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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01999

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01999

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Big changes for Britney. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ...............2B, 5B 80 56 Patchy and a.m. fog WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 Vol. 138, No. 249 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Rountree Mooreto introduce newNissan showroom. Friends of Music to continue concert series in Live Oak. SUNDAYEDITION 3A 1C 1A NAACP branch president oustedBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comBernice Presley has been removed as the Columbia County NAACP branch president, a state NAACP official confirmed Friday. Dale R. Landry, president of the Tallahassee branch NAACP and fourth vice president of the Florida State Conference NAACP, said during a telephone call that Lynda Thomas has been named president of the local branch. He declined to say why Presley had been removed from office less than a month into her term, referring additional questions to the NAACP national head-quarters. A reporter for the Lake City Reporter was present at the NAACP meeting during which it is believed Presley was removed on Thursday, but was ordered to leave by Thomas before the meeting began. Thomas, who was elected first vice president during the orga-nization’s bi-annual election in December, is now president. Patricia Brady is now first vice president and Debra White is second vice president. Presley declined comment.Thomas did not return calls seeking comment. Calls to the national NAACP headquarters on Friday regarding Presley’s removal as local branch president were not imme-diately returned. Bernice Presley removed after less than a month in office; no reason given. CAMPUS USA continued on 6A NAACP continued on 6A Presley Girls on wheelsJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLake City Girls Club members Kiley Craig (from left), 8; Taylor Collins, 9; Jordan Tessier, 8; and Brianna Canno n, 8; race on scooters while playing at the club on Friday. 2 juveniles face burglary chargesFrom staff reportsA citizen’s tip to the sheriff’s office resulted in the arrest of two teenagers who were allegedly attempting to burglarize a Lake Jeffery Road home. Authorities arrested a 15-year-old and a 17year-old in connection with the crime. Both juveniles were booked into the Columbia County Detention Center Wednesday on charges of burglary and dealing in stolen property. Their names were not released. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s reports, a concerned citizen noticed a suspi-cious vehicle and person at their neighbor’s home and notified the Sheriff’s Office. When deputies arrived they discovered the home had been burglarized and a television and other items were stolen. The witness provided authorities with a description of the suspicious vehicle, a white Ford Crown Victoria with a police-style spot-light. BURGLARY continued on 6ADEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterThe current location of Campus USA Credit Union on Basco m Norris Drive in Lake City. Campus USA will move to a new location later this y ear.Credit union plansnew location hereBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Campus USA Credit Union is planning to expand its services in Columbia County by opening a new, full-service location later this year. Jerry Benton, the Campus USA Credit Union vice president and chief operations officer, said the prop-erty purchase for a new location is very recent and a timetable for opening has not been established yet. “We closed on the two-plus acre property in December,” he said in an e-mail Friday. “Tentatively we plan to open in the fourth quarter of 2013. However, a schedule has not been established.” Campus USA credit union is a full-service Flu haspeaked,but stillpacks apunch By MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressFlu is now widespread in all but three states as the nation grapples with an earlier-than-normal season. But there was one bit of good news Friday: The number of hard-hit areas declined. The flu season in the U.S. got under way a month early, in December, driven by a strain that tends to make people sicker. That led to worries that it might be a bad season, following one of the mildest flu seasons in recent memory. Meally Jenkins, of Lake City, spent loads of time at the Lake City Mall while organizing for the Christmas Dream Machine. She said she caught the flu on Dec. 3. “I went home and slept 17 hours. I was sick, sick, sick,” she said. “Best thing for you to do is get plenty of liquids and rest.” The latest numbers, however, hint that the flu season may already have peaked in some spots, like in the South. Still, officials there and in other places are bracing for more sickness. Administrators at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, are fearful that a bug that hit employees will spread to students when they return to campus next week. “Everybody’s been sick. It’s miserable,” said school Fewer cases here lately, says local health dept. head. FLU continued on 6A Jenkins Karnes Land

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Frances Sternhagen is 83. TV personality Nick Clooney is 79. Actor Billy Gray is 75. Actor Richard Moll is 70. Rock musician Trevor Rabin is 59. Rhythm-and-blues musi cian Fred White is 58. Rock musician James Lomenzo (Megadeth) is 54. Actor Kevin Anderson is 53. Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus is 52. Daily Scripture CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 15-23-28-33 20 Friday: 7-25-27-35-36 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-8-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 4-1-3-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 19-20-24-27-42-51 x4 Gov. Scott gets taste of food company work MIAMI Gov. Rick Scott has gotten a taste of work at Goya Foods. Scott loaded trucks, filled in on quality control and warehouse jobs and stocked shelves at a super market with Goyas Latino food products on Friday in Miami. It was yet another of Scotts Lets Get to Work Days. They are patterned after similar everyday jobs that became a trade mark of former Gov. and ex-U.S. Sen. Bob Graham. Scott uses his work days to promote Florida indus tries and keep in touch with his constituents. He also took advantage of the Goya job to boost his proposal for exempting purchases of manufactur ing equipment from the states sales tax. That would cost the state $115 million a year, but Scott says it would encourage businesses to expand and create new jobs. State records compromised TALLAHASSEE State officials say the theft of a mobile device at a Florida Department of Juvenile Justice office has com promised thousands of records that include per sonal information. The DJJ reported the security breach to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement on Friday. On Jan. 2, the DJJ report ed the theft of a mobile device containing youth and employee records to the Tallahassee Police Department, which is cur rently investigating the theft. The DJJ also notified the Office of Information Security. Officials say the device was not encrypted or pass word-protected as required by the DJJs technology policy. The DJJ said more than 100,000 records may have been compromised. Ex-con helps struggling deputy NEW PORT RICHEY A man with a criminal past came to the aid of a Pasco County Sheriffs deputy who was in a vio lent struggle with a man he was taking to jail. Authorities say 35-yearold Anthony Stinnett was at a convenience store on Jan. 4 when he saw a patrol car pull up. Stinnett told the Tampa Bay Times he heard loud thumping before the cars window shattered and Osvaldo Flores jumped out and attacked Deputy John Brown. Stinnett says he ran across the parking lot and pried Flores handcuffed arms away from Browns throat. Flores tried to run, but Stinnett tackled him. Stinnett and Brown held him down until backup arrived. Flores remains in jail. Pasco Sheriff Chris Nocco plans to recognize Stinnett during an awards ceremo ny next week. Citrus crop forecast reduced ORLANDO The U.S. Department of Agriculture is lowering its Florida cit rus forecast by 3 percent this season. Agriculture officials said Friday that Florida will produce an estimated 142 million boxes of citrus dur ing the 2012-2013 growing season. Agricultural officials say forecasting is an imperfect science and this years rainfall and disease made predicting the crop espe cially tricky. The majority of the decrease in the estimate is coming from Valencia oranges which decreased 3 million boxes to 76 mil lion boxes. Early-to-midseason oranges decreased 1 mil lion boxes to 66 million boxes. Each box of oranges weighs about 90 pounds. Nearly 800 to hunt pythons MIAMI Nearly 800 people have signed up to hunt Burmese pythons on public lands in South Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is holding a month-long Python Challenge and offer ing cash prizes to who ever brings in the longest python and whoever bags the most pythons. The hunt startsed Saturday and ends Feb. 10. The Burmese python is an invasive species that experts say is decimat ing native wildlife in the Florida Everglades. Florida currently pro hibits possession or sale of the pythons for use as pets. Federal law bans the importation and interstate sale of this species. For the first time, the public is joining licensed hunters in the search for the snakes. Officials hope the com petition will help rid the Everglades of the invaders. State GOP outraises Dems TALLAHASSEE Florida Republicans continue to outraise the states Democrats despite Democratic success at the polls. Campaign reports filed on Thursday showed that the Republican Party of Florida raised nearly $2.2 million in cash dona tions, while the Florida Democratic Party took in just over $424,000. The reports cover money taken in by the parties from Nov. 2 until Dec. 31. LOS ANGELES B ritney Spears capped a week of changes Friday with a judge accepting the resignation of her former fiance from the conservatorship that oversees many of her personal and financial matters. Jason Trawick submitted his resignation and it was accepted by Superior Court Judge Reva Goetz on Friday afternoon, when the singer announced her engagement had ended, only hours after she con firmed she was leaving the Fox com petition show The X Factor. Spears and Trawick got engaged in December 2011 and he was added as her co-conservator in April. Jason and I have decided to call off our engagement, Spears said in the statement. Ill always adore him and we will remain great friends. Spears publicist Jeff Raymond said the breakup was a difficult deci sion made by two mature adults. I love and cherish her and her boys, and we will be close forever, Trawick said in a joint statement that was first reported by People maga zine. Spears has been under a courtsupervised conservatorship since February 2008, with her father and another co-conservator, Andrew Wallet, having control over numer ous aspects of her personal life. The case was opened after several incidents of erratic behavior by the pop singer and a pair of hospitaliza tions, but Spears has recovered and recently served as a judge on Foxs The X Factor. Spears informed the network this week that she would not return next season and planned to focus on her music. Trawick and Spears were engaged in December 2011 and he was appointed a co-conservator along with her father, Jamie, in April. Kimmel says he expects to run 3rd in late night LOS ANGELES Jimmy Kimmel says he expects to settle in at third place in the ratings behind Jay Leno and David Letterman, even as one week of direct com petition suggests a healthy competition. There were backstage smiles at Kimmels Los Angeles studio Friday after Nielsen ratings showed the ABC comic had his largest audience ever on Thursday. This is the first week for Jimmy Kimmel Live in the 11:35 p.m. time slot, directly competing with Leno on NBC and Letterman on CBS. Hackers sentenced for Jackson music theft LONDON A pair of U.K. hack ers has been sentenced to 100 hours of community service for the theft of unreleased Michael Jackson tracks from Sony Music Entertainment. Officials say that music aficio nados James Marks and James McCormick used their home com puters to break into Sonys U.S. servers and scour them for Jacksonrelated material. Britains Serious and Organized Crime Agency says the pair down loaded nearly 8,000 files, including completed or partial tracks, artwork, and videos. The 27-year-old Marks and 26year-old McCormick were arrested in May 2011 after Sony alerted U.K. law enforcement to the breach. Chat logs recovered from their computers showed that they planned to sell or trade some of the files. They were handed suspended sentences and ordered to do com munity service at central Englands Leicester Crown Court on Friday. Britney Spears endures week of changes Wednes day: 11-13-20-27-59 PB 26 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A So in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith, for all of you who were bap tized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. Galatians 3:26-28 Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Britney Spears and her then-agent Jason Trawick arrive at the MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles in August 2011. Spears announced this week that her engagement to Trawick has ended, and a judge said Trawick resigned as her coconservator. Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Warriors ride Wounded war veterans, including Army Staff Sgt. Russell Dennison, front left, and British soldier Steve Gill, front center, across the Seven Mile Bridge on Friday near Marathon. About 40 vets most of whom lost limbs in Iraq and Afghanistan and their supporters joined in the ride down segments of the Florida Keys Overseas Highway during Soldier Ride. The event is staged by the Wounded Warrior Project to help restore injured soldiers physical and emotional well-being. Kimmel

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 3A3A Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting The Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership and the Columbia County Health Department have come together to form a partnership in order to create a tobacco free community. The partnership focuses on policies that effect our youth. In the New Y ear, we would like to focus on multi-unit housing cessation programs and promote the various tobacco cessation programs available to our community. We invite all communi ty members, service workers, and school aged youth to attend the upcoming meeting to discuss toba ccorelated issues in our county.Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting&HQWUDO6FKRRO%RDUG2IFH5RRP7KXUVGD\-DQXDU\:HVW'XYDO6WUHHW/DNH&LW\)/7LPHSPAll partnership meetings are open to the public. For more information on how to make a difference in your community through your local Tobacco Free Partnership, please contact : Lauren PinchouckColumbia County Health DepartmentRU/DXUHQB3LQFKRXFN#GRKVWDWHXV SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans ?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND” Friends of Music continues in Live Oak LIVE OAK The Friends of Music Concert Series is scheduled this season in Live Oak at Covenant First Presbyterian Church, 421 White Avenue,SE. All concerts are free and open to the public. A reception will follow each concert. The first concert will be presented by The Alachua Consort (oboist, violinist, and pianist), on Saturday, Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. The Consort is a group of musi-cians from North Central Florida that specializes in chamber music of the Baroque era. They will be performing music of French Baroque compos-ers on the 26th. John Netardus, oboist, has been a resident and part of the musical com-munity of Gainesville since 1979, when he accepted a scholarship to attend the University of Florida, where he studied oboe with Mark S. Ostoich. Mr. Netardus has performed with the Pensacola Symphony, the Jacksonville Symphony, the Central Florida Symphony, and the Gainesville Chamber Orchestra, as well as various other ensembles through the years. He is a founding member of the Baroque trio Alachua Consort, the pop combo Amusica, and the Florida Schola Cantorum vocal ensemble. He may also frequently be found locally in the role of classical location record-ing engineer. Annemieke Pronker-Coron, violinist, studied at the Amsterdam Sweelinck Conservatory in her native country, the Netherlands. She also studied music therapy in London. A former member of the Gainesville Chamber Orchestra, Ms Pronker-Coron teaches violin and fiddle. She is an active promoter of music in the community, having helped inaugurate the Sawgrass Fiddle con-test and the Annasemble, an orchestra under her musical direction. She teaches a string program at Einstein Montessori School, and plays electric violin with the Greek band, EMBROS. Her research in different musical styles led her to a course in New York City with Mark O’Connor, and she now teaches his New American Violin Method. Miriam Zach, Ph.D. musicologist, organist, harpsichordist, author, and transformative researcher, teaches Honors Music and Health, Music History courses, and in Spring 2012 a new French Music and Texts course with Dr. Sylvie Blum-Ried at the University of Florida. She serves as Director of Music/Organist at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Associate Organist at First Lutheran Church, and member of The Alachua Consort. After completing degrees at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, she lived in Germany teaching piano at the Universitat Bielefeld, singing in the Kantorei St. Nicolai in Lemgo, studying organ with Jobst-Hermann Koch, and was organist for the British Army of the Rhine-Church of England. She has toured Europe with her husband, Dr. Mikesch Muecke, with whom she edited the book, Resonance: Essays on the Intersection of Music and Architecture (2007), taught in Rome, Italy, Spring term 2011, and Architecture and Music honors courses at Iowa State University. She was named International Woman of the Year (1992 & 1997) by the International Biographical Centre in Cambridge, England for her disginguished service to music. The second concert of the 2013 season will bring back to the area, The Graffe String Quartet of the Czech Republic. Japanese-born pianist, Michiko Otaki, will join them for part of the program. The Graffe String Quartet will perform at Covenant First Presbyterian Church in Live Oak on Thursday, February 14, at 7:30 pm. For more information contact Bill or Linda Poplin at 386-365-4932 or 386-365-4941. COURTESYThe Alachua Consort will perform Saturday, Jan, 26, at 7:30 pm. in Live Oak as part of the Friends of Music Concert Series. Life-saving effortsCOURTESYOn Thursday, two Columbia Columbia County Sheriff’s dep uties were honored for their actions in providing life-s aving care. Deputies D.J. Clay (left) and Scott Staley were presented the Medal of Distinction by Sheriff Mark Hunter in a ceremo ny attended by family, friends and coworkers. The awards citati on read: “For rendering life-saving techniques during a suicide attempt. Without their quick intervention the victim could hav e died from their injuries. Their actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of law enforcement and reflect great credit upon themselves and the Columbia County Sheriff’s Offic e.” Staley and Clay encountered the victim with a self-inflicted lace ration and bleeding profusely, sheriff’s officials said They acted immediately to render first aid to the victim until emergen cy medical units could arrive. The victim would have su ffered greater injury or death had they had not intervened so quickly, officials said. From staff reportsThe Governing Board of the Suwannee River Water Management District on Jan. 8 approved an agree-ment with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to expand the partnership-based Mobile Irrigation Lab Services. The MIL is part of the ongoing efforts between the Suwannee River Partnership and the agricultural com-munity to assist farmers in irrigation efficiencies. The MIL provides free water conservation evaluations to the farmer. The MIL in the District is being expanded to address the enhanced water conserva-tion and water quality improvement efforts in the Suwannee River and Santa Fe River basins. The MIL services provide site-specific expertise in analyzing irrigation systems and educating property owners on how to improve water conservation and are free to the farmer. In 2012, the MIL conducted 171 site-specific evaluations covering more than 16,000 acres that identified a potential water savings of over 900 million gallons within the District. The expanded partnership-based agreement will provide for about 20 additional pre-evaluations and post-evaluations at a funding level of $40,000. This increase effort will save an estimated 179 million gallons of water annually or just under 0.5 million gallons per day.Water district expands irrigation lab services From staff reportsThe construction on US 41 in White Springs is expected to switch gears Monday from sidewalk and drainage work to paving as part of the 16-mile resurfacing project in Hamilton County from US 129 to the Columbia County line. Work began in October with one crew replacing sec-tions of side-walk, curb and ditch pavement in town, while a second crew removed and replaced the top layer of asphalt from just north of White Springs to US 129 south of Jasper. Paving begins Monday in White Springs near the entrance of the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park and con-tinues south to the Columbia County line at the Suwannee River Bridge. Crews will then turn around and pave the northbound lane. Motorists can continue to expect day-time lane closures Monday through Friday after 8:30 a.m. and possibly some weekend construction. Anderson Columbia Company, Inc. of Lake City is doing the work for FDOT at a cost of $4.4 million. The work is expected to be completed by early March, depend-ing on weather conditions and other unex-pected circumstances. For additional information regarding this project or other FDOT projects around Northeast Florida, visit www.nflroads.com or call 800-475-0044. Paving of US 41 to beginMonday in White Springs

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4AEDIT OPINION Sunday, January 13, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A D r. Fritz Fountain, a 1955 Columbia High School graduate, a first-class scholar and a veteran of nearly 50 years in the pastoral ministry, wrote a fine fiction book in 2009, “Gradually Forgetting Righteousness.” It is about a town where evil got control. Here is Dr. Fountain’s description of his book: “It is a story of a rural southern county where a corrupt sheriff is arrested and sent to prison. The appointed sheriff, who is a believer in Christ, attempts to create a respect for the law among a population where — for generations — evil has been like an heirloom, handed down from parents to children; where most of the people are ‘on the take’ or want to be, and superficial Christianity is a ‘hobby’ that is practiced widely but not well.” The book was published by Crossroads, 1663 Liberty Drive, Bloomington, IN 47403, www.crossbooks. com. The book costs $20 and you can buy one by call-ing Dr. Fountain at (386) 754-3770. By the way, Dr. Fountain knew from an early age that he would go into the ministry. His picture in his high school yearbook honoring him as “Most Likely To Succeed,” shows him holding a Bible. He was our county’s first elementary school counselor (at Melrose Elementary) and is cur-rently a licensed family therapist, living in Lake City.Blanche questionOur city engineer, Henry Shelton, is also a historian. He is working on a local historical paper and wants to know the last year the Blanche Hotel was a hotel. In other words, what year did the Blanche cease operations as a hotel? If you know even an approximate date, call me at 386-755-8183 and I will tell Henry.Lakes followupLast week’s column was about Lake City’s lakes, and I got two light-hearted calls about two of the lakes. A man called about Lake Hamburg, prede-cessor name to Lake Montgomery. I had said it was named after a local family named Hamburg. Not true, he says, tongue in cheek. In fact he said the name was actually Lake Hamburger. Local sewage was dumped into the lake, he said, and some of the material bonded and looked like “cow patties” (to put it del-icately,) which resembled hamburger patties, thus Hamburger Lake. I’m sure the Hamburg family will be glad to get that information The other caller wonder ed how I could write about Gwen Lake without mentioning “Skeeter Hill,” a lover’s lane on the north side of the lake some 60 years ago where, the call-er said, she did her first serious kissing. It turned out that lots of people remember “Skeeter Hill!”Lake City 1901A few things going on in our town in 1901: City government was trying to keep cows from running in the city streets; a pauper’s list was published weekly in the paper listing the names and amounts received by people on “welfare”; a person was arrested for the serious crime of using profanity at the train sta-tion; the city used inmates from the jail to remove the hyacinths from Lake DeSoto; and the Columbia County Light Infantry was called to Jacksonville to preserve martial law dur-ing the great fire of 1901.Taxi rideA man tells this story: “Two days before Christmas, I was out for an evening with friends and had too much to drink so I took a cab home. “Sure enough, on the way home, there was a police roadblock, but since it was a cab, they waved it past. I arrived home safely without inci-dent. “All this was a real surprise to me because I had never driven a cab before! I don’t even remember where I got it, and now that it’s in my garage, I don’t know what to do with it. All reasonable offers will be considered.” Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman H elp is still available for those suffering in the wake of Tropical Storm Debbie. Volunteers from World Renew, formerly the Christian Reformed World Relief Committee, will be here through Wednesday to identify the continuing needs of flood victims. The volunteers, who can be identified by their green shirts with the World Renew logo, have been here and in neighboring Suwannee County since Monday. To see how they can help, visit the walk-in center at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., or call 438-8621. Volunteers have already gone door-todoor in many affected areas, but if they haven’t gotten to you, be sure to let them know you’re here and still need help. TS Debbie victims, take note Dr. Fritz Fountain’s novel OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Q Associated Press HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1733, James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrived at Charleston, S.C., while en route to settle in present-day Georgia. In 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. (The number of stripes was later reduced to the original 13.) In 1864, composer Stephen Foster died in a New York hospital at age 37. (In his pocket: a note that read, “Dear friends and gentle hearts.”) In 1898, Emile Zola’s famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, “J’accuse,” was published in Paris. In 1945, during World War II, Soviet forces began a huge, successful offensive against the Germans in Eastern Europe. In 1962, comedian Ernie Kovacs died in a car crash in west Los Angeles 10 days before his 43rd birthday. In 1966, Robert C. Weaver was named Secretary of Housing and Urban Development by President Lyndon B. Johnson; Weaver became the first black Cabinet member. In 1978, former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey died in Waverly, Minn., at age 66. In 1982, an Air Florida 737 crashed into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and fell into the Potomac River after taking off during a snowstorm, killing a total of 78 people; four passengers and a flight atten-dant survived. Lessons from the past for Democrats T he start of the new year, and also of President Barack Obama’s second term, is a good time to pause for perspective on the sources of the current politi-cal constellation in our country. To help understand the recent national electoral success of Obama and the Democratic Party, study Al Smith. Who?Alfred E. Smith was governor of New York State and the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee in 1928. He was also the first Roman Catholic candidate to be chosen for national office by a major party. He was buried in the enormous Republican election landslide that carried Herbert Hoover to the White House, and reinforced that party’s strong grip on majorities in both houses of Congress. Hoover at the time was the most popular political figure in America. He was a gifted engineer and highly effective executive who got things done. Vast programs of humanitar-ian relief for Europe in the wake of World War I, and for the Mississippi River valley in the wake of devastat-ing floods in 1927, were overseen by this leader, who was also above reproach in personal ethics. However, in 1928 Smith won the twelve biggest cities — beginning with New York and ending with Los Angeles — with an overall plural-ity, reversing previous Republican dominance in these areas. Samuel Lubell, a brilliant journalist as well as scholar, insightfully describes the phenomenon in his book “The Future of American Politics,” pub-lished in 1952. Not surprisingly in that different time, a quarter-century before the modern South began developing, all of the largest cities were in Northern states. Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami and other centers of Southern national political as well as economic influence had not yet emerged. In the North, newly arriving immigrants from Europe had suffered severely from intense ingrained ethnic bigotry. The Irish in particular experienced devastating discrimina-tion by dominant groups. Immigrants found relief through Democratic Party local organiza-tions, using resulting practical leverage to gain desperately needed employment in the fire and police departments, and other city services. Those jobs could be tedious as well as dangerous but brought regular pay, and usually involved some security. After World War II, the big cities were challenged and then overcome by the rapidly expanding suburbs. Earlier rural-urban divisions faded. In 1960, suburbs for the first time had a plurality of the electorate. By 1992, the suburbs held a majority. Successful Democratic presidential nominees John F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton demonstrated strong appeal in the suburbs. In the 1950s, popular commentaries often casually referred to the suburbs as Republican, but that was not actually true. They were more Eisenhower suburbs — the incred-ibly popular Republican Dwight Eisenhower carried them as he did the rest of the country. Suburban residents, however, did not com-pletely abandon the Democratic sympathies of their parents and grandparents. Every post-World War II president except Eisenhower has run into seri-ous trouble during his second term. Re-elected presidents, and associates, should remember the adage of ancient Rome — “All glory is fleeting.” Arthur I. Cyr Q Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College. Email him at acyr@carthage.edu.

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Jan. 13 Music concert The Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. Baseball tryouts The Columbia Timber Rattlers 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 2 p.m. at the Southside Baseball Complex (blue fields). For details, call Jason Dumas at 965-8530 or Todd Gustavson at 365-2133. Jan. 14 SCORE workshop SCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educa tional materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun seling with SCORE volun teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com. Budgeting workshop Columbia County Extension will have a work shop, Budgeting Basics and Credit Repair, from 6:30 to 7:30 pm. The dead line to register is Jan. 11. It is the first in a series of Living Well workshop to be held on the second Monday of each month. Cost is $10 per person for the year, $15 per couple or $3 a session. Workshop will be at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. To register or for more information, contact Jenny Jump at (386)752-5384. Grief support group Haven Hospice will have a grief support meeting each Monday for six weeks at 11 a.m. at Haven Suwannee Valley Care Center, 6037 West U.S. 90. There is no charge. For more informa tion, call (352) 692-5123. Republican Women The Columbia Federated Republican Women will meet at 7 p.m. at Beef OBradys in the meeting room. Come at 6 p.m. to eat before the meeting. For more information, call Betty Ramey at (386) 9354111. Jan. 15 Pageant entries Today is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal ent and photogenic catego ries. The pageant awards include educational schol arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 9652787. Historical Society The Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The topic will be the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. NARFE meeting The National Active and Retired Federal Employees will meet at 1 p.m. in the LifeStyle Enrichment Center at 628 SE Allison Court. Guest speaker will ve Cody Gray, represent ing the Blue/Gray Army, to talk about the upcoming Olustee Festival. For more information, call Jim Purvis at 752-8570 or 292 9361. Art League meeting The Art League of North Florida will meet at 6:30 pm at First Presbyterian Church on US 90 west. The community is invited. There will be refresh ments, fellowship, a short meeting and speaker. The speaker this month is Don Sloan, well known teacher and artist, who will demon strate the simplicity of tem pera paint. Kailey Kiss will assist, presenting a demon stration of art techniques for tempera. Sloan is an art teacher at Lake City Middle School. He has a BEF in art education from the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. His hobbies include restoring old cars and trucks, fishing and painting swamps and Florida wildlife. March of Dimes lunch The March of Dimes will hold its March for Babies Kickoff luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the CountryClub of Lake City, 717 NWFairway Drive. Team captains accompanied by their CEOs will receve March for Babies T-shirts. For more information, call (386) 755-0507 or email kmccallister@ marchofdimes.com. Jan. 16 Festival planning The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Soil testing Columbia County Master Gardeners do free soil test ing each Wednesday morn ing at the Columbia County Agricultural Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Drop off soil samples at the office during normal work hours; leave name and a phone number, so you can be called with the results. For more informa tion, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408. Disaster assistance World Renew will be in Columbia and Suwannee counties will have walk-in centers through today, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., to assist households affected by Tropical Storm Debbie. Suwannee County resi dents can visit the walk-in center at Suwannee County Emergency Management, 617 Ontario Avenue SW, Suite 200, in Live Oak. Columbia County resi dents can visit the walk-in center at Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, in Lake City. World Renew is sponsored by the Suwannee County Long Term Recovery Group and the Suwannee Valley Long Term Recovery Committee, convened by United Way of Suwannee Valley. Call the Suwannee County center at (386) 364-3405 or the Columbia County center at (386) 438-8621. Jan. 17 Retired educators Columbia County Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. at the School Board Adult Center, room 120. For more information, please contact Will Brown at 752-2431. Propagation class Columbia County Master Gardeners will give a class on propagation at 5:45 p.m. at the Fort White Library. Learn to increas plant stock by cuttings, root division and seeds. For more infor mation, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408. Jan. 18 Medicare information SHINE will present a program about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. Music concert Southern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. For tickets or more information, visit www.fgcentertainment. com. Randy Wilford Johns Randy Wilford Johns, 56, of Lake City, passed away peacefully at the Suwannee Haven Hospice in Lake City. He was born and a life long residence of Lake City. He was the son of the late Wilford S. Johns and Shirley Vaughn Johns. He was a salesman for MillerBearing Co., Inc., in Gainesville. He was survived by his lov ing wife: Sandra Gale Statham Johns. Sister Marlilyn (Tommy) Brock of Palatka, 6 Brothers: Kirby (Diane) Johns of Lake City; Gary Johns; Boogie Johns all of LaCrosse and David Johns of Lake City, and Ron nie Johns (Jessica) of Labelle. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 P.M. in the Archer Memorial Chapel in Lake Butler, with Rev. Bill follow in Mt. Zion Cemetery, under the care of ARCHER FUNERAL HOME. The fam ily will receive friends at the funeral home from 6 to 8 P.M., Friday evening. 386-496-2008Paula Ann Magee Mrs. Paula Ann Magee 66, died Wednesday January 9, 2013 at the Select Specialty Hospital in Gainesville, FL after an extended illness. She was the daughter of the late Leon and Jewell Good win Murray. She had made Lake City her home for the past fortythree years after moving here from Safety Harbor, FL; she was a member of Pine Grove Baptist Church. She was a care taker for the children of Guardian Ad enjoyed being and playing with her grandchildren and making and collecting porcelain dolls. Mrs. Magee is survived by her husband of forty-three years George Magee, Lake City, FL; one son Leon Magee, Lake City, FL; and one daughter Paulette Linder (Richard) Clearwater, FL; two grandchildren Dalton Wayne Magee and Rebecca Lynn Magee. Also surviving is her uncle Jack Goodwin (Kay) Portsmouth,VA. Cremation arrangements are under the direction of DEES-P ARRISH F AMILY FUNERAL HOME in Lake City, Fl. a memorial service will be held at a later date.458 South Marion Avenue Lake City, FL; 32025. 1(386) 7521234. Please sign guess book at www.parrishfami lyfuneralhome.com.Robert Lee Wilsey Robert Lee Wilsey, Colonel Bob passed away 12-23-2012. Born in Live Oak, FL on June 16,1929. Raised in Jacksonville, FL, graduated from Andrew Jackson High School. After attending Bradley Uni versity College of Horology in Peoria, IL, he pursued a career as a watchmaker and jeweler for the next 57 years. He is survived by his sister: Janet Roberts of St. Petersburg, FL.; his 3 children: Stephen, Phillip, Cynthia; and stepdaugh ter Robin; nieces: Laura Rob erts Carroll and Mary Roberts Bowers, as well as and many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. He was a Veteran, having served in the Army as Sergeant for two years in Korea. He was greatly loved and will be missed by many, his family, his church family, and his Lake City family. A memorial service was held at the VA Chapel on Dec. 27, 2012, Pastor Robert Johnson presiding. Arrangements were by A DESIGN CREMA TION LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 5A 5A Employee Name Yrs Job Title Vernon M. Parsons 40 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Rudy D. Nyssen 30 Manager, Materials Management Willard Cribbs, Jr. 25 Area Foreman Bruce D. Ford 25 Utility Operator Darryl L. Franklin 25 Chief Operator James C. Hughes 25 Heavy Equipment Operator Bernard K. McCullers 25 Utility Operator William D. Newell 25 Comb A/C Man Elec Tech III Jamie L. Bowen 10 Shift Foreman Production Jonathan H. Carver 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III Allen V. Corbin 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III John A. Creech, Jr. 10 Mechanic First Class Alfred A. Deas 10 Radio Tech/Ins/Man/Tech III Monroe N. Dunaway 10 Chief Operator Phillip D. Franklin 10 Heavy Equipment Operator Jackie C. Gaylard 10 Supervisor, Accounts Payable Mona D. Gillen 10 Sr. Maintenance Assistant William G. Godwin 10 General Foreman Clayton J. Goolsby 10 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Nathan A. Griffin 10 Computer Network Specialist Jerald C. Harrell, Jr. 10 Dragline Operator Samuel E. Hawkins 10 Tank Farm Operator Zemillar Laura Hayes 10 Flotation Operator Darrin C. Howard 10 Mobile Mechanic First Class Keith L. Howell 10 B Operator Bennie J. Morris 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III William J. Moseley 10 Utility Operator Thomas E. Musgrove 10 Chief Operator Evan C. Nichols 10 Utility Operator Elton D. Peacock, Jr. 10 Area Foreman John M. Peeler, Jr. 10 Tank Farm Operator Larry L. Robinson 10 Nurse/ Paramedic Robert N. Skinner 10 Mechanic First Class Anthony L. Smith 10 Combination Repairman Michael L. Smith 10 Utility Operator Anthony D. Staley 10 Chief Operator David L. Swilley 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III Brian R. Townsend 10 Large Dragline Oiler George P. Townsend 10 Heavy Equipment Operator Kenneth Tutt 10 Maint Planner Scheduler Craig R. White 10 Mechanic First Class Timothy Wiggins, Jr. 10 B Operator Clifford Y. Bean 5 Utility Operator Richard C. Eatmon 5 Combination Repairman Jesse Griffin 5 Combination Repairman Amber R. Grinstead 5 Buyer/Coordinator Lisa A. Hook 5 QA Tech B Justin P. Hughes 5 C Operator Kenneth C. Hutcherson 5 Utility Operator Ethan W. Kirby 5 Heavy Equipment Operator White Springs 2012 3 rd & 4th Quarter Service Awards At PotashCorp-White Springs, we celebrate with our of service. It is the experience, strong work ethic and leadership of these men and women that allow us to excel in all that we strive to accomplish. Their commitment to safely mining and manufacturing products that supply plant nutrients to help feed a hungry world ensures that we meet one of the PotashCorp Goals of No Harm to People or the Environment. As General Manager, I know that our employees are our greatest resource. I would like to take this opportunity to thank these employees for their dedication, strong work ethic and years of service. Sincerely, Terry L. Baker, General Manager Sandals ...20-30% off WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Shirts & Jackets Boots...Boots...Boots GALORE Tumblers Lake City/ 352-374-4534 426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 Programs starting as low as 4 weeks for Medically Supervised Programs Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com.

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spokeswoman Ritter Hoy. Mark Lander, administrator for the health departments in Columbia and Hamilton counties, said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say this years vaccine is a good match for this years flu, which means that it is more likely to provide protection to people that have been vaccinated. “We’re in the middle of the season,” Lander said. “We’re not near the end.” Columbia and Hamilton counties saw a spike in the number of cases starting in December, but the health departments have seen fewer cases lately, Lander said. “We’re still having activity, but seeing less cases,” Lander said. “The flu is still here.” While the flu vaccine doesn’t necessarily mean full protection, Lander said its still provides a degree of protection. “As a public health reminder, if you haven’t already had a flu shot, we recommend that you get one,” he said. “Getting the flu shot is one of the best ways to prevent getting the virus.” Flu was widespread in 47 states last week, up from 41 the week before, the CDC said Friday. The only states without widespread flu were California, Mississippi and Hawaii. The number of hard-hit states fell to 24 from 29, where larger num-bers of people were treated for flu-like illness. Now off that list: South Carolina, Florida and Arkansas in the South, the first region hit this flu season. Angela Land, of Lake City, caught the flu last June and had was so sick she had to go to the hospital. “It just came on all of a sudden,” she said. Her doctor told her that she should get a flu vaccine when flu season comes around, which she did early in December. Recent flu reports included holiday weeks when some doctor’s offic-es were closed, so it will probably take a couple more weeks to get a better picture, CDC officials said Friday. Experts say so far say the season looks moderate. “Only time will tell how moderate or severe this flu season will be,” CDC Director Thomas Frieden said Friday. The government doesn’t keep a running tally of adult deaths from the flu, but estimates that it kills about 24,000 people in an average year. Nationally, 20 children have died from the flu this season. John Karnes, of Wellborn, was at the Lake City Mall with his wife Jennifer. He said he was vaccinated recently but has a cold now. “I just got the flu shot last saturday and come down with (a cold) satur-day,” he said. He said whatever he has, it’s not nearly as bad as the flu. He said he doesn’t feel bad and isn’t vomiting but he’s congested. Flu vaccinations are recommended for everyone 6 months or older. Since the swine flu epidemic in 2009, vaccination rates have increased in the U.S., but more than half of Americans haven’t gotten this year’s vaccine. Nearly 130 million doses of flu vaccine were distributed this year. Derek Gilliam contributed to this story. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246APresley was elected in mid-December following a public dispute with Debra White, her opponent in the race. Presley filed a police report alleging White approached Presley and her husband in an aggressive manner in her car in a parking lot after an NAACP meeting Nov. 19. Presley told police the incident put her in fear of her life and later sought a restraining order against White. According to a Lake City Police Department incident report, Presley said White was upset at the thought of Presley becoming NAACP president. White, who was represented by an attorney supplied by the NAACP, clamied Presley sought the restraining order to keep her from attending official NAACP func-tions, including the election of officers. The restraining order was denied. The Nov 19 meeting had been scheduled to vote on a new president, but was delayed by order of national NAACP officials after reports surfaced that pre-elec-tion procedures had not been followed. The election was rescheduled for Dec. 15. Presley won, 16 votes to 13. CAMPUS USA: New location planned Continued From Page 1A NAACP: President oustedContinued From Page 1A FLU: Worst may be over here, official says Continued From Page 1A BURGLARY: Two chargedContinued From Page 1Afinancial institution offering best-of-market rates on auto loans, mort-gages, credit cards, savings and CDs. Campus USA has 14 service centers in North Central Florida far north as Tallahassee and locations as far south as Summerfield. Campus USA is headquartered near Newberry. The company was chartered in 1935 and has been in business for more than 75 years. Benton said the new Campus USA credit union will be located on U.S. Highway 90, on the south side between Sandlin Way and Sisters Welcome Road. “We hope to begin construction in the first half of 2013,” he said. Campus will build its prototypical full service branch office at the new site. The office will be approximately 4,500 sq. ft. with a 24-hour ATM, drive-through and ample parking. “The Lake City and Columbia County community has embraced the financial services offered by Campus USA Credit Union,” Benton said. “Campus is committed to serving the financial needs of the residents of Columbia County and wants to show that commitment by investing in a new full service branch location. We are specifically excited about offer-ing drive-through capabilities in this market.” Benton said Campus officials have been working on plans for a new loca-tion in Columbia County for a couple of years. “The biggest enhancement (of the new location) will be the addition of drive-through lanes,” Benton said. “Also, this site will offer more visibil-ity and easier access.” Campus USA Credit Union opened in Lake City in July 2002. That branch, at 183 SW Bascom Norris Drive, will be closed when the new one opens.From staff reportsColumbia County Relay For Life organizers received an unexpected financial boost Thursday night when Phish Heads Restaurant owners Toni, Philip and James Crenshaw donated $3,600 to the local cancer awareness program. Several of the restaurant’s customers came out to the check presentation, along with members from the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, to watch as the donation was made. Kim Nicholson, Columbia County Relay For Life volun-teer, said the funds donated by the Phish Heads res-taurant owners were from one fundraiser they hold annually in support of fam-ily and friends that have had cancer who touch their lives personally. “Save the TaTa’s is a project they have been doing for years as a very close friend of theirs lost her bat-tle to breast cancer and this is one way to remember and honor her,” Nicholson said. “We have so many of our friends and customers that are battling this disease or have in the past and we want them to know we are always here for them,” Toni Crenshaw said. During October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Phish Head’s has a private room where a female cus-tomers can create a piece of art in honor of breast cancer awareness month. “It is so fun to see how creative our customers care,” Toni Crenshaw said. More than a hundred tapestries were made and then auctioned off in November. In 2011 this fundraiser raised around $1,000, and it 2012 it raised $3,600. “The success of the event was helping to bring aware-ness to our community and by donating the funds raised to the American Cancer Society, knowing our future may have a cure for cancer in it,” Nicholson said. If you would like to get more information on the Relay for Life please con-tact Kim Nicholson (local volunteer chair) at (386) 288-2871 or krnicholson1@yahoo.com. The Relay For Life event will take place 6 p.m. April 26 at Columbia High School.COURTESY Phish Head’s restaurant owners recently donated $3,600 to the Columbia County Relay for Life event. Attending the don ation ceremony were: Toni Crenshaw (front row from left), Philli p Crenshaw, Kim Nicholson and Lindsey Greenockle; and back row (from left) James Crenshaw, Kathy Williams-Gidden, Tony G idden, Stephanie Roberts, Tony Roberts and Dennille Deck er. Sheriff’s deputies immediately began searching for the vehicle. Sgt. Pete Spurlock saw a vehicle that matched the description parked on Southeast Lomond Street. Spurlock and detective Martin Lee attempted to speak with the vehicle’s occupants when one of the suspects fled on foot. After a brief foot chase, deputies were able to take the suspect, a 15-year-old male, into custody. Deputies discovered some of the stolen proper-ty in the suspect’s vehicle and on his person, accord-ing to reports. A subsequent investigation led to the arrest of another suspect, a 17-year-old male. Both juveniles were arrested and taken to jail, reports said. The recov-ered stolen property will be returned to the owner. “Additional arrests are expected as this investiga-tion moves forward,” said Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office public information officer. “The quick apprehension of these burglary sus-pects would not have been possible without the assis-tance of the citizen whom was concerned enough to call law enforcement,” Seifert said in a prepared statement. “Anyone that observes suspicious activ-ity in their community is urged to contact law enforcement. Citizens may also report criminal activ-ity and/or tips to Crime Stoppers of Columbia County at 754-7099. Callers to Crime Stoppers will always remain anony-mous and may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000.” Phish Heads donates $3,600 to Relay By MIKE STOBBEAP Medical WriterNEW YORK — Some key things to know about the flu season: THE SITUATION: The annual flu season hit about a month early this year, and illness is now wide-spread in 47 states. Many cases are caused by a flu strain that tends to make people sicker. But so far experts say it’s too early to know whether this will end up being a bad season. Maybe not: There are signs the flu may have already peaked in a few states, though it’s too early to tell for sure, health officials say. THE VACCINE: This season’s vaccine is well matched to the circulating strains, and there’s still some available. It is 62 per-cent effective, according to gov-ernment study results released Friday, which is pretty good for a flu vaccine. Health officials are urging people to get vaccinated; it’s recommended for everyone 6 months or older. THE DEFENSE: Besides getting a flu shot, wash hands with soap and warm water, and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Keep away from sick people. THE TREATMENT: Most people will get a mild case and can help themselves and protect oth-ers by staying home and resting. But people with severe symptoms should see a doctor. They may be given antiviral drugs or other medications to ease symptoms. COLD OR FLU?: Influenza is not the only bug making people sick. The cold virus and a nasty stomach virus are also going around. It can sometimes be hard to tell the difference, but cold symptoms include stuffy or runny nose, sore throat and sneezing. Flu usually involves fever, along with chills, headache and mod-erate-to-severe body aches and tiredness. Symptoms can come on rapidly, within three to six hours. Key things to know this flu season“As a public health reminder, if you haven’t already had a flu shot, we recommend that you get one.”— Mark Lander, health department administrator, Columbia and Hamilton counties Florida to spend $60M from banks settlementAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Some of Florida’s share of a national $25 billion set-tlement with five of the nation’s largest mortgage lenders is finally going to start being spent.But it’s unclear how imme-diate and how wide of an effect the money will have in one of the states hard-est hit by the foreclosure crisis and the recession.A legislative panel next week is expected to sign off on spending $60 mil-lion — or the first portion of $334 million Florida received directly under the settlement. This is money going directly to state government and is separate from an estimat-ed $8 billion also expected to go to help homeown-ers and borrowers in the state.Under a deal worked out between Attorney General Pam Bondi and legislative leaders, the $60 million will be used to help first-time homebuyers and to provide counseling to homeowners who are dealing with foreclosure and default.

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By ANDREW MIGA Associated Press WASHINGTON Conservatives and watch dog groups are mounting a not-so-fast campaign against a $50.7 billion Superstorm Sandy aid package that Northeastern governors and lawmakers hope to push through the House this coming week. Their complaint is that lots of the money that lawmakers are consider ing will actually go toward recovery efforts for past disasters and other proj ects unrelated to the lateOctober storm. A Senate-passed ver sion from the end of the last Congress included $150 million for what the Commerce Department described as fisher ies disasters in Alaska, Mississippi and the Northeast, and $50 million in subsidies for replanting trees on private land dam aged by wildfires. The objections have led senior House Republicans to assemble their own $17 billion proposal, that when combined with already approved money for flood insurance claims, is less than half what President Barack Obama sought and the Senate passed in December That $17 billion pack age will be brought to the floor by the House Appropriations Committee, and Northeast lawmakers will have a chance to add $33.7 billion more. House Speaker John Boehner intends to let the House vote on both measures. Hes respond ing both to conservatives who are opposed to more deficit spending, and to Govs. Andrew Cuomo, DN.Y., and Chris Christie, R-N.J., who are irate that the House hasnt acted sooner. Critics are taking the sharpest aim at $12.1 bil lion in the amendment for Department of Housing and Urban Development emergency block grants. Any state struck by a federally declared major disaster in 2011, 2012 or this year would qualify for the grants, and thats just about all the states, said Stephen Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, a bud get watchdog group. Only South Carolina, Arizona and Michigan would not qualify, he said. Thats not a bad chunk of change, particularly if you are trying to get other lawmakers to vote for the bill, Ellis said. State and local govern ments like block grants because they provide more flexibility in how the money is spent. The money can go toward a variety of needs, including hospitals, utilities, roads, small businesses and rent subsidies. The Northeast law makers $33.7 billion amendment also includes more than $135 mil lion to help the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration improve weather forecasting. A lot of the money goes to government agen cies to rebuild rather than helping people actually afflicted by Sandy, Ellis said. Before getting to the aid measures, the House on Monday planned to con sider legislation intended to streamline Federal Emergency Management Agency regulations that critics blame for slowing down recovery efforts. That bill would let FEMA make limited repairs instead of lease payments to provide housing that might be less expensive than traditional agency trailers. A $60.4 billion storm aid package passed by the Senate in December included $188 million for an Amtrak expansion proj ect with an indirect link to Sandy: Officials say that new, long-planned tunnels from New Jersey to Penn Station in Manhattan would be better protected against future flooding. The Club for Growth, a conservative group, com plained the Senate bill was overpriced, full of pork and would swell the fed eral deficit because other government programs werent being cut to cover the costs of the legislation. That bill expired with the old Congress on Jan. 3. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 7A 7A Florida Department of Elder Affairs Acceptable Standard For Patient-Reported Pain Reduction 2012 havhos_006989_tri_county_ad_HP_LCreporter_11.indd 1 1/4/13 8:37 AM By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON The U.S. trade deficit expanded in November to its widest point in seven months, driv en by a surge in imports that outpaced only modest growth in exports. The Commerce Department report Friday suggests trade will drag on economic growth in the October-December quar ter. A wider trade gap slows growth because it means Americans spent more on foreign products while U.S. businesses earned less in overseas sales. Still, the report showed consumers have maintained an appetite for spending. They kept buying iPhones and other imported goods in November, despite high unemployment and low wage growth. A strong rebound in imports is not necessarily all bad for the U.S. econo my because it indicates that consumers are spending. It shows the private sector is not dead, said Gregory Daco, senior economist at HIS Global Insight. The trade gap widened 15.8 percent to $48.7 billion in November from October, the report noted. Imports grew 3.8 percent, led by gains in shipments of cell phones, including Apples new iPhone. Exports increased only 1 percent. And exports to Europe fell 1.3 percent, fur ther evidence of the pro longed debt crisis that has gripped the region. Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, predicts trade trimmed growth by about 0.5 percentage point in the final three months of the year. He expects fourth-quar ter growth to be no more than an annual rate of 1.5 percent. That would be nearly half the 3.1 percent rate reported for the JulySeptember quarter, which was helped by healthy growth in exports. Martin Schwerdtfeger, senior economist at TD Bank, also expects the trade deficit to subtract from October-December growth. But he said the flood of imports could be signaling stronger consumer spend ing and business invest ment. The higher imports could mean that domestic consumption is improv ing. That would override some of the drag from a higher trade deficit, Schwerdtfeger said. ASSOCIATED PRESS Truck for export sit at a port in Yokohama, Japan. Sandy relief package loaded with money for past disasters Some lawmakers hope to delay bill to cut pork. ASSOCIATED PRESS An unsafe for human occupancy sticker is attached to a home severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Bay Head, N.J. Conservatives and watchdog groups are mount ing a not-so-fast campaign against a $50.7 billion Superstorm Sandy aid package that Northeastern governors and lawmakers hope to push through the House this week. US trade deficit grows to $48.7B

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.1 Offer only available on 1/1/13-4/15/13 and may no t be combined with any other offer. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. APR=Annual Percen tage Rate. There are costs associated with the use of this card. For specific information call 800-367-6440 or write us at P.O. Box 147029, Gain esville, FL 32614. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. 7 98 % BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL APR1for the life of the balance transfer when you trans fer a balance from your “bank” credit card to a CAMPUS VISA Platinum Card.CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. No annual fee No balance transfer fee Free design-your-own-card Plus! OFFER IS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! Apply today at campuscu.com!

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, January 13, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Monday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Hamilton County High, 5 p.m. Tuesday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer vs. host Santa Fe High in District 5-2A tournament, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Taylor County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High boys soccer at Palatka High, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Wolfson High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Bradford High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Thursday Q Fort White High boys soccer vs. Gainesville High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High football banquet, 6:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High basketball vs. Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Friday Q Columbia High wrestling at Brandon High meet, TBA Q Fort White High girls basketball at Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High basketball vs. St. Augustine High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Newberry High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Vanguard High, 8 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Brandon High meet, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS TENNIS Lady Tiger tryouts Monday Columbia High’s girls tennis has tryouts at 3:30 p.m. Monday at the CHS tennis courts. All interested girls must have completed paperwork with them in order to try out. For details, call coach Tabatha McMahon at 755-8103. PREP SPORTS Deadline for non-traditionals Non-traditional students (home-school, charter schools, FHSAA non-member private schools, special schools, Florida virtual schools) must declare their intention to try out for public school sports. The deadlines to declare for baseball and Classes 3A-4A track and field is Monday. Students must register at the school in the zone where they live. For details, call John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. FLAG FOOTBALL Christ Central registration Registration for Christ Central Sports flag football for ages 5-12 continues through Friday. Cost is $45. For details, call Ronny at 365-2128.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Justice Campbell (1) is fouled by Lafa yette High’s Kaley Koon (3) as she attempts a lay-up on Thurs day. Lady Tigers pick up back-to-back winsFrom staff reportsColumbia High picked up its second win in as many nights as the Lady Tigers defeated Stanton Prep on senior night, 44-34. It was senior night for the Lady Tigers and the start-ing lineup consisted of all seniors in the 10-point win. “It was senior night, but we had a total team effort,” Columbia High head coach David Tompkins said. “All the seniors were able to start and we picked up our first district win.” Justice Campbell led the way for the Lady Tigers with 18 points in the con-test. Aikiria Richburg had 10 points as the only other Columbia player in double figures. Marnae Gaskins finished with seven points in the contest. The Lady Tigers improved to 6-8 with the victory and are now 1-3 in district play. Columbia returns to action at Santa Fe High at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday.Fort White basketballFort White High’s boys basketball team is perched atop the District 5-4A stand-ing and pummeling anyone trying to take its place. The Indians crushed Interlachen High, 92-57, on Thursday and Keystone Heights High, 64-27, on Tuesday with both games on the road. Fort White brought on the running clock against the Rams and coach Isiah Phillips took out his start-ers with 2:00 remaining in the third quarter. “Against Interlachen was the best shooting exhibition I have see us do,” Phillips said. “We hit nine 3-point-ers in the first quarter. We probably didn’t miss on our first 12-14 shots. Five differ-ent players made 3s. It was deadly shooting.” Melton Sanders paced the Indians with 25 points. Jalen Wyche scored 19 and Trey Phillips also hit double figures with 13. Other scorers were Paul Perry, 9, Chris Cottrell, 8, Michael Mulberry, 8, Joe Powers, 5, Dre Brown, 3, and Kaleel Jackson, 2. Fort White High basketball stays undefeated. PREP continued on 5B Major plans JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLake City native Michael Kirkman has major plans with the Texas Rangers. Kirkman looks for increased role with Rangers By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comT he Texas Rangers seem to be in turmoil, but Michael Kirkman is taking his usual approach to earning a spot on the pitching staff. The 2005 Columbia High graduate is entering his ninth season with the Texas organization. Kirkman has been with the club for parts of the last three seasons. He has two American League championship rings and pitched in the 2010 World Series. Between hosting a pair of pitching camps for youngsters last week, Kirkman talked of the prospects for himself and the Rangers. “I will be leaving for spring training on Feb. 6,” Kirkman said. “I talk here and there with some of the players and will see a few of them at the Winter Caravan in Arlington next week.” Kirkman said the Winter Caravan is mostly for pitchers and his early spring training date is the start-up for pitchers and catchers. Kirkman appeared in 28 games in relief for the Rangers in 2012. He was 1-2 with a 3.82 ERA, 17 walks and 38 strikeouts in 35 1/3 innings. During last year at Round Rock (Texas), the Rangers’ Triple A farm club, Kirkman pitched 48 innings with 31 walks and 48 strikeouts and had a 5.25 ERA. He had a 5-1 record and started eight games. In the minors at Triple A Oklahoma City in 2010, Kirkman was Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year and a midand post-season KIRKMAN continued on 5B BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Cody Beadles attempts a free kick again st Wolfson High in the first half last night.Tigers play to 1-1 tie against Wolfson HighBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comJACKSONVILLE — It was a rough start for Columbia High, but a bril-liant finish as the Tigers came back to earn a tie against Wolfson High in dis-trict play on Friday. The Tigers fell behind 1-0 at the 12 minute mark of the first half and trailed the Wolfpack going into the half before Dylan Sessions scored a goal with 24:15 left in the game to help Columbia earn a 1-1 tie. Sessions had a breakaway goal off a ball played by Cody Beadles and scored from the left side of the field on a 22-yard kick to tie the game. Columbia had chances late and two corner kicks in the final 10 minutes of the Sessions’ second half goal helps CHS tie Wolfpack. CHS continued on 5B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo Champions, final round, at Durban, South Africa (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Sony Open, final round, at Honolulu MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1:30 p.m. CBS — Michigan at Ohio St. NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. FOX — NFC Divisional Playoff, Seattle at Atlanta 4:30 p.m. CBS — AFC Divisional Playoff, Houston at New England TENNIS 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma St. at Texas 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Nebraska at Penn St. 2:30 p.m. FSN — Baylor at Kansas 4 p.m. ESPN2 — California at Stanford 4:30 p.m. FSN — Southern Miss. at Memphis ——— Monday AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 9, San Miguel de Tucuman to Cordoba, Argentina (delayed tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Louisville at UConn 9 p.m. ESPN — Baylor at Kansas TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, first round, at Melbourne, AustraliaFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Saturday Baltimore at Denver (n)Green Bay at San Francisco (n) Today Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS); NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)Hall of Fame finalists (x-first-year eligible; y-senior nominee) x-Larry Allen, G-T, Dallas and San Francisco Jerome Bettis, RB, L.A./St. Louis Rams and Pittsburgh Tim Brown, WR, L.A/Oakland Raiders and Tampa Bay Cris Carter, WR, Philadelphia, Minnesota and Miami y-Curley Culp, DT, Kansas City, Houston Oilers, Detroit Edward DeBartolo, Jr. owner, San Francisco Kevin Greene, LB-DE, L.A. Rams, Pittsburgh, Carolina and San Francisco Charles Haley, LB-DE, San Francisco and Dallas Art Modell, owner, Cleveland Browns/ Baltimore Ravens x-Jonathan Ogden, OT, Baltimore Ravens Bill Parcells, coach, N.Y. Giants, New England, N.Y. Jets, Dallas Andre Reed, WR, Buffalo and Washington y-Dave Robinson, LB, Green Bay and Washington x-Warren Sapp, DT, Tampa Bay and Oakland Will Shields, G, Kansas Cityx-Michael Strahan, DE, N.Y. GiantsAeneas Williams, DB, Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals and St. Louis RamsCollege all-star games Saturday RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games New Orleans at New York, 12 p.m.Milwaukee at Toronto, 1 p.m.Indiana at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.Golden State at Denver, 8 p.m.Oklahoma City at Portland, 9 p.m.Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m.Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Miami at Utah, 9 p.m.Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Cleveland at Sacramento, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 2 Michigan at No. 15 Ohio State, 1:30 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State vs. Nebraska, 6 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State at Evansville, 4:35 p.m.TENNISAustralian Open seeds At Melbourne ParkMelbourne, Australia (Today-Jan. 27) Men 1. Novak Djokovic, Serbia2. Roger Federer, Switzerland3. Andy Murray, Britain4. David Ferrer, Spain5. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic6. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina7. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France8. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia9. Richard Gasquet, France10. Nicolas Almagro, Spain11. Juan Monaco, Argentina12. Marin Cilic, Croatia13. Milos Raonic, Canada14. Gilles Simon, France15. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland16. Kei Nishikori, Japan17. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany18. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine19. Tommy Haas, Germany20. Sam Querrey, United States21. Andreas Seppi, Italy22. Fernando Verdasco, Spain23. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia24. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland25. Florian Mayer, Germany26. Jurgen Melzer, Austria27. Martin Klizan, Slovakia28. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus29. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil30. Marcel Granollers, Spain31. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic32. Julien Benneteau, France Women 1. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus2. Maria Sharapova, Russia3. Serena Williams, United States4. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland5. Angelique Kerber, Germany6. Li Na, China7. Sara Errani, Italy8. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic9. Sam Stosur, Australia10. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark11. Marion Bartoli, France12. Nadia Petrova, Russia13. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia14. Maria Kirilenko, Russia15. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia16. Roberta Vinci, Italy17. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic18. Julia Goerges, Germany19. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia20. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium21. Varvara Lepchenko, United States22. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia23. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic24. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia25. Venus Williams, United States26. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan27. Sorana Cirstea, Romania28. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan29. Sloane Stephens, United States30. Tamira Paszek, Austria31. Urszula Radwanska, Poland32. Mona Barthel, Germany 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS BOWLING League resultsLake City Bowl league play: SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Farmers (97-63); 2. Jo’s Crew (95-65, 47,002 pins); 3. Perky Pals (95-65, 46,394 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Jo’s Crew 848; 2. Farmers 809. Team high handicap series: 1. Keglers 2,512; 2. Pin Busters 2,442; 3. Pin Droppers 2,307. High scratch game: 1. Betty Carmichael 175; 2. Sandra Johns 155; 3. Barbara Croft 140. 1. Michael Murrey 205; 2. Dan Ritter 198; 3. (tie) Mike Helvey, Ross Meyers 177. High scratch series: 1. Joyce Crandall 475; 2. Yvonne Finley 469; 3. Joanne Denton 428. 1. Earl Hayward 520; 2. Ric Yates 508; 3. Vernon Black 499. High handicap game: 1. Janet Nash 237; 2. Janie Posey 234; 3. Ann Soliz 207. 1. Jim Belgard 247; 2. Ron Grey 245; 3. Jerry Crandall 223. High handicap series: 1. Louise Atwood 672; 2. Aggie Mumbauer 636; 3. Vy Ritter 579. 1. Johnnie Croft 640; 2. Jim Hawkins 617; 3. Edward Smith 610.(results from Jan. 8) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. We Don’t Care 907; 2. Dominators 843; 3. All In 836. Team high handicap series: 1. 10 In The Pitt 2,626; 2. All In The Family 2,474; 3. Wolf Pack 2,466. High scratch game: 1. Lorrie Geiger 241; 2. Mary Lobaugh 194; 3. Mary Lobaugh 192. 1. Jim Lobaugh 244; 2. James Price 233; 3. Bill Dolly 221. High scratch series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 600; 2. Mary Lobaugh 576; 3. Joyce Hooper 489. 1. Jim Lobaugh 670; 2. Bill Dolly 628; 3. James Price 596. High handicap game: 1. Samantha Lovell 239; 2. Susie Camacho 235; 3. Staci Greaves 229. 1. James Price 244; 2. Ben Nyssen 240; 3. Steve Fancy 238. High handicap series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 672; 2. Rachel McInally 647; 3. Mary Lobaugh 645. 1. Jim Lobaugh 745; 2. Bill Dolly 679; 3. George Mulligan 661. High average: Mary Lobaugh 182; James Price 196.(results from Jan. 8) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. 2 Girls & 2 Guys; 3. 2 Plus 2. Team high handicap game: 1. Gamblers 862; 2. (tie) Wild Things, Stripers 837. Team high handicap series: 1. Quirky Quads 2,478; 2. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 2,440; 3. Jo’s Crew 2,366. High scratch game: 1. Amy Musselwhite 172; 2. Elaine Nemeth 167; 3. Joanne Denton 160. 1. Wayne Johns 198; 2. (tie) Earl Hayward, Bill Price 184; 4. Tom Young 179. High scratch series: 1. Debi Evert 475; 2. DeDe Young 470; 3. Betty Carmichael 431. 1. David Duncan 595; 2. Lee McKinney 519; 3. Dan Ritter 504. High handicap game: 1. Judy Johnson 230; 2. Janie Posey 226; 3. Joan Carman 225. 1. Vern Black 227; 2. Art Joubert 221; 3. Ross Meyers 217. High handicap series: 1. Louise Atwood 661; 2. June Pat Klock 644; 3. (tie) Barbara Gruiner, Pat Hale 629. 1. Bill Dolly 660; 2. Ric Yates 622; 3. Sal Annello 604. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 152.58; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.41; 3. DeDe Young 150.63. 1. Bill Dolly 191; 2. David Duncan 190.3; 3. Lee McKinney 180.43.(results from Jan. 3) Lance Armstrong to admit doping in Oprah interviewBy JIM VERTUNOAssociated PressAUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong will make a lim-ited confession to doping during his televised inter-view with Oprah Winfrey next week, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. Armstrong, who has long denied doping, will also offer an apology dur-ing the interview scheduled to be taped Monday at his homeowner Austin, Texas, according to the person spoke on condition of ano-nymity because there was no authorization to speak publicly on the matter. While not directly saying he would confess or apolo-gize, Armstrong sent a text message to The Associated Press early Saturday that said: “I told her (Winfrey) to go wherever she wants and I’ll answer the questions directly, honestly and can-didly. That’s all I can say.” The 41-year-old Armstrong, who vehement-ly denied doping for years, has not spoken publicly about the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report last year that cast him as the leader of a sophisticated and brazen doping program on his U.S. Postal Service teams that included use of steroids, blood boosters and illegal blood transfusions. The USADA report led to Armstrong being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and given a lifetime ban from the sport. Several outlets had reported that Armstrong was considering a confession. The interview will be broadcast Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network and oprah.com A confession would come at a time when Armstrong is still facing some legal troubles. Armstrong faces a federal whistle-blower lawsuit filed by former teammate Floyd Landis accusing him of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service, but the U.S. Department of Justice has yet to announce if it will join the case. The British news-paper The Sunday Times is suing Armstrong to recover about $500,000 it paid him to settle a libel lawsuit. A Dallas-based promotions company has threat-ened to sue Armstrong to recover more than $7.5 mil-lion it paid him as a bonus for winning the Tour de France. But potential perjury charges stemming from his sworn testimony denying doping in a 2005 arbitra-tion fight over the bonus payments have passed the statute of limitations. Armstrong lost most of his personal sponsorship — worth tens of millions of dollars — after USADA issued its report and he left the board of the Livestrong cancer-fighting charity he founded in 1997. He is still said to be worth an esti-mated $100 million. Livestrong might be one reason to issue an apology or make a confession. Vettel to be special guest at Columbia High football banquetFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s Quarterback Club is host-ing its annual Football Banquet at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday. The banquet will kick off in the cafeteria with a meal and this year’s high-lights and conclude with awards presentations in the CHS auditorium. Our key-note speaker will be Larry Vettel, the voice of the Gators and host of the Larry Vettel show on ESPN 850/900. Tickets for the event will be $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Advance tick-ets are available at Hunter Printing in Lake City. Larry Vettel has just about seen it all when it comes to University of Florida sports. The 54-year-old Martin County High School gradu-ate has broadcast Florida athletics both on the radio and television for more than 30 years. Vettel got his start in radio by keeping statistics at Martin County football games in the mid-1970s. He then attended Florida and was named sports director for WRUF-AM & FM that spring. Since then, Vettel has called seven SEC football title games, three national championship games and had a front-row seat for each of the Gators’ back-to-back basketball titles in 2007 and 2008. Vettel, who will be among the featured speakers at the Kiwanis Club of Stuart’s sixth annual College Football Preview on July 27 at the Lyric Theater in Stuart, spoke with Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers about his career, Gators coach Will Muschamp and Florida’s quarterback com-petition. Vettel has been heard on the airwaves in Gainesville and throughout Florida for more than 30 years, broad-casting every Gator sports team on both radio and tele-vision and voicing his opin-ions on sports and a vari-ety of other topics on daily and weekly talk shows. He pioneered sports talk in Gainesville, creating the market’s first daily show in the fall of 1989. Currently Vettel is the host of the popular after-noon drive show on ESPN Radio 850/900 weekdays from 4-6 p.m. He also serves as a play-by-play announcer for FoxSports Florida, Sun Sports and Cox Sports Television on telecasts for a number of Gator sports including men’s football, basketball, volleyball, softball, swim-ming and gymnastics. He has done play-by-play for seven SEC football champi-onship games. In addition, he is seen on Gatorzone, a television show featuring Gator ath-letics and as a reporter/interviewer for FoxSports Florida and Sun Sports. Vettel is also a writer for Fightin’ Gators magazine. Vettel’s earlier career highlights include serving as television play-by-play and color com-mentator for the FHSAA football and basketball championships for many years.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 3B3BSPORTSLady Tigers win back-to-back JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brandisha Cook makes a path around L afayette’s Teyonnia Blake as she looks for an open teamm ate. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Akiria Richburgh drives down the cou rt on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLafayette High’s Teyonnia Blake takes a swipe at Columbi a High’s Lona Wilson (10) as she makes a shot on Thur sday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterLafayette High’s Kaley Koon attempts to work her way aroun d Columbia High’s Adriana Young.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Marnae Gaskins attempts to save a rogue ball from bouncing out of bounds during a game against Lafayette High.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSports Seniors shine for Fort White soccer JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High captain Matt Otto drives down the field durin g a game against Hamilton County High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Max Jovel takes control of a pass again st Hamilton County High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Dalton Wilder fights for possession of the ball while playing against Hamilton County High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High senior Kody Moniz makes a play on the b all during a game against Hamilton County High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Dalton Wilder kicks the ball away from two Hamilton County High defenders.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 5B5BSports KIRKMAN: Rangers good as anyone Continued From Page 1B CHSFrom Page 1B PREP: Indians’ soccer on a streak Continued From Page 1BThe local Indians were even more dominant against the Clay County variety, winning by 37, as Sanders poured in 30 points. Phillips scored nine points, with seven from Wyche, five from Jackson, four from both Mulberry and Brown, three from Brandon Myers and two from Perry. Fort White (10-0, 7-0) travels to Starke to take on Bradford High in a district game at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.Fort White soccerFort White’s boys soccer team is on a three-game win streak to double its victory total for the season. The Indians beat St. John Lutheran School, 6-0, in Ocala on Thursday. Steven Giardina earned the shut-out in goal. Billy Whitney scored the first two goals for the Indians and Kody Moniz added a pair of goals. Anthony Gonzalez scored a goal to add to his team-leading total and defender Dalton Wilder scored his first goal of the season. Coach Pete Blanchard bragged on the play of freshman Wyatt Kesead, who “kept the energy level high with his relentless play as he does every game.” Blanchard said the Indians are playing well at a critical time in the season. Two games remain. “We played well in spurts,” Blanchard said. “We did some really good things. We had some moments when we let down, but all in all we are really playing much better team soccer. Winning three in a row has really helped with our con-fidence.” Fort White (6-8-2, 3-6-1 district) plays at Palatka High at 7 p.m. Tuesday and hosts Gainesville High at 6 p.m. on Thursday. all-star. That was as a starter, but Kirkman said starting is unlikely for him with Texas. Still, he has high expectations for 2013. “I talked to (pitching coach) Mike Maddux and he said I would be in a bigger role this season — a set-up role,” Kirkman said. “What that means I don’t know yet, but I’m ready for it. I am looking at getting through 2013 on a positive note.” That could be a catch phrase for all the Rangers. Texas lost slugger Josh Hamilton to division rival Los Angeles Angels and long-time team leader Michael Young was traded to Philadelphia. Mike Napoli also moved on. “We will be a little younger,” Kirkman said. “Losing Hamilton’s bat will hurt and we are losing Young as a leader. We have several guys who can step into that leadership role and put a face on the franchise.” Kirkman said Adrian Beltre, Elvis Andrus and Nelson Cruz are some who can step out of the shadows. “It is something to deal with, but we are still as good as anybody,” Kirkman said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMichael Kirkman stretches at the Impact Zone earlier this w eek. Peterson, Watt unanimous All-ProsBy BARRY WILNERAssociated PressNEW YORK — It’s unanimous, on both sides of the ball. Vikings 2,000-yard man Adrian Peterson and Texans pass-swatting end J.J. Watt were unanimous choices for The Associated Press All-Pro team announced Saturday. Peterson, who came within 9 yards of breaking Eric Dickerson’s single-season rushing record, and Watt, who led the NFL with 20 1-2 sacks, were selected by all 50 members of a nation-wide panel of media mem-bers who cover the league. Peterson is a three-time All-Pro, while Watt repre-sents lots of new blood. He’s among 17 players making their All-Pro debuts. “Obviously it’s a huge honor, especially for being such a young guy,” said Watt, a second-year pro. “It’s crazy to even think about. It’s very humbling and very motivating. It makes me want to do it again and again.” Peyton Manning made his sixth team, the previous five while quarterbacking Indianapolis. He led Denver to the AFC’s best record, 13-3. Also chosen for the sixth time was Atlanta tight end Tony Gonzalez, who this season moved into second place on the career receptions list. San Francisco linebacker Patrick Willis made it for the fifth time in his six pro seasons. The 49ers had the most All-Pros, six: Willis, fel-low LBs NaVorro Bowman and Aldon Smith, guard Mike Iupati, safety Dashon Goldson and punter Andy Lee. “As an organization, we take great pride in the suc-cess and recognition of our players,” 49ers general manager Trent Baalke said. “This type of acknowledge-ment only comes from hard work and a team-first men-tality, which all six of these men exhibit on a daily basis. They play the game the way it was meant to be played, and are very deserving of this honor.” Seattle was next with RB Marshawn Lynch, center Max Unger, cornerback Richard Sherman and safe-ty Earl Thomas. All were selected for the first time. Sherman was incensed when he didn’t make the Pro Bowl. He was thrilled with the news he made the All-Pro team “because that’s comparing the whole league.” “ That is taking individuals and saying they are the best in the NFL at that position and that’s what I wanted to be,” Sherman said. “ The Pro Bowl is tak-ing three from each side, it’s more of a popularity contest. The All-Pro, you’re the best at your position. It doesn’t matter if you’re a fifth-rounder or fourth-rounder or undrafted. If you play the best, you’re All-Pro.” Denver had three AllPros: LB Von Miller, tackle Ryan Clady and Manning. No other team had more than two. The NFC had 17 players and only 10 made it from the AFC. One rookie, Minnesota kicker Blair Walsh, was chosen. Also on offense were Baltimore fullback Vonta Leach, making it for the third straight year; Detroit WR Calvin Johnson and Chicago WR Brandon Marshall; Houston tack-le Duane Brown; New Orleans guard Jahri Evans, making his fourth consecu-tive appearance; Baltimore kick returner Jacoby Jones; Miami DE Cameron Wake; Cincinnati DT Geno Atkins and New England DT Vince Wilfork; and Chicago CB Charles Tillman. ASSOCIATED PRESSMinnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson (28) tr ies to break a tackily by Green Bay Packers strong safe ty Charles Woodson (21) during the first half of an NFL wild card playoff football game on Saturday in Green Bay, Wi s. game, but were unable to put another shot in the net. “I like that we didn’t give up after the first half,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “We definitely played leaps and bounds better in the second half. Cody played an excellent ball and they misplayed it. Dylan was able to put it away.” The Tigers are 9-6-4 after their game on Friday with two games to start out the upcoming week. Columbia travels to Hamilton County High at 7 p.m. on Monday and has senior night at 7 p.m. on Tuesday against Taylor County High.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04216BSPORTS Price excludes tax, tag, registration, title and dealer fee. 1-888-650-2199 2013 Nissan VersaModel # 11213 Stk # 13ns380 Vin # 846634 at this Price $14,999 2013 Nissan SentraModel # 12113 Stk # 13ns420 Vin # 646776 at this Price $18,999 2013 Nissan PathfinderModel # 25313 Stk # 13ns409 Vin # 631671 at this Price $29,999 2013 Nissan FrontierModel # 32312 Stk # 12ns270 Vin # 481577 at this Price $23,999 2013 Nissan AltimaModel # 13113 Stk # 13ns369 Vin # 167116 at this Price $20,999 2013 Nissan JukeModel # 20112 Stk # 12ns278 Vin # 117582 at this Price $19,999 2013 Nissan RougeModel # 22113 Stk # 13ns34 Vin # 576229 at this Price $21,999 www.RMNissan.com Grand Re-Opening Celebration January 14, 4-7 p.m.

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1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net The devil is in the details. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe I t is so important to examine every part of your business with fresh eyes every day. When you become accustomed to your businesss environment, it is just so easy to overlook the small, but important details. I think this is just how our brains operate. We just do not really notice small changes that occur over time. However, your business could suffer if you do not see small problems developing. I was giving a seminar in Ecuador in a very poor area on the other side of Quito. Since I only had to teach two hours each day, I had time to get out and see this wonderful country. As I explored each day, I saw the most rampant pov erty that I have ever seen. People were living in condi tions I could not imagine my dog living in. However, as shocking as this was for me at the beginning, I eventually stopped see ing the poverty and the difficult lives these people were living. My brain just accepted these horrific con ditions as the norm for this environment. Attention to detail is key Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of January 13-19 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Annual checkups could save your life. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. CCCNF supports early detection. From staff reports T he Rountree Moore Automotive Group will unveil the remodeled Nissan Showroom at a grand re-opening cer emony Monday from 4 to 7 p.m. at 4316 W U.S. 90. The public is invited. Jazz music will be played and food and wine will be served. Andy Moore, one of the owners in the automotive group, said the Nissan dealership was partially outdoors before, but now is fully enclosed. Were really excited about the grand re-opening, Moore said. We did a pretty complete remodel. The $400,000 investment by was designed to provide customers an enhanced experience, as well as create a service operations center for the Nissan dealership. The ease of doing business in a comfortable, state-of-the-art facility will create a first class experience for the customer, said Susie Hall, communications officer for the group. Nissan customers can have their car serviced at this facility and wait in a very comfortable, well appointed lounge with Wi-Fi access. The lounge is as comfort able as your family room at home. Moore said that one of the ser vice advisors from another deal ership will be transferred to the Nissan showroom. Hall said the renovation took the building from 2,400 square feet to 4,000 square feet, giving more room to showcase Nissan cars. Dino Daniel, Nissan sales man ager, said there will be a one-dayonly sale of select cars Monday. A new look at Nissan JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Rountree Moore Nissans remodeled showroom at 4316 W U.S. 90 almost doubled in size after the Rountree Moore Automotive Group invested $400,000 into renovations. The grand re-opening of the showroom will be Monday from 4 to 7 p.m. Rountree Moore plans celebration to debut renovated showroom. GRAND RE-OPENING Home and Patio Show set for March 2 and 3 By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Residents who are con sidering buying a home or making upgrades to their current home will be able to get tips, speak to busi ness professionals and look at home improvement products during the North Florida Home and Patio Show. The 10th annual North Florida Home and Patio Show will take place March 2 3 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Saturday, SHOW continued on 2C DETAILS continued on 2C

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March 2, the gates will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., while on Sunday, March 3, the event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Austin Seay, North Florida Home and Patio Show chairman, said this year’s event organizers are expecting 60 to 80 vendors to participate in the home and patio show. “The purpose of the event is to give every-body in the community and opportunity to face-to-face time with vendors concerning anything from a house, patio, including banking and real estate.” Organizers are still accepting applications from businesses who want to be vendors at this year’s event. There are two ways to become a vendor, by either completing an application at www.Rotarydowntown. com or by calling Seay at (386) 288-8217. The num-ber of vendors by industry group are limited. “Anybody that gets a contract in by Jan. 25 their donation for the event will also include a 1/8-page advertisement in the Lake City Reporter’s Home Show Program,” Seay said. Seay said normally the event has an average atten-dance of 10,000 to 15,000 people. “We’re about the only home show that’s done in the area that has free parking and no admission fee,” Seay said. “It’s one of those things where the family comes out, walks around and checks every-thing out with no costs, no parking fees and no admis-sion fees.” The Rotary Club of Lake City-Downtown uses pro-ceeds from the event to benefit the community with its various programs. “This is all charity-funded,” Seay said. “One hun-dred percent of all the pro-ceeds we distribute back out to the community. We give that money to schol-arships for some of the local high school students, Columbia food bank, local service projects and any-thing that somebody comes up to us and requests with a need.” 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 13, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY FILELowe’s sales specialist Dale King (left) and seasonal manager Travis King organize a flower display while setti ng up for the Home & Patio Show last year at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. New regulations designed to curb risky mortgages By DANIEL WAGNERAP Business WriterWASHINGTON — Federal regulators for the first time are laying out rules aimed at ensuring that mortgage borrowers can afford to repay the loans they take out. The rules being unveiled Thursday by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau impose a range of obliga-tions and restrictions on lenders, including bans on the risky “interest-only” and “no documentation” loans that helped inflate the hous-ing bubble. Lenders will be required to verify and inspect bor-rowers’ financial records. The rules discourage them from saddling borrowers with total debt payments totaling more than 43 per-cent of the person’s annual income. That includes exist-ing debts like credit cards and student loans. CFPB Director Richard Cordray, in remarks pre-pared for an event Thursday, called the rules “the true essence of ‘responsible lending.’” The rules, which take effect next year, aim to “make sure that people who work hard to buy their own home can be assured of not only greater consumer pro-tections but also reasonable access to credit,” he said. Cordray noted that in years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, consumers could easily obtain mort-gages that they could not afford to repay. In contrast, in subsequent years banks tightened lending so much that few could qualify for a home loan. The new rules seek out a middle ground by protecting consumers from bad loans while giving banks the legal assurances they need to increase lending, he said. The mortgage-lending overhaul is a priority for the agency, which was created under the 2010 financial law known as the Dodd-Frank Act. The agency is charged with reducing the risk of a credit bubble by helping to ensure that borrowers are better informed and loans are more likely to be repaid. The agency is charged with writing and enforcing rules that flesh out the law passed by Congress. Some provisions are required under the law, but the agen-cy had broad discretion in designing many of the new requirements. The rules limit features like teaser rates that adjust upwards and large “balloon payments” that must be made at the end of the loan period. They include several exceptions aimed at ensur-ing a smooth phase-in and protecting access to credit for underserved groups. For example, the strict cap on how much debt consum-ers may take on will not apply immediately. Loans that meet separate federal standards also would be permitted for the first seven years. Balloon payments would be allowed for certain small lenders that operate in rural or underserved communi-ties, because other loans may not be available in those areas. The bureau also proposed amendments that would exempt from the rules some loans made by community banks, credit unions and nonprofit lenders. DETAILS: Don’t be lulled into blindness Continued From Page 1CThis kind of blindness can occur anywhere and under a variety of condi-tions, including at my laundromat. I am not very domesticated. I have not turned on my stove or oven in two years, and I go to a laundromat to have my clothes washed and folded. Every time I go, the laundramat’s parking lot is filthy and full of debris, and I am sure the owner has just become so accus-tomed to these conditions that he does not really even see the mess. I just know that if he did, he would have the parking lot swept each morning and this would encourage more customers to use his services. For another example, the other day, I stopped into Bob Evans restaurant for breakfast. As I was sitting at the counter, I looked through the open-ing into the kitchen and saw all the chefs wearing t-shirts stating the restau-rant’s mission. I am sure the restaurant spent time and money developing these shirts, but unfortunately, the aprons the chefs had to wear completely covered the mission statement. No one seemed to be aware of this detail even though it was pretty obvious to my eyes. Another restaurant is using yard signs to draw in customers. Over time, the signs have deteriorated from exposure to the ele-ments, gotten bent and blown off. Needless to say, they were not sending a very good message to the business’s clientele. We all know the devil is in the details. What makes it tricky is that you have to be able to see the details in order to make the changes that are so necessary. Just like in the examples above, it is so easy for you to miss details that can have negative consequences for your business. To make sure you do not slip into this unawareness, you have to constantly jog your mind and try different things everyday so you can see your surroundings with fresh eyes. Try taking a different route to work each day or wearing your watch on your other hand every other day. One of my favorite ways to stay fresh is to get plenty of exercise before I go to work. This really just seems to energize me. Additionally, when I go to work or meetings, I try to focus on my breathing and get out of my head because if I am lost in my thoughts, I know I am not present. Now go out and make sure that you have a method in place for keep-ing your mind fresh so you are able to see the details of your business. Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. SHOW: 60 to 80 vendors expected to participate Continued From Page 1C

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 13, 2013 3C NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN As promised, the Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown now invites you to join us for the upcoming 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show. Vendor indoor booths, and Outdoor space set-up, will be on Friday March 1st. 2013 (beginning at 8:00 AM). Please plan to complete your set-up by 4:00 PM on Friday March 1st. Show times are: Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 10 AM4PM. ATTENTION VENDORS trr1PUFOUJBM$VTUPNFSTt'SFF1BSLJOHBOE"ENJUUBODFGPSBMMt"MMnQSPDFFETGPSUIFFWFOUHPCBDLUPDPNNVOJUZ If we receive your check post marked by 1/25/2013, you will receive a FREE 1/8 page ad in the Home Show Program published by Lake City ReporterPlease mail checks and contracts to:5)&305"3:$-6#0'-",&$*5:%08/508/PO Box 2334 Lake City, Florida 32056http://rotarydowntown.com 5IFOVNCFSPGWFOEPSTCZJOEVTUSZHSPVQBSFMJNJUFE %POU%FMBZ4JHO6Q5PEBZ Austin Seay (386) 288-8217 10THANNUAL PRESENTEDBYROTARYCLUBOFLAKECITYDOWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUBOF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN By BARBARA ORTUTAYAssociated PressLAS VEGAS — Some of the weirdest gadgets at the International CES show are designed to solve problems you never knew you had. Are you eating too fast? A digital fork will let you know. Is your toddler hav-ing trouble sitting still on the potty? Let the iPotty come to the rescue. Are you bored driving to work in a four-wheeled vehicle? Climb inside a 1,600-pound mechanical spider for your morning commute. Of course, not all of the prototypes introduced at the annual gadget show will succeed in the market-place. But the innovators who shop their wares here are fearless when it comes to pitching new gizmos, be they flashy, catchy or just plain odd. A search for this year’s strangest (and perhaps least useful) electronic devices yielded an extra-loud pair of headphones from a metal band, an eye-sensing TV that didn’t work as intended and more. Take a look:IPOTTYToilet training a toddler is no picnic, but iPotty from CTA Digital seeks to make it a little easier by letting parents attach an iPad to it. This way, junior can gape and paw at the iPad while taking care of business in the old-fashioned part of the plastic potty. IPotty will go on sale in March, first on Amazon.com. There are potty training apps out there that’ll reward toddlers for accomplishing the deed. The company is also examining whether the potty’s attachment can be adapted for other types of tablets, beyond the iPad. “It’s novel to a lot of people but we’ve gotten great feedback from parents who think it’d be great for train-ing,” said CTA product spe-cialist Camilo Gallardo.MOTORHEADPHONESBass-heavy headphones that borrow the names of hip-hop luminaries like Dr. Dre have become extreme-ly popular. Rock fans have been left out of the party — until now. British metal band Motorhead, famous for playing gut-punchingly loud, is endorsing a line of headphones that “go to eleven” and are hitting U.S. stores now. Says lead singer and bassist Lemmy Kilmister, explaining his creative input: “I just said make them louder than every-body else’s. So that’s the only criteria, and that it should reflect every part of the sound, not just the bass.” The Motorheadphone line consists of three overthe-ear headphones and six in-ear models. The initia-tive came from a Swedish music-industry veteran, and distribution and mar-keting is handled by a Swedish company, Krusell International AB.EYE-SENSING TVA prototype of an eyesensing TV from Haier didn’t quite meet viewers eye-to-eye. An on-screen cursor is supposed to appear where the viewer looks to help, say, select a show to watch. Blinking while controlling the cur-sor is supposed to result in a click. In our brief time with the TV, we observed may quirks and comic dif-ficulties. For one, the company’s demonstrator Hongzhao Guo said the system doesn’t work that well when view-ers wear eyeglasses. (That kind of defeats the purpose of TV, no?) But it turns out, one bespectacled reporter was able to make it work. But the cursor appeared a couple inches below where the viewer was looking. This resulted in Guo snap-ping his fingers to attract the reporter’s eye to cer-tain spots. The reporter dutifully looked, but the cursor was always a bit low. Looking down to see the cursor only resulted in it moving further down the TV screen.PARROT FLOWER POWERA company named after a bird wants to make life easier for your plants. A plant sensor called Flower Power from Paris-based Parrot is designed to update your mobile device with a wealth of information about the health of your plant and the environment it lives in. Just stick the y-shaped sensor in your plant’s soil, download the accompany-ing app and — hopefully — watch your plant thrive. “It basically is a Bluetooth smart low-energy sensor. It senses light, sunlight, tem-perature, moisture and soil as well as fertilizer in the soil,” a spokesman said. Carmakers let app developers drive By RYAN NAKASHIMAAssociated PressLAS VEGAS — It’s not wise to Google the nearest gas sta-tion, compose email, or use your smartphone to check the latest sports scores while driving. But many Americans do. Drivers have grown so accustomed to their on-the-go tasks that automakers are increasingly trying to make those things eas-ier to pull off with both hands on the wheel and both eyes on the road. As General Motors and Ford commissioned ideas from app makers this week, the possibili-ties for what you can do with your vehicle’s steering wheel buttons, microphone, speakers and inter-nal gauges are quickly expand-ing. How would you like to choose your favorite tune by simply utter-ing the song’s title, turn your car into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot, or respond to an ad you hear on the radio without lifting a finger? At the International CES show, General Motors and Ford launched programs that will open their designs to developers, invit-ing them to create software appli-cations for future car models. It’s a relatively new strategy for car makers, but one that many gadget manufacturers employ, including Apple, which did it for the original iPhone in 2007. The programs free the automakers from having to keep pace with new technologies by tying the functionality of their cars’ internal systems to advances in smartphones. Ford Motor Co.’s app developer program, called Sync AppLink, “is a way for (the company) not to worry about the next big app,” said product manager Julius Marchwicki. General Motors Co. said its framework “gives develop-ers a whole new sandbox, with wheels.” In some ways, though, the current systems inside cars have a long ways to go to provide the functionality that smartphones have offered for years. For instance, in a demo of Ford’s new integration with music service Rhapsody, you can wirelessly sync your phone with the car and listen to playlists you have already created by pressing the voice button on the steering wheel and saying “play playlist 1.” But you can’t just choose a track by voice on a whim, which is part of what makes these unlimited streaming plans attrac-tive even at $10 a month. Saying “Bruno Mars” to your Ford car won’t pull up “Locked Out of Heaven,” although typing it on Rhapsody’s website or smartphone app can. The same is true of Pandora’s radio app in Ford cars. The company plans to improve the car’s ability to respond to voice commands that cover a wider range of search terms and speech in AppLink 2.0, which is expected out by September of this year, said C.J. King, develop-ment engineer for AppLink. General Motors showed off its new relationship with Apple’s Siri voice assistant, which is newly integrated in some of its cars including the Chevy Spark. Siri, however, only linked up to the car’s speaker and microphone and didn’t offer access to the car’s inner systems. Rhapsody CEO Jon Irwin said that it’s really just the beginning for automakers to work more closely with high-tech content providers. “This is the first step in what’s going to be a really exciting year,” Irwin said. “As that technology evolves, you’ll see it get better and better.” When it comes to integrating new driver-friendly advance-ments, American automakers are playing catch-up to their Asian counterparts. Hyundai’s Blue Link technology syncs with iPhones and Android devices already and allows users to check their car’s maintenance data like tire pres-sure, fluids and the condition of airbags on their mobile devices. The service debuted in 2011 on its Sonata and is expanding to a wider range of vehicles. Voice-activated control of third-party music apps isn’t integrated yet, but the company is exploring using Google’s Android software to do so. Toyota’s use of voice is the most advanced of the auto provid-ers, even though it had nothing new to show at this year’s CES. When it upgraded its Entune service for Toyota cars and Enform for its Lexus line at CES last year, drivers got the ability to use their voice to control several key apps, allowing them to say, for example, “Adele” to the iHeart Radio or Pandora app to create a custom station with tracks from the British singer and others who sound similar. Voice commands also worked to buy movie tickets, make res-taurant reservations through the OpenTable app and get turn-by-turn navigation towards cheap gas. Both Toyota’s and Hyundai’s systems require yearly subscrip-tion fees after free trial periods. On Chrysler’s Ram 1500 truck introduced at the gadget show this year, iHeart Radio was added as an application. Users who link their smartphones to the car can select from customized stations they’ve made already but aren’t able to create new ones by voice. That is not likely to be a bar-rier for long, said Brian Lakamp, president of iHeart parent Clear Channel Digital. “Voice activation — it’s a trend and it’s going to get more and more sophisticated over time,” Lakamp said. “We’ll be lock-step when they’re taking advantage of voice to the extent they can.” The truck also includes the option of using a 3G cellular phone chip inside the vehicle itself to become a Wi-Fi hotspot for $15 a day. That could be an attractive feature for people who might want to use the truck for a tail-gate party. And one small company called Livio was looking to drum up some business from radio stations and automakers with a prototype for embedding tiny codes inside traditional FM radio streams. The codes would allow cellphone users to respond to advertise-ments with a tap on their smart-phone screen. ASSOCIATED PRESSA man tests out Ford’s SYNC connection and entertainment sy stem in a Ford Fusion at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Car makers are allowin g application developers design new software being demanded by tech-savvy buyers. Software products for autos draw attention at show.Some wacky gadgets on display ASSOCIATED PRESSThe iPotty for iPad potty training device is one of the odder gadgets on display at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. No app is available to go with the trainer, but the idea is to keep the child on the toilet for as long as necessary by keeping him digitally entertained.CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW ‘Smart’ potty or dumb idea?

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, JANUARY13, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$2,990 386-623-2848 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalNOTICE OFPUBLIC HEARINGCONCERNING AVARIANCE AS PROVIDED FORIN THE COLUMBIACOUNTYLAND DEVELOPMENTREGU-LATIONSBYTHE BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTOF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-bia County Land Development Reg-ulations, as amended, hereinafter re-ferred to as the Land Development Regulations, as amended, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the variance, as described below, will be heard by the Board of Adjustment of Columbia County, Florida, at a public hearing on Janu-ary 24, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex lo-cated at 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida. V0289, a petition by Dr. Chandler Mohan of Emory Medical Corpora-tion, to request a variance be granted from the requirements of Section 4.15.13 of the Land Development Regulations requesting a decrease in the number of required parking spaces from 65 to 25 within an Com-mercial Highway Interchange (CHI) zoning districts in accordance with a site plan submitted as part of a peti-tion filed December 19, 2012, to be located on property described, as fol-lows:Aparcel of land lying within Section 33, Township 3 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-ing more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 33; thence North 8911'09" West along the South line of said Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 33 a distance of 224.61 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 8911'009" Weststill along said Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 33 a distance of 98.32 feet; North 0742'37" East 346.96 feet to a point of the South right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10); thence South 6330'00" East along said South right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10) a dis-tance of 102.58 feet; thence South 0736’55” West 302.12 feet to the Point of Beginning.Containing 0.80 acre, more or less. LESS AND EXCEPTAparcel of land lying within Section 33, Township 3 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-ing more particularly described, as follows:Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 33; thence North 0442'10" East along the East line of said Northeast 1/4 of Section 33 a dis-tance of 268.13 feet to the centerline of U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10) as per Florida Department of Trans-portation Right-of-Way Map, Sec-tion 29010; Thence North 6520’55” West along said centerline of U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10) a dis-tance of 183.50 feet; thence South 2439’05” West 50.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 0512’38” West 21.12 feet; thence North 6520’55” West 104.08 feet; thence North 0506’56” East 21.22 feet; thence South 6520’55” East 104.12 feet to the Point of Begin-ning.Containing 0.05 acre, more or less.Said lands totaling 0.75 acre, more or less.The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates.Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice con-cerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six (6) calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing.At the aforementioned public hear-ing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the var-iance.Copies of the variance are available for public inspection at the Office of the County Planner, County Admin-istrative Offices located at 135 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida during regular business hours.All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hear-ing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur-pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tesLegaltimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in the pro-ceeding should contact Lisa K. B. Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.Ms. Rob-erts may be contacted by telephone at 386.758.1005 or by Telecommuni-cation Device for Deaf at 386.758.2139.05536768January 13, 2013 100Job Opportunities05536728Retail Sales Associate at Camping World, Lake City High School education or equivalent Previous Retail experience preferred Ability to established strong product knowledge and sell to customers. Superior customer service skills and excellent communication skills both written and verbal Must maintain a professional demeanor and work ethic Available to start immediately. Apply in person. 05536752T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler Positions: 12 Mo Ft Teacher (Jennings) And 12 MO PTTeacher (Jasper) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FLor send resume to: employment@sv4cs.or g Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE Auto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 Earn approx $250/wk delivering USATODAYin Lake City, M-F, approx 3AM-9AM. Must be avail on Mondays for collections. No wknds or holiday. Must have good credit, valid FLDL, ins., reliable vehicle. To apply call 800-627-6485 option 2. Housekeeping positions @ Camp Kulaqua Please call Jacalyn @ 386-454-7960 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Send Resume to info@swiftcreekrealty.net Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 100Job OpportunitiesSALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Web Application Engineer Develop web applications for signage industry. Customize and extend magento system. Develop and maintain online design tool with flex, develop and maintain graphic processing and other java servlet for web app. Develop and maintain desktop applications for production department. Masters degree in Computer Engineering or related required. Certification in Sun Java Programming required. 2 years experience in Software Engineering required. Send resume to: SignSite.com 162 SWSpencer Ct. Suite 106 Lake City, FL32025. 120Medical Employment05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnf.com. No Calls Please. 05536657RN/LPN 3-11 Shift and PRN Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN for 3-11 Shift and PRN Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Billing Specialist : Complete knowledge of insurance, Follow Up and Follow Thru of Accts Receivable, Billing, Posting and Collection, Sage Software a plus. Fax resume to 758-5628. CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization & assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Looking for P/TEcho Cardiography Tech & VascularUltra Sound Tech Call Nancy at 984-5543 Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldog 1 yr old, 110 lbs, spayed and neutered, shots,Free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to Good Home 1yr old Med. mix breed Male dog, good w/ children and other dogs, does not do well with cats. Call 752-4481 FREE TO THE RIGHTHOME Small dachshund mix, short hair. Very energetic. 1 yr old Contact 984-6796 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Baseball & Coin Collection Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Mickey Mantle & Many More 386-752-6724 Bill Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. Fitness Center Equipment Treadmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. Tanning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3BR/2BA DWMH on 2.5 Acres North of Lake City $500 Dep $700 Mth Call 386-623-0232 and leave msg 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Lots for Rent for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 630Mobile Homes forRentQuiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 Palm HarborHomes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 NICE 2/2 SWAND 740 sf frame house/studio/outbuilding, country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $450 mth + Security Utilities Included, Avail now. 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760$89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 2br/1ba Duplex located in Ft. White Convenient to Lake City & Gainesville. References Needed No Pets. 386-497-1116. ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bd/1ba very clean, CH/A, carport, screened back porch, fenced back yard. $700 mth & $700 Deposit. Call 386-344-5065 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsASuite Available in Midtown Commercial Center Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $2,990. 386-623-2848 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LIFE Sunday, January 13, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D A s we passed by the brick exte-rior of an older building while driving through the streets of Washington, D.C., our cabbie told us the place was a beer pub that is in the Guinness World Record Book for having the most varieties of beers commercially available. It’s called Brickskeller and we decided we had to go. Our first day in town, we wanted to have lunch there, so we looked up the address and learned they were closed. Because we were passengers in the cab when we passed by, we had some difficulty finding our way back on foot. We made a couple of wrong turns so decided to stop at a nearby hotel and ask for direc-tions. I’m traveling with Sue, not Scott, because guys don’t ask for direc-tions. Ha! Ha! The concierge or bellman, I forget which, looks at us questioningly and says, “I don’t think you ladies want to go there. It’s really not a ‘proper’ place for ladies. Are you sure you have the right place?” We thought this was funny and assured him we had the right place. We still didn’t question the establishment at all. At this point we were determined and it was one of those things we just had to do to cross off of our list. So we finally made it to Brickskeller! We arrived at the front steps of the old brick build-ing (which looked more like an old house) and walked up and into the main entrance. There was a sign and door immedi-ately to the right indicating Brickskeller this way so we walked through another old wooden door and down stairs to be greeted by the dank smells, dark room and old beer artifacts; a true hole in the wall kind of place. But what was amazing were the coolers lining the wall behind the bar with over a thousand different beers to choose from. We bellied up to the bar on our bar stools made of old beer barrels and received a menu — which was more like a photocopied booklet in black and white that was probably the thickest menu I’ve ever seen. We both ordered a beer — something different that we just don’t drink every day … heck, I was just happy to get Sue in an establishment that didn’t serve wine. We also ordered the Pentagon Cheese Board with five cheeses with a loaf of warm French bread. We decided to have a second beer, and both let the bartender make a recommendation. We were feeling pretty On a Beer Run Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comM ark Lander, health department administrator for Columbia and Hamilton counties, grew up in Southwest Florida, but has come to call North Florida home. “I came up here and just never left,” Lander said. He said he enjoys going to the grocery store and it taking an hour because he runs into so many people he knows. Lander said he could have left the area for other opportunities, but feels he can have the largest impact right here in North Florida. “What kept me here is that sense of community ...” he said. “You just feel like you can really make a difference.” He sees plenty of room for improvement for public health in Columbia and Hamilton counties, he said. Lander takes his job as administrator of the Health Department seriously and believes in the power of knowledge in fighting chronic diseases. While Lander has been acting administrator for the two health departments since March 1, he was approved as the permanent administrator by the Columbia County Board of Commissioners in December. In 1990, Lander’s first professional job, after graduating from the University of Florida, kept him in the North Florida area. The job was evaluating septic systems along the Suwannee River in an attempt to find out the degree that septic systems were causing contamination of the river. What some would loathe to do, driving up and down the river checking for leaky septic tanks, Lander found enjoyable. “It was a really cool job,” he said. He traveled across 12 North Florida counties, getting to know the people and the plac-es of the area. He said one of the people he worked with was from Columbia County, and he would spend a lot of time at the Columbia County Health Department. F lorida celebrates Arbor Day this year on Jan. 18. We have the earliest celebration date in the nation due to the fact that it’s cold enough for dorman-cy, yet the ground is not frozen. These factors make Florida’s Arbor Day, the third Friday in January, an excellent time to get out and plant trees. Some good hurricane-resistant choices are live oak, cabbage palm and crape myrtle. The warm weather we are having, however, can cause unex-pected damage to established plants, especially if the warm temperatures have lured you into early pruning activities. Pruning stimulates plant growth, and if plants are pushing dormancy because of the unseasonably warm temperatures, they may begin to grow and become very vulnerable to inevitable cold snaps. Keep those blankets and sheets handy so you can give ten-der plants some protection when frosty nights return. Spring flowering trees and shrubs such as dogwoods, azaleas and spireas should be pruned in late spring after the plant has bloomed. These plants have already set flower buds on last year’s growth. If you prune them in the winter, you will cut off all those flower buds that are waiting to open in the spring. Summer bloomers such as roses and crape myrtles have not developed their flower buds yet. They will bud and flower on new growth that emerges this coming spring. Flower production will not suffer from late winter pruning and shaping. Just hold off for a few more weeks. This is a good time to use dormant horticultural oil to treat the overwintering pests that are more difficult to control dur-ing the growing season. Some popular landscape plants such as camellia, hibiscus and holly have persistent scale problems. These oils kill all stages of scale, but before using them, refer to the product label for plant sensitivity and temperature ranges. While outside enjoying a delightful yet unseasonable warm winter day, check your planting beds for moisture. Warm weather will cause more water loss from plants and soil, so those water sensitive plants may need an extra drink of water. Established drought tolerant plants are fine. Please join UF/IFAS Extension for free workshops on “Plant Propagation for Home Gardeners” and prepare for spring gardening. The workshops are at Fort White Public Library on Thursday at 5:45 p.m. and at the main Columbia County Library in Lake City on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. They will be pre-sented by entrepreneurs and UF Master Gardeners Lou Lowder and Sue and Bruce Karcher. Different plants need different winter care GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu New man in charge No longer ‘acting,’ Health Department administrator settles in Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterThe new administrator for the Columbia County and Hamilton County health departments, Mark Lander, sits at his desk w hile reading area health statistics. Lander has worked for the health department since 20 03. 10-year staff veteran given permanent status as head of local health operations. LANDER continued on 2D TRAVEL continued on 2D Drinking on a diet? Calories can add up fastBy MICHELLE LOCKEAssociated PressThe first rule of drinking on a diet is: Don’t. Surely you’ve heard that Americans get way too many calories — and nutrition-ally empty calories at that — from alcohol. But the second rule of drinking on a diet is that since you probably will ignore Rule No. 1, find a way to enjoy alcohol without letting it swamp your healthy intentions. Here are a few suggestions on how to go about that.Q THINK BEFORE YOU DRINKYou don’t have to give up alcohol entirely for weight control, says Andrea Giancoli, registered dietitian and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. But you do have to fit it into your calorie limit. Making that work means knowing the calo-rie counts of what you drink. For women, federal health guidelines recommend no more than one drink a A recent study found Americans get almost as many calories from alcohol as from soft drinks.ASSOCIATED PRESS DRINK continued on 2D TRAVEL TALES Sandy Kishton

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By JENNIFER FORKERAssociated PressThe home-improvement and design shows make it look easy: Take a simple sheet of inexpensive ply-wood and presto! In a few minutes, you’ve got a table, a cabinet or a lounge chair. It’s not that fast or dirtcheap, but it can be that easy, according to wood-working experts who speak fondly of plywood’s many merits. “Plywood is the starting point for many of the things I build,” says artist and designer Jimmy DiResta of New York City. “With some imagination and inventive-ness it can become any-thing.” Plywood is cheaper and often stronger than solid wood, easy to find at home-improvement or lumber stores, and ‚ darn it ‚ it looks good. Plywood is made from thin layers ‚ called plies, or veneers ‚ glued togeth-er under heat and pressure, with each ply laid perpen-dicular to the next. This “cross-graining” gives ply-wood its strength and sta-bility, says Philip Schmidt, author of “PlyDesign” (Storey Publishing, 2012). Since plywood comes in more than a dozen stan-dard thicknesses and twice as many grades, check a buying guide ‚ Home Depot has one online ‚ before purchasing it. Schmidt recommends using a cabinet-grade mate-rial, such as Baltic birch, for do-it-yourself projects. The plies are thin and even, and the exterior is smooth, sanded and blemish-free. “Beluga caviar notwithstanding, Baltic birch ply-wood may be Russia’s fin-est export,” Schmidt writes in his book. “PlyDesign” includes 73 projects for novices and experienced builders. Do-it-yourself project magazines such as Ready Made and Make, and online sites such as Instructables offer many other ways to use plywood. “Plywood is inherently modern, if you think of modern as starting in the 1920s,” says Schmidt, of Denver. “It’s still beautiful wood and it’s really easy to work with.” A jigsaw can cut straight lines and curves, so that’s your primary tool, says Schmidt. After that, invest in a good-quality drill. If you want to go deeper into plywood DIY, get a circular saw and a router, which helps cut out multiple pat-tern pieces. “I don’t own a table saw or any stationary power tools,” says Schmidt, a proj-ect designer and author of 17 design books. “I’m more into DIY.” DiResta recommends the jigsaw and circular saw for most plywood projects, and suggests starting out by building a storage box or simple bench. He offers video tutorials on YouTube, sponsored by Make maga-zine. Plywood has its drawbacks. Schmidt warns against sand-papering through the thin top layer, ruining the look of your piece. To avoid this, use a fine-grit sandpaper, and be careful. DiResta warns against splinters. A few years ago, he inadvertently brushed a palm against a cut edge, and a matchstick-size splin-ter went through his palm. He recommends wear-ing gloves when cutting plywood, and sanding cut edges with a sanding block. Then there’s “the edge thing,” as Schmidt calls it: Do you cover the exposed plywood edge or let it be? Design will dictate, both DiResta and Schmidt say. Some modern-looking pieces look great with their plywood edges exposed, and the better quality the plywood, the better it’ll look. For other projects, you may want to cover that edge with veneer. “Exposing the edge strata of the panel is really cool,” says Schmidt. “It’s a nice design element that you can work with.” For some, a project is too delicate or the plywood too high-end to entrust the cutting to one’s own hand. If that happens, find a local furniture-design business to cut the piece for you. They use computer-con-trolled routers that make precise cuts. Denver furniture maker Scott Bennett works with birch-and-alder plywood to make storage and shelving pieces for his company, Housefish. Occasionally, he’s asked to cut a one-off piece for a designer or DIY enthusiast. The cost is less than most people expect, he says, averaging about $100 per hour of work. “Considering how many hours you might spend trying to cut a complicated shape with hand tools spending a couple hundred dollars to have a computer cut out your parts can be a good way to get into DIY projects,” Bennett says. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Woodworkers praise plywood Crafts ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Plywood is versatile, inexpensive and easy to come by — all of which make it a great material for do-ityourself home furnishing projects. Some of the many ways to use plywood can be found in Philip Schmidt’s book “Plydesign:” (top) a Reluctance sofa-table; (right) a Rubber Hose chair made with reclaimed plywood and and old air hose; and (below) a Bespoke chair. TRAVEL: Beer adventure Continued From Page 1Dadventurous. LOL! Happy to have finally made it, we thoroughly enjoyed the beers and the snacks, the atmosphere in general, but most of all we made new memories. While writing this article I looked up Brickskeller online to verify something and learned that just a short time after we were there, which was May of 2010, the family-owned business closed after 53 years in operation. It reopened in December of 2010 under new owners and a new name, Bier Baron. DRINK: Hollow calories Continued From Page 1Dday (5 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of liquor or a 12-ounce beer). For men the limit is two drinks. Though the numbers can vary, most wines sport about 120 calories per serving. Most hard liquors, such as gin and vodka, have about 100 calories per serving. A regular beer has a bit more than 150 calories, while a light beer has about 100. Those numbers make the hard stuff seem like a good choice when you’re watching your calories. Except that most people aren’t going to just sip a jigger of vodka and call it a night. And once you start adding mixers and sweeteners and juices, the calories can add up fast. Just 4 ounces of strawberry daiquiri mixer can add 260 calories to your rum, for a total of 360 calo-ries, roughly the same as a Sausage McMuffin from McDonald’s. Even a simple rum and Coke can have 200 calories or more. A vodka and cranberry juice has about the same. “Mixers can really add up,” says Giancoli. “If you like to use liquor vs. hav-ing beer or wine, go for the low-calorie mixer. If you’re somebody who likes rum and cola, do rum and diet cola. If you’re somebody who likes vodka cranberry, you can do vodka with diet cranberry.” It can take some of the spontaneity out of an eve-ning, but if you’re planning to drink it’s best to plan ahead, tally the calories and budget accordingly.Q ICE IS NICELisa McRee, a former “Good Morning America” co-anchor who now pub-lishes the popular recipe and diet tip site The Skinny, remembers being on a “no white foods” diet and being miserable since that included “no white wine.” These days she eschews fad diets for a sensible regime of good food cooked well, heavy on the vegetables. “The philosophy really comes down to eat more things that grow and fewer things that walk,” she says. Cutting carbs and other empty calories leaves a little room for alcohol. And when she wants to enjoy her favorite chardonnay she slips an ice cube or two into the glass. That makes the drink last longer and also dilutes the alcohol, an important point since alco-hol is a notorious sapper of willpower. In summer, she’ll do the same with a light red wine. While you probably wouldn’t want to do this with a heavy red wine such as cabernet sauvignon — or in front of your vino-phile friends — serving wine over ice is not with-out precedent. McRee first came across it while travel-ing in Italy in 100-degree weather and seeing the locals chill their wine with a few cubes.GET ON THE FRESH EXPRESSJacques Bezuidenhout, the master mixologist for Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, has an easy tip for trimming calories from drinks: Keep it simple. “When I approach healthy drinking, I focus on what goes in the glass,” he says. “Is the juice fresh squeezed? Are we using quality spirits? When you look at those key factors then really look at what kind of sugar you add to the drink! Sugar is the first thing that will start to tack on the calories ...” Using better ingredients and fresh juice means you need to add less sugar or liqueurs to balance out the cocktail. LANDER: Veteran given permanent job Continued From Page 1DIn 2003, Lander landed at the Columbia County Health Department as director of environmental health. “Everybody in the office I had worked with,” he said. “It was like coming back to an old family.” He said sometimes people will comment that the Health Department acts as a hospital. While that is true, Lander said, the department does more than just primary care. “A lot of what we do at the Health Department is pure education,” he said. “One of our biggest jobs is to educate and empower.” Lander said that the flu has overwhelmed some areas this year, and that it’s never too late to get a flu shot. He said in the Chicago area, hospitals have turned away emer-gency flu cases and had patients go to other hos-pitals. Lander noted that local hospitals have indicated that they are seeing more cases of the flu compared to last year. He said he doesn’t expect area hospitals to turn away any flu patients, but he still recommended that residents of the Hamilton and Columbia contact their medical provider and receive a vac-cination. “If you haven’t already gotten your flu shot, it’s not too late,” Lander said. Business travel to declineSCOTT MAYEROWITZAP Business WriterNEW YORK — Fewer business travelers are like-ly to hit the road this year as the travel industry is challenged by corporate America’s persistent eco-nomic fears. Business travelers are expected to take 431.8 million trips in 2013, the Global Business Travel Association said Tuesday. The industry trade group had forecast 435 million trips back in July. The latest estimate would mean a 1.1 percent decline from the 436.5 million trips taken in 2012. Fewer people traveling, however, doesn’t mean lower costs. Airfare, hotel rooms, meals and car rent-als have helped to push up the overall price of busi-ness travel. In 2012, business travelers spent $254.9 billion, up 1.6 percent from the prior year. This year, the travel association expects anoth-er 4.6 percent increase to $266.7 billion. That’s down slightly from the $268.5 bil-lion predicted back in July. Worries over the tax and budget battle in Washington were blamed for some of the 2012 declines. Now that tax changes have been approved, the business travel group is cautiously optimistic that travel will improve. “... (C)ompanies should now have somewhat greater confidence in their spend-ing decisions,” Michael W. McCormick, executive director of the group said in a statement. Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@comcast.net.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 3D3DLIFEBy LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — Janell Burley Hofmann honored her 13-year-old son’s “maturity and growth” at Christmas with his first iPhone, but it came with strings attached. Eighteen strings, to be exact, in a written code of conduct that placed the mommy blogger at the center of the debate over how par-ents should handle technology in the hands of their teens, especial-ly younger ones just entering the frenetic world of social networks and smartphones. Thousands of people, including those bemoaning too much helicopter parenting, commented and shared the funny, heartfelt agreement posted at the holiday by the Cape Cod, Mass., mom of five. The interest crashed her website and led her to appear with her eldest, Gregory, on morning TV. Hofmann’s first order of business: “1. It is my phone. I bought it. I pay for it. I am loaning it to you. Aren’t I the greatest?” She included caveats that some parenting and tech addiction experts consider crucial in eas-ing new entrants onto Facebook, Instagram and shiny new mobile devices: You must share passwords with a parent, answer their calls, hand over said device early on school nights and a little later on weekends. You must avoid hurt-ful texts and porn and pay for a replacement if your phone “falls into the toilet, smashes on the ground, or vanishes into thin air.” Of the latter Hofmann advises her teen, “Mow a lawn, stash some birthday money. It will hap-pen, you should be prepared.” Hofmann said in an interview that she decided on the contract as she pondered the power of the technology she and her hus-band were about to plop into their son’s world. She was looking for a way to be present in his phone use without being a “creeper,” his word for stalky, spying parents. She wasn’t surprised that her list, which Greg agreed to, resonates with other parents. It also resonates with psycholo-gist David Greenfield, a technol-ogy addiction specialist in West Hartford, Conn. “We have ritualized the gift of the smartphone,” he said, yet many parents don’t have the know-how, stomach, time or interest in actively guiding kids when they first jump into digital life. For some parents, he said, it’s only when things go horribly wrong that attention is paid. He knows of parents who have gone so far as to jam all Internet and cell phone signals at home when they couldn’t get their kids to power down. Police in Rocklin, Calif., said two girls, ages 15 and 16, used a prescription sleeping medication recently to spike the milkshakes of one’s parents so they could log onto the Internet after 10 p.m. Greenfield recommends contracts like Hofmann’s, if parents follow through. Others creep using apps and monitoring soft-ware. He thinks that’s fine, too. There’s little data broken down by age on the number of Internet users whose lives are negatively impacted by smartphones, tab-lets, laptops and other technology, Greenfield said. In the gener-al population, studies range from 1 percent to 10 percent of users whose digital habits interfere with their lives. Greenfield esti-mates the reality is somewhere between 2 and 6 percent. Hofmann was looking for a way to open the conversation with her son. Many other parents are, obviously, concerned as well about what their teens are doing online, but also what is being done to them. In a recent report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 81 percent of parents with online teens said they are concerned about how much information advertisers can learn about their kids’ behavior and 72 percent said they’re concerned about how their children interact online with people they don’t know. Nearly 70 percent said they’re concerned about how their chil-dren manage their reputations online and 57 percent of kids ages 12 and 13 said they’re very concerned about it. The report said parents are being more proactive, not just relying on parental-control tools such as browser filters. An increasing number are joining their kids on social media, but older parents may be approach-ing their kids’ lives there with the wrong emotional filters. “We see it as a separation from social behavior. They see it AS social behavior,” Greenfield said. “I’m not sure we’re going to be able to bridge that difference generationally.” More tech abuse education needs to be done in this country before teens are actively engaged, he said. In parts of Europe and Asia, for instance, kids learn how to handle their digital lives as formal training in third or fourth grade. “Here they think of it like it’s part of their body, and they treat it that way,” Greenfield said. Hofmann’s contract is her own attempt at education. “Don’t take a zillion pictures and videos. There is no need to document everything. Live your experienc-es. They will be stored in your memory for eternity.” And she gets downright inspirational toward the bottom: “Leave your phone home some-times and feel safe and secure in that decision. It is not alive or an extension of you. Learn to live without it. Be bigger and more powerful than FOMO — fear of missing out.” Hofmann also urges her boy to, “Keep your eyes up. See the world happening around you. Stare out a window. Listen to the birds. Take a walk. Talk to a stranger. Wonder without googling.” Finding ways to cope with smartphones and social networks. Mom’s phone code of conduct goes viral PARENTING ASSOCIATED PRESSJanell Burley Hofmann and her son Gregory of Sandwich Mass., go over a copy of the contract she drafted and that Gregory signed as a condition for receiving his fir st Apple iPhone. Ferrets: domesticated or wild? By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — The difference between own-ing a ferret in Hawaii and one in Pennsylvania can be up to three years in jail — and hundreds of thou-sands of dollars in fines. That’s the penalty for ferret fans in the Aloha State, where the 3-pound members of the weasel and polecat family are banned amid concerns of the animals escaping and wreaking havoc on the islands’ delicate eco-systems. Similar fears are behind a decades-old ban in California, which has one of the nation’s most diverse ecosystems. “The concern is that if these animals were released, like other non-native species have been, they would adapt and thrive and out-com-pete native species for food, and prey on native species,” said Adrianna Shea, deputy director of California’s Fish and Game Commission. States have had problems with feral animals in nonnative environments, creating problems for native species by eating them or ravaging their food supply. Feral cats, for example, have deci-mated bird populations. In Hawaii, the introduction of the mongoose to com-bat a rat problem “was a very poor idea. Rats are nocturnal and mon-gooses are diurnal. They only saw each other for a short period between dusk and dawn,” said Minami Keevin, a land vertebrate specialist with the Hawaii Department of Agriculture. But ferret fans argue that the foot-long domesticated creatures make excellent pets and shouldn’t be regulated by wildlife agencies. “Ferrets are really wonderful animals for those of us who are so inclined. They are messy, and they’re expensive, and they’re demanding, but they are full of personal-ity, full of love and full of joy,” said Pat Wright, who lives in La Mesa, near San Diego, and has been fight-ing California’s ban for nearly 20 years. Keeping a ferret as a pet takes more time, care and money than owning a dog or cat. The American Veterinary Medical Association in Schaumburg, Ill., which recently posted a YouTube video on pet ferrets, noted that they need to be caged most of the time, require hours of exercise and emit a musky odor that many people find unpleasant. Large cages are expensive, but on the other hand, ferrets don’t require as much medical or dental care as cats or dogs. “They are wonderful little clowns that not only steal your heart but they will steal anything they deem is theirs. This includes your shoes, socks, pens, pencils, hair-brushes, potatoes, car keys, wallets and clothing. I had two ferrets that tried to take my notebook com-puter to what is called their hidey-hole,” said AmyJo Casner of Harrisville, Pa., who legally owns fer-rets Manny, Marcuz, and Marylin. Their antics are better than antidepressants, said Casner, whose pets inspired her to start a fer-ret clothing line that she sells online. A count of ferret owners across the U.S. was unavailable, but the American Pet Products Association said that in 1992, 2 percent of people who owned a small animal like a mouse, rat, ferret, gerbil, rabbit, hamster or guinea pig said they had a ferret. In 2000, 10 per-cent of small-animal own-ers said they had a ferret, and 7 percent in 2010 had them. That’s despite bans in the two states, plus a number of large cities including New York, and U.S. military bases. In California, where having a ferret can net a $500 fine or six months in jail, Wright estimated between 50,000 and 500,000 pet ferrets live a clandestine existence. His guess is based on ferret-supply sales and a 5,000-member mailing list for his ferret legalization cause. Shea, who said Fish and Game has never tried to verify those numbers, said California doesn’t have enough game war-dens to chase violators, so the ban is not strictly enforced. Billboards close to the borders of Arizona and Nevada point motor-ists in the direction of fer-ret sellers. And most pet stores in California carry ferret food and supplies. But the issue is taken seriously in Hawaii, where every report of a ferret is checked. One captured last year in Hilo was quar-antined until it could be shipped out of state. Pets ASSOCIATED PRESSPat Wright, an advocate for legalizing ferret owner ship in California, gets a kiss from one his three ferrets at his home in La Mesa, Calif. The fe rrets live peacefully along with Wright’s three dogs and a cat. Ferret fans argue that the fo ot-long domesticated creatures make excellent pets and shouldn’t be regulated by wildli fe agencies. In some states, having one can get you jail time. London subway system marks 150 years service By ROBERT BARRAssociated PressLONDON — Busy, congested, stressful. This is how the world’s first sub-way system was depicted by London newspapers in 1863. It’s a situation that would be familiar to nail-biting pas-sengers of the present as the Tube turned 150 years old Wednesday. “The constant cry, as the trains arrived, of ‘no room,’ appeared to have a very depressing effect upon those assembled,” The Guardian newspaper reported on the public opening of London’s Metropolitan Line on Jan. 10, 1863. The first stretch of rail had opened the day before, on Jan. 9. The line — the first part of what is now an extensive London transport network that has shaped the British capital and its suburbs — ran 120 trains each way dur-ing the day, carrying up to 40,000 excited passengers. Extra steam locomotives and cars were called in to handle the crowds. Architectural historian David Lawrence said the rapid expansion of the subway network — better known in London as the Tube — had a major impact on the city’s design. The Tube helped lure people away from the inner city into new areas where new hous-ing was being built near the stations. The houses were built in a village style mocked by some historians as already dated. “They were selling an England which had already passed by that time,” said Lawrence, a principal lectur-er at Kingston University. In 1919, the Metropolitan company became directly involved in developing what came to be called “Metro-land” on surplus land. One of the company’s promotional posters displayed drab rows of inner city terrace houses and urged people to, “Leave this and move to Edgware.” However, they were also selling the dual benefit of a quiet, unpolluted suburban life paired with rapid access to the cultural and economic benefits of the metropolis, Lawrence said. The pioneering Metropolitan Line sparked a new wave of underground development which today has grown into a 249-mile system carrying 1.2 billion passenger journeys a year. Although Londoners love to complain about its some-times sketchy performance, the Tube is an efficient way to move vast numbers of people in and out of the city. ASSOCIATED PRESSFarringdon Station dates back to the beginnings of London’s Underground, the world’s first subway system, which turned 150 years old on Wednesday.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 13, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “The Outsider” (N) Revenge “Sabotage” (N) Happy Endings (N) Apartment 23News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 Newsomg! InsiderLove-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Show Stopper” Criminal Minds “Closing Time” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin Portwenn Players Dance. Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey Season 3” Wedding guests arrive. Masterpiece ClassicThe Abolitionists: AmericanDoc Martin Portwenn Players Dance. 7-CBS 7 47 47e NFL Football AFC Divisional Playoff -Houston Texans at New England Patriots. 60 Minutes (N) The Good Wife “Je Ne Sais What?” (N) The Mentalist “Little Red Corvette” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Yourjax MusicAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Legacy” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00)“Air America” (1990) Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage Evidence is on a plane. 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsGolden Globes Arrivals Special (N) The 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards Achievement in lm and television. (N) (Live) NewsFirst Coast News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanne “Vegas” RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now? Hanson. Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass (N) Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Lifeclass A&E 19 118 265Storage: NYStorage: NYStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Wedding Daze” (2004) “Undercover Bridesmaid” (2012) Brooke Burns, Gregory Harrison. “The Nearlyweds” (2013) Danielle Panabaker, Naomi Judd. FrasierFrasier “Oops!” FX 22 136 248(5:00)“Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard.“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle.“Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Memo to the President: Road MapPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Memo to the President: Road Map TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“The Sum of All Fears” (2002) Ben Af eck, Morgan Freeman. “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. (DVS)“The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon. NIK 26 170 299Marvin MarvinMarvin MarvinMarvin MarvinMarvin MarvinSee Dad Run“Hotel for Dogs” (2009, Comedy) Emma Roberts, Jake T. Austin. The NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:25)“Scarface” (1983, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer. “Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson. An ordinary teen decides to become a superhero.“Fighting” (2009) Channing Tatum, Terrence Howard. MY-TV 29 32 -“The Music Box” (1932) M*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo An embezzler murders his partner. M*A*S*HThriller “The Twisted Image” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyA.N.T. FarmShake It Up!Good Luck CharlieDog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieJessieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “The Preacher’s Daughter”“Walking the Halls” (2012, Drama) Jamie Luner, Al Sapienza. “A Mother’s Nightmare” (2012) Annabeth Gish, Jessica Lowndes. (:02) “Walking the Halls” (2012) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“The Game Plan” (2007) BET 34 124 329(4:30)“Love & Basketball” (2000) The BET Awards 2011 Music, entertainment and sports in LA. Family FirstFamily First ESPN 35 140 206Strongest ManStrongest ManWorld’s Strongest Man Competition (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL PrimeTime (N) (Live) SportsCenter Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209CrossFit GamesE 2013 Australian Open Tennis First Round. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) SUNSP 37 Wm. BasketballSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSportsman’s Adv.Reel TimeAlong the WaySport FishingReel Animals (N) Transat Qubec-St-MaloHalls of Fame DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. Moonshiners “Tickle Goes Rogue” Moonshiners “Troubled Waters” Moonshiners (N) Cruise Disaster: Concordia UpdateMoonshiners TBS 39 139 247(5:45)“Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Will Ferrell. Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band “Personal Universe” HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Live From the Red Carpet: The 2013 Golden Globe Awards (N) Ice Loves CocoKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloE! After Party: Golden Globes TRAVEL 46 196 277Mysteries at the MuseumMysteries of the SmithsonianExtreme Pig OutsExtreme Fast FoodBurger LandBurger LandState Fair Foods HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lIsland HuntersIsland HuntersHawaii LifeHawaii Life (N) House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Here Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo Boo (N) Pete Rose: HitsPete Rose: HitsHere Comes Honey Boo Boo HIST 49 120 269Ax Men “Sabotage” Ax Men DJ Jeremiah is pushed to far. Ax Men “Cage Match” Ax Men “Flipping Logzilla” (N) Bamazon “Dangerous Gamble” (N) (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys “Alligator Face-Off” Gator Boys “Mississippi or Bust” Wild West Alaska (Series Premiere) (N) Gator Boys “Knee Deep in Mississippi” Finding Bigfoot “Bacon for Bigfoot” (N) Gator Boys “Knee Deep in Mississippi” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffSugar Dome “The 80s” (N) Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off (N) Iron Chef America (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Shoes of the Fisherman” (1968) Anthony Quinn, Sir Laurence Olivier. FSN-FL 56 -Action Sports World TourWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Star Trek IV“Star Trek: First Contact” (1996, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes.“Star Trek: Nemesis” (2002) Patrick Stewart. Capt. Picard faces his Romulan-engineered clone. Star Trek-Insur. AMC 60 130 254“Sword sh” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman. “Gone in Sixty Seconds” (2000, Action) Nicolas Cage, Angelina Jolie, Giovanni Ribisi. Premiere.“Gone in Sixty Seconds” (2000, Action) Nicolas Cage. COM 62 107 249(4:30)Semi-Pro“Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. Daniel Tosh: Happy ThoughtsAnthony Jeselnik: Caligula (N) Anthony Jeselnik: Caligula CMT 63 166 327Ink MasterInk Master “Star Wars Forever” Ink Master “Holy Ink” Ink Master “Buck Off” Ink Master “Blowing Chunks” Ink Master “Better Than Words?” NGWILD 108 190 283The Whale That ExplodedTiger DynastySecrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” Secrets of Wild India “Tiger Jungles” Sloth BearsSecrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” NGC 109 186 276Wicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Italian Cruise Ship DisasterThe Whale That Ate Jaws: Bite-SizedWicked Tuna “Back in the Hunt” Mudcats “Big Fish Big Bucks” Wicked Tuna “Back in the Hunt” SCIENCE 110 193 284How the Universe Works “Volcanoes” Through Wormhole-FreemanDeep Space Marvels “Life” Deep Space Marvels “Survival” Deep Space Marvels “Destiny” Deep Space Marvels “Life” ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “The Ring” Fatal Encounters “A Deadly Fix” Fatal Encounters “Shot in the Foot” Fatal Encounters (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) Fatal Encounters “Shot in the Foot” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“The Dilemma” (2011) “American Reunion” (2012, Comedy) Jason Biggs, Chris Klein. ‘R’ GirlsEnlightenedGirlsEnlightenedGirlsEnlightened MAX 320 310 515(5:10)“Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows”(:20)“Wanderlust” (2012) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991, Suspense) Jodie Foster. ‘R’ Banshee “Pilot” SHOW 340 318 545(5:00)“50/50” (2011) ‘R’ “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ Shameless “El Gran Canon” House of LiesCalifornicationShameless “El Gran Canon” MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 14, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor Sean goes on an adrenalinelled date. (N) (:01) Castle A DJ is murdered. (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow Vintage ash art. Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens (N) (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherBig Bang Theory2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 A professor is murdered. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Carrie Diaries “Pilot” The Carrie Diaries “Pilot” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones The team investigates a dancer’s death. (N) (PA) (DVS) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Cut the Junk” Trivia about childhood obesity. (N) Deception “Nothing’s Free, Little Girl” NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Main StreetMain StreetMain StreetMain StreetDateline on OWN (N) Shocking Family SecretsTrouble Next Door (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Obstruction; Flight Risk” Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” (2009) Shia LaBeouf. Sam Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon.“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” (2009) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Redacted” The MentalistThe Mentalist “Bloodsport” The Mentalist “Bloodhounds” The Mentalist “Red Alert” CSI: NY “Veritas” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDora the ExplorerDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30)“Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse.“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black, Zachery Ty Bryan.“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie“Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas!” (2011, Comedy) Shake It Up!Austin & AllyDog With a BlogA.N.T. 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Love It or List It “The Cunniam Family” Love It or List It “The Roedger Family” Love It or List It “The Coughlin Family” House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Elliott Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Pete Rose: HitsPete Rose: HitsCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “The Doctor Is In” Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsAmerican PickersAmerican Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys: Xtra BitesGator Boys: Xtra BitesFinding BigfootFinding Bigfoot “Bacon for Bigfoot” Wild West AlaskaFinding Bigfoot FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery Diners TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! 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(:01)“Unforgiven” (1992) COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaReba “The Rings” Bar Rescue “Bar Fight” Bar Rescue “Bad to the Bone” Bar Rescue “Hogtied Ham’s” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Army Brats” Caught on Safari: Battle at KrugerUltimate Predators “Chimp Attack” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Ultimate Predators “Killer Instincts” Ultimate Predators “Chimp Attack” NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersDrugs, Inc. “Ecstasy” Drugs, Inc. “Crack” Alaska State Troopers (N) Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanSupermassive Black HolesSeeing Black Holes Black holes. Through Wormhole-Freeman ID 111 192 285Disappeared “Crime and Punishment” Disappeared A man goes missing. 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DEAR ABBY: My husband and I just got back from visiting my dad and stepmother in another state. Dad is elderly, and I know my time with him is limited. Apparently, his marriage is in a shambles and they are on the verge of divorce. He comes home only to sleep. The rest of the time he finds places to get away from her and her constant arguments. The time we were there was tense, unpleasant and, frankly, a waste of time and money. I wasn’t able to spend more than five min-utes with Daddy without my stepmother trying to pick a fight with him. Have you any suggestions or advice? I just want to spend time with him in the time he has left. -DADDY’S GIRL DOWN SOUTH DEAR DADDY’S GIRL: Now that you have been in the “war zone,” the cat is out of the bag. Because your stepmother was such a distraction you had no quality time with your father, consider staying elsewhere and having him spend time with you away from the house. Alternatively, if he’s able to travel, offer to send him a ticket to visit you and your husband for a few days or a week without her. That’s cheaper than plane fare for you and your husband to visit him. Contact your siblings and find out if your father plans to spend the rest of his “limited” time mar-ried to your stepmother, because the stress of the hostility in their household could shorten his life. If he plans to divorce her, one of the places where he should seek refuge is his lawyer’s office. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My fian-cee, “Tara,” has a problem with social boundaries. She was home-schooled most of her education and missed out on a social life. Recently, a male friend of mine quit talking to both of us because of her behav-ior. When I talked with him about it, he said Tara makes him uncomfortable. She doesn’t understand where friendly joking stops and serious flirting starts. She gave him the impres-sion she wanted to start an affair, so he walked away. Tara has been open and upfront about everything. She doesn’t lie. It’s like she doesn’t know any other way to interact with the opposite sex, and it’s spooking me before our wedding. I don’t want to have to be my fiancee’s constant social monitor. What can I do to help her with this? Are there social classes for late bloomers? -FREAKED-OUT FIANCE IN OHIO DEAR FREAKED-OUT FIANCE: I don’t blame you for being “freaked out” because Tara’s behavior must have been blatant for your friend to avoid both of you. My advice is to put your wedding on hold until you, a female rela-tive (or two) whom Tara respects and will listen to, or a counselor is able to make her understand the boundaries of socially appropriate behavior. If you proceed as things are, the next letter I receive from you may be from “Freaked-Out Husband.” DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): An impulsive move will lead to a mistake that will be difficult to over-come. Concentrate on what you can do to help others. Anger, rejection or manipulation will not solve a work-related problem. Find a workable solution and proceed. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t get angry; get moving. You can have your way if you are diplomatic and responsible in the way you move forward and deal with others. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Do some legwork that will help you get a project you want to pursue off the ground. Greater prosperity will be yours if you focus on a service, product or talent you have to offer. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Pay more attention to your children, family or your lover. Sharing your creative ideas or taking an interest in an unusual lifestyle or even visiting an unfamiliar destination will lead to personal and professional progress. Love is in the stars. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t limit what you can accomplish because some-one puts demands on you. Focus on what will get you ahead. A change may be needed in the way you live your life or the people you share life with. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Enjoy unusual enter-tainment or friends who offer you something to think about. Motivation and inspiration will come from trying new things and meeting interesting people. Romance is high-lighted and a promise made will lead to a better, more accommodating life-style. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Domestic matters will escalate. Not everyone will be on your side. You are best to get out and partici-pate in an activity you find interesting and physically challenging. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Travel plans or getting involved in a community event will lead to new con-nections and the chance to learn or start something new. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Take charge and make the first move. Reconnect with an old friend or revisit an old idea or goal. Make adjustments at home that are conducive to something you want to incorporate into your life. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Rethink your strategy and consider an unorthodox way to turn a negative into a positive. Using your imagination, expertise and diplomacy will pay off in the end by helping you avoid an impulsive mistake that will be hard to reverse. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Put your time to good use. Channel your energy wisely, and you will reach your goals. Focus on home, family and how you can make life better for everyone concerned. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): Rethink your next move. Participate in a cause you feel pas-sionate about. Nurture a relationship you cherish. Problems with a pend-ing financial or medical situation will worsen if you show anger or emotion. A commitment will help you reach a decision. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Pop4 Court statistic.LGVJDPHZLWKD ball $%REEVH\WZLQ&RQVWHOODWLRQQHDU Scorpius 6WDUWWRPDNHD OLYLQJIURPVRPHWKLQJ ::,,PDULQH WKUHDW ,VUDHOLZHDSRQ:KDWVRPHJRJJOHV SURYLGH HUJV86$QHLJKERU5HSUHVHQWDWD FRVWXPHSDUW\ BBBPLQXWH,WPD\EHWLJKWO\ FRLOHG /HWXVSDUWBBBWKH VHDVRQRISDVVLRQIRUJHWXV
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE By BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press PORT ORANGE A framed photo of serial killer Aileen Wuornos sits on the bar at The Last Resort, the place where she had her last beer. Her photo is also on bottles of hot sauce and T-shirts sold there, while an airbrushed portrait lists the seven men she killed, along with her last words. At a nearby motel, guests often ask for the room where Wuornos stayed. Almost 22 years after her arrest and more than 10 years since her execu tion, the hitchhiking pros titute depicted by Charlize Theron in the 2003 movie Monster continues to fascinate the public. Some sympathize with her, saying the abuse she suffered as a child and later as an adult made her snap. Others are captivated by the idea of a female serial killer. Some who stop in at The Last Resort simply want to see the bar from the movie. Al Bulling, whos owned the tiny brick biker bar for 33 years and who appeared in Monster, says hes simply honoring her last wishes. She wanted to be remembered and keep the memory going, he said. Well, well keep it going for her. Michelle Forbes of New Orleans decided to visit The Last Resort after see ing the movie. She was always a character that really fascinated me, said Forbes. Forbes said the bar covered inside and out with graffiti is not the kind of place I would go under most circumstanc es. She waited in her car until a friend joined her, but once inside, she listened to Bulling and a bartender tell stories about Wuornos for an hour. They were really happy to talk about it. They were really nice. They made me feel bad for cowering in the car! Forbes said with a laugh, adding, I do think they were trying to keep things in her spirit. I think they were honoring her, and not just making a spectacle. Wuornos life story is as lurid as her crimes. She was raped and abused growing up in Michigan. Her father committed suicide in prison and her mother abandoned her. She began selling sex at an early age and classmates shunned her. Her grand parents kicked her out at age 15 and she hitchhiked out of Michigan, eventually ending up in Florida, where she survived selling sex on the highways. She claimed she killed her first victim in self-defense after he raped her. A burly bartender at The Last Resort who goes only by the name of Cannonball was working there the eve ning of Jan. 19, 1991, when Wuornos was arrested at the bar. Cannonball, who played himself in Monster, has told the story countless times. Ive been asked some of the stupidest questions, he said. Did she act like a serial killer? Well hell, I dont know. Ive never seen one. I dont know what they act like. And one guy asked me, Well, were you scared of her? I aint never been scared of nobody. Wuornos wasnt a regu lar customer, just someone who came in now and then, probably while hitchhik ing back to what was then called the Fairview Motel, where she shared a room with her girlfriend, Tyria Moore. Cannonball said he only knew her name because she introduced herself. When they first come in she goes My name is Lee and this is my girl friend Ty and were gay. And Im, Well my names Cannonball and I dont care. Pay for what you get, dont cause me no grief and Ill treat you square. I dont care what anybody is, Cannonball said. The Last Resort is a popular biker bar even without the Wuornos con nection. Hank Williams Jr. mentioned the bar in the song Daytona Nights and some regulars have had their ashes scattered outside, beneath a live oak with battered Japanese motorcycles hanging from the limbs. Still, Bulling is not shy about promoting the Wuornos story. The bars slogan is Home of ice cold beer and killer women, and he sold the hot sauce on eBay until the site forced him to stop, saying he was profiting from a serial killer. Customers like to pose with the framed photo of Wuornos on the bar, and theres also a framed and signed Monster movie poster. T-shirts for sale show a picture of Wuornos being arrested, and the Crazed Killer Hot Sauce lists her execution date under a photo that makes her look crazy. The label reads, WARNING!! This Hot Sauce could drive you insane, or at least off on some murderous rampage. Aileen liked it and look what it did to her. Wuornos childhood friend, Dawn Botkins, who exchanged thousands of letters with Wuornos while she was on death row, is upset by all this. She says Bulling is just using the situation that Aileen just happened to be there and all of a sudden hes on TV saying, Yup, this was her hang out. No it wasnt. She just happened to be there that night. Serial killer Wuornos still a draw for bar Curious visitors attracted to place she was arrested. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Airbush artist Ted E. Bear sits in front of a portrait she painted of serial killer Aileen Wuronos at The Last Resort Bar in Port Orange. Almost 22 years after Wuornos was arrested at The Last Resort, the curious still come to the place where she had her last drink. TRAVEL FLORIDA ASSOCIATED PRESS Tourists could one day view the Forsythe Park fountain and other sites in Savannah, Ga., from double-decker buses. Savannah debates double-decker buses for tourists By RUSS BYNUM Associated Press SAVANNAH, Ga. A proposal to put doubledecker tour buses on the streets of Savannahs his toric district has residents rallying to bring the plans to a screeching halt, with crit ics fearing the buses would hit ancient oak limbs and give sightseers a peeping Toms view into Victorian homes. Two Boston business men are lobbying Savannah City Hall to end a 17-year prohibition on double-deck er buses in the coastal citys downtown historic district, which draws 12 million visitors a year. Savannahs Downtown Neighborhood Association is urging offi cials to deny the request. Opponents say the buses, which would have passen ger seats on an open-air top, could run into low-hanging branches along the edges of Savannahs manicured squares. And they complain the buses elevated views would enable tourists to peer over garden walls and possibly into second-floor windows of private homes. What this company is asking us to do is to change our rules so we can be more like everywhere else, when what draws people to Savannah is that were not like anywhere else, said Bob McAlister, who lives in an 1853 row house on Gordon Street in the heart of downtown. The dou ble-decker buses threaten Savannahs special ambi ence, its livability. Its not Colonial Williamsburg. Its not New York. Steve Caplan and Tom OConnor, the Boston inves tors, argue they shouldnt be kept out of the citys lucrative tourism market worth $2 billion in 2011 because of a blanket ban. The partners say theyre having four buses built to custom specs in England. While they would hold 75 passengers, double the capacity of the tour trolleys Savannah is used to, the buses would stand 12 feet tall. Thats a foot below the minimum clearance the city requires for maintain ing its tree canopy, though residents insist some branches hang lower. Julie Wade, a Savannah attorney hired by the busi ness partners, said con cerns about privacy were overblown. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS One of the products at the Last Resort bar in Port Orange is Crazed Killer Hot Sauce with an image of serial killer Aileen Wuronos on the label.