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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reportsThe murder trial of a man accused of setting a June 2009 house fire that killed his live-in girlfriend starts Monday at the Columbia County Courthouse. According to prosecutors, Kenneth Allen Ford, 46, set fire to his 238 NW Bagel Court mobile home the morn-ing of Sunday, June 7, 2009. The body of Kristy L. Whatley was found inside the home later that morning. The fire was deemed suspicious early on, and Ford, apprehended in Polk County, was identified as a person of interest and transferred to the Columbia County jail. The fire was reported to authorities at 8:30 that morning by a neigh-bor. Ford was indicted by a Columbia County grand jury in September 2009 on charges of arson and first-degree murder. Ford had been arrested in May 2009 in Columbia County on kid-napping and other charges. He had been released on $5,000 bond and was required to maintain electronic monitoring, but reportedly fled the jurisdiction. The murder trial begins at 9 a.m. and will be presided over by Circuit Judge Paul Bryan. CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Washington tops NAACP awards. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 67 33 Sunny and breezy WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM All-American Tunsil reacts to Parade honor. Ousted NAACPpresident breaksher silence. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 264 4A 1B 1A Murdertrial setto begin Ford Man set fire that killed his live-in girlfriend in 2009, say prosecutors. 14 educators viefor district-widehonors on Weds. TEACHERS continued on 3A CHASTEEN’S continued on 3A Teacherof Yearhopefulsready DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterCory Russell and Alfred Johnson survey the damage cau sed by a car crashing into a house off Greg Place in Lake City. Johnson was sleeping on a coach when he he ard the sound of the car smashing its way through the wall. Russell said he was in the living room when he when he heard a boom. CAR RAMS HOUSE Woman said to be angry at boyfriendFrom staff reportsFourteen local educators will represent their schools at the District Teacher of the Year ceremonies at First Presbyterian Church on Wednesday. The guest speaker will be Alexandre Lopes, 2013 Florida Teacher of the Year and Christa McAuliffe Ambassador for Education. The program is set for 4 p.m., with a reception to fol-low at 5. The 14 teachers of the year were chosen by their peers at the schools where they teach. “They are representative of the high qualities of all teachers in our district,” said Dorothy S. Spradley, district volunteer/education marketing coordinator. “It is most important to have this recognition program to showcase our nominees and all teachers and to let them know how much we truly appreciate their many con-tributions, hard work, dedi-cation, creativity, selfless-ness and care they give the students in our schools.” Black History Month under way JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMembers of The Baby Hines Singers & Cedar Park Commun ity Crew perform at the kickoff of Black History Month at the Richardson Community Center on Friday. See mo re photos, Page 7A. Pair mark35 years inrestaurantbusinessBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comWhen the Chasteens opened their first resturant in 1978, they wanted to serve home-style cooking that would pack the house seven days a week. The for-mer owner of the property told them they wouldn’t last three months. “He said we wouldn’t make a living serving collard greens,” Robert Chasteen said. “So needless to say, we’re here still — 35 years later.” The Chasteens celebrated their 35th anniversary as restaurateurs on Friday, and although they moved loca-tions and changed names, the couple still prides them-selves on their attention to detail and commitment to hard work. Through all 35 years, Emmie and Robert Chasteen have worked side by side. “He’s still my best friend,” Emmie Chasteen said. It’s a family business and all three of their daughters put in time at the restaurant. They started out across from the airport in 1978 at a place called Robert’s Dock. Plum Creek has a new partner fordevelopment By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comAs a car crashed into the house and the tires smoked white, Alfred Johnson woke up and at first thought it was a tornado. The wall was bowed in and the 50-inch television had slid near where he lay sleeping on the couch, but there was no wind. When the car backed up and rammed the house a second time, he knew it wasn’t a storm. Allegedly, 22-year-old Alexis Shemeka Mixon repeatedly crashed her car into the house on Greg Place off Llewellyn Avenue in Lake City about 10 a.m. Friday. According to wit-nesses, she rammed the house of her 18-year-old boyfriend then chased him with her vehi-cle around the home, destroying part of a wood-en fence and sideswiping a car parked behind the house. Mixon faces charges of aggravated assault with a weapon and two counts of damage to property. Cory Russell was at the house when the rampage started. He heard a boom while he was in the living room. Russell and his friend, who he said had been dating Mixon for the past two years, went outside to see what made the sound. “Her foot was on the gas, and white smoke was coming out of the tires, then she backed up and ran into it at least two more times,” Russell said. “Then she backed up and tried to run over my friend who was running around the house trying to get away from her.” Johnson said the two had recently had an argument. He knew Mixon was angry because her boyfriend had reportedly cheated on her. Johnson said he was shocked that she crashed her car into the house. After Mixon chased her boyfriend around the house, Russell said, she stopped at the front of the house, windshield spider-webbed, and started yelling at the man she had been chasing. Then she sped down the street a few houses before sheriff’s depu-ties cut her off and stopped her. Russell said the destruction was over in about three minutes. The man chased by Mixon in the car left the property when police arrived and was not avail-able for comment. Contact infor-mation was left with Russell and Johnson, but the alleged victim had not contacted the Lake City Reporter by Saturday night. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office had not released the arrest report by press time Saturday night. She reportedly hithouse, then chased him in her car. Mixon By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe North Florida Intermodal Park has a new partner after Plum Creek Timber Company and The Rockefeller Group signed an agree-ment to pursue a joint-venture devel-opment project at the 2,622-acre site near Lake City. Plum Creek, the largest landowner in the United States, currently owns the land at the intermodal park. Plans for the intermodal park include developing the area into a hub of commercial and indus-trial activity. According to a news release, the joint venture will look at developing manufacturing and dis-tribution centers as well developing an inland port and office buildings. The site is on the south side of U.S. 90 on the east side of town. In the beginning of January, workers started clearing the land to make the project “shovel ready” for business prospects. The area where the joint venture is planned would also include the 500-acre parcel known as the cata-lyst site. At the last stakeholder meeting held on Jan. 14, Rick Moore, PLUM CREEK continued on 3A

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Comedian Shelley Berman is 88. Former Sen. Paul Sarbanes, D-Md., is 80. Football Hall-of-Famer Fran Tarkenton is 73. Actress Bridget Hanley is 72. Actress Blythe Danner is 70. Singer Dennis Edwards is 70. Football Hall-of-Famer Bob Griese is 68. Singer-guitarist Dave Davies (The Kinks) is 66. Actress Morgan Fairchild is 63. Actress Pamela Franklin is 63. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 4-15-26-40 21 Friday: 1-9-15-32-35 Saturday: Afternoon: 3-4-1 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 4-6-0-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: 1-9-15-32-35 Legislature puts employee salaries online TALLAHASSEE Floridians will finally get a chance on their own to find out how much people are getting paid to work for the Florida Legislature. The two Republican leaders of the Florida House and Florida Senate quietly this week added links on legislative web sites that allow people to look up legislative employee salaries. The two chambers are also posting copies of contracts. The move to post the information comes nearly two years after Gov. Rick Scott posted salaries of most state workers. Scott eventually posted the salaries of professors and other university employees even though it drew the ire of some of those work ing for the schools. Florida has also has information regarding state contracts posted online. Ryan Duffy, a spokes man for House Speaker Will Weatherford, said the records are the ones most frequently requested. We thought it would be easiest for access by put ting them online, Duffy said Friday. The House website shows, for example, that 32 employees in the House earn $100,000 or more a year, while the Senate web site also lists 32 employees earning at least $100,000. The decision by lawmak ers comes after a decision by Scott to shutter a bud get-tracking website that the Senate paid $5 million to develop. The Florida Senate hired a contractor to build the site, but the contract to use the website called Transparency 2.0 expired on Dec. 31. The vendor wanted $1 million to renew it. The Legislature appro priated $2.5 million to transfer the website to Scotts office and make it public. But Scott declined because it was developed through a no-bid contract. Scotts office then announced that it would seek competitive bids for a Florida budget web site open to all citizens. Open government and ethics advocacy groups had urged keeping the Transparency 2.0 website and making it public. The governor already his own website, www. FloridaHasARightToKnow, which gives the public access to state employee salary information. It also allows the public to view six-figure retirement ben efits for state and local employees with personal information redacted. On the web: www. myfloridahouse.gov or www.flsenate.gov. Judge wont delay voting lawsuit JACKSONVILLE A federal judge has denied the states request to delay a lawsuit challenging Floridas reduction in early voting days. The state sought a delay until June 3, about a month after the upcoming legislative session ends, to see if lawmakers restore early voting days they cut in 2011. U.S. District Judge Timothy Corrigan in Jacksonville on Thursday wrote theres no guarantee such a law will be enacted. U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown, a Jacksonville Democrat, and other plaintiffs contend the Republican-controlled Legislatures decision to reduce early voting from 14 to eight days was discriminatory because blacks vote early in higher percentages. Corrigan ordered pre trial disclosures and inter views to begin on Feb. 22 and be completed by Sept. 6. No trial date yet has been set. Man kills sons, then himself BOYNTON BEACH A South Florida man killed two of his sons early Saturday before killing himself at his estranged wifes home, police said. Officers were called at 1:50 a.m. to the Boynton Beach home of Victoria Flores Zavala, who had been separated for some time from her husband, Isidro Zavala, police spokeswoman Stephanie Slater said. Victoria Zavala told detectives that she was watching TV when she heard a commotion. She went to check on the boys and saw Zavala, dressed all in black, choking one of them. She tried fighting off Isidro Zavala, begging him to kill her and not the chil dren, Slater said. He told her she was going to stay alive and suffer the loss of them, Slater said. Police identified the children as 12-year-old Eduardo Zavala and 11year-old Mario Zavala. One boy was found dead in a screened patio area, and the other was in the kitchen. Both boys had been strangled with a rope, Slater said. Zavala was discovered in the kitchen with a selfinflicted gunshot wound. He had shot Mario several times before turning the gun on himself, Slater said. The couple also has a 19-year-old son, who does not live at the home. Hit-run witness nabs suspect JACKSONVILLE John Avery II sprang into action when he saw a pickup truck speed away after hitting a pedestrian in Jacksonville. The 44-year-old man said he didnt want the driver to get away. So he followed him to a nearby parking lot where the driver tried to run. Thats when Avery says he pulled out his gun and ordered the man to stop and lie down on the ground. Avery and passenger Gary Gibson held the man until police arrived. Avery says he was on the phone with a 911 dispatcher and informed them of his weapon. The driver, 26-yearold Tracy Andrew Isbell of Covington, Ga., was released from jail Thursday. Authorities say the pedestrian, Joseph Bastian, is expected to survive. LOS ANGELES K erry Washington was a triple threat at the NAACP Image Awards. The star of ABCs Scandal picked up a trio of trophies at the 44th annual ceremony: outstanding actress in a drama series for Scandal, sup porting actress in a motion picture for Django Unchained and the Presidents Award, which is given in recognition of special achievement and exceptional public service. This award does not belong to me, said Washington, who plays a slave separated from her husband in Django Unchained, as she picked up her first trophy of the evening for her role in the film directed by Quentin Tarantino. It belongs to our ancestors. We shot this film on a slave plantation, and they were with us along every step of the way. Washington, who plays crisis management consultant Olivia Pope on Scandal, serves on President Barack Obamas Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. Don Cheadle was awarded the outstanding actor in a comedy series trophy for his role as a slick man agement consultant in Showtimes House of Lies. A few winners werent present at the Shrine Auditorium to pick up their trophies, including Denzel Washington for outstanding actor in a motion picture for Flight, Viola Davis for outstanding actress in a motion picture for Wont Back Down and Omar Epps for support ing actor in a drama series for Foxs House. Red Tails, the drama about the Tuskegee Airmen, was honored as outstanding motion picture. Travis admits driving drunk, gets probation SHERMAN, Texas Randy Travis pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated Thursday in a case that began last summer when the coun try music star was found naked after crashing his Pontiac Trans Am. Travis received two years of pro bation, a $2,000 fine and a 180-day suspended jail sen tence. If he doesnt successfully com plete the probation, he will face the jail time. He was ordered to spend at least 30 days at an alcohol treatment facility, complete 100 hours of community service and have an ignition inter lock device on any vehicle he oper ates while on probation. Travis, 53, entered the plea in a court in the North Texas city of Sherman. The misdemeanor was punishable by up to one year in jail and a $4,000 fine. Prosecutors said Travis was found lying in the roadway naked and was belligerent at the scene and while being transported to a hospital. He had a blood alcohol level of 0.21. The legal limit for driving is 0.08. Travis also had faced a charge of retaliation for allegedly threaten ing officers, but as part of the plea agreement he will no longer face that charge. Stallone supports assault weapon ban BEVERLY HILL Sylvester Stallone says that despite his Rambo image and new shoot-em-up film Bullet to the Head, hes in favor of new national gun control legislation. Stallone supported the 1994 Brady bill that included a now-expired ban on assault weapons, and hopes that ban can be reinstated. I know people get (upset) and go, Theyre going to take away the assault weapon. Who ... needs an assault weapon? Like really, unless youre carrying out an assault. ... You cant hunt with it. ... Whos going to attack your house, a (expletive) army? The 66-year-old actor, writer and director said he also hopes for an additional focus on mental health to prevent future mass shootings. Kerry Washington tops NAACP awards Saturday: 7-9-10-42-45-49 x3 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A However, as it is written: What no eye has seen, what no ear has heard, and what no human mind has conceived the things God has prepared for those who love Him. 1 Corinthians 2:9 Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Actress Kerry Washington was a triple winner at the 44th Annual NAACP Image Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles on Friday. Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Foam fest? An unidentified racer slides through a foam tunnel in the 5k Foam Fest race at Amelia Earhart Park in Hialeah on Saturday. Officials describes the Foam Fest as the newest and craziest race to hit the nation. Foam Fest is a mix of foam, mud and obstacles. It is a mud run com bined with foam, giant inflatable obstacles, army crawls, foam, colossal walls, mud pits, cargo net climbs, foam, body washer, moon walk, foam, slipn slides and water obstacles. Travis Stallone

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 3A 3A Call Today 487 0087 Your Authorized Retailer SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. TEACHERS: Feb. 7 Continued From Page 1A PLUM CREEK: Continued From Page 1A CHASTEENS: 35 years Continued From Page 1A The candidates are: Al Nelson, an eighth-grade math teacher at Richardson Middle School, a 13-year vet eran of teaching; Lisa Michele VanBennekom, a thirdgrade teacher at Five Points Elementary School with 13 years teaching experience; Becky Zoeller, an eighth-grade teacher at Lake City Middle School, with 33 years experience; Denetria Stokes, who teaches sixthto 12th-grade math at Challenge Learning Center, with three and a half years experi ence; Sarah Ripple, a fourth-grade teacher at Eastside Elementary School, with six years experience; S. Denise Gillyard, who teaches thirdgrade at Summers Elementary School, with 13 years experience; Mary E. (Beth) Cason, a third-grade teacher at Melrose Park Elementary, with nine years experience; Jamie L. Stamper, a fourth-grade teacher at Pinemount Elementary School, with 13 years experience; Tina Johnson, a music teacher at Fort White High/Middle School, with 26 years experience; Carrie Cooper, who teachers ninthgrade English at Columbia High School, with six years experience; Maxine Felgar Williams, who teaches kindergarten to fifth grade at Westside Elementary, with 17 years experience; Nicole Carr, a third-grade teacher at Fort White Elementary School with three years experience; Lauren Gerling, who teaches kinder garten through fifth grade at Columbia City Elementary School, with one and a half years experience; and Thayla Mullins, a fourth-grade teacher at Niblack Elementary School, with four years experience. The event is sponsored by First Federal Savings Bank of Florida, Delta Kappa Gammas NU Chapter and the Columbia County Schools Foundation. First Presbyterian Church is at 697 SW Baya Drive in Lake City. Nelson VanBennekom Zoeller Stokes Ripple Gillyard Cason Stamper Johnson Cooper Williams Carr Mullins Gerling It was a seafood resturant, and both Emmie Chasteen and Robert Chasteen committed to making it in the resturant business. They cooked, cleaned and did whatever was nec essary. That is still true today at their downtown resturant, Chasteens Downtown. They sweep the floor and help in the kitchen. Theyre not passive owners but active participants in the success of their business. Both of us are here to work, and neither one of us would be comfortable sitting around doing nothing, Robert Chasteen said. Robert and Emmie Chasteen both agreed that its tough to make a restaurant successful, and theres a number of things that are difficult to predict. They said that their one peice of advice to anyone who is thinking about opening a resturant is to be prepared to work hard. Despsite the hard work, Emmie Chasteen said its a pro fession shes enjoyed. I cant begin to tell you how many good friends weve made in this business through the years, she said. Emmie and Robert Chasteen, owners of Chasteens Downtown, pose for a photograph in their restaurant in downtown Lake City on Friday. The Chasteens have been restaurateurs 35 and have been at their current location for 13 years. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter project engineer hired by Plum Creek for the inter modal park, presented a timeline under which the site could have a conceptu al environmental resource permit for stormwater by March. The Rockefeller Group developed the Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan and has devel oped about 5 million square feet of industrial develop ment since 2008, according to a news release. State back on track with Race to the Top projects By CHRISTINE ARMARIO AP Education Writer MIAMI A year after Florida was put on warning for falling behind on its $700 million Race to the Top grant projects, U.S. Department of Education officials say the state has regained its momentum. A Department of Education report released Friday concludes nearly all projects are on track with Floridas amended time lines. Ninety-eight percent of the grant funds are being budgeted for contracts. In the first year Florida strug gled to issue them in a time ly manner. The initial delay meant the state faces an aggres sive timeline on an ambi tious education reform agenda. The report con cludes Florida should focus on making sure that contrac tors who get funds from the grant aimed at improving student achievement do high quality work. Florida has made encouraging progress toward implementing its plan, and we want to see that growth accelerate in the second half of the grant, U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan said. In the second year of carrying out the grant, the state adopted Common Core State Standards, a set of uniform benchmarks for math and reading, in kinder garten; began utilizing new teacher and principal evalu ation systems; and provided professional development and new teachers as part of its plans to turn around low performing schools. Florida was one of 11 states and the District of Columbia to receive a share of the U.S. Department of Educations $4.3 billion in Race to the Top money in the first two rounds of the competition. The state wants to double the percent age of incoming high school freshmen who graduate and go on to earn at least a years worth of college credit; cut the achievement gap in half; and increase the percentage of students scor ing at or above proficient on the National Assessment of Educational Progress by 2015. Floridas strategic plan also focuses on improving instruction. The Student Success Act, passed in 2011, created a new teacher evalu ation system that uses stu dent growth data and ties compensation to evaluation results starting in the 201415 school year. In its goal of ensuring students are prepared for college, Florida adopted the Common Core State Standards, which have been adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia. Over 40 percent of the Race to the Top money is being used to train teachers and assist in the transition to the new standards, which will be in place in all grades by 2014. The state has begun using its new teacher and principal evaluations and developing new models for teachers in hard-to-measure subject areas like physical education, music and art.

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OPINION Sunday, February 3, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A M y Silver Life NAACP mem-bership was suspended accord-ing to a letter signed by National NAACP President Benjamin Jealous on January 2, 2013. Additionally, I was removed as President of the Columbia County Branch NAACP. The reason stated in the let-ter for my removal was that I “filed charges against Debra White on December 4, 2012, while she was chair of the Columbia County Branch Nominating Committee.” This is categorically untrue. The Nominating Committee was dissolved during the monthly meet-ing on October 15, 2012, removing Debra White as chairperson and all other persons from the commit-tee. The Nominating Committee chose Bernice D. Presley as President of the Columbia County branch of the NAACP on the slate of officers that was presented to the Branch and voted on at the October 15, 2012 meeting. There were no additional nominations from the floor at the October branch meet-ing, therefore, the slate of officers was finalized – Bernice D. Presley was president. Debra White did not attend the October 15 meeting. The general election was then sched-uled for November 19, 2012 by the newly cho-sen Election Committee. However, the November 19 election was can-celled at the last minute because of a complaint filed by another mem-ber. This complaint was never investigated by the NAACP, but was allowed to cancel the election. The Florida State Conference of NAACP Branches and the National Office sponsored an elec-tion on December 15, 2012, in Lake City. At the December 15, 2012 elec-tion that was state/nation-al-sponsored, under the direction and leadership of Dale Landry, 4th State Vice President, Bernice D. Presley defeated Debra White for Branch President by a vote of 16 to 13. Immediately after the election Presley was sworn in as President of the Columbia County Branch of the NAACP by Rev. Juvais Harrington, Assistant Secretary of the Florida State Conference of NAACP Branches. Additional officers that were voted on and sworn in were: Patricia Brady, 2nd Vice President; Glynnell Presley, Secretary; and Martha W. Harris, Treasurer. Debra White was an active participant in an unsuccessful attempt by the leadership of the Florida State Conference when they came to Lake City, in July 2012 to oust (without credible evi-dence) the Chief of Police, Argatha Gilmore. Debra’s Youth Group marched down U. S. Highway 90 to City Hall holding picket signs against the chief. Debra White joined the local Branch February 7, 2012, was named 2nd Vice President and Youth Director during a regu-lar Branch meeting by President John Mayo, February 20, 2012, after being a member of the NAACP for only 13 days. Branch President Mayo told the body that Mr. Dale Landry said that he (Mayo) had the author-ity to name her. The problem: Debra White was never voted on by the Executive Committee or the general body. She was not ever legally approved for these posi-tions! Presently she is the 2nd Vice President of this Branch, appointed January 10, 2013, by the newly assigned President, Linda Thomas. The National Office’s action against me was based on untruths, innu-endos and retaliation. My 5th Amendment rights have been ignored. I have been denied due process. Explanation: On November 19, 2012, at approximately 8:30 p.m., while I was standing in the parking lot with four others, I was approached by Debra White (Lake City Reporter, Jan. 13, Page 1A). On the advice of my attorney and the investi-gating officer, I sought a restraining order against Debra. The restraining order was denied because the judge said it had to be repeated incidents. The national office, on a recommendation by State President Adora Obi Nweze and Dale Landry, removed me – because I defended myself! At the hearing, Debra appeared with an NAACP-paid attorney, Andrea V. Nelson, who said she was hired by the NAACP to represent the branch. I did not file a restraining order against the branch; I filed against Debra White as an individual. This was clearly not an NAACP matter! Attorney Nelson did not allow Debra to speak; however, she cross-examined me during the hearing. Since when does the NAACP use hard-earned NAACP membership dollars to defend an individual who attacks another indi-vidual, namely Bernice D. Presley? The NAACP at the national level operates on a double standard. At national conventions, lead-ers have armed guards follow them around – to protect them. Yet, I, Bernice D. Presley, am suspended, my Silver Life Membership revoked, and I am removed as President of the Columbia County Branch NAACP when I attempted to protect myself! I am a Silver Life member who has attended 7 of the last 9 national conventions, mostly at my expense. Debra White has been a member less than a year. No other Columbia County Branch mem-ber or officer has this record of attending 7 of 9 National Conventions. The NAACP surfaced in Columbia County in the 1930’s, was chartered in 1968, and has numerous success stories in this county, including suing the county and the school board to get single mem-ber district voting, and the city for street-paving, side-walks, street lights, sewer and other amenities. The branch was recently honored at the national convention in Houston, Texas for memberships. I received the award for the branch during the July, 2012 Convention in Houston, Texas. It is often said, “Membership is the life blood of the NAACP.” How can this be? On one hand the NAACP requests memberships; on the other hand the NAACP unjustly and unfairly takes memberships away! As a reply to President Benjamin Jealous’ let-ter to me, on January 5 I requested an imme-diate hearing. As of today’s date (January 30, 2013) there has been no response from Benjamin Jealous or any other NAACP leader. This appears to be a tactic of leaders at the National Office when they can’t justify what has been done. Remember: Justice delayed is justice denied! The NAACP as an organization is a blessing to all humanity. However, it is a few self-centered, self-righteous, myopic, retaliatory and vindictive individuals who give it a dirty name. A special note to readers: The President’s posi-tion is a volunteer posi-tion, no salary is involved. I remain committed to the struggle. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T he latest viral hashtag on Twitter is #teoing, which features pictures of male college students with their arms around an invisible girlfriend. They are meant to be humorous, but speak to a larger societal issue — a culture of lies. While it is not possible to say whether Notre Dame football star Manti Te’o is a victim or per-petrator in the fake girlfriend hoax, his story, paired with cyclist Lance Armstrong’s admitted doping on Oprah Winfrey’s OWN network last month, represents someone foisting a big lie into the cultural mainstream. Researchers at Zhejiana Normal University in China and at Northwestern University found that lying “becomes more automatic upon training.” When people practice deception, it is simply easier to lie, in turn making it harder to differentiate from the truth. It is no longer limited to pulling a deception among one’s peers. Rather, the practice of lying often turns into whirlwinds of deceit that grow into grand scandals. One of the grandest went all the way up to the president of the United States and forced his resignation. And the repercussions usually share a theme of “sorry, I got caught” rather than just the one-word apology, as in the case of former Cincinnati Reds player Pete Rose, who was involved in a betting scandal. Rose told Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig: “I didn’t think I’d get caught.” Everyone from the elementary school student who said the dog ate his homework to members of the media who exaggerate or invent their stories have violated a moral imper-ative to tell the truth. But that is not always the case. The First Amendment’s freedoms apparently protect lying to some degree. In an infamous 1997 whistleblower case between the Fox affiliate WTVT in Tampa and former employees, who were allegedly fired for “refusing to knowingly include false infor-mation” in a segment about milk production company Monsanto giving their cows drugs to speed up the milk process, an appellate court ruled in favor of Fox that violating the Federal Communications Commission news distortion policy is not against the law. The Armstrong saga is a stark reminder that some are willing to lie and risk the possibility of shame in return for instant rewards. His col-lapse is likewise a reminder that the risk is ulti-mately not worth the final price. A culture of lying NAACP was unfair, unjust in suspending my membership ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Bernice D. Presley Q The Miami Herald 4AEDIT On this date:In 1783, Spain formally recognized American independence. In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens held a shipboard peace confer-ence off the Virginia coast; the talks deadlocked over the issue of Southern autonomy. In 1913, the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, providing for a federal income tax, was ratified. In 1924, the 28th president of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, died in Washington, D.C., at age 67. In 1930, the chief justice of the United States, William Howard Taft, resigned for health reasons. (He died just over a month later.) In 1943, during World War II, the U.S. transport ship Dorchester, which was carrying troops to Greenland, sank after being hit by a German torpedo; of the more than 900 men aboard, only about 230 survived. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 5A Feb. 3 Church anniversary The Vineyard Baptist Church will celebrate its 60th anniversary with a spe cial service at 10:30 a.m. in the church, 1832 Tomaka Terrace (off SW Bascom Norris Drive). The speaker will be Brandon Elixson. A covered-dish lunch will follow. For more informa tion, call Cheryl Thomas at 365-0764. Feb. 4 Loans workshop Columbia County Extension will hold a free workshop to discuss loan and grant programs for small business and agri cultural producers with USDA and Florida Office of Energy. The workshop will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Office. To reg ister or for more informa tion, contact Derek Barber at the Extension Office at (386) 752-5384. Feb. 5 Musicians to perform The Friends of the Library will host a perfor mance by folk music duo Hungrytown at 7 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Musicians Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson will perform music from their two acclaimed albums, Hungrytown and Any Forgotten Thing. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Charity tournament The Players Club on U.S. 90 West will host a Texas hold em poker tournament each Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m., to benefit the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. For more informa tion, call Linda Dowling at 752-8822. Feb. 6 Newcomers lunch The Lake City Newcomers friendship lunch will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Texas Roadhose res taurant on U.S. 90 West. For more information, contacte Rose Taylor at 755-2175 or Barbara Test at 754-7227. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Festival planning The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Feb. 7Forest workshop Columbia County Extension is offering a Forest Stewardship Program workshop on tim berland security from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Landowners, especially those who dont reside on their land, may be at risk of losses or costs resulting from tres pass, timber theft, dump ing, drug farming, wildfire, arson or other property violations. This workshop will help landowners be more aware of security risks and take steps to minimize them. A $10 fee covers lunch and materials. Register online at http:// fsp-workshop020713.event brite.com/. Those without web access can reserve a space by contacting the Extension office at (386) 752-5384. Space is limited so please register early. Debutants meeting The Debutants Society will have an informational meeting from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The meet ing is for for girls and boys in 11th and 12th grades who might be interested in becoming members. Minister Jan Harrison is the organization contact person. Feb. 8 Music concert Country music singer Tracy Lawrence will per form at Florida Gateway Colleges Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrence has amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including Alibis, If the Good Die Young and Find Out Who Your Friends Are. For tickets or more information, call (386) 754-4340 or visit www. fgcentertainment.com. Art League exhibit The Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening recep tion will be at 6 p.m. at the colleges Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109. Festival vendors The Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 4383131, visit the festival web site, www.olusteefestival. com, or email vendorinfo@ olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited. Theater performance High Springs Community Theater will present the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Death of a Salesman tonight through March 3. Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $11. Seniors tickets for the Sunday matinee are $9. Tickets are availabe at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City, by calling (386) 754-2780 or online at highspring scommunitytheater.com. For more information, call (386) 454-3525. Feb. 9 BCU alumni The Columbia County Chapter of BethuneCookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU president Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence. The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the univer sity scholarship fund. Writing program The Friends of the Library host Liz Coursen in presenting Self-Editing in the Internet Age: How to Edit Your Words Without Losing Your Mind at 3:30 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Whether youre a full-fledged author or someone who edits your organizations news letter or wesite, learn the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar that will help improve your writing and put a shine on your fin ished product. Black History Month Black History Month organizers will host a Trip to Freedom bus trip to Fort Mose at St. Augustine, the first all-black cettle ment in the United States. The bus will leave at 7 a.m. from Richardson Community Center. Cost is $25, which includes entry fees and lunch. To register or for more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 8671601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts. org. Elks event B & S Combs Elks Lodge and Temple will have a Black History Month pro gram at the Richardson Center at 10 a.m. The speak er will be L. C. Bradley. For more information, call Mrs. Margaret Carter at (386) 752-3533. Shriners fish fry Lake City Shrine Club will have a fish fry begin ning at 7 p.m. at the Shrine clubhouse on Northwest Brown Road, west of Lake City. The cost of $7 includes fried fish and all the trim mings. Funds raised will benefit the Lake City Shrine Club and are not tax-deductible. For more information or to order ahead, call Bob Breyer at 365-1388. Feb. 10 Library group to meet The Friends of the Library will have its annual meeting program, Having Fun, Wish You Were Here!: An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida, presented by Liz Coursen at 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The program will include vin tage postcards featuring Lake City and other region al locations. Christian concert The Christian music group Brian Free and Assurance will give a con cert at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Live Oak and Lake City at the intersection with Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. More infor mation about the church is available online www.well bornbaptist.com or by call ing (386) 963-2231. Feb. 11 Coalition meeting The Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway Inc. execu tive/finance committee will meet at 3 p.m. at the coalition Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers state and fed eral funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Prekindergarten programs for the following coun ties: Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee, and Union. Anyone with a dis ability requiring special assistance to attend the meeting should contact Stacey Nettles at (386) 7529770. Cancer survivors tea All cancer survivors are invited to a tea in of cel ebration with other survi vors from 3 ot 4:30 p.m. at The Clubhouse of the Lake City Womans and Garden clubs at 257 SE Hernando St. Enjoy For more infor mation, call to (386) 7524198 or (386) 752-0956. 5A Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd, Buffalo, Casio, Citizens of Humanity, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Hart Schaffner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/novelty electrics/coffee, Lacoste, ladies better swim, ladies designer & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, My Flat in London, Nautica, Original Penguin, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, Wusthof; non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid February 5, 2013 RED DOT: **Limited exclusions in Brighton, My Flat in London, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 45-65%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT senior Tuesday, Feb. 5 BELK.COM 30-50 % off Better sportswear from Rafaella, Madison, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh & more for misses & petites. Orig. 24.00-119.00 Sale 11.99-82.99 Also available in todays woman sizes at slightly higher prices. Imported 60 % off ENTIRE STOCK Belk Silverworks Orig. 26.00-180.00 Sale 10.40-72.00 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY *See below for details. In store only 1 5 % o ff be mine always r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 6 5 % 30 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save Henry N. Steedley Henry N. Steedley, 84, passed away on Tuesday, January 29, 2013. Memorial services will be held at 10:30 a.m., on Saturday, February 9, 2013 GATEWAYFOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954. Maj. Michael Lynn Baker Major Michael Lynn Baker USMC Ret., born Feb. 4, 1933 in Houston, Texas. Left this world January 21, 2013 in Lake City, FL. Survived by his wife of 49 yrs. Valdalea Baker, Major Baker served in the United States Marine Corps for over as enlisted, after 16 yrs he was a Gunnery Sgt. when commissioned as an of posts throughout the world including combat tours in Korea and Vietnam. He was a member of many veterans and fraternal organizations and did much to give back over the years. Major Baker requested no funeral services, however a Memorial service will be held at the Lake City Moose Lodge on February 7, 2013 at 12:00. Drinks and a dinner provided. All his friends are invited. Dr. George Jan Corvin Dr. George Jan Corvin, 76, Died Friday February 1, 2013. at the Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City, Arrangements are in complete and a full obit will run in Tuesdays edition. Dees-Par rish Family Funeral home is in charge of all arrangements. 458 South Marion Avenue Lake City, FL. 32025. (386) 752-1234. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Joe Smith (left), Lake City Reporter district sales manager, presents a plaque for Carrier of the Year to Mitchell Lee. Lee has been working with the paper for two years. Its an honor representing the Lake City Reporter and knowing that Ive been doing a good job for my customers, Lee said. Obituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. Carrier of the Year

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By MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Most candy, high-calorie drinks and greasy meals could soon be on a food blacklist in the nation’s schools. For the first time, the government is proposing broad new standards to make sure all foods sold in schools are more health-ful. Under the new rules the Agriculture Department proposed Friday, foods like fatty chips, snack cakes, nachos and mozzarella sticks would be taken out of lunch lines and vending machines. In their place would be foods like baked chips, trail mix, diet sodas, lower-calorie sports drinks and low-fat hamburgers. The rules, required under a child nutrition law passed by Congress in 2010, are part of the government’s effort to combat childhood obesity. While many schools already have improved their lunch menus and vending machine choices, others still are selling high-fat, high-calorie foods. Under the proposal, the Agriculture Department would set fat, calorie, sugar and sodium limits on almost all foods sold in schools. Current standards already regulate the nutritional con-tent of school breakfasts and lunches that are sub-sidized by the federal gov-ernment, but most lunch-rooms also have “a la carte” lines that sell other foods. Food sold through vending machines and in other ways outside the lunchroom has never before been federally regulated. “Parents and teachers work hard to instill healthy eating habits in our kids, and these efforts should be supported when kids walk through the school-house door,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said. Most snacks sold in school would have to have less than 200 calories. Elementary and middle schools could sell only water, low-fat milk or 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice. High schools could sell some sports drinks, diet sodas and iced teas, but the calories would be limited. Drinks would be limited to 12-ounce por-tions in middle schools and to 8-ounce portions in elementary schools. The standards will cover vending machines, the “a la carte” lunch lines, snack bars and any other foods regularly sold around school. They would not apply to in-school fundrais-ers or bake sales, though states have the power to regulate them. The new guidelines also would not apply to after-school con-cessions at school games or theater events, goodies brought from home for classroom celebrations, or anything students bring for their own personal con-sumption. The new rules are the latest in a long list of chang-es designed to make foods served in schools more healthful and accessible. Nutritional guidelines for the subsidized lunches were revised last year and put in place last fall. The 2010 child nutrition law also provided more money for schools to serve free and reduced-cost lunches and required more meals to be served to hungry kids. Sen. Tom Harkin, DIowa, has been working for two decades to take junk foods out of schools. He calls the availability of unhealthful foods around campus a “loophole” that undermines the taxpayer money that helps pay for the healthier subsidized lunches. “USDA’s proposed nutrition standards are a critical step in closing that loop-hole and in ensuring that our schools are places that nurture not just the minds of American children but their bodies as well,” Harkin said. Last year’s rules faced criticism from some con-servatives, including some Republicans in Congress, who said the government shouldn’t be telling kids what to eat. Mindful of that backlash, the Agriculture Department exempted in-school fundraisers from federal regulation and pro-posed different options for some parts of the rule, including the calorie limits for drinks in high schools, which would be limited to either 60 calories or 75 cal-ories in a 12-ounce portion. The department also has shown a willingness to work with schools to resolve complaints that some new requirements are hard to meet. Last year, for example, the govern-ment relaxed some limits on meats and grains in subsidized lunches after school nutritionists said they weren’t working. Schools, the food industry, interest groups and other critics or supporters of the new proposal will have 60 days to comment and suggest changes. A final rule could be in place as soon as the 2014 school year. Margo Wootan, a nutrition lobbyist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said surveys by her organization show that most parents want chang-es in the lunchroom. “Parents aren’t going to have to worry that kids are using their lunch money to buy candy bars and a Gatorade instead of a healthy school lunch,” she said. The food industry has been onboard with many of the changes, and sev-eral companies worked with Congress on the child nutrition law two years ago. Major beverage com-panies have already agreed to take the most caloric sodas out of schools. But those same companies, including Coca-Cola and PepsiCo, also sell many of the non-soda options, like sports drinks, and have lobbied to keep them in vending machines. A spokeswoman for the American Beverage Association, which repre-sents the soda companies, says they already have greatly reduced the num-ber of calories that kids are consuming at school. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN Lake City352-374-4534426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 As standoff drags on, town grieves bus driverBy JAY REEVESAssociated PressMIDLAND CITY, Ala. — As the police standoff with an Alabama man accused of holding a 5-year-old boy hostage contin-ued Saturday, a nearby commu-nity prepared to bury the beloved bus driver who was shot to death trying to protect children on his bus when the episode began days earlier. Charles Albert Poland Jr., 66, who was known around town as Chuck, was described by folks in his hometown of Newton as a humble hero. Hundreds of peo-ple attended visitation services for Poland on Saturday evening. Mourners said they were proud of Poland for his act of selfless-ness, and for laying down his life for the children on the bus. His funeral was set for Sunday afternoon. “I believe that if he had to do it all over again tomorrow, he would,” said Poland’s sis-ter-in-law, Lavern Skipper, ear-lier Saturday. “He would do it for those children.” Authorities said Jim Lee Dykes boarded a stopped school bus filled with 21 children Tuesday afternoon and demanded two boys between 6 and 8 years old. When Poland tried to block his way, the gunman shot him sev-eral times and took one 5-year-old boy — who police say remains in an underground bunker with Dykes. Dale County Sheriff Wally Olson said in a briefing with reporters Saturday that Dykes told them he has blankets and an electric heater in the bunker on his property. Authorities have been communicating with Dykes through a ventilation pipe to the bunker. Olson also said Dykes has allowed police to deliver coloring books, medication and toys for the boy. “I want to thank him for taking care of our boy,” Olson said. “That’s very important.” The shooting and abduction took place in Midland City, a small town near Dothan, Ala., in the state’s southeastern corner. Newton is about three miles away, a small hamlet with fewer than 2,000 residents. It sits amid cotton farms and rolling hills sprinkled with red earth; most of the residents commute to Dothan or to a nearby Army post. Nearly everyone in Newton was planning to attend Poland’s visitation or funeral. “He’s probably the nicest guy you’ll ever meet,” said Lonnie Daniels, the 69-year-old owner of the NAPA Auto Parts store, one of three establishments in town that was open Saturday. Daniels last saw his friend Tuesday morning, when Poland agreed to buy a car from him. The two men shook hands and closed the deal “like gentlemen,” Daniels said. Poland was to return after working his bus route to pay for the car. “He never came back,” Daniels said quietly. Daniels said Poland had been married to his wife for 43 years. Poland was from Idaho, but his wife was from Newton. The cou-ple lived there for decades in a small mobile home, and Poland enjoyed gardening and clearing brush from his property. “I knew that he was always there if I needed,” said Daniels, adding that Poland was an excel-lent mechanic with an array of tools that he lent to people in town. In Midland City, police were mostly staying mum about their talks with Dykes, — a Vietnam-era veteran known as Jimmy to his neighbors. Some have described him as a menacing figure with anti-government views. Sheriff Olson would not say Saturday whether Dykes has made any demands. Olson added that he is limited in the details he can release. FBI spokesman Jason Pack said Saturday that officials were working to establish a command center near the bunker. Dykes had been scheduled to appear in court Wednesday to answer charges he shot at his neighbors in a dispute last month over a speed bump. Mistakenly freed killer recaptured By JASON KEYSERAssociated PressCHICAGO — Two days after a stunning series of errors allowed a convicted murderer to walk out of a Chicago jail where he did not need to be in the first place, police recaptured the man at a northern Illinois home where he was found watching TV. Steven L. Robbins, 44, put up no resistance Friday night as police burst through the door of a town-home in Kankakee, about 60 miles south of Chicago, said Cook County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Frank Bilecki. “He was in the living room or kitchen area watching TV, taken by total surprise,” Bilecki said, adding that it appears the homeowner might know an acquaintance of Robbins. Before the arrest, a surveil-lance team spotted Robbins wearing a curly wig while carrying groceries from a vehicle into the home, the sheriff’s office said. By Saturday afternoon, Robbins was back in the Indiana State Prison, where he was serving a 60-year sentence for mur-der. The prisoner’s mistaken release focused attention on an antiquated corner of the criminal justice system that still relies extensively on paper docu-ments instead of comput-ers in moving detainees and keeping tabs on their court status.Junk foods to be outlawed at schools Authorities holding back out of concern for abducted boy.ASSOCIATED PRESSMembers of an FBI special operations team wait Saturday in Midland City, Ala., the fifth day of a standoff with a man who holed up in a bunker with a 5-year-old boy a s hostage after the man shot and killed school bus drive r on Tuesday.Authorities said they still had communication with the man, Jim Lee Dykes. Sheriff Wally Olson said Saturday that Jimmy Lee Dykes has told them that he has bl ankets and an electric heater in the bunker. ASSOCIATED PRESSSide salads, apple sauce and plums await the students o f Eastside Elementary School in Clinton, Miss. The government for the first time is proposing broad new standards to make school snacks healthier, a move that would ban the sale of almost all candy, high-calorie sports drinks and greasy foods at schools that receive fe deral funds. Robbins

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 7A7A Sandals...20-30% off WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots & More Boots All Insulated Camo...40% offMens • Womens • Children Share the love, romantic music and Chateaubriand. White Lake Yacht & Dinner Club at Cerveny Conference Center & Camp Weed February 14, 2013 Reservations please call 386-364-5250 Bring your own wine or spirits. Social 6 pm. Dinner 7 pm Call for menu. $50 each person. 11057 Camp Weed PlaceLive Oak, FLwww.campweed.org386-364-5250 LAKECITYCOMMUNITYREDEVELOPMENTAGENCYMEETING CITYOFLAKECITYNOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN thattheLakeCityCommunityRedevelopmentAgencyforthe CityofLakeCity,FloridawillholdameetingonMonday,February4,2013,at6:30P.M .,in theCouncilChamberslocatedonthesecondfloorofCityHallat205NorthMarionAve nue, LakeCity,Florida.THEPURPOSEOFTHEMEETINGISTOCONSIDERTHEFOLLOWINGITEMS: ArtLeagueFunding Allinterestedpersonsareinvitedtoattend. AUDREYESIKES,MMCCityClerkCITYCOUNCILMEETING THECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFLAKECITY,FLORIDAWILL MEETONMONDAY,FEBRUARY4,2013AT7:00P.M.INTHE COUNCILCHAMBERSLOCATEDONTHESECONDFLOOROFCITY HALLAT205NORTHMARIONAVENUE,LAKECITY,FLORIDAAllinterestedpersonsareinvitedtoattend.SPECIALREQUIREMENTS:Ifyourequirespecialaidorservicesforanyoft hemeetings identifiedabove,asaddressedintheAmericanDisabilitiesAct,pleas econtacttheCity Manager : sOfficeat(386)719-5768. AUDREYESIKES,MMCCityClerk Seats still availablefor Tracy Lawrence performance Friday County health fairDEREK GILLIAM /Lake City ReporterQuinton Callum Jr. has his cholesterol checked at t he Columbia County Recreation Department’s annual C ommunity Health and Wellness Fair at Richardson Community Center on Saturday. Callum teaches virtual school at Columb ia High School and coaches the running backs for the football team. Ir ma Neves, point-of-care coordinator at Lake City Me dical Center, administered the cholesterol test. She said anyone 18 years old or older should have a complete lipid profile done once a year. Black History Month speakers Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterTwo of the speakers at Friday’s opening ceremonies for B lack History Month at Richardson Community Center talked about two particularly important chapters of that history. LEFT: Minister Diallo-Sekou Abur El recites John F. Kennedy ’s Civil Rights Addres. RIGHT: John Gay, a former Tuskegee Airman, speaks about his e xperiences at the Black History Month opening ceremony held at the Richardson Community Center on Friday. ‘I want to use this opportunity to get into the community and talk about history,’ Gay said. ‘The Tuskegee Airmen was an Am erican thing that happened to involve a whole lot of blac k people. It should be celebrated year-round. I’d like to spread the word.’ Ponzi schemer’s wife pleads guiltyFrom staff reports Limited tickets remain for Tracy Lawrence show Friday at Florida Gateway College During the past 20 years, Tracy Lawrence’s discography has been a showcase for one of the most unforgettable voices in contemporary country music. That unique music style will be on display on as part of the FGC Entertainment series. The concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Howard Conference Center at the college. Tracy Lawrence’s performance is sponsored by Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center and CMS Professional Staffing Inc. Lawrence’s respect for country-music tradition has made him one of his genre’s cornerstone styl-ists. The Arkansas native burst on the scene with 1991’s platinum-selling “Sticks and Stones.” The album contained four mas-sive radio hits, including its title tune. “Alibis,” issued in 1993, sold more than two million copies and spawned four consecutive No. 1 hits, “Alibis,” “Can’t Break It to My Heart,” “My Second Home” and “If the Good Die Young.” “Can’t Break It to My Heart” and “My Second Home” were the first hits that he co-wrote. Lawrence also had a hand in penning “If the World Had a Front Porch” (1995), “Stars Over Texas” (1996), “How a Cowgirl Says Goodbye” (1997) and “Lessons Learned” (2000). “I think everybody else seems to be so busy trying to be pop stars that they’ve forgotten what they came here for,” Lawrence said. “I didn’t come here to be a pop star. I came here to be a country singer. I’ve been passionate about country since I was a kid. I still love it, and I’m desperately try-ing to hold onto it, in spite of what the marketplace says is ‘fashionable.’” Tickets are still available for the concert, though VIP seats are extremely limited. VIP tickets are $40, general admission is $25, and tickets for FGC students, staff and faculty are $15. Tickets can be purchased by calling (386) 754-4340 or by visiting www.fgc entertainment.com. COURTESY PHOTOTracy Lawrence, one of country music’s major stars, with 18 No. 1 hits to his credit, will appear in concert Friday night at Florida Gateway College.Python hunt yields 41 snakes so far MIAMI — More than three dozen Burmese pythons have been hunted during Florida’s “Python Challenge” that ends in less than two weeks. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Friday that 41 of the invasive snakes have been killed in the Everglades since the competi-tion began Jan. 12. Q Associated Press By CURT ANDERSONAP Legal Affairs WriterFORT LAUDERDALE — The wife of convicted Ponzi scheme operator Scott Rothstein pleaded guilty Friday to a federal conspiracy charge, admit-ting that she and others sought to conceal and sell more than $1 million in jewelry that federal investigators wanted to seize to repay wronged investors. Kim Rothstein, 38, faces a maximum of five years in prison when she is sentenced April 19 but is likely to get far less under federal guide-lines. She pleaded guilty in a short, subdued hearing to conspiracy to commit money laundering, obstruct justice and tamper with a witness. She and her attorney, David Tucker, declined comment after the plea, ducking into a dark-colored SUV and speeding off. Two others involved in the hidden-jewelry plot — her friend Stacie Weisman, 49, and her attorney Scott Saidel, 45 — have also pleaded guilty and face similar five-year sentences. Two other men accused of playing roles in the scheme are set to go to trial in April. Scott Rothstein, a now-disbarred lawyer who formerly headed a high-flying firm, is serving a 50-year prison sentence for orchestrating a $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme using fake legal settlements to lure investors with promises of huge profits. In reality, Rothstein was using money from new investors to pay older ones in classic Ponzi scheme fashion. Once the scam collapsed in late 2009, investigators moved to seize Rothstein’s homes, property, fancy cars, boats and many other assets including a treasure trove of jewelry in order to partially repay the inves-tors. Kim Rothstein said in a sworn statement on Nov. 9, 2009, that every-thing had been turned over. Some of the jewelry, however, seemed to be missing.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Apply online atcampuscu.comor call754-9088and press 4 today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties!2APR Fixed1 % Bust out of your 30-year mortgage! IN 10 YEARS Free ’n Clear TOTAL CLOSING COSTS1(Loans of $200,000 or less)10-year FIXED APR1 First Mortgage(Please call for other rates & terms) Apply Now! 1.Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offe r is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate proper ty valuation and first mortgage position are requir ed. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mo bile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months wo uld require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and o ne final payment of $1,022.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a total of payments of $123,151 .93. The amount financed is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit appro val and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention thi s ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee.This credit union is federally insured by the Natio nal Credit Union Administration.5and 15-year rates and terms also available! Pay off your homein10 years!

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, February 3, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS In a continued effort to raise awareness about heart disease and to reduce the risk factors for it, Lake City Medical Center and Cardiologist Steven Roark, MD, are hosting a Heart Health Lunch and Learn. Learn the warning signs of a heart attack and why speed saves. Please call 386-758-3385 to reserve your spot for this informative seminar. Seating is limited. A light lunch will be served. LakeCityMedical.com Wednesday, Feb. 20, 12-1pm Fifth Generation Farms Banquet Hall (3739 W US HWY 90) LCM-4416 Heart Seminar Ad 5.25x10.5_L5.indd 1 2/1/13 1:35 PM Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 CONTACTS EYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses 2 Complete Pair 2 Complete Pair $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 NOW FREE GLASSES FREE PAIR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES FEB. 28, 2013 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday Decision time for Tunsil JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High left tackle Laremy Tunsil poses for a photograph while at football practice earlier this year. Tunsil will be signing live televised by ESPN during National Signing Day on Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at the Columbia High School auditorium. Parade All-American to sign live on Wednesday By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com As a first-team member of this years Parade AllAmerica Football Team, Columbia Highs Laremy Tunsil continues to rake in the recognition. Tunsil is the fourth player in the Lake City Reporters coverage area to be named to the Parade All-America Football team. For a player that has been handed so many honors, Tunsil still accepts each recognition as a gift. Its a blessing, Tunsil said. Ive got to keep work ing to be on top. You never know who wants to take it from you. Tunsil said that hes not one to overindulge in the awards. I dont take it to the head, becausde Im still in high school, Tunsil said. I dont wanna get the big head, so its always another TUNSIL continued on 2B Back in action By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com After a 21-6 campaign last season, head coach Jimmy Williams doesnt plan on the Lady Tigers softball program of Columbia High slowing down any in 2013. I expect us to have a deep run into regionals, Williams said. The trick is, we have to win our district. Williams said that the district will once again be top heavy with the same group vying for the cham pionship again this season. Its a three-team race with us, St. Augustine and Atlantic Coast, Williams said. People will find this hard to believe, but I think this may be the best team Ive ever had. Theyll find that especially hard to believe after the Fab 4 last year. We just have every ingredient. Williams will have a tworotation pitching staff that includes Erin Andeson and Ashley Shoup. Theyre not rook ies any more, Williams said. They have varsity experience. Both pitchers have contrasting styles that Williams believes will keep teams off balance. Anderson is a little fast er than Ashley, Williams Lady Tigers begin season on Tuesday. CHS continued on 2B BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs 2013 softball team is (front row, from left) Keeley Murray, Brandy Morgan, Tatum Morgan, Lacey King, Brittney Morgan, Erin Anderson, Leslie Ann Rosonet, and Holly Borris. Back row (from left) is head coach Jimmy Williams, Ashley Shoup, Caleigh McCauley, Kayli Kvistad, Hollianne Dohrn, Lauren Eakeer, Jessica Shimmel, assistant coach Mitch Shoup and assistant coach Greg Sund.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, final round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, final round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2 p.m. ESPN — Marquette at Louisville NFL FOOTBALL 6:29 p.m. CBS — Super Bowl XLVII, San Francisco vs. Baltimore, at New Orleans NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC — Pittsburgh at Washington WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma at West Virginia Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Notre Dame at SyracuseNBCSN — George Mason at Old Dominion 9 p.m. ESPN — Texas at West Virginia NHL HOCKEY 9 p.m. NBCSN — Dallas at Colorado WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Purdue at Penn St. 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Texas A&M at LSUFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 2OTSan Francisco 45, Green Bay 31Atlanta 30, Seattle 28New England 41, Houston 28 Conference Championships Sunday San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24Baltimore 28, New England13 Pro Bowl Sunday At HonoluluNFC 62, AFC 35 Super Bowl Sunday At New Orleans Baltimore vs. San Francisco, 6 p.m. (CBS)NFL calendar March 9-11 — Clubs may enter negotiations with certified agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at end of league year. March 12 — Before 4 p.m. EDT, clubs must exercise options for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their 2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation; clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclu-sive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 contracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must be under the salary cap. The 2013 league year, free agency and trading period begins at 4 p.m. EDT. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix April 25-27 — NFL draft, New YorkMay 20-22 — NFL spring league Meeting, Boston Sept. 5, 8-9 — 2013 NFL season begins.BASKETBALLNBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 29 15 .659 — Brooklyn 28 19 .596 2 12 Boston 23 23 .500 7 Philadelphia 20 26 .435 10 Toronto 17 30 .362 13 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 29 14 .674 — Atlanta 26 19 .578 4 Orlando 14 32 .304 16 12 Charlotte 11 34 .244 19 Washington 11 34 .244 19 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 28 18 .609 —Indiana 28 19 .596 12 Milwaukee 24 21 .533 3 12 Detroit 18 29 .383 10 12 Cleveland 13 34 .277 15 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 37 11 .771 — Memphis 30 16 .652 6 Houston 25 23 .521 12 Dallas 20 27 .426 16 12 New Orleans 15 32 .319 21 12 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 35 11 .761 — Denver 30 18 .625 6Utah 26 21 .553 9 12 Portland 23 23 .500 12 Minnesota 17 26 .395 16 12 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 34 14 .708 — Golden State 29 17 .630 4 L.A. Lakers 21 26 .447 12 12 Sacramento 17 31 .354 17 Phoenix 16 31 .340 17 12 NBA Glance Friday’s Games Toronto 98, L.A. Clippers 73Indiana 102, Miami 89Boston 97, Orlando 84New York 96, Milwaukee 86Brooklyn 93, Chicago 89Philadelphia 89, Sacramento 80Detroit 117, Cleveland 99 Memphis 85, Washington 76Denver 113, New Orleans 98Utah 86, Portland 77Dallas 109, Phoenix 99L.A. Lakers 111, Minnesota 100 Sunday’s Games L.A. Clippers at Boston, 1 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 1 p.m.Miami at Toronto, 2 p.m. Monday’s Games Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Washington, 7 p.m.Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m.Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m. AP Top 25Record Pts Prv 1. Michigan (51) 19-1 1,611 2 2. Kansas (13) 18-1 1,572 3 3. Indiana 18-2 1,457 7 4. Florida (1) 16-2 1,420 8 5. Duke 17-2 1,328 1 6. Syracuse 18-2 1,322 3 7. Gonzaga 19-2 1,177 10 8. Arizona 17-2 1,160 6 9. Butler 17-3 1,023 9 10. Oregon 18-2 969 1611. Ohio St. 15-4 945 14 12. Louisville 16-4 905 5 13. Michigan St. 17-4 897 13 14. Miami 15-3 894 25 15. Wichita St. 19-2 621 20 16. Mississippi 17-2 473 23 17. Missouri 15-4 464 22 18. Kansas St. 15-4 463 11 19. NC State 16-4 431 18 20. New Mexico 17-3 333 15 21. Creighton 18-3 312 1722. San Diego St. 16-4 302 — 23. Minnesota 15-5 281 12 24. Cincinnati 16-4 220 21 25. Marquette 14-4 216 — Others receiving votes: Georgetown 121, UNLV 56, Wisconsin 45, UCLA 34, Arizona St. 14, Notre Dame 12, Pittsburgh 10, Louisiana Tech 8, Villanova 6, Baylor 5, Iowa St. 4, Memphis 4, VCU 4, La Salle 3, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 2, Colorado St. 1.HOCKEYNHL Games Friday’s Games Dallas 4, Phoenix 3, SOVancouver 2, Chicago 1, SOWashington 3, Philadelphia 2Carolina 1, Ottawa 0Tampa Bay 8, Winnipeg 3Detroit 5, St. Louis 3Anaheim 3, Minnesota 1 Sunday’s Games Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.Ottawa at Montreal, 2 p.m.Florida at Buffalo, 3 p.m.New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m. Monday’s Games Carolina at Toronto, 7 p.m.Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.San Jose at Anaheim, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 2BSPORTSwow moment.” Tunsil’s next step will be naming a school when he commits on ESPN at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday. “It’s a hard, stressful decision that I’ve got to make in the next few days,” he said. His choices are limited to SEC schools and he will play at either Alabama, Georgia or Ole Miss. “They’re all really the same,” Tunsil said. “I’m basing it al on relationships. It’s going to come down to who I can deal with the best. It’s gonna be who I have the most rela-tionships with, who I have the relationship with.” And the Tiger product wasn’t about to tip his hand to where he might be leaning. “There’s really not a leader,” Tunsil said. “They’re all the same.” In fact, he might not even have the decision made. Tunsil hinted that the deci-sion might not come until that morning. “It’s going to be whatever I think about in the morning when I first wake up,” Tunsil said. “I’m gonna keep it to myself and let it be a little surprise for everyone.” With Georgia head coach Mark Richt in town for an in-home visit this week and the Ole Miss coaching staff attending Thursday’s bas-ketball game against Fort White High with Tunsil, the recruiting game appears to be coming down to the wire for the services of one of the nation’s top tackles. And as Tunsil mentioned, it seems that this is any-one’s game. TUNSIL: Signing on Wednesday Continued From Page 1B BRIEFS YOUTH BASKETBALL USSSA travel team sign-up Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc. has announced tryouts at Richardson Community Center for its seventhand 10th-grade USSSA travel basketball teams. Tryouts for seventh-grade (ages 11-14) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb.13, 15, 20 and 22; tryouts for 10-grade (ages 14-17) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb. 12, 14, 19 and 21. Permission/waver forms must be signed by a parent or guardian. Twelve players will be chosen for each team and contacted by phone. Fee for players selected is $60,due by March 1. For details, call Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith at 754-7096 or 754-7095. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up open The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Feb. 16. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most outgoing and fun-filled outfit. The first runner to break 19 minutes will receive $100, and there will be raffle prizes. Registration is open at active.com; the fee will increase the day of the race. For details, call Michelle at (386) 208-2447.Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. March 2 at O’Leno State Park on U.S. Highway 41-441, 17 miles south of Lake City. Entry fee through Feb. 14 is $10 for ages 14 and younger and $20 for all others ($25 after Feb.14). Entry to the park is free for registered runners. The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. Proceeds go to O’Leno State Park. To register go to www.friendsofoleno.org and click 5K Run. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723. CHS FOOTBALL Quarterback Club pheasant shoot Allen & Son Quail Farm and the Columbia County Quarterback Club, is sponsoring a pheasant hunt on Feb. 9 at Robert Louis Green Farm, 12 miles north of Lake City. Ticket cost for the shooting stations is $250 (20-shooter limit), which includes runners to pick up birds, dressing out birds and any tipping. Back-up shooters will be charged $75. Shooters should arrive no later than noon, and there will be a safety meeting before the shoot. For details, call Leronia Allen at 754-9127 or Christofer Piercey at 288-9631. Ducks Unlimited District Chairman Jimmy Sparks is working with Allen on the pheasant shoot. Q From staff reports said. “Ashley is methodical. She’s like a surgeon. I think they will both complement each other this season.” But the strength of the Lady Tigers this year will come from their ability to score runs. “I think we’re going to outscore a lot of people,” Williams said. “We have power with Brandy Morgan, Kayli Kvistad, Hollianne Dohrn and having Keeley Murray back is a big plus. We have eight girls that can hit it out of the park, but we don’t want to be a long-ball team.” Williams said that his goal is to still hit the ball with power, but not neces-sarily try to hit it over the fence. “We’re working to change our approach,” Williams said. “We still want to hit the ball hard, but we want to hit it so hard that they can’t catch it.” Williams expects Morgan and Kvistad to lead the team both from an offensive and defensive standpoint. “Morgan can cover the entire outfield,” he said. “She may be the single greatest outfielder I’ve ever seen in my life. Kayli, she makes all the smart outs and her bat is amazing.” Kvistad already hold the Columbia record for home runs and she’s still got two years to add to it. She hit 11 home runs as a freshman and added 15 last year. Dohrn will move to a new position this year after Stephanie Pilkington’s grad-uation. Dohrn will replace Pilkington as the team’s catcher. “She’s been our catcher in waiting for a while now and she’s just got better every single day,” Williams said. “She’s going to be our defensive quarterback, our computer processor. I’m excited to see what she can do, because she’s working to be the best she can be.” Williams also mentioned Caleigh McCauley, Lauren Eaker, Jessica Shimmel and Brittney Morgan as the other expected start-ers on opening day. Tatum Morgan and Lacey King will split duties leading off the Lady Tigers. “They’re just getting better every day,” Williams said. “The lineup may change as they get hot and cold.” The one downside for the Lady Tigers is that they’ve lost senior Holly Boris for the year. “It’s two years in a row I’ve had bad luck with a senior getting hurt,” Williams said. “I don’t know how to describe it. We will have to overcome it.” The Lady Tigers begin the season by hosting Wolfson High at 6 p.m. on Tuesday. CHS: Preparing for big 2013 season Continued From Page 1B BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Daniel Devers defeated Jared Guminski from Lincoln High in the 160-pound championship at the District 2-2A wrestling tou rnament at Columbia High School on Saturday.Three Tigers win district tournament BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kaleb Warner holds down Lincoln’s D avid Edmunds as he struggles to escape from Warner’s pin during the District 2-2A wrestl ing tournament held at Columbia High School on Saturday. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High had three winners take home first place at the District 2-2A wrestling champion-ship on Saturday in Lake City. The Tigers’ Cole Schreiber, Kaleb Warner and Daniel Devers each took home first place in their respective weight classes. Schreiber ended the day with a perfect 2-0 record with pins in both matches. He defeated Ryan Ochoa from Paxon High and Devontea Middlebrook from Terry Parker High in 1:16 to claim the cham-pionship. Schreiber has a 29-4 record on the year in the 113-pound weight class. Warner finsihed the day with two falls to take home the 126-pound champion-ship. He defeated Dexter Melton from Leon High in the preliminary and David Edmunds of Lincoln High at 5:18 for the win. Warner has a 43-7 record for the year. Devers took home first place in the 160-pound divi-sion and is 42-5 on the season. Devers defeated Jackson Baldwin from Lee High with a fall at 2:12 of the preliminaries and Jared Guminski of Leon with a fall at 1:34 of the finals. Dustin Regar finished the day with a 2-1 record and finished second in the 138-pound division. Cole Horton finished 2-1 and was third place in the 106-pound division and Robert Martin was fourth in the 152-pound division with a 1-2 record. “Schreiber is now a three time district champi-on and he’s fought through a lot of adversity to be here again this year with a bust-ed knee,” Columbia head coach Andrew Porter said. “Daniel and Kaleb have both worked their butts off to get here. The guys went all out today.” Each of the top four individuals per weight group advance. Lincoln finsihed in first wtih 260.50 points with Stanton Prep in second and Columbia in third.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER BASKETBALL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 3B5BSports Tourney time for Tigers By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High enters the District 4-6A tourna-ment next week as the No. 2 seed following the regular season, but the Tigers are looking to end the tournament as district champions. “Honestly, we’re playing as well as we have all year,” Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. “According to the records, Wolfson is the team to beat. They’re 20-3. In the last two weeks, they’ve lost to Raines twice. The last time we played them, they made their free throws down the stretch. Against Raines, they were 11-of-33 down the stretch.” While Jefferson is already expecting a Wolfson team in the finals, he isn’t taking anything for granted and will be closely watching St. Augustine and Stanton Prep high schools when they match up on Tuesday. The coach doesn’t really have a favorite to come out of that game with a vic-tory. “I’m not sure, because Stanton Prep is a scary team,” Jefferson said. “Going by record, you’d have to say St. Augustine. They’ve lost to us and Wolfson only.” To win the tournament, Jefferson offered up simple keys. “We’re going to have to defend and shoot the ball better,” Jefferson said. “We’ve got to take care of the ball and play as hard as we’ve been playing. We could beat (Wolfson). It’s hard to beat a team three times in a row and we’ve nipping at the door. We’ve been knocking. The way things are, if we keep our streak going, we have beat-en everyone that’s beaten us this year. We’ll use it as a motivator.” The Tigers (15-6) haven’t played the Wolfpack in a couple of weeks and Jefferson thinks that could work out to Columbia’s benefit. “We’re playing better now than we were playing two weeks ago, so I think we should make a little noise, however, we have to get passed the first round first,” he said. “I’ll be scout-ing the game on Tuesday night. Nothing will be taken for granted.” Jefferson pointed out Akeem Williams on the defensive side and the Tigers’ “Big 3” of Morris Marshall, Javantae Foster and Tre Simmons on the offensive side as keys to the tournament. “Akeem is going to have to defend,” Jefferson said. “I have to have two of our big three guys going. I think Tre Simmons has to con-tinue to get up and down the court. If he continues to do that, we’re alright. If there’s a key, we have to keep pushing the ball with the “Big 3” running the floor.” Columbia should have Dekarry Rossin back after the forward missed time late in the 72-70 win against Fort White High to close the year with an injury. “Dekarry’s injury isn’t as bad as it looked,” Jefferson said. “It’s a hyperextension and we’ll see how it works out in the next couple of days. He experienced very little pain. There was very little swelling. We look for him to be playing.” And Jefferson is also looking for some key bench minutes out of one of his seniors. “I’m looking to get big minutes out of Kevin Louder,” Jefferson said. “He could be a tremendous asset to us. He’s strong and he can jump. It would give us another presence. He’s a more physical jumper inside.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Morris Marshall celebrates after makin g a dunk against Fort White Thursday. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the GUXJFRPSDQLHVGRQWZDQW\RXWRNQRZ&DOO7ROO)UHH (800) 333-1950 RU www.eddoctor.com.'U.HYLQ+RUQVE\0'ZLOOPDLOWKHILUVWPHQWKDWUHVSRQGWRWKLVDGDIUHHFRS\RIKLVQHZWKLUW\GROODUERRN$'RFWRUV*XLGHWR(UHFWLOH'\VIXQFWLRQ+HVVRVXUHWKLVERRNZLOOFKDQJH\RXUOLIHKHZLOOHYHQ SD\WKHSRVWDJHDQGKDQGOLQJ,IWKHSRSXODUSLOOVGRQWZRUNIRU\RXUHJDUGOHVVRI\RXUDJHRUPHGLFDOKLVWRU\LQFOXGLQJGLDEHWHVDQGSURVWDWHFDQFHU\RXRZHLWWR\RXUVHOIDQG\RXUODG\WRUHDGWKLVERRN JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia’s Tre Simmons manages to steal the ball from Fo rt White’s Melton Sanders during a game on Thursday. What’s next after game for the ages from county rivals? A fter a game for the ages on Thursday night, both Columbia and Fort White High’s basketball programs have something to be proud of. It was easily the most exciting high school basketball game I’ve been to, well, since high school — now 11 years ago for those counting. The game featured long-range threes, dunks and a final three minutes full of nail biting. When the final buzzer went off, the Tigers had defeated the Indians, 72-70, and Columbia’s faithful rushed the court. It was like a scene out of a movie. On the other end, Fort White’s disappointment in the loss was obvious. But here’s the kicker, for as much as the game was filled with jubilation for the Tigers and dispair for the Indians, neither team can look back. Columbia’s moment to bask in its senior night glory was over the day after the game ended and preparation for the district championship began. Fort White has to leave the way it ended the season behind as well. Both of these teams are loaded with players capable of propelling their teams into a deep playoff run. They both have the ability to score from both the inside and outside. Each team excels exceptionally from beyond the arc as witnessed by the 11 total connections in Thursday night’s affair. Sure, it’s a game that each team is going to remember long after their playing days are over. For Columbia senior Javonta Foster, he described the moments following the game as “Heaven.” I’m sure many of the Fort White players felt like they were in hell. But if heaven is a playground, it’s located at Lakeland in the Final 4. Q Brandon Finley covers sports for the Lake City Reporter. FROM THE SIDELINE Brandon FinleyPhone: (386) 754-0420bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 4B3BSPORTS Tigers, Indians go down to JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips (left) and Michael Mulbe rry look to snatch a rebound from Columbia High’s Dill an Hall during a game Thursday. The Tigers defeated Fort W hite, 72-70. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders attempts to get around Colu mbia High’s Akeem Williams. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White’s Joe Powers looks for an open man while pla ying against Columbia Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High basketball head coach Horace Jefferson reacts after what he thinks is a bad call during a game against Fort White High.

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5B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 4BSports wire in county showdown JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s DaKarry Rosson (25), Akeem Williams (11) and Morris Marshall (22) goes up for a rebound against Fort White on Thursday. Fort White fell 72-70. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High basketball head coach Isiah Phillips ins tructs his team during a game against Columbia High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips focuses a free-throw shot. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLEFT : An open Tae Foster goes for a lay-up against Fort White o n Thursday. CENTER : Columbia High’s Dillan Hall makes a shot over Fort Wh ite’s Qarin Porter. RIGHT : Chris Cottrell glides through the air for a lay-up Thursday.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 6BSPORTS A T

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By CAROLE FELDMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON Some people work for them selves because they like the autonomy. Others have been unable to find fulltime, regular jobs and have had to settle for contract work for a specific project or period of time. And still others have retired but have been brought back as consultants by their former employers. Contract workers, con sultants, freelancers or the self-employed these workers face additional challenges when it comes time to file their income taxes. By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON The U.S. job market is proving sturdier than expected at a time when the economy is under pressure from Washington gridlock and the threat of government spending cuts. Employers added 157,000 jobs in January, and hiring was much stronger at the end of last year than the government had previously esti mated. The Labor Departments esti mated job gains for the final two months of 2012 a period when the economy was being threatened by the fiscal cliff rose from 161,000 to 247,000 for November and from 155,000 to 196,000 for December. The mostly encouraging jobs report Friday included one negative sign: The unemployment rate rose to 7.9 percent from 7.8 percent in December. The rate is calculated from a survey of households, and more people in that survey said they were unemployed. The job gains are derived from a separate survey of employers. The hiring picture over the past two years also looked stronger after the departments annual revisions. The revisions showed that employ ers added an average of roughly 180,000 jobs a month in 2012 and 2011. That was up from previous estimates of about 150,000. The significantly stronger payroll gains tell us the economy has a lot more momentum than what we had thought, Joseph LaVorgna, chief U.S. economist at Deutsche Bank, said in a research note. Stocks surged immediately after trading began at 9:30 a.m. Eastern time, an hour after the jobs report was released. The Dow Jones indus trial average jumped 130 points and briefly touched 14,000 for the first time in more than five years, before falling back. Other economic news Friday contributed to the stock rally. Manufacturing expanded at a much faster pace in January compared with December, a private survey found. Ford, Chrysler and General 1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of February 3-9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. FAMILY MEAL Plus Tax Limited Time Offer $ 13 Plus sales tax. Limited time offer. Plus sales tax. Limited time offer. $ 16 PIZZA TRIO 3 Medium 1-Topping Pizzas $ 5 (8 Cheese or Pepperoni Pizza) LUNCH PLUS A PEPSI 10AM-3PM $ 12 Medium 1-Topping Pizza, MIX & MATCH Plus sales tax. Limited time offer. FT. WHITE 7905 S.W. Hwy 27 corner of Hwy. 27 & Hwy. 47 inside the B&B Food Store 497-1484 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE CITY 5735 SW State Rd. 247 corner of SR 242 & SR 247 inside the B&B Food Store 752-3111 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE BUTLER 280 West Main St. next to Mercantile Bank 496-2878 CARRY-OUT ONLY LIVE OAK 6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln. In Walmart Plaza 330-0331 CARRYOUT ONLY LAKE CITY 857 Southwest Main Blvd. in Lake City Plaza 755-7050 New challenges for self-employed, contract workers ASSOCIATED PRESS Cesar Ramirez, a subcontractor for DirecTV, gets ready to install a satellite dish in Los Angeles. Contract workers, consul tants, freelancers and the self-employed face additional chal lenges at tax-filing time. Tax Time THE ECONOMY Hiring numbers strong ASSOCIATED PRESS Job seekers fill a room at the job fair in Sunrise. U.S. employers added 157,000 jobs in January. US gains 157K jobs in January; but jobless rate up to 7.9 percent. Paying estimated taxes critical under new rules. TAXES continued on 2C ECONOMY continued on 2C

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 3, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY TAXES: Rule changes Continued From Page 1CThey won’t receive the traditional W-2 that other workers get reporting income and taxes paid. Instead, they’ll receive a 1099 form with their earn-ings from each of their employers. However, employers aren’t required to provide 1099 forms if income is less than $600. Still, all income, even if there is not a 1099 form, is required to be reported to the Internal Revenue Service. Since self-employed individuals or contract workers don’t have taxes withheld from their pay, they could be in for an unpleasant surprise. “You could be really hurt if you haven’t paid any esti-mated taxes,” said Jackie Perlman, principal tax research analyst with The Tax Institute at H&R Block. Not only will these workers have to pay taxes on income earned, they’ll also have to pay a self-employ-ment tax, said Barbara Weltman, contributing edi-tor to “J.K. Lasser’s Your Income Tax 2013.” That self-employment tax is equivalent to both the employer’s and the employee’s share of Social Security and Medicare. For 2012, it is 13.3 per-cent, 10.4 percent for Social Security on income up to $110,100 and 2.9 per-cent for Medicare on all income. And, they may be subject to a penalty if they did not file estimated taxes. But there is a bright side. “The tax code smiles on people who are self-employed,” said Mark Steber, chief tax officer for Jackson Hewitt Tax Services. That’s because you can offset the true cost of doing business, he said. Did you take a potential client out to lunch? You can generally deduct half the bill as a business meal. Did you have to purchase a printer to produce invoices? That, too, can be deductible, as well as the paper and toner that you’ve used for the busi-ness. Did you use your car for work other than com-muting, to see a customer or to go to that business meal, for example? The IRS mileage rate for 2012 is 55.5 cents for each busi-ness mile driven. “Make sure you know where those deductions are because there are a lot of them,” Steber said. To be deductible, a business expense has to be both ordinary and necessary, according to the “Ernst & Young Tax Guide 2013.” “An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your field of business, trade or profes-sion,” the guide says. “A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appro-priate for your trade, busi-ness or profession.” If you use some items, say a computer, for both personal and business purposes, you’ll have to track the time and usage to determine how much can be deducted. “Have that stuff contemporane-ously documented along the way, not the day you get the letter from the IRS,” suggested Greg Rosica, tax partner at Ernst & Young. Some education expenses may be deductible, as well. What you can’t deduct: regular commuting costs or personal expenses unrelated to the business. Motors all reported double-digit sales gains for January. And construction spending rose in December at a healthy pace. The employment report revealed a notable shift in the job market: More hiring by construction com-panies. They added 28,000 jobs in January and nearly 100,000 over the past four months. Those job gains are consistent with a rebound in home construction and a broader recovery in housing. Retailers added 33,000 positions. Health care gained 23,000 jobs. Manufacturers reported a small increase of 4,000. Restaurants and hotels added 17,000. The solid hiring in retail, construction, restaurants and hotels suggest-ed that such companies expect con-sumer spending to hold up in coming months. “The strong and steady job gains from retail trade and construction look a lot more like a normal econom-ic expansion,” said Scott Anderson, chief economist at Bank of the West. “This is a sign that consumer spend-ing is playing a far more important role in this expansion than it has so far.” The job market has remained steady despite pressure on the econ-omy from the rift between President Barack Obama and Republicans over taxes and spending. Across-the-board spending cuts are set to kick in March 1. Financing to run the government will expire by March 27, raising the threat of a government shutdown. And the federal borrowing cap must be raised by May 18 or the govern-ment could default on its debt. Friday’s jobs report showed that average hourly wages rose 4 cents to $23.78 and have risen an encourag-ing 2.1 percent in the past 12 months. That’s slightly above the inflation rate, which was 1.7 percent. Last month’s hiring should cushion the impact of the higher Social Security taxes that most consumers are paying this year. And it would help the economy resume growing after it shrank at an annual rate of 0.1 percent in the October-December quarter. Higher Social Security taxes are reducing take-home pay for most Americans. A person earning $50,000 a year will have about $1,000 less to spend in 2013. A household with two high-paid workers will have up to $4,500 less. Taxes rose after a 2 percent cut, in place for two years, expired Jan. 1. Analysts expect the Social Security tax increase to shave about a half-point off economic growth in 2013, since consumers drive about 70 per-cent of economic activity. The hit to consumers is coming at a precarious moment for the economy. It contracted in the fourth quarter for the first time in 3 1 years. The decline was driven largely by a steep cut in defense spending and a drop in exports. Analysts generally think those factors will prove temporary and that the economy will resume growing. Still, the contraction last quarter points to what are likely to be key challenges for the economy this year: the prospect of sharp government spending cuts and uncertainty over whether Congress will agree to raise the federal borrowing cap. Most analysts predict that the economy will grow again in the January-March quarter, though likely at a lackluster annual rate of around 1 percent. They expect the economy to expand about 2 percent for the full year. Two key drivers of growth improved last quarter: Consumer spending increased at a faster pace. And busi-nesses invested more in equipment and software. In addition, homebuilders are stepping up construction to meet rising demand. That could generate even more construction jobs. And home prices are rising steadily. That tends to make Americans feel wealthier and more likely to spend. Housing could add as much as 1 percentage point to economic growth this year, some economists estimate. Auto sales reached their highest level in five years in 2012 and are expected to keep growing this year. That’s boosting production and hir-ing at U.S. automakers and their suppliers. ECONOMY: New numbers show strong hiring Continued From Page 1C Gas prices get early start on spring surgeBy JONATHAN FAHEYAP Energy WriterNEW YORK — Gasoline prices are getting an early start on their annual spring march higher. The average U.S. retail price rose 13 cents over the past two weeks to $3.42 per gallon, and within a few days it will likely set a record for this time of year. The culprits: Rising crude oil prices, slowing output at refineries that are undergoing maintenance, and low supplies of gasoline. These are the kinds of things that push gasoline prices higher every spring after what is normally a lull in gasoline prices in the late fall and early win-ter. But a heavy schedule of January maintenance at West Coast refineries has led to sharply higher pric-es there. Meanwhile, low inventories have pushed prices higher on the East Coast. And rising crude oil prices have pushed pric-es higher throughout the country. “I’m not surprised at what I’m seeing, but I am surprised it’s coming early,” said Tom Kloza, Chief Oil Analyst at the Oil Price Information Service. Hopes of stronger economic growth in the U.S. and abroad helped push the U.S. stock market to a five-year high in January and sent crude prices up. When economies expand, more gasoline, diesel and jet fuel are consumed by shippers and travelers. Crude oil has risen 14 percent since mid-December, to $97.49 on Thursday. Brent crude, the benchmark used to price oil that most U.S. refineries use to make gasoline, is up 9 percent since then to $115.55 But gasoline wholesale prices are rising even fast-er. That’s the price distribu-tors and service stations pay to buy the gasoline that they then sell to drivers.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, FEBRUARY3, 2013 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 100Job Opportunities05536990Wanted experience I.T. Person to manage private Company network 20+ computers, Web design & admin needed. Must be willing to perform other Clerical tasks in office environment. Apply in person:3631 us 90 east Lake City FL32055, or send resume to guy@qiagroup.com 05537114NOWHIRINGGeneral Managers Shift LeadersHardee's offers: Competitive Salary, Benefits, Training, & Opportunity for Advancement! For additional info & to apply, visit: www.hardees.com/jobs. EOE. Experienced Survey Help Wanted 140 NWRidgewood Avenue 386-755-6166 FTHelp Needed, General Maintenance, yard work, driving etc. Good references & clean driving record. Email Bryant @ bdj@startech.cc Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Send Resume to info@swiftcreekrealty.net SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Tax AuditorII position Florida Department of Revenue General Tax Administration Located in Alachua, Florida Apply at People First website http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate & understanding of truck repair & parts procurement. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer 752-9754 Unemployed Underemployed Retired Start your own Lake City Business. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net 120Medical EmploymentFull Time CashierPosition Excellent Computer & Communication skills needed. 780 SE Baya Dr., LC, FL, 32055 Looking for P/TEcho Cardiography Tech & VascularUltra Sound Tech Call Nancy at 984-5543 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies 1 MALE Pygmy goat. $30 SOLD 2 MALE b/w potbelly pigs. (ready to mate) $30 each. Contact 386-365-7532 Free to right home. Husky mix w/ electric blue eyes, energetic loves to be indoors & outside. Great w/ kids & other dogs. 752-4155 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $40.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions AUCTIONS at ., Feb. 9, 2012 6 PM 30 Murray Blvd., Lakeland, GAAntique Shop from Live Oak, FLmoved to Lakeland LR/DR/BR Furniture, Display Case, Sideboard, 14-Dwr. File Cabinet, Copper Coffer Urn, Pinball/Gumball Machines & Much More!10% b.p. Terms: cash, check, Visa, M/C, Discover day of auction. Insp.: day of auction4:30 p.m. until auction time. View pictures at auctionzip.com #4282 or call for information.ZENITH AUCTION & REALTY, INC. Donald Patten, CAI, Auctioneer GAL#1294 / GAL#3658 / REL#107251 P.O. Box 98, Lakeland, GA31635 229-482-2116 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 4 PC Dining Room Set Dark wood table with leaf. Very nice. $250 Contact 386-365-7532 4 PC Queen Bedroom Suite, with mattress & box spring. Really nice. Great shape. $375 SOLD Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. GENERATOR big 8500 Watt 2013. Honda Electric start. Battery and wheel kit included. Never used. New retail $4995, wholesale $3750. First $1850 cash. 864-275-6478 Red Seal 4 cyl motor $500 OBO; Shop Smith saw w/ some tools and table saw $1500 OBO; Hay Lift 3 pointer w/ Ext. $1200 OBO; Trailer Frame 2 axle $600 OBO; Utility Trailer w/ Generator $600 OBO; Grass seed Pen & Arg. mix $2.50lb (525lb) OBO. Contact 386-963-3462 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 630Mobile Homes forRent842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 X-CLEAN 2/2 single on private acre 8 mi to VAnear Moore Rd. $500 mo, refs and credit, No dogs 386.961.9181 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinance 4/2 on 2.5 acres, south of LC, small down $850 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com REDUCED Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $37,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $700-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 home in a small MH park, Located onCountyRoad 133C, $600mo & $600 dep. includs electricity & water 954-258-8841 3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2, Double Garage, Nice Neighborhood, in town, Summers School area. 386-623-2848 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 4BR/1BA Very Large lot. Very Clean, lots of shaade $895 mo. + $895. dep. 386-752-7578 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 760Wanted to Rent Wanted: 3/2 w/ land w/ Owner Finance. Need $500/mo. payments. Will provide references. Contact 772-807-0662 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale Handyman 3/1 Close to VA, Lrg corner lot. Owner Finance, $35,900, $1,000 down, $356 mth. 954 SE Putnam St 352-215-1018 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 951Recreational VehiclesCAR TOWDOLLY 2013. All cars/pickups. Swifles, Tilts. Never used. New retail $2750, first $1050 cash. 864.275.6478 RECYCLE YOUR PAPER REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation

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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEEK OF SUNDAY FEBRUARY 3, 1013 4C 4CCLASS 0 % DOWN Delivers A T 0 % DOWN Delivers 0 % DOWN Delivers 0 % DOWN Delivers 0 % DOWN Delivers ONE AT THIS PRICE ONE AT THIS PRICE

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By SUE MANNING Associated Press LOS ANGELES There will be a winner and a loser every Super Bowl Sunday. But at the Puppy Bowl, its always a win for animal shelters. The show provides national exposure to the shelters across the country that provide the puppy athletes and the kittens that star in the halftime show, and introduces viewers to the different breeds and animals that need homes, animal workers say. Many shelters see bumps in vis its from viewers who are inspired to adopt a pet. It raises awareness for our shelter and others that take part, said Madeline Bernstein, president and CEO of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles. It shows dogs in a happy, playful, fun way, which makes people think, Gee, I could play with a dog too. You hope it will also stimulate adop tions, and if not, at least a positive attitude toward dogs, rather than they are just hairy and smelly. The Puppy Bowl, an annual two-hour TV special that mimics a football game with canine play ers, made its debut eight years ago on The Animal Planet. Dogs score touchdowns on a 10-by-19foot gridiron carpet when they cross the goal line with a toy. There is a Most Valuable Pup award, a water bowl cam, a new lipstick cam (its in the lips of the toys), slow-motion cameras, hedgehog referees, a puppy hot tub and a blimp with a crew of hamsters. Bios on each puppy player flash across the screen during closeups of the action, letting viewers know how to find each animal for adoption. Most of the puppies, however, are usually adopted by airtime since the show is filmed months ahead, said executive producer Melinda Toporoff, who is work ing on her fifth Puppy Bowl. But Bernstein said the point is to show that animals just like the ones on the show can be found at any shelter at any time. A lot of people have come in during the last year and said, After Years Of Simulated Use, We Maintained Support 4 Times Better Than Other Leading Brands Wholesale Sleep Distributors FURNITURE SHOWPLACE CATALOG SHOWROOM FOR COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS Mon.-Fri. 9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Sat. 9:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Destiny Opti Cool Memory Foam Queen 2-pc Set $ 799 95 Heathrow Queen 2-pc Set Bay Island Memory Foam Queen 2-pc Set $ 1299 95 $ 699 95 LIFE Sunday, February 3, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas? Contact Robert Bridges Editor 754-0428 rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter 1DLIFE 1DLIFE Learning that you or someone you love has cancer can be a frightening experience. When processing that news, your patients need to know as much as possible about available treatment options: especially what options are available close to home. A Network of Care The Cancer Center at Lake City and the Cancer Center at North Florida Regional have partnered in an effort to bring residents in our region comprehensive cancer services within one local network. Together, we are focused on providing patients with quality, coordinated cancer care. Patients honesty, genuine compassion and an understanding of the challenges people experience when diagnosed with cancer. Our Services Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR)* Mammosite* Prostate Seed Implants Cyberknife Radiosurgery* PET / CT Services GE CT Simulator Varian Linear Accelerator *Some oncology services provided by I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor I went to Cancer Center at Lake City for my treatment and didnt even have to leave town! Everyone at the facility was very nice, gentle and very professional. James Johndro Cancer Survivor 386-758-7822 Jville dinner theater charms Every dog has its day PUPPY BOWL IX T he Alhambra located at 12000 Beach Blvd. in Jacksonville is a landmark for locals. Built in 1967 the Alhambra has strived to bring theater entertain ment to Jacksonville by offering an opportunity to see and hear many nation ally known talents. It is one of the few remaining dinner theaters in America. Its past history includes performances by Dorothy Lamour, Martha Raye, Cyd Charisse and Betty Grable all names that the older generation can appreciate. We hadnt been there in several years, so LaShel and Kimberlynne Norman joined Genie to try out the Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingsworth TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES PUPPY continued on 3D TASTE continued on 2D ASSOCIATED PRESS Dogs mingle on the playing field during taping of Puppy Bowl IX, a two-hour TV special on The Animal Planet that takes advantage of Super Bowl Sunday to highlight the plight of pets in animal shelters across the country. Animal shelters are real winners of this televised game. Puppy Bowl airs today from 3 to 5 p.m. on The Animal Planet and will keep repeating until 3 a.m. The Super Bowl starts at 6:30 p.m.

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Keith and Karen Lager of Live Oak, along with Emerson and Cindy North of Lake City, are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Morgan and Eric. The bride-to-be’s maternal grandparents are Bob and Mildred Coburn of Dover, Florida, and the late Aleeta Coburn; and her paternal grandparents are Sue Lager of Live Oak, and the late Lou Lager. The future groom’s maternal grandparents are the late Rufus and Dorothy Shelton; and his paternal grandparents are the late John Roy and Dell North. The wedding will take place March 16 at 5 p.m. in Mandi’s Chapel at Camp Weed and The Cerveny Conference Center. A reception will immediately fol-low in the Juhan Dining Hall. All friends and family are invited to attend. newly renovated theater. The last time we were there our meal was pre-pared off premises, served buffet style and sadly wasn’t very memorable. The whole place seemed shabby and sad. So, when we ventured out on Saturday afternoon, we had no idea what awaited us. Much to our surprise, when we walked in the door, it was obvious that it was not shabby and sad anymore. There was an upbeat atmosphere of freshly painted walls and people there to help you and welcome you. We walked into the reno-vated dining/stage area and were delighted to find a tastefully redeco-rated room done in warm browns, beiges and rust colors. The table seating was arranged in the four tiers previously found in the old Alhambra, but that was the only sameness. Our table was waiting for us with a crisp white table-cloth, flatwear in place, flowers and the small lamp on the table glowing. In fact, the table lamps on each table give the whole room that cruise atmo-sphere, and it was very warm and inviting. Our table was in the perfect place to see everything without any obstacles. The buffet-style serving is gone, and in its place we found a menu full of interesting choices. Table service is provided by friendly, knowledge-able and helpful staff. Our server, Ivey, was outstand-ing. The menu is created by executive chef DeJuan Roy, who has made such big improvements to the Alhambra’s culinary expe-rience that the food has become as big an attrac-tion as the productions themselves. We weren’t disappointed. The first course choices were citrus chili shrimp or sweet Italian sausage and herb cheese. We all tried the sausage and herb cheese and, wow, it was a surprise. Seasoned Italian sausage was stuffed in a breaded squash blossom then fried and served with a vodka sauce. It was warm, creamy and deli-cious. We could have had a plate full of those for our entre, but that was still to come. Imagine a 13-year-old liking squash blossoms. The other choice was citrus chili shrimp served chilled with fried plantains and an avocado slice. The second course was a choice of she-crab bisque or arugula salad. The bisque was warm, creamy and buttery fla-vored, served with a brie crostini ... fabulous. The arugula salad was topped with poached pear, cran-berries, goat cheese, fried wontons, candied walnuts and a lemon vinaigrette. Both were outstanding. The third course consisted of four tempting choices. slow-roasted prime rib with potatoes au gratin and French green beans or crispy duck confit with a mango glace, served with French green beans, homemade French fries drizzled with herb mayo or whole wheat pasta primavera, served with roasted vegetables (broc-colini, zucchini, red pepper, onions and tomatoes) with a marinara sauce and goat cheese or deconstructed seafood Newburg, served in puff pastry with mashed potatoes and topped with fresh local shrimp, lobster and white fish. Whew, what choices. We tried the duck, prime rib and the pasta. The best thing I can say is that if we went back tomor-row and this was our menu, we would all choose the same thing again. Yep, that good. Let’s not forget the fourth course, dessert. Choices were lemon blackberry cheesecake and Death by Chocolate cake. We tried them both and loved them both. The garnish on the chocolate cake was a half strawberry and a rolled chocolate straw. Feast for the eyes, as well. Can’t forget the warm, yeasty rolls served with butter sprinkled with Hawaiian salt. Take a bow chef Roy; you deserve it. We decided to splurge and have a drink while we enjoyed the show, and the offerings were the Phantom Martini (vodka, raspberry liquor with a ghostly hint of pineapple juice); the Christina, as sweet as her voice, with amaretto, pineapple and OJ; the Opera House, with hot coffee, frangelico and Bailey’s, served with whipped cream on top and our choice the Chandelier (prosecco). Kimberlynne had a fruit concoction (non-alcoholic) that she loved, too. Yes, the show we enjoyed on our visit was “The Phantom.” The managing partner, Craig Smith, a very warm and friendly person, vis-ited every table before the show, adding a special personal touch to our visit. The show was enjoy-able and performed by extremely talented art-ists. We won’t review the show, as this is a review of the food. Check out their website for upcoming per-formances. Matinee tickets with meal are $46 plus tax. Evening performances are $49 to $53. The quality of the meal and of the performance are definitely worth mak-ing reservations and driv-ing over to enjoy. The finishing touch was that when we left the theater, the entire staff and manager lined up in the lobby to thank us for com-ing that day. This ended our visit on a real high. Just a sneak preview of upcoming performances include “Driving Miss Daisy” with Michael Learned (The Waltons), “Murder Among Friends” with Loretta Swit (M*A*S*H), George Wendt (Cheers) and six more. Check out their website for details. Another nice feature is that you can make reserva-tions and print your ticket on line. Hope to see you there. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Travel By BETH J. HARPAZAP Travel EditorWASHINGTON — Whether you’re interested in Lincoln the president or “Lincoln” the movie, Washington is a downright thrilling destination. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States and one of the country’s most admired. Many museums are offering special exhib-its for the 150th anni-versary of the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. Other sites can be visited any time: the Lincoln Memorial, the cot-tage where Lincoln sum-mered, Ford’s Theatre, where he was shot, and the Petersen House, where he died.Lincoln Memorial: This larger-than-life white marble statue of Lincoln, completed in 1922, sits inside a massive col-umned building. About 6 m illion people visit the memo-rial each year. It is crowded even on cold winter days, with visitors from around the world. Located on the National Mall, http://www.nps.gov/linc/.Ford’s Theatre and Petersen House:Lincoln was shot at Ford’s Theatre in 1865 while watching a play. He was taken to a house across the street, now a museum and historic site called the Petersen House. You can see the room where he died and where his war secretary, Edwin Stanton, was said to have uttered the famous words: “Now he belongs to the ages.” Located at 511 10th St., NW, http://www.fords-theatre.org/. Hours vary, depending on show sched-ules. Tickets do sell out. Tickets for a self-guided walk-through of Ford’s and Petersen House bought through Ticketmaster including fees are $9.75.Lincoln’s Cottage:This was Lincoln’s summer home, where he and his family escaped Washington’s heat and humidity. Located on a breezy hill three miles from the White House, it was the 19th century equivalent of contemporary presidential retreats like Camp David. Entrance at Rock Creek Church Road NW and Upshur Street NW, near 140 Rock Creek Church Road NW. Free parking. Open 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday. 16th president memorialized in many places. ASSOCIATED PRESSA statue of President Abraham Lincoln and his horse stan ds outside President Lincoln’s Cottage, one of a number of Lincoln sites that can be visited in Washington, D.C.For Lincoln fans, there’s lots to see in Washington COURTESYMorgan Lager and Eric North. F lorida’s climate is ideal for growing a wide range of crops. Some of our major commercial crops include citrus, sugarcane, peppers, cotton, peanuts, watermelons, beans, pota-toes and tomatoes. The tomato is not only the most important com-mercial vegetable grown in Florida but also the most popular vegetable grown in home gardens.The tomato is second only to the potato as the most produced vegetable in the U.S. Recently, there has been an increase in imported winter and spring tomatoes from Mexico. Most tomatoes are grown in the field, but greenhouse production is on the rise. The U.S. imports greenhouse toma-toes from Holland, Spain, Israel and Canada. The pressure is on commercial growers to be able to ship needed pro-duce to keep up with the demand and stay competi-tive in expanding markets. As consumers, we don’t want find bruised and off color tomatoes on the grocer’s shelves. But if growers shipped “red-ripe’ tomatoes, they wouldn’t survive the ordeal of being shipped and shelved for customers. To meet the needs of growers and get their crops to distant markets, researchers have crossed and tested many tomato varieties. New varieties ship much better and resist bruising, and they continue to ripen well when picked at a point before the “red-ripe” stage. They stand up to the melting Florida heat and show resistance to many pests, lessening the amount of pesticide used. Somewhere in this research, many agree that a certain tomato flavor has been los, or bred out. The same thing hap-pened with roses. I natu-rally sniff a rose because I expect a wonderful fra-grance. But in an effort to get longer stems, larger blossoms, more sensation-al colors or longer vase life, rose breeders have lost the scent in newer rose varieties. In an effort to find that lost tomato flavor, many gardeners are growing heirloom tomatoes, which are non-hybrid varieties. To be an heirloom variety, a tomato must meet three criteria. First, it must grow from seed. It also must have a known his-tory and have been grown in cultivation for more than 50 years. There are drawbacks to growing heirlooms, however. The fruits aren’t very tough, they spoil quickly, and bruise eas-ily. Because they aren’t hybrids bred for resistanc-es, they easily succumb to our heat, diseases and pests. Determined gar-deners do have an option of grafting an heirloom plant shoot (scion) onto the root (rootstock) of a resistant tomato variety. Both heirloom and sug-gested rootstock varieties can be obtained from commercial seed compa-nies. Responding to the needs of Florida’s con-sumers and industries is a vital role of research at the University of Florida/IFAS. The Tasti-Lee Tomato is a newly introduced UF variety that has successfully restored the “old-fashioned” flavor. They are now available in your grocery store. The UF tomato breeding pro-gram is working to main-tain growers’ competitive-ness and ability to supply a good product to Florida and the nation. For more researchbased information on growing tomatoes in Florida’s climate and soil, go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh028 or call the Master Gardeners at 752-5384. ‘Old-fashion’ tomato flavor restored at UF GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. TASTE: The Alhambra has new life Continued From Page 1D HAPPENINGS North-Lager engagement, wedding

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By HILLARY SPEEDAssociated PressVintage dishware doesn’t have to gather dust in the china cabi-net. Outdated table settings, such as a stack of your grandmother’s old plates or a bundle of used mugs you scooped up at Salvation Army, can find fresh life with a little TLC. All it takes is a marker or a drill and a basic plan. “I always find it a bit sad when things so loved by previous gen-erations are thrown on the scrap heap,” says lifestyle blogger Anna Nicholson, based in Yorkshire, England. “I’m always looking for ways things can be reused, upcycled and overhauled to fit in with our 21st century style.” Here are some ways to spruce up old china dishes:MARKERS AND PAINTThe popular craft-swapping website Pinterest is full of plate-decorating projects that tap into the “magic” of magic markers. Nicholson, whose blog is “angel in the north” (www.angelinthe-north.com ), uses Sharpies to per-sonalize vintage floral plates. In one set, she adorned each plate with a letter in the word “EAT,” to display in the kitchen. In another, she used four plates to spell out the word “HOME.” She prints her own letter cutouts, using the font Bodoni MT, onto thick paper or cardstock. She traces around the letters onto the old plates with a pen, then goes over the outline with a Sharpie and fills it in. “This is an easy project, but you do need a steady hand,” she says. Others take the Sharpie idea to another level and — if the dishes are ovenproof — bake the marker on to make it permanent. Many crafting blogs call for draw-ing with a Sharpie and baking the ovenproof dish at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Christine Dinsmore, based in Portland, Ore., has used the Sharpie method for free-hand-ing original drawings. On her blog, The Plumed Nest (www.theplumednest.com ), she shows how she drew original monster pictures onto plates for her chil-dren. “I would often see cute little dishes for children but they were usually made out of plastic,” Dinsmore says. She has tried to rid her kitchen of plastic “and didn’t want to purchase any more.” That’s when she got inspired to draw her own series of kid-friendly characters. Dinsmore advises using nontoxic Sharpie paint pens, found at most craft stores and online. Also, she recommends cleaning plates gently, never with an abra-sive sponge or dishwasher. Other bloggers suggest ceramic or glass paint if the dish will have frequent contact with food. Danielle Warner of the blog “The Yarn to Tell” (http://theyarntotell.wordpress.com ) recommends Delta PermEnamel paint for a more painted — rather than drawn — look. It’s also avail-able at craft stores or online.CHOP IT UPSometimes, old china is no longer in one piece. But that shouldn’t stop you from turning it into something special. Do-it-yourselfer Ashley Hackshaw, editor of the blog “Lil Blue Boo” (www.lilblueboo.com ), was inspired to find a use for chunks of a broken Tiffany vase that she had received as a wed-ding gift. “I couldn’t bear to throw away the beautiful pieces, so I decided to start making them into useful items,” says Hackshaw, of Palm Desert, Calif. Her answer: key chains.Once you find a piece you like, the main job is to drill a hole and smooth the edges. You can use a household drill, using a carbide drill bit to make the hole, and sandpaper and steel wool for the edges. Make sure to wear protective eyewear and dip the piece in water to keep it cool, Hackshaw says. Or you can use a rotary tool and attachment set, she says. Then, just thread a key ring through the hole, and you have a meaningful and practical new use for an old chunk of china. “One of my favorite gifts I’ve ever received was a keychain from my aunt that was made from one of my great-grandmother’s old silverware pieces,” Hackshaw says. “I knew it was something that I would keep forever and hand down to my daughter, and hopefully one day she would do the same. That’s what gave me the idea about the broken vase.”BUILD SOMETHING NEWIf you have beautiful old pieces of china that you rarely use, why not turn them into something else? Marceli Botticelli of Franklin, Mass., runs an Etsy store called “Tea Times Creations” (www.etsy.com/shop/TeaTimesCreations ). It offers tiered stands, made out of old china, that can be used as serving platters or “tidbit” trays for anything from jewelry to loose change or keys. She also sells jewelry and nightlights made out of repurposed table settings and teacups. For the DIYer, Botticelli sells kits that come with drill bits, fittings and instructions. And if you’re too sheepish to drill your own holes into your precious antique plates, she offers to do it for you. One of the biggest challenges in repurposing old china for any project, she says, is finding the right piece. “I am inspired by many different things,” she says. “It can be the color, the pattern, a theme.” ‘I want a dog just like Fumble,’” she said, refer-ring to spcaLA’s player entry in “Puppy Bowl VIII” who earned the game’s Most Valuable Pup crown. About 300 puppies and kittens have been featured on “Puppy Bowl” over the last decade, accord-ing to Petfinder.com, the country’s largest online pet adoption database that helps cast the show’s ani-mal stars. “Shelters and rescues are at capacity, and pet adoption is the responsible way to add to your family,” said Sara Kent, who over-sees outreach to the 14,000 shelters and rescues that Petfinder works with. The inaugural “Puppy Bowl,” which was pro-moted as an alternative to the Super Bowl, had 22 puppies and was watched by nearly 6 million view-ers. Nearly 9 million tuned in last year and another 1.4 million watched via video streams, Toporoff said. “Puppy Bowl IX” will feature 84 animals, includ-ing 21 kittens from a New York shelter for the half-time show, and 63 puppies from 23 shelters. Only four of the puppies have yet to find new homes, Toporoff said. They include Tyson, Daphne and Sacha — three pit bull mixes from the Pitter Patter Animal Rescue in Silver Lake, Wis., — and Jenny, a terri-er mix from the Pitty Love Rescue in Rochester, N.Y. “I don’t know if there’s any bigger forum for getting something out on adoption. We make sure the message gets out there. We make clear that these dogs need homes and that all animals have come to us during the adoption process,” Toporoff said. Fumble, last year’s MVP winner, was adopted before the show aired. Michael Wright, of New York, said he found out about Fumble’s participa-tion toward the end of the adoption process. He planned to watch this year’s show to catch any flashbacks of last year’s MVP playing his heart out. “I’m not really a fan of football,” he said, add-ing that he has renamed Fumble to Toby. “He fits the name Toby. He is so cute. I like the name Fumble, but I pictured someone dropping the ball. He wasn’t a Fumble,” Wright said. Each year, recruiting for the show is a logistical challenge for Kent and her crew of 80-plus. This year’s show was particu-larly worrisome because taping was scheduled for October 2012 — just after Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast. “We worried about the puppies, kittens and hedgehogs that may have been directly impacted or unable to travel due to Sandy,” Kent said. The New York studio where the game was sup-posed to be taped lost power, but the taping couldn’t be postponed for too long given how quickly puppies grow. Another studio further uptown that had both power and space was found, and “amaz-ingly, the crew was able to reschedule the shoot for only a week later and all the animals were still able to attend,” Kent said. Bernstein said they try to find rambunctious, energetic puppies to enter in the bowl though even if a dog falls asleep on its way to the end zone, it can be funny. Puppies chosen for the show have to be between 10 and 15 weeks old, healthy and sturdy enough to be on the field with playmates. All breeds are considered because “we try to reflect what’s out there in the adoption world. A lot of those breeds are mixed,” Toporoff said. roducers also were trying to find ways to incor-porate older animals into the show, since shelters have more trouble finding homes for them than they do puppies and kittens, Toporoff said. As with all reality TV shows, the behind-the-scenes casting can lead to problems. Viewers often come in seeking a dog just like one on the show, and “then the lawyer brain kicks in, and you have to make sure you let everybody know not every dog plays football,” said Bernstein, who is also an attorney. “People will adopt the kind of dog they see in the movie and they’ll expect their Dalmatian to know how to use a word processor and not under-stand that was a cartoon.” Some dogs like to play more than others. But don’t come in thinking every Chihuahua can play football,” she said. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 3D3DLIFE Give new life to old dinnerwareCRAFTS ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSABOVE: This vintage-plate-decorating project upcycled with mode rn letter print is described on the lifestyle blog “angel in th e north” run by Anna Nicholson of West Yorkshire, England. TOP RIGHT: Tea Times Creations shows an upcycled-vintage-china project sold at the onl ine Etsy store, run by Marceli Botticelli, of Franklin, Mass. LOWER RIGHT: A do-it-yourself kit sold at the Etsy store include fittings, drill bits and i nstructions, and some include teacups that are filled with soy candle wax and saucers. ASSOCIATED PRESS‘Competitors” in the Puppy Bowl score touchdowns on a 1 0-by-19-foot gridiron carpet when they cross the goal line with a toy. By HOLLY RAMERAssociated PressMy son is 8, so I knew hearts and flowers weren’t going to cut it for Valentine’s Day this year. Sure, he likes collecting candy from his classmates, but the rest of it? Ick. So I decided to take that reaction and run with it, designing a decidedly gross Valentine that would be fun for his friends with-out relying on more sug-ary treats. I chose a simple concoction that consists of water and fiber supple-ment powder (Metamucil). It’s easy to make, not too sticky and, if you use the “berry” variety, ends up a vibrant red color perfect for Valentine’s Day.Materials:— Metamucil or other powdered fiber supple-ment — water— large saucepan— spoon— bowl, baking dish or rimmed cookie sheet — plastic bags or small containers to pack-age finished slime — “Be My Valenslime” cards, which can be downloaded at my blog, www.stitchcraftcreations.com — double-stick tapeInstructions:1. Combine 6 cups of water with 6 teaspoons of Metamucil in a large saucepan, stirring to dis-solve the powder. 2. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. 3. Continue to boil mixture for approximately 15-17 minutes. The mixture will decrease in volume and become thick, and will cling to a spoon if you stir it. If you turn off the heat and tilt the pan a bit, run-ning a spoon across the bottom of the pan should leave a clear path for a few seconds. You want it to be thick but not so thick it turns solid and rubbery. 4. Pour slime into a large bowl, baking dish or rimmed cookie sheet and allow to cool. If it still seems too wet, you can return it to the saucepan and reheat. 5. Divide slime into smaller blobs. One batch will make approximately 10 portions. 6. Package slime in snack-size plastic bags and seal. ‘Valenslime’ fits young boys’ tastesASSOCIATED PRESSA handmade Valentine’s Day card appropriate for young boys who may find the usual hearts and flowers too lovey dovey, is made with, Metamucil and water. This homemade “slime” is a fun, non-toxic alternative to candy. PUPPY: Adopted pets are big winners Continued From Page 1D Online: Q animal.discovery.com/tv-shows/puppy-bowl Q www.spcaLA.com Q www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24414038 (Tyson) Q www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24413997 (Daphne) Q www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24413979 (Sacha) Q www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24393351 (Jenny) Vintage china can be the basis for a variety of projects. For the kids

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosShark Tank (DVS) Modern FamilyModern FamilyNews at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Big Bang Theory“The Replacements” (2000, Comedy) Keanu Reeves, Gene Hackman, Orlando Jones. NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc MartinNOVA Charles Lindbergh’s baby. Masterpiece ClassicMasterpiece ClassicMasterpiece ClassicDoc Martin 7-CBS 7 47 47Kickoff Show (N)e(:25) Super Bowl XLVII Baltimore Ravens vs. San Francisco 49ers. (N) Elementary “The Deductionist” (N) Action Sports 360Ferguson 9-CW 9 17 17The Big GameAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “D-Girl” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00)“Enchanted” (2007) Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Family GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Second David Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsOff Their RockersOff Their RockersOff Their RockersOff Their RockersLive From New York: The First 5 Years of Saturday Night Live (PA) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Oprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Oprah’s Next Chapter L.L. Cool J. Oprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312The Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow.“The Proposal” (2009, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Ryan Reynolds, Mary Steenburgen.“The Proposal” (2009) Sandra Bullock. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245Law & Order “House Calls” Law & Order “Compassion” Law & Order “Executioner” Law & Order “Dignity” (DVS) Law & Order A suspicious nasal spray. Law & Order “Brilliant Disguise” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run“Rugrats in Paris: The Movie” (2000, Adventure) The NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Bar Fight” Bar Rescue “Bad to the Bone” Bar Rescue “Hogtied Ham’s” Bar Rescue “Beach Bummer” Bar Rescue “Fallen Angels” Bar Rescue MY-TV 29 32 -Donna ReedDonna ReedM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Indiscreet wife is blackmailed. M*A*S*HThriller An 8-year-old holds a weapon. The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290(5:00)“High School Musical”“High School Musical 2” (2007) Zac Efron, Vanessa Hudgens. A.N.T. FarmJessieDog With a BlogA.N.T. FarmAustin & AllyGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “The Wife He Met Online” (2012) “Maternal Obsession” (2010, Suspense) Jean Louisa Kelly, Kirsten Prout. “Taken Back: Finding Haley” (2012, Suspense) Moira Kelly, David Cubitt. (:02) “Maternal Obsession” (2010) USA 33 105 242NCIS A suicide bomber kills a Marine. NCIS “Missing” NCIS Captain’s family is kidnapped. NCIS “Good Wives Club” NCIS “Vanished” “The Break-Up” (2006) BET 34 124 329Reed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed BetweenReed Between ESPN 35 140 206Strongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManWorld’s Strongest Man CompetitionSportsCenter (N) NFL PrimeTime (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College Gymnastics Auburn at Florida. (Taped) 30 for 3030 for 30SportsCenter (N) (Live) 30 for 30 SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeFins & SkinsSport Fishinghow to Do oridaFight Sports: In 60GatorZone DISCV 38 182 278Alaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last Frontier “Fall Feast” Alaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247(5:00)“Sex and the City 2” (2010) Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall. “The Bucket List” (2007) Jack Nicholson, Morgan Freeman. (DVS)“The Holiday” (2006) Cameron Diaz, Kate Winslet, Jude Law. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The SaturChasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The Satur TRAVEL 46 196 277Sandwich Paradise 2Food Truck ParadiseBbq Paradise 2: Another RackDeep Fried Paradise 2: Extra CrispyFast Foods Gone Global “Asia” Man v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229Property Brothers “April” Property Brothers “Kristine & Paul” Hawaii LifeHawaii LifeHawaii LifeHawaii LifeHouse Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280My Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingMy Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding: (:10) My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding: More Bling (N) My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding: My Big Fat Ameri HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Fairlane Fever” American PickersAmerican PickersAmerican PickersRestoration(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282(5:00) Puppy Bowl IXPuppy Bowl IX Puppies play on a tiny football eld. Puppy Bowl IX Puppies play on a tiny football eld. Puppy Bowl IX FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off (N) Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 Tennis Champions Series: Las Vegas. Agassi vs. Courier. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 10The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Land of the Lost” (2009, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Anna Friel.“The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley.“Edward Scissorhands” (1990) AMC 60 130 254The Walking Dead(:38) The Walking Dead “Vatos” (:40) The Walking Dead “Wild re” (:42) The Walking Dead “TS-19” All is not what it it seems. (9:47) The Walking Dead Rick emerges from a coma. The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249(5:00)“The House Bunny” (2008) Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Anthony Jeselnik: Caligula CMT 63 166 327Swamp Pawn(:45) CMT MusicRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaCrossroads“Clear and Present Danger” NGWILD 108 190 283Brutal KillersUltimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Ultimate Predators “Jaws of Death” Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” Attack of the Big CatsUltimate Predators “Jaws of Death” NGC 109 186 276Drugged “High on Alcohol” Search for the Amazon HeadshrinkersTaboo Uncommon relationships. Taboo Individuals leading double lives. Taboo The hidden world of prostitution. Taboo Individuals leading double lives. SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Wives With KnivesWives With Knives “Lonely and Lethal” Wives With KnivesWives With KnivesWives With KnivesWives With Knives HBO 302 300 501(5:30)“Red Riding Hood” (2011) (:15)“Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman. ‘R’ GirlsEnlightenedGirlsEnlightenedGirlsEnlightened MAX 320 310 515Meet the Fockers“Alien vs. Predator” (2004) Sanaa Lathan. ‘PG-13’ (:10)“Varsity Blues” (1999, Comedy-Drama) James Van Der Beek. ‘R’ “What’s Your Number?” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Anna Faris. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:15)“Faster” (2010) ‘R’ Shameless “May I Trim Your Hedges?” House of LiesCalifornication“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’“Ransom” (1996) Mel Gibson. ‘R’ MONDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 4, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor Sean and the women travel to Montana. (N) (:01) Castle “Recoil” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Boston” (N) Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenHow I Met/MotherRules/Engagement2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Hookman” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries “Fright Night” (N) 90210 “Here Comes Honey Bye Bye” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Doll in the Derby” (N) (PA) The Following “The Poet’s Fire” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Lead by Example” Laila Ali leads a challenging workout. (N) (:01) Deception “Why Wait” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Stolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesDateline on OWN A mysterious illness. Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN A well-liked family. Dateline on OWN A mysterious illness. A&E 19 118 265The First 48Hoarders “Debra & Patty” Hoarders “Manuel & Carla” Hoarders “Fuzzie & Fred; Nancy” (N) Intervention “Andrew” (N) (:01) Intervention “Sarah P.” HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchNUMB3RS “The Janus List” NUMB3RS “Trust Metric” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson.“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist Patrick leaves the CBI. The Mentalist Murdered high schooler. The Mentalist “Red Gold” Dallas Ann takes action against Ryland. Monday Mornings “Pilot” (:05) Dallas “Sins of the Father” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobMarvin MarvinDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(3:30)“The Guardian” (2006)“Super Troopers” (2001) Jay Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn.“Super Troopers” (2001) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeld “The Fire” FrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieGood Luck CharlieDog With a Blog“Ratatouille” (2007, Comedy) Voices of Patton Oswalt, Ian Holm. Gravity FallsGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!Jessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:30)“Disappearing Acts” (2000) Sanaa Lathan, Wesley Snipes. “Betty and Coretta” (2013, Docudrama) Angela Bassett, Mary J. Blige. “Murder on the 13th Floor” (2012) Sean Patrick Thomas, Jordan Ladd. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Spider and the Fly” NCIS A female bomb-tech is attacked. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles (DVS) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“Waist Deep” (2006) Tyrese Gibson. A man’s son is inside his hijacked car.“Four Brothers” (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson, Andr Benjamin. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Notre Dame at Syracuse. (N)d College Basketball Texas at West Virginia. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruption Women’s College Basketball Purdue at Penn State. (N) Women’s College Basketball Texas A&M at LSU. (N) Welcome to the NFL (Part II) SUNSP 37 -Into the BlueInside the HEATUFC Reloaded “UFC 68: Sylvia vs. Couture” Randy Couture comes out of retirement. World Poker Tour: Season 10Inside the HeatInside the HEAT DISCV 38 182 278Shipwreck Men “Bahama Drama” Shipwreck Men “Hurricane Alley” Extreme Smuggling “Weapons” (N) Shipwreck Men (N) Bering Sea Gold “Greedy People” Shipwreck Men TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Fashion PoliceE! News (N) Studio E! (N) E! News SpecialKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodThe Layover With Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel Impossible After Anthony (N) Hotel Impossible “The Hotel Leger” HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It “The Goddard Family” Love It or List It A formidable facelift. Love It or List It “The Piccione Family” House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake BossCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Ladies Know Best” Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Top Gear “College Cars” ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake RepublicGator Boys: Xtra BitesWild West AlaskaFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot “The Sierra Spy” Wild West Alaska FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery Diners TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Philadelphia 76ers. From Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Narnia: Prince Caspian”Continuum “Wasting Time” Continuum A scientist is murdered. (N) Being Human (N) Lost Girl “Fae-de to Black” (N) Continuum A scientist is murdered. AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Hannibal” (2001) Anthony Hopkins, Julianne Moore. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. “The Shawshank Redemption” COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) South Park(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327(5:44) Reba(:22) RebaRebaRebaRebaReba“Clear and Present Danger” (1994) Harrison Ford, Willem Dafoe. CIA chief combats Colombian drug cartels. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Hollywood Hounds” Cheetah: Fatal InstinctCat Wars: Lion vs. CheetahEye of the Leopard Three years in the life of one cat. Cat Wars: Lion vs. Cheetah NGC 109 186 276Lords of WarLords of WarDrugs, Inc. “Drug Kings of New York” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers (N) Lords of WarLords of WarAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow the Universe Works Black holes. How the Universe WorksHow the Universe Works “Asteroids” How the Universe WorksHow the Universe Works ID 111 192 285Unusual Suspects A secret money trail. Unusual SuspectsDisappeared “City of Angels” Disappeared “A Diamond Is Forever” True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Disappeared “City of Angels” HBO 302 300 501“Antitrust” (2001, Suspense) Ryan Phillippe, Claire Forlani. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God” (2012) ‘NR’ “X-Men: First Class” (2011) MAX 320 310 515(5:45)“We Bought a Zoo” (2011) Matt Damon. Premiere. ‘PG’ (7:50)“The Legend of Bagger Vance” (2000) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ “Contagion” (2011, Suspense) Marion Cotillard, Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545“Raw Deal” (1986, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger. Premiere. ‘R’ Homeland “State of Independence”“The Iron Lady” (2011) Meryl Streep. ‘PG-13’ (:45)“Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis. ‘PG-13’ WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsNightly Business 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312MarieVaried ProgramsMad HungryMad HungryHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherVaried ProgramsTwo and Half Men CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesThe MentalistThe Mentalist NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Little EinsteinsVaried Programs Phineas and FerbVaried Programs (:10) A.N.T. FarmVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyWife SwapVaried ProgramsWife SwapVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied ProgramsNCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329(11:00) MovieVaried ProgramsJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe ParkersMoeshaMovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesVaried ProgramsNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Numbers Never LieDan Le BatardVaried ProgramsColl. Football LiveSportsNationNFL32 SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247According to JimLove-RaymondAmerican DadAmerican DadWipeoutFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsCougar TownKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. 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ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDCriminal PursuitVaried Programs48 Hours on IDVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(10:30) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(:15) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(10:45) MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: When I was 12, my family moved to New Jersey. It was a difficult time in my life. Lucky for me, I made a best friend across the street, “Janie.” We spent all our time together. I loved being at her house because it was a happy one, unlike my own home. (My mom was erratic and unhappy, and it affected our whole family.) A year later, Janie learned her family would be moving to Ohio. The day the moving truck came, Janie and I were inseparable. The driver was a young man in his 20s named Randy. When Janie and her family left in their car, I sat on the curb outside my house sobbing. When the load-ing crew finished, Randy started the truck, then turned off the engine. He got out and came and sat beside me on the curb and told me how someday my pain would lessen. He said I was a special person, and shared a little about his own family who was far away. Then he took a ring off his finger and said he wanted me to have it. It was a Marines ring his grandfather had given to him. He insisted I take it, gave me a hug and drove off. In the years that have followed, that man’s gener-osity and compassion have stayed with me. It helped me to believe in myself when things in my family seemed dark. Sadly, I have never known how to find him to thank him. Randy: Wherever you are, please know how much of a dif-ference your kindness made in my life. -STILL GRATEFUL IN TEXAS DEAR STILL GRATEFUL: One simple act of kindness made an impact on your life, but you have multiplied it many times over by con-tinuing to pass it on. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: When set-ting someone up for a date, do you think it is impor-tant to share the person’s race? Our friend “Jena” set up a girlfriend, “Joan,” who is Chinese, on a date with a white man. Joan knew what the man looked like and was fine with it, but when Jena showed the man a picture of Joan (who is gorgeous), he made an excuse and backed out. We hate to think what he may have said to Joan if he’d gone into the date “blind.” What do you think, Abby? We dislike preju-dice, but we want to avoid hurting anyone in the future. -COLORBLIND IN MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA DEAR COLORBLIND: When arranging a blind date, the usual practice is to give each party as much information about the other as possible. Because it’s part of the “pack-age” you’re offering, race should be mentioned to prevent any surprises. However, you may have drawn the wrong conclu-sion about the man in this case. Has it occurred to you that he may have backed out because Joan is so gorgeous that he was intimidated? Many beau-tiful women have com-plained about having this problem. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Participate in events and causes that interest you, and you will meet someone you will want to get to know better. Partnerships are in a high cycle for both business and pleasure. Making a personal change will bring good results. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t worry about the things you can’t change or people who oppose you. Focus on what you can do and do it well. Your kind-ness will be appreciated by those who share your interests. +++ GEMINI (May 21June 20): Nothing will be straightforward. Ask questions and determine for yourself whether or not you can take part in what’s being asked of you. An offer will turn out to be more inviting then expect-ed, but read the fine print first. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Spice up your looks and do whatever it takes to build your confidence. A unique situation will arise if you attend an event that features different cultural traditions. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Troubles at home can be expected. You’d be wise to get out and enjoy a pas-time with someone who shares your interests and doesn’t judge you. Don’t give in to bullying or any-one trying to coerce you into something you don’t want to do. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t hold back when discipline and hard work offers such good results. Too much of anything will be your downfall. Keep life simple, pursue goals with moderation and you will come out on top. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Be unique, imagina-tive and engaging and you will be noticed. Your ability to pull things together will result in greater interest from someone who can offer you either personal or professional assistance. Love and romance are heading your way. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Stick to cre-ative endeavors or home improvement projects. Talks will get you nowhere but into trouble with the people you love most. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): A little reserva-tion when it comes to tak-ing a risk will be required. You have to look at whatev-er you are planning to do objectively and wager all the pros and cons before leaping into action. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Take command. An emotional matter can be cleared up if you are compassionate and under-standing with regard to the needs of those around you. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Look at your options but don’t make a decision just yet. Stick close to home and take care of odd jobs you’ve left undone. Mulling over in your mind what you want to strive for in the future will pay off. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look over your impor-tant papers and you will discover something that needs to be dealt with and that can make your life easier financially. Keeping the way you feel about someone a secret will backfire. You are best to be upfront. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Break in poetry8 Costumed animal, perhaps 14 Something media executives keep aneye on? 19 The hare, notably20 One on the verge of croaking? 21 Prompt again22 Allowed aboard23 Molecules in natural gas 24 Acrobat developer25 Chains7DNHWKDW28 Egg-sorting device2IIHQVHWKDWV provoked by luridnews )LQHKDYHLW\RXU ZD\ 'DYLVRI,P1RW 5DSSDSRUW 37 Mom-and-pop orgs.38 Salty stream40 Aforementioned1HZ(QJODQG seafood staple 43 Author who wrote about frontier life 9HKLFOHWKDWVRXWRI this world? 49 Person on tap?51 Cold war fighters52 Shred53 Villain in many a fairy tale 55 Winged57 Salon request59 27-Down predators60 Diamond unit62 Water park feature6RZHGRQHVZLOG oats 66 ___-dozen70 Metals giant in the Dow Jonesindustrial average 72 Monterrey cheddar?75 Sanitariums77 Chaise scene?79 Villain in many an action movie 82 Darkens83 ___ mater84 Paparazzi payer86 Biblical resting spot88 Base of Asti wine90 Sandwich spec)LUVWUHVSRQGHUVIRU short 3RSVSRS94 Where the Mets once met 95 Back-to-back competitions? 100 ETs'RPLQDWUL[VZHDU 105 Sampling106 ___ Sea, body of water north of1RUZD\ ,QLWVHOI109 Really hurts111 More poker-faced113 Show time115 Act impulsively, as young lovers 116 Without any oomph117 More dirty, as 6DQWDVERRWV +HZURWH2QH 6WHS)RUZDUG7ZR6WHSV%DFN 119 Dramatist Sean120 Swaddles Down ,WPD\EHVSRWWHGLQD pet store 2 Last Oldsmobiles3 Hinders4 Wife of Woody)DQF\IORZHUKROGHUV6 The Pied Piper of Hamelin, e.g. 7 Years abroad0LVW\FURRQHU9 Leigh Hunt poem $ERX%HQBBB 10 Middle weights?11 Traffic director12 Cry with an accent13 Mosaic tiles14 Screwball character RQ7KH6LPSVRQV 15 Moistens, in a way 16 Make the Billboard charts, say 17 Unwieldy boat18 Victorian leader?)RXUVRPH,QNKROGHUV29 Return address letters? 32 Bonding measurement )HXGDOYDVVDO30VDQGVXFK Abbr. 36 Sigmoid curve,QRQ39 Actress Sommer43 Cry like a feline45 Participants in some rivalries, briefly 46 Going rate?47 Yours, in Ypres1XPEHUFUXQFKHUV numbers 49 Hwy. that ends near La Guardia 50 Word often seen before 3, 4 or 5,but never 1 51 Precocious Roald Dahl heroine $SROORV6QRRS\ e.g., for short +HURVVSRW61 Magazine of the 1DWLRQDO6SDFHSociety 64 High-fiber cereal5DSWRUVKRPH Abbr. 67 Pioneering conservationist 68 Watson of the Harry Potter films 3DUWRI7$$EEU71 Retirement spot72 Old barnstorming needs 73 Lake connected to Sandusky Bay 74 Roll around in the yard? 76 Modern R&R option77 Well-rounded78 Source of talk, often80 Jack of old westerns0\WXUQ83 Double agent Aldrich 85 Shakes on87 Cherry, e.g.90 Master of literary twists 92 Sauted seafood dish ,QWOVWDQGDUG,QWHQVHDVDJD]H1RWID]HGE\97 Kind of pass for an overseas passenger 98 On the stock exchange 99 Stock units?103 Hitch ___ 106 When doubled, island near Tahiti $XWKRUVHQFO108 Univ. figure7KH3URGXFHUV producer Brooks ,WPD\EH represented by;;;LQWKHfunnies 2QHRIWKH;VLQ ;;; 1R 5(/($6('$7( %/$&.&$76%\-HII&KHQ(GLWHGE\:LOO6KRUW] )RUDQ\WKUHHDQVZHUVcall from a touch-toneSKRQH$1.49 each minute; or,with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. 12345678910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 252627 2829 30 31323334 353637383940 414243 44 45464748495051525354 5556 57585960616263646566676869 70717273747576 777879808182 838485 8687 888990919293949596979899100101102103 104 105106107108 109110111112 113114 115116 117 118119 120 Stranger’s act of kindness gives comfort lasting years r rr rr r nn nr r r rr r r rrr Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 5D

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By MANUEL VALDES Associated Press TULUM, Mexico The allinclusive Cancun resorts are not known for topless women on the beach or Argentinians with scrag gly beards playing Gypsy music. But thats the norm in Tulum, a Mexican seaside spot south of Cancun that attracts a mix of bohemians, well-pocketed New Age types and sun-seekers to its turquoise waters and white sandy beaches. Despite its proximity to Cancun and its fellow party neighbor Playa del Carmen, Tulum is not for the same spring break crowd. The college kids go to Cancun. The professors and teacher assistants come to Tulum, said Richard Contreras, whose fam ily has managed properties in Tulum for nearly a decade. That doesnt mean Tulum is cheap. We couldnt find a room on the beach for less than $150 a night that came with a bathroom. Meals nearby cost just as much as they do in my hometown of Seattle. Tulum is luxury, but the luxu ry here is nature and the beach, said Mimi Contreras, Richards sister. Our trip was a five-day sunseeking dash in the first week of January, during the areas high season, which stretches from win ter through spring break. Tulum, located on Mexicos lush green Yucatan Peninsula, was an ideal destination. The weather was perfect. The bright sunshine was rarely obscured by fast traveling clouds. December and January are among the driest months on the Yucatan Peninsula and offer hot weather, but no debilitating heat. The dayside highs in our trip were in the mid-80s. The night skies were full of stars. Tulum is about 90 miles south of Cancun and the highway con necting both is well-paved. We flew into Cancun, rented a car ($25 a day plus insurance from Hertz) and made the drive late at night. It went smoothly and we hit no traffic, but watch out for speed bumps scattered around the area and pedestrians cross ing the highway in some spots. There are also shuttles available from Cancun to Tulum, but the car gave us the mobility to visit attractions beyond the beach. Tulum is pretty laid-back and chill. And I think most of the people who live here, work here, who have property here, want to keep that way to a certain extent, Mimi Contreras said. Tulum can be divided in to three parts: the town, the Mayan ruins and the beach. Tulum the town is on the high way, about a 10-minute drive from the beach. Tourism has pushed the population to around 30,000 people, but the town retains the blueprint of many Latin American pueblos, centered around an open plaza or town square. Shops, street-food vendors, hotels and restaurants catering to tourists line the main drag. In general, hotels and restaurants downtown are much cheaper than those on the beach. (We found tasty Mexican food and great service at La Malquerida.) Just past the town are the near est cenotes, which are water caves that are part of a network of rivers under the Yucatan Peninsula. We went to the Gran Cenote ($10 entrance plus snorkel rental) for a swim in its cool and clear waters. Snorkeling underwa ter, you can see how the water has eroded the caves limestone walls over the eons into formations of many different shapes and sizes. The Gran Cenote even had fish in its cavernous pool and bats flying overhead. The Yucatan has many cenotes and some are deep enough for scuba diving. Tulum may be best-known for its ancient Mayan ruins, which attract a steady stream of daytrippers, cruise passengers and tour buses. The complex of crum bling structures here is smaller and less impressive than some other Mayan sites like Chichen Itza, but its location atop sea side cliffs is one of the most scenic ruin sites on the Yucatan. The complex is surrounded by a wall (Tulum means wall) and was inhabited for centuries before Spanish colonialists arrived in the early 1500s. Entrance to the park is $10, which also gives you access to a beach where you can swim beneath the ruins. Guided tours cost extra. Last but not least, theres Tulum the beach. Stretching for roughly six miles (10 kilome ters), waterfront Tulum is lined with cabanas, eco-chic hotels, fancy restaurants and yoga spots, but its less developed than some of Mexicos other resort areas, where the view of the beach often includes high-rise hotels. Theres only one main road and it does get crowded during the day. In spots, it barely accommo dates the stream of cars, trucks, taxis, bicycles and pedestrians using it. Biking can be perilous; two women staying next to us fell off their bikes in the traffic, though fortunately they were not seriously injured. We stayed in one of Contreras seaside cabanas for $75 a night. It came with a shared bathroom, a fan and occasional insects com mon in tropical settings includ ing some that bite. The cabana rooms are large, cleaned daily and are nicely decorated. Theres Wi-Fi, if you must. People stay ing at the cabanas can use beach beds, lounge chairs and a bar from the Contreras next-door property, which hosts cruise ship tours in the afternoons. We were just footsteps from the beach. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE Dr. Robert J. Harvey 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South www.theaspendentalgroup.com Dr. Rameek McNair We are now a Cigna PPO Dental Network Savings Provider They fit like a GLOVE, better even than before. They are STRAIGHT!!! No more buck teeth! Did I say how much I LOVE MY TEETH? I just keep smiling and saying that to myself. Thank you EVERYONE for your incredible grace and for HEARING me! This is EXACTLY what I wanted. I couldnt ask for better. Thank you again, ALL of you. Many blessing for the upcoming week. I... LOVE... MY... Teeth Before Before After After TRAVEL Tulum, Mexico, an escape to the beach Cancun alternative attracts different classes of tourists. The Castle of the Mayan ruins is one of the main attractions in Tulum. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Tourists leave the swimming beach next to the Mayan ruins in Tulum, Mexico. Tulum may be best-known for its ancient Mayan ruins, which attract a steady stream of day-trippers, cruise passengers and tour buses. The com plex of crumbling structures here is smaller and less impressive than some other Mayan sites like Chichen Itza, but its location atop seaside cliffs is one of the most scenic ruin sites on the Yucatan.