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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02024

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02024

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA lan McGhee said he’s created about 30,000 toy soldiers in his lifetime. However, by the amount of attention that he garnered at the Olustee Battle Festival this weekend, most people seemed in awe as if it might have been his first gig. McGhee was a vendor at the 2013 Olustee Battle Festival and had hun-dreds of miniature soldier displays for sale in the Toy Soldiers booth. “I’m having a wonderful time at the festival,” he said. “I’ve been col-lecting and painting toy soldiers for about 20 years. If I sit and paint, kids are fascinated by watching me paint.” McGhee crafts the soldiers out of pewter, tin and lead. Tom Coleman, Blue-Grey Army commanding general, said the 2013 Olustee Battle Festival went very well. “We had beautiful weather, the crowds are good and we had a nice turnout of dignitaries for our opening ceremonies,” he said. “Attendance looks average, but it always picks up.” Organizers say the two-day event usually draws about 40,000 visitors to the downtown area. Downtown Lake City was transformed into a festival area for the event, with vendor booths in a single line on Marion Avenue, food booths set up in several areas and a children’s play area established near the public library. Entertainers per-formed in the gazebo in front of the courthouse and parking spaces in the area were at a premium as most people parked anywhere they could fit their vehicles. “All the Olustee Battle Festivals are special,” Coleman said. “That’s the good news and the committee understands that the people look forward to this every year — the vendors, the food and the sights and sounds and the people that they sometimes don’t see all year. I believe the event is about food, fel-lowship and fun. That’s what special and it’s always special here.” Rachel Dubi was dressed in CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Wonder chimes in on Lil Wayne. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 3B, 5B 53 26 Sunny WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Like havinga chef on the shelf. Caribbean seeingsigns of rebound in tourist industry. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 274 1D 1C Honoring the dead of both sidesBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comConfederate battle flags planted beside the headstones of the 155 fallen soldiers gently waved in a cold February breeze as the Oaklawn Cemetery Memorial Ceremony signaled the start of the 37th Olustee Battle Festival Friday at 9 a.m. After the presentation of the colors by the First Florida Honor Guard, former county commissioner James Montgomery led about 60 spectators in the invocation. He spoke of the North, the South and the fight that tore the nation apart. “Remembering those who paid the ultimate price for a cause they believed in — the Northern soldier for the Union, Johnny Reb for the Southern way of life — we honor them both this morning,” Montgomery said. The Rev. James W. Binion, dressed as Confederate President Jefferson Davis, was guest speaker at the ceremony. Binion served in the Air Force with service in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. Binion said it was an honor to speak at Olustee weekend begins with memorial service at Oaklawn Cemetery.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterDavid Dubi (left) and his brother, John, retire the colors Friday. OAKLAWN continued on 5A HORRORS continued on 5A FESTIVAL continued on 5A Civil War medical technology makes for gruesome display. Horrors of war brought homeBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comSevered limbs lay scattered under the table with wounded soldiers bleeding nearby. “Don’t take my arm, don’t take my arm!” says one as the saw gnaws its way through. The medical demonstra-tion at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park presented the cruel truth about what was in store for wounded soldiers during the Civil War. Without antibiotics or proper sanitation practices, Civil War soldiers faced disfigurement or death from wounds easily healed today. Eric Chadwick, of Fort Myers, is a computer technician but played the role of surgeon Saturday during the medical demonstration. He’s a former Man forged checks, took W-2’s: PoliceFrom staff reportsA Fort White man forged personal checks and took Social Security numbers and W-2 forms from members of his family, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office arrest report. Kyle Dennis McDonald, 29, faces felony charges of dealing in stolen prop-erty and forgery after depu-ties arrested him Thursday afternoon at his home at FORGERY continued on 5A McDonald BLASTING AWAY Thousands flock to annual Olustee Festival As many as 40,000 visitors were expectedfor the two-day event.Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterABOVE: Confederates fire on a replica of the ironclad USS Moni tor in a skirmish at Lake DeSoto during the Olustee Festiv al Friday. BELOW: Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Tad Allen, addresses the crowd at the festival Friday. BOTTOM: Alan McGhee and some of his miniature soldiers. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA scene during Saturday’s demon-stration.1A

PAGE 2

TALLAHASSEE Florida lobbyists earned more than $120 million last year in an effort to pass and defeat bills in the Republican-controlled Legislature, reports show. An analysis of year-end reports filed this week showed that some of the biggest spenders on lob byists were those with the most to lose or gain in the halls of the state Capitol. The 2012 totals dont match the amount spent in 2011, the year Gov. Rick Scott took office and Republicans assumed a supermajority. But the final total for 2012 which is close to $124 million is still one of the highest on record since Florida started requiring lobbyists to report how much they get paid back in 2006. The economy has sort of leveled out, said Brian Ballard, who runs one of the most successful lobby ing firms in Tallahassee. The whole industry felt a recovery the year before. State law requires ran dom audits of what lobby ing firms report but legis lators have never carried out the requirement. The figures reported by lobbyists are not exact; instead they report a range of how much they are paid by various corporations. The $124 million total was derived by taking the median amount, although lobbyists must report exact amounts if they are paid $50,000 or more from one company. But while the amounts may not be exact, the reports shed a light on how much money is spent by corporations and others in an effort to either pass, or kill, a long list of legisla tion. Gambling interests, telecommunications com panies and sugar growers were among some of the biggest spenders on lob byists. AT&T spent more than $1.35 million on lob byists, while Bayfront 2011 Development spent $965,000. The company is an arm of Genting, which wants to build a large resort casino on the shores of Biscayne Bay in Miami. Lawmakers in 2012 wound up shooting down a bill that would have allowed the casino to go forward. Another com pany caught up in last years gambling fight International Internet Technologies spent as much as $740,000. The company was fighting a proposal to shut down storefront sweepstakes operations known as Internet cafes. Commandments suit dropped CROSS CITY The American Civil Liberties Union has dropped its law suit challenging a granite monument inscribed with the Ten Commandments in front of a north Florida courthouse. ACLU of Florida execu tive director Howard Simon said Friday that the group had to withdraw the case because its client, a North Carolina man, no longer plans to move to Dixie County. Simon, though, said its only a matter of time before the suit is re-filed because eventually some one in Dixie County will have the courage to step forward. A federal judge ruled the six-ton monument at the courthouse in Cross City crosses the consti tutional line separating church and state and ordered it removed. That ruling was put on hold and appealed on grounds the plaintiff wasnt a county resident so lacked standing to sue. Officer acquitted in battery case PENSACOLA A Pensacola police K-9 offi cer has been found not guilty of battery after a video showed him alleg edly slamming a woman into her car while arrest ing her. A dash cam video shows Officer Christopher Geraci telling hit-and-run suspect Abbi Bonds repeatedly to get back into her car in August. She ignored the command. Geraci allegedly grabbed her by her arm and bashed her into the side of the car, then grabbed her by her hair. But Geracis attorney said Friday the video that went viral didnt show the entire incident. The Pensacola News Journal reports 29-year-old Bonds was not seriously injured. Geraci was fired and charged with battery. A jury this week found Geraci not guilty. He is also appealing his firing. Spitting ordinance being challenged LAKELAND A Lakeland City Commissioner wants to do away with a 69-year-old ordinance that prohibits people from spitting on the sidewalk or grass. Commissioner Don Selvage says the ordinance is outdated and was going to address the issue with the full board on Friday. Selvages plan to nix the spitting ordinance comes eight months after a man was arrested for spitting on the sidewalk or grass at 2:30 a.m. May 30 near Florida Southern College. The charge against Joseph Stoiber, 29, was dropped by prosecutors. The Lakeland Ledger reports that police have filed charges for spitting in 17 cases since 2000. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor Hal Holbrook is 88. Mystery writer Ruth Rendell is 83. Actor-comedian Barry Humphries (aka Dame Edna) is 79. Country singer-songwriter Johnny Bush is 78. Actress Christina Pickles is 78. Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Brown is 77. Actress Mary Ann Mobley is 74. Actress Brenda Fricker is 68. Actress Rene Russo is 59. Actor Richard Karn is 57. Actor Lou Diamond Phillips is 51. Basketball Hall of Famer Michael Jordan is 50. Actor-comedian Larry, the Cable Guy is 50. TV personality Rene Syler is 50. Daily Scripture For this is the message you heard from the beginning: We should love one another. 1 John 3:11 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 6-14-34-35 17 Friday: 6-15-16-23-27 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-9-7 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 5-8-1-8 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 5-12-25-29-33-34 x2 State lobbyists earned more than $120 million ATLANTA S tevie Wonder is not happy with Lil Waynes vulgar lyr ics that reference Emmett Till, a black teen who was killed in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman. The R&B legend says the rappers disturbing verse should not have made it beyond the recording studio for the world to hear. You cant equate that to Emmett Till, Wonder said. You just cannot do that. ... I think you got to have someone around you that even if they are the same age or older is wiser to say, Yo, thats not happen ing. Dont do that. Wonder, who says he is a fan and friend of Lil Wayne, made the com ments when asked what he thought of Lil Waynes controversial lyrics in an interview Thursday. On a remix to Futures song Karate Chop, Lil Wayne compared a rough sex act to the tortuous death of 14-year-old Till in Mississippi, an incident that ultimately helped change the national conversation on race. Following a crude reference to rough sex, Lil Wayne indicates that he wanted to do as much damage as had been done to Till. Tills family has asked the rapper for an apology, and Epic Records, Futures label, said the official song will not feature the vulgar words and is employing great efforts to pull it down. Wonder, 62, hopes the 30-year-old Grammy winner understands the perspective of the Till family and chooses his words wisely in the future. Judge sets date for Kardashian divorce trial LOS ANGELES Kim Kardashian has a due date for her baby and now a trial date for her divorce from NBA player Kris Humphries. A judge on Friday set a May 6 trial for the reality TV star who wants to end her marriage before July, when her child with Kanye West is due. Kardashian filed for divorce on Oct. 31, 2011, after she and Humphries had been married just 72 days. Their lavish, star-studded nup tials were recorded and broadcast by E! Entertainment Television. The trial is expect ed to last three to five days and could reveal details about Kardashians reality show empire, which includes Keeping Up With the Kardashians and several spinoffs. Two judges determined Friday that Humphries lawyers had ade quate time to prepare for the trial. Humphries wants the marriage annulled based on his claim that Kardashian only married him for the sake of her show. She denies that allegation and says the case should be resolved through what would be her second divorce. Humphries attorney Marshall Waller asked for a delay until basket ball season is over. But Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon refused, saying firefighters, police officers, truck drivers and others have to miss work for trials, and Humphries must do the same if necessary. Waller filed paperwork Thursday to withdraw from the case but didnt mention that development in court and refused to answer any questions about the document on Friday. Rapper 2 Chainz arrested on drug charge EASTON, Md. Rapper 2 Chainz has been arrested on drug charges in Maryland where he was performing at a college homecom ing event. Maryland State Police spokesman Sgt. Marc Black said troopers stopped a van Thursday night about 9:15 p.m. for speeding near Easton, Md., and smelled a strong odor of burnt mari juana in the van. A backpack in the van had a marijuana grinder and trace amounts of marijuana, police said. Stevie Wonder chimes in on Lil Wayne Wednesday: 12-23-25-27-43 PB 29 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Snake hunt ends Bill Booth of Bradenton stretches out a dead Burmese python he caught for students from the University of Florida to measure. The month-long Python Challenge in the Everglades yielded 68 of the invasive snakes, the longest measuring more than 14 feet, Florida wildlife officials said Saturday. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Stevie Wonder is not excited about the use of Lil Waynes vulgar lyrics that refer ence Emmett Till, a black teen who was killed in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Kardashian 2 Chainz

PAGE 3

Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 3A Bank donates rodeo tickets to Boys Ranch From staff reports First Federal Bank of Florida, along with Columbia County Resources, Inc., announced a donation of 50 tickets to the Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo to the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch in Live Oak. This is the 16th year First Federal Bank has part nered with Columbia County Resources, Inc. to donate tickets to the Boys Ranch. The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is the parent organization of the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch. The Youth Ranches is a chari table, non-profit corporation with a mission to prevent delinquency and develop strong, lawful, resilient, and productive citizens who will make a positive contribution to our communities for years to come. Because of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, these young men and women are able to face the future with a sense of direction, ability and hope. The Youth Ranches operates four res idential programs: Boys Ranch, Youth Villa, Youth Ranch/Safety Harbor, and Youth Ranch/Bradenton-Sarasota; two camping programs: Youth Camp and Caruth Camp; and other family services around the state. For over 50 years First Federal has been committed to building vibrant communities through the support of education, sports, the arts and improving the quality of life for all. First Federal prides itself on being com mitted to helping local communities flour ish. Founded in 1962, First Federal has 18 branches located in Amelia Island, Bonifay, Bradenton, Chipley, Dowling Park, Jasper, Lake City, Live Oak, Macclenny, Marianna, Mayo, Sarasota and Yulee. COURTESY Back row, from left: Jeff Parker (Farm Manager), Heather Thompson (First Federal), Keith Leibfried (President, First Federal), Stephanie McClendon (First Federal), Steve Briscoe and Lamar Boozer (Columbia County Resources Board of Directors). Front row, from left: Ranchers Wyatt, Craig, Damarcus and Jacob. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Feb. 17 Anniversary, revival New Beginning Church, on Highway 242 between Sister Welcome and Highway 247, will cele brate its 16th anniversary with a homecoming ser vice at 11 a.m., followed by lunch in the fellowship hall. Revival services, with Evangelist Leon Bachelor of Tyler, Texas, will be at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. today ad at 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more informa tion, call (386) 719-8985. Feb. 18 Black History Month Black History Month organizers will host a Teen Summit at 10 a.m. at Community Revival Church. Enjoy mock trial, college information, meet ing peers, teen talk and more. The event is free to teens, and transporta tion is provided if request ed by Feb. 15. For more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 867-1601, Blondell Johnson at 7553110 or Bea Coker at 6976075 or visit online at www. itsaboutmyefforts.org. SCORE workshop SCORE will hold a free entrepreneurs interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Those attending can ask questions, get advice, meet other entrepreneurs, receive free educational materials from the Small Business Administration and other sources and arrange for one-on-one business counseling from qualified SCORE volun teers. For more informa tion or to reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com. Feb. 19 Lenten lunch The First Presbyterian Church invites the com munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec tion of Jesus. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas holdem poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Medical talk Dr. Bharat Gummadi will give a free talk on medical matters at noon at the Holiday Inn, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The program is part of Shands Lake Shores Lunch and Learn series. To register or for more information, go online at ShandsLakeShore. com or call (386) 292-8120. Art League The Art League of North Florida will meet at 6 p.m. at The First Presbyterian Church. There will be sup per, fellowship, a short meeting. Kathy Willson and Anda Chance will give a talk and demonstration comparing oil painting and colored pencil techniques. The public is invited. NARFE meeting The National Active and Retired Federal Employees will meet at 1 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. County Commissioner Stephen Bailey will be guest speaker. For more infor mation, call Jim Purvis at 292-9361. Feb. 20 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. For more informa tion, call 752-5384. Class of Columbia High School Class of 1946 will hold its quarterly luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Phish Heads Restaurant. For information, call Lenvil Dicks at 961-1104. Feb. 20-22 Revival services Voice of Deliverance Church willl have revival services at 7:30 nightly with Sister Joyce Igo. Feb. 21 Debutants meeting The Debutants Society will have an informational meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The meeting is for for girls and boys in ninth through 12th grades who might be interested in becoming members. Minister Jan Harrison is the organization contact person. Gardening talk Master Gardeners Bill Whitley and Gerry Murphy will give a program about Spring Vegetable Gardening at 5:45b p.m. in the Fort White Library on State Road 47. The pro gram is free and open to the public. Feb. 22-27 Pet adoption Lake City Humane Society and PetSmart will be holding a Big Tent Adoption Event in the Publix Shopping Center. The Humane Society and North Florida Animal Rescue will have dogs and cats available for adoption on display. 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM *See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID required. Management reserves all rights. Offers are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa. Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice, not valid for live Poker or Table Games. No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. 2011 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved. 4 813.627 SEMINOLE HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TAMPA YOU PAY: $ 40 00 PACKAGE INCLUDES: $ 35 00 FREE PLAY Plus $ 5 Meal Voucher & Roundtrip Transportation OVER 4,100 OF THE HOTTEST SLOT MACHINES, 90 TABLE GAMES AND 50 LIVE POKER TABLES. MORE WAYS TO WIN. Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES NEW SERVICE! For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653 For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at 1.866.352.7295 or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com HOP ON THE BUS GUS YOU PAY: $ 35 00 From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS VALDOSTA MALL VALDOSTA, GA 1700 Norman Drive LAKE CITY MALL LAKE CITY 2469 West US Hwy. 90 OAKS MALL GAINESVILLE 6419 Newberry Road 8:15 AM 7:00 AM 9:00 AM Ever Live in NY? New York Day Join Us: Saturday, March 16th from 12:15 4 pm at Epiphany Church Hall for St. Patrick's Day Dinner Appetizers, Full Meal & Dessert Live Music By: "Three of Us" Call Vern or Maureen Lloyd 752-4885 or Bob Peloni 984-8232 Deadline March 9th I NY

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OPINION Sunday, February 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A D r. Alfonso Levy died July 3, 2011, and his funer-al service was held July 9, 2011, in, where else, the Alfonso Levy Performing Arts Center at Florida Gateway College. Every seat was filled, about half white citizens and half black. Anybody expecting a tearful, sad ceremony should have known better. Master musician, Dr. Tony Buzzella, set the upbeat tone for the day by playing a rousing New Orleans Dixieland version of ‘Amazing Grace’ on his alto sax that brought peo-ple out of their seats and cheering every note. George Hudson, Jr. who had played in Dr. Levy’s band over 25 years, then took the stage and entertained the crowd. He started by reciting the number of years in Dr. Levy’s life, multiplied by the number of days in a year, and pointed out that Dr. Levy had lived some 28,000 days. Then he con-cluded with a wink and a nod that Dr. Levy was ‘one o-l-d, o-l-d man.’ Then George told how he became a member of Dr. Levy’s band when he was still in high school and Dr. Levy told him the first day that he wasn’t a “half bad musician for a white boy.” Dr. Levy’s band was called “the salt and pepper trio.” Get it? Two whites and one black. According to George, Dr. Levy told one latenight audience that if anyone there couldn’t tell the salt from the pepper, they probably had had too much to drink. Then Chris Williams, a former student under Dr. Levy at the Niblack Sixth Grade Center, jogged the memories of many former Niblack students when he told the way Dr. Levy read the daily lunch menu every morning over the P.A. system and always ended with “and GOOD OLD MILK.” Chris also told of Dr. Levy’s often rumored but never actually seen “elec-tric paddle,” the mere mention of which kept many a kid on the straight and narrow. He also told of being one of Dr. Levy’s private piano students and how enjoyable the lessons were—if you had been practicing—but if you did not strike exactly the right note the right way, he wouldn’t hesitate to correct you. He wanted music played right! Person after person took the stage and told how Dr. Levy had enhanced their lives with good humor and great musicianship. The Saint James Episcopal Church choir, Dr. Levy’s choir up until his illness, simply outdid themselves and you won-dered if they had been saving their best just for that very day. Words I had heard at some previous tribute to Dr. Levy came echoing back to me from the past: “He was born with the soul of an artist and he never lost sight of his art. He soothed us with his artistry. “In difficult times he was our mediator and peacemaker. In good times he warmed us all with his joy and zest for life. This was a man who dared and this was a man who cared.” At the end, just one single word remained to be said and Dr. Levy’s self-proclaimed son, Dr. Buzzella, stepped forward to say it: “Mercy!” – Dr. Levy’s signature word. And with that, the majestic soul of William Alfonso Levy, having served us all gloriously well for his 28,000 earthly days, winged its way to Heaven. And all God’s children said, “Amen and Amen!”The drones are coming, ready or not Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman W hen the Florida Supreme Court in January upheld a 2011 state law that requires state and county employees to contribute 3 percent of their salaries to their retirement accounts, it was only a matter of time before the Legislature moved to propose more changes to the government pension system. That time was less than a month.Last week, a House subcommittee passed a bill that would place all new state employees in a 401(k)-style retirement plan beginning in 2014. That would begin phasing out the state’s defined-benefit pension in favor of a defined-contribution plan similar to what many public-sector employees have long received — and which many states have adopted. The move is both wise and inevitable. However, it matters how and when the change is made. The House Government Operations Subcommittee passed the bill last week along party lines despite the fact that lawmakers don’t know the financial impact of the pro-posed changes — an actuarial study won’t be available until later this week. Committee Chairman Jason Brodeur, R-Sanford, said he just wanted to get the proposal moving through the legislative process, and that changes can be made along the way. True, but the Legislature has a bad habit of putting the cart before the horse — note its rushing a prison privatization plan that ran afoul of the courts, and its teacher evaluation system that has been beset by problems with methodology. A 401(k) has many potential benefits to both state taxpayers and government employees. The accounts are portable, meaning the accumulated assets travel with the employee from job to job. That should be especially appealing to employees who don’t remain in public service long enough to earn a cushy pension. The employee also controls his investment decisions. Taxpayers should welcome the change because they won’t be on the hook so much for funding public retirements. Although Florida’s pension program cur-rently is in good financial shape, California and Illinois are among those with defined-benefit programs facing huge funding gaps — investment income is insufficient to pay retirees the benefits they are owed, so taxpay-ers will be forced to make up the difference. The Republican-controlled Legislature wasn’t waiting on the Supreme Court to spring the 401(k) plan on public employees; House Speaker Will Weatherford endorsed the proposal in the fall. The court’s ruli ng, however, validated the Legislature’s authority to m ake changes to the retirement system.... That cleared the path for the 401(k) agenda to star t rolling.... Some lawmakers might be tempted to ram the legislation through. That would be a mistake. There are valid questions about providing disability or survivor benefits for employees who are injured or killed on the job. Studies are pending on the costs of different options. They may not arrive until late in the session. That doesn’t provide much time for factual analysis and thoughtful debate. Because its pension plan isn’t on the brink of bankruptcy, Florida can and should take its time to ensure it gets the transition to a 401(k) right. Take some time on 401(k) Dr. Levy’s majestic sendoff ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comP erhaps it’s a good thing we have made extensive, if controver-sial, use of drones in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen because it has allowed us to build up substantial exper-tise in operating the pilotless air-craft. We’ll need that valuable experience at home because the Federal Aviation Administration has taken the first steps toward making drones a standard feature of the American skies -an estimated 10,000 in civilian use within five years, according to the FAA. The agency began soliciting proposals for six drone sites scat-tered around the country. Plans are to start small, with drones weigh-ing less than around 55 pounds. The Global Hawk, perhaps the drone most widely used in military operations, weighs 15,000 pounds without fuel or payload. However, there’s no technical reason a drone couldn’t be as large as a full-size airliner. Small drones are in limited use in the United States now for law enforcement, border surveillance and academic research. Industry experts told the Associated Press they anticipate a multibillion-dollar market for civilian drones once the FAA finishes drafting regulations to ensure that the drones are designed and operated so they don’t create a hazard for other aircraft and population centers. The FAA, too, has drafted a privacy policy. Originally, the drones were developed for surveillance and intelligence purposes, functions in which they’ve been almost eerily successful. The AP noted, “Privacy advocates worry that a proliferation of drones will lead to a ‘surveillance society’ in which the movements of Americans are routinely monitored, tracked, recorded and scrutinized by the authorities.” It may not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the horse is already out of that barn. Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Uncle Sam, Russia’s go-to scapegoat I f something bad happens in Russia, Russian officials have an instant explanation: It’s the United States’ fault. They must have standing instructions in the event of an unfortunate event: “Blame America first, and we’ll get around to the real explanation later.” The blame begins at the top: At the 2009 economic forum in Davos, Russian leader Vladimir Putin blamed the U.S. for the global eco-nomic slowdown. The demonstrations following Putin’s blatantly rigged election to the presidency in 2011: The work of U.S. agents acting under the orders of Hillary Clinton. In 2012, Russian space officials blamed a series of launch and satel-lite failures on “foreign sabotage,” making it clear that the foreigner was the United States. In 2010, a scientist in a think tank with close ties to the Kremlin blamed Russia’s drought and dev-astating wildfires on “American weather weapons.” The Russian navy’s initial explanation for the loss of the submarine Kursk and its crew of 118 in 2000 was due to either a torpedo from an American sub or a collision with an American sub. Subsequent inves-tigations showed, as they so often did in post-Soviet Russia, that the sinking was due to carelessness, poor maintenance and obsolescent torpedoes. On Friday, a meteor the size of a city bus flashed across the Ural Mountains and exploded in spectacular fashion miles up in the atmosphere not far from the city of Chelyabinsk, injuring, at first reports, about 1,000 people and shattering glass over a wide region. And whose fault was the great flash in the sky and the accompany-ing tremors from the explosion? The U.S., of course. “Those aren’t meteors falling; it’s the Americans testing new weapons,” explained Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the leader of the Liberal Democratic Party and one of Russia’s flakier lawmakers. Maybe we should take it as a compliment that the Russians have far greater faith than we do in our technical prowess and ability to influence events not only on the other side of the world but in outer space too. Q Scripps Howard News Service Q Scripps Howard News Service Q Panama City News Herald4AEDIT

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By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comUnion and Confederate re-enactors pointed their guns and shouted insults across the battle lines Saturday near Lake Desoto as mock-ups of two famous iron-clads battled on the lake. “Somebody get that ugly one down there,” one Confederate shouted. David Dubi participated in the skirmish and said it wasn’t meant to represent any particular battle, but to give a feel for the many small engagements fought across the South during the Civil War. A Civil War soldier was supposed to be able to fire three rounds a minute, Dubi said. He described the seven steps required to load a Civil War-era rifle. He said the soldier would take a cartridge, which was gunpowder and a .58-cali-ber bullet wrapped in paper, then rip the top off by biting it and tearing. Then he would pour the contents of the cartridge into the top of the gun, ram the round down barrel, bring the hammer of the gun to half cock, load a percussion cap and return to the ready position. Also, there was a replica 1841, 12-pound field howitzer positioned on the bank of Lake Desoto. The cannon’s crew blast-ed about 10 shots — most aimed at the ironclads. The famous battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack took place near Hampton Roads, Va. Two fishing boats with plywood additions were built to resem-ble the warships. The Monitor and the Merrimack circled back and forth shooting fireworks in each other’s general direction. As the battle on the sea raged, the Confederate and Union soldiers prepared to fire. “All right, boys, get ready,” the commanding officer said. “First platoon shoul-der your arms.” And the fight started. With every trigger pull, a long trail of smoke spewed from the end of the gun, and soon the air was filled with the smell of burned gunpowder. The Confederates had more men in this demonstration, but the Union troops had better cover. “Missed me, stupid Yank,” one reenactor yelled across the lines. At first the Confederates seemed to push the Union troops back. After a few moments, the Confederates were taking fire and casualties. “Take a knee, lower your profile,” a Union officer said. “Take position behind trees.” The Confederates would line up and march in line, shoulder to shoulder — a tactic taken from European warfare. With the advances in weapons technology, this tactic led to massive casualties on both sides during the Civil War. As the sea battle was fought to a draw, the cannon took aim at the fortified position of the Union troops. Soon, the rebel yell could be heard the wounded and dying Union troops slumped on ground. “Take their boots,” one Confederate said. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 5A Louis Francis Beames Mr. Louis Francis Beames, age 74, of Lake City, Fla. died Thurs-day, Feb. 14, at Suwannee Valley Care Center following a brief illness. He was a native of Glens Falls, New York and had resided in Lake City, Fla. since 1993. He worked for the Glens Falls Po-lice Department for over 20 years before retiring in 1985. He was a member of the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church, Glens Falls, N.Y., a Marine veter-DQZKRHQMR\HGKXQWLQJVKLQJand football. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clarence and Anna L. Beames, Sr. and his daughter, Susan Ann Beames. He is survived by his wife and companion of 22 years, Cecilia J. Beames of Lake City, Fla.: Three daughters, Kathleen Ann (Gary) Watson and Kimberly Ann (Gerry) Adair both of Lake City, Fla. and Kelly Ann (Roger) Smith of Cincinnati, Ohio: Two sons, Louis Anthony Beames of High Springs, Fla. and Gary Lou-is “Sonny” Beames of Lake City, Fla.: One step-son, Clarence J. (Toni) Waters, II of Rockville, Md.: Survivors include eight JUDQGFKLOGUHQDQGYHJUHDWgrandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted at 11 A.M., Wednesday, Feb. 20, in the Cha-pel of Guerry Funeral Home with the VA Chaplain George Heming-ZD\RIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOObe at 2:30 P.M., Wednesday in Jacksonville National Cemetery, Jacksonville, Fla. Visitation for the family will be one hour before services 10 to 11 A.M. GUERRY FUNERAL HOME 2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla. is in charge of arrangements. www.guerryfuneralhome.net Ella Mae Boudreaux Pickens Allcorn ShinnElla Mae Boudreaux Pickens Allcorn Shinn, or “Mimi” as she was known to her grandchildren and friends, entered into new life on January 29, 2013. Born January 5, 1925 in Ged, LA to Gas-ton and Lula Evelyn Horn Boudreaux, Mimi took great pride in her fam-LO\DQGUHHFWHGORYHWRDOOZLWKwhom she came in contact. Please see full obituary on-line at ruebelfuneralhome.com Lesa Bailey WoolleyLesa Bailey Woolley, 53, of Lake City, passed away suddenly on February 9, 2013. Born in New-berry, Florida, she lived most of her life in that area. Lesa was preceded in death by her parents, Clif-ton and Nell Parker and a sister, Deborah. Mrs. Woolley is survived by her husband, Michael Woolley, a son, Cody; Granddaughter, Lola; two sisters a stepdaugh-ter and two step-grandchildren. She retired in 2010 after 28 years of Nursing. Lesa was a lifelong horse enthusiast and was very devoted to her beloved dogs, Buster, Lucy and Ban-dit. She also enjoyed making beautiful quilts for family and friends and was an avid reader. A private celebration of her life will be held at a later time. In OLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVPD\be made to the Destiny Com-munity Church, 420 SW 250th Street, Newberry, FL 32669. Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES FORGERY: Fort White man faces charges Continued From Page 1A HORRORS: Cruelty of war brought home Continued From Page 1A FESTIVAL: Thousands Continued From Page 1A OAKLAWN: Memorial service marks start of festival Continued From Page 1A Skirmish ends in Confederate win 223 SW Seagrove in Fort White, according to the report. McDonald’s sister-in-law called police after a blue folder went miss-ing from her home. Inside the folder were her and her children’s Social Security numbers. The folder also contained the same information for the sister-in-law’s boyfriend and his children, according to the report. When deputies contacted McDonald, he told them he didn’t take the folder. Deputies asked to search his belong-ings, and he gave them permission, the report said. Deputies searched a fanny pack and a duffel bag. Inside the duffel bag, deputies found three presonal checks and two W-2 forms belonging to Yancy Gotshall, who is McDonald’s cousin. He said the checks and W-2s were inside the duffle bag, and Gotshall had allowed him to take the duffle bag. When deputies contacted Gotshall, he told them McDonald stayed with him in his Pinnellas County home the night of Feb. 8 and left on Feb. 9. Gotshall said he did not stay at his home that night, but before Gotshall left, McDonald asked him questions about tax information. That’s when Gotshall said he retrievied his W-2. Gotshall said McDonald then talk-ed about forging tax returns, which at this point, Gotshall said he told McDonald he didn’t want to talk about forging tax returns because that was illegal, according to the arrest report. When he returned to his home after McDonald left, Gotshall said, he noticed some checks were miss-ing and his W-2s were gone. Gotshall tried to contact McDonald, accord-ing to the arrest report. Then he called the Pinnellas County Sheriff’s Office to report his checks and W-2s stolen, according to the Columbia County arrest report. Deputies returned to McDonald’s home in Fort White. They asked him about the checks. One of the checks was written for $200, one was written for $50 and another had been left blank. The two checks with dol-lar amounts written on them bore a signature from Gotshall, according to the arrest report. Deputies called Gotshall. He said neither the checks nor the W-2s were inside the duffel bag when he gave it to McDonald. Also, he did not write or sign the checks, according to the arrest report. Deputies arrested McDonald and took him to Columbia County Detention Facility. He was being held in lieu of $20,000 bond. The Columbia County Tax Collector’s Office will be closed Monday, Feb. 18, for in-service training of staff. Tax collector’s office closed member of the 92nd Infantry and loves the Civil War era, he said. He grew up in Pennsylvania near Gettysburg and started participating in re-enactments 25 years ago when he was a child. “Once you put on the wool uniform, the leather gloves and carry that rifle,” Chadwick said. “you go out and you see what they did, I don’t care who you are, you’re hooked.” The demonstration starts with nurses kneeling over wounded sol-diers. Blood-stained butcher’s aprons hang from the necks of the women in long dresses. Adrian Cox McCabe, from the Lulu area, has been creating fake blood and crafting realistic wounds for the medical demonstration for the past 12 years. She said before the Civil War, the medical profession was almost exclusively male. “They had so many casualties, they had to bring females in to help,” Cox McCabe said. Chadwick said the .58 caliber bullet shot from Civil War muskets would tear through flesh and shatter bone. “When this is fired it’s lead, its heated, it’s soft,” he said. “It hits your bone, it hits your body, it flattens out and expands ... It’s going to hurt you.” If the bullet struck the abdomen, the soldier was left on the battlefield to die, Chadwick said. The medical knowledge to cure such a wound did not exist. Cox McCabe works in the medical field as a registered cardiac stenogra-pher, and she had a relative fight in the Battle of Olustee 149 years ago. During the demonstration, she said she thinks about the pain the soldiers felt. Civil War field hospitals were not pretty places, Cox McCabe said. “A lot of burning flesh, especially from cauterizing, a lot of rot from body parts just laying around and the blood smell,” she said. “... A lot of just nasty. Urine and feces. Vomit and diarrhea.” Fake blood squirts into a large crowd gathered to watch soldiers treated with 150-year-old medical pro-cedures. Chadwick gouges out a lead bullet with a tool resembling modern forceps. The wound must be sealed with a red-hot iron, he says. “This is disgusting,” said Brooke Bland, 15, on a field trip from St. Augustine. A little girl with her hair in timeperiod curls covers her eyes and leans back against her mother. Erin O’Malley said she couldn’t watch, “I don’t do blood,” she said.When the crowd reacts in a shocked or disturbed way is how Cox McCabe said she can tell if the message of the medical demonstration hits home. “That’s the way you can judge if you did a good job,” Cox McCabe said. period costume as she made her way through streets of downtown looking at festival booths. Dubi was one of many people who choose to wear period costumes during the festival. “I decided to wear period dress to the battle festival because I wanted to dress like they did 150 years ago,” she said, noting it was a Civil War period dress. Ashley Oneal was with her two children and her boyfriend as the foursome made their through the vendor booths. She said it was the second time they had attended the Olustee Battle Festival. “We’re enjoying ourselves,” she said. “We decided to come to the Olustee Battle Festival because my kids wanted to play in the bounce houses and eat.” “I’m enjoying everything,” added Oneal’s daughter, Laci. the memorial service, and wanted to make clear the underlying reason for the service. “We don’t come here this morning to glorify war because we all know that there is nothing glorious about war,” Binion said. “What we come here to do is to remember.” Acccording to newly revised estimates, roughly 750,000 soldiers died during the Civil War, more than in all other U.S. wars combined. “Those four years were the deadliest four years in our history,” Binion said. “...We as a nation owe them the honor and respect to remember their sacrifice, and not only their sacrifice but the sacrifice of all the men and women who have died since 1776 for this nation.” When Binion finished speaking, Columbia County Judge Tom Coleman offered some remarks to the audience. Coleman is serving for the fourth time as the commanding general of the Blue-Grey Army. “It is an honor I do not take lightly,” he said. Coleman asked for all members who served in the United States military to stand so they could be recognized. Also, he said the Sons of Confederate Veterans spent around 200 hours mak-ing the cemetery grounds respectable for the memorial service. After the Oaklawn Cemetery Memorial Ceremony, the Sons of Confederate Veterans hosted their own memorial service where they read the names of the confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery. Robert Tucker, commander of SCV Camp 1463, said the SCV dug out the sunken gravestones of the 155 Confederates who died at the Battle of Olustee. Tucker said his great-great-grandfather died at the Battle of Olustee 149 years ago. Tucker’s father’s final resting place was 6-feet deep in the Oaklawn Cemetery, he said. The memorial service ended with a reading of the names of known Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery and three volleys blasted from four muzzle-loaded guns. The 37th annual Olustee Battle Re-enactment is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. today at the Olus-tee Battleeld. Admission is $7 for adults, $3 for school-age children and free for pre-schoolers. Those 62 and older, $5. Active military personnel with military ID, free. See coverage in Tuesday’s Lake City Reporter. Re-enactment is today JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterABOVE: Replicas of the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia are s een on Lake DeSoto during a skirmish on Friday. A Confederate soldier reloads his weapon after a comrade is gunned down by Union troops. BELOW LEFT: A Confederate soldier reloads his weapon after a comrade is gunned down by Union troops. 5A

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots Galore All Insulated Camo 40% off (in stock) All Jackets 30% off New Patterns Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health FREE book by doctor reveals what the (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com. OLUSTEE BATTLE FESTIVAL & RE-ENACTMENT Scenes from some of the activities Friay and Saturday in connection with the Olustee Battle Festival and Re-enactment Breanna Black, Miss Olustee 2013, waves to thousands of parade watchers as she passes by U.S. 90 on Saturday. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter Confederate president Jefferson Davis, portrayed by the Rev. John Woodson Binion III, speaks during the memorial service held at Oaklawn Cemetery in Lake City on Friday. David Eversole (left) bows his head in a moment of silence as (from left) Annette Lindsey-Hutson, Olustee Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy past president, UDC past president Ann Butler Brown and current president Linda Williams participate in the Placing of the Wreath Ceremony at Oaklawn Cemetery on Friday. Dwight Nicely (center) watches as Colton Goss (left) goes head-to-head with his brother, Jayson, 12, in hamster balls at the 35th annual Olustee Battle Festival on Friday. Kids are able to be in these giant balls, try to walk on water, fall on their faces and make themselves laugh all at the same time, Nicely said. A couple of Lake City Police Department officers lend a helping hand as they assist in pulling a carriage through the Olustee Parade. Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis and their wives wave to spectators from a horse-drawn carriage dur ing the Olustee Parade on Saturday. Miniature potbelly pigs race up a ramp during a show at the Chases Racing & Swimming Pigs booth at the Olustee Battle Festival on Friday.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 7A7A A lone Confederate holds the line as the Rebel forces tem porarily retreat from Union forces. Rebel soldiers return fire as they are greeted by Northe rn resistance.Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter Confederate cavalrymen group up for a conference on how best to purge their lands of the Yankee invaders. Union artillerymen shield their ears as they bombard C onfederate troops during the preliminary battle re-enactme nt Saturday at Olustee Battlefield. Eastside Elementary School students sing during the Olus tee Battle Festival in Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Friday. A horse-drawn hearse is seen during the Olustee Parad e on Saturday. Union soldiers approaching the front lines are met with hostility on the Olustee Battlefield. A woman braids her friend’s hair in the Union camp at Olustee Battlefield as soldiers march off to do battle agai nst the Confederates during a preliminary battle on Saturday.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AWEATHER AUTOLOAN MillionDollar ! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $1 MILLION IN 2013 MOVE your Auto Loan (from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanWe’ll save you at least We’ll pay youOR 50 1 25 1 ... and we’re starting with YOU! 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $12,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High wrestler Cole Schreibers fourth trip to the state meet could be his best ever. After three wins in the 113-pound weight class, Schreiber matched up against Donovan Hough of Armwood High for the championship on Saturday night. Schreiber, who is a dis trict and region champion this year, won three tough matches to get to the final. In his first match, Schreiber pinned Dakota Arends of River Ridge High at 5:23. He then won con secutive 7-6 decisions over Zachary Kelly of Venice High and Mike McDonald of Springstead High. Kaleb Warner was still alive in the 126-pound weight class, going into Saturday evening, despite a loss in his opening match. He was pinned by Vincent Mott of Lake Region High in 3:02. Warner rebounded with a 4-2 decision over Anthony Viscomi of Palmetto High, a pin of Andrew Smith of Springstead in 3:26 and a 6-2 decision over Gregory Manfredi of Gulf Breeze High. Warner, who also won district and region, next faced Daniel Preciado of Miami Springs High late Saturday. Daniel Devers went 2-2 in the 160-pound weight class. The district champi on opened with a pin of Springsteads William Swift in 4:33. He dropped a 4-2 decision to Jabari Irons of Lehigh High, then defeated Robert Witte of Armwood 6-4. Mike Aroyo of Olympic Heights High eliminated Devers in a 3-2 decision. By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Fort White Highs baseball team beat Keystone Heights High, 7-1, in a District 5-4A game at home on Friday. It was the district opener for Fort White (2-0), while Keystone Heights dropped into an 0-2 district hole after also losing to Williston High earlier in the week. Fort White pitchers Robby Howell and Lane Pendergrast kept the vis iting Indians flailing for much of the evening. They combined for 18 strikeouts and did not walk a batter. Howell (2-0) started and pitched four shutout innings with four hits and 10 strikeouts. Pendergrast struck out eight and gave up two hits in three innings. His one run was unearned. Fort White scored three runs in the third inning and Kevin Dupree added more than enough insurance with a three-run home run in the fifth inning. Dupree drove a 2-0 pitch 1BSPORTS Lake City residents now have access to quality joint replacement surgery, close to home. Under the medical direction of Dr. Jeffrey Glenn, Lake City Bone and Joint offers many surgical options to the community from hip and knee replacement to partial knee replacement. Dr. Glenn is a board-certied orthopedic surgeon fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. To schedule an appointment, call 386-755-9720. 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City, FL 32055 Dr. Jeffrey Glenn is Lake Citys only board-certied Orthopedic Surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery. www.LCBoneandJoint.com Excellence. I B... J. Excellence. I B... J. BASEBALL continued on 2B Fort White opens district play with win over Indians. Cole Schreiber in final as potential state champion. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Kevin Dupree takes a cut while playing against Columbia High on Tuesday. The senior blasted a three-run home run in the 7-1 win over Keystone Heights High on Friday. Strong start FILE Columbia High wrestlers Cole Schreiber (from left), Daniel Devers and Kaleb Warner are joined by coach Kevin Warner at the Ken Chertow Weekend Warrior camp at CHS on Oct. 6-7 before the beginning of the season. All three wrestlers qualified for state. Success at state

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach 8 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Winternationals, at Pomona, Calif. (same-day tape) GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, final round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, final round, at Los Angeles 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, final round, at Los Angeles TGC — LPGA, Women’s Australian Open, final round, at Canberra, Australia (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, ACE Group Classic, final round, at Naples (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Ohio St. at WisconsinESPN — Louisville at South Florida 10 p.m. FSN — Southern Cal at California MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 1 p.m. NBCSN — Doubleheader, Penn St. vs. Denver and Ohio St. vs. Jacksonville, at Jacksonville (EverBank Field) NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — All-Star Game, at Houston NHL HOCKEY Noon NBC — Pittsburgh at Buffalo 3:30 p.m. NBC — Los Angeles at Chicago 6 p.m. NBCSN — Washington at N.Y. Rangers WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1:30 p.m. FSN — West Virginia at Iowa St. 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Regional, Notre Dame at Marquette, Georgia Tech at N.C. State, Oklahoma at Kansas and Alabama at Auburn 3:30 p.m. FSN — Texas at Texas Tech 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Regional, Maryland at Virginia, Cincinnati at St. John’s, Iowa at Purdue and Vanderbilt at Tennessee ——— Monday AUTO RACING 7 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Whelen All-American Series, at Daytona Beach MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Notre Dame at PittsburghNBCSN — Hofstra at Drexel 9 p.m. ESPN — West Virginia at Kansas St. WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Kentucky at Texas A&M 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Baylor at UConnBASKETBALLNBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 32 18 .640 — Brooklyn 31 22 .585 2 12 Boston 28 24 .538 5 Philadelphia 22 29 .431 10 12 Toronto 21 32 .396 12 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 36 14 .720 — Atlanta 29 22 .569 7 12 Washington 15 36 .294 21 12 Orlando 15 37 .288 22 Charlotte 12 40 .231 25 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 32 21 .604 — Chicago 30 22 .577 1 12 Milwaukee 26 25 .510 5Detroit 21 33 .389 11 12 Cleveland 16 37 .302 16 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 42 12 .778 — Memphis 33 18 .647 7 12 Houston 29 26 .527 13 12 Dallas 23 29 .442 18 New Orleans 19 34 .358 22 12 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 39 14 .736 — Denver 33 21 .611 6 12 Utah 30 24 .556 9 12 Portland 25 28 .472 14 Minnesota 19 31 .380 18 12 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 39 17 .696 — Golden State 30 22 .577 7 L.A. Lakers 25 29 .463 13Sacramento 19 35 .352 19 Phoenix 17 36 .321 20 12 Today’s Game All-Star Game at Houston, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games No games scheduled NBA All-Star rosters At Houston Today (i-injured, will not play; r-replacement) EASTERN CONFERENCE Starters Player Pos Ht Wt Carmelo Anthony, NY F 6-8 230Kevin Garnett, Bos F 6-11 253 LeBron James, Mia F 6-8 250i-Rajon Rondo, Bos G 6-1 186Dwyane Wade, Mia G 6-4 210 Reserves Chris Bosh, Mia F-C 6-11 235Tyson Chandler, NY C 7-1 240Luol Deng, Chi F 6-9 220Paul George, Ind G-F 6-8 221Jrue Holiday, Phi G 6-4 190Kyrie Irving, Cle G 6-3 191r-Brook Lopez, Bklyn C 7-0 265Joakim Noah, Chi C 6-11 232 Head Coach: Erik Spoelstra, MiamiTrainer: Max Benton, Cleveland WESTERN CONFERENCE Starters Player P Ht Wt Kobe Bryant, LAL G 6-6 205Dwight Howard, LAL C 6-11 265Kevin Durant, Okl F 6-9 230Blake Griffin, LAC F 6-10 251Chris Paul, LAC G 6-0 175 Reserves LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F 6-11 240Tim Duncan, SA F 6-11 255James Harden, Hou G 6-5 220David Lee, GS F 6-9 240Tony Parker, SA G 6-2 185Zach Randolph, Mem F 6-9 260Russell Westbrook, Okl G 6-3 187 Head Coach: Gregg Popovich, San Antonio Trainer: Keith Jones, Houston NBA calendar Thursday — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin.June 6 — NBA Finals begin (possible switch to June 4). June 20 — Last possible date for NBA Finals (possible switch to June 18). June 27 — NBA draft. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 3 Miami at Clemson, 6 p.m.No. 4 Michigan vs. Penn State, Noon No. 9 Arizona at Utah, 3 p.m.No. 12 Louisville at South Florida, 1 p.m. No. 13 Ohio State at No. 20 Wisconsin, 1 p.m.Florida 83, Auburn 52 At Auburn, Ala. FLORIDA (21-3) Murphy 4-6 0-0 11, Young 1-3 0-0 2, Boynton 5-11 2-2 16, Rosario 9-14 2-3 22, Wilbekin 3-7 0-0 6, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Ogbueze 0-1 2-4 2, Graham 0-2 0-0 0, Frazier II 6-7 0-0 18, Prather 3-3 0-1 6, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-54 6-10 83.AUBURN (9-16) Payne 1-6 1-2 3, Chubb 0-4 1-2 1, Denson 5-8 3-4 13, S. Johnson 2-5 4-4 8, Wallace 0-3 0-0 0, Dixon-Tatum 0-2 0-0 0, Price 5-10 1-2 12, Sullivan 3-6 0-0 8, Greene Jr. 1-4 0-0 2, Granger 1-3 0-0 2, N. Johnson 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 19-54 10-14 52. Halftime—Florida 47-22. 3-Point Goals—Florida 15-30 (Frazier II 6-7, Boynton 4-9, Murphy 3-4, Rosario 2-6, Graham 0-1, Wilbekin 0-3), Auburn 4-16 (Sullivan 2-3, Price 1-3, N. Johnson 1-3, Wallace 0-1, Payne 0-1, Greene Jr. 0-2, S. Johnson 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida 30 (Murphy 6), Auburn 30 (Payne 7). Assists—Florida 25 (Wilbekin 10), Auburn 9 (S. Johnson 3). Total Fouls—Florida 11, Auburn 14. Technical—Auburn Bench. A—8,953.Florida St. 69, Boston College 66 At Tallahassee BOSTON COLLEGE (11-14) Rahon 3-8 0-0 8, Anderson 4-13 2-4 10, Clifford 0-2 2-2 2, Hanlan 6-13 4-4 19, Heckmann 4-6 1-2 10, Van Nest 0-2 0-0 0, Odio 4-4 0-0 9, Rubin 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 3-6 0-0 8. Totals 24-54 9-12 66.FLORIDA ST. (14-11) Bookert 1-2 2-2 5, Thomas 2-4 2-2 6, White 6-12 0-0 13, Snaer 8-10 4-4 21, Ojo 0-1 0-0 0, Bojanovsky 1-2 3-4 5, Turpin 3-4 0-0 6, Brandon 1-3 0-0 3, Miller 1-5 0-0 3, Whisnant II 2-3 1-2 7, Gilchrist 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 25-49 12-14 69. Halftime—Florida St. 31-26. 3-Point Goals—Boston College 9-16 (Hanlan 3-4, Jackson 2-2, Rahon 2-3, Odio 1-1, Heckmann 1-3, Anderson 0-1, Van Nest 0-2), Florida St. 7-13 (Whisnant II 2-3, White 1-2, Brandon 1-2, Bookert 1-2, Snaer 1-2, Miller 1-2). Fouled Out—Odio. Rebounds—Boston College 27 (Anderson 11), Florida St. 26 (White 8). Assists—Boston College 12 (Rahon 5), Florida St. 14 (Bookert 8). Total Fouls—Boston College 16, Florida St. 10.BASEBALLMLB calendar Through Thursday — Salary arbitration hearings, Phoenix. Wednesday — Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-19 — World Baseball Classic.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.Los Angeles at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.Boston at Winnipeg, 6 p.m.Calgary at Dallas, 6 p.m.Detroit at Minnesota, 6 p.m.Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m.St. Louis at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Monday’s Games Ottawa at New Jersey, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m.Nashville at Colorado, 3 p.m.Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.Toronto at Florida, 7:30 p.m.Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 By JENNA FRYERAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — If two practices are any indi-cation, Danica Patrick is a solid candidate to win the pole for the Daytona 500. Patrick turned the fastest lap Saturday in a pair of practice sessions focused solely on qualifying for the Daytona 500. She went 196.220 mph around Daytona International Speedway in the second practice session and said she’s eyeing the top start-ing spot in “The Great American Race.” “Everything that we do is to make sure that we do whatever we can to be on the pole,” Patrick said. “That is what we all are shooting for.” The front row for the Feb. 24 season-opening Daytona 500 will be set in today’s time trials. The rest of the field is set next Thursday after a pair of qualifying races. Patrick said it would be an accomplishment for her Stewart-Haas Racing team to lock into the field on Sunday. “I think it would be really nice for all of us to know we were in the race,” she said. “It’s nice to know as a team, but it’s also nice to know for your (sponsors) like GoDaddy and all the other people that are involved in the car. That is who really pays for you to be out there on the track.” Patrick was nearly a second faster than the other drivers Saturday. Second fastest in the afternoon session was three-time champion Tony Stewart, her teammate and car co-owner, who turned a lap of 195.363 mph in his Chevrolet. Kyle Busch was third in a Toyota, and he was followed by Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Jamie McMurray as Chevrolet took four of the top five spots. Trevor Bayne, the 2011 Daytona 500 winner, was the fastest Ford in sixth. Joey Logano paced the morning practice with a fast lap at 195.410 mph.2BSPORTS BASEBALL: At Bradford on Tuesday Continued From Page 1Bover the left-field fence after Brady Wilkinson walked and Kody Moniz singled to open the inning. Willie Carter and Rhett Willis walked in the inning and Pendergrast reached on an error. Carter stole second base and later scored on a wild pitch. Kodey Owens was safe on a one-out error to start the rally in the third inning. Wilkinson walked and Dupree laced a hit-and-run single to center field to score Owens. Wilkinson also scored on the play on an overthrow to third base and Dupree went to third. Tyler Parker came in for Dupree as a courtesy run-ner and scored on an infield single by Carter. Wilkinson did his job as lead-off batter, reaching base four times on a single and three walks. He stole two bases. Howell singled in the second inning. Hunter Shannon singled and Robbie Davis doubled to lead off the fourth inning for Keystone Heights. Howell struck out the next three batters. Dalton McIntyre reached on an error in the fifth inning and scored on Tucker Bracewell’s second single of the game. Adam Bryan and McIntyre had the other hits for Keystone Heights. Bryan pitched three innings and took the loss. Davis and Morgan Smith also pitched. Fort White plays Bradford High at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Starke. CHS beats BobcatsFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s baseball team pulled out a 2-1 win over Buchholz High at Tiger Stadium on Friday. Dalton Mauldin pitched six innings of four-hit ball. He struck out four and walked one. The run in the seventh inning was earned. Brent Stalter had a hand in putting the Tigers on top and keeping them there. Stalter tripled and scored Columbia’s second run on a sacrifice fly by Sam Bass in the sixth inning. Stalter relieved Mauldin in the seventh inning and got the save. He struck out two, walked one and did not give up a hit. Caleb Vaughn scored Columbia’s first run in the second inning. He singled, then Mauldin bunted and was safe on an error. Vaughn got caught off sec-ond base and headed for third. The catcher over-threw the base, which allowed Vaughn to score. Columbia’s game at Union County High on Thursday was rained out, so the Tigers evened their mark at 1-1 and gave new head coach Jonathan Ulsh his first victory. “It was a huge win against that caliber of club,” Ulsh said. “They pitched prob-ably one of the best guys we will face. We scratched and clawed and came out on top.” Columbia hosts Suwannee High at 7 p.m. next Friday. Haas shoots 64 to take 3-shot lead at Riviera ASSOCIATED PRESSBill Haas drives on the second tee in the third round o f the Northern Trust Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Clu b in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on Saturda y.Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Bill Haas had another bogey-free round at Riviera while shooting a 7-under 64 — the best round of the day by three shots — to take a three-stroke lead into the final day of the Northern Trust Open. Haas turned in a remarkable score. The key was a seven-hole stretch in the middle of his round that he played in 6-under par, including a chip-in for eagle on the par-4 10th. He was at 12-under 201. Webb Simpson, Charl Schwartzel and John Merrick were three back. Lake City’s Blayne Barber shot a 1-over 72 and was tied for 22nd with a three-day total of 211. Danica fastest in practice

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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 3B5BSports Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN BRIEFS Tuesday Q Columbia High girls tennis at Ridgeview High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Trinity Christian Academy, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High baseball at Bradford High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys basketball at Williston High in Region 2-4A semifinals, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Columbia High weightlifting at Baker County High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High JV baseball at Buchholz High, 6 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High softball at Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Newberry High, 6 p.m. (JV-5 at Keystone Heights High) Q Columbia High softball at Gainesville, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Vanguard High at Jonesville Tennis Center, 3 p.m. Q Fort White High track at East Coast Classic in Bunnell, TBA Q Fort White High softball vs. Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Q Fort White High baseball at Buchholz High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Saturday Q Columbia High baseball at Chiles High, 2 p.m. (JV-11 a.m.) Q Fort White High track at Bradford Invitational or Ocala Forest Invitational, TBA GAMES FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Tuesday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the faculty lounge at the school. For details, call Shayne Morgan at 397-4954. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball online registration continues through Monday at lcccyb.com Fee is $95. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. YOUTH BASKETBALL USSSA travel team tryouts Tryouts at Richardson Community Center for seventhand 10th-grade USSSA travel basketball teams end this week. Final tryouts for seventh-grade (ages 11-14) are 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday and Friday; final tryouts for 10-grade (ages 14-17) are 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Permission/waver forms must be signed by a parent or guardian. Twelve players will be chosen for each team. Fee for players selected is $60. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. ROLLER DERBY Mash Up Madness event today Jacksonville Roller Derby’s Mash Up Madness is 1:30 p.m. today at the Skating Palace on Hall of Fame Drive. Spectator fee is $5. For details, call the Skating Palace at 755-2232.Q From staff reports ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida’s Erik Murphy (left) shoots against Auburn’s Asa uhn Dixon-Tatum during the game in Auburn, Ala., on Saturday.Florida wins big at AuburnAssociated PressAUBURN, Ala. — Mike Rosario, Kenny Boynton and No. 7 Florida were bru-tally efficient. The Gators made the extra passes, hit a season-high 15 3-pointers and pretty much confounded Auburn’s shooters in a systematic 83-52 rout on Saturday. Rosario scored a seasonhigh 22 points, Boynton had 16 and the Gators (21-3, 11-1 SEC) raced to a 25-point halftime lead. The game matched the worst loss for Auburn (9-16, 3-9) in coach Tony Barbee’s three seasons, tying a 90-59 defeat against Mississippi on Feb. 16, 2011. It also was the Tigers’ worst home loss since an 88-48 blowout by Kentucky in 1952. The Gators have won their last three SEC games by an average of 24 points since their only league loss at Arkansas. Rosario had 18 points — two shy of his previous high this season — by halftime, when the game was effec-tively over. Michael Frazier added 15 points on 5-of-6 shooting from 3-point range for Florida, which has won seven straight at Auburn. Erik Murphy added 11 points and went 3 of 4 from beyond the arc. Chris Denson led Auburn with 13 points and Jordan Price had 12.Florida State 69, Boston College 66TALLAHASSEE — Michael Snaer scored 21 points and Okaro White added 13 as Florida State hung on for a win over Boston College. The Eagles had a chance to tie at the buzzer, but Ryan Anderson’s 3-point try bounced off the front rim. It was the first time that Snaer scored 20 or more points against a league opponent. He made 8 of 10 shots and was perfect on four free throws. Florida State (14-11, 6-6 ACC) led by as many as 12 points in the opening half on its way to a 31-26 lead at the break. BC rallied to take a brief 45-42 lead on Patrick Heckmann’s 3, but the Seminoles, keyed by freshman Devon Bookert’s floor play, went on a 12-2 to move into a 54-47 lead with 8:06 left and never trailed. COURTESY PHOTODance-STARZ state championsThe Columbia County Dance-STARZ of Fancy Dancer Studio co mpeted in the American Cheer and Dance Florida State Championships at the Tampa State Fair last weekend. The Junior Dance-STARZ were crowned State Champions in the Junior Pom division and won the Overall High Score. The Senior Dance-STARZ were State Champions in the Senior Variety division, a combination of pom, kick, hip hop, and jazz dance, and won Overall High Score. The Senior team also won a Silver Award in the Senior Jazz division. Team members (front row, from left) are Abby Larsen, Captai n Rachel Walker, Savannah Hoffman, Captain Sarah Elkins, Logan Woods, Bro oke Fletcher and Riley Eubank. Back row (from left) are Cassady Feagle, Erika Ha yes, Devin Baxter, Amber Bell, Kathryn Hillyard, Laurel Daniel, Katelynn Flandreau, Apri ena Riley, Rebekah Dashler, Sierra Thomas and Tobie Williams. Jennifer Owens is co ach. COURTESY PHOTO‘Amazing Feet’ get pedometersSchool Board member Steve Nelson and Principal Sonya Judkins joined students from Lake City Middle School who are all about feet — ‘Amazi ng Feet.’ The students are learning about health and exercise and are competing to get feet on the wall of the health classroom. Coaches Linda and Girvin Skinner instruct b oys and girls that exercise and good nutrition are the keys to good health. Each student mu st log their laps and the top boy and top girl in each class are recognized for thei r achievements. The student receives a paper shoe that goes on the wall in the classroom. A p edometer donation from Lake City Medical Center enables students to better track their achie vements. John Wes Townley wins first ARCA race at DaytonaAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — John Wes Townley has won his first ARCA Series race at Daytona International Speedway on Saturday. Townley nudged Bobby Gerhart out of the way with seven laps left and held off Kyle Larson. Gerhart had the dominant car and seemed on his way toward winning his ninth ARCA Daytona race. But when Gerhart slowed down on the track, Townley tapped him and took off for the win. Gerhart pulled off the track, tried to return, but appeared to run out of gas. He finished 29th, five laps down. Darrell Wallace Jr., set to become the fourth black driver to run a full-time schedule in a NASCAR series, was caught up in the only major wreck and finished 35th.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER BASEBALL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421Fort White, Columbia clash JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Andrew Johnson (left) throws to first bas e to try and complete a double play after a force out on Fo rt White High’s Brady Wilkinson at second base. Fort White and Columbia played in Lake City on Tuesday to open the 20 13 baseball season. The Indians won 4-0. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High third baseman Steven Rendel throws acros s the diamond to first base in the game against Fort White High on Tuesday. J ASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brent Stalter checks the action at the pla te while taking off for second base. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Brady Wilkinson shows bunt during the game against Columbia High.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High pitcher Robby Howell delivers against Co lumbia High on Tuesday. The Indians’ ace has signed a scholarship to play at UC F.4BSports

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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER BASEBALL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 5B in baseball season-opener JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Columbia High baseball team watch Tuesda y’s game against Fort White High from behind the dugout sc reen. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High pitcher Caleb Vaughn looks for the sign in the game against Fort White High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High shortstop Brady Wilkinson (left) gets ready to tag Columbia High’s Brent Stalter as he steals second base. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Rhett Willis makes a play against Colum bia High in the Indians’ 4-0 win on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Anthony Gonzalez tosses his bat after drawing a walk in the game against CHS.5BSports

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By CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer NEW YORK Theres noth ing more satisfying than a homecooked meal, especially if it comes out of a can or a pouch. As more people try their hand at mimicking sophisticated recipes from cooking shows and blogs, food companies are rolling out meal kits and starters that make amateur chefs feel like Emeril Lagasse or Rachael Ray in the kitchen. Call it the next generation of dinner-in-box sets like Rice-A-Roni and Hamburger Helper that were rolled out as moms flooded the workforce in the 50s, 60s and 70s. But the new kits and starters go beyond just browning meat and throwing evaporated cheese and seasonings into boiling water the idea is to make people feel like theyre making their meals from scratch. General Mills Inc. has a line of Progresso Recipe Starters, which are pre-made sauces in flavors such as Fire-Roasted Tomato and Creamy Portabella Mushroom that can be bases for a variety of dishes. Kraft Food Group Inc.s Sizzling Salads din ner kits pair a meat marinade with salad dressing: you provide all the other ingredients. And Campbell Soup Co. has Skillet Sauces that can be mixed with fresh meat and veggies. Total prep time: 15 minutes. Scott Jones, a public relations specialist in Fort Worth, Texas, uses Krafts Velveeta Skillets, a deluxe version of mac-n-cheese in a box with flavors such as Chicken Alfredo and Lasagna. Jones likes that the box sug gests ways to customize the rec ipe by doing things like using different types of meats. He says the creamy cheese packets are a step up from powder mixes. And he likes adding personal touches (Think: diced tomatoes and pep pers.) Its not the same as the pot roasts feasts that he cooks on Sundays but on weekdays it allows him to give his family a satisfying meal, quickly and conveniently. Cooking shortcuts long have been an American way of life, of course. But demand has grown for time-saving recipes as busy Americans eat more meals at home to save money. The NPD Group estimates the average num ber of meals eaten at home at 902 last year, up from 870 four years earlier. At the same time, theres a growing foodie culture that val ues authenticity and fresh ingre dients. It may be why sales of Rice-A-Roni essentially a box of rice and powdered seasoning mix have dropped 16 percent to $196 million from five years ago, according to the market research er Euromonitor International. The companies that make the new starters say its too early to make sales projections but the hope is to appeal to the people who want it both ways: a homecooked meal that doesnt require much sweat and labor. In par ticular, companies are aiming for those in their 20s and 30s whose cooking skills may be outmatched by their increasingly sophisticated tastes. Their definition of cook ing is different, says Darren Serrao, who heads innovation for Campbell Soup, based in Camden, N.J. Assembly is cooking. Indeed, Kraft Sizzling Salads dinner kits arent exactly your mothers made from scratch recipes. They direct people to heat up some chicken with the marinade and toss a salad with the dress ing. But in case aspiring home cooks need some extra guidance in their culinary adventures, Kraft provides cooking tutorials online. In a video for the Chicken Caesar meal kit, a woman demon strates how to squeeze the mari nade over four chicken breasts in a frying pan. She then guides viewers through the steps of add ing croutons and shredded cheese into a bowl of chopped lettuce. The finishing touch? Squirting in 1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of February 17-23, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County Like having a chef on the shelf Companies roll out next generation of dinner-in-a-box. ASSOCIATED PRESS General Mills Inc. is promoting its new line of Progresso Recipe Starters. As more people try their hand at mim icking sophisticated recipes from cooking shows and blogs, food companies are rolling out meal kits and starters that make amateur chefs feel like Emeril Lagasse or Rachael Ray in the kitchen. NEW FOOD TREND FOOD continued on 2C 1CColumbia Inc. Learning that you or someone you love has cancer can be a frightening experience. When processing that news, your patients need to know as much as possible about available treatment options: especially what options are available close to home. A Network of Care The Cancer Center at Lake City and the Cancer Center at North Florida Regional have partnered in an effort to bring residents in our region comprehensive cancer services within one local network. Together, we are focused on providing patients with quality, coordinated cancer care. Patients honesty, genuine compassion and an understanding of the challenges people experience when diagnosed with cancer. Our Services Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR)* Mammosite* Prostate Seed Implants Cyberknife Radiosurgery* PET / CT Services GE CT Simulator Varian Linear Accelerator *Some oncology services provided by I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor 386-758-7822 LCM-4410 Cancer Ad 5.25x10.5.indd 1 1/24/13 3:31 PM

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 From staff reportsAir Methods Corporation said Thursday it has entered into an agree-ment with HCA, owner of Lake City Medical Center, to provide air transport for emergency patients. Effective immediately, Air Methods is the pre-ferred provider for air medical transport ser-vices for its Florida affili-ated hospitals located in Lake City, Gainesville, and Ocala. In addition to Lake City Medical Center, HCA also owns North Florida Medical Center in Gainesville and West Marion Community Hospital in Ocala. The company’s existing air medical bases in Cross City and Lake City will work together with the North Florida Division to facilitate the interfacility transfer of critically ill and injured patients requiring air transport. The Air Medical Services Division is the largest provider of air medical transport servic-es for hospitals and one of the largest communi-ty-based providers of air medical services.Air Methods enters agreements with HCA FOOD: New meal helpers Continued From Page 1Csome Kraft dressing. Progresso’s sauces involve a little more work. For example, let’s say you want beef stroga-noff. All you need is two pounds of boneless beef sirloin, an onion, garlic, Worcestershire sauce and a can of Progresso’s Recipe Starters in Creamy Portabella Mushroom fla-vor. The dish takes 35 minutes from start to fin-ish, according to the reci-pe on the can. Making beef stroganoff from scratch, by con-trast, would be a deeply involved ordeal, in large part because of the sauce, says Brendan Walsh, dean of culinary education at the Culinary Institute of America. “You’re dealing with stocks and reductions. It’s a good 12-hour process,” he says. Although Walsh wouldn’t put Progresso’s version of beef stroganoff “in the realm of chef-dom,” he notes that companies have gotten better at making products with improved taste and nutri-tional content. And given busy schedules, Walsh says such “survival cook-ing” is often an easy way to put a hot meal on the table. Some starters are even more basic. Land O’ Lakes has “Saute Starters,” cubes of butter that contain olive oil and are packed with the right mix of spices to make a dish, coming in fla-vors such as Italian Herb and Lemon Pepper. Cooking instructions? Toss a square in a pan, add some meat, shrimp or fish, then serve with rice or pasta. Peggy Ellingson, Land O’ Lakes’ vice president of innovation and new busi-ness development, prom-ises that the aroma from the butter will have every-one asking what mom is cooking for dinner. In other words, it’s all part of the show. Horsemeat scandal spreadsBy JILL LAWLESS andLORI HINNANTAssociated PressPARIS — The price, smell and color should have been clear tip-offs some-thing was wrong with ship-ments of horsemeat that were fraudulently labeled as beef, French authorities said Thursday. The govern-ment pinned the bulk of the blame on a French whole-saler at the heart of a grow-ing scandal in Europe. Police in the U.K., meanwhile, announced the arrests Thursday of three men on suspicion of fraud at two meat plants inspect-ed earlier this week by the country’s Food Standards Agency. The two separate developments were part of an escalating scare that has raised questions about food controls in the European Union — and highlighted how little consumers know about the complex trading operations that get food from producers to whole-salers to processers to stores and onto their din-ner tables. Europol, the European Union police agency, is coordinating a broad con-tinent-wide fraud investiga-tion amid allegations of an international criminal con-spiracy to substitute horse for more-expensive beef. In Paris, Benoit Hamon, the government’s consum-er affairs minister, said it appeared that in the most prominent case, fraudulent meat sales had been going on for several months and have reached across 13 countries and 28 compa-nies. He did not name the countries or companies. He said there was plenty of blame to go around, but most of it rested with Spanghero, a wholesaler based in southern France. Officials at Spanghero denied knowingly buying and reselling horsemeat but French authorities immediately suspended their trading activities. Hamon said Spanghero was one company in a chain that started with two Romanian slaugh-terhouses that says they clearly labeled their meat as horse. The meat was then bought by a Cyprus-reg-istered trader and sent to a warehouse in the Netherlands. Spanghero bought the meat from the trader, then resold it to the French frozen food processor Comigel. The resulting food was marketed under the Sweden-based Findus brand as lasagna and other products as containing ground beef. Hamon said Spanghero was well aware that the meat was mislabeled when it sold it to Comigel. “Spanghero knew,” Hamon said. “One thing that should have attracted Spanghero’s attention? The price.” Hamon said the meat from Romania cost far below the market rate for beef. A representative for Spanghero said company officials have been inter-rogated by authorities, who have raided Spanghero headquarters several times in recent days, but no one has been arrested. The representative insisted the company acted “in good faith” and that it never knew the meat it bought and sold was horsemeat. The representative said he was not authorized to be publicly named accord-ing to his contract with Spanghero. He wouldn’t comment on French authorities’ insistence that Spanghero should have recognized the meat as horse by its price, smell and color. Food processor Comigel was not blameless either, Hamon said, declaring that the paperwork from Spanghero had significant irregularities, including a failure to specify country of origin. “And once the meat was defrosted, we can ask our-selves why Comigel didn’t notice that the color and odor was not that of beef?” Hamon said. Romanian food suppliers rejoiced that the blame for the frozen lasagna scan-dal has shifted away from Romanian slaughterhouses to companies in France. ASSOCIATED PRESSSculptured horses’ heads adorn a horsemeat butcher sho p in Paris. Tests have found horsemeat in school meals, hospital food and restaurant dishes in Britain, officials said Friday, as the scandal over adulterated meat spread beyond froze n supermarket products. French French Consumer Affairs Minister Benoit Hamon said Thurs day that it appeared fraudulent meat sales over several months reached across 13 coun tries and 28 companies. French firm blamed; Brits make arrests.2CBIZ/MOTLEY

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY17, 2013 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service Directory To place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding Counties Highlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Artwork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 Services BANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCIENCE Position #F999910 164 Duty Days-Tenure Track To Commence Fall Semester Te ach Physical Science, Physics, and/or Chemistry. Work with others in Science Department to develop and revise curriculum. Requires Masters degree in a physical science. Ability to teach a variety of science courses. Experience in using technology in science teaching. Ability to work well with others. Experience with or desire to teach distance-learning, online and/or evening courses. Desirable qualifications: Ability and credentials to teach both physics and chemistry courses a plus. Community College teaching experience. Other undergraduate teaching experience may be acceptable. Ability to work with technology in the classroom. Willingness to explore Web based instruction and mutli-media presentational teaching technologies as well as a willingness to teach evening classes. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, ENGLISH Position #: F99909 164 Duty Days Tenure Track to Commence Fall Semester Full-time, tenure track position teaching Freshman Composition I and II, Literature Courses (American, British, or World); other duties as assigned. Requires Masters degree or doctorate with at least 18 graduate credits in English prefix courses. Proven ability to teach English Composition and Literature to freshman and sophomore community college students; ability to work with computers, web-based instruction, and multi-media presentational teaching technologies. Desirable qualifications: The ability, willingness, and qualifications to teach in other areas (such as history, speech, or humanities) are advantages. Substantive experience teaching both traditional and online courses is desirable. SALARY: Based on degree and experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/13/13 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment 1994 Chevy Silverado Ext. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean. $4,800 386-288-6102 Each office independently owned and operated 3101 US HWY 90 WEST DEBORAH MYLES, BROKER CALL (386) 719-1224 Ve ry pretty property, all brick home with large great room, nice size kitchen and laundry room. Septic system has been re-certi ed Lots of trees and shrubs surround this home. 3 Br., 2 Ba. on 4.2 plus acres. A pprox. 1471 sq. ft. Front covered patio. MLS: 82843 $81,000 Home is all brick, large kitchen and great room. 3 Br., 2 Ba. on 3.98 acres. Exterior features fence, stocked sh pond and 26x36 barn with a second steel story w/200 Amp electric. Over sized garage doors for large vehicles. Pond has clay bottom. Roof replaced 3-4 years ago. MLS: 81666 $155,000 Nestled in the trees, beautiful home. Fe a tures sparkling hardwood oors, formal dining room, great room w/ replace and double doors to screened porch. Eat in kitchen features island and beautiful wood cabinets. 3 Br, 2 Ba. and 1 partial Ba. Double garage, w/ bonus room, all on 10 plus acres. MLS: 82374 $239,900 Legal IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 13-28-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD CECILKAHLICH, deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of RICHARD CECILKAHLICH, deceased, whose date of death was July 14, 2012; File Number 13-28-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: February 10, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Beverly J. Kahlich BEVERLYJ. KAHLICH 359 SE Church Avenue Lake City, Florida 32025 Attorneys for Personal Representative: FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTORNEYS, P.A. By: /s/ Mark E. Feagle Mark E. Feagle Florida Bar No. 0576905 153 NE Madison Street Post Office Box 1653 Lake City, Florida 32056-1653 386/752-7191 mefeagle@bellsouth.net 05537191 FEBRUARY10, 17, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE A von Park Air Force Range Restoration Advisory Board Meeting Notice The next Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting for the Avon Park Air Force Range (AFR) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) will be held at 5:00 p.m. on T uesday, February 19, at the Jacaranda Hotel on Main Street in Avon Park, Florida 33825. The purpose of the RAB is to update the public on the environmental cleanup progress at the Range and allow the public the opportunity to provide input for the Program. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Chris Baker at (863) 452-4137 or via email at chris.baker .3.ctr@us.af.mil 05537291 FEBRUARY17, 2013 100 Job Opportunities 05537211 Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to fchbookkeeper@fhclakecity comcastbiz.net or mail: AT T: Human Resources, 3909 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL32055 05537366 Drawdy Insurance is seeking Professional 440 CSR or 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to 738 SWMain Blvd. Lake City, FL, 32056 CDLClass A T ruck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Counselor/ Case Manager CDS Family & Behavioral Health Services Family Action N.W. FTposition available in program serving adolescents and families in Columbia and Hamilton Counties. MA/MS preferred. Send resume with cover letter to: Tracey Ousley Regional, Coordinator 1218 N.W. 6th St. Gainesville Fl. 32601 or tracey_ousley@cdsfl.or g Background Screen req. EOE/DFW 100 Job Opportunities Head Teller Lake City Seeking energetic individual who enjoys working with public. Supervisory and teller exp REQ. Professional appearance REQ Great pay and benefits! App REQ and avail at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic T echnician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 SALES POSITION A vailable for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Sewing Machine Operator Needed W ith some experience. Contact 755-6481 Unemployed Underemployed Retired Start your own Lake City Business. Some Financing A vailable. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net W ANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon 120 Medical Employment 05537285 Certified Dietary Manager A valon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Certified Dietary Manager. Experience in a long term care setting with a working knowledge of MDS/Care Planning is required. Please apply at A valon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE 05537311 Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987 Certified Dietary ManagerNeeded L TC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F Experienced Dental Hygienist Needed for Live Oak office. Please call 386-362-1646 F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resumes only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.As All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240 Schools & Education 05536525 Interested in a Medical Career? Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp Nursing Assistant, $479 next class1/7/2013 Phlebotomy national certification, $800 next class-1/14/13 LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310 Pets & Supplies Free to good home 7 yr old AKC Male Pug Great with children Contact 386-303-2574 Full blooded Rotty 2 years old male. Needs room to run. Great w/ Adults needs supervision w/ a Child. $400. 438-3131 /984-5142 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407 Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430 Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 630 Mobile Homes forRent 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 2BR/2BA w/ carport located onCountyRoad 133, $500 mo. plus $500 dep. 954-258-8841 3/2 DW on land, countryside between Live Oak and Lake City of CR 252. Remodeled, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $550 & $550 dep 386963-4833 or 936-594-0121 Answering machine 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $520 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 640 Mobile Homes forSale 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TO YOUR LAND. Several Repos Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes Demo your mobile home/free tear down at Palm Harbor New mobiles $39K off list John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext 210 710 Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! FREE afterschool program W indsong Apts 386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 A Landlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. Avail 5/1, 941-924-5183 710 Unfurnished Apt. ForRent Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview A ve. Lake City, FL This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720 Furnished Apts. ForRent ROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. W eekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730 Unfurnished Home ForRent 3bd/ 2 ba, fenced yard, small shed, half mile to paved road, fruit trees, $600.00 deposit & first months rent! 352-239-3260! 3bd/1.5ba Brick Home in town, $715 mth Security Dep $450. Call 386-935-1482 or 386-752-4701 Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750 Business & Office Rentals AS uite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805 Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810 Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 820 Farms & Acreage 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 820 Farms & Acreage Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 870 Real Estate W anted I Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 951 Recreational Veh icles 1989 Mallot Travel Trailer Fully self contained, sleeps 6 comfortable, a/c, double doors, awning, Full bed, Sofa/bed, full bathroom, great cond., second owner, A1 condition $2600 negotible. 352-321-0030 or 850-261-5337 To place your classified ad call RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter

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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 $389$35,000

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W hat gar dener wouldnt love to find a flowering plant that is fast growing, heat and drought tolerant, easily grown, unusual and beautiful? Do I have your attention? Add edible and nutritious to that list of desirable characteristics of the amaranth plant and we have a winner for Florida gardens. There are about 60 spe cies of amaranths, and there are many uses for them worldwide. Most are annual plants grown for their colorful ornamental quality, nutrient-rich edible leaves or cereal grain-like seeds. These plants are not to be mistaken for wild amaranth weeds, which are no strangers to many farmers and gardeners. One of the best known ornamental types is Josephs Coat Amaranth, or Amaranthus tricolor. This annual is a fast upright grower, often need ing to be staked when reaching 4 feet in height. As the name implies, the colors of Josephs Coats large leaves are brilliantly variegated red, purple, green and yellow. To obtain the best leaf color, ornamental ama ranths should be planted in full sun, although some shading in high after noon is acceptable. They grow well in acidic, sandy soil that is well drained and they are moderately drought tolerant. Limit fertilizer applications, how ever, because their vibrant leaf colors fade when grown in rich soil. Love-lies-bleeding, my favorite, is another breathtaking amaranth that can take its place as a specimen in the gar den. Gracefully drooping branches laden with footlong chenille-like blooms make the 4-foot-tall plant a spectacular focal point. The name of this plant can evoke emotion, but com bine that with the sight of this plant in its full glory and you may shed a tear. According to the UF/ IFAS publication on ama ranths (https://edis.ifas. LIFE Sunday, February 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D C edar River Seafood has been a staple in the North Florida area for little more than a decade. With restaurants in Lake City and Gainesville and several other locations, Cedar River consistently serves tasty meals to local patrons and folks just pass ing through. A favorite for the after-church crowd and on weekends, you better get there early for a table. Recently a bunch of us girls got together for lunch and Cedar River fit the bill. Their menu strongly leans towards all things seafood related, but were sure even our but I dont like fish friends will find some thing to suit their taste. With six of us, we had a chance to try a number of menu items. Our waitress was friendly and accommo dated our varied requests for this and that. From the appetizer menu, Kimberlynne and Alexis ordered stuffed mushrooms, Mary Kay opted for fried green toma toes and Katie selected fried dill pickles and jalap eno bites. The mushrooms with an interesting seafood stuffing were the size of golf balls and piping hot when they arrived. The plate full of fried green tomatoes was some of the best in Lake City and would have been sufficient as a meal. Katies fried dill pickles were perfectly seasoned and crispy. Our favorite appetizer was the jalapeno bites. Filled with tasty queso and crispy fried, the sweet, hot chili dipping sauce made these extra special. Genie ordered the lunch flounder. You get three nice-sized pieces, which turned out to be light, flaky and simply delicious. Alexiss cod tail was excel lent as well. The hushpup pies that come with all lunch specials have great flavor with a hint of sweet ness. Kimberlynne stuck with one of our all-time favorites, the fried shrimp basket. What a deal 20 perfectly fried shrimp for $5.99. Cindy tried the penne pasta alfredo with grilled chicken, which had a nice blend of seasonings and came with two sides as well. Mary Kay ordered the hamburger and fries, just to be different. You can only get the burger well done so if you like yours on the rare side, we wouldnt recommend ordering it. Several of us ordered the fried okra as one of our sides, and we can say without a doubt these little pop in your mouth goodies arent your average frozen variety, and the slaw is really good. The cabbage and other Cedar River Seafood pleases Story ideas? Contact Robert Bridges Editor 754-0428 rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter 1DLIFE Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingsworth TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES By DANICA COTO Associated Press SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico The number of people traveling to the Caribbean is bouncing back to pre-recession levels, with visitors from Canada and the U.S. giving a boost to a region struggling to recover from a global economic crisis, a top tourism official said Wednesday. About 25 million tourists visited the Caribbean last year, a more than 5 percent increase from 2011. Its a growth rate that outpaced the rest of the world, which saw arriv als increase by 4 percent, said Beverly Nicholson-Doty, chair woman of the Barbados-based Caribbean Tourism Organization. All the signs suggest Caribbean tourism is rallying, said Nicholson-Doty. The region as a whole has regained ground lost in the heat of the global eco nomic depression. The Caribbean also saw its larg est number of stayover visitors in five years, with the regions overall hotel occupancy increas ing by more than 7 percent and total room revenues up by nearly 9 percent. And tourists spent big while visiting the Caribbean last year, dropping more than $27 billion, a more than 3 percent increase from 2011. The numbers mark a return to pre-recession levels, Nicholson-Doty said. The U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands fared the best, reporting a nearly 7 percent jump in tourists. From January to August last year alone, more than 1.1 million people vis ited Puerto Rico, mostly from the U.S. mainland. Recent visitors include James Trucksess, a 46-year-old exter mination business owner from North Brunswick, N.J. He flew again to Puerto Rico to escape the crippling snowstorm that recently hit the northeast U.S. coast. Its nice, its warm and theres a lot of history, he said as he strolled near a historic fort with Cause for celebration TRAVEL ASSOCIATED PRESS Tourists walk near the 16th century Spanish fortress called El Morro in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. An upsurge in tourist traffic is a welcome change for Caribbean islands, most of whose economies are heavily dependent on spending by visitors seeking fun in the sun. Caribbean seeing signs of rebound in tourist industry. TASTE continued on 2D Amaranth: great in the garden and you can eat it, too TRAVEL continued on 2D GARDEN continued on 2D GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorest dndemorest@ufl.edu COURTESY PHOTO Amaranth planted in com bination with leaf lettuce makes an attractive garden scene as well as a great salad greens mix. 1DLIFE Delivering Quality Healthcare that Matters to You! Quality Care is Important to Every Patient. But how can you really know the care youre receiving is the best? The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the healthcare as doing the right thing at the right time in the right way to achieve the best possible results. At Lake City Medical Center, our team of physicians and staff in the area by voting us the Lake City Reporters Best of the Best Hospital. Want to see more? For more information about publicly reported data, visit www.HospitalCompare.hhs.gov THE TOP 7 REASONS TO CHOOSE LCMC AS YOUR COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Survey of Patients Hospital Experience* Lake City Medical Center Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center The following scores are reported on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) national survey. Patients who reported that their nurses always communicated well. Patients who reported that their doctors always communicated well. Patients who reported that they always receieved help as soon as they wanted. Patients who reported that their pain was always well controlled. Patients at each hospital who reported that YES they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home. Patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest). Patients who reported YES they would definitely recommend this hosiptal. FLA Average US Average 77% 84% 68% 68% 86% 74% 73% 66% 73% 51% 61% 71% 48% 46% 73% 77% 60% 67% 81% 65% 68% 78% 81% 66% 70% 84% 69% 70% *The data was last updated 12/13/12 and is updated every quarter.

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ufl.edu/mv006) a green form, A. gangeticus, is commonly grown for use as boiled greens. Young leaves and shoots, report-edly similar in taste to spinach, are ready to har-vest about 3-6 weeks after sowing. These nutrient-rich greens can be cooked or eaten raw in salads. Amaranthus edulis is a ‘grain’ amaranth, grown for the edible seeds. These seeds can be ground into a flour to make nutritious breads, noodles and pan-cakes. When heated, the seeds will expand and pop like popcorn for a crunchy gourmet treat. Many mar-kets and health food stores carry the seeds and seed products. Maybe your flower garden, edible landscape or vegetable garden has a place for amaranths this year. Join the UF Master Gardeners for a Spring Vegetable Gardening Workshop and get your garden ready. Where: Fort White Public Library on Route 47. Thursday, Feb. 21, at 5:45 p.m. veggies are chopped fine and mixed with a creamy dressing in just the right amount. We have to say our eyes were definitely larger than our stomachs, so we all nibbled a bit off each oth-er’s plates and had enough for take-home to boot! With ample servings, you can certainly get by with sharing. Obviously there wasn’t room for dessert, but if we had even saved a little room we would have tried the fried xangos, which are deep-fried cheesecake bites. They also serve Key lime pie and New York cheesecake. Cedar River is open seven days a week. Area locations: Gainesville: 5141 NW 43rd St., Suite 101; phone (352) 371-4848, and Lake City: 2938 W U.S. Highway 90; phone (386) 752-8399. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 PETS By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — It may sound like a West Side Story-style love story, but some dogs love big cats. Cheetahs are the fastest mammals in the world, but they also are the world’s biggest scaredy-cats — so much so that they don’t breed easily and are in danger of going extinct. Some zoos are introducing dogs to calm the skittish cats and bring attention to their plight. They’re pairing “companion dogs” with some cheetahs to serve as play-mates and to provide the cats with guidance. “It’s a love story of one species helping another species survive,” said Jack Grisham, vice president of animal collections at the St. Louis Zoo and species survival plan coordinator for cheetahs in North America. Or, to quote Stephen Stills, it’s a matter of loving the one you’re with, he said. “It is all about comforting and reassuring the cheetah,” said Janet Rose-Hinostroza, animal training supervisor at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park — the top U.S. breeder of cheetahs in captivity. In the past 40 years, 135 cheetahs have been born at the park’s breeding facility. The cheetahs most often found at zoos and wildlife parks are not considered good breeding can-didates, they don’t relate well to other cheetahs, or they are aban-doned by their mothers, Rose-Hinostroza said. But they seem to take easily to companion dogs and look to the dogs for play. Of the 19 cheetahs at Safari Park, four have dogs. Four of the zoo’s cheetahs also have dogs. The dogs, usually from animal shelters, and cheetah pups generally are introduced when they are about 3 months old. “In this relationship, the dog is dominant, but we look for dogs that want to be a buddy,” Rose-Hinostroza said. “The dog always has the cat’s back, but it’s never the other way around. Dogs worry about their cats. They pro-tect their cats.” One of the most popular draws at Safari Park is the 100-meter cheetah run where the public gets to see firsthand the speed of “nature’s perfect sprinter.” “Speed is incredibly important. It is their survival technique, in a nutshell,” Rose-Hinostroza said. “If they can’t run, they won’t sur-vive. They are not equipped to be confrontational.” A cheetah’s claws don’t retract, so they have footing that takes them from “zero to 60 in 3.4 sec-onds,” she said. “That’s faster than every single car on the market, and it only takes three steps,” Rose-Hinostroza said. Cheetahs use their tails like a rudder to balance while they are running. Their top speed is 60 to 70 mph, based on size, but they can run that fast only for 20 or 30 seconds. Extending that to a minute or more puts the animal in serious jeopardy of death. Speedy cats need companions to help them settle down. ASSOCIATED PRESSCheetah keepers Shannon Smith, left, and Kim Hanley, secon d from left, walk Shiley, a male cheetah 3 and half years old, while Larissa Combs, lead cheetah keeper, wa lks Yeti, a female Anatolian shepherd, during an animal ambassador walk through Safari Park, in Escondido, Cali f. Dogs cross species barrier to help cheetahs HAPPENINGS Jacob Sullivan of Dahlonega, Ga., and grandson of Bruce and Dolly Robinson of Lake City, recently completed the eight-week basic military training pro-gram at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. Sullivan, the son of Gary and Stefani Sullivan of Dahlonega, earned an honor graduate ribbon for finishing in the top 10 percent of his class of more than 700 trainees. He will now take a five-month technical training program in civil engineering at Sheppard Air Force Base in Wichita Fall, Texas, after which he will return to college to continue his studies in com-puter engineering and will serve in the Air Force Reserve, stationed at Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta, Ga. Local couple’s grandson completes Air Force basic Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. TASTE: Cedar River — an old standby Continued From Page 1D Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN: Decorative and edible Continued From Page 1D TRAVEL: Caribbean buoyed by rise Continued From Page 1Da cigar in one hand and a cup of coffee in another. “I come here pretty much for the history and the food as well.” Coming in second for visitor arrivals was the Dutch Caribbean, reporting a 5.6 percent increase from 2011 thanks to a surge in busi-ness from South America. The most popular islands were Curacao and Aruba, just north of Venezuela. The bulk of tourists visiting the Caribbean come from the U.S., a number that increased by more than 4 percent last year, on par with pre-reces-sion levels five years ago. Canada also remained one of the Caribbean’s largest markets, with tourists from that country increasing by nearly 6 percent in 2012. Meanwhile, the number of visitors from the United Kingdom dropped by 10 percent to 1 million last year, with tourism officials blaming weak European economies and high air-fares coupled with a con-troversial air passenger duty. Cruise ship tourism was flat across the Caribbean for the last three years. Some islands suffered more than others, with Barbados, Grenada, St. Vincent, Dominica and the British Virgin Islands seeing a double-digit percent-age drop in cruise ship pas-senger arrivals last year. A slight increase in cruise ship tourism is expected next year after Disney Cruise Lines begins departing from the Puerto Rican capital of San Juan, generating an estimated $5 million in revenue from the four departures scheduled in 2014. Those cruise ships will stop for the first time at the eastern Caribbean island of Grenada, which saw a nearly 22 percent drop in cruise ship passengers in 2012. Caribbean governments are counting on cruise ship passengers like 40-year-old Jenna Balagus of Winnipeg, Canada, who arrived for the first time in Puerto Rico on Wednesday but hopes to return for an extended stay. “Puerto Rico has a unique culture,” she said as she watched her husband play with their three sons in a shaded public plaza. “I’d like to see more of it.” ASSOCIATED PRESSThe picturesque architecture of the historic colonial secti on of San Juan is among the features that keep tourists going ba ck to the Caribbean island. High Museum opens major exhibitBy KATE BRUMBACKAssociated PressATLANTA — A major exhibition in Atlanta explores the work of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, the famed 20th cen-tury couple who shared influences ranging from Marxism to Mexican folk art but whose legacies could not be more dif-ferent — her best-known work consisting of dra-matic self-portraits, his celebrity stemming from public murals celebrating Mexican nationalism. “Frida & Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting” opened Thursday at the High Museum of Art, the only U.S. venue where it will be shown. Featuring more than 120 pieces, it is the largest exhibition ever of the husband-and-wife’s work shown together and includes about a quarter of Kahlo’s total body of work, according to the High. Rivera and Kahlo were married for nearly 25 years — a union that was both passionate and tumultuous — but their art is rarely shown together in a single exhibition because of the perceived differences in their styles, said curator Elliott King. “What our show really tries to do is bring these two artists together, to talk about their shared context, the influences that really brought them together as a couple — their shared commitment to Mexico, their shared politics, their commitment to the Marxist revolu-tion — and I think that’s a story that really hasn’t been told fully because the two artists have been seen in isolation,” he said. By the time the two married in 1929, Rivera was already established as a creative figure, per-haps best-known for more than 200 public murals that depict scenes from Mexican history.2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 3D By SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — Influencers finish up New York Fashion Week on Thursday with a taste of what’s to come next fall, their appetite whet by some tough, some tailored and many black looks. But there were flashes of bright colors and earth tones, too. There were sleek minimalist shapes and some oversized, slouchy ones. For every bouncy miniskirt there was a ladylike pencil, and broad-shouldered mil-itary coats were offset by gently molded oversized ones. What shoppers can take away from New York is the idea that the runway is a tool to present fanciful options, not to be used to dictate a specific look. “This season is going to help the person out there who is try-ing to get dressed in the morning. You can wear anything, just do it with conviction and confidence,” said Linda Wells, editor-in-chief of Allure magazine. Marc Jacobs and fellow heavy hitters Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein by Francisco Costa closed out Fashion Week. Jacobs court-ed glamorous screen sirens who wore beaded PJs by day and lame gowns by night, lit in sepia for half the show in a cavernous armory. Jacobs’ collection is never for a shrinking violet, and the models owned their 1940s looks. Lauren had a strong woman in mind with a mix of military looks and regal gowns, all with a hint of the Russian Revolution, while Costa had some razor-sharp menswear details. “The trend, really, was the strength of women,” Wells said. Largely absent this season were the bohemian and disco-era 1960s and ‘70s that seemed to have a permanent place on the runways, said Jennifer Wheeler, vice president of designer appar-el for Nordstrom. Instead, she saw those inspirations replaced with looser, some-times exaggerated, silhouettes from the ‘80s and the restrained minimalism of the ‘90s. “But these looks didn’t look dated,” she said, “because there have been so many changes in fabrics and techniques.” She particularly liked the mixed-media message that might be the next generation of Mondrian-style colorblocking: Instead of chunks of primary col-ors, a dress or coat might be patchworks of pony hair, snake skin, leather or ostrich feathers, she explained. Wheeler also noted the sophisticated palette — gray, navy, camel and moss green — all mixed with black. The dominance of black allows shoppers to make investments into “building blocks” of their closet that for fall can be worn for a long time, swapping out a shoe or bag as seasons evolve, said Lottie Oakley, who served as American Express’ fashion ambassador, watching shows to cull trends for consumers. “It’s not so passe to wear clothes from last season. It used to be that it did matter if what you were wearing was from a few years ago, but now, if it’s a state-ment piece, you can keep it going for a long time,” said Oakley. The hardest part for the serious shopper isn’t keeping things for too long, she added, it’s wait-ing for them to move into stores. “The overall topic I kept hearing about was how to buy now and wear now.” For the most part, though, customers will have to wait. Retailers, stylists and editors next take off for London, then Milan and Paris to see if this individualist streak lasts.RALPH LAURENLauren didn’t just have a muse for fall. He had a heroine. His models seemed as if they stepped out of the pages of a grip-ping Russian novel. The story? A woman who through strength finds herself and, in the final chapter, discovers love. “I was inspired by the spirit of a romantic revolutionary — a time-less heroine, independent and bold, a woman who revels in her individuality and personal style,” Lauren told The Associated Press in an email. Perhaps her story begins in a cold, seaside town, with a ward-robe that includes a cashmere cable-knit turtleneck with a flared leather miniskirt or balloon-leg pants tucked into her boots. She also has a nautical-striped sweat-er and sailor-style pants in black double-face wool. And she has heavy black wool coats with strong shoulders and fitted waists. Did the officer’s coat with the gold hardware, crest and embroidered stripes belong to her or her lover?CALVIN KLEINCosta said the collection was loosely based on the 1960s Russian film “Ivan’s Childhood,” set during World War II. It was about the coming together of masculine military looks and feminine softness. It’s a “modern uniform,” Costa said in his notes. Geometric shapes are familiar ground for Costa, but the more refined tailoring and menswear-driven fabrics are a shift for the designer who recently has exper-imented more with raw edges and looser shapes. These clothes couldn’t have been sharper. First out was a plaid coat with a trench-style collar, oversized pockets and small rectangular cutouts. Other chic outerwear options included coats with knife-pleat backs, and a plaid belted overcoat with patches of shiny black vinyl. A black tuxedo coatdress with sharp shoulders, pleated details and a double buckle was nothing you’d want to cover up.PROENZA SCHOULEROnce again Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough came up with something new and fascinat-ing. In a long shuttered, 19th-century building said to have been the first high-rise in New York City, the designers displayed a restrained color palette of white, black and subtle pastels that included mint and peach. By ELIZABETH KARMELAssociated PressOf all of the awards shows I love to watch (and I love to watch them all), the Oscars is my favorite. And it’s a great excuse to throw a party. Many of my friends do the “red carpet” thing for their own parties and ask guests to dress in their black tie best. But I prefer watching in comfy clothes and snacking on simple but satisfying nibbles. After all, it’s a very long show! This year, I am going to make popcorn the old-fashioned way — on the stovetop — and flavor the hot kernels three different ways. Everyone loves pop-corn and there is no other food that is so closely asso-ciated with movies. Even though I sometimes make microwave popcorn just like the rest of the world, when I make it from scratch, I can’t believe the difference in taste. Microwave pop-corn is a mere shadow of the original. There are basically two ways to top popcorn — wet and dry. Let’s start with wet toppings, such as melted but-ter. Melted butter is always a crowd pleaser, but you have to make that version just before serving or else it gets soggy. Plus, buttered popcorn is always best hot. Other wet toppings, such as melted chocolate, should be applied to pop-corn spread flat on a bak-ing sheet, then allowed to cool. Otherwise it becomes soggy. The advantage of dry flavor toppings is that you can make the popcorn a few hours in advance, then serve it room at temper-ature. Just make sure to add the spices while the popcorn is hot. My three favorites are truffle salt, Parmesan cheese and a sweet and spicy barbecue rub. To cook the popcorn for use with a dry topping, I use a heavy enameled cast-iron Dutch oven set over medium heat. I heat the empty pot for about 2 min-utes over low heat, then pour in the olive oil and the popcorn, increase the heat to medium and imme-diately place the lid on the pot. The heavy pot helps prevent the popcorn from burning and almost all of the kernels pop. I find that a good olive oil gives the popcorn a great flavor and that you won’t even want to add melted butter. As soon as the popcorn is popped, I pour it out of the pan into the biggest bowl I have. I toss the pop-corn with the seasoning and continue to toss so that the steam doesn’t make the popcorn soggy. When the steam dissipates, I toss it a few more times, taste to make sure that I have enough flavoring, then let it come to room temperature in the bowl. At this point you can place it in serving bowls or baskets or even individual paper bags to give your guests. And don’t forget to pair your gourmet popcorn with a flute of sparkling wine. The make the perfect high-low party combination!STOVETOP POPCORN MANY WAYS Start to finish: 10 minutes Servings: 1/2 cup corn kernels will produce about 12 cups popcornIngredients2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil (depending on the size of the pot) 1/3 to 1/2 cup popcorn kernels (depending on the size of the pot) Fine-grain sea salt or other seasoned toppingsInstructionsHeat an empty cast-iron Dutch oven over low heat for 2 minutes. Add enough olive oil to the pot to thinly coat the entire bottom. Add a single layer of popcorn kernels. You want them to be touch-ing but not more than one layer thick. Increase the heat to medium and place the lid on the pot. Wait until popping begins, then turn the heat down slightly. Shake the pot every 30 seconds or so. Start shak-ing a bit more when the popping starts to subside. When the kernels stop pop-ping in unison and you only hear one pop every couple of seconds, it is done. Pour the popcorn into a large bowl. Season gen-erously with the toppings listed below, or another one of your favorites. Toss the popcorn in the bowl and sprinkle with addition-al seasoning several times to make sure you have an even coating. Serve imme-diately or let cool.SWEET AND SPICY BARBECUE RUB Start to finish: 5 minutesMakes about 1 cupIngredients1 /4 cup paprika 2 tablespoons superfine sugar 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 2 tablespoons dried chipotle chili powder 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon cayenne1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon garlic powderInstructionsIn a small bowl, combine all ingredients. Store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.Wet popcorn toppingsBe certain to spread the popcorn flat on a baking sheet before adding wet toppings, then let it set before serving. Q Melted chocolate Q Melted chocolate and peanut butter Q Melted caramels and a pinch of saltDry popcorn toppingsQ Truffle salt Q Maple sugar and crispy bits of smoked bacon Q Mini marshmallows, chocolate chips and chopped salted peanuts Q Mini M&Ms, chopped roasted almonds and dried coconut Q Ragin’ Cajun Spice mixture Q Lemon-pepper salt Q Italian spice blend and finely grated Parmesan cheese Fall lineups: tough, tailored, lots of blackNEW YORK FASHION WEEK ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSThe latest in fall fashions by the design houses of (from l eft) Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs and Ralph Lauren were unveiled during New York Fashion Week this past week i n New York City. Designs seemed to be all over the map, without any of the strong trends or big surprises that were apparent in past years. ASSOCIATED PRESSPopcorn can be prepared many ways, such as (from top, c lockwise) with mini marshmallows, chocolate chips and salted peanuts; with melted chocolate; with sweet and spicy barbecue rub; and with finely grated parmesan cheese and truffle s alt. No new trends being pushed by big designers. FOOD Dressing up popcorn for an Oscars viewing party 3DLIFE

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Manhattan” (N) (:01) Revenge “Sacri ce” (N) (:02) Revenge for Real (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Mommie Deadest” Criminal Minds “Run” (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin Louisa is up for promotion. Masterpiece Classic Change affects many at Downton Abbey. Masterpiece Classic (Season Finale) Trip to a Scottish hunting lodge. (N) Doc Martin Louisa is up for promotion. 7-CBS 7 47 47g PGA Tour GolfAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing RaceThe Good Wife (N) The Mentalist “Red in Tooth and Claw” Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Yourjax MusicAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Showtime” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ce “Lotto” The Of ce “Trivia” 10-FOX 10 30 30Judge Joe BrownJudge Joe BrownThe SimpsonsCleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N)(:35) Bob’s BurgersFamily Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Tap-Out Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBCOff Their RockersOff Their RockersSaturday Night Live in the ’90s: Pop Culture Nation Lorne Michaels. (PA) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensCurb EnthusiasmCurb Enthusiasm OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Rihanna. Oprah’s Next Chapter Beyonc. Oprah’s Next Chapter Beyonc. Oprah’s Next Chapter Rihanna. A&E 19 118 265Shipping WarsShipping WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Love Begins” (2011) “Love’s Everlasting Courage” (2010) Cheryl Ladd, Bruce Boxleitner. “Love Comes Softly” (2003, Drama) Katherine Heigl, Dale Midkiff. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:00)“Live Free or Die Hard” (2007, Action) Bruce Willis, Justin Long.“Tron: Legacy” (2010, Science Fiction) Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde.“Tron: Legacy” (2010) Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsMozambique TNT 25 138 245(5:15)“Men in Black II” (2002) NBA Tip-Off (N) (Live) d 2013 NBA All-Star Game From the Toyota Center in Houston. (N) 2013 NBA All-Star Game NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobWendell & VinnieSee Dad Run (N)“Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” (1986, Comedy) Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck. Premiere. (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Mystique or Murder?” Bar Rescue “Weber’s of Lies” Bar Rescue “Owner Ousted” Bar Rescue “Turtle on Its Back” Bar Rescue “Rock ’N Roaches” (N) (:01) Car Lot Rescue (N) MY-TV 29 32 -(5:50) Family Affair(:25) Family AffairM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Art critic murders for collection. M*A*S*HThriller “The Guilty Men” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyAustin & AllyJessie Jessie gets her big break. Dog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) Gravity FallsGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmJessieAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“My Sister’s Keeper”“Pastor Brown” (2009, Drama) Salli Richardson-Whit eld, Nicole Ari Parker. “She Made Them Do It” (2012) Jenna Dewan Tatum, Mackenzie Phillips. (:02) “Pastor Brown” (2009) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) BET 34 124 329(5:00) Roots George saves Tom’s life. (Part 6 of 6) Roots: The Next GenerationsHusbandsHo.Second GenerationBET Takes Hollywood ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Track and Field Millrose Games. From New York. (Taped) Sport Science (N) Best of the NFLSportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College BasketballBasketballNHRA Thrills NHRA Drag Racing O’Reilly Auto Parts Winternationals. From Pomona, Calif. (N Same-day Tape) 2012 World Series of Poker SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport FishingMountainFight Sports: In 60 From Nov. 19, 2011. Along the Way DISCV 38 182 278MoonshinersMoonshiners “Hat in Hand” Gold Rush “The Night Shift” Gold Rush “Bedrock Blowout” Gold Rush “Redemption Road” Gold Rush “Bedrock Blowout” TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“Why Did I Get Married?” (2007) Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson. “Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) Tyler Perry, Sharon Leal. (DVS)“Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take Miami“The Break-Up” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer Aniston. Kourtney and Kim Take Miami (N) Chasing The SaturE! Special (N) Kourtney and Kim Take Miami TRAVEL 46 196 277Xtreme WaterparksXtreme WaterparksExtreme Waterparks Wild aquatic rides. SI Swimsuit 2013 (N) Hot Hotels Sets (N) The Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony Bourdain HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lScoring the DealScoring the DealHawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Here Comes Honey Boo BooGypsy SistersGypsy SistersGypsy Sisters (N) Here Comes Honey Boo BooGypsy Sisters HIST 49 120 269(5:00) The President’s Book of SecretsPawn StarsPawn StarsAx Men “Gators & Hand Grenades” Ax Men “Goldmine” (N) Swamp People “Swamp Invaders” (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedWild West Alaska “Bear Problems” Wild West Alaska (N) Gator Boys “Gator Smackdown” (N) Finding Bigfoot (N) Finding Bigfoot (N) FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffChopped “Make No Mistake” (N) Worst Cooks in AmericaChef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Iron Chef America “Symon vs. Brock” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Car Warriors (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 (Taped) The Best of Pride (N)d College Basketball USC at California. (N) SYFY 58 122 244(4:00)“Shutter Island” (2010)“Fast & Furious” (2009, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez.“G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. Halloween H2O AMC 60 130 254“Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight. The Walking Dead “The Suicide King” The Walking Dead “Home” (N) (:01) Talking Dead (N) The Walking Dead “Home” COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Dinner for Schmucks” (2010) Steve Carell, Paul Rudd. Jeff Dunham: Arguing With MyselfJeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersTosh.0WorkaholicsJeff Dunham: Arguing With Myself CMT 63 166 327Dukes-HazzardRon White: They Call Me Tater SaladMy Big Redneck VacationSwamp Pawn “Crawmageddon”“The Dukes of Hazzard” (2005) Johnny Knoxville, Seann William Scott. NGWILD 108 190 283America’s Wild SpacesRed Sea JawsGalapagos Sites and creatures of the islands. Galapagos NGC 109 186 276Lincoln’s Secret Killer: RevealedReal George Washington: Revealed“Killing Lincoln” (2013, Docudrama) Billy Campbell, Jesse Johnson. Premiere. “Killing Lincoln” (2013, Docudrama) Billy Campbell, Jesse Johnson. SCIENCE 110 193 284Fire y Saffron steals a valuable gun. Fire y “The Message” Fire y “Heart of Gold” Fire y “Objects in Space” Fire y 10th Anniversary: Browncoats Fire y “Heart of Gold” ID 111 192 28550 Ways to Leave Your LoverTrue Crime With Aphrodite Jones48 Hours on ID “Ransom” (N) Catch My Killer “Double Dip Homicide” On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) 48 Hours on ID “Ransom” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“The Lucky One” (2012) (6:50)“The Five-Year Engagement” (2012) Jason Segel. ‘R’ Girls “Boys” (N) Enlightened (N) Girls “Boys” EnlightenedGirls “Boys” (:35) Enlightened MAX 320 310 515(5:10)“The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004) Vin Diesel.“Apollo 13” (1995) Tom Hanks. Based on the true story of the ill-fated 1970 moon mission.“I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:45)“The Rock” (1996) ‘R’ Shameless “The Helpful Gallaghers” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “The Sins of My Caretaker” House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “The Sins of My Caretaker” MONDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 18, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor The hometowns of the nal four women. (N) (:01) Castle “Target” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! 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DEAR ABBY: I recently married a loving man who works full-time and is studying for his MBA online. A few months ago, he received a promotion and was transferred to another state, so after our wedding I moved here to be with him. While he was living here alone before our wedding, he got into some trouble with the law and he’s now on probation. He was never in trouble before. I have no family or friends here, and he can’t go out and socialize to meet new people now that he’s under those strict guidelines. I have always been popular and have many friends back home, but I’m lonely and depressed now. I moved here because I love him, but I can’t get over the fact that this has dampened our first year as husband and wife. How should I handle the future of our marriage and our life here with all these unsettling issues he has put me in? -HURT WIFE IN MICHIGAN DEAR HURT WIFE: Unless your husband is under house arrest -which probation is not -he can socialize. He can make friends through work, and look for volunteer opportunities if he has the time. Both will help him to make connections with construc-tive people. The same is true for you to help you connect with the commu-nity. I know this is a big adjustment for you, but in time you can both put this unfortunate chapter behind you. I wish you both a future filled with success. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: Help! My husband won’t wear clothes. When our children were young, he walked around naked because he wanted to make sure they didn’t have the same hang-ups about nudity that he grew up with. (His father was ultra-conservative and uptight.) My husband began wearing clothes again when the kids got older, but now they have all moved out and he has quit. He sits naked in his reclin-er to watch TV. The reclin-er is right next to the front door, and there’s only the storm door between him and the world. Abby, he lit-erally strips all his clothes off to do the dishes! We live in a NEIGHBORHOOD. It’s not like we’re out in the country. If I say anything to him, he says I can go into a different room if I don’t like it. Is this nor-mal? -NUDIE’S WIFE IN FLORIDA DEAR NUDIE’S WIFE: It appears to be normal for your husband. Some -not all -families are very relaxed about nudity. As long as your living room isn’t visible to the neigh-bors and you don’t have drop-in visitors, your hus-band is harming no one. If you don’t want to look at him, take him up on his suggestion. P.S. I hope you thank him for doing the dishes. Not all husbands are so helpful. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take the high road when faced with adver-sity. Offering information and being helpful will be your ticket to success. An interesting partnership will help you out mentally, emotionally and financially. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Get involved in some-thing that you feel passion-ate about. Take a leader-ship position and prepare to face any challenge or opposition you meet head-on. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Do your own thing and back away from any-one who is trying to con-trol you. A lack of respect and trust is apparent. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take hold of whatever situation you face. Voice your opinion and refer to past experiences to make your point. Don’t let a cre-ative opportunity pass you by because you are lacking in motivation. Once you begin, you will be glad you did. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s fine to have plenty of ideas, but if you don’t fol-low through with at least some of them, the time spent mulling over them will be a waste. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t take someone else’s word. Investigate what’s being said and find out firsthand how you can deal with any changes that might influence your life. Staying on top of what’s happening will make a dif-ference. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Socialize, attend a conference or communi-cate from the heart with someone you love. A little time spent updating your look or boosting your confidence will help you present what you want and who you are with pizzazz and passion. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Size up your situation as well as anyone influenc-ing your life. Wager the consequence of making a personal change. The outcome may be costly if you don’t go about doing things in accordance with the standards you usually live by. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Put love, pam-pering and having fun first. You deserve a break and should follow your heart when it comes to love and romance. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t jump just because someone puts demands on you. Separate your emotions from what you know you must do and proceed without hesitation. Practical application will help you cut your losses and allow you to make improvements. Don’t back down. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Listen, but don’t make decisions based on what someone tells you. Emotional ups and downs can be expected, causing you to appear inconsistent or out of control. Keep your feelings a secret and observe what’s going on around you with caution. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t go overboard and you will get your way. Look over contracts or your personal papers and you will find a way to save money. A chance to use your talent must be displayed. Someone will recognize what you have to offer. ++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Wallop6 Gray piece10 Cricket club13 Fair-minded)XQHUDO%OXHV writer 3LW\LVIRUWKH OLYLQJBBBLVIRUWKHGHDG7ZDLQ .DSODQRI:HOFRPH %DFN.RWWHU ,QIRIURPD GHEULHILQJ 6RPHZKDWUHGXQGDQW 1965 country song? 26 Journalist Couric27 ___ Lang, 6XSHUER\VORYH 28 1951 Cooperstown inductee ,QFUHDVHVZLWKXS6RPHZKDWUHGXQGDQW 0LOWRQ%UDGOH\game? 6KRZIHDWXULQJWKH /93' 2NWREHUIHVW collectibles 39 Cotillion attendee3RZHULQVFLIL.QHHOHUVRIIHULQJ43 Ambient musician %ULDQ 2UJWKDWILQHV polluters &KLFNHQEUHGIRULWV meat 6RPHZKDWUHGXQGDQW size? 5RRISURMHFWLRQ55 Constitutional%HGWLPHSUH\HU"1LFN1HZVKRVW Linda 6RQJIHDWXUHGLQ $QLPDO+RXVH %DNHU\DUUD\62 Reacted to a bad call 0U%LOODSSHDUHGRQ LW$EEU 6RPHZKDWUHGXQGDQW 1960s spy series? 6RXQGRIKHDUWEUHDN3LFNVXS73 Cartoon beagle+LWWKHURRI78 Like some passages LQDV\PSKRQ\ (OWRQ-RKQ nickname 'HOLDSSOLDQFH21HLOOVBBB &KULVWLH 6RPHZKDWUHGXQGDQW literary genre? 88 Scrammed%ULHIODXJK92 Flamboyant stole0DFKLDYHOOLDQ concerns -RKQRI6DOLVEXU\3LQNODG\LQJUHGLHQW7KHWKLQJV,SXWXS ZLWK %XII6RPHZKDW UHGXQGDQWWKHDWHUproduction? *OLQGDVFUHDWRU&ORFNIDFHQXPEHU5HSRMXVWLILFDWLRQ&RUHSKLORVRSK\112 Extremely redundant 1963FDSHUILOP" 7DGD3DWURQVDLQWRI sailors 120 Cut and collectFKDUDFWHUVHW122 Job title abbr.&RRSHU8QLRQV ORFDWLRQEULHIO\ +DXWHFXLVLQHLWV not &KHZVRXW 'RZQ 1RWORRNSHUN\VD\2 Visibility reducer3 Skull session result4 Comb row5 Ancient Roman DXWKRU4XLQWXVBBB ,QDFFRUGDQFHZLWK*RDOLHVMHUVH\ QXPEHURIWHQ $:DXJK+XPDQVSHHFK mimickers 6KHDULQJVKHGVRXQG11 Swallow, as costs12 Clearly low on patience 3HWHU3DQULYDO1RWDVFRQWHQW3HUFXVVLYHGDQFH troupe 0XVLFLDQVUDWH :LOO*HHUVUROHRQ 7KH:DOWRQV 21 Minus5HILQHG$QLPDOZKRVHKHDG GRHVQWPDNHDsound? &RPPRQFKHFNER[ on surveys 079VHDUOLHVW viewers, mostly 3ODVWLFVKLHOGV DQGVXFK (TXDO3UHIL[7DQJ\VDODGOHDYHV36 Amendment guaranteeing aspeedy trial 3DUWRIWKHIURQW matter 0RVDLFLVWVVXSSO\6RXWK'DNRWD$LU Force base 1RWRQGHFNPD\EH5'VLWHV8QFKDQJLQJ:DONZKLOHGL]]\:LPEOHGRQFKDPS Gibson 6KDNHVXS52 Very impressed53 Crystal Cave is one58 Common middle name ('D\GHEXWV61 Emergency&DSWDLQZKRVD\V :HOOJHQWOHPHQbetween ourselvesDQGKRPHDUHVHDPLOHV 65 Fill up on 3HUIXPHVDPSOLQJ spot 67 Roman calendar day68 Overused69 One way to go to a party :KDWDFDODPLW\71 Inclination%LJ(DVWVFK3URXVWVOD 5HFKHUFKHGX7HPSVBBB 77 Sweet meet? 1DELVFRWUHDWVVROG only seasonally +LGGHQ$WKHQVVKRPHV79VWDU 'XQFDQ 'RDVH[SHFWHG87 Old World deer%RG\EORZUHDFWLRQ90 World capital VLWXDWHGLQZKDWwas once ancient7KUDFH +RZEDGQHZVLV RIWHQUHFHLYHG 96 Attests0XVLFIRUWKH 5R\DO)LUHZRUNVcomposer 2SHQFRQIOLFW100 End note?1LFNQDPHRIMD]]V (DUO+LQHV 102 Joins&KHQH\VIROORZHU6ORZRQWKHXSWDNH BBB%RG\"ILUVW /RUG3HWHU:LPVH\QRYHO 0DULQHWKUHDW111 Skinny6DWLVILHG%UHDNLQJ%DG network 115 Great Leap Forward overseer %ODFN%HUU\EX\117 Slam 1R 5(/($6('$7( ,+($5'<287+(),5677,0(%\3DWULFN%HUU\(GLWHG E\:LOO6KRUW] )RUDQ\WKUHHDQVZHUVFDOOIURPDWRXFKWRQHSKRQHHDFKPLQXWHRUZLWKDFUHGLWFDUG814-5554. 1234567891011121314151617 18192021 22232425 26 272829 3031323334 35363738 3940 414243444546474849505152535455 56575859 60 6162 63 64656667 68 69707172 73 74757677 7879 8081 82 8384858687 888990919293 949596979899 100101102103104 105 106107108 109110111 112113114115116 117 118 119120121 122123124125 Marriage starts on wrong foot after man steps out of line TARTSSALABARTABS SOLEILPERILOVERVIEW PUMPERNICKELAERIALLY APOORUPRIVERDUBDEE RENTGREENYESONDUCT TEDEMITTWAINTENTH ASSASSINREALMREG CPUPOLYPEBERSOL SKEINNODEORALSRBI SPADEDALEXLORICOLAELFISHITOHIPTRUMAN TAFTEAVEVOTEZAPATA ASEMINERENIDKRONE THECITYGREEKREL KATBEERYSPIRACLE OLLIEREIMSRULEHOD BEANMENSASELIGDAWG AMTLABTREADLEMAORI MUSSESUPKINDERGARTEN ARCHDUKEORTONTILING SHEAREDNEATENACT Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 5D

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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 6DLIFE WK $QQXDO )HE 5RGHKHDYHU%R\V5DQFK 3DODWND)ORULGD FEBRUARY 21, 22 & 23, 2013A FAMILY FESTIVALSound by BLUE RIDGE SOUND MUSIC RAIN OR SHINE!COVERED PAVILION PROVIDEDSecurity Guards On Duty NO Alcoholic Beverages, Smoking or Pets Allowed in Concert Area – Stricly Enforced – WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ADMISSION TO ANYONE9th ANNU AL!CONCESSIONS & HOT FOODCamper Hook-ups (Water & Electric)rn (386) 328-1281NO VIDEO OR AUDIO RECORDINGSHERRY BOYD, M.C.GOLDWING EXPRESS(Friday, 22nd)“It is better to build boys than to mend men”380 BOYS’ RANCH ROADPALATKA, FLORIDA 32177For tickets, complete details and free mailing list, contact:Adams and Anderson, LLC P.O. Box 98 Dahlonega, GA 30533 Phone: (706) 864-7203 www.adamsandandersonbluegrass.com DAILEY & VINCENT“2008–2010 IBMA Entertainer of the Year”(Thursday 21st) (Thursday, 21st) (Thursday, 21st) (Thursday, 21st)(Thursday, 21st)TONY HOLT & THE WILDWOOD VALLEY BOYS SHOWTIMES: (Ticket Prices Do Not Include Camping)GATE ADVANCE GENERAL ADMISSION THURSDAY, 12 Noon – 10 p.m. (Open stage at 11 a.m.) .........................$30.00 .................FRIDAY, 12 Noon – 10 p.m. (Open stage at 11 a.m.)...............................$30.00 .................SATURDAY, 12 Noon – 10 p.m. (Open stage at 11 a.m.) .........................$30.00 .................3-Day Advance (Weekend Ticket Special)* ............................................. $75.00 .................Children Ages 6-13, $15.00 per day, 3 days ...........................................$40.00 ................. $35.00$35.00$35.00$85.00$45.00 Children Under 6..............................................................................................................FREE with Parentrrnnnnrnr Tickets not mailed: processing fee on credit cards: ($3.00 per 3-day ticket, $2.00 per 1-day ticket) rQuality Inn & Suites (386) 328-3481 Crystal Cove Resort (386) 325-1055 Sleep Inn & Suites (386) 325-8889Ask for Special Bluegrass Rates AT ALL MOTELSPLEASE BRING LAWN CHAIRS.r nr****THE JAMES KING BAND “ Queen of Bluegrass”RHONDA VINCENT & THE RAGENOTHIN’ FANCY THE MARKSMENSPBGMA 7 Time Bluegrass Gospel Group of the Year CGMG4 Time Country Gospel Quartet of the YearTHE BLUEGRASS BROTHERS“2010 Country Legend of the Year” GENE WATSON(Saturday, 23rd)& The Farewell Party BandTHE GRASCALS“IBMA Entertainer of the Year 2006-2007”(Thursday, 21st) (Friday, 22nd) (Friday, 22nd) (Friday, 22nd) (Friday, 22nd) THE CROW E BROTHERSTHE GIBSON BROTHERS THE SELDOM SCENE(Friday & Saturday 22nd & 23rd)DRY BRANCH FIRE SQUAD ALECIA NUGENT THE MORON BROTHERS IBMA-Vocal Group of the Year-2011THE LITTLE ROY & LIZZY SHOW (Saturday, 23rd) (Saturday, 23rd) (Saturday, 23rd) (Saturday, 23rd) TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE GATE DURING FESTIVAL ,76 %/8(*5$66 )(67,9 $/7,0( TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE GATE