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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02020

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02020

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe deaths of 20 children in Newtown, Connecticut shined a bright light on problems that have brewed for decades surrounding mental health services. In Florida, the mental health care industry lacks proper funding and fights a public perception of stigmas that prevent many from seeking the care they need, said one expert with 30 years of experience in the industry. Margarita Labarta, chief executive officer for Meridian Behavioral Healthcare, started working for the company more than 30 years ago, and said she’s seen improvements in understanding and treatment of the mentally ill. But a number of problems persist. Florida ranked 49 out of 51 (Washington, D.C. was included in the study) for funding of mental health services, Labarta said. Only Texas and Idaho spend less money per person than Florida. The national average per capita spending is $120 for individu-als with mental illnesses, but in Florida it is $39. Labarta was the speaker at a forum hosted at the Fairfield Hotel and Suites in Lake City where more By MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressORLANDO – Former Republican Party of Florida chairman Jim Greer pleaded guilty to theft and money laundering charges Monday just before jury selection in his criminal trial was to begin. Greer pleaded guilty to four counts of theft and a single count of money laundering for funneling money from the Republican Party of Florida to a company he set up with his right-hand man. He could be sentenced to a minimum of 3 1/2 years and a maximum of 35 years in prison at his March 27 sentencing. The plea deal avoids what would could have been an embarrassing trial for the state GOP. Some of Florida’s most powerful politicians were scheduled as witnesses, including former Gov. Charlie Crist, former U.S. Sen. George LeMieux, former Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum and several state House and state Senate lead-ers. “There were a number of people who did not want this trial to go forward and the trial isn’t going forward,” said Damon Chase, Greer’s attorney. “Once again, Jim Greer is falling on his sword for a lot of other folks.” Topics that were covered in pretrial depositions included allegations of prostitutes at a state GOP fundraiser in the Bahamas, lavish spending on Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Grammys: No one dominates. COMING WEDNESDAY Local news roundup. 71 58 Chance of storms WEATHER, 2A CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 270Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM 1Olustee should bring in $4M-plusBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comMillions of dollars are spent in the community each year from the 40 to 60 thou-sand people who visit Lake City for the Olustee Battle Festival and the Olustee Battle Re-enactment. Director of the Tourist Development Council Harvey Campbell said the festival and re-enactment have the single largest economic impact of any event of the year and sited a Florida State University survey that says the festival has an economic impact about $4.5 million on the local economy. He said about 40,000 people spend money at local restaurants and hotels during the 2-day festival. Another 20,000 people travel the 18 miles east to the site of the battle reenactment on Sunday. Campbell said some of the 20,000 people are double-counted. The festival has statewide recogni-tion and was named by Florida Living as the best live Civil War re-enactment. Because the festival starts Friday and vendors set up on Thursday, Campbell said the festival has a dispersed COUNTDOWN BEGINS Grand opening of steakhouse set for Feb. 25 Pope willstepdown POPE continued on 3A OLUSTEE continued on 3A GREER continued on 3A FORUM continued on 3A Festival, re-enactment have greater economic impact on area than any other event. 85-year-old pontiffsays he lacks strength to continue in job. By NICOLE WINFIELD andVICTOR L. SIMPSONAssociated PressVATICAN CITY — Declaring that he lacks the strength to do his job, Pope Benedict XVI announced Monday he will resign Feb. 28 — becoming the first pontiff to step down in 600 years. His decision sets the stage for a mid-March conclave to elect a new leader for a Catholic Church in deep turmoil. The 85year-old pope dropped the bombshell in Latin dur-ing a meeting of Vatican cardinals, surprising even his closest collaborators even though he had made clear previously that he would step down if he became too old or infirm to carry on. Benedict called his choice “a decision of great importance for the life of the church.” Indeed, the move allows the Vatican to hold a conclave before Easter to elect a new pope, since the traditional nine days of mourning that would follow the death of a pope doesn’t have to JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter A scene from last year’s re-enactment. ABOVE, RIGHT: The newly completed LongHorn Steakhouse is seen along U.S. 90 on Monday. The restaurant will have a grand opening at 11 a.m. on Feb. 25. Employee orientation has already begun at the restaurant. The Olive Garden restaurant, next door, will open sometime in early spring. ASSOCIATED PRESSJim Greer, left, pleads guilty in court Monday morn-ing in Orlando. COMINGQ Complete Olustee coverage this week in the Reporter. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Benedict XVI Mental health issuesin spotlight at forum Ex-GOP chief pleads guilty Labarta

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Movie director Franco Zeffirelli is 90. Q Actor Louis Zorich is 89. Q Baseball Hall-of-Fame sportscaster Joe Garagiola is 87. Q Movie director CostaGavras is 80. Q Basketball Hall-of-Famer Bill Russell is 79. Q Actor Joe Don Baker is 77. Q Rock musician Ray Manzarek (The Doors) is 74. Q Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak is 71. Q Country singer Moe Bandy is 69. Q Actress Maud Adams is 68. Q Actor Cliff DeYoung is 67. Q Actor Michael Ironside is 63. AROUND FLORIDA Disabled kids’ program fixed FORT LAUDERDALE — Florida health officials said Monday they will assign care coordinators to about 1,600 children with disabilities amid allegations from federal health officials that the state was cutting in-home services and essentially forcing kids into adult nursing homes. An individual care coordinator will work with no more than 40 disabled children at a time who are receiving in-home nursing services and ensure they have continued access to those services. The Agency for Health Care Administration said it will begin the transition within 90 days. Many of the chil-dren require ventilators, feeding tubes and other machinery that is too complicated for parents to monitor. The changes come several months after federal health officials threatened to sue the state and accused it of violating fed-eral law by allowing more than 200 children with dis-abilities and even babies to be kept in nursing homes, often for years. Federal regulators say children languish in facili-ties, sharing common areas with elderly patients and having few interactions with others, rarely leav-ing the nursing homes or going outside. Pier closing to cost 400 jobs ST. PETERSBURG — An estimated 400 people will be out of work when the St. Petersburg pier is demol-ished. The Tampa Tribune reports that many of the small retail businesses at the pier are still looking for a place to relocate. Some have decided to close alto-gether, saying they won’t find another location in Pinellas County with such high foot traffic and beauti-ful views. In addition to retail shop employees, valet parking attendants, cleaners, secu-rity officers and others will also be back on the job market. St. Petersburg is scheduled to barricade the cause-way in four months and then proceed to demolish the ironic pier. It will be replaced with a futuristic design. The new pier will offer visitors kayaking and paddle boating instead of gelato stands and fortune-telling machines.Scott pushes budget priorities WEST PALM BEACH — Gov. Rick Scott sought to build public support for his budget priorities Monday, pressing for teacher raises and a cut to manufactur-ing equipment sales taxes as keys to boosting the economy. Addressing a large gathering of the Forum Club of the Palm Beaches, the Republican governor also called Everglades restoration efforts vital, in part to maintain a clean water source for a growing population. He called to the stage numerous leaders in Everglades cleanup proj-ects, including prominent environmentalists. Scott’s $74.2 budget proposal includes a 6 percent hike in spending, including restoring money for some environmental efforts such as the Florida Forever land-buying program. Scott said such a move was only possible because of frugal-ity earlier in his term. “We made the tough choices two years ago, we lived within our means, we balanced the budget, we paid down debt,” he said, “and our economy has come back.”Burned man gets 10 years in prison TAMPA — A Tampa Bay area man who severe-ly burned himself while trying to set his estranged wife on fire has been sentenced to 10 years in prison. As part of a deal with Hillsborough County prosecutors, 51-year-old Matthew Wong pleaded guilty Monday to attempt-ed murder. The Tampa Bay Times reports that he attended the hearing in a wheelchair. Prosecutors say Wong and his wife had been sep-arated for several months last February when he drove to the Countrywood apartment complex in a rental car and waited for her to leave for work. Authorities say Wong chased his wife and tried to splash gasoline on her. Instead he got the gas all over himself. The woman escaped into an apartment, and he poured gas on the entry-way. When he lit it, fire blew back and engulfed him.Skateboard crash kills boy, 10 ORANGE CITY — Authorities say it was a “tragic accident” when an Orange City boy was struck and killed while rid-ing his skateboard. Orange City police spokesman Jason Sampsell told The Daytona Beach News-Journal it doesn’t appear the driver of the truck that hit the boy Friday night committed any traffic infractions. According to reports, the truck driver didn’t have time to avoid the boy. No one dominates Grammys LOS ANGELES U nlike last year, when the Grammys became the Adele show, each of the leading nominees in a diverse and eclectic field got a chance to bask in the spotlight of music’s biggest night. Fun., whose anthemic and semidark jam “We Are Young” dominated the charts in 2012, won song of the year. Gotye’s massive and oddball pop hit, “Somebody I Used to Know,” picked up record of the year. And folk-rockers Mumford & Sons won album of the year for their platinum-selling “Babel.” Fun. also won best new artist, besting Frank Ocean in an upset. The Recording Academy had a clear message at its 55th annual Grammy Awards on Sunday night: There are a lot of top acts today with both mainstream appeal and an edge to their music, and the academy was happy to spread the love. “One after the other, it was like, ‘And the Black Keys...,’ so I think we just sort of resigned ourselves to like, last year was Adele’s year and this year would be the Black Keys,” said lead singer Marcus Mumford, who thought his band would lose album of the year to the Black Keys. Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys, the night’s big winner with four tro-phies, was one of six acts with the most nominations — six each. He won non-classical producer of the year, while the Black Keys earned the best rock album, song and per-formance honors. The Black Keys dominated the rock category, while Jay-Z and Kanye West did the same in the rap area. But the pop, country and R&B categories were a reflection of the top four honors, with no single act dominating. Winners in those cat-egories ranged from Adele to Paul McCartney, Carrie Underwood to the Zac Brown Band, and Usher to Miguel.Bruce Willis receives French acting award PARIS — Actor Bruce Willis has been awarded the Commander of the Arts in France for his contribution to cinema. The 57-year-old, whose latest film is “A Good Day to Die Hard,” told the Paris ceremony Monday night that he feels honored that his work has been recognized. His attended the event with his wife, Emma Heming. Willis was born in Europe and said he feels as home in France. But the star said he opposes President Francois Hollande’s plan to tax the richest at 75 percent and hopes he would be able to complain about it if he lived in France.‘Buckwild’ cast member Amin arrested CHARLESTON — A cast member of the MTV reality show “Buckwild” is facing drug chargesa. Twenty-four-year-old Salwa Amin was arraigned Monday in Nicholas County Magistrate Court on felony charges of posses-sion of a controlled substance with intent to deliver. She’s being held at the Central Regional Jail on $200,000 bond. State police say Amin and two others were arrested late Sunday at a home in Summersville after officers responding to a tip found oxycodone pills and heroin. Sunday: 5-9-13-23-30 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Monday: Afternoon: 5-4-3-5 Evening: N/A Monday: Afternoon: 7-8-2 Evening: N/A Saturday: 12-22-36-42-44-52 x3 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dis-honor others, it is not self-seek-ing, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.” — 1 Corinthians 13:4-5 Q Associated PressASSOCIATED PRESSRecording artists (from left) Sting, Ziggy Marley, Bruno Mar s and Rihanna perform at the 55th annual Grammy Awards on Sunday in Los Ange les. The awards show, which had no dominant recipient, featured several ensemb le performances. Q Associated Press Amin Willis

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 3A 3A 1001306 As life changes, so do your needs. Let State Farm Bank help with a mortgage that ts your life and your budget. Let us help you make the right move. Bank with a Good Neighbor CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Shopping for a mortgage? State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL We have a great selection. Some products and services not available in all areas. John Kasak, Agent State Farm Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 NMLS # 382656 WILSONS CONTAINERS Construction/Debris Containers Available 755-7060 Delivered to your job site today Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health FREE book by doctor reveals what the (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com. GREER: Pleads guilty to money laundering, theft Continued From Page 1A FORUM: Mental health issues under scrutiny Continued From Page 1A fancy restaurants and luxury hotels by state party leaders, the drinking habits of Crist and party leaders stab bing each other in the back. Greer, 50, was vice mayor of the small central Florida town of Oviedo when Crist surprisingly picked him to be the state party chairman after he led local efforts to help Crist get elected governor in 2006. He previ ously was the president and CEO of a company that provides training to the hospitality industry on how to comply with alcohol laws. Crist didnt immediately return a phone call seeking comment. The Republican Party of Florida said in a statement that Greer had tried to damage the partys reputation since his arrest in 2010. But the truth is now known that Jim Greer broke the law, stole from the RPOF and our donors, and then said and did everything he could to cover up and distract attention from his crimes, the statement said. Stephen Dobson, an attorney for the party, said Greers acknowledg ment of guilt was what the party wanted all along. Party officials werent worried about potentially embarrassing testi mony at trial, he said. There was absolutely no concern. In fact, a lot of people were looking forward to clearing a lot of these allegations that had been made up, Dobson said outside the courtroom. Today the truth came out. The plea deal was reached at the last minute. Jury selection was set to begin early Monday, but neither Greer nor prosecutors had appeared in the courtroom an hour after the trial was supposed to start. Greer had earlier pleaded not guilty to allegations that he funneled almost $200,000 of party money into a company he had formed with his right-hand man, Delmar Johnson. Johnson had been scheduled to be prosecutors star witness and was granted immunity in exchange for his testimony. Its Finally Over!!! Johnson post ed on Facebook after the deal was announced in court. Greer had said party leaders were aware of the company and that his prosecution was political payback. than 60 local residents, business lead ers, elected officials and law enforce ment talked about mental healthcare. The sheriff, chief of police, city man ager, Lake Shore Hospital officials, business owners and couty residents were able to voice opinions and con cerns about their interactions with the mentally ill. Labarta said about 25 percent of the population suffers from a men tal illness. Nine percent suffer from severe mental illness, Labarta said. Rhonda Sherrod, market CEO for Shands Lake Shore, said every emer gency room in the state sees patients with mental health issues, and by the time the mentally ill enter an emergency room its usually because the persons actions have taken an extreme turn. One thing we see is obviously a lack of resources so that folks can be in treatment and hopefully prevent escalations at all of our (emergency rooms), she said. While most mental illness is identi fied after high school, Labarta said mental illness of students in the pub lic education system is important because at that age children are creatures of the moment, and impul sive, which leads to a belief current conditions will never improve. Those feelings sometimes result in suicide, she said. She said social workers and counseling staff in school districts have fallen prey to budget cuts. When children show signs that they are upset and it goes above a typical phase then someone needs to have the symptoms checked with a mental healthcare professional, she said. Superintendent Terry Huddleston said although the district has seen cuts to the budget, every school in Columbia County has a nurse. Huddleston said there are problems with getting troubled students the help they need, and the problem isnt addressed until the law enforcement becomes involved. Our biggest issue in the school system is once we can identify a person that has a need then there is very few places to refer them where they can get treatment and help, Huddleston said. ... Its hard to get these families and students to ser vices until something happens. He said even when a need is identi fied, its often too expensive for the families to treat because of holes in insurance coverage. Chief of Police Argatha Gilmore said law enforcement receives train ing for the instances when officers encounter mentally ill people. She said the forum did address some of what she believes needs to occur -preventive measures so incidents are less likely to happen. If we deal with preventive mea sures on the front end (and) if we talk about those concerns on the front end then we are all better to give the services that that person needs not just for that night, not for that par ticular incident, but so it would not be a repetitive response we would be giving all the time, she said. Labarta said one of the problems is the public doesnt understand mental illness. Until we understand what the ill nesses really are, its really hard to have a public education and a public health campaign, which is what we really need, Labarta said. Depression and anxiety are the mental illnesses the general popula tion hears the most about and under stands the best, she said. She said about nine percent of people suffer from depression and half of the peo ple with depression develop severe symptoms. About18 percent of the population suffer from anxiety, she said. When we talk about anxiety and depression, we are not talking about the blues or when you feel bad, she said. ... What Im talking about is a level of sadness or a level of anxiety that intervenes with your ability to carry on your day-to-day life as you had before. A more serious mental illnesses called bipolar disorder affects about 2 percent of people, but 84 percent experience the disorder to a severe degree, she said. The other disorder that pops up in the media is schizo phrenia, which is affects one of per cent of the population and usually is quite severe, she said. While recent mass murders by mentally ill individuals have resulted in big headlines, she said most vio lent crimes are not committed by the mentally ill. She said while the mentally ill do committ voilent acts, they are much more likely to be the victim in a violent crime then the perpatrator While its what we hear about, while its certainly something we need to address, its very very hard to predict when a single individual will become violent because of their mental illness, Labarta said. be observed. It will also allow Benedict to hold great sway over the choice of his successor, though he will not vote. He has already hand-picked the bulk of the College of Cardinals the princes of the church who will elect the next pope to guaran tee his conservative legacy and ensure an orthodox future for the church. Without doubt this is a historic moment, said Cardinal Christoph Schoenborn, a protege and former theol ogy student of Benedicts who himself is considered a papal contender. Right now, 1.2 billion Catholics the world over are holding their breath. Cardinal Andre Vingt-Trois, the arch bishop of Paris, called the decision a lib erating act for the future, saying popes from now on will no longer feel com pelled to stay on until their death. One could say that in a certain man ner, Pope Benedict XVI broke a taboo, he told reporters in Paris. There are several papal contenders in the wings, but no obvious front-runner the same situation when Benedict was elected pontiff in 2005 after the death of Pope John Paul II. The Vatican stressed that no specific medical condition prompted Benedicts decision, that he remained fully lucid and took his decision independently. Any interference or intervention is alien to his style, Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi said. It has been obvious to all that the pope has slowed down significantly in recent years, cutting back his foreign travel and limiting his audiences. He now goes to and from the altar in St. Peters Basilica on a moving plat form to spare him the long walk down the aisle. Occasionally he uses a cane. His 89-year-old brother, Georg Ratzinger, said doctors had recently advised the pope not to take any more trans-Atlantic trips. His age is weighing on him, Ratzinger told the dpa news agency. At this age, my brother wants more rest. Benedict emphasized that carrying out the duties of being pope requires both strength of mind and body. After having repeatedly examined my conscience before God, I have come to the certainty that my strengths due to an advanced age are no longer suited to the demands of being the pope, he told the cardinals. In order to govern the bark (ship) of St. Peter and proclaim the Gospel, both strength of mind and body are neces sary strengths which in the last few months, have deteriorated in me, he said. Popes are allowed to resign but church law says the decision must be freely made and properly manifested. Still, only a handful have done it. The last pope to resign was Pope Gregory XII, who stepped down in 1415 in a deal to end the Great Western Schism, a dispute among competing papal claim ants. The most famous resignation was Pope Celestine V in 1294; Dante placed him in hell for it. There are good reasons why others havent followed suit, primarily because of the fear of a schism with two living popes. Lombardi sought to rule out such a scenario, saying church law makes clear that a resigning pope no longer has the right to govern the church. During his tenure, Benedict charted a very conservative course for the church, trying to reawaken Christianity in Europe where it had fallen by the wayside and return the church to its traditional roots, which he felt had been betrayed by an incorrect interpretation of the modern izing reforms of the Second Vatican Council. His efforts, though, were overshad owed by a worldwide clerical sex abuse scandal, communication gaffes that out raged Jews and Muslims alike and, more recently, a scandal over leaked docu ments by his own butler. Many of his stated priorities as pope also fell short: he failed to establish rela tions with China, heal the schism and reunite with the Orthodox Church, or reconcile with a group of breakaway, tra ditionalist Catholics. Still, most Vatican watchers saw his decision as the best thing to do for the church given his diminished capacities. It is an act ultimately of responsibility and love for the church, said the Rev. John Wauck, an Opus Dei priest. POPE: Will step down on Feb. 28 Continued From Page 1A OLUSTEE: Should bring in $4M-plus Continued From Page 1A effect on the local economy. The economic benefit is spread out longer than you would typically think of a weekend festival, he said. Rod Butler, general manager at the Holiday Inn and Suites in Lake City, said the Olustee Battle Festival is Lake Citys signature annual event and he expects many local hotels will be sold out this weekend. Its a huge event for us, Butler said. February is a high-demand month for the Florida hotel industry as residents of northern states flock to Floridas sunny beaches and mild-winter weather. Butler called the festival an added ben efit to an already busy time for the indus try. One of the exciting aspects is to have guests in 1860s time-period costumes walk ing around our hotels, he said. It raises a lot of questions among the folks that are not here for the festival. PotashCorp-White Springs donates funds for library From staff reports WHITE SPRINGS PotashCorp-White Springs General Manager Terry Baker, the Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners, and the Camp-Able Family joined Regional Library Director Betty Lawrence to celebrate the opening of White Springs Library in White Springs on Monday. The event was followed by an open house for the community to visit and tour the new library facility. PotashCorp is honored to be part of this project which fills a critical need with in the local community, Baker said. Our PotashCorp-White Springs Family is com mitted to our partnership with Hamilton County and its people. This facility will serve as learning hub for students and families in the extended White Springs community. The library will feature a collection of books, magazines, newspapers, movies, e-books and internet access. Additionally, the White Springs Library community meeting room will provide a public place for community and civic groups to host meetings as well as summer and after school programs for children. The library will be designated as the PotashCorp Building in recognition of the donation made by the corporation to make the library possible. COURTESY The new library in White Springs, courtesy PotashCorp-White Springs.

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OPINION Tuesday, February 12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A WASHINGTON A s president, Ronald Reagan issued his 11th com-mandment that Republicans should not speak ill of other members of the party. But the edict has languished, and it won’t be restored unless the GOP ends its internecine warfare over what is more important: winning elections or being philosophically pure. It is not difficult to foresee a time when the ultras break entirely from the moderates and bring about an upheaval, form-ing a permanent minority that stays true to its ideol-ogy but can’t further it. That already has started. Anyone with the least bit of interest in politics knows that bad candidates may find enough support to defeat good ones in primary elections but cer-tainly not to win the elec-tion that counts. That happened in the last two elections. Unless the Republican mainstreamers can some-how pitch the Tea Party movement overboard, it’s likely to recur two years from now. Republican candidates had a chance of gaining dramatically in the Senate last time out but nominated candidates whose wild, embarrassing ideas cost them the election. In Indiana, for instance, the Republican Party paid an enormous price. County chairmen who were upset over Richard Lugar’s support for the Obama administration’s economic bailout sent the prestigious, 36-year incumbent packing — and then lost the seat when the obscure candidate of their choice, Richard Mourdock, alienated half of the nation’s women. The exercise duplicated one in Missouri, where Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill was predicted to lose — until her GOP opponent, Todd Akin, started the anti-woman ball rolling with some illiterate, bewildering non-sense about the results of rape. In a conversation with several “true believers” just before the presi-dential election, I was amazed that they actually believed Mitt Romney would win. They’d become so convinced of the righteousness of their beliefs that they had lost touch with reality. In a biennial “pick ‘em” contest, I won the money for a second time. When asked how, I explained that I’d merely chosen with my head, not my emotions. These weren’t political novices, either. Joining me in shaking his head was a former chair-man of the Republican Party. Now former White House political guru Karl Rove has incurred the wrath of the far right by taking on turn-back-the-clock zealots. He and others have begun the Conservative Victory Project, an effort to select Republican can-didates with a real chance of winning. One of the people Rove won’t be supporting is Rep. Paul Broun of Georgia, who has announced he wants to run for the seat being vacated by Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss. Chambliss is retiring at the end of next year rather than waiting to be shoved out by the Tea Party. For those who haven’t been paying attention, Broun is the doctor con-gressman who says that “evolution, embryology and the Big Bang theory” are lies “straight out of hell.” Move over, Mourdock and Akin. You were last year’s embarrassments. Could this end up splitting the GOP so badly that it can’t recover as a major party? Should this war continue over what increasingly seems like the last haven for old white men, with little appeal to the overwhelm-ing majority in a chang-ing demographic? Would that lead to a third party, dramatically altering the nation’s two-party politi-cal model? It was forged following the 1850s cre-ation of the Republican Party and its first presi-dential candidate, John C. Fremont. It is far too early for such hysterical predic-tions. But if there is any indication that such a trauma may be immi-nent, it’s the fact that two Republican speakers — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio for the establishment and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul for the Tea Party — are scheduled to give the rebuttal to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address Tuesday. That should tell us something — and it just might not be good news for the Grand Old Party come next year’s elec-tions. Reform credit ratings companies now Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T he Sunshine State has long been just that when it comes to the public’s right to know. Our public-records and open-meetings laws are among the best in the nation, and go far in keep-ing public officials from operating out of sight of the people they were elected or appointed to serve. The one glaring omission in the Sunshine Law? While Floridians have a right to be present at public meetings, they do not have a statutory right to speak there. The state supreme court affirmed this in 2010, refusing to hear an appeal of a lower-court ruling to that effect. State Sen. Joe Negron (R-Stuart) is out to change that. Negron, who has tried before and failed, is once again sponsoring legislation requiring that local boards – city councils, county commissions, zoning boards and the like – give citizens in attendance a reasonable opportunity to be heard. It’s a fine idea.Being seen but not heard isn’t enough. Floridians who attend public meetings should also have the right, within reason, to make comments relevant to the discus-sion at hand. But even if Negron’s bill fails, the Columbia County Commission has shown it recognizes the importance of public participation at its meetings. Up until last Thursday, citizens had five minutes each to offer relevant comments at the start of commission meetings. With a rule change finalized just five days back, citizens now have two minutes each to address commissioners at the end of meetings as well. Two minutes may not sound like much, but it should be plenty long for folks to let their elected officials know, in brief, just how they feel about the issues of the day. It’s a good move on the part of commissioners. A step in the right direction Can Republicans bridge divide? OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comT his famous line of the cynical Captain Renault to nightclub manager Rick in the classic film “Casablanca” comes to mind in reflecting on the practices of American credit rating agencies: “I am shocked, shocked to find ... gam-bling. ...” Standard & Poor’s Corp., arguably the preeminent credit rating com-pany, was formally charged Monday with large-scale fraud. Attorney General Eric Holder announced civil, not criminal, federal prosecution for $5 billion in damages for allegedly falsely inflating the value of mort-gage-backed investments. The Feds focus on the period of March to October 2007, just before the U.S. mortgage securi-ties market’s failure touched off the global financial collapse and severe recession. The indictment alleges warnings from the industry’s own analysts were ignored for at least three years. Lead S&P attorney Floyd Abrams was primed and responded imme-diately that his client was being unfairly singled out. He argues other firms, and indeed the Treasury Department, were guilty of similar optimism. This lawyer’s shock was not heard round the world, partly because the wrongdoing of others does not absolve S&P. S&P has also been conducting preemptive maneuvers. In a historic measure in August 2011, the firm downgraded the United States’ cred-itworthiness from the top AAA rat-ing. Meanwhile, global demand for U.S. government bonds increased even as the downgrade made inter-national news. Company officials declared the downgrade reflected the U.S. gov-ernment’s high and growing deficit and debt levels — and doubts about the capacity and will to correct the situation. With moralistic solemnity, the credit crunchers announced this was the first time in history their firm has moved the U.S. down from AAA. When a National Public Radio interviewer at the time asked a Standard & Poor’s executive about shocking lapses in private-sector evaluation, the executive said it was handled by another part of the com-pany. In “Casablanca” vernacular, the S&P guy played dumb and passed the buck. Which brings us to President Harry Truman, who displayed a sign on his desk in the Oval Office stating “The Buck Stops Here. “ Truman and other Allied leaders of that time faced seemingly endless challenges, including the Cold War, which began soon after the unconditional sur-renders of Germany and Japan, the Korean War, and U.S. debt greater than today. Yet S&P did not downgrade the United States at that time. Why not?Because equating the U.S. national government, which commands vast actual and potential assets, with the balance sheets of even enormous commercial corporations is absurd. In that turbulent earlier time, national unity was essential. A credit ratings company that downgraded our government would have rightly been ostracized. Financial services firms today resent re-regulation by Washington and strike back by appealing to gen-eral public cynicism regarding much of government, especially Congress. The Justice Department is avoiding criminal charges. Ratings compa-nies including S&P should seize this opportunity to reform their practices. Q Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis., and author of “After the Cold War.” 4AOPINION Arthur I. Cyracyr@carthage.edu Dan K. Thomasson Q Dan K. Thomasson is former editor of Scripps Howard News Service.

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Feb. 12Medicare seminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center will have a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C and Associates Inc. Subjects to be covered include how to enroll in Medicare, what is covered and whether supplemen-tal insurance is needed. To register, call (386) 755-3476, ext. 107.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournamentThe Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas hold’em poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa-tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822.Water board meetingThe Suwannee River Water Management District Board of Governors will meet at 9 a.m. at district headquarters, 9225 County Road 49 in Live Oak. The meeting will be to consider district business and hold public hearings on regula-tory, real estate and other matters. A public hearing also will be held on adop-tion of Resolution No. 2013-01 and amendments to the Florida Forever Work Plan. Feb. 13Coalition meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. board will meet at 9 a.m at the coalition office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers the state and federal funding for all school readiness and vol-untary pre-kindergarten programs for the coun-ties: Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union. Anyone with a dis-ability requiring special assistance in order to be able to to attend the meet-ing Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770.Necomers lunch The Lake City Newcomers will have a lun-cheon meeting at 11 a.m. at Quail Heights Country Club on Branford Highway (State Road 247). Ted Allen will give a program featur-ing a portrayal of Abraham Lincoln. For more informa-tion, call Pinky Moore at 752-4552.Ash Wednesday serviceFirst Presbyterian Church will hold Ash Wednesday services at noon and 1 p.m. to mark the beginning of Lent. The Rev. Dr. Roy A. Martin, Jr., And Pastor Jason E. Hill, director of worship and music, will offer ashes and to give a blessing or prayer. The sanctuary Will be open for private prayer and reflection.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Feb. 14Art demonstrationFlorida Hiwayman artist Robert Lewis Jr. will talk about art style and give a painting demonstration, at 2 p.m. in the Florida Gateway College Allied Health Center. The public is invited to attend.Book sale helpThe Friends of the Library needs volunteers to help with the Olustee Festival Book Sale. We will sort books on Feb. 14 and sell books on Feb. 15 and 16. Friends of the Library also is seeking donations of gently used books to sell during the festival. Books may be dropped off at any Columbia County Library brancn. Call Nancy Taylor at (386) 867-1152 for more information.DAR meetingThe Edward Rutledge Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court. Noah Lindsey will speak about the War of 1812. For more information, call 752-2903. Tea Party to meetThe North Central Florida Tea Party will meet at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 Sw Birley Ave. Chris Hall, a local Baptist preacher, will talk about what a Christian’s duty is toward the govern-ment. For more informa-tion, call John at (386) 935-0126, Sharon at (386) 935-0821 or go online to www.northcentralfloridatea party.org.Concert series The second concert in the Friends of Music Concert Series will be at 7:30 p.m. in Covenant First Presbyterian Churcj, 421 White Ave. in Live Oak. The concert will be by the Graffe String Quartet of the Czech Republic, with pianist Michiko Otaki. Admission is free and a reception will follow. For more information, call Bill Poplin at (386) 365-4932 or Linda Poplin at (386) 365-4941.Garden Club The Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse at 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time begins at 9:30 a.m. and the meeting starts at 10. The program this month will be questions from the mem-bers and answers from Bruce Cavey. Feb. 15Early learning groupThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. quality com-mittee will meet at 3 p.m. at the coalition office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. Anyone with a disability requiring special assistance to attend the meeting Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770.Chorus fundraiserStudent members of the Richardson Middle School Chorus will be selling throughout the community for a discount on Nettle’s sausage and drinks that the chorus will be selling at its booth at the Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16. The $5 tickets will entitle holders to receive a sau-sage sandwich and drink, $1 less than the price with-out a ticket.Book saleThe Friends of the Library will hold a side-walk book sale today and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Stop by to peruse and purchase gently used books at afford-able prices. All proceeds benefit the Friends of the Columbia County Public Library.Schools eventColumbia County School District will have its annu-al Career and Technical Education Business Partner Breakfast and meeting starting at 9 a.m., in Columbia High School cafeteria, 469 SE Fighting Tiger Drive. After break-fast and opening remarks, participants will break into small groups to visit classrooms at the middle and high school levels. A special tour at 10:45 a.m. will showcase the Global Logistics warehouse, the FFA land laboratory, Tiger Tots day care and other CTE activities. Reservations are request-ed by Feb. 12. To register or for more information, call the high school office at 755-8190 or contact coor-dinator Mary M. Keen at m_keen@firn.edu.Theater performanceHigh Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Death of a Salesman” on weekends through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are availabe at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspringscommuni-tytheater.com. For more information, call (386) 454-3525.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Boys programThe Lake City Parks and Recreation Department has openings for its after-school structured activ-ity for boys, The program is held at the Teen Town Community Center, next to the Lake City Girls Club. The program is licensed by the Department of Children and Families and the staff is DCF certified. The current session runs through March 15 and the cost is $200. Bus service from the schools is includ-ed. For more information, contact Heyward Christie at (386) 754-3607 or email christieh@lcfla.com.Art League exhibitThe Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit runs through April 5 at Florida Gateway College’s Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. For more informa-tion, contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109.Contestants soughtContestants are being sought for the ninth annual Miss Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo Queens Competition. Girls ages 4 to 18 may enter. Judging will be March 15 at the 19th annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo. Applications are avail-able at The Money Man, Smitty’s Western Store, Columbia County schools’ offices, the Columbia County Fairgrounds office or online at www.columbia-countyfair.org. For more information, call (386) 752-8822.Classic rock concert The group Phil Dirt andthe Dozers will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Levy Performing Arts Center at Florida Gateway College. Tickets will be available at the door an hour before the concert. Cost is $20 or $5 for students, cash or check only. For more information, visit on line at www.phildirt.com or www.communityconcerts.info or call (386) 466-8999. Feb. 16Dinner danceThe Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will hold a Valentine’s Day Dinner and Dance from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall. This event is free for FACS members The cost for nonmembers is $10 per person. New Members are always wel-come. For more informa-tion, contact Bob Gavette at 965-5905.Large rummage saleThe Lake City Garden Club and Woman’s Club will have a joint Mega Indoor Rummage Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando St. All proceeds will go toward the Restoration Fund for the Clubhouse. Members have been cleaning out their attics, closets, garages and drawers for this event. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 5A5A Bring your unwantedGold, Silver & Platinumto someone you can trustPrecious metals are seeing record values.Please call me for a private and con dential appointmentto sell or trade your unwanted gold, silver and platinum.George R. Ward Downtown Lake City (386) 752-5470 Jay Poole, AAMSFinancial Advisor846 S W Baya DriveLake City FL 32025386-752-3545 Name Brand Gently Used Children’s ClothingStrollers galore!!471 SW 247 • Branford Crossing • 752-9885 (Across from the fairgrounds) NEW MERCHANDISEARRIVINGDAILY Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Bethany CorkBethany Cork, 90, passed away February 6, 2013 at the Good Samaritan Center in Dowling Park Florida. Mrs. Cork was born in Lan-sing, Michi-gan and was the daughter of Arthur and Ann Manthey Gertenhouse. She received her education in the public schools of Detroit, Michi-gan. She married John Cork of Greenwood, S.C and had four children. She assisted her hus-band in his tire business and they also enjoyed square danc-ing. In 1956 the family moved to Lakeland, Florida. In Lakeland she was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church and the Lakeland Art Guild. Here she returned to school and became and LPN. She was Valedictorian and President of her LPN class. She was employed as an LPN at the Watson Clinic in Lakeland, Florida until her retirement in 1982. At this time she moved to the house she and her husband had built on farming acreage outside of Dunnellon, FL. Here she enjoyed caring for animals especially her dogs and driving her tractor to mow the pastures. Mrs. Cork was known as a cre-ative person. She enjoyed needle crafts and painting in oils. Mrs. Cork was predeceased by her husband, John, to whom she was married to for 44 years. She is survived by her four children, Michael (Peggy) Cork, Downers Grove, IL, Judy Sears, Lake City, FL, Linda Cork, Charleston, SC, Tom Cork, Sr. Madeira Beach, FL and an “adopted” son, Don Anderson. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Jay Sears, Susan Sears, Scott (Kristen) Cork, David (Kelly) Cork, Kassi Cork, Laurel (Robin) Sanderson, Beth (Tony) McKie, Sarah Bei-ers, Tom Cork, Jr. and Kather-ine Cork. In addition, there are eleven great-grandchildren and a special niece, Diane McCrary. Grave side services will be held at a later date in Lansing 0LFKLJDQ,QOLHXRIRZHUVIDP ily request donations be made to Alzheimers Organization. DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES & CREMATORY, INC. of Live Oak and Branford, FL in charge of arrangements. Dorothy FieldingMrs. Dorothy Fielding went home to Heaven February 6, 2013. She was born March 28, 1928 in King Fisher Oklahoma WR$UWKXU/HH6WDQOODQG(OL]D EHWK)D\H-HWW6WDQOO6KHZDVborn again into the family of God March 27, 1938 and loved and served her Lord by serving others. Mrs. Fielding attended school in Hennessey, Oklahoma and graduated from High School LQ(QLG2NODKRPD6KHZHQWon to graduate from the Dallas Bible Institute in Dallas, Texas where she was a part of a min-istry team teaching bible classes at a local tuberculosis sanitarium and participated in presenting the Bible through KYB Clubs (Know your Bible Clubs). It thrilled her to see young people learning Gods word and accept-ing Christ as their Savior. She spent a summer in Cuba with Practical Missionary Training where she participated in street ministry radio ministry and in assisting resident missionaries.Mrs. Fielding was preceded in death by her mother and Father, KHUGDXJKWHU(OL]DEHWK$QQ&XO ley of Kasilof, Alaska, and three siblings who died in infancy.She is survived by her husband Hunter Weston “Tuck” Fielding of Lake City; daughters: Mary (VWHU0HUOH-RKQVRQRI6XWWRQAlaska, Sharon Kay (Rob) Hein RI:DVLOOD$ODVND$QQ(OL]D beth (Bud) Corson of Leesburg, Fla.; Genie Marie (Bill) Head of Ft. Valley, GA.; and Irene Marie (Kirk) Humphreys of Palm Beach *DUGHQV)OD(LJKW*UDQG children, Ten (10) Great Grand-children, and a host of those she calls her “children of the heart”.Mrs. Fielding disliked seeing God’s money wasted and re-spectfully requests that, in lieu RIRZHUVDQ\PHPRULDOVEHmade in the form of donations to Southside Baptist Church or to Gideon’s International for the placement of Bibles.A memorial service will be held at Southside Baptist Church on Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 'U5DOSK5RGULJXH]RIFLDWLQJ OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterBank makes donationOfficials at TD Bank presented a check for $4,000.19 to Chr ist Central Ministries Lead Pastor Lonnie Johns (second from right) on Tuesday. The money is a contribution from the bank’s Affinity Membership Program and will help to fund some of the church’s ministries, including Operation Backpack and its feeding and counseling programs. Pictured are (from left) Suzanne Norris, TD Bank regional vice president for Nor th Central Florida; retail market manager Gwynn Virostek; Johns; and TD store manager Don Win kleman.

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From staff reportsLIVE OAK — Kevin Wright, a professional engineer at the Suwannee River Water Management District, is one of 13 young engineers across the nation nominated by the American Society of Agriculture and Biological Engineers (ASABE) for the National Engineers Week Foundation New Faces of Engineering 2013. Of that group, Wright was among five selected to represent their profession as top engi-neers. The New Faces of Engineering program high-lights the interesting and unique work of young engi-neers. Young engineers two to five years out of college are the focus of the pro-gram. Wright is the first ASABE candidate to be selected in the top five twice. He was previously selected in 2010. National Engineers Week takes place Feb. 17-23. “The ASABE members, all 30 years or younger, have distinguished them-selves with outstanding, early-career achievements that serve as an inspiration to their peers and to the future engineers who will follow in their footsteps,” said Dolores Landeck, of the ASABE. Wright oversees the District’s Ag Team that helps agricultural opera-tions needing assistance with water use permitting, environmental resource permitting, best management practices, and the District’s agricultural cost-share partnership pro-gram. The Ag Team helps to simplify and streamline the permitting process and assists growers in comply-ing with total maximum daily loads requirements and Basin Management Action Plans established by the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. “It is an honor to be nominated for the New Faces of Engineering program, and I would like to thank the District for supporting my continued education and allowing my diverse workload,” said Wright. “Our nation needs young engineers to help solve the problems our country will face in the future.” Wright said he encourages any student interested in engineering to visit www.discoverengineering.org. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246AFrom staff reportsLIVE OAK — The new AURA Music and Arts Festival will be the first festival for 2013 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park. A wide range of musical groups are scheduled to perform Friday through Sunday, and the festival is expected to bring thousands to the SOSMP to enjoy the fourth AURA Music & Arts Festival. Artists set to perform are Papadosio, Conspirator, Perpetual Groove, Break Science, The Heavy Pets, Dopapod and Kung Fu. There will be a tribute to Stevie Wonder with Nigel Hall, as well as RAQ, The Lee Boys, Greenhouse Lounge, DrFameus, Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, Stokeswood, Jeff Bujak, Consider the Source, Brock Butler Solo, Lingo, Former Champions, The Main Squeeze, Newton Crosby, The McLovins. My Boy Elroy and Earth Cry. Artists at large are Todd Stoops, Roosevelt Collier, Adam ‘Shmeeans’ Smirnoff from Lettuce, Nigel Hall, John Provenzano and Jimmy Dunstan. Silent Disco line-up artists include Arpetrio, DuBBle James, Sir Charles, Vlad the Inhaler, UDNTPRTY, Monozygotik, EarthCry, Beat Thief Inc., DJ Tony D and DJ Scotty Solomon. In addition to the regular Silent Disco, Jeff Bujak will host a sepa-rate “Club Bujak” each night. Bujak creates live instrumental songs centered around classi-cal composition, progressive rock and dance music, while Jen Dulong performs with LED hula-hoops providing movement and depth. Visual artists include Jeff Wood, Michael Garfield, Christian Jaxtheimer, Reinier Gamboa, Andrew Wagner, Allie Azura, Olivia Curry, Dean Arscott, Goatfaced, Brian Barnard, Mike Mayoski, Andy Reed, Emily Kell, Chapin Matthews, Laura Atria, Katie Sandeen, Steve Brienzi, Patrick Anglin and Missy Parker. Since its inception in 2010, AURA Music and Arts Festival has showcased the best regional and national touring bands in the jam community and liveelectronic scene. The festival brings fans together for music, art, fun, yoga, culture and togetherness. To see the schedule of events, go to http://bit.ly/AURAdaily Single general admission weekend tickets are $119 at tier 2 and include music, primitive camping, all fees and taxes. The price will rise to $129 at tier 3. Kids 12 and younger are free with paid adult 21 and over. Gate tickets will be $150 (taxes and fees included). Single-day tickets are $75 (Friday or Saturday) and $50 on Sunday. Go to aurafestival.com for tickets. To rent a non-primitive campsite for this event, call The SOSMP at (386) 364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere.com. AURA will host a canned food drive and a charity disc golf tour-nament on the fantastic 18-hole Magnolia Disc Golf Course dur-ing the festival benefiting local charity Love INC. For those who want to reduce stress and help give back to fami-lies in need,. pre-order an assort-ment of gear for the weekend at www.ProjectShelter.org and it will be there when you arrive. Project Shelter will collect and donate all unwanted gear after the festival to victims of disaster and other hardships. You may also contact the SOSMP to inquire about any of the many exciting events com-ing up such as SpringFest; Wanee with the Allman Brothers, Widespread Panic, Gov’t Mule, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band, Michael Franti and Spearhead and many more; Suwannee River Jam Auditions; 2013 Suwannee River Jam’s Ms Suwannee River Jam Daisy Duke contest and Red Neck Wedding plus much more. See the SOSMP website at www.musicliveshere.com. The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park is located at 3076 95th Drive, 4.5 miles north of Live Oak off U.S. 129 at the famous Suwannee River. The park is 4.5 miles south of Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles north of Interstate 10 off U.S. 129.AURA festival to bring thousands to SOSMP COURTESY PHOTOThe band Papadosio is one of a huge line up of groups scheduled to perform this coming weekend during the three-day AURA Music and Arts Festival at Spirit of the Suw annee Music Park in Live Oak. From staff reportsLIVE OAK — Two more great acts — Aaron Tippin and Florida Georgia Line — have been added to the 2013 Suwannee River Jam line-up for the largest country music jam in the South May 1-4. Tippin and FGL will join with multiple Grammy award-winning singer Sheryl Crow, Eli Young Band, Rodney Atkins, Easton Corbin, Randy Houser and the LoCash Cowboys at the music festival. Tippin, known as the hardest working man in country music, is a long-time favorite of Suwannee River Jam fans and has made several appearances at the Jam over the years, draw-ing rave reviews every time. His fans love his music — “Where the Stars and Stripes Fly,” “I Wouldn’t Have It Any Other Way,” “There Ain’t Nothin’ Wrong With The Radio” among them — and are always impressed with Tippin’s determination to share his autograph with every fan regardless of how long the line is after performances. Florida Georgia Line, a duo of Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard who have the rockin’ No. 1 hit “Cruise” that is filling the airways across America with a tale of young love. The duo’s breakthrough single, “Cruise,” hit the Top 10 just 14 weeks after its release, faster than any debut since Brooks & Dunn’s “Brand New Man” in 1991. “It’s safe to say it’s been a real whirlwind for us,” says Tyler. “It’s been awesome.” “It’s a dream come true,” adds Brian. More acts added to ‘Jam’ lineup COUIRTESY PHOTOHot country duo Florida Georgia Line has been added to the lineup for the Suwannee River Jam festival in May. Wide range of musical talent to perform at SOSMP. SRWMD engineer receives national society recognition COURTESY PHOTOKevin Wright, an engineer with Suwannee River Water Management District, has received national recognition from others in his profession. Wright selected for same award in 2010 — a first. Public schools lose millions to crooked tutors, cheatersBy MICHAEL LAFORGIATampa Bay TimesTAMPA — When Yolanda Axson wasn’t watching, a pot of hot water spilled into a crib at her day care in Orlando, scald-ing a 4-month-old boy. She served probation for felony child neglect and then, barred from child care, found a less regulat-ed line of work. She start-ed a company to earn tax dollars tutoring poor kids in Florida’s failing schools. When state officials saw Axson’s name on an application for the govern-ment tutoring program, they didn’t hesitate. They stamped their approval, and her business, Busy BEE Services, went to work tutoring Florida’s neediest children. The cost to taxpayers per student? At least $60 an hour. Axson’s case points to a larger problem with man-dated tutoring in Florida: The program pays pub-lic money to people with criminal records, and to cheaters and profiteers who operate virtually unchecked by state regula-tors. In a three-month investigation, the Tampa Bay Times examined invoice records from 59 school dis-tricts, conducted dozens of interviews and reviewed thousands of pages of complaint reports, audits and other documents, and found: Florida school districts paid at least $7 million last year to tutoring companies run by people with crimi-nal records. Among those who have headed stateapproved tutoring firms are a rapist, thieves and drug users. In more than 40 cases across the state, tutoring companies have faked stu-dent sign-up sheets or billed for tutoring that never hap-pened. Companies that overcharged for tutoring earned $7 million last year alone. The program is riddled with conflicts of interest. In one county last year, more than 100 teachers moonlighted as tutors of their own students, flout-ing state ethics rules by positioning themselves to steer kids toward their sec-ondary employers. Parents have billed for tutoring their own children and the head of a small North Florida school system ran a tutoring company that did business with neigh-boring school districts. Dozens of tutoring firms have broken federal rules by luring impover-ished kids to sign up with promises of bicycles, gift cards and computers. Others have sent school administrators on golf out-ings or sponsored retreats for district officials who administer tutoring con-tracts. Despite uncovering millions of dollars in potential fraud and documenting flagrant violations, school districts almost never for-ward cases to law enforce-ment. And state education officials charged with policing the program are missing chances to cut back on fraud and waste. Florida’s Department of Education doesn’t screen backgrounds of the people who profit from subsidized tutoring, and it seldom cracks down on companies accused of improper bill-ing, illegal marketing and low-quality tutoring. Overwhelmingly, the state has allowed these companies to continue earning tax dollars year after year. After nearly a decade, Florida last year won a waiver from the federal law that requires private tutoring. The state was set to shut down the program when lobbyists for the tutoring industry stepped in. They convinced state lawmakers to keep the money flowing. Florida has spent $192 million on private tutor-ing firms in the past two years. The companies are paid at a dramatically higher rate than conventional public schools. In the 2009-10 school year, the most recent period for which numbers are available, the state spent $9,981 per stu-dent — about $11 an hour. Florida spent $58 an hour, more than five times as much, on private tutoring. Florida schools officials say the money could have paid for extended school days or extra instruction in high-poverty schools. Tutoring companies, many of which meet high standards and offer quality instruction, say they pro-vide a needed service. But researchers disagree over whether gov-ernment-funded tutor-ing is worth the money. Studies are inconclusive or contradictory. The debate often takes on political undertones, with Republicans in favor of subsidized tutoring — known in education jar-gon as supplemental edu-cational services — and Democrats against it. In May, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan weighed in, telling a group of Florida busi-nesspeople that, when it comes to subsidized tutor-ing firms, “there never has been accountability for results.” —The George W. Bush administration kicked off a gold rush in 2001 when, as part of its landmark edu-cation reform, No Child Left Behind, it required states to spend hundreds of millions of federal dol-lars on private tutoring for poor children. The law — adopted with bipartisan support — forced districts to hire tutors at high-pov-erty schools that failed to improve test scores two years in a row. To pay for it, districts were to tap Title I money, federal funds set aside for elevating impoverished kids. A new industry was born. Hundreds of companies were formed in Florida alone. The bulk of them were for-profit. Each year more companies lined up, lured by the promise of per-child fees that aver-aged about $60 an hour. With so much money at stake, providers have offered children bicycles, laptops and other prizes for signing up. They have followed kids from bus stops and mobbed parents in school parking lots.

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Columbia City ElementaryLiteracy WeekMrs. Boone kissed a pig! During the week of Jan. 14 CCE students participated in Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida. CCE students were challenged by Mrs. Boone to read 5 million words. They not only met the challenge, they surpassed it! Mrs. Boone was featured on morning announcements kissing “Chewy” the Guinea pig. Students started off the week by helping Florida reach a goal of 20 million minutes read. Each class-room teacher gave the students at least 20 extra minutes of reading time to help meet this goal. Each day there were prizes given away to classes that played “Guess That Book.” Classes also created a poster of their favorite book for display in the media center. Mrs. Cembruch still has the posters dis-played in the media center. Come by and see them.Congratulations to Mrs. Cunningham’s fifth-grade classroom, they came the closest to guessing the number of books in the media center. CCE concluded the week by dressing like characters from their favorite books. Students and adults did a fantastic job. They shared their costumes in a character parade on Friday.Great gradesCongratulations to these students that had a 100 percent average for Accelerated Reader for the second nine weeks: Tucker Boggs Marie Henderson, Jacob Feagle, Dalton Morris, Gracie Harris and Lon Maggard.Broadcast teamWe are fortunate at Columbia City Elementary to have a state-of-theart broadcast studio. Mrs. Regina Guetherman and Mrs. Malinda Cembruch work with a wonderful group of fifth-graders to produce “Good Morning, Columbia City,” a news show each morning. The broadcast team members for this semester are: TJ Hudson, Morgan Ham-Hunter, Seth Rutledge, Julie Boozer, Hunter Shoup, Tyler Yaxley, Brooke Spin, Victoria Tetstone, and Cadence Mirra.Five Points ElementaryK-9 unit visitThe second-grade classes had the Lake City Police Department’s K-9 Unit team out on Thursday, Feb. 7. Mrs. Leann Carroll, Mrs. Linda Kamback, Gail Leighty, and Mrs. Lisa Nettles’ classes watched the K-9 Unit demonstrate the use of police dogs. The students and staff were very appreciative and impressed how well trained and intelligent the dogs were.Melrose Park ElementaryScience fair entriesAfter the school-wide science fair, we went on to compete at the county level at Florida Gateway College. We would like to congratulate two Melrose Park students. Jacob Sheldon won second place for sec-ond grade in the county. Zoryana Hughes won first place in second grade for the entire county. We are so proud of our students! Westside ElementaryCeramic art on displayWestside Elementary School students have ceramic artwork on dis-play in the Columbia School Board Offices foyer. Students whose work is displayed include Michael Slime, Bridget Butcher, Tatiana Rosin, Austin Knowles, Daphne Watson, Jordan Tiran, Cameron Murphy, Trinity Doyle, Colby Craig, Lane Dinkins, Sativa Valier, Avon Randolph, Riley Stressed, Ivey McCredie, Haley Rouse, Lesley Caballero, Joey Paul, Daniel Prince, Zachery Strickland, Juan Resend, Brett Marts, Adrianna McClellan, Miranda Markham, Zachary Dicks, Seth Sieges, Ashley Powell, Skylar Hill, Victoria Marshall, Darren Eubanks, Racine Fidel, Marquez Bell, Jenna Burns, Scarlett Kohlhepp, Kori Rentz, Gabriel McCoy, Dakota Drain, Jonathan Sobczak, Carly Brocchi, Alex Pierron, Mason Gray, Daisha Poulnot, Sheldon Jackson, Tyeshia Broom-Jones, Christian Roldan, Tatyana Murphy, Jamiel Cray, Hannah Schafer, Diya Patel, Liana Martos, Bronson Dumas, Kinley Keen, Joseph Richards, Jacob Porter, Ie’shia Broom-Jones, Sarah Tallador, Damon Manning, Anan-Eya Griffin, Aaliyah Johnson, Hannah Waller, Lena Deloatch, Lexie Trussell, Coyle Giebeig, Jersee Walker. Come and see the wonderful work these students have done.Writing winnersWriting winners for the fourth six-week period were: First grade — Tayah Johnson, Bo Ruis, Sydney Zieguas, Zania Jones, Evan Williams, Abraham Ayon and Bobby Wilson; second grade — Samantha Shaw, Emilee Ostendorf, Olivia Hannigan, Arnav Kapasi, Abigail Rossborough and Briani Desroches; third grade — Asayjah Jackson, Mayar Fadhel, Dakota Strand, Dana Reed and Jade Tyre; fourth grade — Bryant Green, Starr Harkins, Terrick Ponds, Bailey Rogers, Emily Flugrath, Mason Gray and Sarah Tallador; fifth grade — Seth Zieguas, Devin Keeling, Cara Christie, Raymond Turner and Daphne Watson. ON CAMPUS CLASS NOTESQ To leave an anonymous message about a possible dangerous situation concerning Columbia County schools, call toll-free, (866) 295-7303.Q To leave an anonymous message about a possible truancy problem in Columbia County schools, call 758-4947.Q Items for the school page should be dropped off or mailed to: Jim Barr, Lake City Reporter 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055; faxed to (386) 752-9400; or emailed to jbarr@lakecityreporter.com by 5 p.m. Thursdays. BulletinBoard NEWS ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS From staff reportsAn open house for the Suwannee Valley Regional Science Fair will be held at Florida Gateway College today from 5 to 7 p.m. This event will be open to members of the public who are interested in viewing projects entered by stu-dents from schools in the 10-county Suwannee Valley region. The students will be competing for 25 spots to the Florida State Science Fair and two spots to the International Science Fair. Winners will be announced later. COURTESY PHOTOHonor band selectionsNine Lake City Middle School students were selected for North Florida Honor Band, it was announced following aud itions at Lake Butler Middle School. Selected were (front ro, from left) Avery Wallace, bassoon; Jessica Yu, flute; Michael Turner, trumpet; Rebecca Silva, flute; Brooke Silva, trombone; (back row) Adriana Medina, clarinet first chair; Aubrey Bennett, clarinet; Melodie Marts, clarinet; Cody Kight, clarinet. North Florida Honor Band recognizes the top performers from five area counties by a week of sight reading, rehearsals and a full d ay under the direction of guest conductor Jeannie Berry from Hunter’s Creek Middle School in Orlando. The week’s activities c ulminated in a concert on Feb.1 at the Union County High S chool in conjunction with the high school honor band. CALENDAR Tuesday Summers Elementary School — Mid-terms go home. Career and Adult Education meeting, Columbia County School District Central Building, room 120, 12:10 to 1 p.m. Richardson Middle School — Wolf softball vs. Madison, 6 p.m., home; Wolf baseball vs. Madison, 6 p.m., home. Columbia County School Board meeting at Fort White Elementary School, 7 p.m. Fort White High School — Indian JV baseball vs. Columbia High School, 5 p.m., away; Indian varsity softball vs. Chiefland, 6 p.m., home; Indian varsity baseball vs. CHS, 7 p.m., away; Indian track and field at Suwannee High School, 3:30 p.m. Fort White Middle School — Indian base-ball vs. PK Yonge, 5 p.m., awayWednesday Summers Elementary — Fifth-grade RtI meeting, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m; Summers Singers practice in cafete-ria, 1:34 to 2 p.m. Columbia City Elementary — Volunteer Appreciation Breakfast in Media Center, 8:15 a.m. Westside Elementary — Volunteer Appreciation Brunch in cafeteria, 9 a.m.; Book Fair begins; Learning Community for grades three through five. Lake City Middle School — Faculty meeting in Media Center, 8 a.m.Thursday Melrose Park Elementary — Pre-kin-dergarten Valentine Exchange in classes; kindergarten Valentine’s party in classes; second-grade Valentine’s party in classes. Career and Adult Education student meeting at CCSD Central Building, room 13, 10 a.m. to noon. Summers Elementary — Volunteer Appreciation Breakfast in cafeteria 9 to 10 a.m. RMS — Valentine Social in cafeteria, 3:30 to 5 p.m.; Wolf softball vs. Perry, 4 p.m., home; Wolf baseball vs. Perry, 4 p.m., home. Five Points Elementary — School Advisory Council meeting, 5 to 6 p.m.; Family Reading Night. 5 to 6 p.m.; PTO meeting, 6 to 7 p.m. LCMS — Falcon softball vs. Suwannee, 4 p.m., home; Falcon baseball vs. Suwannee, 4 p.m., home. FWHS — Indian JV baseball vs. Newberry, 6 p.m., away; Indian varsity softball vs. Union County, 6 p.m., home. Eastside Elementary — African-American History program for third through fifth grades in cafeteria, 8:45 to 9:30 a.m. Westside Elementary — “A” Day celebration. Five Points Elementary — PTO meeting in cafete-ria, 6 p.m., Vocal Chords will sing.Friday Teacer work day, student holiday Columbia City Elementary — Chorus sings at Olustee Festival. Summers Elementary — Summer Singers at Olustee Festival, 11 a.m. to noon. LCMS — Falcon softball vs. FWMS, 5 p.m., away; Falcon baseball vs. FWMS, 5 p.m.; chorus to Olustee Festival. FWHS — Indian varsity baseball vs. Keystone Heights, 7 p.m., home. Five Points Elementary — Vocal Chords sing at Olustee Festival.Saturday Lake City Middle School — Falcon Band to Olustee Parade, 9 a.m.; Fusion vol-leyball practice in gym, 9 a.m. to noon. 7A LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04247ASCHOOL 234 SW Main Blvd. • 752-5866 Af_e9liej#@@@ 8^\ek DXip?%Jldd\iXcc =`eXeZ`XcJ\im`Z\jI\g%For Life Insurance Go With Someone You Know DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterFuture Farmers of America WeekColumbia County Commission Chairman Stephen Bailey pr esents students in the Future Farmers of America program wi th a proclamation establishing Feb. 18 through Feb. 22 as Nation al FFA Week. The students asked the county commissioners to fly the FFA flag at the county offices, which the county will do during National FFA Week. Regional science fair open house tonight

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 8A Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com Lake City Reporter G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES $500 CASH GIVEAWAY Every Saturday (Casino Style) 2510 W. Hwy 90, Suite 101 386-438-5712 Never before seen games and entertainment. Double the fun, double the excitement, double the prizes at the Double Deuce Cafe. The next best thing to Vegas baby. $10 00 Match Play With Coupon Expires 2-18-13 New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires February 28, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Noahs Art of Lake City All Children Are Artists! Now offering: An after school program for ages 5-12 Mixed media art classes for children ages 2-10 Funding Accepted Through the Early Learning Coalition www.noahs-art.com (386) 438-8060 New Students Sold-out show Tracy Lawrence thrills overflow crowd at FGC Photos by TROY ROBERTS /Special to the Reporter ABOVE, BELOW, BOTTOM: County music star Tracy Lawrence performed to a sold-out house Friday at Florida Gateway College. Military weighs cutbacks, shifts in drone programs By LOLITA C. BALDOR Associated Press LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. The Pentagon for the first time is consid ering scaling back the massive buildup of drones it has overseen in the past few years, both to save money and to adapt to changing security threats and an increased focus on Asia as the Afghanistan war winds down. Air Force leaders are saying the mili tary may already have enough unmanned aircraft systems to wage the wars of the future. And the Pentagons shift to Asia will require a new mix of drones and other aircraft because countries in that region are better able to detect unmanned ver sions and shoot them down. If the Pentagon does slow the huge building and deployment program, which was ordered several years ago by thenDefense Secretary Robert Gates, it wont affect the CIA drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere against terror sus pects. Those strikes were brought center stage last week during the confirmation hearing for White House counterterror chief John Brennan, President Barack Obamas pick to lead the CIA.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, February 12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Lake CityLake City Commons Center(Publix Shopping)752-3733 CONTACTSEYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $119 Includes Lenses & FramesSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 NOW FREE GLASSES FREEPAIR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive aSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 $99 1 PairEyeglasses Includes lenses & frames.Some Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 NOW “Where you get the Best for Less”Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday Today Q Columbia High baseball vs. Fort White High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Gainesville High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High softball at Madison County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Q Fort White High track district at Baldwin High, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High weightlifting at Palatka High, 3 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High baseball vs. Newberry High, 5:30 p.m. Q Columbia High softball vs. P.K. Yonge, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Taylor County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Union County High, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High basketball at Ridgeview High in Class 6A playoffs, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High basketball at Mount Dora High in the Class 4A playoffs, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High baseball vs. St. Augustine High, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Lafayette High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dillan Hall (left) and Akeem Williams go up for a rebound against Wolfson High on Saturday in the District 4-6A Championship.Playoff time GAMES By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comDespite losses in their respective district champi-onship games, the Tigers and Indians of Columbia and Fort White high schools will continue their playoff journey this week. Columbia (19-7) travels to Ridgeview High in a rematch of last year’s first round game with the Panthers at 7 p.m. on Thursday in Orange Park. Fort White is making its first trip to the state playoffs and will travel to Mount Dora High at 7 p.m. on Thursday. Although the Tigers will go on the road, Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson felt that Columbia Columbia, Fort White takes shows on road. BRIEFS FISHING Justin Brown Memorial tourney The Justin Brown Memorial Bass Tournament is March 2 at Clay Landing. Entry fee is $70 per boat with an option-al big bass pot for $10. For details, call Chris Starling at 288-7633.Q From staff reports CHS continued on 2B ASSOCIATED PRESSMiami guard Shane Larkin passes past North Carolina g uard Marcus Paige (5) during the first half on Saturday in Coral Gables.Hurricanes climb to 3rd in rankings for 1st timeBy STEVEN WINEAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — Miami Hurricanes center Julian Gamble learned about his team’s latest ranking when he received a flurry of phone messages, including one from his mother in North Carolina. “She texted me — ‘No. 3. Wow. That’s crazy,”’ Gamble said. “I didn’t even know what she was talking about.” For the sixth-year senior, the Hurricanes’ unprece-dented achievement was a little tough to grasp. They were ranked behind only No. 1 Indiana and No. 2 Duke in Monday’s poll, and received a school-record 17 first-place votes. The Hurricanes (19-3, 10-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) had never pre-viously been ranked higher than No. 8. Last week they achieved that spot for the first time since 1960. “I’ve never really thought that Miami could be a top 10 program,” senior Reggie Miami in midst of best season in team’s history. CANES continued on 3B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at FloridaESPN2 — Seton Hall at Rutgers 9 p.m. ESPN — Michigan at Michigan St. NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — N.Y. Rangers at Boston SOCCER 2:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Paris at Valencia 8 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Celtic vs. Juventus, at Glasgow, Scotland (same-day tape)FOOTBALLNFL calendar March 9-11 — Clubs may enter negotiations with certified agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at end of league year. March 12 — Before 4 p.m., clubs must exercise options for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their 2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation; clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclusive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 contracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must be under the salary cap. The 2013 league year, free agency and trading period begins at 4 p.m. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix April 25-27 — NFL draft, New YorkMay 20-22 — NFL spring league Meeting, Boston Sept. 5, 8-9 — 2013 NFL season begins.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Sunday’s Games L.A. Clippers 102, New York 88Miami 107, L.A. Lakers 97Memphis 105, Minnesota 88Boston 118, Denver 114,3OTToronto 102, New Orleans 89Orlando 110, Portland 104Oklahoma City 97, Phoenix 69San Antonio 111, Brooklyn 86Sacramento 117, Houston 111 Today’s Games Denver at Toronto, 7 p.m.Portland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.Houston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.Wednesday’s Games NBA calendar Friday-Sunday — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin.June 6 — NBA Finals begin (possible switch to June 4). June 20 — Last possible date for NBA Finals (possible switch to June 18). June 27 — NBA draft. AP Top 25Record Pts Prv 1. Indiana (26) 21-3 1,559 1 2. Duke (20) 21-2 1,515 4 3. Miami (17) 19-3 1,499 8 4. Michigan 21-3 1,428 3 5. Gonzaga (2) 23-2 1,371 6 6. Syracuse 20-3 1,293 9 7. Florida 19-3 1,286 2 8. Michigan St. 20-4 1,178 12 9. Arizona 20-3 1,062 7 10. Kansas St. 19-4 1,012 13 11. Butler 20-4 943 14 12. Louisville 19-5 842 11 13. Ohio St. 17-6 828 10 14. Kansas 19-4 823 5 15. Georgetown 17-4 679 2016. Pittsburgh 20-5 591 23 17. Oklahoma St. 17-5 587 22 18. Marquette 17-5 493 24 19. New Mexico 20-4 433 15 20. Wisconsin 17-7 305 — 21. Notre Dame 19-5 264 25 22. Memphis 20-3 193 — 23. Oregon 19-5 137 1924. Colorado St. 19-4 125 — 25. Kentucky 17-6 87 — Others receiving votes: Minnesota 80, Missouri 69, Cincinnati 68, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 62, Creighton 56, San Diego St. 53, Louisiana Tech 43, VCU 35, Saint Louis 34, Illinois 26, NC State 24, Akron 12, UCLA 8, UNLV 6, Indiana St. 5, Virginia 4, Wichita St. 3, Belmont 2, Mississippi 1, Oklahoma 1.Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 4 Michigan at No. 8 Michigan State, 9 p.m. No. 7 Florida vs. No. 25 Kentucky, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Nebraska, 7 p.m.No. 2 Duke vs. North Carolina, 9 p.m.No. 3 Miami at Florida State, 7 p.m.No. 6 Syracuse vs. UConn at the XL Center, Hartford, Conn., 7 p.m. No. 11 Butler vs. Charlotte, 7 p.m.No. 17 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech, 7 p.m. No. 19 New Mexico at Fresno State, 10 p.m. No. 21 Notre Dame vs. DePaul, 7 p.m. No. 22 Memphis vs. UCF, 8 p.m.No. 23 Oregon at Washington, 11 p.m. No. 24 Colorado State vs. San Diego State, 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 5 Gonzaga at Saint Mary’s (Cal), 11 p.m. No. 9 Arizona at Colorado, 10 p.m.No. 12 Louisville vs. St. John’s, 9 p.m.No. 13 Ohio State vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 20 Wisconsin at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 15 Georgetown at Cincinnati, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Purdue, 2 p.m.No. 2 Duke at Maryland, 6 p.m.No. 5 Gonzaga at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m. No. 6 Syracuse at Seton Hall, 8 p.m.No. 7 Florida at Auburn, 1:30 p.m.No. 8 Michigan State at Nebraska, 8 p.m. No. 10 Kansas State vs. Baylor, 7 p.m.No. 11 Butler at Fordham, 4 p.m.No. 14 Kansas vs. Texas, 9 p.m.No. 16 Pittsburgh at No. 18 Marquette, 1 p.m. No. 17 Oklahoma State vs. Oklahoma, 1:30 p.m. No. 19 New Mexico vs. Boise State, 9 p.m. No. 21 Notre Dame at Providence, Noon No. 22 Memphis at Marshall, 8 p.m.No. 23 Oregon at Washington State, 7 p.m. No. 24 Colorado State at Air Force, 4 p.m. No. 25 Kentucky at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 3 Miami at Clemson, 6 p.m.No. 4 Michigan vs. Penn State, NoonNo. 9 Arizona at Utah, 3 p.m.No. 12 Louisville at South Florida, 1 p.m. No. 13 Ohio State at No. 20 Wisconsin, 1 p.m.BASEBALL MLB calendar Through Feb. 21 — Salary arbitration hearings, Phoenix. Today — Mandatory reporting date for players participating in the World Baseball Classic in Asia. Mandatory reporting date for all other pitchers and catchers par-ticipating in the WBC. Voluntary reporting date for pitchers and catchers not partici-pating in the WBC. Friday — Mandatory reporting date for WBC players not participating in Asia. Voluntary reporting date for position players not participating in the WBC. Feb. 20 — Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-11 — Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 2-19 — World Baseball Classic. March 13 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 — Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. March 31 — Opening day, Texas at Houston. Active rosters reduced to 25 players.HOCKEYNHL schedule Sunday’s Games Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2Edmonton 3, Columbus 1Boston 3, Buffalo 1N.Y. Rangers 5, Tampa Bay 1New Jersey 3, Pittsburgh 1Chicago 3, Nashville 0 Today’s Game Carolina at New Jersey, 7 p.m.N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Buffalo at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Florida, 7:30 p.m.Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m.Anaheim at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Dallas at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m.GOLFWorld Golf Ranking Through Feb. 10 1. Rory McIlroy NIR 12.03 2. Tiger Woods USA 9.03 3. Luke Donald ENG 7.58 4. Brandt Snedeker USA 6.91 5. Justin Rose ENG 6.44 6. Louis Oosthuizen SAF 6.44 7. Adam Scott AUS 5.85 8. Lee Westwood ENG 5.50 9. Bubba Watson USA 5.28 10. Phil Mickelson USA 5.16 11. Ian Poulter ENG 5.04 12. Jason Dufner USA 4.97 13. Steve Stricker USA 4.85 14. Sergio Garcia ESP 4.81 15. Keegan Bradley USA 4.79 16. Charl Schwartzel SAF 4.72 17. Dustin Johnson USA 4.69 17. Webb Simpson USA 4.69 19. Graeme McDowell NIR 4.43 20. Peter Hanson SWE 4.38 21. Nick Watney USA 4.31 22. Matt Kuchar USA 4.24 23. Bo Van Pelt USA 4.10 24. Ernie Els SAF 4.07 25. Zach Johnson USA 3.84 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 12, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Taste “Daring Pairings” (N) State of the Union 2013 (N) (Live) Modern FamilyNews at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementState of the Union 2013 (N) (Live) NewsChann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Frontline “Cliffhanger” (N) John D. Rockefeller: American Experience John D. 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(N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) SUNSP 37 -Inside Israeli Bask.Seminole SportsLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live!Inside LightningAmerican Ski Classic DISCV 38 182 278Dual Survival “Trouble in Paradise” Dual Survival “The Green Hell” Dual Survival “Untamed: Nicaragua” Dual Survival “Meltdown” (N) Africa “Making Of” (N) Dual Survival “Meltdown” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCougar Town (N) Big Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) (8:55) State of the Union 2013 (N) (Live) To Be AnnouncedThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) Fashion PoliceE! 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(N) Chopped “Food Network Stars!” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Way Of MasterThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoyce MeyerJoseph PrinceRod ParsleyPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Spotlight (N) Ship Shape TVWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 UEFA Champions League Soccer Round of 16 -Celtic FC vs Juventus FC. First Leg. Game TimeWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Face Off “Heroic Proportions” Face Off “When Hell Freezes Over” Face Off “Eye Candy” Face Off (N) Total Blackout (N) Total BlackoutFace Off AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Jumanji” (1995, Fantasy) Robin Williams, Bonnie Hunt. “Happy Gilmore” (1996, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Christopher McDonald. “Happy Gilmore” (1996, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Christopher McDonald. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowThe Burn-JeffTosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) The Burn-JeffDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba (:22) Reba Reba Reba Reba “Encounters” Reba “Young Guns” (1988, Western) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. “Young Guns II” (1990, Western) NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Raging Bandit” Cesar Millan’s Leader of the PackCesar Millan’s Leader of the PackThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Flu the Coop” The Incredible Dr. PolCesar Millan’s Leader of the Pack NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersDoomsday Preppers Bugged OutDoomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers (N) Diggers (N) Diggers (N) Doomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHeavy Metal Task Force Build It Bigger Strip the City “Sydney” (N) Strip the City “San Francisco” Build It Bigger ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID “Strangers on a Train” Dateline on ID “Strangers on a Train” The Will: Family Secrets RevealedMy Dirty Little Secret (N) Redrum (N) Redrum The Will: Family Secrets Revealed HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “The Eagle” (2011) Channing Tatum. ‘PG-13’ Bobby McFerrin “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012) ‘PG’ (:45) Girls (:15) “The Thing” (2011, Horror) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(:05) “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ “Meet the Fockers” (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel. ‘NR’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:00) Melancholia “Chasing Amy” (1997, Romance-Comedy) Ben Af eck, Jason Lee. ‘R’ “Your Sister’s Sister” (2011) Emily Blunt. Premiere. ‘R’ House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “The Helpful Gallaghers” CHS: On road to begin playoffs Continued From Page 1B would bounce back after one of their worst showings of the year against Wolfson High in the District 4-6A championship. Jefferson noted that the Tigers have been a strong road team throughout the season. “We’ve had success on the road this season,” Jefferson said. “We’ve only lost three on the road, so we’re playing consistent whether we’re at home or on the road. Obviously, we wanted to be at home, but we’re in the state playoffs for the second-consecutive year.” Ridgeview enters the playoffs with a 21-8 record and defeated Leon High, 60-49, on Friday to claim the District 3-6A Championship. Wolfson will host Leon with the winner of that game taking on the winner of Columbia and Ridgeview on Feb. 19. Fort White finished the year with an overtime loss against Williston High looking to claim its first district championship in boys’ basketball. The Indians will take on Mount Dora High, which finished the year with a District 6-4A Championship win against South Sumter High. Williston will host South Sumter with the win-ner of that game facing the winner of Fort White and Mount Dora on Feb. 19. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Indiana stays at No. 1 in Top 25 despite lossBy JIM O’CONNELLAssociated PressIndiana coach Tom Crean used an analogy to the state’s second favorite sport after the Hoosiers remained No. 1 in The Associated Press’ Top 25 for a second straight week. It had been over a month since a team managed to stay on top, and Indiana broke that trend despite losing a game last week, leading Crean to bring up auto racing. “I had a good friend tell me that in-season rankings are the barometer of rep-resenting what lane you’re in and the direction and how far you are moving towards your goals,” Crean said Monday. “We want to stay in the left lane and keep working on our team and pace because we know there are quite a few others in the left lane as well.” The Hoosiers (21-3) lost to Illinois on a last-sec-ond basket Thursday but rebounded with a win at then-No.10 Ohio State on Sunday. In a week when four of the top five teams and six of the top 10 lost, it was enough to keep the No. 1 ranking. “They were really disappointed on Thursday night. And instead of carrying that disappointment into a ‘woe is me’ mentality, they really did trigger how to get better. And I think it was in the sense of closing games,” Crean said. “I think there was a different level, a sense of urgency because of the way we didn’t finish it off, combined with the fact that we knew we were playing a team that it is outstand-ing.” This ends a stretch of five consecutive weeks with a new No. 1, two weeks short of the longest such stretch in 1993-94. Duke started the run followed by Louisville, Duke again, Michigan and Indiana. The Hoosiers received 26 first-place votes from the 65-member national media panel Monday, while Duke, the only member of the top five not to lose last week, moved up two spots to second after getting 20 first-place votes. The last time a No. 1 team lost and kept the ranking the next week was the final poll of last season. Kentucky fell to Vanderbilt in the Southeastern Conference tournament championship game, but Nos. 2-4 also went down that week, so the Wildcats were No. 1 heading into the NCAA tournament. Miami, which received 17 No. 1 votes, jumped from eighth to No. 3, the Hurricanes’ highest rank-ing ever. “I’ve never really thought that Miami could be a top 10 program,” cen-ter Reggie Johnson said. “I didn’t think we’d be here in February. It’s surreal. The votes are cool, but we’ve still got work to do.” The Hurricanes are the last team from a major con-ference to still be unbeaten in league play. “It’s what every program strives for,” coach Jim Larranaga said. “Carolina and Duke have this every year. It’s a little different for us. These guys are hungry. They remain very, very humble.” Michigan dropped one spot to fourth, while Gonzaga, which got the other two first-place votes, moved up one spot to fifth. Syracuse was sixth, followed by Florida, Michigan State, Arizona and Kansas State. Along with Indiana and Ohio State, the other top 10 teams to lose last week were No. 2 Florida, No. 3 Michigan, No. 5 Kansas and No. 7 Arizona. There were four newcomers to the rankings: No. 20 Wisconsin, No. 22 Memphis, No. 24 Colorado State and No. 25 Kentucky. Wisconsin, Memphis and Kentucky, the defending national champion, were all ranked early in the sea-son, while Colorado State makes it first appearance in the poll since March 9, 1954. They replace Creighton, Cincinnati, Minnesota and Missouri, the only one of the four not to lose two games last week.

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3Bsports CANES: Not worried about ranking Continued From Page 1BJohnson said. “I didn’t think we’d be here in February. It’s surreal.” Miami cracked the Top 25 three weeks ago and has since enjoyed a rapid rise, thanks to a succession of impressive victories and a flurry of losses by highly ranked teams. With the Hurricanes’ win Saturday over North Carolina, they became the first ACC team ever to beat both the Tar Heels and Duke by at least 25 points in the same season. The Hurricanes are so good they’ve even started to quibble that their rank-ing isn’t high enough. “It does feel strange Duke is still ahead of our team,” Johnson said. “I feel like if the poll’s really legit, we should be ranked in front of them.” Coach Jim Larranaga described the Top 25 as a popularity contest and a beauty contest. But he also said the high ranking will benefit the university and give his program a long-term boost. Larranaga said he texted recruiting prospects with the news of the latest rank-ing and received congratu-lations from every one. “We had an eighth-grader commit,” the coach said with a grin. “We told him it’s a little too early.” Larranaga said the Hurricanes are handling success and attention well in part because they’re a senior-laden team. Miami takes an 11-game winning streak into Wednesday’s game at Florida State, and several players said they expect the games to start getting tougher. “The target on our back is bigger than it ever was,” Gamble said. “We’re going to get everybody’s best shot,” guard Shane Larkin added. Larkin’s only a sophomore, but Miami’s other four starters are seniors who are well aware the program’s in uncharted ter-ritory. So is Larranaga, who is in his second season with Miami after leading George Mason to the Final Four in 2006. The Hurricanes have already set a school record for ACC victories in a sea-son, and the last time they received any votes for No. 1 was in March 1960. “This is what every program strives for,” Larranaga said. “Carolina and Duke have this every year. It’s a little different for us.” The buzz the Hurricanes are creating is a big change for the long-overlooked pro-gram. Monday’s practice drew a large media con-tingent, and three of the past four home games have been sellouts. “I’m at the shopping mall and people are coming up to me, ‘Hey, man, I’m proud of you guys. Keep it up,”’ Johnson said. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN ASSOCIATED PRESSMiami’s Kenny Kadji rejects a shot by North Carolina fo rward James Michael McAdoo during the first half on Saturday in Coral Gables. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Nov. 11 file photo, Philadelphia Eagles quarterbac k Michael Vick throws a pass against the Dallas Cowboys in the first half in Philadelp hia. Vick, who was slated to earn $16 million next season, has agreed to a restructured de al with the Philadelphia Eagles. Vick, who was injured and inconsistent last season, even tually giving way to rookie Nick Foles, now has a three-year contract, and will compete with Foles to see who runs new coach Chip Kelly’s offense this season.QB Vick, Eagles agree to new deal to stay with teamBy ROB MAADDIAssociated PressPHILADELPHIA — Quarterback Michael Vick, who was slated to earn $16 million next season, has agreed to a restructured deal with the Philadelphia Eagles. Vick, who was injured and inconsistent last sea-son, eventually giving way to rookie Nick Foles, now has a three-year contract, and will com-pete with Foles over the next nine months to see who runs new coach Chip Kelly’s offense this sea-son. Vick, who returned to start the season finale vs. the New York Giants in December because Foles was injured, finished the season with 2,362 yards passing, 12 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. The Eagles finished 4-12 and in last place in the NFC East. Andy Reid was fired as coach the day after the season ended, and Kelly was hired last month. Vick, who will be 33 when next season begins, is still elusive when healthy, and seems equipped to run Kelly’s aggressive, up-tempo offense that he is bringing to the Eagles from Oregon. “He wanted to be here,” Kelly said Monday in his first meeting with the media following his open-ing press conference on Jan. 17. “I had never met him before. The one thing that attracted me to him, is Michael is a competitor. Nick is, too. You want guys who want to compete.” Vick was signed by Philadelphia in 2009, and became the starter in 2010. He led the Eagles that sea-son to an NFC East title, and a memorable 38-31 December win over the Giants in which he rallied the team from a 21-point deficit. There are questions, of course, about his durabil-ity and his age, as he now seems far removed from that resurgent 2010 sea-son. He finished that year with 3,018 yards passing, 676 yards rushing and 30 total touchdowns. “He’s younger than (Dallas quarterback) Tony Romo, and he’s right about the same age as (Giants quarterback) Eli Manning,” Kelly said. “The only reason I say that is because I told Michael that this morning, and he didn’t know.” Vick only played in 10 games last season, and in the finale vs. New York, he had a quarterback rating of just 68.4 en route to a 42-7 loss. “I looked at the films, and studied the tape. When you look at Michael, it’s his toughness. That can-not be overrated at all,” Kelly said. “We looked at his skillset. He still has that skillset. He can still throw the football. “He’s got an unbelievable release, and it’s our job as coaches to make sure he can get the ball out quickly.” All told, Vick has started 35 games for Philadelphia over the last three seasons. Foles has started six. The Eagles scored just 280 points last season as they endured an eightand a three-game losing streak. Only Arizona (250) scored fewer in the NFC. When asked which quarterback would work with the first-team offense in training camp, Kelly smiled and quickly showed he’s going to be able to handle the Philadelphia media just fine. “We’ll go alphabetical,” he said with a grin. “First name? Last name? We’ll flip a coin.”While James sizzles Wade generates Heat Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 3B By TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI — Dwyane Wade got the ball on the left wing, darted toward the basket, leaped to avoid Dwight Howard and dunked from the right side of the rim. A year ago, a play like that one from Sunday might have been impossible for Wade. Now, he’s looking good as new, at maybe the perfect time for the surging Miami Heat. LeBron James might be the best player in the world and might be playing like the best player in the world, but he’s hardly having to carry the entire load for the Heat these days. While James is on a history-making run of scor-ing at least 30 points and shooting at least 60 percent in Miami’s last five games — all wins — Wade is averaging 24.8 points on better than 50 percent shooting over that same stretch. And what’s weird is, it almost seems as if Wade is doing it qui-etly. “I know what a problem he is,” said the Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant, who watched Wade score 30 in a Heat win on Sunday. “You try to focus in on him as much as you can. They have two very, very special players. Two of the best that we’ve seen. Dwyane obviously is dealing with injuries starting the year, but he seems to be rounding into form and you saw that breakaway dunk he had — that’s the younger D-Wade.” During this Miami winning streak, James and Wade are com-bining to average 55.8 points a game. Over the same time span, no other NBA 1-2 punch was close. Tony Parker and Danny Green combined to average 49.3 points for San Antonio. Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire averaged 48.8 points for the New York Knicks. James Harden and Jeremy Lin scored 47.1 per game for Houston. And while the rest of the NBA shot 46 percent dur-ing that stretch, the Heat shot 52 percent. Sure, James is on an unbelievable roll. At least some of the credit for that, he believes, goes to Wade for being hot at the same time. “His legs are under him. You can tell on his jump shot, he is fin-ishing up-top and he is penetrat-ing and getting to the rim, too,” James said after Wade’s 30-point showing Sunday. “He is getting healthier and healthier each and every day, each and every game. It is a huge plus for our team and I know how great he feels right now.” Miami closes its homestand Tuesday against Portland, then is at Oklahoma City for a 2012 NBA Finals rematch before heading into the All-Star break. And part of the reason why Wade is hurting opponents is because he’s hurting less than he has in the past. Wade said months ago that he figured off-season knee surgery would keep him from getting to his best level until about the All-Star break. Here comes that timeframe, and Wade is flying. “Feeling good,” Wade said. “Feeling better. I’ve come in and gotten my work in, taken care of my body and it’s working.” Wade is averaging 21.1 points for the season, and if he stays there his average will have dropped for the fourth straight year after a career-best 30.2-point-per-game clip in 2008-09. And that scoring dip has prompted many, including one-time Wade com-mercial co-star and now often-critic Charles Barkley, to say the 10th-year guard is clearly in a career decline. Wade publicly laughs off that talk, yet privately seethes about some of that criticism. While his scoring has dipped each year, so have his shots per game — some-thing that he knew would happen when he helped lure James and Chris Bosh to Miami in the sum-mer of 2010. Wade famously left a huge bit of salary — about $17 million over the lifespan of his contract — on the Heat bargaining table that summer, providing the team with flexibility to not only close the deals with James and Bosh but to add other players. James and Bosh also took less money than they would have been entitled to under the terms of the past collec-tive bargaining agreement. But Wade didn’t just sacrifice cash that summer. The way he sees it, he also sacrificed stats. And if he’s the Robin to James’ Batman right now, and the Heat are winning, then Wade’s fine with that arrangement. “It takes pressure off all of us,” Wade said. “Obviously, Chris, myself and all these guys, we’ve played without a guy like that before and we’ve done pretty good. But when he’s playing the way he is, it makes our job a little easier. And vice versa — when we’re playing the way we are, it makes his job a little easier. So we all work for each other.” James is getting almost all the attention right now, and that’s certainly deserved. Still, to him, the notion that Wade is an afterthought in Miami now is downright comical. “You guys overlook him,” said James, the NBA’s reigning MVP. “We understand how great he is.”

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DEAR ABBY: I just found out that my girl-friend of nearly four years had an abortion when she was in high school. I overheard her during a conversation she was having with someone. I later asked her what was implied when the name of her ex-boyfriend from high school was brought up. She proceeded to tell me what had happened and then said, “I never told you that?” My reaction is feelings of disgust, betrayal and of having been lied to. Am I overreacting or are my feelings warranted? -FEELS BETRAYED IN CONNECTICUT DEAR FEELS BETRAYED: That depends upon whether you ever had a conversation with your girlfriend about her sexual history during which you were supposed to tell each other “every-thing.” If so, then the omis-sion was deliberate. If not, she was under no obliga-tion to reveal that she had terminated a pregnancy during high school. Abortion is a deeply personal and often complex decision for women. Many do not feel that it is some-thing to celebrate and may not be comfortable sharing that they have had one. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My husband gives me gift cards for my birthday and spe-cial occasions, but with it comes, “I want to know everything you buy!” I tell him it’s a gift and I shouldn’t HAVE to tell him what I use it for. If I do tell him what I bought, he invariably says, “Did you really need that?” So who’s right -he or I? -RELUCTANT RECIPIENT IN ALASKA DEAR RELUCTANT RECIPIENT: You are, for the reason you stated. The object of a gift is to bring pleasure, and there are few comments your husband could make that would put a bigger damper on your purchase than, “Do you really need that?” The next time he asks what you bought, tell him, “None of your beeswax!” ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My stepmother was in a fatal car accident. She was very dear to me. A few days after the funeral, Dad told me the best way to handle grief is to clean house -so we began cleaning house like crazy, stopping to cry every now and then. We ran out of towels, so I went to fetch more from the guest bathroom where they are kept. Seeing a penny on the sink, I grabbed it and threw it in the wastebasket. (I won-dered where it had come from because I hadn’t noticed it there earlier in the day.) Suddenly, I remembered the letters in your column from people saying if you find a penny after you have lost a loved one, it means they are sending you a message of love from heaven. I quickly reached into the wastebasket to retrieve the penny, praying that it was newly minted -and it was! I showed it to Dad, explaining the significance, and we both had a good cry. We keep it in my stepmother’s china cabinet to remind us that love is eternal. To us, that penny is priceless. -READER IN CONNECTICUT DEAR READER: To me your EXPERIENCE is priceless. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Someone interesting who can offer you good advice or an opportunity will come into your life if you volunteer or use your talents to help others. A serious union will help you explore new possibilities. Your past experience will pay off. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Share information and you will come up with something that works. You will make new allies and bring about a collabora-tion with people who share your concerns, values and solutions. Discipline coupled with action will pay off. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Too much of anything will turn into a bad experi-ence. You have to gauge your time and your input so that you aren’t taken advantage of or treated wrongly. Focus on what you know you can accom-plish, not what others want you to do. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): A steady pace will ensure that you make headway. Put a little muscle behind whatever you set out to do. Strength, courage and originality will be what lead to your success. A serious relation-ship must be nurtured. Impulse is the enemy. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Visit unfamiliar places and interact with people who come from different walks of life and you will gather interesting information that will enable you to let go of the past and move full speed into the future. Love is in the stars. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t judge others or jump to conclusions with-out having all the facts. Take your time, listen and show compassion. Communicating openly will help you decide what to do next. Don’t allow someone’s demands to ruin your plans. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Revisit old ideas and do what you can to spice things up. This time you will get a far better reac-tion if you let your imagi-nation wander and your creativity flow. Don’t worry about others. Put your needs first and foremost. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put more time and effort into creative endeav-ors. Not everyone will appreciate what you do, but the ones who do will also offer contributions that will help you develop something unique and serviceable with potential to be profitable as well. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Listen, but hold your response until it’s appropriate. You will face trouble, opposition and challenges if you are too outspoken or pushy about what you want to see hap-pen. Stick close to home and prepare what you want to do next. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll need to show compassion if you want others to help in return. Someone will have a change of heart or make last-minute changes, but you mustn’t let this deter you from following through with your plans. Use your imagination. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Focus on the positive and look at what you can gain by attend-ing a lecture or talking to someone with experience in a field that interests you. You’ll come across an opportunity that can result in a new beginning. Embrace change. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Stabilize your situa-tion, taking control and making things happen. It’s up to you to enforce what you want and to follow through. You have great ideas and the drive to excel. Don’t let a personal contract interfere with your plans. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Boyfriend feels betrayed to learn of past abortion Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2013 4B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY12, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDABANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPPlaintiffCase No. 12 2012 CA000211 CAVs.KENNETH BANNISTER AKAKENNETH TBANNISTER; LISAFAITH BANNISTER AKALISAF BANNISTERDefendantsNOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Default Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated January 31, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash beginning at 11:00 AM at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, on 2/27/13, the fol-lowing described property:LOT17, OF CANNON CREEK PLACE UNIT2, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 8, PAGES 130-131, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Property Address: 509 SWGER-ALD CONNER DR, LAKE CITY, FL32024ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired call 711.WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of February, 2013.CLERK/s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk of CourtSEAL05537227February 12, 19, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICEONINVITATION TO BIDITB-010-2013Sealed bids will be accepted by the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 until Thursday, March 7, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the City Council Chambers locat-ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-da.DIRECTIONALDRILL– FOUR LOCATIONSDocuments may be viewed on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at De-mandStar.com. Contact the Procure-ment Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more informa-tion.05537268February 12, 2013 Public AuctionFlorida Statue 713.585Will be held at Wishes Auto Repair, 1357 SE Baya Drive, Lake City, FL32025 (386) 754-0040.Date: March 8, 2013Time: 9:00 AM2001 DodgeVin# 1B3ES46C91D10075005537270FEBRUARY12, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCIVILCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIR-CUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTYCIVILDIVISIONCase No. 12-2011-CA-000068STATE FARM BANKPlaintiff,vs.JARELTON JAMES FLOYD, SA-MANTHACAROLE DRIGGERS AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,Defendants,NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on Jan-uary 31, 20123, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Colum-bia County, Florida described as;COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF SW1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SECTION 19, TOWN-SHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND RUN THENCE S 8922’E, 1406 FEET; RUN THENCE S 040’E, 498.32 FEET; THENCE N 8922’W125 FEET; RUN THENCE N 3442’18” W, 89.75 FEET; RUN THENCE N 040’W, 125 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; RUN THENCE N 8922’W, 115 FEET; RUN THENCE N 040’W, 125 FEET; RUN THENCE S 8922’E, 115 FEET; RUN THENCE S 040’E, 125 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME AS LOT1, BLOCK B, AZA-LEAPARK SUBDIVISION, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION. LESS AND EXCEPTTHATPOR-TION OFF THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SAID LOTWHICH HAS BEEN DEEDED TO THE COUNTYOF COLUMBIA, FLOR-IDA, FOR RIGHT-OF-WAYPUR-POSES.and commonly known as: 216 SWTULIPPL, LAKE CITY, FL32025; including the building, appurtenan-ces, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE THIRD FLOOR OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE AT173 N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA32055, on March 6, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 1st day of February, 2013Clerk of the Circuit CourtP. DeWitt CasonBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05537228FEBRUARY12, 19, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-382-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA, a Banking corporation organized under the laws of theUnited States of America, f/k/a FIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDAPlaintiff, vs.JAMES W. FICKEN, MARTHAD. FICKEN and FLORIDACREDITUNION, ETAL,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE is hereby given that P. DEWITTCASON, Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-ida, will on the 27th day of March, 2013 at 11:00a.m. at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 N. E. Hernando Avenue, in the City of Lake City, Florida 32055, of-fer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described proper-ty situated in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:Lot 6 and the East half of Lot 7, Country Creek, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 81, of the public re-cords of Columbia County, Florida.Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pend-ing in said Court, the style of which is as set out above, and the docket number of which is 12-382-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 4 day of Feb-ruary, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, Florida/s/B. ScippioBy: Deputy ClerkSEAL05537224February 12, 19, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCASE NO. 10-85 CABANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO LASALLE BANK NAAS TRUSTEE FOR WASH-INGTON MUTUALASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES WMABS SERIES 2006-HE5 TRUST;Plaintiff,vs.WILUNDALATREZ MERRICK; ETAL, DefendantsNOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Default Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated January 14, 2013, in the above-styled cause, The C Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the third floor of the Columbia County courthouse at 173 N.E. Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, 32055, on 2/23/2013 the following described property:LOT13, BLOCK B, 242 VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 5 AND AREPLATOF APARTOF 242 VILLAGE RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PA-GES 99 AND 99A, OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Property Address: 518 SWTHOMP-KINS LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL32025ANYPERSON CLAIMING N IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, he provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, at least 7 days, before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.WITNESS my hand on 1/14/2013./s/ B. Scippio D.C.SEALAttorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C.100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045For Lauderdale, FL33309Phone: (954) 644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.comServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com05536904February 5, 12, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACase No. 13-117 DRSang MTHoang,PetitionerandTimothy Duong,Respondent.NOTICE OFACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OFMARRIAGETO: TIMOTHYDUONGADDRESS: UNKNOWNYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against you and that you are re-quired to serve a copy of your writ-ten defenses, if any, to it on Sang MTHoang whose address is 254 NWGwen Lake Blvd, Lake City, FL32055, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you forthe relief demand-ed in the petition.The action is asking the court to de-cided how the following real or per-sonal property should be divided: 254 NWGwen Lake Blvd., Lake City, FL32055, Columbia County.Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available a the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s of-fice. You may review these docu-ments upon request.You must keep the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file No-tice of Current Address, Florida Su-preme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.912.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office.WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-quires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, in-cluding dismissal or striking of pleadings.Dated: 2/7/2013CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/SEAL05537242February 12, 19, 25, 2013March 5, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 13-20-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF MURIELJOAN KEITHDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Muriel Joan Keith, deceased, whose date of death was December 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-ODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPRO-BATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-TER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is February 5, 2013.Personal Representative:/s/ Desari Sterling f/k/a Muriel Ann Schauffle1800 N AndrewsApt. 12-iFt. Lauderdale, Florida 33311Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386)755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail: jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary Email: mad@rkkattor-neys.com05537158February 5, 12, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000581WACHOVIAMORTGAGE COR-PORATION,Plaintiff,vs.CATHYMARZILIANO, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated 1/16/2013, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000581 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida in which Wachovia Mort-gage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Cathy Marziliano, Peter Marziliano, The Unknown Spouse of Cathy Mar-ziliano n/k/a Stanley Mathis, are de-fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Court-house at 173 N.E Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 20th day of February, 2013, the fol-lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Fore-closure:APARCELOF LAND IN SEC-TION 10, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE SOUTH 8819’59” WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-TION 11 ADISTANCE OF 5311.34 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF SECTION 11; THENCE NORTH 0122’42” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF SECTION 11, BEING ALSO THE EASTLINE OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 1330.05 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 10; THENCE SOUTH 8755’20” WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 10 ADIS-TANCE OF 2650.10 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 10; THENCE NORTH 0121’04” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE EAST1/2 OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 1442.93 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONLegalTINUE NORTH 0121’04” WESTALONG SAID WESTLINE OF THE EAST1/2 OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 500.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8737’11” EASTADISTANCE OF 872.14 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0121’04” EASTADISTANCE OF 500.08 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8737’11” WESTADISTANCE OF 872.14 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.A/K/A1641 SKYLINE LOOP, FORTWHITE, FL32038Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 18th day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate should call Jacquetta Bradley, ADACoordinator, Third Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-7428 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if your voice impaired, call (800) 955-8770. To file response please contact Columbia County Clerk of Court, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056-2069; Fax (386) 758-1337. 05537234February 8, 12, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 1100515CACITIMORTGAGE, INC., SUCCES-SOR BYMERGER TO ABN AM-RO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC.Plaintiff,vs.TIPMIZELLA/K/ATIPHOUS-TON MIZELLA/KATIPHOUS-TON HOUSTON MIZELL, IV, et alDefendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated January 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 11000515CAof the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC is Plaintiff, and TIPMIZELLA/K/ATIPHOUSTON MIZELLA/KATIPHOUSTON HOUSTON MIZELL, IV, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, be-ginning at 11:00 am at COLUMBIACounty Courthouse, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, 3rd Floor, Lake City, FL32055, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 10th day April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summa-ry Final Judgment, to wit:LOT13, BLAINE ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 7, PA-GES 21 AND 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, this 1st day of February, 2013.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEALAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the 7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Indi-viduals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05537225February 12, 19, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesCustomer Service/Telephone Sales business to business. Auto Parts Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC BP 100Job Opportunities05537178State Veterans’ Domiciliary Home Lake City, Florida 149 bed ALF is accepting applications for the following positions: (2) OPS Part-time Custodial Workers (2) OPS Part-time Dietary Support Service Aides Apply on line at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comReq. #50507102 for Custodial Worker Req. #50504016 for Support Service Aide Call Kim Graham at 386-758-0600 ext. 1006 Closes 02/15/13 EEO/AAE 05537211Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to fchbookkeeper@fhclakecity comcastbiz.net or mail: ATT: Human Resources, 3909 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL32055 05537237Busy Insurance Agency seeking Professional 440 CSR and 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to Box 05101, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Available Position: Revenue Specialist III Florida Department of Revenue General Tax Administration, Collections. Location: Lake City Apply at People First website http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com CDLDriver 2 yrs exp clean MVR for local company. Apply between 8am & Noon only. 247 NWHillandale Glen, Lake City. No phone calls Driver/Warehouse Need good MVR. Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC., BPA Experienced Sewing Machine Operator & Support Person for Operator: cutting material from patterns. 386-755-6481 4 TEMPFarmworkers needed 3/11/13 – 12/01/13. Workers will perform various duties associated with planting, cultivating, harvesting grading & packing various crops. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. Worksites location in Shelby Co, KY. $9.80/hr. Report or send a resume to nearest local FLAgency of Workforce Innovations office or call 386-755-9026 & ref. job order # KY0474171. Gallrein Farms – Shelbyville, KY Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY12, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$4,800 386-288-6102 100Job OpportunitiesUnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net WANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon’ 120Medical EmploymentCertified Dietary ManagerNeeded LTC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F Experienced Dental Hygienist Needed for Live Oak office. Please call 386-362-1646 F/TLPN needed for family practice office. 1 page resume’s only will be accepted. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.A’s All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v JOB OPENING Pharmacy Clerk/Cashier. Pharmacy experience Required. Apply in person: DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Found Brown/Tan/White 8 lbs Cat in the Eastwood Subd. House trained, Clean. Contact 365-4255 Free to right home Brindle Male pit bull, approx 10 mths, all shots up to date, nutured. Sweet loving inside dog. 386-243-8577 Full blooded Rotty 2 years old male. Needs room to run. Great w/ Adults needs supervision w/ a Child. $400. 438-3131 /984-5142 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture TWIN BED, Extra Long, Tempurpedic, Electric (w/remote) Adjustable. Originally $2500 Asking $1500. Call 386-758-9692 416Sporting Goods SEARS TREADMILL. Paid $500 used twice Asking $250 Contact 386-963-3242 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Beautiful Olustee Outfit Ladys size 20(?) $75.00 Contact 365-1277 Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2BR/2BA w/ carport located onCountyRoad 133, $500 mo. plus $500 dep. 954-258-8841 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8,500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John Lyons @800-622-2832 ext 210 for details WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Ft. White, Private in town, upstairs studio apt. Water & Trash included 1st/Last/Security. 2 yr lease Must have ref. Avail 5/1, 941-924-5183 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$500 month $500 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bd/ 2 ba, fenced yard, small shed, half mile to paved road, fruit trees, $600.00 deposit & first months rent! 352-239-3260! Nice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $800 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 820Farms & AcreageOwner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $4,800 386-288-6102 951Recreational Vehicles1989 Mallot Travel Trailer Fully self contained, sleeps 6 comfortable, a/c, double doors, awning, Full bed, Sofa/bed, full bathroom, great cond., second owner, A1 condition $2600 negotible. 352-321-0030 or 850-261-5337 For You! Call 755-5440Today NEED HELP!Let Us Write Your Classified Ad 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter