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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

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CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Armstrong emotional. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 2B, 5B 72 45 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Bank has givenmore than $40Kto nonprofits. Local folks sharememories of‘Dear Abby.’ SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 254 1D 1C 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterRetired Third Judicial Circuit Judge John W. Peach (rig ht) administers the oath of office to newly elected Third Ci rcuit Judge Andrew J. Decker III (left) during an investiture ceremony Friday afternoon at th e Hamilton County Courthouse, where Decker will be a si tting judge. Pictured are (from left) Decker; his son, Andrew J. Decker IV; mother, Frances; d aughter, Rose Jr.; Andrzej Mitera, of St. Francis Xavier Catho lic Church; and Peach. Decker began his duties as judge on Monday. Obama aims to outflank NRA JOBS continued on 6A By ERICA WERNERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Supporters of President Barack Obama’s gun-control proposals are planning a methodical, state-by-state campaign to try to persuade key lawmakers that it’s in their politi-cal interest to back his sweeping effort to crack down on firearms and ammunition sales and expand criminal background checks. To succeed will require overturning two decades of conven-tional wisdom that gun control is bad politics. The National Rifle Association is confident that argument won’t sell. But with polls showing major-ities supporting new gun laws a month after the Connecticut shooting deaths of 20 schoolchil-dren and six adults, gun-control activists say the political calculus has changed. Their goal in com-ing weeks is to convince lawmak-ers of that, too, and to counter the NRA’s proven ability to mobilize voters against any proposals lim-iting access to guns. The gun-control advocates are focused first on the Senate, which is expected to act before the House on Obama’s gun propos-als. How Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., proceeds will depend in part on what he hears from a handful of Democrats in more conservative states where voters favor gun rights. These include some who are eyeing re-election fights in 2014, such as Mark Pryor of Arkansas, Mark Begich of Alaska and Max Baucus of Montana. “We need to tell our members of Congress that they’ve got to Will undertake state-by-state campaignon gun legislation. GUNS continued on 6A Decker dons robesArbor Day honor JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterIn celebration of Florida Arbor Day, longtime city attorney Herbert Darby and his wife, Ann, were honored by the Lake City/Columbia County Beautificati on Committee at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Friday. A Bradford pear tree — abou t 10 feet tall — and a memorial plaque will be placed in Wilson Park. Darby is the lo ngest serving city attorney in Florida. Here Darby recounts an anecdote while saying a few words afte r being honored at the Florida Arbor Day event. Joblessrate incountydrops Falls 0.3%; statefigures on the decline as well. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County’s unemployment rate fell three-tenths of a point to 7.3 per-cent in December, better than both the state and national average, according to data released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. In November and October the county jobless rate was 7.6 percent. Florida’s unemployment rate was 8.0 percent in December 2012, the lowest for the state since November 2008, when the jobless rate was 7.8 per-cent. The Columbia County labor force consists of 31,186 peo-ple. In December 28,896 were employed, while an estimated 2,290 were jobless. The state’s unemployment rate now stands at its lowest level since November Rash of car break-insreported in Lake CityBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLocal residents are reporting a rash of car break-ins that are taking place in the county as well as within city limits. There are reports of vehicles being ransacked with burglars going through make-up bags, glove compartments, and center consoles as they look for loot. However, in several cases, the would-be thieves have not removed any electronics or other valuables that could be traced back to them. Early estimates indicate there have been at least 10 vehicle break-ins in the past few days, with at least six occur-ring Friday night. Most did not result in the filing of police reports. Three vehicle break-in reports were filed with the Lake City Police Department from incidents where A hot time at chili cook-offBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comChili was the main dish on the menu Saturday at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market where seven contestants were competing in the Second Annual Chili Cook-off. The chili cooking competition also aided in raising funds for a local charity which planned to use the proceeds to send church members to Africa for mis-sion work. Jackie Kite was the winner of the cookoff. Although the contest was billed as a competition with categories for hot or mild chili, contest officials only had one category for the cooking competition BREAK-INS continued on 6A CHILI continued on 6A



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, January 20, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Lake CityLake City Commons Center(Publix Shopping)752-3733 CONTACTSEYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $119 Includes Lenses & FramesSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JAN. 31, 2013 NOW FREE GLASSES FREEPAIR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive aSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JAN. 31, 2013 $99 1 PairEyeglasses Includes lenses & frames.Some Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JAN. 31, 2013 NOW “Where you get the Best for Less”Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday BRIEFS GAMES Tuesday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting in District 2 state qualifier at Arnold High in Panama City Beach, 3 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer vs. Interlachen High in District 5-2A tournament at Keystone Heights High, 5 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Mosley High in District 2-4A tournament at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee, 6 p.m. Wednesday Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Williston High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High boys basketball at Lee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Fort White High girls weightlifting in District 4 state qualifier at Belleview High, TBA Q Columbia High basketball at Hamilton County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) YOUTH BASKETBALL USSSA travel team sign-up Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc. has announced tryouts at Richardson Community Center for its seventhand 10th-grade USSSA travel basketball teams. Tryouts for seventh-grade (ages 11-14) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb.13, 15, 20 and 22; tryouts for 10-grade (ages 14-17) are 5:30-7 p.m. on Feb. 12, 14, 19 and 21. Permission/waver forms must be signed by a parent or guardian. Twelve players will be chosen for each team and contacted by phone. Fee for players selected is $60,due by March 1. For details, call Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith at 754-7096 or 754-7095. CHS FOOTBALL Quarterback Club pheasant shoot Allen & Son Quail Farm and the Columbia County Quarterback Club, is sponsoring a pheasant hunt on Feb. 9 at Robert Louis Green Farm, 12 miles north of Lake City. Ticket cost for the shooting stations is $250 (20-shooter limit), which includes runners to pick up birds, dressing out birds and any tipping. Back-up shooters will be charged $75. Shooters should arrive no later than noon, and there will be a safety meeting and home-cooked meal before the shoot begins. No license or permit is needed; No. 5 shot is recommended. For details, call Leronia Allen at 754-9127 or Christofer Piercey at 288-9631. Ducks Unlimited District Chairman Jimmy Sparks is working with Allen on the pheasant shoot. Call Sparks at 752-9589.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High keeper Ty Williams makes a save earli er this season. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High finished off its regular season by picking up its 10th win of the year on Friday. The Tigers’ soccer team picked up a 1-0 victory over Vanguard High with a goal from Dylan Sessions in the first half on an assist from Alex Rhea. “It was a great effort from our entire team and our goalkeeper Ty Williams came up with some great saves,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “I feel great about the way the team played and it’s good timing heading into the dis-trict tournament.” Columbia finishes the regular season with a 10-6-4 record and will travel to Tallahassee for the District 4-6A tournament beginning on Tuesday. The Tigers will face Panama City Mosely in the first round at 6 p.m. at Lincoln High on Tuesday. Tigers head into disrict tourney on Tuesday. CHS soccer closes out season with win over Vanguard JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Arnereanna Bryant puts up a shot earli er this season against Wolfson High.Lady Tigers split games against Raiders, JacketsBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s Lady Tigers basketball team rounded out the week with a split against Santa Fe and St. Augustine high schools. The Lady Tigers knocked off the Lady Raiders, 45-28, behind Marnae Gaskins’ 23-point effort. Stephanie Silva had eight points and Akiria Richburg had six points. “It was just a great team effort,” Columbia head coach David Tompkins said. “We had more power tonight.” After a big win against Santa Fe on Thursday, the Lady Tigers ran into one of the strongest teams in the district with St. Augustine. The Lady Yellow Jackets stung Columbia with a 66-27 win. Gaskins and Silva led with five points apiece. “They’re just a great team,” Tompkins said. “They’re good from the inside and the outside. They can just do it all.” Gaskins scores 23 to lead Columbia over Santa Fe.Rivalry revenge JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javonta Foster looks to make a move tow ard the basket earlier this week.Tigers sweep weekendBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High finished off the weekend with a bit of rivalry revenge as the Tigers defeated Suwannee High, 68-62, on Saturday. Columbia picked up a district win against St. Augustine High, 63-49, on Friday to clinch the No. 2 seed in the District 4-6A tournament. But the big game of the weekend was getting revenge for a season-opening loss against the Bulldogs. Morris Marshall led the Tigers with 20 points in the contest to lead the Tigers to victory, but it was Tre Simmons who ignited the Columbia to a 16-2 run that spanned the end of the third and beginning of the fourth quarters. Columbia trailed by nine points, but an 11-0 run fin-ished off by an Akeem Williams’ layup gave the Tigers a 38-36 edge with 1:26 remaining in the third quarter. The Tigers never looked back. “Simmons was able to stick the dagger in them once he got going,” Columbia High head coach Horace Jefferson said. “Marshall played like a terror, like we need him to play every night and kudos go out to Akeem Williams, who I thought played ideal.” Simmons had 12 points, Javonta Foster had 10 points and Andrew Momeaka and Williams each had six points. Against the Yellow Jackets, Marshall had 28 points and Foster finished with 23 points to help lead the Tigers to victory.



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H appy New Year! What a great time to live and work in Lake City! What an even better time to be a Lake City–Columbia County Chamber Member. We have a new execu-tive committee, as well as two new board members. Please welcome the new executive board: Joel Foreman, President, John Kuykendall, President-Elect and Joy Lizotte, Treasurer, as well as our two new board members: Bruce Drawdy and Jimbo Haley. I, along with the 2013 Board of Directors, am looking forward to Chamber eventson tap in January Lake City Reporter Week of January 20-26 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc. FT. WHITE7905 S.W. Hwy 27r rrnr 497-1484 ##(!%$! (LAKE CITY5735 SW State Rd. 247rn#n# rrnr 752-3111 ##(!%$! (LAKE BUTLER280 West Main St.r-r)+r)* 496-2878 ##(!%$! ( LIVE OAK6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln.')+,)"+).) 330-0331 ##(0!%$! ( LAKE CITY857 Southwest Main Blvd.)*r"+).) 755-7050 &#(/##(0!%$ Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer.Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. $12 Large 2-Topping Pizza PLUS 8 Wings with Cajun Bread & Dipping SaucePIZZA & WINGS Two Medium 2-topping Pizzas, an order of our NEW Flavored Howie Bread, one Free Dipping Sauce and a 2-Liter! Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. LARGEPIZZA Any Specialty $10 Works, Howie Maui, Meat Eaters and VeggieCheese or Pepperoni $595 Additional toppings available Carry-out $10 PICK TWO Medium 1-Topping Pizza, Small Oven Baked Sub, 8 Piece Wings, Any Medium Salad or Baked Pasta 22048_LCReporter_1/8/12 CHAMBER BUSINESS Dennille Deckerdennille@lakecitychamber.comFrom staff reportsThe First Federal Bank of Florida recently completed its 2012 Community Awards Program, through which where the bank gave more than $40,000 to local nonprofit organizations and institu-tions. According to information from the bank, First Federal Bank of Florida gave $41,200 to local schools, after-school programs, intellectual developmental disabil-ity organizations, sports programs, animal shelters and other nonprofit organizations the past year. The Community Awards Program is a way for First Federal and the community to partner together to support local organiza-tions. Through the program, every time a First Federal customer who is enrolled in the program, uses their debit card to make a signature-based transaction, First Federal donates money to a partici-pating organization. First Federal customers just have to swipe, sign and support. All the money raised comes from First Federal. Participating organizations for Columbia County were Columbia City Elementary School, Richardson Community Center, Happy House, Florida Gateway College, Lake City Humane Society, Niblack Elementary School and CARC (Advocates for Citizens with Disabilities). “I am grateful to the loyalty of our customers who share in our mission to provide support to our communities,” said Keith Leibfried, First Federal president and CEO. “It is through their commitment to First Federal that we are able to donate to these organizations that Bank benefits nonprofits COURTESY PHOTOFirst Federal Bank of Fllorida officials present a check fo r $5,000 from the bank’s Community Awards Program to the Florida Gateway College Foundation.More than $40,000 donated to area organizations. COMMUNITY SUPPORT BANK continued on 2C CHAMBER continued on 2C



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LIFE Sunday, January 20, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D W e all have our favorite Asian take-out place that has the standard offerings, but if you are in the mood for something a little different and more than a little deli-cious, we encourage you to try out Bento Caf. They have locations in Orlando, Jacksonville and Gainesville. Serving Pan Asian cuisine and top-notch Sushi for more than 10 years, Bento Caf is a gem of a find. Bento Caf is not run-ofthe-mill. The dcor is styl-ish ... in deep dragon red or cool blue, depending on the location. The Newberry Road location in Gainesville is popular among the col-lege crowd and nearby businesses so it’s always hustling and bustling, while the Archer Road location is more laid back and spa-cious with tables for those in a hurry and comfort-able booths for those who have time to unwind and relax in the calming atmo-sphere. We’ve not tried the Jacksonville or Orlando locations, but are confident those locations are just as inviting. The authentic Asian food is cooked to order and they pride themselves on using only the freshest ingredi-ents. As with most Asian restaurants, and the cook-ing style, you can be in and out in 30 minutes. A defi-nite plus for those on short lunch breaks or those who need a quick meal between shopping locations. We’re not huge fans of sushi, but they have nearly 50 choices, plus sashimi bowls that are sure to please even the most dis-cerning palate. We’ll let you be the judge. We are however, lovers of pan Asian cuisine. Without a doubt, Bento offers up some of the best around our part of the world. You have a choice between Bento Boxes, which means “boxed meal” in Japanese; noodle bowls or rice bowls. The Bento Box comes with steamed white rice, string beans, noodles and a ginger salad. You can order noodle bowls with either thick Udon or mini-Udon noo-dles. Either are fabulous. One of our favorites is the Bulgogi Box. A Korean dish of marinated beef (our favorite) or chicken that’s wok seared with onions, scallions in a mild spicy sauce. Cindy says it comes close to the authentic Bulgogi she came to love while stationed overseas. Another favorite is the Szechuan chicken noodle bowl; tasty chicken, juli-enne carrots, snow peas, Bento Caf does Asian Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter BY JOCELYN NOVECKAP National WriterTwo men had recently bought a house together in San Francisco, and the neighbors were annoyed. The men were entertaining “a very suspicious mixture of people,” the neigh-bors wrote, asking: “How can we improve the neighborhood?” “You could move,” Dear Abby replied.That zinger, contained in the 1981 collection “The Best of Dear Abby,” was such classic Abby — real name, Pauline Friedman Phillips — that it moved her daughter to burst into laughter Thursday when reminded of it, even though she had just returned from the funeral of her mother. The elder Phillips had died a day earlier at age 94 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. “People weren’t really talking about homosexuality back then,” Jeanne Phillips, who now writes the famous syndicated column, said. “But you know, there wasn’t a subject my mother wouldn’t take on.” As the world said goodbye to Dear Abby on Thursday, the Web was full of her snap-piest one-liners, responses to thousands of letters over the decades that she wrote in her daily column. But her admirers noted that behind the humor and wit was a huge heart, and a genuine desire to improve people’s lives. “She really wanted to help people,” said Judith Martin, the etiquette columnist known as Miss Manners. “Yes, she wrote with humor, but with great sympathy. She had an enormous amount of influence, and for the good. Her place in the culture was really extraordinary.” The long-running “Dear Abby” column first appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle in 1956. Phillips was hardly experienced, but she had managed to snag an interview for the job. A skeptical editor allowed her to write a few sample columns, and Phillips was hired. Here in Florida, Elaine Griffis, of Bradford County, said what she remembers most is that Abby’s advice always was founded in folksy common sense. “I think she gives good advice, but people that need it won’t heed it,” she said at the Lake City Mall Friday afternoon. Davenia Griffin, of Lake City, agreed that it was good advice, and that people shouldn’t have had need to ask most of the time. “I would say it’s very good advice that she gave,” she said. “The thing is if they followed it.” Jenny Sargent, from Lake City, said she had her own way of reading the column. “What I’d like to do was read the problem and then come up with my own solutions,” Sargent said. “Her solutions were always just as good or better.” Phillips wrote under the name Abigail Van Buren, plucking the name Abigail from the Bible and Van Buren from American history. Her column competed for decades with that of Ann Landers, who was none other than her twin sister, Esther Friedman Lederer (she died in 2002). Their relationship was stormy G rowing your own seed-lings for the spring vegetable garden can be very rewarding. You can get a head start on the growing season and find the cultivars that are adapted best for Florida. Your money will get you a lot more plants if you start them yourself instead of buy-ing store-bought transplants. Some vegetable plants are just too difficult, however, to start indoors, so wait and sow them directly into the spring garden. Some of these plants include bush and pole beans, lima beans, melon, sweet corn, cucumbers, southern peas, squash and turnips. Our average frost free date is in mid-March. We most likely will not have frosts later, but there’s no guarantee. Most vegetable trans-plants are going to require six to eight weeks to develop before set-ting them out in the garden. If you do the math, you’ll see that now, mid-January, is the right time to start your seeds indoors. If you are new at starting seeds indoors, consider trying tomato, broccoli, cauliflower, eggplant or peppers. These plants are easy to grow if you give them the proper conditions, and they will likely survive when you transplant them into the garden. Start with seeds that are adapted to Florida, and those that have good nematode and disease resis-tance. A list of good vegetable varieties for our Florida gardens can be found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021 Check the local garden shops, farm supply stores, seed catalogues, and on-line seed com-panies for these seeds. The materials you will need to get started include sterile seed-starter soil, clean seed trays or cell packs, water, and water soluble houseplant fertilizer. Other requirements are warmth, bright light, and constant soil moisture. Clean containers such as cans or yogurt cups with drain holes can also be used for direct seeding or for transplanting seedlings. You can use a bagged commercial seed-starter medium or you can mix your own, but use sterile ingredients. There are a number of good recipes, but the mix should be fine, retain moisture, drain well, contain no fertilizer. One good mix is equal parts of sphagnum peat moss, perlite or vermiculite, and fine composted pine bark. Water the mix before seeding, or sprinkle repeatedly until the mix is saturat-ed. Water from then on only when soil feels dry to touch. Check the seed pack for depth and additional instructions. A few seeds need light to germinate, so just scatter and gently press them onto the soil surface. Some seeds need to be scarified (nicked or scratched) or stratified (cooled for a period in the freezer) before they will germinate. Purchased seeds will already be prepared. If you col-lect seeds to plant, you’ll need to know what is required for germina-tion. The amount of light that a small seedling receives is very impor-tant. A total of about 16 hours per day is needed such as a combina-tion of bright sunlight, fluorescent lights, or grow lights. Without enough light, plants will be spindly and weak. The soil must be fairly warm for most seeds to germinate. Some people use electric grow mats to keep trays at a constant tempera-ture. You can be successful with most common garden plants if your soil is about 75 degrees in the day and a little cooler at night. When the first set of true leaves appear, fertilize at half the indoor fertilizer rate and continue with every other watering. Plants should be ready to set out in the garden within six to eight weeks, but they need to be ‘hardened’ first. Place them outside in a shady area and increase the amount of sun they receive each day. Bring them back inside at night for at least a week. This pro-cedure will help plants develop a protective cuticle layer on the stem and leaves to help prevent water loss. So get those seeds started and get a head start on a rewarding harvest. Call the Master Gardeners at 752-5384 with your gardening questions.Start seedlings for your vegetable garden GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Dear Abby’s legacy Wit, warmth and snappy advice made her wildly popul ar Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE‘Dear Abby’ advice columnist Pauline Friedman Phillip s, known to millions of readers as Abigail van Buren, s igns autographs for fans after the dedication of a ‘Dear Abby’ star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles in 2001. Phillips, who had Alzheimer’ s disease, died Wednesday. She was 94. Area residents fondly recall columnist who spoke to them with folksy common sense. Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES TASTE continued on 2D ABBY continued on 2D Griffin Sargent1DLIFE



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TALLAHASSEE Bryan F. Smith is returning to Florida A&M University, where he earned a masters degree, as the schools anti-hazing administrator. Interim university President Larry Robinson said on Friday that Smiths job will be to ensure initia tives adopted following the hazing death of a band member will be imple mented. Drum major Robert Champion died in November 2011 after he was beaten aboard a band bus in Orlando. Smith most recently was executive director and co-founder of Destined for Success Educational Services in Decatur, Ga. He said his goal will be to change a hazing culture on the Tallahassee cam pus. Coast Guard rescues 12 PENSACOLA The U.S. Coast Guard has rescued 12 people from a scientific research and survey ship that capsized about 140 miles south of Pensacola. The Coast Guard says the Seaprobes crew reported Friday morn ing that the 170-foot ship was taking on water and its 12 crewmembers had abandoned the ship on life rafts. Coast Guard helicop ters airlifted the group to Mobile for medical evalu ation and three were then sent to an area hospital for further treatment. The Coast Guard says investigators are working to determine what caused the ship to capsize. Gov. Scott signs death warrant TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has signed a death warrant for a man convicted killing a Florida state trooper. The governors office announced Friday that 47-year-old Paul Augustus Howell is scheduled to die by lethal injection at Florida State Prison near Raiford at 6 p.m., Feb. 26. Trooper Jimmy Fulford was blown apart when he opened a booby-trapped package during a routine traffic stop on Interstate 10 in February 1992. The pipe bomb, hidden in a gift-wrapped microwave oven, was intended to kill two women in Marianna because they knew too much about a drug-related murder in 1991. The death led to federal and state investigations that exposed a drug trafficking ring based in South Florida. Howell was convicted of building the bomb and sentenced to death in 1995. 21 snakes killed in python hunt MIAMI Florida wildlife officials say 21 Burmese pythons have been killed so far in a pub lic hunt for the invasive species in the Everglades. Its unknown how many pythons live in the Everglades. Even experi enced hunters have a hard time spotting the snakes in the swamplands. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says more than 1,000 people regis tered for the states month long Python Challenge. The hunters may find more success if colder temperatures drive the snakes onto sunny sur faces. The snakes killed since the contest began Saturday will be processed by the University of Florida. The state hopes to apply the data gleaned from the carcasses to management plans for the Everglades. Officials say the large snakes are devouring native wildlife at an alarm ing rate. Courthouse art payment OKd TALLAHASSEE Florida is paying more than $500,000 to a pair of contractors to resolve a dispute over artwork for a new courthouse. A legislative panel on Thursday approved the payment in order to end several lawsuits related to the construction of the 1st District Court of Appeal building. The $48.8 million structure, which opened about two years ago in Tallahassee, has been criticized for being too expensive and too opulent. Critics dubbed it a Taj Mahal because it included private kitchens and bath rooms for each judge and the structure features granite, etched glass and African mahogany trim. Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater had initially refused to pay contractors for about 400 large, framed historic photos for the building. He said it would exceed state spending lim its on artwork. Woman dies fleeing police TAMPA Police say a woman was killed in a crash shortly after trying to run over two people who were walking on a sidewalk in Tampa. According to Tampa police, the crash took place moments after a fight broke out early Friday between two women at the Interstate Lounge. Several witnesses and an officer saw a car accelerate and drive on the sidewalk where two pedestrians were walking. One jumped out of the way and the other was knocked down. The officer pursued the car, which crashed when 25-year-old Kathleen Trombley lost control and slammed into a pole. She died at the scene and 38year-old Patrick Simmons was taken to the hospital with a broken leg. The pedestrians werent injured. Its not clear whether they had been fighting with the driver. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Country singer Slim Whitman is 89. Comedian Arte Johnson is 84. Former astronaut Buzz Aldrin is 83. Olympic gold medal figure skater Carol Heiss is 73. Singer Eric Stewart is 68. Movie director David Lynch is 67. Country-rock musician George Grantham (Poco) is 66. Actor Daniel Benzali is 63. Rock musician Paul Stanley (KISS) is 61. Rock musician Ian Hill (Judas Priest) is 61. Comedian Bill Maher is 57. Actor Lorenzo Lamas is 55. Country singer John Michael Montgomery is 48. Daily Scripture So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 11-14-26-39 7 Friday: 2-7-11-12-36 Saturday: Afternoon: 6-1-4 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 9-3-7-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 12-20-41-43-49-53 x5 Florida A&M University hires anti-hazing chief CHICAGO L ance Armstrong finally cracked. Not while expressing deep remorse or regrets, though there was plenty of that in Friday nights second part of Armstrongs interview with Oprah Winfrey. It wasnt over the $75 million in sponsorship deals that evaporated over the course of two days, or hav ing to walk away from the Livestrong cancer charity he founded and called his sixth child. It wasnt even about his lifetime ban from competition, though he said that was more than he deserved. It was another bit of collateral damage that Armstrong said he wasnt prepared to deal with. I saw my son defending me and saying, Thats not true. What youre saying about my dad is not true, Armstrong recalled. Thats when I knew I had to tell him. Armstrong was near tears at that point, referring to 13-year-old Luke, the oldest of his five children. He blinked, looked away from Winfrey, and with his lip trembling, struggled to compose himself. It came just past the midpoint of the hourlong program on Winfreys OWN network. In the first part, broadcast Thursday, the disgraced cycling champion admitted using performance-enhancing drugs when he won seven straight Tour de France titles. Radcliffe explores daring territory in new film PARK CITY, Utah Daniel Radcliffe has really left Harry Potter behind with a star tling and explicit Sundance Film Festival role as poet Allen Ginsberg. Kill Your Darlings premiered Friday at Sundance and puts Radcliffe into daring territory. His young Ginsberg is initiated into booze and drugs, has oral sex performed on him in a library, makes out with one man and gets naked for sex with another man. The film recounts a little-known story of murder involving Ginsbergs circle of friends, including fellow future beat heroes Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. Alicia Keys to sing Super Bowl anthem Alicia Keys is adding her voice to the Super Bowl show. The Grammy-winning R&B singer has been lined up to perform the national anthem before the NFL championship game on Feb. 3 in New Orleans, a person familiar with Super Bowl entertainment plans told The Associated Press on Friday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the NFL has not yet announced the anthem singer. Keys, who turns 32 next week, released her fifth studio album, Girl on Fire, late last year. The Super Bowl teams will be deter mined today, when the San Francisco 49ers play the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC cham pionship game, and the Baltimore Ravens face the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game. The NFL said in October that Beyonce will be the star of the half time show at this years Super Bowl. She sang the national anthem at the 2004 NFL title game in her home town of Houston. Armstrong emotional in interview Wednes day: 9-21-28-32-51 PB 35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Lance Armstrong holds his Tour de France winners trophy out of reach of his son, Luke, after Armstrong won his seventh straight Tour de France cycling race in 2005s. During the second part his interview with Oprah Winfrey on Friday, Armstrong talked about talking with Luke, now 13, after his son had defended him concerning doping allegations. ASSOCIATED PRESS Audience participation Dylan Belanger, 8, of Royal Palm Beach, holds onto a horn as Cora, a 51-year-old Indian elephant, blows a note during an afternoon performance at the new Elephant Encounter on opening day of the South Florida Fair on Friday in West Palm Beach. Cora was in the 1980 film Smokey and the Bandit II. Radcliffe Keys



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, final stage, at Santiago, Chile (delayed tape) GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, final round, at La Quinta, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, final round, at Ka’upulehu-Kona, Hawaii NFL FOOTBALL 3 p.m. FOX — Playoffs, NFC Championship, San Francisco at Atlanta 6:30 p.m. CBS — Playoffs, AFC Championship, Baltimore at New England NHL HOCKEY 10 p.m. NBCSN — Chicago at Phoenix PREP BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — New Hampton (N.H.) Prep vs. Huntington (W.Va.) Prep, at Springfield, Mass. TENNIS 11 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, fourth round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, fourth round, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, fourth round, at Melbourne, Australia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN — Iowa St. at Oklahoma St. 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Maryland at Georgia TechFSN — UAB at UTEP 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Texas A&M at Georgia Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Cincinnati at Syracuse 5:30 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma St. at Baylor 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Georgetown at Notre Dame 9:30 p.m. ESPN — Texas at Oklahoma NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Indiana at Memphis 7 p.m. TNT — San Antonio at Philadelphia 9:30 p.m. TNT — L.A. Lakers at Chicago NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Detroit at Columbus TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Duke at UConnFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 2OTSan Francisco 45, Green Bay 31Atlanta 30, Seattle 28New England 41, Houston 28 Conference Championships Today San Francisco at Atlanta, 3 p.m. (FOX)Baltimore at New England, 6:30 p.m. (CBS) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New Orleans AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)NFL Draft early entries Keenan Allen, WR, CaliforniaStedman Bailey, WR, West VirginiaDavid Bakhtiari, OT, ColoradoLe’Veon Bell, RB, Michigan StateGio Bernard, RB, North CarolinaTyler Bray, QB, TennesseeTerrence Brown, CB, StanfordKnile Davis, RB, ArkansasMike Edwards, DB, HawaiiMatt Elam, S, FloridaZach Ertz, TE, StanfordChris Faulk, OT, LSUSharrif Floyd, DT, FloridaD.J. Fluker, OT, AlabamaMichael Ford, RB, LSUTravis Frederick, C, WisconsinKwame Geathers, NT, GeorgiaWilliam Gholston, DE, Michigan StateJohnathan Hankins, DT, Ohio StateDeAndre Hopkins, WR, ClemsonJustin Hunter, WR, TennesseeJawan Jamison, RB, RutgersStefphon Jefferson, RB, NevadaTony Jefferson, S, OklahomaJelani Jenkins, LB, FloridaLuke Joeckel, OT, Texas A&MJarvis Jones, LB, GeorgiaBrandon Kaufman, WR, Eastern Washington Joe Kruger, DE, UtahEddie Lacy, TB, AlabamaMarcus Lattimore, RB, South CarolinaCorey Lemonier, DE, AuburnBennie Logan, DT, LSUTyrann Mathieu, CB, LSUDee Milliner, CB, AlabamaBarkevious Mingo, DE, LSUKevin Minter, LB, LSUSam Montgomery, DE, LSUBrandon Moore, DT, TexasAlec Ogletree, LB, GeorgiaKyle Padron, QB, Eastern WashingtonCordarrelle Patterson, WR, TennesseeJustin Pugh, OT, SyracuseJoseph Randle, RB, Oklahoma StateJordan Reed, TE, FloridaEric Reid, S, LSUXavier Rhodes, CB, Florida StateDa’Rick Rogers, WR, Tennessee TechLogan Ryan, CB, RutgersDarrington Sentimore, DE, TennesseeTharold Simon, CB, LSUDion Sims, TE, Michigan StateAkeem Spence, DT, IllinoisKenny Stills, WR, OklahomaLevine Toilolo, TE, StanfordSpencer Ware, RB, LSUBjoern Werner, DE, Florida StateSteve Williams, CB, CaliforniaBrad Wing, P, LSUCierre Wood, RB, Notre DameTom Wort, LB, Oklahoma College all-star games Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLAP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Indiana at Northwestern, 1 p.m.No. 14 N.C. State vs. Clemson, 6 p.m.TENNISAustralian Open seeds At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Singles Men Third Round Richard Gasquet (9), France, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (2), 6-0. Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Juan Martin del Potro (6), Argentina, 6-3, 6-3, 6-7 (3), 3-6, 6-3. Andreas Seppi (21), Italy, def. Marin Cilic (12), Croatia, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (7), France, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-1, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (17), Germany, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-4. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Gilles Simon (14), France, def. Gael Monfils, France, 6-4, 6-4, 4-6, 1-6, 8-6. Women Third Round Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Yanina Wickmayer (20), Belgium, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Jamie Hampton, United States, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Serena Williams (3), United States, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 6-1, 6-3. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Roberta Vinci (16), Italy, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-3. Sloane Stephens (29), United States, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 7-5, 6-3. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-2, 7-6 (3). Doubles Men Second Round Simone Bolelli and Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Rohan Bopanna, India, and Rajeev Ram (12), United States, 6-2, 7-6 (3). Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, and Benoit Paire, France, def. Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (9), Brazil, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. Robin Haase and Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Jonathan Marray, Britain, and Andre Sa (16), Brazil, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Daniel Nestor (5), Canada, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, and Martin Klizan, Slovakia. David Marrero and Fernando Verdasco (11), Spain, def. Tomasz Bednarek and Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 6-1, 6-2. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, and Jonathan Erlich, Israel, def. Matthew Barton and John Millman, Australia, 6-1, 6-7 (5), 6-3. arcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, and Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Horia Tecau (4), Romania, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Julien Benneteau and Edouard RogerVasselin, France, def. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Nenad Zimonjic (7), Serbia, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5). Women Second Round Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Kveta Peschke (9), Czech Republic, walkover. Irina-Camelia Begu and Monica Niculescu (13), Romania, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia, and Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5. Nadia Petrova, Russia, and Katarina Srebotnik (5), Slovenia, def. Darija Jurak, Croatia, and Katalin Marosi, Hungary, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Varvara Lepchenko, United States, and Zheng Saisai, China, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, and Sam Stosur, Australia, 7-5, 3-6, 7-5. Serena and Venus Williams (12), United States, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, and Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-1, 6-2. Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, def. Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Irina Falconi, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Mixed First Round Jarmila Gajdosova and Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Frederik Nielsen, Denmark, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Abigail Spears and Scott Lipsky, United States, def. Raquel Kops-Jones, United States, and Treat Conrad Huey, Philippines, 6-3, 3-6, 10-7. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, and Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Vania King, United States, and Marcelo Melo, Brazil, 2-6, 6-4, 10-7. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Rohan Bopanna, India, def. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, and Jack Sock, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Elena Vesnina, Russia, and Leander Paes (2), India, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, and Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, 6-7 (8), 6-4, 10-7. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, and Daniele Bracciali (7), Italy, def. Casey Dellacqua and John-Patrick Smith, Australia, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4). Legends Doubles Round Robin Men Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde, Australia, def. Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Wayne Ferreira, South Africa, 7-6 (17), 6-4. Women Iva Majoli, Croatia, and Barbara Schett, Austria, def. Nicole Bradtke and Rennae Stubbs, Australia, 7-5, 6-1. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 2BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOGoofy Challenge finishersMichelle Wilson, (right) of Lake City, and her sister, Kath y Carter, of East Prairie, Mo., finished the Goofy Challenge races Jan. 12-13, at Walt Dis ney World. Runners must finish the Disney Half Marathon (13.1 miles) on Saturday, then finish the Disney Marathon (26.2 miles) on Sunday for a running total of 39.3 miles in one weeke nd. The accomplishment is called Disney’s Goofy Challenge. The sisters earned medals in each race, plus the Goofy Challenge medal, for their finish. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFalcons claim championshipLake City Middle School’s Caleb Strickland (4) chases the ball in a game against Suwannee on Thursday. Lake City finished the regular season undefe ated after a 7-0 win. Te’o tells ESPN: Not involved in hoaxAssociated PressNEW YORK — Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o insisted he had no role in the bizarre hoax involv-ing his “dead” girlfriend and told ESPN on Friday night that he was duped by a person who has since apologized to him. In an off-camera interview Friday with ESPN, Te’o said Ronaiah Tuiasosopo, a 22-year-old acquaintance who lives in California, con-tacted him two days ago and confessed to the prank.



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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 20, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Fed underestimated crisis in 2007Associated PressWASHINGTON — Federal Reserve officials in 2007 underestimated the scope of the approach-ing financial crisis and how it would tip the U.S. economy into the worst recession since the Great Depression, transcripts of the Fed’s policy meetings that year show. The meetings occurred as the country was on the brink of the worst finan-cial crisis since the 1930s. As the year went on, Fed officials shifted their focus away from the risk of infla-tion as they slowly began to recognize the severity of the crisis. During 2007, the Fed began to cut interest rates and took extraordi-nary steps to ease credit and shore up confidence in the banking system. Throughout the year, the housing crisis deepened. Banks and hedge funds that had invested big in subprime mortgages were left with worthless assets as foreclosures rose. The damage reached the top echelons of Wall Street. At the Fed’s Oct. 30 policy meeting, Janet Yellen, then-president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, said the economy faced increased risks. But she hardly pre-dicted anything dire. “I think the most likely outcome is that the econ-omy will move forward toward a soft landing,” she said. Chairman Ben Bernanke noted that housing was “very weak” and manufac-turing was slowing. “But expect for those sectors, there is a good bit of momentum in the econ-omy,” he said. Bernanke did acknowledge that there was “an unusual amount of uncertainty” surround-ing the Fed’s economic forecasts. continuing to work on our three year strategic plan. Our specific area from our plan we will focus on for 2013 is work-force development. We will be meeting with school officials in the Columbia County School System, Florida Gateway College, as well as both large and small businesses, to see how we can all come together to create a labor ready work-force in our community. Chamber MixerWe will host our first Chamber Mixer of the year on Thursday, Jan. 24, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Lake City Medical Center. This is a great opportunity to network with the local business community. This also leads up the annual Chamber Ball weekend, which will take place on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25 and 26. If you are a golfer, we invite you to come and play in our golf tournament spon-sored by GulfCoast Financial Services on Friday at noon at the Country Club of Lake City. Entry fee is $60 and includes lunch and many other fun surprises. We have a few spots left. So, if you are interested, please contact the Chamber as soon as possible. Saturday, Jan. 26, at 6 p.m. we will be hosting our Chamber Ball dinner spon-sored by Rountree Moore Automotive Group. We are pleased to announce that we sold out of dinner tickets three weeks before the event. We are very thankful to our members who continue to support us over the Chamber Ball weekend. We are still look-ing for silent auction items, if you have a product or service that you would like to expose in front of the 376 chamber members who will be in attendance. It is a great way to market your business and all of the proceeds go to help our cham-ber grow and thrive. The year ahead2013 is going to be a great year for Lake City and Columbia County. Your Chamber of Commerce is ready to do our part to welcome the changes and growth to our community. As the old saying goes, it takes two — the chamber and you! If you are a business owner or private individual that would like to take a more active role in shaping our community and business environment, we welcome you to consider membership. We would love the opportunity to tell you what the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce can do for you. Stop by and see us, visit our website — www.lakecitychamber.com— give us a call at 752-3690 or follow us on Facebook for the latest Chamber events and information. Q Dennille Decker is the executive director of the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. CHAMBER: Mixer, weekend on tap Continued From Page 1C BANK: Local nonprofits benefit Continued From Page 1Cprovide valued services to our communities.” For more than 50 years First Federal and its employees have been com-mitted to building vibrant communities through the support of education, sports, the arts and improv-ing the quality for all. Since its inception in 2010, First Federal has given more than $62,000 to local agencies through the Community Awards Program. This is in addi-tion to the thousands of dollars and volunteer hours that First Federal and its employees give each year. The bank has announced that the Community Rewards Program is under-way for 2013. Anyone inter-ested in helping support the community through the Community Rewards Program, stop by a local First Federal branch or call customer service 755-0600 to enroll your debit card. Any organization represen-tative interested in partici-pating in the Community Rewards Program, please visit the Web site www.ffsb.com and click on the Contribution Requests learn more picture. COURTESY PHOTOFirst Federal Bank of Florida officials present a c heck for $500 to Columbia City Elementary School, a participant in the bank’s Community Rewar ds Program. COURTESY PHOTOChildren and staff of the Happy House show off a ch eck for $1,000 received from First Federal Bank of Florida’s Community Rewards Program.



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scallions and thick Udon noodles in a mildly spicy sauce. You cannot go to Bento without ordering their pork dumplings. You can get them fried or steamed. We lean toward the steamed. They are delicious, and the slightly sweet, slightly spicy dipping sauce com-pliments these tasty treats perfectly. There are five to the order. We promise you’ll wish you hadn’t offered to share with your dining companions. Bento Caf also offers a variety of green tea, red tea and blended ice tea fla-vors, along with Boba teas. Give them a try; we’re sure you’ll likey, Hours of operation depend on location. Check them out on the web or Facebook. Gainesville locations:Q 3832 W Newberry Road; (352) 377-8686 Q 3841 SW Archer Road; (352) 224-5123 Jacksonville location:Q 4860 Big Island Drive, A#1; (904) 564-9494 Orlando location:Q 151 South Orange Ave.; (407) 999-8989 By DEAN FOSDICK Associated PressGardens can be great training grounds for fitness buffs. Add trails for jogging. Build benches for work-outs. Use trees and fence posts for stretching. Lose even more calories by squatting or lifting while weeding, planting, hauling and digging. You can personalize your garden to fit your energy level. Equipment such as exercise beams and con-ditioning ladders are inex-pensive and simple to make, while portable gear like weighted rollers, jump ropes, dumbbells and Swiss balls can be eased into the routines. “If you have children’s play equipment, it is easy to add a pull-up bar or climb-ing frame for adults to a tree house,” said Bunny Guinness, a landscape architect who runs a gar-den design business near Peterborough in central England. Gardening in and of itself can be a formi-dable calorie burner, said Guinness, who with physio-therapist Jacqueline Knox wrote “Garden Your Way to Health and Fitness” (Timber Press. 2008). Regular physical activity reduces the risk of many illnesses, and gar-dening can provide it, said Margaret Hagen, an educa-tor with University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. “Raking is like using a rowing machine,” Hagen said. “Turning a compost pile is similar to lifting weights. Carry a gallon sprinkling can of water in each hand and you’ve got 8-pound dumbbells. Pushing a lawnmower is like walk-ing on a treadmill, only much more interesting.” Even more calories are burned when calisthenics are included in the mix. Add push-ups, chin-ups, bridging, power lunges and dips to the workouts. Warm up before you begin to avoid cramping and joint pain. Pace your-self. Hydrate, especially if you’re gardening out in the sun. Avoid bending by using telescoping pruners, edgers and weeders. Opt for lightweight and easy-to-grip hand tools. Work ergonomically. Stress good posture and balance. “As someone who has had a back issue, I do try to follow my physical thera-pist’s advice and be careful to kneel instead of stoop-ing while gardening, and to lift with bent knees and a straight back,” Hagen said. “One of the things I like most about gardening is that because you stretch and move in so many direc-tions, it works all your muscle groups, releasing tension everywhere in your body.” Don’t forget to include mental health in your land-scape design. Add tranquil herb gardens, soothing fountains and small sitting areas for meditation, relax-ing and cooling off. “Any gardener can tell you that there is nothing like spending time outdoors gardening to refresh the soul,” Hagen said. “Psychologically, I’m sure it provides the same benefits to gardeners that recent research says recess pro-vides to schoolchildren.” Good nutrition also is an important part of any fitness package, and few things taste better than food served fresh from the garden. “If you can boost your health and avoid stresses and strains in the process, it becomes all the more sat-isfying,” Guinness said. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424Use your garden for fitness instead of going to the gym GARDENING ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Bunny Guinness, co-author of “Garden Your Way To Health and Fitness,” uses a garden bench for exercise from the book. Gardens can be pathway s to better conditioning, when you trade treadmills for trails, exercise mats for lawns and g arden benches for weight racks. ‘Garden Your Way To Health and Fitness’ by Bunny Guinn ess and Jacqueline Knox offers dozens of ways you can get more out of your gardening experience than just fresh vegetabl es and flowers.Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Muhammad Ali sent opponents crashing to the canvas. Now the boxing great is being portrayed on can-vas in his Kentucky hometown. A contemporary art show featuring 25 pieces created by 21 artists from across the country opens to the public on Friday at the Muhammad Ali Center, the cultural and education complex that promotes his social activism and relives his boxing exploits. Some of the artwork portrays Ali defeating Sonny Liston and George Foreman in his heyday as heavyweight champion. Artist Corey Pickett of Clovis, N.M., chose another side as his subject — Ali’s role in the civil-rights movement. Pickett’s work shows a steely image of Ali in a red, white and blue background to symbolize his role in American society. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau-rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. Online: Q For more about the healing power of gardening, see this University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service bulletin: http:// hendry.ifas.ufl.edu/HCHortNews_Healing.htm HAPPENINGS Mitchel Ordinario, a resident of Lake City, was among the students from Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne who were named to the Dean’s List for the fall semester, which ended in December. Ordinario is majoring in computer science. To be included on the Dean’s List, a student must complete 12 or more grad-ed credits in a semester with a semester grade-point average of at least 3.4. Founded in 1958, Florida Tech is the only indepen-dent, technological univer-sity in the Southeast, with 9,000 students enrolled on main campus. TASTE: Try Bento Cafe’ Continued From Page 1DLake City student makes dean’s list Kentucky art exhibit honors Ali ABBY: Wit remembered Continued From Page 1Din their early adult years, but they later regained the closeness they’d had growing up in Sioux City, Iowa. Carolyn Hax, who writes her own syndicated advice column, feels that one can’t speak of one sis-ter without the other, so influential were they both, and at the same time. “Any of us who do this owe them such a debt,” she said. “The advice column was a backwater of the newspaper, and now it is so woven into our cultural fabric. These columns are loved and widely read, by people you wouldn’t expect. That couldn’t have happened without them.” In a time before confessional talk shows and the nothing-is-too-private culture of the Web, the sisters’ columns offered a rare window into Americans’ private lives and a forum for discuss-ing marriage, sex and the swiftly changing mores of the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s. “I just enjoyed reading her columns,” Live Oak resident Pattie St. John said. “I guess I like to read other peoples prob-lems that way we know that we’re not the only one with problems.” The two columns differed in style, though. While Ann Landers responded to question-ers with homey, detailed advice, Abby’s replies were more flippant and occasionally risqu, like some collected for her 1981 book. Dear Abby: My boyfriend is going to be 20 years old next month. I’d like to give him some-thing nice for his birth-day. What do you think he’d like? — Carol Dear Carol: Never mind what he’d like, give him a tie. Dear Abby: I’ve been going with this girl for a year. How can I get her to say yes? — Don Dear Don: What’s the question? Jeanne Phillips, who took over the column in 2002 after a few years of sharing the byline, recalled in a telephone interview Thursday her mother’s response to a woman who wrote in detail of how many drinks she’d shared with her date one night. “Did I do wrong?” the woman wrote, in the daugh-ter’s retelling. “Probably,” her mom respond-ed. Tina Greene, of Lake City, appreci-ated the frank-ness with which Phillips wrote. “I remember reading some of her (columns) and laughing because she was dead on and straight to the point,” she said. But with all the wonderful humor, the younger Phillips says she was most impressed with two things: her mother’s com-passion and her bravery. The compassion, she says, shone through especially when her mother met her readers. She remembers a young girl coming up at a speaking engagement and saying something quietly, at which point her mother embraced the girl, who wept on her shoulder. “That is my favorite visual memory of my mom,” she said. Dear Abby’s advice changed over the years. When she started writing the column, she has said, she was reluctant to advo-cate divorce. “I always thought that marriage should be for-ever,” she explained. “I found out through my readers that sometimes the best thing they can do is part.” But her bravery, her daughter says, was exem-plified even more by her willingness to take on issues like abortion, AIDS, sexism and other hot top-ics. She caught some flack for writing about homo-sexuality. “Whenever I say a kind word about gays, I hear from people, and some of them are damn mad,” she said. “People throw Leviticus, Deuteronomy and other parts of the Bible to me. It doesn’t bother me. I’ve always been compassionate toward gay people.” Phillips didn’t always stop at answering letters; sometimes she called people directly. Greene Hickman 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760



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By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Several current and former employees in the adminis tration of Gov. Rick Scott are being ordered by a judge to testify in a sen sational criminal case that centers on allegations of illegal taping. It is still unclear after Fridays hearing whether Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll will be forced to answer questions in the criminal case against her former aide that has also included allegations of improper relationships in Carrolls office. Carletha Cole, who was fired last year, was arrest ed in 2011 and accused of giving a reporter a secret recording containing a con versation between Cole and Carrolls chief of staff. Cole has not been charged with making the recording nor have prosecutors said exactly when the recording was made. Circuit Judge Frank Sheffield initially ruled that Carroll must answer ques tions from lawyers repre senting Cole. But then he changed his mind at the urging of Scotts top law yer. Sheffield said Carroll would be questioned last and only if Coles lawyers could show her testimony was needed. Sheffield, however, made it clear that ques tions of Scott administra tion employees will be lim ited to illegal taping and whether or not top officials working for the governor had ordered widespread taping as alleged by Cole. The judge said lawyers could not ask Carroll or anyone else about the lieu tenant governors sexual preference or whether or not her office was the absolute worst place in the world to work. We are not going to try the lieutenant governors office, Sheffield said. Coles attorneys have asserted that their client was being set up because she witnessed unprofes sional behavior by Carroll and other employees, including walking in on Carroll and a female aide in a compromising position. Carroll, who is a former Navy officer and married, has called the allegations false and absurd. Attorney Stephen Webster suggested other employees in Carrolls office placed recordings on Coles computer and she assumed they were public records. A spokesman for the governors office pre viously denied that there was a widespread policy of taping people. Associated Press WEST PALM BEACH Florida officials want to recoup the $20 million in taxpayer funds they invest ed in Digital Domain now that the visual effects stu dio is facing bankruptcy. The Tampa Bay Times reported Saturday that Gov. Rick Scott directed the states Department of Economic Opportunity to hire lawyers to represent the state in bankruptcy court. He said the com pany broke its contract by not notifying the state it was filing for bankruptcy. The $20 million awarded in 2009 was part an incen tive to bring the company to Port St. Lucie with the promise of hundreds of high-paying jobs. Digital Domain Media Group also partnered with Florida State Universitys film school to build a branch campus in West Palm Beach. But the company shut down all of its Florida operations, closed its new animation studio in Port St. Lucie and laid off about 280 employees last fall. The production com pany, which was founded by James Cameron, has produced visual effects for movies including Titanic, Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End and the Transformers series. State and local officials had hoped the company would draw filmmakers from all over the world, giving the Sunshine State the ability to compete with California and New York with the backing of an established Hollywood entity. The state moved for ward with the funding incentive even though its lead public-private business screening com pany, Enterprise Florida, rejected it. Digital Domain pulled in a total of $40 mil lion in cash and land from state and local economic development funds. The company also has a $40 million bond issue with the city of Port St. Lucie, but that money must be paid back eventually. Its just the latest twist for the embattled compa ny. Florida State University President Eric Barron made a pitch this week to keep his schools digital film program in West Palm Beach, even though the partner company has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Digital Domain also helped Florida State establish a new bachelors degree program related to digital media production. Barron said talks are under way with four other companies interested in replacing Digital Domain. The board that oversees Floridas 12 public universi ties is considering whether Florida State should be required to move the pro gram to its main campus in Tallahassee. Besides los ing its business partner, the program has drawn opposition from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, which is only 30 miles from West Palm Beach. A three-member com mittee will study the issue and make a recommenda tion to the panel. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Call Today 487 0087 Your Authorized Retailer By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press SARASOTA On a recent sunny winter day on a downtown Sarasota street corner, a cluster of homeless men lounged on the back steps of a building, grimy backpacks and bags at their feet, while a few folks ambled to the nearby bus station. Parked at a meter just feet from them was a red Ferrari and around the corner was Sur la Table, an upscale cookware store offering $400 juicers. Newer, wealthy residents in the Gulf Coast city known for its arts scene and beautiful beaches are buying expensive downtown condos so they can live an urban lifestyle, but they dont want the problems associated with a city, including the 700 or so homeless people who inhabit the county, the American Civil Liberties Union and others contend. They also say authorities, including police, are trying to harass the homeless into leav ing the town of 53,000 full-time residents. Recently, the ACLU uncovered a surveillance video showing an officer throwing a homeless man against a metal grate and received public records that show offi cers sent messages to each other about bum hunting. We thought those messages were beyond just being juve nile, but was sort of indicative of the atmosphere that existed in the city, said Michael Barfield, the legal chair of the ACLU in Sarasota. To be sure, other warm-weath er cities have grappled with problems associated with the homeless. In Florida, Key West has periodically cracked down on quality of life offenses such as aggressive panhandling and using residents outdoor show ers. Miami-Dade County counted nearly 4,000 homeless people either sleeping on the street or in shelters within its borders one year ago. Barfield said that in the past 18 months, the city has target ed the homeless by removing benches and banning smoking in downtown parks and arrested a homeless man for charging his cellphone on a city-owned outlet in a park. The charge was later dropped. I think for a long time weve had a lot of issues. The fact that we have a lot of wealthy people downtown, we have a few condos that cater to that type of people, and theyre not quite used to dealing with the lowly and down trodden, said Steve McAllister, a Sarasota native who says he chooses to be homeless and live a lifestyle based on bartering. And so when we have home less people come here because of the weather or the opulence or whatnot, we get a lot of clashes between the two classes. The ACLU has filed five law suits against the city some have been settled and the smok ing ban has been struck down by a judge. Police Chief Bernadette DiPino who took the helm of the department in late December says the agency is conduct ing an internal investigation of both police issues raised by the ACLU. The city of Sarasota is work ing aggressively to learn as much as it can to learn about homeless issues in this community, DiPino said. Theres been a number of complaints from citizens and business owners about people who are sleeping or on the side walks or are begging for money. We try to apply the appropriate response to the complaints were getting from citizens. She and other city officials say Sarasota actually offers many more services to the homeless than other communities. Officials point to statistics that show there have been about 25,000 instanc es of documented police con tact with the homeless between 2004 and 2012, with 1,416 people referred to various social service programs by officers. DiPino said that like other com munities, Sarasota must balance its responsibility to help people with drug, alcohol and mental health issues with keeping other residents safe and happy. Phil Grande is a downtown business owner and one-time resident who spearheaded the effort to remove benches from the parks. Grande, a syndicated radio host, in 2010 purchased an expen sive condo in the same building as his downtown studio. He quickly noticed that stu dent groups fed the homeless in a nearby park and that people con gregated near the library, used drugs and hassled people on the street. He said the troublemakers are often aggressive, younger men. This isnt a homeless prob lem, Grande said. The home less are pretty much taken care of. This is a vagrant situation. Grande said there was a parade of homeless from the bus station to the library. Many business owners complained to the city and Grande contends lead ers were reluctant to take action because they were very liberal and didnt want more downtown development. At one point, a frus trated Grande chartered a bus for the homeless and drove them from downtown to a million-dol lar neighborhood where one city official lived and proceeded to feed the homeless in front of the officials home. Eventually, the benches were taken out of the parks. Once the benches were removed, the parade really dimin ished, he said. Grande sold his condo and now lives in a gated communi ty. He said hes donated time, money and food to homeless programs, including an offer of buying a building where the city and groups could distribute food an offer, he said, that was rejected by officials. Leslie Loveless, the inter im executive director of the Suncoast Partnership to End Homelessness, said part of the problem is that because Sarasota is such an upscale area, inexpen sive housing is difficult to find, even if a homeless person were to snag a job. We need to look at transition al and permanent housing thats affordable, she said. The Center for Housing Policy concluded that in late 2011, only 28 percent of the jobs in the area could earn enough to afford a two-bedroom apartment. To qual ify as affordable, rent must be less than 30 percent of monthly income. Some of the homeless contend that only a few troublemakers cause all problems, while the rest are trying to extricate them selves from the cycle of jobless ness and poverty. James Franklin Jr. spends his days on a bench outside City Hall and says hes never had issues with officers or city officials. Still, Franklin said hes concerned about the overall societal attitudes about the home less. Ive been homeless, Ive been a vagrant and now Im a bum thats being hunted by bum hunters. You know, call me what youre going to call me, but quit switching me up, he said. Call me James Franklin Jr., whether my situation is good or bad. I respect you and I expect you to respect me. ASSOCIATED PRESS Legal Consultant Michael Barfield (right) talks to Cindy Edlund (left) and James Franklin Jr., both of whom are homeless, as they sit on a park bench outside the Sarasota City Hall. Newer, wealthy residents in the Gulf Coast city known for its arts scene and beautiful beaches are buying expensive downtown condos so they can live an urban lifestyle, but they dont want the problems associated with a city, including the 700 or so homeless people who inhabit the county, the American Civil Liberties Union and others contend. Wealthy newcomers pushing city officials to remove bums. Homeless are a challenge for Sarasota Scott wants $20M state money back from bankrupt visual effects firm Governors staff ordered to testify in recording case



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 3B3BSPORTSTigers hit halfway point of year JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javonta Foster is fouled by Wolfson Hig h’s Andrew Spicer (32) during a play on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dilan Hall attempts to hold back a Wolfs on offensive player as he drives to the basket during a district game on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLEFT : Columbia High’s Morris Marshall drives down the court against Wolfson High on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Wayne Broom scans the court for an ope n teammate. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil forces his way past Wol fson’s Jason Baxter to the basket in a district game on Tuesday.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 20, 2013 3C By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — The aftermath of the housing bust forced many home-builders to dramatically scale back construction on new homes to avoid the risk of ending up saddled with a trove of newly built, yet unsold properties. But an improving housing market has homebuild-ers feeling more confident about sales, and that’s likely to kick the pace of new con-struction into a higher gear this year. The Commerce Department said Thursday that builders broke ground on houses and apartments last month at a seasonal-ly adjusted annual rate of 954,000. That’s 12.1 percent higher than November’s annual rate. And it is nearly double the recession low reached in April 2009. Construction increased last month for both single-family homes and apart-ments. And the pace in which builders request-ed permits to start more homes ticked up to a 4 1 year high. For the year, builders started work on 780,000 homes. That’s still roughly half of the annual number of starts consistent with healthier markets. But it is an increase of 28.1 percent from 2011. And it is the most since 2008 — shortly after the housing market began to collapse in late 2006 and 2007. Steady hiring, record-low mortgage rates and a tight supply of new and previ-ously occupied homes avail-able for sale have helped boost sales and prices in most markets. That has persuaded builders to start more homes, which adds to economic growth and hir-ing. David Williams, a homebuilding analyst with Williams Financial Group, says builders are very close-ly tied to what’s happen-ing in the housing market and they’re going to build homes to meet demand, but not go overboard. “I don’t think, at this point, that they’re going to overbuild,” Williams said, noting that homebuilders are still holding back on building too many spec homes, or properties built before they’re sold. Having some spec homes can help sales, especially when a buyer isn’t willing to wait several months for their home to be built. Builders tend to put up more of those homes heading into the spring home-selling sea-son that traditionally begins next month. Larry Webb, CEO of homebuilder The New Home Co., in Aliso Viejo, Calif., says he is building homes at a faster pace than a year ago, but he sticks to a sell-first, build-second approach. Overall, Webb is selling and building a minimum of four homes a month, at least double the pace of sales and construction two years ago. Webb believes the stepped-up pace of home construction will continue this year. But he’s hold-ing on to the sell-first approach. “Based on what we’ve gone through in the last recession and the way we do business, we think we should primarily build after we sell homes,” he said. “We only build after we sell.” The company, which builds homes in California, has 10 open communities and plans to open another 14 this year. “Normally there’s a big drop off between Thanksgiving and Christmas,” Webb said. “We saw very solid traf-fic and we’re anticipating a very good first quarter.” Thursday’s positive housing report, along with a steep decline in unem-ployment benefit appli-cations, contributed to a strong day on Wall Street. The Standard & Poor’s 500 closed at a five-year high. “There is no denying that the housing market recov-ery is solidifying, and we expect construction activity to ramp up to the 1 million annualized threshold by the end of this year,” said Michael Dolega, an econo-mist with TD Economics, in a note to clients. Dolega said the gains in home building helped boost construction hiring in December by 30,000 jobs — the most in 15 months. He predicts the construc-tion industry could add half a million jobs in 2013. In December, the pace of single-family home con-struction, which makes up two-thirds of the market, increased 8 percent. While that’s well below healthy levels, single-family hous-ing starts are now 75 per-cent higher than the reces-sion low reached in March 2009. Apartment construction, which is more vola-tile, surged 23 percent last month. It is now back to pre-recession levels.Auto industry exuberant about 2013By DEE-ANN DURBINAP Auto WritersDETROIT — Maybe it was the brand new, bright red Chevrolet Corvette gleaming in one corner, or the elegant BMW coupe in the other. Maybe it was just the free-flowing espresso at nearly every stand. But car companies were positively giddy this week as the North American International Auto Show opened in Detroit. They have reason to be. U.S. new car and truck sales reached a five-year high of 14.5 million in 2012, and many executives and analysts think they’ll climb to 15.5 million this year. Credit is easier to obtain, interest rates are low and many people who held on to old cars during the reces-sion are ready to buy. To catch those customers’ eyes at the Detroit show, car compa-nies are unveiling 59 new cars and concepts. That’s up from just 41 in 2012, a sign that auto mak-ers have more profits at their disposal and expect higher sales. Toyota, Nissan and Mercedes have larger, more elaborate dis-plays. Ford is luring visitors with the oldest surviving Ford in the world, a 1903 Model A, and the newest, a chiseled pickup truck concept called Atlas that could become the next F-150. General Motors can just sit back and watch the crowds gather around the Corvette. The Detroit show, one of the country’s biggest, opens to the public Saturday. Here are five trends visitors will see:Getting more efficient:One lesson from this year’s show: There are plenty of ways to squeeze more efficiency from cars and trucks. Volkswagen is showing a plugin hybrid SUV prototype called the CrossBlue that mates a diesel engine with two electric motors. It can travel 14 miles in all-elec-tric mode and gets an estimated 35 miles per gallon while run-ning on both gas and electricity. The Jeep Grand Cherokee is also making a jump to diesel power with a new, optional 3-liter V-6 diesel that gets 30 miles per gal-lon on the highway, five better than the gas-powered V-6. Automakers are trying other tricks to save fuel as they face higher fuel economy require-ments, even in muscle cars. The eight-cylinder engine on the 2014 Corvette kicks down to four at highway speeds. The grille and wheels of Ford’s Atlas concept pickup have shutters that auto-matically close at high speeds to cut wind drag. Many carmak-ers are replacing steel with alu-minum, carbon fiber and other materials to save weight. Jeremy Anwyl, vice chairman of the Edmunds.com auto web-site, said many people have been surprised by the resurgence of internal combustion engines as new technology makes them more efficient. “It is one reason why we’re not all driving hybrids now, or EVs,” Anwyl said. Even so, there are plenty of gas-electric hybrids and some new electric cars for customers to look at. Nissan, a late convert to the hybrid market, is showing the Resonance concept, a dramatical-ly styled hybrid crossover. Acura has the NSX hybrid supercar. And Cadillac debuted the ELR, its version of the Chevrolet Volt plug-in, which will go around 35 miles in all-electric mode before a small gas engine kicks in. And Tesla is showing its all-electric Model X crossover, whose futur-istic wing-like doors are among the handful of stop-and-stare fea-tures this year.Pickups take off:With new home construction back on the rise, pickup truck sales are poised to grow in the coming year. And Detroit is ready. General Motors is showing its new trucks for the first time at the Detroit show. The Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra, which will go on sale this Spring, have mean-looking grilles, restyled interiors and new engines and transmissions that GM promises will be very efficient. The trucks even have steps inset into the rear bumper so people can jump into the bed to get tools or tie down cargo. Chrysler’s just-refurbished Ram pickup — named the truck of the year by automotive jour-nalists at the show — is also no slouch, boasting a segment-best 25 mpg on the highway. But Ford, whose F-Series has been the top-selling truck for more than three decades, won’t cede that title without a fight. The company pulled off one of the show’s few surprises, low-ering its Atlas pickup concept from the ceiling amid a shower of sparks during media previews. Ford gave few details about the beefy, chiseled Atlas, other than to say that it hints at the look of the next F-Series, due to come out in 2014 or 2015. “It sends a message that we hope to continue to strengthen our leadership in commercial vans and trucks,” Ford’s Chief Operating Officer Mark Fields said. “We know there’s a lot of people who want to take that away from us.” The competition could mean good deals for buyers in a seg-ment already known for big dis-counts. Chrysler sales chief Reid Bigland said Ram will stay com-petitive, but Chrysler also wants to make money.Luxury boom:Supple leather seats, finely stitched dashboards and spar-kling chrome grilles are every-where at this year’s auto show, a sign that car companies are clawing at each other for a piece of the growing and lucrative U.S. luxury market. From a well-crafted new EClass lineup from Mercedes to the plush, decked out luxury Cadenza sedan from once-lowly Kia, automakers are vying for customers who are ready to be pampered a little more. Luxury sales grew almost 12 percent last year to over 1 mil-lion sales, and automakers are expecting further increases as people feel better about the econ-omy and the Great Recession recedes into the rear-view mirror. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe completely restyled 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray w as debuted for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Maybe it was the brand new, bright re d Chevrolet Corvette gleaming in one corner, or the elegant BMW coupe in the other, but car companies were p ositively giddy this week as the show opened. U.S. new car and truck sales reached a five-year high of 14 .5 million in 2012, and many executives and analysts think they’ll climb to 15.5 million this year. Climbing car sales have companies feeling optimistic.Home construction surges ASSOCIATED PRESSWorkers set roof trusses for new home in Pepper Pik e, Ohio. U.S. home construction surges 12.1 percent in December to end best year since 200 8.North American International Auto Show Jump in activity in December likely to continue. US retail salesup 0.5 percent in December By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — U.S. consumers increased their spending at retail business-es in December, buying more autos, furniture and clothing. Steady job growth and lower gas prices kept consumers shopping for the holidays, despite wor-ries about potentially tax increases. Retail sales rose 0.5 percent in December from November, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. That’s slightly better than November’s 0.4 percent increase and the best show-ing since September. Sales of autos and auto parts rose 1.6 percent to lead all categories. Car companies closed out their best sales year since 2007. Total retail spending was even stronger when factor-ing out a steep drop in gas prices. And so-called core retail sales, which exclude gas, building materials and autos, rose 0.6 percent after a 0.5 percent increase in November. Economists pay closer attention to core sales because they strip out the most volatile catego-ries and are a better gauge of consumer spending. Two straight months of solid increases in core sales suggest consumers were not too worried about tense negotiations to resolve the fiscal cliff. Congress and the White House ultimate-ly reached a deal on Jan. 1 that prevented income taxes from rising for most households. Still, retail sales are likely to weaken in the first half of 2013 because lawmakers and President Barack Obama allowed a two-year reduction in Social Security pay-roll taxes to lapse. Most Americans will start see-ing less money in their paychecks this month. A person earning $50,000 a year will see take-home pay shrink by roughly $1,000 in 2013. That’s likely to slow con-sumer spending and weigh on overall economic growth. “Nothing in today’s data does anything to dispel the notion that consumer spending the first half of 2013 should be quite weak,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist at BTIG. “’’The smaller paychecks will be anything but a welcome development.” Consumer spending drives roughly 70 percent of economic activity. Even though consumers kept spending at the end of the year, most analysts predict overall economic growth weakened in the October-December quar-ter to an annual rate below 2 percent. That’s largely because companies built up their stockpiles at a slower pace than over the summer. Faster restock-ing was a key reason the economy grew at an annu-al rate of 3.1 percent in the July-September quarter. And growth in retail spending for all of 2012 ended up being less robust than the previous two years. Retail sales rose just 5.2 percent last year — slower than the 7.9 percent growth in 2011 and the 5.6 percent growth in 2010.



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Toothbrush could cure bad pet breathBy SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — Dogs and cats can’t brush, spit, gargle or floss on their own. So owners who want to avoid bad pet breath will need to lend a hand. “Brushing is the gold standard for good oral hygiene at home. It is very effective, but some dogs and more cats don’t appreciate having something in their mouth,” said Dr. Colin Harvey, a professor of surgery and dentistry in the Department of Clinical Studies for the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. The bulk of bad breath odor — the trademark rotten egg smell — comes from hydrogen sulfide, which is waste from anaerobic bacteria that thrive without oxy-gen in places like gaps between teeth and gums. Plaque buildup also invites the bacteria and as the accumulation grows, so does the smell. Animal shelters and rescues know bad breath and filthy teeth can be a deal breaker. Some shelters, such as the Humane Society of Vero Beach & Indian River County in Florida, shuffle their charges through a dental health program before the ani-mals are adopted out. “We usually do dental cleanings and extractions when ani-mals are spayed or neutered so the animal doesn’t have to be put under anesthesia again after adoption and the adopter has one less thing to worry about,” said Janet Winikoff, the shelter’s director of education. If a pet is already spayed or neutered, it will still get dental care before adoption, she said. Harvey added that bad breath could also be a symptom of an underlying medical problem. Stacy Silva, Santa Barbara County Animal Services’ com-munity outreach coordinator, noted that wear on teeth could give the wrong impression of an animal’s age. “(The animals) may look a lot older than their teeth, and it may just be a mat-ter of cleaning the tartar off that gets them back looking their age and that helps them to be adopted,” said Silva. The animals that need a cleaning get chew toys or ropes, hard treats or cookies and a prescrip-tion diet if the vet orders it, she said. Harvey, who has been director of the Veterinary Oral Health Council since it was founded in 1970, said such products are good substitutes for a teeth-brushing. Pet owners can try a combination or use other products such as water additives, chew toys, plaque and tartar cleaners, and dental diets, Harvey said. Puppies and kittens are born toothless. They get their baby teeth before they’re a month old, lose them three to five months later and get their permanent teeth by age 1. Dogs have 42 teeth and cats have 30. Toy dogs tend to have more dental problems because breed-ing for their smaller size hasn’t caught up with evolution, Harvey said. “Primitive dogs had a standard size and shape because they were evolved from wolves” but for toy breeds, their jaw size was reduced and tooth size was not, “so their teeth are too large for their mouths,” he added. Christie Keith, a communications consultant to animal wel-fare and veterinarian groups, said she spends about two minutes each night brushing the teeth of her three dogs after dinner. The Davisburg, Mich., resident believes most dog owners need-lessly fear brushing their dogs’ teeth. “But cats are another story,” she added. Harvey said that’s because cats’ mouths are smaller, their teeth sharper and they could care less about bonding with a human during designated tooth time. Keith said she took it slow when she began brushing the teeth of her 8-year-old greyhound Val. She started with one tooth at a time and used a foamless fla-vored gel that dogs can swallow. “She started to nibble (on the toothbrush) and I rubbed it on her front teeth. I didn’t make a big deal out of it. I didn’t worry about brushing the first half dozen times. It was just a little bonding thing. Eventually, I brushed one tooth. Now she stands there and lets me brush all her teeth,” she said. The gel doesn’t require water to rinse, lessening the likelihood of a mess. A year later, “(Val’s) gums look healthy to me, and it doesn’t seem she has any more tartar,” Keith said. Oral care products for animals are generally not regulated by any federal agency, although the Food and Drug Administration monitors all products that claim to prevent or slow disease. The agency does not test products that claim cleaner teeth, fresher breath or the reduction of plaque and tartar, Harvey said. The VOHC is not a regulatory agency but it uses American Dental Association guidelines to test pet plaque and tartar prod-ucts. Test requests are voluntary but companies pay nonrefundable submission and annual mainte-nance fees. Products are given a VOHC seal if they pass. The council has approved a human, ADA-compliant, flathead toothbrush with soft bristles and rounded tips for pet use. A child’s brush can be used for small pets and an adult size for big dogs, but don’t use human toothpaste on pets, Harvey warned. Such toothpastes contain detergents that foam and pets will swallow it instead of spitting it out, he said. Harvey said he can’t comment on any product VOHC hasn’t tested, but as a rule, any wipe, tongue cleaner or additive should be beneficial — although noth-ing beats brushing. PETS ABOVE: A cat named Pepper gets her teeth brushed by her owner, in Phoenix. RIGHT: Veterinary technician Aubrey Mallory checking the teeth of a six-week-old male pit bull mix named Kobe, in Vero Beach. Regular exams help spot bad breath, an early warning sign of pet dental disease. Dogs and cats can’t brush, spit, gargle or floss on their own. So owners who want to avoid bad pet breath will need to lend a hand. Animals also need brushing at home, regular checkups. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 3D ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSBy ALISON LADMANAssociated PressThe day of the big game calls for big, stick-to-your-ribs grub. So we went with that as a theme, creating a recipe for boneless beef short ribs that are inspired by all the sweet and sticky goodness of Chinese-style pork ribs. To keep you in front of the television instead of the stove, we kept the recipe simple. Start by dumping everything in a bowl to marinate. When you’re ready to cook, transfer it to a baking sheet and pop it in the oven. Done. To make sure the ribs are meltingly tender, they cook low and slow while you watch the first half of the game. They should be good to go right around half-time. And if beef isn’t your thing, the same approach will work with pork ribs and chicken wings (though you’ll need to adjust the cooking time).Sweet and sticky, tender short ribs The servings indicated are for appetizer por-tions. If the friends gath-ered around the game are hearty eaters, or this is to be served as a main course, plan accordingly. Start to finish: 1 1/2 hours (plus marinating) Servings: 12Ingredients1/2 cup hoisin sauce1/2 cup rice vinegar1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/2 teaspoon five-spice powder 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 3 cloves minced garlic3 pounds boneless beef short ribs, cut into long, thin strips (1/4 inch thick by 1 inch wide)InstructionsIn a medium bowl, whisk together the hoisin, rice vinegar, soy sauce, brown sugar, red pepper flakes, five-spice powder, sesame oil and garlic. Reserve 1/2 cup of the mixture in a small bowl. Add the short ribs to the original mix-ture and toss to thoroughly coat. Cover the bowl and refrigerate at least 8 hours, or overnight. When ready to cook, heat the oven to 275 F. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with foil and place a rack over each pan. Arrange the short ribs on the rack and bake for 45 to 60 minutes, or until tender. Brush the ribs with the reserved 1/2 cup of marinade and increase the oven temperature to 450 F. Return to the oven and cook for another 10 minutes, or until browned and caramelized. Thread a skewer through each piece of meat to serve. Nutrition information per serving: 270 calories; 130 calories from fat (48 percent of total calories); 14 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 65 mg choles-terol; 11 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 23 g protein; 650 mg sodium. Sweet, sticky ribs for the game Super Bowl Party IdeaASSOCIATED PRESSSweet and sticky, slow-cooked short ribs, served on skew ers for easy munching, will be a big hit with hungry fans who can’t tear themselves away from a ll the Superbowl action. By MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — People with severe food allergies have a new tool in their attempt to find menus that fit their diet: federal disabilities law. And that could leave schools, res-taurants and anyplace else that serves food more vul-nerable to legal challenges over food sensitivities. A settlement stemming from a lack of gluten-free foods available to students at a Massachusetts uni-versity could serve as a precedent for people with other allergies or condi-tions, including peanut sensitivities or diabetes. Institutions and businesses subject to the Americans With Disabilities Act could be open to lawsuits if they fail to honor requests for accommodations by people with food allergies. Colleges and universities are especially vulner-able because they know their students and often require them to eat on campus, Eve Hill of the Justice Department’s civil rights division says. But a restaurant also could be liable if it blatantly ignored a customer’s request for certain foods and caused that person to become ill, though that case might be harder to argue if the cus-tomer had just walked in off the street, Hill says. The settlement with Lesley University, reached last month but drawing little attention, will require the Cambridge, Mass., institution to serve glu-ten-free foods and make other accommodations for students who have celiac disease. At least one stu-dent complained to the fed-eral government after the school would not exempt the student from a meal plan even though the stu-dent couldn’t eat the food. “All colleges should heed this settlement and take steps to make accommo-dations,” says Alice Bast, president and founder of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. “To our community this is defi-nitely a precedent.” People who suffer from celiac disease don’t absorb nutrients well and can get sick from the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley. The illness, which affects around 2 million Americans, causes abdom-inal pain, bloating and diar-rhea, and people who have it can suffer weight loss, fatigue, rashes and other problems. Celiac is a diag-nosed illness that is more severe than gluten sensi-tivity, which some people self-diagnose. Ten years ago, most people had never heard of celiac disease. Awareness exploded in recent years, for reasons that aren’ t entirely clear. Some researchers say it was under-diagnosed, others say it’s because people eat more processed wheat products like pas-tas and baked goods than in past decades, and those items use types of wheat that have a higher gluten content. Food allergy now legally listed as medial disability3DLIFE



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OPINION Sunday, January 20, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A W hen Secretary of State Hillary Clinton returned to work after her hospitalization for a con-cussion, her staff gave her a “gag gift” — A T-shirt with the numbers 112 on it. The number 112 refers to the 112 trips out of the country Secretary Clinton has made, the most ever for a U.S. Secretary of State (by some accounts). This took me back to the 1950s, when presi-dential candidate Adlai E. Stevenson spoke to a large crowd in Lake City’s Olustee Park. In his speech, Mr. Stevenson took a small shot at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles, who also did a lot of foreign travel. Said Mr. Stevenson, “Secretary Dulles has traveled so far so often and so fast, he hardly has time to contradict himself twice in the same coun-try.”Museum thanksQ To Isaac (Ike) McDonald for a 1953 Columbia High School graduation program (Phyllis Dawsey Ramsey was valedictorian, William F. (Bill) Fletcher was salutatorian) and a 1949 Baccalaureate program (Church of God pastor, the Rev. Vep Ellis was the speaker). Ike also donated an 8-by-10-inch photograph of the CHS class of 1948 when they were second-graders and their teacher was Clarice Johnson (later Clarice Evans). Q To the CHS Class of 1961 for a generous dona-tion in loving memory of classmates Barbara Susan Griffin (daughter of Carolyn Griffin) and Gail Hosford Acosta, delivery courtesy of Calvin C. Creamer. Q To Gigi Witt Register for donating several items that belonged to her late grandmother, Genevieve Nelson (CHS 1934), including two 1934 year-books and Genevieve’s cheerleader megaphone when she was cheering on the Tigers those many years ago.Skipping aroundQ I did not know Eva Mae Brown but I know I would have liked her. One line in her obituary won my heart: She enjoyed raking leaves and picking up pecans. My mother would have liked her too. Q Think Larry Law isn’t a heart-and-soul Gator fan? When he got a new dog, he immediately named him what else? — Tebow! Q According to Calvary Baptist Church pastor Ivan Clements, he lived on the east-most part of Baya Avenue back in the day, and that road was so rough people called it Washboard Avenue. Q The Mascot for the current Fort White High School is the Indians; the mascot for the “old” FWHS was Eagles. Q Kudos to County Judge Tom Coleman who shows great honor and respect to the jurors who serve in his courtroom. He asks that all present stand when the jurors leave or return during their deliberations. Q CHS offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil is a first-team selection on the prestigious MaxPrep national team. Q Thanks to Gwen and Lowell O’Steen for giv-ing me a comprehensive history of Bethlehem Baptist Church (located on Highway 100), which includes a timeline of improvements to the physical plant and a list of former pastors. Gwen also gave me a picture of longtime local teacher Fannie Hobbs when she was about age 30. Q Rumor: A new pistol has been invent-ed and called “The Congressman.” It won’t work and you can’t fire it! Are MLK’s values welcome today? Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman The Miami Herald reported last fall that a sizable number of South Florida residents were still in line waiting to vote well into the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 7, even after the presidential election had been called for Barack Obama. Some were in line as long as seven hours. Others reportedly gave up and went home. As if that weren’t bad enough, it took three days to total up the votes state-wide and certify the results. Swing-state Florida was relegated to total insignificance on election night. Some attribute the long lines and at least some of the confusion to a 2011 state law reducing the number of early voting days from 14 to eight. Gov. Rick Scott, who signed the law and spent $500,000 of taxpayer money defending it in court, has changed course, asking now that early voting be restored to a full two weeks. Beyond that, Scott wants lawmakers to expand early-voting hours from 96 to 168 and to allow more polling places. In addi-tion, voting would be allowed, at the local supervisor’s discretion, on the Sunday before Election Day. For the record, Scott now denies ever supporting the 2011 law, saying he “didn’t have anything to do with” passing it. Most of the reforms Scott now seeks would benefit the more populated parts of the state, which generally have a different take on state and national politics than rural areas like ours. Still, that kind of thinking cannot enter the equation. Voting is a sacred right in our republic, no matter what your views. Besides, we’re tired of looking like a laughingstock to the rest of the nation. Scott was right to change his mind, even if he won’t admit it. Mid-course correction Secretary Clinton’s 112 trips OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comT he Rev. Louie Giglio, designated to give the benediction at this year’s presidential inauguration, has withdrawn, under apparent pressure, after the surfac-ing of remarks he made, some 25 years ago, about the sinfulness of homosexuality. Note that the pastor of the evangelical Passion City Church in Atlanta has been pushed off the stage not because of a deed, but because of words he said — words expressing a widely held Christian belief that homosexuality is a sin. Let’s recall that freedom of religion appears in the First Amendment of our constitution, alongside the protection of freedom of speech. So what kind of irony do we have before us that two key aspects of American life, protected by our constitution, are up in smoke and the venue is inauguration of an American president, who will put his hand on a Bible and swear to “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States”? Adding more bitter irony, Rick Warren, who gave the benediction at the 2009 inauguration of this same president, America’s first black president, recently said that “the battle to preserve religious liberty for all, in all areas of life, will likely become the civil rights move-ment of this decade.” And in what context did Warren — pastor of Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif. — make this observation? In context of the refus-al of Hobby Lobby, a firm owned by evangelical Christians, to comply with a new mandate, signed into law by this president, forcing firms, regardless of their religious convic-tions, to pay for employees’ contra-ception and abortion -inducing pills. What we have is the ongoing march forward of tyranny in America, a tyranny of the left, in which moral chaos and political power are becoming a new national religion, and what was once under-stood as religion and tradition is now called bigotry and pushed off the stage. One wonders if the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday coincides with this second inaugura-tion of America’s first black presi-dent, would not himself wind up today pushed off the stage because of his Christian convictions. A hint of how to think about this may be gleaned by visiting the new memorial in Washington, D.C., hon-oring King. Visiting the memorial, what immediately struck this black Christian was the complete absence of any hint that King was a Christian pastor, who founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and who led a movement animated and inspired by biblical conviction and imagery. No, the King celebrated at this memorial on the National Mall is a political activist and community orga-nizer. Try to find a hint that this was a pastor, try to find a biblical quote, try to find a reference to God. Absent is the King who concluded his “I have a dream” speech on the same National Mall pleading for the day “when all of God’s children ... will be able to join hands and sing the words of the old Negro spiritual, ‘Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last.’ “ In King’s famous letter written in 1963 while he was locked in a jail in Birmingham, Ala., he begins with the salutation “My fellow clergymen” and asks, “How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust?” The answer given by King was this: “A just law is a manmade code that squares with the moral law or the law of God.” Would a law such as the one forcing the evangelical Christian owners of Hobby Lobby to pay for contracep-tion and abortion-inducing pills of employees, and exposing them to fines of $1.3 million per day for non-compliance — qualify as “just” under King’s definition? Would King be ejected from the stage of this president’s inaugural if he called this law, produced by this administration, unjust? Would there even have been a civil rights movement without the Christian values that today’s left calls bigotry? 4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books.



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 4BSportsIndians having remarkable season JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips gets around Union Coun ty High’s Austin Dukes in a game on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders gets a shot around Union County High’s Daquin Edwards during a game on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Chris Cottrell loses control of the ball as he is fouled by a pair of Union defenders. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterUnion County High’s Daquin Edwards attempts to block Fort White High’s Michael Mulberry.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, JANUARY20, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$2,990 386-623-2848 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$5,500 386-288-6102 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900 386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 100Job Opportunities05536914Responsible person to work with Sales Agents and building inspectors. Travel necessary Vehicle provided, valid Drivers License required. Salary dependent on experience. Send Resume to: Human Resources PO Box 760 Toast, NC 27049 Auto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 General Office & Bookkeeping Microsoft Office Word, Quick Books Proficient Punctual & Able to Follow Established Procedures. Salary Requirement & Resume to: P.O. 830 Lake City, Florida 32056 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 MemberService Rep Lake City Full-Time Position. Strong Customer Service skills, cash Handling or teller exp, opening accts, opening account duties and professional appearance req. Great pay and benefits! App REQ and avail at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment, HVAC Installation, & Plumbing Exp., Preferably with Plumbing license. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Somebody to clean up storage Room and closet, Dispose of Unnecessary items & re-organize Everything. 386-754-4136 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical Employment05536759Insurance Verifier/Medicaid Specialist Verify Insurance/Authorizations.Bill Medicaid and post payments. Candidate must have HS Diploma, with a Min. of 1 year Medical Billing Exp. Please send resume to jsmith@ccofnf.com JOB OPENING Pharmacy Clerk/Cashier. Apply in person: DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. Looking for P/TEcho Cardiography Tech & VascularUltra Sound Tech Call Nancy at 984-5543 120Medical Employment05536887Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 05536911COME JOINOUR TEAM!! $1500 Sign-On Bonus Availablefor qualified Candidates SHANDS LAKE SHORE REGIONALMEDICAL CENTER has the following immediate openings: RN Full Time (OB) RN Full Time (ICU) 3-5 years experience in same orsimilarunit preferred RN Full Time (Telemetry) RN Full Time (ER) Competitive salary and benefit package See qualifications and apply online @ shandslakeshore.com EOE, M/F/V/D, Drug Free Workplace PTPositions Avail for: Massage Therapist, ARNPfor Family Care & Women's Care .Send resume: PO Box 1256, Lake City, Fl 32056 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions HUGH EQUIPMENT AUCTIONSat. Jan. 26th, 9:00 AM at the Tobacco Barn Lake Jeffrey Road @ NWWashington Avenue Loaders, Forklifts, Tractors, Trailers, Trucks, Welders, Farm Equipment, AC Units, Restaurant Equipment, MUCH MORE! Terms: Cash, Check, Visa, MC CONSIGNMENTS ACCEPTED 10% Buyer's Premium Inspection 9am 4pm ELROD 904-699-7067 AB1698 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. GE Side by Side Refrigerator, white, works great, ice and water $265 Contact 386-292-3927 Kenmore full size dryer, White, Works Great $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Kenmore Roll around dishwasher. Several options. Works great. $125 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 TV60" Rear Proctection HDTVMonitor $500.00. OBO 754-8766 Emerald Lake. Wellborn Church of God is Selling 18 brown padded church pews for $25 each. SOLD White Frigidaire Frost Free Refrigerator. Works great. Clean. $175 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 White GE Electric Stove Works Great $135 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. Dep & referrences For more info. 386-965-3477 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 Triple Wide MH, 2006 Homes of Merit, For Rent ($1500 mth) or Sale ($139,000 OBO). 12x24’ pool, 30x30’rear deck, covered porch, three car garage (1 car if rented) 4.2 acres, planted pines. Please drive by and only look. 914 SWLamboy Cr. LC 32024, 386-965-0061 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 Palm HarborHomes Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go Save Up To 35K 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 650Mobile Home & LandNICE 2/2 SWAND 740 sf frame house/studio/outbuilding, country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinance 4/2 on 2.5 acres, south of LC, small down $850 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BD/1BA$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Call Chris 386-365-2515 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Large 2BD/2BAwith W/D hookup, fresh paint, Convient location $650 mth 386-867-9231 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05536873LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $675 2BR/1BA 768SF $495 3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825 3BR/2BA 1258SF $900 3BR/2.5BA 1470SF $795 3BR/1BA 960SF $725 1BR/1BA 576SF $525 1BR/1BA 500SF $450 2 AVAILABLE MADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODELED$450 2 AVAILABLE3BR/1.5BAREMODELED$550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We offer: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $5,500 386-288-6102 940Trucks 2001 Dodge Ram 3500, V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/ tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900. Call 984-6606 or 758-6800 950Cars forSale 2001 Burgundy ALTIMAvery cold a/c, 140,000 miles, leather, 6 change cd, sunroof. $3,500 listed below blue book, 386-288-6877 No exception, will be pleased, changed oil on time.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com RECYCLE YOUR PAPER nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter



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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 20, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Daniel faces his ercest rival. (:02) Shark TankNews at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami Eric Delko returns. Criminal Minds “A Family Affair” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -(4:00) Les Misrables 25th Anniversary Concert at the O2Masterpiece ClassicMasterpiece ClassicThe Abolitionists: AmericanAustin City Limits 7-CBS 7 47 47The NFL Today (N)e NFL Football AFC Championship -Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots. (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Olelo Ho’Opa’I Make” Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00) MovieAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Barter” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30NFL PostgameThe First FamilyBob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Family GuyAmerican Dad (PA) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage Parker gets jury duty. 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsThe Biggest Loser “Get Moving” Contestants are pushed to new limits. The Biggest Loser “Cut the Junk” Trivia about childhood obesity. First Coast News at 11 (N) CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Lance Armstrong. Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Second Honeymoon” (2001)“Just Desserts” (2004) Lauren Holly, Costas Mandylor. “The Sweeter Side of Life” (2013) Kathryn Morris, James Best. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow.“The A-Team” (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special Forces soldiers form a rogue unit.“The A-Team” (2010, Action) CNN 24 200 202The Presidential Inauguration (N) The Presidential Inauguration (N) The Presidential Inauguration (N) Piers Morgan TonightAnderson Cooper 360CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245Castle “Pandora” (Part 1 of 2) Castle “Linchpin” (Part 2 of 2) Castle “47 Seconds” Castle Castle takes on a new partner. Castle “Always” “Disturbia” (2007) Shia LaBeouf. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run“Legally Blonde” (2001, Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Luke Wilson. The NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:35)“Rambo III” (1988, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna.“Skyline” (2010, Science Fiction) Eric Balfour, Scottie Thompson. Premiere.“Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. MY-TV 29 32 -Loretta YoungLoretta YoungM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo Mystery writer murders nephew. M*A*S*HThriller “Child’s Play” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” (N) Dog With a BlogJessieShake It Up!Shake It Up!Austin & AllyAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Blue-Eyed Butcher” (2012) “She Made Them Do It” (2012) Jenna Dewan Tatum, Mackenzie Phillips. “Prosecuting Casey Anthony” (2013) Rob Lowe, Elizabeth Mitchell. (:02) “She Made Them Do It” (2012) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“The Ugly Truth” (2009) BET 34 124 329(5:00) Roots Kunta Kinte is captured. (Part 1 of 6) Roots Kunta Kinte arrives in America. (Part 2 of 6) HusbandsHo.Second GenerationHusbandsHo.Second Generation ESPN 35 140 206d HS BasketballSEC Storied (N) Content of Character (N) 30 for 30SportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL PrimeTime (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 Women’s College BasketballStrongest ManStrongest ManWorld’s Strongest Man CompetitionE 2013 Australian Open Tennis Round of 16. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeReel AnimalsSport FishingReel Animals Women’s College Basketball: Cyclones at Cowboys DISCV 38 182 278Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. Amish Ma a “The Book of Merlin” Levi’s war with Merlin escalates. (N) Amish Ma a “The Reckoning” Amish Ma a “The Book of Merlin” TBS 39 139 247Madea Goes“Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009) Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson. (DVS)“Hitch” (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. (DVS) Wedding Band HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Special Report With Bret BaierFOX ReportHuckabee E! 45 114 236Kourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The SaturKourtney-KimChasing The SaturKourtney-Kim TRAVEL 46 196 277Man v FoodMan v FoodMonstersized It’s All About the Radical RidesSturgis “Biker Madness” Sturgis “Metal Mania” Sturgis “Wild and Free” HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lAmazing Water HomesHawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Toddlers & TiarasToddlers & TiarasHere Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family (:08) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family Sized (N) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: Family Here Comes Honey HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Ultimate Guide to the PresidentsAmerican Pickers “Pickin’ Perry-dise” Ax Men “Flipping Logzilla” Ax Men Gabe faces a crew mutiny. (N) Bamazon “Dead in the Water” (N) RestorationRestoration ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedWild West AlaskaWild West Alaska (N) Gator Boys Alligator with zombie eyes. Finding Bigfoot “Bigfoot Merit Badge” Gator Boys Alligator with zombie eyes. FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffSugar Dome “Daredevil Stunts” (N) Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off (N) Bobby’s Dinner BattleIron Chef America (N) TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“Exodus” (1960, Historical Drama) Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint. FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. “Star Trek Generations” (1994, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, William Shatner. Continuum “A Stitch in Time” AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Hulk” (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly, Sam Elliott.“The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi. Premiere. “The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi. COM 62 107 249FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturama“Joe Dirt” (2001, Comedy) David Spade, Dennis Miller, Brittany Daniel. Tosh.0Tosh.0WorkaholicsKroll Show CMT 63 166 327In the Army Now(:45) CMT MusicRebaRebaReba “Sister Act” RebaRebaRebaChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw Gang NGWILD 108 190 283(5:00)“The Last Lions” (2011) Hunt for the Shadow CatSecret Brazil “Jaguar Rising” Secret Brazil “Cannibal Caimans” Mega PiranhaSecret Brazil “Jaguar Rising” NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersThe Man Who Can FlyWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Wicked Tuna “Go Fish!” (N) Mudcats Locating the heaviest sh. (N) Wicked Tuna “Go Fish!” SCIENCE 110 193 284FringeFringe “White Tulip” Fringe “The Man From the Other Side” Fringe “Brown Betty” Fringe “Northwest Passage” Fringe “The Man From the Other Side” ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Shot in the Foot” Fatal Encounters48 Hours on ID (N) Fatal Encounters “The Final Act” (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:15)“Green Lantern” (2011) (:15)“This Means War” (2012, Action) Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ Girls “I Get Ideas” Enlightened (N) Girls “I Get Ideas” EnlightenedGirls “I Get Ideas” Enlightened MAX 320 310 515(5:45)“Troy” (2004) Brad Pitt. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. ‘R’ “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. ‘R’ “Mars Attacks!” (1996, Comedy) Jack Nicholson. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesShameless “El Gran Canon” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “The American Dream” (N) House of Lies (N) Californication (N) Shameless “The American Dream” MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 21, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor Sean makes a revelation. (N) (:01) Castle Alexis starts a video blog. News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow A 1912 portrait. Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens Artist Wayne White. (N) (DVS) Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherBig Bang Theory2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 A prostitute is murdered. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries “Lie With Me” (N) 90210 “Misery Loves Company” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Corpse on the Canopy” The Following “Pilot” (DVS) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Pay It Forward” The contestants run a 5K. (N) Deception (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Main StreetMain StreetMain StreetMain StreetDateline on OWN “Trouble on the Hill” Dateline on OWN “Justice for Sparkle” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN “Trouble on the Hill” A&E 19 118 265The First 48Hoarders “Terry; Adelle” Hoarders “BG & Lee; Chris” Hoarders “Marlene; Jeff” (N) Intervention “Tiffany” (N) (:01) Intervention “Sandi” HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes.“Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. CNN 24 200 202The Situation Room (N) The Presidential InaugurationThe Presidential InaugurationThe Presidential InaugurationAnderson Cooper 360 (N) Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Always Bet on Red”d NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Philadelphia 76ers. From Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia.d NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) NIK 26 170 299“The Last Airbender” (2010) Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. Premiere. “The Last Airbender” (2010, Fantasy) Noah Ringer, Dev Patel. The NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241“Skyline” (2010, Science Fiction) Eric Balfour, Scottie Thompson.“Underworld” (2003) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. A vampire protects a medical student from werewolves.“Underworld” (2003, Horror) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Deluge” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Dog With a BlogJessieJessieGood Luck Charlie “All Fall Down” Dog With a BlogGravity FallsGravity FallsJessieGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmJessie LIFE 32 108 252“An Amish Murder” (2013, Mystery) Neve Campbell, Christian Campbell. “Prosecuting Casey Anthony” (2013) Rob Lowe, Elizabeth Mitchell. Beyond the Headlines: C. Anthony(:01) My Life Is a Lifetime Movie USA 33 105 242NCIS A sniper kills Marine recruiters. NCIS Naval of cers targeted. WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Personal” BET 34 124 329(5:30) Roots Chicken George wins his freedom. (Part 5 of 6) Roots George saves Tom’s life. (Part 6 of 6) HusbandsHo.Second GenerationHusbandsHo. ESPN 35 140 206d(5:30) College Basketball Oklahoma State at Baylor. (N)d College Basketball Georgetown at Notre Dame. (N)d College Basketball Texas at Oklahoma. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsCenter (N) (Live) Women’s College Basketball Duke at Connecticut. (N)E 2013 Australian Open Tennis Men’s and Women’s Quarter nals. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) SUNSP 37 -Fight Sports: In 60TaylorMade: Outside the Ropes3 Wide LifeFlorida Travel Women’s College Basketball: Seminoles at Wolfpack The New College Football ShowShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv. DISCV 38 182 278(5:00) Amish Ma aAmish Ma a “The Reckoning” Extreme Smuggling “Drugs II” (N) Shipwreck Men “Bahama Drama” (N) Bering Sea GoldShipwreck Men “Bahama Drama” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) America’s Election Headquarters (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloChasing The SaturKourtney and Kim Take MiamiKourtney and Kim Take MiamiChasing The SaturChasing The SaturChelsea Lately (N) Kourtney-Kim TRAVEL 46 196 277Hotel ImpossibleHotel Impossible “Triangle T Ranch” The Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel Impossible (N) Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229My First PlaceMy First PlaceLove It or List It “The Wahl Family” Love It or List It “The Shaver Family” Love It or List It Leslie loves her home. House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Sproat Family” TLC 48 183 280Cake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Pete Rose: HitsPete Rose: HitsCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys “Alligator Face-Off” Gator Boys “See You Later, Alligators” Gator Boys Alligator with zombie eyes. Gator Boys “Mississippi or Bust” Gator Boys “Knee Deep in Mississippi” Gator Boys Alligator with zombie eyes. FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery Diners TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10UFC Reloaded “UFC 139: Rua vs. Henderson” Shogun Rua vs. Dan Henderson. World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Star Trek Generations” (1994) Patrick Stewart, William Shatner. Continuum “Fast Times” (N) Being Human (N) Lost Girl “Subterrfaenean” (N) Continuum “Fast Times” AMC 60 130 254“Sword sh” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman. “Gone in Sixty Seconds” (2000, Action) Nicolas Cage, Angelina Jolie, Giovanni Ribisi. (:31)“Gone in Sixty Seconds” (2000) Nicolas Cage. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) South Park(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba “Happy Pills” Reba Bar brawl. Reba Suspicions. RebaRebaRebaThem Idiots Whirled Tour Bill Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy. Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the NGWILD 108 190 283Croc GanglandsMother CrocCroc Invasion (N) Monster Croc Hunt (N) Built for the Kill “Crocodile” Croc Invasion NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersDrugs, Inc. “Heroin” Heroin. Hard Riders (N) Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers “Shots Fired” Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe Works (N) How the Universe Works ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next DoorNightmare Next DoorNightmare Next DoorDisappeared “Out of the Ashes” (N) True Crime With Aphrodite Jones (N) Nightmare Next Door HBO 302 300 501“Hanna” (2011, Action) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“Red Tails” (2012, Historical Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘PG-13’ Boxing MAX 320 310 515(5:15)“Napoleon Dynamite” ‘PG’ (6:50)“Wanderlust” (2012) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “A Thousand Words” (2012) Eddie Murphy. ‘PG-13’“The Hurricane” (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00)“The School of Rock”60 Minutes SportsHomeland “The Smile” CalifornicationHouse of LiesShameless “The American Dream” House of LiesCalifornication WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalThe DoctorsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsNightly Business 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried Programs(:12) BonanzaVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312MarieVaried ProgramsHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried ProgramsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation RoomVaried Programs TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesThe MentalistThe Mentalist NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!Teenage Mut.SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Little EinsteinsLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsPhineas and FerbVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329Varied ProgramsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe ParkersMoeshaVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First TakeVaried Programs2013 Australian Open TennisVaried Programs NFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247American DadAccording to JimLove-RaymondLove-RaymondRules/EngagementRules/EngagementLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsVaried ProgramsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280Varied ProgramsA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossVaried ProgramsWhat Not to WearVaried ProgramsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonK-9 CopsPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and Parolees FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244(11:00) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(9:30) MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:23) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Time WarpTime WarpMythBustersVaried ProgramsThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDSins & SecretsVaried ProgramsSins & SecretsVaried ProgramsFatal EncountersFatal EncountersVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:00) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs(:15) Movie Varied Programs MAX 320 310 515MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:00) MovieVaried Programs



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Sara May NemeshSara May Nemesh, 64, of Lake Butler, Florida passed away af-ter an extended illness, Tues-day, January 8, 2013. She was born in Moultrie, Georgia to the late Ruben E. and Roxie C. (Tillman) West. She served her country faithfully in the United States Army. She has lived in the North Florida area for the past 19 years having moved here from Killeen, Texas. She was a devoted wife, mom and nannie to her family who enjoyed wood-working and gardening. She was of the Catholic faith, and attend-ed Epiphany Catholic Church. Survivors include her loving husband of 45 years, Michael J. Nemesh of Lake Butler, FL; son, Michael J. Nemesh Jr. of Lake City, FL; daughter, Malina Nemesh of Lake Butler, FL; broth-er, James West of Ft. White, FL; and sisters, Louise, Nelly, Erma, and Linda.; & 6 grandchildren. Memorial services will be con-ducted at 2:00 p.m. on Tues-day, January 22, 2013 at the Lake City V.A. Medical Center Chapel. Fel-lowship with the family will be one hour prior to service time in the V.A. Chapel. ,QOLHXRIRZ ers the family asks that dona-tions be made in her honor to the Lake City V.A. Medical Center Volunteer Services, at Lake City VAMC, Voluntary Service, 619 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, Florida, 32025. please annotate on your con-tribution check: GPF 8102 or Contact Nicky Adams at the V.A. at (386) 758-3016. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY 3596 S. U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Twyla Jo Thorpe (T.J)In Remembrance of Twyla Jo Thorpe (T.J) who passed away December 30, 2012 while being treat at North Florida Regional. T.J. was born August 21, 1970 in Emporia, VA to Earl Thorpe and Madge Harris Thorpe. T.J. moved to Lake City, FL in 1984. She is survived by her mother Madge of Lake City, FL and father, Earl of Emporia, VA; four sons: Aaron (24), Cody (22), Dalton (21), and Ja-FREYHEURWKHUV5D\Jeff and Scott Reeves of Lake City, FL., and John Thorpe and Craig Phillips of Emporia, VA.; four grand children: De-seree, Richard, Kendall, and Feloni; many beloved nieces and nephew. A memorial service was held Sat-urday, January 5, 2013 at South-side Baptist Church. Friends of T.J.’s son’s called her mom and they were as much hers as her own, including Cody Croft, Jamie Parrish and Kenneth Eskilson. T.J. was diagnosed with double kidney failure in May 2006. She went to the Lake City Dialysis Center for treatments 3 times a week. She went through many operations, including open heart surgery in October, 2012, which left her unable to walk more than 30 feet at a time. Still she pressed on, working at the Waf-H+RXVHXQWLO2FWREHU6KHlived her life to the fullest and always had a kind word and a beautiful smile. Laughter was the best medicine for her. The entire family thanks everyone for their support, condolences, prayers and help in any many other ways. A special thanks to the employees and custom-HUVDW:DIH+RXVHZKHUHshe worked and Jamie Parrish and Nick Eason and the Lake City Reporter. Rest in peace T.J.Lavaughn Wayne SwailsLavaughn Wayne Swails 81, of Welborn, passed away Thursday afternoon at the Suwannee Haven Hospice in Lake City after an extended illness. He was born in Branford, living most of his life in CoCo Beach until mov-ing to Welborn 13 years ago. He was the son of the late John B. Swails and Lela Kirby Swails. He was a WWII Army Veteran and was in the Paint and Body Business. He is a member of the Watertown Congregational Methodist Church. He is sur-vived by his loving wife; Carol M. Swails; Daughter: Lorie Lee Spicer of Ohio (U.S. Airforce) Step Daughters: Wanda Carol Norman (Donald) of Raiford; Debra Ann Natividad of Orange Park; Elizabeth Bass of Welborn; Son: Wayne Swails Jr. of CoCo Beach.; Stepsons: William C. Phillips Jr. (Lydia) of Lake City, Gregory Scott Barber of Welborn; 1 Sister: Doris White of Tampa; 12 Grandchildren and 18 Great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 11:00 AM at the Watertown Congregational Methodist Church in Lake City with Rev. Randy Ogburn offi-ciating. Burial will follow at Elzey Chapel Cemetery in Lake Butler. Family invites friends for a visitation at Archer Funeral Home on Monday, January 21, 2013, from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Rosemary MastersMrs. Rosemary “Gloria” Masters, 85, of Lake City passed away Friday, January 18, 2013 at Suwannee Valley Care Center “Haven Hospice” in Lake City. She was the daughter of the late James and Lillian Brandeberry and graduated from Lee High School in Jacksonville. She married Leonard Masters February 5, 1947 and moved to Lake City in 1963, where they owned and operated Leonard’s Frame Service until she retired. She was a mem-ber of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, Woman’s Club, Garden Club, and was a member of the Order of The Eastern Star for 53 years. She was preceded in death by her oldest son Michael Masters in 2012. Mrs. Masters is survived by her husband of 65 years, Leonard Masters of Lake City; two sons, Ronnie Masters (Bonita Hadwin) and Vernon Masters (Cindee) all of Lake City; eight grandchildren, Victoria Masters of Lexington, KY, Vernon Masters, Jr. (Amber) of Lake City, Jake Masters of Hope, AR, Jessica Masters of Lake City, Lisa Masters and Ronald Masters, Jr. both of Overland Park, KA, Chris Masters (Candace) of Lake City, Danyell Salyer of Gallatin, TN; five great-grandchildren, Ayden, Aybree, and Sophie Masters all of Lake City, and Cecily and Ragan Salyer of Gallatin, TN. Funeral services for Mrs. Masters will be conducted on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Lake City with Pastor Bruce Alkire officiating. Interment will follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens in Lake City. Visitation with the family will be held from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Monday evening at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Suwannee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice), 6037 US Highway 90 West, Lake City, FL 32055. Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAYFOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South HWY 441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort and love on the online guest book at www.gatewayforest-lawn.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 5A5A Sandals ...20-30% off WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Boots...Boots...Boots GALORE Tumblers Get Ready for Cold Weather Camo Jackets, Coveralls, Shirts Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan. 20MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Bridal showThe third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi-ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur-chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411.Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Jan. 21SCV meetingThe local Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 1463 will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Porterhouse Grill. Topics of discussion will be the camp’s partici-pation with the upcoming Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting is open to the public and those who want to assist the camp in its re-enactment activities during the festival parade and bat-tle field camp. Come early and enjoy dinner before the meeting.Jan. 224Cs board meetingThe Suwannee Valley 4Cs Board of Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m. at 260 S. Marion Avenue, Suite 135, Lake City.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Jan. 23Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at theLifeStyle Enrichment Center in Lake City. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Quilters meetingThe Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St., Lake City, two blocks north of Duval (US 90) off Lake Jeffery Road. Social time will be at 9:30 a.m., and the business meeting will be at 10. The program will be presenta-tion of the 2013 Challenge by Sandy Lindfors and Nancy See.Water group to meetThe stakeholder advisory committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 SE College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be held in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agenda includes dis-cussion and possible com-mittee recommendation of the north Florida regional water supply plan bound-ary area. Other agenda items include: an overview of public water suppliers’ strategies for conservation and protection of water resources; an overview presentation on historical rainfall data; discussion of committee members per-spectives on north Florida water supply issues. The meeting is open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for public comment.Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a con-cert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fund-raiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admission tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. Parker is perhaps best known as a regular artist at the Gaither Homecoming events, and is featured on most of the Gaither videos. He has been voted favor-ite male vocalist 12 times and soloist of the year nine times. The “Artist’s Circle” tickets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are available by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be available at the door beginning an hour before the performance.Landlords meetingLake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res-taurant on U.S. 90. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the meeting will begin at 6. John Kasak will give a talk on “What Is Covered in Your Insurance Policy for Rentals.” For more infor-mation, call 755-0110.Military officers groupThe Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meeting at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando Street, at 6:30 p.m. For informa-tion and reservations, call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 old will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sports-wear, talent and photoge-nic categories. For more information, contact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade on Feb. 16.Prayer breakfastThe Pastor’s Care Committeeof Antioch Missionary Baptist of Fort White will have a prayer breakfast at 9 a.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Ronald Walters of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church of Lake City. Cost is $10 for aduts and $5 for chil-dren 5 and younger. For more information, contact Marilyn Frazier at (386) 318-3441, Allonia Griffin at (386) 497-3062, Francis Legree at (386) 497-1748 or Evangilist Gloria Jackson at (352) 538-0352.Music series startsThe 17th season of the Friends of Music Concert Series opens with The Alachua Consort (oboe, violin and piano) performing French baroque music at 7:30 p.m. at Covenant First Presbyterian Church, 421 White Ave. SE in Live Oak. For more information con-tact Bill or Linda Poplin, (386) 365-4932 or (386) 365-4941.RHS alumniThe RHS Alumni Roundup 2013 planning commit-tee will meet at noon at the Richardson Community Center. For more informa-tion, call (386) 752-7812.Sock hopThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 57 will have its annual Sock Hop in mem-ory of Brenda MacDiarmid at American Legion Post 57 Home on Highway 41 South. A cake raffle will be held that evening. Admission is $5 per person. All proceeds will go to the American Legion Auxiliary Department of Florida Girl State Scholarship Fund. Joey Rand will be the enter-tainmen. Sliders, french fries and milkshakes will be available for purchase. The doors will open for the dance at 7:30 p.m. and dance will start at 8. Come in with your 1950ssdress and bobbie socks. For more information, call Irma Wehrli at (386) 755-3814.Jan. 27History programArchaeologist Barbara Hines, of the Florida Public Archaeology Network, will give a brief overview of the Spanish in Florida at 2 p.m. in the Columbia County Main Library at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Hines will talk about Spanish mis-sions in the state, particu-larly Mission San Luis and the Apalachee.Revival weekFirst Full Gospel Church will have a revival program today through Feb. 1 with the Rev. Darren Wilson. Times will be today at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. and Monday through Friday at 7 p.m. The church is on Jonesway, one block off U.S. 90 East, on the left, across from the boys club.Music concertGospel singer Larry Ford will perform a free concert at 10:30 a.m. at the Glad Tidings Assembly, 1571 E. Duval St. Ford is a world-renowned tenor who performed with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and appeared on the Bill Gaither TV pro-grams. A love offering will be received. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Church anniversaryShiloh Missionary Baptist Church will have its 71st anniversary cele-bration. The speaker for the morning service will be the Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock. The speaker for the 3 p.m. service will be the Rev. Billy Simon, pastor of Greater Popular Springs MB Church.Jan. 30Senior driversAn AARP Driver Safety Course for Seniors will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Columbia County LifeStyle Enrichment Center, Reading Room, 628 SE Allison Court. Participants should take their own lunch. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. Those who complete the course will receive a certificate of completion, which is good for a discount on automo-bile insurance. Registration is required and may be done by calling (352) 333-3036.Feb. 2Civil War eventFort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will hold a Union Garrison history event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi-tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys will bring every part of the Civil War-era to life. Hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.West Virginia DayWest Virginia natives are invited to the 2013 West Virginia Day at Epiphany Church Social Hall on Malone Drive. The event will begin at noon. Bring a covered dish to share. Reservations are required by Jan. 28 and may be made by calling (386) 754-1760.Health fairColumbia County Recreation Department will have its annual Community Health and Wellness Fair at the Richardson Community Center from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Local physicians will be speaking about health issues, various tests will be available as well as door prizes and giveaways. For more information, contact Mario Coppock or Nicole Smith at (386) 754-7095.Feb. 4Loans workshopThe UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension is offer-ing a free workshop to discuss Loan and Grant Programs for Small Business and Agricultural Producers with USDA and Florida Office of Energy. The workshop will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Office. Registration dead-line is Feb 1. To register or for more information, con-tact the Extension Office at (386)752-5384.



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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 5B5BSports ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida’s Erik Murphy (33) blocks Missouri guard Jab ari Brown (32) as teammate Florida Gators guard Scottie Wilbekin (5) watches during the sec ond half in Gainesville on Saturday.Florida thumps MissouriBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida center Pat Young dumped a bucket of ice water on coach Billy Donovan in the locker room after the game, a celebratory shower for win No. 400. Young could have doused him at halftime. Scottie Wilbekin had 13 points and 10 assists, his first career double-double, and the 10th-ranked Gators dominated every aspect of Saturday’s 83-52 victory over No. 17 Missouri. “A 30-point victory against one of the best teams in the SEC, it was just us a great game for us,” Young said. “Nobody expected that. I’m sure a lot of people thought they were going to come in here and upset us. I know they thought they were going to upset us. We really wanted it.” Donovan became the third coach in Southeastern Conference history to reach 400 wins at the same school, joining Kentucky’s Adolph Rupp and LSU’s Dale Brown. No surprise, the dean of SEC coaches credited play-ers past and present. “It’s always special when you have friends and family and your players and your crowd,” Donovan said. “But like I said before, all those individual things as it relates to coaching, it’s much, much more a reflec-tion on the players I’ve had a chance to coach here. That’s really what it’s about. I don’t look at them as my wins. ... I never, ever look at those things as being something I did. It’s always a ‘we’ thing. There’s a lot of people involved.” Just about everyone on Florida’s bench chipped in for Donovan’s 400th. Erik Murphy scored 15 points. Kenny Boynton added 14. Young finished with nine points, eight rebounds and three blocks. Will Yeguete had 13 points on 6-of-7 shooting and six boards, and Mike Rosario had nine points. The Gators (14-2, 4-0 SEC), won their sixth con-secutive game. One Harbaugh in, one out for Super Bowl picksBy BARRY WILNERAssociated PressFor those fans clamoring to see someone new in the Super Bowl, the NFC is giving you what you want. Sorry about the AFC.Yep, same old, same old is ahead, with the New England Patriots hosting the Baltimore Ravens for the second straight confer-ence championship game Sunday. With a similar result, too. New England (13-4) is a 9 12 -point favorite to reach its sixth Super Bowl in the Tom Brady-Bill Belichick era. The Patriots’ quar-terback and coach are 3-2 together in the big game, but the last two appear-ances have been losses to the Giants. That surely must irk the two men who otherwise have dominated the last 12 NFL seasons. The Patriots have never lost an AFC title game at home (4-0, three of those in those 12 seasons). They certainly came close last January when Lee Evans couldn’t hold onto a pass in the end zone in the final moment that would have sent the Ravens to their second Super Bowl and first since the 2000 season, when they won it all. New England will move the ball on Baltimore (12-6) and could resort to run-ning it more often than in the past. Not only is Stevan Ridley a 1,000-yard rusher, something very rare for the Patriots, but the Ravens aren’t nearly as stout as they once were at stopping the run. With the emergence of Shane Vereen and consistency of Danny Woodhead if he is healthy, the Patriots are deep in the backfield, too. The loss of star tight end Rob Gronkowski will be damaging for the Patriots, but not overwhelmingly so. Aaron Hernandez will pick up the slack in recep-tions and the blocking of Michael Hoomanawanui against Houston was exem-plary. Where the Ravens could prosper is in a revitalized pass rush. Terrell Suggs finally is approaching his top defensive player status of 2011 after returning from a partially torn Achilles ten-don. Paul Kruger already is a dynamic sack guy. Ray Lewis’ pending retirement adds an emo-tional boost for Baltimore. But in the end, New England’s offense will be too persistent, too sharp and too deep for Baltimore to stop. Look for Wes Welker, Brandon Lloyd and Hernandez to have strong games, and for the Patriots’ defense to keep Joe Flacco, Ray Rice, Anquan Boldin and Baltimore’s danger-ous offense from doing too much damage. And look for the Patriots to be in New Orleans next month. PATRIOTS, 30-24San Francisco (minus 3 12 ) at AtlantaHad the Falcons kept the rout going against Seattle in last Sunday’s divisional round, the spread here would be different. But Atlanta (14-3) nearly blew it, raising questions among the odds makers about how good the Falcons real-ly are. They’re plenty good, as their last-minute rally to Matt Bryant’s 49-yard field goal to beat the Seahawks proved. The issue: San Francisco (12-4-1) simply is better. Of the remaining four teams, the 49ers are the most balanced. They have the best defense by far; only Seattle’s unit really challenged them among all the playoff qualifiers. Atlanta will struggle to run against Patrick Willis, Justin Smith, NaVorro Bowman and Co. So the Falcons will take to the air, a wise decision when you have playmakers Tony Gonzalez, Roddy White and Julio Jones. Problem is, the Niners’ secondary is as good as any, even if the intercep-tions were down this sea-son. And the pass rush, sparked by Aldon Smith (19 12 sacks), is formidable. Where San Francisco has an edge over last year, when it lost at home to the Giants for the confer-ence crown, is in its pass-ing game. Second-year QB Colin Kaepernick has added a dynamic dimen-sion with his strong arm, escapability and overall athletic skills. Michael Crabtree has developed into a dependable receiver with big-play abilities. Add that to Frank Gore’s running, and Atlanta’s D will be overmatched. 49ERS, 23-16 NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN As promised, the Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown now invites you to join us for the upcoming 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show. Vendor indoor booths, and Outdoor space set-up, will be on Friday March 1st. 2013 (beginning at 8:00 AM). Please plan to complete your set-up by 4:00 PM on Friday March 1st. Show times are: Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 10 AM4PM. ATTENTION VENDORS trr1PUFOUJBM$VTUPNFSTt'SFF1BSLJOHBOE"ENJUUBODFGPSBMMt"MMnQSPDFFETGPSUIFFWFOUHPCBDLUPDPNNVOJUZ If we receive your check post marked by 1/25/2013, you will receive a FREE 1/8 page ad in the Home Show Program published by Lake City ReporterPlease mail checks and contracts to:5)&305"3:$-6#0'-",&$*5:%08/508/ PO Box 2334 Lake City, Florida 32056http://rotarydowntown.com 5IFOVNCFSPGWFOEPSTCZJOEVTUSZHSPVQBSFMJNJUFE %POU%FMBZ4JHO6Q5PEBZ Austin Seay (386) 288-8217 ASSOCIATED PRESSNew England Patriots cornerback Aqib Talib (31) talks with cornerback Alfonzo Dennard (37) as they stretch during practice on Thursday in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots will play the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC Championship game for the second year in a row at Foxborough today.



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DEAR ABBY: I’m two months pregnant with my second child. Our first child is a boy. My prob-lem is my mother. She loves her grandson dearly, but she’s desperate for a granddaughter. Recently, the subject of names came up. Although we have already decided on a name if the child is a boy, we had not discussed girls names at length. When Mother asked me what the girl’s name would be, I said I had always liked “Melody,” and that if I had my way, that is what I’d name a girl. My mother immediately started knit-ting an afghan with the name Melody on it. A week later, my husband said that while he didn’t mind the name Melody, he thought we should decide on a name together. I tried to tell Mom that Melody might not be the name we choose. Her response was, “Well, my granddaughter will always be Melody to me.” Mom and I are very close, but she can be extremely stubborn. What’s the best way to tell her we have decided on another name? -WHAT’S IN A NAME IN CANADA DEAR WHAT’S: Tell her in plain English, and do it before the afghan has to be unraveled and redone. If she insists on complet-ing the blanket with the wrong name, accept it gra-ciously and quietly donate it to charity. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I was a busy wife, mother and grand-mother who had always been active and involved in my church and com-munity. When my beloved husband died three years ago, everything changed. I became so consumed by grief, all my regular activi-ties meant nothing to me. My children and grandchildren were busy with their own families and careers. I missed having someone to talk to and began feeling deeply lone-ly, even in a crowd. Then something remarkable happened: I learned I have an incurable cancer. I was so scared and worried, I couldn’t eat or sleep. One of my sons took me to a world-famous cancer cen-ter. Everyone I met there was loving and kind, and radiated positive feelings. Once again, I felt sur-rounded by love -and it changed my outlook. Now I have people in two centers who treat me with love and respect. Community and church members are rallying around me to show their support. I feel blessed and content, and the best part is I am no longer afraid. Abby, what do you think about my change in attitude? Am I in denial or experiencing some new stage of grief? I don’t want to have cancer. I don’t want to leave everyone behind. But I am not afraid to die. -LOVING EVERY DAY WITHOUT FEAR DEAR LOVING: What you have experienced could be called an epiph-any. In your case, it may be the simple, striking dis-covery that once you felt again surrounded by love, respect and security, leav-ing this world and joining your husband in the next no longer held terror, but gave you peace. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Lend a helping hand and you will get something in return. A greater inter-est in a cause you come across will open doors to new adventures and people you enjoy keeping compa-ny with. Voice your opinion and gain confidence and respect. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Make travel plans. Enjoy a quiet day with someone you think is special. Do your best to enhance an important rela-tionship. Listen to what’s being said and you will dis-cover something that will help you with a project. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t share too much information. You will be misinterpreted if you aren’t careful, causing uncertain-ty that can hurt an impor-tant relationship. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t make an impul-sive decision regarding your professional or per-sonal position. Now is not the time to make changes or to jump to conclusions. Bide your time until you have more knowledge, facts and figures pertain-ing to your situation. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Keep your emotions in check when dealing with personal matters or people you feel responsible for. Don’t let demands be put on you or agree to some-thing you feel may damage your reputation. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Plan a fun-filled day. Take part in activities that interest you or get together with friends you find inspiring. Love is in the stars and planning a romantic encounter will lead to a better future with plenty of personal plan-ning. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Put greater emphasis on intellectual pursuits, learning and participating in events that will intro-duce you to different cul-tures. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Head in whatever direction best suits your needs, and don’t worry about what others do, think or say. You have to satisfy your own needs and utilize your skills to get the best results. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll miss out on a fortunate opportunity if you are overindulgent or take on too much. Rethink what it is you want to accomplish and downsize so you can reach your goals. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Fix up your digs, but make sure you don’t infringe on anyone’s pri-vacy or space. Getting the go-ahead from family or a neighbor will also result in additional help you didn’t expect. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Entertain friends or move things around to make room for a hobby you want to start. Spending time at home will help you avoid people looking for trouble. Make the changes that will ensure your happiness and comfort. Discipline will be needed. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let your intuition help determine what you should or shouldn’t do. Set a budget that will allow you to live more comfort-ably in the near future. An idea will spark interest, and help and suggestions will be offered. ++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Sting7 Makes a love connection? 14 Like Big Mama 7KRUQWRQV+RXQG'RJ ,QFOLQHG21 Mollify22 Limestone variety0LGGOHURZ25 Ones getting hit on DWVDOVDFOXEV" 26 File extensions*HQ%UDGOH\6OHGJHZKRVDQJ :KHQD0DQ/RYHVD:RPDQ 30 Master6WUHWFKHGLQDZD\33 Nesting place for a ELUG +RUQHG)URJVVFK/LNHPDJLFVTXDUHV,QYHVWRUVERWWRP line 6SLGHU0DQ GLUHFWRU6DP 1XPHULFDOSUHIL[(FRFRQVFLRXV/LNHOHWWHUVPDUNHG 5HWXUQWRVHQGHU 49 Pizza topper$XWKRURI8QWRWKH 6RQV 54 Poison hemlock or 4XHHQ$QQHVODFH :KHQWKH)HVWLYDO GH&DQQHVRSHQV 3HDFHBBBKDQG&RPLFDFWRU-DFTXHV&RPSDQ\FORVLQJ"61 Silent screen star 1DOGL :LQJLQJLW"%DFNGRRU68 Lift,PLPSUHVVHG:RRGVWRFNDUWLVW *XWKULH 37$VFRQFHUQ $EEU $WODQWD%UDYHVGLY.QHHOHQJWKKLSKRS shirts 0RWKHUZKRZDVD 1REHOLVW 80 Skeleton section5RWDWLQJVXUYH\LQJ tool +ROO\ZRRGV 3DWULFLDDQGRWKHUV ,W+DSSHQHG2QH 1LJKWGLUHFWRU $EUXSWO\FDOOVRII SODQVVD\ 6KRZVRPH irritation 6HH$FURVV3XEOLVKHG&KRUXVDIWHU$OOLQ IDYRU 5RDGVLJQWKDWPD\ elicit a groan 8VHGDVDGLQQHU tray 'DQFHLQVWUXFWLRQ'LWFKGLJJLQJHJBBB6HOW]HU+LS:LWK$FURVV 'RZQDQG'RZQZKDWHDFKline in the centerVTXDUHVKRXOGGR 117 Like some XQH[FLWLQJELGV 2QHZKRVEH\RQG EHOLHI" 5HYROXWLRQDU\ ILJXUH" +LJKKDW7HQQLV+DOORI )DPHUERUQLQ%XFKDUHVW *HWUHDG\WRULGH ZLWKXS'RZQ :RPHQVVXIIUDJH OHDGHU&DUULH&KDSPDQBBB :RUNSODFHZHOIDUH org. :RUNSODFHULJKWVRUJ(DWDWBBBFODVVLF sign) 8QORFNWRDSRHW2QHRIWZRSKRWRVLQ DQDG :KHUH3RQFHGH/HyQ GLHG %HUQVWHLQV &DQGLGHIRURQH %ODFNBBB10 Stay fresh3LWFKHUVGDWXP )ULHQGO\ LQWURGXFWLRQ" 3DUWVRISRXQGV6KRUWFXW/HDYHVRXWRIWKH EDJ" %RQHFRQQHFWHGWR WKHREOLTXHFRUG 7RSURZ18 Ancient Greek school 19 Start of an DJUHHPHQWWKDWVnot really anagreement 0XVOLPOHDGHU/LJKWVLGH7XVFDQH[SRUW3ULHBBBNQHHOLQJ EHQFK 6HH$FURVV*HUVKZLQV7KH BBB/RYH 6XIIL[ZLWK]LOOLRQ)HGDJHQWV3ULFHDEEU&RDFK3DUVHJKLDQ41 Trail43 Singer Dion+LWFK6HH$FURVV49 Snake along2LOULFKODQG+6VHQLRUVH[DP once 'LYLVLRQSROLWLTXH3OD\ZULJKW)XJDUG%HJLQQLQJRIBBB ZDWHUVKHGmoment)


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A G A M B L E WITH CARE See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID required. Management reserves all rights. Offers are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa. Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice, not valid for live Poker or Table Games. No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1.888.ADMIT.IT. 2013 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved. 4 813.627 7:00 AM 8:15 AM 9:00 AM 1200 N. Saint Augustine Rd., #A 2469 W. US Hwy. 90 6003 W. Newberry Rd. GET $ 40 FREE PLAY WITH YOUR ROUND TRIP TRANSPORTATION FOR MORE INFO & RESERVATIONS CALL FABULOUS COACH LINES AT 866.352.7295 OR RESERVE ONLINE AT FABULOUSCOACH.COM HOP ON THE BUS TO THE SERVICE FROM VALDOSTA / LAKE CITY / GAINESVILLE TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS Auto Commercial Residential Mobile Services Insurance Claims Accepted Residential Bath Enclosures Mirrors Table Tops Ventilated Shelving Window Replacement Plate Glass Beveled Glass Auto Glass Store Front Your Clear Choice for All Your Glass Needs Monday Friday 8am-5pm After Hours Emergency 386-397-2121 386-397-2896 1770 W US Hwy 90 Lake City, FL 32055 Located between Furniture Showplace and Columbia Bank Ricky Bennett & Dale Brown Owners GUNS: Obama will try to outflank NRA Continued From Page 1A JOBS: Unemployment rate falls Continued From Page 1A CHILI: Second annual cook-off a hit Continued From Page 1A BREAK-INS: Many reports received Continued From Page 1A By BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott who slashed early-voting from 14 to 8 days then defended the decision in court now says he thinks returning to 14 early-voting days is a good idea. The first-term Republican said in a statement we need shorter ballots. We need more early-voting days, which should include an option of the Sunday before Election Day. And, we need more early voting locations. In 2011, Scott signed an elections bill that cut early voting from 14 to 8 days and eliminated the Sunday before Election Day one used by many black churches for get-out-the-vote drives as an early-voting day. The state was criti cized last fall for six-hour-long voting lines, though Scott then defended the law. He said Thursday the changes will ease long lines and delays in counting ballots. An about-face on early voting TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Jackie Kite prepares a bowl of chili for Mike Leedom on Saturday during the Second Annual Chili Cook-off at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market. Kite took first place honors in the contest. 2008, when it was 7.8 percent, though 749,000 workers remain jobless out of a workforce of approximately 9.3 million Floridians. The December unemployment rate was down 0.1 percentage points from the November rate of 8.1 percent and was 1.9 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 9.9 percent. In November the countys labor force consisted of 31,229 people with 28,863 having jobs, while there were 2,366 unemployed residents. In December 2011 the countys unem ployment rate was 9.2 percent, when 28,718 people in the countys workforce of 31,628 people had jobs. Then, 2,910 residents were jobless. vehicle owners reported break-ins Friday night, but officers were called to sev eral other homes where people reported their cars had been broken into and ran sacked, but nothing taken. Jay Swisher, a homeowner in the Cypress Landing Subdivision off Grandview Avenue, said three of his familys vehicles where targeted Friday night or early Saturday morning. We actually had two cars and a truck that got hit, he said. They ransacked two of them and the third they ransacked and they got cash from the glove box. Swisher said he believes he was the only person on his street whose vehi cles were targeted by thieves, but when speaking to authorities about his case, he heard of other vehicle burglaries around the city and county. Several subdivisions throughout the county, including Cannon Creek and the Lake City Country Club had some bur glaries this past week, he said. All were kind of similar MO (method of opera tion) with the ransacking. It appears they are looking for something specific. We had several electronics that were in the vehicle, checks and gift cards that were available and they didnt take it. They probably dont want anything they have to sell and take a chance of it coming back to them. Melinda Moses said thieves also ransacked her vehicle sometime after dark Friday or before daylight hours Saturday. I didnt notice my car was broken into initially, she said. My neighbor, Joel Foreman, came over and told me his car had been broken into and the police where at his home. So then we looked at my car and the suspects had left open the glovebox and gone through my make-up bag. I didnt really have anything of value in my car. Moses said she didnt believe anything was missing from her car, but the thieves ransacked her vehicle once they gained entry to the car. Several of the cars that were targeted by the thieves were left unlocked, and some even had the keys in the vehicle, victims said. and a contest for booth display. Kite took first place in the cooking con test, while Deborah Jennings was second and Eb Steward was third. I am totally surprised, Kite said, noting she began preparing her award-winning chili the night before the contest. Maxines All In Organic Chili, the name of Kites chili, was sold out by the end of the day as consumers with cups and bowls continuously visited her booth for the award-winning chili. I am pleased I took first place and Im kind of shocked, too, she said. I do an all white meat chili with turkey, sausage and chicken breast. My family loves it, but I never thought it would win. In the booth decoration contest, Richard Wright took first place, Jennings was sec ond and Kite was third. Nick Roberts, Lake DeSoto Farmers Market manager, said the competition went really well. The chili contestants really brought it this year, he said. Last year there were only six or seven contestants, but this year people brought their friends and it ran smoothly. Everyone is pleased with the way it worked out. Roberts said the idea behind the chili cookoff was to get more people to visit the farmers market. Even if people dont stop in and pur chase items from the vendors that are usually here, Church On The Way (rep resentatives) were the ones selling the chili bowls and they raised money thats going to help some of their people go to Kenya. Dale Tompkins, Church On The Way lead pastor, said all the proceeds from the bowls and cups are going to help people from the church who are working at an orphanage in Africa. stand up for sensible gun laws, and if they do that, we will stand up for them, and if they dont we will stand up for whoever runs against them, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg told the U.S. Conference of Mayors Friday. Because thats exactly what the NRA is trying to do. Just hours after Obama rolled out his gun proposals on Wednesday, the group gathered at the headquarters of the National Education Association to game out their plans. As of Friday, voters calls to Reids office were running two-to-one against Obamas proposals, a Reid aide said.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 6BSPORTS NEW 2013 NISSA N VERSA SEDAN SV 1 AVAILABLE A T THIS PRICE STK#13NS380 MDL CODE: 11213 VIN#846634 www. R ountree M oore N issan.com 1-888-650-2199 4316 Hwy 90 West L ake C ity, F L NEW 2013 NISSA N SENTRA SV 1 AVAILABLE A T THIS PRICE STK#13NS420 MDL CODE: 12113 VIN#646776 $ 17,999 $ 14,599 NEW 2013 NISSA N ROGUE ( S PECIAL E DITION) 4 AVAILABLE A T THIS PRICE STK#13NS392 MDL CODE: 22113 VIN#516005 $ 20,899 NEW 2013 NISSA N A LTIMA 2.5 S 1 AVAILABLE A T THIS PRICE STK#13NS374 MDL CODE: 13113 VIN#177276 $ 20,499 Price excludes tax, tag, title, registration, and dealer fee.



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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 6DLIFE Delivering Quality Healthcare that Matters to You! Quality Care is Important to Every Patient. But how can you really know the care youre receiving is the best? The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the lead federal agency tasked with improving healthcare nationwide, denes quality healthcare as doing the right thing at the right time in the right way to achieve the best possible results. At Lake City Medical Center, our team of physicians and staff lives by this denition every day. In fact, we have been recognized for our commitment to quality care by the most respected organizations in healthcare. And for 13 consecutive years, the community has recognized our efforts to provide the best care in the area by voting us the Lake City Reporters Best of the Best Hospital. Want to see more? For more information about publicly reported data, visit www.HospitalCompare.hhs.gov Survey of Patients Hospital Experience* Lake City Medical Center Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center The following scores are reported on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) national survey. Patients who reported that their nurses always communicated well. Patients who reported that their doctors always communicated well. Patients who reported that they always receieved help as soon as they wanted. Patients who reported that their pain was always well controlled. Patients at each hospital who reported that YES they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home. Patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest). Patients who reported YES they would definitely rec ommend this hosiptal. *The data was last updated 12/13/12 and is updated every quarter. FLA Average US Average 77% 84% 68% 68% 86% 74% 73% 66% 73% 51% 61% 71% 48% 46% 73% 77% 60% 67% 81% 65% 68% 78% 81% 66% 70% 84% 69% 70% THE TOP 7 REASONS TO CHOOSE LCMC AS YOUR COMMUNITY HOSPITAL



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 7A7A NOTICE OF MEETING COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE CITY OF LAKE CITYNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee for the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 5:30 P.M., in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. All interested persons are invited to attend. AUDREY E SIKES, MMCCity Clerk NOTICE OF MEETING LAKE CITY COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY CITY OF LAKE CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Lake City Community Redevelopment Agency for the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Tuesday, January 22, 2013, at 6:45 P.M., in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: x Faade Grant application All interested persons are invited to attend. AUDREY E SIKES, MMCCity Clerk CITY COUNCIL MEETING THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL MEET ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2013 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA All interested persons are invited toattend. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the me etings identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager’s Office at (386) 719-5768. AUDREY E SIKES, MMCCity Clerk By BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — State officials on Friday announced plans for quality improve-ments and tighter monitoring of juvenile justice residential and detention facilities following the arrest last month of a staff member accused of battering a 15-year-old girl in the Florida Panhandle. The new efforts include enhancing mental health training, routinely interviewing youths and reviewing less serious incidents by the state. Such incidents formerly were handled by private providers or program managers. “Our primary concern is the health and safety of Florida’s youth,” said Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters. “We are enhancing services to give kids the best foot forward so they can lead rewarding lives.” Ninety-five percent of the residential facilities are privately operated, and the state is planning this year to outsource the remaining five. Those facilities are separate from detention centers, which are stateor county-operated for high risk offenders. The privately operated Milton Girls Academy, northeast of Pensacola, last month agreed to end its residential contract with the state after the arrest and reports by other children who expressed worries about their safety. The department on Dec. 12 released a surveillance video showing Shannon Abbott pushing a teenager into a wall, throwing her on the floor and lying on top of her for near-ly 20 minutes in August. Abbott pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge. The agency in October also released a report on the death of 18-year-old Eric Perez at the Palm Beach Regional Juvenile Detention Center in July 2011 after a staffer dropped him on his head. The report said Perez lay vomiting and moaning on a mat after staffers failed to get him medical attention. By BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — A judge has thrown out charg-es against one defendant in a north Florida voting fraud case and defense lawyers on Thursday predicted that others would follow. Circuit Judge Julian Collins this week dismissed felony charges against Montollis Roberson, a vol-unteer in the 2010 cam-paign of a Madison County school board candidate. “I think it effectively is going to end the case,” Tallahassee lawyer Robert Cox said. He said his cli-ent, a nurse who lost her nursing home job after her arrest, was “absolutely ecstatic.” Roberson was one of nine Madison County residents, including two elected offi-cials, who were arrested in the case in 2011. She was accused of violating regulations for the distribution and collection of absentee ballots, but Collins cited a 1975 Florida Supreme Court ruling that says those provisions are discretionary rather than mandatory. The judge also noted that the state conceded there had been no intent to cast a false or fraudulent bal-lot. Voters who received the absentee ballots said they were able to cast them for the candidates of their choice. “The legal issues and the facts in this case are com-mon to all defendants,” said attorney Jami Coleman, who is representing another defendant, Raven Williams. State Attorney Willie Meggs said he disagreed with the judge’s decision, but added, “It’s kind of OK.” He said if nothing else, the case has shown the Legislature needs to tighten laws on absentee voting. “It is an area prime for fraud,” Meggs said. Five other defendants are facing similar charges, including Williams and sus-pended Madison County School Board member Abra “Tina” Hill Johnson and her husband. Two other cases have been resolved through pretrial intervention. Suspended Supervisor of Elections Jada Woods Williams, meanwhile, is fac-ing separate misdemeanor negligence charges. Johnson won the election by 28 votes. She and her campaign volunteers were charged with obtain-ing about 45 absentee ballots without proper authorization.COURTESY PHOTOSFlorida Gateway College hosted the Columbia County Scien ce Fair this week at the Levy Performing Arts Center. TOP: The junior division winner of the Best in Fair Trophy, s ponsored by FGC, was Victoria Marsh (center) from Westside E lementary School for her project ‘Juice Mold.’ Also pictured are Westside Principal Cherie Hill (left) and teacher Tammy Nessmith. ABOVE: The winner of the Best in Fair Trophy, sponsored by FGC, w as Ryan Kasak (right) from Epiphany Catholic School for his pro ject ‘Microwave Emission of Cell Phones.’ Kasak was also the winner of the Best Physical Science Project. Also pictured are organizer Janet Sweat (left) and Hannah Knight of Lake Ci ty Middle School, the winner of the Best Biological Project. County science fair winners Madison voting fraud case charges dismissedJudge rules that no laws broken, just guidelines. State tightens monitoring of juvenile justice facilities AROUND FLORIDA Mom gives birth in moving car OCALA — A central Florida couple is celebrating after their baby girl was unexpectedly born in the front seat of their car while on the way to hospital. Laura Jimenez had already been to the hospital the night before but was sent home because her labor was not progressing. On Thursday morning, the baby’s father Leobardo Villasana started driving Jimenez to the hospital after her water broke. But as they battled their way through sluggish rush hour traffic, Jimenez said she had to push. The mother said she was surprised at the easy birth of the eight-pound baby. This is her third child. Villasana continued driving to the hospital, never stopping the car for the birth.Man, 3 children die in wreck LAKELAND — Florida authorities say that a man and three children have been killed in a wreck northwest of Orlando. The Florida Highway Patrol said the accident occurred Friday night on SR 33 in Lake County. Police said in a news release that “for an unknown reason” 41-year-old Wilfredo Malave lost control of his 2009 Mercedes, which struck several trees and a pole before hitting another tree and coming to a rest. The father and his 9-year-old son Zion were pronounced dead at the scene; a 7-year-old boy and a 2-year-old girl died at Southlake Hospital. The driver and the children were wearing seat belts or child restraints.FEMA rejects Sandy disaster aid Tallahassee — Florida officials say the Federal Emergency Management Agency has denied disaster assistance for areas of the state damaged by Hurricane Sandy. The Florida Division of Emergency Management reports that Gov. Rick Scott received notification of the denial Thursday. Scott requested federal assistance on Nov. 1 for Brevard, Broward, Indian River, Martin, Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties as a result of damage from Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 24-26. Officials say Florida sustained $44.9 million in damage to infrastructure and beaches.Miami airport hits passenger record MIAMI — Miami International Airport officials say a record number of people traveled through their termi-nals in 2012. According to officials, 39.5 million passengers came through the airport last year. That’s up more than 1.1 million passengers form 2011. Q Associated Press



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTERRuns: Sunday, January 20, 2013 CAR SALE Alachua Service Center One-year Anniversary Thursday, Friday & Saturday January 24, 25 & 26 OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY AND MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. 1. Credit approval required. Your APR may vary based on your credit worthiness, loan amount, term of loan and vehicle. For example, a $25,000 loan with no money down at 1.75% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $438.96 and a final payment of $425.01, finance charge of $1,235.45, for a total of payments of $26,323.65. The amount financed is $25,088.20, the APR is 1.9%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. at Santa Fe Ford 16330 U.S. 441, Alachua t Meguiar’s Car Kit FREE when you buy with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft! 1.9APR1for 60 months on any 2009 or newer with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft.1% t $400 o invoice prices! (in-stock vehicles only) Plus, one FREE oil change.Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!2 Visit campuscu.com or call 754-9088 and press 4 to get pre-approved!