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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02022

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02022

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The Florida Department of Education recommends school districts replace their buses every 10 years. Some in Columbia Countys aging fleet have been in service more than twice that long. School board member Keith Hudson said the school district hasnt bought new buses in three years. Im real ly disap pointed, Hudson said at Tuesdays school board meeting in Fort White. I dont think were doing the right thing. Carol Alford, the school districts director of transpor tation, said Wednesday that By DEREK GILLIAM dgillliam@lakecityreporter.com E very year the Olustee Battle Festival draws thousands, giving Lake City the chance to showcase the downtown area. It takes an army of more than 100 volunteers from The Blue-Grey Army to plan for the marching spectators that descend from all over, and every year the citys public works department enlists to make the plans become a reality. Thomas Henry, director of Lake Citys public works department, said city employ ees start preparing the downtown area more than a week before the festival from making sure the vendors have electricity and water to building an entire village at the battle site. Everthing and anything. Thats the best way to say it, Henry said. ... The first three weeks of February we are committed to the Blue-Grey Army. Joey Raulerson, assistant director of Lake Citys public works department, will work an additional 40 hours in 3 days spotting poten tial problems before they occur. While he will not make overtime (hes salaried), working the big festivals is something he enjoys. I look forward to the Fourth of July and Olustee, Raulerson said. They are a chal lenges and I like challenges. Raulerson works with the Blue-Grey Army in committees, and has been planning and preparing the Olustee Battle Festival for more than 20 years. He said he has it down to an art. It takes a lot of planning, but its easy for me because Ive done it so many times, Raulerson said. He said the key is organization. For exam ple, the parade starts at 10:30 on Saturday. There are certain things that must be done well before Saturday so the parade can begin. Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Giffords, Kelly stay committed. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 63 40 Chance of showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75 LAKECITYREPORTER COM CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 272 Battle Festival & Re-enactment 2013 Special Section In Todays Paper Festival Starts Friday Details Inside 1 ITS SCIENTIFIC GOP chides Obama for hostility By ERICA WERNER Associated Press WASHINGTON Republicans said Wednesday that President Barack Obamas State of the Union address was full of well-worn liberal ideas and campaign-style hostility, and did little to ease partisan ten sions over major issues. An opportunity to bring together the country instead became another retread of lip service and liberalism, said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. He said Obama offered little more than gimmicks and tax hikes in a pedestrian liberal boilerplate that any Democratic lawmaker could have given at any time in recent history. Obama used the prime-time speech Tuesday to call for action on a broad agenda that included the economy, guns, immigration, taxes and climate change. He offered new initiatives on preschool programs, voting, manufacturing and research and development. He said he wanted to raise the minimum wage and lower energy use. It is our unfinished task to make sure that this government works on behalf of the many and not just the few, the presi dent said. During a visit Wednesday to Asheville, N.C., Obama promoted his ideas on cre ating jobs and closing the income gap between the wealthiest and middle-income Americans. The president used a retrofit ted former Volvo plant to make a case for JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Zach Windley (right), 13, an eighth-grader from Bradford Middle School, explains his project to judge Steve Sedwick Tuesday at the Suwannee Valley Regional Science and Engineering Fair 2013, hosted by Florida Gateway College. About 90 middleand high-school students from Columbia, Bradford, Hamilton, Union, Madison and Baker counties participated in the event. See photos of overall winners, Page 5A. State of the Union speech did little to quell partisan rancor in Congress. GOP continued on 5A PANEL continued on 5A BUSES continued on 5A Hudson Lots of Olustee prep ahead for city JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Two participants race to find their places in last years Olustee parade in Lake City. City workers are instrumental in preparing the downtown area for the various events associated with the Olustee Battle Festival, including the parade. OLUSTEE continued on 5A School bus fleet getting up in years Some of districts vehicles are more than 25 years old. Elections bill getting bipartisan support By BRANDON LARRABEE THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE A pro posal designed to expand early voting days and limit the length of ballots unanimously passed a House subcommittee Wednesday, but Democrats warned the measure would need to change to continue to attract bipartisan support. Still, the across-the-aisle support marked a striking departure from the venomous debate two years ago over leg islation that restricted voting, and showed how the debate has shifted since an Election Day that featured long lines, late results and more late-night jokes at Floridas expense. The measure (PCB EES 1301) would allow supervisors to increase the number of earlyvoting days to 14, though they could remain at the current standard of eight. It would also limit some ballot summaries

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TUCSON, Ariz. F ormer U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, Mark Kelly, talk about their continued push for gun regulation in the upcoming issue of Vogue magazine. The couple has formed a political action committee in hopes of pre-venting gun violence and changing laws to require compulsory back-ground checks for gun buyers. The PAC will also work to limit the size of ammo magazines and to ban the sale of assault weapons to civilians. Kelly said “now is the time” to do something in the wake of recent mass shootings in Colorado and Connecticut. Giffords and Kelly were interviewed at their Tucson home for the article, which appears in the March issue of Vogue that will be available on newsstands on Tuesday. Giffords, 42, is shown lounging on a couch, dressed casually in a turtle-neck sweater and holding hands with her husband. Giffords was among 13 people wounded in a January 2011 shooting rampage as she met with constitu-ents outside a Tucson supermarket. Six people were killed. She resigned from Congress last year. Kelly, a former astronaut, has been by her side during her recov-ery. They both attended Tuesday’s State of the Union Address in which President Barack Obama called for stricter gun laws.Dave Clark Five bassist Huxley dies at 72 LONDON — Bass player Rick Huxley, one of the founding mem-bers of the Dave Clark Five, has died. He was 72. Clark announced Huxley’s death Tuesday, saying the news was “devastating.” Huxley played on the band’s signature hits from the era when they brief-ly rivaled the Beatles in popularity. They were part of the British invasion that included the Rolling Stones, The Kinks and other bands. Their best-known songs included “Bits and Pieces” and “Glad All Over.” They enjoyed a large following in the United States after appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, the Sunday night televi-sion show that also introduced the Beatles to American audiences. The band faded after several years when harder-edged bands such as Cream, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Doors rose to popularity. The Dave Clark Five broke up in 1970 after 12 years together. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2008.Magistrate reduces bond for reality TV actress SUMMERSVILLE, W.Va. — A Nicholas County magistrate has cut reality show “Buckwild” cast member Salwa Amin’s bond in half. The 24-year-old Amin had been held on $200,000 bond at the Central Regional Jail since her arrest late Sunday night. She’s charged with two counts of possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance. Her lawyer, Michael Callaghan, says Amin’s bond was reduced Wednesday to $100,000 cash. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q TV personality Hugh Downs is 92. Q Actress-singer Florence Henderson is 79. Q Actor Andrew Prine is 77. Q Country singer Razzy Bailey is 74. Q New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is 71. Q Jazz musician Maceo Parker is 70. Q Movie director Alan Parker is 69. Q Journalist Carl Bernstein is 69. Q Former Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., is 66. Q TV personality Pat O’Brien is 65. Q Magician Teller (Penn and Teller) is 65. Q Cajun singer-musician Michael Doucet (Beausoleil) is 62. Q Actor Ken Wahl is 56. Q Opera singer Renee Fleming is 54. Q Actress Meg Tilly is 53. Q Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Kelly is 53. AROUND FLORIDA City to stop ‘bum hunting’ SARASOTA — A judge ruled Wednesday that the city of Sarasota can’t stop homeless people from holding up signs or solicit-ing for money because it would violate their First Amendment rights. Judge Fredrick Defuria signed the temporary injunction and the city has agreed to abide by the order, which stops officials and police from targeting the city’s homeless popula-tion. The judge said that the police cannot “inter-fere with the exercise of First Amendment Rights,” which includes people holding signs on public sidewalks and soliciting assistance. The American Civil Liberties Union recently brought a legal challenge on behalf of two homeless men, saying authorities were trying to harass the homeless into leaving the city. The ACLU uncov-ered a recent surveillance video showing an officer throwing a homeless man against a metal grate. They also allege that officers sent messages to each other on the police depart-ment’s communication system referring to “bum hunting.” According to Michael Barfield, who is the chair of the legal panel of the Sarasota ACLU chapter, the lawsuit was filed after police arrested two home-less men who were on public property asking for money. One of the men displayed a sign that said, “Homeless. Any work is a blessing.”Man pleads guilty in fraud case TAMPA — A man accused of embezzling millions from his wife’s employer has pleaded guilty to one count of mail fraud in Tampa federal court. Guy faces a maximum sentence of five years after agreeing Tuesday to a plea deal. The Tampa Tribune reports 41-year-old Kevin Guy encouraged his wife to forge signature of her supervisors at HSBC Finance Corp. Michelle Guy then ordered $2.2 million in gift cards and checks between 2007 and 2011. Authorities say Michelle Guy worked in various “administrative and service positions” for HSBC. The company offered incen-tives for employees, includ-ing “HSBC cash,” vouch-ers, gift cards and checks. She’s expected to enter a plea deal soon. According to documents, the couple went on shopping sprees, put down a down payment on a Mercedes-Benz and reno-vated their home.Pilot killed in plane crash NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla. — The pilot of a small plane is dead after a cen-tral Florida crash. The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office reports that the twin-engine Cessna 337 took off Wednesday from the New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport and went down moments later near the city’s sports complex. The plane broke apart on impact, killing the pilot. There were no other injuries.State parks app now available TALLAHASSEE — Planning the perfect outdoor trip in Florida? A free Florida State Park app can help you find a nearby camp site as it tracks your trails and sends you weath-er alerts. The Florida Park Service announced Wednesday a partner-ship with ParksByNature Network and PocketRanger.com to provide the free smart-phone app. An interactive guide offers visitors a list of ame-nities, facility maps, direc-tions, a calendar of events and a built-in compass. Users can plan their trip using their GPS location to find parking and nearby locations for hiking, camp-ing, boating, birding and more. You can also track and record trails, mark waypoints and find your friends. On Monday, visitors to most state parks can show the app downloaded on their phone to get in for free.Hotel takes down offensive portrait MIAMI BEACH — A luxury Miami Beach hotel has taken down a piece of art inspired by the image of Ernesto “Che” Guevara after it upset some in the Cuban exile community. The work by British artist Gavin Turk was taken down from the W South Beach on Tuesday. It fea-tured Turk’s own face but with the scraggly beard, beret and revolutionary garb worn by Guevara in a now iconic 1960 photo-graph by Alberto Korda. According to El Nuevo Herald, the hotel began receiving telephone calls and messages through social media from Cuban-Americans expressing their frustration. Many exiles despise Guevara for his role in bringing com-munism to Cuba. Giffords, Kelly continue campaign Wednesday: Afternoon: 7-8-4 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 1-6-9-5 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 8-10-14-19-21 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242AWEATHER Daily Scripture “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” — John 3:16 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter Q Associated PressASSOCIATED PRESSFormer Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly watch President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address on C apitol Hill on Tuesday. Q Associated Press Huxley Amin

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I woke one morning with a thought to contact a local man, said to have been the biggest racist in town. After struggling with the internal dilemma I decided to meet with him and found him to be quite interesting. He shared with me many opinions, some I concurred with and some I did not. I found one opinion he held about affirmative action rather concerning. I recalled thinking to myself, maybe people were right about this man. My mind would not allow that without probing the origin of his opinion. Conversing further, I found his opinion rooted in personal experience, not hatred. Prior to leav-ing the meeting, I shared with him the perception some held of him, and my opinion that their percep-tions might well have been the product of his communication skills. I asked him to consider that some audiences required explanation far beyond his understanding to remove ambiguous motives in his dialogue. The entire conversation left me baffled that many people use the term “racist” to describe the individual opinions held by others rather than beliefs or issues one has against an entire race. Moreover, and even worse, is the self-fulfilling prophecy humans face. We say it enough times and it will become true. Merriam-Webster defines a racist as one who believes that race is the primary determinant of human traits and capacities and that racial differ-ences produce an inherent superiority of a particular race. What’s the old say-ing, the stupid question is the one one you don’t ask. Maybe we should probe just a little more to understand the origin of the words and actions of people prior to giving them the power of being a racist, when in fact they simply possess an opinion about an individual, who happens to be of a particu-lar race. Just something to think about.LOCAL WISDOMFrancine Robinson-HarrisBorn nearly one century ago, Mrs. Robinson-Harris was married 52 years to her first husband Frank Robinson prior to becom-ing a widow. The couple had five children, two girls and three boys, who pro-duced 14 living grandchil-dren and a few great-grand-children. She grew up in Watertown and graduated from Richardson High School. Her first job was working at Sowell Jewelry Store, followed by the Lovely Shop, Director at Richardson Daycare, the Bridal Shop and Penny’s. After 10 years as a widow, Mrs. Robinson-Harris recalls the many prayers sent up asking God for a good man to share life with, as her companion. After 10 years as a widow, and at the age of 85, she married Samuel Harris and the cou-ple enjoyed the remainder of his life together full of love, joy and the warmth of happiness. Mrs. Robinson-Harris smiles as she shares that she never imagined being so blessed to marry a man like Samuel. She says she prayed long and hard with great specificity and became Mrs. Samuel Harris, proving to her that God answers the specif-ic prayers. I asked Mrs. Robinson-Harris what was the most significant event to occur in her life-time, being almost a cen-tury in this world. Her response was, “becoming a Christian.” She recalled the responsibility she had beginning at age 15, of teaching Sunday school lessons from a blackboard draw-ing. She would arrive early, draw the picture and allow the creativity of the children to lead the lesson’s discussion. Mrs. Robinson-Harris said the advice she would give to young people was to keep hope alive by having a relationship with God. We are proud to have the wisdom of Mrs. Francine Robinson-Harris in the community. TEST YOUR HISTORY KNOWLEDGELocal History1870–The United States Census for Lake City recorded three citizens that were born in Africa. Those citizens were Lucy Adams, born about 1780, Rebecca Godwin, born about 1765 and Mary Jackson, born about 1795. National History Mary Jane McLeod (Bethune) was born on July 10, 1875 in Mayesville, South Carolina on a rice farm. Her parents were both former slaves and she was the 15th of 17 children. At the age of 11, Mary began attending a school for African American children run by the Presbyterian Church. Mary was an excellent student and worked very hard at mas-tering her studies. Mary attended Scotia Seminary in North Carolina and the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago where she was the only African American in attendance. She graduated in 1895. In 1898, she married Albertus Bethune and they moved to Savannah, Georgia. Their first son, Albert was born in 1899. She founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Girls in Daytona Beach to help provide these opportuni-ties. She was an instructor and the headmaster of this school for more than 19 years. The school merged with the Cookman Institute in 1923 becoming Bethune-Cookman College. Mary was the president of the college until 1942. She also founded the National Council for Negro Women in 1935 and directed the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration until 1944. She was the first African American woman to become the head of a fed-eral agency. Mary was appointed a special assistant to the Secretary of War during World War II to help in the selection of candidates for the Women’s Army Corps. She also served as a special advisor on minority affairs to President Roosevelt. Mary worked closely with both President and Mrs. Roosevelt and was a trust-ed advisor. In 1945, she assisted Eleanor Roosevelt as a special consultant on interracial affairs at the San Francisco Conference of the United Nations. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 3A3A AUTOLOAN MillionDollar ! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2APPLY NOW!Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS$1 MILLION IN 2013 MOVEyour Auto Loan (from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanWe’ll save you at least We’ll pay youOR 1 1... and we’re starting withYOU! 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $12,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Bea Coker Historically Speaking Racist, or just opinionated? BLACK HISTORY MONTH COURTESYFrancine Robinson-Harris.

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OPINION Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A NAACP official resigns leadership post Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman The guilty plea by the former head of the Republican Party of Florida has saved some of the state’s political elite the embarrassment of a trial. But the tale of Jim Greer’s rise and fall — and his ability to hide his crimes from many party insiders and donors — is a powerful argument for the need for campaign finance reform in Tallahassee. Political parties should be just as open and held just as much to account as candidates and committees for the dol-lars they collect and spend. Greer’s guilty plea to theft and money laundering charges ends a sordid story that engulfed elected officials from former Gov. Charlie Crist, who put Greer in charge of the state GOP, to U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, whose cavalier use of a party credit card during his time as Florida House speaker also came to light. Greer’s guilty plea limits the fallout, particularly since no current statewide offi-cial has been tied to this mess. Many Republicans have argued that Greer was a self-interested rogue operator caught stealing cash from the state party through a separate consulting business. But the broader truth is that Greer was a creature of Tallahassee’s corrupt pay-to-play culture. He facilitated the collection of millions of dollars in con-tributions to the Republican Party and then spent the money in a manner that allowed him and a small cadre of others — many of them elected officials — to live large under the guise of party business. The only difference, perhaps, was the magnitude. After all, for years before Greer arrived, elected party officials had free use of party credit cards that some abused. All this subterfuge is facilitated by a state campaign finance law whose disclosure requirements are of little use. Political parties only have to dis-close their contributions and expenditures once every three months, or slightly more frequently around elections. What if grass roots activists, donors and lesser officials could regularly assess how the party apparatus is spending the millions it collects? Would it not make leaders of all political parties more accountable? So far, the Florida House and Senate discussions about increasing campaign finance reporting requirements to once a month, and much more frequently around elections, would apply only to candidates, political committees and electioneer-ing communication organizations — excluding the most powerful political organizations in the state capital. House Speaker Will Weatherford and Senate President Don Gaetz should reassess that plan. Political parties can collect unlimited donations and spend them far more freely — dwarfing the power of any single candidate or committee. Greer now awaits sentencing, but it’s only a matter of time, with millions of special interest dollars flowing through Tallahassee, before someone else gets greedy. More openness remains one of the best safeguards. Lessons from Greer’s guilty pleaA third nuke test by North Korea ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comI deology and personal tastes often can speak louder in politics than evidence or logic, and, yes, that’s as true for one side as it is for another. But it has been especially pronounced among leftists in recent years, as many found little that George W. Bush did as president that they did not abhor even as they can find little in Barack Obama they do not very nearly worship. There have been pronounced exceptions, but the left has mainly defended even the most obvious transgressions, such as lassitude on our imperiling debt. And even when Obama was doing something comparable to what they used to denounce as Hitlerian in Bush, the comments about similar Obama acts have mainly been by way of making excuses. That may be changing some now in the wake of a leaked administra-tion paper on drones, but let’s recall how the left reacted to the Patriot Act under Bush. It was the end of the Constitution, that’s what, only somehow, when it was extended with Obama’s approving signature, it was a yawn at worst. Let’s next consider rendition, the practice of imprisoning captured terrorists in other countries where all kinds of nasty things might happen to them. When the Bush administration trod in that territory, liberals were aghast. Obama has also done it, and many liberals have managed to look the other way. Now we come to the use of unmanned, remote-controlled drones to kill enemies in foreign lands. The Bush administration employed the weaponry, but its use has been greatly increased by the Obama administration. Sometimes civilians are killed, including chil-dren, and critics contend we there-by fuel anti-U.S. hatred that further jeopardizes our security. Obama, who has involved himself personally in attacks, according to a New York Times account citing witnesses, has also used drones to kill U.S. citizens who have been convicted of no crime. All of this has been known for some time with few loudly voiced complaints. Lately, though, the press got hold of a White House paper showing that the administra-tion was quite possibly far more lax in its criteria for killing than had been assumed, meaning that there were increased chances of snuffing out the lives of innocent people pos-ing no threat to us. A number of previously quiet liberals have come to life over this issue, as they should. For that mat-ter, it was proper to ask hard ques-tions about Bush’s interrogation techniques; few would agree that anything goes, even on a battlefield in the midst of combat. At the same time, we need to remember there is no way to con-duct war without horror and we are involved in a terrible, asymmetric conflict of a kind we have not faced before. Safeguarding our nation demands new ways of thinking, such as recognizing that the most fearsome combatants often operate in civilian settings. There is meanwhile an old way of thinking we should cling to. We should understand that our democ-racy is ill served by blatantly hypo-critical judgments bowing to politi-cal predispositions while ignoring the obvious. 4AOPINIONI f there was any hope that new leadership in Pyongyang pre-saged an end to North Korea’s indifference to the welfare of its people and world opinion, it ended with a seismic thud Tuesday, when that nation conducted its third underground nuclear test. The test was the first under new ruler Kim Jong Un, who, despite a smattering of Western education, seems more and more in the bel-ligerent and hermetic mold of his father and grandfather, the Kim family being the only rulers North Korea has ever known. President Barack Obama said the test would only increase North Korea’s isolation and impoverish-ment. The U.N. Security Council convened an emergency session to denounce the test as “a clear threat to international peace and security” and made a vague pledge of further action against the regime. If Kim’s regime has one weakness, it’s that it can’t stand to be ignored. Late last year, perhaps thinking the United States was far too preoccupied with the Mideast and North Africa, it made a series of direct threats to “target” the U.S. That might have been alarming if North Korea had been remotely capable of carrying them out. But it would be a mistake to underestimate the country’s deter-mination to have a credible nuclear threat. At one time, North Korea could blackmail the developed nations to provide food and fuel in return for promises -ultimately empty -that it would mothball its nuclear-weap-ons program. China is Pyongyang’s closest ally, or at least the nation least hostile to it. Here again, North Korea’s poverty is one of its best defenses. Beijing fears -correctly, no doubt -that any turmoil, like regime change, would send hundreds of thousands of desperate refugees flooding across the Chinese border. China specifically warned North Korea not to conduct the test. China’s state-run Global Times newspaper said North Korea must “pay a heavy price” if it did. China should proceed quickly and deci-sively to exact that price. Q Scripps Howard News Service. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Ms. Linda Thomas, PresidentColumbia County NAACP BranchLake City, Florida 32055Dear President Thomas:After much reflections and prayer I have concluded that I cannot be active in the branch as an officer. The Columbia County Branch is a part of the Florida State Conference of Branches and a part of the National Association. The recent action taken against Mrs. Presley by the state conference and national office was unfair, unjust and cruel. Any fair person would realize the heavy handiness of taking her down as president of the branch and revoking her Lifetime member-ship without the benefit of defense is inhumane and unbecoming of a CIVIL RIGHTS ORGANIZATION. I have been upset and angry since I found out about the punitive action against the Presleys. Now my angry has turn into outrage therefore the Godly thing to do is to resign from the Executive Board of Columbia NAACP Branch. I do so with a determination to fight for Mrs. Presley’s restoration and to expose the evil plot to harm the Presleys. I can no longer be associ-ated with a State Conference that treats a warrior’s family like trai-tors. I do plan on returning to my community activism but as an inde-pendent agent or with another civil rights organization. May God Smile On You And All That You DO!! Sincerely,Glenel BowdenLake City Drones and hypocrisy Q Jay Ambrose, formerly Washington director of editorial pol-icy for Scripps Howard newspapers and the editor of dailies in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a columnist living in Colorado. Jay AmbroseSpeaktoJay@aol.com Q Tampa Bay Times

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Harry Brady Artley Harry Brady Artley, 95 a resi dent of Lake City, Florida passed away February 13, 2013. Mr. Artley had resided in Lake City for the past twenty-two years coming from Branford and Maryland. He is the son of the late Brady and Marie Sherub Artley. He was em ployed with the Naval Ordi nance Lab working with mis siles and space shuttle design. Survivors include two sons: Charles B. Artley, Lake City, Fl. and William H, Artley Ft. White, Fl. Three grandchildren and three great grandchildren also survive. Private services will be con ducted at a later date. Arrange ments are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Bobby James Carver Bobby James Carver, 75, of McAlpin, Florida passed away on Wednesday; February 13, 2013 at the Lake City Medical Center. He was born in Suwan nee County to the late Reginal and Agnes [Daughtry] Carver. He served faithfully in the Unit ed States Air Force and retired from the Florida Department of Transportation in 1999 after 33 years of service. He was a loving father and grand father who enjoyed farm ing, tending his cows and devot ing his time to his family. He is preceded in death by his parents, his sisters, Delores Stephens and Max ine Downing, and his devoted wife of 35 years, Linda Carver. Survivors include his daugh ters, Leslie Carver, Ashlee Carver, and Mandy Carver; and his grandson, Cole Carv er all of McAlpin, Florida. Funeral services will be con ducted at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday; February 17, 2013 in the chapel of Gateway-Forest Lawn Fu neral Home. Interment will be in Mt Beulah Baptist Church Cem etery. Visitation with the family will be held Saturday evening February 16, 2013 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the funeral home. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Willie Darnella Edwards Willie Darnella Edwards, age 91 resident of Avalon Health Care & Rehab. Center passed away Saturday, February 9, 2013 ter minating an extended illness. Born in Lake City, Fla. she was the daughter of the late Mr. S.T. Gambles & Mrs. Maude Tarver Gambles. She attended the pub lic school of Columbia County and was a member of Hope Henry A.M.E. Church where she served on the Stewardess Board No. 2. Survivors include 3 daughters: Mary M. Lee, Arrie L. Wade (Ce cil and Willie M. Jones, of Lake City; (1) brother, Nathan Gamble (Coretha) of Gainesville, FL.; (1) sister, Esther Flourney, In dianapolis, Indiana; (1) sister-inlaw Mary Gambles, of Pompano Beach, Fla.; (10) grandchildren; (12) great grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Willie Dar nella Edwards, will be 1:00 p.m. Saturday, February 9, 2013 at Hope Henry Church, with elder Clyde Douglass, of in the Hope Henry Cemetery. The family will receive friends Friday, February 8, 2013 at Cooper Funeral Home Chapel from 6:00 p.m until 7:00 p.m. Arrangements by COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washing ton Street; Lake City, FL. Kyler Jamil Peetey Haygood Kyler Jamil Haygood, lov ingly known by all as Peetey, passed away peacefully on Feb ruary 5, 2013. Kyler was born July 8, 2009 to loving parents, Kelly Marie Haygood and James Thomp son, Jr. His brief life was a gift to us that will live on in our hearts and memories for ever. Peety always brought joy and smiles to all that knew him. He touched many lives with his laughter and dazzling smile. He is survived by his parents; a host of siblings; grandparents, Gail Haygood, Melinda Thomas, Anne Thompson, Ethel Thom as, George Roberts and James Thompson, Sr.; aunts, uncles, cousins and loving friends. Funeral services will be held 12:00 noon Saturday, Febru ary 16, 2013 at Faith Bible Church. 15902 US High way 90. Sanderson, Flori da. Videll Williams, Pastor. Viewing one hour prior to the service at Faith Bible Church. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, Florida (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. The Caring Professionals Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 5A 5A Whites Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.com Need somelthing hauled call us: Fill Dirt Lime Rock Asphalt Millings Granite Road Rock Misc. Hauling to meet your needs Semi Services also available You Call & We Haul! NEW LOCATION Virginia Tiner & Associates BOOKKEEPING AND TAX SERVICE Corner of Baya & S.E. Llewellyn Ave. Lake City, Fl (across from East Side School) (386) 758-9808 Shelley Pinkham, Virginia Tiner, Melinda Powell, and Fran Witt Over 30 Years Serving Lake City Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health FREE book by doctor reveals what the (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com. Rosa Sheppard Jan. 7, 1930 to Dec. 16, 2012 A rose fades leaving seeds to grow. The Family of Rosa Mae Sheppard sincerely appreciates your love, prayers and support. Her legacy will live through each of us. Sheppard, Camiel, Rowe Gaskins, Mullins For More Information Call 386-965-8062 AU3785 AB3243 IMAGE ANTIQUES BUILDING Behind Red Lobster US 90W Details & photos at www.auctionzip.com ID#13315 12% BP Visa, Discover, MC, NO AMEX 2% Discount Cash or Check GOP: President offered little that was new Continued From Page 1A BUSES: District getting by with aging fleet to transport students Continued From Page 1A PANEL: Approves bill Continued From Page 1A OLUSTEE: Lots of prep Continued From Page 1A If you miss something you cant back up and catch it, Raulerson said. Everything has a working order. Henry said the huge crowds pouring into the downtown area require additional garbage collec tion sites. The city puts out 20 extra 55-gallon drums in the downtown area for the festival. Cleanliness, Cleanliness, Cleanliness, Raulerson said. People dont like coming to a nasty festival. A crew of city employees will monitor the park for the two days of the festival. It takes a lot of city time to do this, he said. Henry estimated the city spends between $8,000 to $10,000 on overtime during the festival. City Manager Wendell Johnson said the public works department is instru mental to making the festi val a success. Public works are really the backbone of the Olustee Battle Festival, he said. ... We couldnt do it without them. No question about that. Starting Friday, the pub lic works department will be closing some roads near Olustee Park in Downtown Lake City: Hernando Avenue to Madison, and Marion Avenue down to NE Franklin. In addition, the courthouse parking lot will close Friday. Part of the lot will be left open so people can access the tax collectors office. COURTESY Science Fair winners Overall winners in the Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair held at Florida Gateway College were Senior Division win ner Santos Rodriguez of Union County High School, left, and Junior Division winner Christian Chiong of Lake City Middle School. FGC sponsored the Junior and Senior Division Best in Fair trophies. Pictured with the students are teacher at Union High School teacher and science fair co-coordinator Renae Allen and Mike McKee, executive director of media and public information at the college. for legislatively-sponsored constitutional amendments to 75 words, a standard that already applies to citizen initiatives. However, if the Legislature approved more than one summary for an amendment, only the first would be subject to the 75world limit. And if the attor ney general were required to rewrite a flawed ballot summary, that revision would also not fall under the new rules. proposals designed to encourage companies that have operated over seas to bring back jobs to the U.S. Were seeing this trend of what we call insourcing, not just outsourc ing, Obama said. And the reason is because America has got outstanding workers. Were starting to produce more homegrown energy, which is driving down our energy costs. And, obviously, weve still got the biggest market in the world. And if we try to improve our infrastructure a little bit more, then were going to be even that much more competitive. Obama wants to spend money on public works, on neighborhood renovations on helping communi ties that have lost job major employ ers, and on encouraging businesses, universities and the government to work together on new manufacturing technologies. I need Congress to take up these initiatives, because weve come too far and weve worked too hard to turn back now, Obama said. His remarks didnt seem to budge Republicans who control the House and hold enough votes to stall leg islation in the Senate. They believe government helps best by getting out of the way. the districts buses average about two breakdowns a day. The older your fleet, the more breakdowns you have, she said. The school district has 117 buses, 73 of which are used on a daily basis. One of the buses thats used every day was built in 1987. Its more than 15 years past its recommended life span. At least 10 of the buses were built in 1990, Alford said. All buses built after 2001 are required to have seat belts. The school district has 60 buses built after 2001. She said all the buses must pass a monthly safety checks, and even though some buses are older, they are still safe. There is absolutely no way we would have them on a route if they werent safe, she said. The real problem with an aging fleet of school buses is the cost of maintenance. Just as with cars, when vehicles age the parts become harder to find and more maintenance is required. The district would need to buy about 30 new buses to properly update the fleet, Alford said. On average, Hudson said, a school bus costs $100,000. Superintendent Terry Huddleston said he expects the district to purchase two school buses this year, but wants to wait until the measures he has been working fix some of the districts budget problems. The district could fall below the states required 3 percent general fund reserve this budget cycle, and Huddleston has been implementing savings to try to stay above that mark. If the dis trict falls below 3 percent, it will have to send a plan to the state with ways to bring the reserve above that threshold. The money used to buy buses comes from a different fund than the general fund, and some of that fund could be transferred to the general fund, Huddleston said. He expects the purchase of school buses to take place some time between March 1 and June 30. Next year, he said, the district needs to buy at least two buses. If we can buy more than that we need to, he said. It just depends on the budget. The quicker we can purchase them the better off we will be. Huddleston said the district wont know next school years budget until May. It doesnt take long to fall behind on a replacement plan, Huddleston said. You have to replace buses every year.

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By MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer NEW YORK A big gov ernment study has fingered leafy greens like lettuce and spinach as the leading source of food poisoning, a perhaps uncomfortable conclusion for health offi cials who want us to eat our vegetables. Most meals are safe, said Dr. Patricia Griffin, a government research er and one of the studys authors who said the find ing shouldnt discourage people from eating produce. Experts repeated oftenheard advice: Be sure to wash those foods or cook them thoroughly. While more people may have gotten sick from plants, more died from con taminated poultry, the study also found. The results were released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each year roughly 1 in 6 Americans or 48 mil lion people gets sick from food poisoning. That includes 128,000 hospital ization and 3,000 deaths, according to previous CDC estimates. The new report is the most comprehensive CDC has produced on the sourc es of food poisoning, cover ing the years 1998 through 2008. It reflects the agen cys growing sophistication at monitoring illnesses and finding their source. What jumped out at the researchers was the role fruits and vegetables played in food poisonings, said Griffin, who heads the CDC office that handles food borne infection surveillance and analysis. About 1 in 5 illnesses were linked to leafy green vegetables more than any other type of food. And nearly half of all food poi sonings were attributed to produce in general, when illnesses from other fruits and vegetables were added in. Its been kind of a tough month for vegetables. A controversy erupted when Taco Bell started airing a TV ad for its variety 12-pack of tacos, with a voiceover saying that bringing a vege table tray to a football party is like punting on fourthand-1. It said that people secretly hate guests who bring vegetables to parties. The fast-food chain on Monday announced it was pulling the commercial after receiving complaints that it discouraged people from eating vegetables. The CDC report sug gests that the Food and Drug Administration should devote more staff time and other resources to inspection of fruits and veg etables, said Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgias Center for Food Safety. Earlier this month, the FDA released a proposed new rule for produce safety that would set new hygiene standards for farm workers and for trying to reduce contact with animal waste and dirty water. Meanwhile, CDC offi cials emphasized that their report should not be seen as discouraging people from eating vegetables. Many of the vegetablerelated illnesses come from norovirus, which is often spread by cooks and food handlers. So contamination sometimes has more to do with the kitchen or restau rant it came from than the food itself, Griffin noted. By LINDSEY TANNER AP Medical Writer CHICAGO Shootings and other traumatic events involving children are not rare, but theres a startling lack of scientific evidence on the best ways to help young survivors and wit nesses heal, a governmentfunded analysis found. School-based counsel ing treatments showed the most promise, but theres no hard proof that anxi ety drugs or other medi cation work and far more research is needed to pro vide solid answers, say the authors who reviewed 25 studies. Their report was sponsored by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. According to research cited in the report, about two-thirds of U.S. children and teens younger than 18 will experience at least one traumatic event, includ ing shootings and other violence, car crashes and weather disasters. That includes survivors and wit nesses of trauma. Most will not suffer any long-term psychological problems, but about 13 percent will develop symptoms of posttraumatic stress, including anxiety, behavior difficul ties and other problems related to the event. The reports conclusions dont mean that no treat ment works. Its just that no one knows which treat ments are best, or if certain ones work better for some children but not others. Our findings serve as a call to action, the researchers wrote in their analysis, published online Monday by the journal Pediatrics. This is a very impor tant topic, just in light of recent events, said lead author Valerie FormanHoffman, a researcher at RTI International, a North Carolina-based nonprofit research group. She has two young chil dren and said the results suggest that its likely one of them will experi ence some kind of trauma before reaching adult hood. As a parent I want to know what works best, the researcher said. Besides the December massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, other recent tragedies involving young survivors or witnesses include the fatal shooting last month of a 15-yearold Chicago girl gunned down in front of a group of friends; Superstorm Sandy in October; and the 2011 Joplin, Mo., tornado, whose survivors include students whose high school was destroyed. Some may do fine with no treatment; others will need some sort of counsel ing to help them cope. Studying which treat ments are most effective is difficult because so many things affect how a child or teen will fare emotion ally after a traumatic event, said Dr. Denise Dowd, an emergency physician and research director at Childrens Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, Missouri, who wrote a Pediatrics editorial. One of the most impor tant factors is how the childs parents handle the aftermath, Dowd said. If the parent is freak ing out and has difficul ty controlling emotions, kids will have a tougher time dealing with trauma. Traumatized kids need to feel like theyre in a safe and stable environment, and if their parents have trouble coping, its going to be very difficult for the kid, she said. The researchers ana lyzed 25 studies of treat ments that included antianxiety and depression drugs, school-based coun seling, and various types of psychotherapy. The strongest evidence favored school-based treatments involving cognitive behav ior therapy, which helps patients find ways to cope with disturbing thoughts and emotions, sometimes including talking repeat edly about their trauma. This treatment worked better than nothing, but more research is needed comparing it with alterna tives, the report says. We really dont have a gold standard treatment right now, said William Copeland, a psychologist and researcher at Duke University Medical Center who was not involved in the report. A lot of doctors and therapists may be patch ing together a little bit of this and a little bit of that, and that might not add up to the most effective treat ment for any given child, he said. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6AHealth S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE S O U T H E R N INTERNAL MEDICINE Specializing in adult medical care including: Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I Now Accepting New Patients Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP Allisha Lanier, ARNP 386-719-2540 www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com System needed to track fake drugs ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Students listen during an assembly on the first day of school at a temporary high school in a converted store in Joplin, Mo., nearly three months after a tornado destroyed much of the city and killed 160 people. According a report by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, about two-thirds of U.S. children will experience at least one traumatic event, includ ing shootings and other violence, car crashes and weather disasters before turning 18. What heals traumatized kids? Answers lacking Most will have bad experiences before age 18. By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON Fighting the problem of fake drugs will require cre ating a national drug-track ing system, the Institute of Medicine said Wednesday. The call for putting med ications through a chain of custody like U.S. courts require for evidence in a trial comes a week after the Food and Drug Administration warned doctors, for the third time in about a year, that it dis covered a counterfeit batch of the cancer drug Avastin that lacked the real tumorkilling ingredient. Fake and substandard drugs have become an increasing concern as U.S. pharmaceutical compa nies move more of their manufacturing overseas. The risk made headlines in 2008 when U.S. patients died from a contaminated blood thinner imported from China. The Institute of Medicine report made clear that this is a global problem that requires an international response. It also notes that developing countries especially at risk from phony medications. Drug-resistant tuberculo sis, for example, is fueled in part by watered-down medications sold in many poor countries. There can be nothing worse than for a patient to take a medication that either doesnt work or poisons the patient, said Lawrence O. Gostin, a professor of health law at Georgetown University who led the IOM com mittee that studied how to combat the growing problem. Study determines leafy greens are top food poisoning source Poultry found to cause more deaths, though. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE A worker harvests romaine lettuce in Salinas, Calif. Leafy green vegetables were the leading source of food poisoning over an 11-year period, federal health officials say. However, the most food-related deaths were from contaminated chicken and other poultry.

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Buy 1 Get 1 WELCOME! BLUE-GRAY ARMY! Combo Deal Columbia travels to Ridgeview for first round game. Today Columbia High girls tennis at Gainesville High, 3:30 p.m. Fort White High softball vs. Union County High, 6 p.m. Fort White High JV baseball at Newberry High, 6 p.m. Columbia High baseball at Union County High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-4) Columbia High softball vs. Aucilla Christian Academy, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Columbia High boys basketball at Ridgeview High in Region 1-6A quarterfinals, 7 p.m. Fort White High boys basketball at Mount Dora High in Region 2-4A quarterfinals, 7 p.m. Friday Columbia High wrestlers Cole Schreiber, Kaleb Warner, Daniel Devers in FHSAA Finals state meet at The Lakeland Center, 10 a.m. Columbia High baseball vs. Buchholz High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Fort White High baseball vs. Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. Saturday Columbia High wrestlers Cole Schreiber, Kaleb Warner, Daniel Devers in FHSAA Finals state meet at The Lakeland Center, TBD GAMES BRIEFS ROLLER DERBY Mash Up Madness event on Sunday Jacksonville Roller Derbys Mash Up Madness is 1:30 p.m. Sunday at the Skating Palace on Hall of Fame Drive. Spectator fee is $5. For details, call the Skating Palace at 755-2232. From staff reports Playoff push By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High will begin its playoff push today where the Tigers ended it last season. A veteran group returns for Ridgeview High as it hosts the Tigers in the Region 1-6A quarterfinal game at 7 p.m. in Orange Park. Last year, the Panthers knocked off Columbia, 76-53, behind 42 points in the paint. Ridgeview will start five seniors with Kendell Blackmon, Kyjon Jones, K.J. Mitchell, Kurae Burns and Jaylin Gilbert getting the start for the Panthers. Last year Burns had 14 points and Jones had 12 points to help knock off the Tigers. Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson is hoping that the Tigers can reverse their fortunes against the Panthers this season. The Tigers (16-7) had a District 4-6A runner-up year forcing them onto the road for the playoff matchup against the Panthers (19-8). And although the Panthers are strong, Jefferson feels that they are beatable. Theyre a combo of two teams weve already seen a lot of this year in Palatka and Fort White, Jefferson said. They have extremely quick guard play. Theyre like Palatka in that they will run a lot of full court man and theyre like Fort White in that theyll run a lot of full court zone. Theyre going to do both and try to use their quickness. Jefferson said that its no upset that the Panthers are back in this spot hosting a first round playoff game and that it all starts with the guards. Theyre one of the top two or three teams weve seen all year in terms of quickness, Jefferson said. Theyre very experienced and theyre going to look to run and penetrate. Jefferson said that defense will be the best offense for the Panthers. They want to come and slap the ball away from behind, Jefferson said. They want to trap. Their defense sets up their offense and theyre a transi tion team. But the Panthers are also packed with experience. Theyre all good, Jefferson said. Gilbert can shoot and theyve got a lineup of seniors. One thing though is that theyre not very big. Size was part of the prob lem the Tigers had against the Wolfpack in the District 4-6A Championship, but Jefferson doesnt see any matchup problems against Ridgeview. If we can handle the pressure, well be alright, because they like to come at you, Jefferson said. I dont see any matchup prob lems. My concern is their quickness. Theyre going to run multiple defenses. We have a lot of fires in this area, and sometimes to control a fire you have to start another fire. Thats what were going to try to do, start a fire some where else to keep them off balance. Jefferson said if theres one key for the Tigers its to start fast. They key is to make early baskets, Jefferson said. If we can have suc cess early, the rest will take care of itself. We cant start the game 0-for-10 from the field again. We have to score early. The head coach wants the Tigers to forget about Wolfson High for now and focus on the playoffs. I told the guys we arent as bad as we played, Jefferson said. The good thing is we get another chance to go out there and prove that. A win and they could get another chance at Wolfson in round two. COURTESY PHOTO Columbia Highs varsity basketball team is (front row) manager Andre Thompson. Middle row (from left) is Tre Simmons, Darren Jones, Dylan Henson, Marquise Harrell, Dillan Hall, Akeem Williams, Kelvin Jonas, Jordan Coppock and Javonta Foster. Back row (from left) is Andrew Momeaka, Kevin Louder, DaKarry Rossin, assistant coach John Brown, head coach Horace Jefferson, assistant coach Mardel Jackson, Wayne Broom, Robert Dace and Morris Marshall.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, first round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 12:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Women’s Australian Open, first round, at Yarralumla, Australia (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, first round, at Pacific Palisades, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Wisconsin at MinnesotaESPN2 — LSU at South Carolina 9 p.m. ESPN — St. John’s at LouisvilleESPN2 — UCLA at California 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Gonzaga at Saint Mary’s (Cal) NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Miami at Oklahoma City 10:30 p.m. TNT — L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 8 p.m. FSN — Iowa St. at OklahomaBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Miami at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Team Shaq vs. Team Chuck, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No games scheduled Sunday’s Games All-Star Game at Houston, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games No games scheduled NBA calendar Friday-Sunday — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin.June 6 — NBA Finals begin (possible switch to June 4). June 20 — Last possible date for NBA Finals (possible switch to June 18).AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 5 Gonzaga at Saint Mary’s (Cal), 11 p.m. No. 9 Arizona at Colorado, 10 p.m.No. 12 Louisville vs. St. John’s, 9 p.m.No. 13 Ohio State vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 20 Wisconsin at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 15 Georgetown at Cincinnati, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Purdue, 2 p.m.No. 2 Duke at Maryland, 6 p.m.No. 5 Gonzaga at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m. No. 6 Syracuse at Seton Hall, 8 p.m.No. 7 Florida at Auburn, 1:30 p.m. No. 8 Michigan State at Nebraska, 8 p.m. No. 10 Kansas State vs. Baylor, 7 p.m.No. 11 Butler at Fordham, 4 p.m.No. 14 Kansas vs. Texas, 9 p.m.No. 16 Pittsburgh at No. 18 Marquette, 1 p.m. No. 17 Oklahoma State vs. Oklahoma, 1:30 p.m. No. 19 New Mexico vs. Boise State, 9 p.m. No. 21 Notre Dame at Providence, Noon No. 22 Memphis at Marshall, 8 p.m.No. 23 Oregon at Washington State, 7 p.m. No. 24 Colorado State at Air Force, 4 p.m. No. 25 Kentucky at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 3 Miami at Clemson, 6 p.m.No. 4 Michigan vs. Penn State, NoonNo. 9 Arizona at Utah, 3 p.m.No. 12 Louisville at South Florida, 1 p.m. No. 13 Ohio State at No. 20 Wisconsin, 1 p.m.Florida 69, Kentucky 52 At Gainesville KENTUCKY (17-7) Noel 3-5 2-4 8, Poythress 1-9 3-5 5, Goodwin 4-9 0-0 8, Harrow 0-3 0-0 0, Mays 4-7 0-0 10, Hood 0-1 0-0 0, Polson 1-2 1-2 4, Cauley-Stein 5-9 0-0 10, Wiltjer 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 21-50 6-11 52.FLORIDA (20-3) Murphy 3-10 2-2 10, Young 5-7 2-3 12, Boynton 3-7 2-3 9, Rosario 4-11 2-2 12, Wilbekin 5-9 3-4 14, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 0-1 0-0 0, Prather 6-8 0-0 12, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 26-53 11-14 69. Halftime—Florida 38-25. 3-Point Goals—Kentucky 4-12 (Mays 2-5, Polson 1-2, Wiltjer 1-2, Goodwin 0-1, Poythress 0-1, Harrow 0-1), Florida 6-14 (Rosario 2-4, Murphy 2-5, Wilbekin 1-2, Boynton 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Kentucky 31 (Cauley-Stein, Noel 6), Florida 27 (Young 11). Assists—Kentucky 11 (Goodwin, Mays 3), Florida 17 (Wilbekin 8). Total Fouls—Kentucky 15, Florida 13. A—12,480.BASEBALLMLB calendar Friday — Mandatory reporting date for WBC players not participating in Asia. Voluntary reporting date for position players not participating in the WBC. Wednesday — Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-11 — Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 2-19 — World Baseball Classic. March 13 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. March 31 — Opening day, Texas at Houston. Active rosters reduced to 25 players.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.Montreal at Florida, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m.Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7 p.m.Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m.Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m.Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 14, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Zero Hour “Strike” Grey’s Anatomy “Hard Bargain” (N) (:02) Scandal “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot” News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Frontline “Cliffhanger” MI-5 BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “Booked Solid” (:01) Elementary “Details” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries (N) Beauty and the Beast “Trust No One” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsAmerican Idol (N) (Part 4 of 4) Glee “I Do” Will and Emma’s wedding. NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Community (N) Parks/RecreatThe Of ce (N) (:31) 1600 Penn (N) (:01) Do No Harm “Me Likey” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It Dateline on OWN “As Darkness Fell” Dateline on OWN “Murder by the Sea” Lost and Found (N) Dateline on OWN “As Darkness Fell” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 “Night Shift; Mobbed” The First 48 The First 48 “Blood on the Streets” After the First 48 “Into the Woods” (N) (:01) The First 48 HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch“Be My Valentine” (2013, Romance) William Baldwin, Natalie Brown. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half Men “The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. AngerAngerArcher (N) Legit “Justice” (N) Totally BiasedBrandX With CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Badge” The Mentalist “Red Menace” d NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N) d NBA Basketball: Clippers at Lakers NIK 26 170 299The PenguinsOdd ParentsDrake & JoshVictorious iCarly “iKiss” iCarly Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail (N) Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator MMA Live (N) (Live) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar Jones’ missing friend. College Basketball White Collar Neal goes undercover. DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Austin & Ally Jessie “WALL-E” (2008) Voices of Ben Burtt. Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Dance Moms Dance Moms “Rotten to the Core” Project Runway “Surprise Me” Project Runway The designers must create a line. (N) Double DivasTo Be Announced USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSuits “Normandy” Scottie returns. (N) (:01) Necessary Roughness BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) HusbandsHo.Second GenerationBET Takes Hollywood “Getting Played” (2005, Romance-Comedy) Carmen Electra, Stacey Dash. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptiond College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) d College Basketball SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaInside LightningLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live!Fight Sports: In 60 From Nov. 19, 2011. Along the Way DISCV 38 182 278Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners Moonshiners Moonshiners “Tickle’s Guide to Love” Property Wars (N) (:45) Property WarsMoonshiners “Tickle’s Guide to Love” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “High IQ’s” (N) Conan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) The SoupE! News SpecialKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food “DC” Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersWest End SalvageWest End SalvageRehab AddictRehab AddictHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHawaii Life Hawaii Life TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumDC Cupcakes: County Fair (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressWhat Not to Wear “Casey D.” (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Swamp People “Man Down” Swamp People “Fight to the Finish” Swamp People “Endgame” Swamp People “Swamp Invaders” Big Rig Bounty Hunters “Tracked” (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute! “Fluffy Puppy Party” Too Cute! “Fuzzy Polar Puppies” Too Cute! Shar-Pei; cairn terrier; boxer. Too Cute! “Spotted, Pampered Pups” Too Cute! “Cuddly Kittens” Too Cute! “Spotted, Pampered Pups” FOOD 51 110 231Chopped Sea snails in the basket. Sweet Genius “Wicked Genius” Chopped “One in a Hundred” Chopped “Reversal of Fortune” Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UFC Primetime (N) UFC Primetimed College Basketball Clemson at Georgia Tech. (N Subject to Blackout) Women’s College BasketballAction Sports World TourWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Total Blackout “Sin City” (2005) Jessica Alba. Sordid characters run amok in a crime-ridden metropolis. “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. “My Bloody Valentine” (2009) AMC 60 130 254(4:30) Mad MaxThe Walking Dead Rick emerges from a coma. The Walking Dead Trapped by walkers. Comic Book MenFreakshow Immortalized Comic Book MenFreakshow Immortalized COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowIt’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyWorkaholics Tosh.0 It’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba (:22) Reba Reba “Sister Act” Reba Reba Reba “Overboard” (1987) Goldie Hawn. An amnesiac millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. Overboard NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Poodle; English bulldog. Unlikely Animal FriendsUnlikely Animal FriendsUnlikely Animal FriendsUnlikely Animal Friends “Hello Kitty” Unlikely Animal Friends NGC 109 186 276Brain Games “Remember This!” Mudcats “Raising Hell” Doomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersMudcats: Down and Dirty (N) Mudcats “Raising Hell” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Scorned: Love Kills “Mortal Sin” Scorned: Love Kills Scorned: Love Kills “Deadly Game” 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover (N) FrenemiesFrenemiesScorned: Love Kills “Deadly Game” HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “Wrath of the Titans” (2012) (:15) Picture Paris(:45) “The Five-Year Engagement” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Jason Segel, Rhys Ifans. ‘R’ Girls Enlightened Real Sex Swingers convention. MAX 320 310 515(:05) “The Blues Brothers” (1980, Musical Comedy) John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd. ‘R’ (:20) “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy” “Resident Evil: Apocalypse” (2004) Milla Jovovich. ‘R’ (:35) Life on Top SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis. ‘PG-13’ “The Rock” (1996) Sean Connery. Alcatraz Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. ‘R’ Melanie Comarcho: Hello! (N) Gigolos Gigolos JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders finds a way around Colu mbia High’s Kevin Louder at a game on Feb. 1. Indians make first trip to state playoffs By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High basketball’s first entry into the state playoffs will be at Mount Dora High. The Indians will take on the Hurricanes at 7 p.m. today. While Fort White is making its first trip to the state playoffs, Mount Dora, which opened in 1922, will be going for the 24th time and the second straight year under coach Ariel Betancourt. Fort White’s record is 14-5, while Mount Dora is 16-10. The Indians lost 66-62 in overtime to Williston High in the District 5-4A cham-pionship game. Mount Dora beat South Sumter High, 61-46, for the District 6 title after escaping with a 48-47 win over Trinity Catholic High in the semifinals. Fort White’s Melton Sanders scored 24 points in both tournament games. Michael Mulberry hit dou-ble figures in both games with 15 points against Santa Fe High and 13 against Williston. Jalen Wyche scored 22 points in the two games, with 18 from Chris Cottrell and 14 from Trey Phillips. In Mount Dora’s win over South Sumter, Zach Frazier scored 13 points and Von Davis scored 10. The two districts are familiar with each other after last year. Mount Dora beat Bradford High in the open-ing round of the 2012 play-offs and was eliminated by Williston in the second round. Mount Dora won a state championship under Scott Williams in 1998. The Hurricanes beat Ribault and Bernard Wilkes in the final. Today’s winner will play the winner of the Williston/South Sumter game. In the other half of the mini-bracket, Lake Highland Prep hosts Cocoa High and Satellite High hosts Jones High. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s wrestling program produced champions Cole Schreiber and Kaleb Warner at the Region 1-2A meet at Matanzas High on Saturday. Schreiber and Warner qualified for the state meet, where they will be joined by Daniel Devers. Devers was runner-up at region. The FHSAA Finals state meet is Friday and Saturday at The Lakeland Center. Wrestling begins at 10 a.m. Friday, and there will be rounds one and two plus wrestlebacks on the first day. Schreiber won region for the third time and is mak-ing his fourth trip to state. He was 4-0 in the 113-pound weight class at region and is 33-4 on the year. Schreiber’s opening opponent at state is Dakota Arends (37-4) of River Ridge High in New Port Richey. Warner also was 4-0 at region, in the 126-pound weight class, and the soph-omore will be making his first trip to state. He is 47-7 on the season. Warner’s first-round opponent is Vincent Mott (37-13) of Lake Region High in Eagle Lake. Devers was 3-1 in the 160-pound weight class at region and is 29-8 for the season. The junior is going to state for the first time. Devers’ opening match is against William Swift (38-15) of Springstead High in Spring Hill. Columbia’s other region qualifiers — Cole Horton (106-pound weight class), Dustin Regar (138 pounds) and Robert Martin (152 pounds) — were 1-2 at the meet. Columbia High wrestlers Schreiber, Warner win regional

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DEAR ABBY: It bothers me greatly to know that so many children continue to start smoking at an early age. My husband and I did that, and now we’re paying an awful price. We have had emphysema for years. Four of our children also took up the habit. I finally started paying them to quit ($100 every two weeks they didn’t smoke -up to five payments). I decided to head off the temptation our grandchil-dren would face. We told them if they didn’t start smoking by the age of 18, we’d pay them $2,000. So far, seven of the 10 have collected a nice check on their 18th birthday, and we expect the remaining three to collect in turn. They have grown up understand-ing that cigarettes are “gross” and, if they start smoking, it will cost them a lot of money! Abby, you’re the best way to spread ideas. I hope you will think it worthwhile to pass this one along. -DO AS I SAY, GAINESVILLE, FLA. DEAR DO AS I SAY: I’m passing it along, but frankly, I’m not crazy about bribery. One would think that, having witnessed firsthand the serious health issues you and your husband are experiencing, your grandchildren would have understood what awaited them if they took up the habit. The tobacco industry has done a huge disser-vice to young people by marketing their products to them -and not just in the form of cigarettes, but also with flavored chewing tobacco, which is equally addictive. According to the U.S. Surgeon General, nearly 90 percent of smok-ers start by age 18. In 2006, U.S. District Judge Gladys E. Kessler of Washington, D.C., ruled the major cigarette manufacturers were guilty of fraud and racketeering under the federal RICO Act. (When the tobacco companies appealed, the Supreme Court rejected it without comment.) She wrote that for more than 50 years the tobacco industry “lied, misrepre-sented and deceived the American public, including smokers and the young people they avidly sought as ‘replacement smok-ers,’ about the devastating effects of smoking.... “They suppressed research, they destroyed documents, they manipu-lated the use of nicotine so as to increase and per-petuate addiction, they dis-torted the truth ... so as to discourage smokers from quitting.” It is extremely important that young people be educated about -and prevented from -using tobacco. Smokers who start as teenagers increase their chances of becom-ing addicted. Think about it: reduced lung function, early heart disease, cancer, asthma, disfigurement. Yes -it could happen to YOU. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have a wonderful husband and adorable grandchildren, but I have developed deep feelings for a man I met at the gym where I go with a friend. I find myself thinking of this man during the day and night. I don’t want to have an affair nor do I want him to know what I feel. When the thoughts of him come, they overwhelm me so I try to pray. I have no plans to cheat on my hus-band. What else can I do? -CONFIDENTIAL IN GREENVILLE, N.C. DEAR CONFIDENTIAL: Because you have a won-derful husband and a life you do not want to be dis-rupted, I recommend that when you finish exercis-ing at the gym you take a COLD shower. And if that doesn’t work, go to an all-female gym. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Nurture partnerships that are under pressure. It’s better to be nice than nasty if you want to get a good response. Sensitive issues that are left to fester will escalate. Taking care of past regrets or problems will help you move for-ward now. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Discipline and practi-cal applications will help you solve any problem you face. Showing your con-cern for others will lead to an interesting alliance. Favors will be granted if you are straightforward regarding what you want and need. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t meddle or offer help. If you get involved in a sticky situation, you will risk being blamed. Protect your position and your reputation. Moderation is required. Love is in the stars. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t be shy; share your thoughts and ideas and you will gain momen-tum and attract the help you require to excel. Let your intuition guide you when dealing with people or situations of a sensitive nature. Back away from people displaying erratic behavior. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You will enhance your outlook, ideas and imagi-nation if you visit people or places that are unusual or offer something you’ve never experienced before. Take care of what’s neces-sary, then take care of you. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A contract or partner-ship can alter your finan-cial future. A new plan or commitment coupled with pursuing a joint venture will give you a new lease on life. Details will be what separate you from the competition. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Engage in pastimes or groups that will introduce you to new and exciting people. It’s time to spice up your life and put your-self first. Romance is on the rise and a chance to enhance your love life is apparent. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Home is where you belong. Turn your abode into your den for both work and play. Set aside time to take care of your personal desires and to explore possibilities that will shape your future. Let your intuition guide you. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Read between the lines or you may fall victim to a scam. Keep your conversations to the point and as honest as possible. You will be misunderstood if you are too exuberant. Changes at home will end up being beneficial. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Ease into what-ever you want to pursue. Making assumptions based on too few facts will lead to an emotional mess. Try to decipher the information you gather before making any sudden moves. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Look and you shall find. Don’t mess with what’s working. Focus on what you can do to improve your life, your position and your home base. Your ideas are solid -now all you have to do is implement your plan of attack. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take everything you do seriously and show others that you mean business. It’s your attitude that will make the difference at the end of the day. Own your position and control your decision. Simplicity and moderation will lead to victory. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Grandma pays good money to keep kids from smoking Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY14, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 LegalWewill sell the following tenants units at Ellisville Mini Storage 14373 S US 441., on February 23, 2013 at 2:30 PMWE SELLFOR CASH ONLY386-758-5840SHARON PEARCE10x10, B-31RICHARD J. JENSEN-12x24,A-20JASON B. SENIE 10x10, C-02DAWN MAJZEL5x10, C-51BOBBYL. ALBERTIE -10x10, B-36 & 10x10, B-37RICHARD T. ZATARAN 10x20, C-68 & 10x20, C-69DAWN M. WENDAL10x10, B-13 & 10x10 B-14WE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REFUSE ALLBIDS. Cash only.05537313FEBRUARY14, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000178CITITMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,v.TIMOTHYJ. LOFSTROM; REGI-NALOFSTROM; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTSDefendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated 1/18/13, entered in Civil Case No. 12-2011-CA-000178 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 15th day of May, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:LOT13, BLOCK A, SOUTHWOOD MEADOWS UNIT2, ASUBDIVI-SION AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 84 OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Property Address: 348 SOUTH-WESTAINSLEYGLEN, LAKE CITY, FL32024Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIESIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 18TH DAYO JANUARY2013./s/ B. Scippio d.cClerkP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDASEAL05537157February 7, 14, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION:CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000294COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,Plaintiff,vs.CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; SUN-STATE FEDERALCREDITUN-ION; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; UN-KNOWN TENANTN/K/ARAN-DALLR. BARBEE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-sure Sale dated the 16th day of Janu-ary, 2013, and entered in Case No. Legal12-2009-CA-000294, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPis the Plaintiff and CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, SUNSTATE FEDERALCREDITUNION, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, UNKNOWN TENANTN/K/ARANDALLR. BARBEE and UN-KNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 6th day of March, 2013, the following de-scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:Part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 13, and part of the South-east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 14, all in Township 06 south, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida more par-ticularly described as follows: Begin at the Southeast Corner of the North-east 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14 and run thence S 020'38”E, along the West line of said Section 13, 660.95 feet to the Southwest corner of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4; thence N 8825'01” E along the South line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 660.63 feet to the Southeast corner thereof; thence N 021'49” Walong the East line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 661.24 feet to the Northeast corner thereof; thence S 8823'28”W, along the North line of said Northeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 101.07 feet; thence N 7420’34” W, 377.99 feet; thence S 9000’00” W, 114.39 feet; thence S 6904’46” W, 339.64 feet to the South line of the North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14; thence N 8908’17”E along said South line, 236.51 feet to the POINTOF BE-GINNING, containing 11.2132 acres, more or less.Subject to an easement for ingress and egress more particularly descri-bed as follows: Begin at the North-east corner of the above described lands; thence S 8823’20” W, along the North line of said described lands, 101.07 feet; thence S 7420'37” E, 73.92 feet; thence S 0021'49” N, a distance of 639.28 feet to the intersection with the South line of said described lands; thence N 8825'01” E, along said South line, 30.01 feet; thence N 0021’49” W, along the East line of said described lands, a distance of 661.24 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055. (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated is 16 day of January, 2013.P. DEWITTCASON LegalClerk Of The Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05536976February 7, 14, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Probate DivisionFile No. 12-294-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF J.D. PAYNEDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSTOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE:You are hereby notified that an Or-der of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of J.D. PAYNE, deceased, File No. 12-294-CP, by the Circuit Court for Colum-bia County, Florida, Probate Divi-sion, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055; that the total cash value of the estate is $0 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order areNameJerri J.D. PayneAddress187 SWMorning Glory Dr., Lake City, FL32024ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the estate of the dece-dent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 7, 2013.Person Giving Notice:/s/ Jerri J.D. PayneJerri J.D. Payne187 SWMorning Glory Dr.Lake City, FL32024Attorney for Person Giving Notice/s/ Terry McDavidTERRYMCDAVIDPost Office Box 1328Lake City, FL32056-1328Telephone: (386) 752-1896Florida Bar No. 05245405537170February 7, 14, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 13-26-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIAM HOWARD HENRYDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of William Howard Henry, deceased, whose date of death was November 13, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. the names and addresses of the personal repre-sentative and the personal represen-tative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF LegalTHE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-ODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPRO-BATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-TER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication is Febraury 7, 2013Personal Representative:/s/ Wanda ConnerWanda Conner449 SWWildwood Ct.Lake City, Florida 32024Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronAttorney for Wanda ConnerFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386)755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail: jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary Email: mad@rkkattor-neys.com05537173February 7, 14, 2013 100Job Opportunities05537211Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to fchbookkeeper@fhclakecity comcastbiz.net or mail: ATT: Human Resources, 3909 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL32055 Available Position: Revenue Specialist III Florida Department of Revenue General Tax Administration, Collections. Location: Lake City Apply at People First website http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. WANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon’ 100Job OpportunitiesPROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Residential Framing Carpenter. Must have valid D.L., transportation, and tools. Call 386-496-3873 L/M 386-623-7063 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 UnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net 120Medical Employment05537285Certified Dietary Manager Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Certified Dietary Manager. Experience in a long term care setting with a working knowledge of MDS/Care Planning is required. Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE JOB OPENING Pharmacy Clerk/Cashier. Pharmacy experience Required. Apply in person: DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. RECYCLE YOUR PAPER ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY1 4 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$4,800 386-288-6102 120Medical Employment05537311Medical Billing Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987 Certified Dietary ManagerNeeded LTC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F Experienced Dental Hygienist Needed for Live Oak office. Please call 386-362-1646 F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.A’s All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 140Work Wanted Need help with cleaning or household shopping? Call Jenny 386-867-6510. Reasonable prices and references available! 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free to good home 7 yr old AKC Male Pug Great with children Contact 386-303-2574 Free to right home Brindle Male pit bull, approx 10 mths, all shots up to date, nutured. Sweet loving inside dog. 386-243-8577 Full blooded Rotty 2 years old male. Needs room to run. Great w/ Adults needs supervision w/ a Child. $400. 438-3131 /984-5142 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions Michael G. Perry Auctioneers ESTATE AUCTION Fri., Feb. 15th 6:30 p.m.; Preview starts at Noon. Image Antiques Building behind Red Lobster Details & photos at www.auctionzip.com ID#13315 12% BPVisa, Disc, MC, NO AMEX 2% Discount Cash/Check Contact Mike 386-965-8062 AB3243/AU3785 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $80.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture TWIN BED, Extra Long, Tempurpedic, Electric (w/remote) Adjustable. Originally $2500 Asking $1500. Call 386-758-9692 430Garage Sales HUGE MULTI-FAMILY Sat 8-4, 468 SE Oak St by the VA. Antiques/ books/sports Too much good stuff to list! MOVING SALE Everything must go. Furniture, Kitchen, etc. 727-422-3472 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Yard Sale Sat. 2/16, 8-? Main to Alamo to Elprado to 363 SWTularosa Ln. Look for signs. 440Miscellaneous Beautiful Olustee Outfit Ladys size 20(?) $75.00 Contact 365-1277 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 2BR/2BA w/ carport located onCountyRoad 133, $500 mo. plus $500 dep. 954-258-8841 3/2 DW on land, countryside between Live Oak and Lake City of CR 252. Remodeled, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $550 & $550 dep 386963-4833 or 936-594-0121 Answering machine 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $520 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 640Mobile Homes forSale2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8,500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John Lyons @800-622-2832 ext 210 for details WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A $500 month & $500 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentWayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3bd/ 2 ba, fenced yard, small shed, half mile to paved road, fruit trees, $600.00 deposit & first months rent! 352-239-3260! Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath house on 5 acres. $700.00 per month. First, last and security Firm. 386-292-2228 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 810Home forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $4,800 386-288-6102 951Recreational Vehicles1989 Mallot Travel Trailer Fully self contained, sleeps 6 comfortable, a/c, double doors, awning, Full bed, Sofa/bed, full bathroom, great cond., second owner, A1 condition $2600 negotible. 352-321-0030 or 850-261-5337REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04206BSports Jump Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Women’s Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply.• OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY• PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS• STD’S & HPV TESTING• BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY • MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE• WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS• BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL• NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD • EMAD ATTA, MD“NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS” 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com Noah’s Art of Lake CityAll Children Are Artists! Now offering: An after school program for ages 5-12 s#URRICULUMBASEDARTCLASSESs(OMEWORKHELPs&REETRANSPORTATIONFROMMOSTSCHOOLSs%XXPERIENCEDINSTRUCTORSs!CCESSTOCOMPUTERS s0AINTINGs3CULPTINGs$RAWING s$!RT-ORE Mixed media art classes for children ages 2-10 Funding Accepted Through the Early Learning Coalition www.noahs-art.com(386) 438-806037-AIN"LVD3TEs,AKE#ITY&, New Students 2ECEIVEA &REE.OAHS!RT 4r3HIRT OR!RT3ET COURTESY PHOTOState QualifiersColumbia High wrestlers Cole Schreiber (from left), Kale b Warner and Daniel Devers qualified for the FHSAA Finals state meet at The Lakeland Cen ter on Friday and Saturday. Schreiber and Warner hold the bracket placards they re ceived as Region 1-2A champions. Devers was runner-up at region. Story on 2B. Tigers finalize district, 2013 football scheduleBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head football coach Brian Allen announced the completion of the Tigers’ 2013 football schedule on Wednesday. Columbia will compete in a new district next season with only two holdovers from the 2012 district. The Tigers will still have Orange Park and Middleburg high schools as part of the district sched-ule in 2013, but Columbia loses district runner-up Ridgeview High. Joining Columbia in the new District 3-6A are Ed White, Englewood, Lee and Terry Parker high schools. Columbia is the only school with a winning record in 2012 in the new district. “This is brand new to me,” Allen said. “I hear that it’s a district similar to what we used to compete in before I was in high school. I’m not judging a book by its cover and the same can be said for us. I think the district is fair and we won’t have to travel as much.” Columbia does have a tough non-district schedule this season. The Tigers will open with the kickoff clas-sic against Jacksonville’s Trinity Christian School on Aug. 23. The regular season kicks off in a rematch of the Tigers’ only regular season loss against 6A state run-ner-up Gainesville High on Aug. 30 in Lake City. Columbia will renew its rivalry with Lincoln High on the road on Sept. 6. The Tigers then come home for back-to-back games with Buchholz and Terry Parker high schools. Parker will be the first dis-trict game of the season. Columbia plays district games in four-consecutive weeks. The Tigers are away at Englewood on Sept. 27 before homecoming against Orange Park on Oct. 4 and a road game at Ed White on Oct. 11. Columbia’s bye week is Oct. 18 and the Tigers will host Lee High for senior night on Oct. 25 before two road games close the regu-lar season. Columbia will travel to Middleburg High on Nov. 1 and Suwannee High on Nov. 8. Allen feels the schedule is a good regular-season challenge for the Tigers as they prepare to challenge for the district champion-ship for the second con-secutive year. “We’ll play two teams that played for a state champi-onship in Gainesville and Lincoln,” Allen said. “The kickoff classic is also against a very good Trinity Christian team. There’s some good ball games. We wish we had one of those tough non-district oppo-nents around week 6 or 7 as we prepare for the play-offs, not to say our district opponents wont be, but we still have some very good opponents. Buchholz is another playoff team that made it to the second round last year.” Allen said the junior varsity needs two more games to complete its schedule. C J ’ s 1/2 PriceTobacco Your Choice Your BlendRegular, Light, Ultra Lights$27.00 Carton Menthol$29.00 Carton Chemical FREE 1438 W. U.S. Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl(Next to Hwy Patrol Station & Beds, Beds, Beds Ph. 386-752-2444 Fax. 752-2248 !IOJIH February 14, 15, 16, 2013Per Carton Tigers lift way past ’CanesBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High didn’t have any trouble in its first weightlifting meet of the year as the Tigers swept past Gainesville High, 72-26, at home on Thursday. The Tigers had first place winners in eight of the 10 weight classes. Tony Springborn had a 240 bench and 170 clean and jerk for a 410 total in the 139-weight class. Other first place winners for the Tigers were: Antonio Pelham (255-235-450) in the 154-pound weight class, Blake Kuykendall (265-225-490) in the 169-pound weight class, Drew Clark (295-265-550) in the 183-pound weight class, Felix Woods (290-285-575) in the 199-pound weight class, Terry Calloway (300-275-575) in the 219-pound weight class, Javere Smith (295-300-595) in the 238-pound weight class and Laremy Tunsil (330-265-595) in the heavyweight division Kenny Paul, Lonnie Underwood, Wyndell Wallace, Solomon Bell and Malachi Jean had sec-ond place finishes for the Tigers. Roger Cray, Hunter lord, Ben Kuykendall, Trey Marshall, Deonta Crumitie and Ethan Bailey had third place finishes. “For the first meet, it was good numbers,” head coach Brian Allen said. “The num-bers aren’t as good as they want them to be or they’re going to be, but it was a good meet. Gainesville is a little down and graduated a lot of kids, but I’m pleased with the outcome.” Columbia travels to Baker County High in a quad-meet also featuring Suwannee and Oakleaf high schools at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday.