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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02032

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02032

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5AAdvice & Comics......... 3BPuzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Pianist Cliburn dies at 78. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 68 37 Breezy WEATHER, 2A CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 282 1 NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUBOF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Columbia County Fairgrounds Saturday, March 2nd 9am 5pm 10am 4pmSunday, March 3rd FREE ADMISSION By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comAcross-the-board federal spending cuts termed the “sequester” would have imme-diate and real affects on local programs if Congress does not act. From the Osceola National Forest to federally funded programs at county schools, budgets are about to be cut — in some cases by as much as 10 percent. What that means for the residents of Columbia County is less access to government programs and services. Only a few government programs are exempt from the seques-ter, including Social Security, Medicare and Veterans Affairs Hospitals, but the majority of federal programs face cuts if the sequester is not avoided. School DistrictMary Loughran, director of the finance department for Columbia County School District, said it’s a waiting game to see exactly what the effects of the budget cuts will be for local schools. “Until March comes and goes and we know what the legislature is going to do, it’s kind of wait and see,” Loughran said. The school district receives funding for multiple federal education programs, but two of the largest are the IDEA program ($2.4 million) for special education and Title I ($3.3 million) for disadvan-taged students. She said those programs would be included in the sequester and has heard they would be cut by about 9 percent. Artifacttheftringbusted Life plus 30 Fort White man charged along with 12 others.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterKenneth Allen Ford (right) speaks with Public Defender B lair Payne before the start of Ford’s sentencing hearing on Wednesday. Ford was sentenced to life in prison for se cond-degree murder and an additional 30 years for first-degree arson in connection to the June 2009 death o f his girlfriend Kristy L. Watley. By JAMES L. ROSICAAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Eleven people from Florida, including a Fort White man, and two from Georgia have been charged in what state investigators called a criminal conspiracy to sell artifacts stolen from state-owned lands in Florida. James Tatum, 74, of Fort White, was arrested and charged with 13 fel-ony counts of violations of historical resources, 13 felony counts of deal-ing in stolen property, one felony count of dealing in stolen property in connec-tion with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Center on $77,000 bond. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers Wednesday described a nearly $2 mil-lion black market in illegal historical artifacts. Items shown at a news conference in Tallahassee included dozens of arrow-heads and pot shards. But many stolen artifacts likely will never be recovered. “This looting didn’t just take artifacts from the ground,” said Robert Bendus, Florida’s state historic preservation offi-cer. “It took history away from this generation and from future generations of Floridians.” The FWC’s Maj. Curtis Brown said those arrest-ed were the “main dealers and looters.” The youngest defendant is 25; the oldest is 74. “This network is a very tight-knit group of folks,” Brown said. “They had JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterOut for a trotA horse and its foal walk through a field along County R oad 240 Tuesday afternoon. Man sentenced in arson death of girlfriendBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comKenneth Allen Ford was sentenced to life in prison, plus 30 years, for the 2009 murder of his girlfriend Kristy L. Whatley in a mobile home fire. Whatley’s mother, Susie Brinkley, sobbed as Third Judicial Circuit Judge Paul Bryan delivered the sentence during a hearing Wednesday afternoon in Courtroom 2 at the Columbia County Courthouse. Ford, 47, was represented by Third Judicial Circuit Public Defender Blair Payne and stood with his head bowed as Bryan read his sentence. On Feb. 8, Ford was convicted of second-degree murder for starting a June 2009 fire in the home he shared with Whatley. Ford was also convicted of first-degree arson. The jury deliber-ated about seven hours before returning its guilty verdicts. On Wednesday, Bryan said he used his notes taken from the trial to help determine the sen-tence for Ford. He said he also took into account how Whatley was fighting for her life against lupus at the time of her death. “You can’t replace life and you can’t replace time,” Bryan told Ford before reading his sentence. Early in the hearing, Whatley’s parents, Brinkley and her father Ronald Hart, had state attorney’s office victim’s advocate Julie Glenn read a prepared statement to Ford and the court. “The family has waited for almost four years,” she said. “The most heart-breaking years any one would have to bear. First of all, the family treated you like family, Kenny. We trusted you just like our Kristy did. You knew she didn’t have long to live as it was, probably six or nine months ... a year at the most. But she deserved that, that was God’s judgment call ... I just don’t under-stand how a human being could do this to another human being.” Roberta Getzan, assistant state attorney, prosecuted the case and requested Ford get a life sentence. “This was no accident. This was intentional,” she said. “He (Ford) didn’t care for the life of Kristy. Basically, he cared more for their bird.” Payne disagreed, saying Whatley’s death wasn’t an inten-tional act and he suggested the maximum sentence that Bryan give Ford be only 22 years, based on a criminal point score sheet formula used to determine the length of sentences. However, Bryan sentenced Ford to life in prison. “I can’t say the sentence was expected,” Bryan said while sit-ting in his office after the case. Ford has indicated he wants an appeal. “I want an appeal and I don’t have any money,” Ford said, as he addressed Bryan after the sen-tence was announced. Payne said the appeal will not be handled by the Third Circuit Public Defender’s office. He said his office is responsible for fil-ing a notice and making sure Local officials get ready if sequester law isn’t reversed.Cuts could hurt here GOP backs off gun lawsBy BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — For a gun-friendly state like Florida, there’s a lack of gun-friendly bills that will be considered in this year’s legislative session. Instead, Democrats are trying to control the gun agenda with a slew of bills that mostly try to undo or change what Republicans have done in the past. Other bills would allow local governments the right to ban guns at certain events. Good luck with that.While the Trayvon Martin shooting, the Newtown, Conn., elementary school shooting and President Barack Obama have created a lot of buzz about gun-con-trol issues, don’t expect the Republican-dominated Legislature to suddenly advo-cate for tighter gun laws during the 60-day session, which begins March 5. This year, though, don’t expect a push for broader gun rights laws either. “We’re in a very highly emotionally charged atmosphere in these cases,” said Rep. Dennis Baxley, the Ocala Republican who sponsored the “stand your ground” bill. “Let’s keep our eye on the ball about building good policy and let’s don’t overre-act to what the atmosphere is. This might not be the best time to make some good (gun) policy decisions.” HAIL continued on 3A Prosecutor: He cared more for his pet bird than that of victim. Tatum ARTIFACTS continued on 6A LIFE continued on 3A LAWS continued on 6A CUTS continued on 3A Democrats put forward numerous bills to undo past Republican legislation.

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FORT WORTH, Texas V an Cliburn, the interna-tionally celebrated pianist whose triumph at a 1958 Moscow competition helped thaw the Cold War and launched a spectacular career that made him the rare classical musician to enjoy rock-star status, died Wednesday after a fight with bone cancer. He was 78. Cliburn died at his home in Fort Worth surrounded by loved ones, said his publicist and longtime friend Mary Lou Falcone. The Grammy winner had made his last public appearance in September at the 50th anniversary of the pres-tigious piano competition in Fort Worth named in his honor. To a roaring standing ovation, he saluted many past contestants, the orchestra and the city, saying: “Never forget: I love you all from the bottom of my heart, forever.” Cliburn skyrocketed to fame when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow at age 23 in 1958, six months after the Soviets’ launch of Sputnik embarrassed the U.S. and propelled the world into the space age. He tri-umphantly returned to a New York City ticker tape parade — the first ever for a classical musician — and a Time magazine cover proclaimed him “The Texan Who Conquered Russia.” Despite the tension between the nations, Cliburn became a hero to music-loving Soviets who clamored to see him perform and Premier Nikita Khrushchev reportedly gave the go-ahead for the judges to honor a foreigner: “Is Cliburn the best? Then give him first prize.” In the years that followed, Cliburn’s popularity soared, and the young man from the small east Texas town of Kilgore sold out concerts, caused riots when spotted in public and even prompted an Elvis Presley fan club to change its name to his. His recording of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 became the first classical album to reach platinum status.SC court nixes James Brown estate settlement COLUMBIA, S.C. — The South Carolina Supreme Court on Wednesday over-turned a settlement divvying up the mul-timillion-dollar estate of James Brown, say-ing a former attorney general didn’t follow the late soul singer’s wishes in putting together the deal. Attorney General Henry McMaster brokered a settlement in 2009 that split Brown’s estate, giv-ing nearly half to a charitable trust, a quarter to his widow, Tomi Rae Hynie, and leaving the rest to be split among his adult children. But the justices ruled that the deal ignored Brown’s wishes for most of his money to go to charity. Bobby Brown sentenced to jail for DUI LOS ANGELES — Bobby Brown has been sentenced to 55 days in a Los Angeles jail and four years of proba-tion for a drunken driving case. City attorney’s spokesman Frank Mateljan says Brown was sentenced Tuesday after pleading no contest to charges he was under the influence and driving on a suspended license when he was arrested in October. Brown was on probation for another DUI case at the time. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Architect Frank Gehry is 84. Q Actor Gavin MacLeod is 82. Q Actor Don Francks is 81. Q Actor-director-dancer Tommy Tune is 74. Q Hall of Fame auto racer Mario Andretti is 73. Q Actor Frank Bonner is 71. AROUND FLORIDA Gov. wants funds for spring training TALLAHASSEE — Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants to spend $5 million in the coming year to help keep spring training alive in the state. Scott made the announcement Wednesday during a work day held at the Lakeland baseball stadium that is the spring training home for the American League cham-pion Detroit Tigers. State legislators will have to approve Scott’s request. This year marks the 125th anniversary of spring training in Florida. There are currently 15 Major League Baseball teams training in the state. But the state has been in a battle in recent years to keep teams from relocat-ing to Arizona. Scott was scheduled to spend the day working with a grounds crew, hand-ing out programs and sell-ing concessions to baseball fans. Man wheelchair pushed into road KISSIMMEE — Authorities say a robber followed a handicapped man from a central Florida ATM and pushed him out of his wheelchair into oncoming traffic. The victim told authorities a man was watching him as he withdrew money from a cash machine at a gas station in Kissimmee on Saturday. As he tried to get home, the suspect caught up with him and tipped him out of his wheelchair into oncoming traffic. The victim was unable to get up and said several cars drove by before some-one stopped to help. A small dog that was with the victim was injured. Deputies used surveillance video from the gas station to track 24-year-old Sonny Abreu who was charged Wednesday with attempted murder, rob-bery, abuse of a disabled adult and animal cruelty.Ex-candidate to plead guilty MIAMI — A former South Florida congres-sional candidate linked to defeated U.S. Rep. David Rivera is planning to plead guilty to federal campaign finance violations. Court documents show that 35-year-old Justin Lamar Sternad intends to enter the plea next Wednesday in Fort Lauderdale federal court. Sternad initially pleaded not guilty to three charges, but prosecutors indicated he was cooperating with investigators. Sternad’s lawyer declined comment. The case centers on whether Sternad, an unknown Democrat, received thousands of dol-lars from the campaign of Rivera, a Republican. Sternad was running in the Democratic pri-mary last year against Joe Garcia, who eventually defeated Rivera for the 26th congressional district that runs from the Miami suburbs to Key West. Rivera has repeatedly denied any connection.Cops: Man faked being deputy SPRING HILL — Authorities say a man who worked at Pizza Hut is accused of impersonating a Pasco County Sheriff’s Deputy to impress his girl-friend. The Hernando County Sheriff’s Office says 37-year-old Christopher Sharp was trying to impress his girlfriend. But the scheme landed him in jail after his Feb. 22 arrest. The Tampa Tribune reports that between August and January he told his live-in girlfriend that he was a Pasco deputy. He came home wearing a Pasco County Sheriff’s uniform and often told his girlfriend, family and friends stories about things that happened during his shift. He even entertained partygoers on New Year’s Eve with stories about DUI enforce-ment he’d been involved with earlier that evening. He was booked on fraud charges. Human trafficking sentence ordered MIAMI — A Miami Beach man was sentenced to 15 years in prison for beating and strangling a woman he forced into prostitution. The sentencing of 34year-old Robert Burton on Tuesday marked the first conviction for the Miami-Dade Human Trafficking Unit. The Miami Herald reports Burton forced at least six women into pros-titution and fathered chil-dren with three of them. He faced similar charges in Nevada where he wasn’t convicted. Burton was accused of beating and choking a 31-year-old woman and abducting their 7-year-old son in 2011. Prosecutors say when police pulled Burton over and inquired about the two women in the car, the child said, “those are my daddy’s hoes.” State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle says human trafficking is simi-lar to domestic violence. “ Thought for Today ” “Education is learning what you didn’t even know you didn’t know.” — Daniel J. Boorstin, American historian, educator and librarian of Congress (1914-2004) Reknowned pianist Van Cliburn dies Wednesday: Afternoon: 4-0-0 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 5-3-0-8 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 9-19-27-29-32 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242AWEATHER HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture “Dear children, let us not love with words or speech but with actions and in truth.” — 1 John 3:18 ASSOCIATED PRESSPianist Van Cliburn, the internationally celebrated piani st whose triumph at a 1958 Moscow competition helped thaw the Cold War and launche d a spectacular career that made him the rare classical musician to enjoy rock star status died early Wednesday at his Fort Worth, Texas, home. He was 78. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press Bobby Brown James Brown

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 3A3A MORTGAGE MillionDollar ! APPLY NOW!Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS$1 MILLION IN 2013 FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $80,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2... and we’re starting withYOU! Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. MOVEyour First Mortgage(from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanOR We’ll save you at least1 We’ll pay you1 COURTSEY FHPBoth drivers involved in a head-on crash on U.S. 90 ne ar the Lake City Gateway Airport were airlifted to Shands at University of Florida on Wednesday night. A 2004 Lexus and a 2002 Ford Econoline van collided about 7:10 p.m., Florida Highway Patrol said. The drivers’ injuries were not life-threatening, FHP said. the records are prepared. Once the paperwork has been filed, it will be sent to the Public Defender’s Office in Second Judicial Circuit in Tallahassee, which handles appellate cases. “The grounds for the appeal haven’t been fully analyzed yet,” Payne said. “Ultimately, the issues that are raised on appeal will be decided by the Second Circuit Public Defender’s Office.” Payne said he would not expect a decision on the requested appeal for at least 18 months. Brinkley said she was satisfied with the sentence. the judge imposed. “I think he should have gotten first-degree mur-der because it was such a cruel, horrific way that she died, and she knew she was going to die,” Brinkley said. “He blocked the way for her to get out, but for some reason or another, the jury seemed to think it wasn’t as first-degree as it should have been. But I am satisfied with the sentence that he got. The only thing that I can’t get over is that he not once, ever said, ‘I’m sorry.’ That hurts more than anything else. She (Whatley) loved him and she trusted him. I think it was a true sentence and I think that the family is satisfied. Hopefully he will never see free ground to walk on again.” Jeff Siegmeister, Third Circuit state attorney, also agreed with the sentence. “Under the circumstances and facts of this case, Mr. Ford got a just sen-tence to serve the maxi-mum,” he said. “Whatley’s family certainly deserves closure after this long peri-od of time.” Ford was arrested in September 2009, but the case wasn’t tried until four years later. Siegmeister addressed the delay. “It’s one of those times between balancing a man’s rights as well as some tacti-cal decisions, and I don’t think anybody is proud with the length of time it took to close that case,” he said. Siegmeister said once the decision was made, with consultation of the family, to waive the death penalty, the state attorney’s office took the steps necessary to get the case tried as quickly as possible. That would mean a reduction of more than $500,000 this year. Loughran said the district pays out money for the programs and is reimbursed by the govern-ment later. Some of the federal money goes to hire special education teachers. Since the economic downturn, the school district has not laid off any teachers. “We have done everything by people leaving and not replacing the position,” Loughran said. The largest federally funded program for the school district is the National School Lunch Program. The program is funded through state and federal sources — $3.6 million from the state and about $7 million from fed-eral funding. Loughran said she does not believe this program will be part of the seques-ter. The decrease in federal funding will leave the district scrambling to find other ways to replace the lost revenue. Loughran said the possible money cut from the budget by the sequester equals the salaries for about 11 teachers. “It’s a terrible feeling to not know,” she said. “If you know, you can plan for it.”Child care servicesThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway helps low income families across Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union coun-ties pay for child care ser-vices so parents who work during the day, and pro-vides other services aimed at increasing a child’s suc-cess in school with state and federally funded pro-grams. Thomas Logan, executive director for the Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway, said he has already frozen enroll-ment in the federal pro-gram the organization administers. The coalition’s School Readiness program receives $7 million in fed-eral funding, which helps about 1,650 children’s fami-lies pay the cost of child care. He said he expects 8.9 percent cuts to fund-ing if the sequester is not avoided. The cuts would amount to about $620,000. The cuts would force the coalition to reduce enrollment in the program by about 150 chil-dren, Logan said. He said the program will not enroll any children until the threat of budget cuts passes. Logan said if the sequester does happen, he will not throw children out of the program, but let attrition reduce the number of chil-dren in the program. “The last thing in the world we would do is to dis-enroll children,” he said. Logan said he hasn’t received information about when the cuts will take affect, and any date he does say would be a “pure guess.” “We have frozen the enrollment because we do not know,” Logan said.Health departmentFunding for Columbia County’s health depart-ment could be cut by 10 percent, the administrator of Columbia and Hamilton counties health depart-ments said. Mark Lander said the cuts will amount to about $50,000, and he plans to address those cuts by pool-ing resources between the health departments in the area. “This is real life we are dealing with,” Lander said. “Now is when you have to be very creative.” He plans to work with community partners and find solutions to maintain services at the health departments he manages. Because of budget cuts to the health department last year, three positions were lost — two of them with active employees. The work those positions would have done was absorbed by the rest of the staff at the health department, Lander said. “Losing any more positions would be a last option,” Lander said.Forest ServiceIvan Green, district manager of the Osceola National Forest, was unavailable for comment, but nationally the U. S. Forest Service faces more than $200 million in cuts from the sequester. In a letter to the Senate Appropriations Committee dated Feb. 5, Secretary of Agriculture Thomas J. Vilsack said the sequester would affect the USDA’s operating budget by about $2 billion in fiscal year 2013. In the letter, Vilsack provided detailed information about how each bureau would be affected by the sequester, including the Forest Service. The Forest Service will complete “as many as 200,000 fewer acres of hazardous fuel treatments, resulting in an increased risk to communities from wildfires.” Also, Vilsack’s letter says the Forest Service would close as many as 670 pub-lic recreation sites such as campgrounds, picnic areas and trails. “Closing this many recreation sites would reduce an estimated 1.6 million recreation visits across the country, thereby harming the economies of remote rural communities that depend on recreationists’ economic activity, and elim-inating convenient vacation opportunities for rural resi-dents,” the letter said.Local companiesMeat processing companies could face shutdowns if the sequester does go into effect. Confusion sur-rounds the issue, as mul-tiple possibilities have sur-faced since Monday. In Vilsack’s letter to the Senate, he said the sequester would result in an across -the-board fur-lough for Food Safety and Inspection Service employ-ees, which in turn would force meat plants to stop production. One scenario would have “rolling furloughs” that would spread out the furlough days of meat inspectors to prevent shut downs. According to Reuters, the USDA said there would still be shutdowns even with non-consecutive furlough days because it would not be possible for a reduced workforce to cover all meat processing plants. Billy Nettles, owner of Nettles Sausage, declined comment on the issue. Another local company that could be affected is Timco. The company does maintenance work on air-craft for the Coast Guard. Leonard Kazmerski, Timco’s vice president of business and development, said the company does not expect to lay off anyone off, despite possible cuts to military contracts. He said the Lake City aircraft maintenance employ-ees can be moved to other commercial and personal aircraft contracts the com-pany has, and he expects the company to be able to place all workers working on military aircraft on other projects. “Many of our Lake City employees have skills that will allow them to work on different types of aircraft,” he said. Still, he said the murky future is not something the company finds as ideal. CUTS: Many local programs could be harmed Continued From Page 1A LIFE: Sentence imposed Continued From Page 1ABad crash on U.S. 90

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To the Editor:I think it is shameful that the Columbia County Board of County Commissioners and County Manager Dale Williams find it acceptable to give pay increases to the top three employees in the county, due to a “restructuring” of the top positions, while the major-ity of their employees are surviving on poverty wages. As the wife of a Columbia County firefighter I find it insulting that my husband makes below the federal poverty level for our family, yet the county sees fit to raise the salaries of the top employ-ees while denying raises to the rank and file for approximately the last four years. And equally insulting is the fact that those “managers” will accept those raises without a thought to the people below them who can’t pay their bills or feed their families. How about applying some common sense here. Take all that money, $43095.00, and divide it among the lowest paid employees thereby improving their lives while leaving the highest paid folks where they are. Somehow that seems to make more fiscal sense than this plan does. Kathy D’AntonioLake City I t’s a phrase that’s well-worn, and for a reason, namely that it sums up so splendidly the idea of something that is itsy-bitsy relative to something very, very big: “Spit in the ocean.” “Sequestration” -it’s a four-syllable word referring to across-the-board spending cuts of $85 billion scheduled for automatic implementation with the purpose of reducing deficits and better con-trolling the federal debt. However large it sounds, the amount is spit next to the oceanic gobs of owed money that could easily drown the American economy. You’d hardly know as much listening to President Barack Obama. You almost get the idea that seques-tration means the military will have to fight off terrorists with bare fists, that lonely students will sit in schools minus teachers, that hospi-tals will be bereft of caregivers and that no air traffic controllers will be at airports to let your planes take off crash-free for long-planned vaca-tions. I promise you, it’s not as bad as he says, though there are problems. They are mostly Obama’s fault. He and his White House gang are mostly to blame for the whole idea and he is the one primarily in the way of doing something about the confusion, inconvenience and worse that will result in the absence of a deal with Republicans to set things right. The fact is that House Republicans have already passed legislation substituting considered spending cuts for across-the-board, indiscriminate ones and that those refusing compromise are Obama and Senate Democrats. Ideologically fixated on ever-bigger, more control-ling government, the president says there will be no bargain without still more tax hikes on top of those he won in the so-called fiscal cliff deal. And while the Republicans really should go along with nuanced tax reform of the pro-growth kind, the first thing should be the spending cuts. Obama may have figured he could get what he wanted if he said that was the only way Republicans would get what they wanted – an end to the sequestration’s thoughtless spending cuts in defense. Instead, the Republicans have apparently noticed what the Washington Examiner’s Byron York has pointed out: Those cuts just slow down the rate of defense spending growth. Concerning the bigger picture, columnist George F. Will has observed that the overall sequestra-tion cuts in the first year would still leave federal spending 12 percent more than when Obama became president. He says the cuts over 10 years would reduce spending from $46 trillion to $44.8 trillion -not all that much, especially considering that we borrow something like 40 cents for every dollar spent. Reported federal figures show government spending has gone up by more than $800 per American since 2008, the year before Obama became president. For all of this, Obama is still likely to win politically. The wily one has spared no propagandistic effort to portray the Republicans as the heartless, reckless bad guys, and too few commentators have caught up with some of the basics, such as the work of the Washington Post’s Bob Woodward. Though hardly saying the Republicans are sweet-hearts, he has shown through his research how sequestration became a reality and entered common English usage as a consequence of White House conniving. The Republicans appear ready to negotiate on how the spending cuts are done, but if they don’t surrender to the tax bullying, Obama seems determined to just let the sequestra-tion happen, blaming it on them. He will still be a hero to a public that voted him back into office, now gives him high favorability ratings and is proving in polls that it’s no toughie to fool lots of people most of the time. As for the Republicans, they will get blamed for this spit in the ocean and get spit in the face in return. OPINION Thursday, February 28, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A County workers deserve better Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T ime is running short for President Obama and Congress to avoid yet another budget trap they’ve set for themselves. This time it’s the sequester — the $1.2 trillion in across-the-board spending cuts over 10 years that would begin to bite on Friday. Over the next seven months, the sequester would slash $85 billion in federal spending, split between military and nonmilitary programs. It wouldn’t create havoc overnight, but its impact on government ser-vices, jobs and the economy would deepen the longer the cuts remain in effect. The White House says Florida would lose at least $278 million in federal funding this year and thousands of jobs supported by those dollars. Defense industry representatives say cuts in military spending would idle tens of thousands of Florida workers. Yet it’s essential that the president and Congress stick with the overall goal of bringing down deficits. If not, the heavy burden of debt on Americans will keep growing, and investments that would build the econo-my and strengthen security will be diverted to making interest payments. Washington, D.C., needs to think smarter — and bigger — in dealing with debt. As we’ve argued before, across-the-board spending cuts are a mindless way to close budget gaps. They don’t distinguish between highand low-priority pro-grams. They punish efficient and wasteful agencies equally. The president has proposed that Congress make more modest, targeted cuts, and cover the difference by raising taxes on the rich and closing tax loopholes. He calls this a “balanced approach” to deficit reduc-tion. But the president’s plan isn’t big enough. Nonpartisan budget analysts say deficits need to be reduced by at least $2.4 trillion over the next 10 years to bring the national debt under control. And a truly balanced plan would include significant savings in three of the biggest federal programs: Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. Together those three entitlement programs account for about 40 percent of federal spending. Their share of the budget will mushroom as health-care costs go up and millions more baby boomers retire. Generally, Republicans favor slowing the growth of entitlement spending to cut deficits, while Democrats prefer to raise taxes on the rich. But a budget plan that includes, for example, higher Medicare premiums or lower benefits for the wealthy could meet the GOP desire for entitlement reform and the Democratic goal of making the rich pay more. And if the president insists on more revenues, they should be raised through a badly needed overhaul of the federal tax code. Reform could include closing loopholes that favor the wealthy and corporations, as the president has proposed, without the higher rates Republicans oppose. There’s enough common ground between the parties to avoid the sequester and come up with a long-term fix for the nation’s budget problems. Otherwise, they’ll just keep staggering from one trap to the next. How to sidestep the sequester Sequestration is Obama’s fault, but GOP will pay ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AEDIT Q Orlando Sentinel LETTERS TO THE EDITOR HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1898, the United States refuses to support Britain in its conflict with Russia over a loan to China. In 1904, Germany revises 1872 anti-Jesuit law to permit return of some members of the Roman Catholic order. In 1917, riots and strikes break out in St. Petersburg, marking start of Russian Revolution. In 1950, Marshal Voroshilov announces the existence of the Soviet atomic bomb. In 1954, the United States and Japan sign mutual defense agree-ment. In 1957, Ghana is admitted to the United Nations. In 1965, United States lands 3,500 Marines in South Vietnam. 1969, Soviet Union puts its Far East army on alert as warning to China after frontier clash on Ussuri River. In 1970, Cyprus President Archbishop Makarios escapes assassination when terrorist snipers shoot down his helicopter. 1986, guerrilla violence in Colombia takes seven lives a day before national elections. In 1987, Sri Lankan troops launch large new offensive, killing 11 sepa-ratist Tamil Tiger rebels in north-ern Jaffna peninsula. Q Jay Ambrose, formerly Washington director of editorial policy for Scripps Howard news-papers and the editor of dailies in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a columnist living in Colorado. Jay AmbroseSpeaktoJay@aol.com Q Associated Press

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Feb. 28Black History MonthBlack History Month organizers will host an Elders Banquet at Richardson Community Center. The banquet will honor our eleders and present community repre-sentatives and business-es with awards for their contributions in 2012. Entertainment, free food, prizes and a special keynote speaker will be inlcuded. Transportation will be pro-vided if requested by Feb. 15. For more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 867-1601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts.org.Senior drivers classAn AARP Driver Safety Course for Seniors will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center Reading Room, 628 SE Allison Court. Participants should take a sack lunch. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers. Registration is required and can be done by calling (352) 333-3036.Uniform saleThe Auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Regional Medical Center will have a uniform sale from 7a.m until 4:30 p.m. at the hos-pital. Proceeds will aid patient care at the hospital. Uniforms and shoes will be provided by First Uniform Inc. of North Carolina.Landlords meetingLake City area landlords will meet at IHOP Restraunt on U.S. 90 West. Dinner will be at 5 p.m. and the program will be at 6. Jordan Wade from Clay Electric will speak. For more information, call (386) 755-0110.Nursing home seminarA free Nursing Home Planning Workshop will be held at 10 a.m. at the Morgan Law Center for Estate and Legacy Planning, 234 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90). Anyone concerned about how they will pay for nursing home care should attend this informa-tive workshop led by local elder law attorney Teresa Byrd Morgan. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Call Shana Miller at (386) 755-1977.Military officers groupThe Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will hold its monthly din-ner meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Elks’ Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St. The speaker will be retired Air Force Col. Brian Anderson, MOAA deputy director for council and chapter affairs. The meeting is open to all active-duty military officers, retired and for-mer officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard and their surviv-ing spouses. For informa-tion and reservations, call Tandy Carter at 719-9706 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.March 1Author to visitThe Friends of the Library will present “A Florida Road Trip with Tim Dorsey” at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Author Tim Dorsey will make Lake City a stop on his tour for his new book, “The Riptide Ultra-Glide.” Free tickets are requried and may be obtained at any library location. Refreshments will be served.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. March 2Breakfast with chiefLake City Police Department will hold a “Breakfast with the Chief” event from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Lake City Moose Lodge, 624 NE Williams St. A free complimentary breakfast will be available, as well as an opportunity to hear from and ask questions of Police Chief Argatha Gilmore. For more information, contact Audre Washington at (386) 719-5742 or email washing-tona@lcflapd.com.Women’s programFirst United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., will host a free pro-gram for women entitled “The Word of God for the Women of God — Where is Your Treasure” from 9 am. to noon. Robin Arnold will be keynote speaker. Breakout sessions include “20 Ways to Bring the Wrd of God into Your Home” with Linda Callahan; “Using God’s Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, Others” with Alicia Pfahler; and “God’s Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen” with Joanna Figley. A continen-tal breakfast will be served and child care will be avail-able. For more information, call (386) 752-4488.Car, truck showThe fifth annual Fort White Car, Truck and Bike Show will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fort White High School, 17579 SW State Road 47. A swap meet and barbecue cook-off will be included. Prizes will be awarded in several catego-ries. Cost for participants is $20 if registered by Feb. 15 or $25 the day of the show. Swap meet space is $15 by Feb. 15 or $20 the day of the show. Live and silent auctions and a cake sale also will be held. Proceeds will support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. For barbeque cook-off informa-tion and registration, call Keith at (386) 497-WING. For vehicl entries and other infromation, contact Brown’s Racing at (386) 497-1481.Grief supportA GriefShare grief support group will meets from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at Willowbrook Assisted Living, Room D. For more information, call Marlene Hirsh at 288-7429.Church yard saleThe Kids Club of Lake City Church of God, 173 SE Ermine Ave., will have a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Family Life Center. For mor informa-tion, call (386) 752-9400.Spring yard saleThe Wellborn Community Association will host a Spring Community Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community cen-ter, 1340 8th Ave. in down-town Wellborn. A space is $5. Bring your own tents and tables. The monthly blueberry pancake break-fast will be served from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-dren. Lunch will be avail-able, too. The Bloodmobile will be there to take dona-tions. For more info, call Wendell at 963-1157, find us on Facebook or see www.wellborncommunityasso-ciation.com.Supper, gospel singLee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will have a pot-luck supper and gos-pel sing. The supper will be at 6 p.m. and the gos-pel sing will begin at 7. The church is at 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 869-9977.Free workshops The UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer-ing free workshops dur-ing the Home and Patio Show form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday at the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Workshops will include raised-bed veg-etable gardens, container gardens for kids, how to prepare nutritious smooth-ies, backyard poultry and more. For more information, call the Extension office at (386)752-5384.Dulcimer talkPrize-winning hammered dulcimer player Michael Vickey will host a Coffee House event from 7 to 9 p.m. in the auditori-um at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs.March 3History programThe Friends of the Library will present “A Florida History Chautauqua: Three Views (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas)” at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Chautauqua performer Betty Jean Steinshouer will help us consider the inter-twined stories of three of Florida’s most well-known female authors, who put the state on the map as only the hearts of women could. Free tickets are required and may be obtained at any library location.Free workshops The UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer-ing free workshops during the Home and Patio Show form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Workshops will include raised-bed vegetable gar-dens, container gardens for kids, how to prepare nutritious smoothies, back-yard poultry and more. For more information, call the Extension office at (386)752-5384.Gospel concertWesley Memorial United Methodist Church, 1272 SW MacFarlane Ave., will host a free, Southern gos-pel music concert by the Friends Singers at 6 p.m. The group of eight singers is a ministry of Friendship International Ministries, based at Colorado Springs, Colo. March 4Scout fundraiserBoy Scouts Troop 85 with a fundraiser at Moe’s between 5 and 8 p.m. A portion of all sales during that time will go to the troop. For details, contact Tabatha McMahon at 965-4674.March 5Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Alvoid BrownAlvoid Brown, age 45 resident of 3134 N.W. 21st Street, Gaines-ville, FL and former resident of Lake City, died Sunday, February 24, 2013 at Shands Hospital at the University of Florida termi-nating an ill-ness. born in Gainesville, FL. he was the son of Willie Dee Brown, Sr. and Bernice Brown McCoy. Early in life he lived with Mrs. Albertha Dace, and was raised by her. He attended Columbia High School and was a graduate of the Class of 1986. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy and was honorably discharged.He leaves to mourn his passing 1 daughter Dominque Brown; Brothers: Willie Dee Brown, Jr. (LaLette) and Clarence Alonzo Lucas (Tammy) of South Caro-lina; Sisters: Angela Lucas of Valdosta, GA; Lisa Bess, Ocala, FL.; Tonyia Edmonds and Tawa-nia Hicks of Columbus, GA.; a host of nieces, nephews, cous-ins, other relatives and friends.Funeral services for Alvoid Brown will be 1:00 p.m. Satur-day, March 2, 22013 at New Mt. Zion Methodist Church with Rev. 6WDFH\/HZLVRIFLDWLRQ,QWHU ment will follow in the Garden of Rest Cemetery. The family will receive friends Friday, March 1, 2013 at Cooper Funeral Home from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.Arrangements entrusted to: COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Elder Mitchell Givens Elder Mitchell Givens, resi-dent of Baker County transi-tioned from life to eternal rest on February 23, 2013. He was born Au-gust 3, 1921 to Arthur and Rosie Givens. Both preceded him in death. Elder Givens accepted Christ in 1939 under the leadership of Elder Fudge, at the Church of God By Faith. He currently serves as an Elder under the leadership of Elder Alvin Armstrong at the church in Sanderson, FL. Elder Givens retired from both the Frito Lay Company and the Baker County School System. He will be great-ly missed in the community by his loving family and friends. Funeral services for Elder Mitch-ell Givens will be 2:00 p.m. Sat-urday, March 2, 2013 at Faith Bible Church. 15902 US High-way 90. Videll Williams, Pastor.The family will receive friends from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Friday, March 1, 2013 at the Church of God By Faith, Sanderson, FL. Alvin Armstrong, Pastor.Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals”Jeanie M. Randon Mrs. Jeanie Mae Randon, resi-dent of Lake City, Florida, de-parted this life on February 20, 2013 to be with the Lord. Jeanie was born Au-gust 10, 1945 in Lulu, Flor-LGDWR,VDEHOODand George Webb, Sr. Both preceded her in death. She was edu-cated in the public school system of Columbia County, graduating from Richardson High School. She was employed with Lake Shore Hospital for many years. Other precedents in death; hus-band, Willie Randon; sisters, Thelma Allen and Annie Mae Thompson; brothers, George Webb, Jr., Willie Bias, Sr., and James Bias. She was loved dear-ly and will be greatly missed. Cherishing loving memories: daughters, Carmen (Vicky) Gra-KDP)ORUHQGD'%URZQYHgrandchildren, Andria Lewis, Dontavious Brown, Travis Brown, Devontae’ Brown, Mon-terrence Williamson; ten great grandchildren; sisters, Juanita White, Luverna Hawkins, Jackie Huland (Herman), Lil-lie Mae Wintons; brother, Lewis Webb (Andria); brother-in-law, Jessie Prester (Ceda Mae); hosts of nieces, neph-ews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mrs. Jeanie Mae Randon will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, March 2, 2013 at Olivet Missionary Baptist Church. 901 NE Davis Street. Lake City, FL. Rev. Ronald V. Walters, Pastor. Family will receive friends from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Friday, March 1, 2013 at the funeral home. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Otis O. Thompson, Sr. Otis O. Thomson answered the call to be with the Lord on Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Otis, son of Lu-ella Ford was born May 22, 1946 in Olus-tee, Florida. Mrs. Ford preceded him in death. He attended school in Columbia County and was a 1965 gradu-ate of Richardson High School. He served in the United States Navy from 1965 to 1967. Af-ter serving with the Navy, he was employed with Mathis Welding Company and then later employed with Occidental Chemical Company for several years. Otis was a compassion-ate person and a business man, believing and practicing strong work ethics until his demise. Cherishing memories: wife, Annie Mae Thompson; chil-dren, Otis Oliver Thompson, Jr., John Wesley Thompson, Lavita Thompson, Takella “Libby” Thompson, Antonio “Tony” Thompson, Bruce Thompson (Nannette), Cornelius Jackson, Tamika D. Souter, Andrea S. *ULIQVLVWHUV6KHUUHOO+D\ ZRRG,YRU\0LOGUHG)RUG(Larry); brothers, Alonzo Gallo-way (Emily), Rentz Galloway, Gerald Ford (Angee), Charles Ford; several grandchildren; other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mr. Otis O. Thompson will be 10:00 a.m. Saturday, March 2, 2013 at Union A.M.E. Church. 357 NW Queen Road, Lake City, FL. Rev. Gary DeSue, Pastor. Family will receive friends from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. Friday, March 1, 2013 at Union AME Church. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, Florida. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 5A5A Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterThe moon, which is about 250,000 miles from Earth, is seen on a clear night in its waxing gibbous phase.

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I was fortunate enough to be invited to speak at a prison last week for its Black History pro gram. I decided to speak about the historical figure I believed the inmates would be able to relate to about the effective use of incarceration, Malcolm X. I have found over the years that regardless of the opinion held about his view on civil rights, or reli gion he, in my opinion, is the recipient of the award for Best Transition While Incarcerated. The pre sentation to the inmates was received very well. My silent prayer leading up to and until approach ing the podium, was that God would direct both my words and my ability to transfer a message that would be meaningful and capable to effect needed change in the lives of the inmates. I stood before a couple of hundred inmates and listened as I heard the message delivered through me. The mes sage that their journeys were just as capable as transforming history as were the journeys of Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X and many others. There was a long pause after the words exit ed my mouth. I guess I needed a moment to allow what I heard to resonate on my brain, for I as well was experiencing a para digm shift at that moment. We readily accept the positive experience as a change agent, but the negative experience has the same promise and potential if used to improve our surround ings and ourselves. Each of those inmates had an opportunity to shed light on a problem plaguing the black community and its history from a perspec tive that a person who has never been to prison would lack. While I am glad that I lack the ability, I am open enough in my understanding to recog nize the potential for an inmate to make significant and positive change in our communities. As I con cluded the presentation, I realized that each of them represented an opportu nity not just for me, but also for community to chal lenge ourselves to identify and provide resources that counter the need for incarceration for so many black males. Clearly if such a large number of black males have made it to and continue to find a vehicle to prison, there remain opportunities for America to identify addi tional resources. I see my progress or my opportu nity to make changes for progress in looking at my surroundings. I want my children and those in the community to look back at this history and see people who loved each other, who sought to improve each other and who embraced the opportunity to serve God with obedience. I want my children and the children in the world to see we loved them far greater than we loved our selves. I challenge each of us to put forth an effort to resolve some problems we observe in our surround ings, it isnt about measur ing what needs to be done against all the resources needed, but about your efforts alone. The prison industry does not have to be recorded in history as the fastest growing industry, and not because we chose not to send those deserv ing of incarceration there, but because we provided enough resources that no crime was committed. My experience that day in prison reminded me of a wretched soul God saved and the continuing desire I have as we all should to show gratitude in his mercy and kindness. We are only as good as our weakest link! Local Wisdom John Gay was born in Houston, Texas and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He and his wife Mary Ann made Lake City their home in 2004, after being displaced by Hurricane Wilma. They share eight children, seventeen grand children, and six greatgrandchildren. Mr. Gay has traveled across America and abroad and brings to Lake City a much needed perspective and wisdom. Mr. Gay graduated from Phyllis Wheatley Senior High School, followed by gradua tion from Tuskugee in 1953. He was the second black to graduate from the Miami, Florida Police Academy in the first integrated class in 1961, requiring congressio nal persmission to get com missioned because he was so young at graduation. Mr. Gay holds a Bachelors in Science, and Business Administration with an emphasis on Economics. He holds a Masters Degree in Social Work, and Business with an emphasis on International Finance. Additionally, he is 12 cred it hours from completing his Ph.D in Experiential Learning and smiles as he conveys he has an interest in pursuing law studies. Mr. Gay holds dear a geni une passion for children, that I was fortunate enough to observe in his interactions with mine. He shared many stories, as one would imag ine given his background and the wealth of knowledge he has; however, the one that I am compelled to share is the emphasis his family placed on his education and the com mitment he now continues to display. Mr. Gay spent his summers being mentored by family members who worked dilligently, to store away the financial nest egg to send Mr. Gay to school. His family recognized that he had great potential and it became their collective goal to ensure he was not haulted by a lack of resources. Mr. Gay was raised by a village and he knew what the sacrifices were and used his summers with them to demonstrate he appreciated their efforts. Mr. Gay remains true to his commitment to his fam ily. On our theme, We Need Unity, I asked for his advice and thoughts. He explained the continu ing need for unity in our households. He contrasted the progress today to that of the 70s, making note of the decline in meaningful progress. I couldnt help but hear the grief as he embraced what his fam ily had imparted upon him and what he desired to share with the youth today. Mr. Gay now is a member of the Tuskugee Airmen, Inc. an organization com posed of former graduates who have committed them selves to educating America on an important part of our history. He believes that in the education we will be reminded of all the many possibilities afforded through hard work, perse verance and geniune con cern for our fellow man. He and his wife are pleased to call Lake City their home and willing to share where he is needed. Test Your History Knowledge Local, Florda and American history In Lake City, Florida, in the State of Florida, and in the United States black males hold the highest percentage of incarcerated individuals. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Saturday, March 2nd Sunday, March 3rd 9am 5pm 10am 4pm Columbia County Fairgrounds FREE ADMISSION P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Bea Coker Historically Speaking BLACK HISTORY MONTH My contributions to Black History? COURTESY John Gay and his wife, Mary Ann. LAWS: Continued From Page 1A Even the states top gun lobbyist isnt asking for any new laws, though she says it was a decision that was made before the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting and Obamas call for stricter gun laws. We decided that there were important issues fac ing the state and we just want to take a breather, said Marion Hammer, who represents the National Rifle Association and the Unified Sportsmen of Florida and is considered one of the states most influential lobbyists. Democrats have filed six bills seeking to either repeal or rewrite the stand your ground law that says people can use deadly force if they feel threatened with no requirement to retreat if possible. They were filed in response to Martins shoot ing death by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in February 2012, a case that has drawn national attention. Zimmerman, 29, is charged with second-degree murder, but is expected to argue that Martin, 17, attacked him and that he should be acquitted under the stand your ground law. Democrats have also filed bills that would allow local governments to ban con cealed weapons and ammu nition from public events held in public facilities. Other bills would require gun owners to turn their weapons over to school principals or police officers to avoid being charged with carrying a concealed weap on in a school safety zone. ARTIFACTS: Fort White man among 13 charged in scheme Continued From Page 1A collectors they dealt with and theyd sell around the state and around the country. When asked if some of the collectors who bought illegal artifacts would also be arrested, Brown said, There may be additional violations found. Other officers served searched four homes in Florida and found artifacts and other illegal items, the FWC said. Two of those arrested also were charged with drug possession. Investigators said the recent arrests resulted from a two-year-long investigation called Operation Timucua, named after an Indian tribe that once lived in parts of Florida and Georgia. The probe started after com plaints of looting lodged over the last five years from around the state. An undercover operative posed as a buyer, Brown said. The looted artifacts often were listed on web sites such as Craigslist and also turned up at trade shows. Asking prices for some of the artifacts were as high as $100,000, Brown told reporters. Some of those charged were accused of sneaking onto historical sites mostly in northern Florida at night and digging in the dirt with hand tools. The charges listed include multiple counts of violation of historical resources, dealing in sto len property and illegal removal of artifacts by excavation. Lake City Reporter staff writer Tony Britt contributed to this story.

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By DARLENE SUPERVILLEAssociated PressCLINTON, Miss. — Michelle Obama on Wednesday congratu-lated this Southern state for a more than 13 percent drop in its child obesity rates and said its example should inspire the rest of the country. It’s the reason the first lady made Mississippi the first stop on a two-day tour to promote her signature effort, the anti-childhood obesity campaign she launched three years ago called “Let’s Move.” In remarks at an elementary school near Jackson, Mrs. Obama cited new research showing that childhood obesity rates among elementary school pupils in the state had declined by more than 13 percent between 2005 and 2011. “What’s happening here in Mississippi is really what ‘Let’s Move’ is all about,” she told an audience of state officials, school nutrition professionals and par-ents. She urged them to keep on doing what they’ve been doing. “It’s the story of what you all have achieved here that we want to tell. It’s the story we want to be telling in every state all across this country,” the first lady said. When she visited Mississippi three years ago, she said, it had just been declared the most obese state in the nation. Mrs. Obama attributed the decline in childhood obesity rates here to efforts by state law-makers, the Board of Education and individual school districts, which she said took such steps as setting new standards for food and drinks in school vending machines, serving more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and replacing food fryers with steam-ers, to which she exclaimed, “Hallelujah.” Some churches even declared “no-fry” zones for their congrega-tions, where only healthy food and nothing fried was allowed. “So there’s no reason why this success can’t happen in cities and states all across the country — if we’re willing to work for it,” Mrs. Obama said. “So now is the time for us to truly double down on these efforts. We know what works. We’re seeing it right here. We know how to get results. Now we just need to keep stepping up.” The first lady said Mississippi, and other parts of the country that also have seen their childhood obesity rates come down — including California and New York City and Philadelphia — are showing others what works. After all, she said, “love for our chil-dren” is the motivating factor. Mrs. Obama was joined by Food Network star and daytime talk-show host Rachael Ray, who arranged for two school chefs to compete to prepare lunches that meet newly adopted federal nutri-tion guidelines. “I’m here to say, Mississippi, thank you. Thank you so much. Congratulations on your work,” the first lady said. “Thank you for taking the lead on this issue. Thank you for serving as an inspi-ration for states and communities across the country.” About one-third of U.S. children are overweight or obese, putting them at higher risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as other ailments. Mrs. Obama launched “Let’s Move” with the goal of helping to reduce childhood obesity rates within a generation. In response, a range of industry groups and others, includ-ing food companies, restaurants, retailers and others, promised to make their food healthier and make it easier for kids to get needed exercise. Among the changes: Wal-Mart is now putting special labels on some of its store-brand prod-ucts to help shoppers quickly spot healthier items. Millions of schoolchildren are helping themselves to vegetables from salad bars that have been donat-ed for their lunchrooms. Kids’ meals at Olive Garden and Red Lobster restaurants are automati-cally served with a side of fruit or vegetables and a glass of low-fat milk. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 7A7AHEALTH ASSOCIATED PRESSFirst lady Michelle Obama (left) and TV chef Rachel Ray discuss the lunches with elementary school stu dents in at the Clinton, Miss., on Wednesday. The pair visited with the children as part of Obama’s anti-obesity c ampaign. Mississippi gains seen as example for other states. First lady highlights obesity progress New VA clinics, expansions in limboBy KEVIN FREKINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON — A veterans’ health clinic in Brick, N.J. is in such disrepair that when the snow gets heavy, patients have to go elsewhere for fear the roof might collapse. Another in San Antonio has exten-sive mildew and mold problems that could prove a health hazard for employees and patients in the com-ing years. In Lake Charles, La., it’s not the condition of a clinic but the lack of one. It’s estimated that 6,000 veter-ans would enroll in VA health care if the community were to get a new clinic. The Department of Veterans Affairs has cited these examples as it sought approval from Congress last year for a dozen new or expanded health clinics around the country. Lawmakers anticipated that the cost for the current fiscal year would probably run into the tens of millions of dollars, but the estimate from the Congressional Budget Office came in at $1.2 billion. The nonpartisan CBO said that sound accounting principles require the full cost of the 20-year leases for the clinics be accounted for up front. The huge jump in the clinics’ price tag left lawmakers scrambling, and in the face of the budget-cutting cli-mate on Capitol Hill, the VA request stalled. Now the agency is warning that unless lawmakers act, some cur-rently operating clinics may have to close after their old leases expire and other long-planned expansions will not go forward. Since the mid-1990s, the VA has turned to outpatient clinics as a way to bring health care closer to where veterans live. The department has opened 821 clinics to supplement the care provided at 152 medical centers. The clinics vary in size and services offered but virtually all pro-vide primary care and mental health counseling. In most cases, the VA enters into a lease with private build-ing owners, which gives the depart-ment flexibility to meet changes in demand down the road. “I know the VA itself had plans to go beyond these 12 in the next sev-eral years. It’s going to be difficult for that to happen at a time when we see veterans’ needs rising,” said Rep. Charles Boustany Jr., R-La., whose congressional district includes Lake Charles and Lafayette, where the expansion of another VA outpatient clinic was delayed. “This has thrown a wrench into the entire way we do things.” Any lease costing more than $1 million a year requires con-gressional approval. That’s where the 12 proposed clinics come in. Lawmakers submitted the legislation to the Congressional Budget Office, which keeps score of how legisla-tion fits with congressional spending targets. When CBO took a closer look at the clinics, analysts determined that the leases generally involved the construction of new buildings that the VA would essentially finance through a 20-year lease. The CBO told lawmakers that the entire cost of the leases needed to be accounted for up front to show taxpayers the true cost associated with a 20-year obligation. The Congressional Budget Office declined to discuss publicly the rational for its new treatment of VA leases. Instead, it forwarded a brief about financing arrangements akin to those being used by the VA. The brief said that treating long-term investments as annual operating expenses under-states the size of the federal govern-ment and its obligations. Sound bud-geting requires agencies to acknowl-edge the full cost of their investment up front, the brief said. That left lawmakers with two options — find $1.2 billion in savings from other government programs or waive rules that require offsets to new spending. They decided to regroup and try again this year. “Most Democrats and Republicans agree that these projects should move ahead, so the task at hand is simply finding a way forward in light of CBO’s new method of scoring lease authorizations,” said Rep. Jeff Miller, the Republican chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs. “I’m confident we’ll find a solution that doesn’t involve cuts to veterans’ benefits to pay for these leases, an option that is not on the table and one that I would not support,” Miller said. Advanced breast cancer edges up in younger womenBy LINDSEY TANNERAP Medical WriterCHICAGO — Advanced breast cancer has increased slightly among young women, a 34-year analy-sis suggests. The disease is still uncommon among women younger than 40, and the small change has experts scratching their heads about possible rea-sons. The results are potentially worrisome because young women’s tumors tend to be more aggressive than older women’s, and they’re much less likely to get routine screening for the disease. Still, that doesn’t explain why there’d be an increase in advanced cases and the researchers and other experts say more work is needed to find answers. It’s likely that the increase has more than one cause, said Dr. Rebecca Johnson, the study’s lead author and medical director of a teen and young adult cancer pro-gram at Seattle Children’s Hospital. “The change might be due to some sort of modifi-able risk factor, like a life-style change” or exposure to some sort of cancer-linked substance, she said. Johnson said the results translate to about 250 advanced cases diagnosed in women younger than 40 in the mid-1970s ver-sus more than 800 in 2009. During those years, the number of women nation-wide in that age range went from about 22 million to closer to 30 million — an increase that explains part of the study trend “but defi-nitely not all of it,” Johnson said. Other experts said women delaying pregnancy might be a factor, partly because getting pregnant at an older age might cause an already growing tumor to spread more quickly in response to pregnancy hormones. Obesity and having at least a drink or two daily have both been linked with breast cancer but research is inconclusive on other pos-sible risk factors, including tobacco and chemicals in the environment. Whether any of these explains the slight increase in advanced disease in young women is unknown. There was no increase in cancer at other stages in young women. There also was no increase in advanced disease among women older than 40. Overall U.S. breast cancer rates have mostly fallen in more recent years, although there are signs they may have plateaued.ASSOCIATED PRESSDr. Rebecca Johnson, a cancer specialist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and a cancer survivor, Johnson is the lead author of a new study that shows that advanced breast can-cer cases have increased slightly among young women. Some results her of campaignAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Steps that retailers, restaurants and others are taking as part of Michelle Obama’s campaign to reduce childhood obesity.Wal-MartPledged in January 2011 to reformulate its store-brand, packaged foods by cutting sodium 25 percent and added sugars by 10 percent, and removing all remaining industrially produced trans fats by 2015. Child NutritionObama actively campaigned behind the scenes in 2010 for a child nutrition law, which passed in the final days of a Democratic-controlled House. The law helped schools pay for healthier lunches and also set new nutrition requirements for all foods in schools. Beverage associationThe Amerian Beverage Association, which repre-sents Coca-Cola and PepsiCo, now also puts calorie labels on the front of cans, bottles and packs, fulfilling its pledge to do so.Healthy weight foundationThis coalition of retailers, and food and beverage manu-facturers, said in 2010 that it would remove 1.5 trillion calories from their products by 2015 —about 12.5 calories per person per day.

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By MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Pour on the olive oil, pref erably over fish and veg etables: One of the longest and most scientific tests of a Mediterranean diet sug gests this style of eating can cut the chance of suffer ing heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk of them. The study lasted five years and involved about 7,500 people in Spain. Those who ate Mediterraneanstyle with lots of olive oil or nuts had a 30 percent lower risk of major cardiovascular problems compared to those who were told to follow a low-fat diet but who in real ity, didnt cut fat very much. Mediterranean meant lots of fruit, fish, chicken, beans, tomato sauce, salads, and wine and little baked goods and pastries. Mediterranean diets have long been touted as hearthealthy, but thats based on observational studies that cant prove the point. The new research is much stronger because people were assigned diets to fol low for a long time and care fully monitored. Doctors even did lab tests to verify that the Mediterranean diet folks were consuming more olive oil or nuts as recom mended. Most of these people were taking medicines for high cholesterol and blood pressure, and researchers did not alter those prov en treatments, said one study leader, Dr. Ramon Estruch of Hospital Clinic in Barcelona. But as a first step to pre vent heart problems, we think diet is better than a drug because it has few if any side effects, Estruch said. Diet works. Results were published online Monday by the New England Journal of Medicine and were dis cussed at a nutrition confer ence in Loma Linda, Calif. People in the study were not given rigid menus or calorie goals because weight loss was not the aim. That could be why they found the diets easy to stick with only about 7 per cent dropped out within two years. There were twice as many dropouts in the lowfat group than among those eating Mediterranean-style. Researchers also pro vided the nuts and olive oil, so it didnt cost partici pants anything to use these relatively pricey ingredi ents. The type of oil may have mattered they used extra-virgin olive oil, which is minimally processed and richer than regular or light olive oil in the chemicals and nutrients. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Florida Strawberries Now is the time! Hurry to your neighborhood Publix and get plenty of fragrant, red-ripe, succulent strawberries. Theyre fresh from Florida and more delicious than you can possibly imagine. Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. 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The next best thing to Vegas baby. $10 00 Match Play New Customers With Coupon Expires 3-4-13 S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE Specializing in adult medical care including: Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I Now Accepting New Patients Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP Allisha Lanier, ARNP 386-719-2540 www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com FDA expands approval of cancer drug Associated Press WASHINGTON The Food and Drug Administration on Monday expanded approval of a Bayer cancer pill to treat tumors of the intestinal tract that dont respond to other treatments. The drug is called Stivarga and regula tors approved it to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors that cannot be surgically removed and no longer respond to other FDA-approved drugs. The FDA previously approved Stivarga to treat colorectal cancer. It works by blocking several enzymes that promote cancer growth. The FDA approved the drug for the new use based on a study of nearly 200 patients who were randomly assigned to take Stivarga or a placebo pill. ASSOCIATED PRESS A fishmonger prepares fish for a client in a market in Barcelona, Spain. One of the longest and most scientific tests suggests the Mediterranean style of eating can cut the chance of suffering heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk of them. Mediterranean-style diets found healthier

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, February 28, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Proud to Sponsor theTickets on Sale at all stores! ADULTS $10 Children $5 Lake City Branford Bell Try our Rodeo Combo Deal!$1.49Coca-Cola Fountain & Regular Size Reese’s Candy BRIEFS Today Q Columbia High softball vs. P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Bradford High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Arlington Country Day School, 6 p.m. (JV-6 at Baker County High) Q Fort White High JV baseball at Bradford High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Forest High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High track at UNF Spring Break Open, TBA Q Fort White High softball at Interlachen High, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Lincoln High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Madison County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Williston High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Saturday Q Columbia High baseball vs. Wakulla High, 2:30 p.m. (JV-noon) Q Fort White High track at Suwannee Invitational, TBA GAMES FISHING Justin Brown Memorial tourney The Justin Brown Memorial Bass Tournament is Saturday at Clay Landing. Entry fee is $70 per boat with an optional big bass pot for $10. There is a 60 percent payback to 10 percent of the field. All proceeds benefit Columbia FFA students. For details, call Chris Starling at 288-7633 or Karen Brown at 961-2526. RUNNING Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. Saturday at O’Leno State Park on U.S. Highway 41-441, 17 miles south of Lake City. Entry fee is $10 for ages 14 and younger and $25 for all others. Entry to the park is free for registered runners. The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. Proceeds go to O’Leno State Park. To register go to www.friendsofoleno.org and click 5K Run. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kayli Kvistad (21) hits a pitch during a game against Wolfson.Lady Tigers win againBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High made easy work of its rival on Wednesday by putting the Lady Bulldogs of Suwannee High in the pound. The Lady Tigers won 10-0 behind a six-inning per-formance on the mound by Erin Anderson. Anderson had her best game of the season with 11 strikeouts and allowed only two hits. Ashley Shoup got the save after allowing one hit in the final inning. The Lady Tigers struck early and never looked back with four runs in the first inning. Hollianne Dohrn scored Lacey King on a bases-loaded single and Caleigh McCauley’s grounder scored Tatum Morgan and Kayli Kvistad after an error. Jessica Shimmel batted in Dohrn to end the inning. Kvistad added two more for the Lady Tigers in the top of the second with a two-run homer that also scored Tatum Morgan. In the fourth, Brandy Morgan scored King after a bases loaded walk and Tatum Morgan scored on a wild pitch. Dohrn and McCauley scored by taking home on an error for the 10-0 final. Columbia dogs Suwannee High, 10-0, on the road.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Tshwane Open, first round, at Centurion, South Africa (same-day tape) 12:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HSBC Women’s Champions, first round, at Singapore (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Honda Classic, first round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — North Carolina at ClemsonESPN2 — Ohio State at Northwestern NBCSN — Drexel at Old Dominion 9 p.m. ESPN — Duke at VirginiaESPN2 — Missouri at South Carolina 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Gonzaga at BYU NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Philadelphia at Chicago 10:30 p.m. TNT — Minnesota at L.A. LakersFOOTBALLNFL calendar March 9-11 — Clubs may enter negotiations with certified agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at end of league year. March 12 — Before 4 p.m., clubs must exercise options for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their 2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation; clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclusive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 contracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must be under the salary cap. The 2013 league year, free agency and trading period begins at 4 p.m. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix April 25-27 — NFL draft, New YorkMay 20-22 — NFL spring league Meeting, Boston Sept. 5, 8-9 — 2013 NFL season begins.BASKETBALLNBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 33 20 .623 — Brooklyn 34 24 .586 1 1/2Boston 30 27 .526 5 Toronto 23 34 .404 12 Philadelphia 22 33 .400 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 41 14 .745 — Atlanta 32 23 .582 9 Washington 18 37 .327 23Orlando 16 41 .281 26 Charlotte 13 44 .228 29 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 36 21 .632 — Chicago 32 25 .561 4Milwaukee 27 28 .491 8Detroit 22 37 .373 15 Cleveland 19 38 .333 17 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 45 13 .776 — Memphis 37 18 .673 6 1/2 Houston 31 27 .534 14 Dallas 25 31 .446 19 New Orleans 20 38 .345 25 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 41 15 .732 — Denver 36 22 .621 6Utah 31 26 .544 10 1/2 Portland 26 30 .464 15 Minnesota 20 34 .370 20 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 41 18 .695 — Golden State 33 24 .579 7 L.A. Lakers 28 30 .483 12 1/2Phoenix 19 39 .328 21 1/2 Sacramento 19 39 .328 21 1/2 NBA schedule Today’s Games L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Gonzaga at BYU, 11 p.m.No. 3 Duke at Virginia, 9 p.m.No. 16 Ohio State at Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 24 Oregon vs. Oregon State, 11 p.m. No. 25 Louisiana Tech vs. Utah State, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Iowa, 7:30 p.m.No. 2 Gonzaga vs. Portland, 5 p.m.No. 3 Duke vs. No. 5 Miami, 6 p.m. No. 6 Kansas vs. West Virginia, 2 p.m.No. 7 Georgetown vs. Rutgers, 9 p.m.No. 8 Florida vs. Alabama, NoonNo. 10 Louisville at No. 12 Syracuse, Noon No. 11 Arizona at UCLA, 9 p.m.No. 13 Kansas State at Baylor, 7 p.m.No. 14 New Mexico vs. Wyoming, 5 p.m. No. 15 Oklahoma State vs. Texas, 4 p.m. No. 18 Saint Louis at George Washington, 4 p.m. No. 19 Memphis at UCF, 1 p.m.No. 20 Butler at VCU, NoonNo. 21 Notre Dame at No. 22 Marquette, 2 p.m. No. 25 Louisiana Tech vs. San Jose State, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 4 Michigan vs. No. 9 Michigan State, 4 p.m. No. 17 Wisconsin vs. Purdue, 1 p.m.No. 23 Pittsburgh vs. Villanova, NoonBASEBALLSpring Training Today’s Games Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees (ss) at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Cincinnati (ss) at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 6:05 p.m.MLB calendar Saturday-March 11 — Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. Saturday-March 19 — World Baseball Classic. March 13 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. March 31 — Opening day, Texas at Houston. Active rosters reduced to 25 players.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.New Jersey at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m.Detroit at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 28, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Zero Hour “Pendulum” (N) Scandal “Truth or Consequences” (:02) Jimmy Kimmel Live News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! 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(N) Community (N) Parks/RecreatThe Of ce (:31) 1600 Penn(:01) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Double Life Big game animal poaching. Double Life “Operation Royal Charm” Dateline on OWN “Burning Suspicion” Dateline on OWN NY ERNY ERDateline on OWN “Burning Suspicion” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 “Caught in the Middle” The First 48 “Cold Light of Day” The First 48 “Shattered” After the First 48 “The Witness” (N) (:01) The First 48 HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchFrasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248 “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (2010, Drama) Michael Douglas, Shia LaBeouf, Josh Brolin. AngerAngerArcher (N) Legit “Health” (N) BrandX With Russell Brand (N) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Carpet Treatment” The Mentalist A jockey is murdered.d NBA Basketball Philadelphia 76ers at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) d NBA Basketball: Timberwolves at Lakers NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshTo Be AnnouncedFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30) “The Expendables” (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham. iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator MMA Live The world’s top ghters take part in this tournament. (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Upper West Side Story” College Basketball White Collar “Neighborhood Watch” DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Shake It Up! Jessie Shake It Up! “Frenemies” (2012) Bella Thorne, Zendaya. (:10) Austin & AllyGood Luck CharlieJessie Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedProject Runway Project Runway Creating looks for senior citizens. (N) Double Divas(:01) Double Divas(:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS An ambulance explodes in transit. NCIS “Ravenous” NCIS “Iced” NCIS “Untouchable” NCIS “Bloodbath” Psych Henry ghts for his life. BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Big Momma’s House 2” (2006, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long, Emily Procter. Steve Harvey: Don’t Trip... He Ain’t Through with Me Yet ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptiond College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Gonzaga at BYU. SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at New York Rangers. (N Subject to Blackout) Lightning Live!Inside LightningFight Sports: In 60Along the Way DISCV 38 182 278Property WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty Wars (N) Auction Kings (N) Auction Kings (N) Property Wars (N) (:45) Property WarsAuction KingsAuction Kings TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Enginerds” (N) Conan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) The SoupBurning LoveKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkSalvage DawgsSalvage DawgsWest End SalvageWest End SalvageRehab AddictRehab AddictHouse HuntersHunters Int’lHawaii Life Hawaii Life TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumBorrowed, NewBorrowed, NewSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressWhat Not to Wear “Tina Yothers” (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Big Rig Bounty Hunters Swamp People “Swamp Invaders” Swamp People “Texas Hold ’Em” Swamp People “Floating Dead” (N) Big Rig Bounty Hunters (N) Larry the Cable Guy ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceNorth Woods Law: On the HuntNorth Woods Law “Wicked Summer” North Woods Law “The Rookies” North Woods Law “Things Are Afowl” North Woods Law “The Rookies” FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Belly Dance!” Sweet GeniusChopped “Good Chop, Bad Chop?” Chopped “Make No Mistake” Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Worst Cooks in America TBN 52 260 37239th Annual GMA Hall of Fame InducAlways Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Car ScienceHot Stove Rep Women’s College Basketball Arkansas at Florida. (N) BoxingAction Sports World TourWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244 “The Ninth Gate” (1999, Suspense) Johnny Depp. A rare-book dealer is hired to track down two satanic tomes. “Stake Land” (2010, Horror) Nick Damici, Connor Paolo, Danielle Harris. “Edward Scissorhands” (1990) AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Hulk” (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly. The Walking Dead Comic Book MenFreakshow (N) Immortalized (N) Comic Book MenFreakshow Immortalized COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowIt’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyWorkaholics Tosh.0 The Ben ShowNathan for YouDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Swamp Pawn “Cajun Mystery Meat” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Laker dog. World’s Deadliest “Animal Battles” Africa’s Deadliest “Killer Tactics” Africa’s Deadliest “Lethal Weapons” Africa’s Deadliest “Predator Swarm” Africa’s Deadliest “Killer Tactics” NGC 109 186 276Mudcats: Down and DirtyMudcats “Big Fish Big Bucks” Highway Thru Hell (N) Doomsday PreppersMudcats: Down and Dirty (N) Mudcats “Big Fish Big Bucks” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeStrip the City They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285My Dirty Little Secret My Dirty Little Secret “Green Widow” My Dirty Little Secret My Dirty Little Secret FrenemiesFrenemiesMy Dirty Little Secret HBO 302 300 501(5:15) “The Lucky One” (2012) “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011, Suspense) Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ Parade’s End (N) (Part 5 of 5) Girls Enlightened Katie MorganBest of Pornucopia MAX 320 310 515(:15) “Contagion” (2011, Suspense) Marion Cotillard. ‘PG-13’ “Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds. ‘R’ “Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “The Iron Lady” (2011, Biography) Meryl Streep. ‘PG-13’ History of the Eagles The evolution and popularity of The Eagles. (:05) Gigolos Gigolos Indians undefeated in weightlifting at 5-0From staff reportsFort White High moved to 5-0 on the year by defeat-ing Oak Hall, Hamilton and Hawthorne high schools in weightlifting on Monday. The Indians won the meet with 83 points. Hamilton finished second with 28 points. Hamilton was third with 16 points and Hawthorne finished last with 12 points. Lifters for Fort White by weight class were: Q 119 — Brent Beach, 265 total 1st Q 129 — Brendan Womer, 310 total 2nd; TJ Strachen, 265 total 4th Q 139 — Tyler Harding, 365 total 2nd; Shayne Newman, 355 total 3rd Q 154 — Tristan Nelson, 455 total 2nd; Lane Ross, 335 total 5th Q 169 — Dale Gocek, 470 total 1st; EJ Garrison, 440 total 2nd Q 183 — Dylan Harrell, 490 total 1st; Blair Chapman, 440 total 2nd Q 199 — Andrew Baker, 525 total 1st; Caleb Bundy, 430 total -3rd Q 219 — Kellan Snider, 610 total 1st; Matt Martin, 475 total 2nd Q 238 — Chris Waites, 565 total 1st; Randall Fraddosio, 450 total 3rd Q Heavyweight — AJ Kleuss, 615 total 1st; Brayson Caley, 520 total 2nd. Fort White is 5-0 on the year. NCAA says Shapiro gave UM least $170KBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — The NCAA is alleging that former Miami booster Nevin Shapiro was respon-sible for providing about $170,000 in impermissible benefits to Hurricanes ath-letes, recruits, coaches and others between 2002 and 2010. Shapiro allegedly spent more than half that amount — at least $90,000 — in an effort to get NFL players Vince Wilfork and Antrel Rolle to sign with a sports agency he was involved with, said the person, who spoke to The Associated Press Wednesday on condition of anonymity because neither Miami nor the NCAA has publicly released the allegations. Also included in the allegations: That Shapiro spent at least another $56,000 on “meals, entertainment, clothing, jewelry, travel, lodging and cash” on foot-ball players, recruits and others. The NCAA alleged that Shapiro spent that on 72 then-players, three recruits and 12 “friends and family members” of those either on the team or being recruited by the school. Virtually all of the Hurricane players listed as receiving some sort of extra benefit from Shapiro left the program several years ago. The figures that the NCAA’s enforcement staff cited in the notice of alle-gations add up to a sig-nificantly lower total than what Shapiro told Yahoo Sports in 2011, when he estimated his extra-benefit spending spree as going into the “millions of dol-lars.” If true, the NCAA only listed a sliver of that in the allegations. The figures that were sent to Miami also were described as “approximate total values.” The NCAA said Shapiro also provided extra benefits in the forms of impermis-sible supplemental com-pensation to at least three former Miami assistant coaches, along with travel benefits and other items. Miami received its notice of allegations, ones that included a lack of institutional control for failing to properly moni-tor Shapiro’s activities as a booster, last week. It also includes charges that three former assistant coaches broke what’s known as the NCAA’s Rule 10.1 — gov-erning ethical conduct — by misleading the inves-tigation. Two of those for-mer assistants have asked that their cases be thrown out because of problems the NCAA acknowledged with the way it conducted the probe. The NCAA’s Committee on Infractions wants to hear the case in June. The Hurricanes have already self-imposed sev-eral sanctions, including sitting out two bowl games and a conference football championship game. Miami President Donna Shalala said on two occasions last week that she believes those punishments should be enough. Shapiro is serving a 20year prison term for mas-terminding a $930 million Ponzi scheme. AP Source: 49ers to send Smith to Kansas City for p ick By BARRY WILNERAssociated PressAlex Smith is headed to Kansas City, the first major acquisition by the Chiefs since Andy Reid took over as coach. A person with knowledge of the trade told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the Chiefs have agreed to deal for the 2005 top overall draft pick who lost his starting quar-terback job in San Francisco to Colin Kaepernick last season. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the trade does not become official until March 12, when the NFL’s new business year begins. Another person familiar with the deal said the 49ers will get a second-round draft pick in April, No. 34 overall, and a conditional pick in the 2014 draft. Fox Sports first reported the deal. Smith sustained a concussion Nov. 11 and Kaepernick played well in his place. Coach Jim Harbaugh stuck with him even when Smith got healthy, and Kaepernick led the 49ers to the NFC championship and a close loss to Baltimore in the Super Bowl. The 28-year-old Smith struggled for most of his career in San Francisco, plagued as much by coach-ing and coordinator chang-es as by his own indecisive-ness. But when Harbaugh became coach, Smith blos-somed. He was among the league leaders in passer rating (104.1) with a 70.2 com-pletion percentage when he was injured in a 24-24 tie against St. Louis. Smith never started again for the 49ers, but now will replace Matt Cassel in Kansas City. The Chiefs went 2-14 in 2012, earning the top pick in April’s draft. But with no standout quarterbacks coming out of college this year, they quickly turned to finding a veteran. Reid was fired by Philadelphia after 14 high-ly successful seasons, although the Eagles went 4-12 last year. Kansas City made him the first coach hired to fill a vacancy in January — there were eight of them — and the Chiefs also fired general manager Scott Pioli.

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DEAR ABBY: My exwife cheated on me five years ago. She ran off with a nonworking criminal type and has been bounc-ing from place to place with this bozo ever since. When they and their 3-year-old became home-less two weeks ago, all of a sudden she showed up at my door shoeless and with their son in a diaper. She said her boyfriend was abusive and asked to stay with me until she finds a place. I agreed under the provision that she not see this guy. I am a hard-working single father of two. I know my heart is two sizes too big for my own good some-times, and I don’t want to be taken advantage of. Abby, did I make the right choice? Or should I have told her she was not wel-come and turned her and her son away? I really feel I shouldn’t have to help her, and she should rely on her loser boyfriend -who she has started seeing again. I need guidance and your expert advice. Am I an idiot? -CONFUSED DEAR CONFUSED: You’re not an idiot; you’re a pushover. Your ex has already broken the agree-ment she made when you let her in. The situation is not going to get better; it will only become more complicated. You have helped her for two weeks. Now it’s time to direct her to a shelter that can help her get her life back together and give her son a stable home. Your responsibility for her welfare ended when she left you for another man. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I just finished reading the let-ter from “Cafe Crazy” (Jan. 4), about the woman changing the baby on the restaurant’s table. You advised that she should have taken the baby to the ladies’ room to change it on a changing table there, and if there wasn’t one, there should be. I am a stay-at-home father and many times have had to resort to an awkward changing table alternative to accomplish the task (though never a restaurant table) as there are very few changing tables in men’s rooms. In these dynamic, diverse and changing economic times, the ability to stay home and raise my children has been awesome, and I would do it over again in a heartbeat. It has been hard, however, because society still assumes that raising children is a wom-an’s job. Not only should there have been a chang-ing table in the ladies’ room, but also one in the men’s room. -GRANT IN SUNNYVALE, CALIF. DEAR GRANT: I apologize, and I’m glad to have the opportunity to not only help fathers everywhere to raise their children, but also to raise consciousness where it is needed. Since the letter from “Cafe Crazy” was printed, I have heard from parents of both sexes, as far away as Denmark. Although some men’s restrooms are equipped with changing tables, not all are -and they should be. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: Something has been bothering me and I’d like your opinion. If a group of people goes out to eat together, and no one wants to order des-sert except one person, is it rude for that person to keep everyone else waiting and watching while he/she orders and eats the des-sert? -CHECK, PLEASE DEAR CHECK, PLEASE: It’s not rude if you first ask the others in the group if they would mind, and they wanted to chat over coffee. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (MARCH 21APRIL 19): Don’t get angry, get moving. Sitting around waiting for some-one will only make you dis-gruntled. You’ll make new acquaintances that have far more to offer if you get out and do things you enjoy or find interesting. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Reorganize and rede-fine what it is you want to accomplish. Getting together with people will lead to solutions if you collaborate. Love is on the rise and a union with someone you respect and admire will bring you added confidence. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t give in under pressure. If someone demands too much of you, put a stop to it. Taking on responsibilities that stand in the way of your own accomplishments will not benefit you. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take the unusual route or sign up for some-thing that you know little about. Heading down an obscure path will enrich your life and bring you in contact with someone who fits your personality and personal desires perfectly. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Concentrate on what needs to be done at home. Pay attention to money matters and the expenses you incur. Spend time making sure you stick to a well thought-out plan. Make your dollar stretch. Don’t let pressure lead to impulse. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Share responsibilities with coworkers and per-sonal partners. If you are willing to distribute work equally, you will build a solid relationship that will benefit you for years to come. Push for what you want and you will receive. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Overreacting or taking on too much will be your downfall. Don’t let your emotions lead you down a slippery slope. Controlling your emotions will be nec-essary if you don’t want to damage a good working relationship. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Take a break and enjoy the people you like to spend time with most. Nurture your relationships with friends, your lover or your children. Getting involved in activities that inspire and motivate you will lead to creative projects and make new acquaintances. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Communication and travel will be costly. Listen but don’t start a feud with someone who doesn’t share your opin-ions. Learn from what’s being said and question your own beliefs. You may need to make a personal change. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Engage in activi-ties that will allow you to readdress goals that you let fade away. Refuse to let anyone put pressure on you to do something you don’t care to do. Plan your day based on your needs, someone else’s. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Go over your plans and readdress the changes you must make to your personal papers in order to head in a direc-tion that will bring you greater happiness at home. Family and finances should be at the top of your to-do list. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let your ideas grow and develop a plan that will secure a better life for you and those you love. Make your assets grow or cut losses by getting rid of deadweight. The moves you make now will help you prosper later. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Man begins to regret giving his ex-wife a place to stay Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY28, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalNOTICE OF BOARD MEETING T O WHOM IT MA Y CONCERN The District Board of Trustees, Flori-da Gateway College, will hold a re-ception at 3:30p.m. followed by a public meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tues-day, March 12, 2013, in the Confer-ence Room at the Emergency Opera-tions Center, 1190 West Macclenny Avenue, Macclenny, Florida 32063.Topics of consideration will be rou-tine college business. Any person wishing to be heard on any agenda matter will be provided an opportu-nity to do so by appearing before the Board in the Board Room.All objections to this notice and pro-priety of the scheduled meeting should be filed with Florida Gateway College prior to noon, Friday, March 8, 2013. All legal issues should be brought to the Trustees’attention and an attempt made to resolve them prior to the meeting.Please notify the President’s Office immediately if you require accom-modation for participation in the meeting.05537522February 28, 2013 NOTICE OFSALENotice is hereby given that on March 08, 2013 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage & Record Storage of Lake City, 442 SWSaint Margaret Street, Lake City, FL32025; will sell at public sale by competitive bidding, the per-sonal property heretofore stored with the undersigned:T-31 Darryl DarminX-20 Matthew AvalloneAA-04 Nancy Markham TatumW-18 Stormy MartinL-09 Mike RussellW-44 John RodgersBB-15 Austin SchlimmerV-28 Dustin DolesAA-05 Stephanie CauleyT-10 Lola Ann WhiteCC-19 Randy CraneU-19 Harry Russo IIBB-02 Dorian TaylorZ-61 Vicki BruceEE-03 Whitney Lee G-06 Dennis MurphyM-03 Regina StaplesT-13 Antonio GibsonBB-24 Timothy MorganFF-15 Karen JonesFF-16 Karen JonesK-17 Cathy StrozierS-11 Carla DavidsonF-11 Carla DavidsonR-12 Debby LindemannGG-08 Scott O'QuinnJ-13 Nathaniel LeeN-15 Sarah Burke05537432February 21, 28, 2013 COLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2013-01Southside Recreation Complex Concrete Pads and Sidewalks NOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on March 07, 2013, for Colum-bia County Project No. 2013-01. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of constructing 4" thick 3000 PSI concrete bleacher slabs (6400 sf) and concrete side-walks (960 sf) at Southside Recrea-tion Complex.Scope of work includes removing grass, grading, compacting, concrete placement, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Deadline for questions regarding specifications and/or bid documents must be re-ceived before 11:00 P.M. on March 05, 2013.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with proof of liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05537447February 21, 28, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesAUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN NEEDEDwith tools and experience. Contact 758-4757 100Job Opportunities05537529EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for the position of Director Human Resources/Community Services. Position is responsible for planning & directing programs including human resources administration, recruitment, selection, training and development, compliance, & records maintenance. Minimum Experience: Graduation from an accredited four year college/university with degree in a related area & two years professional human resource or professional public employment service in a related area. Professional experience may be substituted for required college training on a year by year basis. Columbia County residency required within six months of date of employment. Salary $27.73 hourly plus benefits. Applications available from Human Resources, Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32055, (386)719-2025, TDD (386)758-2139 or at www.columbiacountyfla.com. Review of applications will begin March 15, 2013 & continue until filled. An AA/EEO/ADA/VP BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Contract Billing Specialist Lake City, FL. F/T. Responsible for all aspects of billing and contract negotiations for the Association. Salary based on experience. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056 F/TExecutive Director for local non-profit organization. Salary based on experience. Prefer BAdegree and experience in budgeting and community relations. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056. General Office position in high pace business. Excel & Word (45wpm) Experience Required. Email resume to rhd7@yahoo.com Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with previous marketing skills, good oral and written communication skills, good people skills, experience with Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 100Job OpportunitiesQuality Inn formerly Jameson Inn Now Hiring: P/TNight Audit position and P/THousekeeping position. Please apply in person 285 SWCommerce Blvd., LC SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Smitty's Western Store Help Wanted. Energetic, Experienced sales person wanted. Stock and computer experience a plus. Please apply in person. Mon.-Fri. 9-6 Sat 9-4 120Medical Employment05537536COME JOINOUR TEAM!!SHANDS LAKE SHORE REGIONALMEDICAL CENTER has the following immediate openings: Directorof Accounting Bachelor Degree in Accounting required, 1-3 years experience in accounting procedures, third party reimbursement and data processing preferably in healthcare setting. Competitive salary and benefit package See qualifications and apply online @ shandslakeshore.com EOE, M/F/V/D, Drug Free Workplace F/T Entry Level position In busy medical practice. M-F. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. Part-time Respiratory Therapist and CNAneeded on Mon., Tues., and Thurs. Fax resume to (386) 754-1712 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales Multi Yard SalesFri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SWFabian Way. Close to 242 & 247. Look for signs. Clothes, tools. Much More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT. 3/2 7am-2pm Woodcrest sbdv. 161 SWGuthrie Terr. Alittle bit of everything, clothes, furniture, odds and ends. 440Miscellaneous Deer Hunting Club-Clinch County, GAneeds members. Have your own exclusive area for still hunting area $600. 229-349-1991 GYM EQUIPMENT Olympic weights $.40/per lb Cybex, Nautilus, Hammer strength, and other machines. Call for prices. Some office equip. Must move quickly. 386-365-2047 Tanning Bed WOLF SYSTEM, 24 Bulb $400 386-365-2047 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 RVLots or Cottage avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 640Mobile Homes forSale2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location in Columbia County, older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale. 3 Stock models must go $39k off select 2012 models John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1,512 sqft DW perfect Rental or First home. Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ MH. $1,000 down $600 mthly. 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY2 8 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3BR/2BA. 1998 Sq/ft. Inground pool. Fenced yard. Smoke Free. No indoor pets. $1150/mo. 12 mo. lease reqd. 1st/last mo. (386) 623-4654 Nice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $790 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 14.69 ac tract on Lake Jeffrey Rd. Has well & septic and power ready for site built or MH. $65,000 MLS #82567 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Beautiful lot on Suwannee River. Lot has a well and anerobic septic system. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small, affordable home on corner lot w/ fenced in yard. Needs a little TLC. MLS #81204 $19,900 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, 810Home forSale 1BR/1BAon 2.8 acres 201 NWBronco Terr. 24x30 workshop. Owner Fin. $59,900, 3K down, $585/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 2BR/2BAgorgeous custom built pool home. Spacious bedrooms. SS appliances, Corian counter tops. Remax Jo Lytte 386-3652821 MLS 80934 $179,900 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 3BD/2BAcustom western cedar home on two acres lakefront lot. Boat ramp, dock and deck. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 74681 $179,900 3BD/2BAon 10 acres has a unique open great room, dining and family room with vaulted ceilings. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 79593 $345,800 82374 Beautiful inside and out, 3br/2.5ba home sits on 10 acres, fenced. Screened back porch. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $243,900 82718 Beautiful Brick home. Upgraded granite counter tops, new paint, carpet & appliances. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $189,000 82763 This great open floor plan home has had new flooring, paint, appliances, a/c and light fixtures. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $139,500 82794 -Great house in Great neighborhood. Granite countertops, Florida room, vaulted ceilings. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $129,000 82843 Home sits on 4.2 acres and has a 3br/2.5ba brick home, large great room w/ brick fireplace. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $81,000 82845Cute as can be, solid built home with large kitchen, newer cabinetry, & granite countertops. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $75,500 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable lakefront 2/2 Watch the sun rise from nearly anywhere Needs TLC has potential. $59,000 Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847 MLS 81189 Beautiful 4BD/3BAhome in gated s/d. high volume ceilings, open kitchen. MLS 81102 $119,999 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Beautiful tripe wide home / plenty of space to spread out family, showroom quality. MLS 82622 $123,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Close to town, oversized Great rm, Dining rm, Study, lrg Master suite w/ walk in closet. MLS 82435 $173,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 5BD/3BAjust minutes away from town on half an acre. Mary Brown Whitehusrt $210,000 386-965-0887 MLS #82546 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAcustom home w/ 2 car garage. Designer kitchen. Sherry G. Ratliff $115,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81774 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAnewly renovated with fireplace. New appliances, carpet & More. Sherry G. Ratliff $94,900 386-365-8414 MLS #82657 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Golf Court view! 3BD/3BAlog home on #1 green. Built in ‘99 & upgraded in ‘09. Custom cabinets. MLS # 80765 Swift Creek Realty $294,900 800-833-0499 Gorgeous view off screened back porch, Open flrpln w/ oversized eat-in kitchen. MLS 82699 $110,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Great Country Living! 2BD/1BA on 1.17 Acres! 1,462 heated sq.ft w/ large great room. MLS # 82030 Swift Creek Realty $109,900 800-833-0499 Immaculately kept home, great rm with f/p, fenced w/ 12x30 utility shed. MLS 82604 $115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Just Outside of Mayo, well maintained home for its year. Screened front porch, shed. $33,250 Ric Donovan, Poole Realty 386-590-1298 MLS 82711 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Private acres & access to Ichetucknee via private Rec Area. Large screened porch. MLS 81623 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Reduced 4BD/2.5BA, 2,405 heated sq.ft. Many upgrades throughout home. MLS # 81985 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 800-833-0499 REDUCED! 3,000 sq.ft., 3/2.5 on 20 acres 14’ceilings, Central vacuum system. $489,000. Nelda Hatcher Poole Realty 386-688-8067 MLS 82280 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2208sf, all original wood restored, newer paint, remodeled baths, large bedrooms. #82850 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2161sf, 6 ac MOL, Roman shades, Italian tile, crown molding, master has tray ceilings. #82646 $299,900 Spectacular home for the price. 1649 heated sq ft, screened back patio., MLS 82395 $154,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Well maintained home on lovely landscaped lot, close to everything in downtown Branford. $139,000. Sylvia Newell, Poole Realty 386-590-2498 MLS 82233 Woodborough s/d. Separate Living Rm and Great Rm, 3 full baths, custom kitchen. MLS 81334 $259,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 ac Ranch, Brick 3/3 w/ 2000 sqft. New roof in 2005, kitchen remodeled, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 70 acres in McAlpin. Farmhouse, tobacco barn, corner property w/ paved road. Less than $3000/ acre. Ronnie Poole, Poole Realty 386-208-3175 MLS 79336 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter

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