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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02009

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02009

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe buck was passed to Joel Foreman at the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Chamber Ball as he became the new president of the chamber Saturday night. The chamber held its annual ball at the Columbia County Fairgrounds where nearly 400 community and business lead-ers celebrated the successes of 2012 and looked forward to a new year. Before “The Passing of the Buck,” outgoing president of the chamber of commerce Todd Wilson spoke about the suc-cess of 2012. He noted 98 per-cent of chamber memberships were retained, which beats the national average of 80 percent, and thanked all those that made 2012 a success. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comWhen Jacquie Hagler hosted a jewelry party at her home, she never expected to shout down a gunman while invoking the name of Jesus Christ. Hagler said 18 women were at her Lake View Avenue home Friday around 7:40 p.m. The show was just starting and the women were asked to get their purses and put them in their laps. A masked gunman with a semiautomatic pistol then slipped into the house and demanded their money. Sharron Ballance said at first she thought the gunman was part of the presentation because they had just been asked to get their purses. “It was like it was a bad joke,” Ballance said. Then the man put the gun to Ballance’s head. Ballance said she pushed the gun away, and told him it was only a water pistol. “He pulled the slide back and showed us that there was bullets in there and then he pushed it back and he said ‘I’m fixin’ to shoot somebody,’” said Dianne Copper, who was only a few feet away from the gunman. The man, dressed in dark clothing with a dark knit cap over his head and a blue and white bandana over his face, put a black duffel bag on the table CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Damon ‘hijacks’ Kimmel show. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 2B, 5B 73 50 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM New laws meanbigger tax refund checks likely. WTC workersscrawl graffiti of defiance, hope. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 259 1D 1C 1A‘Get out, in the name of Jesus!’ JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterJacquie Hagler (from left), Dianne Cooper, Gwen Adams an d Sharron Ballance survived a home invasion and attem pted armed robbery -all through the power of Christ, they said. Hagler, who hosted a jewelr y party at her home Friday night, stood up amongst a group of 18 women, pointed to armed robbery suspect Derick Jeremy Lee and shouted ‘Get out in the name of Jesus!’ HOME INVASION ROBBERY THWARTED Women repel armed man with ‘holy boldness’ When confronted, would-be robber turned and ran. INTRUDER continued on 3A CHAMBER continued on 3A Lee A worldwithoutwork? Many mid-pay jobs could be eliminated by smart machines.By BERNARD CONDON andPAUL WISEMANAP Business WritersWASHINGTON — They seem right out of a Hollywood fantasy, and they are: Cars that drive themselves have appeared in movies like “I, Robot” and the television show “Knight Rider.” Now, three years after Google invented one, auto-mated cars could be on their way to a freeway near you. In the U.S., California and other states are rewriting the rules of the road to make way for driverless cars. Just one prob-lem: What happens to the mil-lions of people who make a liv-ing driving cars and trucks — jobs that always have seemed sheltered from the onslaught of technology? “All those jobs are going to disappear in the next 25 years,” predicts Moshe Vardi, a computer scientist at Rice University in Houston. “Driving by people will look quaint; it will look like a horse and buggy.” If automation can unseat bus drivers, urban delivery-men, long-haul truckers, even cabbies, is any job safe? Vardi poses an equally scary question: “Are we prepared for an economy in which 50 percent of people aren’t work-ing?” An Associated Press analysis of employment data from 20 countries found that mil-lions of mid-skill, mid-pay jobs already have disappeared over the past five years, and they are the jobs that form the backbone of the middle class in developed countries. That experience has left a growing number of technolo-gists and economists wonder-ing what lies ahead. Will mid-dle-class jobs return when the global economy recovers, or are they lost forever because of the advance of technology? The answer may not be known for years, perhaps decades. Experts argue among them-selves whether the job market will recover, muddle along or get much worse. To understand their arguments, it helps to understand the past. Every time a transformative invention took hold over the past two centuries — whether the steamboat in the 1820s or the locomotive in the 1850s or the telegraph or the tele-phone — businesses would disappear and workers would lose jobs. But new businesses would emerge that employed even more. The combustion engine decimated makers of horse-drawn carriages, saddles, buggy whips and other occu-pations that depended on the horse trade. But it also result-ed in huge auto plants that employed hundreds of thou-sands of workers, who were paid enough to help create a prosperous middle class. WORK continued on 3A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterTodd Wilson (right), the outgoing 2012 Lake City-Columbi a County Chamber of Commerce president, passes the buck to incoming 2013 president Joel Foreman Saturday during the Chamber Ball. ‘Buck is passed’at Chamber of Commerce ball

PAGE 2

NEW YORK M att Damon had his revenge. The butt of a long-running joke on ABCs Jimmy Kimmel Live, the actor opened Thursday nights show as a kidnap per who tied Kimmel to a chair with duct tape and gagged him with his own tie. Theres a new host in town and his initials are M.D., Damon said. Thats right, the doctor is in. For years, Kimmel has joked at the end of his show that he ran out of time and was unable to bring Damon on as a guest. Kimmel was the silent one Thursday, watching from the back of the stage as Damon did his job. Damon tormented Kimmel by bringing on a succession of big-name guests. Robin Williams stopped by to finish the monologue. Ben Affleck had a walk-on role. Sheryl Crow was the bandleader and performed her new single. Nicole Kidman, Gary Oldman, Amy Adams, Reese Witherspoon and Demi Moore all crowded the talk shows couch. Ive been waiting for this moment for a long, long time, Damon said. This is like when I lost my virginity, except this is going to last way lon ger than one second. Sarah Palin ending Fox News position NEW YORK Fox News Channel is parting ways with former Republican vice pres idential candidate Sarah Palin, ending her three-year tenure as a contributor on the network. While Palins time at Fox was occa sionally rocky, the networks news executive, Bill Shine, said Friday that we have thoroughly enjoyed our association with her. We wish her the best in her future endeavors, said Shine, Foxs executive vice president for programming. A person familiar with discussions between Fox and Palin described the parting as amicable, saying that Fox and Palin had discussed renewing her contract but she decided to do other things. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record. Palins lawyer in Alaska, John Tiemessen, had no immediate com ment on her exit. Palins last appear ance on Fox News was Dec. 19 on Greta Van Susterens show. Palin signed to deliver commen tary on Fox in January 2010, report edly for $1 million a year. It was a coup for both sides at the time; the former Alaska governor was a little more than a year removed from her attention-getting run for the vice presidency. Van Dyke glad he made someone smile LOS ANGELES Forget false modesty. Dick Van Dyke seems nothing short of gobsmacked about receiving the life-achievement honor at Sundays Screen Actors Guild Awards. They mustve got ten to the Vs, he joked. Though prob ably best known for The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-66) and Walt Disneys big-screen musical Mary Poppins (1964), the 87-year-old Van Dyke said that, with the SAG Award, I kind of find a home. Ive always been a bit of an orphan, because actors say, Well, hes more of a dancer. And dancers say, No. Hes really a singer. And singers say, No. Hes an actor. So, now Ive got a home. I can actually refer to these people as my peers. His career has spanned eight decades, starting with work as a disc jockey and a standup comic in the late 1940s. He even worked as a national television morning-show host, with no less than Walter Cronkite serving as his news anchor. TALLAHASSEE Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi says that Floridians who lost their homes to foreclosure still have a chance to get a share of a large national settlement. The initial deadline for people to file for a claim payment was Jan. 18, but state officials say claims filed afterwards are likely to be accepted. Those eli gible could receive at least $840. The settlement applies to loans serviced by Bank of America, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan Chase, Citi or GMAC/Ally. Payments will go to people who lost their home to foreclosure between 2008 and 2011. Florida has been one of the states hit hardest by the foreclosure crisis. So far only about half of the estimated 150,000 people in Florida eligible for claim payments have responded to mail notices or phone calls. Satanists praise Gov. Scott TALLAHASSEE A group of self-proclaimed Satanists on Friday praised Gov. Rick Scott for signing a bill into law last year that lets Florida school boards permit student-initiated prayer and other inspira tional messages. During their rally, a white sign with black let tering was stretched across the steps of Floridas Old Capitol proclaiming Hail Satan! Hail Rick Scott! A high priest wearing goat horns and four min ions dressed in black, hooded robes were joined by a spokesman, sound technician and camera crew. The devil, though, was in the details. The spokesman, Lucien Greaves of Cambridge, Mass., earlier this month had been listed on the Actors Access website as the casting director in an ad seeking unpaid, nonunion actors in Tallahassee. They were wanted to perform in a mockumentary titled The Satanic Temple. Murder case jury unable to agree MIAMI A South Florida jury said it remained deadlocked Friday on the murder charge against a woman accused of killing 4-yearold foster child Rilya Wilson more than 12 years ago. Jurors said they still had not resolved their 11-1 split on that count against 67year-old Geralyn Graham. Circuit Judge Marisa Tinkler Mendez urged the panel to try again to reach a unanimous verdict, which is required by law. Jurors said Thursday they reached verdicts on kidnapping and aggravated child abuse charges but did not say what the ver dicts were. If they remain split on murder, a mistrial would be declared for that charge. Graham is accused of killing Rilya in late 2000 and disposing of her remains. The girls body has never been found and authorities didnt realize she was missing for 15 months. Justices clarify contractor law TALLAHASSEE The Florida Supreme Court says defendants in con tracting cases cannot claim plaintiffs are equal wrong doers as a common law defense. The justices Thursday unanimously approved a ruling by the Daytona Beach-based 5th District Court of Appeal in an Orange County case, which conflicted with another appellate decision. It was a victory for T&G Corp., a general contrac tor. T&G and Earth Trades Inc., an unlicensed subcon tractor, sued each other for breach of contract in connection with a parking garage project. State law says contracts entered by unlicensed con tractors are unenforceable. Earth Trades argued T&G also couldnt enforce the contract because the com pany knew the subcontrac tor was unlicensed and, therefore, was an equal wrongdoer. Justice Charles Canady wrote the equal wrongdoer defense is invalid because the Legislature intended to disadvantage unlicensed contractors. Marion Co. seeks alligator trappers OCALA Marion County is looking to hire nuisance alligator trappers. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting applications for contracted trappers. Applicants must live in the county, have an email address, a clean criminal history and no wildlife law violations. Applications must be received by Jan. 31. For an application visit MyFWC. com/Alligator. Child death leads to policy review CLEARWATER The Pinellas County Sheriffs Office will review its inter nal policies after a 5-yearold girl died in foster care about a week after investi gators removed her from her home. Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said Thursday that Elizabeth Holder didnt received a medical screen ing within the 72-hour period after removal as required by law. The death remains under investi gation, so its unknown whether a screening would have saved the girl. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor James Cromwell (Babe) is 73. Drummer Nick Mason of Pink Floyd is 68. Singer Nedra Talley of The Ronettes is 67. Dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov is 65. Country singer Cheryl White of The Whites is 58. Guitarist Richard Young of The Kentucky Headhunters is 58. Actress Mimi Rogers is 57. Guitarist Janick Gers of Iron Maiden is 56. Singer Margo Timmins of Cowboy Junkies is 52. Keyboardist Gillian Gilbert (New Order) is 52. Actress Bridget Fonda is 49. Actor Alan Cumming is 48. Singer Mike Patton (Faith No More) is 45. Country singer Tracy Lawrence is 45. Rapper Tricky is 45. Guitarist Michael Kulas of James is 44. Daily Scripture Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up. James 4:10 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 17-23-33-35 2 Friday: 8-9-30-35-36 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-2-5 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 0-8-3-5 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 15-21-22-24-39-41 x2 Floridians who lost homes can still file claims Damon hijacks Kimmels ABC show Wednes day: 11-12-24-43-45 PB 9 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A ASSOCIATED PRESS Guests (from left) Nicole Kidman, Gary Oldman and Amy Adams applaud Matt Damon, who took over as host of Jimmy Kimmel Live after opening the show as a kidnapper, tying Kimme, (background right) to a chair with duct tape and gag ging him with his own tie. For years, Kimmel has joked at the end of his show that he ran out of time and was unable to bring Damon on as a guest. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS State Democrats elect new chair Former Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith of Alachua hands the gavel to newly elected Chairwoman Allison Tant at the state party organizational meeting at Lake Mary on Saturday. Tant, a Tallahassee fundraiser active in President Barack Obamas campaign, beat Hillsborough County State Committeeman Alan Clendenin 587-448 to win the top spot. Clendenin was unanimously proclaimed first vice chairman of the party. Palin Van Dyke

PAGE 3

What has always been true is that technology has destroyed jobs but also always created jobs, says Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz of Columbia University. You know the old story we tell about (how) the car destroyed blacksmiths and created the auto industry. The astounding capa bilities of computer tech nology are forcing some mainstream economists to rethink the conventional wisdom about the econom ic benefits of technology, however. For the first time, we are seeing machines that can think or some thing close to it. In the early 1980s, at the beginning of the personal computer age, economists thought computers would do what machines had done for two centuries eliminate jobs that required brawn, not brains. Low-level workers would be forced to seek training to qualify for jobs that required more skills. Theyd become more productive and earn more money. The process would be the same as when mech anization replaced manual labor on the farm a century ago; workers moved to the city and got factory jobs that required higher skills but paid more. But it hasnt quite worked out that way. It turns out that computers most eas ily target jobs that involve routines, whatever skill level they require. And the most vulnerable of these jobs, economists have found, tend to employ mid skill workers, even those held by people with college degrees the very jobs that support a middle-class, consumer economy. So the rise of computer technology poses a threat that previous generations of machines didnt: The old machines replaced human brawn but created jobs that required human brains. The new machines threat en both. Technological change is more encompassing and moving faster and making it harder and harder to find things that people have a comparative advantage in versus machines, says David Autor, an econo mist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has studied the loss of midpay jobs to technology. Here are the three sce narios that economists and technologists offer about jobs in the future: THE ECONOMY RETURNS TO HEALTH AFTER A WRENCHING TRANSITION It has always happened before. Europe and the United States endured repeated economic and social upheaval during the 19th and early 20th cen turies as their agricultural economies transformed into industrial ones. Columbias Stiglitz argues that such pressures led to the collapse of the world economy in 1929 the cataclysm we call the Great Depression. The mechanization of farming caused agricul tural production to soar worldwide in the 1920s and prices to plunge. In the U.S., crop and live stock prices fell by 50 per cent between 1929 and 1932. American farmers, who accounted for a fifth of the U.S. workforce, lost purchasing power and also struggled to pay their mort gages and other loans. As their debts went bad, banks began to collapse, squeez ing credit and spreading panic. The economy went into free-fall. Only World War II and the massive rearma ment program it required restored the U.S. econo my to full health. The expe rience was traumatizing. And today only 2 percent of Americans work on farms. Economies dont make these transitions well, Stiglitz says. People in the dying parts of the econo my cant afford to invest in the education or retraining they need to find different work. So you get workers trapped in the wrong sec tors or unemployed, he says. Peter Lindert, an econo mist at the University of California-Davis, says computers are more dis ruptive than earlier inno vations because they are general-purpose technolo gies used by all kinds of companies. They upend many industries instead of just a few. The mechanized looms the Luddites hated in England in the early 1800s, for instance, rattled one industry. Information technology touches every business. The changes are coming much faster this time, too. Lindert says thats show ing up in the steep drop in prices for some products this time. In the Industrial Revolution, the price of textiles went down. But it was a small number com pared to how the cost of information storage has gone down. Its a fraction of what it was in the 1970s, Lindert says. Now, com puting power is doubling every 18 months to two years and the price is plummeting. But Lindert does not believe workers are doomed to unemployment. With the right skills and education, he says, they can learn to work with the machines and become pro ductive enough to fend off the automation threat. There is a period of time that is extremely disruptive, says Thomas Schneider, CEO of the consultancy Restructuring Associates. If youre 55 years old now and lose your job, the odds of you ever getting hired into what you were doing before is as close to zero as you can imagine. If you are a 12year-old, you have a very bright future. Its just not doing what your father was doing or your mother was doing. The rise of the iPhone, for instance, has put more than 290,000 people to work on related iPhone apps since 2007, accord ing to Apple. That suggests that new technology con tinues to create new types of jobs that require higher skills and creativity. Over the long run, I have confidence we can do it, Stiglitz says. But, he warns, I can see us being in this kind of doldrums for half a decade, for a decade, or for longer. THE ECONOMY CONTINUES TO PRODUCE JOBS, JUST NOT ENOUGH GOOD ONES Some economists worry that the sluggish, lopsided labor market of the past five years is what well be stuck with in the future. Smarter machines and niftier software will con tinue to replace more and more midpay jobs, making businesses more produc tive and swelling their prof its. The most highly skilled workers those who can use machines to be more productive but cant be replaced by them will continue to prosper. Many low-pay jobs are likely to remain sheltered from the technological offensive: Robots are too clumsy to tidy up hotel rooms or clear dirty dishes at busy restau rants. Computers can do calcu lus better than any human being, says Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at MITs Center for Digital Business. But restaurant bus boy is a very safe job for a long time to come. Under this scenario, technology could continue to push economic growth but only a few would enjoy the benefits. More people would be compet ing for midpay jobs, so pay would shrivel. Many mid skill workers would be left unemployed or shunted into low-skill, low-pay jobs. The income gap between the rich and ordinary citizens, already at record levels in many developed countries, would continue to widen. Most economists say that unequal societies dont prosper; it takes a large and confident middle class to produce the con sumer spending that drives healthy economic growth. In the long run, you could actually see growth stop ping, says economist Maarten Goos at Belgiums University of Leuven. If everyone is employed in low-wage service jobs, then, thats it. TECHNOLOGY LEADS TO MASS UNEMPLOYMENT In a speech last year, former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers declared that the biggest economic issue of the future would not be the federal debt or compe tition from China but the dramatic transformations that technology is bring ing about. Summers imagined a machine called the Doer that could make anything or provide any service. Productivity would soar. Wonderful goods and services would emerge. Enormous wealth would go to those who could design better Doers, to those who could think of better things for Doers to do. But everyone else would be worthless in the labor market. Summers said the world is moving in that direction and has completed only 15 percent of the journey, but already we are observing its consequences. Consequences, indeed. ATMs dislodged bank tell ers. Microsoft Outlook manages what secretar ies used to do. Expedia is replacing travel agents. EZPass is doing away with toll-booth operators. And robots continue to supplant factory workers. But surely some jobs are safe. Truck drivers, perhaps? A machine cant negotiate a left-hand turn against oncoming traffic without a human behind the wheel, can it? Or so economists Frank Levy of MIT and Richard Murnane of Harvard University rea soned in their book The New Division of Labor, way back in 2004. That was then. Six years later, Google developed a car that could drive itself. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Florida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Board Certied Healthcare Provider offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. Daina Greene, MD Marlene Summers, CNM Call Today 487 0087 Your Authorized Retailer F l u S h o t s 150 Channels $ 29.99 FREE Installation FREE Movies 386-344-2957 INTRUDER: Suspect in custody in home invasion Continued From Page 1A CHAMBER: Ball Continued From Page 1A WORK: Smart machines could lead to massive unemployment, expert says Continued From Page 1A I want to thank the business commu nity and the board of directors for their support of the great year we had in 2012, Wilson said. I would urge everyone to get involved with the chamber this year. After the buck was passed, Foreman spoke about his views on the direction the chamber will take in 2013 and about how he viewed the responsibility that comes with being the chamber president. Im truly honored and I hope you can sense Im a bit overwhelmed to be here tonight, Foreman said. To be the president of an organization with the kind of history our chamber is able to boast, and to know that my name will be recorded alongside some of the best and the brightest that our community has ever had to offer is truly humbling. Foreman said the chamber will con tinue its focus on being the voice of the business community on important issues, and also partnering with the colleges and schools in the area on workforce development. Also, he said the chamber should have an active engagement in the community. Columbia County is a great place to live and work, Foreman said. The clean envi ronment, the short drive to great football games in three directions and the upcom ing Olustee Festival were all mentioned. Theres a reason we all live and work here -part of it is love but part of also is we know theres a bright future here and the chamber will be part of that, he said. and demanded they put their money and cell phones inside, witnesses said. Thats when Hagler was struck with what she called a holy boldness. I just stood up and said, Get out, in the name of Jesus!, she said. Hagler says she could hear the words coming out of her mouth, but had no control over what she was doing. And then everybody just started saying, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, and he got this blank look on his face, he scanned the whole room, turned around and ran out the door, Hagler said. That fast. Gwen Adams, who was sitting next to Ballance, said she was never afraid, and credits the Lord with protecting the group from harm. Hagler said she became angry but never feared for her safety during the ordeal. Ballance, the woman with the bar rel of the gun inches from her head, also said she was never frightened. It was like there was a shield of protection, Ballance said. Kerry Hagler, Jacquies husband, had taken the two dogs and cat and left the house for a couple of hours. He said there were no men, no dogs and none of the women had guns in their purses. The only weapon these women had was the Lord, he said. The Holy Spirit. It is not clear if the man targeted Haglers home because of the jewelry party. Hagler said the party was mentioned on her Facebook page, but that details were sent by way of private messages. Another armed robbery attempt was reported less then an hour later in the parking lot of the Bank of America at 949 SW Main Blvd., according to the victim, who asked that the Lake City Reporter not publish her name. As the woman was returning to her car after using the ATM, a man similar to the one described by Hagler and her guests yelled at her to give me that money. When she reached her car a moment later he was upon her, she said, a handgun held waist-high and aimed at her. Again he said, Give me that money. She said she looked into his eyes to see whether he was obviously intoxicated. She said he did not appear to be, and refused to comply. I told him, Im not giving you my money, she said. The man fled on foot moments later. He kind of looked like it was his first time doing it, she said of the would-be thief. She said the man was dressed in dark clothing with a black, or possibly dark blue, bandana over his face. The parking lot was very dark, she said. An individual in her car said the man was wearing a dark-colored knit cap, she said. A suspect in the home invasion, Derick Jeremy Lee, 24, of Lake City, was taken into custody at his home at 11:17 p.m. Friday and booked into the county jail on $200,000 bond. Lee lives two blocks from Haglers home, according to Craig Strickland, a public information officer for the Lake City Police Department. Hagler said the women picked Lee out of a photo lineup provided by investigators. The Florida Department of Corrections website lists Lee as 5 feet 9 inches tall. The woman in the bank parking lot said the man there was not over 5 feet 6 inches tall. Strickland called Lee a possible suspect in the second rob bery attempt, based on his clothing, the close proximity of the crimes and the time frame. Lee, of 864 SW Thetis Place, was released from prison in March 2011 after serving 30 months for attempted armed rob bery and burglary, according to the state DOC website. The women at the jewelry party did not hold a grudge, according to Hagler. It is our hope that not only justice comes to this young man, but salvation, she said.

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OPINION Sunday, January 27, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Sometimes a wrong step turns out OK Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman On this date:In 1695, Mustafa II becames the Ottoman sultan in Istanbul on the death of Amhed II. In 1825, Congress approved the Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma), clearing the way for forced relocation of the Eastern Indians on the “Trail of Tears.” In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued General War Order No. 1, setting in motion the Union armies. In 1900, foreign diplomats in Peking feared revolt and demanded that the Imperial government discipline the Boxer Rebels. Sheer courage OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICYLetters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comS everal years ago, a man I know went to the wrong Lake City funeral home for the ‘visitation’ but his mistake led to a positive ending. Here is the story. A family friend had died and he intended to go to the visitation but somehow went to the wrong funeral home. Not knowing he was at the wrong place, he walked inside, signed the guest book and went inside the main visitation room, expecting to see some people he knew. He was wrong. He didn’t see anybody he knew. Yet, there he was, so he walked respectfully over to the casket, viewed the woman’s body, said a few hellos and started to leave. Then suddenly a young couple approached him, and he recognized them from their school days. The young man said, “We are so glad you came to Mama’s visita-tion.” He then introduced the man all around so he sat down and chat-ted a few minutes with those near-by, then excused himself and left. Over the years he would occasionally see this couple around town, and they always mentioned how much it had meant to them that he had gone to his Mama’s visitation. A question. Was his going to the wrong funeral home just a simple mistake that turned out OK? Or are there are no accidents in the universe and it was meant for him to be there? You decide. He says he wonders too but just doesn’t know. He says he does know he was glad he went — and even then, with all that had gone on before, he still had enough time to go to his friend’s visitation at anoth-er funeral home.Too many logsIn the 1930s, a sturdy log cabin was built near the shore of Lake Montgomery. It was called simply “The Scout Hut,” because local Boy Scouts were the main users of the cabin. First Presbyterian Church pastor, the Rev. Dr. E.F. Montgomery Sr., was placed in charge of the log cabin. He was a natural selection as a community leader in youth pro-grams and our town’s most promi-nent Boy Scout leader. The log cabin became a headquarters for local Scouts. It was an excellent environment for young Scouts to gather and work on their ranks and merit badges. There was even a clear spring nearby where the boys could satisfy their thirst. The Scout Hut was a happy place for many young local boys to enjoy fellowship and grow up and create lasting memories. Then one day the property owner decided he wanted to develop the land and build houses there, so he gave The Scout Hut to Dr. Montgomery. “Dr. Mont” decided to move the cabin to family prop-erty on the Suwannee River, where young campers could continue to enjoy it over the years. Dr. Montgomery, a believer in historic preservation, wanted the cabin to be restored exactly like the original so he numbered every log for perfect restoration and took the logs to the river and rebuilt it. Despite the meticulous planning, when the cabin was finally rebuilt — surprise! — they had several logs left over! Noboody ever noticed the difference. James Montgomery, Rev. Montgomery’s son, can tell you all the details. He was there!Wise and trueMany a child is spoiled because you can’t spank grandpa! 4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. D uring the past year, it has been my great honor to serve as the 2012 President of the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. I have thor-oughly enjoyed my term in office. We’ve had a great year! Thanks to Executive Director Dennille Decker, Marketing Coordinator Abbie Chasteen and Administrative Assistant Sonja Meads for their tireless work every day to make our Chamber the best that it can be. The dedication of our employees and the support of our board of directors made 2012 a memorable and exciting year. I also want to thank my team at the Lake City Reporter for holding things together when I was required to focus on Chamber business. I also am most appreciative of my wife, Michelle, and my daughter, Lauren, for allowing me the time commitment that it takes to serve this outstanding Chamber of Commerce and our community. Our 2012 was a record-setting year at the Chamber of Commerce. We retained 98 percent of our membership during the year. The national average is only 80 percent retention. We appreciate everyone’s dedication to the Chamber. Our events also grew at a record pace during 2012. From the July 4th fire-works display, to Trunk or Treat, to Snow Day, the Christmas Lights Festival, our 5K race and the Chamber Ball Weekend and Golf Tournament, our business partners stepped up with their sponsor-ship and the people have shown up to enjoy these great community events. None of this success could have happened with-out the members’ financial support and dedication to help the Chamber make our community better. Last year, I pledged to lead our organization toward being first and foremost the voice of busi-ness in Columbia County. We did this and have laid positive groundwork for the future. We polled our business members to get their input, and we worked closely with both city and county leaders to calmly express the concerns of our small business members. We’ve opened communication and we’ve built positive relationships. We also traveled to Tallahassee and met with every state legislator in the House and Senate who represent portions of Columbia County. We helped welcome to Lake City several officials with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, and Gov. Rick Scott. I want to thank our board and our business community for embrac-ing my “Think Lake City First!” shop local initiative. I presented this platform as the banner of my presi-dency last year. Let’s carry it forward and remember that if we don’t collectively support our community first, no one else is going to do it for us. We solidified our relationship with The Ichetucknee Partnership and agreed to be the TIP group’s marketing arm. We hired Abbie Chasteen as our marketing coordi-nator and she has done an outstanding job as the TIP administrator. Hopefully you’ve seen the citydonated TIP van and its colorful wrap that brings awareness to water con-servation issues. We’ve ushered Bellamy Beaver, the TIP mascot, through numerous public appearances and helped the TIP group market its message at schools and events across the county. From the Dale Carnegie Management Course to the revamped Leadership Lake City program, to mixers and ribbon cut-tings, there are plenty of opportunities for involve-ment. We need more people to become involved in our community. The Chamber has momentum, and we’ve got plenty of goals to attain this year under the leader-ship of new 2013 presi-dent Joel Foreman. “We” is the key word. No one accomplishes anything on their own. I’m honored to have been the 2012 president. We have a great team in place at the Chamber and I’m excited to serve another year on the board of directors. The Chamber is strong, and it continues to build toward a better future.Chamber presidency an honor Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter. Q Historynet.com Jacquie Hagler and the 17 other women who stared down an armed intruder and sent him scurrying Friday are to be commended for their courage. As recounted on Page 1A of today’s paper, Hagler was hosting a jewelry party at her home when the man entered and put a gun to a guest’s head. At first they weren’t sure it wasn’t a joke. The woman with the pistol at her head brushed it aside, calling it a water gun. The intruder showed her the bullets and threatened to start firing. Then, armed only with what Hagler called “holy boldness,” the women repelled the invader with some pretty powerful words. “Get out, in the name of Jesus,” Hagler shouted at the man. The women then began to chant “Jesus” until the masked gunman, confused and likely somewhat taken aback, turned and ran. Hagler said she felt no fear, only anger.Others there gave similar reports.It is a remarkable story.And while we do not recommend others stand their ground in this fashion when confronted with a loaded handgun, we can’t help but admire the sheer nerve these women displayed. Great work, ladies.But please, stay safe out there. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY

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Jan. 27History programArchaeologist Barbara Hines, of the Florida Public Archaeology Network, will give a brief overview of the Spanish in Florida at 2 p.m. in the Columbia County Main Library at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Hines will talk about Spanish mis-sions in the state, particu-larly Mission San Luis and the Apalachee.Revival weekFirst Full Gospel Church will have a revival program today through Feb. 1, with the Rev. Darren Wilson. Times will be today at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. and Monday through Friday at 7 p.m. The church is on Jonesway, one block off U.S. 90 East, on the left, across from the Boys Club.Music concertGospel singer Larry Ford will perform a free concert at 10:30 a.m. at the Glad Tidings Assembly, 1571 E. Duval St. Ford is a world-renowned tenor who performed with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and appeared on the Bill Gaither TV pro-grams. A love offering will be received. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Church anniversaryShiloh Missionary Baptist Church will have its 71st anniversary cele-bration. The speaker for the morning service will be the Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock. The speaker for the 3 p.m. service will be the Rev. Billy Simon, pastor of Greater Popular Springs MB Church.Jan. 28Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Jan. 29Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Jan. 30Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have a men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. For more information, contact Pastor Bruce Alkire at (386) 755-4299.Children’s programColumbia County Library will have a special program for children in celebra-tion of the 50th birthday of beloved children’s book character Amelia Bedlia. Children will be able to meet Amelia in person. The program will be at 4 p.m. at the Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Jan. 31Senior drivers courseAn AARP Driver Safety Course for Seniors will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Columbia County LifeStyle Enrichment Center, Reading Room, 628 SE Allison Court. Participants should take their own lunch. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. Those who complete the course will receive a certificate of completion, which is good for a discount on automo-bile insurance. Registration is required and may be done by callingl (352) 333-3036.Feb. 1Black History MonthOpening ceremonies for Black History Month in Lake City will be at 6 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center. City officials will present a proc-lamation. There will be registration for activities, nominations for awards and entertainment. For more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 867-1601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmyefforts.org.Feb. 2Civil War eventFort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will hold a Union Garrison history event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi-tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys will bring every part of the Civil Warera to life. Hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.West Virginia DayWest Virginia natives are invited to the 2013 West Virginia Day at Epiphany Church Social Hall on Malone Drive. The event will begin at noon. Bring a covered dish to share. Reservations are required by Jan. 28 and may be made by calling (386) 754-1760.Health fairColumbia County Recreation Department will have its annual Community Health and Wellness Fair at the Richardson Community Center from 9 a.m. to 2 pm. Local physicians will be speaking about health issues, various tests will be available as well as door prizes and giveaways. For more information, contact Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith at (386) 754-7095.Feb. 3Church anniversaryThe Vinyard Baptist Church will celebrate its 60th anniversary with a spe-cial service at 10:30 a.m. in the church, 1832 Tomaka Terrace (off SW Bascom Norris Drive). The speaker will be Brandon Elixson. A covered-dish lunch will follow. For more informa-tion, call Cheryl Thomas at 365-0764.Feb. 4Loans workshopThe UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer-ing a free workshop to discuss Loan and Grant Programs for Small Business and Agricultural Producers with USDA and Florida Office of Energy. The workshop will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Extension Office. Registration deadline is Feb 1. To register or for more information, contact Derek Barber at the Extension Office at (386)752-5384.Feb. 5Musicians to performThe Friends of the Library welcome a perfor-mance by folk music duo Hungrytown at 7 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Musicians Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson will perform music from their two acclaimed albums, “Hungrytown” and “Any Forgotten Thing.” Feb. 6Newcomers lunchThe Lake City Newcomers’ friendship lunch will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Texas Roadhose res-taurant on U.S. 90 West. For more information, contacte Rose Taylor at 755-2175 or Barbara Test at 754-7227.Feb. 8Music concertCountry music singer Tracy Lawrence will per-form at the Florida Gateway College Howard Conference Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lawrencehas amassed 18 No. 1 hits during his career, including “Alibis” and “If the Good Die Young.” For more informa-tion, visit www.fgcentertain-ment.com.Art League exhibitThe Art League of North Florida eighth annual Spring Members Art Exhibit opens today at the Florida Gateway College. The exhibit runs through April 5. An opening recep-tion will be at 6 p.m. at the college’s Alfonso Levi Performing Arts Center. There will be refreshments, original art, an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and an awards pre-sentation. Artists who are not league members but would like to participate are asked to contact Marie Brown at 752-1248 or Sue Hall 755-1109Feb. 9BCU alumni eventThe Columbia County Chapter of Bethune-Cookman University Alumni will hold its Founders Day program at 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Lake City. The speaker, BCU president Dr. Edison Jackson, will speak about “A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence.” The event is semiformal. Donations will be accepted for the univer-sity scholarship fund.Writing programThe Friends of the Library host Liz Coursen in presenting “Self-Editing in the Internet Age: How to Edit Your Words Without Losing Your Mind” at 3:30 p.m. at Columbia County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Whether you’re a full-fledged author or someone who edits your organization’s newsletter or website, learn the ins and outs of punctuation and grammar.Black History MonthBlack History Month organizers will host a “Trip to Freedom” bus trip to Fort Mose at St. Augustine, the first all-black cettle-ment in the United States. The bus will leave at 7a.m. from Richardson Community Center. Cost is $25, which includes entry fees and lunch. To register or for more information, contact the Ambassador Leadership Council at 867-1601, Blondell Johnson at 755-3110 or Bea Coker at 697-6075 or visit online at www.itsaboutmy efforts.org. Annie Mae HollidayAnnie Mae Holliday, 95, went home to be with her Lord and Savior, Friday, January 25, 2013. She was born in Lake City to the late William and Nellie (Cox) Thomas and remained here all of her life. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great & great great grandmother who devoted her time to her family and to the service of her church. She was Secretary at Pine Grove Baptist Church for 17 years and will be deeply missed by her church family. She is preceded in death by her parents, her brothers, Fred Thomas, Rich-ard “Dink” Thomas, and Grady “Buck” Thomas; sisters, Ruth Thomas and Wilma Howell; son, Ellis Holliday and her husband of 32 years, Elmer Holliday. Survivors include her daugh-ter, Nella Mae Richardson; grandchildren, Jimbo (Lisa) Richardson, Marcie (Jerry) Kemp, Kent (Brandy) Hol-liday, and Kim Holliday; great grandchildren, Jacob, Micah, and Ethan Richardson, Brittany and Makenzie Kemp, Eric Holliday and two other great grandchildren; and 2 great great grandchildren; many niec-es and nephews also survive. Funeral services will be con-ducted at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 29, 2013 in the chapel of Gateway-Forest Lawn Fu-neral Home with Pastor Ron 7KRPSVRQRIFLDWLQJ,QWHU ment will follow in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery. Visitation with the family will be Monday evening, Janu-ary 28, 2013 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the funeral home. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Lois Mildred Wheeler RegisterApril 12, 1922 January 24, 2013 (YHQZKHQ,DPROGDQGJUD\GRQRWIRUVDNHPH2*RGWLOO,declare your power to the next generation, Your might to all who are to come. Psalms 71:18 Lois Mildred Wheeler Register, known as “Granny Lois”, died at the Haven Hospice in Lake City, Florida. She was born April 12, 1922 in Needmore, Florida, lo-cated in the North Florida area near Oak Grove. She lived her entire life in Columbia County. Lois was the daughter of the late John Henry and Huron Robinson Wheeler. She was preceded in death by her brothers and sis-ters: Carrie Bell Register, Avvie Mae Bryant, Ola Kapes, Pauline Harden, BM Wheeler, Marvin Wheeler, Buster Wheeler, Elmer Wheeler, Milton Wheeler, Bill Wheeler and Curtis Wheeler. Lois considered herself the rich-est woman in the world because of the love for her children, grandchildren, great grandchil-dren and great-great grandchil-dren, along with her nieces and nephews and all the extended family and friends she acquired through her walk in life. Lois loved to cook and feed anyone who came into her home. Her most loved dishes were fried chicken, fried venison and home-made biscuits, along with her chocolate cream cheese, coconut, hard chocolate and pound cakes. Granny Lois was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, William Bill Register, their 3 children, James Register, Mike Register and Grace Register Sir-kis and son-in-law, Don Suhl. She is survived by her 6 children: Dr. Jerry (Pam) Register; Sonya Suhl, Cindy (Howard) Spradley, Patty Register, daughter-in-law, all of Lake City; Steve (Te-resa) Register of Dade City, FL; Vicky (David) Estep of Yulee, FL; Phyllis (Ralph) Douglas of Providence, FL.; special nieces, Diana Snelgrove (Wayne) and Anna Mae Puttere. Twenty-four grandchildren: Jay Register, Kelly Register, Andy Register, Gordon Register, Lynn Register, Tiffany Register, Terri Bowdoin, Jeff Estep, Amy Chapman, Chris Register, Matt Register, Levi Register, Jessica Register, Will Douglas, Allison Chamberlin, Tony Creel, Andy Creel, Cin-dy Lynn Lang, April Register, Crystal Register, Jennifer Be-denbaugh, DJ Suhl, Ashley Reg-ister, and Candace Register. 34 great-grandchildren and 3 great-great grandchildren also survive. Visitation with the family will be held at Christ Central Ministries of Lake City from 1pm – 2pm with services beginning at 2pm on Monday, January 28, 2013. Dr. Robert Harden (nephew) and Andy Register (grandson) ZLOOEHRIFLDWLQJ%XULDOZLOObe in the Oak Grove Cemetery. ,QOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVmay be made to Oak Grove Cemetery, 249 SE Mohawk Way, Lake City, Florida 32055 or to the Suwannee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice) 6039 U.S. Hwy 90 West, Lake City, Florida, 32055.Arrange-ments are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, INC. 3596 S US Hwy 441, Lake City FL (386-752-1954). Please send words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 5A5A Sandals ...20-30% off WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots...Boots...Boots GALORE Tumblers Get Ready for Cold Weather Camo Jackets, Coveralls, Shirts Lake City352-374-4534426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterHeavy liftingKyle Shannon (top), 21, pulls on a 500-pound log traile r axle as his brother, Austin, 18, pushes it off of his shoulders. ‘It was really heavy, but we gotta get the job done,’ Austin sa id.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Happy 40th Anniversary Bob and Olivia Greene Love, Matt, Mike and Family Thera Smith Mayo Mom, it has been 3 years since you completed your journey on this earth. The Bible says that man is a spirit and we surely know this is true, because your spirit lives on in each of us. Thank you for being a great mother, wife and friend. We will continue to celebrate your life and love you for the gift that keeps givingour memories. We love you and miss you dearly. May you continue to Rest in Peace The Mayo & Smith Family Albert (Husband) Annie Mae Smith (Mother) Children: Felicia (Forrest), Antoinette (Walter), Eric (Tracy) and Alonzo Grandchildren: Wesley, Kendall, Cori, Eryn and Madison Family Pets: Bonzy and Mieke FACES & PLACES Scenes from Saturdays Chamber of Commerce Ball at at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Bee Boyle (left) and Janet Kuykendall. Matt Megrath and Allison Megrath Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter Laurie Evans (from left), Robert Evans, Blaiyze Neeley and Jazan Neeley. Dusty Markham (from left), Gloria Markham and Todd Sampson. Rob Carter (from left), Sherri Cassidy and Lisa Pinkham. Jo Haley (left) and Jimbo Haley. Amber Tompkins and Dale Tompkins. Brian Sganga and Melinda Sganga. Barbee Kight and Jason Kight.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 7A7A SPEAKERS INCLUDE Wv]oD' of the River Church in Tampa. ZŒ]DPŒ} of Future Now Ministries, ZXsXŒ}vU associate evangelist with the Billy Graham Crusades, :]u,Œš and Œ}o> Worship Music will be provided by Your local churches. ^ZŒ]vP'K[o}]v}šZ‰ŒŸov‰]Œ]šo Xvš sponsored by Crusades for Christ Tent Ministry. Call 386-623-6189 for more info... Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter CHAMBER BALLActivities at Saturday’s Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Ball at the County Fairgrounds. Scott Middleton (second from left), owner of North Florida Pharmacy, poses for a photo-graph with ‘Pat,’ the Chamber Champion traveling trophy, after submitting the winning bid of $1,200 for it during a live auction Saturday. With him are Chamber Executive Director Dennille Decker (left) and 2013 Chamber President Joel Foreman. ‘This is a big honor,’ Middleton said. ‘Lake City has been good to me. The county has ral-lied behind me. I have great business partners. Without the Chamber of Commerce, I wouldn’t be where I am at now.’ Retiring Director Jim Moses (right) accepts a plaque fro m 2013 Chamber President Joel Foreman. Joel Foreman, 2013 Lake City-Chamber of Commerce presi-dent, delivers a speech to a group of nearly 400 during the Chamber Ball Saturday. Newly elected Chamber President Joel Foreman (left) pres ents a plaque to retiring Chamber Director Rod Butler. Incoming 2013 Chamber President Joel Foreman (right) presents a plaque to outgoing 2012 Chamber President To dd WIlson.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Apply online atcampuscu.comor call754-9088and press 4 today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties!2APR Fixed1 % Bust out of your 30-year mortgage! IN 10 YEARS Free ’n Clear TOTAL CLOSING COSTS1(Loans of $200,000 or less)10-year FIXED APR1 First Mortgage(Please call for other rates & terms) Apply Now! 1.Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offe r is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate proper ty valuation and first mortgage position are requir ed. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mo bile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months wo uld require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and o ne final payment of $1,022.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a total of payments of $123,151 .93. The amount financed is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit appro val and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention thi s ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee.This credit union is federally insured by the Natio nal Credit Union Administration.5and 15-year rates and terms also available! Pay off your homein10 years!

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, January 27, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterAnnual Chamber of Commerce Tournament a successABOVE LEFT : John Durrett (from left) and Tony Broome watch as Chambe r president-elect Joel Foreman putts at hole No. 12 while participating in the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament at The Country Club of Lake Ci ty on Friday. Twenty-four teams consisting of 96 people took part in the event. ABOVE RIGHT : Ben Dow, of Gainesville, tees off while participating in the Chamber Golf Tournament at The Country Club at Lake Ci ty. ‘The hospitality is great,’ he said. ‘ This is a great course and you have great people around.’ More photos on page 5B. Fort White clinches top seed BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javonta Foster drives toward the basket against Lee High in Jacksonville on Friday. Tigers close out district BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Morris Marshall puts up a shot agains t Lee High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Paul Perry soars through the air while making a lay-up against Williston High on Wednesday.Indians knock off Santa Fe, 78-70 CHS commands Generals, 63-48 By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comJACKSONVILLE — Columbia High closed out the District 4-6A portion of its regular season sched-ule the same way it has closed out most of its dis-trict opponents this year on Friday against Lee High — with a 63-48 win over the Generals. “It was a game going into it that we felt like we should win and we were able to,” Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. “We kind of went into the game trying to get on a roll in the district. We have a couple of games left now on our schedule to experiment going into the district tournament.” One of the changes came into effect against the Generals as Akeem Williams was transported into the starting lineup for the Tigers. Jefferson is looking for another defensive specialist and Williams was able to help hold Lee throughout the night. He was also a contributer on the offensive end with eight points. “He’s our stopper,” Jefferson said. “We needed another defensive guy in our starting lineup. He’s able to do that for us.” Columbia was also pretty CHS continued on 6B By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFort White High got back to its winning ways with a 78-70 win against rival Santa Fe High on Friday after fall-ing against Williston High earlier in the week. The win clinched the No. 1 seed for the Indians in the district. The Indians jumped out to a 21-14 lead and never looked back in the win. Fort White was only outscored in one quarter when Santa Fe pulled within seven points to start the fourth quarter after a 24-20 third. Melton Sanders led the Indians in scoring with 17 points in the contest and three more Fort White players were able to reach double digits in the game. Chris Cotrell and Jalen Wyche each had 16 points INDIANS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 9 a.m. SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, 24 Hours at Daytona, end of race, at Daytona Beach, Fla. BOWLING Noon ESPN — PBA, league play, round 1, at Allen Park, Mich. CYCLING 12:30 p.m. NBCSN — Tour Down Under, final stage, at Adelaide, Australia EXTREME SPORTS 2 p.m. ESPN — X Games, at Aspen, Colo. 9 p.m. ESPN — X Games, at Aspen, Colo. FIGURE SKATING 3 p.m. NBC — U.S. Championships, at Omaha, Neb. GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, at San Diego 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, at San Diego MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Michigan St. at Indiana 3:30 p.m. FSN — California at Colorado NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC — Miami at Boston 3:30 p.m. ABC — Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers 6:30 p.m. ESPN — Atlanta at New York NFL FOOTBALL 7 p.m. NBC — Pro Bowl, at Honolulu NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN — Minnesota at St. Louis WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN — TCU at Texas Tech 2 p.m. ESPN2 — North Carolina at Miami 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Purdue at Michigan St. Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Pittsburgh at LouisvilleNBCSN — Delaware at Drexel 9 p.m. ESPN — Kansas at West Virginia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Notre Dame at TennesseeFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 2OTSan Francisco 45, Green Bay 31Atlanta 30, Seattle 28New England 41, Houston 28 Conference Championships Sunday San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24Baltimore 28, New England13 Pro Bowl Sunday At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansBaltimore vs. San Francisco, 6 p.m. (CBS)BASKETBALLNBA Glance Friday’s Games Washington 114, Minnesota 101Atlanta 123, Boston 111,2OTCleveland 113, Milwaukee 108Miami 110, Detroit 88San Antonio 113, Dallas 107 Chicago 103, Golden State 87Memphis 101, Brooklyn 77Houston 100, New Orleans 82Oklahoma City 105, Sacramento 95L.A. Lakers 102, Utah 84 Today’s Games Miami at Boston, 1 p.m.Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. New Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m.Detroit at Orlando, 6 p.m.Atlanta at New York, 6:30 p.m.Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.HOCKEYNHL Games Friday’s Games Boston 4, N.Y. Islanders 2Carolina 3, Buffalo 1New Jersey 3, Washington 2, OTTampa Bay 6, Ottawa 4Detroit 5, Minnesota 3Winnipeg 4, Pittsburgh 2Vancouver 5, Anaheim 0 Today’s Games Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m.Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 5 p.m.New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.Vancouver at San Jose, 8 p.m.TENNISAustralian Open seeds Monday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Singles Women Championship Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Li Na (6), China, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. Doubles Men Championship Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Robin Haase and Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-4. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS INDIANS: Are No. 1 district seed Continued From Page 1B BRIEFS YOUTH BASKETBALL USSSA travel team sign-up Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc. has announced tryouts at Richardson Community Center for its seventhand 10th-grade USSSA travel basketball teams. Tryouts for seventh-grade (ages 11-14) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb.13, 15, 20 and 22; tryouts for 10-grade (ages 14-17) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb. 12, 14, 19 and 21. Permission/waver forms must be signed by a parent or guardian. Twelve players will be chosen for each team and contacted by phone. Fee for players selected is $60,due by March 1. For details, call Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith at 754-7096 or 754-7095. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Alumni game festivities set The Fort White High School Baseball Program is sponsoring the 2nd Annual FWHS Baseball Alumni Game on Feb. 2. Any alumni interested in playing can contact coach Mike Rizzi or Jeanne Howell. There will be a hit-a-thon and a fast throw competition starting at 11 a.m. Barbecue pork sandwich plates will be sold for $6 each starting at 11 a.m. The game will begin at 1 p.m. There will be merchandise tables, and all proceeds go to the Dugout Club to help cover costs for middle school, junior varsity and varsity baseball. For details, call Howell at 288-5537. ARCHERY Education course for bowhunters The Florida Bowhunter Education Course can be taken by completing an online, distance-learning component, followed by attending a field class. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hunter safety personnel have scheduled the field day from 8 a.m. until noon on Feb. 2. Students of all ages may participate; however, an adult must accompany those younger than 16. Participants should bring all equipment, including bow and arrows. Students should register for the course in advance by calling the FWC regional office in Lake City at 758-0525. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up open The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Feb. 16. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most outgoing and fun-filled outfit. The first runner to break 19 minutes will receive $100, and there will be raffle prizes. Registration is open at active.com; the fee will increase the day of the race. For details, call Michelle at (386) 208-2447.Tortoise 5k run/walk at O’Leno The fifth annual Race the Tortoise 5k run/walk is 8 a.m. March 2 at O’Leno State Park on U.S. Highway 41-441, 17 miles south of Lake City. Entry fee through Feb. 14 is $10 for ages 14 and younger and $20 for all others ($25 after Feb.14). Entry to the park is free for registered runners. The race is limited to the first 300 registrants, and all will receive a T-shirt. Proceeds go to O’Leno State Park. To register go to www. friendsofoleno.org and click 5K Run. For details, call Cindy Preston at 454-0723. CHS FOOTBALL Quarterback Club pheasant shoot Allen & Son Quail Farm and the Columbia County Quarterback Club, is sponsoring a pheasant hunt on Feb. 9 at Robert Louis Green Farm, 12 miles north of Lake City. Ticket cost for the shooting stations is $250 (20-shooter limit), which includes runners to pick up birds, dressing out birds and any tipping. Back-up shooters will be charged $75. Shooters should arrive no later than noon, and there will be a safety meeting and home-cooked meal before the shoot begins. No license or permit is needed; No. 5 shot is recommended. For details, call Leronia Allen at 754-9127 or Christofer Piercey at 288-9631. Ducks Unlimited District Chairman Jimmy Sparks is working with Allen on the pheasant shoot. Call Sparks at 752-9589. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games moved to Feb. 2 Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Feb. 2. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. YOUTH BASEBALL Fort White Babe Ruth registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball registration for its spring league is at the South Columbia Sports Complex concession stand from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Feb. 2, and 4-7 p.m. on Jan. 29 and Feb. 7. League costs for age groups are 4-6 (T-ball) $45, 7-8 $55, 9-10 $65, 11-12 $75 and 13-15 $85. A birth certificate is required if a child has not previously played in the Fort White leagues. Coaches are needed and can register on the same dates. For details, call Chris Sharpe at (386) 292-4224.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterWilliston High’s Tre Williams attempts to stop a lay-up m ade by Fort White High’s Mike Mulberry Wednesday. and Paul Perry finished the game with 13 points. Trey Phillips finished wtih seven points and Mike Mulberry had five points in the contest. Fort White is 12-2 on the season while Santa Fe falls to 8-12. The Indians end the regular season when they travel to Columbia High at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday.Lady Indians basketballA game that saw a slow first half quickly turned into a shootout as Fort White High defeated Suwannee High, 51-34, to close out the regular season. The teams played to a 12-12 tie in the first half before the Lady Indians got hot to pull away in the sec-ond half. Tasha Robinson led the Lady Indians with 22 points in the contest. Kayshanique Cook was the only other Fort White player in double digits as she finished with 14 points in the game. Daysha Bandy led the Lady Bulldogs with 14 points. Fort White will take on Interlachen High at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday at Bradford High in the dis-trict tournament. The Lady Indians are the No. 3 seed.Lady Tigers basketballThree Columbia High players scored in double digits, but it wasn’t enough for the Lady Tigers to overcome a slow start as Lafayette High defeated Columbia, 53-46, on Friday. Marnae Gaskins scored 16 points, Justice Campbell had 15 points and Akiria Richburg had 11 points for the Lady Tigers. Columbia trailed 33-20 at the half before outscoring Lafayette 13-9 in the third quarter and 13-11 in the fourth quarter to end the regular season.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 3B3BSPORTSRMS crowned champions JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterStar Conference championsRichardson Middle School’s Shaniyah Chatmon snatches a rebound while playing Madison Thursday. The Lady Wol ves defeated Madison 38-24 to claim the Star Conference C hampionship for the third time in four years. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson’s Maya Clark (41) and Aumaria Gibson (3) beat Madison’s Travecia Fead to a rebound during their championship win on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson Middle School’s Aumaria Gibson looks for an open player as she tries to move around Madison’s Shakera Cook. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRichardson Middle School’s Aumaria Gibson plays defe nse against Madison’s Joise Long. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMadison’s Shakera Cook frantically looks to distract Ric hardson’s Deonna Munnerlyn during a game on Thursday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 4BSportsIndians on top of district JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterWilliston High’s Earl Brown fails to stop Fort White High’ s Melton Sanders as he drives down the court on Wednes day. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Jalen Wyche attempts to make a shot aroun d Williston High’s Tre Wilson during a game on Wednesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips makes a lay-up while p laying against Williston High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Paul Perry makes a jump shot during W ednesday’s game against Williston High.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 5B5BSports Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterABOVE : Chris Pottle tees off at hole No. 13 while participating i n the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament at The Country Club of Lake City on Friday. Twenty-four teams consisting of 96 people took part in the event. BELOW : Lake City resident Robert Ford whacks the ball down the green as he tees off on hole No. 12 during the Chamber Golf Tournament Friday. Azarenka defends Australian OpenBy JOHN PYEAssociated PressMELBOURNE, Australia — Victoria Azarenka had the bulk of the crowd against her. The fireworks were fizzling out, and when she looked over the net she saw Li Na crashing to the court and almost knocking herself out. Considering the cascading criticism she’d encoun-tered after her previous win, Azarenka didn’t need the focus of the Australian Open final to be on another medical timeout. So after defending her title with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 victo-ry over the sixth-seeded Li in one of the most unusual finals ever at Melbourne Park, Azarenka understand-ably dropped her racket and cried tears of relief late Saturday night. She heaved as she sobbed into a towel beside the court, before regaining her composure to collect the trophy. “It isn’t easy, that’s for sure, but I knew what I had to do,” the 23-year-old Belarusian said. “I had to stay calm. I had to stay positive. I just had to deal with the things that came onto me.” There were a lot of those things squeezed into the 2-hour, 40-minute match. Li, who was playing her sec-ond Australian Open final in three years, twisted her ankle and tumbled to the court in the second and third sets. The second time was on the point immediately after a 10-minute delay for the Australia Day fireworks — a familiar fixture in down-town Melbourne on Jan. 26, but not usually coinciding with a final. Li had been sitting in her chair during the break, while Azarenka jogged and swung her racket around before leaving the court to rub some liniment into her legs to keep warm. The 30-year-old Chinese player had tumbled to the court after twisting her left ankle and had it taped after falling in the fifth game of the second set. Immediately after the fireworks ceased, and with smoke still in the air, she twisted the ankle again, fell and hit the back of her head on the hard court. The 2011 French Open champion was treated immediately by a tourna-ment doctor and assessed for a concussion in anoth-er medical timeout before resuming the match. “I think I was a little bit worried when I was falling,” Li said, in her humorous, self-deprecating fashion. “Because two seconds I couldn’t really see anything. It was totally black. “So when the physio come, she was like, ‘Focus on my finger.’ I was laugh-ing. I was thinking, ‘This is tennis court, not like hospital.’” Li’s injury was obvious and attracted even more support for her from the 15,000-strong crowd. Azarenka had generated some bad PR by taking a medical timeout after wast-ing five match points on her own serve in her semi-final win over American teenager Sloane Stephens on Thursday. She came back after the break and finished off Stephens in the next game, later telling an on-court interviewer that she “almost did the choke of the year.” She was accused of gamesmanship and manip-ulating the rules to get time to regain her compo-sure against Stephens, but defended herself by saying she actually was having dif-ficulty breathing because of a rib injury that needed to be fixed. That explanation didn’t convince everybody. So when she walked onto Rod Laver Arena on Saturday, there were some people who booed, and others who heckled her or mimicked the distinctive hooting sound she makes when she hits the ball. “Unfortunately, you have to go through some rough patches to achieve great things,” she said. “That’s what makes it so special for me. I went through that, and I’m still able to kiss that beautiful trophy.” She didn’t hold a grudge. “I was expecting way worse, to be honest. What can you do? You just have to go out there and try to play tennis in the end of the day,” she said. “It’s a tennis match, tennis battle, final of the Australian Open. I was there to play that. “The things what happened in the past, I did the best thing I could to explain, and it was left behind me already.” The match contained plenty of nervy moments and tension, and 16 service breaks — nine for Li. But it also produced plenty of winners and bravery on big points. Today’s men’s final features two-time defending champion Novak Djokovic and U.S. Open winner Andy Murray. Djokovic is seek-ing to become the first man in the Open era to win three titles in a row in Australia. ASSOCIATED PRESSVictoria Azarenka hugs her trophy after winning the wome n’s final against China’s Li Na at the Australian Open te nnis championship in Melbourne, Australia on Saturday.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS (386) 755-0601 cccnf.com Follow us on Dedicated to providing more advanced treatment options for cancer patients. Breakthroughs in chemotherapy and systemic treatments now allow for more precisely targeted procedures with fewer side effects, giving patients the competitive edge in the battle against cancer. www.sb.com R OXANNE M AXSON 755-0600 ext. 3945 NMLS ID# 457358 W ILLETTE S IST R UNK 755-0600 ext. 3520 NMLS ID# 457315 2571 W US Hwy 90 4705 W US Hwy 90 707 SW Main Blvd M ITCH B R O W N 755-0600 ext. 3905 NMLS ID# 457328 R O BB B U R NS 755-0600 ext. 3540 NMLS ID# 457332 N ED R A H O R TON 755-0600 ext. 3301 NMLS ID# 613834 DEDICATED TO M AKING YOU R D R EA M S A R EALITY A CTUAL F I R ST F EDE R AL M O R TGAGE C USTO M E R CO MM ENTS EQUA L HOU SIN G L E ND ER BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Morris Marshall drives to the basket against Lee High on Friday for an easy basket. The Tigers commanded the Generals in a 63-48 win in District 4-6A play in Jacksonville. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Akeem Williams is surrounded by two Lee High defenders during the Tigers 63-58 win on Friday in Jacksonville. CHS: Beats Lee, 63-48 Continued From Page 1B good on the offensive side against Lee. Three Tigers scored in double figures on the night. Tre Simmons led all play ers in the contest with 18 points. He had nine in each half. Morris Marshall had 14 points and Javonta Foster had 12 points. I thought Marshall played a big game like he usually does, but Simmons played extremely well tonight, Jefferson said. Every time I watch him I realize more and more just how quick he is with the ball in his hands. Hes got a great court presence and is playing phenomenal. Columbia commanded the game from the begin ning with a 15-10 lead after the first quarter. The Tigers made the games first two baskets and never trailed in the contest. The Tigers held onto a five-point lead at the half and Lee cut the lead to three going into the fourth quarter as Columbia only led 46-43, but depth took over for Columbia. Tonight is a game that we should have won according to the records, Jefferson said. Were the No. 2 seed and theyre kind of young this year, but thats the way they play everyone this year. Columbia is 13-5 (8-2, district) after Fridays win against Lee (3-15). Columbia will now turn its effort to Fort White High as the Tigers take a break from district play before the district tournament begins at Atlantic Coast on Feb. 4. We turn our attention now to the rivalry games, Jefferson said. Right now were playing pretty good. Were in our element. Thats the way that we want to be playing at this point in the year. Columbia will be the No. 2 seed in the district tournament and will have a first round bye after losing only two games both to Wolfson High in the dis trict this season.

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Lake City Reporter Week of January 27-March 2, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc.By CAROLE FELDMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Taxpayers preparing to file their 2012 returns can breathe a collective sigh of relief. The alternative minimum tax or AMT has been patched — permanently — and several tax credits and deductions that technically expired at the end of 2011 were extended as part of the fiscal cliff legislation that Congress passed and President Barack Obama signed into law in January. “It certainly puts back into place many of the tax benefits that had expired for many peo-ple,” said Mark Steber, chief tax officer with Jackson Hewitt Tax Services. “The extenders will be back on people’s tax returns, making their 2012 refunds larger than they would have been.” But the delay in congressional action could mean confusion for some taxpayers over what credits and deductions still exist. That could make going it alone on tax day costly. Experts say people should seek some guid-ance, whether it’s from a pro-fessional tax preparer, up-to-date software programs or tax guides, before filing returns. More than 90 percent of taxpayers go to a tax preparer or use tax software to file their returns, estimated Jim Buttonow, a 20-year IRS veteran who is now vice president of products for New River Innovation, a tax technol-ogy company.IRS getting readyThe Internal Revenue Service will begin accepting returns Jan. 30, an eight-day delay necessi-tated by the late congressional action. “We have worked hard to open tax season as soon as possible,” IRS Acting Commissioner Steven T. Miller said in a statement. “This date ensures we have the time we need to update and test our processing systems.” The agency said most taxpayers — more than 120 million households — would be able to begin filing Jan. 30. But filing for those claiming energy cred-its, depreciation of property or general business credits will be delayed until late February or March. Last year, the agency received 137 million returns. Electronic filing increased by 6.2 percent to 113 million in 2012, an upward trend that tax experts expect to continue. Although most electronically filed returns are by tax professionals, increas-ing percentages of individuals are doing their own returns elec-tronically. Nearly 104 million people received refunds last year total-ing about $283 billion. The aver-age refund was $2,707, slightly less than the year before, accord-ing to the IRS.Standard deduction risesAs people sit down to do their taxes this year, they’ll find that the standard deduction has been adjusted higher for inflation, to $11,900 for married couples fil-ing jointly, $8,700 for heads of households and $5,950 for single taxpayers. About two-thirds of taxpayers claim the standard deduction, according to Barbara Weltman, an author of J.K. Lasser’s Tax Guide 2013. Each personal exemption is worth $3,800 this year, up from $3,700 in 2011. Look expansively at dependents beyond your chil-dren under 19, or 24 if in college. For example, if you’re paying more than half the support for your parents and their taxable income is less than the $3,800 exemption, you might be able to claim them as dependents even if they’re not living in your own home. “If a parent’s only income is It’s tax time again ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSDressed as the Statue of Liberty, part-time employee, Zidkija h Zabad, waves to passing motorists while holding a sign to advertise for Liberty Tax Service in Los Ange les on Tuesday. Congress extended credits, deductions; larger refunds likely For Baby Boomers, changing family dynamic may spell relief By CAROLE FELDMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Members of the sandwich generation — caught between supporting elderly parents whose assets are nearly exhausted and adult chil-dren without jobs — might find some relief come tax time. The bottom line is, who’s a dependent? Your kindergarten-age son, your adult daughter, her grandparents, or maybe an elderly uncle or aunt? “There’s a changing family dynamic because of the econo-my,” said Bob Meighan, vice president of TurboTax, an online tax preparation service. More people are living longer. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of older Americans increased by 9.7 per-cent from 2000 to 2010, when there were about 40 million people age 65 or older. A lon-ger lifespan puts added strain on retirement accounts, which have already taken a hit in the roller-coaster economy. As a result, many baby boomers find themselves supporting their elderly parents, in some cases footing the bill for assisted living or nursing home care. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate for young adults age 20 to 24 was 13.7 percent in December, considerably higher than the overall rate of 7.8 percent. Unable to find work, many young adults are returning home — or never leaving, relying on mom and dad for food, lodging and more. What does this mean for taxes? “A lot of filers are going to have to pay particular attention,” Meighan said. More people may By BERNARD CONDONAP Business WritersNEW YORK — Five years after the start of the Great Recession, the toll is terrifyingly clear: Millions of middle-class jobs have been lost in developed countries the world over. And the situation is even worse than it appears. Most of the jobs will never return, and millions more are likely to vanish as well, say experts who study the labor market. What’s more, these jobs aren’t just being lost to China and other developing countries, and they aren’t just factory work. Increasingly, jobs are disappearing in the service sector, home to two-thirds of all workers. They’re being obliterated by technology. Year after year, the software that runs computers and an array of other machines and devices becomes more sophisticat-ed and powerful and capa-ble of doing more efficient-ly tasks that humans have always done. For decades, science fiction warned of a future when we would be architects of our own obso-lescence, replaced by our machines; an Associated Press analysis finds that the future has arrived.Not coming back“The jobs that are going away aren’t coming back,” says Andrew McAfee, principal research sci-entist at the Center for Digital Business at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and co-author of “Race Against the Machine.” ‘’I have never seen a period where com-puters demonstrated as many skills and abilities as they have over the past seven years.” The global economy is being reshaped by machines that generate and analyze vast amounts of data; by devices such as smartphones and tablet computers that let people work just about anywhere, even when they’re on the move; by smarter, nimbler robots; and by services that let businesses rent com-puting power when they need it, instead of install-ing expensive equipment and hiring IT staffs to run it. Whole employment cat-egories, from secretaries to travel agents, are starting to disappear. “There’s no sector of the economy that’s going to get a pass,” says Martin Ford, who runs a software com-pany and wrote “The Lights in the Tunnel,” a book predicting widespread job losses. “It’s everywhere.” The numbers startle even labor economists. In the United States, half the 7.5 million jobs lost dur-ing the Great Recession were in industries that pay middle-class wages, ranging from $38,000 to $68,000. But only 2 per-cent of the 3.5 million jobs gained since the recession ended in June 2009 are in midpay industries. Nearly 70 percent are in low-pay industries, 29 percent in industries that pay well. In the 17 European countries that use the euro as their currency, the numbers are even worse. Almost 4.3 million low-pay jobs have been gained since mid-2009, but the loss of mid-pay jobs has never stopped. ASSOCIATED PRESSRosser Pryor, co-owner and president of Factory Automation Systems, sits next to a new high-performance industrial robot at the company’s Atlanta facility. Pryor, who cut 40 of 100 workers since the recession, says while the company is making more money now and could hire 10 people, it is holding back in favor of investing in automation and software. Millions will never return to former careers.Recession, technology kill middle-class jobs TAXES continued on 2C BOOMERS continued on 2C RESET continued on 3C H&R Block Tax preparer Tracey Wales, right, works w ith customer Muneer Sheikh, on preparing his taxes, at H&R Block office in Washington.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 27, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY TAXES: Many rule changes to adapt to this year Continued From Page 1CSocial Security, chances are little or none of the Social Security will be taxable. Otherwise, very few peo-ple would get to claim a parent,” said Jackie Perlman, principal tax research analyst with H&R Block’s Tax Institute. Single taxpayers with qualified children or relatives as dependents also may be able to use head of household filing status, which is more advantageous to the taxpayer. There also are higher mileage rate deductions — 55.5 cents per mile if you use your car for business, 23 cents per mile for moving or medi-cal issues and 14 cents a mile for charity. Capital gains rates are unchanged from 2011 — a maximum of 15 per-cent for assets held more than a year. And don’t forget planning for retirement. You can contribute up to $5,000 to a traditional individual retirement account — $6,000 for people age 50 and older — and reduce their income by that amount. If you haven’t made a contribution yet, there’s still time. You have until April 15, the tax filing deadline. Be aware, however. Many deductions and credits phase out at higher incomes.Saved from the clifDozens of credits and deductions that affect 2012 taxes had been due to expire at the end of 2011, but were extended as part of the legislation that restored the Bush-era tax cuts for most taxpayers. The measure breathed new life into deductions for state and local sales taxes and an array of educa-tion-related credits and deductions. Not to mention the lack of an AMT patch. “There was broad bipartisan agreement it had to be fixed,” Steber said. Originally set up to make sure millionaires were paying taxes, the AMT was ensnaring increasing num-bers of middle-class taxpayers. To avoid that, the tax has been adjusted for inflation every year, but the last patch expired at the end of 2011. Without a new one, Miller said in a letter to Congress last fall, about 33 million taxpayers would have to pay the AMT in 2012, up from about 4 million in 2011. Congress, as part of the fiscal cliff bill, passed a permanent fix for the AMT. Going forward, it will be indexed according to inflation. For 2012, the AMT exemption is $50,600 for unmarried individuals and $78,750 for joint filers. “It’s just not that they passed the threshold amount and indexed it for inflation,” said Kathy Pickering, executive director of H&R Block’s Tax institute. “The other nugget in there is that the nonrefundable cred-its are allowed.” That means filers subject to the AMT may still be able to use these credits, as long as their income doesn’t exceed the phaseout limits. The fiscal cliff bill signed by Obama also extends the $1,000 per child tax credit, the expanded earned income tax credit and the credit for adopting a child. Several education-related credits and deductions also were extended in the legislation. The American Opportunity Tax Credit can be worth up to $2,500 for college tuition. The credit, which can be claimed for each of the first four years of college, was extended through 2017. Elementary and sec-ondary school teachers will still be able to deduct up to $250 of their out-of-pocket expenses for the class-room. And taxpayers will have the choice of deducting state and local sales taxes instead of state and local income taxes. This is especially important to residents of states like Florida, which doesn’t have an income tax. Knowing what tax credits and benefits you’re eligible for is key. No one wants to pay more than is required in taxes. “You certainly want to understand the tax law,” Steber said. “Look to life changes” like retirement, losing a job, getting married, having a child or an elderly parent moving in as events that can affect your taxes.Special disaster reliefFor people in the Northeast, Superstorm Sandy certainly was a life-changing event. State officials have estimated the total damage at more than $80 billion, most of it in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Tax law allows victims in federally declared disaster areas to file casualty claims in the year the incident hap-pened or file an amended return for the previous year. If they don’t have all the material they need yet to file 2012 returns, they can amend their 2011 return now to include the casualty losses. “It’s one of the unique things about those disaster areas,” Pickering said. That’s just one of the reasons people file amended returns. Amended returns are often filed when taxpayers discover discrepan-cies in the income that was reported. Sometimes they receive a 1099 form late or a corrected one after they filed their returns. Or they may discover that they didn’t take a deduction or credit to which they were entitled. Some people are reluctant to file amended returns out of fear that they might be audited. Mark Luscombe, principal tax analyst for CCH, said the IRS closely guards statistics on what type of returns invite audits. “An amended return would not necessarily be an invitation for an audit,” he said. “It depends what’s contained in there,” said Greg Rosica, a partner at Ernst & Young. BOOMERS: Some relief Continued From Page 1Crely on tax software to help get them through the dependency issue. Depending on the individual circumstances, a tax-payer may be able to claim both their parents and their children as dependents. “The rules are very protaxpayer,” said Mark Steber, chief tax officer at Jackson-Hewitt Tax Services. If you are taking care of someone and the IRS defines that clearly — age, income, resi-dency tests and support — you should be able to claim the exemption, he says. It comes down to the definition of dependent. The Internal Revenue Service makes a distinction between a qualifying child and a qualifying relative. To be a qualifying child, the person would have to be a child, stepchild, foster child or sibling, and under the age of 19, or 24 if in college, who has lived with you for at least half the year. The taxpayer would have to provide at least half the support. A qualifying relative can be a child who doesn’t meet the qualifying child require-ment, a parent or steppar-ent, grandparent, niece or nephew, aunt or uncle or in-laws, according to the IRS. They do not necessar-ily have to live with you, but you do have to provide at least half the support for that person. And that person’s income cannot exceed the personal exemp-tion — $3,800 in 2012. “Unlike a qualifying child, a qualifying relative can be any age,” the IRS says in its Publication 17. Taxpayers can take an exemption of $3,800 for each qualified child or rela-tive who is a dependent. Here are some examples from the IRS: Q “Your mother received $2,400 in Social Security benefits and $300 in inter-est. She paid $2,000 for lodging and $400 for rec-reation.” If you spend more than $2,400 to support her, supplementing what she spends, and her annual income is less than $3,800, you can claim her as a dependent and take the full value of the exemption. Q “Your brother’s daughter takes out a student loan of $2,500 and uses it to pay her college tuition. She is personally responsible for the loan. You provide $2,000 toward her total sup-port. You cannot claim an exemption for her because you provide less than half of her support.” Usually the items that go into determining support are the cost of housing, food, clothing and medical costs, including doctor bills and medicine But it’s not just the personal exemption that could help taxpayers. Individual taxpayers might qualify and get the “extra benefit” of fil-ing as head of households if they legally can claim chil-dren, parents or relatives as a dependent, said Jackie Perlman, principal tax research analyst for H&R Block For example, the 15 percent tax bracket applies to taxable income up to $47,350 for heads of households and $35,350 for individual returns. At the 25 percent tax bracket, it’s $133,300 for heads of households and $85,650 for single filers. Steber said taxpayers have to understand that it’s not just nuclear family mem-bers who might qualify. Think beyond children and parents. If you’re providing half the support for an aunt or uncle, niece or nephew, whose income for the year was under $3,800 you may be able to claim them as dependents. ASSOICATED PRESSBob Meighan, vice president of the online tax preparation service, TurboTax, is one of the few people happy that tax season has arrived.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 27, 2013 3C NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN As promised, the Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown now invites you to join us for the upcoming 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show. Vendor indoor booths, and Outdoor space set-up, will be on Friday March 1st. 2013 (beginning at 8:00 AM). Please plan to complete your set-up by 4:00 PM on Friday March 1st. Show times are: Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 10 AM4PM. ATTENTION VENDORS trr1PUFOUJBM$VTUPNFSTt'SFF1BSLJOHBOE"ENJUUBODFGPSBMMt"MMnQSPDFFETGPSUIFFWFOUHPCBDLUPDPNNVOJUZ If we receive your check post marked by 1/25/2013, you will receive a FREE 1/8 page ad in the Home Show Program published by Lake City ReporterPlease mail checks and contracts to:5)&305"3:$-6#0'-",&$*5:%08/508/ PO Box 2334 Lake City, Florida 32056http://rotarydowntown.com 5IFOVNCFSPGWFOEPSTCZJOEVTUSZHSPVQBSFMJNJUFE %POU%FMBZ4JHO6Q5PEBZ Austin Seay (386) 288-8217 Battery’s limitations holding back progress By SETH BORENSTEINAP Science WriterWASHINGTON — As 21st century technology strains to become ever faster, cleaner and cheaper, an invention from more than 200 years ago keeps hold-ing it back. It’s why electric cars aren’t clogging the roads and why Boeing’s new ultra-efficient 787 Dreamliners aren’t flying high. And chances are you have this little invention next to you right now and probably have cursed it recently: the infernal battery. Boeing is the first company to make extensive use in an airliner of technology’s most advanced battery — lithium ion. But a Jan. 7 battery fire aboard a Dreamliner in Boston, followed by a similar meltdown in Japan, led authori-ties around the world to ground the fleet this month, highlighting a longstanding safety problem that engineers have struggled with. In 2006 and 2007, more than 46 million cellphone batteries and 10 million laptop batteries — all lithium ion — were recalled because of the risk of overheat-ing, short-circuiting and explod-ing. Additional safety features have been installed since then on lithium ion batteries used in consumer electronics. As for the electric car industry, lithium ion batteries have proved to have two major draw-backs: They are costly, and they do not allow automobiles to go far enough between rechargings. A123, a maker of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, went bankrupt last year because of poor demand and high costs after receiving a $249 million federal grant. Lithium ion batteries, which store more energy at a higher voltage and a lighter weight than earlier types, represent the most recent big jump in battery tech-nology. And that took place near-ly a quarter of a century ago. “We need to leapfrog the engineering of making of batteries,” said Lawrence Berkeley National Lab battery scientist Vince Battaglia. “We’ve got to find the next big thing.” But none of the 10 experts who talked to The Associated Press said they know what that big thing will be yet, or when it will come. “If you crack it ... it’ll change the world,” said Carnegie Mellon University materials science professor Jay Whitacre. Batteries are so crucial to a greener energy future that the Obama administration has spent more than $2 billion to jump-start the advanced battery industry, including setting up what some experts say is a mini-Manhattan Project for batteries. To make the next breakthrough, researchers will have to master complex chemis-try, expensive manufacturing, detailed engineering, a variety of different materials, lengthy test-ing, stringent safety standards and giant cost problems. It involves dealing with liquids and solids, metals and organic chemicals, and things that are in between, said Glenn Amatucci, director of the Energy Storage Research Group at Rutgers University. “We’re dealing with a system that you can imagine is almost alive. It’s almost breathing,” Amatucci said. “Trying to under-stand what’s happening within these batteries is incredibly com-plex.” One reason the battery is the slowpoke of the high-tech high-way is that it has conflicting func-tions. Its primary job is to store energy. But it’s also supposed to discharge power, lots of it, quickly. Those two jobs are at odds with each other. “If you want high storage, you can’t get high power,” said M. Stanley Whittingham, direc-tor of the Northeast Center for Chemical Energy Storage. “People are expecting more than what’s possible.” On the commercial market, lithium ion batteries are gener-ally ones small enough to fit into cellphones. But to power bigger items — from a Prius to a 787 — they get grouped together, increasing the juice they store and provide. That also increases the safety risk, experts say. The lithium ion battery that caught fire in a Boeing 787 weighed 63 pounds and was 19 inches long. “You can’t get around the fundamental thing is that lithium ion batteries are stuffed full of flam-mable liquid,” Whitacre said. Even one-in-a-million problems with lithium ion batteries can result in many fires because there are billions of them in use now, with dozens sometimes stacked together in a single device. Experts say lithium ion batteries are more dangerous because their electrolyte, the liquid that allows ions to move between elec-trodes in the battery, is more flammable than the substance in older type batteries. Those older types include the lead-acid bat-teries in most cars and the nickel cadmium batteries that are often in video equipment and power tools. Still, MIT materials science and engineering professor Gerbrand Ceder and others said the safety problems can be fixed. ASSOCIATED PRESS TECHNOLOGY RESET: High unemployment likely to continue Continued From Page 1CA total of 7.6 million disap-peared from January 2008 through last June. Experts warn that this “hollowing out” of the mid-dle-class workforce is far from over. They predict the loss of millions more jobs as technology becomes even more sophisticated and reaches deeper into our lives. Maarten Goos, an economist at the University of Leuven in Belgium, says Europe could double its middle-class job losses. Some occupations are beneficiaries of the march of technology, such as soft-ware engineers and app designers for smartphones and tablet computers. Overall, though, technol-ogy is eliminating far more jobs than it is creating. To understand the impact technology is having on middle-class jobs in devel-oped countries, the AP analyzed employment data from 20 countries; tracked changes in hiring by indus-try, pay and task; compared job losses and gains dur-ing recessions and expan-sions over the past four decades; and interviewed economists, technology experts, robot manufactur-ers, software developers, entrepreneurs and people in the labor force who ranged from CEOs to the unemployed.The AP’s key findingsQ For more than three decades, technology has reduced the number of jobs in manufacturing. Robots and other machines controlled by computer programs work faster and make fewer mistakes than humans. Now, that same efficiency is being unleashed in the service economy, which employs more than two-thirds of the workforce in developed countries. Technology is eliminating jobs in office buildings, retail establish-ments and other business-es consumers deal with every day. Q Technology is being adopted by every kind of organization that employs people. It’s replacing work-ers in large corporations and small businesses, established companies and start-ups. It’s being used by schools, colleges and universities; hospitals and other medical facilities; nonprofit organizations and the military. Q The most vulnerable workers are doing repeti-tive tasks that program-mers can write software for — an accountant checking a list of numbers, an office manager filing forms, a paralegal reviewing docu-ments for key words to help in a case. As soft-ware becomes even more sophisticated, victims are expected to include those who juggle tasks, such as supervisors and managers — workers who thought they were protected by a college degree. Q Thanks to technology, companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index reported one-third more profit the past year than they earned the year before the Great Recession. They’ve also expanded their busi-nesses, but total employment, at 21.1 million, has declined by a half-million. Q Start-ups account for much of the job growth in developed economies, but software is allowing entre-preneurs to launch busi-nesses with a third fewer employees than in the 1990s. There is less need for administrative support and back-office jobs that handle accounting, payroll and benefits. Q It’s becoming a selfserve world. Instead of rely-ing on someone else in the workplace or our personal lives, we use technology to do tasks ourselves. Some find this frustrating; others like the feeling of control. Either way, this trend will only grow as software per-meates our lives. Q Technology is replacing workers in developed countries regardless of their politics, policies and laws. Union rules and labor laws may slow the dismissal of employees, but no coun-try is attempting to prohibit organizations from using technology that allows them to operate more effi-ciently — and with fewer employees. Some analysts reject the idea that technology has been a big job killer. They note that the collapse of the housing market in the U.S., Ireland, Spain and other countries and the ensuing global recession wiped out millions of middle-class con-struction and factory jobs. In their view, governments could bring many of the jobs back if they would put aside worries about their heavy debts and spend more. Others note that jobs continue to be lost to China, India and other countries in the developing world. But to the extent technology has played a role, it raises the specter of high unemployment even after economic growth accelerates. ABOVE: Engineer Bryant Polzin fills a lithium-ion battery cell with electrolyte at Argonne National Laboratory’s Cell Fabrication Facility in Lemont, Ill. RIGHT: Lew Urry holds up an original alkaline battery that was marketed in 1958, left, and a current batter. Urry, 76, who still works for Energizer Holdings Inc., developed the first commercially viable alkaline battery. It’s been nearly a quarter of a century since the last big jump in battery technology, which led to the lithium ion.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, JANUARY6, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900 386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$5,500 386-288-6102 APPLY TODAY TO BECOME A LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSEStart a challenging and rewarding career in healthcare at Bradford-Union Technical Center. Our health programs will give you quality educational experiences in the classroom and clinical labs. You will have exibility, stability and job security when choosing a career in the health industry. An LPN certicate may also earn you college credit at Santa Fe College. All testing for applicants must be completed by February 14, 2013. Bradford-Union Area Career Technical Center For more information, please contact us at 904.966.6769 or visit www.bradfordcareertech.com Bradford County Public Schools.The Right Choice. Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalNOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: FORTWHITE AUTOMOTIVE gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 02/08/2013, 8:00 am at 8493 SWUS Hwy 27, Fort White, Fl. 32038, pursuant to subjection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. FORTWHITE AUTOMOTIVE reserves the right to accept or reject and and/or all bids.2B3HD46F2VH7165261997 DODGE05536919JANUARY27, 2013 020Lost & Found LOSTDOG 1/21/13:Small male beagle mix. Tan & White, long tail, floppy ears, 35 lbs. Fort White/High Springs Barney St 441 area Very friendly 386-454-2573 100Job Opportunities05536728Retail Sales Associate at Camping World, Lake City High School education or equivalent Previous Retail experience preferred Ability to established strong product knowledge and sell to customers. Superior customer service skills and excellent communication skills both written and verbal Must maintain a professional demeanor and work ethic Available to start immediately. Apply in person. 05536914Responsible person to work with Sales Agents and building inspectors. Travel necessary Vehicle provided, valid Drivers License required. Salary dependent on experience. Send Resume to: Human Resources PO Box 760 Toast, NC 27049 05536933The Gilchrist County Health Department Is seeking a Medical Executive Director (PSN# 64081217). Must have a valid Florida Medical License. Must be Board certified or Board eligible in Family Practice. Must have a valid Florida Medicaid number. Must be fingerprinted and drub screened. May be required to work extra hours or days in the event of an emergency. Salary range $74,858.68-$210,795.52. Applications will be accepted online athttps://peoplefirst.myflorida.comState of Florida applications may be mailed to: State of Florida, People First, Staffing Administration, PO Box 44058, Jacksonville, FL 32231 or faxed to (904) 6362627 by 1/28/13. EEO/AA/VP Employer. 05536959Busy insurance agency seeking professional Administrative Assistant/Receptionist. Must have strong communication and computer skills. Send confidential resume and salary requirements to: Box 05101, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536990Wanted experience I.T. Person to manage private Company network 20+ computers, Web design & admin needed. Must be willing to perform other Clerical tasks in office environment. Apply in person:3631 us 90 east Lake City FL32055, or send resume to guy@qiagroup.com Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment, HVAC Installation, & Plumbing Exp., Preferably with Plumbing license. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 100Job OpportunitiesP/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 Quality Inn formerly Jameson Inn Now Hiring: P/TNight Audit position and P/THousekeeping position. Please apply in person 285 SWCommerce Blvd., LC SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate & understanding of truck repair & parts procurement. Southern Specialized Truck & Trailer 752-9754 Unemployed Underemployed Retired Start your own Lake City Business. Email Inquires to mdebied@windstream.net 110Sales EmploymentHELPWANTED Door to Door Sales, Commission only, Make Money (407) 460-9225 120Medical Employment05536995Medical Billing Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. Billing Specialist : Complete knowledge of insurance, follow up and follow through of Accounts Receivable, Billing, Posting and Collection, Sage Software a plus. FAX RESUME: 386-758-5628. Full Time CashierPosition Excellent Computer & Communication skills needed. 780 SE Baya Dr., LC, FL, 32055 Looking for P/TEcho Cardiography Tech & VascularUltra Sound Tech Call Nancy at 984-5543 Madison County Memorial Hospital Now HiringGN's, RN's, LPN's, CNA's Full Time & As Needed Send Resume to 850-973-8158 or Contact Human Resources 850-973-2271 ext 1906 EOE/DFW RN HOME HEALTH Suwannee, Columbia, Hamilton Min. 1 year Home Health Medicare Experience Required. Call 386-364-5515. Fax Resume 386-364-5648 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free dog & cats To Good Home. One Female Chihuahua very friendly. Three adult cats, 1 male & 2 females 386-438-8557 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Shih Tzu fell madly in love with Poodle. Very cute puppy, ready to go, $300.00. 752-0523 or email tlcpetmav@hotmail.com 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. Site Work Unlimited Driveway & Repair, Grade work, Land Clearing, House pads, Stump grinding & removal, etc. Free Est. Daniel Elixson 352-494-5829 TV60" Rear Proctection HDTVMonitor $500.00. OBO 754-8766 Emerald Lake. 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386-752-1941 or 965-0932 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Near Timco, $350 mth, No pets. Contact 386-758-0057 3bd/2ba Clean & quiet. Branford Area $550 + Sec. Country Setting. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 842 Newark Dr, Ft. White 3 Rivers Estates MH 16x76 3br/2 ba, CHAReference and Lease required. No Pets 752-4348 Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 X-CLEAN 2/2 single on private acre 8 mi to VAnear Moore Rd. $500 mo, refs and credit, No dogs 386.961.9181 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinance 4/2 on 2.5 acres, south of LC, small down $850 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $450 mth + Security Utilities Included, Avail now. 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 730 W. Grandview Ave. Lake City, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Branford Villas Apartments Now Renting 1 & 2 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-935-2319 517 SE Craven St, Branford, FL “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer” Equal Housing Opportunity TDD # 1-800-955-8771 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05536873LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $675 2BR/1BA 768SF $495 3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825 3BR/2BA 1258SF $900 3BR/2.5BA 1470SF $795 3BR/1BA 960SF $725 1BR/1BA 576SF $525 1BR/1BA 500SF $450 2 AVAILABLE MADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODELED$450 2 AVAILABLE3BR/1.5BAREMODELED$550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We offer: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. 1BR Cottage 10 min. on South 41 All utilities plus Satellite included. Small Yard, carport. Pet friendly $675. mo. 386-758-2408 2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 3 bd/2ba Brick home on cul-de-sac close to shopping. 1 acre. $800/m w/F&D upfront. Contact 575-749-6117 3 bedroom 1 bath $615 mth and $615 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3BD/2BA Brick Home 147 NWSilver Glen LC Privacy fence lots of storage 386-208-1950 $950/month 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3BD/2BA in town No Pets! $650. mo. Contact 386-758-0057 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 810Home forSale Handyman 3/1 Close to VA, Lrg corner lot. Owner Finance, $35,900, $1,000 down, $356 mth. 954 SE Putnam St 352-215-1018 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call RECYCLE YOUR PAPER PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LIFE Sunday, January 27, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D A road trip into rural Georgia Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy VERENA DOBNIKAssociated PressNEW YORK O n most construction projects, workers are discouraged from signing or otherwise scrawling on the iron and concrete. At the skyscraper rising at Ground Zero, though, they’re being invited to leave messages for the ages. “Freedom Forever. WTC 9/11” is scrawled on a beam near the top of the gleaming, 104-story One World Trade Center. “Change is from within” is on a beam on the roof. Another reads: “God Bless the workers & inhabitants of this bldg.” One of the last pieces of steel hoisted up last year sits near a precarious edge. The message on it reads: “We remember. We rebuild. We come back stronger!” It is signed by a visitor to the site last year — President Barack Obama. The words on beams, walls and stairwells of the skyscraper that replaces the twin tow-ers lost on Sept. 11, 2001, form the graffiti of defiance and rebirth, what ironworker super-visor Kevin Murphy calls “things from the heart.” They’re remembrances of the 2,700 people who died, and testaments to the hope that rose from a shattered morning. “This is not just any construction site, this is a special place for these guys,” says Murphy of the 1,000 men and some women who work in the building at any given time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “Everyone here wants to be here, they want to put this building up,” Murphy says. “They’re part of the redemption.” On a frigid, windy winter day, with the 9/11 memorial fountain straight below and the Statue of Liberty in the distance, Murphy supervised a crew of men guiding the first piece of the steel spire that will top out the building at a dizzying 1,776 feet — the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. In the rooftop iron scaffolding for the spire, 105 floors up, a beam pays homage to Lillian Frederick, a 46-year-old administrative assis-tant who died on the 105th floor of the south tower, pierced by a terrorist-hijacked airliner. A popular Spanish phrase is penned next to two names on one concrete pillar: “Te Amo Tres Metros Sobre el Cielo,” meaning, “I love you three steps above heaven.” Some beams are almost completely covered in a spaghetti-like jumble of doodled hearts and flowers, loopy cursives and blar-ing capitals. Many want to simply mark their presence: “Henry Wynn/Plumbers Local (hash)1/Sheepshead Bay/Never Forget!” Families of victims invited to go up left names and comments too, as did firefighters and police officers who were first respond-ers. “R.I.P. Fanny Espinoza, 9-11-01” reads a typical remembrance signed by several family members of a Cantor-Fitzgerald employee. T he month of January is the coldest month of the year, according to math and statistics. If we believed that averages were the norm, then we would assume that our weather is on an easy, downhill glide into spring. Sounds good. Unfortunately for many of our plants, a recent warm spell trig-gered active spring growth and bud break. These plants began to develop leaves and flowers much too early. Actively growing plants are extremely vulnerable to freez-ing temperatures because they are no longer acclimated to the cold. Increased water content inside the plant cells may not be expelled in time before it freezes. Expanded ice crystals rupture the plant cells, killing the tissue. A freeze can kill an entire plant this way, or it can damage more vulnerable parts of certain plants. Affected plant parts that may exhibit browned, dead tissue include flowers, young leaves and stems. Containerized plants above ground are more susceptible to root damage from a freeze. The damage may not even be apparent until the plant becomes stressed from lack of proper water uptake as the temperature rises. Delay pruning any injured plants until the new spring growth appears to insure that no live wood is accidently removed. Some plants may be slower than usual to bud out again this spring. You can check for live branches by nicking the bark with your thumbnail to reveal the green cambium layer underneath. Any branch ends that are dead will no longer have green cambium, so find the point along the branch where it turns green and prune just beyond that point. Adding colorful flowers to the landscape is one of the first things we want to do when the sun shines. Garden stores may start displaying some less cold hardy annuals soon, but try to stick with the cold hardy bloomers for anoth-er month. These include viola, pansy, snaps, dusty miller, dianthus and alyssum. With a little care, these flowers will provide color in the garden well into May and June. A few vegetables that you can plant now through March are pota-toes, radishes, and beets. Don’t miss your window of opportunity to grow these and others listed at the UF site http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021 Get your soil pH tested before you prepare the soil bed. Most of our vegetables grow best in slightly acidic sandy soils with a pH of 5.8 to 6.3. Our UF Master Gardeners perform this test free for county residents. Call 752-5384 for more information.Yo-yo temperatures are bad for plants GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Messages to the future WTC workers scrawl graffiti of defiance, hope Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSIronworkers release the cables from a steel beam after co nnecting it on the 104th floor of One World Trade Center i n New York in August. The beam was signed by President Barack Obama: ‘We remember. ‘We re build.’ and ‘We come back stronger!’ Also adorned with the autographs of workers and police officers at the site, the beam will be sealed into the struc ture of the tower, which is scheduled for completion in 20 14. Sentiments from builders, dignitaries are scribbled on building’s steel skeleton. ONE WORLD TRADE CENTER W hile the kids were out of school for the Christmas holidays, I decided we needed to take a short road trip. So, I took my sister, Cindy, and her two kids, Austin and Allison, up to Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Ga., to see their Christmas lights. First of all, these kids have been to a lot of main-stream attractions like you would find in Orlando or on the beaches and have mostly traveled via the interstate. So, in getting to Pine Mountain, once we left the highway and hit the two-lane, lesser traveled roads, it was small town after small town. It was quite educational for them. We saw hay fields, lots of bales of hay, then pecan groves for miles, but what interested all of us the most were the number of cotton fields. Most of them had recently been picked and we saw huge bales of cotton. At one point, we pulled over so the kids could touch it and see how it grows. We even passed a town that had a quarry, which they had also never even heard of much less seen one. As we passed and drove through each of the small towns, Austin wondered out loud what people did in these towns. Clearly most everyone farms, but at 15 years old, he was curi-ous about their social life and what kind of activities there were to do for fun, he didn’t see much that appealed to him. As we approached Pine Mountain, the road we came in on took you through F. D. Roosevelt State Park. It’s very sce-nic. The road sits upon a mountain ridge, so you can look down into two valleys over each side of the road. There were a couple of trail heads and a couple of scenic overlooks, where we stopped for photo ops. Upon arriving at Callaway Gardens, we quickly got checked in and ate dinner so we could catch our trolley to see Fantasy in Lights. It was very, very cold, and after offering extra hats, gloves and scarves to Cindy and Allison; I realized I left my coat at home. Fortunately, Cindy brought an extra one, and I keep blankets in the car that we were able to use. All bundled up in the dark, cold night, we made our way from the parking lot to the entrance and had to stop for hot chocolate just to help keep our hands warm. There were fire pits scattered throughout the park but you had to fight the crowds to get near them. So we boarded the TRAVEL TALES Sandy KishtonGRAFFITI continued on 2D TRAVEL continued on 3D A steel column for the Freedom Tower bears signatures of Sept. 11 victims’ family members at the World Trade Center in New York.

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 PETS By MICHELLE LOCKEAssociated PressDuring “happy hour” at the Summer Winter bar in Burlington, Mass., the bar-gain is on the bivalves, not the brews. That’s because Massachusetts legislators passed a law in 1984 banning bars from offering cut-price drinks. So James Flaherty, the bar’s director of food and bev-erage, decided to use shellfish specials to draw customers. “We’ve had to get creative by offering something other than a typical happy hour,” he said. “Having a raw bar at the heart of the restaurant, we launched Oyster Happy Hour to appeal to the after work crowd with fresh, local selections and it’s become a popular draw.” And Massachusetts isn’t alone. The concept of happy hour — when bars offer lower prices or two-for-one specials — may seem like an American tradition, but is in fact ille-gal or restricted in quite a few places. Laws vary by state, and even districts within states, so it’s hard to get a handle on the national picture, but Ben Jenkins, vice president of government communica-tions for the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS), has noted some recent activity aimed at updating happy hour laws. A few states, including Oklahoma, Massachusetts and Virginia, recently have considered changes to existing restric-tions. The bills failed, but are likely to re-emerge. Meanwhile, happy hour became legal in Kansas last year after a 26-year ban. In 2011, Pennsylvania extended happy hour potentials from two to four hours and New Hampshire changed its law to allow estab-lishments to advertise drinks specials. DISCUS does not take a position on happy hour bills, but Jenkins sees the activity in the context of a larger modern-ization trend. “States across the country are updating their liquor laws to pro-vide better consumer convenience and increased revenue without raising taxes,” he says. The patchwork nature of the laws is a holdover from Prohibition, when states were left to set regulations once the fed-eral ban had been repealed. Some of the laws written then are still on the books, which can strike an anachronistic note today. For instance, it’s still illegal to sell alcohol in South Carolina on Election Day. And it may surprise you to know that Moore County in Tennessee is “dry” and also home to the Jack Daniel Distillery. The reasoning behind happy hour bans or restrictions generally stems from con-cerns that lowering prices will encourage high consumption and its ensuing prob-lems. “Some communities have issues of morality regarding promoting the drinking of alcohol or concerns regarding the kinds of behavior that can come from drink-ing too much,” notes Kyle-Beth Hilfer, an advertising and marketing attorney with the New York-based law firm Collen IP. Having so many different rules means bar owners and restaurateurs need to keep up with changes in the laws and read exist-ing statutes carefully, says Hilfer. Some states not so happy about idea of happy hours By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — When Jay Mesinger heard about a study seeking golden retrievers to help fight canine cancer, he immedi-ately signed up 2-year-old Louie. He and his wife know firsthand the toll of canine cancer: Louie is their fourth golden retriever. The first three died of cancer. “They all had long lives but were taken by complications from one kind of cancer or another,” said the Boulder, Colo., business-man. For Louie and 2,999 other purebred goldens, it will be the study of a lifetime. Their lives — usually 10 to 14 years — will be tracked for genetic, nutritional and environmental risks to help scientists and veterinarians find ways to prevent canine cancer, widely considered the No. 1 cause of death in older dogs, said Dr. Rodney Page. The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study will be the largest and lon-gest dog study ever conducted, said Page, the study’s principal investigator, a professor of veteri-nary oncology and the director of the Flint Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University. The study will focus on three cancers that can be fatal to the dogs, including bone cancer, lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes) and a cancer in the blood vessels called hemangiosarcoma, Page said. He also expects the data to yield information about other dog diseases, like arthritis, hip dysplasia, hormonal and skin disorders and epilepsy, he said. The Morris Animal Foundation, a 64-year-old group based in Denver, is providing much of the $25 million needed for the study. The rest will be funded through online public donations that allow people to sponsor one of the 3,000 canine volunteers. The study is recruiting purebred golden retrievers under the age of 2 whose pedigree can be traced back at least three gen-erations. The breed was chosen because “they are very common. They are the fourthor fifth-most common dog recognized by the American Kennel Club. They are wonderful companions for people and found in every walk of human endeavor,” Page said. Researchers were seeking young dogs because “knowing the history of their lives pro-vides huge advantages,” Page said. Those involved in the study compared the work to the Framingham Heart Study, which has tracked a group of humans and their descendants from Framingham, Mass., since 1948. Dr. Nancy Bureau, Mesinger’s veterinarian at the Alpine Animal Hospital in Boulder, said that given the condensed lifespan of a dog, it might not take a decade to see results from the study. “Before this group of volunteer dogs has left this world, hopefully we will have data to help even them,” she said. A pilot study of 50 dogs started in August 2012, and Page said preliminary results from that first group should be ready soon and reportable results could be pos-sible in a year. Work on the study started about four years ago. After fund-ing was approved, scientific and research teams were formed, the database was set up, a bio-lab found to store the samples and a questionnaire was written. The recruitment of volunteer dogs was expected to be done in two years, with most of it spent on verifying eligibility and par-ticipation. Page said it takes about four weeks to verify pedigree and health, and make sure a dog’s owner and veterinarian will par-ticipate. So far, 200 dogs have accepted the invitation, and 600 others are on a waiting list. Bureau, who also has a golden retriever client on the waiting list, said it’s a privilege to be part of a groundbreaking study. Aside from researchers, participating veterinarians probably have the most work — they have to submit samples of blood, urine and hair during annual exams and report whenever they treat a volunteer dog for any reason. Study leaders will not intervene or recommend any treat-ment, Page said. “We will work with the vets working with the pets. We will catalog all the things that happen, the medical history, the diet, environment and expo-sures.” The vets hope the study eventually will benefit humans. Researchers will pay particular attention to early onset obesity in dogs to see how it is related to diabetes, Page said. Dog-years are a benefit to researching ailments found in both dogs and humans, because studying a dog for 10 years is akin to studying a human for 60 or 70 years, said Dr. Wayne Jensen, the Morris Animal Foundation’s chief scientific officer and execu-tive director. “There are many examples where risk factors in dogs have also been found in people,” said Jensen. The study will also try to measure factors in a dog’s life, such as how fun and an owner’s love affect the animal’s health and longevity. That will be attempt-ed through questions about the number of children or other pets in the owner’s family, the amount of time spent together — and the dog’s sleeping spot. Mesinger knows the answer to that one off the top of his head: “In bed, with my wife and I.” Researchers look for treatments for No. 1 killer of dogs. ASSOCIATED PRESSDr. Rodney L. Page, professor of oncology and director of the Colorado State University Flint Animal Cancer Center, sits with a golden retriever, Winston, in the lobby of the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Fort Collins, Colo. The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study will be the largest and longest study of dogs ever conducted, said Page, the study’s principal investigator. Golden retrievers key to dog cancer study Online: Q www.CanineLifetime Health.org Q www.csuanimalcancer center.org Q www.morrisanimal foundation.org ASSOCIATED PRESSTwo women enjoy $5 Mai Tais during happy hour at the Roy’s restaurant in San Francisco. The concept of happy hour when bars offer lower prices or two-for-one specials seems like a widespread tradition, but is actually illegal or restricte d in quite a few places. GRAFTITI: WTC beams carry messages Continued From Page 1CFormer Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff wrote: “With you in spirit — those who perished, those who fought, those who build.” Time and daily routines have softened the communal grief as the workers carry on, trading jokes and gruff male banter. Some ends up in whimsical graf-fiti marking World Cup soccer matches, New York Giants Super Bowl victories and other less-weighty matters that have gone on since construction began six years ago. One crudely drawn map of the neighborhood down below shows the location of a popular strip club. People on the ground below will never see the spontaneous private thoughts high in the Manhattan sky. The graffiti will disappear as the raw basic structure is covered with drywall, ceiling panels and paint for tenants moving into the 3 million square feet of office space by 2014. Knowing this, workers and visitors often take photographs of special bits of graffiti, so the words will live on.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 3D3DLIFEBackyard vintners do it for fun, profit, lifestyleBy DEAN FOSDICKAssociated PressGrowing gapes can be a rewarding pursuit. They’re appealing to the eye, pleasing to the palate, a profitable sideline and a reason for parties and neighborhood togetherness. Small wonder so many vineyards are cropping up in people’s yards. “The idea of having a landscape that produces something is one of the attractive issues,” said Tom Powers, a winemaker who has designed and installed more than 100 small vineyards, mainly around the Alhambra Valley of Contra Costa County, Calif., near where he lives. “The other thing is the lifestyle of being in wine country is attractive to people and they want to be a part of it.” Property owners often install vineyards when renovating unsightly or underutilized land, said Powers, author of “The Organic Backyard Vineyard” (Timber Press, 2012). “It’s less expensive to do grapes than traditional landscaping like shrubs and flowers from an invest-ment viewpoint,” he said. “The trade-out is that you have to put in more maintenance time.” Make no mistake: Vineyards require attention. Rootstocks must be chosen, the soil prepared, trellises and fences built, vines pruned, canopy leaves thinned, nets strung to discourage preda-tors, grape clusters harvested and processed.But the work can be worth it economically. Grape grow-ers from New York to California profit by selling their crops to hobbyists or to wineries that don’t have enough tonnage to meet pro-duction demands. Other growers, including those who grow table grapes, enjoy exceptional flavors from fruit seldom found in mar-kets. The small acreage required for a vineyard can generate sur-prisingly high earnings. “Up to $3,000 to $7,000 per acre in gross returns,” according to the Upper Shore Regional Council in Chestertown, Md. Grapes also are a smart environmental choice given their mod-est water and fertilizer require-ments, plus low soil runoff, the council said. It doesn’t take many vines to start a rewarding grape-growing venture. “A 100-foot row of vines can yield up to 175 bottles of wine,” Powers said. “With a one-acre vineyard, you could make more than 5,000 bottles.” A mild climate is not required for growing grapes. Many variet-ies can be grown anywhere there is an ample amount of sun and an abundance of nutrient-rich, well-drained soil. Grape-grow-ing regions in the United States include Virginia, upper New York, southern Illinois, and exten-sively in California, Oregon and Washington. Many other small pockets lay elsewhere. “It’s a difficult thing to do if you live in an area where spring weather is wet for many weeks,” said Gary Gao, a small fruit spe-cialist with Ohio State University. “In Ohio, springs are so wet that you can get all kinds of fungal diseases.” Vineyard design varies greatly, but must accommodate climate and lay of the land. “You try to match the personality of the place,” Powers said. “The vineyard becomes the centerpiece of the spot you’re landscaping.” Powers, for instance, built his home toward the back of the property and planted the vines up front. “You have to drive through the vineyard to get to it (the house),” he said. “When I built one for a neighbor, we were able to wrap it around his house. It visually fit in with the house, and then we laid a trail so people could stroll through and see how they (grapes) were doing. It also incorporates a small lawn for parties.” Margot and Mario Corona live on a “very generous size lot” near Martinez, Calif. Much of their hill-side property was undeveloped when they purchased it, giving them a variety of landscaping options. “We’re not in a neighborhood where we’re allowed to have ani-mals,” Margot Corona said. “We didn’t want some complicated landscaping. So we bought hun-dreds of vines ‚ some 650 plants. With an acre of land under culti-vation, it turned out to be much more than a hobby.” “It became a binding factor in the circle of friends we have,” she said. “Their culture is Italian and they’re used to making wines. We were already good friends, and it surged and brought us even closer together.” PURSUITS Vineyards popping up in many places wine lovers settle. ASSOCIATED PRESSA vineyard does double duty by producing great-tasting wine grapes while enhancing the looks of the residentia l property near Martinez, Calif. The owner-designer placed the grapes in front of his house to help showcase the entry for visitors. Other vineyards include walking trail s while some serve as entertainment centers with tables, chairs and outdoor kitchens. By ELIZABETH KARMELAssociated PressI long ago fell in love with the clean, crisp, sweet taste of Meyer lemons. And recently, Mexican foods guru Rick Bayless remind-ed me why. The Meyer lemon (named for Frank Meyer, who discovered them over 100 years ago) is a cross between a lemon and possi-bly some variety of orange. Thin-skinned, they often mature to a yellow-orange color and are slightly less acidic than common lem-ons. I like that because the lower acid makes it so much easier to appreciate the vibrant taste of these lemons. Bayless’ new cookbook, “Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks” has a recipe for Meyer lemon margaritas that uses tequila that has been infused with the zest of the lemons for four days. This past summer, I experimented with infusing tequila with a split vanilla bean and rich roasted cof-fee, but I never considered citrus. This book was the perfect excuse to try more infusing. When I read through the recipe, I realized that it was natural to use citrus to infuse tequila, and how special the Meyer lemon zest would make it and the margaritas. Thoughts of limoncello with a Mexican twist immediately came to mind. I love having the infused tequila on hand, which makes masterful margaritas, of course. But it’s also delicious all on its own to be enjoyed as sip-ping tequila. Besides the creative recipes, the best part of this cookbook is that Bayless provides two recipes for every margarita — a single-serve cocktail and a pitcher version. And I thought the latter would be just perfect to get a Super Bowl watch-ing party going. Not only is it a fun drink, but the tangy lemon flavor is perfect for cutting through all the rich, heavy foods we usually eat during the big game. For ease, the entire recipe can be made in advance and refrigerated. That way when your guests arrive all you have to do is fill a cock-tail shaker with ice, shake the drink to get it icy cold, and serve. You also could just serve it poured over crushed ice.Meyer lemon margarita Start to finish: 2 hours (10 minutes active) Servings: 8Ingredients1 1/2 cups Meyer lemon tequila (see recipe below) 1 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice (4 to 5 lem-ons) 3/4 cup triple sec1/2 cup Meyer lemon simple syrup (see recipe below) 6 cups ice cubes8 lemon twists, to garnishInstructionsIn a pitcher, combine the tequila, lemon juice, triple sec and simple syrup. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours. When ready to serve, fill a cocktail shaker half full with ice and pour in 1 cup of the margarita mixture. Shake, strain into two 6-ounce martini glasses and garnish each with a twist. Repeat for the remaining margaritas.Meyer lemon-infused taquila Start to finish: 4 days (10 minutes active) Makes one 750-milliliter bottleIngredients8 Meyer lemons750-milliliter bottle 100 percent blue agave blan-co tequilaInstructionsUsing a vegetable peeler, remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. Place the zest in a large glass jar, then add the tequila and cover tightly. Let stand for 4 days to allow the flavors to blend, tipping the jar back and forth a couple times a day. Strain out the zest, and the tequila is ready to use. Stored in a glass container or its original bottle, it will keep its vibrant color for 1 to 2 months.Meyer lemon simple syrup Start to finish: 15 minutes Makes 1 cupIngredients2 Meyer lemons1 cup sugar1/2 cup waterInstructionsUse a vegetable peeler to remove the zest (colored layer of skin only) from the lemons in large strips. In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the zest, sugar and water, stir-ring until the sugar is dis-solved. Let the mixture reach a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain out and discard the zest. Cover and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for sev-eral weeks. Meyer lemons provide extra zest to pitcher of margaritas Party IdeaASSOCIATED PRESSMeyer lemons were used to flavor the simple syrup and tequila in these margaritas. From staff reportsGAINESVILLE — The largest snake that ever roamed the Earth is the subject of a new exhibit at the Florida Museum of Natural History that opened Saturday. The exhibit tells the story of Titanoboa cerre-jonensis, which ruled the jungles of South America 60 million years ago as the top predator, able to crush and devour giant croco-diles and other animals. Featuring real fossils and a full-scale model of the snake, as well as plant and other animal fossils from the same site, the Florida Museum is the only venue to display actual Titanoboa fossils. Fossils of Titanoboa, a gigantic constrictor that sci-entists say was as long as a school bus and weighed about 2,500 pounds, were found in a Colombian coal mine in 2004. “The new exhibit also features a working pale-ontology lab ...” Florida Museum education assis-tant Amanda Harvey said. “Museum scientists and volunteers will be work-ing on fossils from the same location, including a recently discovered Titanoboa skeleton that is the most complete specimen recovered and includes parts of the skull.” The exhibit, which will run through Aug. 11, fea-tures a re-created scene of the discovery site, clips from the Smithsonian Channel documentary on Titanoboa. Admission to “Titanoboa: Monster Snake” is $6 for adults, $5 for Florida resi-dents, seniors and college students and $4.50 for chil-dren ages 3 to 17 years old. Museum members receive free admission.Gigantic snake subject of exhibit at nature museum JEFF GAGE/Florida MuseumFlorida Museum of Natural History researcher Jonathan Bloch compares a vertebrae from Titanoboa, left, with one from a 17-foot anaconda. TRAVEL: A chilly tour Continued From Page 1Ctrolley and took the hour-plus-long tour through the gardens to see their Christmas lights. Our tour took a little bit longer, since someone a few cars ahead arranged for a mar-riage proposal “in lights” along the route. So we had to wait for her reply. I assume it was yes! It was pretty impressive, but almost too cold to really enjoy. Another cup of hot chocolate on the way out and then it was back to the hotel to snuggle in for the night. Cindy said it was fun, but next year we need to head south! Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 27, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosOnce Upon a Time “Lady of the Lake” “The Makeover” (2013) Julia Stiles, David Walton. Premiere. News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “L.A.” Criminal Minds (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc MartinNOVA Secrets of drones. (DVS) Masterpiece Classic (DVS) Masterpiece Classic (N) The Abolitionists: AmericanDoc Martin 7-CBS 7 47 47g PGA Tour GolfAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) NCIS “Shell Shock, Part II” The Good Wife “The Seven Day Rule” The Mentalist “The Red Barn” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00) MovieAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Working Mom” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00)“27 Dresses” (2008) Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The First David Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly Newse 2013 Pro Bowl From Honolulu. (N) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304(5:38) Roseanne(:16) Roseanne(6:54) Roseanne(:27) RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah’s Next Chapter Rapper 50 Cent. Oprah’s Next Chapter L.L. Cool J. (N) Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Rapper 50 Cent. A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“The Good Witch’s Gift”“The Good Witch’s Family” (2011) Catherine Bell, Noah Cappe. “The Good Witch’s Charm” (2012) Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:00)“The Twilight Saga: New Moon” (2009, Romance) Kristen Stewart.“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson.“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(4:45)“The Dark Knight” (2008) Christian Bale, Heath Ledger. (DVS) 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (N) (Live) (:02) 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:30)“The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. MY-TV 29 32 -Dick Van DykeDick Van DykeM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Episode directed by Steven Spielberg. M*A*S*HThriller “Worse Than Murder” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Good Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” Dog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieShake It Up!Shake It Up!A.N.T. FarmA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys”“Abducted: The Carlina White Story” (2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. “Steel Magnolias” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah, Phylicia Rashad. “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“He’s Just Not That Into You” BET 34 124 329(4:30)“Coach Carter” (2005) Samuel L. Jackson. “Madea’s Family Reunion” (2006, Comedy) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood, Lynn Whit eld. The UNCF: An Evening of Stars Melanie Fiona; Eric Benet; Faith Evans. (N) ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N)d NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at New York Knicks. From Madison Square Garden in New York. (N) Winter X Games From Aspen, Colo. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College Gymnastics LSU at Alabama. (Taped) 2013 Australian Open Tennis Men’s Final. From Melbourne, Australia. SUNSP 37 -k NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live! (N) Ship Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeSport FishingSport Fishing Gymnastics DISCV 38 182 278MoonshinersMoonshiners “Hat in Hand” Monster Squid: The Giant Is Real Footage of the giant squid. (N) Dual Survival “Untamed: Hawaii” (N) Monster Squid: The Giant Is Real TBS 39 139 247“Failure to Launch” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Matthew McConaughey. 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (N) (Live) (:02)“Sex and the City 2” (2010) Sarah Jessica Parker. Premiere. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Live From the Red Carpet: 2013 SAG Awards (N) (Live) Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami (N) Chasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The Satur TRAVEL 46 196 277Tricked Out TrailersMega RV CountdownTrip of a Lifetime (N) Extreme YachtsExtreme YachtsExtreme Houseboats HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lCool PoolsHawaii LifeHawaii LifeHouse Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Cake BossCake BossCake BossCake BossHere Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo Boo (N) Plastic Wives (N) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAx Men Gabe faces a crew mutiny. Ax Men “Shelby’s New Toy” (N) Bamazon “Judgment Day” (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedWild West AlaskaWild West Alaska (N) Gator Boys “Gatorzilla” (N) Finding Bigfoot “Bigfoot Hoedown” (N) Gator Boys “Gatorzilla” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffChoppedRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off (N) Bobby’s Dinner Battle “Battle Dallas” Iron Chef America “Symon vs. Tio” (N) TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarIn the Beginning... FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Blade II” (2002, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson.“Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009, Horror) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. “Dragon Wasps” (2012, Science Fiction) Corin Nemec, Dominika Juillet. AMC 60 130 254(4:00)“Braveheart” (1995) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau. “A Knight’s Tale” (2001) Heath Ledger. Premiere. A peasant poses as a knight for a shot at jousting glory.“A Knight’s Tale” (2001) COM 62 107 249“Without a Paddle” (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. “Grandma’s Boy” (2006, Comedy) Doris Roberts, Allen Covert. Kroll ShowWorkaholicsSouth ParkSouth Park CMT 63 166 327Redneck VacationRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessMy Big Redneck VacationSwamp Pawn NGWILD 108 190 283Caught in the Act “Charge!” Caught in the ActPredators at War Night Stalkers “Hyena Gangs” Predators at War NGC 109 186 276Border Wars “War Games” Giant Crystal CaveWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “The Numbers War” (N) Mudcats “Raising Hell” (N) Hard Riders SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Death Undercover” Fatal Encounters “The Final Act” 48 Hours on ID “A Family’s Honor” (N) Fatal Encounters “Not a Routine Call” On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) 48 Hours on ID “A Family’s Honor” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“Wrath of the Titans” (2012) (6:50)“Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. ‘R’ Girls “Bad Friend” Enlightened (N) Girls “Bad Friend” EnlightenedGirls “Bad Friend” Enlightened MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman. ‘NR’ “Patch Adams” (1999, Comedy-Drama) Robin Williams. ‘PG-13’ “I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545“Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn”Shameless “The American Dream” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “May I Trim Your Hedges?” House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “May I Trim Your Hedges?” MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 28, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor Rock climbing date; roller derby. (N) (:01) Castle “Murder, He Wrote” News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow Paul Revere print. Market Warriors Unique lighting. Independent Lens Textbook standards. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherBig Bang Theory2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 A deadly art heist. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries “Read Before Use” 90210 (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones Investigation into two deaths. (N) The Following “Chapter Two” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Waist & Money” A contestant faces setbacks. (N) (:01) Deception (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Unusual SuspectsUnusual SuspectsRemembering Whitney: The Oprah Interview The singer discusses her life. Oprah’s Next Chapter “Cissy Houston” Remembering Whitney: Oprah A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “River’s Edge” Hoarders “Jan; Bebe” Hoarders “Susan & Michael” Hoarders “Diana; Dolores” (N) Intervention “Sean” (N) (:01) Intervention “Terry; Alissa” HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Grown Ups” (2010) Adam Sandler. Friends learn that maturity does not always come with age.“Grown Ups” (2010) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Rover, Red Rover” The Mentalist “The Crimson Hat” The Mentalist A witness gets killed. Dallas “Battle Lines” (:03) Dallas “Venomous Creatures” (N) (:05) Dallas “Battle Lines” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(3:30)“The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse.“GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York Ma a.A Bronx Tale MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieAustin & AllyShake It Up!Good Luck Charlie“Geek Charming” (2011, Comedy) Sarah Hyland, Matt Prokop. Good Luck CharlieAustin & AllyJessie LIFE 32 108 252“Long Lost Son” (2006, Drama) Gabrielle Anwar, Craig Sheffer. “In the Dark” (2013, Suspense) Elizabeth Rohm, Sam Page. Movie USA 33 105 242NCIS Death of a petty of cer. NCIS “Caged” Women’s prison riot. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Harm’s Way” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“Imagine That” (2009) Eddie Murphy. A troubled executive enters his daughter’s imaginary land.“Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Pittsburgh at Louisville. (N)d College Basketball Kansas at West Virginia. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Around the HornInterruption Women’s College Basketball Notre Dame at Tennessee. (N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) SUNSP 37 AHL Hockeyk AHL Hockey 2013 All-Star Game. From Providence, R.I. (N) The New College Football ShowHalls of FameBoxing DISCV 38 182 278Extreme Smuggling “Drugs” Extreme Smuggling “Drugs II” Extreme Smuggling “Wildlife” (N) Shipwreck Men “Hurricane Alley” (N) Bering Sea GoldShipwreck Men “Hurricane Alley” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Emmy Rossum; Dave Franco. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney and Kim Take MiamiE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Chasing The SaturFashion Police (N) Fashion PoliceChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodThe Layover with Anthony BourdainAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations (N)Hotel Impossible “Periwinkle Inn” (N) Hotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Singh Family” Love It or List It “Smyth” Love It or List It Julia and Sub are split. House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “Ramos” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Pete Rose: HitsPete Rose: HitsCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Fast Eddie” American PickersPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) American Pickers “Big Bear” ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake Republic “Mutiny” Gator Boys: Xtra BitesWild West AlaskaFinding Bigfoot “Bigfoot Hoedown” Finding Bigfoot “Squatch Spies” Wild West Alaska FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery Diners TBN 52 260 372(5:00) TBN Highlights 2012Max LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10Magic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Brooklyn Nets. From Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009, Horror) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. Continuum “Wasting Time” (N) Being Human (N) Lost Girl “Confaegion” (N) Continuum “Wasting Time” AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“A Knight’s Tale” (2001, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Mark Addy.“Hulk” (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly. Scientist Bruce Banner transforms into a powerful brute. (:01)“Hulk” (2003) Eric Bana. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) South Park(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Therapist. RebaReba(:31) Reba(:02) Reba(:32) RebaMy Big Redneck Vacation“Starsky & Hutch” (2004, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Jersey Shore Dogs” Hogzilla Large pig. How Big Can It Get?How Big Can It Get?How Big Can It Get?How Big Can It Get? NGC 109 186 276Alaska State Troopers “Shots Fired” Drugs, Inc. Coca farmers in Colombia. Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers (N) Lords of WarLords of WarAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeGiant Squid: Caught on CameraChasing Giants: Giant SquidMonster Squid: The Giant Is RealHow the Universe Works (N) Chasing Giants: Giant Squid ID 111 192 285Unusual SuspectsUnusual Suspects “A Monstrous Act” Disappeared A woman goes missing. Disappeared “Breaking News” (N) True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Disappeared A woman goes missing. HBO 302 300 501“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“American Reunion” (2012, Comedy) Jason Biggs, Chris Klein. ‘R’ “Red Tails” (2012) ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515Mars Attacks!(:35)“The Revenant” (2009, Comedy) David Anders, Chris Wylde. ‘R’ (:35)“The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ “Forrest Gump” (1994, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15)“The Iron Lady” (2011, Biography) Meryl Streep. ‘PG-13’ Homeland “Beirut Is Back” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “May I Trim Your Hedges?” House of LiesCalifornication WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried Programs The Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsNightly Business 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312MarieVaried ProgramsMad HungryMad HungryHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch FX 22 136 248(10:00) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesVaried Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Little EinsteinsLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsGaspard & LisaPhineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierWife SwapVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329(11:00) Movie Jamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe ParkersMoeshaMoeshaMovie ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter SpecialNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveSportsNationNFL32 SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247American DadAccording to JimLove-RaymondLove-RaymondRules/EngagementRules/EngagementLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsVaried ProgramsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried ProgramsKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take Miami TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBest SandwichBest SandwichBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried ProgramsWhat Not to WearSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesK-9 Cops FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -NBA BasketballVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244(10:30) MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:30) Movie Varied Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:23) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Time WarpTime WarpMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDFacing EvilFacing EvilVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:00) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:45) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs(:45) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:45) MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: My fiance’s friend “Art” and his wife, “Julie,” just had a baby. While Julie was preg-nant she asked my fiance and me to be godparents. Although we could not attend her baby shower due to a previous commit-ment, we contributed sev-eral gifts as well as a quilt I had made. A few weeks later, Julie posted on her social net-working site that she was thankful for her baby’s godparents and named an entirely different couple -not us. I am offended. If she had discussed her reason for the change with me, I would have under-stood. But there was no dialogue, and to this day I have never received so much as a thank-you for our shower presents. I would like to distance myself from Julie, but without damaging the relationship between Art and my fiance, who thinks I am overreacting and should let it go. What are your thoughts? -NOT A GODMOTHER DEAR NOT A GODMOTHER: Julie may have been upset that you and your fiance didn’t attend the baby shower, or she may have spoken too quickly when she asked you to be godparents and didn’t have the courage to say so. Whether you can let this go only you can decide, but I do think that before you make up your mind, you should have a chat with her and clear the air -if only because your fiance and her husband are such good friends. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My husband’s younger sister, “Cindy,” is mentally ill. She has caused tremendous problems in the family. She has been arrested too many times to remember and is now on five years’ probation for injury to a child. My in-laws continue making excuses for her and are the worst enablers I have ever known. My husband once urged his dad to put Cindy into a group home or program that will take care of her because his parents are getting up in years. They refuse because it would mean they’d have to have Cindy officially committed, and they think there is still some magic doctor out there who will fix her. Can my husband do anything as a last effort before something happens to one of his parents, or she winds up in jail? -SAD IN TEXAS DEAR SAD: Your husband should try to con-vince his parents to get some family counseling. It might help them accept that their daughter needs more help than they are equipped to give her. An outside, objective person should weigh in so that Cindy can get the profes-sional help she so obvi-ously needs. If she is physically, psychologically or emotion-ally abusing her parents, Adult Protective Services can step in to be sure they are protected. When your in-laws pass away, if your sister-in-law becomes a danger to herself or those around her, a family mem-ber can request a commit-ment and psychological evaluation. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Someone with some-thing to say will pique your interest. Using the information offered to suit a situation you face will help you clear passage to a better future, and will also help foster a new relation-ship. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Choose your words wisely. You are likely to start a feud if you are too critical or pushy. Put more emphasis on your personal life and nurturing the rela-tionships that mean the most to you. Arguing will be futile. Make love, not war. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll have some great ideas, but before you get started, make sure that your plans are feasible. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Look at different ways of living, and you will learn a lot about why you do things the way you do. Pick and choose what attracts you most and you will come up with the best way to move forward. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Partnerships can be try-ing if you aren’t willing to compromise. Let others voice an opinion before you make your sugges-tions. Asking rather than demanding will bring you better results. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Network and get out with friends or people you feel can contribute infor-mation vital to an idea you want to pursue. Love is in the stars, and setting up a plan that will impress someone special will also enhance your relationship. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Speak your mind and people will listen. Put a little added energy behind your pursuits and you will be respected for your efforts. Travel, commu-nication and delving into unusual pastimes will con-tribute to your future suc-cess. Live, love and laugh. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Domestic problems must be dealt with. Take an unusual approach and you may be able to grab someone’s interest who has been unwilling to see things your way in the past. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Deal with money matters. Cash in on an investment if it will help you pay off a debt. Cut your losses and regain your financial security. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t be too quick to make alterations to please someone you love. You have to make smart moves for the right reasons. Ulterior motives and demands will lead to instability. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t underesti-mate what you are capable of doing. Set goals and pro-ceed toward your destina-tion. The journey you take now will make a difference to the way you do things in the future. You have every-thing to gain and nothing to lose. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Proceed with caution. Not everyone is on your side. Information is likely to be withheld, or a prob-lem with an institution, government agency or legal settlement will devel-op. Don’t leave anything to chance. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Like some church matters 7 Ancient priests'U0RUHDXVFUHDWRU20 Go over the wall, maybe 21 Fix, as a model plane 22 Gradual decline3ULQFHVSRWWHU\ equipment? 25 Firearm company for nearly fivecenturies 26 Indy entrant27 Bygone Saudi king28 City on Utah Lake29 Cooking meas.30 Words of certainty31 Series32 Lounging robes34 Hooter35 New members of society 36 Prepares for action38 Madras title39 Soft cheese40 Dutch city near Arnhem 41 Ten, for openers42 Manhattan area bordered byBroadway 44 Boobs 45 Certain sorority woman 47 Cat on the prowl48 Soup kitchen needs50 2006 Winter Olympics host 52 Radio wave producer 3DUWRIRQHV inheritance 54 Those girls, to Juanita 55 Public ___57 Lack of enthusiasm61 The year 151*RRVHEXPSV writer 63 Jewelry material64 Leaves after dinner?65 Best Actor Tony ZLQQHUIRU0DUN7ZDLQ7RQLJKW 67 Of the blood3HWH6HHJHUVJHQUH71 Punch-in-the-gut sounds 72 Have no doubt73 Mournful rings75 Put back up, as a blog entry 78 Kind of TV79 Online health info site 80 Hard cheese81 In hiding'RFWRU=KLYDJR role 84 Hails from Rocky Balboa 87 Makes a lap 88 Modern groupmailing tool 89 Some barkers(YHVFRXQWHUSDUW92 Commonly, once93 Infatuated with
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By ALISON LADMANAssociated PressThese noodles are a fun and approachable dish equally good for a busy weeknight or to celebrate Chinese New Year. Asian markets are jammed with many dif-ferent noodle varieties. We’ve opted for a thick noodle for this quick stir-fry dish, but you can use other varieties for a differ-ent texture. Just be sure to cook the noodles until just a few minutes shy of being done; they will con-tinue to cook while being stir-fried.Shrimp and shitake noodle stir-fry As with all stir-fries, which by definition are cooked fast and at a high heat, it’s best to prep all of your ingredients and have them near the stove before you begin cooking. Start to finish: 30 minutes Servings: 4Ingredients2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 small sweet onion, sliced 7 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, thinly sliced 1 red bell pepper, cored and thinly sliced 9 1/2-ounce package thick Asian-style noodles, such as udon 1 pound small shrimp, cooked and peeled 2 tablespoons oyster sauce 3 tablespoons lowsodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds 1/4 cup thinly sliced scallionsInstructionsBring a large saucepan of water to a boil. While the water heats, in a large deep skillet or a wok over medium-high, heat the oil. Add the onion and saute for 4 minutes, or until tender. Add the mushrooms and cook for 6 to 7 minutes, or until browned and tender. Add the red pepper and cook for 2 minutes. Just after adding the red pepper to the pan, add the noodles to the boiling water. Cook for 2 minutes, or until just al dente. After 2 minutes, use tongs to pull the noodles out of the boiling water and add directly to the wok. Add the shrimp, oys-ter sauce and soy sauce, then toss well. Cook until heated through and the noodles have finished cooking, about another 3 to 4 minutes. Toss with the sesame seeds and scallions. Nutrition information per serving: 500 calories; 110 calories from fat (22 percent of total calories); 12 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 170 mg cholesterol; 62 g carbohydrate; 6 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 36 g protein; 970 mg sodium. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFEAuthentic dishes for Chinese New YearBy ALISON LADMANAssociated PressYou can call it a peppercorn all you like, but the peppery ingredient that puts the buzz in Sichuan-style cooking actually isn’t one. Though it resembles and is used similarly to black peppercorns, Sichuan pepper isn’t a peppercorn at all. Rather, it is the dried rind of the berry-like fruit of the prickly ash tree. And you don’t need to be a heat fiend to love it. Because while it does have a pep-pery bite, its real power is in the tingling, zingly feeling it leaves on your tongue, rather than a true heat. In Chinese cooking, the Sichuan pepper often is used with meats and is a basic component of five-spice powder. In this weeknight-friendly beef recipe, we combine the Sichuan pepper with spicy chili garlic paste for a dish that will jumpstart your mouth. Serve it over rice or noodles.Sichuan beef Start to finish: 30 minutes (plus marinating) Servings: 4Ingredients1 pound flank steak, thinly sliced across the grain 3 tablespoons chili garlic paste 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 1 teaspoon Sichuan pepper, crushed 1/4 cup vegetable or canola oil 1 tablespoon soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin or rice wine 3 stalks celery, thinly sliced on the diagonal 2 carrots, thinly sliced on the diagonal 3 scallions, cut into 1/2 inch pieces Rice or noodles, to serveInstructionsPlace the flank steak slices in a zip-close plastic bag. Add the chili garlic paste, ginger and Sichuan pepper. Seal the bag, then massage the seasonings into the meat. Refrigerate and allow to marinate at least 2 hours, and up to overnight. When ready to cook, in a large, deep skillet or a wok over high, heat the oil until it shimmers. Add the beef and saute for 8 minutes, or until the beef is browned and starting to dry. Add the soy sauce, mirin, celery, carrots and scallions. Cook for anoth-er 4 minutes, or until the vegetables are crisp ten-der. Serve over noodles or rice. Nutrition information per serving: 330 calories; 180 calories from fat (55 percent of total calories); 20 g fat (3.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 35 mg cholesterol; 11 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 26 g protein; 770 mg sodium. FOOD Beef dish that leaves a tingle on your tongue. ASSOCIATED PRESS Shrimp and shitake noodle stir-fry served in a bowl. By LEE REICHAssociated PressA few months ago I happened upon an enormous cucumbertree magno-lia. “Must be the biggest cucumbertree magnolia anywhere,” I thought. Such speculation doesn’t have to be idle. In a Washington, D.C., office, the American Forests orga-nization keeps the National Register of Big Trees. The Big Tree program was begun in 1940 as America faced impending war and its attendant need for resources, including wood. The first giant to be earmarked and saved from the threat of a saw was Maryland’s Wye Oak, an estimated 450 years old and, up to its death, the champion white oak. Since 1940, more than 800 Big Trees have been named. Almost every state has at least one, with the most in Florida and then California. Those states are home to some species found only there.How big is biggest?Not all Big Trees are necessarily big. Each is merely the biggest of its species. The smallest Big Tree is in Texas, a Reverchon hawthorn in Dallas which “soars” to 9 feet tall and around whose trunk you could wrap your hands. You can probably guess which is the biggest Big Tree: the General Sherman sequoia in California, its upper leaves, at 275 feet, tickling clouds, and its girth, at 998 inches, wide enough to accommodate a two lane road. Somewhat unsettling, given its weedy nature, is the image of the largest staghorn sumac, which is 61 feet high. Or one of the two poison-sumac co-champs, 23 feet tall with a branch spread of 21 feet!Trees with historyIt’s fun to imagine what was going on when the sequoia or western juni-per champions were still in their relative youth a thou-sand or so years ago. A few Big Trees have been more than mere wit-nesses; they have been part of history. The champion osage orange tree, still standing at the Patrick Henry homestead, was grown from a seed sent by Lewis and Clark to Thomas Jefferson, then presented to Henry’s daughter. I will now surely pause for thought before plant-ing out my 5-year-old osage orange seedlings this spring.Competition rulesThe Big Tree program is friendly competition, but like any competition, there are rules. Most obvious is that a Big Tree must be a tree, that is, a plant with a definite crown of foliage topping a trunk at least 3 inches in diameter. It also must be native or natu-ralized in the continental United States. Big Trees are measured three ways to give an over-all score, which becomes the basis for championship. First, and most straightfor-ward, is to measure trunk girth in inches. Rules specify taking this mea-surement at 4.5 feet from the ground. If the ground slopes, measure from the high point; if the tree forks at 4.5 feet, measure the smallest circumference below that height; if the fork starts lower, measure the largest stem. Height is a straightforward measure only if you’re a very good tree climber. For an indirect measure, hold a yardstick vertically in your outstretched hand, adjusting its height above your hand to equal the dis-tance from your hand to your eyes. Now walk back-wards until the top of the tree lines up with the top of the yardstick and you can just see the base of the tree over your hand ‚ all without moving your head or your hand. The height of the tree, if you stayed on level ground, is equal to your distance away from the tree. The third measurement is the average spread of the branches. Add the wid-est spread and the small-est spread, then divide by two. Get your overall score by adding up the girth in inches, the height in feet, plus one-quarter times the average branch spread in feet.Think you’ve got a big tree? Check the national register Gardening ASSOCIATED PRESSThis giant sequoia in Bristol, R.I., is a big tree but not a ‘ Big Tree’ by the standards of folks who keep track of such thi ngs. By JOSHUA FREEDAP Airlines WriterMINNEAPOLIS — Delta Air Lines is hint-ing that its frequent flier program will increasingly favor big spenders over travelers who simply rack up miles. Such a change would generally reward business travelers, who often fly on short notice on more-expensive tickets, versus leisure travelers who might fly long distances but often on cheaper fares. Air travelers have long complained that a $700 ticket buys them a seat next to someone who might be riding on a fare sale for, say, $200. More and more, the airlines are steering greater rewards to the traveler who spend more. Delta announced last week that in 2014 frequent fliers will need to spend at least $2,500 to qualify for the lowest level of elite sta-tus. Previously, they could qualify on miles alone. The highest level of elite status will require spend-ing $12,500. Travelers prize that status because it moves them to the front of airport lines and lets them qualify for upgrades to first class. Delta said the shift was to make sure “our most val-ued customers receive the best program benefits and a more exclusive experi-ence.” Delta appears to be planning more changes in that direction. President Ed Bastian said on Tuesday that Delta wants to shift its SkyMiles rewards program “to drive the type of customer behavior that we would like to encourage.” “I think before we didn’t discern between a customer that was a high-yielding customer versus a low-yielding customer,” he said on the company’s quarterly earnings con-ference call. “I think that as we continue to evolve those programs we’ll be continuing to favor the higher-yielding customers over the lower-yielding customers.” Delta declined to say more about future chang-es to SkyMiles. JetBlue Airways Corp.’s “True Blue” frequent flier program already awards points based on dollars spent, not on miles. Two years ago Southwest Airlines Co. changed its frequent flier program to reward more-expensive tickets. The change jarred some Southwest customers. Delta hints itsfrequent-flier rules to change Here’s to a happy New Year with noodles.ASSOCIATED PRESS Sichuan beef served in a bowl. ASSOCIATED PRESSTravelers on Delta Airlines wait for flights in Detroit. De lta has indicated it will change its frequent-flier program.