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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02044

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02044

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County’s stormwater drainage woes continue after county officials agreed to buy “repetitive flood loss” homes in the Eastwood sub-division but then never bought the properties, two lawsuits allege. Two of the affected prop-erty owners in the subdivi-sion have sued the county for modifications performed on county-owned stormwater management systems that are near or on their proper-ties, causing “an increased and permanent threat of flooding,” the suits allege. Rodney Baker, pastor at Hopeful Baptist Church, and Randal Roberts, a detective with the Gainesville Police By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.com“ I f you’re ready to have a good time, let me hear you say, ‘Yeah’,” Jerry Todd says at the beginning of every rodeo. He’s been a rodeo announcer for 30 years and knows how to create excite-ment in the stands. “They respond kinda lightly the first time, then I go back to them and say ‘If you are really ready to have a good time, let me here you say ‘Yeah!’” Todd said. “And that’s when they come back at ya.” Matt Merritt played the rodeo clown at the Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo this year. It was his first Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association event, but he knows the ropes. He’s been a class clown since his school days, and figured he was good at it. “You get to be the life of the party,” Merritt said. Both Todd and Merritt are paid to entertain people who attend the rodeos. They said the key to making the rodeo fun for the crowd is to have fun themselves. “If they see us having a good time, they are going to too,” Todd said. “A good time is contagious.” Of course, being a rodeo clown is about more than just having fun. The real purpose of a rodeo clown is to protect the cowboys — especially bull riders — when an angry ani-mal comes after them. Merritt said the rodeo allows people the chance to put worries on the back burner for the day, and focus on something fun. By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comDim lighting clouds the computer-lined Internet cafe where Linda Mosley sits playing a sweepstakes game. Sevens slide easily across her screen, but no win. She clicks the button to play another round. Ten minutes slips by quickly. Mosley, 49, visits a local Internet cafe about two times a week on a $20 allowance from her husband. At her favorite cafe, they charge for the Internet time, and she can choose how to spend the minutes. Some cus-tomers check their emails, some Facebook and some play the games. “I’m addicted,” Mosley said. “I go home and hear them little ducks when I’m sleeping.” The draw pulls her back to the cafe. Several of the establishments in Lake City stay open 24 hours a day, so gamers or Internet users can play whenever they want. If Mosley wins enough, she finds herself at the cafe more than twice weekly. “I used to come every day,” she said. “But that’s when I worked at the pris-on. It doesn’t bother me to spend $20 a night on enter-tainment.” But Mosley’s entertainment may be shut down soon. A statewide crackdown on gam-ing parlors led to 57 arrests and the forced closure of dozens of Internet cafes run by Allied Veterans of the World, including Lake City Internet Services on U.S. 90 West. Allied Veterans claimed it was donating a sig-nificant portion of its pro-ceeds to charity. However, donations were only 2 percent of the estimated $300 million it generated from 49 cafes in Florida, according to law enforce-ment statements. Now, the state Legislature is moving Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEW SPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Area businessespost most jobsin nearly 3 years. Sergeant Safety: FHP’s new PIO out to save lives. SUNDAYEDITION 1D 1C CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6AAdvice & Comics......... 8BPuzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Newton could face eviction. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 77 55 A.M. fog WEATHER, 6A Vol. 138, No. 294 1A You’re closer than ever to nationally ranked health care for your child.To nd out about all the services at Wolfson Children’s Specialty Center, call 386.758.1811 (option 1). 164 NW Madison Street • Historic Downtown • Lake City, FL 32055 • wolfsonchildrens.org/columbiacounty Smith Strickland Local cafe draws plenty of loyal, repeat customers. Two lawsuits allege county made flooding worse; want buy-outs. Competitors seek to entertain, excite all who attend. Ride ’em hard Owners sue over‘taking’ of homes Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterWhit Ashe, of Savannah, Tenn., manages to hold onto Night Fli ght as he competes in the saddle bronc competition during the 19th Annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo held at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Rodeo Arena on Friday. Ashe scored a 73. Ro deo action continues today. Rodeo pros work for good show PatronsenjoyInternetgaming Slain guard’s memorial service Mon. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.com“We Never Walk Alone” is the motto and creed for Department of Corrections employees around the state. The phrase can be seen on walls and bulle-tin boards at Columbia Correctional Institution as well. Although no one can see a person’s spirit, the human embodiment of the phase will come to life Monday, when hun-dreds of DOC employ-ees gather to pay homage to Sgt. Ruben Thomas III on the first anniversary of his death, when a memorial park, bench and pedestal monument will be unveiled in his honor. The memorial dedication ceremony SUIT continued on 3A MEMORIAL continued on 3A CAFE continued on 3A Thomas ABOVE: Will Bradley, of Troy, Ala., strains as he flips a calf in 10.3 seconds during the tie down roping contest Friday night. RIGHT: Featured performer Rider Kiesner attempts to whip the petals off a flower in the mouth of his assistant.COURTESYFlooding inside the home of Randal and Maria Roberts during Tropical Storm Debby. RODEO continued on 3A

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TALLAHASSEE The Republican Party of Florida is donating $300,000 to a veterans charity in the wake of gam bling arrests. Republican Party Chairman Lenny Curry announced Friday that the party was giving the donation to the Florida Veterans Foundation. The move comes just days after authorities arrested nearly 60 people who were part of a vet erans charity that law enforcement authorities say was a front for a $300 million gambling ring. The investigation also led to the resignation of Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll. An Associated Press review found that people connected with the Allied Veterans of the World scandal donated in excess of $1 million to Florida pol iticians between 2009 and 2012. Most of the money went to the Republican Party. Curry said the party had zero tolerance for crimi nal activity. State could have extra $3.5B TALLAHASSEE Florida economists on Friday projected that state legislators could have an extra $3.5 billion to spend in the coming fiscal year. Despite concerns that automatic spending cuts at the federal level would dampen the states economy, economists said there are definite signs of recovery, bringing with it higher tax collections as Floridians spend more. But they pared back their estimates slightly in the wake of federal cuts in defense and other areas. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, wel comed the news, but cau tioned that he may want to boost reserves in case the federal cuts prove more damaging. Any modest improve ment could be more than offset by the potential sig nificant impact caused by sequestration, Gaetz said in a statement, referring to the automatic budget cuts triggered by the lack of a budget agreement in Washington. This uncer tainty, caused by a lack of leadership in Washington, highlights Floridas need to plan ahead, be cautious and to maintain adequate reserves. In December, econo mists projected that the states tax collections one sign of the econo mys health would grow about 5 percent for the next two years. But that was before the bruising battle between President Barack Obama and Congress over whether to let spending cuts go for ward. Dead newborn left at fire station CLEARWATER When firefighters opened the front door to get the newspaper, they found a dead baby wrapped in a towel on the door step. The baby, discovered about 7:20 a.m. Friday, still had the umbilical cord attached to her. Under Floridas Safe Haven law, a baby who is seven days old or younger, can be turned over to an employee at a fire station or other designated loca tion. Clearwater police say that did not happen in this case. Investigators are try ing to figure out what time the baby was dropped off and whether she was alive when they left her. There were no outward signs of foul play. An autopsy is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Friday. Ex-candidate pleads guilty FORT LAUDERDALE A one-time Democratic U.S. House candidate who was a political unknown before last years election pleaded guilty Friday to federal campaign viola tions including accepting illegal contributions and filing false finance reports in a case linked to former Republican Rep. David Rivera. Justin Lamar Sternad, 35, pleaded guilty to con spiracy, false statements and illegal contributions charges that each carry a possible maximum sen tence of five years in pris on and $250,000 in fines. U.S. District Judge Robin Rosenbaum set sentencing for May 31. Sternad admitted accept ing but failing to disclose thousands of dollars in contributions for the 2012 Democratic primary race in the 26th congressional district, which runs from the Miami suburbs to Key West. It was the district represented by Rivera until the November gen eral election, when he was beaten by Democrat Joe Garcia. Sternad was charged after The Miami Herald published articles saying that the money came from Rivera in an attempt to weaken Garcia and that the go-between was Ana Sol Alliegro, a Republican political operative with ties to Rivera. Pelican death puzzle officials MELBOURNE Florida wildlife officials are trying to figure out why more than 100 brown peli cans have died between Melbourne and Merritt Island. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Friday it has sent samples two weeks ago to the National Wildlife Health Centers. But so far there is no con clusive answer. Officials are now waiting for results from additional samples sent this week. Researcher Dan Wolf says the pelicans are emaciated and have heavy parasite counts. He says they dont believe other bird species have been affected. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Guitarist Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship is 72. Singer-songwriter Jim Weatherly is 70. Singer-songwriter John Sebastian of the Lovin Spoonful is 69. Percussionist Harold Brown of War is 67. Actor Patrick Duffy is 64. Country singer Susie Allanson is 61. Actress Lesley-Anne Down is 59. Country singer Paul Overstreet is 58. Actor Gary Sinise is 58. Actor Christian Clemenson (CSI: Miami) is 55. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 1-3-5-26 15 Friday: 17-18-27-29-30 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-5-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 9-5-8-1 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 15-30-34-44-47-49 x5 Republicans donating $300,000 to veterans LAS VEGAS T he sign may read For Sale outside the sprawl ing southeast Las Vegas estate that Wayne Newton dubbed Casa de Shenandoah. But Newtons wife, Kathleen McCrone Newton, said Friday that even if a bidder snatches up the property at auction May 31, the Mr. Las Vegas crooner and his family have no intention of moving out. We stay here until we choose to leave. We have that right, Kathleen Newton told The Associated Press. Even if at some point the property gets sold, it gets sold with us here. She said a lease with a partnership that purchased the nearly 40-acre property for $19.5 million in June 2010 will let the couple and their 10-year-old daugh ter stay in the gold-trimmed opulent main house. The mansion, featuring 17th cen tury antiques and keepsakes from performers like Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and Bobby Darin, was to have been the featured attraction in a Graceland West attraction commemorating the career of the 70-year-old Mr. Las Vegas crooner. But those plans have crumbled. Joseph Wielebinski, a Dallas-based lawyer representing the property owner, CSD LLC, in a bitterly con tested Chapter 11 reorganization. Wielebinski said, It is anything but certain whether the Newtons remain on the property or not. This is a business divorce. Everything is contested. Wielebinski said. Country singer McGraw plays first UK show LONDON Tim McGraw took to the United Kingdom stage for the first time Saturday night. The Grammy-winning music star headlined a two-day concert called Country To Country at Londons O2 Arena. Sugarlands Kristian Bush, Little Big Town and Vince Gill also performed. Today, Carrie Underwood will top the bill, with LeAnn Rimes and Darius Rucker will be on stage. McGraw says hes been to London a few times before, but hes really excited to finally play here because of its musical history. And while he was busy singing, his wife Faith Hill and their daugh ters were making the most of the family trip by going sightseeing. Gomez: Transition to Breakers awkward LOS ANGELES A little awkward is how Selena Gomez describes her transition from Disney girl to Disney girl gone wild in the new R-rated independent film Spring Breakers, in which she plays a bikini-clad and heavily armed college student bent on a good time with three friends and some drugs, sex and violence. I am getting a little bit older, so I wanted to push myself and kind of get into a little bit more of an indie world. And it was a really great experi ence for me. And at the same time it has been, of course, a little awkward, but great, the 20year-old Gomez said Thursday at the films Hollywood premiere. Known for her role on Disneys Wizards of Waverly Place, Gomez actually began moving to a faster track as Justin Biebers now ex-girl friend. Honestly, its been a weird transition. You never really know whats right or wrong and you can only do the best you can, she said. Directed by art-house favorite Harmony Korine, the movie also stars James Franco and Vanessa Hudgens. Wayne Newton could face eviction Wednesday: 5-9-28-32-38 PB 29 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Therefore, as Gods chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compas sion, kindness, humility, gentle ness and patience. Colossians 3:12 Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Two cockatoos perch on branches at Wayne Newtons Casa de Shenandoah in Las Vegas. The sign outside the sprawling Newton estate says For Sale, but the Newtons say their lease lets them stay on the property. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter CARC fundraiser Judy Cashmore sends the bowling ball on its way down the lane while Alex Haynes helps her at the CARC 20th Annual Bowl-A-Thon on Saturday at Lake City Bowl. The CARC is still accepting donations for its fundraiser, executive director Svetlana Zhavoronkova said. Cashmore has been at a CARC group home for people with disabilities for the past 10 years. Newton McGraw Gomez

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Department, have filed separate lawsuits against county govern-ment. Both Baker and Roberts live in the Eastwood subdivision and hired the same Gainesville attorney. Byron Flagg represents both Baker and Roberts. The suits he filed in Columbia County Circuit Court in December and January allege the county has “effectively ‘taken’ the property” by the work it has done to stormwater man-agement systems in Eastwood, and also by public comments made at county commission meetings. County Manager Dale Williams said he could not comment on specifics of the case. The county hired the law firm Nabors, Giblin and Nickerson to represent it in the suit. Greg Stewart, an attorney with NGN, said the suit is in its early phas-es. “At this point in time, the county will be aggressively defending these lawsuits,” he said.Baker’s claimsBaker’s suit alleges the county made “major stormwa-ter drainage modifications” in the Eastwood subdivision after the neighborhood flooded from Tropical Storm Alberto in 2006. The suit says after Alberto, the county installed a concrete block drain next to Baker’s driveway. The drain was to funnel water into a underground pipe — also installed by the county. The suit says the county completed additional work in the summer of 2008, “because the property continued to be flood-ed by this system on a periodic basis during substantial rainfall events.” Neither the work done by the county in 2006 nor in 2008 “received the required permit approvals from the Suwannee River Water Management District,” the suit alleges, and “no engineering plans exist for the stormwater mitigation work” done in those years. The suit claims the county modifications “serve as the focal point for stormwater drainage in the area,” and the stormwa-ter management system has not been maintained. It also says the system “is a contributing factor to the overflow of stormwater on to the property.”Roberts’ allegationsRoberts’ home sits on land next to a county road and a county-owned retention pond. According to the suit, Roberts made “numerous complaints, recommendations and personal efforts to alleviate stormwater flooding to his property” to coun-ty officials. “Because of the way the county has installed culverts to drain stormwater in this area ... (Roberts) bears the burden of dealing with storm water that is diverted directly onto his prop-erty,” the suit says. It says Roberts’ property was flooded in 2004 and 2012. The stormwater flowed across Robert’s yard into a retention pond. The retention pond over-flowed and flooded Roberts prop-erty about 30 inches “in depth throughout the house” during Tropical Storm Debby, the suit claims. Roberts’ home “is uninhabitable because drywall has rotted, electrical wiring has been com-promised and mold has com-pletely inundated the dwelling all as a result of flooding,” and “the county has failed to take proper corrective action to prevent flood-ing to plaintiff’s property,” the suit says. Deal or no deal?According to the lawsuit, county officials met with Baker, Roberts and other homeown-ers in the Eastwood subdivision to discuss purchasing their properties. Both lawsuits say an agreement was reached that the county would buy their properties. Both suits say two appraisals were com-pleted to determine fair market value and sent to the county. At the Aug. 2, 2012, county commission meeting, the board discussed stormwater mitigation projects. County staff recom-mended buying six houses and identified those houses as “repeti-tive flood losses.” “It was determined that preventative controls were not cost effective,” the minutes from that meeting said. “As a less expensive alternative, it was decided to pur-chase the repetitive flood losses in the Eastwood subdivision ...” But at the next county commission meeting, the board rejected the recommendation to purchase “repetitive flood losses,” and Baker and Roberts “have never been compensated by Columbia County through Eminent Domain or any other theory of compen-sation for the taking of (their) property as an overflow easement discharge area.” Both suits allege the county has “taken” their property by a process called inverse condemna-tion. Inverse condemnation result-ed when the county altered the stormwater management system, which then caused a “continual and permanent condition that can-not be remedied ...,” according to the suits. The lawsuits also say that public comment from county officials designating their property a repet-itive flood loss is “injurious to the property’s marketable title,” and “tantamount to whole taking of private property ...” Baker’s suit alleges county commission discussion of his property’s flooding problems “transformed those meetings into condemnation proceedings ...” Both Baker and Roberts seek damages in excess of $15,000 and attorney fees. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 3A3A SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND”Board Certied Healthcare Provider?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM From staff reportsThe stakeholder advisory committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet Monday at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 S.E. College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be conducted in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agenda includes:• A briefing on rainfall data • An overview on mining operations’ water use, including conservation and protection of water resource strategies for phosphate mining • A report of land and water use data in the regional water supply plan boundary areas. Water Supply Partnershipgroup will meet Monday JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMaria Roberts points out mold that has grown on the walls of a room in her home since flooding from Tropical Storm Debby. Roberts, and her husband, Randy, say they hav e been forced to abandon the home as a result. MEMORIAL: Service set Continued From Page 1Ain honor Thomas will take place 10:30 a.m. at the Columbia Correctional Institution, eight miles east of Lake City on U.S. 90, just north for the CCI main unit. The ceremony will include welcome comments by Warden S.E. Wellhausen. The keynote speaker will be state Department of Corrections Secretary Michael Crews. The ceremony will also feature a Medal of Valor presentation, unveiling of a monument in Thomas’ honor and a 21-gun salute by an honor guard. Color guards from Union Correctional Institution and Sumter Correctional Institution will also take part. The program will also feature a ceremonial set-ting of bricks for Thomas’ family members and a flag flying ceremony, debuting a new flag pole at the facil-ity. Thomas began his career with the Florida Department of Corrections Sept. 22, 2006, and was promoted to correctional officer sergeant on Jan. 6, 2012. On March 18, 2012, he was killed when he was attacked by an inmate at the facility. SUITS: Eastwood property owners sue county over flooding p roblems Continued From Page 1A CAFE: Local patrons enjoy their gaming Continued From Page 1Atoward banning the cafes altogether. The House Select Committee on Gaming on Friday voted to proceed with a measure (HB 155) that would modify the definition of slot machines and other gaming machines used at Internet cafes. The bill would end a gray area in state statutes used by operators of Internet cafes that claims the games are contests of skill and are similar to regulated sweepstakes offered by businesses like McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, Chucky Cheese and churches. The bill appears on an extremely fast track to passage. Leaders in the both the House and Senate support the idea and said this past week that a measure could be brought up on the House floor as early as next week. While nearly all employees at the Internet cafe on U.S. 90 preferred not to comment, Carolyn Strickland, the district manager, said she believes the cafes will stay open. “They aren’t going to shut us down. Not as much as we pay in taxes,” she said. The number of people visiting the establishment has nearly doubled since the Allied cafe shut down, pushing the numbers to more than 300 a day. As 5 p.m. nears, the employees of Strickland’s cafe start a waiting list. There aren’t enough computers to serve the crowd waiting to use them. “I like to play, too,” Strickland said. “I work for my money. You aren’t going to be able to tell me what to do with it. There’s nothing to do in Lake City. I mean, nothing.” The cafe’s manager, Leslie Smith, agrees. “People come here to relax instead of going to the bars, drinking,” she said. For many of the customers — many of whom are retired — the cafe is a place to relax. Rose Brown, 56, visits the Internet cafe to get away from home and unwind. She said it wouldn’t bother her if the business closed its doors; she would travel to Gainesville or Jacksonville for entertainment. If the cafe closed, Alice Moore, 59, said she would return to sewing clothes. “I enjoy coming here. It’s relaxing,” she said. “A lot of people say it’s addict-ing, but I think it’s free will. Win or lose, you have to have the sense to get up and leave.” Lucy Alexander insists the cafes should be able to run without being bothered by the state’s regulations. Since she’s retired, the cafe has become one of her pastimes. She visits the cafe seven to eight times per month. “I think it’s unfair to close every Internet cafe,” Alexander said. “I should know as an adult when to stop.” Many patrons take advantage of the open doors, and Strickland said she sees people stay at the cafe for hours on end. Entire nights spent sitting in the dimly lit room. Mosely said closing the Internet cafes would eliminate a form of entertainment for many people, but she didn’t seem too upset about it. “If they shut this place down, I will stay at home, play my casino games at home, save my money and go to Louisiana,” she said. The News Service of Florida contributed to this report. RODEO: Lots of action Continued From Page 1A“Our goal is to have people not think about their bills or their jobs,” Merritt said. “We want them to have a two-hour escape from reality.” Merritt said he loves his job. The 31-year-old said he has clowned around at rodeos in almost every state. But it’s still a job, and he said it’s important to him that the crowd enjoys the show. “Because they deserve to get their money’s worth,” Merritt said. He called the rodeo put on in Lake City “new age,” and said the entertainers try to give something for everybody, including those who have never been to one before. “From rap music to Bob Wells,” Merritt said. “We can give you the folklore of the cowboys but are also connecting it to today.” Todd said putting on a high quality show is most important, and the athletes at the Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo are top notch. “This is the highest level you can get,” Todd said. “You won’t see Major League Baseball or NFL come to Lake City, but the PRCA will.” Action continues today, starting at 2 p.m. Brown“A lot of people say it’s addicting, but I think it’s free will. Win or lose, you have to have the sense to get up and leave.”— Alice Moore, 59, Internet cafe patron

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I n November 1939, the first Florida Highway Patrol class graduated from training school and were issued 1940 Fords. Those Fords had no radio communications at all so how did they communicate? FHP Colonel Reid Clifton, a member of that first training school, gave the fascinating answer to that ques-tion to columnist Vic Smith who wrote a column about it in 1987. This is a quote from that column, printed with his permission. “We had a working agreement with the Greyhound and Trailways bus drivers. When they spotted a wreck or other trouble on the highways, the drivers notified their dispatchers who would call the troopers’ wives and our wives would tell us the problem when we’d call in periodically. “It could be rough sometimes when we would reach the scene of an accident at maybe 3 o’clock on a cold morning. Without radios, we had to wait until some car came along, flag it down, and ask the driv-er to send back a wrecker or maybe an ambulance or a hearse from the next town. “Sometimes back then you might have a long wait as there wouldn’t be over two or three cars come by all night. “And that’s the way it was done back in those early days.” Lake City has had several direct connections to the FHP. • Lake City Governor Fred P. Cone’s legislation established the FHP. • Colonel Clifton, later top man in the FHP, had his first assignment as a young trooper in Lake City and his starting pay was $125 a month. • Alfonso Lofton, a local man, became the first black trooper in the FHP. • The Crawford boys (Floyd, Frank, and Terrell), all CHS graduates, were the first three brothers to be in the FHP at the same time. • Nancy Wheaton’s father, Major C.W. Keith, was the FHP’s first archivist and historian. The FHP was financed at first solely from drivers’ license fees; the licenses cost fifty cents each and required no examination of any kind. WEEKLY HUGSA couple visited their pastor’s office for marriage counseling and the woman said her husband never showed her any affection anymore. The pastor walked over to the wife, patted her softly on her back, complimented her on her appearance, and gave her a gentle Christian hug. Then he told the husband she need that at least twice a week. The husband said, “Fine. I’ll bring her to your office every Tuesday and Thursday.” OPINION Sunday, March 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T oday marks the high-light and finale of the 19th Annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo. If you didn’t attend on opening night or yesterday, do yourself a favor and stop on by. You’ll find some of the toughest and most talented athletes in the nation on display this afternoon at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. They’ll compete in barrel racing, steer wrestling, bareback and sad-dle bronc riding, calf roping, team roping and, of course, bull riding. There is little in the world of American sport that matches the excitement of professional rodeo. The gates open at noon and rodeo action starts at 2 p.m. We hope to see you there. See you at the rodeoThe earliest FHP had no radios OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Growing restaurant industry will need trained workforce S uddenly, we’re the new restaurant hub of North Florida. Welcome to Lake City, the Gateway to Eating! How nice that sounds and how encouraging it is to see local people showing pride when they talk about the growth of our community. People are excited and they should be. It’s a big deal to land so many new restaurants at once and these will complement the quality establishments we already enjoy. We like to eat out here and so do others in the region who use Lake City as their hub. With Longhorn Steakhouse and Gators Dockside open, Olive Garden opening Monday and Chick-fil-A under construction, there’s a nice selection to draw more people to our community from around the region. If you have lived here for any length of time you have no doubt heard the stories about the past attempts to land some of the more popular chain restaurants and now it is happening. While this is exciting, don’t forget our longtime restaurant partners that have been a part of our social outings in Lake City for decades. These long-time establish-ments still need our support too, so continue to make them a part of your dining-out schedule. The new challenge for all of our restaurants now will be finding employees. At one time, waiting tables, cooking or washing dishes was a large segment of the teenaged popula-tion’s first job. Now, I wonder. There are a lot of kids that either don’t have to work for their gas money or don’t have any motivation to work. I hope all of these new restaurants have eager, qualified people lined up wanting to work. Serving food in a restaurant is basic train-ing for the sales world. Income is uncapped: The better you are at the job, the more tips you will make. You see customers at their best and worst and learn how to profession-ally deal with all moods. The res-taurant business is good life skills training. My fear is that once all the accomplished “trainers” at our new restaurants return home, the public will see a decline in efficient service. I hope I am wrong, but this is a smaller market and we are see-ing four well-known establishments opening in the scope of about 90 days – three of them within three weeks. These quick openings may be a strain on the number of ser-vice-trained workers who have basic knowledge of bringing quality food to your table in a timely manner. I’ve eaten at the three open restaurants and at each of the loca-tions, I’ve seen young, eager faces with the desire to work hard and do the job right. That’s encouraging. But, others may need assistance to prepare them to be a preferred job candidate. There’s a lot of turnover in the restaurant business. Every chain will have its own unique train-ing program, but a candidate who shows up on Day 1 with better than average skills will be tailored to the company method at a faster pace. The Columbia County School District has a nice record of respect-ing a vocational education curricu-lum. In this case, maybe an after-school seminar or “camp” could be arranged to teach interested stu-dents the basics of how to properly wait tables and work in the food ser-vice industry. It’s just a thought, but it would teach a skill that could help them survive as they grow into their chosen career in the future. Get good restaurant jobs in high school and gain experience that can lead to a similar survival job in a college town down the road. Food service jobs have flexible hours and usually offer starving college kids at least a discount on food if not an occasional free meal in the back of the kitchen. Restaurants have become an industry in Lake City we cannot overlook when we talk about work force. And, we’re not going to be the only ones judging the qual-ity of these Lake City restaurants. Thousands of interstate travelers will pull off here for a meal and they will be brutal with their Internet reviews to corporate if the service or food is inferior. These places of business need a trained workforce, just like a factory or a warehouse. This is an exciting time for the U.S. 90 West corridor in Lake City. I hope it’s another chapter in con-tinued growth. I hope that in every area, we can give these new employ-ers in our market and our existing restaurants – everything they need to succeed. Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter. Q Associated Press Today is Sunday, March 17, the 76th day of 2013. There are 289 days left in the year. This is St. Patrick’s Day. On this date:In A.D. 461 (or A.D. 493, depending on sources), St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, died in Saul. In 1762, New York’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place. In 1861, Victor Emmanuel II was proclaimed the first king of a united Italy. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt first likened crusading journalists to a man with “the muckrake in his hand” in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington. In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls organization was incorporated in Washington, D.C., two years to the day after it was founded in Thetford, Vt. (The group is now known as Camp Fire USA.) In 1943, the Taoiseach of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, delivered a radio speech about “The Ireland That We Dreamed Of.” In 1950, scientists at the University of California at Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, “californium.” In 1966, a U.S. midget submarine located a missing hydrogen bomb which had fallen from an American bomber into the Mediterranean off Spain. TODAY IN HISTORY

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March 17 Unity Day Sisters Welcome Missionary Baptist Church, 3194 SW Sisters Welcome Road, will have a Unity Day, with the theme One in Christ. The womens program will be at 11 a.m. and the mens program will be at 3 p.m. Family reunion The fourth annual Christie Family reunion will be at 1pm at the Deep Creek Community Center, 10 miles north of Lake City on U.S. 441. Bring a pot luck dish to share. For more information, call Wallace Christie at 7524447 or Alton Christie at 752-3454. Pastor appreciation Trinity Faith Outreach Ministries, 738 NW Texas St., will have an appre ciation service for Pastor C. Y. Perry at 11:30 a.m. The messenger will be Elder Kenneth Griffin of Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Fort White. Brother Atuan Richardson of Gainesville. At 3 p.m., the mesenger will be Elder Darryl Reid of Lake City with music by Sharon Williams of Gainesville. The commu nity is invited. Preacher appreciation Olivet Missionar Baptist Church will celebrate its Pastor Ronald V. Walters and his family for eight years of service. Guest speaker for 11a.m. service will be Pastor Antonie Walker from Baxley, Ga. Guest speaker for 3 p.m. service will be Pastor Tyrone Blue from Gainesville. Please join us in this joyous appre ciation celebration. For more information, contact Margaret Denson at (386) 754-1821 or Annie Perry at (386) 438-8635. March 18 SCORE workshop SCORE is holding a free entrepreneurs inter active workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. You can ask questions, get advice, meet other entrepreneurs, receive free educational materials from the Small Business Administration and other sources and arrange for one-on-one business counseling from qualified SCORE volun teers. Call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail. com to reserve a seat. UDC meeting The Olustee Chapter of United Daughters of the Confederacy will meet at 5:15 p.m. at the China Buffet, 345 W. Duval St. (U.S. 90). The guest speaker will be Lunelle Siegel, a noted author ity on 19th-century history and the War Between the States. She will give a talk on A 150 Year Reflection on the Emancipation Proclamation. A buffet meal will be served after the meeting. Cost is $9 (drinks extra). Reservations not required. For more infor mation, call Linda Williams at (352) 215-8776 Laying hen project Columbia County Extension will have an orientation for the 4H Laying Hen Projects for youth at 6:30 p.m. the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Participants are not required to be already enrolled in 4H. For more information, contact the Extension Office at (386)752-5384. March 19 Lenten lunch The First Presbyterian Church invites the community to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol lowed by a short drama. Fundraiser night Eastside Elementary School Safety Patrol will have a fundraiser from 5 to 8 p.m. at Moes on U.S. 90 West. School open house A ribbon cutting and open house for Columbia Academic Academy will begin at 4:30 p.m. The academy is at 3329 SW Main Blvd. To register, contact the Lake CityColumbia County Chamber of Commerce at www.lake citychamber.com or phone (386) 752-3690. Support group Another Way Inc. pro vides a domestic violence support group every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. If you are a current or former sur vivor of domestic violence, call 386-719-2702 for meet ing location and an intake appointment. All services are free and confidential. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagno sis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Square dancing The Dixie Dancers square dance group will have square dancing classes from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St. Classes will be held each Tuesday at that location. The first two classes are free. For more information, call 758-3654 or 754-1478 or visit online at www.DixieDancers.net. Art league to meet The Art League of North Florida will meet atat 6:15 p.m. at The First Presbyterian Church. The community is invit ed to attend. There will be refreshments, fellow ship, a short meeting and speaker. The speaker this month is Helen Beaty with a program called Framing Matters. Helen has taught art at Niblack Elementery School for the past 13 years and also has her own frame shop, The Framery, located on Marion Avenue. Ombudsman volunteers Floridas Long-term Care Ombudsman Program is seeking volunteers to advocate for the rights of seniors living in nursing homes, assisted living facil ities and adult family care homes. Special training and certification are provided. For more information, call (888) 831-0404 or visit the program website at http:// ombudsman.myflorida. com. The local ombudsman council will meet at 1 p.m. today, April 18 and May 21 at the Alachua Regional Service Center, 14107 NW Highway 441 in Alachua. The meetings are open to the public. Patrol fundraiser Eastside Elementary School Safety Patrol will have a fundraiser at Moes on U.S. 90 West from 5 to 8 p.m. Moes will donate 20 percent of the proceeds go to the safety patrol. Patrol members also will be sell ing the Belks charity tick ets for $ 1each. NARFE meeting The National Association of Retired Federal Employees will meet at 1 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. Master gardener Tony Kurtz will be the speaker. For more information, contact Jim Purvis at 752-8570. March 20 Business of year The Lake City-Columbia County Business/Citizen of the Year luncheon will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites. Tickets are $25 each; tables are $200. Reservations are required by 9 a.m. March 15. For more information or reservations, contact the chamber at at www.lakec itychamber.com or phone (386) 752-3690. March 20 Holy Week service First Presbyterian Church will have a Service of Wholeness at 6:15 p.m. The service provides a time for to meet God and to feel the omfort and for giveness that refreshes through Jesus Christ. At this service, chants are sung, reflective silence, and proclamation of the Scriptures will be held. We will offer anointing with oil and prayers for healing. March 21 Pet loss program A free program, Coping with the Loss of Your Pet will be held at 2 p.m. at the Wings Community Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd. in the Lake City Plaza. The workshop, facili tated by Dr. Joy Dias, direc tor of client counseling and support services, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, will discuss working through grief over the death of a pet and understanding the grief of others. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 ext. 2411 or (866) 642-0962 at Hospice of Citrus County Inc./Hospice of the Nature Coast. Visit www.hospice ofcitrus.org. Gardening program Master Gardener Tony Kurtz will present a pro gram on Green and Easy Florida Lawns at 5:45 p.m. at the Fort White Library on State Route 47. Joint replacement Dr. Jeffrey Glenn will give a free seminar on joint replacement options at 2 p.m. in the Lake City Medical Center class rooms He will discuss hip and knee replacement and answers questions like Is surgery my only option? and How quickly can I return to my normal life style after surgery? To reserve a seat, call (386) 758-3385 to reserve a seat. Camera club The Branford Camera Club will meet at 7 p.m. at Cuzins Restaurant, across the street from Scaffs Market in Branford. The program will focus on preparations for our sec ond annual Spring Photo Critique to be held dur ing our April 18 meeting. Skip Weigel, retired local professional portrait pho tographer, will be our host for the meeting. Come early if youd like to join us for dinner before the meeting. Visit Branford Camera Club on Facebook or call Carolyn Hogue at (386) 935-2044, for more information. March 22 Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Living will program The Five Wishes Workshop is available to community groups, civic clubs, and churches in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. Larry Geiger, public relations manag er for the Hospice of the Nature Coast, will facilitate the workshop at no cost. Five Wishes is a easy-tocomplete, legal living will document that spells out the medical, personal, emo tional and spiritual needs. To schedule a workshop contact Larry Geiger at 755-7714 or 866-642-0962. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 5A 5A PALM SUNDAYMarch 24, 10:30 a.m. EASTER SUNDAYMarch 31, 10:30 a.m. MAUNDY THURSDAYMarch 28, 7:00 p.m. GOOD FRIDAYMarch 29, 7:00 p.m. SERVICE OF WHOLENESSMarch 20, 6:15 p.m. A celebration of Jesus triumphant entry into Jerusalem. We will relive this celebration with a parade including marching drummers, waving of palms, and a parade of banners. Commemorates the Last Supper when Jesus shared the Passover meal with his disciples on the night before he was crucied. We are oering Communion as part of the celebration. A time of penance and fasting as the anniversary of the death of Christ. Celebrating Christs triumphant resurrection in this celebration of worship, including the proclamation of the Good News, music, scripture, and worship. The Worship team will present a special program called HES ALIVE. The services provides a time for you to meet God and feel the comfort and forgiveness that refreshes you through Jesus Christ. In this service we will sing chants, reective silence, and proclamation of scriptures. We will oer anointing with oil and prayers for healing. First Presbyterian Church First Presbyterian Church 697 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, Florida www.Fpclc.org (386) 752-0670 Email: fpclc@comcast.net Holy Week Services Misty Dawn Harper Misty Dawn Harper, age 32, a lifelong resident of Co lumbia County died Sunday, March 10, 2013 at Shands UF in Gaines ville. Misty was born August 4, 1980 in Phoenix, Arizona. She is survived by her mother Bo nita Harper of Lake City; two children: Dakota Harper, 5 and Marisa Harper, 2 both of Lake City; brothers: Shawn Hoagland of Zainesville, Oh, Billy Hoa gland of Tallahassee, FL., Bruce Harper and Brian Harper both of Lake City. She is proceeded in death by her father Russell Harp er and brother Russell Hoagland. Loved and missed by family and friends. Elijah D. McKnight Mr. Elijah Duke McKnight, 88, was born May 15, 1924 in Live Oak, Florida to Grant McKnight and Minnie Hawkins McKnight. He was educated in the Suwan nee County School System. Mr. McKnight was employed as an Engineer with the City of Gainesville, Florida. On March 13, 2013, he tran sitioned from this life in the Suwannee Health Care Center, Live Oak, Florida. His memory will live on in the hearts of his children, James McKnight, Jackson ville, Florida, Nathaniel McK night, Yvonne McKnight, both of Gainesville, Florida, Linda McKnight-Sampson, Colum bus, Georgia; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mr. McK night will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, March 18, 2013 at Shiloh Mis sionary Baptist Church. view ing one hour prior to service. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. COURTESY Top chorus Congratulations to the Fort White High School Chorus for scoring straight Superiors on performance and Excellent on sight-singing, giving them an over-all score of Superior at the District 4 Music Performance Assessment. The event was held on March 8 at First Coast Senior High School in Jacksonville. The Chorus is under the direction of Tina Johnson, and their accompanist is Bobbie Moore, who is also the reading specialist at FWHS.

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6A MORTGAGE MillionDollar ! APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $1 MILLION IN 2013 FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $80,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2... and we’re starting with YOU! MOVE your First Mortgage(from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanOR 00 We’ll save you at least 1 25 We’ll pay you 1 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS Delivering Quality Healthcare that Matters to You! Quality Care is Important to Every Patient. But how can you really know the care youre receiving is the best? The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the healthcare as doing the right thing at the right time in the right way to achieve the best possible results. At Lake City Medical Center, our team of physicians and staff in the area by voting us the Lake City Reporters Best of the Best Hospital. Want to see more? For more information about publicly reported data, visit www.HospitalCompare.hhs.gov THE TOP 7 REASONS TO CHOOSE LCMC AS YOUR COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Survey of Patients Hospital Experience* Lake City Medical Center Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center The following scores are reported on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) national survey. Patients who reported that their nurses always communicated well. Patients who reported that their doctors always communicated well. Patients who reported that they always receieved help as soon as they wanted. Patients who reported that their pain was always well controlled. Patients at each hospital who reported that YES they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home. Patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest). Patients who reported YES they would definitely recommend this hosiptal. FLA Average US Average 77% 84% 68% 68% 86% 74% 73% 66% 73% 51% 61% 71% 48% 46% 73% 77% 60% 67% 81% 65% 68% 78% 81% 66% 70% 84% 69% 70% *The data was last updated 12/13/12 and is updated every quarter. LCM-4392 Quality Ad 5.25x10.indd 1 2/1/13 2:19 PM Dr. Robert J. Harvey Dr. Rameek McNair Dr. Robert J. Harvey Dr. Rameek McNair 752-2336 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available Ask About CareCredit and other financing available (wac) A Special Welcoming Gift For You We Are Offering: (ADA-00110) (ADA-00330) (if needed) COUPON #008 $ 29 00 For Only The policy of our office is that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination, or treatment if performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, examination or treatment. When Irish Eyes Are Smilin When Irish Eyes Are Smilin 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South www.theaspendentalgroup.com You know theyve been to Aspen Dental Group GATORS: Boynton takes over in win Continued From Page 1B Heat continues to rise in Miami By ANDREW SELIGMAN Associated Press MILWAUKEE Whether this winning streak for the Miami Heat ends with the NBA record or not, Chris Bosh is cer tain of one thing. He wont look back with any regrets. You have to enjoy it, Bosh said Friday after Heat beat Milwaukee for their 21st straight win. We dont want to be in a position where were not and then we look back and say, I wish we would have done this. I wish we would have done that. Were having a blast together, which is most important. To put some wins together, to have a chance at winning an NBA title and defending an NBA title is very special. LeBron James and Chris Bosh each scored 28 points, and Miami kept its win streak going, beating the Bucks 107-94. Only three other teams have won 20 in a row in one season, and the Heat now trail just the 1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers (33) and the 2007-08 Houston Rockets (22) after moving ahead of the 1970-71 Bucks. The Heat havent lost since they fell at Indiana on Feb. 1, and they return Sunday to Toronto, the place where this streak started two days later back when they were a mediocre road team barely on top of the Eastern Conference standings. I think the biggest thing for our team was watching the Super Bowl and get ting away from basketball in a sense and just enjoying each other, Dwyane Wade said. We got the famous speech from Shane Battier and weve been rolling ever since. What did Battier say? You had to be there, Bosh said. It was after watching the Super Bowl. It was a good game, we had a great time. I guess the main focus was that youre going to miss me when Im gone. Bosh laughed. It was not so much about him, he continued. He tied in everything. He tied in life to the Super Bowl. It was just everything. It was a good time. Its been nothing but good times for the Heat ever since, although there was a scary moment for them in this game. That was when Wade walked to the locker room with what the team said was a neck strain after crashing to the court in the early going. The Heat overcame that and led by as much as 17 in the third quarter, then withstood a push by the Bucks to keep the streak going. Bosh hit from all angles and was 12 of 16 in the game, nailing two 3-point ers. He even converted a four-point play that made it 67-53 about five minutes into the third quarter. James was his usual dominant self, and Wade finished with 20 points as the Heat avenged a loss at Milwaukee in late December. Theres a chance these two teams could meet in the first round of the playoffs, and Milwaukees Brandon Jennings basically said bring it on. I still dont take any thing back about playing Miami in the first round, he said afterward as he kept his eyes on North Carolina States ACC tour nament game. I still think we match up well against them. We just had an off night tonight. Ersan Ilyasova led Milwaukee with 26 points and a season-high 17 rebounds. Jennings scored 21 but was 6 of 15 from the field, and the Bucks shot just over 37 percent. Monta Ellis struggled, finishing with seven points after scor ing 26 in the previous game at Washington, and the Bucks dropped their third straight. Larry Sanders got eject ed for the second straight game with 2:44 left after he was called for a foul against James and picked up two technicals. Despite all those issues, ASSOCIATED PRESS Miami Heats LeBron James jumps onto a table while trying to save a ball going out of bounds against the Milwaukee Bucks in a NBA basketball game on Friday in Milwaukee. Hurricanes play way into ACC Championship anyone to shoot 50 percent or better this season. Alabama was ahead 2825 after a first half that featured five ties and seven lead changes, with neither team ever in front by more than five points. The Tides hot shooting enabled them to lead even though they had seven turnovers and only one assist before half time. The Tide stayed hot early in the second half and extended itsr lead to 37-27 when Releford sank two free throws with 16:05 remaining. Thats when Boynton took over the game. First the senior guard made a pair of free throws to cut Alabamas lead to 3731. Next he made a driving basket. Then Boynton sank a 3-pointer. He followed that up with a fast-break layup that gave Florida the lead. Boynton closed this stunning flurry by going into the paint and making a shot off the glass that extended Floridas advan tage to 40-37 with 12:02 remaining. By AARON BEARD Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. Durand Scott scored a career-high 32 points to help No. 9 Miami beat North Carolina State 81-71 on Saturday in the Atlantic Coast Conference tourna ment semifinals, earning its first trip to the champi onship game. Shane Larkin added 23 for the top-seeded Hurricanes (26-6), who led the entire way and by 19 points late in the first half. Miami shot 46 per cent behind Scott, a senior guard who went 12-for-18 from the field and 5-for-8 from 3-point range. Scott also had a couple of big shots that shut down comeback bids from the fifth-seeded Wolfpack (2410), who got as close as six after halftime but couldnt dig out of that big hole. Miami also controlled the boards to score 18 second-chance points to go with 15 points off turn overs. Now the Hurricanes can turn their attention to add ing a tournament title to go with their first regularseason crown in Sundays final. ASSOCIATED PRESS Miamis Julian Gamble (45) battles with North Carolina States Richard Howell (1) and T.J. Warren (24) for a rebound during the first half the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Greensboro, N.C. on Saturday.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, March 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Monday Q Fort White High weightlifting hosts sub-sectional, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls tennis at Forest High, 4:30 p.m. Q Fort White High JV baseball vs. Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High tennis at Suwannee High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Palatka High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Williston High, 7 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High softball vs. P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Wolfson High, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. St. Augustine High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High track in Dale Regan Memorial meet at Episcopal School, 3:30 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Citrus High at Jonesville Tennis Center, 2:30 p.m. Q Fort White High weightlifting at Bradford High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High softball at Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Saturday Q Fort White High baseball vs. Columbia High, 3 p.m. (JV-1) Q Fort White High track at FSU Relays, TBD March 25 Q Fort White High baseball at Bolles School, 6 p.m. March 26 Q Fort White High baseball at Episcopal High, 7 p.m. GAMES POP WARNER FOOTBALL Coaches needed; meeting April 15 Lake City Pop Warner Football is looking for coaches. Coaches must be 18 years old or older and will be subject to background screening. There is a Pop Warner Football meeting at 6 p.m. April 15 at Richardson Community Center. For details, call Mike Ferrell at 209-1662. WOLVES CHEERLEADING Clinic, tryouts set for this week Richardson Middle School cheer tryout packets are available at the front office and guidance office at RMS, and the front office of the zoned elementary schools. Packets are due by 3 p.m. Monday in the RMS cheer mailbox. Cheer clinics are 3:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. Tryouts are 3:30 p.m. Thursday in the RMS gym. For details, call coach Shannon Hall at 623-4058.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High School’s Brandy Morgan swings at a pitc h during a game against Lafayette on March 7. Lady Tigers rebound against Gainesville High BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Springing into the seasonThe Lake City/Columbia County Babe Ruth youth baseball se ason kicked off with it’s opening day ceremonies on Sa turday. Teams met at noon for introductions at Jack Muenchen field. More pictures on pa ge 4B. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAfter suffering only their second loss of the season on Thursday, the Lady Tigers softball team showed that they are best when bounc-ing back. Columbia High defeated Gainesville High, 12-2, in six innings on Friday. Ashley Shoup pitched five innings to pick up the win for the Lady Tigers allowing five hits and strik-ing out five batters. Shoup issued two walks and gave up two earned runs. Erin Anderson finished the final inning and gave up one hit. Columbia scored in bunches throughout the contest. The Lady Tigers went scoreless in the first inning, but Keeley Murray start-ed out a four-run second inning to give Columbia a 1-0 lead by scoring Caleigh McCauley on a double. Emily Harvey, who reached on a walk, scored on a passed ball to give Columbia a 2-0 lead and Lacey King doubled to score Murray for a 3-0 lead. The final run of the second inning came off a sacrifice fly from Kayli Kvistad to score Brittany Morgan. The Lady Tigers went scoreless in the third, but bounced back with four more runs in the fourth inning. Murray reached with her second double of the game, stole second and then scored off a passed ball to CHS softball knocks off Lady Hurricanes, 12-2. ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida guard Michael Frazier II (20) picks up a loose ball as forward Will Yeguete (15) lies on the court and Alab ama guard Retin Obasohan chases during the first half the Southeastern Conference tournament on Saturday in Nashville, Tenn. CHS continued on 2B Gators roll Tide in SECBy STEVE MEGARGEEAssociated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. — Kenny Boynton scored 11 straight points during a 15-0 second-half run and No. 13 Florida overcame a 10-point, second-half deficit to beat Alabama 61-51 on Saturday in the Southeastern Conference tournament semifinals. The top-seeded Gators (26-6) advanced the Sunday championship game against Mississippi or Vanderbilt. Alabama (21-12), the tournament’s No. 4 seed, will spend Sunday waiting to learn its fate from the NCAA tournament selec-tion committee. Most mock brackets had Alabama on the wrong side of the NCAA tournament bubble at the start of the week. Even after beating Tennessee 64-62 on Friday in a battle of bubble teams, Alabama said it still had more work to do and was trying to take its fate out of the selection committee’s hands by earning the SEC’s automatic bid. Alabama went 12-6 in conference play during the regular season, but the Tide hurt its cause by going 1-5 in December, including home nonconference losses to Mercer and Tulane. Held scoreless for the first 25 minutes, Boynton finished with a game-high 16 points. Patric Young had 13 points and nine rebounds for the Gators. Mike Rosario added 10 points. Trevor Releford scored 12 points, and Nick Jacobs and Trevor Lacey each added 11 for Alabama. Alabama led 37-27 with 16:05 remaining before Florida reeled off 15 straight points over the next 5 min-utes. In the lone regular-season meeting between the two teams, Florida ral-lied from eight points down in the final 12 minutes to win 64-52 on March 2 in Gainesville. This game featured the SEC’s two best scoring defenses, with Florida (53.4) and Alabama (58.9) allow-ing fewer than 60 points per game. And it started out as a defensive struggle, with Florida leading 6-2 7 min-utes into the game. But after missing four of its first five shots and com-mitting four turnovers in the first 5 minutes, Alabama’s offense found a rhythm. The Crimson Tide shot 55 percent (11 of 20) in the first half against a Florida team that hadn’t allowed GATORS continued on 6B Florida makes easy work of Alabama, 61-51.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Gatornationals, at Gainesville (same-day tape) 12:30 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Food City 500, at Bristol, Tenn. BASEBALL 9 p.m. MLB — World Baseball Classic, semifinal, at San Francisco COLLEGE SOFTBALL Noon FSN — East Carolina at UAB GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Avantha Masters, final round, at Delhi, India (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tampa Bay Classic, final round, at Tampa Bay 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, Tampa Bay Classic, final round, at Tampa Bay 4 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Founders Cup, final round, at Phoenix 7:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Toshiba Classic, final round, at Newport Beach, Calif. (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4 p.m. WGN — Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland, at Phoenix MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Southeastern Conference, championship, at Nashville, Tenn. CBS — Atlantic 10 Conference, championship, at Brooklyn, N.Y. ESPN — Atlantic Coast Conference, championship, at Greensboro, N.C. 3:30 p.m. CBS — Big Ten Conference, championship, at Chicago 6 p.m. CBS — NCAA Division I tournament, Selection Show, at Indianapolis NBA BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. ABC — New York at L.A. Clippers NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — Boston at Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Buffalo at Washington SOCCER 1 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, Houston at Dallas TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour/WTA, BNP Paribas Open, men’s and women’s championships, at Indian Wells, Calif. ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Preseason, Philadelphia vs. Atlanta, at Orlando NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Miami at Boston 10:30 p.m. ESPN — New York at Utah NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Philadelphia at Tampa BayBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Orlando at Milwaukee, 1 p.m.Miami at Toronto, 1 p.m.New York at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.Golden State at Houston, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Oklahoma City at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.Atlanta at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Indiana at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Portland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Dallas at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Brooklyn at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Denver at Chicago, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Miami at Boston, 8 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10 p.m.New York at Utah, 10:30 p.m. SEC tournament Second Round Late Thursday Vanderbilt 75, Arkansas 72Missouri 62, Texas A&M 50 Quarterfinals Friday Florida 80, LSU 58Alabama 58, Tennessee 48Vanderbilt 64, Kentucky 48Mississippi 64, Missouri 62 Semifinals Saturday Florida 61, Alabama51Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi (n) Championship Today Semifinal winners, 1 p.m. Florida 61, Alabama 51 At Nashville, Tenn.ALABAMA (21-12)Gueye 0-2 0-2 0, Lacey 4-13 0-0 11, Releford 4-8 4-4 12, Randolph 2-3 0-1 5, Cooper 2-4 0-0 6, Jacobs 5-7 1-1 11, Pollard 0-1 2-2 2, Obasohan 2-4 0-2 4. Totals 19-42 7-12 51. FLORIDA (26-6)Murphy 2-7 2-4 6, Young 6-10 1-3 13, Boynton 6-12 2-2 16, Rosario 3-6 3-3 10, Wilbekin 1-4 2-2 4, Yeguete 2-6 2-2 6, Frazier II 0-3 0-0 0, Prather 3-4 0-2 6. Totals 23-52 12-18 61. Halftime_Alabama 28-25. 3-Point Goals_Alabama 6-12 (Lacey 3-6, Cooper 2-3, Randolph 1-1, Releford 0-2), Florida 3-17 (Boynton 2-6, Rosario 1-3, Wilbekin 0-2, Frazier II 0-3, Murphy 0-3). Fouled Out_None. Rebounds_Alabama 28 (Gueye, Lacey 5), Florida 29 (Young 9). Assists_Alabama 5 (Lacey, Releford 2), Florida 9 (Wilbekin 4). Total Fouls_Alabama 15, Florida 13. A_NA. Florida 80, LSU 58 At Nashville, Tenn. LSU (19-12) Carmouche 4-10 3-7 14, Hickey 2-4 0-0 5, O’Bryant III 3-7 2-6 8, Coleman 3-9 1-3 7, Stringer 2-7 1-2 7, Courtney 1-3 3-4 5, Collins 2-5 0-0 6, Hammink 0-3 1-2 1, Morgan 1-3 1-2 4, Del Piero 0-3 1-2 1. Totals 18-54 13-28 58.FLORIDA (25-6) Boynton 1-7 0-0 2, Rosario 2-7 3-3 7, Young 3-5 4-10 10, Wilbekin 6-8 0-0 16, Murphy 11-15 0-2 27, Kurtz 1-2 0-0 2, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Yeguete 1-2 1-2 3, Frazier II 3-5 3-4 11, Prather 1-4 0-1 2, Walker 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 29-57 11-22 80. Halftime—Florida 43-28. 3-Point Goals—LSU 9-19 (Carmouche 3-5, Collins 2-3, Stringer 2-6, Hickey 1-1, Morgan 1-2, Coleman 0-2), Florida 11-20 (Murphy 5-7, Wilbekin 4-5, Frazier II 2-2, Rosario 0-2, Boynton 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—LSU 27 (Del Piero 6), Florida 47 (Murphy 12). Assists—LSU 7 (Carmouche 3), Florida 17 (Boynton 7). Total Fouls—LSU 18, Florida 18.ACC tournament First Round Late Thursday Maryland 75, Wake Forest 62Florida State 73, Clemson 69 Quarterfinals Friday Miami 69, Boston College 58N.C. State 75, Virginia 56Maryland 83, Duke 74North Carolina 83, Florida St. 62 Semifinals Saturday Miami 81, N.C. State 71Maryland vs. North Carolina (n) Championship Today Semifinal winners, 1 p.m. North Carolina 83, Florida State 62 At Greensboro, N.C. FLORIDA ST. (18-15) White 3-5 0-0 6, Turpin 2-3 4-4 8, Bookert 2-7 5-5 9, Snaer 8-12 1-2 20, Thomas 3-7 2-2 8, Shannon 2-5 0-2 4, Gilchrist 1-2 0-0 2, Brandon 1-3 1-3 3, Miller 1-5 0-0 2, Whisnant II 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 23-51 13-18 62.NORTH CAROLINA (23-9) Bullock 7-11 1-1 17, McAdoo 6-9 0-0 12, Hairston 7-11 2-2 21, Strickland 3-8 4-4 10, Paige 3-8 2-3 9, McDonald 2-9 2-2 8, Hubert 1-1 0-0 2, Tokoto 0-2 0-0 0, Johnson 0-2 0-0 0, Simmons 1-1 0-0 2, James 0-0 0-0 0, Moody 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 0-0 0-0 0, Tanner 0-0 0-0 0, Manor 1-1 0-0 2, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-63 11-12 83. Halftime—North Carolina 35-27. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 3-12 (Snaer 3-5, White 0-1, Miller 0-1, Thomas 0-1, Bookert 0-1, Brandon 0-1, Whisnant II 0-2), North Carolina 10-22 (Hairston 5-6, McDonald 2-6, Bullock 2-6, Paige 1-4). Fouled Out—McAdoo, Snaer. Rebounds—Florida St. 30 (Snaer 7), North Carolina 33 (Bullock 9). Assists—Florida St. 8 (Snaer 5), North Carolina 20 (Paige 10). Total Fouls—Florida St. 17, North Carolina 15.Florida State 73, Clemson 69 At Greensboro, N.C. CLEMSON (13-18) Jennings 3-9 1-2 7, McDaniels 6-9 2-3 16, Booker 4-8 2-4 11, Hall 1-4 5-8 7, Roper 3-11 9-13 18, Harrison 3-9 0-1 7, Filer 1-1 0-0 3, Sullivan 0-0 0-0 0, Nnoko 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 21-51 19-31 69.FLORIDA ST. (18-14) White 8-11 7-7 24, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0, Bookert 3-4 4-8 12, Thomas 2-3 0-0 5, Snaer 3-10 4-4 10, Gilchrist 0-0 0-0 0, Turpin 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 0-4 0-0 0, Whisnant II 0-0 0-0 0, Brandon 2-3 3-6 8, Shannon 4-8 4-5 12, Bojanovsky 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 22-45 24-32 73. Halftime—Clemson 35-30. 3-Point Goals—Clemson 8-17 (Roper 3-3, McDaniels 2-3, Booker 1-1, Filer 1-1, Harrison 1-3, Hall 0-1, Jennings 0-5), Florida St. 5-13 (Bookert 2-2, Brandon 1-1, Thomas 1-1, White 1-3, Snaer 0-3, Miller 0-3). Fouled Out—McDaniels, Miller, Shannon. Rebounds—Clemson 32 (Harrison 8), Florida St. 28 (Bookert, Snaer 5). Assists—Clemson 12 (Hall 5), Florida St. 11 (Snaer 5). Total Fouls—Clemson 24, Florida St. 23. A—22,169.BASEBALLSpring Training Today’s Games Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.Toronto vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:35 p.m. San Diego vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las Vegas, Nev., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Colorado vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 6:15 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Arizona vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Seattle vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 10:10 p.m.World Baseball Classic SECOND ROUND Thursday’s Game Dominican Republic 3, United States i Friday’s Game Puerto Rico 4, United States 3 Saturday’s Game Puerto Rico vs. Dominican Republic Today’s Game Group 1 winner vs. Japan, 9 p.m. Monday’s Game Netherlands vs. Group 2 winner, 9 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP At San Francisco Tuesday Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.AUTO RACINGRace week NHRA MELLOW YELLO DRAG RACING NHRA GATORNATIONALS Site: GainesvilleSchedule: Today, final eliminations (ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.). Track: Auto Plus Raceway. NASCAR SPRINT CUP FOOD CITY 500 Site: Bristol, Tenn.Schedule: Today, practice (Fox Sports Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Fox Sports Speed, 9-10 a.m., noon-1 p.m.); Sunday, race 1 p.m. (FOX, 12:30-4:30 p.m.). Track: Bristol Motor Speedway (oval, 0.533 miles). Race distance: 500 laps, 266.5 miles.Next race: Auto Club 400, March 24, Auto Club Speedway, Fontana, Calif.Food City 500 lineup At Bristol Motor SpeedwayBristol, Tenn. Friday qualifying; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 129.535.2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 128.995. 3. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 128.96.4. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 128.528.5. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 128.356. 6. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 128.288. 7. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 128.211.8. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 128.005. 9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 127.946. 10. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 127.877.11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 127.869. 12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 127.852. 13. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 127.835. 14. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 127.792.15. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 127.588.16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 127.512. 17. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 127.47. 18. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 127.453. 19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 127.393. 20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 127.377.21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 127.36.22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 127.36.23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 127.3.24. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 127.258.25. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 127.132. 26. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 126.595. 27. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 126.578.28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 126.528. 29. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 126.42. 30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 126.403.31. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 126.237. 32. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 125.947. 33. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 125.848. 34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 125.74. 35. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 125.732.36. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 125.708.37. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 42. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Owner Points.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Boston at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.Winnipeg at Ottawa, 5 p.m.Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m.San Jose at Anaheim, 10 p.m.Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN CHS From Page 1B COURTESY PHOTOScholar athletesColumbia High baseball players who received Gator ba seball tickets are coach Jonathan Ulsh (from left), T.J. Price, Jason Bass, Caleb Vau ghn and Kaleb Rossignol. In back are Dan Shelley (left), representing the RountreeMoore Auto Group, and Fred Koberlein. Korberlein and Rountee-Moore donate tickets fo r Florida home series to CHS players who exhibit teamwork and high academic perform ance. give Columbia a 5-0 lead. “She’s hit the ball well tonight,” Columbia head coach Jimmy Williams said. “She can do it all for us.” Brittany Morgan stole home on a suicide squeeze and Anderson scored King and Kvistad off a single for an 8-0 lead. In the fifth, the Lady Hurricanes got two back, but Columbia made it 9-2 when Tatum Morgan hit a double to score King. Columbia finished off Gainesville in the bottom of the sixth. Murray scored McCauley and Anderson for an 11-2 lead with a dou-ble and Brittany Morgan’s single scored Murray for the 12-2 final. “We have a way of taking it out on our next opponent after a loss,” Williams said. “We know how to bounce back.” Columbia (13-2, 3-0 district) travels to P.K. Yonge at 6 p.m. on Tuesday before hosting St. Augustine and Atlantic Coast high schools in district games on Thursday and Friday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 3B3BSPORTSTigers have strong showing JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Blake Kuykendall locks in his elbow s as he participates in the clean-and-jerk. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High weightlifting coach Brian Allen motivates Felix Woods during a match on Monday.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High weightlifting coach Dennis Dotson gives a few pointers to Javere Smith. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Malachi Jean bench presses at a weig htlifting meet held at the Fort White High School gymnasium on Mond ay.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil rests weights on his ch est before attempting a clean-and-jerk at a weightlifting me et on Monday at Fort White High School.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsOpening Day in Lake City BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterMore than 300 people were out at the Lake City/Columbia C ounty Babe Ruth Opening Day Ceremony at Southside Sports Complex on Saturday. Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City ReporterLEFT : Members of the Big Bubba Gear team race prior to a gam e on Saturday. Ashton Miles (from left), Bryant Green and J akai Williams look to lead the bunch. RIGHT : Max Bavar takes ground balls from his dad Andy Norri s (not pictured) before the game.BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Lawn Enforcement 12U baseball team practic e their fielding prior to the Opening Day Ceremonies he ld for the Lake City/Columbia County Babe Ruth Association on Sa turday at Southside Sports Complex in Lake City.Photos by BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterABOVE : A group of children gather to play keep away in between games on Saturday.BELOW : Head coach Tommy Boston of the Health Center of Lake City 8U team speaks prior to a game on Saturday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 5B5BSports WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net All Jackets 30-40% off Canvas & Camo Jackets 40% off All Insulated Camo 40% off (in stock) All Sandals (Mens & Womens)Childrens...30% off20%off Florida State eliminated from ACC tournamentBy AARON BEARDAssociated PressGREENSBORO, N.C. — North Carolina opened the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament by reclaiming the form that carried the Tar Heels through February. The only question is wheth-er they’ll have to continue their title chase without the guy who sparked their late-season surge. P.J. Hairston scored 21 points before leaving the game with a cut to his left hand in the Tar Heels’ 83-62 win against Florida State in Friday night’s quar-terfinals. Hairston, playing in his hometown, suffered a cut to the webbing between his middle and ring fingers — apparently when the ball got jammed in between those fingers. Hairston left a trail of blood droplets as he checked out of the game and then left the bench area in obvious pain with 4:13 left. The 6-foot-5 sophomore needed eight stitches for the cut to his non-shooting hand. “We’re extremely concerned right now because his hand is torn up,” Williams said. “It doesn’t look good and they’re stitch-ing it up and I wouldn’t watch it.” Hairston, who didn’t speak with reporters after-ward, hit his first four 3-pointers and finished 7-for-11 from the field, including 5-for-6 from behind the arc. For UNC fans, Hairston’s injury is sure to stir an unwanted feeling of deja vu. It was in last year’s quar-terfinal win that forward John Henson suffered a wrist injury that sidelined him for the rest of the ACC tournament. And it was nearly a year to the day since point guard Kendall Marshall — the Tar Heels’ most irreplaceable player — suffered a broken right wrist when he took a hard foul in an NCAA tour-nament game here in the Greensboro Coliseum. The injury sidelined Marshall the rest of the way and ultimately derailed UNC’s national-title chances. If Hairston is out, it will certainly make things tougher as the Tar Heels try to win the tournament for the first time since 2008. After all, the Tar Heels didn’t climb the league standings until Williams inserted Hairston into a four-guard starting lineup. “He’s a pretty tough kid, so hopefully he’ll be able to shoot around tomorrow, and he’ll be back ready to play,” senior Dexter Strickland said. Reggie Bullock added 13 of his 17 points after halftime for North Carolina, which took control with a 13-0 run early in the second half. UNC hit 10 3s and also scored 27 points off 18 turnovers to beat the reign-ing champion Seminoles in a rematch of last season’s championship game. Michael Snaer scored 20 for sixth-seeded Florida State (18-15), which lost all three meetings with the Tar Heels this season with the last two coming by 21 points each. The Seminoles advanced to the quarterfinals by holding off 11th-seeded Clemson in the first round Thursday night. But they struggled to slow Hairston early and then Bullock after halftime, as the Tar Heels returned to the form they displayed during a six-game winning streak before last weekend’s home loss to rival Duke. “That was a terrible game for us offensively,” Bullock said of the Duke game. “We just came out and played great basketball.” Two of Hairston’s firsthalf 3s fueled an 8-0 burst that gave UNC a 10-point lead, then Bullock sparked the 13-0 second-half run that helped the Tar Heels blow the game open. “It seemed that we just could not keep up with Bullock and Hairston,” Seminoles coach Leonard Hamilton said. “Our game plan was to try defensively to be there, not allow them to get out in transition and get those open looks. They’ve got such great range and get it off so quick, that if you allow them to catch, contest-ing’s hard.” After FSU closed to within 39-35, Hairston started the run with a 3, while Bullock followed two possessions later with his own 3 over Devon Bookert. Bullock also had a driving layup while drawing a foul for a three-point play, then Hairston closed the run with two free throws to make it 52-35 with 14:15 left. Florida State never managed to get that deficit back to single digits. Snaer — the senior with buzzer-beating winners in the past two seasons — fouled out with 1:40 left and headed to the bench to a standing ovation from his teammates. ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State’s Michael Snaer (21) shoots as North Carol ina’s Leslie McDonald (2) defends during the Atlantic C oast Conference tournament in Greensboro, N.C. on Friday. Free agency remains wild in NFLAssociated PressElvis Dumervil was staying with the Denver Broncos. And then, he wasn’t. On another busy day of NFL free agency, the high-light — or lowlight — came after a strange sequence of events in which the Broncos and the defensive end reached an agreement on a new deal that ended up not valid because the paper-work was filed too late. And now, Dumervil is a free agent. Also Friday, Greg Jennings left Green Bay to head to rival Minnesota, Dustin Keller became the latest member of the Jets to leave and Kevin Kolb was released by Arizona. A person familiar with the negotiations gave The Associated Press details about the confusion involv-ing Dumervil and the Broncos. The person did not want to be identified because the negotiations were not public. Broncos front office chief John Elway said the team delivered its final contract proposal to Dumervil at 11 a.m. and set a 1 p.m. dead-line for a decision. Elway said Dumervil accepted the contract at around 1:25 and “although we expressed our concern regarding the time constraints, we were assured that the signed doc-uments would be submitted to us before the league’s waiver deadline.” “We did not receive the documents from Elvis by the league’s deadline and were forced to release him shortly before 2 p.m. MDT,” Elway said. Dumervil’s agent, Marty Magid, did not return mes-sages left by AP via text and voicemail. Though the sides had agreed on a deal, the odds of Dumervil returning to Denver are hampered because cutting him could leave them with a salary cap hit of up to nearly $5 million. Jennings spent seven years getting the best of the Vikings’ secondary while playing for their bit-ter rivals in Green Bay. No longer feeling as important to the Packers after two sea-sons shortened by injuries, Jennings crossed the bor-der and found a team that welcomed him with desper-ately open arms. Jennings signed a fiveyear contract with the Vikings on Friday, leav-ing Aaron Rodgers and that high-octane passing offense in Green Bay for the unproven Christian Ponder and the ground-and-pound Vikings. In 2011, he missed three games with a sprained left knee. He said he felt lost in the shuffle behind younger Packers receivers such as James Jones, Jordy Nelson and Randall Cobb and sounded determined to prove that his best years are not behind him. “I can definitely still do it,” said Jennings, who will turn 30 on Sept. 21. “I can definitely still make plays and be as exciting as I was in my earlier years.” Arizona released Kolb, ending the quarterback’s two injury-filled seasons with the team. The move came just ahead of the deadline for paying Kolb a $2 million roster bonus. The Cardinals paid Kolb some $20 million over two seasons after acquiring him in a trade that sent a second-round draft pick and cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie to the Philadelphia Eagles. The move reportedly saved $7 million in salary cap space. Meanwhile, the Cardinals were spend-ing the money left and right, agreeing to terms on one-year contracts with former San Diego and ex-University of Arizona cor-nerback Antoine Cason and ex-Oakland defensive end Matt Shaughnessy. In Miami, Ryan Tannehill now has plenty of poten-tial pass targets, thanks to a spending spree by the Dolphins. Miami signed Keller and wideout Brandon Gibson to complete a much-needed upgrade of the receiving corps. The Dolphins ear-lier added Mike Wallace, the top pass-catcher in free agency, and re-signed wideout Brian Hartline last week. The moves transform the passing game into a poten-tial strength. “We feel that we have added some very good pieces to our passing game,” general manager Jeff Ireland said. Keller and Gibson agreed. “In today’s NFL, you’ve got to have more than one or two ways to get people the ball,” Gibson said. “This is a young and talented group. If we stick together, we could be very good.” Gibson spent the past four seasons with the St. Louis Rams, where he made 38 starts. Last year, he had 51 receptions for a career-high 691 yards and five touchdowns while starting 13 games. Keller, who had 17 career touchdown catches with the Jets, signed a one-year con-tract as a replacement for Anthony Fasano. Keller was slowed by a left ankle injury last year, when he made 28 catches for 317 yards and two scores in eight games. “It was pretty frustrating,” he said. “This is a fresh start for me. It’s an opportu-nity to go somewhere and re-prove myself.” Meanwhile, the Jets had their busiest day yet of free agent signings after watch-ing several of their key play-ers leave during the early days of free agency. New York signed running back Mike Goodson, offensive lineman Willie Colon and nose tackle Antonio Garay. The team announced the deal with Goodson, along with the re-signing of fullback Lex Hilliard.

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By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — A spike in gas prices drove a measure of U.S. consum-er costs up in February by the most in more than three years. But outside the gain in fuel costs, infla-tion was mostly modest. The consumer price index increased a season-ally adjusted 0.7 percent last month from January, the Labor Department said Friday. It was the biggest monthly rise since June 2009. Still, three-fourths of the increase in the index reflected a 9.1 percent surge in gas prices. That was also the largest month-ly gain since June 2009. Gas prices had fallen in the previous four months. Since last month’s increase gas price have started to decline again. For the 12 months that ended in February, pric-es increased 2.0 percent. That’s in line with the Federal Reserve’s inflation target. Excluding volatile food and energy costs, core inflation rose just 0.2 per-cent in February. Over the past 12 months, core prices have risen just 2 percent. “Aside from the spike in gasoline prices, which is already being reversed, it is hard to find any evi-dence of major price pres-sures,” said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist for Capital Economics. Low inflation leaves consumers with more money to spend, which benefits the economy. It also allows the Federal Reserve lee-way to keep interest rates low to help spur economic growth. In February, total energy costs rose 5.4 percent. In ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung(850) 644-3372jostery@comcast.net “He who is different from me does not impover-ish me — he enriches me. Our unity is constituted in something higher than our-selves — in Man... For no man seeks to hear his own echo, or to find his reflec-tion in the glass.” — Antoine De SaintExupery T oo often we make the mis-take of seeing entrepreneurs like Donald Trump and Steve Jobs as examples that all business-es should follow. However, the great majority of firms in this country are not truly entrepreneurial but more what I call “lifestyle businesses.” These lifestyle businesses add so much to our economy and the wel-fare of so many employees. To me, an entrepreneurial business is innovative and fast-growing, with revenues increasing by 20 percent or more a year. Lifestyle businesses, how-ever, either do not choose to grow or cannot for what-ever reason, and owners are comfortable simply providing secure jobs for themselves and their staffs. I have been head of the entrepreneurship program at FSU for over 20 years, and throughout my tenure, we have always empha-sized entrepreneurship because it is what we felt would be most beneficial to our students. However, while this business model is great for college students to study, it does not fit the majority of businesses in this country. It is not a true comparison in terms of what they do, how they operate or even how they measure their success. For example, I am working with a family bakery. I consider this a lifestyle business because, at the end of the day, they just want to keep the business afloat so that the family members who work there will get paid. They do not want to grow very much but want to keep things going simply to ensure they have jobs and a viable source of income. The knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in a lifestyle business are very different from those required of an entrepre-neur. Entrepreneurs need to understand concepts like venture capital and equity funding, but lifestyle busi-nesses do not, and that is okay. This disparity became clear to me while teaching entrepreneurship courses at an all-female prison. It was obvious that these inmates were not identify-ing with entrepreneurial concepts at all. Their goals for their lives after release Growth is not always the goal Lake City Reporter Week of March 17-23, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc. 1CColumbia Inc.By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comT here are several signs that indicate Columbia County’s and the region’s economy are perking up and 2013 may be a prosperous year for local businesses. In fact, the highest number of jobs listed in the region in the past three years were posted at Florida Crown Workforce Career Center in January. “For January we actually showed the highest number of job listings in the last three years for our region,” said Denise Wynne, Florida Crown’s lead employer services represen-tative. “It shows we are trending. It was a record number of job openings, and it shows our area really is starting to open back up and we’re booming. It’s a good time to be looking for work in our area.” The data did not contain how many positions were available, nor did it show in what areas the employment opportunities were available. Wynne said some of the employment opportunities were in the food service industry, with three new restaurants, LongHorn Steakhouse, (which opened last month), Olive Garden and Gators Dockside fill-ing their staffs in Lake City. “We also have Sitel, who’s doing a big hiring push right now,” she said. “They need 35 positions filled by the end of the month. I would definitely say those are the two industries right now — food service and call center — that we’re seeing a big push in.” She also said the Department of Corrections is hiring at a higher rate than in other profes-sions. “Lancaster (Correctional Facility) was the only one in our region that didn’t post job list-ings,” Wynne said. “Correctional Corporations of America has even started posting some posi-tions. They’re looking for correc-tions officers, but they’ve been looking for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. They have several positions available.” When Wynne reviewed the March statistics, she said there are currently 157 job postings in Florida Crown Region VII, which covers Columbia, Union, Dixie and Gilchrist counties. “That represents at least 159 positions,” she said. Although Wynne did not have the data listing with a total of job listings for February, she said she expected to see a similar number of job listings. “Based on how busy we’ve been and how busy we continue to be, I expect the numbers to at least stay the same, if not con-tinue to rise,” she said. “We’ve continued to see new businesses opening, and I think that’s a real-ly good indicator that things are picking up. It’s going to continue to improve.” To apply for the vacant positions, residents are encour-aged to visit the Florida Crown Workforce Career Center at 139 W. Highway 90, Suite 170. Wynne said Florida Crown has a variety of services to offer people who want to re-enter the workforce or students entering the workforce for the first time.Jobs to be had locally TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterBetty Shope (left), a client at Florida Crown Workforce Cente r, talks to Lora Rayam, a customer service representative, about local employment opportunities. The highest numb er of jobs listed in the region in the past three years were posted at Florida Crown in January. Area businesses post most positions in nearly 3 years. LOCAL EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS continued on 2C ASSOCIATED PRESSA spike in gas prices drove consumer costs up in February, but outside the gain in fuel, inflation was mostly modest. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Carnival Dream is docked in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Isl ands. Carnival, the world’s largest cruise line, has suffered through a number of high-p rofile mishaps. Yet passengers continue to book vacations thanks to discounts, albeit at a slo wer pace. Gas spike drives consumer prices up 0.7 percent Carnival returns to profit; travelers fear mishapsBy SCOTT MAYEROWITZAP Business WriterMIAMI — The world’s largest cruise line has suf-fered through a number of high-profile mishaps. Yet passengers continue to book vacations thanks to discounts, albeit at a slower pace. Carnival Corp. offered more sales to attract wary passengers after an engine fire last month crippled the Carnival Triumph, leaving 4,200 people stranded for five days without working toilets or power. This week, two more of its ships had mechanical problems, ruin-ing the vacations of thou-sands more travelers. Carnival Corp. said Friday that it earned $37 million, or 5 cents per share, in first quarter ended Feb. 28. That compares with a loss of $139 million, or 18 cents per share, a year earlier. But its forecast for the year came in below analyst’s predictions. Its shares fell more than 2 percent. On Thursday, the company ended the voyage of the Carnival Dream after the ship’s backup emer-gency diesel generator failed, causing problems with elevators and toilets. Instead of continuing back to Florida, Carnival was forced to charter airplanes to fly home the ship’s 4,300 passengers. The Dream’s next trip, which was sup-posed to start Sunday, was canceled. All of the pas-sengers scheduled for that PRICES continued on 2C CARNIVAL continued on 2CShip breakdowns hurting bookings despite discounts.Biggest increase in three years, but not a worry.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Foreign holdings of US debt rise WASHINGTON — Foreign demand for U.S. Treasury securities rose to a record level in January, providing evidence that international investors remain confident in U.S. debt despite on-going budget battles in Washington. The Treasury Department said Friday that foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury securities rose in January for a 13th straight month to a record $5.62 trillion, up 0.8 per-cent from December. China, the top foreign holder, increased its holdings 3.6 percent to $1.26 trillion. Japan, the second largest holder, boosted its investment 0.4 percent to $1.12 tril-lion. Demand kept rising as Congress and President Barack Obama kept wrangling over various budget issues. Congress did agree to temporarily lift the government’s borrowing limit but no deal was reached on a plan to avert automatic spending cuts from going into effect on March 1.Citigroup pays CEO $12.4M in 2012 NEW YORK — Citigroup awarded its new CEO, Michael Corbat, a total of $12.4 million last year. That’s 17 percent less than the $14.9 million his predecessor, Vikram Pandit, received in 2011. But Corbat, who replaced Pandit in October, was only in the top job for three months last year. Citigroup paid Pandit a total of $9.5 million in 2012. Before replacing him, Corbat had been CEO of Citi’s Europe, Middle East and Africa division.BUSINESS BRIEFS BUSINESS: Different goals Continued From Page 1Cinvolved being able to pro-vide a living for themselves and their families, and pushing entrepreneurial values was like trying to put a square peg in a round hole. After having this epiphany, I have changed my approach, and I am now teaching these ladies how to start and success-fully run their own lifestyle businesses. They can now clearly visualize starting home or pool cleaning businesses, for example. Now I am not saying either type of business is better than the other. What I am trying to get across is that lifestyle businesses are not busi-nesses that failed to reach entrepreneurial success, but rather businesses that are comfortable in their own shoes. Not everyone has the desire to be an entrepre-neur. We need to recognize the difference between these types of businesses and appreciate the contri-butions each makes to our country and our economy. You can do this! Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. PRICES: Sharp jump not an inflation concern Continued From Page 1Caddition to gasoline, prices for natural gas and home heating oil also showed big gains. Food prices grew just 0.1 percent. Prices for fruits and vegetables jumped 1.4 percent jump. Meat, poultry and fish prices increased 0.5 percent. Most other food prices declined. Prices for new cars fell 0.3 percent, the largest monthly decline in three years. Airline fares and clothing prices also fell. Monthly rents and used car prices increased. Gas prices rose sharply in February after falling at the end of 2012. The national average price for a gallon of gas jumped from $3.42 on Jan. 31 to $3.78 on Feb. 28. Since then, however, gas prices have come down a bit. They averaged $3.70 per gallon on Thursday, according to AAA’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report. An increase in gas prices also drove a measure of wholesale prices up in February by the most in five months. The govern-ment said the producer price index rose 0.7 percent last month. The index mea-sures prices before they reach the consumer. The unemployment rate is still high at 7.7 percent. As long as the inflation out-look stays mild, the Fed said it plans to keep the short-term interest rate it controls near zero until the unemployment rate falls to at least 6.5 percent. The Fed will hold a twoday meeting next week and economists expect the central bank will keep its low-interest-rate policies unchanged. CARNIVAL: Profits despite embarrassments Continued From Page 1Cvoyage will receive a refund for the cruise and airfare. The company also said that another ship — the Legend — was having mechanical problems and would skip its stop at the Cayman Islands, head-ing straight to its final port in Tampa, Fla. instead. Carnival runs cruises under 10 brands including Holland America, Princess, Cunard and its namesake line. Vacationers have been wary about booking cruises ever since the Costa Concordia — also owned by Carnival — sank off the coast of Italy in January 2012. Passengers have returned to the seas, but many needed to be coaxed by deep discounts. Asked if they would like to share how deep the discounts have been for the various lines, Carnival executives replied, “Not particularly.” In its earnings release Friday, the Miami-based company said advance bookings for 2013 are behind the same point a year earlier. The compa-ny blamed Europe’s economic prob-lems for its inability to raise prices. North American prices are up slightly but those in Europe and Asia are lag-ging behind. Passengers in Europe are booking vacations much closer to the date of departure, Carnival said. The company now expects revenue to be flat for the year, compared with a previous forecast for growth of 1 to 2 percent. That outlook worried investors. Carnival shares dropped 83 cents, or 2.3 percent, to $34.90. Carnival’s rivals have also been hurt by the lagging European econo-my. Summer Mediterranean cruises favored by Italians and Spaniards are suffering due to economic woes in those countries. Last month, Royal Caribbean, the world’s second-larg-est cruise line, wrote down $413.9 million due to a substantial drop in bookings and prices in Spain because of the government’s austerity mea-sures there. Royal Caribbean also blamed residual fears from the Costa Concordia disaster for a drop in European bookings. Executives said Carnival is doing an assessment of emergency power and redundancies across its entire fleet following the Triumph mishap. Howard S. Frank, the company’s chief operating officer, didn’t estimate the possible cost of improvements for analysts during a conference call Friday. “I don’t see it as being enor-mous,” Frank said. The company refused to tell analysts how much it spent each year on safety and training. For the quarter that ended Feb. 28, adjusted earnings were 8 cents per share. Analysts had expected 3 cents per share. Revenue rose slightly to $3.59 billion. The best thing going for Carnival right now is declining fuel prices. The cruise line paid $677 per metric ton for fuel in the first quarter, down 4 per-cent from the same period last year. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEThe Carnival Legend, a 2,100-passenger, 960-foot-long cru ise ship arrives at Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale in 2002. Q Associated Press

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 3C By MARCY GORDONAP Business WriterWASHINGTON — Two former high-ranking exec-utives at JPMorgan Chase faced tough questions from senators Friday about why the bank played down risks and hid losses from regulators when it was los-ing billions of dollars. The hearing was held a day after the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations issued a scathing report that ascribed widespread blame for $6.2 billion in trading losses to key executives at the firm. Douglas Braunstein, the former chief financial officer, and Ina Drew, the former chief investment officer overseeing trading strategy, were pressed to explain why bank execu-tives gave federal examin-ers in April information that significantly under-stated losses for the first quarter of 2012. “The number I reported (to the regulators) was the number that was given to me,” said Drew, who resigned last spring after the losses became public. Drew blamed the losses on executives under her watch who failed to control risks out of the London office. She said that undermined her over-sight and kept her from preventing the losses. The report also suggested that CEO Jamie Dimon was aware of the losses in April, even while he played them down pub-licly. And Sen. Carl Levin, the chairman of the panel, implied that Dimon set a precedent at the bank for withholding information. Dimon acknowledged in May 2012 that the firm had lost $2 billion on risky trades out of its London office. The losses have since been revised to more than $6 billion. After reading the report and hearing executives testify that they didn’t know who was respon-sible for informing regu-lators, members of the panel questioned whether the nation’s biggest bank had become too large to manage. The “trading culture at JPMorgan ... piled on risk, hid losses, disregarded risk limits, manipulated risk models, dodged over-sight and misinformed the public,” Levin said Friday at the hearing. On Thursday, JPMorgan acknowledged it made mistakes but rejected any assertions that it con-cealed losses or risks. A spokesman declined to comment directly on the accusation that Dimon knew of the trading loss in April. Dimon was not a witness at Friday’s hearing. In April, news reports said a trader in JPMorgan’s London office known as “the whale” had taken huge risks that were roil-ing the markets. Dimon immediately dismissed the reports as a “tempest in a teapot” during a con-ference call with analysts. But Dimon acknowledged the losses a month later. And he told a sepa-rate Senate committee in June that the bank showed “bad judgment,” was “stupid” and “took far too much risk.” He also had his compensation last year reduced by 50 per-cent, as did Braunstein. After the trading loss came to light, Drew resigned after 30 years with the firm and volun-tarily paid back two years of salary. Drew said Friday that while she doesn’t believe she bore personal respon-sibility for the losses, she decided to step down to make it easier for JPMorgan “to move beyond these issues.” Her comments were her first public remarks since leav-ing the firm. Braunstein acknowledged that risk models for the trading operation were changed in a way that was improper early last year. The changes made the bank’s trading losses appear smaller than they were. The loss came less than four years after the 2008 financial crisis and hurt the reputation of a bank that had come through the crisis known for tak-ing fewer risks than its competitors. Three employees in the London office were fired — two senior managers and a trader. It also led to Drew’s resignation. By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — A strong increase in auto output boosted U.S. factory production last month, the latest sign that manufacturing is helping drive economic growth after lagging for much of 2012. Factory output rose a seasonally adjusted 0.8 percent in February from January, after falling 0.3 per-cent in the previous month, the Federal Reserve said Friday. The biggest gain was in autos and auto parts, where production increased 3.6 percent after falling 4.9 percent in January. Car sales have risen steadily this year after reaching a five year high in 2012. Overall industrial production, which includes mining and utili-ties, rose 0.7 percent in February. That is the most in three months. Utility output jumped 1.6 per-cent while mining output, which covers oil and gas drilling, fell 0.3 percent, the third straight decline. Still, economists were encouraged by the broad-based gains in factory output. Rising home construction and increased busi-ness investment in machinery and other goods are also boosting manufacturers. The Fed’s mea-sure of factory production is at its highest level in more than four and a half years. Production of construction supplies, which includes steel, cement and wood products, rose 1.5 percent, the fourth straight solid gain. Factories also cranked out more industrial machinery, appliances, and furniture. “Growth has clearly picked up,” Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics, said in a note to clients. “This is another positive sign” for the economy in the January-March quarter. O’Sullivan forecasts that growth will jump to a 3 percent annual rate in the first quarter, after bare-ly expanding in the final three months of last year. Jonathan Basile, an economist at Credit Suisse, said the healthy increase in output suggests manu-facturers will need step up hiring in the months ahead. Factory job gains could rise to 20,000 a month, up from average gains of 13,000 in the past three months. Factories are running at nearly full speed to keep up with demand. Manufacturers are now using 78.3 percent of their capacity, the high-est since December 2007, when the recession began. That’s just a half-point below the long-run average. Running near full capacity could lead to higher prices for manufac-tured goods, economists caution, and could push up inflation. But for now, a separate report Friday showed that consumer prices, outside gas, remained tame in February. The industrial production report adds to recent signs that manufac-turing is picking up. A closely watched index of U.S. manufacturing activity increased in February for the third straight month. Big increases in new orders and production pushed the Institute for Supply Management’s index to its highest level in 20 months. New car and truck sales rose 4 percent in February from a year earlier to an annual pace of 15.4 million. That’s a big improvement from sales of only 10.4 million in 2009. It’s still short of the pre-recession peak of 17 million in 2005. Auto makers are expected to have boosted output last month to keep up with the sales. Increasing factory output is contributing to an improved out-look for the economy this year. Americans are spending more, despite higher Social Security taxes and a sharp increase in gas prices. Retail sales rose in February at a healthy pace. The job market is also gaining steam. Employers have added more than 200,000 jobs per month in the past four months, nearly double the average last spring. That’s pushed the unemployment rate down to a four-year low of 7.7 percent.Auto output boosts factory productionManufacturing now helping to drive US economic growth.ASSOCIATED PRESSThe 2013 Cadillac ATS by General Motors is one of the ne w models fueling a rise in auto production — which, in turn, is propelling U.S. factory production and resulting e conomic growth for the nation. ASSOCIATED PRESSA Japan Airlines Boeing 787 jet aircraft is surrounded by emergency vehicles on Jan. 7 at Logan International Airp ort in Boston as a fire chief looks into the cargo hold. Feder al regulators have approved a Boeing plan to redesign the fireprone lithium-ion batteries, although extensive testing wil l be needed before the planes can fly passengers again. Ex-JPMorgan execs pressed about firm’s trading losses By JOSHUA FREEDAP Business WriterBoeing said Friday that it expects to finish testing its battery fix for the 787 within two weeks. Then it will be up to the Federal Aviation Administration to decide when the planes fly again. Boeing is testing several changes to the plane’s lithium-ion battery aimed at preventing overheating and fire — conditions that led to the global fleet of 787s being grounded for the past two months. Ron Hinderberger, Boeing’s vice president for engineering on the 787, said Friday that there will be one flight test. Most tests will be done on the ground, and all should all be done in one to two weeks. “We would like to complete those tests as soon as possible,” he said. He said the FAA will evaluate the tests and decide whether to return the 787 to passenger flights. He said it would be inappropriate to speculate on how long that would take. Hinderberger’s assessment was more cautious than statements from other company officials, who sug-gested Thursday that the 787 could be flying within weeks. Changes include a sealed, steel box for the battery that is intended to choke off any fire before it can begin. A new titanium tube will carry gases from an overheated battery out of the plane through a hole in the side. The fix will add 150 pounds to the weight of each plane, Hinderberger said. Weight is a key issue for the fuel efficiency of any plane, and Boeing has struggled to keep the 787 at the weight that it promised to customers. The 787 fleet has been grounded for two months after a battery fire on a parked plane in Boston and smoke that forced an emer-gency landing in Japan. Boeing officials speaking in Japan on Friday said they still don’t know the precise cause of the incidents. Boeing official: resuming 787 flights up to FAA ASSOCIATED PRESSJPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks Jan. 23 at the 4 3rd Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland. Accordi ng to congressional testimony Friday, Dimon held back showing federal regulators repo rts in May that revealed the bank had accumulated billions of dollars in trading losses. MANUFACTURING The Associated PressFIRED-UP: A strong increase in auto output boosted U.S. factory production by a season-ally-adjusted 0.8 percent last month after falling 0.3 percent in January. Autos and auto parts production increased 3.6 percent. BUSY BEES: Factories are running at nearly full speed to keep up with demand. Manufacturers are now using 78.3 percent of their capacity, the highest since the recession began in December 2007. But run-ning near full capacity could lead to higher prices for manufactured goods and could push up inflation. BROADER READING: Overall industrial produc-tion, which includes min-ing and utilities, rose 0.7 percent in February, the most in three months. Utility output jumped 1.6 percent while mining output, which covers oil and gas drilling, fell 0.3 percent. Factory production bounces back

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7 pt LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 2008 Forest River SalemBarn kept, sleeps 9, excellent condition.$16,000 obo 386-623-0474 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalPUBLIC NOTICEON INVITATION TO BIDITB-013-2013Sealed bids will be accepted by the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 until Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the City Council Chambers locat-ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-da.CONSTRUCTION OF FOUR (4) RACQUETBALLCOURTSDocuments may be viewed on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at DemandStar.com. Contact the Pro-curement Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more in-formation.05537860March 17, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICEON REQUESTFOR LETTERS OF INTERESTLOI-014-2013The City of Lake City, Florida is accepting letters of interest to deter-mine whether there are parties inter-ested in leasing a parcel of land and building at 764 SWKuhn Road, Lake City, Florida, parcel #08040-000. The parcel and building formerly operated as the Recreation Department Business Office.Additional information may be obtained on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at DemandStar.com. Contact the Procurement Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more information.05537859March 17, 24, 31, 2013April 7, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesDRIVERS: ALLMiles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-591605537616Needed Warehouse Clerk MUSTBE ABLE TO READ TAPE MEASURE Duties to include; Pull Inventory, Stocking, Receiving, Basic Computer Skills needed, some deliveries so a Valid Driver License is needed. Apply in person 3631 EASTUS 90 Lake City, FLor Email: guy@qiagroup.com 05537843The City of Lake City has openings for the following full-time positions:Assistant Chief of Police Police OfficerPolice OfficerSponsorship Administrative Secretary Collection Technician Distribution Technician T/F/T WastewaterTreatment Plant Operator "C Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www .lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. 05537633Lincare leading national respiratory company seeks Healthcare Specialist. Responsibilities: Disease management programs, clinical evaluations, equipment set up and education. Be the Dr.’s eyes in the home setting. RN, LPN, RRT, CRT licensed as applicable. Great personalities with strong work ethic needed. This is a contract position with full time potential. Please fax resumes to 386-754-2795 for consideration. Drug-Free workplace. EOE CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 100Job Opportunities05537845SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORThe Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches,Inc. is seeking a Systems Administrator to provide support to the department operations and users of computer systems within the agency. The person applying for this position should possess at least three (3) years related experience (or equivalent combination of education, approved training, and experience). Degree or Technical Certifications preferred. Solid knowledge of personal computers, servers, networking technology, and user support is required. For further information, salary and benefits contact Edward Blodgett at 386/842-5501 or itjobs@youthranches.org AN EQUALOPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG FREE WORKPLACE Assistant needed retail optical seeks full-time sales associate. All training provided. Sales experience helpful. Salary $400$500/week. Apply 9am-5pm Tues Sat at Eyeglass Express 295 NWCommons Loop Lake City (Hwy 90 Publix Plaza). AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN NEEDEDwith tools and experience. Contact 758-4757 CadyStudios is seeking a F/T Director of Finance. Performs AR/APtasks, account reconciliations, & process payroll. QBs & ADPPayroll Service knowledge a plus. Equal Employment Opportunity. Contact: maribel.flores@cadystudios.com F/T Office Position avail. A/R Customer Service, answering phones, scheduling & Misc office duties. Exp inExcel & Word. Email resume hrhd7@yahoo.com Hiring Construction Manager position; Experience a must; Email resume to resume8920@gmail.com or fax to 386-758-892005537634Lincare leading national respiratory company seeks caring Service Representative. Service patients in their home for oxygen and equipment needs. Warm personalities, who can lift up to 120 lbs should apply. CDLw/ DOTa plus or obtainable. Growth opportunities are excellent. Drug-free workplace. EOE. Please fax resumes to 386-754-2795 for consideration. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 The Third Judicial Circuit currently has the following position available: UserSupport Analyst For more information go to: www.jud3.flcourts.org WANTED OTR Driver 2 yrs Reefer & LTL. Clean MVR a must. FL-Midwest. Great work ethic. Call 386-963-3153 We are a family business seeking a tow truck operator to operate both rollback and medium duty trucks. Applicants must have clean driving record and no felonies, have excellent customer service skills and be able to work a 6 day week. This is a temporary position which can turn into a full time position. Contact us Bryant’s Towing 386-752-7799 120Medical Employment05537808LPN needed PRN for Ambulatory Surgery Center Please send resume to 256 SWProfessional Glen Lake City, Florida 32025 or email to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net Billing Specialist Experienced Medical Biller: Insurance, Accounts Receivable, Posting and Collection. Good follow up and follow through skills. Sage Software a plus. FAX RESUME: 386-758-5628 Dental assistant needed 3-4 days/week. Must have expanded duties & clinical experience. Apply in person at Oak Hill Dental Group, 272 SWBentley Place, Lake City. 120Medical Employment05537846LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Directorof HIM RHIAor RHITand a Bachelor’s Degree in HIM or related field. 3 years exp. as a Director of HIM with Case Mngt/UR/PI exp. preferred. For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace 05537861LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Asst. ControllerF/T BS in Acct./Finance. 3-5 Years Acct. Exp. Strong General Ledger, Accts Payable, Payroll & Accts Rec Working Knowledge, Strong Written & Oral Communications Skills, Strong Computer SkillsProficient in Excel, Word, Adobe, & PowerPoint. Health Care Exp. APlus. For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace F/TLab Tech needed for Family Practice office. Must have FL license & exp as Lab supervisor. Email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net P/Tposition for LPN available in family practice office. 1 page resumes only. Email to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net 240Schools & Education05537693Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class3/18/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class3/11/2013• LPN 04/22/2013 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions 05537862PMC LIQUIDATORS AB3212 On Site Estate Action 1900 SWBrim St Lake City, FL32024 Saturday, March 23rd Preview 8AM-Auction 10AMPropertymanagement714.webs.com407-416-4063 407Computers Complete Dell Desktop $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy WE BUYUSED APPLIANCES OR HAULAWAY. CALL386-365-1915 MARK 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous GE side by side Refrigerator, white. Ice & Water. $275 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 440Miscellaneous Large Kenmore Freezer. Works Great!Clean! $175.00 Contact 292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 Cottage & RVLots avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Quiet Country Park 3/2 w/ screened porch $550 a month. Very clean. NO PETS! Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale. 3 Stock models must go $39k off select 2012 models John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. $450, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3bd/2ba brick home. Nice area. Near WillowBrook. Hardwood floors, CH/A. $950 mth. No pets. 1st&last. Call 965-0763 Lake City Country Club fairway at back. 3BR/2BA1760 SQFT, carpet, tile, encl porch, all appliances, lrg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Court Ordered #16-2011-CA010514 REALESTATE AUCTION ThursdayMarch 2112noon 2786WUS Hwy 90 Lake City 90+/ACRES LAND “Corbitt Manufacturing” Commercial / Industrial STAMPLER AUCTIONS Lic. Real Estate Broker AB196AU 295 800.330.BIDS stamplerauctions.com PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 1BR/1BAon 2.8 acres 201 NWBronco Terr. 24x30 workshop. Owner Fin. $59,900, 3K down, $585/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 820Farms & AcreageOwner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LIFE Sunday, March 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D T ucked away under the Oak trees on Kinhega Drive, near the entrance to Killearn Lakes, in Tallahassee is one of Mary Kay’s favorite restau-rants in the capitol — Z. Bardhi’s Italian Cuisine. For 15 years, Chef Zeke, his son and daughter and lord knows who else in their family, have been serving up authentic and inspired Italian specials in a quaint atmosphere that will leave you thinking you were in the Old Country. The minute you walk through the vine covered entry into the covered dining patio, you feel as if you are walking into an old friend’s house. There are veggies and herbs grow-ing just about everywhere, flashy red geraniums in pots and tons of other gar-den treasures to delight the senses. Once inside, you are greeted just as if you are family. Mary Kay’s mom and dad dine there so fre-quently, they just about are! Immediately upon sitting down at one of the white-clothed tables, friendly wait staff serve up freshly baked bread with sun-dried tomato, garlic and rose-mary infused olive oil to get you started. They have a very nice wine list and offer mixed drinks to your liking. They make a killer Bloody Mary that is perfect for brunch! One of our favorite entrees is Chicken Picatta. Mary Kay loves this dish, just about anywhere she can get it, but Z’s is proba-bly the best ever. One year for her birthday, she was thrilled to be invited into the kitchen, where the chef showed her exactly how they make it. She has tried many times in her own kitchen to duplicate the recipe but, just like every-thing else, when someone else cooks, it’s so much better. The chicken medal-lions are pounded to about a quarter-inch thickness but are tender and juicy in a perfectly balanced white wine, lemon sauce laden with just enough capers to give that little salty bite. In a word, simply delish! The Eggplant Parmesan is fabulous as well. The thin eggplant is rolled with spinach, fresh ricotta and mozzarella, topped with marinara and baked to perfection. Their Chicken Parmesan is just as delec-table and served with perfectly cooked angel-hair pasta. They always offer specials of the day. Whether a fresh catch creation or a simple perfectly cooked rib-eye steak, you can’t miss if you opt for one of these. Mary Kay’s brother’s favorite special Capital has great Italian cuisine Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEL aurel wilt is a disease that is killing our red-bay trees and other trees in the laurel family. The red-bay ambrosia beetle is the culprit responsible for the spread of this disease. This non-native beetle was first detected along the Georgia coast in 2002, and it has since spread along the coastal regions of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and most Florida counties except those in the panhandle. Columbia County reported its first infesta-tions of the pathogen in 2008. It was first detected in Suwannee County in 2009 as it continued to move west. The natural spread of this pathogen through natural areas is estimated to be as high as 34 miles per year. We are losing many native redbay, sassafras and swamp bay trees, but southern coun-ties are facing problems with their avocado trees. The ambrosia beetle actually carries the lau-rel wilt fungal spores on its body. The beetle is attracted to aromas naturally emitted by liv-ing trees, stumps, and wounded or pruned limbs of redbay, sassafras, and avocado trees. The beetle infects the tree with the spores as it tunnels in the tree sapwood. The spores germinate, grow and inter-fere with the movement of water and nutrients in the tree. As the fungus grows, it actually becomes the food for the beetles and larvae that live in the tree. The black beetle is so tiny that it is not usually seen. Symptoms of wilted, faded leaves are usually the first indication. Leaves on infected branches will turn reddish brown and may hang on the stems for some time before falling. When the bark is removed, bore holes where the insect entered can be seen. A dark stain around the hole is caused by the fungus growing inside. Read more about this fungus at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in886 Be on the lookout for redbay and sassafras trees that show the symptoms mentioned above. The signs of damage will be most evident from June through October. Although mature trees and injured trees are attacked more often than young trees, there has been as much as a 99 percent loss of redbay trees in infected areas. For information on reporting laurel wilt symptoms on redbay trees, go to http://www.freshfrom florida.com/pi/enpp/pathology/laurel_wilt_ disease.html#samples Tony Kurtz will be talking about “Green and Easy Lawn Care” at the Fort White Library Branch at 5:45 p.m. on Thursday. By AMANDA WILLIAMSONawilliamson@lakecityreporter.comF or Tracy Hisler-Pace, her career at the Florida Highway Patrol isn’t just another job; it’s a legacy. Her father worked with FHP for 35 years before retiring as a captain. Her grandfather patrolled the local for-ests and waterways as an officer with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Growing up around the protect-and-serve mindset, law enforcement was in her blood. Hisler-Pacer started with FHP 22 years ago, after attending Barry University in Miami for journalism and working at a Miami television station. “While I enjoyed the job, there was always a part of me that was interested in law enforcement,” she said. Starting out as a trooper in Broward County, Hisler-Pace moved north to Orlando after living in South Florida her whole life. In Orlando, she met and married a fellow state trooper, and the two returned to his home-town of Lake City in 1995. Seven years later, she was promoted to sergeant after work-ing her way up from a trooper to a corporal responsible for traffic and homicide investiga-tions. Hisler-Pace became the public information officer for FHP’s Troop B in Lake City in November. As soon as the position opened, she applied, knowing that PIO would meld her two loves: journalism and law enforcement. “First of all, I feel very lucky. I get to promote such a great agency that I’ve been a part of since I was born, if you think about it,” she said. But promoting the agency isn’t the PIO’s only job — she also works with new organiza-tions to keep the public informed, and dis-cusses safety with people in the community. During her safety talks, she teaches students and adults the value of being cautious Sergeant Safety FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterAlthough Florida Highway Patrol public affairs officer T racy Hisler-Pace has been proudly promoting the organ ization since November 2012, she has been keeping the streets safe for 22 years. ‘What I love the most is to get out to promote this agency that I love and to educa te the public so they can keep themselves and their family safe,’ she said. ‘And I love th e community. I do the job that I love and I love dealing wi th the public.’ Troop B’s information officer driven to save livesQ D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Fungus killing redbay, related tree species Hisler-Pace explains a rollover simulator that she use s to educate drivers about the dangers of driving without a seat belt. ‘With seat belt safety, when you tell people to wear a seat belt, you can talk all day long and they won’t listen. When I have my dummi es inside, they see what happens to people inside and really brings it home. Seeing it visually h as more of a powerful effect on people.’ Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES PIO continued on 2D TASTE continued on 2D

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Bullard-Lashley engagement Timothy and Julie Bullard of Lake City announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Keri Amber Bullard of Lake City to Joe Edward Lashley, also of Lake City. The wedding is planned for 3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at Alligator Park, lakeside. A reception will follow at their home, 185 Sw Gremlin Way. Keri has been a hairstylist for three years. Joe has been an electrician for eight years. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 HAPPENINGS Tuckers celebrate 50th wedding anniversary Larry and Mary Tucker of Lake City will be celebrating their 50th anniversary today. They were married in at Fitzgerald Primitive Baptist Church in Fitzgerald, Ga., on March 17, 1963. They have lived in Lake City for 45 years. They have five children: Cassie (Eric) Rudd, Joel (Leah) Tucker, Dawn (Mike) Ripplinger, Jennifer (Buddy) Freeman, and April (Mike) Bay. They also have 11 grandchildren: Gray and Bradly Rudd, Caroline and Miles Tucker, Abigail and Caleb Ripplinger, Austin, MacKenzie and MacKenna Freeman, Payton and Ellie Bay. The couple will celebrate their anniversary with a private reception hosted by their children.COURTESY PHOTOLarry and Marry Tucker on their wedding day. ASSOCIATED PRESS ‘Girls’ costume designer advises on lingerie wearBy SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — The four lead characters on HBO’s “Girls” wear bras and underwear, and so do real women. These are the few consistent items in the ward-robe of the 20-somethings that costume designer Jenn Rogien creates for the show, which follows a group of young women (Lena Dunham, Allison Williams, Jemima Kirke and Zosia Mamet) in what is touted as the next-gen “Sex and the City.” The characters seem to spend a lot of time with the audience seeing their undergarments. Some of them wear them correctly and use the foundation pieces to their very best advantage, says Rogien, and some just don’t get them at all, which is how it is with almost any group of women. Rogien has signed on as the style and fit expert for American Eagle’s Aerie brand, which specializes in lingerie and loungewear. As women start eyeing tank tops and sheer fabrics for summer, she shares some of her tips: — If your bra strap is showing, make sure it’s intentional — and that you’re wearing it some-where it’s OK to show. A colorful bra strap can be flirty when it peeks from under a tank top at a beach restaurant, but it could be inappropriate if worn at a business meeting. “There is a long history of wearing innerwear as outerwear, and there is something to be said for the beautiful lingerie out there,” she says. “We, as women, are being bolder in our choices, allowing it to be part of our personal-ity and a fun part of our closet, but I only want lin-gerie to show when I want it to show.” Be particularly wary at work, she adds. — Foundation garments should be smoothing and slimming. They shouldn’t create any additional bumps, dimples or bulg-es. If they do, they’re the wrong size. — A bra that rides up higher is probably too big, and one that digs in is too small. Changing the cup size isn’t the right adjustment; you need to change the band size. — If you want to wear a sheer shirt, pick a neu-tral color so the lingerie “disappears.” Black is bold and sexy; a bright color is playful. Stay away from a color that’s too light or muted, though, because it’s not enough of a com-mitment and might leave people wondering if you meant to show off your lingerie or not. In most situations, no one should see underpin-nings under a sheer bot-tom, so if you dare to don a little purposeful color, make sure it’s full cover-age. — Panty lines are a choice. Seamless technol-ogy has made it so there shouldn’t be any visible lines from your under-wear. The other choice is a thong. A shaping panty should follow the line of the garment going on top of it. — Cup types for bras, such as pushup, plunge or padded, should have differ-ent effects. The same goes for underwear, whether it’s briefs, boy shorts or thongs. Fabrics, pattern and color change it up, too. And there’s no rule that says when you find one type of undergarment you like, you have to wear it every day. “When we’re using lingerie in costumes, it’s part of the story we’re trying to tell. It’s part of every character I dress,” Rogien says. “Everyone can tell their story through their underwear.” COURTESY PHOTOKeri Bullard and Joe Lashley. ASSOCIATED PRESSJenn Rogien, costume designer for the HBO series “Girls,” says undergarments are among the few consis-tent items in the wardrobe of 20-somethings and there are guidelines for thei wear. PIO: Teaching traffic safety Continued From Page 1Don the road. For adults departing on holiday trav-els, she reminds them not to drink and drive, make sure the driver gets plenty of rest and check the vehi-cle’s maintenance before departing. For students, she advises don’t forget your helmet or your seat belt. Her rollover simulator does most of the talking during the seat belt les-sons. It simulates how an unrestrained body responds to gravitational forces created by an acci-dent. “We can talk to people all day about what they should or should not do, but when you have some-thing visual, it has a more profound effect,” Hisler-Pace said. “I want to start with elementary school kids, so that by the time they start driving, they just reach up and buckle their seat belts. It isn’t even a second thought.” She stays busy giving safety talks throughout the year. Each season, she said, brings a different concern: Springbreakers rush for the beaches and pools during March, summer brings vacationers and school children with time to waste, and winter has all the holiday travelers. Her Lake City troop values itself on being able and available to help the public by protecting the streets and providing education. Hisler-Pace said any of the officers, from a trooper to the major, is available for a concerned citizen to speak to. “We’re law enforcement for the state,” she said. “Our whole mission is to make sure people are safe.” FHP’s mission guarantees that Hisler-Pace works 24 hours a day. If she isn’t on duty, she carries her media phone with her, and her phone rings at all hours of the day and night. “If there’s something going on that I know the media will most likely be interested in, I have to go to it — no matter the time,” she said. But traffic accidents drive her determination to continue pressing the com-munity about traffic safety. Standing at the scene of a deadly accident, she said, many times she’s thought to herself that the death could have been prevent-ed. If only they had worn their seat belts, if only the child had been properly restrained. “The hardest thing I’ve ever had to do in my job as a state trooper is tell a family that a loved one had died,” she said. “In order to be a state trooper, I think you have to have a big heart. You have to care about people.” As PIO, Hisler-Pace tries to eliminate the stigma associated with police officers. People think the state troopers are always out there ticketing people, but the men and women of Florida Highway Patrol ticket for a reason. “If we’re saving your life — maybe not that day, but a week or a year later — then we’ve done our job,” she said. “I want to see everyone healthy and safe. That’s probably the biggest motivation I have. I love my community.” To contact Hisler-Pace to schedule a safety pre-sentation, call her at (386) 754-6283 or email her at TracyHisler-Pace@flhsmv.gov. TASTE: A Tallahassee favorite Continued From Page 1Dis a Seafood Lasagne that is chock full of scallops, shrimp and lobster in a rich and creamy sauce that will just about send you to heaven. Z’s also makes their own desserts that are to die for … if you have the room after your wonderful meal. Assorted cheesecakes, Chocolate Turtle Cake, Tiramisu and cannoli will tempt you for sure. Take our word for it: Get one to go! The restaurant is open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Reservations are highly recommended. Hours are 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for lunch (or brunch on the weekends); 5 to 10 p.m. for dinner. It is located at 3596 Kinhega Drive, Tallahassee. Phone (850) 894-9919. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their col umn on area restaurants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. By SCOTT MAYEROWITZAssociated PressNEW YORK — When Amy Eisen originally booked a weeklong vaca-tion to celebrate her 30th anniversary, she was look-ing at a $3,749 hotel bill. But Eisen reserved her room at the all-inclusive Sanctuary Cap Cana in the Dominican Republic through a new travel site, Tingo.com. Each day, the booking site automatically checked to see if the hotel lowered its price for the nights Eisen was stay-ing there. Eventually, the price fell. Tingo canceled Eisen’s original reservation and rebooked her at the new, lower rate. Her savings: $1,874. “I would not have considered that you could continue to ask: Are there any discounts? Are there any discounts? Are there any discounts?” said the Wynnewood, Pa., psychol-ogist. “I don’t think most people would. You book it and think this is the best price I can get.” Tingo is one of a growing number of services that aim to save travel-ers money on their hotel stays. The site, which is owned by TripAdvisor, says that travelers have a 20 percent chance of get-ting at least some money back. The typical rebate is $50, according to the company, but occasionally travelers like Eisen get much more back. The site requires prepayment of the room and focuses on fully refundable rates. Sometimes, cheaper rooms might be available through other booking channels but they typically can’t be canceled. Tingo isn’t the only site changing the way travel-ers book. A host of new apps are offering steep discounts on hotel stays, particularly last-minute bookings. New technologies help travelers find lower hotel prices quickly A long journey’s endDaniel Alvarez paddles the last few hundred feet to conclude a paddling journey of some 4,000 miles in Key West on March 9. Alvarez, a Tallahassee resident, began his kayaking trek in Minnesota on June 11, 2012. He paddled about 20 miles most days, stopping along the way to conduct presentations on waterway conservation.

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By MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Diners will have to wait a little longer to find calorie counts on most restaurant chain menus, in supermarkets and on vending machines. Writing a new menu labeling law “has gotten extremely thorny,” says the head of the Food and Drug Administration, as the agency tries to figure out who should be covered by it. The 2010 health care law charged the FDA with requir-ing chain restaurants and other establishments that serve food to put calorie counts on menus and in vending machines. The agency issued a proposed rule in 2011, but the final rules have since been delayed as some of those non-restaurant establish-ments have lobbied hard to be exempt. While the restaurant industry has signed on to the idea and helped to write the new regula-tions, supermarkets, convenience stores and other retailers that sell prepared food say they want no part of it. “There are very, very strong opinions and powerful voices both on the consumer and public health side and on the indus-try side, and we have worked very hard to sort of figure out what really makes sense and also what is implementable,” FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a recent inter-view with The Associated Press. Hamburg said menu labeling has turned out to be one of the FDA’s most challenging issues, and while requiring calorie counts in some establishments might make sense on paper, “in practice it really would be very hard.” She did not say what spe-cific types of establishments she was referring to. The challenges of putting such a law in place — and decid-ing whom it should apply to — were made clear Monday when a judge struck down New York City’s ban on large sug-ary drinks. State Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling said in his ruling that the 16-ounce limit on sodas and other high-calorie drinks arbitrarily applied to only some sweet beverages and some places that sell them. The new limits, championed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, were sup-posed to take effect Tuesday. Hamburg said the FDA is in the final stages of writing the menu labeling regulations and the final rules should come out in the “relative near term.” The FDA has tentatively said the rules are due this spring, but that deadline may be optimistic as the food industry and regulators continue to haggle over how they will be written. The 2011 proposed rules would require chain restaurants with 20 or more locations, along with bakeries, grocery stores, conve-nience stores and coffee chains, to clearly post the calorie count for each item on their menus. Additional nutritional informa-tion would have to be available upon request. The rules would also apply to vending machines if calorie information isn’t already visible on the package. The proposed rules exempted movie theaters, airplanes, bowl-ing alleys and other businesses whose primary business is not to sell food. Alcohol would also be exempt. Supermarkets and convenience stores are looking for similar exemptions in the final rules. Representatives for the supermarket industry say it could cost them up to a billion dollars to put the rules in place — costs that would be passed on to consumers. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy BETH J. HARPAZAssociated PressNEW YORK — There were lies told to parents, a car with five seats car-rying eight teens, and an unlicensed driver. The car was speeding. No seat belts were used. If parents of teenagers need a real-life caution-ary tale to sum up all their warnings and fears, surely the crash of a stolen car in Warren, Ohio, that killed six teenagers is it. “You heard about that story?” Daniel Flannery, an Ohio father of three teens, asked his kids as news of the tragedy filtered out. “This could happen to you. It’s horrible. These kids are not coming home. I don’t want you to be that person.” Mario Almonte of Queens, N.Y., said he and his wife talked to their teen-age son — who’s on the verge of getting his driv-er’s license — about it, too. “We pointed to this trag-edy and mentioned that he shouldn’t think something like this can never hap-pen to him,” said Almonte. “Sometimes it just takes one bad decision to end in tragedy.”Crashes on the riseUnfortunately, car crashes with multiple teen deaths are not uncommon. Five teens died in a Texas crash Tuesday; three died in Indiana last week, and four died in a California crash last month. But one aspect of the Ohio story may be especially compel-ling to parents involved in the usual battles with teens about where they’re going, who they’re with, and when they’re coming home: Some of the kids misled their parents as to their whereabouts. The father of one of the dead said the teenagers were coming home from a sleepover at a friend’s house, but the mother of another boy killed said that her son and his best friend had lied about staying over at each other’s homes that evening. She said she thinks they went to a party. “If only he had listened,” said Lisa Williamson, moth-er of 14-year-old Brandon Murray.Teens lie“It’s an age-old thing for teens to tell their folks they’re going to do one thing and they’re doing another,” said Daniel Flannery, a psy-chologist who teaches at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. He even admits that his own children, “while very good kids and excellent students, sometimes do things they know we won’t approve of and they mis-lead us.” And he notes that like most parents of teens, he’s gotten his share of calls from other parents asking, “Is my son at your house?” But while teenagers lying to parents is nothing new, the deadly outcome in this case is drawing attention. “Any time a tragedy like this occurs, while you don’t want to go overboard on the sensationalism, it is a teachable moment. It has to be,” said Flannery, who also runs Case Western’s Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education.Parents don’t knowEmily Cappo, a mom in suburban Westchester, N.Y., who writes a blog about raising three sons at OhBoyMom.com, says she’s just starting to deal with teen issues among her older boys’ peers. “All these high school parties are going on now,” she said. “And parents really don’t know what’s going on. You don’t want to think that your own child is involved in it.” Older parents may think it was worse before the era of cellphones, because if your kid was out of touch, you had no way to reach them. But Cappo thinks cellphones may “give a false sense of security that you can contact your kid at any time. That probably contributes to things like this happening.” And some teens are expert at cellphone subter-fuge. They turn phones off, ignore them or let them run out of juice. When they do call home, a cell provides less information about loca-tion than landlines at physi-cal addresses. Sure, you can put a GPS locator on a cell, but kids can disable those, or leave their phones in an approved location and head off.Don’t back offWhile it’s not easy to stay on top of what teens are up to, the one thing par-ents shouldn’t do is back off, says Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, a professor at New York University’s Silver School of Social Work. He says research shows that “at the very point when adolescents are most likely to get involved in risk-tak-ing behaviors, many par-ents monitor less than they had previously. It’s at this point where young people are trying to develop a level of healthy indepen-dence that they most need parental guidance.” He said monitoring is different from the controls associated with overly pro-tective “helicopter parent-ing”; this is more about “parents weighing in on important decisions.” Knowing the activities and whereabouts of teens is key, along with making expectations clear and fol-lowing through with dis-cipline when rules aren’t honored, he said. Guilamos-Ramos coauthored a book called “Parental Monitoring of Adolescents” that has been adapted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an online resource for parents, and he says the research shows that most parents overestimate how much they’re supervising. Supervise more“It’s pretty classic for parents to say, ‘I did check on my teen, I feel like I was clear about the rules’ and for teens to say, ‘We never talked about that,’” he said. And while teens may complain about parents checking on them, “par-ents don’t realize that teens actually want that structure — they actually feel com-forted by it,” he said. Cappo likes the policy some parents have of tell-ing kids they can always call home for a ride, no matter what, so they’re not tempted to lie: “If you’re at a party, I never want you to get in a car with some-one who’s been drinking; if you’ve been drinking, call me, I won’t ask questions, I just want you safe.” But not all parents “want to go that far because they don’t want to give their kids per-mission to drink. The kid feels like they can’t make that call because ‘my par-ents will kill me.’ It’s hard because we don’t want to sit there and give them the green light,” Cappo said. Whatever rules parents come up with, Guilamos-Ramos said, they need to emphasize “there is only one goal: We want to make sure you are safe.”Ohio crash cautionary tale for familiesPARENTINGASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS ABOVE: Shannon Whetstone reads notes left at the scene where six teens died March 10 in Warren, Ohio. Two teens who escaped a crash that kill ed six friends in a swampy pond wriggled out of the wreckage by smashing a rear window and swimming away from the SUV, a state trooper said. ABOVE RIGHT: The wreckage of the vehicle. Teenagers need to know dangers are close at hand. FDA head says menu calorie labels ‘thorny’ issue The Associated PressThe deaths of six teens in Ohio came the same day as an accident in Texas that killed five and a day before an Illinois crash killed four. Three teenagers died days earlier in Indiana when police said two pickups ran a four-way stop and collided. Here is a look at some recent teen driving deaths statistics from the Governors Highway Safety Association, which represents state highway safety offic-es: — There were 435 16-year-old drivers killed in 2000, but that had dropped to 173 by 2011. Deaths among 17-year-old drivers dropped from 564 to 250 during the same time period. — But deaths of 16and 17-year-old drivers in traffic accidents during the first six months of 2012 rose 19 per-cent as compared to the same period of the previous year — from 202 to 240 deaths. — Despite the recent increase, overall teen driving deaths are signifi-cantly lower than a decade ago, when teen drivers traveled with fewer state-imposed restrictions, including limits on driving with teen passengers and driving at night. — Deaths of young passengers when the driver was between the ages of 15 and 20 have dropped significantly since 1982, when 1,898 riders within the same age range died. In 2011, the year for which most recent passen-ger data are available, the number of deaths of passengers between 15 and 20 years old dropped to 777. Governors Highway Safety Association. Online: Q U.S. Centers for Disease Control advice on parental monitoring: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/adoles-centhealth/pdf/paren-tal_monitoring_fact-sheet.pdf Stats on teen driving deaths ASSOCIATED PRESSThe sandwich board at the Panera store in Brookline, Mas s shows the calorie count for each item. Diners will have to wait a little longer to find calorie counts on mos t restaurant chain menus, in supermarkets and on vending machines. Writing a new menu labeling law “has go tten extremely thorny,” says the head of the Food and Drug Administration, as the agency tries to figure out who should be covered by it.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 17, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosOnce Upon a Time (N) Revenge “Illumination” (N) (:01) Red Widow “The Escape” (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Kill Zone” Criminal Minds “Blood Hungry” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin “Out of the Woods” To Be Announced Doc Martin “Out of the Woods” 7-CBS 7 47 47NCAA Championship Selection Show60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) The Mentalist “Red, White and Blue” Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17JacksonvilleLive From theYourJax MusicDaryl’s HouseLaw & Order “Baby, It’s You” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30(4:30)“A Knight’s Tale” (2001) Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Cleveland ShowFamily Guy (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The First David Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBC Cops and drug dealers working together. (N) All-Star Celebrity Apprentice The contestants perform a soap opera. (N) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307a MLB BaseballBloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304The Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah Presents Master Class “Jay-Z” Oprah Presents Master ClassOprah Presents Master ClassOprah’s Next Chapter “John of God” Oprah Presents Master Class (N) Oprah Presents Master Class A&E 19 118 265Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “A Taste of Romance” (2011)“Honeymoon for One” (2011) Nicollette Sheridan, Greg Wise. “Tom, Dick & Harriet” (2013) Steven Weber, Andrew Francis. Frasier “Liar! Liar!” Frasier FX 22 136 248“The Twilight Saga: New Moon” (2009) Kristen Stewart. Bella nds herself drawn into the world of werewolves.“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. Twil: Eclipse CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245“The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice” (2008) Noah Wyle. “The Dark Knight” (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. (DVS) (:15)“Resident Evil: Extinction” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieSee Dad Run (N)“Scooby-Doo” (2002) Freddie Prinze Jr., Sarah Michelle Gellar. Friends The six friends say goodbye. SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Weber’s of Lies” Bar Rescue “Murphy’s Mess” Bar Rescue “Mystique or Murder?” Bar Rescue “Empty Pockets” Bar Rescue “Jon T, He Don’t Like It” (:01) Car Lot Rescue “After the Storm” MY-TV 29 32 -BewitchedBewitchedM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Botanist kills nephew for money. M*A*S*HThriller “The Prediction” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyAustin & Ally“The Wizards Return: Alex vs. Alex”Austin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieJessie “Toy Con” Austin & AllyJessieShake It Up!Jessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Pastor Brown” (2009) “Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009) Tyler Perry, Derek Luke. Army Wives “From the Ashes” (N) The Client List “Who’s Cheatin’ Who”“Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” USA 33 105 242NCIS “Double Identity” NCIS A girl is kidnapped. NCIS A murder is caught on tape. NCIS “Thirst” (DVS) NCIS “Till Death Do Us Part” NCIS A missing staff sergeant. BET 34 124 329(5:30)“B.A.P.S” (1997, Comedy) Halle Berry. “Deliver Us From Eva” (2003, Romance-Comedy) LL Cool J, Gabrielle Union. HusbandsHo.Second GenerationDon’t Sleep! Hosted by T.J. Holmes ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Bracketology (N) (Live) 30 for 30 (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 ATP Tennis NHRA Drag Racing Gatornationals. From Gainesville, Fla. (N Same-day Tape) College GameNight (N) SUNSP 37 -Inside Israeli Bask.Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport FishingAlong the WaySpecial OlympGatorZone DISCV 38 182 278Auction KingsAuction KingsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty Wars (N) Property WarsProperty WarsProperty Wars TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) Tyler Perry.“Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009) Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson. (DVS)“Our Family Wedding” (2010) America Ferrera. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeAmerican JourneyMystery DetectivesWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Giuliana & Bill “48 Hour Hustle” Giuliana & Bill (N) Giuliana & BillKourtney and Kim Take Miami (N) Playing With Fire (Series Premiere) (N) Kourtney and Kim Take Miami TRAVEL 46 196 277Man v. FoodMan v. FoodMega RV CountdownTrip FlipTrip Flip “Seattle” Extreme RVsExtreme RVsExtreme RVs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes (N) Hawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Gypsy SistersGypsy Sisters “Wedded for Disaster” Gypsy Sisters “Who’s Your Daddy?” Gypsy Sisters (N) Welcome to Myrtle Manor (N) Gypsy Sisters HIST 49 120 269The Bible Joshua conquers Jericho. The Bible The Jews are enslaved in Babylon. (N) Vikings “Dispossessed” (N) (:01) Vikings “Dispossessed” ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceWild West Alaska “Fools Gold Fever” Wild West Alaska (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot “Virgin Sasquatch” (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveWorst Cooks in AmericaCupcake Wars “Aloha Cupcakes” (N) Worst Cooks in America (N) Restaurant: Impossible (N) Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarThe Ten Commandments Moses leads the Israelites to the Promised Land. FSN-FL 56 -Ship Shape TVThe Game 365World Poker Tour: Season 11World Poker Tour: Season 11 (N) UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour: Season 11World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Leprechaun 2” (1994) “Leprechaun” (1992, Horror) Warwick Davis, Jennifer Aniston, Ken Olandt.“Leprechaun 2” (1994, Horror) Warwick Davis, Charlie Heath. “Leprechaun” (1992, Horror) AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Godzilla” (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno. The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead “Prey” (N) (:01) Talking Dead (N) The Walking Dead “Prey” COM 62 107 249(5:58)“I Love You, Man” (2009, Comedy) Paul Rudd, Jason Segel. “Grandma’s Boy” (2006, Comedy) Doris Roberts, Allen Covert. (:02) Tosh.0(:33) Workaholics(:03) Daniel Tosh: Completely Serious CMT 63 166 327“Blue Collar Comedy Tour”Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham returns with new characters. Ron White’s Vegas Salute to the Troops 2013“Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road” (2006) NGWILD 108 190 283Wild Wives of Africa “Family Feud” Killer ShrimpKingdom of the Oceans (N) Kingdom of the Oceans “Sand Wars” Shocking Sharks (N) Kingdom of the Oceans NGC 109 186 276The Real Bonnie and ClydeCradle of the GodsWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “Hell on High Seas” (N) Mudcats “Any Means Necessary” (N) Wicked Tuna “Hell on High Seas” SCIENCE 110 193 284Factory MadeFactory MadeThrough Wormhole-FreemanAlien MummiesAlien Encounters 2 “The Invasion” Alien Encounters 2 “The Offspring” Alien Mummies ID 111 192 285Who the (Bleep)...Who the (Bleep)...Who the (Bleep)...Who the (Bleep)...On the Case With Paula ZahnCatch My Killer “Blood Sacri ce” (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501“Harry Potter-Prisoner of Azkaban”(:10) “Tower Heist” (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ Girls “Together” VeepGirls “Together” VeepGirls “Together”Project X (2012) MAX 320 310 515“The Long Kiss Goodnight” (1996, Action) Geena Davis. ‘R’ “Green Lantern” (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. ‘PG-13’ “Meet the Fockers” (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:20)“Payback” (1999) ‘R’ Shameless “Where There’s a Will” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “Frank the Plumber” (N) House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “Frank the Plumber” MONDAY EVENING MARCH 18, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars (Season Premiere) (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “Scared to Death” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Capitol UpdateNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Spokane, WA” Market WarriorsIndependent Lens (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Na Ki’i” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries (N) Hart of DixieTMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Doom in the Gloom” (N) The Following “Love Hurts” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Live Finale” (Season Finale) The winner is announced. (N) (:01) Deception (Season Finale) (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Sins & Secrets “Nantucket” Sins & Secrets “Albuquerque” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN “Behind the Badge” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars (N) Storage Wars (N) Bates Motel (Series Premiere) (N) (10:55) Bates Motel HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchNUMB3RS “Atomic No. 33” NUMB3RS Don and Charlie are at odds. FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Megamind” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Will Ferrell, Brad Pitt. Premiere.“Megamind” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Will Ferrell, Brad Pitt, Tina Fey. CNN 24 200 202(5:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Live (N) (Live) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle Castle bets with Esposito. Castle “Inventing the Girl” Castle “Deep in Death” Dallas “Ewings Unite!” (N) Monday Mornings “One Fine Day” (N) (:01) Dallas “Ewings Unite!” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:42)“The Transporter 2” (2005, Action) Jason Statham, Amber Valletta.“Transporter 3” (2008) Jason Statham. Frank Martin becomes involved with a Ukrainian woman. (:45)“Crank: High Voltage” (2009) Jason Statham. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldDick Van DykeThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieShake It Up!Austin & Ally“The Wizards Return: Alex vs. Alex”JessieA.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessieGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252The Bible Joshua conquers Jericho. The Bible The Jews are enslaved in Babylon. Preachers’ Daughters(:01) The Client List USA 33 105 242NCIS A Navy pilot is found dead. NCIS Gibbs questions DiNozzo’s ability. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles (DVS) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. “Friday After Next” (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Women’s Basketball Selection Speciald NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N)d NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Utah Jazz. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN Tournament Challenge (N) (Live) Numbers Never LieSportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Along the WayHalls of FameSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport FishingReel AnimalsInside the HeatInside the HEAT DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Bad Ass Bronco Part 1” Fast N’ Loud “Bad Ass Bronco Part 2” Fast N’ Loud: Revved Up (N) Fast N’ Loud (N) The Devils Ride “Blood in & Out” (N) Fast N’ Loud TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeld “The Fire” Family GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Playing With FireE! News (N) Chasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiBurning Love (N) After Lately (N) Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodBizarre Foods America “Wisconsin” Bizarre Foods America (N) Hotel Impossible “Bromley Sun Lodge” Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern HGTV 47 112 229Curb AppealCurb AppealLove It or List It Robert and Kim. Love It or List ItLove It or List It “Pattinson Family” (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It, Too (N) TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumGypsy Sisters: Extra Bling (N) (:08) Gypsy Sisters: Extra Bling “Who’s Your Daddy?” (N) (:20) Gypsy Sisters: Extra Bling (N) Gypsy Sisters: Ex HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Mama Knows Best” American Pickers “Cheap Pick” American Pickers “Hometown Pickin”’ American PickersAmerican Pickers “Sturgis or Bust” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Tanked: Un ltered Feng shui tank. Gator Boys “Deathgrip” Mud Lovin’ RednecksCat shin’ Kings “Outlaw Noodlers” Cat shin’ Kings “Moby Dick” (N) River Monsters: Unhooked FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicShip Shape TVUFC Reloaded “UFC 144: Edgar vs. Henderson” Frankie Edgar vs. Benson Henderson. (N) World Poker Tour: Season 11World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. Continuum “Endtimes” Being Human (N) Lost Girl “The Ceremony” (N) Continuum “Endtimes” AMC 60 130 254(3:00)“Braveheart” (1995) “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” (2002, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen. Members of a fellowship battle evil Sauron and his pawns. “Lord of the Rings” COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) South ParkSouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:53) Reba(:31) Reba(:09) Reba “The Two Girl Theory” (7:47) Reba(:24) Reba“The Karate Kid Part II” (1986, Drama) Ralph Macchio, Noriyuki “Pat” Morita. Karate Kid III NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Unruly French bulldog. Morphed The evolution of the bear. Predators in ParadiseBuilt for the Kill “Polar Bears” Alpha DogsAlpha DogsPredators in Paradise NGC 109 186 276Inside Combat RescueAlpha DogsAlpha DogsAre You Tougher than a Boy Scout?Bomb Squad NYC (N) Inside Combat Rescue “Fog of War” Bomb Squad NYC SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s Madeinside out: BugsMonster Squid: The Giant Is RealInsect AutopsyPlanet Ant (N) Monster Squid: The Giant Is Real ID 111 192 285FBI: Criminal Pursuit “Dead Quiet” FBI: Criminal PursuitFBI: Criminal PursuitDateline on ID (N) FBI: Criminal PursuitFBI: Criminal Pursuit HBO 302 300 501(5:30)“Cowboys & Aliens” (2011) Daniel Craig. Fight GameReal Time With Bill Maher“American Winter” (2013, Documentary) Premiere. ‘NR’ Fight GameMichael Buffer Boxing MAX 320 310 515(:15)“The Hangover Part II” (2011, Comedy) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ “Road House” (1989, Action) Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch. ‘R’ “Alien vs. Predator” (2004) Sanaa Lathan. ‘PG-13’ (:40) Banshee SHOW 340 318 545(5:50)“Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” (2001, Drama) Nicolas Cage. ‘R’ Homeland “Two Hats” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “Frank the Plumber” Inside Comedy (N) House of Lies WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkVaried ProgramsLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilVaried ProgramsFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:38) GunsmokeVaried Programs(1:49) GunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowVaried Programs(:38) M*A*S*H OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312MarieVaried ProgramsMad HungryMad HungryHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202Around the WorldCNN NewsroomCNN Newsroom The Lead With Jake TapperThe Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesCastleVaried ProgramsCastle NIK 26 170 299Peter RabbitMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobRocket MonkeysOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! 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DEAR ABBY: I was divorced when my son was 9. He’s now 24. My ex-wife married the man she had been having an affair with and they have a 12-year-old son. I am also remarried and in a good place in my life. For the past two years, my son has brought his half brother to our beach house for a weekend of fun. We honored this request and enjoy time with our son, but it is diffi-cult having his half brother in my home. It brings up emotions I thought I had put behind me years ago. I do not want these visits to continue, and I need to communicate this. I’d like to have an adult conversa-tion with my son to explain the situation. I also don’t think he should have to carry the news to my ex or disap-point a 12-year-old. Should I send a simple note to her and explain that we will no longer host her son? -NEEDS THE RIGHT WORDS DEAR NEEDS: By all means write your ex. Explain that entertaining her son brings up emo-tions you would rather not have to relive. It’s not the boy’s fault that he’s the flesh-and-blood symbol of his mother’s infidelity, but you don’t have to have him there if you don’t want to. If you would like to have a man-to-man talk with your son, go ahead and do it. He’s an adult. Tell him pret-ty much the same thing -that having the boy over is painful for you and, there-fore, you prefer the beach house visits stop. You are entitled to your feelings, and your son is old enough to appreciate them. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I’m a widow, as are many of my friends these days. Widowhood is difficult. If you’re not prepared, it can be horrible. That’s why I’d like to urge women to learn to take care of them-selves because the odds are they will be alone soon-er or later after the age of 50. Some suggestions: 1. If you haven’t already, learn to drive. 2. Learn to pump gas and how to check your tires and the fluids in your car. 3. Learn to use a few basic tools and do home repairs. 4. Pay attention to financial matters such as bal-ancing a checkbook. 5. Know where your records are, what’s in them and what information you will need for taxes. 6. Buy a shredder and shred unnecessary papers. 7. Make friends with other women. If you don’t, life gets lonely. 8. Be courageous and do what you need to do to be happy. 9. Start to simplify your home. It will free your mind from clutter and, if necessary, allow you to move to smaller quarters. 10. Let your children lead their lives, lead your own and present a cheer-ful face to the world! -KATHLEEN IN DULUTH, MINN. DEAR KATHLEEN: Those are excellent sug-gestions, to which I would add how important it is to consult a CPA and a law-yer if your spouse hasn’t already shown you what you need to know. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your ability to do the unexpected will give you a competitive edge. Revisit an old relationship that somehow drifted apart. Satisfy your need to know by being blunt and asking direct questions. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Volunteer your servic-es and you will enrich your life through the people you meet. Relationships will develop with people who share your opinion. Building a strong fight for reform will be emotional but rewarding. A partner-ship will help you advance. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your emotions will be uncontrollable. Stick to the truth and question sug-gestions or promises that sound misleading. You are best to step away from any-one trying to pressure you to do things you don’t care to do. Deception is appar-ent. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You need an adven-ture. Whether you decide to travel or engage in a different philosophy or lifestyle, the change will do you good. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your generosity will get you into trouble. Don’t feel obliged to pay for others. Spend your time engaging in challenges and adven-tures that will give you a thrill and encourage you to make personal changes that will enhance your life. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Expect to face emo-tional stress if you don’t agree with your friend or partner. Before you say something you might regret, opt to do some-thing on your own that you find relaxing in order to have a chance to rethink your strategy. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Explore new avenues and visit people and places that will make you think. Wager the pros and cons and consider the cost involved to make some of the changes suggested. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Develop a plan you’ve been mulling over and you will turn it into a service that is in demand. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Keep your busi-ness and your personal life separate. Make changes at home that will help you take on a physical chal-lenge that will ultimately lead to a better you. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Past acquain-tances and propositions will help you make a cru-cial decision regarding business. Realizing how much leeway you have will enable you to outmaneuver anyone trying to compete or take advantage of you. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Changing the way you do things will give you a new lease on life. Get back to doing the things you enjoyed in the past and you will meet interesting new friends. Physical activity will help you regain your strength and confidence. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A secret will be divulged. Don’t meddle or let anyone interfere in your personal business. Precision and practical applications will help you bypass a financial setback. Make adjustments to a contract or settlement. A promise will instill security. ++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Direct descendant of the MayflowerPilgrims, e.g. 5 Way up a mountain9 Dutch flower14 Humorist Bombeck18 Sun Valley locale20 Tony of the Dallas Cowboys 21 Lancaster County folk .LQJVRIBBB8VH 6RPHERG\EDQG 23 Claw24 Puccini piece25 Prop in many an action film 27 Subject of big 1970s headlines 30 Elliptical31 Adriatic resort32 Western nickname33 Exchange35 The second AfricanAmerican, afterHattie McDaniel,to be nominated foran Oscar 37 Completes at the request of 2OG79VBBB&OXE40 Hero of a Hindu epic 42 Zip43 Papal court45 Ape 46 ___ Bo47 Enjoy50 Seltzer53 Many altar paintings of the Middle Ages 56 Long-distance letters 57 Onetime art glass manufacturer 61 Rock subgenre62 Not loco63 Some college dorm rooms 65 Pickle juice66 Bud67 Best Picture inspired by aPulitzer-winningseries of newspaperarticles 71 Sporty cars72 In other words75 Book after II Timothy 76 Sitcom diner78 Quipster79 Femme fatale of cartoons 82 Director Van Sant83 Ignite85 Necklace decoration WKDWVQRWIURPWKHsea 88 Pressed upon89 20-20, e.g.91 Places to eat a late breakfast, maybe 92 Nitpick95 Sound at a checkup96 Means of inheritance 8QLOHYHUVRDSEUDQG 98 Auto-shop offerings102 Coastal structures countering erosion 104 Tale written in runes, perhaps 8QFRQYLQFLQJ reason, informally 107 ___ Islands108 Pong maker+LVWRULFHYHQWRQ June 18, 1815 112 Like many Playboy Playmate photos 117 Certain nest eggs, for short 118 Actress Eleniak119 Greek war goddess120 SeaWorld resident121 Irish county8SWR123 Snookums/HDYHVXVHGLQ Mediterraneancuisine 125 Chop ___+HQVDQGYL[HQV Down 5HIXVHWRKDQGRYHU2 Slowly3 ___ nioise4 Software for touch-up artists 5 Gothic window ornamentation 6 Cleansing agent%\JRQH8JDQGDQ tyrant 8 MG, e.g.0DUYLQ*D\HVUHFRUG label 10 Actress Thurman 11 D.M.V. issue5HODWLYHRIHVTXH13 Symbol of the golden ratio 14 Last possible moment 15 Robes, scepters and such 16 Ski-mask feature17 Queen ___ lace19 20/2026 Japanese drama28 Adaptable aircraft, for short &REEOHUVWRRO34 HPproduct*LYHVRII%HTXLHWRQ scores 38 Line of defense?3DVWDSULPDYHUD ingredients 41 Doc grp.44 Marge who owned the Cincinnati Reds 45 Recurring ideas,QWHUYHQH48 Fleet1<8DWKOHWH51 Where people are always changing? 52 One coming out54 N.B.A. star Ming$&FKDQQHO58 Nabob8QDEULGJHG60 Like matryoshka dolls 63 Frame jobs64 Horn of Africa resident 68 What an optimist has 69 Kind of income$QWLTXHUHVWRUHUV WRXFKLQEULHI 73 Sanctuary74 Old Dungeons & Dragons co. 77 Coach Don with two Super BowlYLFWRULHV 6QRZ:KLWHDQG WKH6HYHQ'ZDUIVsong 81 Word on either side RIWR 3LYRWDOSRLQW84 Prominent features of the theme from6WDU:DUV 86 Cupcake6ZLPPLQJGLYLQJ etc. 89 Open-faced sandwich toppedwith a fancy spread $PHQWRWKDW,WVFOHDU94 Dolt97 N.Y.C. airport99 Early stone tool100 First-year101 Toasts102 Responded sheepishly? 103 Wine aperitif)RUPHU$PHULFDQ ,GROMXGJH 106 Irish county110 Drop ___111 Coup de ___ JXQVKRW)U 113 Kind of connection from a mobileGHYLFHWRD3& 114 Doo-wop syllable115 Suffers from8.UHFRUGFR No. 0310 RELEASE DATE: 3/17/2013 CONDENSATION By Finn Vigeland / Edited by Will Shor tz For any three answers,call from a touch-tonephone: 1-900-285-5656,$1.49 each minute; or,with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. 123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142 43444546 4748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475767778798081828384 85868788 8990919293949596979899100101 102103104105106107108 109110111 112113114115116117118119120121122123124125126 Ex-wife’s son is painful reminder of unhappy past r n n rr Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogee Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 5D

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By SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — It turns out spring is leather weather — at least this year. Don’t be frightened: This isn’t a heavy head-to-toe rock ‘n’ roll look. This is about leather done as easy and breezy as one would expect as we head into warmer, sunnier times. It could be a jacket, but it also could be a dress or a vest, a button-down shirt or pants. Maybe it’s light pink or the chic color of stone, or maybe it’s perfo-rated to give it a sporty vibe. There are paper-thin leathers and “vegan leathers,” the new industry way to say “pleather” or faux leather. Laser cutting can add airiness. “What’s happened is that customers are responding to the luxurious-ness of it,” says Tim Baxter, execu-tive vice president of Macy’s fashion and product office. Women started really embracing leather as an everyday fabric, not just a cool-kid statement, this past fall, and they’re not ready to give it up, he says. “The customer is shifting toward seasonless clothing. They want clothing they can wear at least eight or nine months a year, and leather is now one of those things she can wear most of the year.” The customer also likes that leather takes pigment so well, and just as the season flips into spring, people are eager to wear cheerful, optimis-tic colors, even if the real-feel tem-perature doesn’t match the mood. Marti Horwitz, designer of the Marti collection, says a leather jacket or vest is the perfect layering piece for the days the weather can throw anything at you. “It’s an instantly more glamorous look.” Lambskin or goatskin is naturally thinner than cow hide, she explains, advising shoppers to keep that in mind as they set out on a spring shopping spree. She’d take one of her floral-print leather jackets and pair it with a clas-sic black dress, or wear a tougher motorcycle-chic jacket with a long evening skirt. “The floral print is a showstopper, but it’s not for every-one. I can envision it more in LA than New York. It’s for the person who wants to be the first one in a trend. It’s the same for the leather and eveningwear.” For the leather novice, it’s easier to start with the daytime outfits, Horwitz says, and go with a navy or a chocolate brown, which she prom-ises will work with existing items in the closet. (She says she is assuming black is a no-brainer and already in the wardrobe.) Baxter, meanwhile, suggests a bolder bright color or feminine blush tone in a classic, familiar shape, such as a blazer. If that still takes the cus-tomer out of her comfort zone, he says, try leather trim on the cuffs of a shirt, leather elbow patches or col-lars — all stepping stones into the trend that are selling very well. Price shouldn’t be a stumbling block, adds Tom Julian, a director at the The Doneger Group, a fash-ion trend forecasting firm. Designer leather pieces will cost in the $500 (and up) range, but adding a touch of high-quality here and there is afford-able in the contemporary market, he says, and the faux leather — for less than $100 — is looking better than ever. Leather also isn’t a look necessarily limited by age, body shape or style. “Leather is consistent in men’s and women’s, and you can be rock ‘n’ roll trendy and wear John Varvatos to AllSaints, or be into clas-sic American, like a Michael Kors or Gap-type operator,” Julian says. Unlike some trends that feed into a single look — like a maxi dress might work for the bohemian, or shoulder pads for the minimalist — leather crosses into the lifestyles of all the muses buyers aim to keep in mind, adds Macy’s Baxter. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFEBy KIM COOKAssociated PressVisiting this spring’s decor previews often felt like exploring an art gal-lery. There was an artistic vibe to everything from dinnerware to drapery, art photographs to textiles. Manufacturers are now able to reproduce artwork with impressive detail and precision. Originals that may have been painted or inked retain evidence of brush and pen. Computer-generated designs have greater depth of color and pattern than in the past. And photo prints are even more striking. Zara Home has a bouquet of lovely throw pillows for spring with vintage prints or botanical ones reminis-cent of paintings by the Masters. “Mariposa” fea-tures a flock of Edouard Travies-esque exotic but-terflies on a white back-ground; “Lula” evokes a Renoir still life; “Spring” has a sweet cottage flo-ral; “Lannion,” ‘’Hawaiana” and “Hojas’” tropical motifs have a retro vibe. (www.zarahome.com ) A spring walk through the Chicago Botanic Garden inspired artist Matthew Lew to create an exuberant burst of white and tan blooms on a bright orange background, rendered at CB2 on a hand-tufted rug. The retailer’s got another modern rug featuring a graphic brush stroke of linen white on tonal carbon gray. And artist Katherine Finn-Gamino’s colorful multi-media geometric pillow is abstract art for the sofa. (Botanical rug, Swoosh rug, pillow, www.cb2.com) Watercolor paintings of many popular dog breeds, including Labs, golden retrievers and little terriers, are available from Pottery Barn on linen throw pillows with personalized mono-grams. The needle arts are showcased here, as well, on linen lampshades stitched with tonal ikat or floral motifs, and a pillow depicting a vintage bird postcard in finely-detailed embroidery. Photographic art is an excellent way to bring a creative or unusual ele-ment to your room. Pottery Barn continues to expand its wall-art series this spring with a coterie of photo artists who have made intriguing works at a price point not easily matched in the market for great photography. California photographer Lupen Grainne creates imagery that combines a pensive Instagram quality with professional composi-tion. She captures dreamy San Francisco street scenes and beautiful fruit or fork still lifes that draw you in. San Francisco-based Ana Ramirez’ shell photo-graphs in stark black and white highlight the sculp-tural beauty of nature. And Prague-born photographer Michal Venera’s expressive black-and-white Tanzanian animal prints depict the textural grace and beauty of the natural world. You’ll also find some amazing work from pro photogs Cindy Taylor and Rebecca Plotnick. (www.potterybarn.com ) At Crate & Barrel, there’s the Monet-like watercolor floral of the “Myrtle” pillow, while the dramatic “Landscape” pil-low, featuring a winding road through wild coun-tryside, brings Turner to mind. (www.crateandbar-rel.com ) Bird’s eggs writ large — in fact, 32-inch-square large — are the powerful focal point of a series of wall art at Wisteria this spring. The eggs are softly hued, but the scale of the photographic imagery is so remarkable that one or more would be a central feature in any room. (www.wisteria.com ) Spring prints have artsy vibe HOME DECOR ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSVisiting this spring’s decor previews often felt li ke exploring an art gallery. ABOVE: Sky Bird embroidered pillow covers are available from Potter y Barn. RIIGHT: Crate and Barrel is offering a Myrtle Pillow ($34.95), with a Monet-like waterco lor garden print that is digitally printed on the white cotton background. Colorful, daring products add flair to a room. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSSpring is leather weather and fashion trends are le aning toward a sporty vibe. ABOVE: A model off a multi-colored leather mini dress fro m the Tommy Hilfiger. BELOW LEFT: The Lisette black leather jacket by Marti. BELOW RIGHT: The Brittany floral print leather jacket, also by Marti Spring is leather season in the world of fashion Fashion Grow your own cocktail fixing in the backyardBy DEAN FOSDICKAssociated PressGardening can be an intoxicating hobby, espe-cially if the botany is booze-related. Consider the possibilities: grapes fermented into wine, corn distilled into bourbon, hops used to fla-vor beer and fruit to sweet-en liqueurs. Why run to a liquor store when you can savor the harvest from your own cocktail garden? Three processes are involved in converting plants into serviceable drinks: fermentation, distillation and mixing, according to Amy Stewart, author of the new book “The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World’s Great Drinks” (Algonquin Books). “Virtually anything that produces sugar — fruit and grains — can be used distilled, fermented or drunk,” Stewart said in an interview. “Most people get involved with the mixers.” Fermenting — adding yeasts to turn plant sugars into alcohol — came first, she said. High-proof bever-age alcohol (20 percent and above) came later with dis-tillation, or heating ferment-ed liquids into a vapor and then re-condensing that into a more concentrated mix. A cautionary note: It’s illegal to distill anything in the United States without a license. “You can ferment but you can’t distill without the feds knocking on your door,” Stewart said. In addition, know your plants. “Understand what you’re doing if you’re out there gleaning,” Stewart said. “A lot of plants become solvents when mixed with alcohol. Don’t pick any-thing that might become potentially deadly.” A dizzying array of plants has been converted into alcohol over the ages, everything from agave (tequila) to yams (beer and vodka). Many plants are used primarily as garnish-es, such as spearmint (mint julep), olives (martini) and cherries (Manhattan). The marketplace is untapped for this emerging type of niche gardening, said Tim Russell, a spokes-man for Territorial Seed Co. in Cottage Grove, Ore. Territorial is teaming with Stewart to sell a cocktail-friendly line of herbs, fruits, vegetables and flowers. “A lot of young people are looking to do cooler things in their gardens like grow their own cocktail ingredi-ents,” Russell said. “We’re hoping this will draw them further into gardening.” The average liquor bottle contains a great deal more than straight alcohol, Stewart writes. “Once a spirit leaves the still, it is subject to end-less experimentation with herbs, spices, fruits, nuts, bark, roots and flowers,” she said. “Some distillers claim to use over a hundred different botanicals in their secret recipes.” ASSOCIATED PRESSBotanicals can be used to fer-ment, distill, mix and decorate alcoholic beverages, such as this Bloody Mary.