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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02027

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02027

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — George LeMieux somehow convinced Gov. Charlie Crist’s chief of staff during a late-night meet-ing that he deserved an inter-view to be considered for the U.S. Senate post to which he was ultimately appointed, according to newly unearthed documents. However, the documents show that chief of staff repeatedly said he did not recall what LeMieux said dur-ing that 1 a.m. meeting at a burger joint — and leaving a big mystery from Crist’s four-year term unanswered: Why did he choose a man whom he had previously dismissed as unqualified for such a high office? The documents, obtained by The Associated Press, were part of a civil case involving former Republican Party of Florida Chairman Jim Greer. They contain a deposition given by former Crist chief of staff Eric Eikenberg, who held the late-night meeting with LeMieux. Insiders have long wondered why Crist bypassed big-name political figures like Jacksonville Mayor John Delaney, U.S. Rep Bill Young and his own lieutenant gov-ernor, Jeff Kottkamp. Crist instead chose LeMieux, his onetime chief of staff, who had never held elected office. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comB ill Brown once hunted ducks where the tree planted in his honor now grows. More than 50 years ago where Florida Gateway College’s administration building now stands, there was a pond. A lot has changed in 50 years, but Brown remembers it all started with one wood-en building because he was the first student to enroll at Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Roberts returns to GMA. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 77 55 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 277 1 NO. 1 STUDENT Medicaidexpansionapproved by Scott Tax deal on tap at boardmeeting Three-year plan hinges on feds keeping promise to pay added costs. County to considerabatement for local cold-storage firm.By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe county commission could approve tax relief for a Columbia County busi-ness in exchange for invest-ing in facility improvements and hiring more work-ers. The meeting will be held at the School Board Administration Complex starting at 5:30 p.m. Also on the agen-da are pay hikes for three newly-created admin-istrative positions and a vote on raising the bed tax by a penny. United States Cold Storage plans on spending $15.2 million to improve its equipment and facili-ties at 211 NE McCloskey Ave., and hire 15 additional employees if the county commission agrees to sus-pend 10 years of property taxes. The county’s estimated lost revenue from the tax exemption would be $121,828 for the first year. During the current fiscal year, the county will col-lect more than $17.5 million from taxes based on real property and real estate. Parts of the agreement would require the company to “provide credible docu-mentation” each year to establish the number of full-time employees working in the expanded business. If the company does not hire the additional 15 employ-ees, the county can revoke the tax exemption. The public hearing for the proposed tax exemp-tion will be held at tonight’s meeting. The job creation project between United States Cold Storage and the county was code named “Project Action.” The county commission also plans to assign pay grades for the three divi-sion managers created last year and bring those posi-tions into the county pay plan. County Manager Dale Williams said every employee in the county fits somewhere into the county pay plan, but because the division managers are new positions, they haven’t been classified with a pay grade yet. “The main objective is to have these positions that have been created, placed into the county pay plan,” Williams said. The three positions include managers for: admin-istration, Lisa Roberts; safe-ty, David Kraus; and opera-tions, Kevin Kirby. Kurt Spitzer was hired as a consultant to review and provide recommendations on pay grades for the new positions. Williams said any recommendations from Spitzer were just that, rec-ommendations. The final pay assignments would By GARY FINEOUT andKELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott announced plans Wednesday to expand Medicaid coverage to roughly 900,000 more people under the federal health overhaul, a surprise decision from the vocal critic of President Barack Obama’s plan. Scott said he will ask the Legislature to expand the program under a bill that would expire in three years, after which it would require renewed legislative support. He’s the seventh Republican governor so far to propose expanding the taxpayer-funded health insurance program. Scott said he would support the expansion as long as the federal government pays 100 percent of the increased costs, which is the deal offered to states by the Obama administration for the first three years. After that, the federal government said it would pay 90 percent of the cost for the additional enrollees. The governor said he gained new perspective after his mother’s death last year, calling his decision to support a key provision of the Affordable Care Act a “compassionate, com-mon sense step forward,” and not a “white flag of surrender to government-run health care.” MEDICAID continued on 3A BROWN continued on 3A CDC continued on 3A Scott Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterFlorida Gateway College speech professor Larry Gunter ( left) hands Bill Brown a bouquet of flowers during a tree planting ceremony for Brown at FGC. Brown w as the first student enrolled at Lake City Junior College. He retired on Feb. 15 after 24 years as d irector of purchasing. ‘We are both Vietnam vets. We have a special connection,’ Gunter said. ‘He’s j ust a genuine human. What he shows is what he is. He’s a stand-up guy.’Lake City Junior College’s first enrollee ends his career there Bill Brown retires after 24 years on the job at FGC. Williams Bill Brown hides his face in laughter as Tonia E. Laws on, FGC coordinator of purchasing and contracts, shares a joke d uring a tree-planting ceremony on Wednesday. A Cleveland pear tree was planted in Brown’s honor. COUNTY continued on 3A Documents spark questions about Crist choice for SenateHousing group banquet set for Saturday nightBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Greater Lake City Community Development Corporation is a local orga-nization founded to give residents better housing opportunities. “Our mission is to assist low to moderate income families and individuals to become home owners and renters of decent, safe and sanitary affordable housing,” said Ann McKellum, CDC assistant executive direc-tor. The CDC provides housing certification for lowand moderate-income families. The agency is certified through the state and works in Columbia County. The agency has been in Columbia County since 2002. Lester McKellum serves as the organization’s executive director. Saturday the organization will host its annual banquet, which also serves as a fundraiser.TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterA Toyota minivan sits damaged following a Wednesday afternoon crash near the inter-section of Southeast Eloise Avenue and Southeast Baya Drive. See story, Page 3A. Afternoon accident

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NEW YORK R obin Roberts made her return to ABC’s “Good Morning America” Wednesday, five months to the day after receiving a bone marrow transplant and a year since she started feeling symptoms of the ailment that has sidelined her since August. Roberts looked thin and didn’t bother to cover her hair loss with a wig. She wore a wide smile in tak-ing her seat next to co-host George Stephanopoulos on TV’s top-rated morning show. “I have been waiting 174 days to say this,” Roberts said. “Good morn-ing, America.” The bulk of the ABC show turned into a celebration of her return as she’s recovering from MDS, a blood and bone marrow disease. President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and basketball star Magic Johnson all sent taped greetings. At the studio, ABC boss Anne Sweeney, news division President Ben Sherwood and Katie Couric all stood in the wings watching. When Roberts thanked her nurses on the air, all of the show producers in the control room a floor away stood and applauded. Sherwood delivered a champagne toast on the set after the show went off the air at 9 a.m. “Can I go home now?” Roberts said, before delivering a tearful thank-you to her colleagues.Stevie Wonder says UN Day Concert to be on TV ATLANTA — Stevie Wonder says a concert devoted to peace is going from the stage to television. “Stevie Wonder With Friends: Celebrating a Message of Peace” will premiere Saturday on Centric at 9 p.m. EST. The musical celebration took place at the General Assembly Hall at United Nations Headquarters in New York last October. The con-cert will also air March 3 on BET at 11 a.m. EST. “It was a great night,” said Wonder, who hosted the concert. “People not only sang about it but their spirits were committed to see peace. In this society we are living in, there’s a need for peace for all nations throughout the world.” The 90-minute concert celebrated the 67th anniversary of the UN’s peacekeeping and crisis manage-ment efforts around the globe. “Peace is something we can’t just talk about, we got to be about it,” the 62-year-old singer said. “The way people participated on that night showed their commitment. I was very, very happy.” Wonder hopes the televised event will encourage others to take part in the next concert. Chan film to tell story of looted antiquities SEOUL, South Korea — Jackie Chan wants his lat-est film to spread the message about how China’s national artifacts are being looted and sold. “Chinese Zodiac” or “CZ12” is about a man who finds and recovers 12 bronze zodiac animal heads histori-cally depicted as being looted from China’s Summer Palace by colonial-ists. The blockbuster’s director, writer, producer and star, Chan said he was upset after seeing three of the bronz-es being auctioned while he lived in Hong Kong. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Actor Gary Lockwood is 76. Q Actress Tyne Daly is 67. Q Actor Anthony Daniels is 67. Q Tricia Nixon Cox is 67. Q Former Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, R-Maine, is 66. AROUND FLORIDA Florida near top in AP testing TALLAHASSEE — Florida students rank fourth nationally in advanced placement test scores, an increase from sixth the prior year. The College Board on Wednesday released 2012 results that also showed Florida had the highest advanced placement par-ticipation rate for a fourth straight year. Students scoring 3 or better on a five-point scale receive college credit for taking advanced placement courses. In Florida, 27 percent of 2012 high school gradu-ates scored a 3 or higher. That’s up from 24 percent in 2011. The state’s partici-pation rate was 53 percent, an increase from 47 per-cent the prior year. Twenty-nine percent of Florida’s Hispanic students scored a 3 or better. That’s up one percentage point. Among AfricanAmericans graduates, 7.4 percent made 3 or higher compared to 7.1 percent last year.Bill would reduce class penalties TALLAHASSEE — Financial penalties would be reduced for school districts that violate Florida’s class size limits under a bill moving in the Legislature. A House education subcommittee approved the measure on Wednesday. A 2002 state constitutional amendment limits classes in core subjects to 18 students in kindergar-ten through third grade, 22 in fourth through eighth grade and 25 in high school. The state now penalizes districts for every class over those limits. The bill would impose penalties only if a school’s average class size violates the lim-its. That’s the way the penalties were applied during a phase-in period from 2006 through 2010. Statewide penalties totaled only $267,000 in the last year of school average penalties. Since then they’ve ranged from $10 million last year to $5.8 million this year.Man gets 9 years for police chase CLEARWATER — A Florida judge revoked a man’s driver’s license for life and sentenced him to nine years in prison for leading police on a chase with his toddler in the back seat. The July 9 crash ended when 22-year-old Derrick Deon Mims crashed a stolen sports utility vehicle into a public transportation bus. Police say the 2-year-old child wasn’t injured but a passenger was taken to the hospital with serious injuries. The Tampa Bay Times reports Mims pleaded guilty Tuesday to multiple charges, including flee-ing and eluding, DUI with property damage and child abuse. The 14-minute chase prompted the Gulfport Police Department to tweak its policy on police chases.Boy finds gun, shoots woman CALLAWAY — Authorities say a 3-year-old Florida Panhandle boy found a .38-caliber hand-gun under the mattress in his parents’ bedroom and shot a family friend in the forehead. The shooting happened Tuesday in Callaway. The News Herald of Panama City reports 18-year-old Emily Allen told deputies she was lying on the bed when she heard a “loud bang.” That’s when she saw the child standing next to her with a gun. Allen told investigators she only realized she’d been shot when blood started running down her face. Deputies say Allen was expected to be ok. The child’s mother was in the other room. His father told deputies he kept the loaded gun between the mattresses. Sheriff’s investigators are working with the state attorney’s office to deter-mine whether charges will be filed.Red light cameras help fight crime HIALEAH — Police in Hialeah are using red light cameras to fight crime. El Nuevo Herald reported Wednesday that police are installing cameras at eight intersections and equipping an undercover patrol with four high-defi-nition cameras. It is part of an effort to curb a wave of robberies that recently hit the Miami suburb. The cameras send alerts to police when tags of sto-len vehicles are detected, or when a car’s owner has an arrest warrant or sus-pected driver’s license. The system was established with $200,000 in federal funds. During the first two weeks, cameras captured the license plates of more than 156,000 vehicles, including 14,790 which belonged to drivers with suspended licenses. The American Civil Liberties Union says the cameras are giving resi-dents the impression that they deter crime. “ Thought for Today ” “Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t — you’re right.” — Henry Ford, American industrialist (1863-1947) Robin Roberts returns to ‘GMA’ Wednesday: Afternoon: 3-7-4 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 5-5-8-7 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 10-25-30-35-36 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-04242AWEATHER Daily Scripture “Whoever would foster love covers over an offense, but who-ever repeats the matter sepa-rates close friends.” — Proverbs 17:9 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESSAnchor Robin Roberts, left, and George Stephanopoulos sha re a laugh during a broadcast of ‘Good Morning America’ Wednesday in New York. Roberts returned to the popular morning program after undergoing a bone marrow transplant five months ago. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press Wonder Chan

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 3A3A MORTGAGE MillionDollar ! APPLY NOW!Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS$1 MILLION IN 2013 FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $80,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2... and we’re starting withYOU! Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. MOVEyour First Mortgage(from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanOR We’ll save you at least1 We’ll pay you1 TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterJoe Allen (left) stands with Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt (center) and former Fire Chief Carlton Tunsil during Tue sday night’s City Council meeting, where Allen and Tunsil we re recognized for their years of work for the city. Allen and Tunsil recently retired. Retirement proclamationsFrom staff reportsTwo Lake City residents were involved in a traffic crash that caused one of the cars to overturn along Baya Avenue Wednesday shortly before 1 p.m., according to a Florida Highway Patrol media release. Martha Elsie Breon, 79, was driving a Chevrolet Impala when she turned left onto Baya Avenue from Eloise Street and struck the rear passenger door of a Toyota Sienna driven by Robert Scott Winstead, 42, causing the Sienna to over-turn and come to a rest in the westbound lane of Baya Avenue, according to the media release. Neither driver was taken to the hospital, and their injuries were listed as minor. Breon was charged with a stop sign violation, accord-ing to the release. Both drivers were wearing seat belts, according to FHP.Injuries in crash minor CDC: Annual fundraising event set for Saturday Continued From Page 1AThe event will take place at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds exhibition hall. The keynote speaker is Russell Wright. Entertainment and music for the event will be provided by Tony Buzzella and Melvin Goggins Jr. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased at the CDC office, 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive. Dress for the event is formal. “Our platinum sponsor this year is Rountree-Moore Automotive Group,” McKellum said. The theme for this year’s event is: “Networking Builds Communities.” “The goal for this banquet is to raise funds to pour the foundation for another home for a low to moder-ate income family,” McKellum said. “We’re open for volunteers for any-one who wants to volunteer their time. All donations are appreciated.” The 2013 Greater Lake City Community Development Cooperation Inc. banquet marks the eighth year the organization has held a banquet. The Greater Lake City Community Development Corporation is a nonprofit 501C3 organization. All contributions and donations are tax deductible. “We also offer other community services such as computer classes and we are beginning our mentoring and technology classes,” McKellum said. “We’ll hold a meet-and-greet event on Saturday, March 2, from 10 a.m. to noon at the CDC office.” MEDICAID: Scott concedesContinued From Page 1A“Before I ever dreamed of standing here today as governor of this great state, I was a strong advocate for better ways to improve health care than the gov-ernment-run approach taken in the president’s health care law. I believe in a different approach. But, regardless of what I — or anyone else — believes, a Supreme Court decision and a presidential elec-tion made the President’s healthcare mandates the law of the land,” Scott said at a news conference. The governor said he still worries that the pres-ident’s health care reform plan could “lead to less patient choice, worse care and higher costs” but he can’t “in good conscience deny the uninsured access to care.” Scott stressed he won’t simply deny new Medicaid recipients health insur-ance after the three years are up, but said he will spend that time measuring how the expansion impacts healthcare costs, quality and access. COUNTY: Job-creating deal up for consideration Continued From Page 1Abe finalized by Williams after the county assigns the pay grades. Also, any increase in pay would need to already be allocated in the budget approved by the county for salaries. Before taking the position of administration manager, Roberts was assistant county manager and made $63,959. A memo on division man-ager salaries recommended Roberts receive a 12.7 percent increase in pay to $72,093. The position of administration manager oversees the management of $4.3 million of the county budget. The safety manager’s responsibilities include management of almost $7 million of the county budget. Part of the $7 million the position supervises includes the Lifeguard Ambulance Service contract, which is more than $1 million. Kraus was a senior staff assistant before taking the safety manager position. His salary was $54,933. Spitzer recommends a 27.3 percent salary increase for Kraus, bringing his salary to $69,933. The operations manager position administers $20.2 million of the county budget. Kevin Kirby took the operations manager position after serving as the public works director. His salary is $88,039. Spitzer recommends a 21.5 percent pay increase to $107,000. Also, the county commission will hold a public hearing on increas-ing the bed tax by one cent. The increase would help pay for improve-ments at the Southside Recreation Complex. BROWN: A stand-up guy takes his bows Continued From Page 1ALake City Junior College and Forest Ranger School back in 1962. “That was a mouthful for the cheerleaders,” he joked. Brown served 24 years as an employee of the college before retir-ing Friday. He was the director of purchasing, and was proud of the work he did. The college planted his favorite tree, a Cleveland pear, behind the administration building. He met his wife, Mary Ellen, when he went back to college at Valdosta State University, where he received a degree in accounting. “I slid down the banister in my dorm, and he was at the bottom,” Mary Ellen said. “We have been together ever since.” She said he served two tours in Vietnam, and he’s been all over the world. In his military service, she said, Brown has dined with kings and stayed in fancy hotels, but that never changed him. “He’s just a farm boy ... and the love of my life,” Mary Ellen said. At his tree-planting ceremony, about 50 people came to see Brown honored for his hard work and com-munity service. Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter said Brown was someone he considered a mentor and whose advice he takes seriously. “He’s been involved in our community with a lot of different organi-zations and helping a lot of people,” Hunter said. “Just a class-act guy, he would give you the shirt off his back.” School Board member Dana Brady said Brown was “like a father figure” to her, and she was sad to see him leave the college. Brady said he was a big help with her campaign and always had “the well-thought-out answer.” Brown said he’s not sure how he’s going to spend his retirement, but he knows he wants to do something for the community because the com-munity has been good to him. The college has become a part of the community and has the best interests of the students at heart, Brown said. “I’m just proud of that, and in some way I may have helped some kids get their schooling,” he said. District 2 County Commissioner Rusty DePratter has known Brown for 25 years. He said Brown is will-ing to help anyone and not expect anything back. “If more of us could act like Bill, then the world would be a better place,” DePratter said. “... It makes me proud to stand behind some-body like Bill.”

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W hen the remains of Richard III were identified recently in England, just about every commentator mentioned the famous quotation associated with his name: “A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Unfortunately for the last Plantagenet king of England, it is always difficult to find a spare horse in the midst of a battlefield rout. They are as scarce as a taxi on a wet night in New York City -or in Pittsburgh’s case, as scarce as a taxi at any time in any weather. What is more unfortunate is that the quotation was not among the king’s last words, which were more likely “ouch” and “darn.” He died of his wounds and was buried under a future parking lot, history’s way of adding insult to injury. No, the credit for King Richard’s supposed eloquence goes to William Shakespeare, as usual, because the playwright pretty much invented the English language. You may think this column is a sorry sight, but it is now a foregone conclusion that many of the things we carelessly say are Shakespearean in origin. For exam-ple, “a sorry sight” comes from “Macbeth” and “foregone conclu-sion” from “Othello.” The immortal bard invented dozens of such phrases, and the average person doesn’t have to be wearing tights to say them. That’s not to suggest that Shakespeare invented every memorable saying in the English lan-guage. He didn’t say, even though it is a great truth: “Different strokes for different folks, and so on and so on and scooby dooby dooby.” That was Mr. Sly of the Family Stone. Now, at this stage of the column, you may be baffled enough to wander lonely as a cloud that floats on high (William Wordsworth) or maybe you have trod the pavement in a dead patrol or measured out your life with coffee spoons (T.S. Eliot). Or perhaps you are simply saying: “What the heck is this?” (Anonymous). No less an authority than British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, a great man who did not limit himself in matters of inebriation and was good for a quote himself, observed as much. “It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quota-tions,” he said. “ ‘Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations’ is an admirable work, and I studied it intently. The quo-tations when engraved upon the memory give you good thoughts. They also make you anxious to read the authors and look for more.” Very true. If I were marooned on a desert island, I would be content if all I had was “Familiar Quotations” to keep me company -that and a well-stocked fridge and good plumb-ing. And maybe a DVD player. It is true that my favorite quotations tend to be from a dead poet’s society of the traditional greats -Wordsworth, Keats, Byron and the boys. But if anybody should criticize my narrow literary taste, then I would say to them: “Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries” (French sol-dier, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”). One regret: Having kept company, one quotation at a time, with the greatest speakers, actors, singers, statesmen and writers of any gen-eration, I am left feeling defeated that no quotation of mine shall ever be saved for posterity -not in Bartlett’s, not at the bottom of those little calendars people used to turn one day at a time. Apparently every-thing worthwhile has been said. If BrainyQuote.com were to include one of my sayings -such as my definition of a liberal: a per-son who believes that consenting adults may have any sort of sex but shouldn’t be allowed a cigarette afterward -then it would be better than a Pulitzer to me. So much for good thoughts. I sound no better than a pygmy seeking to enter the hall of giants. Only one thing to do: Flee the battlefield. A horse! A horse! A taxi! A taxi! Darn, where did they go? OPINION Thursday, February 21, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman P resident Obama’s proposal to raise the mini-mum wage to $9 an hour wouldn’t strength-en the economy, increase confidence or help very many workers. The idea does have superficial appeal — “If you work full time,” Obama says, “you shouldn’t be in poverty.” But if poverty were so easily dispatched, why not raise the wage so that every worker can be middle class, or even more affluent? The real value of labor is set by the free market, not by government. If you’re getting paid more than you’re worth, someone else must be making up the differ-ence. The government can indeed force an employer to pay $9 an hour, but it can’t guarantee the workers will be offered the same number of hours, that they won’t be laid off, or that the company will even make a profit and stay in business. Obama talked about the minimum wage because it’s an easy way for him to appear to be on the side of workers, and to make Republicans seem like Scrooge. It’s harder for Obama to talk about the overall econ-omy, which shrank in the last quarter. It’s harder for him to talk about unemployment, which increased from 7.8 percent in December to 7.9 percent in January. And it’s harder to talk about median family household income, which declined by 1.7 percent in real terms between 2010 and 2011. States already can set a higher minimum wage than federally required $7.25. Florida’s minimum wage is now $7.79 per hour, not unreasonable. It’s up 12 cents (1.5 percent) from last year’s $7.67. Perhaps there are surprising economic advantages from decreeing much higher wages; if they think so, Florida and other states are free to experiment. Obama’s proposal would mean a 15 percent increase by 2015. That cost is high enough to make companies dependent on low-cost labor reconsider any plans to expand. If entry-level workers are to get $9, those now making $9 and $10 also would need a big raise. We join most Americans in agreeing with Obama that poverty is bad for families and bad for the econo-my, which is one reason there is such broad public sup-port for public education. The way to overcome poverty is to fight it at the individual level, through honest initiative, training, and experience. Most workers who start at minimum levels quickly get raises and move on to better-paying, more challenging assignments. The raise Obama wants would increase a minimumwage worker’s total pay by about $2,500 a year. He didn’t mention where the extra $48 per week for a Florida worker would come from. It would come straight out of an economy that from 2000 to 2010 saw median household income fall an inflation-adjusted 7 percent. If government has the power to make work pay more, let’s give everyone a 15 percent raise and short-en the work week so we’ll all have more time to spend our extra money. Obviously, government has no such power. Only when the economy gets moving again will real wages rise. Proposing a 15 percent raise for the least produc-tive workers at a time the economy has stalled and overall income is falling is irresponsible. Why not give us all a raise? My kingdom for a quote! ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comT wo little-known Russian and American cities, the places where the nuclear superpowers began their bomb race more than a half-century ago, were separately catapulted into the news last weekend by a coincidence of unrelated events. One suddenly became ground zero for a celestial occurrence. The other was victimized by subterranean hap-penstance. Together they are A Tale of Two Nuclear Cities, a Cold War tragedy that serves as a reminder of the unintended consequences that can make Americans and Russians 21st-century victims of the nuclear mistakes of a long-past era. In Chelyabinsk, Siberia, a speeding meteor produced a shock wave that shattered windows and injured more than 1,000 people last week. Experts (who are more into info than irony) announced that the blast was equivalent to the energy produced by more than 20 atomic bombs of the size the United States dropped on Hiroshima. In Hanford, Wash., officials revealed that an old underground storage tank holding radioactive liq-uid has been leaking at the Hanford nuclear reservation, America’s most contaminated nuclear site. Authorities estimate that between 150 to 300 gallons have leaked into the surrounding land and ground-water. Officials are concerned about similar deterioration of some of the other underground tanks that also store waste from nuclear reactors. Beginning in the mid-1940s, Chelyabinsk and Hanford were the sites of highly secretive nuclear-weapons plants that were the first engines of the nuclear-arms race. The facilities ended up polluting surrounding land and water with massive amounts of radioactive contamination. Local residents of these bucolic settings were unaware of the dangers their governments introduced -even as nuclear radia-tion contaminated their bodies, their rivers, their lands and brought genetic disability and early death. Today, Russia has closed its aged bomb-making plants, but it still stores plutonium at Mayak. There have been no reports of damage to that facility, nor of damage to the nearby chemical-weapons facility at Shchuchye. Half a world away, folks who grew up in picturesque Hanford -on the Columbia River, which is famous for its salmon -told similar stories of parents who worked at the nuclear plant and died in their 40s. The leakage problem at Hanford involves 149 older metal tanks that consist of just a single shell. Many date back to the 1940s; they were not designed to be in service this long. Hanford also has 28 newer tanks that have double shells and are not believed to be leaking; but they are reportedly almost full. Inslee said the state was assured years ago that problems such as leakage from older tanks had been dealt with. He added that the pros-pect of federal spending cuts would increase the risks at Hanford. Today, it is tragic testimony to the superpowers’ shared nuclear folly that neither ever attacked the other with any of the thousands of nuclear bombs each rushed to produce at the Chelyabinsk and Hanford facili-ties. But the products of those facili-ties wound up inflicting death, dis-ease and disfigurement upon many of their own citizens. Q Martin Schram writes political analysis for Scripps Howard News Service. Martin Schrammartin.schram@gmail.com 4AOPINION Reg Henryrhenry@post-gazette.com Q Reg Henry is a columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Cold War vestiges still afflict 2 cities Q Tampa Tribune

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George D. AnthonyMr. George D. Anthony Jr. 67, of Lake City, FL departed this life on Febru-ary 16, 2013 at the Select Spe-cialty hospital in Gainesville, FL. He was born on May 12, 1945 in Brunswick, GA to the late George and Mar-ian Hargrove Anthony. On April 10, 1970 he was joined in Holy matrimony to Elnora Bennett and together they had (3) chil-dren. George was retired from the state of FL Division of For-estry after 25 years of service. After retiring he and his wife El-nora relocated to the Lake City area. He joined the Philadelphia (MB) Church. George leaves to celebrate his legacy Wife Elnora Anthony, (2) Sons George D. Anthony III (Camish), Corey R. Anthony both of Palm Beach, FL. (1) daughter Gacoma D. Anthony of Atlanta, GA. (5) Grandchildren, (8) Nephews and (4) Nieces and a host of other relatives and friends. Visita-tion for family and friends will be from 5:00 until 7:00pm Fri-day at the Philadelphia Baptist Church, CR 242, Lake City, FL. The home going celebration will be Saturday, February 23, 2013 at 11:00am at the Philadelphia Baptist Church with Pastor I.L. :LOOLDPVRIFLDWLRQ,QWHUPHQWwill follow in the Philadelphia Memorial Garden Cemetery. MIZELL FUNERAL HOME 365 NW Washington St., Lake City is in charge of arrange-ments. (ph #) 386-72-3166. Please sign guest register at www.mizellfuneralhome.com Rufus BassMr. Rufus Bass, 84, a resident of White Springs, Florida, died Wednesday, February 20, 2013 in the V.A. Medical Center. He was born on August 12, 1928 in Quincy, Florida to the late, Hen-ry and Vassie Manning Bass and moved to this area from Thomasville, Georgia in 1952. He was a veteran of W.W. II having served in the Army Air Corp. He was a heavy equipment operator for many years hav-ing worked for Owens-Illinois for the majority of the time. He was a “sawyer” by trade work-ing for area sawmills in his spare time. Mr. Bass enjoyed playing the guitar and reading the Bible. Mr. Bass was preceded in death by his wife, Evelyn Glover Bass.Mr. Bass is survived by his children, Ricky Bass (Katie) of White Springs; Terry Bass (Deb-rah Lynn) of White Springs; Charles Bass (Emma) of Avon Park, Florida; Marilyn “Cookie” Bass of Lake City; Deidra De-Maris Randall (Willard) of North Carolina; Delane Bass and Don-na Sue Hill (Jeff) both of Perry, Florida; two brothers, Henry Bass of Panama City, Florida and Manuel Bass of Asheville, North Carolina. Ten grandchildren and numerous great and great-great grandchildren also survive.Graveside funeral services for Mr. Bass will be conducted at 1:00 P.M. on Thursday, Febru-ary 21, 2013 in the Riverside Cemetery. The family will of-FLDWHWKHVHUYLFH7KHIDP ily will receive friends for ONE HOUR PRIOR to the service at the cemetery. The reason he did not want a preacher to preach his funeral was his life was his testimony and no one could preach what he lived. Arrange-ments are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234 please sign our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comEvona Carol WilliamsMrs. Evona Carol “BUNNY” Williams, 76, a lifelong resi-dent of Lake City, passed away peacefully surrounded by her family on Tuesday, February 19, 2013 in the Shands at Lake Shore Regional Medical Cen-ter. The daughter of the late Al-len and Ollie Davis Drake, Mrs. Williams had been a homemaker and a very loving and doting wife, mother and grandmother. She loved to vacation in the mountains but her true passion was in tending to and cooking for her children and grandchil-dren. She was well known for her willingness to help others. Mrs. Williams was a member of the Lake City Church of God. She was preceded in death by two step-sons, Johny Wil-liams and Sammy Williams. Mrs. Williams is survived by her husband, Sidney Williams; a son, Johnny Sullivan (Lee) of Branford; two daughters, Martha Parker (Jeff) of Lake City and Dawn Leslie (widow of Doyle) of Lake City; step-son, Gary Williams (Sandy) of Lake City; step-daughter, Sylvia Lynch (F.M.) of Lake City; a daugh ter-in-law, Joan Williams of Lake City; a brother, Dennis Drake (Dean) of Claxton, Geor-gia and a sister, Eloise Beden-baugh (Winford) of Live Oak, Florida. Seven grandchildren, Richard Odom, Billy Brady, Carmen Sullivan, Dustin Brady, Cody Croft, Morgan Gabey DQG5\DQ*DEH\DQGYHJUHDWgrandchildren also survive.Funeral services for Mrs. Wil-liams will be conducted at 10:00 A.M. on Friday, February 22, 2013 in the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home ZLWK5HY/RQQLH-RKQVRIFLDW ing. Interment will follow in the Hopeful Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 5:00-7:00 Thursday evening at the funeral home. Ar-rangements are under the direc-tion of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234 please sign our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 5A5A White’s Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.comNeed somelthing hauled call us:Fill DirtLime RockAsphaltMillingsGraniteRoad RockMisc. Hauling to meet your needsSemi Services also availableYou Call & We Haul! Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES W hile travel-ing last week, my 15 year old son shared with me that his current study of Black History did not attribute the technol-ogy of the current traffic signal to Garrett Morgan, or even to a black inven-tor at all. I thought about his comments and almost concluded indifference. Realizing he mentioned it because it was significant to him, I hesitated. He explained that the mention of Mr. Morgan was signifi-cant to protect the contri-butions of a black person in the creation of the tech-nology that would later become the traffic signal we use today. I couldn’t avoid wondering why he seemed unsatisfied when he knew that a black man contributed to the inven-tion. When you know that I love you, why must you hear it often? Just as he reasoned it was because it brought a sense of pride that increased his esteem and confidence in his identity, the answer to an age-old question seemed to appear out of nowhere. The debate about the melt-ing pot. Merriam-Webster defines a melting pot as a place where a variety of races, cultures or indi-viduals assimilate into a cohesive whole. What exactly is the “cohesive whole”? Is true progress to lose identity or to share in the appreciation of that which distinguishes one from the other? If I travel to any place, and there exists segregation in the community, such that resi-dences, entertainment and the lifestyles of its citizens are distinguished by race, culture or nationality, that to me isn’t an embrace of the “melting pot” concept. Further, in those places and abroad, the measure to me of whether they exist productively is deter-mined by progress. If any one of the demographics fall short of the other, such that there exists a disparity, there is a con-tinuing need that might be unique to that group. I am not ashamed by the realities of difference, I am challenged by it and com-pelled to identify and bring resolve, such that the team is stronger. I challenge myself, my family and friends to find opportuni-ties to improve themselves because we are improving the whole. In my humble opinion, the measure of whether or not we still require the celebration of black history isn’t answered by anything but progress. We will continue to need the celebration of black history as long as we continue to make progress that places advancement and productivity no further than that which lies in our history. Local Wisdom: Helen Morgan:Helen Morgan has been a resident of Columbia County her entire life. She was married to the late James Morgan, a minor league baseball player that was quite famous in his time. The couple had four boys and two girls, and now Helen enjoys nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. She continues to be a member of Falling Creek Missionary Baptist Church, under the leadership of the Rev. Clarence Hayes. Mrs. Morgan worked for Gold Kist for many years before moving on to employment at the state hospital, where she retired. She shares that the happiest time in her life, second only to becom-ing a Christian, was wit-nessing the re-election of President Barack Obama. I asked Mrs. Morgan to talk about the theme for black history this year, which is “We Need Unity.” She shared that in contrasting her neighborhood present and past, there is a reduced sense of concern among its citizens. She recalled years ago, larger numbers of chil-dren played outside in the streets and backyards. The responsibility of ensuring their safety fell on every-one and children were protected by the concern of the entire neighborhood. Today, she shares that she observes self-serving attitudes, with less time, care and concern for each other, not to mention that the youth don’t seem to fre-quent the outside as they did in the past. No longer popular are the neighbor-hood gatherings, with bar-becue and street playing. “We made progress, but got too busy to enjoy it,” stated Mrs. Morgan. Mrs. Morgan has and will continue to be a reminder in the commu-nity of the wisdom of our elders. She has given us 83 years and we look forward much more. Test Your History Knowledge Local History:1890, Finley High School was founded by E.T. Holmes of Jacksonville. This was the first black school in Lake City and it was located in Watertown. National History:Garrett Morgan was the son of former slaves, born in Paris, Ky., on March 4, 1877. His early childhood was spent attending school and working on the family farm with his brothers and sisters. While still a teen-ager, he left Kentucky and moved north to Cincinnati, Ohio, in search of opportunity. Morgan did not attend school beyond elementary school, but he hired a tutor while living in Cincinnati and continued his studies in English grammar. In 1895, Morgan moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where he went to work as a sewing machine repairman for a clothing manufacturer. In 1907, the inventor opened his own sewing equipment and repair shop. It was the first of several businesses he would establish. In 1920, Garrett Morgan moved into the newspaper business when he estab-lished the Cleveland Call. Garrett Morgan was one of the first to apply for and acquire a U.S. patent for an inexpensive device to produce traffic signals. The patent was granted on Nov. 20, 1923. Garrett Morgan also had his invention pat-ented in Great Britain and Canada. The Morgan traffic signal was a T-shaped pole unit that featured three positions: Stop, Go and an all-directional stop position. This “third position” halted traffic in all directions to allow pedestrians to cross streets more safely. Garrett Morgan’s handcranked semaphore traffic management device was in use throughout North America until replaced by the automatic red, yellow and green traffic light sig-nals currently used around the world. The inventor sold the rights to his traf-fic signal to the General Electric Corp. for $40,000. Shortly before his death in 1963, the United States gov-ernment awarded Garrett Morgan a citation for his traffic signal. Bea Coker Historically Speaking Black history to American history, are we ready? BLACK HISTORY MONTH COURTESYGarrett Morgan COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Feb. 21Debutants meetingThe Debutants Society will have an informational meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The meeting is for for girls and boys in ninth through 12th grades who might be interested in becoming members. Minister Jan Harrison is the organization contact person.Gardening talkMaster Gardeners Bill Whitley and Gerry Murphy will give a program about Spring Vegetable Gardening at 5:45b p.m. in the Fort White Library on State Road 47. The pro-gram is free and open to the public.Retired educatorsColumbia County Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. in Room 120 of the Columbia County School District Adult Center. District 4 director Carolyn Stephen will attend. For more information, call Will Brown at 752-2431. Any retired person interested in education is welcome.Cast auditionsHigh Springs Community Theater will hold cast audi-tions for the Neil Simon play “Rumors” at 7 p.m. today and at 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, at the theater, 130 NE First Ave. in High Springs. Casting needs include four adult couples over 21 years old, two police officers and other adults, both male and female. Rehearsals will begin March 4, and per-formances will be April 12 through May 5. For more information, email director Terry Beauchamp at ouis-erb@aol.com of call (352) 335-9137 and leave a mes-sage.Revival servicesVoice of Deliverance Church willl have a revival service at 7:30 p.m. with Sister Joyce Igo.Feb. 22-27Pet adoptionLake City Humane Society and PetSmart will be holding a “Big Tent Adoption Event” in the Publix Shopping Center. The Humane Societ and North Florida Animal Rescue will have dogs and cats available for adoption on display and volunteers on hand to answer ques-tions. All animals will be spayed or neutered and have current vaccinations. Dogs also wil have micro-chip identifiers. Hours will be 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, 11 a..m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more infor-mation, call the Humane Society at (386) 752-1178.Feb. 22Play performances High Springs Community Theater is performing Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” on week-ends through March 3. Performances will be at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $11 for evening shows and $9 for seniors on Sundays only. Tickets are available at The Framery of Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, (386) 754-2780, online at highspringscom-munitytheater.com, and at the door, if seating is avail-able. The theater is at 130 NE First Avenue in High Springs.

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By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON Printing out body parts? Cornell University research ers showed its possible by creating a replacement ear using a 3-D printer and injections of living cells. The work reported Wednesday is a first step toward one day growing customized new ears for children born with mal formed ones, or people who lose one to accident or disease. Its part of the hot field of tissue regeneration, try ing to regrow all kinds of body parts. Scientists hope using 3-D printing technol ogy might offer a speedier method with more lifelike results. If it pans out, this enables us to rapidly customize implants for whoever needs them, said Cornell bio medical engineer Lawrence Bonassar, who co-authored the research published online in the journal PLoS One. This first-step work craft ed a human-shaped ear that grew with cartilage from a cow, easier to obtain than human cartilage, especially the uniquely flexible kind that makes up ears. Study co-author Dr. Jason Spector of Weill Cornell Medical Center is working on the next step how to cultivate enough of a childs remain ing ear cartilage in the lab to grow an entirely new ear that could be implanted in the right spot. Wednesdays report is a nice advancement, said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, who wasnt involved in the new research. Three-dimensional print ers, which gradually layer materials to form shapes, are widely used in manufac turing. For medicine, Atala said the ear work is part of broader research that shows the technology now is at the point where we can in fact print these 3-dimen sional structures and they do become functional over time. Today, people who need a new ear often turn to prosthetics that require a rod to fasten to the head. For children, doctors some times fashion a new ear from the stiffer cartilage surrounding ribs, but its a big operation. Spector said the end result seldom looks completely natural. Hence the quest to use a patients own cells to grow a replace ment ear. The Cornell team started with a 3-D camera that rap idly rotates around a childs head for a picture of the existing ear to match. It beams the ears geometry into a computer, without the mess of a traditional mold or the radiation if CT scans were used to mea sure ear anatomy. Kids arent afraid of it, said Bonassar, who used his then-5-year-old twin daughters healthy ears as models. From that image, the 3D printer produced a soft mold of the ear. Bonassar injected it with a special col lagen gel thats full of cow cells that produce cartilage forming a scaffolding. Over the next few weeks, cartilage grew to replace the collagen. At three months, it appeared to be a flexible and workable outer ear, the study concluded. Now Bonassars team can do the process even faster by using the living cells in that collagen gel as the printers ink. The 3-D technology directly layers the gel into just the right ear shape for cartilage to cover, without having to make a mold first. The next step is to use a patients own cells in the 3D printing process. Spector, a reconstructive surgeon, is focusing on children born without a fully developed external ear, a condition called microtia. They have some ear cartilage-produc ing cells in that tissue, just not enough. So hes experi menting with ways to boost those cells in the lab, so we can grow enough of them from that patient to make an ear, he explained. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6AHealth S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE Specializing in adult medical care including: Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I Now Accepting New Patients Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP Allisha Lanier, ARNP 386-719-2540 www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com Lake City Reporter Drug overdose deaths up for 11th consecutive year By LINDSEY TANNER AP Medical Writer CHICAGO Drug overdose deaths rose for the 11th straight year, fed eral data show, and most of them were accidents involving addictive painkill ers despite growing atten tion to risks from these medicines. The big picture is that this is a big problem that has gotten much worse quickly, said Dr. Thomas Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which gathered and analyzed the data. In 2010, the CDC report ed, there were 38,329 drug overdose deaths nation wide. Medicines, mostly prescription drugs, were involved in nearly 60 per cent of overdose deaths that year, overshadowing deaths from illicit narcot ics. The report appears in Tuesdays Journal of the American Medical Association. It details which drugs were at play in most of the fatalities. As in previ ous recent years, opioid drugs which include OxyContin and Vicodin were the biggest prob lem, contributing to 3 out of 4 medication overdose deaths. Frieden said many doc tors and patients dont real ize how addictive these drugs can be, and that theyre too often prescribed for pain that can be man aged with less risky drugs. Theyre useful for can cer, but if youve got ter rible back pain or terrible migraines, using these addictive drugs can be dan gerous, he said. Medication-related deaths accounted for 22,134 of the drug overdose deaths in 2010. Anti-anxiety drugs includ ing Valium were among common causes of medica tion-related deaths, involved in almost 30 percent of them. Among the medica tion-related deaths, 17 per cent were suicides. The reports data came from death certificates, which arent always clear on whether a death was a suicide or a tragic attempt at getting high. But it does seem like most serious painkiller overdoses were accidental, said Dr. Rich Zane, chair of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. The studys findings are no surprise, he added. The results are consistent with what we experience in ERs, he said, adding that the statistics no doubt have gotten worse since 2010. Some experts believe these deaths will level off. Right now, theres a gen eral belief that because these are pharmaceutical drugs, theyre safer than street drugs like heroin, said Don Des Jarlais, direc tor of the chemical depen dency institute at New York Citys Beth Israel Medical Center. But at some point, people using these drugs are going to become more aware of the dangers, he said. Frieden said the data show a need for more pre scription drug monitoring programs at the state level and more laws shutting down pill mills doc tor offices and pharmacies that over-prescribe addic tive medicines. Prescription painkillers said to be main cause. ASSOCIATED PRESS Hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin, are arranged at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Drug overdose deaths rose for the 11th straight year, federal data show, and most of them were accidents involving addictive painkillers like Vicodin and Oxycontin. Replacement ears printed ASSOCIATED PRESS Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar holds the scaffolding for an ear his laboratory is creating using a 3-D printer and cartilage-producing cells.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, February 21, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS nrnrr rnr 2/ $ 2 (24oz. sport cap) Protein Bars Free! Buy 1 Get 1 Prices in effect thru 2/28/13 2LS1IG?%II>1H;=EM We’re All Service & Smiles! (1.5oz. size) 2/ $ 1 OR 79 ¢ each BRIEFS Today Q Fort White High softball at Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Newberry High, 6 p.m. (JV-5 at Keystone Heights High) Q Columbia High softball at Gainesville, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Vanguard High at Jonesville Tennis Center, 3 p.m. Q Fort White High track at East Coast Classic in Bunnell, TBA Q Fort White High softball vs. Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Q Fort White High baseball at Buchholz High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Saturday Q Columbia High baseball at Chiles High, 2 p.m. (JV-11 a.m.) Q Fort White High track at Bradford Invitational or Ocala Forest Invitational, TBA GAMES RUNNING Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. March 2 at O’Leno State Park on U.S. Highway 41-441, 17 miles south of Lake City. Entry fee through Thursday is $10 for ages 14 and younger and $20 for all others ($25 after Thursday). The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Quarterback Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday (moved from today) in the faculty lounge at the school. Formation of committees and fundrais-ers will be discussed. For details, call Shayne Morgan at 397-4954.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ashley Shoup winds up for a pitch dur ing the season opener against Wolfson on Feb. 5. CHS off to 5-0 start after win JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Lane Pendergrast catches a fly ball hit by Columbia High’s Dalton Mauldin on Feb. 12 in Lake City.Indians pitch shutout against Bradford HighBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High continued its fast start to the 2013 sea-son by picking up a shutout victory at Bradford High. Kevin Dupree allowed only one hit in picking up the 4-0 win against the Tornadoes. Dupree went four innings, walked three bat-ters and struckout six before giving way to soph-omore Rhett Willis. Willis closed out Bradford with three innings of work. The sophomore was equally impressive holding the Tornadoes to one hit, striking out five batters and walking three to pick up the save. A host of Indians were able to pick up hits in the game while being led by Zack Gaskins’ two-hit per-formance. Other Indians with hits in the game were Kody Moniz, Anthony Gonzales, Kevin Dupree, Willie Carter and Trace Wilkinson. Gonzalez had two RBIs in the game while Dupree provided one more for Fort White. Moniz, Carter, Wilkinson and Gaskins scored the Fort White begins season with 3-0 record. INDIANS continued on 2B By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head coach Jimmy Williams said before the season that he may have his best Lady Tigers softball team that he’s ever coached. After a 5-0 start that capped off with a 7-1 win against Trinity Christian Academy, the Lady Tigers are doing everything they can to back up the words of their head coach. After breaking in two new pitchers last year, the Lady Tigers have found a nice balance with Ashley Shoup and Erin Anders this year. Both are sophomores and complementing each other through the early part of the season. Shoup picked up the win against Trinity Christian by pitching four inings, strik-ing out four batters, walk-ing two and allowing only one hit. Anderson relieved the final three innings, struck out four batters, walked three and allowed one hit to Lady Tigers knock off Trinity Christian, 7-1. CHS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 10 a.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for DRIVE4COPD 300, at Daytona Beach, Fla. Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, practice for NextEra Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 2 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Budweiser Duel, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 6 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, final practice for NextEra Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach, Fla. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — LPGA Thailand, first round, at Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, second round matches, at Marana, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Cincinnati at ConnecticutESPN2 — Georgia at ArkansasNBCSN — Drexel at Delaware 9 p.m. ESPN — Duke at Virginia TechESPN2 — California at Oregon 11 p.m. ESPN2 — BYU at Saint Mary’s (Cal) NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Miami at Chicago 10:30 p.m. TNT — San Antonio at L.A. ClippersBASKETBALLNBA schedule Tuesday’s Games Charlotte 105, Orlando 92Toronto 96, Washington 88Brooklyn 113, Milwaukee 111, OTMemphis 105, Detroit 91Chicago 96, New Orleans 87Denver 97, Boston 90Utah 115, Golden State 101Phoenix 102, Portland 98San Antonio 108, Sacramento 102 Today’s Games Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 6 Duke at Virginia Tech, 9 p.m.No. 23 Oregon vs. California, 9 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 15 Butler vs. Saint Louis, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 2 Miami at Wake Forest, 1 p.m.No. 3 Gonzaga vs. San Diego, 7 p.m.No. 5 Florida vs. Arkansas, 7 p.m.No. 8 Syracuse vs. No. 11 Georgetown, 4 p.m. No. 9 Kansas vs. TCU, 4 p.m.No. 10 Louisville vs. Seton Hall, NoonNo. 12 Arizona vs. Washington State, 3 p.m. No. 13 Kansas State at Texas, 8 p.m.No. 16 New Mexico at No. 22 Colorado State, 4 p.m. No. 17 Marquette at Villanova, 6 p.m.No. 21 Memphis vs. Southern Mississippi, 1 p.m. No. 23 Oregon vs. Stanford, 8 p.m.No. 24 VCU at Xavier, 2 p.m.AUTO RACINGDaytona 500 qualifying At Daytona International SpeedwayDaytona Beach Sunday qualifying; race Feb. 24 (Car number in parentheses) 1. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 196.434 mph. 2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 196.292. Note: Duel qualifying races Thursday to set rest of field 3. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195.976.4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.946. 5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195.925. 6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 195.852. 7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.771.8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.767.9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 195.767.10. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.725. 11. (88) Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Chevrolet, 195.584. 12. (17) Ricky Stenhouse, Jr., Ford, 195.537. 13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 195.508. 14. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.503. 15. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 195.495.16. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 195.385. 17. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.240.18. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 195.228.19. (56) Martin Truex, Jr., Toyota, 195.207. 20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195.156. 21. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.084. 22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 195.042. 23. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.961. 24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.793. 25. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.742. 26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.742.27. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.729.28. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.683.29. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 194.654.30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.616.31. (26) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 194.313. 32. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 194.254.33. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.657. 34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 193.544. 35. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 193.540.36. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 193.515.37. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.096. 38. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 192.996. 39. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.563. 40. (36) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.094.41. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 190.339. 42. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.142.43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, owner points. ——— Failed to qualify 44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, owner points. 45. (52) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, owner points.Budweiser Duel 1 Lineup 1. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 196.434 mph. 2. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195.976.3. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195.925. 4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.771.5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 195.767.6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.584. 7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 195.508. 8. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 195.495.9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.24.10. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 195.207. 11. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.084. 12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.961. 13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.742. 14. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.729.15. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 194.654. 16. (26) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 194.313. 17. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.657. 18. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 193.54.19. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.096. 20. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.563. 21. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 190.339. 22. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.046. 23. (52) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 183.876.Budweiser Duel 2 Lineup 1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 196.292 mph. 2. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.946. 3. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 195.852. 4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.767.5. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.725.6. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.537. 7. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.503. 8. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 195.385. 9. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 195.228.10. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195.156. 11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 195.042. 12. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.793. 13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.742.14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.683.15. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.616.16. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 194.254.17. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 193.544. 18. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 193.515.19. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 192.996. 20. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.094.21. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.142.22. (19) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 189.438.HOCKEYNHL schedule Tuesday’s Games Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, SOWinnipeg 2, Buffalo 1Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 1Ottawa 3, N.Y. Islanders 1Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 2San Jose 2, St. Louis 1Nashville 4, Detroit 3, OTLos Angeles 3, Edmonton 1 Thursday’s Games Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.New Jersey at Washington, 7 p.m.Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.Columbus at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Vancouver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.BASEBALLMLB calendar Wednesday — Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-11 — Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 2-19 — World Baseball Classic. March 13 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. March 31 — Opening day, Texas at Houston. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 21, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Zero Hour “Face” (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Frontline “Raising Adam Lanza” MI-5 Conspirators destabilize Britain. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “Relevance” (:01) Elementary “Possibility Two” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries “Stand by Me” Beauty and the Beast “Tough Love” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsAmerican Idol Ten male singers perform. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Community (N) Parks and Recreation (N) (:31) 1600 Penn (N) (:01) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Married-MobsterMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterDateline on OWN Dateline on OWN “Deadly Exposure” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Mother and Child” The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 After the First 48 “John Doe” (N) (:01) The First 48 HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy Days Happy Days Happy Days Happy Days Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. AngerAngerArcher (N) Legit “Family” (N) Totally BiasedBrandX With CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Rose-Colored Glasses” The Mentalist “Bleeding Heart” d NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) d NBA Basketball: Spurs at Clippers NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshVictorious House of Anubis (N) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00) “A Bronx Tale” (1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz Palminteri. iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator MMA Live (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Countdown” College Basketball White Collar “Checkmate” DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm Shake It Up! “Toy Story 2” (1999) Voices of Tom Hanks. Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Dance Moms “Rotten to the Core” Dance Moms Project Runway Project Runway The teams design for Miranda Lambert. (N) Double Divas(:01) Double Divas(:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS A woman witnesses a murder. NCIS A Marine tapes his own murder. NCIS “Masquerade” NCIS “Jack Knife” Suits “War” Differing opinions. (:01) Necessary Roughness BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 20 Countdown” (N) “Cadillac Records” (2008, Drama) Adrien Brody, Beyonc Knowles. BET Honors 2013 Honorees Halle Berry and Chaka Khan. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Dan Le BatardInterruptiond College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball BYU at St. Mary’s. SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaInside LightningLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live!Inside LightningGatorZoneAlong the Way DISCV 38 182 278Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners Moonshiners Auction Kings “Pick-Off Special” (N) Property Wars (N) (:45) Property WarsAuction Kings “Pick-Off Special” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Nerdy Dancing” (N) Conan Mila Kunis; Chris Hardwick. (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) The SoupE! SpecialE! SpecialKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkSalvage DawgsSalvage DawgsWest End SalvageWest End SalvageRehab AddictRehab AddictHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHawaii Life Hawaii Life TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumBorrowed, NewBorrowed, NewSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressWhat Not to Wear “Shannon Elizabeth” Say Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Swamp People “Forces of Nature” Big Rig Bounty Hunters “Tracked” Swamp People “Swamp Invaders” Swamp People “Texas Hold ’Em” (N) Big Rig Bounty Hunters (N) Larry the Cable Guy ANPL 50 184 282North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law “Harvest Time” Glory Hounds (N) North Woods Law “The Rookies” (N) Glory Hounds FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Orzo It Seemed” Sweet Genius A southern candy treat. Chopped “Class Acts, Too” Chopped Recipes to use with leftovers. Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Worst Cooks in America TBN 52 260 372(5:00) “Solomon and Sheba” (1995) Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UFC Primetime (N) Hot Stove Rep Women’s College Basketball Arkansas at Georgia. (N Subject to Blackout) Women’s College Basketball LSU at Missouri. (N Subject to Blackout) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Total Blackout “The Omen” (2006, Horror) Liev Schreiber, Julia Stiles. A diplomat’s adopted son is pure evil. “My Soul to Take” (2010, Horror) Max Thieriot, John Magaro. “House of Bones” (2010, Horror) AMC 60 130 254 “Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight. The Walking Dead Comic Book MenFreakshow (N) Immortalized (N) Comic Book MenFreakshow Immortalized COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowIt’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyWorkaholics Tosh.0 It’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba “As Is” Reba Reba “Blazing Saddles” (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn. Beer for Horse NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Denise Richards. Red Sea Jaws Galapagos Sites and creatures of the islands. Galapagos NGC 109 186 276Mudcats: Down and DirtyMudcats “Midnight Monsters” Highway Thru Hell (N) (DVS) Doomsday Preppers “Pain is Good” Mudcats: Down and DirtyMudcats “Midnight Monsters” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeStrip the City They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Someone WatchingSomeone WatchingSomeone WatchingSomeone WatchingDeadly Sins “I’d Kill for a Sex Change” Deadly Sins “High Society Sins” FrenemiesFrenemiesDeadly Sins “I’d Kill for a Sex Change” HBO 302 300 501 “Hop” (2011) Voices of James Marsden. ‘PG’ (:45) “Battleship” (2012) Taylor Kitsch. Earth comes under attack from a superior alien force. Girls “Boys” Enlightened Taxicab Confessions: All’s Fare MAX 320 310 515(5:35) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011) ‘PG-13’ (7:50) “Red Tails” (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr., Nate Parker. ‘PG-13’ “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel. ‘NR’ SHOW 340 318 545 “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life” (2003) Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’ Tim Minchin and the Heritage(:10) Gigolos (:40) Gigolos CHS: Lady Tigers looking strong Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Still perfect at 3-0 on year Continued From Page 1BIndians’ runs. Carter finished the game with a perfect on-base per-centage after being walked three times to go along with his hit. Fort White scored three runs in the fourth inning and added its final run in the top of the seventh. The Indians are 3-0 on the year with a 2-0 district record. Fort White returns home today to host Newberry High at 6 p.m. and travels to Buchholz High at 7 p.m. on Friday. pick up the save. Trinity Christian’s only run was unearned. “Both our pitchers are doing really good,” Williams said. “They’re doing good on hitting their locations. Their stats are very similar for the sea-son. They’re identical right down the board. The one-two punch is working very well. They’re both staying fresh. It’s the first time we’ve went seven innings, so it was good to pitch both of them.” The Lady Tigers got on the board early and never looked back. Lacey King singled to start the game, stole second base and was moved to third on an out by Kayli Kvistad. Brandy Morgan’s hit drove in King for the Lady Tigers to take a 1-0 lead in the first inning. Columbia added a second run in the third inning when Morgan singled in Tatum Morgan, who reached on a walk earlier in the inning. The Lady Tigers held onto a 2-1 lead heading into the fifth inning before add-ing four more runs. King singled to start the inning and scored on a throwing error to give Columbia a 3-1 lead. Kvistad had a solo home run to put Columbia up 4-1. Brandy Morgan walked following Kvistad’s home run, stole second and third and Hollianne Dohrn drove her in for a 5-1 lead. The final run of the inning came when Caliegh McCauley drove in Dohrn for a 6-1 lead. Tatum Morgan had a double in the sixth and Brandy Morgan knocked her in with a single for the 7-1 final. Columbia is 5-0 on the season and will travel to Gainesville High at 7 p.m. tonight. The Lady Tigers close out the week with a rivalry game at Suwannee High at 7 p.m. on Friday. NCAA says 3 former coaches misled probeBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — The NCAA believes former Miami assistant coaches Clint Hurtt, Aubrey Hill and Jorge Fernandez pro-vided false or misleading information during the probe into the Hurricanes’ athletic department. The NCAA said all three violated “principles of ethi-cal conduct” as part of the notice of allegations served against the Hurricanes, according to a person who spoke to The Associated Press Wednesday on condi-tion of anonymity because the allegations have not been released publicly. Hurtt and Hill were members of Miami’s football staff. Fernandez worked on the men’s bas-ketball staff. Several other coaches are named or referenced in the allegations, including Missouri basketball coach Frank Haith. But only Hurtt, Hill and Fernandez are facing the ethical-con-duct charge, commonly known as NCAA Rule 10.1. Hurtt is currently on the staff at Louisville. Hill is not working as a coach at this time, and Fernandez spent last season as an assistant at Marshall, resigning last May. The notice of allegations was delivered to Miami on Tuesday, and the univer-sity is facing the charge that it had a “lack of insti-tutional control” — one of the worst things the NCAA can levy against a mem-ber school. The charge revolves around how the school allegedly failed to monitor conduct of Nevin Shapiro, a rogue booster and convicted felon who provided cash, gifts and other items to players on the football and men’s bas-ketball teams. University President Donna Shalala said Tuesday night that the Hurricanes have suf-fered enough already through self-imposed sanctions. Through a uni-versity spokesman, she declined further comment Wednesday. The NCAA said Hurtt and Hill committed the same violations, at least related to the ethical-con-duct matter. The NCAA alleged both provided meals, transpor-tation and lodging to either recruits, current players, or both in either 2008 or 2009. Both were inter-viewed by the NCAA dur-ing the course of its probe and allegedly denied pro-viding those extra benefits, statements the NCAA said were contradicted in each case by what players told them separately. Hurtt also took a $2,500 personal loan from Shapiro, which was repaid. The NCAA also believes he sent about 40 impermissible text messages to recruits, which typically is a secondary, or minor, violation. Fernandez, the NCAA alleged, “knowingly pro-vided extra benefits” in the form of an air ticket. The NCAA said Fernandez denied using air miles for the tickets for a men’s bas-ketball player and a high school coach, despite evi-dence to the contrary. In February 2012, Miami center Reggie Johnson was ruled ineligible by the school after an investigation revealed that members of his family accepted “impermis-sible travel benefits” from a member of the school’s former coaching staff, with-out specifying Fernandez or anyone else by name.

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DEAR ABBY: I’m a 43year-old single mom with three young boys. I am also a veteran and getting ready to go back to school. I have been dating a gentleman for two months now, and we get along great. He’s three years older than I am and good with my kids and family. I like him a lot and we seem to have a LOT in common -more than most. I really want him to kiss me, but I don’t want to seem pushy. He’s a real gentleman. We have gone from hugs to holding hands while sitting on the couch watching television. I don’t mind taking things slow, but ... How do I find out if he wants to kiss me or not? Sometimes it seems like it, but then he seems afraid to. How do I let him know it’s OK? Sorry I seem like a teenager. -CONFUSED IN IDAHO DEAR CONFUSED: This man isn’t taking things slow. Glaciers have been known to move faster. Two months is a very long time to wait for a first kiss. The next time you find yourself sitting on the couch and holding hands with him, you have my permission to turn to him and say, “I’d love it if you kissed me.” If that doesn’t do the trick, then face it -his feelings for you are only brotherly. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: You have written about children in grocery stores before. Would you please address the risk to children by allowing them to stand in grocery shopping carts? I see it all too often, and I don’t think the parents/grandparents realize that if the child falls out and lands on his or her head, neck or back, the child could end up paralyzed or dead. The adult must be the rule setter and protect the child. -CONCERNED SHOPPER IN NEW YORK DEAR CONCERNED SHOPPER: I’m glad to oblige. Many markets equip their shopping carts with seat belts to secure tiny passengers and avoid this problem. That way, any liability that might stem from a child falling would lie directly where it belongs, with the adult who should have been using common sense. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My oldest friend owes me a lot of money. I loaned it to her when she was being evict-ed. She has now come into some money and is going on a cruise. I asked her to repay me before the trip. She said she “needs the cruise for her mental health.” I am shocked and very angry. When I lost my temper and told her off, she accused me of being “greedy and money-obsessed.” Abby, I helped her when she needed it! What should I do? -FURIOUS IN SAN FRANCISCO DEAR FURIOUS: When your “friend” returns from her sea cruise, see if you can get her to agree to a repayment plan for the sake of YOUR mental -and financial -health. However, if she refuses, you may have to write off the loan as tuition in the school of experience. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have two sons who will graduate from college on the same day. My wife and I would like to attend both cer-emonies, but for obvious reasons, we cannot. How do I resolve this dilemma? -FATHER IN TEXAS DEAR FATHER: Divide and conquer. You attend one graduation and your wife the other. To decide which one, you and the Mrs. should draw straws. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Listen to complaints and what it is people are asking for and you will have a better idea how to move forward. Being oblivious to others will lead to emotional stress and demands that you won’t want to tackle. Avoid secret encounters. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Follow your intuition and you will end up exactly where you are supposed to be. Share feelings with someone who has common interests. Don’t give in to indulgence. Too much of anything will depreciate your gains. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Steer clear of anyone looking for a favor that will deter you from reaching your personal or profes-sional goals. Leave room to deal with a personal issue that arises between you and someone looking for more than what you have to offer. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t hesitate if an opportunity arises that allows you to mix busi-ness with pleasure. The better acquainted you are with your colleagues, the further ahead you will get. Precision and decisive-ness will raise your profile. Take control. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Make whatever alterations are necessary to achieve happiness. Don’t give in to demands being put on you by someone you feel is sti-fling you. A short trip will open your eyes to what’s available if you are willing to make a move. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put practicality first. You may want to over-react to compensate for something, but you are best to keep things simple and to the point. Live by your rules, not what some-one else wants you to do. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Let situations play out naturally and eventually everything will fall into place. A change in your relationships will benefit you in the end, so don’t lament something you cannot alter. Love is in the stars and socializing is a must. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Visit people you admire or research a cul-ture that you find fascinat-ing. Incorporating ideals you feel akin to will enable you to fulfill a dream from long ago. Get involved in a creative endeavor that allows you to explore your talents. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Make changes at home that will secure your reputation and your future. Deception and disillusion-ment are present. Proceed with caution. Don’t reveal personal information or it may end up costing you financially. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Utilize everything you studied or experienced in the past in order to com-plete a project. An unusual approach to an old idea will put you in a favorable position when dealing with potential partners. Personal investments will pay off. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Learning and trying new pastimes will lead to an interesting meet-ing with someone who is trying to achieve similar goals. Larger quarters or closer proximity to others will add comfort, oppor-tunity and joy to your life. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let anyone talk you in to doing things on too grand a scale. Minimizing your job duties will result in higher prof-its. Contracts should be drawn up and signed to keep everyone in check and contributing what’s expected. +++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Gentleman is slow to seal couple’s dates with a kiss Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY21, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAIN RE: ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISIONFile Number: 13-17-CPJULIAD. MILLS NIBLACKDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSTOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE:You are hereby notified that an Or-der of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of Julia D. Mills Niblack, deceased, File Num-ber 13-17-CP, by the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055; that the total cash value of the estate is $12,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:NAMEBetty Gean Niblack ScottADDRESS387 Winspear Avenue, Buffalo, NY14215NAMEElouise Niblack LumpkinADDRESS2739 SWC.R. 778, Ft. White, FL32038NAMEPatricia A. NiblackADDRESS5820 Lokey Drive, Orlando, FL32810ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THE THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-TYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the estate of the dece-dent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF PUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREV-ER BARREDThe date of the first publication of this Notice is February 14, 2013.The undersigned certifies that a copy of hereof has been furnished to Xe-rox Recovery Services, Estate Re-covery Team, P. O. Box 12188, Tal-lahassee, FL32317 by U.S. Mail on the 11th day of February, 2013.DARRYLJ. TOMPKINS, P.A.BY: DARRYLJ. TOMPKINS, ES-QUIREP.O. Box 519Alachua, FL32616Telephone (386)418-1000Florida Bar No. 36336705537314FEBRUARY15, 21, 2013 NOTICE OFSALENotice is hereby given that on March 08, 2013 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage & Record Storage of Lake City, 442 SWSaint Margaret Street, Lake City, FL32025; will sell at public sale by competitive bidding, the per-sonal property heretofore stored with the undersigned:T-31 Darryl DarminX-20 Matthew AvalloneAA-04 Nancy Markham TatumW-18 Stormy MartinL-09 Mike RussellW-44 John RodgersBB-15 Austin SchlimmerV-28 Dustin DolesAA-05 Stephanie CauleyT-10 Lola Ann WhiteCC-19 Randy CraneU-19 Harry Russo IIBB-02 Dorian TaylorZ-61 Vicki BruceEE-03 Whitney Lee G-06 Dennis MurphyM-03 Regina StaplesT-13 Antonio GibsonBB-24 Timothy MorganFF-15 Karen JonesFF-16 Karen JonesK-17 Cathy StrozierS-11 Carla DavidsonF-11 Carla DavidsonR-12 Debby LindemannGG-08 Scott O'QuinnJ-13 Nathaniel LeeN-15 Sarah Burke05537432February 21, 28, 2013 LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2013-01Southside Recreation Complex Concrete Pads and Sidewalks NOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on March 07, 2013, for Colum-bia County Project No. 2013-01. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of constructing 4" thick 3000 PSI concrete bleacher slabs (6400 sf) and concrete side-walks (960 sf) at Southside Recrea-tion Complex.Scope of work includes removing grass, grading, compacting, concrete placement, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Deadline for questions regarding specifications and/or bid documents must be re-ceived before 11:00 P.M. on March 05, 2013.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with proof of liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05537447February 21, 28, 2013 100Job Opportunities05537366Drawdy Insurance is seeking Professional 440 CSR or 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to 738 SWMain Blvd. Lake City, FL, 32056 BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Head Teller Lake City Seeking energetic individual who enjoys working with public. Supervisory and teller exp REQ. Professional appearance REQ Great pay and benefits! App REQ and avail at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesPROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 120Medical Employment05537417Medical Assistant Must have HS Diploma and Phlebotomy certification with min. 1 yr exp. Qualified candidates please email resume to: jsmith@ccofnf.com F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. Local medical office looking for a PT Billing Clerk .Experience Preferred.Please send resume to PO Box 1256, Lake City, Fl 32056 Office Staff needed For Medical Practice. 155 NWEnterprise Way, LC Fax 386-755-3369 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 RVLots or Cottage avail for nightly or extended stay. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location in Columbia County, older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes Demo your mobile home/free tear down at Palm HarborNew mobiles $39K off list John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 640Mobile Homes forSaleWOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1,512 sqft DW perfect Rental or First home. Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2bd and 1bd Apts. Avail now. Everything included. Close to VA, closed in yard. 727-415-2207 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242, 2 miles West of RT247 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentBranford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3bd/1.5ba Brick Home in town, $715 mth Security Dep $450. Call 386-935-1482 or 386-752-4701

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY21, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$4,800 386-288-6102 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 14.69 ac tract on Lake Jeffrey Rd. Has well & septic and power ready for site built or MH. $65,000 MLS #82567 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Beautiful lot on Suwannee River. Lot has a well and anerobic septic system. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small, affordable home on corner lot w/ fenced in yard. Needs a little TLC. MLS #81204 $19,900 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, 810Home forSale 2BR/2BAgorgeous custom built pool home. Spacious bedrooms. SS appliances, Corian counter tops. Remax Jo Lytte 386-3652821 MLS 80934 $179,900 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 3BD/2BAcustom western cedar home on two acres lakefront lot. Boat ramp, dock and deck. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 74681 $179,900 3BD/2BAon 10 acres has a unique open great room, dining and family room with vaulted ceilings. Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 MLS 79593 $345,800 82374 Beautiful inside and out, 3br/2.5ba home sits on 10 acres, fenced. Screened back porch. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $243,900 82718 Beautiful Brick home. Upgraded granite counter tops, new paint, carpet & appliances. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $189,000 82763 This great open floor plan home has had new flooring, paint, appliances, a/c and light fixtures. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $139,500 82794 -Great house in Great neighborhood. Granite countertops, Florida room, vaulted ceilings. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $129,000 82843 Home sits on 4.2 acres and has a 3br/2.5ba brick home, large great room w/ brick fireplace. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $81,000 82845Cute as can be, solid built home with large kitchen, newer cabinetry, & granite countertops. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $75,500 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 810Home forSale Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable lakefront 2/2 Watch the sun rise from nearly anywhere Needs TLC has potential. $59,000 Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847 MLS 81189 Beautiful 4BD/3BAhome in gated s/d. high volume ceilings, open kitchen. MLS 81102 $119,999 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Beautiful tripe wide home / plenty of space to spread out family, showroom quality. MLS 82622 $123,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Close to town, oversized Great rm, Dining rm, Study, lrg Master suite w/ walk in closet. MLS 82435 $173,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 5BD/3BAjust minutes away from town on half an acre. Mary Brown Whitehusrt $210,000 386-965-0887 MLS #82546 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAcustom home w/ 2 car garage. Designer kitchen. Sherry G. Ratliff $115,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81774 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3BD/2BAnewly renovated with fireplace. New appliances, carpet & More. Sherry G. Ratliff $94,900 386-365-8414 MLS #82657 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Golf Court view! 3BD/3BAlog home on #1 green. Built in ‘99 & upgraded in ‘09. Custom cabinets. MLS # 80765 Swift Creek Realty $294,900 800-833-0499 Gorgeous view off screened back porch, Open flrpln w/ oversized eat-in kitchen. MLS 82699 $110,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Great Country Living! 2BD/1BA on 1.17 Acres! 1,462 heated sq.ft w/ large great room. MLS # 82030 Swift Creek Realty $109,900 800-833-0499 Immaculately kept home, great rm with f/p, fenced w/ 12x30 utility shed. MLS 82604 $115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Just Outside of Mayo, well maintained home for its year. Screened front porch, shed. $33,250 Ric Donovan, Poole Realty 386-590-1298 MLS 82711 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Private acres & access to Ichetucknee via private Rec Area. Large screened porch. MLS 81623 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 Remax Professionals Reduced 4BD/2.5BA, 2,405 heated sq.ft. Many upgrades throughout home. MLS # 81985 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 800-833-0499 REDUCED! 3,000 sq.ft., 3/2.5 on 20 acres 14’ceilings, Central vacuum system. $489,000. Nelda Hatcher Poole Realty 386-688-8067 MLS 82280 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2208sf, all original wood restored, newer paint, remodeled baths, large bedrooms. #82850 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 2161sf, 6 ac MOL, Roman shades, Italian tile, crown molding, master has tray ceilings. #82646 $299,900 Spectacular home for the price. 1649 heated sq ft, screened back patio., MLS 82395 $154,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Well maintained home on lovely landscaped lot, close to everything in downtown Branford. $139,000. Sylvia Newell, Poole Realty 386-590-2498 MLS 82233 810Home forSale Woodborough s/d. Separate Living Rm and Great Rm, 3 full baths, custom kitchen. MLS 81334 $259,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 ac Ranch, Brick 3/3 w/ 2000 sqft. New roof in 2005, kitchen remodeled, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 70 acres in McAlpin. Farmhouse, tobacco barn, corner property w/ paved road. Less than $3000/ acre. Ronnie Poole, Poole Realty 386-208-3175 MLS 79336 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyMedical Office Building For Sale or Rent. Contact 727-422-3472 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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Now offering: An after school program for ages 5-12 Mixed media art classes for children ages 2-10 Funding Accepted Through the Early Learning Coalition www.noahs-art.com (386) 438-8060 New Students ASSOCIATED PRESS Dale Earnhardt Jr. watches as his crew gets his car ready in the garage during practice for the NASCAR Daytona 500 Sprint Cup Series auto race at Daytona International Speedway, Wednesday in Daytona Beach. NASCARs big names take time to find right sponsor By DAN GELSTON Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH For sale! Made-for-TV pre mium ad space on the hood of the car of NASCARs most popular driver. Believe it. Even Dale Earnhardt Jr. has coveted sponsorship up for grabs. In fact, his No. 88 Chevrolet lacks a primary sponsor for about one-third of the 36 Sprint Cup races this season. The perfect corporate sponsorship has yet to materialize for Earnhardt and team owner Rick Hendrick. Both are preach ing patience, believing the right deal will eventually fall into place, and not a dire sign that big business has soured on NASCAR. Were just looking for the right corporations that are a good fit for us, that are long-term, that want to be in the sport for a while, Earnhardt said. You dont just take the first guy that comes along. Earnhardt is one of the lucky drivers that can afford to be picky in the race for cash. But Hendrick is not alone when it comes to teams still trying to make all the spon sor pieces fit for a season that opens with Sundays Daytona 500. Stewart-Haas Racing owned and oper ated by three-time Cup champion Tony Stewart has about 20 races spread out over three cars that need a top sponsor. Not even NASCARs big gest stars are immune from the economic pinch that plagues a sport dependent on Fortune 500 dollars. Earnhardts sponsor ship dried up when Pepsi, through Diet Mountain Dew and Amp, sliced its sponsorship from 20 races to five in 2013. The National Guard did bolster its support of the No. 88, going from 16 to 20 races. Earnhardt, whos made the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship each of the last two seasons, is some what hindered in finding the right fit because of con flicts with committed corpo rate sponsors. For example, his Pepsi deal is the reason he ditched Budweiser when he signed with Hendrick Motorsports for the 2008 season. At Daytona, Earnhardt has the National Guard on the No. 88 for The Great American Race. His sponsorship deals run low around mid-summer, so theres time to sign new business partners. Earnhardt is one of the superstar faces of NASCAR. Even as the wins have dried up, he was still voted NASCARs most popular driver for each of the last 10 years. He cant be asso ciated with any fleeting or cheesy sponsors. You have to think about whats good for his image, Hendrick said. Some of that has stopped us. Theres been a lot of interest. Hendrick announced at Daytona he locked up Lowes for five-time champ Jimmie Johnsons No. 48 Chevy for 2014. Lowes has sponsored Johnson for the first 399 races of his Cup career. With a new paint scheme, Lowes again will be on the side of the car for start No. 400 in the Daytona 500. Lowes, in fact, is likely one of the biggest spon sor spenders in NASCAR. While most numbers are never publicly announced, NASCAR insiders say it costs about $18 million to $20 million a year to fund an elite drivers car for a full season. Some of the low-budget teams try and get by on around $5 million. You can have the best financed team in the series, but if they dont know how to apply it, it doesnt mat ter, Stewart said. Theres teams that have taken less money and gotten better results out of it because they know how to use the money, where to put it. ASSOCIATED PRESS Drivers, Tony Stewart (14), Kasey Kahne (5), and Martin Truex Jr., (56) run, during a Daytona 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race practice Wednesday in Daytona Beach. Dramatic 1st Daytona 500 practice with Gen-6 By JENNA FRYER Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH It took all of 15 minutes for NASCARs new Gen-6 race car to throw drivers a few curves of its own at the first practice for the Daytona 500. Ryan Newman lost con trol of his Chevrolet right in front of Carl Edwards and Mark Martin, and all three cars sustained dam age. Its the third time in a week that a wreck has collected Martin, who also suffered damaged cars in a crash started by Matt Kenseth last week and another triggered by Tony Stewart in Saturday nights exhibition race. Newman had no idea what caused him to spin. My car came around, I dont know if it was the air off of Carls car or what, he said. Carl came over and said Hey man. I said, I dont even know what to tell you yet. The accident happened as drivers are still adjusting to the new car, a process that has been bumpy so far. Dale Earnhardt Jr. trig gered a multi-car accident in January testing, Kenseth started an accident last Friday and the wreck in the exhibition race cut the 19-car field to 12. Edwards was just as vexed as Newman. I was up close to Ryan and then all of a sudden his car just got a little loose and there was no space, Edwards said. I could have given him more space, but I dont think either one of us really understands why his car got so loose. It was just all of a sudden and he was turned side ways. Its really interesting and something Im going to be careful of during the race. Edwards said he believes the finicky cars could con tribute to an entertaining season-opening Daytona 500 on Sunday. Race cars are supposed to be hard to drive, its sup posed to be on the edge, you are supposed to be sliding around, Edwards said. We as drivers, it is our responsibility to learn how to drive them. If this (warm) weather stays like this, and we can run cars sideways down the corner and give each other a little bit of room, its going to be an awesome 500. Meanwhile, Earnhardt and defending Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski also had issues in the first practice session, which was paced by two-time Daytona 500 winner Michael Waltrip. Earnhardt blew an engine, and Keselowski had a fuel system problem that limited his track time. Something went wrong with the fuel system in the car, Keselowski said. Thats not what you want when youre in front of the pack because when your car slows down, theyve got nowhere to go and it could cause a wreck. So were going to spend a little extra time to make sure weve got whatever it is figured out. Earnhardt had to wait for an engine change, which will send him to the back of the field for Thursdays qualifying race. Im sure there is some logical explanation as to what happened, but, well just put a new one in and start at the back of the qualifier and race up through there, Earnhardt said. Waltrip was fastest in the first practice, turning a lap at 198.347 mph. Kasey Kahne led the less-event ful second practice only 27 of 45 drivers practiced with a lap at 197.737 mph.