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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02015

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comIn the opening statements of the first degree murder and arson trial of Kenneth A. Ford, Public Defender Blair Payne said Ford told investigators “he was being bom-barded by things coming through his radio speakers, he was being subjected to positive and negative charges that were controlling him, he had been enveloped by some type of spray or cloud and there were people out-side his home hiding in his bushes.” Lead prosecutor Roberta Getzan said Ford set the home he shared with Kristy L. Whatley ablaze, intentionally killing her because Ford thought she was “up to no good with someone else.” “This case is about jealousy,” Getzan said. “This case is about the actions of an angry man. Kenneth Ford, the defendant in this case, and the actions that he took in the early morning of June 7, 2009.” Getzan said Ford poured gasoline on a couch, lit the fire and fled -leaving Whatley in the home to die, unable to escape the blaze after returning from the hospital just the day before. By KATE BRUMBACK andTAMARA LUSHAssociated PressMIDLAND CITY, Ala. — Authorities stormed an underground bunker Monday in Alabama, freeing a 5-year-old boy who had been held hostage for nearly a week in the tiny underground shelter and leaving the boy’s abduc-tor dead. After days of fruitless negotiations, talks had deteriorated with an increasingly agitated Jimmy Lee Dykes, who had kidnapped the child from a school bus after fatally shoot-ing the driver. Dykes had been seen with a gun, and officers concluded the boy was in imminent dan-ger, said Steve Richardson of the FBI’s office in Mobile. Officials refused to say how the 65-year-old died. “Ever since this started, there’s never been a moment that (the boy) wasn’t on my mind,” said Michael Senn, pastor of a church near where reporters had been camped out since the standoff began. “So when I heard that he was OK, it was just like a thousand pounds lifted off of me.” The rescue capped a long drama that drew national attention to this town of 2,400 people nestled amid peanut farms and cotton fields that By JULIE PACE andNEDRA PICKLERAssociated PressMINNEAPOLIS — President Barack Obama declared Monday on his first trip outside Washington to promote gun con-trol that a consensus is emerging for universal background checks for purchasers, though he con-ceded a tough road lay ahead to pass an assault weapons ban over formidable opposition in Congress. “We should restore the ban on military-style assault weapons and a 10-round limit for maga-zines,” Obama said in a brief speech, standing firm on his full package on gun-control mea-sures despite long odds. Such a ban “deserves a vote in Congress because weapons of war have no place on our streets or in our schools or threatening our law enforcement officers.” The president spoke from a special police operations center in a city once known to some as “Murderapolis” but where gun violence has dropped amid a push to address it from city lead-ers. Officers stood behind him, dressed in crisp uniforms of blue, white and brown. The site conveyed Obama’s message that a reduction in vio-lence can be achieved nationally, even if Americans have sharp disagreements over gun control. That includes among members of his own party in Washington. Suggesting he won’t get all he’s proposing, he said, “We don’t have to agree on everything to agree it’s time to do something.” The president unveiled his guncontrol plans last month after the shootings at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school. But many of the proposals face tough oppo-sition from some in Congress Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Beyonce wows ‘em. COMING WEDNESDAY Local news roundup. 71 48 Mostly cloudy WEATHER, 2A CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 265Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM 1 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterKenneth Allen Ford (second from the right) is seen with h is attorneys Monday while on trial for the June 7, 2009 m urder of his live-in girlfriend, Kristy L. Whatley. Ford is charged with setting the fire that to ok her life in the mobile home they shared. If convicted h e faces life in prison for firstdegree murder and a maximum of 30 years for arson.Obama making a push on guns State gets approval to enroll patients in privatization plan. But admits odds are long that he will geteverything he wants. Defendant allegedly poured gasoline on couch, left hisgirlfriend to perish in blaze. GUNS continued on 6A ABDUCTOR continued on 6A TRIAL continued on 6A Black History Month at FGCCOURTESYStudent Stephanie Myers speaks during Florida Gateway Co llege’s Black History Month Proclamation on Monday as fellow student an d emcee Vincent Woodberry looks on. The event, which drew more th an 50 staff, faculty, and students, took place at the Wilson S. Rivers Lib rary and Media Center. MURDER TRIAL BEGINS Defense: Ford felt forces were ‘controlling him’Feds OKFlorida’sMedicaidproposalBy KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressFORT LAUDERDALE — Federal health officials gave Florida the green light to enroll long-term care patients into a statewide Medicaid privatization program. But Gov. Rick Scott noted Monday he is awaiting a final signoff from the feds to privatize the program statewide for most of the state’s nearly 3 million Medicaid recipients. Florida lawmakers have been waiting for nearly two years to learn whether the feds will allow them to expand a program that allows for-profit providers to determine the health care of millions of the state’s poor. The goal of the sweeping privatization bills passed in 2011 was to save the state money while improving services, though little solid data exists on whether the approach works. Lawmakers warned that Medicaid’s roughly $21 billion annual costs were consuming the state budget. But critics worry for-profit providers are scrimping on patient care and denying medical ser-vices to increase profits. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius approved the long-term care por-tion of the request late Friday. During a meeting in Washington last month, Scott asked her to act quickly on the statewide request so that Florida lawmakers can figure out how it will affect their plans to implement The Affordable Care Act. “We need HHS’s immediate action to determine what flexibil-ity we will have within our current Medicaid program and its impacts on the cost, quality and access to healthcare. Our state is fac-ing unprecedented decisions that demand unprecedented attention from federal health officials,” Scott said in a statement. The waiver approved on Friday will allow Florida to enroll patients who require long-term care into managed care programs that will offer services in their home or other community programs to keep them out of nursing homes. Long-term care patients are typ-ically a fragile population with extensive medical needs. The decision comes as the GOPcontrolled Legislature is playing a catch-up of sorts on implement-ing the federal health overhaul. Scott MEDICAID continued on 6A Boy safe, abductor is dead in standoff

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CORRECTION The Columbia County School District Teacher of the Year program will be on Thursday. The day of the event was inc orrectly reported in Sunday’s paper. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Country singer Claude King is 90. Q The Rev. Andrew M. Greeley is 85. Q Baseball Hall-of-Famer Hank Aaron is 79. Q Actor Stuart Damon is 76. Q Tony-winning playwright John Guare is 75. Q Financial writer Jane Bryant Quinn is 74. Q Actor David Selby is 72. Q Singer-songwriter Barrett Strong is 72. Q Football Hall-of-Famer Roger Staubach is 71. Q Singer Cory Wells (Three Dog Night) is 71. Movie director Michael Mann is 70. Q Rock singer Al Kooper is 69. AROUND FLORIDA Repeat offenders decline in state TALLAHASSEE — Florida’s taxpayers are saving millions of dollars because fewer felons are returning to prison after being released, the sys-tem’s chief said Monday. Department of Corrections Secretary Michael D. Crews also said he supports propos-als to increase facilities that focus on preventing inmates from reverting to crime but opposes letting private companies run them. Recidivism has been trending down for years. Inmates returning to pris-on within three years of release dropped from 33.8 percent in 2003 to 27.6 per-cent in 2008, Crews said. He credited law enforcement as well as the prison system for that decline. Florida’s crime rate is at a 41-year low, and overall prison admissions declined to 32,279 in the budget year ending June 30. That compares to nearly 35,000 the year before and 41,000 in 2007-08.Gun turn-in effort highly successful TAMPA — Authorities say two rocket launchers were among roughly 2,500 weapons exchanged for cash and tickets in the Tampa Bay area. The Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office says the response to its “Operation Gun Swap” on Saturday was overwhelm-ing. People waited in long lines at five locations in the county to anonymously trade guns for $75 cash and ticket vouchers for the Tampa Bay Rays baseball team and the Tampa Bay Lightning hockey team. Authorities say that so many people showed up that they ran out of cash and tickets. Deputies had to distribute vouchers for the same cash and ticket packages.Intruder fatally shot inside home NEWBERRY — Deputies say north Florida homeowner and a teenag-er fatally shot a man who twice forced his way into the home. The Gilchrist County Sheriff’s Office reports 21-year-old Kenneth David Drown Jr. was armed Sunday when he barged into the home of his ex-girlfriend and their baby. Authorities say someone inside the home told 911 dispatchers that Drown was armed with a 12-guage shotgun. During a scuffle, Drown was disarmed and left the home. Before deputies arrived, he forced his way inside again, armed with another gun. News reports said Drown pointed the gun at the homeowner, who shot him. A 16-year-old also shot Drown. He was hit several times in the upper body. Man finds skeleton in tent OCALA — Authorities say a man found a skeleton inside a tent by the rail-road tracks in Ocala. Lt. Scott Fosler told the Ocala Star-Banner the remains found Sunday had likely been in the tent for between six months and a year. Fosler says a skull could be seen inside the tent, partially covered by a blan-ket. He says other bones were scattered around the camp site. Fosler says there are no indications of foul play. But the Ocala police are inves-tigating.Man dies in hang gliding accident GROVELAND — Authorities say an Illinois man has died in a hang gliding accident in central Florida. The Lake County Sheriff’s Office says 27-year-old Zachary James Marzec crashed Saturday on the runway at a small airport in Groveland. Beyonce electrifies at Super BowlI f naysayers still doubted Beyonce’s singing talents — even after her national anthem performance last week at a press conference — the singer proved she is an exceptional performer at the Super Bowl half-time show. Beyonce opened and closed her set Sunday belting out songs, and in between, she danced hard and heavy — and better than most contempo-rary pop stars. She set a serious tone as she emerged onstage in all black, sing-ing lines from her R&B hit “Love on Top.” The stage was dark as fire and lights burst from the sides. Then she went into her hit “Crazy in Love,” bringing some feminine spirit to the Superdome in New Orleans as she and her background dancers did the singer’s signature booty-shaking dance. Beyonce ripped off part of her shirt and skirt. She even blew a kiss. She was ready to rock, and she did so like a pro. Her confidence — and voice — grew as she worked the stage with and without her Destiny’s Child band mates during her 13-minute set. Beyonce proved not only that she can sing, but that she can also enter-tain on a stage as big as the Super Bowl’s. The 31-year-old was far bet-ter than Madonna, who sang to a backing track last year, and miles ahead of the Black Eyed Peas’ disas-trous set in 2011.Affleck’s ‘Argo’ wins Directors Guild honor LOS ANGELES — Ben Affleck has won the top film honor from the Directors Guild of America for his CIA thriller “Argo,” further sealing its status as best-picture front-runner at the Academy Awards. Saturday’s prize also normally would make Affleck a near shoo-in to win best-director at the Feb. 24 Oscars, since the Directors Guild recipient nearly always goes on to claim the same prize at Hollywood’s biggest night. But Affleck surprisingly missed out on an Oscar directing nomina-tion, along with several other key favorites, including fellow Directors Guild contenders Kathryn Bigelow for “Zero Dark Thirty” and Tom Hooper for “Les Miserables.” Affleck has had no traction in acting honors this season, and he’s joked that no one considered it a snub when he wasn’t nominated for best actor. So a best-picture vote for “Argo” might be viewed as making right his omission from the directing lineup and acknowledging what a double-threat talent he’s become in front of and behind the camera. A best-picture prize also would send Affleck home with an Oscar. The award would go to the produc-ers of “Argo”: George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Affleck.Frank Ocean says ‘no charges’ against Brown LOS ANGELES — Frank Ocean says he won’t pursue criminal charges against Chris Brown, who is alleged to have punched Ocean in a recent fight. “As a child I thought if some-one jumped me it would result in me murdering or mutilating a man,” the R&B star wrote on his Tumblr page Saturday. “But as a man I am not a killer. I’m an artist and a modern person. I’ll choose sanity. No crimi-nal charges. No civil lawsuit.” Sunday: 1-3-18-21-34 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Monday: Afternoon: 9-3-6-8 Evening: N/A Monday: Afternoon: 3-1-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: 1-2-31-40-46-52 x4 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture “I love you, Lord, my strength. The Lord is my rock, my for-tress and my deliverer; my God is my rock, in whom I take ref-uge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.” — Psalm 18:1-2 ASSOCIATED PRESSBeyonce performs during halftime of Super Bowl XLVII footb all game Sunday in New Orleans. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESSFirearms turned in by citizens fill the bed of a pickup tr uck during the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office’s Oper ation Gun Swap in Tampa on Saturday. So many guns were turne d in, the sheriff’s office ran out of the cash and professio nal sports game tickets it was giving in exhange. Ocean Affleck

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 3A 3A No Runaround -No Hassle We can help. Denied Social Security Disability? GBIS Disability, Inc. Free Consultation 1-800-782-0059 20 years of Social Security Disability Experience www.GBISOnline.com Let us help your business SHINE! COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL Janitorial Services Tile, Grout and General Floor Maintenance Fire, Water and Storm Restoration Upholstery Cleaning Emergency Water Extraction & Dry Down Carpet & Rug Cleaning Odor Control 24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency call out (386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234 email: bayway1@windstream.net Fax: (386) 362-6822 636 Helvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida www.baywayservices.biz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services COURTESY PHOTO Sheriff welcomes new deputy Joshua Sampson (left) officially joined the Columbia County Sheriffs Office as a deputy sher iff on Friday. In a ceremony attended by family, friends and coworkers, Sampson was sworn in by Sheriff Mark Hunter (right). Sampson will be assigned to the Patrol Division. Special thanks Jorge Garcia-Bengochea (right), who co-owns Gentle Carousel Miniture Therapy Horses with his wife Debbie, presents Mayor Stephen Witt with a card signed with a hoof print for helping make their trip to Connecticut pos sible. Gentle Carousel took their show on the road to Newtown, Conn., to help comfort the victims of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The City Council donated $500 for travel expenses. Gentle Carousel received letters from Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy thanking them for their efforts. Fort White students dabble in aquaponics From staff reports Some teenagers want a car; Tiffy Murrow wants to feed the world. The Fort White High School junior has spent almost two years learning to farm fish, with help from the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and her schools agri culture adviser, Wayne Oelfke. Murrow started with glass aquaria and tropical fish, then she graduated to a 750-gallon tank housed in an equipment building on the school campus. It holds 140 tilapia destined for a soup kitchen in nearby Lake City when they reach optimum size, about one pound. But this project is about more than fish. Soon, Murrow and collabora tor Kaila Cheney, a FWHS sopho more, will begin growing veg etables on floating platforms in another part of the system, a shallow pool where water cir culates. The crops may include cucumber, tomato, lettuce and basil. With roots dangling in the water, the plants will draw mois ture and nutrients from the pool, reducing the need for fertilizer and helping maintain the ammo nia and nitrogen levels tilapia need to stay healthy. The technology is called aqua ponics, a sustainable method for raising food where farmland is scarce. Increasingly common in Third World countries, aquapon ics is still a novel concept to many Americans. But in Fort White, Murrow has plans to spread the word by holding open house events and encouraging others to investigate aquaponics as a pos sible project, hobby or business opportunity. We want to see if we can make a difference, Murrow said. This is a model showing how you can grow a large amount of food in a small amount of space. We want to set up the same kind of thing with fish ponds and incorporate it into Third World countries. Thats an ambitious goal, no doubt. But, as Oelfke points out, all of todays successful agricul tural technologies began as new fangled ideas in need of advo cates. Someone needs to be proactive and apply it and make it work, he said. Thats what Tiffys doing. And once she makes up her mind to do something, it will happen. Shes persistent. Already, Murrows persis tence has helped the project earn awards at state and national Future Farmers of America science com petitions. Shes also won a $2,500 FFA research grant, which has funded most of the equipment and supplies needed for that 750gallon system. It all started in January 2011, when Murrow and her friend Julia ONeail were enrolled in Oelfkes Foundation of Agriscience class. Asked to develop and execute a project, the two settled on raising tropical fish and aquatic plants together, trying to find ideal stock ing rates so that the plants nutri ent uptake removed metabolic wastes produced by the fish and kept the water clean. Oelfke recognized early on that water quality and fish medi cine would be important facets of the project, so he reached out to Chuck Cichra, a professor with the UF/IFAS fisheries and aquatic sci ences program in Gainesville, part of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation. Cichra helped Murrow and ONeail secure tanks and filtration equipment and taught them the basics of water chemistry, fish care, statistics and record-keep ing. The project moved forward and so did Murrows vision. Soon, she was talking about bigger fish, bigger tanks and bigger goals. As summer 2012 approached, ONeail decided to spend her free time on other activities, and Cheney a student with hydro ponic vegetable production expe rience, whod recently transferred to the school volunteered to help with the project. This past fall, Murrow and Cheney were enrolled in Oelfkes agricultural mechanics class, and the aquaponics project accounted for most of their classwork. They built a sturdy wooden platform to hold the main tank, a biologi cal filter that handles initial water treatment, and piping that moves the water around the system. They did virtually all the construc tion themselves, even learning to weld. Both teens agree theyve learned valuable skills from the project besides welding, theres persistence, ingenuity, leadership, communication and a suite of sci entific knowledge and practical know-how. Murrow hopes to pursue a career in nursing or veterinary medicine but wants to continue working in aquaponic production as a hobby. Cheney says her path may lead to a position in nursing or therapy. Regardless of where they end up, both agree that this project has made them realize that few accomplishments are out of reach for those who work hard. Students have always been ready to do these things, Oelfke said. With encouragement and some guidance, these students can and will meet the challenges of the future. Other UF/IFAS personnel who assisted with the project include Dan Canfield, Amanda Croteau, Sharon Fitz-Coy, Bob Hochmuth, Carlos Martinez, Denise Petty and Geoff Wallat. Marisol Amador/ University of Florida/IFAS Fort White High School students Tiffy Murrow, left, and Kaila Cheney toss feed pellets into a 750-gallon tank where they raise tilapia at the school. The two also plan to grow vegetable crops in another part of the system, using recirculated water to provide moisture and nutrients. They are exploring a food-production strategy called aquaponics, where fish and plant crops are raised side by side. Researchers with the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences have helped the pair with some of the technical challenges involved. Girls learn to grow fish and vegetables in water systems. MIAMI GARDENS Police say one man died and two others were wounded in a shooting outside a Super Bowl party in Miami Gardens. Reports from witnesses indicate up to 30 shots rang out as suspects drove by and opened fire on a group of people standing outside a home late Sunday. Police say a large crowd had gathered for a neigh borhood party to watch the Super Bowl. They say the dead man was a 25-year-old father of two. There was no word on the identities of him, or the other two shooting victims. Police say it initially appears the suspects targeted the men. 1 dead in Super Bowl party shooting DEREK GILLIAM /Lake City Reporter Associated Press

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OPINION Tuesday, February 5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4AThoughts about the Miss Olustee Pageant Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T here aren’t many jobs that employ-ers are handing out in this economy without anyone asking for them. But Herschel Vinyard is running Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection in his own way. Vinyard hired a right-hand man who didn’t even apply for the newly created post. And he won’t publicly explain the official’s job responsibilities, which have included overseeing the layoffs of 58 employees, some of them veterans with decades of experience. The hiring might not raise such alarm if Vinyard were a transparent public official and a committed protector of Florida’s natural resourc-es. But neither is the case, which makes the renegade nature of Randall F. “Randy” Greene’s hiring and his portfolio so troubling. The Brandon businessman said he was offered the job after applying to Gov. Rick Scott’s administration for an unpaid position on the governing board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District, an agency that oversees water use permits in a 16-county area. In his application, Greene cited no experience with government or environmental regulation, and he didn’t mention his time with a chemical company or his work coaching CEOs. Instead, Greene touted his work as a subdivision developer and as president of a utility company. When Greene sat for his interview in mid 2011, Vinyard offered to name him the agency’s chief operating officer. Vinyard won’t publicly explain the appointment; he walked away from a Tampa Bay Times reporter who asked him about Greene during a public meeting in Tallahassee. But in a five-page memo to his boss, Greene listed a number of accomplishments. Among them: initiating a reor-ganization of the Tampa district office (where he spoke with companies the DEP regulates) and vetting candidates for senior management jobs. The reorganization of the two agency sections saw 58 layoffs, including some employees with 20 or more years of experience. Greene said he didn’t make the decision on which administrators to retain but “might have” recommended whom to ax. This is another egregious example, even for Scott’s administration, of freelance governing on the part of a public agency. And Vinyard’s refusal to publicly account for the arrangement speaks to why this side deal shouldn’t exist. Farming out decisionmaking authority on the operations side to a contract employee reeks of political gamesmanship and undermines the morale of career employees and the department’s reputa-tion. Vinyard still doesn’t grasp the concept of public service, and the secretary’s poor judgment reflects squarely on the governor. DEP chief is mum, and that speaks volumes ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comTo the Editor:I want to offer my congratulations to the winners in the recent Miss Olustee Pageant, and to their parents, their grandparents, all of their aunts and uncles and their in-laws. I’m sure they are very proud of their family member who might have won the title of Pre-Teen Miss Olustee, Junior Miss Olustee, the actual Miss Olustee, Baby Miss Olustee, Miniature Miss Olustee, Tiny Miss Olustee and Petite Miss Olustee. I am certain that these eight girls who were named as a winner in one of the categories are all very proud, along with their families. At the same time, I wonder how much disappointment there was involved with the families of other girls who did not get selected. We all know that in any contest there has to be winners and losers, but it must be terrible to go away from a contest where there were eight titles to be won, and your child went away with nothing. That must be a terrible feeling, not only for the family but for whatever child was entered who did not win anything. It seems that out of eight categories to be won it would be hard to understand why one family’s child did not get anything at all, and that simply must have an adverse effect on that child, of which there were a great many. My suggestion as to how this situation might be corrected is to not limit the winners to the eight categories now existing, which are Pre-Teen, Junior, Miss, Baby, Miniature, Little, Tiny and Petite. Perhaps a few more cat-egories could be selected, such as Microscopic Miss Olustee, Almost Invisible Miss Olustee, Bacteria-Sized Miss Olustee, Infant Miss Olustee, Indiscernible Miss Olustee, Featherweight Miss Olustee, Middleweight Miss Olustee, Hard-to-find Miss Olustee and perhaps even Premature Miss Olustee, Embryonic Miss Olustee, Miniscule Miss Olustee and Iddy-Biddy Miss Olustee. Thus, instead of eight girls being able to leave the contest as winners, this would increase the number of winners to 20 girls. Maybe this would give some of the other fami-lies a chance to have a family mem-ber win something in the pageant, and not have quite so many go away saddened and disheartened and feeling that their child should have won but didn’t. I have personally always refused to contribute to anything having to do with a beauty pageant. Although the winner of such a contest goes away with a great deal of pride and happiness, the other contestants who do not win go away feeling rejected, with low self-esteem and a great deal of disappointment, and I feel these negative emotions are more significant than the feeling of pride that the winner must feel. I do not personally feel that such pride is not earned, because it is. Any girl winning in any category of the Miss Olustee Festival Pageant has the right to be proud, but then all of the losers, I suppose, have the right to be saddened, disheartened and disappointed, not to mention the waste of time and expense get-ting the losing contestants their nice, dressy outfits for entrance into the pageant. Maybe next year we can have 20 categories of contestants, and take in a bigger segment of the population. Lastly, I am somewhat surprised that the NAACP has not made the appropriate uproar after this pag-eant, due to the fact that only one black girl was selected out of all of the categories. It should not be lost on anyone that black people were the chief beneficiaries, if any, of the Civil War. The Battle of Olustee was a part of the Civil War and, there-fore, was fought partly because of and in consideration of blacks who were at that time slaves in the South. I did not attend the pageant, so I do not know how many black contes-tants there were, but from just read-ing the paper, it seems odd that not more than one black girl would have been selected, even though she won probably the highest honor. This is not meant as any criticism at all of the people who organize and present the pageant. I do con-fess to finding it a little bit unusual for one pageant to have so many different categories, and if we’re going to go that route, we might as well increase it to 20, which I have suggested. Lenvil H. Dicks Lake City4AOPINIONW hen I tell you my lat-est news-paper sales pitch, I know you’ll think I belong in a rehab program for pathological liars. But I’m not fibbing when I report the best reason I’ve ever seen for reading a news-paper: It will make you happy.I didn’t make that up, folks. There it is on page 47 of the January 2013 issue of Prevention magazine. “Reading a Newspaper” is one of six things listed in an article titled “6 Weird Things That Make You Happy.” Here’s what Prevention says: “If you’re among the 19 million Americans who have canceled their daily paper, it’s time to resub-scribe or read the online edition of your local Daily Planet. Perusing a broad-sheet instead of gawking at the TV emerged as a key difference between mostand least-happy folks in a University of Maryland study that analyzed how more than 30,000 people spend their time.” I knew it, I knew it, I knew it. Television makes you sad; newspa-pers make you happy. (No doubt the happiness theory applies to weekly newspapers, too.) Several of us hardnosed newspaper hounds finally gave up trying to get tele-vision banned from the Earth. We knew TV was depressing long before “positivity researchers” — whoever they are — came out with their list of “unexpected happiness triggers that can turn your frown upside down,” as Prevention puts it. It is legal, we all know, to telecast shows and news programs that’ll slam-dunk the most Pollyanna-ish person into a pit of depression. Allow me to cite some of the culprits: Q TV weather coverage: Television is useful when a real storm is on the way. But sometimes competing TV stations go overboard. For example, much of the South just lived through another winter storm watch of almost unprec-edented potential. TV camera people fanned out to seven counties, all of them looking for freezing rain and/or sleet. When they finally found enough to show up, they placed their cameras on the ground to make it look like Antarctica. They interviewed people who said things like, “Yeah, I seen some ice on a car over on Main Street.” It’s depressing. Senior citi-zens were afraid to walk outside to get their news-papers. Q Reality shows: We all know that reality is not choosing your bride — or your groom — from a bevy of beautiful people waiting with bated breath and eager eyes. If that’s reality, we all missed it. It’s depressing. (Honey, I’m happy with my choice nonetheless.) I’m too distraught to mention such shows as “Honey Boo Boo.” They make Southerners look like nincompoops. Q 24-hour cable news: If you’re covering the news nonstop for 24 hours a day, eventually you’ll interview someone who’ll say something really stupid, a live com-ment that will be dissemi-nated around the world. That stupid comment will be repeated on the next 47 newscasts. It’s depressing. OK, I’ve given you three depressing elements of television. Now, don’t you really appreciate the newspaper you’re read-ing? Don’t you feel hap-pier already? I’m going to read one right now. You’ll have to read this column to find out how to be happy Phil Hudginsphudgins@cninewspapers.com Q Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community Newspapers Inc. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Q Tampa Bay Times

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Feb. 5 Musicians to perform The Friends of the Library welcome a perfor mance by folk music duo Hungrytown at 7 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Musicians Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson will perform music from their two acclaimed albums, Hungrytown (2008) and Any Forgotten Thing (2011). Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas holdem poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Boys program The Lake City Parks and Recreation Department has openings for its afterschool structured activ ity for boys, The program is held at the Teen Town Community Center, next to the Lake City Girls Club. The program is licensed by the Department of Children and Families and the staff is DCF certified. The current session runs through March 15 and the cost is $200. Bus service from the schools is includ ed. For more information, contact Heyward Christie at (386) 754-3607 or email christieh@lcfla.com. Feb. 6 Newcomers lunch The Lake City Newcomers friendship lunch will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Texas Roadhose res taurant on U.S. 90 West. For more information, contacte Rose Taylor at 755-2175 or Barbara Test at 754-7227. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Festival planning The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Feb. 7Forest workshop Columbia County Extension is offering a Forest Stewardship Program workshop on tim berland security from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Landowners, especially those who dont reside on their land, may be at risk of losses or costs resulting from tres pass, timber theft, dump ing, drug farming, wildfire, arson or other property violations. This workshop will help landowners be more aware of security risks and take steps to minimize them. A $10 fee covers lunch and materials. Register online at http:// fsp-workshop020713.event brite.com/. Those without web access can reserve a space by contacting the Extension office at (386) 752-5384. Space is limited, so register early. Debutants meeting The Debutants Society will have an informational meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The meet ing is for for girls and boys in 11th and 12th grades who might be interested in becoming members. Minister Jan Harrison is the organization contact person. Feb. 8 Music concert Country music singer Tracy Lawrence will per form at Florida Gateway Colleges Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrence has amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including Alibis, If the Good Die Young and Find Out Who Your Friends Are. For tickets or more information, call (386) 754-4340 or visit www. fgcentertainment.com. Art League exhibit The Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening recep tion will be at 6 p.m. at the colleges Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109. Festival vendors The Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 4383131, visit the festival web site, www.olusteefestival. com, or email vendorinfo@ olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited. Theater performance High Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Death of a Salesman tonight through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are availabe at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspringscommunity theater.com. For more information, call (386) 454-3525. Theater productions Acrosstown Repertory Theatre, 619 S. Main St. in Gainesville, will present special shows this week end. On Friday at 8 p.m., Theatre Strike Forces Sunday Group will pres ents an evening of longform improvisation. On Saturday at 8 p.m., Mandisa Haarhoof will perform a one-woman show, CrushHopper: Rush-Hopper, about growing up in South Africa. On Sunday at 2 p.m., a staged reading of a the Greek play Herakles by Euripides will be given. Tickets are $10 to $25 for all three shows. Tickets may be purchased at the door 30 minutes before each show; tickets may also be reserved by calling (352) 505-0868. Feb. 9 BCU alumni The Columbia County Chapter of BethuneCookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU president Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence. The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the univer sity scholarship fund. Writing program The Friends of the Library host Liz Coursen in presenting Self-Editing in the Internet Age: How to Edit Your Words Without Losing Your Mind at 3:30 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Whether youre a full-fledged author or someone who edits your organizations news letter or wesite, learn the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar that will help improve your writing and put a shine on your fin ished product. Black History Month Black History Month organizers will host a Trip to Freedom bus trip to Fort Mose at St. Augustine, the first all-black cettle ment in the United States. The bus will leave at 7a.m. from Richardson Community Center. Cost is $25, which includes entry fees and lunch. To register or for more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 8671601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts. org. Elks event B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple will have a Black History Month program at the Richardson Center at 10 a.m. The speaker will be L. C. Bradley. For more infor mation, call Mrs. Margaret Carter at (386) 752-3533. Shriners fish fry Lake City Shrine Club will have a fish fry begin ning at 7 p.m. at the Shrine clubhouse on Northwest Brown Road, west of Lake City. The cost of $7 includes fried fish and all the trim mings. Funds raised will benefit the Lake City Shrine Club and are not tax-deductible. For more information or to order ahead, call Bob Breyer at 365-1388. RHS alumni meeting Richardson High School Alumni will have a roundup meeting at noon at the Richardson Community Center. For further information, call (386) 752-0815. Feb. 10 Library group meeting The Friends of the Library will have its annual meeting program, Having Fun, Wish You Were Here!: An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida, presented by Liz Coursen at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Take a trip back in time through Floridas varied and exciting history, using museum-quality vintage postcards. The program will also include vintage postcards featuring Lake City and other regional locations and a chance to win your own vintage Lake City postcard. Christian concert The Christian music group Brian Free and Assurance will give a con cert at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Live Oak and Lake City at the intersection with Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. More infor mation about the church is available online www.well bornbaptist.com or by call ing (386) 963-2231. Feb. 11 Coalition meeting The Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway Inc. executive/ finance committee will meet at 3 p.m. at the coali tion Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. Anyone with a dis ability requiring special assistance to attend should contact Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 5A 5A 1001306 As life changes, so do your needs. Let State Farm Bank help with a mortgage that ts your life and your budget. Let us help you make the right move. Bank with a Good Neighbor CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Shopping for a mortgage? State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL We have a great selection. Some products and services not available in all areas. John Kasak, Agent State Farm Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 NMLS # 382656 Jay Poole, AAMS Financial Advisor 846 S W Baya Drive Lake City FL 32025 386-752-3545 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health FREE book by doctor reveals what the (800) 333-1950 www.eddoctor.com. In Loving Memory Roger Gillen 2/16/35/5/12 You will always be forever loved & missed. Your wife, children & grandchildren Dr. George Jan Corvin Dr. George Jan Corvin, 76, died late Friday evening on February 1, 2013 at the Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City, Florida after an extended illness. He was the son of the late Zygmunt and Jadwiga Litwinski, of Warsaw, Po land. He was preceded in death by his He had made Lake City his home for the past 23 years having originally emi grated from Poland in the 1980s when he became a US citizen. Although he was very humble and private about his military career, Dr. Corvin was a highlydecorated Captain in the US Army who was awarded a Sil ver Star, a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart for his service in the Vietnam War. As a result of his military background, he was very patriotic and felt his true calling was his subsequent medi cal career caring for Veterans. He was retired from the Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Lake City after twenty-two years of devoted service as an Anesthesiologist. He special ized in Pain Management, and enjoyed training and mentoring many other physicians and medi cal care providers throughout his career. He touched the lives of many patients who have valued his compassionate care. He was a member of the NRA, the As soc. of the United States Army, and a member of the First Pres byterian Church of Lake City where he served as an usher. He enjoyed traveling, target shoot ing, reading, and in his earlier years: sailing and playing tennis. He proudly loved and provided for his children, stepchildren and grandchildren and was a dedicat ed family members and friends. Dr. Corvin is survived by his de voted wife of eight years Betty Corvin, Lake City, FL; one sis ter Jadwiga Wolska (Witus), Poland; one son Jerzy Litwinski (Malgosia), Poland; two daugh ters Anya Corvin, Seminole, FL; Julian Corvin (France Roy) Jersey City, NJ; two stepdaugh ters Natashia Tucker, Lake City; Lasheka Tucker, Atlanta, GA; one Godson Reginald Williams (Karen) Jacksonville, FL; three Goddaughters Elizabeth Hamil ton, Teresa McCuan and Laurie Shoemaker (Matt); two special friends Haleem Moussa, Lake City; and Scott Bailey, Lake City; his father and mother-inlaw Ocie and Irene Tanniehill, in-laws Sheron Smith (Patrick), Alabaster, AL; Brenda Mitchell (Roderick) Alabaster, AL; Cas sandra White, Alabaster, AL; Lenora Harris (Mack), Alabas ter, AL; Teresa Lacey (Quincy), Montevallo, AL. Six grandchil dren and a host of nieces and nephews also survive. Funeral services for Dr. Corvin will be conducted on Friday, February 8th at 2pm at the First Presby terian Church of Lake City. Ar rangements are under the direc tion of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)752-1234 please sign our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Michael Edenfield, a technician with Donald F. Lee and Associates engineering firm, adjusts a surveying instrument while surveying on Baya Avenue on Monday. Edenfield said the survey ing is being done in preparation for future road projects. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com. Getting the lay of the land

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Florida led the way in chal lenging the constitutional ity of the Affordable Care Act. Some Democrats are now accusing state agen cies of not having a Plan B in case the law was upheld, leading lawmakers to make crucial decisions on tight deadlines. For now, it appears Florida will allow federal health officials to run an online state exchange, where consumers can shop for health insurance. Florida must also decide whether to expand Medicaid under the fed eral health overhaul and offer health insurance to an additional roughly 900,000 residents. Meanwhile, the state is waiting on the feds to sign off on the statewide priva tization request. Federal health offi cials have been cautious all along about Floridas statewide privatization request to continue with an overhaul that expands on a five-county pilot pro gram. HHS officials have said they want to make sure the state addresses concerns about access to health care in the program raised by some residents. In 2011, federal health officials allowed the state to continue running the five-county pilot program, but insisted on new protec tions, more accountability, and quality reporting. Some doctors have dropped out of the pilot program, complaining of red tape and that the insurers deny the tests and medicine they prescribe. Patients have com plained they struggled to get doctors appointments. Supporters of the over haul say new accountabil ity measures will address those concerns. Several health plans also dropped out of the pilot program saying they couldnt make enough money. Patients com plained they were bounced from plan to plan with laps es in care. Federal health officials have also noted concern about those disruptions during the nearly two-year negotiations. Whatleys body was identified through DNA evidence, Getzan said. The mobile home Whatley and Ford shared was located along Interstate 75 off Lake Jeffery Road. Law enforcement found tire tracks leading to a gap in the fence that separat ed the property from the interstate. The gap had been created by cutting the fence. Getzan said police found wire cutters in the vehicle Ford drove to Polk County, and an expert positively identified the wire cutters produced the marks left on the chain-link fence. Also, Whatleys two inside dogs and a pet African Gray Parrot, still inside the bird cage, were outside away from the mobile home engulfed in flames. Getzan said there was no dog door or any other way for the dogs to leave the mobile home. One of the witnesses said the smaller of the two dogs was in a kennel outside the burning home. Payne said there are gaps in the evidence against Ford. The fire mar shal could not find gasoline at the scene of the crime, he said. Getzan said the fire mar shal ruled out all other pos sible explanations for the fire. She said he will testify the fire was started in the living room where a couch would have been. Police located Ford by tracking him when he used his cell phone, Payne said. Payne said the state will not be able to prove Ford committed the crime beyond a reasonable doubt. After you have heard all the evidence, it will leave you with as many questions as answers, Payne said. Getzan said the evidence will point to the conclusion that Ford is guilty He intentionally set that fire, he intentionally cut that fence with premeditation and left her, she said. Left her to die in that fire. The trial is estimated to last about a week. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Longer you stay, Less you pay Monthly Unlimited See store for details. WILSONS CONTAINERS Construction/Debris Containers Available 755-7060 Delivered to your job site today Bring your unwanted Gold, Silver & Platinum to someone you can trust Precious metals are seeing record values. Please call me for a private and con dential appointment to sell or trade your unwanted gold, silver and platinum. George R. Ward Downtown Lake City (386) 752-5470 SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH GOSPEL SING Friday, February 8 7:00 p.m. featuring: Herman Hampton Gayle Moore Mandy Grimmett Pine Grove Choir GUNS: Obama admits he may not get everything he wants from Congress Continued From Page 1A ABDUCTOR: Boy rescued after talks deteriorate Continued From Page 1A MEDICAID: Federal health officials OK plan Continued From Page 1A and from the National Rifle Association. Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has said he wants to give the bans on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines a vote. But he will not say whether he will support either, and advo cates and opponents alike predict they are unlikely to pass. Putting the controver sial measures up for a vote could put some Democratic senators in a tough spot. That includes some from conservative-leaning states who are up for re-election next year and face the prospect of voting against either fervent gun-rights supporters or Obama and gun-control supporters in the partys base. Reid himself came in for criticism for declining to stand with the president by Minneapolis Democratic mayor, R.T. Rybak, who accompanied Obama while he was in town. Hes danc ing around this issue and people are dying in this country, Rybak said of Reid on MSNBC. Democratic lawmak ers and aides, as well as lobbyists, say an assault weapons ban has the least chance of being approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee that is work ing up the legislation. They say a ban on high-capacity magazines is viewed as the next least likely proposal to survive, though some compromise version of it might, allowing more than the 10-round maximum that Obama favors. Likeliest to be included are universal background checks and prohibitions against gun trafficking, they say. One lobbyist said other possible terms include steps to improve record keeping on resales of guns and perhaps pro visions that would make it harder for mentally ill people from obtaining fire arms. Asked last week what was likely to be in his com mittees bill, committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said he didnt yet know but I dont know how anybody can be opposed to universal background checks. He added, I think gun trafficking, youve got to be able to close that. I dont know how anybody, anybody can object to that. Obama also was more upbeat on the prospects of universal background checks, including for pur chases at gun shows. The good news is that were starting to see a con sensus emerge about the action Congress needs to take, he said. The vast majority of Americans, including a majority of gun owners, support requir ing criminal background checks for anyone trying to buy a gun. Theres no reason why we cant get that done. He urged Americans to call their members of Congress to push for his entire package of stronger gun controls. Tell them now is the time for action. Changing the status quo is never easy, Obama said. This will be no excep tion. The only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the American people decide its impor tant, if you decide its important, if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, Americans of every background stand up and say, this time, its got to be different. Weve suffered too much pain to stand by and do nothing. The White House says Obama is not writing off any part of his package despite the long odds for the assault weapons ban in particular before votes are scheduled or he takes his arguments on the road. Ahead of Mondays trip, the White House released a photo of the president skeet shooting at Camp David, the presidential retreat, which prompted more question about the presidents experience with guns. White House press sec retary Jay Carney said he was not aware of Obama personally owning any firearms. He said Obama has shot a gun elsewhere, although he didnt know when or if he had done sobefore becoming president. He never intended to sug gest he had grown up as a hunter, Carney said. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Public defender Blair Payne delivers his opening statements at Kenneth Allen Fords murder trial on Monday. Assistant State Attorney Roberta Getzan gestures while mak ing her opening remarks Monday. TRIAL: Man faces charge of first-degree murder Continued From Page 1A has long relied on a strong Christian faith, a policy of love thy neighbor and the power of group prayer. The childs plight prompted nightly can dlelight vigils. Throughout the ordeal, authori ties had been speaking with Dykes though a plastic pipe that went into the shelter. They also sent food, med icine and other items into the bunker, which apparently had running water, heat and cable television but no toilet. It was about 4 feet underground, with about 50 square feet of floor space. Authorities said the kindergartner appeared unharmed. He was taken to a hospital in nearby Dothan. Officials have said he has Aspergers syn drome and attention deficit hyperac tivity disorder. FBI bomb technicians were clear ing the property for explosive devices and planned to look more closely at the scene when its safe, FBI spokes man Jason Pack said. Daryle Hendry, who lives about a quarter-mile from the bunker, said he heard a boom Monday afternoon, followed by what sounded like a gun shot. Melissa Knighton, city clerk in Midland City, said a woman had been praying in the town center Monday afternoon. Not long after, the mayor called with news that Dykes was dead and that the boy was safe. She must have had a direct line to God because shortly after she left, they heard the news, Knighton said. Neighbors described Dykes as a menacing, unpredictable man who once beat a dog to death with a lead pipe, threatened to shoot children for setting foot on his property and patrolled his yard at night with a flashlight and a firearm. Government records and inter views with neighbors indicate that Dykes joined the Navy in Midland City and served on active duty from 1964 to 1969.

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ON CAMPUS CLASS NOTESQ To leave an anonymous message about a pos sible dangerous situation concerning Columbia County schools, call toll-free, (866) 295-7303.Q To leave an anonymous mesage about a pos sible truancy problem in Columbia County schools, call 758-4947.Q Items for the school page should be dropped off or mailed to: Jim Barr, Lake City Reporter 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055; faxed to (386) 752-9400; or emailed to jbarr@lakecityreporter.com by 5 p.m. Thursdays. BulletinBoard NEWS ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS Niblack Elementary SchoolFamily NightThe is having a free dinner for its students and their parents from 5 to 7:30 tonight in the cafeteria Each grade level will have a tip for parents and will toot about what is going on in their classes. A drawing will be held for a microwave oven donated by Walmart.Westside Elementary SchoolHoop Shoot winnersCongratulations to Jalyria Miller for receiv-ing first place for girls in the 12-13 age group in the Hoop Shoot competition at District level and second place for the Regional level. Also Marquez Bell received first place in the boys 12-13 age group at the District level and third place at Regional.Great gradesWestside would like to congratulate all of our stu-dents for a great second six weeks. We had 134 stu-dents make A Honor Roll, 165 made AB Honor Roll, and 63 had perfect atten-dance. We are very proud of our students.Science fairCongratulations to the following students for their accomplishments at the recent District Science Fair: fifth grade; Victoria Marshall, first place in the Biology Division, and Overall Best Project of the Science Fair, Sklya Hill, honorable mention; fourth grade, Amari Murphy, hon-orable mentionl; second grade, Gabe Crooms, hon-orable mention, and Arnav Kapasi, honorable mention.Five Points Elementary School100 days of schoolKindergarten classes celebrated 100 days of school by doing fun and educational activities. The classes of Mrs. Ashley Feagle, Mrs. Kim Fortner, Ms. Jennifer Holme and Mrs. Somer Jenkin made fruit-ring necklaces, glued 100 things to paper crowns, mixed together trail mix, and ate cake in celebration of this milestone. COURTESY PHOTOSkilled judgesLake City Middle School Future Farmers of America horse judging team placed fourth in the state career development event in Okeechobee on Jan. 18. During the event, teams judged four halter classes and competed in a ‘skillathon,’ iden tifying breeds, colors and markings, tack, feed, horseshoes, knots, gaits, and conformation flaws. The LCMS team, composed of all first-year members, will be recognized during the 8 5th Florida FFA Convention. CALENDAR Tuesday Richardson Middle School — School Advisory Council meeting in Title I Parent/Teacher Resource Room, 7:30 a.m.; Wolf soft-ball vs, Lake Butler, 5 p.m., away. Summers Elementary School — First grade RtI meeting, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; third through fifth grade Reading Night in cafeteria, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Fort White Elementary School — Family Reading Night, 5:30 tp 7:30 p.m. Westside Elementary School — Fifth grade Data Day. Lake City Middle School — Grade-level department meeting, 8 a.m.; Fusion vol-leyball practice in gym, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.Wednesday Melrose Park Elementary School — Pre-kindergarten field trip to KC's Produce. Summers Elementarh — Second 2nd grade RtI meet-ing, 8 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Fort White Elementary — End of third AR period. LCMS — AVID meeting in Media Center, 8 a.m.Thursday Sumers Elementary — Third grade RtI meeting, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; fourth grade FCAT Writing Bootcamp, 8 to 9 a.m. RMS — Wolf softball vs. Fort White Middle School, 5 p.m., away; Wolf baseball vs. FWMS, 5 p.m.. away. Five Points Elementary School — Lake City Police K-9 Unit visits second-grade classes, 9 a.m. Eastside Elementary School — Reading Night in Media Center, 2:15 to 8 p.m. Westside Elementary —First grade Data Day. LCMS — Chorus Parent Night in room 217, 6 p.m.; Fusion volleyball practice in gym, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Teacher of the Year — Program and reception at First Presbyterian Church, 4 p.m.Friday RMS — Student Councilsponsored dance in cafete-ria, 6 to 9 p.m. Summers Elementary — Fourth-grade FCAT Writing Bootcamp, 8 to 9 a.m.; fourthand fifth-grade Student Council pre-pare for volunteer brunch in Cafeteria, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Five Points Elementary — Lake City Police safety talk with second-graders, 9 a.m. Eastside Elementary — Group pictures in Tiger Den LCMS — Falcon soccer banquet at Parkview Baptist Church, 6 p.m. Lake City Reporter 7A LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04247ASCHOOL 234 SW Main Blvd. • 752-5866 Af_e9liej#@@@ 8^\ek DXip?%Jldd\iXcc =`eXeZ`XcJ\im`Z\jI\g%For Life Insurance Go With Someone You Know COURTESY PHOTOTeacher of the Year candidatesThe Nu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma welcomed the 2012-13 Teacher of the Year candidates to its January meeting. Teacher of the Year candidate s introduced themselves and gave a brief description of why they were chosen to represent their school. Delta Kappa Gamma is a nonprofit organization that strives to support and encour age intercultural understanding and encourage standards of excellence in education. The Teac her of the Year reception will be at 4 p.m. Thursday at the First Presbyterian Church. Picture are : (seated, from left) Cherie Hill, president; Brooke Bedenbaugh, vice preside nt; Lisa Lee, second vice president; Andrea Cox, recording secretary; Jennifer Saucer, tre asurer; and Laurie Stephens, corresponding secretary; (standing) Becky Zoelle, Lake C ity Middle School; Denetria Stokes, Challenge Learning Center; Denise Gillyard, Summ ers Elementary School; Carrie Cooper, Columbia High School; Sarah Smith-Ripple, Eastsi de Elementary School; Michele VanBennekom, Five Points Elementary School; Al Nelson, Ri chardson Middle School; Nicole Carr, Fort White Elementary School; Beth Cason, Melr ose Park Elementary School; Thayla Mullins, Niblack Elementary School; Maxine Willi ams, Westside Elementary School; Lauren Gerling, CCE; Tina Johnson, Fort White Middle/High School; abd Jamie L. Stamper, Pinemount Elementary School. COURTESY PHOTOMelrose Park young artists Melrose Park Elementary School’s Young Artists of the Mo nth for January are: (front row, from left) Mason Cray, grade three; Kaylyn Evans, grade on e; Reagan Vinson, grade one; and Jordan Jones, grade two; (back row) art teacher Betsy Ward; Isaiah Henderson, grade two; Joshua Eadie, grade three; and Principal Laurie Ann Fike. The Young Artist of the Month program is a partnership between the Columbia County Sc hool System and Sunstate Federal Credit Union, Mix 94.3, Lake City Advertiser and Pizza Bo y Pizza. COURTESY PHOTOWorld Water Monitoring Day Richardson Middle sixth-grade SAIL students Jessica Harris and Jaxon Melton participated in World Water Monitoring Day at Ichetucknee Springs State Park. The SAIL students participate in a series of environmental labs as part of the Learning In Florida’s Environment program through the state Department of Environmental Protection and sponsored by The Ichetucknee Partnership and the JB Butler Science Grant. UGA getting new presidentAssociated PressATLANTA — Just after he was officially hired as the University of Georgia’s 22nd president Monday, Jere Morehead announced that a major capital cam-paign is in the school’s future and changes to the university’s organizational structure could be on the horizon. The Georgia Board of Regents quickly voted 18-0 to hire Morehead, who is the current provost and a 1980 graduate of the University of Georgia School of Law. He also as senior vice president for academic affairs. He will start his new job on July 1. Morehead says he’ll assemble a small team to help him transition into the new role after Michael Adams retires at the end of June, and will focus on nurturing relationships with lawmakers, students and alumni.

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Associated PressFor the fifth straight week there is a new No. 1 in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll. This time it’s Indiana. The Hoosiers, the preseason No. 1 who held the top spot for the first five weeks of the regu-lar season, moved up two spots Monday, following their weekend win over No. 1 Michigan and No. 2 Kansas’ loss to Oklahoma State. The Hoosiers received 58 first-place votes from the 65-member national media panel while Florida, which jumped two spots to second, got the other seven. Duke started the current streak of new No. 1s and was followed by Louisville, Duke again, From staff reportsFORT WHITE — The District 5-4A boys basketball tournament is at Fort White High this week and the Indians need only serve as hosts for today’s first round. Fort White (8-2 in district play) is the No. 1 seed and will enter the fray on Friday. Williston High (8-2) is the No. 2 seed, and also gets a first-round bye. The championship game is 7 p.m. Saturday. The tournament begins today with two games: Q No. 4 seed Santa Fe High (5-5) plays No. 5 Interlachen High (3-7) at 6 p.m.; Q No. 3 Bradford High (7-3) plays No. 6 Keystone Heights High (0-10) at 7:30 p.m. Fort White plays the Santa Fe/ Interlachen winner at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Williston plays the Bradford/Keystone Heights winner at 6 p.m. Friday in the other semifinal game. Both semifinal winners will advance to the state playoffs. The tournament winner will host an opening round game, while the runner-up will have to travel for its first game. Williston is the defending district champion. Admission to the tournament is $6; only State Series passes are accepted. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s girls basket-ball team is advancing to the state playoffs for the first time. The Lady Indians came up short against host Bradford High in the District 5-4A championship game on Saturday, but qualified for the state playoffs as district runner-up. Fort White will play Trinity Catholic High at 7 p.m. Thursday in Ocala. Bradford stays at home and will play Mount Dora High. In the other half of District 5’s mini-bracket, Atlantic High hosts Cocoa Beach High and West Shore High hosts Lake Highland Prep. Fort White, which was the No. 3 seed for the dis-trict tournament, gave No. 1 By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s softball team is young and will have to grow up fast. The Lady Indians open the 2012 season on the road against Gainesville High at 6 p.m. today. Fort White has a couple of preseason games under its belt — a win over Bronson High and a loss to Union County High last week. Fort White hosted the preseason classic, which included Williston High, and will also host the District 5-4A tournament at the end of the season. The district includes Bradford High, Interlachen High, Keystone Heights High, Santa Fe High and Williston. “All of them are going to be tough,” head coach Cassie Sparks said. “They haven’t lost a lot while we are brand new.” Keystone Heights is defending champion in the district and the Indians from Clay County made the state semifinals last year. Bradford was runner-up and advanced to the second round. Fort White has a roster of 14 with two seniors (Kendell Day, Ashley D’Antonio) and two juniors (Emily Roach, Jessica Widlan). Freshman Morgan Cushman joins nine Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, February 5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTSToday Q Columbia High softball vs. Wolfson High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Gainesville High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball at Buchholz High in preseason game, 6 p.m. Wednesday Q Fort White High baseball vs. Melody Christian Academy in preseason game, 7 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High softball vs. Buchholz High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High softball at Bronson High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball at Trinity Catholic High in Region 2-4A quarterfinals, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High baseball vs. Union County High in preseason game, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High baseball at North Marion High in preseason game, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High wrestling in Region 1-2A meet at Matanzas High in Palm Coast, TBA Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High/Interlachen High winner in District 5-4A tournament at Fort White, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High’s Kayla Carman, Dana Roberts and Charline Watson in state weight-lifting meet at Kissimmee Civic Center, 10:30 a.m. Q Columbia High wrestling in Region 1-2A meet at Matanzas High in Palm Coast, TBA Q Fort White High track at Florida High All Comers Meet, TBA GAMES BRIEFS YOUTH BASEBALL Fort White Babe Ruth registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball registration for its spring league is at the South Columbia Sports Complex concession stand from 4-7 p.m. Thursday. League costs for age groups are 4-6 (T-ball) $45, 7-8 $55, 9-10 $65, 11-12 $75 and 13-15 $85. A birth certificate is required if a child has not previously played in the Fort White leagues. Late registration will be offered on Saturday with a $5 additional charge.Coaches are needed and can register on the same dates. For details, call Chris Sharpe at (386) 292-4224.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has registration for its spring league at Southside Sports Complex from 6-8 p.m. Friday and Monday. Five leagues are offered for ages 4-6 (coach pitch), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-15. Fee is $95. A parent or guardian must accompany player and provide a birth certificate. Online registration continues at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897.Q From staff reports SOFTBALL continued on 2B Fort White High softball begins season today. INDIANS continued on 6B Lady Indians basketball makes state playoff field. GATORS continued on 6B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Ayla Gonzalez, 17, warms up before prac tice on Monday. Play ball Postseason firstTIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterFort White High head coach DeShay Harris (left) rallies the Lady Indians during their Jan. 8 win over Keystone H eights High. Fort White hosts district tourneyJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders (22) drives during a g ame on Jan. 31. Gators top out at No. 2

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sophomores — Caitlyn Bruce, Ashley Chesney, Shea Chesney, Mallorie Godbey, Alya Gonzalez, Alexa Hatcher, Kayla Redwine, Alex Walker and Sydney Walker. “We are having to go back and teach so many fundamentals, we will definitely be underdogs,” Sparks said. Sparks said Alex Walker and Cushman will split the pitching duties. Hatcher will be behind the plate, backed up by Redwine. “The bats are starting off good, but we need to work on defense and the mental game,” Sparks said. “The defense needs to make the plays behind the pitchers if they want them to do their job on the mound and throw strikes.” The Chesneys, the Walkers, Hatcher, D’Antonio and Widlan have varsity experience. Fort White has no junior varsity this year, so the younger players will have to learn on the go. “We have high expectations that we will grow and get better,” Sparks said. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Florida at ArkansasESPN2 — Villanova at DePaul 9 p.m. ESPN — Ohio St. at Michigan NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Tampa Bay at PhiladelphiaFOOTBALLNFL postseason final Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 9Seattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 2OTSan Francisco 45, Green Bay 31Atlanta 30, Seattle 28New England 41, Houston 28 Conference Championships San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24Baltimore 28, New England 13 Pro Bowl NFC 62, AFC 35 Super Bowl Baltimore 34, San Francisco 31 Super Bowl records INDIANAPOLIS — Records set or tied in the 2013 Super Bowl: RECORDS SET Individual Most Combined Yards, Game — 290, Jacoby Jones, Baltimore. Longest Kickoff Return — 108 yards (TD), Jacoby Jones, Baltimore. Longest Touchdown Run, Quarterback — 15 yards, Colin Kaepernick, San Francisco. Team Most Kickoff-Return Yards, Both Teams — 312 (Baltimore 206, San Francisco 106) Longest Time Of Game — 4:14 RECORDS TIED Individual Most Touchdowns, Plays of 50-orMore Yards, Game — 2, Jacoby Jones, Baltimore. Most Receiving Yards, Game, Tight End — 104, Vernon Davis, San Francisco. Most Touchdowns, Kickoff Returns, Game — 1, Jacoby Jones, Baltimore. Most Safeties, Game — 1, Chris Culliver. Team Most Touchdowns, Kickoff Returns, Game, Team — 1, Baltimore. Most Safeties, Game, Team — 1, San Francisco. Most Players, 100-or-More Receiving Yards, Game, Team — 2, San Francisco (Michael Crabtree 109, Vernon Davis 104) Most Points, Third Quarter, Both Teams — 24 (San Francisco 17, Baltimore 7). Most Field Goals, Game, Both Teams — 5 (San Francisco 3, Baltimore 2). Fewest Rushing Touchdowns, Game, Team — 0, Baltimore. NOTABLES Joe Flacco threw 11 touchdown passes in the postseason following the 2012 season, tying the NFL single-postseason record shared by Joe Montana (postsea-son after 1989 season) and Kurt Warner (postseason after 2008 season). Flacco and Montana did not throw an intercep-tion during those respective postseasons. Ed Reed made the ninth interception of his postseason career, tying the NFL record shared by Charlie Waters, Bill Simpson and Ronnie Lott. This Super Bowl was the second league championship game in NFL his-tory (including the pre-Super Bowl era) in which each team scored 30-or-more points. Pittsburgh defeated Dallas, 35-31, in the 1979 Super Bowl. BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Memphis, 8 p.m.Milwaukee at Denver, 9 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Charlotte at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Indiana at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 7 p.m.New York at Washington, 7 p.m.Memphis at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Brooklyn at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Golden State at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Utah, 9 p.m.San Antonio at Minnesota, 9 p.m. Thursday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m.Chicago at Denver, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 3, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Indiana (58) 20-2 1,615 3 2. Florida (7) 18-2 1,536 4 3. Michigan 20-2 1,490 1 4. Duke 19-2 1,413 5 5. Kansas 19-2 1,350 2 6. Gonzaga 21-2 1,249 7 7. Arizona 19-2 1,248 8 8. Miami 17-3 1,132 14 9. Syracuse 18-3 1,091 610. Ohio St. 17-4 1,033 1111. Louisville 18-4 1,018 1212. Michigan St. 18-4 994 1313. Kansas St. 17-4 782 1814. Butler 18-4 774 915. New Mexico 19-3 660 2016. Creighton 20-3 578 2117. Cincinnati 18-4 552 2418. Minnesota 17-5 454 2319. Oregon 18-4 390 1020. Georgetown 16-4 364 —21. Missouri 16-5 245 1722. Oklahoma St. 15-5 235 —23. Pittsburgh 18-5 207 —24. Marquette 15-5 137 2525. Notre Dame 18-4 132 — Others receiving votes: Mississippi 75, NC State 64, Colorado St. 49, Wichita St. 49, Memphis 44, Wisconsin 28, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 27, Louisiana Tech 24, Kentucky 21, San Diego St. 17, UNLV 13, Saint Louis 8, UCLA 8, VCU 8, Akron 4, Virginia 4, UConn 2, Belmont 1.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Florida at Arkansas, 7 p.m.No. 3 Michigan vs. No. 10 Ohio State, 9 p.m. No. 8 Miami vs. Boston College, 7 p.m. No. 13 Kansas State at Texas Tech, 8 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No. 5 Kansas at TCU, 9 p.m.No. 7 Arizona vs. Stanford, 9 p.m.No. 11 Louisville at Rutgers, 7:30 p.m.No. 12 Michigan State vs. No. 18 Minnesota, 7 p.m. No. 14 Butler vs. St. Bonaventure, 7 p.m. No. 15 New Mexico vs. Air Force, 9 p.m. No. 17 Cincinnati at Providence, 7 p.m.No. 22 Oklahoma State vs. Baylor, 7 p.m. No. 25 Marquette at South Florida, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 1 Indiana at Illinois, 7 p.m.No. 4 Duke vs. N.C. State, 9 p.m.No. 6 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 11 p.m.No. 19 Oregon vs. Colorado, 10 p.m.No. 21 Missouri at Texas A&M, 9 p.m. Florida 78, Mississippi 64 At Gainesville MISSISSIPPI (17-4) Buckner 2-4 4-6 8, Holloway 5-16 5-7 15, Summers 3-4 2-4 8, White 2-10 2-2 6, Henderson 8-15 2-2 25, Newby 0-3 0-0 0, Millinghaus 0-1 0-0 0, Perez 0-1 0-0 0, Brutus 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 21-55 15-21 64.FLORIDA (18-2) Murphy 7-8 0-0 19, Young 6-8 1-1 13, Boynton 3-13 2-2 9, Rosario 6-10 0-0 14, Wilbekin 6-15 0-0 13, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Yeguete 2-3 0-0 4, Frazier II 2-4 0-0 6, Prather 0-1 0-0 0, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-62 3-3 78. Halftime—Florida 40-27. 3-Point Goals—Mississippi 7-17 (Henderson 7-11, Millinghaus 0-1, Perez 0-1, Newby 0-2, White 0-2), Florida 11-29 (Murphy 5-6, Frazier II 2-4, Rosario 2-5, Boynton 1-7, Wilbekin 1-7). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Mississippi 33 (Holloway 7), Florida 34 (Young 12). Assists—Mississippi 5 (Summers 3), Florida 23 (Boynton 10). Total Fouls—Mississippi 10, Florida 19. A—12,522.Duke 79, Florida St. 60 At Tallahassee DUKE (19-2) Mas. Plumlee 4-4 0-0 8, Jefferson 4-4 3-4 11, Cook 7-12 0-0 18, Sulaimon 6-11 0-0 14, Curry 7-11 2-2 21, Thornton 1-1 0-0 2, Murphy 0-1 0-0 0, Hairston 2-6 1-2 5, Mar. Plumlee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-51 6-8 79.FLORIDA ST. (12-9) White 3-8 1-2 7, Turpin 3-3 1-2 7, Brandon 1-4 0-0 2, Snaer 3-13 0-0 7, Whisnant II 0-2 0-0 0, Bookert 3-5 2-2 9, Gilchrist 1-3 2-2 4, Bojanovsky 2-2 0-0 4, Thomas 4-7 5-5 14, Miller 2-3 0-0 4, Ojo 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 23-55 11-13 60. Halftime—Duke 42-22. 3-Point Goals—Duke 11-18 (Curry 5-7, Cook 4-6, Sulaimon 2-4, Murphy 0-1), Florida St. 3-13 (Thomas 1-2, Bookert 1-2, Snaer 1-4, White 0-1, Miller 0-1, Gilchrist 0-1, Whisnant II 0-2). Fouled Out—Hairston. Rebounds—Duke 27 (Cook, Mas. Plumlee 5), Florida St. 24 (Snaer 5). Assists—Duke 20 (Cook 6), Florida St. 9 (Miller 4). Total Fouls—Duke 15, Florida St. 14. Technical—Snaer. A—12,100.TENNISDavis Cup United States 3, Brazil 2 At Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Singles Sam Querrey, United States, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. John Isner, United States, def. Thiago Alves, Brazil, 6-3, 7-6(4), 6-3. ——— Doubles Marcelo Melo and Bruno Soares, Brazil, def. Bob and Mike Bryan, United States, 7-6 (6), 6-7 (7), 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. ——— Reverse Singles Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. John Isner, United States, 2-6, 6-4, 6-7 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Sam Querrey, United States, def. Thiago Alves, Brazil, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3).HOCKEYNHL schedule Today’s Games N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m.Buffalo at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.Calgary at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Florida at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.Nashville at St. Louis, 8 p.m.Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.Anaheim at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.Dallas at Edmonton, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Taste “Comfort Food” (N) The Bachelor Everyone heads to the Canadian Rockies. (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! 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Food Bizarre Foods America “Savannah” Edge of AmericaEdge of AmericaMega RV Countdown Tricked Out Trailers HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHouse HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersProperty VirginsProperty VirginsIncome Property “Karen & Kevin” (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lIncome PropertyIncome Property TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumThe Sisterhood The Sisterhood (N) Starter Wives Con dential (N) Say Yes to the Dress: The Big DayStarter Wives Con dential HIST 49 120 269Top Gear “College Cars” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Top Gear “America’s Toughest Car” Ax Men Shelby builds his new empire. (:02) America Unearthed ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake Republic Wild HawaiiWild Deep “Africa” Wild DeepWild Deep (N) Wild Deep (N) River Monsters: UnhookedWild Deep “Africa” Wild Deep FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Prove It On the Plate” Chopped “Belly Dance!” Chopped “Easy Peasy?” Chopped “Orzo It Seemed” Chopped (N) Chopped “I’m Your Huckleberry” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Way Of MasterThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoyce MeyerJoseph PrinceRod ParsleyPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Game TimeShip Shape TVWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 College Basketball Oregon at California. Premier League Review ShowWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Face Off “Make It Reign” Face Off “Heroic Proportions” Face Off “When Hell Freezes Over” (N) Face Off “Eye Candy” (N) Total Blackout (N) Total BlackoutFace Off “Eye Candy” AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “The Fugitive” (1993) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. “The Shawshank Redemption” COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowThe Burn-JeffTosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The Burn-JeffDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba (:22) Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba My Big Redneck Vacation Swamp PawnRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Bad Dogs of Comedy” Cesar Millan’s Leader of the PackCesar Millan’s Leader of the PackThe Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Flu the Coop” Cesar Millan’s Leader of the Pack NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersDoomsday Preppers Bugged OutDoomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers (N) Diggers (N) DiggersDoomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeBuild It Bigger Build It Bigger Strip the City “San Francisco” (N) Build It Bigger Build It Bigger ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID “Family Portrait” Dateline on ID Dateline on ID My Dirty Little Secret (N) Redrum (N) Redrum Dateline on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:00) “Water for Elephants”REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel “The Five-Year Engagement” (2012) Jason Segel, Emily Blunt. ‘R’ (:15) Girls Identity Thief “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011) MAX 320 310 515(5:15) “I, Robot” (2004) ‘PG-13’ (:15) “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. ‘R’ “Die Hard With a Vengeance” (1995, Action) Bruce Willis. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:45) My 5 Wives “I Don’t Know How She Does It” (2011) ‘PG-13’ “The Woman in Black” (2012) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG-13’ (:35) “Blitz” (2011) Jason Statham. ‘R’ (:15) “The Game” (1997) ‘R’ Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN BOWLING SOFTBALL: Home opener on Feb. 12 Continued From Page 1BLeague resultsLake City Bowl league play: SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Farmers (103-65); 2. Perky Pals (101-67); 3. Handicappers (99-69). Team high handicap game: 1. Spoilers 826; 2. Pin Droppers 813. Team high handicap series: 1. Farmers 2,419; 2. Perky Pals 2,361; 3. Keglers 2,267. High scratch game: 1. Joanne Denton 172; 2. Vy Ritter 150; 3. Janie Posey 109. 1. Wayne Johns 211; 2. Mike Helvey 175; 3. Vernon Black 170. High scratch series: 1. Betty Carmichael 466; 2. Yvonne Finley 419; 3. Diane Madsen 365. 1. Michael Murrey 578; 2. Dan Ritter 504; 3. Ric Yates 490. High handicap game: 1. Barbara Croft 225; 2. Joyce Crandall 216; 3. Ann Soliz 203. 1. Keith Herbster 248; 2. Joe Peterson 224; 3. Jim Hawkins 220. High handicap series: 1. Janet Nash 639; 2. Louise Atwood 603; 3. (tie) Pat Hale, Sandra Johns 594. 1. Johnnie Croft 651; 2. Ron Grey 623; 3. Ray Denton 609.(results from Jan. 15) ——— WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. 10 In The Pitt 905; 2. Wolf Pack 861; 3. Split/House 857. Team high handicap series: 1. O 2 Cool 2,557; 2. Canam 2,480; 3. Dominators 2,470. High scratch game: 1. Lorrie Geiger 238; 2. Mary Lobaugh 228; 3. Lorrie Geiger 224. 1. Adam Alford 245; 2. Steve Fancy 237; 3. (tie) Jim Lobaugh, George Mulligan 236. High scratch series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 627; 2. Mary Lobaugh 583; 3. Chrissy Fancy 528. 1. George Mulligan 638; 2. Adam Alford 613; 3. Steve Fancy 605. High handicap game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 250; 2. Brandy Watson 237; 3. Julie Bell 234. 1. Steve Fancy 260; 2. Jim Lobaugh 259; 3. Steven Hayes 254. High handicap series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 696; 2. Linda Oliver 650; 3. Carla Nyssen 646. 1. George Mulligan 710; 2. Frank Miller 671; 3. Jack Stanfield 663. High average: Lorrie Geiger 183; James Price 195.(results from Jan. 15) ——— GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. 2 Plus 2; 3. Wild Things. Team high handicap game: 1. Quirky Quad 837; 2. Jo’s Crew 824; 3. 3 Plus One 802. Team high handicap series: 1. Knock em Down 2,428; 2. Wild Things 2,394; 3. Stripers 2,360. High scratch game: 1. DeDe Young 175; 2. Barbara Griner 171; 3. Debbie Walters 158. 1. Bill Dolly 224; 2. George Walters 195; 3. Bill Price 178. High scratch series: 1. Elaine Nemeth 487; 2. Joyce Hooper 477; 3. Louise Atwood 445. 1. David Duncan 589; 2. Wayne Johns 527; 3. Dan Ritter 502. High handicap game: 1. Judy Johnson 243; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 237; 3. Susan Stanfield 233. 1. Lee McKinney 250; 2. Earl Hayward 234; 3. Sal Annello 222. High handicap series: 1. Joan Carman 660; 2. Jeanne Sireci 637; 3. (tie) Debi Evert, Betty Carmichael 614. 1. Winton Brewer 645; 2. (tie) Tom Young, George Mulligan 612; 4. Ray Denton 607. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 153.17; 2. Elaine Nemeth 152.02; 3. DeDe Young 150.72. 1. Bill Dolly 191.18; 2. David Duncan 190.59; 3. George Mulligan 180.54.(results from Jan. 10) ——— MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. BENCOR (334-206); 2. Bias Well Drilling (313-227); 3. Ronsonet Service (304.5-235.5). High scratch game: 1. Jeff Deitz 267; 2. (tie) Keith Rouse, Teo Parra 266; 4. Josh Bisque 264. High scratch series: 1. Teo Parra 722; 2. David Adel 687; 3. (tie) Dale Coleman, Josh Bisque 675. High handicap game: 1. Keith Rouse 311; 2. Teo Parra 295; 3. Jeff Deitz 293. High handicap series: 1. Teo Parra 809; 2. Steve Madsen 779; 3. Josh Bisque 753. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 220.67; 2. Bill Duncan 213.39; 3. Wally Howard 208.53.(results from Jan. 7) ——— HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (3-1); 2. Sandbaggers (3-1); 3. Legal Ladies (3-1); 4. High Five (3-1). Team high handicap game: 1. Silver Ladies 800; 2. Legal Ladies 794; 3. All Mrs’s 765. Team high handicap series: 1. Sandbaggers 2,271; 2. High Five 2,269; 3. Spare Us 2,248. High handicap game: 1. Ruth Heims 238; 2. Judy Daniels 237; 3. Anna McDonald 229. High handicap series: 1. (tie) Cathy Pelley, Sharon Tuning 629; 3. Iva “Jean” Dukes 620.(results from Jan. 8)Youth leaguesMAJORS SCRATCH Team standings: 1. Ten in the Pit (140.5-99.5); 2. Ninja Bowling Inc. (130.5-109.5); 3. The CBC (121-119). High scratch game: 1. Sara Sykes 196; 2. Linden Barney 187; 3. Sara Sykes 183. 1. Gary Beames 278; 2. Josh Fancy 236; 3. Gary Beames 210. High scratch series: 1. Sara Sykes 554; 2. Christine Peters 491; 3. Lauren Snipes 480. 1. Gary Beames 654; 2. Josh Fancy 586; 3. Cody Howard 561. MAJORS Team standings: 1. Holy Splitz (36-24); 2. Team Ace (35-25); 3. Splitz Happen (31.5-28.5). Team high handicap game: 1. Splitz Happen 636; 2. The Destructors 635; 3. Team Ace 632. Team high handicap series: 1. Team Ace 1,851; 2. The Destructors 1,807; 3. Splitz Happen 1,795. High handicap game: 1. Amanda Schmitt 222; 2. Sara Johns 216; 3. Crystal Campbell 209. 1. Josh Johns 254; 2. Caleb Moulton 243; 3. Chase Williams 233. High handicap series: 1. Crystal Campbell 608; 2. Tiffany Ritch 598; 3. Amanda Schmitt 593. 1. Josh Johns 633; 2. (tie) Elliott Steiskal, Caleb Moulton 630. JUNIORS Team standings: 1. Bearded Dragons (39.5-20.5); 2. The Emergency Exits (37-23, 24,182 pins); 3. Go Bowl or Go Home (37-23, 24,035 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Bearded Dragons 629; 2. Black Ops Dominators 582; 3. Pinheads 576. Team high handicap series: 1. Bearded Dragons 1,735; 2. Black Ops Dominators 1,712; 3. Pinheads 1,705. High handicap game: 1. Savannah Barr 214; 2. Mickie Steiskal 213; 3. Lexie Trussell 208. 1. Drew Green 247; 2. Aaron Rouse 219; 3. David Becker 210. High handicap series: 1. Mickie Steiskal 604; 2. Lexie Trussell 598; 3. Savannah Barr 583. 1. Drew Green 670; 2. Aaron Rouse 605; 3. Adam Fralick 560. BANTAMS High handicap game: 1. Aliyah Rouse 186; 2. Amber Rouse 176; 3. Allison Presnell 166. 1. Kolby Sherrod 176; 2. Jacob Hartman 171; 3. Jacob Burch 166. High handicap series: 1. Amber Rouse 512; 2. Aliyah Rouse 508; 3. Allison Presnell 483. 1. Jacob Hartman 492; 2. Jacob Burch 484; 3. Kolby Sherrod 471.(results from Dec. 1)

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DEAR ABBY: My wife and I are both schoolteach-ers. She hates to call in sick and often teaches class when she says she feels ill. I don’t argue with her. The problem arises when I am not feeling well. When I am sick and feverish, I’m not inclined to rise from my sickbed and go to work. On those few occasions, my wife objects strenuously. She interrogates me about my symptoms, then makes her own “diagnosis” on the spot. Apparently, her gold standard for staying home is the inability to stand. This creates a problem for me at work because co-workers are concerned about catching my obvi-ous illness. The last time I felt sick, my wife ordered me to go to work. When I saw a doctor afterward, I was told I had a virus and should be in bed. My wife still objected to my missing work because she considered it to be “just a cough.” I missed a grand total of two days because of it. On one of them I wasn’t able to stand, the other because I refused to get out of bed. Then, since I was staying home “doing nothing,” my wife insisted I care for our two children (ages 3 and 1), rather than send them to my mother-in-law who baby-sits while we work. If I stay home, my wife will dump the kids on me and give me the cold shoulder. If I go to work, I expose my co-workers and perform poorly. Help! -AT A TOTAL LOSS IN CORPUS CHRISTI DEAR TOTAL LOSS: It appears you married a woman who is not only lacking in empathy, but also is a controlling, slave-driving witch. Unless you can find the backbone to take control of the situa-tion and stop acting like a victim, your wife will con-tinue to punish you when you’re least able to defend yourself. P.S. A teacher with a virus can not only infect co-workers and adminis-trative staff, but also his students -not to mention his own children. Please point that out to “Simone Legree.” ** ** **DEAR ABBY: The adage, “If you don’t have anything nice to say ...” is easier said than done. When I am tired or stressed, I have a tendency to be less tolerant of oth-ers’ quirks, and sometimes I voice my annoyance. While my opinions do have a basis, I sometimes feel guilty about insulting or hurting the person’s feel-ings. I have never been a believer in “killing them with kindness” because that seems to enable their behavior. My intolerance is probably due to unhap-piness about my own life. So how do I allow these annoyances to roll off my back and bite my tongue? -CAN’T TOLERATE FOOLS IN DES MOINES DEAR CAN’T TOLERATE FOOLS: One way to do that would be to remind yourself that the more you take your unhappiness out on those around you, the more you will isolate yourself. When you are tired or stressed, and before shooting off your mouth, ask yourself: Is it true? Is it kind? Is it helpful? And if what you were about to say is not all three, bite your tongue, zip your lip, or walk away until you get a grip. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Change things up a bit. Try something new or get involved in activi-ties that are conducive to love, romance and expand-ing your circle of friends. Greater opportunity to earn money doing some-thing you enjoy is appar-ent. Apply for a new posi-tion. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Emotions and money will not mix well. Don’t make a donation based on guilt. Put more thought into how you can make a difference without limit-ing your cash flow or your integrity. A past partner will cause problems. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Uncertainty will set in, causing a lack of vision with regard to both per-sonal and professional matters. Proceed with cau-tion to avoid being blamed for passing along false information. Spend time improving your skills or updating your appearance. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be faced with opportunities and choices to make. Don’t let a flashy offer override other pos-sibilities. Give ample time to figuring out what is best for you. Sometimes a slow-er start leads to a solid and secure future. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Shake things up by traveling to unfamiliar places or trying your hand at some-thing new and exciting. Sharing with people you feel emotionally attached to will help you realize what you want to achieve. Consider an investment opportunity. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Take a closer look at what’s going on in your life and with the people you must deal with daily. A problem with a peer or boss can lead to emotional mistakes. You should be working toward securing your position practically. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Fix up a space at home that will encourage you to develop a profit-able skill or service. You shouldn’t have to go over budget if you have worked out all your expenses care-fully. A partnership change will improve your pros-pects. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Avoid controversy when it’s creative input that will help you explore and expand new avenues. Walk away from anyone placing restrictions on you or the activities you want to attend. A personal change will turn out to be inspirational. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t believe everything you hear. Ask questions and rely on the people you know and trust to help you see your situa-tion clearly. Love is in the stars, and a special part-nership can make your life better financially, emotion-ally and physically. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Proceed with caution if you are dealing with someone using per-sonal information in the workplace. Protect your reputation and focus on diplomacy and doing the best job possible. Offer positive help and you will redirect negative connota-tions. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb.18): Keep everyone guessing. The more changeable you are, the more intriguing you will become. A personal oppor-tunity will lead to a change of residence or living situ-ation. Romance is in the stars and personal stability within reach. ++++ PISCES (Feb.19-March 20): Go over your personal papers. Update your skills or talk to someone about a problem you face that could lead to legal reper-cussions. Don’t blow situ-ations out of proportion. Bide your time, but be prepared to take action if necessary. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Wife intolerant of illness needs a lesson in health Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY5, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCASE NO. 10-85 CABANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO LASALLE BANK NAAS TRUSTEE FOR WASH-INGTON MUTUALASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES WMABS SERIES 2006-HE5 TRUST;Plaintiff,vs.WILUNDALATREZ MERRICK; ETAL, DefendantsNOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Default Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated January 14, 2013, in the above-styled cause, The C Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the third floor of the Columbia County courthouse at 173 N.E. Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, 32055, on 2/23/2013 the following described property:LOT13, BLOCK B, 242 VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 5 AND AREPLATOF APARTOF 242 VILLAGE RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PA-GES 99 AND 99A, OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Property Address: 518 SWTHOMP-KINS LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL32025ANYPERSON CLAIMING N IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, he provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, at least 7 days, before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.WITNESS my hand on 1/14/2013./s/ B. Scippio D.C.SEALAttorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C.100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045For Lauderdale, FL33309Phone: (954) 644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.comServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com05536904February 5, 12, 2013 NOTICE OFPUBLIC SALE: AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. gives Notice of Foreclo-sure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 02/18/2013, 10:00 am at 2832 SWMAIN BLVD, LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsec-tion 713.78 of the Florida Statues. AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. reserves the right to ac-cept or reject any and/or all bids.1B7GL23Y7VS1683001997 DODGE05537032FEBRUARY5, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 13-20-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF MURIELJOAN KEITHDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Muriel Joan Keith, deceased, whose date of death was December 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a Legalcopy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-ODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPRO-BATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-TER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is February 5, 2013.Personal Representative:/s/ Desari Sterling f/k/a Muriel Ann Schauffle1800 N AndrewsApt. 12-iFt. Lauderdale, Florida 33311Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386)755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail: jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary Email: mad@rkkattor-neys.com05537158February 5, 12, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAFILE NUMBER: 13-11-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF EMMAH. WORTH, ALSO KNOWN AS EM-MALOU HERLONG WORTH,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of EMMAH. WORTH, also known as EMMALOU HERLONG WORTH, deceased, whose date of death was December 31, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 2069, Lake City, Florida 32056-2069. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-TY(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims or demands with this court WITHIN THREE(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.THE DATE OF FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE is: January 29, 2013Co-Personal Representatives/s/ Marietta Elizabeth WardMARIETTAELIZABETH WARD357 SWGertruis DriveLake City, Florida 32024/s/ George William Worth231 Robinhood RoadChesapeake, Virginia 23322-7164Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-tatives/s/ Bonnie S. GreenBONNIE S. GREENFlorida Bar No. 0107085HERBERTF. DARBYFlorida Bar No. 0017901285 Northeast Hernando AvenuePost Office Drawer 1707Lake City, Florida 32056-1707Telephone: 1-386-752-412005536966January 29, 2013February 5, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesExperienced Survey Help Wanted 140 NWRidgewood Avenue 386-755-6166 FTHelp Needed, General Maintenance, yard work, driving etc. Good references & clean driving record. Email Bryant @ bdj@startech.cc 100Job Opportunities05536990Wanted experience I.T. Person to manage private Company network 20+ computers, Web design & admin needed. Must be willing to perform other Clerical tasks in office environment. Apply in person:3631 us 90 east Lake City FL32055, or send resume to guy@qiagroup.com 05537114NOWHIRINGGeneral Managers Shift LeadersHardee's offers: Competitive Salary, Benefits, Training, & Opportunity for Advancement! For additional info & to apply, visit: www.hardees.com/jobs. EOE. 05537150Administrative Assistant Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Administrative Assistant. Good Organizational and Communication Skills a Must Competitive Salary and Excellent Benefit Package. Please Apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 386-752-7900 EOE 05537153Immediate Openings Available positions requiring at least one year prior skills include: Mig/Tig Welder, Electrician, Trim Carpenter, Cabinetmaker, Wood/ Mill Fabrication, Fiberglass Laminator. Some hand tools required. Benefits: Paid Vacation, Paid Holidays, Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Wages negotiable with experience. 3 Temp Farmworkers needed 3/11/13-12/11/13. Workers will seed, set, cut, house, & strip tobacco. Wrkrs will remove weeds and grass from wheat and soybeans by hand or using a hoe. Wrkrs will lift, Load/unload and stack/restack baled hay and straw. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for noncommuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier, if appropriate. Worksite location in Daviess Co, KY. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. $9.80/hr. Report or send resume to the nearest FL Agency of Workforce Innovations office & ref. job order # KY0472626 or call 386-755-9026. Bittel, Bittel, & Bittel – Owensboro, KY 8 TEMPFarm workers needed 3/11/13 – 11/20/13. Workers will plant, cultivate, harvest, grade, & pack produce. Must have 3 months experience in hand harvesting perishable crops. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools, supplies, equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for noncommuting workers. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract; or earlier if appropriate. $10.87/hr. Worksite in Harford Co’s, MD. Report or send a resume to nearest local FLAgency of Workforce Innovation office or call 386-755-9026 & reference Job #268732 Brad’s Produce LLC – Churchville, MD. 20 Temp Diversified Farmworkers needed 3/4/13-11/1/13.Workers will plant, cultivate, harvest, grade & pack produce according to supervisor’s instructions. Workers must have 3 months experience hand harvesting a perishable crop. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. $9.78/hr. Worksites in Greenville Co SC. Report/Send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovations Office office or call 386-755-9026 & ref. JO #548024. Family Farm – Taylors, SC. 100Job Opportunities2 TEMPDiversified Farmwrkrs needed 3/11/13-12/18/13. Must have 3 mo’s verifiable exp. operating 90+ HPequip. pulling 500 gallon sprayer, spraying apple trees. Wrkrs will perform various duties associated with growing apples and tending to cattle. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Worksite in Gilmer Co, GA. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. $9.78/hr. Report or send a resume to nearest local FLAgency of Workforce Innovations office or call 386-755-9026 & ref. job # GA9073655. Hillcrest Orchards, LLC – Ellijay, GA 3 Temp Nursery Workers needed 3/4/13-11/15/13. Workers will plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate, prune, grade, store, & ship container & field grown horticultural products. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Worksite in Ashland Co, OH. Pay rate is $11.74/hr. Report or send resume to the nearest FL Agency of Workforce Innovations office & ref. job order #OH553400 or call 386-755-9026. Hobby Nursery – Loudonville, OH SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 100Job Opportunities4 Temp. Horticultural Workers needed 2/25/13-12/8/13. Workers will be performing various tasks all associated with working in a diverse tree and shrub nursery. Workers must be able to recognize various species and varieties of nursery stock. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if necessary. $11.74/hr. Worksites in Lake Co. OH. Report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovations office or call 386-7559026 & ref. job order #OH553428. W.S. Yoe Nurseries-Madison, OH. 100Job OpportunitiesReal Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Send Resume to info@swiftcreekrealty.net Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate & understanding of truck repair & parts procurement. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer 752-9754 UnemployedUnderemployedRetiredStart your own Lake City Business. Some Financing Available. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, FEBRUARY5, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 100Job Opportunities90 Temp Diversified Farm Workers needed 3/11/13-11/15/13. Wrkrs will perform a variety of duties associated with growing peaches and other vegetables. Wrkrs may perform support duties such as operate farm equipment, packing and general field/ orchard maintenance. Pre-employment & random drug testing at the employer’s expense. 3 months verifiable exp. pruning and hand harvesting a perishable crop. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, & equip provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Pay rate is $9.78/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Worksites in Chesterfield Co., SC. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovations Office or call 386-755-9026 & reference job # 548668. McLeod Farms – McBee, SC 275 Temp Farm Workers needed 2/25/13-8/31/13. Workers will plant, prune, thin, cultivate, harvest, grade, pack peaches, bell peppers & broccoli. Worksites in Saluda, Edgefield, & Aiken Co’s SC. Must have 3 Months verifiable work experience hand harvesting a perishable crop. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. $9.78/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovations office or call 386-7559026 & ref. job order #549033. Titan Peach Farms Inc #2 – Ridge Springs, SC 120Medical Employment05537127Dietary Part Time Aide/Cook Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of Dietary Aide/Cook Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 386-752-7900 EOE 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies 1 MALE Pygmy goat. $30 SOLD 2 MALE b/w potbelly pigs. (ready to mate) $30 each. Contact 386-365-7532 Found Brown/Tan/White 8 lbs Cat in the Eastwood Subd. House trained, Clean. Contact 365-4255 Free to right home. Husky mix w/ electric blue eyes, energetic loves to be indoors & outside. Great w/ kids & other dogs. 752-4155 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 416Sporting Goods SEARS TREADMILL. Paid $500 used twice Asking $250 Contact 796-3234 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 4 PC Dining Room Set Dark wood table with leaf. Very nice. $250 Contact 386-365-7532 4 PC Queen Bedroom Suite, with mattress & box spring. Really nice. Great shape. $375 SOLD 440Miscellaneous 90” wide x 50” long Fabric Levelor custom verticals. Gently used. $50 Call 752-9286 after 6 PM Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. GENERATOR big 8500 Watt 2013. Honda Electric start. Battery and wheel kit included. Never used. New retail $4995, wholesale $3750. First $1850 cash. 864-275-6478 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3/2 Mobile Home on 1/2 ac. Needs TLC, great investment, located in Glenn St. Mary. MLS# 82570, Results Realty $67,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 New Listing. Short Sale Spacious 3BR/2BADWMH, in a Quiet Country Neighborhood on 1.1 Acre Lot. MLS 82426 $49,900 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4 Bedroom Home, clean and roomy, lots of storage. See www.hudhomestore.com Case#091-422050 Robin Williams (386)365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate READY FOR YOU! Immaculate 3/2 home on 5 acres. Pole barn, screened back porch, fireplace – cozy! Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentBrandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 home in a small MH park, Located onCountyRoad 133C, $600mo & $600 dep. includs electricity & water 954-258-8841 3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shaade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Immaculately in 55+ Community of Eastside Village. 3BD/2BA. MLS 81332 $120,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Large indoor pool comes with this rare find. Large home with plenty of space. MLS 81966 $150,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Great Family Home, Lovely Location! Brick home on corner lot, 3/1.5, fenced, Seller motivated! Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 Hallmark Real Estate LARGE FAMILYHOME over 1700 sq. ft., hardwood floors, close to schools, shopping, hospitals. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate SUPREME LIVING in this 4/2 home on 18 acres. One attached, 2 detached garages, beautiful view. Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate YOUR MODERN BRICK HOME IS WAITING! In great location, 3/2, shady lot on 1 acre. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 Handyman 3/1 Close to VA, Lrg corner lot. Owner Finance, $35,900, $1,000 down, $356 mth. 954 SE Putnam St 352-215-1018 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptionally Maintained Brick Home in Crest Point. 3/2, Open Kitchen. Elaine Tolar $149,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81426 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 4BR/3BApool home on 10 acres. Front and back porch. Fenced ready for your horses or cows. MLS 82562 $199,900 Established Emerald Lake Subdivision. Split floor plan, Fantastic Outdoor living. MLS 79733 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Historic/Vintage. Totally remodeled. Great home or office space MLS 80242 $65,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Charming rustic log cabin 2BR/1BAwith solar panels. Wood burning stove & gas range. Pole Barn MLS 81761 $99,900 Beautiful Home, separate dining room, large Master Suite. Open Kitchen. MLS 81910 $179,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Callaway S/D 3BR/2BA, 2250sf, .5ac, gas FP, Bamboo & tile flooring. #82470 $189,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1482sf, 8.7acr, tiled baths, FLroom, 2 detached storage bldgs. fenced & cross fenced. #79950 $149,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Tri-Level in Town 4BR/2BA, 1883sf, .501ac, newer kitchen w/all appl’s included, family room #80607 $144,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1386sf, .151ac, fam rm, liv rm, dining open to living & kitchen, screen back porch. #82446 $78,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 4BR/2BA, 1940sf, .25ac, newer metal roof, A/C, windows, siding, water &heater & soffits. #82187 $99,000 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Investment Opportunity, Office Building lots of exposure. Just Reduced. MLS 79694 $69,900 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty In-Town location. 3/2, Open and Spacious Living Area. MLS 82609 $99,900 Sherry G. Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mobile Home Park w/ lots of Potential. Needs some TLC. MLS 81507 $159,000 Elaine K. Tolar 365-1548 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 951Recreational VehiclesCAR TOWDOLLY 2013. All cars/pickups. Swifles, Tilts. Never used. New retail $2750, first $1050 cash. 864.275.6478 REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS JUMP Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com Lake City Reporter G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES $500 CASH GIVEAWAY Every Saturday (Casino Style) 2510 W. Hwy 90, Suite 101 386-438-5712 Never before seen games and entertainment. Double the fun, double the excitement, double the prizes at the Double Deuce Cafe. The next best thing to Vegas baby. $10 00 Match Play With Coupon Expires 2-18-13 GATORS: Undefeated in SEC at 8-0 Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Play Trinity Catholic High Continued From Page 1B Bradford a game before fall ing 60-47. The Tornadoes were unbeaten in district play during the season. Cenise Armstrong led the Lady Indians with 16 points, including eight of the teams 15 points in the third quarter. Tasha Robinson scored 13 points and Kasha Cook also was in double figures with 12. Rykia Jackson chipped in four points and Desma Blake scored two. Fort Whites semifinal win was over No. 2 seed Santa Fe High, 59-43. It was the second win of the sea son over a Lady Raiders team that had never lost to Fort White. Robinson exploded for 24 points, and both Blake and Cook scored 10. Khadijah Ingram added six points with five from Armstrong and four from Jackson. Fort White rolled over Interlachen High, 68-39, in the opening game of the tournament behind 30 points from Robinson. Cook scored 14 points and Armstrong scored 13. Blake scored five points with four from Ingram and two from Jackson. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Florida guard Mike Rosario (3) goes up for a lay-up in the Gators 75-36 win over South Carolina in Gainesville on Wednesday. ASSOCIATED PRESS Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco (5) passes against the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans on Sunday. Michigan and Indiana. The last time there were five straight new No. 1s was the last five polls of 2008-09 when it was Connecticut, Pittsburgh, Connecticut again, North Carolina and Louisville. It was a whirlwind week for Indiana coach Tom Crean. Upon returning home from the Super Bowl, he found out hes leading Americas No. 1 college basketball team. Again. It was another crown ing moment in a week full of big wins for the Crean clan. Indiana beat No. 13 Michigan State, archrival Purdue and No. 1 Michigan in a seven-day span, before Crean headed to New Orleans. There, he watched one brother-in-law beat his other brother-in-law for the Super Bowl title. Finally, he saw the Hoosiers reclaim the top spot in The Associated Press poll after seven weeks. Florida moved up to No. 2 after impressive home wins over South Carolina and Mississippi,which was ranked No. 16 at the time. Florida plays at Arkansas today. Award time for Flacco By DAVID GINSBURG Associated Press NEW ORLEANS Working on 90 minutes of sleep, Joe Flacco wore a day-old beard and a weary smile that wouldnt go away. Super Bowl tradition deems that the games MVP appear at a ceremony the following morning to shake hands with the commission er of the NFL, accept the shiny trophy, pose for pic tures and receive the keys to a new car. And so, after celebrating the Baltimore Ravens 34-31 victory over the San Francisco 49ers into the early hours of Monday morning, Flacco dutifully fulfilled his obligation. The quarterbacks imme diate reward for throwing three touchdown passes on Sunday night was a 2014 Corvette. In the months ahead, Flacco is almost assured of receiving a lucrative, long-term con tract befitting his incred ible performance during Baltimores run to the NFL championship. During the playoffs, Flacco had 11 touchdown passes and no interceptions, a feat NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell called extraordinary. He was unflappable and brought his team to a Super Bowl level, Goodell said. His play represented that all the way through. Less than 12 hours after hoisting the Lombardi Trophy over his head amid a shower of purple confetti, Flacco still couldnt come to grips with what he and the Ravens had accomplished. After throwing for three scores in the first half to stake the Ravens to a 21-6 lead, Flacco directed two scoring drives in the fourth quarter to help fend off a 49ers comeback. He was 22 for 33 for 287 yards. Im pretty tired right now, and it hasnt sunken in, he said. Its just a sur real moment. Flacco planned to visit Disney World in Florida before heading home. I anticipate not getting very much sleep, but its for all good reasons, man, he said. Unbelievable game. It was just awesome to be a part of it. After the game, Flacco shared a little secret with the rest of his family: He and his wife are expecting their second child. After the Ravens played San Francisco last season, he revealed their first child (a boy) was on the way.