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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02018

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02018

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com C arrie E. Cooper was always told by her mother, Dont be a teacher. Her mother, Gail Little, taught elementary school for 31 years. She saw the highlights that come with the profession. The look on a childs face when a lesson clicks. The satisfaction of know ing you have touched a young life. And when a teacher truly has an impact on a child, the difficulties associated with the profession seem insignificant. But Little also knew teaching was hard. Little told her daughter the work never ends. Theres always one more phone call to make, one more test to grade and one more lesson to plan. Although Coopers mother told her not to be a teacher, Cooper said she showed her it was the most rewarding thing I could ever do with my life. Thursday afternoon Cooper was recognized as Columbia Countys 2013-14 Teacher of the Year at the First Presbyterian Church. She teaches ninth-grade English and is the head of the By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE A proposal to end guar anteed pensions for new teachers, state and county workers and other public employees began moving through the Florida Legislature on Thursday. A House panel voted to introduce a commit tee bill that would replace traditional defined benefit pensions with individual investment accounts similar to 401(k) plans for employees hired after Jan. 1, 2014. It would shift invest ment risk from employers to employees, a growing trend in the private sector. Benefits can vary widely depending upon the perfor mance of investments each employee chooses. The bill also would end disability benefits for new employees. The measure is a top priority for Gov. Rick Scott and Republican legislative lead ers. It cleared the Government Operations Subcommittee on a party-line 9-3 vote. Republicans and business groups that sup port the measure contended the switch would save taxpayers money. Democrats, union offi cials and other critics argued it would have the opposite result. Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Robert set to return to GMA. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 71 46 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 268 Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION 1A Friday Music concert Country music singer Tracy Lawrence will per form at Florida Gateway Colleges Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrence has amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including Alibis, If the Good Die Young and Find Out Who Your Friends Are. For tickets or more information, call (386) 754-4340 or visit www. fgcentertainment.com. Boys program The Lake City Parks and Recreation Department has openings for its afterschool structured activ ity for boys, The program is held at the Teen Town Community Center, next to the Lake City Girls Club. The program is licensed by the Department of Children and Families and the staff is DCF certified. The cur rent session runs through March 15 and the cost is $200. Bus service from the schools is included. For more information, contact Heyward Christie at (386) 754-3607 or email chris tieh@lcfla.com. Art League exhibit The Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening reception will be at 6 p.m. at the colleges Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 7551109. Theater performance High Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Death of a Salesman tonight through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are available at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspringscommunitythe ater.com. For more infor mation, call (386) 454-3525. Saturday B-CU alumni The Columbia County Chapter of BethuneCookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU presi dent Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence. The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the university scholar ship fund. Teen hurt in crash of utility vehicle From staff reports A Lake City teen was seri ously hurt in the crash of a utility vehicle in which he was a passenger Wednesday, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. Jakob L. Ehrler, 14. was transported to Shands at the University of Florida, FHP said. The driver, David I. Huntzberry, 14, White Springs, was unhurt. According to FHP, the two were headed west on private property east of SW Duckett Court at 5:45 p.m. when Ehrler told Huntzberry he saw a dog on their left. Huntzberry steered right, sending the 2010 Polaris Ranger XP onto a small dirt rise where it overturned. Retirement bill on the move PUBLIC PENSIONS Guaranteed pensions for public workers would end under House measure. PENSIONS continued on 3A CENTER continued on 3A TEACHER continued on 3A Events center plans stalled COUNTY COMMISSION County asking for changes to memo of understanding. TOP TEACHER Carrie Cooper ignored her mothers advice when she said, Dont teach Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Columbia City Elementary School Principal Lana Boone (from left) watches as retired teacher JoAnn Torrans hugs Columbia High School ninth-grade English teacher Carrie E. Cooper after Cooper was named the 2013-14 Teacher of the Year. Cooper has been teaching for six years, five of which have been at Columbia High. Ninth-grade English teacher at Columbia High takes top honors. Alexandre Lopes, the 2013 Florida Teacher of the Year, speaks to a crowd of about 300 at the Columbia County Schools Teacher of the Year program and reception at First Presbyterian Church on Thursday. By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The $28 million project to build an events center in Columbia County stalled after the county commis sion rejected a draft memo randum of understanding because it did not form a binding contract. Commissioners want ed Columbia County Resources, Inc., which owns the county fairgrounds, to agree to sign the deed of the fairgrounds over to the county if the county does decide to build an events center. However, the draft mem orandum of understand ing presented at Thursday nights meeting would not force CCR to do so. County Manager Dale Williams said the events

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Composer-conductor John Williams is 81. Q Newscaster Ted Koppel is 73. Q Actor Nick Nolte is 72. Q Comedian Robert Klein is 71. Q Actor-rock musician Creed Bratton is 70. Q Singer Ron Tyson is 65. Q Actress Brooke Adams is 64. Q Actress Mary Steenburgen is 60. Q Author John Grisham is 58. Q Actor Henry Czerny is 54. Q Rock singer Vince Neil (Motley Crue) is 52. Rock singer-musician Sammy Llanas (The BoDeans) is 52. Q Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson is 51. Q Actress Mary McCormack is 44. Rock musician Keith Nelson (Buckcherry) is 44. Q Retired NBA player Alonzo Mourning is 43. Q Actor Seth Green is 39. AROUND FLORIDA Public comment bill in Senate TALLAHASSEE — The public would have a right to be heard at state and local government meetings under a bill that’s cleared a Senate committee. It’s similar to a bill that unanimously passed the Senate last year but never got a floor vote in the House. Sen. Joe Negron, a Stuart Republican, again is sponsoring this year’s ver-sion (SB 50). It’s a response to a pair of appellate court rulings that said citizens have a right to attend public meet-ings, but they don’t have a right to be heard under the state’s open-govern-ment “sunshine” law. The Governmental Oversight and Accountability Committee unanimously approved Negron’s bill, but it has two more committee stops before it can get a floor vote. A similar House bill (HB 23) hasn’t yet received a committee hear-ing.St. Pete cops get state honor TALLAHASSEE — Two St. Petersburg police offi-cers are being honored as Florida’s best. Attorney General Pam Bondi on Wednesday named Sgt. Karl Lounge and Officer Douglas Weaver as the state’s 2012 Law Enforcement Officers of the Year. Lounge and Weaver were cited for their brav-ery in a shootout with a fugitive that resulted in the deaths of two other offi-cers in January 2011. Sgt. Thomas Baitinger and Officer Jeffrey Yaslowitz were killed while helping serve a warrant. The fugitive, Hydra Lacy Jr., also died during the shootout. The attorney general annually names an officer or officers of the year from nominees submitted by various law enforcement organizations. The Fraternal Order of Police nominated Lounge and the Florida Police Chiefs Association nomi-nated Weaver.Jury awards girl $1.7 million WEST PALM BEACH — Jurors in West Palm Beach have awarded a mentally challenged girl $1.7 million for the trauma suffered when she was raped on a school bus in 2007. The jury deliberated a little more than two hours Wednesday. But the Palm Beach Post reports the girl’s attorneys must now persuade the Florida Legislature to lift a cap on jury awards. That’s because under state law, government agencies in 2007 could only be forced to pay $100,000 for injuries resulting in their wrongdo-ing. Jurors rejected the school district’s argument that the girl was too young and too mentally disabled to understand what a 15-year-old disabled student did to her.3 become legal parents of girl MIAMI — Three people — a gay man and two les-bians — are now the legal parents of a 23-month-old girl in South Florida. The Miami Herald reports that Maria Italiano and Cher Filippazzo, who married in Connecticut, approached Massimiliano Gerina as a sperm donor several years ago following unsuccessful attempts to become pregnant through a professional clinic. Gerina gave the women his sperm, and Italiano conceived. The couple had planned for Filippazzo to adopt the baby. Sperm donors have no legal rights under Florida law, but Gerina argued that the women claimed they wanted a father for the baby, not just a sperm donor. Nearly two years of legal battling ended last month when Miami-Dade Circuit Court Judge Antonio Marin approved a settle-ment and private adoption that listed all three parents on the child’s birth certifi-cate.Killer appeals to delay execution TALLAHASSEE — A drug trafficker convicted of killing a state trooper is asking the Florida Supreme Court to block his scheduled Feb. 26 execution. Lawyers for Paul Augustus Howell asked the justices for a stay of execution and filed a post-conviction appeal on Wednesday. Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey previously denied Howell’s appeal in Jefferson County. That’s where Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Jimmy Fulford was killed by an exploding pipe bomb in February 1992. The bomb was in a giftwrapped microwave oven Fulford found in a car he stopped for a traffic viola-tion on Interstate 10 east of Tallahassee. Howell was convicted of building the bomb that he intended to kill two women in Marianna because they knew too much about a South Florida drug traf-ficking ring. Robin Roberts set to return to ‘GMA’ NEW YORK A BC News says Robin Roberts will be back on the job at the “Good Morning America” anchor desk on Feb. 20. Her return will be five months to the day since her bone marrow transplant to treat a rare blood disorder. Roberts has gotten the all-clear from her doctors, according to the announcement made Thursday on “GMA.” She reached the critical 100-day benchmark in December. In January, she began a series of dry runs at the “GMA” studio to re-acclimate herself to the work routine. Her last day on “GMA” was Aug. 30 before she started her medical leave. About a year ago, Roberts began feeling the symptoms of her illness, known as MDS. She said in a statement: “What a difference a year makes.”‘Judge Judy’ ruling daytime TV NEW YORK — Sixteen years into her career as television’s chief justice, Judy Sheindlin is as comfortable in her role as the nation appears to be with her. “Judge Judy” is such a familiar part of daytime TV that now, in the postOprah Winfrey syndication world, it’s easy to overlook how dominant it is. The show averaged 10.1 million viewers each day during the third week of January, a typical week, more than the next three courtroom shows combined, the Nielsen com-pany said. Without her black robe with the white lace, Sheindlin can walk down a Manhattan street undisturbed on a chilly winter afternoon. Just try that with Dr. Phil, Ellen DeGeneres, Dr. Oz or Katie Couric. Each have daytime shows with an audience less than half of what “Judge Judy” draws each day. The people who choose to have their disputes settled on camera by Sheindlin know to expect a sharp tongue and sharp judgments. She believes most people take comfort in order, like newborn babies swaddled tightly in a blanket. “They want to do the right thing, most people,” she said. “For that little core that doesn’t want to do the right thing and gets away with it routinely, most people want to see them get a good whupping. And I am your girl.” Freeborn, makeup artist behind Yoda, dies at 98 LONDON — Stuart Freeborn, a pioneering movie makeup artist behind creatures such as Yoda and Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” films, has died. He was 98. LucasFilm confirmed Wednesday that Freeborn had passed away, “leaving a legacy of unforgettable contributions.” “Star Wars” director George Lucas said in a statement that Freeborn was “already a makeup legend” when he started working on “Star Wars.” Wednesday: Afternoon: 9-3-6 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 2-6-7-2 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 8-10-15-20-33 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture “Let those who love the Lord hate evil, for he guards the lives of his faithful ones and deliv-ers them from the hand of the wicked.” — Psalm 97:10 ASSOCIATED PRESSRoberts Roberts, seen here on Jan. 24, will be back on th e job at the “Good Morning America” anchor desk on Feb. 20. Her return wil l be five months to the day since her bone marrow transplant to treat a rare blo od disorder. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press Sheindlin Freeborn

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 3A 3A $350 $495 High Quality Stainless Steel with Cast Iron Grate. Contemporary Charcoal Grill" Wood Burning Stove WR 244 Gas Logs-All Kinds PENSIONS: Bill approved by House panel would alter state retirement system Continued From Page 1A TEACHER: 2013-14 Teacher of the Year heads English Dept. at Columbia High Continued From Page 1A English Department at Columbia High School. The anticipation built as Sherod Keen, 2012-13 teach er of the year, was preparing to announce his successor. Then Keen started reading one of the nomination let ters. It talked about The Odyssey and Shakespeare. Cooper recognized her words. She was nervous. Her hands twisted together, she knew she would have to speak in front of all those other teachers, administra tors and guests. Cooper kept her com ments short, thanking God, her mother and her hus band, who also teachers at Columbia High School. Obviously, CHS is the best place that Ive ever been, and truly filled with beautiful minds, and Im lucky to rep resent them, she said. Todd Widergren, principal at Columbia High School, said while hes only been in his job for a couple of months it was apparent right away that Cooper was a superb teacher. She truly cares about her students and is dedicated to making them better every day, Widergren said. Superintendent Terry Huddleston said there were a number of qualified appli cants for teacher of the year in the school district. These teachers represent the many, many fine teachers that we have in our district that are not only dedicated to the profession but our stu dents, Huddleston said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter The nominees for the 2013-2014 Columbia County Teacher of the Year pose for a photograph. Pictured are Nicole Carr (front row, from left), Fort White Elementary; Denetria Stokes, Challenge Learning Center; Thayla Mullins, Niblack Elementary School; 2013-2014 Teacher of the Year Carrie Cooper, Columbia High School; Jamie L. Stamper, Pinemount Elementary; Michele VanBennekom, Five Points Elementary; Beth Cason, Melrose Park Elementary; Al Nelson (back row, from left), Richardson Middle School; Lauren Gerling, Columbia City Elementary; S. Denise Gillyard, Summers Elementary; Becky Zoeller, Lake City Middle School; Maxine F. Williams, Westside Elementary; Sarah Ripple, Eastside Elementary; and Tina Johnson, Fort White Middle/High School. Opponents also object ed to taking a vote before actuarial studies, which are expected to resolve that question, have been com pleted. This is, ram it down everyones throat, said Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-Boca Raton. Were not fools. This is just a cost shift, and my advice is find someone elses pocket to pick. Leave our workers alone. Subcommittee Chairman Jason Brodeur, R-Sanford, assured his colleagues there will be plenty more opportunities to discuss and modify the measure when it is heard by other committees. If passed, the proposal would be the second major change in the Florida Retirement System since Scott took office two years ago. A law passed in 2011 requires public employees to contribute 3 percent of their earnings to the sys tem, in effect a pay cut. Brodeur stressed that the bill would affect only new hires, not the retire ment systems 623,011 current active members those now working or its 334,682 retirees. Only about 25 percent of all covered employees are state workers. The rest are teachers and local gov ernment workers including law enforcement officers and firefighters. It doesnt hurt anybody whos currently in the sys tem, Brodeur said. It doesnt break any promises to those who havent been hired yet and it doesnt ask for any taxpayer increases either. Brodeur acknowledged that the Florida system now is one of the nations best-funded and well-man aged pension plans. Financial experts say pension plans that are at least 80 percent funded are considered on solid ground because employees do not all retire at the same time. The Florida system was 87 percent funded as of last June and since then its investments have grown by $10 billion to $132 billion as a result of the ongoing stock market recovery. In some years the fund has topped 100 per cent. Thats enabled the Legislature to divert about $12 billion in state contri butions to other purposes over the past dozen years. Also, the 3 percent employ ee contribution is being used to reduce employer contributions instead of increasing the funds assets. Public employers now contribute 3.55 per cent for most workers. Whats wrong? Why are we trying to fix it? asked Gary Ramey, president of the Florida Professional Firefighters union. Were spending an awful lot of time here and resources for a problem that really doesnt exist. The bills supporters, though, say they are wor ried that kind of success cannot continue, citing huge unfunded liabilities racked by municipalities, other states and private companies. Brodeur characterized the proposal as a minimal change as opposed to more drastic measures he said would have to be taken if the Florida plan suffers the same fate. Closing a defined ben efit plan, believe me, is not a minimal change in any way, shape or form, said Ray Edmondson, CEO of the nonpartisan Florida Public Pension Trustee Association. Its the most expensive thing you can do. Ramey said state and local governments would have to pay more into the present plan for each current employee as its shrinks due to the lack of new members. By MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL A 150-foot-wide aster oid will come remarkably close to Earth next week, even closer than high-fly ing communication and weather satellites. It will be the nearest known flyby for an object of this size. But dont worry. Scientists promise the megarock will be at least 17,100 miles away when it zips past next Friday. No Earth impact is pos sible, Donald Yeomans, manager of NASAs NearEarth Object program at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., said Thursday. Even the chance of an asteroid-satellite run-in is extremely remote, Yeomans and other scientists noted. A few hundred satellites orbit at 22,300 miles, high er than the asteroids path, although operators are being warned about the incoming object for track ing purposes. No one has raised a red flag, nor will they, Yeomans told reporters. I certainly dont anticipate any prob lems whatsoever. Impossible to see with the naked eye, the asteroid is considered small as these things go. By contrast, the one that took out the dino saurs 65 million years ago was 6 miles wide. Yet Asteroid 2012 DA14, as its known for its discov ery date, still could pack a wallop. If it impacted Earth which it wont, scientists were quick to add Thursday it would release the ener gy equivalent of 2.4 million tons of TNT and wipe out 750 square miles. Thats what happened in Siberia in 1908, when forest land around the Tunguska River was flattened by a slightly smaller asteroid that exploded about five miles above ground. The likelihood of some thing this size striking Earth is once in every 1,200 years. ASSOCIATED PRESS This image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech shows a simula tion of asteroid 2012 DA14 approaching from the south as it passes through the Earth-moon system on Feb. 15. center planning committee identified a few absolutes that if did not mate rialize the project would stop. He said the memorandum of understanding is one of those absolutes. Phase One of the events center project identified the fairgrounds as a funding source to help pay for the project. The property appraisor val ues the land at more than $4 million, which would go to fund the events center. Williams said he believed the terms werent iron clad and absolute but very optional, and at some point CCR could opt-out of the agreement. District 1 Commissioner Ron Williams, chair of the events cen ter planning committee, said he was not going to spend any more county money on the project until there was an agreement between CCR and the county. He said he will cancel all events center planning committee meet ings until the agreement has been approved by the county commission. District 3 Commissioner Bucky Nash said he wanted a time frame on how long the CCR and county would have to draft a new agreement. He pro posed 30 days, but later said 60 days would work. District 5 Commissioner Scarlet Frisina admended the motion to send the agreement back to CCR to include the 60-day deadline. The motion passed 5-0. CENTER: Changes to proposed agreement sought Continued From Page 1A Astroid will swing near Earth next week

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OPINION Friday & Saturday, February 8 & 9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A W ant to cheer up? Want to feel happi-er, right now? Got a few minutes? That’s all it takes. Here’s how: Do it now, right away. Drop everything for the next 10 minutes. If you’ve been feeling down, there’s no reason you can’t make yourself a little happier, right now. You can put off dealing with your problems for a while, and give yourself this little break. To feel good, all you need to do is this short exercise: Take out a sheet of paper. All you have to do is to make a list of things you can feel good about. A hint: happy memories of things that have made you happy in the past, things you enjoy, things you appreciate and feel thankful for, and times when you felt happier. Focus on the good times, and dig a little. Would I ask you to do anything I haven’t done myself? Of course I wouldn’t do that. What does the list I just made look like? I listed happy memories, things that made me feel good, and things that bring “warm fuzzies” any time I think about them. They’re things like this: •My wonderful 26-year relationship with the love of my life, my soulmate; •Enjoying good times with my family and friends; •Sailing my little boat in the Pacific Ocean; •Surfing good waves on a warm summer day; •My good health and fitness level; •Sharing music with hospital patients, nursing homes, and the public; •A job I love, teaching at the local college; •Hikes with my dog;•Sitting around a fire with people I enjoy being with. Wow; I feel better again, just putting together this article. That’s how I know it works. It works for me, and research and common sense suggest it will work for you now. I filled out a whole page in just 10 minutes. Now that you’ve started, what else can you do to help you feel bet-ter? List what you’d like to do with your future, that you think could make you happy. Try to visualize those happy moments of things to come. Write up a brief plan, just a couple of things you need to do, to make your life a little more the way you want it to be. Put some of those things on your calendar. Involve yourself more with those people you want to associate with. Don’t brood over problems; see them as challenges that you can deal with and resolve, and take a step towards their resolution. As you’re going to sleep, count your blessings instead of sheep. Be kind to yourself, and to others. Usually other people tend to recip-rocate your kindness. Take care of your own happiness and well-being; you’re worth it. You’re the only self you’ve got! County not aboveboard on events center Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman The Motel Caswell in Tewksbury, Mass., won’t be found on any world’s best hotel lists, but it has become a five-star example of the need for Congress to enact comprehensive civil asset-forfeiture reform. The motel, a mortgage-free property worth more than $1 million, has been owned and oper-ated by the Caswell family for over two genera-tions. According to government prosecutors, some guests at the hotel have used rooms at the inn to engage in minor, drug-related crimes, leading to 15 arrests in the past 15 years. There has never been any allegation that a member of the Caswell family has ever been involved in this or any other criminal activity. The own-ers always cooperated with police, even offer-ing free rooms to law enforcement conducting stakeouts whenever requested. Federal agents repaid that generosity by attempting to seize the hotel from the family and sell it to the highest bidder. Such madness is commonplace under federal civil asset-forfeiture rules that turn law enforce-ment into a for-profit enterprise. The statute enables the taking of any property without compensation unless the owners can prove that they “did all that could reasonably be expected” to end illegal activity on their land. The concept of innocent until proven guilty does not apply. Property can be taken on the mere suspicion of a connection to a crime, and the burden of proof falls on the owner, not the government. Thanks to the assistance of the Institute for Justice, the Caswells have kept the government at bay. On Jan. 24, U.S. Magistrate Judge Judith Dein slapped down the case brought by U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz — the same individual whose aggressive prosecution of Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz was blamed for his sui-cide. Judge Dein spent 59 pages picking apart the flimsy evidence prosecutors put forward in the case, but Ms. Ortiz is nonetheless consider-ing an appeal. It is time for Congress to end this reign of error for the Caswells and the thousands of other innocent families who have seen their property taken and lives destroyed by current asset-forfeiture laws. The government shouldn’t be allowed to grab homes and destroy liveli-hoods on the mere allegation of a possible connection to illegal activity. At a minimum, lawmakers must demand a guilty verdict in a criminal trial prior to any seizure. Government land grab put to bed Want to feel better, right now? ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comTo the Editor:The story you ran recently about Phase ll of the events center was a farce. Mr. Williams tells your report-er “there’s a perception by the public that planning for the events center has occurred in a ‘closed-door’ secret process.” Then he goes on to say that “it s important that due process should take its course.” I strongly believe that “due process” is exactly what they’ve been trying to avoid all along. The county commission shouldn’t be allowed to spend ANY of OUR money on high-dollar, new, special interest projects without asking us first if we want what they propose to spend it on. Any new capital proj-ects should have to be voted on and approved by the taxpayers. This “fact-finding committee” for the events center is a group of cro-nies, hand-picked because they have a direct or indirect interest in seeing it built. They have been working behind the scenes for over a year. They’ve put out requests for people to offer par-cels of land at a hugely inflated price. They’ve traveled to areas in and out of the state. They’ve also hired an out of state firm to draw up plans. I don’t know about the rest of you taxpayers here in Columbia County but I’m sick of the county commis-sion throwing money at projects that have been dreamed up by one of the good-ole-boy crowd. Look at the skeleton of the Columbia County Sports Hall of Fame sitting on the hill above I-75. Look at 10 plus years of the Bascom Norris bypass proj-ect and can you imagine the cost ? Look at the latest money waster: The multi-million dollar water facility in Ellisville. The commission has deliberately made it difficult for the public to offer any input in past meetings which is why most people don’t attend. People are only allowed to speak for two minutes (if they sub-mit a written request) and at the beginning of the meeting. Then they have the nerve to tell YOUR reporter that public perception is WRONG! If the commission wants to regain the respect of the public that it has sworn to serve, they will stop acting like it’s an inconvenience to have to serve them! Wake up, people of Columbia County, and start calling your com-missioner and tell them: I DON’T WANT, DON’T NEED AND WON’T PAY FOR this idiotic idea called an “events center”! We are very happy with our fairgrounds and rodeo arena. They’re convenient to the largest number of people in the county and they’re plenty adequate for all the “events” that take place in Columbia County for a long time to come. Edward S. HarrisLake City Q The Washington Times 4AOPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Contact Robert Denny at (386) 4544950. Taft: From president to mascotO ne of the weirder and most popular traditions of the Washington Nationals baseball team is the Racing Presidents. (Come on, give the city a break. It went without Major League Baseball for 34 years.) In the fourth inning, a gate in centerfield opens and out come these 12-foot tall figures in giant foam heads representing presidents Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt. They “race,” interrupted by pratfalls and other diversions, around the warning track toward home plate. The crowd loves it. This season, a fifth president will join the field: William Howard Taft, who at 340 pounds was our portliest chief executive. He’s perhaps best remembered for once getting stuck in a bathtub. In real life, Taft was a distinguished public servant: the 27th president of the United States (1909 to 1913), chief justice of the Supreme Court, secretary of war, U.S. solicitor general, governor-general of the Philippines, president of the American Bar Association and founder of a political dynasty. Now, along with his four distinguished predecessors, Taft has found a new career promoting the virtues of weight loss while prolong-ing the middle of the fourth inning so the fans can load up on beer, hot dogs and nachos. At least it might make people forget about the bathtub incident. Q Scripps Howard News Service.

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Dorothy FieldingMrs. Dorothy Fielding went home to Heaven February 6, 2013. She was born March 28, 1928 in King Fisher Oklahoma WR$UWKXU/HH6WDQOODQG(OL]D EHWK)D\H-HWW6WDQOO6KHZDVborn again into the family of God March 27, 1938 and loved and served her Lord by serving others. Mrs. Fielding attended school in Hennessey, Oklahoma and graduated from High School LQ(QLG2NODKRPD6KHZHQWon to graduate from the Dallas Bible Institute in Dallas, Texas where she was a part of a min-istry team teaching bible classes at a local tuberculosis sanitarium and participated in presenting the Bible through KYB Clubs (Know your Bible Clubs). It thrilled her to see young people learning Gods word and accept-ing Christ as their Savior. She spent a summer in Cuba with Practical Missionary Training where she participated in street ministry, radio ministry and in assisting resident missionaries.Mrs. Fielding was preceded in death by her mother and Father, KHUGDXJKWHU(OL]DEHWK$QQ&XO ley of Kasilof, Alaska, and three siblings who died in infancy.She is survived by her husband Hunter Weston “Tuck” Fielding of Lake City; daughters: Mary (VWHU0HUOH-RKQVRQRI6XW ton; Alaska, Sharon Kay (Rob) +HLQRI:DVLOOD$ODVND(OL]D beth (Bub) Corson of Leesburg, Fla.; Genie Marie (Bill) Head of Ft. Valley, GA.; and Irene Marie (Kirk) Humphreys of Palm Beach *DUGHQV)OD(LJKW*UDQG children, Ten (10) Great Grand-children, and a host of those she calls her “children of the heart”.Mrs. Fielding disliked seeing God’s money wasted and re-spectfully requests that, in lieu RIRZHUVDQ\PHPRULDOVEHmade in the form of donations to Southside Baptist Church or to Gideon’s International for the placement of Bibles.A memorial service will be held at Southside Baptist Church on Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 'U5DOSK5RGULJXH]RIFLDWLQJ Sgt. Chuck HarperSgt. Chuck Harper, 49 of Ft. White, Florida passed from this life on February 5, 2013. He was born July 20, 1963 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Charles Fred-erick Harper, Sr. and Janet (ODLQH(KUOLFKSgt. Harper is survived by two VRQV%ULDQ(+DUSHURI/DNHCity, Florida and Chad P. Harper of Gainesville, Florida; a daugh-ter, Jana L. Harper of Ft. White, Florida; and a sister, Krissy Harper-Zahn of Pittsburg, Penn-sylvania. He was preceded in death by his wife, Barbara Harp-er and his mother, Jan Clark.He was a sergeant for the High Springs Police Department and received the “Medal of Valor” for service at the school shooting. He was a member of Columbia Bap-tist Church in Lake City, Florida.Funeral Services will take place Saturday, February 9, 2013, 3:00 p.m. at First Baptist Church of High Springs, 20112 North US 441, High Springs, Florida. The family will receive family & friends on Friday, February IURPSPDW(Y ans-Carter Funeral Home, 220 N. Main Street, High Springs, Florida 32643, 386-454-2444.Pearl Robarts ToddPearl Robarts Todd, 98, went home to be with her Lord and Savior, on Thursday, February 7, 2013. She was born in Lake City, Florida to the late Charles DQG(OL]DEHWK>&KDVWDLQ@5REDUWVand remained here all of her life. She was a graduate of Colum-bia County High School, Class of 1932 and a life long member of The 1st Advent Christian Church. She worked as a book-keeper for Granger Lumber Company for 44 years and then ZLWKWKH(WKHULGJH)XUQLWXUHCompany until her retirement at the age of 92. She loved reading, going to work and her church but loving her grand and great grand children was her biggest joy. Survivors include her son, Mike (Becky) Todd; grandchildren, Chris Todd & Josh (Amanda) Todd; great grandchildren, Spencer, Truitt, & Murphy; and her special niece, Barbara Phil-lips, all of Lake City, Florida. Funeral services will be con-ducted at 3:00 p.m., on Sunday, February 10, 2013 at The 1st Advent Christian Church with 3DVWRU)UHG*D\ODUGRIFLDWLQJInterment will follow in For-est Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visitation with the fam-ily will be held one hour prior to service time (2:00 p.m. un-til 3:00 p.m.) at the church. ,QOLHXRIRZHUVWKHIDPLO\DVNVthat donations in her honor be made to the 1st Advent Christian Church, 1881 SW McFarlane Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNER-AL HOME 3596 S. U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrange-ments. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family online at www.gatewayforestlawn.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 5A5A Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.Feb. 8Music concertCountry music singer Tracy Lawrence will per-form at Florida Gateway College’s Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrence has amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including “Alibis,” “If the Good Die Young” and “Find Out Who Your Friends Are.” For tickets or more information, call (386) 754-4340 or visit www.fgcentertainment.com.Boys programThe Lake City Parks and Recreation Department has openings for its after-school structured activ-ity for boys, The program is held at the Teen Town Community Center, next to the Lake City Girls Club. The program is licensed by the Department of Children and Families and the staff is DCF certified. The current session runs through March 15 and the cost is $200. Bus service from the schools is includ-ed. For more information, contact Heyward Christie at (386) 754-3607 or email christieh@lcfla.com.Art League exhibitThe Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening recep-tion will be at 6 p.m. at the college’s Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre-sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109.Gospel singSouthisde Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya Drive, will have a gospel sing at 7 p.m., featuring Herman Hampton, Mandy Grimmett, Gayle Moore and the Pine Grove Choir.Festival vendorsThe Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 438-3131, visit the festival web-site, www.olusteefestival.com, or email vendorinfo@olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited.Theater performanceHigh Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Death of a Salesman” tonight through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are avail-able at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspring-scommunitytheater.com. For more information, call (386) 454-3525.Theater productionsAcrosstown Repertory Theatre, 619 S. Main St. in Gainesville, will present special shows this week-end. On Friday at 8 p.m., Theatre Strike Force’s Sunday Group will pres-ents an evening of long-form improvisation. On Saturday at 8 p.m., Mandisa Haarhoof will perform a one-woman show, “Crush-Hopper: Rush-Hopper,” about growing up in South Africa. On Sunday at 2 p.m., a staged reading of a the Greek play “Herakles” by Euripides will be given. Tickets are $10 to $25 for all three shows. Tickets may be purchased at the door 30 minutes before each show; tickets may also be reserved by calling (352) 505-0868.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Feb. 9B-CU alumniThe Columbia County Chapter of Bethune-Cookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU president Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about “A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence.” The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the univer-sity scholarship fund.Writing programThe Friends of the Library host Liz Coursen in presenting “Self-Editing in the Internet Age: How to Edit Your Words Without Losing Your Mind” at 3:30 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Whether you’re a full-fledged author or someone who edits your organization’s news-letter or wesite, learn the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar that will help improve your writing and put a shine on your fin-ished product.Black History MonthBlack History Month organizers will host a “Trip to Freedom” bus trip to Fort Mose at St. Augustine, the first all-black cettlement in the United States. The bus will leave at 7a.m. from Richardson Community Center. Cost is $25, which includes entry fees and lunch. To register or for more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 867-1601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts.org.Elks eventB & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple will have a Black History Month pro-gram at the Richardson Center at 10 a.m. The speak-er will be L. C. Bradley. For more information, call Mrs. Margaret Carter at (386) 752-3533.Shriners’ fish fryLake City Shrine Club will have a fish fry begin-ning at 7 p.m. at the Shrine clubhouse on Northwest Brown Road, west of Lake City. The cost of $7 includes fried fish and all the trim-mings. Funds raised will benefit the Lake City Shrine Club and are not tax-deductible. For more information or to order ahead, call Bob Breyer at 365-1388.RHS alumni meetingRichardson High School Alumni will have a round-up meeting at noon at the Richardson Community Center. For further infor-mation, call (386) 752-0815.B-CU Founders DayThe Columbia County Chapter of Betune-Cookman University Alumni will have a Founders Day event at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. Dr. Edison O. Jackson, interim president of the university, will speak about “The B-CU Experience: A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence. Dress will be semi-formal. Donations to the scholarchip fund will be accepted.Feb. 10Library group meetingThe Friends of the Library will have its annual meeting program, “Having Fun, Wish You Were Here!: An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida,” presented by Liz Coursen at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Take a trip back in time through Florida’s varied and excit-ing history, using museum-quality vintage postcards. The program will also include vintage postcards featuring Lake City and other regional locations and a chance to win your own vintage Lake City post-card.Christian concertThe Christian music group Brian Free and Assurance will give a concert at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Live Oak and Lake City at the intersection with Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. More infor-mation about the church is available online www. wellbornbaptist.com or by calling (386) 963-2231.Appreciation DayFirst Baptist Church, 182 NE Justice St., will hold an Appreciation Day for the Rev. Robert Daivs at 10:30 a.m. A covered dish dinner will be held on the church grounds. For more infor-mation, call 752-5422.Feb. 11Coalition meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. execu-tive/finance committee will meet at 3 p.m. at the coalition Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers state and fed-eral funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Prekindergarten programs for the following coun-ties: Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee, and Union. Anyone with a dis-ability requiring special assistance to attend the meeting should contact Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770.Cancer survivors teaAll cancer survivors are invited to a tea in of cel-ebration with other survi-vors from 3 ot 4:30 p.m. at The Clubhouse of the Lake City Woman’s and Garden clubs at 257 SE Hernando St. Enjoy Iced tea and homemade baked goods, entertainment, socializing and learning about the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life. For more information, call to (386) 752-4198 or (386) 752-0956.Cancer support groupThe Women’s Cancer Support Group of Lake City will meet at Baya Pharmacy East, 780 SE Baya Drive, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more Information, call (386) 752-4198 or (386) 755-0522.Republican WomenThe Columbia Federated Republican Women will meet at Beef-O’Brady’s at 7p.m. in the meeting room. Come at 6 p.m., if you care to eat before the meeting. For more information, call Betty Ramey at (386) 35-4111.Feb. 12Medicare seminarThe LifeStyle Enrichment Center will have a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C and Associates Inc. Subjects to be covered include how to enroll in Medicare, what is covered and whether supplemen-tal insurance is needed. To register, call (386) 755-3476, ext. 107.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournamentThe Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas hold’em poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa-tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822.Water board meetingThe Suwannee River Water Management District Board of Governors will meet at 9 a.m. at district headquarters, 9225 County Road 49 in Live Oak. The meeting will be to consider district business and hold public hearings on regula-tory, real estate and other matters. A public hearing also will be held on adop-tion of Resolution No. 2013-01 and amendments to the Florida Forever Work Plan. Feb. 13Coalition meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. board will meet at 9 a.m at the coali-tion office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. Anyone with a dis-ability requiring special assistance to attend the should call (386) 752-9770.From staff reportsThe Columbia County Bethune-Cookman University Alumni Association hosts its sec-ond annual Founder’s Day Program at 4 p.m. Saturday at the Lake City Holiday Inn. Dr. Edison O. Jackson, interim president of B-CU, is the keynote speaker. The public is invited. Dress attire is semi-formal. Dr. Jackson will speak about “The B-CU Experience: A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence.” Dr. Jackson was born is Heathsville, Va. He received his bachelor of science degree in zoology, a master of arts degree in counseling from Howard University, master of divinity degree from New York Theological Seminary and a doctorate in education from Rutgers University with emphasis on the philosophy, function, role and administration of urban educational institu-tions. In 1985, Dr. Jackson accepted the challenge to lead Compton Community College in Compton, Calif., remaining there until his assumption of the presiden-cy of Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York in 1989, where he served for 20 years and retired in 2009 as presi-dent mmeritus. Since his retirement, Dr. Jackson has served as an educational consultant. He accepted the position of interim pres-ident at Bethune-Cookman, effective May 14, 2012. Dr. Jackson has held membership in a huge number of civic, educational and community organi-zations, among them The Crown Heights Coalition; The Catholic Interracial Council of New York; the Board of Trustees of the Brooklyn Children’s Museum; the Board of Directors of the Brooklyn Academy of Music; New York Board of Education; the American Association of State Colleges and Universities; and the New York Commission on Human Rights; the Medgar Evers Community Council Leadership Award; Congressman Ed Towns’ Community Award; and the New York Chapter American Jewish Committee Community Relations Award. Dr. Jackson is a member of the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. and serves on the ministerial staff of Macedonia Baptist Church, Heathsville, Va. Dr. and Mrs. Jackson presently reside in Daytona Beach. They are the proud parents of two children and three grandchildren. B-CU president to speak at alumni group event here COURTESY PHOTODR. EDISON JACKSON.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, February 8 & 9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V D o you believe in the resurrection of the dead? What evidence would you use to prove that the resurrection will occur? How would you prove Jesus was raised from the dead? Several writers of the New Testament record people being raised from the dead. Each one gives a piece of evidence that becomes an element of our faith that we will be raised from the dead. Matthew (9:18, 23-26) tells of an incident where a synagogue official’s daughter had died. The “flute players and the crowd” were in “noisy disorder” because of the recent death of the child. It seems that when Jesus got to the house, her passing away had just happened. Using language to convey to His audience His ability to raise someone from the dead, Jesus said it is like awaking someone from sleep, “… the girl has not died, but is asleep” (9:24). The reaction of the crowd to this statement of Jesus was laughter. After He raised the little girl, “this news went out into all that land” (9:26). Luke (7:11-17) records Jesus approaching “the gate of the city” called Nain and meeting a funeral procession coming out of the city. In the casket was the only son of a widow, followed by a “sizeable crowd.” Jesus “came up and touched the coffin; and the bearers came to a halt” (7:14). Jesus spoke to the “young man” and said to him, “Arise.” After the man sat up in the coffin, the crowd reacted with “fear … and they began glorifying God” and taking “this report concerning Him … all over Judea, and in all the surrounding district.” John (11) records Jesus hearing about Lazarus being sick and delays going to see His good friend. When asked by His dis-ciples why He was not going to see Lazarus, Jesus replied, “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep; but I go, that I may awaken him out of sleep.” The disciples did not understand this statement and we probably would not either, so John makes the com-ment, “Jesus had spoken of his death, but they thought that He was speaking of literal sleep” (11:13). When Jesus gets to Bethany, Lazarus had been in the tomb “four days” and everyone knew that his body had started the process of decaying. When Martha sees Jesus she expresses her faith in Jesus’ ability to heal Lazarus but in her wildest imagi-nations she never thought Jesus could raise Lazarus from the dead. She had faith in a general resurrection sometime in the future, but she did not think it would occur on this particular day. Jesus was “deeply moved” by the situation and after asking for the stone to be rolled away, raised Lazarus from the dead. Because of what Jesus had done, many of the Jews “believed in Him.” Paul in several of his letters speaks about the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. To the Corinthians, he went into extreme detail to prove that there would be a resurrection. His most impel-ling argument may be, “if there is no resurrection of the dead, not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is vain, your faith also is vain” (1 Corinthians 15:13, 14). Paul leaves no doubt that Jesus was raised from the dead and because Jesus was raised from the dead we also can be raised from the dead. One point we need to really mediate upon is that Jesus raised people who were at different stages in the death process from the dead. This seems to indicate that He can raise anyone. What further proof do we need that we will be raised from the dead? The question is, do we believe the proof concerning the resurrec-tion? Our own resurrection may depend upon it.Be Strong in the Lord Part 2 Proof of our resurrectionL ast week we spent much time talking about the power of Satan. The only way we can overcome his power is by the Power of God. Please don’t ever think you can stand up to him (Satan) in your own power. Verse 13 of our text tells us “Therefore take up the whole armor of God, (not just part of it, we need the whole armor of God or we will fail) that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand”. I don’t know about you, but I would say if there has ever been a evil day, it is today. Forget about the big cities, just look at our own town. Hardly a week goes by without a meth lab being discovered and if that many are discovered, how many are not? The devil I believe is using drugs as a serious weapon to destroy many young people. The word “sorcerers” is used in the book of Revelation to describe drug use in that terrible time. The word “sorcery” is where we get our word pharmacy from; and it primarily signified the use of medicine, drugs, spells. So we can see what a powerful weapon it is for Satan to use, especially against the young. Romans 13:11-12 tells us “And do this, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep; for now is our salvation is nearer than when we first believed. The night is far spent, the day is at hand. Therefore let us cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light (the armor of God)”. Paul is saying to us that we need to be ready always, for we could be called “home” at any time or the rapture could take place at any time. Please note the armor that is spoken of here is the only armor which can quench all the fiery darts of the devil and only comes from God. It doesn’t come from religion, it doesn’t come from church, it doesn’t come from the law, it doesn’t come from men; it only comes from God. Let me say here that the armor of God will allow us to recognize the “false preachers and deceitful workers transforming themselves into angels of light” (II Corinthians 11:13-15 paraphrased). Again, before we move on, we need the Whole Armor of God. If we leave one area of our life unprotected, that’s the area that Satan will work on. If there is one little detail that we think we can handle on our own, we are open for defeat. If we think we can con-tinue to hang out with ungodly people and it will not affect us, if we don’t need to study God’s word regularly, if we think we don’t need to assemble ourselves in a Bible based local church; we are wrong. Remember, we are not at war with human power but against principalities (meaning Satan — a supernatural being without physical presence). The shield of faith is so important to the Christian — that is how we walk; praying always (verse 16). Be strong in the Lord. Q Hugh Sherrill, an ordained Baptist minister and Bible teacher, is available for special Bible stud-ies and revivals. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 7A7AReligion First Baptist Churchinvites you toPlease join us for dinner on the grounds. For additional information Call 752-5422 First Baptist Church • 182 N.E. Justice St.Appreciation Dayfor Rev. Robert Davis Sunday, Feb. 10 10:30 a.m. Feb. 8Gospel singSouthisde Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya Drive, will have a gospel sing at 7 p.m., featuring Herman Hampton, Mandy Grimmett, Gayle Moore and the Pine Grove Choir.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Feb. 10Christian concertThe Christian music group Brian Free and Assurance will give a con-cert at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Live Oak and Lake City at the intersection with Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. More infor-mation about the church is available online www.well-bornbaptist.com or by call-ing (386) 963-2231.Appreciation DayFirst Baptist Church, 182 NE Justice St., will hold an Appreciation Day for the Rev. Robert Daivs at 10:30 a.m. A covered dish dinner will be held on the church grounds. For more infor-mation, call 752-5422.Dual Day programUnion AME Church, in the Winfield Community, will have its annual Dual Day program. The women’s program willl begin at 11 a.m., and the men’s pro-gram will begin at 3 p.m. The speaker will be Dr. L.C. Bradley, and music will be provided by the St. John Baptist Church choir. For more information, call Rentz Galloway at 752-5643.Love Day servicesWellborn Church of God will have a Love Day beginning at 10:30 a.m. with a showing of the movie “Fireproof” and an opportunity for people to renew their vows to Christ. Husbands and wives will be renewing their wedding vows. A reception will fol-low in the fellowship hall. Bring finger food, chips and dip, nuts or sandwich-es to share. The church is at 3330 U.S. 90 in Wellborn. For more information, call pastor W.C. Cobb at (386) 752-8479.Feb. 13Ash Wednesday serviceFirst Presbyterian Church will hold Ash Wednesday services at noon and 1 p.m. to mark the beginning of Lent. The Rev. Dr. Roy A. Martin, Jr., And Pastor Jason E. Hill, director of worship and music, will offer ashes and to give a blessing or prayer. The sanctuary Will be open for private prayer and reflection.Feb. 16Music concertJunior Combs and Southern Joy will peform a Southern/country gospel music concert at 7 p.m. at Watertown Congregational Methodist Church on Okinawa Road.Music concertPine Grove Baptist Church, 1989 N. U.S. 441, will present a concert by the Harper Brothers at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call (386) 752-2664.Feb. 19Lenten lunchThe First Presbyterian Church invites the com-munity to a Lenten lunch from noon until 1p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the church. The lunch will include soups freshly made by the women of the church. It will be fol-lowed by a short drama. The lunches are in remem-brance of the season of Lent, a 40-day season of reflection and preparation for the death and resurrec-tion of Jesus.Feb. 24Gospel sing, mealThe Glen Markham Aortic Awareness Foundation Inc. is having a gospel sing and chicken pilau meal fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Tickets are $8. There also will be informational booths. To purchase ticket or for more information, contact Renee Manning at (386) 867-2711.OngoingSunday schoolFalling Creek Chapel, 1290 Falling Creek Road in Lake City, has just begun a Sunday school for all ages. It is 9:30 a.m. Sundays. Adults meet in the church and children meet in our new Children’s Ministry building. For more infor-mation call (386) 755-0580 or email fallingcreek chapel@gmail.com.Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, contact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299. L ast week we mentioned two things about forgiveness that are essential in understanding this whole process of dealing with Bitterness. We must understand how important it is to forgive, so we can begin to heal. We also must realize it is not easy, and takes time for healing. (If you are the one who caused the problem, you have to be patient with the victim. There are no magic words to speed the process of healing. Tears help, to the extent that they will express sorrow for the past and sincerity and desire of the heart for a new beginning.) Here are the last two points to be understood about for-giveness: 3. Forgiveness is spiritual and takes place in the heart. Jesus said, “But the things that come out of a person’s mouth come from the heart, and these defile them. For out of the heart come evil thoughts — murder, adultery, sex-ual immorality, theft, false testimony, slander. These are what defile a person; but eating with unwashed hands does not defile them” (Matthew 15:18-20). Jesus is always concerned more with the ‘heart’ of a person. You can dress in the very best clothing, and wear expensive and impressive jewelry. but it won’t take care of the heart! Mom used to tell us, “Shake hands, or hug each other and make up.” Well, we did, but inside we didn’t! Inside we still felt bad, still wanted to ‘duke it out’. Forgiveness is spiritual, and unless it takes place in the heart, it is fake. Insincere forgiveness will not lead to healing, but to more resentment and hate. When you give the gift of forgiveness hypocritically, you free the other person and at the same time, you remain shackled. The offender is done, free, grateful, and on his way. You… are not. Do not take this lightly, if you give the gift, give it from the heart, because it is a ‘heart thing.’ 4. The unforgiven person is helpless. Why did Jesus say to the unforgiving servant that he was a “wicked servant”? Because forgive-ness was given to him, not earned, deserved! Yet when it came to giving this gift to his fellow servant, he refused! Sometimes we say “I just cannot forgive!” Be hon-est, it’s not that we can-not… what we are think-ing is we will not forgive! It hurts too much, we say. Yet we fail to remember how much pain we inflict on the heart of God when we sin against him. The person who is in the wrong, can do absolutely nothing to get forgiveness, but ask. He/she cannot earn it or buy it from you. If it is not a free gift of the heart, it does not work. We used to play “Heavy, heavy, hangs over your head”, but dealing with bitterness, isn’t a game. Often, we want revenge! We want them to suffer! We want them to hurt! All the while not realizing we are doing more damage to ourselves. Of course it is natural to want to hurt someone who has hurt us or our family. “Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth,” “brother you’re gonna get your ‘come-up-ins.’” Yet in the end, bitterness makes no exceptions, it will destroy the heart where it lives.Speaking the languages of loveH appy Valentines Day! People all over the world cel-ebrate Valentine’s Day with many different of expressions of love: some buy candy or flowers or a special dinner at a favorite restaurant. In fact, the National Retail Federation estimates that Americans alone spent approxi-mately $17 billion last year on the Valentine holiday. Why do we go to so much trouble? According to Dr. Gary Chapman, love is an emotional need, not just another emotion. We all want to love and be loved, but perhaps what we most need to learn about love is how to express it in a language that the other person understands. In Chapman’s book “The Five Love Languages,” he explains the five basic languages of love: Words of Affirmation: This can mean words of sincere praise for efforts as well as words of affection that express positive thoughts toward some-one as a person. “You are such a great friend”, “Your eyes are beautiful”, or “I know that didn’t turn out like you hoped, but I am proud of how hard you tried.” Quality Time: Giving a portion of time and undivided atten-tion is a powerful communicator of love to another person because our lives are so busy. This doesn’t mean simply being in the same room at the same time, but has everything to do with together-ness … making sure the other person feels like they are the focus of your attention. Receiving Gifts: Gifts are visible evidence of emotional love. Perhaps this explains the billions spent on Valentine’s Day. The Greek word from which we get our English word gift is “charis” which means grace or undeserved … for no reason. The beauty of gifts is that they don’t have to be fancy or expen-sive to be valuable. A gift says “I care about you” and “I think you are important.” That is the real treasure. Acts of Service: Loving service is an internally motivated desire to give your energy for another. Just doing something for someone, especially something they want or need accomplished is a powerful way to communi-cate love. Like quality time, it requires a portion of our life set aside and donated for another, but acts of service also allows them to be free of a task or chore. Physical Touch: There is a reason why parents are encour-aged to hold and cuddle their newborns … touching is an emo-tionally powerful way to commu-nicate love. This is why we love to give and receive hugs and why we enjoy a shoulder massage or a good back scratch. Touch makes us feel loved and accepted. Although all of the five love languages sound great, every person has one or two of these that makes them feel more loved than the others … and by nature we speak that language to others. If we enjoy gifts, we will prob-ably buy gifts for others. If we want words of affirmation, we will likely leave love notes and be very encouraging verbally. The problem comes when the other person doesn’t speak our language … or we aren’t speak-ing theirs. We may be speaking gifts, but they want some quality time. Or they may be doing acts of service for us while we long to hear them say, “I love you”. We must learn to speak the language of the other person if we want them to feel loved by us. We can usually determine our own language by what we most often do for another when we want to show love to them. We can deter-mine another person’s language by asking their preference and watching what they do for oth-ers. (To learn more, check out Chapman’s book “The Five Love Languages.) These principles can be applied in friendships and parent-child/teenager as well as romantic relationships. What a great way to celebrate love ... in the language of the recipient! Happy Heart Day … because every one matters! Blessings, Angie More Bible facts about forgiveness Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences, and offers biblical counseling. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, spe cial “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s web site, www. jackexum.com. ( EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the fifth of six related col-umns.) CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Bishops seek broader birth control exemptionBy RACHEL ZOLLAP Religion WriterAmerican bishops said Thursday the Obama administration’s latest compromise on birth control cover-age and religious employers doesn’t go far enough to answer church con-cerns. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said a bigger buffer is need-ed between religious charities and any third party arranging contracep-tive coverage. Bishops also want a clearer statement that faith-affiliated hospitals and other nonprofits are religious ministries. And church lead-ers continue pressing for an exemp-tion for owners of for-profit business who say the requirement forces them to violate their religious beliefs. The government has given no indication that it is considering a religious opt-out for business owners. The bishops made their comments nearly a week after the Department of Health and Human Services announced another revision on cover-age for contraception. The regulation is part of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, known as the Affordable Care Act, and is meant to help space pregnancies and promote women’s health. The department had no reaction Thursday to the bishops’ criticism, pointing only to an earlier pledge that the government wants to find a solution that would provide the coverage to women while respecting religious concerns. The HHS announced the proposed rules a year ago. The initial plan contained a religious exemption that many faith groups, including many who have been supportive of health care reform, said was too narrow. The rule covered churches and other houses of worship but not faith-affili-ated hospitals, charities, colleges and other nonprofits. Dozens of religious groups and forprofit business owners have sued over the regulation, saying it violates their religious rights. Advocates for the broadest coverage argued employ-ers are trying to impose their reli-gious beliefs on workers. The issue is expected to reach the Supreme Court. Latest compromise from Obama doesn’t go far enough for them.

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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s wrestling team qualified six for the Region 1-2A meet, which begins today at Matanzas High in Palm Coast. Weigh-in is at 10 a.m. today with first-round matches starting at noon. The semifinals are at 10 a.m. Saturday, fol-lowed by wrestlebacks at 12:30 p.m. The consolation and championship finals begin at 6 p.m. With injuries to Marcus Zeigler and Josh Wine, only seven Tigers wrestled in the District 2-2A tour-nament which was hosted by CHS. The top four in each weight class at dis-trict advanced to region competition. Cole Schreiber, Kaleb Warner and Daniel Devers were district champions. Dustin Regar was district runner-up, while Cole Horton placed third and Robert Martin placed fourth. Schreiber, coming off a torn MCL on Dec. 31, won his two matches at district and was district champion for the fourth time. It was Schreiber’s first tournament action since the injury. He won both matches by pin. Schreiber, who wrestled in the 113-pound weight class, also won region last year and placed third at state. Devers (160-pound weight class) was 2-0 at district as he defended his championship from last year. Devers also recorded two pins. Warner was 2-0 at district in the 126-pound weight class. Warner’s two wins were by pin. Regar (138 pounds) scored two pins before los-ing a 13-6 decision in the district final. Horton (106 pounds) bounced back from being pinned in the third round of his first match to pin his next two opponents, each in under a minute. Martin (152 pounds) split two decisions in the opening rounds and lost by pinfall in the final. The top four at region advance to state. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, February 8 & 9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS nr nrnnn rn nrn n !" nr !"#$%"&#nnr$%&&n'()*"+,+"-. (/011n.23$0r4!5(0($ nn$6$!n $6 $!$7' 8(0$n40($r(n'&7rr(($&r$$0 n$9n:$; ('rr$$7000$n6$$& r$!(nrn&n6 () *$+$ nn&n Warner, Devers, Schreiber go as district champs. State strengthJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High weightlifters Dana Roberts (from left), Charl ee Watson and Kayla Carman qualified for the FHSAA Finals state meet and will compete in Kissimmee on Saturday. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High has three Lady Tiger weightlifters to qualify for the FHSAA Finals state meet. The event is at the Kissimmee Civic Center and begins at 10:30 a.m. Saturday following weigh-ins and a coaches meeting. Dana Roberts, Kayla Carman and Charlee Watson are representing CHS. Columbia coaches Doug Peeler and Brandon Beadles are taking the lift-ers to Kissimmee today for an afternoon walk-through. Having made state last year, Roberts and Carman are already familiar with the procedure. Watson is going for the first time. Roberts, a senior, is making her third trip to state. She qualified as a freshman when the Lady Tigers won the state championship in 2010. Carman is a junior and returning to state for the second time, while junior Watson qualified for state in her first season on the weightlifting team. Roberts and Carman both moved up in weight class this year and it was costly. Roberts qualified with a 165 bench-160 clean-325 total in the Unlimited Division, but is in the mid-dle of the pack among the 30 qualifiers. The top qualifiers are neighbors — Morgan Boettcher (230-210-440) at Keystone Heights High and Samantha Cook (210-225-435) at Bradford High. Carman moved into the 110-pound weight class and her 100-110-210 qualifying lift just made the grade. The top qualifier is Amanda Fair (160-145-305) of Navarre High. Watson competed in the 129-pound weight class and also was on the low end with her 120-125-245 lifts. The top qualifier is Victoria Gilooly (150-195-345) of Timber Creek High.Lifters Roberts, Carman make return trip Tigers take six to region wrestling JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High fullback Darren Burch sports a cap from Miles College, located in Fairfield, Ala. at National Signing Day on Wednesday. Fullback gains noticeBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFor Darren Burch, football isn’t a game where he receives a lot of recogni-tion. He may play the most unrecognizable position in the game at fullback, but his time to shine finally came on National Signing Day. Burch signed with Miles College in Fairfield, Ala. on Wednesday in the Columbia High auditorium to play football at the next level. But Burch never looked for the recognition. For BURCH continued on 2B Solid win for Lady TigersBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High picked up its second win in as many games as the Lady Tigers knocked off Buchholz High, 12-2, in five innings on Thursday. The Lady Tigers started slow, but caught their stride in the third inning with three runs. Kayli Kvistad started the scoring with a sac fly to bring in Brittney Morgan and Brandy Morgan folColumbia knocks off Buchholz, 12-2. CHS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today BOXING 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Welterweights, Kevin Bizier (19-0-0) vs. Nate Campbell (36-9-1), at Montreal GOLF 11 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, second round, at Johannesburg (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, second round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 6:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Allianz Championship, first round, at Boca Raton, Fla. (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — North Dakota at Nebraska-Omaha NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Clippers at Miami 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at Utah ——— Saturday GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, third round, at Johannesburg (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, third round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, third round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 6:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Allianz Championship, second round, at Boca Raton (same-day tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN — Michigan at WisconsinESPN2 — Florida St. at Wake Forest 1 p.m. CBS — Mississippi at Missouri 2 p.m. ESPN — North Carolina at MiamiESPN2 — Saint Joseph’s at UMass 4 p.m. ESPN — Kansas at OklahomaESPN2 — Valparaiso vs. Cleveland St. 6 p.m. ESPN — Pitssburgh at CincinnatiESPN2 — Iowa St. at Kansas St. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — LSU at Alabama 9 p.m. ESPN — Teams TBANBCSN — New Mexico at UNLV 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Illinois St. at Creighton MOTORSPORTS 9:30 p.m. SPEED — National Arenacross Series, at Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 10:30 p.m. SPEED — Supercross, at San Diego RUGBY 2:30 p.m. NBCSN — USA Sevens, pool play, at Las Vegas 4 p.m. NBC — USA Sevens, pool play, at Las Vegas 7 p.m. NBCSN — USA Sevens, quarterfinals, at Las Vegas SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Newcastle at Tottenham WINTER SPORTS 1 p.m. NBCSN — Lake Placid World Cup, women’s team relay luge, at Lake Placid, N.Y. 6 p.m. NBCSN — Biathlon World Championships, men’s sprint, at Nove Mesto, Czech Republic (same-day tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. FSN — West Virginia at KansasFOOTBALLFlorida signees Alex Anzalone, lb, 6-3, 220, Wyomissing (Pa.) HS Alvin Bailey, wr, 5-11, 175, Armwood HS, Seffner Jay-nard Bostwick, dt, 6-4, 291, West Centennial HS, Port St. Lucie Caleb Brantley, dt, 6-3, 295, Crescent City HS Trenton Brown, ol, 6-7, 345, Westover HS, Albany, Ga. Darious Cummings, dt, 6-2, 305, East Mississippi CC Jarrad Davis, lb, 6-2, 225, Camden County HS, Kingsland, Ga. Cameron Dillard, ol, 6-3, 280, Canton (Mich.) HS Ahmad Fulwood, wr, 6-4, 200, Bishop Kenny HS, Jacksonville Vernon Hargreaves III, db, 5-11, 181, Wharton HS, Tampa Marcell Harris, db, 6-2, 220, Dr. Phillips HS, Orlando Marqui Hawkins, wr, 6-2, 190, Carver HS, Columbus, Ga. Joey Ivie, dl, 6-4, 269, Pasco HS, Dade City Octavius Jackson, ol, 6-4, 275, Colquitt County HS, Moultrie, Ga. Roderick Johnson, ol, 6-5, 320, American Heritage HS, Delray Beach Adam Lane, rb, 5-9, 205, Winter Haven HS Daniel McMillian, lb, 6-3, 220, First Coast HS, Jacksonville Tyler Moore, ol, 6-5, 312, St. Petersburg College. Keanu Neal, db, 6-0, 204, South Sumter HS, Bushnell Jarran Reed, dl, 6-4, 305, East Mississippi CC Antonio Riles, de, 6-4, 265, Archer HS, Lawrenceville, Ga. Demarcus Robinson, wr, 6-2, 195, Peach County HS, Fort Valley, Ga. Matt Rolin, lb, 6-4, 205, Briar Woods HS, Ashburn, Va. Jordan Sherit, de, 6-3, 243, Hillsborough HS, Tampa Max Staver, qb, 6-6, 235, Brentwood Academy, Brentwood, Tenn. Kelvin Taylor, rb, 5-10, 205, Glades Day HS, Belle Glade Chris Thompson, wr, 6-0, 167, Gainesville HS Nick Washington, db, 5-11, 170, Trinity Christian Academy, JacksonvilleFlorida St. signees Nate Andrews, db, 6-0, 195, Fairhope (Ala.) HS Wilson Bell, ol, 6-4, 296, Blount HS, Chamblee, Ga. Davarez Bryant de, 6-4, 240, New Smyrna Beach HS Keith Bryant, dt, 6-2, 306, Atlantic HS, Delray Beach Ira Denson, ol, 6-4, 317 Madison County (Fla.) HS, Madison John Franklin III, qb, 6-1, 171,South Plantation HS, Plantation Ryan Green, rb, 5-10, 187, Catholic HS, St. Petersburg Ryan Hoefeld, ol, 6-3, 265, Brother Martin HS, New Orleans, La. Desmond Hollin, de, 6-4, 260, Brooklyn, NY (ASA College/Miami Southridge) Ro’Derrick Hoskins, lb, 6-3, 215, Evans HS, Orlando Isaiah Jones, wr, 6-4, 210, Milton HSJeremy Kerr, te, 6-6, 254, St. Petersburg HS Richy Klepal, ol, 6-4, 285, Plant HS, Tampa E.J. Levenberry Jr, lb, 6-3, 230, C.D. Hylton HS, Woodbridge, Va. Tyrell Lyons, lb, 6-2, 220, First Coast HS, Jacksonville Jalen Ramsey, athlete, 6-0, 189, Brentwood HS, Brentwood, Tenn. Freddie Stevenson, lb, 6-1, 230, Bartow HS Matthew Thomas, lb, 6-3, 205, Booker T. Washington HS, Miami DeMarcus Walker de, 6-3, 265, Sandalwood HS, Jacksonville Marquez White, cb, 6-1, 175, Northview HS, Dothan, Ala. Levonte Whitfield, wr, 5-9, 176, Jones HS, Orlando Jesus Wilson wr, 6-1, 175, Christopher Columbus HS, MiamiMiami signees Devante Bond, lb, 6-3, 230, Sierra College, Antelope, Calif. Artie Burns, db, 6-0, 183, Northwestern HS, Miami Jamal Carter, s, 6-1, 190, Miami Southridge HS, Homestead Stacy Coley, wr, 6-1, 173, Northeast HS, Pompano Beach Standish Dobard, te, 6-4, 255, Edna Carr HS, Belle Chasse, La. Augustus Edwards, rb, 6-2, 230, Tottenville HS, Staten Island, N.Y. Alex Figueroa, lb, 6-3, 225, Brooke Point HS, Stafford, Va. Alex Gall, ol, 6-5, 290, Archbishop Moeller HS, Mason, Ohio Ufomba Kamalu, dl, 6-6, 280, Butler CC, Fayetteville, Ga. Hunter Knighton, ol, 6-5, 265, The Hun School, Pottstown, Pa. Ray Lewis III, ath, 5-9, 190, Lake Mary Prep, Longwood Al-Quadin Muhammad, de, 6-3, 230, Don Bosco Prep, Irvington, N.J. Sunny Odogwu, ol, 6-8, 311, Hargrave Military, Baltimore Kevin Olsen, qb, 6-3, 200, Wayne (N.J.) Hills HS Beau Sandland, te, 6-6, 255, Pierce College, Woodland Hills, Calif.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Miami, 8 p.m.Chicago at Utah, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Denver at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Charlotte at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Utah at Sacramento, 10 p.m. NBA calendar Feb. 15-17 — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin.June 6 — NBA Finals begin (possible switch to June 4). June 20 — Last possible date for NBA Finals (possible switch to June 18).AP Top 25 schedule Saturday’s Games No. 2 Florida vs. Mississippi State, 5 p.m. No. 3 Michigan at Wisconsin, NoonNo. 5 Kansas at Oklahoma, 4 p.m.No. 6 Gonzaga vs. Loyola Marymount, 8 p.m. No. 8 Miami vs. North Carolina, 2 p.m. No. 11 Louisville at No. 24 Notre Dame, 9 p.m. No. 12 Michigan State at Purdue, 7 p.m. No. 13 Kansas State vs. Iowa State, 6 p.m. No. 14 Butler at George Washington, 2 p.m. No. 15 New Mexico at UNLV, 9 p.m.No. 16 Creighton vs. Illinois State, 10 p.m. No. 17 Cincinnati vs. No. 23 Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. No. 19 Oregon vs. Utah, 8 p.m.No. 20 Georgetown at Rutgers, noonNo. 21 Missouri vs. Mississippi, 1 p.m.No. 22 Oklahoma State at Texas, 1:45 p.m. No. 25 Marquette vs. DePaul, 2 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 1 Indiana at No. 10 Ohio State, 1 p.m. No. 4 Duke at Boston College, 6 p.m.No. 7 Arizona vs. California, 7 p.m.No. 9 Syracuse vs. St. John’s, 3 p.m.No. 18 Minnesota vs. Illinois, 6 p.m.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Game Anaheim at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 1 p.m.Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 1 p.m.Carolina at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.Edmonton at Detroit, 2 p.m.Winnipeg at Ottawa, 2 p.m.Phoenix at San Jose, 4 p.m.Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.Toronto at Montreal, 7 p.m.Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 20132BSPORTS BRIEFS BOWLING League resultsLake City Bowl league play: SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Farmers (111-65); 2. Perky Pals (105-71); 3. Handicappers (101-75). Team high handicap game: 1. Pin Droppers 862; 2. Jo’s Crew 828. Team high handicap series: 1. Outcasts 2,471; 2. Perky Pals 2,410; 3. Keglers 2,263. High scratch game: 1. Louise Atwood 175; 2. Yvonne Finley 146; 3. Ellie DeRosa 95. 1. Mike Helvey 191; 2. Jerry Crandall 187; 3. Ric Yates 171. High scratch series: 1. Betty Carmichael 497; 2. Vy Ritter 393; 3. Joanne Denton 386. 1. Dan Ritter 540; 2. Ross Meyers 505; 3. Wayne Johns 498. High handicap game: 1. Sandra Johns 254; 2. Janie Posey 209; 3. Joyce Crandall 202. 1. Morrell Atwood 250; 2. Ron Grey 234; 3. Bill Nash 226. High handicap series: 1. Barbara Croft 682; 2. Ann Soliz 613; 3. Pat Hale 569. 1. (tie) Earl Hayward, Michael Murrey 651; 3. Joe Peterson 632. Note: Michael Murrey bowled a 266 scratch game.(results from Jan. 22) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. Dominators 885; 2. Split/House 846; 3. We Don’t Care 822. Team high handicap series: 1. O 2 Cool 2,537; 2. All in the Family 2,507; 3. Wolf Pack 2,457. High scratch game: 1. Maggie Battle 199; 2. Susie Camacho 191; 3. Maggie Battle 183. 1. Dess Fennell 248; 2. John Quinn 238; 3. Adam Alford 236. High scratch series: 1. Maggie Battle 553; 2. Joyce Hooper 531; 3. Susie Camacho 488. 1. Adam Alford 643; 2. Dess Fennell 607; 3. Frank Miller 595. High handicap game: 1. Brandy Watson 240; 2. Susie Camacho 236; 3. Chrissy Fancy 224. 1. John Quinn 284; 2. Steven Hayes 267; 3. Chris Camacho 252. High handicap series: 1. Maggie Battle 679; 2. Joyce Hooper 672; 3. Staci Greaves 653. 1. Dess Fennell 694; 2. Frank Miller 685; 3. Adam Alford 655. High average: Lorrie Geiger 183; James Price 195.(results from Jan. 22) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. Wild Things; 3. 2 Plus 2. Team high handicap game: 1. 3 Plus One 843; 2. (tie) Stripers, 2 Girls & 2 Guys 803. Team high handicap series: 1. 2 Plus 2 2,443; 2. Jo’s Crew 2,402; 3. 3 S’s 2,302. High scratch game: 1. (tie) Barbara Griner, Joanne Denton 165; 3. Betty Brown 163; 4. Betty Carmichael 157. 1. George Mulligan 223; 2. George Walters 202; 3. Art Joubert 187. High scratch series: 1. (tie) DeDe Young, Joyce Hooper 473; 3. Elaine Nemeth 459; 4. Judy Johnson 453. 1. David Duncan 572; 2. Wayne Johns 542; 3. Bill Price 530. High handicap game: 1. Ellie DeRosa 244; 2. Pat Klock 222; 3. Debi Evert 216. 1. Sal Annello 261; 2. Sandy Sanders 242; 3. Jim Burnett 232. High handicap series: 1. Joan Carman 659; 2. Yvonne Finley 612; 3. Debbie Walters 596. 1. Winton Brewer 713; 2. Ray Denton 672; 3. Jerry Ellis 666. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 153.08; 2. Elaine Nemeth 152.07; 3. DeDe Young 151.09. 1. David Duncan 190.59; 2. Bill Dolly 190.43; 3. George Mulligan 180.5.(results from Jan. 17) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. GN Construction (28-2); 2. Ronsonet Service (27-3); 3. Oasis Lounge (24-6). High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl 289; 2. Tanner Wayne 257; 3. Ron VanDeVoren 255. High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohl 720; 2. Ron VanDeVoren 697; 3. J.J. Hilbert 666. High handicap game: 1. Zech Strohl 301; 2. Ron VanDeVoren 292; 3. Tanner Wayne 279. High handicap series: 1. Ron VanDeVoren 808; 2. Zech Strohl 756; 3. Jeremiah Fulton 729. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 218.63; 2. Bill Duncan 212.47; 3. J.J. Hilbert 210.93.(results from Jan. 14) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (7-1); 2. Sandbaggers (5-3); 3. High Five (5-3). Team high handicap game: 1. High Five 823; 2. Spare Us 789; 3. Silver Ladies 760. Team high handicap series: 1. Oddballs 2,451; 2. Sandbaggers 2,336; 3. Git Up & Bowl 2,290. High handicap game: 1. Sandy Black 242; 2. Karen Clampett 234; 3. Sharon Tuning 228. High handicap series: 1. Jo Anne Carr 684; 2. Joan Carman 657; 3. Cythe Shiver 648.(results from Jan. 15) CHS FOOTBALL Quarterback Club pheasant shoot Allen & Son Quail Farm and the Columbia County Quarterback Club, is sponsoring a pheasant hunt Saturday at Robert Louis Green Farm, 12 miles north of Lake City. Ticket cost for the shooting stations is $250 (20-shooter limit), which includes runners to pick up birds, dressing out birds and any tipping. Back-up shooters will be charged $75. Shooters should arrive by noon, and there will be a safety meeting and home-cooked meal before the shoot begins. No license or permit is needed; No. 5 shot is recommended. For details, call Leronia Allen at 754-9127 or Christofer Piercey at 288-9631. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has registration for its spring league at Southside Sports Complex from 6-8 p.m. today and Monday. Five leagues are offered for ages 4-6 (coach pitch), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-15. Fee is $95. A parent or guardian must accompany player and provide a birth certificate. Online registration continues at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897.Fort White Babe Ruth registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball is offering late registration Saturday, with a $5 additional charge, at the South Columbia Sports Complex concession stand. Leagues offered are ages 4-6 (T-ball), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-15. A birth certificate is required if a child has not previously played in the Fort White leagues. Coaches are needed. For details, call Chris Sharpe at (386) 292-4224. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Quarterback Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. There will be voting for president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, sergeant-at-arms and four board positions. Anyone interested in becoming a part of the Quarterback Club is invited to attend. For details, call club president Harold Bundy at 365-5731. YOUTH BASKETBALL USSSA travel team sign-up Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc. has announced tryouts at Richardson Community Center for its seventhand 10th-grade USSSA travel basketball teams. Tryouts for seventh-grade (ages 11-14) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Wednesday and Feb. 15, 20 and 22; tryouts for 10-grade (ages 14-17) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Thursday and Feb. 19 and 21. Permission/waver forms must be signed by a parent or guardian. Twelve players will be chosen for each team and contacted by phone. Fee for players selected is $60, due by March 1. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up continues The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Feb. 16. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most outgoing and fun-filled outfit. The first runner to break 19 minutes will receive $100, and there will be raffle prizes. Registration is open at active.com ; the fee will increase on race day. For details, call Michelle at (386) 208-2447.Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. March 2 at O’Leno State Park. Entry fee through Thursday is $10 for ages 14 and young-er and $20 for all others ($25 after). Entry to the park is free for registered runners. The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. Proceeds go to O’Leno State Park. To register go to www.friendsofoleno.org and click 5K Run. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723.Q From staff reports him, it was all about help-ing the team win. “The coaches told me not to be selfish,” Burch said. “If we’re winning, I’m happy.” Burch was also happy to be a big part of helping the Tigers rush for over 3,500 yards last season. “I might not have been running it, but it felt good to know I was a part of it,” Burch said. “I was happy to be a part of it.” Burch said that while he’s happy to be signing, there’s one person that he wished could have been on the stage with him. Braxton Stockton was a big part of the Tigers’ rushing attack, but suf-fered an eye injury prior to the Tigers’ last game of the season. That injury kept Stockton from receiving a college scholarship. “Braxton should have been able to share in that moment,” Burch said. “If he hadn’t got hurt, he would be here.” But Burch must move on and will start to make his way at Miles College. He has lofty goals for his first season. “I’m going to go in and play my role, but I’m going to work as hard as I can to be a starter,” Burch said. “I think it can happen if I work hard enough.” BURCH: Signs with Miles College Continued From Page 1B Yeguete out for regular seasonBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — No. 2 Florida will be without for-ward Will Yeguete for at least the rest of the regular season following knee surgery. Yeguete will have arthroscopic surgery Friday to remove loose bodies. Yeguete has dealt with tendinitis all season, but coach Billy Donovan says his knee had “significant swelling” in recent weeks. Yeguete, usually the first player off the bench, is averaging 6.0 points and 6.3 rebounds this season. The Frenchman also is the team’s best frontcourt defender. He played a minute in Tuesday’s loss at Arkansas before leaving with knee pain. Tests revealed the extent of the injury. It’s the latest blow for a team that has dealt with injuries to Casey Prather, Scottie Wilbekin, Mike Rosario and Erik Murphy. lowed up with a double to score Leslie Ann Ronsonet, who was running for Erin Anderson, and Lacey King. After two runs from the Lady Bobcats in the top of the fourth, Columbia added six more runs in the bottom half of the inning. Brittney Morgan bunted and Brandy Morgan came around from second after a bad throw to first on the play for a 4-2 lead. Tatum Morgan then had a sac fly to bring in Brittney Morgan. After a three-run homer from Kvistad which scored Ronsonet and King, Columbia took an 8-2 lead. The final damage of the fourth inning came when Brandy Morgan stole home on a bad throw just as her sister had done to start the inning. After a scoreless fifth, the Lady Tigers finished things off in the sixth inning, beginning with King’s first career home run to give Columbia a 10-2 lead. Brandy Morgan scored Tatum Morgan on her third hit of the game and Emily Harvey had the game win-ning hit to bring in Kvistad for the 12-2 final. Erin Anderson got the win after pitching four innings and allowing four hits. She struck out seven batters and allowed two earned runs. Ashley Shoup picked up the save with two innings of work. She allowed one hit and struck out two.Lady Tigers tennisColumbia High started the season on the right end of the win column as the Lady Tigers tennis team defeated Suwannee High, 5-2, on Wednesday. Picking up wins for the Lady Tigers were No. 2 seed Paula Gimeniz (8-2), No. 3 seed Tori Jackson (8-4), No. 4 seed Chase Broome (8-6) and No. 5 seed Haley Wheeler (8-4). In doubles, Heather Benson and Gimeniz defeated the No. 1 doubles team from Suwannee in a tiebreaker 8-8 (12-10). CHS: Tennis team beats Suwannee Continued From Page 1B

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS F RIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 3B3BSports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s boys basketball team plays a District 54A semifinal game today against Santa Fe High. Team membe rs (front row, from left) are Kaleel Jackson, Mitchel Del Casti llo, Jalen Wyche, Joe Powers, Paul Perry and Mike Mulb erry. Back row (from left) are Dre Brown, Qarin Porter, Trey Phillip s, Melton Sanders, Brandon Myers and Chris Cottrell. Isiah Phillips is head coach. Indians to host district tournament semifinalsBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — The seeding stood up in the opening round, so the District 5-4A basketball tournament’s final four will be its top four. Fort White is hosting the tournament and the top-seeded Indians play No. 4 Santa Fe High at 7:30 p.m. today. No. 2 Williston High takes on No. 3 Bradford High in the early semifinal at 6 p.m. Fort White swept Santa Fe in the regular season on the way to an 8-2 district record. The Raiders were 5-5. Williston also was 8-2 in district with Bradford one game back at 7-3. After starting 10-0 the Indians stumbled a bit down the stretch. The important victory was 78-70 win at Santa Fe on Jan. 25 to nail down the No. 1 seed for the district tournament. Fort White beat the Raiders 70-65 at home on Dec. 6. The Indians had balanced scoring in both games with four players in double figures. At Santa Fe, Melton Sanders scored 17 with 16 apiece from Chris Cottrell and Jalen Wyche and 13 from Paul Perry. In the game at Fort White, Wyche led with 18 points followed by Sanders with 14, Cottrell with 13 and Trey Phillips with 11. In Santa Fe’s 55-41 win over Interlachen High in the opening round of the district tournament, Montrell Flagg scored 19 points and Demarius Harris scored 10. In the Raiders first visit to the Fort White gym, Flagg scored 18 points and Harris scored 16. Marcus Archer added 14 points, all in the second half. Tonight’s winning teams will meet at 7 p.m. Saturday to determine the district champion. Tigers take on St. Augustine at Atlantic Coast tonight JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Morris Marshall attempts to block Fort Wh ite High’s Jalen Wyche during a game on Jan. 31. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High will look to play its way into the state playoffs in the District 4-6A tournament tonight. The Tigers travel to Jacksonville’s Atlantic Coast High, which is hosting the tournament, to take on St. Augustine High in a 6 p.m. matchup. Columbia defeated the Yellow Jackets in both regu-lar season matchups. The Tigers knocked off St. Augustine, 63-61, on the road on Dec. 21 and Columbia picked up a home victory against the Yellow Jackets on Jan 18. The Tigers were hitting on all cylinders in the second matchup with St. Augustine, defeat-ing the Yellow Jackets 63-49. The win clinched the No. 2 seed in tonight’s district tournament game. In the second matchup, the Tigers were able to get big nights from their 1-2 punch as Morris Marshall had 28 points and Javonta Foster finished with 23 points. St. Augustine defeated Stanton Prep 66-54 on Tuesday to reach the semifinal matchup. The 7:30 p.m. game features the district’s No. 1 seed in Wolfson High, which finished 4-6A play with an undefeated mark in the regular season, against Lee High. Lee reached the semifinals with a 68-61 win over host Atlantic Coast High on Tuesday. The winners of each game will meet at 7 p.m. on Saturday. Columbia is 0-2 against Wolfson on the year and undefeated against Lee with a 2-0 record. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter Hoops finally happening at Fort WhiteF or a long time, the best thing you could say about Fort White basketball was there were shuffleboard courts on both ends of the gym. No hoops team at the school had ever made the state playoffs since the doors opened in 2000. That has already changed this year — the Lady Indians qualified for state as the runner-up team in District 5-4A. Fort White’s boys can also break the barrier with a win over Santa Fe in the district tournament tonight on the basketball court. With a win, the Indians will have a chance to play for the district championship. Coach Isiah Phillips has had the boys knocking at the door for a couple of years. The Indians went from five wins in 2010-11 to 11 wins last year and won a district tournament game in each season. This year, the Indians sprinted out to a 10-0 mark and earned the top seed for the district tournament with an 8-2 record. Phillips is assisted by C.C. Wilson and Glenn Wyche, both former Columbia High teammates. Wilson won a district championship during his 10 years as head coach of the Lady Tigers. Wyche went on to play at Lake City Community College. DeShay Harris took over as head coach of the Lady Indians following a winless season in 2009-10. Harris promptly ran into another 0-fer season, but persevered and Fort White won five games last year. This year seemed promising as the Lady Indians started out 4-5. Trouble was, included in the losses were the first four district games. Fort White went on an 8-0 run that included winning its Country Christmas Classic, and beating Santa Fe for the first time in school history. That win nailed down the No. 3 seed for the Lady Indians in the district tournament. They were just getting started. Fort White beat Interlachen in the opening round of the tournament and defeated Santa Fe in the semifinals to earn the state playoff spot. Harris’ assistants are sister Bregay Harris, Shea Showers and Nikeria Solomon. The Lady Indians played a strong game against Bradford, which was 10-0 in district play, in the district championship game, and will have to play near perfect to beat Trinity Catholic (24-2) on its home court. Don’t sell out either set of Indians. CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Ray Lewis III part of Miami’s signing classBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — For Ray Lewis III, going to Miami has been a safe assumption since the day he was born. His father — the newly retired Baltimore Ravens star linebacker Ray Lewis — played for the Hurricanes. His mother went to Miami as well. So when it came time for their son to pick a school, the decision was easy. Lewis III was one of 11 players to send letters of intent back to Miami on Wednesday, joining a group of five more early enrollees in a class that the Hurricanes think can make an immediate impact. Other big addi-tions for Miami included wide receiver Stacy Coley, linebacker Jermaine Grace, safety Jamal Carter, defensive end Al-Quadin Muhammad and quar-terback Kevin Olsen, the brother of another former Hurricane, NFL tight end Greg Olsen. Lewis III sent his letter of intent in very early Wednesday, then with his father at his side, went through a ceremonial signing later in the day at his school, Lake Mary Prep near Orlando. “I made a stand my junior year in college, the year he was born, that it was time for me to go to the league,” said Ray Lewis, who helped the Ravens win the Super Bowl on Sunday in his last game. “Now the year that he’s walking into college I’ve made another stand that it’s time for me to leave the league. Him being born has been a fac-tor in entering the league and leaving the league.” Miami landed several of its top targets, even with the incredibly long NCAA investigation into the school’s athletic com-pliance practices still unre-solved. The NCAA was poised to send the Hurricanes their notice of allega-tions a couple weeks ago — then, in a bizarre twist, ordered an external inquiry into how its own investigators collected information. At the center of that external probe is the NCAA’s relationship with attorney Maria Elena Perez, who represented convicted Ponzi scheme architect and whistle-blow-ing former booster Nevin Shapiro. Perez has not divulged the nature of her con-tractual relationship with the NCAA, and NCAA President Mark Emmert wants to know why one existed. Shapiro is serv-ing a 20-year prison term for masterminding a $930 million Ponzi scheme, and the claims he made in an article published by Yahoo Sports have hung precari-ously over the program for more than two years. “We’re not just fighting the opposition,” Miami coach Al Golden said in a televised interview Wednesday. “We’re fight-ing the term ‘sanctions’ all the time. So it’s sanctions and the opposition versus us.”

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8-9, 2013 DEAR ABBY: When my 9-month-old grandson, “Eli,” comes to visit, I become frustrated to the point of leaving the room, if not my house. Not only must we put away things he shouldn’t get into, we must tape shut every drawer and cabinet, block access behind couches and chairs to keep Eli from electrical cords, then con-stantly be on guard for the “unexpected.” Eli is never restricted in any way, and would never be confined to an “inhu-mane” playpen for even a few minutes. At the slight-est whimper, he is picked up. He’s walked to sleep (or taken on car rides to “soothe” him), and his parents literally run to him whenever he awakens. I’m reluctant to criticize because I know they’ll be offended, but I’m ach-ing to suggest they teach the child about limits and restrictions and correct him when he misbehaves. Let him experience being in his playpen or even allow him to whine a little before jumping at his every whim. We’re not allowed to say “no-no” -the preferred response being to distract Eli and let him go about doing as he pleases. By the way, both parents are professional psycho-babble people. Am I unreasonable to think my grandson is capable of learning limits with a simple “no-no” and, perhaps, a little smack on his hand? Or should I keep my mouth shut? -WELL-MEANING GRANDPA DEAR GRANDPA: Well-meaning as you are, I doubt that you will be able to convince two “pro-fessional psycho-babble people” that by not giv-ing their little one limits, they’re creating a monster. Rather than allow his visits to upset you, I suggest you visit this family in their OWN home. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am shocked at the rude treat-ment I see many older mothers receive from their children. I spend consider-able time at various doctor appointments. Fortunately, I can drive myself, but many senior women must depend on their caregiv-ers -often their daughters -who treat them badly. I can’t help but wonder how they treat their mothers in private since they are so insensitive in public. I’m grateful to have a daughter who puts up with my occasional crankiness and complaints. She loves me unconditionally and takes wonderful care of me when needed. I’d like to ask sons and daughters to be kinder and more patient with their elderly moms. They won’t be around forever. -GRATEFUL MOM IN PHOENIX DEAR GRATEFUL: I wish you had described more clearly the interac-tions you observed. What you saw may not have been a lack of devotion to their mothers, but signs of caregiver stress or burn-out. Daughters (and sons) caught in the sandwich generation -earning a living and caring for their children as well as their aged parents -are not always at their best. However, you are cor-rect. These frail, elderly parents need compassion and patience because they won’t be around forever. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: A question was recently raised at a family gathering. If the patriarch of a fam-ily is deceased and a man wants to marry his daughter, should he ask permission from her mother? -CURIOUS IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR CURIOUS: It would be a lovely, respect-ful gesture if he did. But first he should be 100 percent certain that the daughter would like to marry him. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I have enjoyed a good life. I have served my community. I have a wonderful wife, great children and good friends. However, it now appears that the disease that has been kept at bay has progressed, and soon my days will end. I have accepted my impending death as best one can, and let few people know of it. I would like to thank all the wonderful people who have been an important part of my life over the years, and I’m wondering how that might be accom-plished. I do not want to make them sad or receive condolences. I simply want them to know they were an important part of my life for which I am truly grateful. I considered a party, but wondered if that might seem morbid. Letters seem too distant, and phone calls would be hard on me. While my death sentence is firm, and it will be soon, the exact date is impossible to know. Few of these people are aware that I am seriously ill, although I have been hos-pitalized many times. Can you give me some suggestions to show my appreciation? -ON THE WAY OUT IN NEW JERSEY DEAR ON THE WAY OUT: While goodbyes can be sad, your farewell party need not be morbid -particularly if you and your wife make it a cel-ebration of life and let your guests know it in advance. If you’re afraid that saying what’s in your heart to each person individually will be emotionally drain-ing, then deliver a speech or videotape one to be played at the event. While reading your letter, I am reminded of a friend, Judith, whom I lost several years ago. Judith had battled cancer for 12 years. After she had com-pleted yet another round of chemo, some of her women friends gathered for a potluck luncheon at her place. The wine was poured and we all glanced at each other, worried that toasting “health” might seem inappropriate. Sensing the hesitation, Judy raised her glass and announced, “To LIFE!” And that, my friend, is exactly what your party should be all about. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m a sixth-grade girl with a group of friends I like. The problem is some of them constantly put them-selves down. It’s annoying to hear, “My hair is so messed up,” “I failed that quiz” (they got a B), “My paper is so bad” or “I’m so ugly.” None of these things are true. I know people put themselves down so that others will reassure them that they’re fine. But I’m get-ting tired of hearing these complaints. I have told them to stop acting this way, but it doesn’t work. How can I get my friends to stop complaining about themselves so much? -TIRED OF HEARING IT IN BOULDER, COLO. DEAR TIRED OF HEARING IT: You can’t, so be patient with them because you appear to be more emotionally mature and self-confident than they are. At 12, which I assume most of your friends are, it is not unusu-al for girls to become sen-sitive about their changing bodies, and some of their insecurity may be hor-monal. That’s why they’re looking to others for reas-surance, so please don’t be stingy. ** ** ** Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. ** ** ** For everything you need to know about wedding planning, order “How to Have a Lovely Wedding.” Send your name and mail-ing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Wedding Booklet, P.O. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take note of and great-er interest in what every-one else is doing. You will learn from what you see, giving you the edge when it comes to your own proj-ects. Move forward cau-tiously if someone wants to partner with you. Know your boundaries. ++ TAURUS (April 20May 20): You can make everyone take notice with your actions. Find a way to improve a situation or a project and you will be given more responsibility. Protect your health and your position from some-one jealous of what you have personally or profes-sionally. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Temptation is the enemy. You may feel the need to make changes, but you are best to sit tight until your thinking is clear. Do your best to add to your skills, knowledge and anything else that will enhance your resume. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Learning, travel and getting together with people you find interesting should be your focus. A closer look at your finan-cial situation will lead to an idea that can help you col-lect on an old debt or turn a loss into a gain. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll thrive on adventure and excitement. Making changes that will lead to professional opportunity should be your intent. A geographical change will enhance what you do and improve your prospects. Love is highlighted. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Reassess your rela-tionships and you will come up with some inter-esting thoughts and deci-sions as to how you should move forward. Distance yourself from those who offer nothing in return, leaving more time to nur-ture meaningful partner-ships. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Put home and fam-ily first. Loved ones will need your help, but in the end what you gain from the experience will be worthwhile. Playtime with the ones you care most about will bring you closer together. A lifestyle change looks appealing. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Your actions may be misconstrued. Explain what you are try-ing to do and you will get far more support. Make unusual alterations to your residence and you will establish a position among friends and family that car-ries more clout. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Choose your words wisely and avoid letting someone disrupt your plans. Stick close to home and to your lover. Overindulgence must be avoided. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Emotions will cloud your view. Step back and collect your thoughts. Use the outcome of similar situations you have faced and you will find a way to get past anyone acting erratic. Don’t make prom-ises, but don’t rule out offering help. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Limitations are apparent if you have not stuck to the rules and regulations. Consider the changes you can make to improve your life and your relationships with the people you love. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Too much of anything will lead to trouble. Keep a low profile and focus on making headway finan-cially. Secure your position by networking with people able to contribute to your plans. Health issues must be taken care of quickly. ++++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Grandfather wants to free boy from parents’ protective bubble Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8-9, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 20136B FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 8, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (N) (DVS) (:01) 20/20 News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) Shakespeare Uncovered (N) Shakespeare Uncovered BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenThe Job “The Palm” CSI: NY “Seth and Apep” (N) Blue Bloods “Men in Black” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita “Brave New World” (N) The Carrie Diaries “Fright Night” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsTouch “Event Horizon; Closer” Jake is determined to nd Amelia. NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Dateline NBC Suspicions are raised about a pastor. (N) Rock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:24) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Dallas Police Women of Dallas Police Women of Dallas (N) Police Women of Dallas A&E 19 118 265Beyond Scared Straight Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch“The Makeover” (2013, Romance-Comedy) Julia Stiles, David Walton. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother “Tron: Legacy” (2010, Science Fiction) Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde. The Following “Pilot” The Following “Chapter Two” CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Russet Potatoes” The Mentalist “A Dozen Red Roses” “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente. (DVS) Dallas Ann takes action against Ryland. Monday Mornings NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobTeenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.Teenage Mut.See Dad RunFull House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:47) Gangland “Paid in Blood” (6:54) Gangland “Shoot to Kill” “The Punisher” (2004) Thomas Jane. An FBI agent seeks revenge for the murder of his family. (:33) “Fighting” (2009, Drama) Channing Tatum. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk Investigating a UFO sighting. Monk “Mr. Monk Is Someone Else” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Good Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” “The Game Plan” (2007, Comedy) Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Teen Trouble “Brandi” (:01) Teen Trouble “Chelsea” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNFL Characters Unite (N) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSuits “He’s Back” Hardman returns. BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Gabrielle Union talks BET Honors. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic Stand “Coach Carter” (2005, Drama) Samuel L. Jackson. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to excel. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Countdownd NBA Basketball Los Angeles Clippers at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (N)d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Utah Jazz. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptionNFL Live (N) Pacquiao vs. Marquez 4 (N)s Boxing Friday Night Fights. Kevin Bizier vs. Nate Campbell. From Montreal. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -GatorZone Women’s College Basketball Maryland at Wake Forest. (N) Women’s College Basketball Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech. (N) Inside LightningTransat Qubec-St-Malo DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Pink Slip” Gold Rush “The Merger” Gold Rush “Pay Dirt: The Night Shift” Gold Rush “Bedrock Blowout” (N) Bering Sea Gold “No Snivelin”’ (N) Gold Rush “Bedrock Blowout” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy “Valentine’s Day” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Jessica Biel. (DVS) Are We There Yet? HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Chasing The SaturChasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiFashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures “Prospect Place” Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files (N) The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lCool Pools Cool Pools (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings “...and a Bling Team” Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings “...and a Bodyguard” Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressBorrowed, NewBorrowed, NewSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Modern Marvels “Copper” American Pickers “The Possum Trot” American Pickers “Ladies Know Best” American Pickers American Pickers (:02) American Pickers “Easy Riders” ANPL 50 184 282Infested! “The Nastiest Battles” Infested! “Creeping Terror” Fatal Attractions “The Night Strangler” Infested! “No Escape” (N) Fatal Attractions “Killer Hippo” (N) Infested! “No Escape” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal LindseyThe HarvestPerry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Cleveland Cavaliers. From Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “The Hills Have Eyes 2” (2007) Michael McMillian, Jessica Stroup. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Merlin Arthur has to rescue Gwen. (N) Being Human AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Demolition Man” (1993) Sylvester Stallone, Wesley Snipes. “Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube. Premiere. “Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight. COM 62 107 249(5:55) Futurama(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 (8:58) Kroll Show(:29) Workaholics(9:59) Tosh.0 South Park Aziz Ansari: Dangerously Delicious CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba (:22) Reba Reba “The Feud” Reba Reba “The Wall” Reba “Blazing Saddles” (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder. “National-European” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererPredators in ParadiseCaught in the Act “Lion Brawl” Alpha DogsAlpha Dogs (N) Alaska Fish Wars “Game On” Caught in the Act “Lion Brawl” NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersEgypt UnwrappedKing Tut and the Lost Dynasty: ReKing Tut’s Final Secrets: Revealed (N) DiggersDiggersMudcats “Big Fish Big Bucks” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeFringe “Amber 31422” Fringe Fifteen people suffer amnesia. Fringe Olivia reunites with Henry. Fringe “Amber 31422” ID 111 192 28548 Hours on ID 48 Hours on ID Deadly Women “Bury the Boyfriend” Devil-KnowDevil-KnowWho the (Bleep)...Who the (Bleep)...Deadly Women “Bury the Boyfriend” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” (2011) Tom Hanks. ‘PG-13’ “Wrath of the Titans” (2012) Sam Worthington. ‘PG-13’ Identity ThiefReal Time With Bill Maher (N) Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(:15) “The Change-Up” (2011, Comedy) Ryan Reynolds. ‘NR’ (:15) “Alien vs. Predator” (2004, Science Fiction) Sanaa Lathan. ‘PG-13’ Banshee “The Kindred” (N) Girls in BedBanshee SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “The Iron Lady” (2011, Biography) Meryl Streep. ‘PG-13’ “Big Easy Express” (2012) ‘NR’ (:15) Mumford & Sons: The Road to Red RocksShaquille O’Neal: ComedyInside the NFL SATURDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 9, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown “Despicable Me” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Steve Carell. Premiere. News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsDerm Exclusive!30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk ShowAndy Grif th ShowJust Seen It Two for the Road Music videos. Austin City Limits Alternative pop. (N) Live From the Artists Den “Kid Rock” 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenNCIS: Los Angeles “The Watchers” The Grammys Will Go On: A Death in48 Hours A married couple is murdered. Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payned ABA Basketball Chicago Fury at Jacksonville Giants. (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00) “Dj Vu” (2006) Denzel Washington, Val Kilmer. Are We There Yet?Cops (N) Cops (N) The Following “The Poet’s Fire” (PA) NewsAction Sports 360Hell’s Kitchen “17 Chefs Compete” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! American Ninja Warrior (N) Chicago Fire “Under the Knife” Saturday Night Live NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine Bones TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Disappeared Madalyn Murray O’Hair. Disappeared “The Long Drive Home” Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal (N) Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal (N) Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal A&E 19 118 265Flipping Vegas “Red Rock House” Flipping Vegas “Haunted House” Flipping Vegas “Condo From Hell” Flipping Vegas “Chop House” Flipping Vegas (N) (:01) Flipping Vegas “Stink House” HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Your Love Never Fails” “The Lost Valentine” (2011, Drama) Jennifer Love Hewitt, Betty White. “Be My Valentine” (2013) William Baldwin, Natalie Brown. Premiere. “Be My Valentine” (2013) FX 22 136 248(5:30) “Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. “The A-Team” (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. AngerTotally Biased CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Gloria: In Her Own Words Piers MorganPiers Morgan TonightGloria: In Her Own Words TNT 25 138 245(5:30) “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon. (DVS) “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. (DVS) “Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage, John Cusack. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobMarvin Marvin (N) Supah Ninjas (N) Drake & Josh “Really Big Shrimp” The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:31) “Fighting” (2009, Drama) Channing Tatum, Terrence Howard. “Kick-Ass” (2010) Aaron Johnson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. An ordinary teen decides to become a superhero. (10:50) “Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “Castles in Space” Star Trek “The Lights of Zetar” “Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman” (1943) Lon Chaney Jr., Bela Lugosi. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Jessie Jessie A.N.T. FarmJessie Phineas and FerbShake It Up!A.N.T. Farm Jessie Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252(5:30) “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” (2008) Kathy Bates. “Twist of Faith” (2013, Drama) Toni Braxton, David Julian Hirsh. Premiere. “Betty and Coretta” (2013, Docudrama) Angela Bassett, Mary J. Blige. USA 33 105 242 “The Back-up Plan” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin. “Couples Retreat” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman, Jon Favreau. “Couples Retreat” (2009) BET 34 124 329(5:30) “35 & Ticking” (2011) Nicole Ari Parker, Tamala Jones, Kevin Hart. “Woman Thou Art Loosed: On the 7th Day” (2012, Drama) Blair Underwood. Premiere. “Love & Basketball” (2000) Sanaa Lathan. ESPN 35 140 206d College Basketball Pittsburgh at Cincinnati. (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) d College Basketball Louisville at Notre Dame. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball Iowa State at Kansas State. (N)d College Basketball LSU at Alabama. (N)d College Basketball Illinois State at Creighton. (N) SUNSP 37 -d College BasketballFuture PhenomsFSU First LookFSU First Look (N) Women’s College GymnasticsInside the HeatInside the HeatInside the HEATInside the HeatThe Game 365 DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “Outlaw Brotherhood” Moonshiners “A Price to Pay” Moonshiners Monster Squid: It Lives (N) Monster Squid: It Lives TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensFamily Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Supernerds” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami “Sex and the City” (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker, Chris Noth. Time brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals. Fashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277Hot Dog Paradise 2 Chili Paradise Triple-X Texas Red chili. Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Union Station” HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It Love It or List It “The Pliskat Family” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Hoarding: Buried Alive Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. (N) Untold Stories of the E.R. (N) Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Boys’ Toys” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute! “Cuddly Kittens” Too Cute! “Fluffy Puppy Party” Too Cute! “Extra Special Pets” (N) Pit Boss “The Boiling Point” (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) Pit Boss “The Boiling Point” FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffChopped “Own It!” Chopped Four re ghters battle. Chopped “Chop on Through” Chopped “Chocolate Challenge” Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372Belle & the BeastThe Book and the Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic Crusades “Love Begins” (2011) Wes Brown. FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 Tennis Champions Series: Las Vegas. Women’s College Basketball West Virginia at Kansas. UFC Reloaded Randy Couture comes out of retirement. SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Mothman” (2010) Connor Fox “Tasmanian Devils” (2013, Suspense) Danica McKellar, Apolo Ohno. “Heebie Jeebies” (2013, Horror) Robert Belushi, Michael Badalucco. Premiere. “Boogeyman” (2012) Eddie McClintock. AMC 60 130 254The Walking Dead(:28) The Walking Dead “Trigger nger” (:28) The Walking Dead “18 Miles Out” (:27) The Walking Dead (:27) The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park Idol. South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park CMT 63 166 327(:15) “Overboard” (1987) Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell. An amnesiac millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. My Big Redneck Vacation (N) Swamp Pawn “Buffalo To Go” (N) My Big Redneck Vacation NGWILD 108 190 283Africa’s Great RiftDog Whisperer “Playboy Playmates” The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol (N) Cesar Millan’s Leader of the PackThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Flu the Coop” NGC 109 186 276Hard Time “Truth and Lies” (N) Alaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers “Fatal Inferno” Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeOddities Oddities Oddities (N) Odd Folks HomeAn Idiot Abroad 3 Oddities Oddities ID 111 192 285My Dirty Little Secret Redrum Redrum Deadly Affairs “Predator or Prey” Deadly Sins “Small Town Massacre” Scorned: Love Kills “Mortal Sin” (N) Deadly Affairs “Predator or Prey” HBO 302 300 501(:15) “Dream House” (2011, Suspense) Daniel Craig. ‘PG-13’ “Battleship” (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ (:15) “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515(5:00) “Speed” (1994) ‘R’ “I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ Banshee “The Kindred” “Dragon Eyes” (2012) Jean-Claude Van Damme. ‘R’ Girls in Bed SHOW 340 318 545(5:15) “The Rock” (1996, Action) Sean Connery. ‘R’ (:45) “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman. ‘PG-13’ (:45) “Faster” (2010, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ 60 Minutes Sports Tennessee cornerback chooses Florida StateBy BRENT KALLESTADAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida State’s Jimbo Fisher was able to breathe a sigh of relief when sign-ing day came to an end on Wednesday. The Seminoles coach was able to bolster his defense with a dozen commitments, including a highly rated line-backer from Miami and a top cornerback from Tennessee who had once committed to Southern Cal. Fears that a coaching exodus at Florida State in recent months might dam-age the school’s recruiting efforts appeared to vapor-ize when the 22-player class was completed. “We got some big-time commitments at the end,” Fisher said. “We hit a little bit of every position.” Jalen Ramsey, who played at Brentwood Academy just south of Nashville, signed his letter of intent to play for Fisher at Florida State. Ramsey, who was ranked as high as the 10th best player nationally by one recruiting service, had ver-bally committed to USC last summer. A Tennessee state champion in the decathlon and long jump, Ramsey also plans to run track for coach Bob Braman’s perennial powerhouse track team. “I feel like Florida State has everything that I’m looking for,” the 6-foot, 189-pound Ramsey said Wednesday. “This is the most comfortable fit for me.” Although Ramsey called Fisher on Monday night to tell him he planned to attend Florida State, the coach didn’t breathe easy until shortly before noon when the formal paperwork arrived. “I sweat them until I get them,” Fisher said. The Seminoles signed 6-3, 205 pound Matthew Thomas from Booker T. Washington High School in Miami, who was regarded as a top 15 prospect nation-ally and ranked by some as the top linebacker in this year’s class of high school players. He was one of five linebackers that signed Wednesday with Florida State. “He’s one of those guys that can change the game,” Fisher said. “A tremendous, tremendous football player. And a competitor, he’s a winner.” Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Florida signs 5 WRs, goes heavy on linesBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida’s signing class was heavy at a few positions. None more important than receiver. The Gators landed one of the nation’s top recruiting classes Wednesday, a 28-player group that included seven defensive linemen, five offensive linemen and five receivers. The additions back up coach Will Muschamp’s philosophy of building along the lines of scrim-mage. They also show how eager the Gators were to upgrade the team’s receiv-er position. Alvin Bailey, Ahmad Fulwood, Marqui Hawkins, Demarcus Robinson and Chris Thompson were among those who signed national letters of intent, giving Florida its deep-est — and probably most needed — receiver contin-gent since 1997. “You’ve got to improve,” Muschamp said. “When you say filling needs, you talk in terms of depth and talent. And those are the two things you’ve got to be able to address. I think we’ve taken a step forward in both situations. We’ve improved our depth and I think we’ve improved our talent, (added) some guys that can come in and com-pete.” The Gators need help.Florida lost two of its top four receivers from last season. Starter Frankie Hammond graduated and tight end Jordan Reed, who led the team with 45 receptions, left early for the NFL. And considering the Gators had three wideouts among their top 11 pass-catchers, it was clearly an area of concern. The newcomers should bolster the position, maybe even immediately. “We’ll find out in August,” Muschamp said. “It’s hard to say. I mean, it’s hard to ever say. Y’all know my philosophy: The closer you are to the ball, the harder it is to play as a freshman. It’s just the game’s a lot faster, a lot bigger. The further out, wideout is obviously a place, corner, where you can play because your nat-ural instincts take over and the game’s a little slower on the perimeter as opposed to when it gets closer.” Robinson, a 6-foot-2, 200pounder from Fort Valley, Ga., is considered the best of the group. He enrolled last month and will take part in spring practice that begins in March. Robinson caught 53 passes for more than 1,000 yards and 15 touchdowns as a senior at Peach County High. Bailey, a 6-foot, 170pound slot receiver, had 40 receptions for 658 yards and nine scores as a senior at Armwood High in Seffner. Fulwood, a 6-foot-4, 200pound Jacksonville native, caught 88 passes for 1,821 yards and 34 touchdowns the last two seasons at Bishop Kenny High despite playing through injuries.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 7B7BNascar The fourth class of the NASCAR Hall of Fame will be inducted on Friday night in Charlotte,butonly two of the inductees,driver Rusty Wallaceand Leonard Wood,longtime chief mechanic forthe Wood Brothers racing team,will be there toaccept in person. The other three,Herb Thomas,Buck Baker and Cotton Owens,will be inducted posthumously. Few of today’s NASCAR fans – or media members for that matter – ever saw those three inaction,but Rex White,NASCAR’s oldest livingchampion of the series now known as Sprint Cup,remembers them all well. “I raced against all three of them,”White said.While White,now 83,never really got to know Thomas on a personal level,he has a great appre-ciation for what he accomplished. In a relatively short,228-race career,Thomas won 48 races and two championships beforeinjuries from a crash cut his career short.His win-ning percentage remains the highest ever inNASCAR. “He was a really good hustler on dirt,”White said,pointing out that most of the races inThomas’ era were contested on dirt surfaces.“Buthe also won the Southern 500 three times,whichshows that he was pretty darn good on pavement,too.” In Thomas’ day,before the Daytona 500 came along,the Southern 500 at Darlington Racewaywas stock car racing’s marquee event,and Thomaswon three of the first six 500s at the tricky SouthCarolina track. “It’s win or bust,”Thomas was quoted as saying back in the day.“Second place isnever good enough.” In addition to his championships in1951 and 1953,Thomas was runner-up in points in 1952,1954 and 1956. Like White,he was in the trucking busi-ness after his racingdays ended. Thomas died on Aug.9,2000. White also spent many a Sundaygoing wheel-to-wheel with ElzieWylie “Buck”Baker,who won 46 races and back-to-back championships in 1956-57. “Buck was a pretty darn good driver,really,” White said.“He would fake you out.He did a lot ofplanning,put a lot of effort into his strategy.” White said Baker,like Thomas,was good on both dirt and asphalt racing surfaces. “He beat me at Darlington in the Southern 500 in 1960,”White said,adding that there was somuch confusion about the scoring,he’s not sureexactly who won that race.“When I got to look atthe score cards with [NASCAR scorer] Joe Eptonafter the race,I’m not sure that Joe Epton knewwho won that race. “That was so messed up it was pathetic,but it taught me to hire a scorer that would watch meand not watch the race.” White and Baker also were teammates for a time as both were members of the Atlanta-basedChevrolet factory team in the late 1950s. Baker,who died in 2002,is the father of longtime NASCAR driver and TV commentator BuddyBaker. White also raced against Everett “Cotton” Owens,who won nine Cup races in his own carsbut had his greatest success as a car owner for astable of top-flight drivers,including DavidPearson,who won the first of his three champi-onships in one of Owens’ No.6 Dodges. Owens was at the top of his driving game when he got out of the car.He won at Richmond in hisnext-to-last start and was runner-up at Hillsboro,N.C.,in his final race. As a car owner,he won a total of 38 races.His best season was 1966,when Pearson won 15 racesand the championship despite skipping seven ofthe 49 races on the schedule that year. “I ran a lot with Cotton,”White said.“We went to Toronto and ran a race together.I raced againsthim in the Southern 500,then after I got out ofracing he hired David Pearson.” White,who lived in Owens’ hometown of Spartanburg for several years,remained close tohis fellow racer right up to Owens’ final days lastyear. “Cotton was a super guy,”White said.“I saw him on his birthday two days before he passed away.” “All three of them are deserving of being in the Hall of Fame.” NOTEBOOK Johnson seeks more PIR time Jimmie Johnson,the five-time Cup champion and 60-time winner on the Sprint Cup cir-cuit,isn’t too proud to step back into theNationwide Series to try to get a handle on atrack that is confounding him. He’s done it in the past at Bristol Motor Speedway,and on March 2 he’ll take thewheel of the No.5 Chevrolet for JRMotorsports for the Bashas’ Supermarkets200 at Phoenix International Raceway. Johnson once was the undisputed king at Phoenix,winning four of five Cup racesbetween 2007 and 2009.But he hasn’t wonthere since the track was reconfigured in2011.His struggles in the most recentPhoenix race led to a 32nd-place finish andopened the door for Brad Keselowski to derailhis bid for a sixth Cup title. “This is a great opportunity for me to get more familiar with the new configuration atPIR,”Johnson said in a JR Motorsportsrelease.“Not only do we race there twice inCup,but both races are in crucial spots onthe schedule for Team Lowe’s Racing.I appre-ciate JR Motorsports and Great Clips givingme this opportunity,and I hope to not disap-point my team owner.” For his career,Johnson has run 92 Nationwide races but has just one victory,atChicagoland Speedway in 2001.Walker arrested after chaseTyler Walker,the sprint car driver whose backflips off his car following race victoriesinspired NASCAR driver Carl Edwards to dothe same,was arrested last week on drug-and traffic-related charges after a three-statechase. Published reports indicate the chase was initiated by Nevada state troopers and wentthrough Arizona before ending in Utah. Reports say Walker,33,tried to flee on foot after the tires on his BMW were flattened byofficers using special tire-flattening strips,but was caught. Troopers searched the car,finding methamphetamines,marijuana,drug paraphernaliaand alcohol in the vehicle,according to thereports. Walker and a passenger,Raelle Hann McDonald,30,were under the influence whenarrested,authorities said. Walker was a standout sprint car driver in the 1990s and made several starts inNASCAR’s Nationwide and Camping WorldTruck series.He ran 19 Nationwide and nineTruck races with a best finish of eighth in aTruck race at Martinsville in 2007.He wassuspended from NASCAR in 2007 for failinga random drug test. He resumed his sprint car career and won the prestigious King’s Royal 100 at TonyStewart’s Eldora Speedway in 2011.Romanowski buys into Swan Former NFL linebacker Bill Romanowski has become a minority owner of the Swan Racingteam principally owned by Brandon Davis. Their No.30 Toyota will be driven at Daytona by Michael Waltrip,then David Stremme,whodrove the car last year,will return to the seat. Romanowski's health supplement company, Nutrition53,will be the team’s primary sponsorfor 10 races and an associate on the other 26.Former crew chief promotedDale Earnhardt Jr.’s one-time crew chief Pete Rondeau has been promoted to competitiondirector at Furniture Row Racing,which fieldsthe No.78 Chevrolet driven by Kurt Busch.Rondeau had been the team’s crew chief untilTodd Berrier took that position last year. Rondeau’s boss is Mark McArdle,who is Furniture Row Racing's executive director ofcompetition,but also serves as director of racingoperations at Richard Childress Racing,whichshares technical information with FurnitureRow Racing. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Bonus points earnedin 2012 by Ricky Stenhouse Jr.,the most of anyNationwide Series driver Nationwide Seriesraces in which Chase Miller did not finish,the mostof any driver in 2012 Laps led byJoey Logano in the Nationwide Series in2012,tops among drivers Laps run onthe lead lap in the Nationwide Series in2012 by Elliott Sadler,themost of any driver (a total of6,038 were run)29 39 5,861 1,065 By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Visitors to the NASCAR Hall of Famein Charlotte,N.C.,where the fourthclass will be inducted on Friday,will get to see some of Albert “Buz”McKim’sbest work,and it won’t have anything todo with his day job as the Hall’s historian. In addition to his knack for putting together exhibits and for telling the storyof NASCAR’s history,McKim is an accom-plished racing artist,and as such hashand-lettered many a race car over theyear. His latest lettering job,on a replica of the Wood Brothers’ No.21 Ford that TinyLund drove to victory in the 1963 Daytona500,will be on display to commemorateLeonard Wood’s induction into the Hall.Joining it will be a replica of the 1954Hudson Hornet driven by anotherinductee,the late Herb Thomas.McKimlettered that car nearly 30 years ago,andthe paint job has stood the test of timewithout any issues. “Maybe I should have charged them more,”he chuckled. It all began back in his youth,when he attempted to be a race driver on thetracks around Daytona Beach,Fla.,wherehis family moved from his birthplace inNew Jersey.Going to the tracks was afamily affair as his father was the trackannouncer at several tracks in centralFlorida. “I got my first race car when I was about 14,a 1955 Chevy that we paid 50bucks for,”McKim said.“Of course I didn’thave any money.The thing ran,but wehad to paint it.I couldn’t afford to haveanybody do it,so I did it myself.” He spent about a week on the project, but the finished product was impressive. “Somebody saw it and said,‘Hey,that looks pretty good,how about doing mine?’”McKim said.“Now,1,200 cars later I’mworking on the Wood Brothers’ car.” McKim drove for about six seasons before deciding that he had a betterfuture painting cars than driving them. “And it wasn’t helping attract girls like I’d hoped,”he said.“But my folks knewexactly what they were doing [by allowinghim to race] because it kept me,my broth-er and all our friends busy and broke allthrough high school.” From there,McKim ventured into painting cars at Daytona InternationalSpeedway. “I’d go to the speedway during Speedweeks every year and go throughthe garage area with my paint box,and ifanybody needed anything I’d take care ofit,”he said.“And I handled most of thework for the guys in the Daytona Beacharea.” He also helped design paint schemes back in the 1970s. He designed the King’s Row Fireplace Shops paint scheme on Benny Parsons’No.72 Chevrolet and the Purolatorscheme on the Wood Brothers’ Mercury,although he didn’t do the actual paintingon the cars. “Those cars wound up being back-toback Daytona 500 winners,”McKim said. “I thought that was pretty cool.” McKim also has done racing artwork, designed race program covers and evendone drawings for cartoon characters,including the Teenage Mutant NinjaTurtles and Ren and Stimpy. McKim eventually began making his living as a racing historian,working forNASCAR in Daytona Beach before joiningthe Hall of Fame staff in Charlotte. Through it all,he kept his paint brushes handy,and was ready when the WoodBrothers needed someone to put a period-correct paint scheme on their car. “I hadn’t done much painting since I came to Charlotte,so it was like gettingback on course to do the Wood Brothers’car,”he said. Racing artist and NASCAR Hall of Fame historian Albert “Buz”McKim works to recreate the hand-painted color scheme of a Wood Brothers race car to be used in th e Hall’s upcoming exhibit commemorating Leonard Woo d’s induction.(Photo courtesy of Buz McKim)The art of winningCup’s oldest living champ recalls Hall of Famers go neRacing artisthelps to preservepainting schemeshe pioneered Bud Moore,Cotton Owens and “Buz”McKim at the voting for the NASCAR Hall of Fame’s Class of 2012.(Photo courtesy of Buz McKim) Rex White in 2008 (NASCAR photo)

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8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, FEBRUARY8 &9, 2013 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000121WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,Plaintiff,ANAJ. GASSMAN, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated 1/30/13, and entered in Case No. 12-2011-CA-000121 of the Circuit Court of the third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florid in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plain-tiff and Ana J. Gassman a/k/a Ana Gassman, Michael D. Gassman a/k/a Michael Gassman, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 3rd day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:LOT4 A, BLOCK D, 242 VIL-LAGE, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 5 AND AREPLATOF APARTOF 242 VILLAGE, ASUB-DIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE REPLATRECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 99/99A, A/K/A152 SWMUSKETPL, LAKE CITY, FL32025Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 30th day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate should call Jacquetta Bradley, ADACoordinator, Third Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-7428 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if your voice impaired, call (800) 955-8770. To file response please contact Columbia County Clerk of Court, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056-2069; Fax (386) 758-1337.05537140February 8, 15, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S AUTO SERVICE gives Notice ofForeclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 2/28/2013, 08:30 am at 2550 SWMAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes.JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the right to accept or reject anyand/or all bids.1G3NL52T6TM3263491996 OLDSMOBILE1G4AG55M9R65050021994 BUICK1GDHP32Y9X35007321999 GENERALMOTORSJN8AZ08T65W3300502005 NISSAN05537199FEBRUARY8, 2013 Public Auction1987 MAZDAVIN# JM2UF2115H05243211999 OLDSVIN # 1G3NF52EXXC353428To be held 02/28/13, 8:00 am at Bryant’s Tire and Towing 1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL3205505537223FEBRUARY8, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000112JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION,Plaintiff,vs.MELINDAT. BESTLAND, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated January 16, 2013, and en-tered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000112 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National As-sociation, is the Plaintiff and Melin-da T. Bestland a/k/a Melinda T. Bestland-James, JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, Charles Hayden James, are defendants, I will sell to the high-est and best bidder for cash in/on on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E. Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 27 day of February, 2013, the following described prop-erty as set forth in said Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure:LOT17, CALLAWAY, UNITONE, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TOTHE PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 153, OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA.A/K/A149 SWPHEASANTWAY, LAKE CITYFLORIDA32024Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 23 day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05537132February 8, 15, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCIVILCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIR-CUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTYCIVILDIVISIONCase No. 12-2012-CA-000220DivisionCENLAR FSB Plaintiff,vs.TEDDYJ. LING, ASSOCIATES FI-NANCIALSERVICES COMPANYOF FLORIDA, INC. F/K/AAVCO FINANCIALSERVICES OF HOL-LYWOOD, FLAINC., AND UN-KNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on, in the Circuit Court of Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Columbia County, Florida described as:LOT4, BLOCK B, OLD WIRE FARMS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 22 AND 22A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA. TOGETHER WITH THATCERTAIN 1995 SKYLINE BUDDYMOTOR HOME MOBILE HOME, VIN(S) 34620432ha & 34620432hband commonly known as: 219 SWSTRAWBERRYPL, FORTWHITE, FL32038; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE CO-LUMBIACOUNTYCOURT-HOUSE, 145 N. HERNANDO STREET, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on April 17, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 18 day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtP. Dewitt CasonBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05537134February 8, 15, 2013 HAMILTON COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS REQUESTFOR PROPOSALSThe Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners hereby re-quest proposals from qualified indi-viduals or firms to provide services for the establishment and operation of Rural Health Clinic pursuant to the Rural Health Services Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-210).The Rural Health Clinic will be lo-cated at the site of the existing Health Clinic at 506 N.W. 4th Street, Jasper, Florida 32052, and will pro-vide the following services:1. Physician services2. Services and supplies incident to the services of a physician3. NP, PA, Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM), Clinical Psychologist (CP), and Clinical Social Worker (CSW) services.4. Services and supplies incident to Legalthe services of a NP, PA, CNM, CPand CSW.5. Medicare Part B covered drugs that are furnished by and incident to services of the Rural Health Clinic provider.6. Visiting nurse services to the homebound in an area where the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has certified that there is a shortage of Home Health Agencies.Certain Federal and State require-ments will apply to the contract for this project.Professional services required shall be secured in accordance with the Rural Health Clinic Services Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-210), and the Rural Health Clinic will be required to:1. Employ a NPor PA;2. Have a NP, PAor CNM working at the Clinic at least fifty per cent (50%) of the time the RHC operates;3. Directly furnish routine diagnostic and laboratory services;4. Have arrangements with one or more hospitals to furnish medically necessary services that are not avail-able at the RHC.5. Have available drugs and biologi-cal necessary for the treatment of emergencies.6. Furnish onsite all of the following laboratory tests:Chemical examination of urine by stick or tablet method or both;Hemoglobin or hematocrit;Blood sugar;Examination of stool specimens for occult blood;Pregnancy tests; and Primary culturing for transmittal to a certified laboratory.7. Have an annual program evalua-tion;8. Not be a rehabilitation agency or a facility that is primarily for the treat-ment of mental disease;9. Not be a Federally Qualified Health Center; and 10. Meet other applicable State and Federal requirements.Services will include complete man-agement and reporting and all ad-ministrative duties associated with the establishment and operation of a Rural Health Clinic including, but not limited to, compliance with all Federal and State standards for cer-tification and evaluation of a Rural Health Clinic.Proposals will be evaluated on an equal competitive basis using the fol-lowing criteria:1. Experience or ability to become experienced with the Rural Health Clinics.2. Staffing and management.3. The approach to providing local needs for health services.4. Quality of references and their re-sponses.5. Fees and costs.Seven (7) copies and one (1) original of sealed proposals marked “SEALED PROPOSALS FOR RURAL HEAL TH CLINIC SER V ICES” must be received by 3:00 p.m. on Monday, February 25, 2013 at the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Hamilton County Courthouse, 207 N.E. First Street, Room 106, Jas-per, Florida 32052, in order to be considered.Any proposal received after this date will be rejected.Additional information may be ob-tained from Danny Johnson, Hamil-ton County Coordinator, at 386-792-6639.Proposals will be opened as soon as possible after the selection deadline.An Evaluation Committee may be appointed and interviews may be conducted.Fees may be negotiated in compli-ance with Florida Competitive Nego-tiation Act.The Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive any informalities or ir-regularities in the proposal process.05537012February 1, 8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000581WACHOVIAMORTGAGE COR-PORATION,Plaintiff,vs.CATHYMARZILIANO, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated 1/16/2013, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000581 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida in which Wachovia Mort-gage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Cathy Marziliano, Peter Marziliano, The Unknown Spouse of Cathy Mar-ziliano n/k/a Stanley Mathis, are de-fendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Court-house at 173 N.E Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 20th day of February, 2013, the fol-lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Fore-closure:APARCELOF LAND IN SECLegalTION 10, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE SOUTH 8819’59” WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-TION 11 ADISTANCE OF 5311.34 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF SECTION 11; THENCE NORTH 0122’42” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF SECTION 11, BEING ALSO THE EASTLINE OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 1330.05 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 10; THENCE SOUTH 8755’20” WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 10 ADIS-TANCE OF 2650.10 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 10; THENCE NORTH 0121’04” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE EAST1/2 OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 1442.93 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-TINUE NORTH 0121’04” WESTALONG SAID WESTLINE OF THE EAST1/2 OF SECTION 10 ADISTANCE OF 500.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8737’11” EASTADISTANCE OF 872.14 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0121’04” EASTADISTANCE OF 500.08 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8737’11” WESTADISTANCE OF 872.14 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.A/K/A1641 SKYLINE LOOP, FORTWHITE, FL32038Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 18th day of January, 2013.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate should call Jacquetta Bradley, ADACoordinator, Third Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-7428 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if your voice impaired, call (800) 955-8770. To file response please contact Columbia County Clerk of Court, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056-2069; Fax (386) 758-1337. 05537234February 8, 12, 2013 NOTICE OF INTENT T O ADOPT ORDINANCE TOWHOM ITMAYCONCERN:The Board of County Commissioners of Columbia County, Florida will at its regular meeting on Thursday, February 21, 2013, in the Columbia County School Board Administration Building, 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida at 5:30 p.m. con-sider the adoption of an ordinance entitled:AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMIS-SIONERS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA, AMENDING OR-DINANCE 84-1, AS AMENDED, RELATING TO THE LOCALOP-TION TOURISTDEVELOPMENTTAX; PROVIDING FOR THE IM-POSITION OF AN ADDITIONALONE PERCENTTOURISTDE-VELOPMENTTAX AUTHOR-IZED BYSECTION 125.0104(3)(L), FLORIDASTAT-UTES, TO PROMOTE AND AD-VERTISE TOURISM; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN THE COUN-TYCODE OF ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS; AND PROVIDING EFFECTIVE DATES.The substance of the above-named ordinance is as provided in its name.Copies of the proposed ordinance are available for inspection at the office of the County Manager located in the County Administration Complex, 135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Any interested party may appear and be heard at this pub-lic hearing.In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter relating to the consid-eration of the ordinance at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which re-cord includes the testimony and evi-dence on which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, a person needLegaling special accommodations or an in-terpreter to participate in this pro-ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts 386/752-1006 or T.D. Services 386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.DATED this 8th day of February, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Court05537218February 8, 2013 100Job Opportunities05537114NOWHIRINGGeneral Managers Shift LeadersHardee's offers: Competitive Salary, Benefits, Training, & Opportunity for Advancement! For additional info & to apply, visit: www.hardees.com/jobs. EOE. 05537150Administrative Assistant Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Administrative Assistant. Good Organizational and Communication Skills a Must Competitive Salary and Excellent Benefit Package. Please Apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 386-752-7900 EOE 05537153Immediate Openings Available positions requiring at least one year prior skills include: Mig/Tig Welder, Electrician, Trim Carpenter, Cabinetmaker, Wood/ Mill Fabrication, Fiberglass Laminator. Some hand tools required. Benefits: Paid Vacation, Paid Holidays, Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Wages negotiable with experience. 05537178State Veterans’ Domiciliary Home Lake City, Florida 149 bed ALF is accepting applications for the following positions: (2) OPS Part-time Custodial Workers (2) OPS Part-time Dietary Support Service Aides Apply on line at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comReq. #50507102 for Custodial Worker Req. #50504016 for Support Service Aide Call Kim Graham at 386-758-0600 ext. 1006 Closes 02/15/13 EEO/AAE 05537211Bookkeeper/Secretary for retail business in Lake City. Computer skills REQUIRED. QB Pro exp. +. Email cover letter, resume, references & salary req. to fchbookkeeper@fhclakecity comcastbiz.net or mail: ATT: Human Resources, 3909 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL32055 05537237Busy Insurance Agency seeking Professional 440 CSR and 220 Agent. Must have strong Communication and Computer Skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to Box 05101, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Customer Service/Telephone Sales business to business. Auto Parts Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC BP Driver/Warehouse Need good MVR. Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC., BPA Experienced Sewing Machine Operator & Support Person for Operator: cutting material from patterns. 386-755-6481 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 100Job OpportunitiesNight Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City05537163OPS Administrative/Events Assistant Part Time $9.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking a highly motivated, hard working team player to join an enthusiastic team of personnel and volunteers in the position of OPS Administrative/Events Assistant (24-32 hours/week). This is a non career service position that requires working some weekends, holidays and evenings. Benefits not provided. This position requires an individual that possesses excellent computer and writing skills and to be able to function both independently and as a team player. Duties include, but are not limited to; answering telephones, filing, maintaining budgets, computer and data entry, staffing special events, providing information about park facilities and events; performing occasional janitorial duties and other related duties as required. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for of this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comResumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: Elaine McGrath, Events Coordinator Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act. 05537165OPS Museum Guide Part Time $8.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking an outgoing individual for the positions of OPS Museum Guide. This is a non-career service position that requires working every Monday and Tuesday, occasional holidays, weekends and evenings. Benefits are not provided. Duties include, but are not limited to greeting visitors and conducting tours through the Museum; giving interpretive and informative talks about various exhibits; relating the history of the area and the park; providing information about park facilities and events; performing janitorial duties and other related duties as required. Training provided. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: George Paxton, Assistant Park Manager Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, FEBRUARY8 & 9, 2013 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B 100Job Opportunities05537166OPS Gift Shop Attendant Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park White Springs, Florida $8.00/hr Approx. 28 hours per week Operate cash register, answer visitor inquiries in a courteous and tactful manner in person and over the phone, sells and stocks merchandise, provides cleaning and maintenance of the Gift Shop and Craft Cabins and is self-motivated. Outstanding customer service is a must as well as knowledge of basic arithmetic, computers and sales. Must be able to work rotating shifts including weekends, some nights and holidays. Able to deal well in a seasonal high traffic area with high volume sales. Must be able to lift 20 lbs. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 14, 2013 to the following to: Attn: Susan Conley, Gift Shop/Craft Square Manager Stephen Foster State Park P.O. Box G White Springs, FL32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. PROGRAM SPECIALIST P/Tposition for multi tasker with marketing, communication, and HR / public administration skills. Must have good people skills as well. Must have experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Outlook. Must have good oral and written communication skills. Bachelors degree preferred or 4 years previous experience in related field. Position requires you drive your personal vehicle on agency business. Please send resume to Box 05102, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 UnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net WANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon’ 120Medical Employment05537127Dietary Part Time Aide/Cook Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of Dietary Aide/Cook Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE Certified Dietary ManagerNeeded LTC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F Experienced Dental Hygienist Needed for Live Oak office. Please call 386-362-1646 GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.A’s All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v JOB OPENING Pharmacy Clerk/Cashier. Pharmacy experience Required. Apply in person: DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Found Brown/Tan/White 8 lbs Cat in the Eastwood Subd. House trained, Clean. Contact 365-4255 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 416Sporting Goods SEARS TREADMILL. Paid $500 used twice Asking $250 Contact 386-963-3242 430Garage Sales 3 Families Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SWFabian Way. Close to 242 & 247. Look for signs. Clothes, toys. Much More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 90” wide x 50” long Fabric Levelor custom verticals. Gently used. $50 Call 752-9286 after 6 PM Beautiful Olustee Outfit Ladys size 20(?) $75.00 Contact 365-1277 GENERATOR big 8500 Watt 2013. Honda Electric start. Battery and wheel kit included. Never used. New retail $4995, wholesale $3750. First $1850 cash. 864-275-6478 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 FURNISHED, S mall 1 BR/1BA, private property, not pets, water furnished, $350 month Call 386-628-1018 Quiet Country Park 2bd/2ba $475 a month. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 640Mobile Homes forSale3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3/2 Mobile Home on 1/2 ac. Needs TLC, great investment, located in Glenn St. Mary. MLS# 82570, Results Realty $67,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 New Listing. Short Sale Spacious 3BR/2BADWMH, in a Quiet Country Neighborhood on 1.1 Acre Lot. MLS 82426 $49,900 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4 Bedroom Home, clean and roomy, lots of storage. See www.hudhomestore.com Case#091-422050 Robin Williams (386)365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate READY FOR YOU! Immaculate 3/2 home on 5 acres. Pole barn, screened back porch, fireplace – cozy! Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentGorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$500 month $500 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 home in a small MH park, Located onCountyRoad 133C, $600mo & $600 dep. includs electricity & water 954-258-8841 3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shaade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 Nice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $800 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Immaculately in 55+ Community of Eastside Village. 3BD/2BA. MLS 81332 $120,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Large indoor pool comes with this rare find. Large home with plenty of space. MLS 81966 $150,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the 805Lots forSale law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 CLOSE TOVAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE! 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hallmark Real Estate Great Family Home, Lovely Location! Brick home on corner lot, 3/1.5, fenced, Seller motivated! Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 Hallmark Real Estate LARGE FAMILYHOME over 1700 sq. ft., hardwood floors, close to schools, shopping, hospitals. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate SUPREME LIVING in this 4/2 home on 18 acres. One attached, 2 detached garages, beautiful view. Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate YOUR MODERN BRICK HOME IS WAITING! In great location, 3/2, shady lot on 1 acre. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptionally Maintained Brick Home in Crest Point. 3/2, Open Kitchen. Elaine Tolar $149,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81426 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 4BR/3BApool home on 10 acres. Front and back porch. Fenced ready for your horses or cows. MLS 82562 $199,900 Established Emerald Lake Subdivision. Split floor plan, Fantastic Outdoor living. MLS 79733 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Historic/Vintage. Totally remodeled. Great home or office space MLS 80242 $65,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Charming rustic log cabin 2BR/1BAwith solar panels. Wood burning stove & gas range. Pole Barn MLS 81761 $99,900 Beautiful Home, separate dining room, large Master Suite. Open Kitchen. MLS 81910 $179,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Callaway S/D 3BR/2BA, 2250sf, .5ac, gas FP, Bamboo & tile flooring. #82470 $189,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1482sf, 8.7acr, tiled baths, FLroom, 2 detached storage bldgs. fenced & cross fenced. #79950 $149,900 810Home forSale RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Tri-Level in Town 4BR/2BA, 1883sf, .501ac, newer kitchen w/all appl’s included, family room #80607 $144,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1386sf, .151ac, fam rm, liv rm, dining open to living & kitchen, screen back porch. #82446 $78,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 4BR/2BA, 1940sf, .25ac, newer metal roof, A/C, windows, siding, water &heater & soffits. #82187 $99,000 WOODGATE VILLAGE! Movein ready! Open 3BR/2BAfloor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #82259 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyColdwell BankerBishop Realty Investment Opportunity, Office Building lots of exposure. Just Reduced. MLS 79694 $69,900 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty In-Town location. 3/2, Open and Spacious Living Area. MLS 82609 $99,900 Sherry G. Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mobile Home Park w/ lots of Potential. Needs some TLC. MLS 81507 $159,000 Elaine K. Tolar 365-1548 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $4,800 386-288-6102 951Recreational VehiclesCAR TOWDOLLY 2013. All cars/pickups. Swifles, Tilts. Never used. New retail $2750, first $1050 cash. 864.275.6478 nr 5 a week days Lake City ReporterREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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10B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 & 9, 2013 10BClass 386-758-6171 ALL PRE-OWNED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVS DISCOUNTED AND MARKED! $ 2 499 $ 1 999 $ 1 999 $ 2 499 $ 2 999 $ 2 999 $ 2 999 $ 2 999 $ 3 499 $ 149 $ 239 $ 159 $ 159 $ 169 $ 159 $ 159 $ 129 $ 139 $ 139 $ 139 $ 149 $ 149 $ 149 $ 159 $ 169 CHU C K FOLSOM General Manager PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $ 99 MO. PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $ 99 MO.