influence on the Dow than Chevron, with a value of $233 billion. Why? One share of Exxon sells for $91, while one share of Chevron sells for $120. Q: Why should I care about what happens to the S&P 500? A: If there’s a U.S. stock mutual fund in your retire-ment account, it’s probably tied to it. More funds and more money chase after the S&P 500 than any other U.S. stock index. It’s the most widely used yardstick for money managers who pick and choose stocks, as well as for index funds, which simply try to mir-ror an index, says Michelle Swartzentruber, a research analyst at Morningstar. Some 1,359 funds worth $2.8 trillion track the S&P. The Dow, by contrast, has six followers worth $142 million. The index is also popular with investors in exchange-traded funds, baskets of securities that trade like stocks. The largest ETF is the SPDR S&P 500, with $131 billion. Q: Which index do professional investors follow? A: For anyone working in financial markets — profes-sional investors, academic types — the S&P 500 is the main barometer. It’s built to mirror the overall stock market, and it’s a measure of how well Corporate America is doing. “Anyone in our business uses the S&P,” Luschini says. “Nobody uses the Dow. On any given day, if you stopped me on the street to ask where the Dow was trading, I couldn’t tell you. But I’ll generally know the number for the S&P.” Q: Why did it take the S&P 500 longer than the Dow to reach a new record? A: Mainly, the answer is math. A single actor plays a larger role in a cast of 30 than a cast of 500. The Dow’s success owes a lot to one stock — IBM — because of its high price. Since March 9, 2009, when IBM closed at $83, its stock has gained 155 percent, shouldering a tenth of the Dow’s gain, according to Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices. ASSOCIATED PRESSTraders consult on the floor of the New York Stock Exchan ge on Thursday. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed at a record high Thursday, bea ting the mark it set in October 2007. The S&P rose six points to 1,569, beating its previous rec ord by four points. GAS: New regulations Continued From Page 1Ccost between 6 and 9 cents a gallon. The EPA also said its proposal would add about $130 to the price of new vehicles, beginning in 2025. The administration says the costs to consumers are worth the payoff: billions of dollars in health benefits from reductions in smogand soot-forming pollution. The agency predicts $7 in health benefits for every dollar spent to implement the new rules. The agency must hold public hearings before finalizing the rules. It plans for them to take effect in 2017. The proposal was praised by environmentalists and health advocates, as well as automakers who say it will help the U.S. catch up with the cleaner fuels used in other nations. California already uses the sulfur standard. EPA Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe said the pro-posal is designed to “protect the environment and public health in an affordable and practical way.” Opponents say gasoline prices are stubbornly high already and Americans shouldn’t have to pay more. The oil industry, Republicans and some Democrats had urged the EPA to hold off on propos-ing the tighter regulations. “With $4 a gallon gas the norm in many parts of the country, we cannot afford policies that knowingly raise gas prices,” House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton said Friday. Instead, the Obama administration should work to increase energy supplies by approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada and other projects, said Upton, R-Mich. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Ky., who is chairman of the energy and power subcom-mittee, called the sulfur rule “another example of an overzealous EPA” and said lawmakers would give it a hard look. Environmentalists hailed the proposal as potential-ly the most significant in President Barack Obama’s second term. The so-called Tier 3 standards would reduce sulfur in gasoline by more than 60 percent and reduce nitro-gen oxides by 80 percent. It would make it easier for states to comply with health-based standards for the main ingredient in smog and soot. And the regulation would allow automakers to sell the same vehicles in all 50 states. The Obama administration already has moved to clean up motor vehicles by adopting rules that will double fuel efficiency and putting in place the first standards to reduce the pol-lution from cars and trucks blamed for global warm-ing. “Together, these standards represent the largest step in our nation’s history toward reducing harmful emissions from the vehicles we drive every day,” said Michelle Robinson, direc-tor of the clean vehicles program of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Survey finds many feel its not worth cost as seas rise. ASSOCIATED PRESSA woman gases up her car at a Gulf station in Brookline Mass., last summer. Reducing sulfur in gasoline and tighte ning emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017, as the Obama administration is proposing, would come with costs as well as rewards. 3CBIZ 3CBIZ

PAGE 18

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C DIRECTOR, LIBRARY POSITION# A99957Supervise all aspects of the library, including technical services, reference, collection department, and circulation. Serve on college committees, provide leadership for all library staff, and evaluate library performance using a variety of reports and surveys. Provide leadership for online learning resources via library databases, and ensure that the library communicates with faculty and staff in order to keep the collection relevant and current. Requires Master’s degree in Library Science (MLS) or Information Studies from a program accredited by the American Library Association, and a minimum of three years of work experience in a library. Knowledge of library cataloging practices, library computer applications including online searching, reference techniques, and library instruction. This position requires the ability to communicate effectively with all library users, the general public and the college community. Experience working in a community college library preferred. SALARY: $47,500 annually plus benefits APPLICATION DEADLINE: 4/30/13 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS SUMMER TERM 2013 NURSING CLINICALBSN Required. Master’s degree in nursing preferred. At least two years of recent clinical experience required. Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or mattie.jones@fgc.eduCOLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICSMaster’s degree in mathematics or Master’s degree with 18 graduate hours in mathematics. Contact Paula Cifuentes at 386.754.4260 or paula.cifuentes@fgc.edu for more information.HEALTH INFORMATIONCertified RHIA or RHIT and a minimum of a baccalaureate degree. Please email resume and transcripts to Michele P. Cuadras at michele.cuadras@fgc.eduHORTICULTUREPart-time position for developing and teaching online courses in Horticulture. Master’s degree in horticulture or similar and at least three years of experience in online course development and teaching horticulture or similar required. Horticulture industry experience desired. Ability to work with full-time faculty in the golf and landscape programs to convert existing credit courses for online delivery. Send resumes to John R. Piersol at john.piersol@fgc.edu or call 386-754-4225 for more information. College application and copies of transcripts required. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with a translation and evaluation. Application available at www.fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education & Employment INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAMS POSITION #: F99950 164 Duty Days The primary responsibility of an Instructor/Coordinator at FGC is to teach college level courses, advise students and to develop schedules and curriculum. Instructor/ Coordinators are involved in the budgeting and planning process within their department. Establish and maintain a relationship with service area stakeholders. Allocate time for scheduled teaching assignments, office hours during which the students may have access to the instructor, and for planning and support for programs under them. Requires Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education/Child Development or Master’s degree with at least 18 graduate credit hours in Early Childhood Education/Child Development. One year of responsibility for the professional growth of another adult through career advising, mentoring, job coaching sessions or other training related activities. One year experience in a child care setting serving children ages birth through eight. Ability to use effective communication techniques with students and others. Ability to work with various educational professionals and other stakeholders in continuous improvement of the educational experiences of students. Ability to use technology in the teaching and learning process. Ability to coordinate scheduling of classes for the area. Ability to coordinate with other departments to provide quality education. Ability to evaluate program plans and recommend improvements. Ability to present information in a coherent manner and the ability to fairly evaluate student retention of that information. Ability to manage data and complete industry reports. Skills in interpersonal relationships. Must be computer literate. SALARY: Based on degree and experience APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open Until Filled Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com LegalPUBLIC NOTICEON REQUESTFOR LETTERS OF INTERESTLOI-014-2013The City of Lake City, Florida is accepting letters of interest to deter-mine whether there are parties inter-ested in leasing a parcel of land and building at 764 SWKuhn Road, Lake City, Florida, parcel #08040-000. The parcel and building formerly operated as the Recreation Department Business Office.Additional information may be obtained on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at DemandStar.com. Contact the Procurement Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more information.05537859March 17, 24, 31, 2013April 7, 2013 NOTICE TOPATIENTS OFPHILRHIDDLEHOOVER, M.D Effective April 30, 2013, Dr. Phil Rhiddlehoover is retiring from the practice of medicine. Medical re-cords for patients of Dr. Rhiddleho-over can be obtained by contacting The Orthopaedic Institute at 4500 Newberry Road, Gainesville Florida, 32607, or calling 352-336-6000.05537965March 31, 2013April 7, 14, 21, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesF/T Accounts Receivables Clerk. Other office duties include: Quickbooks, Word & Excel. Email resume hrhd7@yahoo.com CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 100Job OpportunitiesCMS Professional Staffing Inc., Seeking individuals with recent background experience ranging from general business to sales & finance. Must be proficient with Email and Microsoft office. Apositive attitude and great work ethic are a must. Salaries vary in range. Fax resume to 386-758-9047. Driver needed with clean CDL Clean record. Home every night. For more information call 752-2510 ask for Jerry Experienced Lube Tech Needed Apply at Rountree-Moore Ford 2588 W. US Hwy 90 Lake City, FL32055 See: Jimbo Pegnetter. Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock&Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class ACDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 866-823-0323 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesWANTED Live in House Keeper / Maintenance. Couple preferred. Apply at Piney Woods Lodge 386-752-8336 120Medical Employment05537976Temporary Certified Dental Assistant position, starting in June for approx 3 mths. Must be able to work evenings and Saturdays. Fax resume to 386-752-8601. 05538032MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Full-time receptionist for medical office in Lake City. Experience required. Email resume to mafaisalmd@gmail.com or fax to 386-758-5987 05538060Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation Center is now hiring for RN 11-7 shift, full time LPN 3-11 shift, full/part time CNA All shifts, full/part time Competitive pay and full benefit package. Please apply in person at 587 SE Ermine Ave. Lake City, Fl 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-7337 EOE/DFWP F/TLab Tech needed for Family Practice office. Must have FL license & exp as Lab supervisor. Email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net 120Medical EmploymentF/Tposition available in busy medical office M-F. 2 year degree. Req’d, Medical Terminology a plus.Send resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net Immediate opening available for F/Tor P/T Nurse Practitioner or Physicians Assistant in well established Primary Care office. Call 755-0645 or fax 961-9541 We are growing!!! Nurse On Call Home Health Care is looking for RN's, PT's and OT's to cover our expanding business in Lake City/Live Oak Area. Fax Resumes to 386.487.0386 240Schools & Education05537693Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class04/01/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class4/08/2013• LPN 04/22/2013 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com

PAGE 19

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 5C Classified Department: 755-5440 Owner Sammy L. KeenServing Columbia and surrounding counties for over 30 years rrnrr 764 SW Riverside Ave., Fort White, FL 32038 • (386) 365-3646www.slk-construction.com 5IBOLZPVr %PVHr,JNNZr.BSJMZOr3BHBO#SPPLF&EHMFZ XXX&EHMFZ$POTUSVDUJPODPN-%-"%23/&#OLUMBIA#OUNTY"UILDERS!SSOCIATIONs.&)"s,AKE#ITY#HAMBEROF#OMMERCE 37!RLINGTON"LVDs,AKE#ITY&,s0HONErs&AXr ,IC22!"USINESS"UILTON%XCELLENCE #ARRYINGONTHE&AMILY4RADITION #VJMEJOHBOFXIPNFJTBOFYDJUJOHBOE SFXBSEJOHFYQFSJFODF%PVH&EHMFZ&EHMFZ$POTUSVDUJPOnVOEFSTUBOETUIFJOWFTUNFOUJOWPMWFEJOUIFQVSDIBTFPGBOFXIPNFBOEIFXPSLTIBSEUPCVJMEZPVSESFBNUPUIFFYBDUJOHVWDQGDUGVDQGVSHFLFDWLRQV\RXH[SHFW(GJOH\$POTUSVDUJPOIBTCVJMUDVTUPNIPNFTGPSNBOZVDWLVHGFOLHQWVWKURXJKRXWWKH\HDUV%PVH&EHMFZIBTCVJMUNBOZDVTUPNIPNFTJOUIF-BLF$JUZBSFBNBLJOHUIF%PVH&EHMFZOBNFTZOPOZNPVTXJUIRVBMJUZrJOUFHSJUZrFYDFMMFODFBOEDPNNJUNFOUUPIJTDMJFOUT5IJTUSBEJUJPOTUBSUFEPWFSZFBSTBHPXJUIIJTGBUIFSXIPQBTTFEBMFHBDZPGFYDFMMFODFBOEGBJSEFBMJOH%PVH&EHMFZrJTBTFDPOEHFOFSBUJPOGBNJMZCVJMEFSXJUILOPXMFEHFBDRVJSFEUIPVHIIBSEXPSLBTXFMMBTCVJMEJOHFWFSZIPNFBTJGJUXFSFIJTPXO%PVH&EHMFZJTBMTPDPNNJUUFEUPIJTDMJFOUrIFHPFTPWFSFWFSZTUFQPGUIFDPOTUSVDUJPOQSPDFTTBTJUIBQQFOTrJTBMXBZTPOUIFKPCrBOEBWBJMBCMFUPIJTDMJFOUTPOBEBJMZCBTJT&EHMFZ$POTUSVDUJPOJTBGBNJMZPXOFEBOEPQFSBUFECVTJOFTTBOEUBLFTQSJEFJORVBMJUZXPSLBOEPVSSFQVUBUJPOJOUIFDPNNVOJUZ8FMPPLGPSXBSEUPUBMLJOHBOEXPSLJOHXJUIZPVBOEZPVSGBNJMZJOUIFGVUVSF Hallmark REAL ESTATEOF LAKE CITY, INC. 386-755-6600 Toll Free 1-877-755-6600 540 W. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 hallmark01@comcast.net www.hallmarklakecity.com Serving North Florida for over 25 Years! SMARTPHONE? Scan this code to begin your search today!A FAMILY DELIGHT! 3/2 brick home, corner lot, fenced back yard. Ready for you and yours! Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#82491A SPECTACULAR VIEW! 3/2 M/H on 7+ acres. New kitchen cabinets & countertops, a great price! $65,000 Teresa Spradley (386)365-8343 MLS#83138 LET’S TALK TURKEY… and deer roaming around your home in Falling Creek. Beautiful 4/2 home for only $78,900 Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 MLS#83014 BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME, 3/2 home in lovely neighborhood, great for your family! $149,000 Kay Priest (386)365-8888 MLS#82275 COMMERCIAL LISTINGS RETAIL STORE LARGE LOT, 11K square feet & 98 feet fronting heavily traveled US Highway in Lake City, 2.58 acres. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#83018 LOCATION is everything in this over 12K square feet of warehouse and/or retail space, has access from a stop light. US Hwy. 90 W Lake City Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#75778 CALLING ALL Doctors, Contractors, and Professionals to this fantastic renovated property on corner o f US 90. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 MLS#82066 2 OF EVERYTHING! 2 story, 2.5 lots, 2br/2ba, 2 boat lifts. Double enjoy-ment-Gulf and river! Teresa Sprad-ley (386)3658 343 MLS#83139 RIVER ACCESS, 3/2 home also has outbuilding, drop down deck with grilling station invite friends and family! Ron Feagle (386) 288-2901 MLS#81707 REDUCED LAND / ACREAGE IF YOU LOVE A VIEW! Come and see this beautiful working farm/ranch land, cross fenced with an 8 inch well. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 MLS#8161788 BEAUTIFUL ACRES, 2 septics, 2 power poles, and 1 well. Fenced & cross-fenced, pasture land, hunting, and growing hay. Vic Lantroop (386)623-6401 MLS#82898 HUNTING, FARMING, OR TIMBER! 80 acres clear-cut & 60 acres with oaks and cypress trees must see! Ron Feagle (386)288-2901 MLS#82844 2011 Nissan Altima 2.5SGray, 4-door, 55,100 miles.$15,500 386-752-7284 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 310Pets & Supplies Free to Good 2 home (2)cute gray tiger kittens, 4 1/2 mths old. Neutered, shots, leukemia free, litter trained, not declawed, must stay together. 386-755-0057 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Desktop $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture BLACK AND GLASS TVSTAND $35. SOLD Medium walnut wooden day bed with trundle. Almost new mattress and bedding. $75 SOLD 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous High Efficiency Heat Pumps 100% Financing Pymts. as low as $56 per mo. w.a.c. Call 386-3300135, LLC #CAC1815182 Stop COOLING Your Attic! We repair leaky ducts Call today 386-330-0135. 630Mobile Homes forRent2/1 Quiet area, Free garbage p/u 4.5 mi S of Lake City,$520 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Quiet Country Park 3/2 w/ screened porch $550 a month. Very clean. NO PETS! Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSaleNew Palm Harbor Homes Mobile Condo $39,900. Delivered to your site $0 down financing John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013 Jacobsen 28X48 3/2 ( 2 Left ) $39,995 Del & Set. North Pointe Homes Gainesville 352-872-5566 RED STAR SPECIALS Time to move out the old and bring in the new 2014 Models. Free Furniture or Discounts on 12 select Jacobsen Models. Great Bank Finance and Discounts for Cash! We Finance! Free Approval By Phone until 9 PM. Give us a try! North Pointe Homes-Hwy 441 NGainesville 352-872-5566 Several Late Model repos to pick from! North Pointe Homes Gainesville 352-872-5566 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. $450, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2br/1ba Large carport. Corner of Baya & McFarlane. $550. mo. $550 sec. 386-752-9144 or 755-2235 3/2, nice neighborhood, Summers School area. Fenced back yard. 2 car garage. 386-623-2848 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 Lake City Country Club fairway at back. 3BR/2BA1760 SQFT, carpet, tile, encl porch, all appliances, lrg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123 Small 1 bedroom house, $400 month plus electric. Call 386-755-5625 Leave message. 750Business & Office Rentals05538037Move in Ready Office For Lease Newly remodeled, like new. 2700 sqft, great for a Physicians office, Attorneys office or Any Executive office. Security cameras & phone system provided. Computer network ready. Located off Sisters Welcome Rd. Midtown front building. Call Joe at 935-2832 Beautiful Designer Office Space Available! 2760 sq. ft. @ a spectacular $6.40 per sq. ft. This high-quality, up-to-date, and in excellent condition luxurious space is currently operating as a Medispa/ Derm Center and is move-inready! 6 rooms are available, 2 with water, spacious lobby w/ gorgeous granite receptionist desk, retail area, full conference room and 5 exam suites. Perfect for Doctors/Dermatologists or Salon. Photos are available. Please email jlowrey100@gmail.com or call 386.719.9227 for details. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591

PAGE 20

6C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 : $ 13,500 $335 $310 $250 $250 $335 *PRICES INCLUDE ROUNTREE MOORE DISCOUNT. BASED ON AVAILABILITY AND WITH A PPROVED CREDIT $2,500 DOWN A T 3.99% APR FOR 72 MONTHS. T AX, T AG, TITLE, LICENSE AND DEALER FEES NOT INCLUDED. PHOTO S FOR ILLUSTRA TION PURPOSES ONLY. *W ARRANTY IS A LIMITED POWER TRAIN WARRANTY. FOR DET AILS, SEE RET AILER OR GO TO KIA.COM. 888-650-2199www.facebook.com/rountreemoorekia RountreeMooreKIA

PAGE 21

By CHRISTOPHER SHUMAKERSpecial to the ReporterF our Rivers Audubon Society members Valerie Thomas and Jacqui Sulek say their organization has adopted Alligator Lake as their special hang out. “We bird there every month, and of course, we go multiple times a month,” said Thomas. “We love that place. It’s the best birding place in the county.” Thomas and Sulek, both avid bird watchers, said they are never disappointed with a walk down one of the lake’s many trails. Both said they often see new birds on the Great Florida Birding Trail site. “If you have the least bit of interest in nature, looking at birds, looking at butterflies, just being outdoors and enjoying it, you couldn’t ask for a more beau-tiful place,” Thomas said. That is why the fourth annual Alligator Lake Spring Festival is taking place there. Thomas and Sulek want others to know this lake and park exist. The women are the driving forces behind the Four Rivers Audubon-sponsored event, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festival is free to the public and will be held in the park at 420 SE Alligator Glen, off of Old Country Club Road. The Audubon members are surprised more people in Columbia County don’t know of this 1,000 acre recreational park. The two wish more locals would get out and explore the trails, have a picnic or just explore the lake’s wetlands. “We get so involved in our computers and being indoors now. This is just a day to be out-side, to be in a beautiful place, to feel good,” Sulek said, referring to the festival. There will be 35 vendors offering many activities, Thomas said. The kids will get to build birdhouses this year courtesy of Home Depot, as well as get their faces painted and play bird guess-ing games to win small prizes. “It’s fun,” Thomas said, “but we want to have it fun with a little bit of a message.” The festival will also feature native snakes and gopher turtles, as well as expert advice on which native plants attract butterflies and birds into a yard, said Sulek. Several tours are scheduled throughout the day for people interested in learning more about native plants, butterflies and birds. By TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressST. AUGUSTINE — Inside a Catholic convent deep in St. Augustine’s historic district, stacks of centuries-old, sepia-toned papers offer clues to what life was like for early resi-dents of the nation’s oldest permanently occupied city. The parish documents date back to 1594, and they record the births, deaths, marriages and baptisms of LIFE Sunday, March 31, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D O n a recent getaway day, we were joined by Carolyn Castagna and Tina Roberts and ended up browsing the shops in Micanopy looking for a rare find. No success there, so we headed for lunch at the Blue Highway, located at 204 NE U.S. Highway 441. We ended up having to use our GPS, since the signage wasn’t easy to spot. Gainesville friend, Claudia Bates, highly rec-ommended we try this one. The restaurant is one room that seats about 60 people, including the bar seat-ing. It’s painted in a warm cantaloupe color with local artisan work hanging on the walls. The bar features an open kitchen behind it, where you can watch masterful creations being prepared. Our server, Sara, welcomed us warmly and gave us detailed information about the menu choices. She started out our meal in such a nice way. The Italian cuisine had many tempting dishes, and we narrowed our selections to three appetizers and a pizza in hopes that we would get a true perspective of their cooking. The Tuscan hummus Taste Buddies find the Blues Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES FIRST continued on 2D TASTE continued on 2D Lake festival on tap Four Rivers Audubon Society VALERIE THOMAS//Four Rivers Audubon SocietyA festival participant asks a vendor about different birds on display at last year’s Alligator Lake Spring Festiva l. The fourth festival sponsored by Four Rivers Audubon Soci ety is scheduled for Saturday, April 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m at Alligator Lake Recreation Area in Lake City. Organizers promote greater awareness of recreation area. Records of early Floridians being digitally preserved FESTIVAL continued on 2D &"&%"$#)&!"&#$!%% "$&!" &""'$"#$&"!%&%% #*"'$" %&$(&"#$%$(&!&'$'&*" &"!"'!&*!$%&"$)&&%"$$%!! %&&%$&$)$))"$!('$$ &"!+"$&%&r!nr$#$&"#$"$ &&%$&'$! "$&!$%&"&%!&'$%&&!%)$"))!%'$) !&!"!"&%&*$%!&)"$"$! "$(%&#"&%"$#" nrnrnrn rrnrn r rrrrn "&%"$#"#$&%)&" & !&&" %&*&!($"! !&"'$" '!&%!%'%&!"!" $")&

PAGE 22

2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HAPPENINGS Morrell-Radford engagement David and Vicki (Barrs) Morrell of Lake City are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Olivia Miracle Morrell to Lee Dillon Radford, son of Mark and Mori (Warner) Radford of Live Oak. Olivia is the granddaughter of paternal grandparents, Wayne and Emma Jean Morrell of Lake City. Maternal grandpar-ents are the late Morris and Katie Barrs of Madison and Lake City. Lee is the grandson of paternal grandparents, Tom and Mary Kathryn Radford and Vincene and George McKnight of Live Oak. Maternal grandparents are Joyce Warner and the late H.M. Warner and Anna Laura Warner of Live Oak. A spring wedding is being planned. COURTESY PHOTOOlivia Morrell and Lee Radford Birth: Britnee Simpson and Keven Bethune of Lake City welcomed a son, Britin Kace Bethune, on March 14, 2013 at Shands LakeShore Medical Center. The baby weighed 8 poounds, 1 ounce and was 19 inches. He has two siblings, Bryant, 9, and Kanin, 3. Grandparents are Lee and Belinda Austin, Ricky Simpson and the late Franita Bethune. Great-grandparents are Bill and Sandra Black. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. TASTE: Blue Highway restaurant Continued From Page 1Dwas made with pureed Tuscan white beans, tahini, garlic, lemon and spices — all served with warm flat bread ($6.50). It was creamy and seasoned perfectly. We then tried the shrimp bruschetta. It was a hit and consisted of shrimp, garlic butter, diced plum tomatoes, roasted garlic, kalamata olives, capers and fresh herbs served over warm focaccia bread ($9.00). Our third selection was Vongole Poaillipo — Genie’s favor-ite. It included small, succulent Cedar Key clams steamed in garlic, white wine, fresh herbs, plum tomatoes and but-ter served with focaccia. ($10). At this point we were all happy and would have been content to call it a day but we still had pizza coming. All breads and dough are made on the premises, and the yeasty smell is tantalizing. We ordered the Sicilian thick-crusted pizza, and when it arrived it was a sight to behold. It was on a color-ful rectangular pottery platter, bubbly hot and the aroma was amazing. We chose the Abruzzese, which was prepared with tomato sauce, house-made meatballs, sliced roasted garlic, mozzarella, parsley, Romano and Parmesan cheeses ($17). It was huge and covered with 15 to 20 medium-size meatballs. The meatballs were made with ricotta cheese, which gave them a wonderful moist consistency. They had not been cooked in tomato sauce, as most are, but were oven cooked and their flavors weren’t lost in a tomato flavor. Cooked on a stone, the pizza dough was absolutely some of the best we’ve eaten. This alone is worth a future trip. Needless to say, our carry-out box was full. As a side note, gluten free piz-zas are also available. There are many more menu selections left behind for another visit. The salads sounded wonderful, as well as their sandwiches. Next time may have to try the lamb Plandine: roasted lamb, mint pesto, aioli, mixed greens, red onions, Parmesan and red wine vinegarette served on warm flatbread topped with cool salad and folded like a sandwich. ($10) They do serve desserts but we didn’t even look at the menu. Sara told us they have Key lime pie, brownies and cannolis. Frank and Winny Ruffino, originally from Chicago, opened the Blue Highway nine years ago. Intrigued by the name we asked about the origin. Before our cur-rent Interstate highway structure was created Highway 441 was a major route bringing tourists to Florida vacation sites. Like all major U.S. high-ways, it was marked with a blue line on maps. It just goes to prove that driving down the back roads of small town U.S.A. can lead to unexpected treasures. There are two Blue Highway locations. In Micanopy, it is at 204 NE U.S. Highway 441; phone (352) 466-0062, and in Newberry, it is at 13005 SW First Road; (352) 505-6833. ASSOCIATED PRESSUniversity of South Florida professor J. Michael Francis l ooks at documents at the St. Augustine Catholic diocese in St. Augustine. The records d ate back to the year 1594, when Spanish colonists settled in the area. Francis is working to digitize the records, which are fragile. The project is timely as Florida celebrates its 50 0th anniversary this year. Records show that by the time Jamestown was settled in Virginia in the early 1600’s, St Augustine was a diverse home to 500 people of European descent, native Americans and free and enslaved Africans. FIRST: Ancient records being saved Continued From Page 1Dthe people who lived in St. Augustine from that time through the mid-1700s. They’re the earliest written documents from any region of the United States, according to J. Michael Francis, a history profes-sor at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Francis and some of his graduate students in the Florida Studies department have spent the past several months digi-tizing the more than 6,000 fragile pages to ensure the contents last beyond the paper’s deterioration. “The documents shed light on aspects of Florida history that are very difficult to reconstruct,” Francis said. Eventually, the digital images of the records will be put online for anyone to view. Francis’ project is timely because the state is celebrating its 500th anniversary this year. In April 1513, the Spanish monarchy contracted explorer Juan Ponce de Leon to find another island off of Cuba that was rumored to have great riches. Instead, he landed in Florida and named it “La Florida,” after the “feast of the flowers” during Spain’s Easter celebrations. De Leon probably wasn’t the first European to set foot in Florida, and there is debate on whether he landed in St. Augustine or the sites of present-day cit-ies to the north or south. St. Augustine was founded in 1565 by another Spanish explorer, Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles. Many Americans don’t even realize that St. Augustine’s stature among the country’s first European settlements. Jamestown, Va., was founded in 1607 and Plymouth, Mass., in 1620, and both are routinely emphasized in school history classes. Historians believe that because America is an English-speaking country, an emphasis was put on the British settle-ments of Jamestown and Plymouth and not the Spanish-speaking St. Augustine. St. Augustine holds many of the secrets to 16th-century Florida, largely because of these documents. Written in flourishing script, they are a treasure trove for scholars and genealogists who want to know more about who lived in Florida centuries before it became a state. “People’s daily lives here weren’t the difficult struggle that was often represented,” said Francis, adding that most homes had gardens and fruit trees. The documents are yellowed with age and many have worn edges that resemble lace. Francis said that in previous decades, someone tried to preserve the documents by essentially shrink-wrapping them in plastic — but it’s destroying the paper faster due to acids and the plastic used. While the parish there began in 1565, records from its first 29 years are missing for unknown reasons. The documents are continuous from 1594 through 1763, which is the year the British took over the city. Spanish colonists shipped the records to Cuba and they remained there for more than a century. A Catholic bishop had all of the records sent back to the St. Augustine by 1906. Francis said the documents surprised him by revealing what a diverse place St. Augustine was in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. By reading the records in Spanish, Francis has pieced together tales of Irish priests, Spanish missionaries, native Americans. He’s discovered family trag-edies and stories of freed slaves. “Slaves who escaped plantations in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, slaves in fact who had come all the way from New York City, to come to St. Augustine,” he said. “And when you read those, one immediately begins to imagine a situation in which they’re in these plantations, and they decide, one day, to try to escape and make their way to St. Augustine.” FESTIVAL: Lake to be showcased Continued From Page 1DTwo butterfly tours are scheduled with expert Mark Minno. One tour will start at 11 a.m., the other at 1 p.m. If you are interested in native plants, expert Betsy Martin will have a tour at noon. Three bird tours are scheduled, but participants are asked to call Thomas at (386) 466-2193 to reserve a place in one. There will be two tours starting at 8 a.m., one for beginners and the other for the more advanced. Another bird tour with Jimmy Krummrich is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thomas said participants will need to take their own binoculars for bird tours, but they will have a few loaners. “By getting people who haven’t been there [Alligator Lake] before,” Sulek said, “hopefully, you are getting new people who say, ‘Wow, I never knew this was here. I think this is really cool. Hey, maybe I’ll take a native plant home.’ Before you know it, their kids are going to be able to expe-rience a butterfly in the yard. You’re getting them engaged in nature, and nature is important for all of us.” Thomas and Sulek hope the festival gets people thinking about water con-servation, too. “People don’t think about it,” Thomas said. “As long as the faucet turns on when they get ready to wash their dishes or take a shower, every-thing is fine. If we don’t conserve, we are going to be in trouble.” “We understand we all need water,” Sulek said. “We can’t fight each other; we’ve got to find a com-mon solution.” Thomas and Sulek said just turning the water off while brushing your teeth is something simple that helps conservation efforts. The upcoming festival is designed to get people outside, to teach people something new and to develop a love for Alligator Lake, Thomas said. “It would be wonderful if they’d bring their fami-lies back to Alligator Lake or tell their neighbors and have them come enjoy the place,” Thomas said, referring to festival par-ticipants, “because I really do think it’s a beautiful spot, and I do think that it’s not very well known in Lake City.”VALERIE THOMAS//Four Rivers Audubon SocietyTwo volunteers from Our Santa Fe are giving some kids a lesson about keeping area springs clean at last year ’s Alligator Lake Spring Festival. “The documents shed light on aspects of Florida history that are very difficult to reconstruct.”— J. Michael Francis, University of South Florida professor2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106

PAGE 23

Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 3D A merican gardeners aren’t alone in their passion for cultivating roses in their home gardens. People around the world share this love of roses. Here in North Florida, roses will grow and bloom for at least nine months of the year. We grow them in mixed flowering plant beds, as specimens or in con-tainers, or in gardens totally devoted to roses. Roses are generally divided into either low or high maintenance rose groups. Those that thrive with mini-mal care include the antique, or heir-loom roses. These easy care types produce more open and informal blooms like the shrub roses in the “Knock-out” series. At one time in the past, good old rose bushes were grown as flowering shrubs in the landscape. They were leafy and full, had interesting form, and the blossoms had a heady rose scent. The blossom colors were soft pastels that fit harmoniously into southern gardens. When hybridizers produced longer stems, larger blossoms, brighter colors, and pretty bud shapes in ‘modern’ roses, a trade-off was made for higher maintenance. Modern hybrid tea, grandiflora, floribunda and polyantha roses fit into the higher maintenance group because they demand frequent grooming, fertilizing, watering and spraying to keep them healthy. Research in Florida has shown that hybrid roses grafted on ‘Fortuniana’ rootstock grow larger, are more vigorous, produce more flowers, and live much longer than plants grown on any other rootstock. ‘Dr. Huey’ rootstock is second-best, and ‘Multiflora’ is the shortest-lived and least satisfactory rootstock under Florida conditions. Many “old” roses and dwarf cultivars perform well on their own roots, but often do better when grafted. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep339 You may or may not have been successful in your attempts at grow-ing these captivating beauties. Success with roses also depends upon selecting varieties that perform well in our high humidity. Florida humidity contributes to the problem-atic fungal disease on leaves called blackspot. Some roses that perform well despite the humidity are labeled as resistant to blackspot, and they will rapidly renew any foliage lost to infection as they keep on growing. Attend a free rose workshop and learn from the rose experts from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Home Depot garden department in Lake City. Sabine Marcks, registered landscape architect and UF Master Gardener, will share ways to incorpo-rate roses into any landscape. Geoff Hart, rose grower and UF Master Gardener, will show you which roses are best in our North Florida climate. Get answers to your rose questions. Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.eduGet ready for success with roses By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — The world’s smallest bird can take up a big chunk of a person’s spring to-do list: Trim the trees, weed the garden, make the nectar and hang the feeders. With the beginning of spring, hummingbirds are making their way north after migrations that took many of them more than 500 miles across the Gulf of Mexico. They will return to the same yards where they have stayed in the past. “They are fascinating. I call them nature’s miracle. They have all these dis-advantages (size, enemies, flying solo), yet they are thriving and have all these incredible abilities,” said John Schaust, chief natural-ist for Wild Birds Unlimited Inc. nature shops, which are based in Carmel, Ind. Although hummingbirds are not traditional pets in the sense that they can-not be caged, clothed or leashed, enthusiasts con-sider the tiny colorful birds as pets that they feed, watch and fuss over. Every spring, for instance, Schaust fields calls from people worried that not all of the hum-mingbirds that lived in their yards will return. “They say last year they had six and this year there is only one. They want to know if they got hurt, if they were caught in a hur-ricane,” he said. It’s illegal to sell or keep a hummingbird as a pet, but people who put out food and feeders and make their properties bird-friendly care about them like pets, Schaust said. A good reason why hummingbirds shouldn’t be caged like canaries or para-keets is that it would die if it weren’t free to fly and feed, said Dr. Laurie Hess, a Bedford Hills, N.Y., veter-inarian for birds and exotic pets. She has treated two rescued hummingbirds, one for an eye ulcer and one for a beak injury. A hummingbird has to visit between 200 and 1,000 flowers a day to survive, depending on the size of the bird and amount of nec-tar in the flower, said Ethan J. Temeles, a professor of biology at Amherst College in Massachusetts. Nectar is available in many stores, along with bird feeders, but concoctions can be made at home with four parts water to one part sugar, Schaust said. Hummingbird numbers are unknown but Schaust estimated it to be in the hundreds of millions, though they are only found in North, Central and South America. They can live between three and five years. Anyone who wants to attract hummingbirds to their yards should avoid pesticides in their gardens, since the birds need nec-tar and small bugs, and residue can easily be car-ried back to its nest, said Monique Rea of San Juan Capistrano, a volunteer hummingbird rehabilitator. Preparing for the return of the birds means carefully trimming trees and plants to avoid agitating a nest, she added. It might seem like a lot of work for a bird that weighs just a tenth of an ounce, but devotees say the rewards are handsome— among them watching their flight. Hummingbirds flap their wings 20 to 80 times a sec-ond in a figure-eight motion to get lift going up and com-ing down. They can fly forward, backward, right side up and upside down, making them “one of few birds who can fly backwards and the only one that can sustain flight backwards,” Schaust said. “It’s just amazing to me that they can beat, breathe, hover and still be able to eat, but they do,” said Hess. Spring is an ideal time to watch for them, because it coincides with one of the birds’ two mating seasons. Females build walnut-sized nests or redecorate last year’s, Schaust said, in a process that takes six to 10 days. The nests are reinforced with spider web silk, so some homeowners might see the tiny birds in the eaves of homes collect-ing webs, he said. To camouflage the nest, the mother covers the out-side with lichen from tree trunks and glues it on with tree sap. If a nest breaks before the hummingbirds return, it can be rebuilt by humans. “Hummingbirds have no sense of smell, so the moth-er won’t have any problem with you touching the baby. You can even rebuild a nest if it was destroyed,” Rea said. After making a yard hospitable, hummingbird watchers have few other responsibilities. Orphaned babies can be brought to rehabilitators, Rea said, but medical attention for injured birds is difficult for an animal that size. Surgery on hummingbirds is unheard of, Hess said, adding that it’s a problem when the ban-dage weighs more than the patient. Emma Eisenhauer, a first-grader at Fremont Elementary School in Columbus, Ohio, knows exactly how small a hum-mingbird is. For her stud-ies this year, she had to make a life-size model of one— no easy task consid-ering the 6-year-old’s hand was too small to stuff the paper sculpture. “It had to be bigger than the real bird because other-wise it would be too small to stuff,” she said.Work needed to attract hummingbirdsBackyard WildlifeASSOCIATED PRESS A male ruby-throated hummingbird hovers above a backy ard feeder. The smallest bird in the world weighs a tenth of an ounce, has a brain the size o f a BB, wobbly legs and enemies like the praying mantis and bull frog. Even so, millions of hu mans will spend countless hours this spring and summer watching, feeding and worrying about the hummingbirds mating and nesting in their backyards. Jewels of the air overcome many disadvantages. ASSOCIATED PRESSA mother Anna’s hummingbird cares for its young in a n est not much bigger than a golf ball. Online: Q www.avianexoticsvet.com Q mfrartwork.com/ category/interesting-bird-notes Q www.wbu.com Billionaire sues over vintage wine By LARRY NEUMEISTERAssociated PressNEW YORK — As experts can testify, super sleuths in the wine busi-ness must study the cork, glass, sediment, wrapping, labels and how full a bot-tle of wine is to ascertain whether it’s the real deal. And as two uber-wealthy wine collectors can tell you as they square off in fed-eral court over some ques-tionable bottles, even that sometimes is not enough. Testimony began Wednesday in a civil trial six years after Florida ener-gy maven William Koch, a yachtsman and collector, sued onetime-billionaire California businessman Eric Greenberg in U.S. District Court in Manhattan over $320,000 he spent in 2005 on two dozen bottles of wine that turned out to be duds. The trial threatens to pop the cork on the dirty secrets of the wine auction world, which like the art market has been stung in recent years by a prolifera-tion of fakes. At the opening, there was plenty of talk of how difficult it is to be sure a bottle is real and how good a fake can be. It’s heartbreaking for a true collector to learn that wine is inauthentic because it’s more than just a bottle and a flavor, Koch’s attorney John Hueston said. “Koch will say these are links to history,” he said, adding that great wines transport people to another era. “It’s not just the juice in the package.” Greenberg — a former billionaire who built two Internet consulting companies before the 2000 collapse of those stocks reportedly reduced his net worth by as much as 90 percent — asserted his innocence as he took the stand as one of the trial’s first witnesses. “I wouldn’t sell a fake wine,” he said. “I’ve never intentionally sold fake wine in my life.” Koch, the brother of famous industrialists and conservative political sup-porters David and Charles Koch, is seeking compensa-tion for the $320,000, along with unspecified damages. Angry Birds roost at Space CenterBy NARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL — Angry Birds have a new space coop. At NASA’s invitation, the online game birds are roosting at Kennedy Space Center for the next 1 1 years in an effort to lure youngsters to the cosmic wonders of math and sci-ence. The huge interactive exhibit opened March 22 and immediately packed in the kids, including this reporter’s 7-year-old son who couldn’t get enough of the mirrored maze and the design-your-own Angry Bird and play-the-game stations. It’s called Angry Birds Space Encounter and is the first of its kind. Astronaut Donald Pettit, a chemical engineer and father of 12-year-old twin boys, announced the col-laboration between NASA and Angry Birds creator Rovio Entertainment a year ago while living aboard the International Space Station. He squeezed in as much physics as he could in the YouTube announce-ment. “Wow, this could be a great venue for getting some physics and getting some math and getting some science into some-thing that has the con-notation as just an empty brain-draining video game that sucks out the cre-ativity from the minds of young people,” Pettit told The Associated Press at the grand opening. “And so I thought, well, maybe I could help make a difference on this and bring the idea of a game up to a different level, where unbeknownst to the kids playing it, they’re learning a little bit of math and physics at the same time.” Enter the concepts of parabolic trajectories, hyperbolic trajectories, elliptical trajectories and even Holman transfer orbits, “which is what we do with spacecraft going from Planet A to Planet B.”ASSOCIATED PRESSAstronaut Donald Pettit stand out side the Angry Bi rds Space Encounter at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. 3DLIFE

PAGE 24

4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 31, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsIt’s the Easter Beagle, Charlie BrownOnce Upon a Time “Queen of Hearts” Revenge “Masquerade” (N) (:01) Red Widow Natalie goes missing. News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Forced Entry” Criminal Minds “Catching Out” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Masterpiece Classic Trip to a Scottish hunting lodge. Call the Midwife (Season Premiere) (N) Masterpiece Classic Harry Selfridge builds department store. (N) Doc Martin Doc is taken hostage. 7-CBS 7 47 47d 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) The Mentalist “The Red Glass Bead” Action Sports 360Inside March 9-CW 9 17 17JacksonvilleLive From theYourJax MusicDaryl’s HouseLaw & Order “Ritual” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Hannah MontanaAre We There Yet?Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Family GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Beantown Bailout Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsThe Voice “The Blind Auditions Premiere” Vocalists audition. The Voice Auditions continue. All-Star Celebrity Apprentice (N) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!d NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) How I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant ReplayThe Vampire Diaries TVLAND 17 106 304The Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s LifeclassOprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Next Chapter “Joel Osteen” Oprah’s Next Chapter “John of God” Oprah’s Lifeclass A&E 19 118 265Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Love Begins” (2011) “Love’s Everlasting Courage” (2010) Cheryl Ladd, Bruce Boxleitner. “Love Comes Softly” (2003, Drama) Katherine Heigl, Dale Midkiff. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler.“Megamind” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Will Ferrell, Brad Pitt, Tina Fey.“Megamind” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Will Ferrell, Brad Pitt, Tina Fey. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) After Jesus: The First Christians The history of Christianity. (N) CNN Newsroom (N) After Jesus: The First Christians TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“The Book of Eli” (2010, Action) Denzel Washington. (DVS)“The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. (DVS)“The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieSee Dad Run (N)“The Last Airbender” (2010, Fantasy) Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. Friends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Bikini Bust” Bar RescueBar Rescue “Bad to the Bone” Bar Rescue “In a Pinch” Bar Rescue “Karaoke Katastrophe” (N) (:01) Car Lot Rescue MY-TV 29 32 -Dick Van DykeThe Odd CoupleM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Actress plots to murder columnist. M*A*S*HThriller “The Big Blackout” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Shake It Up!Austin & AllyJessie “Toy Con” Dog With a Blog“A Bug’s Life” (1998) Voices of Dave Foley. Phineas and FerbJessieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Dirty Teacher” (2013) “Stalked at 17” (2012, Suspense) Taylor Spreitler, Chuck Hittinger. Army Wives Joan is disappointed. (N) The Client List (N) (:01) “Stalked at 17” (2012) USA 33 105 242NCIS Murder of a naval of cer. NCIS A petty of cer is found dead. NCIS A death aboard a top-secret ship. NCIS A new special agent arrives. NCIS “Devil’s Triangle” (DVS) NCIS The severed leg of a corpse. BET 34 124 329(4:30)“For Colored Girls” (2010) Kimberly Elise. “Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009) Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson. The Game “The Blueprint” Stay TogetherDEWeezy Proj. ESPN 35 140 206Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College Basketball Women’s College Basketball NCAA Tournament -Louisville vs. Baylor. (N) College GameDay Scoreboard (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) 30 for 30 SUNSP 37 -Inside the HEATSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport FishingReel AnimalsInside the HEATInside the HeatInside the Heat DISCV 38 182 278Alaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last Frontier “Fall Feast” Alaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247(5:00)“The Hangover” (2009) Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryMen at WorkMen at Work HLN 40 202 204Murder by the Book Murder case. American JourneyMystery DetectivesDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeHLN After Dark Jodi Arias murder trial. HLN After Dark Jodi Arias murder trial. Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami (N) Playing With Fire (N) Kourtney and Kim Take Miami TRAVEL 46 196 277Hamburger Paradise 2Drive Thru ParadiseTrip Flip (N) Trip FlipBeach-n-RVs (N) MegaYachts (N) Jamaica Bared HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lYou Live in What? (N) Hawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Extreme CouponExtreme CouponWelcome to Myrtle ManorMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingWelcome to Myrtle Manor (N) My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding HIST 49 120 269The Bible Jesus brings a dead man back to life. The Bible Peter denies Jesus; Judas hangs himself. (N) Vikings “Raid” (N) (:01) Vikings “Raid” ANPL 50 184 282Finding BigfootFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence Hunting a strange creature in Australia. Finding Bigfoot (N) Finding Bigfoot “Jungle Bigfoot” (N) Finding Bigfoot FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveWorst Cooks in AmericaCupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks in America (N) Chopped A “heady” ingredient. Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Passion of the Christ” (2004, Drama) Jim Caviezel, Monica Bellucci. FSN-FL 56 -Car Warriors (N) a College Baseball Clemson at North Carolina. (N) World Poker Tour: Season 11World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244“Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. “Casino Royale” (2006) Daniel Craig, Eva Green. James Bond plays poker with a man who nances terrorists. “In the Name of the King: Dungeon” AMC 60 130 254The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead “Prey” The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead (N) (:05) Talking Dead (N) (:05) The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249(5:29)“Coming to America” (1988) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall. “The House Bunny” (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. (:02) Tosh.0(:33) Tosh.0(:03) Ralphie May: Too Big to Ignore CMT 63 166 327(5:00)“The Karate Kid” (1984, Drama) Ralph Macchio. (:02)“Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. (:32)“Facing the Giants” (2006) Alex Kendrick. NGWILD 108 190 283Unlikely Animal Friends “Hello Kitty” Unlikely Animal FriendsUnlikely Animal FriendsA Wild Dog’s Tale (N) Ice BearUnlikely Animal Friends NGC 109 186 276Wicked Tuna “Hell on High Seas” Diving Into Noah’s FloodWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “Captain Carnage” (N) Mudcats “Guts and Glory” (N) Wicked Tuna “Captain Carnage” SCIENCE 110 193 284Alien EncountersAlien Encounters 2 “The Invasion” Alien Encounters 2 “The Offspring” Aliens: The De nitive GuideAliens: The De nitive GuideAlien Encounters 2 “The Offspring” ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaHomicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaOn the Case With Paula ZahnDateline on ID “Deadly Conspiracy” (N) Unusual Suspects “Deadly Forest” (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501A Thousand Words(:45) “Snow White and the Huntsman” (2012, Fantasy) Kristen Stewart. Premiere. ‘NR’ Game of Thrones “Valar Dohaeris” Game of Thrones “Valar Dohaeris” Game of Thrones “Valar Dohaeris” MAX 320 310 515(5:45)“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG’ (:20)“Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012) ‘PG’“The Rundown” (2003) The Rock. ‘PG-13’ The Jump Off SHOW 340 318 545(5:25)“The Woman in Black”Shameless “Civil Wrongs” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “Order Room Service” (N) House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “Order Room Service” MONDAY EVENING APRIL 1, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “The Lives of Others” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Capitol UpdateNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Cincinnati” (N) Kind Hearted Woman Single mother and children. (N) (PA) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 “Ohuna” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries (N) Hart of Dixie “Where I Lead Me” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones A TV producer is murdered. (N) The Following “Whips and Regret” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “The Blind Auditions Continued” More vocalists audition. (N) (:01) Revolution “Ghosts” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy TodayFirst Ladies: In uence & Image (N) Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) The Vampire Diaries TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Disappeared “Silent Night” Disappeared “A Family’s Curse” Dateline on OWN “Bitter Pill” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN Internet con artists. Dateline on OWN “Bitter Pill” A&E 19 118 265Criminal Minds “Hanley Waters” Criminal MindsBates MotelBates MotelBates Motel Dylan begins his new job. (:01) Bates Motel HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Pineapple Express” (2008, Comedy) Seth Rogen, James Franco. A stoner ees after witnessing a murder.“Pineapple Express” (2008) CNN 24 200 202(5:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Live (N) (Live) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle Beckett’s ex-partner arrives. Castle “Punked” Castle “Anatomy of a Murder” Dallas A conspiracy emerges. (N) Monday Mornings (N) (:01) Dallas A conspiracy emerges. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241“Super Troopers” (2001) Jay Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn.“Super Troopers” (2001) Jay Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldDick Van DykeThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieA.N.T. FarmA.N.T. FarmA.N.T. Farm“Geek Charming” (2011, Comedy) Sarah Hyland, Matt Prokop. Austin & AllyGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252The Bible Jesus brings a dead man back to life. The Bible Peter denies Jesus; Judas hangs himself. “The Pastor’s Wife” (2011, Docudrama) Rose McGowan, Michael Shanks. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Untouchable” NCIS A chop shop run by Marines. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Borderline” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Waist Deep” (2006) Tyrese Gibson. A man’s son is inside his hijacked car. “Doing Hard Time” (2004) Boris Kodjoe, Michael K. Williams. ESPN 35 140 206a MLB Baseball: Giants at Dodgers SportsCenter (N) Women’s College Basketball NCAA Tournament, Regional Final: Teams TBA. Women’s College Basketball NCAA Tournament, Regional Final: Teams TBA. SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsCenter (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (N Subject to Blackout) a MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Arizona Diamondbacks. SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport Fishing Rodeo RodeoHouston Super Shootout. From Houston, Tex. (Taped) DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Far-Out Fairlane” Fast N’ LoudFast N’ Loud: Revved Up (N) Fast N’ Loud (N) The Devils Ride “Enemy Within” (N) Fast N’ Loud TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiBurning Love (N) After Lately (N) Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods America “The Ozarks” Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernBizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It “The Roedger Family” Love It or List It James and Sharon. Love It or List It “Sharon & Sandra” House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Singh Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumExtreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea. HIST 49 120 269American PickersAmerican Pickers “When Horses Fly” American Pickers “The Belly Dance” American Pickers “Substitute Picker” American Pickers(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282River Monsters: UnhookedRiver Monsters: The Most BizarreRiver Monsters: UnhookedRiver Monsters: UnhookedRiver Monsters: UnhookedRiver Monsters: Unhooked FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00)“Barabbas” (1962) Anthony Quinn. The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 11Ship Shape TVMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Houston Rockets. Magic Live! (N Subject to Blackout) Magic Live! (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Casino Royale” (2006, Action) Daniel Craig, Eva Green. Being HumanBeing Human (N) Lost Girl “Adventures in Fae-bysitting” Warehouse 13 “An Evil Within” AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“A Knight’s Tale” (2001, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Mark Addy. “The Last Samurai” (2003, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Ken Watanabe. A Westerner learns the ways of the samurai in the 1870s. Md Max-Thndr COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) Futurama(:29) Futurama(9:59) South ParkSouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaReba“The Karate Kid Part II” (1986, Drama) Ralph Macchio, Noriyuki “Pat” Morita. Cops Reloaded (N) Cops Reloaded NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer A Kerry blue terrier. Beast HunterBeast HunterWild JusticeWild JusticeAlpha DogsAlpha DogsBeast Hunter NGC 109 186 276Inside Combat RescueThe Real George WashingtonAre You Tougher than a Boy Scout?Are You Tougher than a Boy Scout?Secret Service FilesAre You Tougher than a Boy Scout? SCIENCE 110 193 284Survivorman “Canadian Boreal Forest” Survivorman Ten DaysSurvivorman Ten DaysSurvivorman Ten DaysSurvivorman Ten DaysSurvivorman Ten Days ID 111 192 285Happily Never AfterFBI: Criminal PursuitUnusual Suspects “Clairemont Killer” Unusual SuspectsFBI: Criminal Pursuit “Lurking Menace” Unusual Suspects “Clairemont Killer” HBO 302 300 501(5:15)“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Patti LuPoneReal Time With Bill Maher“The Five-Year Engagement” (2012) Jason Segel, Emily Blunt. ‘R’ (:15) Game of Thrones MAX 320 310 515(5:10) The Sitter ‘R’ (:35)“Shaun of the Dead” (2004) Simon Pegg. ‘R’ (:15)“The Thing” (2011, Horror) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. ‘R’ “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985) Sylvester Stallone. (:40)The Sitter SHOW 340 318 545(:15)“Faster” (2010, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ Homeland “In Memoriam” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “Order Room Service” Inside Comedy (N) House of Lies WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -(:30) WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307Heat of the NightVaried ProgramsWGN Midday NewsVaried Programs Walker, RangerVaried ProgramsLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowVaried ProgramsGunsmoke(1:49) GunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show(:12) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312MarieVaried ProgramsMad HungryMad HungryHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried ProgramsMovie Varied Programs How I Met/MotherVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202Around the WorldCNN NewsroomCNN Newsroom The Lead With Jake TapperThe Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesCastleCastle NIK 26 170 299Peter RabbitMax & RubyDora the ExplorerLalaloopsySpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobRocket MonkeysOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Varied Programs Phineas and FerbVaried Programs A.N.T. FarmVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied ProgramsNCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329(11:00) MovieThe ParkersThe ParkersMoeshaMoeshaFamily MattersFamily MattersMovie ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsDan Le BatardSportsNationNFL32 SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247According to JimLove-RaymondAmerican DadAmerican DadWipeoutCougar TownFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204Raising America With Kyra Phillips News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsTastiest PlacesTastiest PlacesBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs Four WeddingsVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal PrecinctAnimal PrecinctAnimal PrecinctPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesGator Boys FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied Programs James RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayMovieVaried Programs FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:30) Movie MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:23) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs (:15) MovieVaried Programs (:35) Reba NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsWild JusticeVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs They Do It?They Do It?MythBustersTime WarpTime Warp ID 111 192 285Varied Programs Wicked AttractionWicked AttractionHappily Never After HBO 302 300 501(11:00) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:30) MovieVaried Programs (:10) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:00) MovieVaried Programs(:05) MovieVaried Programs(:45) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs

PAGE 25

DEAR ABBY: I have a relative who is very ill. She’s not expected to sur-vive. She has a 1-year-old daughter, “Whitney,” and a husband who isn’t particu-larly interested in parent-ing once his wife is gone. My husband and I have a 3-year-old, and my husband would like to have more children. I love this rela-tive and the little girl, but I’m not interested in raising another child. I’m fine with just one. I am in my mid-40s and already feel overwhelmed being the parent of one child. My husband says I’m selfish for not wanting to share my good fortune. He may be right, but I feel that if I’m talked into tak-ing her, I’ll be unhappy and resentful. Please advise. -ONLY WANTS ONE DEAR ONLY WANTS ONE: Children need love and attention from the adults who parent them. While your husband has that to offer Whitney, you do not. Because you would be unhappy and resentful if your husband talks you into adopting her, it would be better for you AND Whitney if someone who really wants a child, and is capable of providing the love and support a child needs, took her. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am retired from teaching high school biology after 39 years. The last year I taught, some of my students said I was the “youngest” teacher on the faculty -not chronological-ly, but in the way I talked to them. I treated them as important, as equals. Being around high school stu-dents all those years kept me young. Since my retirement, I can no longer do the thing I loved best: teach biology. However, I am keeping my commitment to stay-ing young. Last summer I bicycled 500 miles across Kansas. I do nine hours of dance exercise and aerobics a week, paint with oils, do photography and am start-ing to relearn the guitar. I may be in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease, so I want to do everything I didn’t get to do when I was younger while I still can. I think too many people are busy being old. Most of my former classmates and friends have died. Many younger people can’t do what I do. Some of them tell me I should “act my age” and “learn to be old.” But what I’m doing keeps me young, and if I look silly doing it, so be it. I feel more fit now than when I was 21. If I die in an aerobics class it will be a lot better than doing it slumped in a chair. What are your thoughts on this? -LIVING WELL IN WICHITA DEAR LIVING WELL: As long as you are living a full life and enjoying what you’re doing, you should ignore those “helpful” indi-viduals who tell you to “act your age” and “learn to be old.” It has been awhile since I have read such non-sense. You have been blessed with health, vitality and an inquiring mind. Life is too short to waste a second of it. When you’re old and infirm you will know it, so don’t let anyone rush you. ** ** **TO MY CHRISTIAN READERS: A happy Easter to all of you! DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Stifle interference. Concentrate on utilizing your talents and skills to ensure that you make the financial, personal and emotional gains you are striving to reach. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speak up and you will resolve pending prob-lems. Your insight and clarity coupled with your no-nonsense outlook will be valued by those you are dealing with. +++ GEMINI (May 21June 20): Get involved in a cause or a function that you believe in, but don’t share your personal secrets with the people you encounter. Gather information for your own use. Love and romance are on the rise. Be open to suggestions. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t react too quick-ly. Follow your gut feeling and rationalize what you must do before you actu-ally take action. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Spend time with friends or do the activities you find exciting and challenging. Love is on the rise, and your current relationship will be enhanced, or a new one will begin if you get out and do the things you enjoy doing most. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let emotional issues get blown out of proportion. Take pride in what you do and use your logic and common sense to get others to help you achieve your goals. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Nurture important relationships. Talks may be emotional, but they will be effective, bringing you closer to a decision that has to be made regarding your personal life. Don’t feel pressured, instead take control and make the choice that is best for you. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A financial situation can be resolved if you drum up new ways to offer services that utilize your skills and talent. Good fortune will be yours if you use your ingenuity and loyal contacts. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t let your emotions stand between you and what you need to accomplish. Put your effort into your home and family as well as your romantic relationships and you will enjoy the luxury of good company and additional comfort. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Stand back and let others fend for them-selves. Taking over may be your way of doing things, but this time you will be meddling and criticized for your actions. Focus on your reputation and what you want to accomplish. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t make excuses. Do what’s expected of you and get on with your day. Getting together with old friends will do you good. Changes at home will work to your advantage. Love is highlighted, and a close relationship will enhance your status. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Flesh out your cre-ative ideas. Draw up your plans and discuss the pos-sibilities with people you feel can contribute. There is money to be made. Stop dreaming and procrastinat-ing and take action before someone steals your idea. ++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Map symbol7ROVWR\DQG21HLOO KHURLQHV 2ULJLQDOVWDWHRIWKH XQLYHUVHLQP\WK :KHQ0DFEHWKGLHV%DMDYDFDWLRQVSRW IDPLOLDUO\ 9HVVHORSHQHU,VODPLF GHQRPLQDWLRQ ([SRVH/\LQJPD\EH$QVZHUWR $FURVVSHU-RKQ).HQQHG\ 6SDPHJ1HZ/RRNGHVLJQHU3XOOLQ5HDOHVWDWHDEEU$QVZHUWR $FURVVSHU6KRFNLQJ@:DWHULQWRZLQHVLWH6WDU:DUVELSHG$QVZHUWR $FURVVSHUMalraux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own &URVVHGDSLFNHWOLQH0HGLWHUUDQHDQVDODG ZLWKEXOJXUZKHDWFKRSSHGWRPDWRHVDQGSDUVOH\ *DYHDKDQGZKHUH RQHVKRXOGQW" +LOODU\RQFH5 Harsh$GYDQFHGGHJUHH"BBBVD\PRUH"+RVSLWDOSURFHGXUH IRUVKRUW 8QGLOXWHG'DYLVVGRPDLQ $EEU +DUGO\DPDQVLRQ&RPSRVHU3UHYLQ/LNHPRVW%OXHWRRWK KHDGVHWV $VHDV\DVSLHVD\$VHDV\DVBBB +DXORII&KDLUOLIWDOWHUQDWLYH6RPH1RYHPEHU SDUDGHUVIRUVKRUW 25 1804 symphony that LQFOXGHVDIXQHUDOmarch *HWBBB1RWDEOHPRWKHURI HVWUDQJHGEURWKHUV %DUUHOSDUW:DQH%DUUHOHGWRZDUG1RWNRVKHUBBBG,YRLUH6TXHH]HVRXW8665SDUW$EEU/HJLVODWLYH DVVHPEOLHV 1%&YLVjYLV 0HHWWKH3UHVV *UHHNYRZHO1DUURZLQOHW)LGHOLW\6HUYLFHFDOO"53 Match part'XQJHRQV 'UDJRQVFR 'LUHFWRU:HQGHUV*UHHNYRZHO::,,WUDQVSRUW $EEU &RPSHWH7UDGLWLRQDOHQHPLHV RIWKH.LRZD /LNHJRRGZDWHUIRU VQRUNHOLQJ %HVLGH*UHHNJRGGHVVHVRI WKHVHDVRQV 0LPLFV)DQF\WLH&KULVWLDQVHQZKR IRXQGHG/HJR :KDWDGLVSHQVDU\ GLVSHQVHVIRUVKRUW /HDGLQWRWDUG6ODP7KRVHQRWIDYRUHG+RVSDUHDV
PAGE 26

6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 6DLIFE late nights long hours countless sacrifices. for the you thank to & just one day celebrating doctors day 2013