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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02039

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02039

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reports A Lake City man, arrest ed Thursday, faces charges for allegedly sending sexu ally explic it images and texts to an 11year-old child in Canada. The arrest was made after a joint investigation by the Lake City Police Department and Peel Regional Police Service in Ontario, Canada. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com S arah Beth Conner displayed a variety of emotions worthy of a champion as she competed in the 50-meter run in Fridays Special Olympics. At the beginning of the race, she nervously headed to the starting area, and when the race began, she carried a stare of determina tion as she focused on reach ing the finish line. When she crossed the finish line, a huge smile appeared on her face as she jumped into the arms and hugged a Florida Highway Patrol trooper who was vol unteering at the event. Then several onlookers gave her CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ............... 4A Business ............... 5A Obituaries ............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Prince tribute at Carnegie Hall. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice ................. 5D Puzzles .............. 3B, 5B 78 51 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 6A Vol. 138, No 289 Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1 00 LAKECITYRE PO RTER COM Lake City dentist marks 50 years in practice here SUNDAY EDITION 1C 3A 1A OFFICIAL INFORMATION BOOK IN TODAYS Wounded woman found in street Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Niblack Elementary Schools Kyle Dixon, 8, is cheered on by volunteers as he nears the finish line during the county Special Olympics on Friday. Champions all Police pursuing leads as they search for shooter; victim listed in serious condition. Richardson Middle School students Catherine Catledge (left), 14, and Shanitra Dallas, 15, participate in the 100-meter run Friday. County Special Olympics held 130 competitors take part in array of events at CHS. Bader ABOVE: Noah Strickland holds up the torch during opening ceremonies of the 2013 Columbia County Special Olympics held at Columbia High School on Friday. At left is Sheriff Mark Hunter. LEFT: Columbia Highs Joshua Wills, 21, competes in the tennis ball throw. SHOOTING continued on 5A EXERCISE continued on 3A ECONOMY continued on 3A SEXTING continued on 5A OLYMPICS continued on 5ARenovations begin to maternity ward at Shands Lake Shore School crisis test slated First responders to simulate shooter situation. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com The Columbia County Emergency Management department will conduct an active shooter exercise at Richardson Middle School on Wednesday. The exercise will involve law enforcement, emer gency medical personnel, emergency management personnel and other first responders. Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriffs Office public information officer, said after the incident at Columbine High School in Colorado years ago, law enforcement agencies across the nation have been forced to evaluate the security procedures for the schools in their communi ties. We all had to look inward at ourselves and say, Are we ready if they were to happen to our community, he said. This training is important for us espe cially nowadays as we start to see more and more inci dents to know that it could happen anywhere at any time and we have to be prepared for our com munitys sake. This train City man faces sexting charge Joint meeting set to discuss local economy By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Representatives from the Columbia County Economic Development Department and the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce will hold an informational meet ing this week to discuss the areas workforce with local employers. The meeting is scheduled for 8 a.m. Wednesday at the Fairfield Inn. Its the first in the series of four meetings that were going to partner with the Chamber on this year, said Jesse Quillen, county economic development director. The areas largest employers have been invited to the meeting, Quillen said. In addi tion, advance surveys have been sent to Quillen Business, industry leaders asked to give guidance to county and chamber. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A Lake City woman was found laying in the southbound lane of North Marion Avenue with a gunshot wound early Saturday morning. Police were still looking for her attacker Saturday night. Misty Dawn Harper, 32, of Lake City, was taken by ambulance to a Gainesville hospital after a Columbia County sheriffs deputy found her laying in the road shortly before 6 a.m. Saturday. Harper was found near 1101 N. Marion Ave., in front of the Dollar General store. Steve Shaw, Lake City Police Department public information officer, did not say wheth er Harpers wounds appeared to be lifethreatening, and authorities are not saying how many gunshot wounds she suffered. She had serious injuries, Shaw said. According to LCPD reports, the depart ment dispatch center received a call about 5:43 a.m. from Deputy Kevin Bailey, who reported hearing a gunshot near Marion Avenue. He heard a gun shot while he was in the Harper

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TALLAHASSEE Traditional pensions for new state and county employees, including teachers, would end under a proposal thats advancing through the Legislature. The House Appropriations committee on Friday voted 12-9 along party lines on a bill that would do away with guar anteed pensions for work ers hired as of January 2014. It would replace pensions with individual investment accounts simi lar to 401(k) plans. That will save the state nearly $13 million a year by 2016, according to Rep. Jason Brodeur, the Sanford Republican whos sponsor ing the bill (HB 7011). This bill reduces the states risk, saves the taxpayers a great deal of money, keeps every prom ise made to every current state worker, and offers robust benefits for our future state workers, he said. Democrats, labor unions and other critics are fight ing the effort, saying state and local governments will have to pay more into the current pension plan because there will be fewer members paying into it. Man gets life for molesting girl OCALA A man con victed of sexually molest ing a 4-year-old Ocala girl has been sentenced to life in prison. The Ocala Star-Banner reports a jury took less than an hour Thursday to find 42-year-old Guies U. Johnson guilty on multiple counts including posses sion of child pornography and sexual battery. The childs mother testi fied that she met Johnson on an online dating web site after separating from her husband in 2011. He eventually moved in with her. The mother testified she found a flash drive and micro SD card in September, which included a video of Johnson molest ing her daughter, who is now 5. She identified him on the video by his voice and body parts since his face wasnt shown. Defense attorneys argued it wasnt Johnson on the video. State reports on pot seizures TALLAHASSEE Florida officials are report ing that 37,000 marijuana plants and 771 grow sites were destroyed last year by law enforcement. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam on Friday also announced that more than 700 arrests were made in connection with a crack down on marijuana grow ers. Florida participates in a domestic eradication pro gram with both federal and local law enforcement. The program has been in place for 31 years. The report also shows that the largest number of plants destroyed in one year occurred in 1992. Officer fatally shoots man JACKSONVILLE Authorities say a man was fatally shot by Jacksonville SWAT officers who had been trying to help him after his truck crashed while ramming another car off the road. The incident turned deadly as the man went for his gun after initially coop erating with the three offi cers Thursday afternoon. Police Chief Tom Hackney says officer Jared Reston shot the man, who died at the scene. News reports said the officers were returning from training when they saw a truck ram another car. The truck then flipped over. A woman in the car approached the officer, saying the man was her ex-husband. The officers were assisting him when he suddenly reached for his gun. The officer is on admin istrative leave while the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office reviews the shoot ing. Police: woman sent nude photos OCALA An Ocala area woman has been arrested for allegedly sending nude pictures to teens. Marion County Jail records show 43-year-old Jody Teressa Onorato was charged Friday with two counts of transmit ting harmful material to minors. She posted bond early Saturday morning. A police statement says a report was made to the police department on Monday alleging that Onorato, an employee at Vanguard High School, had sent nude pictures of herself to two students by text message. One student was a minor at the time. When questioned by police, Onorato acknowl edged sending numerous photos to the students for attention. She also told detectives she apologized to the mothers of the students. Barn fire kills at least 12 horses WELLINGTON Palm Beach County authorities are investigating the cause of a barn fire that killed a dozen horses. Fire Rescue spokes man Capt. Albert Borroto told the Palm Beach Post at least 10 stalls were burned Saturday at the Palm Beach Polo Club in Wellington. No surrounding struc tures caught fire and no other injuries have been reported. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Singer Dean Torrence of Jan and Dean is 73. Actor Chuck Norris is 73. Actress Katharine Houghton is 68. Guitarist Tom Scholz of Boston is 66. Actress Aloma Wright (Scrubs) is 63. Singer-guitarist Gary Louris of The Jayhawks is 58. Actress Sharon Stone is 55. Bassist Gail Greenwood of L7 is 53. Magician Lance Burton is 53. Actress Jasmine Guy (A Different World) is 51. Bassist Jeff Ament of Pearl Jam is 50. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 14-21-22-39 9 Friday: 13-28-30-32-35 Saturday: Afternoon: 5-0-1 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 0-4-0-1 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 3-12-39-44-46-51 x5 Panel clears bill to end guaranteed pension plan NEW YORK T hey partied like it was 1999 the audience and the musicians at a Prince tribute concert at Carnegie Hall. More than 20 performers, includ ing Elvis Costello, The Roots and the Waterboys, paid tribute to the pop icon in a two-hour-plus concert Thursday night. They all joined together onstage to close the show with . Singer DAngelo took the lead while putting his arm around Bettye LaVette, Chris Rock and Costello clapped hands side-by-side, and comedian-actress-singers Maya Rudolph and Sandra Bernhard danced in a silly manner all while the crowd cheered on. Many of the performers got into character as they sang signature Prince tunes. Soul singer Bilal was wild on Sister, singing in various tones like a mad man and thrilling the crowd. Bernhard, in her leather pants, shimmery shirt and shiny shoes, impressed on Little Red Corvette as she skipped around onstage and belted high notes. And singer-songwriter Kat Edmonson captured the audience with The Beautiful Ones, standing still and singing with only a pianist onstage. It was one of the only times The Roots werent backing up other performers throughout the concert, which raised $100,000 for music edu cation programs. Bieber resumes tour after rough week LONDON Its been a rough week for Justin Bieber: Getting booed for being late, struggling to breathe mid-perfor mance and fainting backstage, then caught on cam era clashing with paparazzi. But the 19-yearold pop sensation appeared to have recovered Friday for his final con cert in London, singing and dancing to thousands of adoring fans at the O2 Arena. Earlier Friday, the star made head lines when he got into an altercation with insult-hurling paparazzi, lashing out at a photographer with a stream of expletives as he was restrained by minders. Ahhhhh! Rough morning. Trying to feel better for this show tonight but let the paps get the best of me, the singer posted on Twitter soon after the altercation with the photog rapher, which took place as he got into a car earlier Friday. The scuffle was captured on video by Channel 5 News and widely broadcast by Britains media. Sometimes when people r shov ing cameras in your face all day and yelling the worst thing possible at u...well Im human. Rough week, he wrote on the social networking site. Co-host Joy Behar leaving The View LOS ANGELES Joy Behar will be enjoying The View for only five more months. The 70-year-old comedian is leav ing the ABC daytime talk show at the end of the current sea son in August. The network said in a statement issued on Thursday that it wishes Behar all the best in this next chapter, and are thrilled that we have her for the remainder of the season. Behar has co-hosted the show for 16 seasons. She was among the first co-hosts with co-creator Barbara Walters when the series debuted and has been with the show throughout its run. The current panel includes Whoopi Goldberg, Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Sherri Shepherd. In addition to The View, Behar hosted The Joy Behar Show on HLN from 2009 to 2011 and current ly hosts Joy Behar: Say Anything! on Current TV, which debuted last year. Prince tribute held at Carnegie Hall Wednes day: 6-10-23-41-45 PB 1 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture He has saved us and called us to a holy life not because of anything we have done but because of his own purpose and grace. This grace was given us in Christ Jesus before the begin ning of time. 2 Timothy 1:9 COURTESY PHOTO Natalie Stovall to perform at FGC Fiddle-shredding singer Natalie Stovall will visit Florida Gateway College on Friday as part of the second season of FGC Entertainment. The performance, sponsored by Timco Aviation Services, will kick off at 7:30 p.m. in the Levy Performing Arts Center. Stovall was named 2012 Entertainer of the Year by the voters of Campus Activities Magazine in the Readers Choice Awards. Tickets for the show are still available and can be purchased by calling (386) 754-4340 or visiting www.fgcentertainment.com. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $10 for FGC students, faculty, and staff. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Musician Elvis Costello (center) performs with Maya Rudolph at The Music of Prince tribute concert at Carnegie Hall on Thursday in New York. Behar Bieber

PAGE 3

By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com For years law enforce ment officers deterred criminal activity with the saying, You cant outrun the long arm of the law. Apparently, a Suwannee County man learned he cant outrun the nose of law enforcement officers, either, after he arrested Thursday. The man alleg edly led authorities on high-speed chase, dur ing which he ran over a skunk while fleeing on his all-terrain vehicle. Even though the man was able to avoid capture initially and changed his clothes, the skunks odor led authori ties to him. Justin James Wooddell, 21, 300 SW Lottie Court, was charged with felony fleeing and eluding in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. According to Suwannee County Sheriffs Office reports, a Suwannee County deputy was dis patched to Sixth Avenue and Lake Jeffery Road in Wellborn in reference to a person on a four-wheeler who driven into the woods after leaving the County Line Bar. The deputy saw the ATV in the area of 31st Road and County Road 10 in Wellborn and activated his lights and siren to get the operator, later identified as Wooddell, to stop. The deputy reported Wooddell looked back at him and sped up on the ATV as they turned onto Koonville Highway from U.S. 90. He said Wooddell ran over a skunk with his vehicle shortly after they turned onto Koonville Highway, where he allegedly reached speeds as high as 70 mph. Wooddell then turned onto County Road 252 and headed towards Taylorville, turning onto 27th Road then onto Satellite Lane. Satellite Lane is in Columbia County, and the Columbia County Sheriffs Office was notified about the chase. With aid from the CCSO deputies, authorities were able to find Wooddell at his home. Contact was made with the defendant, who had undressed from the blue jeans and the gray shirt he was wearing, but still smelled like the skunk he had hit on Koonville Highway, Suwannee County Deputy Chuck Tompkins wrote in his report. Wooddell refused to answer any questions from authorities until he spoke to his attorney. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots Galore All Jackets 30% off All Insulated Camo 40% off (in stock) Lake City | SW Deputy J. Davis Lane | 386.752.3910 or 800.597.3526 | ww.morrells.com MAXIMIZE Your Tax Refund *Excluding Tempur-Pedic and iComfort Everything On Sale the amount of the Plus N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G A D V I S O R Y B E A U T I F I C A T I O N C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t h a t t h e A d v i s o r y B e a u t i f i c a t i o n C o m m i t t e e f o r t h e C i t y o f L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a w i l l h o l d a m e e t i n g o n T u e s d a y M a r c h 1 2 2 0 1 3 a t 4 : 0 0 P M i n t h e C o u n c i l C h a m b e r s l o c a t e d o n t h e s e c o n d f l o o r o f C i t y H a l l a t 2 0 5 N o r t h M a r i o n A v e n u e L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A D V I S O R Y C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t h a t t h e C o m m u n i t y R e d e v e l o p m e n t A d v i s o r y C o m m i t t e e f o r t h e C i t y o f L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a w i l l h o l d a m e e t i n g o n T u e s d a y M a r c h 1 2 2 0 1 3 a t 5 : 3 0 P M i n t h e C o u n c i l C h a m b e r s l o c a t e d o n t h e s e c o n d f l o o r o f C i t y H a l l a t 2 0 5 N o r t h M a r i o n A v e n u e L a k e C i t y F l o r i d a A l l i n t e r e s t e d p e r s o n s a r e i n v i t e d t o a t t e n d e i t h e r o f t h e m e e t i n g s d e s c r i b e d a b o v e S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f y o u r e q u i r e s p e c i a l a i d / s e r v i c e s f o r e i t h e r o f t h e m e e t i n g s i d e n t i f i e d a b o v e a s a d d r e s s e d i n t h e A m e r i c a n D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t p l e a s e c o n t a c t t h e C i t y M a n a g e r s O f f i c e a t ( 3 8 6 ) 7 1 9 5 7 6 8 A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k Renovations under way at Shands By AMANDA WILLIAMSON awilliamson@lakecityreporter.com Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center announced on Friday the beginning of construc tion on its fourth-floor maternity unit. The renovations are expected to be completed by around midNovember. The medical center already has a collection of private and semi-private rooms, but Shands Lake Shore CEO Rhonda Sherrod said they intend to create a beauti ful environment for women to give birth within their own community. The comfort and security of our new mother-baby suites coupled with specially trained obstetric phy sicians, and dedicated, compassion ate obstetric and neonatal nurses will create a very special experience for expecting mothers, she said. The renovated Birth Center is anticipated to cost $3.4 million and will replace the current facility with 14 private suites. The new rooms will be furnished with warm and relaxing design elements, accord ing to a press release from Lake Shore Regional Medical Center. Each suite will provide a private bathroom, as well as a flat-screen TV, wireless Internet and a sofa bed for family members. Sherrod believes the hospitals goal is to create a safe and special experience for each mother admit ted into the Birth Center. The new facility ties together Shands Lake Shores quality medical care and lat est techniques to ensure that moth ers and babies are monitored 24 hours a day. Currently, Shands Lake Shore houses 99 beds in its adultcare hospital, providing assistance for a range of health care problems. We strive to make a comfortable environment for our new mothers and the entire family, she said. We take pride in these details that are necessary comforts during the birthing and postpartum events. FILE Shands Lake Shore Medical Center has begun work on renovations to its maternity unit. Construction is expected to be completed by about mid-November. Wooddell Deputies: Suspects scent left no doubt EXERCISE: Set Wednesday Continued From Page 1A ing for us is real important because we can get a reallife scenario, real-life tactics and instead of just reading a manual, our deputies can physically do it at a live school. So, its as real as we can possibly get. Seifert said officials want ed to let county residents know there will be numer ous first responders on the school campus Wednesday, but its strictly for the exer cise. We are using simulat ed munitions, simulated explosions and there will be smoke. And we want people to be aware this is a training exercise, and not to respond to the school themselves, he said. We dont want residents to flood 9-1-1 with phone calls. This is a training exercise, and well inform everyone in that area. Residents and school vis itors are asked to limit their business and traffic around the RMS campus from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Our primary goal is to keep our children in our schools safe, and thats why were doing this, Seifert said. Anyone with questions or concerns should call the Emergency Management Office at 758-1125 or the Columbia School District office at 755-8184. ECONOMY: Local business leaders input sought Continued From Page 1A local business representatives expect ed to attend the meeting and survey results will be discussed. Specifically, what we are looking for is are there things we are doing right that we need to improve on, or more importantly, are there trouble areas that we need to address and solve for our local industry and busi ness so they can more profitable, Quillen said. Other meeting later in the year will focus on the following themes: tech nology, utility services and quality of life and community services. Quillen said the joint meetings are a way for the county department and the Chamber of Commerce to act as partners on a project, as well as important local economic factors. We both have a vested interest in seeing the community succeed and seeing our businesses do well, and at the ground level of that is work force ,and we felt that was the place we needed to start, Quillen said. I know there are concerns there. I know there are things the community has done right, too. We just want to capitalize on those, recognize our weaknesses and make those things better. Abbie Chasteen, Chamber market ing coordinator, also spoke of the importance of the joint meeting and its potential effects on county eco nomics. We want to meet their needs in order for them to grow, thrive and operate efficiently. In turn, there will be a positive impact for the citizens of our community. Just another way that we continue to work together to make Lake City a great place to work, live and play, she said. About 20 representatives from education, business and industry are expected to attend the meeting. Quillen said he hopes the local partnership between industry, busi ness, government and education sec tors continues to strengthen as a result of the meetings. I would really love for this to be an informal, almost a workshop-type setting where the industry folks open up and tell us what some of their real issues are and ways they think we can help them, he said. If we can learn one thing next week that will help industry and business be more effective, then I think weve done a good deed.

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T he Lake City First Baptist Church held Reverend Robert K. Davis “Appreciation Day” on February 10. Reverend Davis preached the sermon that day and he surely felt right at home in that pulpit. After all, he had preached from that same pulpit for 24 years, 1977-2000. All the pews were packed that day and Rev. Davis said up front he knew why: “You all know that I have pancreatic cancer and you are thinking that today is a dress rehearsal for my funeral!” Everybody also knew that Reverend Davis is a big advocate of “Sing me no sad songs” so his straightforward remark brought the biggest laugh of the day. Rev. Davis said he had learned two important lessons in his long ministry. First, a sermon does not have to be a long sermon to be a good sermon. Second, the mind can absorb only what the backside can endure. Accordingly, he kept his sermon short and focused. His sermon was on faithfulness and he made three points: God exemplifies faithfulness, God expects our faithfulness, and God examines our faithfulness, even in small things. Then, with a rousing closing hymn and an uplifting benediction, the congregation retired to the Fellowship Hall for a bounteous covered dish luncheon. The day was all the success the planners could have hoped for and more. Rev. Davis will end his ministry the last day of this month when he retires from his present church, the Woodstock Baptist Church of Jacksonville. As you may know, Rev. Davis and his wife, Pat, have experienced the ultimate tragedy any parents can face. Their son, Deputy Sheriff Jeff Davis, was killed in a car crash in the line of duty when he was in his early 20’s. Deputy Jeff Davis Lane is named after him. No kindler, gentler, more gracious, more dedicated, more genu-ine preacher than Reverend Robert K. Davis has ever graced our area. Thanks be to him for his tremen-dous lifetime of ministry and to everybody at First Baptist for giving him the magnificent Appreciation Day he so richly deserved.REUNION REMINDERThe next CHS 1949-53 reunion will be held on Saturday, May 11, 2013, at 11:30, at the Mason City Community Center. Bring a covered dish. Chicken purlo, drinks, plastic ware, etc. will be provided. For more information, call Julia Osborn at 386-752-7544 or email Ed Milton at Milton 265@earthlink.net.SUWANNEE RIVER PROSE“The real Suwannee River rises in the highest mountains of the human soul and is fed by the deep-est springs of the human heart. “It flows through the pleasant sunny vales of memory and empties into the glorious ocean of unfilled dreams. “It brings, with the mystical powers of its waters, peace and content-ment for the weary and worn who find their way to its shores.” – AnonymousCHARLES’ HUMORFriend Charles Peeler has a humorous way of explaining how each of his days begins: “I open my eyes and thank the Lord for a new day of life. Then I sit on the edge of my bed and thank the Lord for another day of health. Then I go to the bathroom, turn on the light, look in the mirror, have a good laugh at what I see, and that always starts my day in a good mood.” OPINION Sunday, March 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman A man falsely accused of a recent home-invasion robbery attempt spent 40 days in jail because of incorrect investigative proce-dures by the Lake City Police Department. The man, Derick Jeremy Lee, was jailed when he was identified in a photo array by a group of women who were pres-ent during the home-invasion on Jan. 25. The armed man who tried to rob several women having a jewelry party entered the home with most of his face covered. The telling, undisputed trait the women noticed? The gunman had blue eyes. Derick Jeremy Lee is innocent of this crime. He does not have blue eyes. LCPD used an array of black and white photos to ask the women to identify the suspect. How can anyone, beyond a rea-sonable doubt, pick a blue-eyed man from a black and white photo? And, the group of women was shown the photos as a group – a mistake that is never acceptable in the police world. Proper procedure calls for witnesses or victims to be questioned and shown photo arrays and lineups indi-vidually. The Third Judicial Circuit State Attorney’s Office, on reviewing the case, quickly dismissed it Tuesday. The wrongly accused man was set free immediately. This is not a technicality or loophole in the law. In this instance, the wrong man was locked up because of a blunder by LCPD. The department needs to come clean and admit the mistake to the pub-lic. No department is perfect, but quickly issuing a defensive statement saying that procedure was followed correctly does not hold up. We expect the highest level of credibility from every law enforcement agency. It’s time for the leadership at LCPD to show the fortitude necessary to set the record straight, explain what happened, and take responsibility where necessary. A time of reckoning for LCPD Rev. Davis Appreciation Day OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AOPINIONTo the Editor:I wanted you to know how much we appreciate all the newspaper coverage during the Olustee Battle Festival/Re-enactment Weekend (Feb. 15-17). The reporters did a good job in capturing the many events and stories connected to the festival and the re-enactment. Next year we will have the 150th anniversary of the Olustee Civil War battle. The Florida Park Service has already started planning this event and the Blue Grey Army will also be working on it to bring an even bet-ter and more entertaining festival to the community. On behalf of Commanding General Tom Coleman and the many committee people we have involved, I thank you and your staff again for the coverage and support. Faye Bowling-WarrenExecutive Director,Blue Grey Army Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. LETTERS TO THE EDITORThanks for newspaper coverage Texting ban should apply to law officers as wellTo the Editor: I just want to express my concerns about “ texting while driving.” I understand you are 30 percent more likely to have a accident. There is a bill in Tallahassee that would make this illegal. That I sup-port, but it concerns me that it will not apply to law enforcement. It seems to me if I text while driving I am 30 percent more likely to have an accident. Would it not be the same for law enforcement? By the way, I don’t even know how to text. Bill BlackLake City HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1496, Christopher Columbus concluded his second visit to the Western Hemisphere as he left Hispaniola for Spain. In 1629, England’s King Charles I dissolved Parliament. In 1785, Thomas Jefferson was appointed minister to France, succeeding Benjamin Franklin. In 1848, the U.S. Senate ratified the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the war with Mexico. In 1864, Ulysses S. Grant became commander of the Union armies during the Civil War. In 1876, the first successful voice transmission over Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone took place in Boston as his assistant heard Bell say, “Mr. Watson, come here. I want you.” In 2002, Israeli helicopters destroyed Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat’s office in Gaza City, hours after 11 Israelis were killed in a suicide bombing in a cafe across the street from Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s residence in Jerusalem.

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Douglas Hemming Epperson Commander Douglas Hemming Epperson, Lake City, FL, age 98, went peacefully to the Lord on Saturday, March 09, 2013, hav loving family and the wonderful care and compassion of the staff at the Lake City VA Hospital. Doug graduated from Columbia High School in 1934, and Uni versity of Georgia in 1938 with a degree in Forestry. He served his country as an aviator in the US Navy during WWII and the Korean War. Upon retire ment, he became a long time employee of the Florida Di vision of Forestry, a member of the First Baptist Church of Lake City, the American Le gion, the VFW, and the Retired America. He was a scoutmaster, a pilot in the Civil Air Patrol, and active in youth activities. Doug is survived by his wife of ol (Dale) Price, Cheryl (Gary) Copps, Bill (Crystal) Epperson, Susan (Steve) Czeiszperger, and Elizabeth Black; loving sister-inlaw Mary Emma; 11 grandchil dren and 18 great grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services for Mr. Epper son will be conducted at 11:00 A.M. Monday, March 11, 2013 at the Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Rev Interment will follow at Me morial Cemetery in Lake City. Arrangements are under the di rection of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort and love on the online guest book at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Joseph Albert Howell Mr. Joseph Albert Howell, 70, a lifelong resident of Suwan nee County, died early Saturday morning, March 9, 2013 in the Avalon Health and Rehab Cen ter following a brief illness. The son of the late Jacob Roy Howell and Kizzie Crews Howell; Mr. Howell had been employed as a tire mechanic for many years. Mr. Howell attended both the Mt. Pleasant Church in Wellborn and the First Assembly of God in Live Oak. In his spare time he enjoyed reading, writing, yard work, was an avid Seminole Fan and he loved to tell jokes. Mr. Howell is survived by his children, Joseph Fat Boy Howell and Linda of Wellborn, FL; Susan Jolley of Lake City; Tammy Bell of Wellborn, FL; Donna Carter (Billy) of Mac clenny, Fl; Carol Ann Townsend (Pastor Mike Townsend) of Lake City; and Mary Burton (Kevin) of Texas; a brother, Murl How ell (Vivian Ann) of Suwannee County, FL; and best friends, Lynnwood Brown, Tommy Smith, Leon Moses, Aaron Box and Norman McElroy all of Suwannee County. Nineteen grandchildren also survive. Funeral services will be con ducted at 2:00 P.M. On Tuesday, March 12, 2013 in the First As sembly of God Church in Live Oak with Pastor Mike Townsend, ing. Interment will immediately follow in the First Assembly of God Cemetery in Live Oak, Florida with Bro. Billy Carter ceive friends from 6:00 to 8:00 Monday evening at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PAR RIS H FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 Please vis it our online family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 5A 5A Join Me for a Free Seminar OppenheimerFunds Pulse of the Market can provide you with valuable insights into from Changing Times for Investors. Youll get answers to such questions as What factors are driving changes in the What strategies can investors use to OppenheimerFunds Pulse of the Market Changing Times for Investors March 19, 2013 Time: 6:00PM Lifestyle and Enrichment Center 628 SW Allison Court Lake City Dinner will be served at this event There is no charge, but seating is limited. Travis Henry, AAMS Financial Advisor Reserve your spot today. (386) 758-6888 travis.henry@edwardjones.com OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. SEXTING: Man charged Continued From Page 1A Aaron Charles Bader, 22, 1447 NW Wayne Place, was charged with transmission of obscene or harmful material to minors in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. According to Lake City Police Department reports, on Feb. 27, Melany Brophy, the moth er of an 11-year-old child, spoke with officials from the Peel Regional Police Service and told them her child was receiving sexu ally explicit text messages from a person who claimed to be Aaron Bader. Peel Regional police investigator Chad Michell learned from the child that Bader and the child met through an online video game, started talk ing, exchanged phone numbers and began tex ting one another. From Feb. 3 to 11, the two reportedly exchanged more than 2,000 text mes sages. Authorities reported that a majority of the messages exchanged were sexually descriptive in nature and included photos. One of the conversa tions on Feb. 4, specifi cally centered on the age difference betwee the two individuals and how it seemed weird. However, the sexting continued after Bader learned the child was 11 years old. Michell, through his investigation, learned Bader might be in Lake City. He contacted the city departments Criminal Investigations Division and asked investigator David Greear to assist in finding Bader. Greear was able to ver ify the identity of Bader along with the location of his job. On Thursday, Criminal Investigations Division officers found Bader at his job shortly before noon. Greear interviewed Bader, who reportedly openly confessed to send ing obscene and sexual material to the minor while being aware of the childs age. Bader was then arrest ed and charged with transmission of obscene and harmful material to a minor by means of an electronic device. OLYMPICS: Participants get thrill of competition Continued From Page 1A high-fives as she proudly headed to collect her award ribbon. The Columbia County Special Olympics 2013 Summer Games took place Friday at the Columbia High School track, with more than 100 participants. The event kicked off with opening ceremonies where the athletes walked in with their school delegations and the athletes, coaches and volunteer took their oaths before the competi tion began. Representatives from the Columbia County Sheriffs Office, Florida Highway Patrol and Lake City Police Department carried the Special Olympics torch to the stadium. County Sheriff Mark Hunter lit the torch, and selected athletes completed a lap around the track with the torch to offi cially start the games. According to event orga nizers, about 130 partici pants school children and some adults took part in the various activities. Tiffanie Conner was one of several parents sitting alongside the track offering words of encouragement to event participants. Her daughter, Sarah Beth, 12, was representing Lake City Middle School. It means everything to come out and see Sarah Beth participate in the Special Olympics, she said. She looks forward to this every year. Shes been real excited. Conner also said it was important for the children who compete in Special Olympics to have the opportunity to participate in sports and competitions just as other children do. I think competing gives them pride in themselves, and it lets them know they can accomplish any thing that anyone else can accomplish, she said. Landon Green, 15, earned first place in his division of the shot put competition. Green, who was awarded a blue ribbon after his win, said it was the first time he had won first place in the Special Olympics shot put compe tition. It was good to win first place, he said. I like to do the shot put and running. Shea Showers, a Fort White High School coach, was working at his first Special Olympics and he seemed nearly excited as the participants. This is enjoyable just seeing the kids getting out competing and having fun, and thats what its all about, he said. Its just giving them an opportunity to compete and have fun. He said the Fort White High School Special Olympians were prepared for competition. For the most part, the kids have been fine because they enjoy the event and they get to go outside, hang out and participate in the different activities, he said. SHOOTING: Police have some leads on shooter Continued From Page 1A area near Marion Street and State Road 100, Shaw said. He turned his spotlight on and saw something in the roadway and as he proceeded towards it, realized it was somebody. When he got there it was a woman who had been shot. The LCPD Criminal Investigations Division is investigating the shoot ing. We have several leads that were following up on, Shaw said. Were requesting assistance from the com munity. We do have some leads, and were trying to chase them down right now. Weve followed up on some leads that havent panned out up to this point, but we have other leads that were actively investigating. Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime scene technicians were called in and spent hours at the shooting site. Authorities cordoned off the street and the roadway was blocked for about four hours as the investigation progressed. Anyone who knows Harper or who she associates with is asked to call LCPD investigator David Greear at 752-4344 or the LCPDs anonymous TIP line at 719-2068. A reward up to $1,000 is avail able through Crime Stoppers for any information leading to the apture and prosecution of the shooter. Contact Crime Stoppers at (386) 754-7099.

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6A OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY AND FOR A LIMITED TIME. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit app roval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, boat and term of loan. For example, a $30,000 loan with no money down at 4.49% for 84 months would require 83 monthly payments of $419.82 and a final payment of $406.42, finance charge of $5,14 5.43, for a total amount of payments of $35,251.48. The amount financed is $30,106.05, the APR is 4.59 %. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mentio n this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Best-of-Market rates for BOATS 4 59%As low asAPR1For up to 84 months on any 2009 or newer! Limited time offer! Thru March 30 } Forfast approval call 754-9088 and press 4 orvisit campuscu.com today! Come see us at the McDuffie Boat Sale March 7 10 Call 754-2215 for info. This should get your motor running. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, March 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS INDIANS continued on 6B Indians win 2-1 in Saturday showdown. Monday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Oak Hall School, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High weightlifting hosts Indian Invitational, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High JV baseball vs. Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Stanton Prep, 6:30 p.m. (JV-4) Tuesday Q Columbia High girls tennis at Buchholz High, 3 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Lincoln High, 5:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Bradford High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Q Columbia High softball at Lee High, 4 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High softball at Buchholz High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High JV baseball vs. Baker County High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Interlachen High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High track in Friday Knight Invitational at Creekside High, TBA Q Columbia High softball vs. Gainesville High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High baseball at Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Saturday Q Fort White High baseball at Crystal River High, 1 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Hoover (Ala.) High at Chiles High, 1:30 p.m. Q Fort White High track at Bob Hayes Invitational, TBA GAMES GATORS Gator Club meeting Tuesday The North Florida Gator Club is having a meet and greet at 6 p.m. Tuesday in room 153 of the Columbia County School Board Annex Building. All Gator supporters are welcome. The annual fundraising goal of the club is to raise money for scholarships for area students. For details, call Bob McManus at 752-3333. ADULT SOFTBALL Spring league sign-up ongoing Columbia County Adult Softball is accepting registration for its spring season through Friday. Men’s, Women’s, Church and Co-ed leagues will be offered. Fee is $250 with a deadline of March 22. The season begins April 1. There is a coaches meeting at 6 p.m. Friday in the meeting hall at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168, or go to columbiacountyadult softball@gmail.com Q From staff reports Howell holds strong JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High pitcher Robby Howell picked up a win ag ainst Santa Fe High in Saturday’s 2-1 victory for the India ns. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comALACHUA — With college-level talent on the mound, a stumble at the start can be fatal. Fort White High’s baseball team scored two runs in the first inning and pitcher Robby Howell made them stand up in a 2-1 district win at Santa Fe High on Saturday. Howell has signed a scholarship to play at UCF and he was facing Kirby Snead, who has signed with Florida. Consider these pitching lines. Howell went seven innings with three hits, one earned run, four walks and nine strikeouts. He worked out of a one-out, bases-loaded jam in the first inning. After Santa Fe scored with two outs in the second inning, no Raider reached second base. Howell retired the final seven batters includ-ing striking out the side in the seventh inning. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida basketball head coach Billy Donovan holds up the net after beating Vanderbilt to win the regular season SEC Championship on Wednesday. Kentucky upsets No. 11 Florida, 61-57Associated PressLEXINGTON, Ky. — Kentucky faces a diffi-cult road toward an NCAA tournament bid, but the Wildcats rallied past No. 11 Florida 61-57 Saturday to help their cause with the committee. The Gators looked ready to hand a final blow to the Wildcats’ postseason hopes after a 19-5 run provided a 57-50 lead with 7 1/2 min-utes remaining. Kentucky responded by scoring the final 11 points of the game, boosting the Wildcats’ NCAA prospects. The defending national champions (21-10, 12-6) need at least another win in next week’s Southeastern Conference tournament to solidify their tournament chances, but beating Florida clinched the No. 2 seed. “They swam like heck,” said Kentucky coach John Calipari, who used terms such as “sink or swim” and “do or die” to describe his team’s chances on Friday. “In the last seven minutes, when it was in doubt, they swam like heck. When Miami, Florida State both pick up wins in ACC play. NCAA continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterAlex Milton swings at a pitch while playing against Val dosta High on Thursday.Tigers hitless in opening district gameBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comThe weather has been cold so far this year and so have Columbia High’s bats. The Tigers have struggled all year at the plate and nothing changed on Friday night as Columbia travelled to Atlantic Coast High for their first district contest of the season. Columbia was held without a hit in a 4-0 loss against the Stringrays. Pitcher Ross Garnder went 5 23 innings for the Stringrays, struck out nine batters and walked six. He was relieved in the sixth inning by Joe Perret, who kept the no-hitter going with two strikeouts over the remainder of the game. Jordan Culp, Levi Hollingsworth, Alex Milton and Harrison Shubert all drew walks for the Tigers. “It’s the same story that we’ve been going through all year long,” Columbia head coach Jonathan Ulsh said. “We just haven’t been able to hit so far this season.” The good news for the Tigers is that their defense and pitching has been good Atlantic Coast beats Columbia, 4-0, on Friday. CHS continued on 6B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, KOBALT Tools 400, at Las Vegas BASEBALL 6 a.m. MLB — World Baseball Classic, second round, Japan vs. Netherlands, at Tokyo 12:30 p.m. MLB — World Baseball Classic, first round, Spain vs. Venezuela, at San Juan, Puerto Rico 4 p.m. MLB — World Baseball Classic, first round, United States vs. Canada, at Phoenix 7:30 p.m. ESPN — World Baseball Classic, first round, Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, at San Juan, Puerto Rico MLB — World Baseball Classic, first round, Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, at San Juan, Puerto Rico CYCLING 10:30 p.m. NBCSN — Paris-Nice, final stage, Nice to Col d’Eze, France (same-day tape) GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship, final round, at Miami 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship, final round, at Miami 7:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Puerto Rico Open, final round, at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — VCU at TempleESPN2 — Big South Conference, championship, at Myrtle Beach, S.C. 12:30 p.m. ESPN — Teams TBA 2 p.m. CBS — Missouri Valley Conference, championship, at St. Louis NBCSN — Colonial Athletic Association, semifinal, at Richmond, Va. 4 p.m. CBS — Indiana at Michigan 4:30 p.m. NBCSN — Colonial Athletic Association, semifinal, at Richmond, Va. NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Boston at Oklahoma City 3:30 p.m. ABC — Chicago at L.A. Lakers NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — N.Y. Rangers at Washington 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Buffalo at Philadelphia SOCCER 10 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, New York at San Jose WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Atlantic Coast Conference, championship, at Greensboro, N.C. FSN — Big 12 Conference, semifinal, at Dallas 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Big Ten Conference, championship, at Hoffman Estates, Ill. 4:30 p.m. FSN — Big 12 Conference, semifinal, at Dallas 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Southeastern Conference, championship, at Duluth, Ga. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Pac-12 Conference, championship, at Seattle ——— Monday BASEBALL 6 a.m. MLB — World Baseball Classic, second round, at Tokyo MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Preseason, St. Louis vs. N.Y. Yankees, at Tampa MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Teams TBANBCSN — Colonial Athletic Association, championship, at Richmond, Va. 9 p.m. ESPN — West Coast Conference, championship, at Las Vegas ESPN2 — Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, championship, at Springfield, Mass. WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 8 p.m. FSN — Big 12 Conference, championship, at DallasBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Boston at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.Indiana at Miami, 6 p.m.Cleveland at Toronto, 6 p.m.Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m.Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Portland at New Orleans, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Sacramento, 9 p.m.Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m.Denver at Phoenix, 10 p.m.New York at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Kentucky 61, Florida 57 At Lexington, Ky. FLORIDA (24-6) Boynton 4-10 0-0 9, Rosario 2-6 2-2 6, Young 5-11 0-0 10, Wilbekin 2-8 2-2 7, Murphy 6-11 2-2 17, Yeguete 1-2 2-4 4, Frazier II 0-1 0-0 0, Prather 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 22-55 8-10 57.KENTUCKY (21-10) Goodwin 5-13 6-12 16, Harrow 5-12 2-2 13, Cauley-Stein 2-5 2-4 6, Poythress 4-7 1-2 9, Mays 4-10 2-2 13, Hood 0-0 0-0 0, Polson 2-2 0-0 4, Wiltjer 0-7 0-0 0. Totals 22-56 13-22 61. Halftime—Tied 31-31. 3-Point Goals— Florida 5-14 (Murphy 3-6, Boynton 1-3, Wilbekin 1-4, Frazier II 0-1), Kentucky 4-17 (Mays 3-9, Harrow 1-1, Poythress 0-1, Goodwin 0-3, Wiltjer 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida 34 (Murphy 11), Kentucky 40 (Poythress 12). Assists—Florida 8 (Rosario 3), Kentucky 10 (Harrow, Mays, Polson, Poythress 2). Total Fouls—Florida 19, Kentucky 13. A—24,294.Florida St. 71, N.C. State 67 At Tallahassee NC STATE (22-9) Howell 3-6 4-9 10, Leslie 2-5 1-4 5, Wood 4-9 7-7 18, Warren 3-5 2-2 8, Brown 5-12 3-4 14, Purvis 3-6 2-2 8, T. Lewis 1-1 1-2 3, Vandenberg 0-1 1-3 1. Totals 21-45 21-33 67.FLORIDA ST. (17-14) White 2-6 4-5 8, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0, Bookert 4-10 9-12 18, Snaer 7-13 2-2 17, Thomas 0-1 3-4 3, Brandon 2-5 0-0 4, Turpin 2-4 1-2 5, Gilchrist 2-2 0-0 4, Bojanovsky 1-3 1-2 3, Portuondo 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 3-6 2-2 9, Moreau 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 23-50 22-29 71. Halftime—NC State 35-34. 3-Point Goals—NC State 4-13 (Wood 3-8, Brown 1-3, Purvis 0-2), Florida St. 3-14 (Miller 1-2, Bookert 1-4, Snaer 1-4, White 0-2, Brandon 0-2). Fouled Out—Brandon, Brown, Miller. Rebounds—NC State 27 (Howell, Warren 9), Florida St. 32 (White 9). Assists—NC State 10 (Brown 8), Florida St. 10 (Bookert 3). Total Fouls—NC State 22, Florida St. 22. Technicals—Leslie, Miller. A—6,730.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Indiana at No. 7 Michigan, 4 p.m. No. 10 Michigan State vs. Northwestern, 6 p.m. No. 14 Ohio State vs. Illinois, 12:30 p.m. No. 21 VCU at Temple, NoonNo. 22 Wisconsin at Penn State, NoonBASEBALLSpring Training Today’s Games N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Atlanta vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.St. Louis vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 7:05 p.m.World Baseball Classic FIRST ROUND Thursday’s Games Italy 6, Mexico 5Dominican Republic 9, Venezuela 3 Friday’s Games Italy 14, Canada 4Puerto Rico 3, Spain 0Mexico 5, United States 2 Saturday’s Games Dominican Republic 6, Spain 3Canada vs. Mexico (n)Puerto Rico vs. Venezuela (n)United States vs. Italy (n) Today’s Games Spain vs. Venezuela, 12:30 p.m.United States vs. Canada, 4 p.m.Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, 7:30 p.m. GROUP A W L Pct GB x-Cuba 3 0 1.000 — x-Japan 2 1 .667 1China 1 2 .333 2 Brazil 0 3 .000 3 GROUP B W L Pct GB x-Taiwan 2 1 .667 — x-Netherlands 2 1 .667 — South Korea 2 1 .667 —Australia 0 3 .000 2 12 x-advanced to second round SECOND ROUND Thursday’s Game Netherlands 6, Cuba 2 Friday’s Game Japan 4, Taiwan 3, 10 innings Saturday’s Game Cuba 14, Taiwan 0 Today’s Game Netherlands vs. Japan, 6 a.m. Monday’s Game Cuba vs. Game 4 loser, 6 a.m.AUTO RACINGRace week NASCAR SPRINT CUP KOBALT TOOLS 400 Site: Las Vegas.Schedule: Today, race, 3 p.m. (FOX, 2:30-6 p.m.). Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps. Kobalt Tools 400 lineup At Las Vegas Motor SpeedwayLas Vegas, Nev. Qualifying based on owner points; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford.2. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota.3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet.5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford.6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota.7. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford.8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet.10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.11. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota.12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota.14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.15. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota.16. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford.17. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.18. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota.19. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford.22. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford.23. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.24. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet.25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet. 26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota.27. (51) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet.28. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota.29. (34) David Ragan, Ford.30. (13) Casey Mears, Ford.31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford.32. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota.33. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet.34. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford.35. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet.36. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford.37. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet.38. (30) David Stremme, Toyota.39. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford. Qualifying based on attempts 40. (95) Scott Speed, Ford.41. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota.43. (35) Josh Wise, Ford. Failed to Qualify 44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.Columbus at Detroit, 5 p.m.Montreal at Florida, 6 p.m.Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7 p.m.N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Calgary at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS NCAA: Miami clinches ACC title Continued From Page 1B COURTESY PHOTOTigers recognized for teamwork, academicsAttorney Fred Koberlein Jr. and the Rountree-Moore Auto Gr oup are donating University of Florida baseball tickets for each weekend home series to four Columbia High players selected by coach Jonathan Ulsh for their teamwork and c lassroom performance. The selected Tigers will enjoy reserved club-level seats as a reward for extracurricular activities while still maintaining their academics. Pictured at the fi rst presentation are Ulsh (from left) Bryan Blair, general manager for Rountree-Moore Chevro let, players Alex Milton, Dalton Mauldin, Levi Hollingsworth and Andrew Johnson, and Koberlein. you’re going to drown, you want to die, don’t swim. If you want to live, the life raft is over there, you’ve got to swim to it. “As a matter of fact, it’s kind of breezing away from you, so you’re going to have to swim real hard, and they did.” Kentucky’s win ended a two-game losing streak and increased the prospect that the Wildcats needed to win the SEC tournament in Nashville to secure a bid. The Wildcats came away with their second win against a Top-25 opponent — they also beat then-No. 16 Mississippi — and fol-lowed up another quality win against Missouri two weeks ago. Julius Mays’ two free throws with 9.4 sec-onds remaining capped Kentucky’s comeback, a fit-ting end for the fifth-year senior transfer playing his final regular season game for the Wildcats. He fin-ished with 13 points. “I have had big moments in my college career, but that one was probably my biggest one because we needed that win more than anything to keep our hopes alive,” said Mays, honored before the game along with senior guard Twany Beckham. “I told coach when we went into that timeout that I wanted the ball. He didn’t draw the play the way I ran it, but I wanted that ball and I wanted to shoot those free throws.” Archie Goodwin’s nine second-half points set the stage for Kentucky’s rally. With the Wildcats trailing 57-50, the freshman scored five straight points and Ryan Harrow (13 points) added two free throws to tie the game.No. 6 Miami 62, Clemson 49CORAL GABLES — Down to its third try and last chance, Miami came through. Kenny Kadji scored a season-high 23 points to help the sixth-ranked Hurricanes win the Atlantic Coast Conference championship outright by beating Clemson 62-49 on Saturday. Kadji also grabbed 12 rebounds and Miami (24-6, 15-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) clinched its first outright men’s basket-ball league title after being foiled in consecutive losses to Duke and Georgia Tech. The Hurricanes tied the school record for victories set in 2001-02, when they went 24-8, and improved to 14-1 at home in their regu-lar-season finale. The league championship is the second for the Hurricanes, who shared the Big East Conference title in 2000. Clemson (13-17, 5-13) has lost six consecutive games and nine of its past 10.Florida State 71, North Carolina State 67TALLAHASSEE — Freshman Devon Bookert scored a career-high 18 points, Michael Snaer added 17 and Florida State fought back from an eight-point deficit in the second half to beat North Carolina State 71-67 on Saturday in the regular-season finale for both teams. Two free throws by Bookert gave the Seminoles (17-14, 9-9 Atlantic Coast Conference) their first lead of the second half at 57-55. He then added a jumper with 2:01 left to snap a tie at 62 with 2:01 left and three free throws in the final 1:23.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 3B3BSPORTSIndians going strong JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Andrew Kluess reacts while lifting 335 pounds at a weightlifting meet Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Andrew Baker spots Blair Chapman whil e participating in a weightlifting meet against Santa Fe and Bronson high schools on Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Brason Caley attempts to get under the bar as he lifts 285 pounds over his head. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterAndrew Baker bench presses 230 pounds during a meet on Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Chris Waites struggles to even out 300 p ounds during a clean-and-jerk portion of a weightlifting meet Monday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSports Diamond days for CHS JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kayli Kvistad is untagged as she safel y steals second base against Lafayette High. The Lady Tige rs are 11-1 so far this season. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Columbia High School varsity softball team congratulate each other while in a huddle after earning an out against Lafayette High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High assistant coach Joey Edge advises Jorda n Culp while on first base in a game earlier this week JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Sam Bass looks to see where a foul ba ll lands. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brent Stalter connects with a pitch on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Lauren Eaker collides with a Lafayette High runner while attempting to make a play on Thursday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 5B5BSports Highs and lows for Fort White JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Caitlyn Bruce jogs to first base after a w alk in a game against Santa Fe High on Feb. 22. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s softball team experienced highs and lows last week. The Lady Indians (2-7, 1-3) won their first district game, an 18-7 romp over Williston High on Tuesday, but fell to P.K.Yonge School, 8-0, on Thursday. Both games were on the road. Fort White’s home game against Keystone Heights High was moved from Friday to Monday and will be played at 6 p.m. It will be the first of three home games for the Lady Indians during the week — Williston High follows at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Interlachen High at 7 p.m. Thursday. Fort White’s home game against P.K. Yonge on March 21 will be a “Katching 4 Konlin” March of Dimes fundraiser for premature babies. Konlin Rhoden, son of Brittany (Webb) Rhoden and Ryan Rhoden of Starke, was born three months pre-mature on Oct. 11, 2011. He weighed 1 pound, 12 ounces and was 14.2 inches long. Konlin is now a healthy at 17 months and will be at the game for fans to meet. Fort White coach Cassie Sparks is selling Team Konlin T-shirts for $12 and donations also will be accepted at the game. All money collected will go to the March of Dimes. The family’s goal is $10,000. Fort White and P.K. Yonge players will wear the Team Konlin shirts at the game. “The mission of March of Dimes is ‘to improve the health of babies by prevent-ing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality,’” Sparks said. “We encourage everyone to purchase a T-shirt to go toward the cause and wear your shirts to the game.” For details, call Sparks at (352) 318-0851. Lady Indians plan fundraiser on March 21 Barber close in Puerto Rico OpenAssociated PressGRANDE, Puerto Rico — Fabian Gomez of Argentina made four birdies on the back nine for a 7-under 65 that gave him a share of the lead with Scott Brown going into the final round of the Puerto Rico Open. Jordan Spieth made a hole-in-one and shot a 66, putting him in the group at 14-under 202 that included Lake City native Blayne Barber, Steve LeBrun and Brian Stuard. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s junior varsity softball team are (front r ow, from left) Hayes Fulford, Callie Ward, Kaitlyn Hill, Miracle Holton, Breland Phelps, Shani a Pelham, Madison Johnson (back row, from left) Carol Glenn, Hanna Baker, Enigiah Manning Emily Harvey, Lexus Eaker, Jazman Myers and Coach Jamie Crews.Junior varsity softball team off to strong startBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s junior varsity softball program is off to a hot start in 2013 as the Lady Tigers enter their first year under head coach Jamie Crews. The Lady Tigers have put together a 4-2-1 record so far this season behind the pitching of Leslie Ann Ronsonet, who also competes with the varsity when the junior varsity doesn’t have a game sched-uled. Ronsonet has pitched in seven games so far this year and has compiled a 4-2 record. Ronsonet has a 4.40 ERA and has allowed 29 hits and 27 walks. She’s struck out 23 batters in over 30 innings of work. Jazman Myers leads the team with 10 hits on the sea-son and is tied for the team lead with Enigiah Manning with seven RBIs. Hayes Fulford and Callie Ward are second on the team with seven hits apiece while Ronsonet and Emily Harvey each have six hits. Harvey leads the team with 3 doubles on the year and Fulford, Myers and Harvey each have a triple. Kaitlyn Hill and Ronsonet each lead the team with five stolen bases. The Lady Tigers are batting .338 as a team and have a .404 on-base percentage. CHS takes top spot at State Road 100 meetBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High took home the championship in the State Road 100 meet against Bradford, Keystone Heights, Palatka and Union County high schools this week. The Tigers finished with a 95 to finish near-ly 60 points ahead of second-place Keystone Heights. First place finishers for the Tigers were: Q 129-pound, Kenny Paul, 360-total Q 139-pound, Tony Springborn, 445 total; Q 154-pound, Antonoio Pelham, 510 total; Q 169-pound, Blake Kuykendall, 525 total; Q 183-pound, Drew Clark, 595 total; Q 199-pound, Trey Marshall, 545 total Q Hwy, Laremy Tunsil, 640 total. Columbia will compete in the Indian Invitational at Fort White High at 4 p.m. on Tuesday. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Felix Woods attempts to bench 270-pounds

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS INDIANS: Defeat Santa Fe High, 2-1 Continued From Page 1B Snead also went the dis tance, with three hits, two earned runs, three walks and eight strikeouts. After Fort White did its damage in the first inning, the Indians went hitless the rest of the way and had only three more base runners. Snead threw just 83 pitches. I approached it like a nor mal game, Howell said. It is still baseball regardless of who is pitching. I have to give a big shout-out to everybody who was making defensive plays throughout the game. I needed that. Brady Wilkinson led off the game for the Indians with a single to center field. Kody Moniz bunted him to second base and Kevin Dupree lashed an 0-2 pitch in the left-field corner for an RBI-double. Anthony Gonzalez ran for Dupree and after Willie Carter walked they pulled off a double steal. Howell then sliced a single to right field to score the run. (The early runs) fired me up a little bit, Howell said. When you can work with a lead, it makes it easi er on me. Tyler Barron scored Santa Fes run after a twoout single. He stole second base and scored on a single by Chad Stockdale, the first of his two hits. Stockdale stole second, but was denied scoring when sec ond-baseman Rhett Willis made a diving stop on a ground ball and got the out at first base. Howell stabbed a line drive with the bases loaded in the first inning, and thirdbaseman Trace Wilkinson earned praise from coach Mike Rizzi and Howell. Wilkinson snagged a leadoff line drive in the sixth inning that was headed for a double and handled all five ground balls hit his way. It was a great win and what made it for our seniors is they had never beaten Santa Fe before today, Rizzi said. Anytime you face Kirby, you know you are going to be in a close ball game. I have to men tion our third-baseman. He is only a sophomore and he made every play today. With our pitching, good defense is our M.O.; if we do it, we have a chance to win. Santa Fe fell to 7-2 and 1-2 in District 5-4A, but Raiders head coach Todd Gray appreciated the effort. It was a hard-fought battle, Gray said. You had two pitchers who pitched their butts off. (Snead) may have been a little rusty to begin with and we have got to adjust to that. Well learn from it and move on. Fort White (8-1, 4-0) hosts Bradford High at 7 p.m. Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Kevin Dupree hits a shot earlier this season. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High pitcher Levi Hollingsworth throws a pitch while playing against Valdosta High on Thursday. CHS: Tough district start Continued From Page 1B enough to keep them in games, but they havent been able to get over the slump at the plate. Dalton Mauldin went 4 1 3 innings for the Tigers, allowed five hits, struck out five batters, walked one and gave up three earned runs. Atlantic Coast struck early with Nick Koslowski hitting a triple to score Evan Fernandez and take a 1-0 lead after the first inning. Chip Deveitt scored off a David Moses bunt in the fourth inning and Josh Nelson drove in Moses for a 3-0 lead. Atlantic Coasts final run came with Moses scoring off a Hernadez it in the sixth inning to give the Stingrays a 4-0 lead. Columbia (1-7, 0-1 district) plays host to Lincoln High at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday.

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com M any people would cringe at the idea of working in their chosen field of expertise for more than 50 years, especially if they had to look in someones mouth at incisors, canines, molars and premolars all day. However, for local dentist Dr. Robert E. Marks, DDS, the past five and a half decades have been a labor of love. On Monday, Marks will cel ebrate his 50th year of working as a dentist in Lake City. Marks works at Southwest Family Dentistry, 389 SW Chapel Hill St. Marks served in the Army after attending dental school and he also did dental work for two years while serving in the Army in Fort Benning, Ga., before he moved to Columbia County. Ive had 55 years in the mouth, he joked, noting he spent three years in dental school, two years in military dentistry and 50 years working as a dentist in Lake City. Marks, 78, opened his first office in 1963 in the Lake City Plaza. His office, which was built to his specifications, sat on the south end of the plaza. His first patient on March 11, 1963, was William Bill Baldwin. His office has an all-brick facing, different from all the other buildings in the plaza. Some 23 years later, when Marks decided to move his prac tice to a new location, he sought and found Baldwin, who once again served as his first patient in the new office. Originally from Knoxville, Tenn., Marks moved to the area after talking to a dental school friend who practiced in Tallahassee and has remained here. How a young fellow, 28 years old, could expect to go in a totally strange community with three dentists in it and expect to make a living the man would have to 1CBIZ FRONT T he Suwannee River Valley Marketing Group is proud to announce its annual Tourism Week Awards Luncheon will be held on Wednesday, May 15, beginning at 11:30 a.m., at the Lake City Holiday Inn & Suites. The event is open to all hotel, motel, campground, attractions, restaurants, state parks, recreation businesses and elected officials in Columbia, Hamilton and Suwannee counties. The luncheon is intended to highlight the important role of tourism for the economic health and job Tourism awards luncheon coming Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of March 10-16, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. FAMILY MEAL Plus Tax Expires in 30 days $ 13 Plus sales tax. Expires in 30 days. Plus sales tax. Expires in 30 days. $ 16 PIZZA TRIO 3 Medium 1-Topping Pizzas $ 5 (8 Cheese or Pepperoni Pizza) LUNCH PLUS A PEPSI 10AM-3PM $ 12 Choose Any 2 Favorites: Medium 1-Topping Pizza, MIX & MATCH Plus sales tax. Expires in 30 days. FT. WHITE 7905 S.W. Hwy 27 corner of Hwy. 27 & Hwy. 47 inside the B&B Food Store 497-1484 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE CITY 5735 SW State Rd. 247 corner of SR 242 & SR 247 inside the B&B Food Store 752-3111 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE BUTLER 280 West Main St. next to Mercantile Bank 496-2878 CARRY-OUT ONLY LIVE OAK 6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln. In Walmart Plaza 330-0331 CARRYOUT ONLY LAKE CITY 857 Southwest Main Blvd. in Lake City Plaza 755-7050 50 years of dentistry JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Local dentist Dr. Robert E. Marks looks at X-rays of a patients teeth. On Monday, Marks, 78, will celebrate his 50th anniversary as a Lake City dentist. Dr. Robert Marks opened office here five decades ago. COUNTY TOURISM Harvey Campbell 386-758-1397 TOURISM continued on 2C DENTIST continued on 2C PROFESSIONAL MILESTONE

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Kuykendall in President’s Club John Kuykendall of GulfCoast Financial Services, Inc., has been inducted for the second time into Summit Brokerage Services’ President’s Club. The President’s Club is an award given to top producers within Floridabased Summit Brokerage. Before join-ing Summit Brokerage Services in November 2010, Kuykendall held the President’s Club distinction since 2006 with Cambridge Investment Services, Inc. Kuykendall is based in Lake City and is president of GulfCoast Financial Services. A Registered Investment Adviser, GulfCoast Financial Services specializes in developing investment and retirement strat-egies for individuals, families, and business owners.Google to cut more Motorola jobs NEW YORK — Google is cutting an additional 1,200 jobs in its Motorola division as the unprofitable cellphone maker struggles to compete. Last summer, Google Inc. announced 4,000 Motorola job cuts. The latest reductions are in addition to those. BUSINESS BRIEFS Kuykendall TOURISM: Suwannee River Paddling Festival to be held in Apri l Continued From Page 1Acreation in the Suwannee River Valley. Awards will be presented in each of nine categories and anyone employed in a tour-ism-related job is eligible to win. Nomination forms can be obtained by calling Lori Regan at (386) 758-1312 or on the organi-zation’s web site at www.suwan-neevalley.org. The deadline for nominations is 5 p.m. April 30. The award recipients are chosen by a tourism industry panel and the Columbia County Tourist Development Department direc-tor. The nine categories for the awards luncheon are listed below. Outstanding Hotel Employee.Outstanding Campground Employee. Outstanding Management Employee. Outstanding Attractions Employee. Outstanding Agri-Tourism Partner. The “Always There” Award.Best Strategic Partner.The Director’s Award for Excellence in Tourism. Community Service Award.Record tax collectionsAccording to the Florida Department of Revenue, “bed tax” collections for Columbia County totaled $629,694 for the 2012 calendar year, an increase of $17,087 over 2011. We cur-rently have a 3 percent Local Option Tourist Development Tax (bed tax) in Columbia County. After a recommendation by the Columbia County Tourist Development Council, the Board of County Commissioners is cur-rently considering an additional 1 percent levy for the bed tax. If approved, the additional penny will generate approximately an additional $200,000, which would be utilized to pay the TDC portion of debt service on a nearly $3 million upgrade at the Southside Recreation Complex. The improvements include ADA compliant sidewalks, new bleachers with railing, safety and sun netting around the playing fields, new lights at the girls softball complex, three new con-cession and rest room buildings, revamped playing surfaces, addi-tional parking, upgrades to soc-cer field lighting, landscaping, new signage and other items.Hotel occupancy risesMeanwhile, Smith Travel Reports shows Columbia County with an 8 percent increase in occupancy for January of 2013, compared to a year ago. Average Daily Rate was down slightly at $68.40, compared to $68.80 last year. Total room revenues and Revenue Per Available Room were both up 7.3 percent for January of this year.Paddling FestivalThere has been plenty of discussion over the course of the past year about water resources both in the Suwannee River Valley and throughout much of North Florida. As you know, the Suwannee River, Santa Fe River, Icetucknee Springs, etc., are crucial assets not only in terms of being a tourism asset for our area, but contributing signifi-cantly towards the quality of life here. The inaugural Suwannee River Paddling Festival will be hosted by Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park during the weekend of April 5-7. A benefit concert will be held that Friday evening with proceeds going to the Florida Springs Institute. Performers will include Tammerlin, Tom Shed, Magda Hiller and Grant Peeples. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. On Saturday, there will be a canoe trip from Spirit of the Suwannee to Suwannee River State Park where there will be overnight camping. On Sunday, April 7, paddlers will be shuttled to Madison Blue Spring for a pad-dle back to the state park. The weekend will also feature kayak/canoe demonstrations and the opportunity to hear from local experts dedicated to preserving North Florida’s springs, rivers and watersheds. For additional information on the event and pricing for the var-ious activities, go to the website at http://paddleflorida.org/. You can also contact event organizer Bill Richards, 352-388-8342. DENTIST: Dr. Marks marks 50 years as dentist here Continued From Page 1C be nuts,” Marks said. But through time, he proved he wasn’t nuts and turned a small opportunity into a career and living for him and his family more than 50 years later. “It’s been a good time, a great career and this is a great place,” he said. These days, Marks only works a limited number of hours each week. Most of the work is handled by his partner, who purchased the practice four years ago, John A. Batlle III. “He bought me out four years ago and that means he bought the equipment and the patients,” Marks said. “I rent him the building and he keeps me from having to work 65 hours a week. He’s a wonderful friend and a great dentist. I would recommend him to any and every body. He’s a terrific man.” Batlle also was complimentary of Marks. “Dr. Marks is a gentleman, a superb clinician and he has a great love for the people of Columbia County and Lake City,” Batlle said. “He’s just been a tremendous asset to the people of this, area and he’s been a selfless provider for the den-tal health for people in this area.” Batlle said Marks has been able to work in the area for 50 years a for several reasons. “The quality of his work is absolutely superb, he’s a gentleman and he has a love for his patients,” he said. “He goes back three genera-tions with many families in Columbia County, and people who know him love him and he loves his patients, as well.” “You almost have to be another dentist to appreciate the quality of his work,” Batlle continued. “It’s been a pleasure to work with him and come behind him to serve the patients of our practice.” Marks is also well known for his community work with the Rotary Club of Lake City, as well as serv-ing as a Cub Scout troop leader for Troop 87, where he and Bill Wheeler were scout masters. As scout mas-ters, the two had five Eagle Scouts. Marks who has dental patients from Suwannee, Hamilton, Gilchrist and other nearby counties, said Columbia County really supported he, his wife and his four children. “I’ve been blessed by all these thousands of patients who did that for me, and I wish them God speed and to do it with my blessings,” he said. “Those who have gone before, may God rest their souls and those who remain, I wish them every hap-piness and success.” “It’s been a good time, a great career and this is a great place.”— Dr. Robert Marks, Lake City dentist Q From staff and wire reports

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 3C By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — A burst of hiring last month added 236,000 U.S. jobs and reduced the unem-ployment rate to 7.7 per-cent from 7.9 percent in January. The robust gains suggested that the econ-omy can strengthen fur-ther despite higher taxes and government spending cuts. The February jobs report issued Friday by the Labor Department pro-vided encouraging details: The unemployment rate is at its lowest level in four years. Job growth has aver-aged more than 200,000 a month since November. Wages rose. And the job gains were broad-based, led by the most construc-tion hiring in six years. Employers have been emboldened by a rebound-ing U.S. economy. The housing, auto and manu-facturing sectors have improved. Corporate prof-its are strong. And the Dow Jones industrial average is at a record high. The unemployment rate, which had been stuck at 7.8 percent or above since September, declined most-ly because more people found work. Another fac-tor was that 130,000 people without jobs stopped look-ing for work last month. The government doesn’t count them as unem-ployed. The unemployment rate is calculated from a sur-vey of households. The job gains are derived from a separate survey of employ-ers. The 236,000 jobs that were added in February is a historically solid total. And it would have been higher if governments were contributing to job growth, rather than sub-tracting from it as they have for nearly four years. Governments cut 10,000 jobs in February. If federal, state and local governments were adding their long-term combined average of 20,000 to 25,000 jobs a month, February’s total job gains would have been around 260,000. Hiring has accelerated since summer. Employers added an average of 205,000 jobs a month from November through February. They had aver-aged 154,000 gains from July through October and 132,000 from March through June. Stock prices rose modestly Friday after the report was released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time. Another day of stock gains would give the Dow Jones industrial average its fourth straight record close. The government said employers added slightly fewer jobs in January than the government had first estimated. Job gains were lowered to 119,000 from an initially estimated 157,000. Still, December hiring was a little stronger than first thought, with 219,000 jobs added instead of 191,000. Robust auto sales and a steady housing recovery are spurring more hiring, which could trigger more consumer spending and stronger economic growth. The construction industry added 48,000 in February; it’s added 151,000 since September. Manufacturing gained 14,000 jobs last month and 39,000 since November. Retailers added 24,000 jobs, a sign that they antic-ipate healthy consumer spending in the coming months. Education and health services gained 24,000. And the information industry, which includes publishing, telecommu-nications and film, added 20,000, mostly in the movie industry. The economy is generating more higher-pay-ing jobs in industries like accounting, engineering and information technol-ogy. That’s raising average pay, which will help offset the hit that Americans took from higher Social Security taxes and gas prices. Hourly wages rose 4 cents to $23.82 last month. Wages have risen 2.1 per-cent over the past year, slightly ahead of inflation. Higher pay is vital to the economy because consum-er spending drives 70 per-cent of economic activity. “We’re seeing the mix of jobs improve,” says Ryan Sweet, a senior economist at Moody’s Analytics. The improved job market can also benefit coun-tries that sell goods and services to U.S. consum-ers and businesses. “All you have to do is look at the trade numbers,” says Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at the Economic Outlook Group. “The strength in the U.S. economy is lead-ing to faster growth in imports.” Imports rose 2 percent in January from December. Those from China surged 7 percent. A stronger U.S. economy, Baumohl says, will also help a battered Europe, which is contending with high unemployment and a debt crisis. By LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — Yahoo’s leaked edict under CEO Marissa Mayer that calls remote workers back to the office lit the Twitterverse on fire, angering advocates of tele-commuting and other programs intended to balance work and home life. A new study from the nonprofit Families and Work Institute shows a tide moving the other way, with more workers now tele-commuting — and men signifi-cantly more likely than women to be granted the freedom to work at least partially at home. Left mostly unanswered is the question Mayer appears to be dealing with: Is that a good thing? Or has the rise in telecommuting led to a drop in productivity or creativity? Chances are, one telework supporter said, the tech giant just wasn’t doing it right. “If you don’t know where your people are and what they’re doing, then you haven’t imple-mented properly, so she’s got her hands full,” said Kate Lister in San Diego, Calif., co-founder of Global Workplace Analytics, which collects data on the sub-ject for its Telework Research Network. Slogging through decades of research on the value of tele-commuting is complicated. Small studies have been done by employer membership orga-nizations, companies looking at their own ranks, consulting firms and government agencies, along with academics. Some use small samples, others rely on a wild array of statistics from the U.S. Census, the Small Business Administration or the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The verdicts are mixed and the research often so focused on a work force or issue related to flex options that it’s dif-ficult to make conclusions. The new Families and Work Institute study, on the other hand, deals solely with employers in the U.S., delving into a broad range of family friendly programs, poli-cies and benefits. The institute found that 63 percent of employ-ers surveyed allow at least some employees to work partially at home on an occasional basis. That’s up from 34 percent in a comparable study done for the institute in 2005. More of the workers were higher-wage earners. Overall, the number of employees who work entirely from home was 3 percent, compared to 64 percent who sometimes do, said Ellen Galinsky, the institute’s president and co-founder. Men were significantly more likely than women to work par-tially at home — 67 percent com-pared to 59 percent of women, partially a reflection of more men in jobs where the option is pos-sible. Men also were more likely to work mainly from home. Neither Lister nor Galinsky has the inside scoop on what’s happening at Yahoo, but Galinsky was steadfast about one thing. “To take away all flexibility for everyone all the time is an overreaction,” she said. “If you know that people will be more innovative and collaborative by being together, that is a positive. But sometimes people need time alone. Why do the best ideas occur in the shower, or when we’re walking the dog?” Galinsky and others who study work-life balance don’t anticipate a backlash among other employ-ers due to Yahoo. And the com-pany itself followed up an internal memo leaked to the tech blog All things D with a curt statement indicating the prohibition might not be forever. Meantime, Lister said about 2.5 percent of the U.S. civilian population, or about 3 million people, work at home at least half the time, according to U.S. Census data. The rate of growth was slowed by the recession, with some researchers suggest-ing it’s flat at the moment. Why isn’t the number even higher? “The biggest reason is that managers don’t trust their employees,” Lister said. “They’re still managing the 21st-century work force with 20th-century styles of commands and con-trols, back to the days of sweat-shops and typing pools. They like to be able to see the backs of their heads.” The perceived benefits for workers are clear. While 37 percent of the companies in Galinsky’s report cite retention of employees as the main reason for developing workplace flexi-bility and other programs, Lister said 90 percent of teleworkers “feel being able to work flexibly improves their quality of life.” But what about for employers?The leaked Yahoo memo, written by Jackie Reses, the compa-ny’s human resources director, said in part: “Some of the best decisions and insights come from hallway and cafeteria discussions, meet-ing new people and impromptu team meeting. Speed and qual-ity are often sacrificed when we work from home. We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.” Researchers in the field note a dearth in credible studies that confirm a boost in creative flow or innovation from face time. And telecommuting may actually boost productivity, at least where it stands in the number of hours worked, said researchers Mary C. Noonan and Jennifer L. Glass in a study of telecom-muting published last June in the Monthly Labor Review, a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The two studied employees who work regularly but not exclusively from home and found that for them, telecom-muting was not a substitute for working onsite during an agreed upon work week but rather was in addition to a full week, at least half the time. Telecommuting: Was Yahoo doing it right?Internet company bucks trend on working at home.ASSOCIATED PRESSHost Savannah Guthrie (left) interviews Yahoo CEO Mariss a Mayer on NBC News’ “Today” show Feb. 20. Mayer caused a huge debate in the business world when annou nced Yahoo employees would no longer be allowed to telecommute for their jobs. The edict seems to go against the trend of allowing employees to work from home. ASSOCIATED PRESSA Border Patrol agent monitors the International Railroad Bridge in Buffalo, N.Y. Border security will take a hit as federal employees take furlough days becuase of budget cu ts.US adds 236K jobs in FebruaryBy SAM HANANELAssociated PressWASHINGTON — First there was a two-year pay freeze. Now furloughs loom, as federal agencies make personnel costs a prime target for across-the-board budget cuts that went into effect last week. The result: anxiety and low morale in a workforce often envied for its job security. “It would certainly put a strain on things,” said Jonathan Schweizer, 61, an environmental engi-neer at the Environmental Protection Agency in Chicago who could be forced to take up to 13 days of unpaid leave this year. “I’d probably have to run up some credit card debt or defer maintenance on my home that I’d otherwise consider important.” Government agencies vary widely in how they are dealing with the “sequester,” according to labor unions that represent federal work-ers. Federal workers could face seven days of furloughs at the Housing and Urban Development Department, while Homeland Security personnel might see twice that number. More than half of the nation’s 2.1 million federal workers could be fur-loughed over the next six months. The federal govern-ment is the country’s single largest employer, with its employees making up about 1.2 percent of the nation’s work force. “A lot of people think federal employees are fat-cat bureaucrats in Washington, but they don’t realize more than 85 per-cent of these workers live outside of D.C.,” said Tim Kauffman, spokesman for the American Federation of Government Employees. “A lot of them are not high-ly paid folks, like VA nurses and emergency response workers.” AFGE, which represents more than 600,000 federal workers, is trying to keep track of all the different fur-lough plans as their mem-bers face the prospect of lost wages during mandato-ry time off without pay and growing frustration about getting work done. It seems the federal workforce is under constant attack these days, particu-larly from Republican law-makers who want to shrink government and contend federal employees are over-paid with more generous benefits compared to the private sector. Federal workers brace for furloughs ASSOCIATED PRESSAnn Oganesian (left) of Newton, Mass., pauses as she speak s with a State Department employee about job opportunities with the federal governm ent during a job fair in Boston last month. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in February, a dding 236,000 jobs and pushing the unemployment rate down to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent i n January. Working Life

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 GROUNDSKEEPER Position #: OP9934Full-time, Seasonal (4/1/13-9/30/13 )This is manual labor involving the maintenance of College grounds. Responsible for a variety of grounds keeping duties involved in the upkeep and general maintenance of the College grounds. This is a seasonal position (April 1, 2013 through September 30, 2013). Minimum quali cations: High School graduate and previous experience in lawn care or landscape maintenance or any equivalent combination of training and experience. A High School equivalency diploma from the State Department of Education may be substituted for high school graduation. Knowledge of simple tools used in maintenance and construction. Ability to understand and follow oral or written instructions. Ability to operate simple machinery. Ability to read and write English. Skill in operating tools or machinery necessary to accomplish tasks. Desirable quali cations: Pruning experience, commercial grounds maintenance experience. SALARY: $ 8.98 per hour APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open Until Filled Persons interested should provide College employment application. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment nrMake it yours.nn Dollar General Market nrn"$%nnnnnrnrrnrnn&nrrnrnn nnnrnnn !nnnn&rrn#rn Branford, FL.We are hiring for the following roles: OO//%/0*0O0+.!Or*#!./O OO!.%/$(!/Or*#!./ OO+*!++ Or*#!./Ornnnnnnr$%'nnr rnrrnrrrnr&nnnn www.dollargeneral.com/careers, Keyword 13377 “Welcome.” Retail ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCIENCE Position #F999910 164 Duty Days-Tenure Track To Commence Fall SemesterTeach Physical Science, Physics, and/or Chemistry. Work with others in Science Department to develop and revise curriculum. Requires Master’s degree in a physical science. Ability to teach a variety of science courses. Experience in using technology in science teaching. Ability to work well with others. Experience with or desire to teach distance-learning, online and/or evening courses. Desirable qualifications: Ability and credentials to teach both physics and chemistry courses a plus. Community College teaching experience. Other undergraduate teaching experience may be acceptable. Ability to work with technology in the classroom. Willingness to explore Web based instruction and mutli-media presentational teaching technologies as well as a willingness to teach evening classes.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, ENGLISH Position #: F99909 164 Duty Days Tenure Track to Commence Fall SemesterFull-time, tenure track position teaching Freshman Composition I and II, Literature Courses (American, British, or World); other duties as assigned. Requires Master’s degree or doctorate with at least 18 graduate credits in English prefix courses. Proven ability to teach English Composition and Literature to freshman and sophomore community college students; ability to work with computers, web-based instruction, and multi-media presentational teaching technologies. Desirable qualifications: The ability, willingness, and qualifications to teach in other areas (such as history, speech, or humanities) are advantages. Substantive experience teaching both traditional and online courses is desirable. SALARY: Based on degree and experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/13/13 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 020Lost & Found LOSTCONURE PARROT, Green with Bluish head, Lost Sun. 3/3 behind KC’s Produce, Call 386-288-2093 Needs a good home. Female, tan/white. White socks, chest and tip on tail Wearing faded red collar no tags no chip HOME FOUND 100Job Opportunities05537616Needed Warehouse Clerk MUSTBE ABLE TO READ TAPE MEASURE Duties to include; Pull Inventory, Stocking, Receiving, Basic Computer Skills needed, some deliveries so a Valid Driver License is needed. Apply in person 3631 EASTUS 90 Lake City, FLor Email: guy@qiagroup.com 05537684Busy office looking for F/T Receptionist to handle incoming calls, emails, misc office tasks. Fax resume 386-754-5135 05537713Camping World RVSales is seeking a F/TTitle Clerk/ Administrative Assistant. Title work experience preferred. Please Email your resume toangela.cribbs@campingworld.comor fax to 270-495-6142 05537716Aaron’s now hiring Manager Trainees and Delivery Driver in Lake City. Management/Supervisory experience or 2 year degree required. Retail and/or collections experience a plus. Driver must have valid FL driver license and clean driving record. Apply at www.aarons.com/careers Aaron’s is an equal opportunity employer. 100Job Opportunities05537720HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel has the following Part Time positions available : Room Attendant Guest Service Agent Maintenance StaffMust have Experience Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. DRIVERS: ALLMiles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN NEEDEDwith tools and experience. Contact 758-4757 Busy local company looking for Sewing Machine Operator with some experience. Contact 755-6481 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dragline Welders/Mechanics needed. 3 years exp. required. Must be able to pass Welding Test. Email resumes to jrobinson@midstatefl.com F/T Office Position avail. A/R Customer Service, answering phones, scheduling & Misc office duties. Exp inExcel & Word. Email resume hrhd7@yahoo.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesGateway Baptist Church is accepting apps for paid nursery workers. Must be able pass a background ck. Must be available Sun mornings & evenings, Wed. evenings & for other events as needed. Aps available at 3252 SWSTRd. 247, LC or email gatewaychurch@bellsouth.net. Hiring Construction Manager position; Experience a must; Email resume to resume8920@gmail.com or fax to 386-758-8920 OFFICE ASSISTANT Law Firm is looking for a part-time assistant with a strong work ethic to perform routine office work. The right candidate will have great organizational skills, the ability to multi-task and have good communication skills. Experience working in a personal injury practice is preferred. Job Requirements:High school diplomaMust be accurate and detail orientedMust be excellent in the use of Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook and Word PerfectPunctual team player Please email your resume to lawfirm32055@gmail.com Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic Technician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with previous marketing skills, good oral and written communication skills, good people skills, experience with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Revenue Specialist II Florida Department of Revenue General Tax Administration Collections, Location: Lake City, FL. Apply at People First website http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com WANTED OTR Driver 2 yrs Reefer & LTL. Clean MVR a must. FL-Midwest. Great work ethic. Call 386-963-3153 120Medical Employment05537731LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL Maintenance Assistant needed. Experience required. Knowledgeable with all aspects of maintenance as well as the up keep of the grounds, carpentry & plumbing skills a plus. For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace Dental assistant needed 3-4 days/week. Must have expanded duties & clinical experience. Apply in person at Oak Hill Dental Group, 272 SWBentley Place, Lake City. F/TLab Tech needed for Family Practice office. Must have FL license & exp as Lab supervisor. Email resume to rharris@healthcareinstitute.net Nurse Practitioner needed for Primary Care Office in Alachua, FL. Please send resume to stacycami@yahoo.com or fax to 386-418-0622 RN/ LPN Cross City Rehabilitation has 2 full time position 7p-7a and 7a-7p available for LPN/RN. And a full-time Position R/N charge. Requires experience with strong organization. This is a 60-bed facility with a home like atmosphere. Come in for Application 352-498-2005 240Schools & Education05537693Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class3/18/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class3/11/2013• LPN 04/22/2013 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free to Good 2 cute gray tiger kittens, 4 mths old. Neutered shots, leukemia free, litter trained, not declawed, must stay together. 386-755-0057 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 420Wanted to Buy $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ CASHFOR TIMBER Contact 386-344-1782 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ WE BUYUSED APPLIANCES OR HAULAWAY. CALL386-365-1915 MARK 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2bd/1ba in a private country setting $450 mth $200 Sec Dep. Outside pets are welcome. Contact 386-438-0480 Cottage & RVLots avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Quiet Country Park 3/2 w/ screened porch $550 a month. Very clean. NO PETS! Ref & Dep required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes Demo your mobile home/free tear down at Palm HarborNew mobiles $39K off list John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 New Palm Harbor Homes Mobile Condo $39,900. Delivered to your site $0 down financing John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 2br/2ba MH on 1 acre. Columbia City area. $1,000 down $600 month 386-752-4597 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1br Apt no animals and Smoke Free. East of lake city near the college. $400 mth. Contact David 365-7690 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 FT. WHITE, PRIVATE IN TOWN, UPSTAIRS STUDIO APT. WATER & TRASH INCLUDED 1ST/LAST/SECURITY. 2 YR LEASE MUSTHAVE REF. $450, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent1bd/1ba Country, Nice, Clean, Huge w/in closet. New appliances. W/D, Satellite, & Utilities incl. $600 mth 386-984-7576 2BD/1BA Wellborn area, $675 mth, $450 Sec Dep. App required. Call 386-935-1482 3bd/2ba brick home. Nice area. Near WillowBrook. Hardwood floors, CH/A. $950 mth. No pets. 1st&last. Call 965-0763 Lake City Country Club fairway at back. 3BR/2BA1760 SQFT, carpet, tile, encl porch, all appliances, lrg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 820Farms & AcreageOwner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter

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M any kinds of fruit can be grown success-fully in our North Florida home gardens, but some unusual and rather misplaced fruit trees may take a little more grower finesse. One of these worthwhile plants is the attractive, but tempera-mental fig tree. The fig originated in the Old World tropics and has been cultivated in the Mediterranean since at least 5,000 B.C. Because the fig is adapted to dry cli-mates, our humid growing season causes additional disease and insect stress to the plant. Seasonal rains often arrive just in time to cause the skins of developing fruit to crack. In its natural habitat, the fig can reach heights of 50 feet. But here in the Southeast, our winter freezes often kill the top growth when temperatures dip into the teens. Our figs rarely become more than large, multi-stemmed bush-es. They have interesting bright green leaves, which often measure a foot long. The upper leaf surface has a rough, fuzzy texture which can be irritating to the touch for some people. Fig cultivars that grow and produce best here belong to the common types of fig. These are all female forms, and they do not require a pollinator. Brown Turkey and Celeste are two common cultivars that are reportedly more cold hardy than other culti-vars. These selections are both found easily in garden retail stores. The fruit of a fig develops unlike any other type. As the fig matures and becomes fleshy, the apex of the fruit will contain what is called an “open” or “closed” eye. If the fruit is an open-eye type, it means there is a natural opening into the end of the fruit. The opening makes the fruit more vulnerable to attack by insects or diseases. The closed-eye types are more desirable because the opening has grown closed and has fewer problems. Container-grown plants may be planted any time of year provided they receive irrigation until established. After that, irrigation is optional. except during severe drought. Figs need to be planted in full sun and well-drained soil. Young trees will benefit from one half pound of 10-10-10 complete fertilizer applied three times during the growing season from February through August. Each application amount increases to two pounds for larger trees. If you are still interested in growing a fig, or you are just curious about what other factors may limit your success with fig grow-ing in Florida, read more at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg214. If you are more determined than ever, find out how to grow figs in con-tainers, so you can avoid many of the above prob-lemsm at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg243 For further information, call the Master Gardeners at 752-5284. LIFE Sunday, March 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D A fter stumbling across the existence of Mt. Charleston, about 30 minutes north of the Las Vegas strip last year, Sue Towns and I decided we had to explore the area. It started with a fireside breakfast at the Mt. Charleston Lodge complete with mimosas. Outside, the temperatures average 15-20 degrees below that of the valley and ”the strip” below. There were still remnants of the last snowfall and ice on the ground, but the skies were blue and the air crisp. We found the Mary Jane Falls trailhead, which interested us. It was one of the shorter hikes and the thought of a waterfall at the end appealed to us. So off we went. As we navigated the gravel path, we had to sidestep some larger rocks, downed limbs, but mostly melting snow and ice. We didn’t make it far before I spotted some unfamiliar tracks in the icy snow. At first glance, they appeared to be paw prints from a dog. After further investi-gation you could see sharp claws coming off the ends of the paw print, larger than what you’d expect from man’s best friend. I called Sue back and asked her to take a look to confirm what I thought. Initially, she thought she’d walked right over a snake and didn’t notice. Needless to say it spooked us because there are bears in the area and we didn’t want to become one of the stories you hear about on the news — thinking “well they saw the paw prints but kept going anyway.” We stopped, discussed it and made it back down the trail much faster than we headed up it, all the while disappointed about not see-ing the falls and making it to the end of the trail. Fast forward a year later and another trip to Mt. Charleston, this time with Sonja Meads and Susan Eagle also in tow. We start-ed with another fireside breakfast and then made our way back to the trail-head for a second attempt. This time I tried not to pay attention to the icy snow and was determined to make it to the falls. Sue said she was going to look much closer this time. So we made it much further than we did the first time, and with more people, we had more dis-tractions, like navigating the terrain, stopping for photo ops and resting due to the altitude changes. But no bear paw prints in the snow. We neared an area that had a sign pointing right that said “Trail,” so we took the turn and thought we were heading towards the waterfall. The trail became much more strenuous as Jane Falls awaits our third attempt Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comW hether it’s waving to kin-dergart-ners or posing with environ-mentally friendly adults, Bellamy Beaver and The Ichetucknee Partnership marketing effort continue to spread a water conser-vation message through-out Columbia County. Bellamy, the 8-foottall mascot for TIP had just finished visiting about 80 kindergarten students at Five Points Elementary School, high-lighting the importance of saving water to protect the springs, when he and his handler, Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce marketing coordinator and TIP coordinator Abbie Chasteen, paused to explain the mission. The Ichetucknee Partnership was formed in 2008 when residents of the community and city and county government officials decided it would be best for the area to focus on protecting the springs. Local springs pro-vide residents inexpensive recreation but also bring environmental tourists to the area. In 2012, TIP partnered with the Chamber of Commerce to be the marketing arm of the organization and show the impact the springs have on Columbia County. The chamber launched an aggressive market-ing campaign that has revolved around visibility of the organization and springs awareness. The City of Lake City donated a surplus van to TIP and that organiza-tion had a colorful wrap that showcases Bellamy’s message of water con-servation and a beautiful springs scene. The van’s impressive visual isn’t just decoration, Chasteen said. She hopes the four lines of text on the back door will be read every time someone’s attention is grabbed by the flashy ride. “It’s really a spectacle,” Chasteen said. Those four lines give advice on what residents can do to help preserve the springs. They are: use less fertilizer, use less pesticides, maintain septic tanks and conserve water. Chasteen said Bellamy grabs the attention of young children, too. “The kids seem to listen better when Bellamy is around,” she said. “They love Bellamy.” Chasteen, a former first-grade teacher, said she enjoys traveling with Bellamy to the elementary schools to help spread the importance of water con-servation. She said students at the elementary schools ask questions like, “Does Bellamy eat apples?” and “Does Bellamy talk?” Chasteen laughed, and said although the kin-dergartners are more interested in finding out about the overgrown bea-ver, she knows the other parts of the message are sticking. The visits by Bellamy focus on ways households can save water. Chasteen said saving water can be as easy as turning the tap off while brushing your teeth. Spreading the word THE ICHETUCKNEE PARTNERSHIP Photos by TODD WILSON/ Lake City ReporterBellamy Beaver is excited about all the attention the Ichetu cknee Partnership’s Van received after it was wrapped i n a colorful outer cover.Mascot effective teaching kids about the value of s prings TRAVEL TALES Sandy KishtonQ D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Fig trees are attractive, but tempermental TRAVEL continued on 2D BELLAMY continued on 2D Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce market-ing coordinator Abbie Chasteen and Bellamy Beaver loo k through the Friday edition of the Lake City Reporter after Chasteen noticed a photo of Ichetucknee Springs was on the front page.

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By MICHELLE LOCKEAssociated PressCoffee, Irish whiskey and cream. Taken separately they’re a tasty trio. But combine them just the right way and in just the right proportions and they get even better, transforming into a drink that can perk up the gray-est day. We’re talking Irish coffee, of course, a drink that’s especially popular around St. Patrick’s Day, but good any time you want to add some zing to your caffeine. The secret, says Larry Silva, general manager of the Buena Vista Cafe in San Francisco — which serves up 2,000 Irish coffees a day — is how you put the drink together. At the Buena Vista — the original source of the drink in the U.S. — Irish coffee starts with a stemmed, 6-ounce glass that’s been pre-heated with hot water. And both of those elements are critical. A bigger or smaller glass would throw off the coffee-booze balance. A cold glass results in a tepid cocktail. For a touch of sweetness, the Buena Vista recipe adds two cubes of sugar, though other recipes call for brown sugar. The cream, meanwhile, should be fresh and just slightly whipped — nothing from an aerosol can. As for the whiskey, the Buena Vista is currently using Tullamore Dew. In general, what you are seek-ing is a smooth whiskey that won’t fight with the other flavors, says Silva. “Using a premium spirit elevates any cocktail,” says John Concannon, a California vintner who has teamed with Ireland’s Cooley Distillery to develop Concannon Irish Whiskey, which also makes a good Irish coffee. Though it seems likely that people have been introducing a drop or two of whiskey into coffee for a while, the drink as a cocktail was popularized in Ireland at the Foynes port, precursor to Shannon Airport, in the 1940s when chef Joe Sheridan decided to pep up some coffee with Irish whiskey to cheer chilly travelers. The drink was much appreciated and one of the passengers is said to have asked, “Was that Brazilian coffee?” Sheridan jokingly answered, “No, that was Irish Coffee,” and a tradition was born. San Francisco newspaperman Stanton Delaplane tried the coffee while fly-ing from Shannon Airport in 1952 and on his return got together with Jack Koeppler, then-owner of the Buena Vista, to recre-ate the drink. The trickiest part was getting the cream to float on top, something that was solved by whip-ping the cream just a bit, then pouring it carefully over the back of a spoon into the cup. Looking to brew a little Irish cheer yourself this St. Patrick’s Day? Try this classic recipe, or the choco-late-laced variation.IRISH COFFEE Depending on which version of the “original” Irish coffee you subscribe to, it is sweetened with either 2 sugar cubes or 1 teaspoon brown sugar. For a rich and chocolaty take on Irish coffee, stir 2 table-spoons of milk chocolate bits into the coffee at the same time as the sugar. Once the chocolate bits have melted, proceed with the recipe. Start to finish: 5 minutes Servings: 1Ingredients:Boiling waterHot coffee2 sugar cubes or 1 teaspoon brown sugar 1 1/2 ounces Irish whiskey 1/4 cup heavy or whipping cream, lightly beaten (but still pourable)Instructions:Fill a large coffee cup with boiling water to pre-heat it. Let it stand for about 1 minute, then empty the glass. Fill the glass three-quarters full with hot coffee. Add the sugar, then stir until dissolved. Stir in the whiskey. Top the coffee-whiskey blend with the lightly whipped cream. To do this, hold an overturned spoon over the coffee, then slow-ly pour the cream over it. The goal is for the cream to float on top of the cof-fee; do not mix it in. Part of the Irish coffee experi-ence is drinking the hot coffee through a layer of cool cream. you climbed switchbacks further up the side of the mountain on much narrower paths. It didn’t take long to realize this was a different trail, but we continued in hopes of something, though not sure what. The closer to the top we got, the more rocky and narrower the path became. Sonja and Susan stopped short, but Sue and I trekked on in hopes that we’d still see a waterfall. We almost made it to the top. You could see the larger boulders at the top and the trail became almost nonexistent. We decided it was also time for us to stop. We then headed back down, picked up Sonja and Susan and made our way back to the bottom where the trail diverted. We looked closer and you could see rocks across the snow as if it was blocked and you couldn’t go straight. It explained the confusion on why we didn’t continue forward and turned at the sign. We still enjoyed the hike and the beautiful scenery, but darn if we still didn’t see the waterfall. Perhaps another time. Third time’s a charm, right? 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 156 N. Marion Ave. Lake City Downtown 752-5470We know exactly what they want in a wedding or shower gift. We update their list as gifts are purchased, and gift wrap. E<74? +8:
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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy EILEEN AJ CONNELLYAssociated Press NEW YORK — What could possibly go wrong? An Australian billionaire is getting ready to build a new version of the Titanic that could set sail in late 2016. Clive Palmer unveiled blueprints for the famously doomed ship’s namesake recently at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York. He said construction is scheduled to start soon in China. Palmer said 40,000 people have expressed interest in tickets for the maiden voyage, which he intends to follow the original Titanic’s course from Southampton, England, to New York. He said people are inspired by his quest to replicate one of the most famous vessels in history. “We all live on this planet, we all breathe the same air and, of course, the Titanic is about the things we’ve got in common,” he said. “It links three continents.” The original Titanic was the world’s largest and most luxuri-ous ocean liner when it hit an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank on April 15, 1912. Only 700 people of the more than 2,200 on board survived the most famous maritime disaster in history, part-ly because there were not enough lifeboats to carry everyone. Palmer said an unknown when the original ship sailed — climate change — may play into a posi-tive for the new ship’s fate. “One of the benefits of global warming is there hasn’t been as many icebergs in the North Atlantic these days,” Palmer said. Passengers on board the replica will dress in the fashion of that period and eat dishes from the original menu, in dining rooms copied from the ill-fated prede-cessor. Joining Palmer on Tuesday was Helen Benziger, the great granddaughter of Titanic sur-vivor Margaret “Molly” Brown. Benziger, who agreed to serve on the advisory board for the Titanic II, said her great grandmother, who died in 1932, would have loved to see the Titanic rebuilt and complete the journey it never got to finish. In what some may consider a temptation of fate for a remake of a notoriously “unsinkable” ship that sank, a representative of the Finnish designer of the Titanic II said it will be the “safest cruise ship in the world.” Markku Kanerva, director of sales for marine design company Deltamarin said that while the vessel is modeled after the leg-endary liner — the diesel-pow-ered ship will even have four decorative smoke stacks mimick-ing the coal-powered originals — it will meet modern navigation and safety requirements. In addition, plans call for a new “safety deck” featuring state-of-the-art lifeboats, safety chutes and slides. The new ship will also have amenities unknown a cen-tury ago, like air conditioning. Palmer, who is funding construction of the ship himself, built his fortune in real estate and coal. Australia’s BRW magazine esti-mated his net worth last year at $4 billion, although Forbes puts it at $895 million. “I want to spend the money I’ve got before I die,” he said. “You might as well spend it, not leave it to the kids to spend, there will be enough left for them anyway.” Billionaire plans to build Titanic replica TRAVELASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS This artist’s rendering provided by Blue Star Line show s the Titanic II cruising at sea. The ship, which Australian billionaire Clive Palmer (below left) is planning to build in China, is scheduled to sail in 20 16. Palmer said his ambitious plans to launch a copy o f the Titanic and sail her across the Atlantic would be a tribute to those who built and backed the orig inal. Vessel would sail same course as ill-fated namesake. PetsASSOCIATED PRESSIngredients for fruity cereal milk and other items are pre pared for mixing at the Milk Bar kitchen in New York. Cereal i s going out of the box. Milk, ice cream, muffin mix and more are being infused with the flavor of the classic childhood tre at. Cereal being used to flavor variety of foods, drinksBy MICHELLE LOCKEAssociated PressBreakfast cereal flavors are jumping out of the box. Milk, ice cream, baking mixes and more are getting infused with the flavor of the classic childhood treat. There’s even a line of lip balms and a cereal-flavored vodka. Snap, crackle, what?The trend ties into a broader hankering for retro foods and flavors, heavy on the comfort factor, says Cathy Nash Holley, pub-lisher and editor-in-chief of the trade magazine Flavor & The Menu. Chefs have been using cereal for a while as crusts and coatings on savory items. What’s new is that cereals are being used in a more whimsical sense, even calling out the brand name for an added sense of playfulness. So you have desserts like the Shaved Ice Sundae with a topping of Cap’n Crunch at Talde in New York City or the Rice Krispies that top a flourless chocolate cake at Morimoto NY. Looking beyond restaurant menus, there are lip balms that come in the fla-vors of Trix (Silly rabbit, lip balm is for kids!?!), Cocoa Puffs and Count Chocula, among other flavors. Betty Crocker has cereal-flavored muffin mixes including Cinnamon Toast Crunch. And Three Olives released a cereal-flavored vodka called Loopy with a strikingly Froot Loops-style motif on the bottle. A fruity delight in every... er... shot? But it’s possible that may have been a little too spir-ited an attempt at the trend. After first pitching a story on the product to the AP, company representatives suddenly went radio silent, and ultimately declined to comment on their own story. A query to Kellogg’s, makers of Froot Loops, also netted a “no comment.” On the restaurant scene, Christina Tosi, founding chef of Momofuku Milk Bar, a bakery in New York, is a pioneer in cereal creations, an obsession that began in 2007 when she was devel-oping a panna cotta for the opening menu of chef David Chang’s Momofuku Ko restaurant. There were two problems. One, the dessert menu was a blank, and two, the new freezer that was supposed to hold ice cream for that nonexistent des-sert menu was on the fritz. Panna cotta seemed like a good idea, but it needed to be something a bit more interesting than the regular version of that dessert. By TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Hyperbaric chambers have been used for decades to treat divers with the bends, burn victims and people with traumatic inju-ries, but in Florida and a handful of other states they’re increasingly being used on ailing pets. Doctors at the University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine have recently used an oxygen chamber on dogs, cats, ferrets, rabbits and one monkey. Veterinarian and professor Justin Shmalberg said the capsule has been used to treat animals that have been bitten by rattlesnakes, hit by cars and those with infected wounds, among other things. “Any place we have swelling of tissue, we oftentimes are think-ing about the hyperbaric chamber as something we could do to decrease that,” he said. Shmalberg said the chamber’s high-pres-sure atmosphere of pure oxygen appears to help reduce swelling and aid healing time. He added that the school will begin clinical trials this summer to determine how or even if the hyperbaric cham-ber really is effective in speeding recoveries and healing animals. There is little research on hyperbaric treatments and pets, although veteri-narians who use the cham-bers note that most of the research for human hyper-baric treatments comes from trials done on rabbits and rats. “We want to make sure there’s really good science behind it,” said Dr. Diane Levitan, who owns Peace Love Pets Veterinary Care in Commack, N.Y. “It’s not a panacea. There are spe-cific reasons why this is helpful.” Levitan has a hyperbaric chamber in her practice and is writing an article for a veterinary journal on the treatment. Like Shmalberg, she has seen an improved rate of heal-ing for certain conditions such as herniated discs, abscesses and even post-radiation swelling. In humans, insurance companies will pay for hyperbaric treatment for several conditions, includ-ing carbon monoxide poi-soning, crush injuries and bone marrow infections, among other things. Some insurance companies won’t pay for hyperbaric treatment for wounds or ulcers, saying that it’s an “unproven” therapy — but some people swear by the treatment and seek out private clinics. It’s the same with pet owners; veterinarians with oxygen chambers say that people with sick pets often will often research the treatment and request it after becoming familiar with it through human medicine. “It is a very new modality for treatment in veteri-nary medicine,” said Dr. Andrew Turkell of Calusa Veterinary Center in Boca Raton. The devices used by UF, Levitan and Turkell are about the size of a loveseat and are manufac-tured in Florida by a Boca Raton company named Hyperbaric Veterinary Medicine. Turkell was the first doctor to sign a contract with Hyperbaric Veterinary Medicine, and estimates that he’s used the chamber 750-800 times in the past year and a half. “I find that it’s really very effective for any kind of trauma,” he said, adding that he’s seen improve-ments in pets that have been hit by cars that have been subsequently treated in the chamber. Wayne McCullough, the company’s CEO, said that most veterinary offices can’t afford to buy the cap-sules outright — chambers for humans cost between $50,000 and $150,000 each — so the company gives the clinics the chambers and then receives a cut on each treatment done by the veterinarian. At the UF clinic, treatment costs about $125 per session. McCullough said that his employees deliver and train veterinarians on how to use the capsule. Working with 100 percent oxygen can be dangerous, which is why pets going inside the chamber are patted down with water before the treatment so their fur doesn’t conduct static electricity and cause a fire. In 2012, the high-oxygen chamber of a Florida equine sports medicine center exploded and caused part of a building to collapse, killed a worker and the horse inside the chamber. The machine that exploded wasn’t one of McCullough’s chambers; it was a larger contrap-tion made for horses. The horse inside the chamber apparently struck the side of the machine with its foot, which caused the spark and fire. It under-scored the potential dan-ger of the capsules. UF hyperbaric chamber being used to treat pets ASSOCIATED PRESSA dachshund named Maggie is treated in a hyperbaric chamber for an infection and paw wound at the University of Florida’s College of Vet erinary Medicine, in Gainesville. Vets at the university here have used the chamber on dogs, cats ferrets, rabbits and one monkey.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 10, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge “Retribution” (N) (:01) Red Widow “The Consignment” News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Broken” Criminal Minds “Derailed” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin “The Family Way” Unleash the Power of the Female Brain With Dr. Daniel AmenCeltic Thunder Mythology The group performs in Dublin. 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(DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieSee Dad Run (N)“Rugrats in Paris: The Movie” (2000, Adventure) The NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Chumps” Bar Rescue “Downey’s and Out” Bar Rescue “Hogtied Ham’s” Bar Rescue “Tears for Beers” Bar Rescue “Empty Pockets” (N) (:01) Car Lot Rescue (N) MY-TV 29 32 -Beverly HillbilliesDick Van DykeM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Blueprint for Murder” M*A*S*H “Heroes” Thriller “Girl With a Secret” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!Shake It Up!Shake It Up!Shake It Up! (N) Austin & AllyJessie “Toy Con” A.N.T. FarmAustin & AllyJessieShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“The Ex” (2006) Zach Braff.“The Switch” (2010) Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman. 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(N) Vikings “Wrath of the Northmen” (N) (:01) Vikings “Wrath of the Northmen” ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys: Xtra BitesWild West AlaskaWild West Alaska “Fools Gold Fever” Gator Boys “Deathgrip” (N) Finding Bigfoot (N) Gator Boys “Deathgrip” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveWorst Cooks in AmericaCupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks in America (N) Restaurant: Impossible (N) Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Story of Jacob and Joseph” (1974) Keith Michell, Tony Lo Bianco. FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Philadelphia 76ers at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (N) Inside the MagicInside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 11World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Polar Storm” (2009) “Ice Quake” (2010, Science Fiction) Brendan Fehr, Holly Dignard. “Snowmageddon” (2011, Science Fiction) Michael Hogan, David Cubitt. “Super Eruption” (2011) AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Underworld” (2003, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. The Walking Dead “Clear” The Walking Dead (N) (:01) Talking Dead (N) The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249Dukes-Hazzard“Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. Tosh.0WorkaholicsThe Jeselnik OffThe Ben ShowSouth ParkSouth Park CMT 63 166 327(4:45)“The Karate Kid” (1984, Drama) Ralph Macchio. To Be AnnouncedThe Karate KidRebaRebaRebaTo Be Announced NGWILD 108 190 283Great Migrations “Need to Breed” Shark Attack ExperimentKingdom of the OceansKingdom of the Oceans “Fire & Ice” Sharks of Lost Island (N) Kingdom of the Oceans NGC 109 186 276Wild Justice “Meth Madness” Area 51 Declassi edWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “Storm Warning” (N) Mudcats “Turf War” (N) Wicked Tuna “Storm Warning” SCIENCE 110 193 284How the Universe Works:NASA’s Unexplained FilesAlien EncountersAlien EncountersAlien Encounters 2 “The Invasion” Alien Encounters ID 111 192 285Scorned: Love KillsScorned: Love Kills “Slave to Love” On the Case With Paula ZahnCatch My Killer (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501“Harry Potter Deathly Hallows”“American Reunion” (2012, Comedy) Jason Biggs, Chris Klein. ‘R’ Girls (N) Veep “Fundraiser” GirlsVeep “Fundraiser” GirlsSherlock-Game MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Joyful Noise” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah. ‘PG-13’ (:15)“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ “Million Dollar Baby” (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:30)“The Help” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Shameless “A Long Way From Home” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “Where There’s a Will” (N) House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “Where There’s a Will” MONDAY EVENING MARCH 11, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor (Season Finale) Sean makes a decision. (N) (:07) The Bachelor (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Capitol UpdateNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow Bow and quiver; emerald ring. Great Performances Andrea Bocelli performs love songs. Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 McGarrett’s mom visits. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries Dorrit goes missing. 90210 Dixon starts to fall for Michaela. TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones Brennan is accused of murder. 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Friends learn that maturity does not always come with age.“Grown Ups” (2010) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle “Always” Castle “Flowers for Your Grave” CastleDallas “J.R.’s Masterpiece” (N) (:02) Monday Mornings “Communion” (:03) Dallas “J.R.’s Masterpiece” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriendsFriendsFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:14) Bar Rescue(:21) Bar Rescue “Beach Bummer” (:27) Bar Rescue “Bottomless Pit” (:34) Bar Rescue “Tiki Curse” (:40) Bar Rescue A cockroach infestation plagues a bar. (10:47) Bar Rescue “Owner Ousted” MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldDick Van DykeThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieWizards-PlaceWizards-PlaceWizards-Place“Another Cinderella Story” (2008) Selena Gomez. (:10) JessieGood Luck CharlieJessieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252The Bible Noah endures God’s wrath. The Bible Joshua conquers Jericho. To Be Announced USA 33 105 242NCIS DiNozzo investigates a suicide. NCIS Senator asks Gibbs for help. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Familia” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Doing Hard Time” (2004) Boris Kodjoe, Michael K. Williams. “Lakeview Terrace” (2008, Suspense) Samuel L. Jackson, Patrick Wilson. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Sun Belt Conference, Final: Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball West Coast Conference Tournament, Final: Teams TBA. 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(N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Giuliana & Bill “Surgery Day” E! News (N) Studio E! (N) Chasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiBurning Love (N) After Lately (N) Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodBizarre Foods AmericaBizarre Foods America “Wisconsin” Hotel Impossible “Alpenhof Lodge” (N) Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern HGTV 47 112 229House Hunters RenovationLove It or List ItLove It or List It “The Doudelet Family” Love It or List It (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It, Too (N) TLC 48 183 280Lottery Changed My LifeUndercover Boss “Hooters” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “Chicago Cubs” Undercover Boss Canada (N) Undercover Boss “Chicago Cubs” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Cheap Pick” (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Tanked: Un lteredGator Boys “Gator Boy Knockout” Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Cat shin’ Kings “Outlaw Noodlers” Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 11Ship Shape TVCourtside Jones Women’s College Basketball Big 12 Championship, Final: Teams TBA. From Dallas. (N) Halls of FameWorld Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(4:00) “Stake Land” (2010, Horror) Nick Damici, Connor Paolo, Danielle Harris. Continuum “Family Time” (N) Being Human “Of Mice and Wolfmen” Lost Girl “Fae-ge Against the Machine” Continuum “Family Time” AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Footloose” (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer. “The Breakfast Club” (1985, Comedy-Drama) Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson. (:16)“Sixteen Candles” (1984) Molly Ringwald. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(:02) Reba(:40) Reba(:15) Reba Reba decides to write a will. (7:50) Reba(:25) RebaRon White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Tire Terrors” America the WildLion Battle ZoneBuilt for the Kill “Lions” Alpha DogsAlpha DogsLion Battle Zone NGC 109 186 276Inside Combat Rescue “Into the Fire” Are You Tougher than a Boy Scout?Are You Tougher than a Boy Scout?Alaska State Troopers (N) Inside Combat Rescue (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow the Universe Works:How the Universe Works:Mutant Beesinside out: Bugs (N) How the Universe Works: ID 111 192 285Behind Mansion WallsFatal EncountersFatal EncountersFatal Encounters “Not a Routine Call” True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Fatal Encounters HBO 302 300 501Forrest GumpBeyonc: Life Is but a DreamReal Time With Bill MaherKings Point“Tower Heist” (2011) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ (:15) Parade’s End (Part 1 of 5) MAX 320 310 515Harry Potter(:45) “Paul” (2011, Comedy) Simon Pegg, Nick Frost. ‘R’ “Of ce Space” (1999) Ron Livingston. ‘R’ “Final Destination 5” (2011) Nicholas D’Agosto. ‘R’ (:35) Banshee SHOW 340 318 545“October Sky” (1999, Docudrama) Jake Gyllenhaal, Chris Cooper. ‘PG’ Homeland “I’ll Fly Away” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “Where There’s a Will” Inside Comedy (N) House of Lies WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilVaried ProgramsFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowGunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312The Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieMovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried ProgramsTwo and Half Men CNN 24 200 202Around the WorldCNN NewsroomCNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesVaried Programs NIK 26 170 299Peter RabbitMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobRocket MonkeysOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! 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NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops DetroitAnimal Cops DetroitAnimal Cops DetroitPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesGator Boys: Xtra Bites FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(10:00) MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:23) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsWild JusticeVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? 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DEAR ABBY: I met a man 15 years ago who has recently come back into my life. I hadn’t seen him in years. He says he wants to be with me and marry me, and I very much would like to be his wife. I live in one state, he lives in another and his work is in yet another state. He does travel -not much -but some. The problem is I think he’s married to his job. He says he wants to be home with me once we are mar-ried. But then he says that once his work slows down, he won’t earn as much. I’m not sure how I can do this, with him work-ing in one state and living in another. Sometimes I wonder if he’s really in love with me or if he’s stringing me along. How can I be with him if I never see him? If you have any advice for me, please let me know soon. -HEARTS AWAITING DEAR HEARTS AWAITING: If a “little voice” is telling you this man may be stringing you along, make no hasty deci-sions. It’s important that you visit him at his home at least a few times, get to know his friends and fam-ily, if he has any, and see how you would fit in. You also need to decide how you would spend your “alone” time while he’s working. If you are an independent type, you’ll be able to fill the time. But if you’re not, then face the fact that as much as you care for him, you’d be miserable. So look CAREFULLY before you leap to the altar. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am an educated, open-minded, well-spoken, well-man-nered single man. I enjoy life and smile just about every waking moment. My problem is that people -especially women -think I’m gay. I assure you, I’m not! One woman recently lambasted me, saying her “gaydar” is never wrong, so I should just admit it to myself. This issue has prohibited me from dating, especially over the last few years, because ladies see me as a peer instead of potential partner. Also, people tell others that I’m gay, so there are precon-ceived opinions. Please don’t think I am anti-gay. I have several gay male and female friends. I don’t think my speech inflections or manner-isms make people assume this. I don’t know what to do. Help! -STRAIGHT, BUT NOT NARROW IN ALABAMA DEAR STRAIGHT: Because there appears to be some confusion about your sexual orientation, I recommend you talk frankly with some of your female and male friends and ask what it is about you that has created this impression. Obviously there is something about the way you present your-self that’s causing it, and the quickest way to find out what it is would be to ask direct questions of the people who know you best. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Insect pupa sold as fish food 'RHVQWJHWWKH memo, maybe 15 Make do19 Show instability2IIHULQJZLWKSRWDWR chips 21 Amount owed by an insurance policyholder 22 ,WVZRUWKLWMXVW IRU0V%HKDUVIDPRXVODVDJQDUHFLSH 24 Crop up25 Cleverness79V3HWHUDQG OLWHUDWXUHV%HQ :DONWKURXJK0DWKHPDWLFLDQ3DXO%ROLYLDQEHDUV%RUQDV%ULWLVKDFWUHVV Diana 6WDUWDOUHDG\35 $QLQVLJKWIXOORRN DWKRZSOD\LQJ0LVV%URRNVWRRNLWVWROORQ0V$UGHQ 39 Spanish beaches&ROH3RUWHUWLWOH woman 42 Slickers and JDORVKHV &RQJHUFDWFKHU &DSWDLQ+RRNV alma mater (QJLQHDWWDFKPHQW47 Crumbs48
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By LEE REICHAssociated PressWhat do pine cones and paintings have in common? A 13th century Italian math-ematician named Leonardo of Pisa. Better known by his pen name, Fibonacci, he came up with a number sequence that keeps popping up throughout the plant king-dom, and the art world too. A fibonacci sequence is simple enough to generate: Starting with the number one, you merely add the previous two numbers in the sequence to generate the next one. So the sequence, early on, is 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21 and so on. To see how it works in nature, go outside and find an intact pine cone (or any other cone). Look carefully and you’ll notice that the bracts that make up the cone are arranged in a spi-ral. Actually two spirals, run-ning in opposite directions, with one rising steeply and the other gradually from the cone’s base to its tip. Count the number of spirals in each direction — a job made easier by dabbing the bracts along one line of each spiral with a colored marker. The number of spi-rals in either direction is a fibonacci number. I just counted 5 parallel spirals going in one direction and 8 parallel spirals going in the opposite direction on a Norway spruce cone. Or you might examine a pineapple. Focus on one of the hexagonal scales near the fruit’s midriff and you can pick out three spirals, each aligned to a different pair of opposing sides of the hexagon. One set rises gradually, another moder-ately and the third steeply. Count the number of spirals and you’ll find eight gradual, 13 moderate and 21 steeply rising ones. Fibonacci num-bers again. Scales and bracts are modified leaves, and the spiral arrangements in pine cones and pineapples reflect the spiral growth habit of stems. To confirm this, bring in a leafless stem from some tree or shrub and look at its buds, where leaves were attached. The buds range up the stem in a spiral pattern, which kept each leaf out of the shadow of leaves just above it. The amount of spiraling varies from plant to plant, with new leaves developing in some frac-tion — such as 2/5, 3/5, 3/8 or 8/13 — of a spi-ral. Eureka, the numbers in those fractions are fibo-nacci numbers! You can determine the fraction on your dormant stem by finding a bud directly above another one, then counting the num-ber of full circles the stem went through to get there while generating buds in between. So if the stems made three full circles to get a bud back where it started and generated eight buds getting there, the fraction is 3/8, with each bud 3/8 of a turn off its neighbor upstairs or downstairs. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFE By KIM COOKAssociated PressNEW YORK — In a megabyte-driven world, you’d think kids would be playing solely with mega-tech toys. But at the recent Toy Fair 2013 here, buyers gathered like kids on a playground around the booths stocked with the classics — wooden play sets and ride-on toys, craft materials, table games and building sets. “Retro-style toys for the under-tween crowd are on the upswing,” says Adrienne Appell of the Toy Industry Association. Kids may see the unwired stuff as novel; par-ents appreciate having some balance in the toy basket. Here’s a look at some of the new offerings, and also which toys are worth hanging onto after kids outgrow them.WHAT’S NEWBuilding sets — including Lego — are hotter than ever, according to consum-er market research firm NPD Group. The category grew nearly 20 percent in 2012, the group said. Lego’s booth at the February fair included new entries in the Lego City and Lego Friends cat-egories, the new Galaxy Squad space fantasy sets, and the DUPLO Read and Build sets, among others. K’Nex representatives were writing orders for glow-in-the-dark roller-coasters, and construction sets based on Angry Birds, Pac-Man and Super Mario. The manufacturer’s Robo Battlers allow kids to make smaller figures and stick them together to make a more elaborate creation. And Tinkertoys are turning 100 this year, now rendered in durable high-density plastic. The color-ful components include perennial favorites like rods, spools and washers, as well as some new bend-able pieces. British-based Le Toy Van offered high-end, high-quality, creative-play toys: sustainably produced rubberwood and engi-neered-wood dollhouses, pirate ships and accesso-ries, with accompanying characters. The company’s faux food array included petit fours, fine chocolates and croissants. Some toymakers were touting franchises beloved by today’s kids’ parents: board games and figures based on Cabbage Patch Dolls, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Fraggle Rock. There were Bozo the Clown outdoor games. And New York-based Yottoy had old-timey books like “Harry the Dog,” ‘’The Poky Little Puppy” and “Scuffy the Tugboat” paired with plush toys. In arts and crafts, Crayola’s booth showed new kits for making cus-tom markers and crayons. Play-Doh demonstrated a new fluffier formula, while at Waba Fun, buyers were elbow-deep in Bubber, a never-dries-out play dough made with hollow ceramic beads and non-toxic poly-mers; Shape-It sand, which can be formed, baked, sculpted and then warmed back into a pile to start again; and Kinetic Sand, another polymer-filled sand.OLDIES BUT GOODIESWhen a kid outgrows them or loses interest, which toys are worth hang-ing onto? Those with sentimental value, perhaps — books, dolls or train sets that par-ents dream might one day be passed on to grandchil-dren. And then there are collectibles. “I think the ones based on popular movies and shows might have value. Couple that with a brand-name toy and you’ve got a potential collectible,” says Bene Raia of Boston, one of the antiques pickers on PBS’ “Market Warriors.” Hard-to-find sets of “Star Wars” Lego, for instance, are worth big bucks, she says; an out-of-production Rebel Snowspeeder was recently offered online for more than $1,300. And pay attention even to what’s in those fast-food bags. “One of the biggest surprises in toy collecting is the Happy Meal giveaway,” Raia says. Tie-ins to films offer an instant cross-col-lectible, that is, an item of value in more than one collectors’ marketplace. Whole sets command more on the resale market; a “101 Dalmatians” Happy Meal set from McDonald’s now sells on eBay for around $100. Raia says many toys from the Baby Boom era are valuable now — Louis Marx toy trains, Madame Alexander Cissy dolls from the 1950s, Parachute Jump erector sets from the ‘40s — especially if they have the original boxes and accessories. That’s key: Keep the packaging. “Some people will buy two boxes of Lego, one to play with and one to keep,” Raia says. “It might sound extreme, but for the ‘Star Wars’ series it might be a good idea.” When is it time to get rid of toys? Raia, a mother of four under age 10, says her rule of thumb is simple. “Anything that hasn’t been played with in the past three or four months, we give away.” Classic toys stay popular in digital age FOR THE KIDS ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSClassic toys and ones that promote creative, handson play were all the rage at Toy Fair 2013 in New Y ork. Among the big hits were a (above) ‘Star Wars’ Death Star set from Lego and K’NEX Robo Creature assembly kit (below left). Some classic toys, such as the Madame Alexander Cissy doll (below righ t) are worth keeping for their collector value year s down the road. ‘Unwired’ stuff highly popular at NY toy show. ASSOCIATED PRESSA spruce cone with a marked fibonacci number sequence. Nature follows a number pattern called Fibonacci Gardening