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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Dear Abby dies at 94. COMING SUNDAY Chili cookoff coverage. 63 34 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 253 1A Friday Steel Bridge Southern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural sea son of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www.fgcentertainment. com. Arbor Day event The Lake City-Columbia County Beautification Committee will celebrate Arbor Day with a program at 11 a.m. in Olustee Park. The committee will rec ognize the contributions of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Darby to enhancing life in the community. A tree will be planted in their honor at Wilson Park. Saturday Chili cook-off The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili samples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the winner. For registra tion information and con test rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. For more information, call (386) 7195766 or visit market.lcfla. com. Turkey shoot United Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold a turkey from 10 a.m. until dark at Moose Lodge 624, 624 NE Williams St. Shotguns and ammunition will be provided. For more information, call (386) 7525604. Sunday MLK Jr. program The Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform. Bridal show The third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 7541411. Pension pay-in upheld By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE A law cham pioned by Gov. Rick Scott that requires teachers, state and coun ty workers and some municipal employees to contribute 3 percent of their pay to the states pen sion plan was narrowly upheld by the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday. The 4-3 decision reversed a trial judges ruling that the law violated the collective bargaining, contract and property rights of about 600,000 public employees including police, firefighters and other first-responders. The law, which went into effect on July 1, 2011, also repealed 3 percent annual cost-of-living increases for benefits accrued after that date. The ruling was vindication for the Republican governor who had sought an even bigger 5 per cent employee contribution and the GOP-controlled Legislature. The decision was a bitter defeat for public employee unions, led by the Florida Education Association, which had challenged the law. The courts ruling today sup ports our efforts to lower the cost of living for Florida families, Scott said in a statement. This JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Richardson Middle School eighth-grader Eva Kirby, 13, spells out a word on her arm as she battles with Lake City Middle Schools Hunter Ragsdale during the Columbia County Spelling Bee held at the Columbia County School Board Administration Building auditorium on Thursday. Kirby won in six rounds, finishing with the word untenable, which means hard to defend or maintain. She will advance to the regional spelling bee at the Jacksonville Main Public Library on Feb. 23. Im so excited I won, and I was really nervous, she said. I was afraid I would psyche myself out. Im just glad I got to represent Richardson. See another photo, Page 3A. Government workers will have to contribute to retirement fund. COURT continued on 3A Spelling it out Uphill battle on guns for Obama By ERICA WERNER Associated Press WASHINGTON President Barack Obamas sweeping gun-control pack age faces an uncertain future on Capitol Hill, where major ity House Republicans are rejecting his proposals while the presidents allies in the Democratic-controlled Senate are stopping well short of pledging immediate action. The fate of his plan could ultimately hinge on a hand ful of moderate Democratic senators. Although they are unlikely to endorse the presidents call for banning assault weapons, they might go along with other proposals, such as requiring universal background checks on gun purchases. Several of those sena tors responded warily after Obama unveiled his propos als Wednesday with the chal lenge that Congress must act soon. I will look closely at all proposals on the table, but we must use common sense and respect our Constitution, said Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont. Tester told the Missoulian newspaper in his home state recently that he supports back ground checks but doesnt think an assault weapons ban would have stopped the shoot ings at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman massacred 20 chil dren and six adults before turning the gun on himself. Obamas proposals came a month after the shootings in Newtown, which he has called the worst day of his presidency. His announce ments capped a swift and wide-ranging effort, led by Vice President Joe Biden, to respond to the deaths. The $500 million plan marks the most comprehen sive effort to tighten gun laws in nearly two decades. It also sets up a tough politi cal fight with Congress as Obama starts his second term needing Republican support to meet three looming fiscal deadlines and pass compre hensive immigration reform. The White House strategy for pressing Congress centers on building public support for the presidents measures. Theres only one voice powerful enough to make this happen: yours, Obama BATTLE continued on 3A Congress must act soon, he says, but some senators wary. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Suzanne Edwards, representing Catholic Charities Lake City Regional Office, presents the 2012 Dove Award to general manager Terry Baker on behalf of PotashCorp White Springs Wednesday for the companys outstanding participation in a variety of projects. This is the first time the award has been given. We recognize the com munity need after Tropical Storm Debby and the value that Catholic Charities had in the recovery efforts, Baker said. Inaugural Dove Award Woman now missing for 12 days From staff reports The Lake City Police Department is seeking assistance from the public as authorities attempt to find a woman who has been miss ing for 12 days. According to LCPD officials, around 4:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, Betty Ann Hicks, 49, walked away from her home at 434 SE Waldron Terrace and has not been seen since. Around 3:45 p.m. on Jan. 5, Lisa Hicks, called the LCPD and reported her sister Betty Ann Hicks missing. Officer Gerald Ford responded to the residence and met with Lisa Hicks, who told him the last time she saw her sister Betty was around 4:30 that morning. Lisa Hicks told Ford that unconfirmed reports last placed her sister at U.S. 129 Hicks MLK parade scheduled for Monday at 10 By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led thou sands of people when he marched for Civil Rights in the 1960s. Although he wasnt leading parades, Kings legacy will be evi dent during the next few days, when parades will be held at thousands of locations in his honor for his contri butions to civil and human rights. Columbia County will be included in the ranks of places that will hold a Martin Luther King Jr. Parade. The Northeast Florida Leadership Council will host its annual Martin Luther King Jr. Grand Parade at 10 a.m. Monday. Parade line-up starts at 9 a.m. at the Florida Department MISSING continued on 3A PARADE continued on 3A

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Singer-songwriter Bobby Goldsboro is 72. Comedian-singer-musician Brett Hudson is 60. Actor-director Kevin Costner is 58. Country singer Mark Collie is 57. Actress Jane Horrocks is 49. AROUND FLORIDA Martin parents to give scholarship ORLANDO The par ents of Trayvon Martin are presenting a scholarship in their sons name during a Martin Luther King Jr. cel ebration in Daytona Beach. Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin will join attorney Benjamin Crump for Thursdays annual banquet hosted by Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration for Florida, Inc. at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel to honor the civil rights leader. They will present the scholarship to a local high school senior. Crump is giving the keynote address. Trayvon Martin would have graduated from high school this year. He was fatally shot last February by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman during a confrontation in Sanford. Zimmerman has claimed self-defense under the socalled stand your ground law and is awaiting trial. All convicts must pay $20 fee TALLAHASSEE An appellate court says every defendant convicted of a crime must pay a $20 fee to support Crime Stoppers programs. The full 1st District Court of Appeal on Wednesday unanimously withdrew a prior decision by a three-judge of the same court that said the assessment applied only to defendants who are fined. The new ruling noted that the law requiring the fee was revised on July 1, 2010, to change lan guage that made the fee a surcharge to any fine imposed. The 14 participating judges wrote that the cost is no longer an additional surcharge. Teller conspired to rob bank TAMPA Authorities say a teller at a Bank of America branch in Tampa helped another man rob the bank. Tampa police say a 911 caller reported a suspi cious person putting on gloves and a hoodie near the bank around noon on Wednesday. The Tampa Tribune reports an armed robbery call came in as police were responding to the original call. An arriving officer saw someone running from the bank. Tampa police say the man dropped the bag when he saw police. Officers caught up with 21-year-old Marcus Ryan Halbert after a chase. Officers say Halbert told them he and 20-yearold teller Alan Michael Ethington planned to stage the robbery. Spy cam catches man abusing cat BOCA RATON A woman who suspected her roommate of torturing her cat installed a spy camera and caught the abuse on videotape. Police arrested 25-yearold Jordan Bean Tuesday on a charge of animal cru elty after Alanna Jenkins did some preliminary undercover work. The Palm Beach Post reports Jenkins was suspi cious because her belong ings were often misplaced when she returned from work. So she installed the camera. Police say the video shows Bean enter ing Jenkins room and actively hunting the cat, named Chompers. The cat is seen hissing and moaning before Beans catches it and wraps it in a towel. Bean then seemed to smother the cat while holding her down with all of his weight. Elderly man gets 8 years for killing TAMPA A Tampa Bay area man has been sentenced to eight years in prison for fatally shooting his neighbor. A Hillsborough County judge sentenced 72-yearold Trevor Dooley on Thursday. He was con victed of manslaughter in November, despite claims of self-defense. Authorities say Dooley shot 41-year-old David James at a Valicro park in September 2010. Dooley, who lived across from the park, was yelling at a skateboarder using a bas ketball court when James interceded. Witnesses say Dooley flashed a gun, starting a struggle that left James dead. James then-8-yearold daughter watched him die. Dooley testified he had no interest in a physical confrontation and only shot James because James was choking him. Man gets life for gang shooting BARTOW A 20-yearold man has been sen tenced to life in prison for a fatal gang shooting. A Polk County judge made Alejandro BaezGarcias sentence official on Thursday. He was con victed of first-degree mur der and attempted seconddegree murder last month. Because prosecutors didnt seek the death penalty, life imprisonment was the judges only option. Original Dear Abby dies at 94 MINNEAPOLIS P auline Friedman Phillips, who as Dear Abby dis pensed snappy, sometimes saucy advice on love, marriage and meddling mothers-in-law to millions of news paper readers around the world and opened the way for the likes of Dr. Ruth, Dr. Phil and Oprah, has died. She was 94. Phillips died Wednesday in Minneapolis after a long battle with Alzheimers disease, said Gene Willis, a publicist for the Universal Uclick syndicate. My mother leaves very big high heels to fill with a legacy of com passion, commitment and positive social change, her daughter, Jeanne Phillips, who now writes the column, said in a statement. Private funeral services were held Thursday, Willis said. The long-running Dear Abby column first appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle in 1956. Mother and daughter started sharing the byline in 2000, and Jeanne Phillips took over in 2002, when the fam ily announced Pauline Phillips had Alzheimers disease. Pauline Phillips wrote under the name Abigail Van Buren. Her col umn competed for decades with the advice of Ann Landers, written by her twin sister, Esther Friedman Lederer, who died in 2002. Their relationship was stormy in their early adult years, but they later regained the closeness. Pacino to play Paterno in upcoming movie LOS ANGELES Al Pacino will play Joe Paterno in a movie about the late Penn State football coach. Producer Edward R. Pressman confirms Brian De Palma will direct Happy Valley, the tentative title of the film, based on Joe Posnanskis bestseller Paterno. Happy Valley reunites the Scarface and Carlitos Way team of De Palma and Pacino for the third time and I cant think of a better duo to tell this story of a complex, intensely righteous man who was brought down by his own tragic flaw, Pressman said in a statement. No start or release dates were given for the film. While Pressman said the plot remains under wraps, Posnanskis book followed Paternos final years, as the winningest coach in college football history saw his career end in disgrace in 2011 with the sex abuse scandal involving assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. Schwarzenegger talks gun control LOS ANGELES Arnold Schwarzenegger doesnt think theres a parallel between film and real-world gun vio lence. The 65-year-old former governor of California returns to the big screen Friday as the sheriff of an Arizona border town tasked with stopping a Mexican cartel boss from returning to Mexico. It marks his first leading role since serving as The Governator for six years. I personally feel that this is enter tainment, said Schwarzenegger. Thurs day: Afternoon: 4-4-4 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 8-3-5-3 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 6-9-10-12-31 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Do everything without grum bling or arguing, so that you may become blameless and pure, children of God without fault in a warped and crooked generation. Then you will shine among them like stars in the sky as you hold firmly to the word of life. And then I will be able to boast on the day of Christ that I did not run or labor in vain. Philippians 2:14-16 ASSOCIATED PRESS Pauline Friedman Phillips, right, the nationally-syndicated advice columnist best known as Dear Abby, and her daughter Jeanne Phillips, are seen in 2001. Associated Press Associated Press Schwarzenegger Pacino

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and Interstate 75, walking north. Betty Hicks is a black woman, 5 feet 3 inches tall, 230 pounds, black hair, brown eyes, freckles on both cheeks, wearing a black stocking cap, black leather jacket, gray hoodie and blue jeans. Authorities said Betty Ann Hicks is possibly en route to Alabama, where it is reported that she was located the first time she went missing. Betty Ann Hicks doesn’t have a boyfriend or family in the area, other than her sister, and there are no relatives in Alabama. Lisa Hicks said her sister suffers from a men-tal illness and she took some of her medications with her, but not all. She added that Betty Ann withdrew all the funds from her bank account on Jan. 4 and she also has her Social Security check with her. Authorities entered Betty Ann Hicks’ data into the state and nation-al database as missingdisabled on Jan. 5. The case was turned over to LCPD investiga-tor David Greear, who immediately began con-tacting other relatives and friends in an attempt to locate Betty Ann Hicks. The LCPD has exhausted all its leads to Betty Ann Hicks’ whereabouts and is requesting assistance from the community. Anyone with any information concerning the location of Betty Ann Hicks is asked to call Greear at 758-5451 or contact the LCPD anonymously on the department’s TIP line at 719-2068. LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 3A3A Community concertCommunity Concerts of Lake City will host a per-formance by Terry Barber, countertenor superstar, as part of their 2012-13 Concert Series at 2:30 p.m. at the Levy Performing Arts Center on the Florida Gateway College Campus. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students in kindergarten through grade 12. Tickets will beavailable only at the door an hour before the concert. Season tickets for all remaining concerts may be pur-chased at the Lake City Chamber of Commerce or by credit card at www.communityconcerts.info. Call (386) 466-8999 for more information. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterSpelling bee contestantsThe participants in the Columbia County Spelling Bee pos e for a photograph after the competition on Thursday. Picture d are (front row, from left) Molly Tomlinson, Five Points Elementar y School; runner-up Hunter Ragsdale, Lake City Middle S chool; winner Eva Kirby, Richardson Middle School; Tiffany Te desco, Fort White Elementary School; Holden Case, Columbia City Elementary School; (second row, from left) Tovianna R ossin, Westside Elementary School; Calvin Hencin, Summer s Elementary School; Adam Sandlin, Pinemount Elementary Sc hool; Hunter Silcox, Melrose Park Elementary School; (ba ck row, from left) Malia Dallas, Minnie J. Niblack Elementary School; Joshua Chase, Covenant Community School; Michae l Conners, Fort White Middle School; and Andrew Dicks, Easts ide Elementary School. PARADE: March on Marion Avenue set for Monday Continued From Page 1Aof Transportation office off Clements Street. “We’ve always put on an Martin Luther King Jr. parade,” said Ron Williams, Columbia County Commissioner and Northeast Florida Leadership Council president. The annual parade has been held in Columbia County for more than two decades. “The North Central Leadership Council has sponsored an MLK parade from the beginning of a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.” The parade grand marshals for this year’s event will be Ermon and Alma Owens from the Watertown community. “They are pillars and pioneers in this community — especially the Watertown community,” Williams said. The local Martin Luther King Jr. parades traditionally average more than 50 entries and this year’s parade could be larger than past events because there is no entry fee to par-ticipate, Williams said. “We’ll take entries up until 10 a.m. Monday,” he said. The parade will begin near the DOT office on Marion Avenue and head north through the downtown area before making a left turn on Washington Street and ending at Memorial Stadium. Williams said continuing to hold a local parade in honor of Dr. King is an important tradition. “We always say it’s a day on and not a day off,” he said. “It’s something that we need to do to show that the dream is still alive for justice and equality for all men.” People interested in registering a parade entry can call 752-0158 or 867-0468 or call Angela Woody at 965-8000. In addition to the grand parade, the community will continue to honor King during a commemoration ser-vice. The host church for the commemoration service is Olivet Missionary Baptist Church, 901 Davis St., with Rev. Ronald Walters Sr., pastor and keynote speaker for the event. The event will feature music, inspirational dance and a inspirational message by Walters. “As part of the commemoration service, two plaques will be given to local residents for their outstand-ing achievements in mentoring local youths, on and off the field,” said Audre Washington, Northeast Florida Leadership Council MLK pro-gram coordinator. “Coach Brian Allen and Coach Demtric Jackson were nominated and selected as the award recipients.” Following the church service, the community is invited to Annie Mattox Park for community events. “There will be a flag football game featuring the men and women of Columbia County against competi-tors from Suwannee County, a men’s basketball tournament and soul food vendors,” Washington said. “The chil-dren will have bounce houses and other fun events. The specialty of the day will be the live-streaming, via television, of the inauguration of President Barack Obama. We invite the community to a day of food, fun and family as we commemorate the life and legacy of another king, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” MISSING: Woman soughtContinued From Page 1A BATTLE: Much resistance in Congress to gun laws Continued From Page 1Awrote in an op-ed Thursday in The Connecticut Post. The president is also expected to travel around the county pitching for his proposals and could activate his still-operational campaign organiza-tion, Organizing for America, to fight for the plan as well. Campaign manager Jim Messina sent an email to Obama supporters Thursday urging them to sign a peti-tion backing the president’s proposals and promising “more soon” from the organization. Obama, seeking to sidestep some congressional opposition, also signed 23 executive actions Wednesday, including orders to make more fed-eral data available for background checks and end a freeze on govern-ment research on gun violence. But he acknowledged that the steps he took on his own would have less impact than the broad measures requiring approval from Capitol Hill. He is also calling for limiting ammunition maga-zines to 10 rounds or less. “To make a real and lasting difference, Congress, too, must act,” Obama said. The question now is how and whether that happens. House GOP leaders have made clear they’ll wait for the Senate to act first, since they see no need to move on the contentious topic if it doesn’t. “House committees of jurisdiction will review these recommendations. And if the Senate passes a bill, we will also take a look at that,” said Michael Steel, spokesman to House Speaker John Boehner. Many rank-and-file Republicans scorched Obama’s proposal. “The right to bear arms is a right, despite President Obama’s disdain for the Second Amendment,” said Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan. Senators are expected to begin discussions on how to proceed when they return to Washington next week. COURT: Employee contribution law upheld Continued From Page 1Ameans even more busi-nesses will locate and grow in our state.” Scott argued it was unfair that Florida’s pub-lic employees didn’t con-tribute because workers in most other states and the private sector are required to help pay for their pen-sions if they still have that benefit. The public employees’ contributions, though, were not used to strengthen the Florida Retirement System, already one of the nation’s strongest pension plans. Instead, they reduced con-tributions made by state and local government employers. “Balancing the state budget on the backs of middle-class working families is the wrong approach,” teachers union president Andy Ford said in a statement. A ruling against the contribution law would have created a nearly $2 billion budget gap for state and local governments because they then would have had to return the employee contributions. “We still believe that a promise is a promise,” Ford said. “We are more deter-mined than ever to change the face of the Florida Legislature. The next elec-tions in 2014 can turn this decision around.” Although Democrats, who are closely allied with the unions, picked up a few seats in the Legislature last year, Republicans continue to hold large majorities in both chambers. “The changes made to the Florida Retirement System reflect the Legislature’s efforts to maintain a sound retirement system for our hardworking state and local government employ-ees as well as the reality that Florida taxpayers can no longer bear the full cost of this benefit,” said Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville. A key legal issue was how to interpret a law passed in 1974 that declares the retirement rights of public employees are contractual in nature. That year, the Legislature, then led by Democrats, also eliminated employee contributions to the pension plan. The high court majority cited a 1981 Supreme Court opinion that said the law protected rights and benefits already earned but did not preclude the Legislature from altering benefits prospectively for future service. Justice Jorge Labarga wrote for the majority that the same principle applied to the new law that restored employee contributions, so it does not violate employ-ees’ contract rights nor take away property in the form of their pension ben-efits. The new law also doesn’t violate collective bargain-ing rights guaranteed by the Florida Constitution for public and private employ-ees because it doesn’t prohibit such negotia-tions between unions and employers, Labarga wrote. “Although I understand the frustration of state employees, who have in effect taken a 3 percent pay cut in addition to years without cost-of-living adjustments, this case is not about the wisdom or fairness of the Legislature’s decision,” Justice Barbara Pariente wrote in a concur-ring opinion. Labarga and Pariente were joined by Chief Justice Ricky Polston and Justice Charles Canady, the high court’s two most reliably conservative members. Countertenor star to perform tonight EPA gets earful at water hearing By TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressTAMPA — About 150 protesters, many in neon-green T-shirts protesting slime in Florida’s water-ways, showed up Thursday at a U.S. Environmental Protection meeting, con-cerned about nutrient pol-lution. The meeting — where federal officials took only written statements from people — was the first of two held this week. The second is on Friday and Web-based meetings are scheduled for Jan. 22-24. The EPA is accepting comment on proposals that set numerical limits on nutrients that come from such sources as fertilizer, animal waste and sewage effluent, which feed the toxic, slimy algae blooms. They can kill fish and make people sick. Many of the folks who turned up at Thursday’s meeting said that the excess nutrients are fouling beaches, harm-ing wildlife and contami-nating drinking water. Environmentalists point to recent events as proof that nutrient pollution is a serious problem, including Sarasota County’s removal of 4.5 tons of dead fish from beaches after a red tide bloom and a drinking water plant in Lee County closed because of green slime. Environmental groups are urging the agency to adopt stricter pollution rules than the state.

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OPINION Friday & Saturday, January 18 & 19, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Flood controls showing effects of age Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T hat’s what Andy Ford, president of the state’s largest teachers union, said Thursday in derision of the Florida Supreme Court’s ruling to uphold 3 percent mandatory pension pay-ins for government workers. The ‘promise’ to which Mr. Ford refers was made in 1974 by the state legisla-ture with the passage of Florida Statute 121.011(3)(d), under which most state workers were no longer required to con-tribute to their own pension funds through the Florida Retirement System. Moreover, the new law declared this arrangement to be contractual in nature, thereby affording it protection under the Contract Clause of both the state and federal constitutions. In 2011 state lawmakers, responding to a long-term fiscal crisis, changed course and began requiring a 3 percent pay-in by state workers. Last March a Tallahassee circuit court found the law unconstitutional, deeming it, among other things, a violation of workers’ contractual rights. The state high court had the last word Thursday. The court ruled that, yes, a contract is a contract – a promise, a promise – but said legislators hadn’t broken their word in reconfiguring the FRS after all. It all comes down to a question of what was promised. The lower court contended that under the 1974 law, workers who entered the FRS could never be made to contribute to their own retirement. The Supreme Court disagreed, ruling the ‘contract’ was only meant to ensure that money already earned under the law couldn’t be taken away. A good lawyer could argue it both ways, and if you read the various pleadings and briefs, they did. But nowhere did any of those documents address the fiscal reality of current-day Florida. Everyone has had to cut back. Not just government workers, but all of us private sector folks whose taxes pay their salaries. Sorry, Mr. Ford, but we’re all in this together, and the sooner we realize it, the better. ‘A promise is a promise’ OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comW hether it’s man-kind-assisted global warming, long-term cyclical weather pat-terns or just plain bad luck, we seem to be in for an era of superstorms on the order of Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina, storms strong enough to overstress our precautions to prevent or miti-gate their damage. It’s only a slight exaggeration to say that our infrastructure policy seems to consist of waiting for a bridge to collapse or a levee to fail before we get around to fixing it. If Congress is as sluggish as it was at coughing up the money to repair Sandy’s devastation in the most densely populated region of the country, even that may no longer be our policy. That’s why an Associated Press report, based on Freedom of Information Act requests, on the state of the nation’s flood-control levees makes for disturbing and — given a few bad breaks with the weather — potentially expensive reading. As of early this month, the Army Corps of Engineers was almost 60 percent of the way through inspect-ing and cataloging federally overseen levees, the maintenance of many of them being the responsibility of the municipalities they protect. This is the first-ever such inventory. Of the 1,451 flood barriers inspected and for which ratings were published, 326 were rated “unaccept-able,” 1,004 were “minimally accept-able” even though they had deficien-cies in need of correcting, and only 121 were deemed “acceptable.” The AP said that the hundreds of structures at risk of failing endan-gered people and property in 37 states, meaning that it’s hardly a problem confined to the better-publi-cized coastal regions. The biggest culprit, of course, is a lack of money to maintain the systems. After Katrina, California approved $5 billion in bonds to upgrade the financially strapped state’s flood-protection system, but the AP says the state still needs $12 billion to finish the job. Some smaller riverfront towns simply don’t have the money to maintain the systems the Corps built for them. There are other factors as well, such as design flaws, shoddy con-struction, inadequate maintenance; worn-out pumping stations relying on rusted-out pipes to handle flood overflows; and allowing trees, bush-es and burrowing animals to take over vulnerable levees. And in some places the municipalities are complicit, allowing construc-tion on the levees and development on flood plains. With this current weather cycle, or, if you prefer, run of bad luck, we’re going to pay, one way or anoth-er. It would be a lot cheaper to begin paying for prevention now rather than pay for wholesale reconstruc-tion and relocation later. 4AOPINION Secret for a happy lifeW ant to know the secret for a happy life? Well, many experts out there have written books telling you how to do it. Many of them say there’s one path to happiness, based on what they believe or understand of what hap-piness is. I think a lot of them have great ideas, that could help you build that happier life for your-self, but there probably isn’t just one best way. Is it true that “all roads lead to Rome?” I don’t think so. I don’t think there’s one pat, easy formula that’s good for everybody. As far as I know, our human race has pondered and explored what makes a “happy life,” for as long as we’ve been on Earth. Common sense and folk wisdom have offered ideas for thousands of years. The science of psychology emerged more recently, and offers its own “two cents” to the body of beliefs about happiness. A few principles and ideas seem to have outlived the ravages of time, and are generally believed to have some seeds of truth. Research from the science of psychology adds some evidence that seem to sup-port that common sense and folk wisdom. It seems that there’s not just one way to a happy life. Here are some ideas that seem to be accepted as “tried and true.” You may find some of them helpful: It doesn’t matter who you are, or what you’ve got to work with. Anyone can make his or her own life happier. Happiness means something different to each of us. “One man’s cake is another man’s poi-son.” What’s do you think makes a happy life? Take some time to make a list of things that are most important to you. That list helps you find your purpose, and helps give your life meaning. Your life and time are two of the most valuable things you’ve got. What else is very important for you to have, to do with your life and time, and to become? This list can help give your life your own direction to pursue. Dream big. Remember when you were a child, and wanted to be a fire-man or an astronaut? Don’t be afraid to dream about what you want out of life. Wanting it, see-ing it or visualizing it motivates and guides you towards that dream. We’re choice makers. It’s built into us. Make a decision to make your life the best it can be, the life you want it to be. What are your strengths, capabilities, talents, and skills? What’s unique and special about you? What are your special skills, talents, interests, knowledge, and characteristics that you have to work with? What do you love doing? What are you good at doing? Take care of yourself. Build your health and fitness, by making your meals healthier, and including significant physical activities in your days. Health and fitness lay the groundwork for a happy life. Attitude is so important. Research tells us that your thoughts influence your feelings, and that optimists live years lon-ger, on the average, than pessimists. Look for the good side of everything. Expect success, not fail-ure. But don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Learning from our mistakes is a proven way to grow and to build better lives for our-selves. When you search for it, every cloud really does have a silver lining. Believe in something. Try to do what’s right. The “Serenity Prayer” advises us to “have the courage to change the things we can change, the patience to accept and adapt to the things we can’t change, and the wisdom to know the dif-ference.” Build that happier life for yourself, and it will also help bring more hap-piness to those close to you. They’re worth it, and you’re worth it. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob Denny is a licensed mental health therapist in Florida, and teaches psy-chology and human growth and development at Florida Gateway College. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:I would like to start by saying I, like most of the rest of Lake Citians, enjoy my guns. Right now however, there is a lot of finger-pointing as to who or what is to blame for gun violence. Video games are an easy target because most that blame them have never played them. If a child believes that you can shoot some-one and they will automatically “respawn,” then I believe that the parents have dropped the ball and the kid needs more help than just no video games. Gun ownership and video games are a lot alike in the sense that they both require common sense and responsibility, both by the parent and the child. Children need mod-eration and direction in all aspects of life. More focus should be put on mental health rather than “those dern video games.” John Wilson, Lake City Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Jan. 18Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Music concertSouthern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural season of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www.fgcentertainment.com.Masonic banquetGold Standard Lodge 167 will have its annual Masonic banquet at the Winfield Community Center. For tickets and more informa-tion, call Chirs Mirra at (386) 623-3611 or Mike Kelly at (386) 867-6675.Church anniversarySalem Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its 173rd anniversary and annual meeting beginning at 6:30 p.m., with addition-al services Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Guest ministers will be Elder Charles Tyson of Tifton, Ga., Elder Gordon Smith of Jacksonville and others. All descendants of Salem Primitive Baptist Church and those who love the original Baptist doctrines are invited. The church is at 199 SW Salem Church Court, off County Road 250 (Lake Jeffrey Road). For more information, call Pastor Herman W. Griffin at 752-4198.Arbor Day eventThe Lake City-Columbia County Beautification Committee will celebrate Arbor Day with a program at 11 a.m. in Olustee Park. The committee will rec-ognize the contributions of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Darby to enhancing life in the community. A tree will be planted in their honor at Wilson Park.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.Propagation classColumbia County Master Gardeners will give a class on propagation at 2 p.m. at the Lake City Library. Learn to increas plant stock by cuttings, root division and seeds. For more infor-mation, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Turkey shootUnited Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold a turkey from 10 a.m. until dark at Moose Lodge 624, 624 NE Williams St. Shotguns and ammunition will be provided. For more information, call (386) 752-5604.Community concertCommunity Concerts of Lake City will host a performance by Terry Barber, countertenor superstar, as part of their 2012-13 Concert Series at 2:30 p.m. at the Levy Performing Arts Center on the Florida Gateway College Campus. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students in kin-dergarten through grade 12. Tickets will beavailable only at the door an hour before the concert. Season tickets for all remain-ing concerts may be pur-chased at the Lake City Chamber of Commerce or by credit card at www.com-munityconcerts.info. Call (386) 466-8999 for more information. Fish fryThe Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholarship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive (the old Amtrak station). Fish sandwiches are $6 and dinners are $7.50. Dinner includes fish, grids, baked beans, bread and dessert. Drinks are 50 cents. To call in an order, call 752-7054.Jan. 20MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be keynote speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Bridal showThe third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi-ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur-chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411.Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Jan. 224Cs board meetingThe Suwannee Valley 4Cs Board of Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m. at 260 S. Marion Ave, Suite 135.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Jan. 23Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at theLifeStyle Enrichment Center in Lake City. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Quilters meetingThe Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St., Lake City, two blocks north of Duval (US 90) off Lake Jeffery Road. Social time will be at 9:30 a.m., and the business meeting will be at 10. The program will be presenta-tion of the 2013 Challenge by Sandy Lindfors and Nancy See.Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a con-cert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fund-raiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admission tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. The “Artist’s Circle” tickets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are available by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be available at the door beginning an hour before the performance.Landlords meetingLake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res-taurant on U.S. 90. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the meeting will begin at 6. John Kasak will give a talk on “What Is Covered in Your Insurance Policy for Rentals.” For more infor-mation, call 755-0110.Military officers groupThe Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meeting at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando Street, at 6:30 p.m. The dinner meet-ing is open to all active duty military officers, retired and former officers, mem-bers of the Reserve and National Guard, and their surviving spouses. For information and reserva-tions, call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 old will begin at 7 p.m. For more information, con-tact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 5A5A COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com. TODD WILSON/ Lake City ReporterColumbia County winners of the American Legion’s ‘Amer icanism’ essay contest were honored with a dinner at Am erican Legion Post 57 in Lake City earlier this week. Students h onored included (front row, from left) Noah Bittle, fourth gra de, second place; Shelbi Fennell, sophomore, third place; Megha Patel, freshman, second place; Hailey Giamarino, sixth gra de, third place; Clayton Steinruck, seventh grade, first place; Rachel Johnson, junior, first place; Lillian Feagle, senior, seco nd place. (back row) Josh Garbett, eighth grade, second place; Zach Dicks, fourth grade, third place; Lauren Wilson, fifth grade, first place; Eliana Duarte, fifth grade, second place; Sam Abbott, fo urth grade, first place. Not pictured: Morgan Hartopp, sophomore, first place; Ashleigh Bridges, senior, third place; E va Kirby, eighth grade, third place. Students wrote essays on ‘What Freedom Do I Enjoy Most?’ First-place winners move on to the Florida state contest. Freedom essay winners TODD WILSON/ Lake City ReporterMembers of the Columbia High School Robotics Team spok e to the Rotary Club of Lake City Thursday and described the robot they are beginning to c onstruct for the state competition later this year. Team members include (from left) Chandle r Douglas, Dugan Dotson and Chris Nettles. Celena Crews (right), the team’s robotics teacher, i ntroduced the group and its concept for the competition. CHS Robotics Team Ex-Lt. Gov. Kottkamp leaves as CEO of health drink firmBy BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Former Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottkamp has left his position as CEO of a health drink company that so far isn’t fulfill-ing commitments to create jobs after taking a $5 million grant from Lee County. The company, Bonita Springs-based VR Laboratories, accepted a $5 million eco-nomic incentive grant from Lee County with the promise of creating 40 full time jobs by the end of 2012 and 208 jobs by the end of 2016. But the money is nearly gone, few jobs have been created and the bottling plant that the company said it would open is in limbo. The company has blamed the delay on a dispute with a contractor and the county has given it a one-year extension to keep its promises. “I decided to leave VR Laboratories last month. I am focusing my career on the law and the legislative process,” Kottkamp said in an email to The Associated Press Wednesday night. “I wish VR well. Their success will be good for the community.” Kottkamp served under then-Governor Charlie Crist from 2007 to 2011. He sought the Republican nomination for attorney general in 2010. Kottkamp took the position with VR Laboratories in late 2011, after it had received the grant. His salary was $240,000 a year, according to documents the com-pany submitted to Lee County officials. He was one of nine full-time employees the company hired after receiving the grant, according to a document VR Laboratories submitted to the county. “Mr. Kottkamp is a very talented person. The VR Labs team will miss him, but under-stands his desire to accept another opportu-nity,” said Kay Gow, who runs the company with her husband, Robert Gow. The company sells a dozen health drinks under the V!ah name brand; the company says its products help users with issues such as stomach acid, sleep problems, stress, lack of energy and more. The active ingredients listed on the products include a green tea extract and other botanical extracts. They are described as dietary supplements and their claims have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While numerous other companies sell similar products with the same ingredients, the company claims it has discovered a new way of extracting the health benefits from plants that makes them more effective.

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P aul talked to the Corinthians about his own personal situation. He has previously spo-ken to them about how God has comforted him even though he is and has endured a lot of afflictions. In a statement of optimism he says, “Therefore we do not lose heart, but though our outer man is decaying, yet our inner man is being renewed day by day” (2 Corinthians 4:16). Another way of saying what Paul said is, “Even though we are getting older, we are getting renovated.” With each January, we begin a new year. If we were alive last January, then we are one year older this January. When we were younger, we did not think about “decaying” with each passing year. However, every senior citizen realizes that the body parts do not function this year like they did last year. They are beginning to “decay” or wear out; but what about our inner body? We are not taking about our physical heart, lungs, eyes, legs or back. We are talking about our soul. We are talking about our mind and attitude concern-ing our “eternal weight of glory” (2 Corinthians 4:17). We are not talking about the “temporal” things, but the “things which are not seen” that “are eternal” (2 Corinthians 4:18). As we get older, how much time do we think about going to heaven? Does it excite us that we are one more year closer to going to heaven? Does it renovate or energize our disposition when we think about being one year closer to being with God for eternity? When we feel all those aches and pains, do we think about that one day when we are with the Lord we will not have those physical problems? Thinking about heaven and being with God and all the faith-ful from all generations should inspire us to live more for God today than we did last year. It should help us to keep in per-spective that all the problems that we go through in this life are really only “momentary, light afflictions” as compared to “an eternal weight of glory.” This contrast by Paul really shows us how we should feel about all of our “problems” in this world. Really and truly they are only “momentary.” When we place our focus upon the things which we can see, then we tend to see all the nega-tive things in the world. We see all the disappointments. We see all the failures. But, if we will put our focus on the things which we cannot see then life becomes more enjoy-able, or to say the least, much more tolerable. If we will focus more on going to heaven, life becomes less dif-ficult. If we will focus on loving the people around us, the more relationships we will have. If we will focus on helping other people go to heaven, then we will have a life full of purpose. We will have a job that will never be completed; a mission that never comes to an end. So, what will be our focus this next year? That we are one year older and we are one year closer to dying or decaying? Or, will we be renovated or “renewed” because we realize that we are one year closer to reaching our goal of going to heaven and being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit and the faithful like Noah, Abraham, Moses, Joshua, Samuel, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezra, Nehemiah, the apostles, as well as the faithful brethren who were in Corinth, for all eternity? Let’s focus on being renovated. FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, January 18 & 19, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V We must love one another Decaying but being renovatedI suppose in this past year I have heard the word “hate” used more than any other period of time I can remember. Many times it comes from the lips of those who professed Christianity. Not only is it used toward sin or actions, it is used toward people. Nowhere in God’s word are we ever given the right to hate one another. However, over 20 times in the New Testament we are told to love one another. The first time we are told to love “one another” was spoken by the Lord Jesus Christ on His last night on earth; before the cross. He said, “A new com-mandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another” (John 13:34 NKJ). He said “as I have loved you.” How did He love us? He loved us enough to give His life on the cross of Calvary for us, even when we were unlovable. Now don’t misunderstand me. He never loved sin; but He loved the sinner. In John 13:35 (NKJ) Jesus said: “By this all will know that you are My dis-ciples, if you have love for one another”. There are several Greek words for love and they are all action words; that means even if the word is not used, love should be felt. Even if we dis-agree with the way some people live, if we disagree with their beliefs, we must do so in love; and if we are children of God, we must disagree in love. The most carnal church in the Bible was the Church at Corinth. Paul pleaded with them to all “speak the same thing” (I Cor. 1:10). Chapter one tells of their division and why. Chapters 12 and 14 tell of the other seri-ous disagreement that they had over “spiritual gifts.” Chapter 13 is placed between 12 and 14 for a good reason. It is known as the Great Love Chapter in the Bible. Today the word love is tossed around all too freely. I wonder if many of the people who use it really know what it means to love. Paul says you’ve got to love one another. If we don’t have love, then we can’t be a witness for God. He (Paul) says if one has all the ability to speak with all tongues, and though one has great gifts of discernment and great knowledge and great faith, even if one gives all he owns to the poor and gives his life, without love there is no profit (paraphrased). He goes on to say everything else will pass away but love will remain. We who are Christ’s must love one another. Just before going to the cross, Jesus made an emphatic state-ment in John 14:6: “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.” Those of us who enter His way must have love in our hearts for the brethren. Galatians 4:13 says: “For you, brethren, have been called to liberty: only do not use liberty as opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one anoth-er”. Hebrews 10:24 says: “And let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works”. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 7A7AReligionC ornelia “Corrie” ten Boom, sur-vived the holo-caust of World War II. She witnessed many atrocities against her people (Jews) as well as her own family. Her sister has been raped and killed by a German officer who was a prison guard where they were. The war ended, Corrie began a ministry, writing and sharing her story. While speaking one Sunday, she saw the guard who had taken so much pleasure in their pain sit-ting in the audience. She immediately recognized him and the feelings and memories immediately came back. Denial of the problem would not help. She could not ignore him nor her feelings. He came up to meet her, and with tears and deep remorse, he began to beg for her forgiveness. As the story goes, she forgave him. He still had to live with the memories, and sounds of screams from his victims. … They had both done all they could do. Forgiveness does not just help the offender, it especially helps the victim. To be able to go on with life, unchained, unbur-dened and able to release the poison of the past, and begin healing. Corrie understood that bitterness and hate could destroy her by giving the devil a ‘foothold’. Bitterness is the sour brackish stagnant water of ‘life gone bad’. It gradu-ally becomes the ‘center’ of a person’s life and attitude the controlling factor in dealing with life. It eventually will affect all other aspects of life, and relationships. Every con-versation will trail back to the hurt and pain, being constantly relived. Pills or alcohol simply serve to dull the problem for a period of time. It is visible in outward actions, words, and expressions, and is always felt in the heart. We will not trivialize this problem, because it is trivial. This is a big deal! The suggestions made in this series are offered to help in the struggle of many to deal with ‘the past’. Paul says, “get rid of all bitterness”, this includes the ‘blood-kin’ of bitter-ness, “rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of (hate)”. The critical question is, how? So we begin our re-study of an old problem, born in the heart of Satan. Time alone will not heal, it will take time plus something else. When we lived in Ireland, we had coal fire in the fireplace for heat-ing the room. We would build a fire and then in the evening, dad would put bits of coal and coal dust on the fire. This seemed to smother the fire, but it didn’t. During the night, this formed a “shell,” which held in the fire and the heat. In the morning, we would just poke it and the red-hot coals would appear. All we had to do is add more coal. It saved time on a cold morning. We would continue this for several days before cleaning it out and begin-ning again. This simply illustrates what happens when we try and ignore bitterness and even worse deny or justify our problems, which lie hidden until ‘poked’ and the ‘fires’ again flame up and we re-live it all again. Bitterness doesn’t go away on its own, you have to realize you have a problem and take definitive action. Time alone won’t do it. We must accept that we have a problem, and seek a real answer to heal. Next time we will begin to look at the doorway to healing ... forgiveness.Remembering that we ‘know’N o doubt you have often heard the old saying: “What he/she doesn’t know won’t hurt them.” This vote in favor of ignorance was probably first spoken by someone who was either hop-ing to avoid conflict or had been devastated by news they wish could be erased from memory. Either way, I have to disagree. It seems the older I get, the more convinced I am that those things we don’t know definitely do hurt. In fact, they often find a way to nearly beat us to death. John’s record of Jesus’ conversation with the Samaritan woman provides a great example of what I mean: “So he came to a town in Samaria called Sychar … and Jesus, tired as he was from the journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth hour. When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, “Will you give me a drink? The Samaritan woman said to him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.” John 4:5-10 Don’t miss Jesus’ first three words in response: “If you knew ...” What was it she didn’t know? We discovered last week that she was all too aware of the prejudice between the Jews and Samaritans. It is also likely that she was aware of the way oth-ers looked down on her since she chose the hottest part of the day to collect water for her daily household needs. Indeed, it seems she was only too aware of her own shortcomings, past mistakes, and failures. What she didn’t know was how to relieve these heavy burdens she contin-ued to carry … nor did she know that the One who could take those burdens stood right in front of her. There are people all around us who “don’t know” this same truth. Often, those who know the One who will take our burdens away decide to carry them on their own anyway. Recently, I saw one of those people in the mirror. For a lengthy season, a difficult family situation had me gripped, and a struggle of this kind can make it pretty easy to forget the gift of God. Through a series of events, no doubt orchestrated by God, I recently had one of those “well encounters” and clearly heard Him remind me: “If you knew…” Indeed, I had forgotten His offer of living water and traded it instead for a stagnant repeti-tion of half-truths. What we don’t know … and what we have for-gotten, definitely can hurt, and rob us of the peace and joy God intends. It is so important that we know … because every heart matters. Blessings, Angie Jan. 18173rd anniversarySalem Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its 173rd anniversary and annual meeting beginning at 6:30 p.m., with addition-al services Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Guest ministers will be Elder Charles Tyson of Tifton, Ga., Elder Gordon Smith of Jacksonville and others. All descendants of Salem Primitive Baptist Church and those who love the original Baptist doctrines are invited. The church is at 199 SW Salem Church Court, off County Road 250 (Lake Jeffrey Road). For more information, call Pastor Herman W. Griffin at 752-4198.Gospel playThe gospel play “A Taste of Temptation: An Anti-Drug Message” will be performed tonight through Sunday at 6 p.m. at the old Bread of Life Church on State Road 100-A. Featured performers include Anthony Dorsey, lead singer for Hamilton Park, and Jacqueline Marshall Rhodes. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For tickets or more information, call (386) 234-1922 or visit the website www.faithfully mobile.com/sgm.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in.Jan. 20MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and the group Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Deacon to be honoredChurch of Faith and Deliverance Through Christ, 379 NW Long St., will honor its beloved Deacon Anthony Gomes at 4pm. Guest speaker will be Minister Clyde Douglas III of Community Revival Center, Lake City.Jan. 21Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Jan. 23Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75. Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a con-cert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fund-raiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admission tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. Parker is perhaps best known as a regular artist at the Gaither Homecoming events, and is featured on most of the Gaither videos. He has been voted favor-ite male vocalist 12 times and soloist of the year nine times. The “Artist’s Circle” tickets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are available by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be available at the door beginning an hour before the performance.Jan. 25Church anniversaryPentacostal Believers of the Coming of Christ of Fort White will hold a church anniversary celebration at 7:30 p.m. with a gospel music program. The groups Prophetess Jennifer Long, The Gospel Caravans and Elder Robert Jackson and the New Spirit Travelers, all of Jacksonville, will perform, as well as D&D Gospel Singers of Mayo, the Spiritual Harmonizers of Evinston and The Brown Brothers of Valdosta, Ga. Also featured will be The Gospel Harmoneers, Brother Reggie Hill and The Anointed Powell Sisters, all of Lake City, and Fort White’s own The Voices of Joy. Pastor Minnie (Williams) Gomes will serve as mistress of ceremonies. A love offering will be taken to support the church. For more informa-tion, contact Pastor Mother Rosa Bryant at (386) 497-4431.Jan. 26Prayer breakfastThe Pastor’s Care Committeeof Antioch Missionary Baptist of Fort White will have a prayer breakfast at 9 a.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Ronald Walters of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church of Lake City. Cost is $10 for aduts and $5 for chil-dren 5 and younger. For more information, contact Marilyn Frazier at (386) 318-3441, Allonia Griffin at (386) 497-3062, Francis Legree at (386) 497-1748 or Evangilist Gloria Jackson at (352) 538-0352.Jan. 27Church anniversaryShiloh Missionary Baptist Church will have its 71st anniversary cele-bration. The speaker for the morning service will be the Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock. The speaker for the 3 p.m. service will be the Rev. Billy Simon, pastor of Greater Popular Springs MB Church.Feb. 1Women’s conferenceWomen Overcoming Issues will have its annu-al conference, with the theme “Women Why You Tripping? Just Believe God!,” tonight and Saturday at the Community Revival Center, 244 NE Patterson St. At 7:30 tonight, Dr. Queen Horne-Kelly of Miracle World of Faith Ministries, Gainesville, and Dr. Apostle Kelly, overseer, will speak. Activities Saturday will begin with registration at 9 a.m., a continental breakfast will start at 9:30.; workshops will begin at 10 and lunch will be at noon. Workshop speakers include Co-pastor Sharon Jones, on women walking by faith and not by sight; Associated Pastor Carolyn J. Robinson, on insecurity and jealousy; Co-pastor Elaine Dixon, on communications issues; and Sister Laverne Douglas, on personal hygiene, groom-ing and health awareness. After the workshops, the panel will hold a question-and-answer session. Cost for the workshops is $10. Men, women, teenagers, all denominations and cul-tures are invited. For more information, call (352) 317-2540, (352) 214-5931 or (386) 344-4850. If you will be attending, please call as soon as possible so a headcount for food can be made.OngoingSunday school beginsFalling Creek Chapel, 1290 Falling Creek Road in Lake City, has just begun a Sunday school for all ages. It is 9:30 a.m. Sunday mornings. Adults meet in the church and children meet in our new Children’s Ministry build-ing. For more information call (386) 755-0580 or email fallingcreekchapel@gmail.com.Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional ser-vices the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a continen-tal breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship, breakfast and spir-itually uplifting morning. Acknowledging the danger of bitterness Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences, and offers biblical counseling. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, spe cial “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s new website, www. jackexum.com. ( EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second of six related columns. The others will be published over the next four weeks.) CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecity reporter.com. Public schoolBible classes ‘problematic’By WILL WEISSERTAssociated PressAUSTIN, Texas — Some 60 public school districts across Texas offer courses on the Bible, but at least a third aren’t meeting state requirements to be unbi-ased and academically and legally sound, a study released Wednesday con-cluded. Written by Mark Chancey, a professor of Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University, the study found that many dis-tricts’ courses favor conser-vative Protestant interpreta-tions of the Bible. Many also present “problematic treatment of Judaism” while “promoting pseudo-scholar-ship, particularly regarding science and American his-tory.” “At a basic level, students are often being taught to experience Judaism only through Christian eyes,” said Chancey, who complet-ed the study for the Texas Freedom Network, which monitors the State Board of Education from a progres-sive perspective. He said no courses in Texas were found to be favoring Jewish, Roman Catholic or mainstream Protestant views — only those held by conservative Protestants. Statewide, 57 districts and three charter schools offered elective courses on the Bible during the 2011-12 school year. Chancey listed 11 of them as having the most successful class-es, but concluded that 20 had the “most problematic courses.” The total overall number of districts offering Bible classes is more than double the 25 districts that taught them during the 2005-06 school year. But Chancey further found that of the 25 that taught them back then, just nine districts still offered Bible classes last school year.

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Most people would con sider it a dream to travel and work at their lifes love performing on stage. Con OShea-Creal is no different, and for the past year he has been living his dream by performing on stage in the Mary Poppins musical production. The musical will be per formed at the Times-Union Centers Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Jacksonville, from Tuesday through Sunday, Jan. 27. Creal, 26, is playing the role of Bert. Creal has been in the show since February 2011 and took over the role of Bert in September. Weve pretty much been in a different city every week, he said. By the end of this, well play 48 cities in 30 states. Weve been in Florida for the last month, and were headed north again. Well end in Anchorage, Alaska, in June. Creal, who studied musi cal theater in college, has been acting professionally for about four years. He said his role as Bert is the biggest in his career thus far. Creal became interested in performing when he was 7 years old and tap danced. He said he played sports, as well, but the tap dancing stuck with him. Playing the role of Bert is definitely the biggest opportunity that Ive been given, by far, he said. The show is so fun to do, and whats fun about Bert is that he actually gets to talk to the audience at times. Its unlike anything that Ive done before. Its real ly fun to get the feedback from the audience every night. Creal said the cast has developed chemistry through its years of per forming together and that has contributed to the pro ductions success. This is a great group of people, Creal said. This cast really does a good job of just coming into the the ater and giving the best theyve got for that day, and we really have a good time up there. You cant imagine traveling every week and staying in hotels and it definitely makes a huge difference when everybody believes in what were doing and really give what theyve got. Its really a treat to do every night. Creal, a University of Oklahoma graduate, grew up in Lincoln, Neb. He said, the ensemble normally per forms eight times a week, which adds to the groups chemistry. Thats the other fun part of the road, every so often some people are leaving the show and new people are coming in, he said. Youre constantly having to accept new people into the flock and get them acquainted and really set the standard for how we connect ourselves out here on the road. Creal said he was a Mary Poppins fan while growing up, and he vividly remem bered his grandmother bringing the film over to his familys house to watch. A Step in Time was always a favorite number to watch in that film, and I think its part of the magic that belonged to the show the first movie to have animation with live action, he said. It was pretty ground-breaking at the time and fun for kids to watch. However, Creal said this stage production of Mary Poppins has something for adults, as well. I think a lot of people when they see Mary Poppins coming to town, they may think that its a kids show or frivolous entertainment for a kid, Creal said. ... (B)ut the show asks really perti nent questions about fam ily, life and whats really important. From staff reports The deeds of the legendary nanny, Mary Poppins, have been transferred from the silver screen and will be a musical pro duction appearing in Jacksonville from Tuesday through Jan. 27. With seven productions pro duced on three continents, Mary Poppins is one of the biggest stage musical successes to emerge from London or New York in recent years. Worldwide to date, the show has grossed more than $812 million and wel comed more than 11 million guests. The musical is the win ner of 44 major theater awards around the globe, including Tony, Olivier, Helpmann and Evening Standard awards. The entire original creative team has reunited to bring this story of the worlds most famous nanny to audiences around North America. The production will take place at the Times-Union Centers Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Jacksonville. We are thrilled that Mary Poppins is making its Jacksonville premiere, said Sarah Roy, publi cist for the Artist Series, the offi cial presenter of the show. This Broadway musical is a fun, exu berant, exciting and unexpected show that theatergoers of all ages can enjoy. Mary Poppins will be per formed evenings and matinees: Tuesday, Jan. 22 7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Jan. 23 7:30 p.m.; Thursday, Jan. 24 7:30 p.m.; Friday, Jan. 25 8 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 26 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; and Sunday, Jan. 27 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Ticket prices start at $27. Tickets are available 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Artist Series box office, at (904) 442-BWAY and online at www.artistseriesjax.org. The Mary Poppins North American Tour began perfor mances on March 25, 2009, and has played to more than 2.5 mil lion theatergoers in more than 60 cities to date. Madeline Trumble stars as Mary Poppins, while Con OShea-Creal plays the role of Bert. Trumble is making her return to the national tour of Mary Poppins after recently appear ing in the Broadway company of Disneys Newsies The Musical. She has also been seen in stage productions at the MUNY in St. Louis and Berkley Repertory Theatre. Trumble will appear along side OShea-Creal, who plays the affable chimney sweep, Bert. Creal recently performed with the Broadway and national tour ing companies of Irving Berlins White Christmas. Originally from Lincoln, Neb., Creal has also appeared in regional pro ductions of Singin in the Rain, nd Street, Annie Get Your Gun, A Christmas Carol and Urinetown. Mary Poppins, a co-produc tion of Disney and Cameron Mackintosh, opened on Broadway on Nov. 16, 2006. Based on P.L. Travers cherished stories and classic 1964 Walt Disney film, Mary Poppins the stage play features the Academy Award-win ning music and lyrics of Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. The production recouped its initial Broadway investment within 52 weeks of its premiere. Mary Poppins is the only show from the 2006-07 theatrical sea son still running. The Mary Poppins North American Tour has garnered continuous critical praise and achieved box office success since its launch in Chicago in March 2009. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 8A Mary Poppins coming to Jacksonville COURTESY PHOTO BY JEREMY DANIEL Madeline Trumble as Mary Poppins and Con OShea-Creal as Bert the chimney sweep perform in the Broadway musical production of Mary Poppins. COURTESY PHOTOS BY JEREMY DANIEL ABOVE: The cast of the Mary Poppins North America Tour performs the Jolly Holiday dance number from the Broadway production of the much-loved Disney movie. The musical will be performed eight times at the TimesUnion Centers Moran Theater in Jacksonvill between Tuesday and Jan. 27. RIGHT: Broadway veteran actress Madeline Trumble portrays Mary Poppins. National touring company bringing Broadway musical. Con OShea-Creal living out his dream on the stage Steel Bridge performs tonight at FGC From staff reports Fans looking for a dose of Southern rock will undoubtedly find their fill tonight at Florida Gateway College, as Cross Citybased Steel Bridge will perform as part of the FGC Entertainment series. Steel Bridge, which opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural season of FGC Entertainment, will perform at the Levy Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. The show is sponsored by Potash Corp. of White Springs. The band, consisting of Jamey King, Ryan Fulford, Steve Fremen, Robbie Vanosdol, Jordan Davis and Tommy Slaughter, is one of the more well-known Southern rock groups in the area, performing nearly every weekend at venues across North Florida. Their unique blend of country and Southern rock has garnered them rave reviews from their fans dubbed rivets and allowed them to open for such acts as Chris Young, Kellie Pickler and Gary Allan. Tickets for the show can be purchased by calling (386) 754-4340 or visiting www. fgcentertainment.com. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $10 for FGC stu dents, faculty and staff.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, January 18 & 19, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter Timmons, Woods take home top honors for CHS.Different race for WalkerL ocal race car driver Devin Walker is in a different kind of competition. The 16-year-old is entered in the Search for a Champion contest offered by the Champion spark plug folks. A tally is kept of voting and the top 15 racers will become Champion sponsored drivers for the 2013 season. Those 15 will each receive $5,000 and compete for the grand prize sponsorship of $50,000. Vote for Walker on the website www. alwaysachampion.com The voting began on Jan. 2 and runs through Feb. 3. Fans are asked to vote daily. The top 15 finalists will be announced Feb. 21, and there will be another round of voting from Feb. 22 to March 24 to determine the grand prize sponsorship winner. Walker ran a full slate in 2012 in the Street Stock Division at North Florida Speedway. He had three wins at the Lake City track and finished second to Sammy Hatcher by six points. Hatcher and Walker almost lapped the field. Third place in points was 505. Walker drives the No. 55JR car. He had a couple of other wins away from Lake City, including one at Bubba Raceway Park in Mayo. World of Outlaws driver Danny Lasoski is a mentor for Walker, who also joined with sponsor Takedown Outdoors Show later last season. Walker’s website www. devinwalker.com has a link to the Search for a Champion voting. North Florida Speedway has a couple of special events coming up and Walker plans to run in both. “We got the car ready last week,” Walker said. The Nationals for the Locals weekend at NFS is Jan. 25-26. Racing begins at 6 p.m. on that Friday and 4 p.m. on Saturday. Pits open at noon and grandstands at 4 p.m. both days. In addition to Walker’s Street Stock Division, there will be racing for late model, open wheel modified, pure stock, sportsman and box stock. The UMP Modified Nationals event at NFS is Feb. 1-2 (racing 7 p.m. Friday, 5 p.m. Saturday). In addition to the UMP Mods, there will be street stock, pure stock and box stock racing. A UMP Super Late Model is planned by NFS on Feb. 10. For information, go to www.northfloridaspeed way.com or call 754-8800. Falcons double up By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comLake City Middle School soccer doubled up on conference champi-onships with a sweep of Suwannee Middle School at Columbia High Stadium on Thursday. Lake City’s boys polished off a perfect season with a 7-0 win, while the Lady Falcons went into the final minute before pulling off a 2-1 victory. Both teams had the best regular-season records and earned the right to host the championship games. After a scoreless 12 minutes, Lake City’s Hunter Houston had a pair of goals in just over a minute. Brock Edge assisted on the first goal and Joseph Beach on the second. Lake City took the 2-0 lead into halftime. The second-half scoring began in the first minute. Chase Erickson centered a ball from the right side and Edge drilled it off the crossbar. Trent Morrison was there to put in the rebound. In the 37th minute, Houston intercepted a goal kick and punched it in to complete a hat trick. Morrison made his own hat trick with two goals less than two minutes apart at 13:50 and 12:29. Edge capped the scoring with a penalty kick in the 49th minute. The Falcons had 20 shots on goal, while Suwannee had one. In the girls game, Suwannee got on the board first with a goal by Savannah Jackson shortly after the first-half water break. Lake City’s Ashley Nobles answered with a run down the left side. She dribbled past two defenders and beat the keeper on the right side. The game stayed tied until the final minute when Nobles was taken down in the box and Lake City was awarded a penalty kick. Ashton Lee was called in to take the kick and drilled it home. Lake City Middle School sweeps conference titles.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLake City Middle School captain Krysten Giebeig (5) re acts as Suwannee’s Courtney Parlato (1) is about to collide with her during the Conference Championship held at Columbi a High School on Thursday. Tigers honor best BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterDallon Washington (left) and Will Bowen were named the junior varsity MVPs. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAn 11-2 season that saw Columbia High finish as District 3-6A champions deserved a closing ceremo-ny and the Tigers got one on Thursday. Columbia’s football program welcomed in Larry Vettel, host of the Larry Vettel show to speak with the team about what it meant to be a Tiger. Vettel divided being a Tiger up into an acronym with Tigers standing for teamwork, improvement, goals, enthusiasm, resil-ience and success. Vettel told the audience it is up to them to define success. “A drug dealer may make more money than a school teacher who inspires 30 stu-dents to be better,” Vettel said. “You tell me which one is more successful.” Vettel’s speech led into honoring two teams that had a lot of success this season with the 11-2 var-sity and 6-2 junior varsity squads. For the junior varsity Dallon Washington and Will Bowen took home the top honors as Offensive and Defensive MVPs. Other junior varsity award winners were: Dustin Carwile, Unsung Hero; Daylon Sheppard, Unsung Hero; Carwile, Academic Award; Jacob Strickland, Academic Award; Tim Dotson, Academic Award; and Nathan Taylor, Coaches Award. Varsity head coach Brian Allen led into the varsity portion of the awards by thanking the coaching staff and family for the time they put in behind the scenes. “This coaching staff is like a family,” Allen said. “A lot of them don’t get recog-nition or their names in the paper as much, but it’s an honor to have these guys beside me.” Allen also spoke of the honor it was to have four players named to the all-state team this season in Class 6A. Taking home the top awards for the varsity were Ronald Timmons and Felix Woods. Timmons was named the Offensive MVP, while Woods took home the honor for the defense. Offensive coordinator Mitch Shoup introduced Timmons by announcing the numbers he had during a record-breaking year. Timmons rushed for 1,800 yards — the most in Tigers’ history — scored 22 touchdowns and averaged 140 yards per game. Allen closed the ceremony with a speech that brought the head coach to tears when talking about Woods. “This kid leads by example and he reminds me so much of me that it’s crazy,” Allen said. “He doesn’t always get all the accolades, but I can guarantee that he will be successful.” Zedrick Woods took home the game’s third phase MVP by capturing the Special Teams Award. Other award winners for the varsity were: Brayden Thomas, Academic Award; Caleb Carswell, Academic Award; Charles Combs, Comeback Player of the Year; Roger Cray, Newcomer of the Year; Lonnie Underwood, Newcomer of the Year; Laremy Tunsil, Offensive Line Award; Javere Smith, Defensive Line Award; Nate Ayers, Wide Receiver Award; Terry Calloway, Linebacker Award; Darren Burch, Running Back Award; Trey Marshall, Defensive Back Award; Deonte Crumitie, Coaches Award; Brett Newcomb, Coaches Award; Thomas Holmes, Coaches Award; Drew Clark, Unsung Hero; Shaq Johnson, Unsung Hero; Tunsil, Captains Award; Jayce Barber, Captains Award; Woods, Captains Award; Rakeem Battle, Captains Award; Blake Kuykendall, Jim Register Award; and Braxton Stockton, Jim Register Award. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (left) and Felix Woods were honored as the Tigers’ offensive and defensive MV Ps for the 2012 season.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 13, Copiapo to La Serena, Chile (delayed tape) GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, second round, at La Quinta, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, first round, at Ka’upulehu-Kona, Hawaii 4 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, third round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Harvard at Yale NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at Boston 9:30 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma City at Dallas TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, Australia ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 14, La Serena to Santiago, Chile (delayed tape) BOXING 9 p.m. NBCSN — Middleweights, Elvin Ayala (26-5-1) vs. Curtis Stevens (21-4-1); light heavyweights, Gabriel Campillo (21-4-1) vs. Sergey Kovalev (19-0-1), at Uncasville, Conn. 9:45 p.m. HBO — Champion Roman Martinez (26-1-1) vs. Juan Carlos Burgos (30-1-0), for WBO junior lightweight title; champi-on Gennady Golovkin (24-0-0) vs. Gabriel Rosado (21-5-0), for WBA middleweight title; champion Orlando Salido (39-11-2) vs. Mikey Garcia (30-0-0), for WBO featherweight title, at New York GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, third round, at La Quinta, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, second round, at Ka’upulehu-Kona, Hawaii 4 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, final round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN — Maryland at North CarolinaESPN2 — UConn at Pittsburgh 12:30 p.m. FSN — Harvard at Memphis 2 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, West Virginia at Purdue or Kansas at Texas ESPN — Missouri at FloridaESPN2 — Texas Tech at Oklahoma St. 2:30 p.m. FSN — Arizona at Arizona St. 3 p.m. NBCSN — Columbia at Cornell 4 p.m. CBS — Oregon at UCLA ESPN — Syracuse at LouisvilleESPN2 — Creighton at Wichita St. 4:30 p.m. FSN — California at Stanford 5 p.m. NBCSN — Hofstra at George Mason 6 p.m. ESPN — Ohio St. at Michigan St. 7 p.m. NBCSN — UNLV at Colorado St. 9 p.m. ESPN — Gonzaga at Butler NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Memphis at Chicago SOCCER 9:55 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Fulham at Manchester City TENNIS 7 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, fourth round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, fourth round, at Melbourne, AustraliaFOOTBALLNFL postseason Conference Championships Sunday San Francisco at Atlanta, 3 p.m. (FOX)Baltimore at New England, 6:30 p.m. (CBS) ——— Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)College all-star games Saturday RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Houston at Indiana, 7 p.m.Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Washington at Denver, 9 p.m.Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games San Antonio at Atlanta, 7 p.m.Sacramento at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Memphis at Chicago, 8 p.m.Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.Milwaukee at Portland, 10 p.m.Washington at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Saturday’s Games No. 1 Louisville vs. No. 6 Syracuse, 4 p.m. No. 4 Kansas at Texas, 2 p.m.No. 7 Arizona at Arizona State, 2:30 p.m. No. 8 Gonzaga at No. 13 Butler, 9 p.m. No. 10 Florida vs. No. 17 Missouri, 2 p.m. No. 11 Ohio State at No. 18 Michigan State, 6 p.m. No. 12 Creighton at Wichita State, 4 p.m. No. 15 San Diego State at Wyoming, 7:30 p.m. No. 16 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma, 4 p.m. No. 20 Notre Dame vs. Rutgers, 8 p.m. No. 21 Oregon at No. 24 UCLA, 4 p.m. No. 22 VCU vs. Duquesne at CONSOL Energy Center, Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. No. 25 Marquette at Cincinnati, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Indiana at Northwestern, 1 p.m.No. 14 N.C. State vs. Clemson, 6 p.m.TENNISAustralian Open seeds At Melbourne ParkMelbourne, Australia Thursday Men Second Round Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Juan Martin del Potro (6), Argentina, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (7), France, def. Go Soeda, Japan, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Richard Gasquet (9), France, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2. Marin Cilic (12), Croatia, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 7-6 (2), 6-2, 6-3. Gilles Simon (14), France, def. Jesse Levine, Canada, 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Philipp Kohlschreiber (17), Germany, def. Amir Weintraub, Israel, 6-2, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Andreas Seppi (21), Italy, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (3), 6-2. Florian Mayer (25), Germany, lost to Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1. Marcel Granollers (30), Spain, lost to Jeremy Chardy, France, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Women Second Round Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 6-1, 6-0. Serena Williams (3), United States, def. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 6-2, 6-0. Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, lost to Laura Robson, Britain, 2-6, 6-3, 11-9. Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def. Donna Vekic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-4. Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Peng Shuai, China, 7-5, 6-2. Roberta Vinci (16), Italy, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-2. Lucie Safarova (17), Czech Republic, lost to Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 7-5, 7-5. Yanina Wickmayer (20), Belgium, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 7-6 (8), 7-5. Varvara Lepchenko (21), United States, lost to Elena Vesnina, Russia, 6-4, 6-2. Hsieh Su-wei (26), Taiwan, lost to Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 6-2, 6-1. Sloane Stephens (29), United States, def. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 6-4, 6-3. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 20132BSPORTS FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 18, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (DVS) (:01) 20/20 “Wedding Con dential” (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Ed Slott’s Retirement Rescue! The Heart of Perfect Health With Brenda Watson Washington WeekTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss (N) CSI: NY “Nine Thirteen” (N) Blue Bloods “Framed” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita Sonya is Amanda’s mole. (N) Beauty and the Beast TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsFringe “Liberty; An Enemy of Fate” The team implements a plan. (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Off Their RockersOff Their RockersDateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:24) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Dallas Police Women of Dallas Oprah’s Next Chapter Lance Armstrong. Oprah’s Next Chapter Lance Armstrong. Oprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “The Ring; Last Drive” Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch“The Nearlyweds” (2013) Danielle Panabaker, Naomi Judd. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The A-Team” (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. “Hancock” (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron, Jason Bateman. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Pretty Red Balloon” The Mentalist “Ring Around the Rosie” “The Fast and the Furious” (2001) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. (DVS) “2 Fast 2 Furious” (2003, Action) Paul Walker, Tyrese, Eva Mendes. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBob“Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy”Drake & Josh “Really Big Shrimp” See Dad RunFull House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Gangland “Snitch Slaughter” Gangland “Dead Man Inc.” Bellator MMA Live “The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Patton. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk “Mr. Monk Makes the Playoffs” Monk A childhood bully hires Monk. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290(5:20) “Radio Rebel” (2012) Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessie (N) Phineas and FerbGravity Falls Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Dee; Jan” Hoarders “Phyllis; Janet” Hoarders “Barbara G.; Fred and Mary” Hoarders “Randy; Vicki” Teen Trouble “Ashley” (N) (:01) America’s Supernanny USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSuits “Blind-Sided” (DVS) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Hip hop star Common latest project. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic StandHusbandsHo.Second Generation “Next Day Air” (2009, Comedy-Drama) Donald Faison, Mike Epps. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N)d NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) E 2013 Australian Open Tennis Third Round. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) SUNSP 37 -Prep Zone SpoThe New College Football ShowAlong the WayInside Israeli Bask.Boxing From Aug. 21, 2010. XTERRA USA ChampionshipTransat Qubec DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Leprechaun Gold” Gold Rush “Dozer Wars” Gold Rush The Dirt “The Bromance” Gold Rush “Pink Slip” (N) Bering Sea Gold (N) Gold Rush “Pink Slip” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Better WorseBetter WorseBetter WorseBetter Worse “The Bucket List” (2007) Jack Nicholson, Morgan Freeman. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Sex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityFashion PoliceChelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lEmbarrassingFlea Market FlipCool Pools House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLRandy KnowsRandy KnowsFour Weddings (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressRandy KnowsRandy KnowsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Ultimate Guide to the PresidentsUltimate Guide to the Presidents Ultimate Guide to the Presidents Ultimate Guide to the Presidents America emerges as a superpower. (N) (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions Fatal Attractions “My Croc and Me” Infested! “Surrounded” Infested! “Houses of Horror” (N) Fatal Attractions “Terror at Bear Farm” Infested! “Houses of Horror” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery Diners (N) Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal LindseyThe HarvestPerry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Game TimeMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Charlotte Bobcats at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicAction Sports World Tour SYFY 58 122 244Merlin “Arthur’s Bane” Continuum “A Stitch in Time” WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Merlin (N) Being Human AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “The Wedding Planner” (2001) Jennifer Lopez. “There’s Something About Mary” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon, Ben Stiller. “There’s Something About Mary” COM 62 107 249(5:55) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 (8:58) “Get Him to the Greek” (2010, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss. Amy Schumer CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Starsky & Hutch” (2004, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. (:15) “The Brady Bunch Movie” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Mascot Mayhem” Monster Jelly shKiller ShrimpPredators of the Sea Deep-sea creatures and their behaviors. Killer Shrimp NGC 109 186 276Access 360 World Heritage (N) Sex in the Stone AgeThe Human Family Tree: Revealed (N) DiggersDiggersThe Human Family Tree: Revealed SCIENCE 110 193 284Biblical Mysteries Explained “Exodus” Biblical Mysteries Explained Biblical Mysteries Explained Unearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets (N) Biblical Mysteries Explained ID 111 192 285Wicked Attraction Wicked Attraction “Love Me Tender” Deadly Women Desperate Measures (N) Deadly Women “Death Knock” (N) Deadly Women HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG’ “A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’ Real Time With Bill Maher (Live) Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(:05) “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991, Suspense) Jodie Foster. ‘R’ (:05) “I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ Banshee “The Rave” (N) Girls in BedBanshee SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “Restitution” (2011, Crime Drama) Mena Suvari, Mark Bierlein. ‘R’ “Goon” (2011, Comedy) Seann William Scott. ‘R’ (:35) “The Samaritan” (2012) Samuel L. Jackson. ‘R’ (:10) House of Lies(:40) Shameless SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 19, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) 20/20 “Blades of Glory” (2007) Will Ferrell. Rival male skaters compete as a pair. News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -Celtic WomanVictor Borge: Comedy in Music! 60s Pop, Rock & Soul (My Music) Artists and groups from the 1960s. “No Way Out” (1950, Drama) Richard Widmark, Linda Darnell. 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenNCIS “Phoenix” (DVS) Hawaii Five-0 “Lekio” 48 Hours (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneDaryl’s HouseLike, LoveThe Crook and Chase Show (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30The FollowingJudge Joe BrownThe First FamilyMr. Box Of ceCops (N) Cops (PA) Kitchen Nightmares “Revisited No. 1” NewsAction Sports 360MasterChef “Winner Chosen” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneNBC Nightly NewsDeception “Nothing’s Free, Little Girl” Chicago Fire “Mon Amour” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent Funny VideosBulls Eye d NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineBones Remains emit a green glow. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Unusual Suspects “Bathtub Killer” Unusual Suspects Staten Island LawStaten Island LawStaten Island LawStaten Island LawSix Little McGhees: Special DeliveryStaten Island LawStaten Island Law A&E 19 118 265Barter Kings Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage: NYStorage: NYStorage: NYStorage: NY HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Uncorked” (2010) Julie Benz. “A Taste of Romance” (2011, Romance) Teri Polo, Bailee Madison. “The Sweeter Side of Life” (2013) Kathryn Morris, James Best. Premiere. “The Sweeter Side of Life” (2013) FX 22 136 248Two and Half Men “Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. UFC on FX 7: Belfort vs. Bisping (N) Anger Management CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Memo to the President: Road MapPiers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightMemo to the President: Road Map TNT 25 138 245“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” “Terminator Salvation” (2009, Science Fiction) Christian Bale, Sam Worthington. (DVS) “The Book of Eli” (2010, Action) Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299(5:30) “Best Player” (2011) Victorious Victorious Victorious (N) Marvin Marvin (N) Supah NinjasSupah NinjasThe Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(:09) “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. (:15) “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. (:20) “Rambo III” (1988, Action) Sylvester Stallone. MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space Star Trek “Cult of the Cobra” (1955, Horror) Richard Long, Marshall Thompson. DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” (2008) Piper Perabo. (:40) “Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2” (2011, Comedy) Phineas and FerbDog With a BlogAustin & Ally Jessie LIFE 32 108 252“Taken Back: Finding Haley” (2012, Suspense) Moira Kelly, David Cubitt. “Prosecuting Casey Anthony” (2013, Docudrama) Rob Lowe. Premiere. Beyond the Headlines: C. Anthony(:01) Double Divas(:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS A friend of Gibbs’ daughter. NCIS Gibbs second-guesses himself. NCIS Investigating a Marine’s murder. NCIS “Patriot Down” NCIS “Rule Fifty-One” “Crank” (2006) Jason Statham. BET 34 124 329Queen (Part 2 of 3) Queen (Part 3 of 3) “The Women of Brewster Place” ESPN 35 140 206d College Basketball Ohio State at Michigan State. (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) d College Basketball Gonzaga at Butler. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209e College Football NFLPA Bowl: American vs. National. From Carson, Calif. (N)E 2013 Australian Open Tennis Round of 16. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) SUNSP 37 -Lightning Live! (N Subject to Blackout)k NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. Lightning Live!Inside LightningFuture PhenomsThe New College Football Show DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Pink Slip” Moonshiners “Tickle Goes Rogue” Moonshiners “Troubled Waters” Moonshiners “Adios, Mr. Still” Moonshiners Moonshiners “Adios, Mr. Still” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensFamily Guy Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band (N) Cougar TownKing of the Nerds HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236(5:30) “Knocked Up” (2007) Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl, Paul Rudd. “Stick It” (2006, Comedy-Drama) Jeff Bridges, Missy Peregrym. Love You, Mean ItThe SoupFashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277Coaster WarsCoaster WarsExtreme Terror RidesGhost Adventures “Rose Hall” Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “The Galka Family” Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It Shelley and Michael. Love It or List It The Gallagher family. House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Hoarding: Buried Alive Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. G: Inside the Caylee Anthony CaseUntold Stories of the E.R. HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedToo Cute! Too Cute! “Spotted, Pampered Pups” Pit Boss “Racetrack Rescue” (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) Pit Boss “Racetrack Rescue” FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible “Michele’s” Restaurant: ImpossibleIron Chef America TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Wind DancerGods At WarGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesNot a Fan Travel the Road FSN-FL 56 -d College Basketball Texas A&M at Alabama. (N) College Basketball College BasketballPanthers Live!The Game 365 College Basketball SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Sand Serpents” (2009) “Ice Road Terror” (2011, Science Fiction) Brea Grant, Ty Olsson. “Tasmanian Devils” (2013) Danica McKellar. Premiere. Monstrous Tasmanian devils terrorize a group of sky divers. AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Predator 2” (1990, Science Fiction) Danny Glover, Gary Busey. “Hulk” (2003) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly. Premiere. Scientist Bruce Banner transforms into a powerful brute. “Predator” (1987, Action) COM 62 107 249(4:00) Sex Drive “Get Him to the Greek” (2010, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss. “Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Christopher Walken. Joe Dirt (2001) CMT 63 166 327(4:45) “Starsky & Hutch” (2004) “Son-in-Law” (1993) Pauly Shore. A coed brings her surf-minded pal home to the farm. “In the Army Now” (1994, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Andy Dick, Lori Petty. Ridiculousness NGWILD 108 190 283Stranger Than Nature “Alien Roadkill” Dog WhispererThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Gallop Pol” The Incredible Dr. Pol (N) Cesar Millan’s Leader of the PackDog Whisperer NGC 109 186 276Amish: Out of OrderDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersMudcats: Down and DirtyWicked Tuna “Back in the Hunt” Mudcats: Down and Dirty SCIENCE 110 193 284An Idiot Abroad 2 “Climb Mount Fuji” An Idiot Abroad 2 “Desert Island” An Idiot Abroad 2 An Idiot Abroad 3 (Series Premiere) (N) Stuff You Should Stuff You Should An Idiot Abroad 2 ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next Door Redrum Redrum True Crime With Aphrodite JonesDeadly Sins (N) Fatal Vows (N) Motives & Murders “He Came for Me” HBO 302 300 501 “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ “This Means War” (2012) Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’s(:45) Boxing Mikey Garcia vs. Orlando Salido, Featherweights. (N) MAX 320 310 515(5:30) “Varsity Blues” (1999) ‘R’ (:15) “Tower Heist” (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ Banshee “The Rave” “Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545Untold History60 Minutes Sports (7:50) “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman. ‘PG-13’ “Our Idiot Brother” (2011) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ 50/50 (2011)

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 2013 3B3BNASCAR Back in the early 1970s,one of Georgia’s tough-as-nails short track drivers was leading arace on a north Georgia bullring when a rawrookie wrecked him out of a sure win. The kid felt so bad about the crash,which caused lingering hard feelings between the twodrivers’ families,that he abandoned for a timehis plans to become a race driver. It wasn’t until a year later that the boy took the wheel again.The second time around,thingswent much smoother. The veteran driver continued to race the short tracks for decades,and actually became afan of the youngster who once robbed him of avictory. That young driver’s name:Bill Elliott.The veteran was Luther Carter,who died Jan.4 at75 of cancer. A few years back,Elliott sought out Carter and told him how sorry he was about that wreckthose many years ago. “I wanted to quit that night,”Elliott said.“I really felt bad about that.” Carter was deeply moved by the gesture.“It meant a lot to me for a man of his stature to do something like that,”Carter said at thattime.Mark Carter,Luther’s son,said his father,a bulldozer operator and grading companyowner by trade who raced cars numbered 3throughout his career,had a lot in common withthe late Dale Earnhardt when it came to hisdriving style. “He wouldn’t put up with much,and he wasn’t afraid to stand up for what he thought was right,”Mark Carter said,adding that Carterchose that number because he was a fan ofJunior Johnson,who raced a No.3 back in theday.“He told me when I started racing that ifyou ever start taking abuse you’ll have to take it for the rest of your life.And you had to betough back when he raced. “But he also spent a lot of his time riding kids in his race car,and he gave away most of histrophies.” NOTEBOOK Gordon, Bowyer mum on partyAfter their high-profile run-in at Phoenix International Raceway last fall,Jeff Gordon andClint Bowyer just can’t seem to get away fromeach other.A week after the Phoenix incident,one that saw Gordon fined and placed onNASCAR probation for intentionally wreckingBowyer,the two raced for the win – withoutissues – at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Then they ended up at the same New Year’s party on a yacht owned Sean “P.Diddy”Combs,the wealthy rapper and music executive. During their media sessions at Daytona testing,both were asked about the party but nei-ther offered much insight into what transpiredor whether there are issues still to be resolved. “The question is how [Bowyer] got on the yacht,”Gordon said with a smile.“That needs tobe the real question … “We were just hanging out having a good time and on walks Bowyer and [Kevin] Harvickand a couple other folks … It was a great NewYear’s.I enjoyed myself very much.” Said Bowyer:“I’m pretty sure [Gordon] was on there.It was pretty late.Put it that way.” Pressed on the issue,Bowyer indicated he was growing tired of the subject. “Who cares? Really,who cares?”he said.Waltrip aims for Daytona 500Two-time Daytona 500 winner Michael Waltrip plans to come out of semi-retirementand try to qualify the No.30 Swan RacingToyota for the Daytona 500. “We’re looking forward to Daytona,”Waltrip said.“It’s my favorite time of the year everyyear,to come down here and get to participatein the greatest race in the world,in my opinion.To have won it before just makes coming backthat much more special.This year is going tobe particularly cool for me because … it’s goingto be basically a reunion of when we won a fewof these things.” In joining the relatively new Swan team, Waltrip will be reunited with crew chiefTonyEury Jr.and competition director Steve Hmiel,both of whom worked with him when he drovefor Dale Earnhardt Inc. “It’s just an amazing team that they’ve started,and I’m hoping that my driving the car canhelp us get sponsors and can help them jump-start what is going to be a very exciting year forthe Swan Racing team,”Waltrip said.He addedthat he felt it was a bad idea for his own teamto prepare a fourth car for him given the workit’s taking to get the team’s three regular carsprepared. He said he’s fairly confident he can make the starting field in the car normally driven byDavid Stremme. “[Stremme] had a lot to do with the direction and the build of the car that he came here andmade the race with a year ago,and his handsare all over the cars that I will be driving thisyear,”Waltrip said.“Plus,Tony [Eury] Jr.’s confi-dence. “We rode down [to Daytona] together and talked about some of the fun times we’ve had inthe past,but mainly focused on what we’regoing to have in 2013 when we get back here ina couple of weeks.” NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Drivers expected tocompete in next month’s Sprint Unlimited,for-merly known as the BudweiserShootout,at DaytonaInternational Speedway Nationwide Series racesin 2012 in which Morgan Shepherd failed to qual-ify,the most of any driver Nationwide Series driverswho won the most recent race they entered (MarcosAmbrose,Matt Kenseth,KevinHarvick,Carl Edwards andRegan Smith) Laps regained during SprintCup races in 2012 by David Gilliland,Bobby Labonte,Ryan Newman and David Ragan,tops among all drivers10 22 9 5 By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick With three days of restrictor-plate-track testing at DaytonaInternational Speedway behind them,NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series teamsand drivers now head to Charlotte MotorSpeedway this week for another round oftesting of the Generation 6 race cars thatwill make their competitive debuts in nextmonth’s Daytona 500. The Daytona test seemed to show that the superspeedway versions of the cars don’twork as well in the two-car pushing tandemsthat dominated racing at Daytona andTalladega Superspeedway in recent years.The bodies aren’t well suited for pushing,asevidenced by a multi-car crash on Friday atDaytona that damaged 12 cars and sent sev-eral teams headed home early as they hadno backup cars prepared. That incident also brought to light just how much work remains to be done to havefleets of race cars ready for the early monthsof the 2013 season.With the radical changesto the cars since last year,teams are justnow getting some of the key NASCAR-issuedparts like hoods and trunk lids to use onthose cars. With NASCAR’s encouragement,teams tried drafting at Daytona on Friday,and it wasn’tlong before a big lesson was learned.DaleEarnhardt Jr.in his Chevy and MarcosAmbrose in his Ford were near the front of thepack when Earnhardt tried to give Ambrose ashove to see if the tactic of the recent pastwould work with the 2013 Generation 6 cars,so named because it’s the sixth different carthat has run in NASCAR,dating back to thestrictly stock vehicles that were used when thesport was founded back in 1948. “I was just going to give [Ambrose] a push down the back straightaway and see if hecould get the lead,”Earnhardt explained.“Iwas trying to eventually get the lead myself.We got off the back straightaway and werejust kind of pushing him along there and ourcars sort of just didn’t match up very well.Igot him hooked into the fence.” Earnhardt said that earlier he’d pushed Martin Truex Jr.’s Toyota and had goodresults. The Fords,he said,are different,which is not surprising given that one of the keyaspects of the Generation 6 cars is that eachmanufacturer’s car is unique and designed tomore closely resemble the passenger car ver-sions of the vehicles. “The roll bar of the front of my car is just at the right place where [Ambrose’s] car sitsright up on top of that,”Earnhardt said.“Isort of had him going down the backstraightaway like a forklift.” Earnhardt also said the Chevy front end isn’t the best for pushing. “Our bumpers on the Chevys have a little bit of a point,”he said.“It makes it a little bitof a challenge to get into guys and kind ofhelp them.We definitely weren’t doing thatin the corner at all because it was prettyhairy trying to do it on the straightaways.” Earnhardt’s Hendrick Motorsports teammate Jeff Gordon said push drafting is amuch riskier proposition,especially now thatthe superspeedway cars have less downforce,which means they’re harder to control insome circumstances. “The cars drive pretty well,”Gordon said. “You can’t push,which I think is a good thing. “The bad thing is,you can still get to the guy’s bumper,but the cars just don’t line upvery well.You really just shouldn’t even bedoing it.Unfortunately,that is kind of thatlast little bit of momentum that you need tosometimes make the pass or make your lanemove. “So,it’s something that is going to have to be dealt with very carefully.You are going tohave to be cautious when you do it and do itwith the right guys,but most of the timeyou’re going to need to stay away from it.” Carl Edwards,looking to put a miserable 2012 season behind him,said he’s anxious tostart racing with the new package,especiallythe reduction in downforce. “The cars are stuck less,and they are looser,”he said.“That is good for racing.It isgood for the fans.It will make it more excit-ing and make pit strategy come into play. “If you put [fresh] tires on you will be able to go faster.I think all of that is good.This isgoing to be a heck of a race.I like that thecars were sliding around and hard to drive.It will make it a fun race.” For many at the Daytona test,the most immediate concern was the lack of inventoryof body parts like hoods and trunk lids inrace shops with the start of the season just alittle over a month away. The issue is one being faced by teams large and small. Donnie Wingo,crew chief of the Wood Brothers’ No.21 Ford driven by TrevorBayne,said his team,which only plans torace a partial schedule,worked up to the last minute to get its Daytona test car finished.And he said there was still some work to bedone on the downforce car it plans to test atCharlotte this week. Jimmie Johnson said the situation is basically the same over at the giant HendrickMotorsports complex. “Generally speaking,we just don’t have any cars,”he said.“This is our only speedwaycar for the 48 car.We want to have that as abackup when we come back.We still need togo home and build our 500 car.We just don’thave the inventory. “I mean we have four deck lids for our cars that are legal and they are on the fourHendrick cars that are here now.We’re play-ing a big game of catch-up right now.” NASCAR vice president Robin Pemberton addressed the parts shortage during a pressconference at Daytona. “It’s just a fact that there’s a lack of inventory,”he said,adding that he’s confident theparts soon will be flowing through the sup-ply pipeline.“The only thing that is short ishoods from the manufacturers and deck lidsthat come from our supplier. “We’re on a pretty organized schedule for delivery dates on those.There are over 100deck lids out there in service right now. “We’ll be on a shipping schedule that starts next Friday,50 every Friday,so weshould be pretty well handled by the time wehead off to Vegas [for the third points-payingrace of the season on March 10].” Pemberton said that if necessary,teams could swap those parts from one car to thenext among their fleets. After the Sprint Cup Series Preseason Thunder testi ng at Daytona International Speedway last week,driv ers take the Generation 6 race cars for further test runs in Sou th Carolina.(NASCAR photos)Learning curveSon remembers Luther Carter, late short track drive r Luther Carter in an undated photo.(Photo courtesy of Mark Carter) Michael Waltrip (NASCAR photo) Daytona testsreveal issueswith Gen 6 cars

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18-19, 2013 DEAR ABBY: My elderly uncle and aunt have a son-in-law who -to put it mildly -spins tall tales. “Tom” has been EVERYwhere, done EVERYthing and insists on telling anyone who will lis-ten all about it. He speaks many languages fluently (until someone addresses him in one of them) and has had countless adven-tures in various countries, although he can’t locate them on a map. My uncle and aunt have bought two cars for their financially unstable daugh-ter and this phony. Both times, Tom insisted on maintaining them himself (another of his legend-ary skills). Afterward, both cars required major repairs and eventually had to be scrapped. After Tom’s stint as a highly decorated Navy SEAL, he morphed into a genius at creating com-puter software, when he wasn’t touring with a famous bluegrass band -the name of which he can’t remember. I am concerned that my uncle and aunt are so awed by this man that they might one day allow him to manage their finances (there is no topic Tom is not an expert on) or let him fix the brakes on their vehicle. I think you know where I’m heading. I have to bite my tongue to keep from saying, “Tom, Yokohama is a city, not a country. And if you’re real-ly best friends with Johnny Depp, why not invite him over so we can all meet him? Oh, and what you’re passing off as Farsi is Pig Latin.” Is there a way to tactfully intervene before something awful happens without upsetting any-one? -THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND DEAR ROYAL HIGHNESS: Yes, if you do it privately, and say you are speaking up only because you are worried about their welfare. Then explain why you think Tom’s sto-ries don’t hold water and point out that if he should volunteer any financial advice to them they should first run it past an unbi-ased non-family member such as their banker, law-yer, CPA or pastor before making any investments. From your description, Tom appears to be a con man or compulsive liar. But whether your uncle and aunt choose to accept your input is up to them. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I work at home and use my com-puter. Everyone who lives here is over 35. My step-grandchildren visit regularly, and I have told the children’s mother that I have no parental restrictions on my comput-er. She assured me not to worry about it because she has reinforced the rules of responsible Internet usage with them and is confident her children won’t break the rules. As far as I know, they haven’t. Today, one of my brothers-in-law visited and brought along his young teenage daughter. I let her play on the computer, and he caught her in a chat room with an older teen-age boy. Instead of blam-ing her, he attacked ME for being too permissive with children and comput-ers. Do you think it is my responsibility to “protect” his teenager on my com-puter? -JUST A GEEK IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR JUST A GEEK: No, I do not. I suspect that you were attacked because of displaced anger. His daughter deserved the scolding, however, because he could not (for whatever reason) scold her, he directed his anger at you instead. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My daughter was recently married. My niece -a tal-ented artist -hand-painted flowers on wine glasses for the dinner reception following the ceremony. They were intended to be keepsakes for each of the adult guests. The glasses turned out beautifully, and made each place setting extra special. I knew they’d be treasured by our family for years to come. At the end of the evening, I gathered four glass-es from our family’s table, then glanced at the bridal table of eight -as some guests approached to offer thanks for a fabulous evening. When I turned around, the four glasses were gone. Not only had glasses disappeared from our table, but also from the head table and from my niece’s (the artist). Those of us who had worked hardest on the wedding were left with nothing -and that includes the bride and groom. The following day, someone mentioned to me that they had seen certain guests leave with four to six glasses each. One woman even had her child, who was loaded down with glasses, make several trips to her car. We’ve figured out who the culprits were: some out-of-towners who stayed at the home of one of the groom’s relatives. I heard that the glassware covered the entire top of their dining room table. My question: Should we ask these people to return the glasses? Thanks for your input, Abby. -MOTHER OF THE BRIDE IN MESA, ARIZ. DEAR MOTHER: By all means ask -but there is no guarantee they’ll be returned. People who take more than their share usu-ally feel an inflated sense of entitlement. Although their manners were atro-cious, please don’t let this cause in-law problems before the marriage has even begun. Perhaps out of sympathy, the artist will be generous enough to craft another pair of goblets for the bride and groom. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am in a one-year relationship with a wonderful man who is divorced with two chil-dren. The kids and I get along great -or at least I thought we did. It turns out they are making up lies about me and telling their mother. My boyfriend and his ex have a strained relationship and fight about everything. I love his children, but I don’t know how to handle this. What do you think I am doing wrong? -TELLING THE TRUTH IN DULUTH DEAR TELLING THE TRUTH: You’re not doing anything wrong. Either the kids are trying to cause a breakup with the idea their parents will reunite, or they are telling their mother things they think she wants to hear. There’s nothing you can do about it. Your boyfriend will have to clear the air with his for-mer spouse. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I am a woman who was raised in the South by a very proper mother. She told me that a man should never give a woman “intimate” gifts like lingerie. A friend and I have argued about whether this “rule” applies today. I still believe the practice is unacceptable, even if you are engaged. She thinks it is OK. Please settle this. -CONFUSED IN OREGON DEAR CONFUSED: Perhaps the two of you should agree to disagree on this one. Your mother is part of the “hands off” generation, and the logic was that knowing lingerie sizes was “too intimate” for couples who weren’t mar-ried. In today’s world, how-ever, such logic would put companies like La Perla and Victoria’s Secret out of business. ** ** **Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let erratic behavior cause you to make a mistake you’ll regret. Difficulties with someone in charge of a situation can be expected. Do your best to live up to what’s expected of you and move along without com-plaint. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Confront a situation that concerns you, and you will be able to put an end to a misunderstanding. A serious look at your future will lead to research and finding out information that will enable you to use your skills wisely. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s a New Year and time for you to present a new image. Keeping up with the times will lead to compliments and greater confidence. Someone you want to get to know better will respond to the chang-es you make. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ask questions and you’ll get answers that will help you put your time to better use. Suspicion will lead to trouble. Look for facts and trust in your intu-ition and the people who have supported you to tell you the truth. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Enjoy activities and chal-lenges that allow you to use your talent and skills fully. Avoid negative people looking for someone to take over responsibilities. You have to stick to rela-tionships based on equality if you want to reach your goals and find happiness. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Welcome opposition and you will be able to put an end to anyone com-plaining or trying to outdo you. Facts and figures will outshine anyone trying to bully or pressure you into something you don’t want to do. Love is in the stars. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Listen and observe what everyone is doing. Once you have a clear pic-ture. you can take action. but be prepared to face opposition. Problems at home must be taken care of and adjustments must be made to add to your comfort. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Live and learn. The people you interact with now will teach you a valuable lesson. Your gut feeling will lead you in the right direction, but you must be willing to take action if you are going to surpass any opposition you face. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Consider what made you happy in the past and retrieve what’s missing in your life now. Honesty will help you change someone’s mind, bringing about positive change and a second chance. Make a promise and stand behind your work. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Emotions will swell up regarding matters concerning older relatives or children. Do your best to sort out how you can help without jeopardizing your position, morals or ethics. You need a change of pace and place to soothe your mind. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Take on a chal-lenge or use your hobbies to meet new people. Entertaining visitors will open doors to new ideas or lifestyle changes. Incorporate old and new ideas to come up with something fresh, exciting and in-demand. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your intuition will not let you down regard-ing affairs of the heart. Greater involvement in groups or organizations will raise your profile and your reputation. Love is in the stars, and letting your feelings be known will bring positive results. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last King of the whoppers doesn’t fool wife’s clear-eyed cousin Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18-19, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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6B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, JANUARY18 &19, 2013 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 122008CA000260XXXXXXLASALLE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUSTSERIES 2007-HE3,Plaintiff,vs.KIM B. FITZHUGH; et al,Defendants,RE-NOTICE OF SALEPURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated 8/21/2008 and an Order Resetting Sale dated 1/7/13 and entered in Case No. 122008CA000260XXXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein LaSalle bank, N.A. as Trustee for the MLMI Trust Series 2007-HE3 is Plaintiff and KIM B. FITZHUGH: CAROLA. FITZ-HUGH: GREENTREE SERVICING LLC F/K/AGREENTREE FINAN-CIALSERVICING CORPORA-TION; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFEND-ANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-ESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at on the Courthouse steps of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N Hernando Street, Lake City, Fl 32055 County, Florida, at 11:00am on the 6th day of March 2013 and the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to -wit:APARCELOF LAND IN THE NW1/4 OF NW1/4 SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, COMMENCE ATTHE NWCORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, RUN THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 16'51" E, 663.6 FEET, THENCE N 89 DEGREES 06'22" E, 1327.67 FEET; THENCE S 0 DE-GREE 15'31" EAST380 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 06'22" N 308.87 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, RUN THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 15'31" E, 705.16 FEET. RUN THENCE S 89 DEGREES 06'22" W,308.87 FEET; RUN THENCE N 0 DEGREES 15'31" W, 705.16 FEETTO THE SOUTH LINE OF A60 FOOTGRADED ROAD; RUN THENCE N 89 DEGREES 06'22" E DOWN SAID LINE 308.87 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT1996 JA-COBSEN DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN NO. JACFL16495AAND TITLE NO. 69401780 AND VIN NO. JACFL16495B AND TI-TILE NO. 69401781ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE..In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-sons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Columbia County Courthouse. Telephone 904-758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. Dated at Lake City, Florida on 1/7/2013P. DeWitt CasonAs Clerk of Circuit CourtBy, B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536803January 18, 25, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCASE NO. 2011-00571-CACitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to CitifinancialMortgage Company, Inc.,Plaintiff,vs.Nathan D. Petersen a/k/a Nathan Pe-tersen, et al.,Defendants,NOTICE OF FORCLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an order dated 1/2/2013, en-tered in Case No. 2011-00571-CAof the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-cial Circuit, in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein CItiMort-gage, Inc. successor by merger to Citifinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Nathan D. Petersen a/k/a Nathan Petersen; Jen-nifer L. Petersen; Sunstate Federal Credit Union; Unknown tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 are the De-fendants, that the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Ave, Lake City, FL32055, beginning at 11:00am on the 27 day of Feb, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST: APARTOF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EASTMORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 AND RUN NORTH 0 DEGREES 20'00" WEST, ALONG THE WESTLINE THEREOF, 1659.39 FEETFOR APOINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 11'23" WEST, 19.09 FEETTO APOINTON THE EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF BOY-ETTE LANE; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 59'33" WEST, ALONG SAID EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE, 331.27 FEET, TO APOINTON THE EXTENSION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2; THENCE NORTH 89DEGREES 11'41" EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE THEREOF AND ITS EXTENSION, 1352.09 FEET, TO APOINTON THE EASTLINE OF THE WEST1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2; THENCE SOUTH 0DEGREES 27'14" EASTALONG THE EASTLINE THERE-OF, 331.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 11'23" WEST, 1329.89 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 8th day of January 2013.P. DeWitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City Fl 32055, (386)719-7428, within two (2) busi-ness days of receipt of notice to ap-pear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800)955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800)955-8770.05536801January 18, 25, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-129-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporation,Plaintiff,vs.The Estate of DIXIE J. HARRIS, de-ceased, and the unknown heirs and beneficiaries of DIXIE J. HARRIS.Defendants.CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, Court-room 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on April 3, 2013, the fol-lowing described property:TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EASTSECTION 27: Commence at the Southeast corner of said Section 27 and run North 0252'16" West, along the East Line of said Section 27, a distance of 620.79 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 8815'51" West, a distance of 665.87 feet to a point on the West line of the E 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of said Section 27 per a survey of Shadow Wood Unit 2 Subdivision, as record-ed in Plat Book 6, pages 24-24B of the public records of Columbia County, Florida; thence North Legal0344'07" West, along said West line, a distance of 684.84 feet to the NWcorner of the E 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of said Section 27 per said survey of Shadow Wood Unit 2 Sub-division; thence North 8816'17" East, along the North line of the E 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of said Sec-tion 27 per said survey of Shadow Wood Unit 2 Subdivision, a distance of 676.20 feet to the Northeast cor-ner of the E 1/2 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of said Section 27 per survey of Shadow Wood Unit 2 Subdivision, also being a point on the East line of said Section 27 thence South 0252'16" East, along said East line, a distance of 684.47 feet to the Point of Beginning. IN COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Also known as Lot 14, Hawks Ridge Acres, Phase II, an unrecorded sub-division.TOGETHER WITH AND SUB-JECTTO AN NON EXCLUSIVE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASE-MENTMORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;An Easement, 60.00 feet in width, for the purpose of ingress and egress lying in Sections 26 and 27 of Town-ship 6 South, Rang 17 East, Colum-bia County, Florida, being more par-ticularly described as follows:The West 60.00 feet of the North-west 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, the West 60.00 feet of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, and the West 60.00 feet of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, all in said Section 26.SUBJECTTO: That part within the maintained Right-of-Way of a coun-ty graded road across the Northerly end thereof.AND ALSO:COMMENCE at the Southeast cor-ner of said Section 27 and run N. 0256'16" W., along the East line of said Section 27, a distance of 620.79 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence S. 8815'51" W., along the South line of Lot 14 of an unrecorded sub-division 655.29 feet; thence N. 0252'28" W., along a line 1.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 27 a distance of 60.01 feet; thence N. 8815'51' E., along a line 60.00 feet North of and parallel to the South line of said Lot 14 a distance of 655.29 feet to a point on the West line of Section 26; thence N. 0252'16" W., along said West line 643.09 feet to the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of the South-west 1/4 of said Section 26; thence N. 8810'07" E along the North line of said Southwest 1/4 of the South-west 1/4 a distance of 60.01 feet; thence S. 0252'16" E., along a line 60.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of said Section 28 a dis-tance of 643.19 feet thence N. 8815'51" E., along a line 60.00 feet North of said parallel to the South line of Lots 15 and 27 of said unre-corded subdivision 1246.59 feet to a point on the West line of the South-east 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 26; thence N. 0246'21" W., along said West line 292.62 feet to the Northwest corner of Lot 25 of said unrecorded subdivision; thence N. 8821'35" E., along the North line of said Lot 25 a distance of 60.01 feet; thence S. 0246'21'E., along a line 60.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 a distance of 702.70 feet to a point on the North line of Lot 21 of said unre-corded subdivision; thence N. 8821'35" E., along the North line of Lots 21 and 22 a distance of 361.52 feet; thence S. 1558'53" E., along the East line of said Lot 22 a distance of 61.93 feet; thence S.8821'35" W., along a line 60.00 feet South of and parallel to the North line of said Lots 22 and 21 a distance of 435.69 feet to a point on the East line of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 26; thence N. 0246'21" W., along said East line 410.08 feet; thence S. 8815'51" W., along the North line of Lots 18, 17, and 16 of said unrecorded subdivi-sion 1306.50 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING.An easement, 60.00 feet in width for the purpose of ingress and egress ly-ing in Section 34 and 27, Township 6 south, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida, and being 60.00 feet East of and adjacent to the following described line:COMMENCE at the Southwest cor-ner of the East 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 34, as surveyed by L.E. Britt, PLS and run N 8804'35" E., along the South line of the Northeast 1/4, being also the Northerly Right-of-Way line of Bible Camp Road (a County graded Road), a distance of 1.00 feet; thence N.0220’22”W., along a line 1.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of said East 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 as surveyed by L.E. Britt, PLS a distance of 1790.90 feet to the Point of Beginning of herein described line; thence continue N.0220’22”W., still along a line 1.00 feet east of and parallel to the West line of the E 1/4 of the NE 1/4 a distance of 847.44 feet to a point on the South line of said Section 27; thence N.0252’28”W., along a line 1.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of the East 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of said Section 27 a distance of 623.65 feet to a point on the South line of a 60.00 foot inLegalgress/egress easement and the termi-nal point of herein described line;An easement 60.00 feet in width for the purpose of ingress and egress ly-ing in Section 34 and 27, Township 6 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida and being 60.00 feet East of and adjacent to the following described line:COMMENCE at the Southwest cor-ner of the East 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 34, as surveyed by L.E. Britt, PLS and run N 8804’35” E., along the South line of the Northeast 1/4 being also the Northerly Right-of-Way Line of Bi-ble Camp Road (a county graded road), a distance of 1.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence N.0220’22”W, along a line of 1.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of said East 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 as surveyed by L.E. Britt, PLS a distance of 1790.90 feet; thence N.8821’35”E, along a line 30.00 feet North of and parallel to the South line of Lot 12 of an unrecord-ed subdivision 611.55 feet to a point on the East line of said 12; thence S.0038’50”W. along the East line of Lot 12 and 11 a distance of 60.05 feet; thence S.8821’35”W., along a line 30.00 feet South of and parallel to the North Line of said Lot 11 a distance of 548.45 feet; thence S.0220’22”E, along a line 61.00 feet East of and parallel to the West line of the East 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of Section 34 as surveyed by L.E. Britt, PLS, a distance of 1730.60 feet to a point on the South line of the North-est 1/4 of said Section 34; thence S.8804’35”W. along said South line, being also the Northerly right-of-way of Bible Camp Road 60.00 feet to the Point of Beginning.TOGETHER WITH: 2001 MERITMOBILE HOME, 64 LENGTH, ID#FLHML2B589Y23676B, AND ID#FLHML2B589Y23676AANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 1/4/2013P. Dewitt CasonClerk of courtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536851January 18, 25, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONCASE NO. 12-298-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFHARLOWBROUGHTON LAND, deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of HARLOWBROUGHTON LAND, deceased, whose date of death was December 2, 2012; File Number 12-298-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal rep-resentative's attorney are set forth be-low.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: January 18, 2013.Personal Representative: /s/ Harlow H. Land, Jr. HARLOWH. LAND, JR.Post Office Box 188Mayo, Florida 32066Attorneys for Personal Representa-tive:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Marlin M. FeagleMarlin M. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0173248153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-7191dedenfield@bellsouth.net05536834January 18, 25, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-287-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF ALYCE JONES CAESARDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Alyce Jones Caesar, deceased, whose date of death was December 11, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. the names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO 92) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is January 18, 2013.Personal Representative:/s/ Hilton JonesHilton JonesPO Box 1691Lake City, Florida 32056Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ Stephen M. WittStephen M. WittAttorney for Hilton JonesFlorida Bar Number: 231916PO Box 2064Lake City, Florida 32056Telephone: (386) 755-2863Fax: (386) 752-173205536853January 18, 25, 2013 Notice is hereby given per Florida Statue 98.075(2):ARCHIE JACKSON II438 SE ALLEN PL, #101LAKE CITY, FL32025MICKELA. JOHNSON658 NE CENTER AVELAKE CITY, FL32055NAKIAOLIVER800 SE CHURCH AVE, #101LAKE CITY, FL32025LIANAM. WHITE306 SWSUNSETWAYLAKE CITY, FL32024is potentially ineligible to be regis-tered to vote. Please respond within 30 days of publication of this notice by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-tions Office at the address or phone number below. If no response is re-ceived within 30 days of this publi-cation, it may result in determination of ineligibility by the supervisor and removal of the registered voter’s name from the statewide voter regis-tration system. Published one time in the Lake City ReporterElizabeth "Liz" P. HorneColumbia County Supervisor of Elections971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102Lake City, FL32055(386) 758-102605536876January 18. 2013 100Job OpportunitiesAuto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 General Office & Bookkeeping Microsoft Office Word, Quick Books Proficient Punctual & Able to Follow Established Procedures. Salary Requirement & Resume to: P.O. 830 Lake City, Florida 32056 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 100Job OpportunitiesMust have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment, HVAC Installation, & Plumbing Exp., Preferably with Plumbing license. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc 120Medical Employment05536887Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldog 1 yr old, 110 lbs, spayed and neutered, shots,Free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right Home Small dachshund mix, short hair. Very energetic. 1 yr old Home Found PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions PERSONALPROPERTY AUCTION Sat. Jan. 19, 9:00 AM 544 NWBert Ave. Lake City, FL '49 Mercury 2 Dr, '71 Chev C-10 SWB 350/ 3 spd, '99 Harley Sportster, 20' Enclosed Car Hauler w/winch and side door, Utility Trailer, 10K Automotive Lift, Numerous Lots of Snap-On, Mac & Craftsman Hand Tools, Tool Chests, Saws, Grinders, Welders, Elect. Wheel Chair and Carrier, Generator. Chain Saw, Much More! Cash, Appr. Cks, Visa/MC 10% Buyer's Premium LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, JANUARY18 & 19, 2013 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 7B 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$2,990 386-623-2848 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$5,500 386-288-6102 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900 386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 403Auctions Preview : Fri Jan 18, 9am-4pm Directions : From US 90 & I-75, go west on US 90 2 mi to Brown Rd., Turn Rt, go 2 mi to Bert Ave on Rt. Follow Signs Info and Photos www.elrodauctions.com Elrod Auctions AB 1698 904-699-7067 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $65.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales 2 Family Yard Sale 8am to Noon, Rain or Shine, 601 SWBroderwick Rd, LC Off Highway 47 HUGE MOVING SALE SATONLY, 8-NOON EMERALD LAKES 243 Northwest Zack Drive, LC Hugh Indoo r yard Sale Everything must go, Fri & Sat 8 am ?, 1206 SWMain Blvd, LC PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous GE Side by Side Refrigerator, white, works great, ice and water $265 Contact 386-292-3927 Kenmore full size dryer, White, Works Great $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Kenmore Roll around dishwasher. Several options. Works great. $125 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 Wellborn Church of God is selling 18 brown padded church pews for $25 each. Contact 386-752-8479 or 386-623-1348 White Frigidaire Frost Free Refrigerator. Works great. Clean. $175 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 White GE Electric Stove Works Great $135 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 Triple Wide MH, 2006 Homes of Merit, For Rent ($1500 mth) or Sale ($139,000 OBO). 12x24’ pool, 30x30’rear deck, covered porch, three car garage (1 car if rented) 4.2 acres, planted pines. Please drive by and only look. 914 SWLamboy Cr. LC 32024, 386-965-0061 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3/2 Mobile Home on 1/2 ac. Needs TLC, great investment, located in Glenn St. Mary. MLS# 82570, Results Realty $67,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm HarborHomes Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go Save Up To 35K 800-622-2832 ext 210 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 New Listing. Short Sale Spacious 3BR/2BADWMH, in a Quiet Country Neighborhood on 1.1 Acre Lot. MLS 82426 $49,900 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4 Bedroom Home, clean and roomy, lots of storage. See www.hudhomestore.com Case#091-422050 Robin Williams (386)365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate READY FOR YOU! Immaculate 3/2 home on 5 acres. Pole barn, screened back porch, fireplace – cozy! Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 NICE 2/2 SWAND 740 sf frame house/studio/outbuilding, country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinance 4/2 on 2.5 acres, south of LC, small down $850 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BD/1BA$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Call Chris 386-365-2515 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Large 2BD/2BAwith W/D hookup, fresh paint, Convient location $650 mth 386-867-9231 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Immaculately in 55+ Community of Eastside Village. 3BD/2BA. MLS 81332 $120,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Large indoor pool comes with this rare find. Large home with plenty of space. MLS 81966 $150,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Great Family Home, Lovely Location! Brick home on corner lot, 3/1.5, fenced, Seller motivated! Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 Hallmark Real Estate LARGE FAMILYHOME over 1700 sq. ft., hardwood floors, close to schools, shopping, hospitals. Nate Sweat (386)628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate SUPREME LIVING in this 4/2 home on 18 acres. One attached, 2 detached garages, beautiful view. Ginger Parker (386)365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate YOUR MODERN BRICK HOME IS WAITING! In great location, 3/2, shady lot on 1 acre. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptionally Maintained Brick Home in Crest Point. 3/2, Open Kitchen. Elaine Tolar $149,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81426 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 4BR/3BApool home on 10 acres. Front and back porch. Fenced ready for your horses or cows. MLS 82562 $199,900 Established Emerald Lake Subdivision. Split floor plan, Fantastic Outdoor living. MLS 79733 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Historic/Vintage. Totally remodeled. Great home or office space MLS 80242 $65,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Charming rustic log cabin 2BR/1BAwith solar panels. Wood burning stove & gas range. Pole Barn MLS 81761 $99,900 Beautiful Home, separate dining room, large Master Suite. Open Kitchen. MLS 81910 $179,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 810Home forSale RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Callaway S/D 3BR/2BA, 2250sf, .5ac, gas FP, Bamboo & tile flooring. #82470 $189,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1482sf, 8.7acr, tiled baths, FLroom, 2 detached storage bldgs. fenced & cross fenced. #79950 $149,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Tri-Level in Town 4BR/2BA, 1883sf, .501ac, newer kitchen w/all appl’s included, family room #80607 $144,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1386sf, .151ac, fam rm, liv rm, dining open to living & kitchen, screen back porch. #82446 $78,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 4BR/2BA, 1940sf, .25ac, newer metal roof, A/C, windows, siding, water &heater & soffits. #82187 $99,000 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Investment Opportunity, Office Building lots of exposure. Just Reduced. MLS 79694 $69,900 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 860Investment PropertyColdwell BankerBishop Realty Mobile Home Park w/ lots of Potential. Needs some TLC. MLS 81507 $159,000 Elaine K. Tolar 365-1548 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty In-Town location. 3/2, Open and Spacious Living Area. MLS 82609 $99,900 Sherry G. Ratliff 365-8414 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $5,500 386-288-6102 2001 Dodge Ram 3500, V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/ tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900. Call 984-6606 or 758-6800 950Cars forSale 2001 Burgundy ALTIMAvery cold a/c, 140,000 miles, leather, 6 change cd, sunroof. $3,500 listed below blue book, 386-288-6877 No exception, will be pleased, changed oil on time. ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440. We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445

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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 & 19, 20138BSPORTS JUMP NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUBOF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN As promised, the Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown now invites you to join us for the upcoming 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show. Vendor indoor booths, and Outdoor space set-up, will be on Friday March 1st. 2013 (beginning at 8:00 AM). Please plan to complete your set-up by 4:00 PM on Friday March 1st. Show times are: Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 10 AM4PM. ATTENTION VENDORS trr1PUFOUJBM$VTUPNFSTt'SFF1BSLJOHBOE"ENJUUBODFGPSBMMt"MMnQSPDFFETGPSUIFFWFOUHPCBDLUPDPNNVOJUZ If we receive your check post marked by 1/25/2013, you will receive a FREE 1/8 page ad in the Home Show Program published by Lake City ReporterPlease mail checks and contracts to:5)&305"3:$-6#0'-",&$*5:%08/508/ PO Box 2334 Lake City, Florida 32056http://rotarydowntown.com 5IFOVNCFSPGWFOEPSTCZJOEVTUSZHSPVQBSFMJNJUFE %POU%FMBZ4JHO6Q5PEBZ Austin Seay (386) 288-8217 10THANNUAL PRESENTEDBYROTARYCLUBOFLAKECITYDOWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUBOF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN BRIEFS ADULT VOLLEYBALL Interest meeting Sunday at RMS The Columbia County Volleyball Association will has an meeting/open gym day at 1 p.m. Sunday at Richardson Community Center. The purpose is to determine the amount of interest in adult volleyball activities in Columbia County. For details, follow Columbia County Volleyball Association on Facebook. FLAG FOOTBALL Last sign-up day for Christ Central Registration for Christ Central Sports flag football for ages 5-12 ends today. Cost is $45. For details, call Ronny at 365-2128. PREP SPORTS Deadline for non-traditionals Non-traditional students who want to participate in boys weightlifting must declare by Monday. For details, call John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. YOUTH BASEBALL Fort White Babe Ruth registration Fort White Babe Ruth Baseball registration for its spring league is at the South Columbia Sports Complex concession stand from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Jan. 26 and Feb. 2, and 4-7 p.m. on Jan. 29 and Feb. 7. League costs for age groups are 4-6 (T-ball) $45, 7-8 $55, 9-10 $65, 11-12 $75 and 13-15 $85. A birth certificate is required if a child has not previously played in the Fort White leagues. Coaches are needed. For details, call Chris Sharpe at (386) 292-4224.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball registration for its spring league is at Southside Sports Complex from 6-8 p.m. Feb. 1, Feb. 4, Feb. 8 and Feb. 11, and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2. Five leagues are offered for ages 4-6 (coach pitch), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-15. Fee is $95. A parent or guardian must accompany a player and provide a birth certificate. Online registration continues at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. YOUTH SOFTBALL Spring sign-up through Feb. 1 The Girls Softball Association of Columbia County has registration open for its spring softball season for girls ages 4-17. Sign-up is at Brian’s Sports or Impact Zone. Cost is $55 for a single player and $75 for siblings. Registration deadline is Feb. 1. For details, call 755-4271. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games moved to Feb. 2 Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North’s charity basketball games — Live Oak vs. Lake City adult women and men teams — at Lake City Middle School gym is Feb. 2. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095.Q From staff reports Durkin set to replace Quinn as Gators defensive coordinatorBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida coach Will Muschamp wasted little time finding a replacement for departing defensive coordinator Dan Quinn. He didn’t have to search very far, either. Muschamp promoted linebackers coach/special teams coordinator D.J. Durkin to the DC position Thursday, keeping some continuity during a hectic recruiting period. Durkin will continue to serve as linebacker coach. “D.J. and I will run the defense, continuing the way that Dan and I did for the past two years,” Muschamp said in a statement. Quinn accepted an offer to return to the NFL as Seattle’s defensive coor-dinator earlier Thursday, hours after Gus Bradley left to take the head-coaching job with the Jacksonville Jaguars. Quinn served as Florida’s coordinator the past two seasons, working closely with Muschamp as the Gators ranked in the top 10 nationally in total defense. He previously worked as Seattle’s defen-sive line coach. “I’m happy for Dan and this opportunity,” Muschamp said. “I always encourage my staff, when opportunities arise, to take the next step in their career. Dan’s background is in the NFL, and this is a great chance to go back to a place he’s familiar with.” Muschamp plans to hire an assistant to fill out his coaching staff. Durkin spent the last three seasons in Gainesville, one of the few holdovers from for-mer coach Urban Meyer’s staff. Durkin began his coaching career as a graduate assistant under Meyer at Bowling Green in 2001 and later served stints as a defensive assistant at Notre Dame (2003-04), Bowling Green (2005-06) and Stanford (2007-09). He was a four-year starter at defensive end/line-backer at Bowling Green (1997-2000) and was a team captain as a junior and senior. Now, he becomes Florida’s third defensive coordinator in the last four years. Charlie Strong left to become Louisville’s head coach following the 2009 season. Teryl Austin replaced him for one sea-son. Muschamp hired Quinn in 2011. Durkin takes over a Florida defense that is losing seven starters. Defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd, safety Matt Elam and linebacker Jelani Jenkins left school early to enter the NFL. Four seniors — defensive tackle Omar Hunter, safety Josh Evans, linebacker Jon Bostic and defensive end Lerentee McCray — also are moving on. But the Gators have plenty of talent on that side of the ball, with cor-nerbacks Loucheiz Purifoy and Marcus Roberson returning along with defen-sive linemen Dominique Easley, Jonathan Bullard and Dante Fowler. Florida also has young linebackers Antonio Morrison, Michael Taylor and Neiron Ball. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Jan. 10 file photo, Seattle Seahawks defensive coord inator Gus Bradle (center) stands on the field during NFL football practice in Renton, Wash. Th e Jacksonville Jaguars have hired Seattle defensive coordinator Gus Bradley as head coach. Jaguars hire Seahawks’ Bradley as head coachBy MARK LONGAssociated PressJACKSONVILLE — The Jacksonville Jaguars hired Seattle defensive coordina-tor Gus Bradley as head coach Thursday, the latest move in the team’s rebuild-ing project. He joins general manager Dave Caldwell, who led the coaching search after being hired last week. “It was just a matter of time before Gus Bradley became a head coach in the NFL, and the Jacksonville Jaguars are extremely for-tunate that Gus will be on our sidelines for many years to come,” Caldwell said in a statement. “Gus more than met every criteria we insist-ed on from our new head coach, and his intangibles and leadership abilities are exceptional. Gus is who the Jaguars need now and in the future.” Bradley spent the last four seasons in Seattle, where his defense improved each of the last three years and finished in the top 10 in points and yards the last two. This season, the Seahawks ranked first in the NFL in points allowed (15.3), fourth in yards (306.2) and tied for fourth in takeaways (31). The Jaguars were 30th in the league in total defense in 2012. Owner “Shad Khan and Dave Caldwell expect to win, and that’s what I want-ed to hear,” Bradley said. “That’s why I am coming to Jacksonville — to win a Super Bowl.” Bradley will be introduced at a news conference Friday. He began his NFL coaching career with Tampa Bay as a defensive qual-ity control coach in 2006. He was the Buccaneers’ linebackers coach the next two seasons before going to Seattle. Bradley coached in college from 1990-2005, including two stints at his alma mater, North Dakota State, and four years at Fort Lewis College (1992-95). But his rise through the NFL ranks had him on sev-eral teams’ radar. He also interviewed for the head job in Philadelphia this week. “He’s got a brilliant football mind,” Seahawks coach Peter Carroll said this week. “He’s got a way of reaching people and touching people and getting the best out of them, coaches and players alike. He’s got everything that you’re looking for.” The Jaguars interviewed defensive coordinator Mel Tucker, St. Louis Rams offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and Cincinnati Bengals offen-sive coordinator Jay Gruden before striking a deal with Bradley. Bradley replaces Mike Mularkey, who went 2-14 in his only season in Jacksonville. Mularkey failed to make the team any better in his first season. Khan fired general manager Gene Smith, the archi-tect of the roster the last four years, and charged Caldwell with turning around one of the league’s worst franchises. Caldwell’s first move was ousting Mularkey, saying the team “needed a fresh start.” “I’m looking for a cobuilder of our team,” Caldwell said last week. “I felt like it was an atmo-sphere of change. I felt like that to do that, you’ve got to have a fresh start across the board.” Many believed Caldwell would target close friend and college roommate Greg Roman, San Francisco’s offensive coordinator. Instead, Caldwell and Bradley will team up in hope of getting the Jaguars back to the playoffs for the first time since 2007. Jacksonville has missed the postseason 11 times in the last 13 years. “The relationship between the general man-ager and the coach is vital,” Khan said last week. “It has to be a symbiotic relation-ship and they have to grow together and the coach has to be somebody that it’s very, very important to win and very, very important for Jacksonville.” Bradley inherits a team with few playmakers on either side of the ball.