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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02028

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02028

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com T he director of the Lake City Middle School band has a goal to improve the sound of the drumline, the heart beat of any band, and make it safer for his students to perform in parades, concerts and football games. Some of these drums sound like junk. You cant tune them right. They dont sound like theyre sup posed to, 12-year-old LCMS band member Camren Hinton said. Hanging by the chalk board are five metal har nesses. The padding has been compressed from years of use. The harness is used when the drum line takes the show to the streets. That one slips, Celeste Archer, 13, said while pointing at one of the harnesses. Then she thinks about the rest of the harnesses. They all slip, she said. David Chandler, director of the band, said the har nesses distribute the weight of the drum across the body, making it easier to carry the drum in parades or at football games. When a harness slips, the weight of the drum isnt evenly spread out across the stu dents frame. Its essentially sheet metal on the shoulder, and these things are especially uncomfortable, he said. We cant even buy this stuff anymore because its obsolete. Chandler said the students raised $800 last year through car washes and donations in hopes to one day replacing their equipment. While By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com United States Cold Storage received tax exemption on $15.2 million of facility improve ments as the company plans to expand its business in Columbia County. The agreement was finalized at Thursdays county commis sion meeting. The tax exemption will be in effect for 10 years, the maximum time allowable by state law. Jesse Quillin, economic development direc tor, said the company plans to add 105,000 square feet of new space, which will require the company to hire 15 additional employees at a pay rate of 148 percent of the county average. The company will still pay property taxes on its existing property totaling about $216,000, Quillin said. The Economic Development Advisory Board recommended the county commis sion approve the project at their last board meeting. The tax exemption will be for 100 percent of the value added to the property by the $15.2 million improvements. Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Gregory re-ups as Press host. COMING SUNDAY Preview of upcoming legislative session. 80 59 Mostly cloudy WEATHER, 2A CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 278 Lake City Reporter FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75 LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION 1A Friday Pet adoption Lake City Humane Society and PetSmart are holding a Big Tent Adoption Event in the Publix Shopping Center. The Humane Society and North Florida Animal Rescue have dogs and cats available for adop tion on display and volun teers on hand to answer questions. All animals will be spayed or neutered and have current vaccinations. Dogs also wil have micro chip identifiers. The event began Tuesday and contin ues through Sunday. Hours will be 11 a..m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more infor mation, call the Humane Society at (386) 752-1178. Benefit dinner, auction The Fort White and Columbia High School chapters of Future Farmers of America will have their annual benefit dinner and auction at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. A chicken and rice dinner will start at 6 p.m., followed by the auction at 7 p.m. Proceeds will help FFA members attend leadership conferences and career development events and purchase materials for their schools agriscience depart ments. Many of the items to be auctioned made by FFA members. Saturday CDC fundraiser The Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. will have its eighth annual Black Tie Fundraiser banquet at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. The speaker will be Bishop Russell A. Wright of Panama City. Tickets are $30. For more information or to donate, visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive, call 752-9785 or ask any CDC board member. Casting call Alligator Community Theater will hold casting calls today for its produc tion of the play Dearly Departed. The play will be performed April 26 and 27 and May 3 and 4. Black history musical The District Congress of Christian Education of First Central Missionary Baptist Association presents the History of Music in the African-American Church and the achievements of African-Americans in our society. The District Choir under the direction of Deacon Steve Troy and Sister Carolyn Jones will present selections depicting the heritage of music in the black church. The event will be held at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive in at 5 p.m. Rev. Alvin Baker is the pastor and Rev. J. T. Simon is the presi dent. For more information, contact Gloria McIntosh at (386) 755-1099. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Lake City Middle School seventh-grader Celeste Archer, 13, practices on a drum while in class on Tuesday. The LCMS marching band is fundraising to buy used drum equipment from Valdosta State University to replace their existing stock -many which are tattered and beyond repair. LCMS band looking for an upgrade County approves new pay grades Commission also gives OK to one cent increase in bed tax. We cant even buy this stuff anymore because its obsolete, says director David Chandler. TAXES continued on 3A BAND continued on 3A Tax abatement plan OKd Local cold-storage firm wont pay property taxes on improvements for 10 years. SCLC: Woman was threatened for reporting sex offenders presence MAKING SURE THE BEAT GOES ON By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Southern Christian Leadership Conference rep resentatives on Thursday accused Columbia County Commissioner Ron Williams of unethical behavior including abuse of power, threats and intimidation. Williams denied the allega tions. Bea Coker, president of the newly formed Lake City branch of the SCLC, said Williams threatened her after she called law enforcement officers about a convicted sexual offender who attended a public func tion at Richardson Community Center. Coker and R.L. Gundy, SCLC state president, addressed the county commission Thursday evening. Coker said convicted sexual offender Grover Anthony Lewis SCLC continued on 3A JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Bea Coker addresses the county commis sion Thursday. By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The division managers for the county may receive raises after the county commission approved placing them in new pay grades. When the posi tions were created, the county commission provided funding of $50,000 for increase com pensation for the new posi tions in the next budget. Both the administration manager and the safety man ager salary will now fall some where between $57,678 and $86,507. The operations man ager was kept as an exempt position with his salary falling outside the county pay plan and will be negotiable. Lisa Roberts, administra tion manager, heads 10 depart ments and supervises 55 employ ees. David Kraus, safe ty manager, heads seven depart ments and supervises 76 employ ees. Kevin Kirby, operations manager, heads six depart ments and supervises 116 employees. A consultant provided rec ommendations to the commis sioners on how big a raise they should be given. County Manager Dale Williams said he spoke to the division managers separately and provided them with his assessment on their perfor mance. One of the division managers brought the consul tants recommendations and the county did not spend any money on those recommenda tions. Comissioner Bucky Nash said he would rather see sal ary increases come from the bottom up. He sited the num ber of county employees mak ing less then $20,000. In the county 20 employees make less than $20,000 and 131 employees make between 20,001 and $39,999. Williams said hes per cent for providing raises to employee at the bottom, but said an across the board 3 per cent pay increase would cost the county between $600,000 and $650,000. Williams said finding $100,000 of recurring funds would be possible and PAY continued on 3A Dale Williams David Chandler, LCMS marching band instructor, looks at a marching snare dating from the mid-1960s that the band was forced to retire. 1A 3A 22 1 2/21/13 11:55:24 PM

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Announcer Don Pardo is 95. Q Basketball Hall of Famer Julius Erving is 63. Q White House adviser David Axelrod is 58. Q World Golf Hall of Famer Vijay Singh is 50. Q Actress-comedian Rachel Dratch is 47. AROUND FLORIDA Nuclear utility law changes pushed TALLAHASSEE — Four Republican state sena-tors Thursday announced plans to seek changes in a state law that lets utili-ties charge customers for future nuclear power plant construction even if it never gets built. A House member sponsoring repeal legislation, though, said the Tampa Bay area lawmakers’ pro-posal won’t work because it doesn’t go far enough and utilities will find a way around their revisions. Sen. John Legg, R-Lutz, said the legislation’s intent is to protect consumers’ interests, assure account-ability and transparency and responsibly plan for Florida’s long-term energy needs. “On the details, there is plenty of room for con-versation,” Legg said at a news conference. “But on these three principles there will be no room for compromise.” Legg’s bill, which hasn’t yet been filed, would set a deadline for construction to begin and eliminate the profit utilities can make on customers’ prepayments if they fail to build a plant. Another provision would reduce interest utilities now earn on carrying costs on their projected construction cost balances from a current 8.5 percent to an annual market rate, said Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater.UCF suspends frats, sororities ORLANDO — The University of Central Florida has suspended many fraternity and soror-ity activities until alcohol and hazing issues are addressed. In an announcement Wednesday, the univer-sity administration said recent events indicate the school’s Greek community needs a change in culture when it comes to alcohol use and hazing. No infor-mation on anything spe-cific was released. Hazing has been a topic of discussion and debate in Florida since the November 2011 death of Robert Champion. The Florida A&M University drum major died after a brutal hazing ritual aboard a bus. UCF officials said they will develop a comprehen-sive plan to address alco-hol and hazing issues. More than 3,100 students participate in 48 recognized Greek organi-zations at UCF. A school news release says fraternities and sororities will be permitted to hold organizational busi-ness meetings but little else.House Democrats elect new leader TALLAHASSEE — Rep. Darryl Rouson will lead Florida’s House Democrats in 2014-16. The minority party’s caucus narrowly elected the St. Petersburg law-maker as its next leader on Wednesday. Rouson will succeed Rep. Perry Thurston of Plantation. In the unlikely event Democrats unseat Republicans as the major-ity party in the 2014 gener-al election, Rouson would become speaker. The Democratic caucus elected him over Rep. Mia Jones of Jacksonville 23-21 on a second ballot. They had tied on the first ballot. The 58-year-old Rouson is a lawyer and former Republican who once sup-ported then-GOP Gov. Jeb Bush. He also served on former Gov. Charlie Crist’s transition team when Crist was a Republican. Crist, too, has switched parties and now is considering running for governor again as a Democrat in 2014.Crash into cruiser kills motorcyclist TAMPA — A motorcycle traveling at a high rate of speed crashed into the back of a Florida Highway Patrol cruiser that was parked in a construction zone along the Courtney Campbell Causeway. The driver of the motorcycle was killed in the Wednesday night crash. FHP says a female passen-ger was taken to the hospi-tal in critical condition. The highway patrol says the inside lane of the bridge that spans Tampa Bay was closed for con-struction. The trooper who was helping control traffic through the work zone wasn’t injured.Man gets 6 years for fatal shooting DADE CITY — A Tampa Bay area man has been sentenced to six years in prison for a fatal shooting after a party. As part of a deal with Pasco County prosecu-tors, 23-year-old Douglas Gabriel Cevallos Jr. plead-ed guilty Wednesday to manslaughter. Authorities say several teens were involved in a fight following a party in June 2009. At some point, Cevallos picked up a .40-caliber handgun that fell from the pocket of some-one involved in the fight. He began waving the gun around and shot 17-year-old Dustin Sean White. According to the Tampa Bay Times, investigators don’t believe Cevallos intended to kill White. Gregory to stay ‘Meet the Press’ host NEW YORK D avid Gregory has re-upped as host of “Meet the Press.” NBC News shared no details, but described the new deal as “a long-term commit-ment.” “What a great vote of confidence from NBC,” a pleased-looking Gregory said Thursday. He said his first four years in the moderator’s chair have passed quickly. “In some ways, it feels like we’re just getting started,” he said. The 42-year-old Gregory began as host of the Sunday morning public-affairs program in December 2008, succeeding the late Tim Russert. Before that, he was Chief White House correspondent during the presidency of George W. Bush. He joined NBC News in 1995. Gregory is only the 10th permanent host of “Meet the Press,” which premiered in 1947 and continues as the longest-running program on net-work television. Looking beyond the new contract, Gregory said he planned to be host-ing the program “for as long as they’ll let me.” “I can’t think of a better platform to have for doing what I love to do — the interviews — and as an outlet for my curiosity,” he said. “I think this is an impactful, influential program, and I love being associated with it.”Lady Gaga says she’s had hip surgery NEW YORK — Lady Gaga says she’s had surgery to fix her hip. The 26-year-old singer posted on her blog late Wednesday that she had hip surgery and it “happened so fast.” She canceled her “Born This Way Ball” tour last week. She thanked her fans in the post, saying they gave her “a lot of strength.” Lady Gaga said that as she was wheeled to surgery, she reflect-ed on her fans. She wrote: “Sometimes you are so brave that it terrifies me. I wonder how it’s even possible.” Lady Gaga canceled more than 20 dates on the remainder of her tour, which began last April. She originally postponed four dates last week after experienc-ing difficulties during her concert in Montreal. She explained to fans on Twitter that she’d hurt herself while performing some time ago.Rapper Ja Rule leaves NY prison in gun case ALBANY, N.Y. — Platinum-selling rapper Ja Rule left an upstate New York prison Thursday morning after serving most of his two-year sentence for illegal gun possession and headed straight into federal custody in a tax case. U.S. Marshals escorted the 36-year-old musician out of Mid-State Correctional Facility at 9:30 a.m. He was being held at the Oneida County Jail in central New York as he await-ed word from the Federal Bureau of Prisons about where he’ll serve time in the tax case. The rapper has some time remaining on a 28-month sentence for tax evasion that ran concurrently. Ja Rule, whose real name is Jeffrey Atkins, may have less than six months left and may be eligible for a halfway house. Thursday: Afternoon: 8-6-6 Evening: N/A Thursday: Afternoon: 2-1-2-7 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 2-3-14-24-33 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture “The commandments, ‘You shall not commit adultery,’ ‘You shall not murder,’ ‘You shall not steal,’ ‘You shall not covet,’ and whatever other command there may be, are summed up in this one command: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ Love does no harm to a neighbor. Therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.” — Romans 13:9-10 ASSOCIATED PRESS‘Meet the Press’ anchor David Gregory been extended as host of television’s longest-running news program. NBC released no details on Thursday but described the new deal as “a long-term commitment.” Q Associated Press Rule Gaga

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 3A 3A The Word of God for the Women of God Where is Your Treasure? Featuring keynote speaker, Robin Arnold We will take a look at what Scripture says about true treasure and also examine our lives, which tells us what we truly treasure. Open Invitation to ALL Women There will be a continental breakfast served, childcare will be provided and the event is FREE! First United Methodist Church (386) 752-4488 Breakout sessions include: Ways to Bring the Word of God into Your Home by Linda Callaham Using Gods Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, and Others by Alicia Pfahler Gods Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen by Joanna Figley Our other GEM speakers will be sharing other helpful and practical insights from Gods Word. Dr. Robert J. Harvey Dr. Rameek McNair 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South Call Today! Use your income tax return for a Healthier Smile! Ask About CareCredit and other financing available (wac) A Special Welcoming Gift For You We Are Offering: (ADA-00110) (ADA-00330) (if needed) COUPON #008 $ 29 00 For Only The policy of our office is that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination, or treatment if performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, examination or treatment. www.theaspendentalgroup.com was at the Richardson Community Center during an NAACP election and has been at the Winfield Community Center. She said as a convicted sex offender he should not be allowed on the prem ises. She said an oversight occurred because he gave the addresses of the facil ity and not their names, so Lewis probation officer, who reportedly gave him permission to be there, was not aware the facilities were public recreation areas. Lewis was convicted in August 2011 of sexual activ ity with a 17-year-old girl and sentenced to 15 years probation. Coker said during a telephone conversation in January, Williams told her Lewis was a personal friend of his. She claims Williams told her he would take steps to alien ate, obstruct and inter fere with her, according to a Feb. 14 letter from Gundy to Williams and other commissioners. Coker was addressing the board to get an update on the funding status of Its About My Effort, a local community and educational group she founded. Coker is seeking matching funds from the county to secure a state-funded grant. Commission Chairman Stephen Bailey said her claim about Williams was not relevant to the question of funding for her group. Coker said it was. Im trying to ascertain whether or not commis sioner Williams commit ment to conspire with indi viduals is going to affect this commissions decision with regards to my orga nizing ... Coker said as Bailey interrupted her to say he wanted to ensure she stayed on point. Williams said he helped Coker with her efforts to secure state funding through a matching grant and that he never threat ened to hurt her chances of receiving county funds. At no time did I threat en to take the grant money or to squash the grant, Williams said. Bailey again intervened. It appears to me there is an ax to grind somewhere and this board doesnt need to be involved where there are axes to grind, he said. During the public com ment section at the meet ings end, Gundy said that a commissioner threat ened Coker and it was unprofessional, unethical and unwarranted. He said he plans to request an investigation by Gov. Rick Scotts office as well as the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Williams declined fur ther comment after the meeting but said he would issue a statement at a later date. Lewis has not been charged with violating the terms of his probation. SCLC: Group makes allegations Continued From Page 1A BAND: Drumming up money Continued From Page 1A money has been allocated in the past for new instra ments, they havent been purchased. Around Thanksgiving, First Street Music and Sound contacted Chandler and told him Valdosta State University had offered to sell their 2-year-old drum line set. But the drums need to be bought soon. The band raised about $2,900 through patron donations and carwashes. The cost of the drums is $4,500. If the school were to buy new equipment it would cost about $12,000, Chandler said. Band members will be washing cars at First Federal Bank by the Lake City Mall March 16 to make a last push to raise the additional $1,600. Chandler said anyone who would like to donate to help the band buy the new drumline set can call 758-4800. Anyone who would rath er mail a check can. The schools address is 843 SW Arlington Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025. TAXES: Revenue traded for jobs Continued From Page 1A Parts of the agreement require the company to provide credible documen tation each year to estab lish the number of full-time employees working in the expanded business. If the company does not hire the additional 15 employees, the county can revoke the tax exemption. Currently, United States Cold Storage employs 44 full-time workers. After the expansion, the company will be required to keep 59 employees on full-time status to receive the tax exemption, according to the job creation agreement. The countys estimated lost revenue from the tax exemption will be $121,828 for the first year. This year the county will collect more than $17.7 million from taxes based on real prop erty and real estate. The job creation proj ect between United States Cold Storage and the coun ty was code named Project Action. PAY: Salary levels OKd Continued From Page 1A a merit pay system would allow for this level of pay increase. At the countys budget workshop a merit pay sys tem for county employees will be discussed. Nash also said he wants to see rotating monthly presentations of the divsion managers, so we as board members can ask them questions, receive infor mation and (be) updated where projects are... The county commission also voted to raise the bed tax one cent. The bed tax in Columbia County is now 4 percent of every dollar spent for a hotel room. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Lake City Middle School seventh-grade band member Camren Hinton, 12, practices on a set of quads on Tuesday. Some of these drums sound like junk. You cant tune them right. They dont sound like theyre supposed to, Hinton said. In Connecticut, Biden urges action on gun control By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN Associated Press DANBURY, Conn. Vice President Joe Biden sought to rally support for the Obama administrations gun control pro posals as he spoke Thursday at a conference on gun violence being held not far from the scene of Decembers school massacre, say ing it fundamentally altered the debate. Biden acknowledged gun con trol has traditionally been viewed as the third rail of American poli tics, recalling that when President Barack Obama asked him to take the lead, the president told him he didnt have to do it if he didnt want to. America has changed on this issue, Biden said at the confer ence at Western Connecticut State University, which the gunman once attended. There is a moral price to be paid for inaction. Noting the courage of the fami lies of the victims at Sandy Hook Elementary in nearby Newtown, Biden said elected officials should show political courage. We have to speak for those 20 beautiful children who died 69 days ago, 12 miles from here, Biden said. We have to speak for the voice of those six adults who died trying to save the children in their care that day who cant speak for themselves. You have to speak for the 1,900 people who have died at the other end of a gun just since Sandy Hook in this country. Biden advocated a series of pro posals, including universal back ground checks for gun owners, a ban on many military-style weap ons and a limit on the size of maga zines. He said the measures would save lives even though there was no guarantee they would prevent all mass shootings. Fewer children will die, Biden said. U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, who organized the conference with two other members of the states congressional delegation, said those measures are achiev able. He said the Newtown shoot ing dramatically changed the prospects for gun control. Newtown has transformed America, and we need to build on that sense of urgency going forward, Blumenthal said. Preventing gun violence was thought to be untouchable politically two months ago. That unspeakable horror has given us unstoppable momentum. Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, attending the confer ence, announced that he wants to immediately ban high-capacity ammunition magazines, require background checks for the trans fer of firearms and expand the states assault weapons ban. He has expressed frustration that the state legislature has not acted more quickly to form a response to the Newtown tragedy. The gunman, 20-year-old Adam Lanza, killed his mother at their Newtown home before going to Sandy Hook and slaughtering 20 children and six adults. He com mitted suicide as police arrived. Drought could spread to state By JOSH FUNK Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. Climate experts say the drought affecting more than half of the nation will persist in the Great Plains and West through the spring and spread over more of California, Texas and Florida. Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations Climate Prediction Center and the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln released their latest predictions Thursday. Currently, 56 percent of the continental U.S. is covered by some form of drought. Thats an improve ment from last summer, when the drought covered two-thirds of the nation. The drought forecast calls for conditions to improve somewhat in eastern Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Georgia and South Carolina. But the February-throughMay drought forecast pre dicts conditions will worsen overall this spring, NOAA climatologist Dan Collins said. And below-average pre cipitation is expected this spring in most Western states and the southeastern United States. As a result, the drought is expected to spread from southern California to cover nearly the entire state. All of Arizona, most of Texas and most of Florida also are expected to be affected. Texas rancher Debbie Davis said shes already sold off more than half of her cattle herd because feed and hay prices have risen in the drought, and now shes wondering whether more changes will be needed. Were trying to figure out whether this is the new normal is this climate change?, she wondered.

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A ren’t you disappointed often when you find out how many successful, famous, or influential people have lied to you? Recently Lance Armstrong admitted to doping with steroids for years as the world’s leading bike trophy winner. Mark McGuire admitted to regularly using ste-roids for years, to become a great baseball hero. Tiger Woods, Bill Clinton, John Edwards, and Balloon Boy’s fame-seeking parents—the list goes on and on. Why do so many heroes choose lying instead of truth? Psychologists tell us that people lie to avoid shame, punishment, scorn, or getting caught. Once a person has lied, and the lie worked for them to avoid consequences, learning takes place and a habit begins forming. Lying can become a regular way of relating to people, a way of life. But, every coin has two sides: Lying may get you out of a hot spot, or create a favorable image temporarily, but you pay the price in the long run. People who lie usually need to cover a lie with other lies, and may have trouble keeping track of their stories. Every lie probably has some guilty feelings associated with it, even little “white” lies. Even if no one finds out about the lie, guilt doesn’t go away, but builds up, and self-respect declines. Lying becomes part of the person’s char-acter. Therein lies the problem. If you have noticed that your children sometimes lie to you, here are some ideas that could change that undesirable behavior. • Take an attitude of wanting to help them fix the problem, rather than becoming angry, or blaming or resenting the child’s behavior. The problem is the behavior, not the child. • Make sure that you’re being a good example for them. Children learn more from what you do, than what you say. • Communicate to them that you want to be a partner, a coach, and a confidante. You’re there to help them build the best lives they can for themselves. • Give them opportunity to tell the truth with reasonable conse-quences. Remember that children lie because it works for them at some level. They may be able to avoid punishment, gain your good graces, or to avoid your judgment or scorn. Don’t give them a reason to lie. • When your child admits to bad behaviors, or admits to a lie, approach them with the attitude of problem solving: How can we fix the situation you’re in? How can we learn and grow from our mis-takes, and become better people by doing the right thing? • Work with them to solve the problem. What’s wrong with this situation, and what would be the ideal outcome? • When a child lies to you, use it as a “teaching moment.” Explain to them reasons that telling the truth is better. For instance, you want to be a trustworthy person. It’s so much better if you can be counted on to tell the truth. If you take responsibility for anything you’ve done wrong, I’ll be there to help you resolve it in the best way, and make it right. You don’t want to be the kind of person that has to lie to cover your tracks. Holding onto guilt and worry about getting caught are some of the conse-quences. You can feel relieved, a little proud of yourself, and better about your life. What does the child think are the actions neces-sary to correct the problem, and achieve the best outcome? • Ask the child how you can help. Let him or her suggest ways you might help. Then it’s okay for you to suggest some things you might do to help. • Remember that if the results of telling the truth work for the child, if it’s satisfying and rewarding, then he or she is much more likely to tell the truth in future situations. Praise the child for honesty and deciding to do the right thing. You may find that it’s not only working well for the child, but also for you. Your relationship with this child will be much better because of your help. • Show them that you’re on their side. Help them fix the problem and make it right. Make it a pleas-ant, rewarding experience for both of you. Try it out. Truth telling has its price, but it has its rewards. They their heads up high and know they did the right thing. You’ll feel good about learning a new parenting skill, and like yourself better, too. OPINION Friday & Saturday, February 22 & 23, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A You’ve been good citizens. Now get out. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman I f there was any doubt the state’s Medicaid bill-ing system is badly flawed and a threat to local taxpayers, the proof was the $373 million “bill” Florida counties got last year. Pressed for a review by stunned county officials and their lobbyists, who have complained about the poor system for years and repeatedly pointed out common errors, state officials discovered that coun-ties were, indeed, overbilled by about $200 million, and certain corrections were made. But that doesn’t end the dispute over a flawed system that is unfair to counties and overcharges local taxpayers. In Gov. Rick Scott’s proposed budget for the next fiscal year, counties would be on the hook for about $278 million. The counties — which, again, clearly have a better handle on their fair share of the costs than the state — have countered that $220 million is closer to the truth. The root of the issue is that Medicaid is a complex federal and state program for the poor and disabled, and it involves too many bureaucrats. As the Florida Association of Counties points out, the program does not “respect” county lines, and as a result, the billing system is fraught with mistakes, including incorrect addresses and multiple bills for the same service, among others. For example, a bill could reflect a patient’s address as Tampa General Hospital when that person could live in another state. Yet, Hillsborough County would be billed for a portion of the costs. According to the Association of Counties, the state review prompted by the outrageously high bill to the counties last year found that about $84.4 million in errors occurred because the state Agency for Health Care Administration could not verify a Medicaid recipient’s county of residence. “Technical reasons” were attributed to another $47.4 million in bad bills. Ideally, counties shouldn’t even be involved in Medicaid payments. But it’s highly unlikely the cur-rent system will be changed, so the best the state Legislature can do, at this point, is to take steps to correct the deficient billing system to ensure accu-rate and fair costs to counties. It should be a priority. Lawmakers and state administrators also shouldn’t be so skeptical when officials from Florida counties question a Medicaid bill or the broken billing pro-cess. These local officials, who have budget challeng-es of their own, have had too many unfunded man-dates forced down their throats from Tallahassee. The last thing they need is to be forced to pay inac-curate or inflated Medicaid bills that may have even been sent to the wrong county. Local officials want to resolve this budgetary nightmare. They’re not looking to avoid their fair share of the costs. They certainly were right last year. Gov. Scott should listen to them and ensure that local tax-payers aren’t stuck with bad bills. Bad billing system squeezing counties Does your child ever lie to you? ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com 4AOPINION Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob counseled youth and families for 15 years, and teaches psychol-ogy at Florida Gateway College. Comments are welcome at Bob.Denny8@gmail.com. I ’m old. I know it. My idea of burning the candle at both ends is to stay up late enough to catch the weather on the 11 p.m. news. I can’t remember the last time I was out with a group that closed up a saloon. I’ve had a double knee replacement. I com-mute in a little four-door sedan that’s an indeterminate tone of beige. As I say, I’m old. But I don’t need my local elected officials remind-ing me of it. Worse yet, they hint, oh so indirectly, that I would be doing Bethesda, Md. an economic and social favor if I made way for a younger, more desirable demo-graphic -the 18to 34-year-olds who are smart enough to be pulling down big salaries but too callow to realize that they should be saving for their kids’ college education and their own retirement. Before these familial responsibilities arrive, which they will do with frightening rapidity, the Montgomery County Council thinks -according to a Washington Post article -that these folks should be investing this extra capi-tal in the local nightlife so Bethesda and its adjacent suburbs become a “hipster magnet.” Bethesda is perhaps Washington’s oldest suburb in the sense of being purely a bedroom community, but it has since become a city in its own right with the usual inner-suburb problems -not enough parking and too many deer. To lure “Generation Y” out of the more-happening neighborhoods in Washington, the county is proposing the creation of a “Task Force on the Night Time Economy” to study ways, says Post, “to enliven the bar, music and after-hours dining scenes.” Where was this task force when I was interested in civic involvement? Instead, I was an officer of a chain of nonprofit day-care centers. Bethesda -thanks to my generation, which is now supposed to get out of the way -has one of the best restaurant districts in the Washington area. But apparently that’s not good enough. We gather, eat dinner, carefully monitoring our alcoholic intake, and then quietly say our good nights and go home. The county is looking for a younger, more raucous breed of restaurant-goer. It is considering loosening the liquor laws and noise ordinances. The county also wants to identify those areas that are, in a wonderful new formulation, “under-barred.” Apparently my generation wasn’t drunk or loud enough. I wish the authorities had said some-thing at the time. I’m sure we could have stepped up our game if we had known it was our civic duty. Nor do the authorities seem to sense an inherent contradiction in trying to attract patrons to big-ger bars with louder music that stay open later and their ominous public-service ads that warn of the grim fate in store for anyone who fails a breath test. The county council should be careful what it wishes for. My gen-eration can hold its liquor, doesn’t shout and gets home in time to catch the weather forecast. You feel the cold at our age. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Q Tampa Tribune

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Feb. 22-24 Pet adoption Lake City Humane Society and PetSmart are holding a Big Tent Adoption Event in the Publix Shopping Center. The Humane Society and North Florida Animal Rescue will have dogs and cats available for adoption on display and volunteers on hand to answer ques tions. All animals will be spayed or neutered and have current vaccinations. Dogs also will have micro chip identifiers. The event continues through Sunday. Hours will be 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call the Humane Society at (386) 752-1178. Feb. 22Play performances High Springs Community Theater is performing Arthur Millers Death of a Salesman week ends through March 3. Peformances will be at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $11 for evening shows and $9 for seniors on Sundays only. Tickets are available at The Framery of Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, (386) 754-2780, online at highspringscom munitytheater.com, and at the door, if seating is avail able. The theater is at 130 NE First Avenue in High Springs. For information, call (386) 454-3525. Benefit dinner, auction The Fort White and Columbia High School chapters of Future Farmers of America will have their annual benefit dinner and auction at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. A chicken and rice dinner will start at 6 p.m., fol lowed by the auction at 7 p.m. Proceeds will help FFA members attend lead ership conferences and career development events and purchase materials for their schools agriscience departments. Many of the items to be auctioned made by FFA members. Revival services Voice of Deliverance Church willl have a revival service at 7:30 p.m. with Sister Joyce Igo. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Feb. 23 CDC fundraiser The Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. will have its eighth annual Black Tie Fundraiser banquet at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. The speaker will be Bishop Russell A. Wright of Panama City. Tickets are $30. For more information or to donate, visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive, call 752-9785 or ask any CDC board member. Casting call Alligator Community Theater will hold casting calls today for its produc tion of the play Dearly Departed. The play will be performed April 26 and 27 and May 3 and 4. Special program Lake City Church of Christ will present a spe cial program, Growing up Christian in a Muslim World, with speaker Mrs. Sameea Collins. Registration will be at 8:30 a.m.; the program will be 9 a.m. to noon. Lunch will follow. The church is at 656 SW State Road 47. For more information, call (386) 752-6010. Car wash fundraiser Eastside and Pinemount elementary schools Safety Patrol members will hold a car wash fundraiser from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hardees on U.S. 90 West. Funds raised will go toward a Safety Patrol trip to Washington, D.C. Black history musical The District Congress of Christian Education of First Central Missionary Baptist Association pres ents the History of Music in the African-American Church and the achieve ments of African-Americans in our society. The District Choir under the direction of Deacon Steve Troy and Sister Carolyn Jones will present selections depict ing the heritage of music in the black church. AfricanAmerican achievements will be noted through out the program through monologues and other oral presentations. The event will be held at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive in at 5 p.m. Rev. Alvin Baker is the pastor and Rev. J. T. Simon is the president. For more information, contact Gloria McIntosh at (386) 755-1099. Black history program Sweet Home Baptist Church, County Road 25A in White Springs will have a black history celebration at 4 p.m. Pool clinic Gospel Trick Shot Ministries will have a show and pool clinic from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pockets of Lake City. Jason The Michigan Kid Lynch will perform with Rodney Fontaine, The Pool Playing Preacher. You must be 21 to attend. For more information, call Joseph Chancellor at (812) 801-1064. Feb. 24 Gospel sing, meal The Glen Markham Aortic Awareness Foundation Inc. is having a gospel sing and chicken pilau meal fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Tickets are $8. There also will be informational booths. To purchase ticket or for more information, contact Renee Manning at (386) 867-2711. Cast auditions High Springs Community Theater will hold cast audi tions for the Neil Simon play Rumors at 5:30 p.m. at the theater, 130 NE First Ave. in High Springs. Casting needs include four adult couples over 21 years old, two police officers and other adults, both male and female. Rehearsals will begin March 4, and per formances will be April 12 through May 5. For more information, email direc tor Terry Beauchamp at ouiserb@aol.com of call (352) 335-9137 and leave a message. Feb. 25 Casting call Alligator Community Theater will hold casting calls today for its produc tion of the play Dearly Departed. The play will be performed April 26 and 27 and May 3 and 4. Lanscaping program Landscape architect Sabine Marcks will present a program on Landscape Design Creating Outdoor Saces Usable, Sustainable and Florida Friendly from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Aglow meeting Lake City Aglow Lighthouse will meet at 7 p.m. at Grace City Ministries, 1086 SW Main Blvd. Special guest speak er will be Chris Hall, pas tor of Ichetucknee Baptist Church, a Navy veteran and former Russian linguist, well known for his knowl edge of Constitutional his tory. For information, call (386) 935-4018 or (386) 752-1971. Feb. 26 Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas holdem poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Lenten lunch The First Presbyterian Church invites the com munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be followed by a short drama. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Feb. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 5A 5A Robert Orrin Bush, II Robert Orrin Bush, II, born Octo ber 10, 1984 in Gainesville, FL, passed away February 5, 2013. He is the beloved Son of James Orrin Bush and Paula Margaret VanWyck Bush. He was a life long resident of Lake City, FL. Robert is preceded in death his Father, James Orrin Bush; his pa ternal Grandparents Robert and Pearl Bush; Maternal Grandfather Father John C. VanWyck; two uncles Robert and Chester Bush. Mr. Bush is survived by Moth er, Paula VanWyck Bush Lake City, FL; one Brother, Chris topher James Bush (Laura); nephew, CJ Bush of Coralville, Iowa; Grandmother, Lona VanWyck, Lake City, FL; one merous cousins and friends. at Branford Presbyterian Church, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 4:30 ICS CREMATION & FUNERAL HOME, www.icsfuneralservices.com Lake City, FL (386)752-3436. OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. COURTESY PHOTO Fond memories This photo provided by June Epperson of Lake City shows her granddaughters with retired Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of the Desert Storm campaign, outside his home in Tampa in 1996. Lori Beth Epperson is on the left and Carrie Epperson is on the right. The photo was sent to June Eppersons husband former Navy Cmdr. Douglas Epperson, in appreciation for his years as a Navy pilot. Schwarzkoopf died Dec. 27 at age 78.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, February 22 & 23, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V E very now and then we learn of a celebrity taking their own life. It may be a movie actor, a popular musician, or politician. We have heard of the difficulties they have had in their life in recent times. Then one day we hear the tragic news, they died because of an apparent suicide. It is not the purpose of this article to explain why one would take their life. Why they would decide that ending their life is the best solution to their circum-stances. Why they believe there is no reason for continuing to live. The purpose of this article is to get us to meditate for a few moments about how we can help others handle or deal with dif-ficult situations in their life. The ancient patriarch Job said, “Man, who is born of woman, is shortlived and full of turmoil (trouble – KJV, NKJV, NIV and ESV)” (Job 14:1). Life is filled with one problem after another. As soon as one burden is lifted, another one is place upon us. It seems to be a never-ending cycle. Solomon, the wise king of Israel, reported in his book we call Ecclesiastes, that life under the sun is vanity and a striving after the wind. Solomon writes about how he tested life and there was nothing under the sun that would truly bring happiness. Having lots of money did not bring happiness. Building proj-ects or involving ourselves in our work will not bring happiness or purpose to life. At the conclusion of his book Solomon says, “the conclusion, when all has been heard, is: fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hid-den, whether it is good or evil” (12:13, 14). Getting suicidal people to open up and talk about their problems, burdens and circum-stances seems to be a major problem. The majority of these troubled people seem to be individuals who tend to keep things inside and do not want to share them with anyone. How to get them to open up may be very difficult, or nearly impos-sible, but an effort has to be undertaken. Even the best pro-fessionals may not even be able to help them with their situation because they cannot get them to open up and talk. Often people have been dealing with drugs or alcohol for a period of time and it seems to no longer be effective. They have tried for a long time to cover up their pain or their difficulties with this substance but they have not been successful. The burdens and situations just seem greater than any solution that can be found. It seems that the suicidal reach a point where they just give up, even on themselves. They just cannot take it any lon-ger. Ending their life seems to them as the only “real” solution. Our hearts need to go out to these types of people. We need to have compassion upon them and their situation. We need to let them have “their space” but maybe we need to be more willing to “bear one another’s burden, and thus fulfill the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2). Jesus has promised that if we will “learn from [Him]” that we can “find rest” (Matthew 11:29). The premature death of a celebrity is always hurtful to society. The family of the celebri-ty is hurt probably beyond what we can imagine. But celebrities are not the only ones troubled. It may be your next door neighbor or your co-worker. It may even be someone living with you in your own home. Let’s learn to help those that are troubled.The cost of discipleship Helping the troubledL ast week we talked about the need for revival in the church. This week the sub-ject is “discipleship.” Neither of these subjects is for the ones who have never come to Jesus for salvation. These subjects deal with those who are saved. It is not about salva-tion; for salvation is free and costs us nothing, but it cost our Lord everything. It cost Him His heavenly home for 33 years. John 6:38 says “For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of Him who sent me.” It cost him his happiness and brought great sorrow upon him. Matthew 26:38 says “My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death.” Luke 22:44 tells of His “agony.” It cost Him His life on that cross with all the torment that came before death. It cost Him separation from His Father for He cried “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me.” (Read Psalms 22.) Our Savior suffered all this and more so we could have sal-vation — free. Don’t let anyone or any organization tell you that you have to do anything except “believe in the death, burial, and resurrection” for salvation (I Cor. 15:1-4). Ephesians 2:8-9 says “For by grace are you saved through faith; and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.” But being a disciple cost us something. What does it mean to be a disciple of Christ? One who follows one’s teaching. Jesus said in John 8:31 “If you abide in my word, you are my disciple indeed.” A disciple is not only a pupil but also an imitator of Jesus. (John 15:8). When Jesus called His disciples, they responded immedi-ately. Mark 1:16-20 records the call of Simon (Peter), Andrew, James, and John. The scripture says that they left all immediately and followed Jesus. Luke 5:27-28 is the call of Levi (Matthew). He also left all and followed Jesus. Yes, to be a disciple of Jesus, a price has to be paid. I remember years ago most all Southern Baptist churches had on Sunday afternoon “discipleship training.” Most churches have stopped doing that. Thank God for the ones that still do. Some of the prices paid for discipleship recorded in the Bible are as follows: All the New Testament writers except John laid down their lives for their Savior. Mathew died from the wounds of a halberd; Mark was dragged to death by a team of horses; Luke was hanged; Peter and Jude were crucified; and James was smashed to death by a club. John was boiled in oil; he lived but was disfigured for life. Paul was five times scourged with the Roman cat-of-nine-tails. Three times he was clubbed within an inch of his life. I would suggest that all Christians read “Foxe’s Book of Martyrs.” Concerning discipleship Ephesians 2:10 says “For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good work.” America needs more disciples of Jesus and unless the church sees this need, they will not be devel-oped. Church leaders today need to make sure today that their church has a good discipleship program. To teach discipleship, one has to be a disciple. False religions do this very well. Q Hugh Sherrill, an ordained Baptist minister and Bible teacher, is available for special Bible stud-ies and revivals. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 7A7AReligionFeb. 22Revival serviceVoice of Deliverance Church willl have a revival service at 7:30 p.m. with Sister Joyce Igo.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Feb. 23Special programLake City Church of Christ will present a spe-cial program, “Growing up Christian in a Muslim World,” with speaker Mrs. Sameea Collins. Registration will be at 8:30 a.m.; the program will be 9 a.m. to noon. Lunch will follow. The church is at 656 SW State Road 47. For more information, call (386) 752-6010.Gospel pool clinicGospel Trick Shot Ministries will have a show and pool clinic from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pockets of Lake City. Jason “The Michigan Kid” Lynch will perform with Rodney Fontaine, “The Pool Playing Preacher.” You must be 21 to attend. For more information, call Joseph Chancellor at (812) 801-1064.Black history musicalThe District Congress of Christian Education of First Central Missionary Baptist Association pres-ents the “History of Music in the African-American Church” and the achieve-ments of African-Americans in our society. The District Choir under the direction of Deacon Steve Troy and Sister Carolyn Jones will present selections depict-ing the heritage of music in the black church. African-American achievements will be noted through-out the program through monologues and other oral presentations. The event will be held at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive in at 5 p.m. Rev. Alvin Baker is the pastor and Rev. J. T. Simon is the president. For more information, con-tact Gloria McIntosh at (386) 755-1099.Black history programSweet Home Baptist Church, County Road 25A in White Springs will have a black history celebration at 4 p.m.Feb. 24Gospel sing, mealThe Glen Markham Aortic Awareness Foundation Inc. is having a gospel sing and chicken pilau meal fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Tickets are $8. There also will be informational booths. To purchase ticket or for more information, contact Renee Manning at (386) 867-2711.Black history programShiloh Missionary Baptist Church, 948 Aberdeen Ave., will have a black history celebration at 11 a.m., with the theme “At the Crossroads of Freedom.” The speaker will be Minister Jerome Lovett of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church in Jasper. A soul food meal will follow.Feb. 25Aglow meetingLake City Aglow Lighthouse will meet at 7 p.m. at Grace City Ministries, 1086 SW Main Blvd. Special guest speak-er will be Chris Hall, pas-tor of Ichetucknee Baptist Church, a Navy veteran and former Russian linguist, well known for his knowl-edge of Constitutional history. For information, call (386) 935-4018 or (386) 752-1971.Feb. 26Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.March 2Church yard saleThe Kids Club of Lake City Church of God, 173 SE Ermine Ave., will have a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Family Life Center. For mor informa-tion, call (386) 752-9400.Women’s programFirst United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., will host a free pro-gram for women entitled “The Word of God for the Women of God — Where is Your Treasure” from 9 am. to noon. Robin Arnold will be keynote speaker. Breakout sessions include “20 Ways to Bring the Wrd of God into Your Home” with Linda Callahan; “Using God’s Word to Help Your Child Relate to God, Self, Others” with Alicia Pfahler; and “God’s Word When Unexpected Life Events Happen” with Joanna Figley. A continen-tal breakfast will be served and child care will be avail-able. For more information, call (386) 752-4488.Supper, gospel singLee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will have a pot-luck supper and gos-pel sing. The supper will be at 6 p.m. and the gos-pel sing will begin at 7. The church is at 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 869-9977.March 5Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.March 12Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be followed by a short drama. March 19Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.OngoingSunday schoolFalling Creek Chapel, 1290 Falling Creek Road in Lake City, has Sunday school for all ages at 9:30 Sunday mornings. Adults meet in the church and children meet in our new Children’s Ministry build-ing. For more information call (386) 755-0580 or email fallingcreekchapel@gmail.com.Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, contact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299.Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday Morning Devotional Services the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a con-tinental breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship, breakfast and spir-itually uplifting morning. Christian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclists Association, Iron Shepherds Chapter 826 meets the first Thursday of the month at Hong Yip Restaurant, 905 SW Main Blvd., at 6:30pm. For more information email Ironshepherds826@gmail.com or call David Greene at (386) 755-5594. W hen wood reaches 572 degrees, it gives off a gas which reacts with oxy-gen to make a flame. The flame will heat the remain-ing wood, making the fire grow stronger. This will happen even on cold days. The temperature at which something ignites is called its flash point. There are different causes for “wildfires” of course. Sometimes it is because of storms and lightning may strike, causing a fire to begin. Sometimes (unfortunately), the cause is human, whether by accident or on purpose. The death and destruction which follows is awful, and recovery is slow for those who lose everything. Of course some fires are started and controlled in order to minimize the dan-ger of these wildfires. When looking at Thomas M. Bonnicksen’s article dated Sept. 25. 2004, entitled “What Storms Teach About Wildfires”, it started me thinking about what we could learn about ‘storms’ and ‘wildfires’ in the home. Sometimes families experience “storms” and “wildfires,” which are very destructive. Everyone in the end suffers, because no one seems to know how to prepare for or avoid the storms, and even fewer know how to put out the fires. Mom used to tell us, “Come in the house, there’s a storm coming!” “Don’t play with fire. You may get burned!” Kids learn to avoid things like this, but unfortunately, we learn by experience. Why do we insist on touching it anyway? Some points about dealing with family storms and wildfires: 1.) Learn to forgive each other. You aren’t perfect and neither is your spouse. 2.) Learn to say, “I love you just the way you are.” Acceptance is a key to a happy home. 3.) Learn to set and keep boundaries to protect your family. It is your home; ex’s and in-laws, should not be allowed to inter-fere, and “third parties” should never be allowed anywhere close to your relationship. Solomon says, “Drink water from your own cistern, running water from your own well” (Proverbs 5:13). Affairs are out of bounds! Wise up, unless you love getting burned. 4.) When ‘storms’ (problems) come, draw close to each other. Support and protect each other. 5.) Deal with things before they get out of control. My uncle wanted to do some burning on his property behind ours. All went well until the fire got out of control. Before long we were all out trying to put the fire out. Then the fire department came.Advice: Don’t start what you can’t finish, (or put out). Flash points are different with each person. All it takes is a word, or a certain look, or maybe even a memory. The fire flares up and the fight is on. Some fights just ain’t worth it. 6.) Learn that the past is the past, and cannot be changed. Why spend time digging it up again. 7. Learn to speak gently. Solomon says “A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. The tongue of the wise adorns knowledge, but the mouth of the fool gushes folly. The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, keeping watch on the wicked and the good. The soothing tongue is a tree of life, but a perverse tongue crushes the spirit.” (Proverbs 15:1-3). Fires are best put out with water not gasoline.Healing broken relationshipsA familiar quote to many is “Am I my brother’s keeper?” It is one that we either say aloud or at least think from time to time when we are expected to be responsible for another person. Still, it is a strange comment when we remember that these words originated from the mouth of the world’s first murderer. (see Genesis 4:1-10) Killing someone is not the way to avoid taking responsibility for them… in fact, it does just the opposite. Cain was the first of many who found out the hard way! We don’t have to go as far as murder to realize that sin always causes us to blur the lines of responsibility in rela-tionships. Jesus addressed this issue of responsibility to others in Matthew 5:21-24: “You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘Do not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment. But I tell you that anyone who is angry with his brother will be subject to judgment … therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to your brother; then come and offer your gift.’” At first glance, the beginning of this scripture seems to easily apply to the reader, revealing that God equates certain anger to murder. The anger this verse speaks of is unresolved anger, better known as unforgiveness. This subjects us to the conse-quences of choosing not to for-give such as bitterness, rage and malice. Then there is a twist in the application. Verse 23 tells us that when we go to offer our gift at the altar and “there remember that your brother has something against you,” we are to go to him and attempt reconciliation. That shoots holes in our theory that if someone has a problem with me, it is their responsibility to fix it. Certain of this, we ignore our spouses “coolness” toward us or the fact that a friend or family member is avoiding us, convincing ourselves we have done nothing wrong. But listen, this ministry of reconciliation is so important to God, He wants us to tend to this even before we show up to worship. If we took this instruction seriously, what impact would it have on our mar-riages? Friendships? Family rela-tionships? Work relationships? God is calling us to take respon-sibility to help heal broken rela-tionships no matter which side we are on ... because our hearts really do matter. Blessings, AngieStorms and wildfires Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences, and offers biblical counseling. Follow Angie on Twitter: Angie Land @HeartMttrs. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, special “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s website, www. jack exum.com. CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Next pope will face Vatican troublesBy NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressVATICAN CITY — If evidence was ever needed that the next pope must urgent-ly overhaul the powerful Vatican bureaucracy called the Curia, the scandal over Pope Benedict XVI’s private papers is Exhibit A. The pope’s own butler stole sensitive internal letters to the pontiff and passed them off to a jour-nalist, who then published them in a blockbuster book. The butler did it, he admit-ted himself, to expose the “evil and corruption” in the Vatican’s frescoed halls that he believed was hidden from Benedict by those who were supposed to serve him. And if that original sin weren’t enough, the con-tent of the leaks confirmed that the next pope has a very messy house to clean up. The letters and memos exposed petty wrangling, corruption and cronyism at the highest levels of the Catholic Church. The dirt ranged from the awarding of Vatican contracts to a plot, purport-edly orchestrated by senior Vatican officials, to out a prominent Catholic newspa-per editor as gay. Ordinary Catholics might not think that dysfunction in the Apostolic Palace has any effect on their lives, but it does: The Curia makes decisions on everything from bishop appointments to church closings to mar-riage annulments and the disciplining of pedophile priests. Papal politics plays into the prayers the faithful say at Mass since missal trans-lations are decided by com-mittee in Rome. Donations the faithful make each year for the pope are held by a Vatican bank whose lack of financial transparency has fueled bitter internal debate.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 $389$35,000

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, February 22 & 23, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Get our delicious Thickburgers & Burritos in our newly remodeled restaurant. HFS CU 9971-13696 And visit our other location at 2609 W. US Highway 90 In A Better HFS 48 Offer valid through 4/15/13 at participating restaurants. Offer available after regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Food Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 2013 Hardees Food Systems, Inc. 2013 Santa Barbara Restaurant Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Offer valid through 4/15/13 at participating restaurants. Offer available after regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Food Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Offer valid through 4/15/13 at participating restaurants. Offer available during regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Food Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Offer valid through 4/15/13 at participating restaurants. Red Burrito items available after 10:30 a.m. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. 2013 Santa Barbara Restaurant Group, Inc. All rights reserved. 2 FOR $ 5.00 1/3 LB. ORIGINAL THICKBURGER FREE SMALL FRIES & SMALL BEVERAGE WITH PURCHASE OF 5 PC. HAND-BREADED CHICKEN TENDERS TM AT REGULAR PRICE plus tax 3 FOR $ 2.50 BEEF TACO plus tax 99 BISCUIT N GRAVY TM plus tax HFS 2025 HFS 1014 RB 5063 Now Serving the Best Burgers, Biscuits and Burritos Opens Today! HFS CU 9971-13696 (5.25x10.625) ROP.indd 1 2/12/13 9:08 AM TM Where you get the Best for Less! Lake City Commons Center (Next to Publix) 752-3733 FREE GLASSES Buy one pair of glasses at regular price & receive a FREE PAIR OF GLASSES Some Restrictions Apply. Coupon Required. Expires Feb. 28, 2013 1 Pair Eyeglasses Some Restrictions Apply. Coupon Required. Expires Feb. 28, 2013 $ 99 NOW Includes lenses & frames. Ask About CareCredit *Credit approval required.* See store for details. CONTACTS EYE EXAMS By Independent Optometrist Its not about light or dark. Its about everything in-between. ADAPTIVE LENSES Indians remain undefeated By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Another starter, another shutout. Fort White Highs baseball team beat visit ing Newberry High, 9-0, behind the four-hit pitch ing of Lane Pendergrast. Pendergrast pitched a complete game with six strikeouts and four walks. No Panther made it past second base. The Indians gave Pendergrast plenty of run support, starting with two runs in the third inning. Fort White added three runs in the fifth and four in the sixth. Robby Howell had four RBIs, twice getting hits with the bases loaded. In the third inning, Brady Wilkinson and Kevin Dupree walked. Kodey Owens ran for Dupree and Willie Carter reached on an error to load the bases. Howell hit a towering shot that fell at the fence between left and center field to score the two runs. Between a pair of inten tional walks, Dupree ripped a one-two pitch for a home run in the fifth inning. Brady Wilkinson opened the inning with a single and Kody Moniz doubled him home ahead of Duprees blast. Rhett Willis started the final rally with an infield hit. Brady Wilkinson and Moniz singled with Willis scoring. Dupree was walked and Carter also worked a walk for an RBI. Howell singled by the third baseman to drive in the final two runs. Zach Gaskins and Trace Wilkinson also had hits for Fort White. Kyle Kirby started for Newberry (3-2) and last ed four innings. He was relieved by Alex Wilkins, who pitched the final two innings. Kirby had two singles for the Panthers. A pickoff at first by Pendergrast and a six-four-three double play ended the first inning and Newberry didnt threaten again. Fort White (4-0) plays Buchholz High at 7 p.m. today in Gainesville. Fort White picks up win against Newberry, 9-0. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Kody Moniz (3) takes a lead off first base while playing against Columbia High on Feb. 12. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Lake City Middle Schools Clayton Stinruck gets under Richardson Middle School catcher Cody Collins as he safely slides in at home during a game played at Columbia High School on Thursday. Big field blowout By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com For Lake City and Richardson Middle Schools it was a sneak peak at what the next level would be like as the Falcons beat the Wolves, 9-1, at Columbia High on Thursday. The Falcons started early with five runs in the bottom of the first. Hunter Houston tripled and scored on a throwing error for Lake Citys first run. Tyson Ellis followed up with a hit to score Austin Harris, who reached on a triple earlier in the inning for a 2-0 lead. Garrett Finnell, who reached earlier in the inning on a walk, stole home for a 3-0 lead. The Falcons closed out the inning with Jeremy Solomons hit to score Cole Frier and Ellis for the 5-0 lead. Harris scored his second run on a triple by Finnell in the second inning and the Falcons went into the third with a 6-0 lead. In the bottom of the third, the Falcons added three more runs. Clayton Stinruck scored Frier on a single and Brock Edge scored Solomon and Stinruck on a base hit for a 9-0 lead. The Wolves only run came in the top of the fifth inning when Scott Cannon scored on a bases-loaded walk by Trey Houk. The game was called going into the bottom of the fifth inning. The whole point of play ing was to get the kids some experience on the big field, Lake City head coach Shayne Edge said. They were all really excited and played well. Falcons cruise past Wolves, 9-1, at Columbia.

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F ormer Columbia High swimmer Heather Burns is continuing her record-setting ways at Florida Southern. Burns set a meet record in winning the 1,000-yard freestyle race at the Sunshine State Conference Swimming Championships in Clearwater on Feb. 13-16. Burns also placed sixth in the 1,650 free and ninth in the 500 free. She was a member of the 800 free relay team that placed third with a school-record time. Burns qualified to swim at the NCAA Division ll meet in Birmingham, Ala., on March 6-9. The Moccasin men won conference while the women placed third. Q Williston’s win over Fort White in the second round of the state basketball playoffs gives the Red Devils a chance for revenge. Williston plays host Lake Highland Prep at 7 p.m. Saturday with a spot in the final four on the line. The teams met last year in the third round and the Highlanders won 75-62. Lake Highland went on to beat Godby, then lost in the state finals to Pine Crest School of Fort Lauderdale. Lake Highland is coached by Jeff Turner, former NBA player and color commentator for the Orlando Magic. Turner was on the 1984 U.S. Olympics gold medal team. In the other Class 4A south semifinal, University School of Nova Southeastern University plays at Ransom Everglades. The top half of the bracket has East Gadsden at Raines and Berkeley Prep at Saint Andrew’s School. In Class 6A, Pine Forest plays at Ridgeview, which knocked off Wolfson 69-66, Winter Haven hosts Largo, Edgewater hosts Gainesville and Miami Norland hosts Fort Myers. This is not the first year Fort White and Williston both made the basketball playoffs. It happened back in 1924 with the original Fort White High. It was one and out for both teams — Fort White 53-10 to Gainesville, and Williston 37-30 to Lakeland. Hillsborough beat Eustis for the 1924 state championship. Q We disparaged Columbia High weightlifter Charlee Watson in our report on the state meet when we said she did not make any of her lifts. Watson did scratch on the bench press, but she was successful in her clean & jerk with a lift of 120 pounds. Coach Brandon Beadles explained that if a lifter scratches on the bench press, the lifts for the clean & jerk are not listed by the FHSAA on its website report. Columbia’s other state lifters turned in personal bests — Dana Roberts with 180 pounds in the bench press and Kayla Carman with a 105 bench press and 115 clean & jerk. Q The Olustee 5K results provided did not list a category for runners 66 and older. Donna Kite said she was proud to have won first place among the women in that age group. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 11 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach 1:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for NextEra Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for DRIVE4COPD 300, at Daytona Beach 7:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, NextEra Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach BOXING 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Champion Lamont Peterson (30-1-1) vs. Kendall Holt (28-5-0), for IBF junior welterweight title, at Washington 11 p.m. SHO — Middleweights, Tureano Johnson (13-0-0) vs. Willie Fortune (15-0-0); super featherweights, Art Hovhannisyan (15-0-0) vs. Alejandro Perez (16-3-1), at Cabazon, Calif. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — LPGA Thailand, second round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape) 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, third round matches, at Marana, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — North Dakota St. at Akron MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Yale at Quinnipiac 10 p.m. NBCSN — North Dakota at Denver NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Minnesota at Oklahoma City 10:30 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at Golden State ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach 1:15 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, DRIVE4COPD 300, at Daytona Beach 1 a.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Arizona Nationals, at Chandler, Ariz. (delayed tape) BOXING 9 p.m. SHO — Middleweights, J’Leon Love (14-0-0) vs. Derrick Findley (20-8-0); champion Cornelius Bundrage (32-4-0) vs. Ishe Smith (24-5-0), for IBF junior middleweight title, at Detroit 10:30 p.m. NBCSN — Junior welterweights, Chris Algieri (15-0-0) vs. Jose Peralta Alejo (10-1-0); heavyweights, Vyacheslav Glazkov (14-0-0) vs. Malik Scott (35-0-0), at Huntington, N.Y. GOLF Noon TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, quarterfinal matches, at Marana, Ariz. 2 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, quarterfinal matches, at Marana, Ariz. TGC — LPGA Thailand, third round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN2 — Clemson at Maryland 1 p.m. FSN — Southern Miss. at Memphis 2 p.m. CBS — South Carolina at GeorgiaESPN2 — Oklahoma St. at West Virginia 3 p.m. FSN — Washington St. at Arizona 4 p.m. CBS — Georgetown at SyracuseESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Teams TBANBCSN — New Mexico at Colorado St. 6 p.m. ESPN — Creighton at St. Mary’s (Calif.) ESPN2 — Marquette at VillanovaNBCSN — Nevada at San Diego St. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — South Dakota St. at Murray St. 9 p.m. ESPN — Missouri at Kentucky 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Ohio at Belmont MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 1:30 p.m. NBCSN — Maryland at Loyola (Md.) MOTORSPORTS 7:30 p.m. SPEED — Supercross, at Atlanta SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Stoke City at Fulham 8 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, preseason, Desert Diamond Cup, championship match, at Tucson, Ariz.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.New York at Toronto, 7 p.m.Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m.Denver at Washington, 7 p.m.Sacramento at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.Miami at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 15 Butler vs. Saint Louis, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 2 Miami at Wake Forest, 1 p.m.No. 3 Gonzaga vs. San Diego, 7 p.m.No. 5 Florida vs. Arkansas, 7 p.m.No. 8 Syracuse vs. No. 11 Georgetown, 4 p.m. No. 9 Kansas vs. TCU, 4 p.m.No. 10 Louisville vs. Seton Hall, NoonNo. 12 Arizona vs. Washington State, 3 p.m. No. 13 Kansas State at Texas, 8 p.m.No. 16 New Mexico at No. 22 Colorado State, 4 p.m. No. 17 Marquette at Villanova, 6 p.m.No. 21 Memphis vs. Southern Mississippi, 1 p.m. No. 23 Oregon vs. Stanford, 8 p.m.No. 24 VCU at Xavier, 2 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 4 Michigan State at No. 18 Ohio State, 4 p.m. No. 6 Duke vs. Boston College, 2 p.m.No. 7 Michigan vs. Illinois, 1 p.m.No. 20 Pittsburgh vs. St. John’s at Madison Square Garden, Noon No. 25 Notre Dame vs. Cincinnati, 2 p.m.USA Today Top 25 The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 17, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Indiana (19) 23-3 757 2 2. Miami (7) 21-3 728 4 3. Gonzaga (3) 25-2 710 3 4. Florida (2) 21-3 685 6 5. Michigan State 22-4 658 8 6. Duke 22-3 594 1 7. Michigan 22-4 561 5 8. Syracuse 21-4 541 7 9. Kansas 21-4 518 1310. Louisville 21-5 511 1211. Georgetown 19-4 457 1512. Arizona 21-4 415 913. Kansas State 20-5 365 1114. Oklahoma State 19-5 351 1615. Butler 21-5 321 1016. New Mexico 22-4 299 1817. Wisconsin 18-8 258 1918. Ohio State 18-7 239 1419. Memphis 22-3 191 2520. Marquette 18-6 190 2021. Colorado State 21-4 182 2422. Pittsburgh 20-6 161 1723. Oregon 21-5 92 —24. VCU 21-5 91 —25. Notre Dame 20-6 50 21BASEBALLSpring Training Today’s Games Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.N.Y. Yankees vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay (ss) at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:35 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (ss) vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m.AUTO RACINGDaytona 500 lineup 1. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 196.434 mph. 2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 196.292. 3. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.742. 4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.767.5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.729.6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 195.852. 7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 195.508. 8. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 195.385. 9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.084. 10. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 195.228.11. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.657. 12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.725. 13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195.925. 14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.683.15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.961. 16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.503. 17. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 195.495. 18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195.156. 19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.584. 20. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 195.042. 21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 195.767.22. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.616.23. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.563. 24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.793. 25. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 194.654.26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.742.27. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.046. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.537. 29. (26) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 194.313. 30. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 192.996. 31. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 193.54.32. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 194.254.33. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195.976.34. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.946. 35. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.771. 36. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.24.37. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 195.207. 38. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 193.544. 39. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 193.515.40. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.096. 41. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.094.42. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 190.339. 43. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.142. Budweiser Duel No. 1 1. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 60 laps, 116 rating, 0 points, $57,792. 2. (14) Greg Biffle, Ford, 60, 95.9, 0, $42,789. 3. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 60, 65.7, 0, $37,789. 4. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 60, 82.2, 0, $32,789. 5. (17) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 60, 80.4, 0, $30,789. 6. (3) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 60, 75.3, 0, $28,389. 7. (12) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 60, 79, 0, $27,289. 8. (8) Casey Mears, Ford, 60, 91.2, 0, $26,289. 9. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 60, 72.9, 0, $26,264. 10. (5) Joey Logano, Ford, 60, 87.2, 0, $26,239. 11. (20) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 60, 62.6, 0, $26,214. 12. (15) David Gilliland, Ford, 60, 38.1, 0, $26,189. 13. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 60, 46, 0, $26,164. 14. (16) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 60, 69, 0, $26,139. 15. (18) Scott Speed, Ford, 60, 52.3, 0, $26,114. 16. (21) David Reutimann, Toyota, 60, 39.2, 0, $26,089. 17. (1) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 60, 50.4, 0, $26,064. 18. (19) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 60, 48.7, 0, $26,014. 19. (10) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 60, 80, 0, $25,989. 20. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 59, 72.7, 0, $25,964. 21. (23) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 58, 25, 0, $25,914. 22. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 52, 62.4, 0, $25,889. 23. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 52, 106.2, 0, $25,839.Budweiser Duel No. 2 1. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 60 laps, 121.1 rating, 0 points, $58,977. 2. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 60, 120.4, 0, $43,963. 3. (8) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 60, 111.3, 0, $38,963. 4. (9) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 60, 92, 0, $33,963. 5. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 60, 96.3, 0, $31,963. 6. (14) Mark Martin, Toyota, 60, 88.7, 0, $29,563. 7. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 60, 98.2, 0, $28,463. 8. (10) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 60, 85.7, 0, $27,463. 9. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 60, 68.5, 0, $27,438. 10. (15) David Ragan, Ford, 60, 68.8, 0, $27,413. 11. (12) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 60, 69.1, 0, $27,388. 12. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 60, 102.2, 0, $27,363. 13. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 60, 49.4, 0, $27,338. 14. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 59, 60.3, 0, $27,313. 15. (19) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 59, 41.7, 0, $27,288. 16. (16) Josh Wise, Ford, 59, 39.6, 0, $27,263. 17. (21) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 59, 45.3, 0, $27,238. 18. (18) Terry Labonte, Ford, 59, 50.9, 0, $27,188. 19. (17) Michael McDowell, Ford, 59, 32.5, 0, $27,163. 20. (20) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 59, 27.4, 0, $27,138. 21. (2) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 58, 38.8, 0, $27,088. 22. (22) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 55, 26.9, 0, $27,063.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games New Jersey at Washington, 12 p.m.Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.Phoenix at Edmonton, 3:30 p.m.Colorado at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7 p.m.Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 7 p.m.San Jose at Dallas, 8 p.m.Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 20132BSPORTS CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter BRIEFS BOWLING Burns still setting records League resultsLake City Bowl league play: SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Farmers (115-77); 2. Pin Busters (110-82); 3. Jo’s Crew (109-83, 56,276 pins); 4. Handicappers (109-83, 56,210 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Pin Busters 889; 2. Farmers 806. Team high handicap series: 1. Spoilers 2,495; 2. Double Up 2,404; 3. Keglers 2,284. High scratch game: 1. Joyce Crandall 170; 2. Joanne Denton 148; 3. Vy Ritter 146. 1. Michael Murrey 204; 2. Johnnie Croft 186; 3. Ron Grey 168. High scratch series: 1. Louise Atwood 454; 2. Sandra Johns 439; 3. Barbara Croft 407. 1. Wayne Johns 544; 2. Ric Yates 512; 3. Edward Smith 482. High handicap game: 1. Sjaan Tensen 272; 2. Janie Posey 226; 3. Pat Hale 210. 1. Rainer Stutt 237; 2. Mike Helvey 230; 3. Bill Nash 216. High handicap series: 1. Janet Nash 672; 2. Aggie Mumbauer 642; 3. Ann Soliz 607. 1. Earl Hayward 648; 2. (tie) Jerry Crandall, Keith Herbster 632.(results from Feb. 5) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. 10 In The Pitt 902; 2. Canam 860; 3. All In The Family 833. Team high handicap series: 1. O 2 Cool 2,568; 2. Wolf Pack 2,535; 3. Split/House 2,443. High scratch game: 1. Lorrie Geiger 258; 2. Mary Lobaugh 220; 3. Joyce Hooper 200. 1. Bill Dolly 275; 2. Jim Lobaugh 218; 3. Adam Alford 216. High scratch series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 607; 2. Mary Lobaugh 541; 3. Joyce Hooper 507. 1. Bill Dolly 670; 2. Steve Fancy 592; 3. Adam Alford 591. High handicap game: 1. (tie) Joyce Hooper, Carla Nyssen 246; 3. Mary Lobaugh 243; 4. Cathey Creel 230. 1. Chris Camacho 265; 2. Ken Watson 256; 3. Art Gordon 242. High handicap series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 673; 2. Linda Oliver 651; 3. Debbie Walters 636. 1. Bill Dolly 715; 2. Steve Greaves 669; 3. Steven Hayes. High average: Lorrie Geiger 183; James Price 194.(results from Feb. 5) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. Wild Things; 3. 2 Plus 2. Team high handicap game: 1. Knock em Down 861; 2. 3 Plus One 843; 3. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 789. Team high handicap series: 1. Bubba & His Bubetts 2,498; 2. Wild Things 2,400; 3. Jo’s Crew 2,304. High scratch game: 1. Joyce Hooper 193; 2. (tie) Elaine Nemeth, Joanne Denton 179; 4. Debi Evert 164. 1. Lee McKinney 216; 2. Ric Yates 202; 3. Earl Hayward 196. High scratch series: 1. Judy Johnson 504; 2. Debbie Walters 482; 3. Betty Brown 474. 1. Wayne Johns 583; 2. David Duncan 565; 3. George Mulligan 541. High handicap game: 1. Jeanne Sireci 255; 2. Barbara Griner 242; 3. (tie) June Pat Klock, Pat Hall 222. 1. Sal Annello 236; 2. Ross Meyers 231; 3. Dan Ritter 230. High handicap series: 1. Amy Musselwhite 673; 2. Betty Carmichael 649; 3. Susan Mears 630. 1. Tom Young 690; 2. Ronnie Grey 621; 3. Art Joubert 605. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 154.19; 2. Elaine Nemeth 152.94; 3. Joyce Hooper 151.88. 1. David Duncan 190.26; 2. Bill Dolly 189.09; 3. George Mulligan 181.3.(results from Jan. 31) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Ronsonet Service (67-23); 2. Sonny’s Real Pit Bar-B-Q (62.5-27.5); 3. Bias Well Drilling (56-34). High scratch game: 1. Brian Meek 300; 2. Dan Adel 278; 3. Ted Wooley 245. High scratch series: 1. Brian Meek 750; 2. Bill Duncan 690; 3. Wally Howard 668. High handicap game: 1. Brian Meek 315; 2. Dan Adel 293; 3. Aaron Byrne 280. High handicap series: 1. Brian Meek 795; 2. Jeff Deitz 713; 3. Dan Adel 710. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 219.56; 2. Bill Duncan 215.63; 3. Wally Howard 208.7.(results from Jan. 28) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. Spare Us (12-4); 2. All Mrs’s (12-4); 3. High Five (9-7). Team high handicap game: 1. Git Up & Bowl 801; 2. High Five 796; 3. Silver Ladies 780. Team high handicap series: 1. Spare Us 2,404; 2. Sandbaggers 2,299; 3. Legal Ladies 2,234. High handicap game: 1. Karen Clampett 232; 2. Susan Newbern 228; 3. Joanne Knutsen 220. High handicap series: 1. Karen Gardner 657; 2. Cythe Shiver 643; 3. Harriet Woods 630.(results from Jan. 29) RUNNING Chances for Children 5K The UF Child Protection Team is sponsoring the Chances for Children 5K and mile walk Saturday at Lake DeSoto in downtown Lake City. Registration, which includes a free T-shirt, is $25 and begins at 8 a.m. Medals will be awarded for first-place finishers. Raffle items are available the day of event including $500 gift card to Morrell’s. For details, call Stephanie Cox at (352) 334-1300 or (352) 682-6806.Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. March 2 at O’Leno State Park on U.S. Highway 41-441, 17 miles south of Lake City. Entry fee through Thursday is $10 for ages 14 and younger and $25 for all others. Entry to the park is free for registered runners. The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. Proceeds go to O’Leno State Park. To register go to www.friendsofoleno.org and click 5K Run. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Quarterback Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the school. Formation of committees and fundraisers will be discussed. For details, call Shayne Morgan at 397-4954. FISHING Justin Brown Memorial tourney The Justin Brown Memorial Bass Tournament is March 2 at Clay Landing. Entry fee is $70 per boat with an optional big bass pot for $10. There is a 60 percent payback to 10 percent of the field. All proceeds benefit Columbia FFA students. For details, call Chris Starling at 288-7633 or Karen Brown at 961-2526. T-BALL Lake City league registration set Registration for the Lake City Recreation Department T-ball program is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 9 and March 16 at Teen Town Recreation Center. March 9 is reserved for all returning players. New players will register on March 16. Age divisions are offered for 4-5 and 6-7. Proof of age is required at registration. Cost is $50. Parents may select teams, but team rosters are limited to 15 players. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607.Q From staff reports

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Steve Thomas (+9) topped Bruce Ford by two shots for a first-place finish in the Sunday blitz. Other players in the money were Steve Patterson in third and Don Combs, Dell Sanders and Pete Skantos tied for fourth. Thomas added two skins and a closest to the hole prize to his take. Hank Rone, Shelton Keen and Ford also picked up skins. Other closest to the pin win-ners were Mike Jacobs on No. 7, John Brewer on No. 17 and Combs on No. 15. Another +9 score won the Saturday blitz. Eli Witt did the honors this time for a three-point margin over Brian Sneed. Jonathan Allen and Robbie Kerby tied for third at +5, followed by Bud Johnson, Steve Thomas and Michael Yacovelli tied for fifth. The skins pot was lucrative with only two winners — Steve Patterson and Allen. Mike McCranie (+12) ran away from the field in A flight of the Wednesday blitz. Buddy Slay (+5) and George Burnham (+3) were his closest pursuers. The B flight was anything but a runaway with six players in contention. Bob Randall and Ed Higgs escaped the pack for a first-place tie at +6. Bob Wheary, John Raulerson, Jerry Smith and Shelton Keen made it close with a tie for second at +5. Buddy Slay led the skins game with two win-ners including a nice pot hole prize. Steve Patterson and Mickey Willcox split the remaining skins with McCranie and Wheary. Katrina Counts had the best draw in the LGA “blind nine” competition. Her net 31.5 topped Shirley Edelstein by two strokes. Cathy Steen and Roberta Whitaker shared third place with 34.5 Anita West scored the only chip-in on No. 2. Match one of Good Old Boys play was a walkover for the team of Monty Montgomery, Joe Persons, Carl Wilson and Hugh Sherrill by a 10-5 count over the team of Mark Risk, Larry Ward, Bill Wheeler and Bobby Simmons. The second contest went to the foursome of Don Christensen, Merle Hibbard, Emerson Darst and Dan Stephens by a single point over the team of Stan Woolbert, Mike Spencer, Tony Branch and Jim Stevens. Match three was also a one-point victory, this time for the team of Jim Bell, Eli Witt, Dennis Hendershot and Howard Whitaker, 6-5, over the team of Rhea Hart, Jim McGriff, Dave Cannon and Bill Rogers. Montgomery (37-36-73) edged Risk (37-37-74) for medalist honors. Stephens fired a steady 39-39-78, fol-lowed by Hendershot with 38-41-79. The MGA BU-BB is Saturday with a team draw at 7:30 a.m. and a shotgun start to follow. The Ruben Thomas Memorial Tournament is Thursday with a 9 a.m. shot-gun start. The course will be closed until 1:30 p.m. Wallace Christie scored a +11 and ran away from the field in the Wednesday Blitz. Wallace’s +11 was five points better than Todd Carter and Brandon Goss, who tied for second at +6. Closest to pin winners were Tony Johnson (No. 3), Todd Carter (No. 5), Jim Munns (No. 11), Randy Heavrin (No. 15) and Chet Carter (No. 17). There were numerous birdies as 10 skins held up from the 18 holes, with Todd Carter scoring four. Other skin winners were Mike Kahlich, Codey Blackwell, Tony Johnson, Chet Carter, Pete Sapienza and Christie. Monday’s Top of the Hill winner was Gerald Smithy at +8. Friday Dogfight results: Alan Phillips, first +7; Brandon Goss, second +2; Jack Tuggle, third +1. Closest to pin winners were Ralph Minster (No. 5), Jim Munns (No. 11), Brandon Goss (No. 15) and Randy Heavrin (No. 17). All the skin money and a nice payday was picked up by David Sharpe with his birdie on No. 2. The Sunday Scramble had six teams competing for the daily game money and a shot at the big money pot. First place went to the team of Brandon Goss, Tiara Carter and Butch Howell at 5 under. Second place was decided by a chip-off. The chip of Todd Carter edged out the chip of Brian Shead by less than a quarter of an inch, giving Todd Carter and team members Michael Harris and Callie Harrington second place. The pot had Nos. 16 and 17 in play, but No. 18 was the lucky hole drawn so the pot rolls over. Spots are filling up for the Tuesday Night Team Twilight League, as 17 teams are signed up. Seven more spots remain. Deadline to sign up is March 3. Play will begin after the resumption of Daylight Savings Time on March 12, with tee off by 5:30 p.m. Spaces are still available for the Branford Rotary Club Three-Person Scramble on March 2 at 8 a.m. Call John Lacquey at 935-1705 or any Branford Rotary member to sign up. LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRID AY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 3B3BSports QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS Runaway win for Christie Big Sunday take for Thomas Indians weightlifting 2-0 on young seasonFrom staff reportsFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s weightlift-ing team opened the season with a pair of wins at home. The Indians beach Buchholz High, 56-34, on Tuesday and defeated Union County High, 54-36, on Feb. 11. Fort White has a fourteam home meet with Hawthorne High, Oak Hall School and Hamilton County High at 4 p.m. Monday. Individuals who placed in the first two meets follow by weight class with place and total lift (bench press, clean-and-jerk) listed. Indians 56, Bobcats 34119 — Brent Beach, second, 250; 129 — Brendan Womer, first, 300; T.J. Strachen, sec-ond, 255; 139 — Dalton Harding, first, 375; Shayne Newman, second, 365; 154 — Tristan Nelson, first, 445; Kyle Sullivan, sec-ond, 440; 169 — Dale Gocek, first, 475; 183 —Blair Chapman, third, 440; 199 — Dylan Harrell, second, 480; 219 — Kellen Snider, first, 585; Matt Martin, third, 425; 238 — Chris Waites, first, 565; hwt — A.J. Kleuss, first, 630; Brayson Caley, second, 525; Indians 54, Tigers 36119 — Beach, first, 250;129 — Womer, second, 295; Strachen, third, 245; 139 — Newman, second, 380; 154 — Sullivan, first, 445; Nelson, second, 440; 169 — Gocek, first, 510;183 — Harrell, first, 480; Chapman, second, 445; 199 — Andrew Baker, second, 480; Caleb Bundy, third, 410; 219 — Snider, first, 575;238 — Waites, second, 570; Randall Fraddosio, third, 415; hwt — Kleuss, first, 620; Caley, second, 515. Tebow cancels talk at controversial Dallas churchAssociated PressDALLAS — New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow has backed out of an appearance at a Baptist mega church in Dallas run by a pastor who has cre-ated controversy with his remarks about gays and other faiths. Tebow tweeted Thursday that he canceled a sched-uled April 28 appearance at First Baptist Church due to “new information that has been brought to my attention.” “I will continue to use the platform God has blessed me with to bring Faith, Hope and Love to all those needing a brighter day,” Tebow wrote. The Rev. Robert Jeffress, First Baptist’s pastor, con-firmed in a phone inter-view that Tebow called him Wednesday night to cancel. Jeffress said Tebow told him he would like to speak at First Baptist at some point, but “he needed to avoid controversy right now for personal and pro-fessional reasons.” Jeffress has preached that gay sex is sinful, Mormonism is a cult and Islam promotes vio-lence and pedophilia. He said Thursday that First Baptist was being mischar-acterized as a “hate church,” and that the church’s teachings were consistent with historic Christian beliefs. Tebow wasn’t going to speak about anything controversial, Jeffress said. ASSOCIATED PRESSKevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane with the champ ionship trophy after winning the first of two 150-mile qualifying races for the NASCAR Dayto na 500 auto race at Daytona International Speedway on Thursday in Daytona Beach.Harvick and Kyle Busch win Daytona 500 duels By JENNA FRYERAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — There are two certainties heading into the Daytona 500: Kevin Harvick is the favorite, and no one is sure what the action will look like in the “Great American Race.” Harvick remained perfect through Speedweeks on Thursday by winning the first of two 150-mile Budweiser Duel qualifying races, and the victory has positioned him as the top pick to win NASCAR’s ver-sion of the Super Bowl. Being labeled the favorite is the last thing the 2007 Daytona 500 winner want-ed headed into Sunday’s season-opener. “We like to be the lameduck underdog. That’s what we’re shooting for,” Harvick said. Harvick is a perfect 2 for 2 at Daytona International Speedway. He also won an exhibition race last week-end. This strong start comes at a time when Harvick has found a bal-ance in his life with the addition of son, Keelan, who was born last July, and as he heads into his final season with Richard Childress Racing. Harvick has already decided to move to Stewart-Haas Racing in 2014. “We’ve been fortunate to win the first two races of Speedweeks. We’ve just got to keep a level head on our shoulders, not get too high over what we’ve done, just do the same things that we’ve done,” he said. “If it’s meant to be, it’s meant to be. I think we definitely have the car and team to be in contention to do that.” But nobody is quite sure what the 500 will look like with NASCAR’s new Gen-6 race car. Sunday’s race will go off with a full 43-car field, double the amount of cars that ran in Thursday’s qual-ifying races. There were 19 cars in last Saturday’s exhi-bition. Kyle Busch, winner of the second duel, believes more cars on the track will create a much different race than what fans have seen so far. All three races at Speedweeks to date have lacked much action as driv-ers continue to learn the new cars and how it reacts in traffic and different aero-dynamic situations. “With more cars out there, we might see it be a little bit different come Sunday,” Busch said. “There were half the field in each race, obviously. There’s going to be twice as many good cars, twice as many middle of the pack cars, twice as many back of the pack cars. If you can get your car handling, driv-ing, feeling good, you’ll be able to be one of the guys that’s up front.” Is Busch, who was wrecked out of last week’s exhibition just 15 laps into the race, one of those guys? “I feel that’s where we’re at,” Busch said. “That’s an added bonus for us right now.” Busch gave Toyota its first victory of Speedweeks and snapped Chevrolet’s dominance. Harvick took the new Chevrolet SS to Victory Lane twice, and Danica Patrick put it on the Daytona 500 pole in time trials. Busch held off Kasey Kahne, in a Chevrolet, and learned the driver out front is in the strongest posi-tion. “It’s hard to pass the leader,” said Busch. “Stay out front. When you get out front, you can hold everyone off.” But Kahne, who settled for second, said timing will be critical and nobody is sure just yet what move will be needed to win the Daytona 500. “I think it’s tough because you don’t know when you get that push. You don’t know when it plays into your time,” said Kahne, who never got close enough to Busch to take a solid shot at the win. “I think you need to be ready at any time to get to the front, to second, to third, try to move up. I don’t think waiting till the last lap is a ticket the way things are right now.” And Kahne wasn’t ready to give Harvick the win in the big race, either. “I think Kevin looks really good,” he said. “He’s got this place figured out. I think he can be beat, yeah. There’s a few of us in the second race who had real-ly good cars, and I could move around really well, similar to what Harvick did in the first race.” In the first race, Harvick held off Greg Biffle over a four-lap sprint to win. Harvick and Biffle also went 1-2 in last Saturday night’s exhibition race. The starting field for the Daytona 500 is set by the results from the pair of 60-lap qualifiers, but Patrick held onto the pole by run-ning a safe race in the first qualifier. The first woman to win a pole at NASCAR’s top level, Patrick earned the top starting spot in time trials last weekend. She started first in the first qualifier, raced a bit early, then faded back to run a conservative race and ensure she’ll start first in the 500. “I hate coming to the end like that and just lagging back,” she said. “That’s not fun. But it’s also really ignorant to go drive up into the pack and be part of an accident for absolutely no reason. You’re really not going to learn much there.” Patrick wound up 17th out of 23 cars. “What I really feel like I need to do is go down to the Harvick bus and see what he’s doing,” she said. “He’s got it going on down here.” The first race was dull until Denny Hamlin brought out the only cau-tion with seven laps remain-ing. Hamlin lost control of his car, spun into Carl Edwards and triggered a four-car accident that also collected Regan Smith and Trevor Bayne, who had a dominant car early in the qualifier. “I know what the wrecks look like now, I am really familiar with them,” said Edwards, who was wrecked at testing in January and in practice for the exhibition race last week. He was also black-flagged in the exhibi-tion race when his window net fell off. Hamlin said the accident was a product of drivers trying to learn the nuances of NASCAR’s new Gen-6 car. “It just shows you that any kind of bad aero posi-tion you put yourself in, your car can be vulner-able,” said Hamlin, who was running in the high line when he inched into Edwards’ space down low. Juan Pablo Montoya, who infamously crashed into a jet dryer during last year’s Daytona 500 to trigger a massive fuel fire, stopped for minor repairs during the caution. Montoya restarted the race in 13th with four laps remaining, but rocketed through the field to finish third. “It was time to go,” he said. “It’s hard, you don’t want to tear up the car, and at the same time you want to go. The bumpers are a little fragile. You have to be careful with that. You want to have a good car at the end.” The bulk of both races seemed to be one long parade of the Gen-6 race car. Unsure of how the cars handle in packs, and when the drivers choose to side-draft, most of the field in the first race played it con-servatively. “The choice was obviously made by a bunch of us to run around in cir-cles and just make laps,” said two-time Daytona 500 champion Michael Waltrip, who needed a clean race to guarantee a spot in Sunday’s field. “There were a lot of people that just wanted to get through some laps and understand what was going on. There were some of us that would have run like that until they threw the checkered just to make the race. And then there were some that decided it was time to go, and they made it work.” Waltrip is racing in a special Sandy Hook Special Support Fund paint scheme, and his car number has been changed to No. 26 as a tribute to the 26 students and teach-ers killed in the Newtown, Conn., school shooting.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22-23, 2013 DEAR ABBY: My wife of six years was recently arrested for wire fraud, involving the receipt of unemployment benefits. She was receiving money when she should not have been. I knew she had applied for benefits since she was laid off; however, I was not aware that she was falsifying documents in order to receive the benefits. I feel hurt, betrayed and offended. I am a retired law enforcement officer and currently an indepen-dent fraud investigator. Our relationship had been on the rocks for some time prior to this humiliating event. How do I handle this mess? -BETRAYED IN FLORIDA DEAR BETRAYED: The first thing to do is realize that your wife’s indiscretions are a reflec-tion only on her character, not yours. Then let the law take its course, and once you have cooled off, decide rationally if you want to continue a mar-riage that has been “on the rocks for some time.” ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: Before my daughter turned 18, she followed the court’s visita-tion specifics, as her broth-er does. Now that she’s 18, she doesn’t call or come over at all. She won’t answer phone calls, so I text her. She’ll respond with one-word answers -“yes,” “no,” “maybe.” It doesn’t bother me that she chooses to live this way. She’s an adult. I sent her money for her birth-day. She didn’t acknowl-edge it. If I text invitations to her, I still don’t hear from her. She doesn’t go to college, doesn’t drive, doesn’t have a job and lives off her enabling mother. According to her brother, she plays video games all night and sleeps all day. After her birthday silence, should I continue sending her money for occasions? The lack of respect makes me think not, but my love for her says I should. Is there a lesson to be taught, or do I continue dropping a check in the mail twice a year? The money is insignificant. Learning respect, I believe, is important. -DAD IN BATTLE CREEK, MICH. DEAR DAD: It doesn’t bother you that your daughter chooses to live this way? That she doesn’t work, doesn’t go to school, plays video games all night and sleeps all day? Is she on drugs? Suffering from severe depression? Your daughter’s behavior is not normal. You have described a young woman in serious need of counsel-ing to bring her back to reality. If you love your daughter, forget the eti-quette lesson and help her to get the psychological help she needs. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: When I was 17, I was checked into a psychiatric hospital for severe depression and a suicide attempt. While I was there I met “Jim,” a boy who was there for the same reasons. To make a long story short, we kept in touch and now we’re dating. We benefitted from the experience and are good for each other. The catch is that he lives more than an hour away from me. We see each other frequently, but friends often ask how we met and we don’t know how to answer the ques-tion. Generally, we say something vague about how we have known each other for a long time, but some people continue to press. Neither of us wants to advertise that we spent time in a psych ward. How can we gracefully sidestep the question? -DODGING THE QUESTION IN THE U.S.A. DEAR DODGING: It is difficult to sidestep a question that is asked so frequently in the course of conversation -especially if a couple seems compat-ible. Because you would rather not be specific, just say you met in a teen counseling group a few years ago. It’s the truth -you were being counseled. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m a 15year-old student who reads your column every day, and I hope you can help me. I want to be closer to my parents. They yell at my siblings and me and call us names. It hurts me very much. If we make a mistake -even a little one -or forget our chores, we can expect to be insulted, yelled at, etc. I have learned to tune them out, but I don’t understand how such intelligent people like my parents can act this way. Years ago, I decided to talk to them about it, but that was seen as an act of defiance. My parents, especially my father, can’t take constructive criticism and respond with more yelling. Each of our arguments leaves me upset for days. But I still believe I need to do something. I want to be close to them before it’s too late, but I have lost so much respect and trust for them, and they probably feel the same. Please, Abby, I don’t know what to do. I would greatly appreciate your advice, although I know you are very busy. Thank you for taking the time to read my letter. -HOPEFUL IN NEW YORK DEAR HOPEFUL: You have my sympathy. Harsh words can leave wounds that last longer than physi-cal bruises. Some parents develop hair-trigger tem-pers when they are under financial pressure. Others, without realizing it, model their behavior on the way their parents raised THEM and overreact when their children make mistakes. Because you haven’t been able to get through to your father, talk to a trusted adult relative about the fact that you would like to be closer to your par-ents but don’t know how. If they hear it from another adult, they might be more open to the message. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 26-year-old mother of a 13-month-old daughter, “Lissa.” I am a “by-the-book” mom. I’m still breastfeeding and I am strict about what I allow my daughter to eat. She has just barely started to eat table food. I don’t want my child to have bad eating habits, so I try to give her only healthy items at dinner-time. Her dad, on the other hand, thinks it’s funny to give her junk, including sugar. When she was only 2 months old, I caught him giving her licorice. The other day, it was soda and ice cream. I don’t agree with this, and it’s causing us a lot of fights. When we sit down to dinner, I have Lissa’s meal set aside. But before I can sit down, her dad starts giving her things off his plate and then she won’t eat her dinner. I have told him I don’t like it, but he doesn’t understand that I want to teach her good eat-ing habits. Am I wrong in trying so hard? Or should I just give up and let her eat junk? -TRYING MY BEST IN CALIFORNIA DEAR TRYING: Parenting is supposed to be a team sport and I’m more concerned about the fact that Lissa’s dad is undercutting you than what’s going into her mouth right now. If he continues, in another year or two, your little girl will regard him as a pushover and you as a big meanie. You may need an impartial mediator to get through to Lissa’s father, and the perfect person to do that is your child’s pediatrician. The only thing about your approach that might be of concern to me is your calling yourself a “by-the-book” mother. A conscientious parent not only goes by the book and is consistent, but she also uses her head and listens to her heart. I hope you will remember that. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You might want to take a step back and observe what’s going on around you before making a move. You’ll gain insight into the real cause behind your dissatisfaction and be able to scrape your way to a better position. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The adjustments you make at home or to your business partnerships will bring good results. Offering suggestions will draw interest from some-one who can influence the way you advance. Focus on originality. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll feel compelled to speak up, but you must also be prepared to suffer the consequences. Not everyone will agree with you, but you will know who you can trust and who you cannot. Build a strong alliance and don’t back down. +++ CANCER (June 21July 22): You’ve got all the right moves and you know exactly what to say. Broaden your horizons by participating in conversa-tions and events that can bring you in contact with interesting people and ideas. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Emotions will surface, leading to confusion if you don’t control your actions. You are best to make changes within, not overt moves for all to see. Bide your time and concentrate on what you need to accomplish. Make improvements to your home. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Listen carefully. You will be able to improve a partnership if you are prac-tical. Making demands or letting others dictate what you can do will only make matters worse. Creative ideas will help sway some-one to your way of think-ing. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Tell it like it is and prepare to make changes that will suit you better. A good deed can turn into a profitable service. Use your skills, talents and insights, and you will find your niche. Romance is in the stars. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Follow your heart and a creative path that will bring you satisfaction. A passionate presentation will help you enlist the help you need. An unusual change at home will help you prosper. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll receive confusing signals from the people you deal with. You are best to ask direct questions before you move forward with your plans, or it may end up costing you emotionally and finan-cially. Adapt to domestic changes. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Contact people from your past. You will gain from the information you gather and the memo-ries that are brought to your attention. An old rela-tionship could turn into a new partnership with a potential for prosperity. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Size up your current financial situation and look for ways to raise your income. A job change can lead to good fortune. You can talk your way into something good using detail and refurbished ideas. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Network, socialize and get your point and ideas across to those you feel might have an interest in your endeavors. Don’t elaborate too much or your thoughts will be inter-preted as being impos-sible. Stick to practicality instead. +++++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Fraud investigator mortified by wife’s arrest for fraud Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22-23, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 20136B FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 22, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (N) (:01) 20/20 News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) American Masters Slavery by Another Name Labor practices and laws. Tavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenUndercover Boss “O’Neill Clothing” (N) CSI: NY “Today Is Life” Blue Bloods “Quid Pro Quo” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita “Black Badge” (N) Cult “You’re Next” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsKitchen Nightmares (N) (DVS) Touch “Perfect Storm” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Dateline NBC (N) Rock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:38) M*A*S*H(:16) M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Dallas (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence Police Women of Dallas A&E 19 118 265Shipping WarsShipping WarsDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch “Uncorked” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Julie Benz, JoBeth Williams. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Herring” The Mentalist “Code Red” “300” (2007) Gerard Butler. Badly outnumbered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army. Dallas “Trial and Error” Monday Mornings NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobTeenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Full House See Dad RunThe Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:06) “Scarface” (1983, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer. “Underworld” (2003) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. A vampire protects a medical student from werewolves. (:13) “Red Dragon” (2002) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H “Lil” Monk Monk Deadly group therapy. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Good Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” Jessie A.N.T. Farm Austin & AllyShake It Up!Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Jan; Bebe” Hoarders “Jennifer & Ron; Jill” Hoarders “Adella; Teri” Hoarders “Julie and Shannon” Hoarders “Vula; Lisa” (:01) Project Runway USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSuits “War” Differing opinions. BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Freestyle Friday.” Freestyle Friday battle. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic Stand “All About the Benjamins” (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. HusbandsHo. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Countdownd NBA Basketball Minnesota Timberwolves at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N)d NBA Basketball: Spurs at Warriors ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball North Dakota State at Akron. (N)s Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -GatorZone Women’s College Basketball Florida State at Duke. (N) Women’s College Basketball North Carolina at Virginia Tech. (N) Halls of FameInside the HeatInside the Heat DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Bedrock Blowout” Gold Rush (N) Gold Rush Live The crews reveal the nal tallies. (N) (Live) Yukon Men “Feast or Famine” Gold Rush Live TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy “Old School” (2003, Comedy) Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell. (DVS) Are We There Yet?Are We There Yet? HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236E! SpecialThe SoupE! News (N) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiFashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “New Orleans” (N) The Dead Files “A Banshee’s Cry” The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lYou Live in What? You Live in What? House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressBorrowed, NewBorrowed, NewSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Modern Marvels “Distilleries 2” American Pickers “Train Wreck” American Pickers American Pickers “Duke of Oil” American Pickers “When Horses Fly” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “The Night Strangler” Fatal Attractions: Intervention Fatal Attractions “Secret Snakes” Fatal Attractions “Tiger Terror” (N) Fatal Attractions “Terror at Bear Farm” Fatal Attractions “Tiger Terror” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveCan Family Save Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry Stone “David and Bathsheba” (1951) Gregory Peck, Susan Hayward. FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineThe Game 365Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Memphis Grizzlies. From the FedEx Forum in Memphis, Tenn. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the Magic SYFY 58 122 244 “My Soul to Take” (2010, Horror) Max Thieriot, John Magaro. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Merlin “The Hollow Queen” (N) Being Human AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “True Lies” (1994) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jamie Lee Curtis. “The Cave” (2005, Horror) Cole Hauser, Morris Chestnut. Premiere. The Walking Dead “Home” Comic Book MenFreakshow COM 62 107 249(5:55) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 The Jeselnik Off(:29) Workaholics(9:59) Tosh.0 Tosh.0 “Beverly Hills Cop” (1984) CMT 63 166 327(:05) Reba (:40) Reba (:15) Reba A miscommunication. (7:50) Reba (:25) Reba “Overboard” (1987) Goldie Hawn. An amnesiac millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. Dukes-Hazzard NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Spike in the Heart” The Pack “Lions” Caught in the Act “Psycho Deer” Alpha Dogs (N) Alpha Dogs (N) Alaska Fish Wars “Jackpot” (N) Caught in the Act “Psycho Deer” NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersPlanet Carnivore “Lions” American Cougar: Revealed (N) Cat Wars: Lion vs. Cheetah: RevealedVatican: The Hidden WorldCat Wars: Lion vs. Cheetah: Revealed SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Behind Mansion Walls “Kiss or Kill” Behind Mansion Walls Deadly Women “No Good Reason” Deadly Women “Brides of Blood” Who the (Bleep)...Who the BleepDeadly Women “No Good Reason” HBO 302 300 501 “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules” (2011) ‘PG’ (:45) “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(:05) “Alien vs. Predator” (2004, Science Fiction) Sanaa Lathan. ‘PG-13’ (7:50) “Die Hard With a Vengeance” (1995, Action) Bruce Willis. ‘R’ Banshee (N) (:45) MAX QuickiesBanshee Girls in Bed SHOW 340 318 545 “Your Sister’s Sister” (2011) Emily Blunt. ‘R’ “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman. ‘PG-13’ Bill Bellamy’s Ladies Night Out Comedy Tour (N)s Boxing SATURDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 23, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) “Dreamgirls” (2006, Musical) Jamie Foxx, Beyonc Knowles. Three singers learn that fame has a high price. News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsCindy Crawford30 Rock “Floyd” 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk ShowAndy Grif th ShowJust Seen It “Once” (1982, Comedy) Charmion King, Leslie Toth. Just Seen It Just Seen It Just Seen It Austin City Limits (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenNCIS “Extreme Prejudice” 48 Hours “The Accuser” (N) Vanity Fair’s Hollywood (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneVEER! SneakDaryl’s HouseLike, LoveThe Crook and Chase Show (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30Gospel Music Presents The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceCops (N) Cops (PA) The Following “The Siege” (PA) NewsAction Sports 360Hell’s Kitchen “16 Chefs Compete” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! American Ninja Warrior (N) Chicago Fire “A Little Taste” Saturday Night Live NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine Bones “The Secret in the Soil” TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby Show(:43) The Cosby Show The Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Unusual Suspects “A Monstrous Act” Unusual Suspects Blackboard Wars “The Future Is Now” Blackboard Wars “Eye of the Storm” Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal (N) Blackboard Wars “The Future Is Now” A&E 19 118 265Barter Kings “Big Rig or Bust” Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsSouthie Rules (N) Southie Rules (N) (:01) Southie Rules(:31) Southie Rules HALL 20 185 312I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy FX 22 136 248(5:00) “The Hurt Locker” (2008, War) Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie. UFC 157: Rousey vs. Carmouche Prelims (N) “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents Piers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightCNN Presents TNT 25 138 245 “The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice” (2008) Noah Wyle. “War of the Worlds” (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Dakota Fanning. (DVS) “War of the Worlds” (2005) Tom Cruise. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieMarvin Marvin (N) Supah Ninjas (N) Wendell & VinnieSee Dad RunThe Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00) “Underworld” (2003, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. “The Expendables” (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li. Premiere. “The Expendables” (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone. MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “Target: Earth” Star Trek “The Way to Eden” “The Werewolf of London” (1935, Horror) Henry Hull, Warner Oland. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie gets her big break. Gravity FallsDog With a BlogA.N.T. Farm Jessie Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252 “Accused at 17” (2009) Cynthia Gibb, Nicole Gale Anderson. “Stalked at 17” (2012, Suspense) Taylor Spreitler, Chuck Hittinger. “Fugitive at 17” (2012, Suspense) Marie Avgeropoulos, Christina Cox. USA 33 105 242(5:30) “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” (2007) Nicolas Cage. “Schindler’s List” (1993, Historical Drama) Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley. A war pro teer saves his Jewish workers from death. Nat’l Treasure BET 34 124 329(5:30) “All About the Benjamins” (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. “Waist Deep” (2006) Tyrese Gibson. A man’s son is inside his hijacked car. “He Got Game” (1998, Drama) Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. ESPN 35 140 206d College Basketball Creighton at St. Mary’s. (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) d College Basketball Missouri at Kentucky. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball Marquette at Villanova. (N)d College Basketball South Dakota State at Murray State. (N)d College Basketball Ohio at Belmont. (N) SUNSP 37 -Inside LightningLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Carolina Hurricanes. PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C. Lightning Live!Inside LightningInside LightningTaylorMade: Outside the Ropes DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Revved Up” Fast N’ Loud “Mashed Up Mustang” Secrets of the Secret Service Killing bin Laden Argo: Inside Story (N) Killing bin Laden TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensFamily Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Nerdy Dancing” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Kourtney-KimKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami “The Women” (2008) Meg Ryan. Betrayal strains the bond between two high-powered women. Fashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277Fried Chicken Paradise Deep Fried Paradise Crispy fare. Ghost Adventures “Pico House Hotel” Ghost Adventures Houghton Mansion. Ghost Adventures “La Purisima” Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It Hard to please. Love It or List It House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. HIST 49 120 269(4:00) Lincoln Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Ultimate Soldier Challenge ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedToo Cute! “Curious Kittens” Too Cute! “Kitten Beauties” (N) Pit Boss “Everybody’s Changing” (N) Bad Dog! “Naughty by Nature” Pit Boss “Everybody’s Changing” FOOD 51 110 231Worst Cooks in AmericaDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveIron Chef America “Symon vs. Brock” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) “No Greater Love” (2009) Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of PowerBilly Graham Classic Crusades “Love’s Long Journey” (2005) FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Boxing Golden Boy Live Frankie Gomez vs. Lanard Lane. SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Super Cyclone” (2012) “Meteor Storm” (2010, Ciencia Ficcin) Michael Trucco, Kari Matchett. “End of the World” (2013) Brad Dourif, Greg Grunberg. Premiere. “Doomsday Prophecy” (2011) AMC 60 130 254 “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. COM 62 107 249(5:00) “Trading Places” (1983) Dan Aykroyd. “Coming to America” (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, John Amos. Katt Williams: It’s Pimpin’ Pimpin’Kevin Hart: Seriously Funny CMT 63 166 327(4:00) Overboard “The Dukes of Hazzard” (2005, Comedy) Johnny Knoxville, Seann William Scott. My Big Redneck Vacation (N) Swamp Pawn “A-Hunting We Will Go” My Big Redneck Vacation NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Why Dogs Fight” Cesar Millan: The Real StoryThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Rock ’n Pol” The Incredible Dr. Pol (N) Alpha DogsAlpha DogsCesar Millan: The Real Story NGC 109 186 276Locked Up Abroad “Killing Lincoln” (2013, Docudrama) Billy Campbell, Jesse Johnson. “Killing Lincoln” (2013, Docudrama) Billy Campbell, Jesse Johnson. “Killing Lincoln” (2013) SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeOddities Oddities Oddities (N) Odd Folks HomeAn Idiot Abroad: Lost Luggage Jordan. Oddities Oddities ID 111 192 285Deadly Affairs “Deadly Obsession” Deadly Affairs “Killer Ambition” Deadly Sins “High Society Sins” Deadly Sins “Deadly Threesomes” (N) Scorned: Love Kills (N) Deadly Sins “High Society Sins” HBO 302 300 501(4:15) Fast Five “Chronicle” (2012) Dane DeHaan. ‘PG-13’ “Wanderlust” (2012) Paul Rudd. Premiere. ‘R’ (:45) “The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ (:15) “Wanderlust” (2012) ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(5:00) “What’s Your Number?” ‘R’ (6:50) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Banshee (:45) MAX on Set “Meet the Fockers” (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545History, the Eagles(:45) “Die Another Day” (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens. ‘PG-13’ s Boxing Cornelius Bundrage vs. Ishe Smith. Bundrage vs. Smith, IBF welterweight title. From Detroit. 60 Minutes Sports Haith, others may wait months for Miami resolutionBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — When Frank Haith first spoke this week about the allegations against him as part of the NCAA’s inves-tigation into Miami, the Missouri basketball coach talked about how relieved he is that the long process is nearing an end. That may be wishful thinking. The NCAA has told Haith and others involved in the Miami matter that their cases may not be heard until July — so any penal-ties that are forthcoming might not arrive until next fall, at least. On Wednesday, Missouri released documents that the NCAA sent Haith as part of the notice of allegations against Miami, where he coached from 2004 through 2011. Two key dates jump out in the NCAA’s planning: May 20, when responses by those named in the alle-gations are due, and an undetermined period in July — when the governing body for college athletics is planning to convene its Committee on Infractions. That is, “unless all parties ... agree to a shortened response time,” the NCAA said. And that could happen. If not, this long saga — which most people weren’t aware of until August 2011, though in actuality started nearly a year earlier — may just keep dragging along. That doesn’t mean progress isn’t happening. Miami President Donna Shalala is expected to talk to the infractions committee dur-ing their meeting later this week — she’ll be on the phone and it’s not expected to be “a formal hearing for Miami at this point,” said a person who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the information was not to be publicly released. The AP reported Tuesday night, when the NCAA’s allegations were delivered to Miami, that Haith was hit with a charge of failure “to promote an atmosphere for compliance.” Missouri confirmed that Wednesday. The charge stems from his actions when former booster and convicted felon Nevin Shapiro — whose claims sparked this investi-gation — allegedly wanted money in exchange for not going public with accusa-tions that he paid to help the Hurricanes recruit a player. The same accusation also included Jake Morton, a former member of Haith’s staff at Miami. “After learning of the threat, Haith failed to alert anyone in the athletics department administra-tion about Shapiro’s threat, ask reasonable questions of Morton to ensure that Shapiro’s claim lacked merit or disclose the fact that Morton engaged in financial dealings with Shapiro,” read Haith’s por-tion of the notice of allega-tions. “Rather, Haith gave Morton funds that Morton then provided to Shapiro.” Missouri has been told by the NCAA that it does not face any possible sanc-tions, but that Haith’s abil-ity to coach may be affected “if he is found in violation” of rules. “Missouri, while not a subject of this NCAA investigation, will continue to monitor the process,” the school said in a release. ASSOCIATED PRESSMissouri head coach Frank Haith encourages his team du ring the second half against Florida on Tuesday in Colu mbia, Mo. Haith is among many being investigated by the NCAA for h is role at the University of Miami.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 7B7BNascar For the first three days of Speedweeks atDaytona,all the buzz was about DanicaPatrick and what she was doing off-track, specifically her romance with fellow Sprint Cuprookie Ricky Stenhouse Jr. But after Sunday’s pole qualifying for the 55th annual Daytona 500,the talk shifted toPatrick’s activities on the track.She madeNASCAR history by turning a lap at 196.434miles per hour to win the pole for the 500.Shebecame the first woman to win the pole for arace in the series now known as Sprint Cup.And she became the first driver since JimmieJohnson in 2002 to win the pole for the sport’smost prestigious race in their rookie season.Patrick broke the qualifying record for femalesheld by Janet Guthrie,who qualified ninth atBristol and Talladega in 1977. She will start the 500 alongside outside polesitter Jeff Gordon,and the remainder of thestarting lineup will be determined afterThursday’s Budweiser Duels. Like many a Daytona pole winner before her, Patrick gave much of the credit to her crew,ledby veteran crew chief and Daytona Beach resi-dent Tony Gibson. “I appreciate the recognition,but it really falls,as I think I said before I went out on thetrack,90 percent on Tony [Gibson] and his guys,everybody that gives me the car to go out thereand be fast,and maybe 10 percent on me,”Patrick said.“All I have to do is think aboutgoing out there,being smooth,not letting the carbind up,running on that yellow line. “Outside of that,I think it shows how wellprepared Tony and everybody was,how strongthe Hendrick engines are,how good the newChevy SS is.We’ve been fast since practice inJanuary.” Gibson said Patrick,who will start on the pole for the first Budweiser Duel qualifying race onThursday and on the pole for the Daytona 500no matter where she finishes in the Duel,understated her contribution to the final result. “It’s more than 10 percent because you can put a good product out there,but if you don’thave the person to drive it,put everything elsetogether,it can really damage your day,”he said.“We just gave her a product that was really goodand she took it the rest of the way.It’s morethan 10 percent,I promise you.It’s 50/50.” Gibson also pointed out that Patrick had a lot on the line,not just because of hergender but because of her lack of a guar-anteed starting spot for the 500. “I’m proud of her,”he said.“I know there was a lot of pressure on her tocome here and qualify well,in the topsix,to lock us in.I’m proud of her tocarry that weight on her shoulders.She didn’t falter.She did every-thing right.She hit her marks,hit her marks on the shifts,andhere we are.” Patrick,who also made history for women by leading lapsin the Indianapolis 500 and bywinning an Indy car race inJapan,attributed her record-breaking racing career in largepart to fast cars,to herupbringing and to her ability toperform at a high level whileunder the glare of the spotlightthat comes with being a high-pro-file female performer in a mostlymale sport. “First and foremost,I grew up with good values and good goals,”she said.“I was brought up to be thefastest driver,not the fastest girl.That was instilled in me from veryyoung,from the beginning. “Then I feel like thriving in those moments where the pressure’s on,has alsobeen a help for me.I also feel like I’ve beenlucky in my career to be with good teamsand have good people around me.I don’tthink any of it would have been possiblewithout that. “For those reasons,I’ve been lucky enough to make history,be the firstwoman to do many things.I reallyjust hope that I don’t stop doingthat.We have a lot more history tomake.We are excited to do it.” NOTEBOOK If it walks like a duck, it can winIn recent years,being a lame duck in NASCAR hasn’t been the performance killermany assume it might be. Several soon-to-be-splitting drivers and race teams have had strong runs of late.In 2011,after being dismissed from his job as TonyStewart’s crew chief,Darian Grubb ledStewart to five Chase wins and the champi-onship. Last year,in his final year at Roush Fenway Racing before moving to Joe Gibbs Racing,Matt Kenseth won two Chase races. This past Saturday night,Kevin Harvick, starting his final year at Richard ChildressRacing before moving to Stewart-Haas Racing,won the Sprint Unlimited.It was his third winin the past five of the non-points Sprint Cupseason openers. “I don’t think it’s been that big of a deal,” Harvick said of his lame-duck status duringhis winner’s interview.“Kenseth did a great jobwith his situation [last year].” Harvick said that he still wants to win even though he’s leaving,and the people on histeam that are staying put feel the same way. “The atmosphere is great,honestly,”he said. “Everybody is just working toward the samegoal – that’s winning the races.We have to beprofessional anyway,whether it’s lame duck ornot.You can call it whatever you want,we’regoing to have a [whole] lot of fun racing,hav-ing a good time,doing our jobs ... “We’re all here to do a job,and we have a responsibility to the people that are spendingmillions of dollars on the side of that car to doit as best we can.” Harvick’s crew chief Gil Martin said he feels the same way. “This [sport] is too hard to be miserable,”he said.“It’s too hard of work not to come out andtry to win.That’s not in [Harvick’s] nature.That’s not in our team’s nature to try not towin. “Anybody that thinks just because of what the situation is that anybody’s going to laydown,they’re sadly mistaken,because we’regoing to try to win this championship … We’regoing to do whatever it takes to win it.That’spretty well the bottom line.” And Harvick,who has spent his entire Cup career in Childress’ No.29 Chevrolet,saidthere are other reasons for wanting to succeedthis year. “Pride also comes in there pretty good,too,” he said.“It’s fun to prove people wrong.”Townley: Truck win ‘priceless’Camping World Truck Series driver John Wes Townley,who was criticized earlier in hiscareer for wrecking too many race cars,madeall the right moves in Saturday’s Lucas Oil200 ARCA race at Daytona InternationalSpeedway. Townley,driving a Toyota for Venturini Motorsports,started from the pole,then held offall challengers to get his first major racing victo ry and Venturini’s first at Daytona. His previous best finish was a third place at Daytona in 2010. “Personally,this is priceless,”Townley said.“I almost wouldn’t trade it for anything in theworld except my family.It’s a real honor to win atDaytona.” Kyle Larson,who plans a full Nationwide Series campaign this year,finished second.Martinsville Speedway track president ClayCampbell was 14th,and former Sprint Cup driv-er James Hylton,now 78,finished 26th in hisfinal run at Daytona.He’s set to retire at the endof the season after 50 years of racing inNASCAR and ARCA. By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick In historic first,Danica leapsto next levelDanica Patrick (right),driver of the No.10 Chevrolet,with her Pole Award and Jeff Gordon ,driver of the No.24 Chevrolet,with his Front Row Award after qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 at Da ytona International Speedway on Sunday.(NASCAR photos) NEXTUP... Race: DRIVE4COPD 300 Where: Daytona International Speedway When: Saturday, 1:00 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2 2012 Winner: James Buescher SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES Race: Nextera Energy Resources 250 Where: Daytona International Speedway When: Friday, 8:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2012 Winner: John King Race: Daytona 500 Where: Daytona International Speedway When: Sunday, 1:00 p.m. (ET) TV: FOX 2012 Winner: Matt Kenseth (right) Danica Patrick, driver of the No.10 Chevrolet,celebrates with crew chief Tony Gibson after qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 on Sunday.Pole vaultThe Sprint Unlimited and its 19 participants offered the first clues to how the new Generation 6race car will perform during this week’s Daytona500,and the early indications are that the racewill play out much like those of seven or eightyears ago,before the introduction of the Car ofTomorrow. “It’s going to be a pack [of cars],absolutely,”said Unlimited winner Kevin Harvick,who beat GregBiffle and Joey Logano to the finish line as the tw o challengers both recorded career-best Unlimitedfinishes.“I don’t think there’s going to be too man y chances.You’ll see some cars break away.I think ifyou turn on a 2000 race,one of those races,it’sgoing to be very similar … [and] you’re going tohave a lot more advancing of positions when youget so many cars out there.” Unlimited runner-up Greg Biffle predicted that drivers will be able to move up in the middlegroove,a tactic the late Dale Earnhardt used withgreat success back in the day. “There’s going to be a middle,”he said.“I went up the middle a few times.Some guys tried it andmade it work.The middle actually worked OK forme.” The Gen-6 car has a shorter rear spoiler than the CoT,and Dale Earnhardt Jr.said he noticedthe difference in the Unlimited. “With this little spoiler on the back,it’s really easy to lose the draft because the air gets to yournose pretty quick,”he said.“The distance of thedraft isn’t as far back as it used to be off the ca r in front of you,so you can lose it pretty easily.Youhave to be real careful.Me and the No.99 [Carl Edwards] both lost it right there at the end of thesecond segment [of the Unlimited].” Handling was a non-issue in the Unlimited as chilly,nighttime temperatures made for goodgrip for race cars,but Denny Hamlin predictsthat won’t be the case on Sunday in theDaytona 500. “I think if we get any kind of sunny 70 degree day or so at the [Daytona] 500,handling will be anissue just halfway through a fuel run,”he said. With complete race cars and key components of them being in short supply due to the switch to anew car,there was relatively little risk-taking dur ing the practices leading up to the Unlimited,asteams didn’t want to overburden fabricatorsalready swamped trying to get fleets of cars pre-pared for the upcoming season. “You’re just so short on cars,you didn’t want to take any chances,”Harvick said. But once the green flag dropped for the Unlimited,it was time to try some moves with thenew car. “You knew if you tore that car up,you didn’t need it anymore,”he said. One team that was in a fix for race cars was the No.78 team of driver Kurt Busch.He wrecked onein practice and another in the Unlimited. Richard Childress,whose shops build cars for the No.78 team,said late Saturday that his crewwould work overtime to get Busch the equipmenthe needs for the Daytona 500. “We’re going to help them in any way we can,” he said.“We’ll probably have one of those carsback [Sunday],repaired.” Changes to the interiors of the Gen-6 cars were a factor in a couple of incidents early inSpeedweeks. Matt Kenseth said that was a factor in a crash he caused during practice for the Unlimited. Kevin Harvick said the locations of the mirrors is one of the issues. “The first five or six times I looked for the mirror,it was in a different spot,and I didn’t see itbecause it wasn’t there,”he said.“I heard Matt[Kenseth] talking about it.Both wrecks have hap-pened because of that left-side mirror,things beingdifferent compared to what they were in the past.” NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Sprint Unlimited victories byRichard Childress,who owns the No.29 Chevrolet driven to vic-tory by Kevin Harvick on Saturday,the most among car owners Sprint Unlimited victo-ries by Chevrolet (in 35 races),the most of any manu-facturer Drivers who led laps inSaturday’s Sprint Unlimited (Kevin Harvick,40; Matt Kenseth,26; Tony Stewart 5; Martin Truex Jr.2; and Greg Biffle 2) Chevrolets entered inthe Daytona 500,tops among manufacturers (there are15 Fords and 13 Toyotasentered)20 8 17 5 After Car of Tomorrow, Gen-6 heads back to the futu re Dale Earnhardt Jr.drives of the No.88 Chevrolet on Saturday during practice for this Sunday’s Daytona 500 at Da ytona International Speedway.(NASCAR photo)

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8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, FEBRUARY22 & 23, 2013 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTYCIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000525CITIMORTGAGE, INC., SUCCES-SOR BYMERGER TO CITIFI-NANCIALMORTGAGE COMPA-NY, INC. F/K/AFORD CONSUM-ER FINANCE COMPANY, INC.,Plaintiff,vs.UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-ITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF LEE ESTHER TAYLOR A/K/ALEE ESTER HARRIS, DE-CEASED; CLIFFORD V. HARRIS, HEIR; MARVIN HARRIS, HEIR; ANNIE M. PERRY, HEIR; ELIZA-BETH WOODUS, HEIR; REGINASANDERS, HEIR; ISAAC HAR-RIS, HEIR; WILLIE HARRIS, HEIR; IOLACOOPER, HEIR; DA-VID HARRIS, HEIR; CLIFFORD V.HARRIS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CLIFFORD V. HAR-RIS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF RE-MARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-NORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIM-ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DE-FENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TEN-ANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2;Defendant(s).NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUST-EES OF LEE ESTHER TAYLOR A/K/ALEE ESTHER HARRIS, DE-CEASED;Whose residence(s) is/are unknown.YOU ARE HEREBYrequired to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s at-torney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit:TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH -RANGE 15 EASTSECTION 24: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 24, AND RUN 8818’01” E, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 24, 1049.22 FEET; THENCE N 0118'38” W, 37.61 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 0118’38” W, 412.19 FEET; THENCE 8818’01” E, 100.00 FEET; THENCE S 0118’38” E, 412.34 FEET; THENCE S 8818’46” W, ALONG THE NORTH RIGHTOF WAYS-242, 100.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceed-ing with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, telephone (813)915-8660, fac-simile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition.DATED at COLUMBIACounty this 31st day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participated in acourt proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear.Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05537188February 15, 22, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-326-CAATLANTIC COASTBANK F/K/AATLANTIC COASTFEDERAL,Plaintiff,vs.JEREMIAH CADYAND SUSAN-NAM. CADY,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENotice is hereby given that the un-dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Columbia County, Florida, will on the March 6, 2013, at 11:00 A.M., at the 3rd Floor Court Room (1) of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-lic outcry, one by one, to the highest bidder for cash, the property located in Columbia County, Florida, as fol-lows:LOT9, SOUTHWOOD ACRES, UNIT4, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 7, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 5, 2013, in the above-styled cause, pending in said Court.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.P. DeWitt Cason, ClerkClerk of Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05537286February 15, 22, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRDJUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FORHAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO.: 2012-CP-57PROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: The Estate ofADOLPHUS CALLAWAYLEE, Deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS (ancillary administration)TOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of ADOLPHUS CALLAWAYLEE, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-57, is pending in the Circuit Court of Hamilton County, Florida, 207 NE First Avenue, Jasper, Florida 32052. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and that personal representative’s at-torney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF COPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the estate of the dece-dent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOTSO FILE WILLBE FOREV-ER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 22, 2013./s/ Frances Jane Lee Ancillary Personal RepresentativePost Office Box 42Dupont, Georgia 31630/s/ Cary A. Hardee, II Florida Bar No.: 133856Post Office Drawer 450Madison, Florida 32341Primary Email: lawhatter@aol.com Secondary Email: caryhardee@har deelawfirm.net Telephone (850) 973-4007Facsimile (850) 973-849505537357FEBRUARY22, 2013MARCH 1, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTYCIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2011-CA-000302FIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDAF/K/AFIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA,Plaintiff,vs.JAMES LAMBERTHAIR, II A/K/AJAMES L. HAIR, II A/K/AJAMES L. HAIR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES LAMBERTHAIR, II A/K/AJAMES L. HAIR, II A/K/AJAMES LHAIR; CLAR-ENCE EUGENE EDWARDS; UN-KNOWN SPOUSE OF CLARENCEEUGENE EDWARDS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHLegalER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DE-FENDANT(S); WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; WHETHER DIS-SOLVED OR PRESENTLYEXIST-ING, TOGETHER WITH ANYGRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-ITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIM-ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINSTDEFENDANT(S); UN-KNOWN TENANT#1; UN-KNOWN TENANT#2;Defendant(s)NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Columbia County, Florida, described as:Lot 7, Block 4, HOLLIDAYHEIGHTS REPLAT, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 26, of the Public Re-cords of Columbia County, Florida.A/K/A684 NWRidgewood AveLake City, FL32055at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 AM, on 3/13/13.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 5th day of February, 2013.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear.Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771.Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05537241February 15, 22, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDADOYLE EDWIN GRAHAM,(a/k/a Edwin Graham), andMARGARETE. GRAHAM, Case No: 12-673-CADivision: CIVILPlaintiffs,vs.TRACYCOATES, ANGELAMCQUAIG, NELDALOPER, ALICE PASUPATHI, and any heirs of deceased CLEAMON GRAHAM,deceased LOCABELLE GRAHAM, CAMILEE G. COATES and de-ceased HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, cred-itors, trustees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, un-der or against the decedents andDefendants, including any unknown defendants, and including all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the propertyherein described,Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO:Estate of CLEMONGRA-HAM, Deceased, Estate of LOCABELLE GRAHAM, Deceased, Es-tate of CAMILEE G. COATES, De-ceased, and Estate of HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devi-sees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, creditors, trustees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, under or against the dece-dents, and any unknown defendants, including all parties having or claim-ing to have any right, title, or interest in the property herein described, Defendants.YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a le-gal proceeding filed against you for Quiet Title. The action involves real property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida, more fully described as fol-lows:(A) Township 6 South, Range 18 East, Section 29: One acre in the NE Corner of the SW_ of the NW_ of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida. Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-000 Or corrected le-gal description will say the follow-ing:Township 6 South, Range 18 East, Section 29: One square acre in the NE Corner of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida. Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-000(B) Parcel 1 The N 1/2 of the S 1/2 of the NW1/2 of the SW1/4;Parcel 2 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SW1/4;Parcel 3 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of South Legal1115 feet of SW1/4 of SE 1/4;All lying and being in Section 29, Town-ship 6 South, Range 18 East, Colum-bia County, Florida.Parcel ID Num-ber: 29-6S-18-10649-004 Or correct-ed legal description will say the fol-lowing:Parcel 1 The N 1/2 of the S 1/2 of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4;Parcel 2 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SW1/4; Parcel 3 S 1/2 of S 1/2 of South 1115 feet of SW1/4 of SE 1/4;All lying and being in Section 29, Town-ship 6 South, Range 18 East, Colum-bia County, Florida.Parcel ID Number: 29-6S-18-10649-004The action was instituted in the Third Judicial Circuit Court, COLUMBIACounty, Florida, and is styled DOYLE EDWIN GRAHAM (a/k/a Edwin Graham) and MARGARETE. GRAHAM, Plaintiffs vs. TRACYCOATES, ANGELAMCQUAIG, NELDALOPER, ALICE PASUPA-THI, and any heirs of deceased CLEAMON GRAHAM, deceased LOCABELLE GRAHAM, CAMI-LEE G. COATES and deceased HARGRETTS. GRAHAM, and any heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, legatees, lienholders, creditors, trust-ees of the decedents, or otherwise claiming by, through, under or against the decedents and Defend-ants, including any unknown defend-ants, and including all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the property herein descri-bed.You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Plaintiffs’attorney, whose address is 905 SWBaya Drive, Lake City, Florida 32025, on or before March 15, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr. or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-plaint or petition.The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff's interest which will be binding upon you.DATED: February 7, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Third Judicial Circuit CourtCOLUMBIACounty, FloridaBy /s/ B. Scippio Deputy Clerk SEAL05537219February 22, 2013March 1, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12000342CACITIMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,vs.PAULASTOKES POWERS, et alDefendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 5, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12000342CAof the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is Plaintiff, and PAULASTOKES POWERS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. at COLUMBIACounty Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, 3rd Floor, Lake City, FL32055, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13 day of March, 2013, the following described prop-erty as set forth in said Summary Fi-nal Judgment, to wit:BEGIN ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF LOT1, BLOCK 'C", HALL'S SUBDIVISION, RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 1, PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 88 DEGREES 48 MI-NUTES 59 SECONDS 4, ALONG THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF LOTS 1 AND 11, BLOCK 'C', OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVISION, ALSO BEING THE NORTH LINE OF VACATED PENNSYLVANIAAVENUE PER OFFICIALRE-CORD BOOK 48, PAGE 226, OF THE RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, ADIS-TANCE OF 175.33 FEET; THENCE S 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 01 SECONDS W, TO THE CENTER LINE OF VACATED PENNSYL-VANIAAVENUE, ADISTANCE OF 19.97 FEET; THENCE S 87 DE-GREES 01 MINUTES 06 SEC-ONDS E, ALONG SAID CENTER LINE, ADISTANCE 0F 78.38 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS W, ALONG THE EASTERLYLINE AND NORTHERLYPROJECTION OF LOT8, BLOCK 'B' OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVISION, ADIS-TANCE OF 149.94 FEET; THENCE N 88 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WALONG THE SOUTHERLYLINES OF LOTS 6, 7, 8 AND THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF THE N 1/2 OF LOT3, BLOCK 'B' OF SAID HALL'S SUBDIVI-SION, ADISTANCE OF 251.73 FEETTO INTERSECTTHE EAST-ERLYRIGHTOF WAYOF DIVILegalSION STREET(43 FEETRIGHTOF WAY); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHTOF WAYNORTH, ADISTANCE OF 169.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BE-ING IN SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff's mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, this 5th day of February, 2013.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /B/ ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05537287FEBRUARY22, 2013MARCH 1, 2013 100Job Opportunities05537366Drawdy Insurance is seeking Professional 440 CSR or 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to 738 SWMain Blvd. Lake City, FL, 32056 BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Head Teller Lake City Seeking energetic individual who enjoys working with public. Supervisory and teller exp REQ. Professional appearance REQ Great pay and benefits! App REQ and avail at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic Technician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 REQUESTFOR VOLUNTEERS COLUMBIACOUNTYThe Columbia County Board of County Commissioners is seeking volunteers for the following posi-tions:PLANNING & ZONING BOARD/BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTThe Planning and Zoning Board/Board of Adjustment rec-ommends principals and policies for guiding action affecting devel-opment in the county. Recom-mends to the Board of County Commissioners ordinances,regula-tions and other proposals promot-ing orderly development along the lines indicated as desirable by the Comprehensive Plan. Vacancies in Planning and Zoning/Board of Ad-justment membership shall be ap-pointed by the Board of County Commissioners for the unexpired term of the member affected. Amember must be a resident of Co-lumbia County. No member of the Planning and Zoning Board/Board of Adjustment shall be paid or elected official or employee of the county. The term of office shall be for three (3) years.Persons interested in volunteering for appointment should submit their resume to the Columbia County Board of County Commis-sioners, P.O. Drawer 1529, Lake City, Florida 32056-1529 on or be-fore March 8, 2013. 100Job OpportunitiesSALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05537417Medical Assistant Must have HS Diploma and Phlebotomy certification with min. 1 yr exp. Qualified candidates please email resume to: jsmith@ccofnf.com F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. Local medical office looking for a PT Billing Clerk .Experience Preferred.Please send resume to PO Box 1256, Lake City, Fl 32056 Office Staff needed For Medical Practice. 155 NWEnterprise Way, LC Fax 386-755-3369 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 CLEAN 2br/1ba In quiet, private park. Large lot Call: 386-752-6269 lv message if no answer. RVLots or Cottage avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452.

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, FEBRUARY22 & 23, 2013 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$4,800 386-288-6102 640Mobile Homes forSaleNew 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location in Columbia County, older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes Demo your mobile home/free tear down at Palm HarborNew mobiles $39K off list John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1,512 sqft DW perfect Rental or First home. Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert OPEN HOUSE 2005 Spacious 4/2, Sat. Feb. 23, 1-4:00 pm., 3486 NWMoore Rd., Jeb Stewart, Stan Batten Real Estate, Inc. 386-965-8059 705Rooms forRent Room Furnished, Clean, TV, Fridge, Microwave, Cable, Interet, Laundry. Close in. Private w/ Enterence. For more information. Contact 386-965-3477 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2bd and 1bd Apts. Avail now. Everything included. Close to VA, closed in yard. 727-415-2207 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. Avail 5/1, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRentUnfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 14.69 ac tract on Lake Jeffrey Rd. Has well & septic and power ready for site built or MH. $65,000 MLS #82567 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Beautiful lot on Suwannee River. Lot has a well and anerobic septic system. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small, affordable home on corner lot w/ fenced in yard. Needs a little TLC. MLS #81204 $19,900 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, 810Home forSale 2BR/2BAgorgeous custom built pool home. Spacious bedrooms. SS appliances, Corian counter tops. Remax Jo Lytte 386-3652821 MLS 80934 $179,900 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 3BD/2BAcustom western cedar home on two acres lakefront lot. Boat ramp, dock and deck. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 74681 $179,900 3BD/2BAon 10 acres has a unique open great room, dining and family room with vaulted ceilings. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 79593 $345,800 82374 Beautiful inside and out, 3br/2.5ba home sits on 10 acres, fenced. Screened back porch. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $243,900 82718 Beautiful Brick home. Upgraded granite counter tops, new paint, carpet & appliances. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $189,000 82763 This great open floor plan home has had new flooring, paint, appliances, a/c and light fixtures. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $139,500 82794 -Great house in Great neighborhood. Granite countertops, Florida room, vaulted ceilings. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $129,000 82843 Home sits on 4.2 acres and has a 3br/2.5ba brick home, large great room w/ brick fireplace. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $81,000 82845Cute as can be, solid built home with large kitchen, newer cabinetry, & granite countertops. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $75,500 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable lakefront 2/2 Watch the sun rise from nearly anywhere Needs TLC has potential. $59,000 Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847 MLS 81189 Beautiful 4BD/3BAhome in gated s/d. high volume ceilings, open kitchen. MLS 81102 $119,999 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Beautiful tripe wide home / plenty of space to spread out family, showroom quality. MLS 82622 $123,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 OPEN HOUSE Feb 24th Noon 3pm. 4bd/2ba inground pool. 413 SWKirby Ave, LC. Off Branford Hwy. 810Home forSale Close to town, oversized Great rm, Dining rm, Study, lrg Master suite w/ walk in closet. MLS 82435 $173,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 5BD/3BAjust minutes away from town on half an acre. Mary Brown Whitehusrt $210,000 386-965-0887 MLS #82546 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAcustom home w/ 2 car garage. Designer kitchen. Sherry G. Ratliff $115,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81774 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAnewly renovated with fireplace. New appliances, carpet & More. Sherry G. Ratliff $94,900 386-365-8414 MLS #82657 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Golf Court view! 3BD/3BAlog home on #1 green. Built in ‘99 & upgraded in ‘09. Custom cabinets. MLS # 80765 Swift Creek Realty $294,900 800-833-0499 Gorgeous view off screened back porch, Open flrpln w/ oversized eat-in kitchen. MLS 82699 $110,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Great Country Living! 2BD/1BA on 1.17 Acres! 1,462 heated sq.ft w/ large great room. MLS # 82030 Swift Creek Realty $109,900 800-833-0499 Immaculately kept home, great rm with f/p, fenced w/ 12x30 utility shed. MLS 82604 $115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Just Outside of Mayo, well maintained home for its year. Screened front porch, shed. $33,250 Ric Donovan, Poole Realty 386-590-1298 MLS 82711 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Private acres & access to Ichetucknee via private Rec Area. Large screened porch. MLS 81623 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Reduced 4BD/2.5BA, 2,405 heated sq.ft. Many upgrades throughout home. MLS # 81985 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 800-833-0499 REDUCED! 3,000 sq.ft., 3/2.5 on 20 acres 14’ceilings, Central vacuum system. $489,000. Nelda Hatcher Poole Realty 386-688-8067 MLS 82280 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2208sf, all original wood restored, newer paint, remodeled baths, large bedrooms. #82850 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2161sf, 6 ac MOL, Roman shades, Italian tile, crown molding, master has tray ceilings. #82646 $299,900 Spectacular home for the price. 1649 heated sq ft, screened back patio., MLS 82395 $154,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Well maintained home on lovely landscaped lot, close to everything in downtown Branford. $139,000. Sylvia Newell, Poole Realty 386-590-2498 MLS 82233 Woodborough s/d. Separate Living Rm and Great Rm, 3 full baths, custom kitchen. MLS 81334 $259,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 ac Ranch, Brick 3/3 w/ 2000 sqft. New roof in 2005, kitchen remodeled, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 70 acres in McAlpin. Farmhouse, tobacco barn, corner property w/ paved road. Less than $3000/ acre. Ronnie Poole, Poole Realty 386-208-3175 MLS 79336 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyMedical Office Building For Sale or Rent. Contact 727-422-3472 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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10B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 2013 www.RountreeMooreToyota.com1-888-905-14741232 Hwy. 90 West, Lake City, FLPrice excludes tax, tag, title, registration, and dealer fee. TO SEE THE ALL NEW 2013 LINE-UP 2013 AV ALON 2013 SCION FRS Hurry In Today! Limited Availability!060APRFOR UP TOMONTHS ONSELECTEDMODELS% *Covers normal factory scheduled service. Plan is 2 years or 25k miles, whichever comes details.2 Years FREE MAINTENANCE 2013 RA V4