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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02029

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02029

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comKeith Couey will become principal at Fort White High School and Keith Hatcher, who has been the principal at FWHS for more than a decade, is taking Couey’s position at the school district’s central office. The switch is contingent on school board approval during Tuesday night’s meeting. “Keith Couey will be principal down here,” Hatcher said. “He and I are essentially switching roles.” Hatcher said he’s moving to the district office March 5 as director of community and family involvement and employee affairs. Hatcher did not elaborate on the reason for the change. “Ever since (Terry) Huddleston became superin-tendent, he has had a vision for the district and I’m happy to be part of that transition and vision,” he said. Terry Huddleston, the district superintendent, said he had been looking at making a change at FWHS at the end of the school year and discussed the matter with Hatcher. “When you stay in a place for more than 12 years it gets hard to stay in that same loca-tion,” he said. “I was want-ing to change and was prob-ably going to change. Keith (Hatcher) has done a really good job in taking a school from nothing to making Fort White High School into what it is today.” Huddleston said pending educational programs also helped spark the change. The Columbia School District is part of the North CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE First lady won’t be replacing Leno. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 3B, 5B 75 56 Chance of T-storms WEATHER, 6A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Local housingmarket gainingmomentum. Ex-councilwomantalks about progressin racial equality. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 279 1D 1C 1A Waterbill ison tapagain ROAD WORK Rep. Porter refiles measure that fell victim to political infighting in 2012 session. CUTS continued on 3A PORTER continued on 3A HatcherJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterWork crews install a 60-inch storm drain along Pinemo unt Road at U.S. 90 West on Thursday in preparation for the expansion of U.S. 90 to four lanes in th at area. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comState Rep. Elizabeth Porter, R-Lake City, has resurrected a water manage-ment bill that passed 119-0 in the House last year but died in the Senate due to political infighting. The bill would require cooperation between neighboring water man-agement dis-tricts when a consumptive use permit could pull groundwater from one district to another. Despite passing unanimously in the House, Porter’s bill was never allowed to come to a vote in the Senate. “It was a victim of politics in the Senate,” Porter said. Political insiders said the measure was killed because the sponsor of a companion bill in the Senate, Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, opposed his own party’s push for prison privatization. The bill will again be co-sponsored by Dean in the Senate, but with new leader-ship in both the House and Senate, Porter said she expects the measure to pass this year. It has already cleared its first com-mittee hurdle 12-0. The legislative session begins March 4. Porter has also introduced a measure to help victims of Tropical Storm Debbie and Hurricane Isaac. House Bill 43 would provide partial reimbursement of proper-ty and sales tax payments for those whose homes were made uninhabitable during the storms. While the damaged homes’ value dropped, the drop was not reflected in the amount of property tax due to tax collec-tors across Porter’s district. COURTESYState Rep. Elizabeth Porter at the Suwannee River. Porter’s HB 7 is designed to protect against water dis-tricts’ encroaching on one another’s groundwater. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterColumbia County Supervisor of Elections Liz Horne stand s in front of a display featuring photographs of local black veterans in honor of Black History Month. ‘We wanted to do this because we wanted to h onor those that fought for us and our country,’ Horne said. ‘I’m s o grateful to these people that fought for our right to vote.’ HONORING THOSE WHO SERVED ‘Stand your ground’ law gets good marks from task forceBy BRENT KALLESTADAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida’s “stand your ground” law works and should not be over-turned, but the standards for neighborhood watch groups should be looked at by the Legislature, a state task force concluded Friday. The 44-page report released by Republican Gov. Rick Scott’s office said people have a right to feel safe and secure in Florida and have a fundamental right to stand their ground and defend themselves from attack. Most of the recommendations had already been made public. The report, however, recommended that legislators look at neighborhood watch groups. The parents of Trayvon Martin, a teenager killed a year ago by neighborhood LAW continued on 3A Couey taking over as principal at FWHS; Hatcher to dist. office. Couey, Hatcher to trade placesHome and patio show coming next weekendBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comSpring is the time of the year when most people consider making upgrades to their home and property. Residents who want to get a jump on making those improvements or new additions can do so by attending next weekend’s home and patio show. The 10th Annual North Florida Home and Patio Show will take place March 2-3 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Saturday, March 2, the gates will be open from 9 a.m. 5 p.m., while on Sunday, March 3, the event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With less than a week before the event, Austin Seay, North Florida Home and Patio Show Chairman, said there are 70-80 total vendors registered to participate in this year’s event. He also said there are several busi-nesses that will on the outside showing-off goods and products. SHOW continued on 3ALooming cuts threaten gains,say governorsBy KEN THOMAS andSTEVE PEOPLESAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Washington’s protracted budget stalemate could seriously undermine the economy and stall gains made since the recession, exasperated governors said Saturday as they try to gauge the fallout from impending federal spending cuts. At the annual National Governors Association meeting, both Democrat and Republican chief executives expressed pessimism that both sides could find a way to avoid the massive, automatic FWHS continued on 3A

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor Abe Vigoda is 92. Actor Steven Hill is 91. Actress Emmanuelle Riva is 86. Actor-singer Dominic Chianese is 82. Movie composer Michel Legrand is 81. Opera singer-director Renata Scotto is 79. Former Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., is 71. Actor Barry Bostwick is 68. Actor Edward James Olmos is 66. Singer-writer-producer Rupert Holmes is 66. Rock singer-musician George Thorogood is 63. Actress Debra Jo Rupp is 62. Actress Helen Shaver is 62. News anchor Paula Zahn is 57. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 2-32-43-44 22 Friday: 9-22-27-29-31 Saturday: Afternoon: 3-1-6 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 8-1-8-2 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 18-23-28-36-43-45 x4 State warns about fake public aid websites TALLAHASSEE Floridas Department of Children and Families is warning about fake web sites that offer to help people apply for public assistance. The state agency said Friday that it had gotten several reports this week regarding websites that ask for financial and per sonal information. DCF officials said there was only one website authorized to accept appli cations for Medicaid, food stamps or welfare, and it is run by the state. The web address is http://www. myflorida.com/access florida. DCF Secretary David Wilkins cautioned public assistance applicants to safeguard their personal data just like they would bank or financial informa tion. The department also cautioned about mobile phone applications that request confidential infor mation from people who have electronic benefits transfer (EBT) cards. DCF officials said such phone applications could open the door to potential fraud. DCF: Rich working Medicaid system MIAMI Florida wel fare officials are proposing a bill that targets Medicaid fraud among patients who hide their assets with fam ily and friends to get the taxpayer-funded program to pay for their nursing home care. Patients are allowed to hire a relative or friend to oversee small aspects of their care, such as hair styling or room decorat ing. But instead of being paid monthly or yearly, some caregivers are paid up front for years of ser vice at a time, which can decrease some patients assets so they in turn qual ify for Medicaid. Spouses also can sign over their patients financial support to the state, which allows couples with millions of dollars in assets to get Medicaid to foot the bill, Department of Children and Families spokesman Joe Follick said Friday. These are services that most peoples loved ones would be providing without compensation, and it causes us to questions what the purpose of these contracts are really for, Follick said. DCF officials said the loopholes allow patients to unfairly divert assets and are costing the taxpayerfunded Medicaid program millions of dollars a year. Power outage hits water plant TAMPA Tampa Electric officials say a squirrel or other small animal touched off a per fect storm of events that resulted in a power loss at a water treatment plant and a boil water notice to more than a half million people. Tampa Electric spokes man Rick Morera said in a statement Friday afternoon that a small animal likely caused an outage on one of two underground power lines to a city of Tampa water treatment plant. He added that a problem with the citys equipment exacerbated the issue by causing the second line to fail, leaving the plant without power. Electricity was restored but city offi cials say all Tampa Water Department customers should boil their drinking and cooking water as a precaution for at least the next 48 hours. Judge rejects execution delay TALLAHASSEE A judge on Friday rejected a new appeal by a South Florida drug trafficker fac ing execution on Tuesday for killing a state trooper in north Florida with a pipe bomb 21 years ago. Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey denied motions to vacate Paul Augustus Howells murder convic tion and death sentence. His lawyers plan to appeal to the Florida Supreme Court, which rejected a prior appeal Tuesday. They also have an appeal pending in fed eral court. The 47-year-old native of Jamaica was con victed of murdering Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Jimmy Fulford in February 1992 in Jefferson County just east of Tallahassee. The trooper, who had stopped a car for speeding on Interstate 10, died instantly when the bomb went off as he tried to open a gift-wrapped microwave oven he found in the vehicle. Authorities said Howell had hired a driver to deliv er the package that was intended to kill two women in Marianna because they knew too much about a drug-related murder in Broward County. Dempsey also rejected a demand by Howells law yers that she and all other judges in Floridas 2nd Judicial Circuit remove themselves from the case because his trial lawyer, Frank Sheffield, is now a judge in the circuit. Failed candidate facing charges MIAMI A failed South Florida congres sional candidate linked to former U.S. Rep. David Rivera was charged Friday with violating federal campaign finance laws by concealing the true source of thousands of dollars, accepting illegal contribu tions and trying to cover up the scheme with false campaign filings. Justin Sternad, 35, sur rendered to Miami agents Friday morning and appeared in court later in the day. Sternad, previ ously a political unknown, was a candidate in the Democratic primary for Floridas 26th congressio nal district that stretches from the Miami suburbs to Key West. Federal prosecutors charged Sternad with conspiracy to violate fed eral campaign laws, mak ing false statements and accepting illegal contribu tions. If convicted, Sternad faces up to five years in prison on each of the three counts. We are committed to promoting transparency and accountability from our elected officials and from those running for office, said U.S. Attorney Wifredo Ferrer. Our citi zens deserve no less. At the brief court appearance, Sternads attorney Rick Yabor entered a not guilty plea for his client, who did not speak. Sternad is being released on $100,000 bail. Man sentenced for tax fraud MIAMI A South Florida man has been sentenced to more than 13 years in federal prison for stealing more than 23,000 identities in a tax refund fraud scheme. The U.S. Attorneys Office reports that 28-yearold Rodney Saintfleur was sentenced Friday to 159 months. He pleaded guilty in November to conspir acy to submit fraudulent claims to the government, access device fraud and aggravated identity theft. Prosecutors say Saintfleur obtained docu ments that listed tens of thousands of names and birthdates. He then searched an online propri etary database in 2010 and 2011 to find the victims Social Security numbers. Co-conspirators used that information to file fraudu lent tax returns seeking refunds. Court upholds license revocation TALLAHASSEE A three-judge panel has upheld the states revo cation of an out-of-state residents Florida driving privileges in a drunken driving case. The ruling Friday by the 1st District Court of Appeal is based on a law that permanently revokes a motorists driver license after getting a fourth con viction for driving under the influence. The panel rejected Jeffrey John Silhas argu ment that the law didnt apply to him because he no longer lived in the state and did not have a Florida license when he got his fourth DUI conviction in Georgia. Florida revoked his license in 1999, but two years later he obtained an Arkansas license. In 2010, though, Arkansas refused to renew his license because Florida had suspended his driving privileges. WASHINGTON M ichelle Obama says shes eyeing another campaign in 2016 and, contrary to speculation, it doesnt involve running for public office. During her first appearance on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon on Friday, the host asked her to consider a Michelle-Hillary ticket for president in 2016. The latter is former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who lost the 2008 Democratic presidential nomina tion to Mrs. Obamas husband. Speculation is rampant that Clinton is gearing up to run again in 2016. You know, I have my eye actually on another job. And I hear that when Jay Leno retires that The Tonight Show position is going to open and Im thinking about putting my hat in the ring, the first lady says, accord ing to an excerpt of the appearance released before airtime by NBC. I got my hat in the ring, Fallon replies. Mrs. Obama then asks for his opinion, but Fallons answer sug gests hes had a quick change of heart about challenging her. Im done thinking about it, he says, laughing. The first lady visited the late-night talk show to promote Lets Move, her anti-childhood obesity campaign, which marked its third anniversary this month. She also danced with Fallon, who was dressed like a woman. Besides the appearance on Late Night, Mrs. Obama discussed the initiative while in New York City dur ing segments taped for broadcast Tuesday on ABCs Good Morning America and Thursday on The Dr. Oz Show. Next Wednesday, Mrs. Obama embarks on a two-day pro motional tour, with stops in Clinton, Miss.; Chicago; and Springfield, Mo. For the second anniversary of Lets Move, she and Fallon turned the East Room of the White House into a playground. They did pushups, twirled hula hoops and competed at dodge ball and tug-of-war before the first lady triumphed over the come dian in a climactic potato sack race. Jermaine Jacksons name change approved LOS ANGELES Jermaine Jackson has a new, brighter surname Jacksun. A Los Angeles judge approved the change to singers name Friday. The 58-year-old, who shared lead singing duties with his younger brother Michael in the Jackson 5, did not appear in court. He sought the name change for artistic reasons and says it has nothing to do with a recent rift in his family over the care of Michael Jacksons children and family matri arch Katherine Jackson. His attorney Bret D. Lewis says Jacksun is in Europe performing with his brothers and told him that he was sure it was a sunny day in California. Lewis says he doesnt know whether Jacksun will elaborate on the creative reasons for the change. Lane signed divorce doc on Valentines Day LOS ANGELES Court records show Diane Lane signed her filing to divorce Josh Brolin on Valentines Day. Lanes petition to end the actors mar riage after eight and a half years was filed on Feb. 15. Her filing, released Friday, lists irrecon cilable differences for the couples breakup and lists Feb. 13 as their separation date. It does not indicate they have a prenuptial agreement. The actors have no children together. It was a second marriage for both when they tied the knot in August 2004. Lane received an Oscar nomina tion for her performance in the 2002 film Unfaithful and co-stars in the upcoming Superman film Man of Steel. Brolin was Oscar-nominated for his performance in 2008s Milk. First lady jokes about eyeing Lenos gig Wednesday: 3-17-19-25-32 PB 17 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Do not those who plot evil go astray? But those who plan what is good find love and faithfulness. Proverbs 14:22 Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS NBC late show host Jimmy Fallon dressed as a mom (left) dances with first lady Michelle Obama during an appearance of Late Night with Jimmy Fallon on Friday in New York. Obama was on the show to promote her Lets Move childrens antiobesity campaign. Associated Press Jacksun Lane

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 3A3A SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND”Board Certied Healthcare Provider?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM Ever Live in NY?New York Day Join Us: Saturday, March 16th from 12:15 4 pm at Epiphany Church Hallfor St. Patrick's Day DinnerAppetizers, Full Meal & DessertLive Music By:"Three of Us"Call Vern or Maureen Lloyd 752-4885 or Bob Peloni 984-8232 Deadline March 9th IyNY WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots Galore All Jackets 30% off All Insulated Camo 40% off (in stock) New Patterns IBQQZ!CJSUIEBZ!NPNNB!EPMM!IVETPO13036036Zpv!boe!EbeezP!nbef!rvjuf!b!qbjs/Mpwf-!Nbshbsfu-!Hfpshf!Ks/-!Cfdlz!boe!EbeezP!! boe!Kbojt!gspn!Ifbwfo George Gate, book author, founder of Mighty Gray Rebel, and resident of Miami, FL, sends appreciations to the State, City, County and Park Ofcials of Lake City-Olustee, and also to all the public servants, parade coordinator, Blue-Grey Army, to all for their patriotic duty of making possible the Battle Olustee three days event, Lake City Parade, Olustee Festival and Craft Show. Furthermore, appreciations are sent to the Lake City Reporter newspaper for covering the entire Olustee civil war event. To the wonderful people who participated and all those of the audience too, George Gate says, ‘THANK YOU for joining me in the 2013 Olustee remembrance event, I dedicate my poem Re-enactments to all of you, and see you again next year.’ The North and South’s joining Each other they will greet Then they’ll march to battles Historic sites they meet Civil War’s remembered In living history The past it comes alive It is the place to be Come watch re-enactments Where enemies have fun ‘Cause it be mock battles $OOVIULHQGVZKHQJKWLQJGRQH These skirmishes are fought Remembrances they be So heroes not forgot In hearts they live warmly …by G. Gate Re-enactments from book Mighty Gray Rebel Poems CUTS: Governors worry Continued From Page 1A FWHS: Couey is principal; Hatcher moves to office Continued From 1A SHOW: Annual event is scheduled for March 2-3 Continued From Page 1A LAW: ‘Stand your ground’ law gets good marks Continued From Page 1A PORTER: Refiles bill killed in state senate last year Continued From Page 1A“There were people who were literally out of their homes for months on end and some of them never even got back into their homes,” Porter said. “But yet they were still having to pay the full value of their homes’ property taxes.” Porter said she’s hopeful the bill will pass, but expects difficulty finding the money to pay for it. Florida will see a budget surplus this session for the first time in five years, but the number of requests for funding have doubled, she said. “The problem right now is finding the money,” she said. Porter said she’s “torn” about Gov. Rick Scott’s pro-posal to give a $2,500 raise to every Florida teacher, and would like to see where Florida’s educators stand in comparison to states with a comparable economic cli-mate. “And see if we are as a whole just very underpaid,” Porter said. Porter said she does endorse the idea of merit pay for teachers, though the evaluation system now in place needs work. “Because every job I’ve ever had in my life I was paid on how I perform,” Porter said. Gov. Rick Scott’s plans to expand Medicaid coverage for 900,000 more people under the federal health overhaul is something Porter said she doesn’t have enough information about to judge. “No one’s said ‘OK, here are the numbers, here is how its going to affect us’ and that will be what makes up my decision,” Porter said. “... can we afford it, is it really doable.” The federal government will pay for the expansion of Medicaid for three years. “After that, then where are we?” Porter asked. watch volunteer George Zimmerman, had asked the task force to change the 2005 law. Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton asked the task force last June to support a “Trayvon Martin amend-ment” to the law, which would make it harder for someone who starts a fight to use a self-defense argument under the law. “Just review and amend it,” Fulton said then. “I had to bury my son at 17. He was committing no crime. He was doing no wrong.” Zimmerman claims self-defense. He has pleaded not guilty to a second-degree murder charge. The 19-member Task Force on Citizens Safety and Protection, which held meetings in seven different Florida cities, recommended to Scott and the Legislature that the role of neighborhood watch participants should be limited to observing, not pursuing, confronting or provoking potential suspects. On Feb. 26, 2012, Zimmerman spotted Martin walking through his neighborhood, a gated community, in Sanford. Martin was walking back to a house he was staying at in the com-munity after a trip to a convenience store. Zimmerman started to follow him because he thought he looked suspicious. Despite a police dispatch-er telling him “you don’t have to do that,” Zimmerman got out of his truck to pursue Martin. They got into a fight and Martin was shot. At a September hearing in West Palm Beach, task force members acknowledged that “stand your ground” cases were not uniformly handled across the state. Task force vice chairman R.B. Holmes, pastor of the Bethel Missionary Baptist Church in Tallahassee, has noted that Florida’s “stand your ground” law “is associ-ated with an increased death toll that falls disproportionately on minority groups” and that “shooting a person in the back, as he is trying to escape, is, by definition, not self-defense.” Florida’s Republican-led Legislature has stood solidly behind the law and would’ve likely opposed any recom-mendation that it should be repealed. “We’re definitely booked out,” he said. “We’re going to be sold out and everything is looking good. We’ve got everything ranging from landscap-ing to fencing, audio, banks and real estate. It’s quite a big variety.” The home and patio show is held annually to give residents an oppor-tunity to have face-to-face time with vendors concerning home, patio, landscaping, banking and real estate concerns where they are can speak to representatives for each type of industry at one location. “There will be a variety of things for people to come out and look at,” Seay said. “There will be able to get some ideas for their own houses. The thing is they will get an opportunity to talk to somebody face to face. A lot of people will be able to make a deal on the spot or get a name and contact and talk to them later in the month.” Seay said some of this year’s displays will also include motorcycles from Columbia Cycles as well as automobiles from Rountree-Moore Toyota. “We’re feeling good about the show,” Seay said. “Nobody gets paid anything from the money from the booths. The event is 100 percent char-ity. Of everybody that is working this North Florida Home and Patio Show, nobody gets a dime, it’s all done for free so that 100 percent of the money goes back to the community.” The Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown uses proceeds from the event to benefit the community with its various programs. “For people who are unfamiliar with Rotary, we’re going to have cou-ple of booths set up so that they can see where the funds go,” Seay said. “We’re going to have some photos set up. We’re going to have a lot of stuff showing, ‘Hey, this is some of the stuff we’ve done over the years’, so people can see where the funds are going.” spending cuts set to begin March 1, pointing to the impasse as another crisis between the White House and Congress that spooks local businesses from hir-ing and hampers their ability to construct state spending plans. Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie, a former congressman, noted that the cuts — known in Washington-speak as “the sequester” — could lead to 19,000 workers laid off at Pearl Harbor, site of the surprise attack in 1941 that launched the United States into World War II. “That will undermine our capacity for readi-ness at Pearl Harbor. If that doesn’t symbolize for the nation ... what happens when we fail to meet our responsibilities congres-sionally, I don’t know what does,” he said. The budget fight came as many states say they are on the cusp of an eco-nomic comeback from the financial upheaval in 2008 and 2009. States expect their general fund revenues this year to sur-pass the amounts collected before the Great Recession kicked in. An estimated $693 billion in revenues is expected for the 2013 bud-get year, nearly a 4 percent over the previous year. At their weekend meetings, governors were focusing on ways to boost job development and grow their state economies, measures to restrict gun violence and implement the new health care law approved during Obama’s first term. Some Republican governors have blocked the use of Medicaid to expand health insurance coverage for millions of uninsured while others have joined Democrats in a whole-sale expansion as the law allows. The Medicaid expansion aims to cover about half of the 30 million uninsured people expect-ed to eventually gain cov-erage under the health care overhaul. Yet for many governors, the budget-cut fight remains front-and-cen-ter and fuels a pervasive sense of frustration with Washington. “My feeling is I can’t help what’s going on in Washington,” Gov. Terry Branstad, R-Iowa, said in an interview Saturday. “I can’t help the fact that there’s no leadership here, and it’s all politics as usual and gridlock. But I can do something about the way we do things in the state of Iowa.” Indeed, right now no issue carries the same level of urgency as the budget impasse. Congressional leaders have indicated a willing-ness to let the cuts take effect and stay in place for weeks, if not much lon-ger. The cuts would trim $85 billion in domestic and defense spending, leading to furloughs for hundreds of thousands of workers at the Transportation Department, Defense Department and else-where. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has said the cuts would harm the readiness of U.S. fighting forces. East Florida Education Consortium, a grouping of school districts from North Florida, and NEFEC recently secured a $25 million grant. Fort White High School will be a pilot school in the program and the Columbia School District received a $1.8 million TIF (Teacher Incentive Fund) grant through the program. As part of Senate Bill 736 (the teacher merit pay law), career ladder and other teaching-related legislation, Huddleston said teachers are being selected for summer in-service duties and other deadlines are approaching. “If I was thinking about making a change and it was best to go ahead and do that now so that the new prin-cipal could be totally involved with the implementation of that the rest of the year and next year,” Huddleston said. “We really had to begin to imple-ment some things now and for the remainder of the year, so we could hit the ground running next year.” Huddleston said no other changes in administrators are planned for the immediate future, but he may make additional changes in June. “Hatcher has done a fine job down there,” Huddleston said. “He and I talked and he contemplated that maybe it was time for him to maybe look at doing something a little differ-ent. We look forward to great things from Hatcher at the district office and from Couey at Fort White High School as we begin to implement some new instructional techniques.” A faculty meeting has been planned at the school for Friday morning with Couey. Couey said Huddleston asked him last Friday to make the switch. Couey has worked for three years as the school district’s director of community and family involvement. He said he’s excited about the chance to work with students again. “I just want to go back and be around the kids,” Couey said. Couey has been a Columbia School District employee for 26 years and was principal at Richardson Middle School for eight years. Couey spent his first eight years in the district as a math and science teacher and for the next eight years he was over discipline at Niblack and Richardson before becoming princi-pal at Richardson. Hatcher, He spent 19 years as a school district administrator. He has been the Fort White High School principal for 14 years. “I opened the school up,” he said, noting he helped select the school furniture, staff, faculty and curricu-lum. “I was hired a year, August 1999, before the school opened. In January 2000 Sharla Maxwell became the school secretary/bookkeeper.” Hatcher said no other administrative level changes are in the immedi-ate plans for the school. Hatcher said he addressed the school’s faculty and staff about the change Friday afternoon. “It was after school and I felt it was extremely important to talk to the faculty first after having talked to my family,” he said. Hatcher said he was excited about the change. “I’m pleased and excited to be moving into this role and look forward to working with the parents, administra-tors and the community at large in Columbia County,” he said. Hatcher said he was pleased to be helping bring change at the district level. “I’ll miss the kids and teachers at FWHS, but this is a good thing for me and I’m very excited about it,” he said. “This has been something I’ve prayed about.”

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C onsider the following statement: “Let the Jews pay for it.” Did you pick up a hint of anti-Semitism there? The U.S. Senate should consider this and many other disturb-ing statements by Chuck Hagel, President Barack Obama’s nominee for defense secretary. Nebraska’s former Republican senator has said and done truly troubling things regarding Jews and Israel. -When he ran the USO -the United Services Organization, a nonprofit that supports U.S. troops -from 1987 to 1990, Hagel tried to close its Haifa retreat. The facil-ity was highly popular among U.S. sailors, 45,000 of whom visited the Israeli port in 1990, the Associated Press reports. “Chuck Hagel said the Haifa port is costing the U.S. too much (and) that if the Jews wanted one, the Jews should do the fundraising,” an unnamed supporter of the outpost told the Washington Free Beacon website. “He said to me, ‘Let the Jews pay for it’,” recalled Marsha Halteman, of the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs, which backed USO Haifa. “I told him at the time that I found his comments to be anti-Semitic,” Halteman said. “He was playing into that dual-loyalty thing.” -Hagel alone abandoned Russia’s Jews. As David Harris, executive director of the American Jewish Committee, told The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin: “We sought his support, in 1999, for a Senate letter to then-Russian President Boris Yeltsin urging action against rising anti-Semitism. We were unsuccessful. On June 20, 1999, we published the letter as a full-page ad in The New York Times with 99 Senate signatories. Only Sen. Hagel’s name was absent.” -Hagel was one of only four senators who refused to sign a Senate let-ter supporting Israel during Yasser Arafat’s terrorist intifada in 2000. -“The State Department has become adjunct to the Israeli for-eign minister’s office,” Hagel report-edly remarked in a March 2007 Rutgers University speech. “Like many other data points emerging since Hagel’s nomina-tion,” John Podhoretz observed in a New York Post column last week, “this one emits a faint but distinct odor of a classic anti-Semitic stereo-type -Jews as secret marionetteers, pulling the strings of unsuspecting Gentiles.” -“I’m a United States senator,” Hagel declared in 2008. “I’m not an Israeli senator.” “We believe that when Sen. Hagel said that he was not an ‘Israeli senator,’ that he was a U.S. senator, he strongly implied that some of his colleagues have a greater loyalty to Israel than to the United States,” stated Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, named after the late and legendary Nazi hunter. “That crosses the line.” -Prominent Jewish Nebraskans have felt Hagel’s cold shoulder. “During his last year in office, we knew he was not going to run again, he never returned any of our calls,” Jewish activist Gary Javitch told the Jewish newspaper Algemeiner’s website on Dec. 21. “He was not the most responsive politician in Nebraska to me person-ally at the Jewish Press and to the Jewish community as a whole,” said Carol Katzman, the Omaha Jewish Press’ former editor. Nebraska’s rep-resentatives otherwise “were all very responsive ... if we were soliciting them for an interview or a greeting ad for Rosh Hashanah or Passover.” However, “Hagel’s office never even responded.” Katzman concluded: “Hagel was the only one we have had in Nebraska who basically showed the Jewish community that he didn’t give a damn about the Jewish com-munity or any of our concerns.” Are these words anti-Semitic? Call your senators at 202-224-3121 and tell them what you think. Q Deroy Murdock is a columnist with the Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. Deroy Murdockderoy.murdock@gmail.com W hen I was 12 years old, I got my only ‘F’ in school. I got it in music class for “choosing” not to sing alone in front of my class. My music teacher was Ann Wilby and she was a good teacher. One day the class got noisy and she told us not to talk any more or we would have to sing a solo in front of the whole class. Friend Jesse Thomas and I exchanged soft whispers about something, got caught, and she called me to the front of the class to sing. This was bad news for me. First, I could not sing a lick (and still can’t). Second, I was so painfully shy that standing in front of the class and doing anything would have been hard for me. So, I did not go to the front of the class, just kept sitting quietly where I was. If she had required me to mop the floor every day for a month after school, I would have shown up faith-fully with mop and bucket. If she had required me to write “I must not talk in class” 1,000 times by the next day, I would have stayed up all night and done it. But to sing alone in front of my class? I simply could not bring myself to do it. So, I stayed in my seat. Sure enough, when report cards came out, I had an ‘F’ in music and oh, how I dreaded taking that report card home for Daddy to sign. I knew he would not whip me. That was not his way. I felt just ter-rible because I had let him down. I had made an F! Any time in the past when I had handed Daddy my report card he simply looked at it for a few sec-onds, signed it, said nothing, and handed it back to me. I was sure this time would be different – but it wasn’t. He looked at it like always, signed it, said noth-ing, and handed it back to me. The Bible says, “The guilty flee when no man pursueth.” I felt guilty so I had to tell him about the “F” and why I got it. He could see how upset I was. He said, “Come sit with me” and we headed for the sofa and sat. Then, to my amazement, my Daddy, an extremely quiet man, started softly singing “Suwannee River” in perfect tune. It was beautiful. I said, “Daddy, I didn’t know you could sing” and he said, “Do you love me any more now that you know I can sing?” Shocked by the question, I said, “No sir! I love you because you are my Daddy.” And he said softly, “And I don’t love you any less because of any grade you get on your report card. I love you because you’re my son.” Then, “Get washed up. Your Mama has supper on the table.” That ended it. Some things parents say to kids go in one ear and out the other, but others stay with you for the rest of your life. Obviously, what Daddy said to me that day still stays with me to this day. I’m writing this today because Daddy died 50 years ago and my mind is very much on him. My Daddy, R. O. Williams (Raymond Oscar), 83, gone from this earth but forever in my mind and heart. My hope has always been that I can be just half the Daddy he was. OPINION Sunday, February 24, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Chuck Hagel’s Jewish problem Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman G ov. Rick Scott could not resist the siren song of “free” federal money, and now he is steering Florida’s fiscal future toward the rocky shoals. It’s up to the Legislature to chart a different course. Scott on Wednesday agreed to expand Medicaid coverage to Floridians with incomes up to 133 per-cent of the poverty line under the aegis of the federal Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. That’s a sudden about-face on his opposition to the law that goes back to his campaign for governor in 2010. He had a valid reason: Expanding Medicaid would only accelerate its unsustainable growth. Alas, he appears to have been worn down by federal promises of funding all or most of the new Medicaid enrollees, the Obama administration’s regulatory approval of a state Medicaid proposal, intense lobby-ing of Florida’s hospital industry — and his re-election chances for 2014. Washington has pledged to pay 100 percent of the costs for these new Medicaid recipients for the first three years (2014-16). Beginning in 2017, the federal government would gradually drop that coverage to 90 percent of the costs in 2020 and beyond. That sounds too good to be true. Today’s promises are not binding on tomorrow’s Congresses and White Houses, especially with the nation in such dire finan-cial straits. If federal deficits and exploding debt are to be arrested, reducing Medicaid spending will have to be part of the solution. And indeed, the Obama administration considered doing just that during budget negotiations last year. It floated the idea of shifting $100 billion in Medicaid spending to the states over 10 years. That plan eventu-ally was dropped because the administration feared it would prove to be a disincentive to states to expand Medicaid. So for now, the “free” money (money Washington doesn’t really have) is enticing. But like a pusher handing out samples of his narcotics, once you get a taste of that federal money you’re hooked — and have acquired an expensive habit. Scott thinks he can quit anytime. He said Wednesday the state’s participation in expanded Medicaid should sunset after three years if it proves too costly. It’s hard to imagine, though, Florida kick-ing recipients off the rolls; the political will wouldn’t exist, and the federal government probably wouldn’t allow it anyway.... Florida has no room to spare. Medicaid already consumes about 30 percent of the state’s annual budget, which exceeds what it spends on public education. The more it grows, the more it crowds out other pri-orities. If Scott gets his way, he is potentially exposing Florida taxpayers to a ticking time bomb. Thankfully, the Legislature has the final say. House Speaker Will Weatherford has expressed skepticism of expanding Medicaid, and Senate President Don Gaetz has been noncommittal. Lawmakers need to reject the federal lure and devise alternatives that reform the health care safety net rather than funnel more people into a broken system. Gov. Scott surrenders The only ‘F’ I got in school ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resi-dent. Q Panama City News Herald

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Feb. 24 Gospel sing, meal The Glen Markham Aortic Awareness Foundation Inc. is having a gospel sing and chicken pilau meal fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Tickets are $8. There also will be informational booths. To purchase ticket or for more information, contact Renee Manning at (386) 867-2711. Cast auditions High Springs Community Theater will hold cast audi tions for the Neil Simon play Rumors at 5:30 p.m. at the theater, 130 NE First Ave. in High Springs. Casting needs include four adult couples over 21 years old, two police officers and other adults, both male and female. Rehearsals will begin March 4, and per formances will be April 12 through May 5. For more information, email direc tor Terry Beauchamp at ouiserb@aol.com of call (352) 335-9137 and leave a message. Feb. 25 Casting call Alligator Community Theater will hold casting calls today for its produc tion of the play Dearly Departed. The play will be performed April 26 and 27 and May 3 and 4. Lanscaping program Landscape architect Sabine Marcks will present a program on Landscape Design Creating Outdoor Spaces Usable, Sustainable and Florida Friendly from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Aglow meeting Lake City Aglow Lighthouse will meet at 7 p.m. at Grace City Ministries, 1086 SW Main Blvd. Special guest speak er will be Chris Hall, pas tor of Ichetucknee Baptist Church, a Navy veteran and former Russian linguist, well known for his knowl edge of Constitutional his tory. For information, call (386) 935-4018 or (386) 752-1971. Womens Bible study A womens Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909. Feb. 26 Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas hold em poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Lenten lunch The First Presbyterian Church invites the com munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec tion of Jesus. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Feb. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Band fundraiser Papa Johns Pizza will hold a fundraiser to help Lake City Middle Schools Falcons Prid Band pur chase new drums. The pizza store will donate 15 percent of the purchase price for anyone who men tions LCMS Drum Line Fund when placing an order today only. The band is trying to raise $4,500 to replace its 25-year-old drums and needs about $1,600 more to reach its goal. To place an order, call Papa Johns at (386) 9619797 or visit the store at 2815 W. U.S. Highway 90. Quilters to meet The Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet at Bethel United Methodist Church, 4369 U.S. 441 South. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m. and the busi ness meeting will start at 10. The program will be an Ugly Fabric Swap. Please bring 1 yard or 2 half yards or 4 fat quarters of cotton quilt fabric in a brown bag for the fabric exchange. The Charm Square Club color for February is red. Mens Bible study Our Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a mens breakfast and Bible study each Wednesday from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, contact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299. Feb. 28 Black History Month Black History Month organizers will host an Elders Banquet at Richardson Community Center. The banquet will honor our eleders and present community repre sentatives and business es with awards for their contributions in 2012. Entertainment, free food, prizes and a special keynote speaker will be inlcuded. Transportation will be pro vided if requested by Feb. 15. For more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 8671601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts. org. Senior drivers class An AARP Driver Safety Course for Seniors will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center Reading Room, 628 SE Allison Court. Participants should take a sack lunch. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers. Registration is required and can be done by calling (352) 333-3036. Uniform sale The Auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Regional Medical Center will have a uniform sale from 7a.m until 4:30 p.m. at the hos pital. Proceeds will aid patient care at the hospital. Uniforms and shoes will be provided by First Uniform Inc. of North Carolina. Landlords meeting Lake City area land lords will meet at IHOP Restraunt on U.S. 90 West. Dinner will be at 5 p.m. and the program will be at 6. Jordan Wade from Clay Electric will speak. For more information, call (386) 755-0110. Nursing home seminar A free Nursing Home Planning Workshop will be held at 10 a.m. at the Morgan Law Center for Estate and Legacy Planning, 234 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90). Anyone con cerned about how they will pay for nursing home care should attend this informa tive workshop led by local elder law attorney Teresa Byrd Morgan. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Call Shana Miller at (386) 755-1977. Military officers group The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will hold its monthly din ner meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St. The speaker will be retired Air Force Col. Brian Anderson, MOAA deputy director for council and chapter affairs. The meeting is open to all active-duty military officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard and their surviving spouses. For information and reser vations, call Tandy Carter at 719-9706 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885. March 1 Author to visit The Friends of the Library will present A Florida Road Trip with Tim Dorsey at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Author Tim Dorsey will make Lake City a stop on his tour for his new book, The Riptide Ultra-Glide. Free tickets are required and may be obtained at any library location. Refreshments will be served. March 2 Womens program First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., will host a free pro gram for women entitled The Word of God for the Women of God Where is Your Treasure from 9 am. to noon. Robin Arnold will be keynote speaker. Breakout sessions include Ways to Bring the Wrd of God into Your Home with Linda Callahan; Using Gods Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, Others with Alicia Pfahler; and Gods Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen with Joanna Figley. A continen tal breakfast will be served and child care will be avail able. For more information, call (386) 752-4488. Car, truck show The fifth annual Fort White Car, Truck and Bike Show will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fort White High School, 17579 SW State Road 47. A swap meet and barbecue cook-off will be included. Pries will be awarded in several catego ries. Cost for participants is $20 if registered by Feb. 15 or $25 the day of the show. Swap meet space is $15 by Feb. 15 or $20 the day of the show. Live and silent auctions and a cake sale also will be held. Proceeds will support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. For barbecue cook-off informa tion and registration, call Keith at (386) 497-WING. For vehicle entries and other information, contact Browns Racing at (386) 497-1481. Church yard sale The Kids Club of Lake City Church of God, 173 SE Ermine Ave., will have a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Family Life Center. For more informa tion, call (386) 752-9400. Spring yard sale The Wellborn Community Association will host a Spring Community Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the community cen ter, 1340 8th Ave. in down town Wellborn. A space is $5. Bring your own tents and tables. The monthly blueberry pancake break fast will be served from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for chil dren. Lunch will be avail able, too. The Bloodmobile iwill be there to take dona tions. For more info, call Wendell at 963-1157, find us on Facebook or see www.wellborncommunity association.com. Supper, gospel sing Lee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will have a pot-luck supper and gos pel sing. The supper will be at 6 p.m. and the gos pel sing will begin at 7. The church is at 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 869-9977.Free workshops The UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer ing free workshops dur ing the Home and Patio Show form 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday at the Extension offices located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Workshops will include raised-bed veg etable gardens, container gardens for kids, how to prepare nutritious smooth ies, backyard poultry and more. For more informa tion, call the Extension office at (386)752-5384. March 3 History program The Friends of the Library will present A Florida History Chautauqua: Three Views (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas) at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 5A 5A OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. COURTESY PHOTO Learning from the beaver Kindergartners at Columbia City Elementary School got a visit from Bellamy Beaver, The Ichetucknee Partnerships mascot, on Friday. Bellamy Beaver is the good-will ambassador for the Ichetucknee Springs and river and promotes smart stewardship of our natural resources. TIP and Bellamy Beaver are marketed by the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. Mary Klinepeter Abrahamsen Mrs. Mary Klinepeter Abraha msen, 81 of Lake City, passed away on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at the Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center. She was born in 1931 to the late Milton T. and Anna Harvey Lewis in Bellefonte, PA. Mrs. Abrahamsen graduated from State College High School in State College, PA in 1949. She earned her Bachelor of Science from Penn State University in 1953 and was a member of the Delta Zeta Sorority. She later attended the University of Florida where she earned her Masters of Education in 1974. She was a member of the Alpha Delta Kappa Honorary Society since 1968. Mrs. Abrahamsen was employed with the Co lumbia County School System for 30 years having taught the majority of years at Summers Elementary School. Following her retirement, she worked as a volunteer with the Adult Litera cy program of Columbia Coun ty. She was a member of the St. James Episcopal Church in Lake City and lovingly served in the vestry, the alter guild and the choir. Mrs. Abrahamsen was preceded in death by her children, Donald E. Klinepeter in 1969 and her second husband, Ralph Abrahamsen in 2004. Survivors include her three children, Kurt L. (Mary-Ellen) Klinepeter, Winston-Salem, NC, Mark A. (Anne) Klinepeter, Jacksonville and Lisa (Da vid) Sackman, Pensacola; nine grandchildren, Sara, Brian, Jill and Amy Klinepeter, Elizabeth and Molly Klinepeter and Jessi ca (Sean) Phillips, Holly (Mark) VanWyck and David Sackman, Jr.; and two great grandchildren, Lana and Taylor VanWyck. Memorial services will be con ducted on Saturday, March 9, 2013 at 11:00 AM at the St. James Episcopal Church with ating. Interment will follow at the church. The family would like to express their gratitude to Kimberly Peterson and Haven Hospice for their compassion ate care to Mrs. Abrahamsen ers donations may be made to the St. James Episcopal Church alter guild fund in memory of Mrs. Abrahamsen. Arrange ments are under the direction of GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. Please sign the guestbook at www.guerryfuneralhome.net Grace Elizabeth Pope Barry Mrs. Grace Elizabeth Pope Barry age, 83, of Carrollton, GA passed away Wednesday, February 20, 2013. She was born November 14, 1929 in Ft. White, FL, daughter of the late Harry Clayton Pope and She was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas P. Barry, Jr. She is survived by her children, Eileen and Tim Thrower of Car rollton; Dennis and Becky Bar ry of Rockford, TN and Melanie and Dan Morgan of Cochrane AB Canada; 21 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. The funeral service was Sat urday, February 23, 2013 at 3:00 PM at Mt. Pleasant Bap tist Church in Carrollton, GA. Burial will be on Monday, Febru ary 25, 2012 at 3:30 PM in Sun set Memory Gardens, 11005 US 301, Thonotosassa, FL 33592. Express condolences or share a special memory at www.whitleygarner.com Arrangements by: W H ITL EY -G AR N ER A T ROSEHA VEN FUNERAL HOME Douglasville, GA 30134, 770-942-4246. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A MORTGAGE MillionDollar ! APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $1 MILLION IN 2013 FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $80,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2... and we’re starting with YOU! MOVE your First Mortgage(from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanOR 00 We’ll save you at least 1 25 We’ll pay you 1 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 24, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS TIGERS continued on 2B Columbia baseball falls to Suwannee, 8-3. CHS continued on 2B Lady Tigers take down Gainesville High, 7-0. Monday Q Columbia High girls tennis at Oak Hall School, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High weightlifting vs. Hawthorne High, Oak Hall School, Hamilton County High, 4 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Buchholz High, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Gainesville High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Fernandina Beach High, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Fort White High JV baseball at Santa Fe High, 4 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High softball vs. P.K. Yonge School, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Bradford High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Arlington Country Day School, 6 p.m. (JV-6 at Baker County High) Q Fort White High JV baseball at Bradford High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Forest High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High track at UNF Spring Break Open, TBA Q Fort White High softball at Interlachen High, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Lincoln High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. Madison County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball at Williston High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Saturday Q Columbia High baseball vs. Wakulla High, 2:30 p.m. (JV-noon) Q Fort White High track at Suwannee Invitational, TBA GAMES FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the school. For details, call Shayne Morgan at 397-4954. ADULT SOFTBALL Spring league registration open Columbia County Adult Softball is accepting registration for its spring season through March 15. Men’s, Women’s, Church and Co-ed leagues will be offered. Fee deadline is March 22 and the season begins April 1. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168. FISHING Justin Brown Memorial tourney The Justin Brown Memorial Bass Tournament is Saturday at Clay Landing. Entry fee is $70 per boat with an optional big bass pot for $10. All proceeds benefit Columbia FFA students. For details, call Chris Starling at 288-7633.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Emily Roach falls backwards as she sto ps the ball while playing against Santa Fe High. Growing pains for Lady Indians early on in yearBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Growing pains are coming in bunches for Fort White High’s young softball team. The Lady Indians lost 100 at home to Santa Fe High on Friday, one day after fall-ing to Suwannee High 10-2 in Live Oak. The Santa Fe game was the first district game for Fort White (1-4). The Lady Raiders improved to 3-3 overall and 3-0 in district play. Fort White had a couple of chances, but left the bases loaded in the second inning and runners on sec-ond and third in the third. Emily Roach singled with two outs in the sec-ond inning and moved up on a wild pitch and stolen base. Morgan Cushman and Caitlyn Bruce walked before the final out. Alex Walker singled in the third inning and Ashley Chesney reached on an error. They pulled off a double steal, but were stranded. Those were the only hits given up by Santa Fe pitch-er Ashtin Strickland, who pitched six innings before the mercy rule kicked in. Strickland struck out 12 — nine were called third strikes. Cushman started for Fort White and gave up six hits and seven runs in two innings with two walks and a strikeout. Walker went the final four innings with four hits, three runs (one earned), two walks, a hit batter and three strikeouts. Ashtin Strickland helped her cause with a three-run home run and a double. Shelbee Blackburn had a double, RBI-single and two walks and scored three runs. Caylee Back had two hits with an RBI. Megan Strickland (RBI, two runs scored) and Lauren Riley (RBI, run scored) had tri-ples. Alex Sealey’s pinch-hit single drove in the 10th run. Fort White scored two runs in the first inning off Suwannee, but the Lady Bulldogs answered with five runs in the bottom of the inning. Bruce and Walker each had two hits for the Lady Indians. Alexa Hatcher singled and scored a run and Ashley Chesney also Fort White High falls to Santa Fe, 10-0, on Friday. INDIANS continued on 5BSplit showings Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterABOVE : Columbia High’s Brittany Morgan sneaks her way to stea l third base. BELOW : Columbia High second baseman Andrew Johnson throws to first baseman Levi Hollingsworth. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High had a chance to run its record to 7-0 this weekend, but the only thing that could slow down the Lady Tigers was the weather. Columbia picked up a 7-0 win against Gainesville High to move to 6-0 on the sea-son, but had to reschedule its game against Suwannee High for Wednesday due to weather. Erin Anderson picked up the win against the Lady Hurricanes as she pitched five innings, struck out five batters and allowed three hits. Ashley Shoup got the save with two innings of work, three strikeouts and allowed one hit. Head coach Jimmy Williams said it wasn’t only the pitching that has been impressive this season, but also the defense behind the pitching. “We’ve had some impressive defensive efforts includ-ing against Gainesville,” Williams said. “Brandy Morgan had two ESPN-style catches and threw a girl out at first from the outfield. We’re definitely playing solid. Teams aren’t getting a lot of runners on base and they can’t score from the dugout.” Lacey King led all Lady Tigers with three hits against Gainesville. She scored two runs and had two stolen bases. Tatum Morgan, Kayli By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High couldn’t buy a base against Suwannee High on Friday in a rain-plagued outing and ultimately that led the Tigers to coming up dry. Suwannee took advantage of Tigers mistakes and lack of hitting to come away with the 8-3 win. Caleb Vaughn took the loss for the Tigers, but only allowed one earned run in the contest. Vaugh pitched five innings, allowed two hits, walked three and struck out three batters. After two unearned runs in the first inning, Suwnanee held a 2-0 lead heading into the fifth inning. The Bulldogs added to their lead with Dustin Driver batting in Tim Carter for a 3-0 lead and an error to allow Driver to score and take a 4-0 lead into the bot-tom half of the fifth. Columbia finally put two runs on the board in the fifth, but still didn’t have a base hit. With the bases loaded, Sam Bass drew a walk to score Dalton Mauldin and cut the Bulldogs’ lead to 4-1. Brent Stalter scored later in the inning off an infield ground ball by Vaughn to cut the lead to 4-2. After having their lead cut in half, the Bulldogs contin-ued to add on the runs. Paker Stevens walked with the bases loaded to Indians drop first game of season to BuchholzBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comOne hit and three errors all resulted in Fort White High losing its first game of the season on Friday as the Indians fell, 6-0, against Buchholz High. Pheonix Sanders picked up the win for Buchholz as he threw a complete game to knock off the pre-viously unbeaten Indians. He had nine strikeouts in the game. Brady Wilkinson had the only hit on the night for Fort White. Robby Howell suffered his first loss of the season as he pitched 4 2/3 innings, struck out 10 batters and walked two while allowing five hits in the game. He didn’t give up an earned run. Rhett Willis finished the game for the Indians while walking three batters, strik-ing out one and allowing two earned runs. Sean Kamhoot delivered the biggest bat for the Bobcats as he had three hits, three RBIs and a dou-ble in the contest. Sanders helped his own cause with two RBIs. Dakota Turner and Quinlan Washington also had hits on the night for Buchholz. Buchholz held a 1-0 lead until the fifth inning when the Bobcats scored two runs and added three more in the sixth inning. Fort White falls to 4-1 on the season while the Bobcats are 3-1. The Indians return to action at Fernandina Beach High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Bats go cold as Fort White falls to Bobcats, 6-0.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING Noon FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach 8 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Arizona Nationals, at Chandler, Ariz. (same-day tape) BOWLING 3 p.m. ESPN — PBA, USBC Masters, at North Brunswick, N.J. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, semifinal matches, at Marana, Ariz. 1:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Thailand, final round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape) 2 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, championship match, at Marana, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Illinois at Michigan 2 p.m. CBS — Cincinnati at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m. FSN — UCLA at Southern Cal 4 p.m. CBS — Michigan St. at Ohio St. NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — L.A. Lakers at Dallas 7 p.m. ESPN — Memphis at Brooklyn 9:30 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at Oklahoma City NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh RODEO 1 p.m. CBS — PBR, Built Ford Tough Invitational, at Kansas City, Mo. (previous and same-day tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN2 — Purdue at MinnesotaFSN — Texas Tech at Kansas 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Duke at Maryland 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Texas A&M at Vanderbilt ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Syracuse at Marquette 9 p.m. ESPN — Kansas at Iowa St. NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN — Dallas at Nashville SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Tottenham at West Ham WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Baylor at OklahomaBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 1 p.m.Golden State at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.Sacramento at New Orleans, 6 p.m.Cleveland at Miami, 6 p.m.Philadelphia at New York, 7 p.m.Memphis at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.San Antonio at Phoenix, 8 p.m.Boston at Portland, 9 p.m.Chicago at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.Boston at Utah, 9 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 4 Michigan State at No. 18 Ohio State, 4 p.m. No. 6 Duke vs. Boston College, 2 p.m.No. 7 Michigan vs. Illinois, 1 p.m.No. 20 Pittsburgh vs. St. John’s at Madison Square Garden, Noon No. 25 Notre Dame vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m.BASEBALLSpring Training Today’s Games Baltimore vs. Toronto (ss) at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Toronto (ss) vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland (ss) at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Boston (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston (ss) vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 6:10 p.m.AUTO RACINGDaytona 500 lineup At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 196.434 mph. 2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 196.292. 3. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.742. 4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.767.5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.729.6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 195.852. 7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 195.508. 8. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 195.385. 9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.084. 10. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 195.228.11. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.657. 12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.725. 13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195.925. 14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.683.15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.961. 16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.503. 17. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 195.495.18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195.156. 19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.584. 20. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 195.042. 21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 195.767.22. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.616.23. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.563. 24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.793. 25. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 194.654.26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.742.27. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.046. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.537. 29. (26) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 194.313. 30. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 192.996. 31. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 193.54.32. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 194.254.33. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195.976.34. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.946. 35. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.771. 36. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.24.37. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 195.207. 38. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 193.544. 39. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 193.515.40. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.096. 41. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.094.42. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 190.339. 43. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.142. Failed to Qualify 44. (52) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 183.876. 45. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 189.438.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Boston at Florida, 3 p.m.Vancouver at Detroit, 5 p.m.Winnipeg at New Jersey, 5 p.m.Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m.Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Calgary, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Montreal at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.Edmonton at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOFalcons track and fieldMembers of the 2013 Lake City Middle School track and fi eld team are (front row, from left) Sarah Griffin and Sydney Griffin. Second row (from left) are Apriena Riley, Damia Lewis, Tori Napolitano, Jessica Jewett, Emily Bedenbaugh, Lindse y Langston, Cassie Pierron, Bridget Morse and Caleb Crooms. Third row (from left) are Takemma Stewart, Kassady McLean, Bernita Brown, Burch Greene, Aja Lewis, Azende Bryant, Emily Wintons, Christen Odum and Chase Martin. Fourth row (from left) are Joseph Creeley, Kadeyshia Simmons, Rachel Blanton, Andrew Heaton, Luke G riffin, Jillian Morse, Kersha Andre, Chyna Parker and Grace Kolovitz. Kvistad, Hollianne Dohrn and Caliegh McCauley all had two hits in the game. Kvistad delivered three RBIs, Morgan scored two runs and Dohrn and McCauley reached scored once. The Lady Tigers took a 1-0 lead in the top of the first inning when Kvistad singled in Tatum Morgan. Columbia added two more runs in the third. King scored off Brandy Morgan and McCauley drove in Tatum Morgan for the 3-0 lead. The Lady Tigers scored one run in the fourth when Brittany Mogan came in off a sacrifice fly by Kvistad for a 4-0 lead and added their final three runs in the top of the fifth. Dohrn started the inning with a run off McCauley’s double. King then batted in McCauley and Kvistad singled to bring in King for the 7-0 final. The Lady Tigers will have three games next week after Suwannee’s game was rained out. Columbia travels to Suwannee at 7 p.m. on Wednesday before hosting P.K. Yonge at 6 p.m. on Thursday. The Lady Tigers will end the week with a home game against Madison County High at 7 p.m. on Friday. CHS: Lady Tigers keep on rolling Continued From Page 1B TIGERS: Host ACD on Thursday Continued From Page 1B score Trey Owen for a 5-2 lead. Driver then cleared the bases with a triple to score Josh Lesman, Braxton Hicks, and Stevens for the 8-2 lead. Columbia did get one back in the bottom of the seventh when Alex Milton scored on a ground ball. Milton had the Tigers’ only hit in the contest. Owen went four innings without allowing a hit for the Bulldogs. He struck out three Columbia batters and walked three while giving up two earned runs. Driver finished the game for the Bulldogs and allowed one hit while strik-ing out three in the final three innings of work. He had two walks. Stalter finished the final two innings for the Tigers and struck out three batters while allowing two hits. “We didn’t hit and didn’t play defense,” Columbia head coach Jonathan Ulsh said. “We just haven’t swung it well, but eventu-ally we will hit it.” Columbia is 1-2 on the season after Saturday’s game against Chiles High was cancelled. The Tigers return to action against Arlington Country Day School at 6 p.m. on Thursday in Lake City. No. 2 Miami knocked off by Wake Forest, 80-65By JOEDY McCREARYAssociated PressWINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — C.J. Harris scored 23 points and Wake Forest beat No. 2 Miami 80-65 on Saturday to snap the Hurricanes’ 14-game win-ning streak. Codi Miler-McIntyre added 15 points while Harris was 5 for 5 from 3-point range to lead the Demon Deacons (12-14, 5-9 Atlantic Coast Conference). They shot 54 percent, led by double figures for the entire second half and reeled off 12 straight points to pull away for their biggest victory under third-year coach Jeff Bzdelik. Durand Scott had all 17 of his points in the second half for the Hurricanes (22-4, 13-1), the last of the schools in the six BCS conferences to get its first league loss. Shane Larkin added 13 points, Trey McKinney Jones had 11 and Kenny Kadji finished with 10, but Miami was outrebounded 36-35 by the younger, small-er Demon Deacons. Still, the Hurricanes clawed back into the game with an 18-8 run that start-ed late in the first half and ended on Scott’s jumper with 14 1/2 minutes left that made it 46-41. He added a layup 2 minutes later to pull Miami to 50-45, and it looked as if the Hurricanes were going to find a way to keep their charmed run rolling. But two possessions later, Harris turned a turnover into a fast-break dunk that started a 12-0 run that put the Demon Deacons on the fast track to their biggest victory since they knocked off then-No. 1 Duke four years ago when they were in the top five them-selves. As the final seconds ticked away, Harris and Travis McKie — two of the three available non-freshmen on scholarship — exchanged a flying chest-bump before the Wake Forest students rushed the court for the second time in little over a month.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 3B3BSPORTSBig field showcase JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson Middle School first baseman Scott Carman watc hes as Lake City Middle School’s Dylan Blair creeps away from base as he attempts to steal second. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson Middle School catcher Cody Collins gets hi s hand checked out after a collision with a Lake City Middle School player at home base. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLake City Middle School runner Jeremy Solomon makes a break for third base on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson Middle School’s Jacob Sosa swings at a pi tch during a game against Lake City Middle School Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLake City Middle School’s Micah Krieghauser takes a s wing on Thursday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsLady Indians in full swing JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Shea Chesney makes a rolling catch ag ainst Santa Fe High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High pitcher Alex Walker winds up while play ing against Santa Fe High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterSanta Fe High’s Megan Strickland safely slides to thrid b ase just in time for Fort White High’s Kayla Redwine to tag her. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Shae Chesney runs to first after bunting a pitch against Santa Fe on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Emily Roach reconsiders stealing third base against Santa Fe High.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 5B5BSports INDIANS: Fall at home Continued From Page 1B COURTESY PHOTOElks state hoop shootGabby Chambers of Eastside Elementary placed third in the 8-9 age division at the Elks Hoop Shoot state competition at Umatilla on Feb. 15. She is congratulated by Eastside Principal Trey Hosford, who is the local lo dge director for the hoop shoot. scored. Cushman had the other hit. For Suwannee (31), Timberly Steichen (home run, two RBIs, two runs scored) and Shayla Kicklighter (RBI, run scored) were 2-for-3. Jessie TenBroeck reached base on a single, two walks and was hit by a pitch. She stole seven bases and scored four runs. Fort White hosts Gainesville High at 6 p.m. Tuesday. ASSOCIATED PRESSKyle Larson (left) slides to a stop near Regan Smith (7) after a wreck at the conclusion of the NASCAR Nationwide Series auto race Saturday at Daytona International Speedway in Da ytona Beach. Stewart wins at Daytona after scary last-lap crash By JENNA FRYERAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — As emergency workers tended to injured fans and ambulance sirens wailed in the background, a somber Tony Stewart skipped the traditional post-race victory celebration following the NASCAR Nationwide Series race Saturday at Daytona International Speedway. A last-lap accident sent rookie Kyle Larson’s car sailing into the fence that separates the track from the seats, and large chunks of Larson’s car landed in the grandstands. The car itself had its entire front end sheared off, with a piece of burning engine wedged through a gaping hole in the fence. Neither NASCAR nor Daytona International Speedway officials had any immediate comment on potential injuries. “There obviously was some intrusion into the fence and fortunately with the way the event’s equipped up, there were plenty of emergency workers ready to go and they all jumped in on it pretty quickly,” said NASCAR President Mike Helton. “Right now, it’s just a function of determining what all damage is done. They’re moving folks, as we’ve seen, to care centers and take some folks over to Halifax Medical.” Stewart, who won for the 19th time at Daytona and seventh time in the last nine season-opening Nationwide races, was in no mood to celebrate. “The important thing is what going on on the frontstretch right now,” said Stewart, the three-time NASCAR champion. “We’ve always known, and since racing started, this is a dan-gerous sport. But it’s hard. We assume that risk, but it’s hard when the fans get caught up in it. “So as much as we want to celebrate right now and as much as this is a big deal to us, I’m more worried about the drivers and the fans that are in the stands right now because that was ... I could see it all in my mirror, and it didn’t look good from where I was at.” The accident spread into the upper deck and emer-gency crews treated fans on both levels. There were five stretchers that appeared to be carrying fans out, and a helicopter flew overhead. A forklift was used to pluck Larson’s engine out of the fence, and there appeared to be a tire in the stands. Daytona President Joie Chitwood waited by steps as emergency workers attended to those in the stands. Across the track, fans pressed against a fence and used binoculars trying to watch. Wrecked cars and busted parts were strewn across the garage. “It’s a violent wreck. Just seeing the carnage on the racetrack, it’s truly unbe-lievable,” driver Justin Allgaier said. It was a chaotic finish to a race that was stopped nearly 20 minutes five laps from the finish by a 13-car accident that sent driver Michael Annett to a local hospital for further evalua-tion. NASCAR said Annett was awake and alert. The race resumed with three laps to go, and the final accident occurred with Regan Smith leading as he headed out of the final turn to the checkered flag. He admittedly tried to block Brad Keselowski to pre-serve the win. “I tried to throw a block, it’s Daytona, you want to go for the win here,” Smith said. “I don’t know how you can play it any different other than concede second place, and I wasn’t willing to do that today. Our job is to put them in position to win, and it was, and it didn’t work out.” As the cars began wrecking all around Smith and Keselowski, Stewart slid through for the win, but Larson plowed into Keselowski and his car was sent airborne into the stands. When Larson’s car came to a stop, it was miss-ing its entire front end. The 20-year-old, who made his Daytona debut this week, stood apparently stunned, hands on his hips, sever-al feet away from his car, before finally making the mandatory trip to the care center. He later said his first thought was with the fans. “I hope all the fans are OK and all the drivers are all right,” Larson said. “I took a couple big hits there and saw my engine was gone. Just hope everybody’s all right.” He said he was along for the ride in the last-lap acci-dent. “I was getting pushed from behind, I felt like, and by the time my spotter said lift or go low, it was too late,” Larson said. ASSOCIATED PRESSDale Earnhardt Jr. (right) climbs into his car during a practice session for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 at the Daytona International Speedw ay in Daytona Beach.Earnhardt tops final practice for Daytona 500By MARK LONGAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — Quiet most of Speedweeks, Dale Earnhardt Jr. made a little noise Saturday. Earnhardt topped the speed chart for the final practice session before Sunday’s season-opening Daytona 500. The 2004 Daytona 500 champion turned the fast lap by averaging 198.592 mph around the 2 1/2 -mile superspeedway. David Gilliland was second, fol-lowed by Clint Bowyer, Marcos Ambrose and Aric Almirola. Pole-sitter Danica Patrick and Stewart-Haas Racing teammate Tony Stewart were among 10 drivers who skipped the 1 1/2 -hour final tuneup. Patrick is trying to become the first driver win the Daytona 500 from the pole since Dale Jarrett in 2000. Only nine drivers have accomplished the feat in 54 years. Three-time Daytona 500 winner Jeff Gordon, 2010 Daytona 500 champ Jamie McMurray, Casey Mears, Terry Labonte and Joe Nemechek also sat out the session. So did Joe Gibbs Racing teammates Kyle Busch, Denny Hamlin and Matt Kenseth. “We don’t have any plans to go out,” Gordon said. “We feel like this entire week we have been able to learn everything we need to get prepared for the race tomorrow. ... We’ve got a great race car. We are excited. We’ve got a great opportunity here.” Before Saturday, Earnhardt had done little during Speedweeks.

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By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com C olumbia Countys housing market con tinues to improve, bringing real estate agents who had left the profession back into the business. Dan Gherna, executive direc tor of the Lake City Board of Realtors, said he is seeing members who left the industry during the recession return. The monthly market report indicates Columbia Countys real estate market continues to improve. The countys January monthly market report indicated a 66.7 percent increase in closed sales from 12 months ago. Thirdy homes sold in January, compared to 18 in January 2012. Cash sales, an indicator of investors buying homes, were 40 percent of the homes sold in the county. January also saw 82 new list ings posted in the largest increase of new listings in more than a year. With the increase in new list ings, the amount of inventory ticked up 0.1 percent to a 12month of supply. A balanced mar ket for real estate is 5.5 months of supply. Months of supply indi cates an estimate of the number of months it will take to sell all the homes on the market. When the number is above 5.5 months, the market favors buy ers over sellers. Homes sold faster when com pared to a year ago. The median days on the market was 85. In January 2012, the median days on market was 102 days. Columbia County saw the most new listings in the $150,000 to $199,999 price range, with 24 entering the market. The market did see declines in median and average selling price, but Gherna said because the number of homes sold in the county is small, price can swing with few low-priced homes sold. 1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net Each time you are hon est and conduct yourself with honesty, a success force will drive you toward greater success. Each time you lie, even with a little white lie, there are strong forces pushing you toward failure. Joseph Sugarman E nron Corporation is continually in the news. What disturbs me the most about this travesty, is the magnitude and the scope of the dishonesty. It is incredulous to real ize the number of people who knew or should have known that their actions were not correct and prob ably illegal. Yet the majority of these ethical issues were never seriously considered. While dishonesty in corporations hits the front page, just the other day Stephen Ambrose, the well known author, was caught plagiarizing sections of his book The Wild Blue, Citizen Soldiers and Nixon: Ruin and Recovery 19731990. I think that dishonesty in our society is tolerated and in many ways encouraged. Just look at how many times the legal system gives people a chance to change before they have to go to jail. Sometimes in my classes at various universities, I ask the students how they would respond if they got back $20 more than was due them from a restaurant cashier. Unfortunately, the majority of students say they would keep the $20. They rationalize that the restaurant makes millions of dollars and will not miss the $20. After I get over the shock of their reaction, I have a very long talk with them about ethics and hon esty. Can I change their view of honesty? Maybe or maybe not, but what I can do is make them aware of the ethical considerations. I think so many people get themselves into problems because they just do not realize that there are ethical dimensions to their deci sions. Here is what I tell my students and entrepreneurs to ask themselves if they are getting into an ethical quagmire: 1. What would your mother say about this action? 2. How would you feel if your action appeared on the front page of the local newspaper? 3. Is it illegal? If you have the uh-oh feeling about your action from these questions, then you are in an ethical dilemma. I believe that just being aware of an ethical issue will help you to better analyze and deal with the Honesty is best business policy Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of Feb. 24-Mar. 2, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. 3101 US HWY 90 WEST, STE. 101 Lake City, FL 32055 (386) 752-6575 TOLL FREE 1-800-3334946 www.c21darbyrogers.com www.century21.com THE DARBYR OGERS CO. Each office independently owned and operated Huddle Up Huddle Up Buy or Sell with a Winning Team BUYING OR SELLING, CHOOSE THE WINNING TEAM Debbie Myles, Linda Carter, Cindy Carter, Anita Tonetti, Tyrone Weston, Ginny Smith, Carol Law, Susan Sloan, Blake Lunde II, Heather Craig, Mike Sloan. Not pictured: Kayla Carbone, Teena Peavy, Cynthia Kirby, and Michael Streicher. Debbie Myles, Linda Carter, Cindy Carter, Anita Tonetti, Tyrone Weston, Ginny Smith, Carol Law, Susan Sloan, Blake Lunde II, Heather Craig, Mike Sloan. Not pictured: Kayla Carbone, Teena Peavy, Cynthia Kirby, and Michael Streicher. Call or stop by, we have the perfect game plan with the Winning Team Market shows new life Goverments shrink amid calls for cuts By TOM RAUM Associated Press WASHINGTON Republicans and other fiscal conservatives keep insisting on more federal austerity and a smaller gov ernment. Without much fanfare or acknowledge ment, theyve already got ten much of both. Spending by federal, state and local governments on payrolls, equipment, build ings, teachers, emergency workers, defense programs and other core govern mental functions has been shrinking steadily since the deep 2007-2009 recession and as the anemic recovery continues. This recent shrinkage has largely been obscured by an increase in spend ing on benefit payments to individuals under entitle ment programs, including Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and veterans ben efits. Retiring baby boom ers are driving much of this increase. Another round of huge cuts known in Washington parlance as the sequester will hit beginning March 1, poten tially meaning layoffs for hundreds of thousands of federal workers unless Congress and President Barack Obama can strike a deficit-reduction deal to avert them. With the deadline only a week off, Obama and Republicans who control the House are far apart over how to resolve the deadlock. While last-minute budget deals are frequent in Washington, neither side is optimistic of reaching one this time. Even as the private sec tor has been slowly add ing jobs, governments have been shedding them, hold ing down overall employ ment gains and keeping the jobless rate close to 8 per cent, compared with normal non-recessionary levels of 5 to 6 percent that have pre vailed since the 1950s. Its a massive drag on the economy. We lost three-quarter million pub lic-sector jobs in the recov ery, said economist Heidi Shierholz of the laborfriendly Economic Policy Institute. Were still losing government jobs, although the pace has slowed. But we havent turned around yet. A larger-than-usual decline in federal spend ing, notably on defense programs, helped push the economy into negative territory in the final three months of 2012. Economic FILE A number of factors indicate the Columbia County housing market is becoming more active. Both sales and list ings of houses increased substantially in January, according to the Lake City Board of Realtors. Local sales, listings rise significantly compared to 2012. SHRINK continued on 2C HOUSING continued on 2C HONESTY continued on 2C REAL ESTATE By JENNIFER PELTZ Associated Press NEW YORK Help wanted. Qualifications: Must already have a job. Its a frustrating catch for those out of work in an era of high unemployment: looking for a job, only to find that some employers dont want anyone who doesnt already have one. But after four years of above-average joblessness in the U.S., efforts to bar such practices by employers have met with mixed results. While New Jersey, Oregon and Washington, D.C., have passed laws making it illegal to discriminate against the unemployed, New York Citys billionaire-businessman mayor vetoed on Friday what would have been the most aggressive such measure in the country. Similar proposals have stalled in more ASSOCIATED PRESS Janet Falk, an unemployed public relations professional, said hiring managers have refused to consider her application because she has not worked in so long. Long-term unemployed caught in hiring bind JOBLESS continued on 2C

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situation. The top 1 percent of all salesmen were interviewed and asked what is the most important attribute for their success? Was it? a. Their character,b. Their wit,c. Their products/services,d. Their motivation, ore. Their honesty.Without question, the most important attribute to this top group of salesmen was honesty. They clearly understood that for custom-ers to have a relationship with them, the customer needed to trust them. Trust is only earned through consis-tently honest relations. Most people want to have relationships with only honest people. Just ask someone whether he or she would prefer to get a 10 percent discount on a product dealing with a dishonest business or to pay the normal price to an honest company? I believe that honesty is one of the most important consider-ations in being an entrepreneur. Employees, customers and vendors cannot trust you if you are dishon-est. We have been jaded by so much dishonesty in our public lives (e.g. President Clinton and President Nixon) that sometimes we learn to tolerate dishonesty and sometimes to even expect it. Honesty is the virtue you should most desire for your company. The Downtown Rotary Club each year seeks out the best ethically sound business in my local area. I applaud their effort to raise the awareness of ethics and honesty throughout our community. When our kids were younger (about 10 years ago), I went to an ATM machine. It either gave me too much money or the previous cus-tomer had left some money in the money dispenser drawer. When I saw this, I took it into the bank with the kids in tow and returned it. Our children still talk about that experi-ence with pride; however, what real-ly felt great about the experience was that I knew that I had been true to myself. Is being honest easy? No! But honesty brings tremendous divi-dends. I promise you that, if you make a significant effort to be honest, it will bring rewards in that you will feel so much better about yourself. Honesty is the only policy!You can do this! 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. HONESTY: Trust is key to success in business Continued From Page 1C HOUSING: Market improves Continued From Page 1CThe median sale price of a home in January was $106,250, compared to last January’s median sale price of $116,500 — a decrease of 8.8 percent. The aver-age price of a home sold in January was $113,806 com-pared to an average sale price of $124,428 in January 2012 — a decrease of 8.5 percent. Despite the decrease in average and median sale prices, people still sold their homes for about the same percentage of their asking price — 87.4 per-cent this past January as compared to 88.1 percent in January 2012. In total, 365 homes are up for sale in Columbia County, with 75 priced at more than $250,000, including one home listed at $1 million. SHRINK: Governments already getting smaller Continued From Page 1Cgrowth, meanwhile, has been inching along at a weak 1-2 percent — not enough to significantly further drive down the national unemployment rate, which now stands at 7.9 percent. Although federal spending is projected to decline from 22.8 percent of the gross domestic product recorded last year to 21.5 percent by 2017, it still will exceed the 40-year-average of 21.0 percent, according to the nonparti-san Congressional Budget Office. Spending peaked at 25.2 percent of GDP in 2009. The budget office also said the economy is rough-ly 5.5 percent smaller than it would have been had there been no recession. The Defense Department already has made deep spend-ing cuts, and outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said 800,000 civil-ian Pentagon employees were notified this week they likely are to be placed on periods of unpaid leave due to lawmakers’ failure to act. The recent downsizing in government is most pronounced at the state and local levels. Most states have constitutional or statutory requirements for balanced budgets. That means nearly all states are prohibited from running budget deficits, while the federal government is not. Not only can the federal government run deficits, but it can print money — through actions by the Federal Reserve — some-thing states are prohibited from doing. Those calling for a smaller government most-ly don’t take notice of the wave of recent cutbacks. Their clarion call remains Ronald Reagan’s mantra: Government doesn’t solve problems, it is the prob-lem. “This spending issue is the biggest issue that threatens our future,” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, says. “When are we going to get serious about our long-term spending problem?” And Florida Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, deliver-ing the GOP response to Obama’s State of the Union address, said “a major cause of our recent downturn was a housing crisis created by reckless government policies.” Soaring recent government deficits are partially a side effect of the worst recession since the 1930s, which took a huge bite out of tax revenues at the same time spending increased on recession-fighting pro-grams like unemployment compensation and stimu-lus measures under both Presidents George W. Bush and Obama. “The problem going forward is one of demo-graphics and rising health care. It is the baby boom generation retiring,” said Alice Rivlin, a White House budget director under President Bill Clinton. “It’s the fact that everybody is living longer.” Republicans argue that entitlement programs should be on the cutting board as well as other government programs. Democrats generally have been more protective of them, although the presi-dent and many congres-sional Democrats acknowl-edge some paring of these popular programs is in order. The federal budget deficit for the fiscal year end-ing Sept. 30 is estimated to be $845 billion — the first time it’s dropped below $1 trillion in five years. than a dozen other states and Congress. Advocates for the unemployed say such hiring prac-tices are unfair, particularly to those who have been laid off because of the econom-ic crunch and not through any fault of their own. Businesses, though, say that the extent of such prac-tices is exaggerated, hiring decisions are too complicat-ed to legislate, and employ-ers could end up defending themselves against dubious complaints. Nationally, more than 1 in 3 unemployed workers has been looking for at least six months, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Janet Falk said that when she applied for a public-relations job at a New York law firm two years ago, the recruiter told her she wouldn’t be considered because she had been out of work for more than three months. The recruiter was being paid to find candi-dates who were in jobs or just out of them. “My personal view is that hiring is like musical chairs, and if only the people who are already on the dance floor are playing, then the long-term unemployed can’t get in the game,” said Falk, who was laid off four years ago. She now runs her own consulting business. An October 2011 search of New York City-based job listings found more than a dozen that explic-itly required candidates to be employed, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer’s office said. A broader review that year by the National Employment Law Project found 150 ads that were restricted to or aimed at people currently working. As for why, experts say employers may think that unemployed applicants’ skills have atrophied, that they lost their jobs because of their own shortcomings, or that they will jump at any job offer and then leave as soon as something better comes along. But “’don’t apply, don’t even try’ is the opposite of American values,” New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn said when the measure passed last month. She said Friday that she expects the City Council will override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto within a month. JOBLESS: Caught in bind Continued From Page 1C

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, FEBRUARY24, 2013 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com LegalNOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE SCHOOLBOARD OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAThe School District of Columbia County, Florida announces they will hold a workshop, to which all per-sons are invited to attend as follows: DATE: Thursday, March 7, 2013 TIME: 1:00 p.m. PLACE: Columbia County School DistrictCentral Building Room 130 409 SWSt. Johns Street Lake City, FL32025 PURPOSE:Workshop to discuss budget issues. No action will be taken at this meet-ing.Pursuant to the provisions of the American with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommo-dations to participate in the above workshop is asked to advise the School Board at least 48 hours be-fore the workshop by contacting Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003. School Board of Columbia County, FloridaBy:Terry L. HuddlestonSuperintendent of Schools05537442Februray 24, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesBARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Contract Billing Specialist Lake City, FL. F/T. Responsible for all aspects of billing and contract negotiations for the Association. Salary based on experience. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056 F/TExecutive Director for local non-profit organization. Salary based on experience. Prefer BAdegree and experience in budgeting and community relations. Please send resume to P.O. Box 571, Lake City, FL32056. Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic Technician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 Part Time Housekeeper Needed in local physician office. Please fax your resume to 386-719-9662 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 100Job OpportunitiesQuality Inn and Suites in Live Oak Now Hiring • Maintenance • Housekeeping Apply in person at the Sun-Fri 11am-3pm SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Sewing Machine Operator Needed With some experience. Contact 755-6481 120Medical Employment05537417Medical Assistant Must have HS Diploma and Phlebotomy certification with min. 1 yr exp. Qualified candidates please email resume to: jsmith@ccofnf.com 05537466Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Is now hiring for: RN 11-7 shift, full time. LPN 3-11 shift, part time. CNA All Shifts. Excellent pay and benefits. Please apply at 587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025 EOE/DFWP F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. Local medical office looking for a PT Billing Clerk .Experience Preferred.Please send resume to PO Box 1256, Lake City, Fl 32056 Office Staff needed For Medical Practice. 155 NWEnterprise Way, LC Fax 386-755-3369 Part-time CNA Needed on Mon, Tues, and Thurs. Fax resume to (386) 754-1712 Part-time Respiratory Therapist needed for medical office. Fax resume to (386) 754-1712 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 CLEAN 2br/1ba In quiet, private park. Large lot Call: 386-752-6269 lv message if no answer. RVLots or Cottage avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Factory liquidation sale. 3 Stock models must go $39k off select 2012 models John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 705Rooms forRent Room Furnished, Clean, TV, Fridge, Microwave, Cable, Interet, Laundry. Close in. Private w/ Enterence. For more information. Contact 386-965-3477 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. Avail 5/1, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Remodeled2BR/1BA Upstairs, CH/A, Convenient location, No pets water/sewer incl. $550 mo + Sec. Dep. 752-6686 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRentNice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $790 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the 805Lots forSale law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830Commercial PropertyMedical Office Building For Sale or Rent. Contact 727-422-3472 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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T he Academy Awards have admittedly lost much of their luster for me in recent years, and Ive tried to figure out why. Possibly its the plethora of movie award shows, making the Oscars all but a moot point by the time of their broadcast. Perhaps its residual anger at heart felt choices that didnt win. Certainly the death in 2010 of my Oscar soul mate, Mickie, is a factor. I even contemplate that its my advancing age and the thoughts of infinite things more crucially important than movies. (Nowadays when I hear the term visual effects, LIFE Sunday, February 24, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas? Contact Robert Bridges Editor 754-0428 rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter 1DLIFE 1DLIFE TECHNOLOGY BREAKTHROUGHS AND COMPASSIONATE CARE CLOSE TO HOME I ve seen the Grand Canyon many times mostly flying over it, once on the Skywalk but my favor ite so far was the helicopter tour that landed in the can yon next to the Colorado River. Sue and I were picked up by a shuttle bus at our hotel and driven about 35 minutes to Boulder City where the airport/heliport is located. By the way, Boulder City is the only city in Nevada where gam bling is illegal or it was in 2009. Betcha didnt know that. We checked in, which included being weighed with everything you planned to take with you on the helicopter. You see there are weight limits and Grand Canyon chopper flight By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com B ettye Lane remembers pressing her face against the screen door of her Hamilton County home waiting for her father to return. She was too young to understand what frightened her. The 3-year-old Lane didnt understand the race relations of the 1940s and s and why her outspoken father went to all the local meetings. There was just this feeling that he might not make it home. I thought he was absolutely crazy, because I found out he wasnt getting paid for any of this, Lane said. And I asked him one time, Daddy why are you doing all this. The answer he gave shaped the now 75-year-old womans life of dedication to the community. And he said, Because it needs doing, Lane said. My hero was my father ... If I had one wish in this world, it would be that every child born on this earth had the parents I had. In 1996, Lane became the first woman of any color to be elected to Lake Citys City Council, but before deciding to run, she made a trip to her fathers grave and prayed for advice. She said he always talked aboutthose politi cians and she wanted to run things by him. After 40 minutes at the grave yard, Lane decided to give it a shot. She said she won with 70 percent of the vote. She would win two more elections before deciding to not run in 2004. Lanes first memories of Lake City came during her senior year of high school back in 1954. Her father wanted his children to graduate from college, and Richardson High School offered programs that would lead to suc cess after high school, she said. Every morning she would wake up early, ride the 15 miles into White Springs and then be bused to Richardson. There wasnt the bullying then, and they welcomed this ole country girl in, she said. After graduating from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, she wanted to teach high school at Richardson. It took a year before she was hired. She still remembers the day. She was helping her father pick tobacco on a farm when the janitor from the school found her. I said, Dad, Im gone. This is not the life for me, she recalled. She said teaching was her heart and soul. She spoke at eight graduations, including the last year she taught at the school. I said, God help me get through this without the ugly cry, Lane said. Even in retirement, Lane dedicates her time to helping the community. Shes part of many committees and boards, and says although she doesnt have the money to contribute she has the time and energy. One organization shes most proud of participating in is Take Stock in Children. The program targets students who have the potential to reach college but One womans journey BLACK HISTORY MONTH JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Bettye Lane was the first woman elected to Lake City City Council. She says there have been great strides in racial equality in her lifetime. Ex-councilwoman comments on progress in matters of race. TRAVEL TALES Sandy Kishton OSCARS continued on 2D LANE continued on 2D TRAVEL continued on 2D Mark Kirby Oscars: Some easy picks this year

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they have to keep the heli-copter balanced, so based on weights they give you assigned seats. Don’t let it scare you off, only the attendant behind the coun-ter can see the scale. After we checked in, they had us watch a safety video, then you were called by your pilot. Sue and I got to sit up front with the pilot. Yeah! (I noticed at check-in you could pay an additional $50 for a front seat, but we didn’t have to). There were six of us, plus the pilot — his name was Dave and he was really nice and had a great personality. We had to put on life preservers because we were flying over water, buckle up then put on our head phones so we could hear him speaking and talk or ask questions if we wanted to. The helicopter ride was about 40 to 45 minutes over Lake Mead, Hoover Dam and Fortification Hill and into the Grand Canyon. We landed the helicopter on the southern side, in an area owned by one of Indian tribes. The northern side is owned by the government. According to our pilot, the tour companies pay a pretty penny to the tribes for the rights and access to land the helicopters on the banks of the Colorado River. Once we landed, our pilot served lunch. There were picnic tables cov-ered with netting (which reminded me of a military camp you might see on the news), that provided some shade. We each had individual lunch baskets with turkey sandwiches, chips and a cookie. We also had champagne to celebrate our trip to the Grand Canyon. Of course, we did! It was very tasty, but you had to have water too because it was 106 degrees down there. We only had about 30 minutes on the ground to eat and look around. After taking a couple of pictures, we were back in the sky. Here are some of my observations: The water in Lake Mead was bluer than the sky. The Colorado River was orange mud col-ored. The canyon itself is pretty deep, and we didn’t get to see near enough of it. What we did see was gorgeous; the different rock formations of all colors glowed as the sun hit just right, contrasting with the very blue sky. It sure made me want to come back for further exploration. Overall, Sue and I both rated the trip an A-plus (except for the shuttle bus trip back to the hotel). Long story short, we were kicked off our air-conditioned bus and put on another van after the first drop-off spot where the air wasn’t work-ing. It seemed to take for-ever to get back, probably because the excitement and anticipation of the day were long gone. However, a friend of ours said, “Leave it to the two of you to find cham-pagne in the desert!” Yep, that’s us! 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 I f you live in Florida, you grow your own oranges. That’s what many northerners assume when they think of Florida home land-scapes. Although not the norm, there are homeowners in extreme northern Florida who are successful with growing dooryard citrus. The key to success is start-ing with the right plants, and then growing them in the right place. “Right plant, right place.” We may have more freezes than we really think we should have, but that is one part of the growing equation that is out of our control. The up side of cold weather is that some of our pests are kept under control by natural means. Being farther north, away from the concentra-tion of citrus groves, also gives us some relief from citrus pests. Daring gar-deners who do take the risk of growing citrus are often rewarded with juicy “Florida sunshine” right outside their back doors. Citrus trees are coldtender plants from sub-tropical and tropical areas, but they can develop some cold tolerance. They don’t become dormant in the winter like apples and peaches, but they do enter a period during cool weather called “quies-cence,” when no growth takes place. Maximum cold hardiness develops in North Florida because of our lower winter average temperatures. Young trees are the most vulnerable to cold damage. During the first five years, they are more often damaged by cold when already stressed by disease, insects, drought, or nutrient deficiencies. Injury can be expected if young trees have put on a flush of new growth just prior to a cold snap. The smallest parts of the tree are damaged first, generally from the outside to the inside of the tree. The flowers freeze first, then young twigs and leaves, followed by more mature growth. The trunk is the last part of the tree to sustain freeze damage. Satsuma trees grafted on trifoliate orange rootstock have demonstrated the greatest freeze survival and should be number one on your shopping list. Trees have survived tem-peratures of 14 degrees with slight injury. If the tree is in bud or bloom, however, these tender tis-sues will freeze. For more information on which trees to grow, go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs132 If you are growing citrus that you suspect has been cold damaged, don’t prune immediately. During the spring flush of growth, leaves may start to grow, but then soon wilt. After this flush and wilt, you’ll have a better idea which branches need to be removed. Small citrus trees can even help you create more living space at home, and without the need of a builders’ permit. Even the smallest yard can be trans-formed into usable and sustainable outdoor rooms with a little planning. Attend a free Landscape Design class and learn how to create these out-door rooms from the expert, Sabine Marcks, registered landscape archi-tect. This workshop will be at 6:30 p.m. on Monday at the Columbia County Extension Office and everyone is invited. The Extension Office is located on Mary Ethel Lane at the northeast corner of the fairgrounds in Lake City. For information, call 752-5384. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu TRAVEL: Grand Canyon by chopper Continued From Page 1D Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@comcast.net. COURTESY PHOTOSandy Kishton (left) and her friend Sue share a champag ne toast beneath a dining canopy on the floor of the Grand Canyon after being helicoptered in. need financial help to obtain a degree. The program begins tracking a student in eighth grade and requires a pledge from the students to do their very best in their studies. Lane’s son, Darryl, died of cancer about two years ago. His wife, Madelynn, set up an endowment for the program, and Lane serves on the board for the organization. During the Olustee Festival parade through downtown Lake City, Lane was in the viewing stands, and couldn’t help but marvel at some of the things she saw. “My dad would never have imagined that we would be looking down on a parade that has a City Council vehicle in it, the old fire truck, and on that vehicle are two black city councilmen and a white city councilwoman. My dad would have never have imagined that he would be looking down on a county commis-sion vehicle and see the longest serving county commissioner, Ronald Williams — long, long serving, re-elected and re-elected. “... And that royalty float that just went by, that little girl that Miss Olustee is black,” Lane said. LANE: Ex-councilwoman sees progress Continued From Page 1D OSCARS: Some easy picks this year Continued From Page 1DI think of cataract sur-gery, not Oscars.) Or it could be that in recent years movies have been pretty lousy. Last year, the only film I thought Oscar worthy was “The Descendants.” Happily, this year is different. Evidently others agree. Last year only one best picture nominee (“The Help”) out of nine had grossed over $100 mil-lion at Oscar time. This year, five out of nine have (“Argo,” “Les Miserables,” “Lincoln,” “Life of Pi” and “Django Unchained”), and two others (“Zero Dark Thirty” and “Silver Linings Playbook”) should soon. It’s a good sign that so many films that are simultaneously adult and enjoyable are doing well. Maybe moviegoers are becoming more adven-turous once again and Hollywood will reward them with quality, Oscar-worthy films. Well, we’ll see. For now, here are predictions for this year’s nominated crop: BEST PICTURE: “Argo.” Ben Affleck’s movie about the 1979 Iran hostage crisis has been winning prize after prize, and despite Affleck unjustly not being nomi-nated for best director, as one of the film’s pro-ducers (George Clooney is another), he will still triumph. In Greek myth, Argo was the ship on which Prince Jason sailed to find the Golden Fleece, and it looks like the movie “Argo” will bring back the Golden Statue. ACTOR: Daniel DayLewis for “Lincoln.” The film has some flaws but Day-Lewis’ portrayal of our 16th president is not one of them. He will win his third best-actor Oscar, setting an Academy record. One of the refreshingly few races this year with a definite outcome. ACTRESS: Jessica Chastain for “Zero Dark Thirty.” Last year, this race was one of the few with potential for an upset, and so it is again. Chastain plays a deter-mined CIA agent out to kill Osama bin Laden, and while her performance is stellar, I think it’s the role that will win the Oscar for her. Her com-petition is the youngest best-actress nominee ever (Quvenzhan Wallis), the oldest best-actress nominee ever (Emmanuelle Riva), the predicted win-ner (Jennifer Lawrence) and a true dark horse (Naomi Watts). Truly, any of these five could win, but I’m predicting Chastain, one of today’s most promising actresses. SUPPORTING ACTOR: Robert De Niro for “Silver Linings Playbook.” He, along with every other nominee here (Alan Arkin, Tommy Lee Jones, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christoph Waltz), is a terrific actor, and each already has an Oscar. De Niro has two, but he hasn’t won since “Raging Bull” in 1981. It’s very hard for an actor to get three Oscars (unless you’re Daniel Day-Lewis playing Abe Lincoln), but I’m guessing that the 30-year gap and the academy wanting to give something to this movie will push De Niro to victory. His clos-est competition is Tommy Lee Jones for “Lincoln.” SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Sally Field in “Lincoln.” Yes, I know that Anne Hathaway is the sure thing. Yes, I know that she’s won most of this category’s awards for singing the show-stopping “I Dreamed a Dream” in “Les Miserables.” Yes, I know that she’s one of the most talented and popular and respected actresses today, and Hollywood just loves to reward this type of performer. But I’m stubbornly behind Sally and predict that if there’s an upset, it’ll be here and Sally will get her third Oscar, her first since 1985. She’s magnificent as the desperately troubled Mary Todd Lincoln, and she deserves the award. I love Anne, but as my friend Lyle sagely noted, all these accolades aren’t so much for Anne, as for the song. (Just like Jennifer Hudson going to Oscar victory in 2007 by screaming “And I’m Telling You, I’m Not Going” in “Dreamgirls.”) DIRECTOR: Steven Spielberg for “Lincoln.” Since Ben Affleck is not up for this award and “Lincoln” had the most nominations, look for a Spielberg victory here. OTHER RACES:Foreign Language Film: “Amour” Animated Feature: “Wreck-It Ralph Cinematography: “Life of Pi” Makeup and Hairstyling: “Les Miserables” Production Design: “Lincoln” Original Screenplay: Michael Haneke, “Amour” Adapted Screenplay: Tony Kushner, “Lincoln” Visual Effects: “Life of Pi” Costume Design: “Lincoln” Film Editing: “Argo”Sound Mixing: “Les Miserables” Sound Editing: “Zero Dark Thirty” Original Score: “Life of Pi” Original Song: “Skyfall” from “Skyfall” Documentary Feature: “How to Survive a Plague” Documentary Short: “Kings Point” ASSOCIATED PRESS A large Oscar statue is covered with a plastic tarp in th e red carpet arrival area outside the Dolby Theatre in Hollywo od waiting for tonight’s 85th Academy Awards ceremony. Some citrus trees can survive in North Florida Q Mark Kirby is a Lake City resident with a longtime interest in motion pictures.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterBOCA RATON — Greek yogurt is taking over the dairy aisle, but will kids bite? The question is a critical one for General Mills, which is a dominant play-er in yogurt for kids, with about half the market. It’s also important to Chobani, the leader in the Greek yogurt category, which is stepping up its courtship of kids — and their parents. It’s a difficult question to answer, though. That’s because the same reasons some adults prefer Greek yogurt over the traditional yogurts Americans usually eat may not mean much to children. Some adults like Greek yogurt for its bitter taste and the thicker consistency that it has because of the way it’s strained. Some health-conscious adults also like it because it has less fat and more protein. But children are a different story: They general like foods that are sweet and don’t care about how much protein is in their snacks. “Whether the benefits of Greek yogurt are mean-ingful to children or not remains to be seen,” said Ian Friendly, the chief operating officer for the U.S. retail division of General Mills, during an interview with reporters at an indus-try conference on Tuesday. But the fact that companies are looking at market-ing Greek yogurt to kids is a natural progression of a growing market. Since 2007, Greek yogurt has gone from 1 percent of the market to 36 percent, with Chobani accounting for about half the market, according to a report by Bernstein Research. The report noted that Greek yogurt could continue growing and peak at more than 50 percent of the broader yogurt market in the U.S. General Mills, which estimates that kids make up 12 percent of the yogurt market, sees an opportu-nity to lure at least some children. Last month, the company introduced its “Pro-Force” Greek yogurt, which also comes in cups and is marketed for tweens and older children. But the Minneapolis-based compa-ny declined to say whether it has any plans to make a Greek yogurt variety of Go-Gurt, the popular squeez-able yogurt it makes for younger children. To tap into the kids market, Chobani last month introduced “Chobani ChampionsTubes” in flavors such as “Chillin’ Cherry” and “Jammin’ Strawberry,” posing a direct challenge to General Mills’ Go-Gurt. The company first moved into kids territory in 2011, with the introduction of “Chobani Champions,” which comes in cups and is marketed toward slightly older kids. Chobani also is appealing to parents with its Champions cups and tubes by noting that they have less sugar and more protein than other yogurts for kids; Chobani tubes have 8 grams of sugar and 5 grams of pro-tein. Go-Gurt has about 10 grams of sugar and 2 grams of protein. The privately-held company’s introduction of yogurt tubes is just the latest threat to General Mills, which is still scrambling to catch up to the growth of Greek yogurt. If General Mills had known it would become so popular, the company would have jumped into the market sooner, Friendly, General Mills’ COO said. “I don’t think anyone thought that it was going to get as big as it did,” he said during the interview at the Consumer Analyst Group of New York conference in Boca Raton, Fla. But General Mills notes that it’s making up ground quickly. It introduced Yoplait Greek in 2010 and followed up with 100-calorie versions of the line last sum-mer, which it says help set it apart from other Greek yogurts. The company says it now has 9 percent of the Greek yogurt market, with hopes of building up the fig-ure to 20 percent. “There’s a lot of battles in this war,” Friendly said.Greek yogurt popular with adults, will kids bite?By LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — Shoes are having a 21st century moment as they’ve pushed from mere acces-sory to the center of the fashion stage. Sexuality, social status, fashion IQ: The reasons for our shoe obsession are many, but one thing’s for sure: more, and more avant-garde, designers are taking on the feet. “There has been a big emphasis on high designer shoes in the past 10 to 12 years, so more women are certainly willing to spend more money on high-end shoes, but there’s also been a real focus on shoes as art piec-es,” said Colleen Hill, assistant curator of accessories for The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. The museum went directly to the source — a Who’s Who of shoe designers and some high-profile collectors — for “Shoe Obsession,” an exhibition that runs through April 13. Outlandish beer heiress Daphne Guinness lent some of her favorites. So did jewelry designer Lynn Ban, who owns roughly 800 pairs and says, “I’ve worn them all, at least once.” The exhibition shows off 153 specimens, mostly from this cen-tury, including Ban’s silver-plat-form Chanels with handguns for heels (They came with a warning against packing them in carry-on luggage when flying). From the eerie, bone-white Exoskeleton made of resin and produced through 3-D digital printing by Janina Alleyne to the disco-ball-ish silver sparklers without a heel by Giuseppe Zanotti (also Ban’s); nary a style is left unrepresented by FIT. Hill and Valerie Steele, director and chief curator of the museum, have co-written a book, “Shoe Obsession,” to accompany the exhibit. During a recent walk-through, the two spoke of design-er shoes as the new millennium’s “It” bag, which has not gone unnoticed by major department stores. The flagship Macy’s in Manhattan expanded floor space for shoes by 10 percent, boast-ing 250,000 pairs. Saks Fifth Avenue enlarged shoe depart-ments in about a dozen stores around the country, with the Manhattan store’s department 40 percent larger, spanning the entire eighth floor and hosting the first Louis Vuitton shoe shop within a department store. Shoes by established designers and design houses — Manolo Blahnik, Salvatore Ferragamo, Roger Vivier, Chanel, Prada, Christian Louboutin — remain popular — obvi! — but quirky stars have arisen as quickly as heels have gone so high that 4 inches is the new “low,” the two curators said. The new design generation? Modernists Kei Kagami, with art pieces that take on an almost orthopedic terror, and Noritaka Tatehana, working in stamped leather, spikes and tall toe plat-forms absent a heel, stand out in a strong contingent from Japan. Brazilian shoe designer Alexandre Birman lent the exhib-it three pairs done in painted reptile skin. “Shoes have a psychological, sociocultural and seductive sig-nificance to our culture, from the Hollywood celebrity to the every-day woman, which goes beyond a materialistic obsession,” he said in an email. The centuries have spawned many beautiful shoes, but the masses joining in a more recent phenomenon known as the “Sex and the City” effect continues to ripple in fashion. Shoes are so popular, in fact, that Hill cited recent data not-ing the average American woman owns nearly twice as many shoes as she did a decade ago — about 17 pairs. “What we’re seeing in a way is a kind of democratization of the kind of phenomenon that we saw in ‘Sex and the City,’” Steele said. “At first it was just sort of some people who were really obsessed with high-end designer shoes. This has now spread.” Shoes, she said, have moved from accessories to fashion’s main story “to being the main story, in part because designer clothes have gotten so expen-sive. So even if you’re spending $900, $1,000 on a pair of shoes, something insane, that’s less than you’d be spending by far than if you were getting a dress or something, and people seem to feel that it’s more worth it.” Height, Steele said, “has reached this great moment,” when compared to a decade ago. “We’ve gone about as high as most people can walk in shoes, unless you’re Lady Gaga. That’s about six inches, but some peo-ple can do higher.” Ban is one of them.“I can go maybe 10 inches, but that’s, like, standing at a cocktail party not moving. Anything for fashion,” she laughed. While a high toe platform to match rear height remains popu-lar, with Ban and millions of other fashionistas, “we’re starting to see a new trend toward what people are calling sexy shoes, by which they mean single-sole shoes instead of a platform, so I think that implies that the heel will get a little bit less vertigi-nous, and instead the emphasis will be on interesting materials and decoration, and different shoe shapes,” Steele said. There’s no way to categorize popularity in shoes today. There’s a range of heights, shapes and embellishments — feathers, crystals, beads, spikes, human hair made to look like the tails of ponies, molded and painted resins, painted python. All are included in the exhibition. Linda Wells, editor in chief of Allure magazine, said in a New York Fashion Week interview that shoe trends are like fash-ion trends in general — you can find whatever you want: pointy toes, stiletto heels, high plat-forms, fancy flats, more mascu-line shapes. “Everyone likes buying shoes. You don’t have to take your clothes off or be a model size to wear them,” Wells said. Overall, Steele said, “high heels have really become the prime symbol of erotic femininity. However high it is, but the con-cept of the high heel, that’s really important. It’s such a powerful trope for women and for men.” Shoes, Steele said, are “fierce,” but also feminine, high and often striving for that “Cinderella factor” that can transform the wearer. It’s all “quite delightful,” she smiled. “It just makes you want to run out and go shoe shopping.” Out of the closet, shoes move center stage FASHION ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSABOVE LEFT: A model wears high boots during the Rebecca Minkoff Fa ll 2013 fashion show during Fashion Week in New York. ABOVE RIGHT: A model wearing decorated shoes with matching stocking s during The Anna Sui Fall 2013 collection. BELOW LEFT: Shoes to be worn by models displayed backstage before the showing of the Thom Browne Fall 2013 collection. BELOW RIGHT: A pair of silver shoes designed by Chanel with guns a s heels is on display at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. ASSOCIATED PRESSChobani Greek Yogurt is seen at the Chobani plant in So uth Edmeston, N.Y. Greek yogurt is taking over the dairy a isle, but will kids bite? The question is a critical one for Gener al Mills, which is a dominant player in yogurt for kids with about half the market. It’s also important to Chobani, the leader in the Greek yogurt category, which is stepping up its courtship of kids — and their parents. More avant-garde designers are working on feet. Among the fanciful shoes on display in the “Shoe Obsession” exhibit at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York are: (top) Christian Louboutin’s “Fetish Ballerine” pump; (center) Roger Vivier’s Eyelash Heel pump; and (bottom) a pair of shoes designed by Tom Ford.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsOscars Red Carpet Live (N) (Live) The Oscars Honors for achievements in lm. (N) (Live) News at 11 4-IND 4 4 4On the Red Carpet at the Oscars: The Entertainment Tonight (N) “True Confessions” (1981, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall. NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsOn the Red Carpet 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin “Blood Is Thicker” Masterpiece Classic Trip to a Scottish hunting lodge. Masterpiece Contemporary “Page Eight” David Hare’s original spy thriller. Doc Martin “Blood Is Thicker” 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Mentalist “Devil’s Cherry” The Good WifeAction Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17(5:30) Basketball Law & Order “Terminal” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Victory LaneThe SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe SimpsonsCleveland ShowFamily GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Order 23 Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBC (N) Off Their RockersOff Their RockersSaturday Night Live in the 2000s: Time and Again The show in the 2000s. (PA) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304Roseanne “BOO!” RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass (N) Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass A&E 19 118 265Shipping WarsShipping WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Backyard Wedding” (2010)“Elevator Girl” (2010, Romance) Lacey Chabert, Ryan Merriman. “I Married Who?” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:00)“Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard.“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle.“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“Terminator Salvation” (2009) Christian Bale. (DVS)“Clash of the Titans” (2010) Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson. (DVS) (:15)“Terminator Salvation” (2009) Christian Bale. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieSee Dad Run (N)“The Brady Bunch Movie” (1995) Shelley Long, Gary Cole. Premiere. Friends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Turtle on Its Back” Bar Rescue “Bad to the Bone” Bar Rescue “Chumps” Bar Rescue “Rock ’N Roaches” Bar Rescue “Bro’s Got to Geaux” (N) (:01) Car Lot Rescue (N) MY-TV 29 32 -BatmanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Siblings compete for a corporation. M*A*S*HThriller “The Purple Room” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyA.N.T. FarmShake It Up!Dog With a BlogDog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieAustin & AllyJessieA.N.T. FarmShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Prosecuting Casey Anthony”“Blue-Eyed Butcher” (2012, Docudrama) Sara Paxton, Lisa Edelstein. “She Made Them Do It” (2012) Jenna Dewan Tatum, Mackenzie Phillips. (:02) “Blue-Eyed Butcher” (2012) USA 33 105 242NCIS “Blowback” NCIS A murder victim in a taxi. NCIS “Angel of Death” (DVS) NCIS A showdown with an arms dealer. NCIS “Guilty Pleasure” White Collar “Shoot the Moon” BET 34 124 329(4:00)“Coach Carter” (2005) “He Got Game” (1998) Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. A high-school basketball star faces his estranged father. HusbandsHo.Second GenerationDon’t Sleep! Hosted by T.J. Holmes ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Brooklyn Nets. From Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. (N)d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College BasketballCrossFit GamesCrossFit Games NHRA Drag Racing Arizona Nationals. From Chandler, Ariz. (N Same-day Tape) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport FishingAmerican Ski ClassicFight Sports: In 60 From Dec. 2, 2011. DISCV 38 182 278Yukon Men “On the Brink” Yukon Men “Feast or Famine” Silver Rush (Series Premiere) (N) Silver Rush “Curse of the Mantola” (N) Silver Rush “Odyssey’s Victory” (N) Silver Rush “Curse of the Mantola” TBS 39 139 247“Big Daddy” (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. “The Hangover” (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (DVS) (:15)“Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle” (2004) John Cho. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236(5:30) Live From the Red Carpet: The 2013 Academy Awards The stars on the red carpet. (N) (Live) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! After Party (N) TRAVEL 46 196 277Tastiest Places to ChowdownState Fair FoodsMud PeopleSturgis: Wild RideSturgis: CopsRadical Rides HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lCool PoolsHawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Undercover Boss “MGM Grand” Undercover Boss “Baja Fresh” Gypsy Sisters: Extra Bling (N) (:10) Gypsy Sisters: Extra Bling “The Queen of All Cons” (:18) Gypsy Sisters: Extra Bling (N) Gypsy Sisters: Ex HIST 49 120 269Ax Men Shelby builds his new empire. Ax Men “Gators & Hand Grenades” Ax Men “Goldmine” Ax Men Hurricane Isaac hits the bayou. Big Rig Bounty Hunters(:02) Swamp People “Texas Hold ’Em” ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedWild West AlaskaWild West Alaska (N) Gator Boys “Gator Boy Knockout” Finding Bigfoot “Peek-A-Boo Bigfoot” Ghostland, Tennessee (N) FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveWorst Cooks in AmericaChopped “Untrained, Undaunted” (N) Worst Cooks in America (N) Iron Chef America “Flay Vs. Wexler” Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerFull FlameThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“Solomon and Sheba” (1995, Historical Drama) Halle Berry, Jimmy Smits. FSN-FL 56 -Car Warriors (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 11 (Taped) The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244Ghost Hunters “All Ghouls on Deck” Ghost HuntersGhost Hunters “Ghost Mission” Ghost Hunters “Permanent Residents” Ghost Hunters “Prescription for Fear” Ghost Hunters “Ghosts From Hale” AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Catwoman” (2004) The Walking Dead “The Suicide King” The Walking Dead “Home” The Walking Dead “I Ain’t a Judas” (N) (:01) Talking Dead “I Ain’t a Judas.” The Walking Dead “I Ain’t a Judas” COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Coming to America” (1988) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall. Kevin Hart: Seriously FunnyKevin Hart: Laugh at My PainChris Rock: Bigger & BlackerBernie Mac CMT 63 166 327(4:45)“Top Gun” (1986) (:15) My Big Redneck Vacation(:15) Swamp Pawn(:15) “Days of Thunder” (1990, Action) Tom Cruise, Robert Duvall. Upstart stock-car driver goes to the edge. NGWILD 108 190 283World’s Deadliest Arachnid nightmares. 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(N) (:01) Castle Castle tries to nd Alexis. News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Capitol UpdateNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Myrtle Beach” Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei. (N) Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Lana I Ka Moana” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries “Caught” (N) 90210 “Strange Brew” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones An eccentric new intern. (N) (PA) The Following “The Fall” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Face Your Fears” The contestants face their fears. (N) (:01) Deception “Stay With Me” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy TodayFirst Ladies: In uence & Image Martha Washington’s life. 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USA 33 105 242NCIS “Mind Games” NCIS A missing staff sergeant. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Plan B” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“The Best Man” (1999) Taye Diggs. A writer meets an old ame at his friend’s wedding. “Getting Played” (2005, Romance-Comedy) Carmen Electra, Stacey Dash. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Syracuse at Marquette. (N)d College Basketball Kansas at Iowa State. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Women’s College Basketball Baylor at Oklahoma. 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FoodBizarre Foods America “Denver” Bizarre Foods America “Iowa” (N) Hotel ImpossibleTrip of a Lifetime HGTV 47 112 229Property Brothers “Luke & Courtney” Love It or List It The Gallagher family. Love It or List It “The Wood Family” Love It or List It (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The McMinn Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumHere Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family (:12) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family Sized (N) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family Here Comes Honey HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “You Betcha” American Pickers “The Doctor Is In” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “California Kustom” Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Ultimate Soldier Challenge ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceGator Boys: Xtra BitesFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot “Peek-A-Boo Bigfoot” Gator Boys: Xtra BitesFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00)“David and Bathsheba”Max LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -The Game 365Ship Shape TV Women’s College Basketball Wake Forest at Virginia. (N) Inside the MagicInside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 11 SYFY 58 122 244(4:30)“Repo Men” (2010) Continuum “Time’s Up” Continuum Trust and loyalty. (N) Being Human (N) Continuum “Time’s Up” Continuum Trust and loyalty. AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“A Knight’s Tale” (2001, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Mark Addy.“Signs” (2002) Mel Gibson. A widower investigates huge circles in his crop elds. “Demolition Man” (1993) Sylvester Stallone. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearMy Big Redneck VacationDukes-Hazzard NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Expecting Trouble” Ultimate SharkAlaska Fish Wars “Jackpot” Built for the Kill “Hyena” (N) Alpha DogsAlpha DogsAlaska Fish Wars “Jackpot” NGC 109 186 276Inside Combat RescueDrugs, Inc. “High Stakes Vegas” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers (N) Inside Combat Rescue (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Deep Space Marvels “Life” Deep Space Marvels “Survival” Deep Space Marvels “Destiny” How the Universe Works:How the Universe Works:Deep Space Marvels “Destiny” ID 111 192 285I Didn’t Do ItMarch to Justice Voting Rights Act. (N) FBI: Criminal PursuitFBI: Criminal PursuitTrue Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) FBI: Criminal Pursuit HBO 302 300 501(4:30) Monte Carlo“The Girl” (2012, Docudrama) Toby Jones. Real Time With Bill MaherBeyonc: Life Is but a Dream“Wanderlust” (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515Death Becomes“No Escape” (1994, Science Fiction) Ray Liotta, Lance Henriksen. ‘R’ “Child’s Play” (1988) Catherine Hicks. ‘R’ “Dragon Eyes” (2012) Jean-Claude Van Damme. ‘R’ (:35) Banshee SHOW 340 318 545“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ Homeland “A Gettysburg Address” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “Cascading Failures” Inside Comedy (N) House of Lies WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312The Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieMovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesVaried Programs NIK 26 170 299Peter RabbitMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! 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NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs Kourtney-KimVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsFast Foods Gone GlobalBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossCake BossWhat Not to WearFour WeddingsVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied ProgramsAmerican PickersVaried Programs ANPL 50 184 282Varied Programs Pit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesSwamp Wars FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244(11:30) MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:23) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327MovieVaried Programs Roseanne(4:52) RoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:00) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(10:35) MovieVaried Programs (:05) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:15) MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: I have been in love with “Richard” for 14 years. We broke up after we dated for a while because my alcoholic mother kept interfering. She kept telling me how “bad” he was for me -and I, thinking my mother had my best interests at heart, believed her. After a divorce on my part and a breakup on his, we are now in a long-distance relationship. We hope to make our relation-ship permanent after get-ting to know each other again. My problem is, when Richard is unhappy or upset with someone else, he takes it out on me. It doesn’t seem to matter what happened, he’ll pick a fight over something inconsequential. It drives me crazy. I know what he’s doing; I just don’t know how to stop it. The latest flare-up involved the fact that his dog was missing, so he picked a fight with me because I “always tell him how nice the weather is where I live.” He refuses to get counseling. What do I do? -PULLING MY HAIR OUT DEAR PULLING: Your problem isn’t that Richard uses you as a scapegoat for his frustrations; it’s that you tolerate it. It’s pos-sible that because of your mother’s alcoholism and the unpredictable behav-ior you were subjected to during your formative years, you have accepted Richard’s behavior. Because he refuses counseling, YOU should get some. What he’s doing is not acceptable. It is emotional abuse. From my perspective, the healthi-est thing you could do for yourself besides break up with Richard would be to keep the romance long-distance. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a retired woman, active in my community and troubled by a recent inci-dent involving a longtime friend. This is the third time it has happened, and it left me feeling embar-rassed. When we’re out together meeting new people, she will introduce herself as being a secretary or a senior secretary and me as “just” a receptionist. The job title is true, but I hold a college degree. I have held other positions com-manding greater respect. I am chair of the local Council on Aging, a Town Meeting member and on the Cultural Council. The last time it happened, I had brought her to a lunch at a very nice restaurant, and the people we were meet-ing were members of my community. Why does this make me feel so demeaned? Am I being petty or vainly pretentious? Right now I no longer want to continue the friendship. Can you help me under-stand and form a game plan? -MORE THAN A JOB TITLE IN NEW ENGLAND DEAR MORE THAN A JOB TITLE: Your “friend” is insecure. That she describes you as “just” a receptionist is her attempt to make her own job desig-nation appear more impor-tant. And THAT’S what is offensive. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Treat, pamper and play. You deserve a much-needed break and should make plans to engage in something that will inspire, motivate and boost your confidence. Open up and be receptive to romantic opportunities. Love is on the rise. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do something nice for someone without being asked. Your gesture will bring rewards far beyond your expectations. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll be expected to make changes in order to help someone. Do your best to form an alliance that will be benefit every-one involved. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Interact with friends and peers. Networking will allow you to discuss your ideas and plans for the future. A partnership will develop, bringing greater stability and clout to your plans. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Love can make you do strange things. Keep your credit cards in a safe place and stick to whatever budget you set. Trying to impress someone with what you have will not lead to a good connection. Invest in your home. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put greater empha-sis on what you want to get out of a partnership. Meeting someone halfway will allow you to build a solid base for future proj-ects. Sincerity coupled with a promise will help you get your way. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Focus on what you need. Get out, do a little shopping or make an effort to pick up skills, informa-tion or connections that will help you achieve your personal goals. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Take hold of what-ever situation you face and be relentless until you get what you want. Your strength, courage and dedication will enhance your reputation. Increase your living space or create a place to work on creative projects. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Truth will be difficult to come by. Asking opinions will lead to false information. You have to dig deep and find out what you need to know firsthand. Don’t settle for someone else’s deci-sion. Make up your own mind and act accordingly. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): An unusual invest-ment opportunity will catch your eye. Look at the stats and wager what you can do to turn a profit. Old memories and past experi-ence will guide you in the right direction. Time is on your side, so don’t act impulsively. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Let your intuition guide you when making physical, emotional or financial changes. Keep moderation in mind and only do what you feel you can handle. Greater disci-pline will help you achieve your goals. Love is in the stars. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Invest in your endeav-ors. Figure out your strat-egy and discuss what you want to do with someone who has wisdom and expe-rience. Money is within reach and greater stabil-ity will develop if you are vigilant when dealing with contracts. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Summation symbol in math %DVHEDOOWHDPV leading hitter 12 Gotham police procedural
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By MELISSA RAYWORTH Associated Press The conversation often starts with, Where are your shoes? For many parents trying to get out the door on time in the morning, a child with a disorganized bedroom can be a huge roadblock. The clock is ticking. The bus is coming. And your offspring is searching for his favorite hoodie. The day often ends with similar challenges: Is your backpack ready for school tomorrow? Where are your library books? Getting a childs room organized can be the first step toward smoother mornings and more peace ful evenings. It was nice to be orga nized 20 years ago, says organizing consultant Kathryn Bechen, author of Small Space Organizing: A Room-by-Room Guide to Maximizing Your Space (Revell, 2012). But given how busy we are today, she says, its become a neces sity. Here are some experts tips on decorating and arranging your childs bed room in ways that will sim plify daily life. GET THEM EXCITED No need for full-scale redecorating. An offer to rearrange items and per haps add a few new ones will probably get your child excited enough to help shape up her space. Try to make it fun, Bechen says. Take one whole Saturday or Sunday for the whole family to work on it. PARE DOWN Eliminating clutter isnt simple, especially when kids would prefer not to part with anything. Donna Smallin, author and cre ator of unclutter.com, sug gests having kids help haul everything they own into the hallway outside their room. When the room is empty, have them bring back in only their favorite or most necessary things. You can supervise: When all the necessities are back in, start discussing what might be good to give away, sell, or box up for storing in an attic or basement. Reassure the child that items in storage can always come out again later. RETHINK THE CLOSET To get children excit ed about actually putting things away in the closet, let them paint it a neat color inside, says Bechen. It can be as outrageous as theyd like; its hidden behind a door. If they love it and it feels personal, she says, theyre more likely to use it. Then, work with their habits: If your child isnt a fan of hanging up clothing, consider filling some or all of the closet with open shelving. Put bins or bas kets on each shelf, labeling with words and/or pictures to describe what belongs inside. If you will be using the closet rod, Smallin suggests adding a small double rod that hangs below one por tion of the main rod. Put items the child wears most often on the lower rod, so theyre within easy reach. Or use this extra rod for the clothing the child will wear to school this week. GET PLAYFUL Make straightening up fun. Consider buying one large trashcan for sports equipment and another to use as a hamper. Let the child label and personal ize the outside. You can even add a plastic basket ball hoop to the top of each trash can, so the child can have fun tossing items inside. Who doesnt love to throw stuff? asks Smallin. Also, have the child deco rate a special bin or basket where tomorrows clothes and shoes will go. Then choose a permanent spot for it. Each night, toss in everything your child will wear tomorrow (including the packed, zipped school bag). Better to find miss ing socks and debate which clothes are appropriate in the evening than do it when the school bus is on its way. USE THE WALLS Kids are more likely to use hooks than hangers. So add lots of colorful hooks at your childs level not just one or two, but a whole row to store hoodies, jackets and even pants. Also consider hanging a shoe bag on back of the door, but dont feel obli gated to use it for shoes. Smallin says it can be filled with socks and underwear, small toys or anything else that needs to be easily located. Another key item for the wall: a clock with hands. Kutscher says nondigital clocks make time a bit more tangible for kids, helping them notice the passage of time and hopefully stay on task. A large wall calendar is a great way to help them get organized. Last item: a dry-erase board where kids can keep a checklist of tasks for bed time and morning. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE NORTH FLORIDA HOME & PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUB OF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN Saturday, March 2nd Sunday, March 3rd 9am 5pm 10am 4pm Columbia County Fairgrounds FREE ADMISSION ASSOCIATED PRESS New Epcot exhibit Visitors explore the new IBM THINK exhibit at Epcot in the Walt Disney Resorts in Orlando. The exhibit, which focuses on the process of innovation, opened on Wednesday. Tricks to helping kids keep room organized Home Decor ASSOCIATED PRESS There is no single solution to teaching kids to keep their bed rooms neat. A combination of providing the right furnishings and getting them to take ownership can go a long way, though. Help them make the process easy and enjoyable.