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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:02002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCompetition chili cooks are a special breed. They make hot or spicy dishes and bask in the pleasure of having other people eat them. This weekend Columbia County residents will have the opportunity to cook chili in a no-holds-barred competition at the Second Annual Chili Cookoff. The cookoff will take place Saturday in Wilson Park at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market. Anyone planning to compete must have their registration in by 8:30 a.m. Saturday. The contest will be broken down into two contest categories: Hot or mild. • Each entry requires a $10 registration fee; • Each entrant must provide at least two gallons of chili; • Entrants must be on site at 8:30 a.m. to set up their booths. Entrants should bring their own camp burner or crock pot to keep the chili warm. All chili must be ready by 11 a.m. for judging; • Each entrant will be provided with a 10-by-10-foot space By JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentWASHINGTON — Conceding “this will be difficult,” President Barack Obama urged a reluctant Congress on Wednesday to require background checks for all gun sales and ban both military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines in an emotion-laden plea to curb gun violence in America. The president’s sweeping, $500 million plan, coming one month after the school massacre in Connecticut, marks the most comprehensive effort to tighten gun laws in nearly two decades. But his proposals, most of which are opposed by the National Rifle Association, face a doubtful future in a divided Congress where Republicans con-trol the House. Seeking to circumvent at least some opposi-tion, Obama signed 23 executive actions on Wednesday, including orders to make more federal data available for background checks and end a freeze on government research on gun violence. But he acknowledged that the steps he took on his own would have less impact than the broad measures requiring approval from Capitol Hill. “To make a real and lasting difference, Congress, too, must act,” Obama said, speaking at a White House ceremony with school children and their parents. “And Congress must act soon.” The president’s announcements capped a swift and wide-ranging effort, led by Vice Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Conrad Bain dead at 89. COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. 79 54 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 252 1 Background checks, banon some weapons arepart of $500M package. CHILI continued on 3A COLLINS continued on 3A Third Circuit Judgewill give keynoteaddress Sunday. Obama unveils gun control plan GUNS continued on 3AJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA city employee rejoices after Elevated Tank No. 1 is br ought down Wednesday morning. The 165-foot high water tower, whi ch leaked for more than a year, was built in 1922 and oper ational until April 2012. TOUCHDOWN! Chili cookoff: A hot time Saturday in Wilson Park Man turnsself in toget cleanFrom staff reportsA Lake City man, willing to go to jail to break his dependence on methamphetamine, called police and told them he had the drug in his possession so he could be arrested. Sean Paul Wilson, 34, 518 SW Sparrow Terrace, was arrested Monday and faces posses-sion of a controlled substance and possession of drug equip-ment charges in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention ‘Justice before politics’ JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterJamie Siegmeister (left) holds her family Bible as her husband, newly elected State Attorney Jeff Siegmeister, reci tes an oath as he is being sworn in by Circuit Judge David Fina on Wednesday at the Suwanne e County Courthouse. ‘I want good things for the Third Circu it,’ Siegmeister said. ‘This is my home. I will be a buck-stops-here state attorney. This of fice will be justice before politics.’ Man wounded in face with flare gunBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City man is in a Gainesville hospital recovering from injuries he suffered when he was shot in the face with a flare gun Wednesday morning. Authorities have arrested the suspected assailant but continue to investigate the incident for a motive behind the shooting. Authorities did not release any details regarding the condition of the victim, Enrique R. Cutts, 27, but noted he spoke to a depart-ment investigator Wednesday morning. “He was not burned, just cut by the projectile,” said Craig Strickland, Lake City Police Department public information officer. Strickland said Cutts’ injuries were confined to the head area. “He just suffered inju-ries to his face, which he was vis-ibly bleeding from,” Strickland said. The injuries were said not to be life-threaten-ing. Cory M. Douglas, 28, 177 NE Washington St., was arrested and faces aggravated battery and criminal mis-chief charges in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Center in lieu of $20,000 bond. According to information from the Lake City Police Department, around 5:27 a.m. Wednesday, officers were dispatched to North East Martin Luther King Street in reference to a shooting victim. Officer Kevin Johns arrived on scene and reportedly found Cutts standing next to a car bleeding from the face. Cutts told Johns that he was WOUNDED continued on 3A Douglas Collins to speakat MLKservice By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThird Judicial Circuit Judge Julian Collins will serve as the keynote speaker when the Columbia County Branch of the NAACP holds its 29th annu-al Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. observance this weekend. The program will take place at 4 p.m. Sunday at the Mount Pisgah AME Church, 519 NE Washington St. Collins is no stranger to the local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People podium and has previ-ously served a guest speaker at the local affiliate’s annual banquet. Glynnell Presley, Columbia County NAACP secretary and program chairman, said Collins spoke about eight years ago at the NAACP luncheon and annual banquet. “The speech was as good a speech, content-wise, as any-body that we’ve had speak to us,” Presley said. “So we asked him back.” Collins was born in Lake City and grew up in Mayo and St. Cloud, near Orlando. He returned to Lake City in 1960 and graduated Columbia High Collins METH continued on 3A Wilson Yoho

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Betty White is 91. Former FCC chairman Newton N. Minow is 87. Actor James Earl Jones is 82. Talk sho w host Maury Povich is 74. International Boxing Hall of Famer Muhammad Ali is 71. Pop singer Chris Montez is 71. Rhythm-and-blues singer William Hart (The Delfonics) is 68. AROUND FLORIDA State pushes to find homeowners TALLAHASSEE Florida is making a final effort to find former hom eowners who may be eligi ble for payments as part of a national settlement with five major lenders. The deadline to file a claim under the settlement is this Friday. The settle ment applies to loan that were serviced by Bank of America, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan Chase, Citi or GMAC/Ally. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Wednesday that she has hired a company to make phone calls to tens of thousands of people who lost their homes to foreclosure between 2008 and 2011. The state plans to spend up to $187,000 on the effort. So far less than half of the estimated 167,000 peo ple in Florida eligible for payments have responded to previous outreach efforts. Lawmakers want to repeal law TALLAHASSEE The mother of Trayvon Martin and Democratic lawmak ers are calling for the repeal of the so-called stand your ground law. Sybrina Fulton, whose unarmed 17-year-old son was fatally shot by neigh borhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, joined Rep. Alan Williams and Sen. Dwight Bullard on Wednesday in calling for a repeal of the law that says people can use deadly force if they feel threat ened. Zimmerman is charged with second degree mur der and is claiming selfdefense under the law. Williams filed a bill (HB 4009) that would seek the repeal. It is likely to face opposition from Republicans who control the Legislature and backed the current law. A panel created by Gov. Rick Scott has recom mended no major changes to the existing law. FHP: Dog caused fatal accident CANTONMENT Authorities say a man has died after a dog jumped into a vehicle, pushed the accelerator and struck him as he opened a gate out side a Florida Panhandle home. The Florida Highway Patrol says 56-year-old Iris Fortner and 68-yearold James Campbell were returning to their home in Cantonment on Monday when Campbell got out of the passenger side of the vehicle to open the metal gates. The Pensacola News Journal reports Fortner opened the drivers door to see where Campbell was standing. Thats when Fortners large boxer bull dog jumped into the car and pressed the accelera tor. FHP says Fortner tried to stop before the vehicle backed into Campbell. He was trapped under the van and pronounced dead by Escambia County para medics. Couple on trial for animal cruelty BARTOW A jury began hearing testimony in the trial of a Polk City couple accused of animal cruelty in the single larg est animal seizure case in Sheriffs Office history. The Lakeland Ledger reports that the trial con tinued Wednesday. Prosecutors say Charles and Diane OMalley were trying to care for hun dreds of unwanted dogs at their home, but their conduct became criminal when the task proved too much for them. During opening state ments, prosecutors told jurors that deputies and animal control officers responded to an anony mous tip on May 26, 2010, and found 261 dogs living in poor conditions. Their lawyer says the dogs werent mistreated and that prosecutors retreated from the original charges because deputies failed to conduct a proper investigation. State could face $300M penalty TALLAHASSEE The state of Florida could be on the hook for a $300 million penalty unless it makes major changes to the program that provides health insurance to state workers. Florida has thousands of part-time workers who will qualify for health insur ance next year under the federal health care over haul. State law currently pro hibits the state from offer ing health insurance cover age to those workers. Florida legislators will have to decide what to do during the upcoming 2013 session. It would cost the government more than $40 million a year to start pro viding health insurance to part-timers. Rep. Richard Corcoran, R-Land O Lakes, and chairman of a House panel reviewing the federal health care overhaul, said lawmakers could pay for the extra workers by rais ing premiums or changing benefits offered to full-time state workers. Thought for Today A politician is a person with whose politics you dont agree; if you agree with him hes a statesman. David Lloyd George, (1863-1945) Diffrent Strokes dad dead at 89 NEW YORK C onrad Bain, a veteran stage and film actor who became a star in middle age as the kindly white adoptive father of two young African-American brothers in the TV sitcom Diffrent Strokes, has died. Bain died Monday of natu ral causes in his hometown of Livermore, Calif., according to his daughter, Jennifer Bain. He was 89. The show that made him famous debuted on NBC in 1978, an era when television comedies tackled relevant social issues. Diffrent Strokes touched on serious themes but was known better as a family comedy that drew most of its laughs from its standout child actor, Gary Coleman. Bain played wealthy Manhattan widower Philip Drummond, who promised his dying housekeeper he would raise her sons, played by Coleman and Todd Bridges. Race and class relations became topics on the show as much as the typical tri als of growing up. The series lasted six seasons on NBC and two on ABC. Shakira hosts shower for underprivileged kids NEW YORK What does the baby of the worlds most famous Latin American sing er need? Nothing, apparently. Expectant parents Shakira and soccer star Gerard Pique of FC Barcelona are holding an online baby shower to ben efit underprivileged children. Their own child is expected soon. A UNICEF-hosted website invites those attending the virtual baby shower to buy gifts costing as little as $5, which can buy a mosquito net to ensure a sleeping baby stays safe from malaria a leading cause of child deaths worldwide. Guests can spend $10 for polio vaccines to protect 17 children, or $37 for a baby scale. Elton John, partner welcome 2nd son LONDON Elton John and David Furnish say they have become parents for a second time. The couple say they are over whelmed with happiness at the birth of Elijah Joseph Daniel Furnish-John. Johns spokes woman Fran Curtis confirmed an announcement on the singers website that the baby was born Friday in Los Angeles to a sur rogate mother. The baby weighs 8 pounds, 4 ounces. Wednesday: Afternoon: 1-2-8 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 9-3-9-1 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 5-8-13-28-32 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Different Strokes stars Conrad Bain (left), Gary Coleman (foreground) and Todd Bridges are seen in this 1981 file photo. Bain, who played the kindly, white adop tive father of two young African-American brothers died of natural causes Monday. Associated Press Associated Press HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture So I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh. Galatians 5:16 Shakira John

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 3A3A Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.1 Offer only available on 1/1/13-4/15/13 and may no t be combined with any other offer. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. APR=Annual Percen tage Rate. There are costs associated with the use of this card. For specific information call 800-367-6440 or write us at P.O. Box 147029, Gain esville, FL 32614. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. 7 98 %BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL APR1for the life of the balance transfer when you trans fer a balance from your “bank” credit card to a CAMPUS VISA Platinum Card.CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card No annual fee No balance transfer fee Free design-your-own-cardPlus!OFFER IS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.Apply today at campuscu.com! President Joe Biden, to respond to the deaths of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. But Obama’s gun control proposals set him up for a tough political fight with Congress as he starts his second term, when he’ll need Republican support to meet three looming fiscal deadlines and pass comprehensive immigration reform. “I will put everything I’ve got into this, and so will Joe,” the president said. “But I tell you, the only way we can change is if the American people demand it.” Key congressional leaders were tepid in their response to the White House proposals. Republican House Speaker John Boehner’s office signaled no urgen-cy to act, with spokesman Michael Steel saying only that “House com-mittees of jurisdiction will review these recommendations. And if the Senate passes a bill, we will also take a look at that.” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he was commit-ted to ensuring that the Senate will consider gun violence legislation “early this year.” But he did not endorse any of Obama’s specific proposals. U.S. Rep Ted Yoho, whose district includes Columbia County, took issue with Obama’s approach. “Following the president’s remarks today, I am convinced more than ever that we must protect our Second Amendment right,” he said in a prepared statement. “While I agree with President Obama’s mes-sage that we must curb gun vio-lence and protect our citizens, dis-regarding our constitutional rights (is) the wrong way to go. Prior to signing 23 executive orders and pushing for unconstitutional legisla-tion in Congress, I would encourage the president to enforce the laws already on the books. “As a proud gun owner, I believe that our right to bear arms is a birthright and I will oppose any effort to infringe on our guaranteed constitutional rights.” GUNS: President calls on Congress to act Continued From Page 1A WOUNDED: Alleged assailant arrested at home Continued From Page 1Asitting in the front seat of his mother’s car, parked at 361 NE Martin Luther King St., when Douglas approached the vehicle, opened the driver’s side door and shot him in the face with a flare gun. “He (Cutts) gave no information about the shooting,” Strickland said. “He didn’t say why he was parked in that area or why he was attacked. He also declined to file charges.” After the shot, the interior of the car caught fire, but was quickly extinguished by an unknown bystander, Strickland said. The blaze burned the car’s seats and carpet. The vehicle was impounded for evidence. The investigation was turned over to LCPD Investigator Tammy Cox, who found Douglas at his home a shor time later and arrested him. “Once they found out who it was, they went directly to his residence once they finished the on-scene investigation,” Strickland said. “The vic-tim identified him by name and most likely knew where he lived.” Authorities had not recovered the flare gun. CHILI: Event will raise funds for local charity Continued From Page 1Awith electricity. Entrants must pro-vide their own tables and tents, if desired; • The first-place winner will receive a cash prize; • Entrants will be judged on their booth designs. Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place for booth design. Booths will be judged at 10 a.m.; and • Chili samples will be prepared for judging, and the rest of the chili will be sold by Church On the Way. “Last year when the farmers market started, we created events to go along with the farmers market, and one of the events was a chili cookoff,” said Jackie Kite, Lake City Community Redevelopment Agency administrator. “Last year it was a really big success.” Kite said last year’s event served as a fundraiser for a Relay For Life, and this year’s will serve benefit Church On The Way and its community out-reach programs. “They help bring activities into the downtown,” Kite said. “They are one of our big volunteer supporters for the Chamber of Commerce and the events downtown.” Last year’s contest, which had nine participants, was winner-take-all, and Kite said this year’s event will follow the same format. She said seven peo-ple already had registered to compete Saturday event. Ribbons will be given contestants who place first through third in the booth contest, and trophies will be given to contestants who place in the chili cooking competition. Live music will be provided by Bella Luna. “We’re hoping this event will grow,” she said. “We run a week behind the chili contest in Branford so that some of the contestants from Branford would decide to come and join ours. That kicked out competition up a notch when those contestants came. We didn’t really realize how serious people are about their chili. We’re looking forward to having a really nice contest again this year.” Seven judges will have an opportunity to taste the chili in a double-blind tasting format where the person receiving the highest score wins each category. After the competition the audience will be able to purchase chili sample cups for $1 each or purchase a bowl of chili at a different price. Other con-cessions and produce at the farmers market will also be sold during the event. For more information about the chili cookoff, call 719-5766. COLLINS: Will speak SundayContinued From Page 1ASchool in 1962 as valedic-torian and student body president. In 1965 he graduated from Florida State University with honors in government and was awarded a National Defense Education Act Fellowship in political sci-ence at the University of Minnesota, where he earned a master’s degree. He got his law degree at the University of Minnesota in 1978. In 1988, after 10 years of practicing law in Lake City, Collins ran for Columbia County judge. He won and was re-elected sev-eral terms. He served in the position until he was appointed circuit court judge by Gov. Jeb Bush in December 1999. He was re-elected without opposi-tion in 2002 and re-elected without opposition to his current term. Presley said this year’s program will also feature more diversity than in past years and will also include the inaugural performance by the newly formed NAACP choir. The choir will be conducted by Dr. Anthony “Tony” Buzzella. “The NAACP choir, the brainchild of Bernice D. Presley, had only one rehearsal,” Presley said. Presley also spoke of the importance of holding a local MLK observance for close to three decades to honor King and what he stood for. “It’s hard to overstate the impact Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., had on all class-es and races of people in America and the world,” Presley said. “His leadership of the civil rights movement during the ’60s inspired a literal transformation of this nation. Though King preached nonviolence, marchers promoting his cause and adherents to the civil rights movement were often beaten and sometimes killed,” she said. “Still King and his followers persevered,” Presley continued. “Great lead-ers are often remembered for events in their lives or words spoken that crys-tallized for eternity those things for which they stood. Dr. King was the epitome of a great man.” METH: Man asks for jail Continued From Page 1ACenter in lieu of $11,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s Office reports, Wilson called the office and told them he had “meth” and he wanted to be arrested. When Deputy Daniel Lee responded to the reported location, he met Wilson in the front yard and Wilson reportedly told Lee he was “hooked on meth real bad” and that he cooked some methamphetamine in the woods two weeks ago but could not remember its location. Wilson told Lee he was all out except for a plastic bag containing coffee fil-ters from making metham-phetamine that contained residue of the drug. Wilson also reportedly told Lee that he cannot afford treat-ment and wanted to go to jail so he could not have further access to metham-phetamine. Lee field-tested the residue on the coffee filters, which showed the pres-ence of methamphetamine, and Wilson was arrested and taken to jail without incident.

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4AOPINION OPINION Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A N ot to make too much of a fable of a complex subject, but assume that a group of small boys finally man-ages to climb to the roof of the family garage. After first doing what comes naturally — throw-ing stuff off the roof — the boys move on to what comes second: What would happen to someone who jumped off the roof? All this, mind you, is not punitive, but by way of sci-entific exploration. A kid could be a hero or a kid could have a broken arm or worse; inquiring minds want to know. And this brings us to the House Republicans and the issue of raising the debt ceiling so the United States can contin-ue to borrow money and pay its bills. Disregarding the proverbial neighbor lady’s warning, “You’ll break your necks,” some young-er, adventure-minded Republicans — includ-ing Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Reps. Steve Scalise of Louisiana and Daniel Webster of Florida — are toying with the idea, all in the interest of science, of course, of not increasing the borrowing limit: “Let Uncle Sam default. It might be kind of fun to see what hap-pens.” Many people — the Treasury Department, Wall Street, the major corporations, the rest of the world — think this is a terrible idea. We are, after all, messing with the full faith and credit of the United States. One sure indication that defaulting on our debt is a bad idea is that Donald Trump thinks it’s a good one. Trump lectured Republicans: “For the good of the country, they need to hold firm for the big deal. If they don’t, the country will go to hell.” Another reason, apart from the appealing lunacy of the idea, according to one strategist, is that it will reassure the Republican base that the party is seri-ous about cutting spend-ing. I’m sure the rest of us won’t mind being impoverished and the butt of world ridicule if it will reassure the Republican base. I’m sure the rest of us will happily allay GOP fears, even as we can’t get mort-gages and car loans and our neighbors who work for the government can’t get paid, that their leaders aren’t doing something really stupid. Some of the Republicans who are curious about what would happen if the U.S. went into default think absolutely nothing would happen. The rest of us might feel the same if our salaries, medical care and retirement were safe from experimenting with default. Toomey, of Pennsylvania, whose state capital, if you are look-ing for ominous omens, is bankrupt, told Politico, “No Treasury secretary or president would actually default on the debt, even if they couldn’t borrow more money,” which actu-ally sounds to me like a pretty good definition of “default.” The next step would be a televised nationwide address in which the presi-dent asks all Americans with unused gift cards to mail them to the Treasury because we have a $1 bil-lion payment coming due on a T-bill held by the Chinese. Even in default there would be some money coming into the Treasury from the dwindling band of solvent taxpayers, those that hold jobs that don’t depend on the govern-ment paying its bills. Some Republicans are introducing bills that would prioritize those token payments. Deciding who gets paid and who gets stiffed should make for some interesting politics. One Republican made it clear that a prior-ity would be paying the active-duty military first. Of course, they have guns. One Democrat typically proposed that we simply ignore the debt ceiling and keep on spending as if it didn’t exist. Those Democrats! Always full of good ideas. Funny money! Who would have thought of it. Foreigners will never recognize Jefferson Davis’ picture on the $40 bill. What we really need is a grown-up with a drill sergeant’s voice to say, “Hey, you kids? Get off that roof. Don’t make me come up there after you.”‘The Bachelor’ is train-wreck TV Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman I t sounds like a rejected Marx Brothers routine: Put a constitutional amendment on the ballot to fix a problem with having too many constitutional amendments on the ballot. But that’s exactly what one Florida legislator is proposing. And it’s a good start to clean-ing up 2012’s voting mess in the Sunshine State. Sen. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, filed a proposed constitutional amendment that seeks to limit to three the number of pro-posed amendments the Legislature could put on the ballot in any one election. That’s a direct response to the crowded ballot last November that sported 11 amendments, all of them proposed by the Legislature (as opposed to outside groups). Voters approved only three of them; none of the other eight even garnered a simple major-ity, a clear indication that legislators were out of touch with most Floridians. It remains to be seen how popular Clemens’ hard cap on amendments is with his col-leagues, but there’s little doubt that, at least in the near term, change is coming. New Senate President Don Gaetz recently told the News Service of Florida that he planned to instruct senators to propose amendments that are only truly needed. House Speaker Will Weatherford should follow suit. Gaetz’s move is a tacit admission that several amendments last year weren’t necessary — although they probably seemed that way to their sponsors at the time. Leaders will have to clarify that subjectivity. ... The Legislature also should address not just the number of amendments, but their volume. The 11 amendments last year added up to more than 2,600 words. That’s because the lawmakers have exempted themselves from the 75-word limit on ballot summaries that applies to amendments proposed by interest groups. We know it’s asking a lot for politicians to be less verbose, but in this case there’s no excuse why they shouldn’t be held to the same standard on ballot language as outsiders. ... In addition to amendment reform, Gov. Rick Scott has suggested that more early voting days may be needed and that local elections supervisors receive the flexibility to add more voting places and actual voting machines in each place to ensure the process goes faster. Those are worthy ideas. Having fewer amendments and ensuring they are written concisely would be a good first step on elec-toral reform for the 2014 midterms. Good sense election reforms Testing being a deadbeat ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comA s the new season of “The Bachelor” launched this week, I was roped in to watching with my 16-year-old daughter, Tori. For the entire two hours I kept my eyes riveted on the show. And about eight times I looked at her and said, “Never, ever do this!” Yes, I admit that Sean (“The Bachelor”) is attractive. He actually seems like a really nice guy. But the thought of seeing one of my daugh-ters competing along with a couple dozen other young women for a fel-low is just ... horrifying. It’s not just the cattiness that comes out as they tear each other down. (You can just see some of these girls want to scratch each oth-er’s eyes out.) It’s watching them get sexually aggressive and so degrade themselves by chasing this fellow. They are ready to make out with him knowing that on his next date he’ll be doing the same with someone else. Ick.I know, I know: Watching the show was a little like watching a train wreck. It is sort of repulsive and gripping all at the same time. The wildly popular show is full of all sorts of gauzy, romantic over-tures. Though at the same time this season opener had some bizarre ones, including a woman on a date with Sean jumping off a building with him. Another woman, having a prank played on her, thought that she had destroyed a piece of art cost-ing $1.5 million. That was weird. But what is really strange is that despite all the wine, candles and extravagant dates, the endgame is that these couplings, after the “win-ner” has clawed her way to the top, almost never work out. In fact, after 24 seasons of “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette,” there have been lots of engagements followed by lots of breakups. But after all those sea-sons, there have been a grand total of two marriages. So why do women get so pulled into this franchise even as they are faced with the truth that these “matchups” almost never work? (The audiences for “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette” are overwhelm-ingly female.) Because women love to over-romanticize relationships, even when they know that the romance, as fun as it is, doesn’t typi-cally provide long-term relationship power. What’s so ironic is that one key relationship-health predictor is almost entirely absent from “The Bachelor”: That when a man is inter-ested in a woman, he will pursue her. Scott Stanley, co-director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies at the University of Denver, explained to me that throughout his-tory, because only a woman can get pregnant, finding a man who would openly pursue her gave her an added sense of security that would prove supportive throughout the relation-ship and as children came along. To that end, “The Bachelorette” is a little more traditional, as the woman is the one pursued by a couple dozen men. But, frankly, I find that game, with that many guys over a long period of time, fairly emasculating, which is probably why that audience is also so dominated by women. So when it comes to “The Bachelor,” it seems that women hold onto what doesn’t work — gauzy “romantic pornography,” I call it. At the same time, they, too, often don’t hold out for one key relationship pre-dictor that is shown to work over the long term: a man pursuing a woman in a real-life context. I don’t know if I will continue watching “The Bachelor” with Tori. She claims to know it’s all nonsense, but she wants to watch it anyway. I do know I will continue saying, “Never, ever do this!” Q Betsy Hart hosts the “It Takes a Parent” radio show on WYLL-AM 1160 in Chicago. Betsy Hartbetsysblog.com Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Q The (Panama City) News Herald

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Wilbur CasonWilbur Cason 86, resident of the Forest Grove Community passed away Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at Sig-nature Health Care in Gaines-ville, Florida. A native Flo-ridian born in Fort White, veteran of World War II, US Army. Longtime farmer in Dade and Alachua Counties, member of Forest Grove Baptist Church.Survivors: Devoted husband of 64 years to Mary Blanton Ca-son, one son, Gary (Charisse) Cason, Boca Raton, Florida; one daughter, Vicki (Daniel) Ander-son, Wakulla County; one sister, /HWKD$OEULWWRQ/DNH&LW\YHgranddaughters, Cresha, Ce-leste, Kinsey, Crystal, Chanda; and four great grandchildren.Graveside Services will be conducted at 11:00 a.m., Fri-day, January 18 at Forest Grove Cemetery. Reverend Warren &KHVVHURIFLDWLQJ9LVLWDWLRQwill be Thursday, January 17, 6-8 p.m. at EVANS-CARTER FUNERAL HOME High Springs, 386-454-2444. Inter-ment in Forest Grove Cemetery. ,QOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVmay be made to Haven Hos-pice, 4200 N.W. 90th Blvd., Gainesville, Florida 32606.Catherine Taylor Dix Catherine Taylor Dix departed from this life January 11, 2013 for her eternal resting place. She was born March 1, 1939 in Fitzgerald, Georgia to the late Walter and Fannie Pearl Taylor. Both preceded her in death. She was educated in the Ben Hill County School System and grad-uated in 1959 from Queensland High School in Fitzgerald, Georgia. Mrs. Taylor-Dix ac-cepted Christ at an early age and joined Mt. Cavalry Bap-tist Church in Fitzgerald, GA. After mov-ing to Lake City, she joined New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church. She later united with Faith Bible Church, Sander-son, Florida under Pastor Vi-dell Williams’s ministry, serv-ing faithfully until her demise. Cherishing loving memories: daughters, Kathy Dix and Chel-bony Paxton (Eugene); grand-children, Calvin Jackson, Deon-tae Crumite, Na’Haviya Paxton; goddaughter, Jessica Yvette Green; aunt, Ronella Sandifer; other relatives, church fam-ily and friends including Rob-ert Dix and Roosevelt Curry. Memorial services for Mrs. Catherine Dix will be held 11:00 A.M. Saturday, January 19, 2013 at Faith Bible Church. 15902 US Highway 90 West, Sanderson, FL. Videll Williams, Pastor. The family will receive friends from 5-7 pm Friday, January 18, 2013 at the Richardson Commu-nity Center, Lake City, Florida. The family has entrusted the care of their loved one to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Shirley Geneva DowningMrs. Shirley Geneva Down-ing, 76, a resident of Lake City, Florida passed away Tues-day, January 15, 2013 at the Lake City Medical Center. Mrs. Downing was a lifelong resident of Columbia County and is the widow of Clyde Downing. She is the daughter of Mary Simpkins. She is a member of the Mt. Beulah Baptist Church Wellborn, Florida. Mrs. Down-ing is preceded in death by a daughter, Linda K. Hutchinson.Survivors include three daughters: Barbara (Gary) Garner, Lake City, Fl., Mary (Bruce) Williams, Mayo, Florida and Joyce Poulnot, Lake City, Fl. One Son: Mitch (Ellen) Downing, Lake City, Fl. One broth-er: Gene Simpkins, Arkansas. Seven grandchildren and ten great grandchildren also survive. Funeral services will be con-ducted Friday, January 18, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. in the Mt. Beulah Baptist Church with the Rev. Lewis Gooch and the Rev. TomP\&DQQRQRIFLDWLQJ,QWHU ment will follow in the church cemetery. The family will re-ceive friends Thursday evening, January 17, 2013 from 6:00-8:00 P.M. at the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comWillie Mae KeelMrs. Willie Mae Keel transi-tioned from Life to death on Thursday, January 10, 2013 at St. Vincent Medical Center in Jacksonville, Florida. Willie Mae, age 64, was born on Janu-ary 1, 1949 in Rocky Mount, NC to the late Willie West Whita-ker and Annie Roberson Grant. Willie Mae ac-cepted Christ at an early age beginning her Christian journey at Mt. Olive Baptist Church, Jas-per, Florida and completed the course at New Dayspring Missionary Baptist Church, Lake City, Florida.Willie Mae was educated in the Hamilton County School System, graduating with the Hamilton High School Class of 1968. Willie Mae affectionately worked in Culinary Arts for many years before establishing her own restaurant “Mom’s Kitch-en” which she proudly owned/operated until her health failed.Willie Mae also served as a faithful member of the B&S Combs Elks Temple #1238 where she served in many ca-pacities including the Orange Blossom Council of District 1.Three siblings preceded her in death: Frank King, Burnell Roberson, and Dorthy Daniels.She leaves to cherish her mem-ories; two daughters: Sandra Keel and Alnesia Jackson, both of Lake City, Florida; two sons: Reginald (Clara) Keel, Jack-sonville, Florida and Fredrick :LOVRQ/DNH&LW\)ORULGDYHsisters: Christine (John) Ma-son, Titusville, Florida; Alice Twyman, Lancaster, PA; Ann Brown, Tallahassee, Florida; Juanita Alford and Irene (Leon) Claridy both of Jasper, Florida; two brothers: Julius Whitaker, Atlanta, Georgia; and Norman Whitaker of Jasper, Florida; eight grands: Jamecia, Mar-quis, Marcus, Malaycia, For-tune, Fredrick Jr., Clardonna, and Brittnee; two great-grands: Ke’Yon and Kadreona and a host of nieces, nephews, cous-ins, and sorrowing friends. Funeral Services for the late Ms. Willie Mae Keel will be held on Saturday, January 19, 2013 at 11:00am at the New Dayspring Missionary Baptist Church 709 NW Long Street, Lake City, Florida; Rev. Lantz G. Mills, Sr. Pastor; Rev. I.L. Williams of-FLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOOIROORZat Forest Lawn Cemetery. The family will receive friends on Friday, January 18, 2013 from 6:00pm-8:00pm at New Day-spring MBC. Arrangements en-trusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 NE Washington Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 5A5A Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan. 17Retired educatorsColumbia County Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. at the School Board Adult Center, room 120. For more information, contact Will Brown at 752-2431. Any retired person interested in education is welcome.Gospel playThe gospel play “A Taste of Temptation: An Anti-Drug Message” will be performed tonight through Sunday at 6 p.m. at the old Bread of Life Church on State Road 100-A. Featured performers include Anthony Dorsey, lead singer for Hamilton Park, and Jacqueline Marshall Rhodes. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For tickets or more infor-mation, call (386) 234-1922 or visit the website www.faithfullymovile.com/sgm.Propagation classColumbia County Master Gardeners will give a class on propagation at 5:45 p.m. at the Fort White Library. Learn to increas plant stock by cuttings, root division and seeds. For more infor-mation, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Jan. 18Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Music concertSouthern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural sea-son of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www.fgcentertainment.com.Masonic banquetGold Standard Lodge 167 will have its annual Masonic banquet at the Winfield Community Center. For tickets and more informa-tion, call Chirs Mirra at (386) 623-3611 or Mike Kelly at (386) 867-6675.Church anniversarySalem Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its 173rd anniversary and annual meeting beginning at 6:30 p.m., with addition-al services Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Guest ministers will be Elder Charles Tyson of Tifton, Ga., Elder Gordon Smith of Jacksonville and others. All descendants of Salem Primitive Baptist Church and those who love the original Baptist doctrines are invited. The church is at 199 SW Salem Church Court, off County Road 250 (Lake Jeffrey Road). For more information, call Pastor Herman W. Griffin at 752-4198.Arbor Day eventThe Lake City-Columbia County Beautification Committee will celebrate Arbor Day with a program at 11 a.m. in Olustee Park. The committee will rec-ognize the contributions of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Darby to enhancing life in the community. A tree will be planted in their honor at Wilson Park.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. Music will be by Bella Luna. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.Community concertCommunity Concerts of Lake City will host a per-formance by Terry Barber, countertenor superstar, as part of their 2012-13 Concert Series at 2:30 p.m. at the Levy Performing Arts Center on the Florida Gateway College Campus. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students in kin-dergarten through grade 12. Tickets will be available only at the door an hour before the concert. Season tickets for all remaining concerts may be purchased at the Lake City Chamber of Commerce or by credit card at www.community concerts.info. Call (386) 466-8999 for more information. Propagation classColumbia County Master Gardeners will give a class on propagation at 2 p.m. at the Lake City Library. Learn to increas plant stock by cuttings, root division and seeds. For more infor-mation, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Fish fryThe Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholarship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive (the old Amtrak station). Fish sandwiches are $6 and dinners are $7.50. Dinner includes fish, grids, baked beans, bread and dessert. Drinks are 50 cents. To call in an order, call 752-7054.Jan. 20MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Turkey shootUnited Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold a turkey from 10 a.m. until dark at Moose Lodge 624, 624 NE Williams St. Shotguns and ammunition will be provided. For more information, call (386) 752-5604.Bridal showThe third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi-ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur-chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411.Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Jan. 21Women’s Bible studyA women’s Bible study class will be held each Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Class Extension of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 436 SW McFarlane Ave. All denominations are welcome. For more infor-mation, call Esther at (386) 752-9909.Jan. 224Cs board meetingThe Suwannee Valley 4Cs Board of Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m. at 260 S. Marion Avenue, Suite 135, Lake City.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Jan. 23Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center in Lake City. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Quilters meetingThe Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St., Lake City, two blocks north of Duval (US 90) off Lake Jeffery Road. Social time will be at 9:30 a.m., and the business meeting will be at 10. The program will be presenta-tion of the 2013 Challenge by Sandy Lindfors and Nancy See.Jan. 23Men’s Bible studyOur Redeemer Lutheran Church will have men’s breakfast and Bible study from 7 to 8 a.m. at the church, 5056 SW State Road 47, one mile south of Interstate 75.Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a con-cert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fund-raiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admis-sion tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. Parker has been voted favorite male vocal-ist 12 times and soloist of the year nine times. The “Artist’s Circle” tickets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are avail-able by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be available at the door begin-ning an hour before the performance.Landlords meetingLake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res-taurant on U.S. 90. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the meeting will begin at 6. John Kasak will give a talk on “What Is Covered in Your Insurance Policy for Rentals.” For more infor-mation, call 755-0110.Military officers groupThe Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will hold its monthly din-ner meeting at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando Street, at 6:30 p.m. The dinner meeting is open to all active duty mili-tary officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard, and their surviving spouses. For information, call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 old will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic catego-ries. For more information, contact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Prayer breakfastThe Pastor’s Care Committeeof Antioch Missionary Baptist of Fort White will have a prayer breakfast at 9 a.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Ronald Walters of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church of Lake City. Cost is $10 for aduts and $5 for chil-dren 5 and younger. For more information, contact Marilyn Frazier at (386) 318-3441, Allonia Griffin at (386) 497-3062, Francis Legree at (386) 497-1748 or Evangilist Gloria Jackson at (352) 538-0352.Music series startsThe 17th season of the Friends of Music Concert Series opens with The Alachua Consort (oboe, violin and piano) perform-ing French baroque music at 7:30 p.m. at Covenant First Presbyterian Church, 421 White Ave. SE in Live Oak. For more informa-tion contact Bill or Linda Poplin, (386) 365-4932 or (386) 365-4941.

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLocal singing talent will be featured in competition this weekend as several area teens compete for the third annual Southside Idol title. The Southside Idol competition will take 6 p.m. Saturday at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval St. Tickets are $5. At least 11 teens will be vying for the Southside Idol title in this year’s contest. Registered contestants are: Q Jessi Clark Q Kara Compo Q Jessica Land Q Alexus Branscome Q Vakayla Woodbury Q Montine Humphries Q Velana Davis Q Brodi Sargent Q Jenna Markham Q Nikole Bryant Q Neno Quintello The vocal talents and the stage presence of the com-petitors will be scored by four judges: Linard Johnson, Columbia County school board member; Mike Smith, a radio personality from 101.5 in Jacksonville; Sharon Wilburn, a season 8 American Idol contestant who is now a reporter for Fox News in Jacksonville, and Lisa Vunas, a profes-sional consultant from Fort Lauderdale. “We feel like it’s a good community event,” said Wayne Jernigan, Southside Idol organizer. “We try to hold this show to show we have some of the best talent in this area.” The program will also feature a song in honor of the people who died in the Newtown, Conn., shoot-ing. All of the contestants will participate, and Lynn Branscome will lead the song. Last week, several of the contestants were taken by limousine to a Jacksonville radio station, where they promoted the event during a live radio interview. “They really enjoyed that,” Jernigan said. Kara Compo, one of this year’s contestants, described her trip to Jacksonville: “I liked it. It was really cool,” she said. “It was a good experience because we got to learn about the radio station and how the different pieces of a radio interview are put together. To me, it was cool because radio is an integral part of the Army, and I’m going to the Army in August. I got to talk about being in last year’s contest. It was totally exhilarating because you get to realize it’s a bigger program (Southside Idol) than just in Lake City.” Jernigan said this year’s contest winner will be flown to the grand finale of the American Idol televi-sion show in California. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A COURTESY PHOTOSouthside Idol performers (from left) Brodi Sargent, Jessic a Land, Alexus Branscome, Lynn Branscome and Vakayla Woodbury stand near a lim ousine following a recent trip to a Jacksonville radio station, where they participated in a live interview promoting the Southside Idol competition. 11 to take part in 3rd annual ‘Southside Idol’ competitionFAMU must update board on progressYoung womenfrom Lake City area to perform. By By MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida A&M University must file regular updates to the board that governs the state’s universities, detailing how it is improv-ing practices following a blistering inspector gen-eral’s report criticizing officials for failing to fol-low laws and regulations in the years leading to the hazing death of a drum major. State University System Chancellor Frank Brogan said Wednesday that FAMU officials must pull recommendations from the Board of Governors’ inspector general’s report — released late last month — as well as other reports that examined the university’s finances and accreditation standards, and report to the board on steps they are taking to meet them. “We want to determine, where do we go from here? How do we put of all this together and put it into a coordinated action plan?” Brogan told members of the board after they were presented with the report. “Over time, we will be able to report on what meth-odology, what strategies, what remedial activities Florida A&M has taken to create success in each of those areas.” Drum major Robert Champion died in November 2011 after he was hazed on a bus parked outside an Orlando hotel by fellow members of the famed Marching 100 band, which has appeared at inauguration parades and Super Bowls. Champion was beaten in the haz-ing ritual, and more than a dozen students were charged. The inspector general’s report — ordered shortly after Champion’s death — capped a tumultuous year for the university, which also has endured a crimi-nal investigation into the finances of the Marching 100 as well as the rev-elation that the university trustees were given false audit summaries by uni-versity auditors. FAMU officials say they have already made sweeping changes in the aftermath of Champion’s death, which also resulted in the retirement of the band director and the res-ignation of the university president. The university has until next week to respond to the inspector general’s report. Interim FAMU President Larry Robinson said it was premature to talk about the response. But he told the board that FAMU has revised its anti-hazing policies and increased awareness of them, built an anti-hazing website, and improved the systems for reporting and investigating hazing inci-dents. After the meeting, Robinson said he had no problem providing regular updates to the board. “They are the governing body, and they have the right now to know how things are progressing on these issues,” Robinson said. The Board of Governors’ meeting drew about two dozen FAMU alumni, many wearing the school’s colors, green and orange. Alumna Diane Poole Thomas, a retired teacher, said she was concerned about how the Board of Governors was treat-ing FAMU and that she believed the school’s for-mer president had been belittled by members at a previous meeting. “They didn’t treat him with any respect,” said Thomas, who added that she hadn’t read the inspector general’s report. “There are a lot of posi-tive things going on at the university.” By BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — The Florida Legislature crossed the line between its proper role of setting policy and unconstitutionally dictat-ing labor contracts when it passed a law requiring merit pay for teachers and ending tenure for new hires, union lawyers told a judge Wednesday. An attorney for the state, though, denied the law that was passed two years ago violated teachers’ constitu-tional right to collectively bargain for wages, hours and terms of employment. After the two-hour hearing, Circuit Judge John Cooper said he wasn’t sure when he would rule and he may even ask the law-yers to talk with him again. The attorneys also agreed to submit suggested orders by Jan. 28 and take another week to respond to each other’s proposal. Cooper’s decision, whichever way it goes, is expected to be appealed. The judge said he usually has a good idea of how he’s going to rule by the time a case reaches final argu-ment but not this time. “I guess I’m being asked to be sort of the judicial education czar,” Cooper said. “That’s a little bit uncomfortable.” Florida Education Association lawyer Tom Brooks disagreed but said he understood how Cooper feels. “We’re asking you to tell the Legislature they don’t have the authority to do something that they’ve done,” Brooks said. “That makes you nervous. I don’t blame you.” Brooks, though, said the six teachers who sued simply want Cooper to fol-low settled law. He argued the Legislature has violat-ed the right to collective bargaining in the Florida Constitution by dictat-ing the terms of contacts between school boards and local unions. That includes a teacher evaluation system, 50 per-cent of which must be based on student growth as mea-sured by exams such as the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, or FCAT. The evaluations in turn are used to set performance-based salary schedules. “I’m reminded of the old saw attributable to Henry Ford: ‘You can have any color Model T as long as it’s black,’” said Brooks’ partner, Ron Meyer. “That’s what they say in this stat-ute: You can have a salary schedule that has to look exactly like this.” Michael Mattimore argued for the state that the law passes constitu-tional muster because it doesn’t explicitly prohibit collective bargaining. He also noted that some 60 collective bargaining agreements have been signed between school dis-tricts and local unions since it was passed. “There’s still lots of room for collective bargaining,” Mattimore said. “Collective bargaining exists with this law. It has been successful to date.” The union lawyers argued the law is so restric-tive that it implicitly prohib-its collective bargaining. Cooper asked Mattimore what would happen to con-tracts signed under the law if he should strike it down. “I think we’re inviting labor chaos,” he respond-ed. Brooks, though, said the contracts simply could be renegotiated. Mattimore also argued the individual teachers had no right to sue, contending only collective bargaining units have such authority. Brooks responded that col-lective bargaining is a right granted to each individual employee. Striking down the law could affect the state’s $700 million federal Race to the Top grant, which includes a similar test-based merit pay requirement, Mattimore argued. Meyer contended the two are unrelated and noted the federal grant explicitly requires collec-tive bargaining. The law has been the focus of public debate for years, generating protests from street corners to cyberspace. The Republican-controlled Legislature passed a similar bill in 2010, but it was vetoed by then-Gov. Charlie Crist. The high-profile veto came shortly before Crist quit the GOP and ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate without party affiliation. Crist has since become a Democrat and is considering running for governor again. The 2011 version was the first bill signed into law by Crist’s successor, Republican Gov. Rick Scott. Sting nets felons, drugs and guns TAMPA — Ten convicted felons were arrested and scores of guns and drugs were seized during a six-month long operation focused on a consignment store across the street from a Tampa-area elementary school. Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee announced the arrests Tuesday. The Tampa Tribune reports that the drug and gun transactions took place less than 175 feet away from the school, typically after school hours. During the operation, 34 firearms and 49 silencers were sold to undercover detectives. Officials said the guns removed from the streets include an AR-15, an AK-47-style rifle, a .22-caliber rifle with a silencer, sawed-off shotguns and sniper-type rifles with night vision. Detectives also purchased trafficking amounts of narcotics, crack cocaine and methamphetamines.Allen West to host online show WEST PALM BEACH — You may be seeing more of tea party firebrand Allen West after his ouster for Congress, but don’t expect to see him trying to get his old seat back. The Republican tells Fox News he’ll begin hosting an online TV show called “Next Generation Today.” And he tells The Palm Beach Post Wednesday he has no interest in running for against Rep. Patrick Murphy again in 2014. He did not entirely rule out a run in another district. West narrowly lost to Murphy in his race for a second term.UF lineman charged with theft GAINESVILLE — A University of Florida offensive lineman has been charged with stealing a scooter. Campus police say redshirt freshman Jessamen Dunker was arrested Wednesday morning and charged with vehicle theft, a third-degree felony, and driving with a suspended license, a misdemeanor. Maj. Brad Barber says an officer observed Dunker tailgating a campus maintenance truck Wednesday morning. After seeing that Dunker’s scooter didn’t have a license plate, the officer pulled Dunker over near Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. During the stop, the officer learned that Dunker’s license was suspended and the scooter had been reported stolen.Q Associated Press AROUND FLORIDA Judge hears challenge to teacher law NASA, Europeans unite to plan moon shotBy MARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL — NASA is teaming up with the European Space Agency to get astronauts beyond Earth’s orbit. Europe will provide the propulsion and power compartment for NASA’s new Orion crew capsule, officials said Wednesday. This so-called service module will be based on Europe’s supply ship used for the International Space Station. Orion’s first trip is an unmanned mission in 2017. Any extra European parts will be incorporated in the first manned mission of Orion in 2021. NASA’s human exploration chief, Bill Gerstenmaier, said both missions will be aimed at the vicinity of the moon. The exact details are being worked out; lunar fly-bys, rather than landings, are planned. NASA wants to ultimately use the bell-shaped Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts to asteroids and Mars. International cooperation will be cru-cial for such endeavors, Gerstenmaier told reporters. The United States has yet to establish a clear path forward for astro-nauts, 1 years after NASA’s space shuttles stopped flying. The basic requirements for Orion spacecraft are well understood regardless of the destination, allowing work to pro-ceed, Gerstenmaier said. “You don’t design a car to just go to the grocery store,” he told reporters. Getting to 2017 will be challenging, officials for both space programs acknowledged. Gerstenmaier said he’s not “100 percent comfortable” putting Europe in such a crucial role. “But I’m never 100 percent comfort-able” with spaceflight, he noted. “We’ll see how it goes, but we’ve done it smartly.” The space station helped build the foundation for this new effort, he said. Former astronaut Thomas Reiter, Europe’s director of human space-flight, said it makes sense for the ini-tial Orion crew to include Europeans. For now, though, the focus is on the technical aspects, he said. NASA will supply no-longer-used space shuttle engines for use on the service mod-ules. Reiter put the total European contribution at nearly $600 million. Orion originally was part of NASA’s Constellation program that envisioned moon bases in the post-shuttle era. President Barack Obama canceled Constellation, but Orion was repur-posed and survived. A test flight of the capsule is planned for next year; it will fly 3,600 miles away and then return.“I guess I’m being asked to be sort of the judicial education czar. That’s a little bit uncomfortable.”— Circuit Judge John Cooper

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By CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterNEW YORK — CocaCola became one of the world’s most powerful brands by equating its soft drinks with happiness. Now it’s taking to the airwaves for the first time to address a growing cloud over the industry: obesity. The Atlanta-based company on Monday will begin airing a two-minute spot during the highest-rated shows on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC in hopes of flexing its marketing mus-cle in the debate over sodas and their impact on pub-lic health. The ad lays out Coca-Cola’s record of pro-viding drinks with fewer calories and notes that weight gain is the result of consuming too many calo-ries of any kind — not just soda. For Coca-Cola, the world’s No. 1 beverage company, the ads reflect the mounting pressures on the broader industry. Later this year, New York City is set to enact a first-in-the-nation cap on the size of soft drinks sold at restau-rants, movie theaters and sports arenas. The mayor of Cambridge, Mass., has already introduced a similar measure, saying she was inspired by New York’s move. Even when PepsiCo Inc., the No. 2 soda maker, recently signed a wide-ranging endorsement deal with pop singer Beyonce, critics called for her to drop the contract or donate the funds to health initiatives. New research in the past year also suggests that sugary drinks cause people to pack on the pounds independent of other behavior. A decades-long study involving more than 33,000 Americans, for example, suggested that drinking sugary beverages interacts with genes that affect weight and enhances a person’s risk of obesity beyond what it would be from heredity alone. Michael Jacobson, executive director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, was skeptical about Coca-Cola’s ads and said the company would stop fighting soda taxes if it was serious about helping reduce obesity. “It looks like a page out of damage control 101,” he said. “They’re trying to dis-arm the public.” The group has been critical of the soft drink indus-try and last year released a video parodying Coke’s famous polar bears becom-ing plagued with diabetes and other health problems. Coca-Cola said its ads aren’t a reaction to negative public sentiment. Instead, the idea is to raise awareness about its lower-calorie drinks and plans for the coming months, said Stuart Kronauge, general manager of sparkling bev-erages for Coca-Cola North America. “There’s an important conversation going on about obesity out there, and we want to be a part of the conversation,” she said. In the ad, a narrator notes that obesity “concerns all of us” but that people can make a difference when they “come together.” The spot was produced by the ad agencies Brighthouse and Citizen2 and is intend-ed to tout Coca-Cola’s cor-porate responsibility to cable news viewers. Another ad, which will run later this week during “American Idol” and before the Super Bowl, is much more reminiscent of the catchy, upbeat advertising people have come to expect from Coca-Cola. It features a montage of activities that add up to burning off the “140 happy calories” in a can of Coke: walking a dog, dancing, sharing a laugh with friends and doing a victory dance after bowling a strike. The 30-second ad, a version of which ran in Brazil last month, is intended to address confusion about the number of calories in soda, said Diana Garza Ciarlante, a spokeswoman for Coca-Cola Co. She said the company’s consumer research showed people mistakenly thought there were as many as 900 calo-ries in a can of soda. The company declined to say how much it was spending on the commer-cials, which it started put-ting together last summer. It also declined to give Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 7A7AHEALTH Company wants to shift blame from its drinks. Coca-Cola to address obesity in ads Study: Hundreds of rare disease drugs in testing By MIKE STOBBEAP Medical WriterNEW YORK — How bad is this flu season, exactly? Look to the chil-dren. Twenty flu-related deaths have been reported in kids so far this win-ter, one of the worst tolls this early in the year since the government started keeping track in 2004. But while such a tally is tragic, that does not mean this year will turn out to be unusually bad. Roughly 100 children die in an average flu season, and it’s not yet clear the nation will reach that total. The deaths this year have included a 6-year-old girl in Maine, a 15-year Michigan student who loved robot-ics, and 6-foot-4 Texas high school senior Max Schwolert, who grew sick in Wisconsin while visiting his grandparents for the holidays. “He was kind of a gentle giant” whose death has had a huge impact on his hometown of Flower Mound, said Phil Schwolert, the Texas boy’s uncle. Health officials only started tracking pediatric flu deaths nine years ago, after media reports called atten-tion to children’s deaths. That was in 2003-04 when the primary flu germ was the same dangerous flu bug as the one dominating this year. It also was an earlier than normal flu season. The government ultimately received reports of 153 flu-related deaths in children, from 40 states, and most of them had occurred by the beginning of January. But the reporting was scattershot. So in October 2004, the government started requiring all states to report flu-related deaths in kids. Other things changed, most notably a broad expansion of who should get flu shots. During the terrible 2003-04 season, flu shots were only advised for children ages 6 months to 2 years. That didn’t help 4-year-old Amanda Kanowitz, who one day in late February 2004 came home from preschool with a cough and died less than three days later. Amanda was found dead in her bed that terrible Monday morning, by her mother. “The worst day of our lives,” said her father, Richard Kanowitz, a Manhattan attorney who went on to found a vaccine-promoting group called Families Fighting Flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gradually expanded its flu shot guidance, and by 2008 all kids 6 months and older were urged to get the vaccine. As a result, the vaccination rate for kids grew from under 10 percent back then to around 40 percent today. Flu vaccine is also much more plentiful. Roughly 130 million doses have been distributed this season, compared to 83 million back then. Public education seems to be better, too, Kanowitz observed. The last unusually bad flu season for children, was 2009-10 — the year of the new swine flu, which hit young people especially hard. As of early January 2010, 236 flu-related deaths of kids had been reported since the previous August. It’s been difficult to compare the current flu season to those of other winters because this one started about a month earlier than usual. Look at it this way: The nation is currently about five weeks into flu season, as measured by the first time flu case reports cross above a certain threshold. Two years ago, the nation wasn’t five weeks into its flu season until early February, and at that point there were 30 pediatric flu deaths — or 10 more than have been reported at about the same point this year. That suggests that when the dust settles, this season may not be as bad as the one only two years ago. 100 kids die of flu each year By LINDA A. JOHNSONAP Business WriterWASHINGTON — For the nearly 30 million Americans who suffer from rare diseases, there’s heart-ening news: Drugmakers have been shifting much of their research away from pills for the millions to uncommon disorders that often kill prematurely because there are few or no treatment options. Pharmaceutical and biotech companies are run-ning patient tests of more than 5,400 potential new medicines, including many being tested for multiple conditions. Nearly 1,800 research projects are for rare diseases, and hun-dreds more are for dis-orders for which there’s been no new medicine in a decade or more. That’s according to a study to be released Thursday, spon-sored by the trade group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, known as PhRMA. The study also found that thousands of those experi-mental drugs could be the first in a new medicine class with a unique target or effect, including 45 per-cent of 1,100 drugs that made it to the final patient testing stage. At least 577 use new technologies, from gene therapy to cloned anti-bodies, to precisely target the disease site and limit side effects elsewhere. And at least 155 are part of a long-awaited vanguard of personalized medicine, in which gene variations or other characteristics help doctors determine whether a medicine will help a spe-cific patient. “It’s past due,” but encouraging that drug com-panies are focusing more on rare disorders, said Christy Greeley of Lake Forest, Ill., whose 12-year-old son Jack has a rare genetic metabolic disorder called cystinosis. Just several hundred U.S. children have cystinosis, in which an amino acid accu-mulates into crystals in multiple organs. That can stunt growth and cause thyroid and muscle problems, diabetes and eye damage, even blindness. The crys-tals also damage kidneys, so the children eventually need a transplant. That used to occur by age 10, but tak-ing multiple medicines can delay it into their 20s. Jack was very sick and needed a feeding tube as a toddler. One of the eight medicines he now takes, Cystagon, limits the crys-tal formation, but it causes nasty stomach problems and other side effects. It must be taken every six hours, including a middle-of-the-night dose. “There’s no cure,” said his mother, who hopes for one but says Jack is doing better than many children with rare disorders for which there’s no treatment. They’re getting more attention for several rea-sons. Improved understanding of the biology and genet-ics of diseases is opening up new research avenues. An unprecedented wave of new generic competition for blockbuster pills that brought drugmakers bil-lions each year has nudged them to do more in neglect-ed areas, trying to develop “specialty” or niche drugs meant for much smaller groups of patients but car-rying six-figure price tags. And more companies are taking advantage of grants, tax credits and other incen-tives of the Orphan Drug Act passed in 1983. In the preceding decade, only 10 drugs for rare diseases had been approved, but more than 350 were approved from 1984 through 2011. “In all the years I’ve been working with rare diseas-es, I think this is the most hopeful period I’ve seen,” said Mary Dunkle, who’s worked at the National Organization for Rare Disorders for 14 years. “It’s very encouraging.” The group pushes for research and provides information and help finding financial assistance for patients with more than 7,000 rare disor-ders — conditions affect-ing fewer than 200,000 Americans.ASSOCIATED PRESSThis frame grab from a new commercial from Coca-Cola sh ows an array of the company’s lowand no-calorie pro ducts. The Atlanta-based company on Monday said it will start airin g a two-minute spot in hopes of flexing its marketing musc le in the debate over sodas and their impact on public health. ASSOCIATED PRESSMax Schwolert, a 6-foot-4, 17-year-old Texas high school senior, died from the flu on Dec. 29. Twenty flu-related deaths have been reported in kids so far this winter, one of the worst tolls this early in the year since the govern-ment started keeping track in 2004. Flu Season COKE continued on 8A

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By MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer NEW YORK A large study offers reassuring news for pregnant women: Its safe to get a flu shot. The research found no evidence that the vaccine increases the risk of losing a fetus, and may prevent some deaths. Getting the flu while pregnant makes fetal death more likely, the Norwegian research showed. The flu vaccine has long been considered safe for pregnant women and their fetus. U.S. health officials began recommending flu shots for them more than five decades ago, following a higher death rate in preg nant women during a flu pandemic in the late 1950s. But the study is perhaps the largest look at the safe ty and value of flu vacci nation during pregnancy, experts say. This is the kind of infor mation we need to provide our patients when discuss ing that flu vaccine is impor tant for everyone, particu larly for pregnant women, said Dr. Geeta Swamy, a researcher who studies vac cines and pregnant women at Duke University Medical Center. The study was released by the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday as the United States and Europe suffer through an early and intense flu season. A U.S. obstetricians group this week reminded mem bers that its not too late for their pregnant patients to get vaccinated. The new study was led by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. It tracked pregnancies in Norway in 2009 and 2010 during an international epidemic of a new swine flu strain. Before 2009, pregnant women in Norway were not routinely advised to get flu shots. But during the pan demic, vaccinations against the new strain were recom mended for those in their second or third trimester. The study focused on more than 113,000 pregnan cies. Of those, 492 ended in the death of the fetus. The researchers calculated that the risk of fetal death was nearly twice as high for women who werent vac cinated. U.S. flu vaccination rates for pregnant women grew in the wake of the 2009 swine flu pandemic, from less than 15 percent to about 50 percent. But health officials say those rates need to be higher to protect newborns as well. Infants cant be vac cinated until 6 months, but studies have shown they pick up some protection if their mothers got the annu al shot, experts say. Because some drugs and vaccines can be harmful to a fetus, there is a concern about giving any medicine to a pregnant woman. Study confirms flu vaccine safe in pregnancy 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth G. W. 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Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL Visit our website at www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com 386-719-2540 Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP New Patients New Patients INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I ASSOCIATED PRESS Nicole Andreacchio (second from right), who is seven months pregnant, waits in line to receive the swine flu vaccine from the Montgomery County Health Department at in Maple Glen, Pa. A large study released by the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday found no evidence that the vaccine increases the risk of losing a fetus. details on its plans for the year ahead. But among the options under consideration is putting the amount of activity needed to burn off the calories in a drink on cans and bottles. The company noted that it already puts calorie counts on the front of its cans and bottles. Last year, it also started post ing calorie information on its vending machines ahead of a regulation that will require soda companies to do so by 2014. Coca-Colas changing business reflects the public concern over the calories in soda. In North America, all the growth in its soda unit over the past 15 years has come from lowand no-calorie drinks, such as Coke Zero. Diet sodas now account for nearly a third of its sales in the U.S. COKE: Trying to shift blame from soda Continued From Page 7A

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Blue Bell Ice Cream2/ $ 11 Half Gallon Assorted Flavors Prices good thru 1/31/13 Ice Cream Sandwiches 2/$1 Regular Size Candy 2/$1.50OR75¢ each Products 1.25 Liter Size 3/ $ 3or$1.29 eachCouch Potato Specials! www.morrells.comLake City SW Deputy J. Davis Lane 386.752.3910 or 800.597.3526 SOFA LOVESEAT nrrrrrn;HISL^P[O*OHPYZ WJ8\LLU)LKYVVT:L[ 3VM[)LK @6<9*/60*, ;HISL^P[O*OHPYZr)LUJO ;^PU)LK;^PU)LK *OLZ[*OLZ[+YLZZLYr4PYYVY+YLZZLYr4PYYVY 5PNO[Z[HUK5PNO[Z[HUK BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Fort White High boys soccer vs. Gainesville High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High basketball vs. Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Friday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High basketball vs. St. Augustine High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Vanguard High, 8 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Florida High meet, 9 a.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS FOOTBALL Football banquet today at school The Columbia County Quarterback Club football banquet is 6:30 p.m. today at the school cafeteria. The keynote speaker is Larry Vettel, host of the Larry Vettel show. Tickets are $15 at the door. For details, call Allen Masters at 292-0725. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Alumni game festivities set The Fort White High School Baseball Program is sponsoring the 2nd Annual FWHS Baseball Alumni Game on Feb. 2. Any alumni interested in playing can contact coach Mike Rizzi or Jeanne Howell. There will be a hit-a-thon and fast throw competition starting at 11 a.m. Barbecue pork sandwich plates will be sold for $6 each starting at 11 a.m. The game will begin at 1 p.m. There will be merchandise tables, and all proceeds go to the Dugout Club to help cover costs for middle school, junior varsity and varsity baseball. For details, call Howell at 288-5537. ADULT VOLLEYBALL Interest meeting Sunday at RMS The Columbia County Volleyball Association will hold an organization meeting/open gym day at 1 p.m. Sunday at Richardson Community Center. The purpose of the meeting is to determine the amount of interest in adult volleyball activities in Columbia County. For details, follow Columbia County Volleyball Association on Facebook.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High head coach Isiah Phillips speaks with the Indians during a timeout earlier this season.Undefeated no longerBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIn basketball, sometimes a loss can be a good thing. Fort White High is hoping that’s the case after it suffered its first loss of the year against Bradford High, 71-61. When a team is as hot as the Indians have been, starting the season 11-0, a loss could be used to refo-cus the troops heading for-ward in the season. Fort White head coach Isiah Phillips hopes the loss to Bradford will do just that for his Indians. “It does (refocus us),” Phillips said. “We came out and we weren’t playing team ball. We played like a bunch of individuals and that’s not the way we have played all year.” The individual mentality showed on the scoreboard Fort White suffers first setback of basketball season. INDIANS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 12, Fiambala, Argentina to Copiapo, Chile (delayed tape) GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, first round, at La Quinta, Calif. 4 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, second round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Michigan at MinnesotaESPN2 — Florida at Texas A&M 9 p.m. ESPN — Georgia Tech at DukeESPN2 — South Florida at Rutgers NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — L.A. Clippers at Minnesota 10:30 p.m. TNT — Miami at L.A. Lakers TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, second round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne, AustraliaFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 2OTSan Francisco 45, Green Bay 31Atlanta 30, Seattle 28New England 41, Houston 28 Conference Championships Sunday San Francisco at Atlanta, 3 p.m. (FOX)Baltimore at New England, 6:30 p.m. (CBS) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)College all-star games Saturday RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games New York vs. Detroit at London, England, 3 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Milwaukee at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Miami at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Houston at Indiana, 7 p.m.Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Washington at Denver, 9 p.m.Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 3 Duke vs. Georgia Tech, 9 p.m.No. 5 Michigan at No. 9 Minnesota, 7 p.m. No. 8 Gonzaga at Portland, 10 p.m.No. 10 Florida at Texas A&M, 7 p.m. No. 21 Oregon at Southern Cal, 11 p.m. No. 22 VCU vs. Saint Joseph’s, 9 p.m.No. 23 Illinois vs. Northwestern, 8:15 p.m. No. 24 UCLA vs. Oregon State, 9 p.m.TENNISAustralian Open seeds Wednesday Men Second Round Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3. David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Tim Smyczek, United States, 6-0, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3. Tomas Berdych (5), Czech Republic, def. Guillaume Rufin, France, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 7-5. Nicolas Almagro (10), Spain, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. Stanislas Wawrinka (15), Switzerland, def. Tobias Kamke, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (4), retired. Kei Nishikori (16), Japan, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-1. Sam Querrey (20), United States, def. Brian Baker, United States, 6-7 (2), 1-1, retired. Fernando Verdasco (22), Spain, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. Mikhail Youzhny (23), Russia, lost to Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Jerzy Janowicz (24), Poland, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 6-7 (10), 3-6, 6-1, 6-0, 7-5. Jurgen Melzer (26), Austria, def. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-2. Marcos Baghdatis (28), Cyprus, def. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2. Radek Stepanek (31), Czech Republic, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Julien Benneteau (32), France, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5). Women Second Round Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Misaki Doi, Japan, 6-0, 6-0. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-3, 6-3. Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-1. Li Na (6), China, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-2, 7-5. Sam Stosur (9), Australia, lost to Zheng Jie, China, 6-4, 1-6, 7-5. Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Vesna Dolonc, Serbia, 7-5, 6-0. Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 7-5, 1-6, 6-4. Dominika Cibulkova (15), Slovakia, lost to Valeria Savinykh, Russia, 7-6 (6), 6-4. Julia Goerges (18), Germany, def. Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-2. Ekaterina Makarova (19), Russia, def. Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-3, 6-3. Jelena Jankovic (22), Serbia, def. Maria Joao Koehler, Portugal, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Klara Zakopalova (23), Czech Republic, lost to Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-1, 6-0. Venus Williams (25), United States, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-3, 6-3. Sorana Cirstea (27), Romania, def. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2. Tamira Paszek (30), Australia, lost to Madison Keys, United States, 6-2, 6-1. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 17, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Frontline “Inside Obama’s Presidency” Antiques Roadshow Vintage ash art. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest (:01) Elementary A small plane crashes. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries (N) The Carrie Diaries “Pilot” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce “Ma a” The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsAmerican Idol “Auditions No. 2” Hopefuls perform for the judges. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock “Florida” Parks/RecreatThe Of ce (N) (:31) 1600 Penn (N) (:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Stolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesDateline on OWN “Twisted Faith” (N) Dateline on OWN (N) Lost and Found (N) Dateline on OWN “Twisted Faith” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Body of Evidence” The First 48 The First 48 The First 48: Missing Persons (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy Days Happy Days Happy Days Happy Days Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248AngerAngerAngerAngerAngerAngerAngerAngerArcherLegit “Pilot” Totally BiasedArcher CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist (Part 2 of 2) NBA Tip-Off (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball Los Angeles Clippers at Minnesota Timberwolves. (N) d NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers. (N) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshHouse of Anubis (N) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241 “Walking Tall” (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville, Neal McDonough. iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator MMA Live (Series Premiere) From Irvine, Calif. (N) (Live) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Under the Radar” White Collar A notorious thief returns. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie “Badfellas” Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie“Radio Rebel” (2012) Debby Ryan, Sarena Parmar. (:10) A.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally Jessie “Badfellas” LIFE 32 108 252Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Double Divas (N) Double Divas(:01) Dance Moms USA 33 105 242NCIS “Stakeout” NCIS “Dog Tags” NCIS An agent is gunned down. NCIS “Knockout” Suits “Blind-Sided” (N) (DVS) (:01) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Torque” (2004) Martin Henderson, Ice Cube. A drug dealer frames a biker for murder. “Four Brothers” (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)E 2013 Australian Open Tennis SUNSP 37 -how to Do orida Women’s College Basketball Virginia at North Carolina. (N) Women’s College Basketball North Carolina State at Maryland. (N) Inside Israeli Bask.:58 Flat (N) (Live) DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “Adios, Mr. Still” Property WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryKing of the Nerds (Series Premiere) (N) Conan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansE! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean ItFashion PoliceKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloChelsea Lately T.I. E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHawaii Life (N) Hawaii Life Extreme Homes French bubble palace. House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHome Strange Home TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingFour Weddings (N) What Not to Wear “Tristen” (N) Four Weddings HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ultimate Guide to the Presidents Ultimate Guide to the Presidents Ultimate Guide to the Presidents A growing chasm between rich and poor. (N) (:02) Bamazon “Dangerous Gamble” ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys “Warrior Gator” Rattlesnake Republic Country JusticeNorth Woods Law: On the Hunt (N) Law on the Border (N) North Woods Law: On the Hunt FOOD 51 110 231ChoppedCupcake Wars “Work of Art” Chopped Licorice in the rst basket. Chopped “For Sake’s Sake” Sweet Genius “Samba Genius” (N) Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Left BehindAlways Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -ACC All-Access Women’s College Basketball Virginia at North Carolina. (N) Women’s College Basketball North Carolina State at Maryland. (N) Inside the MagicThe Movement SYFY 58 122 244Haven “Burned” Haven “Last Goodbyes” Haven Audrey searches for a killer. (N) Haven Duke faces off against the Killer. Continuum “A Stitch in Time” Haven Audrey searches for a killer. AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “The Karate Kid” (1984, Drama) Ralph Macchio. “The Wedding Planner” (2001, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez, Matthew McConaughey. (:31) “Jerry Maguire” (1996) Tom Cruise. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowSouth Park Tosh.0 Kroll Show Workaholics It’s Always SunnyIt’s Always SunnyDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Encounters” “The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. Premiere. The Princess Bride NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererTiger DynastySecrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” Secrets of Wild India “Tiger Jungles” Sloth BearsSecrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” NGC 109 186 276DiggersAbandonedUltimate Factories “Coca-Cola” Brain Games “Watch This!” Rocket CityRocket CityDiggersAbandonedRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Scorned: Love Kills Scorned: Love Kills Fatal Vows A couple has dark secrets. The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) FrenemiesFrenemiesFatal Vows A couple has dark secrets. HBO 302 300 501 “Happy Feet Two” (2011) Voices of Elijah Wood. ‘PG’ Promised Land “Green Lantern” (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. ‘PG-13’ Girls Enlightened Katie Morgan, SexReal Sex MAX 320 310 515(:15) “Collateral” (2004, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx. ‘R’ (:15) “Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang” (2005) Robert Downey Jr. ‘R’ “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig. ‘NR’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) “The Three Musketeers” “The School of Rock” (2003, Comedy) Jack Black, Joan Cusack. ‘PG-13’ “High School” (2010, Comedy) Adrien Brody, Sean Marquette. ‘R’ Gigolos Gigolos INDIANS: From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kody Moniz (22) retains control of the b all while playing against Hamilton County High on Jan. 8.Fort White High soccer runs win streak to four From staff reportsFort White High’s boys soccer team ran its win streak to four games with a 2-1 win at Palatka High on Tuesday. Anthony Gonzalez got the Indians on the board with a goal assisted by keeper Steven Giardina. It was the 12th goal of the season for Gonzalez, who is tied for the team lead with Billy Whitney. Gonzalez leads the Indians in assists with nine. Matt Otto scored the winning goal on a penalty kick in the 55th minute. Coach Pete Blanchard credited Otto with “provid-ing some solid defense to help secure the win.” Fort White finished District 5-2A play with a record of 3-6-1 and will play Interlachen High at 5 p.m. Tuesday in the opening round of the tournament. Keystone Heights High is top seed and tournament host. Fort White (7-8-2) has a formidable task to finish the regular season at .500. The Indians host Gainesville High at 6 p.m. today.Lady Indians soccerFort White’s girls soccer team hung with host Santa Fe High for a half in the opening round of the District 5-2A tournament on Monday. However, the Lady Raiders turned a 2-1 half-time lead into an 8-1 rout. Lync Stalnaker scored an unassisted goal for Fort White in the 19th minute. The district championship game is 7 p.m. Friday. as Fort White fell behind by its biggest deficit of the season going down 15-0 to start the game against the Tornadoes. Fort White battled back, but never cut the lead to less than six throughout the rest of the game. The Indians were led by Jaylen Wyche with 15 points in the contest. Still, the Indians are sitting pretty heading into the final stretch of the regular season at 11-1 (7-1, district). “We’re still on top and everyone has at least two or three losses,” Phillips said. The Indians try to get back on track when host-ing Union County High at 7:30 p.m. tonight. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida’s Michael Frazier II (20) hopes to protect a rebou nd against Georgia’s Tim Dixon (5) and John Florveus (32 ) during a game on Jan. 9. Florida hosts Texas A&M at 7 p.m. tonight in Gainesville.

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DEAR ABBY: My grandmother is 75 years old and, unfortunately, very unpleasant to be around. She has made many hurt-ful remarks in the past, which have led some fam-ily members to shut her out of their lives. I live in another state and don’t see my grand-mother very often. I call her once or twice a month. When I do, she’s nothing but pleasant with me, but she’s often angry and tear-ful about other members of the family. She feels her children and grandchildren should respect her as the matri-arch of the family and include her in all family get-togethers. (My family tells me they have stopped inviting her to many func-tions because she’s such a troublemaker.) I’m concerned about my grandmother and am beginning to think that my parents and siblings should overlook her unpleasant behavior and occasional snide remarks. At the very least they should include her in important family func-tions. I’d be interested in your opinion, so I can share it with my fam-ily. -TROUBLED IN MINNESOTA DEAR TROUBLED: Your grandmother appears to be reaping what she has sown. Verbal abuse often leaves scars on those at whom it is aimed, and no one can be blamed for wanting distance from a person who is deliberately hurtful. Respect is something that has to be earned. Your parents and siblings “respect” your grandmoth-er from a distance because they have learned it’s the only safe way to do so. Does this mean she should automatically be excluded from all fam-ily get-togethers? No. However, before she’s invited to an important event, she should give assurances that she’ll watch her mouth and be on her best behavior. Or else. If this seems heavyhanded, so be it. It’s no crime to protect oneself from someone else’s mean-spiritedness. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Please allow me to share a dating technique with your read-ers that has saved me a lot of relationship headaches. I call it “the 90-day rule.” Whenever I start dating someone, I try to see them at least once a week for 90 days. That way, if there are any character flaws, I find out within the first 90 days. Among the flaws I’ve discovered: drug dealing and addiction, alcoholism, driving without a valid license and with illegal license tags, and lying about their occupation. The idea is to avoid sexual intimacy during those first 90 days to keep your head clear. If you are intimate too soon, you’ll find yourself making excuses for your partner. This technique has never failed me -unless I made an exception. May I suggest your readers try this 90-day rule? If they do, I promise they won’t be disappointed because it takes TIME to get to know someone. -CLEARHEADED IN CLEARWATER, FLA. DEAR CLEARHEADED: Your 90-day rule makes a lot of sense. I have heard from many readers who went too far too fast because they felt they had made an instant emotional connection. I warn them that physical attraction should not be confused with love because what they’re really describing is infatuation. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t give in to emo-tional blackmail. You must stand up for your rights. A change may be necessary in order to get back on track and reach old goals that have been stifled due to other people’s demands. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take charge and get on with what needs to be done. Travel if it will help you reach your goals. Someone from your profes-sional past will offer you a favor you should consider. Making a geographical move will improve your quality of life. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Add new skills to your resume. Communication and education will go hand-in-hand, allowing you to pick and choose from a wider variety of options available to you in your area. Don’t sell yourself short when you have so much to gain. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Just because some-one else makes changes doesn’t mean you should. Evaluate your situation and consider how you can take advantage of what others give up or leave behind. Recycle, redo and reuse, and you will establish a better position. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A change at work should push you to take action before you end up in an awkward position. Don’t set limits on what you can do. Waiting for things to happen instead of making them happen will be your downfall. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Attend an entertaining function that will lead to encounters that can alter your future positively. If you can imagine some-thing, you can turn it into a reality. Don’t gamble, but do invest in your skills, tal-ents and future. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t feel guilty about the way you feel. Put any-one trying to control you in place so that you can take advantage of a course, event or challenge that helps you advance. You will appreciate someone from your past and should reconnect if possible. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Mix and mingle with people from different back-grounds. Remembering past experiences will help you understand a situation you face now. Nurture a relationship that you cher-ish before it’s too late to salvage. Say what’s on your mind. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Look for adven-ture. Getting together with people who share your love of life will also help you recognize what you need to incorporate into your life in order to enjoy it more. Mix business with pleasure and see what hap-pens. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Question your associates as well as your own motives before you make a move that can alter your life permanently. Check the possibility of altering the way you approach something or someone and you will find a way to make a necessary transition smoothly. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Discuss your feelings and address issues from your past that you have yet to resolve. Clearing your mind from worry and regrets will help you realize what you want to do next. It’s never too late to make a change or revisit a goal. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do for others and you will receive a reward or favor that will help you out financially or contractually. Follow your intuition and you could come across an unlikely choice or situation that will turn a past loss into a winning situation. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Grouchy grandma talks her way out of family events Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JANUARY17, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-072-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporation,Plaintiff,vs.DAVID L. ELLIS and MARIAL. ELLIS, husband and wife, Defendants,CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, Court-room 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on February 6, 2013, the following described property:Begin at a point on the North line of the South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 20, Township 3 South, Range 17 East, at its intersection with the East line of State Road No. 82 where same now extends and run East 400 feet for a Point of Beginning; run thence South 300 feet; thence East 295 feet; thence North 300 feet; thence West 295 feet to a Point of Beginning. Same being a tract of land 295 feet East and West and 300 feet North and South and lo-cated in the South 1/2 of the North-east 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Sec-tion 20, Township 3 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.DATED: 1/4/13P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536773January 17, 24, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-382-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA, a Banking corporation organized under the laws of theUnited States of America, f/k/a FIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDAPlaintiff, vs.JAMES W. FICKEN, MARTHAD. FICKEN andFLORIDACREDITUNION, ETAL,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE is hereby given that P. DEWITTCASON, Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-ida, will on the 30 day of January, 2013 at 11:00a.m. at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 N. E. Hernando Avenue, in the City of Lake City, Florida 32055, of-fer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described proper-ty situated in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:Lot 6 and the East half of Lot 7, Country Creek, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 81, of the public re-cords of Columbia County, Florida.Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pend-ing in said Court, the style of which is as set out above, and the docket number of which is 12-382-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 4 day of Janu-ary, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, Florida/s/B. ScippioBy: Deputy ClerkSEAL05536772January 17, 24, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase # 2010-CA-000609The Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York, as successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Trustee for the Certificate holders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II, Inc. Bear Stearns ALT-ATrust, Mort-gage Pass-Through Certificates Ser-ies 2005-10Plaintiff,-vs-John V. Hiatt a/k/a John Hiatt, Indi-vidually and as Trustee of the Family Trust of John V. Hiatt and Julie Hi-att, dated June 27, 206; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for CTX Mortgage Company, LLC; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants.Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 12/27/12, en-tered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000609 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York, as successor Trustee to JPMorgan Change Bank, National Association, as Trustee for the Certificate holders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc. Bear Stearns ALT-ATrust, Mort-gage Pass-Through Certificates Ser-ies 2005-10, Plaintiff and Family Trust of John V. Hiatt and Julie Hiatt dated June 27, 2006 are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, P. DEWITTCA-SON, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE COURT-ROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LO-CATED AT173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on 2/13/13, the follow-ing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:LOT29, COUNTRYSIDE ES-TATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 8, PAGES 1 AND 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact the ADACoor-dinator; 173 Northeast Hernando Street, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32056; (386) 719-7576 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTColumbia County, Florida/s/ B. ScippioDEPUTYCLERK OF COURTSEAL05536779January 17, 24, 2013 REGISTRATION OFFICTITIOUS NAMESWethe undersigned, being duly sworn, do hereby declare under oath that the names of all persons interest-ed in the business or profession carried on under the name ofPERFORMANCE RESEARCH HOLDINGS, 6797 SWTUSTE-NUGGEE AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32024Contact Phone Number: (352) 333-0939 and the extent of the interest of each, is as follows:Name: KURTD. MAPHURSExtent of Interest: 100%by:/s/ KURTD. MAPHURSSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF ALACHUASworn to and subscribed before me this 14TH day of JANUARY, A.D. 2013.By:/s/ KRISTIE WALDRON05536838JANUARY17, 2012 PUBLIC AUCTION 2005 CHRYVIN# 2C4GM68485R287288CREAMER’S WRECKER SERVICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.LAKE CITY, FL32055COLUMBIACOUNTY386-752-2861SALE DATE: FEBRUARY4, 20138:00 AM05536865January 17, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 122012CA000088XXXXXXBANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP.,Plaintiff,vs.KOREYJ. KELLEY; et al,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALEPURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated 1/2/13, and entered in Case No. 122012CA000088XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, is Plaintiff and KOREYJ. KELLEY; BERNICE C. KELLEY; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFEND-ANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-ESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the Courthouse Steps f the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Street, Lake City, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of February, 2013, the following descri-bed property as set forth in said Or-der or Final Judgment, to-wit:SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EASTCOMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NORTH-EAST1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, WHICH IS ALSO THE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF LOT4, BLOCK 12, LAKE FORESTUNITNO. 4, PLATNO. 1 RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE S 8822’00” W,283.64 FEETTO THE EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF MCFARLANE AVENUE, AND APOINTON ACURVE; THENCE SOUTHERLYALONG SAID EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE ALONG SAID CURVE CONCAVE TOTHE WESTHAVING ARADI-US OF 5689.58 FEETAND ACEN-TRALANGLE OF 208’25”, AN ARC DISTANCE OF 212.56 FEETTOA4”X4” CONCRETE MONUMENTATTHE P.C. OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 009’42” E, STILLALONG SAID EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 209.72 FEETTO THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF ARREDONDO STREET; THENCE N 8830’26” W, ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 110.00 FEET; THENCE S 022’11” E, 600.12 FEETTO THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF ELPRADO STREETAND THE POINTOF BE-GINNING; THENCE N 8830’26” E, 137.50 FEETTO APOINT; THENCE S 000’00” E, 300.4 FEETTOTHE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF GRANDVIEWAVENUE; THENCE ALONG AND WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF GRANDVIEWAVENUE, S 8830’26” W, 135.56 FEETTO APOINT; THENCE N 022’11” W, 300.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-sons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court no later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Columbia County Courthouse. Tele-phone 904-758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service.DATED at Lake City, Florida, on 1/2/13.P. DEWITTCASONAs Clerk, Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536776January 17, 24, 2013 Public Auction1998 FORDVIN# 2FMDA5146WBA492211997 CHRYSLERVIN # 1C4GP64L4VB2796612005 DODGEVIN#1B3ES26C25D1127791988 MERCVIN # 3MABM1355JR641639Tobe held 1/30/2013, 8:00am at Bryant’s Tire and Towing 1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL3205505536852JANUARY17, 2013 LegalNOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S AUTO SERVICE gives Notice ofForeclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 1/30/2013, 08:30 am at 2550 SWMAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes.JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the right to accept or reject anyand/or all bids.2B3HD56M32H1372682002 DODGE2FALP73W8TX1156531996 FORD05536770JANUARY17, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000497JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION,Plaintiff,vs.CHRISTINE SUMMERLIN, et al, Defendant(s),NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated January 3, 2013 and entered in Case No. 12-2011-CA-000497 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALAS-SOCIATION is the Plaintiff and CHRISTINE SUMMERLIN; TER-RYSUMMERLIN; TENANT#1 N/K/AORLANDO ABREUS, and TENANT#2 N/K/AANNAABREUS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTSTEPS OF THE COLUM-BIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00a.m on the 6th day of Febru-ary, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT16, BLOCK A, GRAND VIEWVILLAGE, UNIT2, ASUBDIVI-SIONACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6,PAGE 157 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, LegalFLORIDAA/K/A960 ALEXANDRABOULE-VARD SW, LAKE CITYFL32025Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the LIs Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on January 7, 2013.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIn Accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court administra-tor whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813)774-8124 ; 1-800-955-8771 Legal(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (Y), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05536765January 17, 24, 2013 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JANUARY17, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$2,990 386-623-2848 1994 Chevy SilveradoExt. cab, stepside, 8 cyl., PW, PDL, AM/FM cass., CD stereo, rear sliding glass, very clean.$5,500 386-288-6102 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900 386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 122009CA000808CAXXXXBAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS,Plaintiff, v.JESSICAD. CASSELL; JOHN D. CASSELL; ANYAND ALLUN-KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS; STATE OF FLORIDADE-PARTMENTS OF REVENUE; AND UNKNOWN TENANT/S OWNERS N/K/ALISADILL,Defendant(s).AMENDED NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Amended Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated 11/20/12, en-tered in Civil Case No. 122009CA000808CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court will sell to the highest bid-der for cash on 23rd day of Jan., 2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:LOT5, BLOCK 7, COUNTRYCLUB ESTATES REPLATAC-CORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file aclaim within 60 days after the sale.ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIESIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assis-tance.Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 20TH DAYOF NOV., 2012/s/ B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDASEAL05535989January 10, 17, 2013 100Job OpportunitiesAuto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 General Office & Bookkeeping Microsoft Office Word, Quick Books Proficient Punctual & Able to Follow Established Procedures. Salary Requirement & Resume to: P.O. 830 Lake City, Florida 32056 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc Temporary Farm workers. Scenic View Orchards, Sabillsville, MD. Must be able to work outside in heat., cold, and inclement weather from Feb 15th Nov 30th, Planting, maintenance and harvesting of fruits, hay, and vegetables. 3 months experience required. Tools provided. $10.34/hr, 40 hrs/wk, 3/4’s guaranteed, 8 openings. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site provided upon completion of 50% work contract. Housing provided if not local. Contact State Workforce Agency 301-393-8218 using job order #MD260966 Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical EmploymentDIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldog 1 yr old, 110 lbs, spayed and neutered, shots,Free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right HomeGHT HOME Small dachshund mix, short hair. Very energetic. 1 yr old PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions PERSONALPROPERTY AUCTION Sat. Jan. 19, 9:00 AM 544 NWBert Ave. Lake City, FL '49 Mercury 2 Dr, '71 Chev C-10 SWB 350/ 3 spd, '99 Harley Sportster, 20' Enclosed Car Hauler w/winch and side door, Utility Trailer, 10K Automotive Lift, Numerous Lots of Snap-On, Mac & Craftsman Hand Tools, Tool Chests, Saws, Grinders, Welders, Elect. Wheel Chair and Carrier, Generator. Chain Saw, Much More! Cash, Appr. Cks, Visa/MC 10% Buyer's Premium Preview : Fri Jan 18, 9am-4pm Directions : From US 90 & I-75, go west on US 90 2 mi to Brown Rd., Turn Rt, go 2 mi to Bert Ave on Rt. Follow Signs Info and Photos www.elrodauctions.com Elrod Auctions AB 1698 904-699-7067 407Computers Complete Dell Computer $50.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales 2 Family Yard Sale 8am to Noon, Rain or Shine, 601 SWBroderwick Rd, LC Off Highway 47 HUGE MOVING SALE SATONLY, 8-NOON EMERALD LAKES 243 Northwest Zack Drive, LC Hugh Indoo r yard Sale Everything must go, Fri & Sat 8 am ?, 1206 SWMain Blvd, LC PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Kenmore full size dryer, White, Works Great $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Kenmore Roll around dishwasher. Several options. Works great. $125 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 Wellborn Church of God is selling 18 brown padded church pews for $25 each. Contact 386-752-8479 or 386-623-1348 White Frigidaire Frost Free Refrigerator. Works great. Clean. $175 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 White GE Electric Stove Works Great $135 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. Dep & referrences For more info. 386-965-3477 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3/2 Mobile Home on 1/2 ac. Needs TLC, great investment, located in Glenn St. Mary. MLS# 82570, Results Realty $67,000. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Palm HarborHomes Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go Save Up To 35K 800-622-2832 ext 210 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 New Listing. Short Sale Spacious 3BR/2BADWMH, in a Quiet Country Neighborhood on 1.1 Acre Lot. MLS 82426 $49,900 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 NICE 2/2 SWAND 740 sf frame house/studio/outbuilding, country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinance 4/2 on 2.5 acres, south of LC, small down $850 mth 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $575 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 1BD/1BA$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Call Chris 386-365-2515 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentNICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Immaculately in 55+ Community of Eastside Village. 3BD/2BA. MLS 81332 $120,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Large indoor pool comes with this rare find. Large home with plenty of space. MLS 81966 $150,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptionally Maintained Brick Home in Crest Point. 3/2, Open Kitchen. Elaine Tolar $149,000 386-365-1548 MLS #81426 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 4BR/3BApool home on 10 acres. Front and back porch. Fenced ready for your horses or cows. MLS 82562 $199,900 Established Emerald Lake Subdivision. Split floor plan, Fantastic Outdoor living. MLS 79733 $169,900 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 810Home forSale Historic/Vintage. Totally remodeled. Great home or office space MLS 80242 $65,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Charming rustic log cabin 2BR/1BAwith solar panels. Wood burning stove & gas range. Pole Barn MLS 81761 $99,900 Beautiful Home, separate dining room, large Master Suite. Open Kitchen. MLS 81910 $179,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Callaway S/D 3BR/2BA, 2250sf, .5ac, gas FP, Bamboo & tile flooring. #82470 $189,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1452sf, 1.004ac. Completely Remodeled! 2 story workshop/storage & more. #81192 $116,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1482sf, 8.7acr, tiled baths, FLroom, 2 detached storage bldgs. fenced & cross fenced. #79950 $149,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Tri-Level in Town 4BR/2BA, 1883sf, .501ac, newer kitchen w/all appl’s included, family room #80607 $144,900 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 3BR/2BA, 1386sf, .151ac, fam rm, liv rm, dining open to living & kitchen, screen back porch. #82446 $78,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, 4BR/2BA, 1940sf, .25ac, newer metal roof, A/C, windows, siding, water &heater & soffits. #82187 $99,000 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Investment Opportunity, Office Building lots of exposure. Just Reduced. MLS 79694 $69,900 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 860Investment PropertyColdwell BankerBishop Realty Mobile Home Park w/ lots of Potential. Needs some TLC. MLS 81507 $159,000 Elaine K. Tolar 365-1548 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty In-Town location. 3/2, Open and Spacious Living Area. MLS 82609 $99,900 Sherry G. Ratliff 365-8414 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 880Duplexes Large 2BD/2BAwith W/D hookup, fresh paint, Convient location $650 mth 386-867-9231 940Trucks 1994 Chevy Silverado, extended cab, step side, 8 cyl. power windows & locks, rear sliding glass. Very Clean 164,773miles $5,500 386-288-6102 2001 Dodge Ram 3500, V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/ tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900. Call 984-6606 or 758-6800 950Cars forSale 2001 Burgundy ALTIMAvery cold a/c, 140,000 miles, leather, 6 change cd, sunroof. $3,500 listed below blue book, 386-288-6877 No exception, will be pleased, changed oil on time. We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445

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