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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02019

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02019

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comT he 35th Olustee Battle Festival and the 37th Olustee Battle Re-enactment will bring people from across the country to Lake City this week. Re-enactors and festival-goers, dust off the cos-tumes and ready the cannon. The Battle of Olustee occurred in what is now Baker County 149 years ago, and was the largest Civil War battle fought on Florida soil. For the past 37 years, Civil War enthusi-asts have flocked to the area to think back on a time long ago. Faye Warren, executive director of the Blue-Grey Army, started preparation for the festival in September. She said about 100 volunteers donate time and energy to put every-thing together. “It’s been a love in progress,” she said, “... working together we have been able to do it.” A special guest artist from the Florida Highwaymen will be at the Florida Gateway College on Thursday to demonstrate his painting style. The event will be held at the Allied Health Building. The arts, crafts and food vendors will start setting up on Thursday in downtown Lake City. Friday, the Olustee Battle Festival will begin. At 9 a.m., a Civil War memorial service will kick off the two-day festival. Harvey Campbell, director of the Tourist Development Council, said between 30,000 and 40,000 people attend the downtown festival. “It’s the singular event that has the biggest impact of anything we do in the year,” Campbell said. The Columbia County Tourist Development Council helps the Blue-Grey Army plan and pre-pare for the Battle Festival. The opening ceremonies for the festival are scheduled for noon at Olustee Park in Downtown Lake City on Friday. At 5 p.m. Friday, a Civil War skirmish will be staged By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA White Springs man tried to cash a check drawn on a dead man’s checking account Thursday, according to a sheriff’s office arrest report. Deputies found the man on a bicycle in the drive-thru at the Columbia County Bank, 1720 W US 90. Ray N. Newby, 265 NW Belfry Court, faces charges of fraud, grand theft and uttering a forged instrument. Columbia County Bank employees called law By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comKenneth Allen Ford was found guilty Friday of second-degree murder for start-ing a June 2009 fire in the home he shared with Kristy L. Whatley. A Columbia County jury convicted Ford of first-degree arson, as well. Ford faces a maximum penalty of life in prison for second-degree murder, with a minimum sentence of 25 years. Second-degree arson carries a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison. Ford, 46, will be sentenced on Feb. 27 at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse. The jury deliberated for about seven hours before announcing it had reached a verdict shortly after 7 p.m. The trial lasted five days. The jury heard from 20 witnesses, including tool-mark experts, the state fire marshal and Whatley’s family members, includ-ing Whatley’s mother and sister. Roberta Getzan, assistant state attorney, began closing statements at 9 a.m. Friday. She said Ford was a jealous, angry man who admitted to law enforcement he poured gasoline on the couch and lit it. Prosecutors say he escaped south on Interstate 75 through a hole he cut in a fence on the property. The mobile home Whatley and Ford shared for about one and a half years was off Lake Jeffery Road and bordered I-75. Getzan argued cutting the hole in the fence proved premeditation, and the jury CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Springsteen shines. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................4-5B 74 53 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 6A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Championshipsat stake in hoops for Tigers, Indians. Girl Scouts launch ‘MEdia’ column in Lake City Reporter. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 269 1D 1B Ford guilty of murder, arson Faces possible life term for starting house fire thatkilled girlfriend in 2009. FORD continued on 3A OLUSTEE continued on 3A FRAUD continued on 3A GUNS continued on 3A Ford Back in the saddle Senatorsseek pacton gunsmeasure By ALAN FRAMAssociated PressWASHINGTON — A cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s drive to check gun violence is gathering bipartisan steam as four senators, includ-ing two of the National Rifle Association’s congressional champions, privately seek com-promise on requiring far more firearms purchasers to undergo background checks. The talks are being held even as Obama’s call to ban assault weapons and high-capac-ity ammunition magazines, the two other major pillars of his plan, are hitting rough waters on Capitol Hill. An agreement among the four senators to expand background checks would add significant impetus to that high-profile proposal by getting the endorsement of a group that ranges from one of the Senate’s most liberal Democrats to one of its most conservative Republicans. Group of 4 privatelyseek compromise on background checks. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA member of the Union cavalry escapes with his life as dozens of Confederate soldiers fire on him while awaitin g reinforcements during last year’s Olustee Battle Re-enactment. Artillerymen take shelter in the woods while doling out a steady stream of cannon fire during last year’s Olustee Battle Re-enactm ent. Thousands to mark battle’s 149th anniversary Festivities set to start Friday in downtownLake City.Drive-thrubicyclist faces fraudcharges Newby COMINGQ Complete Olustee coverage this week in the Reporter. OLUSTEE BATTLE FESTIVAL & RE-ENACTMENT 1A

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TALLAHASSEE The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is issuing an email fraud warning. The agency on Thursday said the public should beware of fraudsters using the departments name and email address, DoNotReply(at)flhsmv. gov, to send fake messages that look like receipts from online transactions. They include bogus confirmation and tracking numbers. Officials advise citizens who receive who have not made recent transactions to delete messages. They may have the departments email address or a second address that varies and may look like a personal email address. If recipi ents already have opened a message they should not click any of the links within it. The links lead to web sites that may contain malware. The emails are a type of spam known as phishing. Teen admits guilt in brothers death JACKSONVILLE A Jacksonville teenager charged with killing his 2-year-old half-brother pleaded guilty to reduced charges Friday, avoiding a possible life sentence. As part of a deal with Duval County prosecu tors, 14-year-old Cristian Fernandez pleaded guilty as a juvenile to manslaugh ter and aggravated battery. He will remain at a juvenile facility until he turns 19 in January 2018. After that, hell serve eight years of probation. Fernandez had been charged as an adult with first-degree murder and faced a possible life sentence. State Attorney Angela Corey said during a news conference that she never intended to send Fernandez to prison for life and hopes he will receive treatment, counsel ing and other help that will keep him from offending again. Fernandez, then 12, was arrested following the March 2011 death of his 2-year-old half-brother. Authorities say Fernandez had been home alone with the toddler when he suf fered a fractured skull, bruising to his left eye and a bleeding brain. The boys mother, Biannela Susana, waited more than eight hours to take the injured child to the hospital, where he died. The mother pleaded guilty to manslaughter last year. She is awaiting sentencing. Double hurricane response tested STARKE Florida has hosted a five-day national hurricane exercise to test the ability of state, local, federal and private emer gency responders to com municate with each other. Operation Radar II ended Friday at the Florida National Guards Camp Blanding Joint Training Center near Starke in north Florida. About 500 participants from across the nation were on hand. The exer cise scenario was a double dose of hurricanes within 10 days one striking Floridas east coast and the other the Gulf Coast. The exercise focused on communications among local, regional, state, fed eral and private operations. Gaps in communications systems and networks were evaluated. Also, field communications were addressed and determina tions made on where to focus future efforts. Flipped-off judge gets apology MIAMI A young Miami woman apologized for flipping off a judge, who then dropped con tempt charges and vacated her 30-day jail term. Eighteen-year-old Penelope Soto admitted Friday she was under the influence of Xanax and alcohol when she made the obscene middlefinger gesture and rude com ments earlier this week directed at Circuit Judge Jorge Rodriguez-Chomat. Video of the confrontation quickly went viral. Soto tearfully apologized to the judge, who said the episode should be a lesson in how to properly treat people. Rodriguez-Chomat said Soto would have been a convicted felon if he allowed the contempt charge to stand. Her lawyer said Soto will complete a drug court program, which includes treatment for drug addic tion and usually results in charges being dropped. Lawmaker wants DST all year TALLAHASSEE A Florida state legislator doesnt want to fall back in November. Sen. Darren Soto on Friday filed a bill that would mandate that Florida keep its clock in daylight-saving time yearround. The Orlando Democrat said he sponsored the bill (SB 734) because he gets frustrated that it gets dark earlier during the win ter. The bill is called the Sunshine Protection Act. Florida, like most other states in the country, fol lows the pattern of moving clocks ahead one hour in March then revert ing to standard time in November. Soto has little hope his bill will get passed this year but said he wants to start a discussion about daylight-saving time. Soto also said there is a question whether its legal under federal law for Florida to keep itself on daylight-saving time. Triple killing suspect arrested TAMPA A janitor and trash collector has been arrested in Tampa and charged with killing a woman and two men in a West Virginia park 38 years ago. Authorities from West Virginia, along with the U.S. Marshals Office and Tampa police, arrested 59-year-old Eddie Jack Washington on Thursday. He had been living in Tampa for a decade. LOS ANGELES B e it concert or char ity auction, Bruce Springsteen can bring any event to a crescendo. Springsteen briefly took over auctioneering duties before being honored as MusiCares person of the year Friday night, exhorting the crowd to bid on a signed Fender electric guitar by amping up the deal. The 63-year-old rock n roll star moved the bid north from $60,000 by offering a series of sweeteners. Thats right, a one-hour guitar les son with me, Springsteen shouted. And a ride in my Harley Davidson sidecar. So dig in, one-percenters. That moved the needle past $150,000. He added eight con cert tickets and backstage passes with a bonus tour conducted by Springsteen himself. That pushed it to $200,000, but he wasnt done. And a lasagna made by my moth er! he shouted as an in-house cam era at the Los Angeles Convention Center cut to his 87-year-old mother Adele Ann Springsteen. And with an extra $250,000 in the musicians charitys coffers, Springsteen sat down and spent most of the evening in the unusual role of spectator as a string of stars that included Elton John, Neil Young, Sting, Kenny Chesney, John Legend, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, Patti Smith, Jackson Browne took the stage two nights before the Grammy Awards. Heres a little secret about Bruce Springsteen: He loves this, host Jon Stewart joked. Theres nothing hed rather do than come to Los Angeles, put on a suit ... and then have people talking about him like hes dead. Mary J. Blige honored at pre-Grammy party LOS ANGELES Babyface called her an icon; Diddy said she was like a sister; and Anita Baker credited her for helping secure her latest Grammy nomination. There was no shortage of super latives bestowed on Mary J. Blige on Friday night as Vibe magazine celebrated the Queen of Hip-Hop Souls career, which has now spanned for more than two decades. Shes a musical soulmate, shes my sister, shes one of my best friends in the world, said Diddy, who has worked with Blige since the beginning of her career. Mary is our queen. ... There is no one to come after her. Blige was feted during Vibes first Impact Awards, which coincided with the magazines 20th anniver sary. The event included guests like MC Lyte, Jermaine Dupri and Queen Latifah. Blige appeared to wipe away tears at moments as she was lauded by one guest after another. Babyface, who wrote one of Bliges biggest hits, Not Gon Cry, recalled being a little intimidated by the idea of working with Blige, whom he saw as a tough New Yorker. Mary walked in and she was so sweet ... and so respectful and totally melted me right there, he said. Diddy recalled how Blige worked with him after he got fired from one of his first high-profile jobs in the industry and when no else one would, and also said she was one of his best friends. Hathaway eyes more musical performances BERLIN Anne Hathaway says shed like to do more musicals after the Oscar-nominated Les Miserables but dont expect her to launch into a singing career. Director Tom Hooper on Saturday presented his movie, an adaptation of a Broadway musical based on Victor Hugos novel, at the Berlin film fes tival. Hathaways role as an outcast mother reduced to prostitution has won her an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress. She told reporters she hopes to do more musicals and would like more to be made Im a big fan of them, so that would make me very happy both as an actress and as an audi ence member. But Hathaway says the experience hasnt made her more comfortable singing in public. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Cinematographer Douglas Slocombe (Raiders of the Lost Ark) is 100. Opera singer Leontyne Price is 86. Actor Robert Wagner is 83. Rock musician Don Wilson (The Ventures) is 80. Singer Roberta Flack is 76. Singer Jimmy Merchant (Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers) is 73. Rock musician Bob Spalding (The Ventures) is 66. Olympic gold-medal swim mer Mark Spitz is 63. Walt Disney Co. chairman and chief executive Robert Iger is 62. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 3-15-17-29 17 Friday: 9-10-12-14-36 Saturday: Afternoon: 7-7-3 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 1-4-8-6 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 5-28-29-40-48-51 x4 FDOT issues warning about email fraud Springsteen shines at tribute event Wednesday: 5-27-36-38-41 PB 12 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture We ought always to thank God for you, brothers and sis ters, and rightly so, because your faith is growing more and more, and the love all of you have for one another is increas ing. 2 Thessalonians 1:3 Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Bruce Springsteen performs at the MusiCares Person of the Year tribute in his honor at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Friday. ASSOCIATED PRESS Fourteen-year-old Cristian Frernandez listens while his attorney speaks during a court hear ing in Jacksonville on Friday. Frernandez pleaded guilty as a juvenile in the March 2011 death of his 2-year-old half brother. Hathaway Blige 2A

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on the banks of Lake Desoto. Also, mock-ups of the Monitor and the Merrimac will re-enact the famous Civil War sea battle between the two ironclads. Saturday at 7 a.m., a 5kilometer run is scheduled to start the day. The annual parade will start Saturday at 10:30 a.m. beginning at South Marion Street and continuing onto U.S. 90. The Blue Grey Trails End Square Dance will start at 7:45 p.m. on Saturday at the Rountree Moore Toyota Showroom, 1252 W U.S. 90, the last scheduled event for the festival. Warren said thefestival could not happen without two major sponsors: First Federal Bank of Florida and Lifeguard Ambulance Service. She also thanked the City Council and county commission. We are thankful for all our sponsors and the sup port from businesses that we receive in the commu nity, she said. It is truly a community event. The actual re-enactment starts Sunday, Feb. 17, at Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park, 18 miles east of Lake City on U.S. 90. The battlefield will have authen tic campsites and a sutlers row on Friday, Saturday and Sunday for visitors of the festival. More than 2,000 people will take part in the battle re-enactment on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Admission to the Olustee Battlefield on Friday will costs $3 for adults and $2 for students. Preschool children are free. Saturday and Sunday admission will be $7 for adults and $3 for school-aged children. Admission for adults 62 and older will be $5. Active mili tary with military identifica tion receive free admission. Like last year, there will be a shuttle that takes visi tors to the battlefield from parking sites at the Lake City Gateway Airport and the Baker Correctional Center. The shuttle will start Saturday at 1:30 p.m. The cost is $2 for adults and $1 for school children. Preschool children ride free. From staff reports LIVE OAK The Friends of Music Concert Series will present the Graffe String Quartet from the Czech Republic, with Michiko Otaki, pia nist, on Thursday. The performance will take place at Covenant First Presbyterian Church, 421 White Avenue, in Live Oak at 7:30 p.m. The program will include works by Mozart, Martinu, and Borodin. These outstanding musi cians have delighted audi ences in our area in the past, and Friends of Music Series is pleased to pres ent them again. The Graffe Quartet includes Stepan Graffe, violin; Lukas Bednarik, violin; Lukas Cybulski, viola; and Michal Hreno, violoncello. They rank among the finest ensem bles of their generation, having been awarded the 2008 Czech Chamber Music Society Prize for most promising young ensemble given under the auspices of the Czech Philharmonic. The Quartet made its American debut in 2007 with a highly successful coast-to-coast tour (with pianist Michiko Otaki). They returned the fol lowing year for another extensive American tour, covering fifteen states, and make their fourth tour with Otaki this February. Founded in 1997 at the Brno Conservatory, the Graffe Quartet has been heard throughout the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Germany, Spain, France, Austria, Iceland, Croatia, the Netherlands, and the UK. They will be perform ing in Live Oak the early (1911) Quintet Number Zero by Martinu from that CD. An especially noted chamber musician, pia nist Michiko Otaki has performed and recorded with several renowned international ensembles, as well as with English violist Roger Chase. Born in Japan, Ms. Otaki studied at the San Francisco Conservatory and Manhattan School of Music. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 3A FORD: Convicted of second-degree murder in death of live-in girlfriend Continued From Page 1A FRAUD: Bicyclist charged Continued From Page 1A OLUSTEE: 149th anniversary of 1864 battle Continued From Page 1A GUNS: Four senators look to find common ground Continued From Page 1A Czech quartet coming to Live Oak COURTESY T he Graffe String Quartet, of the Czech Republic, will perform Thursday with pianist Michiko Otaki in Live Oak. should convict Ford of murder in the first degree. First-degree murder car ries a minimum sentence of life in prison with the possibility of the death pen alty. Prosecutors waived the death penalty in Fords trial. Getzan said the relation ship between Ford and Whatley was turbulen,t with Ford leaving many times, but this time was different. She said Whatley didnt cry or beg him to say, and Ford couldnt take that. She said he knew this was the end of their relation ship. She argued he cared more for the family pets than for Whatleys life. Whatleys dogs and a pet bird were found safe outside the burning home. Whatley was alive when the fire started, Getzan said, because an autopsy showed her trachea was black and full of soot. The coroner said Whatley died of burns received in the fire. Whatley had returned from the hospital the night before, and the prosecu tion argued that she was still weak from her stay. She suffered from lupus and had had several toes amputated. Whatley had left the hospital against doctors advice. Getzan said the windows in the 25-year-old mobile home would not have opened wide enough for Whatley to escape the blaze, and the only exit would have required her to pass through the fire. He knew Kristys dis abilities and he knew there was only one way out, Getzan said. John Hendrick, assis tant public defender, called Fords videotaped confes sion into doubt. Hendrick said Ford was misunderstood and not a polished communicator. He said Ford had been awake 14 days before he was caught in Lakeland and was questioned by sea soned interrogators. Hendrick said Ford was not the monster the pros ecution made him out to be. He restored cars and helped paint the home of Whatleys mother just two days before Whatley died. The prosecutions case had holes, and the evidence did not show Ford to be a murderer, Hendrick said. He asked where was the evidence gasoline started the fire. The prosecution said it was consumed in the fire or washed away when the fire was extinguished. The state spent a whole lot of time in this case trying to explain away the obvious, he said. The obvious answer is that there was no gas ever there, Hendrick said. He said the fire could have been started by a fan in the living room, and the state fire marshal had not tested to see if the fan mal functioned. Also, Whatleys remains contained a toxic level of methamphetamine and other drugs, he said. He argued an electrical short could have sparked the fire, and she might never awakened because she was incapacitated by drugs. The problem with the states case is that you are left with more questions than answers, he said. And those questions are reasonable doubt in this case, he told the jury. I want you to consider these other possibilities ... The final argument the jury heard was from John F. Durrett, assistant state attorney. He said Ford was a destroyer, not a restorer as the defense claimed. The only evidence we have heard is Kenneth Ford, the defendant, destroying, he said. Purification by fire, torch ing the residence he and his girlfriend shared. He said the evidence taken together points to only one conclussion. The only logical conclu sion is this defendant burnt her alive; he set fire to that home and killed her, he said. As to where was the gas oline that started the fire, Durrett said look no fur ther then the clothes Ford was wearing when he was arrested. And wheres the gaso line? Durrett said. Its on him, on the one thing that didnt burn up. enforcement after Newby allegedly tried to cash a $300 check that had been written on the account of a deceased customer, according to a media release from the sheriffs office. According to the media release, Newby admitted to forging the dead mans signature. The sheriffs office believes Newby cashed other forged checks and additional charges are possible. Newby was booked into Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $15,000 bond. Well get something, I hope. Im praying for it, said Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., one of the participants. Manchin, a moderate Democrat, is an NRA member who aired a 2010 campaign ad in which he literally shot a hole through Democratic environ mental legislation he opposed. Also involved is Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., another NRA member with a strong conservative record but occa sional maverick impulses; No. 3 Senate Democratic leader Charles Schumer of New York, a liberal; and moderate GOP Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois. Background checks are required only for sales by the nations 55,000 federally licensed gun dealers, but not for private purchases like those at gun shows, online or in person. There are few indisputable, up-to-date statistics on how many guns change hands without background checks, but a respected study using 1990s data esti mated that 30 percent to 40 percent of gun sales do. People involved in the talks would share little about their substance. Schumer said the package they were seeking will not limit your abil ity to borrow your Uncle Willies hunting rifle or share a gun with your friend at a shooting range. 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM Hours: Mon.Fri. 9 a.m. p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. p.m. 386-755-BOOT HWY. 90 W. 4 Miles From I-75 In Lake City Valentines Day Sale ENTIRE LADIES AND MENS DEPARTMENT ON SALE ALL CLOTHING DRESS BOOTS ACCESSORIES GIFT S ( E X CL U DING B RIGHTON )

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OPINION Sunday, February 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A “Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” — John 15:13 S everal years ago I “ran” in the Macclenny Watermelon Run. From the first step, I knew it was a mistake. I hate that kind of running where you just clip-clop along with no goal line or basketball rim or home plate to motivate you. As a kid I could run all day and into the night when some kind of game was involved. But just run-ning — not for me. But friends Stanley Anders and Jim Register had talked me into enter-ing the race, so I imme-diately started “training,” running a couple of miles each day after work. I even hated those after-noon runs, but I had said I would do it, so I kept running. Once I started the actual race I was immedi-ately left behind by almost everyone, but I trudged along on the short race (5 kilometers). My goal shifted from finishing the race, even if it meant walking to the finish line, to just try-ing to take the next step. That next step became harder and harder and I labored along slower and slower. How slow? The first person to breeze by me was Gatorade inventor Dr. Robert Cade, more than 10 years my senior. Then there were two nuns dressed in full habit, followed by a pregnant mother who was pushing her two small children in a double stroller. Then it was a young kid hopping along on crutches. What little spirit I had left was rapidly fading and with the finish line almost in sight some 250 yards away, I decided to quit. But not quite. I glanced ahead and saw two attrac-tive young women seem-ingly in worse shape than I was. They were running the race in reverse, away from the finish line, run-ning toward me! Curious, I kept plugging along to see what was going on. Did I say those young women were attractive? No! They were gorgeous and almost wearing tight shorts and T-shirts. And, they were spectacularly fleshy. I remem-ber thinking that young women who looked that good should be required to wear a government label that said, “Caution! After viewing, do not drive or operate heavy machin-ery for 24 hours!” And still they ran toward me. When they reached me they suddenly whirled around, sandwich-ing me, and each one took an elbow. One said, “Come on, big boy. You can do it!” And the other said, “Step it up, honey, we’re gonna finish this race together.” So what else could I do? Given a motivation stron-ger than goal lines or rims or home plates, I stood up straight and threw my shoulders back and actu-ally started sprinting, and the young lovelies were there with me every step of the way. So, against all odds, I finished the Watermelon Run and got my T-shirt. Of course I wondered why the girls has come to my rescue — until I saw Stanley and Jim standing to one side with the two good lookers, all having a big laugh and I knew the answer. The guys had sent the girls! Everybody needs friends who will rescue them like that. I am sure that John 15:13 is correct. It’s the Scripture! But to have friends who will rescue you in such an inspiring way is a pretty doggone good sign of friendship, too. Grandpa’s turkeyGrandpa shot his first turkey this past Thanksgiving. It scared everybody in the frozen foods section half to death! Does the Republican Party have a future? Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman W e’ve already learned the hard way not to put too much trust in our public officials, even our most respected gen-erals. But now, our favorite athletes, too? Our supposed heroes and role models? If there is a message in the dizzying tales we have been hearing almost daily about sex, drugs and more drugs from the sports world ... it is this: get rid of the pedestals. Respect athletes for what they do on the field. Enjoy their performances as they entertain you. But understand, they are human with frailties like the rest of us. They make mistakes, some of them very large mistakes. So ditch the hero worship, because it’s really hard to tell who to believe in anymore. And when it comes to real role models, that should be the work of parents, not athletes. The latest gut punch came with the news that Miami Dolphins legend Dan Marino — Dan Marino, for gosh sakes — had an affair and fathered a child in 2005.... Marino cultivated an image as a great family man and does terrific work raising money for autism research. This week’s revelations definitely shouldn’t erase all the good he’s done, and no one has been truly hurt other than his family. But be sure to add “human frailty” to his lengthy resume. The news came about five minutes after we heard about the latest drug scandal coming out of Miami, which could involve New York Yankees superstar Alex Rodriguez ... and some University of Miami athletes and a coach, among others. Rodriguez has denied the latest report, which links him to performance-enhanc-ing drugs, but he earlier had admitted taking steroids from 2001 to 2003. That news came about five minutes after we heard about the alleged involvement — strongly denied — with banned substances by Baltimore Ravens and former University of Miami football star Ray Lewis. Catch your breath a minute, and then realize it was just a few days ago we saw Lance Armstrong — inter-nationally revered cycling star and a man who has raised countless millions of dollars for cancer research — sit on Oprah’s couch and tell the world how he cheated and doped his way to the top. Many observ-ers had suspected this for years, but the revelations by Armstrong were still stunning. All of which can almost make you forget what you heard about Tiger Woods — one of the world’s most admired athletes — and his harem back in 2009. And don’t forget, Tiger Woods lived in a Florida estate. We could go on, but why?Suffice to say, news travels faster and wider than ever these days, particularly with social media. And the money and temptations have never been greater for athletes. So enjoy and respect their performances, but put away the pedestals and the talk of heroes and role models. Those days, sadly, appear to be over. Put the pedestals away No greater love ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comT he United States, from Day One, was a project about principles and ide-als. The superpower that emerged and grew from the hand-ful of colonists that began settling here was not the product of where those colonists happened to land, but of the ideals and principles in their heads and hearts, applied in how they lived their lives. The Republican Party was founded in 1854 to address one great blot on the nation’s founding legacy: the existence of slavery in a nation founded under the ideal of freedom under God. Runaway slave and selfeducated abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass said, “I am a Republican, a black, dyed-in-the-wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.” Douglass called Abraham Lincoln, America’s first Republican president, “emphatically the black man’s presi-dent.” When some 30 years ago I told the welfare officer not to bother show-ing up again at my home — when I decided that my own future would be based on the values of Scripture, work and personal responsibility — there was no doubt in my mind what party would become my politi-cal home. The party of “freedom and progress,” the party of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. But, as longshoreman philosopher Eric Hoffer once observed, “Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket.” It’s no mystery why the Republican Party is having a hard time today. No matter how hard you squint and try to discern the values of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, or any values for that matter, in those now wielding the money and power at the top of the party, they’ve disappeared. These establishment Republican leaders and operatives are not about ideals and values but business — their own business. The Wall Street Journal reports that the latest estimate from the Congressional Budget Office is that unemployment will “remain above 7.5 percent through next year. That would make 2014 the sixth con-secutive year with a jobless rate that high, the longest stretch of such elevated unemployment in 70 years.” Yet the Republican presidential candidate could not defeat the cur-rent occupant of the White House. In the party that is supposed to be about freedom and personal responsibility, party operatives want to blame everyone else for their own failures. Worse, they want to pin it on candidates who actually take seriously the traditional values of their party. Karl Rove would like to weed out candidates like former Missouri con-gressman Todd Akin. Akin, defeated by Democrat incumbent Claire McCaskill in the Senate race in Missouri, was a six-term Republican congressman with a flawless conservative record. For most of 2012, he was ahead of McCaskill in the polls. Then, in August, he expressed himself poorly in an interview about abortion. Despite his apologies and efforts to clarify himself, his own party aban-doned him. McCaskill ran ads, over and over, showing the Republican’s own can-didate Mitt Romney questioning Akin’s qualifications. This race could have been saved. But the party elite wasted not a second to dump Akin because they were not comfortable with his conservative values to begin with. There are tens of millions of conservative American patriots who seek an opposition party to represent their conviction that America will not get back on the path to strength and prosperity without restoration of freedom, limited government, free markets and traditional values. Today’s big question is whether the Republican Party is going to be that opposition party. If not, it is not conservative values and convictions that will be abandoned. It will be the Republican Party. Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books. Q South Florida Sun-Sentinel4AEDIT

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Imogene M. Aleywine Imogene M. Aleywine, 82, went to heaven with the Lord on February 9, 2013. Born in Early County, GA to the late John Thomas Mathis and Carrie Belle Mathis, Imogene attended school in Leesburg, GA. Mrs. Aleywine was preceded in death by her mother and father, one grandson. She is survived by her loving husband of 63 years, Fred Aleywine, Sr.; one daugh ter: Carol Bottin; one son: Pat (Kristen), 8 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Mon day, February 11, 2013, at 11:00 A.M. at Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. Robert Herrington of Cochran, GA and Dr. Rodney Baker of ing. Interment will follow in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visitation with the family will be held one hour before the service (10:00 A.M. to 11:00 A.M.) GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025 (386-752-1954) is in charge of arrangements. Please send words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayfor estlawn.com. Bethany Cork Bethany Cork, 90, passed away February 6, 2013 at the Good Samaritan Center in Dowling Park Florida. Mrs. Cork was born in Lansing, Michigan and was the daugh ter of Arthur and Ann Manthey Gertenhouse. She received her education in the public schools of Detroit, Michi gan. She married John Cork of Greenwood, S.C and had four children. She assisted her hus band in his tire business and they also enjoyed square danc ing. In 1956 the family moved to Lakeland, Florida. In Lakeland she was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church and the Lakeland Art Guild. Here she returned to school and became and LPN. She was Valedictorian and President of her LPN class. She was employed as an LPN at the Watson Clinic in Lakeland, Florida until her retirement in 1982. At this time she moved to the house she and her husband had built on farming acreage outside of Dunnellon, FL. Here she enjoyed caring for animals especially her dogs and driving her tractor to mow the pastures. Mrs. Cork was known as a cre ative person. She enjoyed needle crafts and painting in oils. Mrs. Cork was predeceased by her husband, John, to whom she was married to for 44 years. She is survived by her four children, Michael (Peggy) Cork, Down ers Grove, IL, Judy Sears, Lake City, FL, Linda Cork, Charles ton, SC, Tom Cork, Sr. Madeira Beach, FL and an adopted son, Don Anderson. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Jay Sears, Susan Sears, Scott (Kristen) Cork, David (Kelly) Cork, Laurel (Robin) Sanderson, Beth (Tony) McKie, Sarah Bei ers, Tom Cork, Jr. and Kather ine Cork. In addition, there are eleven great-grandchildren and a special niece, Diane McCrary. Grave side services will be held at a later date in Lansing Michi request donations be made to Alzheimers Organization. DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES & CREMATORY INC. of Live Oak and Branford, FL in charge of arrangements. Dorothy Fielding Mrs. Dorothy Fielding went home to Heaven February 6, 2013. She was born March 28, 1928 in King Fisher Oklahoma born again into the family of God March 27, 1938 and loved and served her Lord by serving others. Mrs. Fielding attended school in Hennessey, Oklahoma and graduated from High School in Enid, Oklahoma. She went on to graduate from the Dallas Bible Institute in Dallas, Texas where she was a part of a min istry team teaching bible classes at a local tuberculosis sanitarium and participated in presenting the Bible through KYB Clubs (Know your Bible Clubs). It thrilled her to see young people learning Gods word and accept ing Christ as their Savior. She spent a summer in Cuba with Practical Missionary Training where she participated in street ministry radio ministry and in assisting resident missionaries. Mrs. Fielding was preceded in death by her mother and Father, her daughter Elizabeth Ann Cul ley of Kasilof, Alaska, and three siblings who died in infancy. She is survived by her husband Hunter Weston Tuck Fielding of Lake City; daughters: Mary Ester (Merle) Johnson of Sutton; Alaska, Sharon Kay (Rob) Hein of Wasilla, Alaska; Ann Eliza beth (Bud) Corson of Leesburg, Fla.; Genie Marie (Bill) Head of Ft. Valley, GA.; and Irene Marie (Kirk) Humphreys of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Eight (8) Grand children, Ten (10) Great Grand children, and a host of those she calls her children of the heart. Mrs. Fielding disliked seeing Gods money wasted and re spectfully requests that, in lieu made in the form of donations to Southside Baptist Church or to Gideons International for the placement of Bibles. A memorial service will be held at Southside Baptist Church on Tuesday, February 12, 2013, Robert Bobby Thomas Jones Robert Bobby Thomas Jones, 65, of Coral Springs, went to his heavenly home on January 26, 2013. Bobby was born February 12, 1947 in Marianna, Florida, to the late John Edmund and Lollie (Tidwell) Jones. He was a war decorated veteran, who served his country honorably during the Vietnam Era as a United States Marine. Those left to cherish his memory are his loving wife of 30 years, Lorraine; son, Rob ert Jones Jr.; daughters, Diane Jones and Michelle Jones; be loved granddaughter, Shynickie Dendy; brother, John (Judy) Jones; sisters, Diane (Riley) Morgan and Patricia (Jay) Fernandez; eight nieces and nephews and eighteen great nieces and nephews and one great, great nephew. He was dearly loved by his fam ily and will be forever missed. Bobby spent his formidable years on Orange Street in Lake City running on the dirt roads, playing kick-the-can and base ball with all the neighborhood kids. He could beat everyone at marbles--he was the marble and swimming in Hamburger Lake and Ocean Pond, playing pool at teen town and beating his brother, Butch, at Tennis. Later in life he became ill from injuries suffered during his ser vice in Vietnam, but he never complained. He enjoyed the simple pleasures of life, he backyard, eat his sister Dianes famous cakes and coerce his brother Butch, to take him to the casino. His constant com panion was his dog Rye-Rye, who was always by his side and a loyal friend until the end. Please visit www.kraeer coralsprings.com to sign Bobbys guest book. The family will receive friends on Monday, February 11, 2013, 6:00 7:00pm at Kraeer Funeral Home & Cremation Center, 1655 University Drive, Coral Springs where a Celebration of Life Ser vice will begin at 7:00pm. Inter ment will be Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 10:00am at South Florida National Cemetery, Lake Worth with military honors. Rosa McNally Mrs. Rosa McNally, 88, born January, 12, 1925 in Silver Creek, KY, passed away Feb ruary 7, 2013 at her home in Wellborn, FL. Rosa had been a winter resident of Wellborn since 1978. Her summer resi dence was in Dayton, OH. Preceding her was her husband Otis McNally, an infant daugh ter Jo Ann, her parents Marshall and Mary Lee Rayburn of Silver Creek, KY, her brothers Billy Rayburn of Plant City, FL and Sam Rayburn of Richmond, KY, her sisters Geneva Witt of Lexington, KY, Catherine Ray burn of Silver Creek, KY, and Virginia Clouser of Dayton OH. Surviving her is her daughter Bar bara Tippie of Dayton, OH, her grandsons Tom Tippie of Adena, OH and Bill Tippie (Missy) of West Carrollton, OH, her greatgranddaughters Courtney Brown of Wilmington, OH, Paige and Billie Tippie of West Carroll ton, OH, one great-great-grand daughter of Wilmington, OH, and several nieces & nephews. Funeral services for Mrs. Mc Nally will be held at a later date with Newcomer Family Funeral Home in Dayton, Ohio (937)293-4141. Local arrange ments are under the direction of DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234, please sign the on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Charles Robert Seroki Charles Robert Seroki, Jr. 69, a resident of Lake City, Florida passed away Feb ruary 5, 2013 at his home. Mr. Seroki was a lifelong resi dent of Lake City, Florida and is the son of the late Charles Robert and Lillian Christen son Seroki, Sr. Mr. Seroki had been employed with the Dept. of Transportation Lake City, Corps of Engineers of Jackson Survivors include Two Daugh ters: Christine (Ronald) Dobbs, Lake City, Fl. and Sheila Se roki, Middleburg, Fl. One son: Charlie (Jody) Seroki, Lake But ler, Fl. One Sister: Mary Jean Hutchins (Wiley), Auburndale, Fl. Seven grandchildren and one great grandchild also survive. Memorial funeral services will be conducted Tuesday, Febru ary 12, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. in the Chapel of Dees-Par rish Funeral Home. Arrange ments are under the direction of DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234, please sign the on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 5A 5A Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health FREE book by doctor reveals what the (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com. FREE CONSULTATION Lake City 352-374-4534 426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 Sandals WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots Galore New Arrivals Mens & Womens All Insulated Camo 40% off (in stock) Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. Feb. 10 Library group meeting The Friends of the Library will have its annual meeting program, Having Fun, Wish You Were Here!: An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida, presented by Liz Coursen at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Take a trip back in time through Floridas varied and exciting history, using museum-qual ity vintage postcards. The program will also include vintage postcards featuring Lake City and other region al locations and a chance to win your own vintage Lake City postcard. Christian concert The Christian music group Brian Free and Assurance will give a con cert at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Live Oak and Lake City at the intersection with Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. More infor mation about the church is available online www. wellbornbaptist.com or by calling (386) 963-2231. Appreciation Day First Baptist Church, 182 NE Justice St., will hold an Appreciation Day for the Rev. Robert Daivs at 10:30 a.m. A covered dish dinner will be held on the church grounds. For more infor mation, call 752-5422. Love Day services Wellborn Church of God will have a Love Day beginning at 10:30 a.m. with a showing of the movie Fireproof and an opportunity for people to renew their vows to Christ. Husbands and wives will be renewing their wedding vows. A reception will fol low in the fellowship hall. Bring finger food, chips and dip, nuts or sandwich es to share. The church is at 3330 U.S. 90 in Wellborn. For more information, call pastor W.C. Cobb at (386) 752-8479. Feb. 11 Coalition meeting The Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway Inc. execu tive/finance committee will meet at 3 p.m. at the coalition Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers state and fed eral funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Prekindergarten programs for the following coun ties: Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee, and Union. Anyone with a dis ability requiring special assistance to attend the meeting should contact Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770. Cancer survivors tea All cancer survivors are invited to a tea in of cel ebration with other survi vors from 3 ot 4:30 p.m. at The Clubhouse of the Lake City Womans and Garden clubs at 257 SE Hernando St. Enjoy Iced tea and homemade baked goods, entertainment, socializing and learning about the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life. For more information, call to (386) 752-4198 or (386) 752-0956. Cancer support group The Womens Cancer Support Group of Lake City will meet at Baya Pharmacy East, 780 SE Baya Drive, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more Information, call (386) 752-4198 or (386) 755-0522. Republican Women The Columbia Federated Republican Women will meet at Beef-OBradys at 7 p.m. in the meeting room. Come at 6 p.m., if you care to eat before the meeting. For more information, call Betty Ramey at (386) 3524111. Feb. 12 Medicare seminar The LifeStyle Enrichment Center will have a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C and Associates Inc. Subjects to be covered include how to enroll in Medicare, what is covered and whether supplemen tal insurance is needed. To register, call (386) 755-3476, ext. 107. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas holdem poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Water board meeting The Suwannee River Water Management District Board of Governors will meet at 9 a.m. at district headquarters, 9225 County Road 49 in Live Oak. A public hearing also will be held on adoption of Resolution No. 2013-01 and amendments to the Florida Forever Work Plan. Feb. 13 Coalition meeting The Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway Inc. board will meet at 9 a.m at the coalition office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers state and federal funding for school readiness programs for Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union counties. Anyone with a disability requir ing special assistance to attend the meeting should call Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770. Necomers lunch The Lake City Newcomers will have a lun cheon meeting at 11 a.m. at Quail Heights Country Club on Branford Highway (State Road 247). Ted Allen will give a program featur ing a portrayal of Abraham Lincoln. For more informa tion, call Pinky Moore at 752-4552.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A AUTOLOAN MillionDollar ! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 APPLY NOW! Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS $1 MILLION IN 2013 MOVE your Auto Loan (from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanWe’ll save you at least We’ll pay youOR 50 1 25 1 ... and we’re starting with YOU! 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $12,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.

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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Both teams had the District 5-4A basketball championship won and both teams let it slip away. In the end, it took overtime before Williston High defended its district title with a 66-62 win over Fort White on the Indians’ home court. The Red Devils had a slim margin after the first quarter and at the half. Fort White tied the game at 41-all after the third quarter and both teams scored 16 points in the fourth quarter. Fort White’s Trey Phillips nailed a 3-pointer early in the overtime to give the Indians a two-point lead. Williston answered with three baskets before Melton Sanders ended the run. Sanders’ bucket made it 64-62 Williston with a minute to play. The Indians couldn’t buy a basket down the stretch and the Red Devils made a couple of free throws to seal the win. “They made some shots and we made some plays,” Williston head coach Steve Faulkner said. “It was just a great high school basket-ball game.” Fort White got down by Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS First-year coach expects Tigers to compete for title. INDIANS continued on 5B Monday Q Fort White High JV baseball vs. Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Tuesday Q Fort White High track at Suwannee High, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Chiefland High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High softball at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High baseball vs. Fort White High, 7 p.m. (JV-4) Thursday Q Columbia High girls tennis at Gainesville High, 3:30 p.m. Q Fort White High softball vs. Union County High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High JV baseball at Newberry High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Union County High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-4) Q Columbia High softball vs. Aucilla Christian Academy, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball in Region 1-6A quarterfinals, TBA Q Fort White High boys basketball in Region 2-4A quarterfinals, TBA Friday Q Columbia High baseball vs. Buchholz High, 7 p.m. (JV-4:30) Q Fort White High baseball vs. Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. GAMES FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. There will be voting for president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, sergeant-at-arms and four board positions. Anyone interested in becoming a part of the Quarterback Club is invited to attend. For details, call Harold Bundy at 365-5731. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up ongoing The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Saturday. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most outgoing and fun-filled outfit. The first runner to break 19 minutes will receive $100, and there will be raffle prizes. Registration is open at active.com For details, call Michelle at 208-2447. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball registration for its spring league at Southside Sports Complex is 6-8 p.m. Monday. Five leagues are offered for ages 4-6 (coach pitch), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-15. Fee is $95. A parent or guardian must accompany player and provide a birth certificate. Online registration continues at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897.Q From staff reports Ulsh expects big thingsBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIf you’re walking into your first head coaching job, it’s not a bad idea to walk into a good situation. Columbia High head coach Jonathan Ulsh takes over the Tigers’ baseball program this season in just that role looking to lead his alma mater back to the playoffs. The Tigers made their deepest run last year before coming up short in the third round of the playoffs, but Ulsh brings in plenty of experience and a veteran ballclub. Ulsh was a four-year member of the Tigers and went on to play two more years in Lake City at what was then known as Lake City Community College under Tom Clark. Ulsh played two more years of college ball at Wesleyan College and North Alabama. During his college career he had more than 40 wins. At 30 years old, Ulsh has plenty of experience in coaching already. “I started coaching out of college at North Alabama as a graduate assistant,” Ulsh said. “After that, I came home to coach under Andy Bennett and Richard Collins for two years and Greg Gillman for two years. The last three years I’ve spent at Branford as an assistant on their varsity.” And just because it’s his first year as the head coach, Ulsh doesn’t expect the pro-gram to take a dip. “I think we can go a long BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s 2013 baseball team members are (front row, from left) Dakota Yurke, Brent Stalter, Cody Bass, Jake B ates, Kaleb Rossignol, Harrison Shubert, Steven Rendell and T yler Myrick. Back row (from left) are coach Joey Edge, A lex Milton, Jason Plyn, Levi Hollingsworth, Dalton Mauldin, Caleb Va ughn, Jordan Culp, Andrew Johnson, Sam Bass and head c oach Jonathan Ulsh. Heath Phillips also is an assistant coach CHS continued on 6B Revenge seekers BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Akeem Williams is fouled by a St. Augu stine High player during Friday’s semifinal matchup against the Yellow Jackets in the Distri ct 4-6A tournament in Jacksonville. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders attempts a layup earlier this year against Columbia High. Third time no charm for Tigers against Wolfson By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comJACKSONVILLE — Some nights you have it and some nights you don’t. Columbia High experienced both ends of the spectrum dur-ing the District 4-6A tourna-ment over the weekend. After a 72-56 win against St. Augustine High on Friday, the Tigers came up flat in a 61-35 defeat at the hands of the Wolfson High Wolfpack on Saturday. Columbia missed its first 10 shots from the field and never led in the contest. The Wolfpack were hot early and started the game on a 9-0 run before Morris Marshall’s field goal with 2:48 finally put the Tigers on the board. Columbia would hold it close in the first half and trailed by only 14 heading into the fourth quarter as Wolfson held a 42-28 edge. In desperation mode, the Tigers buried themselves in the final period as the Wolfpack pulled away by the 61-35 final margin. Marshall and Robert Dale led the Tigers with eight points each and Jasper Sasser led Wolfson with 15. “I thought the first half was the worst half of basket-ball we played all year and the second half didn’t get any better,” Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. “Credit Wolfson, they’re a good team, but that just wasn’t our night.” The Tigers will travel to take on Ridgeview High on CHS continued on 5B Williston wins rubber match over Fort White

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From staff reportsColumbia High’s Dana Roberts, Kayla Carman and Charlee Watson competed in the FHSAA Finals state weightlifting meet at the Kissimmee Civic Center on Saturday. In the Unlimited division, Roberts had a 180-pound bench press and a 160-pound clean & jerk for a 340-pound total. She placed 15th in the division, which was won by Samantha Cook of Bradford with 240-225-465. In the 110-pound division, Carman lifted 105-115-220. Amanda Friar of Navarre High won the division with 160-145-305. Watson did not make any of her lifts in the 129-pound division. It was won by Shelby Koren of Spruce Creek High with 160-195-355. Navarre edged out Spruce Creek for the state title, 24 points to 23.Lady Indians basketballFort White High’s girls basketball team ran into a 25-2 Trinity Catholic High buzzsaw in the opening round of the Class 4A state playoffs. The Celtics beat the Lady Indians 61-25 in Ocala on Thursday. Kasha Cook led Fort White, which was making its first trip to the state play-offs, with 13 points. Shambria Washington led Trinity Catholic with 22 points and Amber Ferguson scored 11. In the second round, the Celtics will face Bradford High which beat Mount Dora, 38-30. On the other side of the bracket, Atlantic High beat Cocoa Beach High, 59-39, and Lake Highland Prep beat West Shore High 42-39.Fort White softballFort White’s softball game at Bronson High on Thursday was rained out. The Lady Indians play their home-opener at 6 p.m. Tuesday against Chiefland High. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, final round, at Johannesburg (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, final round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, final round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 7 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Allianz Championship, final round, at Boca Raton (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Indiana at Ohio St. 3 p.m. ESPN — St. John’s at Syracuse 10 p.m. FSN — Washington at Southern Cal NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — L.A. Clippers at New York 3:30 p.m. ABC — L.A. Lakers at Miami 8 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at Brooklyn NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — Los Angeles at Detroit 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — New Jersey at Pittsburgh PREP BASKETBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Chester (Pa.) at NeumannGoretti (Pa.) RUGBY 2 p.m. NBCSN — USA Sevens, semifinals, at Las Vegas 4 p.m. NBC — USA Sevens, consolation games and championship, at Las Vegas WINTER SPORTS 6 p.m. NBCSN — Biathlon World Championships, men’s pursuit, at Nove Mesto, Czech Republic (same-day tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN — Houston at Rice 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Michigan St. at Penn St. 3 p.m. FSN — Tulane at Tulsa 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Kentucky at Vanderbilt 5 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Marquette at GeorgetownNBCSN — Old Dominion at Delaware 9 p.m. ESPN — Kansas St. at Kansas SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, West Bromwich at Liverpool WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Maryland at Duke 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Louisville at Notre DameFOOTBALLNFL calendar March 9-11 — Clubs may enter negotiations with certified agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at end of league year. March 12 — Before 4 p.m., clubs must exercise options for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their 2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation; clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclusive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 contracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must be under the salary cap. The 2013 league year, free agency and trading period begins at 4 p.m. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix April 25-27 — NFL draft, New YorkMay 20-22 — NFL spring league Meeting, BostonBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games L.A. Clippers at New York, 1 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Miami, 3:30 p.m.Minnesota at Memphis, 6 p.m.Denver at Boston, 6 p.m.New Orleans at Toronto, 6 p.m.Portland at Orlando, 6 p.m.Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.Houston at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Monday’s Games Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Indiana, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m.Washington at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. NBA calendar Feb. 15-17 — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin.June 6 — NBA Finals begin (possible switch to June 4). June 20 — Last possible date for NBA Finals (possible switch to June 18). June 27 — NBA draft. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Indiana at No. 10 Ohio State, 1 p.m. No. 4 Duke at Boston College, 6 p.m.No. 7 Arizona vs. California, 7 p.m.No. 9 Syracuse vs. St. John’s, 3 p.m.No. 18 Minnesota vs. Illinois, 6 p.m. Florida 83, Mississippi State 58 At Gainesville MISSISSIPPI ST. (7-15) Borchert 5-11 1-2 14, Ware 7-11 2-7 16, Thomas 4-9 0-0 8, Bloodman 4-7 1-1 10, Sword 2-8 2-2 7, Price 0-1 0-0 0, Cunningham 0-3 0-0 0, Johnson 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 23-54 6-12 58.FLORIDA (19-3) Murphy 7-10 0-0 17, Young 1-5 4-6 6, Boynton 3-9 4-5 10, Rosario 7-10 2-3 18, Frazier II 4-7 0-0 11, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Wilbekin 2-4 0-0 5, Ogbueze 1-1 0-0 2, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Prather 5-9 2-5 12, Walker 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 31-58 12-19 83. Halftime—Florida 42-26. 3-Point Goals—Mississippi St. 6-16 (Borchert 3-5, Johnson 1-2, Bloodman 1-3, Sword 1-3, Thomas 0-1, Cunningham 0-2), Florida 9-25 (Frazier II 3-5, Murphy 3-5, Rosario 2-4, Wilbekin 1-3, Prather 0-1, Graham 0-1, Walker 0-1, Boynton 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Mississippi St. 31 (Sword 8), Florida 36 (Young 7). Assists—Mississippi St. 13 (Sword 5), Florida 21 (Wilbekin 7). Total Fouls—Mississippi St. 18, Florida 12. A—12,444.Wake Forest 71, Florida St. 46 At Winston-Salem, N.C. FLORIDA ST. (13-10) White 4-4 4-7 13, Turpin 3-7 2-4 8, Brandon 0-0 0-1 0, Snaer 4-13 4-5 13, Whisnant II 1-4 0-0 3, Bookert 1-2 0-0 3, Gilchrist 0-2 0-0 0, Bojanovsky 1-4 3-4 5, Portuondo 0-0 0-0 0, Thomas 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 0-3 1-2 1, Moreau 0-1 0-0 0, Ojo 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 14-43 14-23 46.WAKE FOREST (11-12) Thomas 2-6 3-6 7, McKie 5-9 3-4 15, Adala Moto 3-4 0-0 6, Miller-McIntyre 6-10 1-3 14, Harris 4-12 4-4 14, Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Fischer 4-6 0-2 10, Washington 0-0 0-1 0, Rountree III 0-0 1-2 1, Cavanaugh 1-2 0-0 2, Antonelli 0-1 0-0 0, Jennings 1-1 0-0 2, O’Brien 0-0 0-0 0, Niedrich 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 26-53 12-22 71. Halftime—Wake Forest 34-26. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 4-13 (White 1-1, Bookert 1-2, Whisnant II 1-3, Snaer 1-5, Miller 0-2), Wake Forest 7-17 (Fischer 2-3, McKie 2-5, Harris 2-6, Miller-McIntyre 1-2, Adala Moto 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida St. 25 (Turpin, White 6), Wake Forest 45 (Thomas 8). Assists—Florida St. 7 (Bookert, Brandon, Snaer 2), Wake Forest 11 (Jones, Thomas 3). Total Fouls—Florida St. 20, Wake Forest 21.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Los Angeles at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.Edmonton at Columbus, 6 p.m.Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.San Jose at Columbus, 7 p.m.Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m.Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN PREP ROUNDUP MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP COURTESY PHOTOLady Falcons softballLake City Middle School’s softball team plays its first ho me at 4 p.m. Thursday against Suwannee Middle School. Team members are (front row, fro m left) Lauren Hutcherson, SK Lewis, Maddie Kennon and Jamilyn Jeffries. Second r ow (from left) are coach John Kvistad, Malorie Ronsonet, Story Giebeig, Alai na Perry, Carlie Carswell, Dara Gaylord and coach Machon Kvistad. Third row (from left) are Hanna Hamilton, Brandy Wacha, Kamdyn Kvistad, Mikayla Collins, Ivorie Ma ltby and Kaylee Brannon. COURTESY PHOTOLady Falcons place in Matanzas 5KFour Lake City Middle School runners placed in the top eight in the 11-14 age group at the Matanzas 5K in Jacksonville on Jan. 26, all with person al best times. The Lady Falcons are: Cassie Pierron, second in 19:51 (from left); Jillian Morse, fifth in 20:40; Christen Odum, eighth in 23:05; Bridget Morse, first in 19:28. They are join ed by Nicole Morse, who placed fourth in the 15-19 age group.Fort White softball opens with victoryFrom staff reportsFort White High’s middle school softball team opened the season with a 12-0 win at home over Branford High’s middle school on Tuesday. Pitcher Shelby DuBose did not allow a hit and struck out 12. Fort White’s first nine batters scored — DuBose, Kylee Crews, Raven Miles, Jamie Tolkkinen, Jolynn Falgout, Brooke Maynard, Savana Terry, Jess Burns and Shaylen Raulerson. Roberts places in top half of division at state weightlifting

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 3B3BSPORTSLady Tigers start strong JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Lacey King (right) looks to steal seco nd base in the Lady Tigers’ 16-0 home win over Wolfso n High on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kayli Kvistad hits a pitch during Tues day’s game against Wolfson High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brandy Morgan (1) crosses home plate against Wolfson High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ashley Shoup winds up for a pitch dur ing the season-opener. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brittany Morgan steals third base again st Wolfson High.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers commit to future JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head football coach Brian Allen introduc es the nine Tigers signing college scholarships on W ednesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High football players Laremy Tunsil (left) and Felix Woods joke around before appearing on ESPN for National Signing Day on Wednesd ay. Tunsil signed with the University of Mississippi and Woods signed with Weber State University. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High students cheer for members of the football te am signing scholarships during National Signing Day on Wednesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterWyndell Wallace signals to friends and family while on stage at the Columbia High auditorium. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil gives a thumbs-up to an ESPN cameraman after checking the microphone levels.

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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER BASKETBALL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 5B5BSports INDIANS: Playoff bound Continued From Page 1B CHS: Play at Ridgeview on Thursday Continued From Page 1BThursday in Orange Park. In the semifinal matchup against St. Augustine High on Friday, the Tigers led after each quarter on the way to their final matchup against Wolfson High. Columbia took the sting out of the Yellow Jackets early and went onto win 72-56. Early, the Tigers had a secret weapon in Darrell Jones, a junior varsity play-er that was called up for the district tournament. “I always thought highly of him,” Jefferson said. “I thought that he could help us down the stretch, but he ended up helping us more than even I anticipated. I knew that he had the physical skills, but I wasn’t sure if he had the basketball matu-rity. He ended up playing very composed like he had been there all year.” Jones ended the game with 10 points, but scored seven in the first half to help the Tigers establish an early lead. Tre Simmons was the hottest hand for the Tigers on the night, however, as the junior finished with 18 points including knocking down five free throws down the stretch. Akeem Williams had 15 points and Marshall and Dillan Hall each finished with 10. Javonta Foster was the only other Tiger to score with seven points. “The win tonight was for us,” Jefferson said. “But we want to win the champion-ship for the community so that we can have a home playoff game. With the sup-port we’ve got, the commu-nity deserves that.” Jefferson was most pleased with the Tigers’ ability to have a balanced rotation of scoring as five Columbia players reached double digits in the con-test. “It says a few things,” Jefferson said. “It means we were distributing the ball well, we ran the floor and we were making good decisions. It’s a good thing when you have balanced scoring like that.” a dozen points midway through the second quar-ter, then closed on an 8-0 run to get within 27-23. Jalen Wyche and Sanders hit treys early in the third quarter and Dre Brown scored four points to offset a 6-0 spurt by the Red Devils. Michael Mulberry had a pair of baskets late in the quar-ter and Sanders’ two free throws with :50 remaining tied the game. Sanders scored nine points in the fourth quar-ter and Wyche nailed a 3-pointer to give the Indians a four-point lead. Treys by Alex Porter and Earl Brown around a bas-ket by Mulberry produced the tie. The Red Devils missed an alley-oop play at the buzzer. “The rebounding hurt us,” Fort White head coach Isiah Phillips said. “We knew we had to do good job boxing out. That was the key. Our goal was to win the district champi-onship, but we have got to finish.” Sanders led all scorers with 24 points. Wyche scored 15 points and Mulberry scored 13. Phillips and Brown scored four points and Chris Cottrell scored two. Earl Brown led the Red Devils with 23 points. David Heinkel scored 14 points and Tre Wilson scored 13. Both teams advanced to the state playoffs and will play on Thursday. Fort White travels to Mount Dora High, while Williston plays host to South Sumter High. Williston also went to overtime in its 77-75 semi-final win over Bradford High on Friday. Wilson scored seven points in the overtime and led Williston with 26 points. After being shut out in the first quarter, Bradford’s Justin McBride finished with 34 points including eight in the overtime. Fort White had an easier time with Santa Fe High in the other semifinal, beat-ing the Raiders 77-65. The Indians led by eight points at the end of the first quarter. Santa Fe cut the deficit in half by half-time, but Fort White got it back to 12 points by the end of the third quarter. Sanders led four Indians in double figures with 24 points. Cottrell scored 16, with 15 from Mulberry and 10 from Phillips. Wyche added seven points, while Paul Perry and Kaleel Jackson each scored two and Quran Porter had a free throw. Montrell Flagg scored 23 for the Raiders with 16 from Demarius Harris and 10 from Marcus Archer. Gator basketball gets back on trackBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — No. 2 Florida played without for-ward Will Yeguete, benched starting point guard Scottie Wilbekin and got an injury scare from Erik Murphy. It didn’t matter against Mississippi State. Mike Rosario scored 18 points, Murphy added 17 before leaving with a sprained ankle and the Gators bounced back from a humbling loss earlier in the week to thump the short-handed Bulldogs 83-58 on Saturday. The game looked every bit like a matchup of the Southeastern Conference’s best and worst teams. It wasn’t nearly as lopsided as the 35-point beatdown Florida handed Mississippi State on its home court two weeks ago. “When we play like that, it’s hard to beat us,” guard Kenny Boynton said. Casey Prather, playing in place of Yeguete, chipped in 12 points and five rebounds. Yeguete had arthroscopic surgery Friday to remove loose bodies in his right knee and will miss the rest of the regular season. The Gators (19-3, 9-1 SEC) went 4-5 without him last season, but handled his absence much better against the Bulldogs. “Obviously, he’s a big piece of our team that we lost,” said Michael Frazier II, who finished with 11 points and six rebounds in his first career start. “But we’ve got to play together, play hard and try to make up for what he brought to the team.” Mississippi State (7-15, 2-8) played without guard Jalen Steele, who didn’t make the trip after being suspended indefinitely for violating team rules. It was a big blow for a team already down three players. Freshmen Andre Applewhite and Jacoby Davis are out for the sea-son with knee injuries, and senior Wendell Lewis is sidelined with a fractured right patella. So the Bulldogs came to Gainesville with six scholarship players and two walk-ons. ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State’s Michael Snaer (21) drives past Wake Fore st’s C.J. Harris (11) during the second half of the game in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Saturday. Wake Forest won 71-46. ’Noles routed by Wake By AARON BEARDAssociated PressWINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Wake Forest is doing its best to rebuild a homecourt advantage. Travis McKie scored 15 points to help the Demon Deacons beat Florida State 71-46 on Saturday, snapping a four-game losing streak. C.J. Harris added 14 for the Demon Deacons (11-12, 4-7 Atlantic Coast Conference), who led the entire afternoon on the way to matching their league win total for last season. They were in complete con-trol almost from the tip, leading by 11 points in the first half before blowing the game open in a surprisingly easy finish. Now they’re 4-1 at home in the ACC, with the only loss coming against Duke in a game that came down to the final minute. And if third-year coach Jeff Bzdelik is going to turn around the struggling pro-gram, it has to start here at Joel Coliseum. The Demon Deacons finished with a 45-25 rebound-ing advantage, which led to a 19-1 edge in second-chance points and helped them shoot 49.1 percent (26 of 53) for the game. Florida State coach Leonard Hamilton offered a simple assessment when asked what his Seminoles did right Saturday. “We put our uniforms on right,” Hamilton said. “That’s about where it stopped.” Michael Snaer and Okaro White each scored 13 for the Seminoles. Miami rolls overHeelsBy STEVEN WINEAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — North Carolina’s Marcus Paige had Shane Larkin well-covered when the Miami Hurricanes’ point guard launched a shot from the top of the key. “I yelled, ‘Good defense, Marcus,’” Tar Heels coach Roy Williams said. “And it went right in.” Lately there’s no stopping the eighth-ranked Hurricanes, who made a school record-tying 15 3-pointers and extended their winning streak to 11 games by beating North Carolina 87-61 on Saturday. The Tar Heels started poorly and were dominat-ed inside, but Williams said Miami is unbeaten in the Atlantic Coast Conference for a reason. “Everybody from North Carolina always thinks it’s just about North Carolina,” he said. “It’s not. Miami is pretty dadgum good.” North Carolina (16-7, 6-4 ACC), which began the season 18-2 against the Hurricanes, lost to them for the second time in four weeks. Miami (19-3, 10-0) set a school record for ACC victories in a season with eight games still to go. The Hurricanes are the last unbeaten team in league play among the major conferences. Word is spreading, and the attendance-challenged Hurricanes drew a sellout crowd for the third in the past four home games. Among those on hand were LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, seated in the front row. Coach Jim Larranaga said he received a phone call requesting tickets for the Heat stars. “I told them, ‘Sorry, it’s sold out.’ But then we said, ‘We think we can fit you in.’”

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04206BSPORTS (386) 755-0601 U cccnf.com Follow us on You. The most important part of cancer care. CHS: Pitching to be team’s backbone Continued From Page 1Bway,” Ulsh said. “I haven’t been familiar with our dis-trict much, because I’ve been out of it. I’ve read the paper though, and I know about what they’ve done in the past. We’re good enough to pitch and play defense with anyone in the state. We have to be able to manufacture some runs and put the ball in play.” The Tigers will have one experienced hand on the mound while also break-ing in a freshman. Caleb Vaughn has varsity experi-ence starting games, but Harrison Shubert has the faith of the staff as the Tigers’ No. 2 during his freshman season. “Vaughn is a competitor,” Ulsh said. “He goes right at guys. You kind of like a guy like that on the mound. He has that ‘it’ factor. We expect a lot out of Shubert, but we’re going to hold him back until late in the year. We don’t want to put too many innings on him. He’s earned the right to be our No. 2, but we want to bring him along.” Columbia is still looking for a third starter. “We haven’t developed a third guy yet,” Ulsh said. “We’re looking at Levi Hollingsworth, Dalton Mauldin and Jordan Culp. The good thing is we have depth.” Ulsh’s only concern with the Tigers is at the plate, but he feels the Tigers will produce when needed. “It’s a long season and we’re going to be OK at the plate,” he said. “We have a couple of guys in the order that can change the game in one swing with Hollingsworth and Alex Milton. We’re going to do anything to put guys on base, whether that’s crowd-ing the plate or bunting, we’ll do it. The only way we’re going to score runs is to get on base.” Ulsh expects the usual suspects to contend for the District 4-6A championship. “I know that Stanton Prep and Atlantic Coast are the teams that will compete for the district title along with us,” Ulsh said. “I know they’re good, solid ball clubs. We’re away at both of these teams. One thing that is good for our schedule is we play several playoff teams. We’ll play Hoover from Alabama at Chiles. It will help us if we make the playoffs.” Lee, St. Augustine and Wolfson high schools make up the rest of the district. The Tigers open with Fort White High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in Lake City. “Fort White has a good ball club this year,” Ulsh said. “They have a hand-ful of seniors and they’re going to throw their num-ber one against us. They’ll come in trying to beat us. We just have to put the ball in play and score more runs than them. I expect it to be a challenge, but it’s good because it gets the com-munity involved with both teams playing.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High tight end Shaq Johnson will be attending Western Kentucky University to play football this fall. Columbia tight end Johnson brings dual threat to next level By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAt Columbia High, Shaq Johnson was a dual-threat tight end. He expects to be a dual threat at Western Kentucky University on the football field and in the classroom. Johnson committed to play football at Western Kentucky on National Signing Day on Wednesday in the Columbia High auditorium. “For me, it’s about education,” Johnson said. “That’s what I’m getting out of it. The visit was great and I felt a lot of love. I got to hang out with my professors and see the curriculum. I felt at home.” Johnson doesn’t expect to just work hard in the classroom. He’s going to put equal effort into his playing career. “I’m going to get in and work hard for playing time,” Johnson said. “I’ll play any role that I have to. If I have to wait, I will, but when the time comes I’m going to shine.” The offensivee scheme at Western Kentucky is similar to the concepts he learned at Columbia under head coach Brian Allen and offensive coordinator Mitch Shoup, according to Johnson. “When we went, it was just like what I’m used to,” Johnson said. “There are quite a few two-tight end sets. There’s a lot of move-ment and I feel good in the system.” Johnson feels he’ll be an equal asset as a blocker and catching the ball. “Working along side Laremy (Tunsil) every day, I had no choice but to get better,” Johnson said. “Coach (Andy) Giddens and (Doug) Peeler were always there to make sure I was moving the right way and taking the right first step. I’m different from most tight ends, because a lot can only do one thing or the other. With me, I can block and catch passes.” He credits his blocking to Allen’s discipline in the weight room. “The big thing for me was when he got here, I didn’t really like the weight room,” Johnson said. “I would rather be on the track, but he gave me discipline in the weight room. That’s a big positive.” But Johnson will always remember his time as a Tiger. “We were a big family,” he said. “We all care about each other.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFelix Woods (from left), Javere Smith, Brett Newcomb and Sol omon Bell are seen at National Signing Day on Wednesday in the Columbia Hig h auditorium. Smith gets opportunity at Northern ArizonaBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comHis teammates call him Buddha and Columbia High the defensive end found peace and tranquil-ity in his college choice at National Signing Day on Wednesday. Smith was one of 10 seniors to sign a college scholarship from the 2012 class and made his choice to play at Northern Arizona University. For Smith, to be a part of the largest signing class in the Tigers’ history was a blessing, but also a start-ing point. “It’s pretty remarkable,” he said. “We have set the bar for the younger class. They just have to continue the ward work and dedica-tion seen in this class.” For Smith, it all started with head coach Brian Allen for changing the cul-ture of the Tigers. “The way he came in, he just took charge of the program,” Smith said. “We had so much more dis-cipline. It made all of us better.” Smith had many options, but his final choice came down to two schools. “It was stressful when I started, but I narrowed it down to three schools and then two,” Smith said. “Tennessee State, Alcorn State and Northern Arizona were my final three and in the end it came down to Alcorn State and Northern Arizona. When I was done, it was Northern Arizona, just because I felt that the program reminded me so much of what I had been through at CHS.” Smith said the defensive schemes have a lot in com-mon with what he’s learned under Allen and defensive coordinator Dennis Dotson at Columbia. “They run pretty much the same defense,” Smith said. “They want me to line up inside and at defensive end. I’ll run some of the same slants and stunts.” Smith intends to start his career at Northern Arizona the same way he ended it at Columbia. He wants to be a starter and that’s his goal for the first year on campus. “I want to come in and do my job to earn a spot,” Smith said. “It’s just like here at Columbia where I have to do my job and trust in the man next to me to do their job as well. Just like here, we started off not knowing each other, but we left as brothers.” Smith also wants to establish a name for him-self in the west before graduation. “I want to represent Lake City and I hope to do that by being named allconference,” Smith said. But he also wants to represent Lake City off the field. “I want to go in, make my grades and graduate,” he said.

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By KEVIN MCGILLAssociated PressNEW ORLEANS — The company that supplied electricity to the Super Bowl took the blame Friday for the power outage that brought the big game to a halt, explaining that a device designed specifically to prevent a blackout failed and plunged the game into darkness for more than half an hour. The device called a relay had been installed as part of a project begun in 2011 to upgrade the electrical system serving the Superdome in anticipation of the championship game. It was supposed to guard against problems in the cable that links the power grid with lines that go into the stadium. “The purpose of it was to provide a newer, more advanced type of protection for the Superdome,” Dennis Dawsey, an executive with Entergy Corp., told members of the City Council. Entergy is the parent company of Entergy New Orleans. Entergy officials said the relay functioned with no problems during January’s Sugar Bowl and other earlier events. It has been removed and will be replaced. All systems at the Superdome are now working, and the stadium was to host a major Mardi Gras event Saturday night, said Doug Thornton, an executive with SMG, the com-pany that manages the stadium for the state. The relay was installed in a building near the stadium known as “the vault,” which receives a line directly from a nearby Entergy substation. Once the line reaches the vault, it splits into Consider hiring a convicted felon T he 35th annual Olustee Battle Festival and 37th annual re-enactment is upcoming during the week-end of Feb. 15-17 in both downtown Lake City and at the Olustee Battlefield, located approximately 13 miles east of Lake City on U.S. 90. It is anticipated that more than 60,000 area residents and visitors will attend the three-day event, which has been named Florida’s best historical re-enactment by the readers of Florida Living magazine for the past nine years. Activities in downtown will feature free live entertain-ment on both Friday and Saturday in Olustee Park. There will be more than 120 arts and crafts and food booths in the downtown area, which will be open from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. both days. There will also be an extensive Children’s Entertainment Area with music and instruments, a kazoo show and racing pigs at no cost. The festival begins on Friday morning with a Memorial Service at Oaklawn Cemetary and the day will end with a skirmish on the banks of Lake Desoto and a battle between the ironclads Monitor and Merrimac Saturday features the Blue-Grey 5K Run begin-ning at 7 a.m., followed by the One-Mile Fun Run at 9 a.m. The annual Olustee Parade will begin at the Florida Department of Transportation Building at 10:30 a.m., and the day con-cludes with the Blue-Grey Square Dance starting at 7:45 p.m. at the Rountree-Moore Toyota showroom. Meanwhile, the Olustee Battlefield will feature the re-enactor’s campsites, sutler village, interpretive programs, along with a skirmish at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday and the actual Olustee re-enactment on Sunday, beginning at 1:30 p.m. Admission at the battlefield is $7 for adults, school age children are $3 and preschool children are free. If you haven’t been to the battlefield in some time, it’s well worth the trip. You’ll especially be intrigued with the wide array of vendors in the sutler’s village and the many varied food pro-viders. A helpful tip is to be reminded of the shuttle bus service from both the Lake City Gateway Airport and Baker Correctional Institute to the battlefield entrance. The shuttle begins on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. and Sunday at 9 a.m. Round-trip cost is only $2 for adults and $1 for chil-dren and will save you a lengthy walk to the Olustee Battlefield entrance. For additional information on Olustee Battle Festival coming Lake City Reporter Week of February 10-16, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc. COUNTY TOURISM Harvey Campbell386-758-1397 By JOSHUA FREEDAP Business WriterBoeing acknowledged on Friday that it may not be able to deliver its 787 as fast as hoped. The company said it has told customers expecting the next 787 deliveries that those planes have either been delayed, or at risk for a delay. Boeing is still building the longrange, fuel-efficient planes, and it said on Friday that it has no plans to slow production. Norwegian Air Shuttle confirmed that it got such a warn-ing from Boeing. The Oslo-based budget airline’s spokesman, Lasse Sandaker-Nielsen, said that deliv-ery of the planes, scheduled to be flying for the airline in May or June, might not be possible. He gave no reason for the delays. Norwegian is one of Europe’s fastest-growing airlines and had planned to begin its first long-haul flights to New York and Bangkok with the Boeing 787s. The world’s fleet of 50 787s has been grounded since Jan. 16. Boeing and investigators are try-ing to figure out why one aircraft battery caught fire and another one smoldered and forced an emergency landing. The National Transportation Safety Board is still probably weeks away from determining the root cause of the Jan. 7 battery fire in a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Boston’s Logan International Airport, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman told reporters this week. In about 30 days the board plans to issue an interim report on its investigation and post online all the test results and factual information gathered in its investigation, Hersman said. The 787 is the first commercial airliner to rely heavily on lithium-ion batteries. Each plane has two of the 63-pound blue power bricks, one near the front to provide power to the cockpit if the engines stop, and one near the back to start up the auxiliary power unit, which is essentially a backup generator. One of the big unknowns right now is whether Boeing will need to drop the lithium-ion batteries in favor of a battery more like that used on other planes. The NTSB’s detailed update on Thursday said the fire on the Boston plane started when one of the bat-tery’s eight cells short-circuited, causing it to heat up. The heat in turn caused swelling in neighboring cells, and they short-circuited, too. The focus on the battery’s charging, design or manufactur-ing process seems to limit the risk of a larger problem “and is some-what of a positive development for Boeing,” Jefferies analyst Howard A. Rubel wrote in a note on Friday. “We believe the risk of a major re-design has declined.” Boeing shares fell 87 cents to close at $76.56. 787 DREAMLINER Boeing warns of delay ASSOCIATED PRESSA Boeing 787 jet lands Thursday at Paine Field in Evere tt, Wash., following a flight from Texas. The Federal Aviation Administration gave Boeing permission to reloc ate the plane, which was at Meacham Airport for painting when the planes were grounded last month by battery prob lems. May not be able to deliver new planes as fast as hoped. “Risk — If one has to jump a stream and knows how wide it is, he will not jump. If he doesn’t know how wide it is, he’ll jump and six times out of ten he’ll make it.” — Proverb A t every meeting of the Goodwill board of directors, the staff presents success sto-ries about employees who have benefitted from work-ing there. At a recent meeting, they brought in three young men, each successfully employed at Goodwill and each hired despite felony convictions that included DWI-Manslaughter and drug traf-ficking. As we listened to these men describe their experiences and how Goodwill helped them, it became crystal clear what a valu-able service Goodwill provides for this group. So often, convicted felons struggle with becoming productive members of society after their incarceration. There is a high rate of recidivism among these individuals, but Goodwill provides opportunities for gainful employment, sending out a life raft rather than allowing them to sink. So many felons come out of prison with no hope that they will ever be able to find a job because of their crime. In the case of these three men, Goodwill supplied them with the hope they so need-ed when rejoining society. I teach two entrepreneurship courses at the Gadsden Correctional Facility in Gretna, which is an all-female, minimum-security prison. These women know they will always wear the tattoo of a convicted felon and want to develop the skills they will need to be successful after prison. As I was pondering the reasons these ladies are in prison, it occurred to me that each case was the result of one of two simple causes: doing stupid things and getting involved with drugs. Of course, outside of these, there is a third group of people who are just evil — the Charles Mansons of the world, for example. Thankfully, I have never had to deal with any of these as I have only worked in a minimum-security prison. Among these ladies, stupid, thoughtless actions like running nude onto a football field were their downfall. One had been with her boyfriend while he perpetrat-ed a crime, and she was unaware that he planned to use a gun. These kinds of stories are so prevalent. We all do stupid things and have all ended up in a regretful situation because of our thought-less actions — maybe not to the degree these ladies have, but it is not hard to imagine how one bad decision could be the cause. In the other category are those who are serving time for drug convictions. Many may have sold drugs as it was the only way they could support their own habit. Bottom line here is these folks will come out of prison with all the skills they need to have success-ful careers, but may never get an opportunity to put them into prac-tice because many entrepreneurs will just not hire them. For many years, I, myself, discouraged entrepreneurs from considering convicted felons. I felt that you could never trust them or feel safe around them, but after working with these inmates, I have changed my opinion. I can now appreciate their potential value. Kohl’s and McDonald’s are examples of large firms that hire and recruit convicted felons and understand the value they can bring to the table. As I have said, I am now a strong supporter of hiring con-victed felons, but I do have two caveats. First, if you hire a TOURISM continued on 2C ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung(850) 644-3372jostery@comcast.net BUSINESS continued on 2C OUTAGE continued on 2C SUPER BOWL OUTAGE Power company takes the blame

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 10, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY TOURISM: Plenty of events lined up for 2013 Continued From Page 1Cthe festival and re-enact-ment, call (386) 758-1312 or go online to www. olusteefestival.com or www.battleofolustee.org.2013 sports schedule is now under wayAfter an extremely productive year in 2012 when our area hosted more than 34 baseball, softball, cross-country, basketball and football youth tourna-ments, action is resum-ing this weekend at the Southside Recreation Complex with 75 teams playing in a USSSA baseball tournament. Upcoming events include a USSSA National Invitation Tournament with approxi-mately 70 teams during the weekend of Feb. 22-24 and a second similar tour-nament during the week-end of March 1-3 with the same number of participat-ing teams. At this time, more than 20 tournaments are already scheduled for the Suwannee River Valley area including two USSSA Global World Series tour-naments during the weeks of June 26-30 and July 3-7 with each event expected to draw approximately 60 teams. Another new event for Lake City will be the inaugural Florida Gateway Challenge which will be hosted at Florida Gateway College on Saturday, March 16. Hosted by the Academy of Martial Arts in Lake City, the event is expected to include approximately 125 participants, includ-ing a 25-person team from Argentina. The Open Martial Arts Tournament is sanctioned by both the North American Sport Karate Association and World Martial Arts and Kobudo Association. The promoter for the event is Lake City resident and martial arts instructor Laura Lindboe. Additional information can be found at www.facebook.com/FloridaGatewayChallenge. You can also call 386-623-0551. Bed tax levy subject of public hearingThe Columbia County Board of Commissioners will hold a public hear-ing on Thursday, Feb. 21, with a tentative time of 5:30 p.m., at the Columbia County School Board Office, to consider the recommendation of the Columbia County Tourist Development Council (TDC) to increase the Local Option Tourist Development Council “bed tax” from 3 percent to 4 percent. The proposed increase will be utilized to pay the TDC’s portion of an estimated $3 million upgrade of the Southside Complex. The project will include new lights, ADA sidewalks, concession and restroom buildings, new bleachers and other upgrades to the complex. According to the Florida Department of Revenue, bed tax collections in Columbia County were down slightly in November at $52,034, compared to $52,809 in November of 2011. For the 11 month period of January through November, collections are $581,694 in 2012, com-pared to $558,224 in 2011, an increase of $23,470 for the year, thus far. Smith Travel Research reports occupancy rates for all of 2012 were up 13.7 percent to an overall figure of 53 percent; Average Daily Rate (ADR) was up 1.6 percent to $69.85 and total room revenues were up 12.5 percent. Q Harvey Campbell is the executive director of the Columbia County Tourist Development Council. He can be reached at 386-758-1397. BUSINESS: Hire a convict Continued From Page 1Cconvicted felon, you really must know why they went to prison. For instance, in the case of a drug convic-tion, I would recommend regular drug testing. Second, you must be sure that the candidate you hire for a bookkeeper’s position has no crimes related to handling of money. I have just seen bookkeepers rob their employers too many times. Now go out and consider hiring a convicted felon. These people are so much more than any crime they committed. These inmates can be great workers and just need a hand up.BUSINESS BRIEFS Zahner joins Peoples Bank Long-time local banker Joe Zahner has joined Peoples State Bank and will serve the Lake City-based bank as its residential loan officer. In his role, Zahner revives Peoples State Bank’s commitment to providing comprehensive residential mortgage solutions. Zahner, a native of Lake City, has more than two decades of banking and financial services experience, returns to banking after most recently working in the real estate industry for leading hotel group. He earned his accounting degree from Florida Atlantic University and has been active in a host of civic and economic development organizations. He is a past member of the Lake City Rotary and is a past board member of the Housing Authority, Lake City Chamber of Commerce, Tourist Development Authority and United Way. Zahner and his wife, Pamela, have two daughters, Priscilla and Suzanna; and one granddaughter, Savannah. Moses named to Chairman’s Council Philip J. Moses, Jr., a Raymond James Financial advisor located at First Federal Bank of Florida, 4424 NW American Lane, Suite 102, Lake City, FL 32055, was recently named a member of the 2013 Chairman’s Council. Chairman’s Council honors are presented only to those financial advisors who have dem-onstrated an unparalleled commitment to personal service and professional integ-rity. Members of the Chairman’s Council represent the top echelon of the firm’s financial advisors, which is a privilege limited to a select few.* This marks the 7th consecutive year that Moses has qualified for this important recognition. Moses, who joined Raymond James in 1998, has more than 40 years of experience in the financial services industry. Zahner Moses Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. OUTAGE: Power company takes the blame Continued From Page 1C two cables that go into the Superdome. Sunday’s power failure cut lights to about half of the stadium for 34 min-utes, halting play between the Baltimore Ravens and San Francisco 49ers and interrupting the nation’s most-watched sporting event. Not long after Friday’s announcement, the man-ufacturer of the relay, Chicago-based S&C Electric Co., released a statement saying that the blackout occurred because system operators had put the relay’s so-called trip setting too low to allow the device to handle the incoming electric load. The equipment was owned and installed by Entergy New Orleans. “If higher settings had been applied, the equip-ment would not have dis-connected the power,” said Michael J.S. Edmonds, vice president of strategic solutions for S&C. In a follow-up statement, Entergy said that tests conducted by S&C and Entergy on the two relays at the Superdome showed that one worked as expect-ed, the other did not. Entergy spokesman Mike Burns said both relays had the same trip setting. Entergy’s announcement came shortly before compa-ny officials were to answer questions from a committee of the City Council, which is the regulatory body for the company. During the committee hearing, council mem-ber Susan Guidry asked Entergy executives wheth-er they were “fairly certain” that the relay was faulty. “That is correct,” Dawsey said. However, when asked if the outage was caused by the design or a defect in a part of the equipment, Entergy New Orleans CEO Charles Rice said that had not been determined. “The equipment did not function properly,” Rice said. “At this particu-lar time, based upon our analysis, we cannot say definitively that there was a defect in design. What we do know is that the equip-ment for some unknown reason, at this particular time, did not react the way that it should have.” Asked if Entergy and SMG still plan to hire a third-party investigator to get to the bottom of the cause, Rice said that pos-sibility remains open.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, FEBRUARY10, 2013 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 rn nr PROCUREMENT ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALISTPerforms clerical duties such as data entry, typing, filing, collating, copying, faxing. Re-views and processes requisitions and spe-cial reports as required for Purchasing and Business Services areas. Establishes and maintains purchasing files and records. Pro-vide college switchboard operator/ reception-ist relief as needed. Assist college staff with college purchasing policies and procedures inquiries. Requires High School graduate or equivalency plus five years secretarial or clerical experience. Additional education may be substituted on a year for year basis for required experience in related area. Abil-ity to write reports with proper format, punc-tuation, spelling and grammar. Intermediate level knowledge of Microsoft Office applica-tions. Ability to record and deliver information to the college staff; to explain procedures and policies and to follow verbal and writ-ten instructions, guidelines, and objectives. Ability to use mathematical formulas, to plan, organize and coordinate work assignments. Skill in typing. Ability to work with confiden-tial material. Desirable qualifications: One year of experience in purchasing, finance, or paralegal experience is desirable. Special consideration will be given to applicants with an associate degree or higher or a certificate in a related area. SALARY: $ 25,018 annually, plus benefits. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/25/13 Persons interested should provide College employment application. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment SENIOR STAFF ASSISTANTThis is a secretarial position located at the Olustee Center and reports to the Director of Criminal Justice Training. Responsible for assisting the Director in work with developing and expanding programs, maintaining appropriate documentation for training programs, and maintaining staff and room schedules. Other duties vary widely in both subject matter and complexity and require the exercising of considerable initiative and independent judgment. Requires High School graduate or equivalency plus four years secretarial or clerical experience. Additional education may be substituted on a year for year basis for required experience in related area. Experience working with MS Word and Excel. Must have exceptional people skills. Must be able to work in a fast paced, dynamic work environment. Must have good typing skills and be able to develop Word documents and Excel spreadsheets without assistance. Must be able to use MS Outlook to maintain calendars of assigned staff. Must be able to handle telephone calls in a courteous and efficient manner. Must have ability to transcribe notes and minutes, etc. Must be able to establish and maintain effective working relationships with others. Desirable qualifications: Special consideration will be given to applicants with an associate degree or higher or a certificate in a related area. Experience working in the public safety field is desirable. SALARY: $ 23,827 annually, plus benefits. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/25/13 Persons interested should provide College employment application. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 13-28-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFRICHARD CECILKAHLICH,deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of RICHARD CECILKAHLICH, de-ceased, whose date of death was July 14, 2012; File Number 13-28-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Co-lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-vision, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: February 10, 2013.Personal Representative:/s/ Beverly J. KahlichBEVERLYJ. KAHLICH359 SE Church AvenueLake City, Florida 32025Attorneys for Personal Representa-tive:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Mark E. FeagleMark E. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0576905153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-7191mefeagle@bellsouth.net 05537191FEBRUARY10, 17, 2013 NOTICE OF INTENT T O ADOPT ORDINANCE TOWHOM ITMAYCONCERN:The Board of County Commissioners of Columbia County, Florida will at its regular meeting on Thursday, February 21, 2013, in the Columbia County School Board Administration Building, 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida at 5:30 p.m. consider the adoption of an ordinance entitled:AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO AN AD VALOREM TAX EXEMP-TION FOR AN EXPANSION OF AN EXISTING BUSINESS OPER-ATED BYPROJECTACTION; MAKING FINDINGS OF THE AMOUNTOF AD VALOREM TAX REVENUES AVAILABLE TOCOLUMBIACOUNTY, THE AD VALOREN TAX REVENUES LOSTFOR CURRENTEXEMP-TIONS AND THE ESTIMATED AD VALOREM TAX REVENUES LOSTFOR THE PROPOSED EX-EMPTION; FINDING THATPROJ-ECTACTION, IS ELIGIBLE FOR THE ECONOMIC DEVELOP-MENTAD VALOREM TAX EX-EMPTION; GRANTING SAID EXEMPTION TO PROJECTACTION, FOR TEN (10) YEARS BEGIN-NING JANUARY1, 2013; PRO-VIDING FOR THE REVOCATION OF SAID EXEMPTION; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The substance of the above-named ordinance is as provided in its name.Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for inspection at the office of the County Manager located in the County Administration Complex, 135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Any interested party may appear and be heard at this pub-lic hearing.In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter relating to the consid-eration of the ordinance at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which re-cord includes the testimony and evi-dence on which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, a person need-ing special accommodations or an in-terpreter to participate in this pro-ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts 386/752-1006 or T.D. Services 386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.DATED this 7th day of February, 2013./s/ P. DeWitt Cason P.DEWITTCASON Clerk of Court05537254February 10, 2013 100Job Opportunities05537150Administrative Assistant Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Administrative Assistant. Good Organizational and Communication Skills a Must Competitive Salary and Excellent Benefit Package. Please Apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 386-752-7900 EOE 05537153Immediate Openings Available positions requiring at least one year prior skills include: Mig/Tig Welder, Electrician, Trim Carpenter, Cabinetmaker, Wood/ Mill Fabrication, Fiberglass Laminator. Some hand tools required. Benefits: Paid Vacation, Paid Holidays, Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Wages negotiable with experience. 05537178State Veterans’ Domiciliary Home Lake City, Florida 149 bed ALF is accepting applications for the following positions: (2) OPS Part-time Custodial Workers (2) OPS Part-time Dietary Support Service Aides Apply on line at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comReq. #50507102 for Custodial Worker Req. #50504016 for Support Service Aide Call Kim Graham at 386-758-0600 ext. 1006 Closes 02/15/13 EEO/AAE 05537211Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to fchbookkeeper@fhclakecity comcastbiz.net or mail: ATT: Human Resources, 3909 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL32055 05537237Busy Insurance Agency seeking Professional 440 CSR and 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to Box 05101, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Available Position: Revenue Specialist III Florida Department of Revenue General Tax Administration, Collections. Location: Lake City Apply at People First website http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com Customer Service/Telephone Sales business to business. Auto Parts Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC BP Driver/Warehouse Need good MVR. Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC., BPA Experienced Sewing Machine Operator & Support Person for Operator: cutting material from patterns. 386-755-6481 Farm Workers Planting, cultivating and harvesting crops, 40hrs/wk 8:00am 4:00pm. $10.87 hr. Overtime + 1/2 after 60hrs. 8 temp. jobs March mid Nov. Homestead Farm guarantees to offer worker work for at least 3/4 of the workdays of the contract period. Transportation & Subsistence expenses to worksite provided upon completion of 50% Work Contract. Housing provided at no cost for those living a long distance from perma-nent residence. Tools, supplies, and equipment provided at no cost. Call Homestead Farm, Poolesville, MD (301-926-6999) between 9AM1PM for appointment. Or apply for this job at the local State Workforce Agency using job listing Number 268719. Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City Ophthalmic Technician General Ophthalmology Practice in Lake City needs Ophthalmic Technician F/Tor P/T Experience Required Fax resume 386-755-7561 PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. WANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon’ Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Send Resume to info@swiftcreekrealty.net05537163OPS Administrative/Events Assistant Part Time $9.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking a highly motivated, hard working team player to join an enthusiastic team of personnel and volunteers in the position of OPS Administrative/Events Assistant (24-32 hours/week). This is a non career service position that requires working some weekends, holidays and evenings. Benefits not provided. This position requires an individual that possesses excellent computer and writing skills and to be able to function both independently and as a team player. Duties include, but are not limited to; answering telephones, filing, maintaining budgets, computer and data entry, staffing special events, providing information about park facilities and events; performing occasional janitorial duties and other related duties as required. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for of this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comResumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: Elaine McGrath, Events Coordinator Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act. UnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net05537165OPS Museum Guide Part Time $8.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking an outgoing individual for the positions of OPS Museum Guide. This is a non-career service position that requires working every Monday and Tuesday, occasional holidays, weekends and evenings. Benefits are not provided. Duties include, but are not limited to greeting visitors and conducting tours through the Museum; giving interpretive and informative talks about various exhibits; relating the history of the area and the park; providing information about park facilities and events; performing janitorial duties and other related duties as required. Training provided. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: George Paxton, Assistant Park Manager Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act rrrnr rrrnr rrrnr ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, FEBRUARY10, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$4,800 386-288-6102 (&5rrrn$0//&$5&% 45":rrrn$0//&$5&% t/&84t8&"5)&3t01*/*0/t410354t"3$)*7&4t$-"44*'*&%4t$0..6/*5:t&/5&35"*/.&/5 100Job Opportunities05537166OPS Gift Shop Attendant Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park White Springs, Florida $8.00/hr Approx. 28 hours per week Operate cash register, answer visitor inquiries in a courteous and tactful manner in person and over the phone, sells and stocks merchandise, provides cleaning and maintenance of the Gift Shop and Craft Cabins and is self-motivated. Outstanding customer service is a must as well as knowledge of basic arithmetic, computers and sales. Must be able to work rotating shifts including weekends, some nights and holidays. Able to deal well in a seasonal high traffic area with high volume sales. Must be able to lift 20 lbs. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 14, 2013 to the following to: Attn: Susan Conley, Gift Shop/Craft Square Manager Stephen Foster State Park P.O. Box G White Springs, FL32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 UnemployedXUnderemployedXRetiredXStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net 120Medical Employment05537127Dietary Part Time Aide/Cook Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of Dietary Aide/Cook Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE Certified Dietary ManagerNeeded LTC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F 120Medical EmploymentExperienced Dental Hygienist Needed for Live Oak office. Please call 386-362-1646 GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.A’s All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v JOB OPENING Pharmacy Clerk/Cashier. Pharmacy experience Required. Apply in person: DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Found Brown/Tan/White 8 lbs Cat in the Eastwood Subd. House trained, Clean. Contact 365-4255 Full blooded Rotty 2 years old male. Needs room to run. Great w/ Adults needs supervision w/ a Child. $400. 438-3131 /984-5142 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture TWIN BED, Extra Long, Tempurpedic, Electric (w/remote) Adjustable. Originally $2500 Asking $1500. Call 386-758-9692 416Sporting Goods SEARS TREADMILL. Paid $500 used twice Asking $250 Contact 386-963-3242 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Beautiful Olustee Outfit Ladys size 20(?) $75.00 Contact 365-1277 440Miscellaneous Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. GENERATOR big 8500 Watt 2013. Honda Electric start. Battery and wheel kit included. Never used. New retail $4995, wholesale $3750. First $1850 cash. 864-275-6478 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8,500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John Lyons @800-622-2832 ext 210 for details 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$500 month $500 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentGreat area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shaade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 Nice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $800 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the 805Lots forSale law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $4,800 386-288-6102 951Recreational VehiclesCAR TOWDOLLY 2013. All cars/pickups. Swifles, Tilts. Never used. New retail $2750, first $1050 cash. 864.275.6478 :PV‹MMGJOEJUIFSF Xn\\b [Xpj Lake City Reporter

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LIFE Sunday, February 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D E rick, Okla., and a place called The Sandhills Curiosity Shop, The Redneck Capitol of the World; this was by far the strangest stop on our first road trip, Route 66. It was recommended to us by “Crazy Legs,” a man we met in Galena, Kan., the day before. Sue and I often discuss how best to describe it. There are lots of words, but she worried about having nightmares for days after. The shop wasn’t really a shop, but a tribute and hodge-podge of memorabil-ia of everything from Route 66 and anything else that goes with it (and none of it was for sale). The owners, Harvey and Annabelle, were stoned-out hippies from the 1960s, both wearing denim overalls, he without a shirt underneath. Upon arrival, we were offered drinks that we were afraid to accept but did; a bathroom to use that had two “doors,” a word I use loosely. The outer door (the one that was an exte-rior door of the building) wouldn’t completely close and if you tried, it was pitch black, thus no light. And the other “door” was a “pull to” curtain. We both left open, with no option of closing, just so we could see. After sharing some of their strange stories, they offered to sing for us ... “Get Your Kicks on Route 66.” Harvey got his guitar out and they sang with more graphic detail than I’d ever heard, he in a state of undress, vividly pointing out books and movies that were written about the road, the song and their experiences. I tried to videotape their performance but didn’t know then that my digital camera only taped for 15 seconds at a time. So, I faked it! During the song, they ran off three other ladies who walked into their “shop.” Scared off was prob-ably more like it. After their serenade, they wanted to show us the Redneck Castle, i.e. their home. I don’t think we really knew what we were getting into, but we obliged them. So we walked with them across the back lot of their shop to their “home” and we were scared we’d have to go in. We truly didn’t want to see how these people lived and were making up excuses on the way. Fortunately, they only showed us the exterior and around the much clut-tered and crazily decorated yard. Oh, and Annabelle signed our Route 66 guide book and gave us some free postcards, photos and a photocopy of their story with some newspaper clippings. Forty-five minutes was how long this entire expe-rience lasted. With many pictures and blank stares on our faces as we left, we A storycollectedon fabledRoute 66 Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFE Travel Tales Sandy KishtonTRAVEL continued on 2D By LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — Nicole Buergers and Brenden Macaluso are both 32. They struck up a conversation about hipster eye-wear over free beer and cheap eats at a Houston hangout one Sunday afternoon and Macaluso recalls the evening ending this way: Nicole: “So how do we do this?” Brenden: “You give me your number, I call you and we go out and have fun.” Yep, random love is alive and well in Houston. In this age of online dating, virtual flirting and location-based hookup by app, these two are firm believers in three-dimensional serendipity nearly a year after their first encounter. Even better, Macaluso realized before pursuing Buergers further that the two attended the same large suburban high school and had been in a couple of English classes together. “Like many young people in the 21st century I had taken a stab at Internet dating,” said Macaluso, an industrial designer who also restores vintage motor-cycles. “For me this was a com-plete failure. My experiences had always resulted in awkward dates.” That, he said, left a simple formula for finding love: meeting in person, and “when you least expect it, not when you’re trying to.” Mechanized dating remains a huge business worth a billion or more worldwide, but several others like Macaluso in livingonline generations said they, too, found their happiness the old-fashioned way. In other facets of life they remain avid users of digital tools and social networks, which is where the AP caught up with them, including 28-year-old Patrick Murphy in Medway, Mass., southwest of Boston. Murphy, the general manager of a junk removal business, found a girlfriend online and the two eventually moved in together. The relationship soured about three years later and he returned from a weekend away to find she Find love the old way VALENTINE’S DAY ASSOCIATED PRESSNicole Buergers and Brenden Macaluso show their affec tions at the eatery in Houston where they met nearly a year ago. The couple struck up a conversation about hips ter eyewear over free beer and cheap eats at the hangout one Sunday and have been together ever since. In this age of online dating, virtual flirting and location-based hookup by app, these two are firm believers in three-dim ensional serendipity. Digital dating hasn’t completely taken over romance game. By Sandra CaslowA s the leader for Cadette, Senior and Ambassador Troop 525 I, along with my co-leaders Cherylann Patterson, and Scott Towne, helped the girls work their way through their Leadership Journey called “It’s Your Story — Tell It! MEdia.” They learned about different types of media and how it affects their lives. They were amazed to realize that the clothes they wear are advertisements for the clothing companies. They also bet ter understand how media influences their choices and decisions based on how products are presented in magazines, and commercials. They realize how stereotyping can negatively affect good people and positive things they try to accomplish as well as how it affects young women’s perception of what they should look like to be accepted. Over the next several months, they will be bringing to you their per-spective on different subjects such as bullying, school uniforms, Girl Scouts and more. I hope you will embrace their bravery. CathleenHi, my name is Cathleen. I am a Girl Scout in Troop 525. I am 12 years old and in the seventh grade at Lake City Middle School. I love to read and write and take pride in being unique. I love horses, going camping and I am a Trekkie. I also love to get my point out there and across. I have been a Girl Scout for seven years. My Troop has been working on our MEdia Journey, and for our Take Action Project, we decided to bring a teen’s perspec-tive into the world. Over the months, we will be discussing different topics from our point of view. BrandyHi, my name is Brandy Britt. I am a Senior in Girl Scout Troop 525, which has Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors in it. (These are the three older Girl Scout levels.) This past year was the 100th year of Girl Scouting, so we did lots of interesting things. As part of the celebration, my troop, as well as several other troops, got together and did a Flash Mob at the rodeo. We also learned about media through a Journey that we did, called MEdia. We learned about advertising and how when it is presented in certain ways, we see it to be better than it actually is. I was also amazed to find out that when I buy clothes from name-brand places that put their names on the T-shirts and jackets, we are advertising their products, like walking billboards! Before the Journey, I hadn’t ever thought about how I am promoting the companies when I wear a shirt or a pair of shoes. It just never occurred to me.Madison-RoseHello, my name is Madison-Rose Patterson. I am 13 years old and attend Lake City Middle School. I have been a Girl Scout for five years, starting out as a Brownie, then a Junior and now a Cadette. I have earned my Bronze Award, and I am looking forward to earning my Silver and Gold awards. I love being a Girl Scout for many reasons. One of the main reasons is we get to go on a lot of trips. We go camping and we’ve been to Savannah, Ga., St. Augustine, Orlando and, most recently, Washington, D.C. We also learn more about the Earth than we do in school. I am hoping that by writing articles in the newspaper, we will encourage others to talk to teachers more about their problems. KaylaHi, my name is Kayla Caslow and I am in my ninth year as a Girl Scout in the Cadette, Senior, Ambassador Troop 525. We have had many fun times together but one of my favorite has to be when we had our Service Unit cam-pout. My cabin was amazing, we all stayed up late and joked around. And since we were all comfortable with each other, nobody minded if one of us sat on the other’s bed. I have to say one of my favorite reasons that I’m a Girl Scout isn’t because of the badges or arts and crafts, it’s because you make friends that you’ll keep for a lifetime. I truthfully love each and every girl in my troop. We’ve come so close in the past years. You can ask any one of us, we aren’t friends, we’re sisters. We’re doing this column to get the opinion of teens and pre-teens known. Everyone asks adults their views on things, but nobody ever seems to ask us. We thought it would be a good idea to use a column in the newspaper because we have strong writers in our troop, and it sound-ed like a fun idea. I hope you enjoy our column as much as we enjoy writing it. COURTESY PHOTOContributors to the new column from Girl Scout Troop 525 are (from left) Cathleen Towne, 12; MadisonRose Patterson, 13; Brandy Britt, 14; and Kayla Caslow, 13. Editor’s Note: The Lake City Reporter is pleased to encourage our local Girl Scouts’ interest in journalism and happy to provide space for their columns. We are excited that these young women will be bringing new points of view to our pages under the guidance of their Scout leaders.Girl Scouts launching ‘MEdia’ column ROMANCE continued on 2D

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Al and Doris Donovan of Lake City celebrated their 62nd wedding anni-versary at Walt Disney World on Feb. 7, Sixty-two years ago, they said their vows in Clearwater. After moving around the state as Al worked as a Methodist preacher, they fell in love with Lake City when assigned here. They purchased property and retired here 20 years ago. Al pastors Siloam UMC and Doris plays the piano. Food By LISA RATHKEAssociated PressWAITSFIELD, Vt. — Nearly 30 years ago, a handful of enterprising Vermonters realized they could do more with milk than just sell it. And with a little help from the state, they became pioneers in what quickly blossomed into the now behemoth arti-sanal cheese movement. Now Vermont officials are exploring a new round of value-added agriculture. Because why just raise livestock when instead you could be tapping into the burgeoning world of char-cuterie? “You can buy a pig for $3 a pound. You turn it into cuts and you’ll get $4, $5, $6 a pound. Turn it into bacon and you’re getting $8, maybe $9 a pound. Turn it into cured products, the world’s your oyster,” said Robin Morris, founder of the Mad River Food Hub, an incubator for new food businesses that is adding rooms to help producers dry cure meats such as salamis, prosciuttos and sopressatas. It’s actually a pretty simple equation. Produce an agricultural commodity and sell it as a commodity and you get paid commod-ity prices. It’s a formula that requires high volume to be successful, by defini-tion difficult for the sorts of small farmers that populate Vermont. But turn those commodities into sought-after artisanal food products and the game changes. “We have seen how value-added farm products generate new revenue and jobs in a local community,” said Kathleen Merrigan, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Entrepreneurs around the country are developing value-added food business-es, cured meats are just one example.” In the dairy world, for example, Vermont cheese-makers learned that turn-ing milk into Camembert, chevre, tomme and blue cheese doubled or even tripled its value. But turn-ing that lesson into a model that would boost the state’s dairy industry required coordination. With the help of the state, cheesemakers band-ed together to form the Vermont Cheese Council, which helps with promotion and education. Meanwhile, the University of Vermont created a first-in-the-nation program, the Vermont Institute of Artisan Cheese, which provides technical assistance to producers and teaches the art and science of cheese. Now the state hopes to replicate this model for Vermont’s livestock industry, with one avenue being charcuterie. Part of the work is already done; it could build on some of the infrastructure already created by the dairy indus-try, said Chelsea Lewis, senior agricultural devel-opment coordinator with the Vermont Agency of Agriculture. To better understand how they can foster spe-cialty, locally raised meats, Vermont agriculture offi-cials are coordinating with neighboring New England states to develop training and networking opportuni-ties. And last spring, they traveled to Italy to visit farms, slaughterhouses and butchers to learn from the masters of cured meat. The state even launched a new program to train meat cutters. Value-added products seen as potential gold. ASSOCIATED PRESSWorkers make sausage, in East Montpelier, Vt. Along with i ts craft beer, artisan cheese and a demand for locally prod uced foods, Vermont is hoping to expand production of speciali ty cured meats as it works to develop a meat industry in a state that has been primarily dominated by dairy cows. Vermont counting on cured meats to boost ag income COURTESYDoris and Al Donovan celebrate their 62nd anniversary I f you’re thinking about growing a spring vegetable gar-den this year, why not take advantage of this wonderful weather and get your beds pre-pared? Some gardeners agree that the planning, preparation and anticipa-tion of producing a crop is the best part of garden-ing. Others say the exer-cise, fresh air and mental therapy of the work is the best. Even if you want a spring garden simply to grow delicious and nutri-tious vegetables, there still are some planning and work tasks to do in preparation. Find a loca-tion for your garden close to a water source. The site should get at least six hours of direct sunlight, and have well drained soil. Vegetables plants may also be included in the landscape among ornamental plants if they get sun and water. Have your soil pH tested. Soil pH is a measure of the soil acidity. The best pH range for vegeta-ble gardens in our sandy soil is between pH 5.8 and 6.5. Obtain a free soil pH test by bringing a soil sample to the Extension Office. The Master Gardeners will perform the test and call you with the results and recom-mendations on adjusting the pH, if needed. Spade or plow the ground at least three weeks before planting. Working in a couple inch-es of compost or organic material at this time is highly recommended for our sandy soils. Much of our sandy soil drains water like a sieve. This organic material will help hold water and nutrients longer which is vitally for plant and environmental health. Applications of organic materials may include animal manure, rotted leaves, compost, and cover crops. Three weeks later, at planting time, rework the top inches of soil into a fine seedbed. Vegetable plants utilize lots of nutrients, so a pre-plant broadcast appli-cation of a balanced fertil-izer is beneficial. Now the vegetable bed is ready and your plans are being made. The next step is to join other gardeners and UF/IFAS Master Gardeners at an informative Spring Vegetable Gardening workshop presented at the Fort White and Lake City Public Libraries. Learn some good garden-ing techniques from other gardeners and have ques-tions answered. It’s fun, too. Join us for “Spring Vegetable Gardening” at the Lake City Downtown Library on Saturday, Feb. 16 at 1:30 p.m., or at the Fort White Public Library on Thursday, Feb. 21, at 5:45 p.m.. For more infor-mation, call 752-5384. Time to prepare beds for vegetable garden HAPPENINGS Donovans observe 62nd wedding anniversary GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.From staff reportsFormer Lake City resident Philip Glover has been promoted to the rank of lieutenant with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Glover, the son of Bill and Sandy Glover of Lake City and a 2003 Columbia High School graduate, began his new supervisory assignment in the Destin-Fort Walton Beach area on Friday. He will have eight conservation officers under his direction, including two boat-ing fatality investigators. Glover had been working as a conservation officer in the Vero Beach area. Glover entered the Marine Corps 10 days after graduating from high School. He served two tours of duty in Iraq. He applied to the FWC to become a conser-vation officer while in Iraq. Glover and his wife, the former Katie Millikin, are the parents of two sons. Former local man promoted by wildlife agency TRAVEL: An adventure on Route 66 Continued From Page 1Dwondered what the heck we were doing there and better yet, why we stayed so long. It was as if they sucked you in. We both commented on the way out, how crazy it was. I think we were in a daze as we headed back to the car. But we also agree that it’s people like that that make the world go round and what makes this kind of trip the overall experi-ence that it was. We prob-ably should have known when one of their entry signs reads: “Insanity at its finest.” An even better way to wrap it up were their posted hours: “We open when we wake up, and close when we pass out!” Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. ROMANCE: Old ways still work Continued From Page 1Dhad disappeared all his stuff. With little money, no furniture and a whop-ping case of the blues, Murphy’s co-workers alert-ed him to a tags-on leather couch somebody didn’t want. After he picked it up, word came through the office that a local teen club was in search of a sofa, so he decided to donate it instead. Enter Caroline Cooke, the club worker who took possession of said couch. “I wasn’t looking for love,” said Murphy of their unlikely meeting in late 2008. “I was just looking to make it through each day. We’ve been together ever since.” Has virtual life and the promise of dating algo-rithms left some singles closed off to such on-the-ground happenstance? “The way we met, we tell everyone and they think it’s crazy,” Murphy offers. Never married, an internet marketer and without a boyfriend for years, Buergers considered her-self a prime candidate for online dating before she bumped into Macaluso. “I just felt really uneasy about the online dating thing,” she said. “It’s not that it has a stigma for me or anything, but just personally, I couldn’t put myself out there like that.” Others lent assurances that shopping carts still collide, friends of friends still meet at weddings and passengers on planes still strike up conversations that land them happiness. For Barbara Ward, 55, it was the law. She married her real estate attorney in Portland, Maine, after con-sulting him in 2004 about a tricky condo development at an historic inn she had purchased. “Neither Ron or I had been looking for love, or even a date,” she said. “We never did finish those documents.” As a dating concierge, Thomas Edwards dreams of love 24/7, but he never thought he’d find it for himself with a fellow expert in the industry, especially one who works primarily online while he works mostly offline. Edwards, 27, is The Professional Wingman, a real-life “Hitch” who charges up to $20,000 for dating makeovers. He offers everything from confidence-boosting trips to bars for instruction on how to talk to women to lifestyle overhauls, ward-robe and all. “But I’d never done online dating,” he said. Laurie Davis, 31, is an online dating hound, with a new book out from Simon & Schuster, “Love (at) First Click: The Ultimate Guide to Online Dating.” She put up her first profile at 19 and helps people with, among other things, taking just the right photo and hitting just the right tone in their dating bios. The two fell for each other after she spotted his Twitter avatar during a cruise of the hashtag “dating” and struck up a conversation in 140 char-acters. Turns out they grew up 20 minutes apart in the Boston area. The two plan to marry next year. “Everything really just escalated,” Davis said. “Needless to say I never needed to help him with his profile.” Online: Q www.theprofessional wingman.com/ Q www.eflirtexpert.com/

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy LINDA LOMBARDIAssociated PressChildren are fascinated by insects, but many of us eventually grow out of wanting to catch a firefly and keep it in a jar. For the people who never lose that urge, though, it can lead in directions that might be surprising. “Roaches actually make really good pets,” says Scott Martin of Rockville, Md. Used to skeptics, enthusiasts will explain that not all cock-roaches are created equal. Orin McMonigle is author of more than a dozen books on keeping pet insects, produces a magazine for hobbyists and even has a species of roach named after him. He doesn’t like vermin scurrying about his kitchen any more than you do. “I do not like pest cockroaches, I do not like mosquitoes, I do not like lice, I do not like German cockroaches. I just like the neat ones,” says McMonigle, who in fact used to be a licensed pest control operator. “By knowing the difference, I’m able to appre-ciate the neat ones.” The most common pet roach is the hissing cockroach, 2 to 3 inches long. Its name comes from the sound it makes when disturbed, although it may lose that habit when it gets used to being handled. Hissers make a good display not only due to their size, but also because they don’t instinctively hide. If one were to escape, McMonigle says, the only dan-ger would be to the insect itself. Hissing cockroaches can’t sur-vive on their own in the typical home, where the temperature and humidity are unsuitable and they can’t find food. “If you let a thousand hissers loose in your house, they’re not going to do anything,” he says. “There’s over 4,000 species of roaches, and only about 25 are classified as pests, and only five of those are any good at it.” A parallel might be to an escape by guinea pigs, he says: Just because they’re related to mice doesn’t mean they can take up residence in your walls and start breeding. Hissers aren’t the only roaches kept by hobbyists, and McMonigle says there are even species that only exist in cap-tivity. One mutation with white eyes, originally discovered in a deep coal mine, has been bred since the 1940s. Another species that was found only around a cave that was destroyed by min-ing is extinct in the wild. If you’re still not convinced about roaches, McMonigle notes that their closest relative is an insect that many people love: the praying mantis. Yen Saw of Katy, Texas, has been keeping mantises for near-ly 10 years, since his son got interested in them. “But then he conveniently left the hard work to me and I got hooked,” Saw says. With insects, you can breed many generations in a limited space and over a short time. And unlike more conventional pets, they don’t just get larger as they grow, but metamorphose through several different forms. “I love the process of seeing them growing,” says Saw. Owners of some kinds of insects can also observe a natural behavior that might be too grue-some with other pets: predation. Insect keepers typically raise insects to feed their insects ‚ in fact, Martin started out keeping spiders and raising roaches as food, before getting interested in the roaches for their own sake. Mantises, despite their charm, are hunters, and have no mercy even on their own relatives. When asked how many mantises he has right now, Saw laughs and says, “The number keeps changing because praying man-tises, as you know, they eat each other.” Since hundreds hatch at a time, this behavior helps keep the size of a collection manage-able. It’s also one of the insect’s claims to fame: The female has a habit of eating the male’s head after mating, although the fre-quency of that has been exag-gerated, Saw says. He’s watched mantises breed many times, and says, “The males are really careful trying not to lose their heads.” And in captivity, the risk can be minimized simply by feeding the female first, so she’s not hungry. If you doubt how devoted a person can be to what others con-sider creepy and crawly, here’s one last fact about Saw: When he started to develop allergy symp-toms and his doctor diagnosed an allergy to roaches, he realized that also meant he was allergic to his pet mantises. “It was devastat-ing for me,” he said. But that didn’t stop him. Now, he says, “when I go into my insect room, I have to wear a mask and gloves. But I love my hobby so I’ll do whatever I have to.” By TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG — The company that sends you blue envelopes stuffed with coupons also wants you to save money while you’re driving. Valpak has partnered with Roximity, a Denver-based app developer, to bring coupons and deals to drivers of newer-model Fords and Lincolns who use the voice-controlled Sync AppLink connected to their mobile phone. The app allows people to hear about personalized deals from stores, restau-rants and other businesses as they drive. The “cou-pon” appears on the driv-er’s smartphone and can be redeemed once the car is stopped. Valpak, which is based in St. Petersburg, is try-ing to branch out from the traditional print offers and capture the digital coupon market. There are plenty of apps that use GPS-based location services to deter-mine a phone user’s loca-tion and nearby deals — but Roximity’s app taps into the vast number of deals from Valpak. “This partnership took us to the next level,” said Nancy Cook, the vice presi-dent of digital business development at Valpak. “We’re delivering offers anywhere, any time.” About one million Fords and Lincolns are set up for the new app and technol-ogy, Cook said. Here’s how it works: People who drive select-ed vehicles with the Sync AppLink can download the Roximity app on their phone. Once in the car, they plug the phone into the USB port and launch the Roximity app. As they are driving, they can push the hands-free sync button on their steering wheel and instruct the Sync program to access Roximity. Then the driver can search for deals. On a recent day not long after the partnership was announced, Gigi Swanson, the digital alliances and partnerships strategist at Valpak, demonstrated the device on a new Ford Focus. “Find nearby deals,” she said to her dashboard. “Roximity found 10 deals nearby,” the computerized woman’s voice replied. One of the deals was for a large pizza at a nearby restau-rant. Swanson showed how to call the restaurant or read details of the offer, all without touching the phone. Had Swanson want-ed to buy that pizza, she would have showed the cashier the coupon once inside the restaurant; the virtual coupon was on the Roximity app on Swanson’s phone. In the coming months as the app and technology mature, Swanson said, the app and Sync devices will remember a driver’s “pref-erence-based behavior” and send alerts based on prior redemptions ‚ simi-lar to Amazon’s or iTunes’ “recommendations.” Valpak already targets homeowners who receive their coupons based on ZIP code; the coupons are sent out in batches of 10,000 in the U.S. and Canada and are based on geographical locations, income levels and postal carrier routes. All of the mailed offers are printed in St. Petersburg; some 40 million coupons are printed and sent each month.Loved Bug: Some insects make good petsPETS ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSABOVE: Gwynevere McMonigle shows off Dr. Phil, her pet hi ssing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa.The most common pet roach, the hissing cockroach, is tw o to three inches long, and its name comes from the sound the insects make when disturbed, although they may lose the habit when they get used to being handled. His sers make a good display not only due to their size but also because they don’t instinctively hide where they ca n’t be seen. ABOVE RIGHT: Yen Saw keeps this larger Florida mantis, Stagmom antis floridensis, in his Katy, Texas, home. Saw has been keeping mantises for nearly ten years, since his son got interested in them. One interest ing aspect of keeping insects is that in a limited space and over a short time you can breed many generations. ASSOCIATED PRESSGigi Swanson, Digital Alliances and Partnerships Strateg ist for Cox Target Media Inc., owner of Valpak, checks coupons through the phone application “Roximity” and Ford’s SYNC, in St. Petersburg. Valpak has partnered with Roximity, a Denverbased app developer, to bring coupons and deals to drivers of newer-model Fords and Lin colns who use the voice-controlled Sync AppLink connected to their mobile phones. By RAPHAEL SATTERAssociated PressLONDON — Dog owners who refuse to fit Fido with a microchip may someday find themselves fetching a hefty fine, the British government said Wednesday. All dogs in England will have to be fitted with microchips by 2016, authorities said, meaning that canines across the country will be chasing cars with a tiny circuit embedded in the back of their necks. Britain’s Environment Department said that the chips would help reunite owners with lost or stolen pets, promote animal wel-fare and take the pressure off animal shelters. “It’s a shame that in a nation of dog lovers, thou-sands of dogs are roaming the streets or stuck in kennels because the owner cannot be tracked down,” Environment Secretary Owen Paterson said in a statement. “Microchipping is a simple solution that gives peace of mind to owners.” Many British pet owners already have veterinarians insert chips under the skin of dogs, cats, and rabbits in a bid to keep track of their animals. The Environment Department says 60 per-cent of Britain’s 8 million pet dogs already have microchips, which can be scanned and matched to their owners’ details. But officials say what was once an optional extra will become mandatory in three years. Owners who refuse to fit their dogs with chips face fines of up to 500 pounds ($800). Horse owners have had to chip their ani-mals since 2009. In England, all dogs to have microchips inserted by 2016ASSOCIATED PRESSA Jack Russell terrier is scanned for a microchip at th e Blue Cross Lewknor Rehoming Centre in London. British authorities say that all dogs in England will have to be fitted with microchips from 2016. Not all roaches are created equal, enthusiasts say. Online: Q Orin McMonigle’s site: http://www.angelfire.com/oh3/elytraandantenna/ Shopping Coupons now offered in some vehicles

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Tiny” (N) Revenge Amanda and Jack’s wedding. (:02) Revenge for Real (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Back re” Criminal Minds “Pro ling 101” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc MartinNOVA “Building Pharaoh’s Chariot” Masterpiece ClassicMasterpiece Classic Change affects many at Downton Abbey. Doc Martin 7-CBS 7 47 47g PGA Tour GolfAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The 55th Annual Grammy Awards Excellence in the recording industry. (N) (Live) Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17d(5:30) ABA Basketball Albany Shockwave at Jacksonville Giants. (N) Law & Order “Turnaround” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00) “Air Buddies” (2006, Comedy) Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Beantown Bailout Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBC (N) Betty White’s-90th BirthdaySaturday Night Live in the ’80s: Lost and FoundNewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Iyanla, Fix My Life “Fix My Mistake” Iyanla, Fix My LifeOprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass (N) Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass A&E 19 118 265Southie RulesSouthie RulesStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “The Makeover” (2013) “Accidentally in Love” (2010, Drama) Jennie Garth, Ethan Erickson. “Be My Valentine” (2013, Romance) William Baldwin, Natalie Brown. Frasier “The Club” Frasier FX 22 136 248(5:00)“The A-Team” (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper.“Knight and Day” (2010, Action) Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz, Peter Sarsgaard.“Knight and Day” (2010) Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Pictures Don’t LiePiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Pictures Don’t Lie TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage, Hunter Gomez. “Sherlock Holmes” (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. (DVS)“Sherlock Holmes” (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr. NIK 26 170 299Monster High“Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy”SpongeBob“The Last Airbender” (2010, Fantasy) Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. See Dad RunThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar RescueBar Rescue “Murphy’s Mess” Bar Rescue “Broke Black Sheep” Bar Rescue “Bikini Bust” Bar Rescue “Turtle on Its Back” (:01) Car Lot Rescue “Fight Club” MY-TV 29 32 -The Brady BunchBob NewhartM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Dead Weight” M*A*S*HThriller “Rose’s Last Summer” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyJessieGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyAustin & AllyAustin & AllyAustin & AllyGravity FallsAustin & AllyJessieShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys”Movie “Twist of Faith” (2013, Drama) Toni Braxton, David Julian Hirsh. (:02) Movie USA 33 105 242NCIS Murder of a naval of cer. NCIS DiNozzo investigates a suicide. NCIS A missing staff sergeant. NCIS The bodies of two assassins. NCIS Tony and Ziva become trapped.“It’s Complicated” (2009) BET 34 124 329(5:00) Queen (Part 3 of 3) “Love & Basketball” (2000, Romance) Sanaa Lathan, Omar Epps, Alfre Woodard. HusbandsHo.Second GenerationApollo Live Musical guest Faith Evans. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Brooklyn Nets. From Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d High School Basketball30 for 3030 for 3030 for 30 SUNSP 37 -Reel Animals (N) Saltwater Exp.Lightning Live!k NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at New York Rangers. (N Subject to Blackout) Lightning Live!Inside LightningInside LightningAlong the Way DISCV 38 182 278Dual Survival “On the Menu” Dual Survival “Into the Frying Pan” Dual Survival “Trouble in Paradise” Dual Survival “The Green Hell” Dual Survival “Twin Peaks” Dual Survival “The Green Hell” TBS 39 139 247“Father of the Bride Part II” (1995) Steve Martin, Diane Keaton. “The Wedding Date” (2005) Debra Messing. (DVS) (:45)“The Wedding Date” (2005) Debra Messing, Amy Adams. (DVS)She’s the Man HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Live From the Red Carpet: The 2013 Grammy Awards (N) (Live) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami (N) Chasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! After Party (N) TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods America “Austin” Bizarre Foods America “West Virginia” RV 2013 Finding the perfect RV. (N) Extreme RVsExtreme RVsExtreme RVs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lScoring the DealScoring the DealHawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Here Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo Boo (N) Gypsy Sisters “Highway to Hell” (N) Gypsy Sisters (N) Gypsy Sisters “Highway to Hell” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAx Men Shelby builds his new empire. Ax Men “Gators & Hand Grenades” (N) American Pickers(:02) America Unearthed ANPL 50 184 282Wild West AlaskaWild West AlaskaWild West Alaska “Bear Problems” (N) Gator Boys “Scared Snakeless” (N) Finding Bigfoot “Badlands Bigfoot” (N) Gator Boys “Scared Snakeless” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffChoppedRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off (N) Iron Chef America (N) Bobby’s Dinner Battle TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“One Night With the King” (2006, Drama) Tiffany Dupont, Luke Goss. FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the Magicd College Basketball Washington at USC. (N) SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Outlander” (2008, Action) James Caviezel, Ron Perlman. Battlestar Galactica: Blood & Chrome Two pilots escort a mysterious woman. Being HumanBeing Human AMC 60 130 254The Walking Dead “Hounded” The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead “Made to Suffer” The Walking Dead “The Suicide King” (:02) Talking Dead “The Suicide King.” (:01) The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249“Of ce Space” (1999, Comedy) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. “I Love You, Man” (2009, Comedy) Paul Rudd, Jason Segel. Tosh.0WorkaholicsKroll ShowThe Burn-Jeff CMT 63 166 327(5:45)“Days of Thunder” (1990) Tom Cruise. Upstart stock-car driver goes to the edge. (:20) My Big Redneck Vacation(:20) Swamp Pawn “Buffalo To Go” (:20)“Days of Thunder” (1990) Tom Cruise. NGWILD 108 190 283How Big Can It Get?Anaconda: Queen of the SerpentsKing RattlerWorld’s Deadliest SnakesSuper SnakeKing Rattler NGC 109 186 276Inside: 21st Century Warship A versatile new class of warship. Wicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “Fish Fight” (N) Mudcats “Midnight Monsters” (N) Wicked Tuna “Fish Fight” SCIENCE 110 193 284Survivorman “Canadian Boreal Forest” Into the UniverseInto the UniverseInto the Universe With Stephen Hawking The universe, from it’s beginning. Into the Universe ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Shot in the Foot” True Crime With Aphrodite Jones48 Hours on ID (N) Fatal Encounters “White Hot Rage” On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(4:30) Fast Five(:45) “Battleship” (2012) Taylor Kitsch. Earth comes under attack from a superior alien force. Girls (N) Enlightened (N) GirlsEnlightenedGirlsEnlightened MAX 320 310 515(4:40)“Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. ‘PG-13’ “Rounders” (1998, Drama) Matt Damon, Edward Norton. ‘R’ “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011) Robert Downey Jr. SHOW 340 318 545(5:15)“The Woman in Black”Shameless “May I Trim Your Hedges?” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “The Helpful Gallaghers” House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “The Helpful Gallaghers” MONDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 11, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor A trip to St. Croix. (N) (:01) Castle “Reality Star Struck” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Boston” (N) Market Warriors (N) Half the Sky: Turning OppressionBBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Kekoa” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries (N) 90210 “realness” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones Brennan is hospitalized. (N) The Following “Mad Love” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Tough Love” Treats tempt the contestants. (N) (:01) Deception “Don’t Be a Dummy” NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:48) M*A*S*H(:24) M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Solved “An Eye for Murder” Solved No physical evidence. Dateline on OWN “Haunting Images” Dateline on OWN “Bitter Pill” Dateline on OWN A strong suspect. Dateline on OWN “Haunting Images” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Fear Factor; Fall Guy” Shipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchNUMB3RS “Hollywood Homicide” NUMB3RS “Velocity” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Live Free or Die Hard” (2007, Action) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. America’s computers fall under attack.“Live Free or Die Hard” (2007) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle An Arctic explorer dies. Castle A career-changing opportunity. Castle “Vampire Weekend” Dallas “False Confessions” (N) Monday Mornings “Deus Ex Machina” Dallas “False Confessions” NIK 26 170 299“The Last Airbender” (2010, Fantasy) Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. Full HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Tattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo Nightmares“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black, Zachery Ty Bryan. (:35)“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Images” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieAustin & AllyJessieJessieJessieJessieGood Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” Good Luck CharlieJessieGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252The HoustonsThe HoustonsThe HoustonsThe Houstons“Twist of Faith” (2013, Drama) Toni Braxton, David Julian Hirsh. Movie USA 33 105 242NCIS “The Immortals” Of cer’s sword. NCIS A lieutenant’s remains are found. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “The Job” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: Top 10“Madea’s Family Reunion” (2006, Comedy) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood, Lynn Whit eld. BET Honors 2013 Honorees Halle Berry and Chaka Khan. (N) BET Takes Hollywood (N) ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Marquette at Georgetown. (N)d College Basketball Kansas State at Kansas. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Women’s College Basketball Maryland at Duke. (N) Women’s College Basketball Louisville at Notre Dame. (N) SportsNation SUNSP 37 -FSU First LookFSU First LookReel AnimalsShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeSport FishingFSU First LookFSU First LookInside the HeatInside the HeatInside the HEAT DISCV 38 182 278The Devils Ride “Bad Blood” Fast N’ Loud “Double Trouble Galaxie” Fast N’ Loud Scot quits. Fast N’ Loud (Part 2 of 2) Chopper Live: Faster N’ Louder (N) Fast N’ Loud (Part 2 of 2) TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Fashion Police (N) Fashion PoliceChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodBizarre Foods America Fan FavoritesBizarre Foods AmericaHotel Impossible “The Curve” (N) Hotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Love It or List It Julia and Sub are split. 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COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba(:22) RebaRebaRebaRebaReba“Top Gun” (1986, Action) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. Top Gun NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererFish FrenzyAlaska Fish Wars “Game On” Built for the Kill “Killer Whale” (N) Alpha DogsAlpha DogsAlaska Fish Wars “Game On” NGC 109 186 276Lords of WarLords of WarDrugs, Inc. “Hash” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers (N) Lords of War (N) Lords of WarAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe Works “Volcanoes” How the Universe Works ID 111 192 285Unusual Suspects A naval of ce dies. Unusual Suspects “No Mercy” DisappearedDisappeared “Birds of Prey” (N) True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Disappeared HBO 302 300 501“Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“Wrath of the Titans” (2012) Sam Worthington. ‘PG-13’ Good Day, Die“Chronicle” (2012) Dane DeHaan. MAX 320 310 515(4:05) Midnight Run(:20)“Red Tails” (2012, Historical Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘PG-13’ “Shark Tale” (2004) Voices of Will Smith. ‘PG’ “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011) Daniel Radcliffe. SHOW 340 318 545“Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life” (2003) Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’ Homeland Brody runs into Carrie. 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DEAR ABBY: My stepson “Steve” is getting married out of town. His fiancee is an only daughter with three brothers, and her family is throwing a large, traditional, formal wedding. My husband and I have just been informed by Steve’s mother that we are to host the rehearsal dinner for the wedding party, their spouses and out-of-town guests. It will cost thousands of dollars in addition to the cost of us attending the wedding, and we will have to go into debt to pay for it. Is this fair? When we were married, we had a simple wedding. We prepared everything ourselves because it was all we could afford. Should we be expected to fork over money we don’t have to feed people we don’t know just because the bride’s family can afford to throw a large, formal wedding? -STEPMOM IN CANADA DEAR STEPMOM: No, you should not, and you should let the bride’s fami-ly know it ASAP. Although, traditionally, a rehearsal dinner is hosted by the parents of the groom, today it can be hosted by just about anyone who is willing. And while the guest list normally includes all atten-dants and their spouses or partners, close rela-tives and special guests such as the clergyperson and spouse, you are not obligated to include out-of-town guests. Out-of-town guests should be given a list of local restaurants and should not expect to be entertained beyond the wedding and the reception. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I had a working relationship with a couple, “Ed” and “Millie,” for many years. I consid-ered them personal friends as well. I have since left the company and moved about 80 miles away. While I have enjoyed staying in touch with them, their phone calls to me have been overwhelming. They sometimes call at inappropriate times -day and night. Ignoring them or not returning calls didn’t work. Ed sent me texts, and I finally respond-ed with “Please don’t call me anymore,” but his calls continue. I changed my phone number, but now I’m start-ing to get calls where I work, and they have even called my daughter’s phone. I know Ed is retired now and has some health issues, but I don’t know why I’m the one he calls when he’s bored and wants someone to talk to. I now receive multiple phone calls each day and 20 messages in my mail-box during the week. How do I get these nice people to give me some space? -SMOTHERED IN CARROLLTON, GA. DEAR SMOTHERED: Multiple daily phone calls and 20 email messages a week after you have asked the person not to contact you isn’t normal behavior. It’s harassment. In light of your long friendship with this couple, and the fact that Ed’s behavior is esca-lating, call his wife. Explain that you are concerned about her husband’s behavior and urge her to contact his doctor. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let anyone bully you. You have much to offer and can make a good impression if you are con-fident and expressive in the way you deal with such individuals. Those giving you a hard time have their own insecurities. Love is highlighted. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Problems regarding an older relative will lead to taking more responsibil-ity. Enlist help so you can enjoy more of the things that make you happy. A creative solution will come if you brainstorm. Don’t take no for an answer. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Easy come and easy go. You will attract atten-tion but also controversy. Pick and choose your bat-tles wisely and keep your talks as open and honest as possible to avoid being misinterpreted or decep-tive. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You need a break. A spa day or an activity that relieves stress should be on your agenda. Getting together with family and friends will help you feel secure in your environ-ment. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Remembering people from your past will make you want to return to your roots or take a trip of reconnection. Personal and professional partner-ships are highlighted, and making plans with old col-leagues or friends will lead to something good. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll be drawn to someone who has ulterior motives. Protect yourself and your assets. Don’t believe what you are told without sufficient support. Use force if you must in order to get to the bottom of a situation that spells trouble. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get out and enjoy the moment with friends or your lover. Don’t worry about what’s left undone. You can catch up when you have nothing better to do. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can smooth things over and determine how you can build a brighter future by discussing your thoughts with those who will be influenced by your actions. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll make an impact on the people you encounter. Being true to yourself is the only route to take. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t neglect what needs doing. You can conjure up unique ways to take care of pending problems. Trust in your intuition when dealing with old friends or col-leagues. Don’t let last-min-ute changes disrupt your plans. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You’ll be torn between the options you’ve been given. Do your best to choose what ensures greater opportunities to advance through educa-tion, travel or a change of environment. Discipline and practicality will lead the way to better times. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Hidden matters must be protected. Divulging information will lead to set-backs that could spin out of control. Take a quiet, sincere approach and avoid making promises you can-not keep. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD `Across 1 Pop-___6 Divisin of a house10 They may be running in a saloon 17 Sun, in Verdun18 Thin ice, e.g.19 Survey21 Alternative to white23 How overhead photos may betaken 7KDWVBBBH[FXVH 25 Like St. Louis vis-vis New Orleans 27 Name28 End to end?29 Torn,QH[SHULHQFHG31 See 67-Across33 Kind of tape+RZ,0HW
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By RODRIQUE NGOWI Associated Press PAWTUCKET, R.I. The Scottie dog has a new nem esis in Monopoly after fans voted in an online contest to add a cat token to the prop erty trading game, replacing the iron, toy maker Hasbro Inc. announced Wednesday. The results were announced after the shoe, wheelbarrow and iron were neck and neck for elimina tion in the final hours of vot ing that sparked passionate efforts by fans to save their favorite tokens, and by busi nesses eager to capitalize on the publicity. The Facebook vote closed just before midnight Tuesday, marking the first time that fans have had a say on which of the eight tokens to add and which one to toss. The pieces iden tify the players and have changed quite a lot since Parker Brothers bought the game from its original designer in 1935. Rhode Island-based Hasbro announced the new piece Wednesday morning. The cat beat out the robot, diamond ring, heli copter and guitar, getting 31 percent of votes for new tokens. I think there were a lot of cat lovers in the world that reached out and voted, said Jonathan Berkowitz, vice president for Hasbro gaming marketing. The Scottie Dog was the most popular of the clas sic tokens, and received 29 percent of the vote, the com pany said. The iron got the fewest votes and was kicked to the curb. The results were not entirely surprising to animal lovers. The Humane Society of the United States says on its website that there were more than 86 million cats living in U.S. homes, with 33 percent of households owning at least one feline in August 2011. Worldwide, there were an estimated 272 million cats in 194 coun tries in June 2008, accord ing to London-based World Society for the Protection of Animals. The online contest to change the tokens was sparked by chatter on Facebook, where Monopoly has more than 10 million fans. The initiative was intended to ensure that a game created nearly eight decades ago remains rel evant and engaging today. Tokens are always a key part of the Monopoly game ... and our fans are very passionate about their tokens, Berkowitz said. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 6DLIFE BY KIM COOK Associated Press Floral fads may ebb and flow, but the roses appeal remains con stant, well beyond a Valentines Day vaseful. In home decor, roses have long been a favorite motif, in wallpapers, lace, chintz, and soft silk furnishings such as curtains, bedding and carpet. The versatile rose floral can impart old-fash ioned cottage-y charm, cosmo politan elegance, even a certain sexy chic. English drawing rooms were rife with rose patterns through out the Victorian era, and the Shabby Chic heyday of the 1990s saw countless rooms decorated with faded country roses. While the rose is quite at home in traditional spaces, there is an architectural quality to its petaled form that fits well with modern decor, too, and the colors can be extraordinary. Lindsey Harris of Ann Arbor, Mich., photographs roses against white backgrounds, creating striking, sometimes quirky botan ical portraits. In one composition, she turns the flower heads upside down; in another she places a soft plump rose amid spiky dried fern leaves. Harris arranges rows of blowsy blooms in candy hues of cherry, lemon and bubble gum pink, printed on 8-by-10-inch frame-able paper. (www.etsy. com/shop/APeacefulLeaf ) Artist Kathleen Finlays Agnaryd rose photoprint is avail able in poster format at Ikea. (www.ikea.com ) Decorative garden goods retailer Terrain offers a selection of watercolor prints reproduced by the Los Angeles art house Natural Curiosities of rose pat terns created for hankies and pocket squares in the 19th cen tury by French silk manufacturer Brunet-LeCompte. (www.shop terrain.com ) A modern triptych of Paulownia wood panels with hand-carved gray and white roses are on offer at www.ChristineBurkeInteriors. com. Throw pillows lend themselves to floral interpretations; youll find feminine rose-petaled pillows in pretty hues and soft materials at www.pier1.com www.pbteen. com and www.blisslivinghome. com. Thomas Paul applies his edgy sensibility to an illustrated ver sion at www.allmodern.com. Traditional-looking, rose-pat terned wallpaper isnt difficult to find, but you might want to check out a unique collection from Target thats not offered in stores: In taupes, teals, browns and golds, the wallcoverings have a rose print reminiscent of a vintage French negligee, which would be fun in a bedroom or powder room. (www.target.com ) At www.wayfair.com theres a textural, tonal, rose-print wallcov ering evocative of an Old World art print. And California designer Phyllis Morris dramatic Vie en Rose, an overscale photoprint of carmine blooms on a black background, turns a bedroom into a boudoir. (www.phyllismorris.com ) Small accessories are an easy way to introduce rose motifs. Cafe Press has a clever wall clock emblazoned with a purple rose image. (www.cafepress.com). At Pier 1, red felt roses lend drama to a picture frame. And finally, Habidecors Abyss Rose bath rug is a luxurious way to put the flower underfoot. (www.gracious home.com). HOME DECOR Decorating year round with roses ASSOCIATED PRESS The newest Monopoly token, a cat, center, rests on a Boardwalk deed next to other tokens still in use including the wheelbarrow and the shoe at Hasbro Inc. headquarters, in Pawtucket, R.I. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Lindsey Harris, a photographer based in Ann Arbor, Mich., captures roses in interesting architectural compositions like those above and below, then prints them as frameable art available at www.etsy.com/ shop/APeacefulLeaf. RIGHT: Ninteenth-century silk manufacturer BrunetLeComptes Lyons Silk roses has been reproduced on watercolor paper by L.A. arthouse, Natural Curiosities. The original silk designs were used on hankies and pocket squares. Monopoly fans vote to add cat token, toss old flat iron