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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02033

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02033

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com On the final day of Black History month, more than 100 Columbia County residents gathered to cel ebrate their own history and con tributions theyve made locally. The 2013 Its About My Efforts Inc. Black History Elders Banquet was held at Richardson Community Center Thursday night with more than 100 people in attendance. During the threehour award ceremony, the orga nization presented 149 awards recognizing community elder con tributors, youth contributors and local business contributors. Photo displays from the Tuskugee Airmen Experience by Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Lohan said ready to change. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 61 34 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 283 Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION 1A NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Columbia County Fairgrounds Saturday, March 2nd 9am 5pm 10am 4pm Sunday, March 3rd FREE ADMISSION Friday Author to visit The Friends of the Library will present A Florida Road Trip with Tim Dorsey at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Author Tim Dorsey will make Lake City a stop on his tour for his new book, The Riptide Ultra-Glide. Free tickets are required and may be obtained at any library location. Saturday Breakfast with the Chief Lake City Police Department will hold a Breakfast with the Chief event from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Lake City Moose Lodge, 624 NE Williams St. A free complimentary breakfast will be available, as well as an opportunity to hear from and ask questions of Police Chief Argatha Gilmore. For more, contact Audre Washington at (386) 719-5742 or email washing tona@lcflapd.com. Spring yard sale The Wellborn Community Association will host a Spring Community Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community center, 1340 8th Ave. in Wellborn. A space is $5. Bring your own tents and tables. The monthly blueberry pancake breakfast is from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for children. For more info, call Wendell at 9631157, find us on Facebook or see www.wellborn communityassociation. com. Car, truck show The fifth annual Fort White Car, Truck and Bike Show will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fort White High School, 17579 SW State Road 47. A swap meet and barbecue cook-off will be included. Prizes will be awarded in several catego ries. Cost for participants is $25. Swap meet space is $20. Live and silent auc tions and a cake sale also will be held. Proceeds will support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. For barbecue cook-off information and registration, call Keith at (386) 497-WING. For vehi cle entries and other infor mation, call Browns Racing at (386) 497-1481. Saturday-Sunday Home & Patio Show The 10th Annual North Florida Home and Patio Show will take place March 2-3 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Saturday, March 2, the gates will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., while on Sunday, March 3, the event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bill to arm teachers filed By JIM TURNER The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE The states controversial stand your ground law would cover warning shots to fend off attackers and teachers would be able to pack heat on campus under bills now before legislators. Freshman Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk City, filed a bill on the one year anniversary of the shoot ing death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford that would free any indi vidual from prosecution for firing a warning shot or even simply brandishing a firearm to scare away a would-be attacker. The immunity measure would cover acts of self-defense as well as stepping in to protect others. On Wednesday, Rep. Greg Steube, R-Sarasota, offered a bill that asks for school principles to decide which teachers and staff can carry a concealed weapon while at work. Steube said the chances of a student getting hold of a weapon are minimized due to the bills requirement that anyone approved for concealed carry on campus must first undergo firearms training. Also, weve given a lot of flex ibility to principles in the bill, Stand your ground would be expanded under another. BILLS continued on 3A POPE continued on 3A Crash ends chase Photos courtesy BAKER COUNTY PRESS A high-speed chase through Madison, Suwannee and Columbia counties ended after the fleeing suspects swerved to miss stop sticks deployed by Baker County sheriffs deputies near the 325 mile marker on Interstate 10 and crashed Thursday morning. Multiple agencies involved in pursuit 149 people receive recognitions for their local contributions. Multiple law enforcement personnel searched for about three hours for the driver of the car after he fled on foot from the crash scene. By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com A high-speed chase that involved multiple law enforcement agencies ended when the suspect vehicle crashed and its two occu pants were arrested one after a three-hour manhunt. The driver, Terrick Shadon Lundy, 26, of Jacksonville, fled into the woods off Interstate 10 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Hayward Lofton, 86, kisses his wife, Corine, 82, after being named the Couple of the Year during the Its About My Efforts Inc. 2013 Black History Elders Banquet on Thursday. The two have been married for 60 years. Awards banquet ends Black History Month Papal throne empty for now Benedict flies away to begin retirement; cardinals huddle. By FRANCES DEMILIO and NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy Benedict XVI became the first pope in 600 years to resign Thursday, ending an eight-year pon tificate shaped by strug gles to move the church past sex abuse scandals and to reawaken Christianity in an indifferent world. As bells tolled, the Swiss Guards standing at attention in Castel Gandolfo shut the doors of the palazzo shortly after 8 p.m. Thursday, symbolically closing out a papacy whose legacy will be most marked by the way it ended a resignation instead of a death. In a changing of the guard, the Swiss Guards in their yellowand-blue-striped uniforms hand ed over responsibility of protect ing the 85-year-old Benedict to Vatican police as some of the faithful outside shouted Viva il papa! Long live the pope! The popes journey into ASSOCIATED PRESS Pope Benedict XVI leaves the Vatican in Rome on Thursday. AWARDS continued on 3A CHASE continued on 3A One suspect caught after fleeing on foot; other badly injured.

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LOS ANGELES L indsay Lohan is committed to turning her life around and wants to record public service announcements on the dangers of domestic violence, alcohol abuse and drunken driving, her attorney said. Mark Heller told The Associated Press that the actress’ plans are independent of a criminal case that could return her to jail on charges that she lied to police about being a passenger in her car when it slammed into a dump truck in June. The “Liz & Dick” star has been repeatedly sentenced to jail, rehab, and community service since her first pair of arrests for driving under the influence in 2007. She spent several months in court-ordered psychotherapy until a judge released her from supervised probation in March 2012. As part of the intense psychotherapy sessions, Lohan is in the begin-ning stages of trying to become an inspirational speaker to young people, he said. “I think she suddenly woke up one morning and had an epiphany and she suddenly realized and appreci-ated the seriousness of the events that led to her being in court,” Heller said. “She’s going to try to inspire hope in people,” he said. “I think it will be good for her. It certainly won’t hurt others.”Simon Cowell launches online talent contest LONDON — Simon Cowell has taken over television screens and radio airwaves around the world. Now he’s taking aim at the Internet. Cowell’s Syco Entertainment empire and YouTube announced Thursday that they are launching “The You Generation,” a global online talent contest that is seeking entries from people with “unconventional and original talents” — from musicians and pho-tographers to make-up artists, magicians and chefs. Syco says the contest, which starts next month and is due to run for a year, will seek audi-tions in a different category of tal-ent every two weeks. Entrants can upload their pieces on a dedicated YouTube channel, to be viewed by the public and judged by profession-als associated with Syco. There will be prizes — exactly what they are has yet to be announced — every fortnight and a grand prize at the end of the year. Syco calls the initiative an experiment aimed at discovering new tal-ent. It’s the company’s bid to tap the power of social media, which has launched millions of wannabe celebrities — and some genuine stars, including Justin Bieber. Anastacia cancels tour after cancer diagnosis DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Managers for U.S. pop singer Anastacia say she has canceled a planned perfor-mance in Dubai and an upcoming European tour after being diagnosed with breast cancer a decade after her first battle with the disease. A statement Thursday says the 44-year-old performer will cancel all appearances and travel. Anastascia, who has had multiplatinum album sales in Europe, Australia and elsewhere, was sched-uled to perform March 30 at the Dubai World Cup, the world’s richest horse race. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Actor Robert Clary is 87. Q Singer Harry Belafonte is 86. Q Actor Robert Conrad is 78. Q Rock singer Mike D’Abo (Manfred Mann) is 69. Q Rock singer Roger Daltrey is 69. Q Actor Dirk Benedict is 68. Q Actor Alan Thicke is 66. Q Actor-director Ron Howard is 59. AROUND FLORIDA Counties lose out in tax dispute TALLAHASSEE — A divided three-judge panel sided with online travel companies such as Expedia and Travelocity on Thursday in a dispute over how much tax they must pay on hotel rooms booked in Florida. A request for rehearing or an appeal to the Florida Supreme Court, though, is likely. The 1st District Court of Appeal panel voted 2-1 that tourist development taxes are due only on what the firms pay to the hotels, not the full amount they charge their customers. The majority affirmed a prior decision by Tallahassee-based Circuit Judge James Shelfer in a lawsuit filed by 17 of Florida’s 67 counties. The counties argued the online firms also should be taxed on the markup they charge their custom-ers — amounts that run into the millions statewide and nationally. Such cases also have come up in other states with similar laws and in federal courts. The online companies contend the markup should not be taxed because it pays for their services rather than hotel rent.2 officers shot; 1 dies of wounds FORT PIERCE — A St. Lucie County Sheriff’s deputy has been killed in the line of duty. Authorities say Sgt. Gary Morales was shot while making a traffic stop Thursday morning south of Fort Pierce. The 13-year-veteran was later pronounced dead at a hospital. A suspect is in custody. It was the second shooting of an officer in a mat-ter of hours in St. Lucie County. A Port St. Lucie officer was shot in the pre-dawn hours Thursday while responding to a domestic dispute. He was released from the hospital and expected to make a full recovery. No further details on the deputy shooting were immediately available.Man sentenced for old murders BARTOW — A man who told police that he was responsible for a pair of unsolved Lakeland homi-cides from the 1980s has been sentenced to 40 years in prison. As part of a deal with Polk County prosecu-tors, 48-year-old Anthony Jackson pleaded no contest earlier this month to two counts of second-degree murder and one count of attempted robbery. The Ledger reports that Jackson’s conviction is related to the 1984 slay-ing of William Clark Ford Jr. and the 1985 killing of 16-year-old Sharon Cheryl Boyce. For years, the two fatal shootings remained cold cases until Jackson called 911 on Dec. 10, 2011, and asked officers to meet him on a street corner in Tampa.Woman gets jail for animal cruelty PENSACOLA — A Pensacola judge sentenced a woman to 300 days in jail after she was convicted of animal cruelty for duct-tap-ing her dog’s injured eye. The Pensacola News Journal reports 46-year-old Mechele Potter also must pay fines and court costs. Authorities say Potter called animal control Sept. 18 to report a stray dog in her yard with duct tape on its head. Investigators later learned the dog belonged to Potter, who had placed duct tape over its injured eye but didn’t seek medi-cal attention. Animal control workers removed the tape and found the dog’s eye was red, swollen and pro-truding from its socket. The dog’s eye had to be removed. Officials say the cause of the injury is unknown, but it was made worse by Potter’s failure to seek help.Citizens faces class action suit PLANTATION — A class action lawsuit has been filed against the state-backed Citizens Property Insurance Corp. alleging the company deprived cus-tomers of windstorm miti-gation discounts through an arbitrary re-inspection program. Lawyers for the plaintiffs estimated Thursday that 226,000 customers have lost nearly $200 million in credits since 2010. Citizens gave wind mitigation credits to homeown-ers who hardened their homes against storm dam-age. The credits were sup-posed to last five years. But the lawsuit alleges Citizens changed the rules mid-game, embarking on a systematic re-inspection campaign that revoked millions of dollars in credits and was designed to increase customers’ premiums. It has been a particularly heated issue in South Florida where a large chunk of Citizens’ 1.4 million policyholders live. Citizens said in a prepared statement that the re-inspections were con-ducted under statutory authority. Thought for Today “ ” “Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.” — Rudyard Kipling, English author (1865-1936). Lawyer: Lohan committed change Saturday: Afternoon: 8-0-3 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 6-1-5-2 Evening: N/A Saturday: 4-12-14-25-35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture “For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and selfdiscipline.” — 2 Timothy 1:7 ASSOCIATED PRESSActress Lindsay Lohan listens to court proceedings Jan. 30 in Los Angeles with her attorney Mark Heller about charges that Lohan lied to police about her role in a June 2012 car crash. Heller told The Associated Press that Lohan is committed to turning her life around after a long series of legal tr oubles. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press Anastacia Cowell

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after the crash, and canine units were used to track him down. His passenger, Ronnie Benard Williams, of St. Augustine, was injured in the wreck and hosital ized in critical condition, according to police. Lundy suffered minor injuries but did not require hospitalization, law enforce ment officials said. He was taken to the Baker County Jail. A Florida Highway Patrol news release said the two will face multiple charges pending further investigation. The chase began when a Madison County sheriffs deputy attempted to stop the 2012 Dodge Charger for speeding. After pulling over, the driver sped away. Multiple law enforcement agencies became involved as the chase wound through Suwannee and Columbia counties before ending on I-10 in Baker County. Baker County Sheriff Joey Dobson said the sus pects 2012 Dodge Charger swerved around stop sticks deployed by Baker County deputies. When the driver swerved the car tilted onto two wheels and the driver lost control. The Charger ran off the highway and struck a large pine tree. They were going about as fast as they could go, Dobson said. Williams, 31, from St. Augustine, was arrested at the scene of the crash, but Lundy fled into a wood ed area where law enforce ment used heli copters, canine units, deputies and troopers to search the area. He was captured by Department of Corrections and FHP canine units, said Ed Seifert, public informa tion officer with Columbia Countys Sheriffs Office. Law enforcement shut down the eastbound lanes of I-10 and rerouted traf fic onto U.S. 90 while they searched for Lundy. Williams was first trans ported to Fraser Hospital in Macclenny, but because the severity of his injuries, he was moved to Shands Jacksonville. His condi tion was listed as critical at the hospital at 8:20 p.m. Thursday. According to FHP, both were not using seat belts. Initial reports from FHP said the chase began after a Madison County deputy stopped the suspects for speeding. When the dep uty was at the window of the car, the passenger reached under his seat. The deputy told the pas senger to show him his hands, and then the driver sped away east on I-10. The deputy then fired upon the suspect vehicle before it fled the scene, a FHP news release said. The Madison County Sheriffs Office did not return multiple phone calls seeking information about the incident. Also, there were reports of shots fired at law enforce ment during the chase. We cant confirm that that occurred, said Tracy Hisler-Pace, public infor mation officer with FHP. Dobson said he also heard there were shots fired at law enforcement but also could not confirm. We heard that, but cant confirm that, he said. Seifert said about 15 Columbia County depu ties assisted in the chase, including deputies at the I-10 interchanges at U.S. Routes 441 and 41 in the event the suspect exited the interstate. Columbia County depu ties also tried to stop the car with stop sticks, but the driver was able to avoid running over the devices, Seifert said. Nobody was injured, he said. That was our pri mary concern. LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 3A 3A O Most Beautiful Flower of Mt. Carmel, Fruitful Vine, Splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. O Star of the Sea, help me and show me you are my Mother. O Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. (Make request) There are none that can withstand your power. O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse. (3 times) Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands. (3 times) Say this prayer for three days and publish it and it will be granted to you. Thank you for answering my prayers. C OMMERCIAL & R ESIDENTIAL Custom Pools, Spas and Water Features Remodels Free Estimates Complete Pool Service Call for Specials (386) 365-5299 Licensed and Insured Lic# CPC 1457969 AQUATIC ART POOLS & SPAS LLC All you do is swim Just in Time for Spring! Area rivers continue to rise From staff reports Most river gauges on Georgia tributaries to the Suwannee River are cresting after back-to-back storms, according to the Suwannee River Water Management District. As the peak flows approach Florida, forecasts are showing a potential for higher stages on the Withlacoochee, Alapaha, middle Suwannee and Santa Fe rivers than ear lier forecasts indicated. Rainfall was similar to storms in March and April of 2009, which caused record floods on the Alapaha and Withlacoochee. The recent rains were less widespread and intense, resulting in lower expect ed stages than the his toric 2009 flood. However, the Withlacoochee near Pinetta could be higher than other recent floods. retirement began with an emotional send-off from the Vatican, with Swiss Guards in full regalia and prelates kneeling to kiss Benedicts papal ring one last time. Benedicts closest aide wept by his side as they took their final walk down the mar bled halls of the Apostolic Palace. As bells tolled in St. Peters and in church tow ers across Rome, Benedict flew by helicopter to the papal vacation retreat in Castel Gandolfo in the hills south of Rome, where he will spend the first two months of his retirement. Benedict leaves behind a church in crisis, still cop ing with the fallout of the sex abuse scandals, a cen tral Vatican administration torn by divisions, and what Benedict said was a crisis of faith, with baptized Catholics in places of ancient Christian tradition thinking they can do without God. In his final public remarks as pope, Benedict pledged to continue working for the good of the church in his retirement. POPE: Benedict begins retirement Continued From Page 1A BILLS: One would let teachers be armed Continued From Page 1A Steube said. If they want to designate one (teacher), if they want to designate many they can. If want to require them to put (the gun) in a safe they can. Its going to be completely up to the principle logistically how they want to imple ment the legislation. Steubes measure (HB 1097) comes as some conservatives nationwide and in Florida have called for arming teachers and guards at schools in the wake of the December shooting in the Newtown, Conn. Sen. Alan Hays, RUmatilla, is expected to file the Senate companion of the bill. Steube said hes received positive feedback from educators and school board members. However, school admin istrators havent lined up behind the armed teachers plan. Our members are say ing they would rather not have that, that theyd rath er have other security mea sures put in place, said Michele White, a spokes woman for the Florida Association of School Administrators. AWARDS: Contributions recognized Continued From Page 1A John Gay; a Black History Postage Stamp Collection by John Young, and African art work from Deepwell Studios and Public Work by Terry Bailey seemed to transform the Richardson Community Center into a local black his tory museum. During the awards cer emony, former Lake City City Council member Bettye Lane received the 2013 Woman of the Year Award. Im surprised and hon ored, she said of winning the award. Its such a good group and they do so many good things. Im just proud that they thought I do a thing or two in this com munity. I just enjoyed this. These surprises just make me feel good. Mel Turner received the 2013 Man of the Year Award and Hayward and Corine Lofton were recognized as the 2013 Couple of The Year. The couple has been married for 60 years. The event focused on community unity, and Bea Coker, Its About My Efforts executive director, explained why its impor tant to recognize communi ty members with an award ceremony. Its important to recog nize the community in this fashion because citizens need to observe the mini mal seemingly efforts of individuals so that they can determine how best they fit into the community, Coker said. A lot of times peo ple think if they dont have major contributions to make that they are not significant. It takes the contributions of a lot of citizens, a lot of businesses and a lot of indi vidual small efforts to have a big impact on improving our way of life. Thursdays award ban quet was the fourth year Its About My Efforts has held to celebrated the com munity. Gay, past president of the Chappie James Jr. chapter of Tuskugee Airmen Inc., was a presenter at the event. An event like this is basi cally to know who in the heck you are, he said. Its just an event to get together to know what youre doing, to have some ideas of what you should be doing and for the kids, to give them some thing to look forward to and let them know they are not by themselves and that they can be more than what they think they can be and to provide some leadership. The Rev. R.L. Gunter, Southern Christian Leadership Council state president, served as the events keynote speaker and delivered a message thanking residents for mak ing contributions for local history and also challeng ing the community to come together to improve living, educational, financial and economic conditions in Columbia County. Gunter ended his address by urging local leaders to unite to make condi tions better for everyone and he began singing the Christian spiritual Ive Got a Feeling Everything Gone to Be All Right, and the crowd joined in, creating a unified voice by singing several verses of the song, which essentially ended the event. CHASE: Two arrested after crash Continued From Page 1A Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter TOP: Bea Cocker, executive director of Its About My Efforts Inc., poses with local businessman Mel Turner, after he was named the 2013 Man of the Year during the organizations 2013 Black History Elders Banquet held at the Richardson Community Center on Thursday. ABOVE: Former City Councilwoman Bettye Lane embraces Cocker after being named the 2013 Woman of the Year. Lundy

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V ery few times in my life have I been impressed by the ability of a team to accomplish a mission quickly, quietly, and professionally. I was witness to the house fire that occurred the night of Feb. 19 in Three Rivers Estates and was not just impressed, I was awed, by the firemen who responded. My daughter and I were finishing a late dinner out on the deck over-looking the Ichetucknee. I was fac-ing the direction of a nearby house and didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary. Then I heard what sound-ed like three or four rifle shots in fairly quick succession. They sounded close although I couldn’t tell whether the sounds originated in the neighborhood or across the river. My thought was that some fool was celebrating like they do for Cinco de Mayo and was glad I was under cover so no bullets would return to earth through me. Shortly thereafter I smelled what seemed to be spent powder. I didn’t notice a cloud but the smell was strong. I thought someone had discharged a firearm pretty close by. Then the smell changed to something like burning plastic. Then I thought some fool had a bonfire going, burning refuse while taking target practice. I didn’t think it a big enough deal to worry too much. I walked inside where my daughter and I had a conversation in the liv-ing room. Suddenly my daughter exclaimed, “Oh my God!” I looked out the window and it took a second for my brain to register what I was seeing. It looked as if the entire woods were on fire. As we watched, flames rose into the air and above the treetops. I told my daughter to call 911. Before she could make the call, I saw the first truck roll up to the fire. By then I could see the outline of a house in flames. Lights were flashing but there was no siren. Quietly, men got out of the truck and spread out. Within five to ten minutes I heard the pump on the truck fire up. Then they hit the burning house with water. Immediately the fire seemed to come under control. From my vantage point I couldn’t hear any voices. I only saw the shadows of men moving around the fire quietly, going about their business. Quickly I saw the major burning extinguish although fire appeared to glow low to the ground. Then it got dark, although I could still see men moving around the site in the lights they had trained on the site. It sounded as if a few orders were shouted or maybe calls for gear. I couldn’t hear what they were say-ing. But for the most part I heard no voices as these men quietly went about their business as a team. Every now and then I caught smells like a campfire being extinguished with water as they searched the site for secondary fires and burning embers. I stayed up until about 1:30 a.m. and men were still on the scene when I went to bed. On Feb. 20, I walked over to the site. I expected to see nothing but blackened char. I was astonished at how much of the structure still remained. Nothing had spread to the houses on either side. One house was pretty close. I saw no damage to the houses on either side nor to the foliage. I stood there with my mouth open reflecting on the size of the fire I had seen and how well it had been contained. What I witnessed the night of Feb. 19 was so impressive it’s almost hard for me to put my feel-ings into words. Station 46 in Fort White (and anyone else who responded that night) is a highly professional group. I feeler safer knowing these guys are on the job. I thank them all for a job well done. W ho taught you problem solving? Your parents? Elementary school? High school? Or no one at all? How did you learn problem solving? Like much of what we learn about how to live, we may have learned by modeling, or copying, what we saw our parents or others do. We may have seen them get upset, angry, frustrated, and act emotionally out of fear or anger, and spring into thoughtless action to solve a problem. Instead of think-ing straight, we duck the bullet, or hide from it like an ostrich with its head in the sand. Wouldn’t it have been great to learn effective problem solving when you were a child? It’s no wonder that we continue to have problems! It helps to have a prob-lem-solving plan. Here are some steps that should help you: • The first step is to recognize any feelings of discomfort, frus-tration, fear, or anger. Choose to think rationally rather than react-ing emotionally. Don’t get hung up wallowing in the mud. Decide to get up and do something to fix the problem now. • Here comes the positive part. See the problem in a different light. In psychology we call this “reframing.” A problem is only a problem when you see it as a prob-lem. In reality, it’s just a situation. Shakespeare said “All the world’s a stage, and the players merely actors.” So the stage is set, the situ-ation is presented. We’re actors and directors of our own lives. See the situation as a challenge. • Now’s your chance to script your own life. Your challenge can be to choose your own path in life; make your life into what you want it to be. In this life, most anything is possible. As soon as you accom-plish something difficult, you build up strength to accomplish even more. Success breeds success. You become more and better than you were. • Decide on the ideal or best solution. What would be the best outcome? What do you want to have, to do, or to be? • Now that you know what you want, what can you do to “make it so?” (Star Trek’s Picard.) What can you do today? This week? Right now? • You’ve done most of the work. Now, take some action. Research shows that your mind and body don’t see much difference from the real world and your imagination or vision. Imagining the better situa-tion you’ll have after the problem is resolved, you can feel excited, empowered, exhilarated. Your posi-tive vision and good feelings will motivate you to take action. • Write down a short plan, and a schedule on your calendar • After each step, reward yourself. Share your good feelings with someone close to you. Social support is an important source of encouragement. Life can be enjoyable, successful, fulfilling, productive, and fun. Say “bring it on” to the next problem (situation) life presents you. OPINION Friday, March 1, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4AAn impressive job by firefighters Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman D isgraceful. Shameful. An embarrassment. Those are the best words to describe the ordeal Korean War veteran James Gunn endured to get the Department of Veterans Affairs to listen to his appeal for benefits. It took more than five years — and a front-page story [in the South Florida] Sun Sentinel — for the 81-year-old Marine Corps veteran and Coral Springs resident to get his appeal heard as he seeks benefits for debilitating frostbite wounds. Gunn won’t know for weeks whether an appeals judge will grant his claim for a pension, but at least he finally got a chance to be heard. Count him among the almost 250,000 veterans waiting for news about their benefits appeals. What a way to treat our veteransGunn is wheelchair-bound and in constant pain, a reminder of the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the winter of 1950. Fighting through sub-zero cold, the 12,000 survivors are called the Chosin Few and the Frozen Chosin. Gunn applied for two benefits: Aid and Attendance, which would provide more than $1,000 a month, and a mobility stipend. He was denied both in 2007, and appealed the decision. After five years of more paperwork, more frustration and more deterioration of his health, his appeal was finally heard. Who knows how much longer it would have taken if his plight hadn’t made it to the front page of the newspaper? Unfortunately, few veterans entitled to VA benefits can get that kind of exposure. Florida veterans wait nearly 10 months on average for the VA to respond to their claims, although veter-ans advocates say the wait time is often longer than that. And appeals can take several years. Don’t wholly blame the VA for the slog. The department is chronically understaffed and back-logged. The situation only figures to get worse as thousands of veterans return home from Afghanistan. “(Decision review officers) are good people, they know the law, but there’s just no way they can handle the caseload,” says Matthew Hill, an Orlando attor-ney on the board of the National Organization of Veterans’ Advocates. Blame the folks we send to Washington, who talk about “supporting the troops” when the cameras are on, but obviously don’t do enough to adequately fund the VA to help the troops who need it the most. The VA has a $127 billion budget, but more funds are certainly needed to increase staffing and reduce the huge case backlog. Supporting the troops — particularly those who come home with a variety of disabilities after fighting for our freedoms — should be a priority, not just a bumper-sticker slogan. If James Gunn’s case helps bring more attention to the problem and gets results, then maybe the five-year wait he has endured wasn’t totally in vain. Shameful way to treat veterans How to solve that problem ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AEDIT Q South Florida Sun Sentinel GUEST COLUMN Q David Grant lives in Fort White. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Comments? Write Bob Denny at Bob.Denny8@gmail.com David Grant

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March 1Author to visitThe Friends of the Library will present “A Florida Road Trip with Tim Dorsey” at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Author Tim Dorsey will make Lake City a stop on his tour for his new book, “The Riptide Ultra-Glide.” Free tickets are requried and may be obtained at any library location. Refreshments will be served.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. March 2Breakfast with chiefLake City Police Department will hold a “Breakfast with the Chief” event from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Lake City Moose Lodge, 624 NE Williams St. A free complimentary breakfast will be available, as well as an opportunity to hear from and ask questions of Police Chief Argatha Gilmore. For more information, contact Audre Washington at (386) 719-5742 or email washing-tona@lcflapd.com.Women’s programFirst United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., will host a free pro-gram for women entitled “The Word of God for the Women of God — Where is Your Treasure” from 9 am. to noon. Robin Arnold will be keynote speaker. Breakout sessions include “20 Ways to Bring the Wrd of God into Your Home” with Linda Callahan; “Using God’s Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, Others” with Alicia Pfahler; and “God’s Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen” with Joanna Figley. A continen-tal breakfast will be served and child care will be avail-able. For more information, call (386) 752-4488.Car, truck showThe fifth annual Fort White Car, Truck and Bike Show will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fort White High School, 17579 SW State Road 47. A swap meet and barbecue cook-off will be included. Pries will be awarded in several catego-ries. Cost for participants is $20 if registered by Feb. 15 or $25 the day of the show. Swap meet space is $15 by Feb. 15 or $20 the day of the show. Live and silent auctions and a cake sale also will be held. Proceeds will support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. For barbeque cook-off informa-tion and registration, call Keith at (386) 497-WING. For vehicl entries and other infromation, contact Brown’s Racing at (386) 497-1481.Grief supportA GriefShare grief support group will meets from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at Willowbrook Assisted Living, Room D. For more information, call Marlene Hirsh at 288-7429.Church yard saleThe Kids Club of Lake City Church of God, 173 SE Ermine Ave., will have a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Family Life Center. For mor informa-tion, call (386) 752-9400.Spring yard saleThe Wellborn Community Association will host a Spring Community Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community cen-ter, 1340 8th Ave. in downtown Wellborn. A space is $5. Bring your own tents and tables. The monthly blueberry pancake break-fast will be served from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-dren. Lunch will be avail-able, too. The Bloodmobile iwill be there to take dona-tions. For more info, call Wendell at 963-1157, find us on Facebook or see www.wellborncommunityasso-ciation.com.Supper, gospel singLee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will have a pot-luck supper and gos-pel sing. The supper will be at 6 p.m. and the gos-pel sing will begin at 7. The church is at 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 869-9977.Free workshops The UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer-ing free workshops dur-ing the Home and Patio Show form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday at the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Workshops will include raised-bed veg-etable gardens, container gardens for kids, how to prepare nutritious smooth-ies, backyard poultry and more. For more informa-tion, call the Extension office at (386)752-5384.Dulcimer talkPrize-winning hammered dulcimer player Michael Vickey will host a Coffee House event from 7 to 9 p.m. in the auditori-um at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs.March 3History programThe Friends of the Library will present “A Florida History Chautauqua: Three Views (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas)” at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Chautauqua performer Betty Jean Steinshouer will help us consider the inter-twined stories of three of Florida’s most well-known female authors, who put the state on the map as only the hearts of women could. Free tickets are required and may be obtained at any library location.Free workshops The UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offering free workshops during the Home and Patio Show form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Workshops will include raised-bed vegetable gar-dens, container gardens for kids, how to prepare nutritious smoothies, back-yard poultry and more. For more information, call the Extension office at (386)752-5384.Gospel concertWesley Memorial United Methodist Church, 1272 SW MacFarlane Ave., will host a free, Southern gos-pel music concert by the Friends Singers at 6 p.m. The group of eight singers is a ministry of Friendship International Ministries, based at Colorado Springs, Colo. March 4Scout fundraiserBoy Scouts Troop 85 with a fundraiser at Moe’s between 5 and 8 p.m. A portion of all sales during that time will go to the troop. For details, contact Tabatha McMahon at 965-4674.March 5Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus. William “Buddy” O’NealWilliam “Buddy” O’Neal, 60, a resident of Lake City, Florida passed away Febru-ary 28, 2013 at his home.Mr. O’Neal was a lifelong resi-dent of Lake City, Florida and is the son of the late Richard Jackson O’Neal. He was of the Baptist Faith and was employed by Protective Services for the SDVWWKLUW\YH\HDUVDVDVLJQscreener. He was a graduate of Columbia High School Class of 1971 and is preceded in death by a brother Francis O’Neal. He also loved his Florida Gators.Survivors include his loving ZLIHRIWKLUW\YH\HDUV*DLOO’Neal, Lake City, Fl. His Mother, Doris O’Neal, Lake City, Fl. Two daughters: Angela (Steven Kidd) Norris, Lake City, Fl. and Rosalina O’Neal, Lake City, Fl. Three Sons: Anthony (Jamie) O’Neal, Grand Junction, CO., Andy (Tabitha) O’Neal, Lake City, Fl. and Walter (Hope) Norris, Lake City, Fl. Five Sisters: Barbara McDaniel, Jasper, Fl., Florence McDaniel, Valdo-sta, Ga., Sylvia Carter, Calla-han, Fl., Nealy Balkcom, Lake City, Fl. and Sissy Love, Live Oak, Fl. One Brother: Richard O’Neal, Jr. Lake City, Fl. Eight grandchildren also survive. Graveside funeral services for Mr. O’Neal will be conducted Monday March 4, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Forest Lawn Cem-etery with the Rev Joe Chess-HURIFLDWLQJ$UUDQJHPHQWVare under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234 please sign our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comLouis (Bill) W. Rogers Louis (Bill) W. Rogers of High Springs passed away Tuesday, February 26th after a long ill-ness at Shands Hospital. Mr. Rogers was born in Commerce, OK to Avery and Gussie Rogers on July 17, 1933. Mr. Rogers served in the U.S. Army for 22 years retiring in 1973. He was a Vietnam Veteran. He also retired from the D.O.C., State of Flori-da. Mr. Rogers is survived by his wife Mary of High Springs; Son, Charles Todd, Sr. and wife Peg-gy of High Springs; Daughter, Sue Kovras and husband Alex of Edwards, CA; Son, Louis Rogers, Jr. of High Springs; Son, Wayne Rogers and wife Patty of Fayetteville, NC. He has 8 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Mr. Rogers and his wife Mary were the owners of the famous Pickle Barrel Store on Hwy 441 for 13 years. Mr. 5RJHUVHQMR\HGVKLQJDQGJRDWfarming. He is preceded in death by his son Kenneth Lee Todd of St. Marie, ID. and grandson Bobbie Lee Todd of Atlanta, GA.Memorial Services will be conducted Monday, March 4, 2013 in the chapel of Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home at 1:00 pm. Interment will be at a later date in Forest Mead-ows Cemetery, Gainesville, FL. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 5A5A See our booth this weekend at the Home & Patio Show386-269-4265 Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. COURTESYWidespread PanicWidespread Panic will be among the bands at the Wanee Festival at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park April 18-20. The Allman Brothers h eadline. See story, Page 8A.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 2, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V T he apostle Paul left his “true child in a common faith,” Titus, at Crete to “set in order what remains” (Titus 1:4, 5). Based upon the epistle which Paul wrote to Titus, we see that there were several things which Paul want-ed Titus to do. He wanted him to “appoint elders in every city.” Paul wanted Titus to teach cer-tain things to different people. One such group was the “bond-slaves” (2:9). Bondslaves were people who had given up their own desires to please another person. This may have been a voluntary action or it may have been invol-untary. At the beginning of his letter to Titus, Paul used this same word to describe his rela-tionship to God. Paul gives five instructions to this group of people. He wants them to (1) “be subject to their own masters in everything;” (2) “to be well-pleasing;” (3) “not argumentative;” (4) “not pilfer-ing;” (5) “but showing all good faith” (2:9, 10). Paul also gives a reason why these Christians who are bondslaves should act in this way. Paul says, “That they may adorn the doctrine of God our Savior in every respect” (2:10). What seems interesting is that Paul wants these Christians to behave in a certain way, not because it would be a good thing to help their relation-ship to their master, but rather so that the “doctrine of God” would be adorned. He wants the “doctrine of God” to be “embel-lished with honor.” Paul wants the “doctrine of God” to have an appealing influence upon those who are seeing the work of these bondslaves. He wants their actions to “add beauty to” the “doctrine of God.” Have we ever meditated on the idea that our actions on the job would make the “doctrine of God” more appealing to oth-ers? That the way we go about our activities in the work place would “add beauty to” the “doc-trine of God”? That the way that we, as an employee, treat our employer would help the “doc-trine of God” look impressive in the eyes of our boss? This instruction that Paul wanted Titus to teach indicates that our lives in the work place must be governed by the “doc-trine of God.” If we are going to “adorn the doctrine of God” then we must apply Christian principles in our relationship to our employer. It says that this must be our character, that living the Christian life is some-thing which we must do outside of our assemblies or away from a function where church mem-bers are gathered. What if we are the only Christian at our work place? Will we “adorn the doctrine of God”? Are our “ethics” at the work place so above the average that people will wonder why? If you are a female worker, will they wonder if your husband is a preacher? But, let’s look at this thing from the perspective of Paul being a “bondservant.” In his relationship to God, Paul had to be subject to God in everything. Paul had to be “well-pleasing” to God. He had to not be “argu-mentative.” Which should cause us to meditate upon our service to God? Is our “Christian walk” such that people would say we are adorning “the doctrine of God”? They may not express it in those terms, but would they say, “He walks the talk!” Or, “He lives what he preaches!” Whether we are an employee or not, may we all live so that we “adorn the doctrine of God.”The true gospel Employee adorns the doctrine of GodT he word gospel is used some 98 times in the King Janes Version of the Bible. The word gospel simply means “good news.” Many translations choose not to use the word gospel but change it to “good news” or “to announce glad tidings.” What is the gospel? What do we need to know about the gospel? What happens t those who reject the gospel as the only means of salvation? Five times we find the phrase “The Gospel of the Kingdom”: Matthew 4:23; 9:35; 24:14; Mark 1:14-15. The Gospel of the Kingdom message preached by John the Baptist and Jesus before His death and resur-rection is not the Gospel of Salvation today. The message before the cross was “Repent ye and be baptized” for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand. Failure to rightly divide the scripture has caused some to err by adding baptism to the plan of salvation. The true gospel is recorded by Paul in I Corinthians 15:1-4: “Moreover, brethren, I declare to you the gospel which I preached to you, which also you received and in which you stand, by which also you are saved, if you hold fast that word which I preached to you — unless you believed in vain. For I delivered to you first of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that He was bur-ied, and that He rose again in the third day according to the Scriptures ... What we need to know about the gospel is that nothing can be added or taken away from it. It’s the total acceptance of the death, burial and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. He paid the price for our sin. Ephesians 2:8-9 says: “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of woks lest any-one should boast.” It is because of grace; anything else is works. There is no way one an be saved outside the true gospel. Romans 5:8 says: “But God demonstrated His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” It has always taken the shedding of blood for the sac-rifice of sin; but only the blood of the spotless Lamb of God was it done once and for all. All others who pray to a different god or add anything to God’s simple plan of salvation is, as Paul wrote to the churches in Galatia, that some had come in with a different gospel. Paul said, “Which is not another (gospel); but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we or an angel from heaven preach any other gos-pel to you than that which we have preached to you, let him be accursed” )Gal. 1:7-8. Paul repeated this in verse 9. To those who reject the simple gospel of Christ there can be but one ending; that is a devil’s hell prepared for the devil and his angels, a place of outer dark-ness, where the worm dieth not. Accept God’s simple plan: “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved” (Acts 16:31). Q Hugh Sherrill, an ordained Baptist minister and Bible teacher, is available for special Bible stud-ies and revivals. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 7A 7AReligion Proud sponsor of 10 th Annual Home & Patio Show“Now that’s banking!”www.psb.biz March 1Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. March 2Church yard sale The Kids Club of Lake City Church of God, 173 SE Ermine Ave., will have a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Family Life Center. For mor informa-tion, call (386) 752-9400.Women’s program First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., will host a free pro-gram for women entitled “The Word of God for the Women of God — Where is Your Treasure” from 9 am. to noon. Robin Arnold will be keynote speaker. Breakout sessions include “20 Ways to Bring the Wrd of God into Your Home” with Linda Callahan; “Using God’s Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, Others” with Alicia Pfahler; and “God’s Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen” with Joanna Figley. A continen-tal breakfast will be served, and child care will be avail-able. For more information, call (386) 752-4488.Supper, gospel sing Lee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will have a pot-luck supper and gospel sing. The supper will be at 6 p.m. and the gospel sing will begin at 7. The church is at 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. For more informa-tion or to get on the pro-gram, call Allen at (850) 869-9977.March 3Gospel concert Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church, 1272 SW MacFarlane Ave., will host a free, Southern gos-pel music concert by the Friends Singers at 6 p.m. The group of eight singers is a ministry of Friendship International Ministries, based at Colorado Springs, Colo. March 4Women’s Bible study A women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.March 5Lenten lunch The First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.March 6Men’s Bible study Our Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. each Wednesday at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, con-tact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299.March 10Cancer survivors event Union AME Church Women Missionary Society and Young People Department will host a Calendar Tea at 3 p.m., entitled “This is Your Season,” honoring all can-cer survivors and remem-bering those who have lost the battle. The speaker will be the Rev. Martha Kelsey. I am now 63 years old. I have been a minister, a “burger flipper,” a janitor, “Q-Tip” maker, an aircraft repairman, an insur-ance salesman and now a writer. These and other things people do are good, but don’t go far enough. There is more to life than “doing.” I am a husband, a father, a grandfather, a son, a friend. These are more important than things I do, for they speak of relation-ships and love. Still, there is more to life than rela-tionships with friends and loved ones. Even these don’t go far enough. I am a Christian, an (imperfect but grateful) possession of Jesus. This gets to the heart of our question, “What on earth am I here for?” Because it deals with my purpose. As a Christian, I believe that God is Creator, and that “in the beginning GOD actually did what the Bible says He did. Mankind was made in His image, far different from monkeys. I believe there was a “big bang” but this was when God “spoke” and things ‘happened’ (Genesis 1 and 2). Faith and trust in God gives me reason and purpose for living. To take away God, is the same as taking away the stars from the sky, which are used by ships to find their way. As a Christian, my life is not based on ‘doing’ or “having” or “relating to others,” it is based on my relating to God through Jesus Christ, and in Him, all these other things find their meaning and proper place. In Him I find my genuine reason for being here. The older I get, the more clearly I see that without Jesus, all I have is unanswered questions. Solomon, “did it all” and “had it all.” He went after ”pleasure,” but this proved to be meaning-less. “Laughter,” he said, “is madness.” He tried cheering himself with wine. (Sound familiar?) He wanted to see what was good for people to do … during the few days of their lives. He undertook great projects: built great houses, planted vineyards, gardens and parks, with all kinds of fruit trees… He made reservoirs to water groves of trees. He had male and female slaves and had other slaves who were born into his house. He owned more herds and flocks than anyone in Jerusalem. He amassed silver and gold and treasures of kings and provinces. He had male and female singers, and a harem as well—all the delights of a man’s heart. He became greater than anyone in Jerusalem who had ever live. He denied himself nothing. He refused his heart no plea-sure. His heart took delight in all his labor, and this was the reward for all his work. Yet when he surveyed all that his hands had done and what he had worked to achieve, everything was meaningless, a chasing after the wind; nothing was gained under the sun. (Ecclesiastes 2:1-11). The question, “What on earth am I here for?” is not answered in how many things one has, nor by friends or family, as vital as they are. The real mean-ing of life, and the begin-ning of wisdom is found in these simple words, “Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the mat-ter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the duty of all mankind” (Ecclesiastes 12:13). Learn the boundary of your power I t is amazing how much time one person can spend trying to change another … and getting nowhere! Since we are all prone to try this, you (like me) have dis-covered that trying to change other people is a lot like spitting in the wind. It doesn’t work, and it can get real messy. In fact, we are even limited in our own abil-ity to produce lasting change in ourselves. So, why on earth do we ever think we can change someone else? The boundary of power makes clear what we have power over and where we have no power. It is critical for us to understand that we have no power over the attitudes and actions of other people; we cannot make them more mature or responsible. We also cannot change another per-son’s character, or stop their bad habits, no matter how obvious it is to us that they need to. What we do have is the power to influence others. Webster’s dictionary defines “influence” as “power of producing an effect without force or a direct com-mand.” Think about some things that we often do to try and get someone to change: repeat ourselves over and over (better known as nagging), criticize, scream and yell, bully, threaten, withdraw and give the silent treatment. Now think about those who influence you. Would someone doing these things make you want to listen and cooperate? Me neither. We all are more likely to respond to someone who is not trying to “fix us” even if we know they don’t approve of our choices or behavior. Instead, we can draw a boundary by saying something like, “Your irresponsible behavior (be spe-cific) is causing problems in our relationship. Is there some way I can help you? I love you, but if this behavior continues our relationship will suffer (explain how). It is your choice.” This allows the “offender” to be aware of the problem and to understand the consequences if they continue their irrespon-sible behavior. This may mean not being included certain activities or a distancing in the relationships. It also gives the freedom to choose to change the behavior with the benefit of being reconnected to the rela-tionship. The problem is that we spend so much time and effort trying to change someone with ways that hurt our influence with them that we actually lose what we did have power over to start with. The most important part of the boundary of power is gain-ing wisdom, so that we don’t spend time and energy where we have no power and keep our influence where we do. The very familiar “Serenity Prayer” offers a great explanation: “God, grant me the serenity (calm and without worry, stress or disturbance) to accept the things I cannot change (have no power over), the courage (the ability to face danger, dif-ficulty, uncertainty, or pain without being overcome by fear or being detoured from a cho-sen course of action) to change the things I can (that I do have power over), and the wisdom to know the difference.” The Bible tells us in James 1:5 that “If anyone lacks wis-dom, they should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him.” This means that we can bring our problems to God and ask the question: Do I have power to change something in this situation, and if I do, where? When we do, He will generously give us wisdom without blaming and finding fault. Why would God do this? He wants us to have strong, healthy relationships … because our hearts do matter. Blessings, Angie What on earth am I here for? Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences, and offers biblical counseling. Follow Angie on Twitter: Angie Land @HeartMttrs. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, special “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s website, www. jack exum.com. CHURCH CALENDARQ To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. LC 6A, 7A FAITH FRI 3-1 2 2/28/13 8:16:13 PM

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From staff reports LIVE OAKMusic artist and one man band Zach Deputy will entertain and hold his first disc jam and golf tournament March 8-10 at The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Plans are to hold the event annually. While Zack Deputy will entertain at least once each day dur ing the three-day event, other artists include The Legendary JCs, funkUs, Greensound, Herd of Watts, My Morning Fatty and Love Chunk. Zach Deputy is a unique one-man band who had played the SOSMP many times during Bear Creek and other festivals. Deputy, an emerging international musician, recording artist and avid disc golfer, looks forward to helping expand the game by turning new peo ple on to disc golf. He first started playing disc golf as a way to get exercise while on tour and fell in love with the game. The weekend kicks off March 8 with Long Pad Doubles disc golf played on the SOSMPs disc Magnolia Disc Golf Course at 3 p.m. and entertain ment in the amphitheater. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 8A NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Saturday, March 2nd Sunday, March 3rd 9am 5pm 10am 4pm Columbia County Fairgrounds FREE ADMISSION P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Archer Funeral Home is pleased to welcome back Samuel Wesley Wes Markham. Wes was born and raised in Lake City and graduated from Columbia High School in 2010 and is a member of the First Advent Christian Church in Lake City. Wes worked as an embalmer apprentice for Archer Funeral Home for 2 years, before attending Mortuary School in Atlanta, Georgia. He is a 2013 Graduate of Gupton-Jones College of Funeral Service, receiving an Associate of Science Degree in the eld of Funeral Services. While in college he was a member of Pi Sigma Eta Fraternity of Morticians. Wes will be serving his Funeral Director and Embalmer Internship at Archer Funeral Home in Lake Butler. TM Where you get the Best for Less! Lake City Commons Center (Next to Publix) 752-3733 FREE GLASSES Buy one pair of glasses at regular price & receive a FREE PAIR OF GLASSES Some Restrictions Apply. Coupon Required. Expires Mar. 31, 2013 1 Pair Eyeglasses Some Restrictions Apply. Coupon Required. Expires Mar. 31, 2013 $ 99 NOW Includes lenses & frames. Ask About CareCredit *Credit approval required.* See store for details. CONTACTS EYE EXAMS By Independent Optometrist Its not about light or dark. Its about everything in-between. ADAPTIVE LENSES DAN WICKLUND/ Special to the Reporter President Lincoln visits school Shining Star Academy of the Arts was honored recently with a visit from President Abraham Lincoln, as portrayed by actor Tad Allen. Students watched in amazement when they saw the pages of history come alive as the President spoke. Honest Abe was more that a catchy slogan. For me it was a way of life, Allen said. Allen recited the Gettysburg Address and answered questions from the more than 235 students on the Shining Star Academy campus. Also pictured is Shining Star Academy Principal Tony Buzzella. Once again, Allman Brothers to headline Wanee From staff reports LIVE OAKThe Allman Brothers are bringing the Wanee Festival back to the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park April 18-20 and with them will be Widespread Panic (playing twice), Govt Mule, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Jaimoes Jasssz Band, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Leon Russell, Towner of Power, Les Claypools Duo De Twang, Electric Hot Tuna, Maceo Parker, Steel Pulse, North Mississippi Allstars, Blackberry Smoke, Galactic and Friends, The Greyboy Allstars, Voice of the Wetland All-Stars featur ing Tab Benoit, Cyril Neville, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Jumpin Johnny Sansone, Waylon Thibodeaux, Johnny Vidacovich; Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Royal Southern Brotherhood, Bobby Lee Rodgers Trio, The Lee Boys, Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, The Revivalists, Monophonics, Boombox, Oli Brown Band, Flannel Church, The Yeti Trio and Jorma Kaukonens Fur Peace Ranch. The Allman Brothers will play twice. General admission tickets are $205 through April 8 for all ages plus appli cable fees. Annual Wanee Wednesday Happy Hour is included in your gen eral admission festival ticket along with three nights primitive camping April 18-20, music from 12:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18 and two full days of music Friday and Saturday, April 19-20. Camping Wednesday night is an additional fee VIP tickets for all ages are $475 plus applicable fees and include access to VIP only pre-party, catered lunch and dinner Friday and Saturday night, discounted alcoholic beverages, free soda and snacks, special concert view ing area, private restrooms, commem orative Wanee 2013 poster and com memorative Wanee 2013 T-Shirt. Tickets may be purchased through tix@musictoday.com, charge by phone at 1-800-594-TIXX (8499) or go tohttps://www.elevate.com/ boxoffice/?cref=562ddfb4-442c-4cac9d65-fc105aeb2fbd for Wanee tickets. Zach Deputy disc jam, golf tourney set for March 8-10 Florida history at public library From staff reports The Friends of the Library will present A Florida History Chautauqua: Three Views (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas) at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Chautauqua performer Betty Jean Steinshouer will help us consider the inter twined stories of three of Floridas most well-known female authors, who put the state on the map as only the hearts of women could. Free tickets are required and may be obtained at any library location.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 2, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES CHS FOOTBALL QB Club Meeting The Columbia High Quarterback Club will meet at 6 p.m. on Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. They will discuss upcoming fund-raisers and membership drives for the spring. Contact Allen Masters with any questions at 386-292-0725. RMS CHEERLEADING Tryouts on March 21 Richardson Middle School Cheer tryout packets are available today. They can be picked up at the front office and guidance office at RMS and the front office of the zoned elementary schools. Packets are due by 3 p.m. on March 18 in the RMS cheer mailbox in the front office.Cheer clinics will be held at 3:30-5:30 p.m. on March 19 21. Tryouts are March 21 in the RMS gym at 3:30pm. For more information contact Coach Shannon Hall (386)623-4058 or shannonhall73@gmail.com ADULT SOFTBALL Spring league sign-up under way Columbia County Adult Softball is accepting registration for its spring season through March 15. Men’s, Women’s, Church and Co-ed leagues will be offered. Fee deadline is March 22 and the season begins April 1. There is a coaches meet-ing at 6 p.m. March 15 in the Coach’s Meeting Hall at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561. FISHING Brown Memorial tourney The Justin Brown Memorial Bass Tournament is Saturday at Clay Landing. Entry fee is $70 per boat with an optional big bass pot for $10. There is a 60 percent payback to 10 percent of the field. All proceeds benefit Columbia FFA students. For details, call Chris Starling at 288-7633 or Karen Brown at 961-2526.Q From staff reports Today Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Forest High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High track at UNF Spring Break Open, TBA Q Fort White High softball at Interlachen High, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Lincoln High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Madison County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Williston High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Saturday Q Columbia High baseball vs. Wakulla High, 2:30 p.m. (JV-noon) Q Fort White High track at Suwannee Invitational, TBA CHS baseball, softball fall to P.K. Yonge, ACD. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida forward Will Yeguete is fouled by South Carolina guard Eric Smith (5) and forward Mindaugas Kacinas (25) during a game on Jan. 31. Yeguete, Frazier cleared to return to Florida hoopsBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida coach Billy Donovan is cau-tiously optimistic about his team’s health. Forward Will Yeguete and guard Michael Frazier II were cleared to practice and play Thursday, giving Donovan a full complement of players heading into Saturday’s game against Alabama. It’s the first time in three weeks the eighth-ranked Gators (22-5, 12-3 Southeastern Conference) have been fully healthy. But Donovan doesn’t want his players putting too much stock in having Yeguete and Frazier back in the mix. “They’ve got understand that they’ve got to step up and they’ve got to play and they cannot take the approach of, ‘Well, we’re a little bit deeper. We have more guys available,”’ Donovan said. “Because I just don’t know if Frazier and/or Yeguete are going to be really able to be able to really provide some sig-nificant minutes for us.” Yeguete, a 6-foot-7 junior averaging 6.0 points and 6.3 rebounds, missed the last six games following arthroscopic surgery on his right knee. Frazier, a 6-foot-4 freshman averaging 6.4 points, sat out Tuesday night’s loss at Tennessee with a concussion. Without them, the Gators pretty much went with a six-man rotation against the Volunteers and seemed to wear down in the second half. Swingman Casey Prather Gators back at full strength after injury-filled year. GATORS continued on 8BDouble trouble JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Steven Rendel makes a play at third in a game earlier this year. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a tough night on both diamonds as Columbia High’s baseball and softball teams dropped games. The Lady Tigers’ loss was the first of the year for the softball team as Columbia fell, 8-4, to the state’s top-ranked P.K. Yonge Blue Wave, 8-4. On the baseball diamond, the Tigers fell, 14-4, to Arlington Country Day. The Lady Tigers took a 2-0 lead in the bottom of the first inning after loading the bases with Lacey King, Kayli Kvistad and Brandy Morgan on the bases. A fielder’s choice at home with Hollianne Dohrn at the plate moved Kvistad to third with the bases still loaded. Caliegh McCauley singled to score Kvistad and Morgan for the 2-0 lead after the first inning. P.K. Yonge got both runs back and scored an extra one to take a 3-2 lead after two innings. Nikki Santiago and Nikkia Robinson scored off a double by Garland Evans and Taylor Knight scored off a bunt by Katie O’Dell for the Blue Wave’s runs. McCauley drove in her third run of the game in the bottom of the third inning to score Kvistad, who reached on a double earlier in the inning, and Morgan for a 4-3 lead. O’Dell hit a solo shot in the top of the fourth inning to tie the game at 4-4. The game remained tied heading into the sixth inning, but errors caught up with the Lady Tigers. With the bases loaded after a couple of errors, O’Dell delivered a hit up the middle to score Knight and Sara Hendrix for a 6-4 lead. Kassidy Kennard added the final damage for the Blue Wave with a hit to score Evans and O’Dell for the 8-4 lead heading into the bottom half of the sixth inning. The Lady Tigers had runners in scoring position dur-ing their final two at-bats, but were unable to bring a runner home. “Four runs was enough to beat them,” Columbia head coach Jimmy Williams said. “They put the pressure on us when they needed to and they’re just as good as adver-tised. That’s why we signed up to play them three times. We need to know what it’s like to play against teams of their championship caliber. We have to pick up our level of play against teams like that.” Columbia (7-1) plays host to Madison County High at 7 p.m. tonight. On the baseball field, Columbia and Arlington Country Day played three scoreless innings before combining for four runs in the fourth. Arlington Country Day had three runs in the top half of the fourth and never looked back on the way to the win. Columbia got one back with Alex Milton scoring off of a Sam Bass single to make the score 3-1 heading into the fifth. Arlington Country Day added 11 more runs in the next two innings. The Tigers scored three runs in the bottom of the sixth for the 14-4 final. Milton scored Jordan Culp off a double and Levi Hollingsworth scored off a Dalton Mauldin double. The Tigers’ final run came off a ground ball by Caleb Vaughn to score Milton. “We had a better approach at the plate tonight,” Columbia head coach Jonathan Ulsh said. “Every ball they hit just dropped. The big thing is we didn’t give up.” Columbia (1-3) travels to Lincoln at 6 p.m. today. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Tatum Morgan lays down a bunt in a ga me earlier this year.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for Dollar General 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 2 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Subway Fresh Fit 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 3:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for Dollar General 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 6 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Subway Fresh Fit 500, at Avondale, Ariz. BOXING 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Champion Billy Dib (351-0) vs. Evgeny Gradovich (15-0-0), for IBF featherweight title, at Mashantucket, Conn. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Tshwane Open, second round, at Centurion, South Africa (same-day tape) 12:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HSBC Women’s Champions, second round, at Singapore (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, second round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Loyola (Md.) at Iona MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Wisconsin at NebraskaOmaha NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Memphis at Miami 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma City at Denver Saturday AUTO RACING Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Subway Fresh Fit 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 1 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Dollar General 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Subway Fresh Fit 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 5:30 p.m. SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, GRAND-AM of The Americas, at Austin, Texas (same-day tape) GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Tshwane Open, third round, at Centurion, South Africa (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, third round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, third round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 6:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HSBC Women’s Champions, third round, at Singapore (same-day tape) GYMNASTICS 1 p.m. NBC — American Cup, at Worcester, Mass. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — National coverage, Louisville at Syracuse ESPN — Alabama at FloridaESPN2 — Butler at VCU 1 p.m. FSN — Memphis at UCF 2 p.m. CBS — National coverage, West Virginia at Kansas ESPN — Notre Dame at MarquetteESPN2 — Wichita State at CreightonNBCSN — George Mason at Delaware 3 p.m. FSN — Arizona St. at Southern Cal 4 p.m. CBS — National coverage, Kentucky at Arkansas ESPN — Texas at Oklahoma St.NBCSN — UNLV at Nevada 6 p.m. ESPN — Miami at DukeNBCSN — Harvard at Penn 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Kansas St. at Baylor 9 p.m. ESPN — Arizona at UCLAESPN2 — Vanderbilt at Auburn NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Brooklyn at Chicago SOCCER 9:55 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Norwich City at Manchester United 8 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, D.C. United at Houston WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. FSN — Baylor at West VirginiaFOOTBALLNFL calendar March 9-11 — Clubs may enter negotiations with certified agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at end of league year. March 12 — Before 4 p.m., clubs must exercise options for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their 2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation; clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclusive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 contracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must be under the salary cap. The 2013 league year, free agency and trading period begins at 4 p.m. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix April 25-27 — NFL draft, New YorkMay 20-22 — NFL spring league Meeting, Boston Sept. 5, 8-9 — 2013 NFL season begins.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Wednesday’s Games Cleveland 103, Toronto 92Sacramento 125, Orlando 101Detroit 96, Washington 95Milwaukee 110, Houston 107Memphis 90, Dallas 84Oklahoma City 119, New Orleans 74New York 109, Golden State 105Phoenix 105, San Antonio 101, OTAtlanta 102, Utah 91Denver 111, Portland 109 Today’s Games Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.Houston at Orlando, 7 p.m.New York at Washington, 7 p.m.Golden State at Boston, 7:30 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Dallas at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.Memphis at Miami, 8 p.m.Sacramento at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Charlotte at Utah, 9 p.m.Atlanta at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Golden State at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Chicago, 8 p.m.Toronto at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 24, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Indiana (64) 24-3 1,624 1 2. Gonzaga (1) 27-2 1,530 3 3. Duke 24-3 1,461 6 4. Michigan 23-4 1,411 7 5. Miami 22-4 1,317 2 6. Kansas 23-4 1,272 9 7. Georgetown 21-4 1,236 11 8. Florida 22-4 1,164 5 9. Michigan St. 22-6 1,105 410. Louisville 22-5 1,047 1011. Arizona 23-4 998 1212. Syracuse 22-5 915 813. Kansas St. 22-5 875 1314. New Mexico 23-4 764 1615. Oklahoma St. 20-6 692 1416. Ohio St. 20-7 675 1817. Wisconsin 19-8 558 1918. Saint Louis 21-5 495 —19. Memphis 24-3 453 2120. Butler 22-6 351 1521. Notre Dame 22-6 328 2522. Marquette 19-7 317 1723. Pittsburgh 21-7 158 2024. Oregon 22-6 61 2325. Louisiana Tech 24-3 54 — Others receiving votes: Colorado St. 49, VCU 45, Akron 43, Wichita St. 35, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 24, Illinois 19, UConn 18, UNLV 13, North Carolina 8, California 5, Middle Tennessee 2, Belmont 1, Missouri 1, Stephen F. Austin 1.AP Top 25 schedule Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Iowa, 7:30 p.m.No. 2 Gonzaga vs. Portland, 5 p.m.No. 3 Duke vs. No. 5 Miami, 6 p.m. No. 6 Kansas vs. West Virginia, 2 p.m.No. 7 Georgetown vs. Rutgers, 9 p.m.No. 8 Florida vs. Alabama, NoonNo. 10 Louisville at No. 12 Syracuse, Noon No. 11 Arizona at UCLA, 9 p.m.No. 13 Kansas State at Baylor, 7 p.m.No. 14 New Mexico vs. Wyoming, 5 p.m. No. 15 Oklahoma State vs. Texas, 4 p.m. No. 18 Saint Louis at George Washington, 4 p.m. No. 19 Memphis at UCF, 1 p.m.No. 20 Butler at VCU, NoonNo. 21 Notre Dame at No. 22 Marquette, 2 p.m. No. 25 Louisiana Tech vs. San Jose State, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 4 Michigan vs. No. 9 Michigan State, 4 p.m. No. 17 Wisconsin vs. Purdue, 1 p.m.No. 23 Pittsburgh vs. Villanova, NoonBASEBALLSpring Training Thursday’s Games St. Louis 8, Miami 2, 8 inningsMinnesota 7, Baltimore 1Toronto 1, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 0Detroit 10, Tampa Bay 2Philadelphia 10, Atlanta 5N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla (n) Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla. (n) Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix (n) Oakland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz. (n) Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz. (n) Arizona vs. Cincinnati (ss) at Goodyear, Ariz (n) Kansas City vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz. (n) L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz. (n) Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz. (n) Cincinnati (ss) vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz. (n) N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, Fla. (n) Today’s Games Minnesota vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. San Diego vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Washington vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 6:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 7:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.College polls COLLEGIATE BASEBALL TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through Feb. 24, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pvs 1. North Carolina 6-0 496 1 2. Arkansas 7-1 494 2 3. Vanderbilt 7-1 493 3 4. LSU 6-1 489 4 5. Oregon State 8-0 486 9 6. Oregon 6-1 485 5 7. South Carolina 5-1 483 7 8. Kentucky 5-1 478 8 9. Mississippi State 9-0 475 1210. Oklahoma 9-0 471 1411. N.C. State 5-1 469 1312. UCLA 4-2 468 613. Rice 5-2 465 1014. Stanford 5-2 464 1115. Arizona 7-1 463 1516. Mississippi 7-0 461 1617. Cal State Fullerton 8-0 459 19 18. Florida State 7-0 457 1819. Georgia Tech 6-1 456 1720. Miami 7-0 453 2021. UC Irvine 6-1 450 2122. Texas 6-1 448 2523. Louisville 6-1 447 2624. Virginia 7-0 445 2925. Florida Gulf Coast 5-1 442 — 26. Arizona State 4-2 439 2327. Cal Poly 7-0 438 —28. Clemson 5-1 436 2829. Pepperdine 6-2 433 —30. South Alabama 7-0 429 — BASEBALL AMERICA DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through Feb. 24 and ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America ): Record Pvs 1. North Carolina 6-0 1 2. Vanderbilt 7-1 2 3. Arkansas 7-1 3 4. Louisville 6-1 4 5. Mississippi State 9-0 5 6. Oregon State 8-0 6 7. South Carolina 5-1 7 8. Mississippi 7-0 8 9. LSU 6-1 910. N.C. State 5-1 1011. Kentucky 5-1 1112. UCLA 4-2 1213. Rice 5-2 1314. Oregon 6-1 1415. Stanford 5-2 1516. Georgia Tech 6-1 1617. Cal State Fullerton 8-0 2018. Oklahoma 9-0 1819. Florida State 7-0 1920. Arizona 7-1 2321. UC Irvine 6-1 2522. Notre Dame 5-1 —23. Florida Gulf Coast 5-1 — 24. Southern Miss. 5-2 2125. Virginia Tech 6-1 24HOCKEYNHL schedule Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 4, Washington 1Montreal 5, Toronto 2Los Angeles 2, Detroit 1Anaheim 5, Nashville 1 Today’s Game Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Minnesota at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Ottawa at Philadelphia, 12 p.m.Tampa Bay at Boston, 1 p.m.New Jersey at Buffalo, 3 p.m.Washington at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7 p.m.Florida at Carolina, 7 p.m.Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.Nashville at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTSTop NCAA executive speaks about ‘messy and complex’ businessBy LARRY LAGEAssociated PressThe NCAA is enduring another barrage of criti-cism for how it handled another high-profile case. Executive committee Chairwoman Lou Anna K. Simon said in an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday that the botched probe of Miami’s athletic department should lead to change, but not at the top of the governing body. Less than a week after NCAA President Mark Emmert got a vote of con-fidence from the executive committee, Simon insisted no one in a position of power is ready to push for a new leader. “The committee, by and large, understands that this is a very messy and complex business,” Simon, Michigan State’s presi-dent, said in a telephone interview. “What the Miami case showed was that there is an embedded culture and set of processes and approaches that need to be changed.” The NCAA is alleging that former Miami booster Nevin Shapiro was responsible for providing about $170,000 in impermissible benefits to Hurricanes athletes, recruits, coaches and oth-ers between 2002 and 2010, according to a person who spoke Wednesday to the AP on condition of anonym-ity because neither Miami nor the NCAA has publicly released the allegations. The NCAA, though, has acknowledged it can’t use some ill-gotten findings in the probe of Miami because investigators working the case obtained information through depositions taken under subpoenas. “The NCAA has an interesting way of behaving in enforcement cases that has been there for a very long time,” Simon told the AP. “They try to create walls among people within the organization to make sure the investigation is not viewed as being controlled by the executive office. I am not sure that is a cor-rect way to do it because it raises the question about who really is looking over (the enforcement staff), which is a legitimate set of questions to raise.” On the same day last week that Miami received its notice of allegations, which included a charge it lacked institutional control, Emmert announced NCAA vice president of enforce-ment Julie Roe Lach would be replaced. “Obviously, this is an outcome that nobody wants to see on their watch or any-one else’s,” Emmert said Feb. 18. “This is something that’s an embarrassment to the association and our staff.” University of Miami President Donna Shalala has called the NCAA’s probe of the Hurricanes “unprofessional and unethical.” Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford has publicly supported the school in its dispute with the governing body. And Mountain West Conference presidents have questioned Emmert’s leadership. Attorney Kenneth Wainstein, who oversaw the review that found major missteps made during the Miami investigation, has begun looking at ways to prevent another botched case as part of the associa-tion’s attempt to change. “We believe that if some of reforms we were trying to accomplish had been in place, we wouldn’t be talk-ing about some of these issues,” Simon said. Simon said the executive committee is trying to change the way the NCAA operates in many ways, but the governing body can only move as far or as fast as member institutions allow. Simon said the schools that make up the NCAA need to demand integrity and to have a greater sense of urgency to reform quickly. “Some of the criticisms I hear are things that the reform agenda was designed to address,” Simon said. “We’re try-ing to keep focus on the reform agenda, to try to get through that, and then to make an assessment of whether the NCAA is in the right place.” Emmert’s job — it seems — is safe for now. “He is moving in the direction that the execu-tive committee, and the other boards individually, have asked him to move,” Simon said. “It has been a very bumpy path. And just like coaches in a rebuild-ing cycle, there are some things that work out well and some things that don’t. “But what you’re doing is focused on the rebuild-ing cycle, the change cycle, and we have confidence Mark can lead us through that.” The way the Miami probe was foiled from within was only the latest embarrass-ing setback for the NCAA, which is fending off a num-ber of lawsuits and has been the target of sharp criticism by some for how it handed penalties down to Penn State following the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal. Simon said the Penn State situation has a set of circumstances that are “extraordinarily unusual” and will be written about a lot with the benefit of hindsight. Simon added the NCAA shouldn’t allow itself to get sidetracked by the latest flurry of jabs while it deals with the “messy and difficult process” of change. “We can’t get deflected from the reform efforts or we’ll be having these same conversations case after case, year after year,” Simon said. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this photo taken Nov. 9, 2012, Michigan State University President Lou Ann K. Simon smiles during the opening o f the Broad Art Museum in East Lansing, Mich. Simon, the executive committee chairwoman of the NCAA, says the governing body deserves some of the criticism it has be en peppered with lately while trying to run the “messy and complex business” of college sports. Simon said in an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday that the botched probe of Miami’s football team should lead to change. Boxer Chavez Jr. suspended, fined over positive drug testAssociated PressLAS VEGAS — The Nevada State Athletic Commission fined and sus-pended boxer Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. on Thursday over a failed drug test last year. The 26-year-old Mexican fighter tested positive for marijuana in September after his first professional loss. Chavez (46-1-1) was suspended for nine months and fined $900,000, which amounts to 30 percent of his $3 million purse for the fight against Sergio Martinez. Chavez said through a translator that he was sorry for his actions and had taken the drug to curb his stress before the fight. The commission could have banned him for one year and penalized him for up to 100 percent of his purse. At a meeting in January, commissioners questioned why Chavez had not yet returned to Nevada for dis-ciplinary action. Attorney Donald Campbell said the former middleweight champion had been stuck in Mexico, unable to obtain a visa. Chavez’s failed test was revealed Sept. 15 shortly after his dramatic loss to Martinez. Chavez already was fined $20,000 and sus-pended indefinitely by the WBC, whose belt he lost to Martinez. In 2009, Chavez tested positive for another banned substance after his fight with Troy Rowland in Las Vegas. He received a seven-month suspension from the Nevada commission. Chavez was arrested on drunken driving charges last year in Los Angeles, and struggled to make weight for a championship bout last February against Marco Antonio Rubio in San Antonio, Texas. His promoter, Bob Arum, said in September that he did not see marijuana as a performance-enhancing drug.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 3B 3BSports NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Saturday, March 2nd Sunday, March 3rd 9am 5pm 10am 4pm Columbia County Fairgrounds FREE ADMISSION Event Map D 14 Glenn I Jones A 14 Rotary Booth D 13 Soundline & Design C 12 Reporter B 12 Reporter A 13 Rotary booth D 12 Florida Cell Repair C 11 Ser vP ro B 11 A 12 Bath Fitters D 11 Grace Estates Buyers C 10 Lake City Medical Center B 10 Security Safe A 11 Bath Fitters D 10 Alligator Comm. Theatre C 9 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store B 9 Don Reed Construction A 10 Peoples State Bank D 9 Country Comfort C 8 Mac Johnson Roofing B 8 Haven Hospice A 9 People s State Ba nk D 8 Sparks Construction C 7 CC Tax Collector B 7 Florida Credit Union A 8 Baya Pharmacy D 7 Van n Carpet one C 6 Daniel Crapps B 6 Woodman Park Builders A 7 Lawn Enforcement D 6 Van n Carpet one C 5 Shi n ning Star Academy B 5 TBA A 6 Lawn Enforcement D 5 Van n Carpet one C 4 Park Place Cleaning B 4 A & B Well Drilling A 5 A Proud Plumber D 4 North Florida Medical Sales C 3 Bryan Zech er Construction B 3 & Air A 4 Satellite Masters D 3 A Nature Encounter C 2 Columbia Bank B 2 Health Craft A 3 Caring Hands Animal Hospital D 2 Tubs N Stuff C 1 Touchstone Heating & Air B 1 Health Craft A 2 CC Senior Services D 1 Tubs N Stuff *Please note scaled to size subject to booths are not and may be change. A 1 Martins Interior Auto Auto Florida Pest Control Green Star Landscaping AUTO Crime Stoppers H 2 CC Sheriffs Office H 3 CC Sheriffs Office H 4 Waynes Carpet H 5 Waynes Carpet F 1 MIX 94.3 Habitat for Humanity AUTO MIX 94.3 Tough enough to wear Pink Rotary Booth H 7 Scotts Gunsmithing E 2 The Buck Stove Place E 3 The Buck Stove Place E 4 Columbia County Cycles E 5 Columbia County Cycles E 6 Columbia County Cycles H 6 Scotts Gunsmithing E 1 AUTO Please note that booths are not scaled to size and may be subject to change. Sherrifs Trailer 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show Rountree Moore Ford Suwannee Iron Works Jo Carver Creations Building 2 MIX 94.3 Building 1 Flea Market Building, Restrooms & Office Hunts Aluminum Howard Septic Garden Artist Florida Grass Masters Florida Gateway Landscaping Mikells Power Equipement Greens Marine & Sporting Goods Sheriffs Trailer Home Depot *Please note that booths are not scaled to size and may be subject to change. Earthscapes Lowes Lawn Enforce ment Inside VendorsBuilding 1 & 2 Outside Vendors

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1-2, 2013 DEAR ABBY: I’m convinced my father’s wife killed him and I don’t know where to turn. He had fought complications from quadruple bypass surgery for a few years, and had been in hospice for months prior to his death. My siblings and I didn’t put all the pieces together until afterward. Although I’m sure Dad was killed, based on facts and discussions with social workers, I’m pretty sure it was assisted suicide, which is illegal in most states, including the state where he lived. I feel cheated and angry at my father’s wife for not having the guts to talk to us about his plans, and Dad for relying on her to tell us when she never had a good relationship with any of us. I’m also angry with myself for not stopping what I witnessed as it happened before my eyes. How could I have been so blind? It has been several years now, and I still feel guilty for letting it hap-pen, although I’m not sure how I could have stopped it. Your thoughts would be appreciated. -ANGRY SON IN GEORGIA DEAR ANGRY SON: I’m sorry for your pain and anger, emotions that are not uncommon when a loved one dies. But for your own sake, accept that if your father had an advance health care direc-tive, and trusted his wife to carry it out, then she was following his wishes. While today’s medical interventions can prolong someone’s life, they can also prolong death. Hospice offers grief counseling for family members for a period of time after a death occurs, and you and your siblings should have received some. It would have helped you to stop blam-ing the wife, and let go of any negative feelings so you could go on with your life. And that, I assure you, is what your father would have wanted. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My sis-ter “Mary” was in a car accident when she was in her 20s that left her with some brain damage. She appears normal, but has trouble with interpersonal relations, boundaries and impulse control. Overall, her behavior varies from acceptable to belligerent. When she was evaluated by professionals years ago, our family was advised to set standards for her behavior as near to normal as possible. When we go to restaurants, Mary has a hard time deciding what to order, often engaging the server in an uncomfort-able, long conversation about the alternatives. When her meal arrives, she is rarely satisfied with her choice and makes a scene over her dissatisfac-tion to the server. If we try to intervene, she becomes even more belligerent. She looks forward to going out and we love her dearly. We would hate to exclude her from these family outings, but we don’t know what to do. Can you help? -IMPOSSIBLE TO DIGEST IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR IMPOSSIBLE TO DIGEST: Because you were told to “set stan-dards” for your sister as near to normal as possible, that’s what you should be doing. Before you take her out for a meal, explain to her what the ground rules are. If she acts out, do as you would with an unruly child and leave the res-taurant until she regains control of herself. Because of her impairment, she may need extra help with her menu choices. Luckily, many restaurants now post their menus online. If you print one out and go over it with Mary, you might be able to make the process of order-ing easier for her. I can’t promise it will work, but it’s certainly worth a try. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I am a 14year-old female from the West Coast. I am home-schooled and don’t have many friends because I score high in tests, mean-ing I retain more infor-mation than the average person. On the rare occasion that I mingle with children my own age, they call me unpleasant names, play pranks on me and other-wise torture me. I had to change my emergency cellphone number and start using my sister’s because there have been so many immature and insulting prank calls. I hate it. I can’t help that I am smart, and I refuse to degrade myself by dumb-ing down my actions and speech because they can’t handle their insecurities. -HIGH IQ DEAR HIGH IQ: Being “different” isn’t easy, and clearly you are very intel-ligent. But you and your parents should understand that crank calls are not “pranks” -they are a form of bullying and should have been reported when they happened. Most parents who homeschool also network with other home-schooling parents so their children can socialize with peers. If your parents haven’t done this, I recommend you discuss it with them. You might also meet more intellectually advanced young people if you joined special-interest groups for older students. Your high IQ might be less threatening to the students who have given you trouble if you volun-teer to tutor some of them who need help with their schoolwork. (Just don’t fall into the trap of doing it FOR them.) ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have been with my boyfriend, “Dan,” for almost five years. He’s wonderful and we have a great rela-tionship. We have talked about spending our lives together, but had mutually agreed in the beginning that marriage wasn’t a priority for either of us. He has said for years that he never wanted to marry -which is fine with me. I now suspect that he’s planning to propose to me on our fifth anniversary. (He has never been great at hiding surprises.) I’m thrilled that he wants to make that kind of commitment, and I want nothing more than to spend the rest of my life with him, but the thought of marriage scares me. I don’t know if it’s nerves about the pending pro-posal or that I have never planned on marriage and now I have to think about all the stress and strife that comes with planning a wedding. I want to say yes, but I love the way things are right now, and I know that marriage will change things. What, if anything, do I say to him? -COLD FEET? IN SALT LAKE CITY DEAR COLD FEET?: I wish you had mentioned why you think being mar-ried to Dan would “change things.” If you’ve been happy together for five years, it’s unlikely that making a formal commit-ment would damage the special relationship you have together. Perhaps this is “old school,” but I feel that if couples plan to bring children into the world, they should be married. Because you want nothing more than to spend the rest of your life with Dan, and are concerned about the stress of planning a wedding, when he pops the question, I suggest you say, “Yes -why don’t we elope?” ** ** **Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. ** ** ** For an excellent guide to becoming a better con-versationalist and a more sociable person, order “How to Be Popular.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.) HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Listen carefully and avoid being sanctimonious. It’s best to do your own thing and allow others the same privilege. At the end of the day you have to be good about what you accomplished, not what everyone else has done. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s what you offer to do that will separate you from others. Don’t let someone limit or interfere in your life or with your work. Make it clear what your goal is and how you are going to proceed. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): False information or confusing signals will lead you down a difficult path. If you aren’t sure what’s being asked of you, ques-tion your motives and those of the person you are dealing with. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Stop dreaming and start doing. You have some wonderful ideas that must be implemented if you want to get ahead. Discover what you are capable of doing by pre-senting what you have to offer to friends, family and clients. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Fix up your home or nur-ture an important relation-ship. Set aside funds to make domestic changes that will alter your life. A move, trip or involvement with an unusual group or lifestyle will enlighten you and your future. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make plans to get together with friends, fam-ily, or take part in a com-munity event. The people you meet and the exchang-es you make with interest-ing people will shape the way you do things in the future. Love is on the rise. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Finish work before you decide to take off on an adventure. Attending a reunion or visiting a place you haven’t been to for a long time will open up new possibilities with someone from your past. Change is upon you. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Plan to have some fun or work toward a goal that is creative or will improve your living arrangements. Love is highlighted and romance should be sched-uled into your busy day. A commitment or promise will make you happy. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Pay close atten-tion to what transpires between you and the peo-ple you encounter. Friends, family and acquaintances may lead you astray intentionally. Don’t shy away from the truth. Ask direct questions. It’s better to know than to appear naive. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): A positive change to the way you are living is apparent. Put your skills to the test and you will land a position that is interesting, unusual and pays you what you are worth. A celebra-tion will lead to love. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Take care of legal or financial matters. The sooner you clear up any misconceptions, the better. Changing your living arrangements will allow you greater freedom to explore new interests. Someone from your past will surface. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take care of business. Contracts and agreements should be dealt with and put to rest. An important relationship can bring you closer to your goals. Ask questions if you don’t know where you stand. Face facts and move for-ward. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Son suspects dad’s death was an assisted suicide Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1-2, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 20136B SPORTSJapan favorite in World Baseball ClassicBy JANIE McCAULEYAssociated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — They’ll play in the Far East and the Far West — and in the Caribbean, too. Wherever they are, Miguel Cabrera and R.A. Dickey and dozens of All-Stars in the World Baseball Classic know the team to beat: two-time WBC winner Japan. The Japanese are hoping to defend their title in the third edition of baseball’s global tournament, having topped Cuba in the inau-gural Classic in 2006 and South Korea three years later. To do it, Japan — with a roster that doesn’t include a single player from Major League Baseball — will have to win two rounds at home and then the semi-finals and final at San Francisco’s AT&T Park. In their way will be an American team led by Dickey, Ryan Braun and Joe Mauer, trying to make up for a couple of under-whelming WBC showings — and featuring Joe Torre’s return to the top step of the dugout. Team USA has plenty of motivation. The Americans didn’t get out of the second round in 2006, then lost in the semifinals to Japan three years later. “We’ll probably be disappointed if we don’t make it to San Francisco,” said Giants right-hander Ryan Vogelsong, slated to be the No. 2 starter in the U.S. rotation. “First and fore-most, we’re focused on get-ting there.” Japan’s pro teams are known for their rigorous spring training regimen, which typically begins a couple of weeks before the major league clubs and feature all-day workouts with just a short break to eat. “It’s such a dedicated group of players. I go back to going over to Japan as a member of the Mets back in 74 and just notic-ing and at that time I didn’t think necessarily that the Japanese could play at our level, maybe stature-wise,” Torre said. “Even though their game was clean and disciplined, it just didn’t look like they were as good as we were. That’s certainly has changed.” Rockies slugger Carlos Gonzalez will play along-side San Francisco’s Pablo Sandoval and Triple Crown winner Cabrera for Venezuela. The World Series champion Giants have had to plan carefully this spring to get through the Cactus League with much of their roster head-ed to the WBC — Marco Scutaro on Venezuela, Angel Pagan and Andres Torres on Puerto Rico, Vogelsong and reliever Jeremy Affeldt on the U.S. team, closer Sergio Romo pitching for Mexico. “It’s my first time representing and I’m really looking forward to doing it,” Pagan said. “The first two Classics I couldn’t do it because I was either try-ing to make a team or I was trying to be the everyday player. It fills my heart to go out there and play in front of my countrymen and in front of my family. I did it when I played in New York and Puerto Rico but it’s not the same when you’re wear-ing the P.R. jersey.” And CarGo sure is confident in Venezuela’s chances. “I don’t think we need practice — Venezuela doesn’t need practice,” he said. “Japan, they train together for a long time and get prepared for that. We don’t really get prepared for that ... put the uniform on, let’s play.” In all, 45 big league allstars, including seven MVPs, were on the final WBC rosters. Many MLB players are torn between playing for their country or playing for the club that signs their paycheck — especially those who might be on the bubble of making a major league roster or earning a starting job. Gonzalez said the Venezuelans feel tremen-dous pressure to take part in the Classic, yet he under-stands why Seattle ace Felix Hernandez has passed after signing a $175 million, seven-year contract earlier this month that made him the highest-paid pitcher in baseball. “You have to represent your team,” Gonzalez said. “You see all the news about King Felix not playing for Venezuela and the whole country changes, they get upset that you’re not going to play for your country. They think it’s all about the money but, you know what, we’ve been working since we were 16 years old and we came from Venezuela to represent. ... I think made the right choice.” The inaugural 2006 Classic featured a pool-play format, while 2009 was dou-ble-elimination — and this one will be a combination of both. The first round will be pool play, with the top two teams advancing. The second round is double-elimination, and the top two teams from each group will reach the semifinals. The Americans will play their round-robin games at the Arizona Diamondbacks’ Chase Field in Phoenix. The other first-round groups will play in: Fukuoka, Japan; Taichung, Taiwan; and, San Juan, Puerto Rico. “The guys who have played this before were excited to get back to it,” Torre said. “I think it’s still something to get a little used to. Let’s admit it, you play the USA team, MLB, even though there are a number of MLB play-ers obviously playing for other countries, it’s like put-ting on your Sunday best, you know, We’re excited because we have a chance to beat them at their own game’ so to speak.” Semifinals will be played March 17-18, with the championship March 19 in the Giants’ waterfront ball-park. That’s where Sandoval cleared the fences three times in a Game 1 World Series win against the Tigers. The guy known as Kung Fu Panda hopes to find his groove again for his country. If he does, and his nation wins it all, Sandoval will be World Series, Venezuelan and WBC titles to his cred-it. “I’m trying to get the Triple Crown,” Sandoval said. ——— WATCH FOR:Q Animated crowds with a different flavor than the regular MLB fans. Expect musical instruments, patri-otic chants, face paint and flags. More than 1.5 million fans have attended games in first two WBC tourna-ments. Q This year’s 16-team field was drawn from the top 12 nations in the last WBC, plus four others who qualified in a tournament last year. The WBC winner will be named “world cham-pion” for the first time. Q Americans on a mission: Team USA failed to reach the champion-ship game of the first two Classics. Q Players will be subject to drug testing by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Q San Juan will host games for the third time at Hiram Bithorn Stadium, to be played March 7-10. Q Sparkling new Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the shared spring venue of the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies, will be on display for the world to see. The ballpark hosts Pool D games between the U.S., Italy, Mexico and qual-ifier Canada. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Feb. 23 file photo, Japan’s Ryoji Aikawa (left) is w elcomed by manager Koji Yamamoto (right) and coach Os amu Higashio (second from right) after hitting a come-from-beh ind three-run homer against Australia in the eighth inni ng of their exhibition baseball game at Kyocera Dome in Osaka, wes tern Japan. The team to beat in the third World Baseball Cl assic is two-time winner Japan. Branden Grace, DeLaet share early lead at HondaBy DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressPALM BEACH GARDENS — Branden Grace was downright bull-ish when it came to the “Bear’s Trap” on Thursday in the Honda Classic. Grace knew from television and from Charl Schwartzel about the noto-rious four-hole closing stretch at PGA National. It didn’t seem to bother him Thursday when he birdied every hole in the “Bear’s Trap” — Nos. 15, 16 and 17 — and added a birdie on the 18th for a 5-under 65 that gave him a share of the lead with Graham DeLaet of Canada among early starters. Dustin Johnson finally got his game on track to join the group at 66. Tiger Woods turned around his fortunes with one risky decision. He stepped into the water left of the sixth fairway to play a shot that was half-sub-merged in a creek, turning a likely double bogey into a par that enabled him to salvage a 70. Grace, part of the core group of young South Africans on the rise, is making his Honda Classic debut. “I sat down with Charl last week at the Match Play and he said, ‘Listen, the four finishing holes are quite a beast out there.’ So I was a little nervous coming here,” Grace said. “I just thought, ‘What’s going to happen around that cor-ner?”’ The first one was easy after a tee shot into 2 feet on the par-3 15th. He holed birdie putts of about 18 feet on the next two holes, and then his 3-iron barely cleared the water in front of the green on the par-5 18th, leading to a sim-ple up-and-down to finish in style. Some of the tees were moved forward because of rain earlier in the week that softened the course, and players were allowed to lift, clean and replace their golf balls. PGA National is converted into a par 70 for the tournament, however, which keeps scoring at a premium. “This is a golf course that you have to really hit good shots,” said DeLaet, who missed only one green in regulation. “You can save yourself with a few putts here and there, but if you’re hitting it poorly, it’s going to eventually catch up to you.” Woods didn’t hit it all that poorly, except for his tee shot on the par-4 sixth, with the tees moved forward 40 yards. He drove it left and down the bank into the water. Because of where it first crossed the hazard, he would have had no chance to get near the green after a penalty drop. Woods saw enough the ball to give it a shot. He removed his shoes and socks as the gallery came to life, and then put on rain pants and removed his sweater. The ball shot out with a big splash, leaving Woods about 80 yards to a front pin. He hit wedge to 8 feet and saved par. “I wasn’t trying to advance it very far, just make sure I got it back in the fairway and give myself some kind of wedge shot in there, which I did,” Woods said. “I was 1 over at the time, and if that ball is not playable from where it’s at, where I crossed was pretty far back. ... Looking at 6 — 3 over — and all of a sudden I flip it, make par there and birdie the next.” Woods said it was an otherwise boring round, and he was right. He dropped one shot from the middle of the 10th fairway (his first hole), and another when his plan to hit a cut from around a palm bush didn’t go as far as he wanted and left him a long, tough bun-ker shot. Rory McIlroy, the No. 1 player in the world and the defending champion, was among those who played in the afternoon. Johnson, playing alongside Woods, was coming off a miserable stretch of golf in which he missed the cut at Pebble Beach, missed the cut at Riviera and then was bounced from the first round of the Match Play Championship by Alex Noren. But he spent enough time at home in south Florida with Claude Harmon III, mostly on his driver. His miss was a hook, and it was a big miss. This time, he kept the ball in the short grass for most of the cool, cloudy morning and took advantage of his birdie chances. The weather didn’t get much better at the start of the Florida swing. ASSOCIATED PRESSTiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the 13th hole during the first round of the Honda Classic golf tournament on Thu rsday in Palm Beach Gardens.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 7B7BSPORTSLivestrong enters post-Armstrong eraBy MICHAEL TARMAssociated PressCHICAGO — Leaders of the cancer charity founded by Lance Armstrong struck a determined, sometimes defiant tone on Thursday as they declared the organiza-tion will persevere in the wake of the cyclist’s admis-sion that he used perfor-mance-enhancing drugs. “I am on safe ground to say that the past year did not go as planned,” Livestrong’s executive vice president Andy Miller said at The Livestrong Foundation’s annual meeting in Chicago. “Things happen that we cannot control — cancer has taught us that. What do we do? We adapt.” He added later, “This is our message to the world: The Livestrong Foundation is not going anywhere.” The meeting, its first such gathering since Armstrong’s troubled departure in October, comes amid a swirl of uncertainty about whether donors could back away or whether people world-wide will stop showing their support by purchasing the foundation’s trademark yel-low “Livestrong” bracelets. Addressing some 500 people in his 30-minute keynote speech, Miller mentioned Armstrong by name only four times. But there was no mistak-ing what he meant by the foundation being “caught in the crossfire of the media frenzy.” “We faced headwinds that were not only stiff, but heartbreaking,” Miller said, without getting more spe-cific. Armstrong won seven Tour de France titles — all of which were stripped in August. He also is banned for life from sports. He stepped down as chairman of the charity in October, saying he didn’t want his association to damage the foundation’s ability to raise money and continue its advocacy programs on behalf of people with can-cer. Livestrong’s president, Doug Ulman, echoed Miller’s sentiments in pre-pared remarks. “Our success has never been based on one per-son,” said Ulman, who was unable to deliver the speech in person because of travel delays. “Will the Livestrong Foundation survive? Yes. Absolutely, yes. Hell, yes.” A common theme Thursday was disappoint-ment in Armstrong’s actions but gratitude for how he parlayed his fame into rais-ing cancer awareness. “We were deeply disappointed when we learned along with the rest of the world that we had been misled during and after Lance’s cycling career,” Miller said. “We accept-ed the apology ... and we remain grateful for what he decided to create and helped build.” Among the steps the organization is taking to establish a new identity is to change its day of action each year from Oct. 2 — the date in 1996 that Armstrong was diagnosed with cancer — to May 17, the group announced Thursday. On that day in 2004, the charity launched their yel-low bands. Since then, 87 million have been sold, Katherine McLane, the group’s executive vice pres-ident for communications, said. “The foundation is charting its own course with-out the founder since its inception,” she said in an interview. “It’s a challenge. It might be a rocky road in 2013. But we are thinking in terms of the next five years.” There has been no indication, she said, that donors are distancing themselves from the charity, which raised $48 million in 2012. That was 2 or 3 percent less than fundraising in 2011 but consistent with slight dropoffs other foundations saw in a still-struggling economy, she said. The cyclist created the organization — originally called the Lance Armstrong Foundation — in Austin, Texas, in 1997 while he was being treated for testicular cancer that had spread to his brain and lungs. Doctors gave him 50-50 odds of sur-viving. Throughout his career, Armstrong always denied drug use, but earlier this year, he admitted during an interview with Oprah Winfrey that he used per-formance-enhancing drugs. He told Winfrey that leaving Livestrong was the most “humbling” experi-ence after the revelations about his drug use broke. “I wouldn’t at all say forced out, told to leave,” he told Winfrey about Livestrong. “I was aware of the pressure. But it hurt like hell. “That was the lowest,” Armstrong said. “The low-est.” In an interview later Thursday, Miller said Armstrong wasn’t formally asked to resign after admit-ting the use of performance-enhancing drugs. It wasn’t even clear, he added, that there was a provision in the organization’s bylaws to ask the founder to leave. “It ultimately had to be his decision,” he said. During his time as chairman, Armstrong was the biggest single donor to the foundation, and Miller declined to say if Armstrong might continue to contrib-ute or whether — at some point — he could be asked to play a role in the charity again. But when asked if Livestrong would ever seek a new celebrity to be its face, he was quick to answer. “No. ... We won’t go that route,” he said. “It’s risky for any organization to have one person as a spokesman — to put all your eggs in one basket. If something happens to that person, you’re in trouble.” ASSOCIATED PRESSLivestrong Foundation’s executive vice president Andy Mi ller speaks at its annual meeting Thursday in Chicago. L eaders of the cancer charity founded by Lance Armstrong said at the first such gathering since Armstrong was engulfed in sc andal that the organization will persevere in the wake of the cycli st’s admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs Female kicker set for NFL regional combine tryoutBy DAN GELSTONAssociated PressLauren Silberman has a scant chance at making the NFL. Silberman never kicked anything more than a soc-cer ball in an organized game and she just started practicing long-range field goals. Even so, the first female kicker scheduled to try out at an NFL regional scouting combine would like to see where her new hobby will take her. In an era where Danica Patrick can con-tend against men in motor sports, Silberman is about to take a big kick forward for female athletes, even if the odds are clearly stacked against her. The 28-year-old Silberman will kick Sunday at the New York Jets’ train-ing facility in Florham Park, N.J. “I realize that I may not make an NFL team this year,” Silberman told NFL.com. “But for me, I’m expecting to have fun, to meet really interesting people and hopefully per-fect my technique from the other tremendous kickers that will be in attendance.” Her goal for the weekend is a true long shot — per-fect 60-yard field goals. Odds are, though, that scouts will want to see her connect on extra points and chip-shot field goals with some consistency before moving on to the heavy kicking. Silberman will compete against more accomplished or polished college kickers, all hoping to prove they have the leg strength and accuracy worthy of earning an invite to an NFL train-ing camp. St. Louis Rams kicker Greg Zuerlein par-ticipated in a regional com-bine last year before he was drafted and morphed into “Legatron.” Cincinnati Bengals special teams coach Darrin Simmons said teams look for several things specifical-ly when judging kickers in these situations. The most important is leg strength, followed by accuracy on field goals over 40 yards, and how they did on clutch kicks in college. “When rating field goals, the deepest we test at the combine is a 50-yard field goal. There’s not many attempts over 55 yards. We don’t practice kicks much deeper than that — rarely do we do them,” Simmons said. “You can tell after watching a 50-yard field goal how far the ball goes over the crossbar if they can hit from 55. They’ve got to be able to hit from 55. On kickoffs, they’ve got to be able to get the ball out of the back of the end zone.” Silberman won’t be kicking against the best of the sure-footed prospects, but there will be talent there regardless. The regional combines debuted in 2011, and feature players who weren’t among the 333 invited to the main com-bine in Indianapolis. So no first-round picks are likely to show, only potential, hid-den, undrafted gems or late-round risks. The league is holding these sessions in 10 cities this season, with the most impressive play-ers advancing to a super-regional in April in Dallas. It’s sort of the sports ver-sion of a TV reality show, where each hit and tackle can wow a scout and move a player on to the next round. Only instead of a recording contract, it’s an NFL one. “It’s all up to those guys. If you’re talented enough, you’re going to get recog-nized. And if you put up good numbers, the num-bers don’t lie,” said Doug Whaley, assistant general manager/director of player personnel for the Buffalo Bills. “That’s one of the things about the combine part of this business. It’s the least subjective part of the business. And it’s really objective, because you’re looking at numbers.” She hasn’t treated the tryout like a publicity stunt. But Silberman, whose NFL.com bio listed her as a for-mer club soccer player at Wisconsin, seems to under-stand what she’s up against. More likely, she wanted to use the weekend as an opportunity to promote greater diversity in football. “It would be a great opportunity to attract more women to the sport,” she said. “Hopefully, I’ll have a good line that won’t let any-one through to tackle me.” The possibility also exists that Silberman can use this opportunity as a stepping-stone to other ventures. Public speaking, perhaps, or even some sports mar-keting. “The real upside is if she reaches the next level,” said Steve Rosner, a partner with 16W Marketing in New Jersey. “Kickers, in general, aren’t brands. Very rare. Even someone like Adam Vinatieri, who (has won) Super Bowls, would have to do a little more than kick to capitalize and endorse at the national level. The one thing she has, that they don’t have, is that she’s a woman. The uniqueness of her and the possible suc-cess she has will differen-tiate what she has at that position.” While a female has never played in the NFL, if the gender breakthrough did happen, it most likely would be at kicker. Females have kicked or tried out for a roster spot in the college ranks for years. Just last season, for-mer LSU women’s soccer goalkeeper Mo Isom tried out for as a Tigers place-kicker. In 2003, Katie Hnida became the first woman to kick for an NCAA Division I-A football team, scoring in one game for the University of New Mexico. Hnida, who later kicked for the Fort Wayne Firehawks of the Continental Indoor Football League, was sur-prised a player with no true kicking background would be scouted at a combine. “I thought it would be an athlete who has come through the ranks of play-ing football for a long time,” she said. “It is so differ-ent kicking in a live situa-tion, too, dealing with the timing of the snap, having guys rushing at you. That’s where you separate the good from the great.” Sean Landeta, a Super Bowl champion and consid-ered one of the NFL’s great punters, gave Silberman credit for competing, one way or the other. “I think it’s courageous on her part in trying this, and certainly groundbreaking if she could prove her skills are good enough to play in the NFL,” he said. “What a team’s policy would be as far entertaining the thought in signing a female, that’s still debatable.” Scouting combine shows NFL’s global progressBy MICHAEL MAROTAssociated PressINDIANAPOLIS — Ezekiel “Ziggy” Ansah knew nothing about the NFL when he was grow-ing up. Now, he could be a first-round pick in April’s draft. Ansah played soccer in Ghana as a kid, came to America to play basketball at Brigham Young and, after getting cut twice, finally took the advice of his track coach and tried out for football. The first time he put on football pads, as a sophomore in 2010, he looked like the Michelin man with things in all the wrong places. Until last fall, he had never started a game. These days, NFL scouts are drooling over his potential. “I try to stay up late and watch NFL Network. I see some things,” Ansah said. “This is going to be my life, so I just try to suck it all in.” Ansah has been a sponge in this new world order of pro football, where anyone on Earth seemingly can apply for a job. Some men who made it to this year’s 333-player combine were born or reared in Australia, England, Estonia, Germany, Jamaica, Japan, Liberia and Tonga. Sure, the NFL has a history with players from the Pacific Rim and Africa. Some fans will remem-ber Christian Okoye, nicknamed the Nigerian Nightmare, or Jack Thompson, known as the Throwin’ Samoan. Maybe this should have been expected given the league’s conscientious effort to expand its global reach, though the NFL still lags behind Major League Baseball, the MLS, the NBA and the NHL. NFL officials have been scheduling regular-season games annually in London since 2007 and will play two regular-season games there in 2013. Buffalo has played five times in Toronto and has signed an agreement to play at least one game per sea-son there for the next five years. The NFL also has staged preseason games in Mexico City and Tokyo in the past. Twice, league officials tried to create a European developmental league, a venture that ended in 2007. But now the results are rolling in. Ansah played well at the Senior Bowl in January and only cemented his top 15 status by measuring in at 6-foot-5, 271 pounds and finishing the 40-yard dash in 4.63 seconds. Some have questioned his practice habits, but the one guy who has worked up close and personal with him, Lions coach Jim Schwartz, disagrees. Schwartz coached Ansah during Senior Bowl week. “I think the most important thing in football and scouting is how they play,” Schwartz said. “He played well in the game and just like this — it’s important what you run a 40.”

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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 20138BSPORTS FRIDAY EVENING MARCH 1, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (DVS) (:01) 20/20 News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Capitol UpdateNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss Blue Bloods Henry has a heart attack. Blue Bloods “The Life We Chose” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita Nikita and Owen try to catch Ari. The Vampire Diaries “Stand by Me” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsKitchen Nightmares (N) (DVS) Touch “Eye to Eye” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Dateline NBC (N) (:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:38) M*A*S*H(:16) M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Dallas (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Vegas Heat” Police Women of Dallas A&E 19 118 265Barter Kings Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch“Notes From the Heart Healer” (2012) Genie Francis, Ted McGinley. Frasier “Oops!” Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248 “Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. “Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. The Americans Married KGB spies pose as Americans. The Americans CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist The Mentalist “Red Sky at Night” “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. Dallas “Blame Game” Monday Mornings NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobTeenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.See Dad RunFull House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:47) “Skyline” (2010, Science Fiction) Eric Balfour, Scottie Thompson. “Batman Begins” (2005, Action) Christian Bale. Premiere. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark Knight. Bellator MMA Live MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk Surprise birthday party. Monk Sharona returns. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Jessie Jessie gets her big break. Dog With a BlogJessie (N) Gravity Falls (N) Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Randy; Vicki” Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders “Arline; Carolyn” Hoarders (:01) Project Runway “Senior Fling” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitCSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Freestyle Friday All-Star Tournament. (N) “The Wash” (2001, Comedy) Dr. Dre, Snoop “Doggy” Dogg. “Dance Flick” (2009, Comedy) Shoshana Bush, Damon Wayans Jr. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Countdownd NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (N)d NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Denver Nuggets. ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptiond College Basketball Loyola (Md.) at Iona. (N)s Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Inside the HeatInside the Heata College Baseball Miami at Florida. (N) The Game 365Inside the HeatInside the HeatInside the Heat DISCV 38 182 278(5:00) Gold Rush Live Gold Rush “The Motherlode” Gold Rush “Making of the Motherlode” Yukon Men “New Kid in Town” (N) Bering Sea Gold “Go Big or Go Home” Yukon Men “New Kid in Town” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy “Blades of Glory” (2007) Will Ferrell. Rival male skaters compete as a pair. Are We There Yet?Are We There Yet? HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236After LatelyThe SoupE! News (N) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiBurning LoveFashion Police Sarah Silverman; Nina Garcia. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures “New Orleans” Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files “Blood and Gold” The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lFlea Market FlipFlea Market FlipAuction Agent (N) Auction Agent (N) Endless Yard Sale 2012 House HuntersHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings “...and a Super Storm” Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressBorrowed, NewBorrowed, NewSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “5 Acres of Junk” American Pickers “Pickers in the Attic” American Pickers “California Kustom” American Pickers “Full Steam Ahead” American Pickers “Dial F for Fritz” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Tanked: Un ltered A robotic sh tank. Tanked: Un lteredTanked: Un ltered “Roll With It” Tanked: Un ltered (N) Tanked: Un ltered “Fish Out of Water” Tanked: Un ltered FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: Impossible “Wildcat Cafe” Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) UEFA MagazineHalls of FameWorld Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244“House of Bones” (2010, Horror) Charisma Carpenter, Corin Nemec. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Robot Combat League Teams battle. Being Human AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Identity” (2003) “Hannibal” (2001, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins. A dis gured victim of cannibalistic Dr. Lecter seeks revenge. The Walking Dead “I Ain’t a Judas” Comic Book MenFreakshow COM 62 107 249(5:55) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 The Jeselnik OffNathan for You(9:59) Tosh.0 The Ben Show “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” CMT 63 166 327(:05) Reba (:40) Reba (:15) Reba “You Make Me Sick” (7:50) Reba (:25) Reba “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. “National-European” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Project Runaway!” Hogzilla Large pig. Caught in the Act “Crocs vs. Lions” Alpha Dogs (N) Alpha DogsWild Justice (N) Wild Justice (N) Caught in the Act “Crocs vs. Lions” NGC 109 186 276Vatican: The Hidden WorldTitanic: How It Really SankSave the Titanic With Bob Ballard: ReTitanic: Ballard’s Secret Mission: ReDiggersDiggersTitanic: Ballard’s Secret Mission: Re SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeGreat Lakes Shipwrecks Deep Salvage Dive to the Bottom of the World Radioactive Paradise Deep Salvage ID 111 192 285Behind Mansion Walls Behind Mansion Walls “Family Ties” Fatal Vows “The Edge of Love” Fatal Vows “Dead Silence” Who the (Bleep)...Who the BleepFatal Vows “The Edge of Love” HBO 302 300 501(4:45) “The Terminal” (2004) “Game Change” (2012, Docudrama) Julianne Moore, Ed Harris. REAL Sports With Bryant GumbelReal Time With Bill Maher (N) Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(:10) “Meet the Fockers” (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ (:10) “From Dusk Till Dawn” (1996, Horror) Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ Banshee “We Shall Live Forever” (N) Banshee “We Shall Live Forever” SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “A Low Down Dirty Shame”(:15) “The Reunion” (2011, Action) John Cena. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ “Drive Angry” (2011, Action) Nicolas Cage. ‘R’ (:45) House of Lies(:15) Shameless “Cascading Failures” SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 2, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) Once Upon a Time “Manhattan” 20/20 News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock “I Do Do” Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -Unleash the PowerMagic Moments: The Best of 50s Pop Musicians perform. Aaron Neville: Doo Wop: My True Story Albert King With Stevie Ray Vaughan in Session 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenHawaii Five-0 “Kalele” Golden Boy “Pilot” 48 Hours (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17VEER! SneakMeet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneI Know JaxLike, LoveThe Crook and Chase Show (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleDaryl’s HouseAccording to Jim 10-FOX 10 30 30 “Doubt” (2008, Drama) Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Cops (N) Cops (PA) The Following “The Fall” (DVS) NewsAction Sports 360Hell’s Kitchen “15 Chefs Compete” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! American Ninja Warrior (N) Chicago Fire “Nazdarovya!” Saturday Night Live NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent Funny VideosBulls Eyed NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineBones A Halloween killer. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby Show(:43) The Cosby Show “Halloween” The Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Solved “Gone but Not Forgotten” Solved A millionaire is found dead. Iyanla, Fix My Life RechargedBlackboard Wars “Baptism by Fire” (N) Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life Recharged A&E 19 118 265Parking WarsParking WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsSouthie Rules (N) Southie Rules (N) (:01) Southie Rules(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Personally Yours” (2000) “The Magic of Ordinary Days” (2005, Drama) Keri Russell, Skeet Ulrich. “Loving Leah” (2009, Romance) Lauren Ambrose, Adam Kaufman. “Second Honeymoon” (2001) FX 22 136 248(4:30) “The Karate Kid” (2010, Drama) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” (2009, Science Fiction) Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel. AngerBrandX With CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents Piers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightCNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:30) “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage, Hunter Gomez. (DVS) “Sherlock Holmes” (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. (DVS) “Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieMarvin Marvin (N) Supah Ninjas (N) Wendell & VinnieSee Dad RunThe Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Auction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersSavage DiggersSavage DiggersSavage DiggersSav age Diggers MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “Princess of Space” Star Trek “The Cloud Minders” “Son of Dracula” (1943, Horror) Lon Chaney, Robert Paige. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Phineas and FerbPhineas and Ferb “Bolt” (2008, Comedy) Voices of John Travolta. Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbPhineas and FerbJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“Playdate” (2012, Drama) Marguerite Moreau, Richard Ruccolo. “The Surrogate” (2013) Cameron Mathison, Amy Scott. Premiere. “The Wife He Met Online” (2012) Cameron Mathison, Barbara Niven. USA 33 105 242Terminator 3 “Fast & Furious” (2009, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. “Boot Camp” (2007) Mila Kunis. BET 34 124 329“In the Hive” (2011) Michael Clarke Duncan, Loretta Devine. A black teen enters an unorthodox alternative school. “The Secret Life of Bees” (2008, Drama) Queen Latifah, Dakota Fanning. Premiere. Beauty Shop ESPN 35 140 206d College Basketball Miami at Duke. (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) d College Basketball Arizona at UCLA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209h NASCAR Racingd College Basketball Kansas State at Baylor. (N)d College Basketball Vanderbilt at Auburn. (N) Basketball SUNSP 37 College Lacrosse: Orange Bowl Classic GatorZonea College Baseball Miami at Florida. (N) Women’s College GymnasticsSeminole Sports DISCV 38 182 278Dual Survival “Castaways” Yukon Men “Last Chance” Villagers rush to stock up on salmon. Yukon Men “Feast or Famine” Yukon Men “New Kid in Town” Yukon Men “Feast or Famine” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensFamily Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Enginerds” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Giuliana & Bill “New House Hunters” After LatelyThe Soup “There’s Something About Mary” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon. Burning Love (N) After LatelyChelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It “The Shaver Family” Love It or List It House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Cellblock 6: Female Lock Up Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Hat elds & McCoys Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Big Rig Bounty Hunters ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedToo Cute! “Kitten Beauties” Too Cute! “Mighty Munchkins” (N) Pit Boss “Goodbye Ashley” (N) Tanked: Un lteredPit Boss “Goodbye Ashley” FOOD 51 110 231Worst Cooks in AmericaRestaurant StakeoutRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleIron Chef America “Flay Vs. Wexler” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of PowerBilly Graham Classic CrusadesLove’s Unending Legacy FSN-FL 56 -d College BasketballWorld Poker Tour: Season 11d College Basketball Clemson at Virginia Tech. (N)s Boxing Golden Boy Live: Henry Aurad vs. Omar Figueroa. (N) SYFY 58 122 244(4:00)Outlander “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. “Contact” (1997) Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey. Premiere. A scientist seeks alien life in deep space. AMC 60 130 254(4:00) “Braveheart” (1995) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau. “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” (2002) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen. Premiere. Members of a fellowship battle evil Sauron and his pawns. COM 62 107 249 “Idiocracy” (2006, Comedy) Luke Wilson, Maya Rudolph. “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan. Premiere. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The Ben ShowTosh.0 CMT 63 166 327National-European(:45) “Son-in-Law” (1993) Pauly Shore. A coed brings her surf-minded pal home to the farm. My Big Redneck Vacation (N) Swamp Pawn “The Cajun Way” (N) My Big Redneck Vacation NGWILD 108 190 283Freaks & CreepsDog Whisperer “Family Feud” The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol (N) Alpha DogsAlpha DogsDog Whisperer “Family Feud” NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersAlaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersWicked Tuna “Fish Fight” Wicked Tuna “Shark Attack” Wicked Tuna “Fish Fight” SCIENCE 110 193 284Brave New World “Machines” How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeOdd Folks HomeOddities Oddities (N) Oddities An Idiot Abroad: Lost Luggage (N) Odd Folks HomeOddities ID 111 192 285My Dirty Little Secret Redrum Redrum Deadly Sins “I’d Kill for a Sex Change” Deadly Sins “Mommy’s Little Killers” Scorned: Love Kills “Devil Inside” (N) Deadly Sins “I’d Kill for a Sex Change” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “Battleship” (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch. ‘PG-13’ “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011) Robert Downey Jr. (:15) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011) ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515Hangover II(:45) “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. ‘NR’ Banshee “We Shall Live Forever” “The Long Kiss Goodnight” (1996, Action) Geena Davis. Premiere. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545 “Payback” (1999, Action) Mel Gibson, Gregg Henry. Premiere. ‘R’ (7:50) “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman. ‘PG-13’ s Boxing Sharif Bogere vs. Richard Abril. (N) GATORS: Play Tide in first test at full-strength since retu rn from injury Continued From Page 1Balso went down with what looked like a concussion in the final minutes against Tennessee. But Donovan says Prather, who missed four games early in the sea-son because of a concus-sion, passed baseline tests and is fine. “Obviously, it’s great to have those guys back,” forward Erik Murphy said. “You know, it gives us back a full team, at full strength. But I think that doesn’t give us any reason to expect anything out of them. ... We can’t expect too much out of those guys. Everybody’s got to stay on edge, con-tinue to stay focused and do what they’re doing.” Yeguete’s injury caused the most concern. Initially, Donovan said the Frenchman would miss at least the remainder of the regular season. But Yeguete’s knee responded well following surgery to remove loose bodies Feb. 8. Yeguete has been running and cutting more than a week, but hadn’t practiced fully until Thursday. “I have no idea right now,” Donovan said before practice. “My expecta-tion on him going into the game is not very high just because I haven’t seen him play. Obviously, he’s got two days to practice, but I would be hard-pressed to believe he’s going to be the same player he was before he went down with his injury. It’ll probably take him some time to get back, but at least he can start working to get back in shape and get back in rhythm and timing and those kinds of things.” Yeguete, who also missed several games late last sea-son, was nervous and eager to get back on the court. “I feel like a little kid right now,” he said. “I’m a little excited to get back out there. I feel like it’s been a minute since I played with those guys and on the court and competing. But at the same time, I’m not going to be like 100 percent and not going to be able to go up and down for 30 min-utes like a regular practice. So it’s going to take time. It’s going to be a process. I think the coaches know that, and I’m ready to go whenever they want me to go.” Yeguete still has to get used to playing with a bulky knee brace. “I feel like I’m not free,” he said. “My knee is still kind of strapped up or some-thing, but if that’s what I have to do and the safest thing to do, I have to play with it and just get used to it. It was a bit harder in the beginning, but now I’m get-ting used to it.” The Tide (19-9, 11-4) is the first test. The game also could decide the regular-sea-son title. A win would put the Gators, who are 13-0 at home this season, two games up over Alabama with two to play. Florida, though, cares more about getting healthy in time for the postseason. “I always get nervous when guys miss practice and games because there is a rhythm that you kind of miss out on — the normal routine of going through practice, going through shooting, going through individual instruction and game preparation, getting ready to play.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida guard Michael Frazier II wins a rebound while p laying against Georgia during a game on Jan. 9.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 9B 9BNASCAR From the start of Speedweeks through the clos-ing stages of the Daytona 500, an overwhelming amount of focus was on Danica Patrick, first for her romance with fellow Sprint Cup rookie Ricky Stenhouse Jr., then for her winning the pole for th e 500. It continued on Sunday in the race as Patrick ran among the leaders all day and even became the first woman to lead the 500 under the green flag, when she took the top spot for the first time on Lap 90. She wound up leading five laps. But with 10 laps to go, Jimmie Johnson, who had ridden under the media radar for most of Speedweeks, surged past Brad Keselowski into the lead and held it the rest of the way to score his s econd Daytona 500 victory. Johnson, who stuck to single-car runs throughout the pre-race practices, said his speed at the end o f the race shouldn’t have come as a surprise to any-one. “At the end when it was time to go, I knew we had a straight race car with no scratches on it,” h e said. “We worked real hard. We had a game plan down here every time. Even though we were in single-car drafts [in practice], we had an agenda a nd things we worked on and made the car a little bit better each day, kept perfecting it. “I had one heck of a race car.” He said that just because the media attention was elsewhere, it didn’t mean those truly in the know were caught off-guard. “I guess I was quiet in the overall spectrum of th ings from the media side,” he said. “I think people in the garage, peop le knew we were sitting on a lot of speed and had a very good race car.” Johnson said the key to his win was the pass of Ke selowski with 10 laps to go, just before the caution flag flew. Because h e was leading, he got to choose which lane he’d be in for the restart. He pi cked the preferred lane up high, and Keselowski wasn’t able to overcome the disadvantage, and faded to fourth behind the surging duo of Dale Earn hardt Jr. and Mark Martin, who finished second and third, respectively Patrick lined up third on the deciding restart, but faded to eighth at the end, which still was the best-ever Daytona 500 finish by a female. Sara Christian holds the all-time Cup record with a fifth-place finish at Pittsburgh in 1949. Patrick said she needed more experience to truly contend for victory. “I really didn’t feel like I had a great grasp as to ‘how do you go win this race,’” she said. “I hadn’t wrapped my head around exactly how that was going to happen. “I kept thinking about it out there, because for the most part I was running half throttle for most of the race, running in the line. I will know bette r for next time and for Talladega. I mean the same stuff will probably apply.” Johnson was among those praising Patrick for her performance. “Being close to other competitors, door-to-door, whatever environment takes place on the race track, at these speeds, she was very comfortable, held a great wheel, was smooth and predictable, too k advantage of runs when she had them,” he said. “She did a really good job.” But Johnson cautioned that Patrick’s success at Da ytona isn’t a sign that she’ll be a contender when the circuit moves to oth er types of tracks. “I think the style of race track really suits her, ” he said. “When we get to the other tracks, she has a tall learning curve ahe ad of her.” Johnson also has some learning to do, as he and hi s crew chief Chad Knaus prepare to race NASCAR’s new Gen-6 race cars on the flat mile at Phoenix International Raceway this week and at the 1.5-mile Las Vegas Motor Speedway the week after. Their Daytona 500 win won’t be any help there, sai d Knaus, who was enjoying his first Daytona 500 win, as he was suspe nded from NASCAR when Johnson won in 2006. “That’s the thing that’s difficult about our sport ,” he said. “You’ve got to move on relatively quickly and put the good things and the bad things behind you.” Little-funded teams score big The Daytona 500, NASCAR’s richest race, sometimes rewards those on the lower end of the financial ladder. In 2005, journeyman driver Kevin Lepage finished ninth driving for maverick car owner John Carter. In 2011, David Gilliland finished third in Bob Jenkins’ modestly funded No. 34 Ford. And this year, Michael McDowell and J.J. Yeley, both of whom have been relegated to start-and-park efforts in recent seasons, finished ninth and 10th, respectively. McDowell, whose career average finish is a dismal 37.8, got his first-ever top-10 finish but stayed out of trouble, running a smart race and running the entire race. “We were in a good position there at the end and just stayed out of trouble,” he said. “Every time I would pull to the bottom to try and make a move I wouldn’t be able to pull it off, so the last 30 laps I committed to the top. I said to myself, ‘I’m not moving. I’m not even going to try anything. I’m just going to ride right here,’ and made up a lot of spots there coming to the white and coming to the checkered ... “For us, an under-funded team, to come here to Daytona and get a top 10 finish is pretty cool.” Yeley, who has an average finish of 37.4 for the past three seasons, scored his first top-10 since 2008 and the eighth of his career.Sauter wins NextEra 250 Camping World Truck Series driver Johnny Sauter finally put his Daytona bad luck behind him and won last Friday’s NextEra Energy Resources 250. Sauter held a tenuous lead on the white flag lap, with Kyle Busch poised to draft past him, when the caution flag flew and ended the race early and left him with his seventh career Truck victory and his first at Daytona. “We came down here a couple years ago and crashed before the first half lap was over,” he said. “Couple guys got together and we were in it. Last year, we were leading coming to the white [and] got wrecked.” Sauter said he hopes the win in the season opener will propel him to the series champi-onship that also has eluded him. The 2011 season was particularly heartbreaking, as he won the season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway, but lost the title by six points to Austin Dillon. “The Truck Series has been a tough row to hoe for me,” he said, adding that his Daytona troubles have put him behind in points from the start. “Every year we’ve been looking at being 25th to 35th in points, depending where we fin-ished going in to the season, and came close to winning the championship two years ago. “Hopefully, we can get back to champion-ship form. I think we can. I know the guys are working hard. We’re going to Martinsville next, which is a great race track for us. We’ve won there, so I’m digging right now where we’re sitting, that’s for sure.” NUMERICALLY SPEAKINGVictories by Tony Stewart in the past six Nationwide Series season openers at Daytona International Speedway — and he did it with four different own-ers: Joe Gibbs; Rick Hendrick; Kevin Harvick, twice; and Richard Childress Sprint Cup drivers who won in their 400th Cup start — Jimmie Johnson, Lee Petty, Richard Petty, David Pearson, Dave Marcis and Dale Earnhardt Drivers with multiple Daytona 500 victories: Jimmie Johnson, Matt Kenseth, Jeff Gordon, Michael Waltrip, Sterling Marlin, Dale Jarrett, Bill Elliott, Bobby Allison, Cale Yarborough and Richard Petty6 510 The horrifying crash at the end of Saturday’s Nationwide Series race at Daytona International Speedway sent parts of Kyle Larson’s car flying into the grandstands, injuring 28 fans — up to 30-something by some reports — and raising questions of the safety of auto racing, particularly at the faster race tracks like Daytona and its sister track, Talladega Superspeedway. Race winner Tony Stewart, who skipped most of the traditional post-race ritual out of respect to the injured fans, described his view during his brief comments just after the race: “I looked in the mirror, and that’s the worst image I’ve ever seen in a race in my life.” But others before him have had simi-lar experiences over the years, particu-larly at the two giant tracks, both of which were designed decades ago with maximum speed in mind. Daytona, opened in 1959, is 2.5-miles long, with the turns banked 31 degrees and the tri-oval at 18. Talladega, which held its first race 10 years later, is slightly longer at 2.66 miles. Its turns were tweaked for even higher speeds than Daytona, with a more sweeping layout and higher banking at 33 degrees. But about the time Talladega opened, the technology on the race cars had outrun the safety of the race tracks. Bob Welborn won the pole for the first Daytona 500 with a speed of 140.121 miles per hour. Talladega’s first race saw Bobby Isaac win the pole with a lap at 196.386 mph, but Charlie Glotzbach, in the second qualify-ing round, went even faster, qualifying at 199.466 mph. After tires began to fail at those speeds, most of NASCAR’s top drivers boycotted the race, and Richard Brickhouse drove Glotzbach’s car to victory. Since that first Talladega race, NASCAR has struggled to find a way to deal with the speeds at Daytona and Talladega. In 1987, Bill Elliott qualified at a record 212.809 mph at Talladega, but on the 21st lap of that race, the Buick of outside pole-sitter Bobby Allison flew into the catch-fence on the frontstretch, ripping down the fence, sending parts flying and injuring five fans. NASCAR responded by placing speed-dampening restrictor plates on the engines of the cars at Daytona and Talladega. But teams and drivers kept working to make them fast again, using technology in the race shops and tactics like push drafting on the tracks. While some have suggested reducing the banking or adding a bus-stop-like detour on the backstretch, both tracks remain unchanged, and both were recently repaved in their original configurations. In 2009 at Talladega, Carl Edwards’ car, running at nearly 200 miles per hour, being pushed by Brad Keselowski and rac-ing for the win on the last lap, sailed into the catchfence, injuring seven. At that time, the response of NASCAR officials was similar to last Saturday’s, which also occurred because drivers were pushing each other for the win. They point-ed out that the catchfence kept the entire car out of the grandstand, and the situa-tion was being studied. Catchfences were built higher and stronger at many tracks, including Daytona and Talladega, after Edwards’ wreck, and officials continued to try to figure out how to have racing there that is relatively safe, but not boring. Last Saturday night, officials were back in the same spot their colleagues at Talladega were in 2009. Daytona track president Joie Chitwood III said: “Following the incident, we responded appropriately according to our safety proto-cols, and had emergency medical personnel at the incident immediately. We transported 14 people off property and treated 14 people at our on-track care center. We’re in the process of repairing the facility and will be ready to go racing [Sunday].” NASCAR vice president Steve O’Donnell was asked what can be done to prevent future occurrences. His answer: “I think we look at this after every incident. We’ve learned in the past certain protocols put in place today are a result of prior incidents. Again, our initial evaluation is still ongoing. But it’s cer-tainly something we’ll look at. If we can improve upon it, we’ll certainly put that in play as soon as we can.” The situation this past weekend brings to mind the final words ever written by the one-time leader of the NASCAR print media corps, David Poole of the Charlotte Observer. Poole died of a massive heart attack two days after Edwards’ crash. His final para-graphs were: “All I want is for someone to tell me what’s acceptable. We apparently estab-lished Sunday that seven fans being injured — one spent the night in a hospital with a broken jaw — is OK. “It seems we’ve decided we can live with that much damage being done to the sport’s customers for ‘good racing.’ “How many people have to be listed in ‘guarded’ or ‘critical’ condition before we say that’s too much? “Is it lead changes? If we have fewer than five fans hurt for every lead change, is that acceptable? “Does somebody have to die before we’ve decided we don’t have control?” Jimmie Johnson races through the finish line to win the Daytona 500.Nationwide car goes airborne; Johnson wins Daytona 500Patrick’s Daytona 500 a female best; ‘learning curve’ ahead Danica Patrick high-fives the crowd during driver introductions prior to the Daytona 500 on Feb. 24. Johnny Sauter celebrates after winning the Camping World Truck Series NextEra Energy Resources 250. NEXTUP...Race: Dollar General 200 Where: Phoenix International Raceway When: Saturday 4:30 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN2 2012 Winner: Elliott Sadler NATIONWIDE SERIES CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS Race: Kroger 250 Where: Martinsville Speedway When: April 6, 1:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2012 Winner: Kevin Harvick SPRINT CUP Race: Subway Fresh Fit 500 Where: Phoenix International Raceway When: Sunday, 3:00 p.m. (ET) TV: FOX 2012 Winner: Denny Hamlin (right) NOTEBOOK Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images for NASCAR. Johnson celebrates in victory lane after winning the Daytona 500.Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images for NASCAR.Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for NASCAR. Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images for NASCAR. SPRINT CUP STANDINGS1.Jimmie Johnson, 472.Dale Earnhardt Jr., 423.Mark Martin, 414. Brad Keselowski, 415. Ryan Newman, 406. Greg Bif e, 387. Danica Patrick, 378. Michael McDowell, 359. J.J. Yeley, 3410. Clint Bowyer, 34 FRI. 3-1 SEC B 1-12.indd 9 2/28/13 8:34:52 AM

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10B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000604JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION, SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLCPlaintiff,vs.RUSSELL, LAURA, A., et al.Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 12-2010-CA-000604 of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for CO-LUMBIACounty, Florida, wherein, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION, SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, is Plaintiff, and, RUSSELL, LAURAA., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida., at the hour of, on the 20th day of March, 2013, the following described prop-erty:Lot 6, TIMBERLANDS PHASE 1, according to the Plat thereof, as re-corded in Plat Book 9, Pages 26 and 27, of the Public Records of Colum-bia County, Florida.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.DATED this 19 day of February, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIMPORTANTIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coordinator at PO BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL32056, 386-719-7428 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this no-tification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05537499March 1, 8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION:CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000294COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,Plaintiff,vs.CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; SUN-STATE FEDERALCREDITUN-ION; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; UN-KNOWN TENANTN/K/ARAN-DALLR. BARBEE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-sure Sale dated the 13 day of Febru-ary, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000294, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPis the Plaintiff and CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, SUNSTATE FEDERALCREDITUNION, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, UNKNOWN TENANTN/K/ARANDALLR. BARBEE and UN-KNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM at the 19th day of June, 2013, the following descri-bed property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:Part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 13, and part of the South-east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 14, all in Township 06 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida more par-ticularly described as follows: Begin at the Southwest corner of the NorthLegaleast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14 and run thence S 020’38”E, along the West line of said Section 13, 660.95 feet to the Southwest corner of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4; thence N 8825’01” E along the South line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4; thence N 8825’01” E along the South line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 660.63 feet to the Southeast corner thereof; thence N 021’49” Walong the East line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 661.24 feet to the Northeast corner thereof; thence S 8823’28”W, along the North line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 101.07 feet; thence N 7420’34” W, 377.90 feet; thence S 9000’00” W, 114.30 feet; thence S 6904’46” W, 339.64 feet to the South lie of the north 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14; thence N 8906’17” E along said South line, 236.51 feet to the POINTF BEGINNING, contain-ing 11.2132 acres, more or less.Subject to an easement for ingress and egress more particularly descri-bed as follows: Begin at the North-east corner of the above described lands, thence S 8823’28” W, along the North line of said described lands, 101.07 feet; thence S 7420’37” E, 73.92 feet; thence S 0021’49” S, a distance of 639.20 feet to the intersection with the South line of said described lands; thence N 8825'01” N, along said South line, 30.01 feet; thence N 0021’49” W, along the East line of said described lands, a distance of 661.24 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICANS WITH DISABILITYACT: If you are a person with a disa-bility who requires accommodation in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated this 13 day of February, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk Of The Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05537501March 1,8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No.: 12-2012-CA-000082BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPPlaintiff,v.PEPPER L. TOMPKINS; BILLD. TOMPKINS; et al.,Defendants,RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated February 25, 2013, and a Final Summary Judgment dated No-vember 6, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.: 12-2012-CA-000082, of the Circuit Court of the THIRD JU-DICIALCIRCUITin and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, wherein PEPPER L. TOMPKINS; BILLD. TOMPKINS; TIMBERLANDS OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UN-KNOWN TENANT#2; ALLOTH-ER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS, are Defendants.P.DEWITTCASON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash on the third floor of the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, located at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of April, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit:LOT9, TIMBERLANDS PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 9, PAGES 26 AND 27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA.This property is located at the street address of: 299 SWTIMBER RIDGE DR, LAKE CITY, FL32024. LegalIf you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of re-cord as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus.WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 26, 2013P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE COURTBy: /s/ P.A. PerryDeputy ClerkSEALIN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommoda-tion to participate should call the ADAcoordinator, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. 05537580March 1, 8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12000342CACITIMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,vs.PAULASTOKES POWERS, et alDefendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 5, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12000342CAof the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is Plaintiff, and PAULASTOKES POWERS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. at COLUMBIACounty Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, 3rd Floor, Lake City, FL32055, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13 day of March, 2013, the following described prop-erty as set forth in said Summary Fi-nal Judgment, to wit:BEGIN ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF LOT1, BLOCK 'C", HALL'S SUBDIVISION, RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 1, PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 88 DEGREES 48 MI-NUTES 59 SECONDS 4, ALONG THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF LOTS 1 AND 11, BLOCK 'C', OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVISION, ALSO BEING THE NORTH LINE OF VACATED PENNSYLVANIAAVENUE PER OFFICIALRE-CORD BOOK 48, PAGE 226, OF THE RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, ADIS-TANCE OF 175.33 FEET; THENCE S 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 01 SECONDS W, TO THE CENTER LINE OF VACATED PENNSYL-VANIAAVENUE, ADISTANCE OF 19.97 FEET; THENCE S 87 DE-GREES 01 MINUTES 06 SEC-ONDS E, ALONG SAID CENTER LINE, ADISTANCE 0F 78.38 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS W, ALONG THE EASTERLYLINE AND NORTHERLYPROJECTION OF LOT8, BLOCK 'B' OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVISION, ADIS-TANCE OF 149.94 FEET; THENCE N 88 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WALONG THE SOUTHERLYLINES OF LOTS 6, 7, 8 AND THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF THE N 1/2 OF LOT3, BLOCK 'B' OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVI-SION, ADISTANCE OF 251.73 FEETTO INTERSECTTHE EAST-ERLYRIGHTOF WAYOF DIVI-SION STREET(43 FEETRIGHTOF WAY); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHTOF WAYNORTH, ADISTANCE OF 169.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BE-ING IN SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff's mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, this 5th day of February, 2013.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /B/ ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05537287FEBRUARY22, 2013MARCH 1, 2013 LegalIN THE CIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDADOYLE EDWIN GRAHAM,(a/k/a Edwin Graham), andMARGARETE. GRAHAM, Case No: 12-673-CADivision: CIVILPlaintiffs,vs.TRACYCOATES, ANGELAMCQUAIG, NELDALOPER, ALICE PASUPATHI, and any heirs of deceased CLEAMON GRAHAM,deceased LOCABELLE GRAHAM, CAMILEE G. COATES and de-ceased HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, cred-itors, trustees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, un-der or against the decedents andDefendants, including any unknown defendants, and including all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the propertyherein described,Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO:Estate of CLEMONGRA-HAM, Deceased, Estate of LOCABELLE GRAHAM, Deceased, Es-tate of CAMILEE G. COATES, De-ceased, and Estate of HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devi-sees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, creditors, trustees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, under or against the dece-dents, and any unknown defendants, including all parties having or claim-ing to have any right, title, or interest in the property herein described, Defendants.YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a le-gal proceeding filed against you for Quiet Title. The action involves real property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida, more fully described as fol-lows:(A) Township 6 South, Range 18 East, Section 29: One acre in the NE Corner of the SW_ of the NW_ of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida. Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-000 Or corrected le-gal description will say the follow-ing:Township 6 South, Range 18 East, Section 29: One square acre in the NE Corner of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida. Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-000(B) Parcel 1 The N 1/2 of the S 1/2 of the NW1/2 of the SW1/4;Parcel 2 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SW1/4;Parcel 3 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of South 1115 feet of SW1/4 of SE 1/4;All lying and being in Section 29, Town-ship 6 South, Range 18 East, Colum-bia County, Florida.Parcel ID Num-ber: 29-6S-18-10649-004 Or correct-ed legal description will say the fol-lowing:Parcel 1 The N 1/2 of the S 1/2 of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4;Parcel 2 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SW1/4; Parcel 3 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of South 1115 feet of SW1/4 of SE 1/4;All lying and being in Section 29, Town-ship 6 South, Range 18 East, Colum-bia County, Florida.Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-004The action was instituted in the Third Judicial Circuit Court, COLUMBIACounty, Florida, and is styled DOYLE EDWIN GRAHAM (a/k/a Edwin Graham) and MARGARETE. GRAHAM, Plaintiffs vs. TRACYCOATES, ANGELAMCQUAIG, NELDALOPER, ALICE PASUPA-THI, and any heirs of deceased CLEAMON GRAHAM, deceased LOCABELLE GRAHAM, CAMI-LEE G. COATES and deceased HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, creditors, trust-ees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, under or against the decedents and Defend-ants, including any unknown defend-ants, and including all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the property herein descri-bed.You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Plaintiffs’attorney, whose address is 905 SWBaya Drive, Lake City, Florida 32025, on or before March 15, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr. or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-plaint or petition.The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff's interest which will be binding upon you.DATED: February 7, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Third Judicial Circuit CourtCOLUMBIACounty, FloridaBy /s/ B. Scippio Deputy Clerk SEAL05537219February 22, 2013March 1, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRDJUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FORHAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO.: 2012-CP-57PROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: The Estate ofADOLPHUS CALLAWAYLEE, Deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS (ancillary administration)TOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of ADOLPHUS CALLAWAYLEE, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-57, is pending in the Circuit Court of Hamilton County, Florida, 207 NE First Avenue, Jasper, Florida 32052. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and that personal representative’s at-torney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF COPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the estate of the dece-dent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOTSO FILE WILLBE FOREV-ER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 22, 2013./s/ Frances Jane Lee Ancillary Personal RepresentativePost Office Box 42Dupont, Georgia 31630/s/ Cary A. Hardee, II Florida Bar No.: 133856Post Office Drawer 450Madison, Florida 32341Primary Email: lawhatter@aol.com Secondary Email: caryhardee@har deelawfirm.net Telephone (850) 973-4007Facsimile (850) 973-849505537357FEBRUARY22, 2013MARCH 1, 2013 020Lost & Found FOUND TAN/WHITE DOG Contact 292-4259 100Job OpportunitiesAUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN NEEDEDwith tools and experience. Contact 758-4757 BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Contract Billing Specialist Lake City, FL. F/T. Responsible for all aspects of billing and contract negotiations for the Association. Salary based on experience. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056 F/TExecutive Director for local non-profit organization. Salary based on experience. Prefer BAdegree and experience in budgeting and community relations. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056. General Office position in high pace business. Excel & Word (45wpm) Experience Required. Email resume to rhd7@yahoo.com Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 N&W Dry Cleaners is now taking applications for experienced Pressers. Please apply in person at 316 WDuval Street. Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic Technician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 Quality Inn formerly Jameson Inn Now Hiring: P/TNight Audit position and P/THousekeeping position. Please apply in person 285 SWCommerce Blvd., LC 100Job OpportunitiesPROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with previous marketing skills, good oral and written communication skills, good people skills, experience with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 REQUESTFOR VOLUNTEERS COLUMBIACOUNTYThe Columbia County Board of County Commissioners is seeking volunteers for the following posi-tions:PLANNING & ZONING BOARD/BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTThe Planning and Zoning Board/Board of Adjustment rec-ommends principals and policies for guiding action affecting devel-opment in the county. Recom-mends to the Board of County Commissioners ordinances,regula-tions and other proposals promot-ing orderly development along the lines indicated as desirable by the Comprehensive Plan. Vacancies in Planning and Zoning/Board of Ad-justment membership shall be ap-pointed by the Board of County Commissioners for the unexpired term of the member affected. Amember must be a resident of Co-lumbia County. No member of the Planning and Zoning Board/Board of Adjustment shall be paid or elected official or employee of the county. The term of office shall be for three (3) years.Persons interested in volunteering for appointment should submit their resume to the Columbia County Board of County Commis-sioners, P.O. Drawer 1529, Lake City, Florida 32056-1529 on or be-fore March 8, 2013. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Smitty's Western Store Help Wanted. Energetic, Experienced sales person wanted. Stock and computer experience a plus. Please apply in person. Mon.-Fri. 9-6 Sat 9-4 120Medical Employment05537536COME JOINOUR TEAM!!SHANDS LAKE SHORE REGIONALMEDICAL CENTER has the following immediate openings: Directorof Accounting Bachelor Degree in Accounting required, 1-3 years experience in accounting procedures, third party reimbursement and data processing preferably in healthcare setting. Competitive salary and benefit package See qualifications and apply online @ shandslakeshore.com EOE, M/F/V/D, Drug Free Workplace Part-time Respiratory Therapist and CNAneeded on Mon., Tues., and Thurs. Fax resume to (386) 754-1712 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Teacup Yorkie puppy $950 Ask for Celinda 904-259-7867 or 904-259-1373 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, MARCH 1 & 2, 2013 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 11B 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Laptop $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales 3 Family yard sale children’s clothes, toddler bed, much more. 8 am-2pm at The Boat Doctors on 25A Multi Yard SalesFri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SWFabian Way. Close to 242 & 247. Look for signs. Clothes, tools. Much More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT. 3/2 7am-2pm Woodcrest sbdv. 161 SWGuthrie Terr. Alittle bit of everything, clothes, furniture, odds and ends. 440Miscellaneous Deer Hunting Club-Clinch County, GAneeds members. Have your own exclusive area for still hunting area $600. 229-349-1991 GYM EQUIPMENT Olympic weights $.40/per lb Cybex, Nautilus, Hammer strength, and other machines. Call for prices. Some office equip. Must move quickly. 386-365-2047 LIVE BANDS Saturday night (3/2) at The Caf in Historic Downtown. $5/Door 18+ www.TheCafe.us 386-697-4474 Tanning Bed WOLF SYSTEM, 24 Bulb $400 386-365-2047 610Mobile Home Lots forRent2br/1.5ba Nice area $480 mth or $125 week +Dep. Water & garbage pick up included. No Pets Contact 386-466-7270 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 RVLots or Cottage avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8,500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John Lyons @800-622-2832 ext 210 for details MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location in Columbia County, older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale. 3 Stock models must go $39k off select 2012 models John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1,512 sqft DW perfect Rental or First home. Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ MH. $1,000 down $600 mthly. 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. Avail 5/1, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRentNice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $790 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 14.69 ac tract on Lake Jeffrey Rd. Has well & septic and power ready for site built or MH. $65,000 MLS #82567 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Beautiful lot on Suwannee River. Lot has a well and anerobic septic system. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small, affordable home on corner lot w/ fenced in yard. Needs a little TLC. MLS #81204 $19,900 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, 810Home forSale 1BR/1BAon 2.8 acres 201 NWBronco Terr. 24x30 workshop. Owner Fin. $59,900, 3K down, $585/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 2BR/2BAgorgeous custom built pool home. Spacious bedrooms. SS appliances, Corian counter tops. Remax Jo Lytte 386-3652821 MLS 80934 $179,900 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 3BD/2BAcustom western cedar home on two acres lakefront lot. Boat ramp, dock and deck. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 74681 $179,900 3BD/2BAon 10 acres has a unique open great room, dining and family room with vaulted ceilings. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 79593 $345,800 82374 Beautiful inside and out, 3br/2.5ba home sits on 10 acres, fenced. Screened back porch. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $243,900 82718 Beautiful Brick home. Upgraded granite counter tops, new paint, carpet & appliances. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $189,000 82763 This great open floor plan home has had new flooring, paint, appliances, a/c and light fixtures. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $139,500 82794 -Great house in Great neighborhood. Granite countertops, Florida room, vaulted ceilings. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $129,000 82843 Home sits on 4.2 acres and has a 3br/2.5ba brick home, large great room w/ brick fireplace. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $81,000 82845Cute as can be, solid built home with large kitchen, newer cabinetry, & granite countertops. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $75,500 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable lakefront 2/2 Watch the sun rise from nearly anywhere Needs TLC has potential. $59,000 Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847 MLS 81189 Beautiful 4BD/3BAhome in gated s/d. high volume ceilings, open kitchen. MLS 81102 $119,999 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Beautiful tripe wide home / plenty of space to spread out family, showroom quality. MLS 82622 $123,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Close to town, oversized Great rm, Dining rm, Study, lrg Master suite w/ walk in closet. MLS 82435 $173,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 5BD/3BAjust minutes away from town on half an acre. Mary Brown Whitehusrt $210,000 386-965-0887 MLS #82546 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAcustom home w/ 2 car garage. Designer kitchen. Sherry G. Ratliff $115,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81774 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAnewly renovated with fireplace. New appliances, carpet & More. Sherry G. Ratliff $94,900 386-365-8414 MLS #82657 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Golf Court view! 3BD/3BAlog home on #1 green. Built in ‘99 & upgraded in ‘09. Custom cabinets. MLS # 80765 Swift Creek Realty $294,900 800-833-0499 Gorgeous view off screened back porch, Open flrpln w/ oversized eat-in kitchen. MLS 82699 $110,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Great Country Living! 2BD/1BA on 1.17 Acres! 1,462 heated sq.ft w/ large great room. MLS # 82030 Swift Creek Realty $109,900 800-833-0499 Immaculately kept home, great rm with f/p, fenced w/ 12x30 utility shed. MLS 82604 $115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Just Outside of Mayo, well maintained home for its year. Screened front porch, shed. $33,250 Ric Donovan, Poole Realty 386-590-1298 MLS 82711 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 810Home forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Private acres & access to Ichetucknee via private Rec Area. Large screened porch. MLS 81623 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Reduced 4BD/2.5BA, 2,405 heated sq.ft. Many upgrades throughout home. MLS # 81985 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 800-833-0499 REDUCED! 3,000 sq.ft., 3/2.5 on 20 acres 14’ceilings, Central vacuum system. $489,000. Nelda Hatcher Poole Realty 386-688-8067 MLS 82280 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2208sf, all original wood restored, newer paint, remodeled baths, large bedrooms. #82850 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2161sf, 6 ac MOL, Roman shades, Italian tile, crown molding, master has tray ceilings. #82646 $299,900 Spectacular home for the price. 1649 heated sq ft, screened back patio., MLS 82395 $154,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Well maintained home on lovely landscaped lot, close to everything in downtown Branford. $139,000. Sylvia Newell, Poole Realty 386-590-2498 MLS 82233 810Home forSale Woodborough s/d. Separate Living Rm and Great Rm, 3 full baths, custom kitchen. MLS 81334 $259,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage40 ac Ranch, Brick 3/3 w/ 2000 sqft. New roof in 2005, kitchen remodeled, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 70 acres in McAlpin. Farmhouse, tobacco barn, corner property w/ paved road. Less than $3000/ acre. Ronnie Poole, Poole Realty 386-208-3175 MLS 79336 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 820Farms & AcreageAccess Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605

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