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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02017

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02017

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reportsThe 10th Annual North Florida Home and Patio Show is set for March 2 3 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Saturday, March 2, the gates will be open from 9 a.m. 5 p.m., while on Sunday, March 3, the event will take place from 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Austin Seay, North Florida Home and Patio Show chairman, said this year’s event organizers are expecting 60 80 vendors to participate in the home and patio show. “The purpose of the event is to give everybody in the community and oppor-tunity to face-to-face time with vendors concerning anything from a house, patio, including banking and real estate.” Organizers are still accepting applications from businesses who want to be vendors at this year’s event. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comC olumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil has always considered himself a rebel, from his wardrobe to his college choice, and now he will play as one, having signed his letter of intent to play for Ole Miss on Wednesday. Tunsil joins a Southeastern Conference that has won the last seven national championship. The last time the SEC didn’t win a national title, Tunsil was in the fifth grade. Now in a full-grown man’s body, Tunsil is part of a signing class that looks to start a new tra-dition with the Rebels. For him, the choice came down to Ole Miss and Georgia. In the end, it was a clear choice. “I’ve been thinking about them now here for a minute,” the left tackle said. “I prayed really hard about my decision.” Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze has been hot on the recruit-ing trail after a 7-6 season. The Rebels also landed the nation’s top recruit in Robert Nkemdiche. Tunsil credited his relationship with Freeze as one of the sticking points to his decision to become a Rebel. “It’s like he was a best friend even though you wouldn’t call a coach a best friend,” Tunsil said. “I felt that with all of the coach-ing staff.” Tunsil also felt that kind of relationship while a part of the Tigers. “Coach (Brian) Allen has done so many good things with Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Few hints on Star Wars. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 74 58 T-Storms WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 267 1Debby’s lingering damage: $8MBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comTropical Storm Debby drenched North Florida with 30 inches of rain in June, flooding homes and destroying possessions. After a recent study by a Christian orga-nization that specializes in disaster relief, more than 200 households in Columbia County have unmet, long-term needs, which according to the group will total more than $4.4 million dollars. The combined unmet need here and in neighbor-ing Suwannee County is $8 mil-lion. World Renew, formally Christian Reformed World Relief Committee, sent volunteer teams to assess unmet, long-term needs of homes in Columbia and Suwannee coun-ties after flooding from the rains of Tropical Storm Debby. The volunteer teams completed their study on January 16 after about two weeks surveying homes and talking with victims of the flood from the storm. Rita Dopp, executive director of the United Way of Suwannee Valley, said World Renew special-izes in disaster assessment. “This is something they do, and they do it nationand worldwide,” she said. The United Way of Suwannee Valley’s case managers worked with World Renew throughout the needs assessment study. The two organizations set up a walk-in cen-ter at the Columbia County Senior Services Lifestyle Enrichment Center. In Suwannee County, FILEIn the wake of Debby, Nicole Roth sits in a boat at the front lawn of the home she and her family were renting. Coming soon: Home show DEBBY continued on 3A HOME SHOW continued on 3A MAIL continued on 3A Christian relief groupassesses needs here and in Suwannee. TUNSIL TAKES OLE MISS Events centerat issue tonight COUNTY COMMISSION Could vote onpact with owners of fairgrounds.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterColumbia High School football left tackle Laremy Tunsil (second from right) reacts after revealing that he will atte nd the University of Mississippi during National Signing Day on Wednesday. Tunsil was conside ring the University of Georgia and the University of Alab ama. Tunsil is the top-rated offensive tackle in the nation.Nation’s top offensive tackle now a Rebel ESPN present at CHS for National Signing Day on Wednesday. Saturdaymail endsin August By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe county commission may vote to approve a mem-orandum of understanding to move forward with the events center project. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. tonight at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex. The memorandum of understanding would be between the county and Columbia County Resources, Inc., which owns and operates the county fair-grounds. Without a memo-randum of understanding, the events center project will not continue. The events center project has an estimated cost of about $28 million. Also on the agenda, Chairman Stephen Bailey will report on his meetCOUNTY continued on 3A By PAULINE JELINEKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday it will stop deliv-ering mail on Saturdays but continue to disburse packages six days a week, an apparent end-run around an unaccom-modating Congress. The service expects the Saturday mail cutback to begin the week of Aug. 5 and to save about $2 billion annually, said Postmaster General and CEO Patrick R. Donahoe. “Our financial condition is urgent,” Donahoe told a press conference. The move accentuates TUNSIL continued on 3A Multiple injuries in crash JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMedical personnel from Lifeguard Ambulance Service atte nd to a woman involved in a two-car crash at Main Street and State Road 47 Wednesday afternoon. One driver was extracted from her car by the Jaws of Life. At least three were hospitalized in all. Police said none of the injur ies were life-threatening. Hollis JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterRestoration Specialists employees are seen at their booth at last year’s home show.

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS AROUND FLORIDA Woman faces 3 years in prison TAMPA A woman faces a maximum of three years in federal prison for not telling authorities that her boyfriend was a felon in possession of a weapon and ammunition. Courtney Brantley, 22, was the driver of the car involved in a motor vehicle stop June 29, 2010, that ended when authorities said her boyfriend, Dontae Morris, shot and killed Tampa Police officers Jeffrey Kocab and David Curtis. U.S. District Judge James Moody said Wednesday that a jurys guilty verdict last month by the thinnest of legal threads, is supported by the evidence. 3 charged for FAMU hacking TALLAHASSEE Three students are facing conspiracy and related charges for alleg edly hacking Florida A&M Universitys computer sys tem to obtain fraudulent financial aid payments. Federal prosecutors in Tallahassee said Tuesday that Carl Joseph Coutard, 21, Carliss Pereira, 22, and Christopher J. Wright, 22, are accused of hack ing the universitys com puter system in 2010. They allegedly used personal identification information of fellow students without those students knowledge to access their financial aid information. 2 dogs attack letter carrier MIAMI GARDENS A female letter carrier was attacked by two dogs until good Samaritans came to her rescue. Officials said Emogene Powell, 55, opened a gate to deliver mail to a house in Miami Gardens Tuesday when a neighbors dogs jumped the fence and attacked her. A neighbor who wit nessed the attack said Powell screamed Oh, Lord please help me, as the dogs bit her on the face, arms and legs. She was taken to a hospital for treatment. According to MiamiDade Animal Control, the dogs owner had the prop er paperwork and vaccina tions for the dogs, mean ing they can issue a fine. The dogs are registered as American Bulldogs. Fla. to pay $7M to avoid lawsuit TALLAHASSEE Florida is offering to pay a business technology com pany $7 million to avoid a potentially costly lawsuit. The administration of Gov. Rick Scott agreed in late December to pay the money to a subsidiary of Xerox. The company signed a seven-year con tract to consolidate email accounts throughout state government. Last year state, legisla tors cut off funding for the project. House Republicans said they were concerned that the savings associated with the project would not materialize. But Xerox State and Local Solutions warned state officials last August that the company had already spent roughly $30 million on the project and it was prepared to sue to recover its investment. A company spokes woman said this week that Xerox agreed to the settlement to continue a constructive working rela tionship with the state. Bakery box truck hangs off overpass FORT LAUDERDALE Rescue crews used an elevated ladder to reach the passenger compart ment of a bakery box truck left dangling over the side of a highway overpass ramp in Fort Lauderdale. Officials said two people were in the truck when it crashed about 5 a.m. Wednesday on a ramp from State Road 84 to Interstate 95. The truck came to rest halfway off the ramp with its front end smashed into a pillar.One person was hospitalized. Associated Press Abrams gives few hints about Star Wars LAS VEGAS A newly announced Star Wars sequel was on everyones mind when J.J. Abrams took the stage Wednesday at a Las Vegas video game conference, but he made only a sideways mention of the film he has been hired to direct. The reference was a throw-away joke from his last franchise reboot. Talking about the importance of embroidering films with subtle detail, the science fiction director played a scene from his 2009 Star Trek film and freeze-framed to reveal a familiar Star Wars robot peeking out from amid the space junk. So theyre looking at all the debris thats out there, and curiously, its R2D2, he said, drawing a roar of laughter. Gabe Newell, president of video game developer Valve, shared a stage with Abrams at the Design, Innovate, Communicate, Entertain Summit at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. So now I have to go back through your movies looking at all the debris to figure out what movie youre going to direct next? Newell asked. Abrams has given die-hard fans few clues about his vision for the seventh live-action Star Wars film since he was announced as its direc tor in January. He has become a trusted steward of beloved fantasy universes after directing well-received additions to the Star Trek and Mission: Impossible franchises. Fervent fans mark Marleys birthday KINGSTON, Jamaica Hundreds of tourists have joined Rastafarian priests and reggae musicians at Bob Marleys old house in Jamaica to mark the 68th anniversary of the late reggae icons birth. Since his death from cancer in 1981, Marley has become more than just Jamaicas most famous musical export. Marleys message of unity and respect remains a beacon of hope in this Caribbean nation struggling with joblessness and violence. On Wednesday, some of Marleys relatives and old friends danced and chanted to the pounding of drums in the yard of his Kingston home, which is now a museum. Walters hopes to return to The View in 3 weeks NEW YORK Barbara Walters, 83, isnt scratching too much from chickenpox, but she said she wont be back at The View for three more weeks. Walters phoned into the ABC talk show Wednesday. Calling from her home, she reported that shes weak but not in any pain. She was hos pitalized on Jan. 19 after fainting and cutting her head at a party in Washington. MTV picks up second season of Buckwild MORGANTOWN, W.Va. MTVs reality show Buckwild will be picked up for a second season, MTV announced Wednesday. The show is filmed largely around Sissonville and Charleston. It has drawn criticism for what some see as a negative por trayal of the states young people. Associated Press Wednesday: Afternoon: 0-2-5 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 6-3-3-8 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 1-6-10-15-32 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 Page Editor: Jaon M. Walker, 754-0430 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS Producer and director J.J. Abrams listens during a keynote discussion at the D.I.C.E. Summit, Wednesday, in Las Vegas. A newly announced Star Wars sequel was on everyones mind when Abrams took the stage at the annual video game conference, but he made only a sideways mention of the film he has been hired to direct. ASSOCIATED PRESS This aerial photo shows the crippled Crystal River nuclear plant in Crystal River on Tuesday. Charlotte, N.C.-based Duke Energy said Tuesday it will permanently close the Crystal River plant after botched repairs and use $835 million from an insurance settlement to refund consumers forced to pay for higher-cost replacement power. Celebrity Birthdays Reggae musician Brian Travers (UB40) is 54. Comedy writer Robert Smigel is 53. Actor James Spader is 53. Country singer Garth Brooks is 51. Rock musician David Bryan (Bon Jovi) is 51. Actor-comedian Eddie Izzard is 51. Actor-comedian Chris Rock is 48. Actor Jason Gedrick is 46. Actress Essence Atkins is 41. Rock singer-musician Wes Borland is 38. Rock musician Tom Blankenship (My Morning Jacket) is 35. Actor Ashton Kutcher is 35. Thought for Today A cruel story runs on wheels, and every hand oils the wheels as they run. Ouida (Marie Louise de la Ramee) English writer (1839-1908) Daily Scripture Whoever pursues righteous ness and love finds life, prosper ity and honor. Proverbs 21:21 Walters Marley

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 3A3A AUTOLOAN MillionDollar ! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2APPLY NOW!Apply online atwww.campuscu.com,visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. CAMPUS WANTS TO SAVE CONSUMERS$1 MILLION IN 2013 MOVEyour Auto Loan (from another institution) to CAMPUS USA Credit Union over the life of your loanWe’ll save you at least We’ll pay youOR 1 1... and we’re starting withYOU! 1. Variable rates do not qualify. Savings based on current rate and outstanding balance from another nancial institution. $12,000 minimum loan balance required. Existing CAMPUS loans do not qualify. Re nances only, new purchases do not qualify. Proof of existing rate may be required to receive bonus. Credit application required to determine savings amount and/or receive bonus. One per household. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTERRuns: Thursday, February 7, 2013 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. USPS: Cuts Continued From Page 1A TUNSIL: Nation’s top offensive tackle signs with Ole Miss Continued From Page 1A HOME SHOW: Set for March 2-3 at county fairgrounds Continued From Page 1A DEBBY: Tropical storm’s lingering damage totals $8 million Continued From Page 1A COUNTY: Events center to be at issue at meeting tonight Continued From Page 1Aone of the agency’s strong points — pack-age delivery has increased by 14 percent since 2010, officials say, while the delivery of letters and other mail has declined with the increasing use of email and other Internet services. Under the new plan, mail would be delivered to homes and businesses only from Monday through Friday, but would still be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. Post offices now open on Saturdays would remain open on Saturdays. Jane Hollis, of Lake City, said she understands the need to cut days if it will help the post office stay stay afloat in tough encomic times. “I am personally not looking forward to them not delivering mail on Saturday, but if they have to do it to survive then they should,” she said. “Younger generations communicate digitally and that’s fine, but I still prefer a nice handwritten note.” Gene Speight, of Live Oak, said he doesn’t believe the change will do much good though. He said any savings they collect will be spent. “I could live without it on Saturday, but I don’t know if it will help them,” he said. “The more money they make, the more money they spend.” Melissa Vanderpool, of Lake City, said she works during the week and depends on Saturdays to send her bills by post. “Monday through Friday is business,” she said. “So the weekends are the only time I have to send my bills in the mail.” House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ranking Member Tom Coburn M.D., R-Okla., said in a joint statement that they had sent a letter to leaders of the House and Senate in sup-port of the elimination of Saturday mail. Others agreed the Postal Service had little choice. “If the Congress of the United States refuses to take action to save the U.S. Postal Service, then the Postal Service will have to take action on its own,” said corporate communications expert James S. O’Rourke, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame. Lake City Reporter staff writer Derek Gilliam contributed to this story. Speight Vanderpool ing with the Columbia Youth Soccer Association. The Soccer Association had trouble keeping track of its financial state-ments. The association said the records were destroyed when someone broke into a shed where the records were kept. A audit of the group’s finances showed they also had been filing their taxes incor-rectly with the Internal Revenue Service. County Manager Dale Williams said the Columbia Youth Soccer Association has hired an accountant and agreed to disclose its monthly financial statements on their website. The Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s annual funding of $12,000 could be released to the group at the meeting. Also, approval for funding a TOPS program has been requested and is on the agenda. The TOPS program would start a soccer league for children with special needs. The association is request-ing $13,000. The consent agenda also includes a change to county meeting rules and pro-cedures. Two minutes could be added at the end of meetings for “citizens to address the board.” Also, a resolution changing the time of meetings from 7 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. could be approved in the consent agenda. The effective date of the change in time would be Feb. 21. Meetings would still be held on the first and third Thursday of each month. The county commission could also vote to approve a new member to the Board of Adjustment/Planning and Zoning. Jock Phelps resigned in January, leaving a vacancy on the board. One application has been submitted to staff, and the board could vote to approve her to the vacancy. But they also could request to advertise the position to see if there are other interested citizens, Williams said. the walk-in center was at the Suwannee County Emergency Operations Center. According to a press release from United Way of Suwannee Valley, 203 households were identified in Columbia County and the cost to meet those unmet needs was estimated at $4.4 million. Suwannee County had 146 households with unmet needs totaling $3.6 million. Dopp said the unmet needs identified by the needs assessment ranged from gaps in funds received from the Federal Emergency Management Agency that were supposed to help fix flooded-dam-aged homes to furniture and appliances destroyed by the floodwaters. With hundreds of homes with unmet needs, the United Way of Suwannee Valley will prioritize those families that are in jeopardy of never recovering from the flood, and targeting them to receive help first. The Suwannee Valley Long Term Recovery Committee will continue to iden-tify those “greatest at risk of not recover-ing without assistance,” Dopp said. “The goal is to ensure the house hold is a habitable home,” she said. “... (and) the home is returned to a safe, secure and sanitary condition.” this program,” Tunsil said. “He’s a great man and stayed on us with tough love. I’ve been with coach (Doug) Peeler for four years and I connected with coach (Mitch) Shoup right away.” Allen said that Tunsil was a great story for the program. “He’s a special kid with a special talent,” Allen said. “I’m proud of him for the way he handled himself this year. He was never a distraction for the program and I’m excited as heck for him.” Tunsil’s goals going in are simple. He wants to play at a high level immediately. “I want to go in and become a freshman All-American,” Tunsil said. “If I go in and work hard, I feel like I can start from the beginning.” And Tunsil quickly answered why he choose a school like Mississippi over a more storied program. “I wanted the opportunity to start something special,” Tunsil said. “I wanted to be different, to do something different.” Sounds like a Rebel already. There are two ways to become a vendor, by either completing an application at www.Rotarydowntown.com or by calling Seay at (386) 288-8217. The number of vendors by industry group are limited. “Anybody that gets a contract in by Jan. 25 their donation for the event will also include a 1/8-page advertisement in the Lake City Reporter’s Home Show Program,” Seay said. Seay said normally the event has an average attendance of 10,000 15,000 people. “We’re about the only home show that’s done in the area that has free parking and no admission fee,” Seay said. “It’s one of those things where the family comes out, walks around and checks everything out with no costs, no parking fees and no admission fees.” The Rotary Club of Lake City-Downtown uses proceeds from the event to benefit the community with its various programs. “This is all charity-funded,” Seay said.

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OPINION Thursday, February 7, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A M y big sister always manages to say just what I need to hear. Except when she doesn’t. When we were little girls and our parents split up, she told me it was for the best and that sisters always stick together. When our baby brother was born blind, she told me it would never mat-ter to anybody except to people who didn’t matter. When I noticed that our family -our parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins by the dozen -seemed a bit different somehow from other people’s kin, she told me flat-out: All fami-lies are crazy, and ours, at least, was a lot more fun. When I got a scholarship to go to college, leaving her at home with three sweet babies and a sour marriage, she told me to study hard, make her proud and remember to shave my legs. Years later, when my first husband died, she flew from South Carolina to California, took care of my kids and all the casse-role dishes and told me to go to bed. And that summer, on a trip to Mexico, she told me to shut up and sit still while we had our picture made in the flea-bitten arms of a live chimpanzee. I never know what she’s going to say next. I’m never sure how to antici-pate it, with happiness or dread. Generally, it’s both. In recent years, when we talk on the phone, we start with a commisera-tion contest. One of us will list our latest complaint, then the other will try to top it. It’s about 50-50, who wins. A few days ago, for example, I called to tell her that the cream the dermatologist prescribed to fade a spot on my cheek did not fade a thing. Instead, it turned my whole face redder than the rear end of a turkey. Which, I had to admit, did make the spot a lot less noticeable. Especially after my face began to peel. “That’s nothing,” she said. “The cat just mistook my pocketbook for a litter box.” “Oh, no! Did you keep it?” “The pocketbook or the cat?” “Whatever,” I said, “you win.” Then she told me her really big news. She’d been feeling a bit off (more than her usual) and was scheduled for some tests. “Bad ones?” I said.“Is there any other kind?” “Promise to call me as soon as you get the results?” “I promise,” she said.She forgot. So I called her house. No answer. Then her cell. “McFarland’s Funeral Home,” said an unfamiliar voice. “Sissy?”“I’m sorry,” said the voice, “this phone belonged to one of our, um, customers. I’ll see if any of the family is still here.” For a moment, it gave me serious pause. But only for a moment. My sister fools some people. But she can’t fool me. “I cannot believe you could be that mean to me,” I said. She laughed like it was funny. If you ask her, she’ll try to justify it by saying I once poured Diet Pepsi down her pants. Which, OK, I did. Never mind why. It was years ago. And besides, she had it coming. But get-ting Diet Pepsi poured down your pants is not the same thing as pretending to your only sister that you’re dead. It’s not even close. ‘’So what about your test results?” I said. Then came the news that made me forget all about, more or less, every bad thing that she has ever said or done to me. “All fine,” she said, “normal.” I choked back an urge to comment on “normal.” No explanation of how she’s been feeling, but “all fine, normal” sounded pretty good to me. Suddenly I was feeling a tiny bit guilty for having poured that Diet Pepsi down her pants, even if she absolutely deserved it. So I made a solemn vow (to myself, not to her) that as long as she stays “all fine, normal,” I will never, ever pour another Diet Pepsi down her pants. It won’t be a hard vow to keep. These days I drink Diet Coke. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T he U.S. Postal Service creed about punctually completing its appointed rounds regard-less of rain, heat or gloom of night is about to have an asterisk. Starting in August, the Postal Service plans to stop Saturday delivery of first-class mail. That would mark the end of an era when that unexpected letter or new magazine falling through the mail slot could be the highlight of an easygoing day off. In the age of instant messages and tweets, email and online bill payments, post offices would remain open on Saturdays and package delivery will contin-ue six days a week. But the reduced first-class mail delivery schedule is presented as the agency struggles with a staggering $15.9 billion loss last year. The failure of Congress to permit the Postal Service to adjust its obligation to overpay billions of dollars into its pension and retiree health benefit funds has only exacerbated the financial crisis. It is unrealistic to demand that the Postal Service operate like a private sector business while Congress imposes such bureaucratic constraints on its management. While the Internet and private sector delivery services like FedEx and UPS pose considerable market share challenges, Congress has prevented the Postal Service from being able to compete for business on a level playing field. Unlike any other public sector agency, the Postal Service alone is required to make an annual $5.5 billion prepayment into the retiree pen-sion and health funds. At the moment the prefunding requirement has resulted in an estimated $11 billion in overpayments, money the Postal Service could use to fund its operations and compete for business. Since 1775, when Benjamin Franklin was appointed the first postmaster general, the U.S. Postal Service has remained true to its oath in serving the public in the face of all manner of obstacles. It plans to con-tinue to provide reliable home delivery — except on Saturdays. An empty mailbox on Saturdays My big sister gets back at me ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comY ou know you’re talking to veteran Washingtonians if they remember the battle of the Three Sisters Bridge. The three sisters were -and are -a trio of rocks in the Potomac River just north of town. The best thing about the bridge would have been the name, but it wouldn’t have lasted. The name would have been changed to something politically useful or influential, at the time probably named after whomever was chairman of the bridge and highway subcommittee of the House Transportation Committee. The bridge immediately south of the Three Sisters originally went by the enigmatic and exotic name of Cabin John, who, legend had it, was a local hermit and recluse. Romantic though it was, politically the name was a nonstarter and the bridge was named after the American Legion and has become synonymous with a twice-daily traf-fic jam. In the woods not far from my house there is a graceful highway bridge to nowhere, now almost completely obscured by trees, its roadbed overgrown. It’s a relic of a master highway plan for the national capital that would have had four huge interstates linking up around the National Mall, offering motorists speed and convenience, although at the sacrifice of several historic neighborhoods and trea-sured national parks. The great national monuments would have been ringed by inter-changes and accessible only to those fleet enough of foot to sprint across six lanes of traffic. Mercifully, almost none of this was ever built, although evidence of it still survives in the form of the capital’s bizarre traffic patterns. That traumatic experience is perhaps one reason the Washington metropolitan area took with great equanimity the finding by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute that Washington has the worst traffic congestion and longest commutes of any city in the nation, including such notorious traffic snarls as Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and Boston. We spend 67 hours a year in our cars compared to runner-up L.A.’s 60 hours, take 114 minutes to make a 30-minute trip compared to just over 90 minutes for L.A., and waste 32 gallons of gas a year compared to 27 for L.A. And it’s going to get worse, a lot worse, because Uncle Sam is con-solidating some huge government complexes in areas that are already notorious for massive traffic jams. The Washington area has gone crazy installing speed cameras, but in a few years, instead of churning out revenue-producing photos of speeding cars, they will be reward-ing city fathers with huge galleries of automotive still-lifes. A shortcut in Washington is not intended to save time or distance -in fact, both are usually longer -but to allow the driver to keep moving, giving him the illusion that he’s actually getting somewhere. Soon the Three Sisters Bridge and the plan to pave over the National Mall will pass from mem-ory. For now we’ll try to convince capital newcomers that they’re not stuck in gridlock but in an ongoing victory parade. (Victory of what we’ll leave vague.) That will explain why so many drivers are flashing the “we’re num-ber one” sign. That is what they’re signaling, isn’t it? 4AOPINION Q Tampa Bay TimesStudy: Washington, D.C. going nowhere Sharon Randall www.sharonrandall.com Q Sharon Randall can be contacted at P.O. Box 777394, Henderson, NV. 89077. On this date: resolution declaring allegiance with In 1904, a fire began in Baltimore Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Feb. 7 HIV/AIDS testing Columbia Count Health Department is offering free HIV/AIDS testing in connection with todays obsevance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. For more information, call (386) 758-1364 or visit the Health Department office at 217 NE Franklin St.Forest workshop Columbia County Extension is offering a Forest Stewardship Program workshop on tim berland security from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Landowners, especially those who dont reside on their land, may be at risk of losses or costs resulting from tres pass, timber theft, dump ing, drug farming, wildfire, arson or other property violations. This workshop will help landowners be more aware of security risks and take steps to minimize them. A $10 fee covers lunch and materials. Register online at http:// fsp-workshop020713.event brite.com/. Those without web access can reserve a space by contacting the Extension office at (386) 752-5384. Space is limited so please register early. Debutants meeting The Debutants Society will have an informational meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The meeting is for for girls and boys in ninth through 12th grades who might be interested in becoming members. Minister Jan Harrison is the organization contact person. Feb. 8 Music concert Country music singer Tracy Lawrence will per form at Florida Gateway Colleges Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrence has amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including Alibis, If the Good Die Young and Find Out Who Your Friends Are. For tickets or more information, call (386) 754-4340 or visit www. fgcentertainment.com. Boys program The Lake City Parks and Recreation Department has openings for its afterschool structured activ ity for boys, The program is held at the Teen Town Community Center, next to the Lake City Girls Club. The program is licensed by the Department of Children and Families and the staff is DCF certified. The current session runs through March 15 and the cost is $200. Bus service from the schools is includ ed. For more information, contact Heyward Christie at (386) 754-3607 or email christieh@lcfla.com. Art League exhibit The Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening recep tion will be at 6 p.m. at the colleges Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109. Gospel sing Southisde Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya Drive, will have a gospel sing at 7 p.m., featuring Herman Hampton, Mandy Grimmett, Gayle Moore and the Pine Grove Choir. Festival vendors The Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 4383131, visit the festival web site, www.olusteefestival. com, or email vendorinfo@ olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited. Theater performance High Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Death of a Salesman tonight through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are availabe at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspring scommunitytheater.com. For more information, call (386) 454-3525. Theater productions Acrosstown Repertory Theatre, 619 S. Main St. in Gainesville, will present special shows this week end. On Friday at 8 p.m., Theatre Strike Forces Sunday Group will pres ents an evening of longform improvisation. On Saturday at 8 p.m., Mandisa Haarhoof will perform a one-woman show, CrushHopper: Rush-Hopper, about growing up in South Africa. On Sunday at 2 p.m., a staged reading of a the Greek play Herakles by Euripides will be given. Tickets are $10 to $25 for all three shows. Tickets may be purchased at the door 30 minutes before each show; tickets may also be reserved by calling (352) 505-0868. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Feb. 9 B-CU alumni The Columbia County Chapter of BethuneCookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU president Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence. The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the univer sity scholarship fund. Writing program The Friends of the Library host Liz Coursen in presenting Self-Editing in the Internet Age: How to Edit Your Words Without Losing Your Mind at 3:30 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Black History Month Black History Month organizers will host a Trip to Freedom bus trip to Fort Mose at St. Augustine, the first all-black cettle ment in the United States. The bus will leave at 7a.m. from Richardson Community Center. Cost is $25, which includes entry fees and lunch. To register or for more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 8671601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts. org. Elks event B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple will have a Black History Month pro gram at the Richardson Center at 10 a.m. The speak er will be L. C. Bradley. For more information, call Mrs. Margaret Carter at (386) 752-3533. Shriners fish fry Lake City Shrine Club will have a fish fry begin ning at 7 p.m. at the Shrine clubhouse on Northwest Brown Road, west of Lake City. The cost of $7 includes fried fish and all the trim mings. Funds raised will benefit the Lake City Shrine Club and are not tax-deductible. For more information or to order ahead, call Bob Breyer at 365-1388. Robert T. Horachek Robert T. Horachek (Veteran), age 85, passed away peacefully on February 4, 2013 after a full life shared by his lov ing wife of 62 years, Ida; and his beloved yellow lab, Lexie; three sons, Thomas, James, and William; two daughters, Patri cia and Susan; along with four grandchildren, Robert, Erica, Christopher, and Michael, and one great grandchild, Bryson. Robert is also survived by his two sisters, Grace and Jean. A MASS WILL BE HELD ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7th AT 11:00 A.M. AT THE EPIPH ANY CATHOLIC CHURCH, 1905 S.W. EPIPHANY COURT, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA. Im mediately following will be a reception in the Church Hall. Willie Bell Lenoir King Willie Bell Lenoir King, age 64 resident of 463 N.E. Denver Street, Lake City, FL. died Janu ary 31, 2013 at Haven Hos pice in Gaines ville, FL. ter minating an illness. Born in Homerville, Georgia she was the daugh ter of Sylvester Lenoir and Ada OConner Lenoir. She was af fectionately known as BELL by her family and friends. The Lenoir family in 1964 relo cated to Florida. Bell attended Columbia County Schools an Technical College. She was employed for many years at Aero and later at Cluster Care Center until her health failed. She leaves to mourn her passing 4 sons: Dondia Lenoir Grady, Sr., Lloyd King, Jr., Anthony Duhart King and Cordez King; 2 daugh ters: Cynthia Boyd and Sabrina Taylor; 1 sister Diane Aboites; 1 Brother Sammie Singleton; a host of grandchildren; and great grands, nieces, nephews, cous ins other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Willie Bell Lenoir King will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, February 9, 2013 at Salvation Holiness Church with Bishop Kenneth Troupe, receive friends on Friday at Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL 32055 Madeline Speer Mrs. Madeline Speer, 85, of Lake City, passed away on Tuesday, February 5, 2013 at the Haven Hospice Su wannee Valley Care Center. She was born in Taunton, Massachusetts to the late Jo seph and Mary Baptista Cabi no. Mrs. Speer was of the Catholic faith, a longtime resident of Lake City and was preceded in death by her husband, Wayne E. Speer. Survivors include one son, Wayne Speer, Jr., Cocoa Beach, FL; one daughter, Deborah A. McCarty and her husband James of Taunton, Mass.; one brother, Joseph Cabino and his wife Nancy of Merritt Island, FL; one granddaughter, Shauna McCarty and her husband David Simas and two great grandchildren, Pay ton McCarty-Simas and Rowan McCarty-Simas all of Washing ton, DC; her longtime compan ion and friend, Huey Powell, Bainbridge, GA; one nephew and several nieces also survive. Funeral services will be con ducted on Friday, February 8, 2013 at 2:00 PM in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home with Father Andrzej Mitera of the St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church ment will follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery. Visitation with the family will be one hour prior to the service from 1-2:00 PM. Arrange ments are under the direction of GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. Please sign the guestbook at www.guerryfuneralhome.net LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 5A 5A BELK.COM Fresh ideas in skin care & makeup to put a little spring in your step! Yours free* with any Clinique purchase of $ 25 or more. A 65.00 value. BONUS EXCLUSIVE THEN CHOOSE PINKS (shown): OR VIOLETS: Bonus Time Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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From staff reportsThe Lake City Police Department partnered with First Federal Bank of Florida Jan. 29 to present a seminar covering topics such as fraud, identity theft, and counterfeiting, aimed at small business owners in the community. The seminar was held at the Lake City Public Safety Building. Speakers includ-ed LCPD Officer Mike Lee, Crime Prevention Specialist, and Kathy Baird, Branch Operations Officer for First Federal. Each presented topics related to fraud pre-vention, preventing identity theft, and identifying coun-terfeit currency. “The most important point we want everyone to remember is that they need to protect their personal information,” said Baird, as she discussed ways to pre-vent identity theft, such as shredding documents con-taining personal informa-tion. “If you suspect fraud-ulent charges on a credit card or bank account, you should contact us first to prevent further loss, then contact law enforcement.” Officer Mike Lee echoed Baird’s point that preven-tion goes a long way. “Most people benefit simply from following their instincts. If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Always be aware of who you are deal-ing with and do not send money to anyone you do not know. If a business asks you to send them money up front, it is most likely fraud.” Lee also gave a presentation on identifying counterfeit currency and showed those present what to look for to determine if bills are genu-ine or fake. According to Chief Argatha Gilmore, “Fraud is one of the largest cat-egories of crime financially impacting businesses in our community. We continue to find ways to outreach to our business partners. Through this seminar we hope that attendees learned how to avoid becoming victims of various fraudulent practices which in turn can help us continue to make Lake City a safe place to do business.” LCPD offers crime prevention education year-round. Those who did not attend can get more information on pro-tecting themselves and their identity by calling (386) 758-5489. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A White’s Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.comNeed somelthing hauled call us:Fill DirtLime RockAsphaltMillingsGraniteRoad RockMisc. Hauling to meet your needsSemi Services also availableYou Call & We Haul! Share the love, romantic music and Chateaubriand. White Lake Yacht & Dinner Club at Cerveny Conference Center & Camp Weed February 14, 2013 Reservations please call 386-364-5250 Bring your own wine or spirits. Social 6 pm. Dinner 7 pm Call for menu. $50 each person. 11057 Camp Weed PlaceLive Oak, FLwww.campweed.org386-364-5250 SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH GOSPEL SING Friday, February 8 7:00 p.m. featuring: Herman Hampton Gayle Moore Mandy Grimmett Pine Grove Choir Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Black, Negro or African American?C hildren make you think about things that seem rather insignificant in our busy lives. My seven-year-old daughter has been quite the blessing in reminding me to confirm my identity and ensure that hers is grounded in concrete understanding. Just last month she was explaining to me that Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream that requires each of our efforts to protect it, as Americans. She informed me that she did a better job of it than I did. My query of her reasoning left me stunned at her response. My seven-year-old told me that my friends were white, black, Negros and African Americans, and hers were all American. When I stopped laughing internally, I realized that she was right. Life isn’t limited to weathering the storm, but learning how to dance in the rain. As diverse Americans we are the rain, we weather the storm for the benefit of inclusion, all drops falling together. History pro-vides all of us with different backgrounds and experiences to make us better individually, so that we are valuable contribu-tors to the American team. The issues of poverty, homeless-ness, unemployment, and other adversities do not discriminate, but concern all Americans. I am an American, and we are all Americans. We have to simply step back and let the children teach us to play together. LOCAL WISDOMAnnie ReedBorn nearly a century ago, Mrs. Reed made Lake City her home years ago with her late husband John, more than 70 years ago. John worked locally at the VA Hospital and Annie worked as an elementary school teacher at Niblack Elementary School. The couple had three children, two boys and one girl. Looking back Mrs. Reed has many fond memories of her late husband. She shares that couples today could be stronger if they spent more of the right type of time together. She recalls that her husband’s busy life made her appreciate the time they shared together and made creating a family even more enjoyable because of the value they placed on family time. Mrs. Reed’s wisdom to young families is to make “fami-ly time” special. I was reminded of a famous saying while I spent time with Mrs. Reed, “Dance like no one’s watching, sing like no one’s listening, work like you don’t need the money and love like you have never been hurt.” We love you Mrs. Reed. TEST YOUR HISTORY KNOWLEDGE Local History 1860 – William Martin was recorded by the United States Census as being the only free black man in Lake City and he resided in the Cruise household. National HistoryJames Weldon Johnson was born in Jacksonville on June 17, 1871. Johnson attended high school in Atlanta and attended Atlanta University. After gradua-tion, he returned to Jacksonville and established a high school for Blacks. He served as the princi-pal of the school and studied law in his spare time. He became the first Black to be admitted to the Florida Bar in 1897. Johnson wrote songs with his brother including Lift every Voice and Sing, which later became the Black national anthem. He studied at Columbia University and was appointed Consul in Porto Cabrello, Venezuela in 1906 and Consul in Corinto, Nicaragua in 1909. He is best remembered for his novel, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored man, which he wrote in 1912. James Weldon Johnson was killed in an auto-mobile crash on June 26, 1938 near Wiscasset, Maine. BLACK HISTORY MONTH Bea Coker COURTESYAnnie Reed. ‘Dance like no one’s watching, sing like n o one’s listening, work like you don’t need the money and love like you have never been hurt,’ she said.Historically Speaking Organization picked for Charity BallFrom staff reportsThe Lake City Police Department is getting ready to roll out the red car-pet for the 20th Annual Policeman’s Ball & Charity Gala. This year’s Ball, themed “A Red Carpet Affair,” will be on Saturday, March 23 at 7 p.m at the Florida Gateway College Conference Center. This year’s event will benefit the local branch of Take Stock in Children, a non-profit organization that provides a unique opportunity for deserving low-income youth/stu-dents to escape the cycle of pov-erty through education. The program offers students college scholarships, volunteer mentors, and a hope for a better life through comprehensive services that start in middle school and continue through high school and include transi-tion into college. Chief of Police Argatha Gilmore is enthused about the event. “The 2013 Charity Ball, the 20th anni-versary of this event, is going to be impressive,” she said. “Our committee has put a lot of work into the planning of the Ball, and we hope attendees will enjoy a formal evening of fine dining and entertain-ment. We are so glad to support this year’s charity as an organization dedicated to helping young people succeed in life through education.” Reservations for tables and individuals are currently being accepted. All members of the community are invited to attend. A formal banquet dinner will be provided, along with live entertainment all night long. The Ball begins at 7 p.m. and will end at midnight. The attire for the evening is formal, and attendees are encour-aged to dress in “Hollywood Style” as part of the “Red Carpet” theme. Individual tickets are currently available for a $50 donation. Table res-ervations, which seat eight, are avail-able for a $500 donation. Business groups and friends are encouraged to join together and reserve a table for an unforgettable 20th Annual Policeman’s Ball. A limited number of Title Sponsorships, for a donation of $1,000, are also still available. Those interested in attending should contact Audre’ Washington at (386) 719-5742. Gilmore LCPD, First Federal Bank partner on fraud seminarCOURTESYCrime Prevention Specialist Mike Lee of the Lake City Po lice Department makes a presentation at a recent fraud seminar.

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By NICHOLAS RICCARDIAssociated PressDENVER — It was a startling assertion that seemed an about-face from church doctrine: A Catholic hospi-tal arguing in a Colorado court that twin fetuses that died in its care were not, under state law, human beings. When the two-yearold court filing surfaced last month, it triggered an avalanche of criticism — because the legal argu-ment seemed to plainly clash with the church’s centuries-old stance that life begins at conception. But it is also now fueling an already raging debate in Colorado and beyond about whether fetuses should have legal rights and, if so, what kind. On Monday, the hospital and the state’s bish-ops released a statement acknowledging it was “morally wrong” to make the legal argument. News of the wrongful death lawsuit came as Colorado lawmakers weigh how far they should go in penalizing acts that harm a fetus, and some worry that the case could diminish the Catholic Church’s cred-ibility in advocating more rights for the unborn. Miguel De La Torre, a professor at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, noted that the church often argues for laws recognizing a fetus as a human being. “If that legislation was to come up again, how could the Catholic Church argue we should protect the rights of a fetus?” he said. Indeed, last week Colorado’s bishops met with executives at Catholic Healthcare Initiatives, a branch of the church that operates the hospital at the center of the case, to review how the lawsuit was handled. The two released sep-arate statements Monday saying CHI executives had been unaware of the legal arguments and pledging to “work for comprehensive change in Colorado’s law, so that the unborn may enjoy the same legal pro-tections as other persons.” Spurred on by advancing medical technology that makes fetuses more viable and more visible, states have been expand-ing some rights to fetuses, sometimes in conjunction with anti-abortion groups and the Catholic Church. State laws vary widely. It’s difficult to quantify how many states allow wrongful death lawsuits on behalf of unborn children because each state has different case law and judicial interpreta-tion. A report from the anti-abortion Americans United for Life estimates that 38 permit such lawsuits. According to The Guttmacher Institute, which tracks reproductive health issues, 37 states allow some form of pros-ecution for killing a fetus. A federal law also makes it a crime to harm a fetus while committing other federal crimes. The debate over such measures has been espe-cially heated in Colorado, which has long battled over the legal status of unborn children. For example, Colorado has been ground zero for the “personhood” movement, which pushes laws that give fertilized eggs all the legal rights of human beings. Opponents warn that such laws would outlaw all forms of abortion and some types of birth control. Voters here so far have overwhelmingly rejected such proposals. In 1986, a federal court ruled that fetuses are indeed people for pur-poses of wrongful death lawsuits in Colorado, but state courts have offered conflicting views. This lat-est case further calls the matter into question. The case centers on St. Thomas More Medical Center in Canon City, a few hours south of Denver, and a wrongful death lawsuit filed by a husband who lost his pregnant wife. Lori Stodghill was 28 weeks into her pregnancy when, on New Year’s Day 2006, she began vomiting and feeling short of breath, according to court papers. Her husband, Jeremy, took her to the emergency room of St. Thomas More, where Stodghill collapsed and went into cardiac arrest. Doctors and nurses tried to revive her, but she was declared dead from a pul-monary embolism. No one tried to remove the fetuses via an emergency cesarean section, and they perished, too, court papers said. Jeremy Stodghill sued the hospital, some doctors and Catholic Healthcare Initiatives, which owns the company that operates Thomas More. Attorneys for CHI in 2010 filed court papers asking a judge to dismiss the case because the plaintiffs couldn’t prove negligent care killed Lori Stodghill and her fetuses. They also argued that “under Colorado law, a fetus is not a ‘person,’ and Plaintiff’s claims for wrong-ful death must therefore be dismissed.” The trial judge agreed, finding that previous state cases required a fetus to be “born alive” to have a legal claim. An appellate court upheld the dismissal on other grounds. Stodghill’s attorneys are now asking the state Supreme Court to hear the case. The arguments were first reported on Jan. 23 by The Colorado Independent and Westword and set off a fire-storm because of Catholic health groups’ past stanc-es on such issues. The trade group representing Catholic Hospitals opposed a provision of the federal health care law mandating that birth control be cov-ered by insurance. In their Monday statement, Denver Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, Colorado Springs Bishop Michael Sheridan and Pueblo Bishop Fernando Isern said: “Catholic health-care institutions are, and should, be held to the high standard of Jesus Christ himself.” They and CHI pledged not to argue against fetal personhood further in the case. They also said they and CHI sympathize with the Stodghill family. Attorney Timms Fowler, who wrote a brief on behalf of the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association in the case, doesn’t believe that allowing lawsuits over wrongfully killed fetuses leads to giving them the same rights as human beings. He said there is a difference between “the duty owed by a stranger to the mother and the unborn child” and the mother’s own decisions about the fetus’ future. “To die by the wrongful conduct of a stranger, you don’t have to be a walk-ing, talking, full person,” Timms said, stressing he was speaking for himself and not the association. Last Monday, no church representatives testified as a state legislative commit-tee considered a proposal to make it a crime to kill a fetus. Republican Rep. Janak Joshi said his mea-sure was not meant to wade into abortion politics but rather enable prosecutors 7A Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 7A 911 call sheds light on vet’s mindsetBy ANGELA K. BROWNAssociated PressFORT WORTH, Texas — A 911 recording and documents released Tuesday reveal more about the possible state of mind of the Iraq War veteran charged with gunning down a former Navy SEAL sniper and his friend at a Texas shooting range. Eddie Ray Routh told his sister and brother-in-law that he and the two men “were out shooting target practice and he couldn’t trust them so he killed them before they could kill him,” according to a Lancaster police search warrant affidavit. Shortly after the shootings, Routh’s sister told a 911 operator that her brother had come to her house and confessed to killing two people and was “psychotic,” according to a recording of the frantic call to Midlothian police. Routh, 25, is charged with one count of capital murder and two counts of murder in the deaths of Chris Kyle, author of the best-selling book “American Sniper,” and his friend Chad Littlefield on Saturday. He’s jailed in Erath County on $3 million bail and is on suicide watch. Laura Blevins told police her brother seemed “out of his mind saying people were sucking his soul and that he could smell the pigs. He said he was going to get their souls before they took his,” according to the affidavit, which was first obtained by WFAA-TV. Routh told his brother-in-law, Gaines Blevins, that everyone was out to get him, according to the affidavit, which says Lancaster police obtained a warrant to search Routh’s home for weapons and other evidence. In the 911 call, obtained by The Associated Press, Gaines Blevins told the operator that Routh was released from a mental hospital about a week earlier and had been “acting a little weird.” He also told the operator that Routh was recently diagnosed with post-traumatic stress dis-order. Routh was taken to a mental hospital twice since last fall and told authorities he suffers from PTSD, according to police records. Routh, a member of the Marines Corps Reserve, threatened to kill his family and himself Sept. 2, according to police records in Lancaster, where Routh lives. In a 911 call obtained by The Dallas Morning News, Routh’s mom, Jodi Routh, told an operator in September that her son “probably needs to go to the VA to the emergency room and they need to admit him to the mental ward.” Later, she said one of her son’s Marine Corps buddies had taken weapons from the house for safekeeping. Lancaster police took Routh to Green Oaks Hospital for psychiatric care. Dallas police records show Routh was taken to the same mental hospital in mid-January after a woman called police and said she feared for Routh’s safety. Green Oaks will not release patient information, citing privacy laws. On Tuesday, Routh remained in his jail cell instead of meeting with his court-appointed attorney or relatives, Erath County Sheriff Tommy Bryant said in a telephone interview. Routh had demanded a cigarette in exchange for a meeting, but smoking isn’t allowed in the jail, Bryant said. The sheriff said he didn’t know which relatives came to visit Routh in the jail in Stephenville, about 75 miles southwest of Fort Worth. Kyle and Littlefield apparently had been helping Routh work through PTSD, said Travis Cox, director of FITCO Cares, the nonprofit that Kyle set up to give in-home fitness equipment to physically and emo-tionally wounded veterans. Kyle, 38, left the Navy in 2009 after four tours of duty in Iraq, where he earned a reputation as one of the military’s most lethal snipers. Littlefield, 35, was Kyle’s friend, neighbor and “workout buddy,” and also volunteered his time to work with veterans, Cox said. Routh joined the Marines in 2006 and rose to the rank of corporal in 2010. His military specialty was small-arms techni-cian, commonly known as an armorer. He had been stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C., and served in Iraq from 2007-08 and in the Haiti disaster relief mission in 2010. He is now in the individual ready reserve. Associated Press writers Terry Wallace in Dallas; Jamie Stengle in Lancaster, Texas; Martha Waggoner in Raleigh, N.C.; and AP researcher Rhonda Shafner contributed to this report. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this April 6, 2012 file photo, Chris Kyle, a former Navy SEAL and author of the book “American Sniper,” poses i n Midlothian, Texas. Kyle and his friend Chad Littlefield were fatally shot at a shoo ting range southwest of Fort Worth, Texas, on Saturday. Former Marine Eddie Ray Routh, who came with them to the range, has been arrested fo r the murders. Catholic hospital takes surprise stance in suit HOSPITAL continued on 8A

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, February 7, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Prices good thru 2/28/13Xfsf!Bmm!Tfswjdf!'!Tnjmft Selected Stores Roller Grill Slow Cooked! Hot Dog OR Nettles Sausage 2/ $ 3 OR $ 1.59 each BRIEFS Columbia has 10 guys sign college scholarships. CHS continued on 2B Today Q Columbia High softball vs. Buchholz High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Bronson High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball at Trinity Catholic High in Region 2-4A quarterfinals, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Union County High in preseason game, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High girls tennis vs. Lecanto High at Central Florida College in Ocala, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at North Marion High in preseason game, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High wrestling in Region 1-2A meet at Matanzas High in Palm Coast, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. St. Augustine High in District 4-6A tournament at Atlantic Coast High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High in District 5-4A tournament at Fort White, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High’s Kayla Carman, Dana Roberts and Charlee Watson in state weight-lifting meet at Kissimmee Civic Center, 10:30 a.m. Q Columbia High wrestling in Region 1-2A meet at Matanzas High in Palm Coast, TBD Q Fort White High track at Florida High All Comers Meet, TBA GAMES YOUTH BASEBALL Fort White Babe Ruth registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball final registration for its spring league is at the South Columbia Sports Complex concession stand from 4-7 p.m. today. League costs for age groups are 4-6 (T-ball) $45, 7-8 $55, 9-10 $65, 11-12 $75 and 13-15 $85. A birth certificate is required if a child has not previously played in the Fort White leagues. For details, call Chris Sharpe at (386) 292-4224. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up open The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Feb. 16. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most fun-filled outfit. Registration is open at active.com For details, call Michelle at 208-2447.Q From staff reportsRecord setters JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFamily members and friends gather behind nine Columbia High School football players as they participate in Nati onal Signing Day at the school’s auditorium on Wednesday. Pictured ar e Antonio Pelham (from left), Darren Burch, Wyndell Walla ce, Shaquille Johnson, Laremy Tunsil, Felix Woods, Javere S mith, Brett Newcomb and Solomon Bell. Tunsil signed with the University of Mississippi; Bell, Pelham, Newcomb, and Wal lace signed with Edward Waters College; Burch signed w ith Miles College; Shaquille Johnson signed with Western Kentucky University; Smith signed with Northern Arizona Universi ty and Woods signed with Weber State University. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a record-setting day for Columbia High foot-ball as the Tigers capped off a class that sent 10 play-ers to college. Highlighted by the signing of Laremy Tunsil, which appeared live on ESPN, the Tigers also had eight more players sign on Wednesday that included Solomon Bell, Antonio Pelham, Brett Newcomb, and Wendall Wallace signing with Edward Waters College, Darren Burch signing with Miles College, Shaq Johnson sign-ing with Western Kentucky University, Javere Smith signing with Northern Arizona University and Felix Woods signing with Weber State University. Jayce Barber was an early enrollee with Jacksonville JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High linebacker Felix Woods signs to Weber S tate University, located in Ogden, Utah, while at National Signi ng Day. A win for the good guys By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head football coach Brian Allen called it ‘a win for the good guys’ as Felix Woods signed his letter of intent to play college football for Weber State University in Utah. “I call him little B.A.,” Allen said. “You’ve heard me talk about him and at our football banquet I kind of got shook up. I remem-ber the feeling that he was going through. He’s a kid that does everything right. To have no college offers and then over night Weber State jump into the conver-sation at a Division-I univer-sity, it’s a good guy winning in the end.” Justin Rascati came down to visit Woods and imme-diately fell in love with the linebacker. “It was a one-day visit,” Allen said. “He fell in love with the kid. He’s going to gray shirt, so he won’t go in until January, so he’ll be a semester ahead when he gets there. It’s an Woods signs to play for Weber State University. WOODS continued on 2B Foursome join as band of brothersBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFor four Columbia High football players, col-lege will be a continued brotherhood. Solomon Bell, Antonio Pelham, Brett Newcomb and Wyndell Wallace signed to play college football at Edward Waters College in Jacksonville. “It’s going to be fun already knowing these guys,” Bell said. For Wallace, it’s a builtin support system. “We’re brothers,” he said. “We won’t know anyone else when we get there, but we already know that we have three other guys that have our back.” For Pelham, it’s a bond with an important focus. “We all keep God first and now it’s time to put it on for this city,” Pelham said. “We have a unity together, a bond of brothers.” They make up a class of 10 Tigers that signed to play col-lege football on Wednesday. It’s something that they share great pride in. “This is all a stepping stone,” Wallace said. “We’re just the first step and it shows that coach (Brian) Allen is doing something right.” Pelham expects each class coming out of Columbia to be right there with what this year’s group of Tigers were able to accomplish. “It’s only the beginning,” Pelham said. “It’s a sign that if you follow the right path, good things will come to you.” Bell said it’s a day that he dreamed about and one that came to fruition on Wednesday. “It’s a day I never thought I would see,” Bell said. “We were a team that cried on each other’s shoulders. We felt each others pain. We came together.” And for this group of boys, part of the team stays together. Group of CHS players to attend Edward Waters. BROTHERS continued on 2BJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High football players Wyndell Wallace (from l eft), Antonio Pelham, Solomon Bell and Brett Newcomb joke with each other after signing to Edward Waters College in Jacksonville.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 11 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Joburg Open, first round, at Johannesburg (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, first round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Indiana at IllinoisESPN2 — Clemson at VirginiaNBCSN — Old Dominion at Drexel 9 p.m. ESPN — Washington at UCLAESPN2 — Missouri at Texas A&M 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Saint Mary’s (Cal) at Santa Clara NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — L.A. Lakers at Boston 10:30 p.m. TNT — Chicago at Denver WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. FSN — Marshall at UCFBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m.Chicago at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Miami, 8 p.m.Chicago at Utah, 10:30 p.m. NBA calendar Feb. 15-17 — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline. April 20 — Playoffs begin. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Indiana at Illinois, 7 p.m.No. 4 Duke vs. N.C. State, 9 p.m.No. 6 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 11 p.m.No. 19 Oregon vs. Colorado, 10 p.m.No. 21 Missouri at Texas A&M, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 2 Florida vs. Mississippi State, 5 p.m. No. 3 Michigan at Wisconsin, NoonNo. 5 Kansas at Oklahoma, 4 p.m.No. 6 Gonzaga vs. Loyola Marymount, 8 p.m. No. 8 Miami vs. North Carolina, 2 p.m. No. 11 Louisville at No. 24 Notre Dame, 9 p.m. No. 12 Michigan State at Purdue, 7 p.m. No. 13 Kansas State vs. Iowa State, 6 p.m. No. 14 Butler at George Washington, 2 p.m. No. 15 New Mexico at UNLV, 9 p.m.No. 16 Creighton vs. Illinois State, 10 p.m. No. 17 Cincinnati vs. No. 23 Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. No. 19 Oregon vs. Utah, 8 p.m.No. 20 Georgetown at Rutgers, TBANo. 21 Missouri vs. Mississippi, 1 p.m.No. 22 Oklahoma State at Texas, 1:45 p.m. No. 25 Marquette vs. DePaul, 2 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 1 Indiana at No. 10 Ohio State, 1 p.m. No. 4 Duke at Boston College, 6 p.m.No. 7 Arizona vs. California, 7 p.m.No. 9 Syracuse vs. St. John’s, 3 p.m.No. 18 Minnesota vs. Illinois, 6 p.m. Arkansas 80, Florida 69 At Fayetteville, Ark. FLORIDA (18-3) Murphy 2-7 4-5 9, Young 4-7 1-3 9, Boynton 4-11 0-0 10, Rosario 5-10 3-3 15, Wilbekin 5-15 2-2 14, Yeguete 0-0 1-2 1, Frazier II 3-5 2-2 11, Prather 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 23-56 13-19 69.ARKANSAS (14-8) Clarke 3-4 3-3 9, Powell 5-12 0-0 11, Wade 2-6 1-2 7, Scott 0-2 2-2 2, Qualls 5-9 0-1 11, Madden 2-3 4-4 8, Bell 0-0 0-0 0, Young 3-8 5-6 13, Gulley 0-0 1-3 1, Haydar 1-3 0-0 3, Mickelson 4-5 0-0 8, Williams 3-4 0-0 7, Wagner 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 28-57 16-21 80. Halftime—Arkansas 43-26. 3Point Goals—Florida 10-27 (Frazier II 3-4, Rosario 2-5, Wilbekin 2-5, Boynton 2-7, Murphy 1-6), Arkansas 8-18 (Young 2-4, Wade 2-6, Powell 1-1, Williams 1-1, Qualls 1-2, Haydar 1-3, Madden 0-1). Fouled Out—Young. Rebounds—Florida 33 (Frazier II 9), Arkansas 34 (Powell 6). Assists—Florida 15 (Wilbekin 4), Arkansas 19 (Young 5). Total Fouls—Florida 19, Arkansas 17. A—13,816.Florida St. 56, Georgia Tech 54 At Atlanta FLORIDA ST. (13-9) Brandon 0-2 1-2 1, White 1-7 1-2 3, Turpin 4-6 2-3 10, Snaer 4-9 4-4 15, Whisnant II 1-3 0-0 2, Bookert 1-2 0-0 3, Gilchrist 1-1 1-2 3, Bojanovsky 4-4 2-2 10, Thomas 3-3 0-2 6, Miller 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 20-40 11-17 56.GEORGIA TECH (12-9) Udofia 2-8 0-0 6, Georges-Hunt 3-9 1-5 8, Carter 2-9 0-0 4, Miller 3-4 3-4 9, Bolden 2-7 2-2 6, Jordan 1-2 0-0 2, Poole Jr. 0-1 1-2 1, Reed 3-5 0-0 9, Holsey 2-4 2-2 6, Poole 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 19-50 9-15 54. Halftime—Georgia Tech 27-26. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 5-15 (Snaer 3-5, Bookert 1-1, Miller 1-3, Whisnant II 0-2, White 0-4), Georgia Tech 7-17 (Reed 3-4, Udofia 2-6, Poole 1-1, Georges-Hunt 1-3, Bolden 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida St. 30 (White 10), Georgia Tech 24 (Bolden, Miller 5). Assists—Florida St. 18 (Brandon 5), Georgia Tech 14 (Miller, Udofia 4). Total Fouls—Florida St. 15, Georgia Tech 15. A—7,012.HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Games Montreal at Buffalo, 7 p.m.Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 7 p.m.N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Toronto at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.Detroit at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Chicago at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Friday’s Game Anaheim at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 7, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank A three-in-one nail polish. Grey’s Anatomy “The Face of Change” Scandal “Nobody Likes Babies” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Lifecasters (N) (DVS) MI-5 BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “One Percent” (:01) Elementary (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries “Into the Wild” Beauty and the Beast “Cold Turkey” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsAmerican Idol (N) (Part 2 of 4) Glee “Diva” Kurt confronts Rachel. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) CommunityParks/RecreatThe Of ce (N) (:31) 1600 Penn (N) (:01) Do No Harm (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Who the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepDateline on OWN “Something Wicked” Dateline on OWN A well-liked family. Lost and Found (N) Dateline on OWN “Something Wicked” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48: Missing Persons (N) Beyond Scared Straight “Follow-Up Special” (N) (:31) The First 48 HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy Days Happy Days Happy Days Happy Days Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half Men “Tron: Legacy” (2010, Science Fiction) Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde. AngerAngerArcher (N) Legit “Anger” (N) Totally BiasedBrandX With CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Scarlett Fever” NBA Tip-Off d NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N) d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Denver Nuggets. (N) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobMarvin MarvinDrake & JoshDrake & JoshHouse of Anubis (N) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241World’s Wildest Police Videos World’s Wildest Police Videos iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator MMA Live (N) (Live) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar A teenage con man. d College Basketball North Carolina State at Duke. (N) White Collar “Taking Account” DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie Good Luck CharlieDog With a Blog “Cars” (2006, Comedy) Voices of Owen Wilson, Paul Newman. Gravity FallsGood Luck CharlieGravity Falls Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252Dance Moms Dance Moms Project Runway “Spin Out” Project Runway The designers create garments for Heidi. Double Divas(:01) Double Divas(:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS “Two-Faced” (DVS) NCIS A murder is caught on tape. NCIS “Endgame” NCIS “Power Down” Citywide blackout. Suits “He’s Back” (N) (DVS) (:01) Necessary Roughness BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “He Got Game” (1998) Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. A high-school basketball star faces his estranged father. Second GenerationSecond Generation ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruptiond College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaLightning Live!k NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at New Jersey Devils. From Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. Lightning Live!Inside LightningFight Sports: In 60Along the Way DISCV 38 182 278Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners “Last Shiner Standing” Moonshiners “Secret Summit Part 1” Property WarsProperty WarsProperty Wars (N) Property Wars (N) Property WarsProperty Wars TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds “Supernerds” (N) Conan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Chasing The SaturChasing The SaturE! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean ItFashion PoliceKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHawaii Life (N) Hawaii Life Extreme Homes House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss Cake Boss Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressWhat Not to Wear “Casey D.” (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Swamp People “Rising Pressure” Swamp People “House Divided” Swamp People Swamp People “Two Days to Tag Out” Swamp People “Swamp Showdown” Larry the Cable Guy ANPL 50 184 282Law on the Border (N) Alaska Wildlife Troopers North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law “Harvest Time” (N) North Woods LawNorth Woods Law “Harvest Time” FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Flower Power” Sweet Genius “Heated Genius” Restaurant StakeoutChef Wanted With Anne BurrellChef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UFC Primetime (N) UFC Insider Women’s College Basketball Marshall at Central Florida. (N) Tennis Champions Series: Las Vegas. Agassi vs. Courier. World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Total Blackout “The Dead” (2010, Horror) Rob Freeman, Prince David Osei, David Dontoh. “The Hills Have Eyes” (2006, Horror) Aaron Stanford. Bloodthirsty mutants hunt fresh meat. Hills-Eyes 2 AMC 60 130 254(4:00) “Braveheart” (1995) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau. “Demolition Man” (1993, Science Fiction) Sylvester Stallone, Wesley Snipes. (:31) “Constantine” (2005) Keanu Reeves. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowIt’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyWorkaholics Tosh.0 It’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba (:22) Reba Reba Reba Reba “The Rings” Reba Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear My Big Redneck Vacation NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “The Other Woman” Ultimate PredatorsUltimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Ultimate Predators “Jaws of Death” Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” NGC 109 186 276Doomsday PreppersAlaska State Troopers “Drug Bust” Brain Games “Watch This!” Brain Games “Pay Attention!” Brain Games “Remember This!” Brain Games “Pay Attention!” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Final Cut A teacher is found dead. Final Cut “A Script to Die For” (N) Final Cut “Red Carpet to Hell” Evil Twins “Tribe of Two” FrenemiesFrenemiesFinal Cut “Red Carpet to Hell” HBO 302 300 501(:15) “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender. ‘PG-13’ “Chronicle” (2012) Dane DeHaan. ‘PG-13’ Girls Enlightened Cathouse: Menage a Trois MAX 320 310 515 The Art of War “Taking Lives” (2004) Angelina Jolie. ‘R’ (:15) “The Running Man” (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ “Die Hard 2” (1990, Action) Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “Die Another Day” (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens. ‘PG-13’ “I Will Follow” (2010) Salli Richardson-Whit eld. ‘NR’ The Chocolate Sundaes Comedy ShowGigolos Gigolos PREP ROUNDUP CHS: Nine guys sign on Wednesday Continued From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Laker City ReporterLady Indians basketballFort White High’s 2012-13 girls basketball team is Distri ct 5-4A runner-up and the first Lady Indians team to qualify for the state playoffs. Fort White plays Trinity Catholic High in the region quartifinals at 7 p.m. today in Ocala. Team members are Heather Bohling (from left), Rykia Jackson, Khadijah Ingram, Kashanique Cook, Cenise Armstrong, Shatasha Robinson, Desma Blake and Hailey Shook. DeShay Harris is head coach. Hoops semifinals setFrom staff reportsThe district basketball tournament semifinal matchups are set for both Columbia High and Fort White High. Fort White is hosting the District 5-4A tournament and will play Santa Fe High at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Santa Fe defeated Interlachen High on Tuesday, while Bradford High knocked off Keystone Heights High. Williston High will play Bradford at 6:30 p.m. Friday. The championship game is 7 p.m. Saturday. In Columbia’s District 4-6A semifinals on Tuesday, St. Augustine High beat Stanton Prep and Robert E. Lee High beat host Atlantic Coast High. The Tigers play St. Augustine at 6 p.m. Friday, followed by Wolfson High vs. Robert E. Lee at 7:30 p.m. The championship game is 7 p.m. Saturday.Fort White softballFort White’s softball team opened the season with an 8-1 loss at Gainesville High on Tuesday. Caitlyn Bruce had the two hits for the Lady Indians and drove in Jessica Widlan with the run in the fifth inning. “The girls put the bat on the ball well, we just left runners in scoring posi-tions,” coach Cassie Sparks said. “We had a few mental errors, but overall just got outplayed. This is a young team and learning each day.” Fort White play at Bronson High at 7 p.m. today. State University. “It’s definitely not something that I can take credit for,” Allen said. “I also have to credit the staff and kids for jumping in line for the vision we had. This is a chance for them to get a college education and earn a college income. It’s some-thing that could impact two generations.” For the players, it was a shared excellence in arguably the greatest class in the history of the Tigers. “It feels good to see so many of our players go on to college,” Johnson said. “I can’t wait to see great things happen for my teammates.” While more players could still have things fall in place for some of the Tigers, the teammates were quick to remember anoth-er player that should have been on stage with them. When Braxton Stockton went down with an eye injury, it delayed any plans the running back had of playing college football. But the Tigers knew that he was fully capable of being on the stage during signing day. “He was supposed to be here,” Burch said. “If he hadn’t have got hurt, he would have been.” “That’s just who we are, a big family,” Johnson said. “When Braxton went down, I don’t think there was a dry eye on the football team. We’re a big family and we all care about each other.” But the Tigers don’t want this class to be an anoma-ly. They want it to be the beginning of something. “We are trying to set the example for the younger classes,” Smith said. “It’s all about hard work and being dedicated.” And their goal moving forward is all the same. “We want to represent Lake City,” Smith said. opportunity to get a great education.” For Woods, the signing was a moment of elation. “It was a dream come true,” Woods said. “After talking to them, it was an opportunity that I couldn’t pass up.” Woods’ biggest knock wasn’t his playing ability, but the he doesn’t have the size of a normal college linebacker. That was never something Woods was going to let hold him back. “I’ve always played with a chip on my shoulder,” Woods said. “To me it’s not about the size of my body, but the size of my heart.” Woods said that Allen had just as big of an impact on him as he had on the head coach. “He was like a father figure,” Woods said. “I tried to mimic everything he does. That’s why he called me little B.A.” Woods said that the choice to play at Weber State over smaller colleges was an obvious one. “It’s a Division-I program,” Woods said. “It’s a full rise and they’re on the rise. My goal is to go in and get playing time as a fresh-man.” Woods said although he’ll be across the country, he’ll never forget his time with the Tigers. “It was a great time of ups and downs,” he said. “There was never a dull moment.” WOODS: Will play for Weber State Continued From Page 1B BROTHERS: Join forces at EWC Continued From Page 1B“The best part will be still being able to play beside them,” Newcomb said. Football is like life and it’s good to have someone to trust. These boys won’t have that problem. “We have told things to each other that we haven’t even told our families,” Pelham said. “It’s a unity we feel with each other.”

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DEAR ABBY: Thank you for the compassion you showed “Wants to Be a Mom” (Nov. 24), the 15-year-old girl consider-ing motherhood with her almost 18-year-old boyfriend. Having lost her dad at an early age and having a mother who prefers drugs over her daughter, must have made this young lady feel very unwanted. I understand why she might think a baby would give her the love she’s missing. I applaud you for not judging her, but instead kindly helping her to understand the conse-quences of her potential actions. I wish her the best and hope she’ll have the wisdom to realize how important an education will be for her future. With luck, in a few years she’ll be a young adult ready to assume the responsibilities of being a parent. -LINDA IN MICHIGAN DEAR LINDA: “Wants” was smart to write for advice before acting on impulse. She deserved a thoughtful response and not just a reprimand. Readers had much to say about her letter: DEAR ABBY: At 15, I had the first of my five daughters. By the time I was 20 I was raising the babies by myself. Would I do it all over again? Not in this lifetime! “Wants,” your boyfriend is immature. He should finish school and get a job before thinking about children. You are only 15 and have your best years ahead. One thing that never crossed MY mind was how I would be able to support my child without an educa-tion. I learned the hard way. If you and your grandma aren’t getting along, it’s up to you to change your atti-tude. Grandma has more experience than you do in this world. Listening to her will help you avoid many of the pitfalls that I went through, and that you face presently. -WAS THERE ONCE IN WASHINGTON DEAR ABBY: I had my first child at 21, and while I love my son there are times I wish I would have waited a while. I missed out on college and figuring out who I was and what I wanted to do. My son and daughter turned out to have special needs, so my life has been busy taking care of them. Please tell that teen that having a baby is not at all like it is in TV commercials. -MARIA IN ILLINOIS DEAR ABBY: A mentor to teen boys told me that some of them deliberately try to impregnate girls so they’ll have a “trophy” of how manly and virile they are. The more babies they help conceive, espe-cially without having to be responsible for them, the more bragging can go on in the locker room. Every parent needs to know this behavior is going on. Some of these boys have punched holes in condoms and con-vinced a reticent girl to have sex -then laughed at her and dumped her when she became pregnant. -NURSING SCHOOL STUDENT IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: That 15-year-old’s boyfriend’s desire for her to have a baby seems like a control issue to me, and it will set the tone for their relation-ship. She needs to say no or she will most likely be under his power for the foreseeable future. -FORMER TEACHER IN THE NORTHWEST DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): An emotional situa-tion will entice you to say something that will make matters worse. Bide your time, focus on a creative endeavor, and do your best to keep the peace with people you deal with daily. Let past experience be your lesson. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Engage in discussions with people you can share information with and you will stumble upon a way to make a difference. Don’t let a partner limit what you can do or put pressure on you to go in a direc-tion you don’t agree with. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Concentrate on what you have and how you can make it grow -or at least maintain what you’ve got. Making personal changes that will enhance your out-look or your appearance will lead to interesting new acquaintances. Love is highlighted. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Speak up and take action and you can make a difference. A partnership will take an unusual turn toward greater stability. Travel to a destination that will motivate you to follow through with a plan. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Added responsibilities will surface. The way you handle your personal and financial life will set the stage for what’s to come. Creative accounting and building up your assets should be your first choice. Partnership opportunities should be considered. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Discuss your ideas and plans with peers and do whatever you can to position yourself for future advancement. An unusual investment or trendy idea will pay off as long as you avoid overdoing and over-spending. A challenge will entice you. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Change will catch you by surprise. Don’t lose sight of your dreams, hopes and wishes just because someone has a change of heart or plans. Secure your position by socializing with people who can help you excel. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put your skills to the test. Don’t let a relation-ship come between you and your goals. Making simple yet unique changes at home will help you embrace new ways of doing daily tasks. Stand up and make demands and you’ll get your way. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Don’t be fooled by a big talker who makes empty promises. Trust in your talent and ability to do things on your own. You don’t need a partner taking advantage of your good nature or your skills. Focus on love, not work. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Revisit a plan and find a way to make it successful. Mixing the old with the new will bring back old memories and reconnect you to people from your past. Listen to what others say, but fol-low your own path. Limit spending. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb.18): Discretion will be necessary when dealing with people from different backgrounds. Indulge in something new, but don’t forget where you come from and what works best for you. Protect your health and your heart. +++ PISCES (Feb.19-March 20): Don’t look back. Focus on what must be done and move swiftly. If you slow down or let uncertainty take over, you will lose ground and be faced with opposition. Don’t let shortsightedness lead to a costly mishap. Cover your back. ++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Readers warn teen to avoid becoming a parent too soon Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY7, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the nrn (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com.nrn#$%n&'()n(*&(# (r !(&#( ( +( ,(("(# Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION:CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000294COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,Plaintiff,vs.CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; SUN-STATE FEDERALCREDITUN-ION; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BARBEE; UN-KNOWN TENANTN/K/ARAN-DALLR. BARBEE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-sure Sale dated the 16th day of Janu-ary, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000294, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPis the Plaintiff and CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, SUNSTATE FEDERALCREDITUNION, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CAMELLIAR. BAR-BEE, UNKNOWN TENANTN/K/ARANDALLR. BARBEE and UN-KNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 6th day of March, 2013, the following de-scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:Part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 13, and part of the South-east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 14, all in Township 06 south, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida more par-ticularly described as follows: Begin at the Southeast Corner of the North-east 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14 and run thence S 020'38”E, along the West line of said Section 13, 660.95 feet to the Southwest corner of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4; thence N 8825'01” E along the South line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 660.63 feet to the Southeast corner thereof; thence N 021'49” Walong the East line of said Northwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 661.24 feet to the Northeast corner thereof; thence S 8823'28”W, along the North line of said Northeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, 101.07 feet; thence N 7420’34” W, 377.99 feet; thence S 9000’00” W, 114.39 feet; thence S 6904’46” W, 339.64 feet to the South line of the North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 14; thence N 8908’17”E along said South line, 236.51 feet to the POINTOF BE-GINNING, containing 11.2132 acres, more or less.Subject to an easement for ingress and egress more particularly descri-bed as follows: Begin at the North-east corner of the above described lands; thence S 8823’20” W, along the North line of said described lands, 101.07 feet; thence S 7420'37” E, 73.92 feet; thence S 0021'49” N, a distance of 639.28 feet to the intersection with the South line of said described lands; thence N 8825'01” E, along said South line, 30.01 feet; thence N 0021’49” W, along the East line of said described lands, a distance of 661.24 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055. (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated is 16 day of January, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk Of The Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05536976February 7, 14, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000178CITITMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,v.TIMOTHYJ. LOFSTROM; REGI-NALOFSTROM; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTSDefendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated 1/18/13, entered in Civil Case No. 12-2011-CA-000178 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 15th day of May, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:LOT13, BLOCK A, SOUTHWOOD MEADOWS UNIT2, ASUBDIVI-SION AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 84 OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Property Address: 348 SOUTH-WESTAINSLEYGLEN, LAKE CITY, FL32024Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIESIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 18TH DAYO JANUARY2013./s/ B. Scippio d.cClerkP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDASEAL05537157February 7, 14, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION2003 SATURNVIN# 5GZCZ63B33S900840To be held on FEBRUARY18, 2013At Daniel’s Towing & RecoveryArrowhead Road Lake City, Florida 32056-3026At 9:00 am05537171FEBRUARY7, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Probate DivisionFile No. 12-294-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF J.D. PAYNEDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSTOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE:You are hereby notified that an Or-der of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of J.D. PAYNE, deceased, File No. 12-294-CP, by the Circuit Court for Colum-bia County, Florida, Probate Divi-sion, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055; that the total cash value of the estate is $0 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order areNameJerri J.D. PayneAddress187 SWMorning Glory Dr., Lake City, FL32024ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the estate of the dece-dent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 7, 2013.Person Giving Notice:/s/ Jerri J.D. PayneJerri J.D. Payne187 SWMorning Glory Dr.Lake City, FL32024Attorney for Person Giving Notice/s/ Terry McDavidTERRYMCDAVIDPost Office Box 1328Lake City, FL32056-1328Telephone: (386) 752-1896Florida Bar No. 05245405537170February 7, 14, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 13-26-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIAM HOWARD HENRYDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of William Howard Henry, deceased, whose date of death was November 13, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. the names and addresses of the personal repre-sentative and the personal represen-tative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERILegalODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPRO-BATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-TER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication is Febraury 7, 2013Personal Representative:/s/ Wanda ConnerWanda Conner449 SWWildwood Ct.Lake City, Florida 32024Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronAttorney for Wanda ConnerFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386)755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail: jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary Email: mad@rkkattor-neys.com05537173February 7, 14, 2013 Notice is hereby given per Florida Statue 98.075(2):ASHLEIGH E HUDSON248 SWLAGUNAGLNLAKE CITY, FL32024CHRISTOPHER ALONDON JR253 SE GREG PLLAKE CITY, FL32025MICHAELLTRACY751 SE SYCAMORE TERLAKE CITY, FL32025is potentially ineligible to be regis-tered to vote. Please respond within 30 days of publication of this notice by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-tions Office at the address or phone number below. If no response is re-ceived within 30 days of this publi-cation, it may result in determination of ineligibility by the supervisor and removal of the registered voter’s name from the statewide voter regis-tration system. Published one time in the Lake City ReporterElizabeth "Liz" P. HorneColumbia County Supervisor of Elections971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102Lake City, FL32055(386) 758-102605537179February 7, 2013 LegalSTATE OFFLORIDADEPARTMENTOF ENVIRON-MENTALPROTECTIONNOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCYACTIONThe Department of Environmental Protection gives Notice of its Intent to Issue a permit to the Columbia County Board of County Commis-sioners to construct and operate Cell 4 of the Winfield Solid Waste Facili-ty’s Class I Landfill (approximately 9.3-acres) and to continue to operate and monitor Cells 1, 2 and 3 of the Facility’s Class I Landfill (with a combined total disposal area of ap-proximately 33.6 acres for all four cells). The Winfield Solid Waste Fa-cility is located at Oosterhoudt Road, west of U.S. Highway 41, approxi-mately five miles northwest of Lake City, Columbia County, Florida. The Department's file on this matter is available for public inspection dur-ing normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Fri-day, except legal holidays, at 8800 Baymeadows Way West, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32256. Aperson whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action may petition for an ad-ministrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (re-ceived) in the Department's Office of General Counsel, Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building, 3900 Common-wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Pe-titions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3) of the Flori-da Statutes must be filed within 14 days of publication of this notice or receipt of the written notice, which-ever occurs first. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the ap-plicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person’s right to request an administrative de-termination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, or to intervene in this pro-ceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another par-ty) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Adminis-trative Code. Apetition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s ac-tion is based must contain the fol-lowing information: (a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner, the appli-cant's name and address, the Depart-ment File Numbers (9862-015 and 9862-016) and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) Astatement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department's action or proposed ac-tion;(c) Astatement of how each petition-er's substantial interests are affected by the Department's action or pro-posed action; (d) Astatement of all material facts disputed by petitioner or a statement that there are no disputed facts; (e) Astatement of facts which the petitioner contends warrant reversal Legalor modification of the Department's action or proposed action; (f) Astatement of which rules or statutes the petitioner contends re-quire reversal or modification of the Department's action or proposed ac-tion; and (g) Astatement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wants the Department to take with respect to the Department's action or proposed action.Apetition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Depart-ment’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and oth-erwise shall contain the same infor-mation as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301 of the Florida Administrative Code. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Department’s final action may be different from the po-sition taken by it in this notice. Per-sons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final deci-sion of the Department have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above. In accordance with Section 120.573, F.S., the Department advises that mediation is not available in this case as an alternative to filing a petition for an administrative determination. NORTHEASTDISTRICT8800 BAYMEADOWS WAYWEST, SUITE 100 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA32256 05537180February 7, 2013 060Services DISPLAY4 100Job Opportunities05536990Wanted experience I.T. Person to manage private Company network 20+ computers, Web design & admin needed. Must be willing to perform other Clerical tasks in office environment. Apply in person:3631 us 90 east Lake City FL32055, or send resume to guy@qiagroup.com 05537114NOWHIRINGGeneral Managers Shift LeadersHardee's offers: Competitive Salary, Benefits, Training, & Opportunity for Advancement! For additional info & to apply, visit: www.hardees.com/jobs. EOE. LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, FEBRUARY7 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 100Job Opportunities05537150Administrative Assistant Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Administrative Assistant. Good Organizational and Communication Skills a Must Competitive Salary and Excellent Benefit Package. Please Apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 386-752-7900 EOE 05537153Immediate Openings Available positions requiring at least one year prior skills include: Mig/Tig Welder, Electrician, Trim Carpenter, Cabinetmaker, Wood/ Mill Fabrication, Fiberglass Laminator. Some hand tools required. Benefits: Paid Vacation, Paid Holidays, Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Wages negotiable with experience. Customer Service/Telephone Sales business to business. Auto Parts Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC BP Driver/Warehouse Need good MVR. Apply in person. 385 SWArlington Blvd, LC., BPA Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City05537163OPS Administrative/Events Assistant Part Time $9.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking a highly motivated, hard working team player to join an enthusiastic team of personnel and volunteers in the position of OPS Administrative/Events Assistant (24-32 hours/week). This is a non career service position that requires working some weekends, holidays and evenings. Benefits not provided. This position requires an individual that possesses excellent computer and writing skills and to be able to function both independently and as a team player. Duties include, but are not limited to; answering telephones, filing, maintaining budgets, computer and data entry, staffing special events, providing information about park facilities and events; performing occasional janitorial duties and other related duties as required. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for of this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.comResumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: Elaine McGrath, Events Coordinator Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act. 05537166OPS Gift Shop Attendant Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park White Springs, Florida $8.00/hr Approx. 28 hours per week Operate cash register, answer visitor inquiries in a courteous and tactful manner in person and over the phone, sells and stocks merchandise, provides cleaning and maintenance of the Gift Shop and Craft Cabins and is self-motivated. Outstanding customer service is a must as well as knowledge of basic arithmetic, computers and sales. Must be able to work rotating shifts including weekends, some nights and holidays. Able to deal well in a seasonal high traffic area with high volume sales. Must be able to lift 20 lbs. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 14, 2013 to the following to: Attn: Susan Conley, Gift Shop/Craft Square Manager Stephen Foster State Park P.O. Box G White Springs, FL32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act 100Job Opportunities05537165OPS Museum Guide Part Time $8.00 perhour Stephen Foster State Park is seeking an outgoing individual for the positions of OPS Museum Guide. This is a non-career service position that requires working every Monday and Tuesday, occasional holidays, weekends and evenings. Benefits are not provided. Duties include, but are not limited to greeting visitors and conducting tours through the Museum; giving interpretive and informative talks about various exhibits; relating the history of the area and the park; providing information about park facilities and events; performing janitorial duties and other related duties as required. Training provided. AClass E valid driver’s license is required for this position. Applications are available online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com. Resumes are not accepted unless accompanied with a State of Florida Employment Application. Submit Application no later than Monday, February 18, 2013 to the following: George Paxton, Assistant Park Manager Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Post Office Drawer G White Springs, Florida 32096 Fax (386) 397-4262 DEPonly hires US Citizens or authorized aliens and is an EEO / ADA/ VPemployer. Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits the employment of any male required to register with Selective Service System under the US Military Selective Service Act P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 UnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net WANTED Parts Counter Person Apply @ Rountree Moore Toyota 1232 WUS HWY90 Lake City, FL32055 See Mike Koon’ 120Medical Employment05537127Dietary Part Time Aide/Cook Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of Dietary Aide/Cook Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE Certified Dietary ManagerNeeded LTC Experience Preferred. Must be abel to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for 180 bed facility. Full Time with Excellent Benefits. Email Resume to Greg Roberts @ groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or Fax Resume to: 386-362-4417 Live Oak. FL EOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY C.N.A’s All Shifts Full Time, excellent benefits, up to $12/hr with shift diff. Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Found Brown/Tan/White 8 lbs Cat in the Eastwood Subd. House trained, Clean. Contact 365-4255 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 416Sporting Goods SEARS TREADMILL. Paid $500 used twice Asking $250 Contact 796-3234 430Garage Sales 3 Families Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SWFabian Way. Close to 242 & 247. Look for signs. Clothes, toys. Much More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 90” wide x 50” long Fabric Levelor custom verticals. Gently used. $50 Call 752-9286 after 6 PM Beautiful Olustee Outfit Ladys size 20(?) $75.00 Contact 365-1277 GENERATOR big 8500 Watt 2013. Honda Electric start. Battery and wheel kit included. Never used. New retail $4995, wholesale $3750. First $1850 cash. 864-275-6478 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3/2 Mobile Home on 1/2 ac. Needs TLC, great investment, located in Glenn St. Mary. MLS# 82570, Results Realty $67,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 New Listing. Short Sale Spacious 3BR/2BADWMH, in a Quiet Country Neighborhood on 1.1 Acre Lot. MLS 82426 $49,900 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4 Bedroom Home, clean and roomy, lots of storage. See www.hudhomestore.com Case#091-422050 Robin Williams (386)365-5146 650Mobile Home & LandHallmark Real Estate READY FOR YOU! Immaculate 3/2 home on 5 acres. Pole barn, screened back porch, fireplace – cozy! Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$500 month $500 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 home in a small MH park, Located onCountyRoad 133C, $600mo & $600 dep. includs electricity & water 954-258-8841 3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shaade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 Nice block home 3bd/2ba Living /Family/Dining rm, kitchen applicans, HVAC, 2 car carport $800 mth, $400 Dep.Contact 867-0849 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Immaculately in 55+ Community of Eastside Village. 3BD/2BA. MLS 81332 $120,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS 805Lots forSale Large indoor pool comes with this rare find. Large home with plenty of space. MLS 81966 $150,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3bd/ 2ba Brick Home Off Hwy 47 S., Greenridge Ln. New H&A, Nice Shop, Many Updates, 3/4 ac. M/I Ready (386) 365-4591 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Great Family Home, Lovely Location! Brick home on corner lot, 3/1.5, fenced, Seller motivated! Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 Hallmark Real Estate LARGE FAMILYHOME over 1700 sq. ft., hardwood floors, close to schools, shopping, hospitals. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate SUPREME LIVING in this 4/2 home on 18 acres. One attached, 2 detached garages, beautiful view. Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate YOUR MODERN BRICK HOME IS WAITING! In great location, 3/2, shady lot on 1 acre. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptionally Maintained Brick Home in Crest Point. 3/2, Open Kitchen. Elaine Tolar $149,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81426 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 4BR/3BApool home on 10 acres. Front and back porch. Fenced ready for your horses or cows. MLS 82562 $199,900 Established Emerald Lake Subdivision. Split floor plan, Fantastic Outdoor living. MLS 79733 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Historic/Vintage. Totally remodeled. Great home or office space MLS 80242 $65,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Charming rustic log cabin 2BR/1BAwith solar panels. Wood burning stove & gas range. Pole Barn MLS 81761 $99,900 Beautiful Home, separate dining room, large Master Suite. Open Kitchen. MLS 81910 $179,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Callaway S/D 3BR/2BA, 2250sf, .5ac, gas FP, Bamboo & tile flooring. #82470 $189,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1482sf, 8.7acr, tiled baths, FLroom, 2 detached storage bldgs. fenced & cross fenced. #79950 $149,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Tri-Level in Town 4BR/2BA, 1883sf, .501ac, newer kitchen w/all appl’s included, family room #80607 $144,900 810Home forSale RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1386sf, .151ac, fam rm, liv rm, dining open to living & kitchen, screen back porch. #82446 $78,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 4BR/2BA, 1940sf, .25ac, newer metal roof, A/C, windows, siding, water &heater & soffits. #82187 $99,000 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Investment Opportunity, Office Building lots of exposure. Just Reduced. MLS 79694 $69,900 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty In-Town location. 3/2, Open and Spacious Living Area. MLS 82609 $99,900 Sherry G. Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mobile Home Park w/ lots of Potential. Needs some TLC. MLS 81507 $159,000 Elaine K. Tolar 365-1548 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 951Recreational VehiclesCAR TOWDOLLY 2013. All cars/pickups. Swifles, Tilts. Never used. New retail $2750, first $1050 cash. 864.275.6478 RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 6BSports Jump YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO The most On Demand TV shows and movies on TV, streaming online and on your tablet or smartphone with the XFINITY TV app The most HD choices The most live sports WatchESPN app so you can watch your favorite ESPN content anywhere on your iPhone or iPad More Internet protection included at no additional cost with Norton Security Suite, IDENTITY GUARD and Comcast Secure Backup & Share The fastest in-home Wi-Fi with the most coverage in your home The fastest Internet YES NO Advanced home phone calling features like Readable Voicemail and Text Messaging at no extra cost YES NO Skype video calling on your TV with HD-quality video Offer ends 3/31/13, and is limited to new residential customers. XFINITY service not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Economy Plus Internet service. After promotional period, or if any service is cancelled or downgraded, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge for Economy Plus Internet is $39.95, or $29.95 with subscription to XFINITY TV and/or XFINITY Voice, depending on area. Not all services available with all XFINITY packages. Service limited to a single outlet. Equipment, installation, taxes, and franchise fees extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Basic service subscription required to receive other levels of service. XFINITY On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Not all programming available in all areas. Internet: Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed. Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Wi-Fi claim based on August 2012 study of comparable in-home wireless routers by Allion Test Labs, Inc. Voice: $29.99 activation fee applies. Service (including 911/emergency services) may not function after an extended power outage. HD programming limited to programming provided to Comcast in HD format. HD choices include HD channel lineup and HD programming available On Demand. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Text messaging requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Standard data charges may apply. Check with your carrier. Universal Caller ID requires subscription to XFINITY Digital TV and Internet Service. WatchESPN: Programming and scheduling subject to change and not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Digital Starter TV (or above). Skype: Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. Limited to residential customers. Skype on TV requires XFINITY TV with HDMI connection, HD service, XFINITY Internet and XFINITY Voice. Skype to Skype calls require participants to have Skype accounts. Additional charges apply. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. MoneyBack Guarantee applies to one month recurring charge and standard installation up to $500. Call for restrictions and complete details. Norton is a registered mark of Symantec Corporation. Constant Guard and associated logos are trademarks or federally registered trademarks of Comcast Corporation. Not all features, including Constant Guard Protection Suite, are available with Macintosh systems. For details about Constant Guard for MAC, visit xnity.com/CGMAC. Comcast. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc. NPA103942-0190

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8AHealth Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com Lake City Reporter G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES $500 CASH GIVEAWAY Every Saturday (Casino Style) 2510 W. Hwy 90, Suite 101 386-438-5712 Never before seen games and entertainment. Double the fun, double the excitement, double the prizes at the Double Deuce Cafe. The next best thing to Vegas baby. $10 00 Match Play With Coupon Expires 2-18-13 New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires February 28, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Accepting New Patients Medicare, Blue Cross, Tri-Care and most insurance plans accepted Specializing in adult medical care including: Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Allergy Testing & Treatment Accepting New Patients SOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINE Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL Visit our website at www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com 386-719-2540 Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP New Patients New Patients INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 HOSPITAL: Catholic facility takes surprise stance in Colorado lawsuit Continued From Page 7A to file additional charges in cases like the Aurora movie theater shooting. One victim was so severely wounded during the July massacre that she miscar ried, but prosecutors could not file murder charges on her unborn childs behalf. Witness Heather Surovik told the com mittee about how a drunken driver injured her last year and killed her 8 1/2-monthold unborn son, Brady. At the hospital, the emergency staff removed him from her body and dressed his corpse in infant clothes. Prosecutors could not file vehicular manslaughter charges because Brady was not legally a person. ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Monday, Jan. 28 photo, Heather Surovik, who lost her 8 1/2-month-old unborn son when her car was struck by drunken driver Gary Sheats in 2012, speaks at a news con ference promoting a political drive to grant personhood status to unborn fetuses at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver.